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Sample records for adoptive cell transfer

  1. Isolation of Immune Cells for Adoptive Transfer.

    PubMed

    Barhoumi, Tlili; Paradis, Pierre; Mann, Koren K; Schiffrin, Ernesto L

    2017-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of T lymphocytes is a useful technique to characterize the role of the immune system in hypertension and vascular disease. Here we describe as an example the isolation of splenic T regulatory cells from donor mice processed to obtain a single cell suspension, followed by negative and positive selection to obtain CD4(+) T cells and CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg cells, respectively. Treg cells can be subsequently transferred to recipient animals.

  2. Adoptive cell transfer in autoimmune hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Czaja, Albert J

    2015-06-01

    Adoptive cell transfer is an intervention in which autologous immune cells that have been expanded ex vivo are re-introduced to mitigate a pathological process. Tregs, mesenchymal stromal cells, dendritic cells, macrophages and myeloid-derived suppressor cells have been transferred in diverse immune-mediated diseases, and Tregs have been the focus of investigations in autoimmune hepatitis. Transferred Tregs have improved histological findings in animal models of autoimmune hepatitis and autoimmune cholangitis. Key challenges relate to discrepant findings among studies, phenotypic instability of the transferred population, uncertain side effects and possible need for staged therapy involving anti-inflammatory drugs. Future investigations must resolve issues about the purification, durability and safety of these cells and consider alternative populations if necessary.

  3. Adoptive cell transfer therapy for malignant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Eiichi; Takano, Shingo; Ohno, Tadao; Tsuboi, Koji

    2012-01-01

    To date, various adoptive immunotherapies have been attempted for treatment of malignant gliomas using nonspecific and/or specific effector cells. Since the late 1980s, with the development of rIL-2, the efficacy of lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cell therapy with or without rIL-2 for malignant gliomas had been tested with some modifications in therapeutic protocols. With advancements in technology, ex vivo expanded tumor specific cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL) or those lineages were used in clinical trials with higher tumor response rates. In addition, combinations of those adoptive cell transfer using LAK cells, CTLs or natural killer (NK) cells with autologous tumor vaccine (ATV) therapy were attempted. Also, a strategy of high-dose (or lymphodepleting) chemotherapy followed by adoptive cell transfer has been drawing attentions recently. The most important role of these clinical studies using cell therapy was to prove that these ex vivo expanded effector cells could kill tumor cells in vivo. Although recent clinical results could demonstrate radiologic tumor shrinkage in a number of cases, cell transfer therapy alone has been utilized less frequently, because of the high cost of ex vivo cell expansion, the short duration of antitumor activity in vivo, and the recent shift of interest to vaccine immunotherapy. Nevertheless, NK cell therapy using specific feeder cells or allergenic NK cell lines have potentials to be a good choice of treatment because of easy ex vivo expansion and their efficacy especially when combined with vaccine therapy as they are complementary to each other. Also, further studies are expected to clarify the efficacy of the high-dose chemotherapy followed by a large scale cell transfer therapy as a new therapeutic strategy for malignant gliomas.

  4. Studying Neutrophil Migration In Vivo Using Adoptive Cell Transfer.

    PubMed

    Miyabe, Yoshishige; Kim, Nancy D; Miyabe, Chie; Luster, Andrew D

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive cell transfer experiments can be used to study the roles of cell trafficking molecules on the migratory behavior of specific immune cell populations in vivo. Chemoattractants and their G protein-coupled seven-transmembrane-spanning receptors regulate migration of cells in vivo, and dysregulated expression of chemoattractants and their receptors is implicated in autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. Inflammatory arthritides, such as rheumatoid arthritis (RA), are characterized by the recruitment of inflammatory cells into joints. The K/BxN serum transfer mouse model of inflammatory arthritis shares many similar features with RA. In this autoantibody-induced model of arthritis, neutrophils are the critical immune cells necessary for the development of joint inflammation and damage. We have used adoptive neutrophil transfer to define the contributions of chemoattractant receptors, cytokines, and activation receptors expressed on neutrophils that critically regulate their entry into the inflamed joint. In this review, we describe the procedure of neutrophil adoptive transfer to study the influence of neutrophil-specific receptors or mediators upon the their recruitment into the joint using the K/BxN model of inflammatory arthritis as a model of how adoptive cell transfer studies can be used to study immune cell migration in vivo.

  5. Pathogen boosted adoptive cell transfer immunotherapy to treat solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Gang; Schauder, David M.; Jing, Weiqing; Jiang, Aimin; Joshi, Nikhil S.; Johnson, Bryon; Cui, Weiguo

    2017-01-01

    Because of insufficient migration and antitumor function of transferred T cells, especially inside the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment (TME), the efficacy of adoptive cell transfer (ACT) is much curtailed in treating solid tumors. To overcome these challenges, we sought to reenergize ACT (ReACT) with a pathogen-based cancer vaccine. To bridge ACT with a pathogen, we genetically engineered tumor-specific CD8 T cells in vitro with a second T-cell receptor (TCR) that recognizes a bacterial antigen. We then transferred these dual-specific T cells in combination with intratumoral bacteria injection to treat solid tumors in mice. The dual-specific CD8 T cells expanded vigorously, migrated to tumor sites, and robustly eradicated primary tumors. The mice cured from ReACT also developed immunological memory against tumor rechallenge. Mechanistically, we have found that this combined approach reverts the immunosuppressive TME and recruits CD8 T cells with an increased number and killing ability to the tumors. PMID:28069963

  6. Pathogen boosted adoptive cell transfer immunotherapy to treat solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Xin, Gang; Schauder, David M; Jing, Weiqing; Jiang, Aimin; Joshi, Nikhil S; Johnson, Bryon; Cui, Weiguo

    2017-01-24

    Because of insufficient migration and antitumor function of transferred T cells, especially inside the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment (TME), the efficacy of adoptive cell transfer (ACT) is much curtailed in treating solid tumors. To overcome these challenges, we sought to reenergize ACT (ReACT) with a pathogen-based cancer vaccine. To bridge ACT with a pathogen, we genetically engineered tumor-specific CD8 T cells in vitro with a second T-cell receptor (TCR) that recognizes a bacterial antigen. We then transferred these dual-specific T cells in combination with intratumoral bacteria injection to treat solid tumors in mice. The dual-specific CD8 T cells expanded vigorously, migrated to tumor sites, and robustly eradicated primary tumors. The mice cured from ReACT also developed immunological memory against tumor rechallenge. Mechanistically, we have found that this combined approach reverts the immunosuppressive TME and recruits CD8 T cells with an increased number and killing ability to the tumors.

  7. The use of endogenous T cells for adoptive transfer.

    PubMed

    Yee, Cassian

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive T-cell therapy involves the ex vivo enrichment and expansion of tumor-reactive T cells for infusion. As an immune-based approach, adoptive therapy has become an increasingly attractive modality for the treatment of patients with cancer due to its potential for high specificity, non-cross resistance with conventional therapies, and promise of long-term immunoprotection. In recent years, a resurgence in discoveries underlying T-cell recognition, tumor immune evasion, and T-cell memory and differentiation coupled with the development of several enabling technologies have facilitated a renewed focus in the field of adoptive therapy and its transition to the clinical arena as a treatment modality for patients with cancer. In this review, endogenous T cells derived from peripheral blood or tumor sites will be presented as a source of effector cells for adoptive therapy and strategies to isolate, manipulate, and enhance the function of antigen-specific T cells in vitro and to augment their in vivo efficacy and persistence by host immunomodulation are presented in the context of an ever-increasing inventory of preclinical and clinically available reagents. Optimizing the combination of adoptive cellular therapy and other immune-based and conventional approaches will herald a new generation of research and clinical opportunities for cancer immunotherapy.

  8. Multifunctional T-cell Analyses to Study Response and Progression in Adoptive Cell Transfer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chao; Cheung, Ann F.; Chodon, Thinle; Koya, Richard C.; Wu, Zhongqi; Ng, Charles; Avramis, Earl; Cochran, Alistair J.; Witte, Owen N.; Baltimore, David; Chmielowski, Bartosz; Economou, James S.; Comin-Anduix, Begonya; Ribas, Antoni; Heath, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Adoptive cell transfer (ACT) of genetically engineered T cells expressing cancer-specific T-cell receptors (TCR) is a promising cancer treatment. Here, we investigate the in vivo functional activity and dynamics of the transferred cells by analyzing samples from 3 representative patients with melanoma enrolled in a clinical trial of ACT with TCR transgenic T cells targeted against the melanosomal antigen MART-1. The analyses included evaluating 19 secreted proteins from individual cells from phenotypically defined T-cell subpopulations, as well as the enumeration of T cells with TCR antigen specificity for 36 melanoma antigens. These analyses revealed the coordinated functional dynamics of the adoptively transferred, as well as endogenous, T cells, and the importance of highly functional T cells in dominating the antitumor immune response. This study highlights the need to develop approaches to maintaining antitumor T-cell functionality with the aim of increasing the long-term efficacy of TCR-engineered ACT immunotherapy. SIGNIFICANCE A longitudinal functional study of adoptively transferred TCR–engineered lymphocytes yielded revealing snapshots for understanding the changes of antitumor responses over time in ACT immunotherapy of patients with advanced melanoma. PMID:23519018

  9. T-cell-based Immunotherapy: Adoptive Cell Transfer and Checkpoint Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Houot, Roch; Schultz, Liora Michal; Marabelle, Aurélien; Kohrt, Holbrook

    2015-10-01

    Tumor immunotherapy has had demonstrable efficacy in patients with cancer. The most promising results have been with T-cell-based therapies. These include adoptive cell transfer of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, genetically engineered T cells, and immune checkpoint inhibitor antibodies. In this review, we describe the different T-cell-based strategies currently in clinical trials and put their applications, present and future, into perspective.

  10. Adoptive transfer of hepatic stellate cells ameliorates liver ischemia reperfusion injury through enriching regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Feng, Min; Wang, Quanrongzi; Wang, Hao; Wang, Meng; Guan, Wenxian; Lu, Ling

    2014-04-01

    Our previous study indicated that adoptive transferred regulatory T cells (Tregs) attenuated liver ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI). Recent studies demonstrated that hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) were producers of induced Tregs (iTregs) via retinoic acid. This study aimed to investigate the role of adoptive transferred HSCs in liver IRI. Mice were treated with gradient doses of HSCs before surgery at 24h or 72h. The levels of serum aminotransferases and hepatic cytokines were evaluated after reperfusion. Meanwhile, hepatic Tregs and their subsets were analyzed by flow cytometry. We found that adoptive transferred HSCs attenuated liver IRI. Administration of HSCs expanded the number of hepatic iTregs and natural Tregs (nTregs) after reperfusion. In addition, we found that the increased Tregs were almost Helios-Tregs before surgery. These Helios-Tregs were considered as iTregs and protected liver from IRI partially. Furthermore, adoptive transferred HSCs stabilized nTregs and prevented nTregs from reducing after reperfusion. These nTregs also attenuated liver IRI partially. Depletion of Tregs abolished the protective effect of HSCs. Thus, we conclude that adoptive transferred HSCs ameliorate liver IRI in Tregs-dependent manner.

  11. Myeloid-derived suppressor cell impact on endogenous and adoptively transferred T cells.

    PubMed

    Arina, Ainhoa; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2015-04-01

    Novel models of autochthonous tumorigenesis and adoptive T cell therapy (ATT) are providing new clues regarding the pro-tumorigenic and immunosuppressive effects of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), and their interaction with T cells. New findings are shifting the perception of the main level at which MDSC act, from direct cell-to-cell suppression to others, such as limiting T cell infiltration. Adoptively transferred, high-avidity T cells recognizing peptides with high-affinity for MHC-I eliminated large tumors. However, low-avidity T cells or low-affinity peptides resulted in failure to eradicate tumors. Manipulation of intratumoral myeloid cells improved the outcome of otherwise unsuccessful ATT. Therefore, therapeutic intervention directed at the tumor stroma might be required when using suboptimal T cells for ATT.

  12. Restoration of Viral Immunity in Immunodeficient Humans by the Adoptive Transfer of T Cell Clones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riddell, Stanley R.; Watanabe, Kathe S.; Goodrich, James M.; Li, Cheng R.; Agha, Mounzer E.; Greenberg, Philip D.

    1992-07-01

    The adoptive transfer of antigen-specific T cells to establish immunity is an effective therapy for viral infections and tumors in animal models. The application of this approach to human disease would require the isolation and in vitro expansion of human antigen-specific T cells and evidence that such T cells persist and function in vivo after transfer. Cytomegalovirus-specific CD8^+ cytotoxic T cell (CTL) clones could be isolated from bone marrow donors, propagated in vitro, and adoptively transferred to immunodeficient bone marrow transplant recipients. No toxicity developed and the clones provided persistent reconstitution of CD8^+ cytomegalovirus-specific CTL responses.

  13. Proliferation-Linked Apoptosis of Adoptively Transferred T Cells after IL-15 Administration in Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Carolina; Berger, Michael; Beard, Brian C.; Kiem, Hans-Peter; Gooley, Theodore A.; Riddell, Stanley R.

    2013-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of antigen-specific effector T cells is being used to treat human infections and malignancy. T cell persistence is a prerequisite for therapeutic efficacy, but reliably establishing a high-level and durable T cell response by transferring cultured CD8+ T cells remains challenging. Thus, strategies that promote a transferred high-level T cell response may improve the efficacy of T cell therapy. Lymphodepletion enhances persistence of transferred T cells in mice in part by reducing competition for IL-15, a common γ-chain cytokine that promotes T cell memory, but lymphodepleting regimens have toxicity. IL-15 can be safely administered and has minimal effects on CD4+ regulatory T cells at low doses, making it an attractive adjunct in adoptive T cell therapy. Here, we show in lymphoreplete macaca nemestrina, that proliferation of adoptively transferred central memory-derived CD8+ effector T (TCM/E) cells is enhanced in vivo by administering IL-15. TCM/E cells migrated to memory niches, persisted, and acquired both central memory and effector memory phenotypes regardless of the cytokine treatment. Unexpectedly, despite maintaining T cell proliferation, IL-15 did not augment the magnitude of the transferred T cell response in blood, bone marrow, or lymph nodes. T cells induced to proliferate by IL-15 displayed increased apoptosis demonstrating that enhanced cycling was balanced by cell death. These results suggest that homeostatic mechanisms that regulate T cell numbers may interfere with strategies to augment a high-level T cell response by adoptive transfer of CD8+ TCM/E cells in lymphoreplete hosts. PMID:23418547

  14. Adoptive transfer of induced-Treg cells effectively attenuates murine airway allergic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Lan, Qin; Chen, Maogen; Chen, Hui; Zhu, Ning; Zhou, Xiaohui; Wang, Julie; Fan, Huimin; Yan, Chun-Song; Kuang, Jiu-Long; Warburton, David; Togbe, Dieudonnée; Ryffel, Bernhard; Zheng, Song-Guo; Shi, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Both nature and induced regulatory T (Treg) lymphocytes are potent regulators of autoimmune and allergic disorders. Defects in endogenous Treg cells have been reported in patients with allergic asthma, suggesting that disrupted Treg cell-mediated immunological regulation may play an important role in airway allergic inflammation. In order to determine whether adoptive transfer of induced Treg cells generated in vitro can be used as an effective therapeutic approach to suppress airway allergic inflammation, exogenously induced Treg cells were infused into ovalbumin-sensitized mice prior to or during intranasal ovalbumin challenge. The results showed that adoptive transfer of induced Treg cells prior to allergen challenge markedly reduced airway hyperresponsiveness, eosinophil recruitment, mucus hyper-production, airway remodeling, and IgE levels. This effect was associated with increase of Treg cells (CD4(+)FoxP3(+)) and decrease of dendritic cells in the draining lymph nodes, and with reduction of Th1, Th2, and Th17 cell response as compared to the controls. Moreover, adoptive transfer of induced Treg cells during allergen challenge also effectively attenuate airway inflammation and improve airway function, which are comparable to those by natural Treg cell infusion. Therefore, adoptive transfer of in vitro induced Treg cells may be a promising therapeutic approach to prevent and treat severe asthma.

  15. Targeting STAT3 in adoptively transferred T cells promotes their in vivo expansion and antitumor effects

    PubMed Central

    Kujawski, Maciej; Zhang, Chunyan; Herrmann, Andreas; Reckamp, Karen; Scuto, Anna; Jensen, Michael; Deng, Jiehui; Forman, Stephen; Figlin, Robert; Yu, Hua

    2010-01-01

    Adoptive cell therapy with engineered T cells to improve natural immune response and antitumor functions has shown promise for treating cancer. However, the requirement for extensive ex vivo manipulation of T cells and the immunosuppressive effects of the tumor microenvironment limit this therapeutic modality. In the present study, we investigated the possibility to circumvent these limitations by engineering Stat3-deficient CD8+ T cells or by targeting Stat3 in the tumor microenvironment. We show that ablating Stat3 in CD8+ T cells prior to their transfer allows their efficient tumor infiltration and robust proliferation, resulting in increased tumor antigen-specific T cell activity and tumor growth inhibition. For potential clinical translation, we combined adoptive T cell therapy with an FDA-approved tyrosine kinase inhibitor, sunitinib, in renal cell carcinoma and melanoma tumor models. Sunitinib inhibited Stat3 in dendritic cells and T cells, reduced conversion of transferred Foxp3− T cells to tumor-associated T regulatory cells while increasing transferred CD8+ T cell infiltration and activation at the tumor site, leading to inhibition of primary tumor growth. These data demonstrate that adoptively transferred T cells can be expanded and activated in vivo either by engineering Stat3 silenced T cells or by targeting Stat3 systemically with small-molecule inhibitors. PMID:21118964

  16. T cell receptor repertoires after adoptive transfer of expanded allogeneic regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Theil, A; Wilhelm, C; Kuhn, M; Petzold, A; Tuve, S; Oelschlägel, U; Dahl, A; Bornhäuser, M; Bonifacio, E; Eugster, A

    2017-02-01

    Regulatory T cell (Treg ) therapy has been exploited in autoimmune disease, solid organ transplantation and in efforts to prevent or treat graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). However, our knowledge on the in-vivo persistence of transfused Treg is limited. Whether Treg transfusion leads to notable changes in the overall Treg repertoire or whether longevity of Treg in the periphery is restricted to certain clones is unknown. Here we use T cell receptor alpha chain sequencing (TCR-α-NGS) to monitor changes in the repertoire of Treg upon polyclonal expansion and after subsequent adoptive transfer. We applied TCR-α-NGS to samples from two patients with chronic GVHD who received comparable doses of stem cell donor derived expanded Treg . We found that in-vitro polyclonal expansion led to notable repertoire changes in vitro and that Treg cell therapy altered the peripheral Treg repertoire considerably towards that of the infused cell product, to different degrees, in each patient. Clonal changes in the peripheral blood were transient and correlated well with the clinical parameters. We suggest that T cell clonotype analyses using TCR sequencing should be considered as a means to monitor longevity and fate of adoptively transferred T cells.

  17. Adoptive transfer of effector CD8+ T cells derived from central memory cells establishes persistent T cell memory in primates.

    PubMed

    Berger, Carolina; Jensen, Michael C; Lansdorp, Peter M; Gough, Mike; Elliott, Carole; Riddell, Stanley R

    2008-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of antigen-specific T cells that have been expanded ex vivo is being actively pursued to treat infections and malignancy in humans. The T cell populations that are available for adoptive immunotherapy include both effector memory and central memory cells, and these differ in phenotype, function, and homing. The efficacy of adoptive immunotherapy requires that transferred T cells persist in vivo, but identifying T cells that can reproducibly survive in vivo after they have been numerically expanded by in vitro culture has proven difficult. Here we show that in macaques, antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell clones derived from central memory T cells, but not effector memory T cells, persisted long-term in vivo, reacquired phenotypic and functional properties of memory T cells, and occupied memory T cell niches. These results demonstrate that clonally derived CD8+ T cells isolated from central memory T cells are distinct from those derived from effector memory T cells and retain an intrinsic capacity that enables them to survive after adoptive transfer and revert to the memory cell pool. These results could have significant implications for the selection of T cells to expand or to engineer for adoptive immunotherapy of human infections or malignancy.

  18. Natural Killer Cell Adoptive Transfer Therapy: Exploiting the First Line of Defense Against Cancer.

    PubMed

    Davis, Zachary B; Felices, Martin; Verneris, Michael R; Miller, Jeffrey S

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells constitute an important component of the initial immunological response against transformed cells. However, chronic exposure to the tumor microenvironment can fundamentally alter the ability of NK cells to sufficiently control tumor progression. Thus, the adoptive transfer of healthy, functional NK cells as an interventional therapy has been an area of great interest for improving patient outcomes. Recent developments in the field have provided a better understanding of what makes the NK compartment effective against malignant cells. Moreover, there are now multiple potential sources of NK cell products for infusion as well as techniques to manipulate these cells to enhance their antitumor functions. This review explores the advantages and disadvantages of various sources of NK cells as well as prospective therapeutic enhancements to adoptively transferred NK cells.

  19. Adoptive transfer of fibrocytes enhances splenic T-cell numbers and survival in septic peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Nemzek, Jean A; Fry, Christopher; Moore, Bethany B

    2013-08-01

    Fibrocytes are unique, fibroblast-like cells with diverse functions and the potential for immunomodulation, which prompted investigation of their previously unexplored role in sepsis. Specifically, the study goals were to determine if adoptive transfer of fibrocytes would affect outcome in sepsis and to define relevant immunopathologic changes associated with the outcomes. Initial in vitro studies demonstrated that naive T-cell proliferation was significantly increased in cocultures with tissue-derived fibrocytes as compared with culture either alone or with fibroblasts. In vivo, the adoptive transfer of fibrocytes at the time of cecal ligation and puncture significantly improved survival of mice compared with transfer of fibroblasts or saline. Septic mice had lower blood levels of interleukin 6 (IL-6) and markers of organ injury after fibrocyte transfer as well as a reduced bacterial burden. Locally, peritoneal lavage fluid yielded lower bacterial counts, lower IL-6, and reduced inflammatory cell counts when fibrocyte transfer was compared with saline. This was also accompanied by significant increases in splenic CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. In vitro stimulation of the splenic T cells demonstrated that, after cecal ligation and puncture and adoptive transfer, the percentages of both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells with intracellular interferon γ were increased, whereas those with IL-4 remained similar between the groups. Therefore, it appears the adoptive transfer of fibrocytes improves sepsis survival, lowers bacterial burden, and promotes the proliferation of splenic T cells with a T(H)1 phenotype. These results confirm the immunomodulatory effects of exogenous, tissue-derived fibrocytes in sepsis and suggest their potential in cell therapy.

  20. The adoptive transfer of cultured T cells for patients with metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Yang, James C

    2013-01-01

    T cells have been shown to be capable of rejecting a patient's tumor. Weak responses to current vaccines and the toxicity of exogenously administered cytokines limit the intensity of the T-cell response that can be actively generated in vivo. Adoptive T-cell transfer enhances an intrinsically weak immune response to cancer by activating and expanding tumor reactive T cells in vitro and manipulating the environment of the host at the time of transfer. One can frequently find tumor-reactive T cells in metastatic lesions in patients with melanoma, and expand them in vitro for readministration. When successful, this adoptive cellular immunotherapy has resulted in sustainable curative outcomes. Subsequently, the applicability of adoptive T-cell transfer has been greatly expanded by the development of methods to genetically engineer open-repertoire human T-cells to confer tumor reactivity. This re-direction of T-cell specificity can be achieved by introducing a variety of receptors that ligate tumor-associated antigens and then trigger the normal activation mechanism of T cells. Future T-cell engineering will add a new dimension by reprogramming T-cell functions for optimal tumor rejection. The antigens recognized by T cells, the techniques to procure and grow tumor reactive T cells, the conditioning of the recipient to optimize efficacy, and the results of clinical protocols are reviewed herein.

  1. Adoptive T cell transfer for cancer immunotherapy in the era of synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Kalos, Michael; June, Carl H

    2013-07-25

    Adoptivecell transfer for cancer and chronic infection is an emerging field that shows promise in recent trials. Synthetic-biology-based engineering of T lymphocytes to express high-affinity antigen receptors can overcome immune tolerance, which has been a major limitation of immunotherapy-based strategies. Advances in cell engineering and culture approaches to enable efficient gene transfer and ex vivo cell expansion have facilitated broader evaluation of this technology, moving adoptive transfer from a "boutique" application to the cusp of a mainstream technology. The major challenge currently facing the field is to increase the specificity of engineered T cells for tumors, because targeting shared antigens has the potential to lead to on-target off-tumor toxicities, as observed in recent trials. As the field of adoptive transfer technology matures, the major engineering challenge is the development of automated cell culture systems, so that the approach can extend beyond specialized academic centers and become widely available.

  2. A Th1-inducing adenoviral vaccine for boosting adoptively transferred T cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiao-Tong; Turnis, Meghan E; Zhou, Xiaoou; Zhu, Wei; Hong, Bang-Xing; Rollins, Lisa; Rabinovich, Brian; Chen, Si-Yi; Rooney, Cliona M; Gottschalk, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Although the benefits of adoptive T-cell therapy can be increased by prior lymphodepletion of the recipient, this process usually requires chemotherapy or radiation. Vaccination with antigens to which the transferred T cells respond should be a less toxic means of enhancing their activity, but to date such vaccines have not been effective. We, therefore, determined which characteristics an adenoviral vaccine has to fulfill to optimally activate and expand adoptively transferred antigen-specific T cells in vivo. We evaluated (i) antigen, (ii) flagellin, a Toll-like receptor (TLR) 5 ligand, and (iii) an inhibitor of the antigen-presenting attenuator A20. Vaccination of mice before T-cell transfer with a vaccine that contained all three components dramatically enhanced the effector function of ovalbumin (OVA)-specific T cells as judged by the regression of established B16-OVA tumors compared to one- and two-component vaccines. Immunization with the three-component vaccine induced a strong Th1 environment, which was critical for the observed synergy and proved as effective as cytoxan-induced lymphodepletion in enhancing in vivo T-cell expansion. Thus, the combination of our vaccine with T-cell therapy has the potential to enhance and broaden adoptive cellular immunotherapy.

  3. Dissecting memory T cell responses to TB: concerns using adoptive transfer into immunodeficient mice.

    PubMed

    Ancelet, Lindsay; Rich, Fenella J; Delahunt, Brett; Kirman, Joanna R

    2012-09-01

    Several studies have used adoptive transfer of purified T cell subsets into immunodeficient mice to determine the subset of T cells responsible for mediating protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. These studies suggested that CD62L(hi) memory CD4(+) T cells from BCG-vaccinated mice are key for protection against tuberculosis. Importantly, we observed that transfer of naïve CD4(+) T cells into Rag1-/- recipients protected against a mycobacterial challenge as well as transfer of BCG-experienced CD4(+) T cells. We found that transfer of total CD4(+) T cells from naïve mice or enriched CD62L(hi)CD4(+) T cells from BCG-vaccinated mice into Rag1-/- recipients induced severe colitis by 3 weeks post cell transfer, whereas transfer of CD62L(lo)CD4(+) T cells from BCG-vaccinated mice did not. Naïve and CD62L(hi)CD4(+) T cells proliferated extensively upon transfer and developed an activated effector phenotype in the lung, even in the absence of infectious challenge. The induction of colitis and systemic cytokine response induced by the transfer and subsequent activation of CD4(+) T cells from naïve mice or CD62L(hi)CD4(+) T cells from BCG-vaccinated mice, into immunodeficient recipients, may heighten their ability to protect against mycobacterial challenge. This raises doubts about the validity of this model to study CD4(+) T cell-mediated protection against tuberculosis.

  4. Adoptive transfer of natural killer cells promotes the anti-tumor efficacy of T cells.

    PubMed

    Goding, Stephen R; Yu, Shaohong; Bailey, Lisa M; Lotze, Michael T; Basse, Per H

    2016-07-01

    The density of NK cells in tumors correlates positively with prognosis in many types of cancers. The average number of infiltrating NK cells is, however, quite modest (approximately 30 NK cells/sq.mm), even in tumors deemed to have a "high" density of infiltrating NK cells. It is unclear how such low numbers of tumor-infiltrating NK cells can influence outcome. Here, we used ovalbumin-expressing tumor cell lines and TCR transgenic, OVA-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (OT-I-CTLs) to determine whether the simultaneous attack by anti-tumor CTLs and IL-2-activated NK (A-NK) cells synergistically increases the overall tumor cell kill and whether upregulation of tumor MHC class-I by NK cell-derived interferon-gamma (IFNγ) improves tumor-recognition and kill by anti-tumor CTLs. At equal E:T ratios, A-NK cells killed OVA-expressing tumor cells better than OT-I-CTLs. The cytotoxicity against OVA-expressing tumor cells increased by combining OT-I-CTLs and A-NK cells, but the increase was additive rather than synergistic. A-NK cells adenovirally-transduced to produce IL-12 (A-NK(IL-12)) produced high amounts of IFNγ. The addition of a low number of A-NK(IL-12) cells to OT-I-CTLs resulted in a synergistic, albeit modest, increase in overall cytotoxicity. Pre-treatment of tumor cells with NK cell-conditioned medium increased tumor MHC expression and sensitivity to CTL-mediated killing. Pre-treatment of CTLs with NK cell-conditioned medium had no effect on CTL cytotoxicity. In vivo, MHC class-I expression by OVA-expressing B16 melanoma lung metastases increased significantly within 24-48h after adoptive transfer of A-NK(IL-12) cells. OT-I-CTLs and A-NK(IL-12) cells localized selectively and equally well into OVA-expressing B16 lung metastases and treatment of mice bearing 7-days-old OVA-B16 lung metastases with both A-NK(IL-12) cells and OT-I-CTLs lead to a significant prolongation of survival. Thus, an important function of tumor-infiltrating NK cells may be to increase

  5. Accelerated Type 1 Diabetes Induction in Mice by Adoptive Transfer of Diabetogenic CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Gregory; Waldner, Hanspeter

    2013-01-01

    The nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse spontaneously develops autoimmune diabetes after 12 weeks of age and is the most extensively studied animal model of human Type 1 diabetes (T1D). Cell transfer studies in irradiated recipient mice have established that T cells are pivotal in T1D pathogenesis in this model. We describe herein a simple method to rapidly induce T1D by adoptive transfer of purified, primary CD4+ T cells from pre-diabetic NOD mice transgenic for the islet-specific T cell receptor (TCR) BDC2.5 into NOD.SCID recipient mice. The major advantages of this technique are that isolation and adoptive transfer of diabetogenic T cells can be completed within the same day, irradiation of the recipients is not required, and a high incidence of T1D is elicited within 2 weeks after T cell transfer. Thus, studies of pathogenesis and therapeutic interventions in T1D can proceed at a faster rate than with methods that rely on heterogenous T cell populations or clones derived from diabetic NOD mice. PMID:23685789

  6. Accelerated type 1 diabetes induction in mice by adoptive transfer of diabetogenic CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Berry, Gregory; Waldner, Hanspeter

    2013-05-06

    The nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse spontaneously develops autoimmune diabetes after 12 weeks of age and is the most extensively studied animal model of human Type 1 diabetes (T1D). Cell transfer studies in irradiated recipient mice have established that T cells are pivotal in T1D pathogenesis in this model. We describe herein a simple method to rapidly induce T1D by adoptive transfer of purified, primary CD4+ T cells from pre-diabetic NOD mice transgenic for the islet-specific T cell receptor (TCR) BDC2.5 into NOD.SCID recipient mice. The major advantages of this technique are that isolation and adoptive transfer of diabetogenic T cells can be completed within the same day, irradiation of the recipients is not required, and a high incidence of T1D is elicited within 2 weeks after T cell transfer. Thus, studies of pathogenesis and therapeutic interventions in T1D can proceed at a faster rate than with methods that rely on heterogenous T cell populations or clones derived from diabetic NOD mice.

  7. Treatment of dextran sodium sulfate-induced experimental colitis by adoptive transfer of peritoneal cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ting; Ren, Jun; Wang, Wei; Wei, Xia-wei; Shen, Guo-bo; Liu, Yan-tong; Luo, Min; Xu, Guang-chao; Shao, Bin; Deng, Sen-yi; He, Zhi-yao; Liang, Xiao; Liu, Yu; Wen, Yan-Zhu; Xiang, Rong; Yang, Li; Deng, Hong-xin; Wei, Yu-quan

    2015-11-13

    The adoptive transfer of the natural regulatory B cells and macrophages should be a useful treatment for inflammation and autoimmune disease. However, it is usually difficult to isolate these cells from the tissues and expand them. Here, we investigated the feasibility of adoptively transferring peritoneal cells (PCs) as a treatment for DSS-induced colitis. We found that peritoneal cavity can provide an easily accessible site for harvesting enough number of PCs, namely, two-dose PCs for the treatment from a mouse in one operation. Adoptive therapy of these cells from healthy mice or those with disease is effectively in reducing the disease activity score. The natural B cells and macrophages of the infused PCs can selectively migrate to lesion sites and regulate the expression of Stat3, NF-κB, Smad3 and Smad7. Additionally, PCs exert dual activity of IL-10 and TGF-β secreted spontaneously by both peritoneal B cells and macrophages, which in turn enhance the induction of regulatory B cells and Macrophages in microenvironment of inflammation. Moreover, PCs can re-establish immunological tolerance in the OVA-immunized mice. Thus, our findings provide a new strategy for colitis therapy and could be of importance in additional exploration of other inflammation and autoimmune diseases therapy.

  8. Adoptive transfer of CD34(+) cells during murine sepsis rebalances macrophage lipopolysaccharide responses.

    PubMed

    Brudecki, Laura; Ferguson, Donald A; McCall, Charles E; El Gazzar, Mohamed

    2012-11-01

    Effective treatment of the acute systemic inflammatory response associated with sepsis is lacking, but likely will require new ways to rebalance dysregulated immune responses. One challenge is that human sepsis often is diagnosed too late to reduce the hyperinflammation of early sepsis. Another is that the sequential response to sepsis inflammation rapidly generates an adaptive and immunosuppressive state, which by epigenetic imprint may last for months or years. Emerging data support that the immunosuppressive phase of sepsis can both directly reprogram gene expression of circulating and tissue cells, and disrupt development and differentiation of myeloid precursor cells into competent immunocytes. We recently reported that adoptive transfer of bone marrow CD34(+) cells into mice after sepsis induction by cecal ligation and puncture significantly improves late-sepsis survival by enhancing bacterial clearance through improved neutrophil and macrophage phagocytosis. That study, however, did not examine whether CD34(+) transfer can modify noninfectious acute systemic inflammatory responses. Here, we report that CD34(+) cell transfer mice that have survived late sepsis also resist lethal lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced inflammatory shock (88% lived vs 0% of naive mice). The CD34(+) cell-recipient survivor mice administered LPS had globally reduced levels of circulating inflammatory mediators compared with naive mice, but their peritoneal and bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs), unlike those from naïve mice, remained LPS responsive ex vivo. We further found that CD34(+) cell transfer into LPS-challenged naïve mice had diminished immunosuppression, as assessed by ex vivo responses of peritoneal and BMDMs to LPS challenge. We conclude that CD34(+) cell adoptive transfer rebalances dysregulated immune responses associated with sepsis and endotoxin shock.

  9. Antiangiogenic immunotherapy targeting Flk-1, DNA vaccine and adoptive T cell transfer, inhibits ocular neovascularization

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Han; Sonoda, Koh-Hei; Hijioka, Kuniaki; Qiao, Hong; Oshima, Yuji; Ishibashi, Tatsuro

    2009-04-17

    Ocular neovascularization (NV) is the primary cause of blindness in a wide range of ocular diseases. The exact mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of ocular NV is not yet well understood, and so there is no satisfactory therapy for ocular NV. Here, we describe a strategy targeting Flk-1, a self-antigen overexpressed on proliferating endothelial cells in ocular NV, by antiangiogenic immunotherapy-DNA vaccine and adoptive T cell therapy. An oral DNA vaccine encoding Flk-1 carried by attenuated Salmonella typhimurium markedly suppressed development of laser-induced choroidal NV. We further demonstrated that adoptive transfer of vaccine-induced CD8{sup +} T cells reduced pathological preretinal NV, with a concomitant facilitation of physiological revascularization after oxygen-induced retinal vessel obliteration. However, physiological retinal vascular development was unaffected in neonatal mice transferred with vaccine-induced CD8{sup +} T cells. These findings suggested that antiangiogenic immunotherapy targeting Flk-1 such as vaccination and adoptive immunotherapy may contribute to future therapies for ocular NV.

  10. Technical Considerations for the Generation of Adoptively Transferred T Cells in Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Visioni, Anthony; Skitzki, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    A significant function of the immune system is the surveillance and elimination of aberrant cells that give rise to cancer. Even when tumors are well established and metastatic, immune-mediated spontaneous regressions have been documented. While there are have been various forms of immunotherapy, one of the most widely studied for almost 40 years is adoptive cellular immunotherapy, but its success has yet to be fully realized. Adoptive cell transfer (ACT) is a therapeutic modality that has intrigued physicians and researchers for its many theoretical benefits. Preclinical investigations and human trials have utilized natural killer (NK) cells, dendritic cells (DC), macrophages, T-cells or B-cells for ACT with the most intense research focused on T-cell ACT. T-cells are exquisitely specific to the target of its T-cell receptor (TCR), thus potentially reducing the amount of collateral damage and off-target effects from treatment. T-cells also possess a memory subset that may reduce the risk of recurrence of a cancer after the successful treatment of the primary disease. There are several options for the source of T-cells used in the generation of cells for ACT. Perhaps the most widely known source is T-cells generated from tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs). However, studies have also employed peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), lymph nodes, and even induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSCs) as a source of T-cells. Several important technical considerations exist regarding benefits and limitations of each source of T-cells. Unique aspects of T-cells factor into their ability to be efficacious in ACT including the total number of cells available for ACT, the anti-tumor efficacy on a per cell basis, the repertoire of TCRs specific to tumor cells, and their ability to traffic to various organs that harbor tumor. Current research is attempting to unlock the full potential of these cells to effectively and safely treat cancer. PMID:27657129

  11. Successful immunotherapy of autoimmune cholangitis by adoptive transfer of forkhead box protein 3(+) regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, H; Zhang, W; Yang, G-X; Ando, Y; Tomiyama, T; Tsuneyama, K; Leung, P; Coppel, R L; Ansari, A A; Lian, Z X; Ridgway, W M; Joh, T; Gershwin, M E

    2014-11-01

    Treatment of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) has lagged behind that of other autoimmune diseases. In this study we have addressed the potential utility of immunotherapy using regulatory T cells (Treg ) to treat murine autoimmune cholangitis. In particular, we have taken advantage of our ability to produce portal inflammation and bile duct cell loss by transfer of CD8(+) T cells from the dominant negative form of transforming growth factor beta receptor type II (dnTGF-βRII) mice to recombination-activating gene (Rag)1(-/-) recipients. We then used this robust established adoptive transfer system and co-transferred CD8(+) T cells from dnTGF-βRII mice with either C57BL/6 or dnTGF-βRII forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3(+) ) T cells. Recipient mice were monitored for histology, including portal inflammation and intralobular biliary cell damage, and also included a study of the phenotypical changes in recipient lymphoid populations and local and systemic cytokine production. Importantly, we report herein that adoptive transfer of Treg from C57BL/6 but not dnTGF-βRII mice significantly reduced the pathology of autoimmune cholangitis, including decreased portal inflammation and bile duct damage as well as down-regulation of the secondary inflammatory response. Further, to define the mechanism of action that explains the differential ability of C57BL/6 Treg versus dnTGF-βRII Treg on the ability to down-regulate autoimmune cholangitis, we noted significant differential expression of glycoprotein A repetitions predominant (GARP), CD73, CD101 and CD103 and a functionally significant increase in interleukin (IL)-10 in Treg from C57BL/6 compared to dnTGF-βRII mice. Our data reflect the therapeutic potential of wild-type CD4(+) FoxP3(+) Treg in reducing the excessive T cell responses of autoimmune cholangitis, which has significance for the potential immunotherapy of PBC.

  12. Recombinant interleukin 2 stimulates in vivo proliferation of adoptively transferred lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ettinghausen, S.E.; Lipford, E.H. 3d.; Mule, J.J.; Rosenberg, S.A.

    1985-11-01

    The authors previously reported that the adoptive transfer of lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells plus repetitive injections of recombinant interleukin 2 (IL 2) produced a marked reduction in established pulmonary metastases from a variety of murine sarcomas. The requirement for the exogenous administration of IL 2 prompted a subsequent examination of the role of IL 2 in the in vivo function of transferred LAK cells. The in vivo proliferation and migration patterns of lymphoid cells in C57BL/6 mice were examined after i.v. transfer of LAK cells alone, i.p. injection of IL 2 alone, or the combination of LAK cells and IL 2. A model for in vivo labeling of the DNA of dividing cells was used in which mice were injected with 5-( SVI)-iodo-2'-deoxyuridine ( SVIUdR) and, 20 hr later, their tissues were removed and were counted in a gamma analyzer. A proliferation index (PI) was calculated by dividing the mean cpm of organs of experimentally treated mice by the mean cpm of organs of control mice. In animals given LAK cells alone, the lungs and liver demonstrated little if any uptake of SVIUdR above saline-treated controls, whereas the same organs of mice receiving 6000 U of IL 2 alone displayed higher radiolabel incorporation. When mice were given LAK cells plus 6000 U of IL 2, their tissues showed an additional increase in SVIUdR uptake.

  13. Skewing the T-cell repertoire by combined DNA vaccination, host conditioning, and adoptive transfer.

    PubMed

    Jorritsma, Annelies; Bins, Adriaan D; Schumacher, Ton N M; Haanen, John B A G

    2008-04-01

    Approaches for T-cell-based immunotherapy that have shown substantial effects in clinical trials are generally based on the adoptive transfer of high numbers of antigen-specific cells, and the success of these approaches is thought to rely on the high magnitude of the tumor-specific T-cell responses that are induced. In this study, we aimed to develop strategies that also yield a T-cell repertoire that is highly skewed toward tumor recognition but do not rely on ex vivo generation of tumor-specific T cells. To this end, the tumor-specific T-cell repertoire was first expanded by DNA vaccination and then infused into irradiated recipients. Subsequent vaccination of the recipient mice with the same antigen resulted in peak CD8(+) T-cell responses of approximately 50%. These high T-cell responses required the presence of antigen-experienced tumor-specific T cells within the graft because only mice that received cells of previously vaccinated donor mice developed effective responses. Tumor-bearing mice treated with this combined therapy showed a significant delay in tumor outgrowth, compared with mice treated by irradiation or vaccination alone. Furthermore, this antitumor effect was accompanied by an increased accumulation of activated and antigen-specific T cells within the tumor. In summary, the combination of DNA vaccination with host conditioning and adoptive transfer generates a marked, but transient, skewing of the T-cell repertoire toward tumor recognition. This strategy does not require ex vivo expansion of cells to generate effective antitumor immunity and may therefore easily be translated to clinical application.

  14. Clinical scale rapid expansion of lymphocytes for adoptive cell transfer therapy in the WAVE® bioreactor

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To simplify clinical scale lymphocyte expansions, we investigated the use of the WAVE®, a closed system bioreactor that utilizes active perfusion to generate high cell numbers in minimal volumes. Methods We have developed an optimized rapid expansion protocol for the WAVE bioreactor that produces clinically relevant numbers of cells for our adoptive cell transfer clinical protocols. Results TIL and genetically modified PBL were rapidly expanded to clinically relevant scales in both static bags and the WAVE bioreactor. Both bioreactors produced comparable numbers of cells; however the cultures generated in the WAVE bioreactor had a higher percentage of CD4+ cells and had a less activated phenotype. Conclusions The WAVE bioreactor simplifies the process of rapidly expanding tumor reactive lymphocytes under GMP conditions, and provides an alternate approach to cell generation for ACT protocols. PMID:22475724

  15. Elimination of metastatic melanoma using gold nanoshell-enabled photothermal therapy and adoptive T cell transfer.

    PubMed

    Bear, Adham S; Kennedy, Laura C; Young, Joseph K; Perna, Serena K; Mattos Almeida, Joao Paulo; Lin, Adam Y; Eckels, Phillip C; Drezek, Rebekah A; Foster, Aaron E

    2013-01-01

    Ablative treatments such as photothermal therapy (PTT) are attractive anticancer strategies because they debulk accessible tumor sites while simultaneously priming antitumor immune responses. However, the immune response following thermal ablation is often insufficient to treat metastatic disease. Here we demonstrate that PTT induces the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines and promotes the maturation of dendritic cells within tumor-draining lymph nodes, thereby priming antitumor T cell responses. Unexpectedly, however, these immunomodulatory effects were not beneficial to overall antitumor immunity. We found that PTT promoted the infiltration of secondary tumor sites by CD11b(+)Ly-6G/C(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells, consequently failing to slow the growth of poorly immunogenic B16-F10 tumors and enhancing the growth of distant lung metastases. To exploit the beneficial effects of PTT activity against local tumors and on antitumor immunity whilst avoiding the adverse consequences, we adoptively transferred gp100-specific pmel T cells following PTT. The combination of local control by PTT and systemic antitumor immune reactivity provided by adoptively transferred T cells prevented primary tumor recurrence post-ablation, inhibited tumor growth at distant sites, and abrogated the outgrowth of lung metastases. Hence, the combination of PTT and systemic immunotherapy prevented the adverse effects of PTT on metastatic tumor growth and optimized overall tumor control.

  16. Effective adoptive transfer of haploidentical tumor-specific T cells in B16-melanoma bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Cui, Nai-peng; Xie, Shao-jian; Han, Jin-sheng; Ma, Zhen-feng; Chen, Bao-ping; Cai, Jian-hui

    2012-03-01

    Adoptive transfer of allogeneic tumor-specific T cells often results in severe graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Here, we sought to maximize graft-versus-tumor and minimize GVHD by using haploidentical T cells in pre-irradiated B16-melanoma bearing mice. C57BL/6 mice bearing B16-melanoma tumors were irradiated with 0, 5, or 7 Gy total body irradiation (TBI), or 7 Gy TBI plus bone marrow transplantation. Tumor areas were measured every 3 days to assess the influence of irradiation treatment on tumor regression. B16-melanoma bearing mice were irradiated with 7 Gy TBI; sera and spleens were harvested at days 1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, and 13 after irradiation. White blood cell levels were measured and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-b1) and interleukin 10 (IL-10) levels in serum were detected using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) kits. Real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and flow cytometry were performed to test TGF-b1, IL-10 and Foxp3 mRNA levels and the proportion of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T-regulatory cells (Tregs) in spleens. B16-melanoma bearing C57BL/6 mice were irradiated with 7 Gy TBI followed by syngeneic (Syn1/Syn2) or haploidentical (Hap1/Hap2), dendritic cell-induced cytotoxic T lymphocytes (DC-CTLs) treatment, tumor areas and system GVHD were observed every 3 days. Mice were killed 21 days after the DC-CTLs adoptive transfer; histologic analyses of eyes, skin, liver, lungs, and intestine were then performed. Irradiation with 7 Gy TBI on the B16-melanoma-bearing mice did not influence tumor regression compared to the control group; however, it down-regulated the proportion of Tregs in spleens and the TGF-b1 and IL-10 levels in sera and spleens, suggesting inhibition of autoimmunity and intervention of tumor microenvironment. Adoptive transfer of haploidentical DC-CTLs significantly inhibited B16-melanoma growth. GVHD assessment and histology analysis showed no significant difference among the groups. Adoptive transfer of

  17. Adoptive transfer of unresponsiveness to allogeneic skin grafts with hepatic gamma delta + T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gorczynski, R M

    1994-01-01

    C3H/HEJ mice injected with irradiated multiple minor incompatible B10.BR lymphoid cells via the portal vein showed delayed rejection of subsequent B10.BR skin grafts. Similar delayed rejection was produced by lateral tail vein injection of B10.BR hepatic mononuclear cells or H-2k cells pulsed in vivo with B10 minor histocompatibility antigens. Inhibition of C3H anti-B10.BR immunity in vivo (assessed by delayed graft rejection) and in vitro (assessed by B10.BR-induced lymphokine production) can be transferred by radioresistant, plastic-adherent F4/80+33D1-CD4-CD8-alpha beta TcR-gamma delta TcR- mononuclear hepatic cells from (C3H/HEJ x C3H.SW)F1 mice injected 36 hr earlier with 100 x 10(6) irradiated spleen cells. By 10 days post-injection, cells transferring delayed rejection are radiosensitive, plastic non-adherent, F4/80-33D1-CD4-CD8- alpha beta Tc+- gamma delta TcR+ cells. Injection of interleukin-2 (IL-2) in vivo into mice receiving pretreatment with B10.BR cells via the portal vein, or adoptive transfer into such mice of immune anti-B10.BR lymphoid cells, abolished delayed rejection on subsequent skin grafting. Delayed rejection or modulation of lymphokine production was associated in all cases with suppression of IL-2 production and preferential retention of IL-4 production from cells stimulated in vitro. PMID:8132216

  18. Adoptively transferred TRAIL+ T cells suppress GVHD and augment antitumor activity

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arnab; Dogan, Yildirim; Moroz, Maxim; Holland, Amanda M.; Yim, Nury L.; Rao, Uttam K.; Young, Lauren F.; Tannenbaum, Daniel; Masih, Durva; Velardi, Enrico; Tsai, Jennifer J.; Jenq, Robert R.; Penack, Olaf; Hanash, Alan M.; Smith, Odette M.; Piersanti, Kelly; Lezcano, Cecilia; Murphy, George F.; Liu, Chen; Palomba, M. Lia; Sauer, Martin G.; Sadelain, Michel; Ponomarev, Vladimir; van den Brink, Marcel R.M.

    2013-01-01

    Current strategies to suppress graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) also compromise graft-versus-tumor (GVT) responses. Furthermore, most experimental strategies to separate GVHD and GVT responses merely spare GVT function without actually enhancing it. We have previously shown that endogenously expressed TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is required for optimal GVT activity against certain malignancies in recipients of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). In order to model a donor-derived cellular therapy, we genetically engineered T cells to overexpress TRAIL and adoptively transferred donor-type unsorted TRAIL+ T cells into mouse models of allo-HSCT. We found that murine TRAIL+ T cells induced apoptosis of alloreactive T cells, thereby reducing GVHD in a DR5-dependent manner. Furthermore, murine TRAIL+ T cells mediated enhanced in vitro and in vivo antilymphoma GVT response. Moreover, human TRAIL+ T cells mediated enhanced in vitro cytotoxicity against both human leukemia cell lines and against freshly isolated chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells. Finally, as a model of off-the-shelf, donor-unrestricted antitumor cellular therapy, in vitro–generated TRAIL+ precursor T cells from third-party donors also mediated enhanced GVT response in the absence of GVHD. These data indicate that TRAIL-overexpressing donor T cells could potentially enhance the curative potential of allo-HSCT by increasing GVT response and suppressing GVHD. PMID:23676461

  19. A Fusion Receptor as a Safety Switch, Detection, and Purification Biomarker for Adoptive Transferred T Cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiuqi; Shi, Bizhi; Zhang, Jiqin; Shi, Zhimin; Di, Shengmeng; Fan, Minliang; Gao, Huiping; Wang, Hai; Gu, Jianren; Jiang, Hua; Li, Zonghai

    2017-10-04

    The incorporation of an endogenous safety switch represents a rational strategy for the control of toxicities following the administration of adoptivecell therapies. An ideal safety switch should be capable of depleting the transferredcells with minimal injury to normal tissues. We generated a fusion receptor by engineering a cryptic 806 epitope of human epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) into the N terminus of the full-length human folate receptor 1 (FOLR1), designated as FR806. The expression of FR806 allows transduced T cells to be targeted with CH12, a monoclonal antibody recognizing the 806 epitope, but not wild-type EGFR in healthy tissues. FR806, therefore, constitutes a specific cell-surface marker for the elimination of transduced T cells. We demonstrate that the antibody-drug conjugate (ADC) CH12-MMAF is efficiently internalized by FR806-expressing T cells and has the potential to eliminate them. Transfected T cells could, furthermore, be efficiently detected and purified using CH12 antibodies. In immuno-compromised mice, CH12-MMAF eliminated the majority of transferredcells expressing FR806 and anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR). The selectivity for the 806 epitope and internalization capacity of FOLR1 makes FR806 an efficient safety switch, which may additionally be used as a detection and purification biomarker for human T cell immunotherapies. Copyright © 2017 The American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Experimental Myocardial Infarction Induces Altered Regulatory T Cell Hemostasis, and Adoptive Transfer Attenuates Subsequent Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Sharir, Rinat; Semo, Jonathan; Shimoni, Sara; Ben-Mordechai, Tamar; Landa-Rouben, Natalie; Maysel-Auslender, Sofia; Shaish, Aviv; Entin–Meer, Michal; Keren, Gad; George, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Background Ischemic cardiac damage is associated with upregulation of cardiac pro-inflammatory cytokines, as well as invasion of lymphocytes into the heart. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are known to exert a suppressive effect on several immune cell types. We sought to determine whether the Treg pool is influenced by myocardial damage and whether Tregs transfer and deletion affect cardiac remodeling. Methods and Results The number and functional suppressive activity of Tregs were assayed in mice subjected to experimental myocardial infarction. The numbers of splenocyte-derived Tregs in the ischemic mice were significantly higher after the injury than in the controls, and their suppressive properties were significantly compromised. Compared with PBS, adoptive Treg transfer to mice with experimental infarction reduced infarct size and improved LV remodeling and functional performance by echocardiography. Treg deletion with blocking anti-CD25 antibodies did not influence infarct size or echocardiographic features of cardiac remodeling. Conclusion Treg numbers are increased whereas their function is compromised in mice with that underwent experimental infarction. Transfer of exogeneous Tregs results in attenuation of myocardial remodeling whereas their ablation has no effect. Thus, Tregs may serve as interesting potential interventional targets for attenuating left ventricular remodeling. PMID:25436994

  1. Effect of adoptive transfer of cloned Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans-specific T helper cells on periodontal disease.

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, K; Eastcott, J W; Taubman, M A; Smith, D J; Cox, D S

    1991-01-01

    Previously we isolated several Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans-specific T-cell clones from the spleens and lymph nodes of immunized Rowett rats. These clones were characterized as W3/13+, W3/25+, OX8-, and OX22-, suggesting a T helper (Th) phenotype. In the current experiments, 10(6) cells from a single A. actinomycetemcomitans-specific clone (A3) were adoptively transferred to a group (AaTh; n = 13) of normal heterozygous rats (rnu/+) at 28 days of age. A second group received no T cells (AaNT; n = 15), and a third group also received no T cells (NAaNT, n = 11). Beginning 1 day after transfer, the first and second groups were infected orally with A. actinomycetemcomitans for 5 consecutive days. The presence of infection was confirmed immediately after challenge and after 5 months, when the experiments were ended. Significantly higher numbers of lymphocytes were recovered from the gingival tissues of the first group than from those of either of the other groups. Also, this group showed significantly elevated (P less than 0.01) serum immunoglobulin G and immunoglobulin M antibody to A. actinomycetemcomitans in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay when compared with both other groups. Bone loss was significantly lower (P less than 0.01) in recipients of A. actinomycetemcomitans-specific cloned cells when compared with the other infected group and was approximately equal to the bone loss of the uninfected group. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that T-cell regulation can affect periodontal disease. In this regulation, T helper cells appear to interfere with periodontal bone loss. PMID:1825991

  2. [Adoptive transfer of immunity against Nippostrongylus brasiliensis in mice. In vitro restimulation of immune cells before their transfer].

    PubMed

    Rhalem, A; Bourdieu, C; Luffau, G; Péry, P

    1989-01-01

    When mesenteric lymph node cells from infected mice were stimulated during an in vitro culture with exoantigens or with a purified protective antigen of Nippostrongylus brasiliensis, a drop was noted in the number of cells required to transfer protection to new mice. A maximal effect was already obtained after 4 hrs. of culture, but irradiated cells or cells from another mouse strain were unable to mediate this transfer. T cells were more effective than B cells in transferring the protection.

  3. Adoptive transfer of MART-1 T cell receptor transgenic lymphocytes and dendritic cell vaccination in patients with metastatic melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Chodon, Thinle; Comin-Anduix, Begonya; Chmielowski, Bartosz; Koya, Richard C; Wu, Zhongqi; Auerbach, Martin; Ng, Charles; Avramis, Earl; Seja, Elizabeth; Villanueva, Arturo; McCannel, Tara A.; Ishiyama, Akira; Czernin, Johannes; Radu, Caius G.; Wang, Xiaoyan; Gjertson, David W.; Cochran, Alistair J.; Cornetta, Kenneth; Wong, Deborah J.L.; Kaplan-lefko, Paula; Hamid, Omid; Samlowski, Wolfram; Cohen, Peter A.; Daniels, Gregory A.; Mukherji, Bijay; Yang, Lili; Zack, Jerome A.; Kohn, Donald B.; Heath, James R.; Glaspy, John A.; Witte, Owen N.; Baltimore, David; Economou, James S.; Ribas, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Purpose It has been demonstrated that large numbers of tumor-specific T cells for adoptive cell transfer (ACT) can be manufactured by retroviral genetic engineering of autologous peripheral blood lymphocytes and expanding them over several weeks. In mouse models, this therapy is optimized when administered with dendritic cell (DC) vaccination. We developed a short one-week manufacture protocol to determine the feasibility, safety and antitumor efficacy of this double cell therapy. Experimnetal Design A clinical trial (NCT00910650) adoptively transferring MART-1 T cell receptor (TCR) transgenic lymphocytes together with MART-1 peptide pulsed DC vaccination in HLA-A2.1 patients with metastatic melanoma. Autologous TCR transgenic cells were manufactured in 6 to 7 days using retroviral vector gene transfer, and re-infused with (n = 10) or without (n = 3) prior cryopreservation. Results 14 patients with metastatic melanoma were enrolled and nine out of 13 treated patients (69%) showed evidence of tumor regression. Peripheral blood reconstitution with MART-1-specific T cells peaked within two weeks of ACT indicating rapid in vivo expansion. Administration of freshly manufactured TCR transgenic T cells resulted in a higher persistence of MART-1-specific T cells in the blood as compared to cryopreserved. Evidence that DC vaccination could cause further in vivo expansion was only observed with ACT using non-cryopreserved T cells. Conclusion Double cell therapy with ACT of TCR engineered T cells with a very short ex vivo manipulation and DC vaccines is feasible and results in antitumor activity, but improvements are needed to maintain tumor responses. PMID:24634374

  4. Adoptive transfer of tracer alloreactive CD4+ TCR-transgenic T cells alters the endogenous immune response to an allograft

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Michelle L.; Chen, Jianjun; Daniels, Melvin D.; McKeague, Matthew G.; Wang, Ying; Yin, Dengping; Vu, Vinh; Chong, Anita S.; Alegre, Maria-Luisa

    2016-01-01

    T cell receptor transgenic (TCR-Tg) T cells are often used as tracer populations of antigen-specific responses to extrapolate findings to endogenous T cells. The extent to which TCR-Tg T cells behave purely as tracer cells or modify the endogenous immune response is not clear. To test the impact of TCR-Tg T cell transfer on endogenous alloimmunity, recipient mice were seeded with CD4+ or CD8+ TCR-Tg or polyclonal T cells at the time of cardiac allograft transplantation. Only CD4+ TCR-Tg T cells accelerated rejection, and unexpectedly led to a dose-dependent decrease in both transferred and endogenous T cells infiltrating the graft. In contrast, recipients of CD4+ TCR-Tg cell exhibited enhanced endogenous donor-specific CD8+ T-cell activation in the spleen and accelerated alloantibody production. Introduction of CD4+ TCR-Tg T cells also perturbed the intra-graft accumulation of innate cell populations. Thus, transferred CD4+ TCR-Tg T cells alter many aspects of endogenous alloimmunity, suggesting that caution should be used when interpreting experiments utilizing these adoptively-transferred cells, as the overall nature of allograft rejection may be altered. These results may also have implications for adoptive CD4+ T cell immunotherapy in tumor and infectious clinical settings as cell infusion may have additional effects on natural immune responses. PMID:27063351

  5. Adoptive transfer of tracer alloreactive CD4(+) TCR-transgenic T cells alters the endogenous immune response to an allograft.

    PubMed

    Miller, Michelle L; Chen, Jianjun; Daniels, Melvin D; McKeague, Matthew G; Wang, Ying; Yin, Dengping; Vu, Vinh; Chong, Anita S; Alegre, Maria-Luisa

    2016-04-11

    T cell receptor transgenic (TCR-Tg) T cells are often used as tracer populations of antigen-specific responses to extrapolate findings to endogenous T cells. The extent to which TCR-Tg T cells behave purely as tracer cells or modify the endogenous immune response is not clear. To test the impact of TCR-Tg T cell transfer on endogenous alloimmunity, recipient mice were seeded with CD4(+) or CD8(+) TCR-Tg or polyclonal T cells at the time of cardiac allograft transplantation. Only CD4(+) TCR-Tg T cells accelerated rejection, and unexpectedly led to a dose-dependent decrease in both transferred and endogenous T cells infiltrating the graft. In contrast, recipients of CD4(+) TCR-Tg cell exhibited enhanced endogenous donor-specific CD8(+) T-cell activation in the spleen and accelerated alloantibody production. Introduction of CD4(+) TCR-Tg T cells also perturbed the intra-graft accumulation of innate cell populations. Thus, transferred CD4(+) TCR-Tg T cells alter many aspects of endogenous alloimmunity, suggesting that caution should be used when interpreting experiments utilizing these adoptively-transferred cells, as the overall nature of allograft rejection may be altered. These results may also have implications for adoptive CD4(+) T cell immunotherapy in tumor and infectious clinical settings as cell infusion may have additional effects on natural immune responses. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Adoptive cell transfer after chemotherapy enhances survival in patients with resectable HNSCC.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Pan; Zhang, Yan; J Archibald, Steve; Wang, Hua

    2015-09-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the therapeutic efficacy and to determine the immune factors for treatment success in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) treated with chemotherapy followed by adoptive cell transfer (ACT). A total of 43 HNSCC patients who received radical resection and chemotherapy were analysed in this study. Twenty-one of the patients were repeatedly treated with ACT after chemotherapy (ACT group), and the other twenty-two patients without ACT treatment were included as part of the control group. To investigate the immunological differences underlying these observations, we expanded and profiled improving cytokine-induced killer cells (iCIK) from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) with the timed addition of RetroNectin, OKT3 mAb, IFN γ and IL-2. The median of progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) in the ACT group were significantly higher as compared to the control group (56 vs. 40; 58 vs. 45 months). In iCIK culture, there was a significant reduction in CD3+CD4+ T-cell proliferation and cytokines (IL-2, TNF) production from patients who received chemotherapy compared to patients without chemotherapy. Intra-arterial infusion of iCIK, in coordination with chemotherapy, considerably rescued iCIK culture from the suppression of systemic immunity induced by chemotherapy and induced tumour regression. Altogether, these findings suggest that ACT is an effective neo-adjuvant therapy for rescuing systemic immune suppression and improving survival time in patients with HNSCC. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Adoptive transfer of dendritic cells isolated from helminth-infected mice enhanced T regulatory cell responses in airway allergic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Liu, J-Y; Li, L-Y; Yang, X-Z; Li, J; Zhong, G; Wang, J; Li, L-J; Ji, B; Wu, Z-Q; Liu, H; Yang, X; Liu, P-M

    2011-10-01

    Our and others' previous studies have shown that Schistosoma japonicum (SJ) infection can inhibit allergic reactions. Moreover, we found that adoptive transfer of dendritic cells (DCs) from inhibited mice showed a similar inhibitory effect on allergy, suggesting a critical role of DCs in SJ-infected mediated inhibition of allergy. In this study, we further examined the mechanism by which DCs contribute to inhibition of allergy. Our results showed that DCs from SJ-infected mice (SJDCs) produced significantly higher levels of IL-10 compared to those from naive control mice (NDCs). Adoptive transfer of SJDCs, unlike NDCs, significantly increased CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells and CD4+CD25+IL-10+ T cells regulatory T-cell responses in vivo. This was correlated with significantly reduced production of IL-4 and IL-5 by CD4+ T cells, eotaxin in lung tissues and reduced airway allergic inflammation in the SJDC recipients following allergen sensitization and challenge. These data suggest that helminth infection may induce tolerogenic DCs that can inhibit the development of airway allergic inflammation through enhancing T regulatory cell responses.

  8. Improving Adoptive T Cell Therapy: The Particular Role of T Cell Costimulation, Cytokines, and Post-Transfer Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Redeker, Anke; Arens, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive cellular therapy (ACT) is a form of immunotherapy whereby antigen-specific T cells are isolated or engineered, expanded ex vivo, and transferred back to patients. Clinical benefit after ACT has been obtained in treatment of infection, various hematological malignancies, and some solid tumors; however, due to poor functionality and persistence of the transferred T cells, the efficacy of ACT in the treatment of most solid tumors is often marginal. Hence, much effort is undertaken to improve T cell function and persistence in ACT and significant progress is being made. Herein, we will review strategies to improve ACT success rates in the treatment of cancer and infection. We will deliberate on the most favorable phenotype for the tumor-specific T cells that are infused into patients and on how to obtain T cells bearing this phenotype by applying novel ex vivo culture methods. Moreover, we will discuss T cell function and persistence after transfer into patients and how these factors can be manipulated by means of providing costimulatory signals, cytokines, blocking antibodies to inhibitory molecules, and vaccination. Incorporation of these T cell stimulation strategies and combinations of the different treatment modalities are likely to improve clinical response rates further. PMID:27656185

  9. Improving Adoptive T Cell Therapy: The Particular Role of T Cell Costimulation, Cytokines, and Post-Transfer Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Redeker, Anke; Arens, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive cellular therapy (ACT) is a form of immunotherapy whereby antigen-specific T cells are isolated or engineered, expanded ex vivo, and transferred back to patients. Clinical benefit after ACT has been obtained in treatment of infection, various hematological malignancies, and some solid tumors; however, due to poor functionality and persistence of the transferred T cells, the efficacy of ACT in the treatment of most solid tumors is often marginal. Hence, much effort is undertaken to improve T cell function and persistence in ACT and significant progress is being made. Herein, we will review strategies to improve ACT success rates in the treatment of cancer and infection. We will deliberate on the most favorable phenotype for the tumor-specific T cells that are infused into patients and on how to obtain T cells bearing this phenotype by applying novel ex vivo culture methods. Moreover, we will discuss T cell function and persistence after transfer into patients and how these factors can be manipulated by means of providing costimulatory signals, cytokines, blocking antibodies to inhibitory molecules, and vaccination. Incorporation of these T cell stimulation strategies and combinations of the different treatment modalities are likely to improve clinical response rates further.

  10. Adoptive transfer of cytomegalovirus-specific effector CD4+ T cells provides antiviral protection from murine CMV infection.

    PubMed

    Jeitziner, Sanja Mandaric; Walton, Senta M; Torti, Nicole; Oxenius, Annette

    2013-11-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infects a majority of the human population and establishes a life-long persistence. CMV infection is usually asymptomatic but the virus carries pathogenic potential and causes severe disease in immunocompromised individuals. T-cell-mediated immunity plays an essential role in control of CMV infection and adoptive transfer of CMV-specific CD8(+) T cells restores viral immunity in immunosuppressed patients but a role for CD4(+) T cells remains elusive. Here, we analyzed in adoptive transfer studies the features and antiviral functions of virus-specific CD4(+) T cells during primary murine CMV (MCMV) infection. MCMV-specific CD4(+) T cells expanded upon MCMV infection and displayed an effector phenotype and function. Adoptive transfer of in vivo activated MCMV-specific CD4(+) T cells to immune-compromised mice was protective during pathogenic MCMV infection and IFN-γ was a crucial mediator of this protective capacity. Moreover, co-transfer of low doses of both MCMV-specific CD4(+) T cells and CD8(+) T cells synergized in control of lytic viral replication in immune-compromised mice. Our data reveal a pivotal antiviral role for virus-specific CD4(+) T cells in protection from pathogenic CMV infection and provide evidence for their antiviral therapeutic potential.

  11. Phenotype and function of T cells infiltrating visceral metastases from gastrointestinal cancers and melanoma: implications for adoptive cell transfer therapy.

    PubMed

    Turcotte, Simon; Gros, Alena; Hogan, Katherine; Tran, Eric; Hinrichs, Christian S; Wunderlich, John R; Dudley, Mark E; Rosenberg, Steven A

    2013-09-01

    Adoptive cell transfer of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) can mediate cancer regression in patients with metastatic melanoma, but whether this approach can be applied to common epithelial malignancies remains unclear. In this study, we compared the phenotype and function of TILs derived from liver and lung metastases from patients with gastrointestinal (GI) cancers (n = 14) or melanoma (n = 42). Fewer CD3(+) T cells were found to infiltrate GI compared with melanoma metastases, but the proportions of CD8(+) cells, T cell differentiation stage, and expression of costimulatory molecules were similar for both tumor types. Clinical-scale expansion up to ~50 × 10(9) T cells on average was obtained for all patients with GI cancer and melanoma. From GI tumors, however, TIL outgrowth in high-dose IL-2 yielded 22 ± 1.4% CD3(+)CD8(+) cells compared with 63 ± 2.4% from melanoma (p < 0.001). IFN-γ ELISA demonstrated MHC class I-mediated reactivity of TIL against autologous tumor in 5 of 7 GI cancer patients tested (9% of 188 distinct TIL cultures) and in 9 of 10 melanoma patients (43% of 246 distinct TIL cultures). In these assays, MHC class I-mediated up-regulation of CD137 (4-1BB) expression on CD8(+) cells suggested that 0-3% of TILs expanded from GI cancer metastases were tumor-reactive. This study implies that the main challenge to the development of TIL adoptive cell transfer for metastatic GI cancers may not be the in vitro expansion of bulk TILs, but the ability to select and enrich for tumor-reactive T cells.

  12. Stable activity of diabetogenic cells with age in NOD mice: dynamics of reconstitution and adoptive diabetes transfer in immunocompromised mice.

    PubMed

    Kaminitz, Ayelet; Mizrahi, Keren; Ash, Shifra; Ben-Nun, Avi; Askenasy, Nadir

    2014-07-01

    The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse is a prevalent disease model of type 1 diabetes. Immune aberrations that cause and propagate autoimmune insulitis in these mice are being continually debated, with evidence supporting both dominance of effector cells and insufficiency of suppressor mechanisms. In this study we assessed the behaviour of NOD lymphocytes under extreme expansion conditions using adoptive transfer into immunocompromised NOD.SCID (severe combined immunodeficiency) mice. CD4(+)  CD25(+) T cells do not cause islet inflammation, whereas splenocytes and CD4(+)  CD25(-) T cells induce pancreatic inflammation and hyperglycaemia in 80-100% of the NOD.SCID recipients. Adoptively transferred effector T cells migrate to the lymphoid organs and pancreas, proliferate, are activated in the target organ in situ and initiate inflammatory insulitis. Reconstitution of all components of the CD4(+) subset emphasizes the plastic capacity of different cell types to adopt effector and suppressor phenotypes. Furthermore, similar immune profiles of diabetic and euglycaemic NOD.SCID recipients demonstrate dissociation between fractional expression of CD25 and FoxP3 and the severity of insulitis. There were no evident and consistent differences in diabetogenic activity and immune reconstituting activity of T cells from pre-diabetic (11 weeks) and new onset diabetic NOD females. Similarities in immune phenotypes and variable distribution of effector and suppressor subsets in various stages of inflammation commend caution in interpretation of quantitative and qualitative aberrations as markers of disease severity in adoptive transfer experiments.

  13. Stable activity of diabetogenic cells with age in NOD mice: dynamics of reconstitution and adoptive diabetes transfer in immunocompromised mice

    PubMed Central

    Kaminitz, Ayelet; Mizrahi, Keren; Ash, Shifra; Ben-Nun, Avi; Askenasy, Nadir

    2014-01-01

    The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse is a prevalent disease model of type 1 diabetes. Immune aberrations that cause and propagate autoimmune insulitis in these mice are being continually debated, with evidence supporting both dominance of effector cells and insufficiency of suppressor mechanisms. In this study we assessed the behaviour of NOD lymphocytes under extreme expansion conditions using adoptive transfer into immunocompromised NOD.SCID (severe combined immunodeficiency) mice. CD4+ CD25+ T cells do not cause islet inflammation, whereas splenocytes and CD4+ CD25− T cells induce pancreatic inflammation and hyperglycaemia in 80–100% of the NOD.SCID recipients. Adoptively transferred effector T cells migrate to the lymphoid organs and pancreas, proliferate, are activated in the target organ in situ and initiate inflammatory insulitis. Reconstitution of all components of the CD4+ subset emphasizes the plastic capacity of different cell types to adopt effector and suppressor phenotypes. Furthermore, similar immune profiles of diabetic and euglycaemic NOD.SCID recipients demonstrate dissociation between fractional expression of CD25 and FoxP3 and the severity of insulitis. There were no evident and consistent differences in diabetogenic activity and immune reconstituting activity of T cells from pre-diabetic (11 weeks) and new onset diabetic NOD females. Similarities in immune phenotypes and variable distribution of effector and suppressor subsets in various stages of inflammation commend caution in interpretation of quantitative and qualitative aberrations as markers of disease severity in adoptive transfer experiments. PMID:24601987

  14. Vascular endothelial cells in cell-mediated immunity: adoptive transfer with in vitro conditioned cells is genetically restricted at the endothelial cell barrier

    SciTech Connect

    Standage, B.A.; Vetto, R.M.; Jones, R.; Burger, D.R.

    1985-01-01

    Delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) is a cell-mediated immune response that can be adoptively transferred in rats when greater than 2 X 10(8) cells from peritoneal exudate, lymph nodes, or spleen are used. We have shown that by using an in vitro conditioning step with antigen, transfer can be subsequently carried out with as few as 2 X 10(7) spleen cells. The magnitude of DTH was reflected in ear swelling after intradermal injection of antigen (tuberculin or keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH)) and confirmed histologically. The transfer was antigen specific, requiring the sensitizing antigen in both the in vitro conditioning step and in the ear test challenge. Adoptive transfer with conditioned cells was genetically restricted by alleles of the RT-1 region (major histocompatibility complex (MHC) of the rat). Brown Norway strain (n haplotype) immune cells would not transfer DTH to Lewis (1 haplotype), ACI (a haplotype), or Buffalo (b haplotype) rats, whereas each strain would transfer DTH to syngeneic recipients. Moreover, this pattern of restriction held for all strains when tested in reciprocal fashion. In additional experiments, F1 to parental bone marrow chimeras were constructed so that bone-marrow-derived cells and non-bone-marrow-derived cells were of different RT-1 haplotypes. When these chimeras were used as recipients, transfer of DTH was only observed when immune donor cells and recipient non-bone-marrow-derived cells were syngeneic. These results point to the critical role of non-bone-marrow-derived cells (endothelial cells) in the DTH reaction.

  15. CMVpp65 Vaccine Enhances the Antitumor Efficacy of Adoptively Transferred CD19-Redirected CMV-Specific T Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiuli; Wong, ChingLam W; Urak, Ryan; Mardiros, Armen; Budde, Lihua E; Chang, Wen-Chung; Thomas, Sandra H; Brown, Christine E; La Rosa, Corinna; Diamond, Don J; Jensen, Michael C; Nakamura, Ryotaro; Zaia, John A; Forman, Stephen J

    2015-07-01

    T cells engineered with chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) recognizing CD19 can induce complete remission of B-cell malignancies in clinical trials; however, in some disease settings, CAR therapy confers only modest clinical benefit due to attenuated persistence of CAR T cells. The purpose of this study was to enhance persistence and augment the antitumor activity of adoptively transferred CD19CAR T cells by restimulating CAR(+) T cells through an endogenous cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific T-cell receptor. CMV-specific T cells from CMV seropositive healthy donors were selected after stimulation with pp65 protein and transduced with clinical-grade lentivirus expressing the CD19R:CD28:ζ/EGFRt CAR. The resultant bispecific T cells, targeting CMV and CD19, were expanded via CD19 CAR-mediated signals using CD19-expressing cells. The bispecific T cells proliferated vigorously after engagement with either endogenous CMVpp65 T-cell receptors or engineered CD19 CARs, exhibiting specific cytolytic activity and IFNγ secretion. Upon adoptive transfer into immunodeficient mice bearing human lymphomas, the bispecific T cells exhibited proliferative response and enhanced antitumor activity following CMVpp65 peptide vaccine administration. We have redirected CMV-specific T cells to recognize and lyse tumor cells via CD19CARs, while maintaining their ability to proliferate in response to CMV antigen stimulation. These results illustrate the clinical applications of CMV vaccine to augment the antitumor activity of adoptively transferred CD19CAR T cells in patients with B-cell malignancies. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. The Past, Present, and Future of NK Cells in Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation and Adoptive Transfer.

    PubMed

    Cichocki, Frank; Verneris, Michael R; Cooley, Sarah; Bachanova, Veronika; Brunstein, Claudio G; Blazar, Bruce R; Wagner, John; Schlums, Heinrich; Bryceson, Yenan T; Weisdorf, Daniel J; Miller, Jeffrey S

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) has been used as a part of cancer therapy for over half a decade. Beyond the necessity for donor-derived cells to reconstitute hematopoiesis after radiation and chemotherapy, immunologic reconstitution from allogeneic cells is important for the elimination of residual tumor cells. Natural killer (NK) cells are first among lymphocytes to reconstitute post-transplant and protect against cancer relapse. In this review, we provide a historical perspective on the role of NK cells in cancer control in the transplant setting and focus on current research aimed at improving NK cell responses for therapeutic benefit.

  17. Development of allogeneic NK cell adoptive transfer therapy in metastatic melanoma patients: in vitro preclinical optimization studies.

    PubMed

    Besser, Michal J; Shoham, Tsipi; Harari-Steinberg, Orit; Zabari, Naama; Ortenberg, Rona; Yakirevitch, Arkadi; Nagler, Arnon; Loewenthal, Ron; Schachter, Jacob; Markel, Gal

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells have long been considered as potential agents for adoptive cell therapy for solid cancer patients. Until today most studies utilized autologous NK cells and yielded disappointing results. Here we analyze various modular strategies to employ allogeneic NK cells for adoptive cell transfer, including donor-recipient HLA-C mismatching, selective activation and induction of melanoma-recognizing lysis receptors, and co-administration of antibodies to elicit antibody-dependent cell cytotoxicity (ADCC). We show that NK cell activation and induction of the relevant lysis receptors, as well as co-administration of antibodies yield substantial anti-cancer effects, which are functionally superior to HLA-C mismatching. Combination of the various strategies yielded improved effects. In addition, we developed various clinically-compatible ex vivo expansion protocols that were optimized according to fold expansion, purity and expression of lysis receptors. The main advantages of employing allogeneic NK cells are accessibility, the ability to use a single donor for many patients, combination with various strategies associated with the mechanism of action, e.g. antibodies and specific activation, as well as donor selection according to HLA or CD16 genotypes. This study rationalizes a clinical trial that combines adoptive transfer of highly potent allogeneic NK cells and antibody therapy.

  18. Extending the lifespan and efficacies of immune cells used in adoptive transfer for cancer immunotherapies-A review.

    PubMed

    Nayar, Sandeep; Dasgupta, Prokar; Galustian, Christine

    2015-04-01

    Cells used in adoptive cell-transfer immunotherapies against cancer include dendritic cells (DCs), natural-killer cells, and CD8(+) T-cells. These cells may have limited efficacy due to their lifespan, activity, and immunosuppressive effects of tumor cells. Therefore, increasing longevity and activity of these cells may boost their efficacy. Four cytokines that can extend immune effector-cell longevity are IL-2, IL-7, IL-21, and IL-15. This review will discuss current knowledge on effector-cell lifespans and the mechanisms by which IL-2, IL-7, IL-15, and IL-21 can extend effector-cell longevity. We will also discuss how lifespan and efficacy of these cells can be regulated to allow optimal clinical benefits.

  19. [Adoptive transfer of T lymphocytes].

    PubMed

    Vié, H; Clémenceau, B

    2017-09-01

    Within a few years, the success of treatments based on the use of T-cells armed with a chimeric T-receptor for the CD19 molecule (CAR-T CD19) has revolutionized the perception of adoptive transfer approaches. The levels of responses observed in acute leukemias, of the order of 70-90 % are indeed unprecedented. The medical and financial enthusiasm aroused by these results has led to the current situation where more than 300 clinical trials are under way, against some thirty different antigens. This enthusiasm, well justified by the first successes, must however be tempered by the difficulties associated with the use of these cells. Indeed, the management of patients is made very complex both for medical reasons, because the toxicities associated with these treatments are important, and for technical reasons, because the preparation of T lymphocytes for therapeutic use requires dedicated structures. During this same period, knowledge of the mechanisms of regulation of T lymphocytes and the possibilities offered by synthetic biology and techniques of genome engineering have progressed considerably. Combined, they allow envisaging a true "programming" of the T lymphocytes, intended to improve the efficiency of the treatments and the safety of the patients. Medical and industrial perspectives and the role of these approaches in the arsenal of cancer therapies will depend largely on two conditions: the emergence of a robust demonstration of their effectiveness in solid tumors, and the establishment of an acceptable production and distribution model 1. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Longitudinal confocal microscopy imaging of solid tumor destruction following adoptive T cell transfer

    PubMed Central

    Schietinger, Andrea; Arina, Ainhoa; Liu, Rebecca B; Wells, Sam; Huang, Jianhua; Engels, Boris; Bindokas, Vytas; Bartkowiak, Todd; Lee, David; Herrmann, Andreas; Piston, David W; Pittet, Mikael J; Lin, P Charles; Zal, Tomasz; Schreiber, Hans

    2013-01-01

    A fluorescence-based, high-resolution imaging approach was used to visualize longitudinally the cellular events unfolding during T cell-mediated tumor destruction. The dynamic interplay of T cells, cancer cells, cancer antigen loss variants, and stromal cells—all color-coded in vivo—was analyzed in established, solid tumors that had developed behind windows implanted on the backs of mice. Events could be followed repeatedly within precisely the same tumor region—before, during and after adoptive T cell therapy—thereby enabling for the first time a longitudinal in vivo evaluation of protracted events, an analysis not possible with terminal imaging of surgically exposed tumors. T cell infiltration, stromal interactions, and vessel destruction, as well as the functional consequences thereof, including the elimination of cancer cells and cancer cell variants were studied. Minimal perivascular T cell infiltrates initiated vascular destruction inside the tumor mass eventually leading to macroscopic central tumor necrosis. Prolonged engagement of T cells with tumor antigen-crosspresenting stromal cells correlated with high IFNγ cytokine release and bystander elimination of antigen-negative cancer cells. The high-resolution, longitudinal, in vivo imaging approach described here will help to further a better mechanistic understanding of tumor eradication by T cells and other anti-cancer therapies. PMID:24482750

  1. Reinforcement of cancer immunotherapy by adoptive transfer of cblb-deficient CD8+ T cells combined with a DC vaccine.

    PubMed

    Lutz-Nicoladoni, Christina; Wallner, Stephanie; Stoitzner, Patrizia; Pircher, Magdalena; Gruber, Thomas; Wolf, Anna Maria; Gastl, Günther; Penninger, Josef M; Baier, Gottfried; Wolf, Dominik

    2012-01-01

    The success of cancer immunotherapy is limited by potent endogenous immune-evasion mechanisms, which are at least in part mediated by transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β). The E3 ubiquitin ligase Cbl-b is a key regulator of T cell activation and is established to regulate TGF-β sensitivity. cblb-deficient animals reject tumors via CD8(+) T cells, which make Cbl-b an ideal target for improvement of adoptive T-cell transfer (ATC) therapy. In this study, we show that cblb-deficient CD8(+) T cells are hyper-responsive to T-cell receptor (TCR)/CD28-stimulation and are in part protected against the negative cues induced by TGF-β in vitro. Notably, adoptive transfer of polyclonal, non-TCR transgenic cblb-deficient CD8(+) T cells is not sufficient to reject B16-ova or EG7 tumors in vivo. Thus, cblb-deficient ATC requires proper in vivo re-activation by a dendritic cell (DC) vaccine. In strict contrast to ATC monotherapy, this approach delayed tumor outgrowth and significantly increased survival rates, which is paralleled by increased CD8(+) T-cells infiltration to the tumor site and enrichment of ova-specific and interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-secreting CD8(+) T cell in the draining lymph node (LN). Moreover, CD8(+) T cells from cblb-deficient mice vaccinated with the DC vaccine show increased cytolytic activity in vivo. In summary, our data using cblb-deficient polyclonal, non-TCR-transgenic adoptively transferred CD8(+) T cells into immuno-competent non-lymphodepleted recipients suggest that targeting Cbl-b might serve as a novel 'adjuvant approach', suitable to augment the effectiveness of established anti-cancer immunotherapies.

  2. Hymenolepis nana: adoptive transfer of protective immunity and delayed type hypersensitivity response with mesenteric lymph node cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Asano, K; Muramatsu, K; Okamoto, K

    1991-01-01

    A marked degree of footpad swelling was observed in BALB/c mice infected with Hymenolepis nana eggs, when soluble egg antigen was injected into their footpads 4 to 21 days after the egg infection, indicating delayed type hypersensitivity responses in infected mice. Adoptive transfer with mesenteric lymph node cells from donor mice (BALB/c strain; +/+) infected with eggs 4 days before cell collection could confer this hypersensitivity to recipient nude mice (BALB/c strain; nu/nu). These mesenteric lymph node cells were then divided into two fractions, blast-enriched and blast-depleted cells, by density gradient centrifugation with Percoll. The recipients intravenously injected with the blast-depleted cell fraction showed a marked increase in footpad thickness, whereas the intravenous transfer of the blast-enriched cell fraction resulted in an insignificant increase in footpad thickness. The transfer of the blast-enriched cell fraction, but not of the blast-depleted cell fraction, conferred a strong adoptive immunity on syngeneic recipient nude mice, when the immunity transferred was assessed by examining cysticercoids developed in the intestinal villi on Day 4 of challenge infection. The lack of delayed type hypersensitivity response in mice that received the blast-enriched cell population was not due to a lack of the capacity of the cells to induce the response, because the cells were capable of inducing a significant increase in thickness of footpads of normal mice when these cells were locally injected into the footpad together with soluble egg antigen.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Suppression of colitis by adoptive transfer of helminth antigen-treated dendritic cells requires interleukin-4 receptor-α signaling

    PubMed Central

    Matisz, C. E.; Faz-López, B.; Thomson, E.; Al Rajabi, A.; Lopes, F.; Terrazas, L. I.; Wang, A.; Sharkey, K. A.; McKay, D. M.

    2017-01-01

    Infection with helminth parasites has been explored as a treatment for autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. As helminth antigens have potent immunomodulation properties capable of inducing regulatory programs in a variety of cell types, transferring cells treated with helminth antigens represents a novel extension to helminth therapy. Previous work determined that transfer of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (DC) pulsed with a crude extract of the tapeworm Hymenolepis diminuta (HD) can suppress colitis in recipient mice. The present study explored the mechanism of disease suppression and the importance of interleukin (IL)-4 signaling. Transfer of HD-DCs suppressed dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (DNBS)-induced colitis through activation of recipient IL-4 receptor-α. The transferred HD-DCs required IL-4Rα and the capacity to secrete IL-10 to drive IL-4 and IL-10 production and to suppress colitis in recipient mice. Treatment of DCs with IL-4 evokes an alternatively activated phenotype, but adoptive transfer of these cells did not affect the outcome of colitis. Collectively, these studies demonstrate the complexity between IL-4 and IL-10 in donor cells and recipient, and the requirement for parasite- and host-derived factors in this novel form of cell therapy. Thus IL-4Rα signaling is revealed as a pathway that could be exploited for helminth antigen cell-based therapy. PMID:28094779

  4. Adoptive transfer of nontransgenic mesenteric lymph node cells induces colitis in athymic HLA-B27 transgenic nude rats

    PubMed Central

    Hoentjen, F; Tonkonogy, S L; Liu, B; Sartor, R B; Taurog, J D; Dieleman, L A

    2006-01-01

    HLA-B27 transgenic (TG) rats develop spontaneous colitis when colonized with intestinal bacteria, whereas athymic nude (rnu/rnu) HLA-B27 TG rats remain disease free. The present study was designed to determine whether or not HLA-B27 expression on T cells is required for development of colitis after transfer of mesenteric lymph node (MLN) cells into rnu/rnu HLA-B27 recipients. Athymic nontransgenic (non-TG) and HLA-B27 TG recipients received MLN cells from either TG or non-TG rnu/+ heterozygous donor rats that contain T cells. HLA-B27 TG rnu/rnu recipients receiving either non-TG or TG MLN cells developed severe colitis and had higher caecal MPO and IL-1β levels, and their MLN cells produced more IFN-γ and less IL-10 after in vitro stimulation with caecal bacterial lysate compared to rnu/rnu non-TG recipients that remained disease free after receiving either TG or non-TG cells. Interestingly, proliferating donor TG T cells were detectable one week after adoptive transfer into rnu/rnu TG recipients but not after transfer into non-TG recipients. T cells from either non-TG or TG donors induce colitis in rnu/rnu TG but not in non-TG rats, suggesting that activation of effector T cells by other cell types that express HLA-B27 is pivotal for the pathogenesis of colitis in this model. PMID:16487247

  5. Enhancement of adoptive T cell transfer with single low dose pretreatment of doxorubicin or paclitaxel in mice.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Fei-Ting; Chen, Tzu-Chun; Chuang, Hui-Yen; Chang, Ya-Fang; Hwang, Jeng-Jong

    2015-12-29

    Ex vivo expansion of CD8+ T-cells has been a hindrance for the success of adoptive T cell transfer in clinic. Currently, preconditioning with chemotherapy is used to modulate the patient immunity before ACT, however, the tumor microenvironment beneficial for transferring T cells may also be damaged. Here preconditioning with single low dose of doxorubicin or paclitaxel combined with fewer CD8+ T-cells was investigated to verify whether the same therapeutic efficacy of ACT could be achieved. An E.G7/OT1 animal model that involved adoptive transfer of OVA-specific CD8+ T-cells transduced with a granzyme B promoter-driven firefly luciferase and tomato fluorescent fusion reporter gene was used to evaluate this strategy. The result showed that CD8+ T-cells were activated and sustained longer in mice pretreated with one low-dose Dox or Tax. Enhanced therapeutic efficacy was found in Dox or Tax combined with 2x106 CD8+ T-cells and achieved the same level of tumor growth inhibition as that of 5x106 CD8+ T-cells group. Notably, reduced numbers of Tregs and myeloid derived suppressor cells were shown in combination groups. By contrast, the number of tumor-infiltrating cytotoxic T lymphocytes and IL-12 were increased. The NF-κB activity and immunosuppressive factors such as TGF-β, IDO, CCL2, VEGF, CCL22, COX-2 and IL-10 were suppressed. This study demonstrates that preconditioning with single low dose Dox or Tax and combined with two fifth of the original CD8+ T-cells could improve the tumor microenvironment via suppression of NF-κB and its related immunosuppressors, and activate more CD8+ T-cells which also stay longer.

  6. Assessing the development of murine plasmacytoid dendritic cells in Peyer's patches using adoptive transfer of hematopoietic progenitors.

    PubMed

    Li, Haiyan S; Watowich, Stephanie S

    2014-03-17

    This protocol details a method to analyze the ability of purified hematopoietic progenitors to generate plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) in intestinal Peyer's patch (PP). Common dendritic cell progenitors (CDPs, lin(-) c-kit(lo) CD115(+) Flt3(+)) were purified from the bone marrow of C57BL6 mice by FACS and transferred to recipient mice that lack a significant pDC population in PP; in this case, Ifnar(-/-) mice were used as the transfer recipients. In some mice, overexpression of the dendritic cell growth factor Flt3 ligand (Flt3L) was enforced prior to adoptive transfer of CDPs, using hydrodynamic gene transfer (HGT) of Flt3L-encoding plasmid. Flt3L overexpression expands DC populations originating from transferred (or endogenous) hematopoietic progenitors. At 7-10 days after progenitor transfer, pDCs that arise from the adoptively transferred progenitors were distinguished from recipient cells on the basis of CD45 marker expression, with pDCs from transferred CDPs being CD45.1(+) and recipients being CD45.2(+). The ability of transferred CDPs to contribute to the pDC population in PP and to respond to Flt3L was evaluated by flow cytometry of PP single cell suspensions from recipient mice. This method may be used to test whether other progenitor populations are capable of generating PP pDCs. In addition, this approach could be used to examine the role of factors that are predicted to affect pDC development in PP, by transferring progenitor subsets with an appropriate knockdown, knockout or overexpression of the putative developmental factor and/or by manipulating circulating cytokines via HGT. This method may also allow analysis of how PP pDCs affect the frequency or function of other immune subsets in PPs. A unique feature of this method is the use of Ifnar(-/-) mice, which show severely depleted PP pDCs relative to wild type animals, thus allowing reconstitution of PP pDCs in the absence of confounding effects from lethal irradiation.

  7. Generation of memory T cells for adoptive transfer using clinical-grade anti-CD62L magnetic beads.

    PubMed

    Verfuerth, S; Sousa, P S E; Beloki, L; Murray, M; Peters, M D; O'Neill, A T; Mackinnon, S; Lowdell, M W; Chakraverty, R; Samuel, E R

    2015-10-01

    Pre-clinical studies of allogeneic stem cell transplantation suggest that depletion of naive T cells from donor lymphocytes will reduce the risk of GvHD but preserve immunity to infectious pathogens. In this study, we have established a clinical-grade protocol under good manufacturing practice conditions for purging CD62L(+) naive T cells from steady-state leukapheresis products using the CliniMACS system. The efficacy of immunomagnetic CD62L depletion was assessed by analysis of cell composition and functional immune responses. A median 2.9 log CD62L depletion was achieved with no evidence of CD62L shedding during the procedure and a mean T-cell yield of 47%. CD62L(-) cells comprised an equal mix of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, with elimination of B cells but maintenance of regulatory T cells and natural killer cell populations. CD62L-depleted T cells were predominantly CD45RA(-) and CD45RA(+) effector memory (>90%) and contained the bulk of pentamer-staining antivirus-specific T cells. Functional assessment of CD62L(-) cells revealed the maintenance of antiviral T-cell reactivity and a reduction in the alloreactive immune response compared with unmanipulated cells. Clinical-grade depletion of naive T cells using immunomagnetic CD62L beads from steady-state leukapheresis products is highly efficient and generates cells suitable for adoptive transfer in the context of clinical trials.

  8. Deletion of Plasmodium berghei-Specific CD4+ T Cells Adoptively Transferred into Recipient Mice after Challenge with Homologous Parasite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirunpetcharat, Chakrit; Good, Michael F.

    1998-02-01

    The immune response to malaria parasites includes T cell responses that reduce parasites by effector T cell responses and by providing help for antibody responses. Some parasites are more sensitive to antibody and others are more sensitive to cell-mediated immunity. We demonstrate that cultured CD4+ T cells that produce interferon CD4+ and interleukin 2, but not interleukin 4, in response to stimulation with the rodent parasite Plasmodium berghei can reduce but not eliminate parasites in vivo after adoptive transfer. Although cells can persist in vivo for up to 9 months in uninfected mice, infection results in elimination of up to 99% of specific T cells in different tissues, as judged by tracking T cells labeled with the fluorescent dye 5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester. T cells specific for ovalbumin are unaffected. In vivo activation and division of transferred T cells per se are not responsible for deletion because T cells positive for 5-(and -6)-carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester divide up to six times within 7 days in uninfected mice and are not deleted. Understanding the factors responsible for parasite-mediated specific deletion of T cells would enhance our knowledge of parasite immunity.

  9. Deficiency of stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 aggravates colitogenic potential of adoptively transferred effector T cells.

    PubMed

    Yeoh, Beng San; Saha, Piu; Singh, Vishal; Xiao, Xia; Ying, Yun; Vanamala, Jairam K; Kennett, Mary J; Harvatine, Kevin J; Joe, Bina; Vijay-Kumar, Matam

    2016-10-01

    Stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD1) is a lipogenic enzyme involved in the de novo biosynthesis of oleate (C18:1, n9), a major fatty acid in the phospholipids of lipid bilayers of cell membranes. Accordingly, Scd1KO mice display substantially reduced oleate in cell membranes. An altered SCD1 level was observed during intestinal inflammation; however, its role in modulating inflammatory bowel disease remains elusive. Herein, we investigated the colitogenic capacity of Scd1KO effector T cells by employing the adoptive T-cell transfer colitis model. Splenic effector T cells (CD4(+)CD25(-)) from age- and sex-matched wild-type (WT) and Scd1KO mice were isolated by FACS and intraperitoneally administered to Rag1KO mice, which were monitored for the development of colitis. At day 60 postcell transfer, Rag1KO mice that received Scd1KO CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells displayed accelerated and exacerbated colitis than mice receiving WT CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells. Intriguingly, Scd1KO CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells display augmented inflammatory cytokine profile and cellular membrane fluidity with a concomitant increase in proinflammatory saturated fatty acids, which we postulate to potentially underlie their augmented colitogenic potential.

  10. Adoptive Transfer of Treg Cells Combined with Mesenchymal Stem Cells Facilitates Repopulation of Endogenous Treg Cells in a Murine Acute GVHD Model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Eun-Sol; Lim, Jung-Yeon; Im, Keon-Il; Kim, Nayoun; Nam, Young-Sun; Jeon, Young-Woo; Cho, Seok-Goo

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic effects of combined cell therapy with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) and regulatory T cells (Treg cells) have recently been studied in acute graft-versus-host-disease (aGVHD) models. However, the underlying, seemingly synergistic mechanism behind combined cell therapy has not been determined. We investigated the origin of Foxp3+ Treg cells and interleukin 17 (IL-17+) cells in recipients following allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (allo-BMT) to identify the immunological effects of combined cell therapy. Treg cells were generated from eGFP-expressing C57BL/6 mice (Tregegfp cells) to distinguish the transferred Treg cells; recipients were then examined at different time points after BMT. Systemic infusion of MSCs and Treg cells improved survival and GVHD scores, effectively downregulating pro-inflammatory Th×and Th17 cells. These therapeutic effects of combined cell therapy resulted in an increased Foxp3+ Treg cell population. Compared to single cell therapy, adoptively transferred Tregegfp cells only showed prolonged survival in the combined cell therapy group on day 21 after allogeneic BMT. In addition, Foxp3+ Treg cells, generated endogenously from recipients, significantly increased. Significantly higher levels of Tregegfp cells were also detected in aGVHD target organs in the combined cell therapy group compared to the Treg cells group. Thus, our data indicate that MSCs may induce the long-term survival of transferred Treg cells, particularly in aGVHD target organs, and may increase the repopulation of endogenous Treg cells in recipients after BMT. Together, these results support the potential of combined cell therapy using MSCs and Treg cells for preventing aGVHD.

  11. Adoptive transfer of regulatory T cells promotes intestinal tumorigenesis and is associated with decreased NK cells and IL-22 binding protein.

    PubMed

    Janakiram, Naveena B; Mohammed, Altaf; Bryant, Taylor; Brewer, Misty; Biddick, Laura; Lightfoot, Stan; Lang, Mark L; Rao, Chinthalapally V

    2015-10-01

    High number of regulatory T cells (Tregs), both circulating and at the tumor site, often indicates a poor prognosis in CRC patient's possibly impairing natural killer (NK) cell function. To determine the role of Tregs in CRC development and their effects on NK cells, we created novel transgenic Rag-Apc mice that lack T cells and develop spontaneous intestinal tumors, and we adoptively transferred Tregs or transiently depleted NK cells during initial stages of tumorigenesis. In 6-weeks old Rag-Apc mice containing microscopic intestinal tumors adoptive transfer of Tregs or transient NK cell depletion dramatically associated with an increase in intestinal tumor multiplicity and tumor size, with significantly decreased survival rates. Importantly, Treg transfer increased small intestinal polyp formation up to 65% (P < 0.0005) and increased colon tumors multiplicities by 84% (P < 0.0001) with a significant decrease in NK cells as compared to control mice. Similarly, in NK depleted mice, colon tumor multiplicities increased up to 40% and small intestinal polyp formation up to 60% (P < 0.0001). Treg transfer or NK cell transient depletion markedly increased interleukin (IL)-22 systemically and the inflammatory signaling molecules P2X7R, and STAT3 in the tumors; and impaired production of the tumor suppressor interferon (IFN)-γ systemically. Notably, IL-22 binding protein (IL-22 BP) was associated with NKs and a significant decrease was seen at the tumor site in mice adoptively transferred with Tregs or depleted of NK cells. Our results suggest that adoptive transfer of Tregs aggressively promote intestinal tumorigenesis by decreasing NK cell number and activity by modulating IL-22 BP.

  12. Adoptive transfer of allogeneic liver sinusoidal endothelial cells specifically inhibits T-cell responses to cognate stimuli.

    PubMed

    Banshodani, Masataka; Onoe, Takashi; Shishida, Masayuki; Tahara, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Shinji; Igarashi, Yuka; Tanaka, Yuka; Ohdan, Hideki

    2013-01-01

    Although it is well known that liver allografts are often accepted by recipients, leading to donor-specific tolerance of further organ transplants, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We had previously used an in vitro model and showed that mouse liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) selectively suppress allospecific T-cells across major histocompatibility complex (MHC) barriers. In the present study, we established an in vivo model for evaluating the immunomodulatory effects of allogeneic LSECs on corresponding T-cells. Allogeneic BALB/cA LSECs were injected intraportally into recombination activating gene 2 γ-chain double-knockout (RAG2/gc-KO, H-2(b)) mice lacking T, B, and natural killer (NK) cells. In order to facilitate LSEC engraftment, the RAG2/gc-KO mice were injected intraperitoneally with monocrotaline 2 days before the adoptive transfer of LSECs; this impaired the host LSECs, conferring a proliferative advantage to the transplanted LSECs. After orthotopic allogeneic LSEC engraftment, the RAG2/gc-KO mice were immune reconstituted intravenously with C57BL/6 splenocytes. After immune reconstitution, mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) assay using splenocytes from the recipients revealed that specific inhibition of host CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell proliferation was greater in response to allostimulation with irradiated BALB/cA splenocytes rather than to stimulation with irradiated third party SJL/jorllco splenocytes. This inhibitory effect was attenuated by administering anti-programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) monoclonal antibody during immune reconstitution in the above-mentioned mice, but not in RAG2/gc-KO mice engrafted with Fas ligand (FasL)-deficient BALB/cA LSECs. Furthermore, engraftment of allogeneic BALB/cA LSECs significantly prolonged the survival of subsequently grafted cognate allogeneic BALB/cA hearts in RAG2/gc-KO mice immune reconstituted with bone marrow transplantation from C57BL/6 mice. In conclusion, murine LSECs have been proven

  13. Effect of adoptive transfer of CD4, CD8 and B cells on recovery from MHV3-induced immunodeficiencies.

    PubMed Central

    Lamontagne, L; Jolicoeur, P; Decarie, D; Menezes, J

    1996-01-01

    A chronic viral infection can occur when the host fails to mount an effective immune response to clear the virus. Mouse hepatitis virus type 3 (MHV3) appears to be an excellent model for the study of the relationship between viral-induced immunodeficiency and chronic disease development. (C57BL/6 x A/J)F1 mice surviving acute hepatitis develop a chronic disease characterized by T- and B-cell immunodeficiencies, viral persistence in various organs including the brain, spleen and thymus, and death within 3 months postinfection (p.i.). We have reported that T- or B-cell deficiencies, observed in MHV3 chronically infected (C57BL/6 x A/J)F1 mice, can be partially or totally thwarted by adoptive transfer of CD4+, CD8+ and/or B cells, at 15 days p.i. in mice surviving the acute phase of the disease. Adoptive transfer of syngeneic CD4+ and/or CD8+ allowed a partial restoration of the T-cell deficiencies, as characterized by thymic atrophy, decrease in splenic T cells, and in all thymocyte subpopulations. B-cell immunodeficiency, as defined by a decrease in splenic B cells, as well as in the bone marrow pre-B- and B-cell compartments, and the occurrence of abnormally larger forms of bone marrow pre-B and B cells, were partially thwarted by B-cell treatment only. Splenic B cells and the bone marrow B-cell compartment, respectively, returned partially or totally to normal values, whereas the pre-B-cell compartment remained depleted in infected mice treated with B cells. Levels of all immunoglobulin classes returned to normal values in MHV3 chronically infected mice when treated with CD4+ in combination with CD8+ cells. All T- and/or B-cell treatments, however, were sufficient to thwart the process of the chronic disease, and favoured the survival of mice for up to 6 months p.i. PMID:8690454

  14. Adoptive transfer of Tc1 or Tc17 cells elicits antitumor immunity against established melanoma through distinct mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yu; Cho, Hyun-Ii; Wang, Dapeng; Kaosaard, Kane; Anasetti, Claudio; Celis, Esteban; Yu, Xue-Zhong

    2013-02-15

    Adoptive cell transfer (ACT) of ex vivo-activated autologous tumor-reactive T cells is currently one of the most promising approaches for cancer immunotherapy. Recent studies provided some evidence that IL-17-producing CD8(+) (Tc17) cells may exhibit potent antitumor activity, but the specific mechanisms have not been completely defined. In this study, we used a murine melanoma lung-metastasis model and tested the therapeutic effects of gp100-specific polarized type I CD8(+) cytotoxic T (Tc1) or Tc17 cells combined with autologous bone marrow transplantation after total body irradiation. Bone marrow transplantation combined with ACT of antitumor (gp100-specific) Tc17 cells significantly suppressed the growth of established melanoma, whereas Tc1 cells induced long-term tumor regression. After ACT, Tc1 cells maintained their phenotype to produce IFN-γ, but not IL-17. However, although Tc17 cells largely preserved their ability to produce IL-17, a subset secreted IFN-γ or both IFN-γ and IL-17, indicating the plasticity of Tc17 cells in vivo. Furthermore, after ACT, the Tc17 cells had a long-lived effector T cell phenotype (CD127(hi)/KLRG-1(low)) as compared with Tc1 cells. Mechanistically, Tc1 cells mediated antitumor immunity primarily through the direct effect of IFN-γ on tumor cells. In contrast, despite the fact that some Tc17 cells also secreted IFN-γ, Tc17-mediated antitumor immunity was independent of the direct effects of IFN-γ on the tumor. Nevertheless, IFN-γ played a critical role by creating a microenvironment that promoted Tc17-mediated antitumor activity. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that both Tc1 and Tc17 cells can mediate effective antitumor immunity through distinct effector mechanisms, but Tc1 cells are superior to Tc17 cells in mediating tumor regression.

  15. Adoptive transfer of helminth antigen-pulsed dendritic cells protects against the development of experimental colitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Matisz, Chelsea E; Leung, Gabriella; Reyes, Jose Luis; Wang, Arthur; Sharkey, Keith A; McKay, Derek M

    2015-11-01

    Infection with helminth parasites and treatment with worm extracts can suppress inflammatory disease, including colitis. Postulating that dendritic cells (DCs) participated in the suppression of inflammation and seeking to move beyond the use of helminths per se, we tested the ability of Hymenolepis diminuta antigen-pulsed DCs to suppress colitis as a novel cell-based immunotherapy. Bone marrow derived DCs pulsed with H. diminuta antigen (HD-DCs), or PBS-, BSA-, or LPS-DCs as controls, were transferred into wild-type (WT), interleukin-10 (IL-10) knock-out (KO), and RAG-1 KO mice, and the impact on dinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (DNBS)-induced colitis and splenic cytokine production assessed 72 h later. Mice receiving HD-DCs were significantly protected from DNBS-induced colitis and of the experimental groups only these mice displayed increased Th2 cytokines and IL-10 production. Adoptive transfer of HD-DCs protected neither RAG-1 nor IL-10 KO mice from DNBS-colitis. Furthermore, the transfer of CD4(+) splenocytes from recipients of HD-DCs protected naïve mice against DNBS-colitis, in an IL-10 dependent manner. Thus, HD-DCs are a novel anti-colitic immunotherapy that can educate anti-colitic CD4(+) T cells: mechanistically, the anti-colitic effect of HD-DCs requires that the host has an adaptive immune response and the ability to mobilize IL-10.

  16. Persistence of Multiple Tumor-Specific T-Cell Clones Is Associated with Complete Tumor Regression in a Melanoma Patient Receiving Adoptive Cell Transfer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Juhua; Dudley, Mark E.; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Robbins, Paul F.

    2007-01-01

    Summary The authors recently reported that adoptive immunotherapy with autologous tumor-reactive tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) immediately following a conditioning nonmyeloablative chemotherapy regimen resulted in an enhanced clinical response rate in patients with metastatic melanoma. These observations led to the current studies, which are focused on a detailed analysis of the T-cell antigen reactivity as well as the in vivo persistence of T cells in melanoma patient 2098, who experienced a complete regression of all metastatic lesions in lungs and soft tissues following therapy. Screening of an autologous tumor cell cDNA library using transferred TILs resulted in the identification of novel mutated growth arrest-specific gene 7 (GAS7) and glyceral-dehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) gene transcripts. Direct sequence analysis of the expressed T-cell receptor beta chain variable regions showed that the transferred TILs contained multiple T-cell clonotypes, at least six of which persisted in peripheral blood for a month or more following transfer. The persistent T cells recognized both the mutated GAS7 and GAPDH. These persistent tumor-reactive T-cell clones were detected in tumor cell samples obtained from the patient following adoptive cell transfer and appeared to be represented at higher levels in the tumor sample obtained 1 month following transfer than in the peripheral blood obtained at the same time. Overall, these results indicate that multiple tumor-reactive T cells can persist in the peripheral blood and at the tumor site for prolonged times following adoptive transfer and thus may be responsible for the complete tumor regression in this patient. PMID:15614045

  17. Clinical-scale isolation of the total Aspergillus fumigatus-reactive T-helper cell repertoire for adoptive transfer.

    PubMed

    Bacher, Petra; Jochheim-Richter, Andrea; Mockel-Tenbrink, Nadine; Kniemeyer, Olaf; Wingenfeld, Eva; Alex, Regina; Ortigao, Alice; Karpova, Darja; Lehrnbecher, Thomas; Ullmann, Andrew J; Hamprecht, Axel; Cornely, Oliver; Brakhage, Axel A; Assenmacher, Mario; Bonig, Halvard; Scheffold, Alexander

    2015-10-01

    Evidence of the criticality of the adaptive immune response for controlling invasive aspergillosis has been provided. This observation is supported by the fact that invasive aspergillosis, a grave complication of allogeneic stem cell transplantation, occurs long after myeloid reconstitution in patients with low T-cell engraftment and/or on immunosuppressants. Adoptive T-cell transfer might be beneficial, but idiosyncrasies of Aspergillus fumigatus and the anti-Aspergillus immune response render established selection technologies ineffective. We developed a Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP)-compliant protocol for preparation of A. fumigatus-specific CD4+ cells by sequentially depleting regulatory and cytotoxic T cells, activating A. fumigatus-specific T-helper cells with GMP-grade A. fumigatus lysate, and immuno-magnetically isolating them via the transiently up-regulated activation marker, CD137. In 13 full-scale runs, we demonstrate robustness and feasibility of the approach. From 2 × 10(9) peripheral blood mononuclear cells, we isolated 27 × 10(3)-318 × 10(3)Aspergillus-specific T-helper cells. Frequency among total T cells was increased, on average, by 200-fold. Specific studies indicate specificity and functionality: After non-specific in vitro expansion and re-stimulation with different antigens, we observed strong cytokine responses to A. fumigatus and some other fungi including Candida albicans, but none to unrelated antigens. Our technology isolates naturally occurring Aspergillus-specific T-helper cells within 2 days of identifying the clinical indication. Rapid adoptive transfer of Aspergillus-specific T cells may be quite feasible; the clinical benefit remains to be demonstrated. A manufacturing license as an advanced-therapy medicinal product was received and a clinical trial in post-transplantation invasive aspergillosis patients approved. The product is dosed at 5 × 10E3/kg T cells (single intravenous injection), of which at least 10

  18. Regulation of allergic airway inflammation by adoptive transfer of CD4(+) T cells preferentially producing IL-10.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Masaya; Doi, Kana; Tsutsumi, Tatsuya; Fujii, Shinya; Kishima, Maki; Nishimura, Kazuma; Kuroda, Ikue; Tanahashi, Yu; Yuasa, Rino; Kinjo, Toshihiko; Kuramoto, Nobuyuki; Mizutani, Nobuaki; Nabe, Takeshi

    2017-10-05

    Anti-inflammatory pharmacotherapy for asthma has mainly depended on the inhalation of glucocorticoids, which non-specifically suppress immune responses. If the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-10 can be induced by a specific antigen, asthmatic airway inflammation could be suppressed when individuals are exposed to the antigen. The purpose of this study was to develop cellular immunotherapeutics for atopic diseases using IL-10-producing CD4(+) T cells. Spleen cells isolated from ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized mice were cultured with the antigen, OVA and growth factors, IL-21, IL-27 and TGF-β for 7 days. After the 7-day culture, the CD4(+) T cells were purified using a murine CD4 magnetic beads system. When the induced CD4(+) T cells were stimulated by OVA in the presence of antigen-presenting cells, IL-10 was preferentially produced in vitro. When CD4(+) T cells were adoptively transferred to OVA-sensitized mice followed by intratracheal OVA challenges, IL-10 was preferentially produced in the serum and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid in vivo. IL-10 production coincided with the inhibition of eosinophilic airway inflammation and epithelial mucus plugging. Most of the IL-10-producing CD4(+) T cells were negative for Foxp3 and GATA-3, transcription factors of naturally occurring regulatory T cells and Th2 cells, respectively, but double positive for LAG-3 and CD49b, surface markers of inducible regulatory T cells, Tr1 cells. Collectively, most of the induced IL-10-producing CD4(+) T cells could be Tr1 cells, which respond to the antigen to produce IL-10, and effectively suppressed allergic airway inflammation. The induced Tr1 cells may be useful for antigen-specific cellular immunotherapy for atopic diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Transition of late-stage effector T cells to CD27+ CD28+ tumor-reactive effector memory T cells in humans after adoptive cell transfer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Powell, Daniel J.; Dudley, Mark E.; Robbins, Paul F.; Rosenberg, Steven A.

    2007-01-01

    In humans, the pathways of memory T-cell differentiation remain poorly defined. Recently, adoptive cell transfer (ACT) of tumor-reactive T lymphocytes to metastatic melanoma patients after nonmyeloablative chemotherapy has resulted in persistence of functional, tumor-reactive lymphocytes, regression of disease, and induction of melanocyte-directed autoimmunity in some responding patients. In the current study, longitudinal phenotypic analysis was performed on melanoma antigen–specific CD8+ T cells during their transition from in vitro cultured effector cells to long-term persistent memory cells following ACT to 6 responding patients. Tumor-reactive T cells used for therapy were generally late-stage effector cells with a CD27Lo CD28Lo CD45RA− CD62 ligand− (CD62L−) CC chemokine receptor 7− (CCR7−) interleukin-7 receptor αLo (IL-7RαLo) phenotype. After transfer, rapid up-regulation and continued expression of IL-7Rα in vivo suggested an important role for IL-7R in immediate and long-term T-cell survival. Although the tumor antigen–specific T-cell population contracted between 1 and 4 weeks after transfer, stable numbers of CD27+ CD28+ tumor-reactive T cells were maintained, demonstrating their contribution to the development of long-term, melanoma-reactive memory CD8+ T cells in vivo. At 2 months after transfer, melanoma-reactive T cells persisted at high levels and displayed an effector memory phenotype, including a CD27+ CD28+ CD62L− CCR7− profile, which may explain in part their ability to mediate tumor destruction. PMID:15345595

  20. Successful adoptive transfer and in vivo expansion of human haploidentical NK cells in patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jeffrey S; Soignier, Yvette; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; McNearney, Sarah A; Yun, Gong H; Fautsch, Susan K; McKenna, David; Le, Chap; Defor, Todd E; Burns, Linda J; Orchard, Paul J; Blazar, Bruce R; Wagner, John E; Slungaard, Arne; Weisdorf, Daniel J; Okazaki, Ian J; McGlave, Philip B

    2005-04-15

    We previously demonstrated that autologous natural killer (NK)-cell therapy after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is safe but does not provide an antitumor effect. We hypothesize that this is due to a lack of NK-cell inhibitory receptor mismatching with autologous tumor cells, which may be overcome by allogeneic NK-cell infusions. Here, we test haploidentical, related-donor NK-cell infusions in a nontransplantation setting to determine safety and in vivo NK-cell expansion. Two lower intensity outpatient immune suppressive regimens were tested: (1) low-dose cyclophosphamide and methylprednisolone and (2) fludarabine. A higher intensity inpatient regimen of high-dose cyclophosphamide and fludarabine (Hi-Cy/Flu) was tested in patients with poor-prognosis acute myeloid leukemia (AML). All patients received subcutaneous interleukin 2 (IL-2) after infusions. Patients who received lower intensity regimens showed transient persistence but no in vivo expansion of donor cells. In contrast, infusions after the more intense Hi-Cy/Flu resulted in a marked rise in endogenous IL-15, expansion of donor NK cells, and induction of complete hematologic remission in 5 of 19 poor-prognosis patients with AML. These findings suggest that haploidentical NK cells can persist and expand in vivo and may have a role in the treatment of selected malignancies used alone or as an adjunct to HCT.

  1. Adoptive Transfer of Dendritic Cells Expressing Fas Ligand Modulates Intestinal Inflammation in a Model of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    de Jesus, Edelmarie Rivera; Isidro, Raymond A; Cruz, Myrella L; Marty, Harry; Appleyard, Caroline B

    2016-01-01

    Background Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are chronic relapsing inflammatory conditions of unknown cause and likely result from the loss of immunological tolerance, which leads to over-activation of the gut immune system. Gut macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) are essential for maintaining tolerance, but can also contribute to the inflammatory response in conditions such as IBD. Current therapies for IBD are limited by high costs and unwanted toxicities and side effects. The possibility of reducing intestinal inflammation with DCs genetically engineered to over-express the apoptosis-inducing FasL (FasL-DCs) has not yet been explored. Objective Investigate the immunomodulatory effect of administering FasL-DCs in the rat trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) model of acute colitis. Methods Expression of FasL on DCs isolated from the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) of normal and TNBS-colitis rats was determined by flow cytometry. Primary rat bone marrow DCs were transfected with rat FasL plasmid (FasL-DCs) or empty vector (EV-DCs). The effect of these DCs on T cell IFNγ secretion and apoptosis was determined by ELISPOT and flow cytometry for Annexin V, respectively. Rats received FasL-DCs or EV-DCs intraperitoneally 96 and 48 hours prior to colitis induction with TNBS. Colonic T cell and neutrophil infiltration was determined by immunohistochemistry for CD3 and myeloperoxidase activity assay, respectively. Macrophage number and phenotype was measured by double immunofluorescence for CD68 and inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase. Results MLN dendritic cells from normal rats expressed more FasL than those from colitic rats. Compared to EV-DCs, FasL-DCs reduced T cell IFNγ secretion and increased T cell apoptosis in vitro. Adoptive transfer of FasL-DCs decreased macroscopic and microscopic damage scores and reduced colonic T cells, neutrophils, and proinflammatory macrophages when compared to EV-DC adoptive transfer. Conclusion FasL-DCs are effective at treating colonic

  2. C-C chemokine receptor type-4 transduction of T cells enhances interaction with dendritic cells, tumor infiltration and therapeutic efficacy of adoptive T cell transfer.

    PubMed

    Rapp, Moritz; Grassmann, Simon; Chaloupka, Michael; Layritz, Patrick; Kruger, Stephan; Ormanns, Steffen; Rataj, Felicitas; Janssen, Klaus-Peter; Endres, Stefan; Anz, David; Kobold, Sebastian

    2016-03-01

    T cell infiltration at the tumor site has been identified as a major predictor for the efficacy of adoptive T cell therapy. The chemokine C-C motif ligand 22 (CCL22) is highly expressed by immune cells in murine and human pancreatic cancer. Expression of its corresponding receptor, C-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CCR4), is restricted to regulatory T cells (Treg). We show that transduction of cytotoxic T cells (CTL) with CCR4 enhances their immigration into a pancreatic cancer model. Further, we show that binding of CCR4 with CCL22 strengthens the binding of T cell LFA-1 to dendritic cell (DC) ICAM-1 and increases CTL activation. In vivo, in a model of subcutaneous pancreatic cancer, treatment of tumor-bearing mice with CCR4-transduced CTL led to the eradication of established tumors in 40% of the mice. In conclusion, CCR4 overexpression in CTL is a promising therapeutic strategy to enhance the efficacy of adoptive T cell transfer (ACT).

  3. Overcoming intrinsic inhibitory pathways to augment the antineoplastic activity of adoptively transferred T cells: Re-tuning your CAR before hitting a rocky road.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang-Chuan S; Riese, Matthew J; Moon, Edmund K; Albelda, Steven M

    2013-11-01

    Effector T cells become rapidly inactivated after antigen exposure due to extracellular as well as intrinsic signals. We have recently demonstrated that the deletion of diacylglycerol kinases, intrinsic inhibitors of T-cell signaling, enhances the activity of adoptively transferred T cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) specific for a tumor-associated antigen.

  4. Adoptive cell therapy for sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Mata, Melinda; Gottschalk, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Current therapy for sarcomas, though effective in treating local disease, is often ineffective for patients with recurrent or metastatic disease. To improve outcomes, novel approaches are needed and cell therapy has the potential to meet this need since it does not rely on the cytotoxic mechanisms of conventional therapies. The recent successes of T-cell therapies for hematological malignancies have led to renewed interest in exploring cell therapies for solid tumors such as sarcomas. In this review, we will discuss current cell therapies for sarcoma with special emphasis on genetic approaches to improve the effector function of adoptively transferred cells. PMID:25572477

  5. IL-2 augments the therapeutic efficacy of adoptively transferred B cells which directly kill tumor cells via the CXCR4/CXCL12 and perforin pathways

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xin; Xia, Leiming; Zhou, Li; Wang, Yi; Bao, Yangyi; Huang, Shiang; Ren, Xiubao; Lundy, Steven K.; Dai, Fu; Li, Qiao; Chang, Alfred E.

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported that antitumor B cells directly kill tumor cells via the Fas/FasL pathway and are regulated by IL-10. In this study, we defined additional mechanisms involved in B cell antitumor immunity. Administration of IL-2 significantly augmented the therapeutic efficacy of adoptively transferred tumor-draining lymph node (TDLN) B cells which express IL- 2R. Culture supernatant of purified B splenocytes harvested from the mice that received adoptive transfer of 4T1 TDLN B cells plus IL-2 administration produced larger amounts of IgG which bound to 4T1, resulting in 4T1 lysis. Furthermore, we detected CXCR4 expression on 4T1 TDLN B cells, and 4T1 tumor cells produced its ligand CXCL12. Transwell experiments demonstrated the chemoattraction of CXCR4-expressing 4T1 TDLN B cells towards CXCL12- producing 4T1 cells. Blockade of CXCR4 using a CXCR4-specific inhibitor, AMD3100, significantly reduced the killing of 4T1 tumor cells by 4T1 TDLN B cells. Blockade of FasL and CXCR4 concurrently inhibited B cell-mediated direct killing of tumor cells in an additive manner, indicating that both Fas/FasL and CXCL12/CXCR4 pathways are involved in the direct killing of 4T1 cells by 4T1 TDLN B cells. TDLN B cells produced perforin. Additional transwell experiments showed that effector B cells could directly kill tumor cells in cell-cell contact via the Fas/FasL and CXCR4/CXCL12 pathways as well as perforin, while without cell contact, perforin secreted by B cells led to tumor cell cytotoxicity. These findings underscore the diversity of function by which B cells can play an important role in the host immune response to tumor. PMID:27528023

  6. IL-2 augments the therapeutic efficacy of adoptively transferred B cells which directly kill tumor cells via the CXCR4/CXCL12 and perforin pathways.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yang; Tao, Huimin; Hu, Yangyang; Chen, Quanning; Chen, Xin; Xia, Leiming; Zhou, Li; Wang, Yi; Bao, Yangyi; Huang, Shiang; Ren, Xiubao; Lundy, Steven K; Dai, Fu; Li, Qiao; Chang, Alfred E

    2016-09-13

    We previously reported that antitumor B cells directly kill tumor cells via the Fas/FasL pathway and are regulated by IL-10. In this study, we defined additional mechanisms involved in B cell antitumor immunity. Administration of IL-2 significantly augmented the therapeutic efficacy of adoptively transferred tumor-draining lymph node (TDLN) B cells which express IL- 2R. Culture supernatant of purified B splenocytes harvested from the mice that received adoptive transfer of 4T1 TDLN B cells plus IL-2 administration produced larger amounts of IgG which bound to 4T1, resulting in 4T1 lysis. Furthermore, we detected CXCR4 expression on 4T1 TDLN B cells, and 4T1 tumor cells produced its ligand CXCL12. Transwell experiments demonstrated the chemoattraction of CXCR4-expressing 4T1 TDLN B cells towards CXCL12- producing 4T1 cells. Blockade of CXCR4 using a CXCR4-specific inhibitor, AMD3100, significantly reduced the killing of 4T1 tumor cells by 4T1 TDLN B cells. Blockade of FasL and CXCR4 concurrently inhibited B cell-mediated direct killing of tumor cells in an additive manner, indicating that both Fas/FasL and CXCL12/CXCR4 pathways are involved in the direct killing of 4T1 cells by 4T1 TDLN B cells. TDLN B cells produced perforin. Additional transwell experiments showed that effector B cells could directly kill tumor cells in cell-cell contact via the Fas/FasL and CXCR4/CXCL12 pathways as well as perforin, while without cell contact, perforin secreted by B cells led to tumor cell cytotoxicity. These findings underscore the diversity of function by which B cells can play an important role in the host immune response to tumor.

  7. Enhanced neointima formation following arterial injury in immune deficient Rag-1-/- mice is attenuated by adoptive transfer of CD8 T cells.

    PubMed

    Dimayuga, Paul C; Chyu, Kuang-Yuh; Kirzner, Jonathan; Yano, Juliana; Zhao, Xiaoning; Zhou, Jianchang; Shah, Prediman K; Cercek, Bojan

    2011-01-01

    T cells modulate neointima formation after arterial injury but the specific T cell population that is activated in response to arterial injury remains unknown. The objective of the study was to identify the T cell populations that are activated and modulate neointimal thickening after arterial injury in mice. Arterial injury in wild type C57Bl6 mice resulted in T cell activation characterized by increased CD4(+)CD44(hi) and CD8(+)CD44(hi) T cells in the lymph nodes and spleens. Splenic CD8(+)CD25(+) T cells and CD8(+)CD28(+) T cells, but not CD4(+)CD25(+) and CD4(+)CD28(+) T cells, were also significantly increased. Adoptive cell transfer of CD4(+) or CD8(+) T cells from donor CD8-/- or CD4-/- mice, respectively, to immune-deficient Rag-1-/- mice was performed to determine the T cell subtype that inhibits neointima formation after arterial injury. Rag-1-/- mice that received CD8(+) T cells had significantly reduced neointima formation compared with Rag-1-/- mice without cell transfer. CD4(+) T cell transfer did not reduce neointima formation. CD8(+) T cells from CD4-/- mice had cytotoxic activity against syngeneic smooth muscle cells in vitro. The study shows that although both CD8(+) T cells and CD4(+) T cells are activated in response to arterial injury, adoptive cell transfer identifies CD8(+) T cells as the specific and selective cell type involved in inhibiting neointima formation.

  8. Adoptive transfer of DNT cells induces long-term cardiac allograft survival and augments recipient CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Treg cell accumulation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhu-Xu; Lian, Dameng; Huang, Xuyan; Wang, Shuang; Sun, Hongtao; Liu, Weihua; Garcia, Bertha; Min, Wei-Ping; Jevnikar, Anthony M

    2011-01-15

    Regulatory T (Treg) cells play an important role in the regulation of immune responses but whether Treg will induce tolerance in transplant recipients in the clinic remains unknown. Our previous studies have shown that TCRαβ(+)CD3(+)CD4⁻CD8⁻NK1.1⁻ (double negative, DN) T cells suppress T cell responses and prolong allograft survival in a single locus MHC-mismatched mouse model. In this study, we investigated the role of DNT cells in a more robust, fully MHC-mismatched BALB/c to C57BL/6 transplantation model, which may be more clinically relevant. Adoptive transfer of DNT cells in combination with short-term rapamycin treatment (days 1-9) induced long-term heart allograft survival (101±31 vs. 39±13 days rapamycin alone, p<0.01). Furthermore adoptive transfer DNT cells augmented CD4+Foxp3+ Treg cells accumulation in transplant recipients while depletion of CD4(+) Treg cells by anti-CD25 inhibited the effect of DNT cells on long-term graft survival (48±12 days vs. 101±31 days, p<0.001). In conclusion, DNT cells combined with short-term immunosuppression can prolong allograft survival, which may be through the accumulation of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) Treg cells in the recipient. Our result suggests that allograft tolerance may require the co-existence of different type Treg cell phenotypes which are affected by current immunosuppression.

  9. Adoptive Cell Transfer Therapy Following Non-Myeloablative but Lymphodepleting Chemotherapy for the Treatment of Patients With Refractory Metastatic Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Dudley, Mark E.; Wunderlich, John R.; Yang, James C.; Sherry, Richard M.; Topalian, Suzanne L.; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Royal, Richard E.; Kammula, Udai; White, Don E.; Mavroukakis, Sharon A.; Rogers, Linda J.; Gracia, Gerald J.; Jones, Stephanie A.; Mangiameli, David P.; Pelletier, Michelle M.; Gea-Banacloche, Juan; Robinson, Michael R.; Berman, David M.; Filie, Armando C.; Abati, Andrea; Rosenberg, Steven A.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose We investigated the combination of lymphodepleting chemotherapy followed by the adoptive transfer of autologous tumor reactive lymphocytes for the treatment of patients with refractory metastatic melanoma. Patients and Methods Thirty-five patients with metastatic melanoma, all but one with disease refractory to treatment with high-dose interleukin (IL)-2 and many with progressive disease after chemotherapy, underwent lymphodepleting conditioning with two days of cyclophosphamide (60 mg/kg) followed by five days of fludarabine (25 mg/m2). On the day following the final dose of fludarabine, all patients received cell infusion with autologous tumor-reactive, rapidly expanded tumor infiltrating lymphocyte cultures and high-dose IL-2 therapy. Results Eighteen (51%) of 35 treated patients experienced objective clinical responses including three ongoing complete responses and 15 partial responses with a mean duration of 11.5 ± 2.2 months. Sites of regression included metastases to lung, liver, lymph nodes, brain, and cutaneous and subcutaneous tissues. Toxicities of treatment included the expected hematologic toxicities of chemotherapy including neutropenia, thrombocytopenia, and lymphopenia, the transient toxicities of high-dose IL-2 therapy, two patients who developed Pneumocystis pneumonia and one patient who developed an Epstein-Barr virus-related lymphoproliferation. Conclusion Lymphodepleting chemotherapy followed by the transfer of highly avid antitumor lymphocytes can mediate significant tumor regression in heavily pretreated patients with IL-2 refractory metastatic melanoma. PMID:15800326

  10. Adoptive Transfer of Tumor-Specific Tc17 Effector T Cells Controls the Growth of B16 Melanoma in Mice

    PubMed Central

    de la Luz Garcia-Hernandez, Maria; Hamada, Hiromasa; Reome, Joyce B.; Misra, Sara K.; Tighe, Michael P.; Dutton, Richard W.

    2010-01-01

    In vitro generated OVA-specific IL-17–producing CD8 T effector cells (Tc17) from OT-1 mice, adoptively transferred into B16-OVA tumor-bearing mice, controlled tumor growth in early and late stage melanoma. IL-17, TNF, and IFN-γ from the Tc17 effectors all played a role in an enhanced recruitment of T cells, neutrophils, and macrophages to the tumor. In addition, Tc17 cells and recently recruited, activated neutrophils produced further chemokines, including CCL3, CCL4, CCL5, CXCL9, and CXCL10, responsible for the attraction of type 1 lymphocytes (Th1 and Tc1) and additional neutrophils. Neutrophils were rapidly attracted to the tumor site by an IL-17 dependent mechanism, but at later stages the induction of the chemokine CXCL2 by Tc17-derived TNF and IFN-γ contributed to sustain neutrophil recruitment. Approximately 10–50 times as many Tc17 effectors were required compared with Tc1 effectors to exert the same level of control over tumor growth. The recruitment of neutrophils was more prominent when Tc17 rather than Tc1 were used to control tumor and depletion of neutrophils resulted in a diminished capacity to control tumor growth. PMID:20237297

  11. An HSV-2 based oncolytic virus can function as an attractant to guide migration of adoptively transferred T cells to tumor sites.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xinping; Rivera, Armando; Tao, Lihua; Zhang, Xiaoliu

    2015-01-20

    Adoptive T-cell therapy has shown promises for cancer treatment. However, for treating solid tumors, there is a need for improving the ability of the adoptively transferred T cells to home to tumor sites. We explored the possibility of using an oncolytic virus derived from HSV-2, which can actively pull T effector cells to the site of infection, as a local attractant for migration of adoptively transferred T cells. Our data show that intratumoral administration of this virus can indeed attract active migration of the adoptively transferred T cells to the treated tumor. Moreover, once attracted to the tumor site by the virus, T cells persisted in there significantly longer than in mock-treated tumor. Chemokine profiling identified significant elevation of CXCL9 and CXCL10, as well as several other chemokines belonging to the inflammatory chemokine family in the virus-treated tumors. These chemokines initially guided the T-cell migration to and then maintained their persistence in the tumor site, leading to a significantly enhanced therapeutic effect. Our data suggests that this virotherapy may be combined with adoptive T-cell therapy to potentiate its therapeutic effect against solid tumors that are otherwise difficult to manage with the treatment alone.

  12. Adoptive transfer of pp65-specific T cells for the treatment of chemorefractory cytomegalovirus disease or reactivation after haploidentical and matched unrelated stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Feuchtinger, Tobias; Opherk, Kathrin; Bethge, Wolfgang A; Topp, Max S; Schuster, Friedhelm R; Weissinger, Eva M; Mohty, Mohamad; Or, Reuven; Maschan, Michael; Schumm, Michael; Hamprecht, Klaus; Handgretinger, Rupert; Lang, Peter; Einsele, Hermann

    2010-11-18

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease and infection refractory to antiviral treatment after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) is associated with a high mortality. Adoptive transfer of CMV-specific T cells could reconstitute viral immunity after SCT and could protect from CMV-related complications. However, logistics of producing virus-specific T-cell grafts limited the clinical application. We treated 18 patients after allo-SCT from human leukocyte antigen-mismatched/haploidentical or human leukocyte antigen-matched unrelated donors with polyclonal CMV-specific T cells generated by ex vivo stimulation with pp65, followed by isolation of interferon-γ-producing cells. Patients with CMV disease or viremia refractory to antiviral chemotherapy or both were eligible for adoptive T-cell transfer and received a mean of 21 × 10³/kg pp65-specific T cells. In 83% of cases CMV infection was cleared or viral burden was significantly reduced, even in cases of CMV encephalitis (n = 2). Viral control was associated with in vivo expansion of CMV-specific T lymphocytes in 12 of 16 evaluable cases, resulting in reconstitution of antiviral T-cell responses, without graft-versus-host disease induction or acute side effects. Our findings indicate that the infusion of low numbers of CMV-specific T cells is safe, feasible, and effective as a treatment on demand for refractory CMV infection and CMV disease after allo-SCT.

  13. Treatment with Cestode Parasite Antigens Results in Recruitment of CCR2+ Myeloid Cells, the Adoptive Transfer of Which Ameliorates Colitis.

    PubMed

    Reyes, José L; Lopes, Fernando; Leung, Gabriella; Mancini, Nicole L; Matisz, Chelsea E; Wang, Arthur; Thomson, Emma A; Graves, Nicholas; Gilleard, John; McKay, Derek M

    2016-12-01

    Awareness of the immunological underpinnings of host-parasite interactions may reveal immune signaling pathways that could be used to treat inflammatory disease in humans. Previously we showed that infection with the rat tapeworm, Hymenolepis diminuta, used as a model helminth, or systemic delivery of worm antigen (HdAg) significantly reduced the severity of dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (DNBS)-induced colitis in mice. Extending these analyses, intraperitoneal injection of HdAg dose-dependently suppressed dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis, and this was paralleled by reduced gamma interferon (IFN-γ), interleukin-17 (IL-17), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) production and increased IL-10 production from mitogen-activated splenocytes. Treatment with HdAg resulted in a CCR2-dependent recruitment of CDllb(+) F4/80(+) Ly6C(hi) Gr-1(lo) monocyte-like cells into the peritoneum 24 h later that were predominantly programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) positive and CXCR2 negative. In vitro assays indicated that these cells were unable to suppress T cell proliferation but enhanced IL-10 and IL-4 production from activated T cells. Adoptive transfer of the HdAg-recruited monocytic cells into naive mice blocked DSS-induced colitis. These findings add to the variety of means by which treatment with parasitic helminth-derived antigens can ameliorate concomitant disease. A precise understanding of the mechanism(s) of action of HdAg and other helminth-derived antigens (and a parallel consideration of putative side effects) may lead to the development of novel therapies for human idiopathic disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Treatment with Cestode Parasite Antigens Results in Recruitment of CCR2+ Myeloid Cells, the Adoptive Transfer of Which Ameliorates Colitis

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Fernando; Leung, Gabriella; Mancini, Nicole L.; Matisz, Chelsea E.; Wang, Arthur; Thomson, Emma A.; Graves, Nicholas; Gilleard, John

    2016-01-01

    Awareness of the immunological underpinnings of host-parasite interactions may reveal immune signaling pathways that could be used to treat inflammatory disease in humans. Previously we showed that infection with the rat tapeworm, Hymenolepis diminuta, used as a model helminth, or systemic delivery of worm antigen (HdAg) significantly reduced the severity of dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (DNBS)-induced colitis in mice. Extending these analyses, intraperitoneal injection of HdAg dose-dependently suppressed dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis, and this was paralleled by reduced gamma interferon (IFN-γ), interleukin-17 (IL-17), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) production and increased IL-10 production from mitogen-activated splenocytes. Treatment with HdAg resulted in a CCR2-dependent recruitment of CDllb+ F4/80+ Ly6Chi Gr-1lo monocyte-like cells into the peritoneum 24 h later that were predominantly programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) positive and CXCR2 negative. In vitro assays indicated that these cells were unable to suppress T cell proliferation but enhanced IL-10 and IL-4 production from activated T cells. Adoptive transfer of the HdAg-recruited monocytic cells into naive mice blocked DSS-induced colitis. These findings add to the variety of means by which treatment with parasitic helminth-derived antigens can ameliorate concomitant disease. A precise understanding of the mechanism(s) of action of HdAg and other helminth-derived antigens (and a parallel consideration of putative side effects) may lead to the development of novel therapies for human idiopathic disorders such as inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:27672083

  15. Study on cellular events in postthymectomy autoimmune oophoritis in mice. I. Requirement of Lyt-1 effector cells for oocytes damage after adoptive transfer

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    Neonatal thymectomy during the critical period, 2-4 d after birth, can induce various organ-specific autoimmune diseases including oophoritis in A/J mice. The oophoritis thus induced was passively transferred into neonatal mice by injection of spleen cells obtained from syngeneic donors with the disease. Recipient ovaries were rapidly damaged with remarkable mononuclear cell infiltration and destruction of follicular structures. The phenotype of effector cells responsible for successful adoptive transfer was found to be Thy-1+, Lyt-1+,23-, Ia-, Qa-1-, and was sensitive to antithymocyte serum treatment but resistant to cyclophosphamide treatment or in vitro X-ray irradiation. The compatibility between donor and recipient at the major histocompatibility complex was not required for the effector phase of transfer. The oophoritis induced in BALB/c (nu/+ or +/+) was also shown to be transferred into athymic BALB/c nude mice with resulting ovarian lesion and circulating autoantibodies against oocytes. In this transfer system, the effector cells were also demonstrated to be T cells with the Lyt-1+,23- phenotype. Adoptive transfer experiments in both systems revealed that the destruction of ovaries in postthymectomy autoimmune oophoritis was mediated by Lyt-1 T cells. Whether these T cells can be distinguished from other Lyt-1 cells, such as T helper cells and effector T cells in delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH), is not clear at present, but the results suggest that the effector mechanisms may be closely related to a DTH reaction. PMID:6983557

  16. Autologous lysate-pulsed dendritic cell vaccination followed by adoptive transfer of vaccine-primed ex vivo co-stimulated T cells in recurrent ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Kandalaft, Lana E; Powell, Daniel J; Chiang, Cheryl L; Tanyi, Janos; Kim, Sarah; Bosch, Marnix; Montone, Kathy; Mick, Rosemarie; Levine, Bruce L; Torigian, Drew A; June, Carl H; Coukos, George

    2013-01-01

    Novel strategies for the therapy of recurrent ovarian cancer are warranted. We report a study of a combinatorial approach encompassing dendritic cell (DC)-based autologous whole tumor vaccination and anti-angiogenesis therapy, followed by the adoptive transfer of autologous vaccine-primed CD3/CD28-co-stimulated lymphocytes. Recurrent ovarian cancer patients for whom tumor lysate was available from prior cytoreductive surgery underwent conditioning with intravenous bevacizumab and oral metronomic cyclophosphamide, sequentially followed by (1) bevacizumab plus vaccination with DCs pulsed with autologous tumor cell lysate supernatants, (2) lymphodepletion and (3) transfer of 5 × 10(9) autologous vaccine-primed T-cells in combination with the vaccine. Feasibility, safety as well as immunological and clinical efficacy were evaluated. Six subjects received this vaccination. Therapy was feasible, well tolerated, and elicited antitumor immune responses in four subjects, who also experienced clinical benefits. Of these, three patients with residual measurable disease received outpatient lymphodepletion and adoptive T-cell transfer, which was well tolerated and resulted in a durable reduction of circulating regulatory T cells and increased CD8(+) lymphocyte counts. The vaccine-induced restoration of antitumor immunity was achieved in two subjects, who also demonstrated clinical benefits, including one complete response. Our findings indicate that combinatorial cellular immunotherapy for the treatment of recurrent ovarian cancer is well tolerated and warrants further investigation. Several modifications of this approach can be envisioned to optimize immunological and clinical outcomes.

  17. Arthritogenic T cells drive the recovery of autoantibody-producing B cell homeostasis and the adoptive transfer of arthritis in SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Kis-Toth, Katalin; Radacs, Marianna; Olasz, Katalin; van Eden, Willem; Mikecz, Katalin; Glant, Tibor T

    2012-08-01

    T cells orchestrate joint inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but B cells/B cell-derived factors are also involved in disease pathogenesis. The goal of this study was to understand the role of antigen-specific T and B cells in the pathological events of arthritis, which is impossible to study in humans due to the small number of antigen-specific cells. To determine the significance of antigen-specific lymphocytes and antibodies in the development of an autoimmune mouse model of RA, we generated TCR transgenic (TCR-Tg) mice specific for the dominant arthritogenic epitope of cartilage proteoglycan (PG) and performed a series of combined transfers of T cells, B cells and autoantibodies into BALB/c.Scid mice. The adoptive transfer of highly purified T cells from naive TCR-Tg, arthritic TCR-Tg or arthritic wild-type mice induced arthritis in SCID recipients, but the onset and severity of the disease were dependent on the sequential events of the T cell-supported reconstitution of PG-specific B cells and autoantibodies. The presence of activated PG-specific T cells was critical for disease induction, establishing a unique milieu for the selective homeostasis of autoantibody-producing B cells. In this permissive environment, anti-PG autoantibodies bound to cartilage and induced activation of the complement cascade, leading to irreversible cartilage destruction in affected joints. These findings may lead to a better understanding of the complex molecular and cellular mechanisms of RA.

  18. Adoptive transfer of Mammaglobin-A epitope specific CD8 T cells combined with a single low dose of total body irradiation eradicates breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Lerret, Nadine M; Rogozinska, Magdalena; Jaramillo, Andrés; Marzo, Amanda L

    2012-01-01

    Adoptive T cell therapy has proven to be beneficial in a number of tumor systems by targeting the relevant tumor antigen. The tumor antigen targeted in our model is Mammaglobin-A, expressed by approximately 80% of human breast tumors. Here we evaluated the use of adoptively transferred Mammaglobin-A specific CD8 T cells in combination with low dose irradiation to induce breast tumor rejection and prevent relapse. We show Mammaglobin-A specific CD8 T cells generated by DNA vaccination with all epitopes (Mammaglobin-A2.1, A2.2, A2.4 and A2.6) and full-length DNA in vivo resulted in heterogeneous T cell populations consisting of both effector and central memory CD8 T cell subsets. Adoptive transfer of spleen cells from all Mammaglobin-A2 immunized mice into tumor-bearing SCID/beige mice induced tumor regression but this anti-tumor response was not sustained long-term. Additionally, we demonstrate that only the adoptive transfer of Mammaglobin-A2 specific CD8 T cells in combination with a single low dose of irradiation prevents tumors from recurring. More importantly we show that this single dose of irradiation results in the down regulation of the macrophage scavenger receptor 1 on dendritic cells within the tumor and reduces lipid uptake by tumor resident dendritic cells potentially enabling the dendritic cells to present tumor antigen more efficiently and aid in tumor clearance. These data reveal the potential for adoptive transfer combined with a single low dose of total body irradiation as a suitable therapy for the treatment of established breast tumors and the prevention of tumor recurrence.

  19. Enhanced anti-tumor activity induced by adoptive T cell transfer and the adjunctive use of the HDAC Inhibitor LAQ824

    PubMed Central

    Vo, Dan D.; Prins, Robert M.; Begley, Jonathan L.; Donahue, Timothy R.; Morris, Lilah F.; Bruhn, Kevin W.; de la Rocha, Pilar; Yang, Meng-Yin; Mok, Stephen; Garban, Hermes J.; Craft, Noah; Economou, James S.; Marincola, Francesco M.; Wang, Ena; Ribas, Antoni

    2009-01-01

    Tumors grow in the presence of antigen-specific T cells, suggesting the existence of intrinsic cancer cell escape mechanisms. We hypothesized that a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor could sensitize tumor cells to immunotherapy because this class of agents has been reported to increase tumor antigen expression and shift gene expression to a pro-apoptotic milieu in cancer cells. To test this question, we treated B16 murine melanoma with the combination of the HDAC inhibitor LAQ824 together with the adoptive transfer (AT) of gp100 melanoma antigen-specific pmel-1 T cells. The combined therapy significantly improved antitumor activity through several mechanisms: 1) increase in MHC and tumor-associated antigen (TAA) expression by tumor cells; 2) decrease in competing endogenous lymphocytes in recipient mice, resulting in a proliferative advantage for the adoptively transferred cells; and 3) improvement in the functional activity of the adoptively transferred lymphocytes. We confirmed the beneficial effects of this HDAC inhibitor as sensitizer to immunotherapy in a different model of prophylactic prime-boost vaccination with the melanoma antigen tyrosinase-related protein-2 (TRP2), which also demonstrated a significant improvement in antitumor activity against B16 melanoma. In conclusion, the HDAC inhibitor LAQ824 significantly enhances tumor immunotherapy through effects on target tumor cells as well as improving the antitumor activity of tumor antigen-specific lymphocytes. PMID:19861533

  20. High vitamin D3 diet administered during active colitis negatively affects bone metabolism in an adoptive T cell transfer model.

    PubMed

    Larmonier, C B; McFadden, R-M T; Hill, F M; Schreiner, R; Ramalingam, R; Besselsen, D G; Ghishan, F K; Kiela, P R

    2013-07-01

    Decreased bone mineral density (BMD) represents an extraintestinal complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Vitamin D₃ has been considered a viable adjunctive therapy in IBD. However, vitamin D₃ plays a pleiotropic role in bone modeling and regulates the bone formation-resorption balance, depending on the physiological environment, and supplementation during active IBD may have unintended consequences. We evaluated the effects of vitamin D₃ supplementation during the active phase of disease on colonic inflammation, BMD, and bone metabolism in an adoptive IL-10-/- CD4⁺ T cell transfer model of chronic colitis. High-dose vitamin D₃ supplementation for 12 days during established disease had negligible effects on mucosal inflammation. Plasma vitamin D₃ metabolites correlated with diet, but not disease, status. Colitis significantly reduced BMD. High-dose vitamin D₃ supplementation did not affect cortical bone but led to a further deterioration of trabecular bone morphology. In mice fed a high vitamin D₃ diet, colitis more severely impacted bone formation markers (osteocalcin and bone alkaline phosphatase) and increased bone resorption markers, ratio of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand to osteoprotegrin transcript, plasma osteoprotegrin level, and the osteoclast activation marker tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (ACp5). Bone vitamin D receptor expression was increased in mice with chronic colitis, especially in the high vitamin D₃ group. Our data suggest that vitamin D₃, at a dose that does not improve inflammation, has no beneficial effects on bone metabolism and density during active colitis or may adversely affect BMD and bone turnover. These observations should be taken into consideration in the planning of further clinical studies with high-dose vitamin D₃ supplementation in patients with active IBD.

  1. High vitamin D3 diet administered during active colitis negatively affects bone metabolism in an adoptive T cell transfer model

    PubMed Central

    Larmonier, C. B.; McFadden, R.-M. T.; Hill, F. M.; Schreiner, R.; Ramalingam, R.; Besselsen, D. G.; Ghishan, F. K.

    2013-01-01

    Decreased bone mineral density (BMD) represents an extraintestinal complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Vitamin D3 has been considered a viable adjunctive therapy in IBD. However, vitamin D3 plays a pleiotropic role in bone modeling and regulates the bone formation-resorption balance, depending on the physiological environment, and supplementation during active IBD may have unintended consequences. We evaluated the effects of vitamin D3 supplementation during the active phase of disease on colonic inflammation, BMD, and bone metabolism in an adoptive IL-10−/− CD4+ T cell transfer model of chronic colitis. High-dose vitamin D3 supplementation for 12 days during established disease had negligible effects on mucosal inflammation. Plasma vitamin D3 metabolites correlated with diet, but not disease, status. Colitis significantly reduced BMD. High-dose vitamin D3 supplementation did not affect cortical bone but led to a further deterioration of trabecular bone morphology. In mice fed a high vitamin D3 diet, colitis more severely impacted bone formation markers (osteocalcin and bone alkaline phosphatase) and increased bone resorption markers, ratio of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand to osteoprotegrin transcript, plasma osteoprotegrin level, and the osteoclast activation marker tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (ACp5). Bone vitamin D receptor expression was increased in mice with chronic colitis, especially in the high vitamin D3 group. Our data suggest that vitamin D3, at a dose that does not improve inflammation, has no beneficial effects on bone metabolism and density during active colitis or may adversely affect BMD and bone turnover. These observations should be taken into consideration in the planning of further clinical studies with high-dose vitamin D3 supplementation in patients with active IBD. PMID:23639807

  2. The stoichiometric production of IL-2 and IFN-γ mRNA defines memory T cells that can self-renew after adoptive transfer in humans.

    PubMed

    Wang, Anran; Chandran, Smita; Shah, Syed A; Chiu, Yu; Paria, Biman C; Aghamolla, Tamara; Alvarez-Downing, Melissa M; Lee, Chyi-Chia Richard; Singh, Sanmeet; Li, Thomas; Dudley, Mark E; Restifo, Nicholas P; Rosenberg, Steven A; Kammula, Udai S

    2012-08-29

    Adoptive immunotherapy using ex vivo-expanded tumor-reactive lymphocytes can mediate durable cancer regression in selected melanoma patients. Analyses of these trials have associated the in vivo engraftment ability of the transferred cells with their antitumor efficacy. Thus, there is intensive clinical interest in the prospective isolation of tumor-specific T cells that can reliably persist after transfer. Animal studies have suggested that central memory CD8(+) T cells (T(CM)) have divergent capabilities including effector differentiation to target antigen and stem cell-like self-renewal that enable long-term survival after adoptive transfer. We sought to isolate human melanoma-specific T(CM) to define their in vivo fate and function after autologous therapeutic transfer to metastatic patients. To facilitate the high-throughput identification of these rare cells from patients, we report that T(CM) have a defined stoichiometric production of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) mRNA after antigen stimulation. Melanoma-specific T cells screened for high relative IL-2 production had a T(CM) phenotype and superior in vitro proliferative capacity compared to cells with low IL-2 production. To investigate in vivo effector function and self-renewal capability, we allowed melanoma-specific T(CM) to undergo in vitro expansion and differentiation into lytic effector clones and then adoptively transferred them back into their hosts. These clones targeted skin melanocytes in all five patients and persisted long term and reacquired parental T(CM) attributes in four patients after transfer. These findings demonstrate the favorable engraftment fitness for human T(CM)-derived clones, but further efforts to improve their antitumor efficacy are still necessary.

  3. Adoptive transfer of Aspergillus-specific T cells as a novel anti-fungal therapy for hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients: Progress and challenges.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulou, Anastasia; Kaloyannidis, Panayotis; Yannaki, Evangelia; Cruz, Conrad Russell

    2016-02-01

    Although newer antifungal drugs have substantially altered the natural history of invasive aspergillosis, the disease still accounts for significant morbidity and mortality in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. Both the evidence supporting a protective role of T cells against this fungal pathogen and the documented efficacy of adoptive transfer of antigen-specific T cells for prophylaxis and treatment of viral infections post-transplant have stimulated much interest towards development of Aspergillus-specific T cells (Asp-STs) for adoptive immunotherapy in the allogeneic transplant setting. In contrast to the remarkable progress with virus-specific T cells, clinical development of fungus-specific T cells is still in its infancy. Several groups have characterized Asp-STs in healthy individuals and patients with malignant hematological diseases, while others sought to develop GMP-compliant methods of expanding or bioengineering Asp-STs ex vivo as immunotherapy. This review highlights the recent advances in this field, and discusses critical issues involved in development and protocol design of Asp-ST immunotherapy.

  4. Evaluation of the therapeutic potential of bone marrow-derived myeloid suppressor cell (MDSC) adoptive transfer in mouse models of autoimmunity and allograft rejection.

    PubMed

    Drujont, Lucile; Carretero-Iglesia, Laura; Bouchet-Delbos, Laurence; Beriou, Gaelle; Merieau, Emmanuel; Hill, Marcelo; Delneste, Yves; Cuturi, Maria Cristina; Louvet, Cedric

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic use of immunoregulatory cells represents a promising approach for the treatment of uncontrolled immunity. During the last decade, myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) have emerged as novel key regulatory players in the context of tumor growth, inflammation, transplantation or autoimmunity. Recently, MDSC have been successfully generated in vitro from naive mouse bone marrow cells or healthy human PBMCs using minimal cytokine combinations. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the potential of adoptive transfer of such cells to control auto- and allo-immunity in the mouse. Culture of bone marrow cells with GM-CSF and IL-6 consistently yielded a majority of CD11b+Gr1hi/lo cells exhibiting strong inhibition of CD8+ T cell proliferation in vitro. However, adoptive transfer of these cells failed to alter antigen-specific CD8+ T cell proliferation and cytotoxicity in vivo. Furthermore, MDSC could not prevent the development of autoimmunity in a stringent model of type 1 diabetes. Rather, loading the cells prior to injection with a pancreatic neo-antigen peptide accelerated the development of the disease. Contrastingly, in a model of skin transplantation, repeated injection of MDSC or single injection of LPS-activated MDSC resulted in a significant prolongation of allograft survival. The beneficial effect of MDSC infusions on skin graft survival was paradoxically not explained by a decrease of donor-specific T cell response but associated with a systemic over-activation of T cells and antigen presenting cells, prominently in the spleen. Taken together, our results indicate that in vitro generated MDSC bear therapeutic potential but will require additional in vitro factors or adjunct immunosuppressive treatments to achieve safe and more robust immunomodulation upon adoptive transfer.

  5. Generation of autologous tumor-specific T cells for adoptive transfer based on vaccination, in vitro restimulation and CD3/CD28 dynabead-induced T cell expansion.

    PubMed

    Brimnes, Marie Klinge; Gang, Anne Ortved; Donia, Marco; Thor Straten, Per; Svane, Inge Marie; Hadrup, Sine Reker

    2012-08-01

    Adoptive cell transfer (ACT) of in vitro expanded autologous tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) has been shown to exert therapeutic efficacy in melanoma patients. We aimed to develop an ACT protocol based on tumor-specific T cells isolated from peripheral blood and in vitro expanded by Dynabeads® ClinExVivo™CD3/CD28. We show here that the addition of an in vitro restimulation step with relevant peptides prior to bead expansion dramatically increased the proportion of tumor-specific T cells in PBMC-cultures. Importantly, peptide-pulsed dendritic cells (DCs) as well as allogeneic tumor lysate-pulsed DCs from the DC vaccine preparation could be used with comparable efficiency to peptides for in vitro restimulation, to increase the tumor-specific T-cell response. Furthermore, we tested the use of different ratios and different types of Dynabeads® CD3/CD28 and CD3/CD28/CD137 T-cell expander, for optimized expansion of tumor-specific T cells. A ratio of 1:3 of Dynabeads® CD3/CD28 T-cell expander to T cells resulted in the maximum number of tumor-specific T cells. The addition of CD137 did not improve functionality or fold expansion. Both T-cell expansion systems could generate tumor-specific T cells that were both cytotoxic and effective cytokine producers upon antigen recognition. Dynabeads®-expanded T-cell cultures shows phenotypical characteristics of memory T cells with potential to migrate and expand in vivo. In addition, they possess longer telomeres compared to TIL cultures. Taken together, we demonstrate that in vitro restimulation of tumor-specific T cells prior to bead expansion is necessary to achieve high numbers of tumor-specific T cells. This is effective and easily applicable in combination with DC vaccination, by use of vaccine-generated DCs, either pulsed with peptide or tumor-lysate.

  6. Adoptive transfer of osteoclast-expanded natural killer cells for immunotherapy targeting cancer stem-like cells in humanized mice.

    PubMed

    Kozlowska, Anna K; Kaur, Kawaljit; Topchyan, Paytsar; Jewett, Anahid

    2016-07-01

    Based on data obtained from oral, pancreatic and lung cancers, glioblastoma, and melanoma, we have established that natural killer (NK) cells target cancer stem-like cells (CSCs). CSCs displaying low MHC class I, CD54, and PD-L1 are killed by cytotoxic NK cells and are differentiated by split anergized NK cells through both membrane bound and secreted forms of TNF-α and IFN-γ. NK cells select and differentiate both healthy and transformed stem-like cells, resulting in target cell maturation and shaping of their microenvironment. In our recent studies, we have observed that oral, pancreatic, and melanoma CSCs were capable of forming large tumors in humanized bone marrow, liver, thymus (hu-BLT) mice with fully reconstituted human immune system. In addition, major human immune subsets including NK cells, T cells, B cells, and monocytes were present in the spleen, bone marrow, peripheral blood, and tumor microenvironment. Similar to our previously published in vitro data, CSCs differentiated with split anergized NK cells prior to implantation in mice formed smaller tumors. Intravenous injection of functionally potent osteoclast-expanded NK cells inhibited tumor growth through differentiation of CSCs in humanized mice. In this review, we present current approaches, advances, and existing limitations in studying interactions of the immune system with the tumor, in particular NK cells with CSCs, using in vivo preclinical hu-BLT mouse model. In addition, we discuss the use of osteoclast-expanded NK cells in targeting cancer stem-like tumors in humanized mice-a strategy that provides a much-needed platform to develop effective cancer immunotherapies.

  7. Combined IL-15 and IL-12 drives the generation of CD34(+)-derived natural killer cells with superior maturation and alloreactivity potential following adoptive transfer.

    PubMed

    Cany, Jeannette; van der Waart, Anniek B; Spanholtz, Jan; Tordoir, Marleen; Jansen, Joop H; van der Voort, Robbert; Schaap, Nicolaas M; Dolstra, Harry

    2015-07-01

    Adoptive transfer of allogeneic natural killer (NK) cells represents a promising treatment approach against cancer, including acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Previously, we reported a cytokine-based culture method for the generation of NK cell products with high cell number and purity. In this system, CD34(+) hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPC) were expanded and differentiated into NK cells under stroma-free conditions in the presence of IL-15 and IL-2. We show that combining IL-15 with IL-12 drives the generation of more mature and highly functional NK cells. In particular, replacement of IL-2 by IL-12 enhanced the cytolytic activity and IFNγ production of HPC-NK cells toward cultured and primary AML cells in vitro, and improved antileukemic responses in NOD/SCID-IL2Rγnull (NSG) mice bearing human AML cells. Phenotypically, IL-12 increased the frequency of HPC-NK cells expressing NKG2A and killer immunoglobulin-like receptor (KIR), which were more responsive to target cell stimulation. In addition, NK15/12 cell products demonstrated superior maturation potential, resulting in >70% positivity for CD16 and/or KIR within 2 weeks after infusion into NSG mice. We predict that higher functionality and faster in vivo maturation will favor HPC-NK cell alloreactivity toward malignant cells in patients, making this cytokine combination an attractive strategy to generate clinical HPC-NK cell products for cancer adoptive immunotherapy.

  8. Whole-body irradiation increases the magnitude and persistence of adoptively transferred T cells associated with tumor regression in a mouse model of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Ward-Kavanagh, Lindsay K; Zhu, Junjia; Cooper, Timothy K; Schell, Todd D

    2014-08-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy has demonstrated efficacy in a subset of clinical and preclinical studies, but the T cells used for therapy often are rendered rapidly nonfunctional in tumor-bearing hosts. Recent evidence indicates that prostate cancer can be susceptible to immunotherapy, but most studies using autochthonous tumor models demonstrate only short-lived T-cell responses in the tolerogenic prostate microenvironment. Here, we assessed the efficacy of sublethal whole-body irradiation (WBI) to enhance the magnitude and duration of adoptively transferred CD8(+) T cells in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) model. We demonstrate that WBI promoted high-level accumulation of granzyme B (GzB, Gzmb)-expressing donor T cells both in lymphoid organs and in the prostate of TRAMP mice. Donor T cells remained responsive to vaccination in irradiated recipients, but a single round of WBI-enhanced adoptive immunotherapy failed to affect significantly the existing disease. Addition of a second round of immunotherapy promoted regression of established disease in half of the treated mice, with no progression observed. Regression was associated with long-term persistence of effector/memory phenotype CD8(+) donor cells. Administration of the second round of adoptive immunotherapy led to reacquisition of GzB expression by persistent T cells from the first transfer. These results indicate that WBI conditioning amplifies tumor-specific T cells in the TRAMP prostate and lymphoid tissue, and suggest that the initial treatment alters the tolerogenic microenvironment to increase antitumor activity by a second wave of donor cells.

  9. Host T cells are the main producers of IL-17 within the central nervous system during initiation of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis induced by adoptive transfer of Th1 cell lines.

    PubMed

    Lees, Jason R; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Russell, John H

    2008-06-15

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of multiple sclerosis, has long been thought to be mediated by Th1 CD4(+) T cells. Using adoptive transfer techniques, transfer of CNS specific Th1 T cells was sufficient to induce EAE in naive mice. However, recent studies found a vital role for IL-17 in induction of EAE. These studies suggested that a fraction of IL-17-producing T cells that contaminate Th1 polarized cell lines are largely responsible for initiation of EAE. In this study, we tracked the appearance and cytokine production capacity of adoptively transferred cells within the CNS of mice throughout EAE disease. IL-17-producing, adoptively transferred cells were not enriched over the low percentages present in vitro. Thus, there was no selective recruitment and/or preferential proliferation of adoptively transferred IL-17-producing cells during the induction of EAE. Instead a large number of CNS infiltrating host T cells in mice with EAE were capable of producing IL-17 following ex vivo stimulation. The IL-17-producing T cells contained both alphabeta and gammadelta TCR(+) T cells with a CD4(+)CD8(-) or CD4(-)CD8(-) phenotype. These cells concentrated within the CNS within 3 days of adoptive transfer, and appeared to play a role in EAE induction as adoptive transfer of Th1 lines derived from wild-type mice into IL-17-deficient mice induced reduced EAE clinical outcomes. This study demonstrates that an encephalitogenic Th1 cell line induces recruitment of host IL-17-producing T cells to the CNS during the initiation of EAE and that these cells contribute to the incidence and severity of disease.

  10. Comparison of naïve and central memory derived CD8+ effector cell engraftment fitness and function following adoptive transfer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiuli; Wong, ChingLam W.; Urak, Ryan; Taus, Ellie; Aguilar, Brenda; Chang, Wen-Chung; Mardiros, Armen; Budde, Lihua E.; Brown, Christine E.; Berger, Carolina; Forman, Stephen J.; Jensen, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    abstract Human CD8+ effector T cells derived from CD45RO+CD62L+ precursors enriched for central memory (TCM) precursors retain the capacity to engraft and reconstitute functional memory upon adoptive transfer, whereas effectors derived from CD45RO+CD62L− precursors enriched for effector memory precursors do not. Here we sought to compare the engraftment fitness and function of CD8+ effector T cells derived from CD45RA+CD62L+ precursors enriched for naïve and stem cell memory precursors (TN/SCM) with that of TCM. We found that cytotoxic T cells (CTLs) derived from TCM transcribed higher levels of CD28, FOS, INFγ, Eomesodermin (Eomes), and lower levels of BCL2L11, maintained higher levels of phosphorylated AKT, and displayed enhanced sensitivity to the proliferative and anti-apoptotic effects of γ-chain cytokines compared to CTLs derived from TN/SCM. Higher frequencies of CTLs derived from TCM retained CD28 expression and upon activation secreted higher levels of IL-2. In NOD/Scid IL-2RγCnull mice, CD8+ TCM derived CTLs engrafted to higher frequencies in response to human IL-15 and mounted robust proliferative responses to an immunostimulatory vaccine. Similarly, CD8+ TCM derived CD19CAR+ CTLs exhibited superior antitumor potency following adoptive transfer compared to their CD8+ TN/SCM derived counterparts. These studies support the use of TCM enriched cell products for adoptive therapy of cancer. PMID:26942092

  11. Comparison of naïve and central memory derived CD8(+) effector cell engraftment fitness and function following adoptive transfer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiuli; Wong, ChingLam W; Urak, Ryan; Taus, Ellie; Aguilar, Brenda; Chang, Wen-Chung; Mardiros, Armen; Budde, Lihua E; Brown, Christine E; Berger, Carolina; Forman, Stephen J; Jensen, Michael C

    Human CD8(+) effector T cells derived from CD45RO(+)CD62L(+) precursors enriched for central memory (TCM) precursors retain the capacity to engraft and reconstitute functional memory upon adoptive transfer, whereas effectors derived from CD45RO(+)CD62L(-) precursors enriched for effector memory precursors do not. Here we sought to compare the engraftment fitness and function of CD8(+) effector T cells derived from CD45RA(+)CD62L(+) precursors enriched for naïve and stem cell memory precursors (TN/SCM) with that of TCM. We found that cytotoxic T cells (CTLs) derived from TCM transcribed higher levels of CD28, FOS, INFγ, Eomesodermin (Eomes), and lower levels of BCL2L11, maintained higher levels of phosphorylated AKT, and displayed enhanced sensitivity to the proliferative and anti-apoptotic effects of γ-chain cytokines compared to CTLs derived from TN/SCM. Higher frequencies of CTLs derived from TCM retained CD28 expression and upon activation secreted higher levels of IL-2. In NOD/Scid IL-2RγC(null) mice, CD8(+) TCM derived CTLs engrafted to higher frequencies in response to human IL-15 and mounted robust proliferative responses to an immunostimulatory vaccine. Similarly, CD8(+) TCM derived CD19CAR(+) CTLs exhibited superior antitumor potency following adoptive transfer compared to their CD8(+) TN/SCM derived counterparts. These studies support the use of TCM enriched cell products for adoptive therapy of cancer.

  12. Memory T cells specific for murine cytomegalovirus re-emerge after multiple challenges and recapitulate immunity in various adoptive transfer scenarios.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Michael; Turula, Holly; Tandon, Mayank; Deslouches, Berthony; Moghbeli, Toktam; Snyder, Christopher M

    2015-02-15

    Reconstitution of CMV-specific immunity after transplant remains a primary clinical objective to prevent CMV disease, and adoptive immunotherapy of CMV-specific T cells can be an effective therapeutic approach. Because of viral persistence, most CMV-specific CD8(+) T cells become terminally differentiated effector phenotype CD8(+) T cells (TEFF). A minor subset retains a memory-like phenotype (memory phenotype CD8(+) T cells [TM]), but it is unknown whether these cells retain memory function or persist over time. Interestingly, recent studies suggest that CMV-specific CD8(+) T cells with different phenotypes have different abilities to reconstitute sustained immunity after transfer. The immunology of human CMV infections is reflected in the murine CMV (MCMV) model. We found that human CMV- and MCMV-specific T cells displayed shared genetic programs, validating the MCMV model for studies of CMV-specific T cells in vivo. The MCMV-specific TM population was stable over time and retained a proliferative capacity that was vastly superior to TEFF. Strikingly, after transfer, TM established sustained and diverse T cell populations even after multiple challenges. Although both TEFF and TM could protect Rag(-/-) mice, only TM persisted after transfer into immune replete, latently infected recipients and responded if recipient immunity was lost. Interestingly, transferred TM did not expand until recipient immunity was lost, supporting that competition limits the Ag stimulation of TM. Ultimately, these data show that CMV-specific TM retain memory function during MCMV infection and can re-establish CMV immunity when necessary. Thus, TM may be a critical component for consistent, long-term adoptive immunotherapy success.

  13. TCR-ligand koff rate correlates with the protective capacity of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells for adoptive transfer.

    PubMed

    Nauerth, Magdalena; Weißbrich, Bianca; Knall, Robert; Franz, Tobias; Dössinger, Georg; Bet, Jeannette; Paszkiewicz, Paulina J; Pfeifer, Lukas; Bunse, Mario; Uckert, Wolfgang; Holtappels, Rafaela; Gillert-Marien, Dorothea; Neuenhahn, Michael; Krackhardt, Angela; Reddehase, Matthias J; Riddell, Stanley R; Busch, Dirk H

    2013-07-03

    Adoptive immunotherapy is a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of chronic infections and cancer. T cells within a certain range of high avidity for their cognate ligand are believed to be most effective. T cell receptor (TCR) transfer experiments indicate that a major part of avidity is hardwired within the structure of the TCR. Unfortunately, rapid measurement of structural avidity of TCRs is difficult on living T cells. We developed a technology where dissociation (koff rate) of truly monomeric peptide-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) molecules bound to surface-expressed TCRs can be monitored by real-time microscopy in a highly reliable manner. A first evaluation of this method on distinct human cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific T cell populations revealed unexpected differences in the koff rates. CMV-specific T cells are currently being evaluated in clinical trials for efficacy in adoptive immunotherapy; therefore, determination of koff rates could guide selection of the most effective donor cells. Indeed, in two different murine infection models, we demonstrate that T cell populations with lower koff rates confer significantly better protection than populations with fast koff rates. These data indicate that koff rate measurements can improve the predictability of adoptive immunotherapy and provide diagnostic information on the in vivo quality of T cells.

  14. Doxorubicin Eliminates Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells and Enhances the Efficacy of Adoptive T Cell Transfer in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, Darya; Trad, Malika; Hanke, Neale T.; Larmonier, Claire B.; Janikashvili, Nona; Bonnotte, Bernard; Katsanis, Emmanuel; Larmonier, Nicolas

    2013-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) expand in tumor-bearing hosts and play a central role in cancer immune evasion by inhibiting adaptive and innate immunity. They therefore represent a major obstacle for successful cancer immunotherapy. Different strategies have thus been explored to deplete and/or inactivate MDSC in vivo. Using a murine mammary cancer model, we demonstrated that doxorubicin selectively eliminates MDSC in the spleen, blood and tumor beds. Furthermore, residual MDSC from doxorubicin-treated mice exhibited impaired suppressive function. Importantly, the frequency of CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes and consequently the effector lymphocytes or natural killer (NK) to suppressive MDSC ratios were significantly increased following doxorubicin treatment of tumor-bearing mice. In addition, the proportion of natural killer (NK) and cytotoxic T cell (CTL) expressing perforin and granzyme B and of CTL producing IFNγ was augmented by doxorubicin administration. Of therapeutic relevance, this drug efficiently combined with Th1 or Th17 lymphocytes to suppress tumor development and metastatic disease. MDSC isolated from patients with different types of cancer were also sensitive to doxorubicin-mediated cytotoxicity in vitro. These results thus indicate that doxorubicin may be used not only as a direct cytotoxic drug against tumor cells, but also as a potent immunomodulatory agent that selectively impairs MDSC-induced immunosuppression, thereby fostering the efficacy of T cell-based immunotherapy. PMID:24197130

  15. Human effector T cells derived from central memory cells rather than CD8(+)T cells modified by tumor-specific TCR gene transfer possess superior traits for adoptive immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fenglin; Zhang, Wenfeng; Shao, Hongwei; Bo, Huaben; Shen, Han; Li, Jiandong; Liu, Yichen; Wang, Teng; Ma, Wenli; Huang, Shulin

    2013-10-10

    Adoptive cell therapy provides an attractive treatment of cancer, and our expanding capacity to target tumor antigens is driven by genetically engineered human T lymphocytes that express genes encoding tumor-specific T cell receptors (TCRs). The intrinsic properties of cultured T cells used for therapy were reported to have tremendous influences on their persistence and antitumor efficacy in vivo. In this study, we isolated CD8(+) central memory T cells from peripheral blood lymphocytes of healthy donors, and then transferred with the gene encoding TCR specific for tumor antigen using recombinant adenovirus vector Ad5F35-TRAV-TRBV. We found effector T cells derived from central memory T cells improved cell viability, maintained certain level of CD62L expression, and reacquired the CD62L(+)CD44(high) phenotype of central memory T cells after effector T cells differentiation. We then compared the antitumor reactivity of central memory T cells and CD8(+)T cells after TCR gene transferred. The results indicated that tumor-specific TCR gene being transferred to central memory T cells effectively increased the specific killing of antigen positive tumor cells and the expression of cytolytic granule protein. Furthermore, TCR gene transferred central memory T cells were more effective than TCR gene transferred CD8(+)T cells in CTL activity and effector cytokine secretion. These results implicated that isolating central memory T cells rather than CD8(+)T cells for insertion of gene encoding tumor-specific TCR may provide a superior tumor-reactive T cell population for adoptive transfer. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Suppression of disease in New Zealand Black/New Zealand White lupus-prone mice by adoptive transfer of ex vivo expanded regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Scalapino, Kenneth J; Tang, Qizhi; Bluestone, Jeffrey A; Bonyhadi, Mark L; Daikh, David I

    2006-08-01

    An increasing number of studies indicate that a subset of CD4(+) T cells with regulatory capacity (regulatory T cells; T(regs)) can function to control organ-specific autoimmune disease. To determine whether abnormalities of thymic-derived T(regs) play a role in systemic lupus erythematosus, we evaluated T(reg) prevalence and function in (New Zealand Black x New Zealand White)F(1) (B/W) lupus-prone mice. To explore the potential of T(regs) to suppress disease, we evaluated the effect of adoptive transfer of purified, ex vivo expanded thymic-derived T(regs) on the progression of renal disease. We found that although the prevalence of T(regs) is reduced in regional lymph nodes and spleen of prediseased B/W mice compared with age-matched non-autoimmune mice, these cells increase in number in older diseased mice. In addition, the ability of these cells to proliferate in vitro was comparable to those purified from non-autoimmune control animals. Purified CD4(+)CD25(+)CD62L(high) B/W T(regs) were expanded ex vivo 80-fold, resulting in cells with a stable suppressor phenotype. Adoptive transfer of these exogenously expanded cells reduced the rate at which mice developed renal disease; a second transfer after treated animals had developed proteinuria further slowed the progression of renal disease and significantly improved survival. These studies indicate that thymic-derived T(regs) may have a significant role in the control of autoimmunity in lupus-prone B/W mice, and augmentation of these cells may constitute a novel therapeutic approach for systemic lupus erythematosus.

  17. A single exercise bout enhances the manufacture of viral-specific T-cells from healthy donors: implications for allogeneic adoptive transfer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Spielmann, Guillaume; Bollard, Catherine M.; Kunz, Hawley; Hanley, Patrick J.; Simpson, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infections remain a major cause of morbidity and mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The adoptive transfer of donor-derived viral-specific cytotoxic T-cells (VSTs) is an effective treatment for controlling CMV and EBV infections after HSCT; however, new practical methods are required to augment the ex vivo manufacture of multi-VSTs from healthy donors. This study investigated the effects of a single exercise bout on the ex vivo manufacture of multi-VSTs. PBMCs isolated from healthy CMV/EBV seropositive participants before (PRE) and immediately after (POST) 30-minutes of cycling exercise were stimulated with CMV (pp65 and IE1) and EBV (LMP2A and BMLF1) peptides and expanded over 8 days. The number (fold difference from PRE) of T-cells specific for CMV pp65 (2.6), EBV LMP2A (2.5), and EBV BMLF1 (4.4) was greater among the VSTs expanded POST. VSTs expanded PRE and POST had similar phenotype characteristics and were equally capable of MHC-restricted killing of autologous target cells. We conclude that a single exercise bout enhances the manufacture of multi-VSTs from healthy donors without altering their phenotype or function and may serve as a simple and economical adjuvant to boost the production of multi-VSTs for allogeneic adoptive transfer immunotherapy. PMID:27181409

  18. Nonatopic asthma: in vivo airway hyperreactivity adoptively transferred to naive mice by THY-1(+) and B220(+) antigen-specific cells that lack surface expression of CD3.

    PubMed Central

    Geba, G P; Wegner, C D; Wolyniec, W W; Li, Y; Askenase, P W

    1997-01-01

    To investigate the cellular immune events contributing to airway hyperreactivity (AHR), we studied an in vivo mouse model induced by the hapten picryl (trinitrophenyl) chloride (PCl). Mice were immunized by cutaneous contact sensitization with PCl and airway challenged subsequently with picryl sulfonic acid (PSA) antigen (Ag). Increased airway resistance was produced late (24 h) after Ag challenge, disappeared by 48 h, and was associated with no decrease in diffusion capacity. AHR could be produced in PCl immune/ PSA challenged mice on day 7 or even, with challenge, as early as 1 d after contact sensitization, after adoptive transfer of immune cells lacking CD3(+) contact sensitivity effector T cells, or after transfer of Ag-specific lymphoid cells depleted of conventional T lymphocytes with surface determinants for CD3, CD4, CD8, TCR-beta, or TCR-delta molecules. Further experiments showed that development of AHR depended upon transfer of immune cells expressing surface membrane Thy-1 and B220 (CD45RA) determinants. We concluded that a novel population of Ag-specific lymphoid cells with a defined surface phenotype (Thy-1(+), CD3(-), CD4(-), CD8(-), TCR-alphabeta-, TCR-gammadelta-, and CD45RA+) is required in a mouse model for the development of AHR. PMID:9241124

  19. Program death-1 signaling and regulatory T cells collaborate to resist the function of adoptively transferred cytotoxic T lymphocytes in advanced acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qing; Munger, Meghan E.; Highfill, Steven L.; Tolar, Jakub; Weigel, Brenda J.; Riddle, Megan; Sharpe, Arlene H.; Vallera, Daniel A.; Azuma, Miyuki; Levine, Bruce L.; June, Carl H.; Murphy, William J.; Munn, David H.

    2010-01-01

    Tumor-induced immune defects can weaken host immune response and permit tumor cell growth. In a systemic model of murine acute myeloid leukemia (AML), tumor progression resulted in increased regulatory T cells (Treg) and elevation of program death-1 (PD-1) expression on CD8+ cytotoxic T cells (CTLs) at the tumor site. PD-1 knockout mice were more resistant to AML despite the presence of similar percentage of Tregs compared with wild type. In vitro, intact Treg suppression of CD8+ T-cell responses was dependent on PD-1 expression by T cells and Tregs and PD-L1 expression by antigen-presenting cells. In vivo, the function of adoptively transferred AML-reactive CTLs was reduced by AML-associated Tregs. Anti–PD-L1 monoclonal antibody treatment increased the proliferation and function of CTLs at tumor sites, reduced AML tumor burden, and resulted in long-term survivors. Treg depletion followed by PD-1/PD-L1 blockade showed superior efficacy for eradication of established AML. These data demonstrated that interaction between PD-1 and PD-L1 can facilitate Treg-induced suppression of T-effector cells and dampen the antitumor immune response. PD-1/PD-L1 blockade coupled with Treg depletion represents an important new approach that can be readily translated into the clinic to improve the therapeutic efficacy of adoptive AML-reactive CTLs in advanced AML disease. PMID:20570856

  20. Efficient tumor regression by adoptively transferred CEA-specific CAR-T cells associated with symptoms of mild cytokine release syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Linan; Ma, Ning; Okamoto, Sachiko; Amaishi, Yasunori; Sato, Eiichi; Seo, Naohiro; Mineno, Junichi; Takesako, Kazutoh; Kato, Takuma; Shiku, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is a cell surface antigen highly expressed in various cancer cell types and in healthy tissues. It has the potential to be a target for chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T-cell therapy; however, the safety of this approach in terms of on-target/off-tumor effects needs to be determined. To address this issue in a clinically relevant model, we used a mouse model in which the T cells expressing CEA-specific CAR were transferred into tumor-bearing CEA-transgenic (Tg) mice that physiologically expressed CEA as a self-antigen. The adoptive transfer in conjunction with lymphodepleting and myeloablative preconditioning mediated significant tumor regression but caused weight loss in CEA-Tg, but not in wild-type mice. The weight loss was not associated with overt inflammation in the CEA-expressing gastrointestinal tract but was associated with malnutrition, reflected in elevated systemic levels of cytokines linked to anorexia, which could be controlled by the administration of an anti-IL-6 receptor monoclonal antibody without compromising efficacy. The apparent relationship between lymphodepleting and myeloablative preconditioning, efficacy, and off-tumor toxicity of CAR-T cells would necessitate the development of CEA-specific CAR-T cells with improved signaling domains that require less stringent preconditioning for their efficacy. Taken together, these results suggest that CEA-specific CAR-based adoptive T-cell therapy may be effective for patients with CEA+ solid tumors. Distinguishing the fine line between therapeutic efficacy and off-tumor toxicity would involve further modifications of CAR-T cells and preconditioning regimens. PMID:27757303

  1. Efficient tumor regression by adoptively transferred CEA-specific CAR-T cells associated with symptoms of mild cytokine release syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Linan; Ma, Ning; Okamoto, Sachiko; Amaishi, Yasunori; Sato, Eiichi; Seo, Naohiro; Mineno, Junichi; Takesako, Kazutoh; Kato, Takuma; Shiku, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is a cell surface antigen highly expressed in various cancer cell types and in healthy tissues. It has the potential to be a target for chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T-cell therapy; however, the safety of this approach in terms of on-target/off-tumor effects needs to be determined. To address this issue in a clinically relevant model, we used a mouse model in which the T cells expressing CEA-specific CAR were transferred into tumor-bearing CEA-transgenic (Tg) mice that physiologically expressed CEA as a self-antigen. The adoptive transfer in conjunction with lymphodepleting and myeloablative preconditioning mediated significant tumor regression but caused weight loss in CEA-Tg, but not in wild-type mice. The weight loss was not associated with overt inflammation in the CEA-expressing gastrointestinal tract but was associated with malnutrition, reflected in elevated systemic levels of cytokines linked to anorexia, which could be controlled by the administration of an anti-IL-6 receptor monoclonal antibody without compromising efficacy. The apparent relationship between lymphodepleting and myeloablative preconditioning, efficacy, and off-tumor toxicity of CAR-T cells would necessitate the development of CEA-specific CAR-T cells with improved signaling domains that require less stringent preconditioning for their efficacy. Taken together, these results suggest that CEA-specific CAR-based adoptive T-cell therapy may be effective for patients with CEA(+) solid tumors. Distinguishing the fine line between therapeutic efficacy and off-tumor toxicity would involve further modifications of CAR-T cells and preconditioning regimens.

  2. GVHD-associated, inflammasome-mediated loss of function in adoptively transferred myeloid-derived suppressor cells

    PubMed Central

    Koehn, Brent H.; Apostolova, Petya; Haverkamp, Jessica M.; Miller, Jeffrey S.; McCullar, Valarie; Tolar, Jakub; Munn, David H.; Murphy, William J.; Brickey, Willie June; Serody, Jonathan S.; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I.; Bronte, Vincenzo; Murray, Peter J.; Ting, Jenny P.-Y.; Zeiser, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a naturally occurring immune regulatory population associated with inhibition of ongoing inflammatory responses. In vitro generation of MDSCs from bone marrow has been shown to enhance survival in an acute model of lethal graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). However, donor MDSC infusion only partially ameliorates GVHD lethality. In order to improve the potential therapeutic benefit and ultimately survival outcomes, we set out to investigate the fate of MDSCs after transfer in the setting of acute GVHD (aGVHD). MDSCs transferred to lethally irradiated recipients of allogeneic donor hematopoietic grafts are exposed to an intense inflammatory environment associated with aGVHD, which we now show directly undermines their suppressive capacity. Under a conditioning regimen and GVHD inflammatory settings, MDSCs rapidly lose suppressor function and their potential to inhibit GVHD lethality, which is associated with their induced conversion toward a mature inflammasome-activated state. We find even brief in vitro exposure to inflammasome-activating mediators negates the suppressive potential of cultured murine and human-derived MDSCs. Consistent with a role for the inflammasome, donor MDSCs deficient in the adaptor ASC (apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD), which assembles inflammasome complexes, conferred improved survival of mice developing GVHD compared with wild-type donor MDSCs. These data suggest the use of MDSCs as a therapeutic approach for preventing GVHD and other systemic inflammatory conditions will be more effective when combined with approaches limiting in vivo MDSC inflammasome activation, empowering MDSCs to maintain their suppressive potential. PMID:26265697

  3. GVHD-associated, inflammasome-mediated loss of function in adoptively transferred myeloid-derived suppressor cells.

    PubMed

    Koehn, Brent H; Apostolova, Petya; Haverkamp, Jessica M; Miller, Jeffrey S; McCullar, Valarie; Tolar, Jakub; Munn, David H; Murphy, William J; Brickey, Willie June; Serody, Jonathan S; Gabrilovich, Dmitry I; Bronte, Vincenzo; Murray, Peter J; Ting, Jenny P-Y; Zeiser, Robert; Blazar, Bruce R

    2015-09-24

    Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) are a naturally occurring immune regulatory population associated with inhibition of ongoing inflammatory responses. In vitro generation of MDSCs from bone marrow has been shown to enhance survival in an acute model of lethal graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). However, donor MDSC infusion only partially ameliorates GVHD lethality. In order to improve the potential therapeutic benefit and ultimately survival outcomes, we set out to investigate the fate of MDSCs after transfer in the setting of acute GVHD (aGVHD). MDSCs transferred to lethally irradiated recipients of allogeneic donor hematopoietic grafts are exposed to an intense inflammatory environment associated with aGVHD, which we now show directly undermines their suppressive capacity. Under a conditioning regimen and GVHD inflammatory settings, MDSCs rapidly lose suppressor function and their potential to inhibit GVHD lethality, which is associated with their induced conversion toward a mature inflammasome-activated state. We find even brief in vitro exposure to inflammasome-activating mediators negates the suppressive potential of cultured murine and human-derived MDSCs. Consistent with a role for the inflammasome, donor MDSCs deficient in the adaptor ASC (apoptosis-associated speck-like protein containing a CARD), which assembles inflammasome complexes, conferred improved survival of mice developing GVHD compared with wild-type donor MDSCs. These data suggest the use of MDSCs as a therapeutic approach for preventing GVHD and other systemic inflammatory conditions will be more effective when combined with approaches limiting in vivo MDSC inflammasome activation, empowering MDSCs to maintain their suppressive potential.

  4. Adoptive transfer of T regulatory cells inhibits lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation in fetal brain tissue in a late-pregnancy preterm birth mouse model.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fan; Xiao, Mi; Chen, Ru-Juan; Lin, Xiao-Jie; Siddiq, Muhammad; Liu, Li

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the effect of regulatory T cells (Tregs) on the inflammation resulting from lipopolysaccharide (LPS) challenge in prenatal brain tissue, Tregs isolated from pregnant mice were transferred into model mice, and the expression levels of fork head family transcription factor (Foxp3), interleukin-6 (IL-6), CD68 (a marker of microglia), and toll-like receptor 4 (TLR-4) were assessed in the fetal brain tissue. Foxp3, IL-6, and TLR-4 expression were detected by polymerase chain reaction and Western blot; CD68 expression level was detected using immunochemical analysis. Foxp3, IL-6, TLR-4, and CD68 expressions in fetal brain were significantly induced by maternal LPS administration, and the increased expression levels were markedly reduced by adoptive transfer of Tregs. Maternal LPS exposure significantly induced inflammation in perinatal brain tissue, and Tregs negatively regulated this LPS-induced inflammation.

  5. Lymphocyte migration in the adoptive transfer of EAU

    SciTech Connect

    Palestine, A.G.; Mc Allister, C.; Carter, C.; Keenan, A.M.; Vistica, B.; Gery, I.; Davey, R.; Nussenblatt, R.

    1986-04-01

    Experimental autoimmune uveoretinitis (EAU) was transferred into naive male Lewis rats using 1 X 10(8) indium-111 labeled lymphocytes from syngeneic donors immunized with S-antigen. The migration of the lymphocytes was monitored by gamma camera imaging and by determining the accumulation of radioactivity in selected organs. The majority of the cells leave the peritoneal cavity within 24 hr and migrate to the liver, spleen, and thymus. Only a small fraction of the labeled cells reach the eye. However, there were significantly more labeled cells present in eyes that developed EAU as compared with controls using lymphocytes sensitized against bovine serum albumin. These results indicate the adoptive transfer of EAU is a complex process in which only a small number of transferred cells actually reach the eye to induce uveoretinitis.

  6. Intestinal barrier dysfunction develops at the onset of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, and can be induced by adoptive transfer of auto-reactive T cells.

    PubMed

    Nouri, Mehrnaz; Bredberg, Anders; Weström, Björn; Lavasani, Shahram

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system with a pathogenesis involving a dysfunctional blood-brain barrier and myelin-specific, autoreactive T cells. Although the commensal microbiota seems to affect its pathogenesis, regulation of the interactions between luminal antigens and mucosal immune elements remains unclear. Herein, we investigated whether the intestinal mucosal barrier is also targeted in this disease. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the prototypic animal model of MS, was induced either by active immunization or by adoptive transfer of autoreactive T cells isolated from these mice. We show increased intestinal permeability, overexpression of the tight junction protein zonulin and alterations in intestinal morphology (increased crypt depth and thickness of the submucosa and muscularis layers). These intestinal manifestations were seen at 7 days (i.e., preceding the onset of neurological symptoms) and at 14 days (i.e., at the stage of paralysis) after immunization. We also demonstrate an increased infiltration of proinflammatory Th1/Th17 cells and a reduced regulatory T cell number in the gut lamina propria, Peyer's patches and mesenteric lymph nodes. Adoptive transfer to healthy mice of encephalitogenic T cells, isolated from EAE-diseased animals, led to intestinal changes similar to those resulting from the immunization procedure. Our findings show that disruption of intestinal homeostasis is an early and immune-mediated event in EAE. We propose that this intestinal dysfunction may act to support disease progression, and thus represent a potential therapeutic target in MS. In particular, an increased understanding of the regulation of tight junctions at the blood-brain barrier and in the intestinal wall may be crucial for design of future innovative therapies.

  7. Vaccination of Lewis rats with temperature-sensitive mutants of Mycoplasma pulmonis: adoptive transfer of immunity by spleen cells but not by sera.

    PubMed Central

    Lai, W C; Bennett, M; Lu, Y S; Pakes, S P

    1991-01-01

    Temperature-sensitive mutant vaccines protect rats against Mycoplasma pulmonis infection. The role of the humoral or cellular immune response in resistance to mycoplasma infection was investigated by adoptive-transfer experiments. Spleen cells from Lewis rats vaccinated but not challenged with wild-type organisms (vaccinated) and spleen cells from rats vaccinated (or not) and challenged were effective in preventing syngeneic recipients from developing respiratory disease. There was also a significant reduction in the incidence and number of challenging organisms in the respiratory system. In contrast, sera from the same donors had no detectable effect on the number of mycoplasmas recovered or on lesion development in the respiratory tract. We conclude that cellular immunity rather than humoral immunity generated in vaccinated rats confers protection against subsequent infection. PMID:1987049

  8. Cutaneous sensitivity induced by immunization with irradiated Schistosoma mansoni cercariae. I. Induction, elicitation, and adoptive transfer analysis of cell-mediated cutaneous sensitivity

    SciTech Connect

    Ch'ang, L.Y.; Colley, D.G.

    1986-06-01

    Exposure of C57BL/6 mice to highly irradiated (50 kR) cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni leads to the development of partial resistance against subsequent challenge with unattenuated cercariae. We have analyzed the cellular immune responses that occur during the afferent and efferent phases of this protective sensitization. Mice were immunized by exposure to irradiated S. mansoni cercariae. After challenge with irradiated cercariae, delayed-type (18-72 hr) cutaneous sensitivity reaction sites were rich in mononuclear cells and eosinophils. This reactivity was established by 4 days after sensitization, reached its maximum between 7 and 14 days after sensitization, and was maintained for over 20 weeks. These challenge reactions could be abrogated by treatment with either 200 mg/kg cyclophosphamide or 5 mg of hydrocortisone. Syngeneic adoptive transfer of cutaneous sensitivity was accomplished with lymphoid cells from the draining lymph nodes or spleens of mice sensitized 7-14 days previously. Negative selection studies of nylon-wool non-adherent cells from sensitized donors demonstrated that the cells responsible for transferring this eosinophil-rich, delayed-type cutaneous sensitivity to S. mansoni irradiated cercariae were Thy/sup -1 +/, Lyt/sup 1 +/, Lyt/sup 2 -/, surface Ig/sup -/ lymphocytes.

  9. Adoptive Transfer of Engineered Rhesus Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Specific CD8+ T Cells Reduces the Number of Transmitted/Founder Viruses Established in Rhesus Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Ayala, Victor I.; Trivett, Matthew T.; Barsov, Eugene V.; Jain, Sumiti; Piatak, Michael; Trubey, Charles M.; Alvord, W. Gregory; Chertova, Elena; Roser, James D.; Smedley, Jeremy; Komin, Alexander; Keele, Brandon F.; Ohlen, Claes

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT AIDS virus infections are rarely controlled by cell-mediated immunity, in part due to viral immune evasion and immunodeficiency resulting from CD4+ T-cell infection. One likely aspect of this failure is that antiviral cellular immune responses are either absent or present at low levels during the initial establishment of infection. To test whether an extensive, timely, and effective response could reduce the establishment of infection from a high-dose inoculum, we adoptively transferred large numbers of T cells that were molecularly engineered with anti-simian immunodeficiency virus (anti-SIV) activity into rhesus macaques 3 days following an intrarectal SIV inoculation. To measure in vivo antiviral activity, we assessed the number of viruses transmitted using SIVmac239X, a molecularly tagged viral stock containing 10 genotypic variants, at a dose calculated to transmit 12 founder viruses. Single-genome sequencing of plasma virus revealed that the two animals receiving T cells expressing SIV-specific T-cell receptors (TCRs) had significantly fewer viral genotypes than the two control animals receiving non-SIV-specific T cells (means of 4.0 versus 7.5 transmitted viral genotypes; P = 0.044). Accounting for the likelihood of transmission of multiple viruses of a particular genotype, the calculated means of the total number of founder viruses transmitted were 4.5 and 14.5 in the experimental and control groups, respectively (P = 0.021). Thus, a large antiviral T-cell response timed with virus exposure can limit viral transmission. The presence of strong, preexisting T-cell responses, including those induced by vaccines, might help prevent the establishment of infection at the lower-exposure doses in humans that typically transmit only a single virus. IMPORTANCE The establishment of AIDS virus infection in an individual is essentially a race between the spreading virus and host immune defenses. Cell-mediated immune responses induced by infection or vaccination

  10. Adoptive Transfer of Engineered Rhesus Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Specific CD8+ T Cells Reduces the Number of Transmitted/Founder Viruses Established in Rhesus Macaques.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Victor I; Trivett, Matthew T; Barsov, Eugene V; Jain, Sumiti; Piatak, Michael; Trubey, Charles M; Alvord, W Gregory; Chertova, Elena; Roser, James D; Smedley, Jeremy; Komin, Alexander; Keele, Brandon F; Ohlen, Claes; Ott, David E

    2016-11-01

    AIDS virus infections are rarely controlled by cell-mediated immunity, in part due to viral immune evasion and immunodeficiency resulting from CD4(+) T-cell infection. One likely aspect of this failure is that antiviral cellular immune responses are either absent or present at low levels during the initial establishment of infection. To test whether an extensive, timely, and effective response could reduce the establishment of infection from a high-dose inoculum, we adoptively transferred large numbers of T cells that were molecularly engineered with anti-simian immunodeficiency virus (anti-SIV) activity into rhesus macaques 3 days following an intrarectal SIV inoculation. To measure in vivo antiviral activity, we assessed the number of viruses transmitted using SIVmac239X, a molecularly tagged viral stock containing 10 genotypic variants, at a dose calculated to transmit 12 founder viruses. Single-genome sequencing of plasma virus revealed that the two animals receiving T cells expressing SIV-specific T-cell receptors (TCRs) had significantly fewer viral genotypes than the two control animals receiving non-SIV-specific T cells (means of 4.0 versus 7.5 transmitted viral genotypes; P = 0.044). Accounting for the likelihood of transmission of multiple viruses of a particular genotype, the calculated means of the total number of founder viruses transmitted were 4.5 and 14.5 in the experimental and control groups, respectively (P = 0.021). Thus, a large antiviral T-cell response timed with virus exposure can limit viral transmission. The presence of strong, preexisting T-cell responses, including those induced by vaccines, might help prevent the establishment of infection at the lower-exposure doses in humans that typically transmit only a single virus. The establishment of AIDS virus infection in an individual is essentially a race between the spreading virus and host immune defenses. Cell-mediated immune responses induced by infection or vaccination are important

  11. Long-term Survival and Clinical Benefit from Adoptive T-cell Transfer in Stage IV Melanoma Patients Is Determined by a Four-Parameter Tumor Immune Signature.

    PubMed

    Melief, Sara M; Visconti, Valeria V; Visser, Marten; van Diepen, Merel; Kapiteijn, Ellen H W; van den Berg, Joost H; Haanen, John B A G; Smit, Vincent T H B M; Oosting, Jan; van der Burg, Sjoerd H; Verdegaal, Els M E

    2017-02-01

    The presence of tumor-infiltrating immune cells is associated with longer survival and a better response to immunotherapy in early-stage melanoma, but a comprehensive study of the in situ immune microenvironment in stage IV melanoma has not been performed. We investigated the combined influence of a series of immune factors on survival and response to adoptive cell transfer (ACT) in stage IV melanoma patients. Metastases of 73 stage IV melanoma patients, 17 of which were treated with ACT, were studied with respect to the number and functional phenotype of lymphocytes and myeloid cells as well as for expression of galectins-1, -3, and -9. Single factors associated with better survival were identified using Kaplan-Meier curves and multivariate Cox regression analyses, and those factors were used for interaction analyses. The results were validated using The Cancer Genome Atlas database. We identified four parameters that were associated with a better survival: CD8(+) T cells, galectin-9(+) dendritic cells (DC)/DC-like macrophages, a high M1/M2 macrophage ratio, and the expression of galectin-3 by tumor cells. The presence of at least three of these parameters formed an independent positive prognostic factor for long-term survival. Patients displaying this four-parameter signature were found exclusively among patients responding to ACT and were the ones with sustained clinical benefit. Cancer Immunol Res; 5(2); 170-9. ©2017 AACR.

  12. Blockade of Programmed Death 1 Augments the Ability of Human T Cells Engineered to Target NY-ESO-1 to Control Tumor Growth after Adoptive Transfer.

    PubMed

    Moon, Edmund K; Ranganathan, Raghuveer; Eruslanov, Evgeniy; Kim, Soyeon; Newick, Kheng; O'Brien, Shaun; Lo, Albert; Liu, Xiaojun; Zhao, Yangbing; Albelda, Steven M

    2016-01-15

    Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) become hypofunctional, although the mechanisms are not clear. Our goal was to generate a model of human tumor-induced TIL hypofunction to study mechanisms and to test anti-human therapeutics. We transduced human T cells with a published, optimized T-cell receptor (TCR) that is directed to a peptide within the cancer testis antigen, NY-ESO-1. After demonstrating antigen-specific in vitro activity, these cells were used to target a human lung cancer line that expressed NY-ESO-1 in the appropriate HLA context growing in immunodeficient mice. The ability of anti-PD1 antibody to augment efficacy was tested. Injection of transgenic T cells had some antitumor activity, but did not eliminate the tumors. The injected T cells became profoundly hypofunctional accompanied by upregulation of PD1, Tim3, and Lag3 with coexpression of multiple inhibitory receptors in a high percentage of cells. This model allowed us to test reagents targeted specifically to human T cells. We found that injections of an anti-PD1 antibody in combination with T cells led to decreased TIL hypofunction and augmented the efficacy of the adoptively transferred T cells. This model offers a platform for preclinical testing of adjuvant immunotherapeutics targeted to human T cells prior to transition to the bedside. Because the model employs engineering of human T cells with a TCR clone instead of a CAR, it allows for study of the biology of tumor-reactive TILs that signal through an endogenous TCR. The lessons learned from TCR-engineered TILs can thus be applied to tumor-reactive TILs. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. The immunosuppressive effects of phthalocyanine photodynamic therapy in mice are mediated by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and can be adoptively transferred to naive recipients.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, Nabiha; Katiyar, Santosh K; Elmets, Craig A

    2008-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising treatment modality for malignant tumors but it is also immunosuppressive which may reduce its therapeutic efficacy. The purpose of our study was to elucidate the role of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in PDT immunosuppression. Using silicon phthalocyanine 4 (Pc4) as photosensitizer, nontumor-bearing CD4 knockout (CD4-/-) mice and their wild type (WT) counterparts were subjected to Pc4-PDT in a manner identical to that used for tumor regression (1 cm spot size, 0.5 mg kg(-1) Pc4, 110 J cm(-2) light) to assess the effect of Pc4-PDT on cell-mediated immunity. There was a decrease in immunosuppression in CD4-/- mice compared with WT mice. We next examined the role of CD8+ T cells in Pc4-PDT-induced immunosuppression using CD8-/- mice following the same treatment regimen used for CD4-/- mice. Similar to CD4-/- mice, CD8-/- mice exhibited less immunosuppression than WT mice. Pc4-PDT-induced immunosuppression could be adoptively transferred with spleen cells from Pc4-PDT treated donor mice to syngenic naive recipients (P < 0.05) and was mediated primarily by T cells, although macrophages were also found to play a role. Procedures that limit PDT-induced immunosuppression but do not affect PDT-induced regression of tumors may prove superior to PDT alone in promoting long-term antitumor responses.

  14. Therapeutic regulatory T-cell adoptive transfer ameliorates established murine chronic GVHD in a CXCR5-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    McDonald-Hyman, Cameron; Flynn, Ryan; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Peterson, Nicholas; MacDonald, Kelli P. A.; Hill, Geoffrey R.; Luznik, Leo; Serody, Jonathan S.; Murphy, William J.; Maillard, Ivan; Munn, David H.; Turka, Laurence A.; Koreth, John; Cutler, Corey S.; Soiffer, Robert J.; Antin, Joseph H.; Ritz, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    Chronic graft-versus-host disease (cGVHD) is a major complication of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. In cGVHD, alloreactive T cells and germinal center (GC) B cells often participate in GC reactions to produce pathogenic antibodies. Although regulatory T cells (Tregs) can inhibit GC reactions, Treg numbers are reduced in cGVHD, contributing to cGVHD pathogenesis. Here, we explored 2 means to increase Tregs in cGVHD: interleukin-2/monoclonal antibody (IL-2/mAb) complexes and donor Treg infusions. IL-2/mAb complexes given over 1 month were efficacious in expanding Tregs and treating established cGVHD in a multi-organ-system disease mouse model characterized by GC reactions, antibody deposition, and lung dysfunction. In an acute GVHD (aGVHD) model, IL-2/mAb complexes given for only 4 days resulted in rapid mortality, indicating IL-2/mAb complexes can drive conventional T-cell (Tcon)-mediated injury. In contrast, Treg infusions, which uniformly suppress aGVHD, increased Treg frequency and were effective in preventing the onset of, and treating, established cGVHD. Efficacy was dependent upon CXCR5-sufficient Tregs homing to, and inhibiting, GC reactions. These studies indicate that the infusion of Tregs, especially ones enriched for GC homing, may be desirable for cGVHD therapy. Although IL-2/mAb complexes can be efficacious in cGVHD, a cautious approach needs to be taken in settings in which aGVHD elements, and associated Tcon, are present. PMID:27385791

  15. Analysis of transgene-specific immune responses that limit the in vivo persistence of adoptively transferred HSV-TK–modified donor T cells after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Carolina; Flowers, Mary E.; Warren, Edus H.; Riddell, Stanley R.

    2006-01-01

    The introduction of an inducible suicide gene such as the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-TK) might allow exploitation of the antitumor activity of donor T cells after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) without graft versus host disease. However, HSV-TK is foreign, and immune responses to gene-modified T cells could lead to their premature elimination. We show that after the infusion of HSV-TK–modified donor T cells to HCT recipients, CD8+ and CD4+ T-cell responses to HSV-TK are rapidly induced and coincide with the disappearance of transferred cells. Cytokine flow cytometry using an overlapping panel of HSV-TK peptides allowed rapid detection and quantitation of HSV-TK–specific T cells in the blood and identified multiple immunogenic epitopes. Repeated infusion of modified T cells boosted the induced HSV-TK–specific T cells, which persisted as memory cells. These studies demonstrate the need for nonimmunogenic suicide genes and identify a strategy for detection of CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses to transgene products that should be generally applicable to monitoring patients on gene therapy trials. The potency of gene-modified T cells to elicit robust and durable immune responses imply this approach might be used for vaccination to elicit T-cell responses to viral or tumor antigens. PMID:16282341

  16. Adoptive immunotherapy for cancer: harnessing the T cell response.

    PubMed

    Restifo, Nicholas P; Dudley, Mark E; Rosenberg, Steven A

    2012-03-22

    Immunotherapy based on the adoptive transfer of naturally occurring or gene-engineered T cells can mediate tumour regression in patients with metastatic cancer. Here, we discuss progress in the use of adoptively transferred T cells, focusing on how they can mediate tumour cell eradication. Recent advances include more accurate targeting of antigens expressed by tumours and the associated vasculature, and the successful use of gene engineering to re-target T cells before their transfer into the patient. We also describe how new research has helped to identify the particular T cell subsets that can most effectively promote tumour eradication.

  17. Phase I/II study of adoptive transfer of γδ T cells in combination with zoledronic acid and IL-2 to patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hirohito; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Yagi, Junji; Minato, Nagahiro; Tanabe, Kazunari

    2011-08-01

    Human Vγ2 Vδ2-bearing T cells have recently received much attention in cancer immunotherapy. In this study, we conducted a phase I/II clinical trial of the adoptive transfer of γδ T cells to patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma. Eleven patients who had undergone nephrectomy and had lung metastasis were enrolled. Peripheral blood γδ T cells obtained from the patients were stimulated ex vivo with 2-methyl-3-butenyl-1-pyrophosphate (2M3B1PP), a synthetic pyrophosphomonoester antigen, and transferred in combination with zoledronic acid (Zol) and teceleukin (recombinant human interleukin-2). Expanded γδ T cells exhibited potent cytotoxic activity against tumor cells in vitro, and the proportion of peripheral blood γδ T cells among CD3(+) cells typically peaked three to 5 days after transfer. Tumor doubling time was prolonged in all 11 patients, and the best overall responses were 1 CR, 5 SD, and 5 PD, as defined based on Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST). Although ten patients developed adverse reactions of grade ≥3, they were likely to have been the result of the concomitant infusion of Zol and IL-2, and most symptoms swiftly reverted to normal during the course of treatment. In conclusion, this clinical trial demonstrated that our regimen for the adoptive transfer of γδ T cells in combination with Zol and IL-2 was well tolerated and that objective clinical responses could be achieved in some patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma.

  18. Role of memory T cell subsets for adoptive immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Busch, Dirk H; Fräßle, Simon P; Sommermeyer, Daniel; Buchholz, Veit R; Riddell, Stanley R

    2016-02-01

    Adoptive transfer of primary (unmodified) or genetically engineered antigen-specific T cells has demonstrated astonishing clinical results in the treatment of infections and some malignancies. Besides the definition of optimal targets and antigen receptors, the differentiation status of transferred T cells is emerging as a crucial parameter for generating cell products with optimal efficacy and safety profiles. Long-living memory T cells subdivide into phenotypically as well as functionally different subsets (e.g. central memory, effector memory, tissue-resident memory T cells). This diversification process is crucial for effective immune protection, with probably distinct dependencies on the presence of individual subsets dependent on the disease to which the immune response is directed as well as its organ location. Adoptive T cell therapy intends to therapeutically transfer defined T cell immunity into patients. Efficacy of this approach often requires long-term maintenance of transferred cells, which depends on the presence and persistence of memory T cells. However, engraftment and survival of highly differentiated memory T cell subsets upon adoptive transfer is still difficult to achieve. Therefore, the recent observation that a distinct subset of weakly differentiated memory T cells shows all characteristics of adult tissue stem cells and can reconstitute all types of effector and memory T cell subsets, became highly relevant. We here review our current understanding of memory subset formation and T cell subset purification, and its implications for adoptive immunotherapy.

  19. Adoptive transfer of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells decreases inhibitory and regulatory T-cell differentiation and improves survival in murine polymicrobial sepsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Wei; Yang, Wen; Gao, Lei; Kang, Jia-Rui; Qin, Jia-Jian; Liu, Yue-Ping; Lu, Jiang-Yang

    2015-05-01

    A decrease in the number of dendritic cells (DCs) is a major cause of post-sepsis immunosuppression and opportunistic infection and is closely associated with poor prognosis. Increasing the number of DCs to replenish their numbers post sepsis can improve the condition. This therapeutic approach could improve recovery after sepsis. Eighty C57BL/6 mice were subjected to sham or caecal ligation and puncture (CLP) surgery. Mice were divided into four groups: (i) Sham + vehicle, (ii) Sham + DC, (iii) CLP + vehicle, and (iv) CLP + DC. Bone-marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) were administered at 6, 12 and 24 hr after surgery. After 3 days, we assessed serum indices of organ function (alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, creatinine, amylase and lipase), organ tissue histopathology (haematoxylin and eosin staining), cytokine [interferon-γ (IFN-γ), tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin-12p70 (IL-12p70), IL-6 and IL-10] levels in the serum, programmed death-1 (PD-1) expression on T cells, regulatory T-cell differentiation in the spleen, and the survival rate (monitored for 7 days). BMDC transfer resulted in the following changes: a significant reduction in damage to the liver, kidney and pancreas in the CLP-septic mice as well as in the pathological changes seen in the liver, lung, small intestine and pancreas; significantly elevated levels of the T helper type 1 (Th1) cytokines IFN-γ and IL-12p70 in the serum; decreased levels of the Th2 cytokines IL-6 and IL-10 in the serum; reduced expression of PD-1 molecules on CD4(+) T cells; reduced the proliferation and differentiation of splenic suppressor T cells and CD4(+)  CD25(+)  Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells, and a significant increase in the survival rate of the septic animals. These results show that administration of BMDCs may have modulated the differentiation and immune function of T cells and contributed to alleviate immunosuppression, hence reducing organ damage and mortality post sepsis. Hence

  20. Limited Model Antigen Expression by Transgenic Fungi Induces Disparate Fates during Differentiation of Adoptively Transferred T Cell Receptor Transgenic CD4+ T Cells: Robust Activation and Proliferation with Weak Effector Function during Recall

    PubMed Central

    Ersland, Karen; Pick-Jacobs, John C.; Gern, Benjamin H.; Frye, Christopher A.; Sullivan, Thomas D.; Brennan, Meghan B.; Filutowicz, Hanna I.; O'Brien, Kevin; Korthauer, Keegan D.; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey; Klein, Bruce S.

    2012-01-01

    CD4+ T cells are the key players of vaccine resistance to fungi. The generation of effective T cell-based vaccines requires an understanding of how to induce and maintain CD4+ T cells and memory. The kinetics of fungal antigen (Ag)-specific CD4+ T cell memory development has not been studied due to the lack of any known protective epitopes and clonally restricted T cell subsets with complementary T cell receptors (TCRs). Here, we investigated the expansion and function of CD4+ T cell memory after vaccination with transgenic (Tg) Blastomyces dermatitidis yeasts that display a model Ag, Eα-mCherry (Eα-mCh). We report that Tg yeast led to Eα display on Ag-presenting cells and induced robust activation, proliferation, and expansion of adoptively transferred TEa cells in an Ag-specific manner. Despite robust priming by Eα-mCh yeast, antifungal TEa cells recruited and produced cytokines weakly during a recall response to the lung. The addition of exogenous Eα-red fluorescent protein (RFP) to the Eα-mCh yeast boosted the number of cytokine-producing TEa cells that migrated to the lung. Thus, model epitope expression on yeast enables the interrogation of Ag presentation to CD4+ T cells and primes Ag-specific T cell activation, proliferation, and expansion. However, the limited availability of model Ag expressed by Tg fungi during T cell priming blunts the downstream generation of effector and memory T cells. PMID:22124658

  1. Adoptive cell therapy: genetic modification to redirect effector cell specificity.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Richard A; Dudley, Mark E; Rosenberg, Steven A

    2010-01-01

    Building on the principals that the adoptive transfer of T cells can lead to the regression of established tumors in humans, investigators are now further manipulating these cells using genetic engineering. Two decades of human gene transfer experiments have resulted in the translation of laboratory technology into robust clinical applications. The purpose of this review is to give the reader an introduction to the 2 major approaches being developed to redirect effector T-cell specificity. Primary human T cells can be engineered to express exogenous T-cell receptors or chimeric antigen receptors directed against multiple human tumor antigens. Initial clinical trial results have demonstrated that both T-cell receptor- and chimeric antigen receptor-engineered T cells can be administered to cancer patients and mediate tumor regression.

  2. Adoptive Transfer of Renal Allograft Tolerance in a Large Animal Model.

    PubMed

    Villani, V; Yamada, K; Scalea, J R; Gillon, B C; Arn, J S; Sekijima, M; Tasaki, M; Cormack, T A; Moran, S G; Torabi, R; Shimizu, A; Sachs, D H

    2016-01-01

    Our recent studies in an inbred swine model demonstrated that both peripheral and intra-graft regulatory cells were required for the adoptive transfer of tolerance to a second, naïve donor-matched kidney. Here, we have asked whether both peripheral and intra-graft regulatory elements are required for adoptive transfer of tolerance when only a long-term tolerant (LTT) kidney is transplanted. Nine highly-inbred swine underwent a tolerance-inducing regimen to prepare LTT kidney grafts which were then transplanted to histocompatible recipients, with or without the peripheral cell populations required for adoptive transfer of tolerance to a naïve kidney. In contrast to our previous studies, tolerance of the LTT kidney transplants alone was achieved without transfer of additional peripheral cells and without strategies to increase the number/potency of regulatory T cells in the donor. This tolerance was systemic, since most subsequent, donor-matched challenge kidney grafts were accepted. These results confirm the presence of a potent tolerance-inducing and/or tolerance-maintaining cell population within LTT renal allografts. They suggest further that additional peripheral tolerance mechanisms, required for adoptive transfer of tolerance to a naïve donor-matched kidney, depend on peripheral cells that, if not transferred with the LTT kidney, require time to develop in the adoptive host.

  3. Tumor-Specific Effector CD8+ T Cells That Can Establish Immunological Memory in Humans after Adoptive Transfer Are Marked by Expression of IL7 Receptor and c-myc.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Smita S; Paria, Biman C; Srivastava, Abhishek K; Rothermel, Luke D; Stephens, Daniel J; Kammula, Udai S

    2015-08-15

    The optimal T-cell attributes for adoptive cancer immunotherapy are unclear. Recent clinical trials of ex vivo-expanded tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes indicated that differentiated T effector cells can elicit durable antitumor responses in some patients with cancer, with their antitumor activity tightly correlated with their persistence in the host. Thus, there is great interest in the definition of intrinsic biomarkers that can predict the conversion of short-lived tumor antigen-specific T effector cells into long-lived T memory cells. Long-term persistence of ex vivo-expanded tumor-specific CD8+ T effector clones has been reported in refractory metastatic melanoma patients after adoptive T-cell transfer. By using highly homogeneous clone populations from these preparations, we performed a comparative transcriptional profiling to define preinfusion molecular attributes that can be ascribed to an effector-to-memory transition. Through this route, we discovered that preinfusion T-cell clones that expressed the IL7 receptor (IL7R) and c-myc were more likely to persist longer after adoptive transfer to patients. The predictive value of these two biomarkers was strengthened by using IL7R protein, IL7-induced pSTAT5, and c-myc mRNA expression to prospectively identify human tumor-specific T effector clones capable of engraftment into immunodeficient mice. Overall, our findings reveal IL7R and c-myc expression as intrinsic biomarkers that can predict the fate of CD8+ T effector cells after adoptive transfer.

  4. Adoptive transfer of genetically modified Wilms' tumor 1–specific T cells in a novel malignant skull base meningioma model

    PubMed Central

    Iwami, Kenichiro; Natsume, Atsushi; Ohno, Masasuke; Ikeda, Hiroaki; Mineno, Junichi; Nukaya, Ikuei; Okamoto, Sachiko; Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Yasukawa, Masaki; Shiku, Hiroshi; Wakabayashi, Toshihiko

    2013-01-01

    Background Meningiomas are the most commonly diagnosed primary intracranial neoplasms. Despite significant advances in modern therapies, the management of malignant meningioma and skull base meningioma remains a challenge. Thus, the development of new treatment modalities is urgently needed for these difficult-to-treat meningiomas. The goal of this study was to investigate the potential of build-in short interfering RNA-based Wilms' tumor protein (WT1)–targeted adoptive immunotherapy in a reproducible mouse model of malignant skull base meningioma that we recently established. Methods We compared WT1 mRNA expression in human meningioma tissues and gliomas by quantitative real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Human malignant meningioma cells (IOMM-Lee cells) were labeled with green fluorescent protein (GFP) and implanted at the skull base of immunodeficient mice by using the postglenoid foramen injection (PGFi) technique. The animals were sacrificed at specific time points for analysis of tumor formation. Two groups of animals received adoptive immunotherapy with control peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) or WT1-targeted PBMCs. Results High levels of WT1 mRNA expression were observed in many meningioma tissues and all meningioma cell lines. IOMM-Lee-GFP cells were successfully implanted using the PGFi technique, and malignant skull base meningiomas were induced in all mice. The systemically delivered WT1-targeted PBMCs infiltrated skull base meningiomas and significantly delayed tumor growth and increased survival time. Conclusions We have established a reproducible mouse model of malignant skull base meningioma. WT1-targeted adoptive immunotherapy appears to be a promising approach for the treatment of difficult-to-treat meningiomas. PMID:23460320

  5. Adoptive transfer of ex vivo expanded Vγ9Vδ2 T cells in combination with zoledronic acid inhibits cancer growth and limits osteolysis in a murine model of osteolytic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zysk, Aneta; DeNichilo, Mark O; Panagopoulos, Vasilios; Zinonos, Irene; Liapis, Vasilios; Hay, Shelley; Ingman, Wendy; Ponomarev, Vladimir; Atkins, Gerald; Findlay, David; Zannettino, Andrew; Evdokiou, Andreas

    2017-02-01

    Bone metastases occur in over 75% of patients with advanced breast cancer and are responsible for high levels of morbidity and mortality. In this study, ex vivo expanded cytotoxic Vγ9Vδ2 T cells isolated from human peripheral blood were tested for their anti-cancer efficacy in combination with zoledronic acid (ZOL), using a mouse model of osteolytic breast cancer. In vitro, expanded Vγ9Vδ2 T cells were cytotoxic against a panel of human breast cancer cell lines, and ZOL pre-treatment further sensitised breast cancer cells to killing by Vγ9Vδ2 T cells. Vγ9Vδ2 T cells adoptively transferred into NOD/SCID mice localised to osteolytic breast cancer lesions in the bone, and multiple infusions of Vγ9Vδ2 T cells reduced tumour growth in the bone. ZOL pre-treatment potentiated the anti-cancer efficacy of Vγ9Vδ2 T cells, with mice showing further reductions in tumour burden. Mice treated with the combination also had reduced tumour burden of secondary pulmonary metastases, and decreased bone degradation. Our data suggests that adoptive transfer of Vγ9Vδ2 T cell in combination with ZOL may prove an effective immunotherapeutic approach for the treatment of breast cancer bone metastases. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  6. Systemic Intravenous Adoptive Transfer of Autologous Lymphokine-activated αβ T-Cells Improves Temozolomide-induced Lymphopenia in Patients with Glioma.

    PubMed

    Kanemura, Yonehiro; Sumida, Miho; Okita, Yoshiko; Yoshioka, Ema; Yamamoto, Atsuyo; Kanematsu, Daisuke; Handa, Yukako; Fukusumi, Hayato; Inazawa, Yui; Takada, A I; Nonaka, Masahiro; Nakajima, Shin; Mori, Kanji; Goto, Shigenori; Kamigaki, Takashi; Shofuda, Tomoko; Moriuchi, Shusuke; Yamasaki, Mami

    2017-07-01

    In this clinical study, we investigated the safety and clinical usefulness of systemic adoptive immunotherapy using autologous lymphokine-activated αβ T-cells (αβ T-cells), combined with standard therapies, in patients with malignant brain tumors. Twenty-three patients with different malignant brain tumors, consisting of 14 treated with temozolomide (TMZ group) and 9 treated without temozolomide (non-TMZ group), received systemic intravenous injections of αβ T-cells (mean=10.4 injections/patient for the TMZ group, and 4.78 for the non-TMZ group). No significant adverse effects associated with the αβ T-cell injection were observed, and the total lymphocyte count (TLC) improved significantly in the TMZ group after five injections. Furthermore, CD8-positive or T-cell receptor V gamma -positive cells were increased with TLC in three patients with glioblastoma multiforme. These findings suggest that systemic αβ T-cell immunotherapy is well tolerated, and may help restore an impaired and imbalanced T-cell immune status, and temozolomide- and/or radiotherapy-induced lymphopenia. Future prospective study is needed to clarify the clinical merits of this immunotherapy. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  7. Safe engineering of CAR T cells for adoptive cell therapy of cancer using long-term episomal gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Jin, Chuan; Fotaki, Grammatiki; Ramachandran, Mohanraj; Nilsson, Berith; Essand, Magnus; Yu, Di

    2016-07-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy is a new successful treatment for refractory B-cell leukemia. Successful therapeutic outcome depends on long-term expression of CAR transgene in T cells, which is achieved by delivering transgene using integrating gamma retrovirus (RV) or lentivirus (LV). However, uncontrolled RV/LV integration in host cell genomes has the potential risk of causing insertional mutagenesis. Herein, we describe a novel episomal long-term cell engineering method using non-integrating lentiviral (NILV) vector containing a scaffold/matrix attachment region (S/MAR) element, for either expression of transgenes or silencing of target genes. The insertional events of this vector into the genome of host cells are below detection level. CD19 CAR T cells engineered with a NILV-S/MAR vector have similar levels of CAR expression as T cells engineered with an integrating LV vector, even after numerous rounds of cell division. NILV-S/MAR-engineered CD19 CAR T cells exhibited similar cytotoxic capacity upon CD19(+) target cell recognition as LV-engineered T cells and are as effective in controlling tumor growth in vivo We propose that NILV-S/MAR vectors are superior to current options as they enable long-term transgene expression without the risk of insertional mutagenesis and genotoxicity. © 2016 The Authors. Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  8. Lymph node-derived donor encephalitogenic CD4+ T cells in C57BL/6 mice adoptive transfer experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis highly express GM-CSF and T-bet.

    PubMed

    Cravens, Petra D; Hussain, Rehana Z; Zacharias, Tresa E; Ben, Li-Hong; Herndon, Emily; Vinnakota, Ramya; Lambracht-Washington, Doris; Nessler, Stefan; Zamvil, Scott S; Eagar, Todd N; Stüve, Olaf

    2011-06-24

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a relevant animal model for the human demyelinating inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system (CNS), multiple sclerosis (MS). Induction of EAE by adoptive transfer allows studying the role of the donor T lymphocyte in disease pathogenesis. It has been challenging to reliably induce adoptive transfer EAE in C57BL/6 (H-2b) mice. The goal of this study was to develop a reproducible and high yield protocol for adoptive transfer EAE in C57BL/6 mice. A step-wise experimental approach permitted us to develop a protocol that resulted in a consistent relatively high disease incidence of ~70% in recipient mice. Donor mice were immunized with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)p35-55 in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) followed by pertussis toxin (PT). Only lymph node cells (LNC) isolated at day 12 post immunization, and restimulated in vitro for 72 hours with 10 μg/mL of MOGp35-55 and 0.5 ng/mL of interleukin-12 (IL-12) were able to transfer disease. The ability of LNC to transfer disease was associated with the presence of inflammatory infiltrates in the CNS at day 12. Interferon gamma (IFNγ) was produced at comparable levels in cell cultures prepared from mice at both day 6 and day 12 post immunization. By contrast, there was a trend towards a negative association between IL-17 and disease susceptibility in our EAE model. The amount of GM-CSF secreted was significantly increased in the culture supernatants from cells collected at day 12 post immunization versus those collected at day 6 post-immunization. Activated CD4+ T cells present in the day 12 LNC cultures maintained expression of the transcription factor T-bet, which has been shown to regulate the expression of the IL-23 receptor. Also, there was an increased prevalence of MOGp35-55-specific CD4+ T cells in day 12 LNC after in vitro re-stimulation. In summary, encephalitogenic LNC that adoptively transfer EAE in C57BL/6 mice were not characterized

  9. Information Transfer and the Adoption of Agricultural Innovations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longo, Rose Mary Juliano

    1990-01-01

    Data collected in the Federal District of Brazil were analyzed in terms of information transfer through mass media and interpersonal communication and how they influence farmers in the Federal District of Brazil in their decisions to adopt agricultural innovations. (42 references) (EAM)

  10. Information Transfer and the Adoption of Agricultural Innovations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longo, Rose Mary Juliano

    1990-01-01

    Data collected in the Federal District of Brazil were analyzed in terms of information transfer through mass media and interpersonal communication and how they influence farmers in the Federal District of Brazil in their decisions to adopt agricultural innovations. (42 references) (EAM)

  11. A study of the role of cell-mediated immunity in bluetongue virus infection in sheep, using cellular adoptive transfer techniques.

    PubMed

    Jeggo, M H; Wardley, R C; Brownlie, J

    1984-07-01

    The transfer of thoracic duct lymphocytes from sheep inoculated 14 days, but not 7 days previously with bluetongue virus into their monozygotic twin resulted in some protection from challenge with bluetongue virus. T cell enrichment of the 14 day thoracic duct lymphocyte population resulted in a similar effect, indicating the T cell basis of the observed protection. Animals recovered from infection with bluetongue virus type 3 and which received thoracic duct lymphocytes from an identical twin recently infected with the same bluetongue virus type were protected from challenge with bluetongue type 4. These observations suggest that T lymphocytes play an important role in protection against bluetongue virus.

  12. Generation of tumor-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocytes from the peripheral blood of colorectal cancer patients for adoptive T-cell transfer.

    PubMed

    Carluccio, Silvia; Delbue, Serena; Signorini, Lucia; Setola, Elisabetta; Bagliani, Anna; Della Valle, Alberto; Galli, Andrea; Ferrante, Pasquale; Bregni, Marco

    2015-07-01

    This study designs a strategy for an adoptive cellular therapy (ACT) protocol based on the ex-vivo selection of autologous peripheral blood-derived CD8-enriched T-cells, stimulated with dendritic cells (DCs) that had been pulsed with apoptotic tumor cells to generate cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) with anti-tumor activity. Seventy-eight colorectal cancer (CRC) patients were enrolled in this study. Tumor tissues and peripheral blood (PB) were obtained at surgery. Tissues were mechanically dissociated and cultured to obtain a primary tumor cell line from each patient. DCs were derived from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) using magnetic positive selection of CD14+ monocytes. Anti-tumor CTLs were elicited in co-/micro-cultures using DCs as antigen-presenting cells, autologous apoptotic tumor cells as a source of antigens, and CD8+ T lymphocytes as effectors. Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) secretion was assessed by ELISpot assays to evaluate the activation of the CTLs against the autologous tumor cells. Primary tumor cell lines were obtained from 20 of 78 patients (25.6%). DCs were generated from 26 patients, and of them, corresponding tumor cell lines were derived from six patients. ELISpot results showed that significant IFN-γ secretion was detected after different numbers of stimulations for two patients, whereas weak secretion was observed for three patients. Despite difficulties due to contamination of several primary tumor cell lines with gut intestinal flora, the results suggest that the generation of tumor-specific CTLs is feasible from patients with CRC, and could be useful for supporting an ACT approach in CRC.

  13. Adoptive T-cell Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Gottschalk, Stephen; Rooney, Cliona

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with a range of malignancies involving B-cells, T-cells, natural killer (NK)-cells, epithelial cells and smooth muscle. All of these are associated with the latent life cycles of EBV, but the pattern of latency-associated viral antigens expressed in tumor cells depends on the type of tumor. EBV-specific T cells (EBVSTs) have been explored as prophylaxis and therapy for EBV-associated malignancies for more than two decades. EBVSTs have been most successful as prophylaxis and therapy for post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD), which expresses the full array of latent EBV antigens (type 3 latency), in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. While less effective, clinical studies have also demonstrated their therapeutic potential for PTLD post solid organ transplant, and for EBV-associated malignancies such as Hodgkin’s Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma, and nasopharyngeal carcinoma that express a limited array of latent EBV antigens (type 2 latency),. Several approaches are actively being pursued to improve the antitumor activity of EBVSTs including activation and expansion of T cells specific for the EBV antigens expressed in type 2 latency, genetic approaches to render EBVSTs resistant to the immunosuppressive tumor environment and combination approaches with other immune-modulating modalities. Given the recent advances and renewed interest in cell therapy, we hope that EBVSTs will become an integral part of our treatment armamentarium against EBV-positive malignancies in the near future. PMID:26428384

  14. Whole-body imaging of adoptively transferred T cells using magnetic resonance imaging, single photon emission computed tomography and positron emission tomography techniques, with a focus on regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Leech, J M; Sharif-Paghaleh, E; Maher, J; Livieratos, L; Lechler, R I; Mullen, G E; Lombardi, G; Smyth, L A

    2013-01-01

    Cell-based therapies using natural or genetically modified regulatory T cells (Tregs) have shown significant promise as immune-based therapies. One of the main difficulties facing the further advancement of these therapies is that the fate and localization of adoptively transferred Tregs is largely unknown. The ability to dissect the migratory pathway of these cells in a non-invasive manner is of vital importance for the further development of in-vivo cell-based immunotherapies, as this technology allows the fate of the therapeutically administered cell to be imaged in real time. In this review we will provide an overview of the current clinical imaging techniques used to track T cells and Tregs in vivo, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET)/single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). In addition, we will discuss how the finding of these studies can be used, in the context of transplantation, to define the most appropriate Treg subset required for cellular therapy. PMID:23574314

  15. Adoptive transfer of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells to C57BL/6J mice during acute infection with Toxoplasma gondii down modulates the exacerbated Th1 immune response.

    PubMed

    Olguín, Jonadab E; Fernández, Jacquelina; Salinas, Nohemí; Juárez, Imelda; Rodriguez-Sosa, Miriam; Campuzano, Jaime; Castellanos, Carlos; Saavedra, Rafael

    2015-08-01

    Infection of C57BL/6J mice with the parasite Toxoplasma gondii triggers a powerful Th1 immune response that is detrimental to the host. During acute infection, a reduction in CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Treg) has been reported. We studied the role of Treg during T. gondii infection by adoptive transfer of cells purified from transgenic Foxp3(EGFP) mice to infected wild type animals. We found a less severe weight loss, a significant delayed mortality in infected Treg-transferred mice, and reduced pathology of the small intestine that were associated with lower IFN-γ and TNF-α levels. Nevertheless, higher cyst number and parasite load in brain were observed in these mice. Treg-transferred infected mice showed reduced levels of both IFN-γ and TNF-α in sera. A reduced number of CD4(+) T cells producing IFN-γ was detected in these mice, while IL-2 producing CD4(+) T cells were restored to levels nearly similar to uninfected mice. CD25 and CD69 expression of CD4(+) T cells were also down modulated. Our data show that the low Treg cell number are insufficient to modulate the activation of CD4(+) T cells and the production of high levels of IFN-γ. Thus, a delicate balance between an optimal immune response and its modulation by Treg cells must exist.

  16. Immunization with soluble BDC 2.5 T cell receptor-immunoglobulin chimeric protein:antibody specificity and protection of nonobese diabetic mice against adoptive transfer of diabetes by maternal immunization

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    The BDC 2.5 T cell clone is specific for pancreatic beta-cell antigen presented by I-Ag7, and greatly accelerates diabetes when injected into 10-21-d-old nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice. The BDC 2.5 T cell receptor (TCR) has been solubilized as a TCR-IgG1 chimeric protein. All NOD mice immunized against BDC 2.5 TCR-IgG1 produced antibodies recognizing TCR C alpha/C beta epitopes that were inaccessible on the T cell surface. 56% of the mice produced antibodies against the BDC 2.5 clonotype that specifically blocked antigen activation of BDC 2.5 cells. We have used the adoptive transfer model of diabetes to demonstrate that maternal immunization with soluble TCR protects young mice from diabetes induced by the BDC 2.5 T cell clone. PMID:8920864

  17. Adoptive Cell Therapy for Metastatic Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Merhavi-Shoham, Efrat; Itzhaki, Orit; Markel, Gal; Schachter, Jacob; Besser, Michal J

    Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) is a powerful form of immunotherapy by inducing durable complete responses that significantly extend the survival of melanoma patients. Mutation-derived neoantigens were recently identified as key factors for tumor recognition and rejection by TILs. The isolation of T-cell receptor (TCR) genes directed against neoantigens and their retransduction into peripheral T cells may provide a new form of ACT.Genetic modifications of T cells with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) have demonstrated remarkable clinical results in hematologic malignancies, but are so far less effective in solid tumors. Only very limited reports exist in melanoma. Progress in CAR T-cell engineering, including neutralization of inhibitory signals or additional safety switches, may open opportunities also in melanoma.We review clinical results and latest developments of adoptive therapies with TILs, T-cell receptor, and CAR-modified T cells and discuss future directions for the treatment of melanoma.

  18. Bioluminescence Imaging of Adoptively Transferred Lymphocytes During Allogeneic Tumor Rejection.

    PubMed

    Juršėnaitė, Jurgita; Girkontaitė, Irutė; Mauricas, Mykolas; Eidukevičius, Rimantas; Šiaurys, Almantas; Characiejus, Dainius

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to analyze the survival, spatial distribution and proliferation of adoptively transferred lymphocytes in allogeneic tumor rejection. Transgenic β-actin-luc mice that express luciferase were sensitized against SL2 tumors and were used as lymphocyte donors to study the anti-tumor effect in SL2 tumor-bearing lymphocyte-deficient RAG(-/-) mice. Whole-body bioluminescence images of recipient mice were obtained to track the adoptively transferred lymphocytes. Proliferation of lymphocytes was estimated by quantification of photon emission. T lymphocytes sensitized against allogeneic SL2 tumors cured the majority of SL2 tumor-bearing RAG(-/-) mice. Bioluminescence imaging showed that transferred T lymphocytes survived in the spleen and lymph nodes. Tumor rejection was associated with lymphocyte proliferation and migration to the tumor site. Sensitized T lymphocytes from transgenic β-actin-luc mice reject allogeneic SL2 tumors in RAG(-/-) mice and can be tracked in vivo using bioluminescence imaging. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  19. Adoptive transfer of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis after in vitro treatment with recombinant murine interleukin-12. Preferential expansion of interferon-gamma-producing cells and increased expression of macrophage-associated inducible nitric oxide synthase as immunomodulatory mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Waldburger, K. E.; Hastings, R. C.; Schaub, R. G.; Goldman, S. J.; Leonard, J. P.

    1996-01-01

    In an adoptive transfer model of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis, stimulation of lymph node cells with proteolipid protein and recombinant murine interleukin (rmIL)-12 before cell transfer accelerated the onset and exacerbates clinical disease. In vitro stimulation with proteolipid protein in the presence of rmIL-12 was associated with an increase in interferon-gamma-producing cells and a decrease in IL-4-producing cells, indicating a preferential expansion of Th1 effector cells. This was supported by the finding that severe disease with rapid onset could be transferred with as few as 10 x 10(6) rmIL-12-stimulated lymph node cells. Immunohistochemical analysis confirmed that the accelerated onset of disease after in vitro stimulation with rmIL-12 coincided with an acute inflammatory response in the central nervous system. At peak disease, both control and rmIL-12 treatment groups exhibited extensive cellular infiltration with characteristic perivascular cuffing. No notable differences in either the cellular composition or cytokine expression within the lesions were seen between groups. However, the frequency of macrophages that stained positively for inducible nitric oxide synthase was increased in animals challenged with rmIL-12-treated lymph node cells. The results suggest that, in addition to promoting the preferential expansion of interferon-gamma-producing cells by rmIL-12 in vitro, secondary in vivo effects leading to macrophage activation and inducible nitric oxide synthase expression may contribute to the severe and protracted course of central nervous system inflammation in this model. Images Figure 2 PMID:8579100

  20. Immunologic Memory Induced by a Glycoconjugate Vaccine in a Murine Adoptive Lymphocyte Transfer Model

    PubMed Central

    Guttormsen, Hilde-Kari; Wetzler, Lee M.; Finberg, Robert W.; Kasper, Dennis L.

    1998-01-01

    We have developed an adoptive cell transfer model in mice to study the ability of a glycoprotein conjugate vaccine to induce immunologic memory for the polysaccharide moiety. We used type III capsular polysaccharide from the clinically relevant pathogen group B streptococci conjugated to tetanus toxoid (GBSIII-TT) as our model vaccine. GBS are a major cause of neonatal infections in humans, and type-specific antibodies to the capsular polysaccharide protect against invasive disease. Adoptive transfer of splenocytes from mice immunized with the GBSIII-TT conjugate vaccine conferred anti-polysaccharide immunologic memory to naive recipient mice. The transfer of memory occurred in a dose-dependent manner. The observed anamnestic immune response was characterized by (i) more rapid kinetics, (ii) isotype switching from immunoglobulin M (IgM) to IgG, and (iii) 10-fold-higher levels of type III-specific IgG antibody than for the primary response in animals with cells transferred from placebo-immunized mice. The adoptive cell transfer model described in this paper can be used for at least two purposes: (i) to evaluate conjugate vaccines with different physicochemical properties for their ability to induce immunologic memory and (ii) to study the cellular interactions required for an immune response to these molecules. PMID:9573085

  1. Adoptive transfer of gut intraepithelial lymphocytes protects against murine infection with Toxoplasma gondii.

    PubMed

    Buzoni-Gatel, D; Lepage, A C; Dimier-Poisson, I H; Bout, D T; Kasper, L H

    1997-06-15

    Intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL) of the gut represent a primary immune barrier against infection by orally acquired pathogens. Naturally acquired infection with Toxoplasma gondii induces the proliferation of CD8+ T cells in both the gut and spleen. Gut-derived CD8alpha/beta+ IEL exhibit MHC-restricted cytotoxicity against parasite-infected enterocytes and macrophages. In a murine model, we demonstrate that the adoptive transfer of IEL obtained from inbred mice at day 11 postinfection is able to protect against a virulent challenge in syngenic recipients. In CBA mice, the parasite cyst load within the brain of the recipients receiving primed IEL was reduced by 90%. In BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice, a 50% decrease in mortality was observed following adoptive transfer of primed IEL. To determine the T cell subset responsible for protective immunity, a purified CD8alpha/beta+ IEL population was isolated from infected mice at day 11 postinfection. These cells were able to protect naive mice by adoptive transfer against a lethal parasite challenge. RNA analysis by reverse-transcriptase PCR revealed that primed CD8alpha/beta+ IEL produce significant message for IFN-gamma, an essential cytokine for host protection against toxoplasmosis. Administration of anti-IFN-gamma at the time of adoptive transfer of primed IEL abrogated protection. The adoptive transfer of these protective IEL was not restricted to the Ld class I locus. These data demonstrate that IFN-gamma-producing IEL may be an important primary barrier against acute and perhaps recurrent infection with T. gondii.

  2. Sodium Benzoate, a Food Additive and a Metabolite of Cinnamon, Modifies T Cells at Multiple Steps and Inhibits Adoptive Transfer of Experimental Allergic Encephalomyelitis1

    PubMed Central

    Brahmachari, Saurav; Pahan, Kalipada

    2007-01-01

    Experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) is the animal model for multiple sclerosis. This study explores a novel use of sodium benzoate (NaB), a commonly used food additive and a Food and Drug Administration-approved nontoxic drug for urea cycle disorders, in treating the disease process of relapsing-remitting EAE in female SJL/J mice. NaB, administered through drinking water at physiologically tolerable doses, ameliorated clinical symptoms and disease progression of EAE in recipient mice and suppressed the generation of encephalitogenic T cells in donor mice. Histological studies reveal that NaB effectively inhibited infiltration of mononuclear cells and demyelination in the spinal cord of EAE mice. Consequently, NaB also suppressed the expression of proinflammatory molecules and normalized myelin gene expression in the CNS of EAE mice. Furthermore, we observed that NaB switched the differentiation of myelin basic protein-primed T cells from Th1 to Th2 mode, enriched regulatory T cell population, and down-regulated the expression of various contact molecules in T cells. Taken together, our results suggest that NaB modifies encephalitogenic T cells at multiple steps and that NaB may have therapeutic importance in multiple sclerosis. PMID:17579047

  3. Adoptive T cell immunotherapy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Perica, Karlo; Varela, Juan Carlos; Oelke, Mathias; Schneck, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Harnessing the immune system to recognize and destroy tumor cells has been the central goal of anti-cancer immunotherapy. In recent years, there has been an increased interest in optimizing this technology in order to make it a clinically feasible treatment. One of the main treatment modalities within cancer immunotherapy has been adoptive T cell therapy (ACT). Using this approach, tumor-specific cytotoxic T cells are infused into cancer patients with the goal of recognizing, targeting, and destroying tumor cells. In the current review, we revisit some of the major successes of ACT, the major hurdles that have been overcome to optimize ACT, the remaining challenges, and future approaches to make ACT widely available.

  4. [Adoption].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pawl, Jeree, Ed.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue addresses adoption and the young child's life. Contributors suggest ways in which practitioners in many professions and settings can better understand and support adoptive families. The first article, "Adoption, 1990" by Barbara F. Nordhaus and Albert J. Solnit, reviews the history of adoption and notes obstacles to…

  5. PET imaging of adoptive progenitor cell therapies.

    SciTech Connect

    Gelovani, Juri G.

    2008-05-13

    Objectives. The overall objective of this application is to develop novel technologies for non-invasive imaging of adoptive stem cell-based therapies with positron emission tomography (PET) that would be applicable to human patients. To achieve this objective, stem cells will be genetically labeled with a PET-reporter gene and repetitively imaged to assess their distribution, migration, differentiation, and persistence using a radiolabeled reporter probe. This new imaging technology will be tested in adoptive progenitor cell-based therapy models in animals, including: delivery pro-apoptotic genes to tumors, and T-cell reconstitution for immunostimulatory therapy during allogeneic bone marrow progenitor cell transplantation. Technical and Scientific Merits. Non-invasive whole body imaging would significantly aid in the development and clinical implementation of various adoptive progenitor cell-based therapies by providing the means for non-invasive monitoring of the fate of injected progenitor cells over a long period of observation. The proposed imaging approaches could help to address several questions related to stem cell migration and homing, their long-term viability, and their subsequent differentiation. The ability to image these processes non-invasively in 3D and repetitively over a long period of time is very important and will help the development and clinical application of various strategies to control and direct stem cell migration and differentiation. Approach to accomplish the work. Stem cells will be genetically with a reporter gene which will allow for repetitive non-invasive “tracking” of the migration and localization of genetically labeled stem cells and their progeny. This is a radically new approach that is being developed for future human applications and should allow for a long term (many years) repetitive imaging of the fate of tissues that develop from the transplanted stem cells. Why the approach is appropriate. The novel approach to

  6. The Presence and Preferential Activation of Regulatory T Cells Diminish Adoptive Transfer of Autoimmune Diabetes by Polyclonal Nonobese Diabetic (NOD) T Cell Effectors into NSG versus NOD-scid Mice.

    PubMed

    Presa, Maximiliano; Chen, Yi-Guang; Grier, Alexandra E; Leiter, Edward H; Brehm, Michael A; Greiner, Dale L; Shultz, Leonard D; Serreze, David V

    2015-10-01

    NOD-scid.Il2rg(null) (NSG) mice are currently being used as recipients to screen for pathogenic autoreactive T cells in type 1 diabetes (T1D) patients. We questioned whether the restriction of IL-2R γ-chain (Il-2rγ)-dependent cytokine signaling only to donor cells in NSG recipients differently influenced the activities of transferred diabetogenic T cells when they were introduced as a monoclonal/oligoclonal population versus being part of a polyclonal repertoire. Unexpectedly, a significantly decreased T1D transfer by splenocytes from prediabetic NOD donors was observed in Il-2rγ(null)-NSG versus Il-2rγ-intact standard NOD-scid recipients. In contrast, NOD-derived monoclonal/oligoclonal TCR transgenic β cell-autoreactive T cells in either the CD8 (AI4, NY8.3) or CD4 (BDC2.5) compartments transferred disease significantly more rapidly to NSG than to NOD-scid recipients. The reduced diabetes transfer efficiency by polyclonal T cells in NSG recipients was associated with enhanced activation of regulatory T cells (Tregs) mediated by NSG myeloid APC. This enhanced suppressor activity was associated with higher levels of Treg GITR expression in the presence of NSG than NOD-scid APC. These collective results indicate NSG recipients might be efficiently employed to test the activity of T1D patient-derived β cell-autoreactive T cell clones and lines, but, when screening for pathogenic effectors within polyclonal populations, Tregs should be removed from the transfer inoculum to avoid false-negative results.

  7. Testing safety of germinated rye sourdough in a celiac disease model based on the adoptive transfer of prolamin-primed memory T cells into lymphopenic mice.

    PubMed

    Freitag, Tobias L; Loponen, Jussi; Messing, Marcel; Zevallos, Victor; Andersson, Leif C; Sontag-Strohm, Tuula; Saavalainen, Päivi; Schuppan, Detlef; Salovaara, Hannu; Meri, Seppo

    2014-03-01

    The current treatment for celiac disease is strict gluten-free diet. Technical processing may render gluten-containing foods safe for consumption by celiac patients, but so far in vivo safety testing can only be performed on patients. We modified a celiac disease mouse model to test antigenicity and inflammatory effects of germinated rye sourdough, a food product characterized by extensive prolamin hydrolysis. Lymphopenic Rag1-/- or nude mice were injected with splenic CD4+CD62L-CD44high-memory T cells from gliadin- or secalin-immunized wild-type donor mice. We found that: 1) Rag1-/- recipients challenged with wheat or rye gluten lost more body weight and developed more severe histological duodenitis than mice on gluten-free diet. This correlated with increased secretion of IFNγ, IL-2, and IL-17 by secalin-restimulated splenocytes. 2) In vitro gluten testing using competitive R5 ELISA demonstrated extensive degradation of the gluten R5 epitope in germinated rye sourdough. 3) However, in nude recipients challenged with germinated rye sourdough (vs. native rye sourdough), serum anti-secalin IgG/CD4+ T helper 1-associated IgG2c titers were only reduced, but not eliminated. In addition, there were no reductions in body weight loss, histological duodenitis, or T cell cytokine secretion in Rag1-/- recipients challenged accordingly. 1) prolamin-primed CD4+CD62L-CD44high-memory T cells induce gluten-sensitive enteropathy in Rag1-/- mice. 2) Hydrolysis of secalins in germinated rye sourdough remains incomplete. Secalin peptides retain B and T cell stimulatory capacity and remain harmful to the intestinal mucosa in this celiac disease model. 3) Current antibody-based prolamin detection methods may fail to detect antigenic gluten fragments in processed cereal food products.

  8. Adoption

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Adoption It's natural for any adopted person, child or adult, to have complex feelings about being adopted. It's also natural to feel that "my parents are my parents" and not feel a desire to seek out more information about the identity of the birth family. Most of us (whether ...

  9. The immunosuppressive effects of phthalocyanine photodynamic therapy in mice are mediated by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and can be adoptively transferred to naïve recipients

    PubMed Central

    Yusuf, Nabiha; Katiyar, Santosh K; Elmets, Craig A

    2013-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising treatment modality for malignant tumors but it is also immunosuppressive which may reduce its therapeutic efficacy. The purpose of our study was to elucidate the role of CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells in PDT immunosuppression. Using silicon phthalocyanine 4 (Pc4) as photosensitizer, non-tumor bearing CD4 knockout (CD4−/−) mice and their wild type (WT) counterparts were subjected to Pc4-PDT in a manner identical to that used for tumor regression (1 cm spot size, 0.5 mg/kg Pc4, 110 J/cm2 light) to assess the effect of Pc4-PDT on cell-mediated immunity. There was a decrease in immunosuppression in CD4−/− mice as compared to WT mice. We next examined the role of CD8+ T-cells in Pc4-PDT induced immunosuppression using CD8−/− mice following the same treatment regimen used for CD4−/− mice. Similar to CD4−/− mice, CD8−/− mice exhibited less immunosuppression than WT mice. Pc4-PDT induced immunosuppression could be adoptively transferred with spleen cells from Pc4-PDT treated donor mice to syngenic naive recipients (p<0.05) and was mediated primarily by T cells, although macrophages were also found to play a role. Procedures that limit PDT induced immunosuppression but do not affect PDT induced regression of tumors may prove superior to PDT alone in promoting long term anti-tumor responses. PMID:18208456

  10. Regulation and Maintenance of an Adoptive T-Cell Dependent Memory B Cell Pool.

    PubMed

    Anson, Marie; Amado, Inês; Mailhé, Marie-Pierre; Donnadieu, Emmanuel; Garcia, Sylvie; Huetz, François; Freitas, Antonio A

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the ability of monoclonal B cells to restore primary and secondary T-cell dependent antibody responses in adoptive immune-deficient hosts. Priming induced B cell activation and expansion, AID expression, antibody production and the generation of IgM+IgG- and IgM-IgG+ antigen-experienced B-cell subsets that persisted in the lymphopenic environment by cell division. Upon secondary transfer and recall the IgM-IgG+ cells responded by the production of antigen-specific IgG while the IgM+ memory cells secreted mainly IgM and little IgG, but generated new B cells expressing germinal center markers. The recall responses were more efficient if the antigenic boost was delayed suggesting that a period of adaptation is necessary before the transferred cells are able to respond. Overall these findings indicate that reconstitution of a functional and complete memory pool requires transfer of all different antigen-experienced B cell subsets. We also found that the size of the memory B cell pool did not rely on the number of the responding naïve B cells, suggesting autonomous homeostatic controls for naïve and memory B cells. By reconstituting a stable memory B cell pool in immune-deficient hosts using a monoclonal high-affinity B cell population we demonstrate the potential value of B cell adoptive immunotherapy.

  11. Regulation and Maintenance of an Adoptive T-Cell Dependent Memory B Cell Pool

    PubMed Central

    Anson, Marie; Amado, Inês; Mailhé, Marie-Pierre; Donnadieu, Emmanuel; Garcia, Sylvie; Huetz, François; Freitas, Antonio A.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the ability of monoclonal B cells to restore primary and secondary T-cell dependent antibody responses in adoptive immune-deficient hosts. Priming induced B cell activation and expansion, AID expression, antibody production and the generation of IgM+IgG- and IgM-IgG+ antigen-experienced B-cell subsets that persisted in the lymphopenic environment by cell division. Upon secondary transfer and recall the IgM-IgG+ cells responded by the production of antigen-specific IgG while the IgM+ memory cells secreted mainly IgM and little IgG, but generated new B cells expressing germinal center markers. The recall responses were more efficient if the antigenic boost was delayed suggesting that a period of adaptation is necessary before the transferred cells are able to respond. Overall these findings indicate that reconstitution of a functional and complete memory pool requires transfer of all different antigen-experienced B cell subsets. We also found that the size of the memory B cell pool did not rely on the number of the responding naïve B cells, suggesting autonomous homeostatic controls for naïve and memory B cells. By reconstituting a stable memory B cell pool in immune-deficient hosts using a monoclonal high-affinity B cell population we demonstrate the potential value of B cell adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:27880797

  12. New Cell Sources for T Cell Engineering and Adoptive Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Themeli, Maria; Rivière, Isabelle; Sadelain, Michel

    2017-01-01

    The promising clinical results obtained with engineered T cells, including chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) therapy, call for further advancements to facilitate and broaden their applicability. One potentially beneficial innovation is to exploit new T cell sources that reduce the need for autologous cell manufacturing and enable cell transfer across histocompatibility barriers. Here we review emerging T cell engineering approaches that utilize alternative T cell sources, which include virus-specific or T cell receptor-less allogeneic T cells, expanded lymphoid progenitors, and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived T lymphocytes. The latter offer the prospect for true off-the-shelf, genetically enhanced, histocompatible cell therapy products. PMID:25842976

  13. Adoption

    MedlinePlus

    ... biological families) and where they came from. This curiosity often becomes more intense as part of the ... adoptive family or feel close to them. This curiosity, which can feel quite intense, is a normal ...

  14. Efficacy of systemic adoptive transfer immunotherapy targeting NY-ESO-1 for glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Everson, Richard G.; Antonios, Joseph P.; Lisiero, Dominique N.; Soto, Horacio; Scharnweber, Rudi; Garrett, Matthew C.; Yong, William H.; Li, Ning; Li, Gang; Kruse, Carol A.; Liau, Linda M.; Prins, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Immunotherapy is an ideal treatment modality to specifically target the diffusely infiltrative tumor cells of malignant gliomas while sparing the normal brain parenchyma. However, progress in the development of these therapies for glioblastoma has been slow due to the lack of immunogenic antigen targets that are expressed uniformly and selectively by gliomas. Methods We utilized human glioblastoma cell cultures to induce expression of New York–esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (NY-ESO-1) following in vitro treatment with the demethylating agent decitabine. We then investigated the phenotype of lymphocytes specific for NY-ESO-1 using flow cytometry analysis and cytotoxicity against cells treated with decitabine using the xCelligence real-time cytotoxicity assay. Finally, we examined the in vivo application of this immune therapy using an intracranially implanted xenograft model for in situ T cell trafficking, survival, and tissue studies. Results Our studies showed that treatment of intracranial glioma–bearing mice with decitabine reliably and consistently induced the expression of an immunogenic tumor-rejection antigen, NY-ESO-1, specifically in glioma cells and not in normal brain tissue. The upregulation of NY-ESO-1 by intracranial gliomas was associated with the migration of adoptively transferred NY-ESO-1–specific lymphocytes along white matter tracts to these tumors in the brain. Similarly, NY-ESO-1–specific adoptive T cell therapy demonstrated antitumor activity after decitabine treatment and conferred a highly significant survival benefit to mice bearing established intracranial human glioma xenografts. Transfer of NY-ESO-1–specific T cells systemically was superior to intracranial administration and resulted in significantly extended and long-term survival of animals. Conclusion These results reveal an innovative, clinically feasible strategy for the treatment of glioblastoma. PMID:26330563

  15. Efficacy of systemic adoptive transfer immunotherapy targeting NY-ESO-1 for glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Everson, Richard G; Antonios, Joseph P; Lisiero, Dominique N; Soto, Horacio; Scharnweber, Rudi; Garrett, Matthew C; Yong, William H; Li, Ning; Li, Gang; Kruse, Carol A; Liau, Linda M; Prins, Robert M

    2016-03-01

    Immunotherapy is an ideal treatment modality to specifically target the diffusely infiltrative tumor cells of malignant gliomas while sparing the normal brain parenchyma. However, progress in the development of these therapies for glioblastoma has been slow due to the lack of immunogenic antigen targets that are expressed uniformly and selectively by gliomas. We utilized human glioblastoma cell cultures to induce expression of New York-esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (NY-ESO-1) following in vitro treatment with the demethylating agent decitabine. We then investigated the phenotype of lymphocytes specific for NY-ESO-1 using flow cytometry analysis and cytotoxicity against cells treated with decitabine using the xCelligence real-time cytotoxicity assay. Finally, we examined the in vivo application of this immune therapy using an intracranially implanted xenograft model for in situ T cell trafficking, survival, and tissue studies. Our studies showed that treatment of intracranial glioma-bearing mice with decitabine reliably and consistently induced the expression of an immunogenic tumor-rejection antigen, NY-ESO-1, specifically in glioma cells and not in normal brain tissue. The upregulation of NY-ESO-1 by intracranial gliomas was associated with the migration of adoptively transferred NY-ESO-1-specific lymphocytes along white matter tracts to these tumors in the brain. Similarly, NY-ESO-1-specific adoptive T cell therapy demonstrated antitumor activity after decitabine treatment and conferred a highly significant survival benefit to mice bearing established intracranial human glioma xenografts. Transfer of NY-ESO-1-specific T cells systemically was superior to intracranial administration and resulted in significantly extended and long-term survival of animals. These results reveal an innovative, clinically feasible strategy for the treatment of glioblastoma. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Neuro

  16. Overcoming unresponsiveness in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) resistant mouse strains by adoptive transfer and antigenic challenge.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Michael K; Zhao, Xiao-qing; Tse, Harley Y

    2012-04-09

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is an inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS) and has been used as an animal model for study of the human demyelinating disease, multiple sclerosis (MS). EAE is characterized by pathologic infiltration of mononuclear cells into the CNS and by clinical manifestation of paralytic disease. Similar to MS, EAE is also under genetic control in that certain mouse strains are susceptible to disease induction while others are resistant. Typically, C57BL/6 (H-2(b)) mice immunized with myelin basic protein (MBP) fail to develop paralytic signs. This unresponsiveness is certainly not due to defects in antigen processing or antigen presentation of MBP, as an experimental protocol described here had been used to induce severe EAE in C57BL/6 mice as well as other reputed resistant mouse strains. In addition, encephalitogenic T cell clones from C57BL/6 and Balb/c mice reactive to MBP had been successfully isolated and propagated. The experimental protocol involves using a cellular adoptive transfer system in which MBP-primed (200 μg/mouse) C57BL/6 donor lymph node cells are isolated and cultured for five days with the antigen to expand the pool of MBP-specific T cells. At the end of the culture period, 50 million viable cells are transferred into naive syngeneic recipients through the tail vein. Recipient mice so treated normally do not develop EAE, thus reaffirming their resistant status, and they can remain normal indefinitely. Ten days post cell transfer, recipient mice are challenged with complete Freund adjuvant (CFA)-emulsified MBP in four sites in the flanks. Severe EAE starts to develop in these mice ten to fourteen days after challenge. Results showed that the induction of disease was antigenic specific as challenge with irrelevant antigens did not induce clinical signs of disease. Significantly, a titration of the antigen dose used to challenge the recipient mice showed that it could be as low as 5

  17. BET bromodomain inhibition enhances T cell persistence and function in adoptive immunotherapy models

    PubMed Central

    Kagoya, Yuki; Nakatsugawa, Munehide; Yamashita, Yuki; Ochi, Toshiki; Guo, Tingxi; Anczurowski, Mark; Saso, Kayoko; Butler, Marcus O.; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy is a potentially curative therapeutic approach for patients with advanced cancer. However, the in vitro expansion of antitumor T cells prior to infusion inevitably incurs differentiation towards effector T cells and impairs persistence following adoptive transfer. Epigenetic profiles regulate gene expression of key transcription factors over the course of immune cell differentiation, proliferation, and function. Using comprehensive screening of chemical probes with defined epigenetic targets, we found that JQ1, an inhibitor of bromodomain and extra-terminal motif (BET) proteins, maintained CD8+ T cells with functional properties of stem cell–like and central memory T cells. Mechanistically, the BET protein BRD4 directly regulated expression of the transcription factor BATF in CD8+ T cells, which was associated with differentiation of T cells into an effector memory phenotype. JQ1-treated T cells showed enhanced persistence and antitumor effects in murine T cell receptor and chimeric antigen receptor gene therapy models. Furthermore, we found that histone acetyltransferase p300 supported the recruitment of BRD4 to the BATF promoter region, and p300 inhibition similarly augmented antitumor effects of the adoptively transferred T cells. These results demonstrate that targeting the BRD4-p300 signaling cascade supports the generation of superior antitumor T cell grafts for adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:27548527

  18. Transient stimulation expands superior antitumor T cells for adoptive therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kagoya, Yuki; Nakatsugawa, Munehide; Ochi, Toshiki; Guo, Tingxi; Anczurowski, Mark; Saso, Kayoko; Butler, Marcus O.

    2017-01-01

    Adoptive cell therapy is a potentially curative therapeutic approach for patients with cancer. In this treatment modality, antitumor T cells are exponentially expanded in vitro prior to infusion. Importantly, the results of recent clinical trials suggest that the quality of expanded T cells critically affects their therapeutic efficacy. Although anti-CD3 mAb-based stimulation is widely used to expand T cells in vitro, a protocol to generate T cell grafts for optimal adoptive therapy has yet to be established. In this study, we investigated the differences between T cell stimulation mediated by anti–CD3/CD28 mAb–coated beads and cell-based artificial antigen-presenting cells (aAPCs) expressing CD3/CD28 counter-receptors. We found that transient stimulation with cell-based aAPCs, but not prolonged stimulation with beads, resulted in the superior expansion of CD8+ T cells. Transiently stimulated CD8+ T cells maintained a stem cell–like memory phenotype and were capable of secreting multiple cytokines significantly more efficiently than chronically stimulated T cells. Importantly, the chimeric antigen receptor–engineered antitumor CD8+ T cells expanded via transient stimulation demonstrated superior persistence and antitumor responses in adoptive immunotherapy mouse models. These results suggest that restrained stimulation is critical for generating T cell grafts for optimal adoptive immunotherapy for cancer. PMID:28138559

  19. Adoptive T-cell therapy for cancer: The era of engineered T cells.

    PubMed

    Bonini, Chiara; Mondino, Anna

    2015-09-01

    Tumors originate from a number of genetic events that deregulate homeostatic mechanisms controlling normal cell behavior. The immune system, devoted to patrol the organism against pathogenic events, can identify transformed cells, and in several cases cause their elimination. It is however clear that several mechanisms encompassing both central and peripheral tolerance limit antitumor immunity, often resulting into progressive diseases. Adoptive T-cell therapy with either allogeneic or autologous T cells can transfer therapeutic immunity. To date, genetic engineering of T cells appears to be a powerful tool for shaping tumor immunity. In this review, we discuss the most recent achievements in the areas of suicide gene therapy, and TCR-modified T cells and chimeric antigen receptor gene-modified T cells. We provide an overview of current strategies aimed at improving the safety and efficacy of these approaches, with an outlook on prospective developments. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Exploiting cytokines in adoptive T-cell therapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    Petrozziello, Elisabetta; Sturmheit, Tabea; Mondino, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy with tumor-reactive autologous T cells, either expanded from tumor specimens or genetically engineered to express tumor-reactive T-cell receptors and chimeric antigen receptors, is holding promising results in clinical trials. Several critical issues have been identified and results underline the possibility to exploit cytokines to further ameliorate the efficacy of current treatment protocols, also encompassing adoptive T-cell therapy. Here we review latest developments on the use of cytokines to better direct the nature of the T-cell infusion product, T-cell function and persistence in vivo, as well as to modulate the tumor microenvironment.

  1. Post-transplant adoptive T-cell immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Aqui, Nicole A.; June, Carl H.

    2008-01-01

    Immune reconstitution following haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT) is an often slow and incomplete process that leads to increased risk of infection and malignant disease. Immunization in SCT is frequently unsuccessful due to the prolonged lymphopenia, especially of CD4 T cells, seen following transplant. The transfusion of T cells, also called ‘adoptive T-cell therapy’, has the potential to enhance anti-tumour and overall immunity, and augment vaccine efficacy in the post-transplant setting. Recent advances in tissue culture, cellular immunology and tumour biology are guiding new approaches to adoptive T-cell therapy. This chapter will discuss the challenges that face the field before adoptive T-cell therapy can be translated into routine clinical practice. PMID:18790452

  2. Tumor relapse prevented by combining adoptive T cell therapy with Salmonella typhimurium

    PubMed Central

    Binder, David C.; Arina, Ainhoa; Wen, Frank; Tu, Tony; Zhao, Ming; Hoffman, Robert M.; Wainwright, Derek A.; Schreiber, Hans

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We recently reported that therapeutic vaccination with live tumor antigen-producing Salmonella typhimurium rescues dysfunctional endogenous T cell responses and eradicates long-established tumors refractory to αCTLA-4 and αPD-L1 checkpoint inhibitor blockade. Here, we show that live intravenously injected or heat-killed (HK) intratumorally injected Salmonella typhimurium, even when not producing tumor antigen, synergize with adoptive T cell therapy to eradicate tumors. These data demonstrate that the combination of adoptive T cell transfer with the injection of live or dead Salmonella typhimurium is a promising approach for cancer treatment. PMID:27471609

  3. Simultaneous in vitro generation of CD8 and CD4 T cells specific to three universal tumor associated antigens of WT1, survivin and TERT and adoptive T cell transfer for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyun-Joo; Sohn, Dae-Hee; Cho, Hyun-Il; Kim, Hee-Je; Kim, Tai-Gyu

    2017-01-01

    Previously, we found that most patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) expressed at least one of the leukemic associated antigens (LAAs) WT1, survivin and TERT, and different combinations of the three LAAs predicted negative clinical outcomes. Multi-tumor antigen-specific T cells were generated to overcome antigenic variation and may be sufficient to maximize antitumoral effects. To generate triple antigen-specific (Tri)-T cells that recognize three LAAs, dendritic cells (DCs) were transfected with three tumor antigen-encoding RNAs. These DCs were used to stimulate both CD8 and CD4 T cells and to overcome the limitation of known human leukocyte antigen-restricted epitopes. The sum of the antigen-specific T cell frequencies was higher in the Tri-T cells than in the T cells that recognized a single antigen. Furthermore, the Tri-T cells were more effective against leukemic blasts that expressed all three LAAs compared with blasts that expressed one or two LAAs, suggesting a proportional correlation between IFN-γ secretion and LAA expression. Engrafted leukemic blasts in the bone marrow of mice significantly decreased in the presence of Tri-T cells. This technique represents an effective immunotherapeutic strategy in AML. PMID:28477011

  4. MUC1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes eradicate tumors when adoptively transferred in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, P; Ginardi, A R; Tinder, T L; Sterner, C J; Gendler, S J

    2001-03-01

    We have reported previously that MUC1 transgenic mice with spontaneous tumors of the pancreas (designated MET) naturally develop MHC class I-restricted, MUC1-specific CTLs as tumors progress (P. Mukherjee et al., J. Immunol., 165: 3451-3460, 2000). From these MET mice, we have isolated, expanded, and cloned naturally occurring MUC1-specific CTLs in vitro. In this report, we show that the CTL line is predominantly CD8+ T cells and expresses T-cell receptor Vbeta chains 5.1/5.2, 11, 13, and 2 and Valpha chains 2, 8.3, 3.2, and 11.1/11.2. These CTLs recognize several epitopes on the MUC1 tandem repeat with highest affinity to APGSTAPPA. The CTL clone, on the other hand, is 100% CD8+ cells and expresses a single Vbeta chain of 5.1/5.2 and Valpha2. It recognizes only the H-2Db class I-restricted epitope of MUC1, APGSTAPPA. When adoptively transferred, the CTLs were effective in eradicating MUC1-expressing injected tumor cells including mammary gland cells (C57mg) and B16 melanomas. These results suggest that MUC1-specific CTLs are capable of possibly preventing, or at least substantially delaying, MUC1-expressing tumor formation. To our knowledge, this is the first evidence that demonstrates that the naturally occurring MUC1-specific CTLs isolated from one tumor model has antitumor effects on other MUC1-expressing tumors in vivo. Therefore, our data confirm that MUC1 is an important tumor rejection antigen and can serve as a target for immunotherapy.

  5. Concise Review: Cell Therapies: The Route to Widespread Adoption

    PubMed Central

    Foley, Lucy

    2012-01-01

    We identify three dimensions with which to classify heuristically the routes to widespread adoption of cellular therapies. The first dimension is based on the relative involvement of clinicians and companies in a particular cellular therapy. The second dimension is based on cell type and consequent scale of manufacture. The third dimension classifies the therapeutic intervention as a procedure or product and has perhaps received less attention. We suggest that for those cellular therapies that require therapeutic procedures, close collaboration between companies and clinicians will reduce the time to widespread adoption. For selected cellular therapies we make predictions of the likely time to widespread adoption. PMID:23197823

  6. Sodium phenylacetate inhibits adoptive transfer of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis in SJL/J mice at multiple steps.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Subhajit; Zhou, You; Jana, Malabendu; Banik, Naren L; Pahan, Kalipada

    2003-04-01

    Experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) is the animal model for multiple sclerosis. The present study underlines the importance of sodium phenylacetate (NaPA), a drug approved for urea cycle disorders, in inhibiting the disease process of adoptively transferred EAE in female SJL/J mice at multiple steps. Myelin basic protein (MBP)-primed T cells alone induced the expression of NO synthase (iNOS) and the activation of NF-kappaB in mouse microglial cells through cell-cell contact. However, pretreatment of MBP-primed T cells with NaPA markedly inhibited its ability to induce microglial expression of iNOS and activation of NF-kappaB. Consistently, adoptive transfer of MBP-primed T cells, but not that of NaPA-pretreated MBP-primed T cells, induced the clinical symptoms of EAE in female SJL/J mice. Furthermore, MBP-primed T cells isolated from NaPA-treated donor mice were also less efficient than MBP-primed T cells isolated from normal donor mice in inducing iNOS in microglial cells and transferring EAE to recipient mice. Interestingly, clinical symptoms of EAE were much less in mice receiving NaPA through drinking water than those without NaPA. Similar to NaPA, sodium phenylbutyrate, a chemically synthesized precursor of NaPA, also inhibited the disease process of EAE. Histological and immunocytochemical analysis showed that NaPA inhibited EAE-induced spinal cord mononuclear cell invasion and normalized iNOS, nitrotyrosine, and p65 (the RelA subunit of NF-kappaB) expression within the spinal cord. Taken together, our results raise the possibility that NaPA or sodium phenylbutyrate taken through drinking water or milk may reduce the observed neuroinflammation and disease process in multiple sclerosis patients.

  7. Design of T cell receptor libraries with diverse binding properties to examine adoptive T cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Chervin, A.S.; Stone, J.D.; Soto, C.M.; Engels, B.; Schreiber, H.; Roy, E.J.; Kranz, D.M.

    2017-01-01

    Adoptive T cell therapies have shown significant promise in the treatment of cancer and viral diseases. One approach, that introduces antigen-specific T cell receptors (TCRs) into ex vivo activated T cells, is designed to overcome central tolerance mechanisms that prevent responses by endogenous T cell repertoires. Studies have suggested that use of higher affinity TCRs against class I MHC antigens could drive the activity of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, but the rules that govern the TCR binding optimal for in vivo activity are unknown. Here we describe a high-throughput platform of “reverse biochemistry” whereby a library of TCRs with a wide range of binding properties to the same antigen is introduced into T cells and adoptively transferred into mice with antigen-positive tumors. Extraction of RNA from tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes or lymphoid organs allowed high-throughput sequencing to determine which TCRs were selected in vivo. The results showed that CD8+ T cells expressing the highest affinity TCR variants were deleted in both the tumor infiltrating lymphocyte population and in peripheral lymphoid tissues. In contrast, these same high-affinity TCR variants were preferentially expressed within CD4+ T cells in the tumor, suggesting they played a role in antigen-specific tumor control. The findings thus revealed that the affinity of the transduced TCRs controlled the survival and tumor infiltration of the transferred T cells. Accordingly, the TCR library strategy enables rapid assessment of TCR binding properties that promote peripheral T cell survival and tumor elimination. PMID:23052828

  8. Mechanisms of action of cannabidiol in adoptively transferred experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    González-García, Coral; Torres, Irene Moreno; García-Hernández, Ruth; Campos-Ruíz, Lucía; Esparragoza, Luis Rodríguez; Coronado, María José; Grande, Aranzazu García; García-Merino, Antonio; Sánchez López, Antonio J

    2017-09-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is one of the most important compounds in Cannabis sativa, lacks psychotropic effects, and possesses a high number of therapeutic properties including the amelioration of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). The aim of this study was to analyse the relative efficacy of CBD in adoptively transferred EAE (at-EAE), a model that allows better delineation of the effector phase of EAE. Splenocytes and lymph nodes from mice with actively induced EAE were cultured in the presence of MOG35-55 and IL-12 and inoculated intraperitoneally in recipient female C57BL/6J mice. The effects of CBD were evaluated using clinical scores and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In the central nervous system, the extent of cell infiltration, axonal damage, demyelination, microglial activation and cannabinoid receptors expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Lymph cell viability, apoptosis, oxidative stress and IL-6 production were measured in vitro. Preventive intraperitoneal treatment with CBD ameliorated the clinical signs of at-EAE, and this improvement was accompanied by a reduction of the apparent diffusion coefficient in the subiculum area of the brain. Inflammatory infiltration, axonal damage, and demyelination were reduced, and cannabinoid receptor expression was modulated. Incubation with CBD decreased encephalitogenic cell viability, increasing early apoptosis and reactive oxygen species (ROS) and decreasing IL-6 production. The reduction in viability was not mediated by CB1, CB2 or GPR55 receptors. CBD markedly improved the clinical signs of at-EAE and reduced infiltration, demyelination and axonal damage. The CBD-mediated decrease in the viability of encephalitogenic cells involves ROS generation, apoptosis and a decrease in IL-6 production and may contribute to the therapeutic effect of this compound. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Adoptive T cell therapy promotes the emergence of genomically altered tumor escape variants

    PubMed Central

    Kaluza, Karen M.; Thompson, Jill M.; Kottke, Timothy J.; Flynn Gilmer, Heather C.; Knutson, Darlene L.; Vile, Richard G.

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive T cell therapy has proven effective against melanoma in mice and humans. However, because most responses are incomplete or transient, cures remain rare. To maximize the efficacy of this therapy, it will be essential to gain a better understanding of the processes which result in tumor relapse. We studied these processes using B16ova murine melanoma and adoptive transfer of OT-I T cells. Transfer of T cells as a single therapy provided a significant survival benefit for mice with established subcutaneous tumors. However, tumors which initially regressed often recurred. By analyzing tumors which emerged in the presence of a potent OT-I response, we identified a novel tumor escape mechanism in which tumor cells evaded T cell pressure by undergoing major genomic changes involving loss of the gene encoding the target tumor antigen. Furthermore, we show that these in vivo processes can be recapitulated in vitro using T cell/tumor cell co-cultures. A single round of in vitro co-culture led to significant loss of the ova gene and a tumor cell population with rapidly induced and diverse karyotypic changes. Although these current studies focus on the model OVA antigen, the finding that T cells can directly promote genomic instability has important implications for the development of adoptive T cell therapies. PMID:21935923

  10. Adoptive transfer of skin-selective autoimmunity induced by Skn alloantigenic disparities.

    PubMed Central

    Jackman, S H; Boyse, E A; Goldberg, E H

    1992-01-01

    Two unlinked genes of the mouse, Skn-1 and Skn-2, each with alterative alleles, specify alternative cell-surface Skn alloantigens expressed only by epidermal and neural cells. C57BL/6 (B6) and A/J (A) strain mice differ at both Skn loci. Thus lethally irradiated B6 mice restored with (B6 x A)F1 hybrid hematopoietic cells [(B6 x A)/B6 chimeras] reject A strain (Skn-incompatible) skin grafts. Our studies were designed primarily to test the inference that (B6 x A)F1 lymphoid cells, after differentiating in B6 recipients, which lack the Skn alloantigens of A strain mice, may make an Skn-related, skin-selective autoimmune response when returned to their native (B6 x A)F1 habitat. Severe cutaneous lesions did, indeed, ensue after spleen cells of (B6 x A)/B6 chimeras were transferred to (B6 x A)F1 recipients, provided that three conditions were met--namely, (i) priming of the (B6 x A)/B6 chimeric donor by grafting and rejection of Skn-incompatible A strain skin grafts, (ii) stimulation of the recipient's skin as from shaving, at which sites the lesions were mainly located, and (iii) pretreatment of the (B6 x A)F1 recipients with cyclophosphamide or sublethal irradiation. Spleen cells of control female chimeras primed by grafting and rejection of H-Y (Skn-compatible) B6 male skin failed to incite the Skn-typical cutaneous lesions in (B6 x A)F1 recipients, indicating that these lesions were Skn-specific and not a nonspecific consequence of incompatible skin grafting per se. Normally compatible A strain skin grafts, but not Skn-compatible B6 skin grafts, were rejected by cyclophosphamide-treated (B6 x A)F1 recipients of (B6 x A)/B6 spleen cells from Skn-primed chimera donors. Treatment of primed chimeras' spleen cells with antiserum to H-2a (A strain) specifically abolished their capacity to adoptively incite the Skn-related autoimmune syndrome, confirming that the immune cells responsible are of (B6 x A)F1 origin and are not residual B6 derivatives. These findings add

  11. [Lymphokine-activated killer cell adoptive immunotherapy for cancer treatment and its significance].

    PubMed

    Toge, T; Yamaguchi, Y

    1992-09-01

    New culture system, CDCS-T1, was developed for clinical conduction of lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cell adoptive immunotherapy (AIT). Advanced or recurrent cancer patients of digestive tract were treated with AIT with LAK cells generated by CDCS-T1 in combination with plasma exchange. Partial responses were shown in 10 to 20% of patients treated. Long survival was found in some responders, indicating the significance of LAK therapy for cancer treatment. AIT with LAK cell transfer was also conducted in patients with esophageal cancer as postoperative adjuvant therapy. Better restoration of postoperative depression of immunological parameters was found in patients with postoperative LAK cell transfer. It is suggested that postoperative LAK cell transfer is a good candidate for adjuvant immunotherapy for cancer treatment.

  12. Adiabatic quantum-flux-parametron cell library adopting minimalist design

    SciTech Connect

    Takeuchi, Naoki; Yamanashi, Yuki; Yoshikawa, Nobuyuki

    2015-05-07

    We herein build an adiabatic quantum-flux-parametron (AQFP) cell library adopting minimalist design and a symmetric layout. In the proposed minimalist design, every logic cell is designed by arraying four types of building block cells: buffer, NOT, constant, and branch cells. Therefore, minimalist design enables us to effectively build and customize an AQFP cell library. The symmetric layout reduces unwanted parasitic magnetic coupling and ensures a large mutual inductance in an output transformer, which enables very long wiring between logic cells. We design and fabricate several logic circuits using the minimal AQFP cell library so as to test logic cells in the library. Moreover, we experimentally investigate the maximum wiring length between logic cells. Finally, we present an experimental demonstration of an 8-bit carry look-ahead adder designed using the minimal AQFP cell library and demonstrate that the proposed cell library is sufficiently robust to realize large-scale digital circuits.

  13. Adoptive transfer of macrophage from mice with depression-like behavior enhances susceptibility to colitis.

    PubMed

    Ghia, Jean-Eric; Park, Amber J; Blennerhassett, Patricia; Khan, Waliul I; Collins, Stephen M

    2011-07-01

    Depression is common in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) but the pathway is not well understood. We examined whether the locus of susceptibility to colitis in mice with depression-like behavior (DLB) resides with the macrophage and implicates the vagus nerve. Chronic colitis mimicking ulcerative colitis (UC) was induced by dextran sulfate sodium administered to C57BL/6-mice. Depression was induced by intracerebroventricular infusion of reserpine in healthy or vagotomized mice treated with antidepressant desmethylimipramine (DMI). Colitis was assessed macroscopically, histologically, and by C-reactive protein measurement in serum and by cytokines in colonic samples. Cytokine release was measured on macrophages isolated from these models. Naive macrophage colony-stimulating factor-deficient mice (op/op) were injected with peritoneal macrophages obtained from the different groups and acute colitis was induced. Vagotomy reactivated inflammation in mice with chronic colitis. DLB reactivated colitis and this was prevented by DMI only in mice with intact vagi. Macrophages isolated from vagotomized or DLB-mice showed a selective increase of proinflammatory cytokine release and this was not seen in macrophages isolated from DLB-DMI-treated mice; moreover, vagotomy abolished this beneficial effect. In op/op, adoptive transfer of macrophages from non-DLB mice significantly increased the inflammatory markers. These parameters were significantly increased when transferred with macrophages isolated from DLB or VXP mice. Op/op mice that received macrophages from DLB-DMI-treated mice showed a significant decrease of all parameters and vagotomy abolished this effect. These data identify the critical role of macrophage in linking depression and susceptibility to intestinal inflammation via the vagus nerve. The results provide a basis for developing new approaches to the management of UC patients with coexisting depression by rebalancing cytokine production by the cell

  14. Cancer treatment by photodynamic therapy combined with adoptive immunotherapy using genetically altered natural killer cell line.

    PubMed

    Korbelik, M; Sun, J

    2001-07-15

    Adoptive immunotherapy mediated by human natural killer (NK) cell line genetically altered to produce interleukin-2 (NK92MI) was evaluated as adjuvant to photodynamic therapy (PDT) of subcutaneous tumors. The combined effect of these two modalities was first examined with SiHa tumors (human cervical squamous cell carcinoma) growing in NOD-scid mice. The most effective protocol for NK92MI cell transfer in conjunction with PDT mediated by photosensitizer mTHPC was the injection of 5 x 10(7) cells (peritumoral or intravenous) given immediately after PDT, which produced a marked improvement in the therapeutic outcome compared with the effect of PDT alone. The same protocol was tested with HT-29 tumor model (human colorectal adenocarcinoma) xenografted in NOD-scid mice. The results demonstrate that the adoptive immunotherapy with NK92MI cells (which when used alone were not effective in controlling tumor growth) significantly improved the cures of PDT-treated HT-29 tumors, whereas such benefit was not observed with the parental cell line NK92 (not producing interleukin-2). Flow cytometry-based analysis revealed a higher percentage of p.t. injected NK92MI cells in PDT-treated than in non-treated HT-29 tumors. Further investigation showed that the NK92MI cell-based adoptive immunotherapy is also a highly effective adjuvant for PDT treatment of murine EMT6 tumors growing in immunocompetent syngeneic BALB/c mice. This result diminishes the concern that adoptively transferred NK92MI cells may be rendered ineffective by an allogenic reaction of the host. The findings of this study suggest that advanced protocols of NK cell-based adoptive immunotherapy can be developed as efficient adjuvants to PDT used for the treatment of solid malignant tumors. Copyright 2001 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Immunostimulatory Effects of Melphalan and Usefulness in Adoptive Cell Therapy with Antitumor CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kuczma, Michal; Ding, Zhi-Chun; Zhou, Gang

    2017-01-01

    The alkylating agent melphalan is used in the treatment of hematological malignancies, especially multiple myeloma. In the past, the usefulness of melphalan has been solely attributed to its cytotoxicity on fast-growing cancerous cells. Although the immunomodulatory effects of melphalan were suggested many years ago, only recently has this aspect of melphalan’s activity begun to be elucidated at the molecular level. Emerging evidence indicates that melphalan can foster an immunogenic microenvironment by inducing immunogenic cell death (ICD) as characterized by membrane translocation of endoplasmic reticulum protein calreticulin (CRT) and by release of chromatin-binding protein high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1). In addition, the lympho-depletive effect of melphalan can induce the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and growth factors, deplete regulatory T cells, and create space to facilitate the expansion of infused tumor-reactive T cells. These features suggest that melphalan can be used as a preparative chemotherapy for adoptive T-cell therapy. This notion is supported by our recent work demonstrating that the combination of melphalan and adoptive transfer of tumor-reactive CD4+ T cells can mediate potent antitumor effects in animal models. This review summarizes the recent advances in understanding and utilizing the immunomodulatory effects of melphalan. PMID:27910767

  16. Tumor-Residing Batf3 Dendritic Cells Are Required for Effector T Cell Trafficking and Adoptive T Cell Therapy.

    PubMed

    Spranger, Stefani; Dai, Daisy; Horton, Brendan; Gajewski, Thomas F

    2017-05-08

    Effector T cells have the capability of recognizing and killing cancer cells. However, whether tumors can become immune resistant through exclusion of effector T cells from the tumor microenvironment is not known. By using a tumor model resembling non-T cell-inflamed human tumors, we assessed whether adoptivecell transfer might overcome failed spontaneous priming. Flow cytometric assays combined with intra-vital imaging indicated failed trafficking of effector T cells into tumors. Mechanistically, this was due to the absence of CXCL9/10, which we found to be produced by CD103(+) dendritic cells (DCs) in T cell-inflamed tumors. Our data indicate that lack of CD103(+) DCs within the tumor microenvironment dominantly resists the effector phase of an anti-tumor T cell response, contributing to immune escape. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection by adoptive immunotherapy. Requirement for T cell-deficient recipients

    SciTech Connect

    Orme, I.M.; Collins, F.M.

    1983-07-01

    The results of this study demonstrate that spleen cells taken from mice at the height of the primary immune response to intravenous infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis possess the capacity to transfer adoptive protection to M. tuberculosis-infected recipients, but only if these recipients are first rendered T cell-deficient, either by thymectomy and gamma irradiation, or by sublethal irradiation. A similar requirement was necessary to demonstrate the adoptive protection of the lungs after exposure to an acute aerosol-delivered M. tuberculosis infection. In both infectious models successful adoptive immunotherapy was shown to be mediated by T lymphocytes, which were acquired in the donor animals in response to the immunizing infection. It is proposed that the results of this study may serve as a basic model for the subsequent analysis of the nature of the T cell-mediated immune response to both systemic and aerogenic infections with M. tuberculosis.

  18. Randomized, Prospective Evaluation Comparing Intensity of Lymphodepletion Before Adoptive Transfer of Tumor-Infiltrating Lymphocytes for Patients With Metastatic Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Dudley, Mark E.; Citrin, Deborah E.; Somerville, Robert P.; Wunderlich, John R.; Danforth, David N.; Zlott, Daniel A.; Yang, James C.; Sherry, Richard M.; Kammula, Udai S.; Klebanoff, Christopher A.; Hughes, Marybeth S.; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Langhan, Michelle M.; Shelton, Thomas E.; Lu, Lily; Kwong, Mei Li M.; Ilyas, Sadia; Klemen, Nicholas D.; Payabyab, Eden C.; Morton, Kathleen E.; Toomey, Mary Ann; Steinberg, Seth M.; White, Donald E.; Rosenberg, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Adoptive cell transfer, the infusion of large numbers of activated autologous lymphocytes, can mediate objective tumor regression in a majority of patients with metastatic melanoma (52 of 93; 56%). Addition and intensification of total body irradiation (TBI) to the preparative lymphodepleting chemotherapy regimen in sequential trials improved objective partial and complete response (CR) rates. Here, we evaluated the importance of adding TBI to the adoptive transfer of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) in a randomized fashion. Patients and Methods A total of 101 patients with metastatic melanoma, including 76 patients with M1c disease, were randomly assigned to receive nonmyeloablative chemotherapy with or without 1,200 cGy TBI before transfer of tumor-infiltrating lymphcytes. Primary end points were CR rate (as defined by Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors v1.0) and overall survival (OS). Clinical and laboratory data were analyzed for correlates of response. Results CR rates were 24% in both groups (12 of 50 v 12 of 51), and OS was also similar (median OS, 38.2 v 36.6 months; hazard ratio, 1.11; 95% CI, 0.65 to 1.91; P = .71). Thrombotic microangiopathy was an adverse event unique to the TBI arm and occurred in 13 of 48 treated patients. With a median potential follow-up of 40.9 months, only one of 24 patients who achieved a CR recurred. Conclusion Adoptive cell transfer can mediate durable complete regressions in 24% of patients with metastatic melanoma, with median survival > 3 years. Results were similar using chemotherapy preparative regimens with or without addition of TBI. PMID:27217459

  19. Anti-Tumor Effects after Adoptive Transfer of IL-12 Transposon-Modified Murine Splenocytes in the OT-I-Melanoma Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Galvan, Daniel L; O'Neil, Richard T; Foster, Aaron E; Huye, Leslie; Bear, Adham; Rooney, Cliona M; Wilson, Matthew H

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of gene modified T cells provides possible immunotherapy for patients with cancers refractory to other treatments. We have previously used the non-viral piggyBac transposon system to gene modify human T cells for potential immunotherapy. However, these previous studies utilized adoptive transfer of modified human T cells to target cancer xenografts in highly immunodeficient (NOD-SCID) mice that do not recapitulate an intact immune system. Currently, only viral vectors have shown efficacy in permanently gene-modifying mouse T cells for immunotherapy applications. Therefore, we sought to determine if piggyBac could effectively gene modify mouse T cells to target cancer cells in a mouse cancer model. We first demonstrated that we could gene modify cells to express murine interleukin-12 (p35/p40 mIL-12), a transgene with proven efficacy in melanoma immunotherapy. The OT-I melanoma mouse model provides a well-established T cell mediated immune response to ovalbumin (OVA) positive B16 melanoma cells. B16/OVA melanoma cells were implanted in wild type C57Bl6 mice. Mouse splenocytes were isolated from C57Bl6 OT-I mice and were gene modified using piggyBac to express luciferase. Adoptive transfer of luciferase-modified OT-I splenocytes demonstrated homing to B16/OVA melanoma tumors in vivo. We next gene-modified OT-I cells to express mIL-12. Adoptive transfer of mIL-12-modified mouse OT-I splenocytes delayed B16/OVA melanoma tumor growth in vivo compared to control OT-I splenocytes and improved mouse survival. Our results demonstrate that the piggyBac transposon system can be used to gene modify splenocytes and mouse T cells for evaluating adoptive immunotherapy strategies in immunocompetent mouse tumor models that may more directly mimic immunotherapy applications in humans.

  20. Generation of T cell effectors using tumor cell-loaded dendritic cells for adoptive T cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Vavrova, Katerina; Vrabcova, Petra; Filipp, Dominik; Bartunkova, Jirina; Horvath, Rudolf

    2016-12-01

    Adoptive T cell transfer has been shown to be an effective method used to boost tumor-specific immune responses in several types of malignancies. In this study, we set out to optimize the ACT protocol for the experimental treatment of prostate cancer. The protocol includes a pre-stimulation step whereby T cells were primed with autologous dendritic cells loaded with the high hydrostatic pressure-treated prostate cancer cell line, LNCaP. Primed T cells were further expanded in vitro with anti-CD3/CD28 Dynabeads in the WAVE bioreactor 2/10 system and tested for cytotoxicity. Our data indicates that the combination of pre-stimulation and expansion steps resulted in the induction and enrichment of tumor-responsive CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells at clinically relevant numbers. The majority of both CD4(+) and CD8(+) IFN-γ producing cells were CD62L, CCR7 and CD57 negative but CD28 and CD27 positive, indicating an early antigen experienced phenotype in non-terminal differentiation phase. Expanded T cells showed significantly greater cytotoxicity against LNCaP cells compared to the control SKOV-3, an ovarian cancer line. In summary, our results suggest that the ACT approach together with LNCaP-loaded dendritic cells provides a viable way to generate prostate cancer reactive T cell effectors that are capable of mounting efficient and targeted antitumor responses and can be thus considered for further testing in a clinical setting.

  1. CMV-Specific CD8 T Cell Differentiation and Localization: Implications for Adoptive Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Corinne J.; Quinn, Michael; Snyder, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a ubiquitous virus that causes chronic infection and, thus, is one of the most common infectious complications of immune suppression. Adoptive transfer of HCMV-specific T cells has emerged as an effective method to reduce the risk for HCMV infection and/or reactivation by restoring immunity in transplant recipients. However, the CMV-specific CD8+ T cell response is comprised of a heterogenous mixture of subsets with distinct functions and localization, and it is not clear if current adoptive immunotherapy protocols can reconstitute the full spectrum of CD8+ T cell immunity. The aim of this review is to briefly summarize the role of these T cell subsets in CMV immunity and to describe how current adoptive immunotherapy practices might affect their reconstitution in patients. The bulk of the CMV-specific CD8+ T cell population is made up of terminally differentiated effector T cells with immediate effector function and a short life span. Self-renewing memory T cells within the CMV-specific population retain the capacity to expand and differentiate upon challenge and are important for the long-term persistence of the CD8+ T cell response. Finally, mucosal organs, which are frequent sites of CMV reactivation, are primarily inhabited by tissue-resident memory T cells, which do not recirculate. Future work on adoptive transfer strategies may need to focus on striking a balance between the formation of these subsets to ensure the development of long lasting and protective immune responses that can access the organs affected by CMV disease. PMID:27695453

  2. CMV-Specific CD8 T Cell Differentiation and Localization: Implications for Adoptive Therapies.

    PubMed

    Smith, Corinne J; Quinn, Michael; Snyder, Christopher M

    2016-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a ubiquitous virus that causes chronic infection and, thus, is one of the most common infectious complications of immune suppression. Adoptive transfer of HCMV-specific T cells has emerged as an effective method to reduce the risk for HCMV infection and/or reactivation by restoring immunity in transplant recipients. However, the CMV-specific CD8(+) T cell response is comprised of a heterogenous mixture of subsets with distinct functions and localization, and it is not clear if current adoptive immunotherapy protocols can reconstitute the full spectrum of CD8(+) T cell immunity. The aim of this review is to briefly summarize the role of these T cell subsets in CMV immunity and to describe how current adoptive immunotherapy practices might affect their reconstitution in patients. The bulk of the CMV-specific CD8(+) T cell population is made up of terminally differentiated effector T cells with immediate effector function and a short life span. Self-renewing memory T cells within the CMV-specific population retain the capacity to expand and differentiate upon challenge and are important for the long-term persistence of the CD8(+) T cell response. Finally, mucosal organs, which are frequent sites of CMV reactivation, are primarily inhabited by tissue-resident memory T cells, which do not recirculate. Future work on adoptive transfer strategies may need to focus on striking a balance between the formation of these subsets to ensure the development of long lasting and protective immune responses that can access the organs affected by CMV disease.

  3. Cellular Immunotherapy for Neuroblastoma: A Review of Current Vaccine and Adoptive T Cell Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Louis, C.U.; Brenner, M.K.

    2014-01-01

    Immunotherapy is an attractive option for patients with high risk neuroblastoma due to their poor long-term survival rates after conventional treatment. Neuroblastoma cells are derived from the embryonic neural crest and therefore express tumor antigens not widely seen in normal cells, making them potential targets for immunologic attack. There is already considerable experience with monoclonal antibodies that target these tumor associated antigens, and in this review we focus on more exploratory approaches, using tumor vaccines and adoptive transfer of tumor-directed T cells. PMID:19199969

  4. Adoptive transfer of experimental autoimmune hepatitis in mice: cellular interaction between donor and recipient mice

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, M.; Mori, Y.; Mori, T.; Ueda, S.; Yoshida, H.; Kato, I.; Iesato, K.; Wakashin, Y.; Azemoto, R.; Wakashin, M.; Okuda, K.; Ohto, M.

    1988-01-01

    This report extends our previous study on experimental autoimmune hepatitis in C57BL/6 (B6) mice. Cellular immunity involved in the induction of liver injury in this model was studied by transfer of primed spleen cells from hepatitis donor mice to syngeneic normal recipient mice. The most prominent liver damage in recipient B6 mice was induced by transfer of nylon wool adherent spleen cells from hepatitis donor mice, and T cells in this fraction were the essential requirement for the liver damage in the recipient mice. Nylon wool adherent spleen cells from hepatitis donor mice after depletion of the suppressor T-cell function by low-dose (300 rad) irradiation induced more severe liver injury compared to the same cells without irradiation. When the recipient mice were depleted of lymphocytes by low or high dose (700 rad) whole body irradiation, transfer of primed spleen cells from hepatitis donor mice did not induce liver lesion in the lymphocyte-depleted mice. This low susceptibility of lymphocyte-depleted recipient mice to primed spleen cells of hepatitis mice was no longer demonstrated after reconstitution with normal spleen cells. In a cell-migration study using 51Cr-labelled spleen cells, it was shown that a considerable number of infiltrating cells in the liver of recipient mice were derived from recipient mice themselves. These results seem to indicate that cell-to-cell interaction between radiosensitive precursor cells of recipient mice and liver-antigen-primed T cells from hepatitis donor mice play an essential role in the induction of liver injury in the recipient mice. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:3052945

  5. Identification of a Novel Immunodominant HLA-B*07: 02-restricted Adenoviral Peptide Epitope and Its Potential in Adoptive Transfer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Günther, Patrick S; Peper, Janet K; Faist, Benjamin; Kayser, Simone; Hartl, Lena; Feuchtinger, Tobias; Jahn, Gerhard; Neuenhahn, Michael; Busch, Dirk H; Stevanović, Stefan; Dennehy, Kevin M

    2015-09-01

    Adenovirus infections of immunocompromised patients, particularly following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, are associated with morbidity and mortality. Immunotherapy by adoptive transfer of hexon-specific and penton-specific T cells has been successfully applied, but many approaches are impeded by the low number of HLA class I-restricted adenoviral peptide epitopes described to date. We use a novel method to identify naturally presented adenoviral peptide epitopes from infected human cells, ectopically expressing defined HLA, using peptide elution and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. We show that the previously described HLA-A*01:01-restricted peptide epitope LTDLGQNLLY from hexon protein is naturally presented, and demonstrate the functionality of LTDLGQNLLY-specific T cells. We further identify a novel immunodominant HLA-B*07:02-restricted peptide epitope VPATGRTLVL from protein 13.6 K, and demonstrate the high proliferative, cytotoxic, and IFN-γ-producing capacity of peptide-specific T cells. Lastly, LTDLGQNLLY-specific T cells can be detected ex vivo following adoptive transfer therapy, and LTDLGQNLLY-specific and VPATGRTLVL-specific T cells have memory phenotypes ex vivo. Given their proliferative and cytotoxic capacity, such epitope-specific T cells are promising candidates for adoptive T-cell transfer therapy of adenovirus infection.

  6. Adoptive immunotherapy for cancer: the next generation of gene-engineered immune cells.

    PubMed

    Berry, L J; Moeller, M; Darcy, P K

    2009-10-01

    Adoptive cellular immunotherapy involving transfer of tumor-reactive T cells has shown some notable antitumor responses in a minority of cancer patients. In particular, transfer of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes has resulted in long-term objective responses in patients with advanced melanoma. However, the inability to isolate sufficient numbers of tumor-specific T cells from most malignancies has restricted the broad utility of this approach. An emerging approach to circumvent this limitation involves the genetic modification of effector cells with T cell receptor (TCR) transgenes or chimeric single-chain variable fragment (scFv) receptors that can specifically redirect T cells to tumor. There has been much progress in the design of TCR and scFv receptors to enhance the antigen-specific activation of effector cells and their trafficking and persistence in vivo. Considerable effort has been directed toward improving the safety of this approach and reducing the immunogenicity of the receptor. This review discusses the latest developments in the field of adoptive immunotherapy using genetically modified immune cells that have been transduced with either TCR or scFv receptor transgenes and used in preclinical and clinical settings as anticancer agents.

  7. Enhancing adoptive cancer immunotherapy with Vγ2Vδ2 T cells through pulse zoledronate stimulation.

    PubMed

    Nada, Mohanad H; Wang, Hong; Workalemahu, Grefachew; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Morita, Craig T

    2017-01-01

    derived with IL-2. Pulse zoledronate stimulation maximizes the purity, quantity, and quality of expanded Vγ2Vδ2 cells for adoptive immunotherapy but there is no advantage to using IL-15 over IL-2 in our humanized mouse model. Pulse zoledronate stimulation is a simple modification to existing protocols that will enhance the effectiveness of adoptively transferred Vγ2Vδ2 cells by increasing their numbers and anti-tumor activity.

  8. Enrichment and Expansion with Nanoscale Artificial Antigen Presenting Cells for Adoptive Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Perica, Karlo; Bieler, Joan Glick; Schütz, Christian; Varela, Juan Carlos; Douglass, Jacqueline; Skora, Andrew; Chiu, Yen Ling; Oelke, Mathias; Kinzler, Kenneth; Zhou, Shibin; Vogelstein, Bert; Schneck, Jonathan P

    2015-07-28

    Adoptive immunotherapy (AIT) can mediate durable regression of cancer, but widespread adoption of AIT is limited by the cost and complexity of generating tumor-specific T cells. Here we develop an Enrichment + Expansion strategy using paramagnetic, nanoscale artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC) to rapidly expand tumor-specific T cells from rare naïve precursors and predicted neo-epitope responses. Nano-aAPC are capable of enriching rare tumor-specific T cells in a magnetic column and subsequently activating them to induce proliferation. Enrichment + Expansion resulted in greater than 1000-fold expansion of both mouse and human tumor-specific T cells in 1 week, with nano-aAPC based enrichment conferring a proliferation advantage during both in vitro culture and after adoptive transfer in vivo. Robust T cell responses were seen not only for shared tumor antigens, but also for computationally predicted neo-epitopes. Streamlining the rapid generation of large numbers of tumor-specific T cells in a cost-effective fashion through Enrichment + Expansion can be a powerful tool for immunotherapy.

  9. Persistence, immune specificity, and functional ability of murine mutant ras epitope-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes following in vivo adoptive transfer.

    PubMed

    Bristol, J A; Schlom, J; Abrams, S I

    1999-05-25

    Adoptive T-cell transfer has been shown to be a potentially effective strategy for cellular immunotherapy in some murine models of disease. However, several issues remain unresolved regarding some of the basic features involved in effective adoptive transfer, such as the influence of specific peptide antigen (Ag) boost after T-cell transfer, the addition of IL-2 post-T-cell transfer, the trafficking of transferred T cells to lymphoid and nonlymphoid tissues, and the functional stability of recoverable CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. We investigated several of these parameters, particularly as they relate to the persistence and maintenance of effector functions of murine CD4(+) and/or CD8(+) T lymphocytes after adoptive cellular transfer into partially gamma-irradiated syngeneic hosts. Our laboratory previously identified murine (H-2(d)) immunogenic CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell peptide epitopes reflecting codon 12 ras mutations as tumor-specific Ag. Therefore, the model system chosen here employed epitope-specific MHC class II-restricted CD4(+) T cells and MHC class I-restricted CD8(+) T cells produced from previously immunized BALB/c mice. Between 2 and 7 days after T-cell transfer, recipient mice received various combinations of peptide boosts and/or IL-2 treatments. At different times after the T-cell transfer, spleen and lung tissues were analyzed phenotypically to monitor the persistence of the immune T cells and functionally (via proliferation or cytotoxicity assays) to assess the maintenance of peptide specificity. The results showed that immune donor T lymphocytes (uncultured immune T cells or cloned T cells) were recoverable from the spleens and lungs of recipient mice after transfer. The recovery of Ag-specific T-cell responses was greatest from recipient mice that received peptide boosts and IL-2 treatment. However, mice that received a peptide boost without IL-2 treatment responded nearly as well, which suggested that including a peptide boost after T-cell

  10. Feasibility of Telomerase-Specific Adoptive T-cell Therapy for B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia and Solid Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Sandri, Sara; Bobisse, Sara; Moxley, Kelly; Lamolinara, Alessia; De Sanctis, Francesco; Boschi, Federico; Sbarbati, Andrea; Fracasso, Giulio; Ferrarini, Giovanna; Hendriks, Rudi W; Cavallini, Chiara; Scupoli, Maria Teresa; Sartoris, Silvia; Iezzi, Manuela; Nishimura, Michael I; Bronte, Vincenzo; Ugel, Stefano

    2016-05-01

    Telomerase (TERT) is overexpressed in 80% to 90% of primary tumors and contributes to sustaining the transformed phenotype. The identification of several TERT epitopes in tumor cells has elevated the status of TERT as a potential universal target for selective and broad adoptive immunotherapy. TERT-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) have been detected in the peripheral blood of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) patients, but display low functional avidity, which limits their clinical utility in adoptive cell transfer approaches. To overcome this key obstacle hindering effective immunotherapy, we isolated an HLA-A2-restricted T-cell receptor (TCR) with high avidity for human TERT from vaccinated HLA-A*0201 transgenic mice. Using several relevant humanized mouse models, we demonstrate that TCR-transduced T cells were able to control human B-CLL progression in vivo and limited tumor growth in several human, solid transplantable cancers. TERT-based adoptive immunotherapy selectively eliminated tumor cells, failed to trigger a self-MHC-restricted fratricide of T cells, and was associated with toxicity against mature granulocytes, but not toward human hematopoietic progenitors in humanized immune reconstituted mice. These data support the feasibility of TERT-based adoptive immunotherapy in clinical oncology, highlighting, for the first time, the possibility of utilizing a high-avidity TCR specific for human TERT. Cancer Res; 76(9); 2540-51. ©2016 AACR.

  11. Large-scale Isolation of Highly Pure "Untouched" Regulatory T Cells in a GMP Environment for Adoptive Cell Therapy.

    PubMed

    Haase, Doreen; Puan, Kia Joo; Starke, Mireille; Lai, Tuck Siong; Soh, Melissa Yan Ling; Karunanithi, Iyswariya; San Luis, Boris; Poh, Tuang Yeow; Yusof, Nurhashikin; Yeap, Chun Hsien; Phang, Chew Yen; Chye, Willis Soon Yuan; Chan, Marieta; Koh, Mickey Boon Chai; Goh, Yeow Tee; Bertin-Maghit, Sebastien; Nardin, Alessandra; Ho, Liam Pock; Rotzschke, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive cell therapy is an emerging treatment strategy for a number of serious diseases. Regulatory T (Treg) cells represent 1 cell type of particular interest for therapy of inflammatory conditions, as they are responsible for controlling unwanted immune responses. Initial clinical trials of adoptive transfer of Treg cells in patients with graft-versus-host disease were shown to be safe. However, obtaining sufficient numbers of highly pure and functional Treg cells with minimal contamination remains a challenge. We developed a novel approach to isolate "untouched" human Treg cells from healthy donors on the basis of negative selection using the surface markers CD49d and CD127. This procedure, which uses an antibody cocktail and magnetic beads for separation in an automated system (RoboSep), was scaled up and adapted to be compatible with good manufacturing practice conditions. With this setup we performed 9 Treg isolations from large-scale leukapheresis samples in a good manufacturing practice facility. These runs yielded sufficient numbers of "untouched" Treg cells for immediate use in clinical applications. The cell preparations consisted of viable highly pure FoxP3-positive Treg cells that were functional in suppressing the proliferation of effector T cells. Contamination with CD4 effector T cells was <10%. All other cell types did not exceed 2% in the final product. Remaining isolation reagents were reduced to levels that are considered safe. Treg cells isolated with this procedure will be used in a phase I clinical trial of adoptive transfer into leukemia patients developing graft-versus-host disease after stem cell transplantation.

  12. Bovine somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Ross, Pablo J; Cibelli, Jose B

    2010-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is a technique by which the nucleus of a differentiated cell is introduced into an oocyte from which its genetic material has been removed by a process called enucleation. In mammals, the reconstructed embryo is artificially induced to initiate embryonic development (activation). The oocyte turns the somatic cell nucleus into an embryonic nucleus. This process is called nuclear reprogramming and involves an important change of cell fate, by which the somatic cell nucleus becomes capable of generating all the cell types required for the formation of a new individual, including extraembryonic tissues. Therefore, after transfer of a cloned embryo to a surrogate mother, an offspring genetically identical to the animal from which the somatic cells where isolated, is born. Cloning by nuclear transfer has potential applications in agriculture and biomedicine, but is limited by low efficiency. Cattle were the second mammalian species to be cloned after Dolly the sheep, and it is probably the most widely used species for SCNT experiments. This is, in part due to the high availability of bovine oocytes and the relatively higher efficiency levels usually obtained in cattle. Given the wide utilization of this species for cloning, several alternatives to this basic protocol can be found in the literature. Here we describe a basic protocol for bovine SCNT currently being used in our laboratory, which is amenable for the use of the nuclear transplantation technique for research or commercial purposes.

  13. Fate of gamma-interferon-activated killer blood monocytes adoptively transferred into the abdominal cavity of patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis

    SciTech Connect

    Stevenson, H.C.; Keenan, A.M.; Woodhouse, C.; Ottow, R.T.; Miller, P.; Steller, E.P.; Foon, K.A.; Abrams, P.G.; Beman, J.; Larson, S.M.

    1987-11-15

    Five patients with colorectal cancer widely metastatic to peritoneal surfaces have been treated i.p. with infusions of autologous blood monocytes made cytotoxic by in vitro incubation with human gamma-interferon. The monocytes were purified by a combination of cytapheresis and counter-current centrifugal elutriation procedures; each week approximately 350 million activated monocytes were given to patients as adoptive immunotherapy by a single i.p. instillation. On the eighth cycle of treatment the trafficking of i.p. infused blood monocytes was studied in two patients by prelabeling the cells with /sup 111/In. These activated cells became distributed widely within the peritoneal cavity. Two and 5 days after infusion their position within the peritoneum had not changed. When peritoneal specimens were obtained 36 h after /sup 111/In-labeled monocyte infusion, labeled monocytes were demonstrated to be associated with the serosal surfaces by autoradiographic analysis. Scintiscanning structures outside the abdominal cavity revealed that /sup 111/In-labeled monocytes infused i.p. did not traffic to other organs during the 5 days of the study. We conclude that i.p. adoptive transfer of autologous killer blood monocytes is an effective way of delivering these cytotoxic cells to sites of tumor burden on peritoneal surfaces in these cancer patients.

  14. Memory T cell–driven differentiation of naive cells impairs adoptive immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Klebanoff, Christopher A.; Scott, Christopher D.; Leonardi, Anthony J.; Yamamoto, Tori N.; Cruz, Anthony C.; Ouyang, Claudia; Ramaswamy, Madhu; Roychoudhuri, Rahul; Ji, Yun; Eil, Robert L.; Sukumar, Madhusudhanan; Crompton, Joseph G.; Palmer, Douglas C.; Borman, Zachary A.; Clever, David; Thomas, Stacy K.; Patel, Shashankkumar; Yu, Zhiya; Muranski, Pawel; Liu, Hui; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco M.; Gros, Alena; Gattinoni, Luca; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Siegel, Richard M.; Restifo, Nicholas P.

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive cell transfer (ACT) of purified naive, stem cell memory, and central memory T cell subsets results in superior persistence and antitumor immunity compared with ACT of populations containing more-differentiated effector memory and effector T cells. Despite a clear advantage of the less-differentiated populations, the majority of ACT trials utilize unfractionated T cell subsets. Here, we have challenged the notion that the mere presence of less-differentiated T cells in starting populations used to generate therapeutic T cells is sufficient to convey their desirable attributes. Using both mouse and human cells, we identified a T cell–T cell interaction whereby antigen-experienced subsets directly promote the phenotypic, functional, and metabolic differentiation of naive T cells. This process led to the loss of less-differentiated T cell subsets and resulted in impaired cellular persistence and tumor regression in mouse models following ACT. The T memory–induced conversion of naive T cells was mediated by a nonapoptotic Fas signal, resulting in Akt-driven cellular differentiation. Thus, induction of Fas signaling enhanced T cell differentiation and impaired antitumor immunity, while Fas signaling blockade preserved the antitumor efficacy of naive cells within mixed populations. These findings reveal that T cell subsets can synchronize their differentiation state in a process similar to quorum sensing in unicellular organisms and suggest that disruption of this quorum-like behavior among T cells has potential to enhance T cell–based immunotherapies. PMID:26657860

  15. Combination Immunotherapy after ASCT for Multiple Myeloma Using MAGE-A3/Poly-ICLC Immunizations Followed by Adoptive Transfer of Vaccine-Primed and Costimulated Autologous T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rapoport, Aaron P.; Aqui, Nicole A.; Stadtmauer, Edward A; Vogl, Dan T.; Xu, Yin Yan; Kalos, Michael; Cai, Ling; Fang, Hong-Bin; Weiss, Brendan M.; Badros, Ashraf; Yanovich, Saul; Akpek, Gorgun; Tsao, Patricia; Cross, Alan; Mann, Dean; Philip, Sunita; Kerr, Naseem; Brennan, Andrea; Zheng, Zhaohui; Ruehle, Kathleen; Milliron, Todd; Strome, Scott E.; Salazar, Andres M.; Levine, Bruce L.; June, Carl H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Myeloma-directed cellular immune responses after autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) may reduce relapse rates. We studied whether coinjecting the TLR-3 agonist and vaccine adjuvant Poly-ICLC with a MAGE-A3 peptide vaccine was safe and would elicit a high frequency of vaccine-directed immune responses when combined with vaccine-primed and costimulated autologous T cells. Experimental Design In a phase II clinical trial (NCT01245673), we evaluated the safety and activity of ex vivo expanded autologous T cells primed in vivo using a MAGE-A3 multipeptide vaccine (compound GL-0817) combined with Poly-ICLC (Hiltonol), granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) ± montanide. Twenty-seven patients with active and/or high-risk myeloma received autografts followed by anti-CD3/anti-CD28–costimulated autologous T cells, accompanied by MAGE-A3 peptide immunizations before T-cell collection and five times after ASCT. Immune responses to the vaccine were evaluated by cytokine production (all patients), dextramer binding to CD8+ T cells, and ELISA performed serially after transplant. Results T-cell infusions were well tolerated, whereas vaccine injection site reactions occurred in >90% of patients. Two of nine patients who received montanide developed sterile abscesses; however, this did not occur in the 18 patients who did not receive montanide. Dextramer staining demonstrated MAGE-A3–specific CD8 T cells in 7 of 8 evaluable HLA-A2+ patients (88%), whereas vaccine-specific cytokine-producing T cells were generated in 19 of 25 patients (76%). Antibody responses developed in 7 of 9 patients (78%) who received montanide and only weakly in 2 of 18 patients (11%) who did not. The 2-year overall survival was 74% [95% confidence interval (CI), 54%–100%] and 2-year event-free survival was 56% (95% CI, 37%–85%). Conclusions A high frequency of vaccine-specific T-cell responses were generated after transplant by combining costimulated autologous T

  16. Passive adoptive transfer of antitumor immunity induced by laser-dye-immunoadjuvant treatment in a rat metastatic breast cancer model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Wei R.; Liu, Hong; Singhal, Anil K.; Nordquist, Robert E.

    2000-06-01

    The ideal cancer treatment modalities should not only cause tumor regression and eradication but also induce a systemic anti-tumor immunity. This is essential for control of metastatic tumors and for long-term tumor resistance. Laser immunotherapy using a laser, a laser-absorbing dye and an immunoadjuvant has induced such a long-term immunity in treatment of a mammary metastatic tumor. The successfully treated rats established total resistance to multiple subsequent tumor challenges. For further mechanistic studies of the antitumor immunity induced by this novel treatment modality, passive adoptive transfer was performed using splenocytes as immune cells. The spleen cells harvested from successfully treated tumor-bearing rats provided 100% immunity in the naive recipients. The passively protected first cohort rats were immune to tumor challenge with an increased tumor dose; their splenocytes also prevented the establishment of tumor in the second cohort of naive recipient rats. This immunity transfer was accomplished without the usually required T-cell suppression in recipients.

  17. Management of patients with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma: focus on adoptive T-cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Perna, Serena Kimi; Huye, Leslie E; Savoldo, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) represents a heterogeneous group of malignancies with high diversity in terms of biology, clinical responses, and prognosis. Standard therapy regimens produce a 5-year relative survival rate of only 69%, with the critical need to increase the treatment-success rate of this patient population presenting at diagnosis with a median age of 66 years and many comorbidities. The evidence that an impaired immune system favors the development of NHL has opened the stage for new therapeutics, and specifically for the adoptive transfer of ex vivo-expanded antigen-specific T-cells. In this review, we discuss how T-cells specific for viral-associated antigens, nonviral-associated antigens expressed by the tumor, T-cells redirected through the expression of chimeric antigen receptors, and transgenic T-cell receptors against tumor cells have been developed and used in clinical trials for the treatment of patients with NHLs. PMID:27471712

  18. Biopolymer implants enhance the efficacy of adoptive T cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Stephan, Sirkka B.; Taber, Alexandria M.; Jileaeva, Ilona; Pegues, Ericka P.; Sentman, Charles L.; Stephan, Matthias T.

    2014-01-01

    Although adoptive T cell therapy holds promise for the treatment of many cancers, its clinical utility has been limited by problems in delivering targeted lymphocytes to tumor sites, and their inefficient expansion in the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. Here we describe a bioactive polymer implant capable of delivering, expanding and dispersing tumor-reactive T cells. The approach can be used to treat inoperable or incompletely-removed tumors by situating implants near them, or at resection sites. Using a mouse breast cancer resection model, we show that the implants effectively support tumor-targeting T cells throughout resection beds and associated lymph nodes, and reduce tumor relapse compared to conventional delivery modalities. In a multifocal ovarian cancer model, we demonstrate that polymer-delivered T cells trigger regression whereas injected tumor-reactive lymphocytes have little curative effect. Scaffold-based T cell delivery may provide a viable treatment option for inoperable tumors, and reduce the rate of metastatic relapse after surgery. PMID:25503382

  19. Bone marrow cells adopt the cardiomyogenic fate in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Rota, Marcello; Kajstura, Jan; Hosoda, Toru; Bearzi, Claudia; Vitale, Serena; Esposito, Grazia; Iaffaldano, Grazia; Padin-Iruegas, M. Elena; Gonzalez, Arantxa; Rizzi, Roberto; Small, Narissa; Muraski, John; Alvarez, Roberto; Chen, Xiongwen; Urbanek, Konrad; Bolli, Roberto; Houser, Steven R.; Leri, Annarosa; Sussman, Mark A.; Anversa, Piero

    2007-01-01

    The possibility that adult bone marrow cells (BMCs) retain a remarkable degree of developmental plasticity and acquire the cardiomyocyte lineage after infarction has been challenged, and the notion of BMC transdifferentiation has been questioned. The center of the controversy is the lack of unequivocal evidence in favor of myocardial regeneration by the injection of BMCs in the infarcted heart. Because of the interest in cell-based therapy for heart failure, several approaches including gene reporter assay, genetic tagging, cell genotyping, PCR-based detection of donor genes, and direct immunofluorescence with quantum dots were used to prove or disprove BMC transdifferentiation. Our results indicate that BMCs engraft, survive, and grow within the spared myocardium after infarction by forming junctional complexes with resident myocytes. BMCs and myocytes express at their interface connexin 43 and N-cadherin, and this interaction may be critical for BMCs to adopt the cardiomyogenic fate. With time, a large number of myocytes and coronary vessels are generated. Myocytes show a diploid DNA content and carry, at most, two sex chromosomes. Old and new myocytes show synchronicity in calcium transients, providing strong evidence in favor of the functional coupling of these two cell populations. Thus, BMCs transdifferentiate and acquire the cardiomyogenic and vascular phenotypes restoring the infarcted heart. Together, our studies reveal that locally delivered BMCs generate de novo myocardium composed of integrated cardiomyocytes and coronary vessels. This process occurs independently of cell fusion and ameliorates structurally and functionally the outcome of the heart after infarction. PMID:17965233

  20. Bone marrow cells adopt the cardiomyogenic fate in vivo.

    PubMed

    Rota, Marcello; Kajstura, Jan; Hosoda, Toru; Bearzi, Claudia; Vitale, Serena; Esposito, Grazia; Iaffaldano, Grazia; Padin-Iruegas, M Elena; Gonzalez, Arantxa; Rizzi, Roberto; Small, Narissa; Muraski, John; Alvarez, Roberto; Chen, Xiongwen; Urbanek, Konrad; Bolli, Roberto; Houser, Steven R; Leri, Annarosa; Sussman, Mark A; Anversa, Piero

    2007-11-06

    The possibility that adult bone marrow cells (BMCs) retain a remarkable degree of developmental plasticity and acquire the cardiomyocyte lineage after infarction has been challenged, and the notion of BMC transdifferentiation has been questioned. The center of the controversy is the lack of unequivocal evidence in favor of myocardial regeneration by the injection of BMCs in the infarcted heart. Because of the interest in cell-based therapy for heart failure, several approaches including gene reporter assay, genetic tagging, cell genotyping, PCR-based detection of donor genes, and direct immunofluorescence with quantum dots were used to prove or disprove BMC transdifferentiation. Our results indicate that BMCs engraft, survive, and grow within the spared myocardium after infarction by forming junctional complexes with resident myocytes. BMCs and myocytes express at their interface connexin 43 and N-cadherin, and this interaction may be critical for BMCs to adopt the cardiomyogenic fate. With time, a large number of myocytes and coronary vessels are generated. Myocytes show a diploid DNA content and carry, at most, two sex chromosomes. Old and new myocytes show synchronicity in calcium transients, providing strong evidence in favor of the functional coupling of these two cell populations. Thus, BMCs transdifferentiate and acquire the cardiomyogenic and vascular phenotypes restoring the infarcted heart. Together, our studies reveal that locally delivered BMCs generate de novo myocardium composed of integrated cardiomyocytes and coronary vessels. This process occurs independently of cell fusion and ameliorates structurally and functionally the outcome of the heart after infarction.

  1. Generation of CAR T cells for adoptive therapy in the context of glioblastoma standard of care.

    PubMed

    Riccione, Katherine; Suryadevara, Carter M; Snyder, David; Cui, Xiuyu; Sampson, John H; Sanchez-Perez, Luis

    2015-02-16

    Adoptive T cell immunotherapy offers a promising strategy for specifically targeting and eliminating malignant gliomas. T cells can be engineered ex vivo to express chimeric antigen receptors specific for glioma antigens (CAR T cells). The expansion and function of adoptively transferred CAR T cells can be potentiated by the lymphodepletive and tumoricidal effects of standard of care chemotherapy and radiotherapy. We describe a method for generating CAR T cells targeting EGFRvIII, a glioma-specific antigen, and evaluating their efficacy when combined with a murine model of glioblastoma standard of care. T cells are engineered by transduction with a retroviral vector containing the anti-EGFRvIII CAR gene. Tumor-bearing animals are subjected to host conditioning by a course of temozolomide and whole brain irradiation at dose regimens designed to model clinical standard of care. CAR T cells are then delivered intravenously to primed hosts. This method can be used to evaluate the antitumor efficacy of CAR T cells in the context of standard of care.

  2. Opportunities and limitations of natural killer cells as adoptive therapy for malignant disease.

    PubMed

    Davies, James O J; Stringaris, Kate; Barrett, A John; Rezvani, Katayoun

    2014-11-01

    Although natural killer (NK) cells can be readily generated for adoptive therapy with current techniques, their optimal application to treat malignant diseases requires an appreciation of the dynamic balance between signals that either synergize with or antagonize each other. Individuals display wide differences in NK function that determine their therapeutic efficacy. The ability of NK cells to kill target cells or produce cytokines depends on the balance between signals from activating and inhibitory cell-surface receptors. The selection of NK cells with a predominant activating profile is critical for delivering successful anti-tumor activity. This can be achieved through selection of killer immunoglobulin-like receptor-mismatched NK donors and by use of blocking molecules against inhibitory pathways. Optimum NK cytotoxicity may require licensing or priming with tumor cells. Recent discoveries in the molecular and cellular biology of NK cells inform in the design of new strategies, including adjuvant therapies, to maximize the cytotoxic potential of NK cells for adoptive transfer to treat human malignancies.

  3. Mechanisms of immunological eradication of a syngeneic guinea pig tumor. II. Effect of methotrexate treatment and T cell depletion of the recipient on adoptive immunity

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, S.; Fonseca, L.S.; Hunter, J.T.; Rapp, H.J.

    1983-01-01

    The influence of methotrexate on the development of immunity to the line 10 hepatoma was studied in guinea pigs. Chronic methotrexate treatment had no apparent effect on the ability of immune guinea pigs to suppress the growth of inoculated tumor cells. In contrast, the same methotrexate regimen inhibited the development of tumor immunity if started before the 8th day after immunization with a vaccine containing viable line 10 cells admixed with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) cell walls. Thus, methotrexate selectively inhibited the afferent limb of the immune response. In adoptive transfer experiments, methotrexate-treated recipient guinea pigs were capable of being passively sensitized with immune spleen cells, indicating that the primary cell-mediated immune response of the recipient was not required for adoptive immunity. The contribution of recipient T cells in adoptive immunity was further investigated in guinea pigs deleted of T cells by thymectomy, irradiation, and bone marrow reconstitution. Despite demonstrable deficiency in T lymphocyte reactions, B animals were fully capable of rejecting tumors after transfer of immune cells. These results suggest that the expression of adoptive immunity was independent of recipient T cell participation. In addition, sublethal irradiation of immune spleen cells prior to adoptive transfer abolished their efficacy. Proliferation of transferred immune cells in the recipient may be essential for expression of adoptive immunity.

  4. A Phase I Study on Adoptive Immunotherapy Using Gene-Modified T Cells for Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kershaw, Michael H.; Westwood, Jennifer A.; Parker, Linda L.; Wang, Gang; Eshhar, Zelig; Mavroukakis, Sharon A.; White, Donald E.; Wunderlich, John R.; Canevari, Silvana; Rogers-Freezer, Linda; Chen, Clara C.; Yang, James C.; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Hwu, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    Purpose A phase I study was conducted to assess the safety of adoptive immunotherapy using gene-modified autologous T cells for the treatment of metastatic ovarian cancer. Experimental Design T cells with reactivity against the ovarian cancer – associated antigen α-folate receptor (FR) were generated by genetic modification of autologous T cells with a chimeric gene incorporating an anti-FR single-chain antibody linked to the signaling domain of the Fc receptor γ chain. Patients were assigned to one of two cohorts in the study. Eight patients in cohort 1received a dose escalation of T cells in combination with high-dose interleukin-2, and six patients in cohort 2 received dual-specific T cells (reactive with both FR and allogeneic cells) followed by immunization with allogeneic peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Results Five patients in cohort 1 experienced some grade 3 to 4 treatment-related toxicity that was probably due to interleukin-2 administration, which could be managed using standard measures. Patients in cohort 2 experienced relatively mild side effects with grade 1to 2 symptoms. No reduction in tumor burden was seen in any patient. Tracking 111In-labeled adoptively transferred T cells in cohort 1revealed a lack of specific localization of T cells to tumor except in one patient where some signal was detected in a peritoneal deposit. PCR analysis showed that gene-modified T cells were present in the circulation in large numbers for the first 2 days after transfer, but these quickly declined to be barely detectable 1month later in most patients. An inhibitory factor developed in the serum of three of six patients tested over the period of treatment, which significantly reduced the ability of gene-modified T cells to respond against FR+ tumor cells. Conclusions Large numbers of gene-modified tumor-reactive T cells can be safely given to patients, but these cells do not persist in large numbers long term. Future studies need to employ strategies to

  5. Manufacture of tumor- and virus-specific T lymphocytes for adoptive cell therapies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, X; Rivière, I

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) and genetically engineered T lymphocytes expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) or conventional alpha/beta T-cell receptors (TCRs), collectively termed adoptive cell therapy (ACT), is an emerging novel strategy to treat cancer patients. Application of ACT has been constrained by the ability to isolate and expand functional tumor-reactive T cells. The transition of ACT from a promising experimental regimen to an established standard of care treatment relies largely on the establishment of safe, efficient, robust and cost-effective cell manufacturing protocols. The manufacture of cellular products under current good manufacturing practices (cGMPs) has a critical role in the process. Herein, we review current manufacturing methods for the large-scale production of clinical-grade TILs, virus-specific and genetically modified CAR or TCR transduced T cells in the context of phase I/II clinical trials as well as the regulatory pathway to get these complex personalized cellular products to the clinic. PMID:25721207

  6. Two-photon imaging of intratumoral CD8+ T cell cytotoxic activity during adoptive T cell therapy in mice

    PubMed Central

    Breart, Béatrice; Lemaître, Fabrice; Celli, Susanna; Bousso, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    CTLs have the potential to attack tumors, and adoptive transfer of CTLs can lead to tumor regression in mouse models and human clinical settings. However, the dynamics of tumor cell elimination during efficient T cell therapy is unknown, and it is unclear whether CTLs act directly by destroying tumor cells or indirectly by initiating the recruitment of innate immune cells that mediate tumor damage. To address these questions, we report real-time imaging of tumor cell apoptosis in vivo using intravital 2-photon microscopy and a Förster resonance energy transfer–based (FRET-based) reporter of caspase 3 activity. In a mouse model of solid tumor, we found that tumor regression after transfer of in vitro–activated CTLs occurred primarily through the direct action of CTLs on each individual tumor cell, with a minimal bystander effect. Surprisingly, the killing of 1 target cell by an individual CTL took an extended period of time, 6 hours on average, which suggested that the slow rate of killing intrinsically limits the efficiency of antitumor T cell responses. The ability to visualize when, where, and how tumor cells are killed in vivo offers new perspectives for understanding how immune effectors survey cancer cells and how local tumor microenvironments may subvert immune responses. PMID:18357341

  7. Adoptive transfer of PR1 cytotoxic T lymphocytes associated with reduced leukemia burden in a mouse acute myeloid leukemia xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Ma, Qing; Wang, Changqing; Jones, Dan; Quintanilla, Kathryn E; Li, Dan; Wang, Yang; Wieder, Eric D; Clise-Dwyer, Karen; Alatrash, Gheath; Mj, You; Munsell, Mark F; Lu, Sijie; Qazilbash, Muzaffar H; Molldrem, Jeffrey J

    2010-12-01

    Tumor antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) have been used in the treatment of human cancer, including leukemia. Several studies have established PR1 peptide, an HLA-A2.1-restricted peptide derived from proteinase 3 (P3), as a human leukemia-associated antigen. PR1-specific CTL elicited in vitro from healthy donors have been shown to lyse P3-expressing AML cells from patients. We investigated whether PR1-CTL can be adoptively transferred into NOD/SCID mice to eliminate human leukemia cells. PR1-CTL were generated in bulk culture from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) stimulated with autologous dendritic cells. Human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patient samples were injected and engrafted in murine bone marrow at 2 weeks post-transfer. Following adoptive transfer, bone marrow aspirate from mice that received AML alone had 72-88% blasts in a hypercellular marrow, whereas mice that received AML plus PR1-CTL co-infusion had normal hematopoietic elements and only 3-18% blasts in a hypocellular marrow. The PR1-CTL persisted in the bone marrow and liver and maintained a CD45RA⁻CD28+ effector phenotype. We found that adoptive transfer of PR1-CTL generated in vitro is associated with reduced AML cells in NOD/SCID mice. PR1-CTL can migrate to the sites of disease and maintain their capacity to kill the AML cells. The surface phenotype of PR1-CTL was consistent with their trafficking pattern in both vascular and end-organ tissues.

  8. Adoptive transfer of PR1 cytotoxic T lymphocytes associated with reduced leukemia burden in a mouse acute myeloid leukemia xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Qing; Wang, Changqing; Jones, Dan; Quintanilla, Kathryn E.; Li, Dan; Wang, Yang; Wieder, Eric D.; Clise-Dwyer, Karen; Alatrash, Gheath; You, M. James; Munsell, Mark F.; Lu, Sijie; Qazibash, Muzaffar H.; Molldrem, Jeffrey J.

    2012-01-01

    Background aims Tumor antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) have been used in the treatment of human cancer, including leukemia. Several studies have established PR1 peptide, an HLA-A2.1-restricted peptide derived from proteinase 3 (P3), as a human leukemia-associated antigen. PR1-specific CTL elicited in vitro from healthy donors have been shown to lyse P3-expressing AML cells from patients. We investigated whether PR1-CTL can be adoptively transferred into NOD/SCID mice to eliminate human leukemia cells. Methods PR1-CTL were generated in bulk culture from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) stimulated with autologous dendritic cells. Human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patient samples were injected and engrafted in murine bone marrow at 2 weeks post-transfer. Results Following adoptive transfer, bone marrow aspirate from mice that received AML alone had 72–88% blasts in a hypercellular marrow, whereas mice that received AML plus PR1-CTL co-infusion had normal hematopoietic elements and only 3–18% blasts in a hypocellular marrow. The PR1-CTL persisted in the bone marrow and liver and maintained a CD45RA− CD28+ effector phenotype. Conclusions We found that adoptive transfer of PR1-CTL generated in vitro is associated with reduced AML cells in NOD/SCID mice. PR1-CTL can migrate to the sites of disease and maintain their capacity to kill the AML cells. The surface phenotype of PR1-CTL was consistent with their trafficking pattern in both vascular and end-organ tissues. PMID:20735170

  9. Swelling agent adopted decal transfer method for membrane electrode assembly fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Doo Hee; Lee, So Young; Shin, Dong Won; Hwang, Doo Sung; Lee, Young Moo

    2014-07-01

    The decal transfer method is regarded as an effective membrane electrode assembly (MEA) fabrication method for industrial processes due to the improved adhesion between the catalyst layers and the hydrocarbon membrane. In this study, three swelling agents (ethanol, 1,5-pentanediol and glycerol) are introduced to the conventional decal methods in order to improve both the transfer ratio of electrodes on the membrane surface and the electrochemical properties. These swelling agents affect the surface energy differences between the swollen catalyst layer and the membrane substrate. Swelling agents also change the structure of the catalyst layer during the preparation (hot pressing) of the MEA. Changing the catalyst layer structure by introducing swelling agents diminishes the charge transfer resistance and internal resistances of MEAs. These improved electrochemical properties lead to the remarkably enhanced single cell performance of a SPAES MEA of 1380 mA cm-2 at 0.6 V, compared to a SPAES MEA fabricated by the conventional decal method (500 mA cm-2).

  10. Adoptive transfer of M2 macrophages reduces neuropathic pain via opioid peptides.

    PubMed

    Pannell, Maria; Labuz, Dominika; Celik, Melih Ö; Keye, Jacqueline; Batra, Arvind; Siegmund, Britta; Machelska, Halina

    2016-10-07

    During the inflammation which occurs following nerve damage, macrophages are recruited to the site of injury. Phenotypic diversity is a hallmark of the macrophage lineage and includes pro-inflammatory M1 and anti-inflammatory M2 populations. Our aim in this study was to investigate the ability of polarized M0, M1, and M2 macrophages to secrete opioid peptides and to examine their relative contribution to the modulation of neuropathic pain. Mouse bone marrow-derived cells were cultured as unstimulated M0 macrophages or were stimulated into an M1 phenotype using lipopolysaccharide and interferon-γ or into an M2 phenotype using interleukin-4. The macrophage phenotypes were verified using flow cytometry for surface marker analysis and cytokine bead array for cytokine profile assessment. Opioid peptide levels were measured by radioimmunoassay and enzyme immunoassay. As a model of neuropathic pain, a chronic constriction injury (CCI) of the sciatic nerve was employed. Polarized M0, M1, and M2 macrophages (5 × 10(5) cells) were injected perineurally twice, on days 14 and 15 following CCI or sham surgery. Mechanical and heat sensitivity were measured using the von Frey and Hargreaves tests, respectively. To track the injected macrophages, we also transferred fluorescently stained polarized cells and analyzed the surface marker profile of endogenous and injected cells in the nerves ex vivo. Compared to M0 and M1 cells, M2 macrophages contained and released higher amounts of opioid peptides, including Met-enkephalin, dynorphin A (1-17), and β-endorphin. M2 cells transferred perineurally at the nerve injury site reduced mechanical, but not heat hypersensitivity following the second injection. The analgesic effect was reversed by the perineurally applied opioid receptor antagonist naloxone methiodide. M2 cells did not affect sensitivity following sham surgery. Neither M0 nor M1 cells altered mechanical and heat sensitivity in CCI or sham-operated animals. Tracing the

  11. Adoptive immunotherapy with Cl-IB-MECA-treated CD8+ T cells reduces melanoma growth in mice.

    PubMed

    Montinaro, Antonella; Forte, Giovanni; Sorrentino, Rosalinda; Luciano, Antonio; Palma, Giuseppe; Arra, Claudio; Adcock, Ian M; Pinto, Aldo; Morello, Silvana

    2012-01-01

    Cl-IB-MECA is a selective A3 adenosine receptor agonist, which plays a crucial role in limiting tumor progression. In mice, Cl-IB-MECA administration enhances the anti-tumor T cell-mediated response. However, little is known about the activity of Cl-IB-MECA on CD8+ T cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of ex vivo Cl-IB-MECA treatment of CD8+ T cells, adoptively transferred in melanoma-bearing mice. Adoptive transfer of Cl-IB-MECA-treated CD8+ T cells or a single administration of Cl-IB-MECA (20 ng/mouse) inhibited tumor growth compared with the control group and significantly improved mouse survival. This was associated with the release of Th1-type cytokines and a greater influx of mature Langerin+ dendritic cells (LCs) into the tumor microenvironment. CD8+ T cells treated with Cl-IB-MECA released TNF-α which plays a critical role in the therapeutic efficacy of these cells when injected to mice. Indeed, neutralization of TNF-α by a specific monoclonal Ab significantly blocked the anti-tumor activity of Cl-IB-MECA-treated T cells. This was due to the reduction in levels of cytotoxic cytokines and the presence of fewer LCs. In conclusion, these studies reveal that ex vivo treatment with Cl-IB-MECA improves CD8+ T cell adoptive immunotherapy for melanoma in a TNF-α-dependent manner.

  12. Combining MPDL3280A with adoptive cell immunotherapy exerts better antitumor effects against cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yi; Yang, Yicheng; Wu, Shu; Zhu, Yongqiang; Tang, Xiaolong; Liu, Xiaopeng

    2016-10-18

    As the second most common gynecologic malignant tumors with a high mortality rate, cervical cancer jeopardizes women's life worldwide. The low cure rate in cervical cancer patients is mainly attributed to the lack of effective therapies. One feasible novel strategy is to develop immune-based approaches such as adoptive cell immunotherapy of DCCIKs which represents a promising nontoxic antineoplastic immunotherapy preferred in clinic practice. However, the therapeutic effect is not as efficient as anticipated. Possible explanations are tumors exploit immunoregulatory check-points such as programmed death 1(PD1)/PDL1 which provides tumor cells an escape strategy of circumventing immunologic rejection from immune surveillance by hampering activated tumor-specific T cell activities and rendering them functionally exhausted. With reduced transformation activity and enhanced antigenicity, a modified HPV16 E7 (HPV16mE7) was used to load DCs with silenced SOCS1 mediated by a recombinant adenovirus to improve the targetability and efficiency against cervical cancer. Combined with anti-PDL1 antibody MPDL3280A therapy, the co-cultured DCCIKs were transfused into murine models bearing tumor of HPV16 E6/E7 expressing CaSki cells for in vitro/in vivo antitumor activity assay. Although all of the animals succumbed to CaSki tumors even after adoptive DCCIKs transfer or MPDL3280A immunotherapy, the infusion of PDL1 blocking monoclonal antibody with activated T cells cured 40% of animals. These data support PDL1 blockade improves the efficacy of adoptive DCCIKs therapy, providing a new approach of immunotherapy against cervical cancer.

  13. Physicians’ experience adopting the electronic transfer of care communication tool: barriers and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    de Grood, Chloe; Eso, Katherine; Santana, Maria Jose

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to assess physicians’ perceptions on a newly developed electronic transfer of care (e-TOC) communication tool and identify barriers and opportunities toward its adoption. Participants and methods The study was conducted in a tertiary care teaching center as part of a randomized controlled trial assessing the efficacy of an e-TOC communication tool. The e-TOC technology was developed through iterative consultation with stakeholders. This e-TOC summary was populated by acute care physicians (AcPs) and communicated electronically to community care physicians (CcPs). The AcPs consisted of attending physicians, resident trainees, and medical students rotating through the Medical Teaching Unit. The CcPs were health care providers caring for patients discharged from hospital to the community. AcPs and CcPs completed validated surveys assessing their experience with the newly developed e-TOC tool. Free text questions were added to gather general comments from both groups of physicians. Units of analysis were individual physicians. Data from the surveys were analyzed using mixed methods. Results AcPs completed 138 linked pre- and post-rotation surveys. At post-rotation, each AcP completed an average of six e-TOC summaries, taking an average of 37 minutes per e-TOC summary. Over 100 CcPs assessed the quality of the TOC summaries, with an overall rating of 8.3 (standard deviation: 1.48; on a scale of 1–10). Thematic analyses revealed barriers and opportunities encountered by physicians toward the adoption of the e-TOC tool. While the AcPs highlighted issues with timeliness, usability, and presentation, the CcPs identified barriers accessing the web-based TOC summaries, emphasizing that the summaries were timely and the quality of information supported continuity of care. Conclusion Despite the barriers identified by both groups of physicians, the e-TOC communication tool was well received. Our experience can serve as a template for

  14. Alkylating agent melphalan augments the efficacy of adoptive immunotherapy using tumor-specific CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaoyun; Ding, Zhi-Chun; Cao, Yang; Liu, Chufeng; Habtetsion, Tsadik; Yu, Miao; Lemos, Henrique; Salman, Huda; Xu, Hongyan; Mellor, Andrew L.; Zhou, Gang

    2014-01-01

    In recent years the immune-potentiating effects of some widely used chemotherapeutic agents have been increasingly appreciated. This provides a rationale for combining conventional chemotherapy with immunotherapy strategies to achieve durable therapeutic benefits. Previous studies have implicated the immunomodulatory effects of melphalan, an alkylating agent commonly used to treat multiple myeloma, but the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. In the current study, we investigated the impact of melphalan on endogenous immune cells as well as adoptively transferred tumor-specific CD4+ T cells in tumor-bearing mice. We showed that melphalan treatment resulted in a rapid burst of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines during the cellular recovery phase after melphalan-induced myelo-leukodepletion. After melphalan treatment, tumor cells exhibited characteristics of immunogenic cell death, including membrane translocation of the endoplasmic reticulum resident calreticulin (CRT), and extracellular release of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1). In addition, there was enhanced tumor antigen uptake by dendritic cells in the tumor-draining lymph node. Consistent with these immunomodulatory effects, melphalan treatment of tumor-bearing mice led to the activation of the endogenous CD8+ T cells, and more importantly, effectively drove the clonal expansion and effector differentiation of adoptively transferred tumor-specific CD4+ T cells. Notably, the combination of melphalan and CD4+ T-cell adoptive cell therapy (ACT) was more efficacious than either treatment alone in prolonging the survival of mice with advanced B-cell lymphomas or colorectal tumors. These findings provide mechanistic insights into melphalan’s immunostimulatory effects, and demonstrate the therapeutic potential of combining melphalan with adoptive cell therapy utilizing antitumor CD4+ T cells. PMID:25560408

  15. Adoptive immunotherapy for cancer: building on success.

    PubMed

    Gattinoni, Luca; Powell, Daniel J; Rosenberg, Steven A; Restifo, Nicholas P

    2006-05-01

    Adoptive cell transfer after host preconditioning by lymphodepletion represents an important advance in cancer immunotherapy. Here, we describe how a lymphopaenic environment enables tumour-reactive T cells to destroy large burdens of metastatic tumour and how the state of differentiation of the adoptively transferred T cells can affect the outcome of treatment. We also discuss how the translation of these new findings might further improve the efficacy of adoptive cell transfer through the use of vaccines, haematopoietic-stem-cell transplantation, modified preconditioning regimens, and alternative methods for the generation and selection of the T cells to be transferred.

  16. Harnessing innate and adaptive immunity for adoptive cell therapy of renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Geiger, Christiane; Nössner, Elfriede; Frankenberger, Bernhard; Falk, Christine S; Pohla, Heike; Schendel, Dolores J

    2009-06-01

    The development of immunotherapies for renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has been the subject of research for several decades. In addition to cytokine therapy, the benefit of various adoptive cell therapies has again come into focus in the past several years. Nevertheless, success in fighting this immunogenic tumor is still disappointing. RCC can attract a multitude of different effector cells of both the innate and adaptive immune system, including natural killer (NK) cells, gammadelta T cells, NK-like T cells, peptide-specific T cells, dendritic cells (DC), and regulatory T cells (Tregs). Based on intensive research on the biology and function of different immune cells, we now understand that individual cell types do not act in isolation but function within a complex network of intercellular interactions. These interactions play a pivotal role in the efficient activation and function of effector cells, which is a prerequisite for successful tumor elimination. This review provides a current overview of the diversity of effector cells having the capacity to recognize RCC. Aspects of the functions and anti-tumor properties that make them attractive candidates for adoptive cell therapies, as well as experience in clinical application are discussed. Improved knowledge of the biology of this immune network may help us to effectively harness various effector cells, placing us in a better position to develop new therapeutic strategies to successfully fight RCC.

  17. Engineered T Cells for the Adoptive Therapy of B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Koehler, Philipp; Schmidt, Patrick; Hombach, Andreas A.; Hallek, Michael; Abken, Hinrich

    2012-01-01

    B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (B-CLL) remains an incurable disease due to the high risk of relapse, even after complete remission, raising the need to control and eliminate residual tumor cells in long term. Adoptive T cell therapy with genetically engineered specificity is thought to fulfil expectations, and clinical trials for the treatment of CLL are initiated. Cytolytic T cells from patients are redirected towards CLL cells by ex vivo engineering with a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) which binds to CD19 on CLL cells through an antibody-derived domain and triggers T cell activation through CD3ζ upon tumor cell engagement. Redirected T cells thereby target CLL cells in an MHC-unrestricted fashion, secret proinflammatory cytokines, and eliminate CD19+ leukaemia cells with high efficiency. Cytolysis of autologous CLL cells by patient's engineered T cells is effective, however, accompanied by lasting elimination of healthy CD19+ B-cells. In this paper we discuss the potential of the strategy in the treatment of CLL, the currently ongoing trials, and the future challenges in the adoptive therapy with CAR-engineered T cells. PMID:21837241

  18. A Mouse Model of Adoptive Immunotherapeutic Targeting of Autoimmune Arthritis Using Allo-Tolerogenic Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jie; Yang, Yiming; Ren, Yana; Xie, Rufeng; Zou, Hejian; Fan, Huahua

    2013-01-01

    Objective Tolerogenic dendritic cells (tDCs) are immunosuppressive cells with potent tolerogenic ability and are promising immunotherapeutic tools for treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, it is currently unknown whether allogeneic tDCs (allo-tDCs) induce tolerance in RA, and whether the numbers of adoptively transferred allo-tDCs, or the requirement for pulsing with relevant auto-antigens are important. Methods tDCs were derived from bone marrow precursors of C57BL/B6 mice, which were induced in vitro by GM-CSF, IL-10 and TGF-β1. Collagen-induced arthritis (CIA) was modeled in D1 mice by immunization with type II collagen (CII) to test the therapeutic ability of allo-tDCs against CIA. Clinical and histopathologic scores, arthritic incidence, cytokine and anti-CII antibody secretion, and CD4+Th subsets were analyzed. Results tDCs were characterized in vitro by a stable immature phonotype and a potent immunosuppressive ability. Following adoptive transfer of low doses (5×105) of CII-loaded allo-tDCs, a remarkable anti-arthritic activity, improved clinical scores and histological end-points were found. Serological levels of inflammatory cytokines and anti-CII antibodies were also significantly lower in CIA mice treated with CII-pulsed allo-tDCs as compared with allo-tDCs. Moreover, treatment with allo-tDCs altered the proportion of Treg/Th17 cells. Conclusion These findings suggested that allo-tDCs, especially following antigen loading, reduced the severity of CIA in a dose-dependent manner. The dampening of CIA was associated with modulated cytokine secretion, Treg/Th17 polarization and inhibition of anti-CII secretion. This study highlights the potential therapeutic utility of allo-tDCs in autoimmune arthritis and should facilitate the future design of allo-tDC immunotherapeutic strategies against RA. PMID:24204938

  19. Metabolic phenotyping of an adoptive transfer mouse model of experimental colitis and impact of dietary fish oil intake.

    PubMed

    Martin, Francois-Pierre J; Lichti, Pia; Bosco, Nabil; Brahmbhatt, Viral; Oliveira, Manuel; Haller, Dirk; Benyacoub, Jalil

    2015-04-03

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are acute and chronic disabling inflammatory disorders with multiple complex etiologies that are not well-defined. Chronic intestinal inflammation has been linked to an energy-deficient state of gut epithelium with alterations in oxidative metabolism. Plasma-, urine-, stool-, and liver-specific metabonomic analyses are reported in a naïve T cell adoptive transfer (AT) experimental model of colitis, which evaluated the impact of long-chain n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA)-enriched diet. Metabolic profiles of AT animals and their controls under chow diet or fish oil supplementation were compared to describe the (i) consequences of inflammatory processes and (ii) the differential impact of n-3 fatty acids. Inflammation was associated with higher glycoprotein levels (related to acute-phase response) and remodeling of PUFAs. Low triglyceride levels and enhanced PUFA levels in the liver suggest activation of lipolytic pathways that could lead to the observed increase of phospholipids in the liver (including plasmalogens and sphingomyelins). In parallel, the increase in stool excretion of most amino acids may indicate a protein-losing enteropathy. Fecal content of glutamine was lower in AT mice, a feature exacerbated under fish oil intervention that may reflect a functional relationship between intestinal inflammatory status and glutamine metabolism. The decrease in Krebs cycle intermediates in urine (succinate, α-ketoglutarate) also suggests a reduction in the glutaminolytic pathway at a systemic level. Our data indicate that inflammatory status is related to this overall loss of energy homeostasis.

  20. Ex vivo Akt inhibition promotes the generation of potent CD19CAR T cells for adoptive immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Urak, Ryan; Walter, Miriam; Lim, Laura; Wong, ChingLam W; Budde, Lihua E; Thomas, Sandra; Forman, Stephen J; Wang, Xiuli

    2017-01-01

    Insufficient persistence and effector function of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-redirected T cells have been challenging issues for adoptive T cell therapy. Generating potent CAR T cells is of increasing importance in the field. Studies have demonstrated the importance of the Akt pathway in the regulation of T cell differentiation and memory formation. We now investigate whether inhibition of Akt signaling during ex vivo expansion of CAR T cells can promote the generation of CAR T cells with enhanced antitumor activity following adoptive therapy in a murine leukemia xenograft model. Various T cell subsets including CD8+ T cells, bulk T cells, central memory T cells and naïve/memory T cells were isolated from PBMC of healthy donors, activated with CD3/CD28 beads, and transduced with a lentiviral vector encoding a second-generation CD19CAR containing a CD28 co-stimulatory domain. The transduced CD19CAR T cells were expanded in the presence of IL-2 (50U/mL) and Akt inhibitor (Akti) (1 μM) that were supplemented every other day. Proliferative/expansion potential, phenotypical characteristics and functionality of the propagated CD19CAR T cells were analyzed in vitro and in vivo after 17-21 day ex vivo expansion. Anti-tumor activity was evaluated after adoptive transfer of the CD19CAR T cells into CD19+ tumor-bearing immunodeficient mice. Tumor signals were monitored with biophotonic imaging, and survival rates were analyzed by the end of the experiments. We found that Akt inhibition did not compromise CD19CAR T cell proliferation and expansion in vitro, independent of the T cell subsets, as comparable CD19CAR T cell expansion was observed after culturing in the presence or absence of Akt inhibitor. Functionally, Akt inhibition did not dampen cell-mediated effector function, while Th1 cytokine production increased. With respect to phenotype, Akti-treated CD19CAR T cells expressed higher levels of CD62L and CD28 as compared to untreated CD19CAR T cells. Once

  1. Tracking in vivo dynamics of NK cells transferred in patients undergoing stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Killig, Monica; Friedrichs, Birte; Meisig, Johannes; Gentilini, Chiara; Blüthgen, Nils; Loddenkemper, Christoph; Labopin, Myriam; Basara, Nadezda; Pfrepper, Christian; Niederwieser, Dietger W; Uharek, Lutz; Romagnani, Chiara

    2014-09-01

    Haploidentical stem cell transplantation (haploSCT) offers an alternative treatment option for advanced leukemia patients lacking a HLA-compatible donor. Transfer of NK cells represents a promising therapeutic option in combination with SCT, as NK cells can promote graft versus leukemia with low risk of GVH disease. In this study, we show results from a phase I/II trial in which 24 acute myeloid leukemia patients underwent haploSCT in combination with early transfer of unmodified NK cells and observed a promising 2-year overall survival rate of 37%. By performing immunomonitoring and subsequent principal component analysis, we tracked donor NK-cell dynamics in the patients and distinguished between NK cells reconstituting from CD34(+) precursors, giving rise over time to a continuum of multiple differentiation stages, and adoptively transferred NK cells. Transferred NK cells displayed a mature phenotype and proliferated in vivo during the early days after haploSCT even in the absence of exogenous IL-2 administration. Moreover, we identified the NK-cell phenotype associated with in vivo expansion. Thus, our study indicates a promising path for adoptive transfer of unmodified NK cells in the treatment of high-risk acute myeloid leukemia.

  2. Adoptive immunotherapy for hematological malignancies using T cells gene-modified to express tumor antigen-specific receptors.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Hiroshi

    2014-12-15

    Accumulating clinical evidence suggests that adoptive T-cell immunotherapy could be a promising option for control of cancer; evident examples include the graft-vs-leukemia effect mediated by donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) and therapeutic infusion of ex vivo-expanded tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) for melanoma. Currently, along with advances in synthetic immunology, gene-modified T cells retargeted to defined tumor antigens have been introduced as "cellular drugs". As the functional properties of the adoptive immune response mediated by T lymphocytes are decisively regulated by their T-cell receptors (TCRs), transfer of genes encoding target antigen-specific receptors should enable polyclonal T cells to be uniformly redirected toward cancer cells. Clinically, anticancer adoptive immunotherapy using genetically engineered T cells has an impressive track record. Notable examples include the dramatic benefit of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) gene-modified T cells redirected towards CD19 in patients with B-cell malignancy, and the encouraging results obtained with TCR gene-modified T cells redirected towards NY-ESO-1, a cancer-testis antigen, in patients with advanced melanoma and synovial cell sarcoma. This article overviews the current status of this treatment option, and discusses challenging issues that still restrain the full effectiveness of this strategy, especially in the context of hematological malignancy.

  3. Transfer of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis to bone marrow chimeras. Endothelial cells are not a restricting element

    SciTech Connect

    Hinrichs, D.J.; Wegmann, K.W.; Dietsch, G.N.

    1987-12-01

    The adoptive transfer of clinical and histopathologic signs of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) requires MHC compatibility between cell donor and cell recipient. The results of adoptive transfer studies using F1 to parent bone marrow chimeras as recipients of parental-derived BP-sensitive spleen cells indicate that this restriction is not expressed at the level of the endothelial cell but is confined to the cells of bone marrow derivation. Furthermore, these results indicate that the development of EAE is not dependent on the activity of MHC-restricted cytotoxic cells.

  4. Development of an Autologous Macrophage-based Adoptive Gene Transfer Strategy to Treat Posttraumatic Osteoarthritis (PTOA) and Osteoarithritis (OA)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-01

    macrophage-based adoptive gene therapy with both an anti-catabolic gene ( IL -1ra or IL -1β shRNA) and a pro-chondrogenic gene (TGFβ3) is based on the...deliver and confine expression of an anti-catabolic gene ( IL -1ra or IL -1β shRNA) along with a chondrogenic gene (TGFβ3) in the inflamed areas within the...synovium of the PTOA joint; and 2) the IL -1ra (or IL -1β shRNA) and TGFβ3 combination autologous macrophage-based adoptive gene transfer strategy will

  5. Depletion of endogenous tumor-associated regulatory T cells improves the efficacy of adoptive cytotoxic T-cell immunotherapy in murine acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qing; Bucher, Christoph; Munger, Meghan E; Highfill, Steven L; Tolar, Jakub; Munn, David H; Levine, Bruce L; Riddle, Megan; June, Carl H; Vallera, Daniel A; Weigel, Brenda J; Blazar, Bruce R

    2009-10-29

    Tumor-induced immune suppression can permit tumor cells to escape host immune resistance. To elucidate host factors contributing to the poor response of adoptively transferred tumor-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), we used a systemic model of murine acute myeloid leukemia (AML). AML progression resulted in a progressive regulatory T-cell (Treg) accumulation in disease sites. The adoptive transfer of in vitro-generated, potently lytic anti-AML-reactive CTLs failed to reduce disease burden or extend survival. Compared with non-AML-bearing hosts, transferred CTLs had reduced proliferation in AML sites of metastases. Treg depletion by a brief course of interleukin-2 diphtheria toxin (IL-2DT) transiently reduced AML disease burden but did not permit long-term survival. In contrast, IL-2DT prevented anti-AML CTL hypoproliferation, increased the number of transferred CTLs at AML disease sites, reduced AML tumor burden, and resulted in long-term survivors that sustained an anti-AML memory response. These data demonstrated that Tregs present at AML disease sites suppress adoptively transferred CTL proliferation, limiting their in vivo expansion, and Treg depletion before CTL transfer can result in therapeutic efficacy in settings of substantial pre-existing tumor burden in which antitumor reactive CTL infusion alone has proven ineffective.

  6. Depletion of endogenous tumor-associated regulatory T cells improves the efficacy of adoptive cytotoxic T-cell immunotherapy in murine acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Qing; Bucher, Christoph; Munger, Meghan E.; Highfill, Steven L.; Tolar, Jakub; Munn, David H.; Levine, Bruce L.; Riddle, Megan; June, Carl H.; Vallera, Daniel A.; Weigel, Brenda J.

    2009-01-01

    Tumor-induced immune suppression can permit tumor cells to escape host immune resistance. To elucidate host factors contributing to the poor response of adoptively transferred tumor-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), we used a systemic model of murine acute myeloid leukemia (AML). AML progression resulted in a progressive regulatory T-cell (Treg) accumulation in disease sites. The adoptive transfer of in vitro–generated, potently lytic anti–AML-reactive CTLs failed to reduce disease burden or extend survival. Compared with non–AML-bearing hosts, transferred CTLs had reduced proliferation in AML sites of metastases. Treg depletion by a brief course of interleukin-2 diphtheria toxin (IL-2DT) transiently reduced AML disease burden but did not permit long-term survival. In contrast, IL-2DT prevented anti-AML CTL hypoproliferation, increased the number of transferred CTLs at AML disease sites, reduced AML tumor burden, and resulted in long-term survivors that sustained an anti-AML memory response. These data demonstrated that Tregs present at AML disease sites suppress adoptively transferred CTL proliferation, limiting their in vivo expansion, and Treg depletion before CTL transfer can result in therapeutic efficacy in settings of substantial pre-existing tumor burden in which antitumor reactive CTL infusion alone has proven ineffective. PMID:19724059

  7. T cells conditioned with MDSC show an increased anti-tumor activity after adoptive T cell based immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Raber, Patrick L; Sierra, Rosa A; Thevenot, Paul T; Shuzhong, Zhang; Wyczechowska, Dorota D; Kumai, Takumi; Celis, Esteban; Rodriguez, Paulo C

    2016-04-05

    The success of adoptive T cell-based immunotherapy (ACT) in cancer is limited in part by the accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), which block several T cell functions, including T cell proliferation and the expression of various cytotoxic mediators. Paradoxically, the inhibition of CD8+ T cell differentiation into cytotoxic populations increased their efficacy after ACT into tumor-bearing hosts. Therefore, we aimed to test the impact of conditioning CD8+ T cells with MDSC on their differentiation potential and ACT efficacy. Our results indicate that MDSC impaired the progression of CD8+ T cells into effector populations, without altering their activation status, production of IL-2, or signaling through the T cell receptor. In addition, culture of CD8+ T cells with MDSC resulted in an increased ACT anti-tumor efficacy, which correlated with a higher frequency of the transferred T cells and elevated IFNγ production. Interestingly, activated CD62L+ CD8+ T cells were responsible for the enhanced anti-tumor activity showed by MDSC-exposed T cells. Additional results showed a decreased protein synthesis rate and lower activity of the mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) in T cells conditioned with MDSC. Silencing of the negative mTOR regulator tuberous sclerosis complex-2 in T cells co-cultured with MDSC restored mTOR activity, but resulted in T cell apoptosis. These results indicate that conditioning of T cells with MDSC induces stress survival pathways mediated by a blunted mTOR signaling, which regulated T cell differentiation and ACT efficacy. Continuation of this research will enable the development of better strategies to increase ACT responses in cancer.

  8. Senescent cells communicate via intercellular protein transfer

    PubMed Central

    Biran, Anat; Perelmutter, Meirav; Gal, Hilah; Burton, Dominick G.A.; Ovadya, Yossi; Vadai, Ezra; Geiger, Tamar

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian cells mostly rely on extracellular molecules to transfer signals to other cells. However, in stress conditions, more robust mechanisms might be necessary to facilitate cell–cell communications. Cellular senescence, a stress response associated with permanent exit from the cell cycle and the development of an immunogenic phenotype, limits both tumorigenesis and tissue damage. Paradoxically, the long-term presence of senescent cells can promote tissue damage and aging within their microenvironment. Soluble factors secreted from senescent cells mediate some of these cell-nonautonomous effects. However, it is unknown whether senescent cells impact neighboring cells by other mechanisms. Here we show that senescent cells directly transfer proteins to neighboring cells and that this process facilitates immune surveillance of senescent cells by natural killer (NK) cells. We found that transfer of proteins to NK and T cells is increased in the murine preneoplastic pancreas, a site where senescent cells are present in vivo. Proteomic analysis and functional studies of the transferred proteins revealed that the transfer is strictly dependent on cell–cell contact and CDC42-regulated actin polymerization and is mediated at least partially by cytoplasmic bridges. These findings reveal a novel mode of intercellular communication by which senescent cells regulate their immune surveillance and might impact tumorigenesis and tissue aging. PMID:25854920

  9. Exploiting cytokine secretion to rapidly produce multivirus-specific T cells for adoptive immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Yuriko; Leen, Ann M; Sun, Jiali; Nakazawa, Yozo; Yvon, Eric; Heslop, Helen E; Brenner, Malcolm K; Rooney, M Cliona

    2009-01-01

    Viral infections remain a major cause of morbidity and mortality after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), and conventional small-molecule therapeutics often have modest benefit, high cost and adverse effects. Adoptive transfer of donor-derived virus-specific T cells has been shown to be feasible and safe after HSCT, and to reconstitute immunity against cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus and adenovirus. Current protocols to generate these cytotoxic T cell (CTL) lines are lengthy, taking up to 12 weeks. Since viral infections often occur <30 days after HSCT, speedy production of virus-specific cytotoxic T cells lacking alloreactivity is highly desirable. We now describe a modified rapid selection method for production and characterization of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells specific for cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus and adenovirus in a single infusate. We use Ad5f35-pp65/LMP2 vectors in a single procedure over a 48hr time period and manufacture a product suited for clinical use. By simultaneously expanding a portion of the selected product we can characterize phenotype and function of the infused product and link them with subsequent in vivo outcome. PMID:18600178

  10. Alloreactive Natural Killer Cells for the Treatment of Acute Myeloid Leukemia: From Stem Cell Transplantation to Adoptive Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ruggeri, Loredana; Parisi, Sarah; Urbani, Elena; Curti, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells express activating and inhibitory receptors, which recognize MHC class-I alleles, termed “Killer cell Immunoglobulin-like Receptors” (KIRs). Preclinical and clinical data from haploidentical T-cell-depleted stem cell transplantation have demonstrated that alloreactive KIR-L mismatched NK cells play a major role as effectors against acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Outside the transplantation setting, several reports have proven the safety and feasibility of NK cell infusion in AML patients and, in some cases, provided evidence that transferred NK cells are functionally alloreactive and may have a role in disease control. The aim of the present work is to briefly summarize the most recent advances in the field by moving from the first preclinical and clinical demonstration of donor NK alloreactivity in the transplantation setting to the most recent attempts at exploiting the use of alloreactive NK cell infusion as a means of adoptive immunotherapy against AML. Altogether, these data highlight the pivotal role of NK cells for the development of novel immunological approaches in the clinical management of AML. PMID:26528283

  11. Somatic cell nuclear transfer in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Siripattarapravat, Kannika; Pinmee, Boonya; Venta, Patrick J; Chang, Chia-Cheng; Cibelli, Jose B

    2009-10-01

    We developed a method for somatic cell nuclear transfer in zebrafish using laser-ablated metaphase II eggs as recipients, the micropyle for transfer of the nucleus and an egg activation protocol after nuclear reconstruction. We produced clones from cells of both embryonic and adult origins, although the latter did not give rise to live adult clones.

  12. Rapid generation of NY-ESO-1-specific CD4+ THELPER1 cells for adoptive T-cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kayser, Simone; Boβ, Cristina; Feucht, Judith; Witte, Kai-Erik; Scheu, Alexander; Bülow, Hans-Jörg; Joachim, Stefanie; Stevanović, Stefan; Schumm, Michael; Rittig, Susanne M; Lang, Peter; Röcken, Martin; Handgretinger, Rupert; Feuchtinger, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Tumor-associated antigens such as NY-ESO-1 are expressed in a variety of solid tumors but absent in mature healthy tissues with the exception of germline cells. The immune system anti-cancer attack is mediated by cell lysis or induction of growth arrest through paralysis of tumor cells, the latter of which can be achieved by tumor-specific CD4+, IFNγ-producing THelper type 1 (TH1) cells. Translation of these immune-mediated mechanisms into clinical application has been limited by availability of immune effectors, as well as the need for complex in vitro protocols and regulatory hurdles. Here, we report a procedure to generate cancer-testis antigen NY-ESO-1-targeting CD4+ TH1 cells in vitro for cancer immunotherapy in the clinic. After in vitro sensitization by stimulating T cells with protein-spanning, overlapping peptide pools of NY-ESO-1 in combination with IL-7 and low dose IL-2, antigen-specific T cells were isolated using IFNγ capture technique and subsequently expanded with IL-2, IL-7 and IL-15. Large numbers of NY-ESO-1-specific CD4+ T cells with a TH1 cytokine profile and lower numbers of cytokine-secreting CD8+ T cells could be generated from healthy donors with a high specificity and expansion potential. Manufactured CD4+ T cells showed strong specific TH1-responses with IFNγ+, TNFα+, IL-2+ and induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in tumor cells. The protocol is GMP-grade and approved by the regulatory authorities. The tumor-antigen specific CD4+ TH1 lymphocytes can be adoptively transferred as a T-cell therapy to boost anticancer immunity and this novel cancer treatment approach is applicable to both T cells from healthy allogeneic donors as well as to autologous T cells derived from cancer patients. PMID:26155389

  13. Rapid generation of NY-ESO-1-specific CD4(+) THELPER1 cells for adoptive T-cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Kayser, Simone; Boβ, Cristina; Feucht, Judith; Witte, Kai-Erik; Scheu, Alexander; Bülow, Hans-Jörg; Joachim, Stefanie; Stevanović, Stefan; Schumm, Michael; Rittig, Susanne M; Lang, Peter; Röcken, Martin; Handgretinger, Rupert; Feuchtinger, Tobias

    2015-05-01

    Tumor-associated antigens such as NY-ESO-1 are expressed in a variety of solid tumors but absent in mature healthy tissues with the exception of germline cells. The immune system anti-cancer attack is mediated by cell lysis or induction of growth arrest through paralysis of tumor cells, the latter of which can be achieved by tumor-specific CD4(+), IFNγ-producing THelper type 1 (TH1) cells. Translation of these immune-mediated mechanisms into clinical application has been limited by availability of immune effectors, as well as the need for complex in vitro protocols and regulatory hurdles. Here, we report a procedure to generate cancer-testis antigen NY-ESO-1-targeting CD4(+) TH1 cells in vitro for cancer immunotherapy in the clinic. After in vitro sensitization by stimulating T cells with protein-spanning, overlapping peptide pools of NY-ESO-1 in combination with IL-7 and low dose IL-2, antigen-specific T cells were isolated using IFNγ capture technique and subsequently expanded with IL-2, IL-7 and IL-15. Large numbers of NY-ESO-1-specific CD4(+) T cells with a TH1 cytokine profile and lower numbers of cytokine-secreting CD8(+) T cells could be generated from healthy donors with a high specificity and expansion potential. Manufactured CD4(+) T cells showed strong specific TH1-responses with IFNγ(+), TNFα(+), IL-2(+) and induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in tumor cells. The protocol is GMP-grade and approved by the regulatory authorities. The tumor-antigen specific CD4(+) TH1 lymphocytes can be adoptively transferred as a T-cell therapy to boost anticancer immunity and this novel cancer treatment approach is applicable to both T cells from healthy allogeneic donors as well as to autologous T cells derived from cancer patients.

  14. How Chimeric Antigen Receptor Design Affects Adoptive T Cell Therapy.

    PubMed

    Gacerez, Albert T; Arellano, Benjamine; Sentman, Charles L

    2016-12-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells have been developed to treat tumors and have shown great success against B cell malignancies. Exploiting modular designs and swappable domains, CARs can target an array of cell surface antigens and, upon receptor-ligand interactions, direct signaling cascades, thereby driving T cell effector functions. CARs have been designed using receptors, ligands, or scFv binding domains. Different regions of a CAR have each been found to play a role in determining the overall efficacy of CAR T cells. Therefore, this review provides an overview of CAR construction and common designs. Each CAR region is discussed in the context of its importance to a CAR's function. Additionally, the review explores how various engineering strategies have been applied to CAR T cells in order to regulate CAR T cell function and activity. J. Cell. Physiol. 231: 2590-2598, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Abrogating Cbl-b in effector CD8(+) T cells improves the efficacy of adoptive therapy of leukemia in mice.

    PubMed

    Stromnes, Ingunn M; Blattman, Joseph N; Tan, Xiaoxia; Jeevanjee, Sara; Gu, Hua; Greenberg, Philip D

    2010-10-01

    The clinical use of adoptive immunotherapy with tumor-reactive T cells to treat established cancers is limited in part by the poor in vivo survival and function of the transferred T cells. Although administration of exogenous cytokines such as IL-2 can promote T cell survival, such strategies have many nonspecific activities and are often associated with toxicity. We show here that abrogating expression of Casitas B-lineage lymphoma b (Cbl-b), a negative regulator of lymphocyte activation, in tumor-reactive CD8(+) T cells expanded ex vivo increased the efficacy of adoptive immunotherapy of disseminated leukemia in mice. Mechanistically, Cbl-b abrogation bypassed the requirement for exogenous IL-2 administration for tumor eradication in vivo. In addition, CD8(+) T cells lacking Cbl-b demonstrated a lower threshold for activation, better survival following target recognition and stimulation, and enhanced proliferative responses as a result of both IL-2-dependent and -independent pathways. Importantly, siRNA knockdown of Cbl-b in human CD8(+)CD28- effector T cell clones similarly restored IL-2 production and proliferation following target recognition independent of exogenous IL-2, enhanced IFN-γ production, and increased target avidity. Thus, abrogating Cbl-b expression in effector T cells may improve the efficacy of adoptive therapy of some human malignancies.

  16. Clinical applications of adoptive natural killer cell immunotherapy for cancer: current status and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Guo, Hongfeng; Qian, Xifeng

    2010-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are cytotoxic and cytokine-producing lymphocytes involved in the immune defense against viral infections and tumors. NK cells activated with cytokines, such as interleukin-2, have been used since the 1980s as adoptive immunotherapy against cancer. NK cell alloreactivity has been demonstrated to enhance control of acute myeloid leukemia relapse and greatly reduce the risk of graft-versus-host disease in HLA haplotype-mismatched hematopoietic transplantation, and has been explored as a tool for adoptive immunotherapy for cancer patients. Future manipulation to improve NK cell adoptive immunotherapy by means of increasing target recognition and reducing inhibitory signaling is being explored.

  17. Adoptive Immunotherapy For Leukemia With Ex vivo Expanded T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Conrad Russell Y.; Bollard, Catherine M.

    2016-01-01

    The development of novel T cell therapies to target leukemia has facilitated the translation of this approach for hematologic malignancies. Different methods of manufacturing leukemia-specific T cells have evolved, along with additional measures to increase the safety of this therapy. This is an overview of expanded T cell therapeutics with a focus on how the manufacturing strategies have been refined, and where the research is heading. PMID:26648070

  18. Antibody responses to allergen Lol pIV are suppressed following adoptive transfer of B lymphocytes from the internal image anti-idiotypic antibody-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, E M; Kisil, F T

    1995-10-01

    An internal image anti-idiotypic antibody, designated B1/1, was generated against an idiotope (Id91) of the monoclonal antibody (mAb91) specific for Lol pIV. The administration of B1/1 in PBS, at doses ranging from 100 ng to 100 micrograms/mouse, to syngeneic Balb/c mice resulted in the suppression of the formation of anti-Lol pIV antibodies that possessed the Id91. Spleen cells obtained from the mice 2 weeks after the treatment with B1/1 (25 micrograms/mouse) were adoptively transferred intravenously into the syngeneic recipients which were challenged intraperitoneally with Lol pIV in alum 2 hr after the transfer. The recipients were boosted with Lol pIV 14 days later. It was demonstrated that the transfer of splenic B cells (but not of T cells) from B1/1-treated donors induced a significant suppression of not only the level of IgE and IgG antibodies to Lol pIV, but also the level of antibodies possessing the Id91. Treatment of the B cells with mAb91 plus complement abrogated their ability to transfer the suppression. This study indicates that the treatment with the anti-Id B1/1 generated B cells that were characterized, serologically, as possessing the anti-Id-like antibodies on their surface and were responsible for transferring the suppression of the formation of antibodies to allergen Lol pIV and the expression of Id91.

  19. Tumor-specific IL-9-producing CD8+ Tc9 cells are superior effector than type-I cytotoxic Tc1 cells for adoptive immunotherapy of cancers.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yong; Hong, Bangxing; Li, Haiyan; Zheng, Yuhuan; Zhang, Mingjun; Wang, Siqing; Qian, Jianfei; Yi, Qing

    2014-02-11

    Because cytokine-priming signals direct CD8(+) T cells to acquire unique profiles that affect their ability to mediate specific immune responses, here we generated IL-9-skewed CD8(+) T (Tc9) cells by priming with Th9-polarized condition. Compared with type-I CD8(+) cytotoxic T (Tc1) cells, Tc9 secreted different cytokines and were less cytolytic in vitro but surprisingly elicited greater antitumor responses against advanced tumors in OT-I/B16-OVA and Pmel-1/B16 melanoma models. After adoptive transfer, Tc9 cells persisted longer and differentiated into IFN-γ- and granzyme-B (GrzB)-producing cytolytic Tc1-like effector cells. Phenotypic analysis revealed that adoptively transferred Tc9 cells secreted IL-2 and were KLRG-1(low) and IL-7Rα(high), suggesting that they acquired a signature of "younger" phenotype or became long-term lived cells with capacity of self-renewal. Our results also revealed that Tc9-mediated therapeutic effect critically depended on IL-9 production in vivo. These findings have clinical implications for the improvement of CD8(+) T-cell-based adoptive immunotherapy of cancers.

  20. Growth and activation of natural killer cells ex vivo from children with neuroblastoma for adoptive cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yin; Wu, Hong-Wei; Sheard, Michael A; Sposto, Richard; Somanchi, Srinivas S; Cooper, Laurence J N; Lee, Dean A; Seeger, Robert C

    2013-04-15

    Adoptive transfer of natural killer (NK) cells combined with tumor-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAb) has therapeutic potential for malignancies. We determined if large numbers of activated NK (aNK) cells can be grown ex vivo from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of children with high-risk neuroblastoma using artificial antigen-presenting cells (aAPC). Irradiated K562-derived Clone 9.mbIL21 aAPC were cocultured with PBMC, and propagated NK cells were characterized with flow cytometry, cytotoxicity assays, Luminex multicytokine assays, and a nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID) mouse model of disseminated neuroblastoma. Coculturing patient PBMC with aAPC for 14 days induced 2,363- ± 443-fold expansion of CD56(+)CD3(-)CD14(-) NK cells with 83% ± 3% purity (n = 10). Results were similar to PBMC from normal donors (n = 5). Expression of DNAM-1, NKG2D, FcγRIII/CD16, and CD56 increased 6- ± 3-, 10- ± 2-, 21- ± 20-, and 18- ± 3-fold, respectively, on day 14 compared with day 0, showing activation of NK cells. In vitro, aNK cells were highly cytotoxic against neuroblastoma cell lines and killing was enhanced with GD2-specific mAb ch14.18. When mediating cytotoxicity with ch14.18, release of TNF-α, granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor, IFN-γ, sCD40L, CCL2/MCP-1, CXCL9/MIG, and CXCL11/I-TAC by aNK cells increased 4-, 5-, 6-, 15-, 265-, 917-, and 363-fold (151-9,121 pg/mL), respectively, compared with aNK cells alone. Survival of NOD/SCID mice bearing disseminated neuroblastoma improved when treated with thawed and immediately intravenously infused cryopreserved aNK cells compared with untreated mice and was further improved when ch14.18 was added. Propagation of large numbers of aNK cells that maintain potent antineuroblastoma activities when cryopreserved supports clinical testing of adoptive cell therapy with ch14.18.

  1. Transfer of extracellular vesicles during immune cell-cell interactions

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez-Vázquez, Cristina; Villarroya-Beltri, Carolina; Mittelbrunn, María; Sánchez-Madrid, Francisco

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY The transfer of molecules between cells during cognate immune cell interactions has been reported, and recently a novel mechanism of transfer of proteins and genetic material such as small RNA between T cells and APCs has been described, involving exchange of extracellular vesicles (EVs) during the formation of the immunological synapse (IS). EVs – a term that encompasses exosomes and microvesicles – have been implicated in cell-cell communication during immune responses associated with tumors, pathogens, allergies and autoimmune diseases. This review focuses on EV transfer as a mechanism for the exchange of molecules during immune cell-cell interactions. PMID:23278745

  2. Interorganizational transfer of technology - A study of adoption of NASA innovations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakrabarti, A. K.; Rubenstein, A. H.

    1976-01-01

    The paper describes a study on the effects of top management support, various techno-economic factors, organizational climate, and decision-making modes on the adoption of NASA innovations. Field research consisted of interviews and questionnaires directed to sixty-five organizations. Forty-five test cases where different decisions for adoption of ideas for new products or processes were made on NASA Tech Briefs were studied in relation to the effects of various factors on the degree of success of adoption, including: (1) the degree of general connection of the technology to the firm's existing operation, (2) the specificity of the relationship between the technology and some existing and recognized problem, (3) the degree of urgency of the problem to which the technology was related, (4) maturity of technology available to implement the technology, (5) availability of personnel and financial resources to implement the technology, (6) degree of top management interest, (7) the use of confrontation in joint-decision, (8) the use of smoothing in decision-making, and (9) the use of forcing in decision-making. It was found that top managements interest was important in the product cases only, and that the success of process innovations was dependent on the quality of information and the specificity of the relationship between the technology and some recognized existing problem.

  3. Interorganizational transfer of technology - A study of adoption of NASA innovations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakrabarti, A. K.; Rubenstein, A. H.

    1976-01-01

    The paper describes a study on the effects of top management support, various techno-economic factors, organizational climate, and decision-making modes on the adoption of NASA innovations. Field research consisted of interviews and questionnaires directed to sixty-five organizations. Forty-five test cases where different decisions for adoption of ideas for new products or processes were made on NASA Tech Briefs were studied in relation to the effects of various factors on the degree of success of adoption, including: (1) the degree of general connection of the technology to the firm's existing operation, (2) the specificity of the relationship between the technology and some existing and recognized problem, (3) the degree of urgency of the problem to which the technology was related, (4) maturity of technology available to implement the technology, (5) availability of personnel and financial resources to implement the technology, (6) degree of top management interest, (7) the use of confrontation in joint-decision, (8) the use of smoothing in decision-making, and (9) the use of forcing in decision-making. It was found that top managements interest was important in the product cases only, and that the success of process innovations was dependent on the quality of information and the specificity of the relationship between the technology and some recognized existing problem.

  4. Dynamics of Lipid Transfer by Phosphatidylinositol Transfer Proteins in Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shadan, Sadaf; Holic, Roman; Carvou, Nicolas; Ee, Patrick; Li, Michelle; Murray-Rust, Judith; Cockcroft, Shamshad

    2008-01-01

    Of many lipid transfer proteins identified, all have been implicated in essential cellular processes, but the activity of none has been demonstrated in intact cells. Among these, phosphatidylinositol transfer proteins (PITP) are of particular interest as they can bind to and transfer phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) – the precursor of important signalling molecules, phosphoinositides – and because they have essential functions in neuronal development (PITPα) and cytokinesis (PITPβ). Structural analysis indicates that, in the cytosol, PITPs are in a ‘closed’ conformation completely shielding the lipid within them. But during lipid exchange at the membrane, they must transiently ‘open’. To study PITP dynamics in intact cells, we chemically targeted their C95 residue that, although non-essential for lipid transfer, is buried within the phospholipid-binding cavity, and so, its chemical modification prevents PtdIns binding because of steric hindrance. This treatment resulted in entrapment of open conformation PITPs at the membrane and inactivation of the cytosolic pool of PITPs within few minutes. PITP isoforms were differentially inactivated with the dynamics of PITPβ faster than PITPα. We identify two tryptophan residues essential for membrane docking of PITPs. PMID:18636990

  5. Dynamics of lipid transfer by phosphatidylinositol transfer proteins in cells.

    PubMed

    Shadan, Sadaf; Holic, Roman; Carvou, Nicolas; Ee, Patrick; Li, Michelle; Murray-Rust, Judith; Cockcroft, Shamshad

    2008-09-01

    Of many lipid transfer proteins identified, all have been implicated in essential cellular processes, but the activity of none has been demonstrated in intact cells. Among these, phosphatidylinositol transfer proteins (PITP) are of particular interest as they can bind to and transfer phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns)--the precursor of important signalling molecules, phosphoinositides--and because they have essential functions in neuronal development (PITPalpha) and cytokinesis (PITPbeta). Structural analysis indicates that, in the cytosol, PITPs are in a 'closed' conformation completely shielding the lipid within them. But during lipid exchange at the membrane, they must transiently 'open'. To study PITP dynamics in intact cells, we chemically targeted their C95 residue that, although non-essential for lipid transfer, is buried within the phospholipid-binding cavity, and so, its chemical modification prevents PtdIns binding because of steric hindrance. This treatment resulted in entrapment of open conformation PITPs at the membrane and inactivation of the cytosolic pool of PITPs within few minutes. PITP isoforms were differentially inactivated with the dynamics of PITPbeta faster than PITPalpha. We identify two tryptophan residues essential for membrane docking of PITPs.

  6. Bortezomib Improves Adoptive T-cell Therapy by Sensitizing Cancer Cells to FasL Cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Shanker, Anil; Pellom, Samuel T; Dudimah, Duafalia F; Thounaojam, Menaka C; de Kluyver, Rachel L; Brooks, Alan D; Yagita, Hideo; McVicar, Daniel W; Murphy, William J; Longo, Dan L; Sayers, Thomas J

    2015-12-15

    Cancer immunotherapy shows great promise but many patients fail to show objective responses, including in cancers that can respond well, such as melanoma and renal adenocarcinoma. The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib sensitizes solid tumors to apoptosis in response to TNF-family death ligands. Because T cells provide multiple death ligands at the tumor site, we investigated the effects of bortezomib on T-cell responses in immunotherapy models involving low-avidity antigens. Bortezomib did not affect lymphocyte or tissue-resident CD11c(+)CD8(+) dendritic cell counts in tumor-bearing mice, did not inhibit dendritic cell expression of costimulatory molecules, and did not decrease MHC class I/II-associated antigen presentation to cognate T cells. Rather, bortezomib activated NF-κB p65 in CD8(+) T cells, stabilizing expression of T-cell receptor CD3ζ and IL2 receptor-α, while maintaining IFNγ secretion to improve FasL-mediated tumor lysis. Notably, bortezomib increased tumor cell surface expression of Fas in mice as well as human melanoma tissue from a responsive patient. In renal tumor-bearing immunodeficient Rag2(-/-) mice, bortezomib treatment after adoptive T-cell immunotherapy reduced lung metastases and enhanced host survival. Our findings highlight the potential of proteasome inhibitors to enhance antitumor T-cell function in the context of cancer immunotherapy. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  7. Adoptive immunotherapy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Ruella, Marco; Kalos, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Recent clinical success has underscored the potential for immunotherapy based on the adoptive cell transfer (ACT) of engineered T lymphocytes to mediate dramatic, potent, and durable clinical responses. This success has led to the broader evaluation of engineered T-lymphocyte-based adoptive cell therapy to treat a broad range of malignancies. In this review, we summarize concepts, successes, and challenges for the broader development of this promising field, focusing principally on lessons gleaned from immunological principles and clinical thought. We present ACT in the context of integrating T-cell and tumor biology and the broader systemic immune response.

  8. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 inhibition increases the antitumor activity of adoptive T-cell therapy when carried out with naïve rather than differentiated T cells.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Takeshi; Adachi, Satoko; Okayama, Tetsuya; Kokura, Satoshi; Mizushima, Katsura; Doi, Toshifumi; Matsuyama, Tatsuzo; Sakamoto, Naoyuki; Katada, Kazuhiro; Kamada, Kazuhiro; Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Handa, Osamu; Takagi, Tomohisa; Naito, Yuji; Itoh, Yoshito; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2015-05-01

    Although treatment with an antibody against cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) combined with multiple therapeutic interventions has been explored, the effect of combination therapy with CTLA-4 inhibition and adoptive T-cell therapy has not been determined. In the present study, our aim was to determine whether CTLA-4 inhibition, combined with adoptive transfer of T cells at different stages of differentiation, exhibits synergistic antitumor effects in a murine colon cancer model. Mice bearing subcutaneous tumors were administered adoptive T-cell transfer of CD62Lhigh or CD62Llow cells combined with an anti-CTLA-4 antibody (α-CTLA-4) or control immunoglobulin G. Subcutaneous tumors were harvested, and the antitumor effects and helper T-cell polarization were analyzed. CTLA-4 inhibition combined with CD62Lhigh cell administration showed the strongest antitumor effect. Combination therapy increased the number of CD3+ cells within the tumor. Moreover, CTLA-4 inhibition induced polarization of T cells infiltrating the tumor toward the T helper 1 lineage, and suppressed the frequency of regulatory T cells within the tumor, particularly in combination with CD62Lhigh T-cell transfer. This is the first report demonstrating that the efficacy of α-CTLA-4 and adoptive T-cell transfer combination therapy depends on the state of differentiation of the transferred T cells. Our data support the notion that a combination of α-CTLA-4 and adoptive T-cell transfer containing an abundance of naïve phenotype cells could potentially exert antitumor effects in a clinical setting.

  9. Mass transfer in fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, R. D., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Developments in the following areas are reported: surface area and pore size distribution in electrolyte matrices, electron microscopy of electrolyte matrices, surface tension of KOH solutions, water transport in fuel cells, and effectiveness factors for fuel cell components.

  10. Adoptive T-cell therapy for hematological malignancies using T cells gene-modified to express tumor antigen-specific receptors.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Hiroshi

    2014-02-01

    The functional properties of the adoptive immune response mediated by effector T lymphocytes are decisively regulated by their T-cell receptors (TCRs). Transfer of genes encoding target antigen-specific receptors enables polyclonal T cells to redirect toward cancer cells and virally infected cells expressing those defined antigens. Using this technology, a large population of redirected T cells displaying uniform therapeutic properties has been produced, powerfully advancing their clinical application as "cellular drugs" for adoptive immunotherapy against cancer. Clinically, anticancer adoptive immunotherapy using these genetically engineered T cells has an impressive and proven track record. Notable examples include the dramatic benefit of chimeric antigen receptor gene-modified T cells redirected towards B-cell lineage antigen CD19 in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and the impressive outcomes in the use of TCR gene-modified T cells redirected towards NY-ESO-1, a representative cancer-testis antigen, in patients with advanced melanoma and synovial cell sarcoma. In this review, we briefly overview the current status of this treatment option in the context of hematological malignancy, and discuss a number of challenges that still pose an obstacle to the full effectiveness of this strategy.

  11. Enhanced NK cell adoptive antitumor effects against breast cancer in vitro via blockade of the transforming growth factor-β signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yue; Hu, Jinyue; Li, Rongguo; Song, Jian; Kang, Yujuan; Liu, Si; Zhang, Dongwei

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells have great potential for improving cancer immunotherapy. Adoptive NK cell transfer, an adoptive immunotherapy, represents a promising nontoxic anticancer therapy. However, existing data indicate that tumor cells can effectively escape NK cell-mediated apoptosis through immunosuppressive effects in the tumor microenvironment, and the therapeutic activity of adoptive NK cell transfer is not as efficient as anticipated. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) is a potent immunosuppressant. Genetic and epigenetic events that occur during mammary tumorigenesis circumvent the tumor-suppressing activity of TGF-β, thereby permitting late-stage breast cancer cells to acquire an invasive and metastatic phenotype in response to TGF-β. To block the TGF-β signaling pathway, NK cells were genetically modified with a dominant-negative TGF-β type II receptor by optimizing electroporation using the Amaxa Nucleofector system. These genetically modified NK cells were insensitive to TGF-β and resisted the suppressive effect of TGF-β on MCF-7 breast cancer cells in vitro. Our results demonstrate that blocking the TGF-β signaling pathway to modulate the tumor microenvironment can improve the antitumor activity of adoptive NK cells in vitro, thereby providing a new rationale for the treatment of breast cancer. PMID:26124672

  12. Antigen-specific T-cell lines transfer protective immunity against Trichinella spiralis in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Riedlinger, J; Grencis, R K; Wakelin, D

    1986-01-01

    T-cell lines specific for infective muscle larvae antigens of the intestinal nematode Trichinella spiralis have been generated in vitro. These antigen-specific T-cell lines express the L3T4+ Ly2- phenotype and secrete the lymphokines IL-2, IL-3 and gamma-IFN. They are stable in culture for up to 15 weeks and are protective when adoptively transferred into naive recipients. As few as 2 x 10(5) T. spiralis-specific tract. In addition, intestinal mastocytosis and peripheral blood eosinophilia were accelerated after adoptive transfer of T. spiralis-specific T-cell lines. PMID:2423438

  13. Charge transfer on the metallic atom-pair bond, and the crystal structures adopted by intermetallic compounds.

    PubMed

    Rajasekharan, T; Seshubai, V

    2012-01-01

    It has been argued in our recent papers that the heat of formation of intermetallic compounds is mostly concentrated in the nearest neighbor unlike atom-pair bonds, and that the positive term in Miedema's equation is associated with charge transfer on the bond to maintain electroneutrality. In this paper, taking examples of some well populated crystal-structure types such as MgCu(2), AsNa(3), AuCu(3), MoSi(2) and SiCr(3) types, the effect of such charge transfer on the crystal structures adopted by intermetallic compounds is examined. It is shown that the correlation between the observed size changes of atoms on alloying and their electronegativity differences is supportive of the idea of charge transfer between atoms. It is argued that the electronegativity and valence differences need to be of the required magnitude and direction to alter, through charge transfer, the elemental radius ratios R(A)/R(B) to the internal radius ratios r(A)/r(B) allowed by the structure types. Since the size change of atoms on alloying is highly correlated to how different R(A)/R(B) is from the ideal radius ratio for a structure type, the lattice parameters of intermetallic compounds can be predicted with excellent accuracy knowing R(A)/R(B). A practical application of the approach developed in our recent papers to superalloy design is presented.

  14. T-cell Depleted Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplants As A Platform For Adoptive Therapy With Leukemia Selective Or Virus-Specific T-cells

    PubMed Central

    O'Reilly, Richard J.; Koehne, Gunther; Hasan, Aisha N; Doubrovina, Ekaterina; Prockop, Susan

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplants adequately depleted of T-cells can reduce or prevent acute and chronic GVHD in both HLA matched and haplotype disparate hosts, without post-transplant prophylaxis with immunosuppressive drugs. Recent trials indicate that high doses of CD34+ progenitors from G-CSF mobilized peripheral blood leukocytes isolated and T-cell depleted by immunoadsorption to paramagnetic beads, when administered after myeloablative conditioning with TBI and chemotherapy or chemotherapy alone can secure consistent engraftment and abrogate GVHD in patients with acute leukemia without incurring an increased risk of a recurrent leukemia. Early clinical trials also indicate that high doses of in vitro generated leukemia reactive donor T-cells can be adoptively transferred and can induce remissions of leukemia relapse without GVHD. Similarly, virus-specific T-cells generated from the transplant donor or an HLA partially matched third party, have induced remissions of Rituxan-refractory EBV lymphomas and can clear CMV disease or viremia persisting despite antiviral therapy in a high proportion of cases. Analyses of treatment responses and failures illustrate both the advantages and limitations of donor or banked, third party derived T-cells, but underscore the potential of adoptive T-cell therapy in the absence of ongoing immunosuppression. PMID:26039207

  15. T-cell depleted allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplants as a platform for adoptive therapy with leukemia selective or virus-specific T-cells.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, R J; Koehne, G; Hasan, A N; Doubrovina, E; Prockop, S

    2015-06-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplants adequately depleted of T-cells can reduce or prevent acute and chronic GVHD in both HLA-matched and haplotype-disparate hosts, without post-transplant prophylaxis with immunosuppressive drugs. Recent trials indicate that high doses of CD34+ progenitors from G-CSF mobilized peripheral blood leukocytes isolated and T-cell depleted by immunoadsorption to paramagnetic beads, when administered after myeloablative conditioning with TBI and chemotherapy or chemotherapy alone can secure consistent engraftment and abrogate GVHD in patients with acute leukemia without incurring an increased risk of a recurrent leukemia. Early clinical trials also indicate that high doses of in vitro generated leukemia-reactive donor T-cells can be adoptively transferred and can induce remissions of leukemia relapse without GVHD. Similarly, virus-specific T-cells generated from the transplant donor or an HLA partially matched third party, have induced remissions of Rituxan-refractory EBV lymphomas and can clear CMV disease or viremia persisting despite antiviral therapy in a high proportion of cases. Analyses of treatment responses and failures illustrate both the advantages and limitations of donor or banked, third party-derived T-cells, but underscore the potential of adoptive T-cell therapy in the absence of ongoing immunosuppression.

  16. Administrative simplification: adoption of operating rules for health care electronic funds transfers (EFT) and remittance advice transactions. Interim final rule with comment period.

    PubMed

    2012-08-10

    This interim final rule with comment period implements parts of section 1104 of the Affordable Care Act which requires the adoption of operating rules for the health care electronic funds transfers (EFT) and remittance advice transaction.

  17. Proton transfer in microbial electrolysis cells

    DOE PAGES

    Borole, Abhijeet P.; Lewis, Alex J.

    2017-02-15

    Proton transfer and electron transfer are of prime importance in the development of microbial electrochemical cells. While electron transfer is primarily controlled by biology, proton transfer is controlled by process engineering and cell design. To develop commercially feasible technologies around the concept of a bioelectrochemical cell, real feedstocks have to be explored and associated limitations have to be identified. Here in this study, the proton transfer rate was quantified for a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) and its dependence on process parameters was investigated using a proton balance model. The reaction system consisted of a biomass-derived pyrolytic aqueous stream as amore » substrate producing hydrogen in a flow-through MEC. The proton transfer rate increased with anode flow rate and organic loading rate up to a maximum of 0.36 ± 0.01 moles per m2 per h, equivalent to a hydrogen production rate of 9.08 L per L per day. Higher rates of hydrogen production, reaching 11.7 ± 0.2 L per L per day were achieved, when additional protons were provided via the cathode buffer. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy shows that proton transfer was the dominant resistance in the production of hydrogen. The quantification of proton transfer rates for MECs with potential for biorefinery application and the demonstration of high hydrogen production rates approaching those required for commercial consideration indicate the strong potential of this technology for renewable hydrogen production. Understanding the transport phenomenon in bioelectrochemical cells is of great significance since these systems have potential for wide-ranging applications including energy production, bioremediation, chemical and nanomaterial synthesis, electro-fermentation, energy storage, desalination, and produced water treatment. Electron transfer in anode biofilms has been investigated extensively, but proton transfer studies are also important, since many cathodic half reactions

  18. Genetically Modified T-Cell-Based Adoptive Immunotherapy in Hematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Baixin; Gao, Qingping; Wang, Qiongyu; Zeng, Zhi

    2017-01-01

    A significant proportion of hematological malignancies remain limited in treatment options. Immune system modulation serves as a promising therapeutic approach to eliminate malignant cells. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) play a central role in antitumor immunity; unfortunately, nonspecific approaches for targeted recognition of tumor cells by CTLs to mediate tumor immune evasion in hematological malignancies imply multiple mechanisms, which may or may not be clinically relevant. Recently, genetically modified T-cell-based adoptive immunotherapy approaches, including chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy and engineered T-cell receptor (TCR) T-cell therapy, promise to overcome immune evasion by redirecting the specificity of CTLs to tumor cells. In clinic trials, CAR-T-cell- and TCR-T-cell-based adoptive immunotherapy have produced encouraging clinical outcomes, thereby demonstrating their therapeutic potential in mitigating tumor development. The purpose of the present review is to (1) provide a detailed overview of the multiple mechanisms for immune evasion related with T-cell-based therapies; (2) provide a current summary of the applications of CAR-T-cell- as well as neoantigen-specific TCR-T-cell-based adoptive immunotherapy and routes taken to overcome immune evasion; and (3) evaluate alternative approaches targeting immune evasion via optimization of CAR-T and TCR-T-cell immunotherapies. PMID:28116322

  19. Mechanisms of immunity in typhus infection: adoptive transfer of immunity to Rickettsia mooseri.

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, J R; Wisseman, C G; Fiset, P

    1979-01-01

    When nonimmune guinea pigs are inoculated intradermally (i.d.) with Rickettsia mooseri (R. typhi), the rickettsiae replicate at the site of inoculation, leading to the development of a grossly observable lesion. In contrast, guinea pigs which have recovered from R. mooseri infection are resistant to challenge and prevent both rickettsial growth and the formation of lesions. To study the mechanisms of this immunity, sera or splenic cells collected from nonimmune or immune guinea pigs were inoculated separetely into nonimmune recipients. Splenic cells collected from immune donors protected R. mooseri-naive recipients from i.d. challenge as measured by control of rickettsial growth and by prevention of development of lesions at i.d. sites of inoculation. In contrast, serum from immune and nonimmune doners failed to protect nonimmune recipients by either criterion. PMID:110699

  20. Human somatic cell nuclear transfer and cloning.

    PubMed

    2012-10-01

    This document presents arguments that conclude that it is unethical to use somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) for infertility treatment due to concerns about safety; the unknown impact of SCNT on children, families, and society; and the availability of other ethically acceptable means of assisted reproduction. This document replaces the ASRM Ethics Committee report titled, "Human somatic cell nuclear transfer (cloning)," last published in Fertil Steril 2000;74:873-6. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Adult rabbits acquire resistance to lethal calicivirus infection by adoptive transfer of sera from infected young rabbits.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, P G; Dinís, M; Costa-E-Silva, A; Aguas, A P

    2008-02-15

    Calicivirus infection of adult rabbits induces the so-called rabbit haemorrhagic disease (RHD) that kills 90% or more of the infected animals; in contrast, young rabbits (up to 8-week-old animals) are resistant to the same infectious agent. We report that calicivirus inoculation of young rabbits induced moderate titres of antiviral antibodies. When these rabbits reached adulthood, a second calicivirus inoculation resulted in resistance to RHD and boosting of antibody titres in half of the rabbits. Adoptive transfer of sera from calicivirus-infected young rabbits to naïve adult rabbits conferred resistance to RHD. We conclude that calicivirus infection of young rabbits induces specific anti-calicivirus antibodies that will protect them from RHD when they reach adulthood.

  2. Cyclophosphamide-facilitated adoptive immunotherapy of an established tumor depends on elimination of tumor-induced suppressor T cells

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    On the basis of preceding studies showing that tumor-induced, T cell- mediated immunosuppression serves as an obstacle to adoptive immunotherapy of the Meth A fibrosarcoma, it was predicted that cyclophosphamide treatment of tumor bearers would remove this obstacle and allow passively transferred immune T cells to cause tumor regression. It was found that infusion of immune spleen cells alone had no effect on tumor growth, and cyclophosphamide alone caused a temporary halt in tumor progression. In contrast, combination therapy consisting of intravenous injection of 100 mg/kg of cyclophosphamide followed 1 h later by intravenous infusion of tumor-immune spleen cells caused small, as well as large tumors, to completely and permanently regress. Tumor regression caused by combination therapy was completely inhibited by intravenous infusion of splenic T cells from donors with established tumors, but not by spleen cells from normal donors. These suppressor T cells were eliminated from the spleen by treating the tumor-bearing donors with 100 mg/kg of cyclophosphamide. Immune T cells, in contrast, were resistant to this dose of cyclophosphamide. These results show that failure of intravenously-infused, tumor- sensitized T cells to cause regression of the Meth A fibrosarcoma growing in its syngeneic or semi-syngeneic host is caused by the presence of a tumor-induced population of cyclophosphamide-sensitive suppressor T cells. PMID:6460831

  3. Serial Low Doses of Sorafenib Enhance Therapeutic Efficacy of Adoptive T Cell Therapy in a Murine Model by Improving Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ren-Shyan; Hwang, Jeng-Jong

    2014-01-01

    Requirements of large numbers of transferred T cells and various immunosuppressive factors and cells in the tumor microenvironment limit the applications of adoptive T cells therapy (ACT) in clinic. Accumulating evidences show that chemotherapeutic drugs could act as immune supportive instead of immunosuppressive agents when proper dosage is used, and combined with immunotherapy often results in better treatment outcomes than monotherapy. Controversial immunomodulation effects of sorafenib, a multi-kinases inhibitor, at high and low doses have been reported in several types of cancer. However, what is the range of the low-dose sorafenib will influence the host immunity and responses of ACT is still ambiguous. Here we used a well-established E.G7/OT-1 murine model to understand the effects of serial low doses of sorafenib on both tumor microenvironment and transferred CD8+ T cells and the underlying mechanisms. Sorafenib lowered the expressions of immunosuppressive factors, and enhanced functions and migrations of transferred CD8+ T cells through inhibition of STAT3 and other immunosuppressive factors. CD8+ T cells were transduced with granzyme B promoter for driving imaging reporters to visualize the activation and distribution of transferred CD8+ T cells prior to adoptive transfer. Better activations of CD8+ T cells and tumor inhibitions were found in the combinational group compared with CD8+ T cells or sorafenib alone groups. Not only immunosuppressive factors but myeloid derived suppressive cells (MDSCs) and regulatory T cells (Tregs) were decreased in sorafenib-treated group, indicating that augmentation of tumor inhibition and function of CD8+ T cells by serial low doses of sorafenib were via reversing the immunosuppressive microenvironment. These results revealed that the tumor inhibitions of sorafenib not only through eradicating tumor cells but modifying tumor microenvironment, which helps outcomes of ACT significantly. PMID:25333973

  4. In vivo trafficking of adoptively transferred interleukin-2 expanded tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and peripheral blood lymphocytes. Results of a double gene marking trial.

    PubMed Central

    Economou, J S; Belldegrun, A S; Glaspy, J; Toloza, E M; Figlin, R; Hobbs, J; Meldon, N; Kaboo, R; Tso, C L; Miller, A; Lau, R; McBride, W; Moen, R C

    1996-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy with tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) and IL-2 appears to produce dramatic regressions in patients with metastatic melanoma and renal cancer. However, the in vivo mechanism of TIL function is not known. We conducted an UCLA Human Subject Protection Committee, Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee, and FDA-approved clinical trial using genetically-marked TIL to test the hypothesis that these cells have unique, tumor-specific in vivo trafficking patterns. TIL and PBL (as a control effector cell population) were isolated and expanded in parallel in vitro in IL-2-containing medium for 4-6 wk. During the expansion, TIL and PBL were separately transduced with the amphotropic retroviral vectors LNL6 and G1Na. Transduced TIL and PBL were coinfused into patients and their respective numbers measured in tumor, peripheral blood, and normal tissues; integrated provirus could be quantitated and distinguished by DNA PCR. Nine patients were treated (six melanoma, three renal) and received between 4.5 x 10(8) and 1.24 x 10(10) total cells. Both "marked" TIL and PBL could be detected circulating in the peripheral blood, in some patients for up to 99 d after infusion. Marked TIL and/or PBL could be detected in tumor biopsies in six of nine patients as early as day 6 and as late as day 99 after infusion. No convincing pattern of preferential trafficking of TIL vs. PBL to tumor was noted. Moreover, concurrent biopsies of muscle, fat, and skin demonstrated the presence of TIL/PBL in comparable or greater numbers than in tumor in five patients. The results of this double gene marking trial provide interesting insights into the life span and trafficking of adoptively transferred lymphocytes, but do not support the hypothesis that TIL specifically traffic to tumor deposits. PMID:8567975

  5. Double-layered cell transfer technology for bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Akazawa, Keiko; Iwasaki, Kengo; Nagata, Mizuki; Yokoyama, Naoki; Ayame, Hirohito; Yamaki, Kazumasa; Tanaka, Yuichi; Honda, Izumi; Morioka, Chikako; Kimura, Tsuyoshi; Komaki, Motohiro; Kishida, Akio; Izumi, Yuichi; Morita, Ikuo

    2016-09-14

    For cell-based medicine, to mimic in vivo cellular localization, various tissue engineering approaches have been studied to obtain a desirable arrangement of cells on scaffold materials. We have developed a novel method of cell manipulation called "cell transfer technology", enabling the transfer of cultured cells onto scaffold materials, and controlling cell topology. Here we show that using this technique, two different cell types can be transferred onto a scaffold surface as stable double layers or in patterned arrangements. Various combinations of adherent cells were transferred to a scaffold, amniotic membrane, in overlapping bilayers (double-layered cell transfer), and transferred cells showed stability upon deformations of the material including folding and trimming. Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells from periodontal ligaments (PDLSC) and osteoblasts, using double-layered cell transfer significantly enhanced bone formation, when compared to single cell type transplantation. Our findings suggest that this double-layer cell transfer is useful to produce a cell transplantation material that can bear two cell layers. Moreover, the transplantation of an amniotic membrane with PDLSCs/osteoblasts by cell transfer technology has therapeutic potential for bone defects. We conclude that cell transfer technology provides a novel and unique cell transplantation method for bone regeneration.

  6. Double-layered cell transfer technology for bone regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Akazawa, Keiko; Iwasaki, Kengo; Nagata, Mizuki; Yokoyama, Naoki; Ayame, Hirohito; Yamaki, Kazumasa; Tanaka, Yuichi; Honda, Izumi; Morioka, Chikako; Kimura, Tsuyoshi; Komaki, Motohiro; Kishida, Akio; Izumi, Yuichi; Morita, Ikuo

    2016-01-01

    For cell-based medicine, to mimic in vivo cellular localization, various tissue engineering approaches have been studied to obtain a desirable arrangement of cells on scaffold materials. We have developed a novel method of cell manipulation called “cell transfer technology”, enabling the transfer of cultured cells onto scaffold materials, and controlling cell topology. Here we show that using this technique, two different cell types can be transferred onto a scaffold surface as stable double layers or in patterned arrangements. Various combinations of adherent cells were transferred to a scaffold, amniotic membrane, in overlapping bilayers (double-layered cell transfer), and transferred cells showed stability upon deformations of the material including folding and trimming. Transplantation of mesenchymal stem cells from periodontal ligaments (PDLSC) and osteoblasts, using double-layered cell transfer significantly enhanced bone formation, when compared to single cell type transplantation. Our findings suggest that this double-layer cell transfer is useful to produce a cell transplantation material that can bear two cell layers. Moreover, the transplantation of an amniotic membrane with PDLSCs/osteoblasts by cell transfer technology has therapeutic potential for bone defects. We conclude that cell transfer technology provides a novel and unique cell transplantation method for bone regeneration. PMID:27624174

  7. Adoptive therapy with CAR redirected T cells: the challenges in targeting solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Abken, Hinrich

    2015-01-01

    Recent spectacular success in the adoptive cell therapy of leukemia and lymphoma with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T cells raised the expectations that this therapy may be efficacious in a wide range of cancer entities. The expectations are based on the predefined specificity of CAR T cells by an antibody-derived binding domain that acts independently of the natural T-cell receptor, recognizes targets independently of presentation by the major histocompatibility complex and allows targeting toward virtually any cell surface antigen. We here discuss that targeting CAR T cells toward solid tumors faces certain circumstances critical for the therapeutic success. Targeting tumor stroma and taking advantage of TRUCK cells, in other words, CAR T cells with inducible release of a transgenic payload, are some strategies envisaged to overcome current limitations in the near future.

  8. Matrix-assisted cell transfer for intervertebral disc cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Bertram, Helge; Kroeber, Markus; Wang, Haili; Unglaub, Frank; Guehring, Thorsten; Carstens, Claus; Richter, Wiltrud

    2005-06-17

    Cell therapy seems to be a promising way to reconstitute degenerated discs. We elucidate the basic aspects of intervertebral disc (IVD) cell therapy to estimate its potential in disc regeneration. Cell transfer efficiency and survival was quantified by luciferase expression after injection of recombinant cells into healthy, nucleotomized or mechanically degenerated rabbit IVDs in vitro, in situ or in vivo. A two-component fibrin matrix was adapted to allow injection of a fluid cell suspension that quickly polymerizes in IVDs. Thirty-five to fifty percent of matrix injected cells remained in the nucleus and transition zone in contrast to a rapid loss of medium-injected cells. Nucleotomy, which reduces intradiscal pressure, was crucial to the survival of the transferred cells over 3 days and nutritional enrichment of the fibrin matrix with potent biomolecules from serum significantly enhanced cell viability. In conclusion, advanced matrix substitutes are needed for efficient transfer and improved cell survival in the low-nutrient intradiscal environment to further improve disc cell therapy.

  9. HLA type-independent generation of antigen-specific T cells for adoptive immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Markus H; Meyer, Sonja; Brestrich, Gordon; Moosmann, Andreas; Kern, Florian; Tesfa, Lydia; Babel, Nina; Mittenzweig, Alexa; Rooney, Cliona M; Hammerschmidt, Wolfgang; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Reinke, Petra

    2005-07-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy with antigen-specific T cells has been successfully used to treat certain infectious diseases and cancers. Although more patients may profit from T cell therapy, its more frequent use is restricted by limitations in current T cell generation strategies. The most commonly applied peptide-based approaches rely on the knowledge of relevant epitopes. Therefore, T cells cannot be generated for diseases with unknown epitopes or for patients with unfavorable HLA types. We developed a peptide-based approach for HLA type-independent generation of specific T cells against various proteins. It is based on short-time stimulation with peptide libraries that cover most CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell epitopes of given proteins. The procedure requires no prior knowledge of epitopes because libraries are synthesized solely on the basis of the protein's amino acid sequence. Stimulation is followed by immunomagnetic selection of activated IFN-gamma-secreting cells and nonspecific expansion. To evaluate the protocol, we generated autologous T cells specific for a well-characterized antigen, the human cytomegalovirus phosphoprotein 65 (pp65). Generated T cell lines consisted of pp65-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) lymphocytes that displayed antigen-specific killing and proliferation. The protocol combines the biosafety of peptide-based approaches with HLA type independence and may help to advance adoptive immunotherapy in the future.

  10. Systemic injection of TLR1/2 agonist improves adoptive antigen-specific T cell therapy in glioma-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yufei; Luo, Feifei; Li, Anning; Qian, Jiawen; Yao, Zhenwei; Feng, Xiaoyuan; Chu, Yiwei

    2014-09-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy is an attractive strategy for glioma treatment. However, some obstacles still need be overcome. In this study, GL261-bearing mice treated with adoptively transferred antigen-specific T cells and systemic injection of bacterial lipoprotein (BLP), a TLR1/2 agonist, got a long-term survival and even immune protection. By analyzing adoptive T cells, it was found that BLP maintained T cell survival, proliferation and anti-tumor efficacy in the brains of tumor-bearing hosts. Moreover, tumor microenvironment was modified by up-regulating IFN-γ-secreting CD8+ T cells and down-regulating MDSC, which might be related with high CXCL10 and low CCL2 expression. In addition, TLR2 deficiency abrogated therapeutic effect with increased MDSC accumulation and decreased IFN-γ-secreting CD8+ T cells in the brains. Thus, the systemic injection of BLP could improve the adoptive T cell therapy by maintaining T cell persistence, modifying the tumor microenvironment and even inducing systemic anti-tumor immunity, which might offer a clinically promising immunotherapeutic strategy for glioma.

  11. Retargeted human avidin-CAR T cells for adoptive immunotherapy of EGFRvIII expressing gliomas and their evaluation via optical imaging

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zhiping; Sun, Haojie; Zhang, Mingzhi; Zhang, Jianning; Liu, Shuang; Hao, Limin; Lu, Guoqiu; Zheng, Kangcheng; Gong, Xikui; Wu, Di; Wang, Fan; Shen, Li

    2015-01-01

    There has been significant progress in the design of chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) for adoptive immunotherapy targeting tumor-associated antigens. However, the challenge of monitoring the therapy in real time has been continually ignored. To address this issue, we developed optical molecular imaging approaches to evaluate a recently reported novel CAR strategy for adoptive immunotherapy against glioma xenografts expressing EGFRvIII. We initially biotinylated a novel anti-EGFRvIII monoclonal antibody (biotin-4G1) to pre-target EGFRvIII+ gliomas and then redirect activated avidin-CAR expressing T cells against the pre-targeted biotin-4G1. By optical imaging study and bio-distribution analysis, we confirmed the specificity of pre-target and target and determined the optimal time for T cells adoptive transfer in vivo. The results showed this therapeutic strategy offered efficient therapy effect to EGFRvIII+ glioma-bearing mice and implied that optical imaging is a highly useful tool in aiding in the instruction of clinical CAR-T cells adoptive transfer in future. PMID:26124178

  12. Retargeted human avidin-CAR T cells for adoptive immunotherapy of EGFRvIII expressing gliomas and their evaluation via optical imaging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kaiyu; Liu, Xujie; Peng, Zhiping; Sun, Haojie; Zhang, Mingzhi; Zhang, Jianning; Liu, Shuang; Hao, Limin; Lu, Guoqiu; Zheng, Kangcheng; Gong, Xikui; Wu, Di; Wang, Fan; Shen, Li

    2015-09-15

    There has been significant progress in the design of chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) for adoptive immunotherapy targeting tumor-associated antigens. However, the challenge of monitoring the therapy in real time has been continually ignored. To address this issue, we developed optical molecular imaging approaches to evaluate a recently reported novel CAR strategy for adoptive immunotherapy against glioma xenografts expressing EGFRvIII. We initially biotinylated a novel anti-EGFRvIII monoclonal antibody (biotin-4G1) to pre-target EGFRvIII+ gliomas and then redirect activated avidin-CAR expressing T cells against the pre-targeted biotin-4G1. By optical imaging study and bio-distribution analysis, we confirmed the specificity of pre-target and target and determined the optimal time for T cells adoptive transfer in vivo. The results showed this therapeutic strategy offered efficient therapy effect to EGFRvIII+ glioma-bearing mice and implied that optical imaging is a highly useful tool in aiding in the instruction of clinical CAR-T cells adoptive transfer in future.

  13. Human embryonic stem cells derived by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Masahito; Amato, Paula; Sparman, Michelle; Gutierrez, Nuria Marti; Tippner-Hedges, Rebecca; Ma, Hong; Kang, Eunju; Fulati, Alimujiang; Lee, Hyo-Sang; Sritanaudomchai, Hathaitip; Masterson, Keith; Larson, Janine; Eaton, Deborah; Sadler-Fredd, Karen; Battaglia, David; Lee, David; Wu, Diana; Jensen, Jeffrey; Patton, Phillip; Gokhale, Sumita; Stouffer, Richard L; Wolf, Don; Mitalipov, Shoukhrat

    2013-06-06

    Reprogramming somatic cells into pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has been envisioned as an approach for generating patient-matched nuclear transfer (NT)-ESCs for studies of disease mechanisms and for developing specific therapies. Past attempts to produce human NT-ESCs have failed secondary to early embryonic arrest of SCNT embryos. Here, we identified premature exit from meiosis in human oocytes and suboptimal activation as key factors that are responsible for these outcomes. Optimized SCNT approaches designed to circumvent these limitations allowed derivation of human NT-ESCs. When applied to premium quality human oocytes, NT-ESC lines were derived from as few as two oocytes. NT-ESCs displayed normal diploid karyotypes and inherited their nuclear genome exclusively from parental somatic cells. Gene expression and differentiation profiles in human NT-ESCs were similar to embryo-derived ESCs, suggesting efficient reprogramming of somatic cells to a pluripotent state.

  14. Nebulization of RNS60, a Physically-Modified Saline, Attenuates the Adoptive Transfer of Experimental Allergic Encephalomyelitis in Mice: Implications for Multiple Sclerosis Therapy.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Susanta; Rangasamy, Suresh B; Ghosh, Supurna; Watson, Richard L; Pahan, Kalipada

    2017-05-01

    Developing a new and effective therapeutic approach against multiple sclerosis (MS) is always an important area of research. RNS60 is a bioactive aqueous solution generated by subjecting normal saline to Taylor-Couette-Poiseuille flow under elevated oxygen pressure. Recently we have demonstrated that RNS60, administered through intraperitoneal injection, ameliorated clinical symptoms and disease progression of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of MS. Since the intravenous route is not preferred for treating a chronic condition, we tested if nebulization of RNS60 could attenuate the disease process of adoptively-transferred EAE in mice. Although we could not directly image RNS60 after nebulization, nebulized Alexa680 reached spleen, spinal cord and different parts of the brain. Nebulization of RNS60 starting from the acute phase attenuated clinical symptoms of relapsing-remitting EAE in female SJL/J mice. RNS60 nebulization also inhibited perivascular cuffing, maintained the integrity of blood-brain and blood-spinal cord barriers, suppressed inflammation, normalized the expression of myelin genes, and blocked demyelination in the CNS of EAE mice. On the immunomodulatory front, nebulization of RNS60 to EAE mice led to the enrichment of anti-autoimmune regulatory T cells (Tregs) and suppression of autoimmune Th17 cells. Together, these results suggest that nebulization of RNS60 may be used to control aberrant immune responses in MS and other autoimmune disorders.

  15. Glyceryl Tribenzoate: A Flavoring Ingredient, Inhibits the Adoptive Transfer of Experimental Allergic Encephalomyelitis via TGF-β: Implications for Multiple Sclerosis Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mondal, Susanta; Dasarathi, Sridevi; Pahan, Kalipada

    2017-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common autoimmune demyelinating disease of the central nervous system (CNS). Here, we have explored a novel use of glyceryl tribenzoate (GTB), a flavoring ingredient, in ameliorating the disease process of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of MS, via TGF-β. Oral feeding of GTB suppressed clinical symptoms of adoptively-transferred relapsing-remitting (RR) EAE in recipient mice and suppressed the generation of encephalitogenic T cells in donor mice. GTB also attenuated clinical symptoms of RR-EAE in PLP-TCR transgenic mice and chronic EAE in male C57/BL6 mice. Accordingly, GTB also suppressed perivascular cuffing, preserved the integrity of blood-brain barrier and blood-spinal cord barrier, inhibited inflammation, and stopped demyelination in the CNS of EAE mice. Interestingly, GTB treatment upregulated TGF-β and enriched regulatory T cells (Tregs) in splenocytes as well as in vivo in EAE mice. Blocking TGF-β by neutralizing antibodies abrogated GTB-mediated enrichment of Tregs and protection of EAE. These results suggest that oral GTB may be considered as a possible therapy for MS patients. PMID:28367355

  16. Autoimmune B-cell lymphopenia after successful adoptive therapy with telomerase-specific T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Ugel, Stefano; Scarselli, Elisa; Iezzi, Manuela; Mennuni, Carmela; Pannellini, Tania; Calvaruso, Francesco; Cipriani, Barbara; De Palma, Raffaele; Ricci-Vitiani, Lucia; Peranzoni, Elisa; Musiani, Piero; Zanovello, Paola; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2010-02-18

    Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) is a good candidate for cancer immunotherapy because it is overexpressed in 85% of all human tumors and implicated in maintenance of the transformed phenotype. TERT-based cancer vaccines have been shown to be safe, not inducing any immune-related pathology, but their impact on tumor progression is modest. Here we show that adoptive cell therapy with the use of high-avidity T lymphocytes reactive against telomerase can control the growth of different established tumors. Moreover, in transgenic adenocarcinoma mouse prostate mice, which develop prostate cancer, TERT-based adoptive cell therapy halted the progression to more aggressive and poorly differentiated tumors, significantly prolonging mouse survival. We also demonstrated that human tumors, including Burkitt lymphoma, and human cancer stem cells, are targeted in vivo by TERT-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Effective therapy with T cells against telomerase, different from active vaccination, however, led to autoimmunity marked by a consistent, although transient, B-cell depletion in primary and secondary lymphoid organs, associated with alteration of the spleen cytoarchitecture. These results indicate B cells as an in vivo target of TERT-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes during successful immunotherapy.

  17. Cancer treatment by photodynamic therapy combined with NK-cell-line-based adoptive immunotherapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korbelik, Mladen; Sun, Jinghai

    1998-05-01

    Treatment of solid cancers by photodynamic therapy (PDT) triggers a strong acute inflammatory reaction localized to the illuminated malignant tissue. This event is regulated by a massive release of various potent mediators which have a profound effect not only on local host cell populations, but also attract different types of immune cells to the treated tumor. Phagocytosis of PDT-damaged cancerous cells by antigen presenting cells, such as activated tumor associated macrophages, enables the recognition of even poorly immunogenic tumors by specific immune effector cells and the generation of immune memory populations. Because of its inflammatory/immune character, PDT is exceptionally responsive to adjuvant treatments with various types of immunotherapy. Combining PDT with immuneactivators, such as cytokines or other specific or non-specific immune agents, rendered marked improvements in tumor cures with various cancer models. Another clinically attractive strategy is adoptive immunotherapy, and the prospects of its use in conjunction with PDT are outlined.

  18. Objective measures of adoption of patient lift and transfer devices to reduce nursing staff injuries in the hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Schoenfisch, Ashley L; Pompeii, Lisa A; Myers, Douglas J; James, Tamara; Yeung, Yeu-Li; Fricklas, Ethan; Pentico, Marissa; Lipscomb, Hester J

    2011-12-01

    Interventions to reduce patient-handling injuries in the hospital setting are often evaluated based on their effect on outcomes such as injury rates. Measuring intervention adoption could address how and why observed trends in the outcome occurred. Unit-level data related to adoption of patient lift equipment were systematically collected at several points in time over 5 years on nursing units at two hospitals, including hours of lift equipment use, equipment accessibility, and supply purchases and availability. Various measures of adoption highlighted the adoption process' gradual nature and variability by hospital and between units. No single measure adequately assessed adoption. Certain measures appear well-correlated. Future evaluation of primary preventive efforts designed to prevent patient-handling injuries would be strengthened by objective data on intermediate measures that reflect intervention implementation and adoption. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Adoptive T-cell therapy improves treatment of canine non–Hodgkin lymphoma post chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, Colleen M.; Sheppard, Sabina; Hartline, Cassie A.; Huls, Helen; Johnson, Mark; Palla, Shana L.; Maiti, Sourindra; Ma, Wencai; Davis, R. Eric; Craig, Suzanne; Lee, Dean A.; Champlin, Richard; Wilson, Heather; Cooper, Laurence J. N.

    2012-01-01

    Clinical observations reveal that an augmented pace of T-cell recovery after chemotherapy correlates with improved tumor-free survival, suggesting the add-back of T cells after chemotherapy may improve outcomes. To evaluate adoptive immunotherapy treatment for B-lineage non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), we expanded T cells from client-owned canines diagnosed with NHL on artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC) in the presence of human interleukin (IL)-2 and IL-21. Graded doses of autologous T cells were infused after CHOP chemotherapy and persisted for 49 days, homed to tumor, and significantly improved survival. Serum thymidine kinase changes predicted T-cell engraftment, while anti-tumor effects correlated with neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratios and granzyme B expression in manufactured T cells. Therefore, chemotherapy can be used to modulate infused T-cell responses to enhance anti-tumor effects. The companion canine model has translational implications for human immunotherapy which can be readily exploited since clinical-grade canine and human T cells are propagated using identical approaches. PMID:22355761

  20. Adoptive cellular therapy for chronic lymphocytic leukemia and B cell malignancies. CARs and more.

    PubMed

    Castro, Januario E; Kipps, Thomas J

    2016-03-01

    Treatment of patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia and other B cell malignancies is evolving very rapidly. We have observed the quick transition during the last couple of years, from chemo-immunotherapy based treatments to oral targeted therapies based on B cell receptor signaling and Bcl-2 inhibitors, as well as the increasing use of second generation glyco-engineered antibodies. The next wave of revolution in the treatment for this conditions is approaching and it will be based on strategies that harness the power of the immune system to fight cancer. In the center of this biotechnological revolution is cellular engineering, the field that had made possible to redirect the immune system effector cells to achieve a more effective and targeted adoptive cellular therapy. In this chapter, we will review the historical context of these scientific developments, the most recent basic and clinical research in the field and some opinions regarding the future of adoptive cellular therapy in CLL and other B cell malignancies.

  1. Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer in the Mouse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishigami, Satoshi; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) has become a unique and powerful tool for epigenetic reprogramming research and gene manipulation in animals since “Dolly,” the first animal cloned from an adult cell was reported in 1997. Although the success rates of somatic cloning have been inefficient and the mechanism of reprogramming is still largely unknown, this technique has been proven to work in more than 10 mammalian species. Among them, the mouse provides the best model for both basic and applied research of somatic cloning because of its abounding genetic resources, rapid sexual maturity and propagation, minimal requirements for housing, etc. This chapter describes a basic protocol for mouse cloning using cumulus cells, the most popular cell type for NT, in which donor nuclei are directly injected into the oocyte using a piezo-actuated micromanipulator. In particular, we focus on a new, more efficient mouse cloning protocol using trichostatin A (TSA), a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, which increases both in vitro and in vivo developmental rates from twofold to fivefold. This new method including TSA will be helpful to establish mouse cloning in many laboratories.

  2. Treatment of metastatic uveal melanoma with adoptive transfer of tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes: a single-centre, two-stage, single-arm, phase 2 study.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Smita S; Somerville, Robert P T; Yang, James C; Sherry, Richard M; Klebanoff, Christopher A; Goff, Stephanie L; Wunderlich, John R; Danforth, David N; Zlott, Daniel; Paria, Biman C; Sabesan, Arvind C; Srivastava, Abhishek K; Xi, Liqiang; Pham, Trinh H; Raffeld, Mark; White, Donald E; Toomey, Mary Ann; Rosenberg, Steven A; Kammula, Udai S

    2017-06-01

    Uveal melanoma is a rare tumour with no established treatments once metastases develop. Although a variety of immune-based therapies have shown efficacy in metastatic cutaneous melanoma, their use in ocular variants has been disappointing. Recently, adoptive T-cell therapy has shown salvage responses in multiple refractory solid tumours. Thus, we sought to determine if adoptive transfer of autologous tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) could mediate regression of metastatic uveal melanoma. In this ongoing single-centre, two-stage, phase 2, single-arm trial, patients (aged ≥16 years) with histologically confirmed metastatic ocular melanoma were enrolled. Key eligibility criteria were an Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group performance status of 0 or 1, progressive metastatic disease, and adequate haematological, renal, and hepatic function. Metastasectomies were done to procure tumour tissue to generate autologous TIL cultures, which then underwent large scale ex-vivo expansion. Patients were treated with lymphodepleting conditioning chemotherapy (intravenous cyclophosphamide [60 mg/kg] daily for 2 days followed by fludarabine [25 mg/m(2)] daily for 5 days, followed by a single intravenous infusion of autologous TILs and high-dose interleukin-2 [720 000 IU/kg] every 8 h). The primary endpoint was objective tumour response in evaluable patients per protocol using Response to Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors, version 1.0. An interim analysis of this trial is reported here. The trial is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT01814046. From the completed first stage and ongoing expansion stage of this trial, a total of 21 consecutive patients with metastatic uveal melanoma were enrolled between June 7, 2013, and Sept 9, 2016, and received TIL therapy. Seven (35%, 95% CI 16-59) of 20 evaluable patients had objective tumour regression. Among the responders, six patients achieved a partial response, two of which are ongoing and have not reached maximum

  3. Adoptive T-cell therapy for fungal infections in haematology patients.

    PubMed

    Deo, Shivashni S; Gottlieb, David J

    2015-08-01

    The prolonged immune deficiency resulting from haematopoietic stem cell transplant and chemotherapy predisposes to a high risk of invasive fungal infections. Despite the recent advances in molecular diagnostic testing, early initiation of pre-emptive antifungal therapy and the use of combination pharmacotherapy, mortality from invasive mould infections remain high among recipients of allogeneic stem cell transplant. The increasing incidences of previously rare and drug-resistant strains of fungi present a further clinical challenge. Therefore, there is a need for novel strategies to combat fungal infections in the immunocompromised. Adoptive therapy using in vitro-expanded fungus-specific CD4 cells of the Th-1 type has shown clinical efficacy in murine studies and in a small human clinical study. Several techniques for the isolation and expansion of fungus-specific T cells have been successfully applied. Here we discuss the incidence and changing patterns of invasive fungal diseases, clinical evidence supporting the role of T cells in fungal immunity, methods to expand fungus-specific T cells in the laboratory and considerations surrounding the use of T cells for fungal immunotherapy.

  4. Melanoma Cells Can Adopt the Phenotype of Stromal Fibroblasts and Macrophages by Spontaneous Cell Fusion in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Kemény, Lajos V; Kurgyis, Zsuzsanna; Buknicz, Tünde; Groma, Gergely; Jakab, Ádám; Zänker, Kurt; Dittmar, Thomas; Kemény, Lajos; Németh, István B

    2016-06-02

    After the removal of primary cutaneous melanoma some patients develop local recurrences, even after having histologically tumor-free re-excision. A potential explanation behind this phenomenon is that tumor cells switch their phenotype, making their recognition via standard histopathological assessments extremely difficult. Tumor-stromal cell fusion has been proposed as a potential mechanism for tumor cells to acquire mesenchymal traits; therefore, we hypothesized that melanoma cells could acquire fibroblast- and macrophage-like phenotypes via cell fusion. We show that melanoma cells spontaneously fuse with human dermal fibroblasts and human peripheral blood monocytes in vitro. The hybrid cells' nuclei contain chromosomes from both parental cells and are indistinguishable from the parental fibroblasts or macrophages based on their morphology and immunophenotype, as they could lose the melanoma specific MART1 marker, but express the fibroblast marker smooth muscle actin or the macrophage marker CD68. Our results suggest that, by spontaneous cell fusion in vitro, tumor cells can adopt the morphology and immunophenotype of stromal cells while still carrying oncogenic, tumor-derived genetic information. Therefore, melanoma-stromal cell fusion might play a role in missing tumor cells by routine histopathological assessments.

  5. Cell Transfer Therapy for Cancer: Past, Present, and Future

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Xiaoling; Wang, Xian; Jin, Hongchuan

    2014-01-01

    Cell transfer therapy for cancer has made a rapid progress recently and the immunotherapy has been recognized as the fourth anticancer modality after operation, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy. Lymphocytes used for cell transfer therapy include dendritic cells, natural killer (NK) cells, and T lymphocytes such as tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs). In vitro activated or engineered immune cells can traffic to cancer tissues to elicit persistent antitumor immune response which is very important especially after immunosuppressive treatments such as chemotherapy. In this review, we overviewed recent advances in the exploration of dendritic cells, NK cells, and T cells for the treatment of human cancer cells. PMID:24741604

  6. Melanoma Cells Can Adopt the Phenotype of Stromal Fibroblasts and Macrophages by Spontaneous Cell Fusion in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Kemény, Lajos V.; Kurgyis, Zsuzsanna; Buknicz, Tünde; Groma, Gergely; Jakab, Ádám; Zänker, Kurt; Dittmar, Thomas; Kemény, Lajos; Németh, István B.

    2016-01-01

    After the removal of primary cutaneous melanoma some patients develop local recurrences, even after having histologically tumor-free re-excision. A potential explanation behind this phenomenon is that tumor cells switch their phenotype, making their recognition via standard histopathological assessments extremely difficult. Tumor-stromal cell fusion has been proposed as a potential mechanism for tumor cells to acquire mesenchymal traits; therefore, we hypothesized that melanoma cells could acquire fibroblast- and macrophage-like phenotypes via cell fusion. We show that melanoma cells spontaneously fuse with human dermal fibroblasts and human peripheral blood monocytes in vitro. The hybrid cells’ nuclei contain chromosomes from both parental cells and are indistinguishable from the parental fibroblasts or macrophages based on their morphology and immunophenotype, as they could lose the melanoma specific MART1 marker, but express the fibroblast marker smooth muscle actin or the macrophage marker CD68. Our results suggest that, by spontaneous cell fusion in vitro, tumor cells can adopt the morphology and immunophenotype of stromal cells while still carrying oncogenic, tumor-derived genetic information. Therefore, melanoma–stromal cell fusion might play a role in missing tumor cells by routine histopathological assessments. PMID:27271591

  7. Cytokine induced killer cells as adoptive immunotherapy strategy to augment graft versus tumor after hematopoietic cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Sangiolo, D; Mesiano, G; Carnevale-Schianca, F; Piacibello, W; Aglietta, M; Cignetti, A

    2009-07-01

    Donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) is used to increase the graft versus tumor (GVT) effect after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT). The limited spectrum of activity and high risk of graft versus host disease (GVHD) remain major limitations of this approach. The finding of new cell populations for adoptive immunotherapy, with the ability to separate GVT from GVHD, would be useful. Here we review the main basic, preclinical and clinical research on cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells, highlighting the aspects of their antitumor and alloreactive potentials that might favourably affect the balance between GVT and GVHD. CIK cells are ex vivo-expanded T lymphocytes sharing NK markers and endowed with a potent MHC-unrestricted antitumor activity against haematological and solid malignancies. Studies in preclinical animal models have demonstrated their low GVHD potential when infused across MHC-barriers, and recent clinical studies seem to confirm these findings in patients with hematological malignancies relapsing after HCT. If consolidated with larger clinical trials, adoptive immunotherapy with CIK cells might represent an effective alternative to classic DLI, helping HCT to succesfully meet current challenges like the extension across major HLA-barriers and application to solid tumors.

  8. Multiplex Genome-Edited T-cell Manufacturing Platform for "Off-the-Shelf" Adoptive T-cell Immunotherapies.

    PubMed

    Poirot, Laurent; Philip, Brian; Schiffer-Mannioui, Cécile; Le Clerre, Diane; Chion-Sotinel, Isabelle; Derniame, Sophie; Potrel, Pierrick; Bas, Cécile; Lemaire, Laetitia; Galetto, Roman; Lebuhotel, Céline; Eyquem, Justin; Cheung, Gordon Weng-Kit; Duclert, Aymeric; Gouble, Agnès; Arnould, Sylvain; Peggs, Karl; Pule, Martin; Scharenberg, Andrew M; Smith, Julianne

    2015-09-15

    Adoptive immunotherapy using autologous T cells endowed with chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) has emerged as a powerful means of treating cancer. However, a limitation of this approach is that autologous CAR T cells must be generated on a custom-made basis. Here we show that electroporation of transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) mRNA allows highly efficient multiplex gene editing in primary human T cells. We use this TALEN-mediated editing approach to develop a process for the large-scale manufacturing of T cells deficient in expression of both their αβ T-cell receptor (TCR) and CD52, a protein targeted by alemtuzumab, a chemotherapeutic agent. Functionally, T cells manufactured with this process do not mediate graft-versus-host reactions and are rendered resistant to destruction by alemtuzumab. These characteristics enable the administration of alemtuzumab concurrently or prior to engineered T cells, supporting their engraftment. Furthermore, endowing the TALEN-engineered cells with a CD19 CAR led to efficient destruction of CD19(+) tumor targets even in the presence of the chemotherapeutic agent. These results demonstrate the applicability of TALEN-mediated genome editing to a scalable process, which enables the manufacturing of third-party CAR T-cell immunotherapies against arbitrary targets. As such, CAR T-cell immunotherapies can therefore be used in an "off-the-shelf" manner akin to other biologic immunopharmaceuticals ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  9. TRANSFER OF ANTIBODY PRODUCTION WITH CELLS FROM BURSA OF FABRICIUS

    PubMed Central

    Gilmour, D. G.; Theis, G. A.; Thorbecke, G. J.

    1970-01-01

    F1 hybrid chicks isogenic for the strong B histocompatibility locus and for most weak H-loci were X-irradiated on day 1 after hatching, injected intraperitoneally on day 2 with dispersed cells of bursa, spleen, or thymus from 4- or 10-wk-old F1 hybrid donors, and immediately challenged by the same route with either Brucella abortus, sheep erythrocytes, or a mixture of both together. The agglutinin titers were measured in sera obtained 1 wk later. With 4-wk-old donors, a greater primary response to Brucella abortus was obtained after transfers of cells from bursa than from spleen, while thymus was much less effective. With 10-wk-old donors, the decreasing order of response was spleen, bursa, thymus. Only splenic cells were effective in transferring a response to sheep erythrocytes, at either donor age. In tests of synergism by cell mixtures from pairs of organs, the only positive finding was a modest augmentation of titer against sheep erythrocytes by bursa + spleen as compared with spleen alone. Bursal cells from 6- or 10-wk-old donors were effective in transferring a response to sheep erythrocytes when antigen injection was delayed until 5 days after cell transfer. Splenic cells from hormonally bursectomized donors were ineffective in transferring a primary response, even when the donors had been injected with antigen 1 wk before transfer. Preimmunization of normal donors led to marked increases in the responses to Brucella abortus produced by transferred splenic or thymic cells. With bursal cells, an increased response was obtained only if the interval between preimmunization and transfer was 17 rather than 7 days. With the 17-day interval, both bursal and thymic cells could also transfer a response to sheep erythrocytes. The primary sera to Brucella abortus produced after transfers of bursal or splenic cells contained almost entirely 19S antibodies. A 7S component was found in all the secondary sera tested. PMID:4994444

  10. Adoptive cell therapy and modulation of the tumour microenvironment: new insights from ASCO 2016

    PubMed Central

    Khoja, Leila; Gyawali, Bishal

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Immuno-oncology has changed the landscape of cancer treatment in recent years. Immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICI) have shown survival advantage with long term remissions in a variety of cancers. However, there is another approach to harnessing the power of the immune system in combating cancer: the adoptive cell therapy (ACT) strategy. Although ACT is restricted to small specialized centres and has yet to deliver as much success as ICI, some important results were presented at this year’s ASCO meeting. Important lessons have been learned from these studies, including the prospects and challenges ahead. In this editorial, we summarize the important studies on ACT presented at the ASCO 2016 meeting and discuss the way forward. PMID:27610200

  11. Adoptive cell therapy and modulation of the tumour microenvironment: new insights from ASCO 2016.

    PubMed

    Khoja, Leila; Gyawali, Bishal

    2016-01-01

    Immuno-oncology has changed the landscape of cancer treatment in recent years. Immune checkpoint inhibitors (ICI) have shown survival advantage with long term remissions in a variety of cancers. However, there is another approach to harnessing the power of the immune system in combating cancer: the adoptive cell therapy (ACT) strategy. Although ACT is restricted to small specialized centres and has yet to deliver as much success as ICI, some important results were presented at this year's ASCO meeting. Important lessons have been learned from these studies, including the prospects and challenges ahead. In this editorial, we summarize the important studies on ACT presented at the ASCO 2016 meeting and discuss the way forward.

  12. Development of an Autologous Macrophage-based Adoptive Gene Transfer Strategy to Treat Posttraumatic Osteoarthritis (PTOA) and Osteoarithritis (OA)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT OA is the most common degenerative joint disease , and ~12% of all OA are resulted from an acute...Osteoarthritis (OA) is the most common degenerative joint disease , and ~12% of all OA are resulted from an acute trauma to the joint and are referred to as...synovial inflammation triggers massive infiltration of activated macrophages. The idea of the combination macrophage-based adoptive gene therapy

  13. Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Are Resistant to Paclitaxel by Adopting a Non-Proliferative Fibroblastic State

    PubMed Central

    Bosco, Dale B.; Kenworthy, Rachael; Zorio, Diego A. R.; Sang, Qing-Xiang Amy

    2015-01-01

    Human mesenchymal stem cell (hMSC) resistance to the apoptotic effects of chemotherapeutic drugs has been of major interest, as these cells can confer this resistance to tumor microenvironments. However, the effects of internalized chemotherapeutics upon hMSCs remain largely unexplored. In this study, cellular viability and proliferation assays, combined with different biochemical approaches, were used to investigate the effects of Paclitaxel exposure upon hMSCs. Our results indicate that hMSCs are highly resistant to the cytotoxic effects of Paclitaxel treatment, even though there was no detectable expression of the efflux pump P-glycoprotein, the usual means by which a cell resists Paclitaxel treatment. Moreover, Paclitaxel treatment induces hMSCs to adopt a non-proliferative fibroblastic state, as evidenced by changes to morphology, cellular markers, and a reduction in differentiation potential that is not directly coupled to the cytoskeletal effects of Paclitaxel. Taken together, our results show that Paclitaxel treatment does not induce apoptosis in hMSCs, but does induce quiescence and phenotypic changes. PMID:26029917

  14. Clinical-scale selection and viral transduction of human naïve and central memory CD8+ T cells for adoptive cell therapy of cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Casati, Anna; Varghaei-Nahvi, Azam; Feldman, Steven Alexander; Assenmacher, Mario; Rosenberg, Steven Aaron; Dudley, Mark Edward; Scheffold, Alexander

    2013-10-01

    The adoptive transfer of lymphocytes genetically engineered to express tumor-specific antigen receptors is a potent strategy to treat cancer patients. T lymphocyte subsets, such as naïve or central memory T cells, selected in vitro prior to genetic engineering have been extensively investigated in preclinical mouse models, where they demonstrated improved therapeutic efficacy. However, so far, this is challenging to realize in the clinical setting, since good manufacturing practices (GMP) procedures for complex cell sorting and genetic manipulation are limited. To be able to directly compare the immunological attributes and therapeutic efficacy of naïve (T(N)) and central memory (T(CM)) CD8(+) T cells, we investigated clinical-scale procedures for their parallel selection and in vitro manipulation. We also evaluated currently available GMP-grade reagents for stimulation of T cell subsets, including a new type of anti-CD3/anti-CD28 nanomatrix. An optimized protocol was established for the isolation of both CD8(+) T(N) cells (CD4(-)CD62L(+)CD45RA(+)) and CD8(+) T(CM) (CD4(-)CD62L(+)CD45RA(-)) from a single patient. The highly enriched T cell subsets can be efficiently transduced and expanded to large cell numbers, sufficient for clinical applications and equivalent to or better than current cell and gene therapy approaches with unselected lymphocyte populations. The GMP protocols for selection of T(N) and T(CM) we reported here will be the basis for clinical trials analyzing safety, in vivo persistence and clinical efficacy in cancer patients and will help to generate a more reliable and efficacious cellular product.

  15. Adoptive T-cell Therapy Using Autologous Tumor-infiltrating Lymphocytes for Metastatic Melanoma: Current Status and Future Outlook

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Richard; Forget, Marie-Andree; Chacon, Jessica; Bernatchez, Chantale; Haymaker, Cara; Chen, Jie Qing; Hwu, Patrick; Radvanyi, Laszlo

    2012-01-01

    Immunotherapy using autologous T-cells has emerged to be a powerful treatment option for patients with metastatic melanoma. These include the adoptive transfer of autologous tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL), T-cells transduced with high-affinity T-cell receptors (TCR) against major melanosomal tumor antigens, and T cells transduced with chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) composed of hybrid immunoglobulin light chains with endo-domains of T-cell signaling molecules. Among these and other options for T-cell therapy, TIL together with high-dose IL-2 has had the longest clinical history with multiple clinical trials in centers across the world consistently demonstrating durable clinical response rates near 50% or more. A distinct advantage of TIL therapy making it still the T-cell therapy of choice is the broad nature of the T-cell recognition against both defined as well as un-defined tumors antigens against all possible MHC, rather than the single specificity and limited MHC coverage of the newer TCR and CAR transduction technologies. In the past decade, significant inroads have been made in defining the phenotypes of T cells in TIL mediating tumor regression. CD8+ T cells are emerging to be critical, although the exact subset of CD8+ T cells exhibiting the highest clinical activity in terms of memory and effector markers is still controversial. We present a model in which both effector-memory and more differentiated effector T cells ultimately may need to cooperate to mediate long-term tumor control in responding patients. Although TIL therapy has shown great potential to treat metastatic melanoma, a number of issues have emerged that need to be addressed to bring it more into the mainstream of melanoma care. First, we have a reached the point where a pivotal phase II or phase III trials are needed in an attempt to gain regulatory approval of TIL as standard-of-care. Second, improvements in how we expand TIL for therapy are needed, that minimize the time the T-cells

  16. Adoptive T-cell therapies for refractory/relapsed leukemia and lymphoma: current strategies and recent advances

    PubMed Central

    McLaughlin, Lauren; Cruz, C. Russell; Bollard, Catherine M.

    2015-01-01

    Despite significant advancements in the treatment and outcome of hematologic malignancies, prognosis remains poor for patients who have relapsed or refractory disease. Adoptive T-cell immunotherapy offers novel therapeutics that attempt to utilize the noted graft versus leukemia effect. While CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T cells have thus far been the most clinically successful application of adoptive T immunotherapy, further work with antigen specific T cells and CARs that recognize other targets have helped diversify the field to treat a broad spectrum of hematologic malignancies. This article will focus primarily on therapies currently in the clinical trial phase as well as current downfalls or limitations. PMID:26622998

  17. Successful adoptive immunotherapy with vaccine-sensitized T cells, despite no effect with vaccination alone in a weakly immunogenic tumor model.

    PubMed

    Parviz, Maryam; Chin, Cynthia S; Graham, Laura J; Miller, Catriona; Lee, Catherine; George, Kimberly; Bear, Harry D

    2003-12-01

    Tumor cell vaccines have been successful at inducing immunity in naïve mice, but only in a few reports has vaccination alone induced regression of established tumors and, generally, only when they are very small. Clinically, vaccinations alone may not be able to cause regression of established human cancers, which tend to be weakly immunogenic. We hypothesized that pharmacologic ex vivo amplification of a vaccination-induced immune response with subsequent adoptive immunotherapy (AIT) to tumor-bearing animals would be more effective in treatment of these animals than vaccination alone. The 4T1 and 4T07 mammary carcinomas are derived from the same parental cell line, but 4T1 is much less immunogenic and more aggressive than 4T07. Vaccination with either 4T1, 4T1-IL-2, or 4T07-IL-2 was not effective as treatment for established 4T1 tumors. However, 4T1 or 4T07-IL-2-vaccine-sensitized draining lymph node (DLN) cells, activated ex vivo with bryostatin 1 and ionomycin and expanded in culture, induced complete tumor regressions when adoptively transferred to 4T1 tumor-bearing animals. This was effective against small tumors as well as more advanced tumors, 10 days after tumor cell inoculation. Furthermore, as would be required for this approach to be used clinically, vaccine-DLN cells obtained from mice with established progressive 4T1 tumors (inoculated 10 days before vaccination) also induced regression of 4T1 tumors in an adoptive host. In none of these experiments was exogenous IL-2 required to induce tumor regression. The response to tumor cell vaccine can be amplified by ex vivo pharmacologic activation of sensitized T cells, which can then cure an established, weakly immunogenic and highly aggressive tumor that was resistant to vaccination alone.

  18. Expansion of T Cells with Interleukin-21 for Adoptive Immunotherapy of Murine Mammary Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zoon, Christine K.; Wan, Wen; Graham, Laura; Bear, Harry D.

    2017-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that culturing antigen-sensitized draining lymph node (DLN) lymphocytes from BALB/c mice in interleukin (IL)-7/15 after activation with bryostatin/ionomycin (B/I) is superior to culture in IL-2 for expansion, differentiation to cluster of differentiation (CD)8+ cells and anti-tumor activity. We sought to determine whether the substitution or addition of IL-21 to culture had a similar effect. DLN lymphocytes were antigen-sensitized with 4T1 mammary carcinoma 10 days prior to harvest, activated with B/I, and expanded in culture for 7 days with either IL-2, IL-21, IL-2/21, IL-7/15, or IL-7/15/21. Cellular expansion, phenotype, interferon (IFN)-γ responses, and in vivo anti-tumor activity were compared. We found that T cells grown in IL7/15/21 demonstrated significantly greater lymphocyte expansion than IL-2, IL-21, IL-2/21, and IL-7/15 (38.4-fold vs. 5.5, 6.6, 9.5, and 23.9-fold, respectively). Of these expanded cells, IL-7/15/21 significantly expanded the greatest percentage of CD8+ cells (67.1% vs. 22.2%, 47.2%, 47.4%, and 55.3%, respectively), and the greatest number of T central memory cells (TCM) compared to IL-2, IL-21 and IL-2/21 (45.8% vs. 11.1%, 7.7%, and 12.1%, respectively). IL-21 and IL-2/21-expanded T cells preferentially differentiated into T naïve cells (TN) vs. those expanded in IL-2, IL-7/15 and IL-7/15/21 (27.6% and 23.2% vs. 1.7%, 4.5%, and 10.4%, respectively), and demonstrated the highest IFN-γ levels in vitro. In vivo adoptive immunotherapy (AIT) experiments demonstrated anti-tumor efficacy was equally effective using IL-2, IL-21, IL-2/21, IL-7/15 and IL-7/15/21-cultured lymphocytes vs. control or cyclophosphamide alone, even at lower doses or with greater initial size of tumor prior to treatment. PMID:28146052

  19. [Nuclear transfer of goat somatic cells transgenic for human lactoferrin].

    PubMed

    Li, Lan; Shen, Wei; Pan, Qing-Yu; Min, Ling-Jiang; Sun, Yu-Jiang; Fang, Yong-Wei; Deng, Ji-Xian; Pan, Qing-Jie

    2006-12-01

    Transgenic animal mammary gland bioreactors are being used to produce recombinant proteins with appropriate post-translational modifications, and nuclear transfer of transgenic somatic cells is a more powerful method to produce mammary gland bioreactor. Here we describe efficient gene transfer and nuclear transfer in goat somatic cells. Gene targeting vector pGBC2LF was constructed by cloning human lactoferrin (LF) gene cDNA into exon 2 of the milk goat beta-casein gene, and the endogenous start condon was replaced by that of human LF gene. Goat fetal fibroblasts were transfected with linearized pGBC2LF and 14 cell lines were positive according to PCR and Southern blot. The transgenic cells were used as donor cells of nuclear transfer, and some of reconstructed embryos could develop to blastocyst in vitro.

  20. Natural killer cell-based adoptive immunotherapy eradicates and drives differentiation of chemoresistant bladder cancer stem-like cells.

    PubMed

    Ferreira-Teixeira, Margarida; Paiva-Oliveira, Daniela; Parada, Belmiro; Alves, Vera; Sousa, Vitor; Chijioke, Obinna; Münz, Christian; Reis, Flávio; Rodrigues-Santos, Paulo; Gomes, Célia

    2016-10-21

    High-grade non-muscle invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) has a high risk of recurrence and progression to muscle-invasive forms, which seems to be largely related to the presence of tumorigenic stem-like cell populations that are refractory to conventional therapies. Here, we evaluated the therapeutic potential of Natural Killer (NK) cell-based adoptive immunotherapy against chemoresistant bladder cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) in a pre-clinical relevant model, using NK cells from healthy donors and NMIBC patients. Cytokine-activated NK cells from healthy donors and from high-grade NMIBC patients were phenotypically characterized and assayed in vitro against stem-like and bulk differentiated bladder cancer cells. Stem-like cells were isolated from two bladder cancer cell lines using the sphere-forming assay. The in vivo therapeutic efficacy was evaluated in mice bearing a CSC-induced orthotopic bladder cancer. Animals were treated by intravesical instillation of interleukin-activated NK cells. Tumor response was evaluated longitudinally by non-invasive bioluminescence imaging. NK cells from healthy donors upon activation with IL-2 and IL-15 kills indiscriminately both stem-like and differentiated tumor cells via stress ligand recognition. In addition to cell killing, NK cells shifted CSCs towards a more differentiated phenotype, rendering them more susceptible to cisplatin, highlighting the benefits of a possible combined therapy. On the contrary, NK cells from NMIBC patients displayed a low density on NK cytotoxicity receptors, adhesion molecules and a more immature phenotype, losing their ability to kill and drive differentiation of CSCs. The local administration, via the transurethral route, of activated NK cells from healthy donors provides an efficient tumor infiltration and a subsequent robust tumoricidal activity against bladder cancer with high selective cytolytic activity against CSCs, leading to a dramatic reduction in tumor burden from 80 % to complete

  1. Cloning mice and ES cells by nuclear transfer from somatic stem cells and fully differentiated cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhongde

    2011-01-01

    Cloning animals by nuclear transfer (NT) has been successful in several mammalian species. In addition to cloning live animals (reproductive cloning), this technique has also been used in several species to establish cloned embryonic stem (ntES) cell lines from somatic cells. It is the latter application of this technique that has been heralded as being the potential means to produce isogenic embryonic stem cells from patients for cell therapy (therapeutic cloning). These two types of cloning differ only in the steps after cloned embryos are produced: for reproductive cloning the cloned embryos are transferred to surrogate mothers to allow them to develop to full term and for therapeutic cloning the cloned embryos are used to derive ntES cells. In this chapter, a detailed NT protocol in mouse by using somatic stem cells (neuron and skin stem cells) and fully differentiated somatic cells (cumulus cells and fibroblast cells) as nuclear donors is described.

  2. Adoptive parenting.

    PubMed

    Grotevant, Harold D; Lo, Albert Yh

    2017-06-01

    Challenges in adoptive parenting continue to emerge as adoption policies and practices evolve. We review three areas of research in adoptive parenting that reflect contemporary shifts in adoption. First, we highlight recent findings concerning openness in adoption contact arrangements, or contact between a child's families of birth and rearing. Second, we examine research regarding racial and cultural socialization in transracial and international adoptions. Finally, we review investigations of parenting experiences of lesbian and gay adoptive parents. Overall, parenting processes (e.g., supportive vs. problematic family interaction) are better predictors of child adjustment than are group differences (e.g., open vs. closed adoptions; adoption by heterosexual vs. same-sex parents). The distinctive needs of adopted children call for preparation of adoption-competent mental health, casework, education, and health care professionals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. T Cells Redirected to a Minor Histocompatibility Antigen Instruct Intratumoral TNFα Expression and Empower Adoptive Cell Therapy for Solid Tumors.

    PubMed

    Manzo, Teresa; Sturmheit, Tabea; Basso, Veronica; Petrozziello, Elisabetta; Hess Michelini, Rodrigo; Riba, Michela; Freschi, Massimo; Elia, Angela R; Grioni, Matteo; Curnis, Flavio; Protti, Maria Pia; Schumacher, Ton N; Debets, Reno; Swartz, Melody A; Corti, Angelo; Bellone, Matteo; Mondino, Anna

    2017-02-01

    Donor-derived allogeneic T cells evoke potent graft versus tumor (GVT) effects likely due to the simultaneous recognition of tumor-specific and host-restricted minor histocompatibility (H) antigens. Here we investigated whether such effects could be reproduced in autologous settings by TCR gene-engineered lymphocytes. We report that T cells redirected either to a broadly expressed Y-encoded minor H antigen or to a tumor-associated antigen, although poorly effective if individually transferred, when simultaneously administered enabled acute autochthonous tumor debulking and resulted in durable clinical remission. Y-redirected T cells proved hyporesponsive in peripheral lymphoid organs, whereas they retained effector function at the tumor site, where in synergy with tumor-redirected lymphocytes, they instructed TNFα expression, endothelial cell activation, and intratumoral T-cell infiltration. While neutralizing TNFα hindered GVT effects by the combined T-cell infusion, a single injection of picogram amounts of NGR-TNF, a tumor vessel-targeted TNFα derivative currently in phase III clinical trials, substituted for Y-redirected cells and enabled tumor debulking by tumor-redirected lymphocytes. Together, our results provide new mechanistic insights into allogeneic GVT, validate the importance of targeting the tumor and its associated stroma, and prove the potency of a novel combined approach suitable for immediate clinical implementation. Cancer Res; 77(3); 658-71. ©2016 AACR.

  4. Generation of V α13/β21+T cell specific target CML cells by TCR gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Zha, Xianfeng; Xu, Ling; Chen, Shaohua; Yang, Lijian; Zhang, Yikai; Lu, Yuhong; Yu, Zhi; Li, Bo; Wu, Xiuli; Zheng, Wenjie; Li, Yangqiu

    2016-12-20

    Adoptive immunotherapy with antigen-specific T cells can be effective for treating melanoma and chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). However, to obtain sufficient antigen-specific T cells for treatment, the T cells have to be cultured for several weeks in vitro, but in vitro T cell expansion is difficult to control. Alternatively, the transfer of T cell receptors (TCRs) with defined antigen specificity into recipient T cells may be a simple solution for generating antigen-specific T cells. The objective of this study was to identify CML-associated, antigen-specific TCR genes and generate CML-associated, antigen-specific T cells with T cell receptor (TCR) gene transfer. Our previous study has screened an oligoclonal Vβ21 with a different oligoclonal Vα partner in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) derived from patients with CML. In this study, oligoclonally expanded TCR α genes, which pair with TCR Vβ21, were cloned into the pIRES eukaryotic expression vector (TCR Vα-IRES-Vβ21). Next, two recombinant plasmids, TCR Vα13-IRES-Vβ21 and TCR Vα18-IRES-Vβ21, were successfully transferred into T cells, and the TCR gene-modified T cells acquired CML-specific cytotoxicity with the best cytotoxic effects for HLA-A11+ K562 cells observed for the TCR Vα13/Vβ21 gene redirected T cells. In summary, our data confirmed TCRVα13/Vβ21 as a CML-associated, antigen-specific TCR. This study provided new evidence that genetically engineered antigen-specific TCR may become a druggable approach for gene therapy of CML.

  5. Manipulation of human early T lymphopoiesis by coculture on human bone marrow stromal cells: potential utility for adoptive immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bing; Ohishi, Kohshi; Orito, Yuki; Nakamori, Yoshiki; Nishikawa, Hiroyoshi; Ino, Kazuko; Suzuki, Kei; Matsumoto, Takeshi; Masuya, Masahiro; Hamada, Hirofumi; Mineno, Junichi; Ono, Ryoichi; Nosaka, Tetsuya; Shiku, Hiroshi; Katayama, Naoyuki

    2013-04-01

    T cell precursors are an attractive target for adoptive immunotherapy. We examined the regulation of human early T lymphopoiesis by human bone marrow stromal cells to explore in vitro manipulation of human T cell precursors in a human-only coculture system. The generation of CD7(+)CD56(-)cyCD3(-) proT cells from human hematopoietic progenitors on telomerized human bone marrow stromal cells was enhanced by stem cell factor, flt3 ligand, and thrombopoietin, but these stimulatory effects were suppressed by interleukin 3. Expression of Notch ligands Delta-1 and -4 on stromal cells additively promoted T cell differentiation into the CD7(+)cyCD3(+) pre-T cell stage, while cell growth was strongly inhibited. By combining these coculture systems, we found that initial coculture with telomerized stromal cells in the presence of stem cell factor, flt3 ligand, and thrombopoietin, followed by coculture on Delta-1- and -4-coexpressing stromal cells led to a higher percentage and number of pre-T cells. Adoptive immunotherapy using peripheral blood T cells transduced with a tumor antigen-specific T cell receptor (TCR) is a promising strategy but has several limitations, such as the risk of forming a chimeric TCR with the endogenous TCR. We demonstrated that incubation of TCR-transduced hematopoietic progenitors with the combination of coculture systems gave rise to CD7(+)TCR(+)CD3(+)CD1a(-) T cell precursors that rapidly proliferated and differentiated under the culture condition to induce mature T cell differentiation. These data show the regulatory mechanism of early T lymphopoiesis on human stromal cells and the potential utility of engineered human stromal cells to manipulate early T cell development for clinical application.

  6. The in vivo expansion rate of properly stimulated transferred CD8+ T cells exceeds that of an aggressively growing mouse tumor

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Leroy N.; Yu, Zhiya; Palmer, Douglas C.; Restifo, Nicholas P.

    2006-01-01

    It has been hypothesized that rapidly dividing tumor cells can outpace adoptively transferred anti-tumor lymphocytes when tumors are large. However, this hypothesis is at odds with clinical observations indicating that bulky tumors can be destroyed by small numbers of adoptively transferred anti-tumor T cells. We sought to measure the relative growth rates of T cells and tumor cells in a model using transgenic CD8+ T cells specific for the gp10025–33 H-2Db epitope (called pmel-1) to treat large, well-established subcutaneous B16 melanoma. We tested the impact of the immunization using an altered-peptide ligand vaccine alone or in combination with IL-2 by analyzing the kinetics of T cell expansion using direct enumeration. We found that pmel-1 T cells proliferated explosively during a 5-day period following transfer. Calculations from net changes in population suggest that at the peak of cell division, pmel-1 T cells divide at a rate of 5.3 hours/cell division, which was much faster than B16 tumor cells during optimal growth (24.9 hours/cell division). These results clearly indicate that the notion of a kinetic “race” between the tumor and lymphocyte is no contest when adoptively transferred cells are stimulated with immunization and IL-2. When appropriately stimulated, tumor-reactive T cell expansion can far exceed the growth of even an aggressively growing mouse tumor. PMID:16424050

  7. Transfer cells in trichomatous nectary in Adenocalymma magnificum (Bignoniaceae).

    PubMed

    Gama, Thália S S; Aguiar-Dias, Ana Cristina A DE; Demarco, Diego

    2016-01-01

    Transfer cells are specialized cells that play an important role where there are high energy costs due to facilitation of transmembrane flow of solutes. This study aimed to investigate the ontogenesis, histochemistry and ultrastructure of glandular trichomes focusing on stalk cells and their possible transfer function. Samples of prophylls of axillary buds, calyces of flowers in anthesis, and flower buds in different stages of development were collected, fixed and processed according to the common methods of microscopy. The glandular trichomes are composed of a secretory head with its cells in columnar format. The stalk is formed by two layers of cells, with the upper layer composed of cuboidal cells where the wall starts to thicken at the beginning of the pre-secretory phase. The secretion is heterogeneous, releasing glucose, other carbohydrates, lipids and phenolic compounds, with two types of release - eccrine and granulocrine. These trichomes are functionally termed as nectaries. The stalk cells appear as transfer cells since they have a thicker anticlinal wall with irregular ingrowths. The presence of transfer cells in the nectaries suggests a high specialization because it improves transport capacity of nectar and compensation in the high energy expenditure for its production and release.

  8. The Danish Adoption Register.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Liselotte; Sørensen, Thorkild I A

    2011-07-01

    The Danish Adoption Register was established in 1963-1964 to explore the genetic and environmental contribution to familial aggregation of schizophrenia. The register encompass information on all 14,425 non-familial adoptions of Danish children legally granted in Denmark 1924-1947. It includes name and date of birth of each adoptee and his or her biological and adoptive parents, date of transfer to adoptive parents and date of formal adoption. The linkage to biological and adoptive parents is close to complete, even biological fathers are registered for 91.4% of the adoptees. Adoption registers are a unique source allowing disentangling of genetic and familial environmental influences on traits, risk of diseases, and mortality.

  9. Cellular interaction between fixed and living cells. Transfer of radioactive materials from living cells to fixed cells

    PubMed Central

    1979-01-01

    Transfer of radioactive materials to fixed cells from an overlying layer of living cells has been examined to determine whether fixed cells can act as acceptors of glycosyltransferases of living cells. After the incubation of living cells were removed by EDTA treatment, and the radioactivity associated with the fixed cells was determined. Lipids, proteins and carbohydrates were found to be transfered from the living cells to the fixed cells. The amount of radioactivity transferred to the fixed cells was dependent on the number of both fixed and living cells and increased with the time of incubation. When fixed cells were treated with chloroform-methanol before the addition of living cells, the transfer of both lipids and proteins to the fixed cells decreased drastically, but only a slight decrease incarbohydrate transfer was observed. Most of the radioactive materials transferred from living cells labeled with glucosamine or fucose to chloroform- methanol-treated fixed cells were solubilized by trypsin but not by the detergents tested. Approximately 55% of the materials transferred from the cells labeled with glucosamine could be solubilized by hyaluronidase and chondroitinase, and the rest was solubilized by neuraminidase and a glycosidase mixture. The treatment of chloroform- methanol-extracted fixed cells with trypsin caused a significant decrease in the transfer from cells labeled with glucosamine. When nucleotide sugars were used as the radioactive precursor, no significant amount of radioactivity was transferred to the fixed cells. PMID:379019

  10. Policy Borrowing and Transfer, and Policy Convergence: Justifications for the Adoption of the Bologna Process in the CEMAC Region and the Cameroonian Higher Education System through the LMD Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eta, Elizabeth Agbor

    2015-01-01

    The borrowing and transfer of policies, ideas and practices from one system to another may in part explain the convergence of educational systems. Using text documents as research material, this paper examines the adoption and transfer of Bologna Process (BP) ideas in the Economic and Monetary Community of Central Africa (CEMAC) and in the…

  11. Policy Borrowing and Transfer, and Policy Convergence: Justifications for the Adoption of the Bologna Process in the CEMAC Region and the Cameroonian Higher Education System through the LMD Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eta, Elizabeth Agbor

    2015-01-01

    The borrowing and transfer of policies, ideas and practices from one system to another may in part explain the convergence of educational systems. Using text documents as research material, this paper examines the adoption and transfer of Bologna Process (BP) ideas in the Economic and Monetary Community of Central Africa (CEMAC) and in the…

  12. Novel strategies of adoptive immunotherapy: How natural killer cells may change the treatment of elderly patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Lemoli, Roberto M; Parisi, Sarah; Curti, Antonio

    2017-01-01

    Although many attempts have been made to identify novel molecular-targeted therapies for patients with acute myeloid leukemia, their translation into the clinic have had limited impact. In particular, the question of effective and curative treatments for elderly patients, who are not eligible for stem cell transplantation, remains an unmet medical need. To answer this question, a wide range of immunologic therapeutic strategies, mostly T cell based, have been proposed and investigated. At present, however, the clinical results have been largely unsatisfactory. Natural killer cells have recently been used as a means of adoptive immunotherapy with promising clinical results. On the basis of recent clinical reports and moving from the basic immunobiology of natural killer cells, here we discuss some open issues in the clinical translation of natural killer-based adoptive immunotherapy for the management of elderly patients with acute myeloid leukemia.

  13. [Selection of culture media for the mass production of gamma delta T cells used in adoptive immunotherapy].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jian-Hua; Kang, Ning; Cui, Lian-Xian; He, Wei

    2011-12-01

    To select the optimal culture media for the mass production of gamma delta T cells used in adoptive immunotherapy. Three different culture media (RPMI-1640, AIM-V, and OpTmizer, with or without autologous serum) were used to culture gamma delta T cells. The survival rate, purity, proliferation efficiency, and biological functions of the expanded gamma delta T cells were examined and compared. The survival rate of gamma delta T cells expanded in RPMI-1640 decreased over culture time. The purities of gamma delta T cells cultured in AIM-V or OpTmizer with or without serum were higher than those cultured in RPMI-1640. After two weeks of culture in the absence of serum, the purity and proliferation efficiency of gamma delta T cells cultured in OpTmizer were significantly higher than those cultured in RPMI-1640 (P < 0.05) and AIM-V (P < 0.05). gamma delta T cells in different culture media had similar CD107a expression and tumor necrosis factor-alpha production (P > 0.05). However, cells expanded in RPMI-1640 exhibited significantly weaker cytotoxicity against Daudi lymphoma cells than those expanded in OpTmizer (P < 0.05) and AIM-V (P < 0.05). Due to low serum-dependence, high proliferation efficiency, and favorable biology function of expanded cells, OpTmizer is the most suitable medium for the mass production of gamma delta T cells used in adoptive immunotherapy.

  14. Effect of regulatory cells induced by influenza virus during adoptive transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Volgarev, A.P.; Maiorova, L.P.; Smorodintsev, A.A.

    1987-06-01

    This paper examines the protective effect of humoral and cellular factors of immunity in experimental influenza infection in mice, with an analysis of the functional activity of the regulatory subpopulations of the lymphocytes, especially in the early stages of observation. The regulatory activity of the splenic lymphocytes was studied by assessing changes in the level of mitogen-induced proliferation of test cultures of lymphocytes from intact animals in the presence of lymphocytes obtained from infected mice at different times after infection. Tritium-labelled thymidine was used as the marker.

  15. Isolation and In vivo Transfer of Antigen Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Pooja; Kharkwal, Shalu Sharma; Porcelli, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    Transfer of antigen presenting cells in vivo is a method used by immunologists to examine the potency of antigen presentation by a selected population of cells. This method is most commonly used to analyze presentation of protein antigens to MHC class I or II restricted T cells, but it can also be used for studies of nonconventional antigens such as CD1-presented lipids. In a recent study focusing on CD1d-restricted glycolipid antigen presentation to Natural Killer T cells, we compared antigen presenting properties of splenic B cells, CD8αPos dendritc cells (DCs) and CD8αNeg DCs (Arora et al., 2014). This protocol describes the detailed method used for isolation of these cell populations, and their transfer into recipient mice to analyze their antigen presenting properties. PMID:27390759

  16. Animal cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Smith, Lawrence C; Yoo, Jae-Gyu

    2009-01-01

    Animal cloning is becoming increasingly useful for its applications in biological inquiry and for its potential use in pharmaceutical, medical, and agricultural fields. Due to the complexity of the numerous steps required in reconstructing oocytes by nuclear transfer, detailed protocols are required to minimize the developmental damages inflicted during these manipulations and to standardize procedures across laboratories. Moreover, because oogenesis and early embryogenesis differ widely among mammalian species, it is essential that protocols be adapted according to each species concerned. Our objective here is to detail the protocols that have been most successful in producing laboratory and domestic animal clones.

  17. Generation of bovine transgenics using somatic cell nuclear transfer

    PubMed Central

    Hodges, Craig A; Stice, Steven L

    2003-01-01

    The ability to produce transgenic animals through the introduction of exogenous DNA has existed for many years. However, past methods available to generate transgenic animals, such as pronuclear microinjection or the use of embryonic stem cells, have either been inefficient or not available in all animals, bovine included. More recently somatic cell nuclear transfer has provided a method to create transgenic animals that overcomes many deficiencies present in other methods. This review summarizes the benefits of using somatic cell nuclear transfer to create bovine transgenics as well as the possible opportunities this method creates for the future. PMID:14613543

  18. Generation of bovine transgenics using somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Hodges, Craig A; Stice, Steven L

    2003-11-07

    The ability to produce transgenic animals through the introduction of exogenous DNA has existed for many years. However, past methods available to generate transgenic animals, such as pronuclear microinjection or the use of embryonic stem cells, have either been inefficient or not available in all animals, bovine included. More recently somatic cell nuclear transfer has provided a method to create transgenic animals that overcomes many deficiencies present in other methods. This review summarizes the benefits of using somatic cell nuclear transfer to create bovine transgenics as well as the possible opportunities this method creates for the future.

  19. Driving CARs on the Highway to Solid Cancer: Some Considerations on the Adoptive Therapy with CAR T Cells.

    PubMed

    Abken, Hinrich

    2017-08-15

    Adoptive therapy with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) redirected T cells achieved lasting remissions in hematologic malignancies, even in terminal stages of the disease. Exploring CAR T cell therapy in the treatment of solid tumors has just begun, balancing efficacy versus toxicity in early phase trials. In contrast to leukemia/lymphoma, solid tumors display a tremendously variable biology demanding different strategies to make a T cell attack successful in the long term. This article summarizes current developments, discusses the hurdles, and considers some modifications to improve the CAR T cell therapy in the treatment of solid tumors.

  20. Transfer of myelin-specific cells deviated in vitro towards IL-4 production ameliorates ongoing experimental allergic neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Ekerfelt, C; Dahle, C; Weissert, R; Kvarnström, M; Olsson, T; Ernerudh, J

    2001-01-01

    A causal role of IL-4 (Th2) production for recovery in experimental allergic neuritis (EAN) was indicated by experiments where Th1-like autoreactive cell populations, taken from the induction phase of the disease, were deviated to extensive secretion of IL-4 in a selective fashion, by ex vivo stimulation with autoantigen in the presence of IL-4. The deviated cells were adoptively transferred to EAN rats at a time just prior to the onset of clinical signs. This treatment ameliorated EAN compared with sham treatment. This therapeutic approach, with generation of autoreactive IL-4-secreting cells ex vivo followed by subsequent adoptive transfer, may become a new selective treatment of organ-specific autoimmune diseases since, in contrast to previous attempts, it is done in a physiological and technically easy way. PMID:11168007

  1. Adoptive transfer of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1)-modified macrophages rescues the nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2) antiinflammatory phenotype in liver ischemia/reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jing; Shen, Xiu-Da; Yue, Shi; Zhu, Jianjun; Gao, Feng; Zhai, Yuan; Busuttil, Ronald W; Ke, Bibo; Kupiec-Weglinski, Jerzy W

    2014-10-14

    Macrophages are instrumental in the pathophysiology of liver ischemia/reperfusion injury (IRI). Although Nrf2 regulates macrophage-specific heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) antioxidant defense, it remains unknown whether HO-1 induction might rescue macrophage Nrf2-dependent antiinflammatory functions. This study explores the mechanisms by which the Nrf2-HO-1 axis regulates sterile hepatic inflammation responses after adoptive transfer of ex vivo modified HO-1 overexpressing bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMMs). Livers in Nrf2-deficient mice preconditioned with Ad-HO-1 BMMs, but not Ad-β-Gal-BMMs, ameliorated liver IRI (at 6 h of reperfusion after 90 min of warm ischemia), evidenced by improved hepatocellular function (serum alanine aminotransferase [sALT] levels) and preserved hepatic architecture (Suzuki histological score). Treatment with Ad-HO-1 BMMs decreased neutrophil accumulation, proinflammatory mediators and hepatocellular necrosis/apoptosis in ischemic livers. Moreover, Ad-HO-1 transfection of Nrf2-deficient BMMs suppressed M1 (Nos2(+)) while promoting the M2 (Mrc-1/Arg-1(+)) phenotype. Unlike in controls, Ad-HO-1 BMMs increased the expression of Notch1, Hes1, phosphorylation of Stat3 and Akt in IR-stressed Nrf2-deficient livers as well as in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated BMMs. Thus, adoptive transfer of ex vivo generated Ad-HO-1 BMMs rescued Nrf2-dependent antiinflammatory phenotype by promoting Notch1/Hes1/Stat3 signaling and reprogramming macrophages toward the M2 phenotype. These findings provide the rationale for a novel clinically attractive strategy to manage IR liver inflammation/damage.

  2. Blast cells transfer experimental hypersensitivity pneumonitis in guinea pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Schuyler, M.; Cook, C.; Listrom, M.; Fengolio-Preiser, C.

    1988-06-01

    We previously demonstrated that experimental hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) can be transferred by lymph node cells (LNC) cultured in vitro with antigen. The purpose of this study was to identify the cells responsible for transfer and to determine if pulmonary cells can transfer HP. We cultured LNC from sensitized Strain 2 guinea pigs with a soluble extract of Micropolyspora faeni for 72 h, separated lymphoblasts from small lymphocytes, and transferred both subpopulations intravenously to syngeneic recipients. We also transferred irradiated lymphoblasts (1,500 rads), macrophage-depleted, lymphoblast-enriched populations, and pulmonary cells either without culture or after culture with M. faeni. Control animals received an equal volume of medium. All recipient animals were challenged intratracheally (i.t.) with M. faeni 48 h after the cell transfer, and they were killed 4 days after i.t. challenge. Randomly selected microscopic fields of the lung (250/animal) were judged to be normal or abnormal without knowledge of treatment. This measurement was reproducible (r = 0.95 for duplicate measurements, n = 55). All guinea pigs were maintained in HEPA-filtered air. There was a low level of pulmonary response to an i.t. challenge of M. faeni in animals that received medium. Animals that received pulmonary cells, either cultured or noncultured, did not differ from those in the control group. There was a substantial increase (p less than 0.01) in the extent of pulmonary abnormalities in the recipients of the lymphoblast population, with significant correlation (r = 0.87, p less than 0.01) between the number of lymphoblasts transferred and the extent of pulmonary abnormalities.

  3. Cell-to-cell transfer of M. tuberculosis antigens optimizes CD4 T cell priming.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Smita; Ernst, Joel D

    2014-06-11

    During Mycobacterium tuberculosis and other respiratory infections, optimal T cell activation requires pathogen transport from the lung to a local draining lymph node (LN). However, the infected inflammatory monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) that transport M. tuberculosis to the local lymph node are relatively inefficient at activating CD4 T cells, possibly due to bacterial inhibition of antigen presentation. We found that infected migratory DCs release M. tuberculosis antigens as soluble, unprocessed proteins for uptake and presentation by uninfected resident lymph node DCs. This transfer of bacterial proteins from migratory to local DCs results in optimal priming of antigen-specific CD4 T cells, which are essential in controlling tuberculosis. Additionally, this mechanism does not involve transfer of the whole bacterium and is distinct from apoptosis or exosome shedding. These findings reveal a mechanism that bypasses pathogen inhibition of antigen presentation by infected cells and generates CD4 T cell responses that control the infection.

  4. Differentiated cells are more efficient than adult stem cells for cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Sung, Li-Ying; Gao, Shaorong; Shen, Hongmei; Yu, Hui; Song, Yifang; Smith, Sadie L; Chang, Ching-Chien; Inoue, Kimiko; Kuo, Lynn; Lian, Jin; Li, Ao; Tian, X Cindy; Tuck, David P; Weissman, Sherman M; Yang, Xiangzhong; Cheng, Tao

    2006-11-01

    Since the creation of Dolly via somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), more than a dozen species of mammals have been cloned using this technology. One hypothesis for the limited success of cloning via SCNT (1%-5%) is that the clones are likely to be derived from adult stem cells. Support for this hypothesis comes from the findings that the reproductive cloning efficiency for embryonic stem cells is five to ten times higher than that for somatic cells as donors and that cloned pups cannot be produced directly from cloned embryos derived from differentiated B and T cells or neuronal cells. The question remains as to whether SCNT-derived animal clones can be derived from truly differentiated somatic cells. We tested this hypothesis with mouse hematopoietic cells at different differentiation stages: hematopoietic stem cells, progenitor cells and granulocytes. We found that cloning efficiency increases over the differentiation hierarchy, and terminally differentiated postmitotic granulocytes yield cloned pups with the greatest cloning efficiency.

  5. Transfer of in vitro-expanded naïve T cells after lymphodepletion enhances antitumor immunity through the induction of polyclonal antitumor effector T cells.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Tomohiro; Watanabe, Satoshi; Takahashi, Miho; Sato, Ko; Saida, Yu; Baba, Junko; Arita, Masashi; Sato, Miyuki; Ohtsubo, Aya; Shoji, Satoshi; Nozaki, Koichiro; Ichikawa, Kosuke; Kondo, Rie; Aoki, Nobumasa; Ohshima, Yasuyoshi; Sakagami, Takuro; Abe, Tetsuya; Moro, Hiroshi; Koya, Toshiyuki; Tanaka, Junta; Kagamu, Hiroshi; Yoshizawa, Hirohisa; Kikuchi, Toshiaki

    2017-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of effector T cells combined with lymphodepletion has demonstrated promising antitumor effects in mice and humans, although the availability of tumor-specific T cells is limited. We and others have also demonstrated that the transfer of polyclonal naïve T cells induces tumor-specific effector T cells and enhances antitumor immunity after lymphodepletion. Because tumors have been demonstrated to induce immunosuppressive networks and regulate the function of T cells, obtaining a sufficient number of fully functional naïve T cells that are able to differentiate into tumor-specific effector T cells remains difficult. To establish culture methods to obtain a large number of polyclonal T cells that are capable of differentiating into tumor-specific effector T cells, naïve T cells were activated with anti-CD3 mAbs in vitro. These cells were stimulated with IL-2 and IL-7 for the CD8 subset or with IL-7 and IL-23 for the CD4 subset. Transfer of these hyperexpanded T cells after lymphodepletion showed significant antitumor efficacy, and tumor-specific effector T cells were primed from these expanded T cells in tumor-bearing hosts. Moreover, these ex vivo-expanded T cells maintained T cell receptor diversity and showed long-term persistence of memory against specific tumors. Further analyses revealed that combination therapy consisting of vaccination with dendritic cells that were co-cultured with irradiated whole tumor cells and the transfer of ex vivo-expanded T cells significantly enhanced antitumor immunity. These results indicate that the transfer of ex vivo-expanded polyclonal T cells can be combined with other immunotherapies and augment antitumor effects.

  6. Cloning Endangered Felids by Interspecies Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Martha C; Pope, C Earle

    2015-01-01

    In 2003, the first wild felid was produced by interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer. Since then other wild felid clone offspring have been produced by using the same technique with minor modifications. This chapter describes detailed protocols used in our laboratory for (1) the isolation, culture, and preparation of fibroblast cells as donor nucleus, and (2) embryo reconstruction with domestic cat enucleated oocytes to produce cloned embryos that develop to the blastocyst stage in vitro and, after transfer into synchronized recipients, establish successful pregnancies.

  7. Somatic cell nuclear transfer: pros and cons.

    PubMed

    Sumer, Huseyin; Liu, Jun; Tat, Pollyanna; Heffernan, Corey; Jones, Karen L; Verma, Paul J

    2009-01-01

    Even though the technique of mammalian SCNT is just over a decade old it has already resulted in numerous significant advances. Despite the recent advances in the reprogramming field, SCNT remains the bench-mark for the generation of both genetically unmodified autologous pluripotent stem cells for transplantation and for the production of cloned animals. In this review we will discuss the pros and cons of SCNT, drawing comparisons with other reprogramming methods.

  8. Adoptive cell therapy with autologous tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and high-dose interleukin-2 for metastatic melanoma: The surgeon’s perspective

    PubMed Central

    ZIPPEL, DOUGLAS B.; BESSER, MICHAL; SHAPIRA, RONI; BEN-NUN, ALON; GOITEIN, DAVID; DAVIDSON, TIMA; TREVES, ABRAHAM J.; MARKEL, GAL; SCHACHTER, JACOB; PAPA, MOSHE Z.

    2012-01-01

    Tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) are produced by resecting tumor tissue and growing and expanding ex vivo large quantities of autologous T cells. Once the TILs are ready for infusion, the patient undergoes a non-myeloablative lympho-depleting course of chemotherapy and subsequent TIL infusion with high-dose bolus IL-2. This study reviews the surgical experience of the TIL program at the Chaim Sheba Cancer Research Center in Israel. Eligible patients underwent surgical consultation to determine what tumorectomy would be beneficial for harvesting appropriate tissue. Factors involved in the decision included tumor mass size, location and morbidity of the procedure. Between January 2006 and May 2010, 44 patients underwent 47 procedures of adoptive transfer of TILs. Three patients underwent the procedure twice for recurrence after initial good responses, including an additional surgical procedure to produce fresh tumor. Thirty-seven excisions were with general anesthesia and 10 were with local anesthesia. Of the 37 general anesthesia procedures, 27 were open procedures involving a thoracotomy, a laparotomy or dissection of a major lymph node basin. Ten used minimally invasive techniques such as thorascopy or laparoscopy. Tumorectomy sites included 18 lymph node metastasis, 13 subcutaneous nodules, 11 lung specimens and 5 abdominal visceral metastasis including 2 liver lesions. Surgical mortality and major morbidity was 0%. Minor morbidity included only wound complications. Maximal number of TILs were derived from lymph node specimens, while liver metastasis procured the fewest TILs. Adoptive cell transfer technology affords a maximal tumor response with minimal surgical morbidity in metastatic patients. PMID:22969990

  9. Emerging role of regulatory T cells in gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ou; Furlan-Freguia, Christian; Arruda, Valder R; Herzog, Roland W

    2007-10-01

    Induction and maintenance of immune tolerance to therapeutic transgene products are key requirements for successful gene replacement therapies. Gene transfer may also be used to specifically induce immune tolerance and thereby augment other types of therapies. Similarly, gene therapies for treatment of autoimmune diseases are being developed in order to restore tolerance to self-antigens. Regulatory T cells have emerged as key players in many aspects of immune tolerance, and a rapidly increasing body of work documents induction and/or activation of regulatory T cells by gene transfer. Regulatory T cells may suppress antibody formation and cytotoxic T cell responses and may be critical for immune tolerance to therapeutic proteins. In this regard, CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells have been identified as important components of tolerance in several gene transfer protocols, including hepatic in vivo gene transfer. Augmentation of regulatory T cell responses should be a promising new tool to achieve tolerance and avoid immune-mediated rejection of gene therapy. During the past decade, it has become obvious that immune regulation is an important and integral component of tolerance to self-antigens and of many forms of induced tolerance. Gene therapy can only be successful if the immune system does not reject the therapeutic transgene product. Recent studies provide a rapidly growing body of evidence that regulatory T cells (T(reg)) are involved and often play a crucial role in tolerance to proteins expressed by means of gene transfer. This review seeks to provide an overview of these data and their implications for gene therapy.

  10. Abrogation of SHP-1 in tumor-specific T cells improves efficacy of adoptive immunotherapy by enhancing the effector function and accumulation of short-lived effector T cells in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Stromnes, Ingunn M.; Fowler, Carla; Casamina, Chanel C.; Georgopolos, Christina M.; McAfee, Megan S.; Schmitt, Thomas M.; Tan, Xiaoxia; Kim, Tae-Don; Choi, Inpyo; Blattman, Joseph N.; Greenberg, Philip D.

    2012-01-01

    T cell expression of inhibitory proteins can be a critical component for the regulation of immunopathology due to self-reactivity or potentially exuberant responses to pathogens, but may also limit T cell responses to some malignancies, particularly if the tumor antigen being targeted is a self-protein. We found that the abrogation of SHP-1, in tumor-reactive CD8+ T cells improves the therapeutic outcome of adoptive immunotherapy in a mouse model of disseminated leukemia, with benefit observed in therapy employing transfer of CD8+ T cells alone or in the context of also providing supplemental IL-2. SHP-1−/− and SHP-1+/+ effector T cells were expanded in vitro for immunotherapy. Following transfer in vivo, the SHP-1−/− effector T cells exhibited enhanced short-term accumulation, followed by greater contraction, and ultimately formed similar numbers of long-lived, functional memory cells. The increased therapeutic effectiveness of SHP-1−/− effector cells was also observed in recipients that expressed the tumor antigen as a self-antigen in the liver, without evidence of inducing autoimmune toxicity. SHP-1−/− effector CD8+ T cells expressed higher levels of Eomesodermin, which correlated with enhanced lysis of tumor cells. Furthermore, reduction of SHP-1 expression in tumor-reactive effector T cells by retroviral transduction with vectors that express SHP-1-specific siRNA, a translatable strategy, also exhibited enhanced anti-tumor activity in vivo. These studies suggest that abrogating SHP-1 in effector T cells may improve the efficacy of tumor elimination by T cell therapy without impacting the ability of the effector cells to persist and provide a long-term response. PMID:22798667

  11. Nanoparticle facilitated extracellular electron transfer in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaocheng; Hu, Jinsong; Lieber, Alexander M; Jackan, Charles S; Biffinger, Justin C; Fitzgerald, Lisa A; Ringeisen, Bradley R; Lieber, Charles M

    2014-11-12

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have been the focus of substantial research interest due to their potential for long-term, renewable electrical power generation via the metabolism of a broad spectrum of organic substrates, although the low power densities have limited their applications to date. Here, we demonstrate the potential to improve the power extraction by exploiting biogenic inorganic nanoparticles to facilitate extracellular electron transfer in MFCs. Simultaneous short-circuit current recording and optical imaging on a nanotechnology-enabled platform showed substantial current increase from Shewanella PV-4 after the formation of cell/iron sulfide nanoparticle aggregates. Detailed characterization of the structure and composition of the cell/nanoparticle interface revealed crystalline iron sulfide nanoparticles in intimate contact with and uniformly coating the cell membrane. In addition, studies designed to address the fundamental mechanisms of charge transport in this hybrid system showed that charge transport only occurred in the presence of live Shewanella, and moreover demonstrated that the enhanced current output can be attributed to improved electron transfer at cell/electrode interface and through the cellular-networks. Our approach of interconnecting and electrically contacting bacterial cells through biogenic nanoparticles represents a unique and promising direction in MFC research and has the potential to not only advance our fundamental knowledge about electron transfer processes in these biological systems but also overcome a key limitation in MFCs by constructing an electrically connected, three-dimensional cell network from the bottom-up.

  12. Gene Transfer in Eukaryotic Cells Using Activated Dendrimers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dennig, Jörg

    Gene transfer into eukaryotic cells plays an important role in cell biology. Over the last 30 years a number of transfection methods have been developed to mediate gene transfer into eukaryotic cells. Classical methods include co-precipitation of DNA with calcium phosphate, charge-dependent precipitation of DNA with DEAE-dextran, electroporation of nucleic acids, and formation of transfection complexes between DNA and cationic liposomes. Gene transfer technologies based on activated PAMAM-dendrimers provide another class of transfection reagents. PAMAM-dendrimers are highly branched, spherical molecules. Activation of newly synthesized dendrimers involves hydrolytic removal of some of the branches, and results in a molecule with a higher degree of flexibility. Activated dendrimers assemble DNA into compact structures via charge interactions. Activated dendrimer - DNA complexes bind to the cell membrane of eukaryotic cells, and are transported into the cell by non-specific endocytosis. A structural model of the activated dendrimer - DNA complex and a potential mechanism for its uptake into cells will be discussed.

  13. Cloning animals by somatic cell nuclear transfer – biological factors

    PubMed Central

    Tian, X Cindy; Kubota, Chikara; Enright, Brian; Yang, Xiangzhong

    2003-01-01

    Cloning by nuclear transfer using mammalian somatic cells has enormous potential application. However, somatic cloning has been inefficient in all species in which live clones have been produced. High abortion and fetal mortality rates are commonly observed. These developmental defects have been attributed to incomplete reprogramming of the somatic nuclei by the cloning process. Various strategies have been used to improve the efficiency of nuclear transfer, however, significant breakthroughs are yet to happen. In this review we will discuss studies conducted, in our laboratories and those of others, to gain a better understanding of nuclear reprogramming. Because cattle are a species widely used for nuclear transfer studies, and more laboratories have succeeded in cloning cattle than any other specie, this review will be focused on somatic cell cloning of cattle. PMID:14614770

  14. Realizing the next generation of CPV cells using transfer printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumb, Matthew P.; Schmieder, Kenneth J.; González, María; Mack, Shawn; Yakes, Michael K.; Meitl, Matthew; Burroughs, Scott; Ebert, Chris; Bennett, Mitchell F.; Forbes, David V.; Sheng, Xing; Rogers, John A.; Walters, Robert J.

    2015-09-01

    Transfer-printing is an important, commercial technology for manufacturing state of the art CPV modules, and has emerged recently as a key enabling technology for the realization of ultra-high-efficiency, mechanically stacked III-V solar cells with low cost. This paper presents the latest results for microscale CPV cells grown on GaAs, InP and GaSb substrates for ultra-high-efficiency, four-terminal, mechanically stacked architectures. The latest findings from a combination of modeling, growth, processing and characterization of single and multijunction solar cells are described, and the roadmap to the long-term goal of using transfer-printing to produce the first solar cell with 50% conversion efficiency is outlined.

  15. Live cell isolation by laser microdissection with gravity transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgorny, Oleg V.

    2013-05-01

    Laser microdissection by pulsing ultraviolet laser allows the isolation and recultivation of live cells based on morphological features or/and fluorescent labelling from adherent cell cultures. Previous investigations described only the use of the laser microdissection and pressure catapulting (LMPC) for live cell isolation. But LMPC requires complex manipulations and some skill. Furthermore, single-cell cloning using laser microdissection has not yet been demonstrated. The first evidence of successful application of laser microdissection with gravity transfer (LMDGT) for capturing and recultivation of live cells is presented. A new strategy for LMDGT is presented because of the failure to reproduce the manufacturer's protocol. Using the new strategy, successful capturing and recultivation of circle-shaped samples from confluent monolayer of HeLa cells was demonstrated. It was found that LMDGT is easier than LMPC because it doesn't require personal participation of investigator in transferring of isolated samples to final culture dishes. Moreover, for the first time, the generation of clonal colonies from single live cells isolated by laser microdissection was demonstrated. Data obtained in this study confirm that LMDGT is a reliable and high-yield method allowing isolation and expansion of both cell clusters and single cells from adherent cell cultures.

  16. Live cell isolation by laser microdissection with gravity transfer.

    PubMed

    Podgorny, Oleg V

    2013-05-01

    Laser microdissection by pulsing ultraviolet laser allows the isolation and recultivation of live cells based on morphological features or/and fluorescent labelling from adherent cell cultures. Previous investigations described only the use of the laser microdissection and pressure catapulting (LMPC) for live cell isolation. But LMPC requires complex manipulations and some skill. Furthermore, single-cell cloning using laser microdissection has not yet been demonstrated. The first evidence of successful application of laser microdissection with gravity transfer (LMDGT) for capturing and recultivation of live cells is presented. A new strategy for LMDGT is presented because of the failure to reproduce the manufacturer's protocol. Using the new strategy, successful capturing and recultivation of circle-shaped samples from confluent monolayer of HeLa cells was demonstrated. It was found that LMDGT is easier than LMPC because it doesn't require personal participation of investigator in transferring of isolated samples to final culture dishes. Moreover, for the first time, the generation of clonal colonies from single live cells isolated by laser microdissection was demonstrated. Data obtained in this study confirm that LMDGT is a reliable and high-yield method allowing isolation and expansion of both cell clusters and single cells from adherent cell cultures.

  17. Primary cells utilize halogen-organic charge transfer complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutmann, F.; Hermann, A. M.; Rembaum, A.

    1966-01-01

    Electrochemical cells with solid state components employ charge transfer complexes or donor-acceptor complexes in which the donor component is an organic compound and the acceptor component is a halogen. A minor proportion of graphite added to these composition helps reduce the resistivity.

  18. Primary cells utilize halogen-organic charge transfer complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gutmann, F.; Hermann, A. M.; Rembaum, A.

    1966-01-01

    Electrochemical cells with solid state components employ charge transfer complexes or donor-acceptor complexes in which the donor component is an organic compound and the acceptor component is a halogen. A minor proportion of graphite added to these composition helps reduce the resistivity.

  19. Intratracheal cell transfer demonstrates the profibrotic potential of resident fibroblasts in pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Tsukui, Tatsuya; Ueha, Satoshi; Shichino, Shigeyuki; Inagaki, Yutaka; Matsushima, Kouji

    2015-11-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a devastating disease for which there are few effective therapies. Activated fibroblasts form subepithelial clusters known as fibroblastic foci, which are characterized by excessive collagen deposition. The origin of activated fibroblasts is controversial and needs to be clarified to understand their pathogenicity. Here, using an intratracheal adoptive cell transfer method, we show that resident fibroblasts in alveolar walls have the highest profibrotic potential. By using collagen I(α)2-green fluorescent protein and neural/glial antigen 2-DsRed fluorescent reporter mice, we identified resident fibroblasts and pericytes in the alveolar walls based on surface marker expression and ultrastructural characteristics. In the early phase of bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis, activated fibroblasts migrated into epithelium-denuded alveolar airspaces. Purified resident fibroblasts delivered into injured alveoli by an intratracheal route showed similar activated signatures as activated fibroblasts and formed fibroblastic foci. Neither pericytes nor epithelial cells had the same profibrotic potential. Transferred resident fibroblasts highly up-regulated profibrotic genes including α-smooth muscle actin and were a significant source of collagen deposition. These data provide insights into the cellular mechanisms of fibrogenesis and show intratracheal cell transfer to be a useful tool for exploring novel therapeutic targets against pulmonary fibrosis. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Investigative Pathology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. From cloned frogs to patient matched stem cells: induced pluripotency or somatic cell nuclear transfer?

    PubMed

    Yamada, Mitsutoshi; Byrne, James; Egli, Dieter

    2015-10-01

    Nuclear transfer has seen a remarkable comeback in the past few years. Three groups have independently reported the derivation of stem cell lines by somatic cell nuclear transfer, from either adult, neonatal or fetal cells. Though the ability of human oocytes to reprogram somatic cells to stem cells had long been anticipated, success did not arrive on a straightforward path. Little was known about human oocyte biology, and nuclear transfer protocols developed in animals required key changes to become effective with human eggs. By overcoming these challenges, human nuclear transfer research has contributed to a greater understanding of oocyte biology, provided a point of reference for the comparison of induced pluripotent stem cells, and delivered a method for the generation of personalized stem cells with therapeutic potential.

  1. Adoptive Immunotherapy in Postoperative Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    He, Jiaxi; Zhang, Jianrong; Liang, Wenhua; Chen, Yaoqi; He, Qihua; He, Jianxing

    2016-01-01

    Background Adoptive immunotherapy (AI) has been applied in the treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients, but the value of postoperative AI has been inconclusive largely as a result of the small number of patients included in each study. We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to address this issue for patients with postoperative NSCLC. Methods Pubmed, Embase, Cochrane Library were searched for randomized controlled trials comparing adoptive immunotherapy with control therapies in postoperative NSCLC patients. The primary endpoint was overall survival. Hazard ratio (HR) was estimated and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using a fixed-effect model. Results Compared with control therapies, analyses of 4 randomized controlled trials (472 patients) showed a significant benefit of adoptive immunotherapy on survival (hazard ratio [HR] 0.61, 95% CI 0.45–0.84, p = 0.002), and a 39% reduction in the relative risk of death (no evidence of a difference between trials; p = 0.16, I² = 42%). In subgroup analyses by treatment cycles and treatment regimen, significant OS benefit was found in combination therapy of AI with chemotherapy, regardless of whether or not the treatment cycles were more than 10 cycles. Conclusion Adoptive immunotherapy has the potential to improve overall survival in postoperative NSCLC. The findings suggest this is a valid treatment option for these patients. Further randomized clinical trials are urgently needed. PMID:27618180

  2. Severe Developmental B Lymphopoietic Defects in Foxp3-Deficient Mice are Refractory to Adoptive Regulatory T Cell Therapy.

    PubMed

    Riewaldt, Julia; Düber, Sandra; Boernert, Marie; Krey, Martina; Dembinski, Marcin; Weiss, Siegfried; Garbe, Annette I; Kretschmer, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    The role of Foxp3-expressing regulatory T (T(reg)) cells in tolerance and autoimmunity is well-established. However, although of considerable clinical interest, the role of T(reg) cells in the regulation of hematopoietic homeostasis remains poorly understood. Thus, we analysed B and T lymphopoiesis in the scurfy (Sf) mouse model of T(reg) cell deficiency. In these experiments, the near-complete block of B lymphopoiesis in the BM of adolescent Sf mice was attributed to autoimmune T cells. We could exclude a constitutive lympho-hematopoietic defect or a B cell-intrinsic function of Foxp3. Efficient B cell development in the BM early in ontogeny and pronounced extramedullary B lymphopoietic activity resulted in a peripheral pool of mature B cells in adolescent Sf mice. However, marginal zone B and B-1a cells were absent throughout ontogeny. Developmental B lymphopoietic defects largely correlated with defective thymopoiesis. Importantly, neonatal adoptive T(reg) cell therapy suppressed exacerbated production of inflammatory cytokines and restored thymopoiesis but was ineffective in recovering defective B lymphopoiesis, probably due to a failure to compensate production of stroma cell-derived IL-7 and CXCL12. Our observations on autoimmune-mediated incapacitation of the BM environment in Foxp3-deficient mice will have direct implications for the rational design of BM transplantation protocols for patients with severe genetic deficiencies in functional Foxp3(+) T(reg) cells.

  3. Severe Developmental B Lymphopoietic Defects in Foxp3-Deficient Mice are Refractory to Adoptive Regulatory T Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Riewaldt, Julia; Düber, Sandra; Boernert, Marie; Krey, Martina; Dembinski, Marcin; Weiss, Siegfried; Garbe, Annette I.; Kretschmer, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    The role of Foxp3-expressing regulatory T (Treg) cells in tolerance and autoimmunity is well-established. However, although of considerable clinical interest, the role of Treg cells in the regulation of hematopoietic homeostasis remains poorly understood. Thus, we analysed B and T lymphopoiesis in the scurfy (Sf) mouse model of Treg cell deficiency. In these experiments, the near-complete block of B lymphopoiesis in the BM of adolescent Sf mice was attributed to autoimmune T cells. We could exclude a constitutive lympho-hematopoietic defect or a B cell-intrinsic function of Foxp3. Efficient B cell development in the BM early in ontogeny and pronounced extramedullary B lymphopoietic activity resulted in a peripheral pool of mature B cells in adolescent Sf mice. However, marginal zone B and B-1a cells were absent throughout ontogeny. Developmental B lymphopoietic defects largely correlated with defective thymopoiesis. Importantly, neonatal adoptive Treg cell therapy suppressed exacerbated production of inflammatory cytokines and restored thymopoiesis but was ineffective in recovering defective B lymphopoiesis, probably due to a failure to compensate production of stroma cell-derived IL-7 and CXCL12. Our observations on autoimmune-mediated incapacitation of the BM environment in Foxp3-deficient mice will have direct implications for the rational design of BM transplantation protocols for patients with severe genetic deficiencies in functional Foxp3+ Treg cells. PMID:22679447

  4. Adoptive transfer of genetically modified macrophages elucidated TGF-beta-mediated 'self-defence' of the glomerulus against local action of macrophages.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, M

    1999-01-01

    TGF-beta has several anti-inflammatory properties which may be relevant to prevention of or recovery from acute glomerular inflammation. Using genetically modified mesangial cells and a technique for in vivo macrophage transfer, this article provides evidence for TGF-beta-mediated 'self-defence' of the glomerulus against macrophages. Rat mesangial cells stably transfected with TGF-beta1 showed a blunted response to the macrophage-derived, proinflammatory cytokine IL-1beta. In contrast, mesangial cells expressing the dominant-interfering TGF-beta receptor showed an enhanced response to IL-1. Similarly, externally added TGF-beta1 inhibited the cytokine response of normal glomeruli, and isolated nephritic glomeruli producing active TGF-beta1 showed a depressed response to IL-1beta, compared to normal glomeruli. Consistent with these in vitro results, in vivo transfer of activated macrophages revealed that the TGF-beta-producing glomeruli are insensitive to the effector action of macrophages. These results indicate that TGF-beta1 functions as an endogenous 'defender' that counteracts local action of activated macrophages in the glomerulus.

  5. Open Adoption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baran, Annette; And Others

    1976-01-01

    Adult adoptees are increasingly challenging the practice of sealing their birth records. The authors examine the historical roots of adoptive practices in this country and suggest that the time has come for open adoption to gain acceptance as an alternative. (Author)

  6. Adoptive immunity mediated by HLA-A*0201 restricted Asp f16 peptides-specific CD8+ T cells against Aspergillus fumigatus infection.

    PubMed

    Sun, Z; Zhu, P; Li, L; Wan, Z; Zhao, Z; Li, R

    2012-11-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus (A. fumigatus) is the most common pathogen of invasive aspergillosis (IA), a life-threatening infection in immunocompromised patients. Recent findings revealed that CD8+ T cells can mediate cytotoxic activity against A. fumigatus. Here, we bioinformatically identified three HLA-A*0201-restricted peptides from Asp f16, an A. fumigatus antigen which was previously shown to be involved in T cell immunity. Our immunological results demonstrated that these peptides can potently induce cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response in CD8+ T cells, thus, damaging the conidia and hyphae of A. fumigatus. Moreover, the Asp f16 peptides can also raise Th1 cell-like response, as measured by interferon-γ (IFN-γ) enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISPOT). Furthermore, we established an invasive pulmonary aspergillosis model in HLA-A*0201 transgenic mice. Adoptive transfer of Asp f16 peptides-specific CTL significantly extended the overall survival time in the A. fumigatus-infected immunocompromised mice. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that the Asp f16 peptides might provide immunity against invasive A. fumigatus infection.

  7. Generation of human islet-specific regulatory T cells by TCR gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Hull, Caroline M; Nickolay, Lauren E; Estorninho, Megan; Richardson, Max W; Riley, James L; Peakman, Mark; Maher, John; Tree, Timothy I M

    2017-05-01

    Based on the success in animal models of type 1 diabetes (T1D), clinical trials of adoptive regulatory T cell (Treg) therapy are underway using ex vivo expanded polyclonal Tregs. However, pre-clinical data also demonstrate that islet-specific Tregs are more potent than polyclonal Tregs at reversing T1D. Translation of this approach into man will require methods to generate large populations of islet-specific Tregs which, to date, has proved to be a major hurdle. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of lentiviral-mediated T cell receptor (TCR) gene transfer to confer antigen specificity on polyclonal human Tregs. Targeting has been achieved using TCRs isolated from human islet-specific and viral-specific CD4(+) T cell clones. Engineered T cells demonstrated expression of ectopically-delivered TCRs, resulting in endowment of cognate antigen-specific responses. This enabled antigen-specific suppression at increased potency compared to polyclonal Tregs. However, cells transduced with islet-specific TCRs were less responsive to cognate antigen than viral-specific TCRs, and in some cases, required additional methods to isolate functional antigen-specific Tregs. This study demonstrates the potential of TCR gene transfer to develop islet-specific Treg therapies for effective treatment of T1D, but also highlights that additional optimisation may be required to achieve its full potential. Crown Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Natural killer cells: can they be useful as adoptive immunotherapy for cancer?

    PubMed

    Arai, Sally; Klingemann, Hans-G

    2005-02-01

    As part of the innate immune system, natural killer (NK) cells form the first line of defence against pathogens or transformed/cancerous host cells. Recent experimental and clinical data show the possibility of exploiting NK activity as a cell-based immunotherapy to treat cancer. This review discusses the recent knowledge on NK cell biology that has impacted on its development as a treatment for cancer.

  9. Muscle side population cells from dystrophic or injured muscle adopt a fibro-adipogenic fate.

    PubMed

    Penton, Christopher M; Thomas-Ahner, Jennifer M; Johnson, Eric K; McAllister, Cynthia; Montanaro, Federica

    2013-01-01

    Muscle side population (SP) cells are rare multipotent stem cells that can participate in myogenesis and muscle regeneration upon transplantation. While they have been primarily studied for the development of cell-based therapies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, little is known regarding their non-muscle lineage choices or whether the dystrophic muscle environment affects their ability to repair muscle. Unfortunately, the study of muscle SP cells has been challenged by their low abundance and the absence of specific SP cell markers. To address these issues, we developed culture conditions for the propagation and spontaneous multi-lineage differentiation of muscle SP cells. Using this approach, we show that SP cells from wild type muscle robustly differentiate into satellite cells and form myotubes without requiring co-culture with myogenic cells. Furthermore, this myogenic activity is associated with SP cells negative for immune (CD45) and vascular (CD31) markers but positive for Pax7, Sca1, and the mesenchymal progenitor marker PDGFRα. Additionally, our studies revealed that SP cells isolated from dystrophic or cardiotoxin-injured muscle fail to undergo myogenesis. Instead, these SP cells rapidly expand giving rise to fibroblast and adipocyte progenitors (FAPs) and to their differentiated progeny, fibroblasts and adipocytes. Our findings indicate that muscle damage affects the lineage choices of muscle SP cells, promoting their differentiation along fibro-adipogenic lineages while inhibiting myogenesis. These results have implications for a possible role of muscle SP cells in fibrosis and fat deposition in muscular dystrophy. In addition, our studies provide a useful in vitro system to analyze SP cell biology in both normal and pathological conditions.

  10. Therapeutic Targeting of CC Ligand 21 or CC Chemokine Receptor 7 Abrogates Pulmonary Fibrosis Induced by the Adoptive Transfer of Human Pulmonary Fibroblasts to Immunodeficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Elizabeth M.; Carpenter, Kristin; Jakubzick, Claudia; Kunkel, Steven L.; Flaherty, Kevin R.; Martinez, Fernando J.; Hogaboam, Cory M.

    2007-01-01

    Idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs) are a collection of pulmonary fibrotic diseases of unknown etiopathogenesis. CC chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7) is expressed in IIP biopsies and primary fibroblast lines, but its role in pulmonary fibrosis was not previously examined. To study the in vivo role of CCR7 in a novel model of pulmonary fibrosis, 1.0 × 106 primary fibroblasts grown from idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis/usual interstitial pneumonia, nonspecific interstitial pneumonia, or histologically normal biopsies were injected intravenously into C.B-17 severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID)/beige (bg) mice. At days 35 and 63 after idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis/usual interstitial pneumonia fibroblast injection, patchy interstitial fibrosis and increased hydroxyproline were present in the lungs of immunodeficient mice. Adoptively transferred nonspecific interstitial pneumonia fibroblasts caused a more diffuse interstitial fibrosis and increased hydroxyproline levels at both times, but injected normal human fibroblasts did not induce interstitial remodeling changes in C.B-17SCID/bg mice. Systemic therapeutic immunoneutralization of either human CCR7 or CC ligand 21, its ligand, significantly attenuated the pulmonary fibrosis in groups of C.B-17SCID/bg mice that received either type of IIP fibroblasts. Thus, the present study demonstrates that pulmonary fibrosis is initiated by the intravenous introduction of primary human fibroblast lines into immunodeficient mice, and this fibrotic response is dependent on the interaction between CC ligand 21 and CCR7. PMID:17392156

  11. Innate and adoptive immune cells contribute to natural resistance to systemic metastasis of B16 melanoma.

    PubMed

    Umeshappa, Channakeshava Sokke; Zhu, Yehan; Bhanumathy, Kalpana Kalyanasundaram; Omabe, Maxwell; Chibbar, Rajni; Xiang, Jim

    2015-03-01

    The greatest hurdle in cancer treatment is the metastasis of primary tumors to distant organs. Our knowledge on how different immune cells, in the absence of exogenous stimulation, prevent tumor metastasis in distant organs is poorly understood. Using a highly metastatic murine lung B16 melanoma cell line BL6-10, we employed naive mice that genetically lack CD4(+) or CD8(+) T cells, or are depleted of dendritic cells (DCs) or natural killer (NK) cells to understand the relative importance of these cells in metastasis prevention. Irrespective of the presence of naïve CD4(+) T, CD8(+) T, DCs, or NK cells, lungs, which act as primary site of predilection for B16 melanoma, readily developed numerous lung BL6-10 melanoma colonies. However, their absence led to B16 melanoma metastasis in variable proportions to distant organs, particularly livers, kidneys, adrenals, ovaries, and hearts. NK cells mediate prevention of BL6-10 metastasis to various organs, especially to livers. Mechanistically, CD40L signaling, a critical factor required for DC licensing and CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses, was required for CD4(+) T cell-mediated prevention of systemic BL6-10 metastasis. These results suggest that the composition and functions of different immune cells in distant tissue microenvironments (distant organs other than primary sites of predilection) robustly mediate natural resistance against melanoma metastasis. Thus, harnessing these immune cells' responses in immunotherapeutics would considerably limit organ metastasis.

  12. Peripheral Nerve Injury: Stem Cell Therapy and Peripheral Nerve Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Robert; Dailey, Travis; Duncan, Kelsey; Abel, Naomi; Borlongan, Cesario V.

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral nerve injury can lead to great morbidity in those afflicted, ranging from sensory loss, motor loss, chronic pain, or a combination of deficits. Over time, research has investigated neuronal molecular mechanisms implicated in nerve damage, classified nerve injury, and developed surgical techniques for treatment. Despite these advancements, full functional recovery remains less than ideal. In this review, we discuss historical aspects of peripheral nerve injury and introduce nerve transfer as a therapeutic option, as well as an adjunct therapy to transplantation of Schwann cells and their stem cell derivatives for repair of the damaged nerve. This review furthermore, will provide an elaborated discussion on the sources of Schwann cells, including sites to harvest their progenitor and stem cell lines. This reflects the accessibility to an additional, concurrent treatment approach with nerve transfers that, predicated on related research, may increase the efficacy of the current approach. We then discuss the experimental and clinical investigations of both Schwann cells and nerve transfer that are underway. Lastly, we provide the necessary consideration that these two lines of therapeutic approaches should not be exclusive, but conversely, should be pursued as a combined modality given their mutual role in peripheral nerve regeneration. PMID:27983642

  13. Light transfer in agar immobilized microalgae cell cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandilian, Razmig; Jesus, Bruno; Legrand, Jack; Pilon, Laurent; Pruvost, Jérémy

    2017-09-01

    This paper experimentally and theoretically investigates light transfer in agar-immobilized cell cultures. Certain biotechnological applications such as production of metabolites secreted by photosynthetic microorganisms require cells to be immobilized in biopolymers to minimize contamination and to facilitate metabolite recovery. In such applications, light absorption by cells is one of the most important parameters affecting cell growth or metabolite productivity. Modeling light transfer therein can aid design and optimize immobilized-cell reactors. In this study, Parachlorella kessleri cells with areal biomass concentrations ranging from 0.36 to 16.9 g/m2 were immobilized in 2.6 mm thick agar gels. The average absorption and scattering cross-sections as well as the scattering phase function of P. kessleri cells were measured. Then, the absorption and transport scattering coefficients of the agar gel were determined using an inverse method based on the modified two-flux approximation. The forward model was used to predict the normal-hemispherical transmittance and reflectance of the immobilized-cell films accounting for absorption and scattering by both microalgae and the agar gel. Good agreement was found between the measured and predicted normal-hemispherical transmittance and reflectance provided absorption and scattering by agar were taken into account. Moreover, good agreement was found between experimentally measured and predicted mean rate of photon absorption. Finally, optimal areal biomass concentration was determined to achieve complete absorption of the incident radiation.

  14. Foamy virus–mediated gene transfer to canine repopulating cells

    PubMed Central

    Kiem, Hans-Peter; Allen, James; Trobridge, Grant; Olson, Erik; Keyser, Kirsten; Peterson, Laura; Russell, David W.

    2007-01-01

    Foamy virus (FV) vectors are particularly attractive gene-transfer vectors for stem-cell gene therapy because they form a stable transduction intermediate in quiescent cells and can efficiently transduce hematopoietic stem cells. Here, we studied the use of FV vectors to transduce long-term hematopoietic repopulating cells in the dog, a clinically relevant large animal model. Mobilized canine peripheral blood (PB) CD34+ cells were transduced with an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)–expressing FV vector in an 18-hour transduction protocol. All 3 dogs studied had rapid neutrophil engraftment to greater than 500/μL with a median of 10 days. Transgene expression was detected in all cell lineages (B cells, T cells, granulocytes, red blood cells, and platelets), indicating multilineage engraftment of transduced cells. Up to 19% of blood cells were EGFP+, and this was confirmed at the DNA level by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and Southern blot analysis. These transduction rates were higher than the best results we obtained previously with lentiviral vectors in a similar transduction protocol. Integration site analysis also demonstrated polyclonal repopulation and the transduction of multipotential hematopoietic repopulating cells. These data suggest that FV vectors should be useful for stem-cell gene therapy, particularly for applications in which short transduction protocols are critical. PMID:16968897

  15. Generation of multi-functional antigen-specific human T-cells by lentiviral TCR gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Perro, M; Tsang, J; Xue, S-A; Escors, D; Cesco-Gaspere, M; Pospori, C; Gao, L; Hart, D; Collins, M; Stauss, H; Morris, E C

    2010-06-01

    T-cell receptor (TCR) gene transfer is an attractive strategy to generate antigen-specific T-cells for adoptive immunotherapy of cancer and chronic viral infection. However, current TCR gene transfer protocols trigger T-cell differentiation into terminally differentiated effector cells, which likely have reduced ability to mediate disease protection in vivo. We have developed a lentiviral gene transfer strategy to generate TCR-transduced human T-cells without promoting T-cell differentiation. We found that a combination of interleukin-15 (IL15) and IL21 facilitated lentiviral TCR gene transfer into non-proliferating T-cells. The transduced T-cells showed redirection of antigen specificity and produced IL2, IFNgamma and TNFalpha in a peptide-dependent manner. A significantly higher proportion of the IL15/IL21-stimulated T-cells were multi-functional and able to simultaneously produce all three cytokines (P<0.01), compared with TCR-transduced T-cells generated by conventional anti-CD3 plus IL2 stimulation, which primarily secreted only one cytokine. Similarly, IL15/IL21 maintained high levels of CD62L and CD28 expression in transduced T-cells, whereas anti-CD3 plus IL2 accelerated the loss of CD62L/CD28 expression. The data demonstrate that the combination of lentiviral TCR gene transfer together with IL15/IL21 stimulation can efficiently redirect the antigen specificity of resting primary human T-cells and generate multi-functional T-cells.

  16. Cellular transfer of magnetic nanoparticles via cell microvesicles: impact on cell tracking by magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Silva, Amanda K Andriola; Wilhelm, Claire; Kolosnjaj-Tabi, Jelena; Luciani, Nathalie; Gazeau, Florence

    2012-05-01

    Cell labeling with magnetic nanoparticles can be used to monitor the fate of transplanted cells in vivo by magnetic resonance imaging. However, nanoparticles initially internalized in administered cells might end up in other cells of the host organism. We investigated a mechanism of intercellular cross-transfer of magnetic nanoparticles to different types of recipient cells via cell microvesicles released under cellular stress. Three cell types (mesenchymal stem cells, endothelial cells and macrophages) were labeled with 8-nm iron oxide nanoparticles. Then cells underwent starvation stress, during which they produced microvesicles that were subsequently transferred to unlabeled recipient cells. The analysis of the magnetophoretic mobility of donor cells indicated that magnetic load was partially lost under cell stress. Microvesicles shed by stressed cells participated in the release of magnetic label. Moreover, such microvesicles were uptaken by naïve cells, resulting in cellular redistribution of nanoparticles. Iron load of recipient cells allowed their detection by MRI. Cell microvesicles released under stress may be disseminated throughout the organism, where they can be uptaken by host cells. The transferred cargo may be sufficient to allow MRI detection of these secondarily labeled cells, leading to misinterpretations of the effectiveness of transplanted cells.

  17. A quantitative, multi-national and multi-stakeholder assessment of barriers to the adoption of cell therapies.

    PubMed

    Davies, Benjamin M; Smith, James; Rikabi, Sarah; Wartolowska, Karolina; Morrey, Mark; French, Anna; MacLaren, Robert; Williams, David; Bure, Kim; Pinedo-Villanueva, Rafael; Mathur, Anthony; Birchall, Martin; Snyder, Evan; Atala, Anthony; Reeve, Brock; Brindley, David

    2017-01-01

    Cellular therapies, such as stem cell-based treatments, have been widely researched and numerous products and treatments have been developed. Despite this, there has been relatively limited use of these technologies in the healthcare sector. This study sought to investigate the perceived barriers to this more widespread adoption. An anonymous online questionnaire was developed, based on the findings of a pilot study. This was distributed to an audience of clinicians, researchers and commercial experts in 13 countries. The results were analysed for all respondents, and also sub-grouped by geographical region, and by profession of respondents. The results of the study showed that the most significant barrier was manufacturing, with other factors such as efficacy, regulation and cost-effectiveness being identified by the different groups. This study further demonstrates the need for these important issues to be addressed during the development of cellular therapies to enable more widespread adoption of these treatments.

  18. Automated manufacturing of chimeric antigen receptor T cells for adoptive immunotherapy using CliniMACS prodigy.

    PubMed

    Mock, Ulrike; Nickolay, Lauren; Philip, Brian; Cheung, Gordon Weng-Kit; Zhan, Hong; Johnston, Ian C D; Kaiser, Andrew D; Peggs, Karl; Pule, Martin; Thrasher, Adrian J; Qasim, Waseem

    2016-08-01

    Novel cell therapies derived from human T lymphocytes are exhibiting enormous potential in early-phase clinical trials in patients with hematologic malignancies. Ex vivo modification of T cells is currently limited to a small number of centers with the required infrastructure and expertise. The process requires isolation, activation, transduction, expansion and cryopreservation steps. To simplify procedures and widen applicability for clinical therapies, automation of these procedures is being developed. The CliniMACS Prodigy (Miltenyi Biotec) has recently been adapted for lentiviral transduction of T cells and here we analyse the feasibility of a clinically compliant T-cell engineering process for the manufacture of T cells encoding chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) for CD19 (CAR19), a widely targeted antigen in B-cell malignancies. Using a closed, single-use tubing set we processed mononuclear cells from fresh or frozen leukapheresis harvests collected from healthy volunteer donors. Cells were phenotyped and subjected to automated processing and activation using TransAct, a polymeric nanomatrix activation reagent incorporating CD3/CD28-specific antibodies. Cells were then transduced and expanded in the CentriCult-Unit of the tubing set, under stabilized culture conditions with automated feeding and media exchange. The process was continuously monitored to determine kinetics of expansion, transduction efficiency and phenotype of the engineered cells in comparison with small-scale transductions run in parallel. We found that transduction efficiencies, phenotype and function of CAR19 T cells were comparable with existing procedures and overall T-cell yields sufficient for anticipated therapeutic dosing. The automation of closed-system T-cell engineering should improve dissemination of emerging immunotherapies and greatly widen applicability. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. [Production of a dialysable transfer factor of cell mediated immunity by lymphoblastoid cells in continuous proliferation].

    PubMed

    Goust, J M; Viza, D; Moulias, R; Trejdosiewicz, L; Lesourd, B; Marescot, M R; Prévot, A

    1975-01-20

    Four lymphoblastoid cell lines tested in this work contain normally a dialysable moiety having by ultraviolet spectroscopy, column chromatography (Biogel P 10) and chemically the same properties than human dialysable Transfer Factor (TFd), but unable to transfer cell mediated immune response against common antigens. Two of them are able to do so after incubation with minimal amounts of TFd. Production of a molecule identical to human TFd is possible in some lymphoblastoid cell lines after induction with TFd.

  20. In situ measurements of water transfer due to different mechanisms in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husar, Attila; Higier, Andrew; Liu, Hongtan

    Water management is of critical importance in a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell, in particular, those based on a sulfonic acid polymer, which requires water to conduct protons. Yet there are limited in situ studies of water transfer through the membrane and no data are available for water transfer due to individual mechanisms through the membrane in an operational fuel cell. Thus it is the objective of this study to measure water transfer through the membrane due to each individual mechanism in an operational PEM fuel cell. The three different mechanisms of water transfer, i.e., electro-osmotic drag, diffusion and hydraulic permeation are isolated by specially imposed boundary conditions. Therefore water transfer through the membrane due to each mechanism is measured separately. In this study, all the data is collected in an actual assembled operational fuel cell. The experimental results show that water transfer due to hydraulic permeation, i.e. the pressure difference between the anode and cathode is at least an order of magnitude lower than those due to the other two mechanisms. The data for water transfer due to diffusion through the membrane are in good agreement with some of the ex situ data in the literature. The data for electro-osmosis show that the number of water molecules dragged per proton increases not only with temperature but also with current density, which is different from existing data in the literature. The methodology used in this study is simple and can be easily adopted for in situ water transfer measurement due to different mechanisms in other PEM fuel cells without any cell modifications.

  1. Mast cells and dendritic cells form synapses that facilitate antigen transfer for T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Carroll-Portillo, Amanda; Cannon, Judy L; te Riet, Joost; Holmes, Anna; Kawakami, Yuko; Kawakami, Toshiaki; Cambi, Alessandra; Lidke, Diane S

    2015-08-31

    Mast cells (MCs) produce soluble mediators such as histamine and prostaglandins that are known to influence dendritic cell (DC) function by stimulating maturation and antigen processing. Whether direct cell-cell interactions are important in modulating MC/DC function is unclear. In this paper, we show that direct contact between MCs and DCs occurs and plays an important role in modulating the immune response. Activation of MCs through FcεRI cross-linking triggers the formation of stable cell-cell interactions with immature DCs that are reminiscent of the immunological synapse. Direct cellular contact differentially regulates the secreted cytokine profile, indicating that MC modulation of DC populations is influenced by the nature of their interaction. Synapse formation requires integrin engagement and facilitates the transfer of internalized MC-specific antigen from MCs to DCs. The transferred material is ultimately processed and presented by DCs and can activate T cells. The physiological outcomes of the MC-DC synapse suggest a new role for intercellular crosstalk in defining the immune response.

  2. Phenotypic changes of bone marrow-derived mast cells after intraperitoneal transfer into W/Wv mice that are genetically deficient in mast cells

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    The ability of mouse IL-3-dependent, bone marrow culture-derived mast cells (BMMC) to generate serosal mast cells (SMC) in vivo after adoptive transfer to mast cell-deficient mice has been defined by chemical and immunochemical criteria. BMMC differentiated and grown from WBB6F1-+/+ mouse progenitor cells in medium containing PWM/splenocyte-conditioned medium synthesized a approximately 350,000 Mr protease-resistant proteoglycan bearing approximately 55,000 Mr glycosaminoglycans, as defined by gel filtration of each. Approximately 85% of the glycosaminoglycans bound to the cell-associated BMMC proteoglycans were chondroitin sulfates based upon their susceptibility to chondroitinase ABC digestion; HPLC of the chondroitinase ABC- generated unsaturated disaccharides revealed these glycosaminoglycans to be chondroitin sulfate E. As determined by heparinase and nitrous acid degradations, approximately 10% of the glycosaminoglycans bound to BMMC proteoglycans were heparin. In contrast, mast cells recovered from the peritoneal cavity of congenitally mast cell-deficient WBB6F1-W/Wv mice 15 wk after intraperitoneal injection of BMMC synthesized approximately 650,000 Mr protease-resistant proteoglycans that contained approximately 80% heparin glycosaminoglycans of approximately 105,000 Mr. Thus, after adoptive transfer, the SMC of the previously mast cell-deficient mice were like those recovered from the normal WBB6F1-+/+ mice that were shown to synthesize approximately 600,000 Mr proteoglycans that contained approximately 80% heparin glycosaminoglycans of approximately 115,000 Mr. As assessed by indirect immunofluorescence staining and flow cytometry using the B1.1 rat mAb (an antibody that recognizes an epitope located on the neutral glycosphingolipid globopentaosylceramide), approximately 5% of BMMC bound the antibody detectably, whereas approximately 72% of the SMC that were harvested from mast cell-deficient mice 15 wk after adoptive transfer of BMMC were B1.1-positive

  3. Stem cells, nuclear transfer and respect for embryos.

    PubMed

    Clausen, Jens

    2010-01-01

    Harvesting human embryonic stem (hES) cells is a highly controversial field of research because it rests on the destruction of human embryos. Altering the procedure of nuclear transfer (NT) is suggested to generate hES cell lines without ethical obstacles by claiming that no embryo would be involved. While discussing the nature of an embryo and related central questions concerning their moral status and the respect they deserve, this paper argues that the entity created by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) or altered nuclear transfer (ANT) is an embryo and has the same moral status as a natural embryo. Respect for the embryo is expressed by the ethical principles of proportionality, probability and subsidiarity. This paper argues that the human embryo should only be taken for research with high ranking goals, which are proven in animal experimentation and for which there are no alternatives. This makes ANT obsolete and shows that SCNT to produce hES cells is premature at the present time.

  4. Efficacy of Adoptive Immune-cell Therapy in Patients with Advanced Gastric Cancer: A Retrospective Study.

    PubMed

    Takimoto, Rishu; Kamigaki, Takashi; Okada, Sachiko; Matsuda, Eriko; Ibe, Hiroshi; Oguma, Eri; Naitoh, Keiko; Makita, Kaori; Goto, Shigenori

    2017-07-01

    Conventional therapy for advanced gastric cancer (GC) has limited survival benefits. In this retrospective study, we aimed to investigate the efficacy of immune-cell therapy, using in vitro-activated T-lymphocytes with and without dendritic cells (DCs), in combination with standard therapies in terms of the survival of patients with advanced GC. A total of 242 patients who were diagnosed as having stage-IV GC were enrolled in this study to receive immune-cell therapy with or without standard therapies, such as chemotherapy, surgery, or radiation therapy. Overall survival was analyzed by the Kaplan-Meier with log-rank test and Cox regression methods. Immune-cell therapy increased median survival time (21.5 months) in patients with advanced GC. The patients who underwent surgery with or without chemotherapy as a prior treatment showed better prognosis than those who received other therapies (p<0.001). Patients who showed stable disease or a partial response to immune-cell therapy had a better prognosis than those with progressive disease (p<0.001). Multivariate analysis revealed that performance status, the type of immune-cell therapy, and prior treatment were independent prognostic factors for patients with GC. No serious adverse event was reported in immune-cell therapy. Immune-cell therapy might extend the survival of patients with advanced GC. Copyright© 2017, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  5. 3D visualization of HIV transfer at the virological synapse between dendritic cells and T cells

    PubMed Central

    Felts, Richard L.; Narayan, Kedar; Estes, Jacob D.; Shi, Dan; Trubey, Charles M.; Fu, Jing; Hartnell, Lisa M.; Ruthel, Gordon T.; Schneider, Douglas K.; Nagashima, Kunio; Bess, Julian W.; Bavari, Sina; Lowekamp, Bradley C.; Bliss, Donald; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Subramaniam, Sriram

    2010-01-01

    The efficiency of HIV infection is greatly enhanced when the virus is delivered at conjugates between CD4+ T cells and virus-bearing antigen-presenting cells such as macrophages or dendritic cells via specialized structures known as virological synapses. Using ion abrasion SEM, electron tomography, and superresolution light microscopy, we have analyzed the spatial architecture of cell-cell contacts and distribution of HIV virions at virological synapses formed between mature dendritic cells and T cells. We demonstrate the striking envelopment of T cells by sheet-like membrane extensions derived from mature dendritic cells, resulting in a shielded region for formation of virological synapses. Within the synapse, filopodial extensions emanating from CD4+ T cells make contact with HIV virions sequestered deep within a 3D network of surface-accessible compartments in the dendritic cell. Viruses are detected at the membrane surfaces of both dendritic cells and T cells, but virions are not released passively at the synapse; instead, virus transfer requires the engagement of T-cell CD4 receptors. The relative seclusion of T cells from the extracellular milieu, the burial of the site of HIV transfer, and the receptor-dependent initiation of virion transfer by T cells highlight unique aspects of cell-cell HIV transmission. PMID:20624966

  6. Unidirectional transfer of prostaglandin endoperoxides between platelets and endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Schafer, A I; Crawford, D D; Gimbrone, M A

    1984-01-01

    An important determinant of platelet-vessel wall interactions is the local balance of production of endothelial prostacyclin (PGI2) and platelet thromboxane (TX) A2, labile eicosanoids with opposing effects on hemostasis. Disputed evidence suggests that platelet-derived prostaglandin endoperoxide intermediates may be utilized as substrates for vascular PGI2 synthesis. Using several different approaches, we have found that platelets can transfer endoperoxides to cultured endothelial cells for efficient conversion to PGI2, but a reciprocal transfer of endothelial endoperoxides for utilization by platelet thromboxane synthetase does not occur under the same experimental conditions. However, platelets can utilize arachidonic acid released by endothelial cells for lipoxygenase metabolism. We have directly demonstrated the production of [3H]6-keto-PGF1 alpha (the breakdown product of [3H]PGI2) by aspirin-treated endothelial cells in the presence of platelets stimulated with [3H]arachidonic acid. In coincubation experiments using either arachidonate or ionophore A23187 as a stimulus, radioimmunoassay of the net production of arachidonic acid metabolites showed that 6-keto-PGF1 alpha generation by aspirin-treated endothelial cells in the presence of platelets may actually exceed its generation by uninhibited endothelial cells alone. In functional assays, platelet aggregation was inhibited in the presence of aspirin-treated endothelial cells after stimulation with either arachidonate or ionophore A23187. In contrast, the inverse experiments, using aspirin-treated platelets and uninhibited endothelial cells, failed to demonstrate platelet utilization of endothelial endoperoxides for TXA2 production by any of the above methods. These studies thus provide evidence that efficient unidirectional transfer and utilization of platelet-derived endoperoxides for endothelial PGI2 production can occur. This process may serve to amplify PGI2 generation adjacent to areas of vascular

  7. Inverted hybrid CdSe-polymer solar cells adopting PEDOT:PSS/MoO3 as dual hole transport layers.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Leize; Richardson, Beau J; Yu, Qiuming

    2016-02-07

    Inverted CdSe quantum dots (QDs):poly (3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) organic/inorganic hybrid solar cells (OIHSCs) with the PSS/MoO3 dual hole transport layers (HTLs) showed superior performance over those with a single HTL of PSS or MoO3. The enhanced electron blocking at the active layer/anode interface as well as the prevention of leakage current accounted for the enhancement in the efficiency of the solar cells with the dual HTLs. By adopting the inverted structure and using the dual HTLs, the resistive losses of the CdSe QDs:P3HT hybrid system at high illumination power were effectively prevented. Further study showed the structure of dual HTLs was applicable to the solar cells with CdSe QDs and nanorods (NRs) blended with poly(thienothiophene-co-benzodithiophenes)7-F20 (PTB7-F20).

  8. Recent advancements in cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer

    PubMed Central

    Ogura, Atsuo; Inoue, Kimiko; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2013-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) cloning is the sole reproductive engineering technology that endows the somatic cell genome with totipotency. Since the first report on the birth of a cloned sheep from adult somatic cells in 1997, many technical improvements in SCNT have been made by using different epigenetic approaches, including enhancement of the levels of histone acetylation in the chromatin of the reconstructed embryos. Although it will take a considerable time before we fully understand the nature of genomic programming and totipotency, we may expect that somatic cell cloning technology will soon become broadly applicable to practical purposes, including medicine, pharmaceutical manufacturing and agriculture. Here we review recent progress in somatic cell cloning, with a special emphasis on epigenetic studies using the laboratory mouse as a model. PMID:23166393

  9. Recent advancements in cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Atsuo; Inoue, Kimiko; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2013-01-05

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) cloning is the sole reproductive engineering technology that endows the somatic cell genome with totipotency. Since the first report on the birth of a cloned sheep from adult somatic cells in 1997, many technical improvements in SCNT have been made by using different epigenetic approaches, including enhancement of the levels of histone acetylation in the chromatin of the reconstructed embryos. Although it will take a considerable time before we fully understand the nature of genomic programming and totipotency, we may expect that somatic cell cloning technology will soon become broadly applicable to practical purposes, including medicine, pharmaceutical manufacturing and agriculture. Here we review recent progress in somatic cell cloning, with a special emphasis on epigenetic studies using the laboratory mouse as a model.

  10. Cloning of ES cells and mice by nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Wakayama, Sayaka; Kishigami, Satoshi; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2009-01-01

    We have been able to develop a stable nuclear transfer (NT) method in the mouse, in which donor nuclei are directly injected into the oocyte using a piezo-actuated micromanipulator. Although the piezo unit is a complex tool, once mastered it is of great help not only in NT experiments, but also in almost all other forms of micromanipulation. Using this technique, embryonic stem (ntES) cell lines established from somatic cell nuclei can be generated relatively easily from a variety of mouse genotypes and cell types. Such ntES cells can be used not only for experimental models of human therapeutic cloning but also as a means of preserving mouse genomes instead of preserving germ cells. Here, we describe our most recent protocols for mouse cloning.

  11. Cell-to-cell transfer of glial proteins to the squid giant axon: The glia- neuron protein transfer hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Lasek, RJ; Gainer, H; Barker, JL

    1977-01-01

    The hypothesis that glial cells synthesize proteins which are transferred to adjacent neurons was evaluated in the giant fiber of the squid (Loligo pealei). When giant fibers are separated from their neuron cell bodies and incubated in the presence of radioactive amino acids, labeled proteins appear in the glial cells and axoplasm. Labeled axonal proteins were detected by three methods: extrusion of the axoplasm from the giant fiber, autoradiography, and perfusion of the giant fiber. This protein synthesis is completely inhibited by puromycin but is not affected by chloramphenicol. The following evidence indicates that the labeled axonal proteins are not synthesized within the axon itself. (a) The axon does not contain a significant amount of ribosomes or ribosomal RNA. (b) Isolated axoplasm did not incorporate [(3)H]leucine into proteins. (c) Injection of Rnase into the giant axon did not reduce the appearance of newly synthesized proteins in the axoplasm of the giant fiber. These findings, coupled with other evidence, have led us to conclude that the adaxonal glial cells synthesize a class of proteins which are transferred to the giant axon. Analysis of the kinetics of this phenomenon indicates that some proteins are transferred to the axon within minutes of their synthesis in the glial cells. One or more of the steps in the transfer process appear to involve Ca++, since replacement of extracellular Ca++ by either Mg++ or Co++ significantly reduces the appearance of labeled proteins in the axon. A substantial fraction of newly synthesized glial proteins, possibly as much as 40 percent, are transferred to the giant axon. These proteins are heterogeneous and range in size from 12,000 to greater than 200,000 daltons. Comparisons of the amount of amino acid incorporation in glia cells and neuron cell bodies raise the possibility that the adaxonal glial cells may provide an important source of axonal proteins which is supplemental to that provided by axonal transport

  12. Murine somatic cell nuclear transfer using reprogrammed donor cells expressing male germ cell-specific genes.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hoin; Park, Jong Im; Roh, Sangho

    2016-01-01

    In vivo-matured mouse oocytes were enucleated, and a single murine embryonic fibroblast (control or reprogrammed by introducing extracts from murine testis tissue, which showed expression of male germ cell-specific genes) was injected into the cytoplasm of the oocytes. The rate of blastocyst development and expression levels of Oct-4, Eomes and Cdx-2 were not significantly different in both experimental groups. However, the expression levels of Nanog, Sox9 and Glut-1 were significantly increased when reprogrammed cells were used as donor nuclei. Increased expression of Nanog can be supportive of complete reprogramming of somatic cell nuclear transfer murine embryos. The present study suggested that donor cells expressing male germ cell-specific genes can be reconstructed and can develop into embryos with normal high expression of developmentally essential genes.

  13. The advantage of topographic prominence-adopted filter for the detection of short-latency spikes of retinal ganglion cells

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jungryul; Choi, Myoung-Hwan; Kim, Kwangsoo; Senok, Solomon S.; Cho, Dong-il Dan

    2017-01-01

    Electrical stimulation through retinal prosthesis elicits both short and long-latency retinal ganglion cell (RGC) spikes. Because the short-latency RGC spike is usually obscured by electrical stimulus artifact, it is very important to isolate spike from stimulus artifact. Previously, we showed that topographic prominence (TP) discriminator based algorithm is valid and useful for artifact subtraction. In this study, we compared the performance of forward backward (FB) filter only vs. TP-adopted FB filter for artifact subtraction. From the extracted retinae of rd1 mice, we recorded RGC spikes with 8×8 multielectrode array (MEA). The recorded signals were classified into four groups by distances between the stimulation and recording electrodes on MEA (200-400, 400-600, 600-800, 800-1000 µm). Fifty cathodic phase-1st biphasic current pulses (duration 500 µs, intensity 5, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60 µA) were applied at every 1 sec. We compared false positive error and false negative error in FB filter and TP-adopted FB filter. By implementing TP-adopted FB filter, short-latency spike can be detected better regarding sensitivity and specificity for detecting spikes regardless of the strength of stimulus and the distance between stimulus and recording electrodes. PMID:28883759

  14. The advantage of topographic prominence-adopted filter for the detection of short-latency spikes of retinal ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Jungryul; Choi, Myoung-Hwan; Kim, Kwangsoo; Senok, Solomon S; Cho, Dong-Il Dan; Koo, Kyo-In; Goo, Yongsook

    2017-09-01

    Electrical stimulation through retinal prosthesis elicits both short and long-latency retinal ganglion cell (RGC) spikes. Because the short-latency RGC spike is usually obscured by electrical stimulus artifact, it is very important to isolate spike from stimulus artifact. Previously, we showed that topographic prominence (TP) discriminator based algorithm is valid and useful for artifact subtraction. In this study, we compared the performance of forward backward (FB) filter only vs. TP-adopted FB filter for artifact subtraction. From the extracted retinae of rd1 mice, we recorded RGC spikes with 8×8 multielectrode array (MEA). The recorded signals were classified into four groups by distances between the stimulation and recording electrodes on MEA (200-400, 400-600, 600-800, 800-1000 µm). Fifty cathodic phase-1(st) biphasic current pulses (duration 500 µs, intensity 5, 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60 µA) were applied at every 1 sec. We compared false positive error and false negative error in FB filter and TP-adopted FB filter. By implementing TP-adopted FB filter, short-latency spike can be detected better regarding sensitivity and specificity for detecting spikes regardless of the strength of stimulus and the distance between stimulus and recording electrodes.

  15. Beta cells transfer vesicles containing insulin to phagocytes for presentation to T cells.

    PubMed

    Vomund, Anthony N; Zinselmeyer, Bernd H; Hughes, Jing; Calderon, Boris; Valderrama, Carolina; Ferris, Stephen T; Wan, Xiaoxiao; Kanekura, Kohsuke; Carrero, Javier A; Urano, Fumihiko; Unanue, Emil R

    2015-10-06

    Beta cells from nondiabetic mice transfer secretory vesicles to phagocytic cells. The passage was shown in culture studies where the transfer was probed with CD4 T cells reactive to insulin peptides. Two sets of vesicles were transferred, one containing insulin and another containing catabolites of insulin. The passage required live beta cells in a close cell contact interaction with the phagocytes. It was increased by high glucose concentration and required mobilization of intracellular Ca2+. Live images of beta cell-phagocyte interactions documented the intimacy of the membrane contact and the passage of the granules. The passage was found in beta cells isolated from islets of young nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice and nondiabetic mice as well as from nondiabetic humans. Ultrastructural analysis showed intraislet phagocytes containing vesicles having the distinct morphology of dense-core granules. These findings document a process whereby the contents of secretory granules become available to the immune system.

  16. Periodontal Regeneration Using Periodontal Ligament Stem Cell-Transferred Amnion

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Kengo; Yokoyama, Naoki; Tanaka, Yuichi; Taki, Atsuko; Honda, Izumi; Kimura, Yasuyuki; Takeda, Masaki; Akazawa, Keiko; Oda, Shigeru; Izumi, Yuichi; Morita, Ikuo

    2014-01-01

    Periodontal disease is characterized by the destruction of tooth supporting tissues. Regeneration of periodontal tissues using ex vivo expanded cells has been introduced and studied, although appropriate methodology has not yet been established. We developed a novel cell transplant method for periodontal regeneration using periodontal ligament stem cell (PDLSC)-transferred amniotic membrane (PDLSC-amnion). The aim of this study was to investigate the regenerative potential of PDLSC-amnion in a rat periodontal defect model. Cultured PDLSCs were transferred onto amniotic membranes using a glass substrate treated with polyethylene glycol and photolithography. The properties of PDLSCs were investigated by flow cytometry and in vitro differentiation. PDLSC-amnion was transplanted into surgically created periodontal defects in rat maxillary molars. Periodontal regeneration was evaluated by microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) and histological analysis. PDLSCs showed mesenchymal stem cell-like characteristics such as cell surface marker expression (CD90, CD44, CD73, CD105, CD146, and STRO-1) and trilineage differentiation ability (i.e., into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes). PDLSC-amnion exhibited a single layer of PDLSCs on the amniotic membrane and stability of the sheet even with movement and deformation caused by surgical instruments. We observed that the PDLSC-amnion enhanced periodontal tissue regeneration as determined by micro-CT and histology by 4 weeks after transplantation. These data suggest that PDLSC-amnion has therapeutic potential as a novel cell-based regenerative periodontal therapy. PMID:24032400

  17. Periodontal regeneration using periodontal ligament stem cell-transferred amnion.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Kengo; Komaki, Motohiro; Yokoyama, Naoki; Tanaka, Yuichi; Taki, Atsuko; Honda, Izumi; Kimura, Yasuyuki; Takeda, Masaki; Akazawa, Keiko; Oda, Shigeru; Izumi, Yuichi; Morita, Ikuo

    2014-02-01

    Periodontal disease is characterized by the destruction of tooth supporting tissues. Regeneration of periodontal tissues using ex vivo expanded cells has been introduced and studied, although appropriate methodology has not yet been established. We developed a novel cell transplant method for periodontal regeneration using periodontal ligament stem cell (PDLSC)-transferred amniotic membrane (PDLSC-amnion). The aim of this study was to investigate the regenerative potential of PDLSC-amnion in a rat periodontal defect model. Cultured PDLSCs were transferred onto amniotic membranes using a glass substrate treated with polyethylene glycol and photolithography. The properties of PDLSCs were investigated by flow cytometry and in vitro differentiation. PDLSC-amnion was transplanted into surgically created periodontal defects in rat maxillary molars. Periodontal regeneration was evaluated by microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) and histological analysis. PDLSCs showed mesenchymal stem cell-like characteristics such as cell surface marker expression (CD90, CD44, CD73, CD105, CD146, and STRO-1) and trilineage differentiation ability (i.e., into osteoblasts, adipocytes, and chondrocytes). PDLSC-amnion exhibited a single layer of PDLSCs on the amniotic membrane and stability of the sheet even with movement and deformation caused by surgical instruments. We observed that the PDLSC-amnion enhanced periodontal tissue regeneration as determined by micro-CT and histology by 4 weeks after transplantation. These data suggest that PDLSC-amnion has therapeutic potential as a novel cell-based regenerative periodontal therapy.

  18. Generating HPV specific T helper cells for the treatment of HPV induced malignancies using TCR gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Infection with high risk Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) is associated with cancer of the cervix, vagina, penis, vulva, anus and some cases of head and neck carcinomas. The HPV derived oncoproteins E6 and E7 are constitutively expressed in tumor cells and therefore potential targets for T cell mediated adoptive immunotherapy. Effective immunotherapy is dependent on the presence of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. However, low precursor frequencies of HPV16 specific T cells in patients and healthy donors hampers routine isolation of these cells for adoptive transfer purposes. An alternative to generate HPV specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells is TCR gene transfer. Methods HPV specific CD4+ T cells were generated using either a MHC class I or MHC class II restricted TCR (from clones A9 and 24.101 respectively) directed against HPV16 antigens. Functional analysis was performed by interferon-γ secretion, proliferation and cytokine production assays. Results Introduction of HPV16 specific TCRs into blood derived CD4+ recipient T cells resulted in recognition of the relevant HPV16 epitope as determined by IFN-γ secretion. Importantly, we also show recognition of the endogenously processed and HLA-DP1 presented HPV16E6 epitope by 24.101 TCR transgenic CD4+ T cells and recognition of the HLA-A2 presented HPV16E7 epitope by A9 TCR transgenic CD4+ T cells. Conclusion Our data indicate that TCR transfer is feasible as an alternative strategy to generate human HPV16 specific CD4+ T helper cells for the treatment of patients suffering from cervical cancer and other HPV16 induced malignancies. PMID:21892941

  19. Method for somatic cell nuclear transfer in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Siripattarapravat, K; Prukudom, S; Cibelli, J

    2016-01-01

    This chapter presents a detailed methodology for somatic cell nuclear transfer-cloning of zebrafish. We aim to place the reader in a virtual lab experience to assist acquisition of the technical skills required for reproducing the published protocol. All materials, including catalog numbers for reagents and techniques for their preparation, are provided. Our protocols describe laser inactivation of egg chromosomes, the transfer of a cell through the oocyte micropyle, and spontaneous activation of the reconstructed embryo. High-quality eggs are the key to cloning success, and Chinook salmon ovarian fluid is indispensable for keeping eggs arrested at the metaphase of meiosis II. This protocol continues to be refined by our laboratory. However, naive investigators should be able to apply it in its present form to generate cloned zebrafish. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Strong photocurrent enhancements in highly efficient flexible organic solar cells by adopting a microcavity configuration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kung-Shih; Yip, Hin-Lap; Salinas, José-Francisco; Xu, Yun-Xiang; Chueh, Chu-Chen; Jen, Alex K-Y

    2014-05-28

    Organic solar cells often show inefficient light harvesting due to a short absorption path length limited by the low charge mobility of organic semiconductors. We demonstrate a flexible organic solar cell in a microcavity configuration using a TeO2/Ag semitransparent electrode to confine the optical field within the device with significant performance improvements and reaching a power conversion efficiency of 8.56%.

  1. Inside Job: Viruses Transfer cGAMP between Cells.

    PubMed

    Gulen, Muhammet F; Ablasser, Andrea

    2015-09-09

    The DNA sensor, cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS), is essential for the detection of viral infection. In a recent issue of Science, two studies, Bridgeman et al. (2015) and Gentili et al. (2015), report a novel mechanism for propagating an antiviral signal between cells, based on the transfer of the cGAS enzymatic product, cyclic GMP-AMP (cGAMP), in viral particles. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Mechanisms of Horizontal Cell-to-Cell Transfer of Wolbachia spp. in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    White, Pamela M; Pietri, Jose E; Debec, Alain; Russell, Shelbi; Patel, Bhavin; Sullivan, William

    2017-04-01

    Wolbachia is an intracellular endosymbiont present in most arthropod and filarial nematode species. Transmission between hosts is primarily vertical, taking place exclusively through the female germ line, although horizontal transmission has also been documented. The results of several studies indicate that Wolbachia spp. can undergo transfer between somatic and germ line cells during nematode development and in adult flies. However, the mechanisms underlying horizontal cell-to-cell transfer remain largely unexplored. Here, we establish a tractable system for probing horizontal transfer of Wolbachia cells between Drosophila melanogaster cells in culture using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). First, we show that horizontal transfer is independent of cell-to-cell contact and can efficiently take place through the culture medium within hours. Further, we demonstrate that efficient transfer utilizes host cell phagocytic and clathrin/dynamin-dependent endocytic machinery. Lastly, we provide evidence that this process is conserved between species, showing that horizontal transfer from mosquito to Drosophila cells takes place in a similar fashion. Altogether, our results indicate that Wolbachia utilizes host internalization machinery during infection, and this mechanism is conserved across insect species.IMPORTANCE Our work has broad implications for the control and treatment of tropical diseases. Wolbachia can confer resistance against a variety of human pathogens in mosquito vectors. Elucidating the mechanisms of horizontal transfer will be useful for efforts to more efficiently infect nonnatural insect hosts with Wolbachia as a biological control agent. Further, as Wolbachia is essential for the survival of filarial nematodes, understanding horizontal transfer might provide new approaches to treating human infections by targeting Wolbachia Finally, this work provides a key first step toward the genetic manipulation of Wolbachia.

  3. The in vitro generation of multi-tumor antigen-specific cytotoxic T cell clones: Candidates for leukemia adoptive immunotherapy following allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Yehia S; Bashawri, Layla A; Vatte, Chittibabu; Abu-Rish, Eman Y; Cyrus, Cyril; Khalaf, Wafaa S; Browning, Michael J

    2016-09-01

    Adoptive T-cell immunotherapy is a promising approach to manage and maintain relapse-free survival of leukemia patients, especially following allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Post-transplant adoptive immunotherapy using cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) of the donor origin provide graft-versus-tumor effects, with or without graft-versus-host disease. Myeloid leukemias express immunogenic leukemia associated antigens (LAAs); such as WT-1, PRAME, MAGE, h-TERT and others, most of them are able to induce specific T cell responses whenever associated with the proper co-stimulation. We investigated the ability of a LAA-expressing hybridoma cell line to induce CTL clones in PBMCs of HLA-matched healthy donors in vitro. The CTL clones were induced by repetitive co-culture with LAAs-expressing, HLA-A*0201(+) hybrid cell line, generated by fusion of leukemia blasts to human immortalized APC (EBV-sensitized B-lymphoblastoid cell line; HMy2). The induced cytotoxic T cell clones were phenotypically and functionally characterized by pentamer analysis, IFN-γ release ELISPOT and cellular cytotoxicity assays. All T cell lines showed robust peptide recognition and functional activity when sensitized with HLA-A*0201-restricted WT-1235-243, hTERT615-624 or PRAME100-108 peptides-pulsed T2 cells, in addition to partially HLA-matched leukemia blasts. This study demonstrates the feasibility of developing multi-tumor antigen-specific T cell lines in allogeneic PBMCs in vitro, using LAA-expressing tumor/HMy2 hybrid cell line model, for potential use in leukemia adoptive immunotherapy in partially matched donor-recipient setting. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Generation of cloned mice and nuclear transfer embryonic stem cell lines from urine-derived cells.

    PubMed

    Mizutani, Eiji; Torikai, Kohei; Wakayama, Sayaka; Nagatomo, Hiroaki; Ohinata, Yasuhide; Kishigami, Satoshi; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2016-04-01

    Cloning animals by nuclear transfer provides the opportunity to preserve endangered mammalian species. However, there are risks associated with the collection of donor cells from the body such as accidental injury to or death of the animal. Here, we report the production of cloned mice from urine-derived cells collected noninvasively. Most of the urine-derived cells survived and were available as donors for nuclear transfer without any pretreatment. After nuclear transfer, 38-77% of the reconstructed embryos developed to the morula/blastocyst, in which the cell numbers in the inner cell mass and trophectoderm were similar to those of controls. Male and female cloned mice were delivered from cloned embryos transferred to recipient females, and these cloned animals grew to adulthood and delivered pups naturally when mated with each other. The results suggest that these cloned mice had normal fertility. In additional experiments, 26 nuclear transfer embryonic stem cell lines were established from 108 cloned blastocysts derived from four mouse strains including inbreds and F1 hybrids with relatively high success rates. Thus, cells derived from urine, which can be collected noninvasively, may be used in the rescue of endangered mammalian species by using nuclear transfer without causing injury to the animal.

  5. Generation of cloned mice and nuclear transfer embryonic stem cell lines from urine-derived cells

    PubMed Central

    Mizutani, Eiji; Torikai, Kohei; Wakayama, Sayaka; Nagatomo, Hiroaki; Ohinata, Yasuhide; Kishigami, Satoshi; Wakayama, Teruhiko

    2016-01-01

    Cloning animals by nuclear transfer provides the opportunity to preserve endangered mammalian species. However, there are risks associated with the collection of donor cells from the body such as accidental injury to or death of the animal. Here, we report the production of cloned mice from urine-derived cells collected noninvasively. Most of the urine-derived cells survived and were available as donors for nuclear transfer without any pretreatment. After nuclear transfer, 38–77% of the reconstructed embryos developed to the morula/blastocyst, in which the cell numbers in the inner cell mass and trophectoderm were similar to those of controls. Male and female cloned mice were delivered from cloned embryos transferred to recipient females, and these cloned animals grew to adulthood and delivered pups naturally when mated with each other. The results suggest that these cloned mice had normal fertility. In additional experiments, 26 nuclear transfer embryonic stem cell lines were established from 108 cloned blastocysts derived from four mouse strains including inbreds and F1 hybrids with relatively high success rates. Thus, cells derived from urine, which can be collected noninvasively, may be used in the rescue of endangered mammalian species by using nuclear transfer without causing injury to the animal. PMID:27033801

  6. Genes adopt non-optimal codon usage to generate cell cycle-dependent oscillations in protein levels

    PubMed Central

    Frenkel-Morgenstern, Milana; Danon, Tamar; Christian, Thomas; Igarashi, Takao; Cohen, Lydia; Hou, Ya-Ming; Jensen, Lars Juhl

    2012-01-01

    The cell cycle is a temporal program that regulates DNA synthesis and cell division. When we compared the codon usage of cell cycle-regulated genes with that of other genes, we discovered that there is a significant preference for non-optimal codons. Moreover, genes encoding proteins that cycle at the protein level exhibit non-optimal codon preferences. Remarkably, cell cycle-regulated genes expressed in different phases display different codon preferences. Here, we show empirically that transfer RNA (tRNA) expression is indeed highest in the G2 phase of the cell cycle, consistent with the non-optimal codon usage of genes expressed at this time, and lowest toward the end of G1, reflecting the optimal codon usage of G1 genes. Accordingly, protein levels of human glycyl-, threonyl-, and glutamyl-prolyl tRNA synthetases were found to oscillate, peaking in G2/M phase. In light of our findings, we propose that non-optimal (wobbly) matching codons influence protein synthesis during the cell cycle. We describe a new mathematical model that shows how codon usage can give rise to cell-cycle regulation. In summary, our data indicate that cells exploit wobbling to generate cell cycle-dependent dynamics of proteins. PMID:22373820

  7. Development of an automated closed system for generation of human lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells for use in adoptive immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Muul, L M; Nason-Burchenal, K; Carter, C S; Cullis, H; Slavin, D; Hyatt, C; Director, E P; Leitman, S F; Klein, H G; Rosenberg, S A

    1987-08-03

    Immunotherapy utilizing the adoptive transfer of lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells in conjunction with recombinant interleukin-2 (IL-2) can mediate tumor regression in some patients with advanced cancer. The activation of large numbers of LAK cells was performed in roller bottles in a research laboratory setting and required meticulous aseptic technique, at least one skilled technician per patient and one laminar flow hood per patient. To reduce the complexity and expense of LAK cell generation for human immunotherapy trials we have developed a closed-system automated procedure using a continuous flow blood cell separator. PBL were obtained by standard apheresis techniques. Platelets and plasma were elutriated using countercentrifugal flow of saline in the cell separator machine. The washed PBL were underlaid with Ficoll-Hypaque (FH) in the original separation bag. Lymphocytes were then flushed into a collection bag where they were concentrated and washed with 2 liters of saline. Mean recovery from the automated FH technique was 54.6 +/- 4.3% compared to 62.3 +/- 4.0% using manual methods in 50 ml tubes (P greater than 0.05). Cells were diluted in the collection bag with RPMI 1640 +/- 2% human AB serum and could be dispensed in an automated fashion to polyolefin bags via a sample port with 1000-1500 U/ml IL-2. After 3-4 days of culture in 5% CO2 at 37 degrees C, activated cells from the bags were harvested and washed in a closed system using the continuous flow cell separator. Cell yield from the harvest was 79.2 +/- 5.4% in the automated system compared to 64.9 +/- 5.0% in the standard procedure using manual harvest of roller bottles (P less than 0.01). Lytic capacity of the cells against fresh human tumor in a 4 h 51Cr release assay was equivalent in cells processed either by the automated or the conventional manual method. The advantages of a closed system include decreased potential for microbial contamination and reduced labor and capital equipment costs

  8. Distinct Intervertebral Disc Cell Populations Adopt Similar Phenotypes in Three-Dimensional Culture

    PubMed Central

    Chou, Alice I.; Reza, Anna T.

    2008-01-01

    Tissue engineering strategies have the potential to improve upon current techniques for intervertebral disc repair. However, determining a suitable biomaterial scaffold for disc regeneration is difficult due to the complex fibrocartilaginous structure of the tissue. In this study, cells isolated from three distinct regions of the intervertebral disc, the outer and inner annulus fibrosus and nucleus pulposus, were expanded and seeded on resorbable polyester fiber meshes and encapsulated in calcium crosslinked alginate hydrogels, both chosen to approximate the native tissue architecture. Three-dimensional (3D) constructs were cultured for 14 days in vitro and evaluated histologically and quantitatively for gene expression and production of types I and II collagen and proteoglycans. During monolayer expansion, the cell populations maintained their distinct phenotypic morphology and gene expression profiles. However, after 14 days in 3D culture, there were no significant differences in morphology, gene expression, or protein production between all three cell populations grown in either alginate or polyester fiber meshes. The results of this study indicate that the culture environment may have a greater impact on cellular behavior than the intrinsic origin of the cells, and suggest that only a single-cell type may be required for intervertebral disc regenerative therapies. PMID:18636941

  9. Role of natural killer cells in iscador mediated inhibition of metastasis by adoptive immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Antony, S; Kuttan, R; Kuttan, G

    2000-08-01

    Iscador activated (in vivo and in vitro) splenocytes were found to inhibit metastatic tumour growth in C57BL/6 mice. In order to check whether NK cells are involved in the antimetastatic activity of Iscador activated splenocytes ,animals were depleted of NK cells using antiasialo GMI antibodies. When spleen cells activated in vivo with Iscador were injected into animals pretreated with Antiasialo GM I antibodies, there was an average of 44.6 tumour nodules on 21st day indicating that stimulation of NK cell activity produced by the Iscador compensate for the NK cell depletion by Antiasialo GM I antibody. Animals treated with Iscador activated splenocytes showed an average survival period of 68 days whereas that of control tumour bearing animals treated with Ab the average survival was 19.3 days. The lung collagen hydroxyproline content, serum sialic acid levels, markers of metastasis were also significantly (P<0.001) lowered in these animals compared to those of the untreated tumour bearing animals. gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase a marker of neoplastic growth, was also significantly reduced (P<0.001) in animals treated with activated splenocytes.

  10. Lignification of developing maize (Zea mays L.) endosperm transfer cells and starchy endosperm cells

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Sara; Monjardino, Paulo; Mendonça, Duarte; da Câmara Machado, Artur; Fernandes, Rui; Sampaio, Paula; Salema, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Endosperm transfer cells in maize have extensive cell wall ingrowths that play a key role in kernel development. Although the incorporation of lignin would support this process, its presence in these structures has not been reported in previous studies. We used potassium permanganate staining combined with transmission electron microscopy – energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry as well as acriflavine staining combined with confocal laser scanning microscopy to determine whether the most basal endosperm transfer cells (MBETCs) contain lignified cell walls, using starchy endosperm cells for comparison. We investigated the lignin content of ultrathin sections of MBETCs treated with hydrogen peroxide. The lignin content of transfer and starchy cell walls was also determined by the acetyl bromide method. Finally, the relationship between cell wall lignification and MBETC growth/flange ingrowth orientation was evaluated. MBETC walls and ingrowths contained lignin throughout the period of cell growth we monitored. The same was true of the starchy cells, but those underwent an even more extensive growth period than the transfer cells. Both the reticulate and flange ingrowths were also lignified early in development. The significance of the lignification of maize endosperm cell walls is discussed in terms of its impact on cell growth and flange ingrowth orientation. PMID:24688487

  11. Lignification of developing maize (Zea mays L.) endosperm transfer cells and starchy endosperm cells.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Sara; Monjardino, Paulo; Mendonça, Duarte; da Câmara Machado, Artur; Fernandes, Rui; Sampaio, Paula; Salema, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Endosperm transfer cells in maize have extensive cell wall ingrowths that play a key role in kernel development. Although the incorporation of lignin would support this process, its presence in these structures has not been reported in previous studies. We used potassium permanganate staining combined with transmission electron microscopy - energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry as well as acriflavine staining combined with confocal laser scanning microscopy to determine whether the most basal endosperm transfer cells (MBETCs) contain lignified cell walls, using starchy endosperm cells for comparison. We investigated the lignin content of ultrathin sections of MBETCs treated with hydrogen peroxide. The lignin content of transfer and starchy cell walls was also determined by the acetyl bromide method. Finally, the relationship between cell wall lignification and MBETC growth/flange ingrowth orientation was evaluated. MBETC walls and ingrowths contained lignin throughout the period of cell growth we monitored. The same was true of the starchy cells, but those underwent an even more extensive growth period than the transfer cells. Both the reticulate and flange ingrowths were also lignified early in development. The significance of the lignification of maize endosperm cell walls is discussed in terms of its impact on cell growth and flange ingrowth orientation.

  12. Syngeneic transfer of autoimmune diabetes from diabetic NOD mice to healthy neonates. Requirement for both L3T4+ and Lyt-2+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    1987-01-01

    We have developed a model of syngeneic adoptive transfer for type I diabetes mellitus of NOD mice. This model consists in injecting spleen cells from diabetic adult mice into newborn NOD recipients. 50% of recipients inoculated with 20 X 10(6) cells develop diabetes within the first 10 wk of life, at a time when none of the control littermates have yet become diabetic. The earliest successful transfers are observed at 3 wk of age, at a time when controls do not even exhibit histological changes in their pancreas. In addition we have shown that: (a) both males and females can be adoptively transferred, despite the fact that males rarely develop spontaneous diabetes in our colony; (b) diabetes transfer is a dose-dependent phenomenon that provides an in vivo assay for comparing the autoimmune potential of spleen cells from mice at various stages of their natural history; (c) the susceptibility of the recipients to the transfer is limited in time and declines after 3 wk; and (d) both L3T4+ and Lyt-2+ T cell subsets are necessary for the successful transfer. The neonatal syngeneic transfer provides an effective model for studies of the cellular events involved at regulatory and effector stages of autoimmune type I diabetes. PMID:3309126

  13. Improvement of canine somatic cell nuclear transfer procedure.

    PubMed

    Jang, G; Oh, H J; Kim, M K; Fibrianto, Y H; Hossein, M S; Kim, H J; Kim, J J; Hong, S G; Park, J E; Kang, S K; Lee, B C

    2008-01-15

    The purpose of the present study on canine somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) was to evaluate the effects of fusion strength, type of activation, culture media and site of transfer on developmental potential of SCNT embryos. We also examined the potential of enucleated bovine oocytes to serve as cytoplast recipients of canine somatic cells. Firstly, we evaluated the morphological characteristics of in vivo-matured canine oocytes collected by retrograde flushing of the oviducts 72 h after ovulation. Secondly, the effectiveness of three electrical strengths (1.8, 2.3 and 3.3 kV/cm), used twice for 20 micros, on fusion of canine cytoplasts with somatic cells were compared. Then, we compared: (1) chemical versus electrical activation (a) after parthenogenetic activation or (b) after reconstruction of canine oocytes with somatic cells; (2) culture of resulting intergeneric (IG) embryos in either (a) mSOF or (b) TCM-199. The exposure time to 6-DMAP was standardized by using bovine oocytes reconstructed with canine somatic cells. Bovine oocytes were used for SCNT after a 22 h in vitro maturation interval. The fusion rate was significantly higher in the 3.3 kV/cm group than in the 1.8 and 2.3 kV/cm treatment groups. After parthenogenesis or SCNT with chemical activation, 3.4 and 5.8%, respectively, of the embryos developed to the morula stage, as compared to none of the embryos produced using electrical activation. Later developmental stages (8-16 cells) were transferred to the uterine horn of eight recipients, but no pregnancy was detected. However, IG cloned embryos (bovine cytoplast/canine somatic cell) were capable of in vitro blastocyst development. In vitro developmental competence of IG cloned embryos was improved after exposure to 6-DMAP for 4 h as compared to 0, 2 or 6h exposure, although the increase was not significantly different among culture media. In summary, for production of canine SCNT embryos, we recommend fusion at 3.3 kV/cm, chemical activation

  14. The protease inhibitor chagasin of Trypanosoma cruzi adopts an immunoglobulin-type fold and may have arisen by horizontal gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Rigden, D J; Monteiro, A C; Grossi de Sá, M F

    2001-08-24

    Chagasin, a protein from Trypanosoma cruzi, is the first member of a new family of tight binding cysteine protease inhibitors [Monteiro, A.C.S., Abrahamson, M., Lima, A.P.C., Vannier-Santos, M.A. and Scharfstein, J. (2001) J. Cell Sci., in press] [corrected]. Despite its lack of significant sequence identity with known proteins, convincing structural models, using variable light chain templates, could be constructed on the basis of threading results. Experimental support for the final structure came from inhibition data for overlapping oligopeptides spanning the chagasin sequence. Chagasin therefore exemplifies a new protease inhibitor structural class and a new natural use for an immunoglobulin-like domain. Limited sequence resemblance suggests that chagasin may represent the result of a rare horizontal gene transfer from host to parasite.

  15. Regulation and direction of umbilical cord blood mesenchymal stem cells to adopt neuronal fate.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Lu, Ming

    2014-03-01

    Umbilical cord blood mesenchymal stem cells (UCB-MSCs) transplantation is becoming a promising and attractive cell-based treatment modality for repairing the damaged central nervous system due to its advantages of low immunogenicity, wide range of sources, and less ethical controversy. One of the limitations of this approach is that the proportion of neurons differentiated from UCB-MSCs still remains at low level. Thus, to induce UCB-MSCs to differentiate into neuron-like cells with a higher proportion is one of the key technologies of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering. Many induction protocols with remarkably higher differentiation rate to neurons have been reported. However, each protocol has its pros and cons and whether the neurons differentiated from UCB-MSCs under a certain protocol has normal nerve function remains controversial. Therefore, to guarantee the success of future clinical applications of UCB-MSCs, more investigations should be performed to improve the induction method and differentiation efficiency.

  16. Birth of Beagle dogs by somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Hossein, Mohammad Shamim; Jeong, Yeon Woo; Park, Sun Woo; Kim, Joung Joo; Lee, Eugine; Ko, Kyeong Hee; Hyuk, Park; Hoon, Song Seung; Kim, Yeun Wook; Hyun, Sang Hwan; Shin, Taeyoung; Hwang, Woo Suk

    2009-09-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate two enucleation methods for somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT), and to standardize the optimum number of embryos for transfer to each recipient for canines. Oocytes retrieved from outbreed dogs were reconstructed with adult somatic cells from a male Beagle dog. A total of 134 or 267 oocytes were enucleated either by aspiration or squeezing method, fused with two DC pulses of 1.75 kV/cm for 15 micros electrical stimulation, chemically activated after 1h of fusion using 10 microM calcium ionophore for 4 min and cultured 4h in 1.9 mM 6-dimethylaminopurine. Finally, 103 or 214 embryos for aspiration or squeezing method were transferred to 6 or 11 naturally synchronized recipients, respectively. A total of 53, 317 and 342 embryos were transferred to 7, 17 and 12 recipients for the group of 4-10, 11-25 and 26-40 embryos, respectively. There was no difference between fusion rate (76.87% vs. 80.15%), full term pregnancy rate (16.66% vs. 27.27%) and percent of live puppies born (0.97% vs. 1.87%) for aspiration and squeezing method (P>0.05). Production efficiency of cloned dogs was significantly affected by the number of embryos transferred to each recipient. No pregnancy was established for the group of 4-10 embryos (n=7) and 26-40 embryos (n=12) while pregnancy was detected in 23.53% recipients received a group of 11-25 embryos (n=17). Among them, five (1.76%) live puppies were born (P<0.05). These data show an increase in the overall efficiency of SCNT in canine species.

  17. Reshaping the transcriptional frontier: epigenetics and somatic cell nuclear transfer.

    PubMed

    Long, Charles R; Westhusin, Mark E; Golding, Michael C

    2014-02-01

    Somatic-cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) experiments have paved the way to the field of cellular reprogramming. The demonstrated ability to clone over 20 different species to date has proven that the technology is robust but very inefficient, and is prone to developmental anomalies. Yet, the offspring from cloned animals exhibit none of the abnormalities of their parents, suggesting the low efficiency and high developmental mortality are epigenetic in origin. The epigenetic barriers to reprogramming somatic cells into a totipotent embryo capable of developing into a viable offspring are significant and varied. Despite their intimate relationship, chromatin structure and transcription are often not uniformly reprogramed after nuclear transfer, and many cloned embryos develop gene expression profiles that are hybrids between the donor cell and an embryonic blastomere. Recent advances in cellular reprogramming suggest that alteration of donor-cell chromatin structure towards that found in an normal embryo is actually the rate-limiting step in successful development of SCNT embryos. Here we review the literature relevant to the transformation of a somatic-cell nucleus into an embryo capable of full-term development. Interestingly, while resetting somatic transcription and associated epigenetic marks are absolutely required for development of SCNT embryos, life does not demand perfection.

  18. Human T Cell Crosstalk Is Induced by Tumor Membrane Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Uzana, Ronny; Eisenberg, Galit; Merims, Sharon; Frankenburg, Shoshana; Pato, Aviad; Yefenof, Eitan; Engelstein, Roni; Peretz, Tamar

    2015-01-01

    Trogocytosis is a contact-dependent unidirectional transfer of membrane fragments between immune effector cells and their targets, initially detected in T cells following interaction with professional antigen presenting cells (APC). Previously, we have demonstrated that trogocytosis also takes place between melanoma-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and their cognate tumors. In the present study, we took this finding a step further, focusing on the ability of melanoma membrane-imprinted CD8+ T cells to act as APCs (CD8+T-APCs). We demonstrate that, following trogocytosis, CD8+T-APCs directly present a variety of melanoma derived peptides to fraternal T cells with the same TCR specificity or to T cells with different TCRs. The resulting T cell-T cell immune synapse leads to (1) Activation of effector CTLs, as determined by proliferation, cytokine secretion and degranulation; (2) Fratricide (killing) of CD8+T-APCs by the activated CTLs. Thus, trogocytosis enables cross-reactivity among CD8+ T cells with interchanging roles of effectors and APCs. This dual function of tumor-reactive CTLs may hint at their ability to amplify or restrict reactivity against the tumor and participate in modulation of the anti-cancer immune response. PMID:25671577

  19. Chimeric antigen receptors for the adoptive T cell therapy of hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Davila, Marco L; Bouhassira, Diana C G; Park, Jae H; Curran, Kevin J; Smith, Eric L; Pegram, Hollie J; Brentjens, Renier

    2014-04-01

    The genetic modification of autologous T cells with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) represents a breakthrough for gene engineering as a cancer therapy for hematologic malignancies. By targeting the CD19 antigen, we have demonstrated robust and rapid anti-leukemia activity in patients with heavily pre-treated and chemotherapy-refractory B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). We demonstrated rapid induction of deep molecular remissions in adults, which has been recently confirmed in a case report involving a child with B-ALL. In contrast to the results when treating B-ALL, outcomes have been more modest in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) or other non-hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). We review the clinical trial experience targeting B-ALL and CLL and speculate on the possible reasons for the different outcomes and propose potential optimization to CAR T cell therapy when targeting CLL or other indolent NHL. Lastly, we discuss the pre-clinical development and potential for clinical translation for using CAR T cells against multiple myeloma and acute myeloid leukemia. We highlight the potential risks and benefits by targeting these poor outcome hematologic malignancies.

  20. Adoptive transfer of IL-4Rα+ macrophages is sufficient to enhance eosinophilic inflammation in a mouse model of allergic lung inflammation