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Sample records for adoptive t-cell therapies

  1. Exploiting cytokines in adoptive T-cell therapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    Petrozziello, Elisabetta; Sturmheit, Tabea; Mondino, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy with tumor-reactive autologous T cells, either expanded from tumor specimens or genetically engineered to express tumor-reactive T-cell receptors and chimeric antigen receptors, is holding promising results in clinical trials. Several critical issues have been identified and results underline the possibility to exploit cytokines to further ameliorate the efficacy of current treatment protocols, also encompassing adoptive T-cell therapy. Here we review latest developments on the use of cytokines to better direct the nature of the T-cell infusion product, T-cell function and persistence in vivo, as well as to modulate the tumor microenvironment.

  2. Transient stimulation expands superior antitumor T cells for adoptive therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kagoya, Yuki; Nakatsugawa, Munehide; Ochi, Toshiki; Guo, Tingxi; Anczurowski, Mark; Saso, Kayoko; Butler, Marcus O.

    2017-01-01

    Adoptive cell therapy is a potentially curative therapeutic approach for patients with cancer. In this treatment modality, antitumor T cells are exponentially expanded in vitro prior to infusion. Importantly, the results of recent clinical trials suggest that the quality of expanded T cells critically affects their therapeutic efficacy. Although anti-CD3 mAb-based stimulation is widely used to expand T cells in vitro, a protocol to generate T cell grafts for optimal adoptive therapy has yet to be established. In this study, we investigated the differences between T cell stimulation mediated by anti–CD3/CD28 mAb–coated beads and cell-based artificial antigen-presenting cells (aAPCs) expressing CD3/CD28 counter-receptors. We found that transient stimulation with cell-based aAPCs, but not prolonged stimulation with beads, resulted in the superior expansion of CD8+ T cells. Transiently stimulated CD8+ T cells maintained a stem cell–like memory phenotype and were capable of secreting multiple cytokines significantly more efficiently than chronically stimulated T cells. Importantly, the chimeric antigen receptor–engineered antitumor CD8+ T cells expanded via transient stimulation demonstrated superior persistence and antitumor responses in adoptive immunotherapy mouse models. These results suggest that restrained stimulation is critical for generating T cell grafts for optimal adoptive immunotherapy for cancer. PMID:28138559

  3. Clinical application of adoptive T cell therapy in solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Yi-Wen; Gu, Xiao-Dong; Xiang, Jian-Bin; Chen, Zong-You

    2014-01-01

    As an emerging therapeutic approach, adoptive T cell therapy shown promise in advanced solid malignancies. The results obtained in patients with metastatic melanoma and kidney cancer are encouraging because of the visible clinical benefits and limited adverse effects. Recently, the genetically-modified T cells expressing specific T cell receptors or chimeric antigen receptors are just now entering the clinical arena and show great potential for high avidity to tumor-associated antigens and long-lasting anti-tumor responses. However, continued investigations are necessary to improve the cell product quality so as to decrease adverse effects and clinical costs, and make adoptive T cell therapy a tool of choice for solid malignancies. PMID:24912947

  4. Adoptive T-cell therapy for cancer: The era of engineered T cells.

    PubMed

    Bonini, Chiara; Mondino, Anna

    2015-09-01

    Tumors originate from a number of genetic events that deregulate homeostatic mechanisms controlling normal cell behavior. The immune system, devoted to patrol the organism against pathogenic events, can identify transformed cells, and in several cases cause their elimination. It is however clear that several mechanisms encompassing both central and peripheral tolerance limit antitumor immunity, often resulting into progressive diseases. Adoptive T-cell therapy with either allogeneic or autologous T cells can transfer therapeutic immunity. To date, genetic engineering of T cells appears to be a powerful tool for shaping tumor immunity. In this review, we discuss the most recent achievements in the areas of suicide gene therapy, and TCR-modified T cells and chimeric antigen receptor gene-modified T cells. We provide an overview of current strategies aimed at improving the safety and efficacy of these approaches, with an outlook on prospective developments.

  5. Biopolymer implants enhance the efficacy of adoptive T cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Stephan, Sirkka B.; Taber, Alexandria M.; Jileaeva, Ilona; Pegues, Ericka P.; Sentman, Charles L.; Stephan, Matthias T.

    2014-01-01

    Although adoptive T cell therapy holds promise for the treatment of many cancers, its clinical utility has been limited by problems in delivering targeted lymphocytes to tumor sites, and their inefficient expansion in the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. Here we describe a bioactive polymer implant capable of delivering, expanding and dispersing tumor-reactive T cells. The approach can be used to treat inoperable or incompletely-removed tumors by situating implants near them, or at resection sites. Using a mouse breast cancer resection model, we show that the implants effectively support tumor-targeting T cells throughout resection beds and associated lymph nodes, and reduce tumor relapse compared to conventional delivery modalities. In a multifocal ovarian cancer model, we demonstrate that polymer-delivered T cells trigger regression whereas injected tumor-reactive lymphocytes have little curative effect. Scaffold-based T cell delivery may provide a viable treatment option for inoperable tumors, and reduce the rate of metastatic relapse after surgery. PMID:25503382

  6. Improving Adoptive T Cell Therapy: The Particular Role of T Cell Costimulation, Cytokines, and Post-Transfer Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Redeker, Anke; Arens, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive cellular therapy (ACT) is a form of immunotherapy whereby antigen-specific T cells are isolated or engineered, expanded ex vivo, and transferred back to patients. Clinical benefit after ACT has been obtained in treatment of infection, various hematological malignancies, and some solid tumors; however, due to poor functionality and persistence of the transferred T cells, the efficacy of ACT in the treatment of most solid tumors is often marginal. Hence, much effort is undertaken to improve T cell function and persistence in ACT and significant progress is being made. Herein, we will review strategies to improve ACT success rates in the treatment of cancer and infection. We will deliberate on the most favorable phenotype for the tumor-specific T cells that are infused into patients and on how to obtain T cells bearing this phenotype by applying novel ex vivo culture methods. Moreover, we will discuss T cell function and persistence after transfer into patients and how these factors can be manipulated by means of providing costimulatory signals, cytokines, blocking antibodies to inhibitory molecules, and vaccination. Incorporation of these T cell stimulation strategies and combinations of the different treatment modalities are likely to improve clinical response rates further. PMID:27656185

  7. Improving Adoptive T Cell Therapy: The Particular Role of T Cell Costimulation, Cytokines, and Post-Transfer Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Redeker, Anke; Arens, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive cellular therapy (ACT) is a form of immunotherapy whereby antigen-specific T cells are isolated or engineered, expanded ex vivo, and transferred back to patients. Clinical benefit after ACT has been obtained in treatment of infection, various hematological malignancies, and some solid tumors; however, due to poor functionality and persistence of the transferred T cells, the efficacy of ACT in the treatment of most solid tumors is often marginal. Hence, much effort is undertaken to improve T cell function and persistence in ACT and significant progress is being made. Herein, we will review strategies to improve ACT success rates in the treatment of cancer and infection. We will deliberate on the most favorable phenotype for the tumor-specific T cells that are infused into patients and on how to obtain T cells bearing this phenotype by applying novel ex vivo culture methods. Moreover, we will discuss T cell function and persistence after transfer into patients and how these factors can be manipulated by means of providing costimulatory signals, cytokines, blocking antibodies to inhibitory molecules, and vaccination. Incorporation of these T cell stimulation strategies and combinations of the different treatment modalities are likely to improve clinical response rates further.

  8. Adoptive T cell therapy promotes the emergence of genomically altered tumor escape variants

    PubMed Central

    Kaluza, Karen M.; Thompson, Jill M.; Kottke, Timothy J.; Flynn Gilmer, Heather C.; Knutson, Darlene L.; Vile, Richard G.

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive T cell therapy has proven effective against melanoma in mice and humans. However, because most responses are incomplete or transient, cures remain rare. To maximize the efficacy of this therapy, it will be essential to gain a better understanding of the processes which result in tumor relapse. We studied these processes using B16ova murine melanoma and adoptive transfer of OT-I T cells. Transfer of T cells as a single therapy provided a significant survival benefit for mice with established subcutaneous tumors. However, tumors which initially regressed often recurred. By analyzing tumors which emerged in the presence of a potent OT-I response, we identified a novel tumor escape mechanism in which tumor cells evaded T cell pressure by undergoing major genomic changes involving loss of the gene encoding the target tumor antigen. Furthermore, we show that these in vivo processes can be recapitulated in vitro using T cell/tumor cell co-cultures. A single round of in vitro co-culture led to significant loss of the ova gene and a tumor cell population with rapidly induced and diverse karyotypic changes. Although these current studies focus on the model OVA antigen, the finding that T cells can directly promote genomic instability has important implications for the development of adoptive T cell therapies. PMID:21935923

  9. Adoptive therapy with CAR redirected T cells: the challenges in targeting solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Abken, Hinrich

    2015-01-01

    Recent spectacular success in the adoptive cell therapy of leukemia and lymphoma with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T cells raised the expectations that this therapy may be efficacious in a wide range of cancer entities. The expectations are based on the predefined specificity of CAR T cells by an antibody-derived binding domain that acts independently of the natural T-cell receptor, recognizes targets independently of presentation by the major histocompatibility complex and allows targeting toward virtually any cell surface antigen. We here discuss that targeting CAR T cells toward solid tumors faces certain circumstances critical for the therapeutic success. Targeting tumor stroma and taking advantage of TRUCK cells, in other words, CAR T cells with inducible release of a transgenic payload, are some strategies envisaged to overcome current limitations in the near future.

  10. Engineered T Cells for the Adoptive Therapy of B-Cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukaemia

    PubMed Central

    Koehler, Philipp; Schmidt, Patrick; Hombach, Andreas A.; Hallek, Michael; Abken, Hinrich

    2012-01-01

    B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (B-CLL) remains an incurable disease due to the high risk of relapse, even after complete remission, raising the need to control and eliminate residual tumor cells in long term. Adoptive T cell therapy with genetically engineered specificity is thought to fulfil expectations, and clinical trials for the treatment of CLL are initiated. Cytolytic T cells from patients are redirected towards CLL cells by ex vivo engineering with a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) which binds to CD19 on CLL cells through an antibody-derived domain and triggers T cell activation through CD3ζ upon tumor cell engagement. Redirected T cells thereby target CLL cells in an MHC-unrestricted fashion, secret proinflammatory cytokines, and eliminate CD19+ leukaemia cells with high efficiency. Cytolysis of autologous CLL cells by patient's engineered T cells is effective, however, accompanied by lasting elimination of healthy CD19+ B-cells. In this paper we discuss the potential of the strategy in the treatment of CLL, the currently ongoing trials, and the future challenges in the adoptive therapy with CAR-engineered T cells. PMID:21837241

  11. Management of patients with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma: focus on adoptive T-cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Perna, Serena Kimi; Huye, Leslie E; Savoldo, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) represents a heterogeneous group of malignancies with high diversity in terms of biology, clinical responses, and prognosis. Standard therapy regimens produce a 5-year relative survival rate of only 69%, with the critical need to increase the treatment-success rate of this patient population presenting at diagnosis with a median age of 66 years and many comorbidities. The evidence that an impaired immune system favors the development of NHL has opened the stage for new therapeutics, and specifically for the adoptive transfer of ex vivo-expanded antigen-specific T-cells. In this review, we discuss how T-cells specific for viral-associated antigens, nonviral-associated antigens expressed by the tumor, T-cells redirected through the expression of chimeric antigen receptors, and transgenic T-cell receptors against tumor cells have been developed and used in clinical trials for the treatment of patients with NHLs. PMID:27471712

  12. Two-photon imaging of intratumoral CD8+ T cell cytotoxic activity during adoptive T cell therapy in mice

    PubMed Central

    Breart, Béatrice; Lemaître, Fabrice; Celli, Susanna; Bousso, Philippe

    2008-01-01

    CTLs have the potential to attack tumors, and adoptive transfer of CTLs can lead to tumor regression in mouse models and human clinical settings. However, the dynamics of tumor cell elimination during efficient T cell therapy is unknown, and it is unclear whether CTLs act directly by destroying tumor cells or indirectly by initiating the recruitment of innate immune cells that mediate tumor damage. To address these questions, we report real-time imaging of tumor cell apoptosis in vivo using intravital 2-photon microscopy and a Förster resonance energy transfer–based (FRET-based) reporter of caspase 3 activity. In a mouse model of solid tumor, we found that tumor regression after transfer of in vitro–activated CTLs occurred primarily through the direct action of CTLs on each individual tumor cell, with a minimal bystander effect. Surprisingly, the killing of 1 target cell by an individual CTL took an extended period of time, 6 hours on average, which suggested that the slow rate of killing intrinsically limits the efficiency of antitumor T cell responses. The ability to visualize when, where, and how tumor cells are killed in vivo offers new perspectives for understanding how immune effectors survey cancer cells and how local tumor microenvironments may subvert immune responses. PMID:18357341

  13. Immunostimulatory Effects of Melphalan and Usefulness in Adoptive Cell Therapy with Antitumor CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kuczma, Michal; Ding, Zhi-Chun; Zhou, Gang

    2017-01-01

    The alkylating agent melphalan is used in the treatment of hematological malignancies, especially multiple myeloma. In the past, the usefulness of melphalan has been solely attributed to its cytotoxicity on fast-growing cancerous cells. Although the immunomodulatory effects of melphalan were suggested many years ago, only recently has this aspect of melphalan’s activity begun to be elucidated at the molecular level. Emerging evidence indicates that melphalan can foster an immunogenic microenvironment by inducing immunogenic cell death (ICD) as characterized by membrane translocation of endoplasmic reticulum protein calreticulin (CRT) and by release of chromatin-binding protein high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1). In addition, the lympho-depletive effect of melphalan can induce the release of pro-inflammatory cytokines and growth factors, deplete regulatory T cells, and create space to facilitate the expansion of infused tumor-reactive T cells. These features suggest that melphalan can be used as a preparative chemotherapy for adoptive T-cell therapy. This notion is supported by our recent work demonstrating that the combination of melphalan and adoptive transfer of tumor-reactive CD4+ T cells can mediate potent antitumor effects in animal models. This review summarizes the recent advances in understanding and utilizing the immunomodulatory effects of melphalan. PMID:27910767

  14. Generation of T cell effectors using tumor cell-loaded dendritic cells for adoptive T cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Vavrova, Katerina; Vrabcova, Petra; Filipp, Dominik; Bartunkova, Jirina; Horvath, Rudolf

    2016-12-01

    Adoptive T cell transfer has been shown to be an effective method used to boost tumor-specific immune responses in several types of malignancies. In this study, we set out to optimize the ACT protocol for the experimental treatment of prostate cancer. The protocol includes a pre-stimulation step whereby T cells were primed with autologous dendritic cells loaded with the high hydrostatic pressure-treated prostate cancer cell line, LNCaP. Primed T cells were further expanded in vitro with anti-CD3/CD28 Dynabeads in the WAVE bioreactor 2/10 system and tested for cytotoxicity. Our data indicates that the combination of pre-stimulation and expansion steps resulted in the induction and enrichment of tumor-responsive CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells at clinically relevant numbers. The majority of both CD4(+) and CD8(+) IFN-γ producing cells were CD62L, CCR7 and CD57 negative but CD28 and CD27 positive, indicating an early antigen experienced phenotype in non-terminal differentiation phase. Expanded T cells showed significantly greater cytotoxicity against LNCaP cells compared to the control SKOV-3, an ovarian cancer line. In summary, our results suggest that the ACT approach together with LNCaP-loaded dendritic cells provides a viable way to generate prostate cancer reactive T cell effectors that are capable of mounting efficient and targeted antitumor responses and can be thus considered for further testing in a clinical setting.

  15. Elimination of metastatic melanoma using gold nanoshell-enabled photothermal therapy and adoptive T cell transfer.

    PubMed

    Bear, Adham S; Kennedy, Laura C; Young, Joseph K; Perna, Serena K; Mattos Almeida, Joao Paulo; Lin, Adam Y; Eckels, Phillip C; Drezek, Rebekah A; Foster, Aaron E

    2013-01-01

    Ablative treatments such as photothermal therapy (PTT) are attractive anticancer strategies because they debulk accessible tumor sites while simultaneously priming antitumor immune responses. However, the immune response following thermal ablation is often insufficient to treat metastatic disease. Here we demonstrate that PTT induces the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines and promotes the maturation of dendritic cells within tumor-draining lymph nodes, thereby priming antitumor T cell responses. Unexpectedly, however, these immunomodulatory effects were not beneficial to overall antitumor immunity. We found that PTT promoted the infiltration of secondary tumor sites by CD11b(+)Ly-6G/C(+) myeloid-derived suppressor cells, consequently failing to slow the growth of poorly immunogenic B16-F10 tumors and enhancing the growth of distant lung metastases. To exploit the beneficial effects of PTT activity against local tumors and on antitumor immunity whilst avoiding the adverse consequences, we adoptively transferred gp100-specific pmel T cells following PTT. The combination of local control by PTT and systemic antitumor immune reactivity provided by adoptively transferred T cells prevented primary tumor recurrence post-ablation, inhibited tumor growth at distant sites, and abrogated the outgrowth of lung metastases. Hence, the combination of PTT and systemic immunotherapy prevented the adverse effects of PTT on metastatic tumor growth and optimized overall tumor control.

  16. Generation of CAR T cells for adoptive therapy in the context of glioblastoma standard of care.

    PubMed

    Riccione, Katherine; Suryadevara, Carter M; Snyder, David; Cui, Xiuyu; Sampson, John H; Sanchez-Perez, Luis

    2015-02-16

    Adoptive T cell immunotherapy offers a promising strategy for specifically targeting and eliminating malignant gliomas. T cells can be engineered ex vivo to express chimeric antigen receptors specific for glioma antigens (CAR T cells). The expansion and function of adoptively transferred CAR T cells can be potentiated by the lymphodepletive and tumoricidal effects of standard of care chemotherapy and radiotherapy. We describe a method for generating CAR T cells targeting EGFRvIII, a glioma-specific antigen, and evaluating their efficacy when combined with a murine model of glioblastoma standard of care. T cells are engineered by transduction with a retroviral vector containing the anti-EGFRvIII CAR gene. Tumor-bearing animals are subjected to host conditioning by a course of temozolomide and whole brain irradiation at dose regimens designed to model clinical standard of care. CAR T cells are then delivered intravenously to primed hosts. This method can be used to evaluate the antitumor efficacy of CAR T cells in the context of standard of care.

  17. CMV-Specific CD8 T Cell Differentiation and Localization: Implications for Adoptive Therapies.

    PubMed

    Smith, Corinne J; Quinn, Michael; Snyder, Christopher M

    2016-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a ubiquitous virus that causes chronic infection and, thus, is one of the most common infectious complications of immune suppression. Adoptive transfer of HCMV-specific T cells has emerged as an effective method to reduce the risk for HCMV infection and/or reactivation by restoring immunity in transplant recipients. However, the CMV-specific CD8(+) T cell response is comprised of a heterogenous mixture of subsets with distinct functions and localization, and it is not clear if current adoptive immunotherapy protocols can reconstitute the full spectrum of CD8(+) T cell immunity. The aim of this review is to briefly summarize the role of these T cell subsets in CMV immunity and to describe how current adoptive immunotherapy practices might affect their reconstitution in patients. The bulk of the CMV-specific CD8(+) T cell population is made up of terminally differentiated effector T cells with immediate effector function and a short life span. Self-renewing memory T cells within the CMV-specific population retain the capacity to expand and differentiate upon challenge and are important for the long-term persistence of the CD8(+) T cell response. Finally, mucosal organs, which are frequent sites of CMV reactivation, are primarily inhabited by tissue-resident memory T cells, which do not recirculate. Future work on adoptive transfer strategies may need to focus on striking a balance between the formation of these subsets to ensure the development of long lasting and protective immune responses that can access the organs affected by CMV disease.

  18. CMV-Specific CD8 T Cell Differentiation and Localization: Implications for Adoptive Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Corinne J.; Quinn, Michael; Snyder, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a ubiquitous virus that causes chronic infection and, thus, is one of the most common infectious complications of immune suppression. Adoptive transfer of HCMV-specific T cells has emerged as an effective method to reduce the risk for HCMV infection and/or reactivation by restoring immunity in transplant recipients. However, the CMV-specific CD8+ T cell response is comprised of a heterogenous mixture of subsets with distinct functions and localization, and it is not clear if current adoptive immunotherapy protocols can reconstitute the full spectrum of CD8+ T cell immunity. The aim of this review is to briefly summarize the role of these T cell subsets in CMV immunity and to describe how current adoptive immunotherapy practices might affect their reconstitution in patients. The bulk of the CMV-specific CD8+ T cell population is made up of terminally differentiated effector T cells with immediate effector function and a short life span. Self-renewing memory T cells within the CMV-specific population retain the capacity to expand and differentiate upon challenge and are important for the long-term persistence of the CD8+ T cell response. Finally, mucosal organs, which are frequent sites of CMV reactivation, are primarily inhabited by tissue-resident memory T cells, which do not recirculate. Future work on adoptive transfer strategies may need to focus on striking a balance between the formation of these subsets to ensure the development of long lasting and protective immune responses that can access the organs affected by CMV disease. PMID:27695453

  19. T-cell depleted allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplants as a platform for adoptive therapy with leukemia selective or virus-specific T-cells.

    PubMed

    O'Reilly, R J; Koehne, G; Hasan, A N; Doubrovina, E; Prockop, S

    2015-06-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplants adequately depleted of T-cells can reduce or prevent acute and chronic GVHD in both HLA-matched and haplotype-disparate hosts, without post-transplant prophylaxis with immunosuppressive drugs. Recent trials indicate that high doses of CD34+ progenitors from G-CSF mobilized peripheral blood leukocytes isolated and T-cell depleted by immunoadsorption to paramagnetic beads, when administered after myeloablative conditioning with TBI and chemotherapy or chemotherapy alone can secure consistent engraftment and abrogate GVHD in patients with acute leukemia without incurring an increased risk of a recurrent leukemia. Early clinical trials also indicate that high doses of in vitro generated leukemia-reactive donor T-cells can be adoptively transferred and can induce remissions of leukemia relapse without GVHD. Similarly, virus-specific T-cells generated from the transplant donor or an HLA partially matched third party, have induced remissions of Rituxan-refractory EBV lymphomas and can clear CMV disease or viremia persisting despite antiviral therapy in a high proportion of cases. Analyses of treatment responses and failures illustrate both the advantages and limitations of donor or banked, third party-derived T-cells, but underscore the potential of adoptive T-cell therapy in the absence of ongoing immunosuppression.

  20. Adoptive T-cell therapy improves treatment of canine non–Hodgkin lymphoma post chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, Colleen M.; Sheppard, Sabina; Hartline, Cassie A.; Huls, Helen; Johnson, Mark; Palla, Shana L.; Maiti, Sourindra; Ma, Wencai; Davis, R. Eric; Craig, Suzanne; Lee, Dean A.; Champlin, Richard; Wilson, Heather; Cooper, Laurence J. N.

    2012-01-01

    Clinical observations reveal that an augmented pace of T-cell recovery after chemotherapy correlates with improved tumor-free survival, suggesting the add-back of T cells after chemotherapy may improve outcomes. To evaluate adoptive immunotherapy treatment for B-lineage non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), we expanded T cells from client-owned canines diagnosed with NHL on artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC) in the presence of human interleukin (IL)-2 and IL-21. Graded doses of autologous T cells were infused after CHOP chemotherapy and persisted for 49 days, homed to tumor, and significantly improved survival. Serum thymidine kinase changes predicted T-cell engraftment, while anti-tumor effects correlated with neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratios and granzyme B expression in manufactured T cells. Therefore, chemotherapy can be used to modulate infused T-cell responses to enhance anti-tumor effects. The companion canine model has translational implications for human immunotherapy which can be readily exploited since clinical-grade canine and human T cells are propagated using identical approaches. PMID:22355761

  1. Abrogating Cbl-b in effector CD8(+) T cells improves the efficacy of adoptive therapy of leukemia in mice.

    PubMed

    Stromnes, Ingunn M; Blattman, Joseph N; Tan, Xiaoxia; Jeevanjee, Sara; Gu, Hua; Greenberg, Philip D

    2010-10-01

    The clinical use of adoptive immunotherapy with tumor-reactive T cells to treat established cancers is limited in part by the poor in vivo survival and function of the transferred T cells. Although administration of exogenous cytokines such as IL-2 can promote T cell survival, such strategies have many nonspecific activities and are often associated with toxicity. We show here that abrogating expression of Casitas B-lineage lymphoma b (Cbl-b), a negative regulator of lymphocyte activation, in tumor-reactive CD8(+) T cells expanded ex vivo increased the efficacy of adoptive immunotherapy of disseminated leukemia in mice. Mechanistically, Cbl-b abrogation bypassed the requirement for exogenous IL-2 administration for tumor eradication in vivo. In addition, CD8(+) T cells lacking Cbl-b demonstrated a lower threshold for activation, better survival following target recognition and stimulation, and enhanced proliferative responses as a result of both IL-2-dependent and -independent pathways. Importantly, siRNA knockdown of Cbl-b in human CD8(+)CD28- effector T cell clones similarly restored IL-2 production and proliferation following target recognition independent of exogenous IL-2, enhanced IFN-γ production, and increased target avidity. Thus, abrogating Cbl-b expression in effector T cells may improve the efficacy of adoptive therapy of some human malignancies.

  2. Chimeric antigen receptors for the adoptive T cell therapy of hematologic malignancies.

    PubMed

    Davila, Marco L; Bouhassira, Diana C G; Park, Jae H; Curran, Kevin J; Smith, Eric L; Pegram, Hollie J; Brentjens, Renier

    2014-04-01

    The genetic modification of autologous T cells with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) represents a breakthrough for gene engineering as a cancer therapy for hematologic malignancies. By targeting the CD19 antigen, we have demonstrated robust and rapid anti-leukemia activity in patients with heavily pre-treated and chemotherapy-refractory B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). We demonstrated rapid induction of deep molecular remissions in adults, which has been recently confirmed in a case report involving a child with B-ALL. In contrast to the results when treating B-ALL, outcomes have been more modest in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) or other non-hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). We review the clinical trial experience targeting B-ALL and CLL and speculate on the possible reasons for the different outcomes and propose potential optimization to CAR T cell therapy when targeting CLL or other indolent NHL. Lastly, we discuss the pre-clinical development and potential for clinical translation for using CAR T cells against multiple myeloma and acute myeloid leukemia. We highlight the potential risks and benefits by targeting these poor outcome hematologic malignancies.

  3. Rapid generation of NY-ESO-1-specific CD4(+) THELPER1 cells for adoptive T-cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Kayser, Simone; Boβ, Cristina; Feucht, Judith; Witte, Kai-Erik; Scheu, Alexander; Bülow, Hans-Jörg; Joachim, Stefanie; Stevanović, Stefan; Schumm, Michael; Rittig, Susanne M; Lang, Peter; Röcken, Martin; Handgretinger, Rupert; Feuchtinger, Tobias

    2015-05-01

    Tumor-associated antigens such as NY-ESO-1 are expressed in a variety of solid tumors but absent in mature healthy tissues with the exception of germline cells. The immune system anti-cancer attack is mediated by cell lysis or induction of growth arrest through paralysis of tumor cells, the latter of which can be achieved by tumor-specific CD4(+), IFNγ-producing THelper type 1 (TH1) cells. Translation of these immune-mediated mechanisms into clinical application has been limited by availability of immune effectors, as well as the need for complex in vitro protocols and regulatory hurdles. Here, we report a procedure to generate cancer-testis antigen NY-ESO-1-targeting CD4(+) TH1 cells in vitro for cancer immunotherapy in the clinic. After in vitro sensitization by stimulating T cells with protein-spanning, overlapping peptide pools of NY-ESO-1 in combination with IL-7 and low dose IL-2, antigen-specific T cells were isolated using IFNγ capture technique and subsequently expanded with IL-2, IL-7 and IL-15. Large numbers of NY-ESO-1-specific CD4(+) T cells with a TH1 cytokine profile and lower numbers of cytokine-secreting CD8(+) T cells could be generated from healthy donors with a high specificity and expansion potential. Manufactured CD4(+) T cells showed strong specific TH1-responses with IFNγ(+), TNFα(+), IL-2(+) and induced cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in tumor cells. The protocol is GMP-grade and approved by the regulatory authorities. The tumor-antigen specific CD4(+) TH1 lymphocytes can be adoptively transferred as a T-cell therapy to boost anticancer immunity and this novel cancer treatment approach is applicable to both T cells from healthy allogeneic donors as well as to autologous T cells derived from cancer patients.

  4. Adoptive T-cell Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Gottschalk, Stephen; Rooney, Cliona

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with a range of malignancies involving B-cells, T-cells, natural killer (NK)-cells, epithelial cells and smooth muscle. All of these are associated with the latent life cycles of EBV, but the pattern of latency-associated viral antigens expressed in tumor cells depends on the type of tumor. EBV-specific T cells (EBVSTs) have been explored as prophylaxis and therapy for EBV-associated malignancies for more than two decades. EBVSTs have been most successful as prophylaxis and therapy for post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD), which expresses the full array of latent EBV antigens (type 3 latency), in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. While less effective, clinical studies have also demonstrated their therapeutic potential for PTLD post solid organ transplant, and for EBV-associated malignancies such as Hodgkin’s Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma, and nasopharyngeal carcinoma that express a limited array of latent EBV antigens (type 2 latency),. Several approaches are actively being pursued to improve the antitumor activity of EBVSTs including activation and expansion of T cells specific for the EBV antigens expressed in type 2 latency, genetic approaches to render EBVSTs resistant to the immunosuppressive tumor environment and combination approaches with other immune-modulating modalities. Given the recent advances and renewed interest in cell therapy, we hope that EBVSTs will become an integral part of our treatment armamentarium against EBV-positive malignancies in the near future. PMID:26428384

  5. Adoptive T-cell therapy for hematological malignancies using T cells gene-modified to express tumor antigen-specific receptors.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Hiroshi

    2014-02-01

    The functional properties of the adoptive immune response mediated by effector T lymphocytes are decisively regulated by their T-cell receptors (TCRs). Transfer of genes encoding target antigen-specific receptors enables polyclonal T cells to redirect toward cancer cells and virally infected cells expressing those defined antigens. Using this technology, a large population of redirected T cells displaying uniform therapeutic properties has been produced, powerfully advancing their clinical application as "cellular drugs" for adoptive immunotherapy against cancer. Clinically, anticancer adoptive immunotherapy using these genetically engineered T cells has an impressive and proven track record. Notable examples include the dramatic benefit of chimeric antigen receptor gene-modified T cells redirected towards B-cell lineage antigen CD19 in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia, and the impressive outcomes in the use of TCR gene-modified T cells redirected towards NY-ESO-1, a representative cancer-testis antigen, in patients with advanced melanoma and synovial cell sarcoma. In this review, we briefly overview the current status of this treatment option in the context of hematological malignancy, and discuss a number of challenges that still pose an obstacle to the full effectiveness of this strategy.

  6. Cytotoxic T lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 inhibition increases the antitumor activity of adoptive T-cell therapy when carried out with naïve rather than differentiated T cells.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Takeshi; Adachi, Satoko; Okayama, Tetsuya; Kokura, Satoshi; Mizushima, Katsura; Doi, Toshifumi; Matsuyama, Tatsuzo; Sakamoto, Naoyuki; Katada, Kazuhiro; Kamada, Kazuhiro; Uchiyama, Kazuhiko; Handa, Osamu; Takagi, Tomohisa; Naito, Yuji; Itoh, Yoshito; Yoshikawa, Toshikazu

    2015-05-01

    Although treatment with an antibody against cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) combined with multiple therapeutic interventions has been explored, the effect of combination therapy with CTLA-4 inhibition and adoptive T-cell therapy has not been determined. In the present study, our aim was to determine whether CTLA-4 inhibition, combined with adoptive transfer of T cells at different stages of differentiation, exhibits synergistic antitumor effects in a murine colon cancer model. Mice bearing subcutaneous tumors were administered adoptive T-cell transfer of CD62Lhigh or CD62Llow cells combined with an anti-CTLA-4 antibody (α-CTLA-4) or control immunoglobulin G. Subcutaneous tumors were harvested, and the antitumor effects and helper T-cell polarization were analyzed. CTLA-4 inhibition combined with CD62Lhigh cell administration showed the strongest antitumor effect. Combination therapy increased the number of CD3+ cells within the tumor. Moreover, CTLA-4 inhibition induced polarization of T cells infiltrating the tumor toward the T helper 1 lineage, and suppressed the frequency of regulatory T cells within the tumor, particularly in combination with CD62Lhigh T-cell transfer. This is the first report demonstrating that the efficacy of α-CTLA-4 and adoptive T-cell transfer combination therapy depends on the state of differentiation of the transferred T cells. Our data support the notion that a combination of α-CTLA-4 and adoptive T-cell transfer containing an abundance of naïve phenotype cells could potentially exert antitumor effects in a clinical setting.

  7. Large-scale Isolation of Highly Pure "Untouched" Regulatory T Cells in a GMP Environment for Adoptive Cell Therapy.

    PubMed

    Haase, Doreen; Puan, Kia Joo; Starke, Mireille; Lai, Tuck Siong; Soh, Melissa Yan Ling; Karunanithi, Iyswariya; San Luis, Boris; Poh, Tuang Yeow; Yusof, Nurhashikin; Yeap, Chun Hsien; Phang, Chew Yen; Chye, Willis Soon Yuan; Chan, Marieta; Koh, Mickey Boon Chai; Goh, Yeow Tee; Bertin-Maghit, Sebastien; Nardin, Alessandra; Ho, Liam Pock; Rotzschke, Olaf

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive cell therapy is an emerging treatment strategy for a number of serious diseases. Regulatory T (Treg) cells represent 1 cell type of particular interest for therapy of inflammatory conditions, as they are responsible for controlling unwanted immune responses. Initial clinical trials of adoptive transfer of Treg cells in patients with graft-versus-host disease were shown to be safe. However, obtaining sufficient numbers of highly pure and functional Treg cells with minimal contamination remains a challenge. We developed a novel approach to isolate "untouched" human Treg cells from healthy donors on the basis of negative selection using the surface markers CD49d and CD127. This procedure, which uses an antibody cocktail and magnetic beads for separation in an automated system (RoboSep), was scaled up and adapted to be compatible with good manufacturing practice conditions. With this setup we performed 9 Treg isolations from large-scale leukapheresis samples in a good manufacturing practice facility. These runs yielded sufficient numbers of "untouched" Treg cells for immediate use in clinical applications. The cell preparations consisted of viable highly pure FoxP3-positive Treg cells that were functional in suppressing the proliferation of effector T cells. Contamination with CD4 effector T cells was <10%. All other cell types did not exceed 2% in the final product. Remaining isolation reagents were reduced to levels that are considered safe. Treg cells isolated with this procedure will be used in a phase I clinical trial of adoptive transfer into leukemia patients developing graft-versus-host disease after stem cell transplantation.

  8. Adoptive T cell immunotherapy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Perica, Karlo; Varela, Juan Carlos; Oelke, Mathias; Schneck, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Harnessing the immune system to recognize and destroy tumor cells has been the central goal of anti-cancer immunotherapy. In recent years, there has been an increased interest in optimizing this technology in order to make it a clinically feasible treatment. One of the main treatment modalities within cancer immunotherapy has been adoptive T cell therapy (ACT). Using this approach, tumor-specific cytotoxic T cells are infused into cancer patients with the goal of recognizing, targeting, and destroying tumor cells. In the current review, we revisit some of the major successes of ACT, the major hurdles that have been overcome to optimize ACT, the remaining challenges, and future approaches to make ACT widely available.

  9. Adoptive T-cell therapy for cancer in the United kingdom: a review of activity for the British Society of Gene and Cell Therapy annual meeting 2015.

    PubMed

    Gilham, David Edward; Anderson, John; Bridgeman, John Stephen; Hawkins, Robert Edward; Exley, Mark Adrian; Stauss, Hans; Maher, John; Pule, Martin; Sewell, Andrew Kelvin; Bendle, Gavin; Lee, Steven; Qasim, Waseem; Thrasher, Adrian; Morris, Emma

    2015-05-01

    Adoptive T-cell therapy is delivering objective clinical responses across a number of cancer indications in the early phase clinical setting. Much of this clinical activity is taking place at major clinical academic centers across the United States. This review focuses upon cancer-focused cell therapy activity within the United Kingdom as a contribution to the 2015 British Society of Gene and Cell Therapy annual general meeting. This overview reflects the diversity and expansion of clinical and preclinical studies within the United Kingdom while considering the background context of this work against new infrastructural developments and the requirements of nationalized healthcare delivery within the UK National Health Service.

  10. Adoptive T-Cell Therapy for Cancer in the United Kingdom: A Review of Activity for the British Society of Gene and Cell Therapy Annual Meeting 2015

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, John; Bridgeman, John Stephen; Hawkins, Robert Edward; Exley, Mark Adrian; Stauss, Hans; Maher, John; Pule, Martin; Sewell, Andrew Kelvin; Bendle, Gavin; Lee, Steven; Qasim, Waseem; Thrasher, Adrian; Morris, Emma

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Adoptive T-cell therapy is delivering objective clinical responses across a number of cancer indications in the early phase clinical setting. Much of this clinical activity is taking place at major clinical academic centers across the United States. This review focuses upon cancer-focused cell therapy activity within the United Kingdom as a contribution to the 2015 British Society of Gene and Cell Therapy annual general meeting. This overview reflects the diversity and expansion of clinical and preclinical studies within the United Kingdom while considering the background context of this work against new infrastructural developments and the requirements of nationalized healthcare delivery within the UK National Health Service. PMID:25860661

  11. Systemic injection of TLR1/2 agonist improves adoptive antigen-specific T cell therapy in glioma-bearing mice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yufei; Luo, Feifei; Li, Anning; Qian, Jiawen; Yao, Zhenwei; Feng, Xiaoyuan; Chu, Yiwei

    2014-09-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy is an attractive strategy for glioma treatment. However, some obstacles still need be overcome. In this study, GL261-bearing mice treated with adoptively transferred antigen-specific T cells and systemic injection of bacterial lipoprotein (BLP), a TLR1/2 agonist, got a long-term survival and even immune protection. By analyzing adoptive T cells, it was found that BLP maintained T cell survival, proliferation and anti-tumor efficacy in the brains of tumor-bearing hosts. Moreover, tumor microenvironment was modified by up-regulating IFN-γ-secreting CD8+ T cells and down-regulating MDSC, which might be related with high CXCL10 and low CCL2 expression. In addition, TLR2 deficiency abrogated therapeutic effect with increased MDSC accumulation and decreased IFN-γ-secreting CD8+ T cells in the brains. Thus, the systemic injection of BLP could improve the adoptive T cell therapy by maintaining T cell persistence, modifying the tumor microenvironment and even inducing systemic anti-tumor immunity, which might offer a clinically promising immunotherapeutic strategy for glioma.

  12. Severe Developmental B Lymphopoietic Defects in Foxp3-Deficient Mice are Refractory to Adoptive Regulatory T Cell Therapy.

    PubMed

    Riewaldt, Julia; Düber, Sandra; Boernert, Marie; Krey, Martina; Dembinski, Marcin; Weiss, Siegfried; Garbe, Annette I; Kretschmer, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    The role of Foxp3-expressing regulatory T (T(reg)) cells in tolerance and autoimmunity is well-established. However, although of considerable clinical interest, the role of T(reg) cells in the regulation of hematopoietic homeostasis remains poorly understood. Thus, we analysed B and T lymphopoiesis in the scurfy (Sf) mouse model of T(reg) cell deficiency. In these experiments, the near-complete block of B lymphopoiesis in the BM of adolescent Sf mice was attributed to autoimmune T cells. We could exclude a constitutive lympho-hematopoietic defect or a B cell-intrinsic function of Foxp3. Efficient B cell development in the BM early in ontogeny and pronounced extramedullary B lymphopoietic activity resulted in a peripheral pool of mature B cells in adolescent Sf mice. However, marginal zone B and B-1a cells were absent throughout ontogeny. Developmental B lymphopoietic defects largely correlated with defective thymopoiesis. Importantly, neonatal adoptive T(reg) cell therapy suppressed exacerbated production of inflammatory cytokines and restored thymopoiesis but was ineffective in recovering defective B lymphopoiesis, probably due to a failure to compensate production of stroma cell-derived IL-7 and CXCL12. Our observations on autoimmune-mediated incapacitation of the BM environment in Foxp3-deficient mice will have direct implications for the rational design of BM transplantation protocols for patients with severe genetic deficiencies in functional Foxp3(+) T(reg) cells.

  13. Severe Developmental B Lymphopoietic Defects in Foxp3-Deficient Mice are Refractory to Adoptive Regulatory T Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Riewaldt, Julia; Düber, Sandra; Boernert, Marie; Krey, Martina; Dembinski, Marcin; Weiss, Siegfried; Garbe, Annette I.; Kretschmer, Karsten

    2012-01-01

    The role of Foxp3-expressing regulatory T (Treg) cells in tolerance and autoimmunity is well-established. However, although of considerable clinical interest, the role of Treg cells in the regulation of hematopoietic homeostasis remains poorly understood. Thus, we analysed B and T lymphopoiesis in the scurfy (Sf) mouse model of Treg cell deficiency. In these experiments, the near-complete block of B lymphopoiesis in the BM of adolescent Sf mice was attributed to autoimmune T cells. We could exclude a constitutive lympho-hematopoietic defect or a B cell-intrinsic function of Foxp3. Efficient B cell development in the BM early in ontogeny and pronounced extramedullary B lymphopoietic activity resulted in a peripheral pool of mature B cells in adolescent Sf mice. However, marginal zone B and B-1a cells were absent throughout ontogeny. Developmental B lymphopoietic defects largely correlated with defective thymopoiesis. Importantly, neonatal adoptive Treg cell therapy suppressed exacerbated production of inflammatory cytokines and restored thymopoiesis but was ineffective in recovering defective B lymphopoiesis, probably due to a failure to compensate production of stroma cell-derived IL-7 and CXCL12. Our observations on autoimmune-mediated incapacitation of the BM environment in Foxp3-deficient mice will have direct implications for the rational design of BM transplantation protocols for patients with severe genetic deficiencies in functional Foxp3+ Treg cells. PMID:22679447

  14. Role of memory T cell subsets for adoptive immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Busch, Dirk H; Fräßle, Simon P; Sommermeyer, Daniel; Buchholz, Veit R; Riddell, Stanley R

    2016-02-01

    Adoptive transfer of primary (unmodified) or genetically engineered antigen-specific T cells has demonstrated astonishing clinical results in the treatment of infections and some malignancies. Besides the definition of optimal targets and antigen receptors, the differentiation status of transferred T cells is emerging as a crucial parameter for generating cell products with optimal efficacy and safety profiles. Long-living memory T cells subdivide into phenotypically as well as functionally different subsets (e.g. central memory, effector memory, tissue-resident memory T cells). This diversification process is crucial for effective immune protection, with probably distinct dependencies on the presence of individual subsets dependent on the disease to which the immune response is directed as well as its organ location. Adoptive T cell therapy intends to therapeutically transfer defined T cell immunity into patients. Efficacy of this approach often requires long-term maintenance of transferred cells, which depends on the presence and persistence of memory T cells. However, engraftment and survival of highly differentiated memory T cell subsets upon adoptive transfer is still difficult to achieve. Therefore, the recent observation that a distinct subset of weakly differentiated memory T cells shows all characteristics of adult tissue stem cells and can reconstitute all types of effector and memory T cell subsets, became highly relevant. We here review our current understanding of memory subset formation and T cell subset purification, and its implications for adoptive immunotherapy.

  15. Feasibility of Telomerase-Specific Adoptive T-cell Therapy for B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia and Solid Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Sandri, Sara; Bobisse, Sara; Moxley, Kelly; Lamolinara, Alessia; De Sanctis, Francesco; Boschi, Federico; Sbarbati, Andrea; Fracasso, Giulio; Ferrarini, Giovanna; Hendriks, Rudi W; Cavallini, Chiara; Scupoli, Maria Teresa; Sartoris, Silvia; Iezzi, Manuela; Nishimura, Michael I; Bronte, Vincenzo; Ugel, Stefano

    2016-05-01

    Telomerase (TERT) is overexpressed in 80% to 90% of primary tumors and contributes to sustaining the transformed phenotype. The identification of several TERT epitopes in tumor cells has elevated the status of TERT as a potential universal target for selective and broad adoptive immunotherapy. TERT-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) have been detected in the peripheral blood of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) patients, but display low functional avidity, which limits their clinical utility in adoptive cell transfer approaches. To overcome this key obstacle hindering effective immunotherapy, we isolated an HLA-A2-restricted T-cell receptor (TCR) with high avidity for human TERT from vaccinated HLA-A*0201 transgenic mice. Using several relevant humanized mouse models, we demonstrate that TCR-transduced T cells were able to control human B-CLL progression in vivo and limited tumor growth in several human, solid transplantable cancers. TERT-based adoptive immunotherapy selectively eliminated tumor cells, failed to trigger a self-MHC-restricted fratricide of T cells, and was associated with toxicity against mature granulocytes, but not toward human hematopoietic progenitors in humanized immune reconstituted mice. These data support the feasibility of TERT-based adoptive immunotherapy in clinical oncology, highlighting, for the first time, the possibility of utilizing a high-avidity TCR specific for human TERT. Cancer Res; 76(9); 2540-51. ©2016 AACR.

  16. Serial Low Doses of Sorafenib Enhance Therapeutic Efficacy of Adoptive T Cell Therapy in a Murine Model by Improving Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ren-Shyan; Hwang, Jeng-Jong

    2014-01-01

    Requirements of large numbers of transferred T cells and various immunosuppressive factors and cells in the tumor microenvironment limit the applications of adoptive T cells therapy (ACT) in clinic. Accumulating evidences show that chemotherapeutic drugs could act as immune supportive instead of immunosuppressive agents when proper dosage is used, and combined with immunotherapy often results in better treatment outcomes than monotherapy. Controversial immunomodulation effects of sorafenib, a multi-kinases inhibitor, at high and low doses have been reported in several types of cancer. However, what is the range of the low-dose sorafenib will influence the host immunity and responses of ACT is still ambiguous. Here we used a well-established E.G7/OT-1 murine model to understand the effects of serial low doses of sorafenib on both tumor microenvironment and transferred CD8+ T cells and the underlying mechanisms. Sorafenib lowered the expressions of immunosuppressive factors, and enhanced functions and migrations of transferred CD8+ T cells through inhibition of STAT3 and other immunosuppressive factors. CD8+ T cells were transduced with granzyme B promoter for driving imaging reporters to visualize the activation and distribution of transferred CD8+ T cells prior to adoptive transfer. Better activations of CD8+ T cells and tumor inhibitions were found in the combinational group compared with CD8+ T cells or sorafenib alone groups. Not only immunosuppressive factors but myeloid derived suppressive cells (MDSCs) and regulatory T cells (Tregs) were decreased in sorafenib-treated group, indicating that augmentation of tumor inhibition and function of CD8+ T cells by serial low doses of sorafenib were via reversing the immunosuppressive microenvironment. These results revealed that the tumor inhibitions of sorafenib not only through eradicating tumor cells but modifying tumor microenvironment, which helps outcomes of ACT significantly. PMID:25333973

  17. Post-transplant adoptive T-cell immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Aqui, Nicole A.; June, Carl H.

    2008-01-01

    Immune reconstitution following haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (SCT) is an often slow and incomplete process that leads to increased risk of infection and malignant disease. Immunization in SCT is frequently unsuccessful due to the prolonged lymphopenia, especially of CD4 T cells, seen following transplant. The transfusion of T cells, also called ‘adoptive T-cell therapy’, has the potential to enhance anti-tumour and overall immunity, and augment vaccine efficacy in the post-transplant setting. Recent advances in tissue culture, cellular immunology and tumour biology are guiding new approaches to adoptive T-cell therapy. This chapter will discuss the challenges that face the field before adoptive T-cell therapy can be translated into routine clinical practice. PMID:18790452

  18. The use of endogenous T cells for adoptive transfer.

    PubMed

    Yee, Cassian

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive T-cell therapy involves the ex vivo enrichment and expansion of tumor-reactive T cells for infusion. As an immune-based approach, adoptive therapy has become an increasingly attractive modality for the treatment of patients with cancer due to its potential for high specificity, non-cross resistance with conventional therapies, and promise of long-term immunoprotection. In recent years, a resurgence in discoveries underlying T-cell recognition, tumor immune evasion, and T-cell memory and differentiation coupled with the development of several enabling technologies have facilitated a renewed focus in the field of adoptive therapy and its transition to the clinical arena as a treatment modality for patients with cancer. In this review, endogenous T cells derived from peripheral blood or tumor sites will be presented as a source of effector cells for adoptive therapy and strategies to isolate, manipulate, and enhance the function of antigen-specific T cells in vitro and to augment their in vivo efficacy and persistence by host immunomodulation are presented in the context of an ever-increasing inventory of preclinical and clinically available reagents. Optimizing the combination of adoptive cellular therapy and other immune-based and conventional approaches will herald a new generation of research and clinical opportunities for cancer immunotherapy.

  19. Phenotype and function of T cells infiltrating visceral metastases from gastrointestinal cancers and melanoma: implications for adoptive cell transfer therapy.

    PubMed

    Turcotte, Simon; Gros, Alena; Hogan, Katherine; Tran, Eric; Hinrichs, Christian S; Wunderlich, John R; Dudley, Mark E; Rosenberg, Steven A

    2013-09-01

    Adoptive cell transfer of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) can mediate cancer regression in patients with metastatic melanoma, but whether this approach can be applied to common epithelial malignancies remains unclear. In this study, we compared the phenotype and function of TILs derived from liver and lung metastases from patients with gastrointestinal (GI) cancers (n = 14) or melanoma (n = 42). Fewer CD3(+) T cells were found to infiltrate GI compared with melanoma metastases, but the proportions of CD8(+) cells, T cell differentiation stage, and expression of costimulatory molecules were similar for both tumor types. Clinical-scale expansion up to ~50 × 10(9) T cells on average was obtained for all patients with GI cancer and melanoma. From GI tumors, however, TIL outgrowth in high-dose IL-2 yielded 22 ± 1.4% CD3(+)CD8(+) cells compared with 63 ± 2.4% from melanoma (p < 0.001). IFN-γ ELISA demonstrated MHC class I-mediated reactivity of TIL against autologous tumor in 5 of 7 GI cancer patients tested (9% of 188 distinct TIL cultures) and in 9 of 10 melanoma patients (43% of 246 distinct TIL cultures). In these assays, MHC class I-mediated up-regulation of CD137 (4-1BB) expression on CD8(+) cells suggested that 0-3% of TILs expanded from GI cancer metastases were tumor-reactive. This study implies that the main challenge to the development of TIL adoptive cell transfer for metastatic GI cancers may not be the in vitro expansion of bulk TILs, but the ability to select and enrich for tumor-reactive T cells.

  20. Design of T cell receptor libraries with diverse binding properties to examine adoptive T cell responses

    PubMed Central

    Chervin, A.S.; Stone, J.D.; Soto, C.M.; Engels, B.; Schreiber, H.; Roy, E.J.; Kranz, D.M.

    2017-01-01

    Adoptive T cell therapies have shown significant promise in the treatment of cancer and viral diseases. One approach, that introduces antigen-specific T cell receptors (TCRs) into ex vivo activated T cells, is designed to overcome central tolerance mechanisms that prevent responses by endogenous T cell repertoires. Studies have suggested that use of higher affinity TCRs against class I MHC antigens could drive the activity of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, but the rules that govern the TCR binding optimal for in vivo activity are unknown. Here we describe a high-throughput platform of “reverse biochemistry” whereby a library of TCRs with a wide range of binding properties to the same antigen is introduced into T cells and adoptively transferred into mice with antigen-positive tumors. Extraction of RNA from tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes or lymphoid organs allowed high-throughput sequencing to determine which TCRs were selected in vivo. The results showed that CD8+ T cells expressing the highest affinity TCR variants were deleted in both the tumor infiltrating lymphocyte population and in peripheral lymphoid tissues. In contrast, these same high-affinity TCR variants were preferentially expressed within CD4+ T cells in the tumor, suggesting they played a role in antigen-specific tumor control. The findings thus revealed that the affinity of the transduced TCRs controlled the survival and tumor infiltration of the transferred T cells. Accordingly, the TCR library strategy enables rapid assessment of TCR binding properties that promote peripheral T cell survival and tumor elimination. PMID:23052828

  1. T Cells Redirected to a Minor Histocompatibility Antigen Instruct Intratumoral TNFα Expression and Empower Adoptive Cell Therapy for Solid Tumors.

    PubMed

    Manzo, Teresa; Sturmheit, Tabea; Basso, Veronica; Petrozziello, Elisabetta; Hess Michelini, Rodrigo; Riba, Michela; Freschi, Massimo; Elia, Angela R; Grioni, Matteo; Curnis, Flavio; Protti, Maria Pia; Schumacher, Ton N; Debets, Reno; Swartz, Melody A; Corti, Angelo; Bellone, Matteo; Mondino, Anna

    2017-02-01

    Donor-derived allogeneic T cells evoke potent graft versus tumor (GVT) effects likely due to the simultaneous recognition of tumor-specific and host-restricted minor histocompatibility (H) antigens. Here we investigated whether such effects could be reproduced in autologous settings by TCR gene-engineered lymphocytes. We report that T cells redirected either to a broadly expressed Y-encoded minor H antigen or to a tumor-associated antigen, although poorly effective if individually transferred, when simultaneously administered enabled acute autochthonous tumor debulking and resulted in durable clinical remission. Y-redirected T cells proved hyporesponsive in peripheral lymphoid organs, whereas they retained effector function at the tumor site, where in synergy with tumor-redirected lymphocytes, they instructed TNFα expression, endothelial cell activation, and intratumoral T-cell infiltration. While neutralizing TNFα hindered GVT effects by the combined T-cell infusion, a single injection of picogram amounts of NGR-TNF, a tumor vessel-targeted TNFα derivative currently in phase III clinical trials, substituted for Y-redirected cells and enabled tumor debulking by tumor-redirected lymphocytes. Together, our results provide new mechanistic insights into allogeneic GVT, validate the importance of targeting the tumor and its associated stroma, and prove the potency of a novel combined approach suitable for immediate clinical implementation. Cancer Res; 77(3); 658-71. ©2016 AACR.

  2. The immunosuppressive effects of phthalocyanine photodynamic therapy in mice are mediated by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and can be adoptively transferred to naive recipients.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, Nabiha; Katiyar, Santosh K; Elmets, Craig A

    2008-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising treatment modality for malignant tumors but it is also immunosuppressive which may reduce its therapeutic efficacy. The purpose of our study was to elucidate the role of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in PDT immunosuppression. Using silicon phthalocyanine 4 (Pc4) as photosensitizer, nontumor-bearing CD4 knockout (CD4-/-) mice and their wild type (WT) counterparts were subjected to Pc4-PDT in a manner identical to that used for tumor regression (1 cm spot size, 0.5 mg kg(-1) Pc4, 110 J cm(-2) light) to assess the effect of Pc4-PDT on cell-mediated immunity. There was a decrease in immunosuppression in CD4-/- mice compared with WT mice. We next examined the role of CD8+ T cells in Pc4-PDT-induced immunosuppression using CD8-/- mice following the same treatment regimen used for CD4-/- mice. Similar to CD4-/- mice, CD8-/- mice exhibited less immunosuppression than WT mice. Pc4-PDT-induced immunosuppression could be adoptively transferred with spleen cells from Pc4-PDT treated donor mice to syngenic naive recipients (P < 0.05) and was mediated primarily by T cells, although macrophages were also found to play a role. Procedures that limit PDT-induced immunosuppression but do not affect PDT-induced regression of tumors may prove superior to PDT alone in promoting long-term antitumor responses.

  3. T cell receptor repertoires after adoptive transfer of expanded allogeneic regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Theil, A; Wilhelm, C; Kuhn, M; Petzold, A; Tuve, S; Oelschlägel, U; Dahl, A; Bornhäuser, M; Bonifacio, E; Eugster, A

    2017-02-01

    Regulatory T cell (Treg ) therapy has been exploited in autoimmune disease, solid organ transplantation and in efforts to prevent or treat graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). However, our knowledge on the in-vivo persistence of transfused Treg is limited. Whether Treg transfusion leads to notable changes in the overall Treg repertoire or whether longevity of Treg in the periphery is restricted to certain clones is unknown. Here we use T cell receptor alpha chain sequencing (TCR-α-NGS) to monitor changes in the repertoire of Treg upon polyclonal expansion and after subsequent adoptive transfer. We applied TCR-α-NGS to samples from two patients with chronic GVHD who received comparable doses of stem cell donor derived expanded Treg . We found that in-vitro polyclonal expansion led to notable repertoire changes in vitro and that Treg cell therapy altered the peripheral Treg repertoire considerably towards that of the infused cell product, to different degrees, in each patient. Clonal changes in the peripheral blood were transient and correlated well with the clinical parameters. We suggest that T cell clonotype analyses using TCR sequencing should be considered as a means to monitor longevity and fate of adoptively transferred T cells.

  4. T cell receptor (TCR)-transgenic CD8 lymphocytes rendered insensitive to transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) signaling mediate superior tumor regression in an animal model of adoptive cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Tumor antigen-reactive T cells must enter into an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment, continue to produce cytokine and deliver apoptotic death signals to affect tumor regression. Many tumors produce transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ), which inhibits T cell activation, proliferation and cytotoxicity. In a murine model of adoptive cell therapy, we demonstrate that transgenic Pmel-1 CD8 T cells, rendered insensitive to TGFβ by transduction with a TGFβ dominant negative receptor II (DN), were more effective in mediating regression of established B16 melanoma. Smaller numbers of DN Pmel-1 T cells effectively mediated tumor regression and retained the ability to produce interferon-γ in the tumor microenvironment. These results support efforts to incorporate this DN receptor in clinical trials of adoptive cell therapy for cancer. PMID:22713761

  5. Adoptive transfer of Aspergillus-specific T cells as a novel anti-fungal therapy for hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients: Progress and challenges.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulou, Anastasia; Kaloyannidis, Panayotis; Yannaki, Evangelia; Cruz, Conrad Russell

    2016-02-01

    Although newer antifungal drugs have substantially altered the natural history of invasive aspergillosis, the disease still accounts for significant morbidity and mortality in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. Both the evidence supporting a protective role of T cells against this fungal pathogen and the documented efficacy of adoptive transfer of antigen-specific T cells for prophylaxis and treatment of viral infections post-transplant have stimulated much interest towards development of Aspergillus-specific T cells (Asp-STs) for adoptive immunotherapy in the allogeneic transplant setting. In contrast to the remarkable progress with virus-specific T cells, clinical development of fungus-specific T cells is still in its infancy. Several groups have characterized Asp-STs in healthy individuals and patients with malignant hematological diseases, while others sought to develop GMP-compliant methods of expanding or bioengineering Asp-STs ex vivo as immunotherapy. This review highlights the recent advances in this field, and discusses critical issues involved in development and protocol design of Asp-ST immunotherapy.

  6. CD3ζ-based chimeric antigen receptors mediate T cell activation via cis- and trans-signalling mechanisms: implications for optimization of receptor structure for adoptive cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Bridgeman, J S; Ladell, K; Sheard, V E; Miners, K; Hawkins, R E; Price, D A; Gilham, D E

    2014-02-01

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) can mediate redirected lysis of tumour cells in a major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-independent manner, thereby enabling autologous adoptive T cell therapy for a variety of malignant neoplasms. Currently, most CARs incorporate the T cell receptor (TCR) CD3ζ signalling chain; however, the precise mechanisms responsible for CAR-mediated T cell activation are unclear. In this study, we used a series of immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-mutant and transmembrane-modified receptors to demonstrate that CARs activate T cells both directly via the antigen-ligated signalling chain and indirectly via associated chains within the TCR complex. These observations allowed us to generate new receptors capable of eliciting polyfunctional responses in primary human T cells. This work increases our understanding of CAR function and identifies new avenues for the optimization of CAR-based therapeutic interventions.

  7. Safe engineering of CAR T cells for adoptive cell therapy of cancer using long-term episomal gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Jin, Chuan; Fotaki, Grammatiki; Ramachandran, Mohanraj; Nilsson, Berith; Essand, Magnus; Yu, Di

    2016-07-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy is a new successful treatment for refractory B-cell leukemia. Successful therapeutic outcome depends on long-term expression of CAR transgene in T cells, which is achieved by delivering transgene using integrating gamma retrovirus (RV) or lentivirus (LV). However, uncontrolled RV/LV integration in host cell genomes has the potential risk of causing insertional mutagenesis. Herein, we describe a novel episomal long-term cell engineering method using non-integrating lentiviral (NILV) vector containing a scaffold/matrix attachment region (S/MAR) element, for either expression of transgenes or silencing of target genes. The insertional events of this vector into the genome of host cells are below detection level. CD19 CAR T cells engineered with a NILV-S/MAR vector have similar levels of CAR expression as T cells engineered with an integrating LV vector, even after numerous rounds of cell division. NILV-S/MAR-engineered CD19 CAR T cells exhibited similar cytotoxic capacity upon CD19(+) target cell recognition as LV-engineered T cells and are as effective in controlling tumor growth in vivo We propose that NILV-S/MAR vectors are superior to current options as they enable long-term transgene expression without the risk of insertional mutagenesis and genotoxicity.

  8. Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cell Therapy in Hematology.

    PubMed

    Ataca, Pınar; Arslan, Önder

    2015-12-01

    It is well demonstrated that the immune system can control and eliminate cancer cells. Immune-mediated elimination of tumor cells has been discovered and is the basis of both cancer vaccines and cellular therapies including hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Adoptive T cell transfer has been improved to be more specific and potent and to cause less off-target toxicity. Currently, there are two forms of engineered T cells being tested in clinical trials: T cell receptor (TCR) and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) modified T cells. On 1 July 2014, the United States Food and Drug Administration granted 'breakthrough therapy' designation to anti-CD19 CAR T cell therapy. Many studies were conducted to evaluate the benefits of this exciting and potent new treatment modality. This review summarizes the history of adoptive immunotherapy, adoptive immunotherapy using CARs, the CAR manufacturing process, preclinical and clinical studies, and the effectiveness and drawbacks of this strategy.

  9. Adoptive immunotherapy for cancer: harnessing the T cell response.

    PubMed

    Restifo, Nicholas P; Dudley, Mark E; Rosenberg, Steven A

    2012-03-22

    Immunotherapy based on the adoptive transfer of naturally occurring or gene-engineered T cells can mediate tumour regression in patients with metastatic cancer. Here, we discuss progress in the use of adoptively transferred T cells, focusing on how they can mediate tumour cell eradication. Recent advances include more accurate targeting of antigens expressed by tumours and the associated vasculature, and the successful use of gene engineering to re-target T cells before their transfer into the patient. We also describe how new research has helped to identify the particular T cell subsets that can most effectively promote tumour eradication.

  10. Innovative T Cell-Targeted Therapy for Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    TERMS ROR1, γδ T cells, adoptive T cell therapy, ovarian cancer, chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF...to recognize EBV and ovarian CA cells • Generate EBV -specific T cells LCL (Mos. 1-2) • Refine c-Met-specific CAR and propagate c-Met-specific T...cells on K562-derived artificial antigen presenting cells (Mos. 1-2) • Generate EBV and c-Met-bi-specific T cells (Mos. 2-6) • Functional analysis

  11. Adoptive Immunotherapy For Leukemia With Ex vivo Expanded T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Conrad Russell Y.; Bollard, Catherine M.

    2016-01-01

    The development of novel T cell therapies to target leukemia has facilitated the translation of this approach for hematologic malignancies. Different methods of manufacturing leukemia-specific T cells have evolved, along with additional measures to increase the safety of this therapy. This is an overview of expanded T cell therapeutics with a focus on how the manufacturing strategies have been refined, and where the research is heading. PMID:26648070

  12. Targeting STAT3 in adoptively transferred T cells promotes their in vivo expansion and antitumor effects

    PubMed Central

    Kujawski, Maciej; Zhang, Chunyan; Herrmann, Andreas; Reckamp, Karen; Scuto, Anna; Jensen, Michael; Deng, Jiehui; Forman, Stephen; Figlin, Robert; Yu, Hua

    2010-01-01

    Adoptive cell therapy with engineered T cells to improve natural immune response and antitumor functions has shown promise for treating cancer. However, the requirement for extensive ex vivo manipulation of T cells and the immunosuppressive effects of the tumor microenvironment limit this therapeutic modality. In the present study, we investigated the possibility to circumvent these limitations by engineering Stat3-deficient CD8+ T cells or by targeting Stat3 in the tumor microenvironment. We show that ablating Stat3 in CD8+ T cells prior to their transfer allows their efficient tumor infiltration and robust proliferation, resulting in increased tumor antigen-specific T cell activity and tumor growth inhibition. For potential clinical translation, we combined adoptive T cell therapy with an FDA-approved tyrosine kinase inhibitor, sunitinib, in renal cell carcinoma and melanoma tumor models. Sunitinib inhibited Stat3 in dendritic cells and T cells, reduced conversion of transferred Foxp3− T cells to tumor-associated T regulatory cells while increasing transferred CD8+ T cell infiltration and activation at the tumor site, leading to inhibition of primary tumor growth. These data demonstrate that adoptively transferred T cells can be expanded and activated in vivo either by engineering Stat3 silenced T cells or by targeting Stat3 systemically with small-molecule inhibitors. PMID:21118964

  13. Genetically Modified T-Cell-Based Adoptive Immunotherapy in Hematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Baixin; Gao, Qingping; Wang, Qiongyu; Zeng, Zhi

    2017-01-01

    A significant proportion of hematological malignancies remain limited in treatment options. Immune system modulation serves as a promising therapeutic approach to eliminate malignant cells. Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) play a central role in antitumor immunity; unfortunately, nonspecific approaches for targeted recognition of tumor cells by CTLs to mediate tumor immune evasion in hematological malignancies imply multiple mechanisms, which may or may not be clinically relevant. Recently, genetically modified T-cell-based adoptive immunotherapy approaches, including chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy and engineered T-cell receptor (TCR) T-cell therapy, promise to overcome immune evasion by redirecting the specificity of CTLs to tumor cells. In clinic trials, CAR-T-cell- and TCR-T-cell-based adoptive immunotherapy have produced encouraging clinical outcomes, thereby demonstrating their therapeutic potential in mitigating tumor development. The purpose of the present review is to (1) provide a detailed overview of the multiple mechanisms for immune evasion related with T-cell-based therapies; (2) provide a current summary of the applications of CAR-T-cell- as well as neoantigen-specific TCR-T-cell-based adoptive immunotherapy and routes taken to overcome immune evasion; and (3) evaluate alternative approaches targeting immune evasion via optimization of CAR-T and TCR-T-cell immunotherapies. PMID:28116322

  14. Improve T Cell Therapy in Neuroblastoma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-10-1-0425 TITLE: Improve T Cell Therapy in Neuroblastoma ...2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Improve T Cell Therapy in Neuroblastoma 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-10-1-0425 5c. PROGRAM...AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Approved for Public Release; Distribution Unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Neuroblastoma (NB) is

  15. Monoclonal T-cell receptors: new reagents for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Stauss, Hans J; Cesco-Gaspere, Michela; Thomas, Sharyn; Hart, Daniel P; Xue, Shao-An; Holler, Angelika; Wright, Graham; Perro, Mario; Little, Ann-Margaret; Pospori, Constantina; King, Judy; Morris, Emma C

    2007-10-01

    Adoptive transfer of antigen-specific T lymphocytes is an effective form of immunotherapy for persistent virus infections and cancer. A major limitation of adoptive therapy is the inability to isolate antigen-specific T lymphocytes reproducibly. The demonstration that cloned T-cell receptor (TCR) genes can be used to produce T lymphocyte populations of desired specificity offers new opportunities for antigen-specific T-cell therapy. TCR gene-modified lymphocytes display antigen-specific function in vitro, and were shown to protect against virus infection and tumor growth in animal models. A recent trial in humans demonstrated that TCR gene-modified T cells persisted in all and reduced melanoma burden in 2/15 patients. In future trials, it may be possible to use TCR gene transfer to equip helper and cytotoxic T cells with new antigen-specificity, allowing both T-cell subsets to cooperate in achieving improved clinical responses. Sequence modifications of TCR genes are being explored to enhance TCR surface expression, while minimizing the risk of pairing between introduced and endogenous TCR chains. Current T-cell transduction protocols that trigger T-cell differentiation need to be modified to generate "undifferentiated" T cells, which, upon adoptive transfer, display improved in vivo expansion and survival. Both, expression of only the introduced TCR chains and the production of naïve T cells may be possible in the future by TCR gene transfer into stem cells.

  16. T-cell-based Immunotherapy: Adoptive Cell Transfer and Checkpoint Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Houot, Roch; Schultz, Liora Michal; Marabelle, Aurélien; Kohrt, Holbrook

    2015-10-01

    Tumor immunotherapy has had demonstrable efficacy in patients with cancer. The most promising results have been with T-cell-based therapies. These include adoptive cell transfer of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, genetically engineered T cells, and immune checkpoint inhibitor antibodies. In this review, we describe the different T-cell-based strategies currently in clinical trials and put their applications, present and future, into perspective.

  17. BET bromodomain inhibition enhances T cell persistence and function in adoptive immunotherapy models

    PubMed Central

    Kagoya, Yuki; Nakatsugawa, Munehide; Yamashita, Yuki; Ochi, Toshiki; Guo, Tingxi; Anczurowski, Mark; Saso, Kayoko; Butler, Marcus O.; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy is a potentially curative therapeutic approach for patients with advanced cancer. However, the in vitro expansion of antitumor T cells prior to infusion inevitably incurs differentiation towards effector T cells and impairs persistence following adoptive transfer. Epigenetic profiles regulate gene expression of key transcription factors over the course of immune cell differentiation, proliferation, and function. Using comprehensive screening of chemical probes with defined epigenetic targets, we found that JQ1, an inhibitor of bromodomain and extra-terminal motif (BET) proteins, maintained CD8+ T cells with functional properties of stem cell–like and central memory T cells. Mechanistically, the BET protein BRD4 directly regulated expression of the transcription factor BATF in CD8+ T cells, which was associated with differentiation of T cells into an effector memory phenotype. JQ1-treated T cells showed enhanced persistence and antitumor effects in murine T cell receptor and chimeric antigen receptor gene therapy models. Furthermore, we found that histone acetyltransferase p300 supported the recruitment of BRD4 to the BATF promoter region, and p300 inhibition similarly augmented antitumor effects of the adoptively transferred T cells. These results demonstrate that targeting the BRD4-p300 signaling cascade supports the generation of superior antitumor T cell grafts for adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:27548527

  18. Myeloid-derived suppressor cell impact on endogenous and adoptively transferred T cells.

    PubMed

    Arina, Ainhoa; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2015-04-01

    Novel models of autochthonous tumorigenesis and adoptive T cell therapy (ATT) are providing new clues regarding the pro-tumorigenic and immunosuppressive effects of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), and their interaction with T cells. New findings are shifting the perception of the main level at which MDSC act, from direct cell-to-cell suppression to others, such as limiting T cell infiltration. Adoptively transferred, high-avidity T cells recognizing peptides with high-affinity for MHC-I eliminated large tumors. However, low-avidity T cells or low-affinity peptides resulted in failure to eradicate tumors. Manipulation of intratumoral myeloid cells improved the outcome of otherwise unsuccessful ATT. Therefore, therapeutic intervention directed at the tumor stroma might be required when using suboptimal T cells for ATT.

  19. WT1-specific T cell receptor gene therapy: improving TCR function in transduced T cells.

    PubMed

    Stauss, Hans J; Thomas, Sharyn; Cesco-Gaspere, Michela; Hart, Daniel P; Xue, Shao-An; Holler, Angelika; King, Judy; Wright, Graham; Perro, Mario; Pospori, Constantina; Morris, Emma

    2008-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of antigen-specific T lymphocytes is an attractive form of immunotherapy for haematological malignancies and cancer. The difficulty of isolating antigen-specific T lymphocytes for individual patients limits the more widespread use of adoptive T cell therapy. The demonstration that cloned T cell receptor (TCR) genes can be used to produce T lymphocyte populations of desired specificity offers new opportunities for antigen-specific T cell therapy. The first trial in humans demonstrated that TCR gene-modified T cells persisted for an extended time period and reduced tumor burden in some patients. The WT1 protein is an attractive target for immunotherapy of leukemia and solid cancer since elevated expression has been demonstrated in AML, CML, MDS and in breast, colon and ovarian cancer. In the past, we have isolated high avidity CTL specific for a WT1-derived peptide presented by HLA-A2 and cloned the TCR alpha and beta genes of a WT1-specific CTL line. The genes were inserted into retroviral vectors for transduction of human peripheral blood T lymphocytes of leukemia patients and normal donors. The treatment of leukemia-bearing NOD/SCID mice with T cells transduced with the WT1-specific TCR eliminated leukemia cells in the bone marrow of most mice, while treatment with T cells transduced with a TCR of irrelevant specificity did not diminish the leukemia burden. In order to improve the safety and efficacy of TCR gene therapy, we have developed lentiviral TCR gene transfer. In addition, we employed strategies to enhance TCR expression while avoiding TCR mis-pairing. It may be possible to generate dominant TCR constructs that can suppress the expression of the endogenous TCR on the surface of transduced T cells. The development of new TCR gene constructs holds great promise for the safe and effective delivery of TCR gene therapy for the treatment of malignancies.

  20. Prospects and limitations of T cell receptor gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Jorritsma, Annelies; Schotte, Remko; Coccoris, Miriam; de Witte, Moniek A; Schumacher, Ton N M

    2011-08-01

    Adoptive transfer of antigen-specific T cells is an attractive means to provide cancer patients with immune cells of a desired specificity and the efficacy of such adoptive transfers has been demonstrated in several clinical trials. Because the T cell receptor is the single specificity-determining molecule in T cell function, adoptive transfer of TCR genes into patient T cells may be used as an alternative approach for the transfer of tumor-specific T cell immunity. On theoretical grounds, TCR gene therapy has two substantial advantages over conventional cellular transfer. First, it circumvents the demanding process of in vitro generation of large numbers of specific immune cells. Second, it allows the use of a set of particularly effective TCR genes in large patient groups. Conversely, TCR gene therapy may be associated with a number of specific problems that are not confronted during classical cellular therapy. Here we review our current understanding of the potential and possible problems of TCR gene therapy, as based on in vitro experiments, mouse model systems and phase I clinical trials. Furthermore, we discuss the prospects of widespread clinical application of this gene therapy approach for the treatment of human cancer.

  1. Dynamic imaging for CAR-T-cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Emami-Shahri, Nia; Papa, Sophie

    2016-04-15

    Chimaeric antigen receptor (CAR) therapy is entering the mainstream for the treatment of CD19(+)cancers. As is does we learn more about resistance to therapy and the role, risks and management of toxicity. In solid tumour CAR therapy research the route to the clinic is less smooth with a wealth of challenges facing translating this, potentially hugely valuable, therapeutic option for patients. As we strive to understand our successes, and navigate the challenges, having a clear understanding of how adoptively transferred CAR-T-cells behavein vivoand in human trials is invaluable. Harnessing reporter gene imaging to enable detection and tracking of small numbers of CAR-T-cells after adoptive transfer is one way by which we can accomplish this. The compatibility of certain reporter gene systems with tracers available routinely in the clinic makes this approach highly useful for future appraisal of CAR-T-cell success in humans.

  2. Adoptive transfer of effector CD8+ T cells derived from central memory cells establishes persistent T cell memory in primates.

    PubMed

    Berger, Carolina; Jensen, Michael C; Lansdorp, Peter M; Gough, Mike; Elliott, Carole; Riddell, Stanley R

    2008-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of antigen-specific T cells that have been expanded ex vivo is being actively pursued to treat infections and malignancy in humans. The T cell populations that are available for adoptive immunotherapy include both effector memory and central memory cells, and these differ in phenotype, function, and homing. The efficacy of adoptive immunotherapy requires that transferred T cells persist in vivo, but identifying T cells that can reproducibly survive in vivo after they have been numerically expanded by in vitro culture has proven difficult. Here we show that in macaques, antigen-specific CD8(+) T cell clones derived from central memory T cells, but not effector memory T cells, persisted long-term in vivo, reacquired phenotypic and functional properties of memory T cells, and occupied memory T cell niches. These results demonstrate that clonally derived CD8+ T cells isolated from central memory T cells are distinct from those derived from effector memory T cells and retain an intrinsic capacity that enables them to survive after adoptive transfer and revert to the memory cell pool. These results could have significant implications for the selection of T cells to expand or to engineer for adoptive immunotherapy of human infections or malignancy.

  3. Improve T Cell Therapy in Neuroblastoma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    transfer of Epstein - Barr - virus (EBV)-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (EBV- CTLs) genetically modified to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR-GD2...4 Introduction. In our recent Phase I study we found that the adoptive transfer of Epstein - Barr - virus (EBV...specific aims. 8 Reference List 1. Pule MA, Savoldo B, Myers GD et al. Virus -specific T cells

  4. Adoptively transferred TRAIL+ T cells suppress GVHD and augment antitumor activity

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arnab; Dogan, Yildirim; Moroz, Maxim; Holland, Amanda M.; Yim, Nury L.; Rao, Uttam K.; Young, Lauren F.; Tannenbaum, Daniel; Masih, Durva; Velardi, Enrico; Tsai, Jennifer J.; Jenq, Robert R.; Penack, Olaf; Hanash, Alan M.; Smith, Odette M.; Piersanti, Kelly; Lezcano, Cecilia; Murphy, George F.; Liu, Chen; Palomba, M. Lia; Sauer, Martin G.; Sadelain, Michel; Ponomarev, Vladimir; van den Brink, Marcel R.M.

    2013-01-01

    Current strategies to suppress graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) also compromise graft-versus-tumor (GVT) responses. Furthermore, most experimental strategies to separate GVHD and GVT responses merely spare GVT function without actually enhancing it. We have previously shown that endogenously expressed TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is required for optimal GVT activity against certain malignancies in recipients of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT). In order to model a donor-derived cellular therapy, we genetically engineered T cells to overexpress TRAIL and adoptively transferred donor-type unsorted TRAIL+ T cells into mouse models of allo-HSCT. We found that murine TRAIL+ T cells induced apoptosis of alloreactive T cells, thereby reducing GVHD in a DR5-dependent manner. Furthermore, murine TRAIL+ T cells mediated enhanced in vitro and in vivo antilymphoma GVT response. Moreover, human TRAIL+ T cells mediated enhanced in vitro cytotoxicity against both human leukemia cell lines and against freshly isolated chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells. Finally, as a model of off-the-shelf, donor-unrestricted antitumor cellular therapy, in vitro–generated TRAIL+ precursor T cells from third-party donors also mediated enhanced GVT response in the absence of GVHD. These data indicate that TRAIL-overexpressing donor T cells could potentially enhance the curative potential of allo-HSCT by increasing GVT response and suppressing GVHD. PMID:23676461

  5. CAR-T Cell Therapy for Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Carlos A; Heslop, Helen E; Brenner, Malcolm K

    2016-01-01

    Lymphomas arise from clonal expansions of B, T, or NK cells at different stages of differentiation. Because they occur in the immunocyte-rich lymphoid tissues, they are easily accessible to antibodies and cell-based immunotherapy. Expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) on T cells is a means of combining the antigen-binding site of a monoclonal antibody with the activating machinery of a T cell, enabling antigen recognition independent of major histocompatibility complex restriction, while retaining the desirable antitumor properties of a T cell. Here, we discuss the basic design of CARs and their potential advantages and disadvantages over other immune therapies for lymphomas. We review current clinical trials in the field and consider strategies to improve the in vivo function and safety of immune cells expressing CARs. The ultimate driver of CAR development and implementation for lymphoma will be the demonstration of their ability to safely and cost-effectively cure these malignancies.

  6. CAR-T Cell Therapy for Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Carlos A.; Heslop, Helen E.; Brenner, Malcolm K.

    2016-01-01

    Lymphomas arise from clonal expansions of B, T, or NK cells at different stages of differentiation. Because they occur in the immunocyte-rich lymphoid tissues, they are easily accessible to antibodies and cell-based immunotherapy. Expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) on T cells is a means of combining the antigen-binding site of a monoclonal antibody with the activating machinery of a T cell, enabling antigen recognition independent of major histocompatibility complex restriction, while retaining the desirable antitumor properties of a T cell. Here, we discuss the basic design of CARs and their potential advantages and disadvantages over other immune therapies for lymphomas. We review current clinical trials in the field and consider strategies to improve the in vivo function and safety of immune cells expressing CARs. The ultimate driver of CAR development and implementation for lymphoma will be the demonstration of their ability to safely and cost-effectively cure these malignancies. PMID:26332003

  7. Adoptive cell therapy for sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Mata, Melinda; Gottschalk, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Current therapy for sarcomas, though effective in treating local disease, is often ineffective for patients with recurrent or metastatic disease. To improve outcomes, novel approaches are needed and cell therapy has the potential to meet this need since it does not rely on the cytotoxic mechanisms of conventional therapies. The recent successes of T-cell therapies for hematological malignancies have led to renewed interest in exploring cell therapies for solid tumors such as sarcomas. In this review, we will discuss current cell therapies for sarcoma with special emphasis on genetic approaches to improve the effector function of adoptively transferred cells. PMID:25572477

  8. Skewing the T-cell repertoire by combined DNA vaccination, host conditioning, and adoptive transfer.

    PubMed

    Jorritsma, Annelies; Bins, Adriaan D; Schumacher, Ton N M; Haanen, John B A G

    2008-04-01

    Approaches for T-cell-based immunotherapy that have shown substantial effects in clinical trials are generally based on the adoptive transfer of high numbers of antigen-specific cells, and the success of these approaches is thought to rely on the high magnitude of the tumor-specific T-cell responses that are induced. In this study, we aimed to develop strategies that also yield a T-cell repertoire that is highly skewed toward tumor recognition but do not rely on ex vivo generation of tumor-specific T cells. To this end, the tumor-specific T-cell repertoire was first expanded by DNA vaccination and then infused into irradiated recipients. Subsequent vaccination of the recipient mice with the same antigen resulted in peak CD8(+) T-cell responses of approximately 50%. These high T-cell responses required the presence of antigen-experienced tumor-specific T cells within the graft because only mice that received cells of previously vaccinated donor mice developed effective responses. Tumor-bearing mice treated with this combined therapy showed a significant delay in tumor outgrowth, compared with mice treated by irradiation or vaccination alone. Furthermore, this antitumor effect was accompanied by an increased accumulation of activated and antigen-specific T cells within the tumor. In summary, the combination of DNA vaccination with host conditioning and adoptive transfer generates a marked, but transient, skewing of the T-cell repertoire toward tumor recognition. This strategy does not require ex vivo expansion of cells to generate effective antitumor immunity and may therefore easily be translated to clinical application.

  9. Prospects for chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) γδ T cells: A potential game changer for adoptive T cell cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mirzaei, Hamid Reza; Mirzaei, Hamed; Lee, Sang Yun; Hadjati, Jamshid; Till, Brian G

    2016-10-01

    Excitement is growing for therapies that harness the power of patients' immune systems to combat their diseases. One approach to immunotherapy involves engineering patients' own T cells to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) to treat advanced cancers, particularly those refractory to conventional therapeutic agents. Although these engineered immune cells have made remarkable strides in the treatment of patients with certain hematologic malignancies, success with solid tumors has been limited, probably due to immunosuppressive mechanisms in the tumor niche. In nearly all studies to date, T cells bearing αβ receptors have been used to generate CAR T cells. In this review, we highlight biological characteristics of γδ T cells that are distinct from those of αβ T cells, including homing to epithelial and mucosal tissues and unique functions such as direct antigen recognition, lack of alloreactivity, and ability to present antigens. We offer our perspective that these features make γδ T cells promising for use in cellular therapy against several types of solid tumors, including melanoma and gastrointestinal cancers. Engineered γδ T cells should be considered as a new platform for adoptive T cell cancer therapy for mucosal tumors.

  10. T cells conditioned with MDSC show an increased anti-tumor activity after adoptive T cell based immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Raber, Patrick L; Sierra, Rosa A; Thevenot, Paul T; Shuzhong, Zhang; Wyczechowska, Dorota D; Kumai, Takumi; Celis, Esteban; Rodriguez, Paulo C

    2016-04-05

    The success of adoptive T cell-based immunotherapy (ACT) in cancer is limited in part by the accumulation of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), which block several T cell functions, including T cell proliferation and the expression of various cytotoxic mediators. Paradoxically, the inhibition of CD8+ T cell differentiation into cytotoxic populations increased their efficacy after ACT into tumor-bearing hosts. Therefore, we aimed to test the impact of conditioning CD8+ T cells with MDSC on their differentiation potential and ACT efficacy. Our results indicate that MDSC impaired the progression of CD8+ T cells into effector populations, without altering their activation status, production of IL-2, or signaling through the T cell receptor. In addition, culture of CD8+ T cells with MDSC resulted in an increased ACT anti-tumor efficacy, which correlated with a higher frequency of the transferred T cells and elevated IFNγ production. Interestingly, activated CD62L+ CD8+ T cells were responsible for the enhanced anti-tumor activity showed by MDSC-exposed T cells. Additional results showed a decreased protein synthesis rate and lower activity of the mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) in T cells conditioned with MDSC. Silencing of the negative mTOR regulator tuberous sclerosis complex-2 in T cells co-cultured with MDSC restored mTOR activity, but resulted in T cell apoptosis. These results indicate that conditioning of T cells with MDSC induces stress survival pathways mediated by a blunted mTOR signaling, which regulated T cell differentiation and ACT efficacy. Continuation of this research will enable the development of better strategies to increase ACT responses in cancer.

  11. The immunosuppressive effects of phthalocyanine photodynamic therapy in mice are mediated by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells and can be adoptively transferred to naïve recipients

    PubMed Central

    Yusuf, Nabiha; Katiyar, Santosh K; Elmets, Craig A

    2013-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a promising treatment modality for malignant tumors but it is also immunosuppressive which may reduce its therapeutic efficacy. The purpose of our study was to elucidate the role of CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells in PDT immunosuppression. Using silicon phthalocyanine 4 (Pc4) as photosensitizer, non-tumor bearing CD4 knockout (CD4−/−) mice and their wild type (WT) counterparts were subjected to Pc4-PDT in a manner identical to that used for tumor regression (1 cm spot size, 0.5 mg/kg Pc4, 110 J/cm2 light) to assess the effect of Pc4-PDT on cell-mediated immunity. There was a decrease in immunosuppression in CD4−/− mice as compared to WT mice. We next examined the role of CD8+ T-cells in Pc4-PDT induced immunosuppression using CD8−/− mice following the same treatment regimen used for CD4−/− mice. Similar to CD4−/− mice, CD8−/− mice exhibited less immunosuppression than WT mice. Pc4-PDT induced immunosuppression could be adoptively transferred with spleen cells from Pc4-PDT treated donor mice to syngenic naive recipients (p<0.05) and was mediated primarily by T cells, although macrophages were also found to play a role. Procedures that limit PDT induced immunosuppression but do not affect PDT induced regression of tumors may prove superior to PDT alone in promoting long term anti-tumor responses. PMID:18208456

  12. Generation of CD8+ T cells expressing two additional T-cell receptors (TETARs) for personalised melanoma therapy

    PubMed Central

    Höfflin, Sandra; Prommersberger, Sabrina; Uslu, Ugur; Schuler, Gerold; Schmidt, Christopher W; Lennerz, Volker; Dörrie, Jan; Schaft, Niels

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive T-cell therapy of cancer often fails due to the tumor cells' immune escape mechanisms, like antigen loss or down-regulation. To anticipate immune escape by loss of a single antigen, it would be advantageous to equip T cells with multiple specificities. To study the possible interference of 2 T-cell receptors (TCRs) in one cell, and to examine how to counteract competing effects, we generated TETARs, CD8+ T cells expressing two additional T-cell receptors by simultaneous transient transfection with 2 TCRs using RNA electroporation. The TETARs were equipped with one TCR specific for the common melanoma antigen gp100 and one TCR recognizing a patient-specific, individual mutation of CCT6A (chaperonin containing TCP1, subunit 6A) termed “CCT6Am TCR.” These CD8+ T cells proved functional in cytokine secretion and lytic activity upon stimulation with each of their cognate antigens, although some reciprocal inhibition was observed. Murinisation of the CCT6Am TCR increased and prolonged its expression and increased the lytic capacity of the dual-specific T cells. Taken together, we generated functional, dual-specific CD8+ T cells directed against a common melanoma-antigen and an individually mutated antigen for the use in personalised adoptive T-cell therapy of melanoma. The intended therapy would involve repetitive injections of the RNA-transfected cells to overcome the transiency of TCR expression. In case of autoimmunity-related side effects, a cessation of treatment would result in a disappearance of the introduced receptors, which increases the safety of this approach. PMID:26178065

  13. Antiangiogenic immunotherapy targeting Flk-1, DNA vaccine and adoptive T cell transfer, inhibits ocular neovascularization

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Han; Sonoda, Koh-Hei; Hijioka, Kuniaki; Qiao, Hong; Oshima, Yuji; Ishibashi, Tatsuro

    2009-04-17

    Ocular neovascularization (NV) is the primary cause of blindness in a wide range of ocular diseases. The exact mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of ocular NV is not yet well understood, and so there is no satisfactory therapy for ocular NV. Here, we describe a strategy targeting Flk-1, a self-antigen overexpressed on proliferating endothelial cells in ocular NV, by antiangiogenic immunotherapy-DNA vaccine and adoptive T cell therapy. An oral DNA vaccine encoding Flk-1 carried by attenuated Salmonella typhimurium markedly suppressed development of laser-induced choroidal NV. We further demonstrated that adoptive transfer of vaccine-induced CD8{sup +} T cells reduced pathological preretinal NV, with a concomitant facilitation of physiological revascularization after oxygen-induced retinal vessel obliteration. However, physiological retinal vascular development was unaffected in neonatal mice transferred with vaccine-induced CD8{sup +} T cells. These findings suggested that antiangiogenic immunotherapy targeting Flk-1 such as vaccination and adoptive immunotherapy may contribute to future therapies for ocular NV.

  14. Chimaeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy for tumour immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Sha, Huan-huan; Wang, Dan-dan; Yan, Da-li; Hu, Yong; Yang, Su-jin; Liu, Si-wen

    2017-01-01

    Chimaeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapies, as one of the cancer immunotherapies, have heralded a new era of treating cancer. The accumulating data, especially about CAR-modified T cells against CD19 support that CAR T-cell therapy is a highly effective immune therapy for B-cell malignancies. Apart from CD19, there have been many trials of CAR T cells directed other tumour specific or associated antigens (TSAs/TAAs) in haematologic malignancies and solid tumours. This review will briefly summarize basic CAR structure, parts of reported TSAs/TAAs, results of the clinical trials of CAR T-cell therapies as well as two life-threatening side effects. Experiments in vivo or in vitro, ongoing clinical trials and the outlook for CAR T-cell therapies also be included. Our future efforts will focus on identification of more viable cancer targets and more strategies to make CAR T-cell therapy safer. PMID:28053197

  15. Gene therapy of primary T cell immunodeficiencies.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Alain; Hacein-Bey-Abina, Salima; Cavazzana-Calvo, Marina

    2013-08-10

    Gene therapy of severe combined immunodeficiencies has been proven to be effective to provide sustained correction of the T cell immunodeficiencies. This has been achieved for 2 forms of SCID, i.e SCID-X1 (γc deficiency) and adenosine deaminase deficiency. Occurrence of gene toxicity generated by integration of first generation retroviral vectors, as observed in the SCID-X1 trials has led to replace these vectors by self inactivated (SIN) retro(or lenti) viruses that may provide equivalent efficacy with a better safety profile. Results of ongoing clinical studies in SCID as well as in other primary immunodeficiencies, such as the Wiskott Aldrich syndrome, will be thus very informative.

  16. Adoptive transfer of fibrocytes enhances splenic T-cell numbers and survival in septic peritonitis.

    PubMed

    Nemzek, Jean A; Fry, Christopher; Moore, Bethany B

    2013-08-01

    Fibrocytes are unique, fibroblast-like cells with diverse functions and the potential for immunomodulation, which prompted investigation of their previously unexplored role in sepsis. Specifically, the study goals were to determine if adoptive transfer of fibrocytes would affect outcome in sepsis and to define relevant immunopathologic changes associated with the outcomes. Initial in vitro studies demonstrated that naive T-cell proliferation was significantly increased in cocultures with tissue-derived fibrocytes as compared with culture either alone or with fibroblasts. In vivo, the adoptive transfer of fibrocytes at the time of cecal ligation and puncture significantly improved survival of mice compared with transfer of fibroblasts or saline. Septic mice had lower blood levels of interleukin 6 (IL-6) and markers of organ injury after fibrocyte transfer as well as a reduced bacterial burden. Locally, peritoneal lavage fluid yielded lower bacterial counts, lower IL-6, and reduced inflammatory cell counts when fibrocyte transfer was compared with saline. This was also accompanied by significant increases in splenic CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. In vitro stimulation of the splenic T cells demonstrated that, after cecal ligation and puncture and adoptive transfer, the percentages of both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells with intracellular interferon γ were increased, whereas those with IL-4 remained similar between the groups. Therefore, it appears the adoptive transfer of fibrocytes improves sepsis survival, lowers bacterial burden, and promotes the proliferation of splenic T cells with a T(H)1 phenotype. These results confirm the immunomodulatory effects of exogenous, tissue-derived fibrocytes in sepsis and suggest their potential in cell therapy.

  17. C-C chemokine receptor type-4 transduction of T cells enhances interaction with dendritic cells, tumor infiltration and therapeutic efficacy of adoptive T cell transfer.

    PubMed

    Rapp, Moritz; Grassmann, Simon; Chaloupka, Michael; Layritz, Patrick; Kruger, Stephan; Ormanns, Steffen; Rataj, Felicitas; Janssen, Klaus-Peter; Endres, Stefan; Anz, David; Kobold, Sebastian

    2016-03-01

    T cell infiltration at the tumor site has been identified as a major predictor for the efficacy of adoptive T cell therapy. The chemokine C-C motif ligand 22 (CCL22) is highly expressed by immune cells in murine and human pancreatic cancer. Expression of its corresponding receptor, C-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CCR4), is restricted to regulatory T cells (Treg). We show that transduction of cytotoxic T cells (CTL) with CCR4 enhances their immigration into a pancreatic cancer model. Further, we show that binding of CCR4 with CCL22 strengthens the binding of T cell LFA-1 to dendritic cell (DC) ICAM-1 and increases CTL activation. In vivo, in a model of subcutaneous pancreatic cancer, treatment of tumor-bearing mice with CCR4-transduced CTL led to the eradication of established tumors in 40% of the mice. In conclusion, CCR4 overexpression in CTL is a promising therapeutic strategy to enhance the efficacy of adoptive T cell transfer (ACT).

  18. Improving Therapy of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia (CLL) with Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR) T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fraietta, Joseph A.; Schwab, Robert D.; Maus, Marcela V.

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive cell immunotherapy for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) has heralded a new era of synthetic biology. The infusion of genetically-engineered, autologous chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells directed against CD19 expressed by normal and malignant B cells represents a novel approach to cancer therapy. The results of recent clinical trials of CAR T cells in relapsed and refractory CLL have demonstrated long-term disease-free remissions, underscoring the power of harnessing and re-directing the immune system against cancer. This review will briefly summarize T cell therapies in development for CLL disease. We discuss the role of T cell function and phenotype, T cell culture optimization, CAR design, and approaches to potentiate the survival and anti-tumor effects of infused lymphocytes. Future efforts will focus on improving the efficacy of CAR T cells for the treatment of CLL and incorporating adoptive cell immunotherapy into standard medical management of CLL. PMID:27040708

  19. The adoptive transfer of cultured T cells for patients with metastatic melanoma.

    PubMed

    Yang, James C

    2013-01-01

    T cells have been shown to be capable of rejecting a patient's tumor. Weak responses to current vaccines and the toxicity of exogenously administered cytokines limit the intensity of the T-cell response that can be actively generated in vivo. Adoptive T-cell transfer enhances an intrinsically weak immune response to cancer by activating and expanding tumor reactive T cells in vitro and manipulating the environment of the host at the time of transfer. One can frequently find tumor-reactive T cells in metastatic lesions in patients with melanoma, and expand them in vitro for readministration. When successful, this adoptive cellular immunotherapy has resulted in sustainable curative outcomes. Subsequently, the applicability of adoptive T-cell transfer has been greatly expanded by the development of methods to genetically engineer open-repertoire human T-cells to confer tumor reactivity. This re-direction of T-cell specificity can be achieved by introducing a variety of receptors that ligate tumor-associated antigens and then trigger the normal activation mechanism of T cells. Future T-cell engineering will add a new dimension by reprogramming T-cell functions for optimal tumor rejection. The antigens recognized by T cells, the techniques to procure and grow tumor reactive T cells, the conditioning of the recipient to optimize efficacy, and the results of clinical protocols are reviewed herein.

  20. CRISPR Meets CAR T-cell Therapy.

    PubMed

    2017-03-21

    Using CRISPR/Cas9 technology, researchers have devised a method to deliver a CAR gene to a specific locus, TRAC, in T cells. This targeted approach yielded therapeutic cells that were more potent even at low doses; in a mouse model of acute lymphoblastic leukemia, they outperformed CAR T cells created with a randomly integrating retroviral vector.

  1. Reinforcement of cancer immunotherapy by adoptive transfer of cblb-deficient CD8+ T cells combined with a DC vaccine.

    PubMed

    Lutz-Nicoladoni, Christina; Wallner, Stephanie; Stoitzner, Patrizia; Pircher, Magdalena; Gruber, Thomas; Wolf, Anna Maria; Gastl, Günther; Penninger, Josef M; Baier, Gottfried; Wolf, Dominik

    2012-01-01

    The success of cancer immunotherapy is limited by potent endogenous immune-evasion mechanisms, which are at least in part mediated by transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β). The E3 ubiquitin ligase Cbl-b is a key regulator of T cell activation and is established to regulate TGF-β sensitivity. cblb-deficient animals reject tumors via CD8(+) T cells, which make Cbl-b an ideal target for improvement of adoptive T-cell transfer (ATC) therapy. In this study, we show that cblb-deficient CD8(+) T cells are hyper-responsive to T-cell receptor (TCR)/CD28-stimulation and are in part protected against the negative cues induced by TGF-β in vitro. Notably, adoptive transfer of polyclonal, non-TCR transgenic cblb-deficient CD8(+) T cells is not sufficient to reject B16-ova or EG7 tumors in vivo. Thus, cblb-deficient ATC requires proper in vivo re-activation by a dendritic cell (DC) vaccine. In strict contrast to ATC monotherapy, this approach delayed tumor outgrowth and significantly increased survival rates, which is paralleled by increased CD8(+) T-cells infiltration to the tumor site and enrichment of ova-specific and interferon-γ (IFN-γ)-secreting CD8(+) T cell in the draining lymph node (LN). Moreover, CD8(+) T cells from cblb-deficient mice vaccinated with the DC vaccine show increased cytolytic activity in vivo. In summary, our data using cblb-deficient polyclonal, non-TCR-transgenic adoptively transferred CD8(+) T cells into immuno-competent non-lymphodepleted recipients suggest that targeting Cbl-b might serve as a novel 'adjuvant approach', suitable to augment the effectiveness of established anti-cancer immunotherapies.

  2. Improve T Cell Therapy in Neuroblastoma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    CMV seropositive donors were cocultured with irradiated aAPCs. As shown in Fig 10E, after 10 - 12 days of culture, aAPCs expressing pp65 reactivated CMV ...inferior to the PBMC loaded with pp65 peptides (INF SFU 789 ± 130), aAPCs expressing pp65 were effective in reactivating CMV -specific T cells (INF SFU 83...significantly increased the boosting of CMV -specific T cells (INF SFU 292 ± 56 vs. 502 ± 104 for K562/pp65 and K562/CD40L/pp65, respectively; p=0.034). The

  3. A universal strategy for adoptive immunotherapy of cancer through use of a novel T-cell antigen receptor.

    PubMed

    Urbanska, Katarzyna; Lanitis, Evripidis; Poussin, Mathilde; Lynn, Rachel C; Gavin, Brian P; Kelderman, Sander; Yu, Jason; Scholler, Nathalie; Powell, Daniel J

    2012-04-01

    Adoptive immunotherapies composed of T cells engineered to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) offer an attractive strategy for treatment of human cancer. However, CARs have a fixed antigen specificity such that only one tumor-associated antigen (TAA) can be targeted, limiting the efficacy that can be achieved because of heterogeneous TAA expression. For this reason, a more generalized and effective application of CAR therapy would benefit from the capability to produce large panels of CARs against many known TAAs. In this study, we show a novel strategy to extend the recognition specificity potential of a bioengineered lymphocyte population, allowing flexible approaches to redirect T cells against various TAAs. Our strategy employs a biotin-binding immune receptor (BBIR) composed of an extracellular-modified avidin linked to an intracellular T-cell signaling domain. BBIR T cells recognized and bound exclusively to cancer cells pretargeted with specific biotinylated molecules. The versatility afforded by BBIRs permitted sequential or simultaneous targeting of a combination of distinct antigens. Together, our findings show that a platform of universal T-cell specificity can significantly extend conventional CAR approaches, permitting the tailored generation of T cells of unlimited antigen specificity for improving the effectiveness of adoptive T-cell immunotherapies for cancer.

  4. TIL therapy broadens the tumor-reactive CD8(+) T cell compartment in melanoma patients.

    PubMed

    Kvistborg, Pia; Shu, Chengyi Jenny; Heemskerk, Bianca; Fankhauser, Manuel; Thrue, Charlotte Albæk; Toebes, Mireille; van Rooij, Nienke; Linnemann, Carsten; van Buuren, Marit M; Urbanus, Jos H M; Beltman, Joost B; Thor Straten, Per; Li, Yong F; Robbins, Paul F; Besser, Michal J; Schachter, Jacob; Kenter, Gemma G; Dudley, Mark E; Rosenberg, Steven A; Haanen, John B A G; Hadrup, Sine Reker; Schumacher, Ton N M

    2012-07-01

    There is strong evidence that both adoptive T cell transfer and T cell checkpoint blockade can lead to regression of human melanoma. However, little data are available on the effect of these cancer therapies on the tumor-reactive T cell compartment. To address this issue we have profiled therapy-induced T cell reactivity against a panel of 145 melanoma-associated CD8(+) T cell epitopes. Using this approach, we demonstrate that individual tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte cell products from melanoma patients contain unique patterns of reactivity against shared melanoma-associated antigens, and that the combined magnitude of these responses is surprisingly low. Importantly, TIL therapy increases the breadth of the tumor-reactive T cell compartment in vivo, and T cell reactivity observed post-therapy can almost in full be explained by the reactivity observed within the matched cell product. These results establish the value of high-throughput monitoring for the analysis of immuno-active therapeutics and suggest that the clinical efficacy of TIL therapy can be enhanced by the preparation of more defined tumor-reactive T cell products.

  5. TIL therapy broadens the tumor-reactive CD8+ T cell compartment in melanoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Kvistborg, Pia; Shu, Chengyi Jenny; Heemskerk, Bianca; Fankhauser, Manuel; Thrue, Charlotte Albæk; Toebes, Mireille; van Rooij, Nienke; Linnemann, Carsten; van Buuren, Marit M.; Urbanus, Jos H.M.; Beltman, Joost B.; thor Straten, Per; Li, Yong F.; Robbins, Paul F.; Besser, Michal J.; Schachter, Jacob; Kenter, Gemma G.; Dudley, Mark E.; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Haanen, John B.A.G.; Hadrup, Sine Reker; Schumacher, Ton N.M.

    2012-01-01

    There is strong evidence that both adoptive T cell transfer and T cell checkpoint blockade can lead to regression of human melanoma. However, little data are available on the effect of these cancer therapies on the tumor-reactive T cell compartment. To address this issue we have profiled therapy-induced T cell reactivity against a panel of 145 melanoma-associated CD8+ T cell epitopes. Using this approach, we demonstrate that individual tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte cell products from melanoma patients contain unique patterns of reactivity against shared melanoma-associated antigens, and that the combined magnitude of these responses is surprisingly low. Importantly, TIL therapy increases the breadth of the tumor-reactive T cell compartment in vivo, and T cell reactivity observed post-therapy can almost in full be explained by the reactivity observed within the matched cell product. These results establish the value of high-throughput monitoring for the analysis of immuno-active therapeutics and suggest that the clinical efficacy of TIL therapy can be enhanced by the preparation of more defined tumor-reactive T cell products. PMID:22754759

  6. Human effector T cells derived from central memory cells rather than CD8(+)T cells modified by tumor-specific TCR gene transfer possess superior traits for adoptive immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fenglin; Zhang, Wenfeng; Shao, Hongwei; Bo, Huaben; Shen, Han; Li, Jiandong; Liu, Yichen; Wang, Teng; Ma, Wenli; Huang, Shulin

    2013-10-10

    Adoptive cell therapy provides an attractive treatment of cancer, and our expanding capacity to target tumor antigens is driven by genetically engineered human T lymphocytes that express genes encoding tumor-specific T cell receptors (TCRs). The intrinsic properties of cultured T cells used for therapy were reported to have tremendous influences on their persistence and antitumor efficacy in vivo. In this study, we isolated CD8(+) central memory T cells from peripheral blood lymphocytes of healthy donors, and then transferred with the gene encoding TCR specific for tumor antigen using recombinant adenovirus vector Ad5F35-TRAV-TRBV. We found effector T cells derived from central memory T cells improved cell viability, maintained certain level of CD62L expression, and reacquired the CD62L(+)CD44(high) phenotype of central memory T cells after effector T cells differentiation. We then compared the antitumor reactivity of central memory T cells and CD8(+)T cells after TCR gene transferred. The results indicated that tumor-specific TCR gene being transferred to central memory T cells effectively increased the specific killing of antigen positive tumor cells and the expression of cytolytic granule protein. Furthermore, TCR gene transferred central memory T cells were more effective than TCR gene transferred CD8(+)T cells in CTL activity and effector cytokine secretion. These results implicated that isolating central memory T cells rather than CD8(+)T cells for insertion of gene encoding tumor-specific TCR may provide a superior tumor-reactive T cell population for adoptive transfer.

  7. Cyclophosphamide-facilitated adoptive immunotherapy of an established tumor depends on elimination of tumor-induced suppressor T cells

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    On the basis of preceding studies showing that tumor-induced, T cell- mediated immunosuppression serves as an obstacle to adoptive immunotherapy of the Meth A fibrosarcoma, it was predicted that cyclophosphamide treatment of tumor bearers would remove this obstacle and allow passively transferred immune T cells to cause tumor regression. It was found that infusion of immune spleen cells alone had no effect on tumor growth, and cyclophosphamide alone caused a temporary halt in tumor progression. In contrast, combination therapy consisting of intravenous injection of 100 mg/kg of cyclophosphamide followed 1 h later by intravenous infusion of tumor-immune spleen cells caused small, as well as large tumors, to completely and permanently regress. Tumor regression caused by combination therapy was completely inhibited by intravenous infusion of splenic T cells from donors with established tumors, but not by spleen cells from normal donors. These suppressor T cells were eliminated from the spleen by treating the tumor-bearing donors with 100 mg/kg of cyclophosphamide. Immune T cells, in contrast, were resistant to this dose of cyclophosphamide. These results show that failure of intravenously-infused, tumor- sensitized T cells to cause regression of the Meth A fibrosarcoma growing in its syngeneic or semi-syngeneic host is caused by the presence of a tumor-induced population of cyclophosphamide-sensitive suppressor T cells. PMID:6460831

  8. Re-adapting T cells for cancer therapy: from mouse models to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Stromnes, Ingunn M; Schmitt, Thomas M; Chapuis, Aude G; Hingorani, Sunil R; Greenberg, Philip D

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive T-cell therapy involves the isolation, expansion, and reinfusion of T lymphocytes with a defined specificity and function as a means to eradicate cancer. Our research has focused on specifying the requirements for tumor eradication with antigen-specific T cells and T cells transduced to express a defined T-cell receptor (TCR) in mouse models and then translating these strategies to clinical trials. Our design of T-cell-based therapy for cancer has reflected efforts to identify the obstacles that limit sustained effector T-cell activity in mice and humans, design approaches to enhance T-cell persistence, develop methods to increase TCR affinity/T-cell functional avidity, and pursue strategies to overcome tolerance and immunosuppression. With the advent of genetic engineering, a highly functional population of T cells can now be rapidly generated and tailored for the targeted malignancy. Preclinical studies in faithful and informative mouse models, in concert with knowledge gained from analyses of successes and limitations in clinical trials, are shaping how we continue to develop, refine, and broaden the applicability of this approach for cancer therapy.

  9. Chimeric Antigen Receptors Modified T-Cells for Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Dai, Hanren; Wang, Yao; Lu, Xuechun; Han, Weidong

    2016-07-01

    The genetic modification and characterization of T-cells with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) allow functionally distinct T-cell subsets to recognize specific tumor cells. The incorporation of costimulatory molecules or cytokines can enable engineered T-cells to eliminate tumor cells. CARs are generated by fusing the antigen-binding region of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) or other ligand to membrane-spanning and intracellular-signaling domains. They have recently shown clinical benefit in patients treated with CD19-directed autologous T-cells. Recent successes suggest that the modification of T-cells with CARs could be a powerful approach for developing safe and effective cancer therapeutics. Here, we briefly review early studies, consider strategies to improve the therapeutic potential and safety, and discuss the challenges and future prospects for CAR T-cells in cancer therapy.

  10. Chimeric Antigen Receptors Modified T-Cells for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Hanren; Wang, Yao; Lu, Xuechun

    2016-01-01

    The genetic modification and characterization of T-cells with chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) allow functionally distinct T-cell subsets to recognize specific tumor cells. The incorporation of costimulatory molecules or cytokines can enable engineered T-cells to eliminate tumor cells. CARs are generated by fusing the antigen-binding region of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) or other ligand to membrane-spanning and intracellular-signaling domains. They have recently shown clinical benefit in patients treated with CD19-directed autologous T-cells. Recent successes suggest that the modification of T-cells with CARs could be a powerful approach for developing safe and effective cancer therapeutics. Here, we briefly review early studies, consider strategies to improve the therapeutic potential and safety, and discuss the challenges and future prospects for CAR T-cells in cancer therapy. PMID:26819347

  11. Improve T Cell Therapy in Neuroblastoma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    antibodies and T-cell immune responses elicited by tumor vaccine , we have combined the beneficial effects of both humoral and cell-mediated components of...the anti-neuroblastoma activity of CTLs expressing the GD2-specific CAR in two xenograft mouse models of neuroblastoma. Figure 1: Vaccination with...K562-derived whole-cell vaccine expressing CMV-pp65, CD40L and OX40L enhances antitumor effects of CAR-CMV- CTLs in vivo. Panel A. NOG/SCID/γc

  12. Multifunctional T-cell Analyses to Study Response and Progression in Adoptive Cell Transfer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chao; Cheung, Ann F.; Chodon, Thinle; Koya, Richard C.; Wu, Zhongqi; Ng, Charles; Avramis, Earl; Cochran, Alistair J.; Witte, Owen N.; Baltimore, David; Chmielowski, Bartosz; Economou, James S.; Comin-Anduix, Begonya; Ribas, Antoni; Heath, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Adoptive cell transfer (ACT) of genetically engineered T cells expressing cancer-specific T-cell receptors (TCR) is a promising cancer treatment. Here, we investigate the in vivo functional activity and dynamics of the transferred cells by analyzing samples from 3 representative patients with melanoma enrolled in a clinical trial of ACT with TCR transgenic T cells targeted against the melanosomal antigen MART-1. The analyses included evaluating 19 secreted proteins from individual cells from phenotypically defined T-cell subpopulations, as well as the enumeration of T cells with TCR antigen specificity for 36 melanoma antigens. These analyses revealed the coordinated functional dynamics of the adoptively transferred, as well as endogenous, T cells, and the importance of highly functional T cells in dominating the antitumor immune response. This study highlights the need to develop approaches to maintaining antitumor T-cell functionality with the aim of increasing the long-term efficacy of TCR-engineered ACT immunotherapy. SIGNIFICANCE A longitudinal functional study of adoptively transferred TCR–engineered lymphocytes yielded revealing snapshots for understanding the changes of antitumor responses over time in ACT immunotherapy of patients with advanced melanoma. PMID:23519018

  13. Adoptive transfer of MART-1 T cell receptor transgenic lymphocytes and dendritic cell vaccination in patients with metastatic melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Chodon, Thinle; Comin-Anduix, Begonya; Chmielowski, Bartosz; Koya, Richard C; Wu, Zhongqi; Auerbach, Martin; Ng, Charles; Avramis, Earl; Seja, Elizabeth; Villanueva, Arturo; McCannel, Tara A.; Ishiyama, Akira; Czernin, Johannes; Radu, Caius G.; Wang, Xiaoyan; Gjertson, David W.; Cochran, Alistair J.; Cornetta, Kenneth; Wong, Deborah J.L.; Kaplan-lefko, Paula; Hamid, Omid; Samlowski, Wolfram; Cohen, Peter A.; Daniels, Gregory A.; Mukherji, Bijay; Yang, Lili; Zack, Jerome A.; Kohn, Donald B.; Heath, James R.; Glaspy, John A.; Witte, Owen N.; Baltimore, David; Economou, James S.; Ribas, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Purpose It has been demonstrated that large numbers of tumor-specific T cells for adoptive cell transfer (ACT) can be manufactured by retroviral genetic engineering of autologous peripheral blood lymphocytes and expanding them over several weeks. In mouse models, this therapy is optimized when administered with dendritic cell (DC) vaccination. We developed a short one-week manufacture protocol to determine the feasibility, safety and antitumor efficacy of this double cell therapy. Experimnetal Design A clinical trial (NCT00910650) adoptively transferring MART-1 T cell receptor (TCR) transgenic lymphocytes together with MART-1 peptide pulsed DC vaccination in HLA-A2.1 patients with metastatic melanoma. Autologous TCR transgenic cells were manufactured in 6 to 7 days using retroviral vector gene transfer, and re-infused with (n = 10) or without (n = 3) prior cryopreservation. Results 14 patients with metastatic melanoma were enrolled and nine out of 13 treated patients (69%) showed evidence of tumor regression. Peripheral blood reconstitution with MART-1-specific T cells peaked within two weeks of ACT indicating rapid in vivo expansion. Administration of freshly manufactured TCR transgenic T cells resulted in a higher persistence of MART-1-specific T cells in the blood as compared to cryopreserved. Evidence that DC vaccination could cause further in vivo expansion was only observed with ACT using non-cryopreserved T cells. Conclusion Double cell therapy with ACT of TCR engineered T cells with a very short ex vivo manipulation and DC vaccines is feasible and results in antitumor activity, but improvements are needed to maintain tumor responses. PMID:24634374

  14. CAR-T Cell Therapies From the Transfusion Medicine Perspective.

    PubMed

    Fesnak, Andrew; Lin, ChieYu; Siegel, Don L; Maus, Marcela V

    2016-07-01

    The use of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-T cell therapy for the treatment of hematologic malignancies has generated significant excitement over the last several years. From a transfusion medicine perspective, the implementation of CAR-T therapy as a potential mainstay treatment for not only hematologic but also solid-organ malignancies represents a significant opportunity for growth and expansion. In this review, we will describe the rationale for the development of genetically redirected T cells as a cancer therapeutic, the different elements that are required to engineer these cells, as well as an overview of the process by which patient cells are harvested and processed to create and subsequently validate CAR-T cells. Finally, we will briefly describe some of the toxicities and clinical efficacy of CAR-T cells in the setting of patients with advanced malignancy.

  15. Dissecting memory T cell responses to TB: concerns using adoptive transfer into immunodeficient mice.

    PubMed

    Ancelet, Lindsay; Rich, Fenella J; Delahunt, Brett; Kirman, Joanna R

    2012-09-01

    Several studies have used adoptive transfer of purified T cell subsets into immunodeficient mice to determine the subset of T cells responsible for mediating protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. These studies suggested that CD62L(hi) memory CD4(+) T cells from BCG-vaccinated mice are key for protection against tuberculosis. Importantly, we observed that transfer of naïve CD4(+) T cells into Rag1-/- recipients protected against a mycobacterial challenge as well as transfer of BCG-experienced CD4(+) T cells. We found that transfer of total CD4(+) T cells from naïve mice or enriched CD62L(hi)CD4(+) T cells from BCG-vaccinated mice into Rag1-/- recipients induced severe colitis by 3 weeks post cell transfer, whereas transfer of CD62L(lo)CD4(+) T cells from BCG-vaccinated mice did not. Naïve and CD62L(hi)CD4(+) T cells proliferated extensively upon transfer and developed an activated effector phenotype in the lung, even in the absence of infectious challenge. The induction of colitis and systemic cytokine response induced by the transfer and subsequent activation of CD4(+) T cells from naïve mice or CD62L(hi)CD4(+) T cells from BCG-vaccinated mice, into immunodeficient recipients, may heighten their ability to protect against mycobacterial challenge. This raises doubts about the validity of this model to study CD4(+) T cell-mediated protection against tuberculosis.

  16. Global Manufacturing of CAR T Cell Therapy.

    PubMed

    Levine, Bruce L; Miskin, James; Wonnacott, Keith; Keir, Christopher

    2017-03-17

    Immunotherapy using chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cells has demonstrated high response rates in patients with B cell malignancies, and chimeric antigen receptor T cell therapy is now being investigated in several hematologic and solid tumor types. Chimeric antigen receptor T cells are generated by removing T cells from a patient's blood and engineering the cells to express the chimeric antigen receptor, which reprograms the T cells to target tumor cells. As chimeric antigen receptor T cell therapy moves into later-phase clinical trials and becomes an option for more patients, compliance of the chimeric antigen receptor T cell manufacturing process with global regulatory requirements becomes a topic for extensive discussion. Additionally, the challenges of taking a chimeric antigen receptor T cell manufacturing process from a single institution to a large-scale multi-site manufacturing center must be addressed. We have anticipated such concerns in our experience with the CD19 chimeric antigen receptor T cell therapy CTL019. In this review, we discuss steps involved in the cell processing of the technology, including the use of an optimal vector for consistent cell processing, along with addressing the challenges of expanding chimeric antigen receptor T cell therapy to a global patient population.

  17. Optimizing T-cell receptor gene therapy for hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Emma C.

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in genetic engineering have enabled the delivery of clinical trials using patient T cells redirected to recognize tumor-associated antigens. The most dramatic results have been seen with T cells engineered to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) specific for CD19, a differentiation antigen expressed in B cells and B lineage malignancies. We propose that antigen expression in nonmalignant cells may contribute to the efficacy of T-cell therapy by maintaining effector function and promoting memory. Although CAR recognition is limited to cell surface structures, T-cell receptors (TCRs) can recognize intracellular proteins. This not only expands the range of tumor-associated self-antigens that are amenable for T-cell therapy, but also allows TCR targeting of the cancer mutagenome. We will highlight biological bottlenecks that potentially limit mutation-specific T-cell therapy and may require high-avidity TCRs that are capable of activating effector function when the concentrations of mutant peptides are low. Unexpectedly, modified TCRs with artificially high affinities function poorly in response to low concentration of cognate peptide but pose an increased safety risk as they may respond optimally to cross-reactive peptides. Recent gene-editing tools, such as transcription activator–like effector nucleases and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats, provide a platform to delete endogenous TCR and HLA genes, which removes alloreactivity and decreases immunogenicity of third-party T cells. This represents an important step toward generic off-the-shelf T-cell products that may be used in the future for the treatment of large numbers of patients. PMID:27207802

  18. Technical Considerations for the Generation of Adoptively Transferred T Cells in Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Visioni, Anthony; Skitzki, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    A significant function of the immune system is the surveillance and elimination of aberrant cells that give rise to cancer. Even when tumors are well established and metastatic, immune-mediated spontaneous regressions have been documented. While there are have been various forms of immunotherapy, one of the most widely studied for almost 40 years is adoptive cellular immunotherapy, but its success has yet to be fully realized. Adoptive cell transfer (ACT) is a therapeutic modality that has intrigued physicians and researchers for its many theoretical benefits. Preclinical investigations and human trials have utilized natural killer (NK) cells, dendritic cells (DC), macrophages, T-cells or B-cells for ACT with the most intense research focused on T-cell ACT. T-cells are exquisitely specific to the target of its T-cell receptor (TCR), thus potentially reducing the amount of collateral damage and off-target effects from treatment. T-cells also possess a memory subset that may reduce the risk of recurrence of a cancer after the successful treatment of the primary disease. There are several options for the source of T-cells used in the generation of cells for ACT. Perhaps the most widely known source is T-cells generated from tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs). However, studies have also employed peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), lymph nodes, and even induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSCs) as a source of T-cells. Several important technical considerations exist regarding benefits and limitations of each source of T-cells. Unique aspects of T-cells factor into their ability to be efficacious in ACT including the total number of cells available for ACT, the anti-tumor efficacy on a per cell basis, the repertoire of TCRs specific to tumor cells, and their ability to traffic to various organs that harbor tumor. Current research is attempting to unlock the full potential of these cells to effectively and safely treat cancer. PMID:27657129

  19. Alkylating agent melphalan augments the efficacy of adoptive immunotherapy using tumor-specific CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaoyun; Ding, Zhi-Chun; Cao, Yang; Liu, Chufeng; Habtetsion, Tsadik; Yu, Miao; Lemos, Henrique; Salman, Huda; Xu, Hongyan; Mellor, Andrew L.; Zhou, Gang

    2014-01-01

    In recent years the immune-potentiating effects of some widely used chemotherapeutic agents have been increasingly appreciated. This provides a rationale for combining conventional chemotherapy with immunotherapy strategies to achieve durable therapeutic benefits. Previous studies have implicated the immunomodulatory effects of melphalan, an alkylating agent commonly used to treat multiple myeloma, but the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. In the current study, we investigated the impact of melphalan on endogenous immune cells as well as adoptively transferred tumor-specific CD4+ T cells in tumor-bearing mice. We showed that melphalan treatment resulted in a rapid burst of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines during the cellular recovery phase after melphalan-induced myelo-leukodepletion. After melphalan treatment, tumor cells exhibited characteristics of immunogenic cell death, including membrane translocation of the endoplasmic reticulum resident calreticulin (CRT), and extracellular release of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1). In addition, there was enhanced tumor antigen uptake by dendritic cells in the tumor-draining lymph node. Consistent with these immunomodulatory effects, melphalan treatment of tumor-bearing mice led to the activation of the endogenous CD8+ T cells, and more importantly, effectively drove the clonal expansion and effector differentiation of adoptively transferred tumor-specific CD4+ T cells. Notably, the combination of melphalan and CD4+ T-cell adoptive cell therapy (ACT) was more efficacious than either treatment alone in prolonging the survival of mice with advanced B-cell lymphomas or colorectal tumors. These findings provide mechanistic insights into melphalan’s immunostimulatory effects, and demonstrate the therapeutic potential of combining melphalan with adoptive cell therapy utilizing antitumor CD4+ T cells. PMID:25560408

  20. New development in CAR-T cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenguang; Wu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Yang; Han, Weidong

    2017-02-21

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered T cells (CAR-T cells) have yielded unprecedented efficacy in B cell malignancies, most remarkably in anti-CD19 CAR-T cells for B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) with up to a 90% complete remission rate. However, tumor antigen escape has emerged as a main challenge for the long-term disease control of this promising immunotherapy in B cell malignancies. In addition, this success has encountered significant hurdles in translation to solid tumors, and the safety of the on-target/off-tumor recognition of normal tissues is one of the main reasons. In this mini-review, we characterize some of the mechanisms for antigen loss relapse and new strategies to address this issue. In addition, we discuss some novel CAR designs that are being considered to enhance the safety of CAR-T cell therapy in solid tumors.

  1. Rebalancing immune specificity and function in cancer by T-cell receptor gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Udyavar, Akshata; Geiger, Terrence L.

    2010-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy with tumor-specific T lymphocytes has demonstrated clinical benefit in some cancers, particularly melanoma. Yet isolating and expanding tumor-specific cells from patients is challenging, and there is limited ability to control T cell affinity and response characteristics. T cell receptor (TCR) gene therapy, in which T lymphocytes for immunotherapy are redirected using introduced rearranged TCR, has emerged as an important alternative. Successful TCR gene therapy requires consideration of a number of issues, including TCR specificity and affinity, optimal gene therapy constructs, types of T cells administered, and the survival and activity of the modified cells. In this review, we highlight the rationale for and experience with, as well as new approaches to enhance TCR gene therapy. PMID:20680493

  2. CAR T Cell Therapy: A Game Changer in Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Almåsbak, Hilde; Aarvak, Tanja; Vemuri, Mohan C.

    2016-01-01

    The development of novel targeted therapies with acceptable safety profiles is critical to successful cancer outcomes with better survival rates. Immunotherapy offers promising opportunities with the potential to induce sustained remissions in patients with refractory disease. Recent dramatic clinical responses in trials with gene modified T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) in B-cell malignancies have generated great enthusiasm. This therapy might pave the way for a potential paradigm shift in the way we treat refractory or relapsed cancers. CARs are genetically engineered receptors that combine the specific binding domains from a tumor targeting antibody with T cell signaling domains to allow specifically targeted antibody redirected T cell activation. Despite current successes in hematological cancers, we are only in the beginning of exploring the powerful potential of CAR redirected T cells in the control and elimination of resistant, metastatic, or recurrent nonhematological cancers. This review discusses the application of the CAR T cell therapy, its challenges, and strategies for successful clinical and commercial translation. PMID:27298832

  3. An HSV-2 based oncolytic virus can function as an attractant to guide migration of adoptively transferred T cells to tumor sites.

    PubMed

    Fu, Xinping; Rivera, Armando; Tao, Lihua; Zhang, Xiaoliu

    2015-01-20

    Adoptive T-cell therapy has shown promises for cancer treatment. However, for treating solid tumors, there is a need for improving the ability of the adoptively transferred T cells to home to tumor sites. We explored the possibility of using an oncolytic virus derived from HSV-2, which can actively pull T effector cells to the site of infection, as a local attractant for migration of adoptively transferred T cells. Our data show that intratumoral administration of this virus can indeed attract active migration of the adoptively transferred T cells to the treated tumor. Moreover, once attracted to the tumor site by the virus, T cells persisted in there significantly longer than in mock-treated tumor. Chemokine profiling identified significant elevation of CXCL9 and CXCL10, as well as several other chemokines belonging to the inflammatory chemokine family in the virus-treated tumors. These chemokines initially guided the T-cell migration to and then maintained their persistence in the tumor site, leading to a significantly enhanced therapeutic effect. Our data suggests that this virotherapy may be combined with adoptive T-cell therapy to potentiate its therapeutic effect against solid tumors that are otherwise difficult to manage with the treatment alone.

  4. Accelerated type 1 diabetes induction in mice by adoptive transfer of diabetogenic CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Berry, Gregory; Waldner, Hanspeter

    2013-05-06

    The nonobese diabetic (NOD) mouse spontaneously develops autoimmune diabetes after 12 weeks of age and is the most extensively studied animal model of human Type 1 diabetes (T1D). Cell transfer studies in irradiated recipient mice have established that T cells are pivotal in T1D pathogenesis in this model. We describe herein a simple method to rapidly induce T1D by adoptive transfer of purified, primary CD4+ T cells from pre-diabetic NOD mice transgenic for the islet-specific T cell receptor (TCR) BDC2.5 into NOD.SCID recipient mice. The major advantages of this technique are that isolation and adoptive transfer of diabetogenic T cells can be completed within the same day, irradiation of the recipients is not required, and a high incidence of T1D is elicited within 2 weeks after T cell transfer. Thus, studies of pathogenesis and therapeutic interventions in T1D can proceed at a faster rate than with methods that rely on heterogenous T cell populations or clones derived from diabetic NOD mice.

  5. A Phase I Study on Adoptive Immunotherapy Using Gene-Modified T Cells for Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kershaw, Michael H.; Westwood, Jennifer A.; Parker, Linda L.; Wang, Gang; Eshhar, Zelig; Mavroukakis, Sharon A.; White, Donald E.; Wunderlich, John R.; Canevari, Silvana; Rogers-Freezer, Linda; Chen, Clara C.; Yang, James C.; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Hwu, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    Purpose A phase I study was conducted to assess the safety of adoptive immunotherapy using gene-modified autologous T cells for the treatment of metastatic ovarian cancer. Experimental Design T cells with reactivity against the ovarian cancer – associated antigen α-folate receptor (FR) were generated by genetic modification of autologous T cells with a chimeric gene incorporating an anti-FR single-chain antibody linked to the signaling domain of the Fc receptor γ chain. Patients were assigned to one of two cohorts in the study. Eight patients in cohort 1received a dose escalation of T cells in combination with high-dose interleukin-2, and six patients in cohort 2 received dual-specific T cells (reactive with both FR and allogeneic cells) followed by immunization with allogeneic peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Results Five patients in cohort 1 experienced some grade 3 to 4 treatment-related toxicity that was probably due to interleukin-2 administration, which could be managed using standard measures. Patients in cohort 2 experienced relatively mild side effects with grade 1to 2 symptoms. No reduction in tumor burden was seen in any patient. Tracking 111In-labeled adoptively transferred T cells in cohort 1revealed a lack of specific localization of T cells to tumor except in one patient where some signal was detected in a peritoneal deposit. PCR analysis showed that gene-modified T cells were present in the circulation in large numbers for the first 2 days after transfer, but these quickly declined to be barely detectable 1month later in most patients. An inhibitory factor developed in the serum of three of six patients tested over the period of treatment, which significantly reduced the ability of gene-modified T cells to respond against FR+ tumor cells. Conclusions Large numbers of gene-modified tumor-reactive T cells can be safely given to patients, but these cells do not persist in large numbers long term. Future studies need to employ strategies to

  6. Chimeric antigen receptor T cells: a novel therapy for solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shengnan; Li, Anping; Liu, Qian; Li, Tengfei; Yuan, Xun; Han, Xinwei; Wu, Kongming

    2017-03-29

    The chimeric antigen receptor T (CAR-T) cell therapy is a newly developed adoptive antitumor treatment. Theoretically, CAR-T cells can specifically localize and eliminate tumor cells by interacting with the tumor-associated antigens (TAAs) expressing on tumor cell surface. Current studies demonstrated that various TAAs could act as target antigens for CAR-T cells, for instance, the type III variant epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFRvIII) was considered as an ideal target for its aberrant expression on the cell surface of several tumor types. CAR-T cell therapy has achieved gratifying breakthrough in hematological malignancies and promising outcome in solid tumor as showed in various clinical trials. The third generation of CAR-T demonstrates increased antitumor cytotoxicity and persistence through modification of CAR structure. In this review, we summarized the preclinical and clinical progress of CAR-T cells targeting EGFR, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), and mesothelin (MSLN), as well as the challenges for CAR-T cell therapy.

  7. The companions: regulatory T cells and gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Eghtesad, Saman; Morel, Penelope A; Clemens, Paula R

    2009-01-01

    Undesired immunological responses to products of therapeutic gene replacement have been obstacles to successful gene therapy. Understanding such responses of the host immune system to achieve immunological tolerance to a transferred gene product is therefore crucial. In this article, we review relevant studies of immunological responses to gene replacement therapy, the role of immunological tolerance mediated by regulatory T cells in down-regulating the unwanted immune responses, and the interrelationship of the two topics. PMID:19368560

  8. Generation of autologous tumor-specific T cells for adoptive transfer based on vaccination, in vitro restimulation and CD3/CD28 dynabead-induced T cell expansion.

    PubMed

    Brimnes, Marie Klinge; Gang, Anne Ortved; Donia, Marco; Thor Straten, Per; Svane, Inge Marie; Hadrup, Sine Reker

    2012-08-01

    Adoptive cell transfer (ACT) of in vitro expanded autologous tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) has been shown to exert therapeutic efficacy in melanoma patients. We aimed to develop an ACT protocol based on tumor-specific T cells isolated from peripheral blood and in vitro expanded by Dynabeads® ClinExVivo™CD3/CD28. We show here that the addition of an in vitro restimulation step with relevant peptides prior to bead expansion dramatically increased the proportion of tumor-specific T cells in PBMC-cultures. Importantly, peptide-pulsed dendritic cells (DCs) as well as allogeneic tumor lysate-pulsed DCs from the DC vaccine preparation could be used with comparable efficiency to peptides for in vitro restimulation, to increase the tumor-specific T-cell response. Furthermore, we tested the use of different ratios and different types of Dynabeads® CD3/CD28 and CD3/CD28/CD137 T-cell expander, for optimized expansion of tumor-specific T cells. A ratio of 1:3 of Dynabeads® CD3/CD28 T-cell expander to T cells resulted in the maximum number of tumor-specific T cells. The addition of CD137 did not improve functionality or fold expansion. Both T-cell expansion systems could generate tumor-specific T cells that were both cytotoxic and effective cytokine producers upon antigen recognition. Dynabeads®-expanded T-cell cultures shows phenotypical characteristics of memory T cells with potential to migrate and expand in vivo. In addition, they possess longer telomeres compared to TIL cultures. Taken together, we demonstrate that in vitro restimulation of tumor-specific T cells prior to bead expansion is necessary to achieve high numbers of tumor-specific T cells. This is effective and easily applicable in combination with DC vaccination, by use of vaccine-generated DCs, either pulsed with peptide or tumor-lysate.

  9. Genetically modified T cells in cancer therapy: opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Michaela; Mount, Natalie

    2015-04-01

    Tumours use many strategies to evade the host immune response, including downregulation or weak immunogenicity of target antigens and creation of an immune-suppressive tumour environment. T cells play a key role in cell-mediated immunity and, recently, strategies to genetically modify T cells either through altering the specificity of the T cell receptor (TCR) or through introducing antibody-like recognition in chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) have made substantial advances. The potential of these approaches has been demonstrated in particular by the successful use of genetically modified T cells to treat B cell haematological malignancies in clinical trials. This clinical success is reflected in the growing number of strategic partnerships in this area that have attracted a high level of investment and involve large pharmaceutical organisations. Although our understanding of the factors that influence the safety and efficacy of these therapies has increased, challenges for bringing genetically modified T-cell immunotherapy to many patients with different tumour types remain. These challenges range from the selection of antigen targets and dealing with regulatory and safety issues to successfully navigating the routes to commercial development. However, the encouraging clinical data, the progress in the scientific understanding of tumour immunology and the improvements in the manufacture of cell products are all advancing the clinical translation of these important cellular immunotherapies.

  10. Efficacy of CAR T-cell therapy in large tumors relies upon stromal targeting by IFNγ.

    PubMed

    Textor, Ana; Listopad, Joanna J; Wührmann, Lara Le; Perez, Cynthia; Kruschinski, Anna; Chmielewski, Markus; Abken, Hinrich; Blankenstein, Thomas; Charo, Jehad

    2014-12-01

    Adoptive T-cell therapy using chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cells (CAR-T therapy) has shown dramatic efficacy in patients with circulating lymphoma. However, eradication of solid tumors with CAR-T therapy has not been reported yet to be efficacious. In solid tumors, stroma destruction, due to MHC-restricted cross-presentation of tumor antigens to T cells, may be essential. However, CAR-Ts recognize antigens in an MHC-independent manner on cancer cells but not stroma cells. In this report, we show how CAR-Ts can be engineered to eradicate large established tumors with provision of a suitable CD28 costimulatory signal. In an HER2-dependent tumor model, tumor rejection by HER2-specific CAR-Ts was associated with sustained influx and proliferation of the adoptively transferred T cells. Interestingly, tumor rejection did not involve natural killer cells but was associated instead with a marked increase in the level of M1 macrophages and a requirement for IFNγ receptor expression on tumor stroma cells. Our results argue that CAR-T therapy is capable of eradicating solid tumors through a combination of antigen-independent stroma destruction and antigen-specific tumor cell targeting.

  11. Protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection by adoptive immunotherapy. Requirement for T cell-deficient recipients

    SciTech Connect

    Orme, I.M.; Collins, F.M.

    1983-07-01

    The results of this study demonstrate that spleen cells taken from mice at the height of the primary immune response to intravenous infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis possess the capacity to transfer adoptive protection to M. tuberculosis-infected recipients, but only if these recipients are first rendered T cell-deficient, either by thymectomy and gamma irradiation, or by sublethal irradiation. A similar requirement was necessary to demonstrate the adoptive protection of the lungs after exposure to an acute aerosol-delivered M. tuberculosis infection. In both infectious models successful adoptive immunotherapy was shown to be mediated by T lymphocytes, which were acquired in the donor animals in response to the immunizing infection. It is proposed that the results of this study may serve as a basic model for the subsequent analysis of the nature of the T cell-mediated immune response to both systemic and aerogenic infections with M. tuberculosis.

  12. Clinical manufacturing of CAR T cells: foundation of a promising therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiuyan; Rivière, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of cancer patients with autologous T cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) is one of the most promising adoptive cellular therapy approaches. Reproducible manufacturing of high-quality, clinical-grade CAR-T cell products is a prerequisite for the wide application of this technology. Product quality needs to be built-in within every step of the manufacturing process. We summarize herein the requirements and logistics to be considered, as well as the state of the art manufacturing platforms available. CAR-T cell therapy may be on the verge of becoming standard of care for a few clinical indications. Yet, many challenges pertaining to manufacturing standardization and product characterization remain to be overcome in order to achieve broad usage and eventual commercialization of this therapeutic modality. PMID:27347557

  13. Automated manufacturing of chimeric antigen receptor T cells for adoptive immunotherapy using CliniMACS prodigy.

    PubMed

    Mock, Ulrike; Nickolay, Lauren; Philip, Brian; Cheung, Gordon Weng-Kit; Zhan, Hong; Johnston, Ian C D; Kaiser, Andrew D; Peggs, Karl; Pule, Martin; Thrasher, Adrian J; Qasim, Waseem

    2016-08-01

    Novel cell therapies derived from human T lymphocytes are exhibiting enormous potential in early-phase clinical trials in patients with hematologic malignancies. Ex vivo modification of T cells is currently limited to a small number of centers with the required infrastructure and expertise. The process requires isolation, activation, transduction, expansion and cryopreservation steps. To simplify procedures and widen applicability for clinical therapies, automation of these procedures is being developed. The CliniMACS Prodigy (Miltenyi Biotec) has recently been adapted for lentiviral transduction of T cells and here we analyse the feasibility of a clinically compliant T-cell engineering process for the manufacture of T cells encoding chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) for CD19 (CAR19), a widely targeted antigen in B-cell malignancies. Using a closed, single-use tubing set we processed mononuclear cells from fresh or frozen leukapheresis harvests collected from healthy volunteer donors. Cells were phenotyped and subjected to automated processing and activation using TransAct, a polymeric nanomatrix activation reagent incorporating CD3/CD28-specific antibodies. Cells were then transduced and expanded in the CentriCult-Unit of the tubing set, under stabilized culture conditions with automated feeding and media exchange. The process was continuously monitored to determine kinetics of expansion, transduction efficiency and phenotype of the engineered cells in comparison with small-scale transductions run in parallel. We found that transduction efficiencies, phenotype and function of CAR19 T cells were comparable with existing procedures and overall T-cell yields sufficient for anticipated therapeutic dosing. The automation of closed-system T-cell engineering should improve dissemination of emerging immunotherapies and greatly widen applicability.

  14. Impaired and imbalanced cellular immunological status assessed in advanced cancer patients and restoration of the T cell immune status by adoptive T-cell immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Atsutaka; Kaneko, Toru; Naitoh, Keiko; Saito, Masashi; Iwai, Kazuro; Maekawa, Ryuji; Kamigaki, Takashi; Goto, Shigenori

    2014-01-01

    Recent progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms of antitumor immune responses, which may further clarify the immune status of cancer patients. In this study, we performed a detailed evaluation of the immunological status of 47 patients with advanced solid cancer, who had received no immunosuppressive treatment, and compared the results with 32 healthy subjects. Flow-cytometry data for peripheral blood were obtained using 19 monoclonal antibodies against various cell surface and intracellular molecules. Absolute numbers of T cells, several T cell subsets, B cells, and NK cells were significantly decreased in patients compared with healthy subjects. The percentage of CD27(+)CD45RA(+) T cells was lower and that of CD27(-)CD45RA(-) T cells was higher in patients compared with controls. Regulatory and type 2 helper T cells were elevated in patients relative to healthy subjects. The percentage of perforin(+) NK cells was significantly lower in patients than in controls. These results suggest a dysfunctional anti-tumor immune response in cancer patients. Furthermore, peripheral blood from 26 of 47 cancer patients was analyzed after adoptive T cell immunotherapy (ATI). ATI increased the number of T cell subsets, but not B and NK cells. The number and percentage of regulatory T cells decreased significantly. These results suggest that ATI can restore impaired and imbalanced T cell immune status.

  15. T-Cell Receptor Gene Therapy of Established Tumors in a Murine Melanoma Model

    PubMed Central

    Abad, John D.; Wrzensinski, Claudia; Overwijk, Willem; De Witte, Moniek A.; Jorritsma, Annelies; Hsu, Gary; Gattinoni, Luca; Cohen, Cyrille J.; Paulos, Chrystal M.; Palmer, Douglas C.; Haanen, John B. A. G.; Schumacher, Ton N. M.; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Morgan, Richard A.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Adoptive cell transfer therapy using tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes for patients with metastatic melanoma has demonstrated significant objective response rates. One major limitation of these current therapies is the frequent inability to isolate tumor-reactive lymphocytes for treatment. Genetic engineering of peripheral blood lymphocytes with retroviral vectors encoding tumor antigen-specific T-cell receptors (TCRs) bypasses this restriction. To evaluate the efficacy of TCR gene therapy, a murine treatment model was developed. A retroviral vector was constructed encoding the pmel-1 TCR genes targeting the B16 melanoma antigen, gp100. Transduction of C57BL/6 lymphocytes resulted in efficient pmel-1 TCR expression. Lymphocytes transduced with this retrovirus specifically recognized gp100-pulsed target cells as measured by interferon-γ secretion assays. Upon transfer into B16 tumor-bearing mice, the genetically engineered lymphocytes significantly slowed tumor development. The effectiveness of tumor treatment was directly correlated with the number of TCR-engineered T cells administered. These results demonstrated that TCR gene therapy targeting a native tumor antigen significantly delayed the growth of established tumors. When C57BL/6 lymphocytes were added to antigen-reactive pmel-1 T cells, a reduction in the ability of pmel-1 T cell to treat B16 melanomas was seen, suggesting that untransduced cells may be deleterious to TCR gene therapy. This model may be a powerful tool for evaluating future TCR gene transfer-based strategies. PMID:18157006

  16. T-cell receptor gene therapy of established tumors in a murine melanoma model.

    PubMed

    Abad, John D; Wrzensinski, Claudia; Overwijk, Willem; De Witte, Moniek A; Jorritsma, Annelies; Hsu, Cary; Gattinoni, Luca; Cohen, Cyrille J; Paulos, Chrystal M; Palmer, Douglas C; Haanen, John B A G; Schumacher, Ton N M; Rosenberg, Steven A; Restifo, Nicholas P; Morgan, Richard A

    2008-01-01

    Adoptive cell transfer therapy using tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes for patients with metastatic melanoma has demonstrated significant objective response rates. One major limitation of these current therapies is the frequent inability to isolate tumor-reactive lymphocytes for treatment. Genetic engineering of peripheral blood lymphocytes with retroviral vectors encoding tumor antigen-specific T-cell receptors (TCRs) bypasses this restriction. To evaluate the efficacy of TCR gene therapy, a murine treatment model was developed. A retroviral vector was constructed encoding the pmel-1 TCR genes targeting the B16 melanoma antigen, gp100. Transduction of C57BL/6 lymphocytes resulted in efficient pmel-1 TCR expression. Lymphocytes transduced with this retrovirus specifically recognized gp100-pulsed target cells as measured by interferon-gamma secretion assays. Upon transfer into B16 tumor-bearing mice, the genetically engineered lymphocytes significantly slowed tumor development. The effectiveness of tumor treatment was directly correlated with the number of TCR-engineered T cells administered. These results demonstrated that TCR gene therapy targeting a native tumor antigen significantly delayed the growth of established tumors. When C57BL/6 lymphocytes were added to antigen-reactive pmel-1 T cells, a reduction in the ability of pmel-1 T cell to treat B16 melanomas was seen, suggesting that untransduced cells may be deleterious to TCR gene therapy. This model may be a powerful tool for evaluating future TCR gene transfer-based strategies.

  17. A balanced review of the status T cell-based therapy against cancer

    PubMed Central

    Marincola, Francesco M

    2005-01-01

    A recent commentary stirred intense controversy over the status of anti-cancer immunotherapy. The commentary suggested moving beyond current anti-cancer vaccines since active-specific immunization failed to match expectations toward a more aggressive approach involving the adoptive transfer of in vitro expanded tumor antigen-specific T cells. Although the same authors clarified their position in response to others' rebuttal more discussion needs to be devoted to the current status of T cell-based anti-cancer therapy. The accompanying publications review the status of adoptive transfer of cancer vaccines on one hand and active-specific immunization on the other. Hopefully, reading these articles will offer a balanced view of the current status of antigen-specific ant-cancer therapies and suggest future strategies to foster unified efforts to complement either approach with the other according to specific biological principles. PMID:15831096

  18. Adoptive immunotherapy with the use of regulatory T cells and virus-specific T cells derived from cord blood.

    PubMed

    Hanley, Patrick J; Bollard, Catherine M; Brunstein, Claudio G

    2015-06-01

    Cord blood transplantation, an alternative to traditional stem cell transplants (bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell transplantation), is an attractive option for patients lacking suitable stem cell transplant donors. Cord blood units have also proven to be a valuable donor source for the development of cellular therapeutics. Virus-specific T cells and regulatory T cells are two cord blood-derived products that have shown promise in early-phase clinical trials to prevent and/or treat viral infections and graft-versus-host disease, respectively. We describe how current strategies that use cord blood-derived regulatory T cells and virus-specific T cells have been developed to improve outcomes for cord blood transplant recipients.

  19. Successful immunotherapy of autoimmune cholangitis by adoptive transfer of forkhead box protein 3(+) regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, H; Zhang, W; Yang, G-X; Ando, Y; Tomiyama, T; Tsuneyama, K; Leung, P; Coppel, R L; Ansari, A A; Lian, Z X; Ridgway, W M; Joh, T; Gershwin, M E

    2014-11-01

    Treatment of primary biliary cirrhosis (PBC) has lagged behind that of other autoimmune diseases. In this study we have addressed the potential utility of immunotherapy using regulatory T cells (Treg ) to treat murine autoimmune cholangitis. In particular, we have taken advantage of our ability to produce portal inflammation and bile duct cell loss by transfer of CD8(+) T cells from the dominant negative form of transforming growth factor beta receptor type II (dnTGF-βRII) mice to recombination-activating gene (Rag)1(-/-) recipients. We then used this robust established adoptive transfer system and co-transferred CD8(+) T cells from dnTGF-βRII mice with either C57BL/6 or dnTGF-βRII forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3(+) ) T cells. Recipient mice were monitored for histology, including portal inflammation and intralobular biliary cell damage, and also included a study of the phenotypical changes in recipient lymphoid populations and local and systemic cytokine production. Importantly, we report herein that adoptive transfer of Treg from C57BL/6 but not dnTGF-βRII mice significantly reduced the pathology of autoimmune cholangitis, including decreased portal inflammation and bile duct damage as well as down-regulation of the secondary inflammatory response. Further, to define the mechanism of action that explains the differential ability of C57BL/6 Treg versus dnTGF-βRII Treg on the ability to down-regulate autoimmune cholangitis, we noted significant differential expression of glycoprotein A repetitions predominant (GARP), CD73, CD101 and CD103 and a functionally significant increase in interleukin (IL)-10 in Treg from C57BL/6 compared to dnTGF-βRII mice. Our data reflect the therapeutic potential of wild-type CD4(+) FoxP3(+) Treg in reducing the excessive T cell responses of autoimmune cholangitis, which has significance for the potential immunotherapy of PBC.

  20. Supernatural T cells: genetic modification of T cells for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Kershaw, Michael H; Teng, Michele W L; Smyth, Mark J; Darcy, Phillip K

    2005-12-01

    Immunotherapy is receiving much attention as a means of treating cancer, but complete, durable responses remain rare for most malignancies. The natural immune system seems to have limitations and deficiencies that might affect its ability to control malignant disease. An alternative to relying on endogenous components in the immune repertoire is to generate lymphocytes with abilities that are greater than those of natural T cells, through genetic modification to produce 'supernatural' T cells. This Review describes how such T cells can circumvent many of the barriers that are inherent in the tumour microenvironment while optimizing T-cell specificity, activation, homing and antitumour function.

  1. Adoptive transfer of tracer alloreactive CD4(+) TCR-transgenic T cells alters the endogenous immune response to an allograft.

    PubMed

    Miller, Michelle L; Chen, Jianjun; Daniels, Melvin D; McKeague, Matthew G; Wang, Ying; Yin, Dengping; Vu, Vinh; Chong, Anita S; Alegre, Maria-Luisa

    2016-04-11

    T cell receptor transgenic (TCR-Tg) T cells are often used as tracer populations of antigen-specific responses to extrapolate findings to endogenous T cells. The extent to which TCR-Tg T cells behave purely as tracer cells or modify the endogenous immune response is not clear. To test the impact of TCR-Tg T cell transfer on endogenous alloimmunity, recipient mice were seeded with CD4(+) or CD8(+) TCR-Tg or polyclonal T cells at the time of cardiac allograft transplantation. Only CD4(+) TCR-Tg T cells accelerated rejection, and unexpectedly led to a dose-dependent decrease in both transferred and endogenous T cells infiltrating the graft. In contrast, recipients of CD4(+) TCR-Tg cell exhibited enhanced endogenous donor-specific CD8(+) T-cell activation in the spleen and accelerated alloantibody production. Introduction of CD4(+) TCR-Tg T cells also perturbed the intra-graft accumulation of innate cell populations. Thus, transferred CD4(+) TCR-Tg T cells alter many aspects of endogenous alloimmunity, suggesting that caution should be used when interpreting experiments utilizing these adoptively-transferred cells, as the overall nature of allograft rejection may be altered. These results may also have implications for adoptive CD4(+) T cell immunotherapy in tumor and infectious clinical settings as cell infusion may have additional effects on natural immune responses. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. Exploiting cytokine secretion to rapidly produce multivirus-specific T cells for adoptive immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Yuriko; Leen, Ann M; Sun, Jiali; Nakazawa, Yozo; Yvon, Eric; Heslop, Helen E; Brenner, Malcolm K; Rooney, M Cliona

    2009-01-01

    Viral infections remain a major cause of morbidity and mortality after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), and conventional small-molecule therapeutics often have modest benefit, high cost and adverse effects. Adoptive transfer of donor-derived virus-specific T cells has been shown to be feasible and safe after HSCT, and to reconstitute immunity against cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus and adenovirus. Current protocols to generate these cytotoxic T cell (CTL) lines are lengthy, taking up to 12 weeks. Since viral infections often occur <30 days after HSCT, speedy production of virus-specific cytotoxic T cells lacking alloreactivity is highly desirable. We now describe a modified rapid selection method for production and characterization of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells specific for cytomegalovirus, Epstein-Barr virus and adenovirus in a single infusate. We use Ad5f35-pp65/LMP2 vectors in a single procedure over a 48hr time period and manufacture a product suited for clinical use. By simultaneously expanding a portion of the selected product we can characterize phenotype and function of the infused product and link them with subsequent in vivo outcome. PMID:18600178

  3. A novel method using blinatumomab for efficient, clinical-grade expansion of polyclonal T cells for adoptive immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Golay, Josée; D'Amico, Anna; Borleri, Gianmaria; Bonzi, Michela; Valgardsdottir, Rut; Alzani, Rachele; Cribioli, Sabrina; Albanese, Clara; Pesenti, Enrico; Finazzi, Maria Chiara; Quaresmini, Giulia; Nagorsen, Dirk; Introna, Martino; Rambaldi, Alessandro

    2014-11-01

    Current treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients often results in life-threatening immunosuppression. Furthermore, CLL is still an incurable disease due to the persistence of residual leukemic cells. These patients may therefore benefit from immunotherapy approaches aimed at immunoreconstitution and/or the elimination of residual disease following chemotherapy. For these purposes, we designed a simple GMP-compliant protocol for ex vivo expansion of normal T cells from CLL patients' peripheral blood for adoptive therapy, using bispecific Ab blinatumomab (CD3 × CD19), acting both as T cell stimulator and CLL depletion agent, and human rIL-2. Starting from only 10 ml CLL peripheral blood, a mean 515 × 10(6) CD3(+) T cells were expanded in 3 wk. The resulting blinatumomab-expanded T cells (BET) were polyclonal CD4(+) and CD8(+) and mostly effector and central memory cells. The Th1 subset was slightly prevalent over Th2, whereas Th17 and T regulatory cells were <1%. CMV-specific clones were detected in equivalent proportion before and after expansion. Interestingly, BET cells had normalized expression of the synapse inhibitors CD272 and CD279 compared with starting T cells and were cytotoxic against CD19(+) targets in presence of blinatumomab in vitro. In support of their functional capacity, we observed that BET, in combination with blinatumomab, had significant therapeutic activity in a systemic human diffuse large B lymphoma model in NOD-SCID mice. We propose BET as a therapeutic tool for immunoreconstitution of heavily immunosuppressed CLL patients and, in combination with bispecific Ab, as antitumor immunotherapy.

  4. Pre-emptive and therapeutic adoptive immunotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma: Phenotype and effector function of T cells impact on clinical response

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Corey; Lee, Victor; Schuessler, Andrea; Beagley, Leone; Rehan, Sweera; Tsang, Janice; Li, Vivian; Tiu, Randal; Smith, David; A. Neller, Michelle; Matthews, Katherine K.; Gostick, Emma; Price, David A.; Burrows, Jacqueline; Boyle, Glen M.; Chua, Daniel; Panizza, Benedict; Porceddu, Sandro V.; Nicholls, John; Kwong, Dora; Khanna, Rajiv

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adoptive T cell therapy has emerged as a powerful strategy to treat human cancers especially haematological malignancies. Extension of these therapies to solid cancers remains a significant challenge especially in the context of defining immunological correlates of clinical responses. Here we describe results from a clinical study investigating autologous Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-specific T cells generated using a novel AdE1-LMPpoly vector to treat patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) either pre-emptively in at-risk patients with no or minimal residual disease (N/MRD) or therapeutically in patients with active recurrent/metastatic disease (ARMD). Tolerability, safety and efficacy, including progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS), were evaluated following adoptive T-cell immunotherapy. Twenty-nine patients, including 20 with ARMD and nine with N/MRD, successfully completed T-cell therapy. After a median follow-up of 18.5 months, the median PFS was 5.5 months (95% CI 2.1 to 9.0 months) and the median OS was 38.1 months (95% CI 17.2 months to not reached). Post-immunotherapy analyses revealed that disease stabilization in ARMD patients was significantly associated with the functional and phenotypic composition of in vitro-expanded T cell immunotherapy. These included a higher proportion of effector CD8+ T-cells and an increased number of EBV-specific T-cells with broader antigen specificity. These observations indicate that adoptive immunotherapy with AdE1-LMPpoly-expanded T cells stabilizes relapsed, refractory NPC without significant toxicity. Promising clinical outcomes in N/MRD patients further suggest a potential role for this approach as a consolidation treatment following first-line chemotherapy.

  5. Adoptive Cellular Therapy Targeting Recurrent Pediatric Brain Cancers During Hematopoietic Recovery from High-Dose Chemotherapy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    medulloblastoma and primitive neuroectodermal tumors (MB/PNETs), will still die from recurrent disease. Furthermore, survivors are often left with...REMATCH: ”Recurrent Medulloblastoma and Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor Adoptive T Cell Therapy during Recovery from Myeloablative Chemotherapy and...Recurrent Medulloblastoma and Primitive Neuroectodermal Tumor Adoptive T Cell Therapy during Recovery from Myeloablative Chemotherapy and Hematopoietic

  6. Dichotomy between T Cell and B Cell Tolerance to Neonatal Retroviral Infection Permits T Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mavrommatis, Bettina; Baudino, Lucie; Levy, Prisca; Merkenschlager, Julia; Eksmond, Urszula; Donnarumma, Tiziano; Young, George; Stoye, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Elucidation of the immune requirements for control or elimination of retroviral infection remains an important aim. We studied the induction of adaptive immunity to neonatal infection with a murine retrovirus, under conditions leading to immunological tolerance. We found that the absence of either maternal or offspring adaptive immunity permitted efficient vertical transmission of the retrovirus. Maternal immunodeficiency allowed the retrovirus to induce central Th cell tolerance in the infected offspring. In turn, this compromised the offspring’s ability to mount a protective Th cell–dependent B cell response. However, in contrast to T cells, offspring B cells were not centrally tolerized and retained their ability to respond to the infection when provided with T cell help. Thus, escape of retrovirus-specific B cells from deletional tolerance offers the opportunity to induce protective retroviral immunity by restoration of retrovirus-specific T cell help, suggesting similar T cell immunotherapies for persistent viral infections. PMID:27647833

  7. Cellular Immunotherapy for Neuroblastoma: A Review of Current Vaccine and Adoptive T Cell Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Louis, C.U.; Brenner, M.K.

    2014-01-01

    Immunotherapy is an attractive option for patients with high risk neuroblastoma due to their poor long-term survival rates after conventional treatment. Neuroblastoma cells are derived from the embryonic neural crest and therefore express tumor antigens not widely seen in normal cells, making them potential targets for immunologic attack. There is already considerable experience with monoclonal antibodies that target these tumor associated antigens, and in this review we focus on more exploratory approaches, using tumor vaccines and adoptive transfer of tumor-directed T cells. PMID:19199969

  8. Adoptive transfer of cytomegalovirus-specific effector CD4+ T cells provides antiviral protection from murine CMV infection.

    PubMed

    Jeitziner, Sanja Mandaric; Walton, Senta M; Torti, Nicole; Oxenius, Annette

    2013-11-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infects a majority of the human population and establishes a life-long persistence. CMV infection is usually asymptomatic but the virus carries pathogenic potential and causes severe disease in immunocompromised individuals. T-cell-mediated immunity plays an essential role in control of CMV infection and adoptive transfer of CMV-specific CD8(+) T cells restores viral immunity in immunosuppressed patients but a role for CD4(+) T cells remains elusive. Here, we analyzed in adoptive transfer studies the features and antiviral functions of virus-specific CD4(+) T cells during primary murine CMV (MCMV) infection. MCMV-specific CD4(+) T cells expanded upon MCMV infection and displayed an effector phenotype and function. Adoptive transfer of in vivo activated MCMV-specific CD4(+) T cells to immune-compromised mice was protective during pathogenic MCMV infection and IFN-γ was a crucial mediator of this protective capacity. Moreover, co-transfer of low doses of both MCMV-specific CD4(+) T cells and CD8(+) T cells synergized in control of lytic viral replication in immune-compromised mice. Our data reveal a pivotal antiviral role for virus-specific CD4(+) T cells in protection from pathogenic CMV infection and provide evidence for their antiviral therapeutic potential.

  9. Genetic modification of T cells improves the effectiveness of adoptive tumor immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jakóbisiak, Marek; Gołab, Jakub

    2010-10-01

    Appropriate combinations of immunotherapy and gene therapy promise to be more effective in the treatment of cancer patients than either of these therapeutic approaches alone. One such treatment is based on the application of patients' cytotoxic T cells, which can be activated, expanded, and genetically engineered to recognize particular tumor-associated antigens (TAAs). Because T cells recognizing TAAs might become unresponsive in the process of tumor development as a result of tumor evasion strategies, immunogenic viral antigens or alloantigens could be used for the expansion of cytotoxic T cells and then redirected through genetic engineering. This therapeutic approach has already demonstrated promising results in melanoma patients and could be used in the treatment of many other tumors. The graft-versus-leukemia, or more generally graft-versus-tumor, reaction based on the application of a donor lymphocyte infusion can also be ameliorated through the incorporation of suicide genes into donor lymphocytes. Such lymphocytes could be safely and more extensively used in tumor patients because they could be eliminated should a severe graft-versus-host reaction develop.

  10. Modulating Gold Nanoparticle in vivo Delivery for Photothermal Therapy Applications Using a T Cell Delivery System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kennedy, Laura Carpin

    This thesis reports new gold nanoparticle-based methods to treat chemotherapy-resistant and metastatic tumors that frequently evade conventional cancer therapies. Gold nanoparticles represent an innovative generation of diagnostic and treatment agents due to the ease with which they can be tuned to scatter or absorb a chosen wavelength of light. One area of intensive investigation in recent years is gold nanoparticle photothermal therapy (PTT), in which gold nanoparticles are used to heat and destroy cancer. This work demonstrates the utility of gold nanoparticle PTT against two categories of cancer that are currently a clinical challenge: trastuzumab-resistant breast cancer and metastatic cancer. In addition, this thesis presents a new method of gold nanoparticle delivery using T cells that increases gold nanoparticle tumor accumulation efficiency, a current challenge in the field of PTT. I ablated trastuzumab-resistant breast cancer in vitro for the first time using anti-HER2 labeled silica-gold nanoshells, demonstrating the potential utility of PTT against chemotherapy-resistant cancers. I next established for the first time the use of T cells as gold nanoparticle vehicles in vivo. When incubated with gold nanoparticles in culture, T cells can internalize up to 15000 nanoparticles per cell with no detrimental effects to T cell viability or function (e.g. migration and cytokine secretion). These AuNP-T cells can be systemically administered to tumor-bearing mice and deliver gold nanoparticles four times more efficiently than by injecting free nanoparticles. In addition, the biodistribution of AuNP-T cells correlates with the normal biodistribution of T cell carrier, suggesting the gold nanoparticle biodistribution can be modulated through the choice of nanoparticle vehicle. Finally, I apply gold nanoparticle PTT as an adjuvant treatment for T cell adoptive transfer immunotherapy (Hyperthermia-Enhanced Immunotherapy or HIT) of distant tumors in a melanoma mouse

  11. Adoptive transfer of hepatic stellate cells ameliorates liver ischemia reperfusion injury through enriching regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Feng, Min; Wang, Quanrongzi; Wang, Hao; Wang, Meng; Guan, Wenxian; Lu, Ling

    2014-04-01

    Our previous study indicated that adoptive transferred regulatory T cells (Tregs) attenuated liver ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI). Recent studies demonstrated that hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) were producers of induced Tregs (iTregs) via retinoic acid. This study aimed to investigate the role of adoptive transferred HSCs in liver IRI. Mice were treated with gradient doses of HSCs before surgery at 24h or 72h. The levels of serum aminotransferases and hepatic cytokines were evaluated after reperfusion. Meanwhile, hepatic Tregs and their subsets were analyzed by flow cytometry. We found that adoptive transferred HSCs attenuated liver IRI. Administration of HSCs expanded the number of hepatic iTregs and natural Tregs (nTregs) after reperfusion. In addition, we found that the increased Tregs were almost Helios-Tregs before surgery. These Helios-Tregs were considered as iTregs and protected liver from IRI partially. Furthermore, adoptive transferred HSCs stabilized nTregs and prevented nTregs from reducing after reperfusion. These nTregs also attenuated liver IRI partially. Depletion of Tregs abolished the protective effect of HSCs. Thus, we conclude that adoptive transferred HSCs ameliorate liver IRI in Tregs-dependent manner.

  12. Adoptive transfer of Mammaglobin-A epitope specific CD8 T cells combined with a single low dose of total body irradiation eradicates breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Lerret, Nadine M; Rogozinska, Magdalena; Jaramillo, Andrés; Marzo, Amanda L

    2012-01-01

    Adoptive T cell therapy has proven to be beneficial in a number of tumor systems by targeting the relevant tumor antigen. The tumor antigen targeted in our model is Mammaglobin-A, expressed by approximately 80% of human breast tumors. Here we evaluated the use of adoptively transferred Mammaglobin-A specific CD8 T cells in combination with low dose irradiation to induce breast tumor rejection and prevent relapse. We show Mammaglobin-A specific CD8 T cells generated by DNA vaccination with all epitopes (Mammaglobin-A2.1, A2.2, A2.4 and A2.6) and full-length DNA in vivo resulted in heterogeneous T cell populations consisting of both effector and central memory CD8 T cell subsets. Adoptive transfer of spleen cells from all Mammaglobin-A2 immunized mice into tumor-bearing SCID/beige mice induced tumor regression but this anti-tumor response was not sustained long-term. Additionally, we demonstrate that only the adoptive transfer of Mammaglobin-A2 specific CD8 T cells in combination with a single low dose of irradiation prevents tumors from recurring. More importantly we show that this single dose of irradiation results in the down regulation of the macrophage scavenger receptor 1 on dendritic cells within the tumor and reduces lipid uptake by tumor resident dendritic cells potentially enabling the dendritic cells to present tumor antigen more efficiently and aid in tumor clearance. These data reveal the potential for adoptive transfer combined with a single low dose of total body irradiation as a suitable therapy for the treatment of established breast tumors and the prevention of tumor recurrence.

  13. Dimethyl Fumarate Therapy Significantly Improves the Responsiveness of T Cells in Multiple Sclerosis Patients for Immunoregulation by Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Schlöder, Janine; Berges, Carsten; Luessi, Felix; Jonuleit, Helmut

    2017-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic autoimmune disease caused by an insufficient suppression of autoreactive T lymphocytes. One reason for the lack of immunological control is the reduced responsiveness of T effector cells (Teff) for the suppressive properties of regulatory T cells (Treg), a process termed Treg resistance. Here we investigated whether the disease-modifying therapy of relapsing-remitting MS (RRMS) with dimethyl fumarate (DMF) influences the sensitivity of T cells in the peripheral blood of patients towards Treg-mediated suppression. We demonstrated that DMF restores responsiveness of Teff to the suppressive function of Treg in vitro, presumably by down-regulation of interleukin-6R (IL-6R) expression on T cells. Transfer of human immune cells into immunodeficient mice resulted in a lethal graft-versus-host reaction triggered by human CD4+ Teff. This systemic inflammation can be prevented by activated Treg after transfer of immune cells from DMF-treated MS patients, but not after injection of Treg-resistant Teff from therapy-naïve MS patients. Furthermore, after DMF therapy, proliferation and expansion of T cells and the immigration into the spleen of the animals is reduced and modulated by activated Treg. In summary, our data reveals that DMF therapy significantly improves the responsiveness of Teff in MS patients to immunoregulation. PMID:28134847

  14. Chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy for solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Newick, Kheng; Moon, Edmund; Albelda, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells are engineered constructs composed of synthetic receptors that direct T cells to surface antigens for subsequent elimination. Many CAR constructs are also manufactured with elements that augment T-cell persistence and activity. To date, CAR T cells have demonstrated tremendous success in eradicating hematological malignancies (e.g., CD19 CARs in leukemias). This success is not yet extrapolated to solid tumors, and the reasons for this are being actively investigated. Here in this mini-review, we discuss some of the key hurdles encountered by CAR T cells in the solid tumor microenvironment. PMID:27162934

  15. Whole-body irradiation increases the magnitude and persistence of adoptively transferred T cells associated with tumor regression in a mouse model of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Ward-Kavanagh, Lindsay K; Zhu, Junjia; Cooper, Timothy K; Schell, Todd D

    2014-08-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy has demonstrated efficacy in a subset of clinical and preclinical studies, but the T cells used for therapy often are rendered rapidly nonfunctional in tumor-bearing hosts. Recent evidence indicates that prostate cancer can be susceptible to immunotherapy, but most studies using autochthonous tumor models demonstrate only short-lived T-cell responses in the tolerogenic prostate microenvironment. Here, we assessed the efficacy of sublethal whole-body irradiation (WBI) to enhance the magnitude and duration of adoptively transferred CD8(+) T cells in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) model. We demonstrate that WBI promoted high-level accumulation of granzyme B (GzB, Gzmb)-expressing donor T cells both in lymphoid organs and in the prostate of TRAMP mice. Donor T cells remained responsive to vaccination in irradiated recipients, but a single round of WBI-enhanced adoptive immunotherapy failed to affect significantly the existing disease. Addition of a second round of immunotherapy promoted regression of established disease in half of the treated mice, with no progression observed. Regression was associated with long-term persistence of effector/memory phenotype CD8(+) donor cells. Administration of the second round of adoptive immunotherapy led to reacquisition of GzB expression by persistent T cells from the first transfer. These results indicate that WBI conditioning amplifies tumor-specific T cells in the TRAMP prostate and lymphoid tissue, and suggest that the initial treatment alters the tolerogenic microenvironment to increase antitumor activity by a second wave of donor cells.

  16. Adoptive Cell Therapies for Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Bielamowicz, Kevin; Khawja, Shumaila; Ahmed, Nabil

    2013-01-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and most aggressive primary brain malignancy and, as it stands, is virtually incurable. With the current standard of care, maximum feasible surgical resection followed by radical radiotherapy and adjuvant temozolomide, survival rates are at a median of 14.6 months from diagnosis in molecularly unselected patients (1). Collectively, the current knowledge suggests that the continued tumor growth and survival is in part due to failure to mount an effective immune response. While this tolerance is subtended by the tumor being utterly “self,” it is to a great extent due to local and systemic immune compromise mediated by the tumor. Different cell modalities including lymphokine-activated killer cells, natural killer cells, cytotoxic T lymphocytes, and transgenic chimeric antigen receptor or αβ T cell receptor grafted T cells are being explored to recover and or redirect the specificity of the cellular arm of the immune system toward the tumor complex. Promising phase I/II trials of such modalities have shown early indications of potential efficacy while maintaining a favorable toxicity profile. Efficacy will need to be formally tested in phase II/III clinical trials. Given the high morbidity and mortality of GBM, it is imperative to further investigate and possibly integrate such novel cell-based therapies into the current standards-of-care and herein we collectively assess and critique the state-of-the-knowledge pertaining to these efforts. PMID:24273748

  17. Adoptive immunotherapy with Cl-IB-MECA-treated CD8+ T cells reduces melanoma growth in mice.

    PubMed

    Montinaro, Antonella; Forte, Giovanni; Sorrentino, Rosalinda; Luciano, Antonio; Palma, Giuseppe; Arra, Claudio; Adcock, Ian M; Pinto, Aldo; Morello, Silvana

    2012-01-01

    Cl-IB-MECA is a selective A3 adenosine receptor agonist, which plays a crucial role in limiting tumor progression. In mice, Cl-IB-MECA administration enhances the anti-tumor T cell-mediated response. However, little is known about the activity of Cl-IB-MECA on CD8+ T cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of ex vivo Cl-IB-MECA treatment of CD8+ T cells, adoptively transferred in melanoma-bearing mice. Adoptive transfer of Cl-IB-MECA-treated CD8+ T cells or a single administration of Cl-IB-MECA (20 ng/mouse) inhibited tumor growth compared with the control group and significantly improved mouse survival. This was associated with the release of Th1-type cytokines and a greater influx of mature Langerin+ dendritic cells (LCs) into the tumor microenvironment. CD8+ T cells treated with Cl-IB-MECA released TNF-α which plays a critical role in the therapeutic efficacy of these cells when injected to mice. Indeed, neutralization of TNF-α by a specific monoclonal Ab significantly blocked the anti-tumor activity of Cl-IB-MECA-treated T cells. This was due to the reduction in levels of cytotoxic cytokines and the presence of fewer LCs. In conclusion, these studies reveal that ex vivo treatment with Cl-IB-MECA improves CD8+ T cell adoptive immunotherapy for melanoma in a TNF-α-dependent manner.

  18. Adoptive immunotherapy for hematological malignancies using T cells gene-modified to express tumor antigen-specific receptors.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Hiroshi

    2014-12-15

    Accumulating clinical evidence suggests that adoptive T-cell immunotherapy could be a promising option for control of cancer; evident examples include the graft-vs-leukemia effect mediated by donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) and therapeutic infusion of ex vivo-expanded tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) for melanoma. Currently, along with advances in synthetic immunology, gene-modified T cells retargeted to defined tumor antigens have been introduced as "cellular drugs". As the functional properties of the adoptive immune response mediated by T lymphocytes are decisively regulated by their T-cell receptors (TCRs), transfer of genes encoding target antigen-specific receptors should enable polyclonal T cells to be uniformly redirected toward cancer cells. Clinically, anticancer adoptive immunotherapy using genetically engineered T cells has an impressive track record. Notable examples include the dramatic benefit of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) gene-modified T cells redirected towards CD19 in patients with B-cell malignancy, and the encouraging results obtained with TCR gene-modified T cells redirected towards NY-ESO-1, a cancer-testis antigen, in patients with advanced melanoma and synovial cell sarcoma. This article overviews the current status of this treatment option, and discusses challenging issues that still restrain the full effectiveness of this strategy, especially in the context of hematological malignancy.

  19. Generation of memory T cells for adoptive transfer using clinical-grade anti-CD62L magnetic beads.

    PubMed

    Verfuerth, S; Sousa, P S E; Beloki, L; Murray, M; Peters, M D; O'Neill, A T; Mackinnon, S; Lowdell, M W; Chakraverty, R; Samuel, E R

    2015-10-01

    Pre-clinical studies of allogeneic stem cell transplantation suggest that depletion of naive T cells from donor lymphocytes will reduce the risk of GvHD but preserve immunity to infectious pathogens. In this study, we have established a clinical-grade protocol under good manufacturing practice conditions for purging CD62L(+) naive T cells from steady-state leukapheresis products using the CliniMACS system. The efficacy of immunomagnetic CD62L depletion was assessed by analysis of cell composition and functional immune responses. A median 2.9 log CD62L depletion was achieved with no evidence of CD62L shedding during the procedure and a mean T-cell yield of 47%. CD62L(-) cells comprised an equal mix of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, with elimination of B cells but maintenance of regulatory T cells and natural killer cell populations. CD62L-depleted T cells were predominantly CD45RA(-) and CD45RA(+) effector memory (>90%) and contained the bulk of pentamer-staining antivirus-specific T cells. Functional assessment of CD62L(-) cells revealed the maintenance of antiviral T-cell reactivity and a reduction in the alloreactive immune response compared with unmanipulated cells. Clinical-grade depletion of naive T cells using immunomagnetic CD62L beads from steady-state leukapheresis products is highly efficient and generates cells suitable for adoptive transfer in the context of clinical trials.

  20. Deletion of Plasmodium berghei-Specific CD4+ T Cells Adoptively Transferred into Recipient Mice after Challenge with Homologous Parasite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirunpetcharat, Chakrit; Good, Michael F.

    1998-02-01

    The immune response to malaria parasites includes T cell responses that reduce parasites by effector T cell responses and by providing help for antibody responses. Some parasites are more sensitive to antibody and others are more sensitive to cell-mediated immunity. We demonstrate that cultured CD4+ T cells that produce interferon CD4+ and interleukin 2, but not interleukin 4, in response to stimulation with the rodent parasite Plasmodium berghei can reduce but not eliminate parasites in vivo after adoptive transfer. Although cells can persist in vivo for up to 9 months in uninfected mice, infection results in elimination of up to 99% of specific T cells in different tissues, as judged by tracking T cells labeled with the fluorescent dye 5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester. T cells specific for ovalbumin are unaffected. In vivo activation and division of transferred T cells per se are not responsible for deletion because T cells positive for 5-(and -6)-carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester divide up to six times within 7 days in uninfected mice and are not deleted. Understanding the factors responsible for parasite-mediated specific deletion of T cells would enhance our knowledge of parasite immunity.

  1. Immunosuppressive therapy exacerbates autoimmunity in NOD mice and diminishes the protective activity of regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Kaminitz, Ayelet; Mizrahi, Keren; Yaniv, Isaac; Stein, Jerry; Askenasy, Nadir

    2010-09-01

    Mounting evidence indicates that immunosuppressive therapy and autologous bone marrow transplantation are relatively inefficient approaches to treat autoimmune diabetes. In this study we assessed the impact of immunosuppression on inflammatory insulitis in NOD mice, and the effect of radiation on immunomodulation mediated by adoptive transfer of various cell subsets. Sublethal radiation of NOD females at the age of 14 weeks (onset of hyperglycemia) delayed the onset of hyperglycemia, however two thirds of the mice became diabetic. Adoptive transfer of splenocytes into irradiated NON and NOD mice precipitated disease onset despite increased contents of CD25(+)FoxP3(+) T cells in the pancreas and regional lymphatics. Similar phenotypic changes were observed when CD25(+) T cells were infused after radiation, which also delayed disease onset without affecting its incidence. Importantly, irradiation increased the susceptibility to diabetes in NOD and NON mice (71-84%) as compared to immunomodulation with splenocytes and CD25(+) T cells in naïve recipients (44-50%). Although irradiation had significant and durable influence on pancreatic infiltrates and the fractions of functional CD25(+)FoxP3(+) Treg cells were elevated by adoptive cell transfer, this approach conferred no protection from disease progression. Irradiation was ineffective both in debulking of pathogenic clones and in restoring immune homeostasis, and the consequent homeostatic expansion evolves as an unfavorable factor in attempts to restore self-tolerance and might even provoke uncontrolled proliferation of pathogenic clones. The obstacles imposed by immunosuppression on abrogation of autoimmune insulitis require replacement of non-specific immunosuppressive therapy by selective immunomodulation that does not cause lymphopenia.

  2. Enhancement of adoptive T cell transfer with single low dose pretreatment of doxorubicin or paclitaxel in mice.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Fei-Ting; Chen, Tzu-Chun; Chuang, Hui-Yen; Chang, Ya-Fang; Hwang, Jeng-Jong

    2015-12-29

    Ex vivo expansion of CD8+ T-cells has been a hindrance for the success of adoptive T cell transfer in clinic. Currently, preconditioning with chemotherapy is used to modulate the patient immunity before ACT, however, the tumor microenvironment beneficial for transferring T cells may also be damaged. Here preconditioning with single low dose of doxorubicin or paclitaxel combined with fewer CD8+ T-cells was investigated to verify whether the same therapeutic efficacy of ACT could be achieved. An E.G7/OT1 animal model that involved adoptive transfer of OVA-specific CD8+ T-cells transduced with a granzyme B promoter-driven firefly luciferase and tomato fluorescent fusion reporter gene was used to evaluate this strategy. The result showed that CD8+ T-cells were activated and sustained longer in mice pretreated with one low-dose Dox or Tax. Enhanced therapeutic efficacy was found in Dox or Tax combined with 2x106 CD8+ T-cells and achieved the same level of tumor growth inhibition as that of 5x106 CD8+ T-cells group. Notably, reduced numbers of Tregs and myeloid derived suppressor cells were shown in combination groups. By contrast, the number of tumor-infiltrating cytotoxic T lymphocytes and IL-12 were increased. The NF-κB activity and immunosuppressive factors such as TGF-β, IDO, CCL2, VEGF, CCL22, COX-2 and IL-10 were suppressed. This study demonstrates that preconditioning with single low dose Dox or Tax and combined with two fifth of the original CD8+ T-cells could improve the tumor microenvironment via suppression of NF-κB and its related immunosuppressors, and activate more CD8+ T-cells which also stay longer.

  3. Regulation and Maintenance of an Adoptive T-Cell Dependent Memory B Cell Pool

    PubMed Central

    Anson, Marie; Amado, Inês; Mailhé, Marie-Pierre; Donnadieu, Emmanuel; Garcia, Sylvie; Huetz, François; Freitas, Antonio A.

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the ability of monoclonal B cells to restore primary and secondary T-cell dependent antibody responses in adoptive immune-deficient hosts. Priming induced B cell activation and expansion, AID expression, antibody production and the generation of IgM+IgG- and IgM-IgG+ antigen-experienced B-cell subsets that persisted in the lymphopenic environment by cell division. Upon secondary transfer and recall the IgM-IgG+ cells responded by the production of antigen-specific IgG while the IgM+ memory cells secreted mainly IgM and little IgG, but generated new B cells expressing germinal center markers. The recall responses were more efficient if the antigenic boost was delayed suggesting that a period of adaptation is necessary before the transferred cells are able to respond. Overall these findings indicate that reconstitution of a functional and complete memory pool requires transfer of all different antigen-experienced B cell subsets. We also found that the size of the memory B cell pool did not rely on the number of the responding naïve B cells, suggesting autonomous homeostatic controls for naïve and memory B cells. By reconstituting a stable memory B cell pool in immune-deficient hosts using a monoclonal high-affinity B cell population we demonstrate the potential value of B cell adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:27880797

  4. A carbon nanotube-polymer composite for T-cell therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadel, Tarek R.; Sharp, Fiona A.; Vudattu, Nalini; Ragheb, Ragy; Garyu, Justin; Kim, Dongin; Hong, Enping; Li, Nan; Haller, Gary L.; Pfefferle, Lisa D.; Justesen, Sune; Harold, Kevin C.; Fahmy, Tarek M.

    2014-08-01

    Clinical translation of cell therapies requires strategies that can manufacture cells efficiently and economically. One promising way to reproducibly expand T cells for cancer therapy is by attaching the stimuli for T cells onto artificial substrates with high surface area. Here, we show that a carbon nanotube-polymer composite can act as an artificial antigen-presenting cell to efficiently expand the number of T cells isolated from mice. We attach antigens onto bundled carbon nanotubes and combined this complex with polymer nanoparticles containing magnetite and the T-cell growth factor interleukin-2 (IL-2). The number of T cells obtained was comparable to clinical standards using a thousand-fold less soluble IL-2. T cells obtained from this expansion were able to delay tumour growth in a murine model for melanoma. Our results show that this composite is a useful platform for generating large numbers of cytotoxic T cells for cancer immunotherapy.

  5. Immune escape from NY-ESO-1-specific T-cell therapy via loss of heterozygosity in the MHC.

    PubMed

    Klippel, Z K; Chou, J; Towlerton, A M; Voong, L N; Robbins, P; Bensinger, W I; Warren, E H

    2014-03-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy of tumors with T cells specific for the cancer-testis antigen NY-ESO-1 has shown great promise in preclinical models and in early stage clinical trials. Tumor persistence or recurrence after NY-ESO-1-specific therapy occurs, however, and the mechanisms of recurrence remain poorly defined. In a murine xenograft model of NY-ESO-1(+) multiple myeloma, we observed tumor recurrence after adoptive transfer of CD8(+) T cells genetically redirected to the prototypic NY-ESO-1157-165 peptide presented by HLA-A*02:01. Analysis of the myeloma cells that had escaped from T-cell control revealed intact expression of NY-ESO-1 and B2M, but selective, complete loss of HLA-A*02:01 expression from the cell surface. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) involving the HLA-A locus was identified in the tumor cells, and further analysis revealed selective loss of the allele encoding HLA-A*02:01. Although LOH involving the MHC has not been described in myeloma patients with persistent or recurrent disease after immune therapies such as allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), it has been described in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia who relapsed after allogeneic HCT. These results suggest that MHC loss should be evaluated in patients with myeloma and other cancers who relapse after adoptive NY-ESO-1-specific T-cell therapy.

  6. Therapy of relapsed leukemia after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation with T cells specific for minor histocompatibility antigens

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Nobuharu; Akatsuka, Yoshiki; Chaney, Colette N.; Mito, Jeffrey K.; Loeb, Keith R.; Gooley, Ted A.; Brown, Michele L.; Koo, Kevin K. W.; Rosinski, Kellie V.; Ogawa, Seishi; Matsubara, Aiko; Appelbaum, Frederick R.; Riddell, Stanley R.

    2010-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of donor T cells that recognize recipient minor histocompatibility antigens (mHAgs) is a potential strategy for preventing or treating leukemic relapse after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). A total of 7 patients with recurrent leukemia after major histocompatibility complex (MHC)–matched allogeneic HCT were treated with infusions of donor-derived, ex vivo–expanded CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) clones specific for tissue-restricted recipient mHAgs. The safety of T-cell therapy, in vivo persistence of transferred CTLs, and disease response were assessed. Molecular characterization of the mHAgs recognized by CTL clones administered to 3 patients was performed to provide insight into the antileukemic activity and safety of T-cell therapy. Pulmonary toxicity of CTL infusion was seen in 3 patients, was severe in 1 patient, and correlated with the level of expression of the mHAg-encoding genes in lung tissue. Adoptively transferred CTLs persisted in the blood up to 21 days after infusion, and 5 patients achieved complete but transient remissions after therapy. The results of these studies illustrate the potential to selectively enhance graft-versus-leukemia activity by the adoptive transfer of mHAg-specific T-cell clones and the challenges for the broad application of this approach in allogeneic HCT. This study has been registered at http://clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00107354. PMID:20071660

  7. Induction of CD4(+) and CD8(+) anti-tumor effector T cell responses by bacteria mediated tumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Stern, Christian; Kasnitz, Nadine; Kocijancic, Dino; Trittel, Stephanie; Riese, Peggy; Guzman, Carlos A; Leschner, Sara; Weiss, Siegfried

    2015-10-15

    Facultative anaerobic bacteria like E. coli can colonize solid tumors often resulting in tumor growth retardation or even clearance. Little mechanistic knowledge is available for this phenomenon which is however crucial for optimization and further implementation in the clinic. Here, we show that intravenous injections with E. coli TOP10 can induce clearance of CT26 tumors in BALB/c mice. Importantly, re-challenging mice which had cleared tumors showed that clearance was due to a specific immune reaction. Accordingly, lymphopenic mice never showed tumor clearance after infection. Depletion experiments revealed that during induction phase, CD8(+) T cells are the sole effectors responsible for tumor clearance while in the memory phase CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells were involved. This was confirmed by adoptive transfer. CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells could reject newly set tumors while CD8(+) T cells could even reject established tumors. Detailed analysis of adoptively transferred CD4(+) T cells during tumor challenge revealed expression of granzyme B, FasL, TNF-α and IFN-γ in such T cells that might be involved in the anti-tumor activity. Our findings should pave the way for further optimization steps of this promising therapy.

  8. Toxicity and management in CAR T-cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Bonifant, Challice L; Jackson, Hollie J; Brentjens, Renier J; Curran, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    T cells can be genetically modified to target tumors through the expression of a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR). Most notably, CAR T cells have demonstrated clinical efficacy in hematologic malignancies with more modest responses when targeting solid tumors. However, CAR T cells also have the capacity to elicit expected and unexpected toxicities including: cytokine release syndrome, neurologic toxicity, "on target/off tumor" recognition, and anaphylaxis. Theoretical toxicities including clonal expansion secondary to insertional oncogenesis, graft versus host disease, and off-target antigen recognition have not been clinically evident. Abrogating toxicity has become a critical step in the successful application of this emerging technology. To this end, we review the reported and theoretical toxicities of CAR T cells and their management.

  9. Efficient tumor regression by adoptively transferred CEA-specific CAR-T cells associated with symptoms of mild cytokine release syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wang, Linan; Ma, Ning; Okamoto, Sachiko; Amaishi, Yasunori; Sato, Eiichi; Seo, Naohiro; Mineno, Junichi; Takesako, Kazutoh; Kato, Takuma; Shiku, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is a cell surface antigen highly expressed in various cancer cell types and in healthy tissues. It has the potential to be a target for chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T-cell therapy; however, the safety of this approach in terms of on-target/off-tumor effects needs to be determined. To address this issue in a clinically relevant model, we used a mouse model in which the T cells expressing CEA-specific CAR were transferred into tumor-bearing CEA-transgenic (Tg) mice that physiologically expressed CEA as a self-antigen. The adoptive transfer in conjunction with lymphodepleting and myeloablative preconditioning mediated significant tumor regression but caused weight loss in CEA-Tg, but not in wild-type mice. The weight loss was not associated with overt inflammation in the CEA-expressing gastrointestinal tract but was associated with malnutrition, reflected in elevated systemic levels of cytokines linked to anorexia, which could be controlled by the administration of an anti-IL-6 receptor monoclonal antibody without compromising efficacy. The apparent relationship between lymphodepleting and myeloablative preconditioning, efficacy, and off-tumor toxicity of CAR-T cells would necessitate the development of CEA-specific CAR-T cells with improved signaling domains that require less stringent preconditioning for their efficacy. Taken together, these results suggest that CEA-specific CAR-based adoptive T-cell therapy may be effective for patients with CEA(+) solid tumors. Distinguishing the fine line between therapeutic efficacy and off-tumor toxicity would involve further modifications of CAR-T cells and preconditioning regimens.

  10. Efficient tumor regression by adoptively transferred CEA-specific CAR-T cells associated with symptoms of mild cytokine release syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Linan; Ma, Ning; Okamoto, Sachiko; Amaishi, Yasunori; Sato, Eiichi; Seo, Naohiro; Mineno, Junichi; Takesako, Kazutoh; Kato, Takuma; Shiku, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is a cell surface antigen highly expressed in various cancer cell types and in healthy tissues. It has the potential to be a target for chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T-cell therapy; however, the safety of this approach in terms of on-target/off-tumor effects needs to be determined. To address this issue in a clinically relevant model, we used a mouse model in which the T cells expressing CEA-specific CAR were transferred into tumor-bearing CEA-transgenic (Tg) mice that physiologically expressed CEA as a self-antigen. The adoptive transfer in conjunction with lymphodepleting and myeloablative preconditioning mediated significant tumor regression but caused weight loss in CEA-Tg, but not in wild-type mice. The weight loss was not associated with overt inflammation in the CEA-expressing gastrointestinal tract but was associated with malnutrition, reflected in elevated systemic levels of cytokines linked to anorexia, which could be controlled by the administration of an anti-IL-6 receptor monoclonal antibody without compromising efficacy. The apparent relationship between lymphodepleting and myeloablative preconditioning, efficacy, and off-tumor toxicity of CAR-T cells would necessitate the development of CEA-specific CAR-T cells with improved signaling domains that require less stringent preconditioning for their efficacy. Taken together, these results suggest that CEA-specific CAR-based adoptive T-cell therapy may be effective for patients with CEA+ solid tumors. Distinguishing the fine line between therapeutic efficacy and off-tumor toxicity would involve further modifications of CAR-T cells and preconditioning regimens. PMID:27757303

  11. Therapeutic potential of CAR-T cell-derived exosomes: a cell-free modality for targeted cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li; Yang, Zhuo-Shun; Zou, Dan-Dan; Wang, Bin; Warnock, Garth L.; Dai, Long-Jun; Luo, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-based T-cell adoptive immunotherapy is a distinctively promising therapy for cancer. The engineering of CARs into T cells provides T cells with tumor-targeting capabilities and intensifies their cytotoxic activity through stimulated cell expansion and enhanced cytokine production. As a novel and potent therapeutic modality, there exists some uncontrollable processes which are the potential sources of adverse events. As an extension of this impactful modality, CAR-T cell-derived exosomes may substitute CAR-T cells to act as ultimate attackers, thereby overcoming some limitations. Exosomes retain most characteristics of parent cells and play an essential role in intercellular communications via transmitting their cargo to recipient cells. The application of CAR-T cell-derived exosomes will make this cell-based therapy more clinically controllable as it also provides a cell-free platform to diversify anticancer mediators, which responds effectively to the complexity and volatility of cancer. It is believed that the appropriate application of both cellular and exosomal platforms will make this effective treatment more practicable. PMID:26496034

  12. Therapeutic potential of CAR-T cell-derived exosomes: a cell-free modality for targeted cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiang-Jun; Sun, Xu-Yong; Huang, Kuan-Ming; Zhang, Li; Yang, Zhuo-Shun; Zou, Dan-Dan; Wang, Bin; Warnock, Garth L; Dai, Long-Jun; Luo, Jie

    2015-12-29

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-based T-cell adoptive immunotherapy is a distinctively promising therapy for cancer. The engineering of CARs into T cells provides T cells with tumor-targeting capabilities and intensifies their cytotoxic activity through stimulated cell expansion and enhanced cytokine production. As a novel and potent therapeutic modality, there exists some uncontrollable processes which are the potential sources of adverse events. As an extension of this impactful modality, CAR-T cell-derived exosomes may substitute CAR-T cells to act as ultimate attackers, thereby overcoming some limitations. Exosomes retain most characteristics of parent cells and play an essential role in intercellular communications via transmitting their cargo to recipient cells. The application of CAR-T cell-derived exosomes will make this cell-based therapy more clinically controllable as it also provides a cell-free platform to diversify anticancer mediators, which responds effectively to the complexity and volatility of cancer. It is believed that the appropriate application of both cellular and exosomal platforms will make this effective treatment more practicable.

  13. Experimental Myocardial Infarction Induces Altered Regulatory T Cell Hemostasis, and Adoptive Transfer Attenuates Subsequent Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Sharir, Rinat; Semo, Jonathan; Shimoni, Sara; Ben-Mordechai, Tamar; Landa-Rouben, Natalie; Maysel-Auslender, Sofia; Shaish, Aviv; Entin–Meer, Michal; Keren, Gad; George, Jacob

    2014-01-01

    Background Ischemic cardiac damage is associated with upregulation of cardiac pro-inflammatory cytokines, as well as invasion of lymphocytes into the heart. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are known to exert a suppressive effect on several immune cell types. We sought to determine whether the Treg pool is influenced by myocardial damage and whether Tregs transfer and deletion affect cardiac remodeling. Methods and Results The number and functional suppressive activity of Tregs were assayed in mice subjected to experimental myocardial infarction. The numbers of splenocyte-derived Tregs in the ischemic mice were significantly higher after the injury than in the controls, and their suppressive properties were significantly compromised. Compared with PBS, adoptive Treg transfer to mice with experimental infarction reduced infarct size and improved LV remodeling and functional performance by echocardiography. Treg deletion with blocking anti-CD25 antibodies did not influence infarct size or echocardiographic features of cardiac remodeling. Conclusion Treg numbers are increased whereas their function is compromised in mice with that underwent experimental infarction. Transfer of exogeneous Tregs results in attenuation of myocardial remodeling whereas their ablation has no effect. Thus, Tregs may serve as interesting potential interventional targets for attenuating left ventricular remodeling. PMID:25436994

  14. T-cell receptor gene therapy targeting melanoma-associated antigen-A4 inhibits human tumor growth in non-obese diabetic/SCID/γcnull mice.

    PubMed

    Shirakura, Yoshitaka; Mizuno, Yukari; Wang, Linan; Imai, Naoko; Amaike, Chisaki; Sato, Eiichi; Ito, Mamoru; Nukaya, Ikuei; Mineno, Junichi; Takesako, Kazutoh; Ikeda, Hiroaki; Shiku, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    Adoptive cell therapy with lymphocytes that have been genetically engineered to express tumor-reactive T-cell receptors (TCR) is a promising approach for cancer immunotherapy. We have been exploring the development of TCR gene therapy targeting cancer/testis antigens, including melanoma-associated antigen (MAGE) family antigens, that are ideal targets for adoptive T-cell therapy. The efficacy of TCR gene therapy targeting MAGE family antigens, however, has not yet been evaluated in vivo. Here, we demonstrate the in vivo antitumor activity in immunodeficient non-obese diabetic/SCID/γc(null) (NOG) mice of human lymphocytes genetically engineered to express TCR specific for the MAGE-A4 antigen. Polyclonal T cells derived from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells were transduced with the αβ TCR genes specific for MAGE-A4, then adoptively transferred into NOG mice inoculated with MAGE-A4 expressing human tumor cell lines. The transferred T cells maintained their effector function in vivo, infiltrated into tumors, and inhibited tumor growth in an antigen-specific manner. The combination of adoptive cell therapy with antigen peptide vaccination enhanced antitumor activity, with improved multifunctionality of the transferred cells. These data suggest that TCR gene therapy with MAGE-A4-specific TCR is a promising strategy to treat patients with MAGE-A4-expressing tumors; in addition, the acquisition of multifunctionality in vivo is an important factor to predict the quality of the T-cell response during adoptive therapy with human lymphocytes.

  15. Enhancing T cell therapy by overcoming the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Arina, Ainhoa; Corrales, Leticia; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2016-02-01

    Immune response to tumors can be successfully oriented for therapeutic purposes, as shown by the clinical efficacy of checkpoint blockade in extending the survival of patients with certain solid and hematologic neoplasms. Nonetheless, numerous patients do not benefit from these new treatments. Tumor-specific CD8(+) T lymphocytes, either endogenously revived by checkpoint interference or adoptively transferred after in vitro expansion and retargeting, can be extremely efficient in controlling metastatic disease but have to overcome a number of restraints imposed by growing tumors. This immune escape relies on a profound modification of the tumor environment, which is rendered less permissive to lymphocyte arrival, persistence, and functional activity. We review here emerging findings on the main negative circuits limiting the efficacy of cancer immunotherapy, as well as novel and conventional approaches that can translate into rational combination therapies.

  16. Expansion of T Cells with Interleukin-21 for Adoptive Immunotherapy of Murine Mammary Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zoon, Christine K.; Wan, Wen; Graham, Laura; Bear, Harry D.

    2017-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that culturing antigen-sensitized draining lymph node (DLN) lymphocytes from BALB/c mice in interleukin (IL)-7/15 after activation with bryostatin/ionomycin (B/I) is superior to culture in IL-2 for expansion, differentiation to cluster of differentiation (CD)8+ cells and anti-tumor activity. We sought to determine whether the substitution or addition of IL-21 to culture had a similar effect. DLN lymphocytes were antigen-sensitized with 4T1 mammary carcinoma 10 days prior to harvest, activated with B/I, and expanded in culture for 7 days with either IL-2, IL-21, IL-2/21, IL-7/15, or IL-7/15/21. Cellular expansion, phenotype, interferon (IFN)-γ responses, and in vivo anti-tumor activity were compared. We found that T cells grown in IL7/15/21 demonstrated significantly greater lymphocyte expansion than IL-2, IL-21, IL-2/21, and IL-7/15 (38.4-fold vs. 5.5, 6.6, 9.5, and 23.9-fold, respectively). Of these expanded cells, IL-7/15/21 significantly expanded the greatest percentage of CD8+ cells (67.1% vs. 22.2%, 47.2%, 47.4%, and 55.3%, respectively), and the greatest number of T central memory cells (TCM) compared to IL-2, IL-21 and IL-2/21 (45.8% vs. 11.1%, 7.7%, and 12.1%, respectively). IL-21 and IL-2/21-expanded T cells preferentially differentiated into T naïve cells (TN) vs. those expanded in IL-2, IL-7/15 and IL-7/15/21 (27.6% and 23.2% vs. 1.7%, 4.5%, and 10.4%, respectively), and demonstrated the highest IFN-γ levels in vitro. In vivo adoptive immunotherapy (AIT) experiments demonstrated anti-tumor efficacy was equally effective using IL-2, IL-21, IL-2/21, IL-7/15 and IL-7/15/21-cultured lymphocytes vs. control or cyclophosphamide alone, even at lower doses or with greater initial size of tumor prior to treatment. PMID:28146052

  17. CAR T-cell therapy: toxicity and the relevance of preclinical models.

    PubMed

    Kalaitsidou, Milena; Kueberuwa, Gray; Schütt, Antje; Gilham, David Edward

    2015-01-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells form part of a broad wave of immunotherapies that are showing promise in early phase cancer clinical trials. This clinical delivery has been based upon preclinical efficacy testing that confirmed the proof of principle of the therapy. However, CAR T-cell therapy does not exist alone as T cells are generally given in combination with patient preconditioning, most commonly in the form of chemotherapy, and may also include systemic cytokine support, both of which are associated with toxicity. Consequently, complete CAR T-cell therapy includes elements where the toxicity profile is well known, but also includes the CAR T cell itself, for which toxicity profiles are largely unknown. With recent reports of adverse events associated with CAR T-cell therapy, there is now concern that current preclinical models may not be fit for purpose with respect to CAR T-cell toxicity profiling. Here, we explore the preclinical models used to validate CAR T-cell function and examine their potential to predict CAR T-cell driven toxicities for the future.

  18. Enhanced neointima formation following arterial injury in immune deficient Rag-1-/- mice is attenuated by adoptive transfer of CD8 T cells.

    PubMed

    Dimayuga, Paul C; Chyu, Kuang-Yuh; Kirzner, Jonathan; Yano, Juliana; Zhao, Xiaoning; Zhou, Jianchang; Shah, Prediman K; Cercek, Bojan

    2011-01-01

    T cells modulate neointima formation after arterial injury but the specific T cell population that is activated in response to arterial injury remains unknown. The objective of the study was to identify the T cell populations that are activated and modulate neointimal thickening after arterial injury in mice. Arterial injury in wild type C57Bl6 mice resulted in T cell activation characterized by increased CD4(+)CD44(hi) and CD8(+)CD44(hi) T cells in the lymph nodes and spleens. Splenic CD8(+)CD25(+) T cells and CD8(+)CD28(+) T cells, but not CD4(+)CD25(+) and CD4(+)CD28(+) T cells, were also significantly increased. Adoptive cell transfer of CD4(+) or CD8(+) T cells from donor CD8-/- or CD4-/- mice, respectively, to immune-deficient Rag-1-/- mice was performed to determine the T cell subtype that inhibits neointima formation after arterial injury. Rag-1-/- mice that received CD8(+) T cells had significantly reduced neointima formation compared with Rag-1-/- mice without cell transfer. CD4(+) T cell transfer did not reduce neointima formation. CD8(+) T cells from CD4-/- mice had cytotoxic activity against syngeneic smooth muscle cells in vitro. The study shows that although both CD8(+) T cells and CD4(+) T cells are activated in response to arterial injury, adoptive cell transfer identifies CD8(+) T cells as the specific and selective cell type involved in inhibiting neointima formation.

  19. Innovative T Cell-Targeted Therapy for Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    infected cells using γδ T cells. Drug Discov Today 2014; 19: 787-93. doi: 10.1016/j.drudis.2014.03.021. PubMed PMID: 24681060. 52...surveillance follow- ing viral infection and expressed on tumor cells as it is involved in the cellular stress response (23). MICA is also one of the ligands for...T cells can have specificity for virus as cytomegalovirus (CMV)-reactive Vγ8Vδ1 cells have been isolated from umbilical cord blood from infected

  20. Autologous lysate-pulsed dendritic cell vaccination followed by adoptive transfer of vaccine-primed ex vivo co-stimulated T cells in recurrent ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Kandalaft, Lana E; Powell, Daniel J; Chiang, Cheryl L; Tanyi, Janos; Kim, Sarah; Bosch, Marnix; Montone, Kathy; Mick, Rosemarie; Levine, Bruce L; Torigian, Drew A; June, Carl H; Coukos, George

    2013-01-01

    Novel strategies for the therapy of recurrent ovarian cancer are warranted. We report a study of a combinatorial approach encompassing dendritic cell (DC)-based autologous whole tumor vaccination and anti-angiogenesis therapy, followed by the adoptive transfer of autologous vaccine-primed CD3/CD28-co-stimulated lymphocytes. Recurrent ovarian cancer patients for whom tumor lysate was available from prior cytoreductive surgery underwent conditioning with intravenous bevacizumab and oral metronomic cyclophosphamide, sequentially followed by (1) bevacizumab plus vaccination with DCs pulsed with autologous tumor cell lysate supernatants, (2) lymphodepletion and (3) transfer of 5 × 10(9) autologous vaccine-primed T-cells in combination with the vaccine. Feasibility, safety as well as immunological and clinical efficacy were evaluated. Six subjects received this vaccination. Therapy was feasible, well tolerated, and elicited antitumor immune responses in four subjects, who also experienced clinical benefits. Of these, three patients with residual measurable disease received outpatient lymphodepletion and adoptive T-cell transfer, which was well tolerated and resulted in a durable reduction of circulating regulatory T cells and increased CD8(+) lymphocyte counts. The vaccine-induced restoration of antitumor immunity was achieved in two subjects, who also demonstrated clinical benefits, including one complete response. Our findings indicate that combinatorial cellular immunotherapy for the treatment of recurrent ovarian cancer is well tolerated and warrants further investigation. Several modifications of this approach can be envisioned to optimize immunological and clinical outcomes.

  1. Deficiency of stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 aggravates colitogenic potential of adoptively transferred effector T cells.

    PubMed

    Yeoh, Beng San; Saha, Piu; Singh, Vishal; Xiao, Xia; Ying, Yun; Vanamala, Jairam K; Kennett, Mary J; Harvatine, Kevin J; Joe, Bina; Vijay-Kumar, Matam

    2016-10-01

    Stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD1) is a lipogenic enzyme involved in the de novo biosynthesis of oleate (C18:1, n9), a major fatty acid in the phospholipids of lipid bilayers of cell membranes. Accordingly, Scd1KO mice display substantially reduced oleate in cell membranes. An altered SCD1 level was observed during intestinal inflammation; however, its role in modulating inflammatory bowel disease remains elusive. Herein, we investigated the colitogenic capacity of Scd1KO effector T cells by employing the adoptive T-cell transfer colitis model. Splenic effector T cells (CD4(+)CD25(-)) from age- and sex-matched wild-type (WT) and Scd1KO mice were isolated by FACS and intraperitoneally administered to Rag1KO mice, which were monitored for the development of colitis. At day 60 postcell transfer, Rag1KO mice that received Scd1KO CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells displayed accelerated and exacerbated colitis than mice receiving WT CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells. Intriguingly, Scd1KO CD4(+)CD25(-) T cells display augmented inflammatory cytokine profile and cellular membrane fluidity with a concomitant increase in proinflammatory saturated fatty acids, which we postulate to potentially underlie their augmented colitogenic potential.

  2. Co-Expansion of Cytokine-Induced Killer Cells and Vγ9Vδ2 T Cells for CAR T-Cell Therapy.

    PubMed

    Du, Shou-Hui; Li, Zhendong; Chen, Can; Tan, Wee-Kiat; Chi, Zhixia; Kwang, Timothy Weixin; Xu, Xue-Hu; Wang, Shu

    2016-01-01

    Gamma delta (γδ) T cells and cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells, which are a heterogeneous population of T lymphocytes and natural killer T (NKT) cells, have been separately expanded ex vivo and shown to be capable of targeting and mediating cytotoxicity against various tumor cells in a major histocompatibility complex-unrestricted manner. However, the co-expansion and co-administration of these immune cells have not been explored. In this study we describe an efficient method to expand simultaneously both CIK and Vγ9Vδ2 T cells, termed as CIKZ cells, from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) using Zometa, interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), interleukin 2 (IL-2), anti-CD3 antibody and engineered K562 feeder cells expressing CD64, CD137L and CD86. A 21-day culture of PBMCs with this method yielded nearly 20,000-fold expansion of CIKZ cells with γδ T cells making up over 20% of the expanded population. The expanded CIKZ cells exhibited antitumor cytotoxicity and could be modified to express anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR), anti-CEA CAR, and anti-HER2 CAR to enhance their specificity and cytotoxicity against CD19-, CEA-, or HER2-positive tumor cells. The tumor inhibitory activity of anti-CD19 CAR-modified CIKZ cells was further demonstrated in vivo in a Raji tumor mouse model. The findings herein substantiate the feasibility of co-expanding CIK and γδ cells for adoptive cellular immunotherapy applications such as CAR T-cell therapy against cancer.

  3. Co-Expansion of Cytokine-Induced Killer Cells and Vγ9Vδ2 T Cells for CAR T-Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Can; Tan, Wee-Kiat; Chi, Zhixia; Xu, Xue-Hu; Wang, Shu

    2016-01-01

    Gamma delta (γδ) T cells and cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells, which are a heterogeneous population of T lymphocytes and natural killer T (NKT) cells, have been separately expanded ex vivo and shown to be capable of targeting and mediating cytotoxicity against various tumor cells in a major histocompatibility complex-unrestricted manner. However, the co-expansion and co-administration of these immune cells have not been explored. In this study we describe an efficient method to expand simultaneously both CIK and Vγ9Vδ2 T cells, termed as CIKZ cells, from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) using Zometa, interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), interleukin 2 (IL-2), anti-CD3 antibody and engineered K562 feeder cells expressing CD64, CD137L and CD86. A 21-day culture of PBMCs with this method yielded nearly 20,000-fold expansion of CIKZ cells with γδ T cells making up over 20% of the expanded population. The expanded CIKZ cells exhibited antitumor cytotoxicity and could be modified to express anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR), anti-CEA CAR, and anti-HER2 CAR to enhance their specificity and cytotoxicity against CD19-, CEA-, or HER2-positive tumor cells. The tumor inhibitory activity of anti-CD19 CAR-modified CIKZ cells was further demonstrated in vivo in a Raji tumor mouse model. The findings herein substantiate the feasibility of co-expanding CIK and γδ cells for adoptive cellular immunotherapy applications such as CAR T-cell therapy against cancer. PMID:27598655

  4. Whole-body imaging of adoptively transferred T cells using magnetic resonance imaging, single photon emission computed tomography and positron emission tomography techniques, with a focus on regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Leech, J M; Sharif-Paghaleh, E; Maher, J; Livieratos, L; Lechler, R I; Mullen, G E; Lombardi, G; Smyth, L A

    2013-01-01

    Cell-based therapies using natural or genetically modified regulatory T cells (Tregs) have shown significant promise as immune-based therapies. One of the main difficulties facing the further advancement of these therapies is that the fate and localization of adoptively transferred Tregs is largely unknown. The ability to dissect the migratory pathway of these cells in a non-invasive manner is of vital importance for the further development of in-vivo cell-based immunotherapies, as this technology allows the fate of the therapeutically administered cell to be imaged in real time. In this review we will provide an overview of the current clinical imaging techniques used to track T cells and Tregs in vivo, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET)/single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). In addition, we will discuss how the finding of these studies can be used, in the context of transplantation, to define the most appropriate Treg subset required for cellular therapy. PMID:23574314

  5. Preparation for a Clinical Trial Using Adoptive Transfer of Tumor-Reactive TGF_Beta-Insensitive CD8+ T Cells for Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    W81XWH-05-1-0450 TITLE: Preparation for a Clinical Trial Using Adoptive Transfer of Tumor-Reactive TGF_Beta- Insensitive CD8+ T Cells for...CONTRACT NUMBER Preparation for a Clinical Trial Using Adoptive Transfer of Tumor-Reactive TGF_Beta- Insensitive CD8+ T Cells for Treatment of Prostate...that adoptive transfer of tumor-reactive TGF-beta- insensitive CD8+ T cells to hosts bearing mouse prostate tumors resulted in a complete rejection

  6. Ibrutinib Therapy Increases T Cell Repertoire Diversity in Patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Yin, Qingsong; Sivina, Mariela; Robins, Harlan; Yusko, Erik; Vignali, Marissa; O'Brien, Susan; Keating, Michael J; Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Estrov, Zeev; Jain, Nitin; Wierda, William G; Burger, Jan A

    2017-02-15

    The Bruton's tyrosine kinase inhibitor ibrutinib is a highly effective, new targeted therapy for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) that thwarts leukemia cell survival, growth, and tissue homing. The effects of ibrutinib treatment on the T cell compartment, which is clonally expanded and thought to support the growth of malignant B cells in CLL, are not fully characterized. Using next-generation sequencing technology, we characterized the diversity of TCRβ-chains in peripheral blood T cells from 15 CLL patients before and after 1 y of ibrutinib therapy. We noted elevated CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell numbers and a restricted TCRβ repertoire in all pretreatment samples. After 1 y of ibrutinib therapy, elevated peripheral blood T cell numbers and T cell-related cytokine levels had normalized, and T cell repertoire diversity increased significantly. Dominant TCRβ clones in pretreatment samples declined or became undetectable, and the number of productive unique clones increased significantly during ibrutinib therapy, with the emergence of large numbers of low-frequency TCRβ clones. Importantly, broader TCR repertoire diversity was associated with clinical efficacy and lower rates of infections during ibrutinib therapy. These data demonstrate that ibrutinib therapy increases diversification of the T cell compartment in CLL patients, which contributes to cellular immune reconstitution.

  7. T cell Bim levels reflect responses to anti–PD-1 cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dronca, Roxana S.; Liu, Xin; Harrington, Susan M.; Chen, Lingling; Cao, Siyu; Kottschade, Lisa A.; McWilliams, Robert R.; Block, Matthew S.; Nevala, Wendy K.; Thompson, Michael A.; Mansfield, Aaron S.; Park, Sean S.; Markovic, Svetomir N.

    2016-01-01

    Immune checkpoint therapy with PD-1 blockade has emerged as an effective therapy for many advanced cancers; however, only a small fraction of patients achieve durable responses. To date, there is no validated blood-based means of predicting the response to PD-1 blockade. We report that Bim is a downstream signaling molecule of the PD-1 pathway, and its detection in T cells is significantly associated with expression of PD-1 and effector T cell markers. High levels of Bim in circulating tumor-reactive (PD-1+CD11ahiCD8+) T cells were prognostic of poor survival in patients with metastatic melanoma who did not receive anti–PD-1 therapy and were also predictive of clinical benefit in patients with metastatic melanoma who were treated with anti–PD-1 therapy. Moreover, this circulating tumor-reactive T cell population significantly decreased after successful anti–PD-1 therapy. Our study supports a crucial role of Bim in both T cell activation and apoptosis as regulated by PD-1 and PD-L1 interactions in effector CD8+ T cells. Measurement of Bim levels in circulating T cells of patients with cancer may provide a less invasive strategy to predict and monitor responses to anti–PD-1 therapy, although future prospective analyses are needed to validate its utility. PMID:27182556

  8. Regulatory T cell-based therapies for autoimmunity.

    PubMed

    Arellano, Benjamine; Graber, David J; Sentman, Charles L

    2016-08-01

    Autoimmune disorders are long-term diseases that adversely affect the quality of life for patients, and they are one of the top ten leading causes of death. While each autoimmune disorder is unique, they all are caused by a breakdown of tolerance against endogenous proteins. This leads to auto-inflammatory events that promote the destruction of organs in a humoral and cellular immune mediated manner. Treatment options for autoimmunity can involve the use of chemical and biologic agents that suppress inflammation. While these treatment options for patients have shown to be beneficial in autoimmunity, they can result in patients being vulnerable to opportunistic infections. Newer therapies aim to identify methods to specifically block auto-inflammatory immune cells while allowing for an intact immune response to other antigens. T regulatory (Treg) cells are a subtype of the adoptive immune cell that is capable of suppressing inflammatory events in an antigen-specific manner, but they are often poorly functioning within autoimmune patients. Treg cells have been well characterized for their immune modulating capabilities and preclinical and early clinical studies support their therapeutic potential for antigen-specific immune suppression. This review will examine the current understanding of Treg cell function and the therapeutic potential of enhancing Treg cells in patients with inflammatory disorders.

  9. Lethal graft-versus-host disease in mouse models of T cell receptor gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Bendle, Gavin M; Linnemann, Carsten; Hooijkaas, Anna I; Bies, Laura; de Witte, Moniek A; Jorritsma, Annelies; Kaiser, Andrew D M; Pouw, Nadine; Debets, Reno; Kieback, Elisa; Uckert, Wolfgang; Song, Ji-Ying; Haanen, John B A G; Schumacher, Ton N M

    2010-05-01

    The transfer of T cell receptor (TCR) genes can be used to induce immune reactivity toward defined antigens to which endogenous T cells are insufficiently reactive. This approach, which is called TCR gene therapy, is being developed to target tumors and pathogens, and its clinical testing has commenced in patients with cancer. In this study we show that lethal cytokine-driven autoimmune pathology can occur in mouse models of TCR gene therapy under conditions that closely mimic the clinical setting. We show that the pairing of introduced and endogenous TCR chains in TCR gene-modified T cells leads to the formation of self-reactive TCRs that are responsible for the observed autoimmunity. Furthermore, we demonstrate that adjustments in the design of gene therapy vectors and target T cell populations can be used to reduce the risk of TCR gene therapy-induced autoimmune pathology.

  10. Innovative T Cell-Targeted Therapy for Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    haploidentical HSCT (15-17). Vδ1 cells were also shown to kill glioblastoma independent of cytomegalovirus ( CMV ) status (34). However, Vδ1 cells have... CMV (36-39). Our results are the first to directly show that Vδ1negVδ2neg cells exhibit anti-tumor activities, and given their propensity to engage...467-78. 2. Vantourout P, Hayday A. Six -of-the-best: unique contributions of gammadelta T cells to immunology. Nat Rev Immunol. 2013;13:88-100. 3

  11. Chimeric antigen receptor T cell therapy in AML: How close are we?

    PubMed

    Gill, Saar

    2016-12-01

    The majority of patients presenting with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) initially respond to chemotherapy but post-remission therapy is required to consolidate this response and achieve long-term disease-free survival. The most effective form of post-remission therapy relies on T cell immunotherapy in the form of allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). However, patients with active disease cannot usually expect to be cured with HCT. This inherent dichotomy implies that traditional T cell-based immunotherapy in the form of allogeneic HCT stops being efficacious somewhere between the measurable residual disease (MRD) and the morphologically obvious range. This is in part because the full power of T cells must be restrained in order to avoid lethal graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) and partly because only a sub-population of donor T cells are expected to be able to recognize AML cells via their T cell receptor. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy, most advanced in the treatment of patients with B-cell malignancies, may circumvent some of these limitations. However, major challenges remain to be overcome before CAR T cell therapy can be safely applied to AML.

  12. Anti-coreceptor therapy drives selective T cell egress by suppressing inflammation-dependent chemotactic cues

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Aaron J.; Clark, Matthew; Gojanovich, Gregory; Manzoor, Fatima; Miller, Keith; Kline, Douglas E.; Morillon, Y. Maurice; Wang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    There continues to be a need for immunotherapies to treat type 1 diabetes in the clinic. We previously reported that nondepleting anti-CD4 and -CD8 Ab treatment effectively reverses diabetes in new-onset NOD mice. A key feature of the induction of remission is the egress of the majority of islet-resident T cells. How this occurs is undefined. Herein, the effects of coreceptor therapy on islet T cell retention were investigated. Bivalent Ab binding to CD4 and CD8 blocked TCR signaling and T cell cytokine production, while indirectly downregulating islet chemokine expression. These processes were required for T cell retention, as ectopic IFN-γ or CXCL10 inhibited Ab-mediated T cell purging. Importantly, treatment of humanized mice with nondepleting anti–human CD4 and CD8 Ab similarly reduced tissue-infiltrating human CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. These findings demonstrate that Ab binding of CD4 and CD8 interrupts a feed-forward circuit by suppressing T cell–produced cytokines needed for expression of chemotactic cues, leading to rapid T cell egress from the islets. Coreceptor therapy therefore offers a robust approach to suppress T cell–mediated pathology by purging T cells in an inflammation-dependent manner. PMID:27777971

  13. IGF1R- and ROR1-Specific CAR T Cells as a Potential Therapy for High Risk Sarcomas.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xin; Park, Haein; Greene, Joseph; Pao, James; Mulvey, Erin; Zhou, Sophia X; Albert, Catherine M; Moy, Fred; Sachdev, Deepali; Yee, Douglas; Rader, Christoph; Hamby, Carl V; Loeb, David M; Cairo, Mitchell S; Zhou, Xianzheng

    2015-01-01

    Patients with metastatic or recurrent and refractory sarcomas have a dismal prognosis. Therefore, new targeted therapies are urgently needed. This study was designed to evaluate chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells targeting the type I insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF1R) or tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor 1 (ROR1) molecules for their therapeutic potential against sarcomas. Here, we report that IGF1R (15/15) and ROR1 (11/15) were highly expressed in sarcoma cell lines including Ewing sarcoma, osteosarcoma, alveolar or embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma, and fibrosarcoma. IGF1R and ROR1 CAR T cells derived from eight healthy donors using the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon system were cytotoxic against sarcoma cells and produced high levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-13 in an antigen-specific manner. IGF1R and ROR1 CAR T cells generated from three sarcoma patients released significant amounts of IFN-γ in response to sarcoma stimulation. The adoptive transfer of IGF1R and ROR1 CAR T cells derived from a sarcoma patient significantly reduced tumor growth in pre-established, systemically disseminated and localized osteosarcoma xenograft models in NSG mice. Infusion of IGF1R and ROR1 CAR T cells also prolonged animal survival in a localized sarcoma model using NOD/scid mice. Our data indicate that both IGF1R and ROR1 can be effectively targeted by SB modified CAR T cells and that such CAR T cells may be useful in the treatment of high risk sarcoma patients.

  14. IGF1R- and ROR1-Specific CAR T Cells as a Potential Therapy for High Risk Sarcomas

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xin; Park, Haein; Greene, Joseph; Zhou, Sophia X.; Albert, Catherine M.; Moy, Fred; Sachdev, Deepali; Yee, Douglas; Rader, Christoph; Hamby, Carl V.; Loeb, David M.; Cairo, Mitchell S.; Zhou, Xianzheng

    2015-01-01

    Patients with metastatic or recurrent and refractory sarcomas have a dismal prognosis. Therefore, new targeted therapies are urgently needed. This study was designed to evaluate chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells targeting the type I insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF1R) or tyrosine kinase-like orphan receptor 1 (ROR1) molecules for their therapeutic potential against sarcomas. Here, we report that IGF1R (15/15) and ROR1 (11/15) were highly expressed in sarcoma cell lines including Ewing sarcoma, osteosarcoma, alveolar or embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma, and fibrosarcoma. IGF1R and ROR1 CAR T cells derived from eight healthy donors using the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon system were cytotoxic against sarcoma cells and produced high levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α and IL-13 in an antigen-specific manner. IGF1R and ROR1 CAR T cells generated from three sarcoma patients released significant amounts of IFN-γ in response to sarcoma stimulation. The adoptive transfer of IGF1R and ROR1 CAR T cells derived from a sarcoma patient significantly reduced tumor growth in pre-established, systemically disseminated and localized osteosarcoma xenograft models in NSG mice. Infusion of IGF1R and ROR1 CAR T cells also prolonged animal survival in a localized sarcoma model using NOD/scid mice. Our data indicate that both IGF1R and ROR1 can be effectively targeted by SB modified CAR T cells and that such CAR T cells may be useful in the treatment of high risk sarcoma patients. PMID:26173023

  15. High vitamin D3 diet administered during active colitis negatively affects bone metabolism in an adoptive T cell transfer model

    PubMed Central

    Larmonier, C. B.; McFadden, R.-M. T.; Hill, F. M.; Schreiner, R.; Ramalingam, R.; Besselsen, D. G.; Ghishan, F. K.

    2013-01-01

    Decreased bone mineral density (BMD) represents an extraintestinal complication of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Vitamin D3 has been considered a viable adjunctive therapy in IBD. However, vitamin D3 plays a pleiotropic role in bone modeling and regulates the bone formation-resorption balance, depending on the physiological environment, and supplementation during active IBD may have unintended consequences. We evaluated the effects of vitamin D3 supplementation during the active phase of disease on colonic inflammation, BMD, and bone metabolism in an adoptive IL-10−/− CD4+ T cell transfer model of chronic colitis. High-dose vitamin D3 supplementation for 12 days during established disease had negligible effects on mucosal inflammation. Plasma vitamin D3 metabolites correlated with diet, but not disease, status. Colitis significantly reduced BMD. High-dose vitamin D3 supplementation did not affect cortical bone but led to a further deterioration of trabecular bone morphology. In mice fed a high vitamin D3 diet, colitis more severely impacted bone formation markers (osteocalcin and bone alkaline phosphatase) and increased bone resorption markers, ratio of receptor activator of NF-κB ligand to osteoprotegrin transcript, plasma osteoprotegrin level, and the osteoclast activation marker tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (ACp5). Bone vitamin D receptor expression was increased in mice with chronic colitis, especially in the high vitamin D3 group. Our data suggest that vitamin D3, at a dose that does not improve inflammation, has no beneficial effects on bone metabolism and density during active colitis or may adversely affect BMD and bone turnover. These observations should be taken into consideration in the planning of further clinical studies with high-dose vitamin D3 supplementation in patients with active IBD. PMID:23639807

  16. T-Cell Gene Therapy to Eradicate Disseminated Breast Cancers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-01

    2 therapy include diabetes mellitus and hypothyroidism (Table 3). These are presumed to represent examples of off-target autoimmunity in the absence... Hypothyroidism during immunotherapy with interleukin-2 is associated with antithyroid antibodies and response to treatment. J Clin Oncol. 1993;11(7):1376-1383...RM. Transient thyrotoxicosis and persistent hypothyroidism due to acute autoimmune thyroiditis after interleukin-2 and interferon-[alpha] therapy

  17. T-cell therapies for HIV: Preclinical successes and current clinical strategies.

    PubMed

    Patel, Shabnum; Jones, R Brad; Nixon, Douglas F; Bollard, Catherine M

    2016-08-01

    Although antiretroviral therapy (ART) has been successful in controlling HIV infection, it does not provide a permanent cure, requires lifelong treatment, and HIV-positive individuals are left with social concerns such as stigma. The recent application of T cells to treat cancer and viral reactivations post-transplant offers a potential strategy to control HIV infection. It is known that naturally occurring HIV-specific T cells can inhibit HIV initially, but this response is not sustained in the majority of people living with HIV. Genetically modifying T cells to target HIV, resist infection, and persist in the immunosuppressive environment found in chronically infected HIV-positive individuals might provide a therapeutic solution for HIV. This review focuses on successful preclinical studies and current clinical strategies using T-cell therapy to control HIV infection and mediate a functional cure solution.

  18. Intestinal barrier dysfunction develops at the onset of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, and can be induced by adoptive transfer of auto-reactive T cells.

    PubMed

    Nouri, Mehrnaz; Bredberg, Anders; Weström, Björn; Lavasani, Shahram

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system with a pathogenesis involving a dysfunctional blood-brain barrier and myelin-specific, autoreactive T cells. Although the commensal microbiota seems to affect its pathogenesis, regulation of the interactions between luminal antigens and mucosal immune elements remains unclear. Herein, we investigated whether the intestinal mucosal barrier is also targeted in this disease. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), the prototypic animal model of MS, was induced either by active immunization or by adoptive transfer of autoreactive T cells isolated from these mice. We show increased intestinal permeability, overexpression of the tight junction protein zonulin and alterations in intestinal morphology (increased crypt depth and thickness of the submucosa and muscularis layers). These intestinal manifestations were seen at 7 days (i.e., preceding the onset of neurological symptoms) and at 14 days (i.e., at the stage of paralysis) after immunization. We also demonstrate an increased infiltration of proinflammatory Th1/Th17 cells and a reduced regulatory T cell number in the gut lamina propria, Peyer's patches and mesenteric lymph nodes. Adoptive transfer to healthy mice of encephalitogenic T cells, isolated from EAE-diseased animals, led to intestinal changes similar to those resulting from the immunization procedure. Our findings show that disruption of intestinal homeostasis is an early and immune-mediated event in EAE. We propose that this intestinal dysfunction may act to support disease progression, and thus represent a potential therapeutic target in MS. In particular, an increased understanding of the regulation of tight junctions at the blood-brain barrier and in the intestinal wall may be crucial for design of future innovative therapies.

  19. CAR-T cell therapy in gastrointestinal tumors and hepatic carcinoma: From bench to bedside

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Zimu; Peng, Meiyu; Fu, Shuyu; Xue, Zhenyi; Zhang, Rongxin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) is a genetically engineered receptor that combines a scFv domain, which specifically recognizes the tumor-specific antigen, with T cell activation domains. CAR-T cell therapies have demonstrated tremendous efficacy against hematologic malignancies in many clinical trials. Recent studies have extended these efforts to the treatment of solid tumors. However, the outcomes of CAR-T cell therapy for solid tumors are not as remarkable as the outcomes have been for hematologic malignancies. A series of hurdles has arisen with respect to CAR-T cell-based immunotherapy, which needs to be overcome to target solid tumors. The major challenge for CAR-T cell therapy in solid tumors is the selection of the appropriate specific antigen to demarcate the tumor from normal tissue. In this review, we discuss the application of CAR-T cells to gastrointestinal and hepatic carcinomas in preclinical and clinical research. Furthermore, we analyze the usefulness of several specific markers in the study of gastrointestinal tumors and hepatic carcinoma. PMID:28123893

  20. Approaches to augment CAR T-cell therapy by targeting the apoptotic machinery.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Hannah

    2016-04-15

    Chimaeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cells have shown impressive results in patients with B-cell leukaemia. Yet, in patients with lymphoma durable responses are still rare and heavy preconditioning required. Apoptosis resistance is considered a hallmark of cancer, often conveyed by a halted apoptosis signalling. Tumours regularly skew the balance of the components of the apoptotic machinery either through up-regulating anti-apoptotic proteins or silencing pro-apoptotic ones. Malignant B-cells frequently up-regulate anti-apoptotic B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) family proteins leading to therapy resistance. CAR T-cells kill tumour cells via apoptosis induction and their efficacy may be affected by the level of Bcl-2 family proteins. Hence, there is an interesting possibility to increase the effect of CAR T-cell therapy by combining it with apoptosis inhibitor blockade agents. Compounds that inhibit Bcl-2, B-cell lymphoma extra large (Bcl-xL) and Bcl-2-like protein 2 (Bcl-w), can restore execution of apoptosis in tumour cells or sensitize them to other apoptosis-dependent treatments. Hence, there is a great interest to combine such agents with CAR T-cell therapy to potentiate the effect of CAR T-cell killing. This review will focus on the potential of targeting the apoptotic machinery to sensitize tumour cells to CAR T-cell killing.

  1. CAR-T cell therapy in gastrointestinal tumors and hepatic carcinoma: From bench to bedside.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qi; Zhang, Zimu; Peng, Meiyu; Fu, Shuyu; Xue, Zhenyi; Zhang, Rongxin

    2016-01-01

    The chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) is a genetically engineered receptor that combines a scFv domain, which specifically recognizes the tumor-specific antigen, with T cell activation domains. CAR-T cell therapies have demonstrated tremendous efficacy against hematologic malignancies in many clinical trials. Recent studies have extended these efforts to the treatment of solid tumors. However, the outcomes of CAR-T cell therapy for solid tumors are not as remarkable as the outcomes have been for hematologic malignancies. A series of hurdles has arisen with respect to CAR-T cell-based immunotherapy, which needs to be overcome to target solid tumors. The major challenge for CAR-T cell therapy in solid tumors is the selection of the appropriate specific antigen to demarcate the tumor from normal tissue. In this review, we discuss the application of CAR-T cells to gastrointestinal and hepatic carcinomas in preclinical and clinical research. Furthermore, we analyze the usefulness of several specific markers in the study of gastrointestinal tumors and hepatic carcinoma.

  2. Enhanced anti-tumor activity induced by adoptive T cell transfer and the adjunctive use of the HDAC Inhibitor LAQ824

    PubMed Central

    Vo, Dan D.; Prins, Robert M.; Begley, Jonathan L.; Donahue, Timothy R.; Morris, Lilah F.; Bruhn, Kevin W.; de la Rocha, Pilar; Yang, Meng-Yin; Mok, Stephen; Garban, Hermes J.; Craft, Noah; Economou, James S.; Marincola, Francesco M.; Wang, Ena; Ribas, Antoni

    2009-01-01

    Tumors grow in the presence of antigen-specific T cells, suggesting the existence of intrinsic cancer cell escape mechanisms. We hypothesized that a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor could sensitize tumor cells to immunotherapy because this class of agents has been reported to increase tumor antigen expression and shift gene expression to a pro-apoptotic milieu in cancer cells. To test this question, we treated B16 murine melanoma with the combination of the HDAC inhibitor LAQ824 together with the adoptive transfer (AT) of gp100 melanoma antigen-specific pmel-1 T cells. The combined therapy significantly improved antitumor activity through several mechanisms: 1) increase in MHC and tumor-associated antigen (TAA) expression by tumor cells; 2) decrease in competing endogenous lymphocytes in recipient mice, resulting in a proliferative advantage for the adoptively transferred cells; and 3) improvement in the functional activity of the adoptively transferred lymphocytes. We confirmed the beneficial effects of this HDAC inhibitor as sensitizer to immunotherapy in a different model of prophylactic prime-boost vaccination with the melanoma antigen tyrosinase-related protein-2 (TRP2), which also demonstrated a significant improvement in antitumor activity against B16 melanoma. In conclusion, the HDAC inhibitor LAQ824 significantly enhances tumor immunotherapy through effects on target tumor cells as well as improving the antitumor activity of tumor antigen-specific lymphocytes. PMID:19861533

  3. PET imaging of adoptive progenitor cell therapies.

    SciTech Connect

    Gelovani, Juri G.

    2008-05-13

    Objectives. The overall objective of this application is to develop novel technologies for non-invasive imaging of adoptive stem cell-based therapies with positron emission tomography (PET) that would be applicable to human patients. To achieve this objective, stem cells will be genetically labeled with a PET-reporter gene and repetitively imaged to assess their distribution, migration, differentiation, and persistence using a radiolabeled reporter probe. This new imaging technology will be tested in adoptive progenitor cell-based therapy models in animals, including: delivery pro-apoptotic genes to tumors, and T-cell reconstitution for immunostimulatory therapy during allogeneic bone marrow progenitor cell transplantation. Technical and Scientific Merits. Non-invasive whole body imaging would significantly aid in the development and clinical implementation of various adoptive progenitor cell-based therapies by providing the means for non-invasive monitoring of the fate of injected progenitor cells over a long period of observation. The proposed imaging approaches could help to address several questions related to stem cell migration and homing, their long-term viability, and their subsequent differentiation. The ability to image these processes non-invasively in 3D and repetitively over a long period of time is very important and will help the development and clinical application of various strategies to control and direct stem cell migration and differentiation. Approach to accomplish the work. Stem cells will be genetically with a reporter gene which will allow for repetitive non-invasive “tracking” of the migration and localization of genetically labeled stem cells and their progeny. This is a radically new approach that is being developed for future human applications and should allow for a long term (many years) repetitive imaging of the fate of tissues that develop from the transplanted stem cells. Why the approach is appropriate. The novel approach to

  4. Strong and sustained effector function of memory- versus naïve-derived T cells upon T-cell receptor RNA transfer: implications for cellular therapy.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Simone; Klobuch, Sebastian; Besold, Katrin; Plachter, Bodo; Dörrie, Jan; Schaft, Niels; Theobald, Matthias; Herr, Wolfgang

    2012-12-01

    Current protocols used to select CMV-specific T cells for adoptive immunotherapy focus on virus-specific memory T cells from seropositive donors. However, this strategy is not feasible in patients undergoing allogeneic haematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT) from CMV-seronegative donors. Here, we redirected T cells of CMV-seronegative donors with a human genetically engineered TCR recognizing an HLA-A*0201-binding peptide epitope of CMVpp65. To facilitate clinical translation of this approach, we used a non-viral expression system based on in vitro transcribed RNA and electroporation. Although memory and naïve-derived T-cell subsets were both efficiently transfected by TCR-RNA, memory-derived T cells showed much stronger levels of HLA-A*0201-restricted cytolytic activity to CMV-infected fibroblasts and maintained acquired function for 5-10 days. In addition to redirection of CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells, TCR-RNA transfection was capable of redirecting CD4(+) T cells into potent Ag-specific Th cells that efficiently triggered maturation of DCs. Our data suggest that memory rather than naïve-derived T cells are the preferred subset for transient TCR expression by RNA electroporation, providing more efficient and sustained virus-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell function. CMV TCR-RNA may represent a suitable therapeutic 'off-the-shelf' reagent to be used in severe CMV infections of HSCT patients when endogenous CMV-specific T-cell immunity is insufficient.

  5. CAR T-Cell Therapy: The Role of Physical Barriers and Immunosuppression in Lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Enblad, Gunilla; Karlsson, Hannah; Loskog, Angelica S I

    2015-08-01

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cells have shown remarkable results in patients with B-cell leukemia and lymphoma. However, while CAR T-cells have shown complete responses in a majority of patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), lymphomas are more difficult to treat. Different CAR designs and conditioning protocols seem to affect the persistence of patient responses. However, factors that determine if patients receiving the same CARs will respond or not remain obscure. In Sweden, a phase I/IIa trial using third-generation CAR T-cells is ongoing in which we intend to compare tumor biology and immunology, in each patient, to treatment response. CAR T-cell therapy is a powerful tool to add to the treatment options for this patient group but we need to perform the necessary basic research on the multifactorial mechanisms of action to give patients the best possible option of survival. Such studies are also crucial to expand the success of CAR T-cells beyond CD19+ B-cell malignancy. This review will focus on possible barriers of treating lymphoma to define factors that need to be investigated to develop the next generation of CAR T-cell therapy.

  6. Reengineering chimeric antigen receptor T cells for targeted therapy of autoimmune disease.

    PubMed

    Ellebrecht, Christoph T; Bhoj, Vijay G; Nace, Arben; Choi, Eun Jung; Mao, Xuming; Cho, Michael Jeffrey; Di Zenzo, Giovanni; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Seykora, John T; Cotsarelis, George; Milone, Michael C; Payne, Aimee S

    2016-07-08

    Ideally, therapy for autoimmune diseases should eliminate pathogenic autoimmune cells while sparing protective immunity, but feasible strategies for such an approach have been elusive. Here, we show that in the antibody-mediated autoimmune disease pemphigus vulgaris (PV), autoantigen-based chimeric immunoreceptors can direct T cells to kill autoreactive B lymphocytes through the specificity of the B cell receptor (BCR). We engineered human T cells to express a chimeric autoantibody receptor (CAAR), consisting of the PV autoantigen, desmoglein (Dsg) 3, fused to CD137-CD3ζ signaling domains. Dsg3 CAAR-T cells exhibit specific cytotoxicity against cells expressing anti-Dsg3 BCRs in vitro and expand, persist, and specifically eliminate Dsg3-specific B cells in vivo. CAAR-T cells may provide an effective and universal strategy for specific targeting of autoreactive B cells in antibody-mediated autoimmune disease.

  7. CAR-modified T-cell therapy for cancer: an updated review.

    PubMed

    Haji-Fatahaliha, Mostafa; Hosseini, Maryam; Akbarian, Asiye; Sadreddini, Sanam; Jadidi-Niaragh, Farhad; Yousefi, Mehdi

    2016-09-01

    The use of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T cells is a promising approach for cancer immunotherapy. These genetically modified receptors contain an antigen-binding moiety, a hinge region, a transmembrane domain, and an intracellular costimulatory domain resulting in T-cell activation subsequent to antigen binding. Optimal tumor removal through CAR-modified T cells requires suitable target antigen selection, co-stimulatory signaling domain, and the ability of CAR T cells to traffic, persist, and retain antitumor function after adoptive transfer. There are several elements which can improve antitumor function of CAR T cells, including signaling, conditioning chemotherapy and irradiation, tumor burden of the disease, T-cell phenotype, and supplementary cytokine usage. This review outlines four generations of CAR. The pre-clinical and clinical studies showed that this technique has a great potential for treatment of solid and hematological malignancies. The main purpose of the current review is to focus on the pre-clinical and clinical developments of CAR-based immunotherapy.

  8. BCR-ABL–specific T-cell therapy in Ph+ ALL patients on tyrosine-kinase inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Riva, Giovanni; Guido, Ilaria; Gurrado, Antonella; Quartuccio, Giuseppe; Rubert, Laura; Lagreca, Ivana; Vallerini, Daniela; Forghieri, Fabio; Morselli, Monica; Bresciani, Paola; Cuoghi, Angela; Paolini, Ambra; Colaci, Elisabetta; Marasca, Roberto; Cuneo, Antonio; Iughetti, Lorenzo; Trenti, Tommaso; Narni, Franco; Foà, Robin

    2017-01-01

    Although the emergence of bone marrow (BM)–resident p190BCR-ABL–specific T lymphocytes has been correlated with hematologic and cytogenetic remissions in patients with Philadelphia chromosome–positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (Ph+ ALL) undergoing maintenance tyrosine-kinase inhibitor treatment, little is known about the possibility of culturing these cells ex vivo and using them in T-cell therapy strategies. We investigated the feasibility of expanding/priming p190BCR-ABL–specific T cells in vitro by stimulation with dendritic cells pulsed with p190BCR-ABL peptides derived from the BCR-ABL junctional region and alternative splicing, and of adoptively administering them to patients with relapsed disease. We report on the feasibility of producing clinical-grade BCR-ABL–specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs), endowed with antileukemia activity, from Ph+ ALL patients and healthy donors. We treated 3 patients with Ph+ ALL with autologous or allogeneic p190BCR-ABL–specific CTLs. No postinfusion toxicity was observed, except for a grade II skin graft-versus-host disease in the patient treated for hematologic relapse. All patients achieved a molecular or hematologic complete remission (CR) after T-cell therapy, upon emergence of p190BCR-ABL–specific T cells in the BM. Our results show that p190BCR-ABL–specific CTLs are capable of controlling treatment-refractory Ph+ ALL in vivo, and support the development of adoptive immunotherapeutic approaches with BCR-ABL CTLs in Ph+ ALL. PMID:27927646

  9. Mouse Models in Bone Marrow Transplantation and Adoptive Cellular Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Arber, Caroline; Brenner, Malcolm K.; Reddy, Pavan

    2014-01-01

    Mouse models of transplantation have been indispensable to the development of bone marrow transplantation (BMT). Their role in the generation of basic science knowledge is invaluable and is subject to discussion below. However, this article focuses on the direct role and relevance of mouse models towards the clinical development and advances in BMT and adoptive T-cell therapy for human diseases. The authors aim to present a thoughtful perspective on the pros and cons of mouse models while noting that despite imperfections these models are obligatory for the development of science-based medicine. PMID:24216170

  10. The impact of unprotected T cells in RNAi-based gene therapy for HIV-AIDS.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Carrillo, Elena; Liu, Ying Poi; Berkhout, Ben

    2014-03-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is highly effective in inhibiting human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication by the expression of antiviral short hairpin RNA (shRNA) in stably transduced T-cell lines. For the development of a durable gene therapy that prevents viral escape, we proposed to combine multiple shRNAs against highly conserved regions of the HIV-1 RNA genome. The future in vivo application of such a gene therapy protocol will reach only a fraction of the T cells, such that HIV-1 replication will continue in the unmodified T cells, thereby possibly frustrating the therapy by generation of HIV-1 variants that escape from the inhibition imposed by the protected cells. We studied virus inhibition and evolution in pure cultures of shRNA-expressing cells versus mixed cell cultures of protected and unprotected T cells. The addition of the unprotected T cells indeed seems to accelerate HIV-1 evolution and escape from a single shRNA inhibitor. However, expression of three antiviral shRNAs from a single lentiviral vector prevents virus escape even in the presence of unprotected cells. These results support the idea to validate the therapeutic potential of this anti-HIV approach in appropriate in vivo models.

  11. Development of a T cell receptor targeting an HLA-A*0201 restricted epitope from the cancer-testis antigen SSX2 for adoptive immunotherapy of cancer.

    PubMed

    Abate-Daga, Daniel; Speiser, Daniel E; Chinnasamy, Nachimuthu; Zheng, Zhili; Xu, Hui; Feldman, Steven A; Rosenberg, Steven A; Morgan, Richard A

    2014-01-01

    The clinical success of adoptive immunotherapy of cancer relies on the selection of target antigens that are highly expressed in tumor cells but absent in essential normal tissues. A group of genes that encode the cancer/testis or cancer germline antigens have been proposed as ideal targets for immunotherapy due to their high expression in multiple cancer types and their restricted expression in immunoprivileged normal tissues. In the present work we report the isolation and characterization of human T cell receptors (TCRs) with specificity for synovial sarcoma X breakpoint 2 (SSX2), a cancer/testis antigen expressed in melanoma, prostate cancer, lymphoma, multiple myeloma and pancreatic cancer, among other tumors. We isolated seven HLA-A2 restricted T cell receptors from natural T cell clones derived from tumor-infiltrated lymph nodes of two SSX2-seropositive melanoma patients, and selected four TCRs for cloning into retroviral vectors. Peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) transduced with three of four SSX2 TCRs showed SSX241-49 (KASEKIFYV) peptide specific reactivity, tumor cell recognition and tetramer binding. One of these, TCR-5, exhibited tetramer binding in both CD4 and CD8 cells and was selected for further studies. Antigen-specific and HLA-A*0201-restricted interferon-γ release, cell lysis and lymphocyte proliferation was observed following culture of TCR engineered human PBL with relevant tumor cell lines. Codon optimization was found to increase TCR-5 expression in transduced T cells, and this construct has been selected for development of clinical grade viral vector producing cells. The tumor-specific pattern of expression of SSX2, along with the potent and selective activity of TCR-5, makes this TCR an attractive candidate for potential TCR gene therapy to treat multiple cancer histologies.

  12. T-cells fighting B-cell lymphoproliferative malignancies: the emerging field of CD19 CAR T-cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Heijink, D M; Kater, A P; Hazenberg, M D; Hagenbeek, A; Kersten, M J

    2016-05-01

    CAR T-cells are autologous T-cells transduced with a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR). The CAR contains an antigen recognition part (originating from an antibody), a T-cell receptor transmembrane and cytoplasmic signalling part, and one or more co-stimulatory domains. While CAR T-cells can be directed against any tumour target, most experience thus far has been obtained with targeting of the B-cell antigen CD19 that is expressed by B-cell acute lymphocytic leukaemia, chronic lymphocytic leukaemia and other B-cell lymphomas. The first clinical results are promising, although there are profound differences in response between patients with different haematological malignancies. Treatment-related side effects have been observed that require specific management. This review will explain the mechanism of action, summarise the experience to date and point out future directions for this hopeful new addition to the therapeutic armamentarium in the treatment of lymphoproliferative B-cell malignancies.

  13. A Multifunctional Role for Adjuvant Anti-4-1BB Therapy in Augmenting Antitumor Response by Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cells.

    PubMed

    Mardiana, Sherly; John, Liza B; Henderson, Melissa A; Slaney, Clare Y; von Scheidt, Bianca; Giuffrida, Lauren; Davenport, Alexander J; Trapani, Joseph A; Neeson, Paul J; Loi, Sherene; Haynes, Nicole M; Kershaw, Michael H; Beavis, Paul A; Darcy, Phillip K

    2017-03-15

    Adoptive immunotherapy utilizing chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells has demonstrated high success rates in hematologic cancers, but results against solid malignancies have been limited to date, due in part to the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. Activation of the 4-1BB (CD137) pathway using an agonistic α-4-1BB antibody is known to provide strong costimulatory signals for augmenting and diversifying T-cell responses. We therefore hypothesized that a combination of α-4-1BB and CAR T-cell therapy would result in improved antitumor responses. Using a human-Her2 self-antigen mouse model, we report here that α-4-1BB significantly enhanced CAR T-cell efficacy directed against the Her2 antigen in two different established solid tumor settings. Treatment also increased the expression of IFNγ and the proliferation marker Ki67 in tumor-infiltrating CAR T cells when combined with α-4-1BB. Strikingly, α-4-1BB significantly reduced host immunosuppressive cells at the tumor site, including regulatory T cells and myeloid-derived suppressor cells, correlating with an increased therapeutic response. We conclude that α-4-1BB has a multifunctional role for enhancing CAR T-cell responses and that this combination therapy has high translational potential, given current phase I/II clinical trials with α-4-1BB against various types of cancer. Cancer Res; 77(6); 1296-309. ©2017 AACR.

  14. Immunoregulatory T cell epitope peptides: the new frontier in allergy therapy

    PubMed Central

    Prickett, S R; Rolland, J M; O'Hehir, R E

    2015-01-01

    Allergen immunotherapy (AIT) has been practised since 1911 and remains the only therapy proven to modify the natural history of allergic diseases. Although efficacious in carefully selected individuals, the currently licensed whole allergen extracts retain the risk of IgE-mediated adverse events, including anaphylaxis and occasionally death. This together with the need for prolonged treatment regimens results in poor patient adherence. The central role of the T cell in orchestrating the immune response to allergen informs the choice of T cell targeted therapies for down-regulation of aberrant allergic responses. Carefully mapped short synthetic peptides that contain the dominant T cell epitopes of major allergens and bind to a diverse array of HLA class II alleles, can be delivered intradermally into non-inflamed skin to induce sustained clinical and immunological tolerance. The short peptides from allergenic proteins are unable to cross-link IgE and possess minimal inflammatory potential. Systematic progress has been made from in vitro human models of allergen T cell epitope-based peptide anergy in the early 1990s, through proof-of-concept murine allergy models and early human trials with longer peptides, to the current randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials with the potential new class of synthetic short immune-regulatory T cell epitope peptide therapies. Sustained efficacy with few adverse events is being reported for cat, house dust mite and grass pollen allergy after only a short course of treatment. Underlying immunological mechanisms remain to be fully delineated but anergy, deletion, immune deviation and Treg induction all seem contributory to successful outcomes, with changes in IgG4 apparently less important compared to conventional AIT. T cell epitope peptide therapy is promising a safe and effective new class of specific treatment for allergy, enabling wider application even for more severe allergic diseases. PMID:25900315

  15. Adoptive T cell transfer for cancer immunotherapy in the era of synthetic biology.

    PubMed

    Kalos, Michael; June, Carl H

    2013-07-25

    Adoptive T cell transfer for cancer and chronic infection is an emerging field that shows promise in recent trials. Synthetic-biology-based engineering of T lymphocytes to express high-affinity antigen receptors can overcome immune tolerance, which has been a major limitation of immunotherapy-based strategies. Advances in cell engineering and culture approaches to enable efficient gene transfer and ex vivo cell expansion have facilitated broader evaluation of this technology, moving adoptive transfer from a "boutique" application to the cusp of a mainstream technology. The major challenge currently facing the field is to increase the specificity of engineered T cells for tumors, because targeting shared antigens has the potential to lead to on-target off-tumor toxicities, as observed in recent trials. As the field of adoptive transfer technology matures, the major engineering challenge is the development of automated cell culture systems, so that the approach can extend beyond specialized academic centers and become widely available.

  16. T Cell Receptor-Engineered T Cells to Treat Solid Tumors: T Cell Processing Toward Optimal T Cell Fitness

    PubMed Central

    van Steenbergen-Langeveld, Sabine; van Brakel, Mandy; Groot-van Ruijven, Corrien M.; van Elzakker, Pascal M.M.L.; van Krimpen, Brigitte; Sleijfer, Stefan; Debets, Reno

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Therapy with autologous T cells that have been gene-engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) or T cell receptors (TCR) provides a feasible and broadly applicable treatment for cancer patients. In a clinical study in advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC) patients with CAR T cells specific for carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX), we observed toxicities that (most likely) indicated in vivo function of CAR T cells as well as low T cell persistence and clinical response rates. The latter observations were confirmed by later clinical trials in other solid tumor types and other gene-modified T cells. To improve the efficacy of T cell therapy, we have redefined in vitro conditions to generate T cells with young phenotype, a key correlate with clinical outcome. For their impact on gene-modified T cell phenotype and function, we have tested various anti-CD3/CD28 mAb-based T cell activation and expansion conditions as well as several cytokines prior to and/or after gene transfer using two different receptors: CAIX CAR and MAGE-C2(ALK)/HLA-A2 TCR. In a total set of 16 healthy donors, we observed that T cell activation with soluble anti-CD3/CD28 mAbs in the presence of both IL15 and IL21 prior to TCR gene transfer resulted in enhanced proportions of gene-modified T cells with a preferred in vitro phenotype and better function. T cells generated according to these processing methods demonstrated enhanced binding of pMHC, and an enhanced proportion of CD8+, CD27+, CD62L+, CD45RA+T cells. These new conditions will be translated into a GMP protocol in preparation of a clinical adoptive therapy trial to treat patients with MAGE-C2-positive tumors. PMID:25423330

  17. T cell receptor peptide therapy for autoimmune encephalomyelitis: stronger immunization is necessary for effective vaccination.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Y; Tsuchida, M; Hanawa, H; Abo, T

    1994-02-01

    Although T cell receptor (TCR) peptide therapy was initially reported to be a very effective method for prevention of the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), it was recently demonstrated that the same peptide immunization led to enhanced and chronic EAE in some cases. In the present study, we examined the effect of the TCR peptide (V beta 8.2-39-59) vaccination on the development of EAE by employing several immunization protocols. We found that TCR peptide vaccination effectively prevented EAE development only when the peptide was injected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis-enriched CFA in the vicinity of the challenge site. Under such conditions, a sufficient number of peptide-reactive T cells were generated. Flow cytometry and immunohistochemical analyses using anti-peptide antibody and anti-V beta 8.2 mAb revealed that despite the presence of V beta 8.2+ cells, very few peptide-positive T cells appeared in the lymphoid organs throughout the course of EAE. These findings imply that antibodies that are generated after immunization with V beta 8P are hardly accessible to their specific epitopes in the native protein. Insufficient generation of both T cells and antibodies against V beta 8.2-positive T cells may be attributable to the outcome of the therapy. To establish effective TCR peptide immunotherapy, these disadvantages should be overcome by using other TCR sequences and/or by employing a more suitable adjuvant.

  18. Predictors of Adopting Motivational Enhancement Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ager, Richard; Roahen-Harrison, Stephanie; Toriello, Paul J.; Kissinger, Patricia; Morse, Patricia; Morse, Edward; Carney, Linton; Rice, Janet

    2011-01-01

    Substance abuse counselors have shown limited success in adopting evidence-based practices (EBPs). The purpose of this paper is to identify the barriers and facilitators of adopting an EBP called motivational enhancement therapy (MET). One hundred thirty-six predominantly female (60%) African American (68%) addiction counselors representing over…

  19. Tumor Regression and Delayed Onset Toxicity Following B7-H4 CAR T Cell Therapy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jenessa B; Lanitis, Evripidis; Dangaj, Denarda; Buza, Elizabeth; Poussin, Mathilde; Stashwick, Caitlin; Scholler, Nathalie; Powell, Daniel J

    2016-11-01

    B7-H4 protein is frequently overexpressed in ovarian cancer. Here, we engineered T cells with novel B7-H4-specific chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) that recognized both human and murine B7-H4 to test the hypothesis that B7-H4 CAR T cell therapy can be applied safely in preclinical models. B7-H4 CAR T cells specifically secreted IFN-γ and lysed B7-H4(+) targets. In vivo, B7-H4 CAR T cells displayed antitumor reactivity against B7-H4(+) human ovarian tumor xenografts. Unexpectedly, B7-H4 CAR T cell treatment reproducibly showed delayed, lethal toxicity 6-8 weeks after therapy. Comprehensive assessment of murine B7-H4 protein distribution uncovered expression in ductal and mucosal epithelial cells in normal tissues. Postmortem analysis revealed the presence of widespread histologic lesions that correlated with B7-H4(+) expression, and were inconsistent with graft versus host disease. Lastly, expression patterns of B7-H4 protein in normal human tissue were comparable to distribution in mice, advancing our understanding of B7-H4. We conclude that B7-H4 CAR therapy mediates control of cancer outgrowth. However, long-term engraftment of B7-H4 CAR T cells mediates lethal, off-tumor toxicity that is likely due to wide expression of B7-H4 in healthy mouse organs. This model system provides a unique opportunity for preclinical evaluation of safety approaches that limit CAR-mediated toxicity after tumor destruction in vivo.

  20. IL-2-targeted therapy ameliorates the severity of graft-versus-host disease: ex vivo selective depletion of host-reactive T cells and in vivo therapy.

    PubMed

    Yarkoni, Shai; Prigozhina, Tatyana B; Slavin, Shimon; Askenasy, Nadir

    2012-04-01

    T cell depletion prevents graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) but also removes T cell-mediated support of hematopoietic cell engraftment. A chimeric molecule composed of IL-2 and caspase-3 (IL2-cas) has been evaluated as a therapeutic modality for GVHD and selective ex vivo depletion of host-reactive T cells. IL2-cas does not affect hematopoietic cell engraftment and significantly reduces the clinical and histological severity of GVHD. Early administration of IL2-cas reduced the lethal outcome of haploidentical transplants, and survivor mice displayed markedly elevated levels of X-linked forkhead/winged helix (FoxP3(+); 50%) and CD25(+)FoxP3(+) T cells (35%) in the lymph nodes. The chimeric molecule induces in vitro apoptosis in both CD4(+)CD25(-) and CD4(+)CD25(+) subsets of lymphocytes from alloimmunized mice, and stimulates proliferation of cells with highest levels of CD25 expression. Adoptive transfer of IL2-cas-pretreated viable splenocytes into sublethally irradiated haploidentical recipients resulted in 60% survival after a lethal challenge with lipopolysaccharide, which is associated with elevated fractions of CD25(high)FoxP3(+) T cells in the lymph nodes of survivors. These data demonstrate that ex vivo purging of host-presensitized lymphocytes is effectively achieved with IL2-cas, and that IL-2-targeted apoptotic therapy reduces GVHD severity in vivo. Both approaches promote survival in lethal models of haploidentical GVHD. The mechanism of protection includes direct killing of GVHD effectors, prevention of transition to effector/memory T cells, and induction of regulatory T cell proliferation, which becomes the dominant subset under conditions of homeostatic expansion.

  1. [Attachment and Adoption: Diagnostics, Psychopathology, and Therapy].

    PubMed

    Brisch, Karl-Heinz

    2015-01-01

    This presentation describes the development of attachment between adopted children and their adoptive parents with a focus on the particular issues seen in international adoptions. The questions of settling in, trauma in the country of origin, and the motivations of the adoptive parents will be discussed. Diagnosis and various psychopathological manifestations will be examined, as will outpatient and inpatient modes of therapy. The treatment of children of various ages will be covered along with the necessity for intensive counseling and psychotherapy for the adoptive parents. This will enable the parents to work through early trauma, which will give them and their adopted child the basis for developing healthy attachment patterns. This in turn will enable the child to mature and integrate into society. Possibilities of prevention are discussed. Many of the approaches discussed here regarding attachment and adoption may be applied to foster children and their foster parents.

  2. Rituximab Therapy Reduces Organ-Specific T Cell Responses and Ameliorates Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Monson, Nancy L.; Cravens, Petra; Hussain, Rehana; Harp, Christopher T.; Cummings, Matthew; de Pilar Martin, Maria; Ben, Li-Hong; Do, Julie; Lyons, Jeri-Anne; Lovette-Racke, Amy; Cross, Anne H.; Racke, Michael K.; Stüve, Olaf; Shlomchik, Mark; Eagar, Todd N.

    2011-01-01

    Recent clinical trials have established B cell depletion by the anti-CD20 chimeric antibody Rituximab as a beneficial therapy for patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS). The impact of Rituximab on T cell responses remains largely unexplored. In the experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) model of MS in mice that express human CD20, Rituximab administration rapidly depleted peripheral B cells and strongly reduced EAE severity. B cell depletion was also associated with diminished Delayed Type Hypersensitivity (DTH) and a reduction in T cell proliferation and IL-17 production during recall immune response experiments. While Rituximab is not considered a broad immunosuppressant, our results indicate a role for B cells as a therapeutic cellular target in regulating encephalitogenic T cell responses in specific tissues. PMID:21359213

  3. Circulating gamma delta T cells are activated and depleted during progression of high-grade gliomas: Implications for gamma delta T cell therapy of GBM

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) remains frustratingly impervious to any existing therapy. We have previously shown that GBM is sensitive to recognition and lysis by ex vivo activated gamma delta T cells, a minor subset of lymphocytes that innately recognize autologous stress-associated target antigens...

  4. Analysis of transgene-specific immune responses that limit the in vivo persistence of adoptively transferred HSV-TK–modified donor T cells after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Carolina; Flowers, Mary E.; Warren, Edus H.; Riddell, Stanley R.

    2006-01-01

    The introduction of an inducible suicide gene such as the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-TK) might allow exploitation of the antitumor activity of donor T cells after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) without graft versus host disease. However, HSV-TK is foreign, and immune responses to gene-modified T cells could lead to their premature elimination. We show that after the infusion of HSV-TK–modified donor T cells to HCT recipients, CD8+ and CD4+ T-cell responses to HSV-TK are rapidly induced and coincide with the disappearance of transferred cells. Cytokine flow cytometry using an overlapping panel of HSV-TK peptides allowed rapid detection and quantitation of HSV-TK–specific T cells in the blood and identified multiple immunogenic epitopes. Repeated infusion of modified T cells boosted the induced HSV-TK–specific T cells, which persisted as memory cells. These studies demonstrate the need for nonimmunogenic suicide genes and identify a strategy for detection of CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses to transgene products that should be generally applicable to monitoring patients on gene therapy trials. The potency of gene-modified T cells to elicit robust and durable immune responses imply this approach might be used for vaccination to elicit T-cell responses to viral or tumor antigens. PMID:16282341

  5. Adoptive transfer of unresponsiveness to allogeneic skin grafts with hepatic gamma delta + T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Gorczynski, R M

    1994-01-01

    C3H/HEJ mice injected with irradiated multiple minor incompatible B10.BR lymphoid cells via the portal vein showed delayed rejection of subsequent B10.BR skin grafts. Similar delayed rejection was produced by lateral tail vein injection of B10.BR hepatic mononuclear cells or H-2k cells pulsed in vivo with B10 minor histocompatibility antigens. Inhibition of C3H anti-B10.BR immunity in vivo (assessed by delayed graft rejection) and in vitro (assessed by B10.BR-induced lymphokine production) can be transferred by radioresistant, plastic-adherent F4/80+33D1-CD4-CD8-alpha beta TcR-gamma delta TcR- mononuclear hepatic cells from (C3H/HEJ x C3H.SW)F1 mice injected 36 hr earlier with 100 x 10(6) irradiated spleen cells. By 10 days post-injection, cells transferring delayed rejection are radiosensitive, plastic non-adherent, F4/80-33D1-CD4-CD8- alpha beta Tc+- gamma delta TcR+ cells. Injection of interleukin-2 (IL-2) in vivo into mice receiving pretreatment with B10.BR cells via the portal vein, or adoptive transfer into such mice of immune anti-B10.BR lymphoid cells, abolished delayed rejection on subsequent skin grafting. Delayed rejection or modulation of lymphokine production was associated in all cases with suppression of IL-2 production and preferential retention of IL-4 production from cells stimulated in vitro. PMID:8132216

  6. Adoptive transfer of allogeneic liver sinusoidal endothelial cells specifically inhibits T-cell responses to cognate stimuli.

    PubMed

    Banshodani, Masataka; Onoe, Takashi; Shishida, Masayuki; Tahara, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Shinji; Igarashi, Yuka; Tanaka, Yuka; Ohdan, Hideki

    2013-01-01

    Although it is well known that liver allografts are often accepted by recipients, leading to donor-specific tolerance of further organ transplants, the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. We had previously used an in vitro model and showed that mouse liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) selectively suppress allospecific T-cells across major histocompatibility complex (MHC) barriers. In the present study, we established an in vivo model for evaluating the immunomodulatory effects of allogeneic LSECs on corresponding T-cells. Allogeneic BALB/cA LSECs were injected intraportally into recombination activating gene 2 γ-chain double-knockout (RAG2/gc-KO, H-2(b)) mice lacking T, B, and natural killer (NK) cells. In order to facilitate LSEC engraftment, the RAG2/gc-KO mice were injected intraperitoneally with monocrotaline 2 days before the adoptive transfer of LSECs; this impaired the host LSECs, conferring a proliferative advantage to the transplanted LSECs. After orthotopic allogeneic LSEC engraftment, the RAG2/gc-KO mice were immune reconstituted intravenously with C57BL/6 splenocytes. After immune reconstitution, mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR) assay using splenocytes from the recipients revealed that specific inhibition of host CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell proliferation was greater in response to allostimulation with irradiated BALB/cA splenocytes rather than to stimulation with irradiated third party SJL/jorllco splenocytes. This inhibitory effect was attenuated by administering anti-programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) monoclonal antibody during immune reconstitution in the above-mentioned mice, but not in RAG2/gc-KO mice engrafted with Fas ligand (FasL)-deficient BALB/cA LSECs. Furthermore, engraftment of allogeneic BALB/cA LSECs significantly prolonged the survival of subsequently grafted cognate allogeneic BALB/cA hearts in RAG2/gc-KO mice immune reconstituted with bone marrow transplantation from C57BL/6 mice. In conclusion, murine LSECs have been proven

  7. TCR-ligand koff rate correlates with the protective capacity of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells for adoptive transfer.

    PubMed

    Nauerth, Magdalena; Weißbrich, Bianca; Knall, Robert; Franz, Tobias; Dössinger, Georg; Bet, Jeannette; Paszkiewicz, Paulina J; Pfeifer, Lukas; Bunse, Mario; Uckert, Wolfgang; Holtappels, Rafaela; Gillert-Marien, Dorothea; Neuenhahn, Michael; Krackhardt, Angela; Reddehase, Matthias J; Riddell, Stanley R; Busch, Dirk H

    2013-07-03

    Adoptive immunotherapy is a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of chronic infections and cancer. T cells within a certain range of high avidity for their cognate ligand are believed to be most effective. T cell receptor (TCR) transfer experiments indicate that a major part of avidity is hardwired within the structure of the TCR. Unfortunately, rapid measurement of structural avidity of TCRs is difficult on living T cells. We developed a technology where dissociation (koff rate) of truly monomeric peptide-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) molecules bound to surface-expressed TCRs can be monitored by real-time microscopy in a highly reliable manner. A first evaluation of this method on distinct human cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific T cell populations revealed unexpected differences in the koff rates. CMV-specific T cells are currently being evaluated in clinical trials for efficacy in adoptive immunotherapy; therefore, determination of koff rates could guide selection of the most effective donor cells. Indeed, in two different murine infection models, we demonstrate that T cell populations with lower koff rates confer significantly better protection than populations with fast koff rates. These data indicate that koff rate measurements can improve the predictability of adoptive immunotherapy and provide diagnostic information on the in vivo quality of T cells.

  8. Adoptive transfer of natural killer cells promotes the anti-tumor efficacy of T cells.

    PubMed

    Goding, Stephen R; Yu, Shaohong; Bailey, Lisa M; Lotze, Michael T; Basse, Per H

    2016-07-01

    The density of NK cells in tumors correlates positively with prognosis in many types of cancers. The average number of infiltrating NK cells is, however, quite modest (approximately 30 NK cells/sq.mm), even in tumors deemed to have a "high" density of infiltrating NK cells. It is unclear how such low numbers of tumor-infiltrating NK cells can influence outcome. Here, we used ovalbumin-expressing tumor cell lines and TCR transgenic, OVA-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (OT-I-CTLs) to determine whether the simultaneous attack by anti-tumor CTLs and IL-2-activated NK (A-NK) cells synergistically increases the overall tumor cell kill and whether upregulation of tumor MHC class-I by NK cell-derived interferon-gamma (IFNγ) improves tumor-recognition and kill by anti-tumor CTLs. At equal E:T ratios, A-NK cells killed OVA-expressing tumor cells better than OT-I-CTLs. The cytotoxicity against OVA-expressing tumor cells increased by combining OT-I-CTLs and A-NK cells, but the increase was additive rather than synergistic. A-NK cells adenovirally-transduced to produce IL-12 (A-NK(IL-12)) produced high amounts of IFNγ. The addition of a low number of A-NK(IL-12) cells to OT-I-CTLs resulted in a synergistic, albeit modest, increase in overall cytotoxicity. Pre-treatment of tumor cells with NK cell-conditioned medium increased tumor MHC expression and sensitivity to CTL-mediated killing. Pre-treatment of CTLs with NK cell-conditioned medium had no effect on CTL cytotoxicity. In vivo, MHC class-I expression by OVA-expressing B16 melanoma lung metastases increased significantly within 24-48h after adoptive transfer of A-NK(IL-12) cells. OT-I-CTLs and A-NK(IL-12) cells localized selectively and equally well into OVA-expressing B16 lung metastases and treatment of mice bearing 7-days-old OVA-B16 lung metastases with both A-NK(IL-12) cells and OT-I-CTLs lead to a significant prolongation of survival. Thus, an important function of tumor-infiltrating NK cells may be to increase

  9. Self-Reactive CFTR T Cells in Humans: Implications for Gene Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Calcedo, Roberto; Griesenbach, Uta; Dorgan, Daniel J.; Soussi, Samia; Boyd, A. Christopher; Davies, Jane C.; Higgins, Tracy E.; Hyde, Stephen C.; Gill, Deborah R.; Innes, J. Alastair; Porteous, David J.; Alton, Eric W.; Wilson, James M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Cystic fibrosis (CF) is one of the most common autosomal recessive lethal disorders affecting white populations of northern European ancestry. To date there is no cure for CF. Life-long treatments for CF are being developed and include gene therapy and the use of small-molecule drugs designed to target specific cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) gene mutations. Irrespective of the type of molecular therapy for CF, which may include gene replacement, exon skipping, nonsense suppression, or molecular correctors, because all of these modulate gene expression there is an inherent risk of activation of T cells against the wild-type version of CFTR. Here we report the validation of the human interferon-γ enzyme-linked immunospot assay and its application for the analysis of CFTR-specific T cell responses in patients with CF and in non-CF subjects. We found non-CF subjects with low levels of self-reactive CFTR-specific T cells in the United States and several patients with CF with low to high levels of self-reactive CFTR-specific T cells in both the United States and the United Kingdom. PMID:23790242

  10. Th2-polarized CD4+ T cells and macrophages limit efficacy of radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shiao, Stephen L.; Ruffell, Brian; DeNardo, David G.; Faddegon, Bruce A.; Park, Catherine C.; Coussens, Lisa M.

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy (RT) and chemotherapy (CTX) following surgery are mainstays of treatment for breast cancer (BC). While multiple studies have recently revealed the significance of immune cells as mediators of CTX response in BC, less is known regarding roles for leukocytes as mediating outcomes following RT. To address this, we utilized a syngeneic orthotopic murine model of mammary carcinogenesis to investigate if response to RT could be improved when select immune cells or immune-based pathways in the mammary microenvironment were inhibited. Treatment of mammary tumor-bearing mice with either a neutralizing monoclonal antibody (mAb) to colony-stimulating factor-1 (CSF-1) or a small molecule inhibitor of the CSF-1 receptor kinase (i.e., PLX3397), resulting in efficient macrophage depletion, significantly delayed tumor regrowth following RT. Delayed tumor growth in this setting was associated with increased presence of CD8+ T cells, and reduced presence of CD4+ T cells, the main source of the Th2 cytokine interleukin (IL)4 in mammary tumors. Selective depletion of CD4+ T cells or neutralization of IL4 in combination with RT, phenocopied results following macrophage depletion, whereas depletion of CD8+ T cells abrogated improved response to RT following these therapies. Analogously, therapeutic neutralization of IL4 or IL13, or IL4 receptor alpha deficiency, in combination with the CTX paclitaxel resulted in slowed primary mammary tumor growth by CD8+ T cell-dependent mechanisms. These findings indicate that clinical responses to cytotoxic therapy in general can be improved by neutralizing dominant Th2-based programs driving protumorigenic and immune suppressive pathways in mammary (breast) tumors to improve outcomes. PMID:25716473

  11. A Rapid Cell Expansion Process for Production of Engineered Autologous CAR-T Cell Therapies.

    PubMed

    Lu, Tangying Lily; Pugach, Omar; Somerville, Robert; Rosenberg, Steven A; Kochendefer, James N; Better, Marc; Feldman, Steven A

    2016-12-01

    The treatment of B-cell malignancies by adoptive cell transfer (ACT) of anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor T cells (CD19 CAR-T) has proven to be a highly successful therapeutic modality in several clinical trials.(1-6) The anti-CD19 CAR-T cell production method used to support initial trials relied on numerous manual, open process steps, human serum, and 10 days of cell culture to achieve a clinical dose.(7) This approach limited the ability to support large multicenter clinical trials, as well as scale up for commercial cell production. Therefore, studies were completed to streamline and optimize the original National Cancer Institute production process by removing human serum from the process in order to minimize the risk of viral contamination, moving process steps from an open system to functionally closed system operations in order to minimize the risk of microbial contamination, and standardizing additional process steps in order to maximize process consistency. This study reports a procedure for generating CD19 CAR-T cells in 6 days, using a functionally closed manufacturing process and defined, serum-free medium. This method is able to produce CD19 CAR-T cells that are phenotypically and functionally indistinguishable from cells produced for clinical trials by the previously described production process.

  12. Cinnamon ameliorates experimental allergic encephalomyelitis in mice via regulatory T cells: implications for multiple sclerosis therapy.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Susanta; Pahan, Kalipada

    2015-01-01

    Upregulation and/or maintenance of regulatory T cells (Tregs) during an autoimmune insult may have therapeutic efficacy in autoimmune diseases. Although several immunomodulatory drugs and molecules are available, most present significant side effects over long-term use. Cinnamon is a commonly used natural spice and flavoring material used for centuries throughout the world. Here, we have explored a novel use of cinnamon powder in protecting Tregs and treating the disease process of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of MS. Oral feeding of cinnamon (Cinnamonum verum) powder suppresses clinical symptoms of relapsing-remitting EAE in female PLP-TCR transgenic mice and adoptive transfer mouse model. Cinnamon also inhibited clinical symptoms of chronic EAE in male C57/BL6 mice. Dose-dependent study shows that cinnamon powder at a dose of 50 mg/kg body wt/d or higher significantly suppresses clinical symptoms of EAE in mice. Accordingly, oral administration of cinnamon also inhibited perivascular cuffing, maintained the integrity of blood-brain barrier and blood-spinal cord barrier, suppressed inflammation, normalized the expression of myelin genes, and blocked demyelination in the central nervous system of EAE mice. Interestingly, cinnamon treatment upregulated Tregs via reduction of nitric oxide production. Furthermore, we demonstrate that blocking of Tregs by neutralizing antibodies against CD25 abrogates cinnamon-mediated protection of EAE. Taken together, our results suggest that oral administration of cinnamon powder may be beneficial in MS patients and that no other existing anti-MS therapies could be so economical and trouble-free as this approach.

  13. Lenalidomide Therapy for Patients With Relapsed and/or Refractory, Peripheral T-Cell Lymphomas

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-04-18

    Peripheral T-cell Lymphomas; Adult T-cell Leukemia; Adult T-cell Lymphoma; Peripheral T-cell Lymphoma Unspecified; Angioimmunoblastic T-cell Lymphoma; Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; T/Null Cell Systemic Type; Cutaneous t-Cell Lymphoma With Nodal/Visceral Disease

  14. Adoptive transfer of pp65-specific T cells for the treatment of chemorefractory cytomegalovirus disease or reactivation after haploidentical and matched unrelated stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Feuchtinger, Tobias; Opherk, Kathrin; Bethge, Wolfgang A; Topp, Max S; Schuster, Friedhelm R; Weissinger, Eva M; Mohty, Mohamad; Or, Reuven; Maschan, Michael; Schumm, Michael; Hamprecht, Klaus; Handgretinger, Rupert; Lang, Peter; Einsele, Hermann

    2010-11-18

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) disease and infection refractory to antiviral treatment after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) is associated with a high mortality. Adoptive transfer of CMV-specific T cells could reconstitute viral immunity after SCT and could protect from CMV-related complications. However, logistics of producing virus-specific T-cell grafts limited the clinical application. We treated 18 patients after allo-SCT from human leukocyte antigen-mismatched/haploidentical or human leukocyte antigen-matched unrelated donors with polyclonal CMV-specific T cells generated by ex vivo stimulation with pp65, followed by isolation of interferon-γ-producing cells. Patients with CMV disease or viremia refractory to antiviral chemotherapy or both were eligible for adoptive T-cell transfer and received a mean of 21 × 10³/kg pp65-specific T cells. In 83% of cases CMV infection was cleared or viral burden was significantly reduced, even in cases of CMV encephalitis (n = 2). Viral control was associated with in vivo expansion of CMV-specific T lymphocytes in 12 of 16 evaluable cases, resulting in reconstitution of antiviral T-cell responses, without graft-versus-host disease induction or acute side effects. Our findings indicate that the infusion of low numbers of CMV-specific T cells is safe, feasible, and effective as a treatment on demand for refractory CMV infection and CMV disease after allo-SCT.

  15. Therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome in a case of cutaneous adult T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Naofumi; Shinohara, Kenji; Ota, Ituro; Muraki, Kazuhiko; Shimohakamada, Yoko

    2002-01-01

    We report a case of therapy-related myelodysplastic syndrome (t-MDS) in adult T-cell lymphoma. A 69-year-old man suffered from cutaneous adult T-cell lymphoma, which was treated with radiation to the skin and combination chemotherapy of CHOP-V-MMV and VEPA-B. After 14 months of these therapies, anemia and thrombocytopenia appeared, and bone marrow aspiration smears showed immature myeloblasts, dysplastic erythroblasts, and micromegakaryocytes. Therapy-related MDS of refractory anemia with an excess of blasts was diagnosed. Cytogenetic study of the bone marrow cells showed 5q- and additional abnormalities. Rearrangement of the MLL gene was observed in the bone marrow cells. Mutations of N-ras codons at 12,13, and 61, p53 tumor suppressor gene, and monoclonal integration of human T-lymphotrophic virus -1 provirus DNA were not observed in the bone marrow cells. The patient died of pneumonia 21 months after diagnosis of cutaneous adult T-cell lymphoma.

  16. Autoimmune Hepatitis: Progress from Global Immunosuppression to Personalised Regulatory T Cell Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Than, Nwe Ni; Jeffery, Hannah C.; Oo, Ye H.

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) is an immune mediated liver injury. The precise aetiology of AIH is still unknown but current evidence suggests both genetic and environmental factors are involved. Breakdown in peripheral self-tolerance, and impaired functions of FOXP3+ regulatory T cell along with effector cell resistance to suppression at the tissue level seem to play an important role in AIH immunopathogenesis. AIH is predominantly a T lymphocytes driven disease but B lymphocytes are also involved in the immunopathology. Innate immune cells are crucial in the initial onset of disease and their response is followed by adaptive T (Th1, Th17, and cytotoxic T cells) and B cell responses evidenced by liver histology and peripheral blood serology. Standard treatment regimens involving steroid and immunosuppressive medications lead to global immune suppression requiring life-long therapy with many side effects. Biologic therapies have been attempted but duration of remission is short-lived. Future direction of diagnosis and treatment for AIH should be guided by “omics” and the immunology profile of the individual patient and clinicians should aim to deliver personalised medicine for their patients. Cell therapy such as infusion of autologous, antigen-specific, and liver-homing regulatory T cells to restore hepatic immune tolerance may soon be a potential future treatment for AIH patients. PMID:27446862

  17. Expanding Roles for CD4 T Cells and Their Subpopulations in Tumor Immunity and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Dobrzanski, Mark J.

    2013-01-01

    The importance of CD4 T cells in orchestrating the immune system and their role in inducing effective T cell-mediated therapies for the treatment of patients with select established malignancies are undisputable. Through a complex and balanced array of direct and indirect mechanisms of cellular activation and regulation, this functionally diverse family of lymphocytes can potentially promote tumor eradication, long-term tumor immunity, and aid in establishing and/or rebalancing immune cell homeostasis through interaction with other immune cell populations within the highly dynamic tumor environment. However, recent studies have uncovered additional functions and roles for CD4 T cells, some of which are independent of other lymphocytes, that can not only influence and contribute to tumor immunity but paradoxically promote tumor growth and progression. Here, we review the recent advances in our understanding of the various CD4 T cell lineages and their signature cytokines in disease progression and/or regression. We discuss their direct and indirect mechanistic interplay among themselves and with other responding cells of the antitumor response, their potential roles and abilities for “plasticity” and memory cell generation within the hostile tumor environment, and their potentials in cancer treatment and immunotherapy. PMID:23533029

  18. Fully human CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptors for T-cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Sommermeyer, D; Hill, T; Shamah, S M; Salter, A I; Chen, Y; Mohler, K M; Riddell, S R

    2017-02-16

    Impressive results have been achieved by adoptively transferring T-cells expressing CD19-specific CARs with binding domains from murine mAbs to treat B-cell malignancies. T-cell mediated immune responses specific for peptides from the murine scFv antigen-binding domain of the CAR can develop in patients and result in premature elimination of CAR-T-cells increasing the risk of tumor relapse. As fully human scFv might reduce immunogenicity, we generated CD19-specific human scFvs with similar binding characteristics as the murine FMC63-derived scFv using human Ab/DNA-libraries. CARs were constructed in various formats from several scFvs and used to transduce primary human T-cells. The resulting CD19-CAR-T-cells were specifically activated by and lysed CD19-positive tumor cell lines and primary CLL cells, and eliminated human lymphoma xenografts in immunodeficient mice. Certain fully human CAR constructs were superior to the FMC63-CAR, which is widely used in clinical trials. Imaging of cell surface distribution of the human CARs revealed no evidence of clustering without target cell engagement, and tonic signaling was not observed. To further reduce potential immunogenicity of the CARs, we also modified the fusion sites between different CAR components. The described fully human CARs for a validated clinical target may reduce immune rejection compared with murine based CARs.Leukemia accepted article preview online, 16 February 2017. doi:10.1038/leu.2017.57.

  19. Full-Breadth Analysis of CD8+ T-Cell Responses in Acute Hepatitis C Virus Infection and Early Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lauer, Georg M.; Lucas, Michaela; Timm, Joerg; Ouchi, Kei; Kim, Arthur Y.; Day, Cheryl L.; zur Wiesch, Julian Schulze; Paranhos-Baccala, Glaucia; Sheridan, Isabelle; Casson, Deborah R.; Reiser, Markus; Gandhi, Rajesh T.; Li, Bin; Allen, Todd M.; Chung, Raymond T.; Klenerman, Paul; Walker, Bruce D.

    2005-01-01

    Multispecific CD8+ T-cell responses are thought to be important for the control of acute hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection, but to date little information is actually available on the breadth of responses at early time points. Additionally, the influence of early therapy on these responses and their relationships to outcome are controversial. To investigate this issue, we performed comprehensive analysis of the breadth and frequencies of virus-specific CD8+ T-cell responses on the single epitope level in eight acutely infected individuals who were all started on early therapy. During the acute phase, responses against up to five peptides were identified. During therapy, CD8+ T-cell responses decreased rather than increased as virus was controlled, and no new specificities emerged. A sustained virological response following completion of treatment was independent of CD8+ T-cell responses, as well as CD4+ T-cell responses. Rapid recrudescence also occurred despite broad CD8+ T-cell responses. Importantly, in vivo suppression of CD3+ T cells using OKT3 in one subject did not result in recurrence of viremia. These data suggest that broad CD8+ T-cell responses alone may be insufficient to contain HCV replication, and also that early therapy is effective independent of such responses. PMID:16189000

  20. Preparation for a Clinical Trial Using Adoptive Transfer of Tumor-Reactive TGF_Beta-Insensitive CD8+ T Cells for Treatment of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    W81XWH-05-1-0450 TITLE: Preparation for a Clinical Trial Using Adoptive Transfer of Tumor-Reactive TGF_Beta-Insensitive CD8+ T Cells for...CONTRACT NUMBER Preparation for a Clinical Trial Using Adoptive Transfer of Tumor-Reactive TGF_Beta-Insensitive CD8+ T Cells for Treatment of Prostate...technology to clinical trial. At present, I have submitted a R21/R33 application to NCI for a combination of pre-clinical and clinical trial for the use of

  1. Adoptive cell transfer therapy for malignant gliomas.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Eiichi; Takano, Shingo; Ohno, Tadao; Tsuboi, Koji

    2012-01-01

    To date, various adoptive immunotherapies have been attempted for treatment of malignant gliomas using nonspecific and/or specific effector cells. Since the late 1980s, with the development of rIL-2, the efficacy of lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cell therapy with or without rIL-2 for malignant gliomas had been tested with some modifications in therapeutic protocols. With advancements in technology, ex vivo expanded tumor specific cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTL) or those lineages were used in clinical trials with higher tumor response rates. In addition, combinations of those adoptive cell transfer using LAK cells, CTLs or natural killer (NK) cells with autologous tumor vaccine (ATV) therapy were attempted. Also, a strategy of high-dose (or lymphodepleting) chemotherapy followed by adoptive cell transfer has been drawing attentions recently. The most important role of these clinical studies using cell therapy was to prove that these ex vivo expanded effector cells could kill tumor cells in vivo. Although recent clinical results could demonstrate radiologic tumor shrinkage in a number of cases, cell transfer therapy alone has been utilized less frequently, because of the high cost of ex vivo cell expansion, the short duration of antitumor activity in vivo, and the recent shift of interest to vaccine immunotherapy. Nevertheless, NK cell therapy using specific feeder cells or allergenic NK cell lines have potentials to be a good choice of treatment because of easy ex vivo expansion and their efficacy especially when combined with vaccine therapy as they are complementary to each other. Also, further studies are expected to clarify the efficacy of the high-dose chemotherapy followed by a large scale cell transfer therapy as a new therapeutic strategy for malignant gliomas.

  2. T-Cell Receptor-Transduced T Cells: Clinical Experience.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Paul F

    2015-01-01

    The large number of T-cell epitopes that have been found to be processed and presented on human tumors, now numbering in the hundreds, provides a rich source of targets for therapeutic interventions aimed at inducing durable tumor regression. Vaccination strategies aimed at inducing responses to these antigens have been largely ineffective, and it has been challenging to generate large numbers of T cells with the functional capacity to mediate durable tumor regressions in adoptive immunotherapy strategies in patients who have common epithelial malignancies. The ability to generate T-cell receptors that recognize shared as well as unique antigens expressed in a wide variety of common tumor types that include lung, breast, ovarian, gastrointestinal, urothelial, and genitourinary cancers provides an opportunity to develop widely applicable therapies based on the adoptive transfer of autologous T cells transduced with those receptors.

  3. T Cell Receptor Engagement Triggers Its CD3ε and CD3ζ Subunits to Adopt a Compact, Locked Conformation

    PubMed Central

    Risueño, Ruth M.; Schamel, Wolfgang W. A.; Alarcón, Balbino

    2008-01-01

    How the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) discriminates between molecularly related peptide/Major Histocompatibility Complex (pMHC) ligands and converts this information into different possible signaling outcomes is still not understood. One current model proposes that strong pMHC ligands, but not weak ones, induce a conformational change in the TCR. Evidence supporting this comes from a pull-down assay that detects ligand-induced binding of the TCR to the N-terminal SH3 domain of the adapter protein Nck, and also from studies with a neoepitope-specific antibody. Both methods rely on the exposure of a polyproline sequence in the CD3ε subunit of the TCR, and neither indicates whether the conformational change is transmitted to other CD3 subunits. Using a protease-sensitivity assay, we now show that the cytoplasmic tails of CD3ε and CD3ζ subunits become fully protected from degradation upon TCR triggering. These results suggest that the TCR conformational change is transmitted to the tails of CD3ε and CD3ζ, and perhaps all CD3 subunits. Furthermore, the resistance to protease digestion suggests that CD3 cytoplasmic tails adopt a compact structure in the triggered TCR. These results are consistent with a model in which transduction of the conformational change induced upon TCR triggering promotes condensation and shielding of the CD3 cytoplasmic tails. PMID:18320063

  4. Adoptive Transfer of Tumor-Specific Tc17 Effector T Cells Controls the Growth of B16 Melanoma in Mice

    PubMed Central

    de la Luz Garcia-Hernandez, Maria; Hamada, Hiromasa; Reome, Joyce B.; Misra, Sara K.; Tighe, Michael P.; Dutton, Richard W.

    2010-01-01

    In vitro generated OVA-specific IL-17–producing CD8 T effector cells (Tc17) from OT-1 mice, adoptively transferred into B16-OVA tumor-bearing mice, controlled tumor growth in early and late stage melanoma. IL-17, TNF, and IFN-γ from the Tc17 effectors all played a role in an enhanced recruitment of T cells, neutrophils, and macrophages to the tumor. In addition, Tc17 cells and recently recruited, activated neutrophils produced further chemokines, including CCL3, CCL4, CCL5, CXCL9, and CXCL10, responsible for the attraction of type 1 lymphocytes (Th1 and Tc1) and additional neutrophils. Neutrophils were rapidly attracted to the tumor site by an IL-17 dependent mechanism, but at later stages the induction of the chemokine CXCL2 by Tc17-derived TNF and IFN-γ contributed to sustain neutrophil recruitment. Approximately 10–50 times as many Tc17 effectors were required compared with Tc1 effectors to exert the same level of control over tumor growth. The recruitment of neutrophils was more prominent when Tc17 rather than Tc1 were used to control tumor and depletion of neutrophils resulted in a diminished capacity to control tumor growth. PMID:20237297

  5. Generation of EBV-specific T cells for adoptive immunotherapy: a novel protocol using formalin-fixed stimulator cells to increase biosafety.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Markus H; Brestrich, Gordon; Mittenzweig, Alexa; Roemhild, Andy; Zwinger, Sandra; Subklewe, Marion; Beier, Carola; Kurtz, Andreas; Babel, Nina; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Reinke, Petra

    2007-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy with in vitro generated Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-specific T cells is a safe and effective treatment in patients with EBV-related complications after transplantation. More frequent use of EBV-specific T cells is held back by their cost and time-intensive generation under good manufacturing practice (GMP) conditions. Currently, EBV-specific T cells are produced by repetitive stimulation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells with EBV-infected lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs), a protocol that requires several open GMP-handling steps. The aim of the present study was to improve T-cell generation under GMP conditions. We introduce a novel generation protocol that replaces repetitive with short-term LCL stimulation of PMBCs. Vital and formalin-fixed LCLs were used to further increase biosafety. Stimulated T cells were selected by the clinically approved cytokine secretion assay followed by nonspecific expansion. Sufficient numbers of EBV-specific T-cell lines were generated with all protocols. Specific recognition and killing of EBV-infected targets was found and was independent of the generation protocol applied. The novel protocol based on formalin-fixed cells, selection, and expansion reduced open GMP-handling steps and increased biosafety. Furthermore, fixation will allow the use of transgenic LCLs (eg, with cytomegalovirus or tumor antigens) and thereby facilitate the generation of antigen-specific T cells directed against pathogens other than EBV.

  6. [Novel therapy for malignant lymphoma: adoptive immuno-gene therapy using chimeric antigen receptor(CAR)-expressing T lymphocytes].

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Keiya

    2014-03-01

    Adoptive T-cell therapy using chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) technology is a novel approach to cancer immuno-gene therapy. CARs are hybrid proteins consisting of target-antigen-specific single-chain antibody fragment fused to intracellular T-cell activation domains (CD28 or CD137/CD3 zeta receptor). CAR-expressing engineered T lymphocytes can directly recognize and kill tumor cells in an HLA independent manner. In the United States, promising results have been obtained in the clinical trials of adoptive immuno-gene therapy using CD19-CAR-T lymphocytes for the treatment of refractory B-cell malignancies, including chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). In this review article, CD19-CAR-T gene therapy for refractory B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma is discussed.

  7. Recent advances in T-cell immunotherapy for haematological malignancies.

    PubMed

    Rouce, Rayne H; Sharma, Sandhya; Huynh, Mai; Heslop, Helen E

    2017-03-01

    In vitro discoveries have paved the way for bench-to-bedside translation in adoptive T cell immunotherapy, resulting in remarkable clinical responses in a variety of haematological malignancies. Adoptively transferred T cells genetically modified to express CD19 CARs have shown great promise, although many unanswered questions regarding how to optimize T-cell therapies for both safety and efficacy remain. Similarly, T cells that recognize viral or tumour antigens though their native receptors have produced encouraging clinical responses. Honing manufacturing processes will increase the availability of T-cell products, while combining T-cell therapies has the ability to increase complete response rates. Lastly, innovative mechanisms to control these therapies may improve safety profiles while genome editing offers the prospect of modulating T-cell function. This review will focus on recent advances in T-cell immunotherapy, highlighting both clinical and pre-clinical advances, as well as exploring what the future holds.

  8. Memory T cells specific for murine cytomegalovirus re-emerge after multiple challenges and recapitulate immunity in various adoptive transfer scenarios.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Michael; Turula, Holly; Tandon, Mayank; Deslouches, Berthony; Moghbeli, Toktam; Snyder, Christopher M

    2015-02-15

    Reconstitution of CMV-specific immunity after transplant remains a primary clinical objective to prevent CMV disease, and adoptive immunotherapy of CMV-specific T cells can be an effective therapeutic approach. Because of viral persistence, most CMV-specific CD8(+) T cells become terminally differentiated effector phenotype CD8(+) T cells (TEFF). A minor subset retains a memory-like phenotype (memory phenotype CD8(+) T cells [TM]), but it is unknown whether these cells retain memory function or persist over time. Interestingly, recent studies suggest that CMV-specific CD8(+) T cells with different phenotypes have different abilities to reconstitute sustained immunity after transfer. The immunology of human CMV infections is reflected in the murine CMV (MCMV) model. We found that human CMV- and MCMV-specific T cells displayed shared genetic programs, validating the MCMV model for studies of CMV-specific T cells in vivo. The MCMV-specific TM population was stable over time and retained a proliferative capacity that was vastly superior to TEFF. Strikingly, after transfer, TM established sustained and diverse T cell populations even after multiple challenges. Although both TEFF and TM could protect Rag(-/-) mice, only TM persisted after transfer into immune replete, latently infected recipients and responded if recipient immunity was lost. Interestingly, transferred TM did not expand until recipient immunity was lost, supporting that competition limits the Ag stimulation of TM. Ultimately, these data show that CMV-specific TM retain memory function during MCMV infection and can re-establish CMV immunity when necessary. Thus, TM may be a critical component for consistent, long-term adoptive immunotherapy success.

  9. Domain-swapped T cell receptors improve the safety of TCR gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Bethune, Michael T; Gee, Marvin H; Bunse, Mario; Lee, Mark S; Gschweng, Eric H; Pagadala, Meghana S; Zhou, Jing; Cheng, Donghui; Heath, James R; Kohn, Donald B; Kuhns, Michael S; Uckert, Wolfgang; Baltimore, David

    2016-11-08

    T cells engineered to express a tumor-specific αβ T cell receptor (TCR) mediate anti-tumor immunity. However, mispairing of the therapeutic αβ chains with endogenous αβ chains reduces therapeutic TCR surface expression and generates self-reactive TCRs. We report a general strategy to prevent TCR mispairing: swapping constant domains between the α and β chains of a therapeutic TCR. When paired, domain-swapped (ds)TCRs assemble with CD3, express on the cell surface, and mediate antigen-specific T cell responses. By contrast, dsTCR chains mispaired with endogenous chains cannot properly assemble with CD3 or signal, preventing autoimmunity. We validate this approach in cell-based assays and in a mouse model of TCR gene transfer-induced graft-versus-host disease. We also validate a related approach whereby replacement of αβ TCR domains with corresponding γδ TCR domains yields a functional TCR that does not mispair. This work enables the design of safer TCR gene therapies for cancer immunotherapy.

  10. Domain-swapped T cell receptors improve the safety of TCR gene therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bethune, Michael T; Gee, Marvin H; Bunse, Mario; Lee, Mark S; Gschweng, Eric H; Pagadala, Meghana S; Zhou, Jing; Cheng, Donghui; Heath, James R; Kohn, Donald B; Kuhns, Michael S; Uckert, Wolfgang; Baltimore, David

    2016-01-01

    T cells engineered to express a tumor-specific αβ T cell receptor (TCR) mediate anti-tumor immunity. However, mispairing of the therapeutic αβ chains with endogenous αβ chains reduces therapeutic TCR surface expression and generates self-reactive TCRs. We report a general strategy to prevent TCR mispairing: swapping constant domains between the α and β chains of a therapeutic TCR. When paired, domain-swapped (ds)TCRs assemble with CD3, express on the cell surface, and mediate antigen-specific T cell responses. By contrast, dsTCR chains mispaired with endogenous chains cannot properly assemble with CD3 or signal, preventing autoimmunity. We validate this approach in cell-based assays and in a mouse model of TCR gene transfer-induced graft-versus-host disease. We also validate a related approach whereby replacement of αβ TCR domains with corresponding γδ TCR domains yields a functional TCR that does not mispair. This work enables the design of safer TCR gene therapies for cancer immunotherapy. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19095.001 PMID:27823582

  11. The human application of gene therapy to re-program T-cell specificity using chimeric antigen receptors

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Alan D; Moyes, Judy S; Cooper, Laurence JN

    2014-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of T cells is a promising approach to treat cancers. Primary human T cells can be modified using viral and non-viral vectors to promote the specific targeting of cancer cells via the introduction of exogenous T-cell receptors (TCRs) or chimeric antigen receptors (CARs). This gene transfer displays the potential to increase the specificity and potency of the anticancer response while decreasing the systemic adverse effects that arise from conventional treatments that target both cancerous and healthy cells. This review highlights the generation of clinical-grade T cells expressing CARs for immunotherapy, the use of these cells to target B-cell malignancies and, particularly, the first clinical trials deploying the Sleeping Beauty gene transfer system, which engineers T cells to target CD19+ leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. PMID:25189715

  12. Adoptive Immunotherapy for Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Using T Cells Simultaneously Targeted to Tumor and Tumor-Associated Macrophages

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-01

    will be delivered to separate T-cell populations using the SFG retroviral vector and retronectin - coated tissue culture dishes: (i) HOX – targets MUC1 and...cancer. Patient derived T-cells were activated with CSD3+CD28- coated beads and transduced with retroviral expression vectors. A representative example for...cells from ascites and tumor tissue stained from a patient with ovarian cancer. Tumor cells were separated using magnetic beads coated with antibodies

  13. CD47 in the tumor microenvironment limits cooperation between anti-tumor T cell immunity and radiation therapy

    PubMed Central

    Soto-Pantoja, David R.; Terabe, Masaki; Ghosh, Arunima; Ridnour, Lisa A.; DeGraff, William G.; Wink, David A.; Berzofsky, Jay A.; Roberts, David D.

    2014-01-01

    While significant advances in radiotherapy have increased its effectiveness in many cancer settings, general strategies to widen the therapeutic window between normal tissue toxicity and malignant tumor destruction would still offer great value. CD47 blockade has been found to confer radioprotection to normal tissues while enhancing tumor radiosensitivity. Here we report that CD47 blockade directly enhances tumor immunosurveillance by CD8+ T cells. Combining CD47 blockade with irradiation did not affect fibrosarcoma growth in T cell-deficient mice, whereas adoptive transfer of tumor-specific CD8+ T cells restored combinatorial efficacy. Further, ablation of CD8+ T cells abolished radiotherapeutic response in immunocompetent syngeneic hosts. CD47 blockade in either target cells or effector cells was sufficient to enhance antigen-dependent CD8+ CTL-mediated tumor cell killing in vitro. In CD47-deficient syngeneic hosts, engrafted B16 melanomas were 50% more sensitive to irradiation, establishing that CD47 expression in the microenvironment was sufficient to limit tumor radiosensitivity. Mechanistic investigations revealed increased tumor infiltration by cytotoxic CD8+ T cells in a CD47-deficient microenvironment, with an associated increase in T cell-dependent intratumoral expression of granzyme B. Correspondingly, an inverse correlation between CD8+ T cell infiltration and CD47 expression was observed in human melanomas. Our findings establish that blocking CD47 in the context of radiotherapy enhances antitumor immunity by directly stimulating CD8+ cytotoxic T cells, with the potential to increase curative responses. PMID:25297630

  14. Clinical Potential of Regulatory T Cell Therapy in Liver Diseases: An Overview and Current Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Jeffery, Hannah C.; Braitch, Manjit Kaur; Brown, Solomon; Oo, Ye Htun

    2016-01-01

    The increasing demand for liver transplantation and the decline in donor organs has highlighted the need for alternative novel therapies to prevent chronic active hepatitis, which eventually leads to liver cirrhosis and liver cancer. Liver histology of chronic hepatitis is composed of both effector and regulatory lymphocytes. The human liver contains different subsets of effector lymphocytes that are kept in check by a subpopulation of T cells known as Regulatory T cells (Treg). The balance of effector and regulatory lymphocytes generally determines the outcome of hepatic inflammation: resolution, fulminant hepatitis, or chronic active hepatitis. Thus, maintaining and adjusting this balance is crucial in immunological manipulation of liver diseases. One of the options to restore this balance is to enrich Treg in the liver disease patients. Advances in the knowledge of Treg biology and development of clinical grade isolation reagents, cell sorting equipment, and good manufacturing practice facilities have paved the way to apply Treg cells as a potential therapy to restore peripheral self-tolerance in autoimmune liver diseases (AILD), chronic rejection, and posttransplantation. Past and on-going studies have applied Treg in type-1 diabetes mellitus, systemic lupus erythematosus, graft versus host diseases, and solid organ transplantations. There have not been any new therapies for the AILD for more than three decades; thus, the clinical potential for the application of autologous Treg cell therapy to treat autoimmune liver disease is an attractive and novel option. However, it is fundamental to understand the deep immunology, genetic profiles, biology, homing behavior, and microenvironment of Treg before applying the cells to the patients. PMID:27656181

  15. HIV persists in CCR6+CD4+ T cells from colon and blood during antiretroviral therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gosselin, Annie; Wiche Salinas, Tomas Raul; Planas, Delphine; Wacleche, Vanessa S.; Zhang, Yuwei; Fromentin, Rémi; Chomont, Nicolas; Cohen, Éric A.; Shacklett, Barbara; Mehraj, Vikram; Ghali, Maged P.; Routy, Jean-Pierre; Ancuta, Petronela

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this article is to investigate the contribution of colon and blood CD4+ T-cell subsets expressing the chemokine receptor CCR6 to HIV persistence during antiretroviral therapy. Design: Matched sigmoid biopsies and blood samples (n = 13) as well as leukapheresis (n = 20) were collected from chronically HIV-infected individuals receiving antiretroviral therapy. Subsets of CD4+ T cells with distinct differentiation/polarization profiles were identified using surface markers as follows: memory (TM, CD45RA−), central memory (TCM; CD45RA−CCR7+), effector (TEM/TM; CD45RA−CCR7−), Th17 (CCR6+CCR4+), Th1Th17 (CCR6+CXCR3+), Th1 (CCR6−CXCR3+), and Th2 (CCR6−CCR4+). Methods: We used polychromatic flow cytometry for cell sorting, nested real-time PCR for HIV DNA quantification, ELISA and flow cytometry for HIV p24 quantification. HIV reactivation was induced by TCR triggering in the presence/absence of all-trans retinoic acid. Results: Compared with blood, the frequency of CCR6+ TM was higher in the colon. In both colon and blood compartments, CCR6+ TM were significantly enriched in HIV DNA when compared with their CCR6− counterparts (n = 13). In blood, integrated HIV DNA levels were significantly enriched in CCR6+ versus CCR6− TCM of four of five individuals and CCR6+ versus CCR6− TEM of three of five individuals. Among blood TCM, Th17 and Th1Th17 contributed the most to the pool of cells harboring integrated HIV DNA despite their reduced frequency compared with Th2, which were infected the least. HIV reactivation was induced by TCR triggering and/or retinoic acid exposure at higher levels in CCR6+ versus CCR6− TM, TCM, and TEM. Conclusion: CCR6 is a marker for colon and blood CD4+ T cells enriched for replication-competent HIV DNA. Novel eradication strategies should target HIV persistence in CCR6+CD4+ T cells from various anatomic sites. PMID:27835617

  16. Clinical responders to antiviral therapy of chronic HCV infection show elevated antiviral CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses.

    PubMed

    Pillai, Vinodh; Lee, William M; Thiele, Dwain L; Karandikar, Nitin J

    2007-05-01

    Chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is characterized by attenuated antiviral T-cell responses, making their detection and characterization a technological challenge. The role and the dynamics of antiviral T-cell responses during antiviral therapy are incompletely understood. To assess HCV-specific T-cell responses during antiviral therapy of genotype-1-infected patients, we adopted a flow cytometric approach to comprehensively evaluate virus-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell proliferative responses against pools of genotype- and subtype-specific serial, overlapping peptides spanning the entire virus. Studies in cross-sectional cohorts of treatment-naïve (TN) patients , early and sustained clinical virological responders (EVRs and SVRs) or clinical nonresponders (NRs) showed that this proliferative assay had significantly greater sensitivity in detecting HCV-specific responses, compared with ex vivo cytokine flow cytometry. At the same time, it could be used to detect and quantify both CD4+ and CD8+ responses simultaneously. EVRs and SVRs showed significantly more HCV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ responses, compared with either TN patients or NRs. This corresponded to a higher magnitude of responses as well as a greater breadth of reactivity with higher responses against the core/E1, NS3, NS4 and NS5b regions of the virus. Interestingly, both clinical responders and NRs showed higher cytomegalovirus-specific CD4+ responses, compared with TN patients. These results demonstrate an association between clinically successful antiviral therapy and enhanced magnitude and breadth of antiviral responses. Moreover, the study demonstrates the clinical relevance of this flow cytometric proliferation assay system, in combination with an unbiased library of viral peptides, in evaluating the biology of antiviral T-cell responses during infection and therapy.

  17. Antiretroviral therapy suppressed participants with low CD4+ T-cell counts segregate according to opposite immunological phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Santiago, Josué; Ouchi, Dan; Urrea, Victor; Carrillo, Jorge; Cabrera, Cecilia; Villà-Freixa, Jordi; Puig, Jordi; Paredes, Roger; Negredo, Eugènia; Clotet, Bonaventura; Massanella, Marta; Blanco, Julià

    2016-01-01

    Background: The failure to increase CD4+ T-cell counts in some antiretroviral therapy suppressed participants (immunodiscordance) has been related to perturbed CD4+ T-cell homeostasis and impacts clinical evolution. Methods: We evaluated different definitions of immunodiscordance based on CD4+ T-cell counts (cutoff) or CD4+ T-cell increases from nadir value (ΔCD4) using supervised random forest classification of 74 immunological and clinical variables from 196 antiretroviral therapy suppressed individuals. Unsupervised clustering was performed using relevant variables identified in the supervised approach from 191 individuals. Results: Cutoff definition of CD4+ cell count 400 cells/μl performed better than any other definition in segregating immunoconcordant and immunodiscordant individuals (85% accuracy), using markers of activation, nadir and death of CD4+ T cells. Unsupervised clustering of relevant variables using this definition revealed large heterogeneity between immunodiscordant individuals and segregated participants into three distinct subgroups with distinct production, programmed cell-death protein-1 (PD-1) expression, activation and death of T cells. Surprisingly, a nonnegligible number of immunodiscordant participants (22%) showed high frequency of recent thymic emigrants and low CD4+ T-cell activation and death, very similar to immunoconcordant participants. Notably, human leukocyte antigen - antigen D related (HLA-DR) PD-1 and CD45RA expression in CD4+ T cells allowed reproducing subgroup segregation (81.4% accuracy). Despite sharp immunological differences, similar and persistently low CD4+ values were maintained in these participants over time. Conclusion: A cutoff value of CD4+ T-cell count 400 cells/μl classified better immunodiscordant and immunoconcordant individuals than any ΔCD4 classification. Immunodiscordance may present several, even opposite, immunological patterns that are identified by a simple immunological follow-up. Subgroup

  18. Methotrexate therapy of T-cell large granular lymphocytic leukemia impact of STAT3 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Zhi-Yuan; Fan, Lei; Wang, Rong; Gale, Robert Peter; Liang, Hua-Jin; Wang, Man; Wang, Li; Wu, Yu-Jie; Qiao, Chun; Chen, Yao-Yu; Xu, Wei; Qian, Jun; Li, Jian-Yong

    2016-01-01

    T-cell large granular lymphocytic leukemia (T-LGLL) is a rare haematologic neoplasm. Consequntly, there are no large prospective studies of therapy and no uniform therapy recommendations. We analyzed data from 36 subjects receiving methotrexate alone (N = 27) or with prednisone (N = 9) as initial therapy. 31 subjects responded (86%, 95% confidence interval [CI], 73, 95%) with 8 complete responses and 23 partial responses. Median time-to-response was 3 months (range, 1–5 months). Median response duration was 20 months (range, 2–55 months). β2-microoglobulin (β2-MG) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) decreased significantly post-therapy (P < 0.0001). Pure red cell aplasia (PRCA) was present in 18 subjects (50%) of our subjects and responded well to methotrexate. 26 subjects (72%) were tested for STAT3 mutation. 9 with a mutation had a median treatment-free survival of 5 months (range, 0.5–13 months), significantly briefer than that of 17 subjects without a STAT3 mutation (19 months, range, 3–97 months; P = 0.012; log-rank test). Methotrexate with or without prednisone is an effective initial therapy of persons with T-LGLL with wild-type STAT3. PMID:27542218

  19. Tumor-Unrelated CD4 T Cell Help Augments CD134 plus CD137 Dual Costimulation Tumor Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Mittal, Payal; St Rose, Marie-Clare; Wang, Xi; Ryan, Joseph M.; Wasser, Jeffrey S.; Vella, Anthony T.; Adler, Adam J.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of immune-based cancer therapies to elicit beneficial CD8+ CTL is limited by tolerance pathways that inactivate tumor-specific CD4 helper T cells. A strategy to bypass this problem is to engage tumor-unrelated CD4 helper T cells. Thus, CD4 T cells, regardless of their specificity per se, can boost CD8+ CTL priming so long as the cognate epitopes are linked via presentation on the same dendritic cell. Here, we assessed the therapeutic impact of engaging tumor-unrelated CD4 T cells during dual costimulation with CD134 plus CD137 that not only provide help via the above-mentioned classical linked pathway, but also provide non-linked help that facilitates CTL function in T cells not directly responding to cognate antigen. We found that engagement of tumor-unrelated CD4 helper T cells dramatically boosted the ability of dual costimulation to control the growth of established B16 melanomas. Surprisingly, this effect depended upon a CD134-dependent component that was extrinsic to the tumor-unrelated CD4 T cells, suggesting that the dual-costimulated helper cells are themselves helped by a CD134+ cell(s). Nevertheless, the delivery of therapeutic help tracked with an increased frequency of tumor-infiltrating granzyme B+ effector CD8 T cells and a reciprocal decrease in Foxp3+CD4+ cell frequency. Notably, the tumor-unrelated CD4 helper T cells also infiltrated the tumors, and their deletion several days following initial T cell priming negated their therapeutic impact. Taken together, dual costimulation programs tumor-unrelated CD4 T cells to deliver therapeutic help during both the priming and effector stages of the anti-tumor response. PMID:26561553

  20. Adoptive Transfer of Engineered Rhesus Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Specific CD8+ T Cells Reduces the Number of Transmitted/Founder Viruses Established in Rhesus Macaques.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Victor I; Trivett, Matthew T; Barsov, Eugene V; Jain, Sumiti; Piatak, Michael; Trubey, Charles M; Alvord, W Gregory; Chertova, Elena; Roser, James D; Smedley, Jeremy; Komin, Alexander; Keele, Brandon F; Ohlen, Claes; Ott, David E

    2016-11-01

    AIDS virus infections are rarely controlled by cell-mediated immunity, in part due to viral immune evasion and immunodeficiency resulting from CD4(+) T-cell infection. One likely aspect of this failure is that antiviral cellular immune responses are either absent or present at low levels during the initial establishment of infection. To test whether an extensive, timely, and effective response could reduce the establishment of infection from a high-dose inoculum, we adoptively transferred large numbers of T cells that were molecularly engineered with anti-simian immunodeficiency virus (anti-SIV) activity into rhesus macaques 3 days following an intrarectal SIV inoculation. To measure in vivo antiviral activity, we assessed the number of viruses transmitted using SIVmac239X, a molecularly tagged viral stock containing 10 genotypic variants, at a dose calculated to transmit 12 founder viruses. Single-genome sequencing of plasma virus revealed that the two animals receiving T cells expressing SIV-specific T-cell receptors (TCRs) had significantly fewer viral genotypes than the two control animals receiving non-SIV-specific T cells (means of 4.0 versus 7.5 transmitted viral genotypes; P = 0.044). Accounting for the likelihood of transmission of multiple viruses of a particular genotype, the calculated means of the total number of founder viruses transmitted were 4.5 and 14.5 in the experimental and control groups, respectively (P = 0.021). Thus, a large antiviral T-cell response timed with virus exposure can limit viral transmission. The presence of strong, preexisting T-cell responses, including those induced by vaccines, might help prevent the establishment of infection at the lower-exposure doses in humans that typically transmit only a single virus.

  1. Arthritogenic T cells drive the recovery of autoantibody-producing B cell homeostasis and the adoptive transfer of arthritis in SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Kis-Toth, Katalin; Radacs, Marianna; Olasz, Katalin; van Eden, Willem; Mikecz, Katalin; Glant, Tibor T

    2012-08-01

    T cells orchestrate joint inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis (RA), but B cells/B cell-derived factors are also involved in disease pathogenesis. The goal of this study was to understand the role of antigen-specific T and B cells in the pathological events of arthritis, which is impossible to study in humans due to the small number of antigen-specific cells. To determine the significance of antigen-specific lymphocytes and antibodies in the development of an autoimmune mouse model of RA, we generated TCR transgenic (TCR-Tg) mice specific for the dominant arthritogenic epitope of cartilage proteoglycan (PG) and performed a series of combined transfers of T cells, B cells and autoantibodies into BALB/c.Scid mice. The adoptive transfer of highly purified T cells from naive TCR-Tg, arthritic TCR-Tg or arthritic wild-type mice induced arthritis in SCID recipients, but the onset and severity of the disease were dependent on the sequential events of the T cell-supported reconstitution of PG-specific B cells and autoantibodies. The presence of activated PG-specific T cells was critical for disease induction, establishing a unique milieu for the selective homeostasis of autoantibody-producing B cells. In this permissive environment, anti-PG autoantibodies bound to cartilage and induced activation of the complement cascade, leading to irreversible cartilage destruction in affected joints. These findings may lead to a better understanding of the complex molecular and cellular mechanisms of RA.

  2. Mathematical Models of the Impact of IL2 Modulation Therapies on T Cell Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    León, Kalet; García-Martínez, Karina; Carmenate, Tania

    2013-01-01

    Several reports in the literature have drawn a complex picture of the effect of treatments aiming to modulate IL2 activity in vivo. They seem to promote either immunity or tolerance, probably depending on the specific context, dose, and timing of their application. Such complexity might derive from the pleiotropic role of IL2 in T cell dynamics. To theoretically address the latter possibility, our group has developed several mathematical models for Helper, Regulatory, and Memory T cell population dynamics, which account for most well-known facts concerning their relationship with IL2. We have simulated the effect of several types of therapies, including the injection of: IL2; antibodies anti-IL2; IL2/anti-IL2 immune-complexes; and mutant variants of IL2. We studied the qualitative and quantitative conditions of dose and timing for these treatments which allow them to potentiate either immunity or tolerance. Our results provide reasonable explanations for the existent pre-clinical and clinical data, predict some novel treatments, and further provide interesting practical guidelines to optimize the future application of these types of treatments. PMID:24376444

  3. Natural killer T cell defects in multiple myeloma and the impact of lenalidomide therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chan, A C; Neeson, P; Leeansyah, E; Tainton, K; Quach, H; Prince, H M; Harrison, S J; Godfrey, D I; Ritchie, D; Berzins, S P

    2014-01-01

    The causes of multiple myeloma (MM) remain obscure and there are few known risk factors; however, natural killer T (NKT) cell abnormalities have been reported in patients with MM, and therapeutic targeting of NKT cells is promoted as a potential treatment. We characterized NKT cell defects in treated and untreated patients with MM and determined the impact of lenalidomide therapy on the NKT cell pool. Lenalidomide is an immunomodulatory drug with co-stimulatory effects on NKT cells in vitro and is an approved treatment for MM, although its mode of action in that context is not well defined. We find that patients with relapsed/progressive MM had a marked deficiency in NKT cell numbers. In contrast, newly diagnosed patients had relatively normal NKT cell frequency and function prior to treatment, although a specific NKT cell deficiency emerged after high-dose melphalan and autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) regimen. This also impacted NK cells and conventional T cells, but the recovery of NKT cells was considerably delayed, resulting in a prolonged, treatment-induced NKT cell deficit. Longitudinal analysis of individual patients revealed that lenalidomide therapy had no in-vivo impact on NKT cell numbers or cytokine production, either as induction therapy, or as maintenance therapy following ASCT, indicating that its clinical benefits in this setting are independent of NKT cell modulation. PMID:24032527

  4. At the Bench: Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy for the treatment of B cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Daniyan, Anthony F O; Brentjens, Renier J

    2016-12-01

    The chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) represents the epitome of cellular engineering and is one of the best examples of rational biologic design of a synthetic molecule. The CAR is a single polypeptide with modular domains, consisting of an antibody-derived targeting moiety, fused in line with T cell-derived signaling domains, allowing for T cell activation upon ligand binding. T cells expressing a CAR are able to eradicate selectively antigen-expressing tumor cells in a MHC-independent fashion. CD19, a tumor-associated antigen (TAA) present on normal B cells, as well as most B cell-derived malignancies, was an early target of this technology. Through years of experimental refinement and preclinical optimization, autologously derived CD19-targeting CAR T cells have been successfully, clinically deployed, resulting in dramatic and durable antitumor responses but not without therapy-associated toxicity. As CD19-targeted CAR T cells continue to show clinical success, work at the bench continues to be undertaken to increase further the efficacy of this therapy, while simultaneously minimizing the risk for treatment-related morbidities. In this review, we cover the history and evolution of CAR technology and its adaptation to targeting CD19. Furthermore, we discuss the future of CAR T cell therapy and the need to ask, as well as answer, critical questions as this treatment modality is being translated to the clinic.

  5. Adoptive Immunotherapy for Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Using T-cells Simultaneously Targeted to Tumor and Tumor-Associated Macrophages

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    Figure   10   that   demonstrate   ring   enhancement   around   the   viable   circumference   of   the   tumor.   When...in head and neck cancer. Taken together, it is logical to build on this experience by developing the use of TiN-4+ T-cell immunotherapy for the

  6. Defining CD8+ T cells that provide the proliferative burst after PD-1 therapy

    PubMed Central

    Im, Se Jin; Hashimoto, Masao; Gerner, Michael Y.; Lee, Junghwa; Kissick, Haydn T.; Burger, Matheus C.; Shan, Qiang; Hale, J. Scott; Lee, Judong; Nasti, Tahseen H.; Sharpe, Arlene H.; Freeman, Gordon J.; Germain, Ronald N.; Nakaya, Helder I.; Xue, Hai-Hui; Ahmed, Rafi

    2017-01-01

    Chronic viral infections are characterized by a state of CD8+ T-cell dysfunction that is associated with expression of the programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) inhibitory receptor1–4. A better understanding of the mechanisms that regulate CD8+ T cell responses during chronic infection is required to improve immunotherapies that restore function in exhausted CD8+ T cells. Here we identify a population of virus-specific CD8+ T cells that proliferate after blockade of the PD-1 inhibitory pathway in mice chronically infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). These LCMV-specific CD8+ T cells expressed the PD-1 inhibitory receptor but also expressed several costimulatory molecules such as ICOS and CD28. This CD8+ T cell subset was characterized by a unique gene signature that was related to that of CD4+ T follicular helper (TFH) cells, CD8+ T cell memory precursors and haematopoietic stem cell progenitors, but that was distinct from that of CD4+ TH1 cells and CD8+ terminal effectors. This CD8+ T cell population was found only in lymphoid tissues and resided predominantly in the T cell zones along with naïve CD8+ T cells. These PD-1+ CD8+ T cells resembled stem cells during chronic LCMV infection, undergoing self-renewal and also differentiating into the terminally exhausted CD8+ T cells that were present in both lymphoid and non-lymphoid tissues. The proliferative burst after PD-1 blockade came almost exclusively from this CD8+ T cell subset. Notably, the transcription factor TCF1 had a cell intrinsic and essential role in the generation of this CD8+ T cell subset. These findings provide a better understanding of T cell exhaustion and have implications in the optimization of PD-1-directed immunotherapy in chronic infections and cancer. PMID:27501248

  7. γδ T Cell-Mediated Immune Responses in Disease and Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Latha, T. Sree; Reddy, Madhava C.; Durbaka, Prasad V. R.; Rachamallu, Aparna; Pallu, Reddanna; Lomada, Dakshayani

    2014-01-01

    The role of γδ T cells in immunotherapy has gained specific importance in the recent years because of their prominent function involving directly or indirectly in the rehabilitation of the diseases. γδ T cells represent a minor population of T cells that express a distinct T cell receptor (TCR) composed of γδ chains instead of αβ chains. Unlike αβ T cells, γδ T cells display a restricted TCR repertoire and recognize mostly unknown non-peptide antigens. γδ T cells act as a link between innate and adaptive immunity, because they lack precise major histocompatibility complex (MHC) restriction and seize the ability to recognize ligands that are generated during affliction. Skin epidermal γδ T cells recognize antigen expressed by damaged or stressed keratinocytes and play an indispensable role in tissue homeostasis and repair through secretion of distinct growth factors. γδ T cell based immunotherapy strategies possess great prominence in the treatment because of the property of their MHC-independent cytotoxicity, copious amount of cytokine release, and a immediate response in infections. Understanding the role of γδ T cells in pathogenic infections, wound healing, autoimmune diseases, and cancer might provide knowledge for the successful treatment of these diseases using γδ T cell based immunotherapy. Enhancing the human Vγ9Vδ2 T cells functions by administration of aminobisphosphonates like zoledronate, pamidronate, and bromohydrin pyrophosphate along with cytokines and monoclonal antibodies shows a hopeful approach for treatment of tumors and infections. The current review summarizes the role of γδ T cells in various human diseases and immunotherapeutic approaches using γδ T cells. PMID:25426120

  8. Generation of tumor-specific cytotoxic T-lymphocytes from the peripheral blood of colorectal cancer patients for adoptive T-cell transfer.

    PubMed

    Carluccio, Silvia; Delbue, Serena; Signorini, Lucia; Setola, Elisabetta; Bagliani, Anna; Della Valle, Alberto; Galli, Andrea; Ferrante, Pasquale; Bregni, Marco

    2015-07-01

    This study designs a strategy for an adoptive cellular therapy (ACT) protocol based on the ex-vivo selection of autologous peripheral blood-derived CD8-enriched T-cells, stimulated with dendritic cells (DCs) that had been pulsed with apoptotic tumor cells to generate cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) with anti-tumor activity. Seventy-eight colorectal cancer (CRC) patients were enrolled in this study. Tumor tissues and peripheral blood (PB) were obtained at surgery. Tissues were mechanically dissociated and cultured to obtain a primary tumor cell line from each patient. DCs were derived from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) using magnetic positive selection of CD14+ monocytes. Anti-tumor CTLs were elicited in co-/micro-cultures using DCs as antigen-presenting cells, autologous apoptotic tumor cells as a source of antigens, and CD8+ T lymphocytes as effectors. Interferon-γ (IFN-γ) secretion was assessed by ELISpot assays to evaluate the activation of the CTLs against the autologous tumor cells. Primary tumor cell lines were obtained from 20 of 78 patients (25.6%). DCs were generated from 26 patients, and of them, corresponding tumor cell lines were derived from six patients. ELISpot results showed that significant IFN-γ secretion was detected after different numbers of stimulations for two patients, whereas weak secretion was observed for three patients. Despite difficulties due to contamination of several primary tumor cell lines with gut intestinal flora, the results suggest that the generation of tumor-specific CTLs is feasible from patients with CRC, and could be useful for supporting an ACT approach in CRC.

  9. Adoptive Immunotherapy for Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Using T Cells Simultaneously Targeted to Tumor and Tumor-Associated Macrophages

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    CD28 expander beads. It was originally planned to deliver four CARs to separate T-cell populations using the SFG retroviral vector and retronectin ... coated tissue culture dishes: (i) HOX – targets MUC1 and contains a fused CD28+OX40+CD3ζ endodomain (2, 3) (ii) CSF28z – targets CSF-1R and contains a...renilla-­‐containing   retroviral   vectors.   (A)  Human  T-­‐cells  were  activated  with  CD3  +   CD28-­‐ coated   paramagnetic

  10. Interleukin-2 Therapy Induces CD4 Downregulation, Which Decreases Circulating CD4 T Cell Counts, in African Green Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Mudd, Joseph C.; Perkins, Molly R.; DiNapoli, Sarah R.; Hirsch, Vanessa M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT African green monkeys (AGMs) are natural hosts of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVAGM). Because these animals do not develop simian AIDS despite maintaining high viral loads, there is considerable interest in determining how these animals have evolved to avoid SIV disease progression. Unlike nonnatural hosts of SIV, adult AGMs maintain low levels of CD4+ T cells at steady states and also have a large population of virus-resistant CD8αα T cells that lack CD4 expression despite maintaining T helper cell functionalities. In recent work, we have shown that homeostatic cytokines can induce CD4 downregulation in AGM T cells in vitro. Through administering therapeutic doses of recombinant human interleukin-2 (IL-2) to AGMs, we show here that this mechanism is operative in vivo. IL-2 therapy induced transient yet robust proliferation in all major T cell subsets. Within the CD4+ T cell population, those that were induced into cycle by IL-2 exhibited characteristics of CD4-to-CD8αα conversion. In all animals receiving IL-2, circulating CD4+ T cell counts and proportions tended to be lower and CD4− CD8αα+ T cell counts tended to be higher. Despite reductions in circulating target cells, the viral load was unaffected over the course of study. IMPORTANCE The data in this study identify that homeostatic cytokines can downregulate CD4 in vivo and, when given therapeutically, can induce AGMs to sustain very low levels of circulating CD4+ T cells without showing signs of immunodeficiency. PMID:27053558

  11. Addition of maraviroc to antiretroviral therapy decreased interferon-γ mRNA in the CD4+ T cells of patients with suboptimal CD4+ T-cell recovery.

    PubMed

    Minami, Rumi; Takahama, Soichiro; Kaku, Yu; Yamamoto, Masahiro

    2017-01-01

    The CCR5 antagonist, maraviroc (MVC), is associated with an enhanced CD4+ T-cell response independent of virological suppression; however, its mechanism of action has not been elucidated. In this study, we confirmed the effect of MVC on CD4+ T-cell count recovery in immunological non-responders, and compared the conventional combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) with MVC-intensified cART. We also investigated the effect of MVC on interferon-γ (IFN-γ) production in CD4+ T cells in vitro and in vivo, and evaluated the relationship between the mRNA level of IFN-γ and the degree of CD4+ T-cell count recovery. In vitro analysis indicated that MVC significantly decreased mRNA levels of IFN-γ in HIV-Tat stimulated CD4+ T cells from healthy donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Of the 18 HIV-infected patients treated with MVC-intensified cART, 12 had a significantly increased CD4+ T-cell count after 24 weeks of additional treatment with MVC. In patients exhibiting a response in CD4+ T-cell counts, mRNA levels of IFN-γ in CD4+ T cells were lower than those in patients showing a non-response at baseline and at week 24, while mRNA levels of IFN-γ decreased in both groups at 24 weeks. In conclusion, MVC decreased the mRNA level of IFN-γ in CD4+ T cells in vitro and in vivo, especially in patients whose CD4+ T-cell count increased significantly. We also found that the lower baseline IFN-γ mRNA level and the larger decreased rate of IFN-γ mRNA in CD4+ T cells were associated with a good response to MVC regarding CD4+ T-cell recovery.

  12. Evaluating Human T-Cell Therapy of Cytomegalovirus Organ Disease in HLA-Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Simone; Klobuch, Sebastian; Podlech, Jürgen; Plachter, Bodo; Hoffmann, Petra; Renzaho, Angelique; Theobald, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Reactivation of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) can cause severe disease in recipients of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Although preclinical research in murine models as well as clinical trials have provided 'proof of concept' for infection control by pre-emptive CD8 T-cell immunotherapy, there exists no predictive model to experimentally evaluate parameters that determine antiviral efficacy of human T cells in terms of virus control in functional organs, prevention of organ disease, and host survival benefit. We here introduce a novel mouse model for testing HCMV epitope-specific human T cells. The HCMV UL83/pp65-derived NLV-peptide was presented by transgenic HLA-A2.1 in the context of a lethal infection of NOD/SCID/IL-2rg-/- mice with a chimeric murine CMV, mCMV-NLV. Scenarios of HCMV-seropositive and -seronegative human T-cell donors were modeled by testing peptide-restimulated and T-cell receptor-transduced human T cells, respectively. Upon transfer, the T cells infiltrated host tissues in an epitope-specific manner, confining the infection to nodular inflammatory foci. This resulted in a significant reduction of viral load, diminished organ pathology, and prolonged survival. The model has thus proven its potential for a preclinical testing of the protective antiviral efficacy of HCMV epitope-specific human T cells in the evaluation of new approaches to an immunotherapy of CMV disease. PMID:26181057

  13. An epigenetic mechanism of resistance to targeted therapy in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Knoechel, Birgit; Roderick, Justine E; Williamson, Kaylyn E; Zhu, Jiang; Lohr, Jens G; Cotton, Matthew J; Gillespie, Shawn M; Fernandez, Daniel; Ku, Manching; Wang, Hongfang; Piccioni, Federica; Silver, Serena J; Jain, Mohit; Pearson, Daniel; Kluk, Michael J; Ott, Christopher J; Shultz, Leonard D; Brehm, Michael A; Greiner, Dale L; Gutierrez, Alejandro; Stegmaier, Kimberly; Kung, Andrew L; Root, David E; Bradner, James E; Aster, Jon C; Kelliher, Michelle A; Bernstein, Bradley E

    2014-04-01

    The identification of activating NOTCH1 mutations in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) led to clinical testing of γ-secretase inhibitors (GSIs) that prevent NOTCH1 activation. However, responses to these inhibitors have been transient, suggesting that resistance limits their clinical efficacy. Here we modeled T-ALL resistance, identifying GSI-tolerant 'persister' cells that expand in the absence of NOTCH1 signaling. Rare persisters are already present in naive T-ALL populations, and the reversibility of their phenotype suggests an epigenetic mechanism. Relative to GSI-sensitive cells, persister cells activate distinct signaling and transcriptional programs and exhibit chromatin compaction. A knockdown screen identified chromatin regulators essential for persister viability, including BRD4. BRD4 binds enhancers near critical T-ALL genes, including MYC and BCL2. The BRD4 inhibitor JQ1 downregulates expression of these targets and induces growth arrest and apoptosis in persister cells, at doses well tolerated by GSI-sensitive cells. Consistently, the GSI-JQ1 combination was found to be effective against primary human leukemias in vivo. Our findings establish a role for epigenetic heterogeneity in leukemia resistance that may be addressed by incorporating epigenetic modulators in combination therapy.

  14. Favorable alteration of tumor microenvironment by immunomodulatory cytokines for efficient T-cell therapy in solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Tähtinen, Siri; Kaikkonen, Saija; Merisalo-Soikkeli, Maiju; Grönberg-Vähä-Koskela, Susanna; Kanerva, Anna; Parviainen, Suvi; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Hemminki, Akseli

    2015-01-01

    Unfavorable ratios between the number and activation status of effector and suppressor immune cells infiltrating the tumor contribute to resistance of solid tumors to T-cell based therapies. Here, we studied the capacity of FDA and EMA approved recombinant cytokines to manipulate this balance in favor of efficient anti-tumor responses in B16.OVA melanoma bearing C57BL/6 mice. Intratumoral administration of IFN-α2, IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-2 significantly enhanced the anti-tumor effect of ovalbumin-specific CD8+ T-cell (OT-I) therapy, whereas GM-CSF increased tumor growth in association with an increase in immunosuppressive cell populations. None of the cytokines augmented tumor trafficking of OT-I cells significantly, but injections of IFN-α2, IFN-γ and IL-2 increased intratumoral cytokine secretion and recruitment of endogenous immune cells capable of stimulating T-cells, such as natural killer and maturated CD11c+ antigen-presenting cells. Moreover, IFN-α2 and IL-2 increased the levels of activated tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T-cells concomitant with reduction in the CD8+ T-cell expression of anergy markers CTLA-4 and PD-1. In conclusion, intratumoral administration of IFN-α2, IFN-γ and IL-2 can lead to immune sensitization of the established tumor, whereas GM-CSF may contribute to tumor-associated immunosuppression. The results described here provide rationale for including local administration of immunostimulatory cytokines into T-cell therapy regimens. One appealing embodiment of this would be vectored delivery which could be advantageous over direct injection of recombinant molecules with regard to efficacy, cost, persistence and convenience.

  15. Favorable Alteration of Tumor Microenvironment by Immunomodulatory Cytokines for Efficient T-Cell Therapy in Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Tähtinen, Siri; Kaikkonen, Saija; Merisalo-Soikkeli, Maiju; Grönberg-Vähä-Koskela, Susanna; Kanerva, Anna; Parviainen, Suvi; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Hemminki, Akseli

    2015-01-01

    Unfavorable ratios between the number and activation status of effector and suppressor immune cells infiltrating the tumor contribute to resistance of solid tumors to T-cell based therapies. Here, we studied the capacity of FDA and EMA approved recombinant cytokines to manipulate this balance in favor of efficient anti-tumor responses in B16.OVA melanoma bearing C57BL/6 mice. Intratumoral administration of IFN-α2, IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-2 significantly enhanced the anti-tumor effect of ovalbumin-specific CD8+ T-cell (OT-I) therapy, whereas GM-CSF increased tumor growth in association with an increase in immunosuppressive cell populations. None of the cytokines augmented tumor trafficking of OT-I cells significantly, but injections of IFN-α2, IFN-γ and IL-2 increased intratumoral cytokine secretion and recruitment of endogenous immune cells capable of stimulating T-cells, such as natural killer and maturated CD11c+ antigen-presenting cells. Moreover, IFN-α2 and IL-2 increased the levels of activated tumor-infiltrating CD8+ T-cells concomitant with reduction in the CD8+ T-cell expression of anergy markers CTLA-4 and PD-1. In conclusion, intratumoral administration of IFN-α2, IFN-γ and IL-2 can lead to immune sensitization of the established tumor, whereas GM-CSF may contribute to tumor-associated immunosuppression. The results described here provide rationale for including local administration of immunostimulatory cytokines into T-cell therapy regimens. One appealing embodiment of this would be vectored delivery which could be advantageous over direct injection of recombinant molecules with regard to efficacy, cost, persistence and convenience. PMID:26107883

  16. Regional delivery of mesothelin-targeted CAR T cell therapy generates potent and long-lasting CD4-dependent tumor immunity.

    PubMed

    Adusumilli, Prasad S; Cherkassky, Leonid; Villena-Vargas, Jonathan; Colovos, Christos; Servais, Elliot; Plotkin, Jason; Jones, David R; Sadelain, Michel

    2014-11-05

    Translating the recent success of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy for hematological malignancies to solid tumors will necessitate overcoming several obstacles, including inefficient T cell tumor infiltration and insufficient functional persistence. Taking advantage of an orthotopic model that faithfully mimics human pleural malignancy, we evaluated two routes of administration of mesothelin-targeted T cells using the M28z CAR. We found that intrapleurally administered CAR T cells vastly outperformed systemically infused T cells, requiring 30-fold fewer M28z T cells to induce long-term complete remissions. After intrapleural T cell administration, prompt in vivo antigen-induced T cell activation allowed robust CAR T cell expansion and effector differentiation, resulting in enhanced antitumor efficacy and functional T cell persistence for 200 days. Regional T cell administration also promoted efficient elimination of extrathoracic tumor sites. This therapeutic efficacy was dependent on early CD4(+) T cell activation associated with a higher intratumoral CD4/CD8 cell ratios and CD28-dependent CD4(+) T cell-mediated cytotoxicity. In contrast, intravenously delivered CAR T cells, even when accumulated at equivalent numbers in the pleural tumor, did not achieve comparable activation, tumor eradication, or persistence. The ability of intrapleurally administered T cells to circulate and persist supports the concept of delivering optimal CAR T cell therapy through "regional distribution centers." On the basis of these results, we are opening a phase 1 clinical trial to evaluate the safety of intrapleural administration of mesothelin-targeted CAR T cells in patients with primary or secondary pleural malignancies.

  17. Molecular Pathways: Breaking the Epithelial Cancer Barrier for Chimeric Antigen Receptor and T-cell Receptor Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Hinrichs, Christian S

    2016-04-01

    Adoptive transfer of T cells genetically engineered to express a tumor-targeting chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) or T-cell receptor (TCR) can mediate cancer regression in some patients. CARs are synthetic single-chain proteins that use antibody domains to target cell surface antigens. TCRs are natural heterodimeric proteins that can target intracellular antigens through recognition of peptides bound to human leukocyte antigens. CARs have shown promise in B-cell malignancies and TCRs in melanoma, but neither approach has achieved clear success in an epithelial cancer. Treatment of epithelial cancers may be particularly challenging because of a paucity of target antigens expressed by carcinomas and not by important healthy tissues. In addition, epithelial cancers may be protected by inhibitory ligands and soluble factors in the tumor microenvironment. One strategy to overcome these negative regulators is to modulate expression of T-cell genes to enhance intrinsic T-cell function. Programmable nucleases, which can suppress inhibitory genes, and inducible gene expression systems, which can enhance stimulatory genes, are entering clinical testing. Other work is delineating whether control of genes for immune checkpoint receptors (e.g.,PDCD1, CTLA4) and cytokine and TCR signaling regulators (e.g.,CBLB, CISH, IL12, IL15) can increase the antitumor activity of therapeutic T cells.

  18. The stoichiometric production of IL-2 and IFN-γ mRNA defines memory T cells that can self-renew after adoptive transfer in humans.

    PubMed

    Wang, Anran; Chandran, Smita; Shah, Syed A; Chiu, Yu; Paria, Biman C; Aghamolla, Tamara; Alvarez-Downing, Melissa M; Lee, Chyi-Chia Richard; Singh, Sanmeet; Li, Thomas; Dudley, Mark E; Restifo, Nicholas P; Rosenberg, Steven A; Kammula, Udai S

    2012-08-29

    Adoptive immunotherapy using ex vivo-expanded tumor-reactive lymphocytes can mediate durable cancer regression in selected melanoma patients. Analyses of these trials have associated the in vivo engraftment ability of the transferred cells with their antitumor efficacy. Thus, there is intensive clinical interest in the prospective isolation of tumor-specific T cells that can reliably persist after transfer. Animal studies have suggested that central memory CD8(+) T cells (T(CM)) have divergent capabilities including effector differentiation to target antigen and stem cell-like self-renewal that enable long-term survival after adoptive transfer. We sought to isolate human melanoma-specific T(CM) to define their in vivo fate and function after autologous therapeutic transfer to metastatic patients. To facilitate the high-throughput identification of these rare cells from patients, we report that T(CM) have a defined stoichiometric production of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) mRNA after antigen stimulation. Melanoma-specific T cells screened for high relative IL-2 production had a T(CM) phenotype and superior in vitro proliferative capacity compared to cells with low IL-2 production. To investigate in vivo effector function and self-renewal capability, we allowed melanoma-specific T(CM) to undergo in vitro expansion and differentiation into lytic effector clones and then adoptively transferred them back into their hosts. These clones targeted skin melanocytes in all five patients and persisted long term and reacquired parental T(CM) attributes in four patients after transfer. These findings demonstrate the favorable engraftment fitness for human T(CM)-derived clones, but further efforts to improve their antitumor efficacy are still necessary.

  19. CD4+ T cell recovery beyond the first year of complete suppression of viral replication during highly active antiretroviral therapy is not influenced by CD8+ T cell activation.

    PubMed

    Benito, Jose M; Lopez, Mariola; Lozano, Sara; Ballesteros, Celia; Capa, Laura; Martinez, Pilar; Gonzalez-Lahoz, Juan; Soriano, Vincent

    2005-12-15

    CD38 expression on CD8(+) T cells was longitudinally assessed in 31 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected persons with undetectable plasma viremia who had undergone highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for 12 months and were followed for a mean of 30 months thereafter. Overall, CD4(+)T cell counts increased during follow-up, whereas CD38 expression remained stable. However, a subset of patients showed declines in CD38 expression, and, conversely, another subset showed increases in CD38 expression. No association could be found between long-term gains in CD4(+) T cells and evolution of CD38 expression. Thus, activation of CD8(+) T cells does not seem to be associated with the extent of CD4(+) T cell recovery beyond the first year of successful HAART.

  20. T-cell suicide gene therapy prompts thymic renewal in adults after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Vago, Luca; Oliveira, Giacomo; Bondanza, Attilio; Noviello, Maddalena; Soldati, Corrado; Ghio, Domenico; Brigida, Immacolata; Greco, Raffaella; Lupo Stanghellini, Maria Teresa; Peccatori, Jacopo; Fracchia, Sergio; Del Fiacco, Matteo; Traversari, Catia; Aiuti, Alessandro; Del Maschio, Alessandro; Bordignon, Claudio; Ciceri, Fabio; Bonini, Chiara

    2012-08-30

    The genetic modification of T cells with a suicide gene grants a mechanism of control of adverse reactions, allowing safe infusion after partially incompatible hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). In the TK007 clinical trial, 22 adults with hematologic malignancies experienced a rapid and sustained immune recovery after T cell-depleted HSCT and serial infusions of purified donor T cells expressing the HSV thymidine kinase suicide gene (TK+ cells). After a first wave of circulating TK+ cells, the majority of T cells supporting long-term immune reconstitution did not carry the suicide gene and displayed high numbers of naive lymphocytes, suggesting the thymus-dependent development of T cells, occurring only upon TK+ -cell engraftment. Accordingly, after the infusions, we documented an increase in circulating TCR excision circles and CD31+ recent thymic emigrants and a substantial expansion of the active thymic tissue as shown by chest tomography scans. Interestingly, a peak in the serum level of IL-7 was observed after each infusion of TK+ cells, anticipating the appearance of newly generated T cells. The results of the present study show that the infusion of genetically modified donor T cells after HSCT can drive the recovery of thymic activity in adults, leading to immune reconstitution.

  1. Adoptive immunity mediated by HLA-A*0201 restricted Asp f16 peptides-specific CD8+ T cells against Aspergillus fumigatus infection.

    PubMed

    Sun, Z; Zhu, P; Li, L; Wan, Z; Zhao, Z; Li, R

    2012-11-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus (A. fumigatus) is the most common pathogen of invasive aspergillosis (IA), a life-threatening infection in immunocompromised patients. Recent findings revealed that CD8+ T cells can mediate cytotoxic activity against A. fumigatus. Here, we bioinformatically identified three HLA-A*0201-restricted peptides from Asp f16, an A. fumigatus antigen which was previously shown to be involved in T cell immunity. Our immunological results demonstrated that these peptides can potently induce cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response in CD8+ T cells, thus, damaging the conidia and hyphae of A. fumigatus. Moreover, the Asp f16 peptides can also raise Th1 cell-like response, as measured by interferon-γ (IFN-γ) enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISPOT). Furthermore, we established an invasive pulmonary aspergillosis model in HLA-A*0201 transgenic mice. Adoptive transfer of Asp f16 peptides-specific CTL significantly extended the overall survival time in the A. fumigatus-infected immunocompromised mice. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that the Asp f16 peptides might provide immunity against invasive A. fumigatus infection.

  2. Pre-Transplant Donor-Specific T-Cell Alloreactivity Is Strongly Associated with Early Acute Cellular Rejection in Kidney Transplant Recipients Not Receiving T-Cell Depleting Induction Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Crespo, Elena; Lucia, Marc; Cruzado, Josep M.; Luque, Sergio; Melilli, Edoardo; Manonelles, Anna; Lloberas, Nuria; Torras, Joan; Grinyó, Josep M.; Bestard, Oriol

    2015-01-01

    Preformed T-cell immune-sensitization should most likely impact allograft outcome during the initial period after kidney transplantation, since donor-specific memory T-cells may rapidly recognize alloantigens and activate the effector immune response, which leads to allograft rejection. However, the precise time-frame in which acute rejection is fundamentally triggered by preformed donor-specific memory T cells rather than by de novo activated naïve T cells is still to be established. Here, preformed donor-specific alloreactive T-cell responses were evaluated using the IFN-γ ELISPOT assay in a large consecutive cohort of kidney transplant patients (n = 90), to assess the main clinical variables associated with cellular sensitization and its predominant time-frame impact on allograft outcome, and was further validated in an independent new set of kidney transplant recipients (n = 67). We found that most highly T-cell sensitized patients were elderly patients with particularly poor HLA class-I matching, without any clinically recognizable sensitizing events. While one-year incidence of all types of biopsy-proven acute rejection did not differ between T-cell alloreactive and non-alloreactive patients, Receiver Operating Characteristic curve analysis indicated the first two months after transplantation as the highest risk time period for acute cellular rejection associated with baseline T-cell sensitization. This effect was particularly evident in young and highly alloreactive individuals that did not receive T-cell depletion immunosuppression. Multivariate analysis confirmed preformed T-cell sensitization as an independent predictor of early acute cellular rejection. In summary, monitoring anti-donor T-cell sensitization before transplantation may help to identify patients at increased risk of acute cellular rejection, particularly in the early phases after kidney transplantation, and thus guide decision-making regarding the use of induction therapy. PMID:25689405

  3. Longitudinal evaluation of regulatory T-cell dynamics on HIV-infected individuals during the first 2 years of therapy

    PubMed Central

    Nobrega, Claudia; Horta, Ana; Coutinho-Teixeira, Vítor; Martins-Ribeiro, Ana; Baldaia, Ana; Rb-Silva, Rita; Santos, Catarina L.; Sarmento-Castro, Rui; Correia-Neves, Margarida

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: A sizeable percentage of individuals infected by HIV and on antiretroviral therapy (ART) fail to increase their CD4+ T-cells to satisfactory levels. The percentage of regulatory T-cells (Tregs) has been suggested to contribute to this impairment. This study aimed to address this question and to expand the analysis of Tregs subpopulations during ART. Design: Longitudinal follow-up of 81 HIV-infected individuals during the first 24 months on ART. Methods: CD4+ T-cell counts, Tregs percentages, and specific Tregs subpopulations were evaluated at ART onset, 2, 6, 9, 12, 16, 20, and 24 months of ART (five individuals had no Tregs information at baseline). Results: The slope of CD4+ T-cell recovery was similar for individuals with moderate and with severe lymphopenia at ART onset. No evidence was found for a contribution of the baseline Tregs percentages on the CD4+ T-cell counts recovery throughout ART. In comparison to uninfected individuals, Tregs percentages were higher at ART onset only for patients with less than 200 cells/μl at baseline and decreased afterwards reaching normal values. Within Tregs, the percentage of naive cells remained low in these patients. Reduced thymic export and increased proliferation of Tregs vs. conventional CD4+ T cells might explain these persistent alterations. Conclusion: No effect of Tregs percentages at baseline was detected on CD4+ T-cell recovery. However, profound alterations on Tregs subpopulations were consistently observed throughout ART for patients with severe lymphopenia at ART onset. PMID:26919738

  4. Early and Delayed Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) Result in Comparable Reductions in CD8+ T Cell Exhaustion Marker Expression.

    PubMed

    Rutishauser, Rachel; Hartogensis, Wendy; Deguit, Christian D; Krone, Melissa; Hoh, Rebecca; Hecht, Rick; Pilcher, Christopher D; Bacchetti, Peter; Deeks, Steven G; Hunt, Peter W; McCune, Joseph M

    2017-03-23

    In untreated HIV infection, CD8+ T cell exhaustion (i.e., decreased proliferative and effector capacity) is associated with high levels of expression of co-inhibitory receptors, including PD-1, TIGIT, CD160, and 2B4. This is evident for both HIV-specific and non-HIV-specific CD8+ T cells. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiated during chronic infection decreases but may not completely normalize the expression of such "exhaustion markers." Compared to initiation of ART later in the course of disease, initiation soon after infection reduces some parameters of chronic inflammation and adaptive immune dysfunction. However, it is not known if Early ART (e.g., initiated within the first six months after HIV infection) versus Delayed ART (e.g., initiated during chronic infection) preferentially reduces expression of exhaustion markers. We evaluated exhaustion marker expression on subsets of circulating effector and memory CD8+ T cells at longitudinal pre- and post-ART (two and five years on ART) time points from n=19 (Early ART) and n=23 (Delayed ART) individuals. Prior to ART, TIGIT and CD160 were expressed on a statistically significantly higher proportion of effector and transitional memory cells from individuals in the Delayed ART group: the timing of ART initiation, however, did not consistently affect the expression of the exhaustion markers once viral suppression was achieved. Understanding which factors do and do not regulate aspects of CD8+ T cell exhaustion, including the expression of exhaustion markers, is critical to inform the rational design of CD8+ T cell-based therapies to treat HIV, for which CD8+ T cell exhaustion remains an important barrier to efficacy.

  5. CD4+ T cell counts in initiation of antiretroviral therapy in HIV infected asymptomatic individuals; controversies and inconsistencies.

    PubMed

    Maina, E K; Bonney, E Y; Bukusi, E A; Sedegah, M; Lartey, M; Ampofo, W K

    2015-12-01

    The primary goal when devising strategies to define the start of therapy in HIV infected individuals is to avoid HIV disease progression and toxicity from antiretroviral therapy (ART). Intermediate goals includes, avoiding resistance by suppressing HIV replication, reducing transmission, limiting spread and diversity of HIV within the body and protecting the immune system from harm. The question of how early or late to start ART and achieve both primary and intermediate goals has dominated HIV research. The distinction between early and late treatment of HIV infection is currently a matter of CD4+ T cells count, a marker of immune status, rather than on viral load, a marker of virus replication. Discussions about respective benefits of early or delayed therapy, as well as the best CD4+ T cell threshold during the course of HIV infection at which ART is initiated remains inconclusive. Guidelines issued by various agencies, provide different initiation recommendations. This can be confusing for clinicians and policy-makers when determining the best time to initiate therapy. Optimizing ART initiation strategies are clearly complex and must be balanced between individual and broader public health needs. This review assesses available data that contributes to the debate on optimal time to initiate therapy in HIV-infected asymptomatic individuals. We also review reports on CD4+ T cell threshold to guide initiation of ART and finally discuss arguments for and against early or late initiation of ART.

  6. Efficacy and Toxicity Management of 19-28z CAR T Cell Therapy in B Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Davila, Marco L.; Riviere, Isabelle; Wang, Xiuyan; Bartido, Shirley; Park, Jae; Curran, Kevin; Chung, Stephen S.; Stefanski, Jolanta; Borquez-Ojeda, Oriana; Olszewska, Malgorzata; Qu, Jinrong; Wasielewska, Teresa; He, Qing; Fink, Mitsu; Shinglot, Himaly; Youssif, Maher; Satter, Mark; Wang, Yongzeng; Hosey, James; Quintanilla, Hilda; Halton, Elizabeth; Bernal, Yvette; Bouhassira, Diana C. G.; Arcila, Maria E.; Gonen, Mithat; Roboz, Gail J.; Maslak, Peter; Douer, Dan; Frattini, Mark G.; Giralt, Sergio; Sadelain, Michel; Brentjens, Renier

    2015-01-01

    We report on 16 patients with relapsed or refractory B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) that we treated with autologous T cells expressing the 19-28z chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) specific to the CD19 antigen. The overall complete response rate was 88%, which allowed us to transition most of these patients to a standard-of-care allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (allo-SCT). This therapy was as effective in high-risk patients with Philadelphia chromosome–positive (Ph+) disease as in those with relapsed disease after previous allo-SCT. Through systematic analysis of clinical data and serum cytokine levels over the first 21 days after T cell infusion, we have defined diagnostic criteria for a severe cytokine release syndrome (sCRS), with the goal of better identifying the subset of patients who will likely require therapeutic intervention with corticosteroids or interleukin-6 receptor blockade to curb the sCRS. Additionally, we found that serum C-reactive protein, a readily available laboratory study, can serve as a reliable indicator for the severity of the CRS. Together, our data provide strong support for conducting a multicenter phase 2 study to further evaluate 19-28z CAR T cells in B-ALL and a road map for patient management at centers now contemplating the use of CAR T cell therapy. PMID:24553386

  7. A single exercise bout enhances the manufacture of viral-specific T-cells from healthy donors: implications for allogeneic adoptive transfer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Spielmann, Guillaume; Bollard, Catherine M.; Kunz, Hawley; Hanley, Patrick J.; Simpson, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infections remain a major cause of morbidity and mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The adoptive transfer of donor-derived viral-specific cytotoxic T-cells (VSTs) is an effective treatment for controlling CMV and EBV infections after HSCT; however, new practical methods are required to augment the ex vivo manufacture of multi-VSTs from healthy donors. This study investigated the effects of a single exercise bout on the ex vivo manufacture of multi-VSTs. PBMCs isolated from healthy CMV/EBV seropositive participants before (PRE) and immediately after (POST) 30-minutes of cycling exercise were stimulated with CMV (pp65 and IE1) and EBV (LMP2A and BMLF1) peptides and expanded over 8 days. The number (fold difference from PRE) of T-cells specific for CMV pp65 (2.6), EBV LMP2A (2.5), and EBV BMLF1 (4.4) was greater among the VSTs expanded POST. VSTs expanded PRE and POST had similar phenotype characteristics and were equally capable of MHC-restricted killing of autologous target cells. We conclude that a single exercise bout enhances the manufacture of multi-VSTs from healthy donors without altering their phenotype or function and may serve as a simple and economical adjuvant to boost the production of multi-VSTs for allogeneic adoptive transfer immunotherapy. PMID:27181409

  8. Adoptive transfer of regulatory T cells promotes intestinal tumorigenesis and is associated with decreased NK cells and IL-22 binding protein.

    PubMed

    Janakiram, Naveena B; Mohammed, Altaf; Bryant, Taylor; Brewer, Misty; Biddick, Laura; Lightfoot, Stan; Lang, Mark L; Rao, Chinthalapally V

    2015-10-01

    High number of regulatory T cells (Tregs), both circulating and at the tumor site, often indicates a poor prognosis in CRC patient's possibly impairing natural killer (NK) cell function. To determine the role of Tregs in CRC development and their effects on NK cells, we created novel transgenic Rag-Apc mice that lack T cells and develop spontaneous intestinal tumors, and we adoptively transferred Tregs or transiently depleted NK cells during initial stages of tumorigenesis. In 6-weeks old Rag-Apc mice containing microscopic intestinal tumors adoptive transfer of Tregs or transient NK cell depletion dramatically associated with an increase in intestinal tumor multiplicity and tumor size, with significantly decreased survival rates. Importantly, Treg transfer increased small intestinal polyp formation up to 65% (P < 0.0005) and increased colon tumors multiplicities by 84% (P < 0.0001) with a significant decrease in NK cells as compared to control mice. Similarly, in NK depleted mice, colon tumor multiplicities increased up to 40% and small intestinal polyp formation up to 60% (P < 0.0001). Treg transfer or NK cell transient depletion markedly increased interleukin (IL)-22 systemically and the inflammatory signaling molecules P2X7R, and STAT3 in the tumors; and impaired production of the tumor suppressor interferon (IFN)-γ systemically. Notably, IL-22 binding protein (IL-22 BP) was associated with NKs and a significant decrease was seen at the tumor site in mice adoptively transferred with Tregs or depleted of NK cells. Our results suggest that adoptive transfer of Tregs aggressively promote intestinal tumorigenesis by decreasing NK cell number and activity by modulating IL-22 BP.

  9. Faster T-cell development following gene therapy compared with haploidentical HSCT in the treatment of SCID-X1.

    PubMed

    Touzot, Fabien; Moshous, Despina; Creidy, Rita; Neven, Bénédicte; Frange, Pierre; Cros, Guilhem; Caccavelli, Laure; Blondeau, Johanna; Magnani, Alessandra; Luby, Jean-Marc; Ternaux, Brigitte; Picard, Capucine; Blanche, Stéphane; Fischer, Alain; Hacein-Bey-Abina, Salima; Cavazzana, Marina

    2015-06-04

    During the last decade, gene therapy via ex vivo gene transfer into autologous hematopoietic stem cells has emerged as a convincing therapy for severe combined immunodeficiency caused by ILR2G mutation (SCID-X1) despite the occurrence of genotoxicity caused by the integration of first-generation retroviral vectors. However, the place of gene therapy among the therapeutic armamentarium remains to be defined. We retrospectively analyze and compare clinical outcomes and immune reconstitution in 13 consecutive SCID-X1 patients having undergone haploidentical hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) and 14 SCID-X1 patients treated with gene therapy over the same period at a single center level: the Necker Children's Hospital (Paris, France). Our results show a clear advantage in terms of T-cell development of gene therapy over HSCT with a mismatched donor. Patients treated with gene therapy display a faster T-cell reconstitution and a better long-term thymic output. Interestingly, this advantage of gene therapy vs haploidentical HSCT seems to be independent of the existence of clinical graft-versus-host disease in the latter condition. If data of safety are confirmed over the long term, gene therapy for SCID-X1 appears to be an equal, if not superior, alternative to haploidentical HSCT.

  10. Effective Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Targeting of Persistent HIV-1 during Antiretroviral Therapy Requires Priming of Naive CD8+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Kellie N.; Mailliard, Robbie B.; Piazza, Paolo A.; Fischer, Will; Korber, Bette T.; Fecek, Ronald J.; Ratner, Deena; Gupta, Phalguni; Mullins, James I.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Curing HIV-1 infection will require elimination of persistent cellular reservoirs that harbor latent virus in the face of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART). Proposed immunotherapeutic strategies to cure HIV-1 infection include enhancing lysis of these infected cells by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL). A major challenge in this strategy is overcoming viral immune escape variants that have evaded host immune control. Here we report that naive CD8+ T cells from chronic HIV-1-infected participants on long-term cART can be primed by dendritic cells (DC). These DC must be mature, produce high levels of interleukin 12p70 (IL-12p70), be responsive to CD40 ligand (CD40L), and be loaded with inactivated, autologous HIV-1. These DC-primed CD8+ T cell responders produced high levels of gamma interferon (IFN-γ) in response to a broad range of both conserved and variable regions of Gag and effectively killed CD4+ T cell targets that were either infected with the autologous latent reservoir-associated virus or loaded with autologous Gag peptides. In contrast, HIV-1-specific memory CD8+ T cells stimulated with autologous HIV-1-loaded DC produced IFN-γ in response to a narrow range of conserved and variable Gag peptides compared to the primed T cells and most notably, displayed significantly lower cytolytic function. Our findings highlight the need to selectively induce new HIV-1-specific CTL from naive precursors while avoiding activation of existing, dysfunctional memory T cells in potential curative immunotherapeutic strategies for HIV-1 infection. PMID:27247230

  11. Modulation of Autoimmune T-Cell Memory by Stem Cell Educator Therapy: Phase 1/2 Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Delgado, Elias; Perez-Basterrechea, Marcos; Suarez-Alvarez, Beatriz; Zhou, Huimin; Revuelta, Eva Martinez; Garcia-Gala, Jose Maria; Perez, Silvia; Alvarez-Viejo, Maria; Menendez, Edelmiro; Lopez-Larrea, Carlos; Tang, Ruifeng; Zhu, Zhenlong; Hu, Wei; Moss, Thomas; Guindi, Edward; Otero, Jesus; Zhao, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Background Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a T cell-mediated autoimmune disease that causes a deficit of pancreatic islet β cells. The complexities of overcoming autoimmunity in T1D have contributed to the challenges the research community faces when devising successful treatments with conventional immune therapies. Overcoming autoimmune T cell memory represents one of the key hurdles. Methods In this open-label, phase 1/phase 2 study, Caucasian T1D patients (N = 15) received two treatments with the Stem Cell Educator (SCE) therapy, an approach that uses human multipotent cord blood-derived multipotent stem cells (CB-SCs). SCE therapy involves a closed-loop system that briefly treats the patient's lymphocytes with CB-SCs in vitro and returns the “educated” lymphocytes (but not the CB-SCs) into the patient's blood circulation. This study is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT01350219. Findings Clinical data demonstrated that SCE therapy was well tolerated in all subjects. The percentage of naïve CD4+ T cells was significantly increased at 26 weeks and maintained through the final follow-up at 56 weeks. The percentage of CD4+ central memory T cells (TCM) was markedly and constantly increased at 18 weeks. Both CD4+ effector memory T cells (TEM) and CD8+ TEM cells were considerably decreased at 18 weeks and 26 weeks respectively. Additional clinical data demonstrated the modulation of C–C chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7) expressions on naïve T, TCM, and TEM cells. Following two treatments with SCE therapy, islet β-cell function was improved and maintained in individuals with residual β-cell function, but not in those without residual β-cell function. Interpretation Current clinical data demonstrated the safety and efficacy of SCE therapy in immune modulation. SCE therapy provides lasting reversal of autoimmune memory that could improve islet β-cell function in Caucasian subjects. Funding Obra Social “La Caixa”, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Red de

  12. Ipilimumab with Stereotactic Ablative Radiation Therapy: Phase I Results and Immunologic Correlates from Peripheral T Cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Chad; Welsh, James W; de Groot, Patricia; Massarelli, Erminia; Chang, Joe Y; Hess, Kenneth R; Basu, Sreyashi; Curran, Michael A; Cabanillas, Maria E; Subbiah, Vivek; Fu, Siqing; Tsimberidou, Apostolia M; Karp, Daniel; Gomez, Daniel R; Diab, Adi; Komaki, Ritsuko; Heymach, John V; Sharma, Padmanee; Naing, Aung; Hong, David S

    2017-03-15

    Purpose: Little prospective data are available on clinical outcomes and immune correlates from combination radiation and immunotherapy. We conducted a phase I trial (NCT02239900) testing stereotactic ablative radiotherapy (SABR) with ipilimumab.Experimental Design: SABR was given either concurrently (1 day after the first dose) or sequentially (1 week after the second dose) with ipilimumab (3 mg/kg every 3 weeks for 4 doses) to five treatment groups: concurrent 50 Gy (in 4 fractions) to liver; sequential 50 Gy (in 4 fractions) to liver; concurrent 50 Gy (in 4 fractions) to lung; sequential 50 Gy (in 4 fractions) to lung; and sequential 60 Gy (in 10 fractions) to lung or liver. MTD was determined with a 3 + 3 dose de-escalation design. Immune marker expression was assessed by flow cytometry.Results: Among 35 patients who initiated ipilimumab, 2 experienced dose-limiting toxicity and 12 (34%) grade 3 toxicity. Response outside the radiation field was assessable in 31 patients. Three patients (10%) exhibited partial response and 7 (23%) experienced clinical benefit (defined as partial response or stable disease lasting ≥6 months). Clinical benefit was associated with increases in peripheral CD8(+) T cells, CD8(+)/CD4(+) T-cell ratio, and proportion of CD8(+) T cells expressing 4-1BB and PD1. Liver (vs. lung) irradiation produced greater T-cell activation, reflected as increases in the proportions of peripheral T cells expressing ICOS, GITR, and 4-1BB.Conclusions: Combining SABR and ipilimumab was safe with signs of efficacy, peripheral T-cell markers may predict clinical benefit, and systemic immune activation was greater after liver irradiation. Clin Cancer Res; 23(6); 1388-96. ©2016 AACR.

  13. Patients' characteristics and clinical implications of suboptimal CD4 T-cell gains after 1 year of successful antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez, Félix; Padilla, Sergio; Masiá, Mar; Iribarren, José A; Moreno, Santiago; Viciana, Pompeyo; Hernández-Quero, José; Alemán, Remedios; Vidal, Francesc; Salavert, Miguel; Blanco, José R; Leal, Manuel; Dronda, Fernando; Perez Hoyos, Santiago; del Amo, Julia

    2008-03-01

    To describe characteristics and prognosis of patients with suboptimal immunological response to combined antiretroviral therapy (CART). Using data from a multicenter cohort study, we selected patients who initiated CART and showed suboptimal CD4-T cell response (defined as <50 cells/L increase) after 1 year of therapy, despite sustained virological suppression. Characteristics of those patients were compared with subjects who showed optimal immunological response. Of 650 patients with virological suppression, 108 (16.6%) showed suboptimal CD4-T cell response. Independent predictors of suboptimal response were previous injection drug use (OR, 1.85; 95% CI, 1.12-2.98) and age at CART initiation (OR, 1.04 per year increase; 95%CI, 1.01-1.06). Hepatitis C virus coinfection was not associated with impaired immunological response. As compared with patients with optimal immunological response, those with suboptimal response had a higher mortality rate (3.22 versus 0.71 per 100 person-years; p=.001), but a similar rate of new AIDS-defining events. In patients with sustained virological suppression with CART, previous injection drug use, but not hepatitis C virus coinfection, and older age at initiation of therapy were associated with suboptimal CD4 T-cell responses. Patients with suboptimal response had a higher mortality over time, mainly due to diseases other than AIDS-defining events.

  14. Suppression of disease in New Zealand Black/New Zealand White lupus-prone mice by adoptive transfer of ex vivo expanded regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Scalapino, Kenneth J; Tang, Qizhi; Bluestone, Jeffrey A; Bonyhadi, Mark L; Daikh, David I

    2006-08-01

    An increasing number of studies indicate that a subset of CD4(+) T cells with regulatory capacity (regulatory T cells; T(regs)) can function to control organ-specific autoimmune disease. To determine whether abnormalities of thymic-derived T(regs) play a role in systemic lupus erythematosus, we evaluated T(reg) prevalence and function in (New Zealand Black x New Zealand White)F(1) (B/W) lupus-prone mice. To explore the potential of T(regs) to suppress disease, we evaluated the effect of adoptive transfer of purified, ex vivo expanded thymic-derived T(regs) on the progression of renal disease. We found that although the prevalence of T(regs) is reduced in regional lymph nodes and spleen of prediseased B/W mice compared with age-matched non-autoimmune mice, these cells increase in number in older diseased mice. In addition, the ability of these cells to proliferate in vitro was comparable to those purified from non-autoimmune control animals. Purified CD4(+)CD25(+)CD62L(high) B/W T(regs) were expanded ex vivo 80-fold, resulting in cells with a stable suppressor phenotype. Adoptive transfer of these exogenously expanded cells reduced the rate at which mice developed renal disease; a second transfer after treated animals had developed proteinuria further slowed the progression of renal disease and significantly improved survival. These studies indicate that thymic-derived T(regs) may have a significant role in the control of autoimmunity in lupus-prone B/W mice, and augmentation of these cells may constitute a novel therapeutic approach for systemic lupus erythematosus.

  15. Intratumoral oncolytic adenoviral treatment modulates the glioma microenvironment and facilitates systemic tumor-antigen-specific T cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Jian; Dey, Mahua; Chang, Alan L; Kim, Julius W; Miska, Jason; Ling, Alex; M Nettlebeck, Dirk; Han, Yu; Zhang, Lingjiao; Lesniak, Maciej S

    2015-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most aggressive form of primary brain tumor and is associated with poor survival. Virotherapy is a promising candidate for the development of effective, novel treatments for GBM. Recent studies have underscored the potential of virotherapy in enhancing antitumor immunity despite the fact that its mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here, using a syngeneic GBM mouse model, we report that intratumoral virotherapy significantly modulates the tumor microenvironment. We found that intratumoral administration of an oncolytic adenovirus, AdCMVdelta24, decreased tumor-infiltrating CD4+ Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) and increased IFNγ-producing CD8+ T cells in treated tumors, even in late stage disease in which a highly immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment is considered to be a significant barrier to immunotherapy. Importantly, intratumoral AdCMVdelta24 treatment augmented systemically transferred tumor-antigen-specific T cell therapy. Furthermore, mechanistic studies showed (1) downregulation of Foxp3 in Tregs that were incubated with media conditioned by virus-infected tumor cells, (2) downregulation of indoleamine 2,3 dioxygenase 1 (IDO) in glioma cells upon infection by AdCMVdelta24, and (3) reprograming of Tregs from an immunosuppressive to a stimulatory state. Taken together, our findings demonstrate the potency of intratumoral oncolytic adenoviral treatment in enhancing antitumor immunity through the regulation of multiple aspects of immune suppression in the context of glioma, supporting further clinical development of oncolytic adenovirus-based immune therapies for malignant brain cancer. PMID:26405578

  16. Ewing sarcoma dissemination and response to T-cell therapy in mice assessed by whole-body magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Liebsch, L; Kailayangiri, S; Beck, L; Altvater, B; Koch, R; Dierkes, C; Hotfilder, M; Nagelmann, N; Faber, C; Kooijman, H; Ring, J; Vieth, V; Rossig, C

    2013-01-01

    Background: Novel treatment strategies in Ewing sarcoma include targeted cellular therapies. Preclinical in vivo models are needed that reflect their activity against systemic (micro)metastatic disease. Methods: Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging (WB-MRI) was used to monitor the engraftment and dissemination of human Ewing sarcoma xenografts in mice. In this model, we evaluated the therapeutic efficacy of T cells redirected against the Ewing sarcoma-associated antigen GD2 by chimeric receptor engineering. Results: Of 18 mice receiving intravenous injections of VH-64 Ewing sarcoma cells, all developed disseminated tumour growth detectable by WB-MRI. All mice had lung tumours, and the majority had additional manifestations in the bone, soft tissues, and/or kidney. Sequential scans revealed in vivo growth of tumours. Diffusion-weighted whole-body imaging with background signal suppression effectively visualised Ewing sarcoma growth in extrapulmonary sites. Animals receiving GD2-targeted T-cell therapy had lower numbers of pulmonary tumours than controls, and the median volume of soft tissue tumours at first detection was lower, with a tumour growth delay over time. Conclusion: Magnetic resonance imaging reliably visualises disseminated Ewing sarcoma growth in mice. GD2-retargeted T cells can noticeably delay tumour growth and reduce pulmonary Ewing sarcoma manifestations in this aggressive disease model. PMID:23839490

  17. Anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy for adult Philadelphia chromosome-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yang-min; Wu, Zhao; Tan, You-ping; Du, Yuan-yuan; Liu, Zhi; Ou, Rui-ming; Liu, Shuang; Pu, Cheng-fei; Jiang, Jing; Wang, Jin-ping; Xiao, Lei; Zhang, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: The presence of the Philadelphia chromosome (Ph) in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) has been associated with a high risk of disease relapse and a poor prognosis. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) is an established treatment for adults with Ph-positive ALL, but relapse remains the primary cause of treatment failure, and is associated with an extremely poor prognosis. The emergence of resistance to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) poses a challenge for patients with disease relapses after initial treatment with TKI-containing regimens. Patient concerns: Two patients with TKI-resistant recurrent Ph-positive ALL. Diagnoses: Ph-positive ALL. Interventions: Anti-CD19 CAR T-cell infusion. Outcomes: One patient's bone marrow blasts decreased significantly, and the other reached negative minimal residual disease (MRD). However, we first recorded the development of new-onset acute graft-versus-host disease (aGVHD) after anti-CD19 CAR T-cell infusion in a patient who received allogeneic HSCT. Our 2 case reports also demonstrate the efficacy of anti-CD19 CAR T-cell therapy in the treatment of TKI-resistant Ph-positive ALL. Lessons: Our report suggests that anti-CD19 CAR T-cell therapy may be a promising option for the treatment of relapsed Ph-positive ALL after conventional chemotherapy or allogeneic HSCT. However, caution is due given the possibility of the adverse effects of cytokine release syndrome (CRS)-induced aGVHD for patients receiving allogeneic HSCT. PMID:28002337

  18. Blockade of TNF-α signaling benefits cancer therapy by suppressing effector regulatory T cell expansion.

    PubMed

    Chang, Li-Yuan; Lin, Yung-Chang; Chiang, Jy-Ming; Mahalingam, Jayashri; Su, Shih-Huan; Huang, Ching-Tai; Chen, Wei-Ting; Huang, Chien-Hao; Jeng, Wen-Juei; Chen, Yi-Cheng; Lin, Shi-Ming; Sheen, I-Shyan; Lin, Chun-Yen

    2015-10-01

    Effector but not naive regulatory T cells (Treg cells) can accumulate in the peripheral blood as well as the tumor microenvironment, expand during tumor progression and be one of the main suppressors for antitumor immunity. However, the underlying mechanisms for effector Treg cell expansion in tumor are still unknown. We demonstrate that effector Treg cell-mediated suppression of antitumor CD8(+) T cells is tumor-nonspecific. Furthermore, TNFR2 expression is increased in these Treg cells by Affymetrix chip analysis which was confirmed by monoclonal antibody staining in both hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and colorectal cancer (CRC) patients and murine models. Correspondingly, increased levels of TNF-α in both tissue and serum were also demonstrated. Interestingly, TNF-α could not only expand effector Treg cells through TNFR2 signaling, but also enhanced their suppressive activity against antitumor immunity of CD8(+) T cells. Furthermore, targeting TNFR2 signaling with a TNF-α inhibitor could selectively reduce rapid resurgence of effector Treg cells after cyclophosphamide-induced lymphodepletion and markedly inhibit the growth of established tumors. Herein, we propose a novel mechanism in which TNF-α could promote tumor-associated effector Treg cell expansion and suggest a new cancer immunotherapy strategy using TNF-α inhibitors to reduce effector Treg cells expansion after cyclophosphamide-induced lymphodepletion.

  19. Design and Development of Therapies using Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Expressing T cells

    PubMed Central

    Dotti, Gianpietro; Gottschalk, Stephen; Savoldo, Barbara; Brenner, Malcolm K

    2013-01-01

    Summary Investigators developed chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) for expression on T cells more than 25 years ago. When the CAR is derived from an antibody, the resultant cell should combine the desirable targeting features of an antibody (e.g. lack of requirement for major histocompatibility complex recognition, ability to recognize non-protein antigens) with the persistence, trafficking and effector functions of a T-cell. This article describes how the past two decades have seen a crescendo of research which has now begun to translate these potential benefits into effective treatments for patients with cancer. We describe the basic design of CARs, describe how antigenic targets are selected, and the initial clinical experience with CART cells. Our review then describes our own and other investigators’ work aimed at improving the function of CARs and reviews the clinical studies in hematological and solid malignancies that are beginning to exploit these approaches. Finally, we show the value of adding additional engineering features to CAR-T cells, irrespective of their target, to render them better suited to function in the tumor environment, and discuss how the safety of these heavily modified cells may be maintained. PMID:24329793

  20. Ex Vivo γ-Retroviral Gene Therapy of Dogs with X-linked Severe Combined Immunodeficiency and the Development of a Thymic T Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, Douglas R.; Hartnett, Brian J.; Kennedy, Jeffrey S.; Vernau, William; Moore, Peter F.; O’Malley, Thomas; Burkly, Linda C.; Henthorn, Paula S.; Felsburg, Peter J.

    2011-01-01

    We have previously shown that in vivo γ-retroviral gene therapy of dogs with X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (XSCID) results in sustained T cell reconstitution and sustained marking in myeloid and B cells for up to 4 years with no evidence of any serious adverse effects. The purpose of this study was to determine whether ex vivo γ-retroviral gene therapy of XSCID dogs results in a similar outcome. Eight of 12 XSCID dogs treated with an average of dose of 5.8 × 106 transduced CD34+ cells/kg successfully engrafted producing normal numbers of gene-corrected CD45RA+ (naïve) T cells. However, this was followed by a steady decrease in CD45RA+ T cells, T cell diversity, and thymic output as measured by T cell receptor excision circles (TRECs) resulting in a T cell lymphopenia. None of the dogs survived past 11 months post treatment. At necropsy, few gene-corrected thymocytes were observed correlating with the TREC levels and one of the dogs was diagnosed with a thymic T cell lymphoma that was attributed to the gene therapy. This study highlights the outcome differences between the ex vivo and in vivo approach to γ-retroviral gene therapy and is the first to document a serious adverse event following gene therapy in a canine model of a human genetic disease. PMID:21536334

  1. Host T cells are the main producers of IL-17 within the central nervous system during initiation of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis induced by adoptive transfer of Th1 cell lines.

    PubMed

    Lees, Jason R; Iwakura, Yoichiro; Russell, John H

    2008-06-15

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of multiple sclerosis, has long been thought to be mediated by Th1 CD4(+) T cells. Using adoptive transfer techniques, transfer of CNS specific Th1 T cells was sufficient to induce EAE in naive mice. However, recent studies found a vital role for IL-17 in induction of EAE. These studies suggested that a fraction of IL-17-producing T cells that contaminate Th1 polarized cell lines are largely responsible for initiation of EAE. In this study, we tracked the appearance and cytokine production capacity of adoptively transferred cells within the CNS of mice throughout EAE disease. IL-17-producing, adoptively transferred cells were not enriched over the low percentages present in vitro. Thus, there was no selective recruitment and/or preferential proliferation of adoptively transferred IL-17-producing cells during the induction of EAE. Instead a large number of CNS infiltrating host T cells in mice with EAE were capable of producing IL-17 following ex vivo stimulation. The IL-17-producing T cells contained both alphabeta and gammadelta TCR(+) T cells with a CD4(+)CD8(-) or CD4(-)CD8(-) phenotype. These cells concentrated within the CNS within 3 days of adoptive transfer, and appeared to play a role in EAE induction as adoptive transfer of Th1 lines derived from wild-type mice into IL-17-deficient mice induced reduced EAE clinical outcomes. This study demonstrates that an encephalitogenic Th1 cell line induces recruitment of host IL-17-producing T cells to the CNS during the initiation of EAE and that these cells contribute to the incidence and severity of disease.

  2. Relationship between Regulatory T Cells and Immune Activation in Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Patients Interrupting Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Laurence; Piketty, Christophe; Assoumou, Lambert; Didier, Céline; Caccavelli, Laure; Donkova-Petrini, Vladimira; Levy, Yves; Girard, Pierre-Marie; Burgard, Marianne; Viard, Jean-Paul; Rouzioux, Christine; Costagliola, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    Persistent immune activation plays a central role in driving Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) disease progression. Whether CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) are harmful by suppressing HIV-specific immune responses and/or beneficial through a decrease in immune activation remains debatable. We analysed the relationship between proportion and number of regulatory T cells (Tregs) and immune activation in HIV-infected patients interrupting an effective antiretroviral therapy (ART). Twenty-five patients were included in a substudy of a prospective multicenter trial of treatment interruption (TI) (ANRS 116). Proportions and numbers of Tregs and the proportion of activated CD4 and CD8 T cells were assessed at baseline and month 12 (M12) of TI. Specific anti-HIV CD4 and CD8 responses were investigated at baseline and M12. Non parametric univariate analyses and multivariate linear regression models were conducted. At baseline, the proportion of Tregs negatively correlated with the proportion of HLA-DR+CD8+T cells (r = −0.519). Following TI, the proportion of Tregs increased from 6.3% to 7.2% (p = 0.029); absolute numbers of Tregs decreased. The increase in the proportion of HLA-DR+CD38+CD8+T cells was significantly related to the increase in proportion of Tregs (p = 0.031). At M12, the proportion of Tregs did not negatively correlate with CD8 T-cell activation. Nevertheless, Tregs retain a suppressive function since depletion of Treg-containing CD4+CD25+ cells led to an increase in lymphoproliferative responses in most patients studied. Our data suggest that Tregs are efficient in controlling residual immune activation in patients with ART-mediated viral suppression. However, the insufficient increase in the proportion and/or the decrease in the absolute number of Tregs result in a failure to control immune activation following TI. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00118677 PMID:20657770

  3. Adoptive transfer of ex vivo expanded Vγ9Vδ2 T cells in combination with zoledronic acid inhibits cancer growth and limits osteolysis in a murine model of osteolytic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zysk, Aneta; DeNichilo, Mark O; Panagopoulos, Vasilios; Zinonos, Irene; Liapis, Vasilios; Hay, Shelley; Ingman, Wendy; Ponomarev, Vladimir; Atkins, Gerald; Findlay, David; Zannettino, Andrew; Evdokiou, Andreas

    2017-02-01

    Bone metastases occur in over 75% of patients with advanced breast cancer and are responsible for high levels of morbidity and mortality. In this study, ex vivo expanded cytotoxic Vγ9Vδ2 T cells isolated from human peripheral blood were tested for their anti-cancer efficacy in combination with zoledronic acid (ZOL), using a mouse model of osteolytic breast cancer. In vitro, expanded Vγ9Vδ2 T cells were cytotoxic against a panel of human breast cancer cell lines, and ZOL pre-treatment further sensitised breast cancer cells to killing by Vγ9Vδ2 T cells. Vγ9Vδ2 T cells adoptively transferred into NOD/SCID mice localised to osteolytic breast cancer lesions in the bone, and multiple infusions of Vγ9Vδ2 T cells reduced tumour growth in the bone. ZOL pre-treatment potentiated the anti-cancer efficacy of Vγ9Vδ2 T cells, with mice showing further reductions in tumour burden. Mice treated with the combination also had reduced tumour burden of secondary pulmonary metastases, and decreased bone degradation. Our data suggests that adoptive transfer of Vγ9Vδ2 T cell in combination with ZOL may prove an effective immunotherapeutic approach for the treatment of breast cancer bone metastases.

  4. Activated T cells exhibit increased uptake of silicon phthalocyanine Pc 4 and increased susceptibility to Pc 4-photodynamic therapy-mediated cell death.

    PubMed

    Soler, David C; Ohtola, Jennifer; Sugiyama, Hideaki; Rodriguez, Myriam E; Han, Ling; Oleinick, Nancy L; Lam, Minh; Baron, Elma D; Cooper, Kevin D; McCormick, Thomas S

    2016-06-08

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an emerging treatment for malignant and inflammatory dermal disorders. Photoirradiation of the silicon phthalocyanine (Pc) 4 photosensitizer with red light generates singlet oxygen and other reactive oxygen species to induce cell death. We previously reported that Pc 4-PDT elicited cell death in lymphoid-derived (Jurkat) and epithelial-derived (A431) cell lines in vitro, and furthermore that Jurkat cells were more sensitive than A431 cells to treatment. In this study, we examined the effectiveness of Pc 4-PDT on primary human CD3(+) T cells in vitro. Fluorometric analyses of lysed T cells confirmed the dose-dependent uptake of Pc 4 in non-stimulated and stimulated T cells. Flow cytometric analyses measuring annexin V and propidium iodide (PI) demonstrated a dose-dependent increase of T cell apoptosis (6.6-59.9%) at Pc 4 doses ranging from 0-300 nM. Following T cell stimulation through the T cell receptor using a combination of anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies, activated T cells exhibited increased susceptibility to Pc 4-PDT-induced apoptosis (10.6-81.2%) as determined by Pc 4 fluorescence in each cell, in both non-stimulated and stimulated T cells, Pc 4 uptake increased with Pc 4 dose up to 300 nM as assessed by flow cytometry. The mean fluorescence intensity (MFI) of Pc 4 uptake measured in stimulated T cells was significantly increased over the uptake of resting T cells at each dose of Pc 4 tested (50, 100, 150 and 300 nM, p < 0.001 between 50 and 150 nM, n = 8). Treg uptake was diminished relative to other T cells. Cutaneous T cell lymphoma (CTCL) T cells appeared to take up somewhat more Pc 4 than normal resting T cells at 100 and 150 nm Pc 4. Confocal imaging revealed that Pc 4 localized in cytoplasmic organelles, with approximately half of the Pc 4 co-localized with mitochondria in T cells. Thus, Pc 4-PDT exerts an enhanced apoptotic effect on activated CD3(+) T cells that may be exploited in targeting T cell-mediated skin

  5. Producer T cells: Using genetically engineered T cells as vehicles to generate and deliver therapeutics to tumors

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Alexander K.; Davila, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Adoptive cell transfer (ACT) is an emerging anticancer therapy that has shown promise in various malignancies. Redirecting antigen specificity by genetically engineering T cells to stably express receptors has become an effective variant of ACT. A novel extension of this approach is to utilize engineered T cells to produce and deliver anticancer therapeutics that enhance cytotoxic T cell function and simultaneously inhibit immunosuppressive processes. Here, we review the potential of using T cells as therapeutic-secreting vehicles for immunotherapies and present theoretical and established arguments in support of further development of this unique cell-based immunotherapy. PMID:27467930

  6. Modulation of polyfunctional HIV-specific CD8 T cells in patients responding differently to antiretroviral therapy.

    PubMed

    Casetti, R; De Simone, G; Sacchi, A; Bordoni, V; Viola, D; Rinaldi, A; Agrati, C; Gioia, C; Martini, F

    2014-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy allows a restoration of immune cell homeostasis associated with a normal immune competence. Our goal was to analyze the modulation of polyfunctional HIV-specific CD8+ T-cell responses during antiretroviral therapy. HIV-infected individuals were divided into four groups according to CD4+ cell count and viral load at the moment of recruitment. Whole blood was stimulated with a pool of CD8-specific HIV-antigens to assess cytokine/chemokine production and cytotoxicity activity by using flow cytometry. The groups show different modulation in HIV-specific CD8+ T-cell responses. In particular, immunological failure showed different distributions of polyfunctional HIVspecific CD8+ responses, mainly due to an increase of cells producing CD107alpha/IFNgamma/IL-2/MIP-1beta. Our results indicate that this particular 4+ functional subset is a possible correlate of immunological failure. Considering the complexity of interactions among HAART, immune system and HIV, work is in progress to find correlates of therapy efficacy.

  7. PD-1+ and Foxp3+ T cell reduction correlates with survival of HCC patients after sorafenib therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kalathil, Suresh Gopi; Lugade, Amit Anand; Iyer, Renuka

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND. Sorafenib is an oral antiangiogenic agent administered in advanced-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Based on preclinical and human studies, we hypothesized that, in addition to its antiangiogenic properties, sorafenib may beneficially reduce the extent of the immunosuppressive network in HCC patients. To test this hypothesis, we examined whether alterations in the immunosuppressive burden of advanced-stage HCC patients correlated with clinical outcome. METHODS. In before and after sorafenib treatment, blood samples collected from 19 patients with advanced HCC, the frequency of PD-1+ T cells, Tregs, and myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC) were quantified by multiparameter FACS. Cytokine levels in plasma were determined by ELISA. RESULTS. Overall survival (OS) was significantly impacted by the reduction in the absolute number of both CD4+PD-1+ T cells and CD8+PD-1+ T cells following sorafenib treatment. Significant decreases in the frequency and absolute number of Foxp3+ Tregs were also observed, and a statistically significant improvement in OS was noted in patients exhibiting a greater decrease in the number of Foxp3+ Tregs. The ratio of CD4+CD127+PD-1– T effector cells to CD4+Foxp3+PD-1+ Tregs was significantly increased following treatment with sorafenib. Increased frequency of CD4+CD127+ T effector cells in the posttreatment samples significantly correlated with OS. CONCLUSION. This study is the first to our knowledge to demonstrate the potent immunomodulatory effects of sorafenib therapy on PD-1+ T cells and Tregs and the ensuing correlation with survival. These phenotypes could serve as predictive biomarkers to identify HCC patients who are likely to benefit from sorafenib treatment. TRIAL REGISTRATION. Registration is not required for observational studies. FUNDING. This study was supported by NCI Core Grant to RPCI (NIH P30 CA016056) and discretionary funds to Y. Thanavala. PMID:27540594

  8. Regulatory T Cells and Myeloid-Derived Suppressor Cells in the Tumor Microenvironment Undergo Fas-Dependent Cell Death during IL-2/αCD40 Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Jonathan M.; Subleski, Jeff J.; Back, Tim; Chen, Xin; Watkins, Stephanie K.; Yagita, Hideo; Sayers, Thomas J.; Murphy, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Fas ligand expression in certain tumors has been proposed to contribute to immunosuppression and poor prognosis. However, immunotherapeutic approaches may elicit the Fas-mediated elimination of immunosuppressive regulatory T cells (Tregs) and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) within tumors that represent major obstacles for cancer immunotherapy. Previously, we showed that IL-2 and agonistic CD40 Ab (αCD40) elicited synergistic antitumor responses coincident with the efficient removal of Tregs and MDSCs. We demonstrate in this study in two murine tumor models that Treg and MDSC loss within the tumor microenvironment after IL-2/αCD40 occurs through a Fas-dependent cell death pathway. Among tumor-infiltrating leukocytes, CD8+ T cells, neutrophils, and immature myeloid cells expressed Fas ligand after treatment. Fas was expressed by tumor-associated Tregs and immature myeloid cells, including MDSCs. Tregs and MDSCs in the tumor microenvironment expressed active caspases after IL-2/αCD40 therapy and, in contrast with effector T cells, Tregs significantly downregulated Bcl-2 expression. In contrast, Tregs and MDSCs proliferated and expanded in the spleen after treatment. Adoptive transfer of Fas-deficient Tregs or MDSCs into wild-type, Treg-, or MDSC-depleted hosts resulted in the persistence of Tregs or MDSCs and the loss of antitumor efficacy in response to IL-2/αCD40. These results demonstrate the importance of Fas-mediated Treg/MDSC removal for successful antitumor immunotherapy. Our results suggest that immunotherapeutic strategies that include exploiting Treg and MDSC susceptibility to Fas-mediated apoptosis hold promise for treatment of cancer. PMID:24808361

  9. T-cell mediated anti-tumor immunity after photodynamic therapy: Why does it not always work and how can we improve it?

    PubMed Central

    de Freitas, Lucas Freitas; Hamblin, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) uses the combination of non-toxic photosensitizers and harmless light to generate reactive oxygen species that destroy tumors by a combination of direct tumor cell killing, vascular shutdown, and activation of the immune system. It has been shown in some animal models that mice that have been cured of cancer by PDT, may exhibit resistance to rechallenge. The cured mice can also possess tumor specific T-cells that recognize defined tumor antigens, destroy tumor cells in vitro, and can be adoptively transferred to protect naïve mice from cancer. However, these beneficial outcomes are the exception rather than the rule. The reasons for this lack of consistency lie in the ability of many tumors to suppress the host immune system and to actively evade immune attack. The presence of an appropriate tumor rejection antigen in the particular tumor cell line is a requisite for T-cell mediated immunity. Regulatory T-cells (CD25+, Foxp3+) are potent inhibitors of anti-tumor immunity, and their removal by low dose cyclophosphamide can potentiate the PDT-induced immune response. Treatments that stimulate dendritic cells (DC) such as CpG oligonucleotide can overcome tumor-induced DC dysfunction and improve PDT outcome. Epigenetic reversal agents can increase tumor expression of MHC class I and also simultaneously increase expression of tumor antigens. A few clinical reports have shown that anti-tumor immunity can be generated by PDT in patients, and it is hoped that these combination approaches may increase tumor cures in patients. PMID:26062987

  10. Successful adoptive immunotherapy with vaccine-sensitized T cells, despite no effect with vaccination alone in a weakly immunogenic tumor model.

    PubMed

    Parviz, Maryam; Chin, Cynthia S; Graham, Laura J; Miller, Catriona; Lee, Catherine; George, Kimberly; Bear, Harry D

    2003-12-01

    Tumor cell vaccines have been successful at inducing immunity in naïve mice, but only in a few reports has vaccination alone induced regression of established tumors and, generally, only when they are very small. Clinically, vaccinations alone may not be able to cause regression of established human cancers, which tend to be weakly immunogenic. We hypothesized that pharmacologic ex vivo amplification of a vaccination-induced immune response with subsequent adoptive immunotherapy (AIT) to tumor-bearing animals would be more effective in treatment of these animals than vaccination alone. The 4T1 and 4T07 mammary carcinomas are derived from the same parental cell line, but 4T1 is much less immunogenic and more aggressive than 4T07. Vaccination with either 4T1, 4T1-IL-2, or 4T07-IL-2 was not effective as treatment for established 4T1 tumors. However, 4T1 or 4T07-IL-2-vaccine-sensitized draining lymph node (DLN) cells, activated ex vivo with bryostatin 1 and ionomycin and expanded in culture, induced complete tumor regressions when adoptively transferred to 4T1 tumor-bearing animals. This was effective against small tumors as well as more advanced tumors, 10 days after tumor cell inoculation. Furthermore, as would be required for this approach to be used clinically, vaccine-DLN cells obtained from mice with established progressive 4T1 tumors (inoculated 10 days before vaccination) also induced regression of 4T1 tumors in an adoptive host. In none of these experiments was exogenous IL-2 required to induce tumor regression. The response to tumor cell vaccine can be amplified by ex vivo pharmacologic activation of sensitized T cells, which can then cure an established, weakly immunogenic and highly aggressive tumor that was resistant to vaccination alone.

  11. Nuclear Factor of Activated T Cells and Cytokines Gene Expression of the T Cells in AIDS Patients with Immune Reconstitution Inflammatory Syndrome during Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Heling; Xie, Yirui; Su, Junwei; Huang, Ying; Xu, Lijun; Yin, Michael; Zhou, Qihui

    2017-01-01

    Background. The etiology of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS) in AIDS patients after the initiation of HAART remains unknown. Several researches indicated that the development of IRIS is associated with the production and variation of cytokines, whose gene expression are closely related to the Ca2+/CN-nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) pathway. Methods. We studied the expression of NFAT isoforms and their major target cytokines genes in peripheral blood CD3+ T cells of subjects through fluorescence quantitative PCR and explored the expression changes of these genes before and after HAART. Results. After the initiation of HARRT, NFAT1, IL-6, and IL-8 gene expression showed a reversal trend in the CD3+ T cells of the IRIS group and changed from low expression before HARRT to high expression after HARRT. In particular, the relative gene expression of NFAT1 was markedly higher compared with the other three isoforms. The IRIS group also showed higher NFAT4, NFAT2, NFAT1, IL-1β, IL-10, IL-2, IL-18, and TNF-α gene expression than the non-IRIS group. Conclusion. This study suggested that high expression levels of IL-2, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-10, IL-12, and IL-18 can predict the risk of IRIS. The increased expression of NFAT1 and NFAT4 may promote the expression of cytokines, such as IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α, which may promote the occurrence of IRIS. PMID:28316373

  12. Initiation of Antiretroviral Therapy (ART) at Different Stages of HIV-1 Disease Is Not Associated with the Proportion of Exhausted CD8+ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Sanne Skov; Fomsgaard, Anders; Larsen, Tine Kochendorf; Tingstedt, Jeanette Linnea; Gerstoft, Jan; Kronborg, Gitte; Pedersen, Court; Karlsson, Ingrid

    2015-01-01

    CD8+ T cell-restricted immunity is important in the control of HIV-1 infection, but continued immune activation results in CD8+ T cell dysfunction. Early initiation of antiretroviral treatment (ART) and the duration of ART have been associated with immune reconstitution. Here, we evaluated whether restoration of CD8+ T cell function in HIV-1-infected individuals was dependent on early initiation of ART. HIV-specific CD107a, IFNγ, IL-2, TNFα and MIP-1β expression by CD8+ T cells and the frequency of CD8+ T cells expressing PD-1, 2B4 and CD160 were measured by flow cytometry. The frequency of CD8+ T cells expressing the inhibitory markers PD-1, 2B4 and CD160 was lower in ART-treated individuals compared with ART-naïve individuals and similar to the frequency in HIV-uninfected controls. The expression of the three markers was similarly independent of when therapy was initiated. Individuals treated before seroconversion displayed an HIV-specific CD8+ T cell response that included all five functional markers; this was not observed in individuals treated after seroconversion or in ART-naïve individuals. In summary, ART appears to restore the total CD8+ T cell population to a less exhausted phenotype, independent of the time point of initiation. However, to preserve multifunctional, HIV-1-specific CD8+ T cells, ART might have to be initiated before seroconversion.

  13. Infliximab therapy balances regulatory T cells, tumour necrosis factor receptor 2 (TNFR2) expression and soluble TNFR2 in sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Verwoerd, A; Hijdra, D; Vorselaars, A D M; Crommelin, H A; van Moorsel, C H M; Grutters, J C; Claessen, A M E

    2016-08-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic granulomatous disease of unknown aetiology that most commonly affects the lungs. Although elevated levels of regulatory T cells (Tregs ) have been reported, the extent to which they play a role in sarcoidosis pathogenesis remains unclear. Tumour necrosis factor (TNF) is thought to be one of the driving forces behind granuloma formation, illustrated by the efficacy of infliximab in severe sarcoidosis. Tregs express TNF receptor 2 (TNFR2) highly. Here, we examined the influence of infliximab therapy on Tregs and (soluble) TNFR2 levels in sarcoidosis, and correlated these with response to therapy. We observed that relative frequencies of Tregs were significantly higher in patients (n = 54) compared to healthy controls (n = 26; median 6·73 versus 4·36%; P < 0·001) and decreased following therapy (4·95; P < 0·001). Baseline TNFR2 expression on Tregs was increased significantly in patients versus controls (99·4 versus 96·2%; P = 0·031), and also in responders to therapy versus non-responders (99·6 versus 97·3%; P = 0·012). Furthermore, baseline soluble TNFR2 (sTNFR2) was higher in responders than in non-responders (mean 174 versus 107 pg/ml; P = 0·015). After treatment, responders showed a significant reduction in sTNFR2 levels in peripheral blood (-44·7 pg/ml; P < 0·001), in contrast to non-responders (+3·59 pg/ml). Our results demonstrated that Treg frequencies and TNFR2 expression on Tregs are increased in sarcoidosis, followed by a decline during infliximab therapy, suggesting a pathophysiological role of this T cell subset. Interestingly, sTNFR2 levels at baseline differed significantly between responders and non-responders, making it a potential marker in predicting which patients might benefit from infliximab.

  14. The Presence and Preferential Activation of Regulatory T Cells Diminish Adoptive Transfer of Autoimmune Diabetes by Polyclonal Nonobese Diabetic (NOD) T Cell Effectors into NSG versus NOD-scid Mice.

    PubMed

    Presa, Maximiliano; Chen, Yi-Guang; Grier, Alexandra E; Leiter, Edward H; Brehm, Michael A; Greiner, Dale L; Shultz, Leonard D; Serreze, David V

    2015-10-01

    NOD-scid.Il2rg(null) (NSG) mice are currently being used as recipients to screen for pathogenic autoreactive T cells in type 1 diabetes (T1D) patients. We questioned whether the restriction of IL-2R γ-chain (Il-2rγ)-dependent cytokine signaling only to donor cells in NSG recipients differently influenced the activities of transferred diabetogenic T cells when they were introduced as a monoclonal/oligoclonal population versus being part of a polyclonal repertoire. Unexpectedly, a significantly decreased T1D transfer by splenocytes from prediabetic NOD donors was observed in Il-2rγ(null)-NSG versus Il-2rγ-intact standard NOD-scid recipients. In contrast, NOD-derived monoclonal/oligoclonal TCR transgenic β cell-autoreactive T cells in either the CD8 (AI4, NY8.3) or CD4 (BDC2.5) compartments transferred disease significantly more rapidly to NSG than to NOD-scid recipients. The reduced diabetes transfer efficiency by polyclonal T cells in NSG recipients was associated with enhanced activation of regulatory T cells (Tregs) mediated by NSG myeloid APC. This enhanced suppressor activity was associated with higher levels of Treg GITR expression in the presence of NSG than NOD-scid APC. These collective results indicate NSG recipients might be efficiently employed to test the activity of T1D patient-derived β cell-autoreactive T cell clones and lines, but, when screening for pathogenic effectors within polyclonal populations, Tregs should be removed from the transfer inoculum to avoid false-negative results.

  15. CD8+ T Cells Specific to Apoptosis-Associated Antigens Predict the Response to Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitor Therapy in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Citro, Alessandra; Scrivo, Rossana; Martini, Helene; Martire, Carmela; De Marzio, Paolo; Vestri, Anna Rita; Sidney, John; Sette, Alessandro; Barnaba, Vincenzo; Valesini, Guido

    2015-01-01

    CD8+ T cells specific to caspase-cleaved antigens derived from apoptotic T cells (apoptotic epitopes) represent a principal player in chronic immune activation, which is known to amplify immunopathology in various inflammatory diseases. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the relationship involving these autoreactive T cells, the rheumatoid arthritis immunopathology, and the response to tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitor therapy. The frequency of autoreactive CD8+ T cells specific to various apoptotic epitopes, as detected by both enzyme-linked immunospot assay and dextramers of major histocompatibility complex class I molecules complexed with relevant apoptotic epitopes, was longitudinally analyzed in the peripheral blood of rheumatoid arthritis patients who were submitted to etanercept treatment (or other tumor necrosis factor inhibitors as a control). The percentage of apoptotic epitope-specific CD8+ T cells was significantly higher in rheumatoid arthritis patients than in healthy donors, and correlated with the disease activity. More important, it was significantly more elevated in responders to tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitor therapy than in non-responders before the start of therapy; it significantly dropped only in the former following therapy. These data indicate that apoptotic epitope-specific CD8+ T cells may be involved in rheumatoid arthritis immunopathology through the production of inflammatory cytokines and that they may potentially represent a predictive biomarker of response to tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitor therapy to validate in a larger cohort of patients. PMID:26061065

  16. Effect of prolonged discontinuation of successful antiretroviral therapy on CD4+ T cell decline in human immunodeficiency virus-infected patients: implications for intermittent therapeutic strategies.

    PubMed

    Tebas, Pablo; Henry, Keith; Mondy, Kristin; Deeks, Steven; Valdez, Herman; Cohen, Cal; Powderly, William G

    2002-09-15

    This study evaluates the change in CD4(+) T cell counts among patients who achieved complete viral suppression and subsequently discontinued highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). We included 72 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1-infected patients with plasma HIV RNA loads of <500 copies/mL for at least 3 months who then discontinued therapy for at least 12 weeks. The median CD4(+) T decay while off HAART was 16 cells/mm(3)/month (interquartile range, -6 to -34 cells/month). The mean follow-up after therapy ended was 45 weeks. The slope of the CD4(+) T cell decay was inversely correlated with the increase of CD4(+) T cells while receiving HAART, baseline virus load, CD4(+) T cell count at the time therapy was discontinued, age, and duration HIV RNA levels were undetectable. In a multiple regression analysis model, the increase of CD4(+) T cells while receiving therapy and age were independently associated with the rate of CD4(+) T cell loss.

  17. Radiation therapy for the management of patients with HTLV-1-associated adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Simone, Charles B; Morris, John C; Stewart, Donn M; Urquhart, Nicole E; Janik, John E; Kreitman, Robert J; Lita, Elena; Conlon, Kevin; Wharfe, Gilian; Waldmann, Thomas A; Kaushal, Aradhana

    2012-08-30

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1-associated adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) typically has survivals measured in months with chemotherapy. One prior published series (1983-1991) assessed local radiotherapy for ATL. Ten consecutive patients with pathologically confirmed ATL treated with radiotherapy were reviewed. Subtypes included acute (n = 7), smoldering (n = 2), and lymphomatous (n = 1). Patients received an average of 2.5 systemic therapy regimens before radiotherapy. Twenty lesions (cutaneous = 10, nodal = 8, extranodal = 2) were treated to a mean of 35.4 Gy/2-3 Gy (range, 12-60 Gy). At 9.0-month mean follow-up (range, 0.1-42.0 months), all lesions symptomatically and radiographically responded, with in-field complete responses in 40.0% (nodal 37.5% vs. cutaneous 50.0%; P = .62). No patient experienced in-field progression. Nine patients developed new/progressive out-of-field disease. Median survival was 17.0 months (3-year survival, 30.0%). No Radiation Therapy Oncology Group acute grade ≥ 3 or any late toxicity was noted. This report is the first to use modern radiotherapy techniques and finds effective local control across ATL subtypes. Radiotherapy should be considered for symptomatic local progression of ATL.

  18. Gene therapy with human and mouse T-cell receptors mediates cancer regression and targets normal tissues expressing cognate antigen

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Laura A.; Morgan, Richard A.; Dudley, Mark E.; Cassard, Lydie; Yang, James C.; Hughes, Marybeth S.; Kammula, Udai S.; Royal, Richard E.; Sherry, Richard M.; Wunderlich, John R.; Lee, Chyi-Chia R.; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Schwarz, Susan L.; Cogdill, Alexandria P.; Bishop, Rachel J.; Kim, Hung; Brewer, Carmen C.; Rudy, Susan F.; VanWaes, Carter; Davis, Jeremy L.; Mathur, Aarti; Ripley, Robert T.; Nathan, Debbie A.; Laurencot, Carolyn M.

    2009-01-01

    Gene therapy of human cancer using genetically engineered lymphocytes is dependent on the identification of highly reactive T-cell receptors (TCRs) with antitumor activity. We immunized transgenic mice and also conducted high-throughput screening of human lymphocytes to generate TCRs highly reactive to melanoma/melanocyte antigens. Genes encoding these TCRs were engineered into retroviral vectors and used to transduce autologous peripheral lymphocytes administered to 36 patients with metastatic melanoma. Transduced patient lymphocytes were CD45RA− and CD45RO+ after ex vivo expansion. After infusion, the persisting cells displayed a CD45RA+ and CD45RO− phenotype. Gene-engineered cells persisted at high levels in the blood of all patients 1 month after treatment, responding patients with higher ex vivo antitumor reactivity than nonresponders. Objective cancer regressions were seen in 30% and 19% of patients who received the human or mouse TCR, respectively. However, patients exhibited destruction of normal melanocytes in the skin, eye, and ear, and sometimes required local steroid administration to treat uveitis and hearing loss. Thus, T cells expressing highly reactive TCRs mediate cancer regression in humans and target rare cognate–antigen-containing cells throughout the body, a finding with important implications for the gene therapy of cancer. This trial was registered at www.ClinicalTrials.gov as NCI-07-C-0174 and NCI-07-C-0175. PMID:19451549

  19. NK Cell and CD4+FoxP3+ Regulatory T Cell Based Therapies for Hematopoietic Stem Cell Engraftment

    PubMed Central

    Pierini, Antonio; Alvarez, Maite; Negrin, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    Allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is a powerful therapy to treat multiple hematological diseases. The intensive conditioning regimens used to allow for donor hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) engraftment are often associated with severe toxicity, delayed immune reconstitution, life-threatening infections, and thus higher relapse rates. Additionally, due to the high incidence of graft versus host disease (GvHD), HCT protocols have evolved to prevent such disease that has a detrimental impact on antitumor and antiviral responses. Here, we analyzed the role of host T and natural killer (NK) cells in the rejection of donor HSC engraftment as well as the impact of donor regulatory T cells (Treg) and NK cells on HSC engraftment. We review some of the current strategies that utilize NK or Treg to improve allogeneic HCT therapy in order to accomplish better HSC engraftment and immune reconstitution and achieve a lower incidence of cancer relapse, opportunistic infections, and GvHD. PMID:26880996

  20. Monitoring Pc 4 photodynamic therapy in clinical trials of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma using noninvasive spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tammy K; Baron, Elma D; Foster, Thomas H

    2008-01-01

    Silicon phthalocyanine Pc 4 photodynamic therapy (Pc 4-PDT) has emerged as a potentially effective treatment for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL). Noninvasive reflectance and fluorescence spectroscopy before, during, and after PDT may provide useful dose metrics and enable therapy to be tailored to individual lesions. We present the design and implementation of a portable bedside spectroscopy system for initial clinical trials of Pc 4-PDT of CTCL. Reflectance and fluorescence spectra were obtained from an early stage CTCL patient throughout the course of the PDT treatment. Preliminary patient data show a significant effect of Pc 4 on the tissue absorption, modest Pc 4 photobleaching, and heterogeneity of Pc 4 within and between the lesions.

  1. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-directed adoptive immunotherapy: a new era in targeted cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yamei; Liu, Delong

    2014-01-01

    As a result of the recent advances in molecular immunology, virology, genetics, and cell processing, chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-directed cancer therapy has finally arrived for clinical application. CAR-directed adoptive immunotherapy represents a novel form of gene therapy, cellular therapy, and immunotherapy, a combination of three in one. Early phase clinical trial was reported in patients with refractory chronic lymphoid leukemia with 17p deletion. Accompanying the cytokine storm and tumor lysis syndrome was the shocking disappearance of the leukemia cells refractory to chemotherapy and monoclonal antibodies. CAR therapy was reproduced in both children and adults with refractory acute lymphoid leukemia. The CAR technology is being explored for solid tumor therapy, such as glioma. Close to 30 clinical trials are underway in the related fields (www.clinicaltrials.gov). Further improvement in gene targeting, cell expansion, delivery constructs (such as using Sleeping Beauty or Piggyback transposons) will undoubtedly enhance clinical utility. It is foreseeable that CAR-engineered T cell therapy will bring targeted cancer therapy into a new era.

  2. Long-term Survival and Clinical Benefit from Adoptive T-cell Transfer in Stage IV Melanoma Patients Is Determined by a Four-Parameter Tumor Immune Signature.

    PubMed

    Melief, Sara M; Visconti, Valeria V; Visser, Marten; van Diepen, Merel; Kapiteijn, Ellen H W; van den Berg, Joost H; Haanen, John B A G; Smit, Vincent T H B M; Oosting, Jan; van der Burg, Sjoerd H; Verdegaal, Els M E

    2017-02-01

    The presence of tumor-infiltrating immune cells is associated with longer survival and a better response to immunotherapy in early-stage melanoma, but a comprehensive study of the in situ immune microenvironment in stage IV melanoma has not been performed. We investigated the combined influence of a series of immune factors on survival and response to adoptive cell transfer (ACT) in stage IV melanoma patients. Metastases of 73 stage IV melanoma patients, 17 of which were treated with ACT, were studied with respect to the number and functional phenotype of lymphocytes and myeloid cells as well as for expression of galectins-1, -3, and -9. Single factors associated with better survival were identified using Kaplan-Meier curves and multivariate Cox regression analyses, and those factors were used for interaction analyses. The results were validated using The Cancer Genome Atlas database. We identified four parameters that were associated with a better survival: CD8(+) T cells, galectin-9(+) dendritic cells (DC)/DC-like macrophages, a high M1/M2 macrophage ratio, and the expression of galectin-3 by tumor cells. The presence of at least three of these parameters formed an independent positive prognostic factor for long-term survival. Patients displaying this four-parameter signature were found exclusively among patients responding to ACT and were the ones with sustained clinical benefit. Cancer Immunol Res; 5(2); 170-9. ©2017 AACR.

  3. Lenalidomide consolidation and maintenance therapy after autologous stem cell transplant for multiple myeloma induces persistent changes in T-cell homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Clave, Emmanuel; Douay, Corinne; Coman, Tereza; Busson, Marc; Bompoint, Caroline; Moins-Teisserenc, Helene; Glauzy, Salomé; Carmagnat, Maryvonnick; Gorin, Norbert Claude; Toubert, Antoine; Garderet, Laurent

    2014-08-01

    Whether the efficacy of lenalidomide in the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM) is due to direct tumor toxicity only or to additional immunomodulatory effects is unclear. We studied the effect of lenalidomide treatment on T-cell immune reconstitution in patients with MM who had undergone autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplant (ASCT). Twenty-nine newly diagnosed patients with MM received induction therapy followed by high-dose melphalan and ASCT. After ASCT, 11 patients received lenalidomide consolidation therapy for 2 months followed by maintenance therapy until disease progression. The remaining 18 patients received no treatment. Serial analysis of thymic output, as given by numbers of T-cell receptor excision circles (sjTRECs), and T-cell phenotyping was performed until 18 months post-ASCT. Lenalidomide impaired long-term thymic T-cell reconstitution, decreased CD4 + and CD8 + CD45RA + CCR7 - effector-terminal T-cell absolute counts and increased CD4 + CD25 + CD127 - /low regulatory T-cells. Lenalidomide consolidation and long-term maintenance therapy, administered post-ASCT, may have a potentially negative impact on immune surveillance.

  4. A new approach to gene therapy using Sleeping Beauty to genetically modify clinical-grade T cells to target CD19.

    PubMed

    Singh, Harjeet; Huls, Helen; Kebriaei, Partow; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2014-01-01

    The advent of efficient approaches to the genetic modification of T cells has provided investigators with clinically appealing methods to improve the potency of tumor-specific clinical grade T cells. For example, gene therapy has been successfully used to enforce expression of chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) that provide T cells with ability to directly recognize tumor-associated antigens without the need for presentation by human leukocyte antigen. Gene transfer of CARs can be undertaken using viral-based and non-viral approaches. We have advanced DNA vectors derived from the Sleeping Beauty (SB) system to avoid the expense and manufacturing difficulty associated with transducing T cells with recombinant viral vectors. After electroporation, the transposon/transposase improves the efficiency of integration of plasmids used to express CAR and other transgenes in T cells. The SB system combined with artificial antigen-presenting cells (aAPC) can selectively propagate and thus retrieve CAR(+) T cells suitable for human application. This review describes the translation of the SB system and aAPC for use in clinical trials and highlights how a nimble and cost-effective approach to developing genetically modified T cells can be used to implement clinical trials infusing next-generation T cells with improved therapeutic potential.

  5. Exploring the mode of action of dithranol therapy for psoriasis: a metabolomic analysis using HaCaT cells.

    PubMed

    Hollywood, Katherine A; Winder, Catherine L; Dunn, Warwick B; Xu, Yun; Broadhurst, David; Griffiths, Christopher E M; Goodacre, Royston

    2015-08-01

    Psoriasis is a common, immune-mediated inflammatory skin disease characterized by red, heavily scaled plaques. The disease affects over one million people in the UK and causes significant physical, psychological and societal impact. There is limited understanding regarding the exact pathogenesis of the disease although it is believed to be a consequence of genetic predisposition and environmental triggers. Treatments vary from topical therapies, such as dithranol, for disease of limited extent (<5% body surface area) to the new immune-targeted biologic therapies for severe psoriasis. Dithranol (also known as anthralin) is a topical therapy for psoriasis believed to work by inhibiting keratinocyte proliferation. To date there have been no metabolomic-based investigations into psoriasis. The HaCaT cell line is a model system for the epidermal keratinocyte proliferation characteristic of psoriasis and was thus chosen for study. Dithranol was applied at therapeutically relevant doses to HaCaT cells. Following the optimisation of enzyme inactivation and metabolite extraction, gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was employed for metabolomics as this addresses central metabolism. Cells were challenged with 0-0.5 μg mL(-1) in 0.1 μg mL(-1) steps and this quantitative perturbation generated data that were highly amenable to correlation analysis. Thus, we used a combination of traditional principal components analysis, hierarchical cluster analysis, along with correlation networks. All methods highlighted distinct metabolite groups, which had different metabolite trajectories with respect to drug concentration and the interpretation of these data established that cellular metabolism had been altered significantly and provided further clarification of the proposed mechanism of action of the drug.

  6. TCR repertoires of intratumoral T-cell subsets.

    PubMed

    Linnemann, Carsten; Mezzadra, Riccardo; Schumacher, Ton N M

    2014-01-01

    The infiltration of human tumors by T cells is a common phenomenon, and over the past decades, it has become increasingly clear that the nature of such intratumoral T-cell populations can predict disease course. Furthermore, intratumoral T cells have been utilized therapeutically in clinical studies of adoptive T-cell therapy. In this review, we describe how novel methods that are either based on T-cell receptor (TCR) sequencing or on cancer exome analysis allow the analysis of the tumor reactivity and antigen-specificity of the intratumoral TCR repertoire with unprecedented detail. Furthermore, we discuss studies that have started to utilize these techniques to probe the link between cancer exomes and the intratumoral TCR pool. Based on the observation that both the cancer epitope repertoire and intratumoral TCR repertoire appear highly individual, we outline strategies, such as 'autologous TCR gene therapy', that exploit the tumor-resident TCR repertoire for the development of personalized immunotherapy.

  7. The Media Adoption Stage Model of Technology for Art Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Brent Christian

    2010-01-01

    This study examined survey data from professional credentialed members of the American Art Therapy Association and 8 follow up interviews to determine how art therapists adopt or reject technology and/or new digital media for therapeutic use with their clients. Using Rogers's (2003) "diffusion of innovation" model, the author identified a…

  8. Intestinal Parasitosis in Relation to Anti-Retroviral Therapy, CD4(+) T-cell Count and Diarrhea in HIV Patients.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Shehla; Mirdha, Bijay Ranjan; Sinha, Sanjeev; Panda, Ashutosh; Singh, Yogita; Joseph, Anju; Deb, Manorama

    2015-12-01

    Intestinal parasitic infections are one of the major causes of diarrhea in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seropositive individuals. Antiretroviral therapy has markedly reduced the incidence of many opportunistic infections, but parasite-related diarrhea still remains frequent and often underestimated especially in developing countries. The present hospital-based study was conducted to determine the spectrum of intestinal parasitosis in adult HIV/AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) patients with or without diarrhea with the levels of CD4(+) T-cell counts. A total of 400 individuals were enrolled and were screened for intestinal parasitosis. Of these study population, 200 were HIV seropositives, and the remaining 200 were HIV uninfected individuals with or without diarrhea. Intestinal parasites were identified by using microscopy as well as PCR assay. A total of 130 (32.5%) out of 400 patients were positive for any kinds of intestinal parasites. The cumulative number of parasite positive patients was 152 due to multiple infections. A significant association of Cryptosporidium (P<0.001) was detected among individuals with CD4(+) T-cell counts less than 200 cells/μl.

  9. Intestinal Parasitosis in Relation to Anti-Retroviral Therapy, CD4+ T-cell Count and Diarrhea in HIV Patients

    PubMed Central

    Khalil, Shehla; Mirdha, Bijay Ranjan; Sinha, Sanjeev; Panda, Ashutosh; Singh, Yogita; Joseph, Anju; Deb, Manorama

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal parasitic infections are one of the major causes of diarrhea in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) seropositive individuals. Antiretroviral therapy has markedly reduced the incidence of many opportunistic infections, but parasite-related diarrhea still remains frequent and often underestimated especially in developing countries. The present hospital-based study was conducted to determine the spectrum of intestinal parasitosis in adult HIV/AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome) patients with or without diarrhea with the levels of CD4+ T-cell counts. A total of 400 individuals were enrolled and were screened for intestinal parasitosis. Of these study population, 200 were HIV seropositives, and the remaining 200 were HIV uninfected individuals with or without diarrhea. Intestinal parasites were identified by using microscopy as well as PCR assay. A total of 130 (32.5%) out of 400 patients were positive for any kinds of intestinal parasites. The cumulative number of parasite positive patients was 152 due to multiple infections. A significant association of Cryptosporidium (P<0.001) was detected among individuals with CD4+ T-cell counts less than 200 cells/μl. PMID:26797437

  10. Induction of apoptosis in HaCaT cells by photodynamic therapy with chlorin e6 or pheophorbide a.

    PubMed

    Radestock, A; Elsner, P; Gitter, B; Hipler, U-C

    2007-01-01

    The two photosensitizers, chlorin e6 and pheophorbide a, were tested in an in vitro model of topical photodynamic therapy (PDT). Both dyes accumulate in HaCaT keratinocytes as verified by fluorescence measurement but pheophorbide a is enriched fivefold more strongly than chlorin e6 after 24 h. HaCaT cells are susceptible to PDT with both dyes. The phototoxicity measured by ATP bioluminescence is caused by necrosis and apoptosis depending on the photosensitizer used and the treatment modality. Chlorin e6 shows higher toxic potential because it elicits nearly 90% cell mortality 24 h after PDT comparable to pheophorbide a but with a fivefold lower rate of accumulation. These results implicate caution with topical PDT of oncologic diseases due to the risk of serious side effects on healthy skin in the course of topical photodynamic treatment. But the lack of dark toxicity and the time-dependent enrichment of both dyes in HaCaT cells are arguments for the application of these sensitizers in topical PDT of non-malign skin disorders. Further studies are necessary to discover appropriate lower doses and mechanisms of action of topical PDT with both compounds.

  11. T Cells

    MedlinePlus

    ... Definition of MS Myelin Immune-Mediated Disease T Cells d What Causes MS? Disproved Theories Viruses Clusters d Who Gets MS? Pediatric MS ... the progression of MS, without harming any immune cells that are not involved in the process of myelin destruction. Share Smaller ... More Immune-Mediated Disease Learn More Myelin ...

  12. Requirements for effective antitumor responses of TCR transduced T cells.

    PubMed

    de Witte, Moniek A; Jorritsma, Annelies; Kaiser, Andrew; van den Boom, Marly D; Dokter, Maarten; Bendle, Gavin M; Haanen, John B A G; Schumacher, Ton N M

    2008-10-01

    Adoptive transfer of TCR gene-modified T cells has been proposed as an attractive approach to target tumors for which it is difficult or impossible to induce strong tumor-specific T cell responses by vaccination. Whereas the feasibility of generating tumor Ag-specific T cells by gene transfer has been demonstrated, the factors that determine the in vivo effectiveness of TCR-modified T cells are largely unknown. We have analyzed the value of a number of clinically feasible strategies to enhance the antitumor potential of TCR modified T cells. These experiments reveal three factors that contribute greatly to the in vivo potency of TCR-modified T cells. First, irradiation-induced host conditioning is superior to vaccine-induced activation of genetically modified T cells. Second, increasing TCR expression through genetic optimization of TCR sequences has a profound effect on in vivo antitumor activity. Third, a high precursor frequency of TCR modified T cells within the graft is essential. Tumors that ultimately progress in animals treated with this optimized regimen for TCR-based adoptive cell transfer invariably display a reduced expression of the target Ag. This suggests TCR gene therapy can achieve a sufficiently strong selective pressure to warrant the simultaneous targeting of multiple Ags. The strategies outlined in this study should be of value to enhance the antitumor activity of TCR-modified T cells in clinical trials.

  13. Associations of T cell activation and inflammatory biomarkers with virological response to darunavir/ritonavir plus raltegravir therapy

    PubMed Central

    Taiwo, Babafemi; Matining, Roy M.; Zheng, Lu; Lederman, Michael M.; Rinaldo, Charles R.; Kim, Peter S.; Berzins, Baiba I.; Kuritzkes, Daniel R.; Jennings, Amy; Eron, Joseph J.; Wilson, Cara C.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives One of the goals of antiretroviral therapy (ART) is to attenuate HIV-induced systemic immune activation and inflammation. We determined the dynamics of biomarkers of immune activation, microbial translocation and inflammation during initial ART with a nucleos(t)ide-sparing regimen of darunavir/ritonavir plus raltegravir. We also evaluated associations between these biomarkers and the virological response to the regimen. Methods We determined baseline and week 24 and 48 levels of CD4+ and CD8+ T cell activation (% HLA-DR+/CD38+), interleukin-6 (IL-6), interferon-γ-inducible protein-10 (IP-10), soluble CD14 (sCD14), D-dimer and lipopolysaccharide. Associations between the biomarkers at baseline were assessed using Spearman's rank correlation. The Wilcoxon signed rank test analysed changes from baseline. Comparisons between groups were made using the Wilcoxon rank sum test, and Cox proportional hazards models assessed predictors of virological failure (VF). Results Assays were completed on 107 of 112 subjects after excluding five subjects who had only baseline samples. The subjects included were 94 (88%) men with a median age of 37 years, a median baseline CD4 count of 261.5 cells/mm3 and a median baseline viral load (VL) of 75 876 copies/mL. Subjects with a baseline VL >100 000 copies/mL had higher baseline T cell activation, IL-6, IP-10, sCD14 and D-dimer. These biomarkers declined during treatment (P < 0.05). Although subjects who experienced VF had higher baseline CD4+ T cell activation (P = 0.035), only baseline VL independently predicted VF (hazard ratio for >100 000 versus ≤100 000 copies/mL was 4.5–5.6, P ≤ 0.002). Conclusions Darunavir/ritonavir plus raltegravir attenuated immune activation, inflammation and microbial translocation. T cell activation remained higher in subjects with VF than those without. Baseline VL >100 000 copies/mL remained the primary driver of VF. PMID:23599363

  14. Oligoclonal CD8+ T-cell expansion in patients with chronic hepatitis C is associated with liver pathology and poor response to interferon-alpha therapy.

    PubMed

    Manfras, Burkhard J; Weidenbach, Hans; Beckh, Karl-Heinz; Kern, Peter; Möller, Peter; Adler, Guido; Mertens, Thomas; Boehm, Bernhard O

    2004-05-01

    The role of CD8(+) T lymphocytes in chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and in liver injury with subsequent development of fibrosis and cirrhosis is poorly understood. To address this question, we performed a follow-up study including 27 chronically HCV-infected individuals. We determined clonality and phenotypes of circulating CD8(+) T cells employing TCRBV spectratyping. Antigen specificity was tested by rMHC-peptide tetramer staining and stimulation with recombinant HCV antigens. In addition, T-cell clonality and phenotypes were followed during the variable clinical response of interferon- (IFN) alpha treatment. We could demonstrate that CD8(+) T-cell expansions were significantly associated with liver fibrosis and cirrhosis. Likewise, increased oligoclonality of circulating CD8(+) T cells in chronic HCV infection was identified as an indicator for poor clinical response to IFN-alpha therapy. Moreover, we also found that IFN-alpha therapy enhanced the differentiation of CD8(+) T cells towards a late differentiation phenotype (CD28(-) CD57(+)). In cases of virus elimination the disappearance of expanded terminally differentiated CD8(+) cells was observed. Thus, this study identifies an association of clonal expansions of circulating CD8(+) T cells with liver pathology and provides a possible explanation for the fact that response to IFN-alpha therapy diminishes with the duration of infection.

  15. Automated Enrichment, Transduction, and Expansion of Clinical-Scale CD62L+ T Cells for Manufacturing of Gene Therapy Medicinal Products

    PubMed Central

    Priesner, Christoph; Aleksandrova, Krasimira; Esser, Ruth; Mockel-Tenbrinck, Nadine; Leise, Jana; Drechsel, Katharina; Marburger, Michael; Quaiser, Andrea; Goudeva, Lilia; Arseniev, Lubomir; Kaiser, Andrew D.; Glienke, Wolfgang; Koehl, Ulrike

    2016-01-01

    Multiple clinical studies have demonstrated that adaptive immunotherapy using redirected T cells against advanced cancer has led to promising results with improved patient survival. The continuously increasing interest in those advanced gene therapy medicinal products (GTMPs) leads to a manufacturing challenge regarding automation, process robustness, and cell storage. Therefore, this study addresses the proof of principle in clinical-scale selection, stimulation, transduction, and expansion of T cells using the automated closed CliniMACS® Prodigy system. Naïve and central memory T cells from apheresis products were first immunomagnetically enriched using anti-CD62L magnetic beads and further processed freshly (n = 3) or split for cryopreservation and processed after thawing (n = 1). Starting with 0.5 × 108 purified CD3+ T cells, three mock runs and one run including transduction with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-containing vector resulted in a median final cell product of 16 × 108 T cells (32-fold expansion) up to harvesting after 2 weeks. Expression of CD62L was downregulated on T cells after thawing, which led to the decision to purify CD62L+CD3+ T cells freshly with cryopreservation thereafter. Most important in the split product, a very similar expansion curve was reached comparing the overall freshly CD62L selected cells with those after thawing, which could be demonstrated in the T cell subpopulations as well by showing a nearly identical conversion of the CD4/CD8 ratio. In the GFP run, the transduction efficacy was 83%. In-process control also demonstrated sufficient glucose levels during automated feeding and medium removal. The robustness of the process and the constant quality of the final product in a closed and automated system give rise to improve harmonized manufacturing protocols for engineered T cells in future gene therapy studies. PMID:27562135

  16. Restoration of CD4+ Responses to Copathogens in HIV-Infected Individuals on Antiretroviral Therapy Is Dependent on T Cell Memory Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Riou, Catherine; Tanko, Ramla F; Soares, Andreia P; Masson, Lindi; Werner, Lise; Garrett, Nigel J; Samsunder, Natasha; Abdool Karim, Quarraisha; Abdool Karim, Salim S; Burgers, Wendy A

    2015-09-01

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) induces rapid suppression of viral replication and a progressive replenishment of CD4(+) T cells in HIV-infected individuals. However, the effect of ART on restoring pre-existing memory CD4(+) T cells specific for common copathogens is still unclear. To better understand the dynamics of Ag-specific CD4(+) T cells during ART, we assessed the frequency, functional capacity, and memory profile of CD4(+) T cells specific for Mycobacterium tuberculosis and CMV in 15 HIV-infected individuals before and 1 y after ART initiation. After ART initiation, the frequency of M. tuberculosis-specific CD4(+) T cells showed little change, whereas CMV-specific CD4(+) T cells were significantly lower (p = 0.003). There was no difference in the polyfunctional or memory profile of Ag-specific CD4(+) T cells before and after ART. The replenishment of Ag-specific CD4(+) T cells correlated with the memory differentiation profile of these cells prior to ART. Pathogen-specific CD4(+) T cells exhibiting a late differentiated profile (CD45RO(+)CD27(-)) had a lower capacity to replenish (p = 0.019; r = -0.5) compared with cells with an early differentiated profile (CD45RO(+)CD27(+); p = 0.04; r = 0.45). In conclusion, restoration of copathogen-specific memory CD4(+) T cells during treated HIV infection is related to their memory phenotype, in which early differentiated cells (such as most M. tuberculosis-specific cells) have a higher replenishment capacity compared with late differentiated cells (such as most CMV-specific cells). These data identify an important, hitherto unrecognized, factor that may limit restoration of copathogen immunity in HIV-infected individuals on ART.

  17. Silicon Phthalocyanine 4 and Photodynamic Therapy in Stage IA-IIA Cutaneous T-Cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-12-03

    Recurrent Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Recurrent Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage I Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage IB Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome; Stage II Cutaneous T-cell Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma; Stage IIA Mycosis Fungoides/Sezary Syndrome

  18. Incomplete Reconstitution of T Cell Subsets on Combination Antiretroviral Therapy in the AIDS Clinical Trials Group Protocol 384

    PubMed Central

    Robbins, Gregory K.; Spritzler, John G.; Chan, Ellen S.; Asmuth, David M.; Gandhi, Rajesh T.; Rodriguez, Benigno A.; Skowron, Gail; Skolnik, Paul R.; Shafer, Robert W.; Pollard, Richard B.

    2009-01-01

    Background Initiation of combination antiretroviral therapy (ART) results in higher total CD4 cell counts, a surrogate for immune reconstitution. Whether the baseline CD4 cell count affects reconstitution of immune cell subsets has not been well characterized. Methods Using data from 978 patients (621 with comprehensive immunological assessments) from the AIDS [Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome] Clinical Trials Group protocol 384, a randomized trial of initial ART, we compared reconstitution of CD4+, CD4+ naive and memory, CD4+ activation, CD8+, CD8+ activation, B, and natural killer cells among patients in different baseline CD4+ strata. Reference ranges for T cell populations in control patients negative for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection were calculated using data from AIDS Clinical Trials Group protocol A5113. Results Patients in the lower baseline CD4+ strata did not achieve total CD4+ cell counts similar to those of patients in the higher strata during 144 weeks of ART, although CD4+ cell count increases were similar. Ratios of CD4+ naive-memory cell counts and CD4+:CD8+ cell counts remained significantly reduced in patients with lower baseline CD4+ cell counts (≤350 cells/mm3). These immune imbalances were most notable for those initiating ART with a baseline CD4+ cell count ≤200 cells/mm3, even after adjustment for baseline plasma HIV RNA levels. Conclusions After nearly 3 years of ART, T cell subsets in patients with baseline CD4+ cell counts >350 cells/mm3 achieved or approached the reference range those of control individuals without HIV infection. In contrast, patients who began ART with ≤350 CD4+ cells/mm3 generally did not regain normal CD4+ naive-memory cell ratios. These results support current guidelines to start ART at a threshold of 350 cells/mm3 and suggest that there may be immunological benefits associated with initiating therapy at even higher CD4+ cell counts. PMID:19123865

  19. Planes, Trains, and Automobiles: Perspectives on CAR T Cells and Other Cellular Therapies for Hematologic Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Gill, Saar

    2016-08-01

    Hematologic oncologists now have at their disposal (or a referral away) a myriad of new options to get from point A (a patient with relapsed or poor-risk disease) to point B (potential tumor eradication and long-term disease-free survival). In this perspective piece, we discuss the putative mechanisms of action and the relative strengths and weaknesses of currently available cellular therapy approaches. Notably, while many of these approaches have been published in high impact journals, with the exception of allogeneic stem cell transplantation and of checkpoint inhibitors (PD1/PDL1 or CTLA4 blockade), the published clinical trials have mostly been early phase, uncontrolled studies. Therefore, many of the new cellular therapy approaches have yet to demonstrate incontrovertible evidence of enhanced overall survival compared with controls. Nonetheless, the science behind these is sure to advance our understanding of cancer immunology and ultimately to bring us closer to our goal of curing cancer.

  20. Autoimmune B-cell lymphopenia after successful adoptive therapy with telomerase-specific T lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Ugel, Stefano; Scarselli, Elisa; Iezzi, Manuela; Mennuni, Carmela; Pannellini, Tania; Calvaruso, Francesco; Cipriani, Barbara; De Palma, Raffaele; Ricci-Vitiani, Lucia; Peranzoni, Elisa; Musiani, Piero; Zanovello, Paola; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2010-02-18

    Telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) is a good candidate for cancer immunotherapy because it is overexpressed in 85% of all human tumors and implicated in maintenance of the transformed phenotype. TERT-based cancer vaccines have been shown to be safe, not inducing any immune-related pathology, but their impact on tumor progression is modest. Here we show that adoptive cell therapy with the use of high-avidity T lymphocytes reactive against telomerase can control the growth of different established tumors. Moreover, in transgenic adenocarcinoma mouse prostate mice, which develop prostate cancer, TERT-based adoptive cell therapy halted the progression to more aggressive and poorly differentiated tumors, significantly prolonging mouse survival. We also demonstrated that human tumors, including Burkitt lymphoma, and human cancer stem cells, are targeted in vivo by TERT-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Effective therapy with T cells against telomerase, different from active vaccination, however, led to autoimmunity marked by a consistent, although transient, B-cell depletion in primary and secondary lymphoid organs, associated with alteration of the spleen cytoarchitecture. These results indicate B cells as an in vivo target of TERT-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes during successful immunotherapy.

  1. Circulating T-cell subsets in Graves' disease: differences between patients with active disease and in remission after /sup 131/I-therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Canonica, G.W.; Bagnasco, M.; Ferrini, S.; Biassoni, P.; Giordano, G.; Corte, G.

    1983-08-01

    In the present investigation some surface markers in peripheral blood T lymphocytes of patients with active Graves' disease and subjects in remission after /sup 131/I-therapy have been studied. We confirmed low TG levels in untreated patients and normal values in treated subjects. Increased percentages of DR+, MLR4+ (activated T cells), and 5/9+ (inducer-helper) T cells were detected in patients with active disease, thus indicating the presence of activated T cells and suggesting increased levels of helper T cells. High percentages of MLR4+ and 5/9+, but normal levels of DR+ were found in /sup 131/I-treated subjects. The different distribution of DR and MLR4 positivities on 5/9+ and 5+9-T cells confirm the different meaning of these two markers of the activation state. The imbalance of T-cell subsets found in /sup 131/I-treated subjects and the normal values observed in patients with hyperthyroidism due to toxic adenoma indicate that hyperthyroidism per se is not sufficient to explain the T-cell alterations. The possible meaning of these findings is discussed with respect to previous hypotheses on the pathogenesis of Graves' disease.

  2. Preventing stem cell transplantation-associated viral infections using T-cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Tzannou, Ifigeneia; Leen, Ann M

    2015-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the treatment of choice for many hematologic malignancies and genetic diseases. However, viral infections continue to account for substantial post-transplant morbidity and mortality. While antiviral drugs are available against some viruses, they are associated with significant side effects and are frequently ineffective. This review focuses on the immunotherapeutic strategies that have been used to prevent and treat infections over the past 20 years and outlines different refinements that have been introduced with the goal of moving this therapy beyond specialized academic centers.

  3. Influence of antiretroviral therapy on programmed death-1 (CD279) expression on T cells in lymph nodes of human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Ehrhard, Simone; Wernli, Marion; Dürmüller, Ursula; Battegay, Manuel; Gudat, Fred; Erb, Peter

    2009-10-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus infection leads to T-cell exhaustion and involution of lymphoid tissue. Recently, the programmed death-1 pathway was found to be crucial for virus-specific T-cell exhaustion during human immunodeficiency virus infection. Programmed death-1 expression was elevated on human immunodeficiency virus-specific peripheral blood CD8+ and CD4+ T cells and correlated with disease severity. During human immunodeficiency infection, lymphoid tissue acts as a major viral reservoir and is an important site for viral replication, but it is also essential for regulatory processes important for immune recovery. We compared programmed death-1 expression in 2 consecutive inguinal lymph nodes of 14 patients, excised before antiretroviral therapy (antiretroviral therapy as of 1997-1999) and 16 to 20 months under antiretroviral therapy. In analogy to lymph nodes of human immunodeficiency virus-negative individuals, in all treated patients, the germinal center area decreased, whereas the number of germinal centers did not significantly change. Programmed death-1 expression was mostly found in germinal centers. The absolute extent of programmed death 1 expression per section was not significantly altered after antiretroviral therapy resulting in a significant-relative increase of programmed death 1 per shrunken germinal center. In colocalization studies, CD45R0+ cells that include helper/inducer T cells strongly expressed programmed death-1 before and during therapy, whereas CD8+ T cells, fewer in numbers, showed a weak expression for programmed death-1. Thus, although antiretroviral therapy seems to reduce the number of programmed death-1-positive CD8+ T lymphocytes within germinal centers, it does not down-regulate programmed death-1 expression on the helper/inducer T-cell subset that may remain exhausted and therefore unable to trigger immune recovery.

  4. Adoption

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Adoption KidsHealth > For Teens > Adoption Print A A A ... of Adoption en español La adopción What Is Adoption? Caz knew she'd been adopted as a ...

  5. Preservation of Antigen-Specific Functions of αβ T Cells and B Cells Removed from Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplants Suggests Their Use As an Alternative Cell Source for Advanced Manipulation and Adoptive Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Li Pira, Giuseppina; Di Cecca, Stefano; Biagini, Simone; Girolami, Elia; Cicchetti, Elisabetta; Bertaina, Valentina; Quintarelli, Concetta; Caruana, Ignazio; Lucarelli, Barbarella; Merli, Pietro; Pagliara, Daria; Brescia, Letizia Pomponia; Bertaina, Alice; Montanari, Mauro; Locatelli, Franco

    2017-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is standard therapy for numerous hematological diseases. The use of haploidentical donors, sharing half of the HLA alleles with the recipient, has facilitated the use of this procedure as patients can rely on availability of a haploidentical donor within their family. Since HLA disparity increases the risk of graft-versus-host disease, T-cell depletion has been used to remove alloreactive lymphocytes from the graft. Selective removal of αβ T cells, which encompass the alloreactive repertoire, combined with removal of B cells to prevent EBV-related lymphoproliferative disease, proved safe and effective in clinical studies. Depleted αβ T cells and B cells are generally discarded as by-products. Considering the possible use of donor T cells for donor lymphocyte infusions or for generation of pathogen-specific T cells as mediators of graft-versus-infection effect, we tested whether cells in the discarded fractions were functionally intact. Response to alloantigens and to viral antigens comparable to that of unmanipulated cells indicated a functional integrity of αβ T cells, in spite of the manipulation used for their depletion. Furthermore, B cells proved to be efficient antigen-presenting cells, indicating that antigen uptake, processing, and presentation were fully preserved. Therefore, we propose that separated αβ T lymphocytes could be employed for obtaining pathogen-specific T cells, applying available methods for positive selection, which eventually leads to indirect allodepletion. In addition, these functional T cells could undergo additional manipulation, such as direct allodepletion or genetic modification. PMID:28386262

  6. Association of Serum Albumin Concentration With Mortality, Morbidity, CD4 T-cell Reconstitution Among Tanzanians Initiating Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Sudfeld, Christopher R.; Isanaka, Sheila; Aboud, Said; Mugusi, Ferdinand M.; Wang, Molin; Chalamilla, Guerino E.; Fawzi, Wafaie W.

    2013-01-01

    Background. Prospective studies of serum albumin concentration measurement as a low-cost predictor of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) disease progression are needed for individuals initiating antiretroviral therapy (ART) in resource-limited settings. Methods. Serum albumin concentration was measured at ART initiation for 2145 adults in Tanzania who were enrolled in a trial examining the effect of multivitamins on HIV disease progression. Participants were prospectively followed for mortality, morbidity, and anthropometric outcomes at monthly visits (median follow-up duration, 21.2 months). Proportional hazard models were used to analyze mortality, morbidity, and nutritional outcomes, while generalized estimating equations were used to analyze CD4+ T-cell counts. Results. Individuals with hypoalbuminemia (defined as a serum albumin concentration of <35 g/L) at ART initiation had a hazard of death that was 4.52 times (95% confidence interval, 3.37–6.07; P < .001) that of individuals with serum albumin concentrations of ≥35 g/L, after multivariate adjustment. Hypoalbuminemia was also independently associated with the incidence of pulmonary tuberculosis (P < .001), severe anemia (P < .001), wasting (P = .002), and >10% weight loss (P = .012). Secondary analyses suggested that serum albumin concentrations of <38 g/L were associated with increased mortality and incident pulmonary tuberculosis. There was no association between serum albumin concentration and changes in CD4+ T-cell counts (P = .121). Conclusions. Serum albumin concentrations can identify adults initiating ART who are at high risk for mortality and selected morbidities. Future research is needed to identify and manage conditions that reduce the serum albumin concentration. PMID:23319741

  7. Does thyroidectomy, radioactive iodine therapy, or antithyroid drug treatment alter reactivity of patients` T cells to epitopes of thyrotropin receptor in autoimmune thyroid diseases?

    SciTech Connect

    Soliman, M.; Kaplan, E.; Abdel-Latif, A.

    1995-08-01

    The effect of treatment on thyroid antibody production and T cell reactivity to thyroid antigens was studied in 15 patients with Graves` disease (GD) before and after thyroidectomy, 19 patients with GD before and after radioactive iodine (RAI) therapy, and 9 patients maintained euthyroid on antithyroid drugs (ATD). In GD patients, the responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and TSH receptor (TSHR)-specific T cell lines to recombinant human TSHR extracellular domain, thyroglobulin, and TSHR peptides were examined on the day of surgery or RAI therapy (day 0) and also 6-8 weeks and 3-6 months thereafter. Reactivity to TSHR peptides before surgery was heterogeneous and spanned the entire extracellular domain. Six to 8 weeks after subtotal thyroidectomy, the number of patients` PBMC responding to any peptide and the average number of recognized peptides decreased. A further decrease in the T cell reactivity to TSHR peptides was observed 3-6 months after surgery. The responses of PBMC from Graves` patients before RAI therapy were less than those in the presurgical group. Six to 8 weeks after RAI therapy, the number of patients responding to any peptide and the average number of recognized peptides increased. Three to 6 months after RAI, T cell responses to TSHR peptides were less than those 6-8 weeks after RAI therapy, but still higher than the values on day 0. Responses of PBMC from patients with GD, maintained euthyroid on ATD, were lower than those before surgery or RAI therapy. The reactivity of T cell lines in different groups reflected a pattern similar to PBMC after treatment. TSHR antibody and microsomal antibody levels decreased after surgery, but increased after RAI therapy. The difference in the number of recognized peptides by patients` PBMC before RAI and surgery may reflect the effect of long term therapy with ATD in the patients before RAI vs. the shorter period in patients before surgery. 38 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs.

  8. A phase I clinical trial of adoptive transfer of folate receptor-alpha redirected autologous T cells for recurrent ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Purpose In spite of increased rates of complete response to initial chemotherapy, most patients with advanced ovarian cancer relapse and succumb to progressive disease. Rationale Genetically reprogrammed, patient-derived chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-T lymphocytes with the ability to recognize predefined surface antigens with high specificity in a non-MHC restricted manner have shown increasing anti-tumor efficacy in preclinical and clinical studies. Folate receptor-α (FRα) is an ovarian cancer-specific tumor target; however, it is expressed at low levels in certain organs with risk for toxicity. Design Here we propose a phase I study testing the feasibility, safety and preliminary activity of FRα-redirected CAR-T cells bearing the CD137 (4-1BB) costimulatory domain, administered after lymphodepletion for the treatment of recurrent ovarian cancer. A novel trial design is proposed that maximizes safety features. Innovation This design involves an initial accelerated dose escalation phase of FR-α CAR-T cells followed by a standard 3 + 3 escalation phase. A split-dose approach is proposed to mitigate acute adverse events. Furthermore, infusion of bulk untransduced autologous peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) is proposed two days after CAR-T cell infusion at the lower dose levels of CAR-T cells, to suppress excessive expansion of CAR-T cells in vivo and mitigate toxicity. PMID:22863016

  9. Phase I/II study of adoptive transfer of γδ T cells in combination with zoledronic acid and IL-2 to patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Hirohito; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Yagi, Junji; Minato, Nagahiro; Tanabe, Kazunari

    2011-08-01

    Human Vγ2 Vδ2-bearing T cells have recently received much attention in cancer immunotherapy. In this study, we conducted a phase I/II clinical trial of the adoptive transfer of γδ T cells to patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma. Eleven patients who had undergone nephrectomy and had lung metastasis were enrolled. Peripheral blood γδ T cells obtained from the patients were stimulated ex vivo with 2-methyl-3-butenyl-1-pyrophosphate (2M3B1PP), a synthetic pyrophosphomonoester antigen, and transferred in combination with zoledronic acid (Zol) and teceleukin (recombinant human interleukin-2). Expanded γδ T cells exhibited potent cytotoxic activity against tumor cells in vitro, and the proportion of peripheral blood γδ T cells among CD3(+) cells typically peaked three to 5 days after transfer. Tumor doubling time was prolonged in all 11 patients, and the best overall responses were 1 CR, 5 SD, and 5 PD, as defined based on Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST). Although ten patients developed adverse reactions of grade ≥3, they were likely to have been the result of the concomitant infusion of Zol and IL-2, and most symptoms swiftly reverted to normal during the course of treatment. In conclusion, this clinical trial demonstrated that our regimen for the adoptive transfer of γδ T cells in combination with Zol and IL-2 was well tolerated and that objective clinical responses could be achieved in some patients with advanced renal cell carcinoma.

  10. Inclusion of Strep-Tag II in design of antigen receptors for T cell immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lingfeng; Sommermeyer, Daniel; Cabanov, Alexandra; Kosasih, Paula; Hill, Tyler; Riddell, Stanley R

    2016-01-01

    The tactical introduction of Strep-tag II into synthetic antigen receptors provides engineered T cells with a marker for identification and rapid purification, and a functional element for selective antibody coated microbead-driven large-scale expansion. Such receptor designs can be applied to chimeric antigen receptors of different ligand specificities and costimulatory domains, and to T cell receptors to facilitate cGMP manufacturing of adoptive T cell therapies to treat cancer and other diseases. PMID:26900664

  11. Adoptive transfer of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells to C57BL/6J mice during acute infection with Toxoplasma gondii down modulates the exacerbated Th1 immune response.

    PubMed

    Olguín, Jonadab E; Fernández, Jacquelina; Salinas, Nohemí; Juárez, Imelda; Rodriguez-Sosa, Miriam; Campuzano, Jaime; Castellanos, Carlos; Saavedra, Rafael

    2015-08-01

    Infection of C57BL/6J mice with the parasite Toxoplasma gondii triggers a powerful Th1 immune response that is detrimental to the host. During acute infection, a reduction in CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Treg) has been reported. We studied the role of Treg during T. gondii infection by adoptive transfer of cells purified from transgenic Foxp3(EGFP) mice to infected wild type animals. We found a less severe weight loss, a significant delayed mortality in infected Treg-transferred mice, and reduced pathology of the small intestine that were associated with lower IFN-γ and TNF-α levels. Nevertheless, higher cyst number and parasite load in brain were observed in these mice. Treg-transferred infected mice showed reduced levels of both IFN-γ and TNF-α in sera. A reduced number of CD4(+) T cells producing IFN-γ was detected in these mice, while IL-2 producing CD4(+) T cells were restored to levels nearly similar to uninfected mice. CD25 and CD69 expression of CD4(+) T cells were also down modulated. Our data show that the low Treg cell number are insufficient to modulate the activation of CD4(+) T cells and the production of high levels of IFN-γ. Thus, a delicate balance between an optimal immune response and its modulation by Treg cells must exist.

  12. [Adoption].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pawl, Jeree, Ed.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue addresses adoption and the young child's life. Contributors suggest ways in which practitioners in many professions and settings can better understand and support adoptive families. The first article, "Adoption, 1990" by Barbara F. Nordhaus and Albert J. Solnit, reviews the history of adoption and notes obstacles to…

  13. Neuropilin-1 expression identifies a subset of regulatory T cells in human lymph nodes that is modulated by preoperative chemoradiation therapy in cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Battaglia, Alessandra; Buzzonetti, Alexia; Monego, Giovanni; Peri, Laura; Ferrandina, Gabriella; Fanfani, Francesco; Scambia, Giovanni; Fattorossi, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    We examined the phenotype and function of CD4+ T cells expressing the semaphorin III receptor neuropilin-1 (Nrp1) in human lymph nodes and peripheral blood. In lymph nodes, Nrp1 identified a small regulatory CD4+ CD25(high) T-cell subpopulation (Nrp1+ Treg) that expressed higher levels of Forkhead box P3 (Foxp3) message and protein than Nrp1- Treg, and various molecular markers of activated Treg, i.e. CD45RO, human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-DR and glucocorticoid-induced tumour necrosis factor receptor (GITR). Similarly to conventional Treg, Nrp1+ Treg proliferated poorly in vitro, and exerted contact-dependent in vitro suppression of T-cell proliferation and cytokine secretion. However, Nrp1+ Treg were more efficient than Nrp1- Treg at inducing suppression. Nrp1 was also expressed on a small subpopulation of CD25(int) and CD25- CD4+ T cells that expressed more Foxp3, CD45RO, HLA-DR and GITR than their Nrp1- counterparts. In contrast, in peripheral blood Nrp1 identified a minor CD4+ T-cell subset that did not display the phenotypic features of Treg lacking Foxp3 expression and marginally expressing CD25. Hence, the function of Nrp1+ CD4+ T cells seemingly depends on their anatomical location. In a previous report, we proposed that Treg may curb the anti-tumour T-cell response in cervical cancer. We show here that Treg and Nrp1+ Treg levels dropped in the tumour-draining lymph nodes of patients with cervical cancer following preoperative chemoradiotherapy in a direct relationship with the reduction of tumour mass, suggesting that suppressor cell elimination facilitated the generation of T cells mediating the destruction of the neoplastic cells left behind after cytotoxic therapy.

  14. Increased Natural Killer Cell Activation in HIV-Infected Immunologic Non-Responders Correlates with CD4+ T Cell Recovery after Antiretroviral Therapy and Viral Suppression

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Zhenwu; Li, Zhen; Martin, Lisa; Hu, Zhiliang; Wu, Hao; Wan, Zhuang; Kilby, Michael; Heath, Sonya L.; Huang, Lei; Jiang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    The role of natural killer (NK) cell function in HIV disease especially in the setting of long-term antiretroviral therapy (ART) and viral suppression is not fully understood. In the current study, we have investigated NK cell activation in healthy controls and aviremic ART-treated HIV+ subjects with different degrees of immune restoration. We performed a cross sectional study in 12 healthy controls and 24 aviremic ART-treated HIV-infected subjects including 13 HIV+ subjects with CD4+ T cells above 500 cells/μL defined as “immunologic responders” and 11 HIV+ subjects with CD4+ T cells below 350 cells/μL defined as “immunologic non-responders”. We analyzed NK cell number, subset, and activation by expression of CD107a and NKG2D and co-expression of CD38 and HLA-DR. NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity against uninfected CD4+ T cells was tested in vitro. We found that NK cell absolute number, percentage of NK cells, and percentage of NK cell subsets were similar in the three study groups. The increased NK cell activation was found predominantly in CD56dimCD16+ subset of immunologic non-responders but not immunologic responders compared to healthy controls. The activation of NK cells was inversely correlated with the peripheral CD4+ T cell count in HIV+ subjects, even after controlling for chronic T cell activation, sex, and age, potential contributors for CD4+ T cell counts in HIV disease. Interestingly, NK cells from immunologic non-responders mediated cytotoxicity against uninfected CD4+ T cells ex vivo. NK cells may play a role in blunted CD4+ T cell recovery in ART-treated HIV disease. PMID:28076376

  15. CTOP/ITE/MTX Compared With CHOP as the First-line Therapy for Newly Diagnosed Young Patients With T Cell Lymphoma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-11-24

    ALK-negative Anaplastic Large Cell Lymphoma; Peripherial T Cell Lymphoma,Not Otherwise Specified; Angioimmunoblastic T Cell Lymphoma; Enteropathy Associated T Cell Lymphoma; Hepatosplenic T Cell Lymphoma; Subcutaneous Panniculitis Like T Cell Lymphoma

  16. Engineering T Cells to Functionally Cure HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Leibman, Rachel S; Riley, James L

    2015-01-01

    Despite the ability of antiretroviral therapy to minimize human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication and increase the duration and quality of patients' lives, the health consequences and financial burden associated with the lifelong treatment regimen render a permanent cure highly attractive. Although T cells play an important role in controlling virus replication, they are themselves targets of HIV-mediated destruction. Direct genetic manipulation of T cells for adoptive cellular therapies could facilitate a functional cure by generating HIV-1–resistant cells, redirecting HIV-1–specific immune responses, or a combination of the two strategies. In contrast to a vaccine approach, which relies on the production and priming of HIV-1–specific lymphocytes within a patient's own body, adoptive T-cell therapy provides an opportunity to customize the therapeutic T cells prior to administration. However, at present, it is unclear how to best engineer T cells so that sustained control over HIV-1 replication can be achieved in the absence of antiretrovirals. This review focuses on T-cell gene-engineering and gene-editing strategies that have been performed in efforts to inhibit HIV-1 replication and highlights the requirements for a successful gene therapy–mediated functional cure. PMID:25896251

  17. Pathogen Stimulation History Impacts Donor-Specific CD8(+) T Cell Susceptibility to Costimulation/Integrin Blockade-Based Therapy.

    PubMed

    Badell, I R; Kitchens, W H; Wagener, M E; Lukacher, A E; Larsen, C P; Ford, M L

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies have shown that the quantity of donor-reactive memory T cells is an important factor in determining the relative heterologous immunity barrier posed during transplantation. Here, we hypothesized that the quality of T cell memory also potently influences the response to costimulation blockade-based immunosuppression. Using a murine skin graft model of CD8(+) memory T cell-mediated costimulation blockade resistance, we elicited donor-reactive memory T cells using three distinct types of pathogen infections. Strikingly, we observed differential efficacy of a costimulation and integrin blockade regimen based on the type of pathogen used to elicit the donor-reactive memory T cell response. Intriguingly, the most immunosuppression-sensitive memory T cell populations were composed primarily of central memory cells that possessed greater recall potential, exhibited a less differentiated phenotype, and contained more multi-cytokine producers. These data, therefore, demonstrate that the memory T cell barrier is dependent on the specific type of pathogen infection via which the donor-reactive memory T cells are elicited, and suggest that the immune stimulation history of a given transplant patient may profoundly influence the relative barrier posed by heterologous immunity during transplantation.

  18. Influence of melatonin therapy and orchiectomy on T cell subsets in male Wistar rats infected with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Santello, Fabricia H; Del Vecchio Filipin, Marina; Caetano, Leony C; Brazão, Vânia; Caetano, Luana N; Dos Santos, Carla D; Alonso Toldo, Míriam P; do Prado, José C

    2009-10-01

    Gonadal steroids exert an important influence on the host immune response during infection. Changes resulting from the absence or replacement of gonadal hormones may represent a distinct evolution of a particular parasite. Taking into account the greater susceptibility of males to parasites, the magnitude of the immune response seems to depend on the interaction of many hormones that will act synergistically with other immune cells. The aims of this research were to evaluate the effects of the luck of male sex hormones due to orchiectomy, and the influence of oral administration of melatonin on the immune response of male Wistar rats infected with the Y strain of Trypanosoma cruzi. The percentage of CD3(+) CD4(+) and CD3(+) CD8(+) lymphocyte T cell subsets were evaluated using flow cytometry and the measurement of IL-2 and IL-12. For all parameters examined, a synergistic action of melatonin and orchiectomy on the host's immune response was observed, promoting an effective response against the parasite during the acute phase of infection. These results offer insight into other possibilities for possibly controlling T. cruzi proliferation through melatonin therapy and also the stimulatory effects on host's immune response triggered by the absence of male gonadal steroids during the acute phase of infection.

  19. Adoptive transfer of bone marrow-derived dendritic cells decreases inhibitory and regulatory T-cell differentiation and improves survival in murine polymicrobial sepsis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong-Wei; Yang, Wen; Gao, Lei; Kang, Jia-Rui; Qin, Jia-Jian; Liu, Yue-Ping; Lu, Jiang-Yang

    2015-05-01

    A decrease in the number of dendritic cells (DCs) is a major cause of post-sepsis immunosuppression and opportunistic infection and is closely associated with poor prognosis. Increasing the number of DCs to replenish their numbers post sepsis can improve the condition. This therapeutic approach could improve recovery after sepsis. Eighty C57BL/6 mice were subjected to sham or caecal ligation and puncture (CLP) surgery. Mice were divided into four groups: (i) Sham + vehicle, (ii) Sham + DC, (iii) CLP + vehicle, and (iv) CLP + DC. Bone-marrow-derived DCs (BMDCs) were administered at 6, 12 and 24 hr after surgery. After 3 days, we assessed serum indices of organ function (alanine aminotransferase, aspartate aminotransferase, creatinine, amylase and lipase), organ tissue histopathology (haematoxylin and eosin staining), cytokine [interferon-γ (IFN-γ), tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin-12p70 (IL-12p70), IL-6 and IL-10] levels in the serum, programmed death-1 (PD-1) expression on T cells, regulatory T-cell differentiation in the spleen, and the survival rate (monitored for 7 days). BMDC transfer resulted in the following changes: a significant reduction in damage to the liver, kidney and pancreas in the CLP-septic mice as well as in the pathological changes seen in the liver, lung, small intestine and pancreas; significantly elevated levels of the T helper type 1 (Th1) cytokines IFN-γ and IL-12p70 in the serum; decreased levels of the Th2 cytokines IL-6 and IL-10 in the serum; reduced expression of PD-1 molecules on CD4(+) T cells; reduced the proliferation and differentiation of splenic suppressor T cells and CD4(+)  CD25(+)  Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells, and a significant increase in the survival rate of the septic animals. These results show that administration of BMDCs may have modulated the differentiation and immune function of T cells and contributed to alleviate immunosuppression, hence reducing organ damage and mortality post sepsis. Hence

  20. Specific lymphocyte subsets predict response to adoptive cell therapy using expanded autologous tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in metastatic melanoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Radvanyi, Laszlo G.; Bernatchez, Chantale; Zhang, Minying; Fox, Patricia S.; Miller, Priscilla; Chacon, Jessica; Wu, Richard; Lizee, Gregory; Mahoney, Sandy; Alvarado, Gladys; Glass, Michelle; Johnson, Valen E.; McMannis, John D.; Shpall, Elizabeth; Prieto, Victor; Papadopoulos, Nicholas; Kim, Kevin; Homsi, Jade; Bedikian, Agop; Hwu, Wen-Jen; Patel, Sapna; Ross, Merrick I.; Lee, Jeffrey E.; Gershenwald, Jeffrey E.; Lucci, Anthony; Royal, Richard; Cormier, Janice N.; Davies, Michael A.; Mansaray, Rahmatu; Fulbright, Orenthial J.; Toth, Christopher; Ramachandran, Renjith; Wardell, Seth; Gonzalez, Audrey; Hwu, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) using autologous tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) is a promising treatment for metastatic melanoma unresponsive to conventional therapies. We report here on the results of an ongoing Phase II clinical trial testing the efficacy of ACT using TIL in metastatic melanoma patients and the association of specific patient clinical characteristics and the phenotypic attributes of the infused TIL with clinical response. Experimental Design Altogether, 31 transiently lymphodepleted patients were treated with their expanded TIL followed by two cycles of high-dose (HD) IL-2 therapy. The effects of patient clinical features and the phenotypes of the T-cells infused on clinical response were determined. Results Overall, 15/31 (48.4%) patients had an objective clinical response using immune-related response criteria (irRC), with two patients (6.5%) having a complete response. Progression-free survival of >12 months was observed for 9/15 (60%) of the responding patients. Factors significantly associated with objective tumor regression included a higher number of TIL infused, a higher proportion of CD8+ T-cells in the infusion product, a more differentiated effector phenotype of the CD8+ population and a higher frequency of CD8+ T-cells co-expressing the negative costimulation molecule “B- and T-lymphocyte attenuator” (BTLA). No significant difference in telomere lengths of TIL between responders and non-responders was identified. Conclusion These results indicate that immunotherapy with expanded autologous TIL is capable of achieving durable clinical responses in metastatic melanoma patients and that CD8+ T-cells in the infused TIL, particularly differentiated effectors cells and cells expressing BTLA, are associated with tumor regression. PMID:23032743

  1. High and low vitamin A therapies induce distinct FoxP3+ T cell subsets and effectively control intestinal inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Seung G.; Wang, Chuanwu; Matsumoto, Satoshi; Kim, Chang H.

    2009-01-01

    Background & Aims Retinoic acid plays a positive role in induction of FoxP3+ regulatory T cells. Because retinoic acid is produced as a metabolite of vitamin A in the intestine and FoxP3+ T cells regulate intestinal inflammation, we investigated the impact of vitamin A status on the regulatory T cells and inflammation in the intestine. Methods The SAMP1/YP model is a mouse model of Crohn’s disease. We made vitamin A deficient, excessive and normal SAMP1/YP mice and assessed the intestinal inflammation. We investigated also the phenotype and function of FoxP3+ T cells induced in different vitamin A availability in regulation of intestinal inflammation in a T cell-induced inflammation model in SCID mice. Results The limited and excessive vitamin A conditions induced distinct FoxP3+ T cell subsets in vivo and both ameliorated the intestinal inflammation in SAMP1/YP mice. The limited vitamin A condition greatly induced unusual CD103+CCR7+ FoxP3+ cells, while the high vitamin A condition induced CCR9+α4β7+ FoxP3+ T cells in the intestine. Both FoxP3+ T cell populations, when transferred into mice with ongoing intestinal inflammation, were highly effective in reversing the inflammation. Blockade or lack of occupancy of RARα is a mechanism to induce the highly suppressive CD103+CCR7+ FoxP3+ cells in both thymus and periphery in the limited vitamin A availability. Conclusions Our results identify novel pathways of inducing highly suppressive FoxP3+ regulatory T cells that can effectively control intestinal inflammation. The results have significant ramifications in treating inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:19632226

  2. Integration of retroviral vectors induces minor changes in the transcriptional activity of T cells from ADA-SCID patients treated with gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Cassani, Barbara; Montini, Eugenio; Maruggi, Giulietta; Ambrosi, Alessandro; Mirolo, Massimiliano; Selleri, Silvia; Biral, Erika; Frugnoli, Ilaria; Hernandez-Trujillo, Vivian; Di Serio, Clelia; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia; Naldini, Luigi; Mavilio, Fulvio; Aiuti, Alessandro

    2009-10-22

    Gene transfer into hematopoietic stem cells by gamma-retroviral vectors (RVs) is an effective treatment for inherited blood disorders, although potentially limited by the risk of insertional mutagenesis. We evaluated the genomic impact of RV integration in T lymphocytes from adenosine deaminase-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency (ADA-SCID) patients 10 to 30 months after infusion of autologous, genetically corrected CD34(+) cells. Expression profiling on ex vivo T-cell bulk population revealed no difference with respect to healthy controls. To assess the effect of vector integration on gene expression at the single-cell level, primary T-cell clones were isolated from 2 patients. T-cell clones harbored either 1 (89.8%) or 2 (10.2%) vector copies per cell and displayed partial to full correction of ADA expression, purine metabolism, and T-cell receptor-driven functions. Analysis of RV integration sites indicated a high diversity in T-cell origin, consistently with the polyclonal T-cell receptor-Vbeta repertoire. Quantitative transcript analysis of 120 genes within a 200-kb window around RV integration sites showed modest (2.8- to 5.2-fold) dysregulation of 5.8% genes in 18.6% of the T-cell clones compared with controls. Nonetheless, affected clones maintained a stable phenotype and normal in vitro functions. These results confirm that RV-mediated gene transfer for ADA-SCID is safe, and provide crucial information for the development of future gene therapy protocols. The trials described herein have been registered at http://www.clinicaltrials.gov as #NCT00598481 and #NCT00599781.

  3. A Pilot Trial of Adding Maraviroc to Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy for Suboptimal CD4+ T-Cell Recovery Despite Sustained Virologic Suppression: ACTG A5256

    PubMed Central

    Wilkin, Timothy J.; Lalama, Christina M.; McKinnon, John; Gandhi, Rajesh T.; Lin, Nina; Landay, Alan; Ribaudo, Heather; Fox, Lawrence; Currier, Judith S.; Mellors, John W.; Gulick, Roy; Tenorio, Allan R.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Despite viral suppression, antiretroviral therapy (ART) does not restore CD4+ T-cell counts in many patients infected with human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1). Methods. In a single-arm pilot trial involving ART recipients with suppressed plasma levels of HIV-1 RNA for at least 48 weeks and stable suboptimal CD4+ T-cell recovery, subjects added maraviroc, a CCR5 antagonist, to their existing ART for 24 weeks. After stopping maraviroc, they were followed for an additional 24 weeks. A Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to evaluate whether maraviroc was associated with an increase of at least 20 cells/µL in the CD4+ T-cell count. Results. A total of 34 subjects were enrolled. The median age was 50 years, and the median baseline CD4+ T-cell count was 153 cells/µL. The median increase in CD4+ T-cell count from baseline to week 22/24 was 12 cells/µL (90% confidence interval, 1–22). A CD4+ T-cell count increase of at least 20 cells/µL was not detected (P = .97). Markers of immune activation and apoptosis decreased during maraviroc intensification; this decline partially reversed after discontinuing maraviroc. Conclusions. Adding maraviroc to suppressive ART for 24 weeks was not associated with an increase in CD4+ T-cell counts of at least 20 cells/µL. Further studies of CCR5 antagonists in the dampening of immune activation associated with HIV infection are warranted. Clinical Trials Registration. NCT 00709111. PMID:22740718

  4. Transformation of Sézary syndrome into CD30+ anaplastic large T-cell lymphoma after alemtuzumab therapy with evidence of clonal unity.

    PubMed

    Nevet, Mariela Judith; Zuckerman, Tsila; Sahar, Dvora; Bergman, Reuven

    2015-01-01

    Alemtuzumab is a humanized mouse antibody targeting the CD52 cell surface, which has been effective in patients with advanced stage mycosis fungoides (MF) including erythrodermic MF and Sézary syndrome. There are a few descriptions of large cell transformation after its administration. A young patient with an acute onset of Sézary syndrome treated initially unsuccessfully with fludarabine and cyclophosphamide and later on successfully with alemtuzumab has been described. Three weeks after the beginning of therapy, however, she developed transformed T-cell lymphoma indistinguishable from CD30 anaplastic large-cell lymphoma. After bone marrow transplantation, the transformed CD30 cutaneous T-cell lymphoma recurred as a transformed CD30 plaque MF. All 3 types of lesions showed the same T-cell receptor clonal gene rearrangement, which supports the notion that Sézary syndrome, CD30 anaplastic large-cell lymphoma, and MF are interrelated.

  5. Rigorous optimization and validation of potent RNA CAR T cell therapy for the treatment of common epithelial cancers expressing folate receptor.

    PubMed

    Schutsky, Keith; Song, D Gang; Lynn, Rachel; Smith, Jenessa B; Poussin, Mathilde; Figini, Mariangela; Zhao, Yangbing; Powell, Daniel J

    2015-10-06

    Using lentiviral technology, we recently demonstrated that incorporation of CD27 costimulation into CARs greatly improves antitumor activity and T cell persistence. Still, virus-mediated gene transfer is expensive, laborious and enables long-term persistence, creating therapies which cannot be easily discontinued if toxic. To address these concerns, we utilized a non-integrating RNA platform to engineer human T cells to express FRα-specific, CD27 CARs and tested their capacity to eliminate human FRα(+) cancer. Novel CARs comprised of human components were constructed, C4-27z and C4opt-27z, a codon-optimized variant created for efficient expression. Following RNA electroporation, C4-27z and C4opt-27z CAR expression is initially ubiquitous but progressively declines across T cell populations. In addition, C4-27z and C4opt-27z RNA CAR T cells secrete high levels of Th-1 cytokines and display strong cytolytic function against human FRα(+) cancers in a time- and antigen-dependent manner. Further, C4-27z and C4opt-27z CAR T cells exhibit significant proliferation in vivo, facilitate the complete regression of fully disseminated human ovarian cancer xenografts in mice and reduce the progression of solid ovarian cancer. These results advocate for rapid progression of C4opt-27z RNA CAR to the clinic and establish a new paradigm for preclinical optimization and validation of RNA CAR candidates destined for clinical translation.

  6. Rigorous optimization and validation of potent RNA CAR T cell therapy for the treatment of common epithelial cancers expressing folate receptor

    PubMed Central

    Schutsky, Keith; Song, De-Gang; Lynn, Rachel; Smith, Jenessa B.; Poussin, Mathilde; Figini, Mariangela; Zhao, Yangbing; Powell, Daniel J.

    2015-01-01

    Using lentiviral technology, we recently demonstrated that incorporation of CD27 costimulation into CARs greatly improves antitumor activity and T cell persistence. Still, virus-mediated gene transfer is expensive, laborious and enables long-term persistence, creating therapies which cannot be easily discontinued if toxic. To address these concerns, we utilized a non-integrating RNA platform to engineer human T cells to express FRα-specific, CD27 CARs and tested their capacity to eliminate human FRα+ cancer. Novel CARs comprised of human components were constructed, C4-27z and C4opt-27z, a codon-optimized variant created for efficient expression. Following RNA electroporation, C4-27z and C4opt-27z CAR expression is initially ubiquitous but progressively declines across T cell populations. In addition, C4-27z and C4opt-27z RNA CAR T cells secrete high levels of Th-1 cytokines and display strong cytolytic function against human FRα+ cancers in a time- and antigen-dependent manner. Further, C4-27z and C4opt-27z CAR T cells exhibit significant proliferation in vivo, facilitate the complete regression of fully disseminated human ovarian cancer xenografts in mice and reduce the progression of solid ovarian cancer. These results advocate for rapid progression of C4opt-27z RNA CAR to the clinic and establish a new paradigm for preclinical optimization and validation of RNA CAR candidates destined for clinical translation. PMID:26359629

  7. T cell anergy and activation are associated with suboptimal humoral responses to measles revaccination in HIV-infected children on anti-retroviral therapy in Nairobi, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Buechler, M B; Newman, L P; Chohan, B H; Njoroge, A; Wamalwa, D; Farquhar, C

    2015-09-01

    HIV-infected children are less capable of mounting and maintaining protective humoral responses to vaccination against measles compared to HIV-uninfected children. This poses a public health challenge in countries with high HIV burdens. Administration of anti-retroviral therapy (ART) and revaccinating children against measles is one approach to increase measles immunity in HIV-infected children, yet it is not effective in all cases. Immune anergy and activation during HIV infection are factors that could influence responses to measles revaccination. We utilized a flow cytometry-based approach to examine whether T cell anergy and activation were associated with the maintenance of measles-specific immunoglobulin (Ig)G antibodies generated in response to measles revaccination in a cohort of HIV-infected children on ART in Nairobi, Kenya. Children who sustained measles-specific IgG for at least 1 year after revaccination displayed significantly lower programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) surface expression on CD8(+) T cells on a per-cell basis and exhibited less activated CD4(+) T cells compared to those unable to maintain detectable measles-specific antibodies. Children in both groups were similar in age and sex, CD4(+) T cell frequency, duration of ART treatment and HIV viral load at enrolment. These data suggest that aberrant T cell anergy and activation are associated with the impaired ability to sustain an antibody response to measles revaccination in HIV-infected children on ART.

  8. Effect of Raltegravir-containing Intensification on HIV Burden and T Cell Activation in Multiple Gut Sites of HIV+ Adults on Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yukl, Steven A.; Shergill, Amandeep; McQuaid, Kenneth; Gianella, Sara; Lampiris, Harry; Hare, C. Bradley; Pandori, Mark; Sinclair, Elizabeth; Günthard, Huldrych F.; Fischer, Marek; Wong, Joseph K.; Havlir, Diane V.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine whether raltegravir-containing antiretroviral therapy (ART) intensification reduces HIV levels in the gut. Design Open-label study in HIV+ adults on ART with plasma HIV RNA<40 copies/ml. Methods Seven HIV+ adults received 12 weeks of ART intensification with raltegravir alone or in combination with efavirenz or darunavir. Gut cells were obtained by upper and lower endoscopy with biopsies from duodenum, ileum, colon, and rectum at baseline and 12 weeks. Study outcomes included plasma HIV RNA, HIV DNA and RNA from PBMC and 4 gut sites, T cell subsets, and activation markers. Results Intensification produced no consistent decrease in HIV RNA in the plasma, PBMC, duodenum, colon, or rectum. However, 5 of 7 participants had a decrease in unspliced HIV RNA per 106 CD4+ T cells in the ileum. There was a trend towards decreased T cell activation in all sites, which was greatest for CD8+ T cells in the ileum and PBMC, and a trend towards increased CD4+ T cells in the ileum. Conclusion Most HIV RNA and DNA in the blood and gut is not the result of ongoing replication that can be impacted by short-term intensification with raltegravir. However, the ileum may support ongoing productive infection in some patients on ART, even if the contribution to plasma RNA is not discernible. PMID:20827162

  9. Targetless T cells in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Thor Straten, Per; Garrido, Federico

    2016-01-01

    Attention has recently focused on new cancer immunotherapy protocols aiming to activate T cell mediated anti-tumor responses. To this end, administration of antibodies that target inhibitory molecules regulating T-cell cytotoxicity has achieved impressive clinical responses, as has adoptive cell transfer (ACT) using expanded tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) or genetically modified cytotoxic T cells. However, despite clear clinical responses, only a fraction of patients respond to treatment and there is an urgent call for characterization of predictive biomarkers. CD8 positive T cells can infiltrate tumor tissues and destroy HLA class I positive tumor cells expressing the specific antigen. In fact, current progress in the field of cancer immune therapy is based on the capacity of T cells to kill cancer cells that present tumor antigen in the context on an HLA class I molecule. However, it is also well established that cancer cells are often characterized by loss or down regulation of HLA class I molecules, documented in a variety of human tumors. Consequently, immune therapy building on CD8 T cells will be futile in patients harboring HLA class-I negative or deficient cancer cells. It is therefore mandatory to explore if these important molecules for T cell cytotoxicity are expressed by cancer target cells. We have indications that different types of immunotherapy can modify the tumor microenvironment and up-regulate reduced HLA class I expression in cancer cells but only if the associated molecular mechanisms is reversible (soft). However, in case of structural (hard) aberrations causing HLA class I loss, tumor cells will not be able to recover HLA class I expression and as a consequence will escape T-cell lysis and continue to growth. Characterization of the molecular mechanism underlying the lack or downregulation of HLA class I expression, seems to be a crucial step predicting clinical responses to T cell mediated immunotherapy, and possibly aid the

  10. Total Skin Electron Therapy for Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphoma Using a Modern Dual-Field Rotational Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Heumann, Thatcher R.; Esiashvili, Natia; Parker, Sareeta; Switchenko, Jeffrey M.; Dhabbaan, Anees; Goodman, Michael; Lechowicz, Mary Jo; Flowers, Christopher R.; Khan, Mohammad K.

    2015-05-01

    Purpose: To report our experience with rotational total skin electron irradiation (RTSEI) in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL), and to examine response by disease stage and race. Methods and Materials: We reviewed our outcomes for 68 CTCL patients who received RTSEI (≥30 Gy) from 2000 to 2013. Primary outcomes were complete clinical response (CCR), recurrence-free survival (RFS), and overall survival (OS). Using log–rank tests and Cox proportional hazards, OS and RFS were compared across tumor stages at time of RTSEI with further racial subgroup analysis. Results: Median age at diagnosis and at time of radiation was 52 and 56 years, respectively. Median follow-up was 5.1 years, 49% were African American, and 49% were female. At time of treatment, 18, 37, and 13 patients were T stage 2, 3, and 4, respectively. At 6 weeks after RTSEI, overall CCR was 82% (88%, 83%, and 69% for T2, T3, and T4, respectively). Median RFS was 11 months for all patients and 14, 10, and 12 months for stage T2, T3, and T4, respectively. Tumor stage was not associated with RFS or CCR. Maintenance therapy after RTSEI was associated with improved RFS in both crude and multivariable analysis, controlling for T stage. Median OS was 76 months (91 and 59 months for T3 and T4, respectively). With the exception of improved OS in African Americans compared with whites at stage T2, race was not associated with CCR, RFS, or OS. Conclusions: These results represent the largest RTSEI clinical outcomes study in the modern era using a dual-field rotational technique. Our observed response rates match or improve upon the standard set by previous outcome studies using conventional TSEI techniques, despite a large percentage of advanced CTCL lesions in our cohort. We found that clinical response after RTSEI did not seem to be affected by T stage or race.

  11. The growing world of CAR T cell trials: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Holzinger, Astrid; Barden, Markus; Abken, Hinrich

    2016-12-01

    In recent years, cancer treatment involving adoptive cell therapy with chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified patient's immune cells has attracted growing interest. Using gene transfer techniques, the patient's T cells are modified ex vivo with a CAR which redirects the T cells toward the cancer cells through an antibody-derived binding domain. The T cells are activated by the CAR primary signaling and costimulatory domains. Such "second generation" CAR T cells induced complete remission of B cell malignancies in the long-term. In this fast-moving field with a growing number of engineered T cell products, we list about 100 currently ongoing trials here that involve CAR T cells targeting hematopoietic malignancies and solid cancer. Major challenges in the further development of the therapy are briefly discussed.

  12. Autologous Tax-specific CTL therapy in a primary adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma cell-bearing NOD/Shi-scid, IL-2Rγnull mouse model.

    PubMed

    Masaki, Ayako; Ishida, Takashi; Suzuki, Susumu; Ito, Asahi; Mori, Fumiko; Sato, Fumihiko; Narita, Tomoko; Yamada, Tomiko; Ri, Masaki; Kusumoto, Shigeru; Komatsu, Hirokazu; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Niimi, Akio; Inagaki, Hiroshi; Iida, Shinsuke; Ueda, Ryuzo

    2013-07-01

    We expanded human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 Tax-specific CTL in vitro from PBMC of three individual adult T cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATL) patients and assessed their therapeutic potential in an in vivo model using NOG mice bearing primary ATL cells from the respective three patients (ATL/NOG). In these mice established with cells from a chronic-type patient, treatment by i.p. injection of autologous Tax-CTL resulted in greater infiltration of CD8-positive T cells into each ATL lesion. This was associated with a significant decrease of ATL cell infiltration into blood, spleen, and liver. Tax-CTL treatment also significantly decreased human soluble IL-2R concentrations in the sera. In another group of ATL/NOG mice, Tax-CTL treatment led to a significant prolongation of survival time. These findings show that Tax-CTL can infiltrate the tumor site, recognize, and kill autologous ATL cells in mice in vivo. In ATL/NOG mice with cells from an acute-type patient, whose postchemotherapeutic remission continued for >18 mo, antitumor efficacy of adoptive Tax-CTL therapy was also observed. However, in ATL/NOG mice from a different acute-type patient, whose ATL relapsed after 6 mo of remission, no efficacy was observed. Thus, although the therapeutic effects were different for different ATL patients, to the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that adoptive therapy with Ag-specific CTL expanded from a cancer patient confers antitumor effects, leading to significant survival benefit for autologous primary cancer cell-bearing mice in vivo. The present study contributes to research on adoptive CTL therapy, which should be applicable to several types of cancer.

  13. Tumor-Specific Effector CD8+ T Cells That Can Establish Immunological Memory in Humans after Adoptive Transfer Are Marked by Expression of IL7 Receptor and c-myc.

    PubMed

    Chandran, Smita S; Paria, Biman C; Srivastava, Abhishek K; Rothermel, Luke D; Stephens, Daniel J; Kammula, Udai S

    2015-08-15

    The optimal T-cell attributes for adoptive cancer immunotherapy are unclear. Recent clinical trials of ex vivo-expanded tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes indicated that differentiated T effector cells can elicit durable antitumor responses in some patients with cancer, with their antitumor activity tightly correlated with their persistence in the host. Thus, there is great interest in the definition of intrinsic biomarkers that can predict the conversion of short-lived tumor antigen-specific T effector cells into long-lived T memory cells. Long-term persistence of ex vivo-expanded tumor-specific CD8+ T effector clones has been reported in refractory metastatic melanoma patients after adoptive T-cell transfer. By using highly homogeneous clone populations from these preparations, we performed a comparative transcriptional profiling to define preinfusion molecular attributes that can be ascribed to an effector-to-memory transition. Through this route, we discovered that preinfusion T-cell clones that expressed the IL7 receptor (IL7R) and c-myc were more likely to persist longer after adoptive transfer to patients. The predictive value of these two biomarkers was strengthened by using IL7R protein, IL7-induced pSTAT5, and c-myc mRNA expression to prospectively identify human tumor-specific T effector clones capable of engraftment into immunodeficient mice. Overall, our findings reveal IL7R and c-myc expression as intrinsic biomarkers that can predict the fate of CD8+ T effector cells after adoptive transfer.

  14. Adoption

    MedlinePlus

    ... biological families) and where they came from. This curiosity often becomes more intense as part of the ... adoptive family or feel close to them. This curiosity, which can feel quite intense, is a normal ...

  15. EXTRINSIC APOPTOTIC PATHWAYS: A NEW POTENTIAL “TARGET” FOR MORE SUFFICIENT THERAPY IN A CASE OF CUTANEOUS ANAPLASTIC LARGE CD30+ ALK–T-CELL LYMPHOMA

    PubMed Central

    Georgi, Tchernev; Carlos, Cardoso José; Lubomir, Arseniev; Hiroyuki, Okamoto

    2011-01-01

    The primary cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCL) represent a clonal T-lymphocyte proliferation infiltrating the skin. CD30+T-cell lymphomas present clinically as nodules with a diameter between 1 and 15 cm, mostly in elderly patients. The role of the CD30 molecule in patients suffering from T-cell lymphomas is not completely clear yet. The signal transduction pathway which includes CD30 seems to play a key role in tumor progression. In certain forms of T-cellular lymphomas, the interaction between CD30/CD30-ligand is able to provoke apoptosis of the “tumor lymphocytes”. The modern conceptions of the pathogenesis of T-cell lymphomas include disorders in the pathways involved in programmed cellular death and disregulation in the expression of certain of its regulatory molecules. We are presenting an unusual case of a female patient with a primary cutaneous form of CD30+/ALK− anaplastic large T-cell lymphoma. Upon the introduction of systemic PUVA, (psoralen plus ultraviolet light radiation) combined with beam therapy, a complete remission could be noticed. Eight months later, we observed a local recurrence, which was overcome by CHOP chemotherapy (Cyclophosphamide, Hydroxydaunorubicin (Doxorubicin), Vincristin (Oncovin®), Predniso(lo)n). Six months later, new cutaneous lesions had been noticed again. A new therapeutic hope for the patients with anaplastic large CTCL is actually based on the influence of the activity of the different apoptotic pathways. Death ligands, including tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, CD95L/FasL, and TRAIL, mediate also some important safeguard mechanisms against tumor growth in patients with CD30+ cutaneous anaplastic large T-cell lymphomas and critically contribute to lymphocyte homeostasis. PMID:21572802

  16. Human leucocyte antigen class I‐redirected anti‐tumour CD4+ T cells require a higher T cell receptor binding affinity for optimal activity than CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Tan, M. P.; Dolton, G. M.; Gerry, A. B.; Brewer, J. E.; Bennett, A. D.; Pumphrey, N. J.; Jakobsen, B. K.

    2016-01-01

    Summary CD4+ T helper cells are a valuable component of the immune response towards cancer. Unfortunately, natural tumour‐specific CD4+ T cells occur in low frequency, express relatively low‐affinity T cell receptors (TCRs) and show poor reactivity towards cognate antigen. In addition, the lack of human leucocyte antigen (HLA) class II expression on most cancers dictates that these cells are often unable to respond to tumour cells directly. These deficiencies can be overcome by transducing primary CD4+ T cells with tumour‐specific HLA class I‐restricted TCRs prior to adoptive transfer. The lack of help from the co‐receptor CD8 glycoprotein in CD4+ cells might result in these cells requiring a different optimal TCR binding affinity. Here we compared primary CD4+ and CD8+ T cells expressing wild‐type and a range of affinity‐enhanced TCRs specific for the HLA A*0201‐restricted NY‐ESO‐1‐ and gp100 tumour antigens. Our major findings are: (i) redirected primary CD4+ T cells expressing TCRs of sufficiently high affinity exhibit a wide range of effector functions, including cytotoxicity, in response to cognate peptide; and (ii) optimal TCR binding affinity is higher in CD4+ T cells than CD8+ T cells. These results indicate that the CD4+ T cell component of current adoptive therapies using TCRs optimized for CD8+ T cells is below par and that there is room for substantial improvement. PMID:27324616

  17. Immunomodulation by memantine in therapy of Alzheimer's disease is mediated through inhibition of Kv1.3 channels and T cell responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Lowinus, Theresa; Bose, Tanima; Busse, Stefan; Busse, Mandy; Reinhold, Dirk; Schraven, Burkhart; Bommhardt, Ursula H.H.

    2016-01-01

    Memantine is approved for the treatment of advanced Alzheimer's disease (AD) and reduces glutamate-mediated neuronal excitotoxicity by antagonism of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors. In the pathophysiology of AD immune responses deviate and infectious side effects are observed during memantine therapy. However, the particular effects of memantine on human T lymphocytes are unresolved. Here, we provide evidence that memantine blocks Kv1.3 potassium channels, inhibits CD3-antibody- and alloantigen-induced proliferation and suppresses chemokine-induced migration of peripheral blood T cells of healthy donors. Concurrent with the in vitro data, CD4+ T cells from AD patients receiving therapeutic doses of memantine show a transient decline of Kv1.3 channel activity and a long-lasting reduced proliferative response to alloantigens in mixed lymphocyte reactions. Furthermore, memantine treatment provokes a profound depletion of peripheral blood memory CD45RO+ CD4+ T cells. Thus, standard doses of memantine profoundly reduce T cell responses in treated patients through blockade of Kv1.3 channels. This may normalize deviant immunopathology in AD and contribute to the beneficial effects of memantine, but may also account for the enhanced infection rate. PMID:27462773

  18. TCRγ4δ1-Engineered αβT Cells Exhibit Effective Antitumor Activity

    PubMed Central

    He, Kangxia; You, Hongqin; Li, Yuxia; Cui, Lianxian; Zhang, Jianmin; He, Wei

    2016-01-01

    T cell engineering with T cell receptors (TCRs) specific for tumors plays an important role in adoptive T cell transfer (ATC) therapy for cancer. Here, we present a novel strategy to redirect peripheral blood-derived αβT cells against tumors via TCRγ4δ1 gene transduction. The broad-spectrum antitumor activity of TCRδ1 cells in innate immunity is dependent on CDR3δ1. TCRγ4δ1-engineered αβT cells were prepared by lentiviral transduction and characterized by analyzing in vitro and in vivo cytotoxicity to tumors, ability of proliferation and cytokine production, and potential role in autoimmunity. Results show that TCRγ4δ1 genes were transduced to approximately 36% of polyclonal αβT cells. TCRγ4δ1-engineered αβT cells exhibited effective in vitro TCRγδ-dependent cytotoxicity against various tumor cells via the perforin-granzyme pathway. They also showed a strong proliferative capacity and robust cytokine production. TCRγ4δ1-engineered αβT cells neither expressed mixed TCR dimers nor bound/killed normal cells in vitro. More important, adoptive transfer of TCRγ4δ1-engineered αβT cells into nude mice bearing a human HepG2 cell line significantly suppressed tumor growth. Our results demonstrate a novel role for TCRγ4δ1 in gene therapy and ATC for cancer. PMID:27463149

  19. Synapse-directed delivery of immunomodulators using T-cell-conjugated nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Stephan, Matthias T.; Stephan, Sirkka B.; Bak, S. Peter; Chen, Jianzhu; Irvine, Darrell J.

    2012-01-01

    Regulating molecular interactions in the T-cell synapse to prevent autoimmunity or, conversely, to boost anti-tumor immunity has long been a goal in immunotherapy. However, delivering therapeutically meaningful doses of immune-modulating compounds into the synapse represents a major challenge. Here, we report that covalent coupling of maleimide-functionlized nanoparticles (NPs) to free thiol groups on T-cell membrane proteins enables efficient delivery of compounds into the T cell synapse. We demonstrate that surface-linked NPs are rapidly polarized toward the nascent immunological synapse (IS) at the T cell/APC contact zone during antigen recognition. To translate these findings into a therapeutic application we tested the NP delivery of NSC-87877, a dual inhibitor of Shp1 and Shp2, key phosphatases that downregulate T-cell receptor activation in the synapse, in the context of adoptive T cell therapy of cancer. Conjugating NSC-87877-loaded NPs to the surface of tumor-specific T cells just prior to adoptive transfer into mice with advanced prostate cancer promoted a much greater T-cell expansion at the tumor site, relative to co-infusing the same drug dose systemically, leading to enhanced survival of treated animals. In summary, our studies support the application of T-cell-linked synthetic NPs as efficient drug delivery vehicles into the IS, as well as the broad applicability of this new paradigm for therapeutically modulating signaling events at the T-cell/APC interface. PMID:22594972

  20. Toward immunotherapy with redirected T cells in a large animal model: ex vivo activation, expansion, and genetic modification of canine T cells.

    PubMed

    Mata, Melinda; Vera, Juan F; Gerken, Claudia; Rooney, Cliona M; Miller, Tasha; Pfent, Catherine; Wang, Lisa L; Wilson-Robles, Heather M; Gottschalk, Stephen

    2014-10-01

    Adoptive transfer of T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) has shown promising antitumor activity in early phase clinical studies, especially for hematological malignancies. However, most preclinical models do not reliably mimic human disease. We reasoned that developing an adoptive T-cell therapy approach for spontaneous osteosarcoma (OS) occurring in dogs would more closely reproduce the condition in human cancer. To generate CAR-expressing canine T cells, we developed expansion and transduction protocols that allow for the generation of sufficient numbers of CAR-expressing canine T cells for future clinical studies in dogs within 2 weeks of ex vivo culture. To evaluate the functionality of CAR-expressing canine T cells, we targeted HER2(+) OS. We demonstrate that canine OS is positive for HER2, and that canine T cells expressing a HER2-specific CAR with human-derived transmembrane and CD28.ζ signaling domains recognize and kill HER2(+) canine OS cell lines in an antigen-dependent manner. To reduce the potential immunogenicity of the CAR, we evaluated a CAR with canine-derived transmembrane and signaling domains, and found no functional difference between human and canine CARs. Hence, we have successfully developed a strategy to generate CAR-expressing canine T cells for future preclinical studies in dogs. Testing T-cell therapies in an immunocompetent, outbred animal model may improve our ability to predict their safety and efficacy before conducting studies in humans.

  1. Optimization of T-cell Reactivity by Exploiting TCR Chain Centricity for the Purpose of Safe and Effective Antitumor TCR Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Ochi, Toshiki; Nakatsugawa, Munehide; Chamoto, Kenji; Tanaka, Shinya; Yamashita, Yuki; Guo, Tingxi; Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Yasukawa, Masaki; Butler, Marcus O; Hirano, Naoto

    2015-09-01

    Adoptive transfer of T cells redirected by a high-affinity antitumor T-cell receptor (TCR) is a promising treatment modality for cancer patients. Safety and efficacy depend on the selection of a TCR that induces minimal toxicity and elicits sufficient antitumor reactivity. Many, if not all, TCRs possess cross-reactivity to unrelated MHC molecules in addition to reactivity to target self-MHC/peptide complexes. Some TCRs display chain centricity, in which recognition of MHC/peptide complexes is dominated by one of the TCR hemi-chains. In this study, we comprehensively studied how TCR chain centricity affects reactivity to target self-MHC/peptide complexes and alloreactivity using the TCR, clone TAK1, which is specific for human leukocyte antigen-A*24:02/Wilms tumor 1(235-243) (A24/WT1(235)) and cross-reactive with B*57:01 (B57). The TAK1β, but not the TAK1α, hemi-chain possessed chain centricity. When paired with multiple clonotypic TCRα counter-chains encoding TRAV12-2, 20, 36, or 38-2, the de novo TAK1β-containing TCRs showed enhanced, weakened, or absent reactivity to A24/WT1(235) and/or to B57. T cells reconstituted with these TCRα genes along with TAK1β possessed a very broad range (>3 log orders) of functional and structural avidities. These results suggest that TCR chain centricity can be exploited to enhance desired antitumor TCR reactivity and eliminate unwanted TCR cross-reactivity. TCR reactivity to target MHC/peptide complexes and cross-reactivity to unrelated MHC molecules are not inextricably linked and are separable at the TCR sequence level. However, it is still mandatory to carefully monitor for possible harmful toxicities caused by adoptive transfer of T cells redirected by thymically unselected TCRs.

  2. Intensification of Antiretroviral Therapy with a CCR5 Antagonist in Patients with Chronic HIV-1 Infection: Effect on T Cells Latently Infected

    PubMed Central

    Vallejo, Alejandro; Hernández-Novoa, Beatriz; Abad, María; Madrid, Nadia; Dahl, Viktor; Rubio, Rafael; Moreno, Ana M.; Dronda, Fernando; Casado, José Luis; Navas, Enrique; Pérez-Elías, María Jesús; Zamora, Javier; Palmer, Sarah; Muñoz, Eduardo; Muñoz-Fernández, María Ángeles; Moreno, Santiago

    2011-01-01

    Objective The primary objective was to assess the effect of MVC intensification on latently infected CD4+ T cells in chronically HIV-1-infected patients receiving antiretroviral therapy. Methods We performed an open-label pilot phase II clinical trial involving chronically HIV-1-infected patients receiving stable antiretroviral therapy whose regimen was intensified with 48 weeks of maraviroc therapy. We analyzed the latent reservoir, the residual viremia and episomal 2LTR DNA to examine the relationship between these measures and the HIV-1 latent reservoir, immune activation, lymphocyte subsets (including effector and central memory T cells), and markers associated with bacterial translocation. Results Overall a non significant reduction in the size of the latent reservoir was found (p = 0.068). A mean reduction of 1.82 IUPM was observed in 4 patients with detectable latent reservoir at baseline after 48 weeks of intensification. No effect on plasma residual viremia was observed. Unexpectedly, all the patients had detectable 2LTR DNA circles at week 24, while none of them showed those circles at the end of the study. No changes were detected in CD4+ or CD8+ counts, although a significant decrease was found in the proportion of HLA-DR+/CD38+ CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells. LPS and sCD14 levels increased. Conclusions Intensification with MVC was associated with a trend to a decrease in the size of the latent HIV-1 reservoir in memory T cells. No impact on residual viremia was detected. Additional studies with larger samples are needed to confirm the results. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00795444 PMID:22174752

  3. T-Cell-Based Immunotherapy for Osteosarcoma: Challenges and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhan; Li, Binghao; Ren, Yingqing; Ye, Zhaoming

    2016-01-01

    Even though combining surgery with chemotherapy has significantly improved the prognosis of osteosarcoma patients, advanced, metastatic, or recurrent osteosarcomas are often non-responsive to chemotherapy, making development of novel efficient therapeutic methods an urgent need. Adoptive immunotherapy has the potential to be a useful non-surgical modality for treatment of osteosarcoma. Recently, alternative strategies, including immunotherapies using naturally occurring or genetically modified T cells, have been found to hold promise in the treatment of hematologic malignancies and solid tumors. In this review, we will discuss possible T-cell-based therapies against osteosarcoma with a special emphasis on combination strategies to improve the effectiveness of adoptive T cell transfer and, thus, to provide a rationale for the clinical development of immunotherapies. PMID:27683579

  4. Identifying Individual T Cell Receptors of Optimal Avidity for Tumor Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Hebeisen, Michael; Allard, Mathilde; Gannon, Philippe O.; Schmidt, Julien; Speiser, Daniel E.; Rufer, Nathalie

    2015-01-01

    Cytotoxic T cells recognize, via their T cell receptors (TCRs), small antigenic peptides presented by the major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) on the surface of professional antigen-presenting cells and infected or malignant cells. The efficiency of T cell triggering critically depends on TCR binding to cognate pMHC, i.e., the TCR–pMHC structural avidity. The binding and kinetic attributes of this interaction are key parameters for protective T cell-mediated immunity, with stronger TCR–pMHC interactions conferring superior T cell activation and responsiveness than weaker ones. However, high-avidity TCRs are not always available, particularly among self/tumor antigen-specific T cells, most of which are eliminated by central and peripheral deletion mechanisms. Consequently, systematic assessment of T cell avidity can greatly help distinguishing protective from non-protective T cells. Here, we review novel strategies to assess TCR–pMHC interaction kinetics, enabling the identification of the functionally most-relevant T cells. We also discuss the significance of these technologies in determining which cells within a naturally occurring polyclonal tumor-specific T cell response would offer the best clinical benefit for use in adoptive therapies, with or without T cell engineering. PMID:26635796

  5. Different Subsets of T Cells, Memory, Effector Functions, and CAR-T Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Golubovskaya, Vita; Wu, Lijun

    2016-03-15

    This review is focused on different subsets of T cells: CD4 and CD8, memory and effector functions, and their role in CAR-T therapy--a cellular adoptive immunotherapy with T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptor. The CAR-T cells recognize tumor antigens and induce cytotoxic activities against tumor cells. Recently, differences in T cell functions and the role of memory and effector T cells were shown to be important in CAR-T cell immunotherapy. The CD4⁺ subsets (Th1, Th2, Th9, Th17, Th22, Treg, and Tfh) and CD8⁺ memory and effector subsets differ in extra-cellular (CD25, CD45RO, CD45RA, CCR-7, L-Selectin [CD62L], etc.); intracellular markers (FOXP3); epigenetic and genetic programs; and metabolic pathways (catabolic or anabolic); and these differences can be modulated to improve CAR-T therapy. In addition, CD4⁺ Treg cells suppress the efficacy of CAR-T cell therapy, and different approaches to overcome this suppression are discussed in this review. Thus, next-generation CAR-T immunotherapy can be improved, based on our knowledge of T cell subsets functions, differentiation, proliferation, and signaling pathways to generate more active CAR-T cells against tumors.

  6. Targeted immunotherapy of cancer with CAR T cells: achievements and challenges.

    PubMed

    Lipowska-Bhalla, Grazyna; Gilham, David E; Hawkins, Robert E; Rothwell, Dominic G

    2012-07-01

    The adoptive transfer of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-expressing T cells is a relatively new but promising approach in the field of cancer immunotherapy. This therapeutic strategy is based on the genetic reprogramming of T cells with an artificial immune receptor that redirects them against targets on malignant cells and enables their destruction by exerting T cell effector functions. There has been an explosion of interest in the use of CAR T cells as an immunotherapy for cancer. In the pre-clinical setting, there has been a considerable focus upon optimizing the structural and signaling potency of the CAR while advances in bio-processing technology now mean that the clinical testing of these gene-modified T cells has become a reality. This review will summarize the concept of CAR-based immunotherapy and recent clinical trial activity and will further discuss some of the likely future challenges facing CAR-modified T cell therapies.

  7. Simultaneous diagnosis and gene therapy of immuno-rejection in rat allogeneic heart transplantation model using a T-cell-targeted theranostic nanosystem.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yu; Chen, Wenjie; Wang, Weiwei; Shen, Jun; Guo, Ruomi; Gong, Faming; Lin, Shudong; Cheng, Du; Chen, Guihua; Shuai, Xintao

    2012-12-21

    As the final life-saving treatment option for patients with terminal organ failure, organ transplantation is far from an ideal solution. The concomitant allograft rejection, which is hardly detectable especially in the early acute rejection (AR) period characterized by an intense cellular and humoral attack on donor tissue, greatly affects the graft survival and results in rapid graft loss. Based on a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-visible and T-cell-targeted multifunctional polymeric nanocarrier developed in our lab, effective co-delivery of pDNA and superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles into primary T cells expressing CD3 molecular biomarker was confirmed in vitro. In the heart transplanted rat model, this multifunctional nanocarrier showed not only a high efficiency in detecting post-transplantation acute rejection but also a great ability to mediate gene transfection in T cells. Upon intravenous injection of this MRI-visible polyplex of nanocarrier and pDNA, T-cell gathering was detected at the endocardium of the transplanted heart as linear strongly hypointense areas on the MRI T(2)*-weighted images on the third day after cardiac transplantation. Systematic histological and molecular biology studies demonstrated that the immune response in heart transplanted rats was significantly suppressed upon gene therapy using the polyplex bearing the DGKα gene. More excitingly, the therapeutic efficacy was readily monitored by noninvasive MRI during the treatment process. Our results revealed the great potential of the multifunctional nanocarrier as a highly effective imaging tool for real-time and noninvasive monitoring and a powerful nanomedicine platform for gene therapy of AR with high efficiency.

  8. Acyclovir Therapy Reduces the CD4+ T Cell Response against the Immunodominant pp65 Protein from Cytomegalovirus in Immune Competent Individuals.

    PubMed

    Pachnio, Annette; Begum, Jusnara; Fox, Ashini; Moss, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infects the majority of the global population and leads to the development of a strong virus-specific immune response. The CMV-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cell immune response can comprise between 10 and 50% of the T cell pool within peripheral blood and there is concern that this may impair immunity to other pathogens. Elderly individuals with the highest magnitude of CMV-specific immune response have been demonstrated to be at increased risk of mortality and there is increasing interest in interventions that may serve to moderate this. Acyclovir is an anti-viral drug with activity against a range of herpes viruses and is used as long term treatment to suppress reactivation of herpes simplex virus. We studied the immune response to CMV in patients who were taking acyclovir to assess if therapy could be used to suppress the CMV-specific immune response. The T cell reactivity against the immunodominant late viral protein pp65 was reduced by 53% in people who were taking acyclovir. This effect was seen within one year of therapy and was observed primarily within the CD4+ response. Acyclovir treatment only modestly influenced the immune response to the IE-1 target protein. These data show that low dose acyclovir treatment has the potential to modulate components of the T cell response to CMV antigen proteins and indicate that anti-viral drugs should be further investigated as a means to reduce the magnitude of CMV-specific immune response and potentially improve overall immune function.

  9. Ex vivo rapamycin generates Th1/Tc1 or Th2/Tc2 Effector T cells with enhanced in vivo function and differential sensitivity to post-transplant rapamycin therapy.

    PubMed

    Jung, Unsu; Foley, Jason E; Erdmann, Andreas A; Toda, Yoko; Borenstein, Todd; Mariotti, Jacopo; Fowler, Daniel H

    2006-09-01

    Rapamycin prevention of murine graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is associated with a shift toward Th2- and Tc2-type cytokines. Recently, we found that use of rapamycin during ex vivo donor Th2 cell generation enhances the ability of adoptively transferred Th2 cells to prevent murine GVHD. In this study, using a method, without antigen-presenting cells, of T-cell expansion based on CD3,CD28 costimulation, we evaluated whether (1) rapamycin preferentially promotes the generation of Th2/Tc2 cells relative to Th1/Tc1 cells, (2) rapamycin-generated T-cell subsets induce cytokine skewing after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT), and (3) such in vivo cytokine skewing is sensitive to post-BMT rapamycin therapy. Contrary to our hypothesis, rapamycin did not preferentially promote Th2/Tc2 cell polarity, because rapamycin-generated Th1/Tc1 cells secreted type I cytokines (interleukin [IL]-2 and interferon-gamma) did not secrete type II cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, IL-10, or IL-13) and mediated fasL-based cytolysis. Rapamycin influenced T-cell differentiation, because each of the Th1, Th2, Tc1, and Tc2 subsets generated in rapamycin had increased expression of the central-memory T-cell marker, L-selectin (CD62L). Rapamycin-generated Th1/Tc1 and Th2/Tc2 cells were not anergic but instead had increased expansion after costimulation in vitro, increased expansion in vivo after BMT, and maintained full capacity to skew toward type I or II cytokines after BMT, respectively; further, rapamycin-generated Th1/Tc1 cells mediated increased lethal GVHD relative to control Th1/Tc1 cells. Rapamycin therapy after BMT in recipients of rapamycin-generated Th1/Tc1 cells greatly reduced Th1/Tc1 cell number, greatly reduced type I cytokines, and reduced lethal GVHD; in marked contrast, rapamycin therapy in recipients of rapamycin-generated Th2/Tc2 cells nominally influenced the number of Th2/Tc2 cells in vivo and did not abrogate post-BMT type II cytokine skewing. In conclusion, ex vivo and

  10. Methamphetamine Use in HIV-infected Individuals Affects T-cell Function and Viral Outcome during Suppressive Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Massanella, Marta; Gianella, Sara; Schrier, Rachel; Dan, Jennifer M; Pérez-Santiago, Josué; Oliveira, Michelli F; Richman, Douglas D; Little, Susan J; Benson, Constance A; Daar, Eric S; Dube, Michael P; Haubrich, Richard H; Smith, Davey M; Morris, Sheldon R

    2015-08-24

    We investigated the associations between methamphetamine (meth) use, immune function, and the dynamics of HIV and cytomegalovirus [CMV] in the blood and genital tract of HIV-infected ART-suppressed subjects. Self-reported meth use was associated with increased CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell proliferation (Ki67(+), p < 0.005), CD4(+) T-cell activation (CD45RA(-)CD38(+), p = 0.005) and exhaustion (PD-1(+), p = 0.0004) in blood, compared to non-meth users. Meth use was also associated with a trend towards higher blood HIV DNA levels (p = 0.09) and more frequent shedding of CMV in seminal plasma (p = 0.002). To explore possible mechanisms, we compared ex vivo spontaneous and antigen-specific proliferation in PBMC collected from subjects with and without positive meth detection in urine (Utox+ vs. Utox-). Despite higher levels of spontaneous proliferation, lymphocytes from Utox+ meth users had a significantly lower proliferative capacity after stimulation with a number of pathogens (CMV, candida, mycobacterium, toxoplasma, HIV, p < 0.04 in all cases), compared to Utox- participants. Our findings suggest that meth users have greater proliferation and exhaustion of the immune system. Meth use is also associated with a loss of control of CMV replication, which could be related to loss of immune response to pathogens. Future studies should consider meth use as a potential modulator of T-cell responses.

  11. Interdependent IL-7 and IFN-γ signalling in T-cell controls tumour eradication by combined α-CTLA-4+α-PD-1 therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Lewis Zhichang; Fu, Tihui; Guan, Baoxiang; Chen, Jianfeng; Blando, Jorge M.; Allison, James P.; Xiong, Liangwen; Subudhi, Sumit K.; Gao, Jianjun; Sharma, Padmanee

    2016-01-01

    Combination therapy with α-CTLA-4 and α-PD-1 has shown significant clinical responses in different types of cancer. However, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Here, combining detailed analysis of human tumour samples with preclinical tumour models, we report that concomitant blockade of CTLA-4 and PD-1 improves anti-tumour immune responses and synergistically eradicates tumour. Mechanistically, combination therapy relies on the interdependence between IL-7 and IFN-γ signalling in T cells, as lack of either pathway abrogates the immune-boosting and therapeutic effects of combination therapy. Combination treatment increases IL-7Rα expression on tumour-infiltrating T cells in an IFN-γ/IFN-γR signalling-dependent manner, which may serve as a potential biomarker for clinical trials with immune checkpoint blockade. Our data suggest that combining immune checkpoint blockade with IL-7 signalling could be an effective modality to improve immunotherapeutic efficacy. Taken together, we conclude that combination therapy potently reverses immunosuppression and eradicates tumours via an intricate interplay between IFN-γ/IFN-γR and IL-7/IL-7R pathways. PMID:27498556

  12. Lymph node-derived donor encephalitogenic CD4+ T cells in C57BL/6 mice adoptive transfer experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis highly express GM-CSF and T-bet.

    PubMed

    Cravens, Petra D; Hussain, Rehana Z; Zacharias, Tresa E; Ben, Li-Hong; Herndon, Emily; Vinnakota, Ramya; Lambracht-Washington, Doris; Nessler, Stefan; Zamvil, Scott S; Eagar, Todd N; Stüve, Olaf

    2011-06-24

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a relevant animal model for the human demyelinating inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system (CNS), multiple sclerosis (MS). Induction of EAE by adoptive transfer allows studying the role of the donor T lymphocyte in disease pathogenesis. It has been challenging to reliably induce adoptive transfer EAE in C57BL/6 (H-2b) mice. The goal of this study was to develop a reproducible and high yield protocol for adoptive transfer EAE in C57BL/6 mice. A step-wise experimental approach permitted us to develop a protocol that resulted in a consistent relatively high disease incidence of ~70% in recipient mice. Donor mice were immunized with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)p35-55 in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) followed by pertussis toxin (PT). Only lymph node cells (LNC) isolated at day 12 post immunization, and restimulated in vitro for 72 hours with 10 μg/mL of MOGp35-55 and 0.5 ng/mL of interleukin-12 (IL-12) were able to transfer disease. The ability of LNC to transfer disease was associated with the presence of inflammatory infiltrates in the CNS at day 12. Interferon gamma (IFNγ) was produced at comparable levels in cell cultures prepared from mice at both day 6 and day 12 post immunization. By contrast, there was a trend towards a negative association between IL-17 and disease susceptibility in our EAE model. The amount of GM-CSF secreted was significantly increased in the culture supernatants from cells collected at day 12 post immunization versus those collected at day 6 post-immunization. Activated CD4+ T cells present in the day 12 LNC cultures maintained expression of the transcription factor T-bet, which has been shown to regulate the expression of the IL-23 receptor. Also, there was an increased prevalence of MOGp35-55-specific CD4+ T cells in day 12 LNC after in vitro re-stimulation. In summary, encephalitogenic LNC that adoptively transfer EAE in C57BL/6 mice were not characterized

  13. Functionalized liposomes loaded with siRNAs targeting ion channels in effector memory T cells as a potential therapy for autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Hajdu, Péter; Chimote, Ameet A.; Thompson, Tyler; Koo, Youngmi; Yun, Yeoheung; Conforti, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Effector memory T cells (TM) play a key role in the pathology of certain autoimmune disorders. The activity of effector TM cells is under the control of Kv1.3 ion channels, which facilitate the Ca2+ influx necessary for T cell activation and function, i.e. cytokine release and proliferation. Consequently, the knock-down of Kv1.3 expression in effector TM’s may be utilized as a therapy for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. In this study we synthesized lipid unilamellar nanoparticles (NPs) that can selectively deliver Kv1.3 siRNAs into TM cells in vitro. NPs made from a mixture of phosphatidylcholine, pegylated/biotinylated phosphoethanolamine and cholesterol were functionalized with biotinylated-CD45RO (cell surface marker of TM’s) antibodies via fluorophore-conjugated streptavidin (CD45RO-NPs). Incubation of T cells with CD45RO-NPs resulted into the selective attachment and endocytosis of the NPs into TM’s. Furthermore, the siRNA against Kv1.3, encapsulated into the CD45RO-NPs, was released into the cytosol. Consequently, the expression of Kv1.3 channels decreased significantly in TM’s, which led to a remarkable decrease in Ca2+ influx. Our results can form the basis of an innovative therapeutic approach in autoimmunity. PMID:24075407

  14. Plant-based oral tolerance to hemophilia therapy employs a complex immune regulatory response including LAP+CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaomei; Su, Jin; Sherman, Alexandra; Rogers, Geoffrey L.; Liao, Gongxian; Hoffman, Brad E.; Leong, Kam W.; Terhorst, Cox; Daniell, Henry

    2015-01-01

    Coagulation factor replacement therapy for the X-linked bleeding disorder hemophilia is severely complicated by antibody (“inhibitor”) formation. We previously found that oral delivery to hemophilic mice of cholera toxin B subunit-coagulation factor fusion proteins expressed in chloroplasts of transgenic plants suppressed inhibitor formation directed against factors VIII and IX and anaphylaxis against factor IX (FIX). This observation and the relatively high concentration of antigen in the chloroplasts prompted us to evaluate the underlying tolerance mechanisms. The combination of oral delivery of bioencapsulated FIX and intravenous replacement therapy induced a complex, interleukin-10 (IL-10)–dependent, antigen-specific systemic immune suppression of pathogenic antibody formation (immunoglobulin [Ig] 1/inhibitors, IgE) in hemophilia B mice. Tolerance induction was also successful in preimmune mice but required prolonged oral delivery once replacement therapy was resumed. Orally delivered antigen, initially targeted to epithelial cells, was taken up by dendritic cells throughout the small intestine and additionally by F4/80+ cells in the duodenum. Consistent with the immunomodulatory responses, frequencies of tolerogenic CD103+ and plasmacytoid dendritic cells were increased. Ultimately, latency-associated peptide expressing CD4+ regulatory T cells (CD4+CD25−LAP+ cells with upregulated IL-10 and transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) expression) as well as conventional CD4+CD25+ regulatory T cells systemically suppressed anti-FIX responses. PMID:25700434

  15. Levels of circulating myeloid subpopulations and of heme oxygenase-1 do not predict CD4+ T cell recovery after the initiation of antiretroviral therapy for HIV disease

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The level (or frequency) of circulating monocyte subpopulations such as classical (CD14hiCD16-) and non-classical (CD14dimCD16+) monocytes varies during the course of HIV disease progression and antiretroviral therapy (ART). We hypothesized that such variation and/or differences in the degree to which these cells expressed the immunoregulatory enzyme, heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), would be associated with CD4+ T cell recovery after the initiation of ART. This hypothesis was tested in a cross-sectional study of four groups of HIV-infected subjects, including those who were seronegative, untreated virologic controllers [detectable viral load (VL) of <1000 copies/mL], untreated virologic non-controllers [VL > 10,000 copies/mL], and ART-mediated virologic controllers [VL < 75 copies/mL]. A longitudinal analysis of ART-treated subjects was also performed along with regression analysis to determine which biomarkers were associated with and/or predictive of CD4+ T cell recovery. Suppressive ART was associated with increased levels of classical monocyte subpopulations (CD14hiCD16-) and decreased levels of non-classical monocyte populations (CD14dimCD16+). Among peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), HO-1 was found to be most highly up-regulated in CD14+ monocytes after ex vivo stimulation. Neither the levels of monocyte subpopulations nor of HO-1 expression in CD14+ monocytes were significantly associated with the degree of CD4+ T cell recovery. Monocyte subpopulations and HO-1 gene expression were, however, restored to normal levels by suppressive ART. These results suggest that the level of circulating monocyte subpopulations and their expression of HO-1 have no evident relationship to CD4+ T cell recovery after the initiation of ART. PMID:25180041

  16. Longitudinal PET imaging demonstrates biphasic CAR T cell responses in survivors

    PubMed Central

    Vedvyas, Yogindra; Shevlin, Enda; Zaman, Marjan; Min, Irene M.; Park, Spencer; Park, Susan; Kwon, Keon-Woo; Smith, Turner; Luo, Yonghua; Kim, Dohyun; Kim, Young; Law, Benedict; Ting, Richard; Jin, Moonsoo M.

    2016-01-01

    Clinical monitoring of adoptive T cell transfer (ACT) utilizes serial blood analyses to discern T cell activity. While useful, these data are 1-dimensional and lack spatiotemporal information related to treatment efficacy or toxicity. We utilized a human genetic reporter, somatostatin receptor 2 (SSTR2), and PET, to quantitatively and longitudinally visualize whole-body T cell distribution and antitumor dynamics using a clinically approved radiotracer. Initial evaluations determined that SSTR2-expressing T cells were detectable at low densities with high sensitivity and specificity. SSTR2-based PET was applied to ACT of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells targeting intercellular adhesion molecule-1, which is overexpressed in anaplastic thyroid tumors. Timely CAR T cell infusions resulted in survival of tumor-bearing mice, while later infusions led to uniform death. Real-time PET imaging revealed biphasic T cell expansion and contraction at tumor sites among survivors, with peak tumor burden preceding peak T cell burden by several days. In contrast, nonsurvivors displayed unrelenting increases in tumor and T cell burden, indicating that tumor growth was outpacing T cell killing. Thus, longitudinal PET imaging of SSTR2-positive ACT dynamics enables prognostic, spatiotemporal monitoring with unprecedented clarity and detail to facilitate comprehensive therapy evaluation with potential for clinical translation. PMID:27882353

  17. γδ T Cells Confer Protection against Murine Cytomegalovirus (MCMV)

    PubMed Central

    Villacreces, Arnaud; Juzan, Marina; Rousseau, Benoît; Dulanto, Sara; Giese, Alban; Costet, Pierre; Praloran, Vincent; Moreau, Jean-François; Dubus, Pierre; Vermijlen, David

    2015-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a leading infectious cause of morbidity in immune-compromised patients. γδ T cells have been involved in the response to CMV but their role in protection has not been firmly established and their dependency on other lymphocytes has not been addressed. Using C57BL/6 αβ and/or γδ T cell-deficient mice, we here show that γδ T cells are as competent as αβ T cells to protect mice from CMV-induced death. γδ T cell-mediated protection involved control of viral load and prevented organ damage. γδ T cell recovery by bone marrow transplant or adoptive transfer experiments rescued CD3ε−/− mice from CMV-induced death confirming the protective antiviral role of γδ T cells. As observed in humans, different γδ T cell subsets were induced upon CMV challenge, which differentiated into effector memory cells. This response was observed in the liver and lungs and implicated both CD27+ and CD27− γδ T cells. NK cells were the largely preponderant producers of IFNγ and cytotoxic granules throughout the infection, suggesting that the protective role of γδ T cells did not principally rely on either of these two functions. Finally, γδ T cells were strikingly sufficient to fully protect Rag−/−γc−/− mice from death, demonstrating that they can act in the absence of B and NK cells. Altogether our results uncover an autonomous protective antiviral function of γδ T cells, and open new perspectives for the characterization of a non classical mode of action which should foster the design of new γδ T cell based therapies, especially useful in αβ T cell compromised patients. PMID:25747674

  18. T-cell epitope strength in WAP-T mouse mammary carcinomas is an important determinant in PD1/PD-L1 immune checkpoint blockade therapy

    PubMed Central

    Bruns, Michael; Wanger, Jara; Schumacher, Udo; Deppert, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Using the SV40 transgenic WAP-T/WAP-TNP mouse models for mammary carcinomas, we compared the response to immune checkpoint blockade therapy in tumor mice expressing either SV40 T-antigen containing the LCMV NP-epitope (T-AgNP in WAP-TNP mice), or the unmodified T-antigen (T-Ag in WAP-T mice). Specifically, we asked, whether the presence of the highly immunogenic NP-epitope in T-AgNP influences this response in comparison to the weakly immunogenic T-cell epitopes of T-Ag in WAP-T tumor mice. Treatment of WAP-TNP tumor mice with either anti-PD1 or anti-PD-L1 antibodies led to tumor regression, with anti-PD-L1 treatment being more effective. However, tumors had fully re-appeared after 21 days, indicating that CTL exhaustion had been rapidly re-established. Surprisingly, the same treatment applied to WAP-T tumor mice resulted in a significantly prolonged period of tumor regression. We provide evidence that in contrast to the weak antigenic stimuli exerted by T-cell epitopes of T-Ag, the strong antigenic stimulus of the NP-epitope in T-AgNP has a dual effect: (i) a rapid generation of active NP-specific CTLs, accompanied (ii) by accelerated CTL exhaustion. Our data support the hypothesis that the immunogenicity of tumor antigen T-cell epitopes strongly influences the success of immune checkpoint blockade therapy. PMID:27579535

  19. Determinants of clinician adoption of regenerative therapies in the UK and Canada: an ophthalmology perspective.

    PubMed

    Rose, James B; May, Michael; Williams, David J

    2015-05-01

    The determinants of adoption of regenerative medicine therapies are currently poorly understood. This study aims to draw comparison between the UK and Canada in terms of factors likely to affect healthcare adoption of future regenerative therapies in ophthalmology. Conducting semi-structured interviews with senior ophthalmologists in the UK and Canada, their perceptions of factors either enabling or limiting adoption were recorded and analyzed. A number of key concepts were extracted from the interview data, perceived by stakeholders to contribute to adoption. The core factors developed in this work will be of use to those looking to understand the opportunities and risks involved in securing clinician adoption in both the UK and Canada.

  20. Thymopoiesis, regulatory T cells, and TCRVbeta expression in thymoma with and without myasthenia gravis, and modulatory effects of steroid therapy.

    PubMed

    Fattorossi, Andrea; Battaglia, Alessandra; Buzzonetti, Alexia; Minicuci, Giacomo; Riso, Raffaella; Peri, Laura; Scambia, Giovanni; Evoli, Amelia

    2008-03-01

    We analyzed thymocyte and thymic regulatory T cell (CD4SPCD25+Foxp3+cells, Treg) development in thymoma with and without myasthenia gravis (MG, MG-thymoma, non-MG-thymoma) and in MG-associated non-neoplastic thymus (MG-NNT). An increased number of immature CD4+CD8(-)CD3(-) thymocytes through the CD4+CD8+ to CD4+CD8(-) transition and an abnormal T cell receptor Vbeta (TCRVbeta) development through the CD4+CD8+ to CD4(-)CD8+ transition were seen both in MG-and non-MG-thymomas. Terminal thymopoiesis, i.e., CD45RA+ cells within the CD4+CD8(-)CD3+ and CD8+CD4(-)CD3+ subsets, was skewed towards the CD4+ compartment in MG-thymoma and CD8+ compartment in non-MG-thymoma, but thymic export was increased only in the latter in keeping with the hypothesis that CD8+ lymphocytes may play a role in the initial stages of autosensitization and in disagreement with the relevance of an increased output of CD4+ T lymphocytes in paraneoplastic MG. Treg level in normal thymus and MG-NNT and both MG- and non-MG-thymoma was similar, and TCRVbeta development in Treg cells was slightly altered in thymoma but irrespective of MG presence. Thus, the relevance of a defective Treg development in MG context remains to be established. Most alterations in thymopoiesis were corrected by therapeutic corticosteroid administration, and the effects of steroid administration may be mediated by thymic microenvironment.

  1. Activation of myeloid and endothelial cells by CD40L gene therapy supports T-cell expansion and migration into the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, E; Moreno, R; Milenova, I; Liljenfeldt, L; Dieterich, L C; Christiansson, L; Karlsson, H; Ullenhag, G; Mangsbo, S M; Dimberg, A; Alemany, R; Loskog, A

    2017-02-01

    CD40 is an interesting target in cancer immunotherapy due to its ability to stimulate T-helper 1 immunity via maturation of dendritic cells and to drive M2 to M1 macrophage differentiation. Pancreatic cancer has a high M2 content that has shown responsive to anti-CD40 agonist therapy and CD40 may thus be a suitable target for immune activation in these patients. In this study, a novel oncolytic adenovirus armed with a trimerized membrane-bound extracellular CD40L (TMZ-CD40L) was evaluated as a treatment of pancreatic cancer. Further, the CD40L mechanisms of action were elucidated in cancer models. The results demonstrated that the virus transferring TMZ-CD40L had oncolytic capacity in pancreatic cancer cells and could control tumor progression. TMZ-CD40L was a potent stimulator of human myeloid cells and T-cell responses. Further, CD40L-mediated stimulation increased tumor-infiltrating T cells in vivo, which may be due to a direct activation of endothelial cells to upregulate receptors for lymphocyte attachment and transmigration. In conclusion, CD40L-mediated gene therapy is an interesting concept for the treatment of tumors with high levels of M2 macrophages, such as pancreatic cancer, and an oncolytic virus as carrier of CD40L may further boost tumor killing and immune activation.

  2. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy induces glucocorticoid synthesis in colonic mucosa and suppresses radiation-activated T cells: new insights into MSC immunomodulation.

    PubMed

    Bessout, R; Sémont, A; Demarquay, C; Charcosset, A; Benderitter, M; Mathieu, N

    2014-05-01

    Non-neoplastic tissues around an abdomino-pelvic tumor can be damaged by the radiotherapy protocol, leading to chronic gastrointestinal complications that affect the quality of life with substantial mortality. Stem cell-based approaches using immunosuppressive bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are promising cell therapy tools. In a rat model of radiation proctitis, we evidenced that a single MSC injection reduces colonic mucosa damages induced by ionizing radiation with improvement of the re-epithelization process for up to 21 days. Immune cell infiltrate and inflammatory molecule expressions in the colonic mucosa were investigated. We report that MSC therapy specifically reduces T-cell infiltration and proliferation, and increases apoptosis of radiation-activated T cells. We assessed the underlying molecular mechanisms and found that interleukin-10 and regulatory T lymphocytes are not involved in the immunosuppressive process in this model. However, an increased level of corticosterone secretion and HSD11b1 (11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1)-steroidogenic enzyme expression was detected in colonic mucosa 21 days after MSC treatment. Moreover, blocking the glucocorticoid (GC) receptor using the RU486 molecule statistically enhances the allogenic lymphocyte proliferation inhibited by MSCs in vitro and abrogates the mucosal protection induced by MSC treatment in vivo. Using the irradiation model, we found evidence for a new MSC immunosuppressive mechanism involving GCs.

  3. Survival Advantage With the Addition of Radiation Therapy to Chemotherapy in Early Stage Peripheral T-Cell Lymphoma, Not Otherwise Specified

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xi-Mei; Li, Ye-Xiong; Wang, Wei-Hu; Jin, Jing; Wang, Shu-Lian; Liu, Yue-Ping; Song, Yong-Wen; Fang, Hui; Ren, Hua; Zhou, Li-Qiang; Liu, Xin-Fan; Yu, Zi-Hao

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Early stage peripheral T-cell lymphoma, not otherwise specified (PTCL-NOS) is rare. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcome of treatment as well as the potential role of radiation therapy in PTCL-NOS. Methods and Materials: Thirty-five patients with early stage PTCL-NOS were included. There were 13 patients with stage I disease and 22 with stage II. All patients except 1 received doxorubicin-based chemotherapy alone (n=13) or a combination of chemotherapy and radiation therapy (CMT) (n=21). Results: The 3-year overall survival (OS) and progression-free survival (PFS) rates for the entire group were 41.3% and 25.7%, respectively. The addition of radiation therapy to chemotherapy significantly improved OS and PFS in early stage PTCL-NOS. The 3-year OS and PFS rates were 49.7% and 33.3% for CMT, compared with 23.1% (P=.042) and 15.4% (P=.035) for chemotherapy alone, respectively. The prognosis for patients who achieved a complete response (CR) was significantly better than that observed in those who did not achieve a CR. Conclusions: Despite the aggressive clinical course of early stage PTCL-NOS, additional radiation therapy has a significant impact on outcome. The integration of local radiation therapy into more effective systemic therapies may further improve survival.

  4. Effect of Cytomegalovirus Co-Infection on Normalization of Selected T-Cell Subsets in Children with Perinatally Acquired HIV Infection Treated with Combination Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Kapetanovic, Suad; Aaron, Lisa; Montepiedra, Grace; Anthony, Patricia; Thuvamontolrat, Kasalyn; Pahwa, Savita; Burchett, Sandra; Weinberg, Adriana; Kovacs, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Background We examined the effect of cytomegalovirus (CMV) co-infection and viremia on reconstitution of selected CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell subsets in perinatally HIV-infected (PHIV+) children ≥ 1-year old who participated in a partially randomized, open-label, 96-week combination antiretroviral therapy (cART)-algorithm study. Methods Participants were categorized as CMV-naïve, CMV-positive (CMV+) viremic, and CMV+ aviremic, based on blood, urine, or throat culture, CMV IgG and DNA polymerase chain reaction measured at baseline. At weeks 0, 12, 20 and 40, T-cell subsets including naïve (CD62L+CD45RA+; CD95-CD28+), activated (CD38+HLA-DR+) and terminally differentiated (CD62L-CD45RA+; CD95+CD28-) CD4+ and CD8+ T-cells were measured by flow cytometry. Results Of the 107 participants included in the analysis, 14% were CMV+ viremic; 49% CMV+ aviremic; 37% CMV-naïve. In longitudinal adjusted models, compared with CMV+ status, baseline CMV-naïve status was significantly associated with faster recovery of CD8+CD62L+CD45RA+% and CD8+CD95-CD28+% and faster decrease of CD8+CD95+CD28-%, independent of HIV VL response to treatment, cART regimen and baseline CD4%. Surprisingly, CMV status did not have a significant impact on longitudinal trends in CD8+CD38+HLA-DR+%. CMV status did not have a significant impact on any CD4+ T-cell subsets. Conclusions In this cohort of PHIV+ children, the normalization of naïve and terminally differentiated CD8+ T-cell subsets in response to cART was detrimentally affected by the presence of CMV co-infection. These findings may have implications for adjunctive treatment strategies targeting CMV co-infection in PHIV+ children, especially those that are now adults or reaching young adulthood and may have accelerated immunologic aging, increased opportunistic infections and aging diseases of the immune system. PMID:25794163

  5. Functional attributes of responding T cells in HCV infection: the recent advances in engineering functional antiviral T cells.

    PubMed

    Pasetto, Anna; Aleman, Soo; Chen, Margaret

    2014-02-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is one of the major causes of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) around the world. HCV promotes characteristics of cancer stem cells and the infected cells are insensitive to apoptotic signals, which lead to persistent antigen stimulation and T cell exhaustion in the host. In spite of new effective antiviral drugs, new challenges are around the corner as drug-resistant viral strains and drug-drug interactions have already been reported. Considering that there are few effective treatments available for HCC, novel immunotherapies to prevent HCC and late stage HCV-related liver diseases should be considered. Given that adoptive immunotherapy with antigen-specific T lymphocytes has emerged as an effective therapeutic strategy for combating cancer, there is, therefore, reason to examine the possibility of using highly functional HCV-reactive T cells in immunotherapy. This review aims to provide the current understanding of natural HCV responding T cells in HCV infection and to give an update on the novel approaches that have the capacity to ex vivo generate functional T cells for potential adoptive cell therapy. Approaches based on the pMHC tetramer-associated magnetic enrichment, exogenous HCV T cell receptor transfer, and induced pluripotent stem cell technologies are described herein. Their potentials as immunotherapeutic against HCV-related diseases are discussed.

  6. HIV-1 Reservoir Dynamics after Vaccination and Antiretroviral Therapy Interruption Are Associated with Dendritic Cell Vaccine-Induced T Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Andrés, Cristina; Plana, Montserrat; Guardo, Alberto C.; Alvarez-Fernández, Carmen; Climent, Nuria; Gallart, Teresa; León, Agathe; Clotet, Bonaventura; Autran, Brigitte; Chomont, Nicolas; Gatell, Josep M.; Sánchez-Palomino, Sonsoles

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT HIV-1-specific immune responses induced by a dendritic cell (DC)-based therapeutic vaccine might have some effect on the viral reservoir. Patients on combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) were randomized to receive DCs pulsed with autologous HIV-1 (n = 24) (DC-HIV-1) or nonpulsed DCs (n = 12) (DC-control). We measured the levels of total and integrated HIV-1 DNA in CD4 T cells isolated from these patients at 6 time points: before any cART; before the first cART interruption, which was at 56 weeks before the first immunization to isolate virus for pulsing DCs; before and after vaccinations (VAC1 and VAC2); and at weeks 12 and 48 after the second cART interruption. The vaccinations did not influence HIV-1 DNA levels in vaccinated subjects. After the cART interruption at week 12 postvaccination, while total HIV-1 DNA increased significantly in both arms, integrated HIV-1 DNA did not change in vaccinees (mean of 1.8 log10 to 1.9 copies/106 CD4 T cells, P = 0.22) and did increase in controls (mean of 1.8 log10 to 2.1 copies/106 CD4 T cells, P = 0.02) (P = 0.03 for the difference between groups). However, this lack of increase of integrated HIV-1 DNA observed in the DC-HIV-1 group was transient, and at week 48 after cART interruption, no differences were observed between the groups. The HIV-1-specific T cell responses at the VAC2 time point were inversely correlated with the total and integrated HIV-1 DNA levels after cART interruption in vaccinees (r [Pearson's correlation coefficient] = −0.69, P = 0.002, and r = −0.82, P < 0.0001, respectively). No correlations were found in controls. HIV-1-specific T cell immune responses elicited by DC therapeutic vaccines drive changes in HIV-1 DNA after vaccination and cART interruption. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT00402142.) IMPORTANCE There is an intense interest in developing strategies to target HIV-1 reservoirs as they create barriers to curing the disease

  7. Child-Parent Relationship Therapy for Adoptive Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carnes-Holt, Kara

    2012-01-01

    Adopted children may present with a wide range of disruptive behaviors making it difficult to implement holistic therapeutic interventions. The number of primary caregivers, disrupted placements, and repeated traumatic events contribute to the overall mental health of the adoptee and greater number of occurrences increases the risk of…

  8. Increased Regulatory T-Cell Percentage Contributes to Poor CD4(+) Lymphocytes Recovery: A 2-Year Prospective Study After Introduction of Antiretroviral Therapy.

    PubMed

    Saison, Julien; Maucort Boulch, Delphine; Chidiac, Christian; Demaret, Julie; Malcus, Christophe; Cotte, Laurent; Poitevin-Later, Francoise; Miailhes, Patrick; Venet, Fabienne; Trabaud, Mary Anne; Monneret, Guillaume; Ferry, Tristan

    2015-04-01

    Background.  The primary aim of this study was to determine the impact of regulatory T cells (Tregs) percentage on immune recovery in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients after antiretroviral therapy introduction. Methods.  A 2-year prospective study was conducted in HIV-1 chronically infected naive patients with CD4 count <500 cells/mm(3). Regulatory T cells were identified as CD4(+)CD25(high)CD127(low) cells among CD4(+) lymphocytes. Effect of Treg percentage at inclusion on CD4 evolution overtime was analyzed using a mixed-effect Poisson regression for count data. Results.  Fifty-eight patients were included (median CD4 = 293/mm(3), median Treg percentage = 6.1%). Percentage of Treg at baseline and CD4 nadir were independently related to the evolution of CD4 absolute value according to time: (1) at any given nadir CD4 count, 1% increase of initial Treg was associated with a 1.9% lower CD4 absolute value at month 24; (2) at any given Treg percentage at baseline, 10 cell/mm(3) increase of CD4 nadir was associated with a 2.4% increase of CD4 at month 24; and (3) both effects did not attenuate with time. The effect of Treg at baseline on CD4 evolution was as low as the CD4 nadir was high. Conclusions.  Regulatory T-cell percentage at baseline is a strong independent prognostic factor of immune recovery, particularly among patients with low CD4 nadir.

  9. Effector CD8+ T cell engraftment and anti-tumor immunity in lymphodepleted hosts is IL-7Rα dependent

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, C. Bryce; Riesenberg, Brian P.; May, Bennett R.; Gilreath, Stuart C.; Li, Guangfu; Staveley-O’Carroll, Kevin F.; Garrett-Mayer, Elizabeth; Mehrotra, Shikhar; Cole, David J.; Rubinstein, Mark P.

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive cellular therapy, in which activated tumor-reactive T cells are transferred into murine lymphodepleted hosts, is a promising cancer treatment option. Activation of T cells decreases IL-7 responsiveness; therefore, IL-15 is generally considered the main driver of effector T cell responses in this setting. However, we found in lymphodepleted hosts that CD8+ T cells activated with IL-12 showed enhanced engraftment that was initially dependent on host IL-7, but not IL-15. Mechanistically, enhanced IL-7 responsiveness was conferred by elevated IL-7Rα expression, which was critical for anti-tumor immunity. Elevated IL-7Rα expression was achievable without IL-12, as polyclonal CD8+ T cells activated with high TCR stimulation depended on T cell IL-7Rα expression and host IL-7 for maximal engraftment. Finally, IL-12 conditioning during the activation of human CD8+ T cells, including TCR-modified T cells generated using a clinically relevant protocol, led to enhanced IL-7Rα expression. Our results demonstrate the importance of the donor IL-7Rα/host IL-7 axis for effector CD8+ T cell engraftment and suggest novel strategies to improve adoptive cellular therapy as a cancer treatment. PMID:26297711

  10. A Multidrug-resistant Engineered CAR T Cell for Allogeneic Combination Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Valton, Julien; Guyot, Valérie; Marechal, Alan; Filhol, Jean-Marie; Juillerat, Alexandre; Duclert, Aymeric; Duchateau, Philippe; Poirot, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell represents a highly promising strategy to fight against multiple cancers. The clinical outcome of such therapies is intimately linked to the ability of effector cells to engraft, proliferate, and specifically kill tumor cells within patients. When allogeneic CAR T-cell infusion is considered, host versus graft and graft versus host reactions must be avoided to prevent rejection of adoptively transferred cells, host tissue damages and to elicit significant antitumoral outcome. This work proposes to address these three requirements through the development of multidrug-resistant T cell receptor αβ-deficient CAR T cells. We demonstrate that these engineered T cells displayed efficient antitumor activity and proliferated in the presence of purine and pyrimidine nucleoside analogues, currently used in clinic as preconditioning lymphodepleting regimens. The absence of TCRαβ at their cell surface along with their purine nucleotide analogues-resistance properties could prevent their alloreactivity and enable them to resist to lymphodepleting regimens that may be required to avoid their ablation via HvG reaction. By providing a basic framework to develop a universal T cell compatible with allogeneic adoptive transfer, this work is laying the foundation stone of the large-scale utilization of CAR T-cell immunotherapies. PMID:26061646

  11. Interleukin-7 Modulates Anti-Tumor CD8+ T Cell Responses via Its Action on Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Deiser, Katrin; Stoycheva, Diana; Bank, Ute; Blankenstein, Thomas; Schüler, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells is a promising approach for the treatment of chronic viral and malignant diseases. In order to improve adoptive T cell therapy (ATT) of cancer, recent strategies aim at the antibody-based blockade of immunosuppressive signaling pathways in CD8+ T cells. Alternatively, adjuvant effects of immunostimulatory cytokines might be exploited to improve therapeutic CD8+ T cell responses. For example, Interleukin-7 (IL-7) is a potent growth, activation and survival factor for CD8+ T cells that can be used to improve virus- and tumor-specific CD8+ T cell responses. Although direct IL-7 effects on CD8+ T cells were studied extensively in numerous models, the contribution of IL-7 receptor-competent (IL-7R+) host cells remained unclear. In the current study we provide evidence that CD8+ T cell-mediated tumor rejection in response to recombinant IL-7 (rIL-7) therapy is strictly dependent on IL-7R+ host cells. On the contrary, CD8+ T cell expansion is independent of host IL-7R expression. If, however, rIL-7 therapy and peptide vaccination are combined, host IL-7R signaling is crucial for CD8+ T cell expansion. Unexpectedly, maximum CD8+ T cell expansion relies mainly on IL-7R signaling in non-hematopoietic host cells, similar to the massive accumulation of dendritic cells and granulocytes. In summary, we provide evidence that IL-7R+ host cells are major targets of rIL-7 that modulate therapeutic CD8+ T cell responses and the outcome of rIL-7-assisted ATT. This knowledge may have important implications for the design and optimization of clinical ATT protocols. PMID:27447484

  12. Preferential expansion of human virus-specific multifunctional central memory T cells by partial targeting of the IL-2 receptor signaling pathway: the key role of CD4+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Schmueck, Michael; Fischer, Annika M; Hammoud, Ben; Brestrich, Gordon; Fuehrer, Henrike; Luu, Si-Hong; Mueller, Karin; Babel, Nina; Volk, Hans-Dieter; Reinke, Petra

    2012-05-15

    Effector memory T cells are effective in controlling acute infections, but central memory T cells play a key role in long-lasting protection against viruses and tumors. In vivo/in vitro challenge by Ag commonly supports the generation of effector memory T cells with limited longevity. To our knowledge, this study demonstrates for the first time in the human system and under rechallenge conditions that targeting IL-2R by partial mammalian target of rapamycin inhibition or blocking IL-2Rα enriches human CD4(+)/CD8(+) central memory T cells within the virus-specific T cell product associated with enhanced functionality (i.e., multicytokine secretors, including IL-2; enhanced CD137 and CD107a expression on CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells, respectively; and killing infected target cells). Remarkably, the effects on CD8(+) T cells are mainly mediated via the enhancement of CD4(+) T cell function. The data reveal new insights into the role of CD4(+) T cell support for the quality of CD8(+) T cell memory, even under rechallenge conditions. Moreover, our method offers a new approach to improve the long-lasting efficacy of adoptive T cell therapy in patients.

  13. Concurrent Epstein-Barr virus associated NK/T cell lymphoma after immunosuppressive therapy for aplastic anemia: report of a case and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Yin, Guangli; Ni, Ying; Xiao, Zhengrui; He, Guangsheng; Miao, Kourong

    2015-01-01

    Aplastic anemia (AA) patients with prolonged immunosuppression have a risk of development of lymphoproliferative disorders (LPDs), especially combined with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection. However, development of nature killer/T (NK/T) cell lymphoma, in a nontransplantation setting, has not been documented for AA patients with immunosuppressive therapy (IST). Herein, we described a middle-aged man, Han ethnic, who presented with swelled parotid gland after a long history of IST for AA. Fever, night sweating, weight loss had not been found. Increased heterotypic lymphocytes had been detected in the left side of parotid gland demonstrated as cCD3(+), CD56(+), GranB(+), TIA-1(+), MUM-1(+), KI-67 (50%-75%)(++), Bcl-6(-), MPO(-) by immunohistochemistry, and in-situ hybridization (ISH) indicated EBER positive. Chromosome analysis by R banding method revealed 46, XY [20]. NK/T cell lymphoma concurrent with aplastic anemia was diagnosed and a mild chemotherapy regimen including vincristine, prednisone, L-asparaginase was administered. The parotid mass was gradually regressed after the first cycle of chemotherapy. The patient discharged from the hospital voluntarily and lost the follow-up.

  14. Systemic Cytokine Levels Do Not Predict CD4+ T-Cell Recovery After Suppressive Combination Antiretroviral Therapy in Chronic Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Norris, Philip J.; Zhang, Jinbing; Worlock, Andrew; Nair, Sangeetha V.; Anastos, Kathryn; Minkoff, Howard L.; Villacres, Maria C.; Young, Mary; Greenblatt, Ruth M.; Desai, Seema; Landay, Alan L.; Gange, Stephen J.; Nugent, C. Thomas; Golub, Elizabeth T.; Keating, Sheila M.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Subjects on suppressive combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) who do not achieve robust reconstitution of CD4+ T cells face higher risk of complications and death. We studied participants in the Women's Interagency HIV Study with good (immunological responder [IR]) or poor (immunological nonresponder [INR]) CD4+ T-cell recovery after suppressive cART (n = 50 per group) to determine whether cytokine levels or low-level viral load correlated with INR status. Methods. A baseline sample prior to viral control and 2 subsequent samples 1 and 2 years after viral control were tested. Serum levels of 30 cytokines were measured at each time point, and low-level human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) viral load and anti-HIV antibody levels were measured 2 years after viral suppression. Results. There were minimal differences in cytokine levels between IR and INR subjects. At baseline, macrophage inflammatory protein-3β levels were higher in IR subjects; after 1 year of suppressive cART, soluble vascular endothelial growth factor-R3 levels were higher in IR subjects; and after 2 years of suppressive cART, interferon gamma-induced protein 10 levels were higher in INR subjects. Very low-level HIV viral load and anti-HIV antibody levels did not differ between IR and INR subjects. Conclusions. These results imply that targeting residual viral replication might not be the optimum therapeutic approach for INR subjects. PMID:26966697

  15. A pharmacologic perspective on newly emerging T-cell manipulation technologies

    PubMed Central

    Smethurst, Dominic

    2013-01-01

    T cells are a multifaceted family pivotal in the operations of the immune system and many of its associated diseases. The pathway to understanding T cells has been marked by several pharmacological advances including the discoveries of ciclosporin, tacrolimus and the mTOR inhibitors which revolutionized transplant therapy along with providing relief for severe eczema, asthma and other immunological disorders towards the end of the last century. This article will revisit the current understanding and new developments in T cell pharmacology 10 years on from the TeGenero (TGN 1412) debacle and look at more recent successes with ex vivo antigen presenting cell incubation technologies; T cell receptor (TCR) engineering and adoptive T cell therapy both with chimaeric antibodies and also with modified T cell receptors themselves. Features of T cell biology will be explored and processes often highly unique to humans will be used to highlight what many are beginning to see as an exciting new monoclonal (T cell) frontier for drug development. PMID:23039307

  16. Efficient Gene Editing in Primary Human T Cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yvonne Y

    2015-11-01

    Recent advances in T-cell therapy for cancer, viral infections, and autoimmune diseases highlight the broad therapeutic potential of T-cell engineering. However, site-specific genetic manipulation in primary human T cells remains challenging. Two recent studies describe efficient genome editing in T cells using CRISPR and TALEN approaches.

  17. Genetically engineered T cells to target EGFRvIII expressing glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Bullain, Szofia S.; Sahin, Ayguen; Szentirmai, Oszkar; Sanchez, Carlos; Lin, Ning; Baratta, Elizabeth; Waterman, Peter; Weissleder, Ralph; Mulligan, Richard C.

    2009-01-01

    Glioblastoma remains a significant therapeutic challenge, warranting further investigation of novel therapies. We describe an immunotherapeutic strategy to treat glioblastoma based on adoptive transfer of genetically modified T-lymphocytes (T cells) redirected to kill EGFRvIII expressing gliomas. We constructed a chimeric immune receptor (CIR) specific to EGFRvIII, (MR1-ζ). After in vitro selection and expansion, MR1-ζ genetically modified primary human T-cells specifically recognized EGFRvIII-positive tumor cells as demonstrated by IFN-γ secretion and efficient tumor lysis compared to control CIRs defective in EGFRvIII binding (MRB-ζ) or signaling (MR1-delζ). MR1-ζ expressing T cells also inhibited EGFRvIII-positive tumor growth in vivo in a xenografted mouse model. Successful targeting of EGFRvIII-positive tumors via adoptive transfer of genetically modified T cells may represent a new immunotherapy strategy with great potential for clinical applications. PMID:19387557

  18. Human melanoma immunotherapy using tumor antigen-specific T cells generated in humanized mice

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zheng; Xia, Jinxing; Fan, Wei; Wargo, Jennifer; Yang, Yong-Guang

    2016-01-01

    A major factor hindering the exploration of adoptive immunotherapy in preclinical settings is the limited availability of tumor-reactive human T cells. Here we developed a humanized mouse model that permits large-scale production of human T cells expressing the engineered melanoma antigen MART-1-specific TCR. Humanized mice, made by transplantation of human fetal thymic tissue and CD34+ cells virally-transduced with HLA class I-restricted melanoma antigen (MART-1)-specific TCR gene, showed efficient development of MART-1-TCR+ human T cells with predominantly CD8+ cells. Importantly, MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells developing in these mice were capable of mounting antigen-specific responses in vivo, as evidenced by their proliferation, phenotypic conversion and IFN-γ production following MART-1 peptide immunization. Moreover, these MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells mediated efficient killing of melanoma cells in an HLA/antigen-dependent manner. Adoptive transfer of in vitro expanded MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells induced potent antitumor responses that were further enhanced by IL-15 treatment in melanoma-bearing recipients. Finally, a short incubation of MART-1-specific T cells with rapamycin acted synergistically with IL-15, leading to significantly improved tumor-free survival in recipients with metastatic melanoma. These data demonstrate the practicality of using humanized mice to produce potentially unlimited source of tumor-specific human T cells for experimental and preclinical exploration of cancer immunotherapy. This study also suggests that pretreatment of tumor-reactive T cells with rapamycin in combination with IL-15 administration may be a novel strategy to improve the efficacy of adoptive T cell therapy. PMID:26824989

  19. Premature T Cell Senescence in Pediatric CKD.

    PubMed

    George, Roshan P; Mehta, Aneesh K; Perez, Sebastian D; Winterberg, Pamela; Cheeseman, Jennifer; Johnson, Brandi; Kwun, Jean; Monday, Stephanie; Stempora, Linda; Warshaw, Barry; Kirk, Allan D

    2017-01-01

    An individual's immune function, susceptibility to infection, and response to immunosuppressive therapy are influenced in part by his/her T cell maturation state. Although childhood is the most dynamic period of immune maturation, scant information regarding the variability of T cell maturation in children with renal disease is available. In this study, we compared the T cell phenotype in children with renal failure (n=80) with that in healthy children (n=20) using multiparameter flow cytometry to detect markers of T cell maturation, exhaustion, and senescence known to influence immune function. We correlated data with the degree of renal failure (dialysis or nondialysis), prior immunosuppression use, and markers of inflammation (C-reactive protein and inflammatory cytokines) to assess the influence of these factors on T cell phenotype. Children with renal disease had highly variable and often markedly skewed maturation phenotypes, including CD4/CD8 ratio reversal, increased terminal effector differentiation in CD8(+) T cells, reduction in the proportion of naïve T cells, evidence of T cell exhaustion and senescence, and variable loss of T cell CD28 expression. These findings were most significant in patients who had experienced major immune insults, particularly prior immunosuppressive drug exposure. In conclusion, children with renal disease have exceptional heterogeneity in the T cell repertoire. Cognizance of this heterogeneity might inform risk stratification with regard to the balance between infectious risk and response to immunosuppressive therapy, such as that required for autoimmune disease and transplantation.

  20. Innate Memory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Jameson, Stephen C.; Lee, You Jeong; Hogquist, Kristin A.

    2015-01-01

    Memory T cells are usually considered to be a feature of a successful immune response against a foreign antigen, and such cells can mediate potent immunity. However, in mice, alternative pathways have been described, through which naïve T cells can acquire the characteristics and functions of memory T cells without encountering specific foreign antigen or the typical signals required for conventional T cell differentiation. Such cells reflect a response to the internal rather the external environment, and hence such cells are called innate memory T cells. In this review, we describe how innate memory subsets were identified, the signals that induce their generation and their functional properties and potential role in the normal immune response. The existence of innate memory T cells in mice raises questions about whether parallel populations exist in humans, and we discuss the evidence for such populations during human T cell development and differentiation. PMID:25727290

  1. [Panniculitic T-cell lymphoma].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Vázquez, María; García-Arpa, Mónica; Martín, Francisco; Calle, Carmen; Marchán, Enrique; Romero, Guillermo; Cortina, Pilar

    2005-03-01

    Panniculitic T-cell lymphoma is a rare, aggressive variant of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma, with fewer than 100 cases described. The main problem is its diagnosis, as both the clinical and the histological features may simulate benign panniculitis. We present the case of a 34-year-old male patient, who had presented with an indurated plaque, sclerodermiform in appearance, on the front of the right thigh for 4 months, later accompanied by fever and constitutional symptoms. The initial diagnosis was cellulitis, but no clinical improvement was seen despite systemic antibiotic therapy. After two skin biopsies, the patient was diagnosed with panniculitic cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. The patient was treated with 8 cycles of CHOP chemotherapy, with resolution of the symptoms.

  2. Healthy CD4+ T lymphocytes are not affected by targeted therapies against the PI3K/Akt/mTOR pathway in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Martelli, Alberto M.; Zauli, Giorgio; Ultimo, Simona; McCubrey, James A.; Gonelli, Arianna; Marisi, Giorgia; Ulivi, Paola; Capitani, Silvano; Neri, Luca M.

    2016-01-01

    An attractive molecular target for novel anti-cancer therapies is the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway which is commonly deregulated in many types of cancer. Nevertheless, the effects of PI3K/Akt/mTOR inhibitors on T lymphocytes, a key component of immune responses, have been seldom explored. In this study we investigated the effects on human CD4+ T-cells of a panel of PI3K/Akt/mTOR inhibitors: BGT226, Torin-2, MK-2206, and ZSTK474. We also assessed their efficacy against two acute leukemia T cell lines. T lymphocytes were stimulated with phytohemagglutinin. Inhibitor effects on cell cycle and apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry, while cytotoxicity was assessed by MTT assays. In addition, the activation status of the pathway as well as induction of autophagy were analyzed by Western blotting. Quiescent healthy T lymphocytes were unaffected by the drugs whereas mitogen-stimulated lymphocytes as well as leukemic cell lines displayed a cell cycle block, caspase-dependent apoptosis, and dephosphorylation of key components of the signaling pathway. Autophagy was also induced in proliferating lymphocytes and in JURKAT and MOLT-4 cell lines. When autophagy was inhibited by 3-methyladenine or Bafilomycin A1, drug cytotoxicity was increased, indicating that autophagy is a protective mechanism. Therefore, our findings suggest that PI3K/Akt/mTOR inhibitors preserve lymphocyte viability. This is a valuable result to be taken into account when selecting drugs for targeted cancer therapy in order to minimize detrimental effects on immune function. PMID:27494886

  3. CAR T cells: driving the road from the laboratory to the clinic.

    PubMed

    Cheadle, Eleanor J; Gornall, Hannah; Baldan, Vania; Hanson, Vivien; Hawkins, Robert E; Gilham, David E

    2014-01-01

    Blockbuster antibody therapies have catapulted immune-based approaches to treat cancer into the consciousness of mainstay clinical research. On the back of this, other emerging immune-based therapies are providing great promise. T-cell therapy is one such area where recent trials using T cells genetically modified to express an antibody-based chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) targeted against the CD19 antigen have demonstrated impressive responses when adoptively transferred to patients with advanced chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The general concept of the CAR T cell was devised some 20 years ago. In this relatively short period of time, the technology to redirect T-cell function has moved at pace facilitating clinical translation; however, many questions remain with respect to developing the approach to improve CAR T-cell therapeutic activity and also to broaden the range of tumors that can be effectively targeted by this approach. This review highlights some of the underlying principles and compromises of CAR T-cell technology using the CD19-targeted CAR as a paradigm and discusses some of the issues that relate to targeting solid tumors with CAR T cells.

  4. Genetically engineered donor T cells to optimize graft-versus-tumor effects across MHC barriers

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arnab; Holland, Amanda M.; van den Brink, Marcel R.M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been used for more than 50 years to combat hematologic malignancies. In addition to being the first stem cell therapy, transplantation has provided evidence for the potent anti-tumor effects of T cells. Facilitating T-cell-based immunity against malignancies requires a careful balancing act between generating a robust response and avoiding off-target killing of healthy tissues, which is difficult to accomplish using bulk donor T cells. To address these issues, several approaches have been developed, drawing on basic T-cell biology, to potentiate graft-versus-tumor activity while avoiding graft-versus-host disease. Current strategies for anti-tumor cell therapies include (i) selecting optimal T cells for transfer, (ii) engineering T cells to possess enhanced effector functions, and (iii) generating T-cell precursors that complete development after adoptive transfer. In this review, we assess the current state of the art in T-lineage cell therapy to treat malignancies in the context of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:24329800

  5. TCR Signaling in T Cell Memory.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Mark A; Teixeiro, Emma

    2015-01-01

    T cell memory plays a critical role in our protection against pathogens and tumors. The antigen and its interaction with the T cell receptor (TCR) is one of the initiating elements that shape T cell memory together with inflammation and costimulation. Over the last decade, several transcription factors and signaling pathways that support memory programing have been identified. However, how TCR signals regulate them is still poorly understood. Recent studies have shown that the biochemical rules that govern T cell memory, strikingly, change depending on the TCR signal strength. Furthermore, TCR signal strength regulates the input of cytokine signaling, including pro-inflammatory cytokines. These highlight how tailoring antigenic signals can improve immune therapeutics. In this review, we focus on how TCR signaling regulates T cell memory and how the quantity and quality of TCR-peptide-MHC interactions impact the multiple fates a T cell can adopt in the memory pool.

  6. TCR Signaling in T Cell Memory

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Mark A.; Teixeiro, Emma

    2015-01-01

    T cell memory plays a critical role in our protection against pathogens and tumors. The antigen and its interaction with the T cell receptor (TCR) is one of the initiating elements that shape T cell memory together with inflammation and costimulation. Over the last decade, several transcription factors and signaling pathways that support memory programing have been identified. However, how TCR signals regulate them is still poorly understood. Recent studies have shown that the biochemical rules that govern T cell memory, strikingly, change depending on the TCR signal strength. Furthermore, TCR signal strength regulates the input of cytokine signaling, including pro-inflammatory cytokines. These highlight how tailoring antigenic signals can improve immune therapeutics. In this review, we focus on how TCR signaling regulates T cell memory and how the quantity and quality of TCR–peptide–MHC interactions impact the multiple fates a T cell can adopt in the memory pool. PMID:26697013

  7. Antigen receptor-redirected T cells derived from hematopoietic precursor cells lack expression of the endogenous TCR/CD3 receptor and exhibit specific antitumor capacities

    PubMed Central

    Van Caeneghem, Yasmine; De Munter, Stijn; Tieppo, Paola; Goetgeluk, Glenn; Weening, Karin; Verstichel, Greet; Bonte, Sarah; Taghon, Tom; Leclercq, Georges; Kerre, Tessa; Debets, Reno; Vermijlen, David; Abken, Hinrich; Vandekerckhove, Bart

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Recent clinical studies indicate that adoptive T-cell therapy and especially chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy is a very potent and potentially curative treatment for B-lineage hematologic malignancies. Currently, autologous peripheral blood T cells are used for adoptive T-cell therapy. Adoptive T cells derived from healthy allogeneic donors may have several advantages; however, the expected occurrence of graft versus host disease (GvHD) as a consequence of the diverse allogeneic T-cell receptor (TCR) repertoire expressed by these cells compromises this approach. Here, we generated T cells from cord blood hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) that were transduced to express an antigen receptor (AR): either a CAR or a TCR with or without built-in CD28 co-stimulatory domains. These AR-transgenic HPCs were culture-expanded on an OP9-DL1 feeder layer and subsequently differentiated to CD5+CD7+ T-lineage precursors, to CD4+ CD8+ double positive cells and finally to mature AR+ T cells. The AR+ T cells were largely naive CD45RA+CD62L+ T cells. These T cells had mostly germline TCRα and TCRβ loci and therefore lacked surface-expressed CD3/TCRαβ complexes. The CD3− AR-transgenic cells were mono-specific, functional T cells as they displayed specific cytotoxic activity. Cytokine production, including IL-2, was prominent in those cells bearing ARs with built-in CD28 domains. Data sustain the concept that cord blood HPC derived, in vitro generated allogeneic CD3− AR+ T cells can be used to more effectively eliminate malignant cells, while at the same time limiting the occurrence of GvHD.

  8. CARMA1 is necessary for optimal T cell responses in a murine model of allergic asthma.

    PubMed

    Ramadas, Ravisankar A; Roche, Marly I; Moon, James J; Ludwig, Thomas; Xavier, Ramnik J; Medoff, Benjamin D

    2011-12-15

    CARMA1 is a lymphocyte-specific scaffold protein necessary for T cell activation. Deletion of CARMA1 prevents the development of allergic airway inflammation in a mouse model of asthma due to a defect in naive T cell activation. However, it is unknown if CARMA1 is important for effector and memory T cell responses after the initial establishment of inflammation, findings that would be more relevant to asthma therapies targeted to CARMA1. In the current study, we sought to elucidate the role of CARMA1 in T cells that have been previously activated. Using mice in which floxed CARMA1 exons can be selectively deleted in T cells by OX40-driven Cre recombinase (OX40(+/Cre)CARMA1(F/F)), we report that CD4(+) T cells from these mice have impaired T cell reactivation responses and NF-κB signaling in vitro. Furthermore, in an in vivo recall model of allergic airway inflammation that is dependent on memory T cell function, OX40(+/Cre)CARMA1(F/F) mice have attenuated eosinophilic airway inflammation, T cell activation, and Th2 cytokine production. Using MHC class II tetramers, we demonstrate that the development and maintenance of Ag-specific memory T cells is not affected in OX40(+/Cre)CARMA1(F/F) mice. In addition, adoptive transfer of Th2-polarized OX40(+/Cre)CARMA1(F/F) Ag-specific CD4(+) T cells into wild-type mice induces markedly less airway inflammation in response to Ag challenge than transfer of wild-type Th2 cells. These data demonstrate a novel role for CARMA1 in effector and memory T cell responses and suggest that therapeutic strategies targeting CARMA1 could help treat chronic inflammatory disorders such as asthma.

  9. Considerations on clinical use of T cell immunotherapy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Plautz, Gregory E; Cohen, Peter A; Shu, Suyu

    2003-01-01

    The recognition by effector T lymphocytes of novel antigenic targets on tumor cells is the premise of specific, targeted immunotherapy of cancer. With the molecular characterization of peptide epitopes from melanoma antigens and, more recently, broadly expressed tumor antigens, there has been considerable enthusiasm for clinical evaluation of peptide tumor vaccines. Immunologic monitoring of vaccinated patients has demonstrated an expansion of CD8+ T cells that react with the relevant peptide and, more importantly, with native tumor. In most instances, however, vaccine-induced CD8+ T cell responses alone have not been sufficiently robust or sustained to translate into a high percentage of durable clinical responses. Vaccine strategies have also utilized dendritic cells (DCs) that have been modified to present tumor antigens. The superior antigen-processing capacity and co-stimulatory function of DCs convey a powerful stimulatory signal to both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Several strategies are attempting to broaden the immune response beyond single antigens by introducing the entire complement of tumor antigens into DCs. Adoptive immunotherapy is a promising strategy to recover tumor-reactive precursor T cells from patients, stimulate them to induce numerical expansion, and then re-infuse them. Ex vivo manipulation of the tumor-reactive T cells also permits cytotoxic therapy to be administered to the patient without damaging the effector cells. Recently, host lymphodepletion prior to adoptive transfer of effector T cells has resulted in an extremely high and sustained frequency of effectors that has achieved therapeutic efficacy against bulky metastatic disease in a substantial fraction of treated patients.

  10. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy: Western adoption of Buddhist tenets?

    PubMed

    Fung, Kenneth

    2015-08-01

    Acceptance and Commitment Therapy (ACT) is a psychological intervention that has wide clinical applications with emerging empirical support. It is based on Functional Contextualism and is derived as a clinical application of the Relational Frame Theory, a behavioral account of the development of human thought and cognition. The six core ACT therapeutic processes include: Acceptance, Defusion, Present Moment, Self-as-Context, Values, and Committed Action. In addition to its explicit use of the concept of mindfulness, the therapeutic techniques of ACT implicitly incorporate other aspects of Buddhism. This article describes the basic principles and processes of ACT, explores the similarities and differences between ACT processes and some of the common tenets in Buddhism such as the Four Noble Truths and No-Self, and reports on the experience of running a pilot intervention ACT group for the Cambodian community in Toronto in partnership with the community's Buddhist Holy Monk. Based on this preliminary exploration in theory and the reflections of the group experience, ACT appears to be consistent with some of the core tenets of Buddhism in the approach towards alleviating suffering, with notable differences in scope reflecting their different aims and objectives. Further development of integrative therapies that can incorporate psychological and spiritual as well as diverse cultural perspectives may help the continued advancement and evolution of more effective psychotherapies that can benefit diverse populations.

  11. Differences in hepatitis C virus (HCV)-specific CD8 T-cell phenotype during pegylated alpha interferon and ribavirin treatment are related to response to antiviral therapy in patients chronically infected with HCV.

    PubMed

    Caetano, Joana; Martinho, António; Paiva, Artur; Pais, Beatriz; Valente, Cristina; Luxo, Cristina

    2008-08-01

    CD8 T cells play a major role in antiviral immune responses. Their importance for progression to chronic hepatitis C and response to treatment are still unclear. To address these issues, hepatitis C virus (HCV)-specific CD8 T-cell responses were monitored, at the single-cell level, using HLA class I pentamers specific for HCV core and HCV NS3 epitopes, in 23 chronically infected patients during treatment with pegylated alpha interferon and ribavirin. Patients who presented a sustained-response to therapy had stronger HCV-specific CD8 T-cell responses at all time points studied. Moreover, there were clear differences in the phenotypes of these cells during therapy: in responder patients, terminally differentiated effector cells increased more rapidly, and their frequency was always higher than in nonresponder patients. Sustained-responder patients also showed a higher frequency of HCV-specific CD8 T cells producing cytotoxic factors. Overall, a late and inefficient differentiation process of HCV-specific CD8 T cells might be associated with lack of response to treatment. A better knowledge of the mechanisms underlying this impairment may be important for the development of new therapeutic strategies to maintain, restore, or increase CD8 T-cell effectiveness in chronic HCV infection.

  12. Abnormal T-cell reactivity against paternal antigens in spontaneous abortion: adoptive transfer of pregnancy-induced CD4+CD25+ T regulatory cells prevents fetal rejection in a murine abortion model.

    PubMed

    Zenclussen, Ana Claudia; Gerlof, Katrin; Zenclussen, Maria Laura; Sollwedel, André; Bertoja, Annarosa Zambon; Ritter, Thomas; Kotsch, Katja; Leber, Joachim; Volk, Hans-Dieter

    2005-03-01

    Mammalian pregnancy is thought to be a state of immunological tolerance. The mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are still poorly understood. Here, we determined whether an inappropriate function of T regulatory (Treg) cells is involved in the pathogenesis of spontaneous abortion. We evaluated spleen and decidual lymphocytes from CBA/J mice undergoing immunological abortion (DBA/2J-mated) or having normal pregnancy (BALB/c-mated) on day 14 of gestation for ex vivo cytokine production after PMA or paternal antigen (alloantigen) stimulation. Treg activity was characterized by quantifying CD4(+)CD25(+) cells, foxp3 expression, and interleukin-10 secretion. Decidual lymphocytes from abortion CBA/J mice contained a significantly higher frequency of interferon-gamma-producing T cells specific for paternal antigens compared to those from normal pregnancy (7.8% versus 2.7%, P < 0.05). Compared to virgin CBA/J females, normal pregnant mice showed strongly elevated numbers of CD4(+)CD25(+) and interleukin-10(+) Treg cells in the thymus whereas significantly lower frequencies of Treg cells were observed in abortion mice. Very interestingly, CD4(+)CD25(+) Treg cells from normal pregnant and nonpregnant CBA/J mice could inhibit both proliferation and interferon-gamma secretion of lymphocytes from abortion mice in vitro whereas in vivo prevention of fetal rejection could only be achieved after adoptive transfer of Treg cells from normal pregnant mice. Our data suggest that pregnancy-induced Treg cells play a vital role in maternal tolerance to the allogeneic fetus.

  13. Genetically Modified T Cells to Target Glioblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Krebs, Simone; Rodríguez-Cruz, Tania G.; DeRenzo, Christopher; Gottschalk, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Despite advances in surgical procedures, radiation, and chemotherapy the outcome for patients with glioblastoma (GBM) remains poor. While GBM cells express antigens that are potentially recognized by T cells, GBMs prevent the induction of GBM-specific immune responses by creating an immunosuppressive microenvironment. The advent of gene transfer has allowed the rapid generation of antigen-specific T cells as well as T cells with enhanced effector function. Here we review recent advances in the field of cell therapy with genetically modified T cells and how these advances might improve outcomes for patients with GBM in the future. PMID:24427741

  14. Toxicity and Efficacy Probability Interval Design for Phase I Adoptive Cell Therapy Dose-Finding Clinical Trials.

    PubMed

    Li, Daniel H; Whitmore, James B; Guo, Wentian; Ji, Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Recent trials of adoptive cell therapy (ACT), such as the chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell therapy, have demonstrated promising therapeutic effects for cancer patients. A main issue in the product development is to determine the appropriate dose of ACT. Traditional phase I trial designs for cytotoxic agents explicitly assume that toxicity increases monotonically with dose levels and implicitly assume the same for efficacy to justify dose escalation. ACT usually induces rapid responses, and the monotonic dose-response assumption is unlikely to hold due to its immunobiologic activities. We propose a toxicity and efficacy probability interval (TEPI) design for dose finding in ACT trials. This approach incorporates efficacy outcomes to inform dosing decisions to optimize efficacy and safety simultaneously. Rather than finding the maximum tolerated dose (MTD), the TEPI design is aimed at finding the dose with the most desirable outcome for safety and efficacy. The key features of TEPI are its simplicity, flexibility, and transparency, because all decision rules can be prespecified prior to trial initiation. We conduct simulation studies to investigate the operating characteristics of the TEPI design and compare it to existing methods. In summary, the TEPI design is a novel method for ACT dose finding, which possesses superior performance and is easy to use, simple, and transparent. Clin Cancer Res; 23(1); 13-20. ©2016 AACR.

  15. Adoptive immunotherapy for cancer.

    PubMed

    Ruella, Marco; Kalos, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Recent clinical success has underscored the potential for immunotherapy based on the adoptive cell transfer (ACT) of engineered T lymphocytes to mediate dramatic, potent, and durable clinical responses. This success has led to the broader evaluation of engineered T-lymphocyte-based adoptive cell therapy to treat a broad range of malignancies. In this review, we summarize concepts, successes, and challenges for the broader development of this promising field, focusing principally on lessons gleaned from immunological principles and clinical thought. We present ACT in the context of integrating T-cell and tumor biology and the broader systemic immune response.

  16. The number of tumor infiltrating T-cell subsets in lymph nodes from patients with Hodgkin lymphoma is associated with the outcome after first line ABVD therapy().

    PubMed

    Alonso-Álvarez, Sara; Vidriales, Maria Belén; Caballero, Maria Dolores; Blanco, Oscar; Puig, Noemí; Martin, Alejandro; Peñarrubia, Maria Jesús; Zato, Esther; Galende, Josefina; Bárez, Abelardo; Alcoceba, Miguel; Orfão, Alberto; González, Marcos; García-Sanz, Ramón

    2017-05-01

    Prognostic factors in Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) still fail to accurately identify high-risk patients. Tumor microenvironment in HL is a current focus of research for risk definition but few studies have focused on infiltrating lymphocytes. Here, we analyzed the number of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes by flow cytometry in diagnostic biopsies from 96 HL homogeneously treated patients with ABVD with or without radiotherapy. Most lymph node cells were lymphocytes (90 ± 17), with a median T/B/NK distribution of 74%/26%/0.7%, and CD4(+) T-cell predominance. The amount of CD19(+) B cells, and NK cells did not show association with disease features. However, high numbers of CD8(+) and CD4(+) cells were associated with better and poorer outcomes, respectively. Patients with ≥15% cytotoxic CD8(+) cells among the total cell population had a longer 10-year freedom from treatment failure (FFTF) (93% vs. 73%, p=.04). In turn, cases with ≥75% of CD4(+) infiltrating cells showed a significantly decreased FFTF (73% vs. 96%, p=.021). Consequently, CD4/CD8 ratio ≥5 associated with a poorer 10-year FFTF (69.5% vs. 94%, p=.02). This deleterious effect was particularly prominent in advanced disease (n = 58, p=.01). In multivariate analysis, a CD4/CD8 ratio ≥5 was the only independent variable to predict for treatment failure (HR = 4.5, 95% confidence interval, 1.2-16.8). In conclusion, our study shows that high CD4(+) and low CD8(+) T-cells infiltrates of tumor specimens associate with poor prognosis in HL patients, and CD4/CD8 ratio might be potentially useful for tailoring