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Sample records for adoptive cell transfer

  1. Trial Watch: Adoptive cell transfer for oncological indications

    PubMed Central

    Aranda, Fernando; Buqué, Aitziber; Bloy, Norma; Castoldi, Francesca; Eggermont, Alexander; Cremer, Isabelle; Fridman, Wolf Hervé; Fucikova, Jitka; Galon, Jérôme; Spisek, Radek; Tartour, Eric; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    One particular paradigm of anticancer immunotherapy relies on the administration of (potentially) tumor-reactive immune effector cells. Generally, these cells are obtained from autologous peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) ex vivo (in the context of appropriate expansion, activation and targeting protocols), and re-infused into lymphodepleted patients along with immunostimulatory agents. In spite of the consistent progress achieved throughout the past two decades in this field, no adoptive cell transfer (ACT)-based immunotherapeutic regimen is currently approved by regulatory agencies for use in cancer patients. Nonetheless, the interest of oncologists in ACT-based immunotherapy continues to increase. Accumulating clinical evidence indicates indeed that specific paradigms of ACT, such as the infusion of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-expressing autologous T cells, are associated with elevated rates of durable responses in patients affected by various neoplasms. In line with this notion, clinical trials investigating the safety and therapeutic activity of ACT in cancer patients are being initiated at an ever increasing pace. Here, we review recent preclinical and clinical advances in the development of ACT-based immunotherapy for oncological indications. PMID:26451319

  2. Multifunctional T-cell Analyses to Study Response and Progression in Adoptive Cell Transfer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chao; Cheung, Ann F.; Chodon, Thinle; Koya, Richard C.; Wu, Zhongqi; Ng, Charles; Avramis, Earl; Cochran, Alistair J.; Witte, Owen N.; Baltimore, David; Chmielowski, Bartosz; Economou, James S.; Comin-Anduix, Begonya; Ribas, Antoni; Heath, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Adoptive cell transfer (ACT) of genetically engineered T cells expressing cancer-specific T-cell receptors (TCR) is a promising cancer treatment. Here, we investigate the in vivo functional activity and dynamics of the transferred cells by analyzing samples from 3 representative patients with melanoma enrolled in a clinical trial of ACT with TCR transgenic T cells targeted against the melanosomal antigen MART-1. The analyses included evaluating 19 secreted proteins from individual cells from phenotypically defined T-cell subpopulations, as well as the enumeration of T cells with TCR antigen specificity for 36 melanoma antigens. These analyses revealed the coordinated functional dynamics of the adoptively transferred, as well as endogenous, T cells, and the importance of highly functional T cells in dominating the antitumor immune response. This study highlights the need to develop approaches to maintaining antitumor T-cell functionality with the aim of increasing the long-term efficacy of TCR-engineered ACT immunotherapy. SIGNIFICANCE A longitudinal functional study of adoptively transferred TCR–engineered lymphocytes yielded revealing snapshots for understanding the changes of antitumor responses over time in ACT immunotherapy of patients with advanced melanoma. PMID:23519018

  3. Myeloid-derived suppressor cell impact on endogenous and adoptively transferred T cells.

    PubMed

    Arina, Ainhoa; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2015-04-01

    Novel models of autochthonous tumorigenesis and adoptive T cell therapy (ATT) are providing new clues regarding the pro-tumorigenic and immunosuppressive effects of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), and their interaction with T cells. New findings are shifting the perception of the main level at which MDSC act, from direct cell-to-cell suppression to others, such as limiting T cell infiltration. Adoptively transferred, high-avidity T cells recognizing peptides with high-affinity for MHC-I eliminated large tumors. However, low-avidity T cells or low-affinity peptides resulted in failure to eradicate tumors. Manipulation of intratumoral myeloid cells improved the outcome of otherwise unsuccessful ATT. Therefore, therapeutic intervention directed at the tumor stroma might be required when using suboptimal T cells for ATT.

  4. ADOPTIVE-CELL-TRANSFER THERAPY FOR THE TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Dudley, Mark E.; Rosenberg, Steven A.

    2008-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy — the isolation of antigen-specific cells, their ex vivo expansion and activation, and subsequent autologous administration — is a promising approach to inducing antitumour immune responses. The molecular identification of tumour antigens and the ability to monitor the persistence and transport of transferred cells has provided new insights into the mechanisms of tumour immunotherapy. Recent studies have shown the effectiveness of cell-transfer therapies for the treatment of patients with selected metastatic cancers. These studies provide a blueprint for the wider application of adoptive-cell-transfer therapy, and emphasize the requirement for in vivo persistence of the cells for therapeutic efficacy. PMID:12951585

  5. Restoration of Viral Immunity in Immunodeficient Humans by the Adoptive Transfer of T Cell Clones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riddell, Stanley R.; Watanabe, Kathe S.; Goodrich, James M.; Li, Cheng R.; Agha, Mounzer E.; Greenberg, Philip D.

    1992-07-01

    The adoptive transfer of antigen-specific T cells to establish immunity is an effective therapy for viral infections and tumors in animal models. The application of this approach to human disease would require the isolation and in vitro expansion of human antigen-specific T cells and evidence that such T cells persist and function in vivo after transfer. Cytomegalovirus-specific CD8^+ cytotoxic T cell (CTL) clones could be isolated from bone marrow donors, propagated in vitro, and adoptively transferred to immunodeficient bone marrow transplant recipients. No toxicity developed and the clones provided persistent reconstitution of CD8^+ cytomegalovirus-specific CTL responses.

  6. Targeting STAT3 in adoptively transferred T cells promotes their in vivo expansion and antitumor effects

    PubMed Central

    Kujawski, Maciej; Zhang, Chunyan; Herrmann, Andreas; Reckamp, Karen; Scuto, Anna; Jensen, Michael; Deng, Jiehui; Forman, Stephen; Figlin, Robert; Yu, Hua

    2010-01-01

    Adoptive cell therapy with engineered T cells to improve natural immune response and antitumor functions has shown promise for treating cancer. However, the requirement for extensive ex vivo manipulation of T cells and the immunosuppressive effects of the tumor microenvironment limit this therapeutic modality. In the present study, we investigated the possibility to circumvent these limitations by engineering Stat3-deficient CD8+ T cells or by targeting Stat3 in the tumor microenvironment. We show that ablating Stat3 in CD8+ T cells prior to their transfer allows their efficient tumor infiltration and robust proliferation, resulting in increased tumor antigen-specific T cell activity and tumor growth inhibition. For potential clinical translation, we combined adoptive T cell therapy with an FDA-approved tyrosine kinase inhibitor, sunitinib, in renal cell carcinoma and melanoma tumor models. Sunitinib inhibited Stat3 in dendritic cells and T cells, reduced conversion of transferred Foxp3− T cells to tumor-associated T regulatory cells while increasing transferred CD8+ T cell infiltration and activation at the tumor site, leading to inhibition of primary tumor growth. These data demonstrate that adoptively transferred T cells can be expanded and activated in vivo either by engineering Stat3 silenced T cells or by targeting Stat3 systemically with small-molecule inhibitors. PMID:21118964

  7. Improving the outcome of adoptive cell transfer by targeting tumor escape.

    PubMed

    Kaluza, Karen M; Vile, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Adoptive T-cell transfer is among the most promising immunotherapies against cancer. To continue increasing the potential of this therapy, our studies focus on the inhibition of tumor recurrence. Recently, we have demonstrated several ways in which combination therapies involving multiple T-cell populations and immunostimulatory chemotherapy can enhance long-term survival.

  8. Treatment of dextran sodium sulfate-induced experimental colitis by adoptive transfer of peritoneal cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ting; Ren, Jun; Wang, Wei; Wei, Xia-wei; Shen, Guo-bo; Liu, Yan-tong; Luo, Min; Xu, Guang-chao; Shao, Bin; Deng, Sen-yi; He, Zhi-yao; Liang, Xiao; Liu, Yu; Wen, Yan-Zhu; Xiang, Rong; Yang, Li; Deng, Hong-xin; Wei, Yu-quan

    2015-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of the natural regulatory B cells and macrophages should be a useful treatment for inflammation and autoimmune disease. However, it is usually difficult to isolate these cells from the tissues and expand them. Here, we investigated the feasibility of adoptively transferring peritoneal cells (PCs) as a treatment for DSS-induced colitis. We found that peritoneal cavity can provide an easily accessible site for harvesting enough number of PCs, namely, two-dose PCs for the treatment from a mouse in one operation. Adoptive therapy of these cells from healthy mice or those with disease is effectively in reducing the disease activity score. The natural B cells and macrophages of the infused PCs can selectively migrate to lesion sites and regulate the expression of Stat3, NF−κB, Smad3 and Smad7. Additionally, PCs exert dual activity of IL-10 and TGF-β secreted spontaneously by both peritoneal B cells and macrophages, which in turn enhance the induction of regulatory B cells and Macrophages in microenvironment of inflammation. Moreover, PCs can re-establish immunological tolerance in the OVA-immunized mice. Thus, our findings provide a new strategy for colitis therapy and could be of importance in additional exploration of other inflammation and autoimmune diseases therapy. PMID:26565726

  9. Effect of Adoptive Transfer or Depletion of Regulatory T Cells on Triptolide-induced Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xinzhi; Sun, Lixin; Zhang, Luyong; Jiang, Zhenzhou

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to clarify the role of regulatory T cell (Treg) in triptolide (TP)-induced hepatotoxicity. Methods: Female C57BL/6 mice received either adoptive transfer of Tregs or depletion of Tregs, then underwent TP administration and were sacrificed 24 h after TP administration. Liver injury was determined according to alanine transaminase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase (AST) levels in serum and histopathological change in liver tissue. Hepatic frequencies of Treg cells and the mRNA expression levels of transcription factor Forkhead box P3 and retinoid orphan nuclear receptor γt (RORγt), interleukin-10 (IL-10), suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS), and Notch/Notch ligand were investigated. Results: During TP-induced liver injury, hepatic Treg and IL-10 decreased, while T helper 17 cells cell-transcription factor RORγt, SOCS and Notch signaling increased, accompanied with liver inflammation. Adoptive transfer of Tregs ameliorated the severity of TP-induced liver injury, accompanied with increased levels of hepatic Treg and IL-10. Adoptive transfer of Tregs remarkably inhibited the expression of RORγt, SOCS3, Notch1, and Notch3. On the contrary, depletion of Treg cells in TP-administered mice resulted in a notable increase of RORγt, SOCS1, SOCS3, and Notch3, while the Treg and IL-10 of liver decreased. Consistent with the exacerbation of liver injury, higher serum levels of ALT and AST were detected in Treg-depleted mice. Conclusion: These results showed that adoptive transfer or depletion of Tregs attenuated or aggravated TP-induced liver injury, suggesting that Tregs could play important roles in the progression of liver injury. SOCS proteins and Notch signaling affected Tregs, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of TP-induced hepatotoxicity. PMID:27148057

  10. A New Hope in Immunotherapy for Malignant Gliomas: Adoptive T Cell Transfer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Dong-Sup; Shin, Hye-Jin; Hong, Yong-Kil

    2014-01-01

    Immunotherapy emerged as a promising therapeutic approach to highly incurable malignant gliomas due to tumor-specific cytotoxicity, minimal side effect, and a durable antitumor effect by memory T cells. But, antitumor activities of endogenously activated T cells induced by immunotherapy such as vaccination are not sufficient to control tumors because tumor-specific antigens may be self-antigens and tumors have immune evasion mechanisms to avoid immune surveillance system of host. Although recent clinical results from vaccine strategy for malignant gliomas are encouraging, these trials have some limitations, particularly their failure to expand tumor antigen-specific T cells reproducibly and effectively. An alternative strategy to overcome these limitations is adoptive T cell transfer therapy, in which tumor-specific T cells are expanded ex vivo rapidly and then transferred to patients. Moreover, enhanced biologic functions of T cells generated by genetic engineering and modified immunosuppressive microenvironment of host by homeostatic T cell expansion and/or elimination of immunosuppressive cells and molecules can induce more potent antitumor T cell responses and make this strategy hold promise in promoting a patient response for malignant glioma treatment. Here we will review the past and current progresses and discuss a new hope in adoptive T cell therapy for malignant gliomas. PMID:25009822

  11. Characterization of the natural killer T-cell response in an adoptive transfer model of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    VanderLaan, Paul A; Reardon, Catherine A; Sagiv, Yuval; Blachowicz, Lydia; Lukens, John; Nissenbaum, Michael; Wang, Chyung-Ru; Getz, Godfrey S

    2007-03-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells have recently been implicated in atherogenesis, primarily for their ability to recognize and respond to lipid antigens. Because the atherosclerotic lesion is characterized by the retention and modification of lipids in the vascular wall, NKT cells may be involved in promoting the local vascular inflammatory response. Here, we investigate the proatherogenic role of NKT cells in an adoptive transfer model of atherosclerosis, using as recipients immune-deficient, atherosclerosis-susceptible RAG1(-/-)LDLR(-/-) mice. The adoptive transfer of an NKT cell-enriched splenocyte population from Valpha14Jalpha18 T-cell receptor transgenic mice resulted in a 73% increase in aortic root lesion area compared with recipients of NKT cell-deficient splenocytes derived from CD1d(-/-) mice after 12 weeks of Western-type diet feeding. The total serum from hypercholesterolemic mice leads to a small but significant activation of Valpha14Jalpha18 T-cell receptor-expressing hybridoma line by dendritic cells that is CD1d-dependent. Therefore, these studies demonstrate that NKT cells are proatherogenic in the absence of exogenous stimulation, and this activity is likely associated with endogenous lipid antigens carried by lipoproteins in the circulation and perhaps also in the atherosclerotic plaque.

  12. Characterization of the Natural Killer T-Cell Response in an Adoptive Transfer Model of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    VanderLaan, Paul A.; Reardon, Catherine A.; Sagiv, Yuval; Blachowicz, Lydia; Lukens, John; Nissenbaum, Michael; Wang, Chyung-Ru; Getz, Godfrey S.

    2007-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells have recently been implicated in atherogenesis, primarily for their ability to recognize and respond to lipid antigens. Because the atherosclerotic lesion is characterized by the retention and modification of lipids in the vascular wall, NKT cells may be involved in promoting the local vascular inflammatory response. Here, we investigate the proatherogenic role of NKT cells in an adoptive transfer model of atherosclerosis, using as recipients immune-deficient, atherosclerosis-susceptible RAG1−/−LDLR−/− mice. The adoptive transfer of an NKT cell-enriched splenocyte population from Vα14Jα18 T-cell receptor transgenic mice resulted in a 73% increase in aortic root lesion area compared with recipients of NKT cell-deficient splenocytes derived from CD1d−/− mice after 12 weeks of Western-type diet feeding. The total serum from hypercholesterolemic mice leads to a small but significant activation of Vα14Jα18 T-cell receptor-expressing hybridoma line by dendritic cells that is CD1d-dependent. Therefore, these studies demonstrate that NKT cells are proatherogenic in the absence of exogenous stimulation, and this activity is likely associated with endogenous lipid antigens carried by lipoproteins in the circulation and perhaps also in the atherosclerotic plaque. PMID:17322392

  13. Technical Considerations for the Generation of Adoptively Transferred T Cells in Cancer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Visioni, Anthony; Skitzki, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    A significant function of the immune system is the surveillance and elimination of aberrant cells that give rise to cancer. Even when tumors are well established and metastatic, immune-mediated spontaneous regressions have been documented. While there are have been various forms of immunotherapy, one of the most widely studied for almost 40 years is adoptive cellular immunotherapy, but its success has yet to be fully realized. Adoptive cell transfer (ACT) is a therapeutic modality that has intrigued physicians and researchers for its many theoretical benefits. Preclinical investigations and human trials have utilized natural killer (NK) cells, dendritic cells (DC), macrophages, T-cells or B-cells for ACT with the most intense research focused on T-cell ACT. T-cells are exquisitely specific to the target of its T-cell receptor (TCR), thus potentially reducing the amount of collateral damage and off-target effects from treatment. T-cells also possess a memory subset that may reduce the risk of recurrence of a cancer after the successful treatment of the primary disease. There are several options for the source of T-cells used in the generation of cells for ACT. Perhaps the most widely known source is T-cells generated from tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs). However, studies have also employed peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), lymph nodes, and even induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSCs) as a source of T-cells. Several important technical considerations exist regarding benefits and limitations of each source of T-cells. Unique aspects of T-cells factor into their ability to be efficacious in ACT including the total number of cells available for ACT, the anti-tumor efficacy on a per cell basis, the repertoire of TCRs specific to tumor cells, and their ability to traffic to various organs that harbor tumor. Current research is attempting to unlock the full potential of these cells to effectively and safely treat cancer. PMID:27657129

  14. Technical Considerations for the Generation of Adoptively Transferred T Cells in Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Visioni, Anthony; Skitzki, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    A significant function of the immune system is the surveillance and elimination of aberrant cells that give rise to cancer. Even when tumors are well established and metastatic, immune-mediated spontaneous regressions have been documented. While there are have been various forms of immunotherapy, one of the most widely studied for almost 40 years is adoptive cellular immunotherapy, but its success has yet to be fully realized. Adoptive cell transfer (ACT) is a therapeutic modality that has intrigued physicians and researchers for its many theoretical benefits. Preclinical investigations and human trials have utilized natural killer (NK) cells, dendritic cells (DC), macrophages, T-cells or B-cells for ACT with the most intense research focused on T-cell ACT. T-cells are exquisitely specific to the target of its T-cell receptor (TCR), thus potentially reducing the amount of collateral damage and off-target effects from treatment. T-cells also possess a memory subset that may reduce the risk of recurrence of a cancer after the successful treatment of the primary disease. There are several options for the source of T-cells used in the generation of cells for ACT. Perhaps the most widely known source is T-cells generated from tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs). However, studies have also employed peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), lymph nodes, and even induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSCs) as a source of T-cells. Several important technical considerations exist regarding benefits and limitations of each source of T-cells. Unique aspects of T-cells factor into their ability to be efficacious in ACT including the total number of cells available for ACT, the anti-tumor efficacy on a per cell basis, the repertoire of TCRs specific to tumor cells, and their ability to traffic to various organs that harbor tumor. Current research is attempting to unlock the full potential of these cells to effectively and safely treat cancer. PMID:27657129

  15. Antiangiogenic immunotherapy targeting Flk-1, DNA vaccine and adoptive T cell transfer, inhibits ocular neovascularization

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Han; Sonoda, Koh-Hei; Hijioka, Kuniaki; Qiao, Hong; Oshima, Yuji; Ishibashi, Tatsuro

    2009-04-17

    Ocular neovascularization (NV) is the primary cause of blindness in a wide range of ocular diseases. The exact mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of ocular NV is not yet well understood, and so there is no satisfactory therapy for ocular NV. Here, we describe a strategy targeting Flk-1, a self-antigen overexpressed on proliferating endothelial cells in ocular NV, by antiangiogenic immunotherapy-DNA vaccine and adoptive T cell therapy. An oral DNA vaccine encoding Flk-1 carried by attenuated Salmonella typhimurium markedly suppressed development of laser-induced choroidal NV. We further demonstrated that adoptive transfer of vaccine-induced CD8{sup +} T cells reduced pathological preretinal NV, with a concomitant facilitation of physiological revascularization after oxygen-induced retinal vessel obliteration. However, physiological retinal vascular development was unaffected in neonatal mice transferred with vaccine-induced CD8{sup +} T cells. These findings suggested that antiangiogenic immunotherapy targeting Flk-1 such as vaccination and adoptive immunotherapy may contribute to future therapies for ocular NV.

  16. In vivo imaging of T cell delivery to tumors after adoptive transfer therapy.

    PubMed

    Pittet, Mikael J; Grimm, Jan; Berger, Cedric R; Tamura, Takahiko; Wojtkiewicz, Gregory; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Romero, Pedro; Swirski, Filip K; Weissleder, Ralph

    2007-07-24

    Adoptive transfer therapy of in vitro-expanded tumor-specific cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTLs) can mediate objective cancer regression in patients. Yet, technical limitations hamper precise monitoring of posttherapy T cell responses. Here we show in a mouse model that fused single photon emission computed tomography and x-ray computed tomography allows quantitative whole-body imaging of (111)In-oxine-labeled CTLs at tumor sites. Assessment of CTL localization is rapid, noninvasive, three-dimensional, and can be repeated for longitudinal analyses. We compared the effects of lymphodepletion before adoptive transfer on CTL recruitment and report that combined treatment increased intratumoral delivery of CTLs and improved antitumor efficacy. Because (111)In-oxine is a Food and Drug Administration-approved clinical agent, and human SPECT-CT systems are available, this approach should be clinically translatable, insofar as it may assess the efficacy of immunization procedures in individual patients and lead to development of more effective therapies. PMID:17640914

  17. [Adoptive transfer of immunity against Nippostrongylus brasiliensis in mice. In vitro restimulation of immune cells before their transfer].

    PubMed

    Rhalem, A; Bourdieu, C; Luffau, G; Péry, P

    1989-01-01

    When mesenteric lymph node cells from infected mice were stimulated during an in vitro culture with exoantigens or with a purified protective antigen of Nippostrongylus brasiliensis, a drop was noted in the number of cells required to transfer protection to new mice. A maximal effect was already obtained after 4 hrs. of culture, but irradiated cells or cells from another mouse strain were unable to mediate this transfer. T cells were more effective than B cells in transferring the protection.

  18. Adoptive transfer of MART-1 T cell receptor transgenic lymphocytes and dendritic cell vaccination in patients with metastatic melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Chodon, Thinle; Comin-Anduix, Begonya; Chmielowski, Bartosz; Koya, Richard C; Wu, Zhongqi; Auerbach, Martin; Ng, Charles; Avramis, Earl; Seja, Elizabeth; Villanueva, Arturo; McCannel, Tara A.; Ishiyama, Akira; Czernin, Johannes; Radu, Caius G.; Wang, Xiaoyan; Gjertson, David W.; Cochran, Alistair J.; Cornetta, Kenneth; Wong, Deborah J.L.; Kaplan-lefko, Paula; Hamid, Omid; Samlowski, Wolfram; Cohen, Peter A.; Daniels, Gregory A.; Mukherji, Bijay; Yang, Lili; Zack, Jerome A.; Kohn, Donald B.; Heath, James R.; Glaspy, John A.; Witte, Owen N.; Baltimore, David; Economou, James S.; Ribas, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Purpose It has been demonstrated that large numbers of tumor-specific T cells for adoptive cell transfer (ACT) can be manufactured by retroviral genetic engineering of autologous peripheral blood lymphocytes and expanding them over several weeks. In mouse models, this therapy is optimized when administered with dendritic cell (DC) vaccination. We developed a short one-week manufacture protocol to determine the feasibility, safety and antitumor efficacy of this double cell therapy. Experimnetal Design A clinical trial (NCT00910650) adoptively transferring MART-1 T cell receptor (TCR) transgenic lymphocytes together with MART-1 peptide pulsed DC vaccination in HLA-A2.1 patients with metastatic melanoma. Autologous TCR transgenic cells were manufactured in 6 to 7 days using retroviral vector gene transfer, and re-infused with (n = 10) or without (n = 3) prior cryopreservation. Results 14 patients with metastatic melanoma were enrolled and nine out of 13 treated patients (69%) showed evidence of tumor regression. Peripheral blood reconstitution with MART-1-specific T cells peaked within two weeks of ACT indicating rapid in vivo expansion. Administration of freshly manufactured TCR transgenic T cells resulted in a higher persistence of MART-1-specific T cells in the blood as compared to cryopreserved. Evidence that DC vaccination could cause further in vivo expansion was only observed with ACT using non-cryopreserved T cells. Conclusion Double cell therapy with ACT of TCR engineered T cells with a very short ex vivo manipulation and DC vaccines is feasible and results in antitumor activity, but improvements are needed to maintain tumor responses. PMID:24634374

  19. Improving Adoptive T Cell Therapy: The Particular Role of T Cell Costimulation, Cytokines, and Post-Transfer Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Redeker, Anke; Arens, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive cellular therapy (ACT) is a form of immunotherapy whereby antigen-specific T cells are isolated or engineered, expanded ex vivo, and transferred back to patients. Clinical benefit after ACT has been obtained in treatment of infection, various hematological malignancies, and some solid tumors; however, due to poor functionality and persistence of the transferred T cells, the efficacy of ACT in the treatment of most solid tumors is often marginal. Hence, much effort is undertaken to improve T cell function and persistence in ACT and significant progress is being made. Herein, we will review strategies to improve ACT success rates in the treatment of cancer and infection. We will deliberate on the most favorable phenotype for the tumor-specific T cells that are infused into patients and on how to obtain T cells bearing this phenotype by applying novel ex vivo culture methods. Moreover, we will discuss T cell function and persistence after transfer into patients and how these factors can be manipulated by means of providing costimulatory signals, cytokines, blocking antibodies to inhibitory molecules, and vaccination. Incorporation of these T cell stimulation strategies and combinations of the different treatment modalities are likely to improve clinical response rates further. PMID:27656185

  20. Improving Adoptive T Cell Therapy: The Particular Role of T Cell Costimulation, Cytokines, and Post-Transfer Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Redeker, Anke; Arens, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive cellular therapy (ACT) is a form of immunotherapy whereby antigen-specific T cells are isolated or engineered, expanded ex vivo, and transferred back to patients. Clinical benefit after ACT has been obtained in treatment of infection, various hematological malignancies, and some solid tumors; however, due to poor functionality and persistence of the transferred T cells, the efficacy of ACT in the treatment of most solid tumors is often marginal. Hence, much effort is undertaken to improve T cell function and persistence in ACT and significant progress is being made. Herein, we will review strategies to improve ACT success rates in the treatment of cancer and infection. We will deliberate on the most favorable phenotype for the tumor-specific T cells that are infused into patients and on how to obtain T cells bearing this phenotype by applying novel ex vivo culture methods. Moreover, we will discuss T cell function and persistence after transfer into patients and how these factors can be manipulated by means of providing costimulatory signals, cytokines, blocking antibodies to inhibitory molecules, and vaccination. Incorporation of these T cell stimulation strategies and combinations of the different treatment modalities are likely to improve clinical response rates further.

  1. Improving Adoptive T Cell Therapy: The Particular Role of T Cell Costimulation, Cytokines, and Post-Transfer Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Redeker, Anke; Arens, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive cellular therapy (ACT) is a form of immunotherapy whereby antigen-specific T cells are isolated or engineered, expanded ex vivo, and transferred back to patients. Clinical benefit after ACT has been obtained in treatment of infection, various hematological malignancies, and some solid tumors; however, due to poor functionality and persistence of the transferred T cells, the efficacy of ACT in the treatment of most solid tumors is often marginal. Hence, much effort is undertaken to improve T cell function and persistence in ACT and significant progress is being made. Herein, we will review strategies to improve ACT success rates in the treatment of cancer and infection. We will deliberate on the most favorable phenotype for the tumor-specific T cells that are infused into patients and on how to obtain T cells bearing this phenotype by applying novel ex vivo culture methods. Moreover, we will discuss T cell function and persistence after transfer into patients and how these factors can be manipulated by means of providing costimulatory signals, cytokines, blocking antibodies to inhibitory molecules, and vaccination. Incorporation of these T cell stimulation strategies and combinations of the different treatment modalities are likely to improve clinical response rates further. PMID:27656185

  2. Tumor-derived chemokine MCP-1/CCL2 is sufficient for mediating tumor tropism of adoptively transferred T cells.

    PubMed

    Brown, Christine E; Vishwanath, Reena P; Aguilar, Brenda; Starr, Renate; Najbauer, Joseph; Aboody, Karen S; Jensen, Michael C

    2007-09-01

    To exert a therapeutic effect, adoptively transferred tumor-specific CTLs must traffic to sites of tumor burden, exit the circulation, and infiltrate the tumor microenvironment. In this study, we examine the ability of adoptively transferred human CTL to traffic to tumors with disparate chemokine secretion profiles independent of tumor Ag recognition. Using a combination of in vivo tumor tropism studies and in vitro biophotonic chemotaxis assays, we observed that cell lines derived from glioma, medulloblastoma, and renal cell carcinoma efficiently chemoattracted ex vivo-expanded primary human T cells. We compared the chemokines secreted by tumor cell lines with high chemotactic activity with those that failed to elicit T cell chemotaxis (Daudi lymphoma, 10HTB neuroblastoma, and A2058 melanoma cells) and found a correlation between tumor-derived production of MCP-1/CCL2 (> or =10 ng/ml) and T cell chemotaxis. Chemokine immunodepletion studies confirmed that tumor-derived MCP-1 elicits effector T cell chemotaxis. Moreover, MCP-1 is sufficient for in vivo T cell tumor tropism as evidenced by the selective accumulation of i.v. administered firefly luciferase-expressing T cells in intracerebral xenografts of tumor transfectants secreting MCP-1. These studies suggest that the capacity of adoptively transferred T cells to home to tumors may be, in part, dictated by the species and amounts of tumor-derived chemokines, in particular MCP-1.

  3. Stable activity of diabetogenic cells with age in NOD mice: dynamics of reconstitution and adoptive diabetes transfer in immunocompromised mice

    PubMed Central

    Kaminitz, Ayelet; Mizrahi, Keren; Ash, Shifra; Ben-Nun, Avi; Askenasy, Nadir

    2014-01-01

    The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse is a prevalent disease model of type 1 diabetes. Immune aberrations that cause and propagate autoimmune insulitis in these mice are being continually debated, with evidence supporting both dominance of effector cells and insufficiency of suppressor mechanisms. In this study we assessed the behaviour of NOD lymphocytes under extreme expansion conditions using adoptive transfer into immunocompromised NOD.SCID (severe combined immunodeficiency) mice. CD4+ CD25+ T cells do not cause islet inflammation, whereas splenocytes and CD4+ CD25− T cells induce pancreatic inflammation and hyperglycaemia in 80–100% of the NOD.SCID recipients. Adoptively transferred effector T cells migrate to the lymphoid organs and pancreas, proliferate, are activated in the target organ in situ and initiate inflammatory insulitis. Reconstitution of all components of the CD4+ subset emphasizes the plastic capacity of different cell types to adopt effector and suppressor phenotypes. Furthermore, similar immune profiles of diabetic and euglycaemic NOD.SCID recipients demonstrate dissociation between fractional expression of CD25 and FoxP3 and the severity of insulitis. There were no evident and consistent differences in diabetogenic activity and immune reconstituting activity of T cells from pre-diabetic (11 weeks) and new onset diabetic NOD females. Similarities in immune phenotypes and variable distribution of effector and suppressor subsets in various stages of inflammation commend caution in interpretation of quantitative and qualitative aberrations as markers of disease severity in adoptive transfer experiments. PMID:24601987

  4. Stable activity of diabetogenic cells with age in NOD mice: dynamics of reconstitution and adoptive diabetes transfer in immunocompromised mice.

    PubMed

    Kaminitz, Ayelet; Mizrahi, Keren; Ash, Shifra; Ben-Nun, Avi; Askenasy, Nadir

    2014-07-01

    The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse is a prevalent disease model of type 1 diabetes. Immune aberrations that cause and propagate autoimmune insulitis in these mice are being continually debated, with evidence supporting both dominance of effector cells and insufficiency of suppressor mechanisms. In this study we assessed the behaviour of NOD lymphocytes under extreme expansion conditions using adoptive transfer into immunocompromised NOD.SCID (severe combined immunodeficiency) mice. CD4(+)  CD25(+) T cells do not cause islet inflammation, whereas splenocytes and CD4(+)  CD25(-) T cells induce pancreatic inflammation and hyperglycaemia in 80-100% of the NOD.SCID recipients. Adoptively transferred effector T cells migrate to the lymphoid organs and pancreas, proliferate, are activated in the target organ in situ and initiate inflammatory insulitis. Reconstitution of all components of the CD4(+) subset emphasizes the plastic capacity of different cell types to adopt effector and suppressor phenotypes. Furthermore, similar immune profiles of diabetic and euglycaemic NOD.SCID recipients demonstrate dissociation between fractional expression of CD25 and FoxP3 and the severity of insulitis. There were no evident and consistent differences in diabetogenic activity and immune reconstituting activity of T cells from pre-diabetic (11 weeks) and new onset diabetic NOD females. Similarities in immune phenotypes and variable distribution of effector and suppressor subsets in various stages of inflammation commend caution in interpretation of quantitative and qualitative aberrations as markers of disease severity in adoptive transfer experiments.

  5. Microbial translocation augments the function of adoptively transferred self/tumor-specific CD8+ T cells via TLR4 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Paulos, Chrystal M.; Wrzesinski, Claudia; Kaiser,, Andrew; Hinrichs, Christian S.; Chieppa, Marcello; Cassard, Lydie; Palmer, Douglas C.; Boni, Andrea; Muranski, Pawel; Yu, Zhiya; Gattinoni, Luca; Antony, Paul A.; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Restifo, Nicholas P.

    2007-01-01

    Lymphodepletion with total body irradiation (TBI) increases the efficacy of adoptively transferred tumor-specific CD8+ T cells by depleting inhibitory lymphocytes and increasing homeostatic cytokine levels. We found that TBI augmented the function of adoptively transferred CD8+ T cells in mice genetically deficient in all lymphocytes, indicating the existence of another TBI mechanism of action. Additional investigation revealed commensal gut microflora in the mesenteric lymph nodes and elevated LPS levels in the sera of irradiated mice. These findings correlated with increased dendritic cell activation and heightened levels of systemic inflammatory cytokines. Reduction of host microflora using antibiotics, neutralization of serum LPS using polymyxin B, or removal of LPS signaling components using mice genetically deficient in CD14 and TLR4 reduced the beneficial effects of TBI on tumor regression. Conversely, administration of microbial ligand–containing serum or ultrapure LPS from irradiated animals to nonirradiated antibody-lymphodepleted mice enhanced CD8+ T cell activation and improved tumor regression. Administration of ultrapure LPS to irradiated animals further enhanced the number and function of the adoptively transferred cells, leading to long-term cure of mice with large B16F10 tumors and enhanced autoimmune vitiligo. Thus, disruption of the homeostatic balance between the host and microbes can enhance cell-based tumor immunotherapy. PMID:17657310

  6. Extending the lifespan and efficacies of immune cells used in adoptive transfer for cancer immunotherapies–A review

    PubMed Central

    Nayar, Sandeep; Dasgupta, Prokar; Galustian, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Cells used in adoptive cell-transfer immunotherapies against cancer include dendritic cells (DCs), natural-killer cells, and CD8+ T-cells. These cells may have limited efficacy due to their lifespan, activity, and immunosuppressive effects of tumor cells. Therefore, increasing longevity and activity of these cells may boost their efficacy. Four cytokines that can extend immune effector-cell longevity are IL-2, IL-7, IL-21, and IL-15. This review will discuss current knowledge on effector-cell lifespans and the mechanisms by which IL-2, IL-7, IL-15, and IL-21 can extend effector-cell longevity. We will also discuss how lifespan and efficacy of these cells can be regulated to allow optimal clinical benefits. PMID:26155387

  7. Longitudinal confocal microscopy imaging of solid tumor destruction following adoptive T cell transfer.

    PubMed

    Schietinger, Andrea; Arina, Ainhoa; Liu, Rebecca B; Wells, Sam; Huang, Jianhua; Engels, Boris; Bindokas, Vytas; Bartkowiak, Todd; Lee, David; Herrmann, Andreas; Piston, David W; Pittet, Mikael J; Lin, P Charles; Zal, Tomasz; Schreiber, Hans

    2013-11-01

    A fluorescence-based, high-resolution imaging approach was used to visualize longitudinally the cellular events unfolding during T cell-mediated tumor destruction. The dynamic interplay of T cells, cancer cells, cancer antigen loss variants, and stromal cells-all color-coded in vivo-was analyzed in established, solid tumors that had developed behind windows implanted on the backs of mice. Events could be followed repeatedly within precisely the same tumor region-before, during and after adoptive T cell therapy-thereby enabling for the first time a longitudinal in vivo evaluation of protracted events, an analysis not possible with terminal imaging of surgically exposed tumors. T cell infiltration, stromal interactions, and vessel destruction, as well as the functional consequences thereof, including the elimination of cancer cells and cancer cell variants were studied. Minimal perivascular T cell infiltrates initiated vascular destruction inside the tumor mass eventually leading to macroscopic central tumor necrosis. Prolonged engagement of T cells with tumor antigen-crosspresenting stromal cells correlated with high IFNγ cytokine release and bystander elimination of antigen-negative cancer cells. The high-resolution, longitudinal, in vivo imaging approach described here will help to further a better mechanistic understanding of tumor eradication by T cells and other anti-cancer therapies. PMID:24482750

  8. Longitudinal confocal microscopy imaging of solid tumor destruction following adoptive T cell transfer

    PubMed Central

    Schietinger, Andrea; Arina, Ainhoa; Liu, Rebecca B; Wells, Sam; Huang, Jianhua; Engels, Boris; Bindokas, Vytas; Bartkowiak, Todd; Lee, David; Herrmann, Andreas; Piston, David W; Pittet, Mikael J; Lin, P Charles; Zal, Tomasz; Schreiber, Hans

    2013-01-01

    A fluorescence-based, high-resolution imaging approach was used to visualize longitudinally the cellular events unfolding during T cell-mediated tumor destruction. The dynamic interplay of T cells, cancer cells, cancer antigen loss variants, and stromal cells—all color-coded in vivo—was analyzed in established, solid tumors that had developed behind windows implanted on the backs of mice. Events could be followed repeatedly within precisely the same tumor region—before, during and after adoptive T cell therapy—thereby enabling for the first time a longitudinal in vivo evaluation of protracted events, an analysis not possible with terminal imaging of surgically exposed tumors. T cell infiltration, stromal interactions, and vessel destruction, as well as the functional consequences thereof, including the elimination of cancer cells and cancer cell variants were studied. Minimal perivascular T cell infiltrates initiated vascular destruction inside the tumor mass eventually leading to macroscopic central tumor necrosis. Prolonged engagement of T cells with tumor antigen-crosspresenting stromal cells correlated with high IFNγ cytokine release and bystander elimination of antigen-negative cancer cells. The high-resolution, longitudinal, in vivo imaging approach described here will help to further a better mechanistic understanding of tumor eradication by T cells and other anti-cancer therapies. PMID:24482750

  9. Targeting Stat3 in the myeloid compartment drastically improves the in vivo antitumor functions of adoptively transferred T cells

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Andreas; Kortylewski, Marcin; Kujawski, Maciej; Zhang, Chunyan; Reckamp, Karen; Armstrong, Brian; Wang, Lin; Kowolik, Claudia; Deng, Jiehui; Robert, Figlin; Yu, Hua

    2010-01-01

    Improving effector T cell functions is highly desirable for preventive or therapeutic interventions of diverse diseases. Stat3 in the myeloid compartment constrains Th-1 type immunity, dampening natural and induced antitumor immune responses. We have recently developed an in vivo siRNA delivery platform by conjugating a TLR9 agonist with siRNA that efficiently targets myeloid and B cells. Here we show that either ablating the Stat3 alleles in the myeloid compartment and B cells combined with CpG triggering or administrating the CpG-Stat3siRNA conjugates drastically augments effector functions of adoptively transferred CD8+ T cells. Specifically, we demonstrate that both approaches are capable of increasing dendritic cell and CD8+ T cell engagement in tumor draining lymph nodes. Furthermore, both approaches can significantly activate the transferred CD8+ T cells in vivo, upregulating effector molecules such as perforin, granzyme B and IFN-γ. Intravital multiphoton microscopy reveals that Stat3 silencing combined with CpG triggering greatly increases killing activity and tumor infiltration of transferred T cells. These results suggest the use of CpG-Stat3siRNA, and possibly other Stat3 inhibitors, as a potent adjuvant to improve T cell therapies. PMID:20841481

  10. Deletion of Plasmodium berghei-Specific CD4+ T Cells Adoptively Transferred into Recipient Mice after Challenge with Homologous Parasite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirunpetcharat, Chakrit; Good, Michael F.

    1998-02-01

    The immune response to malaria parasites includes T cell responses that reduce parasites by effector T cell responses and by providing help for antibody responses. Some parasites are more sensitive to antibody and others are more sensitive to cell-mediated immunity. We demonstrate that cultured CD4+ T cells that produce interferon CD4+ and interleukin 2, but not interleukin 4, in response to stimulation with the rodent parasite Plasmodium berghei can reduce but not eliminate parasites in vivo after adoptive transfer. Although cells can persist in vivo for up to 9 months in uninfected mice, infection results in elimination of up to 99% of specific T cells in different tissues, as judged by tracking T cells labeled with the fluorescent dye 5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester. T cells specific for ovalbumin are unaffected. In vivo activation and division of transferred T cells per se are not responsible for deletion because T cells positive for 5-(and -6)-carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester divide up to six times within 7 days in uninfected mice and are not deleted. Understanding the factors responsible for parasite-mediated specific deletion of T cells would enhance our knowledge of parasite immunity.

  11. Adoptive transfer of dendritic cells modulates immunogenesis and tolerogenesis in a neonatal model of murine cutaneous leishmaniasis

    PubMed Central

    Ponce, Loida V; Corado, José; Díaz, Nilka L; Tapia, Felix J

    2005-01-01

    We evaluated the adoptive transfer of DCs on Leishmania (L.) mexicana-infected neonatal BALB/c mice. DCs were isolated and purified from the spleens of the following donor groups: a) Adult BALB/c mice infected during adulthood with L. (L) mexicana; b) Adult BALB/c mice infected during neonatal life; c) Healthy neonatal BALB/c mice; d) Healthy adult BALB/c mice. A neonatal model of infection, generated after inoculation with 5 × 105 promastigotes of L. (L) mexicana, was used as the infection control group. Sixteen hours after intraperitoneal transfer of DCs (1 × 103, 1 × 105, or 1 × 106 cells/ml), neonatal recipient BALB/c mice were infected. The adoptive transfer of DCs diminished disease progression in neonatal mice. This reduction depends on the quantity and provenance of transferred DCs, since the effect was more evident with high numbers of DCs from adult mice infected during adulthood and healthy neonatal mice. Protection was significantly reduced in animals receiving DCs from healthy adult mice but it was absent in mice receiving DCs from adult mice infected during neonatal life. These results suggest that genetic susceptibility to Leishmania infection can be modified during neonatal life, and that the period of life when antigens are encountered is crucial in influencing the capacity of DCs to induce resistance or tolerance. PMID:15670331

  12. Adoptive transfer of helminth antigen-pulsed dendritic cells protects against the development of experimental colitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Matisz, Chelsea E; Leung, Gabriella; Reyes, Jose Luis; Wang, Arthur; Sharkey, Keith A; McKay, Derek M

    2015-11-01

    Infection with helminth parasites and treatment with worm extracts can suppress inflammatory disease, including colitis. Postulating that dendritic cells (DCs) participated in the suppression of inflammation and seeking to move beyond the use of helminths per se, we tested the ability of Hymenolepis diminuta antigen-pulsed DCs to suppress colitis as a novel cell-based immunotherapy. Bone marrow derived DCs pulsed with H. diminuta antigen (HD-DCs), or PBS-, BSA-, or LPS-DCs as controls, were transferred into wild-type (WT), interleukin-10 (IL-10) knock-out (KO), and RAG-1 KO mice, and the impact on dinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (DNBS)-induced colitis and splenic cytokine production assessed 72 h later. Mice receiving HD-DCs were significantly protected from DNBS-induced colitis and of the experimental groups only these mice displayed increased Th2 cytokines and IL-10 production. Adoptive transfer of HD-DCs protected neither RAG-1 nor IL-10 KO mice from DNBS-colitis. Furthermore, the transfer of CD4(+) splenocytes from recipients of HD-DCs protected naïve mice against DNBS-colitis, in an IL-10 dependent manner. Thus, HD-DCs are a novel anti-colitic immunotherapy that can educate anti-colitic CD4(+) T cells: mechanistically, the anti-colitic effect of HD-DCs requires that the host has an adaptive immune response and the ability to mobilize IL-10.

  13. Combinational targeting offsets antigen escape and enhances effector functions of adoptively transferred T cells in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Meenakshi; Corder, Amanda; Chow, Kevin K H; Mukherjee, Malini; Ashoori, Aidin; Kew, Yvonne; Zhang, Yi Jonathan; Baskin, David S; Merchant, Fatima A; Brawley, Vita S; Byrd, Tiara T; Krebs, Simone; Wu, Meng Fen; Liu, Hao; Heslop, Helen E; Gottschalk, Stephen; Gottachalk, Stephen; Yvon, Eric; Ahmed, Nabil

    2013-11-01

    Preclinical and early clinical studies have demonstrated that chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-redirected T cells are highly promising in cancer therapy. We observed that targeting HER2 in a glioblastoma (GBM) cell line results in the emergence of HER2-null tumor cells that maintain the expression of nontargeted tumor-associated antigens. Combinational targeting of these tumor-associated antigens could therefore offset this escape mechanism. We studied the single-cell coexpression patterns of HER2, IL-13Rα2, and EphA2 in primary GBM samples using multicolor flow cytometry and immunofluorescence, and applied a binomial routine to the permutations of antigen expression and the related odds of complete tumor elimination. This mathematical model demonstrated that cotargeting HER2 and IL-13Rα2 could maximally expand the therapeutic reach of the T cell product in all primary tumors studied. Targeting a third antigen did not predict an added advantage in the tumor cohort studied. We therefore generated bispecific T cell products from healthy donors and from GBM patients by pooling T cells individually expressing HER2 and IL-13Rα2-specific CARs and by making individual T cells to coexpress both molecules. Both HER2/IL-13Rα2-bispecific T cell products offset antigen escape, producing enhanced effector activity in vitro immunoassays (against autologous glioma cells in the case of GBM patient products) and in an orthotopic xenogeneic murine model. Further, T cells coexpressing HER2 and IL-13Rα2-CARs exhibited accentuated yet antigen-dependent downstream signaling and a particularly enhanced antitumor activity.

  14. Adoptive Transfer of Dendritic Cells Expressing Fas Ligand Modulates Intestinal Inflammation in a Model of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    de Jesus, Edelmarie Rivera; Isidro, Raymond A; Cruz, Myrella L; Marty, Harry; Appleyard, Caroline B

    2016-01-01

    Background Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are chronic relapsing inflammatory conditions of unknown cause and likely result from the loss of immunological tolerance, which leads to over-activation of the gut immune system. Gut macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) are essential for maintaining tolerance, but can also contribute to the inflammatory response in conditions such as IBD. Current therapies for IBD are limited by high costs and unwanted toxicities and side effects. The possibility of reducing intestinal inflammation with DCs genetically engineered to over-express the apoptosis-inducing FasL (FasL-DCs) has not yet been explored. Objective Investigate the immunomodulatory effect of administering FasL-DCs in the rat trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) model of acute colitis. Methods Expression of FasL on DCs isolated from the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) of normal and TNBS-colitis rats was determined by flow cytometry. Primary rat bone marrow DCs were transfected with rat FasL plasmid (FasL-DCs) or empty vector (EV-DCs). The effect of these DCs on T cell IFNγ secretion and apoptosis was determined by ELISPOT and flow cytometry for Annexin V, respectively. Rats received FasL-DCs or EV-DCs intraperitoneally 96 and 48 hours prior to colitis induction with TNBS. Colonic T cell and neutrophil infiltration was determined by immunohistochemistry for CD3 and myeloperoxidase activity assay, respectively. Macrophage number and phenotype was measured by double immunofluorescence for CD68 and inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase. Results MLN dendritic cells from normal rats expressed more FasL than those from colitic rats. Compared to EV-DCs, FasL-DCs reduced T cell IFNγ secretion and increased T cell apoptosis in vitro. Adoptive transfer of FasL-DCs decreased macroscopic and microscopic damage scores and reduced colonic T cells, neutrophils, and proinflammatory macrophages when compared to EV-DC adoptive transfer. Conclusion FasL-DCs are effective at treating colonic

  15. Adoptive cell therapy for sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Mata, Melinda; Gottschalk, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Current therapy for sarcomas, though effective in treating local disease, is often ineffective for patients with recurrent or metastatic disease. To improve outcomes, novel approaches are needed and cell therapy has the potential to meet this need since it does not rely on the cytotoxic mechanisms of conventional therapies. The recent successes of T-cell therapies for hematological malignancies have led to renewed interest in exploring cell therapies for solid tumors such as sarcomas. In this review, we will discuss current cell therapies for sarcoma with special emphasis on genetic approaches to improve the effector function of adoptively transferred cells. PMID:25572477

  16. An HSV-2 based oncolytic virus can function as an attractant to guide migration of adoptively transferred T cells to tumor sites

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Lihua; Zhang, Xiaoliu

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive T-cell therapy has shown promises for cancer treatment. However, for treating solid tumors, there is a need for improving the ability of the adoptively transferred T cells to home to tumor sites. We explored the possibility of using an oncolytic virus derived from HSV-2, which can actively pull T effector cells to the site of infection, as a local attractant for migration of adoptively transferred T cells. Our data show that intratumoral administration of this virus can indeed attract active migration of the adoptively transferred T cells to the treated tumor. Moreover, once attracted to the tumor site by the virus, T cells persisted in there significantly longer than in mock-treated tumor. Chemokine profiling identified significant elevation of CXCL9 and CXCL10, as well as several other chemokines belonging to the inflammatory chemokine family in the virus-treated tumors. These chemokines initially guided the T-cell migration to and then maintained their persistence in the tumor site, leading to a significantly enhanced therapeutic effect. Our data suggests that this virotherapy may be combined with adoptive T-cell therapy to potentiate its therapeutic effect against solid tumors that are otherwise difficult to manage with the treatment alone. PMID:25460506

  17. Modulation of tumor response to photodynamic therapy in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice by adoptively transferred lymphoid cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korbelik, Mladen; Krosl, Gorazd; Krosl, Jana; Dougherty, Graeme J.

    1996-04-01

    Photodynamic treatment, consisting of intravenous injection of PhotofrinR (10 mg/kg) followed by exposure to 110 J/cm2 of 630 plus or minus 10 nm light 24 hours later, cured 100% of EMT6 tumors (murine mammary sarcoma) growing in syngeneic immunocompetent BALB/C mice. In contrast, the same treatment produced no cures of EMT6 tumors growing in either nude or SCID mice (immunodeficient strains). EMT6 tumors growing in BALB/C and SCID mice showed no difference in either the level of PhotofrinR accumulated per gram of tumor tissue, or the extent of tumor cell killing during the first 24 hours post photodynamic therapy (PDT). In an attempt to improve the sensitivity to PDT of EMT6 tumors growing in SCID mice, these hosts were given either splenic T lymphocytes or whole bone marrow from BALB/C mice. The adoptive transfer of lymphocytes 9 days before PDT was successful in delaying tumor recurrence but produced no cures. A better improvement in PDT response was obtained with tumors growing in SCID mice reconstituted with BALB/C bone marrow (tumor cure rate of 63%). The results of this study demonstrate that, at least with the EMT6 tumor model, antitumor immune activity mediated by lymphoid cell populations makes an important contribution to the curative effect of PDT.

  18. Adoptive transfer of Mammaglobin-A epitope specific CD8 T cells combined with a single low dose of total body irradiation eradicates breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Lerret, Nadine M; Rogozinska, Magdalena; Jaramillo, Andrés; Marzo, Amanda L

    2012-01-01

    Adoptive T cell therapy has proven to be beneficial in a number of tumor systems by targeting the relevant tumor antigen. The tumor antigen targeted in our model is Mammaglobin-A, expressed by approximately 80% of human breast tumors. Here we evaluated the use of adoptively transferred Mammaglobin-A specific CD8 T cells in combination with low dose irradiation to induce breast tumor rejection and prevent relapse. We show Mammaglobin-A specific CD8 T cells generated by DNA vaccination with all epitopes (Mammaglobin-A2.1, A2.2, A2.4 and A2.6) and full-length DNA in vivo resulted in heterogeneous T cell populations consisting of both effector and central memory CD8 T cell subsets. Adoptive transfer of spleen cells from all Mammaglobin-A2 immunized mice into tumor-bearing SCID/beige mice induced tumor regression but this anti-tumor response was not sustained long-term. Additionally, we demonstrate that only the adoptive transfer of Mammaglobin-A2 specific CD8 T cells in combination with a single low dose of irradiation prevents tumors from recurring. More importantly we show that this single dose of irradiation results in the down regulation of the macrophage scavenger receptor 1 on dendritic cells within the tumor and reduces lipid uptake by tumor resident dendritic cells potentially enabling the dendritic cells to present tumor antigen more efficiently and aid in tumor clearance. These data reveal the potential for adoptive transfer combined with a single low dose of total body irradiation as a suitable therapy for the treatment of established breast tumors and the prevention of tumor recurrence.

  19. Correlation of natural killer cell activity and clearance of Cryptococcus neoformans from mice after adoptive transfer of splenic nylon wool-nonadherent cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hidore, M R; Murphy, J W

    1986-01-01

    Previous reports demonstrate that natural killer (NK) cells inhibit the growth of Cryptococcus neoformans in vitro, but conclusive evidence supporting the effectiveness of NK cells in host resistance to cryptococci is not available. The objective of these studies was to assess the ability of NK cells to clear C. neoformans from the lungs, livers, and spleens of infected mice. CBA/J mice were depleted of NK cells, as well as other natural effector cells, by an intraperitoneal injection of cyclophosphamide (Cy), 240 mg/kg of body weight. One day later, 7.5 X 10(7) nylon wool-nonadherent (NWN) spleen cells, either untreated or treated with anti-asialo GM1 and complement to remove NK cells, were adoptively transferred to Cy-pretreated mice. On day 2 after Cy treatment, the mice were injected intravenously with 2 X 10(4) cryptococci. At 4 and 6 days after Cy treatment, tissues were assayed for NK reactivity, using a 4-h 51Cr-release assay, and for in vivo clearance of cryptococci as reflected by mean log10 CFU per organ. We observed that Cy treatment depleted NK activity against YAC-1 targets and reduced in vivo clearance of C. neoformans from the tissues of infected mice. Additionally, Cy treatment depleted the total lung and spleen cellularity and the total number of peripheral blood lymphocytes when compared with those in normal untreated control mice. Also, spleen weights were significantly decreased in comparison with those of untreated animals 4 days after Cy treatment. Adoptive transfer of untreated NWN spleen cells into Cy-depressed mice restored the NK cell activity which correlated with enhanced clearance of cryptococci from lungs, livers, and spleens. In contrast, treatment of NWN spleen cells with anti-asialo GM1 and complement before adoptive transfer abrogated the ability of these cells to restore NK activity or reduce the numbers of cryptococci present in tissues of infected mice. Taken together, these data indicate that NK cells are the cells effective

  20. Enhanced anti-tumor activity induced by adoptive T cell transfer and the adjunctive use of the HDAC Inhibitor LAQ824

    PubMed Central

    Vo, Dan D.; Prins, Robert M.; Begley, Jonathan L.; Donahue, Timothy R.; Morris, Lilah F.; Bruhn, Kevin W.; de la Rocha, Pilar; Yang, Meng-Yin; Mok, Stephen; Garban, Hermes J.; Craft, Noah; Economou, James S.; Marincola, Francesco M.; Wang, Ena; Ribas, Antoni

    2009-01-01

    Tumors grow in the presence of antigen-specific T cells, suggesting the existence of intrinsic cancer cell escape mechanisms. We hypothesized that a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor could sensitize tumor cells to immunotherapy because this class of agents has been reported to increase tumor antigen expression and shift gene expression to a pro-apoptotic milieu in cancer cells. To test this question, we treated B16 murine melanoma with the combination of the HDAC inhibitor LAQ824 together with the adoptive transfer (AT) of gp100 melanoma antigen-specific pmel-1 T cells. The combined therapy significantly improved antitumor activity through several mechanisms: 1) increase in MHC and tumor-associated antigen (TAA) expression by tumor cells; 2) decrease in competing endogenous lymphocytes in recipient mice, resulting in a proliferative advantage for the adoptively transferred cells; and 3) improvement in the functional activity of the adoptively transferred lymphocytes. We confirmed the beneficial effects of this HDAC inhibitor as sensitizer to immunotherapy in a different model of prophylactic prime-boost vaccination with the melanoma antigen tyrosinase-related protein-2 (TRP2), which also demonstrated a significant improvement in antitumor activity against B16 melanoma. In conclusion, the HDAC inhibitor LAQ824 significantly enhances tumor immunotherapy through effects on target tumor cells as well as improving the antitumor activity of tumor antigen-specific lymphocytes. PMID:19861533

  1. CXCL10-induced migration of adoptively transferred human natural killer cells toward solid tumors causes regression of tumor growth in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wennerberg, Erik; Kremer, Veronika; Childs, Richard; Lundqvist, Andreas

    2015-02-01

    Adoptive infusion of natural killer (NK) cells is being increasingly explored as a therapy in patients with cancer, although clinical responses are thus far limited to patients with hematological malignancies. Inadequate homing of infused NK cells to the tumor site represents a key factor that may explain the poor anti-tumor effect of NK cell therapy against solid tumors. One of the major players in the regulation of lymphocyte chemotaxis is the chemokine receptor chemokine (C-X-C motif) receptor 3 (CXCR3) which is expressed on activated NK cells and induces NK cell migration toward gradients of the chemokine (C-X-C motif) ligand (CXCL9, 10 and 11). Here, we show that ex vivo expansion of human NK cells results in a tenfold increased expression of the CXCR3 receptor compared with resting NK cells (p = 0.04). Consequently, these NK cells displayed an improved migratory capacity toward solid tumors, which was dependent on tumor-derived CXCL10. In xenograft models, adoptively transferred NK cells showed increased migration toward CXCL10-transfected melanoma tumors compared with CXCL10-negative wild-type tumors, resulting in significantly reduced tumor burden and increased survival (median survival 41 vs. 32 days, p = 0.03). Furthermore, administration of interferon-gamma locally in the tumor stimulated the production of CXCL10 in subcutaneous melanoma tumors resulting in increased infiltration of adoptively transferred CXCR3-positive expanded NK cells. Our findings demonstrate the importance of CXCL10-induced chemoattraction in the anti-tumor response of adoptively transferred expanded NK cells against solid melanoma tumors.

  2. Evaluation of the Therapeutic Potential of Bone Marrow-Derived Myeloid Suppressor Cell (MDSC) Adoptive Transfer in Mouse Models of Autoimmunity and Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Bouchet-Delbos, Laurence; Beriou, Gaelle; Merieau, Emmanuel; Hill, Marcelo; Delneste, Yves; Cuturi, Maria Cristina; Louvet, Cedric

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic use of immunoregulatory cells represents a promising approach for the treatment of uncontrolled immunity. During the last decade, myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) have emerged as novel key regulatory players in the context of tumor growth, inflammation, transplantation or autoimmunity. Recently, MDSC have been successfully generated in vitro from naive mouse bone marrow cells or healthy human PBMCs using minimal cytokine combinations. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the potential of adoptive transfer of such cells to control auto- and allo-immunity in the mouse. Culture of bone marrow cells with GM-CSF and IL-6 consistently yielded a majority of CD11b+Gr1hi/lo cells exhibiting strong inhibition of CD8+ T cell proliferation in vitro. However, adoptive transfer of these cells failed to alter antigen-specific CD8+ T cell proliferation and cytotoxicity in vivo. Furthermore, MDSC could not prevent the development of autoimmunity in a stringent model of type 1 diabetes. Rather, loading the cells prior to injection with a pancreatic neo-antigen peptide accelerated the development of the disease. Contrastingly, in a model of skin transplantation, repeated injection of MDSC or single injection of LPS-activated MDSC resulted in a significant prolongation of allograft survival. The beneficial effect of MDSC infusions on skin graft survival was paradoxically not explained by a decrease of donor-specific T cell response but associated with a systemic over-activation of T cells and antigen presenting cells, prominently in the spleen. Taken together, our results indicate that in vitro generated MDSC bear therapeutic potential but will require additional in vitro factors or adjunct immunosuppressive treatments to achieve safe and more robust immunomodulation upon adoptive transfer. PMID:24927018

  3. Phase I Trial of Adoptive Cell Transfer with Mixed-Profile Type-I/Type-II Allogeneic T Cells for Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Nancy M.; Mossoba, Miriam E.; Steinberg, Seth M.; Fellowes, Vicki; Yan, Xiao-Yi; Hakim, Frances T.; Babb, Rebecca R.; Avila, Daniele; Gea-Banacloche, Juan; Sportès, Claude; Levine, Bruce L.; June, Carl H.; Khuu, Hahn M.; Carpenter, Ashley E.; Krumlauf, Michael C.; Dwyer, Andrew J.; Gress, Ronald E.; Fowler, Daniel H.; Bishop, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE Metastatic breast cancer (MBC) response to allogeneic lymphocytes requires donor T-cell engraftment and is limited by graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). In mice, Type-II-polarized T cells promote engraftment and modulate GVHD whereas Type-I-polarized T cells mediate more potent graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effects. This Phase-I translational study evaluated adoptive transfer of ex-vivo-costimulated Type-I/Type-II (T1/T2) donor T cells with T-cell-depleted (TCD) allogeneic stem-cell transplantation (AlloSCT) for MBC. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN Patients had received anthracycline, taxane and antibody therapies, been treated for metastatic disease and an HLA-identical-sibling donor. Donor lymphocytes were costimulated ex vivo with anti-CD3/anti-CD28 antibody-coated magnetic beads in IL-2/IL-4-supplemented media. Patients received reduced-intensity conditioning, donor stem cells and T1/T2 cells, and monitoring for toxicity, engraftment, GVHD and tumor response; results were compared with historical controls, identically treated except for T1/T2-product infusions. RESULTS Mixed Type-I/Type-II CD4+-T cells predominated in T1/T2 products. Nine patients received T1/T2 cells at Dose-Level 1 (5×106 cells/kg). T-cell donor chimerism reached 100% by a median of 28 days. Seven (78%) developed acute GVHD. At Day +28, five patients had partial responses (56%) and none had MBC progression; thereafter, two patients had continued responses. Donor-T-cell engraftment and tumor responses appeared faster than in historical controls, but GVHD rates were similar and responders progressed early, often following treatment of acute GVHD. CONCLUSION Allogeneic T1/T2 cells were safely infused with TCD-AlloSCT, appeared to promote donor engraftment, and may have contributed to transient early tumor responses. PMID:21948234

  4. Whole-body irradiation increases the magnitude and persistence of adoptively transferred T cells associated with tumor regression in a mouse model of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ward-Kavanagh, Lindsay K.; Zhu, Junjia; Cooper, Timothy K.; Schell, Todd D.

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy has demonstrated efficacy in a subset of clinical and preclinical studies, but the T cells used for therapy often are rendered rapidly non-functional in tumor-bearing hosts. Recent evidence indicates that prostate cancer can be susceptible to immunotherapy, but most studies using autochthonous tumor models demonstrate only short-lived T-cell responses in the tolerogenic prostate microenvironment. Here, we assessed the efficacy of sublethal whole-body irradiation (WBI) to enhance the magnitude and duration of adoptively transferred CD8+ T cells in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) model. We demonstrate that WBI promoted high-level accumulation of granzyme B (GzB)-expressing donor T cells both in lymphoid organs and in the prostate of TRAMP mice. Donor T cells remained responsive to vaccination in irradiated recipients, but a single round of WBI-enhanced adoptive immunotherapy failed to impact significantly the existing disease. Addition of a second round of immunotherapy promoted regression of established disease in half of the treated mice, with no progressions observed. Regression was associated with long-term persistence of effector/memory phenotype CD8+ donor cells. Administration of the second round of adoptive immunotherapy led to reacquisition of GzB expression by persistent T cells from the first transfer. These results indicate that WBI conditioning amplifies tumor-specific T cells in the TRAMP prostate and lymphoid tissue, and suggest that the initial treatment alters the tolerogenic microenvironment to increase antitumor activity by a second wave of donor cells. PMID:24801834

  5. Adoptive transfer of cytotoxic T lymphocytes induced by CD86-transfected tumor cells suppresses multi-organ metastases of C1300 neuroblastoma in mice.

    PubMed

    Enomoto, A; Kato, K; Yagita, H; Okumura, K

    1997-06-01

    In this study, we examined the therapeutic antitumor effect of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) generated against CD86-transfected mouse neuroblastoma C1300. We first generated the transfectant, CD86 + C1300, expressing a high level of mouse CD86 on the cell surface. While CD86 + C1300 cells were rejected in syngeneic A/J mice when inoculated subcutaneously, neither vaccination nor any therapeutic antitumor effect was obtained, implying that C1300 may be a poorly immunogenic tumor. However, in vitro stimulation of splenocytes from either C1300-bearing or CD86 + C1300-rejecting mice with CD86 + C1300 cells resulted in remarkable CTL activity against C1300 cells. The CTL activity induced by CD86 + C1300 was mediated by T cell receptor/CD3 and CD8 and was further enhanced by the addition of interleukin-2. Intravenous inoculation of C1300 cells led to multiple organ metastases including the liver, lung, kidney, ovary, lymph node and bone marrow. To examine the therapeutic effect of CTL in this metastasis model, CTL induced by parental or CD86 + C1300 cells were administrated into C1300-bearing mice. Adoptive transfer of CD86 + C1300-induced CTL resulted in marked elimination of multi-organ metastases and prolonged survival in almost all mice, 70% of which survived indefinitely. These results indicate that adoptive transfer of CTL induced by CD86-transfected tumor cells in vitro would be effective and useful for tumor immunotherapy against poorly immunogenic tumors.

  6. Adoptive cell transfer of contact sensitivity-initiation mediated by nonimmune cells sensitized with monoclonal IgE antibodies. Dependence on host skin mast cells.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, H; Ushio, H; Paliwal, V; Ptak, W; Askenase, P W

    1995-05-15

    A role for mast cell release of serotonin (5-HT), via Ag-specific factors derived from Thy-1+ B220+ lymphoid cells in the initiation of murine contact sensitivity (CS) has been suggested. However, because CS in mast cell-deficient mice was intact, a role for mast cells in CS initiation was unclear. Therefore, we examined whether CS could be initiated by i.v. injection of nonimmune mixed lymphoid cells that were sensitized in vitro with IgE. When naive mice received IgE-sensitized nonimmune spleen or lymph node cells, or IgE-sensitized purified mast cells, together with immune CS-effector B220- T cells, which therefore were depleted of CS-initiating, Thy-1+, B220+ cells, which could not transfer CS, then reconstitution of CS occurred. Mast cell-deficient W/Wv mice could not elicit this IgE-dependent CS ear swelling, but when mast cell deficiency was reversed by ear injection of normal bone marrow-derived cultured mast cells, then CS was restored. In vitro pretreatment with irrelevant monoclonal anti-OVA IgE prevented CS initiation mediated by Ag-specific, IgE mAb-sensitized cells, presumably by blocking sensitization with IgE. Thus Fc epsilon R on the normal lymphoid cells were involved. When ketanserin, a 5-HT2 receptor antagonist, was injected i.v. before cell transfer, CS initiation via IgE-sensitized cells and CS were no longer elicited. Thus, in this system, IgE Abs bound to circulating IgE Fc epsilon R bearing lymphoid cells sensitized in vitro (most likely basophils), probably mediated early activation of these circulating basophils to release mediators, causing 5-HT release from cutaneous mast cells, to mediate CS initiation. PMID:7730614

  7. A single exercise bout enhances the manufacture of viral-specific T-cells from healthy donors: implications for allogeneic adoptive transfer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Spielmann, Guillaume; Bollard, Catherine M.; Kunz, Hawley; Hanley, Patrick J.; Simpson, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infections remain a major cause of morbidity and mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The adoptive transfer of donor-derived viral-specific cytotoxic T-cells (VSTs) is an effective treatment for controlling CMV and EBV infections after HSCT; however, new practical methods are required to augment the ex vivo manufacture of multi-VSTs from healthy donors. This study investigated the effects of a single exercise bout on the ex vivo manufacture of multi-VSTs. PBMCs isolated from healthy CMV/EBV seropositive participants before (PRE) and immediately after (POST) 30-minutes of cycling exercise were stimulated with CMV (pp65 and IE1) and EBV (LMP2A and BMLF1) peptides and expanded over 8 days. The number (fold difference from PRE) of T-cells specific for CMV pp65 (2.6), EBV LMP2A (2.5), and EBV BMLF1 (4.4) was greater among the VSTs expanded POST. VSTs expanded PRE and POST had similar phenotype characteristics and were equally capable of MHC-restricted killing of autologous target cells. We conclude that a single exercise bout enhances the manufacture of multi-VSTs from healthy donors without altering their phenotype or function and may serve as a simple and economical adjuvant to boost the production of multi-VSTs for allogeneic adoptive transfer immunotherapy. PMID:27181409

  8. Efficient tumor regression by adoptively transferred CEA-specific CAR-T cells associated with symptoms of mild cytokine release syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Linan; Ma, Ning; Okamoto, Sachiko; Amaishi, Yasunori; Sato, Eiichi; Seo, Naohiro; Mineno, Junichi; Takesako, Kazutoh; Kato, Takuma; Shiku, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is a cell surface antigen highly expressed in various cancer cell types and in healthy tissues. It has the potential to be a target for chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T-cell therapy; however, the safety of this approach in terms of on-target/off-tumor effects needs to be determined. To address this issue in a clinically relevant model, we used a mouse model in which the T cells expressing CEA-specific CAR were transferred into tumor-bearing CEA-transgenic (Tg) mice that physiologically expressed CEA as a self-antigen. The adoptive transfer in conjunction with lymphodepleting and myeloablative preconditioning mediated significant tumor regression but caused weight loss in CEA-Tg, but not in wild-type mice. The weight loss was not associated with overt inflammation in the CEA-expressing gastrointestinal tract but was associated with malnutrition, reflected in elevated systemic levels of cytokines linked to anorexia, which could be controlled by the administration of an anti-IL-6 receptor monoclonal antibody without compromising efficacy. The apparent relationship between lymphodepleting and myeloablative preconditioning, efficacy, and off-tumor toxicity of CAR-T cells would necessitate the development of CEA-specific CAR-T cells with improved signaling domains that require less stringent preconditioning for their efficacy. Taken together, these results suggest that CEA-specific CAR-based adoptive T-cell therapy may be effective for patients with CEA+ solid tumors. Distinguishing the fine line between therapeutic efficacy and off-tumor toxicity would involve further modifications of CAR-T cells and preconditioning regimens. PMID:27757303

  9. GVHD-associated, inflammasome-mediated loss of function in adoptively transferred myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Koehn, Brent H; Apostolova, Petya; Haverkamp, Jessica M; Miller, Jeffrey S; McCullar, Valarie; Tolar, Jakub; Munn, David H; Murphy, William J; Brickey, Willie June; Serody, Jonathan S; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I; Bronte, Vincenzo; Murray, Peter J; Ting, Jenny P-Y; Zeiser, Robert; Blazar, Bruce R

    2015-09-24

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a naturally occurring immune regulatory population associated with inhibition of ongoing inflammatory responses. In vitro generation of MDSCs from bone marrow has been shown to enhance survival in an acute model of lethal graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). However, donor MDSC infusion only partially ameliorates GVHD lethality. In order to improve the potential therapeutic benefit and ultimately survival outcomes, we set out to investigate the fate of MDSCs after transfer in the setting of acute GVHD (aGVHD). MDSCs transferred to lethally irradiated recipients of allogeneic donor hematopoietic grafts are exposed to an intense inflammatory environment associated with aGVHD, which we now show directly undermines their suppressive capacity. Under a conditioning regimen and GVHD inflammatory settings, MDSCs rapidly lose suppressor function and their potential to inhibit GVHD lethality, which is associated with their induced conversion toward a mature inflammasome-activated state. We find even brief in vitro exposure to inflammasome-activating mediators negates the suppressive potential of cultured murine and human-derived MDSCs. Consistent with a role for the inflammasome, donor MDSCs deficient in the adaptor ASC (apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD), which assembles inflammasome complexes, conferred improved survival of mice developing GVHD compared with wild-type donor MDSCs. These data suggest the use of MDSCs as a therapeutic approach for preventing GVHD and other systemic inflammatory conditions will be more effective when combined with approaches limiting in vivo MDSC inflammasome activation, empowering MDSCs to maintain their suppressive potential.

  10. GVHD-associated, inflammasome-mediated loss of function in adoptively transferred myeloid-derived suppressor cells

    PubMed Central

    Koehn, Brent H.; Apostolova, Petya; Haverkamp, Jessica M.; Miller, Jeffrey S.; McCullar, Valarie; Tolar, Jakub; Munn, David H.; Murphy, William J.; Brickey, Willie June; Serody, Jonathan S.; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I.; Bronte, Vincenzo; Murray, Peter J.; Ting, Jenny P.-Y.; Zeiser, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a naturally occurring immune regulatory population associated with inhibition of ongoing inflammatory responses. In vitro generation of MDSCs from bone marrow has been shown to enhance survival in an acute model of lethal graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). However, donor MDSC infusion only partially ameliorates GVHD lethality. In order to improve the potential therapeutic benefit and ultimately survival outcomes, we set out to investigate the fate of MDSCs after transfer in the setting of acute GVHD (aGVHD). MDSCs transferred to lethally irradiated recipients of allogeneic donor hematopoietic grafts are exposed to an intense inflammatory environment associated with aGVHD, which we now show directly undermines their suppressive capacity. Under a conditioning regimen and GVHD inflammatory settings, MDSCs rapidly lose suppressor function and their potential to inhibit GVHD lethality, which is associated with their induced conversion toward a mature inflammasome-activated state. We find even brief in vitro exposure to inflammasome-activating mediators negates the suppressive potential of cultured murine and human-derived MDSCs. Consistent with a role for the inflammasome, donor MDSCs deficient in the adaptor ASC (apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD), which assembles inflammasome complexes, conferred improved survival of mice developing GVHD compared with wild-type donor MDSCs. These data suggest the use of MDSCs as a therapeutic approach for preventing GVHD and other systemic inflammatory conditions will be more effective when combined with approaches limiting in vivo MDSC inflammasome activation, empowering MDSCs to maintain their suppressive potential. PMID:26265697

  11. Aerosol Delivery of Interleukin-2 in Combination with Adoptive Transfer of Natural Killer Cells for the Treatment of Lung Metastasis: Methodology and Effect.

    PubMed

    Kiany, Simin; Gordon, Nancy

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are a subtype of lymphocytes with a major role as a host defense mechanism against tumor cells. Allogeneic NK cell therapy is being used as an alternative promising therapy for many different cancers. Interleukin-2 (IL-2) is a critical cytokine for NK cell proliferation, survival, and effector functions. Cytokine support is essential to activate, expand, and increase the life span of NK cells. Aerosol delivery of IL-2 in combination with adoptive transfer of NK cells offers a reasonable approach for the treatment of lung metastases as it avoids the deleterious side effects of systemic IL-2. Using a human OS mouse model, we demonstrated the efficacy of this approach. Combination therapy of aerosol IL-2 with NK cells resulted in a better therapeutic effect against OS lung metastases as compared with each therapy alone. Aerosol IL-2 selectively increased infiltration, retention, and proliferation of infused NK cells in the lung, and there was no local inflammation or toxicity in the lungs or any other organ. Our results demonstrate that delivery of IL-2 via the aerosol route offers a feasible and innovative approach to enhance the immunotherapeutic effect of NK cells against pulmonary metastases. In the following chapter, we describe the methodology and effect of this innovative therapeutic approach. PMID:27177675

  12. Vaccination of Lewis rats with temperature-sensitive mutants of Mycoplasma pulmonis: adoptive transfer of immunity by spleen cells but not by sera.

    PubMed Central

    Lai, W C; Bennett, M; Lu, Y S; Pakes, S P

    1991-01-01

    Temperature-sensitive mutant vaccines protect rats against Mycoplasma pulmonis infection. The role of the humoral or cellular immune response in resistance to mycoplasma infection was investigated by adoptive-transfer experiments. Spleen cells from Lewis rats vaccinated but not challenged with wild-type organisms (vaccinated) and spleen cells from rats vaccinated (or not) and challenged were effective in preventing syngeneic recipients from developing respiratory disease. There was also a significant reduction in the incidence and number of challenging organisms in the respiratory system. In contrast, sera from the same donors had no detectable effect on the number of mycoplasmas recovered or on lesion development in the respiratory tract. We conclude that cellular immunity rather than humoral immunity generated in vaccinated rats confers protection against subsequent infection. PMID:1987049

  13. Cutaneous sensitivity induced by immunization with irradiated Schistosoma mansoni cercariae. I. Induction, elicitation, and adoptive transfer analysis of cell-mediated cutaneous sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Ch'ang, L.Y.; Colley, D.G.

    1986-06-01

    Exposure of C57BL/6 mice to highly irradiated (50 kR) cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni leads to the development of partial resistance against subsequent challenge with unattenuated cercariae. We have analyzed the cellular immune responses that occur during the afferent and efferent phases of this protective sensitization. Mice were immunized by exposure to irradiated S. mansoni cercariae. After challenge with irradiated cercariae, delayed-type (18-72 hr) cutaneous sensitivity reaction sites were rich in mononuclear cells and eosinophils. This reactivity was established by 4 days after sensitization, reached its maximum between 7 and 14 days after sensitization, and was maintained for over 20 weeks. These challenge reactions could be abrogated by treatment with either 200 mg/kg cyclophosphamide or 5 mg of hydrocortisone. Syngeneic adoptive transfer of cutaneous sensitivity was accomplished with lymphoid cells from the draining lymph nodes or spleens of mice sensitized 7-14 days previously. Negative selection studies of nylon-wool non-adherent cells from sensitized donors demonstrated that the cells responsible for transferring this eosinophil-rich, delayed-type cutaneous sensitivity to S. mansoni irradiated cercariae were Thy/sup -1 +/, Lyt/sup 1 +/, Lyt/sup 2 -/, surface Ig/sup -/ lymphocytes.

  14. In vivo imaging and quantitation of adoptively transferred human antigen-specific T cells transduced to express a human norepinephrine transporter gene.

    PubMed

    Doubrovin, Mikhail M; Doubrovina, Ekaterina S; Zanzonico, Pat; Sadelain, Michel; Larson, Steven M; O'Reilly, Richard J

    2007-12-15

    Sequential imaging of genetically marked effector cells after adoptive transfer in vivo has greatly enhanced analyses of their biodistribution, growth, and activity both in animal models and in clinical trials of cellular immunotherapy. However, the immunogenicity of cells expressing xenogeneic reporter constructs limits their survival and clinical utility. To address this limitation, we have evaluated a human norepinephrine transporter (hNET) permitting imaging of transduced cells in vivo with a previously approved clinical grade radiolabeled probe, metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG). The hNET gene cDNA was cloned from the SK-N-SH cell line and inserted into a bicistronic retroviral vector also encoding green fluorescent protein. Following transfection, human EBV-specific T lymphocytes seemed fully functional in vitro and also selectively accumulated [(123)I]MIBG. In nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient mice bearing human EBV lymphoma xenografts, as few as 10(4) transduced T cells injected into the tumors could be imaged by single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) or positron emission tomography (PET) after i.v. infusion of [(123)I]MIBG or [(124)I]MIBG, respectively. When hNET(+) EBV-specific T cells were infused i.v., their migration and specific accumulation in EBV(+) tumors expressing their restricting HLA allele could be imaged by SPECT or PET over 28 days. Image intensity was closely correlated with the number of T cells accumulated in targeted tumors. The use of two reporter probes (MIBG and 2'-deoxy-2'-fluoro-beta-d-arabinofuranosyl-5-iodouracil) permitted independent contemporaneous tracking of two distinct EBV-specific T-cell subpopulations expressing different reporter genes (hNET-CD4(+) T cells and HSV-TK-CD8(+) T cells) in the same animal using three-dimensional nuclear modalities (SPECT and PET). The hNET-based system described may thus have significant potential as a nonimmunogenic reporter for extended repeated quantitative in

  15. Graft Versus Leukemia Response Without Graft-versus-host Disease Elicited By Adoptively Transferred Multivirus-specific T-cells

    PubMed Central

    Melenhorst, Jan J; Castillo, Paul; Hanley, Patrick J; Keller, Michael D; Krance, Robert A; Margolin, Judith; Leen, Ann M; Heslop, Helen E; Barrett, A John; Rooney, Cliona M; Bollard, Catherine M

    2015-01-01

    A 12-year-old boy with refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia received a haploidentical transplant from his mother. As prophylaxis for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV) and adenovirus, he received ex vivo expanded virus-specific donor T cells 3.5 months after transplant. Four weeks later leukemic blasts bearing the E2A deletion, identified by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), appeared transiently in the blood followed by a FISH-negative hematological remission, which was sustained until a testicular relapse 3.5 months later. Clearance of the circulating leukemic cells coincided with a marked increase in circulating virus-specific T cells. The virus-specific cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) line showed strong polyfunctional reactivity with the patient's leukemic cells but not phytohemagglutinin (PHA) blasts, suggesting that virus-specific CTL lines may have clinically significant antileukemia activity. PMID:25266309

  16. Safety and persistence of adoptively transferred autologous CD19-targeted T cells in patients with relapsed or chemotherapy refractory B-cell leukemias

    PubMed Central

    Rivière, Isabelle; Park, Jae H.; Davila, Marco L.; Wang, Xiuyan; Stefanski, Jolanta; Taylor, Clare; Yeh, Raymond; Bartido, Shirley; Borquez-Ojeda, Oriana; Olszewska, Malgorzata; Bernal, Yvette; Pegram, Hollie; Przybylowski, Mark; Hollyman, Daniel; Usachenko, Yelena; Pirraglia, Domenick; Hosey, James; Santos, Elmer; Halton, Elizabeth; Maslak, Peter; Scheinberg, David; Jurcic, Joseph; Heaney, Mark; Heller, Glenn; Frattini, Mark; Sadelain, Michel

    2011-01-01

    We report the findings from the first 10 patients with chemotherapy-refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) or relapsed B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) we have enrolled for treatment with autologous T cells modified to express 19-28z, a second-generation chimeric antigen (Ag) receptor specific to the B-cell lineage Ag CD19. Eight of the 9 treated patients tolerated 19-28z+ T-cell infusions well. Three of 4 evaluable patients with bulky CLL who received prior conditioning with cyclophosphamide exhibited either a significant reduction or a mixed response in lymphadenopathy without concomitant development of B-cell aplasia. In contrast, one patient with relapsed ALL who was treated in remission with a similar T-cell dose developed a predicted B-cell aplasia. The short-term persistence of infused T cells was enhanced by prior cyclophosphamide administration and inversely proportional to the peripheral blood tumor burden. Further analyses showed rapid trafficking of modified T cells to tumor and retained ex vivo cytotoxic potential of CD19-targeted T cells retrieved 8 days after infusion. We conclude that this adoptive T-cell approach is promising and more likely to show clinical benefit in the setting of prior conditioning chemotherapy and low tumor burden or minimal residual disease. These studies are registered at www.clinicaltrials.org as #NCT00466531 (CLL protocol) and #NCT01044069 (B-ALL protocol). PMID:21849486

  17. Serum CEACAM1 Elevation Correlates with Melanoma Progression and Failure to Respond to Adoptive Cell Transfer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ortenberg, R.; Sapoznik, S.; Zippel, D.; Shapira-Frommer, R.; Itzhaki, O.; Kubi, A.; Zikich, D.; Besser, M. J.; Schachter, J.; Markel, G.

    2015-01-01

    Malignant melanoma is a devastating disease whose incidences are continuously rising. The recently approved antimelanoma therapies carry new hope for metastatic patients for the first time in decades. However, the clinical management of melanoma is severely hampered by the absence of effective screening tools. The expression of the CEACAM1 adhesion molecule on melanoma cells is a strong predictor of poor prognosis. Interestingly, a melanoma-secreted form of CEACAM1 (sCEACAM1) has recently emerged as a potential tumor biomarker. Here we add novel evidences supporting the prognostic role of serum CEACAM1 by using a mice xenograft model of human melanoma and showing a correlation between serum CEACAM1 and tumor burden. Moreover, we demonstrate that serum CEACAM1 is elevated over time in progressive melanoma patients who fail to respond to immunotherapy as opposed to responders and stable disease patients, thus proving a correlation between sCEACAM1, response to treatment, and clinical deterioration. PMID:26688824

  18. Role of memory T cell subsets for adoptive immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Busch, Dirk H; Fräßle, Simon P; Sommermeyer, Daniel; Buchholz, Veit R; Riddell, Stanley R

    2016-02-01

    Adoptive transfer of primary (unmodified) or genetically engineered antigen-specific T cells has demonstrated astonishing clinical results in the treatment of infections and some malignancies. Besides the definition of optimal targets and antigen receptors, the differentiation status of transferred T cells is emerging as a crucial parameter for generating cell products with optimal efficacy and safety profiles. Long-living memory T cells subdivide into phenotypically as well as functionally different subsets (e.g. central memory, effector memory, tissue-resident memory T cells). This diversification process is crucial for effective immune protection, with probably distinct dependencies on the presence of individual subsets dependent on the disease to which the immune response is directed as well as its organ location. Adoptive T cell therapy intends to therapeutically transfer defined T cell immunity into patients. Efficacy of this approach often requires long-term maintenance of transferred cells, which depends on the presence and persistence of memory T cells. However, engraftment and survival of highly differentiated memory T cell subsets upon adoptive transfer is still difficult to achieve. Therefore, the recent observation that a distinct subset of weakly differentiated memory T cells shows all characteristics of adult tissue stem cells and can reconstitute all types of effector and memory T cell subsets, became highly relevant. We here review our current understanding of memory subset formation and T cell subset purification, and its implications for adoptive immunotherapy.

  19. The presence and preferential activation of Tregs diminishes adoptive transfer of autoimmune diabetes by polyclonal NOD T cell effectors into NSG versus NOD-scid mice1

    PubMed Central

    Presa, Maximiliano; Chen, Yi-Guang; Grier, Alexandra E.; Leiter, Edward H.; Brehm, Michael A.; Greiner, Dale L.; Shultz, Leonard D.; Serreze, David V.

    2015-01-01

    NOD-scid.Il2rgnull (NSG) mice are currently being used as recipients to screen for pathogenic autoreactive T-cells in Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) patients. We questioned whether the restriction of IL-2 receptor gamma chain (Il-2rγ) dependent cytokine signaling only to donor cells in NSG recipients differently influenced the activities of transferred diabetogenic T-cells when they were introduced as a monoclonal/oligoclonal population versus being part of a polyclonal repertoire. Unexpectedly, a significantly decreased T1D transfer by splenocytes from prediabetic NOD donors was observed in Il2rγnull -NSG versus Il2rγ-intact standard NOD-scid recipients. In contrast, NOD-derived monoclonal/oligoclonal TCR transgenic ß-cell autoreactive T-cells in either the CD8 (AI4, NY8.3) or CD4 (BDC2.5) compartments transferred disease significantly more rapidly to NSG than to NOD-scid recipients. The reduced diabetes transfer efficiency by polyclonal T cells in NSG recipients was associated with enhanced activation of regulatory T-cells (Tregs) mediated by NSG myeloid APC. This enhanced suppressor activity was associated with higher levels of Treg GITR expression in the presence of NSG than NOD-scid APC. These collective results indicate NSG recipients might be efficiently employed to test the activity of T1D patient-derived ß-cell autoreactive T-cell clones and lines, but when screening for pathogenic effectors within polyclonal populations, Tregs should be removed from the transfer inoculum to avoid false negative results. PMID:26283479

  20. Adoptive T-cell Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Gottschalk, Stephen; Rooney, Cliona

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with a range of malignancies involving B-cells, T-cells, natural killer (NK)-cells, epithelial cells and smooth muscle. All of these are associated with the latent life cycles of EBV, but the pattern of latency-associated viral antigens expressed in tumor cells depends on the type of tumor. EBV-specific T cells (EBVSTs) have been explored as prophylaxis and therapy for EBV-associated malignancies for more than two decades. EBVSTs have been most successful as prophylaxis and therapy for post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD), which expresses the full array of latent EBV antigens (type 3 latency), in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. While less effective, clinical studies have also demonstrated their therapeutic potential for PTLD post solid organ transplant, and for EBV-associated malignancies such as Hodgkin’s Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma, and nasopharyngeal carcinoma that express a limited array of latent EBV antigens (type 2 latency),. Several approaches are actively being pursued to improve the antitumor activity of EBVSTs including activation and expansion of T cells specific for the EBV antigens expressed in type 2 latency, genetic approaches to render EBVSTs resistant to the immunosuppressive tumor environment and combination approaches with other immune-modulating modalities. Given the recent advances and renewed interest in cell therapy, we hope that EBVSTs will become an integral part of our treatment armamentarium against EBV-positive malignancies in the near future. PMID:26428384

  1. Whole-body imaging of adoptively transferred T cells using magnetic resonance imaging, single photon emission computed tomography and positron emission tomography techniques, with a focus on regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Leech, J M; Sharif-Paghaleh, E; Maher, J; Livieratos, L; Lechler, R I; Mullen, G E; Lombardi, G; Smyth, L A

    2013-01-01

    Cell-based therapies using natural or genetically modified regulatory T cells (Tregs) have shown significant promise as immune-based therapies. One of the main difficulties facing the further advancement of these therapies is that the fate and localization of adoptively transferred Tregs is largely unknown. The ability to dissect the migratory pathway of these cells in a non-invasive manner is of vital importance for the further development of in-vivo cell-based immunotherapies, as this technology allows the fate of the therapeutically administered cell to be imaged in real time. In this review we will provide an overview of the current clinical imaging techniques used to track T cells and Tregs in vivo, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET)/single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). In addition, we will discuss how the finding of these studies can be used, in the context of transplantation, to define the most appropriate Treg subset required for cellular therapy. PMID:23574314

  2. Information Transfer and the Adoption of Agricultural Innovations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longo, Rose Mary Juliano

    1990-01-01

    Data collected in the Federal District of Brazil were analyzed in terms of information transfer through mass media and interpersonal communication and how they influence farmers in the Federal District of Brazil in their decisions to adopt agricultural innovations. (42 references) (EAM)

  3. Principles of adoptive T cell cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    June, Carl H.

    2007-01-01

    The transfusion of T cells, also called adoptive T cell therapy, is an effective treatment for viral infections and has induced regression of cancer in early-stage clinical trials. However, recent advances in cellular immunology and tumor biology are guiding new approaches to adoptive T cell therapy. For example, use of engineered T cells is being tested as a strategy to improve the functions of effector and memory T cells, and manipulation of the host to overcome immunotoxic effects in the tumor microenvironment has led to promising results in early-stage clinical trials. Challenges that face the field and must be addressed before adoptive T cell therapy can be translated into routine clinical practice are discussed. PMID:17476350

  4. IL-2 / α-IL-2 Complex Treatment Cannot Be Substituted for the Adoptive Transfer of Regulatory T cells to Promote Bone Marrow Engraftment

    PubMed Central

    Mahr, Benedikt; Unger, Lukas; Hock, Karin; Pilat, Nina; Baranyi, Ulrike; Schwarz, Christoph; Maschke, Svenja; Farkas, Andreas Michael; Wekerle, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Cell therapy with recipient Tregs achieves engraftment of allogeneic bone marrow (BM) without the need for cytoreductive conditioning (i.e., without irradiation or cytotoxic drugs). Thereby mixed chimerism and transplantation tolerance are established in recipients conditioned solely with costimulation blockade and rapamycin. However, clinical translation would be substantially facilitated if Treg-stimulating pharmaceutical agents could be used instead of individualized cell therapy. Recently, it was shown that interleukin-2 (IL-2) complexed with a monoclonal antibody (mAb) (clone JES6-1A12) against IL-2 (IL-2 complexes) potently expands and activates Tregs in vivo. Therefore, we investigated whether IL-2 complexes can replace Treg therapy in a costimulation blockade-based and irradiation-free BM transplantation (BMT) model. Unexpectedly, the administration of IL-2 complexes at the time of BMT (instead of Tregs) failed to induce BM engraftment in non-irradiated recipients (0/6 with IL-2 complexes vs. 3/4 with Tregs, p<0.05). Adding IL-2 complexes to an otherwise effective regimen involving recipient irradiation (1Gy) but no Treg transfer indeed actively triggered donor BM rejection at higher doses (0/8 with IL-2 complexes vs. 9/11 without, p<0.01) and had no detectable effect at two lower doses (3/5 vs. 9/11, p>0.05). CD8 T cells and NK cells of IL-2 complex-treated naïve mice showed an enhanced proliferative response towards donor antigens in vitro despite the marked expansion of Tregs. However, IL-2 complexes also expanded conventional CD4 T cells, CD8 T cells, NK cells, NKT cells and notably even B cells, albeit to a lesser extent. Notably, IL-2 complex expanded Tregs featured less potent suppressive functions than in vitro activated Tregs in terms of T cell suppression in vitro and BM engraftment in vivo. In conclusion, these data suggest that IL-2 complexes are less effective than recipient Tregs in promoting BM engraftment and in contrast actually trigger BM

  5. IL-2/α-IL-2 Complex Treatment Cannot Be Substituted for the Adoptive Transfer of Regulatory T cells to Promote Bone Marrow Engraftment.

    PubMed

    Mahr, Benedikt; Unger, Lukas; Hock, Karin; Pilat, Nina; Baranyi, Ulrike; Schwarz, Christoph; Maschke, Svenja; Farkas, Andreas Michael; Wekerle, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Cell therapy with recipient Tregs achieves engraftment of allogeneic bone marrow (BM) without the need for cytoreductive conditioning (i.e., without irradiation or cytotoxic drugs). Thereby mixed chimerism and transplantation tolerance are established in recipients conditioned solely with costimulation blockade and rapamycin. However, clinical translation would be substantially facilitated if Treg-stimulating pharmaceutical agents could be used instead of individualized cell therapy. Recently, it was shown that interleukin-2 (IL-2) complexed with a monoclonal antibody (mAb) (clone JES6-1A12) against IL-2 (IL-2 complexes) potently expands and activates Tregs in vivo. Therefore, we investigated whether IL-2 complexes can replace Treg therapy in a costimulation blockade-based and irradiation-free BM transplantation (BMT) model. Unexpectedly, the administration of IL-2 complexes at the time of BMT (instead of Tregs) failed to induce BM engraftment in non-irradiated recipients (0/6 with IL-2 complexes vs. 3/4 with Tregs, p<0.05). Adding IL-2 complexes to an otherwise effective regimen involving recipient irradiation (1Gy) but no Treg transfer indeed actively triggered donor BM rejection at higher doses (0/8 with IL-2 complexes vs. 9/11 without, p<0.01) and had no detectable effect at two lower doses (3/5 vs. 9/11, p>0.05). CD8 T cells and NK cells of IL-2 complex-treated naïve mice showed an enhanced proliferative response towards donor antigens in vitro despite the marked expansion of Tregs. However, IL-2 complexes also expanded conventional CD4 T cells, CD8 T cells, NK cells, NKT cells and notably even B cells, albeit to a lesser extent. Notably, IL-2 complex expanded Tregs featured less potent suppressive functions than in vitro activated Tregs in terms of T cell suppression in vitro and BM engraftment in vivo. In conclusion, these data suggest that IL-2 complexes are less effective than recipient Tregs in promoting BM engraftment and in contrast actually trigger BM

  6. Engineering antitumor immunity by T-cell adoptive immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Riddell, Stanley R

    2007-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of antigen-specific T cells has been used successfully to treat experimental tumors in animal models and viral infections in humans, but harnessing the exquisite specificity and potency of T cells to treat human malignancy has proven challenging. The efforts to use T cells to treat patients with cancer have often been informative in identifying limitations that must be overcome to improve therapeutic efficacy, and a clearer picture of the requirements for successful adoptive T-cell transfer is gradually emerging. Indolent and a subset of aggressive B-cell lymphomas in humans have been shown to be susceptible to eradication by T cells in clinical settings where highly immunogenic minor histocompatibility or viral antigens are presented by tumor cells. In this article, we will review how recent advances in our understanding of the properties of antigen-specific T cells that facilitate their long-term persistence in vivo and reversion to the memory pool after in vitro culture, combined with approaches to molecularly engineer T cells with receptors that target molecules expressed by B-cell lymphoma, are providing opportunities to broaden the application of T-cell therapy and improve its efficacy for this disease.

  7. Expansion and Homing of Adoptively Transferred Human NK Cells in Immunodeficient Mice Varies with Product Preparation and In Vivo Cytokine Administration: Implications for Clinical Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jeffrey S.; Rooney, Cliona M; Curtsinger, Julie; McElmurry, Ron; McCullar, Valarie; Verneris, Michael R.; Lapteva, Natalia; McKenna, David; Wagner, John E.; Blazar, Bruce R.; Tolar, Jakub

    2014-01-01

    NK cell efficacy correlates with in vivo proliferation and we hypothesize that NK cell product manipulations may optimize this endpoint. Xenotransplantation was used to compare GMP grade freshly activated NK cells (FA-NK) and ex vivo expanded NK cells (Ex-NK). Cells were infused into NSG mice followed by IL-2, IL-15, or no cytokines. Evaluation of blood, spleen and marrow showed that persistence and expansion was cytokine dependent, IL-15 being superior to IL-2. Cryopreservation and immediate infusion resulted in less cytotoxicity and fewer NK cells in vivo and this could be rescued in FA-NK by overnight culture and testing the next day. Marked differences in the kinetics and homing of FA-NK versus Ex-NK were apparent: FA-NK cells preferentially homed to spleen, and persisted longer after cytokine withdrawal. These data would suggest that cryopreservation of FA-NK and Ex-NK is detrimental and that culture conditions profoundly affect homing, persistence and expansion of NK cells in vivo. The NSG mouse model is an adjuvant to in vitro assays prior to clinical testing. PMID:24816582

  8. Production of genetically modified Epstein-Barr virus-specific cytotoxic T cells for adoptive transfer to patients at high risk of EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disease.

    PubMed

    Smith, C A; Ng, C Y; Heslop, H E; Holladay, M S; Richardson, S; Turner, E V; Loftin, S K; Li, C; Brenner, M K; Rooney, C M

    1995-04-01

    EBV-induced lymphoproliferative disease (EBV-LPD) is a disorder most commonly associated with the immunocompromise that follows allogeneic organ transplantation. In patients receiving T cell-depleted bone marrow from HLA-mismatched or HLA-matched unrelated donors, the incidence of EBV-LPD is particularly high, ranging from 5 to 30%. Administration of EBV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes may be one means of preventing and treating this disease. We now describe a method that allows the routine and timely preparation of large numbers of such cells to allow their safe administration to bone marrow transplant recipients. We also describe how these cells may be genetically marked before infusion, to determine their fate and disposition in vivo.

  9. Adoption

    MedlinePlus

    ... the birth nor adoptive parents know the others' identities. Other adoptions are handled more openly. Open adoptions, ... desire to seek out more information about the identity of the birth family. Most of us (whether ...

  10. The Presence and Preferential Activation of Regulatory T Cells Diminish Adoptive Transfer of Autoimmune Diabetes by Polyclonal Nonobese Diabetic (NOD) T Cell Effectors into NSG versus NOD-scid Mice.

    PubMed

    Presa, Maximiliano; Chen, Yi-Guang; Grier, Alexandra E; Leiter, Edward H; Brehm, Michael A; Greiner, Dale L; Shultz, Leonard D; Serreze, David V

    2015-10-01

    NOD-scid.Il2rg(null) (NSG) mice are currently being used as recipients to screen for pathogenic autoreactive T cells in type 1 diabetes (T1D) patients. We questioned whether the restriction of IL-2R γ-chain (Il-2rγ)-dependent cytokine signaling only to donor cells in NSG recipients differently influenced the activities of transferred diabetogenic T cells when they were introduced as a monoclonal/oligoclonal population versus being part of a polyclonal repertoire. Unexpectedly, a significantly decreased T1D transfer by splenocytes from prediabetic NOD donors was observed in Il-2rγ(null)-NSG versus Il-2rγ-intact standard NOD-scid recipients. In contrast, NOD-derived monoclonal/oligoclonal TCR transgenic β cell-autoreactive T cells in either the CD8 (AI4, NY8.3) or CD4 (BDC2.5) compartments transferred disease significantly more rapidly to NSG than to NOD-scid recipients. The reduced diabetes transfer efficiency by polyclonal T cells in NSG recipients was associated with enhanced activation of regulatory T cells (Tregs) mediated by NSG myeloid APC. This enhanced suppressor activity was associated with higher levels of Treg GITR expression in the presence of NSG than NOD-scid APC. These collective results indicate NSG recipients might be efficiently employed to test the activity of T1D patient-derived β cell-autoreactive T cell clones and lines, but, when screening for pathogenic effectors within polyclonal populations, Tregs should be removed from the transfer inoculum to avoid false-negative results.

  11. PET imaging of adoptive progenitor cell therapies.

    SciTech Connect

    Gelovani, Juri G.

    2008-05-13

    Objectives. The overall objective of this application is to develop novel technologies for non-invasive imaging of adoptive stem cell-based therapies with positron emission tomography (PET) that would be applicable to human patients. To achieve this objective, stem cells will be genetically labeled with a PET-reporter gene and repetitively imaged to assess their distribution, migration, differentiation, and persistence using a radiolabeled reporter probe. This new imaging technology will be tested in adoptive progenitor cell-based therapy models in animals, including: delivery pro-apoptotic genes to tumors, and T-cell reconstitution for immunostimulatory therapy during allogeneic bone marrow progenitor cell transplantation. Technical and Scientific Merits. Non-invasive whole body imaging would significantly aid in the development and clinical implementation of various adoptive progenitor cell-based therapies by providing the means for non-invasive monitoring of the fate of injected progenitor cells over a long period of observation. The proposed imaging approaches could help to address several questions related to stem cell migration and homing, their long-term viability, and their subsequent differentiation. The ability to image these processes non-invasively in 3D and repetitively over a long period of time is very important and will help the development and clinical application of various strategies to control and direct stem cell migration and differentiation. Approach to accomplish the work. Stem cells will be genetically with a reporter gene which will allow for repetitive non-invasive “tracking” of the migration and localization of genetically labeled stem cells and their progeny. This is a radically new approach that is being developed for future human applications and should allow for a long term (many years) repetitive imaging of the fate of tissues that develop from the transplanted stem cells. Why the approach is appropriate. The novel approach to

  12. Adoptive transfer of cytotoxic T lymphocytes targeting two different antigens limits antigen loss and tumor escape.

    PubMed

    Kaluza, Karen M; Kottke, Timothy; Diaz, Rosa Maria; Rommelfanger, Diana; Thompson, Jill; Vile, Richard

    2012-10-01

    An antitumor T-cell response can lead to tumor control without clearing all tumor cells. As long as residual tumor cells remain, there is a constant risk of escape from that T-cell response. We previously showed that adoptive transfer of anti-ova OT-I T cells into B16ova-bearing mice led to tumor regression followed by escape of tumors that had lost the ova gene, rendering the OT-I T cells ineffective. In this study, we hypothesized that simultaneous transfer of cytotoxic T lymphocytes targeted against two independent antigens would reduce selection for single-antigen-loss cells, thereby limiting tumor escape. Using OT-I and Pmel T cells to treat B16ova tumors, we found that early cotransfer could prevent tumor emergence in most mice, whereas neither T-cell specificity alone was able to do so. When combined with total body irradiation for the treatment of larger 7-day tumors, cotransfer was also better at limiting tumor recurrence, and the tumors that did escape combination therapy continued to express both target antigens. As adoptively transferred T cells also persisted in vivo, even in mice with recurrent tumors, we hypothesized that restimulation of these antitumor T cells would prolong survival of mice with recurrent tumors. Consistent with this hypothesis, administration of a low-dose regimen of cyclophosphamide following tumor escape slowed tumor growth in mice that had previously received T-cell therapy, but not in control-treated mice, an effect that was associated with increased activation of T cells in vitro by low- but not high-dose cyclophosphamide.

  13. New cell sources for T cell engineering and adoptive immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Themeli, Maria; Rivière, Isabelle; Sadelain, Michel

    2015-04-01

    The promising clinical results obtained with engineered T cells, including chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) therapy, call for further advancements to facilitate and broaden their applicability. One potentially beneficial innovation is to exploit new T cell sources that reduce the need for autologous cell manufacturing and enable cell transfer across histocompatibility barriers. Here we review emerging T cell engineering approaches that utilize alternative T cell sources, which include virus-specific or T cell receptor-less allogeneic T cells, expanded lymphoid progenitors, and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived T lymphocytes. The latter offer the prospect for true off-the-shelf, genetically enhanced, histocompatible cell therapy products.

  14. Improvement of adoptive cellular immunotherapy of human cancer using ex-vivo gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Paul, Stephane; Calmels, Bastien; Acres, R Bruce

    2002-02-01

    A variety of adoptive cellular strategies, aimed at boosting the immune system, have been tested in the management of metastatic diseases. Despite the drawbacks associated with ex vivo cell manipulation and upscaling, several such approaches have been assessed in the clinic. The use of lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells, auto-lymphocyte therapy (ALT) and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) have been the best studied and further trials are ongoing. Thus far, these approaches have not consistently shown benefit when compared to standard immune-based treatment with biologic response modifiers, notably, high-dose interleukin-2 (IL-2). More recently, it has been shown, in various animal models, that the ex vivo transfer of genes to cells of the immune system can have a dramatic impact on cancer immunotherapy. The application of gene transfer techniques to immunotherapy has animated the field of cell-based cancer therapy research. A wide variety of viral and non-viral gene transfer methods have been investigated in this context. Ex vivo strategies include gene delivery into tumor cells and into cellular components of the immune system, including cytotoxic T cells, NK, macrophages and dendritic cells (DC). Several of these approaches have already been translated into cancer therapy clinical trials. In this review, we focus on the rationale and types of ex vivo gene-based immunotherapy of cancer. Finally, the use of genetically modified DC for tumor vaccination and its prospects are discussed. PMID:12108977

  15. Protection against rat vaginal candidiasis by adoptive transfer of vaginal B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    De Bernardis, Flavia; Santoni, Giorgio; Boccanera, Maria; Lucciarini, Roberta; Arancia, Silvia; Sandini, Silvia; Amantini, Consuelo; Cassone, Antonio

    2010-06-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis is a mucosal infection affecting many women, but the immune mechanisms operating against Candida albicans at the mucosal level remain unknown. A rat model was employed to further characterize the contribution of B and T cells to anti-Candida vaginal protection. Particularly, the protective role of vaginal B cells was studied by means of adoptive transfer of vaginal CD3(-) CD5(+) IgM(+) cells from Candida-immunized rats to naïve animals. This passive transfer of B cells resulted into a number of vaginal C. albicans CFU approximately 50% lower than their controls. Sorted CD3(-) CD5(+) IgM(+) vaginal B lymphocytes from Candida-infected rats proliferated in response to stimulation with an immunodominant mannoprotein (MP) antigen of the fungus. Importantly, anti-MP antibodies and antibody-secreting B cells were detected in the supernatant and cell cultures, respectively, of vaginal B lymphocytes from infected rats incubated in vitro with vaginal T cells and stimulated with MP. No such specific antibodies were found when using vaginal B cells from uninfected rats. Furthermore, inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-6 and IL-10, were found in the supernatant of vaginal B cells from infected rats. These data are evidence of a partial anti-Candida protective role of CD3(-) CD5(+) IgM(+) vaginal B lymphocytes in our experimental model.

  16. BET bromodomain inhibition enhances T cell persistence and function in adoptive immunotherapy models.

    PubMed

    Kagoya, Yuki; Nakatsugawa, Munehide; Yamashita, Yuki; Ochi, Toshiki; Guo, Tingxi; Anczurowski, Mark; Saso, Kayoko; Butler, Marcus O; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Hirano, Naoto

    2016-09-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy is a potentially curative therapeutic approach for patients with advanced cancer. However, the in vitro expansion of antitumor T cells prior to infusion inevitably incurs differentiation towards effector T cells and impairs persistence following adoptive transfer. Epigenetic profiles regulate gene expression of key transcription factors over the course of immune cell differentiation, proliferation, and function. Using comprehensive screening of chemical probes with defined epigenetic targets, we found that JQ1, an inhibitor of bromodomain and extra-terminal motif (BET) proteins, maintained CD8+ T cells with functional properties of stem cell-like and central memory T cells. Mechanistically, the BET protein BRD4 directly regulated expression of the transcription factor BATF in CD8+ T cells, which was associated with differentiation of T cells into an effector memory phenotype. JQ1-treated T cells showed enhanced persistence and antitumor effects in murine T cell receptor and chimeric antigen receptor gene therapy models. Furthermore, we found that histone acetyltransferase p300 supported the recruitment of BRD4 to the BATF promoter region, and p300 inhibition similarly augmented antitumor effects of the adoptively transferred T cells. These results demonstrate that targeting the BRD4-p300 signaling cascade supports the generation of superior antitumor T cell grafts for adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:27548527

  17. Lowest numbers of primary CD8(+) T cells can reconstitute protective immunity upon adoptive immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Stemberger, Christian; Graef, Patricia; Odendahl, Marcus; Albrecht, Julia; Dössinger, Georg; Anderl, Florian; Buchholz, Veit R; Gasteiger, Georg; Schiemann, Matthias; Grigoleit, Götz U; Schuster, Friedhelm R; Borkhardt, Arndt; Versluys, Birgitta; Tonn, Torsten; Seifried, Erhard; Einsele, Hermann; Germeroth, Lothar; Busch, Dirk H; Neuenhahn, Michael

    2014-07-24

    Patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) are threatened by potentially lethal viral manifestations like cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivation. Because the success of today's virostatic treatment is limited by side effects and resistance development, adoptive transfer of virus-specific memory T cells derived from the stem cell donor has been proposed as an alternative therapeutic strategy. In this context, dose minimization of adoptively transferred T cells might be warranted for the avoidance of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), in particular in prophylactic settings after T-cell-depleting allo-HSCT protocols. To establish a lower limit for successful adoptive T-cell therapy, we conducted low-dose CD8(+) T-cell transfers in the well-established murine Listeria monocytogenes (L.m.) infection model. Major histocompatibility complex-Streptamer-enriched antigen-specific CD62L(hi) but not CD62L(lo) CD8(+) memory T cells proliferated, differentiated, and protected against L.m. infections after prophylactic application. Even progenies derived from a single CD62L(hi) L.m.-specific CD8(+) T cell could be protective against bacterial challenge. In analogy, low-dose transfers of Streptamer-enriched human CMV-specific CD8(+) T cells into allo-HSCT recipients led to strong pathogen-specific T-cell expansion in a compassionate-use setting. In summary, low-dose adoptive T-cell transfer (ACT) could be a promising strategy, particularly for prophylactic treatment of infectious complications after allo-HSCT.

  18. Adoptive T-cell therapy for cancer: The era of engineered T cells.

    PubMed

    Bonini, Chiara; Mondino, Anna

    2015-09-01

    Tumors originate from a number of genetic events that deregulate homeostatic mechanisms controlling normal cell behavior. The immune system, devoted to patrol the organism against pathogenic events, can identify transformed cells, and in several cases cause their elimination. It is however clear that several mechanisms encompassing both central and peripheral tolerance limit antitumor immunity, often resulting into progressive diseases. Adoptive T-cell therapy with either allogeneic or autologous T cells can transfer therapeutic immunity. To date, genetic engineering of T cells appears to be a powerful tool for shaping tumor immunity. In this review, we discuss the most recent achievements in the areas of suicide gene therapy, and TCR-modified T cells and chimeric antigen receptor gene-modified T cells. We provide an overview of current strategies aimed at improving the safety and efficacy of these approaches, with an outlook on prospective developments.

  19. Lymphocyte function associated antigen-1, integrin alpha 4, and L-selectin mediate T-cell homing to the pancreas in the model of adoptive transfer of diabetes in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Fabien, N; Bergerot, I; Orgiazzi, J; Thivolet, C

    1996-09-01

    The involvement of adhesion molecule in the process of T-cell homing to the pancreas was investigated in the model of the T-cell transfer of type I diabetes in NOD mice. Treatment of mice using monoclonal anti-lymphocyte function associated antigen (LFA)-1, anti-integrin alpha 4, anti-intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, and anti-L-selectin antibodies (monoclonal antibodies [mAbs]) gave rise to a partial or complete prevention of diabetes via different mechanisms of protection. On day 20 posttransfer, diabetes was only observed in control mice (26 of 32) and in few mice treated with the anti-L-selectin mAbs (3 of 24). On day 60, the best protection was observed using the anti-LFA-1 or the anti-integrin alpha 4 mAbs with 3 of 11 and 2 of 5 diabetic mice, respectively. On day 20, no insulitis was observed in the pancreases of mice treated with these mAbs compared with the pancreases of controls, suggesting that such treatment blocked the penetration of T-cells into the islets. In vitro adhesion assays confirmed that adhesion of T-cells to the pancreatic endothelium was blocked, except when using the anti-L-selectin mAb, which induced a modification of the traffic of the transferred T-cells; the ability of T-cells to migrate into the pancreatic lymph nodes was significantly reduced (10.4 vs. 22%). Anti-LFA-1 mAbs did not modify such T-cell trafficking. The present study, therefore, elucidates the role of LFA-1, integrin alpha 4, and L-selectin in T-cell homing to the pancreas, first step of the cascade of events leading to type I diabetes. PMID:8772719

  20. Adoptive transfer of autologous, HER2-specific, cytotoxic T lymphocytes for the treatment of HER2-overexpressing breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bernhard, Helga; Neudorfer, Julia; Gebhard, Kerstin; Conrad, Heinke; Hermann, Christine; Nährig, Jörg; Fend, Falko; Weber, Wolfgang; Busch, Dirk H; Peschel, Christian

    2008-02-01

    The human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) has been targeted as a breast cancer-associated antigen by immunotherapeutical approaches based on HER2-directed monoclonal antibodies and cancer vaccines. We describe the adoptive transfer of autologous HER2-specific T-lymphocyte clones to a patient with metastatic HER2-overexpressing breast cancer. The HLA/multimer-based monitoring of the transferred T lymphocytes revealed that the T cells rapidly disappeared from the peripheral blood. The imaging studies indicated that the T cells accumulated in the bone marrow (BM) and migrated to the liver, but were unable to penetrate into the solid metastases. The disseminated tumor cells in the BM disappeared after the completion of adoptive T-cell therapy. This study suggests the therapeutic potential for HER2-specific T cells for eliminating disseminated HER2-positive tumor cells and proposes the combination of T cell-based therapies with strategies targeting the tumor stroma to improve T-cell infiltration into solid tumors. PMID:17646988

  1. Adoptive T Cell Therapy Targeting CD1 and MR1

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Tingxi; Chamoto, Kenji; Hirano, Naoto

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive T cell immunotherapy has demonstrated clinically relevant efficacy in treating malignant and infectious diseases. However, much of these therapies have been focused on enhancing, or generating de novo, effector functions of conventional T cells recognizing HLA molecules. Given the heterogeneity of HLA alleles, mismatched patients are ineligible for current HLA-restricted adoptive T cell therapies. CD1 and MR1 are class I-like monomorphic molecules and their restricted T cells possess unique T cell receptor specificity against entirely different classes of antigens. CD1 and MR1 molecules present lipid and vitamin B metabolite antigens, respectively, and offer a new front of targets for T cell therapies. This review will cover the recent progress in the basic research of CD1, MR1, and their restricted T cells that possess translational potential. PMID:26052329

  2. Sodium phenylacetate inhibits adoptive transfer of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis in SJL/J mice at multiple steps.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Subhajit; Zhou, You; Jana, Malabendu; Banik, Naren L; Pahan, Kalipada

    2003-04-01

    Experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) is the animal model for multiple sclerosis. The present study underlines the importance of sodium phenylacetate (NaPA), a drug approved for urea cycle disorders, in inhibiting the disease process of adoptively transferred EAE in female SJL/J mice at multiple steps. Myelin basic protein (MBP)-primed T cells alone induced the expression of NO synthase (iNOS) and the activation of NF-kappaB in mouse microglial cells through cell-cell contact. However, pretreatment of MBP-primed T cells with NaPA markedly inhibited its ability to induce microglial expression of iNOS and activation of NF-kappaB. Consistently, adoptive transfer of MBP-primed T cells, but not that of NaPA-pretreated MBP-primed T cells, induced the clinical symptoms of EAE in female SJL/J mice. Furthermore, MBP-primed T cells isolated from NaPA-treated donor mice were also less efficient than MBP-primed T cells isolated from normal donor mice in inducing iNOS in microglial cells and transferring EAE to recipient mice. Interestingly, clinical symptoms of EAE were much less in mice receiving NaPA through drinking water than those without NaPA. Similar to NaPA, sodium phenylbutyrate, a chemically synthesized precursor of NaPA, also inhibited the disease process of EAE. Histological and immunocytochemical analysis showed that NaPA inhibited EAE-induced spinal cord mononuclear cell invasion and normalized iNOS, nitrotyrosine, and p65 (the RelA subunit of NF-kappaB) expression within the spinal cord. Taken together, our results raise the possibility that NaPA or sodium phenylbutyrate taken through drinking water or milk may reduce the observed neuroinflammation and disease process in multiple sclerosis patients. PMID:12646656

  3. Adoptive T cell therapy promotes the emergence of genomically altered tumor escape variants.

    PubMed

    Kaluza, Karen M; Thompson, Jill M; Kottke, Timothy J; Flynn Gilmer, Heather C; Knutson, Darlene L; Vile, Richard G

    2012-08-15

    Adoptive T cell therapy has been proven effective against melanoma in mice and humans. However, because most responses are incomplete or transient, cures remain rare. To maximize the efficacy of this therapy, it will be essential to gain a better understanding of the processes which result in tumor relapse. We studied these processes using B16ova murine melanoma and adoptive transfer of OT-I T cells. Transfer of T cells as a single therapy provided a significant survival benefit for mice with established subcutaneous tumors. However, tumors which initially regressed often recurred. By analyzing tumors which emerged in the presence of a potent OT-I response, we identified a novel tumor escape mechanism in which tumor cells evaded T cell pressure by undergoing major genomic changes involving loss of the gene encoding the target tumor antigen. Furthermore, we show that these in vivo processes can be recapitulated in vitro using T cell/tumor cell co-cultures. A single round of in vitro co-culture led to significant loss of the ova gene and a tumor cell population with rapidly induced and diverse karyotypic changes. Although these current studies focus on the model OVA antigen, the finding that T cells can directly promote genomic instability has important implications for the development of adoptive T cell therapies.

  4. Adiabatic quantum-flux-parametron cell library adopting minimalist design

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, Naoki; Yamanashi, Yuki; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2015-05-07

    We herein build an adiabatic quantum-flux-parametron (AQFP) cell library adopting minimalist design and a symmetric layout. In the proposed minimalist design, every logic cell is designed by arraying four types of building block cells: buffer, NOT, constant, and branch cells. Therefore, minimalist design enables us to effectively build and customize an AQFP cell library. The symmetric layout reduces unwanted parasitic magnetic coupling and ensures a large mutual inductance in an output transformer, which enables very long wiring between logic cells. We design and fabricate several logic circuits using the minimal AQFP cell library so as to test logic cells in the library. Moreover, we experimentally investigate the maximum wiring length between logic cells. Finally, we present an experimental demonstration of an 8-bit carry look-ahead adder designed using the minimal AQFP cell library and demonstrate that the proposed cell library is sufficiently robust to realize large-scale digital circuits.

  5. Artificial antigen presenting cells for use in adoptive immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Turtle, Cameron J.; Riddell, Stanley R.

    2010-01-01

    The observation that T cells can recognize and specifically eliminate cancer cells has spurred interest in the development of efficient methods to generate large numbers of T cells with specificity for tumor antigens that can be harnessed for use in cancer therapy. Recent studies have demonstrated that during encounter with tumor antigen, the signals delivered to T cells by professional antigen presenting cells can affect T cell programming and their subsequent therapeutic efficacy. This has stimulated efforts to develop artificial antigen presenting cells that allow optimal control over the signals provided to T cells. In this review, we will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of cellular and acellular artificial antigen presenting cell systems and their use in T cell adoptive immunotherapy for cancer. PMID:20693850

  6. Artificial antigen-presenting cells for use in adoptive immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Turtle, Cameron J; Riddell, Stanley R

    2010-01-01

    The observation that T cells can recognize and specifically eliminate cancer cells has spurred interest in the development of efficient methods to generate large numbers of T cells with specificity for tumor antigens that can be harnessed for use in cancer therapy. Recent studies have demonstrated that during encounter with tumor antigen, the signals delivered to T cells by professional antigen-presenting cells can affect T-cell programming and their subsequent therapeutic efficacy. This has stimulated efforts to develop artificial antigen-presenting cells that allow optimal control over the signals provided to T cells. In this review, we will discuss the advantages and disadvantages of cellular and acellular artificial antigen-presenting cell systems and their use in T-cell adoptive immunotherapy for cancer. PMID:20693850

  7. Adoptive transfer of chimeric antigen receptor re-directed cytolytic T lymphocyte clones in patients with neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Park, Julie R; Digiusto, David L; Slovak, Marilyn; Wright, Christine; Naranjo, Araceli; Wagner, Jamie; Meechoovet, Hunsar B; Bautista, Cherrilyn; Chang, Wen-Chung; Ostberg, Julie R; Jensen, Michael C

    2007-04-01

    Metastatic neuroblastoma is a poor-prognosis malignancy arising during childhood that overexpresses the L1-cell adhesion molecule (CD171). We have previously described a tumor L1-cell adhesion molecule-specific, single chain antibody-derived, chimeric antigen receptor designated CE7R for re-directing the antigen-specific effector functioning of cytolytic T lymphocytes. Here, we report on the feasibility of isolating, and the safety of infusing, autologous CD8(+) cytolytic T lymphocyte clones co-expressing CE7R and the selection-suicide expression enzyme HyTK in children with recurrent/refractory neuroblastoma. The cytolytic T lymphocyte products were derived from peripheral blood mononuclear cells that were subjected to polyclonal activation, plasmid vector electrotransfer, limiting dilution hygromycin selection, and expansion to numbers sufficient for adoptive transfer. In total, 12 infusions (nine at 10(8) cells/m(2), three at 10(9) cells/m(2)) were administered to six patients. No overt toxicities to tissues known to express L1-cell adhesion molecule (e.g., central nervous system, adrenal medulla, and sympathetic ganglia) were observed. The persistence of cytolytic T lymphocyte clones in the circulation, measured by vector-specific quantitative polymerase chain reaction, was short (1-7 days) in patients with bulky disease, but significantly longer (42 days) in a patient with a limited disease burden. This first-in-humans pilot study sets the stage for clinical trials employing adoptive transfer in the context of minimal residual disease.

  8. Protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection by adoptive immunotherapy. Requirement for T cell-deficient recipients

    SciTech Connect

    Orme, I.M.; Collins, F.M.

    1983-07-01

    The results of this study demonstrate that spleen cells taken from mice at the height of the primary immune response to intravenous infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis possess the capacity to transfer adoptive protection to M. tuberculosis-infected recipients, but only if these recipients are first rendered T cell-deficient, either by thymectomy and gamma irradiation, or by sublethal irradiation. A similar requirement was necessary to demonstrate the adoptive protection of the lungs after exposure to an acute aerosol-delivered M. tuberculosis infection. In both infectious models successful adoptive immunotherapy was shown to be mediated by T lymphocytes, which were acquired in the donor animals in response to the immunizing infection. It is proposed that the results of this study may serve as a basic model for the subsequent analysis of the nature of the T cell-mediated immune response to both systemic and aerogenic infections with M. tuberculosis.

  9. Resolution of murine chlamydial genital infection by the adoptive transfer of a biovar-specific, Th1 lymphocyte clone.

    PubMed

    Igietseme, J U; Ramsey, K H; Magee, D M; Williams, D M; Kincy, T J; Rank, R G

    1993-01-01

    MoPn-specific T-cell clones were isolated from a T-cell line that was capable of curing chlamydial genital infection by the Chlamydia trachomatis agent of mouse pneumonitis (MoPn) after adoptive transfer. Two clones (designated as 2.14-0 and 2.14-3) were characterized by flow cytometry techniques to be homogenous for L3T4, CD3, and alpha/beta T cell receptor (TcR) T-helper cell markers. The two clones were biovar specific, because they reacted to MoPn but not the Chlamydia psittaci agent of guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis (GPIC) or C. trachomatis, serovar type E. Cytokine profile analysis, by a combination of bioassays, ELISA, and slot/Northern blotting for specific cytokine messenger RNAs, further revealed that cultures of antigen-stimulated clone 2.14-0 contained interleukin-2 (IL-2), tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and gamma interferon (a T helper 1 cell [Th1] profile). Clone 2.14-3 was also positive for gamma interferon, a level much lower than that of clone 2.14-0, and negative for IL-4 secretion, suggesting a Th1 profile as well. The ability of these clones to bring about the resolution of the chronic genital chlamydial infection of nude mice was tested by the adoptive transfer of 10(7) cells of each clone into the mice. By 4 weeks after cell transfer of clone 2.14-0, 81% of recipient nude mice (30 of 37) resolved the disease. In contrast, clone 2.14-3 or a control T-cell clone specific for a heterologous antigen were unable to resolve the infection in 20 recipients in each case, even after 100 days.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Adenoviral Delivery of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α and Interleukin-2 Enables Successful Adoptive Cell Therapy of Immunosuppressive Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Siurala, Mikko; Havunen, Riikka; Saha, Dipongkor; Lumen, Dave; Airaksinen, Anu J; Tähtinen, Siri; Cervera-Carrascon, Víctor; Bramante, Simona; Parviainen, Suvi; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Kanerva, Anna; Hemminki, Akseli

    2016-08-01

    Adoptive T-cell transfer is a promising treatment approach for metastatic cancer, but efficacy in solid tumors has only been achieved with toxic pre- and postconditioning regimens. Thus, adoptive T-cell therapies would benefit from complementary modalities that enable their full potential without excessive toxicity. We aimed to improve the efficacy and safety of adoptive T-cell transfer by using adenoviral vectors for direct delivery of immunomodulatory murine cytokines into B16.OVA melanoma tumors with concomitant T-cell receptor transgenic OT-I T-cell transfer. Armed adenoviruses expressed high local and low systemic levels of cytokine when injected into B16.OVA tumors, suggesting safety of virus-mediated cytokine delivery. Antitumor efficacy was significantly enhanced with adenoviruses coding for murine interleukin-2 (mIL-2) and tumor necrosis factor-α (mTNFα) when compared with T-cell transfer alone or viruses alone. Further improvement in efficacy was achieved with a triple combination of mIL-2, mTNFα, and OT-I T-cells. Mechanistic studies suggest that mIL-2 has an important role in activating T-cells at the tumor, while mTNFα induces chemokine expression. Furthermore, adenovirus treatments enhanced tumor-infiltration of OT-I T-cells as demonstrated by SPECT/CT imaging of (111)In-labeled cells. Our results suggest the utility of cytokine-coding adenoviruses for improving the efficacy of adoptive T-cell therapies.

  11. [Principles of adoptive cell therapy based on "Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes"].

    PubMed

    Martins, Filipe; Orcurto, Angela; Michielin, Olivier; Coukos, George

    2016-05-18

    Adoptive cell therapy consists in the use of T lymphocytes for therapeutic purposes. Up to now, of limited use in clinical practice for logistical reasons, technical progress and substantial level of evidence obtained in the last decade allow its arrival in universitary hospitals. We will principally discuss the administration of expanded tumor infiltrating T cells in the treatment of metastatic melanoma. This treatment modality exploits the natural specificity of these cells and aims to potentiate their effectiveness. This personalized immunotherapy detains a potential for expansion to many other advanced tumor types. PMID:27424426

  12. Anti-Tumor Effects after Adoptive Transfer of IL-12 Transposon-Modified Murine Splenocytes in the OT-I-Melanoma Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Galvan, Daniel L; O'Neil, Richard T; Foster, Aaron E; Huye, Leslie; Bear, Adham; Rooney, Cliona M; Wilson, Matthew H

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of gene modified T cells provides possible immunotherapy for patients with cancers refractory to other treatments. We have previously used the non-viral piggyBac transposon system to gene modify human T cells for potential immunotherapy. However, these previous studies utilized adoptive transfer of modified human T cells to target cancer xenografts in highly immunodeficient (NOD-SCID) mice that do not recapitulate an intact immune system. Currently, only viral vectors have shown efficacy in permanently gene-modifying mouse T cells for immunotherapy applications. Therefore, we sought to determine if piggyBac could effectively gene modify mouse T cells to target cancer cells in a mouse cancer model. We first demonstrated that we could gene modify cells to express murine interleukin-12 (p35/p40 mIL-12), a transgene with proven efficacy in melanoma immunotherapy. The OT-I melanoma mouse model provides a well-established T cell mediated immune response to ovalbumin (OVA) positive B16 melanoma cells. B16/OVA melanoma cells were implanted in wild type C57Bl6 mice. Mouse splenocytes were isolated from C57Bl6 OT-I mice and were gene modified using piggyBac to express luciferase. Adoptive transfer of luciferase-modified OT-I splenocytes demonstrated homing to B16/OVA melanoma tumors in vivo. We next gene-modified OT-I cells to express mIL-12. Adoptive transfer of mIL-12-modified mouse OT-I splenocytes delayed B16/OVA melanoma tumor growth in vivo compared to control OT-I splenocytes and improved mouse survival. Our results demonstrate that the piggyBac transposon system can be used to gene modify splenocytes and mouse T cells for evaluating adoptive immunotherapy strategies in immunocompetent mouse tumor models that may more directly mimic immunotherapy applications in humans. PMID:26473608

  13. Anti-Tumor Effects after Adoptive Transfer of IL-12 Transposon-Modified Murine Splenocytes in the OT-I-Melanoma Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Aaron E.; Huye, Leslie; Bear, Adham; Rooney, Cliona M.; Wilson, Matthew H.

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of gene modified T cells provides possible immunotherapy for patients with cancers refractory to other treatments. We have previously used the non-viral piggyBac transposon system to gene modify human T cells for potential immunotherapy. However, these previous studies utilized adoptive transfer of modified human T cells to target cancer xenografts in highly immunodeficient (NOD-SCID) mice that do not recapitulate an intact immune system. Currently, only viral vectors have shown efficacy in permanently gene-modifying mouse T cells for immunotherapy applications. Therefore, we sought to determine if piggyBac could effectively gene modify mouse T cells to target cancer cells in a mouse cancer model. We first demonstrated that we could gene modify cells to express murine interleukin-12 (p35/p40 mIL-12), a transgene with proven efficacy in melanoma immunotherapy. The OT-I melanoma mouse model provides a well-established T cell mediated immune response to ovalbumin (OVA) positive B16 melanoma cells. B16/OVA melanoma cells were implanted in wild type C57Bl6 mice. Mouse splenocytes were isolated from C57Bl6 OT-I mice and were gene modified using piggyBac to express luciferase. Adoptive transfer of luciferase-modified OT-I splenocytes demonstrated homing to B16/OVA melanoma tumors in vivo. We next gene-modified OT-I cells to express mIL-12. Adoptive transfer of mIL-12-modified mouse OT-I splenocytes delayed B16/OVA melanoma tumor growth in vivo compared to control OT-I splenocytes and improved mouse survival. Our results demonstrate that the piggyBac transposon system can be used to gene modify splenocytes and mouse T cells for evaluating adoptive immunotherapy strategies in immunocompetent mouse tumor models that may more directly mimic immunotherapy applications in humans. PMID:26473608

  14. CMV-Specific CD8 T Cell Differentiation and Localization: Implications for Adoptive Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Corinne J.; Quinn, Michael; Snyder, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a ubiquitous virus that causes chronic infection and, thus, is one of the most common infectious complications of immune suppression. Adoptive transfer of HCMV-specific T cells has emerged as an effective method to reduce the risk for HCMV infection and/or reactivation by restoring immunity in transplant recipients. However, the CMV-specific CD8+ T cell response is comprised of a heterogenous mixture of subsets with distinct functions and localization, and it is not clear if current adoptive immunotherapy protocols can reconstitute the full spectrum of CD8+ T cell immunity. The aim of this review is to briefly summarize the role of these T cell subsets in CMV immunity and to describe how current adoptive immunotherapy practices might affect their reconstitution in patients. The bulk of the CMV-specific CD8+ T cell population is made up of terminally differentiated effector T cells with immediate effector function and a short life span. Self-renewing memory T cells within the CMV-specific population retain the capacity to expand and differentiate upon challenge and are important for the long-term persistence of the CD8+ T cell response. Finally, mucosal organs, which are frequent sites of CMV reactivation, are primarily inhabited by tissue-resident memory T cells, which do not recirculate. Future work on adoptive transfer strategies may need to focus on striking a balance between the formation of these subsets to ensure the development of long lasting and protective immune responses that can access the organs affected by CMV disease. PMID:27695453

  15. CMV-Specific CD8 T Cell Differentiation and Localization: Implications for Adoptive Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Corinne J.; Quinn, Michael; Snyder, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a ubiquitous virus that causes chronic infection and, thus, is one of the most common infectious complications of immune suppression. Adoptive transfer of HCMV-specific T cells has emerged as an effective method to reduce the risk for HCMV infection and/or reactivation by restoring immunity in transplant recipients. However, the CMV-specific CD8+ T cell response is comprised of a heterogenous mixture of subsets with distinct functions and localization, and it is not clear if current adoptive immunotherapy protocols can reconstitute the full spectrum of CD8+ T cell immunity. The aim of this review is to briefly summarize the role of these T cell subsets in CMV immunity and to describe how current adoptive immunotherapy practices might affect their reconstitution in patients. The bulk of the CMV-specific CD8+ T cell population is made up of terminally differentiated effector T cells with immediate effector function and a short life span. Self-renewing memory T cells within the CMV-specific population retain the capacity to expand and differentiate upon challenge and are important for the long-term persistence of the CD8+ T cell response. Finally, mucosal organs, which are frequent sites of CMV reactivation, are primarily inhabited by tissue-resident memory T cells, which do not recirculate. Future work on adoptive transfer strategies may need to focus on striking a balance between the formation of these subsets to ensure the development of long lasting and protective immune responses that can access the organs affected by CMV disease.

  16. Cellular immunotherapy for neuroblastoma: a review of current vaccine and adoptive T cell therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Louis, C U; Brenner, M K

    2009-01-01

    Immunotherapy is an attractive option for patients with high risk neuroblastoma due to their poor long-term survival rates after conventional treatment. Neuroblastoma cells are derived from the embryonic neural crest and therefore express tumor antigens not widely seen in normal cells, making them potential targets for immunologic attack. There is already considerable experience with monoclonal antibodies that target these tumor associated antigens, and in this review we focus on more exploratory approaches, using tumor vaccines and adoptive transfer of tumor-directed T cells.

  17. Bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Ross, Pablo J; Cibelli, Jose B

    2010-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is a technique by which the nucleus of a differentiated cell is introduced into an oocyte from which its genetic material has been removed by a process called enucleation. In mammals, the reconstructed embryo is artificially induced to initiate embryonic development (activation). The oocyte turns the somatic cell nucleus into an embryonic nucleus. This process is called nuclear reprogramming and involves an important change of cell fate, by which the somatic cell nucleus becomes capable of generating all the cell types required for the formation of a new individual, including extraembryonic tissues. Therefore, after transfer of a cloned embryo to a surrogate mother, an offspring genetically identical to the animal from which the somatic cells where isolated, is born. Cloning by nuclear transfer has potential applications in agriculture and biomedicine, but is limited by low efficiency. Cattle were the second mammalian species to be cloned after Dolly the sheep, and it is probably the most widely used species for SCNT experiments. This is, in part due to the high availability of bovine oocytes and the relatively higher efficiency levels usually obtained in cattle. Given the wide utilization of this species for cloning, several alternatives to this basic protocol can be found in the literature. Here we describe a basic protocol for bovine SCNT currently being used in our laboratory, which is amenable for the use of the nuclear transplantation technique for research or commercial purposes. PMID:20336522

  18. Enrichment and Expansion with Nanoscale Artificial Antigen Presenting Cells for Adoptive Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Perica, Karlo; Bieler, Joan Glick; Schütz, Christian; Varela, Juan Carlos; Douglass, Jacqueline; Skora, Andrew; Chiu, Yen Ling; Oelke, Mathias; Kinzler, Kenneth; Zhou, Shibin; Vogelstein, Bert; Schneck, Jonathan P

    2015-07-28

    Adoptive immunotherapy (AIT) can mediate durable regression of cancer, but widespread adoption of AIT is limited by the cost and complexity of generating tumor-specific T cells. Here we develop an Enrichment + Expansion strategy using paramagnetic, nanoscale artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC) to rapidly expand tumor-specific T cells from rare naïve precursors and predicted neo-epitope responses. Nano-aAPC are capable of enriching rare tumor-specific T cells in a magnetic column and subsequently activating them to induce proliferation. Enrichment + Expansion resulted in greater than 1000-fold expansion of both mouse and human tumor-specific T cells in 1 week, with nano-aAPC based enrichment conferring a proliferation advantage during both in vitro culture and after adoptive transfer in vivo. Robust T cell responses were seen not only for shared tumor antigens, but also for computationally predicted neo-epitopes. Streamlining the rapid generation of large numbers of tumor-specific T cells in a cost-effective fashion through Enrichment + Expansion can be a powerful tool for immunotherapy. PMID:26171764

  19. Identification of a Novel Immunodominant HLA-B*07: 02-restricted Adenoviral Peptide Epitope and Its Potential in Adoptive Transfer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Günther, Patrick S; Peper, Janet K; Faist, Benjamin; Kayser, Simone; Hartl, Lena; Feuchtinger, Tobias; Jahn, Gerhard; Neuenhahn, Michael; Busch, Dirk H; Stevanović, Stefan; Dennehy, Kevin M

    2015-09-01

    Adenovirus infections of immunocompromised patients, particularly following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, are associated with morbidity and mortality. Immunotherapy by adoptive transfer of hexon-specific and penton-specific T cells has been successfully applied, but many approaches are impeded by the low number of HLA class I-restricted adenoviral peptide epitopes described to date. We use a novel method to identify naturally presented adenoviral peptide epitopes from infected human cells, ectopically expressing defined HLA, using peptide elution and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. We show that the previously described HLA-A*01:01-restricted peptide epitope LTDLGQNLLY from hexon protein is naturally presented, and demonstrate the functionality of LTDLGQNLLY-specific T cells. We further identify a novel immunodominant HLA-B*07:02-restricted peptide epitope VPATGRTLVL from protein 13.6 K, and demonstrate the high proliferative, cytotoxic, and IFN-γ-producing capacity of peptide-specific T cells. Lastly, LTDLGQNLLY-specific T cells can be detected ex vivo following adoptive transfer therapy, and LTDLGQNLLY-specific and VPATGRTLVL-specific T cells have memory phenotypes ex vivo. Given their proliferative and cytotoxic capacity, such epitope-specific T cells are promising candidates for adoptive T-cell transfer therapy of adenovirus infection.

  20. Feasibility of Telomerase-Specific Adoptive T-cell Therapy for B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia and Solid Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Sandri, Sara; Bobisse, Sara; Moxley, Kelly; Lamolinara, Alessia; De Sanctis, Francesco; Boschi, Federico; Sbarbati, Andrea; Fracasso, Giulio; Ferrarini, Giovanna; Hendriks, Rudi W; Cavallini, Chiara; Scupoli, Maria Teresa; Sartoris, Silvia; Iezzi, Manuela; Nishimura, Michael I; Bronte, Vincenzo; Ugel, Stefano

    2016-05-01

    Telomerase (TERT) is overexpressed in 80% to 90% of primary tumors and contributes to sustaining the transformed phenotype. The identification of several TERT epitopes in tumor cells has elevated the status of TERT as a potential universal target for selective and broad adoptive immunotherapy. TERT-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) have been detected in the peripheral blood of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) patients, but display low functional avidity, which limits their clinical utility in adoptive cell transfer approaches. To overcome this key obstacle hindering effective immunotherapy, we isolated an HLA-A2-restricted T-cell receptor (TCR) with high avidity for human TERT from vaccinated HLA-A*0201 transgenic mice. Using several relevant humanized mouse models, we demonstrate that TCR-transduced T cells were able to control human B-CLL progression in vivo and limited tumor growth in several human, solid transplantable cancers. TERT-based adoptive immunotherapy selectively eliminated tumor cells, failed to trigger a self-MHC-restricted fratricide of T cells, and was associated with toxicity against mature granulocytes, but not toward human hematopoietic progenitors in humanized immune reconstituted mice. These data support the feasibility of TERT-based adoptive immunotherapy in clinical oncology, highlighting, for the first time, the possibility of utilizing a high-avidity TCR specific for human TERT. Cancer Res; 76(9); 2540-51. ©2016 AACR.

  1. HLA-peptide multimer selection of adenovirus-specific T cells for adoptive T-cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Chakupurakal, Geothy; Onion, David; Bonney, Sarah; Cobbold, Mark; Mautner, Vivien; Moss, Paul

    2013-10-01

    Adenovirus (Ad) infection is a cause of significant morbidity and mortality in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients and virus-specific immunotherapy is one option for improved control. Cellular immunity is an important component in suppression of Ad replication but the frequency and population distribution of Ad-specific CD8 T cells has not been systematically investigated. This is an important question in relation to the potential use of these cells for adoptive transfer. To address this question, HLA-peptide multimers were generated for 8 HLA class I-restricted Ad epitopes, which are highly conserved across Ad species. Epitope-specific CD8 T cells from healthy donors were identified by tetramer staining and HLA class I A*01-restricted TDL peptide staining T cells were characterized in relation to frequency, phenotype, and function. The cells demonstrated a minimally differentiated central memory phenotype (CD45RA, CD45RO, CCR7, CD62L, CD27, CD28, and CD57) and were able to produce IFN-γ and proliferate extensively upon antigen stimulation in vitro. After proliferation, the phenotype switched to CD45RO, although it is interesting to note that CCR7 expression was retained. Despite their low frequency, tetramer-staining cells could be enriched with magnetic bead technology. Their characteristics should permit rapid establishment in vivo post adoptive transfer, increasing therapeutic options for patients with Ad infection. This is the first reported characterization of Ad-specific tetramer-staining T cells with a view to adoptive transfer to hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients with Ad infection. The efficacy of these cells needs to be further evaluated in the setting of a clinical trial. PMID:23994889

  2. B-cell Maturation Antigen is a Promising Target for Adoptive T-cell Therapy of Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Robert O.; Evbuomwan, Moses O.; Pittaluga, Stefania; Rose, Jeremy J.; Raffeld, Mark; Yang, Shicheng; Gress, Ronald E.; Hakim, Frances T.; Kochenderfer, James N.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Multiple myeloma (MM) is a usually incurable malignancy of plasma cells. New therapies are urgently needed for MM. Adoptive transfer of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-expressing T cells is a promising new therapy for hematologic malignancies, but an ideal target antigen for CAR-expressing T cell therapies of MM has not been identified. B-cell maturation antigen (BCMA) is a protein that has been reported to be selectively expressed by B-lineage cells including MM cells. Our goal was to determine if BCMA is a suitable target for CAR-expressing T cells. Experimental Design We conducted an assessment of BCMA expression in normal human tissues and MM cells by flow cytometry, quantitative PCR, and immunohistochemistry. We designed and tested novel anti-BCMA CARs. Results BCMA had a restricted RNA expression pattern. Except for expression on plasma cells, BCMA protein was not detected in normal human tissues. BCMA was not detected on primary human CD34+ hematopoietic cells. We detected uniform BCMA cell-surface expression on primary MM cells from 5 of 5 patients. We designed the first anti-BCMA CARs to be reported, and we transduced T cells with lentiviral vectors encoding these CARs. The CARs gave T cells the ability to specifically recognize BCMA. The anti-BCMA-CAR-transduced T cells exhibited BCMA-specific functions including cytokine production, proliferation, cytotoxicity, and in vivo tumor eradication. Importantly, anti-BCMA-CAR-transduced T cells recognized and killed primary MM cells. Conclusions BCMA is a suitable target for CAR-expressing T cells, and adoptive transfer of anti-BCMA-CAR-expressing T cells is a promising new strategy for treating MM. PMID:23344265

  3. Memory T cell–driven differentiation of naive cells impairs adoptive immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Klebanoff, Christopher A.; Scott, Christopher D.; Leonardi, Anthony J.; Yamamoto, Tori N.; Cruz, Anthony C.; Ouyang, Claudia; Ramaswamy, Madhu; Roychoudhuri, Rahul; Ji, Yun; Eil, Robert L.; Sukumar, Madhusudhanan; Crompton, Joseph G.; Palmer, Douglas C.; Borman, Zachary A.; Clever, David; Thomas, Stacy K.; Patel, Shashankkumar; Yu, Zhiya; Muranski, Pawel; Liu, Hui; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco M.; Gros, Alena; Gattinoni, Luca; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Siegel, Richard M.; Restifo, Nicholas P.

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive cell transfer (ACT) of purified naive, stem cell memory, and central memory T cell subsets results in superior persistence and antitumor immunity compared with ACT of populations containing more-differentiated effector memory and effector T cells. Despite a clear advantage of the less-differentiated populations, the majority of ACT trials utilize unfractionated T cell subsets. Here, we have challenged the notion that the mere presence of less-differentiated T cells in starting populations used to generate therapeutic T cells is sufficient to convey their desirable attributes. Using both mouse and human cells, we identified a T cell–T cell interaction whereby antigen-experienced subsets directly promote the phenotypic, functional, and metabolic differentiation of naive T cells. This process led to the loss of less-differentiated T cell subsets and resulted in impaired cellular persistence and tumor regression in mouse models following ACT. The T memory–induced conversion of naive T cells was mediated by a nonapoptotic Fas signal, resulting in Akt-driven cellular differentiation. Thus, induction of Fas signaling enhanced T cell differentiation and impaired antitumor immunity, while Fas signaling blockade preserved the antitumor efficacy of naive cells within mixed populations. These findings reveal that T cell subsets can synchronize their differentiation state in a process similar to quorum sensing in unicellular organisms and suggest that disruption of this quorum-like behavior among T cells has potential to enhance T cell–based immunotherapies. PMID:26657860

  4. On the optimization of the generalized coplanar Hohmann impulsive transfer adopting energy change concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamel, Osman M.; Soliman, Adel S.

    2005-02-01

    We considered the problem of transferring the rocket's orbit to higher energy orbit, using minimum fuel cost, as a problem in change of energy, since this is most convenient. For the generalized Hohmann case (the departure; the transferring and the destination orbits are ellipses), we adopt the first configuration only, when the apogee of transfer orbit, and the apogee of destination orbit are coincident. Firstly, we assign the ΔvA, ΔvB increments in velocity at points A,B (the position of peri-apse and apo-apse impulses respectively), as functions of the eccentricity of the transfer orbit, eT. Subsequently, we apply the optimum condition leading to the derivation of the quartic equation in eT, and showed how to deduce (ΔvA+ΔvB)Min. A numerical example is presented, in which we determined the four roots of the quartic equation, by a numerical Mathematica Version 2.2. We selected the adequate consistent root, only one in this case, and evaluated (ΔvA+ΔvB)Min for the two orbits of the couple Earth and Mars. This article is a new approach and leads to new discoveries involved in the problem, consequently adds new insight and avoids complexities of previous procedures.

  5. Adoptive transfer of macrophages from adult mice reduces mortality in mice infected with human enterovirus 71.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiangning; Li, Xiaoying; Fan, Xiaoxu; Ma, Chunmei; Qin, Chuan; Zhang, Lianfeng

    2013-02-01

    Human enterovirus 71 (EV71) causes hand, foot and mouth disease in children under 6 years of age, and the neurological complications of this virus can lead to death. Until now, no vaccines or drugs have been available for the clinical control of this epidemic. Macrophages can engulf pathogens and mediate a series of host immune responses that play a role in the defence against infectious diseases. Using immunohistochemistry, we observed the localizations of virus in muscle tissues of EV71-infected mice. The macrophages isolated from the adult mice could kill the virus gradually in vitro, as shown using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and virus titration. Co-localisation of lysosomes and virus within macrophages suggested that the lysosomes were possibly responsible for the phagocytosis of EV71. Activation of the macrophages in the peritoneal cavity of mice four days pre-infection reduced the mortality of mice upon lethal EV71 infection. The adoptive transfer of macrophages from adult mice inhibited virus replication in the muscle tissues of infected mice, and this was followed by a relief of symptoms and a significant reduction of mortality, which suggested that the adoptive transfer of macrophages from adult humans represents a potential strategy to treat EV71-infected patients.

  6. Fate of gamma-interferon-activated killer blood monocytes adoptively transferred into the abdominal cavity of patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, H.C.; Keenan, A.M.; Woodhouse, C.; Ottow, R.T.; Miller, P.; Steller, E.P.; Foon, K.A.; Abrams, P.G.; Beman, J.; Larson, S.M.

    1987-11-15

    Five patients with colorectal cancer widely metastatic to peritoneal surfaces have been treated i.p. with infusions of autologous blood monocytes made cytotoxic by in vitro incubation with human gamma-interferon. The monocytes were purified by a combination of cytapheresis and counter-current centrifugal elutriation procedures; each week approximately 350 million activated monocytes were given to patients as adoptive immunotherapy by a single i.p. instillation. On the eighth cycle of treatment the trafficking of i.p. infused blood monocytes was studied in two patients by prelabeling the cells with /sup 111/In. These activated cells became distributed widely within the peritoneal cavity. Two and 5 days after infusion their position within the peritoneum had not changed. When peritoneal specimens were obtained 36 h after /sup 111/In-labeled monocyte infusion, labeled monocytes were demonstrated to be associated with the serosal surfaces by autoradiographic analysis. Scintiscanning structures outside the abdominal cavity revealed that /sup 111/In-labeled monocytes infused i.p. did not traffic to other organs during the 5 days of the study. We conclude that i.p. adoptive transfer of autologous killer blood monocytes is an effective way of delivering these cytotoxic cells to sites of tumor burden on peritoneal surfaces in these cancer patients.

  7. Management of patients with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma: focus on adoptive T-cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Perna, Serena Kimi; Huye, Leslie E; Savoldo, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) represents a heterogeneous group of malignancies with high diversity in terms of biology, clinical responses, and prognosis. Standard therapy regimens produce a 5-year relative survival rate of only 69%, with the critical need to increase the treatment-success rate of this patient population presenting at diagnosis with a median age of 66 years and many comorbidities. The evidence that an impaired immune system favors the development of NHL has opened the stage for new therapeutics, and specifically for the adoptive transfer of ex vivo-expanded antigen-specific T-cells. In this review, we discuss how T-cells specific for viral-associated antigens, nonviral-associated antigens expressed by the tumor, T-cells redirected through the expression of chimeric antigen receptors, and transgenic T-cell receptors against tumor cells have been developed and used in clinical trials for the treatment of patients with NHLs. PMID:27471712

  8. Biopolymer implants enhance the efficacy of adoptive T cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Stephan, Sirkka B.; Taber, Alexandria M.; Jileaeva, Ilona; Pegues, Ericka P.; Sentman, Charles L.; Stephan, Matthias T.

    2014-01-01

    Although adoptive T cell therapy holds promise for the treatment of many cancers, its clinical utility has been limited by problems in delivering targeted lymphocytes to tumor sites, and their inefficient expansion in the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. Here we describe a bioactive polymer implant capable of delivering, expanding and dispersing tumor-reactive T cells. The approach can be used to treat inoperable or incompletely-removed tumors by situating implants near them, or at resection sites. Using a mouse breast cancer resection model, we show that the implants effectively support tumor-targeting T cells throughout resection beds and associated lymph nodes, and reduce tumor relapse compared to conventional delivery modalities. In a multifocal ovarian cancer model, we demonstrate that polymer-delivered T cells trigger regression whereas injected tumor-reactive lymphocytes have little curative effect. Scaffold-based T cell delivery may provide a viable treatment option for inoperable tumors, and reduce the rate of metastatic relapse after surgery. PMID:25503382

  9. Generation of CAR T cells for adoptive therapy in the context of glioblastoma standard of care.

    PubMed

    Riccione, Katherine; Suryadevara, Carter M; Snyder, David; Cui, Xiuyu; Sampson, John H; Sanchez-Perez, Luis

    2015-02-16

    Adoptive T cell immunotherapy offers a promising strategy for specifically targeting and eliminating malignant gliomas. T cells can be engineered ex vivo to express chimeric antigen receptors specific for glioma antigens (CAR T cells). The expansion and function of adoptively transferred CAR T cells can be potentiated by the lymphodepletive and tumoricidal effects of standard of care chemotherapy and radiotherapy. We describe a method for generating CAR T cells targeting EGFRvIII, a glioma-specific antigen, and evaluating their efficacy when combined with a murine model of glioblastoma standard of care. T cells are engineered by transduction with a retroviral vector containing the anti-EGFRvIII CAR gene. Tumor-bearing animals are subjected to host conditioning by a course of temozolomide and whole brain irradiation at dose regimens designed to model clinical standard of care. CAR T cells are then delivered intravenously to primed hosts. This method can be used to evaluate the antitumor efficacy of CAR T cells in the context of standard of care.

  10. Generation of CAR T Cells for Adoptive Therapy in the Context of Glioblastoma Standard of Care

    PubMed Central

    Riccione, Katherine; Suryadevara, Carter M.; Snyder, David; Cui, Xiuyu; Sampson, John H.; Sanchez-Perez, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive T cell immunotherapy offers a promising strategy for specifically targeting and eliminating malignant gliomas. T cells can be engineered ex vivo to express chimeric antigen receptors specific for glioma antigens (CAR T cells). The expansion and function of adoptively transferred CAR T cells can be potentiated by the lymphodepletive and tumoricidal effects of standard of care chemotherapy and radiotherapy. We describe a method for generating CAR T cells targeting EGFRvIII, a glioma-specific antigen, and evaluating their efficacy when combined with a murine model of glioblastoma standard of care. T cells are engineered by transduction with a retroviral vector containing the anti-EGFRvIII CAR gene. Tumor-bearing animals are subjected to host conditioning by a course of temozolomide and whole brain irradiation at dose regimens designed to model clinical standard of care. CAR T cells are then delivered intravenously to primed hosts. This method can be used to evaluate the antitumor efficacy of CAR T cells in the context of standard of care. PMID:25741761

  11. The immunologic profile of adoptively transferred lymphocytes influences stroke outcome of recipients☆

    PubMed Central

    Zierath, Dannielle; Schulze, Juliane; Kunze, Allison; Drogomiretskiy, Olga; Nhan, Derek; Jaspers, Brett; Dressel, Alexander; Becker, Kyra

    2013-01-01

    Animals that have myelin basic protein (MBP) specific lymphocytes with a Th1(+) phenotype have worse stroke outcome than those that do not. Whether these MBP specific cells contribute to worsened outcome or are merely a consequence of worse outcome is unclear. In these experiments, lymphocytes were obtained from donor animals one month after stroke and transferred to naïve recipient animals at the time of cerebral ischemia. The MBP specific phenotype of donor cells was determined prior to transfer. Animals that received either MBP specific Th1(+) or Th17(+) cells experienced worse neurological outcome, and the degree of impairment correlated with the robustness of MBP specific Th1(+) and Th17(+) responses. These data demonstrate that the immunologic phenotype of antigen specific lymphocytes influences stroke outcome. PMID:23948692

  12. Mechanisms of immunological eradication of a syngeneic guinea pig tumor. II. Effect of methotrexate treatment and T cell depletion of the recipient on adoptive immunity

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, S.; Fonseca, L.S.; Hunter, J.T.; Rapp, H.J.

    1983-01-01

    The influence of methotrexate on the development of immunity to the line 10 hepatoma was studied in guinea pigs. Chronic methotrexate treatment had no apparent effect on the ability of immune guinea pigs to suppress the growth of inoculated tumor cells. In contrast, the same methotrexate regimen inhibited the development of tumor immunity if started before the 8th day after immunization with a vaccine containing viable line 10 cells admixed with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) cell walls. Thus, methotrexate selectively inhibited the afferent limb of the immune response. In adoptive transfer experiments, methotrexate-treated recipient guinea pigs were capable of being passively sensitized with immune spleen cells, indicating that the primary cell-mediated immune response of the recipient was not required for adoptive immunity. The contribution of recipient T cells in adoptive immunity was further investigated in guinea pigs deleted of T cells by thymectomy, irradiation, and bone marrow reconstitution. Despite demonstrable deficiency in T lymphocyte reactions, B animals were fully capable of rejecting tumors after transfer of immune cells. These results suggest that the expression of adoptive immunity was independent of recipient T cell participation. In addition, sublethal irradiation of immune spleen cells prior to adoptive transfer abolished their efficacy. Proliferation of transferred immune cells in the recipient may be essential for expression of adoptive immunity.

  13. Salmonella typhimurium infection triggers dendritic cells and macrophages to adopt distinct migration patterns in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chunfang; Wood, Michael W; Galyov, Edouard E; Höpken, Uta E; Lipp, Martin; Bodmer, Helen C; Tough, David F; Carter, Robert W

    2006-11-01

    The presence of an anti-bacterial T cell response and evidence of bacterial products in inflamed joints of reactive arthritis patients suggests an antigen transportation role in this disease for macrophages and dendritic cells. We have investigated the functional properties and in vivo migration of macrophages and DC after infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. typhimurium). BM-derived macrophages and DC displayed enhanced expression of costimulatory molecules (CD40 and CD86) and increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IL-12p40) and nitric oxide after infection. Upon adoptive transfer into mice, infected DC migrated to lymphoid tissues and induced an anti-Salmonella T cell response, whereas infected macrophages did not. Infection of DC with S. typhimurium was associated with strong up-regulation of the chemokine receptor CCR7 and acquisition of responsiveness to chemokines acting through this receptor. Moreover, S. typhimurium-infected CCR7-deficient DC were unable to migrate to lymph nodes after adoptive transfer, although they did reach the spleen. Our data demonstrate distinct roles for macrophages and DC as antigen transporters after S. typhimurium infection and a dependence on CCR7 for migration of DC to lymph nodes after bacterial infection. PMID:17048271

  14. A Phase I Study on Adoptive Immunotherapy Using Gene-Modified T Cells for Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kershaw, Michael H.; Westwood, Jennifer A.; Parker, Linda L.; Wang, Gang; Eshhar, Zelig; Mavroukakis, Sharon A.; White, Donald E.; Wunderlich, John R.; Canevari, Silvana; Rogers-Freezer, Linda; Chen, Clara C.; Yang, James C.; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Hwu, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    Purpose A phase I study was conducted to assess the safety of adoptive immunotherapy using gene-modified autologous T cells for the treatment of metastatic ovarian cancer. Experimental Design T cells with reactivity against the ovarian cancer – associated antigen α-folate receptor (FR) were generated by genetic modification of autologous T cells with a chimeric gene incorporating an anti-FR single-chain antibody linked to the signaling domain of the Fc receptor γ chain. Patients were assigned to one of two cohorts in the study. Eight patients in cohort 1received a dose escalation of T cells in combination with high-dose interleukin-2, and six patients in cohort 2 received dual-specific T cells (reactive with both FR and allogeneic cells) followed by immunization with allogeneic peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Results Five patients in cohort 1 experienced some grade 3 to 4 treatment-related toxicity that was probably due to interleukin-2 administration, which could be managed using standard measures. Patients in cohort 2 experienced relatively mild side effects with grade 1to 2 symptoms. No reduction in tumor burden was seen in any patient. Tracking 111In-labeled adoptively transferred T cells in cohort 1revealed a lack of specific localization of T cells to tumor except in one patient where some signal was detected in a peritoneal deposit. PCR analysis showed that gene-modified T cells were present in the circulation in large numbers for the first 2 days after transfer, but these quickly declined to be barely detectable 1month later in most patients. An inhibitory factor developed in the serum of three of six patients tested over the period of treatment, which significantly reduced the ability of gene-modified T cells to respond against FR+ tumor cells. Conclusions Large numbers of gene-modified tumor-reactive T cells can be safely given to patients, but these cells do not persist in large numbers long term. Future studies need to employ strategies to

  15. Manufacture of tumor- and virus-specific T lymphocytes for adoptive cell therapies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X; Rivière, I

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) and genetically engineered T lymphocytes expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) or conventional alpha/beta T-cell receptors (TCRs), collectively termed adoptive cell therapy (ACT), is an emerging novel strategy to treat cancer patients. Application of ACT has been constrained by the ability to isolate and expand functional tumor-reactive T cells. The transition of ACT from a promising experimental regimen to an established standard of care treatment relies largely on the establishment of safe, efficient, robust and cost-effective cell manufacturing protocols. The manufacture of cellular products under current good manufacturing practices (cGMPs) has a critical role in the process. Herein, we review current manufacturing methods for the large-scale production of clinical-grade TILs, virus-specific and genetically modified CAR or TCR transduced T cells in the context of phase I/II clinical trials as well as the regulatory pathway to get these complex personalized cellular products to the clinic. PMID:25721207

  16. Manufacture of tumor- and virus-specific T lymphocytes for adoptive cell therapies.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Rivière, I

    2015-03-01

    Adoptive transfer of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) and genetically engineered T lymphocytes expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) or conventional alpha/beta T-cell receptors (TCRs), collectively termed adoptive cell therapy (ACT), is an emerging novel strategy to treat cancer patients. Application of ACT has been constrained by the ability to isolate and expand functional tumor-reactive T cells. The transition of ACT from a promising experimental regimen to an established standard of care treatment relies largely on the establishment of safe, efficient, robust and cost-effective cell manufacturing protocols. The manufacture of cellular products under current good manufacturing practices (cGMPs) has a critical role in the process. Herein, we review current manufacturing methods for the large-scale production of clinical-grade TILs, virus-specific and genetically modified CAR or TCR transduced T cells in the context of phase I/II clinical trials as well as the regulatory pathway to get these complex personalized cellular products to the clinic. PMID:25721207

  17. Combining α-Radioimmunotherapy and Adoptive T Cell Therapy to Potentiate Tumor Destruction

    PubMed Central

    Ménager, Jérémie; Gorin, Jean-Baptiste; Maurel, Catherine; Drujont, Lucile; Gouard, Sébastien; Louvet, Cédric; Chérel, Michel; Faivre-Chauvet, Alain; Morgenstern, Alfred; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Davodeau, François

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces direct and indirect killing of cancer cells and for long has been considered as immunosuppressive. However, this concept has evolved over the past few years with the demonstration that irradiation can increase tumor immunogenicity and can actually favor the implementation of an immune response against tumor cells. Adoptive T-cell transfer (ACT) is also used to treat cancer and several studies have shown that the efficacy of this immunotherapy was enhanced when combined with radiation therapy. α-Radioimmunotherapy (α-RIT) is a type of internal radiotherapy which is currently under development to treat disseminated tumors. α-particles are indeed highly efficient to destroy small cluster of cancer cells with minimal impact on surrounding healthy tissues. We thus hypothesized that, in the setting of α-RIT, an immunotherapy like ACT, could benefit from the immune context induced by irradiation. Hence, we decided to further investigate the possibilities to promote an efficient and long-lasting anti-tumor response by combining α-RIT and ACT. To perform such study we set up a multiple myeloma murine model which express the tumor antigen CD138 and ovalbumine (OVA). Then we evaluated the therapeutic efficacy in the mice treated with α-RIT, using an anti-CD138 antibody coupled to bismuth-213, followed by an adoptive transfer of OVA-specific CD8+ T cells (OT-I CD8+ T cells). We observed a significant tumor growth control and an improved survival in the animals treated with the combined treatment. These results demonstrate the efficacy of combining α-RIT and ACT in the MM model we established. PMID:26098691

  18. Design of T-cell receptor libraries with diverse binding properties to examine adoptive T-cell responses.

    PubMed

    Chervin, A S; Stone, J D; Soto, C M; Engels, B; Schreiber, H; Roy, E J; Kranz, D M

    2013-06-01

    Adoptive T-cell therapies have shown significant promise in the treatment of cancer and viral diseases. One approach, which introduces antigen-specific T-cell receptors (TCRs) into ex vivo activated T cells, is designed to overcome central tolerance mechanisms that prevent responses by endogenous T-cell repertoires. Studies have suggested that use of higher-affinity TCRs against class I major histocompatibility complex antigens could drive the activity of both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, but the rules that govern the TCR binding optimal for in vivo activity are unknown. Here, we describe a high-throughput platform of 'reverse biochemistry' whereby a library of TCRs with a wide range of binding properties to the same antigen is introduced into T cells and adoptively transferred into mice with antigen-positive tumors. Extraction of RNA from tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) or lymphoid organs allowed high-throughput sequencing to determine which TCRs were selected in vivo. The results showed that CD8(+) T cells expressing the highest-affinity TCR variants were deleted in both the TIL population and in peripheral lymphoid tissues. In contrast, these same high-affinity TCR variants were preferentially expressed within CD4(+) T cells in the tumor, suggesting they had a role in antigen-specific tumor control. The findings thus revealed that the affinity of the transduced TCRs controlled the survival and tumor infiltration of the transferred T cells. Accordingly, the TCR library strategy enables rapid assessment of TCR-binding properties that promote peripheral T-cell survival and tumor elimination.

  19. Adoptive transfer of the generalized lymphoproliferative disease (gld) syndrome in nude beige mice.

    PubMed Central

    Froidevaux, S; Rosenblatt, N; Loor, F

    1992-01-01

    C57BL/6 nude beige mice (B6 nubg) were used as recipients for the transfer of haematopoietic cells from either B6 wild as control mice, or systemic lupus erythematous B6 mice homozygous for the recessive generalized lymphadenopathy disease (gld) locus. Both gld and wild cell grafts prolonged survival of the short-living B6 nubg recipients and restored some T-cell functions, as monitored by the presence of T-dependent Ig isotypes in the serum and responsiveness of spleen cells to a T-cell mitogen. Moreover, the [gld----nubg] chimeras but not the [wild----nubg] chimeras showed several similarities with gld control mice, particularly, a spleen and lymph node hyperplasia, elevated anti-single-stranded DNA antibody titres and a hyperglobulinaemia. This hyperglobulinaemia was however qualitatively different from the gld-type hyperglobulinaemia with an important contribution of the IgG1 isotype; the lymph node hyperplasia was also less marked than in B6 gld mice. PMID:1592442

  20. Alkylating agent melphalan augments the efficacy of adoptive immunotherapy using tumor-specific CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaoyun; Ding, Zhi-Chun; Cao, Yang; Liu, Chufeng; Habtetsion, Tsadik; Yu, Miao; Lemos, Henrique; Salman, Huda; Xu, Hongyan; Mellor, Andrew L.; Zhou, Gang

    2014-01-01

    In recent years the immune-potentiating effects of some widely used chemotherapeutic agents have been increasingly appreciated. This provides a rationale for combining conventional chemotherapy with immunotherapy strategies to achieve durable therapeutic benefits. Previous studies have implicated the immunomodulatory effects of melphalan, an alkylating agent commonly used to treat multiple myeloma, but the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. In the current study, we investigated the impact of melphalan on endogenous immune cells as well as adoptively transferred tumor-specific CD4+ T cells in tumor-bearing mice. We showed that melphalan treatment resulted in a rapid burst of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines during the cellular recovery phase after melphalan-induced myelo-leukodepletion. After melphalan treatment, tumor cells exhibited characteristics of immunogenic cell death, including membrane translocation of the endoplasmic reticulum resident calreticulin (CRT), and extracellular release of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1). In addition, there was enhanced tumor antigen uptake by dendritic cells in the tumor-draining lymph node. Consistent with these immunomodulatory effects, melphalan treatment of tumor-bearing mice led to the activation of the endogenous CD8+ T cells, and more importantly, effectively drove the clonal expansion and effector differentiation of adoptively transferred tumor-specific CD4+ T cells. Notably, the combination of melphalan and CD4+ T-cell adoptive cell therapy (ACT) was more efficacious than either treatment alone in prolonging the survival of mice with advanced B-cell lymphomas or colorectal tumors. These findings provide mechanistic insights into melphalan’s immunostimulatory effects, and demonstrate the therapeutic potential of combining melphalan with adoptive cell therapy utilizing antitumor CD4+ T cells. PMID:25560408

  1. Skeletal muscle stem cells adopt a dormant cell state post mortem and retain regenerative capacity.

    PubMed

    Latil, Mathilde; Rocheteau, Pierre; Châtre, Laurent; Sanulli, Serena; Mémet, Sylvie; Ricchetti, Miria; Tajbakhsh, Shahragim; Chrétien, Fabrice

    2012-01-01

    The accessibility to stem cells from healthy or diseased individuals, and the maintenance of their potency are challenging issues for stem cell biology. Here we report the isolation of viable and functional skeletal myogenic cells from humans up to 17 days, and mice up to 14 days post mortem, much longer beyond previous reports. Muscle stem cells are enriched in post mortem tissue, suggesting a selective survival advantage compared with other cell types. Transplantation of mouse muscle and haematopoietic stem cells regenerates tissues robustly. Cellular quiescence contributes to this cell viability where cells adopt a reversible dormant state characterized by reduced metabolic activity, a prolonged lag phase before the first cell division, elevated levels of reactive oxygen species and a transcriptional status less primed for commitment. Finally, severe hypoxia, or anoxia is critical for maintaining stem cell viability and regenerative capacity. Thus, these cells provide a useful resource for studying stem cell biology.

  2. Tracking in vivo dynamics of NK cells transferred in patients undergoing stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Killig, Monica; Friedrichs, Birte; Meisig, Johannes; Gentilini, Chiara; Blüthgen, Nils; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Labopin, Myriam; Basara, Nadezda; Pfrepper, Christian; Niederwieser, Dietger W; Uharek, Lutz; Romagnani, Chiara

    2014-09-01

    Haploidentical stem cell transplantation (haploSCT) offers an alternative treatment option for advanced leukemia patients lacking a HLA-compatible donor. Transfer of NK cells represents a promising therapeutic option in combination with SCT, as NK cells can promote graft versus leukemia with low risk of GVH disease. In this study, we show results from a phase I/II trial in which 24 acute myeloid leukemia patients underwent haploSCT in combination with early transfer of unmodified NK cells and observed a promising 2-year overall survival rate of 37%. By performing immunomonitoring and subsequent principal component analysis, we tracked donor NK-cell dynamics in the patients and distinguished between NK cells reconstituting from CD34(+) precursors, giving rise over time to a continuum of multiple differentiation stages, and adoptively transferred NK cells. Transferred NK cells displayed a mature phenotype and proliferated in vivo during the early days after haploSCT even in the absence of exogenous IL-2 administration. Moreover, we identified the NK-cell phenotype associated with in vivo expansion. Thus, our study indicates a promising path for adoptive transfer of unmodified NK cells in the treatment of high-risk acute myeloid leukemia.

  3. Transfer and adoption of advanced information technology solutions in resource-poor environments: the case of telemedicine systems adoption in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Kifle, Mengistu; Payton, Fay Cobb; Mbarika, Victor; Meso, Peter

    2010-04-01

    The study of the adoption of information technology (IT) by individuals has taken two approaches, one emphasizing rationalistic goal-oriented behavior and the other focusing on poignant forces that influence an individual's reaction to a new IT. These approaches are not necessarily mutually exclusive. Individuals' acceptance and subsequent usage of a new IT is predicated on both. Additionally, the tendency in past studies has been to examine either the rational or the poignant factors in the context of a "resource-rich" environment-one in which there is an abundance of IT, adequate infrastructure, and a high level of acculturation to technology solutions. Consequently, there is a clear need for the examination of these factors in resource-poor environments, where assumptions on technology abundance and technology culturation do not hold. We empirically test a model that explains the intention of physicians in a resource-poor environment (epitomized by rural Ethiopia) to adopt telemedicine systems. This model integrates the rational factors driving goal-oriented behavior with the poignant/emotive factors that are an innate part of each adopter's reaction to the new technology. We use the model to expose salient contextual factors that explain the acceptance behavior of individuals toward complex information and communications technology (ICT) solutions and implications of these on the management of technology transfer initiatives in a resource-poor environment. The model is parsimonious, yet explains 28% of the variance in the intention to adopt telemedicine systems and 58% in perceived ease of use. The theoretical and practical implications of this model are discussed. Namely, Sub-Saharan African, in general, and Ethiopian culture, in particular, plays an integral role in the adoption of ICT solutions. Organizational positions and roles among physicians, clinical professionals, and superiors stand to impact the adoption of telemedicine and other healthcare

  4. Adoptive Immunotherapy for Hematological Malignancies Using T Cells Gene-Modified to Express Tumor Antigen-Specific Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating clinical evidence suggests that adoptive T-cell immunotherapy could be a promising option for control of cancer; evident examples include the graft-vs-leukemia effect mediated by donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) and therapeutic infusion of ex vivo-expanded tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) for melanoma. Currently, along with advances in synthetic immunology, gene-modified T cells retargeted to defined tumor antigens have been introduced as “cellular drugs”. As the functional properties of the adoptive immune response mediated by T lymphocytes are decisively regulated by their T-cell receptors (TCRs), transfer of genes encoding target antigen-specific receptors should enable polyclonal T cells to be uniformly redirected toward cancer cells. Clinically, anticancer adoptive immunotherapy using genetically engineered T cells has an impressive track record. Notable examples include the dramatic benefit of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) gene-modified T cells redirected towards CD19 in patients with B-cell malignancy, and the encouraging results obtained with TCR gene-modified T cells redirected towards NY-ESO-1, a cancer-testis antigen, in patients with advanced melanoma and synovial cell sarcoma. This article overviews the current status of this treatment option, and discusses challenging issues that still restrain the full effectiveness of this strategy, especially in the context of hematological malignancy. PMID:25517545

  5. Cell transfer immunotherapy for metastatic solid cancer--what clinicians need to know.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Steven A

    2011-10-01

    Cancer immunotherapy using the adoptive transfer of autologous tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes results in objective cancer regression in 49-72% of patients with metastatic melanoma. In a pilot trial combining cell transfer with a maximum lymphodepleting regimen, complete durable responses were seen in 40% of patients, with complete responses ongoing beyond 3 to 7 years. Current approaches to cell transfer therapy using autologous cells genetically engineered to express conventional or chimeric T-cell receptors have mediated cancer regression in patients with metastatic melanoma, synovial sarcoma, neuroblastoma and refractory lymphoma. Adoptive cell transfer immunotherapy is a rapidly developing new approach to the therapy of metastatic cancer in humans. This Review will emphasize the current available applications of cell transfer immunotherapy for patients with cancer.

  6. Adoptive Transfer of Ex Vivo HO-1 Modified Bone Marrow–derived Macrophages Prevents Liver Ischemia and Reperfusion Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Bibo; Shen, Xiu-Da; Gao, Feng; Ji, Haofeng; Qiao, Bo; Zhai, Yuan; Farmer, Douglas G; Busuttil, Ronald W; Kupiec-Weglinski, Jerzy W

    2009-01-01

    Macrophages play a critical role in the pathophysiology of liver ischemia and reperfusion (IR) injury (IRI). However, macrophages that overexpress antioxidant heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) may exert profound anti-inflammatory functions. This study explores the cytoprotective effects and mechanisms of ex vivo modified HO-1-expressing bone marrow–derived macrophages (BMDMs) in well-defined mouse model of liver warm ischemia followed by reperfusion. Adoptive transfer of Ad-HO-1-transduced macrophages prevented IR-induced hepatocellular damage, as evidenced by depressed serum glutamic-oxaloacetic transaminase (sGOT) levels and preserved liver histology (Suzuki scores), compared to Ad-β-gal controls. This beneficial effect was reversed following concomitant treatment with HO-1 siRNA. Ad-HO-1-transfected macrophages significantly decreased local neutrophil accumulation, TNF-α/IL-1β, IFN-γ/E-selectin, and IP-10/MCP-1 expression, caspase-3 activity, and the frequency of apoptotic cells, as compared with controls. Unlike in controls, Ad-HO-1-transfected macrophages markedly increased hepatic expression of antiapoptotic Bcl-2/Bcl-xl and depressed caspase-3 activity. These results establish the precedent for a novel investigative tool and provide the rationale for a clinically attractive new strategy in which native macrophages can be transfected ex vivo with cytoprotective HO-1 and then infused, if needed, to prospective recipients exposed to hepatic IR–mediated local inflammation, such as during liver transplantation, resection, or trauma. PMID:20029397

  7. Differentiation of naive cord-blood T cells into CD19-specific cytolytic effectors for posttransplantation adoptive immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, Lisa Marie; Pfeiffer, Timothy; Olivares, Simon; Numbenjapon, Tontanai; Bennitt, Jennifer; Kim, Daniel; Smith, David; McNamara, George; Al-Kadhimi, Zaid; Rosenthal, Joseph; Forman, Stephen J.; Jensen, Michael C.; Cooper, Laurence J. N.

    2006-01-01

    Disease relapse is a barrier to achieving therapeutic success after unrelated umbilical cord-blood transplantation (UCBT) for B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). While adoptive transfer of donor-derived tumor-specific T cells is a conceptually attractive approach to eliminating residual disease after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, adoptive immunotherapy after UCBT is constrained by the difficulty of generating antigen-specific T cells from functionally naive umbilical cord-blood (UCB)–derived T cells. Therefore, to generate T cells that recognize B-ALL, we have developed a chimeric immunoreceptor to redirect the specificity of T cells for CD19, a B-lineage antigen, and expressed this transgene in UCB-derived T cells. An ex vivo process, which is compliant with current good manufacturing practice for T-cell trials, has been developed to genetically modify and numerically expand UCB-derived T cells into CD19-specific effector cells. These are capable of CD19-restricted cytokine production and cytolysis in vitro, as well as mediating regression of CD19+ tumor and being selectively eliminated in vivo. Moreover, time-lapse microscopy of the genetically modified T-cell clones revealed an ability to lyse CD19+ tumor cells specifically and repetitively. These data provide the rationale for infusing UCB-derived CD19-specific T cells after UCBT to reduce the incidence of CD19+ B-ALL relapse. PMID:16352804

  8. Successful immunotherapy of natural killer-resistant established pulmonary melanoma metastases by the intravenous adoptive transfer of syngeneic lymphocytes activated in vitro by interleukin 2

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    In previous in vitro studies, we have shown that murine splenocytes or cancer patient lymphocytes incubated in IL-2 become lytic for fresh syngeneic or autologous tumors. We have now performed the adoptive transfer of such lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells in a murine B16 metastasis model to test their in vivo efficacy. 1 X 10(8) LAK cells, infused intravenously into C57BL/6 mice with established B16 pulmonary metastases, led to a marked decreased in the number of lung nodules and improved survival. LAK cells administered 3 d after amputation of a tumor-bearing limb also decreased the incidence of spontaneous pulmonary metastases. LAK cells generated from tumor-bearer splenocytes had effects equivalent to those from normal animals, and this antimetastatic effect of the LAK cells did not require the prior administration of cyclophosphamide or other immunosuppressants. Fresh or unstimulated splenocytes had no effect. The antitumor effectors and precursors in vivo and in vitro were Thy-1+. The lymphokine required for the activation appeared to be interleukin 2 (IL-2), since incubation in partially purified supernatants from PMA pulsed EL-4 or Con A-pulsed splenocytes or purified Jurkat IL-2 led to the generation of LAK cells equally active in vivo. The use of IL-2-activated cells may provide a valuable method for the adoptive therapy of human neoplasms as well. PMID:6141211

  9. Immune Checkpoint Blockade to Improve Tumor Infiltrating Lymphocytes for Adoptive Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kodumudi, Krithika N.; Siegel, Jessica; Weber, Amy M.; Scott, Ellen; Sarnaik, Amod A.; Pilon-Thomas, Shari

    2016-01-01

    Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) has been associated with improved survival in cancer patients. Within the tumor microenvironment, regulatory cells and expression of co-inhibitory immune checkpoint molecules can lead to the inactivation of TIL. Hence, there is a need to develop strategies that disrupt these negative regulators to achieve robust anti-tumor immune responses. We evaluated the blockade of immune checkpoints and their effect on T cell infiltration and function. We examined the ability of TIL to induce tumor-specific immune responses in vitro and in vivo. TIL isolated from tumor bearing mice were tumor-specific and expressed co-inhibitory immune checkpoint molecules. Administration of monoclonal antibodies against immune checkpoints led to a significant delay in tumor growth. However, anti-PD-L1 antibody treated mice had a significant increase in T cell infiltration and IFN-γ production compared to other groups. Adoptive transfer of in vitro expanded TIL from tumors of anti-PD-L1 antibody treated mice led to a significant delay in tumor growth. Blockade of co-inhibitory immune checkpoints could be an effective strategy to improve TIL infiltration and function. PMID:27050669

  10. Human somatic cell nuclear transfer and cloning.

    PubMed

    2012-10-01

    This document presents arguments that conclude that it is unethical to use somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) for infertility treatment due to concerns about safety; the unknown impact of SCNT on children, families, and society; and the availability of other ethically acceptable means of assisted reproduction. This document replaces the ASRM Ethics Committee report titled, "Human somatic cell nuclear transfer (cloning)," last published in Fertil Steril 2000;74:873-6.

  11. T-cell adoptive immunotherapy using tumor-infiltrating T cells and genetically engineered TCR-T cells.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Hiroaki

    2016-07-01

    Immunotherapy has received the expectation that it should contribute to the therapy of cancer patients for >100 years. At long last, recent clinical trials of immunotherapy with immune checkpoint inhibitors and adoptive cell therapy with genetically engineered T cells have reported their remarkable efficacies. Nowadays, it is expected that T-cell adoptive immunotherapy can not only control tumor progression but even cure cancer in some patients. Conversely, severe adverse events associated with efficacy have frequently been reported in clinical trials, suggesting that the assessment and control of safety will be indispensable in the future development of the therapy. New approaches in T-cell adoptive immunotherapy such as reduction of adverse events, targeting of new antigens or utilization of allogeneic cells will open a new gate for less harmful and more effective immunological treatment of cancer patients. PMID:27127191

  12. Antibody responses to allergen Lol pIV are suppressed following adoptive transfer of B lymphocytes from the internal image anti-idiotypic antibody-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, E M; Kisil, F T

    1995-10-01

    An internal image anti-idiotypic antibody, designated B1/1, was generated against an idiotope (Id91) of the monoclonal antibody (mAb91) specific for Lol pIV. The administration of B1/1 in PBS, at doses ranging from 100 ng to 100 micrograms/mouse, to syngeneic Balb/c mice resulted in the suppression of the formation of anti-Lol pIV antibodies that possessed the Id91. Spleen cells obtained from the mice 2 weeks after the treatment with B1/1 (25 micrograms/mouse) were adoptively transferred intravenously into the syngeneic recipients which were challenged intraperitoneally with Lol pIV in alum 2 hr after the transfer. The recipients were boosted with Lol pIV 14 days later. It was demonstrated that the transfer of splenic B cells (but not of T cells) from B1/1-treated donors induced a significant suppression of not only the level of IgE and IgG antibodies to Lol pIV, but also the level of antibodies possessing the Id91. Treatment of the B cells with mAb91 plus complement abrogated their ability to transfer the suppression. This study indicates that the treatment with the anti-Id B1/1 generated B cells that were characterized, serologically, as possessing the anti-Id-like antibodies on their surface and were responsible for transferring the suppression of the formation of antibodies to allergen Lol pIV and the expression of Id91.

  13. Mass transfer in fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, R. D., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Developments in the following areas are reported: surface area and pore size distribution in electrolyte matrices, electron microscopy of electrolyte matrices, surface tension of KOH solutions, water transport in fuel cells, and effectiveness factors for fuel cell components.

  14. Bortezomib Improves Adoptive T-cell Therapy by Sensitizing Cancer Cells to FasL Cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Shanker, Anil; Pellom, Samuel T; Dudimah, Duafalia F; Thounaojam, Menaka C; de Kluyver, Rachel L; Brooks, Alan D; Yagita, Hideo; McVicar, Daniel W; Murphy, William J; Longo, Dan L; Sayers, Thomas J

    2015-12-15

    Cancer immunotherapy shows great promise but many patients fail to show objective responses, including in cancers that can respond well, such as melanoma and renal adenocarcinoma. The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib sensitizes solid tumors to apoptosis in response to TNF-family death ligands. Because T cells provide multiple death ligands at the tumor site, we investigated the effects of bortezomib on T-cell responses in immunotherapy models involving low-avidity antigens. Bortezomib did not affect lymphocyte or tissue-resident CD11c(+)CD8(+) dendritic cell counts in tumor-bearing mice, did not inhibit dendritic cell expression of costimulatory molecules, and did not decrease MHC class I/II-associated antigen presentation to cognate T cells. Rather, bortezomib activated NF-κB p65 in CD8(+) T cells, stabilizing expression of T-cell receptor CD3ζ and IL2 receptor-α, while maintaining IFNγ secretion to improve FasL-mediated tumor lysis. Notably, bortezomib increased tumor cell surface expression of Fas in mice as well as human melanoma tissue from a responsive patient. In renal tumor-bearing immunodeficient Rag2(-/-) mice, bortezomib treatment after adoptive T-cell immunotherapy reduced lung metastases and enhanced host survival. Our findings highlight the potential of proteasome inhibitors to enhance antitumor T-cell function in the context of cancer immunotherapy.

  15. Interorganizational transfer of technology - A study of adoption of NASA innovations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakrabarti, A. K.; Rubenstein, A. H.

    1976-01-01

    The paper describes a study on the effects of top management support, various techno-economic factors, organizational climate, and decision-making modes on the adoption of NASA innovations. Field research consisted of interviews and questionnaires directed to sixty-five organizations. Forty-five test cases where different decisions for adoption of ideas for new products or processes were made on NASA Tech Briefs were studied in relation to the effects of various factors on the degree of success of adoption, including: (1) the degree of general connection of the technology to the firm's existing operation, (2) the specificity of the relationship between the technology and some existing and recognized problem, (3) the degree of urgency of the problem to which the technology was related, (4) maturity of technology available to implement the technology, (5) availability of personnel and financial resources to implement the technology, (6) degree of top management interest, (7) the use of confrontation in joint-decision, (8) the use of smoothing in decision-making, and (9) the use of forcing in decision-making. It was found that top managements interest was important in the product cases only, and that the success of process innovations was dependent on the quality of information and the specificity of the relationship between the technology and some recognized existing problem.

  16. Adoptive Cell Therapy of Melanoma with Cytokine-induced Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Sung; Kim, Yong Guk; Pyo, Minji; Lee, Hong Kyung; Hong, Jin Tae; Kim, Youngsoo

    2015-01-01

    Melanoma is the most aggressive skin cancer and its incidence is gradually increasing worldwide. Patients with metastatic melanoma have a very poor prognosis (estimated 5-year survival rate of <16%). In the last few years, several drugs have been approved for malignant melanoma, such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors and immune checkpoint blockades. Although new therapeutic agents have improved progression-free and overall survival, their use is limited by drug resistance and drug-related toxicity. At the same time, adoptive cell therapy of metastatic melanoma with tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes has shown promising results in preclinical and clinical studies. In this review, we summarize the currently available drugs for treatment of malignant melanoma. In addition, we suggest cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells as another candidate approach for adoptive cell therapy of melanoma. Our preclinical study and several previous studies have shown that CIK cells have potent anti-tumor activity against melanomas in vitro and in an in vivo human tumor xenograft model without any toxicity. PMID:25922594

  17. Rapid and efficient transfer of the T cell aging marker CD57 from glioblastoma stem cells to CAR T cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xuekai; Niedermann, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) holds great promise for cancer treatment. We recently developed CAR T cells targeting the prototypic cancer stem cell marker AC133 and showed that these CAR T cells killed AC133+ glioblastoma stem cells (GBM-SCs) in vitro and inhibited the growth of brain tumors initiated from GBM-SCs in xenograft mouse models in vivo. Upon coincubation with GBM-SCs, we observed strong upregulation of the T cell aging marker CD57, but other phenotypical or functional changes usually associated with terminal T cell differentiation could not immediately be detected. Here, we provide evidence suggesting that CD57 is rapidly and efficiently transferred from CD57+ GBM-SCs to preactivated T cells and that the transfer is greatly enhanced by specific CAR/ligand interaction. After separation from CD57+ tumor cells, CD57 epitope expression on T cells decreased only slowly over several days. We conclude that CD57 transfer from tumor cells to T cells may occur in patients with CD57+ tumors and that it may have to be considered in the interpretation of phenotyping results for tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and perhaps also in the characterization of tumor-specific T cells from tumor or lymph node homogenates or peripheral blood mononuclear cells. PMID:26097880

  18. Charge transfer on the metallic atom-pair bond, and the crystal structures adopted by intermetallic compounds.

    PubMed

    Rajasekharan, T; Seshubai, V

    2012-01-01

    It has been argued in our recent papers that the heat of formation of intermetallic compounds is mostly concentrated in the nearest neighbor unlike atom-pair bonds, and that the positive term in Miedema's equation is associated with charge transfer on the bond to maintain electroneutrality. In this paper, taking examples of some well populated crystal-structure types such as MgCu(2), AsNa(3), AuCu(3), MoSi(2) and SiCr(3) types, the effect of such charge transfer on the crystal structures adopted by intermetallic compounds is examined. It is shown that the correlation between the observed size changes of atoms on alloying and their electronegativity differences is supportive of the idea of charge transfer between atoms. It is argued that the electronegativity and valence differences need to be of the required magnitude and direction to alter, through charge transfer, the elemental radius ratios R(A)/R(B) to the internal radius ratios r(A)/r(B) allowed by the structure types. Since the size change of atoms on alloying is highly correlated to how different R(A)/R(B) is from the ideal radius ratio for a structure type, the lattice parameters of intermetallic compounds can be predicted with excellent accuracy knowing R(A)/R(B). A practical application of the approach developed in our recent papers to superalloy design is presented. PMID:22186292

  19. Administrative simplification: adoption of operating rules for health care electronic funds transfers (EFT) and remittance advice transactions. Interim final rule with comment period.

    PubMed

    2012-08-10

    This interim final rule with comment period implements parts of section 1104 of the Affordable Care Act which requires the adoption of operating rules for the health care electronic funds transfers (EFT) and remittance advice transaction. PMID:22888504

  20. Reprogramming CD19-specific T cells with IL-21 signaling can improve adoptive immunotherapy of B-lineage malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Harjeet; Figliola, Matthew J.; Dawson, Margaret J.; Huls, Helen; Olivares, Simon; Switzer, Kirsten; Mi, Tiejuan; Maiti, Sourindra; Kebriaei, Partow; Lee, Dean A.; Champlin, Richard E.; Cooper, Laurence J.N.

    2011-01-01

    Improving the therapeutic efficacy of T cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) represents an important goal in efforts to control B-cell malignancies. Recently an intrinsic strategy has been developed to modify the CAR itself to improve T-cell signaling. Here we report a second extrinsic approach based on altering the culture milieu to numerically expand CAR+ T cells with a desired phenotype. For, the addition of IL-21 to tissue culture improves CAR-dependent T-cell effector functions. We used electrotransfer of Sleeping Beauty (SB) system to introduce a CAR transposon and selectively propagate CAR+ T cells on CD19+ artificial antigen-presenting cells (aAPC). When IL-21 was present, there was preferential numeric expansion of CD19-specific T cells which lysed and produced IFN-γ in response to CD19. Populations of these numerically expanded CAR+ T cells displayed an early memory surface phenotype characterized as CD62L+CD28+ and a transcriptional profile of naïve T cells. In contrast, T cells propagated with only exogenous IL-2 tended to result in an overgrowth of CD19-specific CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of CAR+ T cells cultured with IL-21 exhibited improved control of CD19+ B-cell malignancy in mice. To provide coordinated signaling to propagate CAR+ T cells, we developed a novel mutein of IL-21 bound to the cell surface of aAPC that replaced the need for soluble IL-21. Our findings demonstrate that IL-21 can provide an extrinsic reprogramming signal to generate desired CAR+ T cells for effective immunotherapy. PMID:21558388

  1. Reprogramming CD19-specific T cells with IL-21 signaling can improve adoptive immunotherapy of B-lineage malignancies.

    PubMed

    Singh, Harjeet; Figliola, Matthew J; Dawson, Margaret J; Huls, Helen; Olivares, Simon; Switzer, Kirsten; Mi, Tiejuan; Maiti, Sourindra; Kebriaei, Partow; Lee, Dean A; Champlin, Richard E; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2011-05-15

    Improving the therapeutic efficacy of T cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) represents an important goal in efforts to control B-cell malignancies. Recently an intrinsic strategy has been developed to modify the CAR itself to improve T-cell signaling. Here we report a second extrinsic approach based on altering the culture milieu to numerically expand CAR(+) T cells with a desired phenotype, for the addition of interleukin (IL)-21 to tissue culture improves CAR-dependent T-cell effector functions. We used electrotransfer of Sleeping Beauty system to introduce a CAR transposon and selectively propagate CAR(+) T cells on CD19(+) artificial antigen-presenting cells (aAPC). When IL-21 was present, there was preferential numeric expansion of CD19-specific T cells which lysed and produced IFN-γ in response to CD19. Populations of these numerically expanded CAR(+) T cells displayed an early memory surface phenotype characterized as CD62L(+)CD28(+) and a transcriptional profile of naïve T cells. In contrast, T cells propagated with only exogenous IL-2 tended to result in an overgrowth of CD19-specific CD4(+) T cells. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of CAR(+) T cells cultured with IL-21 exhibited improved control of CD19(+) B-cell malignancy in mice. To provide coordinated signaling to propagate CAR(+) T cells, we developed a novel mutein of IL-21 bound to the cell surface of aAPC that replaced the need for soluble IL-21. Our findings show that IL-21 can provide an extrinsic reprogramming signal to generate desired CAR(+) T cells for effective immunotherapy. PMID:21558388

  2. Adoptive Therapy with Chimeric Antigen Receptor Modified T Cells of Defined Subset Composition

    PubMed Central

    Riddell, Stanley R.; Sommermeyer, Daniel; Berger, Carolina; Liu, Lingfeng (Steven); Balakrishnan, Ashwini; Salter, Alex; Hudecek, Michael; Maloney, David G.; Turtle, Cameron J.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to engineer T cells to recognize tumor cells through genetic modification with a synthetic chimeric antigen receptor has ushered in a new era in cancer immunotherapy. The most advanced clinical applications are in in targeting CD19 on B cell malignancies. The clinical trials of CD19 CAR therapy have thus far not attempted to select defined subsets prior to transduction or imposed uniformity of the CD4 and CD8 cell composition of the cell products. This review will discuss the rationale for and challenges to utilizing adoptive therapy with genetically modified T cells of defined subset and phenotypic composition. PMID:24667960

  3. Anti-CD137 monoclonal antibodies and adoptive T cell therapy: a perfect marriage?

    PubMed

    Weigelin, Bettina; Bolaños, Elixabet; Rodriguez-Ruiz, Maria E; Martinez-Forero, Ivan; Friedl, Peter; Melero, Ignacio

    2016-05-01

    CD137(4-1BB) costimulation and adoptive T cell therapy strongly synergize in terms of achieving maximal efficacy against experimental cancers. These costimulatory biological functions of CD137 have been exploited by means of introducing the CD137 signaling domain in clinically successful chimeric antigen receptors and to more efficiently expand T cells in culture. In addition, immunomagnetic sorting of CD137-positive T cells among tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes selects for the fittest antitumor T lymphocytes for subsequent cultures. In mouse models, co-infusion of both agonist antibodies and T cells attains marked synergistic effects that result from more focused and intense cytolytic activity visualized under in vivo microscopy and from more efficient entrance of T cells into the tumor through the vasculature. These several levels of dynamic interaction between adoptive T cell therapy and CD137 offer much opportunity to raise the efficacy of current cancer immunotherapies.

  4. Serial Low Doses of Sorafenib Enhance Therapeutic Efficacy of Adoptive T Cell Therapy in a Murine Model by Improving Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ren-Shyan; Hwang, Jeng-Jong

    2014-01-01

    Requirements of large numbers of transferred T cells and various immunosuppressive factors and cells in the tumor microenvironment limit the applications of adoptive T cells therapy (ACT) in clinic. Accumulating evidences show that chemotherapeutic drugs could act as immune supportive instead of immunosuppressive agents when proper dosage is used, and combined with immunotherapy often results in better treatment outcomes than monotherapy. Controversial immunomodulation effects of sorafenib, a multi-kinases inhibitor, at high and low doses have been reported in several types of cancer. However, what is the range of the low-dose sorafenib will influence the host immunity and responses of ACT is still ambiguous. Here we used a well-established E.G7/OT-1 murine model to understand the effects of serial low doses of sorafenib on both tumor microenvironment and transferred CD8+ T cells and the underlying mechanisms. Sorafenib lowered the expressions of immunosuppressive factors, and enhanced functions and migrations of transferred CD8+ T cells through inhibition of STAT3 and other immunosuppressive factors. CD8+ T cells were transduced with granzyme B promoter for driving imaging reporters to visualize the activation and distribution of transferred CD8+ T cells prior to adoptive transfer. Better activations of CD8+ T cells and tumor inhibitions were found in the combinational group compared with CD8+ T cells or sorafenib alone groups. Not only immunosuppressive factors but myeloid derived suppressive cells (MDSCs) and regulatory T cells (Tregs) were decreased in sorafenib-treated group, indicating that augmentation of tumor inhibition and function of CD8+ T cells by serial low doses of sorafenib were via reversing the immunosuppressive microenvironment. These results revealed that the tumor inhibitions of sorafenib not only through eradicating tumor cells but modifying tumor microenvironment, which helps outcomes of ACT significantly. PMID:25333973

  5. Transferring isolated mitochondria into tissue culture cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yi-Wei; Koob, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a new method for introducing large numbers of isolated mitochondria into tissue culture cells. Direct microinjection of mitochondria into typical mammalian cells has been found to be impractical due to the large size of mitochondria relative to microinjection needles. To circumvent this problem, we inject isolated mitochondria through appropriately sized microinjection needles into rodent oocytes or single-cell embryos, which are much larger than tissue culture cells, and then withdraw a ‘mitocytoplast’ cell fragment containing the injected mitochondria using a modified holding needle. These mitocytoplasts are then fused to recipient cells through viral-mediated membrane fusion and the injected mitochondria are transferred into the cytoplasm of the tissue culture cell. Since mouse oocytes contain large numbers of mouse mitochondria that repopulate recipient mouse cells along with the injected mitochondria, we used either gerbil single-cell embryos or rat oocytes to package injected mouse mitochondria. We found that the gerbil mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) is not maintained in recipient rho0 mouse cells and that rat mtDNA initially replicated but was soon completely replaced by the injected mouse mtDNA, and so with both procedures mouse cells homoplasmic for the mouse mtDNA in the injected mitochondria were obtained. PMID:22753025

  6. Double-layered cell transfer technology for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Akazawa, Keiko; Iwasaki, Kengo; Nagata, Mizuki; Yokoyama, Naoki; Ayame, Hirohito; Yamaki, Kazumasa; Tanaka, Yuichi; Honda, Izumi; Morioka, Chikako; Kimura, Tsuyoshi; Komaki, Motohiro; Kishida, Akio; Izumi, Yuichi; Morita, Ikuo

    2016-01-01

    For cell-based medicine, to mimic in vivo cellular localization, various tissue engineering approaches have been studied to obtain a desirable arrangement of cells on scaffold materials. We have developed a novel method of cell manipulation called "cell transfer technology", enabling the transfer of cultured cells onto scaffold materials, and controlling cell topology. Here we show that using this technique, two different cell types can be transferred onto a scaffold surface as stable double layers or in patterned arrangements. Various combinations of adherent cells were transferred to a scaffold, amniotic membrane, in overlapping bilayers (double-layered cell transfer), and transferred cells showed stability upon deformations of the material including folding and trimming. Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells from periodontal ligaments (PDLSC) and osteoblasts, using double-layered cell transfer significantly enhanced bone formation, when compared to single cell type transplantation. Our findings suggest that this double-layer cell transfer is useful to produce a cell transplantation material that can bear two cell layers. Moreover, the transplantation of an amniotic membrane with PDLSCs/osteoblasts by cell transfer technology has therapeutic potential for bone defects. We conclude that cell transfer technology provides a novel and unique cell transplantation method for bone regeneration. PMID:27624174

  7. Double-layered cell transfer technology for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Akazawa, Keiko; Iwasaki, Kengo; Nagata, Mizuki; Yokoyama, Naoki; Ayame, Hirohito; Yamaki, Kazumasa; Tanaka, Yuichi; Honda, Izumi; Morioka, Chikako; Kimura, Tsuyoshi; Komaki, Motohiro; Kishida, Akio; Izumi, Yuichi; Morita, Ikuo

    2016-09-14

    For cell-based medicine, to mimic in vivo cellular localization, various tissue engineering approaches have been studied to obtain a desirable arrangement of cells on scaffold materials. We have developed a novel method of cell manipulation called "cell transfer technology", enabling the transfer of cultured cells onto scaffold materials, and controlling cell topology. Here we show that using this technique, two different cell types can be transferred onto a scaffold surface as stable double layers or in patterned arrangements. Various combinations of adherent cells were transferred to a scaffold, amniotic membrane, in overlapping bilayers (double-layered cell transfer), and transferred cells showed stability upon deformations of the material including folding and trimming. Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells from periodontal ligaments (PDLSC) and osteoblasts, using double-layered cell transfer significantly enhanced bone formation, when compared to single cell type transplantation. Our findings suggest that this double-layer cell transfer is useful to produce a cell transplantation material that can bear two cell layers. Moreover, the transplantation of an amniotic membrane with PDLSCs/osteoblasts by cell transfer technology has therapeutic potential for bone defects. We conclude that cell transfer technology provides a novel and unique cell transplantation method for bone regeneration.

  8. Double-layered cell transfer technology for bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Akazawa, Keiko; Iwasaki, Kengo; Nagata, Mizuki; Yokoyama, Naoki; Ayame, Hirohito; Yamaki, Kazumasa; Tanaka, Yuichi; Honda, Izumi; Morioka, Chikako; Kimura, Tsuyoshi; Komaki, Motohiro; Kishida, Akio; Izumi, Yuichi; Morita, Ikuo

    2016-01-01

    For cell-based medicine, to mimic in vivo cellular localization, various tissue engineering approaches have been studied to obtain a desirable arrangement of cells on scaffold materials. We have developed a novel method of cell manipulation called “cell transfer technology”, enabling the transfer of cultured cells onto scaffold materials, and controlling cell topology. Here we show that using this technique, two different cell types can be transferred onto a scaffold surface as stable double layers or in patterned arrangements. Various combinations of adherent cells were transferred to a scaffold, amniotic membrane, in overlapping bilayers (double-layered cell transfer), and transferred cells showed stability upon deformations of the material including folding and trimming. Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells from periodontal ligaments (PDLSC) and osteoblasts, using double-layered cell transfer significantly enhanced bone formation, when compared to single cell type transplantation. Our findings suggest that this double-layer cell transfer is useful to produce a cell transplantation material that can bear two cell layers. Moreover, the transplantation of an amniotic membrane with PDLSCs/osteoblasts by cell transfer technology has therapeutic potential for bone defects. We conclude that cell transfer technology provides a novel and unique cell transplantation method for bone regeneration. PMID:27624174

  9. Next generation adoptive immunotherapy--human T cells as carriers of therapeutic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, M W; Kahns, L; Hansen, T; Sorensen, P G; Björkdahl, O; Jensen, M R; Gundersen, H J G; Bjørnholm, T

    2007-12-01

    An important step in adoptive immunotherapy in general and specifically with respect to cancer treatment is the initiation of an inflammatory T cell response at the tumor site. Here we suggest a new concept for a controlled inflammatory response in which the intrinsic cytotoxic properties of T cells are upgraded with the properties of nanoparticles transfected into the T cells during the ex vivo expansion process. We report in vitro upgrading of human T cells using PEGylated boron carbide nanoparticles functionalised with a translocation peptide aimed at Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). A key finding is that the metabolism of such upgraded human T cells were not affected by a payload of 0.13 pg boron per cell and that the nanoparticles were retained in the cell population after several cell divisions. This is vital for transporting nanoparticles by T cells to the tumor site.

  10. Near-Infrared Imaging of Adoptive Immune Cell Therapy in Breast Cancer Model Using Cell Membrane Labeling

    PubMed Central

    Youniss, Fatma M.; Sundaresan, Gobalakrishnan; Graham, Laura J.; Wang, Li; Berry, Collin R.; Dewkar, Gajanan K.; Jose, Purnima; Bear, Harry D.; Zweit, Jamal

    2014-01-01

    The overall objective of this study is to non-invasively image and assess tumor targeting and retention of directly labeled T-lymphocytes following their adoptive transfer in mice. T-lymphocytes obtained from draining lymph nodes of 4T1 (murine breast cancer cell) sensitized BALB/C mice were activated in-vitro with Bryostatin/Ionomycin for 18 hours, and were grown in the presence of Interleukin-2 for 6 days. T-lymphocytes were then directly labeled with 1,1-dioctadecyltetramethyl indotricarbocyanine Iodide (DiR), a lipophilic near infrared fluorescent dye that labels the cell membrane. Assays for viability, proliferation, and function of labeled T-lymphocytes showed that they were unaffected by DiR labeling. The DiR labeled cells were injected via tail vein in mice bearing 4T1 tumors in the flank. In some cases labeled 4T1 specific T-lymphocytes were injected a week before 4T1 tumor cell implantation. Multi-spectral in vivo fluorescence imaging was done to subtract the autofluorescence and isolate the near infrared signal carried by the T-lymphocytes. In recipient mice with established 4T1 tumors, labeled 4T1 specific T-lymphocytes showed marked tumor retention, which peaked 6 days post infusion and persisted at the tumor site for up to 3 weeks. When 4T1 tumor cells were implanted 1-week post-infusion of labeled T-lymphocytes, T-lymphocytes responded to the immunologic challenge and accumulated at the site of 4T1 cell implantation within two hours and the signal persisted for 2 more weeks. Tumor accumulation of labeled 4T1 specific T-lymphocytes was absent in mice bearing Meth A sarcoma tumors. When lysate of 4T1 specific labeled T-lymphocytes was injected into 4T1 tumor bearing mice the near infrared signal was not detected at the tumor site. In conclusion, our validated results confirm that the near infrared signal detected at the tumor site represents the DiR labeled 4T1 specific viable T-lymphocytes and their response to immunologic challenge can be imaged in

  11. Adoptive immunotherapy combined chemoradiotherapy for non-small-cell lung cancer: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Qian, Haili; Wang, Haijuan; Guan, Xiuwen; Yi, Zongbi; Ma, Fei

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacies between adoptive immunotherapy combined chemoradiotherapy and chemoradiotherapy alone in patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The databases PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane database were searched to identify eligible clinical trials. Data analyses were carried out using a comprehensive meta-analysis program, version 2 software. A total of seven articles were finally included in the analysis. Meta-analyses showed that compared with chemoradiotherapy alone, adoptive immunotherapy combined with chemoradiotherapy could improve the 2-year overall survival [odds ratio (OR)=2.45, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.60-3.75, P<0.001], but not 2-year progression-free survival (OR=1.81, 95% CI: 0.61-5.36, P=0.284). Specifically, early (OR=3.32, 95% CI: 1.38-7.95, P<0.01) but not advanced (OR=3.75, 95% CI: 0.96-14.68, P=0.057) NSCLC patients were likely to gain a large benefit from the adoptive immunotherapy. Most of the adoptive immunotherapy-induced adverse effects were self-limited, mainly including fever, shiver, nausea, fatigue, etc. and severe toxicities were not observed. Adoptive immunotherapy combined with chemoradiotherapy can delay the recurrence of NSCLC and improve survival in patients, where the benefits are even more significant in patients with early-stage NSCLC. PMID:26872311

  12. Antigen-specific culture of memory-like CD8 T cells for adoptive immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Litterman, Adam J; Zellmer, David M; LaRue, Rebecca S; Jameson, Stephen C; Largaespada, David A

    2014-09-01

    Cytotoxic T cells typically are expanded ex vivo in culture with IL2 for adoptive immunotherapy. This culture period leads to a differentiated phenotype and acquisition of effector function, as well as a loss of in vivo proliferative capability and antitumor efficacy. Here, we report antigen-specific and polyclonal expansion of cytotoxic T cells in a cocktail of cytokines and small molecules that leads to a memory-like phenotype in mouse and human cells even during extended culture, leading to enhanced in vivo expansion and tumor control in mice.

  13. Retargeted human avidin-CAR T cells for adoptive immunotherapy of EGFRvIII expressing gliomas and their evaluation via optical imaging

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zhiping; Sun, Haojie; Zhang, Mingzhi; Zhang, Jianning; Liu, Shuang; Hao, Limin; Lu, Guoqiu; Zheng, Kangcheng; Gong, Xikui; Wu, Di; Wang, Fan; Shen, Li

    2015-01-01

    There has been significant progress in the design of chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) for adoptive immunotherapy targeting tumor-associated antigens. However, the challenge of monitoring the therapy in real time has been continually ignored. To address this issue, we developed optical molecular imaging approaches to evaluate a recently reported novel CAR strategy for adoptive immunotherapy against glioma xenografts expressing EGFRvIII. We initially biotinylated a novel anti-EGFRvIII monoclonal antibody (biotin-4G1) to pre-target EGFRvIII+ gliomas and then redirect activated avidin-CAR expressing T cells against the pre-targeted biotin-4G1. By optical imaging study and bio-distribution analysis, we confirmed the specificity of pre-target and target and determined the optimal time for T cells adoptive transfer in vivo. The results showed this therapeutic strategy offered efficient therapy effect to EGFRvIII+ glioma-bearing mice and implied that optical imaging is a highly useful tool in aiding in the instruction of clinical CAR-T cells adoptive transfer in future. PMID:26124178

  14. Cancer treatment by photodynamic therapy combined with NK-cell-line-based adoptive immunotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korbelik, Mladen; Sun, Jinghai

    1998-05-01

    Treatment of solid cancers by photodynamic therapy (PDT) triggers a strong acute inflammatory reaction localized to the illuminated malignant tissue. This event is regulated by a massive release of various potent mediators which have a profound effect not only on local host cell populations, but also attract different types of immune cells to the treated tumor. Phagocytosis of PDT-damaged cancerous cells by antigen presenting cells, such as activated tumor associated macrophages, enables the recognition of even poorly immunogenic tumors by specific immune effector cells and the generation of immune memory populations. Because of its inflammatory/immune character, PDT is exceptionally responsive to adjuvant treatments with various types of immunotherapy. Combining PDT with immuneactivators, such as cytokines or other specific or non-specific immune agents, rendered marked improvements in tumor cures with various cancer models. Another clinically attractive strategy is adoptive immunotherapy, and the prospects of its use in conjunction with PDT are outlined.

  15. Retrotransposition and Cell-to-Cell Transfer of Foamy Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Heinkelein, Martin; Rammling, Matthias; Juretzek, Thomas; Lindemann, Dirk; Rethwilm, Axel

    2003-01-01

    A remarkable feature of the prototype foamy virus (PFV) replication pathway has been reported to consist of the ability to retrotranspose intracellularly with high efficiency (M. Heinkelein, T. Pietschmann, G. Jármy, M. Dressler, H. Imrich, J. Thurow, D. Lindemann, M. Bock, A. Moebes, J. Roy, O. Herchenröder, and A. Rethwilm, EMBO J. 19:3436-3345, 2000). PFV intracellular retrotransposition (IRT) was reported to be enhanced by coexpression of fusion-defective envelope protein. To investigate the possibility of cell-to-cell transfer of PFV genomes, which could mimic IRT, we performed cocultivation experiments with cells transfected with an IRT-competent and marker gene-expressing PFV vector together with cells expressing a different marker and measured cells positive for both markers. The findings corroborated the initial report on IRT of Env-deficient PFV. Furthermore, they indicated that viral cores that have incorporated fusion-deficient Env can be transferred from cell to cell in a cell type-specific manor. One possible explanation consists of a minor alternative cleavage site in Env that can be used to expose the fusion peptide of the Env transmembrane protein, which appears to be required for virus uptake. PMID:14557671

  16. Preparing clinical grade Ag-specific T cells for adoptive immunotherapy trials

    PubMed Central

    DiGiusto, DL; Cooper, LJN

    2007-01-01

    The production of clinical-grade T cells for adoptive immunotherapy has evolved from the ex vivo numerical expansion of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes to sophisticated bioengineering processes often requiring cell selection, genetic modification and other extensive tissue culture manipulations, to produce desired cells with improved therapeutic potential. Advancements in understanding the biology of lymphocyte signaling, activation, homing and sustained in vivo proliferative potential have redefined the strategies used to produce T cells suitable for clinical investigation. When combined with new technical methods in cell processing and culturing, the therapeutic potential of T cells manufactured in academic centers has improved dramatically. Paralleling these technical achievements in cell manufacturing is the development of broadly applied regulatory standards that define the requirements for the clinical implementation of cell products with ever-increasing complexity. In concert with academic facilities operating in compliance with current good manufacturing practice, the prescribing physician can now infuse T cells with a highly selected or endowed phenotype that has been uniformly manufactured according to standard operating procedures and that meets federal guidelines for quality of investigational cell products. In this review we address salient issues related to the technical, immunologic, practical and regulatory aspects of manufacturing these advanced T-cell products for clinical use. PMID:17943498

  17. Role of donor lymphoid cells in the transfer of allograft tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, G.E.; Watts, L.M.

    1985-12-01

    Tolerance to murine skin allografts across a MHC disparity was induced by conditioning primary hosts with sublethal fractionated total-body irradiation (FTBI) and transfusion of allogeneic bone marrow (BM). Tolerance could be adoptively transferred to secondary hosts conditioned by FTBI with infusion of spleen cells from hosts bearing intact skin allografts greater than 60 days. Tolerance could not be transferred by tolerant host spleen (THS) preparations from which cells of the donor genotype had been deleted by cytotoxic alloantisera. Deletion of host genotype cells, however, did not diminish the capability of THS to transfer tolerance. All of the tolerizing activity of THS appeared to reside within cells of the donor genotype. Small numbers of normal donor spleen cells could induce tolerance in FTBI hosts but only at the expense of very high mortality, in contrast to the low mortality observed with tolerizing injections of allogeneic donor cells from THS or injections of normal semiallogeneic F1 hybrid spleen cells. If an active immune response is responsible for tolerance induction/transfer in this model, allogeneic donor lymphoid cells derived from BM, in contrast to donor spleen cells, must be capable of mounting this response without concomitant severe GVHD. In future experiments, cells of donor genotype can be isolated from THS and purified in sufficient numbers to compare their tolerizing efficiency vs. that of normal donor cells, detect possible suppression of normal host cell alloreactivity in vitro and identify the donor cell phenotypes involved.

  18. Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer in the Mouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishigami, Satoshi; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has become a unique and powerful tool for epigenetic reprogramming research and gene manipulation in animals since “Dolly,” the first animal cloned from an adult cell was reported in 1997. Although the success rates of somatic cloning have been inefficient and the mechanism of reprogramming is still largely unknown, this technique has been proven to work in more than 10 mammalian species. Among them, the mouse provides the best model for both basic and applied research of somatic cloning because of its abounding genetic resources, rapid sexual maturity and propagation, minimal requirements for housing, etc. This chapter describes a basic protocol for mouse cloning using cumulus cells, the most popular cell type for NT, in which donor nuclei are directly injected into the oocyte using a piezo-actuated micromanipulator. In particular, we focus on a new, more efficient mouse cloning protocol using trichostatin A (TSA), a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, which increases both in vitro and in vivo developmental rates from twofold to fivefold. This new method including TSA will be helpful to establish mouse cloning in many laboratories.

  19. Cytotoxic function of umbilical cord blood natural killer cells: relevance to adoptive immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Lin, Syh-Jae; Kuo, Ming-Ling

    2011-11-01

    Decreased graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), ease of accessibility, and sustained engraftment encourage the use of umbilical cord blood (UCB) as an alternative source to bone marrow for immune reconstitution in children with leukemia. Natural killer (NK) cells rapidly expand after stem cell transplantation and are important for regulating GVHD and providing graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effects. This review highlights the phenotypic and functional differences between UCB NK cells and adult peripheral blood (APB) NK cells, and discusses the possible therapeutic benefit of using UCB NK cells for adoptive immunotherapy in leukemia. Alloreactive NK cells show potent cytotoxic activities against human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-nonidentical leukemic cells and reduce leukemia relapses. The higher numbers of NK progenitors in UCB makes it a convenient source for ex vivo expansion of UCB NK cells for posttransplant treatment. UCB NK cells readily respond to interleukin-15, which may greatly enhance their antitumor effect. Activation and expansion protocols for UCB NK cells are currently being developed.

  20. Nanoparticle energy transfer on the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Bene, László; Szentesi, Gergely; Mátyus, László; Gáspár, Rezso; Damjanovich, Sándor

    2005-01-01

    Membrane topology of receptors plays an important role in shaping transmembrane signalling of cells. Among the methods used for characterizing receptor clusters, fluorescence resonance energy transfer between a donor and acceptor fluorophore plays a unique role based on its capability of detecting molecular level (2-10 nm) proximities of receptors in physiological conditions. Recent development of biotechnology has made possible the usage of colloidal gold particles in a large size range for specific labelling of cells for the purposes of electron microscopy. However, by combining metal and fluorophore labelling of cells, the versatility of metal-fluorophore interactions opens the way for new applications by detecting the presence of the metal particles by the methods of fluorescence spectroscopy. An outstanding feature of the metal nanoparticle-fluorophore interaction is that the metal particle can enhance spontaneous emission of the fluorophore in a distance-dependent fashion, in an interaction range essentially determined by the size of the nanoparticle. In our work enhanced fluorescence of rhodamine and cyanine dyes was observed in the vicinity of immunogold nanoparticles on the surface of JY cells in a flow cytometer. The dyes and the immunogold were targetted to the cell surface receptors MHCI, MHCII, transferrin receptor and CD45 by monoclonal antibodies. The fluorescence enhancement was sensitive to the wavelength of the exciting light, the size and amount of surface bound gold beads, as well as the fluorophore-nanoparticle distance. The intensity of 90 degrees scattering of the incident light beam was enhanced by the immunogold in a concentration and size-dependent fashion. The 90 degrees light scattering varied with the wavelength of the incident light in a manner characteristic to gold nanoparticles of the applied sizes. A reduction in photobleaching time constant of the cyanine dye was observed in the vicinity of gold particles in a digital imaging

  1. Acoustofluidic Transfer of Inflammatory Cells from Human Sputum Samples.

    PubMed

    Li, Sixing; Ren, Liqiang; Huang, Po-Hsun; Yao, Xianglan; Cuento, Rosemarie A; McCoy, J Philip; Cameron, Craig E; Levine, Stewart J; Huang, Tony Jun

    2016-06-01

    For sputum analysis, the transfer of inflammatory cells from liquefied sputum samples to a culture medium or buffer solution is a critical step because it removes the inflammatory cells from the presence of residual dithiothreitol (DTT), a reagent that reduces cell viability and interferes with further sputum analyses. In this work, we report an acoustofluidic platform for transferring inflammatory cells using standing surface acoustic waves (SSAW). In particular, we exploit the acoustic radiation force generated from a SSAW field to actively transfer inflammatory cells from a solution containing residual DTT to a buffer solution. The viability and integrity of the inflammatory cells are maintained during the acoustofluidic-based cell transfer process. Our acoustofluidic technique removes residual DTT generated in sputum liquefaction and facilitates immunophenotyping of major inflammatory cells from sputum samples. It enables cell transfer in a continuous flow, which aids the development of an automated, integrated system for on-chip sputum processing and analysis. PMID:27183317

  2. Adoptive T-cell therapy improves treatment of canine non-Hodgkin lymphoma post chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Colleen M; Sheppard, Sabina; Hartline, Cassie A; Huls, Helen; Johnson, Mark; Palla, Shana L; Maiti, Sourindra; Ma, Wencai; Davis, R Eric; Craig, Suzanne; Lee, Dean A; Champlin, Richard; Wilson, Heather; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2012-01-01

    Clinical observations reveal that an augmented pace of T-cell recovery after chemotherapy correlates with improved tumor-free survival, suggesting the add-back of T cells after chemotherapy may improve outcomes. To evaluate adoptive immunotherapy treatment for B-lineage non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), we expanded T cells from client-owned canines diagnosed with NHL on artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC) in the presence of human interleukin (IL)-2 and IL-21. Graded doses of autologous T cells were infused after CHOP chemotherapy and persisted for 49 days, homed to tumor, and significantly improved survival. Serum thymidine kinase changes predicted T-cell engraftment, while anti-tumor effects correlated with neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratios and granzyme B expression in manufactured T cells. Therefore, chemotherapy can be used to modulate infused T-cell responses to enhance anti-tumor effects. The companion canine model has translational implications for human immunotherapy which can be readily exploited since clinical-grade canine and human T cells are propagated using identical approaches. PMID:22355761

  3. Dielectrophoresis-assisted 3D nanoelectroporation for non-viral cell transfection in adoptive immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Chang, Lingqian; Gallego-Perez, Daniel; Zhao, Xi; Bertani, Paul; Yang, Zhaogang; Chiang, Chi-Ling; Malkoc, Veysi; Shi, Junfeng; Sen, Chandan K; Odonnell, Lynn; Yu, Jianhua; Lu, Wu; Lee, L James

    2015-08-01

    Current transfection technologies lead to significant inter-clonal variations. Previously we introduced a unique electrotransfection technology, Nanochannel-Electroporation (NEP), which can precisely and benignly transfect small cell populations (~100-200 cells) with single-cell resolution. Here we report on the development of a novel 3D NEP system for large scale transfection. A properly-engineered array of nanochannels, capable of handling/transfecting ~60 000 cells cm(-2), was fabricated using cleanroom technologies. Positive dielectrophoresis was used to selectively position cells on the nanochannels, thus allowing highly efficient transfection. Single-cell dosage control was demonstrated using both small and large molecules, and different cell types. The potential clinical relevance of this system was tested with difficult-to-transfect natural killer cell suspensions, and plasmids encoding for the chimeric antigen receptor (CAR), a model of high relevance for adoptive immunotherapy. Our results show significantly higher CAR transfection efficiencies for the DEP-NEP system (>70% vs. <30%), as well as enhanced cell viabilities.

  4. A Panel of Artificial APCs Expressing Prevalent HLA Alleles Permits Generation of Cytotoxic T Cells Specific for Both Dominant and Subdominant Viral Epitopes for Adoptive Therapy1

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Aisha N.; Kollen, Wouter J.; Trivedi, Deepa; Selvakumar, Annamalai; Dupont, Bo; Sadelain, Michel; O'Reilly, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of virus-specific T cells can treat infections complicating allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplants. However, autologous antigen-presenting cells (APCs) are often limited in supply. Here, we describe a panel of artificial APCs (AAPCs) consisting of murine 3T3 cells transduced to express human B7.1, ICAM-1 and LFA-3 that each stably express one of a series of 6 common HLA class I alleles. In comparative analyses, T cells sensitized with AAPCs expressing a shared HLA allele or autologous APCs loaded with a pool of 15-mers spanning the sequence of CMVpp65 produced similar yields of HLA-restricted CMVpp65 specific T cells; significantly higher yields could be achieved by sensitization with AAPCs transduced to express the CMVpp65 protein. T cells generated were CD8+, IFNγ+ and exhibited HLA-restricted CMVpp65 specific cytotoxicity. T cells sensitized with either peptide-loaded or transduced AAPCs recognized epitopes presented by each HLA allele known to be immunogenic in man. Sensitization with AAPCs also permitted expansion of IFNγ+ cytotoxic effector cells against subdominant epitopes that were either absent or in low frequencies in T cells sensitized with autologous APCs. This replenishable panel of AAPCs can be used for immediate sensitization and expansion of virus-specific T cells of desired HLA restriction for adoptive immunotherapy. It may be of particular value for recipients of transplants from HLA disparate donors. PMID:19635907

  5. Broadening Specificity and Enhancing Cytotoxicity of Adoptive T Cells for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Faè, Damiana Antonia; Martorelli, Debora; Mastorci, Katy; Muraro, Elena; Dal Col, Jessica; Franchin, Giovanni; Barzan, Luigi; Comaro, Elisa; Vaccher, Emanuela; Rosato, Antonio; Dolcetti, Riccardo

    2016-05-01

    Although promising, clinical responses to adoptive immunotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) are still limited by the restricted number of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) antigens that can be targeted and their poor immunogenicity. Our previous work indicated that the immunogenic features of the NPC-associated viral antigen BARF1 may be exploited for immunotherapeutic purposes. Nevertheless, T-cell lines obtained with current protocols include only negligible numbers of BARF1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes, pointing to the need to enrich these effectors in BARF1 specificities. Considering that in B lymphocytes BARF1 is mainly a lytic EBV antigen, we tested different EBV lytic-cycle inducers (TPA/butyric acid, doxorubicin, and cisplatin) used at suboptimal concentrations for their ability to upregulate BARF1 expression in lymphoblastoid B-cell lines (LCL), the commonly used antigen-presenting cells, without compromising their survival. The LCLs treated with doxorubicin (DX-LCL) can reproducibly and efficiently generate EBV-specific effectors enriched in BARF1 specificities from both healthy donors and NPC patients. These DX-LCLs also had more pronounced immunogenic properties, including HLA class I upregulation and expression of immunogenic cell death markers, such as enhanced calreticulin exposure and HMGB1 release. In particular, doxorubicin triggers an HMGB1 autocrine/paracrine loop with its receptor, TLR4, which is also upregulated in DX-LCLs and is responsible for NF-κB activation and a delayed apoptosis that allows a prolonged stimulation of EBV-specific T-cell precursors. This protocol may thus constitute a valid alternative to the use of engineered LCLs to generate EBV-specific T-cell lines for adoptive immunotherapy, being relatively simple, easily upgradable to Good Manufacturing Practice standards, and therefore more broadly applicable. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(5); 431-40. ©2016 AACR.

  6. Adoptive T-cell therapy for fungal infections in haematology patients

    PubMed Central

    Deo, Shivashni S; Gottlieb, David J

    2015-01-01

    The prolonged immune deficiency resulting from haematopoietic stem cell transplant and chemotherapy predisposes to a high risk of invasive fungal infections. Despite the recent advances in molecular diagnostic testing, early initiation of pre-emptive antifungal therapy and the use of combination pharmacotherapy, mortality from invasive mould infections remain high among recipients of allogeneic stem cell transplant. The increasing incidences of previously rare and drug-resistant strains of fungi present a further clinical challenge. Therefore, there is a need for novel strategies to combat fungal infections in the immunocompromised. Adoptive therapy using in vitro-expanded fungus-specific CD4 cells of the Th-1 type has shown clinical efficacy in murine studies and in a small human clinical study. Several techniques for the isolation and expansion of fungus-specific T cells have been successfully applied. Here we discuss the incidence and changing patterns of invasive fungal diseases, clinical evidence supporting the role of T cells in fungal immunity, methods to expand fungus-specific T cells in the laboratory and considerations surrounding the use of T cells for fungal immunotherapy. PMID:26366286

  7. Adoptable strategic approaches to improve outcomes of allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantations from unrelated donors.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Sang Kyun; Moon, Joon Ho

    2014-06-01

    While previous studies have shown comparable clinical results for related and unrelated bone marrow transplantation (BMT), the transplantation outcomes for related and unrelated peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT) may not follow the same pattern due to a higher incidence of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD)-related morbidity and mortality in the case of long-term survival after unrelated PBSCT. Thus, given the higher possibility of an impaired quality of life due to severe GVHD in long-term survivors who receive unrelated PBSCT, the selection of the stem cell source needs to be decided very carefully. In addition, strategic approaches, such as the extended use of immunosuppressant as a GVHD prophylaxis, the use of antithymocyte globulins (ATGs), choosing a younger donor, and optimizing the CD34+ cell dose, need to be adopted to improve the transplantation outcomes by minimizing GVHD-related morbidity and mortality in an unrelated PBSCT setting. This review article provides a comparison of BMT and PBSCT, and related and unrelated PBSCT, plus introduces several adoptable strategies to improve the outcomes of unrelated PBSCT.

  8. Technological advances in adoptive immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Oelke, Mathias; Krueger, Christine; Schneck, Jonathan P

    2005-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy is an attractive and elegant strategy for treating a variety of life-threatening diseases. Several approaches have been developed to generate antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells for adoptive T-cell therapy in cancer and infectious diseases. Currently, many approaches are based on either the use of autologous peptide pulsed dendritic cells as antigen-presenting cells or nonspecific expansion of T cells. Unfortunately, current approaches lack the ability to serve as reproducible and economically viable methods. Several groups are developing new artificial approaches to overcome problems associated with dendritic cells and the nonspecific expansion of T-cell clones in order to make adoptive immunotherapy more feasible and effective. Thus, by increasing the availability of adoptive immunotherapy, we will be able to better determine the efficacy of the approaches in the treatment of a variety of diseases. In this review, we focus on technological advances that will facilitate adoptive immunotherapy. Specifically, we summarize current strategies which are either based on artificial antigen-presenting cells or on T-cell receptor gene transfer. PMID:15753966

  9. Somatic cell nuclear transfer in horses.

    PubMed

    Galli, Cesare; Lagutina, Irina; Duchi, Roberto; Colleoni, Silvia; Lazzari, Giovanna

    2008-07-01

    The cloning of equids was achieved in 2003, several years after the birth of Dolly the sheep and also after the cloning of numerous other laboratory and farm animal species. The delay was because of the limited development in the horse of more classical-assisted reproductive techniques required for successful cloning, such as oocyte maturation and in vitro embryo production. When these technologies were developed, the application of cloning also became possible and cloned horse offspring were obtained. This review summarizes the main technical procedures that are required for cloning equids and the present status of this technique. The first step is competent oocyte maturation, this is followed by oocyte enucleation and reconstruction, using either zona-enclosed or zona-free oocytes, by efficient activation to allow high cleavage rates and finally by a suitable in vitro embryo culture technique. Cloning of the first equid, a mule, was achieved using an in vivo-matured oocytes and immediate transfer of the reconstructed embryo, i.e. at the one cell stage, to the recipient oviduct. In contrast, the first horse offspring was obtained using a complete in vitro procedure from oocyte maturation to embryo culture to the blastocyst stage, followed by non-surgical transfer. Later studies on equine cloning report high efficiency relative to that for other species. Cloned equid offspring reported to date appear to be normal and those that have reached puberty have been confirmed to be fertile. In summary, horse cloning is now a reproducible technique that offers the opportunity to preserve valuable genetics and notably to generate copies of castrated champions and therefore, offspring from those champions that would be impossible to obtain otherwise. PMID:18638143

  10. Melanoma Cells Can Adopt the Phenotype of Stromal Fibroblasts and Macrophages by Spontaneous Cell Fusion in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kemény, Lajos V.; Kurgyis, Zsuzsanna; Buknicz, Tünde; Groma, Gergely; Jakab, Ádám; Zänker, Kurt; Dittmar, Thomas; Kemény, Lajos; Németh, István B.

    2016-01-01

    After the removal of primary cutaneous melanoma some patients develop local recurrences, even after having histologically tumor-free re-excision. A potential explanation behind this phenomenon is that tumor cells switch their phenotype, making their recognition via standard histopathological assessments extremely difficult. Tumor-stromal cell fusion has been proposed as a potential mechanism for tumor cells to acquire mesenchymal traits; therefore, we hypothesized that melanoma cells could acquire fibroblast- and macrophage-like phenotypes via cell fusion. We show that melanoma cells spontaneously fuse with human dermal fibroblasts and human peripheral blood monocytes in vitro. The hybrid cells’ nuclei contain chromosomes from both parental cells and are indistinguishable from the parental fibroblasts or macrophages based on their morphology and immunophenotype, as they could lose the melanoma specific MART1 marker, but express the fibroblast marker smooth muscle actin or the macrophage marker CD68. Our results suggest that, by spontaneous cell fusion in vitro, tumor cells can adopt the morphology and immunophenotype of stromal cells while still carrying oncogenic, tumor-derived genetic information. Therefore, melanoma–stromal cell fusion might play a role in missing tumor cells by routine histopathological assessments. PMID:27271591

  11. Myosin-Va-dependent cell-to-cell transfer of RNA from Schwann cells to axons.

    PubMed

    Sotelo, José R; Canclini, Lucía; Kun, Alejandra; Sotelo-Silveira, José R; Xu, Lei; Wallrabe, Horst; Calliari, Aldo; Rosso, Gonzalo; Cal, Karina; Mercer, John A

    2013-01-01

    To better understand the role of protein synthesis in axons, we have identified the source of a portion of axonal RNA. We show that proximal segments of transected sciatic nerves accumulate newly-synthesized RNA in axons. This RNA is synthesized in Schwann cells because the RNA was labeled in the complete absence of neuronal cell bodies both in vitro and in vivo. We also demonstrate that the transfer is prevented by disruption of actin and that it fails to occur in the absence of myosin-Va. Our results demonstrate cell-to-cell transfer of RNA and identify part of the mechanism required for transfer. The induction of cell-to-cell RNA transfer by injury suggests that interventions following injury or degeneration, particularly gene therapy, may be accomplished by applying them to nearby glial cells (or implanted stem cells) at the site of injury to promote regeneration.

  12. Superiority of rapamycin over tacrolimus in preserving nonhuman primate Treg half-life and phenotype after adoptive transfer.

    PubMed

    Singh, K; Stempora, L; Harvey, R D; Kirk, A D; Larsen, C P; Blazar, B R; Kean, L S

    2014-12-01

    Many critical issues remain concerning how best to deploy adoptive regulatory T cell (Treg) immunotherapy to the clinic. These include a determination of their pharmacokinetic characteristics, their optimal dose, their phenotypic stability and the best therapies with which to pair Tregs. By performing a CFSE-labeled autologous Treg pulse experiment, we determined that the accessible peripheral blood Treg pool in rhesus macaques is quite large (75 ± 11 × 10(6) Tregs/kg). Pharmacokinetic analysis revealed that Tregs have two phases of elimination: an α phase, with a T1/2 in the peripheral blood of 32.4 ± 11.3 h and a β phase with a T1/2 of 120.4 ± 19.7 h. In addition to their short initial half-life, Tregs underwent rapid phenotypic shifts after infusion, with significant loss of both CD25 and FoxP3 by day +6. While tacrolimus stabilized CD25 expression, it did not improve T1/2 , nor mitigate the loss of FoxP3. In contrast, rapamycin significantly stabilized both CD25 and FoxP3, and supported an increased half-life, with an α phase of 67.7 ± 6.9 h and a β phase of 252.1 ± 54.9 h. These results suggest that rapamycin may be a necessary addition to Treg immunotherapy, and that tacrolimus may be deleterious to Treg integrity posttransfer.

  13. Adoptive Immunotherapy using Regulatory T cells and Virus-specific T cells Derived from Cord Blood

    PubMed Central

    Hanley, Patrick J.; Bollard, Catherine M.; Brunstein, Claudio G

    2014-01-01

    Cord blood transplantation, an alternative to traditional stem cell transplants (bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell transplantation), is an attractive option for patients lacking suitable stem cell transplant donors. Cord blood units have also proven to be a valuable donor source for the development of cellular therapeutics. Virus-specific T cells and regulatory T cells are two cord blood derived products that have shown promise in early phase clinical trials to prevent and/or treat viral infections and graft-versus-host disease (GvHD), respectively. Here we describe how current strategies utilizing cord blood-derived regulatory T cells and virus-specific T cells have been developed to improve outcomes for cord blood transplant recipients. PMID:25632003

  14. Posttransplant adoptive immunotherapy with activated natural killer cells in patients with metastatic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    deMagalhaes-Silverman, M; Donnenberg, A; Lembersky, B; Elder, E; Lister, J; Rybka, W; Whiteside, T; Ball, E

    2000-01-01

    Relapse after high-dose chemotherapy is the main cause of therapeutic failure in patients with metastatic breast cancer. Adoptive immunotherapy with interleukin-2 (IL-2) plus activated natural killer cells may eliminate residual disease without excessive toxicity. The authors sought to determine if immunotherapy immediately after transplantation would affect engraftment and the toxicity associated with transplantation. Fifteen consecutive patients with metastatic breast cancer were allocated to three cohorts. Cohort 1 (five patients) received high-dose cyclophosphamide, thiotepa, and carboplatin (CTCb) followed by peripheral blood stem cell infusion and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor at 10 micrograms/kg. Cohort 2 (five patients) received in addition rhIL-2 (2 x 10(6) IU/m2/day) for 4 days intravenously via continuous infusion after peripheral blood stem cell infusion. In cohort 3 (five patients), peripheral blood stem cell transplant was followed by infusion of autologous activated NK cells and rhIL-2 (2 x 10(6) IU/m2/day) for 4 days (via continuous intravenous infusion). Generation of activated NK cells was possible in all patients in cohort 3. All patients has successful engraftment. Median time to absolute neutrophil count more than 0.5 x 10(9)/L was 8 days (range, 8 to 11 days) in cohort 1, 9 days (range, 7 to 11 days) in cohort 2, and 9 days (range, 8 to 9 days) in cohort 3. Median time until the platelet count was more than 20 x 10(9)/L was 14 days (range, 9 to 22 days) in cohort 1, 11 days (range, 6 to 14 days) in cohort 2, and 12 days (range, 11 to 21 days) in cohort 3. All patients developed neutropenic fevers, but the overall toxicity associated with the infusion of IL-2 (cohort 2) or IL-2 plus activated NK cells (cohort 3) did not differ from that observed in cohort 1. Complete responses were achieved in one patient in cohort 1, in two patients in cohort 2, and in one patient in cohort 3. In conclusion, post-transplant adoptive immunotherapy with

  15. Variations in mass transfer to single endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Van Doormaal, Mark A; Zhang, Ji; Wada, Shigeo; Shaw, James E; Won, Doyon; Cybulsky, Myron I; Yip, Chris M; Ethier, C Ross

    2009-06-01

    Mass transfer between flowing blood and arterial mural cells (including vascular endothelial cells) may play an important role in atherogenesis. Endothelial cells are known to have an apical surface topography that is not flat, and hence mass transfer patterns to individual endothelial cells are likely affected by the local cellular topography. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the relationship between vascular endothelial cell surface topography and cellular level mass transfer. Confluent porcine endothelial monolayers were cultured under both shear and static conditions and atomic force microscopy was used to measure endothelial cell topography. Using finite element methods and the measured cell topography, flow and concentration fields were calculated for a typical, small, blood-borne solute. A relative Sherwood number was defined as the difference between the computed Sherwood number and that predicted by the Leveque solution for mass transfer over a flat surface: this eliminates the effects of axial location on mass transfer efficiency. The average intracellular relative Sherwood number range was found to be dependent on cell height and not dependent on cell elongation due to shear stress in culture. The mass flux to individual cells reached a maximum at the highest point on the endothelial cell surface, typically corresponding to the nucleus of the cell. Therefore, for small receptor-mediated solutes, increased solute uptake efficiency can be achieved by concentrating receptors near the nucleus. The main conclusion of the work is that although the rate of mass transfer varies greatly over an individual cell, the average mass transfer rate to a cell is close to that predicted for a flat cell. In comparison to other hemodynamic factors, the topography of endothelial cells therefore seems to have little effect on mass transfer rates and is likely physiologically insignificant.

  16. Recruitment of natural killer cells in advanced stages of endogenously arising B-cell lymphoma: implications for therapeutic cell transfer.

    PubMed

    Przewoznik, Margarethe; Hömberg, Nadine; Naujoks, Marcella; Pötzl, Johann; Münchmeier, Niklas; Brenner, Christoph D; Anz, David; Bourquin, Carole; Nelson, Peter J; Röcken, Martin; Mocikat, Ralph

    2012-04-01

    During inflammation and in transplantable tumor models, natural killer (NK) cells are recruited to pathologic tissues and activated to produce proinflammatory cytokines favoring adaptive immune responses of the T-helper type 1 (Th1) type. Interferon (IFN)-γ is needed to induce chemokines that attract NK cells in transplanted tumors. Nothing, however, is known on NK-cell migration in spontaneous tumors. As effective recruitment is a prerequisite for therapeutic NK-cell transfer, we investigated the cytokine milieu and the mechanisms that are instrumental for NK-cell accumulation in an endogenous tumor model. We make use of λ-myc transgenic mice that harbor the c-myc oncogene and develop spontaneous B-cell lymphoma. In contrast to lymphomas induced by tumor cell injection, virtually no IFN-γ produced by NK or by other cells was present in the tumor environment, particularly in advanced stages. Dendritic cells showed an impaired expression of interleukin-12, which is suggestive of deficient Th1 priming. The IFN-γ-dependent chemokines CXCL9 and CXCL10 were pivotal for NK-cell migration in the endogenous lymphoma model. Although IFN-γ was absent in late tumor stages, there was still expression of CXCL9 and CXCL10 with an ongoing influx of NK cells. The results demonstrate that transplantable tumor models do not reflect the situation as found in endogenously arising neoplasia, because in the latter, effective Th1 and cytotoxic T-lymphocyte responses are presumably not induced because of impaired IFN-γ production. The data also suggest that CXCL9 and CXCL10 production and NK-cell migration become independent of IFN-γ during tumor progression, and therefore support approaches of adoptive NK-cell transfer that hold promise for treatment of cancer. PMID:22421939

  17. Multiplex Genome-Edited T-cell Manufacturing Platform for "Off-the-Shelf" Adoptive T-cell Immunotherapies.

    PubMed

    Poirot, Laurent; Philip, Brian; Schiffer-Mannioui, Cécile; Le Clerre, Diane; Chion-Sotinel, Isabelle; Derniame, Sophie; Potrel, Pierrick; Bas, Cécile; Lemaire, Laetitia; Galetto, Roman; Lebuhotel, Céline; Eyquem, Justin; Cheung, Gordon Weng-Kit; Duclert, Aymeric; Gouble, Agnès; Arnould, Sylvain; Peggs, Karl; Pule, Martin; Scharenberg, Andrew M; Smith, Julianne

    2015-09-15

    Adoptive immunotherapy using autologous T cells endowed with chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) has emerged as a powerful means of treating cancer. However, a limitation of this approach is that autologous CAR T cells must be generated on a custom-made basis. Here we show that electroporation of transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) mRNA allows highly efficient multiplex gene editing in primary human T cells. We use this TALEN-mediated editing approach to develop a process for the large-scale manufacturing of T cells deficient in expression of both their αβ T-cell receptor (TCR) and CD52, a protein targeted by alemtuzumab, a chemotherapeutic agent. Functionally, T cells manufactured with this process do not mediate graft-versus-host reactions and are rendered resistant to destruction by alemtuzumab. These characteristics enable the administration of alemtuzumab concurrently or prior to engineered T cells, supporting their engraftment. Furthermore, endowing the TALEN-engineered cells with a CD19 CAR led to efficient destruction of CD19(+) tumor targets even in the presence of the chemotherapeutic agent. These results demonstrate the applicability of TALEN-mediated genome editing to a scalable process, which enables the manufacturing of third-party CAR T-cell immunotherapies against arbitrary targets. As such, CAR T-cell immunotherapies can therefore be used in an "off-the-shelf" manner akin to other biologic immunopharmaceuticals

  18. Syngeneic syrian hamster tumors feature tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes allowing adoptive cell therapy enhanced by oncolytic adenovirus in a replication permissive setting.

    PubMed

    Siurala, Mikko; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Havunen, Riikka; Tähtinen, Siri; Bramante, Simona; Parviainen, Suvi; Mathis, J Michael; Kanerva, Anna; Hemminki, Akseli

    2016-05-01

    Adoptive transfer of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) has shown promising yet sometimes suboptimal results in clinical trials for advanced cancer, underscoring the need for approaches improving efficacy and safety. Six implantable syngeneic tumor cell lines of the Syrian hamster were used to initiate TIL cultures. TIL generated from tumor fragments cultured in human interleukin-2 (IL-2) for 10 d were adoptively transferred into tumor-bearing hamsters with concomitant intratumoral injections of oncolytic adenovirus (Ad5-D24) for the assessment of antitumor efficacy. Pancreatic cancer (HapT1) and melanoma (RPMI 1846) TIL exhibited potent and tumor-specific cytotoxicity in effector-to-target (E/T) assays. MHC Class I blocking abrogated the cell killing of RPMI 1846 TIL, indicating cytotoxic CD8(+) T-cell activity. When TIL were combined with Ad5-D24 in vitro, HapT1 tumor cell killing was significantly enhanced over single agents. In vivo, the intratumoral administration of HapT1 TIL and Ad5-D24 resulted in improved tumor growth control compared with either treatment alone. Additionally, splenocytes derived from animals treated with the combination of Ad5-D24 and TIL killed autologous tumor cells more efficiently than monotherapy-derived splenocytes, suggesting that systemic antitumor immunity was induced. For the first time, TIL of the Syrian hamster have been cultured, characterized and used therapeutically together with oncolytic adenovirus for enhancing the efficacy of TIL therapy. Our results support human translation of oncolytic adenovirus as an enabling technology for adoptive T-cell therapy of solid tumors.

  19. Syngeneic syrian hamster tumors feature tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes allowing adoptive cell therapy enhanced by oncolytic adenovirus in a replication permissive setting.

    PubMed

    Siurala, Mikko; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Havunen, Riikka; Tähtinen, Siri; Bramante, Simona; Parviainen, Suvi; Mathis, J Michael; Kanerva, Anna; Hemminki, Akseli

    2016-05-01

    Adoptive transfer of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) has shown promising yet sometimes suboptimal results in clinical trials for advanced cancer, underscoring the need for approaches improving efficacy and safety. Six implantable syngeneic tumor cell lines of the Syrian hamster were used to initiate TIL cultures. TIL generated from tumor fragments cultured in human interleukin-2 (IL-2) for 10 d were adoptively transferred into tumor-bearing hamsters with concomitant intratumoral injections of oncolytic adenovirus (Ad5-D24) for the assessment of antitumor efficacy. Pancreatic cancer (HapT1) and melanoma (RPMI 1846) TIL exhibited potent and tumor-specific cytotoxicity in effector-to-target (E/T) assays. MHC Class I blocking abrogated the cell killing of RPMI 1846 TIL, indicating cytotoxic CD8(+) T-cell activity. When TIL were combined with Ad5-D24 in vitro, HapT1 tumor cell killing was significantly enhanced over single agents. In vivo, the intratumoral administration of HapT1 TIL and Ad5-D24 resulted in improved tumor growth control compared with either treatment alone. Additionally, splenocytes derived from animals treated with the combination of Ad5-D24 and TIL killed autologous tumor cells more efficiently than monotherapy-derived splenocytes, suggesting that systemic antitumor immunity was induced. For the first time, TIL of the Syrian hamster have been cultured, characterized and used therapeutically together with oncolytic adenovirus for enhancing the efficacy of TIL therapy. Our results support human translation of oncolytic adenovirus as an enabling technology for adoptive T-cell therapy of solid tumors. PMID:27467954

  20. H-Ras transfers from B to T cells via tunneling nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Rainy, N; Chetrit, D; Rouger, V; Vernitsky, H; Rechavi, O; Marguet, D; Goldstein, I; Ehrlich, M; Kloog, Y

    2013-01-01

    Lymphocytes form cell-cell connections by various mechanisms, including intercellular networks through actin-supported long-range plasma membrane (PM) extensions, termed tunneling nanotubes (TNTs). In this study, we tested in vitro whether TNTs form between human antigen-presenting B cells and T cells following cell contact and whether they enable the transfer of PM-associated proteins, such as green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged H-Ras (GFP-H-Ras). To address this question, we employed advanced techniques, including cell trapping by optical tweezers and live-cell imaging by 4D spinning-disk confocal microscopy. First, we showed that TNTs can form after optically trapped conjugated B and T cells are being pulled apart. Next, we determined by measuring fluorescence recovery after photobleaching that GFP-H-Ras diffuses freely in the membrane of TNTs that form spontaneously between B and T cells during coculturing. Importantly, by 4D time-lapse imaging, we showed that GFP-H-Ras-enriched PM patches accumulate at the junction between TNTs and the T-cell body and subsequently transfer to the T-cell surface. Furthermore, the PM patches adopted by T cells were enriched for another B-cell-derived transmembrane receptor, CD86. As predicted, the capacity of GFP-H-Ras to transfer between B and T cells, during coculturing, was dependent on its normal post-transcriptional lipidation and consequent PM anchorage. In summary, our data indicate that TNTs connecting B and T cells provide a hitherto undescribed route for the transfer of PM patches containing, for example, H-Ras from B to T cells. PMID:23868059

  1. Single-Pass, Closed-System Rapid Expansion of Lymphocyte Cultures for Adoptive Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Klapper, Jacob A.; Thomasian, Armen A.; Smith, Douglas M.; Gorgas, Gayle C.; Wunderlich, John R.; Smith, Franz O.; Hampson, Brian S.; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Dudley, Mark E.

    2009-01-01

    Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) for metastatic melanoma involves the ex vivo expansion and re-infusion of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) obtained from resected specimens. With an overall objective response rate of fifty-six percent, this T-cell immunotherapy provides an appealing alternative to other therapies, including conventional therapies with lower response rates. However, there are significant regulatory and logistical concerns associated with the ex vivo activation and large scale expansion of these cells. The best current practice uses a rapid expansion protocol (REP) consisting of an ex vivo process that occurs in tissue culture flasks (T-flasks) and gas-permeable bags, utilizes OKT3 (anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody), recombinant human interleukin-2, and irradiated peripheral blood mononuclear cells to initiate rapid lymphocyte growth. A major limitation to the widespread delivery of therapy to large numbers of melanoma patients is the open system in which a REP is initiated. To address this problem, we have investigated the initiation, expansion and harvest at clinical scale of TIL in a closed-system continuous perfusion bioreactor. Each cell product met all safety criteria for patient treatment and by head-to-head comparison had a similar potency and phenotype as cells grown in control T-flasks and gas-permeable bags. However, the currently available bioreactor cassettes were limited in the total cell numbers that could be generated. This bioreactor may simplify the process of the rapid expansion of TIL under stringent regulatory conditions thereby enabling other institutions to pursue this form of ACT. PMID:19389403

  2. Prospects for adoptive immunotherapy of pancreatic cancer using chimeric antigen receptor-engineered T-cells.

    PubMed

    Alrifai, Doraid; Sarker, Debashis; Maher, John

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy using chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) engineered T-cells is emerging as a powerful new approach to cancer immunotherapy. CARs are fusion molecules that couple the antibody-like binding of a native cell surface target to the delivery of a bespoke T-cell activating signal. Recent studies undertaken by several centers have demonstrated highly compelling efficacy in patients with acute and chronic B-cell malignancies. However, comparable therapeutic activity has not been achieved in solid tumors. Modern management of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains ineffective, reflected in the virtual equivalence of annual incidence and mortality statistics for this tumor type. Increasing evidence indicates that these tumors are recognized by the immune system, but deploy powerful evasion strategies that limit natural immune surveillance and render efforts at immunotherapy challenging. Here, we review preclinical and clinical studies that have been initiated or completed in an effort to develop CAR-based immunotherapy for PDAC. We also consider the hurdles to the effective clinical development of this exciting new therapeutic modality.

  3. Human mesenchymal stem cells cultured with salivary gland biopsies adopt an epithelial phenotype.

    PubMed

    Maria, Ola M; Tran, Simon D

    2011-06-01

    Sjogren's syndrome and radiotherapy for head and neck cancer result in severe xerostomia and irreversible salivary gland damage for which no effective treatment is currently available. Cell culture methods of primary human salivary gland epithelial cells (huSGs) are slow and cannot provide a sufficient number of cells. In addition, the majority of cultured huSGs are of a ductal phenotype and thus not fluid/saliva secretory cells. Some reports indicated that mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) possessed the potential to differentiate into epithelial cells. To test this hypothesis with huSGs, a coculture system containing 2 chambers separated by a polyester membrane was used to study the capacity of human MSCs to adopt an epithelial phenotype when cocultured with human salivary gland biopsies. Results were that 20%-40% of cocultured MSCs expressed tight junction proteins [claudin-1 (CLDN-1), -2, -3, and -4; occludin; junctional adhesion molecule-A; and zonula occludens-1] as well as other epithelial markers [aquaporin-5, α-amylase (α-AMY), and E-cadherin], and generated a higher transepithelial electrical resistance. Electron microscopy demonstrated that these MSCs had comparable cellular structures to huSGs, such as tight junction structures and numerous secretory granules. Quantitative real time (RT)-polymerase chain reaction revealed an upregulation of several salivary genes (aquaporin-5, AMY, and CLDN-2). Moreover, the amounts of α-AMY detected in cocultured MSCs were comparable to those detected in huSGs control cultures. These data suggest that cocultured MSCs can demonstrate a temporary change into a salivary gland acinar phenotype.

  4. Adoptive cell therapy and modulation of the tumour microenvironment: new insights from ASCO 2016.

    PubMed

    Khoja, Leila; Gyawali, Bishal

    2016-01-01

    Immuno-oncology has changed the landscape of cancer treatment in recent years. Immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICI) have shown survival advantage with long term remissions in a variety of cancers. However, there is another approach to harnessing the power of the immune system in combating cancer: the adoptive cell therapy (ACT) strategy. Although ACT is restricted to small specialized centres and has yet to deliver as much success as ICI, some important results were presented at this year's ASCO meeting. Important lessons have been learned from these studies, including the prospects and challenges ahead. In this editorial, we summarize the important studies on ACT presented at the ASCO 2016 meeting and discuss the way forward. PMID:27610200

  5. Adoptive cell therapy and modulation of the tumour microenvironment: new insights from ASCO 2016

    PubMed Central

    Khoja, Leila; Gyawali, Bishal

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Immuno-oncology has changed the landscape of cancer treatment in recent years. Immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICI) have shown survival advantage with long term remissions in a variety of cancers. However, there is another approach to harnessing the power of the immune system in combating cancer: the adoptive cell therapy (ACT) strategy. Although ACT is restricted to small specialized centres and has yet to deliver as much success as ICI, some important results were presented at this year’s ASCO meeting. Important lessons have been learned from these studies, including the prospects and challenges ahead. In this editorial, we summarize the important studies on ACT presented at the ASCO 2016 meeting and discuss the way forward.

  6. Adoptive cell therapy and modulation of the tumour microenvironment: new insights from ASCO 2016

    PubMed Central

    Khoja, Leila; Gyawali, Bishal

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Immuno-oncology has changed the landscape of cancer treatment in recent years. Immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICI) have shown survival advantage with long term remissions in a variety of cancers. However, there is another approach to harnessing the power of the immune system in combating cancer: the adoptive cell therapy (ACT) strategy. Although ACT is restricted to small specialized centres and has yet to deliver as much success as ICI, some important results were presented at this year’s ASCO meeting. Important lessons have been learned from these studies, including the prospects and challenges ahead. In this editorial, we summarize the important studies on ACT presented at the ASCO 2016 meeting and discuss the way forward. PMID:27610200

  7. Clinical-scale selection and viral transduction of human naïve and central memory CD8+ T cells for adoptive cell therapy of cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Casati, Anna; Varghaei-Nahvi, Azam; Feldman, Steven Alexander; Assenmacher, Mario; Rosenberg, Steven Aaron; Dudley, Mark Edward; Scheffold, Alexander

    2013-10-01

    The adoptive transfer of lymphocytes genetically engineered to express tumor-specific antigen receptors is a potent strategy to treat cancer patients. T lymphocyte subsets, such as naïve or central memory T cells, selected in vitro prior to genetic engineering have been extensively investigated in preclinical mouse models, where they demonstrated improved therapeutic efficacy. However, so far, this is challenging to realize in the clinical setting, since good manufacturing practices (GMP) procedures for complex cell sorting and genetic manipulation are limited. To be able to directly compare the immunological attributes and therapeutic efficacy of naïve (T(N)) and central memory (T(CM)) CD8(+) T cells, we investigated clinical-scale procedures for their parallel selection and in vitro manipulation. We also evaluated currently available GMP-grade reagents for stimulation of T cell subsets, including a new type of anti-CD3/anti-CD28 nanomatrix. An optimized protocol was established for the isolation of both CD8(+) T(N) cells (CD4(-)CD62L(+)CD45RA(+)) and CD8(+) T(CM) (CD4(-)CD62L(+)CD45RA(-)) from a single patient. The highly enriched T cell subsets can be efficiently transduced and expanded to large cell numbers, sufficient for clinical applications and equivalent to or better than current cell and gene therapy approaches with unselected lymphocyte populations. The GMP protocols for selection of T(N) and T(CM) we reported here will be the basis for clinical trials analyzing safety, in vivo persistence and clinical efficacy in cancer patients and will help to generate a more reliable and efficacious cellular product.

  8. Clinical-scale selection and viral transduction of human naïve and central memory CD8+ T cells for adoptive cell therapy of cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Casati, Anna; Varghaei-Nahvi, Azam; Feldman, Steven Alexander; Assenmacher, Mario; Rosenberg, Steven Aaron; Dudley, Mark Edward; Scheffold, Alexander

    2013-10-01

    The adoptive transfer of lymphocytes genetically engineered to express tumor-specific antigen receptors is a potent strategy to treat cancer patients. T lymphocyte subsets, such as naïve or central memory T cells, selected in vitro prior to genetic engineering have been extensively investigated in preclinical mouse models, where they demonstrated improved therapeutic efficacy. However, so far, this is challenging to realize in the clinical setting, since good manufacturing practices (GMP) procedures for complex cell sorting and genetic manipulation are limited. To be able to directly compare the immunological attributes and therapeutic efficacy of naïve (T(N)) and central memory (T(CM)) CD8(+) T cells, we investigated clinical-scale procedures for their parallel selection and in vitro manipulation. We also evaluated currently available GMP-grade reagents for stimulation of T cell subsets, including a new type of anti-CD3/anti-CD28 nanomatrix. An optimized protocol was established for the isolation of both CD8(+) T(N) cells (CD4(-)CD62L(+)CD45RA(+)) and CD8(+) T(CM) (CD4(-)CD62L(+)CD45RA(-)) from a single patient. The highly enriched T cell subsets can be efficiently transduced and expanded to large cell numbers, sufficient for clinical applications and equivalent to or better than current cell and gene therapy approaches with unselected lymphocyte populations. The GMP protocols for selection of T(N) and T(CM) we reported here will be the basis for clinical trials analyzing safety, in vivo persistence and clinical efficacy in cancer patients and will help to generate a more reliable and efficacious cellular product. PMID:23903715

  9. Adoptive T-cell immunotherapy of cancer using chimeric antigen receptor-grafted T cells.

    PubMed

    Davies, David Marc; Maher, John

    2010-06-01

    Harnessing the power of the immune system to target cancer has long been a goal of tumor immunologists. One avenue under investigation is the modification of T cells to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR). Expression of such a receptor enables T-cell specificity to be redirected against a chosen tumor antigen. Substantial research in this field has been carried out, incorporating a wide variety of malignancies and tumor-associated antigens. Ongoing investigations will ensure this area continues to expand at a rapid pace. This review will explain the evolution of CAR technology over the last two decades in addition to detailing the associated benefits and disadvantages. The outcome of recent phase I clinical trials and the impact that these have had upon the direction of future research in this field will also be addressed.

  10. Adoptive T-cell Therapy Using Autologous Tumor-infiltrating Lymphocytes for Metastatic Melanoma: Current Status and Future Outlook

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Richard; Forget, Marie-Andree; Chacon, Jessica; Bernatchez, Chantale; Haymaker, Cara; Chen, Jie Qing; Hwu, Patrick; Radvanyi, Laszlo

    2012-01-01

    Immunotherapy using autologous T-cells has emerged to be a powerful treatment option for patients with metastatic melanoma. These include the adoptive transfer of autologous tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL), T-cells transduced with high-affinity T-cell receptors (TCR) against major melanosomal tumor antigens, and T cells transduced with chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) composed of hybrid immunoglobulin light chains with endo-domains of T-cell signaling molecules. Among these and other options for T-cell therapy, TIL together with high-dose IL-2 has had the longest clinical history with multiple clinical trials in centers across the world consistently demonstrating durable clinical response rates near 50% or more. A distinct advantage of TIL therapy making it still the T-cell therapy of choice is the broad nature of the T-cell recognition against both defined as well as un-defined tumors antigens against all possible MHC, rather than the single specificity and limited MHC coverage of the newer TCR and CAR transduction technologies. In the past decade, significant inroads have been made in defining the phenotypes of T cells in TIL mediating tumor regression. CD8+ T cells are emerging to be critical, although the exact subset of CD8+ T cells exhibiting the highest clinical activity in terms of memory and effector markers is still controversial. We present a model in which both effector-memory and more differentiated effector T cells ultimately may need to cooperate to mediate long-term tumor control in responding patients. Although TIL therapy has shown great potential to treat metastatic melanoma, a number of issues have emerged that need to be addressed to bring it more into the mainstream of melanoma care. First, we have a reached the point where a pivotal phase II or phase III trials are needed in an attempt to gain regulatory approval of TIL as standard-of-care. Second, improvements in how we expand TIL for therapy are needed, that minimize the time the T-cells

  11. Cetuximab intensifies the ADCC activity of adoptive NK cells in a nude mouse colorectal cancer xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shanshan; Li, Xuechun; Chen, Rongming; Yin, Mingang; Zheng, Qiuhong

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells, discovered ~40 years ago, are believed to be the most effective cytotoxic lymphocytes to counteract cancer; however, adoptive NK cell therapy in vivo has encountered certain limitations, including a lack of specificity. The drug cetuximab can mediate antibody dependent cell mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity through NK cells in vivo, and has been approved for the first-line treatment of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-positive metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the ADCC activity of adoptive NK cells, induced by cetuximab in a nude mouse CRC xenograft model, has not been previously reported. The aim of the present study was to explore the ADCC activity of cetuximab combined with adoptive NK cells in CRC xenograft models with various EGFR expressions. The nude mouse xenograft models were established by subcutaneously injecting LOVO or SW620 cells. The mice were then randomly divided into 6 groups: Phosphate-buffered saline, cetuximab, human immunoglobulin G (hIgG), NK cells, hIgG plus NK cells and cetuximab plus NK cells. The ADCC antitumor activity was evaluated in these CRC models. The results indicated that the cetuximab plus NK cells group showed the greatest tumor inhibition effect compared with the NK cells group in LOVO xenograft tumor models with positive EGFR expression. However, the combination of cetuximab and NK cells did not show a stronger tumor inhibitory effect against the SW620 xenograft tumor models compared with the efficiency of NK cells. In conclusion, cetuximab could intensify the ADCC antitumor activity of adoptive NK cells towards CRC with an increased EGFR expression. The combination of cetuximab and NK cells may be a potential immunotherapy for metastatic CRC patients with positive EGFR expression.

  12. Cetuximab intensifies the ADCC activity of adoptive NK cells in a nude mouse colorectal cancer xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shanshan; Li, Xuechun; Chen, Rongming; Yin, Mingang; Zheng, Qiuhong

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells, discovered ~40 years ago, are believed to be the most effective cytotoxic lymphocytes to counteract cancer; however, adoptive NK cell therapy in vivo has encountered certain limitations, including a lack of specificity. The drug cetuximab can mediate antibody dependent cell mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity through NK cells in vivo, and has been approved for the first-line treatment of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-positive metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the ADCC activity of adoptive NK cells, induced by cetuximab in a nude mouse CRC xenograft model, has not been previously reported. The aim of the present study was to explore the ADCC activity of cetuximab combined with adoptive NK cells in CRC xenograft models with various EGFR expressions. The nude mouse xenograft models were established by subcutaneously injecting LOVO or SW620 cells. The mice were then randomly divided into 6 groups: Phosphate-buffered saline, cetuximab, human immunoglobulin G (hIgG), NK cells, hIgG plus NK cells and cetuximab plus NK cells. The ADCC antitumor activity was evaluated in these CRC models. The results indicated that the cetuximab plus NK cells group showed the greatest tumor inhibition effect compared with the NK cells group in LOVO xenograft tumor models with positive EGFR expression. However, the combination of cetuximab and NK cells did not show a stronger tumor inhibitory effect against the SW620 xenograft tumor models compared with the efficiency of NK cells. In conclusion, cetuximab could intensify the ADCC antitumor activity of adoptive NK cells towards CRC with an increased EGFR expression. The combination of cetuximab and NK cells may be a potential immunotherapy for metastatic CRC patients with positive EGFR expression. PMID:27602116

  13. Cloning mice and ES cells by nuclear transfer from somatic stem cells and fully differentiated cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhongde

    2011-01-01

    Cloning animals by nuclear transfer (NT) has been successful in several mammalian species. In addition to cloning live animals (reproductive cloning), this technique has also been used in several species to establish cloned embryonic stem (ntES) cell lines from somatic cells. It is the latter application of this technique that has been heralded as being the potential means to produce isogenic embryonic stem cells from patients for cell therapy (therapeutic cloning). These two types of cloning differ only in the steps after cloned embryos are produced: for reproductive cloning the cloned embryos are transferred to surrogate mothers to allow them to develop to full term and for therapeutic cloning the cloned embryos are used to derive ntES cells. In this chapter, a detailed NT protocol in mouse by using somatic stem cells (neuron and skin stem cells) and fully differentiated somatic cells (cumulus cells and fibroblast cells) as nuclear donors is described.

  14. Purity of transferred CD8+ T cells is crucial for safety and efficacy of combinatorial tumor immunotherapy in the absence of SHP-1

    PubMed Central

    Watson, H Angharad; Dolton, Garry; Ohme, Julia; Ladell, Kristin; Vigar, Miriam; Wehenkel, Sophie; Hindley, James; Mohammed, Rebar N; Miners, Kelly; Luckwell, Rhys A; Price, David A; Matthews, R James; Ager, Ann

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of tumor-specific cytotoxic T cells is a promising advance in cancer therapy. Similarly, checkpoint inhibition has shown striking clinical results in some patients. Here we combine adoptive cell transfer with ablation of the checkpoint protein Src homology 2-domain-containing phosphatase 1 (SHP-1, Ptpn6). Naturally occurring motheaten mice lack SHP-1 and do not survive weaning due to extensive immunopathology. To circumvent this limitation, we created a novel SHP-1null mouse that is viable up to 12 weeks of age by knocking out IL1r1. Using this model, we demonstrate that the absence of SHP-1 augments the ability of adoptively transferred CD8+ T cells to control tumor growth. This therapeutic effect was only observed in situations where T-cell numbers were limited, analogous to clinical settings. However, adoptive transfer of non-CD8+ SHP-1null hematopoietic cells resulted in lethal motheaten-like pathology, indicating that systemic inhibition of SHP-1 could have serious adverse effects. Despite this caveat, our findings support the development of SHP-1 inhibition strategies in human T cells to complement adoptive transfer therapies in the clinic. PMID:27430370

  15. Human Glycolipid Transfer Protein (GLTP) Expression Modulates Cell Shape

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yongguang; Chung, Taeowan; Zou, Xianqiong; Pike, Helen M.; Brown, Rhoderick E.

    2011-01-01

    Glycolipid transfer protein (GLTP) accelerates glycosphingolipid (GSL) intermembrane transfer via a unique lipid transfer/binding fold (GLTP-fold) that defines the GLTP superfamily and is the prototype for GLTP-like domains in larger proteins, i.e. phosphoinositol 4-phosphate adaptor protein-2 (FAPP2). Although GLTP-folds are known to play roles in the nonvesicular intracellular trafficking of glycolipids, their ability to alter cell phenotype remains unexplored. In the present study, overexpression of human glycolipid transfer protein (GLTP) was found to dramatically alter cell phenotype, with cells becoming round between 24 and 48 h after transfection. By 48 h post transfection, ∼70% conversion to the markedly round shape was evident in HeLa and HEK-293 cells, but not in A549 cells. In contrast, overexpression of W96A-GLTP, a liganding-site point mutant with abrogated ability to transfer glycolipid, did not alter cell shape. The round adherent cells exhibited diminished motility in wound healing assays and an inability to endocytose cholera toxin but remained viable and showed little increase in apoptosis as assessed by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage. A round cell phenotype also was induced by overexpression of FAPP2, which binds/transfers glycolipid via its C-terminal GLTP-like fold, but not by a plant GLTP ortholog (ACD11), which is incapable of glycolipid binding/transfer. Screening for human protein partners of GLTP by yeast two hybrid screening and by immuno-pulldown analyses revealed regulation of the GLTP-induced cell rounding response by interaction with δ-catenin. Remarkably, while δ-catenin overexpression alone induced dendritic outgrowths, coexpression of GLTP along with δ-catenin accelerated transition to the rounded phenotype. The findings represent the first known phenotypic changes triggered by GLTP overexpression and regulated by direct interaction with a p120-catenin protein family member. PMID:21625605

  16. Phenotype and Hierarchy of Two Transgenic T Cell Lines Targeting the Respiratory Syncytial Virus KdM282-90 Epitope Is Transfer Dose-Dependent.

    PubMed

    Morabito, Kaitlyn M; Erez, Noam; Graham, Barney S; Ruckwardt, Tracy J

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we compared two lines of transgenic CD8+ T cells specific for the same KdM282-90 epitope of respiratory syncytial virus in the CB6F1 hybrid mouse model. Here we found that these two transgenic lines had similar in vivo abilities to control viral load after respiratory syncytial virus infection using adoptive transfer. Transfer of the TRBV13-2 line resulted in higher levels of IL-6 and MIP1-α in the lung than TRBV13-1 transfer. Interestingly, when large numbers of cells were co-transferred, the lines formed a hierarchy, with TRBV13-2 being immunodominant over TRBV13-1 in the mediastinal lymph node despite no identifiable difference in proliferation or apoptosis between the lines. This hierarchy was not established when lower cell numbers were transferred. The phenotype and frequency of proliferating cells were also cell transfer dose-dependent with higher percentages of CD127loCD62LloKLRG1lo and proliferating cells present when lower numbers of cells were transferred. These results illustrate the importance of cell number in adoptive transfer experiments and its influence on the phenotype and hierarchy of the subsequent T cell response. PMID:26752171

  17. Induction/Engineering, Detection, Selection, and Expansion of Clinical-Grade Human Antigen-Specific CD8+ Cytotoxic T Cell Clones for Adoptive Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Jeras, Matjaž; Bricl, Irena; Zorec, Robert; Švajger, Urban

    2010-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of effector antigen-specific immune cells is becoming a promising treatment option in allogeneic transplantation, infectious diseases, cancer, and autoimmune disorders. Within this context, the important role of CD8+ cytotoxic T cells (CTLs) is objective of intensive studies directed to their in vivo and ex vivo induction, detection, selection, expansion, and therapeutic effectiveness. Additional questions that are being addressed by the scientific community are related to the establishment and maintenance of their longevity and memory state as well as to defining critical conditions underlying their transitions between discrete, but functionally different subtypes. In this article we review and comment latest approaches and techniques used for preparing large amounts of antigen-specific CTLs, suitable for clinical use. PMID:20224660

  18. [Using shock waves for transfer of molecules in cells].

    PubMed

    Ueberle, Friedrich; Delius, Michael; Guo, Lei

    2002-01-01

    A mixture of human lymphocytes (L1210) and fluorescent marker molecules are subjected to shockwaves in vitro. Due to the transient cavitation generated by the shockwaves, the cells take up the marker molecules. Cavitation is characterized by the bubble collapse times. An electrohydraulic generator XL-1 and a piezoelectric generator PR-II were used; PR-II was more effective. Depending on the pulse energy and number of pulses, up to 70% of the surviving cells took up the molecules. Shockwave-mediated molecule transfer provides a useful tool for the transfer of molecules into cells, which can be used as a research tool in the medical and biotechnological fields. Due to the large penetration potential of shock-waves into the body, the method may be further developed for in vivo transfer of drugs and cell transfection use.

  19. Differentiated cells are more efficient than adult stem cells for cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Sung, Li-Ying; Gao, Shaorong; Shen, Hongmei; Yu, Hui; Song, Yifang; Smith, Sadie L; Chang, Ching-Chien; Inoue, Kimiko; Kuo, Lynn; Lian, Jin; Li, Ao; Tian, X Cindy; Tuck, David P; Weissman, Sherman M; Yang, Xiangzhong; Cheng, Tao

    2006-11-01

    Since the creation of Dolly via somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), more than a dozen species of mammals have been cloned using this technology. One hypothesis for the limited success of cloning via SCNT (1%-5%) is that the clones are likely to be derived from adult stem cells. Support for this hypothesis comes from the findings that the reproductive cloning efficiency for embryonic stem cells is five to ten times higher than that for somatic cells as donors and that cloned pups cannot be produced directly from cloned embryos derived from differentiated B and T cells or neuronal cells. The question remains as to whether SCNT-derived animal clones can be derived from truly differentiated somatic cells. We tested this hypothesis with mouse hematopoietic cells at different differentiation stages: hematopoietic stem cells, progenitor cells and granulocytes. We found that cloning efficiency increases over the differentiation hierarchy, and terminally differentiated postmitotic granulocytes yield cloned pups with the greatest cloning efficiency.

  20. Blast cells transfer experimental hypersensitivity pneumonitis in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Schuyler, M.; Cook, C.; Listrom, M.; Fengolio-Preiser, C.

    1988-06-01

    We previously demonstrated that experimental hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) can be transferred by lymph node cells (LNC) cultured in vitro with antigen. The purpose of this study was to identify the cells responsible for transfer and to determine if pulmonary cells can transfer HP. We cultured LNC from sensitized Strain 2 guinea pigs with a soluble extract of Micropolyspora faeni for 72 h, separated lymphoblasts from small lymphocytes, and transferred both subpopulations intravenously to syngeneic recipients. We also transferred irradiated lymphoblasts (1,500 rads), macrophage-depleted, lymphoblast-enriched populations, and pulmonary cells either without culture or after culture with M. faeni. Control animals received an equal volume of medium. All recipient animals were challenged intratracheally (i.t.) with M. faeni 48 h after the cell transfer, and they were killed 4 days after i.t. challenge. Randomly selected microscopic fields of the lung (250/animal) were judged to be normal or abnormal without knowledge of treatment. This measurement was reproducible (r = 0.95 for duplicate measurements, n = 55). All guinea pigs were maintained in HEPA-filtered air. There was a low level of pulmonary response to an i.t. challenge of M. faeni in animals that received medium. Animals that received pulmonary cells, either cultured or noncultured, did not differ from those in the control group. There was a substantial increase (p less than 0.01) in the extent of pulmonary abnormalities in the recipients of the lymphoblast population, with significant correlation (r = 0.87, p less than 0.01) between the number of lymphoblasts transferred and the extent of pulmonary abnormalities.

  1. Effect of regulatory cells induced by influenza virus during adoptive transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Volgarev, A.P.; Maiorova, L.P.; Smorodintsev, A.A.

    1987-06-01

    This paper examines the protective effect of humoral and cellular factors of immunity in experimental influenza infection in mice, with an analysis of the functional activity of the regulatory subpopulations of the lymphocytes, especially in the early stages of observation. The regulatory activity of the splenic lymphocytes was studied by assessing changes in the level of mitogen-induced proliferation of test cultures of lymphocytes from intact animals in the presence of lymphocytes obtained from infected mice at different times after infection. Tritium-labelled thymidine was used as the marker.

  2. Cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Fulka, J; First, N L; Loi, P; Moor, R M

    1998-10-01

    The birth of the first cloned mammals, produced by the introduction of somatic cell nuclei into enucleated oocytes, was an impressive and surprising development. Although the ethical debate has been intense, the important scientific questions raised by this work have been inadequately discussed and are still unresolved. In this essay we address three questions about nuclear transplantation in the eggs of mice and domestic animals. First, why were the recent experiments on somatic cell cloning successful, when so many others have failed? Second, were these exceptional cases, or is somatic cloning now open to all? Third, what are the future possibilities for increasing the efficiency and wider applicability of the cloning process?

  3. Adenoviral-vector-mediated gene transfer to dendritic cells.

    PubMed

    Song, W; Crystal, R G

    2001-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are the most potent antigen presenting cells capable of initiating T-cell-dependent immune responses (1-5). This biologic potential can be harnessed to elicit effective antigen-specific immune responses by transferring the relevant antigens to the DC. Once the DC have been mobilized and purified, the relevant antigens can be transferred to the DC as intact proteins, or as peptides representing specific epitopes, or with gene transfer using sequences of DNA or RNA coding for the pertinent antigen(s) (6-15). Theoretically, genetically modifying DC with genes coding for specific antigens has potential advantages over pulsing the DC with peptides repeating the antigen or antigen fragment. First, the genetically modified DC may present previously unknown epitopes in association with different MHC molecules. Second, gene transfer to DC ensures that the gene product is endogenously processed, leading to the generation of MHC class I-restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), the effector arm of cell-mediated immune responses. Finally, in addition to genes coding for the antigen(s), genetic modification of the DC can induce genes coding for mediators relevant to generation of the immune response to the antigen(s), further boosting host responses to the antigens presented by the modified DC. Different gene transfer approaches have been explored to genetically modify DC, including retroviral vectors (16-18), recombinant vaccinia virus vectors (19), and recombinant adenovirus (Ad) vectors (19-23). The focus of this chapter is on using recombinant Ad vectors to transfer genes to murine DC. We have used a similar strategy to transfer genes to human DC (24). As an example of the power of this technology, we will describe the use of Ad-vector-modified DC to suppress the growth of tumor cells modified to express a specific antigen.

  4. Nuclear equivalence, nuclear transfer, and the cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Campbell, K H

    1999-01-01

    The last 20 years have seen the development of techniques for the production of mammals by nuclear transfer. Originally limited to the swapping of pronuclei and the use of early cleavage-stage embryos as nuclear donors, nuclear transfer came of age in 1995 with the birth of 2 Welsh Mountain lambs, Megan and Morag, that were produced using cultured differentiated cells as donors of genetic material. In 1996, Dolly was the first animal to be produced using the genetic material from an adult-derived somatic cell. The techniques used in the production of these animals have now been reproduced in both sheep and cattle, and as predicted, successful development has been obtained using donor cells taken directly ex vivo. This article reviews the current status of mammalian nuclear transfer and the biological background to these successes. PMID:16218826

  5. Durable Complete Responses in Heavily Pretreated Patients with Metastatic Melanoma Using T Cell Transfer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Steven A.; Yang, James C.; Sherry, Richard M.; Kammula, Udai S.; Hughes, Marybeth S.; Phan, Giao Q.; Citrin, Deborah E.; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Robbins, Paul F.; Wunderlich, John R.; Morton, Kathleen E.; Laurencot, Carolyn M.; Steinberg, Seth M.; White, Donald E.; Dudley, Mark E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Most treatments for patients with metastatic melanoma have a low rate of complete regression and thus overall survival in these patients is poor. We have investigated the ability of adoptive cell transfer utilizing autologous, tumor infiltrating lymphocytes to mediate durable complete regressions in heavily pre-treated patients with metastatic melanoma. Experimental Design Ninety-three patients with measurable metastatic melanoma were treated with the adoptive transfer of autologous tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes administered in conjunction with interleukin-2 following a lymphodepleting preparative regimen on three sequential clinical trials. Ninety-five percent of these patients had progressive disease following a prior systemic treatment. Median potential followup was 62 months. Results Objective response rates by RECIST criteria in the three trials using lymphodepleting preparative regimens (chemotherapy alone or with 2Gy or 12Gy irradiation) were 49%, 52% and 72%. Twenty of the 93 patients (22%) achieved a complete tumor regression and 19 have ongoing complete regressions beyond three years The actuarial three and five year survivals for the entire group were 36% and 29% respectively but for the 20 complete responders were 100% and 93%. The likelihood of achieving a complete response was similar regardless of prior therapy. Factors associated with objective response included longer telomeres of the infused cells, the number of CD8+ CD27+ cells infused and the persistence of the infused cells in the circulation at one month (all p2<0.001). Conclusions Cell transfer therapy with autologous tumor infiltrating can mediate durable complete responses in patients with metastatic melanoma and has similar efficacy irrespective of prior treatment. PMID:21498393

  6. Somatic cell nuclear transfer: pros and cons.

    PubMed

    Sumer, Huseyin; Liu, Jun; Tat, Pollyanna; Heffernan, Corey; Jones, Karen L; Verma, Paul J

    2009-01-01

    Even though the technique of mammalian SCNT is just over a decade old it has already resulted in numerous significant advances. Despite the recent advances in the reprogramming field, SCNT remains the bench-mark for the generation of both genetically unmodified autologous pluripotent stem cells for transplantation and for the production of cloned animals. In this review we will discuss the pros and cons of SCNT, drawing comparisons with other reprogramming methods. PMID:20232594

  7. Somatic cell nuclear transfer: pros and cons.

    PubMed

    Sumer, Huseyin; Liu, Jun; Tat, Pollyanna; Heffernan, Corey; Jones, Karen L; Verma, Paul J

    2009-01-01

    Even though the technique of mammalian SCNT is just over a decade old it has already resulted in numerous significant advances. Despite the recent advances in the reprogramming field, SCNT remains the bench-mark for the generation of both genetically unmodified autologous pluripotent stem cells for transplantation and for the production of cloned animals. In this review we will discuss the pros and cons of SCNT, drawing comparisons with other reprogramming methods.

  8. Policy Borrowing and Transfer, and Policy Convergence: Justifications for the Adoption of the Bologna Process in the CEMAC Region and the Cameroonian Higher Education System through the LMD Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eta, Elizabeth Agbor

    2015-01-01

    The borrowing and transfer of policies, ideas and practices from one system to another may in part explain the convergence of educational systems. Using text documents as research material, this paper examines the adoption and transfer of Bologna Process (BP) ideas in the Economic and Monetary Community of Central Africa (CEMAC) and in the…

  9. Cloning Endangered Felids by Interspecies Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Martha C; Pope, C Earle

    2015-01-01

    In 2003, the first wild felid was produced by interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer. Since then other wild felid clone offspring have been produced by using the same technique with minor modifications. This chapter describes detailed protocols used in our laboratory for (1) the isolation, culture, and preparation of fibroblast cells as donor nucleus, and (2) embryo reconstruction with domestic cat enucleated oocytes to produce cloned embryos that develop to the blastocyst stage in vitro and, after transfer into synchronized recipients, establish successful pregnancies.

  10. Activation and propagation of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes on clinical-grade designer artificial antigen presenting cells for adoptive immunotherapy of melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Forget, Marie-Andrée; Malu, Shruti; Liu, Hui; Toth, Christopher; Maiti, Sourindra; Kale, Charuta; Haymaker, Cara; Bernatchez, Chantale; Huls, Helen; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco M.; Hwu, Patrick; Cooper, Laurence J. N.; Radvanyi, Laszlo G.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) with autologous tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) is a therapy for metastatic melanoma with response rates up to 50%. However, the generation of the TIL transfer product is challenging, requiring pooled allogeneic normal donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) used in vitro as “feeders” to support a rapid expansion protocol (REP). Here, we optimized a platform to propagate TIL to a clinical scale using K562-cells genetically modified to express costimulatory molecules such as CD86, CD137-ligand and membrane-bound IL-15 to function as artificial antigen-presenting cell (aAPC) as an alternative to using PBMC feeders. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN We used aAPC or γ-irradiated PBMC feeders to propagate TIL and measured rates of expansion. The activation and differentiation state was evaluated by flow cytometry and differential gene expression analyses. Clonal diversity was assessed based on pattern of T-cell receptor (TCR) usage. T-cell effector function was measured by evaluation of cytotoxic granule content and killing of target cells. RESULTS The aAPC propagated TIL at numbers equivalent to that found with PBMC feeders, while increasing the frequency of CD8+ T-cell expansion with a comparable effector-memory phenotype. mRNA profiling revealed an up-regulation of genes in the Wnt and stem-cell pathways with the aAPC. The aAPC platform did not skew clonal diversity and CD8+ T cells showed comparable anti-tumor function as those expanded with PBMC feeders. CONCLUSIONS TIL can be rapidly expanded with aAPC to clinical scale generating T cells with similar phenotypic and effector profiles as with PBMC feeders. These data support the clinical-application of aAPC to manufacture TIL for the treatment of melanoma. PMID:25304728

  11. Training substance abuse treatment organizations to adopt evidence-based practices: the Addiction Technology Transfer Center of New England Science to Service Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Squires, Daniel D; Gumbley, Stephen J; Storti, Susan A

    2008-04-01

    Underutilization of evidence-based treatments for substance abuse represents a longstanding problem for the field and the public health of our nation. Those who would most benefit from research advances (community treatment agencies and the clients they serve) have historically been the least likely to be exposed to innovative evidence-based methods for substance abuse treatment. To help address this gap, the Addiction Technology Transfer Center of New England (ATTC-NE), located at Brown University, has adapted and implemented an organizational change strategy intended to equip substance abuse treatment organizations and their employees with the skills needed to adopt evidence-based treatment practices. Since 2003, the ATTC-NE has worked with 54 community-based substance abuse treatment agencies from across New England using this model, which is called Science to Service Laboratory (SSL). Twenty-eight of 54 agencies completed all of the SSL components, and 26 of these 28 completer agencies (96%) successfully adopted and implemented contingency management as a result. Survey data comparing completer and dropout agencies' satisfaction with the quality, organization, and utility of the SSL indicate that both groups rated the SSL favorably. However, differences emerged with respect to organizational characteristics between completer and dropout agencies. Specifically, dropout agencies were more likely to report turnover in staff positions vital to training effort. Future directions for the model are discussed.

  12. Nanoparticle facilitated extracellular electron transfer in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaocheng; Hu, Jinsong; Lieber, Alexander M; Jackan, Charles S; Biffinger, Justin C; Fitzgerald, Lisa A; Ringeisen, Bradley R; Lieber, Charles M

    2014-11-12

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have been the focus of substantial research interest due to their potential for long-term, renewable electrical power generation via the metabolism of a broad spectrum of organic substrates, although the low power densities have limited their applications to date. Here, we demonstrate the potential to improve the power extraction by exploiting biogenic inorganic nanoparticles to facilitate extracellular electron transfer in MFCs. Simultaneous short-circuit current recording and optical imaging on a nanotechnology-enabled platform showed substantial current increase from Shewanella PV-4 after the formation of cell/iron sulfide nanoparticle aggregates. Detailed characterization of the structure and composition of the cell/nanoparticle interface revealed crystalline iron sulfide nanoparticles in intimate contact with and uniformly coating the cell membrane. In addition, studies designed to address the fundamental mechanisms of charge transport in this hybrid system showed that charge transport only occurred in the presence of live Shewanella, and moreover demonstrated that the enhanced current output can be attributed to improved electron transfer at cell/electrode interface and through the cellular-networks. Our approach of interconnecting and electrically contacting bacterial cells through biogenic nanoparticles represents a unique and promising direction in MFC research and has the potential to not only advance our fundamental knowledge about electron transfer processes in these biological systems but also overcome a key limitation in MFCs by constructing an electrically connected, three-dimensional cell network from the bottom-up.

  13. Entamoeba histolytica trophozoites transfer lipophosphopeptidoglycans to enteric cell layers.

    PubMed

    Lauwaet, Tineke; Oliveira, Maria José; De Bruyne, Georges; Bruchhaus, Iris; Duchêne, Michael; Mareel, Marc; Leroy, Ancy

    2004-04-01

    Transfer of antigens frequently follows adhesion of protozoan parasites to host cells. We were interested in such transfer from the Entamoeba surface to enterocytes following adhesion of trophozoites. Therefore, cocultures of enterocytes in vitro and ex vivo with Entamoeba histolytica (strain HM-1:IMSS) or Entamoeba dispar (strain SAW760) trophozoites were processed for immunocytochemistry. The EH5 monoclonal antibody against amoebic proteophosphoglycans marked a dotted pattern on the apical side of enterocytes in in vitro cocultures with HM-1:IMSS and SAW760 trophozoites. Basolateral staining was present in cocultures following dysfunction of tight junctions, or when trophozoites made direct contact with the basolateral side of enterocytes in in vitro and ex vivo cocultures. Based on the molecular mass in Western blot, the transferred proteophosphoglycan was identified as a lipophosphopeptidoglycan. In conclusion, trophozoites transfer LPPG to the apical side of enterocytes following adhesion and prior to dysfunction of tight junctions.

  14. Live cell isolation by laser microdissection with gravity transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgorny, Oleg V.

    2013-05-01

    Laser microdissection by pulsing ultraviolet laser allows the isolation and recultivation of live cells based on morphological features or/and fluorescent labelling from adherent cell cultures. Previous investigations described only the use of the laser microdissection and pressure catapulting (LMPC) for live cell isolation. But LMPC requires complex manipulations and some skill. Furthermore, single-cell cloning using laser microdissection has not yet been demonstrated. The first evidence of successful application of laser microdissection with gravity transfer (LMDGT) for capturing and recultivation of live cells is presented. A new strategy for LMDGT is presented because of the failure to reproduce the manufacturer's protocol. Using the new strategy, successful capturing and recultivation of circle-shaped samples from confluent monolayer of HeLa cells was demonstrated. It was found that LMDGT is easier than LMPC because it doesn't require personal participation of investigator in transferring of isolated samples to final culture dishes. Moreover, for the first time, the generation of clonal colonies from single live cells isolated by laser microdissection was demonstrated. Data obtained in this study confirm that LMDGT is a reliable and high-yield method allowing isolation and expansion of both cell clusters and single cells from adherent cell cultures.

  15. Realizing the next generation of CPV cells using transfer printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumb, Matthew P.; Schmieder, Kenneth J.; González, María; Mack, Shawn; Yakes, Michael K.; Meitl, Matthew; Burroughs, Scott; Ebert, Chris; Bennett, Mitchell F.; Forbes, David V.; Sheng, Xing; Rogers, John A.; Walters, Robert J.

    2015-09-01

    Transfer-printing is an important, commercial technology for manufacturing state of the art CPV modules, and has emerged recently as a key enabling technology for the realization of ultra-high-efficiency, mechanically stacked III-V solar cells with low cost. This paper presents the latest results for microscale CPV cells grown on GaAs, InP and GaSb substrates for ultra-high-efficiency, four-terminal, mechanically stacked architectures. The latest findings from a combination of modeling, growth, processing and characterization of single and multijunction solar cells are described, and the roadmap to the long-term goal of using transfer-printing to produce the first solar cell with 50% conversion efficiency is outlined.

  16. Cloning animals by somatic cell nuclear transfer--biological factors.

    PubMed

    Tian, X Cindy; Kubota, Chikara; Enright, Brian; Yang, Xiangzhong

    2003-11-13

    Cloning by nuclear transfer using mammalian somatic cells has enormous potential application. However, somatic cloning has been inefficient in all species in which live clones have been produced. High abortion and fetal mortality rates are commonly observed. These developmental defects have been attributed to incomplete reprogramming of the somatic nuclei by the cloning process. Various strategies have been used to improve the efficiency of nuclear transfer, however, significant breakthroughs are yet to happen. In this review we will discuss studies conducted, in our laboratories and those of others, to gain a better understanding of nuclear reprogramming. Because cattle are a species widely used for nuclear transfer studies, and more laboratories have succeeded in cloning cattle than any other species, this review will be focused on somatic cell cloning of cattle.

  17. Direct Toll-Like Receptor 8 signaling increases the functional avidity of human CD8+ T lymphocytes generated for adoptive T cell therapy strategies

    PubMed Central

    Chatillon, Jean-François; Hamieh, Mohamad; Bayeux, Florence; Abasq, Claire; Fauquembergue, Emilie; Drouet, Aurélie; Guisier, Florian; Latouche, Jean-Baptiste; Musette, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of in vitro activated and expanded antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) is a promising therapeutic strategy for infectious diseases and cancers. Obtaining in vitro a sufficient amount of highly specific cytotoxic cells and capable of retaining cytotoxic activity in vivo remains problematic. We studied the role of Toll-Like Receptor-8 (TLR8) engagement on peripheral CTLs activated with melanoma antigen MART-1-expressing artificial antigen-presenting cells (AAPCs). After a 3-week co-culture, 3–27% of specific CTLs were consistently obtained. CTLs expressed TLR8 in the intracellular compartment and at the cell surface. Specific CTLs activated with a TLR8 agonist (CL075) 24 h before the end of the culture displayed neither any change in their production levels of molecules involved in cytotoxicity (IFN-γ, Granzyme B, and TNF-α) nor major significant change in their cell surface phenotype. However, these TLR8-stimulated lymphocytes displayed increased cytotoxic activity against specific peptide-pulsed target cells related to an increase in specific anti-melanoma CTL functional avidity. TLR8 engagement on CTLs could, therefore, be useful in different immunotherapy strategies. PMID:25866635

  18. Direct Toll-Like Receptor 8 signaling increases the functional avidity of human CD8+ T lymphocytes generated for adoptive T cell therapy strategies.

    PubMed

    Chatillon, Jean-François; Hamieh, Mohamad; Bayeux, Florence; Abasq, Claire; Fauquembergue, Emilie; Drouet, Aurélie; Guisier, Florian; Latouche, Jean-Baptiste; Musette, Philippe

    2015-03-01

    Adoptive transfer of in vitro activated and expanded antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) is a promising therapeutic strategy for infectious diseases and cancers. Obtaining in vitro a sufficient amount of highly specific cytotoxic cells and capable of retaining cytotoxic activity in vivo remains problematic. We studied the role of Toll-Like Receptor-8 (TLR8) engagement on peripheral CTLs activated with melanoma antigen MART-1-expressing artificial antigen-presenting cells (AAPCs). After a 3-week co-culture, 3-27% of specific CTLs were consistently obtained. CTLs expressed TLR8 in the intracellular compartment and at the cell surface. Specific CTLs activated with a TLR8 agonist (CL075) 24 h before the end of the culture displayed neither any change in their production levels of molecules involved in cytotoxicity (IFN-γ, Granzyme B, and TNF-α) nor major significant change in their cell surface phenotype. However, these TLR8-stimulated lymphocytes displayed increased cytotoxic activity against specific peptide-pulsed target cells related to an increase in specific anti-melanoma CTL functional avidity. TLR8 engagement on CTLs could, therefore, be useful in different immunotherapy strategies. PMID:25866635

  19. Primary cells utilize halogen-organic charge transfer complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutmann, F.; Hermann, A. M.; Rembaum, A.

    1966-01-01

    Electrochemical cells with solid state components employ charge transfer complexes or donor-acceptor complexes in which the donor component is an organic compound and the acceptor component is a halogen. A minor proportion of graphite added to these composition helps reduce the resistivity.

  20. Gene transfer into neural cells in vitro using adenoviral vectors.

    PubMed

    Southgate, T D; Kingston, P A; Castro, M G

    2001-05-01

    Adenoviruses (Ads) have become a very attractive and versatile vector system for delivering genes into brain cells in vitro and in vivo. One of the main attractions of Ads is that they can mediate gene transfer into post-mitotic cells, i.e. neurons. Ads are easy to grow and manipulate, stable, and their biology is very well understood. This unit is designed to help newcomers into the field, to design, prepare and grow replication-defective recombinant adenovirus vectors with the aim of transferring genes into neurons and glial cells in primary culture. It provides step-by-step methods describing the preparation of brain cell cultures, their infection using recombinant adenovirus vectors and also the assessment of transgene expression using a variety of techniques including fluorescence immunocytochemistry and fluorescence activated cell-sorting (FACS) analysis. The methods described will be useful to scientists wishing to enter the adenovirus field to construct adenovirus vectors to be used for gene transfer into neural cells.

  1. Manipulating the tumor microenvironment ex vivo for enhanced expansion of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes for adoptive cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chacon, Jessica Ann; Sarnaik, Amod A; Chen, Jie Qing; Creasy, Caitlin; Kale, Charuta; Robinson, John; Weber, Jeffrey; Hwu, Patrick; Pilon-Thomas, Shari; Radvanyi, Laszlo

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Cultured tumor fragments from melanoma metastases have been used for years as a source of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) for adoptive cell therapy. The expansion of tumor-reactive CD8+ T cells with IL-2 in these early cultures is critical in generating clinically active TIL infusion products, with a population of activated 4-1BB CD8+ T cells recently found to constitute the majority of tumor-specific T cells. Experimental Design We used an agonistic anti-4-1BB antibody added during the initial tumor fragment cultures to provide in situ 4-1BB co-stimulation. Results We found that addition of an agonistic anti-4-1BB antibody could activate 4-1BB signaling within early cultured tumor fragments and accelerated the rate of memory CD8+ TIL outgrowth that were highly enriched for melanoma antigen specificity. This was associated with NFκB activation and the induction of T-cell survival and memory genes, as well as enhanced IL-2 responsiveness, in the CD8+ T cells in the fragments and emerging from the fragments. Early provision of 4-1BB co-stimulation also affected the dendritic cells (DC) by activating NFκB in DC and promoting their maturation inside the tumor fragments. Blocking HLA class I prevented the enhanced outgrowth of CD8+ T cells with anti-4-1BB, suggesting that an ongoing HLA class I-mediated antigen presentation in early tumor fragment cultures plays a role in mediating tumor-specific CD8+ TIL outgrowth. Conclusions Our results highlight a previously unrecognized concept in TIL adoptive cell therapy that the tumor microenvironment can be dynamically regulated in the initial tumor fragment cultures to regulate the types of T cells expanded and their functional characteristics. PMID:25472998

  2. Gene transfer into mammalian cells by particle bombardment.

    PubMed

    Heiser, W C

    1994-03-01

    Using COS-7 and Chinese hamster ovary cells as model systems, I have examined the efficiency of gene transfer into mammalian cells by particle bombardment. The most important parameters affecting transformation efficiency are the size of the particles, the target distance, and the extent of chamber vacuum. The size of the cell culture plate also affects transformation efficiency. Factors which have little effect on transformation efficiency are the helium pressure, the gap distance, and the macrocarrier travel distance. Compared to several other gene transfer techniques, particle bombardment has the advantage of requiring a low amount of DNA and a low number of cells for successful expression, measured as either transient or stable. I also describe transformation of several murine cell lines which have not been successfully transformed, or have been transformed at only low levels using other methods. These cell lines include preadipocytes (BMS-2), macrophages (J774), and transformed pre-B cells (38B9 and 70Z/3). Compared to transformation by electroporation, lipofection, and diethylaminoethyl dextran, particle bombardment was found to give 50- to 240-fold higher levels of transient expression as measured by luciferase activity in cell extracts. PMID:8203746

  3. [Production of a dialysable transfer factor of cell mediated immunity by lymphoblastoid cells in continuous proliferation].

    PubMed

    Goust, J M; Viza, D; Moulias, R; Trejdosiewicz, L; Lesourd, B; Marescot, M R; Prévot, A

    1975-01-20

    Four lymphoblastoid cell lines tested in this work contain normally a dialysable moiety having by ultraviolet spectroscopy, column chromatography (Biogel P 10) and chemically the same properties than human dialysable Transfer Factor (TFd), but unable to transfer cell mediated immune response against common antigens. Two of them are able to do so after incubation with minimal amounts of TFd. Production of a molecule identical to human TFd is possible in some lymphoblastoid cell lines after induction with TFd. PMID:808340

  4. Intercellular Protein Transfer from Thymocytes to Thymic Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Xia; Qiu, Yu-Rong; Zhong, Xiao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Promiscuous expression of tissue restricted antigens (TRAs) in medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) is crucial for negative selection of self-reactive T cells to establish central tolerance. Intercellular transfer of self-peptide-MHC complexes from mTECs to thymic dendritic cells (DCs) allows DCs to acquire TRAs, which in turn contributes to negative selection and regulatory T cell generation. However, mTECs are unlikely to express all TRAs, such as immunoglobulins generated only in B cells after somatic recombination, hyper-mutation, or class-switches. We report here that both mTECs and cortical TECs can efficiently acquire not only cell surface but also intracellular proteins from thymocytes. This reveals a previously unappreciated intercellular sharing of molecules from thymocytes to TECs, which may broaden the TRA inventory in mTECs for establishing a full spectrum of central tolerance. PMID:27022746

  5. Intercellular Protein Transfer from Thymocytes to Thymic Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong-Xia; Qiu, Yu-Rong; Zhong, Xiao-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Promiscuous expression of tissue restricted antigens (TRAs) in medullary thymic epithelial cells (mTECs) is crucial for negative selection of self-reactive T cells to establish central tolerance. Intercellular transfer of self-peptide-MHC complexes from mTECs to thymic dendritic cells (DCs) allows DCs to acquire TRAs, which in turn contributes to negative selection and regulatory T cell generation. However, mTECs are unlikely to express all TRAs, such as immunoglobulins generated only in B cells after somatic recombination, hyper-mutation, or class-switches. We report here that both mTECs and cortical TECs can efficiently acquire not only cell surface but also intracellular proteins from thymocytes. This reveals a previously unappreciated intercellular sharing of molecules from thymocytes to TECs, which may broaden the TRA inventory in mTECs for establishing a full spectrum of central tolerance. PMID:27022746

  6. Adoptive Immunotherapy in Postoperative Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    He, Jiaxi; Zhang, Jianrong; Liang, Wenhua; Chen, Yaoqi; He, Qihua; He, Jianxing

    2016-01-01

    Background Adoptive immunotherapy (AI) has been applied in the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients, but the value of postoperative AI has been inconclusive largely as a result of the small number of patients included in each study. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to address this issue for patients with postoperative NSCLC. Methods Pubmed, Embase, Cochrane Library were searched for randomized controlled trials comparing adoptive immunotherapy with control therapies in postoperative NSCLC patients. The primary endpoint was overall survival. Hazard ratio (HR) was estimated and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using a fixed-effect model. Results Compared with control therapies, analyses of 4 randomized controlled trials (472 patients) showed a significant benefit of adoptive immunotherapy on survival (hazard ratio [HR] 0.61, 95% CI 0.45–0.84, p = 0.002), and a 39% reduction in the relative risk of death (no evidence of a difference between trials; p = 0.16, I² = 42%). In subgroup analyses by treatment cycles and treatment regimen, significant OS benefit was found in combination therapy of AI with chemotherapy, regardless of whether or not the treatment cycles were more than 10 cycles. Conclusion Adoptive immunotherapy has the potential to improve overall survival in postoperative NSCLC. The findings suggest this is a valid treatment option for these patients. Further randomized clinical trials are urgently needed. PMID:27618180

  7. [Transfer of T-DNA from agrobacteria into plant cells through cell walls and membranes].

    PubMed

    Chumakov, M I

    2001-01-01

    Discusses probable routes of agrobacterial penetration through the plant integumental tissues, cell wall, and plant cell plasmodesma. Analyzes the contribution of extracellular structures of agrobacteria in penetration through barriers of a plant cell, primary contact (adhesion), and during DNA transfer from bacterial (E. coli, A. tumefaciens) to recipient (bacterial or plant) cells. Discusses the relationship between donor cell adhesion to recipient cell surface and the infectious and conjugation processes. Considers the probable role of piles in conjugative transfer of agrobacterial DNA through membranes of donor and recipient (bacterial and plant) cells. Analyzes the contribution of the plant cell cytoskeleton to T-DNA transfer. Suggests a model of transport of T-DNA-VirD2 complex and VirE2 proteins through independent channels consisting of vir-coded proteins. PMID:11236737

  8. Generation of multi-functional antigen-specific human T-cells by lentiviral TCR gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Perro, M; Tsang, J; Xue, S-A; Escors, D; Cesco-Gaspere, M; Pospori, C; Gao, L; Hart, D; Collins, M; Stauss, H; Morris, E C

    2010-06-01

    T-cell receptor (TCR) gene transfer is an attractive strategy to generate antigen-specific T-cells for adoptive immunotherapy of cancer and chronic viral infection. However, current TCR gene transfer protocols trigger T-cell differentiation into terminally differentiated effector cells, which likely have reduced ability to mediate disease protection in vivo. We have developed a lentiviral gene transfer strategy to generate TCR-transduced human T-cells without promoting T-cell differentiation. We found that a combination of interleukin-15 (IL15) and IL21 facilitated lentiviral TCR gene transfer into non-proliferating T-cells. The transduced T-cells showed redirection of antigen specificity and produced IL2, IFNgamma and TNFalpha in a peptide-dependent manner. A significantly higher proportion of the IL15/IL21-stimulated T-cells were multi-functional and able to simultaneously produce all three cytokines (P<0.01), compared with TCR-transduced T-cells generated by conventional anti-CD3 plus IL2 stimulation, which primarily secreted only one cytokine. Similarly, IL15/IL21 maintained high levels of CD62L and CD28 expression in transduced T-cells, whereas anti-CD3 plus IL2 accelerated the loss of CD62L/CD28 expression. The data demonstrate that the combination of lentiviral TCR gene transfer together with IL15/IL21 stimulation can efficiently redirect the antigen specificity of resting primary human T-cells and generate multi-functional T-cells.

  9. Generation of multi-functional antigen-specific human T-cells by lentiviral TCR gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Perro, M; Tsang, J; Xue, S-A; Escors, D; Cesco-Gaspere, M; Pospori, C; Gao, L; Hart, D; Collins, M; Stauss, H; Morris, E C

    2010-06-01

    T-cell receptor (TCR) gene transfer is an attractive strategy to generate antigen-specific T-cells for adoptive immunotherapy of cancer and chronic viral infection. However, current TCR gene transfer protocols trigger T-cell differentiation into terminally differentiated effector cells, which likely have reduced ability to mediate disease protection in vivo. We have developed a lentiviral gene transfer strategy to generate TCR-transduced human T-cells without promoting T-cell differentiation. We found that a combination of interleukin-15 (IL15) and IL21 facilitated lentiviral TCR gene transfer into non-proliferating T-cells. The transduced T-cells showed redirection of antigen specificity and produced IL2, IFNgamma and TNFalpha in a peptide-dependent manner. A significantly higher proportion of the IL15/IL21-stimulated T-cells were multi-functional and able to simultaneously produce all three cytokines (P<0.01), compared with TCR-transduced T-cells generated by conventional anti-CD3 plus IL2 stimulation, which primarily secreted only one cytokine. Similarly, IL15/IL21 maintained high levels of CD62L and CD28 expression in transduced T-cells, whereas anti-CD3 plus IL2 accelerated the loss of CD62L/CD28 expression. The data demonstrate that the combination of lentiviral TCR gene transfer together with IL15/IL21 stimulation can efficiently redirect the antigen specificity of resting primary human T-cells and generate multi-functional T-cells. PMID:20164855

  10. Adoptive immunity mediated by HLA-A*0201 restricted Asp f16 peptides-specific CD8+ T cells against Aspergillus fumigatus infection.

    PubMed

    Sun, Z; Zhu, P; Li, L; Wan, Z; Zhao, Z; Li, R

    2012-11-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus (A. fumigatus) is the most common pathogen of invasive aspergillosis (IA), a life-threatening infection in immunocompromised patients. Recent findings revealed that CD8+ T cells can mediate cytotoxic activity against A. fumigatus. Here, we bioinformatically identified three HLA-A*0201-restricted peptides from Asp f16, an A. fumigatus antigen which was previously shown to be involved in T cell immunity. Our immunological results demonstrated that these peptides can potently induce cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response in CD8+ T cells, thus, damaging the conidia and hyphae of A. fumigatus. Moreover, the Asp f16 peptides can also raise Th1 cell-like response, as measured by interferon-γ (IFN-γ) enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISPOT). Furthermore, we established an invasive pulmonary aspergillosis model in HLA-A*0201 transgenic mice. Adoptive transfer of Asp f16 peptides-specific CTL significantly extended the overall survival time in the A. fumigatus-infected immunocompromised mice. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that the Asp f16 peptides might provide immunity against invasive A. fumigatus infection.

  11. Centrocytes rapidly adopt a memory B cell phenotype on co-culture with autologous germinal centre T cell-enriched preparations.

    PubMed

    Casamayor-Palleja, M; Feuillard, J; Ball, J; Drew, M; MacLennan, I C

    1996-05-01

    B cells, after mutating their Ig B-region genes in germinal centres (GC), undergo apoptosis, unless they receive antigen-dependent selection signals. The signals appear to be delivered by GC T cells, require CD40 ligand expression and may induce differentiation to memory cells. Cultured GC B cells are prevented from entering apoptosis by ligating their surface CD40, but the resulting phenotype is not associated with B cells found in vivo. Conversely, GC B cells rapidly adopt a memory B cell phenotype on culture with autologous memory CD4(+) T cells that have been induced to express CD40 ligand transiently. This effect is prevented by blocking CD40 ligand. Naive CD4(+) T cells, induced to express CD40 ligand, do not prevent GC B cells undergoing apoptosis.

  12. Murine somatic cell nuclear transfer using reprogrammed donor cells expressing male germ cell-specific genes.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hoin; Park, Jong Im; Roh, Sangho

    2016-01-01

    In vivo-matured mouse oocytes were enucleated, and a single murine embryonic fibroblast (control or reprogrammed by introducing extracts from murine testis tissue, which showed expression of male germ cell-specific genes) was injected into the cytoplasm of the oocytes. The rate of blastocyst development and expression levels of Oct-4, Eomes and Cdx-2 were not significantly different in both experimental groups. However, the expression levels of Nanog, Sox9 and Glut-1 were significantly increased when reprogrammed cells were used as donor nuclei. Increased expression of Nanog can be supportive of complete reprogramming of somatic cell nuclear transfer murine embryos. The present study suggested that donor cells expressing male germ cell-specific genes can be reconstructed and can develop into embryos with normal high expression of developmentally essential genes. PMID:26369430

  13. In situ measurements of water transfer due to different mechanisms in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husar, Attila; Higier, Andrew; Liu, Hongtan

    Water management is of critical importance in a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell, in particular, those based on a sulfonic acid polymer, which requires water to conduct protons. Yet there are limited in situ studies of water transfer through the membrane and no data are available for water transfer due to individual mechanisms through the membrane in an operational fuel cell. Thus it is the objective of this study to measure water transfer through the membrane due to each individual mechanism in an operational PEM fuel cell. The three different mechanisms of water transfer, i.e., electro-osmotic drag, diffusion and hydraulic permeation are isolated by specially imposed boundary conditions. Therefore water transfer through the membrane due to each mechanism is measured separately. In this study, all the data is collected in an actual assembled operational fuel cell. The experimental results show that water transfer due to hydraulic permeation, i.e. the pressure difference between the anode and cathode is at least an order of magnitude lower than those due to the other two mechanisms. The data for water transfer due to diffusion through the membrane are in good agreement with some of the ex situ data in the literature. The data for electro-osmosis show that the number of water molecules dragged per proton increases not only with temperature but also with current density, which is different from existing data in the literature. The methodology used in this study is simple and can be easily adopted for in situ water transfer measurement due to different mechanisms in other PEM fuel cells without any cell modifications.

  14. Automated manufacturing of chimeric antigen receptor T cells for adoptive immunotherapy using CliniMACS prodigy.

    PubMed

    Mock, Ulrike; Nickolay, Lauren; Philip, Brian; Cheung, Gordon Weng-Kit; Zhan, Hong; Johnston, Ian C D; Kaiser, Andrew D; Peggs, Karl; Pule, Martin; Thrasher, Adrian J; Qasim, Waseem

    2016-08-01

    Novel cell therapies derived from human T lymphocytes are exhibiting enormous potential in early-phase clinical trials in patients with hematologic malignancies. Ex vivo modification of T cells is currently limited to a small number of centers with the required infrastructure and expertise. The process requires isolation, activation, transduction, expansion and cryopreservation steps. To simplify procedures and widen applicability for clinical therapies, automation of these procedures is being developed. The CliniMACS Prodigy (Miltenyi Biotec) has recently been adapted for lentiviral transduction of T cells and here we analyse the feasibility of a clinically compliant T-cell engineering process for the manufacture of T cells encoding chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) for CD19 (CAR19), a widely targeted antigen in B-cell malignancies. Using a closed, single-use tubing set we processed mononuclear cells from fresh or frozen leukapheresis harvests collected from healthy volunteer donors. Cells were phenotyped and subjected to automated processing and activation using TransAct, a polymeric nanomatrix activation reagent incorporating CD3/CD28-specific antibodies. Cells were then transduced and expanded in the CentriCult-Unit of the tubing set, under stabilized culture conditions with automated feeding and media exchange. The process was continuously monitored to determine kinetics of expansion, transduction efficiency and phenotype of the engineered cells in comparison with small-scale transductions run in parallel. We found that transduction efficiencies, phenotype and function of CAR19 T cells were comparable with existing procedures and overall T-cell yields sufficient for anticipated therapeutic dosing. The automation of closed-system T-cell engineering should improve dissemination of emerging immunotherapies and greatly widen applicability. PMID:27378344

  15. Automated manufacturing of chimeric antigen receptor T cells for adoptive immunotherapy using CliniMACS prodigy.

    PubMed

    Mock, Ulrike; Nickolay, Lauren; Philip, Brian; Cheung, Gordon Weng-Kit; Zhan, Hong; Johnston, Ian C D; Kaiser, Andrew D; Peggs, Karl; Pule, Martin; Thrasher, Adrian J; Qasim, Waseem

    2016-08-01

    Novel cell therapies derived from human T lymphocytes are exhibiting enormous potential in early-phase clinical trials in patients with hematologic malignancies. Ex vivo modification of T cells is currently limited to a small number of centers with the required infrastructure and expertise. The process requires isolation, activation, transduction, expansion and cryopreservation steps. To simplify procedures and widen applicability for clinical therapies, automation of these procedures is being developed. The CliniMACS Prodigy (Miltenyi Biotec) has recently been adapted for lentiviral transduction of T cells and here we analyse the feasibility of a clinically compliant T-cell engineering process for the manufacture of T cells encoding chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) for CD19 (CAR19), a widely targeted antigen in B-cell malignancies. Using a closed, single-use tubing set we processed mononuclear cells from fresh or frozen leukapheresis harvests collected from healthy volunteer donors. Cells were phenotyped and subjected to automated processing and activation using TransAct, a polymeric nanomatrix activation reagent incorporating CD3/CD28-specific antibodies. Cells were then transduced and expanded in the CentriCult-Unit of the tubing set, under stabilized culture conditions with automated feeding and media exchange. The process was continuously monitored to determine kinetics of expansion, transduction efficiency and phenotype of the engineered cells in comparison with small-scale transductions run in parallel. We found that transduction efficiencies, phenotype and function of CAR19 T cells were comparable with existing procedures and overall T-cell yields sufficient for anticipated therapeutic dosing. The automation of closed-system T-cell engineering should improve dissemination of emerging immunotherapies and greatly widen applicability.

  16. Recent advancements in cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer

    PubMed Central

    Ogura, Atsuo; Inoue, Kimiko; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2013-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) cloning is the sole reproductive engineering technology that endows the somatic cell genome with totipotency. Since the first report on the birth of a cloned sheep from adult somatic cells in 1997, many technical improvements in SCNT have been made by using different epigenetic approaches, including enhancement of the levels of histone acetylation in the chromatin of the reconstructed embryos. Although it will take a considerable time before we fully understand the nature of genomic programming and totipotency, we may expect that somatic cell cloning technology will soon become broadly applicable to practical purposes, including medicine, pharmaceutical manufacturing and agriculture. Here we review recent progress in somatic cell cloning, with a special emphasis on epigenetic studies using the laboratory mouse as a model. PMID:23166393

  17. Cloning of ES cells and mice by nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Wakayama, Sayaka; Kishigami, Satoshi; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2009-01-01

    We have been able to develop a stable nuclear transfer (NT) method in the mouse, in which donor nuclei are directly injected into the oocyte using a piezo-actuated micromanipulator. Although the piezo unit is a complex tool, once mastered it is of great help not only in NT experiments, but also in almost all other forms of micromanipulation. Using this technique, embryonic stem (ntES) cell lines established from somatic cell nuclei can be generated relatively easily from a variety of mouse genotypes and cell types. Such ntES cells can be used not only for experimental models of human therapeutic cloning but also as a means of preserving mouse genomes instead of preserving germ cells. Here, we describe our most recent protocols for mouse cloning.

  18. Recent advancements in cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Atsuo; Inoue, Kimiko; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2013-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) cloning is the sole reproductive engineering technology that endows the somatic cell genome with totipotency. Since the first report on the birth of a cloned sheep from adult somatic cells in 1997, many technical improvements in SCNT have been made by using different epigenetic approaches, including enhancement of the levels of histone acetylation in the chromatin of the reconstructed embryos. Although it will take a considerable time before we fully understand the nature of genomic programming and totipotency, we may expect that somatic cell cloning technology will soon become broadly applicable to practical purposes, including medicine, pharmaceutical manufacturing and agriculture. Here we review recent progress in somatic cell cloning, with a special emphasis on epigenetic studies using the laboratory mouse as a model.

  19. Production of Cloned Mice by Nuclear Transfer of Cumulus Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kurd, Soleiman; Zarei, Mohammad Ali; Fathi, Fardin; Ghadimi, Tayyeb; Hakhamaneshi, Mohammad Saeed; Jalili, Ali

    2013-01-01

    Background Over the past several years, mammals have been successfully cloned by either the splitting of an early stage embryo or nuclear transfer of adult somatic cells (NT) into oocytes. Although it has been 15 years since the generation of the first cloned mammals from somatic cells by NT, the success rate for producing live offspring by this technique is low regardless of the cell type and animal species used. However, these techniques have the potential to be important tools for future research in basic biology. In the present study, we described our experiences in producing successfully cloned mouse using NT method and piezo-actuated micromanipulator. Methods B6D2F1 mice, 8-12 weeks old, were superovulated with injections of 5 IU of pregnant mare serum gonadotropin and 5 IU of human chorionic gonadotropin administered 48 hr apart. Enucleation and donor nuclei cumulus cell injection were performed with a piezo-actuated micromanipulator after which activation and trichostatin A treatment were used for reconstructed oocytes. Two-cell stage cloned embryos that developed in the mWM medium were transferred into the oviducts of pseudopregnant NMRI mice. Results Of 367 oocytes collected, 131 (69%) developed into 2-cell stage embryos. Of these, 5 (1%) live pups were successfully delivered. We used NMRI foster mother to raise the pups by lactation. One adult cloned mouse was mated, after which she delivered and raised normal offspring. Conclusion For mouse cloning, the present study also successfully tested the capability of somatic cell nuclear transfer SCNT using a piezo unit. PMID:23919122

  20. Somatic cell nuclear transfer in mammals: progress and applications.

    PubMed

    Colman, A

    Somatic nuclear transfer has been performed with frogs since the early 1960s, yet it has proved impossible to generate an adult frog using an adult cell as nuclear donor. After some initial skepticism, the birth of sheep, cows, goats, and mice using this technique with fetal or adult cell donors is now established fact. The success with adult mammalian cell donors extends the historic work in frogs by attesting to the totipotency of nuclei in at least some adult, differentiated cell types. Because the technique offers a developmental read out of the totality of genetic and molecular lifetime changes accumulated by the nucleus of a single somatic cell, basic research applications are seen in the fields of ageing, cancer, X chromosome inactivation, and imprinting. The prospect of a method for gene targeting in livestock holds particular promise for commercial applications; whilst for humans, the use of nuclear transfer to provide diverse populations of customized stem cells for therapeutic purposes presents a tantalizing future goal.

  1. Periodontal regeneration using periodontal ligament stem cell-transferred amnion.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Kengo; Komaki, Motohiro; Yokoyama, Naoki; Tanaka, Yuichi; Taki, Atsuko; Honda, Izumi; Kimura, Yasuyuki; Takeda, Masaki; Akazawa, Keiko; Oda, Shigeru; Izumi, Yuichi; Morita, Ikuo

    2014-02-01

    Periodontal disease is characterized by the destruction of tooth supporting tissues. Regeneration of periodontal tissues using ex vivo expanded cells has been introduced and studied, although appropriate methodology has not yet been established. We developed a novel cell transplant method for periodontal regeneration using periodontal ligament stem cell (PDLSC)-transferred amniotic membrane (PDLSC-amnion). The aim of this study was to investigate the regenerative potential of PDLSC-amnion in a rat periodontal defect model. Cultured PDLSCs were transferred onto amniotic membranes using a glass substrate treated with polyethylene glycol and photolithography. The properties of PDLSCs were investigated by flow cytometry and in vitro differentiation. PDLSC-amnion was transplanted into surgically created periodontal defects in rat maxillary molars. Periodontal regeneration was evaluated by microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) and histological analysis. PDLSCs showed mesenchymal stem cell-like characteristics such as cell surface marker expression (CD90, CD44, CD73, CD105, CD146, and STRO-1) and trilineage differentiation ability (i.e., into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes). PDLSC-amnion exhibited a single layer of PDLSCs on the amniotic membrane and stability of the sheet even with movement and deformation caused by surgical instruments. We observed that the PDLSC-amnion enhanced periodontal tissue regeneration as determined by micro-CT and histology by 4 weeks after transplantation. These data suggest that PDLSC-amnion has therapeutic potential as a novel cell-based regenerative periodontal therapy. PMID:24032400

  2. Periodontal regeneration using periodontal ligament stem cell-transferred amnion.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Kengo; Komaki, Motohiro; Yokoyama, Naoki; Tanaka, Yuichi; Taki, Atsuko; Honda, Izumi; Kimura, Yasuyuki; Takeda, Masaki; Akazawa, Keiko; Oda, Shigeru; Izumi, Yuichi; Morita, Ikuo

    2014-02-01

    Periodontal disease is characterized by the destruction of tooth supporting tissues. Regeneration of periodontal tissues using ex vivo expanded cells has been introduced and studied, although appropriate methodology has not yet been established. We developed a novel cell transplant method for periodontal regeneration using periodontal ligament stem cell (PDLSC)-transferred amniotic membrane (PDLSC-amnion). The aim of this study was to investigate the regenerative potential of PDLSC-amnion in a rat periodontal defect model. Cultured PDLSCs were transferred onto amniotic membranes using a glass substrate treated with polyethylene glycol and photolithography. The properties of PDLSCs were investigated by flow cytometry and in vitro differentiation. PDLSC-amnion was transplanted into surgically created periodontal defects in rat maxillary molars. Periodontal regeneration was evaluated by microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) and histological analysis. PDLSCs showed mesenchymal stem cell-like characteristics such as cell surface marker expression (CD90, CD44, CD73, CD105, CD146, and STRO-1) and trilineage differentiation ability (i.e., into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes). PDLSC-amnion exhibited a single layer of PDLSCs on the amniotic membrane and stability of the sheet even with movement and deformation caused by surgical instruments. We observed that the PDLSC-amnion enhanced periodontal tissue regeneration as determined by micro-CT and histology by 4 weeks after transplantation. These data suggest that PDLSC-amnion has therapeutic potential as a novel cell-based regenerative periodontal therapy.

  3. Method for somatic cell nuclear transfer in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Siripattarapravat, K; Prukudom, S; Cibelli, J

    2016-01-01

    This chapter presents a detailed methodology for somatic cell nuclear transfer-cloning of zebrafish. We aim to place the reader in a virtual lab experience to assist acquisition of the technical skills required for reproducing the published protocol. All materials, including catalog numbers for reagents and techniques for their preparation, are provided. Our protocols describe laser inactivation of egg chromosomes, the transfer of a cell through the oocyte micropyle, and spontaneous activation of the reconstructed embryo. High-quality eggs are the key to cloning success, and Chinook salmon ovarian fluid is indispensable for keeping eggs arrested at the metaphase of meiosis II. This protocol continues to be refined by our laboratory. However, naive investigators should be able to apply it in its present form to generate cloned zebrafish. PMID:27443929

  4. Lignification of developing maize (Zea mays L.) endosperm transfer cells and starchy endosperm cells

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Sara; Monjardino, Paulo; Mendonça, Duarte; da Câmara Machado, Artur; Fernandes, Rui; Sampaio, Paula; Salema, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Endosperm transfer cells in maize have extensive cell wall ingrowths that play a key role in kernel development. Although the incorporation of lignin would support this process, its presence in these structures has not been reported in previous studies. We used potassium permanganate staining combined with transmission electron microscopy – energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry as well as acriflavine staining combined with confocal laser scanning microscopy to determine whether the most basal endosperm transfer cells (MBETCs) contain lignified cell walls, using starchy endosperm cells for comparison. We investigated the lignin content of ultrathin sections of MBETCs treated with hydrogen peroxide. The lignin content of transfer and starchy cell walls was also determined by the acetyl bromide method. Finally, the relationship between cell wall lignification and MBETC growth/flange ingrowth orientation was evaluated. MBETC walls and ingrowths contained lignin throughout the period of cell growth we monitored. The same was true of the starchy cells, but those underwent an even more extensive growth period than the transfer cells. Both the reticulate and flange ingrowths were also lignified early in development. The significance of the lignification of maize endosperm cell walls is discussed in terms of its impact on cell growth and flange ingrowth orientation. PMID:24688487

  5. Generating HPV specific T helper cells for the treatment of HPV induced malignancies using TCR gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Infection with high risk Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) is associated with cancer of the cervix, vagina, penis, vulva, anus and some cases of head and neck carcinomas. The HPV derived oncoproteins E6 and E7 are constitutively expressed in tumor cells and therefore potential targets for T cell mediated adoptive immunotherapy. Effective immunotherapy is dependent on the presence of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. However, low precursor frequencies of HPV16 specific T cells in patients and healthy donors hampers routine isolation of these cells for adoptive transfer purposes. An alternative to generate HPV specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells is TCR gene transfer. Methods HPV specific CD4+ T cells were generated using either a MHC class I or MHC class II restricted TCR (from clones A9 and 24.101 respectively) directed against HPV16 antigens. Functional analysis was performed by interferon-γ secretion, proliferation and cytokine production assays. Results Introduction of HPV16 specific TCRs into blood derived CD4+ recipient T cells resulted in recognition of the relevant HPV16 epitope as determined by IFN-γ secretion. Importantly, we also show recognition of the endogenously processed and HLA-DP1 presented HPV16E6 epitope by 24.101 TCR transgenic CD4+ T cells and recognition of the HLA-A2 presented HPV16E7 epitope by A9 TCR transgenic CD4+ T cells. Conclusion Our data indicate that TCR transfer is feasible as an alternative strategy to generate human HPV16 specific CD4+ T helper cells for the treatment of patients suffering from cervical cancer and other HPV16 induced malignancies. PMID:21892941

  6. Detection of programmed cell death using fluorescence energy transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, X; Gerard, A L; Huang, B C; Anderson, D C; Payan, D G; Luo, Y

    1998-01-01

    Fluorescence energy transfer (FRET) can be generated when green fluorescent protein (GFP) and blue fluorescent protein (BFP) are covalently linked together by a short peptide. Cleavage of this linkage by protease completely eliminates FRET effect. Caspase-3 (CPP32) is an important cellular protease activated during programmed cell death. An 18 amino acid peptide containing CPP32 recognition sequence, DEVD, was used to link GFP and BFP together. CPP32 activation can be monitored by FRET assay during the apoptosis process. PMID:9518501

  7. Generation of cloned mice and nuclear transfer embryonic stem cell lines from urine-derived cells

    PubMed Central

    Mizutani, Eiji; Torikai, Kohei; Wakayama, Sayaka; Nagatomo, Hiroaki; Ohinata, Yasuhide; Kishigami, Satoshi; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2016-01-01

    Cloning animals by nuclear transfer provides the opportunity to preserve endangered mammalian species. However, there are risks associated with the collection of donor cells from the body such as accidental injury to or death of the animal. Here, we report the production of cloned mice from urine-derived cells collected noninvasively. Most of the urine-derived cells survived and were available as donors for nuclear transfer without any pretreatment. After nuclear transfer, 38–77% of the reconstructed embryos developed to the morula/blastocyst, in which the cell numbers in the inner cell mass and trophectoderm were similar to those of controls. Male and female cloned mice were delivered from cloned embryos transferred to recipient females, and these cloned animals grew to adulthood and delivered pups naturally when mated with each other. The results suggest that these cloned mice had normal fertility. In additional experiments, 26 nuclear transfer embryonic stem cell lines were established from 108 cloned blastocysts derived from four mouse strains including inbreds and F1 hybrids with relatively high success rates. Thus, cells derived from urine, which can be collected noninvasively, may be used in the rescue of endangered mammalian species by using nuclear transfer without causing injury to the animal. PMID:27033801

  8. Generation of cloned mice and nuclear transfer embryonic stem cell lines from urine-derived cells.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Eiji; Torikai, Kohei; Wakayama, Sayaka; Nagatomo, Hiroaki; Ohinata, Yasuhide; Kishigami, Satoshi; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2016-01-01

    Cloning animals by nuclear transfer provides the opportunity to preserve endangered mammalian species. However, there are risks associated with the collection of donor cells from the body such as accidental injury to or death of the animal. Here, we report the production of cloned mice from urine-derived cells collected noninvasively. Most of the urine-derived cells survived and were available as donors for nuclear transfer without any pretreatment. After nuclear transfer, 38-77% of the reconstructed embryos developed to the morula/blastocyst, in which the cell numbers in the inner cell mass and trophectoderm were similar to those of controls. Male and female cloned mice were delivered from cloned embryos transferred to recipient females, and these cloned animals grew to adulthood and delivered pups naturally when mated with each other. The results suggest that these cloned mice had normal fertility. In additional experiments, 26 nuclear transfer embryonic stem cell lines were established from 108 cloned blastocysts derived from four mouse strains including inbreds and F1 hybrids with relatively high success rates. Thus, cells derived from urine, which can be collected noninvasively, may be used in the rescue of endangered mammalian species by using nuclear transfer without causing injury to the animal. PMID:27033801

  9. Mast cells and dendritic cells form synapses that facilitate antigen transfer for T cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Carroll-Portillo, Amanda; Cannon, Judy L.; te Riet, Joost; Holmes, Anna; Kawakami, Yuko; Kawakami, Toshiaki; Cambi, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) produce soluble mediators such as histamine and prostaglandins that are known to influence dendritic cell (DC) function by stimulating maturation and antigen processing. Whether direct cell–cell interactions are important in modulating MC/DC function is unclear. In this paper, we show that direct contact between MCs and DCs occurs and plays an important role in modulating the immune response. Activation of MCs through FcεRI cross-linking triggers the formation of stable cell–cell interactions with immature DCs that are reminiscent of the immunological synapse. Direct cellular contact differentially regulates the secreted cytokine profile, indicating that MC modulation of DC populations is influenced by the nature of their interaction. Synapse formation requires integrin engagement and facilitates the transfer of internalized MC-specific antigen from MCs to DCs. The transferred material is ultimately processed and presented by DCs and can activate T cells. The physiological outcomes of the MC–DC synapse suggest a new role for intercellular crosstalk in defining the immune response. PMID:26304724

  10. Human T Cell Crosstalk Is Induced by Tumor Membrane Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Uzana, Ronny; Eisenberg, Galit; Merims, Sharon; Frankenburg, Shoshana; Pato, Aviad; Yefenof, Eitan; Engelstein, Roni; Peretz, Tamar

    2015-01-01

    Trogocytosis is a contact-dependent unidirectional transfer of membrane fragments between immune effector cells and their targets, initially detected in T cells following interaction with professional antigen presenting cells (APC). Previously, we have demonstrated that trogocytosis also takes place between melanoma-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and their cognate tumors. In the present study, we took this finding a step further, focusing on the ability of melanoma membrane-imprinted CD8+ T cells to act as APCs (CD8+T-APCs). We demonstrate that, following trogocytosis, CD8+T-APCs directly present a variety of melanoma derived peptides to fraternal T cells with the same TCR specificity or to T cells with different TCRs. The resulting T cell-T cell immune synapse leads to (1) Activation of effector CTLs, as determined by proliferation, cytokine secretion and degranulation; (2) Fratricide (killing) of CD8+T-APCs by the activated CTLs. Thus, trogocytosis enables cross-reactivity among CD8+ T cells with interchanging roles of effectors and APCs. This dual function of tumor-reactive CTLs may hint at their ability to amplify or restrict reactivity against the tumor and participate in modulation of the anti-cancer immune response. PMID:25671577

  11. Gene transfer by adenovirus in smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, M F; Ewaskiewicz, J I; Adda, S; Bailey, K; Harris, V; Sosnoski, D; Tomasic, M; Wilson, J; Kotlikoff, M I

    1996-08-01

    We report adenovirus-mediated gene transfer into airway smooth muscle cells in cultured cells and organ-cultured tracheal segments. Incubation of cultured rat tracheal myocytes with virus (5 x 10(8) pfu/ml) for 6 h resulted in beta-galactosidase expression in 94.8 +/- 2.5% of cells (n = 4). Following incubation of thin (less than 200 microns diameter) equine trachealis muscle segments with virus in organ culture (5 x 10(8)-5 x 10(10) pfu/ml) the average expression of the Lac Z gene was approximately 19 +/- 10% (n = 9). Expression was markedly improved, however, in segments from neonatal rats (13-21 days). In two experiments in which the mucosa and serosa were removed, nearly all cells expressed beta-galactosidase, whereas in a third experiment in which the tissue was not dissected, about 40% of cells were stained. Viral infection had no effect on tension development of strips following organ culture. In vitro gene transfer may provide a useful method to alter protein expression and examine the effect of this alteration on excitation/contraction coupling in smooth muscle.

  12. Reshaping the Transcriptional Frontier: Epigenetics and Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer

    PubMed Central

    LONG, CHARLES R.; WESTHUSIN, MARK E.; GOLDING, MICHAEL C.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Somatic-cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) experiments have paved the way to the field of cellular reprogramming. The demonstrated ability to clone over 20 different species to date has proven that the technology is robust but very inefficient, and is prone to developmental anomalies. Yet, the offspring from cloned animals exhibit none of the abnormalities of their parents, suggesting the low efficiency and high developmental mortality are epigenetic in origin. The epigenetic barriers to reprogramming somatic cells into a totipotent embryo capable of developing into a viable offspring are significant and varied. Despite their intimate relationship, chromatin structure and transcription are often not uniformly reprogramed after nuclear transfer, and many cloned embryos develop gene expression profiles that are hybrids between the donor cell and an embryonic blastomere. Recent advances in cellular reprogramming suggest that alteration of donor-cell chromatin structure towards that found in an normal embryo is actually the rate-limiting step in successful development of SCNT embryos. Here we review the literature relevant to the transformation of a somatic-cell nucleus into an embryo capable of full-term development. Interestingly, while resetting somatic transcription and associated epigenetic marks are absolutely required for development of SCNT embryos, life does not demand perfection. PMID:24167064

  13. Strong photocurrent enhancements in highly efficient flexible organic solar cells by adopting a microcavity configuration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kung-Shih; Yip, Hin-Lap; Salinas, José-Francisco; Xu, Yun-Xiang; Chueh, Chu-Chen; Jen, Alex K-Y

    2014-05-28

    Organic solar cells often show inefficient light harvesting due to a short absorption path length limited by the low charge mobility of organic semiconductors. We demonstrate a flexible organic solar cell in a microcavity configuration using a TeO2/Ag semitransparent electrode to confine the optical field within the device with significant performance improvements and reaching a power conversion efficiency of 8.56%.

  14. The in vitro generation of multi-tumor antigen-specific cytotoxic T cell clones: Candidates for leukemia adoptive immunotherapy following allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Yehia S; Bashawri, Layla A; Vatte, Chittibabu; Abu-Rish, Eman Y; Cyrus, Cyril; Khalaf, Wafaa S; Browning, Michael J

    2016-09-01

    Adoptive T-cell immunotherapy is a promising approach to manage and maintain relapse-free survival of leukemia patients, especially following allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Post-transplant adoptive immunotherapy using cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) of the donor origin provide graft-versus-tumor effects, with or without graft-versus-host disease. Myeloid leukemias express immunogenic leukemia associated antigens (LAAs); such as WT-1, PRAME, MAGE, h-TERT and others, most of them are able to induce specific T cell responses whenever associated with the proper co-stimulation. We investigated the ability of a LAA-expressing hybridoma cell line to induce CTL clones in PBMCs of HLA-matched healthy donors in vitro. The CTL clones were induced by repetitive co-culture with LAAs-expressing, HLA-A*0201(+) hybrid cell line, generated by fusion of leukemia blasts to human immortalized APC (EBV-sensitized B-lymphoblastoid cell line; HMy2). The induced cytotoxic T cell clones were phenotypically and functionally characterized by pentamer analysis, IFN-γ release ELISPOT and cellular cytotoxicity assays. All T cell lines showed robust peptide recognition and functional activity when sensitized with HLA-A*0201-restricted WT-1235-243, hTERT615-624 or PRAME100-108 peptides-pulsed T2 cells, in addition to partially HLA-matched leukemia blasts. This study demonstrates the feasibility of developing multi-tumor antigen-specific T cell lines in allogeneic PBMCs in vitro, using LAA-expressing tumor/HMy2 hybrid cell line model, for potential use in leukemia adoptive immunotherapy in partially matched donor-recipient setting. PMID:27490939

  15. Genes adopt non-optimal codon usage to generate cell cycle-dependent oscillations in protein levels.

    PubMed

    Frenkel-Morgenstern, Milana; Danon, Tamar; Christian, Thomas; Igarashi, Takao; Cohen, Lydia; Hou, Ya-Ming; Jensen, Lars Juhl

    2012-02-28

    The cell cycle is a temporal program that regulates DNA synthesis and cell division. When we compared the codon usage of cell cycle-regulated genes with that of other genes, we discovered that there is a significant preference for non-optimal codons. Moreover, genes encoding proteins that cycle at the protein level exhibit non-optimal codon preferences. Remarkably, cell cycle-regulated genes expressed in different phases display different codon preferences. Here, we show empirically that transfer RNA (tRNA) expression is indeed highest in the G2 phase of the cell cycle, consistent with the non-optimal codon usage of genes expressed at this time, and lowest toward the end of G1, reflecting the optimal codon usage of G1 genes. Accordingly, protein levels of human glycyl-, threonyl-, and glutamyl-prolyl tRNA synthetases were found to oscillate, peaking in G2/M phase. In light of our findings, we propose that non-optimal (wobbly) matching codons influence protein synthesis during the cell cycle. We describe a new mathematical model that shows how codon usage can give rise to cell-cycle regulation. In summary, our data indicate that cells exploit wobbling to generate cell cycle-dependent dynamics of proteins.

  16. Transfer of allergic airway responses with antigen-primed CD4+ but not CD8+ T cells in brown Norway rats.

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, A; Mishima, H; Renzi, P M; Xu, L J; Hamid, Q; Martin, J G

    1995-01-01

    Activated CD4+ helper T cells have been demonstrated in asthmatic airways and postulated to play a central role in eliciting allergic inflammation; direct evidence of their involvement seems to be lacking. We hypothesized that CD4+ T cells have the potential to induce allergic responses to antigen challenge, and tested this hypothesis in a model of allergic bronchoconstriction, the Brown Norway rat, using the approach of adoptive transfer. Animals were actively sensitized to either ovalbumin (OVA) or BSA and were used as donors of T cells. W3/25(CD4)+ or OX8(CD8)+ T cells were isolated from the cervical lymph nodes of sensitized donors and transferred to naive BN rats. 2 d after adoptive transfer recipient rats were challenged by OVA inhalation, and changes in lung resistance (RL), bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells, and serum levels of antigen-specific IgE were studied. After OVA challenge recipients of OVA-primed W3/25+ T cells exhibited sustained increases in RL throughout the entire 8-h observation period and had significant bronchoalveolar lavage eosinophilia, which was detected by immunocytochemistry using an antimajor basic protein mAb. Recipients of BSA-primed W3/25+ T cells or OVA-primed OX8+ T cells failed to respond to inhaled OVA. OVA-specific immunoglobulin E was undetectable by ELISA or skin testing in any of the recipient rats after adoptive transfer. In conclusion, antigen-induced airway bronchoconstriction and eosinophilia were successfully transferred by antigen-specific W3/25+ T cells in Brown Norway rats. These responses were dependent on antigen-primed W3/25+ T cells and appeared to be independent of IgE-mediated mast cell activation. This study provides clear evidence for T cell mediated immune mechanisms in allergic airway responses in this experimental model. Images PMID:7657805

  17. Plasmon resonance energy transfer and plexcitonic solar cell.

    PubMed

    Nan, Fan; Ding, Si-Jing; Ma, Liang; Cheng, Zi-Qiang; Zhong, Yu-Ting; Zhang, Ya-Fang; Qiu, Yun-Hang; Li, Xiaoguang; Zhou, Li; Wang, Qu-Quan

    2016-08-11

    Plasmon-mediated energy transfer is highly desirable in photo-electronic nanodevices, but the direct injection efficiency of "hot electrons" in plasmonic photo-detectors and plasmon-sensitized solar cells (plasmon-SSCs) is poor. On another front, Fano resonance induced by strong plasmon-exciton coupling provides an efficient channel of coherent energy transfer from metallic plasmons to molecular excitons, and organic dye molecules have a much better injection efficiency in exciton-SSCs than "hot electrons". Here, we investigate enhanced light-harvesting of chlorophyll-a molecules strongly coupled to Au nanostructured films via Fano resonance. The enhanced local field and plasmon resonance energy transfer are experimentally revealed by monitoring the ultrafast dynamical processes of the plexcitons and the photocurrent flows of the assembled plexciton-SSCs. By tuning the Fano factor and anti-resonance wavelengths, we find that the local field is largely enhanced and the efficiency of plexciton-SSCs consisting of ultrathin TiO2 films is significantly improved. Most strikingly, the output power of the plexciton-SSCs is much larger than the sum of those of the individual plasmon- and exciton-SSCs. Our observations provide a practical approach to monitor energy and electron transfer in plasmon-exciton hybrids at a strong coupling regime and also offer a new strategy to design photovoltaic nanodevices. PMID:27481652

  18. Plasmon resonance energy transfer and plexcitonic solar cell.

    PubMed

    Nan, Fan; Ding, Si-Jing; Ma, Liang; Cheng, Zi-Qiang; Zhong, Yu-Ting; Zhang, Ya-Fang; Qiu, Yun-Hang; Li, Xiaoguang; Zhou, Li; Wang, Qu-Quan

    2016-08-11

    Plasmon-mediated energy transfer is highly desirable in photo-electronic nanodevices, but the direct injection efficiency of "hot electrons" in plasmonic photo-detectors and plasmon-sensitized solar cells (plasmon-SSCs) is poor. On another front, Fano resonance induced by strong plasmon-exciton coupling provides an efficient channel of coherent energy transfer from metallic plasmons to molecular excitons, and organic dye molecules have a much better injection efficiency in exciton-SSCs than "hot electrons". Here, we investigate enhanced light-harvesting of chlorophyll-a molecules strongly coupled to Au nanostructured films via Fano resonance. The enhanced local field and plasmon resonance energy transfer are experimentally revealed by monitoring the ultrafast dynamical processes of the plexcitons and the photocurrent flows of the assembled plexciton-SSCs. By tuning the Fano factor and anti-resonance wavelengths, we find that the local field is largely enhanced and the efficiency of plexciton-SSCs consisting of ultrathin TiO2 films is significantly improved. Most strikingly, the output power of the plexciton-SSCs is much larger than the sum of those of the individual plasmon- and exciton-SSCs. Our observations provide a practical approach to monitor energy and electron transfer in plasmon-exciton hybrids at a strong coupling regime and also offer a new strategy to design photovoltaic nanodevices.

  19. Regulation and direction of umbilical cord blood mesenchymal stem cells to adopt neuronal fate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Lu, Ming

    2014-03-01

    Umbilical cord blood mesenchymal stem cells (UCB-MSCs) transplantation is becoming a promising and attractive cell-based treatment modality for repairing the damaged central nervous system due to its advantages of low immunogenicity, wide range of sources, and less ethical controversy. One of the limitations of this approach is that the proportion of neurons differentiated from UCB-MSCs still remains at low level. Thus, to induce UCB-MSCs to differentiate into neuron-like cells with a higher proportion is one of the key technologies of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. Many induction protocols with remarkably higher differentiation rate to neurons have been reported. However, each protocol has its pros and cons and whether the neurons differentiated from UCB-MSCs under a certain protocol has normal nerve function remains controversial. Therefore, to guarantee the success of future clinical applications of UCB-MSCs, more investigations should be performed to improve the induction method and differentiation efficiency.

  20. Improved retroviral suicide gene transfer in colon cancer cell lines after cell synchronization with methotrexate

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cancer gene therapy by retroviral vectors is mainly limited by the level of transduction. Retroviral gene transfer requires target cell division. Cell synchronization, obtained by drugs inducing a reversible inhibition of DNA synthesis, could therefore be proposed to precondition target cells to retroviral gene transfer. We tested whether drug-mediated cell synchronization could enhance the transfer efficiency of a retroviral-mediated gene encoding herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-tk) in two colon cancer cell lines, DHDK12 and HT29. Methods Synchronization was induced by methotrexate (MTX), aracytin (ara-C) or aphidicolin. Gene transfer efficiency was assessed by the level of HSV-TK expression. Transduced cells were driven by ganciclovir (GCV) towards apoptosis that was assessed using annexin V labeling by quantitative flow cytometry. Results DHDK12 and HT29 cells were synchronized in S phase with MTX but not ara-C or aphidicolin. In synchronized DHDK12 and HT29 cells, the HSV-TK transduction rates were 2 and 1.5-fold higher than those obtained in control cells, respectively. Furthermore, the rate of apoptosis was increased two-fold in MTX-treated DHDK12 cells after treatment with GCV. Conclusions Our findings indicate that MTX-mediated synchronization of target cells allowed a significant improvement of retroviral HSV-tk gene transfer, resulting in an increased cell apoptosis in response to GCV. Pharmacological control of cell cycle may thus be a useful strategy to optimize the efficiency of retroviral-mediated cancer gene therapy. PMID:21970612

  1. Adverse Events Following Infusion of T Cells for Adoptive Immunotherapy: A 10 Year Experience

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Conrad Russell; Hanley, Patrick J.; Liu, Hao; Torrano, Vicky; Lin, Yu-Feng; Arce, James A.; Gottschalk, Stephen; Savoldo, Barbara; Dotti, Gianpietro; Louis, Chrystal U.; Leen, Ann M.; Gee, Adrian P.; Rooney, Cliona M.; Brenner, Malcolm K.; Bollard, Catherine M.; Heslop, Helen E.

    2010-01-01

    Background The FDA currently recommends at least 4 hours of recipient monitoring to detect early infusion reactions; recent catastrophic reactions to “first in man” biological agents have emphasized the importance of this rule for initial studies of new products. The value of such monitoring for better established agents is less obvious. Methods We therefore reviewed infusion-related adverse events (AEs) following administration of ex-vivo expanded T cell products (antigen specific CTLs, allodepleted T cells and genetically modified T cells) on Investigational New Drug (IND) studies in our center. Results From 1998 to 2008, we infused 381 T cell products to 180 recipients, enrolled on 18 studies, receiving T cells targeting malignancies or post-transplant viral infections. There were no Grade 3-4 infusion reactions during initial monitoring or 24 hour follow-up. Twenty four mild (grade 1-2) adverse events (AEs) occurred in 21 infusions either during or immediately following infusion (up to 6 hours), most commonly nausea and vomiting (10/24; 41.6%), likely due to the DMSO cryoprotectant, and hypotension (20.8%), attributable to diphenhydramine pre-medication. 22 additional non-severe events were reported within 24 hours of infusion, most commonly culture negative fever, chills and nausea. Increased risk of adverse effects was associated with age (IRR 0.98; 95% CI 0.96-1.00; p=0.05), while an increase risk of immediate infusion-related events was higher in patients reporting allergies (IRR 2.72; 95% CI 1.00-7.40; p=0.05); sex, disease type or T cell source (allogeneic or autologous) had no effect on frequency of adverse events. Discussion Hence infusion of T cells is safe in the outpatient setting and associated with no severe reactions, so that monitoring for one hour after infusion is likely sufficient. As many of the AEs were attributable to diphenhydramine premedication, a lower dose (0.25mg/kg) should be selected. PMID:20429793

  2. Astrocyte-to-neuron intercellular prion transfer is mediated by cell-cell contact

    PubMed Central

    Victoria, Guiliana Soraya; Arkhipenko, Alexander; Zhu, Seng; Syan, Sylvie; Zurzolo, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    Prion diseases are caused by misfolding of the cellular protein PrPC to an infectious conformer, PrPSc. Intercellular PrPSc transfer propagates conversion and allows infectivity to move from the periphery to the brain. However, how prions spread between cells of the central nervous system is unclear. Astrocytes are specialized non-neuronal cells within the brain that have a number of functions indispensable for brain homeostasis. Interestingly, they are one of the earliest sites of prion accumulation in the brain. A fundamental question arising from this observation is whether these cells are involved in intercellular prion transfer and thereby disease propagation. Using co-culture systems between primary infected astrocytes and granule neurons or neuronal cell lines, we provide direct evidence that prion-infected astrocytes can disseminate prion to neurons. Though astrocytes are capable of secreting PrP, this is an inefficient method of transferring prion infectivity. Efficient transfer required co-culturing and direct cell contact. Astrocytes form numerous intercellular connections including tunneling nanotubes, containing PrPSc, often colocalized with endolysosomal vesicles, which may constitute the major mechanism of transfer. Because of their role in intercellular transfer of prions astrocytes may influence progression of the disease. PMID:26857744

  3. HIV-1 Nef promotes the localization of Gag to the cell membrane and facilitates viral cell-to-cell transfer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Newly synthesized HIV-1 particles assemble at the plasma membrane of infected cells, before being released as free virions or being transferred through direct cell-to-cell contacts to neighboring cells. Localization of HIV-1 Gag precursor at the cell membrane is necessary and sufficient to trigger viral assembly, whereas the GagPol precursor is additionally required to generate a fully matured virion. HIV-1 Nef is an accessory protein that optimizes viral replication through partly defined mechanisms. Whether Nef modulates Gag and/or GagPol localization and assembly at the membrane and facilitates viral cell-to-cell transfer has not been extensively characterized so far. Results We report that Nef increases the total amount of Gag proteins present in infected cells, and promotes Gag localization at the cell membrane. Moreover, the processing of p55 into p24 is improved in the presence of Nef. We also examined the effect of Nef during HIV-1 cell-to-cell transfer. We show that without Nef, viral transfer through direct contacts between infected cells and target cells is impaired. With a nef-deleted virus, the number of HIV-1 positive target cells after a short 2h co-culture is reduced, and viral material transferred to uninfected cells is less matured. At later time points, this defect is associated with a reduction in the productive infection of new target cells. Conclusions Our results highlight a previously unappreciated role of Nef during the viral replication cycle. Nef promotes HIV-1 Gag membrane localization and processing, and facilitates viral cell-to-cell transfer. PMID:23899341

  4. Gene transfer in inner ear cells: a challenging race.

    PubMed

    Sacheli, R; Delacroix, L; Vandenackerveken, P; Nguyen, L; Malgrange, B

    2013-03-01

    Recent advances in human genomics led to the identification of numerous defective genes causing deafness, which represent novel putative therapeutic targets. Future gene-based treatment of deafness resulting from genetic or acquired sensorineural hearing loss may include strategies ranging from gene therapy to antisense delivery. For successful development of gene therapies, a minimal requirement involves the engineering of appropriate gene carrier systems. Transfer of exogenous genetic material into the mammalian inner ear using viral or non-viral vectors has been characterized over the last decade. The nature of inner ear cells targeted, as well as the transgene expression level and duration, are highly dependent on the vector type, the route of administration and the strength of the promoter driving expression. This review summarizes and discusses recent advances in inner ear gene-transfer technologies aimed at examining gene function or identifying new treatment for inner ear disorders.

  5. Modulation transfer spectroscopy in a lithium atomic vapor cell.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dali; Zhou, Chao; Zhou, Lin; Wang, Jin; Zhan, Mingsheng

    2016-05-16

    We have investigated modulation transfer spectroscopy of D2 transitions of 7Li atoms in a vapor cell. The role of the intensity of the probe beam in the spectrum is important, we have seen unique characteristics of the signal in the crossover peak. In order to find the best signal for laser locking, the slope and frequency offset of the zero-crossing signal are determined. The dependence of the modulation transfer spectra on polarizations of pump and probe beam is demonstrated. The residual amplitude modulation in the system is also considered, and the distortion of the spectra due to the modulation is analyzed. It was found that the crossover peak is more suitable for frequency stabilization due to its better residual amplitude modulation compensation.

  6. Modulation transfer spectroscopy in a lithium atomic vapor cell.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dali; Zhou, Chao; Zhou, Lin; Wang, Jin; Zhan, Mingsheng

    2016-05-16

    We have investigated modulation transfer spectroscopy of D2 transitions of 7Li atoms in a vapor cell. The role of the intensity of the probe beam in the spectrum is important, we have seen unique characteristics of the signal in the crossover peak. In order to find the best signal for laser locking, the slope and frequency offset of the zero-crossing signal are determined. The dependence of the modulation transfer spectra on polarizations of pump and probe beam is demonstrated. The residual amplitude modulation in the system is also considered, and the distortion of the spectra due to the modulation is analyzed. It was found that the crossover peak is more suitable for frequency stabilization due to its better residual amplitude modulation compensation. PMID:27409886

  7. A New, Dynamic Era for Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer?

    PubMed

    Loi, Pasqualino; Iuso, Domenico; Czernik, Marta; Ogura, Atsuo

    2016-10-01

    Cloning animals by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has remained an uncontrollable process for many years. High rates of embryonic losses, stillbirths, and postnatal mortality have been typical outcomes. These developmental problems arise from abnormal genomic reprogramming: the capacity of the oocyte to reset the differentiated memory of a somatic cell. However, effective reprogramming strategies are now available. These target the whole genome or single domains such as the Xist gene, and their effectiveness has been validated with the ability of experimental animals to develop to term. Thus, SCNT has become a controllable process that can be used to 'rescue' endangered species, and for biomedical research such as therapeutic cloning and the isolation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). PMID:27118511

  8. Immortalized neural progenitor cells for CNS gene transfer and repair.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Serrano, A; Björklund, A

    1997-11-01

    Immortalized multipotent neural stem and progenitor cells have emerged as a highly convenient source of tissue for genetic manipulation and ex vivo gene transfer to the CNS. Recent studies show that these cells, which can be maintained and genetically transduced as cell lines in culture, can survive, integrate and differentiate into both neurons and glia after transplantation to the intact or damaged brain. Progenitors engineered to secrete trophic factors, or to produce neurotransmitter-related or metabolic enzymes can be made to repopulate diseased or injured brain areas, thus providing a new potential therapeutic tool for the blockade of neurodegenerative processes and reversal of behavioural deficits in animal models of neurodegenerative diseases. With further technical improvements, the use of immortalized neural progenitors may bring us closer to the challenging goal of targeted and effective CNS repair.

  9. Production of calves by transfer of nuclei from cultured inner cell mass cells.

    PubMed

    Sims, M; First, N L

    1994-06-21

    We report here the isolation and in vitro culture of bovine inner cell mass (ICM) cells and the use of ICM cells in nuclear transfer to produce totipotent blastocysts that resulted in calves born. Of 15 cell lines represented in this study, 13 were derived from immunosurgically isolated ICM of 3 in vitro produced day 9-10 bovine blastocysts, while 2 lines were derived from single blastocysts. Approximately 70% of attempted cell lines became established cell lines when started from 3 ICMs. The ability to establish cell lines was dependent on the number of ICMs starting the line. Sire differences were noted in the ability of ICMs to establish cell lines and to form blastocysts. The cell lines were cultured as a low cell density suspension in the medium CR1aa plus selenium, insulin, and transferrin (SIT) and 5% fetal calf serum (FCS) for 6-101 days before use in nuclear transfer, at which time some had multiplied to more than 2000 cells. If allowed to aggregate, cells of established cell lines formed embryoid bodies. A total of 659 nuclear transfer clones were made by fusing the ES cells into enucleated oocytes with polyethylene glycol; 460 of these fused, based on cleavage (70%). After culture of the clones for 7 days in vitro in CR1aa/SIT/5% FCS, 109 (24%) of those fused became blastocysts. Thirty-four blastocysts were transferred into uteri of 27 cows, and 13 cows (49%) became pregnant. Four of the 13 cows gave birth to 4 normal calves. DNA typing showed the calves to be derived from the respective sires of the cell lines. The calves were derived from cultures of less than 28 days. PMID:8016127

  10. Production of calves by transfer of nuclei from cultured inner cell mass cells.

    PubMed

    Sims, M; First, N L

    1994-06-21

    We report here the isolation and in vitro culture of bovine inner cell mass (ICM) cells and the use of ICM cells in nuclear transfer to produce totipotent blastocysts that resulted in calves born. Of 15 cell lines represented in this study, 13 were derived from immunosurgically isolated ICM of 3 in vitro produced day 9-10 bovine blastocysts, while 2 lines were derived from single blastocysts. Approximately 70% of attempted cell lines became established cell lines when started from 3 ICMs. The ability to establish cell lines was dependent on the number of ICMs starting the line. Sire differences were noted in the ability of ICMs to establish cell lines and to form blastocysts. The cell lines were cultured as a low cell density suspension in the medium CR1aa plus selenium, insulin, and transferrin (SIT) and 5% fetal calf serum (FCS) for 6-101 days before use in nuclear transfer, at which time some had multiplied to more than 2000 cells. If allowed to aggregate, cells of established cell lines formed embryoid bodies. A total of 659 nuclear transfer clones were made by fusing the ES cells into enucleated oocytes with polyethylene glycol; 460 of these fused, based on cleavage (70%). After culture of the clones for 7 days in vitro in CR1aa/SIT/5% FCS, 109 (24%) of those fused became blastocysts. Thirty-four blastocysts were transferred into uteri of 27 cows, and 13 cows (49%) became pregnant. Four of the 13 cows gave birth to 4 normal calves. DNA typing showed the calves to be derived from the respective sires of the cell lines. The calves were derived from cultures of less than 28 days.

  11. Production of calves by transfer of nuclei from cultured inner cell mass cells.

    PubMed Central

    Sims, M; First, N L

    1994-01-01

    We report here the isolation and in vitro culture of bovine inner cell mass (ICM) cells and the use of ICM cells in nuclear transfer to produce totipotent blastocysts that resulted in calves born. Of 15 cell lines represented in this study, 13 were derived from immunosurgically isolated ICM of 3 in vitro produced day 9-10 bovine blastocysts, while 2 lines were derived from single blastocysts. Approximately 70% of attempted cell lines became established cell lines when started from 3 ICMs. The ability to establish cell lines was dependent on the number of ICMs starting the line. Sire differences were noted in the ability of ICMs to establish cell lines and to form blastocysts. The cell lines were cultured as a low cell density suspension in the medium CR1aa plus selenium, insulin, and transferrin (SIT) and 5% fetal calf serum (FCS) for 6-101 days before use in nuclear transfer, at which time some had multiplied to more than 2000 cells. If allowed to aggregate, cells of established cell lines formed embryoid bodies. A total of 659 nuclear transfer clones were made by fusing the ES cells into enucleated oocytes with polyethylene glycol; 460 of these fused, based on cleavage (70%). After culture of the clones for 7 days in vitro in CR1aa/SIT/5% FCS, 109 (24%) of those fused became blastocysts. Thirty-four blastocysts were transferred into uteri of 27 cows, and 13 cows (49%) became pregnant. Four of the 13 cows gave birth to 4 normal calves. DNA typing showed the calves to be derived from the respective sires of the cell lines. The calves were derived from cultures of less than 28 days. Images PMID:8016127

  12. Adoptive T-Cell Therapy for Cancer in the United Kingdom: A Review of Activity for the British Society of Gene and Cell Therapy Annual Meeting 2015

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, John; Bridgeman, John Stephen; Hawkins, Robert Edward; Exley, Mark Adrian; Stauss, Hans; Maher, John; Pule, Martin; Sewell, Andrew Kelvin; Bendle, Gavin; Lee, Steven; Qasim, Waseem; Thrasher, Adrian; Morris, Emma

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Adoptive T-cell therapy is delivering objective clinical responses across a number of cancer indications in the early phase clinical setting. Much of this clinical activity is taking place at major clinical academic centers across the United States. This review focuses upon cancer-focused cell therapy activity within the United Kingdom as a contribution to the 2015 British Society of Gene and Cell Therapy annual general meeting. This overview reflects the diversity and expansion of clinical and preclinical studies within the United Kingdom while considering the background context of this work against new infrastructural developments and the requirements of nationalized healthcare delivery within the UK National Health Service. PMID:25860661

  13. Single cells spreading on a protein lattice adopt an energy minimizing shape

    PubMed Central

    Vianay, Benoit; Käfer, Jos; Planus, Emmanuelle; Block, Marc; Graner, François; Guillou, Hervé

    2010-01-01

    When spreading onto a protein microlattice living cells spontaneously acquire simple shapes determined by the lattice geometry. This suggests that, on a lattice, living cells’ shapes are in thermodynamic metastable states. Using a model at thermodynamic equilibrium we are able to reproduce the observed shapes. We build a phase diagram based on two adimensional parameters characterizing essential cellular properties involved in spreading: the cell’s compressibility and fluctuations. PMID:20867675

  14. Genetic modification of T cells improves the effectiveness of adoptive tumor immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jakóbisiak, Marek; Gołab, Jakub

    2010-10-01

    Appropriate combinations of immunotherapy and gene therapy promise to be more effective in the treatment of cancer patients than either of these therapeutic approaches alone. One such treatment is based on the application of patients' cytotoxic T cells, which can be activated, expanded, and genetically engineered to recognize particular tumor-associated antigens (TAAs). Because T cells recognizing TAAs might become unresponsive in the process of tumor development as a result of tumor evasion strategies, immunogenic viral antigens or alloantigens could be used for the expansion of cytotoxic T cells and then redirected through genetic engineering. This therapeutic approach has already demonstrated promising results in melanoma patients and could be used in the treatment of many other tumors. The graft-versus-leukemia, or more generally graft-versus-tumor, reaction based on the application of a donor lymphocyte infusion can also be ameliorated through the incorporation of suicide genes into donor lymphocytes. Such lymphocytes could be safely and more extensively used in tumor patients because they could be eliminated should a severe graft-versus-host reaction develop.

  15. Development of a glucose oxidase-based biocatalyst adopting both physical entrapment and crosslinking, and its use in biofuel cells.

    PubMed

    Chung, Yongjin; Ahn, Yeonjoo; Christwardana, Marcelinus; Kim, Hansung; Kwon, Yongchai

    2016-04-28

    New enzymatic catalysts prepared using physical entrapment and chemical bonding were used as anodic catalysts to enhance the performance of enzymatic biofuel cells (EBCs). For estimating the physical entrapment effect, the best glucose oxidase (GOx) concentration immobilized on polyethyleneimine (PEI) and carbon nanotube (CNT) (GOx/PEI/CNT) was determined, while for inspecting the chemical bonding effect, terephthalaldehyde (TPA) and glutaraldehyde (GA) crosslinkers were employed. According to the enzyme activity and XPS measurements, when the GOx concentration is 4 mg mL(-1), they are most effectively immobilized (via the physical entrapment effect) and TPA-crosslinked GOx/PEI/CNT(TPA/[GOx/PEI/CNT]) forms π conjugated bonds via chemical bonding, inducing the promotion of electron transfer by delocalization of electrons. Due to the optimized GOx concentration and π conjugated bonds, TPA/[GOx/PEI/CNT], including 4 mg mL(-1) GOx displays a high electron transfer rate, followed by excellent catalytic activity and EBC performance. PMID:27074999

  16. Effect of laser fluence on yeast cell viability in laser-assisted cell transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yafu; Huang, Yong; Wang, Gaoyan; Tzeng, Tzeng-Rong J.; Chrisey, Douglas B.

    2009-08-01

    Matrix-assisted pulsed-laser evaporation direct-write (MAPLE DW) has been emerging as a promising biological construct fabrication technique. The post-transfer cell viability in MAPLE DW depends on various operation conditions such as the applied laser fluence; unfortunately, the effect of laser fluence on the post-transfer cell viability has not been well elucidated. This work aims to study the effect of laser fluence on the post-transfer cell viability and the cell recovery ability in MAPLE DW of yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). It has been observed that (1) yeast cell viability decreases as the laser fluence increases from 85 to around 1500mJ/cm2 and (2) some of the MAPLE DW process-induced cell damage is reversible. The post-transfer yeast cell recovery is a function of laser fluence; however, this dependence relationship is not monotonic. Future work is needed to better understand the physical and chemical mechanisms of the above observations.

  17. Ultrasound Gene Transfer into Fibroblast Cells using Microbubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Yoji; Hirayama, Kota; Yoshinaka, Kiyoshi; Tei, Yuichi; Takagi, Shu; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2009-04-01

    Ultrasound is widely applied in the medical field and offers the strong advantages of non-invasiveness and high-selectivity. Gene transfer using ultrasound, which is called sonoporation, is one application. Ultrasound has the potential to deliver therapeutic materials such as genes, drugs or proteins into cells. Microbubbles are known to be able to improve delivery efficiency. This is attributed to therapeutic materials passing through the cell membrane after permeability is increased by destruction or oscillation of microbubbles. The present study tried to deliver the GFP plasmids into fibroblast cells. Cells were cultured in 6-well culture plates and exposed to ultrasound (frequency, 2.1 MHz; wave pattern, duty cycle 10%; intensity, 0-26 W/cm2; time, 0-200 s) transmitted through medium containing microbubbles (Levovist® (void fraction, 8×10-5) or Sonazoid® (void fraction, 0-24×10-4)) and GFP plasmids at a concentration of 15 μg/mL. Density of microbubbles after ultrasound irradiation was measured. When ultrasound intensity was increased with Levovist® 8×10-4, transfection efficiency increased, cell viability decreased and microbubbles disappeared. With Sonazoid®, transfection efficiency and cell viability were basically unchanged and microbubbles decreased, but did not disappear. Transfection efficiency also improved with increased ultrasound irradiation time or microbubble density. Microbubble destruction appeared to have the main effect on gene transfection under Levovist® and microbubble oscillation had the main effect under Sonazoid®.

  18. [Changes of T-cell clonality after induction-cultivation of peripheral T lymphocytes in adoptive immunotherapy for leukemias].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Gu, Jiang-Ying; Ou, Yuan; Li, Mian-Yang; Wang, He; Jin, Xian; Tao, Xiu-Yan; Liu, Zhao-Li; Ma, Xing-Fan; Wang, Xiu-Li; Ma, Si-Kun; Kang, Rui; Cai, Peng; Tong, Chun-Rong; Zhu, Ping

    2009-06-01

    This study was purposed to analyze the changes of T-cell clonality after induction of peripheral T lymphocytes by autogenous DC and cytokines in the preparation of adoptive immunotherapy for leukemias. The bone marrow and peripheral blood from 21 leukemia patients at remission stage after treatment and subjected to adoptive immunotherapy were collected. Their DCs and T-cells were stimulated with cytokines and then were mixed to activate T-cells. T-cell receptor beta variable region (TCRBV) families were amplified by RT-PCR, and genescan method and sequencing of the PCR products were used to observe the clonality changes of T-cells before and after the induction and cultivation of T-cells. The flow cytometry was used to identify CD3(+), CD4(+), CD8(+), CD3(+)CD56(+) and CD4(+)CD25str(+)FOXP3(+) cells to disclose the ratio change of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), helper T-cells, regulatory T-cells and NK T-cells before and after induction and cultivation of T-cells. The results showed that in the 21 patients, most of the 24 TCRBV families presented as oligoclonal distribution on genescan, several families were not expressed, and only a few families remained polyclonal. TCRBV24 was found to be oligoclonal in all of the 21 patients. DNA sequence analysis of TCRBV24 revealed a common motif of VAG in CDR3 in 3 cases and a common motif of GGG in CDR3 in 2 cases. In patient 5, both TCRBV 24 and TCRBV8 contained the same motif of GGG in CDR3. The identical motif in these patients may suggest that these T-cells recognize the same antigen. The peripheral lymphocytes demonstrated recovery of clonal profile on genescan from oligoclonal profile and absence of several families before the induction and cultivation to typical polyclonal profile in all TCRBV families after the induction by DC and cytokines for 13 days. After the induction and cultivation, the number of lymphocytes increased to 3.38 +/- 1.20 times. CD3(+), CD4(+), CD8(+), CD3(+)CD56(+) and CD4(+)CD25str(+)FOX P3

  19. Examining and elucidation of human weight cycle model adopting e-cell simulation system.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, Durairaj; Muthukumar, Subramanian; Siva, Durairaj; Saibaba, Ganesan; Dhanasekaran, Dharumadhurai; Archunan, Govindaraju

    2015-01-01

    Cellular rhythms regulate various physiological functions in circadian oscillatory mechanisms. Weight cycling or 'yo-yo' dieting is an evitable process in human, because of subsequent loss and regain of body weight due to irregular diet. Human weight cycle (HWC) is the major factor for causing global epidemic diseases in human beings. Understanding the HWC process would provide potent additional knowledge to prevent obesity. However till date, there is no study dealing with examine the HWC model using virtual cell simulation based on system biological approach. Therefore, the present study was designed to develop a computational HWC model, which was simulated using E-cell system v3.0. The developed model has the cyclic feedback reactions of three significant variables (the consecutive cycles of weight loss in continuous food intake (Q) and regain of body weight (P) at highest threshold point of cognitive restraint (R)) which are obtained by mathematical modelling. The dynamic plot results supported that the PQR variables depicted sustained oscillation with reversible modification due to protein diet. By contrast, the virtual model simulation would provide extensive information on HWC, which might provide knowledge to develop HWC linked with obesity pathway. The presents study concludes that optimization of body weight is essential to prevent the obesity based diseases. PMID:26339149

  20. Circulating cell membrane microparticles transfer heme to endothelial cells and trigger vasoocclusions in sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Camus, Stéphane M.; De Moraes, João A.; Bonnin, Philippe; Abbyad, Paul; Le Jeune, Sylvain; Lionnet, François; Loufrani, Laurent; Grimaud, Linda; Lambry, Jean-Christophe; Charue, Dominique; Kiger, Laurent; Renard, Jean-Marie; Larroque, Claire; Le Clésiau, Hervé; Tedgui, Alain; Bruneval, Patrick; Barja-Fidalgo, Christina; Alexandrou, Antigoni; Tharaux, Pierre-Louis; Boulanger, Chantal M.

    2015-01-01

    Intravascular hemolysis describes the relocalization of heme and hemoglobin (Hb) from erythrocytes to plasma. We investigated the concept that erythrocyte membrane microparticles (MPs) concentrate cell-free heme in human hemolytic diseases, and that heme-laden MPs have a physiopathological impact. Up to one-third of cell-free heme in plasma from 47 patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) was sequestered in circulating MPs. Erythrocyte vesiculation in vitro produced MPs loaded with heme. In silico analysis predicted that externalized phosphatidylserine (PS) in MPs may associate with and help retain heme at the cell surface. Immunohistology identified Hb-laden MPs adherent to capillary endothelium in kidney biopsies from hyperalbuminuric SCD patients. In addition, heme-laden erythrocyte MPs adhered and transferred heme to cultured endothelial cells, inducing oxidative stress and apoptosis. In transgenic SAD mice, infusion of heme-laden MPs triggered rapid vasoocclusions in kidneys and compromised microvascular dilation ex vivo. These vascular effects were largely blocked by heme-scavenging hemopexin and by the PS antagonist annexin-a5, in vitro and in vivo. Adversely remodeled MPs carrying heme may thus be a source of oxidant stress for the endothelium, linking hemolysis to vascular injury. This pathway might provide new targets for the therapeutic preservation of vascular function in SCD. PMID:25827830

  1. Circulating cell membrane microparticles transfer heme to endothelial cells and trigger vasoocclusions in sickle cell disease.

    PubMed

    Camus, Stéphane M; De Moraes, João A; Bonnin, Philippe; Abbyad, Paul; Le Jeune, Sylvain; Lionnet, François; Loufrani, Laurent; Grimaud, Linda; Lambry, Jean-Christophe; Charue, Dominique; Kiger, Laurent; Renard, Jean-Marie; Larroque, Claire; Le Clésiau, Hervé; Tedgui, Alain; Bruneval, Patrick; Barja-Fidalgo, Christina; Alexandrou, Antigoni; Tharaux, Pierre-Louis; Boulanger, Chantal M; Blanc-Brude, Olivier P

    2015-06-11

    Intravascular hemolysis describes the relocalization of heme and hemoglobin (Hb) from erythrocytes to plasma. We investigated the concept that erythrocyte membrane microparticles (MPs) concentrate cell-free heme in human hemolytic diseases, and that heme-laden MPs have a physiopathological impact. Up to one-third of cell-free heme in plasma from 47 patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) was sequestered in circulating MPs. Erythrocyte vesiculation in vitro produced MPs loaded with heme. In silico analysis predicted that externalized phosphatidylserine (PS) in MPs may associate with and help retain heme at the cell surface. Immunohistology identified Hb-laden MPs adherent to capillary endothelium in kidney biopsies from hyperalbuminuric SCD patients. In addition, heme-laden erythrocyte MPs adhered and transferred heme to cultured endothelial cells, inducing oxidative stress and apoptosis. In transgenic SAD mice, infusion of heme-laden MPs triggered rapid vasoocclusions in kidneys and compromised microvascular dilation ex vivo. These vascular effects were largely blocked by heme-scavenging hemopexin and by the PS antagonist annexin-a5, in vitro and in vivo. Adversely remodeled MPs carrying heme may thus be a source of oxidant stress for the endothelium, linking hemolysis to vascular injury. This pathway might provide new targets for the therapeutic preservation of vascular function in SCD.

  2. Specific lymphocyte subsets predict response to adoptive cell therapy using expanded autologous tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in metastatic melanoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Radvanyi, Laszlo G.; Bernatchez, Chantale; Zhang, Minying; Fox, Patricia S.; Miller, Priscilla; Chacon, Jessica; Wu, Richard; Lizee, Gregory; Mahoney, Sandy; Alvarado, Gladys; Glass, Michelle; Johnson, Valen E.; McMannis, John D.; Shpall, Elizabeth; Prieto, Victor; Papadopoulos, Nicholas; Kim, Kevin; Homsi, Jade; Bedikian, Agop; Hwu, Wen-Jen; Patel, Sapna; Ross, Merrick I.; Lee, Jeffrey E.; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E.; Lucci, Anthony; Royal, Richard; Cormier, Janice N.; Davies, Michael A.; Mansaray, Rahmatu; Fulbright, Orenthial J.; Toth, Christopher; Ramachandran, Renjith; Wardell, Seth; Gonzalez, Audrey; Hwu, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) using autologous tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) is a promising treatment for metastatic melanoma unresponsive to conventional therapies. We report here on the results of an ongoing Phase II clinical trial testing the efficacy of ACT using TIL in metastatic melanoma patients and the association of specific patient clinical characteristics and the phenotypic attributes of the infused TIL with clinical response. Experimental Design Altogether, 31 transiently lymphodepleted patients were treated with their expanded TIL followed by two cycles of high-dose (HD) IL-2 therapy. The effects of patient clinical features and the phenotypes of the T-cells infused on clinical response were determined. Results Overall, 15/31 (48.4%) patients had an objective clinical response using immune-related response criteria (irRC), with two patients (6.5%) having a complete response. Progression-free survival of >12 months was observed for 9/15 (60%) of the responding patients. Factors significantly associated with objective tumor regression included a higher number of TIL infused, a higher proportion of CD8+ T-cells in the infusion product, a more differentiated effector phenotype of the CD8+ population and a higher frequency of CD8+ T-cells co-expressing the negative costimulation molecule “B- and T-lymphocyte attenuator” (BTLA). No significant difference in telomere lengths of TIL between responders and non-responders was identified. Conclusion These results indicate that immunotherapy with expanded autologous TIL is capable of achieving durable clinical responses in metastatic melanoma patients and that CD8+ T-cells in the infused TIL, particularly differentiated effectors cells and cells expressing BTLA, are associated with tumor regression. PMID:23032743

  3. Thrombotic Microangiopathy In Metastatic Melanoma Patients Treated with Adoptive Cell Therapy and Total Body Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Jennifer; Citrin, Deborah E.; Waldman, Meryl; White, Donald E.; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Yang, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Background Thrombotic microangioapathy (TMA) is a complication that developed in some patients receiving 12 Gy total body irradiation in addition to lymphodepleting preparative chemotherapy prior to infusion of autologous tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) with high-dose aldesleukin (IL-2). This paper describes the incidence, presentation and course of radiation-associated TMA. Methods The data for patients with metastatic melanoma who received ACT with TIL plus aldesleukin following myeloablative chemotherapy and 12 Gy total body irradiation was examined, looking at patient characteristics and the natural history of TMA. Results The median time to presentation was approximately 8 months after completing TBI. The estimated cumulative incidence of TMA was 31.2% (median follow-up of 24 months). Noninvasive criteria for diagnosis included newly elevated creatinine levels, new-onset hypertension, new-onset anemia, microscopic hematuria, thrombocytopenia, low haptoglobin and elevated lactate dehydrogenase values. Once diagnosed, patients were managed with control of their hypertension with multiple agents and supportive red blood cell transfusions. TMA typically stabilized or improved and no patient progressed to dialysis. TMA was associated with a higher probability of an anti-tumor response. Conclusions Thrombotic microangiopathy occurs in approximately a third of patients treated with a lymphodepleting preparative chemotherapy regimen with total body irradiation prior to autologous T-cell therapy. The disease has a variable natural history, however no patient developed end-stage renal failure. Successful management with supportive care and aggressive hypertension control is vital to the safe application of a systemic therapy that has shown curative potential for patients with disseminated melanoma. PMID:24474396

  4. Somatic cell nuclear transfer: Past, present and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Campbell, K H S; Fisher, P; Chen, W C; Choi, I; Kelly, R D W; Lee, J-H; Xhu, J

    2007-09-01

    It is now over a decade since the birth, in 1996, of Dolly the first animal to be produced by nuclear transfer using an adult derived somatic cell as nuclear donor. Since this time similar techniques have been successfully applied to a range of species producing live offspring and allowing the development of transgenic technologies for agricultural, biotechnological and medical uses. However, though applicable to a range of species, overall, the efficiencies of development of healthy offspring remain low. The low frequency of successful development has been attributed to incomplete or inappropriate reprogramming of the transferred nuclear genome. Many studies have demonstrated that such reprogramming occurs by epigenetic mechanisms not involving alterations in DNA sequence, however, at present the molecular mechanisms underlying reprogramming are poorly defined. Since the birth of Dolly many studies have attempted to improve the frequency of development, this review will discuss the process of animal production by nuclear transfer and in particular changes in the methodology which have increased development and survival, simplified or increased robustness of the technique. Although much of the discussion is applicable across species, for simplicity we will concentrate primarily on published data for cattle, sheep, pigs and mice. PMID:17610946

  5. Adoption of Transoral Robotic Surgery Compared With Other Surgical Modalities for Treatment of Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cracchiolo, Jennifer R.; Roman, Benjamin R.; Kutler, David I.; Kuhel, William I.; Cohen, Marc A.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives Transoral robotic surgery (TORS) has increased for treatment of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC). To define the adoption of TORS, we analyzed patterns of surgical treatment for OPSCC in the US. Methods Cases of T1–T3 OPSCC treated with surgery between 2010 and 2013 from the National Cancer Database were queried. Results Of 3,071 patients who underwent primary surgical management for T1–T3 OPSCC, 846 (28%) underwent TORS. On multivariable analysis, low tumor stage (T2 vs T1: OR 0.75, CI 0.37–0.51, p<0.0001; T3 vs T1: O.R. 0.33, CI 0.28–0.38, p<0.0001), treatment at an academic cancer center (O.R. 2.23, C.I. 1.29–3.88, p=0.004) and treatment at a high volume hospital (34–155 cases vs 1–4 cases: O.R. 9.07, C.I. 3.19–25.79, p<0.0001) were associated with increased TORS approach. Significant geographic variation was observed, with high adoption in the Middle Atlantic. Positive margin rates were lower when TORS was performed at a high volume vs. low volume hospital (8.2% vs 16.7% respectively, p=0.001). Conclusions Tumor and non-tumor factors are associated with TORS adoption. This analysis suggests uneven diffusion of this technology in the treatment of OPSCC. PMID:27392812

  6. Change in wall composition of transfer and aleurone cells during wheat grain development.

    PubMed

    Robert, P; Jamme, F; Barron, C; Bouchet, B; Saulnier, L; Dumas, P; Guillon, F

    2011-02-01

    In addition to the starchy endosperm, a specialized tissue accumulating storage material, the endosperm of wheat grain, comprises the aleurone layer and the transfer cells next to the crease. The transfer cells, located at the ventral region of the grain, are involved in nutrient transfer from the maternal tissues to the developing endosperm. Immunolabeling techniques, Raman spectroscopy, and synchrotron infrared micro-spectroscopy were used to study the chemistry of the transfer cell walls during wheat grain development. The kinetic depositions of the main cell wall polysaccharides of wheat grain endosperm, arabinoxylan, and (1-3)(1-4)-β-glucan in transfer cell walls were different from kinetics previously observed in the aleurone cell walls. While (1-3)(1-4)-β-glucan appeared first in the aleurone cell walls at 90°D, arabinoxylan predominated in the transfer cell walls from 90 to 445°D. Both aleurone and transfer cell walls were enriched in (1-3)(1-4)-β-glucan at the mature stage of wheat grain development. Arabinoxylan was more substituted in the transfer cell walls than in the aleurone walls. However, arabinoxylan was more feruloylated in the aleurone than in the transfer cell walls, whatever the stage of grain development. In the transfer cells, the ferulic acid was less abundant in the outer periclinal walls while para-coumarate was absent. Possible implications of such differences are discussed.

  7. Interspecies Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer: Advancements and Problems

    PubMed Central

    Lagutina, Irina; Fulka, Helena; Lazzari, Giovanna

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Embryologists working with livestock species were the pioneers in the field of reprogramming by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). Without the “Dolly experiment,” the field of cellular reprogramming would have been slow and induced plutipotent cells (iPSCs) would not have been conceived. The major drive of the work in mammalian cloning was the interest of the breeding industry to propagate superior genotypes. Soon it was realized that the properties of oocytes could be used also to clone endangered mammalian species or to reprogram the genomes of unrelated species through what is known as interspecies (i) SCNT, using easily available oocytes of livestock species. iSCNT for cloning animals works only for species that can interbreed, and experiments with taxonomically distant species have not been successful in obtaining live births or deriving embryonic stem cell (ESC) lines to be used for regenerative medicine. There are controversial reports in the literature, but in most cases these experiments have underlined some of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that are incomplete during cell nucleus reprogramming, including the failure to organize nucleoli, silence somatic cell genes, activate the embryonic genome, and resume mitochondrial replication and function, thus indicating nucleus–cytoplasmic incompatibility. PMID:24033141

  8. Using somatic-cell nuclear transfer to study aging.

    PubMed

    Kishigami, Satoshi; Lee, Ah Reum; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2013-01-01

    In mammals, a diploid genome following fertilization of haploid cells, an egg, and a spermatozoon is unique and irreproducible. This implies that the generated unique diploid genome is doomed with the individual's inevitable demise. Since it was first reported in 1997 that Dolly the sheep had been cloned, many mammalian species have been cloned successfully using somatic-cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). The success of SCNT in mammals enables us not only to reproduce offspring without germ cells, that is, to "passage" a unique diploid genome, but also to address valuable biological questions on development, nuclear reprogramming, and epigenetic memory. Successful cloning can also support epigenetic reprogramming where the aging clock is reset or reversed. Recent work using iPS cell technology has explored the practicality and led to the recapitulation of premature aging with iPSCs from progeroid laminopathies. As a result, reprogramming tools are also expected to contribute to studying biological age. However, the efficiency of animal cloning is still low in most cases and the mechanism of reprogramming in cloned embryos is still largely unclear. Here, based on recent advances, we describe an improved, more efficient mouse cloning protocol using histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis) and latrunculin A, which increases the success rates of producing cloned mice or establishing ES cells fivefold. This improved method of cloning will provide a strong tool to address many issues including biological aging more easily and with lower cost.

  9. Generation of Viable Cell and Biomaterial Patterns by Laser Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ringeisen, Bradley

    2001-03-01

    In order to fabricate and interface biological systems for next generation applications such as biosensors, protein recognition microarrays, and engineered tissues, it is imperative to have a method of accurately and rapidly depositing different active biomaterials in patterns or layered structures. Ideally, the biomaterial structures would also be compatible with many different substrates including technologically relevant platforms such as electronic circuits or various detection devices. We have developed a novel laser-based technique, termed matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation direct write (MAPLE DW), that is able to direct write patterns and three-dimensional structures of numerous biologically active species ranging from proteins and antibodies to living cells. Specifically, we have shown that MAPLE DW is capable of forming mesoscopic patterns of living prokaryotic cells (E. coli bacteria), living mammalian cells (Chinese hamster ovaries), active proteins (biotinylated bovine serum albumin, horse radish peroxidase), and antibodies specific to a variety of classes of cancer related proteins including intracellular and extracellular matrix proteins, signaling proteins, cell cycle proteins, growth factors, and growth factor receptors. In addition, patterns of viable cells and active biomolecules were deposited on different substrates including metals, semiconductors, nutrient agar, and functionalized glass slides. We will present an explanation of the laser-based transfer mechanism as well as results from our recent efforts to fabricate protein recognition microarrays and tissue-based microfluidic networks.

  10. Transfer characteristics of the hair cell's afferent synapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keen, Erica C.; Hudspeth, A. J.

    2006-04-01

    The sense of hearing depends on fast, finely graded neurotransmission at the ribbon synapses connecting hair cells to afferent nerve fibers. The processing that occurs at this first chemical synapse in the auditory pathway determines the quality and extent of the information conveyed to the central nervous system. Knowledge of the synapse's input-output function is therefore essential for understanding how auditory stimuli are encoded. To investigate the transfer function at the hair cell's synapse, we developed a preparation of the bullfrog's amphibian papilla. In the portion of this receptor organ representing stimuli of 400-800 Hz, each afferent nerve fiber forms several synaptic terminals onto one to three hair cells. By performing simultaneous voltage-clamp recordings from presynaptic hair cells and postsynaptic afferent fibers, we established that the rate of evoked vesicle release, as determined from the average postsynaptic current, depends linearly on the amplitude of the presynaptic Ca2+ current. This result implies that, for receptor potentials in the physiological range, the hair cell's synapse transmits information with high fidelity. auditory system | exocytosis | glutamate | ribbon synapse | synaptic vesicle

  11. Using somatic-cell nuclear transfer to study aging.

    PubMed

    Kishigami, Satoshi; Lee, Ah Reum; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2013-01-01

    In mammals, a diploid genome following fertilization of haploid cells, an egg, and a spermatozoon is unique and irreproducible. This implies that the generated unique diploid genome is doomed with the individual's inevitable demise. Since it was first reported in 1997 that Dolly the sheep had been cloned, many mammalian species have been cloned successfully using somatic-cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). The success of SCNT in mammals enables us not only to reproduce offspring without germ cells, that is, to "passage" a unique diploid genome, but also to address valuable biological questions on development, nuclear reprogramming, and epigenetic memory. Successful cloning can also support epigenetic reprogramming where the aging clock is reset or reversed. Recent work using iPS cell technology has explored the practicality and led to the recapitulation of premature aging with iPSCs from progeroid laminopathies. As a result, reprogramming tools are also expected to contribute to studying biological age. However, the efficiency of animal cloning is still low in most cases and the mechanism of reprogramming in cloned embryos is still largely unclear. Here, based on recent advances, we describe an improved, more efficient mouse cloning protocol using histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis) and latrunculin A, which increases the success rates of producing cloned mice or establishing ES cells fivefold. This improved method of cloning will provide a strong tool to address many issues including biological aging more easily and with lower cost. PMID:23929101

  12. Phenotypic characteristics of hybrid cells generated by transferring neuronal nuclei into bone marrow stromal cell cytoplasts.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhujuan; Xu, Yan; Zhong, Qi; Zheng, Jian

    2012-02-10

    Bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) are promising donor cells for transplantation therapies for a variety of diseases. However, there still lack efficient ways to induce directional differentiation of BMSCs to promote their practical use in transplantation therapy. In this study, we constructed hybrid cells by transferring neuronal nuclei into BMSC cytoplasts and investigated the proliferative capacity and phenotypic characteristics of the hybrid cells. The neuronal nuclei were labeled with Hoechst 33342 before the transfer process, and the cell membrane antigen CD71 was used as a marker of BMSC cytoplasts. The BMSC cytoplasts and neuronal karyoplasts were separated by Ficoll density gradient ultracentrifugation. The hybrid cells were generated by the polyethylene glycol-mediated fusion of BMSC cytoplasts with neuronal karyoplasts. The hybrid cells exhibited Hoechst 33342 staining in their nuclei and CD71 staining on their cytomembranes, which confirmed the success of cell fusion. The hybrid cells were positive for BrdU immunostaining. Viability analysis of the cultured hybrid cells by the MTT assay demonstrated their proliferative ability. Immunocytochemical staining revealed the expression of the neuron-specific markers NeuN and MAP2 in the third passage hybrid cells, which indicated their neuronal phenotypic characteristics. The results demonstrated that the hybrid cells produced by fusing neuronal karyoplasts with BMSC cytoplasts had proliferative capability and expressed the neuron-specific markers. Further study is required to investigate the phenotype of the hybrid cells both structurally and functionally.

  13. Artificial antigen presenting cells that express prevalent HLA alleles: A step towards the broad application of antigen-specific adoptive cell therapies.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Aisha N; Selvakumar, Annamalai; Doubrovina, Ekaterina; Riviere, Isabelle; Sadelain, Michel W; O'Reilly, Richard J

    2009-12-01

    The artificial antigen-presenting cells (AAPCs) described in this review were generated to facilitate the production of virus-specific T-cells for the treatment of infections in patients after bone marrow transplant. These AAPCs consist of murine 3T3 cells genetically modified to express critical human molecules needed for T-cell stimulation, such as the co-stimulatory molecules B7.1, ICAM-1, and LFA-3 and one of a series of 6 common HLA class I alleles. When T-cells were sensitized against cytomegalovirus (CMV) using AAPCs that express a shared HLA allele or using autologous antigen-presenting cells (APCs) loaded with the CMVpp65 antigen, they were activated and expanded to become HLA-restricted CMVpp65-specific T-cells. These T-cells demonstrated functional activity in vitro against CMV by producing IFN-gamma and inducing CMVpp65-specific cytotoxicity. T-cells sensitized with AAPCs recognized antigenic epitopes presented by each HLA allele known to be immunogenic in Man. Sensitization with AAPCs also permitted expansion of IFN-gamma+ cytotoxic T-cells against subdominant epitopes that were not effectively recognized by T-cells sensitized with autologous APCs. This panel of AAPCs provides a source of immediately accessible, standardizable, and replenishable "off the shelf" cellular reagents with the potential to make adoptive immunotherapy widely available for the treatment of lethal infections, cancer, and autoimmune diseases. PMID:20040272

  14. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based stoichiometry in living cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hoppe, Adam; Christensen, Kenneth; Swanson, Joel A

    2002-01-01

    Imaging of fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between fluorescently labeled molecules can measure the timing and location of intermolecular interactions inside living cells. Present microscopic methods measure FRET in arbitrary units, and cannot discriminate FRET efficiency and the fractions of donor and acceptor in complex. Here we describe a stoichiometric method that uses three microscopic fluorescence images to measure FRET efficiency, the relative concentrations of donor and acceptor, and the fractions of donor and acceptor in complex in living cells. FRET stoichiometry derives from the concept that specific donor-acceptor complexes will give rise to a characteristic FRET efficiency, which, if measured, can allow stoichiometric discrimination of interacting components. A first equation determines FRET efficiency and the fraction of acceptor molecules in complex with donor. A second equation determines the fraction of donor molecules in complex by estimating the donor fluorescence lost due to energy transfer. This eliminates the need for acceptor photobleaching to determine total donor concentrations and allows for repeated measurements from the same cell. A third equation obtains the ratio of total acceptor to total donor molecules. The theory and method were confirmed by microscopic measurements of fluorescence from cyan fluorescent protein (CFP), citrine, and linked CFP-Citrine fusion protein, in solutions and inside cells. Together, the methods derived from these equations allow sensitive, rapid, and repeatable detection of donor-, acceptor-, and donor-acceptor complex stoichiometry at each pixel in an image. By accurately imaging molecular interactions, FRET stoichiometry opens new areas for quantitative study of intracellular molecular networks. PMID:12496132

  15. Factors affecting the development of somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos in Cattle.

    PubMed

    Akagi, Satoshi; Matsukawa, Kazutsugu; Takahashi, Seiya

    2014-01-01

    Nuclear transfer is a complex multistep procedure that includes oocyte maturation, cell cycle synchronization of donor cells, enucleation, cell fusion, oocyte activation and embryo culture. Therefore, many factors are believed to contribute to the success of embryo development following nuclear transfer. Numerous attempts to improve cloning efficiency have been conducted since the birth of the first sheep by somatic cell nuclear transfer. However, the efficiency of somatic cell cloning has remained low, and applications have been limited. In this review, we discuss some of the factors that affect the developmental ability of somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos in cattle.

  16. Adoptive T-cell immunotherapy from third-party donors: characterization of donors and set up of a T-cell donor registry

    PubMed Central

    Eiz-Vesper, Britta; Maecker-Kolhoff, Britta; Blasczyk, Rainer

    2013-01-01

    Infection with and reactivation of human cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and adenovirus (ADV) are frequent and severe complications in immunocompromised recipients after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) or solid organ transplantation (SOT). These serious adverse events are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Donor lymphocyte infusions (DLIs) are often used to treat both viral infections and leukemia relapses after transplantation but are associated with potentially life-threatening graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). Adoptive immunotherapy with virus-specific cytotoxic effector T cells (CTLs) derived from seropositive donors can rapidly reconstitute antiviral immunity after HSCT and organ transplantation. Therefore, it can effectively prevent the clinical manifestation of these viruses with no significant acute toxicity or increased risk of GvHD. In conditions, where patients receiving an allogeneic cord blood (CB) transplant or a transplant from a virus-seronegative donor and since donor blood is generally not available for solid organ recipients, allogeneic third party T-cell donors would offer an alternative option. Recent studies showed that during granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) mobilization, the functional activity of antiviral memory T cells is impaired for a long period. This finding suggests that even stem cell donors may not be the best source of T cells. Under these circumstances, partially human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched virus-specific CTLs from healthy seropositive individuals may be a promising option. Therefore, frequency assessments of virus-specific memory T cells in HLA-typed healthy donors as well as in HSCT/SOT donors using a high throughput T-cell assay were performed over a period of 4 years at Hannover Medical School. This chapter will address the relevance and potential of a third-party T-cell donor registry and will discuss its clinical implication for adoptive T-cell

  17. Gene transfer into mammalian cells by jet injection.

    PubMed

    Furth, P A; Shamay, A; Hennighausen, L

    1995-04-01

    Jet injection of DNA in solution is a technique that can be used to transfer DNA into tissues of living animals, where the introduced genes are expressed. The muscle, fat, skin, and mammary tissue of mice, and the fat, skin, and mammary tissue of sheep can be transfected with DNA. A jet injector, such as the Ped-o-jet (Stirn Industries, Dayton, NJ), is used to form a jet from 100 to 300 microliters of a DNA solution. This jet has sufficient force to travel into and through tissues of adult and juvenile animals. The introduced DNA is found in cells surrounding the path of the jet. When jet injection is performed through the surface of intact skin, underlying muscle, mammary, and fat, cells up to 2 cm distant from the point of injection are transfected with DNA. In this study, we demonstrate that the efficiency of DNA transfer is dependent upon the force of injection. Jet injection is an alternative to needle injection, lipofection, and particle bombardment for the introduction of "naked" DNA into the tissues of animals. This technique has potential for the introduction of genes into living organisms for genetic vaccination and gene therapy. PMID:7590772

  18. Somatic cell nuclear transfer-derived embryonic stem cell lines in humans: pros and cons.

    PubMed

    Langerova, Alena; Fulka, Helena; Fulka, Josef

    2013-12-01

    The recent paper, published by Mitalipov's group in Cell (Tachibana et al., 2013 ), reporting the production of human somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryonic stem cells (ESCs), opens again the debate if, in the era of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), the production of these cells is indeed necessary and, if so, whether they are different from ESCs produced from spare embryos and iPSCs. It is our opinion that these questions are very difficult to answer because it is still unclear whether and how normal ESCs differ from iPSCs. PMID:24180743

  19. Somatic cell nuclear transfer-derived embryonic stem cell lines in humans: pros and cons.

    PubMed

    Langerova, Alena; Fulka, Helena; Fulka, Josef

    2013-12-01

    The recent paper, published by Mitalipov's group in Cell (Tachibana et al., 2013 ), reporting the production of human somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) embryonic stem cells (ESCs), opens again the debate if, in the era of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), the production of these cells is indeed necessary and, if so, whether they are different from ESCs produced from spare embryos and iPSCs. It is our opinion that these questions are very difficult to answer because it is still unclear whether and how normal ESCs differ from iPSCs.

  20. Cloned ferrets produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ziyi; Sun, Xingshen; Chen, Juan; Liu, Xiaoming; Wisely, Samantha M.; Zhou, Qi; Renard, Jean-Paul; Leno, Gregory H.; Engelhardt, John F.

    2007-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) offers great potential for developing better animal models of human disease. The domestic ferret (Mustela putorius furo) is an ideal animal model for influenza infections and potentially other human respiratory diseases such as cystic fibrosis, where mouse models have failed to reproduce the human disease phenotype. Here, we report the successful production of live cloned, reproductively competent, ferrets using species-specific SCNT methodologies. Critical to developing a successful SCNT protocol for the ferret was the finding that hormonal treatment, normally used for superovulation, adversely affected the developmental potential of recipient oocytes. The onset of Oct4 expression was delayed and incomplete in parthenogenetically activated oocytes collected from hormone-treated females relative to oocytes collected from females naturally mated with vasectomized males. Stimulation induced by mating and in vitro oocyte maturation produced the optimal oocyte recipient for SCNT. Although nuclear injection and cell fusion produced mid-term fetuses at equivalent rates (~3–4%), only cell fusion gave rise to healthy surviving clones. Single cell fusion rates and the efficiency of SCNT were also enhanced by placing two somatic cells into the perivitelline space. These species-specific modifications facilitated the birth of live, healthy, and fertile cloned ferrets. The development of microsatellite genotyping for domestic ferrets confirmed that ferret clones were genetically derived from their respective somatic cells and unrelated to their surrogate mother. With this technology, it is now feasible to begin generating genetically defined ferrets for studying transmissible and inherited human lung diseases. Cloning of the domestic ferret may also aid in recovery and conservation of the endangered black-footed ferret and European mink. PMID:16584722

  1. Rabbit embryonic stem cell lines derived from fertilized, parthenogenetic or somatic cell nuclear transfer embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Zhen F.; Gai, Hui; Huang, You Z.; Li, Shan G.; Chen, Xue J.; Shi, Jian J.; Wu, Li; Liu, Ailian; Xu, Ping; Sheng, Hui Z. . E-mail: hzsheng2003@yahoo.com

    2006-11-01

    Embryonic stem cells were isolated from rabbit blastocysts derived from fertilization (conventional rbES cells), parthenogenesis (pES cells) and nuclear transfer (ntES cells), and propagated in a serum-free culture system. Rabbit ES (rbES) cells proliferated for a prolonged time in an undifferentiated state and maintained a normal karyotype. These cells grew in a monolayer with a high nuclear/cytoplasm ratio and contained a high level of alkaline phosphate activity. In addition, rbES cells expressed the pluripotent marker Oct-4, as well as EBAF2, FGF4, TDGF1, but not antigens recognized by antibodies against SSEA-1, SSEA-3, SSEA-4, TRA-1-10 and TRA-1-81. All 3 types of ES cells formed embryoid bodies and generated teratoma that contained tissue types of all three germ layers. rbES cells exhibited a high cloning efficiency, were genetically modified readily and were used as nuclear donors to generate a viable rabbit through somatic cell nuclear transfer. In combination with genetic engineering, the ES cell technology should facilitate the creation of new rabbit lines.

  2. Prospects for chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) γδ T cells: A potential game changer for adoptive T cell cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mirzaei, Hamid Reza; Mirzaei, Hamed; Lee, Sang Yun; Hadjati, Jamshid; Till, Brian G

    2016-10-01

    Excitement is growing for therapies that harness the power of patients' immune systems to combat their diseases. One approach to immunotherapy involves engineering patients' own T cells to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) to treat advanced cancers, particularly those refractory to conventional therapeutic agents. Although these engineered immune cells have made remarkable strides in the treatment of patients with certain hematologic malignancies, success with solid tumors has been limited, probably due to immunosuppressive mechanisms in the tumor niche. In nearly all studies to date, T cells bearing αβ receptors have been used to generate CAR T cells. In this review, we highlight biological characteristics of γδ T cells that are distinct from those of αβ T cells, including homing to epithelial and mucosal tissues and unique functions such as direct antigen recognition, lack of alloreactivity, and ability to present antigens. We offer our perspective that these features make γδ T cells promising for use in cellular therapy against several types of solid tumors, including melanoma and gastrointestinal cancers. Engineered γδ T cells should be considered as a new platform for adoptive T cell cancer therapy for mucosal tumors.

  3. Prospects for chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) γδ T cells: A potential game changer for adoptive T cell cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mirzaei, Hamid Reza; Mirzaei, Hamed; Lee, Sang Yun; Hadjati, Jamshid; Till, Brian G

    2016-10-01

    Excitement is growing for therapies that harness the power of patients' immune systems to combat their diseases. One approach to immunotherapy involves engineering patients' own T cells to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) to treat advanced cancers, particularly those refractory to conventional therapeutic agents. Although these engineered immune cells have made remarkable strides in the treatment of patients with certain hematologic malignancies, success with solid tumors has been limited, probably due to immunosuppressive mechanisms in the tumor niche. In nearly all studies to date, T cells bearing αβ receptors have been used to generate CAR T cells. In this review, we highlight biological characteristics of γδ T cells that are distinct from those of αβ T cells, including homing to epithelial and mucosal tissues and unique functions such as direct antigen recognition, lack of alloreactivity, and ability to present antigens. We offer our perspective that these features make γδ T cells promising for use in cellular therapy against several types of solid tumors, including melanoma and gastrointestinal cancers. Engineered γδ T cells should be considered as a new platform for adoptive T cell cancer therapy for mucosal tumors. PMID:27392648

  4. Development of a glucose oxidase-based biocatalyst adopting both physical entrapment and crosslinking, and its use in biofuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Yongjin; Ahn, Yeonjoo; Christwardana, Marcelinus; Kim, Hansung; Kwon, Yongchai

    2016-04-01

    New enzymatic catalysts prepared using physical entrapment and chemical bonding were used as anodic catalysts to enhance the performance of enzymatic biofuel cells (EBCs). For estimating the physical entrapment effect, the best glucose oxidase (GOx) concentration immobilized on polyethyleneimine (PEI) and carbon nanotube (CNT) (GOx/PEI/CNT) was determined, while for inspecting the chemical bonding effect, terephthalaldehyde (TPA) and glutaraldehyde (GA) crosslinkers were employed. According to the enzyme activity and XPS measurements, when the GOx concentration is 4 mg mL-1, they are most effectively immobilized (via the physical entrapment effect) and TPA-crosslinked GOx/PEI/CNT(TPA/[GOx/PEI/CNT]) forms π conjugated bonds via chemical bonding, inducing the promotion of electron transfer by delocalization of electrons. Due to the optimized GOx concentration and π conjugated bonds, TPA/[GOx/PEI/CNT], including 4 mg mL-1 GOx displays a high electron transfer rate, followed by excellent catalytic activity and EBC performance.New enzymatic catalysts prepared using physical entrapment and chemical bonding were used as anodic catalysts to enhance the performance of enzymatic biofuel cells (EBCs). For estimating the physical entrapment effect, the best glucose oxidase (GOx) concentration immobilized on polyethyleneimine (PEI) and carbon nanotube (CNT) (GOx/PEI/CNT) was determined, while for inspecting the chemical bonding effect, terephthalaldehyde (TPA) and glutaraldehyde (GA) crosslinkers were employed. According to the enzyme activity and XPS measurements, when the GOx concentration is 4 mg mL-1, they are most effectively immobilized (via the physical entrapment effect) and TPA-crosslinked GOx/PEI/CNT(TPA/[GOx/PEI/CNT]) forms π conjugated bonds via chemical bonding, inducing the promotion of electron transfer by delocalization of electrons. Due to the optimized GOx concentration and π conjugated bonds, TPA/[GOx/PEI/CNT], including 4 mg mL-1 GOx displays a high

  5. Multiplexed transposon-mediated stable gene transfer in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Kahlig, Kristopher M.; Saridey, Sai K.; Kaja, Aparna; Daniels, Melissa A.; George, Alfred L.; Wilson, Matthew H.

    2010-01-01

    Generation of cultured human cells stably expressing one or more recombinant gene sequences is a widely used approach in biomedical research, biotechnology, and drug development. Conventional methods are not efficient and have severe limitations especially when engineering cells to coexpress multiple transgenes or multiprotein complexes. In this report, we harnessed the highly efficient, nonviral, and plasmid-based piggyBac transposon system to enable concurrent genomic integration of multiple independent transposons harboring distinct protein-coding DNA sequences. Flow cytometry of cell clones derived from a single multiplexed transfection demonstrated approximately 60% (three transposons) or approximately 30% (four transposons) stable coexpression of all delivered transgenes with selection for a single marker transposon. We validated multiplexed piggyBac transposon delivery by coexpressing large transgenes encoding a multisubunit neuronal voltage-gated sodium channel (SCN1A) containing a pore-forming subunit and two accessory subunits while using two additional genes for selection. Previously unobtainable robust sodium current was demonstrated through 38 passages, suitable for use on an automated high-throughput electrophysiology platform. Cotransfection of three large (up to 10.8 kb) piggyBac transposons generated a heterozygous SCN1A stable cell line expressing two separate alleles of the pore-forming subunit and two accessory subunits (total of four sodium channel subunits) with robust functional expression. We conclude that the piggyBac transposon system can be used to perform multiplexed stable gene transfer in cultured human cells, and this technology may be valuable for applications requiring concurrent expression of multiprotein complexes. PMID:20080581

  6. Regulatory T cell transfer ameliorates lymphedema and promotes lymphatic vessel function

    PubMed Central

    Gousopoulos, Epameinondas; Proulx, Steven T.; Bachmann, Samia B.; Scholl, Jeannette; Dionyssiou, Dimitris; Demiri, Efterpi; Halin, Cornelia; Dieterich, Lothar C.

    2016-01-01

    Secondary lymphedema is a common postcancer treatment complication, but the underlying pathological processes are poorly understood and no curative treatment exists. To investigate lymphedema pathomechanisms, a top-down approach was applied, using genomic data and validating the role of a single target. RNA sequencing of lymphedematous mouse skin indicated upregulation of many T cell–related networks, and indeed depletion of CD4+ cells attenuated lymphedema. The significant upregulation of Foxp3, a transcription factor specifically expressed by regulatory T cells (Tregs), along with other Treg-related genes, implied a potential role of Tregs in lymphedema. Indeed, increased infiltration of Tregs was identified in mouse lymphedematous skin and in human lymphedema specimens. To investigate the role of Tregs during disease progression, loss-of-function and gain-of-function studies were performed. Depletion of Tregs in transgenic mice with Tregs expressing the primate diphtheria toxin receptor and green fluorescent protein (Foxp3-DTR-GFP) mice led to exacerbated edema, concomitant with increased infiltration of immune cells and a mixed TH1/TH2 cytokine profile. Conversely, expansion of Tregs using IL-2/anti–IL-2 mAb complexes significantly reduced lymphedema development. Therapeutic application of adoptively transferred Tregs upon lymphedema establishment reversed all of the major hallmarks of lymphedema, including edema, inflammation, and fibrosis, and also promoted lymphatic drainage function. Collectively, our results reveal that Treg application constitutes a potential new curative treatment modality for lymphedema. PMID:27734032

  7. Direct Gene Transfer into Human Cultured Cells Facilitated by Laser Micropuncture of the Cell Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Wen; Wilkinson, Joyce; Stanbridge, Eric J.; Berns, Michael W.

    1987-06-01

    The selective alteration of the cellular genome by laser microbeam irradiation has been extensively applied in cell biology. We report here the use of the third harmonic (355 nm) of an yttrium-aluminum garnet laser to facilitate the direct transfer of the neo gene into cultured human HT1080-6TG cells. The resultant transformants were selected in medium containing an aminoglycoside antibiotic, G418. Integration of the neo gene into individual human chromosomes and expression of the gene were demonstrated by Southern blot analyses, microcell-mediated chromosome transfer, and chromosome analyses. The stability of the integrated neo gene in the transformants was shown by a comparative growth assay in selective and nonselective media. Transformation and incorporation of the neo gene into the host genome occurred at a frequency of 8 × 10-4-3 × 10-3. This method appears to be 100-fold more efficient than the standard calcium phosphate-mediated method of DNA transfer.

  8. Direct gene transfer into human cultured cells facilitated by laser micropuncture of the cell membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, W.; Wilkinson, J.; Stanbridge, E.J.; Berns, M.W.

    1987-06-01

    The selective alteration of the cellular genome by laser microbeam irradiation has been extensively applied in cell biology. We report here the use of the third harmonic (355 nm) of an yttrium-aluminum garnet laser to facilitate the direct transfer of the neo gene into cultured human HT1080-6TG cells. The resultant transformants were selected in media containing an aminoglycoside antibiotic, G418. Integration of the neo gene into individual chromosomes and expression of the gene were demonstrated by Southern blot analyses, microcell-mediated chromosome transfer, and chromosome analyses. The stability of the integrated neo gene in the transformants was shown by a comparative growth assay in selective and nonselective media. Transformation and incorporation of the neo gene into the host genome occurred at a frequency of 8x10-4-3x10-3. This method appears to be 100-fold more efficient than the standard calcium phosphate-mediated method of DNA transfer.

  9. Heat-transfer-method-based cell culture quality assay through cell detection by surface imprinted polymers.

    PubMed

    Eersels, Kasper; van Grinsven, Bart; Khorshid, Mehran; Somers, Veerle; Püttmann, Christiane; Stein, Christoph; Barth, Stefan; Diliën, Hanne; Bos, Gerard M J; Germeraad, Wilfred T V; Cleij, Thomas J; Thoelen, Ronald; De Ceuninck, Ward; Wagner, Patrick

    2015-02-17

    Previous work has indicated that surface imprinted polymers (SIPs) allow for highly specific cell detection through macromolecular cell imprints. The combination of SIPs with a heat-transfer-based read-out technique has led to the development of a selective, label-free, low-cost, and user-friendly cell detection assay. In this study, the breast cancer cell line ZR-75-1 is used to assess the potential of the platform for monitoring the quality of a cell culture in time. For this purpose, we show that the proposed methodology is able to discriminate between the original cell line (adherent growth, ZR-75-1a) and a descendant cell line (suspension growth, ZR-75-1s). Moreover, ZR-75-1a cells were cultured for a prolonged period of time and analyzed using the heat-transfer method (HTM) at regular time intervals. The results of these experiments demonstrate that the thermal resistance (Rth) signal decays after a certain number of cell culture passages. This can likely be attributed to a compromised quality of the cell culture due to cross-contamination with the ZR-75-1s cell line, a finding that was confirmed by classical STR DNA profiling. The cells do not express the same functional groups on their membrane, resulting in a weaker bond between cell and imprint, enabling cell removal by mechanical friction, provided by flushing the measuring chamber with buffer solution. These findings were further confirmed by HTM and illustrate that the biomimetic sensor platform can be used as an assay for monitoring the quality of cell cultures in time.

  10. Development of buffalo (Bubalus bubalis) embryonic stem cell lines from somatic cell nuclear transferred blastocysts.

    PubMed

    Shah, Syed Mohmad; Saini, Neha; Ashraf, Syma; Singh, Manoj K; Manik, Radheysham; Singla, Suresh K; Palta, Prabhat; Chauhan, Manmohan Singh

    2015-11-01

    We developed buffalo embryonic stem cell lines from somatic cell nuclear transfer derived blastocysts, produced by hand-guided cloning technique. The inner cell mass of the blastocyst was cut mechanically using a Microblade and cultured onto feeder cells in buffalo embryonic stem (ES) cell culture medium at 38 °C in a 5% CO2 incubator. The stem cell colonies were characterized for alkaline phosphatase activity, karyotype, pluripotency and self-renewal markers like OCT4, NANOG, SOX2, c-Myc, FOXD3, SSEA-1, SSEA-4, TRA-1-60, TRA-1-81 and CD90. The cell lines also possessed the capability to differentiate across all the three germ layers under spontaneous differentiation conditions. PMID:26987926

  11. Modulation of Cell Sialoglycophenotype: A Stylish Mechanism Adopted by Trypanosoma cruzi to Ensure Its Persistence in the Infected Host

    PubMed Central

    Freire-de-Lima, Leonardo; da Fonseca, Leonardo M.; da Silva, Vanessa A.; da Costa, Kelli M.; Morrot, Alexandre; Freire-de-Lima, Célio G.; Previato, Jose O.; Mendonça-Previato, Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease exhibits multiple mechanisms to guarantee its establishment and persistence in the infected host. It has been well demonstrated that T. cruzi is not able to synthesize sialic acids (Sia). To acquire the monosaccharide, the parasite makes use of a multifunctional enzyme called trans-sialidase (Tc-TS). Since this enzyme has no analogous in the vertebrate host, it has been used as a target in drug therapy development. Tc-TS preferentially catalyzes the transfer of Sia from the host glycoconjugates to the terminal β-galactopyranosyl residues of mucin-like molecules present on the parasite’s cell surface. Alternatively, the enzyme can sialylate/re-sialylate glycoconjugates expressed on the surface of host cells. Since its discovery, several studies have shown that T. cruzi employs the Tc-TS activity to modulate the host cell sialoglycophenotype, thus favoring its perpetuation in the infected vertebrate. In this review, we summarize the dynamic of host/parasite sialoglycophenotype modulation, highlighting its role in the subversion of host immune response in order to promote the establishment of persistent chronic infection. PMID:27242722

  12. Durable Complete Response from Metastatic Melanoma after Transfer of Autologous T Cells Recognizing 10 Mutated Tumor Antigens.

    PubMed

    Prickett, Todd D; Crystal, Jessica S; Cohen, Cyrille J; Pasetto, Anna; Parkhurst, Maria R; Gartner, Jared J; Yao, Xin; Wang, Rong; Gros, Alena; Li, Yong F; El-Gamil, Mona; Trebska-McGowan, Kasia; Rosenberg, Steven A; Robbins, Paul F

    2016-08-01

    Immunotherapy treatment of patients with metastatic cancer has assumed a prominent role in the clinic. Durable complete response rates of 20% to 25% are achieved in patients with metastatic melanoma following adoptive cell transfer of T cells derived from metastatic lesions, responses that appear in some patients to be mediated by T cells that predominantly recognize mutated antigens. Here, we provide a detailed analysis of the reactivity of T cells administered to a patient with metastatic melanoma who exhibited a complete response for over 3 years after treatment. Over 4,000 nonsynonymous somatic mutations were identified by whole-exome sequence analysis of the patient's autologous normal and tumor cell DNA. Autologous B cells transfected with 720 mutated minigenes corresponding to the most highly expressed tumor cell transcripts were then analyzed for their ability to stimulate the administered T cells. Autologous tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes recognized 10 distinct mutated gene products, but not the corresponding wild-type products, each of which was recognized in the context of one of three different MHC class I restriction elements expressed by the patient. Detailed clonal analysis revealed that 9 of the top 20 most prevalent clones present in the infused T cells, comprising approximately 24% of the total cells, recognized mutated antigens. Thus, we have identified and enriched mutation-reactive T cells and suggest that such analyses may lead to the development of more effective therapies for the treatment of patients with metastatic cancer. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(8); 669-78. ©2016 AACR.

  13. Mitochondria in mesenchymal stem cell biology and cell therapy: From cellular differentiation to mitochondrial transfer.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yi-Chao; Wu, Yu-Ting; Yu, Ting-Hsien; Wei, Yau-Huei

    2016-04-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are characterized to have the capacity of self-renewal and the potential to differentiate into mesoderm, ectoderm-like and endoderm-like cells. MSCs hold great promise for cell therapies due to their multipotency in vitro and therapeutic advantage of hypo-immunogenicity and lower tumorigenicity. Moreover, it has been shown that MSCs can serve as a vehicle to transfer mitochondria into cells after cell transplantation. Mitochondria produce most of the energy through oxidative phosphorylation in differentiated cells. It has been increasingly clear that the switch of energy supply from glycolysis to aerobic metabolism is essential for successful differentiation of MSCs. Post-translational modifications of proteins have been established to regulate mitochondrial function and metabolic shift during MSCs differentiation. In this article, we review and provide an integrated view on the roles of different protein kinases and sirtuins in the maintenance and differentiation of MSCs. Importantly, we provide evidence to suggest that alteration in the expression of Sirt3 and Sirt5 and relative changes in the acylation levels of mitochondrial proteins might be involved in the activation of mitochondrial function and adipogenic differentiation of adipose-derived MSCs. We summarize their roles in the regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis and metabolism, oxidative responses and differentiation of MSCs. On the other hand, we discuss recent advances in the study of mitochondrial dynamics and mitochondrial transfer as well as their roles in the differentiation and therapeutic application of MSCs to improve cell function in vitro and in animal models. Accumulating evidence has substantiated that the therapeutic potential of MSCs is conferred not only by cell replacement and paracrine effects but also by transferring mitochondria into injured tissues or cells to modulate the cellular metabolism in situ. Therefore, elucidation of the underlying mechanisms

  14. Adoptive immunotherapy with MUC1-mRNA transfected dendritic cells and cytotoxic lymphocytes plus gemcitabine for unresectable pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background We previously reported the clinical efficacy of adoptive immunotherapy (AIT) with dendritic cells (DCs) pulsed with mucin 1 (MUC1) peptide and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). We also reported that gemcitabine (GEM) enhances anti-tumor immunity by suppressing regulatory T cells. Therefore, in the present study, we performed combination therapy with AIT and GEM for patients with unresectable or recurrent pancreatic cancer. Patients and methods Forty-two patients with unresectable or recurrent pancreatic cancer were treated. DCs were generated by culture with granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor and interleukin-4 and then exposed to tumor necrosis factor-α. Mature DCs were transfected with MUC1-mRNA by electroporation (MUC1-DCs). MUC1-CTLs were induced by co-culture with YPK-1, a human pancreatic cancer cell line, and then with interleukin-2. Patients were treated with GEM, while MUC1-DCs were intradermally injected, and MUC1-CTLs were intravenously administered. Results Median survival time (MST) was 13.9 months, and the 1-year survival rate was 51.1%. Of 42 patients, one patient had complete response (2.4%), three patients had partial response (7.1%) and 22 patients had stable disease (52.4%). The disease control ratio was 61.9%. The MST and 1-year survival rate of 35 patients who received more than 1 × 107 MUC1-DCs per injection was 16.1 months and 60.3%, respectively. Liver metastasis occurred in only 5 patients among 35 patients without liver metastasis before treatment. There were no severe toxicities associated with AIT. Conclusion AIT with MUC1-DCs and MUC1-CTLs plus GEM may be a feasible and effective treatment for pancreatic cancer. PMID:24947606

  15. Antiretroviral Agents Effectively Block HIV Replication after Cell-to-Cell Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Permanyer, Marc; Ballana, Ester; Ruiz, Alba; Badia, Roger; Riveira-Munoz, Eva; Gonzalo, Encarna; Clotet, Bonaventura

    2012-01-01

    Cell-to-cell transmission of HIV has been proposed as a mechanism contributing to virus escape to the action of antiretrovirals and a mode of HIV persistence during antiretroviral therapy. Here, cocultures of infected HIV-1 cells with primary CD4+ T cells or lymphoid cells were used to evaluate virus transmission and the effect of known antiretrovirals. Transfer of HIV antigen from infected to uninfected cells was resistant to the reverse transcriptase inhibitors (RTIs) zidovudine (AZT) and tenofovir, but was blocked by the attachment inhibitor IgGb12. However, quantitative measurement of viral DNA production demonstrated that all anti-HIV agents blocked virus replication with similar potency to cell-free virus infections. Cell-free and cell-associated infections were equally sensitive to inhibition of viral replication when HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR)-driven green fluorescent protein (GFP) expression in target cells was measured. However, detection of GFP by flow cytometry may incorrectly estimate the efficacy of antiretrovirals in cell-associated virus transmission, due to replication-independent Tat-mediated LTR transactivation as a consequence of cell-to-cell events that did not occur in short-term (48-h) cell-free virus infections. In conclusion, common markers of virus replication may not accurately correlate and measure infectivity or drug efficacy in cell-to-cell virus transmission. When accurately quantified, active drugs blocked proviral DNA and virus replication in cell-to-cell transmission, recapitulating the efficacy of antiretrovirals in cell-free virus infections and in vivo. PMID:22696642

  16. Bio-batteries and bio-fuel cells: leveraging on electronic charge transfer proteins.

    PubMed

    Kannan, A M; Renugopalakrishnan, V; Filipek, S; Li, P; Audette, G F; Munukutla, L

    2009-03-01

    Bio-fuel cells are alternative energy devises based on bio-electrocatalysis of natural substrates by enzymes or microorganisms. Here we review bio-fuel cells and bio-batteries based on the recent literature. In general, the bio-fuel cells are classified based on the type of electron transfer; mediated electron transfer and direct electron transfer or electronic charge transfer (ECT). The ECT of the bio-fuel cells is critically reviewed and a variety of possible applications are considered. The technical challenges of the bio-fuel cells, like bioelectrocatalysis, immobilization of bioelectrocatalysts, protein denaturation etc. are highlighted and future research directions are discussed leveraging on the use of electron charge transfer proteins. In addition, the packaging aspects of the bio-fuel cells are also analyzed and the found that relatively little work has been done in the engineering development of bio-fuel cells.

  17. Somatic cell nuclear transfer cloning: practical applications and current legislation.

    PubMed

    Niemann, H; Lucas-Hahn, A

    2012-08-01

    Somatic cloning is emerging as a new biotechnology by which the opportunities arising from the advances in molecular genetics and genome analysis can be implemented in animal breeding. Significant improvements have been made in SCNT protocols in the past years which now allow to embarking on practical applications. The main areas of application of SCNT are: Reproductive cloning, therapeutic cloning and basic research. A great application potential of SCNT based cloning is the production of genetically modified (transgenic) animals. Somatic cell nuclear transfer based transgenic animal production has significant advances over the previously employed microinjection of foreign DNA into pronuclei of zygotes. This cell based transgenesis is compatible with gene targeting and allows both, the addition of a specific gene and the deletion of an endogenous gene. Efficient transgenic animal production provides numerous opportunities for agriculture and biomedicine. Regulatory agencies around the world have agreed that food derived from cloned animals and their offspring is safe and there is no scientific basis for questioning this. Commercial application of somatic cloning within the EU is via the Novel Food regulation EC No. 258/97. Somatic cloning raises novel questions regarding the ethical and moral status of animals and their welfare which has prompted a controversial discussion in Europe which has not yet been resolved.

  18. Single cell activity reveals direct electron transfer in methanotrophic consortia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGlynn, Shawn E.; Chadwick, Grayson L.; Kempes, Christopher P.; Orphan, Victoria J.

    2015-10-01

    Multicellular assemblages of microorganisms are ubiquitous in nature, and the proximity afforded by aggregation is thought to permit intercellular metabolic coupling that can accommodate otherwise unfavourable reactions. Consortia of methane-oxidizing archaea and sulphate-reducing bacteria are a well-known environmental example of microbial co-aggregation; however, the coupling mechanisms between these paired organisms is not well understood, despite the attention given them because of the global significance of anaerobic methane oxidation. Here we examined the influence of interspecies spatial positioning as it relates to biosynthetic activity within structurally diverse uncultured methane-oxidizing consortia by measuring stable isotope incorporation for individual archaeal and bacterial cells to constrain their potential metabolic interactions. In contrast to conventional models of syntrophy based on the passage of molecular intermediates, cellular activities were found to be independent of both species intermixing and distance between syntrophic partners within consortia. A generalized model of electric conductivity between co-associated archaea and bacteria best fit the empirical data. Combined with the detection of large multi-haem cytochromes in the genomes of methanotrophic archaea and the demonstration of redox-dependent staining of the matrix between cells in consortia, these results provide evidence for syntrophic coupling through direct electron transfer.

  19. Single cell activity reveals direct electron transfer in methanotrophic consortia.

    PubMed

    McGlynn, Shawn E; Chadwick, Grayson L; Kempes, Christopher P; Orphan, Victoria J

    2015-10-22

    Multicellular assemblages of microorganisms are ubiquitous in nature, and the proximity afforded by aggregation is thought to permit intercellular metabolic coupling that can accommodate otherwise unfavourable reactions. Consortia of methane-oxidizing archaea and sulphate-reducing bacteria are a well-known environmental example of microbial co-aggregation; however, the coupling mechanisms between these paired organisms is not well understood, despite the attention given them because of the global significance of anaerobic methane oxidation. Here we examined the influence of interspecies spatial positioning as it relates to biosynthetic activity within structurally diverse uncultured methane-oxidizing consortia by measuring stable isotope incorporation for individual archaeal and bacterial cells to constrain their potential metabolic interactions. In contrast to conventional models of syntrophy based on the passage of molecular intermediates, cellular activities were found to be independent of both species intermixing and distance between syntrophic partners within consortia. A generalized model of electric conductivity between co-associated archaea and bacteria best fit the empirical data. Combined with the detection of large multi-haem cytochromes in the genomes of methanotrophic archaea and the demonstration of redox-dependent staining of the matrix between cells in consortia, these results provide evidence for syntrophic coupling through direct electron transfer. PMID:26375009

  20. Efficient retrovirus-mediated transfer of cell-cycle control genes to transformed cells.

    PubMed

    Strauss, B E; Costanzi-Strauss, E

    1999-07-01

    The use of gene therapy continues to be a promising, yet elusive, alternative for the treatment of cancer. The origins of cancer must be well understood so that the therapeutic gene can be chosen with the highest chance of successful tumor regression. The gene delivery system must be tailored for optimum transfer of the therapeutic gene to the target tissue. In order to accomplish this, we study models of G1 cell-cycle control in both normal and transformed cells in order to understand the reasons for uncontrolled cellular proliferation. We then use this information to choose the gene to be delivered to the cells. We have chosen to study p16, p21, p53 and pRb gene transfer using the pCL-retrovirus. Described here are some general concepts and specific results of our work that indicate continued hope for the development of genetically based cancer treatments.

  1. Programmed Death-Ligand 1 on Antigen-presenting Cells Facilitates the Induction of Antigen-specific Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes: Application to Adoptive T-Cell Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Goto, Tatsunori; Nishida, Tetsuya; Takagi, Erina; Miyao, Kotaro; Koyama, Daisuke; Sakemura, Reona; Hanajiri, Ryo; Watanabe, Keisuke; Imahashi, Nobuhiko; Terakura, Seitaro; Murata, Makoto; Kiyoi, Hitoshi

    2016-10-01

    Programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) binds to programmed death-1 (PD-1) on activated T cells and contributes to T-cell exhaustion. PD-L1 expressed on antigen-presenting cells (APCs) could be thought to inhibit the induction of Ag-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) by transducing negative signal into T cells; however, the roles of PD-L1 on APCs have not yet been well examined. Therefore, we evaluated the roles of PD-L1 on APCs in the induction of Ag-specific CTLs. CD3 T cells isolated from cytomegalovirus (CMV)-seropositive healthy donors were stimulated with mature dendritic cells pulsed with CMV pp65-derived HLA-restricted peptides in the presence of anti-PD-L1 blocking antibody. Unexpectedly, PD-L1 blockade resulted in a less efficient induction of CMV-specific CTLs, suggesting that PD-L1 play a positive role in the induction of Ag-specific CTLs. For further evaluations and application to adoptive immunotherapy, we generated K562-based artificial APCs, which were retrovirally transduced with HLA class I molecules and various combinations of CD80/86 and PD-L1. K562/HLA+CD80/86+PD-L1 cells produced significantly higher induction of CMV-specific CTLs than K562/HLA or K562/HLA+CD80/86 cells without causing excessive differentiation or functional exhaustion of the induced CTLs, whereas PD-L1 itself did not have a stimulatory effect. Furthermore, only K562/HLA+CD80/86+PD-L1 cells pulsed with HLA-A*24:02-restricted Wilms tumor 1 (WT1) peptide clearly expanded WT1-specific CTLs from healthy donors. Our findings presumed that PD-L1 expressed on APCs along with CD80/86 enhanced the induction of Ag-specific CTLs probably depending on fine-tuning excessive stimulation of CD80/86, and that K562/HLA+CD80/86+PD-L1 cells has therapeutic potential as a novel type of artificial APCs for adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:27548033

  2. Direct electron transfer with yeast cells and construction of a mediatorless microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Prasad, D; Arun, S; Murugesan, M; Padmanaban, S; Satyanarayanan, R S; Berchmans, Sheela; Yegnaraman, V

    2007-05-15

    The direct electron transfer exhibited by the yeast cells, Hansenula anomala has been demonstrated using the electrochemical technique cyclic voltammetry by immobilizing the microorganisms by two different methods viz., physical adsorption and covalent linkage. The analysis of redox enzymes present in the outer membrane of the microorganisms has been carried out in this work. This paper demonstrates that yeast cells with redox enzymes present in their outer membrane are capable of communicating directly with the electrode surface and contribute to current generation in a mediatorless biofuel cells. The efficiency of current generation has been evaluated using three anode materials.

  3. Gnotobiotic Miniature Pig Interbreed Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer for Xenotransplantation.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jeong Ho; Kim, Sang Eun; Gupta, Mukesh Kumar; Lee, HoonTaek

    2016-08-01

    Transgenic animal producing technology has improved consistently over the last couple of decades. Among the available methods, somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technology was officially the most popular. However, SCNT has low efficiency and requires a highly skilled individual. Additionally, the allo-SCNT nuclear reprogramming mechanism is poorly understood in the gnotobiotic miniature pig, which is a candidate for xenotransplantation, making sampling in oocytes very difficult compared to commercial hybrid pigs. Therefore, interbreed SCNT (ibSCNT), which is a combination of miniature pig and commercial pig (Landrace based), was analyzed and was found to be similar to SCNT in terms of the rate of blastocyst formation (12.6% ± 2.9% vs. 15.5% ± 2.2%; p > 0.05). However, a significantly lower fusion rate was observed in the ibSCNT compared to normal SCNT with Landrace pig somatic cells (29.6% ± 0.8% vs. 65.0% ± 4.9%). Thus, the optimization of fusion parameters was necessary for efficient SCNT. Our results further revealed that ibSCNT by the whole-cell intracytoplasmic injection (WCICI) method had a significantly higher blastocyst forming efficiency than the electrofusion method (31.1 ± 8.5 vs. 15.5% ± 2.2%). The nuclear remodeling and the pattern of changes in acetylation at H3K9 residue were similar in both SCNT and ibSCNT embryos. PMID:27459580

  4. Adoptive immunotherapy of human pancreatic cancer with lymphokine-activated killer cells and interleukin-2 in a nude mouse model

    SciTech Connect

    Marincola, F.M.; Da Pozzo, L.F.; Drucker, B.J.; Holder, W.D. Jr. )

    1990-11-01

    A pancreatic cancer cell line was grown in orthotopic and heterotopic positions in young Swiss/NIH nude mice, which were tested with adoptive immunotherapy. Mice were injected with 1 x 10(7) human cancer cells in the subcutaneous tissue and duodenal lobe of the pancreas. The mice were randomly divided into four groups: group IA (LAK + IL-2) (N = 25) received 2 X 10(7) human lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells from normal donors by tail vein injection followed by 10,000 units of human recombinant interleukin-2 (IL-2) given intraperitoneally every 12 hours for 28 days; group IB (IL-2) (N = 27) was given the same dose of IL-2 alone; group IC (RPMI-1640) (N = 18) received a placebo consisting of 1 ml of RPMI-1640 intraperitoneally every 12 hours; and group ID (LAK) (N = 14) received 2 X 10(7) LAK cells but no IL-2. Toxicity was significantly higher in group IB, with a mortality rate of 45.5% (10/22 animals) versus a 0% mortality (0/25) in group IA. None of the group IA or IB animals died of pancreatic cancer during the experiment. The animals that did not receive IL-2 died before 28 days in 14.2% of group IC and in 16.7% of group ID. The area under the growth curve of subcutaneous tumors during the course of treatment and the pancreatic tumor weight at the end of treatment were compared in each group. Subcutaneous tumors had a reduced rate of growth in group IA animals compared to all the other treatments. Pancreatic tumor growth was slowed in group IA. The animals treated with IL-2 alone (group IB) showed some slowing of tumor growth that was intermediate between group IA, group IC, and group ID. A similar experiment was done with irradiated (375 rad) mice. Nine nude mice with tumors were treated with LAK + IL-2 (group IIA), eight received IL-2 alone (group IIB), and seven received placebo (group IIC).

  5. CD4⁺ T cells from IPEX patients convert into functional and stable regulatory T cells by FOXP3 gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Passerini, Laura; Rossi Mel, Eva; Sartirana, Claudia; Fousteri, Georgia; Bondanza, Attilio; Naldini, Luigi; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia; Bacchetta, Rosa

    2013-12-11

    In humans, mutations in the gene encoding for forkhead box P3 (FOXP3), a critically important transcription factor for CD4⁺CD25⁺ regulatory T (T(reg)) cell function, lead to a life-threatening systemic poly-autoimmune disease, known as immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX) syndrome. Severe autoimmunity results from the inborn dysfunction and instability of FOXP3-mutated T(reg) cells. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the only current curative option for affected patients. We show here that when CD4⁺ T cells are converted into T(reg) cells after lentivirus-mediated FOXP3 gene transfer, the resulting CD4(FOXP3) T cell population displays stable phenotype and suppressive function, especially when naïve T cells are converted. We further demonstrate that CD4(FOXP3) T cells are stable in inflammatory conditions not only in vitro but also in vivo in a model of xenogeneic graft-versus-host disease. We therefore applied this FOXP3 gene transfer strategy for the development of a T(reg) cell-based therapeutic approach to restore tolerance in IPEX syndrome. IPEX-derived CD4(FOXP3) T cells mirrored T(reg) cells from healthy donors in terms of cellular markers, anergic phenotype, cytokine production, and suppressive function. These findings pave the way for the treatment of IPEX patients by adoptive cell therapy with genetically engineered T(reg) cells and are seminal for future potential application in patients with autoimmune disorders of different origin. PMID:24337481

  6. Protein apparatus for horizontal transfer of agrobacterial T-DNA to eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Chumakov, M I

    2013-12-01

    This review analyzes agrobacterial virulence proteins and recipient cell proteins involved in horizontal transfer of a T-DNA-protein complex. Specifically, it considers the early stages of the interactions of partners (signal exchange, attachment, close contact); T-DNA release from bacterial cells; channel formation for the transfer of ssDNA between the partners; transfer of agrobacterial T-DNA through the membrane, cytoplasm, and nuclear membrane of the recipient cell and its incorporation into the recipient cell genome. It further discusses possible pathways of agrobacterial ssDNA transfer to the recipient cells. In particular, the possible role of T-pili and VirE2 protein during conjugative transfer of agrobacterial ssDNA between donor and recipient cells is discussed. PMID:24460966

  7. Protein apparatus for horizontal transfer of agrobacterial T-DNA to eukaryotic cells.

    PubMed

    Chumakov, M I

    2013-12-01

    This review analyzes agrobacterial virulence proteins and recipient cell proteins involved in horizontal transfer of a T-DNA-protein complex. Specifically, it considers the early stages of the interactions of partners (signal exchange, attachment, close contact); T-DNA release from bacterial cells; channel formation for the transfer of ssDNA between the partners; transfer of agrobacterial T-DNA through the membrane, cytoplasm, and nuclear membrane of the recipient cell and its incorporation into the recipient cell genome. It further discusses possible pathways of agrobacterial ssDNA transfer to the recipient cells. In particular, the possible role of T-pili and VirE2 protein during conjugative transfer of agrobacterial ssDNA between donor and recipient cells is discussed.

  8. Role of regulatory T cells in transferable immunological tolerance to bone marrow donor in murine mixed chimerism model.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Il-Hee; Kim, Yong-Hee; Kim, You-sun; Shin, Jun-Seop; Park, Chung-Gyu

    2013-12-01

    Constructing a bone marrow chimera prior to graft transplantation can induce donor-specific immune tolerance. Mixed chimerism containing hematopoietic cells of both recipient- and donor-origin has advantages attributed from low dose of total body irradiation. In this study, we explored the mechanism of mixed chimerism supplemented with depletion of Natural Killer cells. Mixed chimerism with C57BL/6 bone marrow cells was induced in recipient BALB/c mice which were given 450 cGy of γ-ray irradiation (n = 16). As revealed by reduced proliferation and cytokine production in mixed leukocyte reaction and ELISpot assay (24.6 vs 265.5), the allo-immune response to bone marrow donor was reduced. Furthermore, the induction of transferable immunological tolerance was confirmed by adoptive transfer and subsequent acceptance of C57BL/6 skin graft (n = 4). CD4(+)FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells were increased in the recipient compartment of the mixed chimera (19.2% → 33.8%). This suggests that regulatory T cells may be therapeutically used for the induction of graft-specific tolerance by mixed chimerism.

  9. Systematic Transfer of Prokaryotic Sensors and Circuits to Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Prokaryotic regulatory proteins respond to diverse signals and represent a rich resource for building synthetic sensors and circuits. The TetR family contains >105 members that use a simple mechanism to respond to stimuli and bind distinct DNA operators. We present a platform that enables the transfer of these regulators to mammalian cells, which is demonstrated using human embryonic kidney (HEK293) and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The repressors are modified to include nuclear localization signals (NLS) and responsive promoters are built by incorporating multiple operators. Activators are also constructed by modifying the protein to include a VP16 domain. Together, this approach yields 15 new regulators that demonstrate 19- to 551-fold induction and retain both the low levels of crosstalk in DNA binding specificity observed between the parent regulators in Escherichia coli, as well as their dynamic range of activity. By taking advantage of the DAPG small molecule sensing mediated by the PhlF repressor, we introduce a new inducible system with 50-fold induction and a threshold of 0.9 μM DAPG, which is comparable to the classic Dox-induced TetR system. A set of NOT gates is constructed from the new repressors and their response function quantified. Finally, the Dox- and DAPG- inducible systems and two new activators are used to build a synthetic enhancer (fuzzy AND gate), requiring the coordination of 5 transcription factors organized into two layers. This work introduces a generic approach for the development of mammalian genetic sensors and circuits to populate a toolbox that can be applied to diverse applications from biomanufacturing to living therapeutics. PMID:25360681

  10. Systematic transfer of prokaryotic sensors and circuits to mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Stanton, Brynne C; Siciliano, Velia; Ghodasara, Amar; Wroblewska, Liliana; Clancy, Kevin; Trefzer, Axel C; Chesnut, Jonathan D; Weiss, Ron; Voigt, Christopher A

    2014-12-19

    Prokaryotic regulatory proteins respond to diverse signals and represent a rich resource for building synthetic sensors and circuits. The TetR family contains >10(5) members that use a simple mechanism to respond to stimuli and bind distinct DNA operators. We present a platform that enables the transfer of these regulators to mammalian cells, which is demonstrated using human embryonic kidney (HEK293) and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. The repressors are modified to include nuclear localization signals (NLS) and responsive promoters are built by incorporating multiple operators. Activators are also constructed by modifying the protein to include a VP16 domain. Together, this approach yields 15 new regulators that demonstrate 19- to 551-fold induction and retain both the low levels of crosstalk in DNA binding specificity observed between the parent regulators in Escherichia coli, as well as their dynamic range of activity. By taking advantage of the DAPG small molecule sensing mediated by the PhlF repressor, we introduce a new inducible system with 50-fold induction and a threshold of 0.9 μM DAPG, which is comparable to the classic Dox-induced TetR system. A set of NOT gates is constructed from the new repressors and their response function quantified. Finally, the Dox- and DAPG- inducible systems and two new activators are used to build a synthetic enhancer (fuzzy AND gate), requiring the coordination of 5 transcription factors organized into two layers. This work introduces a generic approach for the development of mammalian genetic sensors and circuits to populate a toolbox that can be applied to diverse applications from biomanufacturing to living therapeutics.

  11. Utilizing cell-matrix interactions to modulate gene transfer to stem cells inside hyaluronic acid hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Gojgini, Shiva; Tokatlian, Talar; Segura, Tatiana

    2011-10-01

    The effective delivery of DNA locally would increase the applicability of gene therapy in tissue regeneration, where diseased tissue is to be repaired in situ. One promising approach is to use hydrogel scaffolds to encapsulate and deliver plasmid DNA in the form of nanoparticles to the diseased tissue, so that cells infiltrating the scaffold are transfected to induce regeneration. This study focuses on the design of a DNA nanoparticle-loaded hydrogel scaffold. In particular, this study focuses on understanding how cell-matrix interactions affect gene transfer to adult stem cells cultured inside matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) degradable hyaluronic acid (HA) hydrogel scaffolds. HA was cross-linked to form a hydrogel material using a MMP degradable peptide and Michael addition chemistry. Gene transfer inside these hydrogel materials was assessed as a function of polyplex nitrogen to phosphate ratio (N/P = 5 to 12), matrix stiffness (100-1700 Pa), RGD (Arg-Gly-Asp) concentration (10-400 μM), and RGD presentation (0.2-4.7 RGDs per HA molecule). All variables were found to affect gene transfer to mouse mensenchymal stem cells culture inside the DNA loaded hydrogels. As expected, higher N/P ratios lead to higher gene transfer efficiency but also higher toxicity; softer hydrogels resulted in higher transgene expression than stiffer hydrogels, and an intermediate RGD concentration and RGD clustering resulted in higher transgene expression. We believe that the knowledge gained through this in vitro model can be utilized to design better scaffold-mediated gene delivery for local gene therapy.

  12. Viral fusion protein transmembrane domain adopts β-strand structure to facilitate membrane topological changes for virus-cell fusion.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hongwei; Lee, Michelle W; Waring, Alan J; Wong, Gerard C L; Hong, Mei

    2015-09-01

    The C-terminal transmembrane domain (TMD) of viral fusion proteins such as HIV gp41 and influenza hemagglutinin (HA) is traditionally viewed as a passive α-helical anchor of the protein to the virus envelope during its merger with the cell membrane. The conformation, dynamics, and lipid interaction of these fusion protein TMDs have so far eluded high-resolution structure characterization because of their highly hydrophobic nature. Using magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR spectroscopy, we show that the TMD of the parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) fusion protein adopts lipid-dependent conformations and interactions with the membrane and water. In phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylglycerol (PG) membranes, the TMD is predominantly α-helical, but in phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) membranes, the TMD changes significantly to the β-strand conformation. Measured order parameters indicate that the strand segments are immobilized and thus oligomerized. (31)P NMR spectra and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) data show that this β-strand-rich conformation converts the PE membrane to a bicontinuous cubic phase, which is rich in negative Gaussian curvature that is characteristic of hemifusion intermediates and fusion pores. (1)H-(31)P 2D correlation spectra and (2)H spectra show that the PE membrane with or without the TMD is much less hydrated than PC and PG membranes, suggesting that the TMD works with the natural dehydration tendency of PE to facilitate membrane merger. These results suggest a new viral-fusion model in which the TMD actively promotes membrane topological changes during fusion using the β-strand as the fusogenic conformation.

  13. Generation of embryonic stem cells from mouse adipose-tissue derived cells via somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yiren; Qin, Jilong; Zhou, Chikai; Li, Jinsong; Gao, Wei-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Somatic cells can be reprogrammed into embryonic stem cells (ESCs) by nuclear transfer (NT-ESCs), or into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) by the "Yamanaka method." However, recent studies have indicated that mouse and human iPSCs are prone to epigenetic and transcriptional aberrations, and that NT-ESCs correspond more closely to ESCs derived from in vitro fertilized embryos than iPSCs. In addition, the procedure of NT-ESCs does not involve gene modification. Demonstration of generation of NT-ESCs using an easily-accessible source of adult cell types would be very important. Adipose tissue is a source of readily accessible donor cells and can be isolated from both males and females at different ages. Here we report that NT-ESCs can be generated from adipose tissue-derived cells (ADCs). At morphological, mRNA and protein levels, these NT-ESCs show classic ESC colonies, exhibit alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity, and display normal diploid karyotypes. Importantly, these cells express pluripotent markers including Oct4, Sox2, Nanog and SSEA-1. Furthermore, they can differentiate in vivo into various types of cells from 3 germinal layers by teratoma formation assays. This study demonstrates for the first time that ESCs can be generated from the adipose tissue by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) and suggests that ADCs can be a new donor-cell type for potential therapeutic cloning.

  14. Generation of embryonic stem cells from mouse adipose-tissue derived cells via somatic cell nuclear transfer

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yiren; Qin, Jilong; Zhou, Chikai; Li, Jinsong; Gao, Wei-Qiang

    2015-01-01

    Somatic cells can be reprogrammed into embryonic stem cells (ESCs) by nuclear transfer (NT-ESCs), or into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) by the “Yamanaka method.” However, recent studies have indicated that mouse and human iPSCs are prone to epigenetic and transcriptional aberrations, and that NT-ESCs correspond more closely to ESCs derived from in vitro fertilized embryos than iPSCs. In addition, the procedure of NT-ESCs does not involve gene modification. Demonstration of generation of NT-ESCs using an easily-accessible source of adult cell types would be very important. Adipose tissue is a source of readily accessible donor cells and can be isolated from both males and females at different ages. Here we report that NT-ESCs can be generated from adipose tissue-derived cells (ADCs). At morphological, mRNA and protein levels, these NT-ESCs show classic ESC colonies, exhibit alkaline phosphatase (AP) activity, and display normal diploid karyotypes. Importantly, these cells express pluripotent markers including Oct4, Sox2, Nanog and SSEA-1. Furthermore, they can differentiate in vivo into various types of cells from 3 germinal layers by teratoma formation assays. This study demonstrates for the first time that ESCs can be generated from the adipose tissue by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) and suggests that ADCs can be a new donor-cell type for potential therapeutic cloning. PMID:25692793

  15. Human plasma phospholipid transfer protein accelerates exchange/transfer of alpha-tocopherol between lipoproteins and cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kostner, G M; Oettl, K; Jauhiainen, M; Ehnholm, C; Esterbauer, H; Dieplinger, H

    1995-01-01

    alpha-Tocopherol (alpha-T), an important anti-oxidant of plasma lipoproteins and cell membranes, is secreted from liver together with very-low-density lipoproteins into the blood stream. Other serum lipoprotein classes gain alpha-T by exchange and transfer processes. We show here that the lipoprotein-free d > 1.22 g/ml fraction of human or pig serum increases the exchange rate of alpha-T by a factor of 2-4 as compared with spontaneous exchange/transfer. The alpha-T exchange/transfer (alpha-TET) activity was purified by multiple-step column chromatography. It gave a single band in PAGE with an apparent molecular mass of 75 kDa, and was found to be identical with the phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP). PLTP catalysed alpha-T exchange between different lipoprotein classes, as well as the transfer of alpha-T from artificial liposomes to high-density lipoproteins. The alpha-TET activity measured with a newly developed assay in ten healthy people was 2.45 +/- 0.88 nmol.ml-1.h-1.alpha-TET activity was negatively correlated with plasma low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (r = -0.75; P < 0.01). It is concluded that human PLTP catalyses exchange/transfer processes of alpha-T between lipid compartments. This factor may be of relevance in atherogenesis and tumour initiation and growth. Images Figure 2 PMID:7832785

  16. Cell-free transfer of sterols by plant fractions

    SciTech Connect

    Morre, D.J.; Wilkinson, F.E.; Morre, D.M. ); Moreau, P. ); Sandelius, A.S. ); Penel, C.; Greppin, H. )

    1990-05-01

    Microsomes from etiolated hypocotyls of soybean or leaves of light-grown spinach radiolabeled in vivo with ({sup 3}H)acetate or in vitro with ({sup 3}H)squalene or ({sup 3}H)cholesterol as donor transferred radioactivity to unlabeled acceptor membranes immobilized on nitrocellulose. Most efficient transfer was with plasma membrane or tonoplast as the acceptor. The latter were highly purified by aqueous two-phase partition (plasma membrane) and preparative free-flow electrophoresis (tonoplast and plasma membrane). Plasma membrane- and tonoplast-free microsomes and purified mitochondria were less efficient acceptors. Sterol transfer was verified by thin-layer chromatography of extracted lipids. Transfer was time- and temperature-dependent, required ATP but was not promoted by cytosol. The nature of the donor (endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus or both) and of the transfer mechanism is under investigation.

  17. Using Magnetic Nanoparticles for Gene Transfer to Neural Stem Cells: Stem Cell Propagation Method Influences Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Pickard, Mark R.; Adams, Christopher F.; Barraud, Perrine; Chari, Divya M.

    2015-01-01

    Genetically engineered neural stem cell (NSC) transplants offer a key strategy to augment neural repair by releasing therapeutic biomolecules into injury sites. Genetic modification of NSCs is heavily reliant on viral vectors but cytotoxic effects have prompted development of non-viral alternatives, such as magnetic nanoparticle (MNPs). NSCs are propagated in laboratories as either 3-D suspension “neurospheres” or 2-D adherent “monolayers”. MNPs deployed with oscillating magnetic fields (“magnetofection technology”) mediate effective gene transfer to neurospheres but the efficacy of this approach for monolayers is unknown. It is important to address this issue as oscillating magnetic fields dramatically enhance MNP-based transfection in transplant cells (e.g., astrocytes and oligodendrocyte precursors) propagated as monolayers. We report for the first time that oscillating magnetic fields enhanced MNP-based transfection with reporter and functional (basic fibroblast growth factor; FGF2) genes in monolayer cultures yielding high transfection versus neurospheres. Transfected NSCs showed high viability and could re-form neurospheres, which is important as neurospheres yield higher post-transplantation viability versus monolayer cells. Our results demonstrate that the combination of oscillating magnetic fields and a monolayer format yields the highest efficacy for MNP-mediated gene transfer to NSCs, offering a viable non-viral alternative for genetic modification of this important neural cell transplant population. PMID:25918990

  18. Using magnetic nanoparticles for gene transfer to neural stem cells: stem cell propagation method influences outcomes.

    PubMed

    Pickard, Mark R; Adams, Christopher F; Barraud, Perrine; Chari, Divya M

    2015-04-24

    Genetically engineered neural stem cell (NSC) transplants offer a key strategy to augment neural repair by releasing therapeutic biomolecules into injury sites. Genetic modification of NSCs is heavily reliant on viral vectors but cytotoxic effects have prompted development of non-viral alternatives, such as magnetic nanoparticle (MNPs). NSCs are propagated in laboratories as either 3-D suspension "neurospheres" or 2-D adherent "monolayers". MNPs deployed with oscillating magnetic fields ("magnetofection technology") mediate effective gene transfer to neurospheres but the efficacy of this approach for monolayers is unknown. It is important to address this issue as oscillating magnetic fields dramatically enhance MNP-based transfection in transplant cells (e.g., astrocytes and oligodendrocyte precursors) propagated as monolayers. We report for the first time that oscillating magnetic fields enhanced MNP-based transfection with reporter and functional (basic fibroblast growth factor; FGF2) genes in monolayer cultures yielding high transfection versus neurospheres. Transfected NSCs showed high viability and could re-form neurospheres, which is important as neurospheres yield higher post-transplantation viability versus monolayer cells. Our results demonstrate that the combination of oscillating magnetic fields and a monolayer format yields the highest efficacy for MNP-mediated gene transfer to NSCs, offering a viable non-viral alternative for genetic modification of this important neural cell transplant population.

  19. Potential of primary kidney cells for somatic cell nuclear transfer mediated transgenesis in pig

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is currently the most efficient and precise method to generate genetically tailored pig models for biomedical research. However, the efficiency of this approach is crucially dependent on the source of nuclear donor cells. In this study, we evaluate the potential of primary porcine kidney cells (PKCs) as cell source for SCNT, including their proliferation capacity, transfection efficiency, and capacity to support full term development of SCNT embryos after additive gene transfer or homologous recombination. Results PKCs could be maintained in culture with stable karyotype for up to 71 passages, whereas porcine fetal fibroblasts (PFFs) and porcine ear fibroblasts (PEFs) could be hardly passaged more than 20 times. Compared with PFFs and PEFs, PKCs exhibited a higher proliferation rate and resulted in a 2-fold higher blastocyst rate after SCNT and in vitro cultivation. Among the four transfection methods tested with a GFP expression plasmid, best results were obtained with the NucleofectorTM technology, resulting in transfection efficiencies of 70% to 89% with high fluorescence intensity, low cytotoxicity, good cell proliferation, and almost no morphological signs of cell stress. Usage of genetically modified PKCs in SCNT resulted in approximately 150 piglets carrying at least one of 18 different transgenes. Several of those pigs originated from PKCs that underwent homologous recombination and antibiotic selection before SCNT. Conclusion The high proliferation capacity of PKCs facilitates the introduction of precise and complex genetic modifications in vitro. PKCs are thus a valuable cell source for the generation of porcine biomedical models by SCNT. PMID:23140586

  20. Enhancement of heat transfer in red cell suspensions in vitro experiments.

    PubMed

    Carr, R T; Tiruvaloor, N R

    1989-05-01

    New data on laminar heat convection with red cell suspensions have been gathered for both heating and cooling. When compared to data for the suspending medium alone, it is apparent that the red cells enhance laminar heat transfer when Pe greater than 4. This is probably due to particle movements. These new data disagree with earlier studies which indicated no enhancement of heat transfer for blood cell suspensions. The data do agree with previous correlations for enhanced thermal transport in sheared suspensions.

  1. CD133-targeted gene transfer into long-term repopulating hematopoietic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Brendel, Christian; Goebel, Benjamin; Daniela, Abriss; Brugman, Martijn; Kneissl, Sabrina; Schwäble, Joachim; Kaufmann, Kerstin B; Müller-Kuller, Uta; Kunkel, Hana; Chen-Wichmann, Linping; Abel, Tobias; Serve, Hubert; Bystrykh, Leonid; Buchholz, Christian J; Grez, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Gene therapy for hematological disorders relies on the genetic modification of CD34(+) cells, a heterogeneous cell population containing about 0.01% long-term repopulating cells. Here, we show that the lentiviral vector CD133-LV, which uses a surface marker on human primitive hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) as entry receptor, transfers genes preferentially into cells with high engraftment capability. Transduction of unstimulated CD34(+) cells with CD133-LV resulted in gene marking of cells with competitive proliferative advantage in vitro and in immunodeficient mice. The CD133-LV-transduced population contained significantly more cells with repopulating capacity than cells transduced with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV)-LV, a lentiviral vector pseudotyped with the vesicular stomatitis virus G protein. Upon transfer of a barcode library, CD133-LV-transduced cells sustained gene marking in vivo for a prolonged period of time with a 6.7-fold higher recovery of barcodes compared to transduced control cells. Moreover, CD133-LV-transduced cells were capable of repopulating secondary recipients. Lastly, we show that this targeting strategy can be used for transfer of a therapeutic gene into CD34(+) cells obtained from patients suffering of X-linked chronic granulomatous disease. In conclusion, direct gene transfer into CD133(+) cells allows for sustained long-term engraftment of gene corrected cells.

  2. Direct gene transfer into human cultured cells facilitated by laser micropuncture of the cell membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, W.; Wilkinson, J.; Stanbridge, E.J.; Berns, M.W.

    1987-06-01

    The selective alteration of the cellular genome by laser microbeam irradiation has been extensively applied in cell biology. The authors report here the use of the third harmonic (355 nm) of an yttrium-aluminum garnet laser to facilitate the direct transfer of the neo gene into cultured human HT1080-6TG cells. The resultant transformants were selected in medium containing an aminoglycoside antibiotic, G418. Integration of the neo gene into individual human chromosomes and expression of the gene were demonstrated by Southern blot analyses, microcell-mediated chromosome transfer, and chromosome analyses. The stability of the integrated neo gene in the transformants was shown by a comparative growth assay in selective and nonselective media. Transformation and incorporation of the neo gene into the host genome occurred at a frequency of 8 x 10 /sup -4/-3 x 10/sup -3/. This method appears to be 100-fold more efficient than the standard calcium phosphate-mediated method of DNA transfer.

  3. Interleukin-15-transferred cytokine-induced killer cells elevated anti-tumor activity in a gastric tumor-bearing nude mice model.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zheng; Liang, Wentao; Li, Zexue; Xu, Yingxin; Chen, Lin

    2016-02-01

    Gastric cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) for gastric cancer is a novel therapy modality. However, the therapeutic effectiveness in vivo is still limited. The objective of this study was to assess the value of interleukin-15 (IL-15)-transferred cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells in ACT for gastric cancer. IL-15-IRES-TK retroviral vector was constructed and transferred into the CIK cells. A gastric tumor-bearing nude mice model was constructed by subcutaneously injecting gastric cancer cells, BGC-823. Gastric tumor-bearing nude mice were randomly divided into three groups (five mice each group) and injected with physiological saline, CIK cells, and IL-15-IRES-TK-transfected CIK cells for 2 weeks, respectively. IL-15-IRES-TK-transferred CIK cells were prepared successfully and flow cytometry (FCM) analysis indicated that the transfection rate reached 85.7% after 5 days culture. In vivo experiment, we found that CIK cells retarded tumor growth by reducing tumor volume and tumor weight, as well as increasing tumor inhibition rate. Furthermore, IL-15-IRES-TK-transferred CIK cells showed a much stronger inhibition on tumor growth than CIK cells alone. Tumor morphology observation and growth indexes also showed that IL-15-transfected CIK cells had stronger cytotoxicity to tumor tissue than CIK cells. IL-15-IRES-TK transfection could elevate the effects of CIK cells to gastric carcinoma. The engineered CIK cells carrying IL-15-IRES-TK may be used in the ACT for gastric carcinoma, but prudent clinical trial is still indispensable.

  4. Organic Solar Cells: Understanding the Role of Förster Resonance Energy Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Feron, Krishna; Belcher, Warwick J.; Fell, Christopher J.; Dastoor, Paul C.

    2012-01-01

    Organic solar cells have the potential to become a low-cost sustainable energy source. Understanding the photoconversion mechanism is key to the design of efficient organic solar cells. In this review, we discuss the processes involved in the photo-electron conversion mechanism, which may be subdivided into exciton harvesting, exciton transport, exciton dissociation, charge transport and extraction stages. In particular, we focus on the role of energy transfer as described by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) theory in the photoconversion mechanism. FRET plays a major role in exciton transport, harvesting and dissociation. The spectral absorption range of organic solar cells may be extended using sensitizers that efficiently transfer absorbed energy to the photoactive materials. The limitations of Förster theory to accurately calculate energy transfer rates are discussed. Energy transfer is the first step of an efficient two-step exciton dissociation process and may also be used to preferentially transport excitons to the heterointerface, where efficient exciton dissociation may occur. However, FRET also competes with charge transfer at the heterointerface turning it in a potential loss mechanism. An energy cascade comprising both energy transfer and charge transfer may aid in separating charges and is briefly discussed. Considering the extent to which the photo-electron conversion efficiency is governed by energy transfer, optimisation of this process offers the prospect of improved organic photovoltaic performance and thus aids in realising the potential of organic solar cells. PMID:23235328

  5. Organic solar cells: understanding the role of Förster resonance energy transfer.

    PubMed

    Feron, Krishna; Belcher, Warwick J; Fell, Christopher J; Dastoor, Paul C

    2012-12-12

    Organic solar cells have the potential to become a low-cost sustainable energy source. Understanding the photoconversion mechanism is key to the design of efficient organic solar cells. In this review, we discuss the processes involved in the photo-electron conversion mechanism, which may be subdivided into exciton harvesting, exciton transport, exciton dissociation, charge transport and extraction stages. In particular, we focus on the role of energy transfer as described by F¨orster resonance energy transfer (FRET) theory in the photoconversion mechanism. FRET plays a major role in exciton transport, harvesting and dissociation. The spectral absorption range of organic solar cells may be extended using sensitizers that efficiently transfer absorbed energy to the photoactive materials. The limitations of F¨orster theory to accurately calculate energy transfer rates are discussed. Energy transfer is the first step of an efficient two-step exciton dissociation process and may also be used to preferentially transport excitons to the heterointerface, where efficient exciton dissociation may occur. However, FRET also competes with charge transfer at the heterointerface turning it in a potential loss mechanism. An energy cascade comprising both energy transfer and charge transfer may aid in separating charges and is briefly discussed. Considering the extent to which the photo-electron conversion efficiency is governed by energy transfer, optimisation of this process offers the prospect of improved organic photovoltaic performance and thus aids in realising the potential of organic solar cells.

  6. Effects of Adoptive Transfer of Tolerogenic Dendritic Cells on Allograft Survival in Organ Transplantation Models: An Overview of Systematic Reviews

    PubMed Central

    Shan, Juan; Guo, Yingjia; Li, Shengfu; Long, Dan

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To dissect the efficacy of Tol-DC therapy with or without IS in multiple animal models of transplantation. Methods and Results. PubMed, Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Library were searched for reviews published up to April 2015. Six systematic reviews and a total of 61 articles were finally included. Data were grouped by organ transplantation models and applied to meta-analysis. Our meta-analysis shows that Tol-DC therapy successfully prolonged allograft survival to varying extents in all except the islet transplantation models and with IS drugs further prolonged the survival of heart, skin, and islet allografts in mice, but not of heart allografts in rats. Compared with IS drugs alone, Tol-DC therapy with IS extended islet allograft survival in rats but failed to influence the survival of skin, small intestine, and heart allografts in rats or of heart and skin allografts in mice. Conclusion. Tol-DC therapy significantly prolonged multiple allograft survival and further prolonged survival with IS. However, standardized protocols for modification of Tol-DC should be established before its application in clinic. PMID:27547767

  7. 14 CFR 221.160 - Adoption notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Adoption notice. 221.160 Section 221.160... REGULATIONS TARIFFS Adoption Publications Required To Show Change in Carrier's Name or Transfer of Operating Control § 221.160 Adoption notice. (a) When the name of a carrier is changed or when its operating...

  8. 14 CFR 221.160 - Adoption notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Adoption notice. 221.160 Section 221.160... REGULATIONS TARIFFS Adoption Publications Required To Show Change in Carrier's Name or Transfer of Operating Control § 221.160 Adoption notice. (a) When the name of a carrier is changed or when its operating...

  9. 14 CFR 221.160 - Adoption notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Adoption notice. 221.160 Section 221.160... REGULATIONS TARIFFS Adoption Publications Required To Show Change in Carrier's Name or Transfer of Operating Control § 221.160 Adoption notice. (a) When the name of a carrier is changed or when its operating...

  10. 14 CFR 221.160 - Adoption notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Adoption notice. 221.160 Section 221.160... REGULATIONS TARIFFS Adoption Publications Required To Show Change in Carrier's Name or Transfer of Operating Control § 221.160 Adoption notice. (a) When the name of a carrier is changed or when its operating...

  11. 14 CFR 221.160 - Adoption notice.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Adoption notice. 221.160 Section 221.160... REGULATIONS TARIFFS Adoption Publications Required To Show Change in Carrier's Name or Transfer of Operating Control § 221.160 Adoption notice. (a) When the name of a carrier is changed or when its operating...

  12. Strengthening Adoption Practice, Listening to Adoptive Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atkinson, Anne; Gonet, Patricia

    2007-01-01

    In-depth interviews with 500 adoptive families who received postadoption services through Virginia's Adoptive Family Preservation (AFP) program paint a richly detailed picture of the challenges adoptive families face and what they need to sustain adoption for many years after finalization. Findings document the need for support in a variety of…

  13. A robust, good manufacturing practice-compliant, clinical-scale procedure to generate regulatory T cells from patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis for adoptive cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Alsuliman, Abdullah; Appel, Stanley H; Beers, David R; Basar, Rafet; Shaim, Hila; Kaur, Indresh; Zulovich, Jane; Yvon, Eric; Muftuoglu, Muharrem; Imahashi, Nobuhiko; Kondo, Kayo; Liu, Enli; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Rezvani, Katayoun

    2016-10-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a fundamental role in the maintenance of self-tolerance and immune homeostasis. Defects in Treg function and/or frequencies have been reported in multiple disease models. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder affecting upper and lower motor neurons. Compelling evidence supports a neuroprotective role for Tregs in this disease. Indeed, rapid progression in ALS patients is associated with decreased FoxP3 expression and Treg frequencies. Thus, we propose that strategies to restore Treg number and function may slow disease progression in ALS. In this study, we developed a robust, Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP)-compliant procedure to enrich and expand Tregs from ALS patients. Tregs isolated from these patients were phenotypically similar to those from healthy individuals but were impaired in their ability to suppress T-cell effector function. In vitro expansion of Tregs for 4 weeks in the presence of GMP-grade anti-CD3/CD28 beads, interleukin (IL)-2 and rapamcyin resulted in a 25- to 200-fold increase in their number and restored their immunoregulatory activity. Collectively, our data facilitate and support the implementation of clinical trials of adoptive therapy with ex vivo expanded and highly suppressive Tregs in patients with ALS.

  14. Fluorescence resonance energy transfers measurements on cell surfaces via fluorescence polarization.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Kashi, Meir; Moshkov, Sergey; Zurgil, Naomi; Deutsch, Mordechai

    2002-01-01

    A method has been developed for the determination of the efficiency of fluorescence resonance energy transfer efficiency between moieties located on cell surfaces by performing individual cell fluorescence polarization (FP) measurements. The absolute value of energy transfer efficiency (E) is calculated on an individual cell basis. The examination of this methodology was carried out using model experiments on human T lymphocyte cells. The cells were labeled with fluorescein-conjugated Concanavalin A (ConA) as donor, or rhodamine-conjugated ConA as acceptor. The experiments and results clearly indicate that determination of E via FP measurements is possible, efficient, and more convenient than other methods. PMID:12202365

  15. Ex vivo priming for long-term maintenance of antileukemia human cytotoxic T cells suggests a general procedure for adoptive immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Montagna, D; Maccario, R; Locatelli, F; Rosti, V; Yang, Y; Farness, P; Moretta, A; Comoli, P; Montini, E; Vitiello, A

    2001-12-01

    Adoptive cellular immunotherapy has proven to be a successful approach in preventing and curing cytomegalovirus infection and Epstein-Barr virus-associated lymphomas after bone marrow transplantation. Translation of this approach for preventing leukemia relapse after bone marrow transplantation might require ex vivo priming and long-term maintenance of leukemia blast-specific T cells. To accomplish this goal, procedures were optimized for the in vitro priming of naive CD8 using dendritic cells activated by CD40 ligation, interleukin-12 (IL-12), and IL-7. Using T lymphocytes and dendritic cells obtained from HLA-matched allogeneic bone marrow transplantation donors and leukemia blasts as a source of tumor antigens, anti-acute myeloid leukemia cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) were induced. In these experiments, it was found that though it is possible to induce CTLs using immature dendritic cells, IL-12, and IL-7, obtaining long-term CTLs requires the presence of CD4 T cells in the priming phase. Using this approach, long-term antileukemia CTL lines could be generated from 4 of 4 bone marrow donors. Because this procedure does not require definition of the target antigen and because it selects responding cells from a virgin T-cell repertoire, its general application is suggested in adoptive immunotherapy and in the definition of tumor rejection antigens. PMID:11719375

  16. Improved Personalized Cancer Immunotherapy: Rapid Selection of Tumor-Reactive T Cells based on Expression of Specific Cell Surface Markers | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute’s Surgery Branch seeks partners interested in collaborative research to co-develop adoptive transfer of tumor infiltrating leukocytes (TIL) for cancers other than melanoma.

  17. Adoptive immunotherapy combined with intratumoral TLR agonist delivery eradicates established melanoma in mice

    PubMed Central

    Amos, Sally M.; Pegram, Hollie J.; Westwood, Jennifer A.; John, Liza B.; Devaud, Christel; Clarke, Chris J.; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Smyth, Mark J.; Darcy, Phillip K.; Kershaw, Michael H.

    2012-01-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists can trigger broad inflammatory responses that elicit rapid innate immunity and promote the activities of lymphocytes, which can potentially enhance adoptive immunotherapy in the tumor-bearing setting. In the present study, we found that Polyinosinic:Polycytidylic Acid [Poly(I:C)] and CpG oligodeoxynucleotide 1826 [CpG], agonists for TLR 3 and 9, respectively, potently activated adoptively transferred T cells against a murine model of established melanoma. Intratumoral injection of Poly(I:C) and CpG, combined with systemic transfer of activated pmel-1 T cells, specific for gp10025–33, led to enhanced survival and eradication of 9-day established subcutaneous B16F10 melanomas in a proportion of mice. A series of survival studies in knockout mice supported a key mechanistic pathway, whereby TLR agonists acted via host cells to enhance IFN-γ production by adoptively transferred T cells. IFN-γ, in turn, enhanced the immunogenicity of the B16F10 melanoma line, leading to increased killing by adoptively transferred T cells. Thus, this combination approach counteracted tumor escape from immunotherapy via downregulation of immunogenicity. In conclusion, TLR agonists may represent advanced adjuvants within the setting of adoptive T-cell immunotherapy of cancer and hold promise as a safe means of enhancing this approach within the clinic. PMID:21327636

  18. Uptake, efflux, and mass transfer coefficient of fluorescent PAMAM dendrimers into pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Opitz, Armin W; Czymmek, Kirk J; Wickstrom, Eric; Wagner, Norman J

    2013-02-01

    Targeted delivery of imaging agents to cells can be optimized with the understanding of uptake and efflux rates. Cellular uptake of macromolecules is studied frequently with fluorescent probes. We hypothesized that the internalization and efflux of fluorescently labeled macromolecules into and out of mammalian cells could be quantified by confocal microscopy to determine the rate of uptake and efflux, from which the mass transfer coefficient is calculated. The cellular influx and efflux of a third generation poly(amido amine) (PAMAM) dendrimer labeled with an Alexa Fluor 555 dye was measured in Capan-1 pancreatic cancer cells using confocal fluorescence microscopy. The Capan-1 cells were also labeled with 5-chloromethylfluorescein diacetate (CMFDA) green cell tracker dye to delineate cellular boundaries. A dilution curve of the fluorescently labeled PAMAM dendrimer enabled quantification of the concentration of dendrimer in the cell. A simple mass transfer model described the uptake and efflux behavior of the PAMAM dendrimer. The effective mass transfer coefficient was found to be 0.054±0.043μm/min, which corresponds to a rate constant of 0.035±0.023min(-1) for uptake of the PAMAM dendrimer into the Capan-1 cells. The effective mass transfer coefficient was shown to predict the efflux behavior of the PAMAM dendrimer from the cell if the fraction of labeled dendrimer undergoing non-specific binding is accounted for. This work introduces a novel method to quantify the mass transfer behavior of fluorescently labeled macromolecules into mammalian cells.

  19. Medical Issues in Adoption

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Know About Zika & Pregnancy Medical Issues in Adoption KidsHealth > For Parents > Medical Issues in Adoption Print ... or emotional abuse of the child continue Agency Adoptions If you adopt through an agency, you might ...

  20. Efficiency of porcine somatic cell nuclear transfer - a retrospective study of factors related to embryo recipient and embryos transferred.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yongye; Ouyang, Hongsheng; Yu, Hao; Lai, Liangxue; Pang, Daxin; Li, Zhanjun

    2013-01-01

    The successful generation of pigs via somatic cell nuclear transfer depends on reducing risk factors in several aspects. To provide an overview of some influencing factors related to embryo transfer, the follow-up data related to cloned pig production collected in our laboratory was examined. (i) Spring showed a higher full-term pregnancy rate compared with winter (33.6% vs 18.6%, P = 0.006). Furthermore, a regression equation can be drawn between full-term pregnancy numbers and pregnancy numbers in different months (y = 0.692x-3.326). (ii) There were no significant differences detected in the number of transferred embryos between surrogate sows exhibiting full-term development compared to those that did not. (iii) Non-ovulating surrogate sows presented a higher percentage of full-term pregnancies compared with ovulating sows (32.0% vs 17.5%, P = 0.004; respectively). (iv) Abortion was most likely to take place between Day 27 to Day 34. (v) Based on Life Table Survival Analysis, delivery in normally fertilized and surrogate sows is expected to be completed before Day 117 or Day 125, respectively. Additionally, the length of pregnancy in surrogate sows was negatively correlated with the average litter size, which was not found for normally fertilized sows. In conclusion, performing embryo transfer in appropriate seasons, improving the quality of embryos transferred, optimizing the timing of embryo transfer, limiting the occurrence of abortion, combined with ameliorating the management of delivery, is expected to result in the harvest of a great number of surviving cloned piglets. PMID:24244859

  1. Magnetomitotransfer: An efficient way for direct mitochondria transfer into cultured human cells

    PubMed Central

    Macheiner, Tanja; Fengler, Vera Heike Ingeborg; Agreiter, Marlene; Eisenberg, Tobias; Madeo, Frank; Kolb, Dagmar; Huppertz, Berthold; Ackbar, Richard; Sargsyan, Karine

    2016-01-01

    In the course of mitochondrial diseases standard care mostly focuses on treatment of symptoms, while therapeutic approaches aimed at restoring mitochondrial function are currently still in development. The transfer of healthy or modified mitochondria into host cells would open up the possibilities of new cell therapies. Therefore, in this study, a novel method of mitochondrial transfer is proposed by anti-TOM22 magnetic bead-labeled mitochondria with the assistance of a magnetic plate. In comparison to the passive transfer method, the magnetomitotransfer method was more efficient at transferring mitochondria into cells (78–92% vs 0–17% over 3 days). This transfer was also more rapid, with a high ratio of magnetomitotransferred cells and high density of transferred mitochondria within the first day of culture. Importantly, transferred mitochondria appeared to be functional as they strongly enhanced respiration in magnetomitotransferred cells. The novel method of magnetomitotransfer may offer potential for therapeutic approaches for treatment of a variety of mitochondria-associated pathologies, e.g. various neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27767193

  2. The Use of Video in Knowledge Transfer of Teacher-Led Psychosocial Interventions: Feeling Competent to Adopt a Different Role in the Classroom (L'utilisation de la vidéo dans le transfert de connaissances dans les interventions psychosociales menées par les enseignants : sentir que l'on a la compétence d'adopter un rôle différent dans la salle de classe)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beauregard, Caroline; Rousseau, Cécile; Mustafa, Sally

    2015-01-01

    Because they propose a form of modeling, videos have been recognised to be useful to transfer knowledge about practices requiring teachers to adopt a different role. This paper describes the results of a satisfaction survey with 98 teachers, school administrators and professionals regarding their appreciation of training videos showing teacher-led…

  3. A Functionally Superior Second-Generation Vector Expressing an Aurora Kinase-A-Specific T-Cell Receptor for Anti-Leukaemia Adoptive Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Casey, Nicholas Paul; Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Tanimoto, Kazushi; Okamoto, Sachiko; Mineno, Junichi; Kuzushima, Kiyotaka; Shiku, Hiroshi; Yasukawa, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    Aurora Kinase A is a cancer-associated protein normally involved in the regulation of mitosis. Being over-expressed in a range of cancers, it is a suitable target for cell-based immunotherapy. Gene transfer of T-cell receptor sequences cognisant of HLA-A*0201-restricted Aurora Kinase A antigen has previously been shown to transfer specific immunoreactivity against the target peptide in a Human Lymphocyte Antigen-restricted manner. While T cell receptor gene-transfer has great potential in overcoming the difficulties of isolating and expanding tumour-reactive lymphocytes from a patient's own cells, one hurdle is potential mispairing and competition between exogenous and endogenous T cell receptor chains. We have used a retroviral vector design bearing a short-interfering RNA that downregulates endogenous T cell receptor chains, without affecting expression of the transgenic T cell receptor sequences. The T cell receptor expression cassette also includes a 2A self-cleaving peptide, resulting in equimolar expression of the T cell receptor alpha and beta chains, further enhancing formation of the desired T cell receptor. Via a simple, modular cloning method, we have cloned the alpha and beta chains of the anti-Aurora Kinase A-reactive T cell receptor into this 'siTCR' vector. We then compared the activity of this vector against the original, 'conventional' vector across a panel of assays. T cell receptors expressed from the siTCR-vector retained the cytotoxic functionality of the original vector, with evidence of reduced off-target reactivity. The rate of expression of correctly-formed T cell receptors was superior using the siTCR design, and this was achieved at lower vector copy numbers. Maintaining T cell receptor efficacy with a reduced vector copy number reduces the risk of genotoxicity. The siTCR design also reduces the risk of mispairing and cross-reactivity, while increasing the functional titre. Such improvements in the safety of T cell receptor gene-transfer

  4. A Functionally Superior Second-Generation Vector Expressing an Aurora Kinase-A-Specific T-Cell Receptor for Anti-Leukaemia Adoptive Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Nicholas Paul; Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Tanimoto, Kazushi; Okamoto, Sachiko; Mineno, Junichi; Kuzushima, Kiyotaka; Shiku, Hiroshi; Yasukawa, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    Aurora Kinase A is a cancer-associated protein normally involved in the regulation of mitosis. Being over-expressed in a range of cancers, it is a suitable target for cell-based immunotherapy. Gene transfer of T-cell receptor sequences cognisant of HLA-A*0201-restricted Aurora Kinase A antigen has previously been shown to transfer specific immunoreactivity against the target peptide in a Human Lymphocyte Antigen-restricted manner. While T cell receptor gene-transfer has great potential in overcoming the difficulties of isolating and expanding tumour-reactive lymphocytes from a patient’s own cells, one hurdle is potential mispairing and competition between exogenous and endogenous T cell receptor chains. We have used a retroviral vector design bearing a short-interfering RNA that downregulates endogenous T cell receptor chains, without affecting expression of the transgenic T cell receptor sequences. The T cell receptor expression cassette also includes a 2A self-cleaving peptide, resulting in equimolar expression of the T cell receptor alpha and beta chains, further enhancing formation of the desired T cell receptor. Via a simple, modular cloning method, we have cloned the alpha and beta chains of the anti-Aurora Kinase A-reactive T cell receptor into this ‘siTCR’ vector. We then compared the activity of this vector against the original, ‘conventional’ vector across a panel of assays. T cell receptors expressed from the siTCR-vector retained the cytotoxic functionality of the original vector, with evidence of reduced off-target reactivity. The rate of expression of correctly-formed T cell receptors was superior using the siTCR design, and this was achieved at lower vector copy numbers. Maintaining T cell receptor efficacy with a reduced vector copy number reduces the risk of genotoxicity. The siTCR design also reduces the risk of mispairing and cross-reactivity, while increasing the functional titre. Such improvements in the safety of T cell receptor gene-transfer

  5. Biochip-based study of unidirectional mitochondrial transfer from stem cells to myocytes via tunneling nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huaxiao; Borg, Thomas K; Ma, Zhen; Xu, Meifeng; Wetzel, George; Saraf, Laxmikant V; Markwald, Roger; Runyan, Raymond B; Gao, Bruce Z

    2016-02-04

    Tunneling nanotubes (TNTs) are small membranous tubes of 50-1000 nm diameter observed to connect cells in culture. Transfer of subcellular organelles through TNTs was observed in vitro and in vivo, but the formation and significance of these structures is not well understood. A polydimethylsiloxane biochip-based coculture model was devised to constrain TNT orientation and explore both TNT-formation and TNT-mediated mitochondrial transfer. Two parallel microfluidic channels connected by an array of smaller microchannels enabled localization of stem cell and cardiomyocyte populations while allowing connections to form between them. Stem cells and cardiomyocytes were deposited in their respective microfluidic channels, and stem cell-cardiomyocyte pairs were formed via the microchannels. Formation of TNTs and transfer of stained mitochondria through TNTs was observed by 24 h real-time video recording. The data show that stem cells are 7.7 times more likely to initiate contact by initial extension of filopodia. By 24 h, 67% of nanotube connections through the microchannels are composed of cardiomyocyte membrane. Filopodial extension and retraction by stem cells draws an extension of TNTs from cardiomyocytes. MitoTracker staining shows that unidirectional transfer of mitochondria between stem cell-cardiomyocyte pairs invariably originates from stem cells. Control experiments with cardiac fibroblasts and cardiomyocytes show little nanotube formation between homotypic or mixed cell pairs and no mitochondrial transfer. These data identify a novel biological process, unidirectional mitochondrial transfer, mediated by heterotypic TNT connections. This suggests that the enhancement of cardiomyocyte function seen after stem-cell injection may be due to a bioenergetic stimulus provided by mitochondrial transfer.

  6. Human somatic cell nuclear transfer and reproductive cloning: an Ethics Committee opinion.

    PubMed

    2016-04-01

    This document presents arguments that conclude that it is unethical to use somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) for infertility treatment due to concerns about safety; the unknown impact of SCNT on children, families, and society; and the availability of other ethically acceptable means of assisted reproduction. This document replaces the ASRM Ethics Committee report titled, "Human somatic cell nuclear transfer and cloning," last published in Fertil Steril 2012;98:804-7. PMID:26746137

  7. Human somatic cell nuclear transfer and reproductive cloning: an Ethics Committee opinion.

    PubMed

    2016-04-01

    This document presents arguments that conclude that it is unethical to use somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) for infertility treatment due to concerns about safety; the unknown impact of SCNT on children, families, and society; and the availability of other ethically acceptable means of assisted reproduction. This document replaces the ASRM Ethics Committee report titled, "Human somatic cell nuclear transfer and cloning," last published in Fertil Steril 2012;98:804-7.

  8. Gene transfer into mammalian somatic cells in vivo.

    PubMed

    Yang, N S

    1992-01-01

    Direct gene transfer into mammalian somatic tissues in vivo is a developing technology with potential application for human gene therapy. During the past 2 years, extensive progress and numerous breakthroughs have been made in this area of research. Genetically engineered retroviral vectors have been used successfully to infect live animals, effecting foreign gene expression in liver, blood vessels, and mammary tissues. Recombinant adenovirus and herpes simplex virus vectors have been utilized effectively for in vivo gene transfer into lung and brain tissues, respectively. Direct injection or particle bombardment of DNA has been demonstrated to provide a physical means for in situ gene transfer, while carrier-mediated DNA delivery techniques have been extended to target specific organs for gene expression. These technological developments in conjunction with the initiation of the NIH human gene therapy trials have marked a milestone in developing new medical treatments for various genetic diseases and cancer. Various in vivo gene transfer techniques should also provide new tools for basic research in molecular and developmental genetics.

  9. Bead transfection: rapid and efficient gene transfer into marrow stromal and other adherent mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Matthews, K E; Mills, G B; Horsfall, W; Hack, N; Skorecki, K; Keating, A

    1993-05-01

    We report a simple, rapid, efficient and cost-effective method of gene transfer into bone marrow stromal and other adherent mammalian cells. Our approach involves brief incubation of cells with glass beads in a solution containing the DNA to be transferred. We optimized the technique using COS cells (SV40 transformed kidney cell line from African green monkey) and a transient expression assay for chloramphenicol acetyl transferase (CAT). Factors affecting gene transfer include size and condition of the beads and DNA concentration, but not DNA conformation. Gene transfer efficiency, assessed in a transient expression assay for beta-galactosidase activity, was 5 and 3% in nontransformed human bone marrow stromal cells and COS cells, respectively. Long-term stable expression with the selectable marker, neomycin phosphotransferase, was demonstrated in clonogenic COS cells at a frequency of 27%. Southern analysis of resistant clones revealed the transferred DNA to be integrated in low copy number at one or two sites in the host cell genome. Comparison with electroporation and DEAE-dextran indicates that bead transfection is more efficient than the latter and less costly than either of these methods. In view of its simplicity and because the use of retroviral sequences can be avoided, bead transfection may be an attractive means of gene insertion for gene therapy.

  10. Inhibition of Akt signaling promotes the generation of superior tumor-reactive T cells for adoptive immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    van der Waart, Anniek B; van de Weem, Noortje M P; Maas, Frans; Kramer, Cynthia S M; Kester, Michel G D; Falkenburg, J H Frederik; Schaap, Nicolaas; Jansen, Joop H; van der Voort, Robbert; Gattinoni, Luca; Hobo, Willemijn; Dolstra, Harry

    2014-11-27

    Effective T-cell therapy against cancer is dependent on the formation of long-lived, stem cell-like T cells with the ability to self-renew and differentiate into potent effector cells. Here, we investigated the in vivo existence of stem cell-like antigen-specific T cells in allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) patients and their ex vivo generation for additive treatment posttransplant. Early after allo-SCT, CD8+ stem cell memory T cells targeting minor histocompatibility antigens (MiHAs) expressed by recipient tumor cells were not detectable, emphasizing the need for improved additive MiHA-specific T-cell therapy. Importantly, MiHA-specific CD8+ T cells with an early CCR7+CD62L+CD45RO+CD27+CD28+CD95+ memory-like phenotype and gene signature could be expanded from naive precursors by inhibiting Akt signaling during ex vivo priming and expansion. This resulted in a MiHA-specific CD8+ T-cell population containing a high proportion of stem cell-like T cells compared with terminal differentiated effector T cells in control cultures. Importantly, these Akt-inhibited MiHA-specific CD8+ T cells showed a superior expansion capacity in vitro and in immunodeficient mice and induced a superior antitumor effect in intrafemural multiple myeloma-bearing mice. These findings provide a rationale for clinical exploitation of ex vivo-generated Akt-inhibited MiHA-specific CD8+ T cells in additive immunotherapy to prevent or treat relapse in allo-SCT patients. PMID:25336630

  11. Nano-ranged low-energy ion-beam-induced DNA transfer in biological cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, L. D.; Wongkham, W.; Prakrajang, K.; Sangwijit, K.; Inthanon, K.; Thongkumkoon, P.; Wanichapichart, P.; Anuntalabhochai, S.

    2013-06-01

    Low-energy ion beams at a few tens of keV were demonstrated to be able to induce exogenous macromolecules to transfer into plant and bacterial cells. In the process, the ion beam with well controlled energy and fluence bombarded living cells to cause certain degree damage in the cell envelope in nanoscales to facilitate the macromolecules such as DNA to pass through the cell envelope and enter the cell. Consequently, the technique was applied for manipulating positive improvements in the biological species. This physical DNA transfer method was highly efficient and had less risk of side-effects compared with chemical and biological methods. For better understanding of mechanisms involved in the process, a systematic study on the mechanisms was carried out. Applications of the technique were also expanded from DNA transfer in plant and bacterial cells to DNA transfection in human cancer cells potentially for the stem cell therapy purpose. Low-energy nitrogen and argon ion beams that were applied in our experiments had ranges of 100 nm or less in the cell envelope membrane which was majorly composed of polymeric cellulose. The ion beam bombardment caused chain-scission dominant damage in the polymer and electrical property changes such as increase in the impedance in the envelope membrane. These nano-modifications of the cell envelope eventually enhanced the permeability of the envelope membrane to favor the DNA transfer. The paper reports details of our research in this direction.

  12. Inhibition of Akt signaling promotes the generation of superior tumor-reactive T cells for adoptive immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    van der Waart, Anniek B.; van de Weem, Noortje M. P.; Maas, Frans; Kramer, Cynthia S. M.; Kester, Michel G. D.; Falkenburg, J. H. Frederik; Schaap, Nicolaas; Jansen, Joop H.; van der Voort, Robbert; Gattinoni, Luca; Hobo, Willemijn

    2014-01-01

    Effective T-cell therapy against cancer is dependent on the formation of long-lived, stem cell–like T cells with the ability to self-renew and differentiate into potent effector cells. Here, we investigated the in vivo existence of stem cell–like antigen-specific T cells in allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) patients and their ex vivo generation for additive treatment posttransplant. Early after allo-SCT, CD8+ stem cell memory T cells targeting minor histocompatibility antigens (MiHAs) expressed by recipient tumor cells were not detectable, emphasizing the need for improved additive MiHA-specific T-cell therapy. Importantly, MiHA-specific CD8+ T cells with an early CCR7+CD62L+CD45RO+CD27+CD28+CD95+ memory-like phenotype and gene signature could be expanded from naive precursors by inhibiting Akt signaling during ex vivo priming and expansion. This resulted in a MiHA-specific CD8+ T-cell population containing a high proportion of stem cell–like T cells compared with terminal differentiated effector T cells in control cultures. Importantly, these Akt-inhibited MiHA-specific CD8+ T cells showed a superior expansion capacity in vitro and in immunodeficient mice and induced a superior antitumor effect in intrafemural multiple myeloma–bearing mice. These findings provide a rationale for clinical exploitation of ex vivo–generated Akt-inhibited MiHA-specific CD8+ T cells in additive immunotherapy to prevent or treat relapse in allo-SCT patients. PMID:25336630

  13. Reconstruction of vascular structure with multicellular components using cell transfer printing methods.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yu Bin; Jun, Indong; Bak, Seongwoo; Shin, Young Min; Lim, Youn-Mook; Park, Hansoo; Shin, Heungsoo

    2014-09-01

    Natural vessel has three types of concentric cell layers that perform their specific functions. Here, the fabrication of vascular structure is reported by transfer printing of three different cell layers using thermosensitive hydrogels. Tetronic-tyramine and RGD peptide are co-crosslinked to prepare cell adhesive and thermosensitive hydrogels. The hydrogel increases its diameter by 1.26 times when the temperature reduces from 37 °C to 4 °C. At optimized seeding density, three types of cells form monolayers on the hydrogel, which is then transferred to the target surface within 3 min. Three monolayers are simultaneously transferred on one substrate with controlled shape and arrangement. The same approach is applied onto nanofiber scaffolds that are cultured for more than 5 d. Every type of monolayer shows proliferation and migration on nanofiber scaffolds, and the formation of robust cell-cell contact is revealed by CD31 staining in endothelial cell layer. A vascular structure with multicellular components is fabricated by transfer of three monolayers on nanofibers that are manually rolled with the diameter and length of the tube being approximately 3 mm and 12 mm, respectively. Collectively, it is concluded that the tissue transfer printing is a useful tool for constructing a vascular structure and mimicking natural structure of different types of tissues.

  14. Transfer of hematopoietic stem cells encoding autoantigen prevents autoimmune diabetes.

    PubMed

    Steptoe, Raymond J; Ritchie, Janine M; Harrison, Leonard C

    2003-05-01

    Bone marrow or hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is a potential treatment for autoimmune disease. The clinical application of this approach is, however, limited by the risks associated with allogeneic transplantation. In contrast, syngeneic transplantation would be safe and have wide clinical application. Because T cell tolerance can be induced by presenting antigen on resting antigen-presenting cells (APCs), we reasoned that hematopoietic stem cells engineered to express autoantigen in resting APCs could be used to prevent autoimmune disease. Proinsulin is a major autoantigen associated with pancreatic beta cell destruction in humans with type 1 diabetes (T1D) and in autoimmune NOD mice. Here, we demonstrate that syngeneic transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells encoding proinsulin transgenically targeted to APCs totally prevents the development of spontaneous autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice. This antigen-specific immunotherapeutic strategy could be applied to prevent T1D and other autoimmune diseases in humans. PMID:12727927

  15. Hematopoietic stem cell gene transfer for the treatment of hemoglobin disorders.

    PubMed

    Persons, Derek A

    2009-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC)-targeted gene transfer is an attractive approach for the treatment of a number of hematopoietic disorders caused by single gene defects. Indeed, in a series of gene transfer trials for two different primary immunodeficiencies beginning early in this decade, outstanding success has been achieved. Despite generally low levels of engrafted, genetically modified HSCs, these trials were successful because of the marked selective advantage of gene-corrected lymphoid precursors that allowed reconstitution of the immune system. Unlike the immunodeficiencies, this robust level of in vivo selection is not available to hematopoietic repopulating cells or early progenitor cells following gene transfer of a therapeutic globin gene in the setting of beta-thalassemia and sickle cell disease. Both preclinical and clinical transplant studies involving bone marrow chimeras suggest that 20% or higher levels of engraftment of genetically modified HSCs will be needed for clinical success in the most severe of these disorders. Encouragingly, gene transfer levels in this range have recently been reported in a lentiviral vector gene transfer clinical trial for children with adrenoleukodystrophy. A clinical gene transfer trial for beta-thalassemia has begun in France, and one patient with transfusion-dependent HbE/beta-thalassemia has demonstrated a therapeutic effect after transplantation with autologous CD34(+) cells genetically modified with a beta-globin lentiviral vector. Here, the development and recent progress of gene therapy for the hemoglobin disorders is reviewed.

  16. SAM-based Cell Transfer to Photopatterned Hydrogels for Microengineering Vascular-Like Structures

    PubMed Central

    Sadr, Nasser; Zhu, Mojun; Osaki, Tatsuya; Kakegawa, Takahiro; Yang, Yunzhi; Moretti, Matteo; Fukuda, Junji; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2011-01-01

    A major challenge in tissue engineering is to reproduce the native 3D microvascular architecture fundamental for in vivo functions. Current approaches still lack a network of perfusable vessels with native 3D structural organization. Here we present a new method combining self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-based cell transfer and gelatin methacrylate hydrogel photopatterning techniques for microengineering vascular structures. Human umbilical vein cell (HUVEC) transfer from oligopeptide SAM-coated surfaces to the hydrogel revealed two SAM desorption mechanisms: photoinduced and electrochemically triggered. The former, occurs concomitantly to hydrogel photocrosslinking, and resulted in efficient (>97%) monolayer transfer. The latter, prompted by additional potential application, preserved cell morphology and maintained high transfer efficiency of VE-cadherin positive monolayers over longer culture periods. This approach was also applied to transfer HUVECs to 3D geometrically defined vascular-like structures in hydrogels, which were then maintained in perfusion culture for 15 days. As a step toward more complex constructs, a cell-laden hydrogel layer was photopatterned around the endothelialized channel to mimic the vascular smooth muscle structure of distal arterioles. This study shows that the coupling of the SAM-based cell transfer and hydrogel photocrosslinking could potentially open up new avenues in engineering more complex, vascularized tissue constructs for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering applications. PMID:21802723

  17. In Vivo Proof of Concept of Adoptive Immunotherapy for Hepatocellular Carcinoma Using Allogeneic Suicide Gene-modified Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Leboeuf, Céline; Mailly, Laurent; Wu, Tao; Bour, Gaetan; Durand, Sarah; Brignon, Nicolas; Ferrand, Christophe; Borg, Christophe; Tiberghien, Pierre; Thimme, Robert; Pessaux, Patrick; Marescaux, Jacques; Baumert, Thomas F.; Robinet, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Cell therapy based on alloreactivity has completed clinical proof of concept against hematological malignancies. However, the efficacy of alloreactivity as a therapeutic approach to treat solid tumors is unknown. Using cell culture and animal models, we aimed to investigate the efficacy and safety of allogeneic suicide gene-modified killer cells as a cell-based therapy for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), for which treatment options are limited. Allogeneic killer cells from healthy donors were isolated, expanded, and phenotypically characterized. Antitumor cytotoxic activity and safety were studied using a panel of human or murine HCC cell lines engrafted in immunodeficient or immunocompetent mouse models. Human allogeneic suicide gene-modified killer cells (aSGMKCs) exhibit a high, rapid, interleukin-2–dependent, and non–major histocompatibility complex class I-restricted in vitro cytotoxicity toward human hepatoma cells, mainly mediated by natural killer (NK) and NK-like T cells. In vivo evaluation of this cell therapy product demonstrates a marked, rapid, and sustained regression of HCC. Preferential liver homing of effector cells contributed to its marked efficacy. Calcineurin inhibitors allowed preventing rejection of allogeneic lymphocytes by the host immune system without impairing their antitumor activity. Our results demonstrate proof of concept for aSGMKCs as immunotherapy for HCC and open perspectives for the clinical development of this approach. PMID:24445938

  18. Mitochondrial transfer from Wharton's jelly-derived mesenchymal stem cells to mitochondria-defective cells recaptures impaired mitochondrial function.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hung-Yu; Liou, Chia-Wei; Chen, Shang-Der; Hsu, Te-Yao; Chuang, Jiin-Haur; Wang, Pei-Wen; Huang, Sheng-Teng; Tiao, Mao-Meng; Chen, Jin-Bor; Lin, Tsu-Kung; Chuang, Yao-Chung

    2015-05-01

    Adult mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-conducted mitochondrial transfer has been recently shown to rescue cellular bioenergetics and prevent cell death caused by mitochondrial dysfunction. Wharton's jelly-derived MSCs (WJMSCs) harvested from postpartum umbilical cords are an accessible and abundant source of stem cells. This study aimed to determine the capability of WJMSCs to transfer their own mitochondria and rescue impaired oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) and bioenergetics caused by mitochondrial DNA defects. To do this, WJMSCs were co-cultured with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-depleted ρ(0) cells and the recapture of mitochondrial function was evaluated. WJMSCs were shown to be capable of transferring their own mitochondria into ρ(0) cells and underwent interorganellar mixture within these cells. Permissive culture media (BrdU-containing and pyruvate- and uridine-free) sieved out a survival cell population from the co-cultured WJMSCs (BrdU-sensitive) and ρ(0) cells (pyruvate/uridine-free). The survival cells had mtDNA identical to that of WJMSCs, whereas they expressed cellular markers identical to that of ρ(0) cells. Importantly, these ρ(0)-plus -WJMSC-mtDNA (ρ(+W)) cells recovered the expression of mtDNA-encoded proteins and exhibited functional oxygen consumption and respiratory control, as well as the activity of electron transport chain (ETC) complexes I, II, III and IV. In addition, ETC complex V-inhibitor-sensitive ATP production and metabolic shifting were also recovered. Furthermore, cellular behaviors including attachment-free proliferation, aerobic viability and OXPHOS-reliant cellular motility were also regained after mitochondrial transfer by WJMSCs. The therapeutic effect of WJMSCs-derived mitochondrial transfer was able to stably sustain for at least 45 passages. In conclusion, this study suggests that WJMSCs may serve as a potential therapeutic strategy for diseases linked to mitochondrial dysfunction through the donation of healthy

  19. Adoptive immunotherapy using T lymphocytes redirected to glypican-3 for the treatment of lung squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kesang; Pan, Xiaorong; Bi, Yanyu; Xu, Wen; Chen, Cheng; Gao, Huiping; Shi, Bizhi; Jiang, Hua; Yang, Shengli; Jiang, Liyan; Li, Zonghai

    2016-01-01

    There are unmet medical needs for patients with lung squamous cell carcinoma (LSCC). Therefore, in this study, we explored the antitumor potential of third-generation glypican 3 (GPC3)-redirected chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered T lymphocytes (CARgpc3 T cells) in tumor models of LSCC. First, we demonstrated by immunohistochemistry (IHC) that GPC3 was expressed in 66.3% of LSCC samples and in 3.3% of lung adenocarcinoma (LAD) samples but not in normal lung tissues. In the presence of GPC3-positive LSCC cells, CARgpc3 T cells were highly activated and increased in number. CARgpc3 T cells could specifically lyse GPC3-positive LSCC cells in vitro. In two established LSCC xenograft models, CARgpc3 T cells could almost completely eliminate the growth of GPC3-positive cells. Additionally, the CARgpc3 T cells were able to persist in vivo and efficiently infiltrate the cancerous tissues. Taken together, these findings indicate that CARgpc3 T cells might be a novel potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of patients with LSCC. PMID:26684028

  20. T cell receptor (TCR)-transgenic CD8 lymphocytes rendered insensitive to transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) signaling mediate superior tumor regression in an animal model of adoptive cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Tumor antigen-reactive T cells must enter into an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment, continue to produce cytokine and deliver apoptotic death signals to affect tumor regression. Many tumors produce transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ), which inhibits T cell activation, proliferation and cytotoxicity. In a murine model of adoptive cell therapy, we demonstrate that transgenic Pmel-1 CD8 T cells, rendered insensitive to TGFβ by transduction with a TGFβ dominant negative receptor II (DN), were more effective in mediating regression of established B16 melanoma. Smaller numbers of DN Pmel-1 T cells effectively mediated tumor regression and retained the ability to produce interferon-γ in the tumor microenvironment. These results support efforts to incorporate this DN receptor in clinical trials of adoptive cell therapy for cancer. PMID:22713761

  1. A helping hand: How vinculin contributes to cell-matrix and cell-cell force transfer.

    PubMed

    Dumbauld, David W; García, Andrés J

    2014-01-01

    Vinculin helps cells regulate and respond to mechanical forces. It is a scaffolding protein that tightly regulates its interactions with potential binding partners within adhesive structures-including focal adhesions that link the cell to the extracellular matrix and adherens junctions that link cells to each other-that physically connect the force-generating actin cytoskeleton (CSK) with the extracellular environment. This tight control of binding partner interaction-mediated by vinculin's autoinhibitory head-tail interaction-allows vinculin to rapidly interact and detach in response to changes in the dynamic forces applied through the cell. In doing so, vinculin modulates the structural composition of focal adhesions and the cell's ability to generate traction forces and adhesion strength. Recent evidence suggests that vinculin plays a similar role in regulating the fate and function of cell-cell junctions, further underscoring the importance of this protein. Using our lab's recent work as a starting point, this commentary explores several outstanding questions regarding the nature of vinculin activation and its function within focal adhesions and adherens junctions.

  2. Inhibition of two temporal phases of HIV-1 transfer from primary Langerhans cells to T cells: the role of langerin.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Najla; Lai, Joey; Botting, Rachel A; Mercier, Sarah K; Harman, Andrew N; Kim, Min; Turville, Stuart; Center, Rob J; Domagala, Teresa; Gorry, Paul R; Olbourne, Norman; Cunningham, Anthony L

    2014-09-01

    Epidermal Langerhans cells (eLCs) uniquely express the C-type lectin receptor langerin in addition to the HIV entry receptors CD4 and CCR5. They are among the first target cells to encounter HIV in the anogenital stratified squamous mucosa during sexual transmission. Previous reports on the mechanism of HIV transfer to T cells and the role of langerin have been contradictory. In this study, we examined HIV replication and langerin-mediated viral transfer by authentic immature eLCs and model Mutz-3 LCs. eLCs were productively infected with HIV, whereas Mutz-3 LCs were not susceptible because of a lack of CCR5 expression. Two successive phases of HIV viral transfer to T cells via cave/vesicular trafficking and de novo replication were observed with eLCs as previously described in monocyte-derived or blood dendritic cells, but only first phase transfer was observed with Mutz-3 LCs. Langerin was expressed as trimers after cross-linking on the cell surface of Mutz-3 LCs and in this form preferentially bound HIV envelope protein gp140 and whole HIV particles via the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD). Both phases of HIV transfer from eLCs to T cells were inhibited when eLCs were pretreated with a mAb to langerin CRD or when HIV was pretreated with a soluble langerin trimeric extracellular domain or by a CRD homolog. However, the langerin homolog did not inhibit direct HIV infection of T cells. These two novel soluble langerin inhibitors could be developed to prevent HIV uptake, infection, and subsequent transfer to T cells during early stages of infection. PMID:25070850

  3. Effects of donor cells' sex on nuclear transfer efficiency and telomere lengths of cloned goats.

    PubMed

    Liu, H-J; Peng, H; Hu, C-C; Li, X-Y; Zhang, J-L; Zheng, Z; Zhang, W-C

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of donor cells' sex on nuclear transfer efficiency and telomere length of cloned goats from adult skin fibroblast cells. The telomere length of somatic cell cloned goats and their offspring was determined by measuring their mean terminal restriction fragment (TRF) length. The result showed that (i) reconstructed embryos with fibroblast cells from males Boer goats obtained significantly higher kids rate and rate of live kids than those of female embryos and (ii) the telomere lengths of four female cloned goats were shorter compared to their donor cells, but five male cloned goats had the same telomere length with their donor cells, mainly due to great variation existed among them. The offspring from female cloned goats had the same telomere length with their age-matched counterparts. In conclusion, the donor cells' sex had significant effects on nuclear transfer efficiency and telomere lengths of cloned goats.

  4. Effects of donor cells' sex on nuclear transfer efficiency and telomere lengths of cloned goats.

    PubMed

    Liu, H-J; Peng, H; Hu, C-C; Li, X-Y; Zhang, J-L; Zheng, Z; Zhang, W-C

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of donor cells' sex on nuclear transfer efficiency and telomere length of cloned goats from adult skin fibroblast cells. The telomere length of somatic cell cloned goats and their offspring was determined by measuring their mean terminal restriction fragment (TRF) length. The result showed that (i) reconstructed embryos with fibroblast cells from males Boer goats obtained significantly higher kids rate and rate of live kids than those of female embryos and (ii) the telomere lengths of four female cloned goats were shorter compared to their donor cells, but five male cloned goats had the same telomere length with their donor cells, mainly due to great variation existed among them. The offspring from female cloned goats had the same telomere length with their age-matched counterparts. In conclusion, the donor cells' sex had significant effects on nuclear transfer efficiency and telomere lengths of cloned goats. PMID:27558653

  5. Pigment-cell-specific genes from fibroblasts are transactivated after chromosomal transfer into melanoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Powers, T P; Shows, T B; Davidson, R L

    1994-01-01

    Human and mouse fibroblast chromosomes carrying tyrosinase or b-locus genes were introduced, by microcell hybridization, into pigmented Syrian hamster melanoma cells, and the microcell hybrids were tested for transactivation of the fibroblast tyrosinase and b-locus genes. By using species-specific PCR amplification to distinguish fibroblast and melanoma cDNAs, it was demonstrated that the previously silent fibroblast tyrosinase and b-locus genes were transactivated following chromosomal transfer into pigmented melanoma cells. However, transactivation of the mouse fibroblast tyrosinase gene was unstable in microcell hybrid subclones and possibly dependent on a second fibroblast locus that could have segregated in the subclones. This second locus was not necessary for transactivation of the fibroblast b-locus gene, thus demonstrating noncoordinate transactivation of fibroblast tyrosinase and b-locus genes. Transactivation of the fibroblast tyrosinase gene in microcell hybrids apparently is dependent on the absence of a putative fibroblast extinguisher locus for tyrosinase gene expression, which presumably is responsible for the extinction of pigmentation in hybrids between karyotypically complete fibroblasts and melanoma cells. Images PMID:8289799

  6. Pigment-cell-specific genes from fibroblasts are transactivated after chromosomal transfer into melanoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Powers, T.P.; Davidson, R.L.; Shows, T.B.

    1994-02-01

    Human and mouse fibroblast chromosomes carrying tyrosinase or b-locus genes were introduced, by microcell hybridization, into pigmented Syrian hamster melanoma cells, and the microcell hybrids were tested for transactivation of the fibroblast tyrosinase and b-locus genes. By using species-specific PCR amplification to distinguish fibroblast and melanoma cDNAs, it was demonstrated that the previously silent fibroblast tyrosinase and b-locus genes were transactivated following chromosomal transfer into pigmented melanoma cells. However, transactivation of the mouse fibroblast tyrosinase gene was unstable in microcell hybrid subclones and possibly dependent on a second fibroblast locus that could have segregated in the subclones. This second locus was not necessary for transactivation of the fibroblast b-locus gene, thus demonstrating noncoordinate transactivation of fibroblast tyrosinase and b-locus genes. Transactivation of the fibroblast tyrosinase gene in microcell hybrids apparently is dependent on the absence of a putative fibroblast extinguisher locus for tyrosinase gene expression, which presumably is responsible for the extinction of pigmentation in hybrids between karyotypically complete fibroblasts and melanoma cells. 46 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Editing T cell specificity towards leukemia by zinc-finger nucleases and lentiviral gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Lombardo, Angelo; Magnani, Zulma; Liu, Pei-Qi; Reik, Andreas; Chu, Victoria; Paschon, David E.; Zhang, Lei; Kuball, Jurgen; Camisa, Barbara; Bondanza, Attilio; Casorati, Giulia; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Ciceri, Fabio; Bordignon, Claudio; Greenberg, Philip D.; Holmes, Michael C.; Gregory, Philip D.; Naldini, Luigi; Bonini, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    The transfer of high-avidity T-cell receptor (TCR) genes isolated from rare tumor-specific lymphocytes into polyclonal T cells is an attractive cancer immunotherapy strategy. However, TCR gene transfer results in competition for surface expression and inappropriate pairing between the exogenous and endogenous TCR chains, resulting in suboptimal activity and potentially harmful unpredicted specificities. We designed zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) promoting the disruption of endogenous TCR β and α chain genes. ZFN-treated lymphocytes lacked CD3/TCR surface expression and expanded with IL-7 and IL-15. Upon lentiviral transfer of a TCR for the WT1 tumor antigen, these TCR-edited cells expressed the new TCR at high levels, were easily expanded to near-purity, and proved superior in specific antigen recognition to matched TCR-transferred cells. In contrast to TCR-transferred cells, TCR edited lymphocytes did not mediate off-target reactivity while maintaining anti-tumor activity in vivo, thus demonstrating that complete editing of T-cell specificity generate tumor-specific lymphocytes with improved biosafety profile. PMID:22466705

  8. Early Detection of T cell Transfer-induced Autoimmune Colitis by In Vivo Imaging System

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Ling; Chen, Yi-Ting; Lo, Cheng-Feng; Hsieh, Ching-I; Chiu, Shang-Yi; Wu, Chang-Yen; Yeh, Yu-Shan; Hung, Shu-Hsuan; Cheng, Po-Hao; Su, Yu-Hsuan; Jiang, Si-Tse; Chin, Hsian-Jean; Su, Yu-Chia

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is a chronic and progressive inflammatory intestinal disease that includes two major types, namely ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease (CD). CD is characterized by intestinal epithelial hyperplasia and inflammatory cell infiltration. Transfer of CD25−CD45RBhiCD4+ (naïve) T cells into immunodeficiency mice induces autoimmune colitis with pathological lesions similar to CD and loss of body weight 4 weeks after cell transfer. However, weight loss neither has sufficient sensitivity nor totally matches the pathological findings of CD. To establish an early and sensitive indicator of autoimmune colitis model, the transferred T cell-induced colitis mouse model was modified by transferring luciferase-expressing donor T cells and determining the colitis by in vivo imaging system (IVIS). Colitis was detected with IVIS 7–10 days before the onset of body weight loss and diarrhea. IVIS was also applied in the dexamethasone treatment trial, and was a more sensitive indicator than body weight changes. All IVIS signals were parallel to the pathological abnormalities of the gut and immunological analysis results. In summary, IVIS provides both sensitive and objective means to monitor the disease course of transferred T cell-induced CD and fulfills the 3Rs principle of humane care of laboratory animals. PMID:27762297

  9. On the track of transfer cell formation by specialized plant-parasitic nematodes

    PubMed Central

    Rodiuc, Natalia; Vieira, Paulo; Banora, Mohamed Youssef; de Almeida Engler, Janice

    2014-01-01

    Transfer cells are ubiquitous plant cells that play an important role in plant development as well as in responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. They are highly specialized and differentiated cells playing a central role in the acquisition, distribution and exchange of nutrients. Their unique structural traits are characterized by augmented ingrowths of invaginated secondary wall material, unsheathed by an amplified area of plasma membrane enriched in a suite of solute transporters. Similar morphological features can be perceived in vascular root feeding cells induced by sedentary plant-parasitic nematodes, such as root-knot and cyst nematodes, in a wide range of plant hosts. Despite their close phylogenetic relationship, these obligatory biotrophic plant pathogens engage different approaches when reprogramming root cells into giant cells or syncytia, respectively. Both nematode feeding-cells types will serve as the main source of nutrients until the end of the nematode life cycle. In both cases, these nematodes are able to remarkably maneuver and reprogram plant host cells. In this review we will discuss the structure, function and formation of these specialized multinucleate cells that act as nutrient transfer cells accumulating and synthesizing components needed for survival and successful offspring of plant-parasitic nematodes. Plant cells with transfer-like functions are also a renowned subject of interest involving still poorly understood molecular and cellular transport processes. PMID:24847336

  10. A Novel Mechanism of Bacterial Toxin Transfer within Host Blood Cell-Derived Microvesicles

    PubMed Central

    Ståhl, Anne-lie; Arvidsson, Ida; Johansson, Karl E.; Chromek, Milan; Rebetz, Johan; Loos, Sebastian; Kristoffersson, Ann-Charlotte; Békássy, Zivile D.; Mörgelin, Matthias; Karpman, Diana

    2015-01-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx) is the main virulence factor of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli, which are non-invasive strains that can lead to hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), associated with renal failure and death. Although bacteremia does not occur, bacterial virulence factors gain access to the circulation and are thereafter presumed to cause target organ damage. Stx was previously shown to circulate bound to blood cells but the mechanism by which it would potentially transfer to target organ cells has not been elucidated. Here we show that blood cell-derived microvesicles, shed during HUS, contain Stx and are found within patient renal cortical cells. The finding was reproduced in mice infected with Stx-producing Escherichia coli exhibiting Stx-containing blood cell-derived microvesicles in the circulation that reached the kidney where they were transferred into glomerular and peritubular capillary endothelial cells and further through their basement membranes followed by podocytes and tubular epithelial cells, respectively. In vitro studies demonstrated that blood cell-derived microvesicles containing Stx undergo endocytosis in glomerular endothelial cells leading to cell death secondary to inhibited protein synthesis. This study demonstrates a novel virulence mechanism whereby bacterial toxin is transferred within host blood cell-derived microvesicles in which it may evade the host immune system. PMID:25719452

  11. Riboflavin-shuttled extracellular electron transfer from Enterococcus faecalis to electrodes in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Enren; Cai, Yamin; Luo, Yue; Piao, Zhe

    2014-11-01

    Great attention has been focused on Gram-negative bacteria in the application of microbial fuel cells. In this study, the Gram-positive bacterium Enterococcus faecalis was employed in microbial fuel cells. Bacterial biofilms formed by E. faecalis ZER6 were investigated with respect to electricity production through the riboflavin-shuttled extracellular electron transfer. Trace riboflavin was shown to be essential for transferring electrons derived from the oxidation of glucose outside the peptidoglycan layer in the cell wall of E. faecalis biofilms formed on the surface of electrodes, in the absence of other potential electron mediators (e.g., yeast extract).

  12. Mortalin antibody-conjugated quantum dot transfer from human mesenchymal stromal cells to breast cancer cells requires cell-cell interaction.

    PubMed

    Pietilä, Mika; Lehenkari, Petri; Kuvaja, Paula; Kaakinen, Mika; Kaul, Sunil C; Wadhwa, Renu; Uemura, Toshimasa

    2013-11-01

    The role of tumor stroma in regulation of breast cancer growth has been widely studied. However, the details on the type of heterocellular cross-talk between stromal and breast cancer cells (BCCs) are still poorly known. In the present study, in order to investigate the intercellular communication between human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSCs) and breast cancer cells (BCCs, MDA-MB-231), we recruited cell-internalizing quantum dots (i-QD) generated by conjugation of cell-internalizing anti-mortalin antibody and quantum dots (QD). Co-culture of illuminated and color-coded hMSCs (QD655) and BCCs (QD585) revealed the intercellular transfer of QD655 signal from hMSCs to BCCs. The amount of QD double positive BCCs increased gradually within 48h of co-culture. We found prominent intercellular transfer of QD655 in hanging drop co-culture system and it was non-existent when hMSCs and BBCs cells were co-cultured in trans-well system lacking imminent cell-cell contact. Fluorescent and electron microscope analyses also supported that the direct cell-to-cell interactions may be required for the intercellular transfer of QD655 from hMSCs to BCCs. To the best of our knowledge, the study provides a first demonstration of transcellular crosstalk between stromal cells and BCCs that involve direct contact and may also include a transfer of mortalin, an anti-apoptotic and growth-promoting factor enriched in cancer cells.

  13. Low-dose ionizing radiation induces direct activation of natural killer cells and provides a novel approach for adoptive cellular immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Guozi; Kong, Qingyu; Wang, Guanjun; Jin, Haofan; Zhou, Lei; Yu, Dehai; Niu, Chao; Han, Wei; Li, Wei; Cui, Jiuwei

    2014-12-01

    Recent evidence indicates that limited availability and cytotoxicity have restricted the development of natural killer (NK) cells in adoptive cellular immunotherapy (ACI). While it has been reported that low-dose ionizing radiation (LDIR) could enhance the immune response in animal studies, the influence of LDIR at the cellular level has been less well defined. In this study, the authors aim to investigate the direct effects of LDIR on NK cells and the potential mechanism, and explore the application of activation and expansion of NK cells by LDIR in ACI. The authors found that expansion and cytotoxicity of NK cells were markedly augmented by LDIR. The levels of IFN-γ and TNF-α in the supernatants of cultured NK cells were significantly increased after LDIR. Additionally, the effect of the P38 inhibitor (SB203580) significantly decreased the expanded NK cell cytotoxicity, cytokine levels, and expression levels of FasL and perforin. These findings indicate that LDIR induces a direct expansion and activation of NK cells through possibly the P38-MAPK pathway, which provides a potential mechanism for stimulation of NK cells by LDIR and a novel but simplified approach for ACI.

  14. Induction of Adult T-Cell Leukemia-Like Lymphoproliferative Disease and Its Inhibition by Adoptive Immunotherapy in T-Cell-Deficient Nude Rats Inoculated with Syngeneic Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1-Immortalized Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Takashi; Hanabuchi, Shino; Kato, Hirotomo; Koya, Yoshihiro; Takemura, Fumiyo; Hirokawa, Katsuiku; Yoshiki, Takashi; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Fujii, Masahiro; Kannagi, Mari

    1999-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) has been shown to be the etiologic agent of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), but the in vivo mechanism by which the virus causes the malignant transformation is largely unknown. In order to investigate the mechanisms of HTLV-1 leukemogenesis, we developed a rat model system in which ATL-like disease was reproducibly observed, following inoculation of various rat HTLV-1-immortalized cell lines. When previously established cell lines, F344-S1 and TARS-1, but not TART-1 or W7TM-1, were inoculated, systemic multiple tumor development was observed in adult nude (nu/nu) rats. FPM1 cells, newly established from a heterozygous (nu/+) rat syngeneic to nu/nu rats, caused transient tumors only at the injection site in adult nu/nu rats, but could progressively grow in newborn nu/nu rats and metastasize in lymph nodes. The derivative cell line (FPM1-V1AX) serially passed through newborn nu/nu rats acquired the potency to grow in adult nu/nu rats. These results indicated that only some with additional changes but not all of the in vitro HTLV-1-immortalized cell lines possessed in vivo tumorigenicity. Using the syngeneic system, we further showed the inhibition of tumor development by transferring splenic T cells from immunized rats, suggesting the involvement of T cells in the regression of tumors. This novel and reproducible nude rat model of human ATL would be useful for investigation of leukemogenesis and antitumor immune responses in HTLV-1 infection. PMID:10364355

  15. Systematic process development towards high performance transferred thin silicon solar cells based on epitaxially grown absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murcia Salazar, Clara Paola

    The value of thin crystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cells is the potential for higher performance compared to conventional wafer approaches. Thin silicon solar cells can outperform thick cells with the same material properties because the smaller active volume causes a reduced bulk recombination leading to higher voltages while efficient light trapping structures ensure all photons are absorbed. Efficiencies above 20+% can be achieved with less than 20um of c-Si with current silicon solar cell processing technologies. In a thin solar cell, factors that will lead to high efficiency include high minority carrier lifetime, low surface recombination, and good optical confinement. Independently optimizing surface optical and electrical properties in a thin solar cell can achieve this higher performance. In addition, re-utilizing a c-Si wafer with a process that allows optimization of both surfaces is a path to higher performance at lower cost. The challenge in the fabrication of this high performance concept is to separately analyze critical parameters through fabrication and transfer and establish the design rules for high performance. This work contributes to the design and systematic fabrication approach of a 20 mum thick epitaxial silicon solar cell. State-of-the-art thin absorbers of less than 30um have reported 655mV (on a textured front surface with antireflection coating), and efficiencies near 17%. We report near 640mV (on a planar front surface with antireflection coating) for 20 mum thick absorbers. It is found that previously reported efficiencies are tightly related to solar cell's active thickness. In the case of transferred solar cells, the thinnest epitaxial transferred cell reported is near 24 mum thick with an efficiency of 15.4% (transparent front handle, textured with ARC and metallic back reflector). Recently, a c-Si transferred solar cell of 43 mum has reported 19.1% efficiency (with a front texture and ARC with localized back contact and reflector

  16. Number and size of human X chromosome fragments transferred to mouse cells by chromosome-mediated gene transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Olsen, A.S.; McBride, O.W.; Moore, D.E.

    1981-05-01

    Labeled probes of unique-sequence human X chromosomal deoxyribonucleic acid, prepared by two different procedures, were used to measure the amount of human X chromosomal deoxyribonucleic acid in 12 mouse cell lines expressing human hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase after chromosome-mediated gene transfer. The amount of X chromosomal deoxyribonucleic acid detected by this procedure ranged from undetectable levels in the three stable transformants and some unstable transformants examined to about 20% of the human X chromosome in two unstable transformants. Reassociation kinetics of the X chromosomal probe with deoxyribonucleic acid from the two unstable transformants containing 15 to 20% of the human X chromosome indicate that a single copy of these sequences is present. In one of these lines, the X chromosomal sequences exist as multiple fragments which were not concordantly segregated when the cells were selected for loss of hprt.

  17. Production of human CD59-transgenic pigs by embryonic germ cell nuclear transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Kwang Sung; Won, Ji Young; Park, Jin-Ki; Sorrell, Alice M.; Heo, Soon Young; Kang, Jee Hyun; Woo, Jae-Seok; Choi, Bong-Hwan; Chang, Won-Kyong; Shim, Hosup

    2010-10-01

    Research highlights: {yields} Human CD59 (hCD59) gene was introduced into porcine embryonic germ (EG) cells. {yields} hCD59-transgenic EG cells were resistant to hyperacute rejection in cytolytic assay. {yields} hCD59-transgenic pigs were produced by EG cell nuclear transfer. -- Abstract: This study was performed to produce transgenic pigs expressing the human complement regulatory protein CD59 (hCD59) using the nuclear transfer (NT) of embryonic germ (EG) cells, which are undifferentiated stem cells derived from primordial germ cells. Because EG cells can be cultured indefinitely in an undifferentiated state, they may provide an inexhaustible source of nuclear donor cells for NT to produce transgenic pigs. A total of 1980 NT embryos derived from hCD59-transgenic EG cells were transferred to ten recipients, resulting in the birth of fifteen piglets from three pregnancies. Among these offspring, ten were alive without overt health problems. Based on PCR analysis, all fifteen piglets were confirmed as hCD59 transgenic. The expression of the hCD59 transgene in the ten living piglets was verified by RT-PCR. Western analysis showed the expression of the hCD59 protein in four of the ten RT-PCR-positive piglets. These results demonstrate that hCD59-transgenic pigs could effectively be produced by EG cell NT and that such transgenic pigs may be used as organ donors in pig-to-human xenotransplantation.

  18. Adopted Children and Discipline

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Pediatrician Family Life Medical Home Family Dynamics Adoption & Foster Care Communication & Discipline Types of Families Media ... Your Community Healthy Children > Family Life > Family Dynamics > Adoption & Foster Care > Adopted Children & Discipline Family Life Listen ...

  19. Adoption & Foster Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Children > Family Life > Family Dynamics > Adoption & Foster Care Adoption & Foster Care Article Body ​Each year, many children join families through adoption and foster care. These families may face unique ...

  20. The Development of Novel, High-Flux, Heat Transfer Cells for Thermal Control in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Marc K.; Glezer, Ari

    1996-01-01

    In order to meet the future needs of thermal management and control in space applications such as the Space Lab, new heat-transfer technology capable of much larger heat fluxes must be developed. To this end, we describe complementary numerical and experimental investigations into the fundamental fluid mechanics and heat-transfer processes involved in a radically new, self contained, heat transfer cell for microgravity applications. In contrast to conventional heat pipes, the heat transfer in this cell is based on a forced droplet evaporation process using a fine spray. The spray is produced by a novel fluidic technology recently developed at Georgia Tech. This technology is based on a vibration induced droplet atomization process. In this technique, a liquid droplet is placed on a flexible membrane and is vibrated normal to itself. When the proper drop size is attained, the droplet resonates with the surface motion of the membrane and almost immediately bursts into a shower of very fine secondary droplets. The small droplets travel to the opposite end of the cell where they impact a heated surface and are evaporated. The vapor returns to the cold end of the cell and condenses to form the large droplets that are fragmented to form the spray. Preliminary estimates show that a heat transfer cell based on this technology would have a heat-flux capacity that is an order of magnitude higher than those of current heat pipes designs used in microgravity applications.

  1. Developmental potential of human oocytes reconstructed by transferring somatic cell nuclei into polyspermic zygote cytoplasm

    SciTech Connect

    Fan, Yong; Chen, Xinjie; Luo, Yumei; Chen, Xiaolin; Li, Shaoying; Huang, Yulin; Sun, Xiaofang

    2009-04-24

    The generation of patient-specific nuclear transfer embryonic stem cells holds huge promise in modern regenerative medicine and cell-based drug discovery. Since human in vivo matured oocytes are not readily available, human therapeutic cloning is developing slowly. Here, we investigated for the first time whether human polyspermic zygotes could support preimplantation development of cloned embryos. Our results showed that polyspermic zygotes could be used as recipients for human somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). The preimplantation developmental potential of SCNT embryos from polyspermic zygotes was limited to the 8-cell stage. Since ES cell lines can be derived from single blastomeres, these results may have important significance for human ES cells derived by SCNT. In addition, confocal images demonstrated that all of the SCNT embryos that failed to cleave showed abnormal microtubule organization. The results of the present study suggest that polyspermic human zygotes could be used as a potential source of recipient cytoplasm for SCNT.

  2. Epigenetic reprogramming in embryonic and foetal development upon somatic cell nuclear transfer cloning.

    PubMed

    Niemann, Heiner; Tian, X Cindy; King, W Allan; Lee, Rita S F

    2008-02-01

    The birth of 'Dolly', the first mammal cloned from an adult donor cell, has sparked a flurry of research activities to improve cloning technology and to understand the underlying mechanism of epigenetic reprogramming of the transferred somatic cell nucleus. Especially in ruminants, somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is frequently associated with pathological changes in the foetal and placental phenotype and has significant consequences for development both before and after birth. The most critical factor is epigenetic reprogramming of the transferred somatic cell nucleus from its differentiated status into the totipotent state of the early embryo. This involves an erasure of the gene expression program of the respective donor cell and the establishment of the well-orchestrated sequence of expression of an estimated number of 10 000-12 000 genes regulating embryonic and foetal development. The following article reviews the present knowledge on the epigenetic reprogramming of the transferred somatic cell nucleus, with emphasis on DNA methylation, imprinting, X-chromosome inactivation and telomere length restoration in bovine development. Additionally, we briefly discuss other approaches towards epigenetic nuclear reprogramming, including the fusion of somatic and embryonic stem cells and the overexpression of genes crucial in the formation and maintenance of the pluripotent status. Improvements in our understanding of this dramatic epigenetic reprogramming event will be instrumental in realising the great potential of SCNT for basic biological research and for various agricultural and biomedical applications.

  3. Cell-mediated transgenesis in rabbits: chimeric and nuclear transfer animals.

    PubMed

    Zakhartchenko, V; Flisikowska, T; Li, S; Richter, T; Wieland, H; Durkovic, M; Rottmann, O; Kessler, B; Gungor, T; Brem, G; Kind, A; Wolf, E; Schnieke, A

    2011-02-01

    The ability to perform precise genetic engineering such as gene targeting in rabbits would benefit biomedical research by enabling, for example, the generation of genetically defined rabbit models of human diseases. This has so far not been possible because of the lack of functional rabbit embryonic stem cells and the high fetal and perinatal mortality associated with rabbit somatic cell nuclear transfer. We examined cultured pluripotent and multipotent cells for their ability to support the production of viable animals. Rabbit putative embryonic stem (ES) cells were derived and shown capable of in vitro and in vivo pluripotent differentiation. We report the first live born ES-derived rabbit chimera. Rabbit mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were derived from bone marrow, and multipotent differentiation was demonstrated in vitro. Nuclear transfer was carried out with both cell types, and embryo development was assessed in vitro and in vivo. Rabbit MSCs were markedly more successful than ES cells as nuclear donors. MSCs were transfected with fluorescent reporter gene constructs and assessed for nuclear transfer competence. Transfected MSCs supported development with similar efficiency as normal MSCs and resulted in the first live cloned rabbits from genetically manipulated MSCs. Reactivation of fluorescence reporter gene expression in reconstructed embryos was investigated as a means of identifying viable embryos in vitro but was not a reliable predictor. We also examined serial nuclear transfer as a means of rescuing dead animals.

  4. Microbubble-Enhanced Ultrasound Gene Transfer into Fibroblast Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirayama, Kota; Kaneko, Yukio; Tei, Yuichi; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2007-05-01

    Ultrasound finds many applications in the medical field, including ultrasound imaging, non-invasive treatment of tumors and lithotripsy. Ultrasound also has a potential to deliver some therapeutic materials, such as genes, drugs or proteins into cells. It is known that microbubbles can improve the delivery efficiency. It is believed that therapeutic materials can pass through the cell membrane whose permeability is increased by microbubble destruction or the ultrasound pressure. In this study, we investigated the delivery of GFP plasmid gene into the fibroblast cells. Ultrasound (frequency = 2.1 MHz, duty cycle = 10%) was used to irradiate the cultured cells through a medium that contains microbubbles and GFP plasmid. GFP plasmid transfection could be easily observed by fluorescence microscopy. Ultrasound irradiation under a variety of conditions resulted in successful GFP plasmid delivery. Microbubbles enhanced GFP transfection, and conclusions were drawn as to the relationship between gene transfection and various ultrasound exposure parameters. We also investigated the effect of ultrasound intensity on cell viability.

  5. Turbulence convective heat transfer for cooling the photovoltaic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arianmehr, Iman

    Solar PV (photovoltaic) is a rapidly advancing renewable energy technology which converts sunlight directly into electricity. One of the outstanding challenges of the current PV technology is the reduction in its conversion efficiency with increasing PV panel temperature, which is closely associated with the increase in solar intensity and the ambient temperature surrounding the PV panels. To more effectively capture the available energy when the sun is most intense, significant efforts have been invested in active and passive cooling research over the last few years. While integrated cooling systems can lead to the highest total efficiencies, they are usually neither the most feasible nor the most cost effective solutions. This work examines some simple passive means of manipulating the prevailing wind turbulence to enhance convective heat transfer over a heated plate in a wind tunnel.

  6. CD36 gene transfer confers capacity for phagocytosis of cells undergoing apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Phagocyte recognition and ingestion of intact cells undergoing apoptosis are key events in this generally important program of cell death. Insufficient phagocyte capacity for apoptotic cells can result in failure to clear dying cells before membrane integrity is lost, resulting in leakage of noxious cell contents and severe tissue damage. However, no means has been available to increase phagocytic clearance of apoptotic cells. We now report that transfection of the macrophage adhesion molecule CD36 into human Bowes melanoma cells specifically conferred greatly increased capacity to ingest apoptotic neutrophils, lymphocytes, and fibroblasts, comparable to that exhibited by macrophages. Furthermore, when CD36 was transfected into another cell type with limited capacity to take up apoptotic bodies, the monkey COS- 7 cell, similar effects were observed. Therefore, CD36 gene transfer can confer "professional" capacity to ingest apoptotic cells upon "amateur" phagocytes. PMID:7536797

  7. Optimized human CYP4B1 in combination with the alkylator prodrug 4-ipomeanol serves as a novel suicide gene system for adoptive T-cell therapies.

    PubMed

    Roellecke, K; Virts, E L; Einholz, R; Edson, K Z; Altvater, B; Rossig, C; von Laer, D; Scheckenbach, K; Wagenmann, M; Reinhardt, D; Kramm, C M; Rettie, A E; Wiek, C; Hanenberg, H

    2016-07-01

    Engineering autologous or allogeneic T cells to express a suicide gene can control potential toxicity in adoptive T-cell therapies. We recently reported the development of a novel human suicide gene system that is based on an orphan human cytochrome P450 enzyme, CYP4B1, and the naturally occurring alkylator prodrug 4-ipomeanol. The goal of this study was to systematically develop a clinically applicable self-inactivating lentiviral vector for efficient co-expression of CYP4B1 as an ER-located protein with two distinct types of cell surface proteins, either MACS selection genes for donor lymphocyte infusions after allogeneic stem cell transplantation or chimeric antigen receptors for retargeting primary T cells. The U3 region of the myeloproliferative sarcoma virus in combination with the T2A site was found to drive high-level expression of our CYP4B1 mutant with truncated CD34 or CD271 as MACS suitable selection markers. This lentiviral vector backbone was also well suited for co-expression of CYP4B1 with a codon-optimized CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) construct. Finally, 4-ipomeanol efficiently induced apoptosis in primary T cells that co-express mutant CYP4B1 and the divergently located MACS selection and CAR genes. In conclusion, we here developed a clinically suited lentiviral vector that supports high-level co-expression of cell surface proteins with a potent novel human suicide gene. PMID:27092941

  8. In vitro study for laser gene transfer in BHK-21 fibroblast cell line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel Aziz, M.; Salem, D. S.; Salama, M. S.; Badr, Y.

    2009-02-01

    Modifications to our previously introduced system for laser microbeam cell surgery were carried out in the present work to match animal cells. These modifications included: 1- Using other laser system that used before, Excimer laser with 193 and 308 nm wavelengths. The used laser here, is He-Cd with low power and 441.5 nm wavelength in the visible region. 2- Instead of using pulsed laser, we used here CW He-Cd chopped by electrical chopper, which is synchronized with the mechanical motion of the mobile stage with step 40 microns, according to cell dimensions to avoid puncturing the same cell twice. The advantages of the modified here laser setup for gene transfer is: it is less damaging to the sensitive animal cell which has thin cell membrane. The present work aimed to: 1- Design a modified laser microbeam cell surgery, applicable to animal cells, such as fibroblast cells 2- To examine the efficiency of such system. 3- To assure gene transfer and its expression in the used cells. 4- To evaluate the ultra damages produced from using the laser beam as a modality for gene transfer. On the other wards, to introduce: safe, efficient and less damaging modality for gene transfer in animal cells. To achieve these goals, we applied the introduced here home-made laser setup with its synchronized parameters to introduce pBK-CMV phagemid, containing LacZ and neomycin resistance (neor )genes into BHK-21 fibroblast cell line. The results of the present work showed that: 1- Our modified laser microbeam cell surgery setup proved to be useful and efficient tool for gene transfer into fibroblast cells. 2- The presence and expression of LacZ gene was achieved using histochemical LacZ assay. 3- Selection of G418 antibiotic sensitivity assay confirmed the presence and expression towards stability of neor gene with time. 4- Presence of LacZ and neor genes in the genomic DNA of transfected fibroblast cells was indicated using PCR analysis. 5- Transmission electron microscopy indicated

  9. Adoptive cellular therapy.

    PubMed

    Grupp, Stephan A; June, Carl H

    2011-01-01

    Cell-based therapies with various lymphocytes and antigen-presenting cells are promising approaches for cancer immunotherapy. The transfusion of T lymphocytes, also called adoptive cell therapy (ACT), is an effective treatment for viral infections, has induced regression of cancer in early stage clinical trials, and may be a particularly important and efficacious modality in the period following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Immune reconstitution post-SCT is often slow and incomplete, which in turn leads to an increased risk of infection and may impact relapse risk in patients with malignant disease. Immunization post-HSCT is frequently unsuccessful, due to the prolonged lymphopenia, especially of CD4 T cells, seen following transplant. ACT has the potential to enhance antitumor and overall immunity, and augment vaccine efficacy in the post-transplant setting. The ability to genetically engineer lymphocyte subsets has the further potential to improve the natural immune response, correct impaired immunity, and redirect T cells to an antitumor effector response. This chapter focuses on various applications of ACT for cancer immunotherapy, and we discuss some of the latest progress and hurdles in translating these technologies to the clinic.

  10. Microvesicle and tunneling nanotube mediated intercellular transfer of g-protein coupled receptors in cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Guescini, M.; Leo, G.; Genedani, S.; Carone, C.; Pederzoli, F.; Ciruela, F.; Guidolin, D.; Stocchi, V.; Mantuano, M.; Borroto-Escuela, D.O.; Fuxe, K.; Agnati, L.F.

    2012-03-10

    Recent evidence shows that cells exchange collections of signals via microvesicles (MVs) and tunneling nano-tubes (TNTs). In this paper we have investigated whether in cell cultures GPCRs can be transferred by means of MVs and TNTs from a source cell to target cells. Western blot, transmission electron microscopy and gene expression analyses demonstrate that A{sub 2A} and D{sub 2} receptors are present in released MVs. In order to further demonstrate the involvement of MVs in cell-to-cell communication we created two populations of cells (HEK293T and COS-7) transiently transfected with D{sub 2}R-CFP or A{sub 2A}R-YFP. These two types of cells were co-cultured, and FRET analysis demonstrated simultaneously positive cells to the D{sub 2}R-CFP and A{sub 2A}R-YFP. Fluorescence microscopy analysis also showed that GPCRs can move from one cell to another also by means of TNTs. Finally, recipient cells pre-incubated for 24 h with A{sub 2A}R positive MVs were treated with the adenosine A{sub 2A} receptor agonist CGS-21680. The significant increase in cAMP accumulation clearly demonstrated that A{sub 2A}Rs were functionally competent in target cells. These findings demonstrate that A{sub 2A} receptors capable of recognizing and decoding extracellular signals can be safely transferred via MVs from source to target cells.

  11. Combining a CD20 chimeric antigen receptor and an inducible caspase 9 suicide switch to improve the efficacy and safety of T cell adoptive immunotherapy for lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Budde, Lihua E; Berger, Carolina; Lin, Yukang; Wang, Jinjuan; Lin, Xubin; Frayo, Shani E; Brouns, Shaunda A; Spencer, David M; Till, Brian G; Jensen, Michael C; Riddell, Stanley R; Press, Oliver W

    2013-01-01

    Modification of T cells with chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) has emerged as a promising treatment modality for human malignancies. Integration of co-stimulatory domains into CARs can augment the activation and function of genetically targeted T cells against tumors. However, the potential for insertional mutagenesis and toxicities due to the infused cells have made development of safe methods for removing transferred cells an important consideration. We have genetically modified human T cells with a lentiviral vector to express a CD20-CAR containing both CD28 and CD137 co-stimulatory domains, a "suicide gene" relying on inducible activation of caspase 9 (iC9), and a truncated CD19 selectable marker. Rapid expansion (2000 fold) of the transduced T cells was achieved in 28 days after stimulation with artificial antigen presenting cells. Transduced T cells exhibited effective CD20-specific cytotoxic activity in vitro and in a mouse xenograft tumor model. Activation of the iC9 suicide switch resulted in efficient removal of transduced T cells both in vitro and in vivo. Our work demonstrates the feasibility and promise of this approach for treating CD20(+) malignancies in a safe and more efficient manner. A phase I clinical trial using this approach in patients with relapsed indolent B-NHL is planned. PMID:24358223

  12. Transfer of ultrasmall iron oxide nanoparticles from human brain-derived endothelial cells to human glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Halamoda Kenzaoui, Blanka; Angeloni, Silvia; Overstolz, Thomas; Niedermann, Philippe; Chapuis Bernasconi, Catherine; Liley, Martha; Juillerat-Jeanneret, Lucienne

    2013-05-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) are being used or explored for the development of biomedical applications in diagnosis and therapy, including imaging and drug delivery. Therefore, reliable tools are needed to study the behavior of NPs in biological environment, in particular the transport of NPs across biological barriers, including the blood-brain tumor barrier (BBTB), a challenging question. Previous studies have addressed the translocation of NPs of various compositions across cell layers, mostly using only one type of cells. Using a coculture model of the human BBTB, consisting in human cerebral endothelial cells preloaded with ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (USPIO NPs) and unloaded human glioblastoma cells grown on each side of newly developed ultrathin permeable silicon nitride supports as a model of the human BBTB, we demonstrate for the first time the transfer of USPIO NPs from human brain-derived endothelial cells to glioblastoma cells. The reduced thickness of the permeable mechanical support compares better than commercially available polymeric supports to the thickness of the basement membrane of the cerebral vascular system. These results are the first report supporting the possibility that USPIO NPs could be directly transferred from endothelial cells to glioblastoma cells across a BBTB. Thus, the use of such ultrathin porous supports provides a new in vitro approach to study the delivery of nanotherapeutics to brain cancers. Our results also suggest a novel possibility for nanoparticles to deliver therapeutics to the brain using endothelial to neural cells transfer.

  13. In what time scale proton transfer takes place in a live CHO cell?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mojumdar, Supratik Sen; Chowdhury, Rajdeep; Mandal, Amit Kumar; Bhattacharyya, Kankan

    2013-06-01

    Excited state proton transfer (ESPT) of pyranine (8-hydroxypyrene-1,3,6-trisulfonate, HPTS) in a live Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell is studied by time resolved confocal microscopy. The cytoplasm region of the cell is stained by a photoacid, HPTS (HA). The time constant of initial proton transfer (τPT) in the cell is found to be ˜10 times longer than that in bulk water, while the time constants of recombination (τrec) and dissociation (τdiss) in the cell are ˜3 times and ˜2 times longer, respectively. The slower rate of proton transfer (˜10 times) inside the CHO cell compared to that in bulk water is ascribed to slower solvation dynamics, lower availability of free water molecules, and disruption of hydrogen-bond network inside the cell. Translational and rotational diffusion of HPTS inside a single CHO cell have been investigated by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) and picosecond anisotropy measurement, respectively. Both the translational and rotational diffusion slow down inside the live cell. FCS studies indicate that HPTS remains tightly bound to a macromolecule inside the cell.

  14. MHC class II/ESO tetramer-based generation of in vitro primed anti-tumor T-helper lines for adoptive cell therapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    Poli, Caroline; Raffin, Caroline; Dojcinovic, Danijel; Luescher, Immanuel; Ayyoub, Maha; Valmori, Danila

    2013-02-01

    Generation of tumor-antigen specific CD4(+) T-helper (T(H)) lines through in vitro priming is of interest for adoptive cell therapy of cancer, but the development of this approach has been limited by the lack of appropriate tools to identify and isolate low frequency tumor antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells. Here, we have used recently developed MHC class II/peptide tetramers incorporating an immunodominant peptide from NY-ESO-1 (ESO), a tumor antigen frequently expressed in different human solid and hematologic cancers, to implement an in vitro priming platform allowing the generation of ESO-specific T(H) lines. We isolated phenotypically defined CD4(+) T-cell subpopulations from circulating lymphocytes of DR52b(+) healthy donors by flow cytometry cell sorting and stimulated them in vitro with peptide ESO(119-143), autologous APC and IL-2. We assessed the frequency of ESO-specific cells in the cultures by staining with DR52b/ESO(119-143) tetramers (ESO-tetramers) and TCR repertoire of ESO-tetramer(+) cells by co-staining with TCR variable β chain (BV) specific antibodies. We isolated ESO-tetramer(+) cells by flow cytometry cell sorting and expanded them with PHA, APC and IL-2 to generate ESO-specific T(H) lines. We characterized the lines for antigen recognition, by stimulation with ESO peptide or recombinant protein, cytokine production, by intracellular staining using specific antibodies, and alloreactivity, by stimulation with allo-APC. Using this approach, we could consistently generate ESO-tetramer(+) T(H) lines from conventional CD4(+)CD25(-) naïve and central memory populations, but not from effector memory populations or CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg. In vitro primed T(H) lines recognized ESO with affinities comparable to ESO-tetramer(+) cells from patients immunized with an ESO vaccine and used a similar TCR repertoire. In this study, using MHC class II/ESO tetramers, we have implemented an in vitro priming platform allowing the generation of ESO

  15. T cell transfer model of colitis: a great tool to assess the contribution of T cells in chronic intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Eri, Rajaraman; McGuckin, Michael A; Wadley, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) consist of Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) affecting about 0.1% of the western population. These two chronic gut diseases affect youth at their prime of life causing diarrhoea, intestinal bleeding, and severe gut discomfort. Mouse models of colitis have been major tools in understanding the pathogenesis of IBD. A number of mouse models are available to assess the contribution of T cells in the pathogenesis of CD and UC. Among these, the T cell transfer model of colitis is the most widely used model to dissect the initiation, induction, and regulation of immunopathology in chronic colitis mediated by T cells. The methodology below describes the classification of various animal models and explains the T cell transfer model in detail, including flow cytometry-based isolation of naïve T cells that are used in the transfer, immunological concepts, detailed immune-pathological assessment, shortcomings of the model, and the latest improvements to this colitis model. A special focus is paid to the utilisation of the T cell transfer model in delineating the immunopathology in a primary epithelial defect model of colitis, namely Winnie. PMID:22262449

  16. Characterization of electron transfer dissociation in the Orbitrap Velos HCD cell.

    PubMed

    Frese, Christian K; Nolting, Dirk; Altelaar, A F Maarten; Griep-Raming, Jens; Mohammed, Shabaz; Heck, Albert J R

    2013-11-01

    Electron transfer dissociation (ETD) is commonly employed in ion traps utilizing rf fields that facilitate efficient electron transfer reactions. Here, we explore performing ETD in the HCD collision cell on an Orbitrap Velos instrument by applying a static DC gradient axially to the rods. This gradient enables simultaneous three dimensional, charge sign independent, trapping of cations and anions, initiating electron transfer reactions in the center of the HCD cell where oppositely charged ions clouds overlap. Here, we evaluate this mode of operation for a number of tryptic peptide populations and the top-down sequence analysis of ubiquitin. Our preliminary data show that performing ETD in the HCD cell provides similar fragmentation as ion trap-ETD but requires further optimization to match performance of ion trap-ETD.

  17. Nuclear transfer with apoptotic bovine fibroblasts: can programmed cell death be reprogrammed?

    PubMed

    Miranda, Moyses dos Santos; Bressan, Fabiana Fernandes; De Bem, Tiago Henrique Camara; Merighe, Giovana Krempel Fonseca; Ohashi, Otávio Mitio; King, William Alan; Meirelles, Flavio Viera

    2012-06-01

    Cell death by apoptosis is considered to be irreversible. However, reports have indicated that its reversibility is possible if the cells have not yet reached the "point of no return." In order to add new information about this topic, we used cells at different moments of apoptotic process as nuclear donors in somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) in order to test if programmed cell death can be reversed. Adult bovine fibroblasts were treated with 10 μM of staurosporine (STP) for 3 h and analyzed for phosphatidylserine externalization (Annexin assay) and presence of active caspase-9. Annexin-positive (Anx+) and Caspase-9-positive (Casp-9+) cells were isolated by FACS and immediately transferred into enucleated in vitro matured bovine oocytes. After STP treatment, 89.9% of cells were Anx+ (4.6% in control cells; p<0.01) and 24.9% were Casp-9+ (2.4% in control cells; p<0.01). Fusion and cleavage were not affected by the use apoptotic cells (p>0.05). Also, the use of Anx+ cells did not affect blastocyst production compared to control (26.4% vs. 22.9%, respectively; p>0.05). However, blastocyst formation was affected by the use of Casp-9+ cells (12.3%; p<0.05). These findings contribute to the idea of that apoptosis is reversible only at early stages. Additionally, we hypothesize that the "point of no return" for apoptosis may be located around activation of Caspase-9.

  18. Rhesus monkey embryos produced by nuclear transfer from embryonic blastomeres or somatic cells.

    PubMed

    Mitalipov, Shoukhrat M; Yeoman, Richard R; Nusser, Kevin D; Wolf, Don P

    2002-05-01

    Production of genetically identical nonhuman primates would reduce the number of animals required for biomedical research and dramatically impact studies pertaining to immune system function, such as development of the human-immunodeficiency-virus vaccine. Our long-term goal is to develop robust somatic cell cloning and/or twinning protocols in the rhesus macaque. The objective of this study was to determine the developmental competence of nuclear transfer (NT) embryos derived from embryonic blastomeres (embryonic cell NT) or fetal fibroblasts (somatic cell NT) as a first step in the production of rhesus monkeys by somatic cell cloning. Development of cleaved embryos up to the 8-cell stage was similar among embryonic and somatic cell NT embryos and comparable to controls created by intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI; mean +/- SEM, 81 +/- 5%, 88 +/- 7%, and 87 +/- 4%, respectively). However, significantly lower rates of development to the blastocyst stage were observed with somatic cell NT embryos (1%) in contrast to embryonic cell NT (34 +/- 15%) or ICSI control embryos (46 +/- 6%). Development of somatic cell NT embryos was not markedly affected by donor cell treatment, timing of activation, or chemical activation protocol. Transfer of embryonic, but not of somatic cell NT embryos, into recipients resulted in term pregnancy. Future efforts will focus on optimizing the production of somatic cell NT embryos that develop in high efficiency to the blastocyst stage in vitro.

  19. Optimizing A Lipocomplex-Based Gene Transfer Method into HeLa Cell Line.

    PubMed

    Asgharian, Alimohammad; Banan, Mehdi; Najmabadi, Hossein

    2014-01-01

    One of the most significant steps in gene expression studies is transferring genes into cell cultures. Despite there are different methods for gene delivery such as viral and non-viral producers, some cationic lipid reagents have recently developed to transfect into mam- malian cell lines. The main aim of this study was optimizing and improving lipocomplex based transient transfection procedures into HeLa cell line which is being used widely as a typical cell in biological studies. This study was an experimental research. In this work, pCMV β-Gal DNA plasmid was used as a reporter DNA for determining the rate of gene transfection into HeLa cells. To accomplish the highest gene delivery into HeLa cells, optimizing experiments were car- ried out in different volumes of FuGENE-HD, Lipofectamine(TM)2000 and X-tremeGENE. Also, we investigated tranasfection efficiency in presence of various cell densities of HeLa cells. Then, transfection efficiency and cell toxicity were measured by beta gal staining and trypan blue methods, respectively. Using FuGENE-HD in volume of 4µl along with 10(5) HeLa cells, transfection efficiency was higher (43.66 ± 1.52%) in comparison with the cationic lipids Lipofectamine(TM)2000 and X-tremeGENE. In addition, the rate of cell toxicity in presence of FuGENE-HD was less than 5%. In summary, the cationic lipid FuGENE-HD indicates a suitable potential to transfer DNA into HeLa cells and it can be an efficient reagent for gene delivery for HeLa cells in vitro. Moreover, it is worth designing and optimizing gene transfer experiments for other cell lines with FuGENE-HD due to its low toxicity and high efficiency.

  20. Development of a high-titer retrovirus producer cell line capable of gene transfer into rhesus monkey hematopoietic stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Bodine, D.M.; McDonagh, K.T.; Brandt, S.J.; Ney, P.A.; Agricola, B.; Byrne, E.; Nienhuis, A.W. )

    1990-05-01

    Retroviral-mediated gene transfer into primitive hematopoietic cells has been difficult to achieve in large-animal models. The authors have developed an amphotropic producer clone that generates >10{sup 10} recombinant retroviral particles (colony-forming units) per ml of culture medium. Autologous rhesus monkey bone marrow cells were cocultured with either high or low titer producer clones for 4-6 days and reinfused into sublethally irradiated animals. The proviral genome was detected in blood and bone-marrow cells from all three animals reconstituted with cells cocultured with the high-titer producer cells. In contrast, three animals reconstituted with bone marrow cocultured with the low-titer producer clone exhibited no evidence of gene transfer.

  1. Horizontal gene transfers and cell fusions in microbiology, immunology and oncology (Review).

    PubMed

    Sinkovics, Joseph G

    2009-09-01

    Evolving young genomes of archaea, prokaryota and unicellular eukaryota were wide open for the acceptance of alien genomic sequences, which they often preserved and vertically transferred to their descendants throughout three billion years of evolution. Established complex large genomes, although seeded with ancestral retroelements, have come to regulate strictly their integrity. However, intruding retroelements, especially the descendents of Ty3/Gypsy, the chromoviruses, continue to find their ways into even the most established genomes. The simian and hominoid-Homo genomes preserved and accommodated a large number of endogenous retroviral genomic segments. These retroelements may mature into exogenous retroviruses, or into functional new genes. Phages and viruses have been instrumental in incorporating and transferring host cell genes. These events profoundly influenced and altered the course of evolution. Horizontal (lateral) gene transfers (HGT) overwhelmed the genomes of the ancient protocells and the evolving unicellular microorganisms, actually leading to their Cambrian explosion. While the rigidly organized genomes of multicellular organisms increasingly resist H/LGT, de-differentiated cells assuming the metabolism of their onto- or phylogenetic ancestors, open up widely to the practice of H/LGT by direct transfer, or to transfers mediated by viruses, or by cell fusions. This activity is intensified in malignantly transformed cells, thus rendering these subjects receptive to therapy with oncolytic viruses and with viral vectors of tumor-suppressive or immunogenic genetic materials. Naturally formed hybrids of dendritic and tumor cells are often tolerogenic, whereas laboratory products of these unisons may be immunogenic in the hosts of origin. As human breast cancer stem cells are induced by a treacherous class of CD8+ T cells to undergo epithelial to mesenchymal (ETM) transition and to yield to malignant transformation by the omnipresent proto

  2. Pig transgenesis by piggyBac transposition in combination with somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhenfang; Xu, Zhiqian; Zou, Xian; Zeng, Fang; Shi, Junsong; Liu, Dewu; Urschitz, Johann; Moisyadi, Stefan; Li, Zicong

    2013-12-01

    The production of animals by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is inefficient, with approximately 2% of micromanipulated oocytes going to term and resulting in live births. However, it is the most commonly used method for the generation of cloned transgenic livestock as it facilitates the attainment of transgenic animals once the nuclear donor cells are stably transfected and more importantly as alternatives methods of transgenesis in farm animals have proven even less efficient. Here we describe piggyBac-mediated transposition of a transgene into porcine primary cells and use of these genetically modified cells as nuclear donors for the generation of transgenic pigs by SCNT. Gene transfer by piggyBac transposition serves to provide an alternative approach for the transfection of nuclear donor cells used in SCNT.

  3. Somatic cell nuclear transfer (cloning): implications for the medical practitioner.

    PubMed

    Tong, W F; Ng, Y F; Ng, S C

    2002-07-01

    The current century will bring tremendous changes to the science and the practice of medicine. This century will be acknowledged as the century of Biology as the fusion of molecular genetics and experimental embryology pushes the barriers of science beyond perimeters that we have thought existed, as much as the past century was the century of Physics, with all the exact scientific calculations and predictions, resulting in electricity, nuclear power and quantum physics. The first major breakthrough has been the pioneering work of Wilmut and Campbell, first with the birth of Megan and Moran in 1995 (1), followed by the birth of Dolly the sheep, the first reported mammalian clone from a fully differentiated adult cell, reported in July 1996 (2). However, current cloning techniques are an extension of over 40 years of research using nuclei derived from non-human embryonic and fetal cells. However, following the birth of Dolly, the prospects of cloning technology have extended to ethically hazier areas of human cloning and embryonic stem cell research. This review hopes to bring the reader closer to the science and the ethics of this new technology, and what the implications are for the medical practitioner.

  4. Somatic cell nuclear transfer (cloning): implications for the medical practitioner.

    PubMed

    Tong, W F; Ng, Y F; Ng, S C

    2002-07-01

    The current century will bring tremendous changes to the science and the practice of medicine. This century will be acknowledged as the century of Biology as the fusion of molecular genetics and experimental embryology pushes the barriers of science beyond perimeters that we have thought existed, as much as the past century was the century of Physics, with all the exact scientific calculations and predictions, resulting in electricity, nuclear power and quantum physics. The first major breakthrough has been the pioneering work of Wilmut and Campbell, first with the birth of Megan and Moran in 1995 (1), followed by the birth of Dolly the sheep, the first reported mammalian clone from a fully differentiated adult cell, reported in July 1996 (2). However, current cloning techniques are an extension of over 40 years of research using nuclei derived from non-human embryonic and fetal cells. However, following the birth of Dolly, the prospects of cloning technology have extended to ethically hazier areas of human cloning and embryonic stem cell research. This review hopes to bring the reader closer to the science and the ethics of this new technology, and what the implications are for the medical practitioner. PMID:12437047

  5. DNA transfer and cell killing in epidermoid cells by diagnostic ultrasound activation of contrast agent gas bodies in vitro.

    PubMed

    Miller, Douglas L; Dou, Chunyan; Song, Jianming

    2003-04-01

    DNA transfer by sonoporation and cell killing in monolayer cells were examined by contrast-aided low-power diagnostic ultrasound (US). Culture chambers with epidermoid cell monolayers were scanned at about 1 mm/s with a 1.5-MHz scan head aimed upward at the chamber in a 37 degrees C water bath. For DNA transfer tests, plasmids coding for green fluorescent protein (GFP) were added to the medium, and GFP expression was assessed by flow cytometry after 2 days. In separate tests, cell killing was determined immediately after treatment. GFP-positive cell counts were 0.4% (0.7% SD) for shams and 3.7% (1.2% SD) of cells for exposure at 2.3 MPa with 2% Optison contrast agent. The fraction of dead cells was 3.4% (1.7% SD) in shams and 28.6% (6.3% SD) in exposed chambers. Both effects increased for increasing Optison concentration and increasing peak rarefactional pressure amplitude. Contrast-aided diagnostic US has a potential therapeutic application for gene transfer, but a trade-off appears to exist with cell killing.

  6. Somatic cell nuclear transfer: origins, the present position and future opportunities.

    PubMed

    Wilmut, Ian; Bai, Yu; Taylor, Jane

    2015-10-19

    Nuclear transfer that involves the transfer of the nucleus from a donor cell into an oocyte or early embryo from which the chromosomes have been removed was considered first as a means of assessing changes during development in the ability of the nucleus to control development. In mammals, development of embryos produced by nuclear transfer depends upon coordination of the cell cycles of donor and recipient cells. Our analysis of nuclear potential was completed in 1996 when a nucleus from an adult ewe mammary gland cell controlled development to term of Dolly the sheep. The new procedure has been used to target the first precise genetic modification into livestock; however, the greatest inheritance of the Dolly experiment was to make biologists think differently. If unknown factors in the recipient oocyte could reprogramme the nucleus to a stage very early in development then there must be other ways of making that change. Within 10 years, two laboratories working independently established protocols by which the introduction of selected transcription factors changes a small proportion of the treated cells to pluripotent stem cells. This ability to produce 'induced pluripotent stem cells' is providing revolutionary new opportunities in research and cell therapy.

  7. Somatic cell nuclear transfer: origins, the present position and future opportunities.

    PubMed

    Wilmut, Ian; Bai, Yu; Taylor, Jane

    2015-10-19

    Nuclear transfer that involves the transfer of the nucleus from a donor cell into an oocyte or early embryo from which the chromosomes have been removed was considered first as a means of assessing changes during development in the ability of the nucleus to control development. In mammals, development of embryos produced by nuclear transfer depends upon coordination of the cell cycles of donor and recipient cells. Our analysis of nuclear potential was completed in 1996 when a nucleus from an adult ewe mammary gland cell controlled development to term of Dolly the sheep. The new procedure has been used to target the first precise genetic modification into livestock; however, the greatest inheritance of the Dolly experiment was to make biologists think differently. If unknown factors in the recipient oocyte could reprogramme the nucleus to a stage very early in development then there must be other ways of making that change. Within 10 years, two laboratories working independently established protocols by which the introduction of selected transcription factors changes a small proportion of the treated cells to pluripotent stem cells. This ability to produce 'induced pluripotent stem cells' is providing revolutionary new opportunities in research and cell therapy. PMID:26416677

  8. Transferring Gus gene into intact rice cells by low energy ion beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zengliang, Yu; Jianbo, Yang; Yuejin, Wu; Beijiu, Cheng; Jianjun, He; Yuping, Huo

    1993-06-01

    A new technique of transferring genes by low energy ion beam has been reported in this paper. The Gus and CAT (chloramphenicol acetyltransferase) genes, as "foreign" genetic materials, were introduced into the suspension cells and ripe embryos or rice by implantation of 20-30 keV Ar + at doses ranging from 1 × 10 15 to 4 × 10 15 ions/cm 2. The activities of CAT and Gus were detected in the cells and embryos after several weeks. The results indicate that the transfer was a success.

  9. The Family of Adoption.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavao, Joyce Maguire

    This book aims to provide a broad framework within which to think about adoption as a whole system, so that everyone involved will learn to feel some empathy for the other members of the adoption process. The book, written by a family and adoption therapist who was adopted as an infant, describes predictable developmental stages and challenges for…

  10. Taking Adoption Seriously.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pierce, William

    1990-01-01

    Argues that adoption should be included in strategies to help children, teen parents, and other women with difficult pregnancies because adolescents are not equipped to raise children. Discusses the need for longitudinal research on adoption, adoption education in secondary schools, and studying mass media impact on adoption. (FMW)

  11. Ultrasound -Assisted Gene Transfer to Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem/Progenitor Cells (ASCs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Yoshitaka; Ueno, Hitomi; Hokari, Rei; Yuan, Wenji; Kuno, Shuichi; Kakimoto, Takashi; Enosawa, Shin; Negishi, Yoichi; Yoshinaka, Kiyoshi; Matsumoto, Yoichiro; Chiba, Toshio; Hayashi, Shuji

    2011-09-01

    In recent years, multilineage adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASCs) have become increasingly attractive as a promising source for cell transplantation and regenerative medicine. Particular interest has been expressed in the potential to make tissue stem cells, such as ASCs and marrow stromal cells (MSCs), differentiate by gene transfection. Gene transfection using highly efficient viral vectors such as adeno- and sendai viruses have been developed for this purpose. Sonoporation, or ultrasound (US)-assisted gene transfer, is an alternative gene manipulation technique which employs the creation of a jet stream by ultrasonic microbubble cavitation. Sonoporation using non-viral vectors is expected to be a much safer, although less efficient, tool for prospective clinical gene therapy. In this report, we assessed the efficacy of the sonoporation technique for gene transfer to ASCs. We isolated and cultured adipocyets from mouse adipose tissue. ASCs that have the potential to differentiate with transformation into adipocytes or osteoblasts were obtained. Using the US-assisted system, plasmid DNA containing beta-galactosidase (beta-Gal) and green fluorescent protein (GFP) genes were transferred to the ASCs. For this purpose, a Sonopore 4000 (NEPAGENE Co.) and a Sonazoid (Daiichi Sankyo Co.) instrument were used in combination. ASCs were subjected to US (3.1 MHz, 50% duty cycle, burst rate 2.0 Hz, intensity 1.2 W/cm2, exposure time 30 sec). We observed that the gene was more efficiently transferred with increased concentrations of plasmid DNA (5-150 μg/mL). However, further optimization of the US parameters is required, as the gene transfer efficiency was still relatively low. In conclusion, we herein demonstrate that a gene can be transferred to ASCs using our US-assisted system. In regenerative medicine, this system might resolve the current issues surrounding the use of viral vectors for gene transfer.

  12. Transfer of tra proteins into the recipient cell during bacterial conjugation mediated by plasmid ColIb-P9.

    PubMed Central

    Rees, C E; Wilkins, B M

    1989-01-01

    Selective transfer of the two products of the ColIb primase gene, sog, from donor to recipient cell during conjugation was demonstrated by two independent methods. The transfer of these tra proteins was unidirectional and dependent on DNA transfer. The Sog polypeptides were localized to the cytoplasm of the donor cell, but they appeared to interact with other tra gene products located in the inner membrane. After cell mating, the transferred polypeptides were found to be in the cytoplasm of the recipient cell, and it is estimated that as many as 500 Sog polypeptides were transferred per round of conjugation. It is proposed that these proteins are transferred as a result of an interaction with the single-stranded DNA and that the transferred strand may be coated with Sog polypeptides. Images PMID:2656642

  13. Functional auditory hair cells produced in the mammalian cochlea by in utero gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Gubbels, Samuel. P.; Woessner, David W.; Mitchell, John C.; Ricci, Anthony J.; Brigande, John V.

    2010-01-01

    Sensory hair cells in the mammalian cochlea convert mechanical stimuli into electrical impulses that subserve audition1,2. Loss of hair cells and their innervating neurons is the most frequent cause of hearing impairment3. Atonal homolog 1 (Atoh1, also known as Math1) is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor required for hair cell development4-6 and its misexpression in vitro7,8 and in vivo9,10 generates hair-cell-like cells. Atoh1-based gene therapy to ameliorate auditory10 and vestibular11 dysfunction has been proposed. However, the biophysical properties of putative hair cells induced by Atoh1 misexpression have not been characterized. Here we show that in utero gene transfer of Atoh1 produces functional supernumerary hair cells in the mouse cochlea. The induced hair cells display stereociliary bundles, attract neuronal processes, and express the ribbon synapse marker C-terminal binding protein 2 (Ctbp2)12,13. Moreover, the hair cells are capable of mechanoelectrical transduction1,2 and display basolateral conductances with age-appropriate specializations. Our results demonstrate that manipulation of cell fate by transcription factor misexpression produces functional sensory cells in the postnatal mammalian cochlea. We anticipate that our in utero gene transfer paradigm will enable the design and validation of gene therapies to ameliorate hearing loss in mouse models of human deafness14,15. PMID:18754012

  14. Electron Transfer Dynamics in Efficient Molecular Solar Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Ke; Ward, William; Farnum, Byron H.; Taheri, Atefeh; Johansson, Patrik; Meyer, Gerald John

    2014-10-01

    This research provided new mechanistic insights into surface mediated photochemical processes relevant to solar energy conversion. In this past three years our research has focused on oxidation photo-redox chemistry and on the role surface electric fields play on basic spectroscopic properties of molecular-semiconductor interfaces. Although this research as purely fundamental science, the results and their interpretation have relevance to applications in dye sensitized and photogalvanic solar cells as well as in the storage of solar energy in the form of chemical bonds.

  15. Fuel cell collector plates with improved mass transfer channels

    SciTech Connect

    Gurau, Vladimir; Barbir, Frano; Neutzler, Jay K.

    2003-04-22

    A fuel cell collector plate can be provided with one or more various channel constructions for the transport of reactants to the gas diffusion layer and the removal of water therefrom. The outlet channel can be arranged to have a reduced volume compared to the inlet channel, in both interdigitated and discontinuous spiral applications. The land width between an inlet channel and outlet channel can be reduced to improved mass flow rate in regions of deleted reactant concentrations. Additionally or alternatively, the depth of the inlet channel can be reduced in the direction of flow to reduce the diffusion path as the concentration of reactant is reduced.

  16. Material requirements for the adoption of unconventional silicon crystal and wafer growth techniques for high-efficiency solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hofstetter, Jasmin; del Cañizo, Carlos; Wagner, Hannes; Castellanos, Sergio; Buonassisi, Tonio

    2015-10-15

    Silicon wafers comprise approximately 40% of crystalline silicon module cost and represent an area of great technological innovation potential. Paradoxically, unconventional wafer-growth techniques have thus far failed to displace multicrystalline and Czochralski silicon, despite four decades of innovation. One of the shortcomings of most unconventional materials has been a persistent carrier lifetime deficit in comparison to established wafer technologies, which limits the device efficiency potential. In this perspective article, we review a defect-management framework that has proven successful in enabling millisecond lifetimes in kerfless and cast materials. Control of dislocations and slowly diffusing metal point defects during growth, coupled to effective control of fast-diffusing species during cell processing, is critical to enable high cell efficiencies. As a result, to accelerate the pace of novel wafer development, we discuss approaches to rapidly evaluate the device efficiency potential of unconventional wafers from injection-dependent lifetime measurements.

  17. Material requirements for the adoption of unconventional silicon crystal and wafer growth techniques for high-efficiency solar cells

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Hofstetter, Jasmin; del Cañizo, Carlos; Wagner, Hannes; Castellanos, Sergio; Buonassisi, Tonio

    2015-10-15

    Silicon wafers comprise approximately 40% of crystalline silicon module cost and represent an area of great technological innovation potential. Paradoxically, unconventional wafer-growth techniques have thus far failed to displace multicrystalline and Czochralski silicon, despite four decades of innovation. One of the shortcomings of most unconventional materials has been a persistent carrier lifetime deficit in comparison to established wafer technologies, which limits the device efficiency potential. In this perspective article, we review a defect-management framework that has proven successful in enabling millisecond lifetimes in kerfless and cast materials. Control of dislocations and slowly diffusing metal point defects during growth, coupled tomore » effective control of fast-diffusing species during cell processing, is critical to enable high cell efficiencies. As a result, to accelerate the pace of novel wafer development, we discuss approaches to rapidly evaluate the device efficiency potential of unconventional wafers from injection-dependent lifetime measurements.« less

  18. Exosome-mediated transfer from the tumor microenvironment increases TGFβ signaling in squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Languino, Lucia R; Singh, Amrita; Prisco, Marco; Inman, Gareth J; Luginbuhl, Adam; Curry, Joseph M; South, Andrew P

    2016-01-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGFβ) signaling in cancer is context dependent and acts either as a tumor suppressor or a tumor promoter. Loss of function mutation in TGFβ type II receptor (TβRII) is a frequent event in oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Recently, heterogeneity of TGFβ response has been described at the leading edge of SCC and this heterogeneity has been shown to influence stem cell renewal and drug resistance. Because exosome transfer from stromal to breast cancer cells regulates therapy resistance pathways we investigated whether exosomes contain components of the TGFβ signaling pathway and whether exosome transfer between stromal fibroblasts and tumor cells can influence TGFβ signaling in SCC. We demonstrate that exosomes purified from stromal fibroblasts isolated from patients with oral SCC contains TβRII. We also demonstrate that transfer of fibroblast exosomes increases TGFβ signaling in SCC keratinocytes devoid of TβRII which remain non-responsive to TGFβ ligand in the absence of exosome transfer. Overall our data show that stromal communication with tumor cells can direct TGFβ signaling in SCC. PMID:27347352

  19. Mechanism of transfer of functional microRNAs between mouse dendritic cells via exosomes

    PubMed Central

    Montecalvo, Angela; Larregina, Adriana T.; Shufesky, William J.; Beer Stolz, Donna; Sullivan, Mara L. G.; Karlsson, Jenny M.; Baty, Catherine J.; Gibson, Gregory A.; Erdos, Geza; Wang, Zhiliang; Milosevic, Jadranka; Tkacheva, Olga A.; Divito, Sherrie J.; Jordan, Rick; Lyons-Weiler, James; Watkins, Simon C.

    2012-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most potent APCs. Whereas immature DCs down-regulate T-cell responses to induce/maintain immunologic tolerance, mature DCs promote immunity. To amplify their functions, DCs communicate with neighboring DCs through soluble mediators, cell-to-cell contact, and vesicle exchange. Transfer of nanovesicles (< 100 nm) derived from the endocytic pathway (termed exosomes) represents a novel mechanism of DC-to-DC communication. The facts that exosomes contain exosome-shuttle miRNAs and DC functions can be regulated by exogenous miRNAs, suggest that DC-to-DC interactions could be mediated through exosome-shuttle miRNAs, a hypothesis that remains to be tested. Importantly, the mechanism of transfer of exosome-shuttle miRNAs from the exosome lumen to the cytosol of target cells is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that DCs release exosomes with different miRNAs depending on the maturation of the DCs. By visualizing spontaneous transfer of exosomes between DCs, we demonstrate that exosomes fused with the target DCs, the latter followed by release of the exosome content into the DC cytosol. Importantly, exosome-shuttle miRNAs are functional, because they repress target mRNAs of acceptor DCs. Our findings unveil a mechanism of transfer of exosome-shuttle miRNAs between DCs and its role as a means of communication and posttranscriptional regulation between DCs. PMID:22031862

  20. CASMI TSCC launch event, Paris, France, July 2013: an assessment of the key barriers to the commercialization and clinical adoption of pluripotent stem cell therapies.

    PubMed

    French, Anna; Bure, Kim; Brindley, David A

    2014-02-01

    The high incidence of unmet medical needs in combination with the rising burden of chronic diseases, linked to an increasingly aging population, necessitates new approaches to therapeutic intervention. One potential class of health care innovation that may offer an alternative approach to addressing current shortfalls is stem cell therapies. The CASMI Translational Stem Cell Consortium (CTSCC) was formed to elucidate the key hurdles to the commercialization and clinical adoption of stem cell technologies, with a particular focus on pluripotent stem cell (PSC) technologies. As a global pre-competitive academic-industry consortium, the CTSCC unites thought leaders from a range of sectors and technical specialties in defining and discovering solutions to roadblocks that will impede the field. Targeted toward stakeholder requirements at the delivery end of the translational spectrum, the CTSCC aims to provide mechanisms for multidirectional dialogue and to produce academically rigorous and commercially practicable research outputs to accelerate industry progress. On the 30th and 31st of July, 2013, the CASMI Translational Stem Cell Consortium (CTSCC) held a launch event at the Saint James Club, Paris, France. PMID:24392658

  1. CASMI TSCC launch event, Paris, France, July 2013: an assessment of the key barriers to the commercialization and clinical adoption of pluripotent stem cell therapies.

    PubMed

    French, Anna; Bure, Kim; Brindley, David A

    2014-02-01

    The high incidence of unmet medical needs in combination with the rising burden of chronic diseases, linked to an increasingly aging population, necessitates new approaches to therapeutic intervention. One potential class of health care innovation that may offer an alternative approach to addressing current shortfalls is stem cell therapies. The CASMI Translational Stem Cell Consortium (CTSCC) was formed to elucidate the key hurdles to the commercialization and clinical adoption of stem cell technologies, with a particular focus on pluripotent stem cell (PSC) technologies. As a global pre-competitive academic-industry consortium, the CTSCC unites thought leaders from a range of sectors and technical specialties in defining and discovering solutions to roadblocks that will impede the field. Targeted toward stakeholder requirements at the delivery end of the translational spectrum, the CTSCC aims to provide mechanisms for multidirectional dialogue and to produce academically rigorous and commercially practicable research outputs to accelerate industry progress. On the 30th and 31st of July, 2013, the CASMI Translational Stem Cell Consortium (CTSCC) held a launch event at the Saint James Club, Paris, France.

  2. CASMI TSCC Launch Event, Paris, France, July 2013: An Assessment of the Key Barriers to the Commercialization and Clinical Adoption of Pluripotent Stem Cell Therapies*

    PubMed Central

    Bure, Kim; Brindley, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract The high incidence of unmet medical needs in combination with the rising burden of chronic diseases, linked to an increasingly aging population, necessitates new approaches to therapeutic intervention. One potential class of health care innovation that may offer an alternative approach to addressing current shortfalls is stem cell therapies. The CASMI Translational Stem Cell Consortium (CTSCC) was formed to elucidate the key hurdles to the commercialization and clinical adoption of stem cell technologies, with a particular focus on pluripotent stem cell (PSC) technologies. As a global pre-competitive academic–industry consortium, the CTSCC unites thought leaders from a range of sectors and technical specialties in defining and discovering solutions to roadblocks that will impede the field. Targeted toward stakeholder requirements at the delivery end of the translational spectrum, the CTSCC aims to provide mechanisms for multidirectional dialogue and to produce academically rigorous and commercially practicable research outputs to accelerate industry progress. On the 30th and 31st of July, 2013, the CASMI Translational Stem Cell Consortium (CTSCC) held a launch event at the Saint James Club, Paris, France. PMID:24392658

  3. Phase I Clinical Trial of 4-1BB-based Adoptive T-Cell Therapy for Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV)-positive Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Eom, Hyeon-Seok; Choi, Beom K.; Lee, Youngjoo; Lee, Hyewon; Yun, Tak; Kim, Young H.; Lee, Je-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Although adoptive cell therapy using Ag-specific T cells has been tested successfully in the clinic, the production of these T cells has been challenging. By applying our simple and practical 4-1BB-based method for the generation of Ag-specific CD8+ T cells, here we determined the maximum tolerated dose, toxicity profile, immunologic responses, and clinical efficacy of autologous Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)/LMP2A-specific CD8+ T cells (EBV-induced Natural T cell; EBViNT) in patients with relapsed/refractory EBV-positive tumors. This was a single-center, phase I, dose-escalation trial study evaluating 4 escalating dosing schedules of single injected EBViNT. CD8+ T-cell responses against different LMP2A peptides in each patient were determined, and the most effective peptides were used to produce EBViNT. The produced autologous EBViNTs were single infused to patients with EBV-associated malignancy who had failed to standard treatments and were of HLA-A02 or A24 type. Of 11 patients enrolled, 8 patients received a single infusion of EBViNT: 4 with nasopharyngeal carcinomas, 1 with Hodgkin lymphoma, 2 with extranodal NK/T lymphomas, and 1 with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Single infusion of EBViNT was well tolerated by all the patients and generated objective antitumor responses in 3 of them. EBViNT infusion induced 2 waves of interferon-γ response: 1 approximately 1 week and the other 4–8 weeks after the treatment. The strength of the second wave was related to the efficacy of the treatment. The current trial shows that EBViNT therapy is safe and may provide a new option for treating EBV-positive recurrent cancer patients resistant to conventional therapy. PMID:26938947

  4. Somatic cell nuclear transfer: origins, the present position and future opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Wilmut, Ian; Bai, Yu; Taylor, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear transfer that involves the transfer of the nucleus from a donor cell into an oocyte or early embryo from which the chromosomes have been removed was considered first as a means of assessing changes during development in the ability of the nucleus to control development. In mammals, development of embryos produced by nuclear transfer depends upon coordination of the cell cycles of donor and recipient cells. Our analysis of nuclear potential was completed in 1996 when a nucleus from an adult ewe mammary gland cell controlled development to term of Dolly the sheep. The new procedure has been used to target the first precise genetic modification into livestock; however, the greatest inheritance of the Dolly experiment was to make biologists think differently. If unknown factors in the recipient oocyte could reprogramme the nucleus to a stage very early in development then there must be other ways of making that change. Within 10 years, two laboratories working independently established protocols by which the introduction of selected transcription factors changes a small proportion of the treated cells to pluripotent stem cells. This ability to produce ‘induced pluripotent stem cells’ is providing revolutionary new opportunities in research and cell therapy. PMID:26416677

  5. Effective donor cell fusion conditions for production of cloned dogs by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Park, JungEun; Oh, HyunJu; Hong, SoGun; Kim, MinJung; Kim, GeonA; Koo, OkJae; Kang, SungKeun; Jang, Goo; Lee, ByeongChun

    2011-03-01

    As shown by the birth of the first cloned dog 'Snuppy', a protocol to produce viable cloned dogs has been reported. In order to evaluate optimum fusion conditions for improving dog cloning efficiency, in vivo matured oocytes were reconstructed with adult somatic cells from a female Pekingese using different fusion conditions. Fusion with needle vs chamber methods, and with low vs high pulse strength was compared by evaluating fusion rate and in vivo development of canine cloned embryos. The fusion rates in the high voltage groups were significantly higher than in the low voltage groups regardless of fusion method (83.5 vs 66.1% for the needle fusion method, 67.4 vs 37.9% for the fusion chamber method). After embryo transfer, one each pregnancy was detected after using the needle fusion method with high and low voltage and in the chamber fusion method with high voltage, whereas no pregnancy was detected using the chamber method with low voltage. However, only the pregnancy from the needle fusion method with high voltage was maintained to term and one healthy puppy was delivered. The results of the present study demonstrated that two DC pulses of 3.8 to 4.0 kV/cm for 15 μsec using the needle fusion method were the most effective method for the production of cloned dogs under the conditions of this experiment.

  6. Adenovirus-mediated gene transfer to tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Cascalló, Manel; Alemany, Ramon

    2004-01-01

    Cell transduction in vitro is only the first step toward proving that a genetherapy vector can be useful to treat tumors. However, tumor targeting in vivo is now the milestone for gene therapy to succeed against disseminated cancer. Therefore, most valuable information is obtained from studies of vector biodistribution. Owing to the hepatotropism of adenoviral vectors, a particularly important parameter is the tumor/liver ratio. This ratio can be given at the level of gene expression if the amount of transgene expression is measured. To optimize the targeting, however, the levels of viral particles that reach the tumor compared to other organs must be studied. Most of this chapter deals with methods to quantify the virus fate in tumor-bearing animals. We present a radioactive labeling method that can be used to study biodistribution. After a small section dealing with tumor models, we describe methods to quantify different parameters related to adenovirus-mediated tumor targeting. PMID:14970588

  7. Transfer of retinol-binding protein from HepG2 human hepatoma cells to cocultured rat stellate cells.

    PubMed Central

    Senoo, H; Smeland, S; Malaba, L; Bjerknes, T; Stang, E; Roos, N; Berg, T; Norum, K R; Blomhoff, R

    1993-01-01

    Rat liver stellate cells were cocultured with HepG2 human hepatoma cells, which are known to synthesize and secrete retinol-binding protein (RBP). Transfer of human RBP from HepG2 cells to stellate cells was studied by cryoimmunoelectron microscopy. In stellate cells, human RBP was found on the cell surface and within endosomes. The transfer of human RBP from HepG2 cells to stellate cells was blocked by addition of RBP antibodies to the culture medium. Very little uptake of RBP was observed when fibroblasts were cocultured with HepG2 cells. In a series of experiments, RBP was bound to its putative cell surface receptor at 4 degrees C, and the stellate cells were washed and then incubated at 37 degrees C in order to allow them to internalize a pulse of RBP. About 50% of the RBP was internalized after 6 min of incubation. The RBP-positive vesicles were initially (after 1-2 min) located close to the cell surface and later were found deeper in the cytoplasm. During the first 10 min, RBP was mainly observed in close association with membranes. After 2 hr, however, most RBP was localized in intracellular vesicles at a distance from the vesicular membranes, suggesting that RBP had been released from its receptor. Saturable binding of RBP to liver cells was demonstrated when cells were incubated with 125I-RBP at 4 degrees C and cell-associated radioactivity was determined. The calculated dissociation constant for the specific binding was 12.7 +/- 3.2 nM. A binding assay was also developed for determination of solubilized RBP receptor. Solubilized proteins from the nonparenchymal liver cells bound about 30 times more 125I-labeled RBP than did parenchymal cells (based on mass of cell protein). These data suggest that RBP mediates the paracrine transfer of retinol from hepatocytes to perisinusoidal stellate cells in liver and that stellate cells bind and internalize RBP by receptor-mediated endocytosis. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8386378

  8. Embryo production and possible species preservation by nuclear transfer of somatic cells isolated from bovine semen.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Westhusin, Mark; Long, Charles; Johnson, Gregory; Burghardt, Robert; Kraemer, Duane

    2010-12-01

    Somatic cells in semen are a potential source of nuclei for nuclear transfer to produce genetically identical animals; this is especially important when an animal has died and the only viable genetic material available is frozen semen. Usefulness of somatic cells obtained from fresh (cultured) and frozen (isolated, not cultured) bovine semen for nuclear transfer was evaluated. Twelve ejaculates were collected from nine bulls representing three breeds: Charolais, Brahman, and crossbred Rodeo bull. All samples were processed immediately and cell growth was obtained from seven of the twelve ejaculates (58.3%). Cells from three bulls (with the best growth rates) were evaluated by optical microscopy and used in cloning experiments. In culture, these cells exhibited classic epithelial morphology and expressed cytokeratin and vimentin, indicating they were of epithelial origin. When cells from the three bulls were used as donor cells, 15.9% (18/113), 34.5% (29/84), and 14.4% (13/90) of the fused embryos developed into blastocysts, respectively. Of the blastocyst stage embryos, 38.9% (7/18), 72.4% (21/29), and 61.5% (8/13) hatched, respectively. Somatic cells isolated (not cultured) from frozen bovine semen were also used in the cloning experiments. Although cleavage occurred, no compact morulae or blastocysts were obtained. In conclusion, epithelial cell growth was obtained from fresh bovine ejaculates with relatively high efficiency. Somatic cells from semen can be used as nucleus donors to produce cloned blastocyst-stage embryos.

  9. Optimization of procedures for cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer in mice.

    PubMed

    Chung, Young Gie; Gao, Shaorong; Latham, Keith E

    2006-01-01

    Cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer is a complex procedure that is dependent on correct interactions between oocyte and donor cell genome. These interactions require minimal insult to either the oocyte or the transplanted nucleus. Available data also indicate that reprogramming the donor cell genome may be slow, so that the cloned embryo expresses genes typical of the donor cell, and thus has different characteristics from normal embryos. Procedures that minimize damage to the donor genome and that address the unique characteristics of the cloned construct should enhance the efficacy of the method.

  10. Viruses transfer the antiviral second messenger cGAMP between cells

    PubMed Central

    Bridgeman, A.; Maelfait, J.; Davenne, T.; Partridge, T.; Peng, Y.; Mayer, A.; Dong, T.; Kaever, V.; Borrow, P.; Rehwinkel, J.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS) detects cytosolic DNA during virus infection and induces an antiviral state. cGAS signals by synthesis of a second messenger, cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP), which activates stimulator of interferon genes (STING). We show that cGAMP is incorporated into viral particles, including lentivirus and herpesvirus virions, when these are produced in cGAS-expressing cells. Virions transferred cGAMP to newly infected cells and triggered a STING-dependent antiviral program. These effects were independent of exosomes and viral nucleic acids. Our results reveal a way by which a signal for innate immunity is transferred between cells, potentially accelerating and broadening antiviral responses. Moreover, infection of dendritic cells with cGAMP-loaded lentiviruses enhanced their activation. Loading viral vectors with cGAMP therefore holds promise for vaccine development. PMID:26229117

  11. Equilibrium exchange of dimethyl methylphosphonate across the human red cell membrane measured using NMR spin transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirk, Kiaran; Kuchel, Philip W.

    The 31P NMR spectrum of dimethyl methylphosphonate, in a suspension of human erythrocytes in a hypertonic medium, is characterized by separate intra- and extracellular resonances. The compound crosses the red cell membrane too rapidly for its transport to be monitored using conventional NMR time-course techniques. In the present work we adapted the saturation transfer method to measure the unidirectional flux of dimethyl methylphosphonate into the cell at equilibrium and thereby gained an estimate of its permeability coefficient. Repeated measurements on low hematocrit cell suspensions showed no significant variation in the permeability coefficients for cells from five different donors. Saturation transfer measurements conducted over a range of hematocrits demonstrated the hematocrit dependence of the unidirectional rate constant for dimethyl methylphosphonate influx. The calculated permeability coefficient was independent of hematocrit.

  12. Endosperm transfer cell-specific genes and proteins: structure, function and applications in biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Lopato, Sergiy; Borisjuk, Nikolai; Langridge, Peter; Hrmova, Maria

    2014-01-01

    Endosperm transfer cells (ETC) are one of four main types of cells in endosperm. A characteristic feature of ETC is the presence of cell wall in-growths that create an enlarged plasma membrane surface area. This specialized cell structure is important for the specific function of ETC, which is to transfer nutrients from maternal vascular tissue to endosperm. ETC-specific genes are of particular interest to plant biotechnologists, who use genetic engineering to improve grain quality and yield characteristics of important field crops. The success of molecular biology-based approaches to manipulating ETC function is dependent on a thorough understanding of the functions of ETC-specific genes and ETC-specific promoters. The aim of this review is to summarize the existing data on structure and function of ETC-specific genes and their products. Potential applications of ETC-specific genes, and in particular their promoters for biotechnology will be discussed. PMID:24578704

  13. Function of Rhizodermal Transfer Cells in the Fe Stress Response Mechanism of Capsicum annuum L

    PubMed Central

    Landsberg, Ernst-Christian

    1986-01-01

    A variety of red pepper (Capsicum annuum L., cv Yaglik) responds to Fe deficiency stress with simultaneously enhanced H+ extrusion, reduction of ferric ions and synthesis of malic and citric acid in a swollen subapical root zone densely covered with root hairs. It is demonstrated that these stress responses temporally coincide with the development of rhizodermal and hypodermal transfer cells in this root zone. During stress response the transfer cells show a marked autofluorescence which could arise from endogenous iron chelators of the phenolic acid type. The presence of organelle-rich cytoplasm which often exhibits rotational cytoplasmic streaming points to high physiological activity and makes these cells, with their increased plasmalemma surface, particularly well suited for the entire stress response mechanism. Since Fe stress-induced acidification is diminished by vanadate and erythrosin B, both specific inhibitors of plasmalemma ATPases, it seems reasonable to suppose that H+ pumping from transfer cells is activated by an ATPase located in their plasmamembrane. H+ extrusion is also shown to be inhibited by abscisic acid. Raised phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity and simultaneous accumulation of malate in the swollen root zone point to the action of a pH stat preventing a detrimental rise in cytoplasmic pH of transfer cells during enhanced H+ extrusion. The simultaneous increase in citric acid concentration favors chelation of iron at the site of its uptake and thus ensures long distance transport to the areas of metabolic demand. A direct link between citrate accumulation and ferric ion reduction as proposed in recent literature further supports the crucial role of transfer cells in the response to Fe deficiency stress. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 PMID:16665060

  14. Boosting the efficiency of quantum dot sensitized solar cells through modulation of interfacial charge transfer.

    PubMed

    Kamat, Prashant V

    2012-11-20

    The demand for clean energy will require the design of nanostructure-based light-harvesting assemblies for the conversion of solar energy into chemical energy (solar fuels) and electrical energy (solar cells). Semiconductor nanocrystals serve as the building blocks for designing next generation solar cells, and metal chalcogenides (e.g., CdS, CdSe, PbS, and PbSe) are particularly useful for harnessing size-dependent optical and electronic properties in these nanostructures. This Account focuses on photoinduced electron transfer processes in quantum dot sensitized solar cells (QDSCs) and discusses strategies to overcome the limitations of various interfacial electron transfer processes. The heterojunction of two semiconductor nanocrystals with matched band energies (e.g., TiO(2) and CdSe) facilitates charge separation. The rate at which these separated charge carriers are driven