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Sample records for adoptive t-cell transfer

  1. Restoration of Viral Immunity in Immunodeficient Humans by the Adoptive Transfer of T Cell Clones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riddell, Stanley R.; Watanabe, Kathe S.; Goodrich, James M.; Li, Cheng R.; Agha, Mounzer E.; Greenberg, Philip D.

    1992-07-01

    The adoptive transfer of antigen-specific T cells to establish immunity is an effective therapy for viral infections and tumors in animal models. The application of this approach to human disease would require the isolation and in vitro expansion of human antigen-specific T cells and evidence that such T cells persist and function in vivo after transfer. Cytomegalovirus-specific CD8^+ cytotoxic T cell (CTL) clones could be isolated from bone marrow donors, propagated in vitro, and adoptively transferred to immunodeficient bone marrow transplant recipients. No toxicity developed and the clones provided persistent reconstitution of CD8^+ cytomegalovirus-specific CTL responses.

  2. Targeting STAT3 in adoptively transferred T cells promotes their in vivo expansion and antitumor effects

    PubMed Central

    Kujawski, Maciej; Zhang, Chunyan; Herrmann, Andreas; Reckamp, Karen; Scuto, Anna; Jensen, Michael; Deng, Jiehui; Forman, Stephen; Figlin, Robert; Yu, Hua

    2010-01-01

    Adoptive cell therapy with engineered T cells to improve natural immune response and antitumor functions has shown promise for treating cancer. However, the requirement for extensive ex vivo manipulation of T cells and the immunosuppressive effects of the tumor microenvironment limit this therapeutic modality. In the present study, we investigated the possibility to circumvent these limitations by engineering Stat3-deficient CD8+ T cells or by targeting Stat3 in the tumor microenvironment. We show that ablating Stat3 in CD8+ T cells prior to their transfer allows their efficient tumor infiltration and robust proliferation, resulting in increased tumor antigen-specific T cell activity and tumor growth inhibition. For potential clinical translation, we combined adoptive T cell therapy with an FDA-approved tyrosine kinase inhibitor, sunitinib, in renal cell carcinoma and melanoma tumor models. Sunitinib inhibited Stat3 in dendritic cells and T cells, reduced conversion of transferred Foxp3− T cells to tumor-associated T regulatory cells while increasing transferred CD8+ T cell infiltration and activation at the tumor site, leading to inhibition of primary tumor growth. These data demonstrate that adoptively transferred T cells can be expanded and activated in vivo either by engineering Stat3 silenced T cells or by targeting Stat3 systemically with small-molecule inhibitors. PMID:21118964

  3. Improving Adoptive T Cell Therapy: The Particular Role of T Cell Costimulation, Cytokines, and Post-Transfer Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Redeker, Anke; Arens, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive cellular therapy (ACT) is a form of immunotherapy whereby antigen-specific T cells are isolated or engineered, expanded ex vivo, and transferred back to patients. Clinical benefit after ACT has been obtained in treatment of infection, various hematological malignancies, and some solid tumors; however, due to poor functionality and persistence of the transferred T cells, the efficacy of ACT in the treatment of most solid tumors is often marginal. Hence, much effort is undertaken to improve T cell function and persistence in ACT and significant progress is being made. Herein, we will review strategies to improve ACT success rates in the treatment of cancer and infection. We will deliberate on the most favorable phenotype for the tumor-specific T cells that are infused into patients and on how to obtain T cells bearing this phenotype by applying novel ex vivo culture methods. Moreover, we will discuss T cell function and persistence after transfer into patients and how these factors can be manipulated by means of providing costimulatory signals, cytokines, blocking antibodies to inhibitory molecules, and vaccination. Incorporation of these T cell stimulation strategies and combinations of the different treatment modalities are likely to improve clinical response rates further. PMID:27656185

  4. Improving Adoptive T Cell Therapy: The Particular Role of T Cell Costimulation, Cytokines, and Post-Transfer Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Redeker, Anke; Arens, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive cellular therapy (ACT) is a form of immunotherapy whereby antigen-specific T cells are isolated or engineered, expanded ex vivo, and transferred back to patients. Clinical benefit after ACT has been obtained in treatment of infection, various hematological malignancies, and some solid tumors; however, due to poor functionality and persistence of the transferred T cells, the efficacy of ACT in the treatment of most solid tumors is often marginal. Hence, much effort is undertaken to improve T cell function and persistence in ACT and significant progress is being made. Herein, we will review strategies to improve ACT success rates in the treatment of cancer and infection. We will deliberate on the most favorable phenotype for the tumor-specific T cells that are infused into patients and on how to obtain T cells bearing this phenotype by applying novel ex vivo culture methods. Moreover, we will discuss T cell function and persistence after transfer into patients and how these factors can be manipulated by means of providing costimulatory signals, cytokines, blocking antibodies to inhibitory molecules, and vaccination. Incorporation of these T cell stimulation strategies and combinations of the different treatment modalities are likely to improve clinical response rates further.

  5. Improving Adoptive T Cell Therapy: The Particular Role of T Cell Costimulation, Cytokines, and Post-Transfer Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Redeker, Anke; Arens, Ramon

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive cellular therapy (ACT) is a form of immunotherapy whereby antigen-specific T cells are isolated or engineered, expanded ex vivo, and transferred back to patients. Clinical benefit after ACT has been obtained in treatment of infection, various hematological malignancies, and some solid tumors; however, due to poor functionality and persistence of the transferred T cells, the efficacy of ACT in the treatment of most solid tumors is often marginal. Hence, much effort is undertaken to improve T cell function and persistence in ACT and significant progress is being made. Herein, we will review strategies to improve ACT success rates in the treatment of cancer and infection. We will deliberate on the most favorable phenotype for the tumor-specific T cells that are infused into patients and on how to obtain T cells bearing this phenotype by applying novel ex vivo culture methods. Moreover, we will discuss T cell function and persistence after transfer into patients and how these factors can be manipulated by means of providing costimulatory signals, cytokines, blocking antibodies to inhibitory molecules, and vaccination. Incorporation of these T cell stimulation strategies and combinations of the different treatment modalities are likely to improve clinical response rates further. PMID:27656185

  6. Multifunctional T-cell Analyses to Study Response and Progression in Adoptive Cell Transfer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chao; Cheung, Ann F.; Chodon, Thinle; Koya, Richard C.; Wu, Zhongqi; Ng, Charles; Avramis, Earl; Cochran, Alistair J.; Witte, Owen N.; Baltimore, David; Chmielowski, Bartosz; Economou, James S.; Comin-Anduix, Begonya; Ribas, Antoni; Heath, James R.

    2013-01-01

    Adoptive cell transfer (ACT) of genetically engineered T cells expressing cancer-specific T-cell receptors (TCR) is a promising cancer treatment. Here, we investigate the in vivo functional activity and dynamics of the transferred cells by analyzing samples from 3 representative patients with melanoma enrolled in a clinical trial of ACT with TCR transgenic T cells targeted against the melanosomal antigen MART-1. The analyses included evaluating 19 secreted proteins from individual cells from phenotypically defined T-cell subpopulations, as well as the enumeration of T cells with TCR antigen specificity for 36 melanoma antigens. These analyses revealed the coordinated functional dynamics of the adoptively transferred, as well as endogenous, T cells, and the importance of highly functional T cells in dominating the antitumor immune response. This study highlights the need to develop approaches to maintaining antitumor T-cell functionality with the aim of increasing the long-term efficacy of TCR-engineered ACT immunotherapy. SIGNIFICANCE A longitudinal functional study of adoptively transferred TCR–engineered lymphocytes yielded revealing snapshots for understanding the changes of antitumor responses over time in ACT immunotherapy of patients with advanced melanoma. PMID:23519018

  7. Myeloid-derived suppressor cell impact on endogenous and adoptively transferred T cells.

    PubMed

    Arina, Ainhoa; Bronte, Vincenzo

    2015-04-01

    Novel models of autochthonous tumorigenesis and adoptive T cell therapy (ATT) are providing new clues regarding the pro-tumorigenic and immunosuppressive effects of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC), and their interaction with T cells. New findings are shifting the perception of the main level at which MDSC act, from direct cell-to-cell suppression to others, such as limiting T cell infiltration. Adoptively transferred, high-avidity T cells recognizing peptides with high-affinity for MHC-I eliminated large tumors. However, low-avidity T cells or low-affinity peptides resulted in failure to eradicate tumors. Manipulation of intratumoral myeloid cells improved the outcome of otherwise unsuccessful ATT. Therefore, therapeutic intervention directed at the tumor stroma might be required when using suboptimal T cells for ATT.

  8. A New Hope in Immunotherapy for Malignant Gliomas: Adoptive T Cell Transfer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Dong-Sup; Shin, Hye-Jin; Hong, Yong-Kil

    2014-01-01

    Immunotherapy emerged as a promising therapeutic approach to highly incurable malignant gliomas due to tumor-specific cytotoxicity, minimal side effect, and a durable antitumor effect by memory T cells. But, antitumor activities of endogenously activated T cells induced by immunotherapy such as vaccination are not sufficient to control tumors because tumor-specific antigens may be self-antigens and tumors have immune evasion mechanisms to avoid immune surveillance system of host. Although recent clinical results from vaccine strategy for malignant gliomas are encouraging, these trials have some limitations, particularly their failure to expand tumor antigen-specific T cells reproducibly and effectively. An alternative strategy to overcome these limitations is adoptive T cell transfer therapy, in which tumor-specific T cells are expanded ex vivo rapidly and then transferred to patients. Moreover, enhanced biologic functions of T cells generated by genetic engineering and modified immunosuppressive microenvironment of host by homeostatic T cell expansion and/or elimination of immunosuppressive cells and molecules can induce more potent antitumor T cell responses and make this strategy hold promise in promoting a patient response for malignant glioma treatment. Here we will review the past and current progresses and discuss a new hope in adoptive T cell therapy for malignant gliomas. PMID:25009822

  9. Technical Considerations for the Generation of Adoptively Transferred T Cells in Cancer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Visioni, Anthony; Skitzki, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    A significant function of the immune system is the surveillance and elimination of aberrant cells that give rise to cancer. Even when tumors are well established and metastatic, immune-mediated spontaneous regressions have been documented. While there are have been various forms of immunotherapy, one of the most widely studied for almost 40 years is adoptive cellular immunotherapy, but its success has yet to be fully realized. Adoptive cell transfer (ACT) is a therapeutic modality that has intrigued physicians and researchers for its many theoretical benefits. Preclinical investigations and human trials have utilized natural killer (NK) cells, dendritic cells (DC), macrophages, T-cells or B-cells for ACT with the most intense research focused on T-cell ACT. T-cells are exquisitely specific to the target of its T-cell receptor (TCR), thus potentially reducing the amount of collateral damage and off-target effects from treatment. T-cells also possess a memory subset that may reduce the risk of recurrence of a cancer after the successful treatment of the primary disease. There are several options for the source of T-cells used in the generation of cells for ACT. Perhaps the most widely known source is T-cells generated from tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs). However, studies have also employed peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), lymph nodes, and even induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSCs) as a source of T-cells. Several important technical considerations exist regarding benefits and limitations of each source of T-cells. Unique aspects of T-cells factor into their ability to be efficacious in ACT including the total number of cells available for ACT, the anti-tumor efficacy on a per cell basis, the repertoire of TCRs specific to tumor cells, and their ability to traffic to various organs that harbor tumor. Current research is attempting to unlock the full potential of these cells to effectively and safely treat cancer. PMID:27657129

  10. Technical Considerations for the Generation of Adoptively Transferred T Cells in Cancer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Visioni, Anthony; Skitzki, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    A significant function of the immune system is the surveillance and elimination of aberrant cells that give rise to cancer. Even when tumors are well established and metastatic, immune-mediated spontaneous regressions have been documented. While there are have been various forms of immunotherapy, one of the most widely studied for almost 40 years is adoptive cellular immunotherapy, but its success has yet to be fully realized. Adoptive cell transfer (ACT) is a therapeutic modality that has intrigued physicians and researchers for its many theoretical benefits. Preclinical investigations and human trials have utilized natural killer (NK) cells, dendritic cells (DC), macrophages, T-cells or B-cells for ACT with the most intense research focused on T-cell ACT. T-cells are exquisitely specific to the target of its T-cell receptor (TCR), thus potentially reducing the amount of collateral damage and off-target effects from treatment. T-cells also possess a memory subset that may reduce the risk of recurrence of a cancer after the successful treatment of the primary disease. There are several options for the source of T-cells used in the generation of cells for ACT. Perhaps the most widely known source is T-cells generated from tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs). However, studies have also employed peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), lymph nodes, and even induced pluripotent stem cells (IPSCs) as a source of T-cells. Several important technical considerations exist regarding benefits and limitations of each source of T-cells. Unique aspects of T-cells factor into their ability to be efficacious in ACT including the total number of cells available for ACT, the anti-tumor efficacy on a per cell basis, the repertoire of TCRs specific to tumor cells, and their ability to traffic to various organs that harbor tumor. Current research is attempting to unlock the full potential of these cells to effectively and safely treat cancer. PMID:27657129

  11. Antiangiogenic immunotherapy targeting Flk-1, DNA vaccine and adoptive T cell transfer, inhibits ocular neovascularization

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Han; Sonoda, Koh-Hei; Hijioka, Kuniaki; Qiao, Hong; Oshima, Yuji; Ishibashi, Tatsuro

    2009-04-17

    Ocular neovascularization (NV) is the primary cause of blindness in a wide range of ocular diseases. The exact mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of ocular NV is not yet well understood, and so there is no satisfactory therapy for ocular NV. Here, we describe a strategy targeting Flk-1, a self-antigen overexpressed on proliferating endothelial cells in ocular NV, by antiangiogenic immunotherapy-DNA vaccine and adoptive T cell therapy. An oral DNA vaccine encoding Flk-1 carried by attenuated Salmonella typhimurium markedly suppressed development of laser-induced choroidal NV. We further demonstrated that adoptive transfer of vaccine-induced CD8{sup +} T cells reduced pathological preretinal NV, with a concomitant facilitation of physiological revascularization after oxygen-induced retinal vessel obliteration. However, physiological retinal vascular development was unaffected in neonatal mice transferred with vaccine-induced CD8{sup +} T cells. These findings suggested that antiangiogenic immunotherapy targeting Flk-1 such as vaccination and adoptive immunotherapy may contribute to future therapies for ocular NV.

  12. Characterization of the natural killer T-cell response in an adoptive transfer model of atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    VanderLaan, Paul A; Reardon, Catherine A; Sagiv, Yuval; Blachowicz, Lydia; Lukens, John; Nissenbaum, Michael; Wang, Chyung-Ru; Getz, Godfrey S

    2007-03-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells have recently been implicated in atherogenesis, primarily for their ability to recognize and respond to lipid antigens. Because the atherosclerotic lesion is characterized by the retention and modification of lipids in the vascular wall, NKT cells may be involved in promoting the local vascular inflammatory response. Here, we investigate the proatherogenic role of NKT cells in an adoptive transfer model of atherosclerosis, using as recipients immune-deficient, atherosclerosis-susceptible RAG1(-/-)LDLR(-/-) mice. The adoptive transfer of an NKT cell-enriched splenocyte population from Valpha14Jalpha18 T-cell receptor transgenic mice resulted in a 73% increase in aortic root lesion area compared with recipients of NKT cell-deficient splenocytes derived from CD1d(-/-) mice after 12 weeks of Western-type diet feeding. The total serum from hypercholesterolemic mice leads to a small but significant activation of Valpha14Jalpha18 T-cell receptor-expressing hybridoma line by dendritic cells that is CD1d-dependent. Therefore, these studies demonstrate that NKT cells are proatherogenic in the absence of exogenous stimulation, and this activity is likely associated with endogenous lipid antigens carried by lipoproteins in the circulation and perhaps also in the atherosclerotic plaque.

  13. Characterization of the Natural Killer T-Cell Response in an Adoptive Transfer Model of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    VanderLaan, Paul A.; Reardon, Catherine A.; Sagiv, Yuval; Blachowicz, Lydia; Lukens, John; Nissenbaum, Michael; Wang, Chyung-Ru; Getz, Godfrey S.

    2007-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells have recently been implicated in atherogenesis, primarily for their ability to recognize and respond to lipid antigens. Because the atherosclerotic lesion is characterized by the retention and modification of lipids in the vascular wall, NKT cells may be involved in promoting the local vascular inflammatory response. Here, we investigate the proatherogenic role of NKT cells in an adoptive transfer model of atherosclerosis, using as recipients immune-deficient, atherosclerosis-susceptible RAG1−/−LDLR−/− mice. The adoptive transfer of an NKT cell-enriched splenocyte population from Vα14Jα18 T-cell receptor transgenic mice resulted in a 73% increase in aortic root lesion area compared with recipients of NKT cell-deficient splenocytes derived from CD1d−/− mice after 12 weeks of Western-type diet feeding. The total serum from hypercholesterolemic mice leads to a small but significant activation of Vα14Jα18 T-cell receptor-expressing hybridoma line by dendritic cells that is CD1d-dependent. Therefore, these studies demonstrate that NKT cells are proatherogenic in the absence of exogenous stimulation, and this activity is likely associated with endogenous lipid antigens carried by lipoproteins in the circulation and perhaps also in the atherosclerotic plaque. PMID:17322392

  14. Effect of Adoptive Transfer or Depletion of Regulatory T Cells on Triptolide-induced Liver Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xinzhi; Sun, Lixin; Zhang, Luyong; Jiang, Zhenzhou

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study is to clarify the role of regulatory T cell (Treg) in triptolide (TP)-induced hepatotoxicity. Methods: Female C57BL/6 mice received either adoptive transfer of Tregs or depletion of Tregs, then underwent TP administration and were sacrificed 24 h after TP administration. Liver injury was determined according to alanine transaminase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase (AST) levels in serum and histopathological change in liver tissue. Hepatic frequencies of Treg cells and the mRNA expression levels of transcription factor Forkhead box P3 and retinoid orphan nuclear receptor γt (RORγt), interleukin-10 (IL-10), suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS), and Notch/Notch ligand were investigated. Results: During TP-induced liver injury, hepatic Treg and IL-10 decreased, while T helper 17 cells cell-transcription factor RORγt, SOCS and Notch signaling increased, accompanied with liver inflammation. Adoptive transfer of Tregs ameliorated the severity of TP-induced liver injury, accompanied with increased levels of hepatic Treg and IL-10. Adoptive transfer of Tregs remarkably inhibited the expression of RORγt, SOCS3, Notch1, and Notch3. On the contrary, depletion of Treg cells in TP-administered mice resulted in a notable increase of RORγt, SOCS1, SOCS3, and Notch3, while the Treg and IL-10 of liver decreased. Consistent with the exacerbation of liver injury, higher serum levels of ALT and AST were detected in Treg-depleted mice. Conclusion: These results showed that adoptive transfer or depletion of Tregs attenuated or aggravated TP-induced liver injury, suggesting that Tregs could play important roles in the progression of liver injury. SOCS proteins and Notch signaling affected Tregs, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of TP-induced hepatotoxicity. PMID:27148057

  15. In vivo imaging of T cell delivery to tumors after adoptive transfer therapy.

    PubMed

    Pittet, Mikael J; Grimm, Jan; Berger, Cedric R; Tamura, Takahiko; Wojtkiewicz, Gregory; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Romero, Pedro; Swirski, Filip K; Weissleder, Ralph

    2007-07-24

    Adoptive transfer therapy of in vitro-expanded tumor-specific cytolytic T lymphocytes (CTLs) can mediate objective cancer regression in patients. Yet, technical limitations hamper precise monitoring of posttherapy T cell responses. Here we show in a mouse model that fused single photon emission computed tomography and x-ray computed tomography allows quantitative whole-body imaging of (111)In-oxine-labeled CTLs at tumor sites. Assessment of CTL localization is rapid, noninvasive, three-dimensional, and can be repeated for longitudinal analyses. We compared the effects of lymphodepletion before adoptive transfer on CTL recruitment and report that combined treatment increased intratumoral delivery of CTLs and improved antitumor efficacy. Because (111)In-oxine is a Food and Drug Administration-approved clinical agent, and human SPECT-CT systems are available, this approach should be clinically translatable, insofar as it may assess the efficacy of immunization procedures in individual patients and lead to development of more effective therapies. PMID:17640914

  16. Tumor-derived chemokine MCP-1/CCL2 is sufficient for mediating tumor tropism of adoptively transferred T cells.

    PubMed

    Brown, Christine E; Vishwanath, Reena P; Aguilar, Brenda; Starr, Renate; Najbauer, Joseph; Aboody, Karen S; Jensen, Michael C

    2007-09-01

    To exert a therapeutic effect, adoptively transferred tumor-specific CTLs must traffic to sites of tumor burden, exit the circulation, and infiltrate the tumor microenvironment. In this study, we examine the ability of adoptively transferred human CTL to traffic to tumors with disparate chemokine secretion profiles independent of tumor Ag recognition. Using a combination of in vivo tumor tropism studies and in vitro biophotonic chemotaxis assays, we observed that cell lines derived from glioma, medulloblastoma, and renal cell carcinoma efficiently chemoattracted ex vivo-expanded primary human T cells. We compared the chemokines secreted by tumor cell lines with high chemotactic activity with those that failed to elicit T cell chemotaxis (Daudi lymphoma, 10HTB neuroblastoma, and A2058 melanoma cells) and found a correlation between tumor-derived production of MCP-1/CCL2 (> or =10 ng/ml) and T cell chemotaxis. Chemokine immunodepletion studies confirmed that tumor-derived MCP-1 elicits effector T cell chemotaxis. Moreover, MCP-1 is sufficient for in vivo T cell tumor tropism as evidenced by the selective accumulation of i.v. administered firefly luciferase-expressing T cells in intracerebral xenografts of tumor transfectants secreting MCP-1. These studies suggest that the capacity of adoptively transferred T cells to home to tumors may be, in part, dictated by the species and amounts of tumor-derived chemokines, in particular MCP-1.

  17. Longitudinal confocal microscopy imaging of solid tumor destruction following adoptive T cell transfer.

    PubMed

    Schietinger, Andrea; Arina, Ainhoa; Liu, Rebecca B; Wells, Sam; Huang, Jianhua; Engels, Boris; Bindokas, Vytas; Bartkowiak, Todd; Lee, David; Herrmann, Andreas; Piston, David W; Pittet, Mikael J; Lin, P Charles; Zal, Tomasz; Schreiber, Hans

    2013-11-01

    A fluorescence-based, high-resolution imaging approach was used to visualize longitudinally the cellular events unfolding during T cell-mediated tumor destruction. The dynamic interplay of T cells, cancer cells, cancer antigen loss variants, and stromal cells-all color-coded in vivo-was analyzed in established, solid tumors that had developed behind windows implanted on the backs of mice. Events could be followed repeatedly within precisely the same tumor region-before, during and after adoptive T cell therapy-thereby enabling for the first time a longitudinal in vivo evaluation of protracted events, an analysis not possible with terminal imaging of surgically exposed tumors. T cell infiltration, stromal interactions, and vessel destruction, as well as the functional consequences thereof, including the elimination of cancer cells and cancer cell variants were studied. Minimal perivascular T cell infiltrates initiated vascular destruction inside the tumor mass eventually leading to macroscopic central tumor necrosis. Prolonged engagement of T cells with tumor antigen-crosspresenting stromal cells correlated with high IFNγ cytokine release and bystander elimination of antigen-negative cancer cells. The high-resolution, longitudinal, in vivo imaging approach described here will help to further a better mechanistic understanding of tumor eradication by T cells and other anti-cancer therapies. PMID:24482750

  18. Longitudinal confocal microscopy imaging of solid tumor destruction following adoptive T cell transfer

    PubMed Central

    Schietinger, Andrea; Arina, Ainhoa; Liu, Rebecca B; Wells, Sam; Huang, Jianhua; Engels, Boris; Bindokas, Vytas; Bartkowiak, Todd; Lee, David; Herrmann, Andreas; Piston, David W; Pittet, Mikael J; Lin, P Charles; Zal, Tomasz; Schreiber, Hans

    2013-01-01

    A fluorescence-based, high-resolution imaging approach was used to visualize longitudinally the cellular events unfolding during T cell-mediated tumor destruction. The dynamic interplay of T cells, cancer cells, cancer antigen loss variants, and stromal cells—all color-coded in vivo—was analyzed in established, solid tumors that had developed behind windows implanted on the backs of mice. Events could be followed repeatedly within precisely the same tumor region—before, during and after adoptive T cell therapy—thereby enabling for the first time a longitudinal in vivo evaluation of protracted events, an analysis not possible with terminal imaging of surgically exposed tumors. T cell infiltration, stromal interactions, and vessel destruction, as well as the functional consequences thereof, including the elimination of cancer cells and cancer cell variants were studied. Minimal perivascular T cell infiltrates initiated vascular destruction inside the tumor mass eventually leading to macroscopic central tumor necrosis. Prolonged engagement of T cells with tumor antigen-crosspresenting stromal cells correlated with high IFNγ cytokine release and bystander elimination of antigen-negative cancer cells. The high-resolution, longitudinal, in vivo imaging approach described here will help to further a better mechanistic understanding of tumor eradication by T cells and other anti-cancer therapies. PMID:24482750

  19. Deletion of Plasmodium berghei-Specific CD4+ T Cells Adoptively Transferred into Recipient Mice after Challenge with Homologous Parasite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirunpetcharat, Chakrit; Good, Michael F.

    1998-02-01

    The immune response to malaria parasites includes T cell responses that reduce parasites by effector T cell responses and by providing help for antibody responses. Some parasites are more sensitive to antibody and others are more sensitive to cell-mediated immunity. We demonstrate that cultured CD4+ T cells that produce interferon CD4+ and interleukin 2, but not interleukin 4, in response to stimulation with the rodent parasite Plasmodium berghei can reduce but not eliminate parasites in vivo after adoptive transfer. Although cells can persist in vivo for up to 9 months in uninfected mice, infection results in elimination of up to 99% of specific T cells in different tissues, as judged by tracking T cells labeled with the fluorescent dye 5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester. T cells specific for ovalbumin are unaffected. In vivo activation and division of transferred T cells per se are not responsible for deletion because T cells positive for 5-(and -6)-carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester divide up to six times within 7 days in uninfected mice and are not deleted. Understanding the factors responsible for parasite-mediated specific deletion of T cells would enhance our knowledge of parasite immunity.

  20. Targeting Stat3 in the myeloid compartment drastically improves the in vivo antitumor functions of adoptively transferred T cells

    PubMed Central

    Herrmann, Andreas; Kortylewski, Marcin; Kujawski, Maciej; Zhang, Chunyan; Reckamp, Karen; Armstrong, Brian; Wang, Lin; Kowolik, Claudia; Deng, Jiehui; Robert, Figlin; Yu, Hua

    2010-01-01

    Improving effector T cell functions is highly desirable for preventive or therapeutic interventions of diverse diseases. Stat3 in the myeloid compartment constrains Th-1 type immunity, dampening natural and induced antitumor immune responses. We have recently developed an in vivo siRNA delivery platform by conjugating a TLR9 agonist with siRNA that efficiently targets myeloid and B cells. Here we show that either ablating the Stat3 alleles in the myeloid compartment and B cells combined with CpG triggering or administrating the CpG-Stat3siRNA conjugates drastically augments effector functions of adoptively transferred CD8+ T cells. Specifically, we demonstrate that both approaches are capable of increasing dendritic cell and CD8+ T cell engagement in tumor draining lymph nodes. Furthermore, both approaches can significantly activate the transferred CD8+ T cells in vivo, upregulating effector molecules such as perforin, granzyme B and IFN-γ. Intravital multiphoton microscopy reveals that Stat3 silencing combined with CpG triggering greatly increases killing activity and tumor infiltration of transferred T cells. These results suggest the use of CpG-Stat3siRNA, and possibly other Stat3 inhibitors, as a potent adjuvant to improve T cell therapies. PMID:20841481

  1. Adoptive transfer of MART-1 T cell receptor transgenic lymphocytes and dendritic cell vaccination in patients with metastatic melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Chodon, Thinle; Comin-Anduix, Begonya; Chmielowski, Bartosz; Koya, Richard C; Wu, Zhongqi; Auerbach, Martin; Ng, Charles; Avramis, Earl; Seja, Elizabeth; Villanueva, Arturo; McCannel, Tara A.; Ishiyama, Akira; Czernin, Johannes; Radu, Caius G.; Wang, Xiaoyan; Gjertson, David W.; Cochran, Alistair J.; Cornetta, Kenneth; Wong, Deborah J.L.; Kaplan-lefko, Paula; Hamid, Omid; Samlowski, Wolfram; Cohen, Peter A.; Daniels, Gregory A.; Mukherji, Bijay; Yang, Lili; Zack, Jerome A.; Kohn, Donald B.; Heath, James R.; Glaspy, John A.; Witte, Owen N.; Baltimore, David; Economou, James S.; Ribas, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Purpose It has been demonstrated that large numbers of tumor-specific T cells for adoptive cell transfer (ACT) can be manufactured by retroviral genetic engineering of autologous peripheral blood lymphocytes and expanding them over several weeks. In mouse models, this therapy is optimized when administered with dendritic cell (DC) vaccination. We developed a short one-week manufacture protocol to determine the feasibility, safety and antitumor efficacy of this double cell therapy. Experimnetal Design A clinical trial (NCT00910650) adoptively transferring MART-1 T cell receptor (TCR) transgenic lymphocytes together with MART-1 peptide pulsed DC vaccination in HLA-A2.1 patients with metastatic melanoma. Autologous TCR transgenic cells were manufactured in 6 to 7 days using retroviral vector gene transfer, and re-infused with (n = 10) or without (n = 3) prior cryopreservation. Results 14 patients with metastatic melanoma were enrolled and nine out of 13 treated patients (69%) showed evidence of tumor regression. Peripheral blood reconstitution with MART-1-specific T cells peaked within two weeks of ACT indicating rapid in vivo expansion. Administration of freshly manufactured TCR transgenic T cells resulted in a higher persistence of MART-1-specific T cells in the blood as compared to cryopreserved. Evidence that DC vaccination could cause further in vivo expansion was only observed with ACT using non-cryopreserved T cells. Conclusion Double cell therapy with ACT of TCR engineered T cells with a very short ex vivo manipulation and DC vaccines is feasible and results in antitumor activity, but improvements are needed to maintain tumor responses. PMID:24634374

  2. Microbial translocation augments the function of adoptively transferred self/tumor-specific CD8+ T cells via TLR4 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Paulos, Chrystal M.; Wrzesinski, Claudia; Kaiser,, Andrew; Hinrichs, Christian S.; Chieppa, Marcello; Cassard, Lydie; Palmer, Douglas C.; Boni, Andrea; Muranski, Pawel; Yu, Zhiya; Gattinoni, Luca; Antony, Paul A.; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Restifo, Nicholas P.

    2007-01-01

    Lymphodepletion with total body irradiation (TBI) increases the efficacy of adoptively transferred tumor-specific CD8+ T cells by depleting inhibitory lymphocytes and increasing homeostatic cytokine levels. We found that TBI augmented the function of adoptively transferred CD8+ T cells in mice genetically deficient in all lymphocytes, indicating the existence of another TBI mechanism of action. Additional investigation revealed commensal gut microflora in the mesenteric lymph nodes and elevated LPS levels in the sera of irradiated mice. These findings correlated with increased dendritic cell activation and heightened levels of systemic inflammatory cytokines. Reduction of host microflora using antibiotics, neutralization of serum LPS using polymyxin B, or removal of LPS signaling components using mice genetically deficient in CD14 and TLR4 reduced the beneficial effects of TBI on tumor regression. Conversely, administration of microbial ligand–containing serum or ultrapure LPS from irradiated animals to nonirradiated antibody-lymphodepleted mice enhanced CD8+ T cell activation and improved tumor regression. Administration of ultrapure LPS to irradiated animals further enhanced the number and function of the adoptively transferred cells, leading to long-term cure of mice with large B16F10 tumors and enhanced autoimmune vitiligo. Thus, disruption of the homeostatic balance between the host and microbes can enhance cell-based tumor immunotherapy. PMID:17657310

  3. Combinational targeting offsets antigen escape and enhances effector functions of adoptively transferred T cells in glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Meenakshi; Corder, Amanda; Chow, Kevin K H; Mukherjee, Malini; Ashoori, Aidin; Kew, Yvonne; Zhang, Yi Jonathan; Baskin, David S; Merchant, Fatima A; Brawley, Vita S; Byrd, Tiara T; Krebs, Simone; Wu, Meng Fen; Liu, Hao; Heslop, Helen E; Gottschalk, Stephen; Gottachalk, Stephen; Yvon, Eric; Ahmed, Nabil

    2013-11-01

    Preclinical and early clinical studies have demonstrated that chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-redirected T cells are highly promising in cancer therapy. We observed that targeting HER2 in a glioblastoma (GBM) cell line results in the emergence of HER2-null tumor cells that maintain the expression of nontargeted tumor-associated antigens. Combinational targeting of these tumor-associated antigens could therefore offset this escape mechanism. We studied the single-cell coexpression patterns of HER2, IL-13Rα2, and EphA2 in primary GBM samples using multicolor flow cytometry and immunofluorescence, and applied a binomial routine to the permutations of antigen expression and the related odds of complete tumor elimination. This mathematical model demonstrated that cotargeting HER2 and IL-13Rα2 could maximally expand the therapeutic reach of the T cell product in all primary tumors studied. Targeting a third antigen did not predict an added advantage in the tumor cohort studied. We therefore generated bispecific T cell products from healthy donors and from GBM patients by pooling T cells individually expressing HER2 and IL-13Rα2-specific CARs and by making individual T cells to coexpress both molecules. Both HER2/IL-13Rα2-bispecific T cell products offset antigen escape, producing enhanced effector activity in vitro immunoassays (against autologous glioma cells in the case of GBM patient products) and in an orthotopic xenogeneic murine model. Further, T cells coexpressing HER2 and IL-13Rα2-CARs exhibited accentuated yet antigen-dependent downstream signaling and a particularly enhanced antitumor activity.

  4. An HSV-2 based oncolytic virus can function as an attractant to guide migration of adoptively transferred T cells to tumor sites

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Lihua; Zhang, Xiaoliu

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive T-cell therapy has shown promises for cancer treatment. However, for treating solid tumors, there is a need for improving the ability of the adoptively transferred T cells to home to tumor sites. We explored the possibility of using an oncolytic virus derived from HSV-2, which can actively pull T effector cells to the site of infection, as a local attractant for migration of adoptively transferred T cells. Our data show that intratumoral administration of this virus can indeed attract active migration of the adoptively transferred T cells to the treated tumor. Moreover, once attracted to the tumor site by the virus, T cells persisted in there significantly longer than in mock-treated tumor. Chemokine profiling identified significant elevation of CXCL9 and CXCL10, as well as several other chemokines belonging to the inflammatory chemokine family in the virus-treated tumors. These chemokines initially guided the T-cell migration to and then maintained their persistence in the tumor site, leading to a significantly enhanced therapeutic effect. Our data suggests that this virotherapy may be combined with adoptive T-cell therapy to potentiate its therapeutic effect against solid tumors that are otherwise difficult to manage with the treatment alone. PMID:25460506

  5. Role of memory T cell subsets for adoptive immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Busch, Dirk H; Fräßle, Simon P; Sommermeyer, Daniel; Buchholz, Veit R; Riddell, Stanley R

    2016-02-01

    Adoptive transfer of primary (unmodified) or genetically engineered antigen-specific T cells has demonstrated astonishing clinical results in the treatment of infections and some malignancies. Besides the definition of optimal targets and antigen receptors, the differentiation status of transferred T cells is emerging as a crucial parameter for generating cell products with optimal efficacy and safety profiles. Long-living memory T cells subdivide into phenotypically as well as functionally different subsets (e.g. central memory, effector memory, tissue-resident memory T cells). This diversification process is crucial for effective immune protection, with probably distinct dependencies on the presence of individual subsets dependent on the disease to which the immune response is directed as well as its organ location. Adoptive T cell therapy intends to therapeutically transfer defined T cell immunity into patients. Efficacy of this approach often requires long-term maintenance of transferred cells, which depends on the presence and persistence of memory T cells. However, engraftment and survival of highly differentiated memory T cell subsets upon adoptive transfer is still difficult to achieve. Therefore, the recent observation that a distinct subset of weakly differentiated memory T cells shows all characteristics of adult tissue stem cells and can reconstitute all types of effector and memory T cell subsets, became highly relevant. We here review our current understanding of memory subset formation and T cell subset purification, and its implications for adoptive immunotherapy.

  6. Principles of adoptive T cell cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    June, Carl H.

    2007-01-01

    The transfusion of T cells, also called adoptive T cell therapy, is an effective treatment for viral infections and has induced regression of cancer in early-stage clinical trials. However, recent advances in cellular immunology and tumor biology are guiding new approaches to adoptive T cell therapy. For example, use of engineered T cells is being tested as a strategy to improve the functions of effector and memory T cells, and manipulation of the host to overcome immunotoxic effects in the tumor microenvironment has led to promising results in early-stage clinical trials. Challenges that face the field and must be addressed before adoptive T cell therapy can be translated into routine clinical practice are discussed. PMID:17476350

  7. Adoptive T-cell Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Gottschalk, Stephen; Rooney, Cliona

    2015-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is associated with a range of malignancies involving B-cells, T-cells, natural killer (NK)-cells, epithelial cells and smooth muscle. All of these are associated with the latent life cycles of EBV, but the pattern of latency-associated viral antigens expressed in tumor cells depends on the type of tumor. EBV-specific T cells (EBVSTs) have been explored as prophylaxis and therapy for EBV-associated malignancies for more than two decades. EBVSTs have been most successful as prophylaxis and therapy for post-transplant lymphoproliferative disease (PTLD), which expresses the full array of latent EBV antigens (type 3 latency), in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients. While less effective, clinical studies have also demonstrated their therapeutic potential for PTLD post solid organ transplant, and for EBV-associated malignancies such as Hodgkin’s Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma, and nasopharyngeal carcinoma that express a limited array of latent EBV antigens (type 2 latency),. Several approaches are actively being pursued to improve the antitumor activity of EBVSTs including activation and expansion of T cells specific for the EBV antigens expressed in type 2 latency, genetic approaches to render EBVSTs resistant to the immunosuppressive tumor environment and combination approaches with other immune-modulating modalities. Given the recent advances and renewed interest in cell therapy, we hope that EBVSTs will become an integral part of our treatment armamentarium against EBV-positive malignancies in the near future. PMID:26428384

  8. Adoptive transfer of Mammaglobin-A epitope specific CD8 T cells combined with a single low dose of total body irradiation eradicates breast tumors.

    PubMed

    Lerret, Nadine M; Rogozinska, Magdalena; Jaramillo, Andrés; Marzo, Amanda L

    2012-01-01

    Adoptive T cell therapy has proven to be beneficial in a number of tumor systems by targeting the relevant tumor antigen. The tumor antigen targeted in our model is Mammaglobin-A, expressed by approximately 80% of human breast tumors. Here we evaluated the use of adoptively transferred Mammaglobin-A specific CD8 T cells in combination with low dose irradiation to induce breast tumor rejection and prevent relapse. We show Mammaglobin-A specific CD8 T cells generated by DNA vaccination with all epitopes (Mammaglobin-A2.1, A2.2, A2.4 and A2.6) and full-length DNA in vivo resulted in heterogeneous T cell populations consisting of both effector and central memory CD8 T cell subsets. Adoptive transfer of spleen cells from all Mammaglobin-A2 immunized mice into tumor-bearing SCID/beige mice induced tumor regression but this anti-tumor response was not sustained long-term. Additionally, we demonstrate that only the adoptive transfer of Mammaglobin-A2 specific CD8 T cells in combination with a single low dose of irradiation prevents tumors from recurring. More importantly we show that this single dose of irradiation results in the down regulation of the macrophage scavenger receptor 1 on dendritic cells within the tumor and reduces lipid uptake by tumor resident dendritic cells potentially enabling the dendritic cells to present tumor antigen more efficiently and aid in tumor clearance. These data reveal the potential for adoptive transfer combined with a single low dose of total body irradiation as a suitable therapy for the treatment of established breast tumors and the prevention of tumor recurrence.

  9. Whole-body irradiation increases the magnitude and persistence of adoptively transferred T cells associated with tumor regression in a mouse model of prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ward-Kavanagh, Lindsay K.; Zhu, Junjia; Cooper, Timothy K.; Schell, Todd D.

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy has demonstrated efficacy in a subset of clinical and preclinical studies, but the T cells used for therapy often are rendered rapidly non-functional in tumor-bearing hosts. Recent evidence indicates that prostate cancer can be susceptible to immunotherapy, but most studies using autochthonous tumor models demonstrate only short-lived T-cell responses in the tolerogenic prostate microenvironment. Here, we assessed the efficacy of sublethal whole-body irradiation (WBI) to enhance the magnitude and duration of adoptively transferred CD8+ T cells in the transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate (TRAMP) model. We demonstrate that WBI promoted high-level accumulation of granzyme B (GzB)-expressing donor T cells both in lymphoid organs and in the prostate of TRAMP mice. Donor T cells remained responsive to vaccination in irradiated recipients, but a single round of WBI-enhanced adoptive immunotherapy failed to impact significantly the existing disease. Addition of a second round of immunotherapy promoted regression of established disease in half of the treated mice, with no progressions observed. Regression was associated with long-term persistence of effector/memory phenotype CD8+ donor cells. Administration of the second round of adoptive immunotherapy led to reacquisition of GzB expression by persistent T cells from the first transfer. These results indicate that WBI conditioning amplifies tumor-specific T cells in the TRAMP prostate and lymphoid tissue, and suggest that the initial treatment alters the tolerogenic microenvironment to increase antitumor activity by a second wave of donor cells. PMID:24801834

  10. Phase I Trial of Adoptive Cell Transfer with Mixed-Profile Type-I/Type-II Allogeneic T Cells for Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hardy, Nancy M.; Mossoba, Miriam E.; Steinberg, Seth M.; Fellowes, Vicki; Yan, Xiao-Yi; Hakim, Frances T.; Babb, Rebecca R.; Avila, Daniele; Gea-Banacloche, Juan; Sportès, Claude; Levine, Bruce L.; June, Carl H.; Khuu, Hahn M.; Carpenter, Ashley E.; Krumlauf, Michael C.; Dwyer, Andrew J.; Gress, Ronald E.; Fowler, Daniel H.; Bishop, Michael R.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE Metastatic breast cancer (MBC) response to allogeneic lymphocytes requires donor T-cell engraftment and is limited by graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). In mice, Type-II-polarized T cells promote engraftment and modulate GVHD whereas Type-I-polarized T cells mediate more potent graft-versus-tumor (GVT) effects. This Phase-I translational study evaluated adoptive transfer of ex-vivo-costimulated Type-I/Type-II (T1/T2) donor T cells with T-cell-depleted (TCD) allogeneic stem-cell transplantation (AlloSCT) for MBC. EXPERIMENTAL DESIGN Patients had received anthracycline, taxane and antibody therapies, been treated for metastatic disease and an HLA-identical-sibling donor. Donor lymphocytes were costimulated ex vivo with anti-CD3/anti-CD28 antibody-coated magnetic beads in IL-2/IL-4-supplemented media. Patients received reduced-intensity conditioning, donor stem cells and T1/T2 cells, and monitoring for toxicity, engraftment, GVHD and tumor response; results were compared with historical controls, identically treated except for T1/T2-product infusions. RESULTS Mixed Type-I/Type-II CD4+-T cells predominated in T1/T2 products. Nine patients received T1/T2 cells at Dose-Level 1 (5×106 cells/kg). T-cell donor chimerism reached 100% by a median of 28 days. Seven (78%) developed acute GVHD. At Day +28, five patients had partial responses (56%) and none had MBC progression; thereafter, two patients had continued responses. Donor-T-cell engraftment and tumor responses appeared faster than in historical controls, but GVHD rates were similar and responders progressed early, often following treatment of acute GVHD. CONCLUSION Allogeneic T1/T2 cells were safely infused with TCD-AlloSCT, appeared to promote donor engraftment, and may have contributed to transient early tumor responses. PMID:21948234

  11. Efficient tumor regression by adoptively transferred CEA-specific CAR-T cells associated with symptoms of mild cytokine release syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Linan; Ma, Ning; Okamoto, Sachiko; Amaishi, Yasunori; Sato, Eiichi; Seo, Naohiro; Mineno, Junichi; Takesako, Kazutoh; Kato, Takuma; Shiku, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is a cell surface antigen highly expressed in various cancer cell types and in healthy tissues. It has the potential to be a target for chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-modified T-cell therapy; however, the safety of this approach in terms of on-target/off-tumor effects needs to be determined. To address this issue in a clinically relevant model, we used a mouse model in which the T cells expressing CEA-specific CAR were transferred into tumor-bearing CEA-transgenic (Tg) mice that physiologically expressed CEA as a self-antigen. The adoptive transfer in conjunction with lymphodepleting and myeloablative preconditioning mediated significant tumor regression but caused weight loss in CEA-Tg, but not in wild-type mice. The weight loss was not associated with overt inflammation in the CEA-expressing gastrointestinal tract but was associated with malnutrition, reflected in elevated systemic levels of cytokines linked to anorexia, which could be controlled by the administration of an anti-IL-6 receptor monoclonal antibody without compromising efficacy. The apparent relationship between lymphodepleting and myeloablative preconditioning, efficacy, and off-tumor toxicity of CAR-T cells would necessitate the development of CEA-specific CAR-T cells with improved signaling domains that require less stringent preconditioning for their efficacy. Taken together, these results suggest that CEA-specific CAR-based adoptive T-cell therapy may be effective for patients with CEA+ solid tumors. Distinguishing the fine line between therapeutic efficacy and off-tumor toxicity would involve further modifications of CAR-T cells and preconditioning regimens. PMID:27757303

  12. Engineering antitumor immunity by T-cell adoptive immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Riddell, Stanley R

    2007-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of antigen-specific T cells has been used successfully to treat experimental tumors in animal models and viral infections in humans, but harnessing the exquisite specificity and potency of T cells to treat human malignancy has proven challenging. The efforts to use T cells to treat patients with cancer have often been informative in identifying limitations that must be overcome to improve therapeutic efficacy, and a clearer picture of the requirements for successful adoptive T-cell transfer is gradually emerging. Indolent and a subset of aggressive B-cell lymphomas in humans have been shown to be susceptible to eradication by T cells in clinical settings where highly immunogenic minor histocompatibility or viral antigens are presented by tumor cells. In this article, we will review how recent advances in our understanding of the properties of antigen-specific T cells that facilitate their long-term persistence in vivo and reversion to the memory pool after in vitro culture, combined with approaches to molecularly engineer T cells with receptors that target molecules expressed by B-cell lymphoma, are providing opportunities to broaden the application of T-cell therapy and improve its efficacy for this disease.

  13. Enhanced anti-tumor activity induced by adoptive T cell transfer and the adjunctive use of the HDAC Inhibitor LAQ824

    PubMed Central

    Vo, Dan D.; Prins, Robert M.; Begley, Jonathan L.; Donahue, Timothy R.; Morris, Lilah F.; Bruhn, Kevin W.; de la Rocha, Pilar; Yang, Meng-Yin; Mok, Stephen; Garban, Hermes J.; Craft, Noah; Economou, James S.; Marincola, Francesco M.; Wang, Ena; Ribas, Antoni

    2009-01-01

    Tumors grow in the presence of antigen-specific T cells, suggesting the existence of intrinsic cancer cell escape mechanisms. We hypothesized that a histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor could sensitize tumor cells to immunotherapy because this class of agents has been reported to increase tumor antigen expression and shift gene expression to a pro-apoptotic milieu in cancer cells. To test this question, we treated B16 murine melanoma with the combination of the HDAC inhibitor LAQ824 together with the adoptive transfer (AT) of gp100 melanoma antigen-specific pmel-1 T cells. The combined therapy significantly improved antitumor activity through several mechanisms: 1) increase in MHC and tumor-associated antigen (TAA) expression by tumor cells; 2) decrease in competing endogenous lymphocytes in recipient mice, resulting in a proliferative advantage for the adoptively transferred cells; and 3) improvement in the functional activity of the adoptively transferred lymphocytes. We confirmed the beneficial effects of this HDAC inhibitor as sensitizer to immunotherapy in a different model of prophylactic prime-boost vaccination with the melanoma antigen tyrosinase-related protein-2 (TRP2), which also demonstrated a significant improvement in antitumor activity against B16 melanoma. In conclusion, the HDAC inhibitor LAQ824 significantly enhances tumor immunotherapy through effects on target tumor cells as well as improving the antitumor activity of tumor antigen-specific lymphocytes. PMID:19861533

  14. In vivo imaging and quantitation of adoptively transferred human antigen-specific T cells transduced to express a human norepinephrine transporter gene.

    PubMed

    Doubrovin, Mikhail M; Doubrovina, Ekaterina S; Zanzonico, Pat; Sadelain, Michel; Larson, Steven M; O'Reilly, Richard J

    2007-12-15

    Sequential imaging of genetically marked effector cells after adoptive transfer in vivo has greatly enhanced analyses of their biodistribution, growth, and activity both in animal models and in clinical trials of cellular immunotherapy. However, the immunogenicity of cells expressing xenogeneic reporter constructs limits their survival and clinical utility. To address this limitation, we have evaluated a human norepinephrine transporter (hNET) permitting imaging of transduced cells in vivo with a previously approved clinical grade radiolabeled probe, metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG). The hNET gene cDNA was cloned from the SK-N-SH cell line and inserted into a bicistronic retroviral vector also encoding green fluorescent protein. Following transfection, human EBV-specific T lymphocytes seemed fully functional in vitro and also selectively accumulated [(123)I]MIBG. In nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient mice bearing human EBV lymphoma xenografts, as few as 10(4) transduced T cells injected into the tumors could be imaged by single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) or positron emission tomography (PET) after i.v. infusion of [(123)I]MIBG or [(124)I]MIBG, respectively. When hNET(+) EBV-specific T cells were infused i.v., their migration and specific accumulation in EBV(+) tumors expressing their restricting HLA allele could be imaged by SPECT or PET over 28 days. Image intensity was closely correlated with the number of T cells accumulated in targeted tumors. The use of two reporter probes (MIBG and 2'-deoxy-2'-fluoro-beta-d-arabinofuranosyl-5-iodouracil) permitted independent contemporaneous tracking of two distinct EBV-specific T-cell subpopulations expressing different reporter genes (hNET-CD4(+) T cells and HSV-TK-CD8(+) T cells) in the same animal using three-dimensional nuclear modalities (SPECT and PET). The hNET-based system described may thus have significant potential as a nonimmunogenic reporter for extended repeated quantitative in

  15. Adoptive T-cell therapy for cancer: The era of engineered T cells.

    PubMed

    Bonini, Chiara; Mondino, Anna

    2015-09-01

    Tumors originate from a number of genetic events that deregulate homeostatic mechanisms controlling normal cell behavior. The immune system, devoted to patrol the organism against pathogenic events, can identify transformed cells, and in several cases cause their elimination. It is however clear that several mechanisms encompassing both central and peripheral tolerance limit antitumor immunity, often resulting into progressive diseases. Adoptive T-cell therapy with either allogeneic or autologous T cells can transfer therapeutic immunity. To date, genetic engineering of T cells appears to be a powerful tool for shaping tumor immunity. In this review, we discuss the most recent achievements in the areas of suicide gene therapy, and TCR-modified T cells and chimeric antigen receptor gene-modified T cells. We provide an overview of current strategies aimed at improving the safety and efficacy of these approaches, with an outlook on prospective developments.

  16. Graft Versus Leukemia Response Without Graft-versus-host Disease Elicited By Adoptively Transferred Multivirus-specific T-cells

    PubMed Central

    Melenhorst, Jan J; Castillo, Paul; Hanley, Patrick J; Keller, Michael D; Krance, Robert A; Margolin, Judith; Leen, Ann M; Heslop, Helen E; Barrett, A John; Rooney, Cliona M; Bollard, Catherine M

    2015-01-01

    A 12-year-old boy with refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia received a haploidentical transplant from his mother. As prophylaxis for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV) and adenovirus, he received ex vivo expanded virus-specific donor T cells 3.5 months after transplant. Four weeks later leukemic blasts bearing the E2A deletion, identified by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH), appeared transiently in the blood followed by a FISH-negative hematological remission, which was sustained until a testicular relapse 3.5 months later. Clearance of the circulating leukemic cells coincided with a marked increase in circulating virus-specific T cells. The virus-specific cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) line showed strong polyfunctional reactivity with the patient's leukemic cells but not phytohemagglutinin (PHA) blasts, suggesting that virus-specific CTL lines may have clinically significant antileukemia activity. PMID:25266309

  17. A single exercise bout enhances the manufacture of viral-specific T-cells from healthy donors: implications for allogeneic adoptive transfer immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Spielmann, Guillaume; Bollard, Catherine M.; Kunz, Hawley; Hanley, Patrick J.; Simpson, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infections remain a major cause of morbidity and mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The adoptive transfer of donor-derived viral-specific cytotoxic T-cells (VSTs) is an effective treatment for controlling CMV and EBV infections after HSCT; however, new practical methods are required to augment the ex vivo manufacture of multi-VSTs from healthy donors. This study investigated the effects of a single exercise bout on the ex vivo manufacture of multi-VSTs. PBMCs isolated from healthy CMV/EBV seropositive participants before (PRE) and immediately after (POST) 30-minutes of cycling exercise were stimulated with CMV (pp65 and IE1) and EBV (LMP2A and BMLF1) peptides and expanded over 8 days. The number (fold difference from PRE) of T-cells specific for CMV pp65 (2.6), EBV LMP2A (2.5), and EBV BMLF1 (4.4) was greater among the VSTs expanded POST. VSTs expanded PRE and POST had similar phenotype characteristics and were equally capable of MHC-restricted killing of autologous target cells. We conclude that a single exercise bout enhances the manufacture of multi-VSTs from healthy donors without altering their phenotype or function and may serve as a simple and economical adjuvant to boost the production of multi-VSTs for allogeneic adoptive transfer immunotherapy. PMID:27181409

  18. Whole-body imaging of adoptively transferred T cells using magnetic resonance imaging, single photon emission computed tomography and positron emission tomography techniques, with a focus on regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Leech, J M; Sharif-Paghaleh, E; Maher, J; Livieratos, L; Lechler, R I; Mullen, G E; Lombardi, G; Smyth, L A

    2013-01-01

    Cell-based therapies using natural or genetically modified regulatory T cells (Tregs) have shown significant promise as immune-based therapies. One of the main difficulties facing the further advancement of these therapies is that the fate and localization of adoptively transferred Tregs is largely unknown. The ability to dissect the migratory pathway of these cells in a non-invasive manner is of vital importance for the further development of in-vivo cell-based immunotherapies, as this technology allows the fate of the therapeutically administered cell to be imaged in real time. In this review we will provide an overview of the current clinical imaging techniques used to track T cells and Tregs in vivo, including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET)/single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). In addition, we will discuss how the finding of these studies can be used, in the context of transplantation, to define the most appropriate Treg subset required for cellular therapy. PMID:23574314

  19. Safety and persistence of adoptively transferred autologous CD19-targeted T cells in patients with relapsed or chemotherapy refractory B-cell leukemias

    PubMed Central

    Rivière, Isabelle; Park, Jae H.; Davila, Marco L.; Wang, Xiuyan; Stefanski, Jolanta; Taylor, Clare; Yeh, Raymond; Bartido, Shirley; Borquez-Ojeda, Oriana; Olszewska, Malgorzata; Bernal, Yvette; Pegram, Hollie; Przybylowski, Mark; Hollyman, Daniel; Usachenko, Yelena; Pirraglia, Domenick; Hosey, James; Santos, Elmer; Halton, Elizabeth; Maslak, Peter; Scheinberg, David; Jurcic, Joseph; Heaney, Mark; Heller, Glenn; Frattini, Mark; Sadelain, Michel

    2011-01-01

    We report the findings from the first 10 patients with chemotherapy-refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) or relapsed B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) we have enrolled for treatment with autologous T cells modified to express 19-28z, a second-generation chimeric antigen (Ag) receptor specific to the B-cell lineage Ag CD19. Eight of the 9 treated patients tolerated 19-28z+ T-cell infusions well. Three of 4 evaluable patients with bulky CLL who received prior conditioning with cyclophosphamide exhibited either a significant reduction or a mixed response in lymphadenopathy without concomitant development of B-cell aplasia. In contrast, one patient with relapsed ALL who was treated in remission with a similar T-cell dose developed a predicted B-cell aplasia. The short-term persistence of infused T cells was enhanced by prior cyclophosphamide administration and inversely proportional to the peripheral blood tumor burden. Further analyses showed rapid trafficking of modified T cells to tumor and retained ex vivo cytotoxic potential of CD19-targeted T cells retrieved 8 days after infusion. We conclude that this adoptive T-cell approach is promising and more likely to show clinical benefit in the setting of prior conditioning chemotherapy and low tumor burden or minimal residual disease. These studies are registered at www.clinicaltrials.org as #NCT00466531 (CLL protocol) and #NCT01044069 (B-ALL protocol). PMID:21849486

  20. The Presence and Preferential Activation of Regulatory T Cells Diminish Adoptive Transfer of Autoimmune Diabetes by Polyclonal Nonobese Diabetic (NOD) T Cell Effectors into NSG versus NOD-scid Mice.

    PubMed

    Presa, Maximiliano; Chen, Yi-Guang; Grier, Alexandra E; Leiter, Edward H; Brehm, Michael A; Greiner, Dale L; Shultz, Leonard D; Serreze, David V

    2015-10-01

    NOD-scid.Il2rg(null) (NSG) mice are currently being used as recipients to screen for pathogenic autoreactive T cells in type 1 diabetes (T1D) patients. We questioned whether the restriction of IL-2R γ-chain (Il-2rγ)-dependent cytokine signaling only to donor cells in NSG recipients differently influenced the activities of transferred diabetogenic T cells when they were introduced as a monoclonal/oligoclonal population versus being part of a polyclonal repertoire. Unexpectedly, a significantly decreased T1D transfer by splenocytes from prediabetic NOD donors was observed in Il-2rγ(null)-NSG versus Il-2rγ-intact standard NOD-scid recipients. In contrast, NOD-derived monoclonal/oligoclonal TCR transgenic β cell-autoreactive T cells in either the CD8 (AI4, NY8.3) or CD4 (BDC2.5) compartments transferred disease significantly more rapidly to NSG than to NOD-scid recipients. The reduced diabetes transfer efficiency by polyclonal T cells in NSG recipients was associated with enhanced activation of regulatory T cells (Tregs) mediated by NSG myeloid APC. This enhanced suppressor activity was associated with higher levels of Treg GITR expression in the presence of NSG than NOD-scid APC. These collective results indicate NSG recipients might be efficiently employed to test the activity of T1D patient-derived β cell-autoreactive T cell clones and lines, but, when screening for pathogenic effectors within polyclonal populations, Tregs should be removed from the transfer inoculum to avoid false-negative results.

  1. The presence and preferential activation of Tregs diminishes adoptive transfer of autoimmune diabetes by polyclonal NOD T cell effectors into NSG versus NOD-scid mice1

    PubMed Central

    Presa, Maximiliano; Chen, Yi-Guang; Grier, Alexandra E.; Leiter, Edward H.; Brehm, Michael A.; Greiner, Dale L.; Shultz, Leonard D.; Serreze, David V.

    2015-01-01

    NOD-scid.Il2rgnull (NSG) mice are currently being used as recipients to screen for pathogenic autoreactive T-cells in Type 1 Diabetes (T1D) patients. We questioned whether the restriction of IL-2 receptor gamma chain (Il-2rγ) dependent cytokine signaling only to donor cells in NSG recipients differently influenced the activities of transferred diabetogenic T-cells when they were introduced as a monoclonal/oligoclonal population versus being part of a polyclonal repertoire. Unexpectedly, a significantly decreased T1D transfer by splenocytes from prediabetic NOD donors was observed in Il2rγnull -NSG versus Il2rγ-intact standard NOD-scid recipients. In contrast, NOD-derived monoclonal/oligoclonal TCR transgenic ß-cell autoreactive T-cells in either the CD8 (AI4, NY8.3) or CD4 (BDC2.5) compartments transferred disease significantly more rapidly to NSG than to NOD-scid recipients. The reduced diabetes transfer efficiency by polyclonal T cells in NSG recipients was associated with enhanced activation of regulatory T-cells (Tregs) mediated by NSG myeloid APC. This enhanced suppressor activity was associated with higher levels of Treg GITR expression in the presence of NSG than NOD-scid APC. These collective results indicate NSG recipients might be efficiently employed to test the activity of T1D patient-derived ß-cell autoreactive T-cell clones and lines, but when screening for pathogenic effectors within polyclonal populations, Tregs should be removed from the transfer inoculum to avoid false negative results. PMID:26283479

  2. New cell sources for T cell engineering and adoptive immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Themeli, Maria; Rivière, Isabelle; Sadelain, Michel

    2015-04-01

    The promising clinical results obtained with engineered T cells, including chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) therapy, call for further advancements to facilitate and broaden their applicability. One potentially beneficial innovation is to exploit new T cell sources that reduce the need for autologous cell manufacturing and enable cell transfer across histocompatibility barriers. Here we review emerging T cell engineering approaches that utilize alternative T cell sources, which include virus-specific or T cell receptor-less allogeneic T cells, expanded lymphoid progenitors, and induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC)-derived T lymphocytes. The latter offer the prospect for true off-the-shelf, genetically enhanced, histocompatible cell therapy products.

  3. Adoptive T Cell Therapy Targeting CD1 and MR1

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Tingxi; Chamoto, Kenji; Hirano, Naoto

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive T cell immunotherapy has demonstrated clinically relevant efficacy in treating malignant and infectious diseases. However, much of these therapies have been focused on enhancing, or generating de novo, effector functions of conventional T cells recognizing HLA molecules. Given the heterogeneity of HLA alleles, mismatched patients are ineligible for current HLA-restricted adoptive T cell therapies. CD1 and MR1 are class I-like monomorphic molecules and their restricted T cells possess unique T cell receptor specificity against entirely different classes of antigens. CD1 and MR1 molecules present lipid and vitamin B metabolite antigens, respectively, and offer a new front of targets for T cell therapies. This review will cover the recent progress in the basic research of CD1, MR1, and their restricted T cells that possess translational potential. PMID:26052329

  4. Design of T-cell receptor libraries with diverse binding properties to examine adoptive T-cell responses.

    PubMed

    Chervin, A S; Stone, J D; Soto, C M; Engels, B; Schreiber, H; Roy, E J; Kranz, D M

    2013-06-01

    Adoptive T-cell therapies have shown significant promise in the treatment of cancer and viral diseases. One approach, which introduces antigen-specific T-cell receptors (TCRs) into ex vivo activated T cells, is designed to overcome central tolerance mechanisms that prevent responses by endogenous T-cell repertoires. Studies have suggested that use of higher-affinity TCRs against class I major histocompatibility complex antigens could drive the activity of both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, but the rules that govern the TCR binding optimal for in vivo activity are unknown. Here, we describe a high-throughput platform of 'reverse biochemistry' whereby a library of TCRs with a wide range of binding properties to the same antigen is introduced into T cells and adoptively transferred into mice with antigen-positive tumors. Extraction of RNA from tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) or lymphoid organs allowed high-throughput sequencing to determine which TCRs were selected in vivo. The results showed that CD8(+) T cells expressing the highest-affinity TCR variants were deleted in both the TIL population and in peripheral lymphoid tissues. In contrast, these same high-affinity TCR variants were preferentially expressed within CD4(+) T cells in the tumor, suggesting they had a role in antigen-specific tumor control. The findings thus revealed that the affinity of the transduced TCRs controlled the survival and tumor infiltration of the transferred T cells. Accordingly, the TCR library strategy enables rapid assessment of TCR-binding properties that promote peripheral T-cell survival and tumor elimination.

  5. BET bromodomain inhibition enhances T cell persistence and function in adoptive immunotherapy models.

    PubMed

    Kagoya, Yuki; Nakatsugawa, Munehide; Yamashita, Yuki; Ochi, Toshiki; Guo, Tingxi; Anczurowski, Mark; Saso, Kayoko; Butler, Marcus O; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H; Hirano, Naoto

    2016-09-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy is a potentially curative therapeutic approach for patients with advanced cancer. However, the in vitro expansion of antitumor T cells prior to infusion inevitably incurs differentiation towards effector T cells and impairs persistence following adoptive transfer. Epigenetic profiles regulate gene expression of key transcription factors over the course of immune cell differentiation, proliferation, and function. Using comprehensive screening of chemical probes with defined epigenetic targets, we found that JQ1, an inhibitor of bromodomain and extra-terminal motif (BET) proteins, maintained CD8+ T cells with functional properties of stem cell-like and central memory T cells. Mechanistically, the BET protein BRD4 directly regulated expression of the transcription factor BATF in CD8+ T cells, which was associated with differentiation of T cells into an effector memory phenotype. JQ1-treated T cells showed enhanced persistence and antitumor effects in murine T cell receptor and chimeric antigen receptor gene therapy models. Furthermore, we found that histone acetyltransferase p300 supported the recruitment of BRD4 to the BATF promoter region, and p300 inhibition similarly augmented antitumor effects of the adoptively transferred T cells. These results demonstrate that targeting the BRD4-p300 signaling cascade supports the generation of superior antitumor T cell grafts for adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:27548527

  6. T-cell adoptive immunotherapy using tumor-infiltrating T cells and genetically engineered TCR-T cells.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Hiroaki

    2016-07-01

    Immunotherapy has received the expectation that it should contribute to the therapy of cancer patients for >100 years. At long last, recent clinical trials of immunotherapy with immune checkpoint inhibitors and adoptive cell therapy with genetically engineered T cells have reported their remarkable efficacies. Nowadays, it is expected that T-cell adoptive immunotherapy can not only control tumor progression but even cure cancer in some patients. Conversely, severe adverse events associated with efficacy have frequently been reported in clinical trials, suggesting that the assessment and control of safety will be indispensable in the future development of the therapy. New approaches in T-cell adoptive immunotherapy such as reduction of adverse events, targeting of new antigens or utilization of allogeneic cells will open a new gate for less harmful and more effective immunological treatment of cancer patients. PMID:27127191

  7. IL-2 / α-IL-2 Complex Treatment Cannot Be Substituted for the Adoptive Transfer of Regulatory T cells to Promote Bone Marrow Engraftment

    PubMed Central

    Mahr, Benedikt; Unger, Lukas; Hock, Karin; Pilat, Nina; Baranyi, Ulrike; Schwarz, Christoph; Maschke, Svenja; Farkas, Andreas Michael; Wekerle, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Cell therapy with recipient Tregs achieves engraftment of allogeneic bone marrow (BM) without the need for cytoreductive conditioning (i.e., without irradiation or cytotoxic drugs). Thereby mixed chimerism and transplantation tolerance are established in recipients conditioned solely with costimulation blockade and rapamycin. However, clinical translation would be substantially facilitated if Treg-stimulating pharmaceutical agents could be used instead of individualized cell therapy. Recently, it was shown that interleukin-2 (IL-2) complexed with a monoclonal antibody (mAb) (clone JES6-1A12) against IL-2 (IL-2 complexes) potently expands and activates Tregs in vivo. Therefore, we investigated whether IL-2 complexes can replace Treg therapy in a costimulation blockade-based and irradiation-free BM transplantation (BMT) model. Unexpectedly, the administration of IL-2 complexes at the time of BMT (instead of Tregs) failed to induce BM engraftment in non-irradiated recipients (0/6 with IL-2 complexes vs. 3/4 with Tregs, p<0.05). Adding IL-2 complexes to an otherwise effective regimen involving recipient irradiation (1Gy) but no Treg transfer indeed actively triggered donor BM rejection at higher doses (0/8 with IL-2 complexes vs. 9/11 without, p<0.01) and had no detectable effect at two lower doses (3/5 vs. 9/11, p>0.05). CD8 T cells and NK cells of IL-2 complex-treated naïve mice showed an enhanced proliferative response towards donor antigens in vitro despite the marked expansion of Tregs. However, IL-2 complexes also expanded conventional CD4 T cells, CD8 T cells, NK cells, NKT cells and notably even B cells, albeit to a lesser extent. Notably, IL-2 complex expanded Tregs featured less potent suppressive functions than in vitro activated Tregs in terms of T cell suppression in vitro and BM engraftment in vivo. In conclusion, these data suggest that IL-2 complexes are less effective than recipient Tregs in promoting BM engraftment and in contrast actually trigger BM

  8. IL-2/α-IL-2 Complex Treatment Cannot Be Substituted for the Adoptive Transfer of Regulatory T cells to Promote Bone Marrow Engraftment.

    PubMed

    Mahr, Benedikt; Unger, Lukas; Hock, Karin; Pilat, Nina; Baranyi, Ulrike; Schwarz, Christoph; Maschke, Svenja; Farkas, Andreas Michael; Wekerle, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Cell therapy with recipient Tregs achieves engraftment of allogeneic bone marrow (BM) without the need for cytoreductive conditioning (i.e., without irradiation or cytotoxic drugs). Thereby mixed chimerism and transplantation tolerance are established in recipients conditioned solely with costimulation blockade and rapamycin. However, clinical translation would be substantially facilitated if Treg-stimulating pharmaceutical agents could be used instead of individualized cell therapy. Recently, it was shown that interleukin-2 (IL-2) complexed with a monoclonal antibody (mAb) (clone JES6-1A12) against IL-2 (IL-2 complexes) potently expands and activates Tregs in vivo. Therefore, we investigated whether IL-2 complexes can replace Treg therapy in a costimulation blockade-based and irradiation-free BM transplantation (BMT) model. Unexpectedly, the administration of IL-2 complexes at the time of BMT (instead of Tregs) failed to induce BM engraftment in non-irradiated recipients (0/6 with IL-2 complexes vs. 3/4 with Tregs, p<0.05). Adding IL-2 complexes to an otherwise effective regimen involving recipient irradiation (1Gy) but no Treg transfer indeed actively triggered donor BM rejection at higher doses (0/8 with IL-2 complexes vs. 9/11 without, p<0.01) and had no detectable effect at two lower doses (3/5 vs. 9/11, p>0.05). CD8 T cells and NK cells of IL-2 complex-treated naïve mice showed an enhanced proliferative response towards donor antigens in vitro despite the marked expansion of Tregs. However, IL-2 complexes also expanded conventional CD4 T cells, CD8 T cells, NK cells, NKT cells and notably even B cells, albeit to a lesser extent. Notably, IL-2 complex expanded Tregs featured less potent suppressive functions than in vitro activated Tregs in terms of T cell suppression in vitro and BM engraftment in vivo. In conclusion, these data suggest that IL-2 complexes are less effective than recipient Tregs in promoting BM engraftment and in contrast actually trigger BM

  9. Lowest numbers of primary CD8(+) T cells can reconstitute protective immunity upon adoptive immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Stemberger, Christian; Graef, Patricia; Odendahl, Marcus; Albrecht, Julia; Dössinger, Georg; Anderl, Florian; Buchholz, Veit R; Gasteiger, Georg; Schiemann, Matthias; Grigoleit, Götz U; Schuster, Friedhelm R; Borkhardt, Arndt; Versluys, Birgitta; Tonn, Torsten; Seifried, Erhard; Einsele, Hermann; Germeroth, Lothar; Busch, Dirk H; Neuenhahn, Michael

    2014-07-24

    Patients undergoing allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (allo-HSCT) are threatened by potentially lethal viral manifestations like cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivation. Because the success of today's virostatic treatment is limited by side effects and resistance development, adoptive transfer of virus-specific memory T cells derived from the stem cell donor has been proposed as an alternative therapeutic strategy. In this context, dose minimization of adoptively transferred T cells might be warranted for the avoidance of graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), in particular in prophylactic settings after T-cell-depleting allo-HSCT protocols. To establish a lower limit for successful adoptive T-cell therapy, we conducted low-dose CD8(+) T-cell transfers in the well-established murine Listeria monocytogenes (L.m.) infection model. Major histocompatibility complex-Streptamer-enriched antigen-specific CD62L(hi) but not CD62L(lo) CD8(+) memory T cells proliferated, differentiated, and protected against L.m. infections after prophylactic application. Even progenies derived from a single CD62L(hi) L.m.-specific CD8(+) T cell could be protective against bacterial challenge. In analogy, low-dose transfers of Streptamer-enriched human CMV-specific CD8(+) T cells into allo-HSCT recipients led to strong pathogen-specific T-cell expansion in a compassionate-use setting. In summary, low-dose adoptive T-cell transfer (ACT) could be a promising strategy, particularly for prophylactic treatment of infectious complications after allo-HSCT.

  10. Rapid and efficient transfer of the T cell aging marker CD57 from glioblastoma stem cells to CAR T cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xuekai; Niedermann, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) holds great promise for cancer treatment. We recently developed CAR T cells targeting the prototypic cancer stem cell marker AC133 and showed that these CAR T cells killed AC133+ glioblastoma stem cells (GBM-SCs) in vitro and inhibited the growth of brain tumors initiated from GBM-SCs in xenograft mouse models in vivo. Upon coincubation with GBM-SCs, we observed strong upregulation of the T cell aging marker CD57, but other phenotypical or functional changes usually associated with terminal T cell differentiation could not immediately be detected. Here, we provide evidence suggesting that CD57 is rapidly and efficiently transferred from CD57+ GBM-SCs to preactivated T cells and that the transfer is greatly enhanced by specific CAR/ligand interaction. After separation from CD57+ tumor cells, CD57 epitope expression on T cells decreased only slowly over several days. We conclude that CD57 transfer from tumor cells to T cells may occur in patients with CD57+ tumors and that it may have to be considered in the interpretation of phenotyping results for tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and perhaps also in the characterization of tumor-specific T cells from tumor or lymph node homogenates or peripheral blood mononuclear cells. PMID:26097880

  11. Adoptive T cell therapy promotes the emergence of genomically altered tumor escape variants.

    PubMed

    Kaluza, Karen M; Thompson, Jill M; Kottke, Timothy J; Flynn Gilmer, Heather C; Knutson, Darlene L; Vile, Richard G

    2012-08-15

    Adoptive T cell therapy has been proven effective against melanoma in mice and humans. However, because most responses are incomplete or transient, cures remain rare. To maximize the efficacy of this therapy, it will be essential to gain a better understanding of the processes which result in tumor relapse. We studied these processes using B16ova murine melanoma and adoptive transfer of OT-I T cells. Transfer of T cells as a single therapy provided a significant survival benefit for mice with established subcutaneous tumors. However, tumors which initially regressed often recurred. By analyzing tumors which emerged in the presence of a potent OT-I response, we identified a novel tumor escape mechanism in which tumor cells evaded T cell pressure by undergoing major genomic changes involving loss of the gene encoding the target tumor antigen. Furthermore, we show that these in vivo processes can be recapitulated in vitro using T cell/tumor cell co-cultures. A single round of in vitro co-culture led to significant loss of the ova gene and a tumor cell population with rapidly induced and diverse karyotypic changes. Although these current studies focus on the model OVA antigen, the finding that T cells can directly promote genomic instability has important implications for the development of adoptive T cell therapies.

  12. HLA-peptide multimer selection of adenovirus-specific T cells for adoptive T-cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Chakupurakal, Geothy; Onion, David; Bonney, Sarah; Cobbold, Mark; Mautner, Vivien; Moss, Paul

    2013-10-01

    Adenovirus (Ad) infection is a cause of significant morbidity and mortality in hematopoietic stem cell transplant recipients and virus-specific immunotherapy is one option for improved control. Cellular immunity is an important component in suppression of Ad replication but the frequency and population distribution of Ad-specific CD8 T cells has not been systematically investigated. This is an important question in relation to the potential use of these cells for adoptive transfer. To address this question, HLA-peptide multimers were generated for 8 HLA class I-restricted Ad epitopes, which are highly conserved across Ad species. Epitope-specific CD8 T cells from healthy donors were identified by tetramer staining and HLA class I A*01-restricted TDL peptide staining T cells were characterized in relation to frequency, phenotype, and function. The cells demonstrated a minimally differentiated central memory phenotype (CD45RA, CD45RO, CCR7, CD62L, CD27, CD28, and CD57) and were able to produce IFN-γ and proliferate extensively upon antigen stimulation in vitro. After proliferation, the phenotype switched to CD45RO, although it is interesting to note that CCR7 expression was retained. Despite their low frequency, tetramer-staining cells could be enriched with magnetic bead technology. Their characteristics should permit rapid establishment in vivo post adoptive transfer, increasing therapeutic options for patients with Ad infection. This is the first reported characterization of Ad-specific tetramer-staining T cells with a view to adoptive transfer to hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients with Ad infection. The efficacy of these cells needs to be further evaluated in the setting of a clinical trial. PMID:23994889

  13. Biopolymer implants enhance the efficacy of adoptive T cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Stephan, Sirkka B.; Taber, Alexandria M.; Jileaeva, Ilona; Pegues, Ericka P.; Sentman, Charles L.; Stephan, Matthias T.

    2014-01-01

    Although adoptive T cell therapy holds promise for the treatment of many cancers, its clinical utility has been limited by problems in delivering targeted lymphocytes to tumor sites, and their inefficient expansion in the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment. Here we describe a bioactive polymer implant capable of delivering, expanding and dispersing tumor-reactive T cells. The approach can be used to treat inoperable or incompletely-removed tumors by situating implants near them, or at resection sites. Using a mouse breast cancer resection model, we show that the implants effectively support tumor-targeting T cells throughout resection beds and associated lymph nodes, and reduce tumor relapse compared to conventional delivery modalities. In a multifocal ovarian cancer model, we demonstrate that polymer-delivered T cells trigger regression whereas injected tumor-reactive lymphocytes have little curative effect. Scaffold-based T cell delivery may provide a viable treatment option for inoperable tumors, and reduce the rate of metastatic relapse after surgery. PMID:25503382

  14. CMV-Specific CD8 T Cell Differentiation and Localization: Implications for Adoptive Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Corinne J.; Quinn, Michael; Snyder, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a ubiquitous virus that causes chronic infection and, thus, is one of the most common infectious complications of immune suppression. Adoptive transfer of HCMV-specific T cells has emerged as an effective method to reduce the risk for HCMV infection and/or reactivation by restoring immunity in transplant recipients. However, the CMV-specific CD8+ T cell response is comprised of a heterogenous mixture of subsets with distinct functions and localization, and it is not clear if current adoptive immunotherapy protocols can reconstitute the full spectrum of CD8+ T cell immunity. The aim of this review is to briefly summarize the role of these T cell subsets in CMV immunity and to describe how current adoptive immunotherapy practices might affect their reconstitution in patients. The bulk of the CMV-specific CD8+ T cell population is made up of terminally differentiated effector T cells with immediate effector function and a short life span. Self-renewing memory T cells within the CMV-specific population retain the capacity to expand and differentiate upon challenge and are important for the long-term persistence of the CD8+ T cell response. Finally, mucosal organs, which are frequent sites of CMV reactivation, are primarily inhabited by tissue-resident memory T cells, which do not recirculate. Future work on adoptive transfer strategies may need to focus on striking a balance between the formation of these subsets to ensure the development of long lasting and protective immune responses that can access the organs affected by CMV disease. PMID:27695453

  15. CMV-Specific CD8 T Cell Differentiation and Localization: Implications for Adoptive Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Corinne J.; Quinn, Michael; Snyder, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a ubiquitous virus that causes chronic infection and, thus, is one of the most common infectious complications of immune suppression. Adoptive transfer of HCMV-specific T cells has emerged as an effective method to reduce the risk for HCMV infection and/or reactivation by restoring immunity in transplant recipients. However, the CMV-specific CD8+ T cell response is comprised of a heterogenous mixture of subsets with distinct functions and localization, and it is not clear if current adoptive immunotherapy protocols can reconstitute the full spectrum of CD8+ T cell immunity. The aim of this review is to briefly summarize the role of these T cell subsets in CMV immunity and to describe how current adoptive immunotherapy practices might affect their reconstitution in patients. The bulk of the CMV-specific CD8+ T cell population is made up of terminally differentiated effector T cells with immediate effector function and a short life span. Self-renewing memory T cells within the CMV-specific population retain the capacity to expand and differentiate upon challenge and are important for the long-term persistence of the CD8+ T cell response. Finally, mucosal organs, which are frequent sites of CMV reactivation, are primarily inhabited by tissue-resident memory T cells, which do not recirculate. Future work on adoptive transfer strategies may need to focus on striking a balance between the formation of these subsets to ensure the development of long lasting and protective immune responses that can access the organs affected by CMV disease.

  16. Generation of CAR T cells for adoptive therapy in the context of glioblastoma standard of care.

    PubMed

    Riccione, Katherine; Suryadevara, Carter M; Snyder, David; Cui, Xiuyu; Sampson, John H; Sanchez-Perez, Luis

    2015-02-16

    Adoptive T cell immunotherapy offers a promising strategy for specifically targeting and eliminating malignant gliomas. T cells can be engineered ex vivo to express chimeric antigen receptors specific for glioma antigens (CAR T cells). The expansion and function of adoptively transferred CAR T cells can be potentiated by the lymphodepletive and tumoricidal effects of standard of care chemotherapy and radiotherapy. We describe a method for generating CAR T cells targeting EGFRvIII, a glioma-specific antigen, and evaluating their efficacy when combined with a murine model of glioblastoma standard of care. T cells are engineered by transduction with a retroviral vector containing the anti-EGFRvIII CAR gene. Tumor-bearing animals are subjected to host conditioning by a course of temozolomide and whole brain irradiation at dose regimens designed to model clinical standard of care. CAR T cells are then delivered intravenously to primed hosts. This method can be used to evaluate the antitumor efficacy of CAR T cells in the context of standard of care.

  17. Generation of CAR T Cells for Adoptive Therapy in the Context of Glioblastoma Standard of Care

    PubMed Central

    Riccione, Katherine; Suryadevara, Carter M.; Snyder, David; Cui, Xiuyu; Sampson, John H.; Sanchez-Perez, Luis

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive T cell immunotherapy offers a promising strategy for specifically targeting and eliminating malignant gliomas. T cells can be engineered ex vivo to express chimeric antigen receptors specific for glioma antigens (CAR T cells). The expansion and function of adoptively transferred CAR T cells can be potentiated by the lymphodepletive and tumoricidal effects of standard of care chemotherapy and radiotherapy. We describe a method for generating CAR T cells targeting EGFRvIII, a glioma-specific antigen, and evaluating their efficacy when combined with a murine model of glioblastoma standard of care. T cells are engineered by transduction with a retroviral vector containing the anti-EGFRvIII CAR gene. Tumor-bearing animals are subjected to host conditioning by a course of temozolomide and whole brain irradiation at dose regimens designed to model clinical standard of care. CAR T cells are then delivered intravenously to primed hosts. This method can be used to evaluate the antitumor efficacy of CAR T cells in the context of standard of care. PMID:25741761

  18. Production of genetically modified Epstein-Barr virus-specific cytotoxic T cells for adoptive transfer to patients at high risk of EBV-associated lymphoproliferative disease.

    PubMed

    Smith, C A; Ng, C Y; Heslop, H E; Holladay, M S; Richardson, S; Turner, E V; Loftin, S K; Li, C; Brenner, M K; Rooney, C M

    1995-04-01

    EBV-induced lymphoproliferative disease (EBV-LPD) is a disorder most commonly associated with the immunocompromise that follows allogeneic organ transplantation. In patients receiving T cell-depleted bone marrow from HLA-mismatched or HLA-matched unrelated donors, the incidence of EBV-LPD is particularly high, ranging from 5 to 30%. Administration of EBV-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes may be one means of preventing and treating this disease. We now describe a method that allows the routine and timely preparation of large numbers of such cells to allow their safe administration to bone marrow transplant recipients. We also describe how these cells may be genetically marked before infusion, to determine their fate and disposition in vivo.

  19. Management of patients with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma: focus on adoptive T-cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    Perna, Serena Kimi; Huye, Leslie E; Savoldo, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) represents a heterogeneous group of malignancies with high diversity in terms of biology, clinical responses, and prognosis. Standard therapy regimens produce a 5-year relative survival rate of only 69%, with the critical need to increase the treatment-success rate of this patient population presenting at diagnosis with a median age of 66 years and many comorbidities. The evidence that an impaired immune system favors the development of NHL has opened the stage for new therapeutics, and specifically for the adoptive transfer of ex vivo-expanded antigen-specific T-cells. In this review, we discuss how T-cells specific for viral-associated antigens, nonviral-associated antigens expressed by the tumor, T-cells redirected through the expression of chimeric antigen receptors, and transgenic T-cell receptors against tumor cells have been developed and used in clinical trials for the treatment of patients with NHLs. PMID:27471712

  20. A Phase I Study on Adoptive Immunotherapy Using Gene-Modified T Cells for Ovarian Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kershaw, Michael H.; Westwood, Jennifer A.; Parker, Linda L.; Wang, Gang; Eshhar, Zelig; Mavroukakis, Sharon A.; White, Donald E.; Wunderlich, John R.; Canevari, Silvana; Rogers-Freezer, Linda; Chen, Clara C.; Yang, James C.; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Hwu, Patrick

    2007-01-01

    Purpose A phase I study was conducted to assess the safety of adoptive immunotherapy using gene-modified autologous T cells for the treatment of metastatic ovarian cancer. Experimental Design T cells with reactivity against the ovarian cancer – associated antigen α-folate receptor (FR) were generated by genetic modification of autologous T cells with a chimeric gene incorporating an anti-FR single-chain antibody linked to the signaling domain of the Fc receptor γ chain. Patients were assigned to one of two cohorts in the study. Eight patients in cohort 1received a dose escalation of T cells in combination with high-dose interleukin-2, and six patients in cohort 2 received dual-specific T cells (reactive with both FR and allogeneic cells) followed by immunization with allogeneic peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Results Five patients in cohort 1 experienced some grade 3 to 4 treatment-related toxicity that was probably due to interleukin-2 administration, which could be managed using standard measures. Patients in cohort 2 experienced relatively mild side effects with grade 1to 2 symptoms. No reduction in tumor burden was seen in any patient. Tracking 111In-labeled adoptively transferred T cells in cohort 1revealed a lack of specific localization of T cells to tumor except in one patient where some signal was detected in a peritoneal deposit. PCR analysis showed that gene-modified T cells were present in the circulation in large numbers for the first 2 days after transfer, but these quickly declined to be barely detectable 1month later in most patients. An inhibitory factor developed in the serum of three of six patients tested over the period of treatment, which significantly reduced the ability of gene-modified T cells to respond against FR+ tumor cells. Conclusions Large numbers of gene-modified tumor-reactive T cells can be safely given to patients, but these cells do not persist in large numbers long term. Future studies need to employ strategies to

  1. Protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection by adoptive immunotherapy. Requirement for T cell-deficient recipients

    SciTech Connect

    Orme, I.M.; Collins, F.M.

    1983-07-01

    The results of this study demonstrate that spleen cells taken from mice at the height of the primary immune response to intravenous infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis possess the capacity to transfer adoptive protection to M. tuberculosis-infected recipients, but only if these recipients are first rendered T cell-deficient, either by thymectomy and gamma irradiation, or by sublethal irradiation. A similar requirement was necessary to demonstrate the adoptive protection of the lungs after exposure to an acute aerosol-delivered M. tuberculosis infection. In both infectious models successful adoptive immunotherapy was shown to be mediated by T lymphocytes, which were acquired in the donor animals in response to the immunizing infection. It is proposed that the results of this study may serve as a basic model for the subsequent analysis of the nature of the T cell-mediated immune response to both systemic and aerogenic infections with M. tuberculosis.

  2. Lymphocyte function associated antigen-1, integrin alpha 4, and L-selectin mediate T-cell homing to the pancreas in the model of adoptive transfer of diabetes in NOD mice.

    PubMed

    Fabien, N; Bergerot, I; Orgiazzi, J; Thivolet, C

    1996-09-01

    The involvement of adhesion molecule in the process of T-cell homing to the pancreas was investigated in the model of the T-cell transfer of type I diabetes in NOD mice. Treatment of mice using monoclonal anti-lymphocyte function associated antigen (LFA)-1, anti-integrin alpha 4, anti-intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, and anti-L-selectin antibodies (monoclonal antibodies [mAbs]) gave rise to a partial or complete prevention of diabetes via different mechanisms of protection. On day 20 posttransfer, diabetes was only observed in control mice (26 of 32) and in few mice treated with the anti-L-selectin mAbs (3 of 24). On day 60, the best protection was observed using the anti-LFA-1 or the anti-integrin alpha 4 mAbs with 3 of 11 and 2 of 5 diabetic mice, respectively. On day 20, no insulitis was observed in the pancreases of mice treated with these mAbs compared with the pancreases of controls, suggesting that such treatment blocked the penetration of T-cells into the islets. In vitro adhesion assays confirmed that adhesion of T-cells to the pancreatic endothelium was blocked, except when using the anti-L-selectin mAb, which induced a modification of the traffic of the transferred T-cells; the ability of T-cells to migrate into the pancreatic lymph nodes was significantly reduced (10.4 vs. 22%). Anti-LFA-1 mAbs did not modify such T-cell trafficking. The present study, therefore, elucidates the role of LFA-1, integrin alpha 4, and L-selectin in T-cell homing to the pancreas, first step of the cascade of events leading to type I diabetes. PMID:8772719

  3. Multiplex Genome-Edited T-cell Manufacturing Platform for "Off-the-Shelf" Adoptive T-cell Immunotherapies.

    PubMed

    Poirot, Laurent; Philip, Brian; Schiffer-Mannioui, Cécile; Le Clerre, Diane; Chion-Sotinel, Isabelle; Derniame, Sophie; Potrel, Pierrick; Bas, Cécile; Lemaire, Laetitia; Galetto, Roman; Lebuhotel, Céline; Eyquem, Justin; Cheung, Gordon Weng-Kit; Duclert, Aymeric; Gouble, Agnès; Arnould, Sylvain; Peggs, Karl; Pule, Martin; Scharenberg, Andrew M; Smith, Julianne

    2015-09-15

    Adoptive immunotherapy using autologous T cells endowed with chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) has emerged as a powerful means of treating cancer. However, a limitation of this approach is that autologous CAR T cells must be generated on a custom-made basis. Here we show that electroporation of transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN) mRNA allows highly efficient multiplex gene editing in primary human T cells. We use this TALEN-mediated editing approach to develop a process for the large-scale manufacturing of T cells deficient in expression of both their αβ T-cell receptor (TCR) and CD52, a protein targeted by alemtuzumab, a chemotherapeutic agent. Functionally, T cells manufactured with this process do not mediate graft-versus-host reactions and are rendered resistant to destruction by alemtuzumab. These characteristics enable the administration of alemtuzumab concurrently or prior to engineered T cells, supporting their engraftment. Furthermore, endowing the TALEN-engineered cells with a CD19 CAR led to efficient destruction of CD19(+) tumor targets even in the presence of the chemotherapeutic agent. These results demonstrate the applicability of TALEN-mediated genome editing to a scalable process, which enables the manufacturing of third-party CAR T-cell immunotherapies against arbitrary targets. As such, CAR T-cell immunotherapies can therefore be used in an "off-the-shelf" manner akin to other biologic immunopharmaceuticals

  4. Differentiation of naive cord-blood T cells into CD19-specific cytolytic effectors for posttransplantation adoptive immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Serrano, Lisa Marie; Pfeiffer, Timothy; Olivares, Simon; Numbenjapon, Tontanai; Bennitt, Jennifer; Kim, Daniel; Smith, David; McNamara, George; Al-Kadhimi, Zaid; Rosenthal, Joseph; Forman, Stephen J.; Jensen, Michael C.; Cooper, Laurence J. N.

    2006-01-01

    Disease relapse is a barrier to achieving therapeutic success after unrelated umbilical cord-blood transplantation (UCBT) for B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). While adoptive transfer of donor-derived tumor-specific T cells is a conceptually attractive approach to eliminating residual disease after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, adoptive immunotherapy after UCBT is constrained by the difficulty of generating antigen-specific T cells from functionally naive umbilical cord-blood (UCB)–derived T cells. Therefore, to generate T cells that recognize B-ALL, we have developed a chimeric immunoreceptor to redirect the specificity of T cells for CD19, a B-lineage antigen, and expressed this transgene in UCB-derived T cells. An ex vivo process, which is compliant with current good manufacturing practice for T-cell trials, has been developed to genetically modify and numerically expand UCB-derived T cells into CD19-specific effector cells. These are capable of CD19-restricted cytokine production and cytolysis in vitro, as well as mediating regression of CD19+ tumor and being selectively eliminated in vivo. Moreover, time-lapse microscopy of the genetically modified T-cell clones revealed an ability to lyse CD19+ tumor cells specifically and repetitively. These data provide the rationale for infusing UCB-derived CD19-specific T cells after UCBT to reduce the incidence of CD19+ B-ALL relapse. PMID:16352804

  5. Adoptive Immunotherapy using Regulatory T cells and Virus-specific T cells Derived from Cord Blood

    PubMed Central

    Hanley, Patrick J.; Bollard, Catherine M.; Brunstein, Claudio G

    2014-01-01

    Cord blood transplantation, an alternative to traditional stem cell transplants (bone marrow or peripheral blood stem cell transplantation), is an attractive option for patients lacking suitable stem cell transplant donors. Cord blood units have also proven to be a valuable donor source for the development of cellular therapeutics. Virus-specific T cells and regulatory T cells are two cord blood derived products that have shown promise in early phase clinical trials to prevent and/or treat viral infections and graft-versus-host disease (GvHD), respectively. Here we describe how current strategies utilizing cord blood-derived regulatory T cells and virus-specific T cells have been developed to improve outcomes for cord blood transplant recipients. PMID:25632003

  6. Reprogramming CD19-specific T cells with IL-21 signaling can improve adoptive immunotherapy of B-lineage malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Harjeet; Figliola, Matthew J.; Dawson, Margaret J.; Huls, Helen; Olivares, Simon; Switzer, Kirsten; Mi, Tiejuan; Maiti, Sourindra; Kebriaei, Partow; Lee, Dean A.; Champlin, Richard E.; Cooper, Laurence J.N.

    2011-01-01

    Improving the therapeutic efficacy of T cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) represents an important goal in efforts to control B-cell malignancies. Recently an intrinsic strategy has been developed to modify the CAR itself to improve T-cell signaling. Here we report a second extrinsic approach based on altering the culture milieu to numerically expand CAR+ T cells with a desired phenotype. For, the addition of IL-21 to tissue culture improves CAR-dependent T-cell effector functions. We used electrotransfer of Sleeping Beauty (SB) system to introduce a CAR transposon and selectively propagate CAR+ T cells on CD19+ artificial antigen-presenting cells (aAPC). When IL-21 was present, there was preferential numeric expansion of CD19-specific T cells which lysed and produced IFN-γ in response to CD19. Populations of these numerically expanded CAR+ T cells displayed an early memory surface phenotype characterized as CD62L+CD28+ and a transcriptional profile of naïve T cells. In contrast, T cells propagated with only exogenous IL-2 tended to result in an overgrowth of CD19-specific CD4+ T cells. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of CAR+ T cells cultured with IL-21 exhibited improved control of CD19+ B-cell malignancy in mice. To provide coordinated signaling to propagate CAR+ T cells, we developed a novel mutein of IL-21 bound to the cell surface of aAPC that replaced the need for soluble IL-21. Our findings demonstrate that IL-21 can provide an extrinsic reprogramming signal to generate desired CAR+ T cells for effective immunotherapy. PMID:21558388

  7. Reprogramming CD19-specific T cells with IL-21 signaling can improve adoptive immunotherapy of B-lineage malignancies.

    PubMed

    Singh, Harjeet; Figliola, Matthew J; Dawson, Margaret J; Huls, Helen; Olivares, Simon; Switzer, Kirsten; Mi, Tiejuan; Maiti, Sourindra; Kebriaei, Partow; Lee, Dean A; Champlin, Richard E; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2011-05-15

    Improving the therapeutic efficacy of T cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) represents an important goal in efforts to control B-cell malignancies. Recently an intrinsic strategy has been developed to modify the CAR itself to improve T-cell signaling. Here we report a second extrinsic approach based on altering the culture milieu to numerically expand CAR(+) T cells with a desired phenotype, for the addition of interleukin (IL)-21 to tissue culture improves CAR-dependent T-cell effector functions. We used electrotransfer of Sleeping Beauty system to introduce a CAR transposon and selectively propagate CAR(+) T cells on CD19(+) artificial antigen-presenting cells (aAPC). When IL-21 was present, there was preferential numeric expansion of CD19-specific T cells which lysed and produced IFN-γ in response to CD19. Populations of these numerically expanded CAR(+) T cells displayed an early memory surface phenotype characterized as CD62L(+)CD28(+) and a transcriptional profile of naïve T cells. In contrast, T cells propagated with only exogenous IL-2 tended to result in an overgrowth of CD19-specific CD4(+) T cells. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of CAR(+) T cells cultured with IL-21 exhibited improved control of CD19(+) B-cell malignancy in mice. To provide coordinated signaling to propagate CAR(+) T cells, we developed a novel mutein of IL-21 bound to the cell surface of aAPC that replaced the need for soluble IL-21. Our findings show that IL-21 can provide an extrinsic reprogramming signal to generate desired CAR(+) T cells for effective immunotherapy. PMID:21558388

  8. Adoptive T-cell immunotherapy of cancer using chimeric antigen receptor-grafted T cells.

    PubMed

    Davies, David Marc; Maher, John

    2010-06-01

    Harnessing the power of the immune system to target cancer has long been a goal of tumor immunologists. One avenue under investigation is the modification of T cells to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR). Expression of such a receptor enables T-cell specificity to be redirected against a chosen tumor antigen. Substantial research in this field has been carried out, incorporating a wide variety of malignancies and tumor-associated antigens. Ongoing investigations will ensure this area continues to expand at a rapid pace. This review will explain the evolution of CAR technology over the last two decades in addition to detailing the associated benefits and disadvantages. The outcome of recent phase I clinical trials and the impact that these have had upon the direction of future research in this field will also be addressed.

  9. Cellular immunotherapy for neuroblastoma: a review of current vaccine and adoptive T cell therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Louis, C U; Brenner, M K

    2009-01-01

    Immunotherapy is an attractive option for patients with high risk neuroblastoma due to their poor long-term survival rates after conventional treatment. Neuroblastoma cells are derived from the embryonic neural crest and therefore express tumor antigens not widely seen in normal cells, making them potential targets for immunologic attack. There is already considerable experience with monoclonal antibodies that target these tumor associated antigens, and in this review we focus on more exploratory approaches, using tumor vaccines and adoptive transfer of tumor-directed T cells.

  10. Adoptive Immunotherapy for Hematological Malignancies Using T Cells Gene-Modified to Express Tumor Antigen-Specific Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating clinical evidence suggests that adoptive T-cell immunotherapy could be a promising option for control of cancer; evident examples include the graft-vs-leukemia effect mediated by donor lymphocyte infusion (DLI) and therapeutic infusion of ex vivo-expanded tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) for melanoma. Currently, along with advances in synthetic immunology, gene-modified T cells retargeted to defined tumor antigens have been introduced as “cellular drugs”. As the functional properties of the adoptive immune response mediated by T lymphocytes are decisively regulated by their T-cell receptors (TCRs), transfer of genes encoding target antigen-specific receptors should enable polyclonal T cells to be uniformly redirected toward cancer cells. Clinically, anticancer adoptive immunotherapy using genetically engineered T cells has an impressive track record. Notable examples include the dramatic benefit of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) gene-modified T cells redirected towards CD19 in patients with B-cell malignancy, and the encouraging results obtained with TCR gene-modified T cells redirected towards NY-ESO-1, a cancer-testis antigen, in patients with advanced melanoma and synovial cell sarcoma. This article overviews the current status of this treatment option, and discusses challenging issues that still restrain the full effectiveness of this strategy, especially in the context of hematological malignancy. PMID:25517545

  11. B-cell Maturation Antigen is a Promising Target for Adoptive T-cell Therapy of Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, Robert O.; Evbuomwan, Moses O.; Pittaluga, Stefania; Rose, Jeremy J.; Raffeld, Mark; Yang, Shicheng; Gress, Ronald E.; Hakim, Frances T.; Kochenderfer, James N.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Multiple myeloma (MM) is a usually incurable malignancy of plasma cells. New therapies are urgently needed for MM. Adoptive transfer of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-expressing T cells is a promising new therapy for hematologic malignancies, but an ideal target antigen for CAR-expressing T cell therapies of MM has not been identified. B-cell maturation antigen (BCMA) is a protein that has been reported to be selectively expressed by B-lineage cells including MM cells. Our goal was to determine if BCMA is a suitable target for CAR-expressing T cells. Experimental Design We conducted an assessment of BCMA expression in normal human tissues and MM cells by flow cytometry, quantitative PCR, and immunohistochemistry. We designed and tested novel anti-BCMA CARs. Results BCMA had a restricted RNA expression pattern. Except for expression on plasma cells, BCMA protein was not detected in normal human tissues. BCMA was not detected on primary human CD34+ hematopoietic cells. We detected uniform BCMA cell-surface expression on primary MM cells from 5 of 5 patients. We designed the first anti-BCMA CARs to be reported, and we transduced T cells with lentiviral vectors encoding these CARs. The CARs gave T cells the ability to specifically recognize BCMA. The anti-BCMA-CAR-transduced T cells exhibited BCMA-specific functions including cytokine production, proliferation, cytotoxicity, and in vivo tumor eradication. Importantly, anti-BCMA-CAR-transduced T cells recognized and killed primary MM cells. Conclusions BCMA is a suitable target for CAR-expressing T cells, and adoptive transfer of anti-BCMA-CAR-expressing T cells is a promising new strategy for treating MM. PMID:23344265

  12. Human T Cell Crosstalk Is Induced by Tumor Membrane Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Uzana, Ronny; Eisenberg, Galit; Merims, Sharon; Frankenburg, Shoshana; Pato, Aviad; Yefenof, Eitan; Engelstein, Roni; Peretz, Tamar

    2015-01-01

    Trogocytosis is a contact-dependent unidirectional transfer of membrane fragments between immune effector cells and their targets, initially detected in T cells following interaction with professional antigen presenting cells (APC). Previously, we have demonstrated that trogocytosis also takes place between melanoma-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) and their cognate tumors. In the present study, we took this finding a step further, focusing on the ability of melanoma membrane-imprinted CD8+ T cells to act as APCs (CD8+T-APCs). We demonstrate that, following trogocytosis, CD8+T-APCs directly present a variety of melanoma derived peptides to fraternal T cells with the same TCR specificity or to T cells with different TCRs. The resulting T cell-T cell immune synapse leads to (1) Activation of effector CTLs, as determined by proliferation, cytokine secretion and degranulation; (2) Fratricide (killing) of CD8+T-APCs by the activated CTLs. Thus, trogocytosis enables cross-reactivity among CD8+ T cells with interchanging roles of effectors and APCs. This dual function of tumor-reactive CTLs may hint at their ability to amplify or restrict reactivity against the tumor and participate in modulation of the anti-cancer immune response. PMID:25671577

  13. Anti-CD137 monoclonal antibodies and adoptive T cell therapy: a perfect marriage?

    PubMed

    Weigelin, Bettina; Bolaños, Elixabet; Rodriguez-Ruiz, Maria E; Martinez-Forero, Ivan; Friedl, Peter; Melero, Ignacio

    2016-05-01

    CD137(4-1BB) costimulation and adoptive T cell therapy strongly synergize in terms of achieving maximal efficacy against experimental cancers. These costimulatory biological functions of CD137 have been exploited by means of introducing the CD137 signaling domain in clinically successful chimeric antigen receptors and to more efficiently expand T cells in culture. In addition, immunomagnetic sorting of CD137-positive T cells among tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes selects for the fittest antitumor T lymphocytes for subsequent cultures. In mouse models, co-infusion of both agonist antibodies and T cells attains marked synergistic effects that result from more focused and intense cytolytic activity visualized under in vivo microscopy and from more efficient entrance of T cells into the tumor through the vasculature. These several levels of dynamic interaction between adoptive T cell therapy and CD137 offer much opportunity to raise the efficacy of current cancer immunotherapies.

  14. Combining α-Radioimmunotherapy and Adoptive T Cell Therapy to Potentiate Tumor Destruction

    PubMed Central

    Ménager, Jérémie; Gorin, Jean-Baptiste; Maurel, Catherine; Drujont, Lucile; Gouard, Sébastien; Louvet, Cédric; Chérel, Michel; Faivre-Chauvet, Alain; Morgenstern, Alfred; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Davodeau, François

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces direct and indirect killing of cancer cells and for long has been considered as immunosuppressive. However, this concept has evolved over the past few years with the demonstration that irradiation can increase tumor immunogenicity and can actually favor the implementation of an immune response against tumor cells. Adoptive T-cell transfer (ACT) is also used to treat cancer and several studies have shown that the efficacy of this immunotherapy was enhanced when combined with radiation therapy. α-Radioimmunotherapy (α-RIT) is a type of internal radiotherapy which is currently under development to treat disseminated tumors. α-particles are indeed highly efficient to destroy small cluster of cancer cells with minimal impact on surrounding healthy tissues. We thus hypothesized that, in the setting of α-RIT, an immunotherapy like ACT, could benefit from the immune context induced by irradiation. Hence, we decided to further investigate the possibilities to promote an efficient and long-lasting anti-tumor response by combining α-RIT and ACT. To perform such study we set up a multiple myeloma murine model which express the tumor antigen CD138 and ovalbumine (OVA). Then we evaluated the therapeutic efficacy in the mice treated with α-RIT, using an anti-CD138 antibody coupled to bismuth-213, followed by an adoptive transfer of OVA-specific CD8+ T cells (OT-I CD8+ T cells). We observed a significant tumor growth control and an improved survival in the animals treated with the combined treatment. These results demonstrate the efficacy of combining α-RIT and ACT in the MM model we established. PMID:26098691

  15. H-Ras transfers from B to T cells via tunneling nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Rainy, N; Chetrit, D; Rouger, V; Vernitsky, H; Rechavi, O; Marguet, D; Goldstein, I; Ehrlich, M; Kloog, Y

    2013-01-01

    Lymphocytes form cell-cell connections by various mechanisms, including intercellular networks through actin-supported long-range plasma membrane (PM) extensions, termed tunneling nanotubes (TNTs). In this study, we tested in vitro whether TNTs form between human antigen-presenting B cells and T cells following cell contact and whether they enable the transfer of PM-associated proteins, such as green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged H-Ras (GFP-H-Ras). To address this question, we employed advanced techniques, including cell trapping by optical tweezers and live-cell imaging by 4D spinning-disk confocal microscopy. First, we showed that TNTs can form after optically trapped conjugated B and T cells are being pulled apart. Next, we determined by measuring fluorescence recovery after photobleaching that GFP-H-Ras diffuses freely in the membrane of TNTs that form spontaneously between B and T cells during coculturing. Importantly, by 4D time-lapse imaging, we showed that GFP-H-Ras-enriched PM patches accumulate at the junction between TNTs and the T-cell body and subsequently transfer to the T-cell surface. Furthermore, the PM patches adopted by T cells were enriched for another B-cell-derived transmembrane receptor, CD86. As predicted, the capacity of GFP-H-Ras to transfer between B and T cells, during coculturing, was dependent on its normal post-transcriptional lipidation and consequent PM anchorage. In summary, our data indicate that TNTs connecting B and T cells provide a hitherto undescribed route for the transfer of PM patches containing, for example, H-Ras from B to T cells. PMID:23868059

  16. Next generation adoptive immunotherapy--human T cells as carriers of therapeutic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Mortensen, M W; Kahns, L; Hansen, T; Sorensen, P G; Björkdahl, O; Jensen, M R; Gundersen, H J G; Bjørnholm, T

    2007-12-01

    An important step in adoptive immunotherapy in general and specifically with respect to cancer treatment is the initiation of an inflammatory T cell response at the tumor site. Here we suggest a new concept for a controlled inflammatory response in which the intrinsic cytotoxic properties of T cells are upgraded with the properties of nanoparticles transfected into the T cells during the ex vivo expansion process. We report in vitro upgrading of human T cells using PEGylated boron carbide nanoparticles functionalised with a translocation peptide aimed at Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). A key finding is that the metabolism of such upgraded human T cells were not affected by a payload of 0.13 pg boron per cell and that the nanoparticles were retained in the cell population after several cell divisions. This is vital for transporting nanoparticles by T cells to the tumor site.

  17. Adoptive T-cell therapy improves treatment of canine non-Hodgkin lymphoma post chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Colleen M; Sheppard, Sabina; Hartline, Cassie A; Huls, Helen; Johnson, Mark; Palla, Shana L; Maiti, Sourindra; Ma, Wencai; Davis, R Eric; Craig, Suzanne; Lee, Dean A; Champlin, Richard; Wilson, Heather; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2012-01-01

    Clinical observations reveal that an augmented pace of T-cell recovery after chemotherapy correlates with improved tumor-free survival, suggesting the add-back of T cells after chemotherapy may improve outcomes. To evaluate adoptive immunotherapy treatment for B-lineage non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL), we expanded T cells from client-owned canines diagnosed with NHL on artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC) in the presence of human interleukin (IL)-2 and IL-21. Graded doses of autologous T cells were infused after CHOP chemotherapy and persisted for 49 days, homed to tumor, and significantly improved survival. Serum thymidine kinase changes predicted T-cell engraftment, while anti-tumor effects correlated with neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratios and granzyme B expression in manufactured T cells. Therefore, chemotherapy can be used to modulate infused T-cell responses to enhance anti-tumor effects. The companion canine model has translational implications for human immunotherapy which can be readily exploited since clinical-grade canine and human T cells are propagated using identical approaches. PMID:22355761

  18. Alkylating agent melphalan augments the efficacy of adoptive immunotherapy using tumor-specific CD4+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaoyun; Ding, Zhi-Chun; Cao, Yang; Liu, Chufeng; Habtetsion, Tsadik; Yu, Miao; Lemos, Henrique; Salman, Huda; Xu, Hongyan; Mellor, Andrew L.; Zhou, Gang

    2014-01-01

    In recent years the immune-potentiating effects of some widely used chemotherapeutic agents have been increasingly appreciated. This provides a rationale for combining conventional chemotherapy with immunotherapy strategies to achieve durable therapeutic benefits. Previous studies have implicated the immunomodulatory effects of melphalan, an alkylating agent commonly used to treat multiple myeloma, but the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. In the current study, we investigated the impact of melphalan on endogenous immune cells as well as adoptively transferred tumor-specific CD4+ T cells in tumor-bearing mice. We showed that melphalan treatment resulted in a rapid burst of inflammatory cytokines and chemokines during the cellular recovery phase after melphalan-induced myelo-leukodepletion. After melphalan treatment, tumor cells exhibited characteristics of immunogenic cell death, including membrane translocation of the endoplasmic reticulum resident calreticulin (CRT), and extracellular release of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1). In addition, there was enhanced tumor antigen uptake by dendritic cells in the tumor-draining lymph node. Consistent with these immunomodulatory effects, melphalan treatment of tumor-bearing mice led to the activation of the endogenous CD8+ T cells, and more importantly, effectively drove the clonal expansion and effector differentiation of adoptively transferred tumor-specific CD4+ T cells. Notably, the combination of melphalan and CD4+ T-cell adoptive cell therapy (ACT) was more efficacious than either treatment alone in prolonging the survival of mice with advanced B-cell lymphomas or colorectal tumors. These findings provide mechanistic insights into melphalan’s immunostimulatory effects, and demonstrate the therapeutic potential of combining melphalan with adoptive cell therapy utilizing antitumor CD4+ T cells. PMID:25560408

  19. Bortezomib Improves Adoptive T-cell Therapy by Sensitizing Cancer Cells to FasL Cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Shanker, Anil; Pellom, Samuel T; Dudimah, Duafalia F; Thounaojam, Menaka C; de Kluyver, Rachel L; Brooks, Alan D; Yagita, Hideo; McVicar, Daniel W; Murphy, William J; Longo, Dan L; Sayers, Thomas J

    2015-12-15

    Cancer immunotherapy shows great promise but many patients fail to show objective responses, including in cancers that can respond well, such as melanoma and renal adenocarcinoma. The proteasome inhibitor bortezomib sensitizes solid tumors to apoptosis in response to TNF-family death ligands. Because T cells provide multiple death ligands at the tumor site, we investigated the effects of bortezomib on T-cell responses in immunotherapy models involving low-avidity antigens. Bortezomib did not affect lymphocyte or tissue-resident CD11c(+)CD8(+) dendritic cell counts in tumor-bearing mice, did not inhibit dendritic cell expression of costimulatory molecules, and did not decrease MHC class I/II-associated antigen presentation to cognate T cells. Rather, bortezomib activated NF-κB p65 in CD8(+) T cells, stabilizing expression of T-cell receptor CD3ζ and IL2 receptor-α, while maintaining IFNγ secretion to improve FasL-mediated tumor lysis. Notably, bortezomib increased tumor cell surface expression of Fas in mice as well as human melanoma tissue from a responsive patient. In renal tumor-bearing immunodeficient Rag2(-/-) mice, bortezomib treatment after adoptive T-cell immunotherapy reduced lung metastases and enhanced host survival. Our findings highlight the potential of proteasome inhibitors to enhance antitumor T-cell function in the context of cancer immunotherapy.

  20. Generation of multi-functional antigen-specific human T-cells by lentiviral TCR gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Perro, M; Tsang, J; Xue, S-A; Escors, D; Cesco-Gaspere, M; Pospori, C; Gao, L; Hart, D; Collins, M; Stauss, H; Morris, E C

    2010-06-01

    T-cell receptor (TCR) gene transfer is an attractive strategy to generate antigen-specific T-cells for adoptive immunotherapy of cancer and chronic viral infection. However, current TCR gene transfer protocols trigger T-cell differentiation into terminally differentiated effector cells, which likely have reduced ability to mediate disease protection in vivo. We have developed a lentiviral gene transfer strategy to generate TCR-transduced human T-cells without promoting T-cell differentiation. We found that a combination of interleukin-15 (IL15) and IL21 facilitated lentiviral TCR gene transfer into non-proliferating T-cells. The transduced T-cells showed redirection of antigen specificity and produced IL2, IFNgamma and TNFalpha in a peptide-dependent manner. A significantly higher proportion of the IL15/IL21-stimulated T-cells were multi-functional and able to simultaneously produce all three cytokines (P<0.01), compared with TCR-transduced T-cells generated by conventional anti-CD3 plus IL2 stimulation, which primarily secreted only one cytokine. Similarly, IL15/IL21 maintained high levels of CD62L and CD28 expression in transduced T-cells, whereas anti-CD3 plus IL2 accelerated the loss of CD62L/CD28 expression. The data demonstrate that the combination of lentiviral TCR gene transfer together with IL15/IL21 stimulation can efficiently redirect the antigen specificity of resting primary human T-cells and generate multi-functional T-cells.

  1. Generation of multi-functional antigen-specific human T-cells by lentiviral TCR gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Perro, M; Tsang, J; Xue, S-A; Escors, D; Cesco-Gaspere, M; Pospori, C; Gao, L; Hart, D; Collins, M; Stauss, H; Morris, E C

    2010-06-01

    T-cell receptor (TCR) gene transfer is an attractive strategy to generate antigen-specific T-cells for adoptive immunotherapy of cancer and chronic viral infection. However, current TCR gene transfer protocols trigger T-cell differentiation into terminally differentiated effector cells, which likely have reduced ability to mediate disease protection in vivo. We have developed a lentiviral gene transfer strategy to generate TCR-transduced human T-cells without promoting T-cell differentiation. We found that a combination of interleukin-15 (IL15) and IL21 facilitated lentiviral TCR gene transfer into non-proliferating T-cells. The transduced T-cells showed redirection of antigen specificity and produced IL2, IFNgamma and TNFalpha in a peptide-dependent manner. A significantly higher proportion of the IL15/IL21-stimulated T-cells were multi-functional and able to simultaneously produce all three cytokines (P<0.01), compared with TCR-transduced T-cells generated by conventional anti-CD3 plus IL2 stimulation, which primarily secreted only one cytokine. Similarly, IL15/IL21 maintained high levels of CD62L and CD28 expression in transduced T-cells, whereas anti-CD3 plus IL2 accelerated the loss of CD62L/CD28 expression. The data demonstrate that the combination of lentiviral TCR gene transfer together with IL15/IL21 stimulation can efficiently redirect the antigen specificity of resting primary human T-cells and generate multi-functional T-cells. PMID:20164855

  2. Feasibility of Telomerase-Specific Adoptive T-cell Therapy for B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia and Solid Malignancies.

    PubMed

    Sandri, Sara; Bobisse, Sara; Moxley, Kelly; Lamolinara, Alessia; De Sanctis, Francesco; Boschi, Federico; Sbarbati, Andrea; Fracasso, Giulio; Ferrarini, Giovanna; Hendriks, Rudi W; Cavallini, Chiara; Scupoli, Maria Teresa; Sartoris, Silvia; Iezzi, Manuela; Nishimura, Michael I; Bronte, Vincenzo; Ugel, Stefano

    2016-05-01

    Telomerase (TERT) is overexpressed in 80% to 90% of primary tumors and contributes to sustaining the transformed phenotype. The identification of several TERT epitopes in tumor cells has elevated the status of TERT as a potential universal target for selective and broad adoptive immunotherapy. TERT-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) have been detected in the peripheral blood of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL) patients, but display low functional avidity, which limits their clinical utility in adoptive cell transfer approaches. To overcome this key obstacle hindering effective immunotherapy, we isolated an HLA-A2-restricted T-cell receptor (TCR) with high avidity for human TERT from vaccinated HLA-A*0201 transgenic mice. Using several relevant humanized mouse models, we demonstrate that TCR-transduced T cells were able to control human B-CLL progression in vivo and limited tumor growth in several human, solid transplantable cancers. TERT-based adoptive immunotherapy selectively eliminated tumor cells, failed to trigger a self-MHC-restricted fratricide of T cells, and was associated with toxicity against mature granulocytes, but not toward human hematopoietic progenitors in humanized immune reconstituted mice. These data support the feasibility of TERT-based adoptive immunotherapy in clinical oncology, highlighting, for the first time, the possibility of utilizing a high-avidity TCR specific for human TERT. Cancer Res; 76(9); 2540-51. ©2016 AACR.

  3. Serial Low Doses of Sorafenib Enhance Therapeutic Efficacy of Adoptive T Cell Therapy in a Murine Model by Improving Tumor Microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ren-Shyan; Hwang, Jeng-Jong

    2014-01-01

    Requirements of large numbers of transferred T cells and various immunosuppressive factors and cells in the tumor microenvironment limit the applications of adoptive T cells therapy (ACT) in clinic. Accumulating evidences show that chemotherapeutic drugs could act as immune supportive instead of immunosuppressive agents when proper dosage is used, and combined with immunotherapy often results in better treatment outcomes than monotherapy. Controversial immunomodulation effects of sorafenib, a multi-kinases inhibitor, at high and low doses have been reported in several types of cancer. However, what is the range of the low-dose sorafenib will influence the host immunity and responses of ACT is still ambiguous. Here we used a well-established E.G7/OT-1 murine model to understand the effects of serial low doses of sorafenib on both tumor microenvironment and transferred CD8+ T cells and the underlying mechanisms. Sorafenib lowered the expressions of immunosuppressive factors, and enhanced functions and migrations of transferred CD8+ T cells through inhibition of STAT3 and other immunosuppressive factors. CD8+ T cells were transduced with granzyme B promoter for driving imaging reporters to visualize the activation and distribution of transferred CD8+ T cells prior to adoptive transfer. Better activations of CD8+ T cells and tumor inhibitions were found in the combinational group compared with CD8+ T cells or sorafenib alone groups. Not only immunosuppressive factors but myeloid derived suppressive cells (MDSCs) and regulatory T cells (Tregs) were decreased in sorafenib-treated group, indicating that augmentation of tumor inhibition and function of CD8+ T cells by serial low doses of sorafenib were via reversing the immunosuppressive microenvironment. These results revealed that the tumor inhibitions of sorafenib not only through eradicating tumor cells but modifying tumor microenvironment, which helps outcomes of ACT significantly. PMID:25333973

  4. T cell transfer model of colitis: a great tool to assess the contribution of T cells in chronic intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Eri, Rajaraman; McGuckin, Michael A; Wadley, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) consist of Crohn's disease (CD) and ulcerative colitis (UC) affecting about 0.1% of the western population. These two chronic gut diseases affect youth at their prime of life causing diarrhoea, intestinal bleeding, and severe gut discomfort. Mouse models of colitis have been major tools in understanding the pathogenesis of IBD. A number of mouse models are available to assess the contribution of T cells in the pathogenesis of CD and UC. Among these, the T cell transfer model of colitis is the most widely used model to dissect the initiation, induction, and regulation of immunopathology in chronic colitis mediated by T cells. The methodology below describes the classification of various animal models and explains the T cell transfer model in detail, including flow cytometry-based isolation of naïve T cells that are used in the transfer, immunological concepts, detailed immune-pathological assessment, shortcomings of the model, and the latest improvements to this colitis model. A special focus is paid to the utilisation of the T cell transfer model in delineating the immunopathology in a primary epithelial defect model of colitis, namely Winnie. PMID:22262449

  5. Antigen-specific culture of memory-like CD8 T cells for adoptive immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Litterman, Adam J; Zellmer, David M; LaRue, Rebecca S; Jameson, Stephen C; Largaespada, David A

    2014-09-01

    Cytotoxic T cells typically are expanded ex vivo in culture with IL2 for adoptive immunotherapy. This culture period leads to a differentiated phenotype and acquisition of effector function, as well as a loss of in vivo proliferative capability and antitumor efficacy. Here, we report antigen-specific and polyclonal expansion of cytotoxic T cells in a cocktail of cytokines and small molecules that leads to a memory-like phenotype in mouse and human cells even during extended culture, leading to enhanced in vivo expansion and tumor control in mice.

  6. Adoptive Therapy with Chimeric Antigen Receptor Modified T Cells of Defined Subset Composition

    PubMed Central

    Riddell, Stanley R.; Sommermeyer, Daniel; Berger, Carolina; Liu, Lingfeng (Steven); Balakrishnan, Ashwini; Salter, Alex; Hudecek, Michael; Maloney, David G.; Turtle, Cameron J.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to engineer T cells to recognize tumor cells through genetic modification with a synthetic chimeric antigen receptor has ushered in a new era in cancer immunotherapy. The most advanced clinical applications are in in targeting CD19 on B cell malignancies. The clinical trials of CD19 CAR therapy have thus far not attempted to select defined subsets prior to transduction or imposed uniformity of the CD4 and CD8 cell composition of the cell products. This review will discuss the rationale for and challenges to utilizing adoptive therapy with genetically modified T cells of defined subset and phenotypic composition. PMID:24667960

  7. Adoptive T-cell Therapy Using Autologous Tumor-infiltrating Lymphocytes for Metastatic Melanoma: Current Status and Future Outlook

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Richard; Forget, Marie-Andree; Chacon, Jessica; Bernatchez, Chantale; Haymaker, Cara; Chen, Jie Qing; Hwu, Patrick; Radvanyi, Laszlo

    2012-01-01

    Immunotherapy using autologous T-cells has emerged to be a powerful treatment option for patients with metastatic melanoma. These include the adoptive transfer of autologous tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL), T-cells transduced with high-affinity T-cell receptors (TCR) against major melanosomal tumor antigens, and T cells transduced with chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) composed of hybrid immunoglobulin light chains with endo-domains of T-cell signaling molecules. Among these and other options for T-cell therapy, TIL together with high-dose IL-2 has had the longest clinical history with multiple clinical trials in centers across the world consistently demonstrating durable clinical response rates near 50% or more. A distinct advantage of TIL therapy making it still the T-cell therapy of choice is the broad nature of the T-cell recognition against both defined as well as un-defined tumors antigens against all possible MHC, rather than the single specificity and limited MHC coverage of the newer TCR and CAR transduction technologies. In the past decade, significant inroads have been made in defining the phenotypes of T cells in TIL mediating tumor regression. CD8+ T cells are emerging to be critical, although the exact subset of CD8+ T cells exhibiting the highest clinical activity in terms of memory and effector markers is still controversial. We present a model in which both effector-memory and more differentiated effector T cells ultimately may need to cooperate to mediate long-term tumor control in responding patients. Although TIL therapy has shown great potential to treat metastatic melanoma, a number of issues have emerged that need to be addressed to bring it more into the mainstream of melanoma care. First, we have a reached the point where a pivotal phase II or phase III trials are needed in an attempt to gain regulatory approval of TIL as standard-of-care. Second, improvements in how we expand TIL for therapy are needed, that minimize the time the T-cells

  8. Preparing clinical grade Ag-specific T cells for adoptive immunotherapy trials

    PubMed Central

    DiGiusto, DL; Cooper, LJN

    2007-01-01

    The production of clinical-grade T cells for adoptive immunotherapy has evolved from the ex vivo numerical expansion of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes to sophisticated bioengineering processes often requiring cell selection, genetic modification and other extensive tissue culture manipulations, to produce desired cells with improved therapeutic potential. Advancements in understanding the biology of lymphocyte signaling, activation, homing and sustained in vivo proliferative potential have redefined the strategies used to produce T cells suitable for clinical investigation. When combined with new technical methods in cell processing and culturing, the therapeutic potential of T cells manufactured in academic centers has improved dramatically. Paralleling these technical achievements in cell manufacturing is the development of broadly applied regulatory standards that define the requirements for the clinical implementation of cell products with ever-increasing complexity. In concert with academic facilities operating in compliance with current good manufacturing practice, the prescribing physician can now infuse T cells with a highly selected or endowed phenotype that has been uniformly manufactured according to standard operating procedures and that meets federal guidelines for quality of investigational cell products. In this review we address salient issues related to the technical, immunologic, practical and regulatory aspects of manufacturing these advanced T-cell products for clinical use. PMID:17943498

  9. Prospects for chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) γδ T cells: A potential game changer for adoptive T cell cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mirzaei, Hamid Reza; Mirzaei, Hamed; Lee, Sang Yun; Hadjati, Jamshid; Till, Brian G

    2016-10-01

    Excitement is growing for therapies that harness the power of patients' immune systems to combat their diseases. One approach to immunotherapy involves engineering patients' own T cells to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) to treat advanced cancers, particularly those refractory to conventional therapeutic agents. Although these engineered immune cells have made remarkable strides in the treatment of patients with certain hematologic malignancies, success with solid tumors has been limited, probably due to immunosuppressive mechanisms in the tumor niche. In nearly all studies to date, T cells bearing αβ receptors have been used to generate CAR T cells. In this review, we highlight biological characteristics of γδ T cells that are distinct from those of αβ T cells, including homing to epithelial and mucosal tissues and unique functions such as direct antigen recognition, lack of alloreactivity, and ability to present antigens. We offer our perspective that these features make γδ T cells promising for use in cellular therapy against several types of solid tumors, including melanoma and gastrointestinal cancers. Engineered γδ T cells should be considered as a new platform for adoptive T cell cancer therapy for mucosal tumors.

  10. Prospects for chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) γδ T cells: A potential game changer for adoptive T cell cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Mirzaei, Hamid Reza; Mirzaei, Hamed; Lee, Sang Yun; Hadjati, Jamshid; Till, Brian G

    2016-10-01

    Excitement is growing for therapies that harness the power of patients' immune systems to combat their diseases. One approach to immunotherapy involves engineering patients' own T cells to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) to treat advanced cancers, particularly those refractory to conventional therapeutic agents. Although these engineered immune cells have made remarkable strides in the treatment of patients with certain hematologic malignancies, success with solid tumors has been limited, probably due to immunosuppressive mechanisms in the tumor niche. In nearly all studies to date, T cells bearing αβ receptors have been used to generate CAR T cells. In this review, we highlight biological characteristics of γδ T cells that are distinct from those of αβ T cells, including homing to epithelial and mucosal tissues and unique functions such as direct antigen recognition, lack of alloreactivity, and ability to present antigens. We offer our perspective that these features make γδ T cells promising for use in cellular therapy against several types of solid tumors, including melanoma and gastrointestinal cancers. Engineered γδ T cells should be considered as a new platform for adoptive T cell cancer therapy for mucosal tumors. PMID:27392648

  11. Adoptive T-cell therapy for fungal infections in haematology patients

    PubMed Central

    Deo, Shivashni S; Gottlieb, David J

    2015-01-01

    The prolonged immune deficiency resulting from haematopoietic stem cell transplant and chemotherapy predisposes to a high risk of invasive fungal infections. Despite the recent advances in molecular diagnostic testing, early initiation of pre-emptive antifungal therapy and the use of combination pharmacotherapy, mortality from invasive mould infections remain high among recipients of allogeneic stem cell transplant. The increasing incidences of previously rare and drug-resistant strains of fungi present a further clinical challenge. Therefore, there is a need for novel strategies to combat fungal infections in the immunocompromised. Adoptive therapy using in vitro-expanded fungus-specific CD4 cells of the Th-1 type has shown clinical efficacy in murine studies and in a small human clinical study. Several techniques for the isolation and expansion of fungus-specific T cells have been successfully applied. Here we discuss the incidence and changing patterns of invasive fungal diseases, clinical evidence supporting the role of T cells in fungal immunity, methods to expand fungus-specific T cells in the laboratory and considerations surrounding the use of T cells for fungal immunotherapy. PMID:26366286

  12. Adoptive T-cell immunotherapy from third-party donors: characterization of donors and set up of a T-cell donor registry

    PubMed Central

    Eiz-Vesper, Britta; Maecker-Kolhoff, Britta; Blasczyk, Rainer

    2013-01-01

    Infection with and reactivation of human cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and adenovirus (ADV) are frequent and severe complications in immunocompromised recipients after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) or solid organ transplantation (SOT). These serious adverse events are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Donor lymphocyte infusions (DLIs) are often used to treat both viral infections and leukemia relapses after transplantation but are associated with potentially life-threatening graft-versus-host disease (GvHD). Adoptive immunotherapy with virus-specific cytotoxic effector T cells (CTLs) derived from seropositive donors can rapidly reconstitute antiviral immunity after HSCT and organ transplantation. Therefore, it can effectively prevent the clinical manifestation of these viruses with no significant acute toxicity or increased risk of GvHD. In conditions, where patients receiving an allogeneic cord blood (CB) transplant or a transplant from a virus-seronegative donor and since donor blood is generally not available for solid organ recipients, allogeneic third party T-cell donors would offer an alternative option. Recent studies showed that during granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) mobilization, the functional activity of antiviral memory T cells is impaired for a long period. This finding suggests that even stem cell donors may not be the best source of T cells. Under these circumstances, partially human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-matched virus-specific CTLs from healthy seropositive individuals may be a promising option. Therefore, frequency assessments of virus-specific memory T cells in HLA-typed healthy donors as well as in HSCT/SOT donors using a high throughput T-cell assay were performed over a period of 4 years at Hannover Medical School. This chapter will address the relevance and potential of a third-party T-cell donor registry and will discuss its clinical implication for adoptive T-cell

  13. A Panel of Artificial APCs Expressing Prevalent HLA Alleles Permits Generation of Cytotoxic T Cells Specific for Both Dominant and Subdominant Viral Epitopes for Adoptive Therapy1

    PubMed Central

    Hasan, Aisha N.; Kollen, Wouter J.; Trivedi, Deepa; Selvakumar, Annamalai; Dupont, Bo; Sadelain, Michel; O'Reilly, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of virus-specific T cells can treat infections complicating allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplants. However, autologous antigen-presenting cells (APCs) are often limited in supply. Here, we describe a panel of artificial APCs (AAPCs) consisting of murine 3T3 cells transduced to express human B7.1, ICAM-1 and LFA-3 that each stably express one of a series of 6 common HLA class I alleles. In comparative analyses, T cells sensitized with AAPCs expressing a shared HLA allele or autologous APCs loaded with a pool of 15-mers spanning the sequence of CMVpp65 produced similar yields of HLA-restricted CMVpp65 specific T cells; significantly higher yields could be achieved by sensitization with AAPCs transduced to express the CMVpp65 protein. T cells generated were CD8+, IFNγ+ and exhibited HLA-restricted CMVpp65 specific cytotoxicity. T cells sensitized with either peptide-loaded or transduced AAPCs recognized epitopes presented by each HLA allele known to be immunogenic in man. Sensitization with AAPCs also permitted expansion of IFNγ+ cytotoxic effector cells against subdominant epitopes that were either absent or in low frequencies in T cells sensitized with autologous APCs. This replenishable panel of AAPCs can be used for immediate sensitization and expansion of virus-specific T cells of desired HLA restriction for adoptive immunotherapy. It may be of particular value for recipients of transplants from HLA disparate donors. PMID:19635907

  14. Mechanisms of immunological eradication of a syngeneic guinea pig tumor. II. Effect of methotrexate treatment and T cell depletion of the recipient on adoptive immunity

    SciTech Connect

    Shu, S.; Fonseca, L.S.; Hunter, J.T.; Rapp, H.J.

    1983-01-01

    The influence of methotrexate on the development of immunity to the line 10 hepatoma was studied in guinea pigs. Chronic methotrexate treatment had no apparent effect on the ability of immune guinea pigs to suppress the growth of inoculated tumor cells. In contrast, the same methotrexate regimen inhibited the development of tumor immunity if started before the 8th day after immunization with a vaccine containing viable line 10 cells admixed with Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) cell walls. Thus, methotrexate selectively inhibited the afferent limb of the immune response. In adoptive transfer experiments, methotrexate-treated recipient guinea pigs were capable of being passively sensitized with immune spleen cells, indicating that the primary cell-mediated immune response of the recipient was not required for adoptive immunity. The contribution of recipient T cells in adoptive immunity was further investigated in guinea pigs deleted of T cells by thymectomy, irradiation, and bone marrow reconstitution. Despite demonstrable deficiency in T lymphocyte reactions, B animals were fully capable of rejecting tumors after transfer of immune cells. These results suggest that the expression of adoptive immunity was independent of recipient T cell participation. In addition, sublethal irradiation of immune spleen cells prior to adoptive transfer abolished their efficacy. Proliferation of transferred immune cells in the recipient may be essential for expression of adoptive immunity.

  15. CD4⁺ T cells from IPEX patients convert into functional and stable regulatory T cells by FOXP3 gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Passerini, Laura; Rossi Mel, Eva; Sartirana, Claudia; Fousteri, Georgia; Bondanza, Attilio; Naldini, Luigi; Roncarolo, Maria Grazia; Bacchetta, Rosa

    2013-12-11

    In humans, mutations in the gene encoding for forkhead box P3 (FOXP3), a critically important transcription factor for CD4⁺CD25⁺ regulatory T (T(reg)) cell function, lead to a life-threatening systemic poly-autoimmune disease, known as immune dysregulation, polyendocrinopathy, enteropathy, X-linked (IPEX) syndrome. Severe autoimmunity results from the inborn dysfunction and instability of FOXP3-mutated T(reg) cells. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the only current curative option for affected patients. We show here that when CD4⁺ T cells are converted into T(reg) cells after lentivirus-mediated FOXP3 gene transfer, the resulting CD4(FOXP3) T cell population displays stable phenotype and suppressive function, especially when naïve T cells are converted. We further demonstrate that CD4(FOXP3) T cells are stable in inflammatory conditions not only in vitro but also in vivo in a model of xenogeneic graft-versus-host disease. We therefore applied this FOXP3 gene transfer strategy for the development of a T(reg) cell-based therapeutic approach to restore tolerance in IPEX syndrome. IPEX-derived CD4(FOXP3) T cells mirrored T(reg) cells from healthy donors in terms of cellular markers, anergic phenotype, cytokine production, and suppressive function. These findings pave the way for the treatment of IPEX patients by adoptive cell therapy with genetically engineered T(reg) cells and are seminal for future potential application in patients with autoimmune disorders of different origin. PMID:24337481

  16. Broadening Specificity and Enhancing Cytotoxicity of Adoptive T Cells for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Faè, Damiana Antonia; Martorelli, Debora; Mastorci, Katy; Muraro, Elena; Dal Col, Jessica; Franchin, Giovanni; Barzan, Luigi; Comaro, Elisa; Vaccher, Emanuela; Rosato, Antonio; Dolcetti, Riccardo

    2016-05-01

    Although promising, clinical responses to adoptive immunotherapy for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) are still limited by the restricted number of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) antigens that can be targeted and their poor immunogenicity. Our previous work indicated that the immunogenic features of the NPC-associated viral antigen BARF1 may be exploited for immunotherapeutic purposes. Nevertheless, T-cell lines obtained with current protocols include only negligible numbers of BARF1-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes, pointing to the need to enrich these effectors in BARF1 specificities. Considering that in B lymphocytes BARF1 is mainly a lytic EBV antigen, we tested different EBV lytic-cycle inducers (TPA/butyric acid, doxorubicin, and cisplatin) used at suboptimal concentrations for their ability to upregulate BARF1 expression in lymphoblastoid B-cell lines (LCL), the commonly used antigen-presenting cells, without compromising their survival. The LCLs treated with doxorubicin (DX-LCL) can reproducibly and efficiently generate EBV-specific effectors enriched in BARF1 specificities from both healthy donors and NPC patients. These DX-LCLs also had more pronounced immunogenic properties, including HLA class I upregulation and expression of immunogenic cell death markers, such as enhanced calreticulin exposure and HMGB1 release. In particular, doxorubicin triggers an HMGB1 autocrine/paracrine loop with its receptor, TLR4, which is also upregulated in DX-LCLs and is responsible for NF-κB activation and a delayed apoptosis that allows a prolonged stimulation of EBV-specific T-cell precursors. This protocol may thus constitute a valid alternative to the use of engineered LCLs to generate EBV-specific T-cell lines for adoptive immunotherapy, being relatively simple, easily upgradable to Good Manufacturing Practice standards, and therefore more broadly applicable. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(5); 431-40. ©2016 AACR.

  17. Prospects for adoptive immunotherapy of pancreatic cancer using chimeric antigen receptor-engineered T-cells.

    PubMed

    Alrifai, Doraid; Sarker, Debashis; Maher, John

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy using chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) engineered T-cells is emerging as a powerful new approach to cancer immunotherapy. CARs are fusion molecules that couple the antibody-like binding of a native cell surface target to the delivery of a bespoke T-cell activating signal. Recent studies undertaken by several centers have demonstrated highly compelling efficacy in patients with acute and chronic B-cell malignancies. However, comparable therapeutic activity has not been achieved in solid tumors. Modern management of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) remains ineffective, reflected in the virtual equivalence of annual incidence and mortality statistics for this tumor type. Increasing evidence indicates that these tumors are recognized by the immune system, but deploy powerful evasion strategies that limit natural immune surveillance and render efforts at immunotherapy challenging. Here, we review preclinical and clinical studies that have been initiated or completed in an effort to develop CAR-based immunotherapy for PDAC. We also consider the hurdles to the effective clinical development of this exciting new therapeutic modality.

  18. Transfer of allergic airway responses with antigen-primed CD4+ but not CD8+ T cells in brown Norway rats.

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, A; Mishima, H; Renzi, P M; Xu, L J; Hamid, Q; Martin, J G

    1995-01-01

    Activated CD4+ helper T cells have been demonstrated in asthmatic airways and postulated to play a central role in eliciting allergic inflammation; direct evidence of their involvement seems to be lacking. We hypothesized that CD4+ T cells have the potential to induce allergic responses to antigen challenge, and tested this hypothesis in a model of allergic bronchoconstriction, the Brown Norway rat, using the approach of adoptive transfer. Animals were actively sensitized to either ovalbumin (OVA) or BSA and were used as donors of T cells. W3/25(CD4)+ or OX8(CD8)+ T cells were isolated from the cervical lymph nodes of sensitized donors and transferred to naive BN rats. 2 d after adoptive transfer recipient rats were challenged by OVA inhalation, and changes in lung resistance (RL), bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells, and serum levels of antigen-specific IgE were studied. After OVA challenge recipients of OVA-primed W3/25+ T cells exhibited sustained increases in RL throughout the entire 8-h observation period and had significant bronchoalveolar lavage eosinophilia, which was detected by immunocytochemistry using an antimajor basic protein mAb. Recipients of BSA-primed W3/25+ T cells or OVA-primed OX8+ T cells failed to respond to inhaled OVA. OVA-specific immunoglobulin E was undetectable by ELISA or skin testing in any of the recipient rats after adoptive transfer. In conclusion, antigen-induced airway bronchoconstriction and eosinophilia were successfully transferred by antigen-specific W3/25+ T cells in Brown Norway rats. These responses were dependent on antigen-primed W3/25+ T cells and appeared to be independent of IgE-mediated mast cell activation. This study provides clear evidence for T cell mediated immune mechanisms in allergic airway responses in this experimental model. Images PMID:7657805

  19. Durable Complete Response from Metastatic Melanoma after Transfer of Autologous T Cells Recognizing 10 Mutated Tumor Antigens.

    PubMed

    Prickett, Todd D; Crystal, Jessica S; Cohen, Cyrille J; Pasetto, Anna; Parkhurst, Maria R; Gartner, Jared J; Yao, Xin; Wang, Rong; Gros, Alena; Li, Yong F; El-Gamil, Mona; Trebska-McGowan, Kasia; Rosenberg, Steven A; Robbins, Paul F

    2016-08-01

    Immunotherapy treatment of patients with metastatic cancer has assumed a prominent role in the clinic. Durable complete response rates of 20% to 25% are achieved in patients with metastatic melanoma following adoptive cell transfer of T cells derived from metastatic lesions, responses that appear in some patients to be mediated by T cells that predominantly recognize mutated antigens. Here, we provide a detailed analysis of the reactivity of T cells administered to a patient with metastatic melanoma who exhibited a complete response for over 3 years after treatment. Over 4,000 nonsynonymous somatic mutations were identified by whole-exome sequence analysis of the patient's autologous normal and tumor cell DNA. Autologous B cells transfected with 720 mutated minigenes corresponding to the most highly expressed tumor cell transcripts were then analyzed for their ability to stimulate the administered T cells. Autologous tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes recognized 10 distinct mutated gene products, but not the corresponding wild-type products, each of which was recognized in the context of one of three different MHC class I restriction elements expressed by the patient. Detailed clonal analysis revealed that 9 of the top 20 most prevalent clones present in the infused T cells, comprising approximately 24% of the total cells, recognized mutated antigens. Thus, we have identified and enriched mutation-reactive T cells and suggest that such analyses may lead to the development of more effective therapies for the treatment of patients with metastatic cancer. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(8); 669-78. ©2016 AACR.

  20. Highly efficient gene transfer using a retroviral vector into murine T cells for preclinical chimeric antigen receptor-expressing T cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Kusabuka, Hotaka; Fujiwara, Kento; Tokunaga, Yusuke; Hirobe, Sachiko; Nakagawa, Shinsaku; Okada, Naoki

    2016-04-22

    Adoptive immunotherapy using chimeric antigen receptor-expressing T (CAR-T) cells has attracted attention as an efficacious strategy for cancer treatment. To prove the efficacy and safety of CAR-T cell therapy, the elucidation of immunological mechanisms underlying it in mice is required. Although a retroviral vector (Rv) is mainly used for the introduction of CAR to murine T cells, gene transduction efficiency is generally less than 50%. The low transduction efficiency causes poor precision in the functional analysis of CAR-T cells. We attempted to improve the Rv gene transduction protocol to more efficiently generate functional CAR-T cells by optimizing the period of pre-cultivation and antibody stimulation. In the improved protocol, gene transduction efficiency to murine T cells was more than 90%. In addition, almost all of the prepared murine T cells expressed CAR after puromycin selection. These CAR-T cells had antigen-specific cytotoxic activity and secreted multiple cytokines by antigen stimulation. We believe that our optimized gene transduction protocol for murine T cells contributes to the advancement of T cell biology and development of immunotherapy using genetically engineered T cells.

  1. Retargeted human avidin-CAR T cells for adoptive immunotherapy of EGFRvIII expressing gliomas and their evaluation via optical imaging

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Zhiping; Sun, Haojie; Zhang, Mingzhi; Zhang, Jianning; Liu, Shuang; Hao, Limin; Lu, Guoqiu; Zheng, Kangcheng; Gong, Xikui; Wu, Di; Wang, Fan; Shen, Li

    2015-01-01

    There has been significant progress in the design of chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) for adoptive immunotherapy targeting tumor-associated antigens. However, the challenge of monitoring the therapy in real time has been continually ignored. To address this issue, we developed optical molecular imaging approaches to evaluate a recently reported novel CAR strategy for adoptive immunotherapy against glioma xenografts expressing EGFRvIII. We initially biotinylated a novel anti-EGFRvIII monoclonal antibody (biotin-4G1) to pre-target EGFRvIII+ gliomas and then redirect activated avidin-CAR expressing T cells against the pre-targeted biotin-4G1. By optical imaging study and bio-distribution analysis, we confirmed the specificity of pre-target and target and determined the optimal time for T cells adoptive transfer in vivo. The results showed this therapeutic strategy offered efficient therapy effect to EGFRvIII+ glioma-bearing mice and implied that optical imaging is a highly useful tool in aiding in the instruction of clinical CAR-T cells adoptive transfer in future. PMID:26124178

  2. Improving the outcome of adoptive cell transfer by targeting tumor escape.

    PubMed

    Kaluza, Karen M; Vile, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Adoptive T-cell transfer is among the most promising immunotherapies against cancer. To continue increasing the potential of this therapy, our studies focus on the inhibition of tumor recurrence. Recently, we have demonstrated several ways in which combination therapies involving multiple T-cell populations and immunostimulatory chemotherapy can enhance long-term survival.

  3. Purity of transferred CD8+ T cells is crucial for safety and efficacy of combinatorial tumor immunotherapy in the absence of SHP-1

    PubMed Central

    Watson, H Angharad; Dolton, Garry; Ohme, Julia; Ladell, Kristin; Vigar, Miriam; Wehenkel, Sophie; Hindley, James; Mohammed, Rebar N; Miners, Kelly; Luckwell, Rhys A; Price, David A; Matthews, R James; Ager, Ann

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of tumor-specific cytotoxic T cells is a promising advance in cancer therapy. Similarly, checkpoint inhibition has shown striking clinical results in some patients. Here we combine adoptive cell transfer with ablation of the checkpoint protein Src homology 2-domain-containing phosphatase 1 (SHP-1, Ptpn6). Naturally occurring motheaten mice lack SHP-1 and do not survive weaning due to extensive immunopathology. To circumvent this limitation, we created a novel SHP-1null mouse that is viable up to 12 weeks of age by knocking out IL1r1. Using this model, we demonstrate that the absence of SHP-1 augments the ability of adoptively transferred CD8+ T cells to control tumor growth. This therapeutic effect was only observed in situations where T-cell numbers were limited, analogous to clinical settings. However, adoptive transfer of non-CD8+ SHP-1null hematopoietic cells resulted in lethal motheaten-like pathology, indicating that systemic inhibition of SHP-1 could have serious adverse effects. Despite this caveat, our findings support the development of SHP-1 inhibition strategies in human T cells to complement adoptive transfer therapies in the clinic. PMID:27430370

  4. Designer T cells by T cell receptor replacement.

    PubMed

    Sommermeyer, Daniel; Neudorfer, Julia; Weinhold, Monika; Leisegang, Matthias; Engels, Boris; Noessner, Elfriede; Heemskerk, Mirjam H M; Charo, Jehad; Schendel, Dolores J; Blankenstein, Thomas; Bernhard, Helga; Uckert, Wolfgang

    2006-11-01

    T cell receptor (TCR) gene transfer is a convenient method to produce antigen-specific T cells for adoptive therapy. However, the expression of two TCR in T cells could impair their function or cause unwanted effects by mixed TCR heterodimers. With five different TCR and four different T cells, either mouse or human, we show that some TCR are strong--in terms of cell surface expression--and replace weak TCR on the cell surface, resulting in exchange of antigen specificity. Two strong TCR are co-expressed. A mouse TCR replaces human TCR on human T cells. Even though it is still poorly understood why some TCRalpha/beta combinations are preferentially expressed on T cells, our data suggest that, in the future, designer T cells with exclusive tumor reactivity can be generated by T cell engineering. PMID:17051621

  5. Automated manufacturing of chimeric antigen receptor T cells for adoptive immunotherapy using CliniMACS prodigy.

    PubMed

    Mock, Ulrike; Nickolay, Lauren; Philip, Brian; Cheung, Gordon Weng-Kit; Zhan, Hong; Johnston, Ian C D; Kaiser, Andrew D; Peggs, Karl; Pule, Martin; Thrasher, Adrian J; Qasim, Waseem

    2016-08-01

    Novel cell therapies derived from human T lymphocytes are exhibiting enormous potential in early-phase clinical trials in patients with hematologic malignancies. Ex vivo modification of T cells is currently limited to a small number of centers with the required infrastructure and expertise. The process requires isolation, activation, transduction, expansion and cryopreservation steps. To simplify procedures and widen applicability for clinical therapies, automation of these procedures is being developed. The CliniMACS Prodigy (Miltenyi Biotec) has recently been adapted for lentiviral transduction of T cells and here we analyse the feasibility of a clinically compliant T-cell engineering process for the manufacture of T cells encoding chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) for CD19 (CAR19), a widely targeted antigen in B-cell malignancies. Using a closed, single-use tubing set we processed mononuclear cells from fresh or frozen leukapheresis harvests collected from healthy volunteer donors. Cells were phenotyped and subjected to automated processing and activation using TransAct, a polymeric nanomatrix activation reagent incorporating CD3/CD28-specific antibodies. Cells were then transduced and expanded in the CentriCult-Unit of the tubing set, under stabilized culture conditions with automated feeding and media exchange. The process was continuously monitored to determine kinetics of expansion, transduction efficiency and phenotype of the engineered cells in comparison with small-scale transductions run in parallel. We found that transduction efficiencies, phenotype and function of CAR19 T cells were comparable with existing procedures and overall T-cell yields sufficient for anticipated therapeutic dosing. The automation of closed-system T-cell engineering should improve dissemination of emerging immunotherapies and greatly widen applicability. PMID:27378344

  6. Automated manufacturing of chimeric antigen receptor T cells for adoptive immunotherapy using CliniMACS prodigy.

    PubMed

    Mock, Ulrike; Nickolay, Lauren; Philip, Brian; Cheung, Gordon Weng-Kit; Zhan, Hong; Johnston, Ian C D; Kaiser, Andrew D; Peggs, Karl; Pule, Martin; Thrasher, Adrian J; Qasim, Waseem

    2016-08-01

    Novel cell therapies derived from human T lymphocytes are exhibiting enormous potential in early-phase clinical trials in patients with hematologic malignancies. Ex vivo modification of T cells is currently limited to a small number of centers with the required infrastructure and expertise. The process requires isolation, activation, transduction, expansion and cryopreservation steps. To simplify procedures and widen applicability for clinical therapies, automation of these procedures is being developed. The CliniMACS Prodigy (Miltenyi Biotec) has recently been adapted for lentiviral transduction of T cells and here we analyse the feasibility of a clinically compliant T-cell engineering process for the manufacture of T cells encoding chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) for CD19 (CAR19), a widely targeted antigen in B-cell malignancies. Using a closed, single-use tubing set we processed mononuclear cells from fresh or frozen leukapheresis harvests collected from healthy volunteer donors. Cells were phenotyped and subjected to automated processing and activation using TransAct, a polymeric nanomatrix activation reagent incorporating CD3/CD28-specific antibodies. Cells were then transduced and expanded in the CentriCult-Unit of the tubing set, under stabilized culture conditions with automated feeding and media exchange. The process was continuously monitored to determine kinetics of expansion, transduction efficiency and phenotype of the engineered cells in comparison with small-scale transductions run in parallel. We found that transduction efficiencies, phenotype and function of CAR19 T cells were comparable with existing procedures and overall T-cell yields sufficient for anticipated therapeutic dosing. The automation of closed-system T-cell engineering should improve dissemination of emerging immunotherapies and greatly widen applicability.

  7. Comparison of Lentiviral and Sleeping Beauty Mediated αβ T Cell Receptor Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Field, Anne-Christine; Vink, Conrad; Gabriel, Richard; Al-Subki, Roua; Schmidt, Manfred; Goulden, Nicholas; Stauss, Hans; Thrasher, Adrian; Morris, Emma; Qasim, Waseem

    2013-01-01

    Transfer of tumour antigen-specific receptors to T cells requires efficient delivery and integration of transgenes, and currently most clinical studies are using gamma retroviral or lentiviral systems. Whilst important proof-of-principle data has been generated for both chimeric antigen receptors and αβ T cell receptors, the current platforms are costly, time-consuming and relatively inflexible. Alternative, more cost-effective, Sleeping Beauty transposon-based plasmid systems could offer a pathway to accelerated clinical testing of a more diverse repertoire of recombinant high affinity T cell receptors. Nucleofection of hyperactive SB100X transposase-mediated stable transposition of an optimised murine-human chimeric T cell receptor specific for Wilm’s tumour antigen from a Sleeping Beauty transposon plasmid. Whilst transfer efficiency was lower than that mediated by lentiviral transduction, cells could be readily enriched and expanded, and mediated effective target cells lysis in vitro and in vivo. Integration sites of transposed TCR genes in primary T cells were almost randomly distributed, contrasting the predilection of lentiviral vectors for transcriptionally active sites. The results support exploitation of the Sleeping Beauty plasmid based system as a flexible and adaptable platform for accelerated, early-phase assessment of T cell receptor gene therapies. PMID:23840834

  8. [Changes of T-cell clonality after induction-cultivation of peripheral T lymphocytes in adoptive immunotherapy for leukemias].

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan; Gu, Jiang-Ying; Ou, Yuan; Li, Mian-Yang; Wang, He; Jin, Xian; Tao, Xiu-Yan; Liu, Zhao-Li; Ma, Xing-Fan; Wang, Xiu-Li; Ma, Si-Kun; Kang, Rui; Cai, Peng; Tong, Chun-Rong; Zhu, Ping

    2009-06-01

    This study was purposed to analyze the changes of T-cell clonality after induction of peripheral T lymphocytes by autogenous DC and cytokines in the preparation of adoptive immunotherapy for leukemias. The bone marrow and peripheral blood from 21 leukemia patients at remission stage after treatment and subjected to adoptive immunotherapy were collected. Their DCs and T-cells were stimulated with cytokines and then were mixed to activate T-cells. T-cell receptor beta variable region (TCRBV) families were amplified by RT-PCR, and genescan method and sequencing of the PCR products were used to observe the clonality changes of T-cells before and after the induction and cultivation of T-cells. The flow cytometry was used to identify CD3(+), CD4(+), CD8(+), CD3(+)CD56(+) and CD4(+)CD25str(+)FOXP3(+) cells to disclose the ratio change of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL), helper T-cells, regulatory T-cells and NK T-cells before and after induction and cultivation of T-cells. The results showed that in the 21 patients, most of the 24 TCRBV families presented as oligoclonal distribution on genescan, several families were not expressed, and only a few families remained polyclonal. TCRBV24 was found to be oligoclonal in all of the 21 patients. DNA sequence analysis of TCRBV24 revealed a common motif of VAG in CDR3 in 3 cases and a common motif of GGG in CDR3 in 2 cases. In patient 5, both TCRBV 24 and TCRBV8 contained the same motif of GGG in CDR3. The identical motif in these patients may suggest that these T-cells recognize the same antigen. The peripheral lymphocytes demonstrated recovery of clonal profile on genescan from oligoclonal profile and absence of several families before the induction and cultivation to typical polyclonal profile in all TCRBV families after the induction by DC and cytokines for 13 days. After the induction and cultivation, the number of lymphocytes increased to 3.38 +/- 1.20 times. CD3(+), CD4(+), CD8(+), CD3(+)CD56(+) and CD4(+)CD25str(+)FOX P3

  9. Early Detection of T cell Transfer-induced Autoimmune Colitis by In Vivo Imaging System

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu-Ling; Chen, Yi-Ting; Lo, Cheng-Feng; Hsieh, Ching-I; Chiu, Shang-Yi; Wu, Chang-Yen; Yeh, Yu-Shan; Hung, Shu-Hsuan; Cheng, Po-Hao; Su, Yu-Hsuan; Jiang, Si-Tse; Chin, Hsian-Jean; Su, Yu-Chia

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease is a chronic and progressive inflammatory intestinal disease that includes two major types, namely ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease (CD). CD is characterized by intestinal epithelial hyperplasia and inflammatory cell infiltration. Transfer of CD25−CD45RBhiCD4+ (naïve) T cells into immunodeficiency mice induces autoimmune colitis with pathological lesions similar to CD and loss of body weight 4 weeks after cell transfer. However, weight loss neither has sufficient sensitivity nor totally matches the pathological findings of CD. To establish an early and sensitive indicator of autoimmune colitis model, the transferred T cell-induced colitis mouse model was modified by transferring luciferase-expressing donor T cells and determining the colitis by in vivo imaging system (IVIS). Colitis was detected with IVIS 7–10 days before the onset of body weight loss and diarrhea. IVIS was also applied in the dexamethasone treatment trial, and was a more sensitive indicator than body weight changes. All IVIS signals were parallel to the pathological abnormalities of the gut and immunological analysis results. In summary, IVIS provides both sensitive and objective means to monitor the disease course of transferred T cell-induced CD and fulfills the 3Rs principle of humane care of laboratory animals. PMID:27762297

  10. Adverse Events Following Infusion of T Cells for Adoptive Immunotherapy: A 10 Year Experience

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Conrad Russell; Hanley, Patrick J.; Liu, Hao; Torrano, Vicky; Lin, Yu-Feng; Arce, James A.; Gottschalk, Stephen; Savoldo, Barbara; Dotti, Gianpietro; Louis, Chrystal U.; Leen, Ann M.; Gee, Adrian P.; Rooney, Cliona M.; Brenner, Malcolm K.; Bollard, Catherine M.; Heslop, Helen E.

    2010-01-01

    Background The FDA currently recommends at least 4 hours of recipient monitoring to detect early infusion reactions; recent catastrophic reactions to “first in man” biological agents have emphasized the importance of this rule for initial studies of new products. The value of such monitoring for better established agents is less obvious. Methods We therefore reviewed infusion-related adverse events (AEs) following administration of ex-vivo expanded T cell products (antigen specific CTLs, allodepleted T cells and genetically modified T cells) on Investigational New Drug (IND) studies in our center. Results From 1998 to 2008, we infused 381 T cell products to 180 recipients, enrolled on 18 studies, receiving T cells targeting malignancies or post-transplant viral infections. There were no Grade 3-4 infusion reactions during initial monitoring or 24 hour follow-up. Twenty four mild (grade 1-2) adverse events (AEs) occurred in 21 infusions either during or immediately following infusion (up to 6 hours), most commonly nausea and vomiting (10/24; 41.6%), likely due to the DMSO cryoprotectant, and hypotension (20.8%), attributable to diphenhydramine pre-medication. 22 additional non-severe events were reported within 24 hours of infusion, most commonly culture negative fever, chills and nausea. Increased risk of adverse effects was associated with age (IRR 0.98; 95% CI 0.96-1.00; p=0.05), while an increase risk of immediate infusion-related events was higher in patients reporting allergies (IRR 2.72; 95% CI 1.00-7.40; p=0.05); sex, disease type or T cell source (allogeneic or autologous) had no effect on frequency of adverse events. Discussion Hence infusion of T cells is safe in the outpatient setting and associated with no severe reactions, so that monitoring for one hour after infusion is likely sufficient. As many of the AEs were attributable to diphenhydramine premedication, a lower dose (0.25mg/kg) should be selected. PMID:20429793

  11. Induction of Adult T-Cell Leukemia-Like Lymphoproliferative Disease and Its Inhibition by Adoptive Immunotherapy in T-Cell-Deficient Nude Rats Inoculated with Syngeneic Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1-Immortalized Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ohashi, Takashi; Hanabuchi, Shino; Kato, Hirotomo; Koya, Yoshihiro; Takemura, Fumiyo; Hirokawa, Katsuiku; Yoshiki, Takashi; Tanaka, Yuetsu; Fujii, Masahiro; Kannagi, Mari

    1999-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) has been shown to be the etiologic agent of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL), but the in vivo mechanism by which the virus causes the malignant transformation is largely unknown. In order to investigate the mechanisms of HTLV-1 leukemogenesis, we developed a rat model system in which ATL-like disease was reproducibly observed, following inoculation of various rat HTLV-1-immortalized cell lines. When previously established cell lines, F344-S1 and TARS-1, but not TART-1 or W7TM-1, were inoculated, systemic multiple tumor development was observed in adult nude (nu/nu) rats. FPM1 cells, newly established from a heterozygous (nu/+) rat syngeneic to nu/nu rats, caused transient tumors only at the injection site in adult nu/nu rats, but could progressively grow in newborn nu/nu rats and metastasize in lymph nodes. The derivative cell line (FPM1-V1AX) serially passed through newborn nu/nu rats acquired the potency to grow in adult nu/nu rats. These results indicated that only some with additional changes but not all of the in vitro HTLV-1-immortalized cell lines possessed in vivo tumorigenicity. Using the syngeneic system, we further showed the inhibition of tumor development by transferring splenic T cells from immunized rats, suggesting the involvement of T cells in the regression of tumors. This novel and reproducible nude rat model of human ATL would be useful for investigation of leukemogenesis and antitumor immune responses in HTLV-1 infection. PMID:10364355

  12. Regulatory T cell transfer ameliorates lymphedema and promotes lymphatic vessel function

    PubMed Central

    Gousopoulos, Epameinondas; Proulx, Steven T.; Bachmann, Samia B.; Scholl, Jeannette; Dionyssiou, Dimitris; Demiri, Efterpi; Halin, Cornelia; Dieterich, Lothar C.

    2016-01-01

    Secondary lymphedema is a common postcancer treatment complication, but the underlying pathological processes are poorly understood and no curative treatment exists. To investigate lymphedema pathomechanisms, a top-down approach was applied, using genomic data and validating the role of a single target. RNA sequencing of lymphedematous mouse skin indicated upregulation of many T cell–related networks, and indeed depletion of CD4+ cells attenuated lymphedema. The significant upregulation of Foxp3, a transcription factor specifically expressed by regulatory T cells (Tregs), along with other Treg-related genes, implied a potential role of Tregs in lymphedema. Indeed, increased infiltration of Tregs was identified in mouse lymphedematous skin and in human lymphedema specimens. To investigate the role of Tregs during disease progression, loss-of-function and gain-of-function studies were performed. Depletion of Tregs in transgenic mice with Tregs expressing the primate diphtheria toxin receptor and green fluorescent protein (Foxp3-DTR-GFP) mice led to exacerbated edema, concomitant with increased infiltration of immune cells and a mixed TH1/TH2 cytokine profile. Conversely, expansion of Tregs using IL-2/anti–IL-2 mAb complexes significantly reduced lymphedema development. Therapeutic application of adoptively transferred Tregs upon lymphedema establishment reversed all of the major hallmarks of lymphedema, including edema, inflammation, and fibrosis, and also promoted lymphatic drainage function. Collectively, our results reveal that Treg application constitutes a potential new curative treatment modality for lymphedema. PMID:27734032

  13. Genetic modification of T cells improves the effectiveness of adoptive tumor immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jakóbisiak, Marek; Gołab, Jakub

    2010-10-01

    Appropriate combinations of immunotherapy and gene therapy promise to be more effective in the treatment of cancer patients than either of these therapeutic approaches alone. One such treatment is based on the application of patients' cytotoxic T cells, which can be activated, expanded, and genetically engineered to recognize particular tumor-associated antigens (TAAs). Because T cells recognizing TAAs might become unresponsive in the process of tumor development as a result of tumor evasion strategies, immunogenic viral antigens or alloantigens could be used for the expansion of cytotoxic T cells and then redirected through genetic engineering. This therapeutic approach has already demonstrated promising results in melanoma patients and could be used in the treatment of many other tumors. The graft-versus-leukemia, or more generally graft-versus-tumor, reaction based on the application of a donor lymphocyte infusion can also be ameliorated through the incorporation of suicide genes into donor lymphocytes. Such lymphocytes could be safely and more extensively used in tumor patients because they could be eliminated should a severe graft-versus-host reaction develop.

  14. Editing T cell specificity towards leukemia by zinc-finger nucleases and lentiviral gene transfer

    PubMed Central

    Lombardo, Angelo; Magnani, Zulma; Liu, Pei-Qi; Reik, Andreas; Chu, Victoria; Paschon, David E.; Zhang, Lei; Kuball, Jurgen; Camisa, Barbara; Bondanza, Attilio; Casorati, Giulia; Ponzoni, Maurilio; Ciceri, Fabio; Bordignon, Claudio; Greenberg, Philip D.; Holmes, Michael C.; Gregory, Philip D.; Naldini, Luigi; Bonini, Chiara

    2016-01-01

    The transfer of high-avidity T-cell receptor (TCR) genes isolated from rare tumor-specific lymphocytes into polyclonal T cells is an attractive cancer immunotherapy strategy. However, TCR gene transfer results in competition for surface expression and inappropriate pairing between the exogenous and endogenous TCR chains, resulting in suboptimal activity and potentially harmful unpredicted specificities. We designed zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) promoting the disruption of endogenous TCR β and α chain genes. ZFN-treated lymphocytes lacked CD3/TCR surface expression and expanded with IL-7 and IL-15. Upon lentiviral transfer of a TCR for the WT1 tumor antigen, these TCR-edited cells expressed the new TCR at high levels, were easily expanded to near-purity, and proved superior in specific antigen recognition to matched TCR-transferred cells. In contrast to TCR-transferred cells, TCR edited lymphocytes did not mediate off-target reactivity while maintaining anti-tumor activity in vivo, thus demonstrating that complete editing of T-cell specificity generate tumor-specific lymphocytes with improved biosafety profile. PMID:22466705

  15. Adoptive immunity mediated by HLA-A*0201 restricted Asp f16 peptides-specific CD8+ T cells against Aspergillus fumigatus infection.

    PubMed

    Sun, Z; Zhu, P; Li, L; Wan, Z; Zhao, Z; Li, R

    2012-11-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus (A. fumigatus) is the most common pathogen of invasive aspergillosis (IA), a life-threatening infection in immunocompromised patients. Recent findings revealed that CD8+ T cells can mediate cytotoxic activity against A. fumigatus. Here, we bioinformatically identified three HLA-A*0201-restricted peptides from Asp f16, an A. fumigatus antigen which was previously shown to be involved in T cell immunity. Our immunological results demonstrated that these peptides can potently induce cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response in CD8+ T cells, thus, damaging the conidia and hyphae of A. fumigatus. Moreover, the Asp f16 peptides can also raise Th1 cell-like response, as measured by interferon-γ (IFN-γ) enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISPOT). Furthermore, we established an invasive pulmonary aspergillosis model in HLA-A*0201 transgenic mice. Adoptive transfer of Asp f16 peptides-specific CTL significantly extended the overall survival time in the A. fumigatus-infected immunocompromised mice. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that the Asp f16 peptides might provide immunity against invasive A. fumigatus infection.

  16. Adoptive transfer of cytotoxic T lymphocytes targeting two different antigens limits antigen loss and tumor escape.

    PubMed

    Kaluza, Karen M; Kottke, Timothy; Diaz, Rosa Maria; Rommelfanger, Diana; Thompson, Jill; Vile, Richard

    2012-10-01

    An antitumor T-cell response can lead to tumor control without clearing all tumor cells. As long as residual tumor cells remain, there is a constant risk of escape from that T-cell response. We previously showed that adoptive transfer of anti-ova OT-I T cells into B16ova-bearing mice led to tumor regression followed by escape of tumors that had lost the ova gene, rendering the OT-I T cells ineffective. In this study, we hypothesized that simultaneous transfer of cytotoxic T lymphocytes targeted against two independent antigens would reduce selection for single-antigen-loss cells, thereby limiting tumor escape. Using OT-I and Pmel T cells to treat B16ova tumors, we found that early cotransfer could prevent tumor emergence in most mice, whereas neither T-cell specificity alone was able to do so. When combined with total body irradiation for the treatment of larger 7-day tumors, cotransfer was also better at limiting tumor recurrence, and the tumors that did escape combination therapy continued to express both target antigens. As adoptively transferred T cells also persisted in vivo, even in mice with recurrent tumors, we hypothesized that restimulation of these antitumor T cells would prolong survival of mice with recurrent tumors. Consistent with this hypothesis, administration of a low-dose regimen of cyclophosphamide following tumor escape slowed tumor growth in mice that had previously received T-cell therapy, but not in control-treated mice, an effect that was associated with increased activation of T cells in vitro by low- but not high-dose cyclophosphamide.

  17. Clinical-scale selection and viral transduction of human naïve and central memory CD8+ T cells for adoptive cell therapy of cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Casati, Anna; Varghaei-Nahvi, Azam; Feldman, Steven Alexander; Assenmacher, Mario; Rosenberg, Steven Aaron; Dudley, Mark Edward; Scheffold, Alexander

    2013-10-01

    The adoptive transfer of lymphocytes genetically engineered to express tumor-specific antigen receptors is a potent strategy to treat cancer patients. T lymphocyte subsets, such as naïve or central memory T cells, selected in vitro prior to genetic engineering have been extensively investigated in preclinical mouse models, where they demonstrated improved therapeutic efficacy. However, so far, this is challenging to realize in the clinical setting, since good manufacturing practices (GMP) procedures for complex cell sorting and genetic manipulation are limited. To be able to directly compare the immunological attributes and therapeutic efficacy of naïve (T(N)) and central memory (T(CM)) CD8(+) T cells, we investigated clinical-scale procedures for their parallel selection and in vitro manipulation. We also evaluated currently available GMP-grade reagents for stimulation of T cell subsets, including a new type of anti-CD3/anti-CD28 nanomatrix. An optimized protocol was established for the isolation of both CD8(+) T(N) cells (CD4(-)CD62L(+)CD45RA(+)) and CD8(+) T(CM) (CD4(-)CD62L(+)CD45RA(-)) from a single patient. The highly enriched T cell subsets can be efficiently transduced and expanded to large cell numbers, sufficient for clinical applications and equivalent to or better than current cell and gene therapy approaches with unselected lymphocyte populations. The GMP protocols for selection of T(N) and T(CM) we reported here will be the basis for clinical trials analyzing safety, in vivo persistence and clinical efficacy in cancer patients and will help to generate a more reliable and efficacious cellular product.

  18. Clinical-scale selection and viral transduction of human naïve and central memory CD8+ T cells for adoptive cell therapy of cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Casati, Anna; Varghaei-Nahvi, Azam; Feldman, Steven Alexander; Assenmacher, Mario; Rosenberg, Steven Aaron; Dudley, Mark Edward; Scheffold, Alexander

    2013-10-01

    The adoptive transfer of lymphocytes genetically engineered to express tumor-specific antigen receptors is a potent strategy to treat cancer patients. T lymphocyte subsets, such as naïve or central memory T cells, selected in vitro prior to genetic engineering have been extensively investigated in preclinical mouse models, where they demonstrated improved therapeutic efficacy. However, so far, this is challenging to realize in the clinical setting, since good manufacturing practices (GMP) procedures for complex cell sorting and genetic manipulation are limited. To be able to directly compare the immunological attributes and therapeutic efficacy of naïve (T(N)) and central memory (T(CM)) CD8(+) T cells, we investigated clinical-scale procedures for their parallel selection and in vitro manipulation. We also evaluated currently available GMP-grade reagents for stimulation of T cell subsets, including a new type of anti-CD3/anti-CD28 nanomatrix. An optimized protocol was established for the isolation of both CD8(+) T(N) cells (CD4(-)CD62L(+)CD45RA(+)) and CD8(+) T(CM) (CD4(-)CD62L(+)CD45RA(-)) from a single patient. The highly enriched T cell subsets can be efficiently transduced and expanded to large cell numbers, sufficient for clinical applications and equivalent to or better than current cell and gene therapy approaches with unselected lymphocyte populations. The GMP protocols for selection of T(N) and T(CM) we reported here will be the basis for clinical trials analyzing safety, in vivo persistence and clinical efficacy in cancer patients and will help to generate a more reliable and efficacious cellular product. PMID:23903715

  19. Role of regulatory T cells in transferable immunological tolerance to bone marrow donor in murine mixed chimerism model.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Il-Hee; Kim, Yong-Hee; Kim, You-sun; Shin, Jun-Seop; Park, Chung-Gyu

    2013-12-01

    Constructing a bone marrow chimera prior to graft transplantation can induce donor-specific immune tolerance. Mixed chimerism containing hematopoietic cells of both recipient- and donor-origin has advantages attributed from low dose of total body irradiation. In this study, we explored the mechanism of mixed chimerism supplemented with depletion of Natural Killer cells. Mixed chimerism with C57BL/6 bone marrow cells was induced in recipient BALB/c mice which were given 450 cGy of γ-ray irradiation (n = 16). As revealed by reduced proliferation and cytokine production in mixed leukocyte reaction and ELISpot assay (24.6 vs 265.5), the allo-immune response to bone marrow donor was reduced. Furthermore, the induction of transferable immunological tolerance was confirmed by adoptive transfer and subsequent acceptance of C57BL/6 skin graft (n = 4). CD4(+)FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells were increased in the recipient compartment of the mixed chimera (19.2% → 33.8%). This suggests that regulatory T cells may be therapeutically used for the induction of graft-specific tolerance by mixed chimerism.

  20. Induction/Engineering, Detection, Selection, and Expansion of Clinical-Grade Human Antigen-Specific CD8+ Cytotoxic T Cell Clones for Adoptive Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Jeras, Matjaž; Bricl, Irena; Zorec, Robert; Švajger, Urban

    2010-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of effector antigen-specific immune cells is becoming a promising treatment option in allogeneic transplantation, infectious diseases, cancer, and autoimmune disorders. Within this context, the important role of CD8+ cytotoxic T cells (CTLs) is objective of intensive studies directed to their in vivo and ex vivo induction, detection, selection, expansion, and therapeutic effectiveness. Additional questions that are being addressed by the scientific community are related to the establishment and maintenance of their longevity and memory state as well as to defining critical conditions underlying their transitions between discrete, but functionally different subtypes. In this article we review and comment latest approaches and techniques used for preparing large amounts of antigen-specific CTLs, suitable for clinical use. PMID:20224660

  1. Phenotype and Hierarchy of Two Transgenic T Cell Lines Targeting the Respiratory Syncytial Virus KdM282-90 Epitope Is Transfer Dose-Dependent.

    PubMed

    Morabito, Kaitlyn M; Erez, Noam; Graham, Barney S; Ruckwardt, Tracy J

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we compared two lines of transgenic CD8+ T cells specific for the same KdM282-90 epitope of respiratory syncytial virus in the CB6F1 hybrid mouse model. Here we found that these two transgenic lines had similar in vivo abilities to control viral load after respiratory syncytial virus infection using adoptive transfer. Transfer of the TRBV13-2 line resulted in higher levels of IL-6 and MIP1-α in the lung than TRBV13-1 transfer. Interestingly, when large numbers of cells were co-transferred, the lines formed a hierarchy, with TRBV13-2 being immunodominant over TRBV13-1 in the mediastinal lymph node despite no identifiable difference in proliferation or apoptosis between the lines. This hierarchy was not established when lower cell numbers were transferred. The phenotype and frequency of proliferating cells were also cell transfer dose-dependent with higher percentages of CD127loCD62LloKLRG1lo and proliferating cells present when lower numbers of cells were transferred. These results illustrate the importance of cell number in adoptive transfer experiments and its influence on the phenotype and hierarchy of the subsequent T cell response. PMID:26752171

  2. T cell receptor-therapy in HBV-related hepatocellularcarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bertoletti, Antonio; Brunetto, Maurizia; Maini, Mala K; Bonino, Ferruccio; Qasim, Waseem; Stauss, Hans

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of lymphocytes expressing engineered T cell receptors (TCR) is a promising option for cancer treatment and could include hepatocellularcarcinoma (HCC), where therapeutic options are limited. We have recently investigated whether hepatitis B viral antigens can act as a HCC-specific antigen and thus be targeted by adoptively transferred HBV-specific TCR redirected T cells. PMID:26155416

  3. A Functionally Superior Second-Generation Vector Expressing an Aurora Kinase-A-Specific T-Cell Receptor for Anti-Leukaemia Adoptive Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Casey, Nicholas Paul; Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Tanimoto, Kazushi; Okamoto, Sachiko; Mineno, Junichi; Kuzushima, Kiyotaka; Shiku, Hiroshi; Yasukawa, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    Aurora Kinase A is a cancer-associated protein normally involved in the regulation of mitosis. Being over-expressed in a range of cancers, it is a suitable target for cell-based immunotherapy. Gene transfer of T-cell receptor sequences cognisant of HLA-A*0201-restricted Aurora Kinase A antigen has previously been shown to transfer specific immunoreactivity against the target peptide in a Human Lymphocyte Antigen-restricted manner. While T cell receptor gene-transfer has great potential in overcoming the difficulties of isolating and expanding tumour-reactive lymphocytes from a patient's own cells, one hurdle is potential mispairing and competition between exogenous and endogenous T cell receptor chains. We have used a retroviral vector design bearing a short-interfering RNA that downregulates endogenous T cell receptor chains, without affecting expression of the transgenic T cell receptor sequences. The T cell receptor expression cassette also includes a 2A self-cleaving peptide, resulting in equimolar expression of the T cell receptor alpha and beta chains, further enhancing formation of the desired T cell receptor. Via a simple, modular cloning method, we have cloned the alpha and beta chains of the anti-Aurora Kinase A-reactive T cell receptor into this 'siTCR' vector. We then compared the activity of this vector against the original, 'conventional' vector across a panel of assays. T cell receptors expressed from the siTCR-vector retained the cytotoxic functionality of the original vector, with evidence of reduced off-target reactivity. The rate of expression of correctly-formed T cell receptors was superior using the siTCR design, and this was achieved at lower vector copy numbers. Maintaining T cell receptor efficacy with a reduced vector copy number reduces the risk of genotoxicity. The siTCR design also reduces the risk of mispairing and cross-reactivity, while increasing the functional titre. Such improvements in the safety of T cell receptor gene-transfer

  4. A Functionally Superior Second-Generation Vector Expressing an Aurora Kinase-A-Specific T-Cell Receptor for Anti-Leukaemia Adoptive Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Casey, Nicholas Paul; Fujiwara, Hiroshi; Tanimoto, Kazushi; Okamoto, Sachiko; Mineno, Junichi; Kuzushima, Kiyotaka; Shiku, Hiroshi; Yasukawa, Masaki

    2016-01-01

    Aurora Kinase A is a cancer-associated protein normally involved in the regulation of mitosis. Being over-expressed in a range of cancers, it is a suitable target for cell-based immunotherapy. Gene transfer of T-cell receptor sequences cognisant of HLA-A*0201-restricted Aurora Kinase A antigen has previously been shown to transfer specific immunoreactivity against the target peptide in a Human Lymphocyte Antigen-restricted manner. While T cell receptor gene-transfer has great potential in overcoming the difficulties of isolating and expanding tumour-reactive lymphocytes from a patient’s own cells, one hurdle is potential mispairing and competition between exogenous and endogenous T cell receptor chains. We have used a retroviral vector design bearing a short-interfering RNA that downregulates endogenous T cell receptor chains, without affecting expression of the transgenic T cell receptor sequences. The T cell receptor expression cassette also includes a 2A self-cleaving peptide, resulting in equimolar expression of the T cell receptor alpha and beta chains, further enhancing formation of the desired T cell receptor. Via a simple, modular cloning method, we have cloned the alpha and beta chains of the anti-Aurora Kinase A-reactive T cell receptor into this ‘siTCR’ vector. We then compared the activity of this vector against the original, ‘conventional’ vector across a panel of assays. T cell receptors expressed from the siTCR-vector retained the cytotoxic functionality of the original vector, with evidence of reduced off-target reactivity. The rate of expression of correctly-formed T cell receptors was superior using the siTCR design, and this was achieved at lower vector copy numbers. Maintaining T cell receptor efficacy with a reduced vector copy number reduces the risk of genotoxicity. The siTCR design also reduces the risk of mispairing and cross-reactivity, while increasing the functional titre. Such improvements in the safety of T cell receptor gene-transfer

  5. T-Cell Receptor-Transduced T Cells: Clinical Experience.

    PubMed

    Robbins, Paul F

    2015-01-01

    The large number of T-cell epitopes that have been found to be processed and presented on human tumors, now numbering in the hundreds, provides a rich source of targets for therapeutic interventions aimed at inducing durable tumor regression. Vaccination strategies aimed at inducing responses to these antigens have been largely ineffective, and it has been challenging to generate large numbers of T cells with the functional capacity to mediate durable tumor regressions in adoptive immunotherapy strategies in patients who have common epithelial malignancies. The ability to generate T-cell receptors that recognize shared as well as unique antigens expressed in a wide variety of common tumor types that include lung, breast, ovarian, gastrointestinal, urothelial, and genitourinary cancers provides an opportunity to develop widely applicable therapies based on the adoptive transfer of autologous T cells transduced with those receptors.

  6. Chemokine Transfer by Liver Sinusoidal Endothelial Cells Contributes to the Recruitment of CD4+ T Cells into the Murine Liver.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Katrin; Erben, Ulrike; Kruse, Nils; Wechsung, Katja; Schumann, Michael; Klugewitz, Katja; Scheffold, Alexander; Kühl, Anja A

    2015-01-01

    Leukocyte adhesion and transmigration are central features governing immune surveillance and inflammatory reactions in body tissues. Within the liver sinusoids, chemokines initiate the first crucial step of T-cell migration into the hepatic tissue. We studied molecular mechanisms involved in endothelial chemokine supply during hepatic immune surveillance and liver inflammation and their impact on the recruitment of CD4(+) T cells into the liver. In the murine model of Concanavalin A-induced T cell-mediated hepatitis, we showed that hepatic expression of the inflammatory CXC chemokine ligands (CXCL)9 and CXCL10 strongly increased whereas homeostatic CXCL12 significantly decreased. Consistently, CD4(+) T cells expressing the CXC chemokine receptor (CXCR)3 accumulated within the inflamed liver tissue. In histology, CXCL9 was associated with liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSEC) which represent the first contact site for T-cell immigration into the liver. LSEC actively transferred basolaterally internalized CXCL12, CXCL9 and CXCL10 via clathrin-coated vesicles to CD4(+) T cells leading to enhanced transmigration of CXCR4(+) total CD4(+) T cells and CXCR3(+) effector/memory CD4(+) T cells, respectively in vitro. LSEC-expressed CXCR4 mediated CXCL12 transport and blockage of endothelial CXCR4 inhibited CXCL12-dependent CD4(+) T-cell transmigration. In contrast, CXCR3 was not involved in the endothelial transport of its ligands CXCL9 and CXCL10. The clathrin-specific inhibitor chlorpromazine blocked endothelial chemokine internalization and CD4(+) T-cell transmigration in vitro as well as migration of CD4(+) T cells into the inflamed liver in vivo. Moreover, hepatic accumulation of CXCR3(+) CD4(+) T cells during T cell-mediated hepatitis was strongly reduced after administration of chlorpromazine. These data demonstrate that LSEC actively provide perivascularly expressed homeostatic and inflammatory chemokines by CXCR4- and clathrin-dependent intracellular transport

  7. Inhibition of Akt signaling promotes the generation of superior tumor-reactive T cells for adoptive immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    van der Waart, Anniek B.; van de Weem, Noortje M. P.; Maas, Frans; Kramer, Cynthia S. M.; Kester, Michel G. D.; Falkenburg, J. H. Frederik; Schaap, Nicolaas; Jansen, Joop H.; van der Voort, Robbert; Gattinoni, Luca; Hobo, Willemijn

    2014-01-01

    Effective T-cell therapy against cancer is dependent on the formation of long-lived, stem cell–like T cells with the ability to self-renew and differentiate into potent effector cells. Here, we investigated the in vivo existence of stem cell–like antigen-specific T cells in allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) patients and their ex vivo generation for additive treatment posttransplant. Early after allo-SCT, CD8+ stem cell memory T cells targeting minor histocompatibility antigens (MiHAs) expressed by recipient tumor cells were not detectable, emphasizing the need for improved additive MiHA-specific T-cell therapy. Importantly, MiHA-specific CD8+ T cells with an early CCR7+CD62L+CD45RO+CD27+CD28+CD95+ memory-like phenotype and gene signature could be expanded from naive precursors by inhibiting Akt signaling during ex vivo priming and expansion. This resulted in a MiHA-specific CD8+ T-cell population containing a high proportion of stem cell–like T cells compared with terminal differentiated effector T cells in control cultures. Importantly, these Akt-inhibited MiHA-specific CD8+ T cells showed a superior expansion capacity in vitro and in immunodeficient mice and induced a superior antitumor effect in intrafemural multiple myeloma–bearing mice. These findings provide a rationale for clinical exploitation of ex vivo–generated Akt-inhibited MiHA-specific CD8+ T cells in additive immunotherapy to prevent or treat relapse in allo-SCT patients. PMID:25336630

  8. Inhibition of Akt signaling promotes the generation of superior tumor-reactive T cells for adoptive immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    van der Waart, Anniek B; van de Weem, Noortje M P; Maas, Frans; Kramer, Cynthia S M; Kester, Michel G D; Falkenburg, J H Frederik; Schaap, Nicolaas; Jansen, Joop H; van der Voort, Robbert; Gattinoni, Luca; Hobo, Willemijn; Dolstra, Harry

    2014-11-27

    Effective T-cell therapy against cancer is dependent on the formation of long-lived, stem cell-like T cells with the ability to self-renew and differentiate into potent effector cells. Here, we investigated the in vivo existence of stem cell-like antigen-specific T cells in allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) patients and their ex vivo generation for additive treatment posttransplant. Early after allo-SCT, CD8+ stem cell memory T cells targeting minor histocompatibility antigens (MiHAs) expressed by recipient tumor cells were not detectable, emphasizing the need for improved additive MiHA-specific T-cell therapy. Importantly, MiHA-specific CD8+ T cells with an early CCR7+CD62L+CD45RO+CD27+CD28+CD95+ memory-like phenotype and gene signature could be expanded from naive precursors by inhibiting Akt signaling during ex vivo priming and expansion. This resulted in a MiHA-specific CD8+ T-cell population containing a high proportion of stem cell-like T cells compared with terminal differentiated effector T cells in control cultures. Importantly, these Akt-inhibited MiHA-specific CD8+ T cells showed a superior expansion capacity in vitro and in immunodeficient mice and induced a superior antitumor effect in intrafemural multiple myeloma-bearing mice. These findings provide a rationale for clinical exploitation of ex vivo-generated Akt-inhibited MiHA-specific CD8+ T cells in additive immunotherapy to prevent or treat relapse in allo-SCT patients. PMID:25336630

  9. Mast cells and dendritic cells form synapses that facilitate antigen transfer for T cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Carroll-Portillo, Amanda; Cannon, Judy L.; te Riet, Joost; Holmes, Anna; Kawakami, Yuko; Kawakami, Toshiaki; Cambi, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells (MCs) produce soluble mediators such as histamine and prostaglandins that are known to influence dendritic cell (DC) function by stimulating maturation and antigen processing. Whether direct cell–cell interactions are important in modulating MC/DC function is unclear. In this paper, we show that direct contact between MCs and DCs occurs and plays an important role in modulating the immune response. Activation of MCs through FcεRI cross-linking triggers the formation of stable cell–cell interactions with immature DCs that are reminiscent of the immunological synapse. Direct cellular contact differentially regulates the secreted cytokine profile, indicating that MC modulation of DC populations is influenced by the nature of their interaction. Synapse formation requires integrin engagement and facilitates the transfer of internalized MC-specific antigen from MCs to DCs. The transferred material is ultimately processed and presented by DCs and can activate T cells. The physiological outcomes of the MC–DC synapse suggest a new role for intercellular crosstalk in defining the immune response. PMID:26304724

  10. Combining a CD20 chimeric antigen receptor and an inducible caspase 9 suicide switch to improve the efficacy and safety of T cell adoptive immunotherapy for lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Budde, Lihua E; Berger, Carolina; Lin, Yukang; Wang, Jinjuan; Lin, Xubin; Frayo, Shani E; Brouns, Shaunda A; Spencer, David M; Till, Brian G; Jensen, Michael C; Riddell, Stanley R; Press, Oliver W

    2013-01-01

    Modification of T cells with chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) has emerged as a promising treatment modality for human malignancies. Integration of co-stimulatory domains into CARs can augment the activation and function of genetically targeted T cells against tumors. However, the potential for insertional mutagenesis and toxicities due to the infused cells have made development of safe methods for removing transferred cells an important consideration. We have genetically modified human T cells with a lentiviral vector to express a CD20-CAR containing both CD28 and CD137 co-stimulatory domains, a "suicide gene" relying on inducible activation of caspase 9 (iC9), and a truncated CD19 selectable marker. Rapid expansion (2000 fold) of the transduced T cells was achieved in 28 days after stimulation with artificial antigen presenting cells. Transduced T cells exhibited effective CD20-specific cytotoxic activity in vitro and in a mouse xenograft tumor model. Activation of the iC9 suicide switch resulted in efficient removal of transduced T cells both in vitro and in vivo. Our work demonstrates the feasibility and promise of this approach for treating CD20(+) malignancies in a safe and more efficient manner. A phase I clinical trial using this approach in patients with relapsed indolent B-NHL is planned. PMID:24358223

  11. T Cell Receptors that Recognize the Tyrosinase Tumor Antigen | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute, Surgery Branch, Tumor Immunology Section, is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize T Cells Attacking Cancer: T Cell Receptors that Recognize the Tyrosinase Tumor Antigen

  12. Inhibition of two temporal phases of HIV-1 transfer from primary Langerhans cells to T cells: the role of langerin.

    PubMed

    Nasr, Najla; Lai, Joey; Botting, Rachel A; Mercier, Sarah K; Harman, Andrew N; Kim, Min; Turville, Stuart; Center, Rob J; Domagala, Teresa; Gorry, Paul R; Olbourne, Norman; Cunningham, Anthony L

    2014-09-01

    Epidermal Langerhans cells (eLCs) uniquely express the C-type lectin receptor langerin in addition to the HIV entry receptors CD4 and CCR5. They are among the first target cells to encounter HIV in the anogenital stratified squamous mucosa during sexual transmission. Previous reports on the mechanism of HIV transfer to T cells and the role of langerin have been contradictory. In this study, we examined HIV replication and langerin-mediated viral transfer by authentic immature eLCs and model Mutz-3 LCs. eLCs were productively infected with HIV, whereas Mutz-3 LCs were not susceptible because of a lack of CCR5 expression. Two successive phases of HIV viral transfer to T cells via cave/vesicular trafficking and de novo replication were observed with eLCs as previously described in monocyte-derived or blood dendritic cells, but only first phase transfer was observed with Mutz-3 LCs. Langerin was expressed as trimers after cross-linking on the cell surface of Mutz-3 LCs and in this form preferentially bound HIV envelope protein gp140 and whole HIV particles via the carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD). Both phases of HIV transfer from eLCs to T cells were inhibited when eLCs were pretreated with a mAb to langerin CRD or when HIV was pretreated with a soluble langerin trimeric extracellular domain or by a CRD homolog. However, the langerin homolog did not inhibit direct HIV infection of T cells. These two novel soluble langerin inhibitors could be developed to prevent HIV uptake, infection, and subsequent transfer to T cells during early stages of infection. PMID:25070850

  13. Centrocytes rapidly adopt a memory B cell phenotype on co-culture with autologous germinal centre T cell-enriched preparations.

    PubMed

    Casamayor-Palleja, M; Feuillard, J; Ball, J; Drew, M; MacLennan, I C

    1996-05-01

    B cells, after mutating their Ig B-region genes in germinal centres (GC), undergo apoptosis, unless they receive antigen-dependent selection signals. The signals appear to be delivered by GC T cells, require CD40 ligand expression and may induce differentiation to memory cells. Cultured GC B cells are prevented from entering apoptosis by ligating their surface CD40, but the resulting phenotype is not associated with B cells found in vivo. Conversely, GC B cells rapidly adopt a memory B cell phenotype on culture with autologous memory CD4(+) T cells that have been induced to express CD40 ligand transiently. This effect is prevented by blocking CD40 ligand. Naive CD4(+) T cells, induced to express CD40 ligand, do not prevent GC B cells undergoing apoptosis.

  14. The in vitro generation of multi-tumor antigen-specific cytotoxic T cell clones: Candidates for leukemia adoptive immunotherapy following allogeneic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mohamed, Yehia S; Bashawri, Layla A; Vatte, Chittibabu; Abu-Rish, Eman Y; Cyrus, Cyril; Khalaf, Wafaa S; Browning, Michael J

    2016-09-01

    Adoptive T-cell immunotherapy is a promising approach to manage and maintain relapse-free survival of leukemia patients, especially following allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Post-transplant adoptive immunotherapy using cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) of the donor origin provide graft-versus-tumor effects, with or without graft-versus-host disease. Myeloid leukemias express immunogenic leukemia associated antigens (LAAs); such as WT-1, PRAME, MAGE, h-TERT and others, most of them are able to induce specific T cell responses whenever associated with the proper co-stimulation. We investigated the ability of a LAA-expressing hybridoma cell line to induce CTL clones in PBMCs of HLA-matched healthy donors in vitro. The CTL clones were induced by repetitive co-culture with LAAs-expressing, HLA-A*0201(+) hybrid cell line, generated by fusion of leukemia blasts to human immortalized APC (EBV-sensitized B-lymphoblastoid cell line; HMy2). The induced cytotoxic T cell clones were phenotypically and functionally characterized by pentamer analysis, IFN-γ release ELISPOT and cellular cytotoxicity assays. All T cell lines showed robust peptide recognition and functional activity when sensitized with HLA-A*0201-restricted WT-1235-243, hTERT615-624 or PRAME100-108 peptides-pulsed T2 cells, in addition to partially HLA-matched leukemia blasts. This study demonstrates the feasibility of developing multi-tumor antigen-specific T cell lines in allogeneic PBMCs in vitro, using LAA-expressing tumor/HMy2 hybrid cell line model, for potential use in leukemia adoptive immunotherapy in partially matched donor-recipient setting. PMID:27490939

  15. T Cells

    MedlinePlus

    ... or turn off the immune response. Cytotoxic or “killer” T cells directly attack and destroy cells bearing ... involve selective activation of helper T cells and killer T cells, with a corresponding decrease in regulatory ...

  16. Trial Watch: Adoptive cell transfer for oncological indications

    PubMed Central

    Aranda, Fernando; Buqué, Aitziber; Bloy, Norma; Castoldi, Francesca; Eggermont, Alexander; Cremer, Isabelle; Fridman, Wolf Hervé; Fucikova, Jitka; Galon, Jérôme; Spisek, Radek; Tartour, Eric; Zitvogel, Laurence; Kroemer, Guido; Galluzzi, Lorenzo

    2015-01-01

    One particular paradigm of anticancer immunotherapy relies on the administration of (potentially) tumor-reactive immune effector cells. Generally, these cells are obtained from autologous peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) ex vivo (in the context of appropriate expansion, activation and targeting protocols), and re-infused into lymphodepleted patients along with immunostimulatory agents. In spite of the consistent progress achieved throughout the past two decades in this field, no adoptive cell transfer (ACT)-based immunotherapeutic regimen is currently approved by regulatory agencies for use in cancer patients. Nonetheless, the interest of oncologists in ACT-based immunotherapy continues to increase. Accumulating clinical evidence indicates indeed that specific paradigms of ACT, such as the infusion of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-expressing autologous T cells, are associated with elevated rates of durable responses in patients affected by various neoplasms. In line with this notion, clinical trials investigating the safety and therapeutic activity of ACT in cancer patients are being initiated at an ever increasing pace. Here, we review recent preclinical and clinical advances in the development of ACT-based immunotherapy for oncological indications. PMID:26451319

  17. Phase I Clinical Trial of 4-1BB-based Adoptive T-Cell Therapy for Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV)-positive Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Eom, Hyeon-Seok; Choi, Beom K.; Lee, Youngjoo; Lee, Hyewon; Yun, Tak; Kim, Young H.; Lee, Je-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Although adoptive cell therapy using Ag-specific T cells has been tested successfully in the clinic, the production of these T cells has been challenging. By applying our simple and practical 4-1BB-based method for the generation of Ag-specific CD8+ T cells, here we determined the maximum tolerated dose, toxicity profile, immunologic responses, and clinical efficacy of autologous Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)/LMP2A-specific CD8+ T cells (EBV-induced Natural T cell; EBViNT) in patients with relapsed/refractory EBV-positive tumors. This was a single-center, phase I, dose-escalation trial study evaluating 4 escalating dosing schedules of single injected EBViNT. CD8+ T-cell responses against different LMP2A peptides in each patient were determined, and the most effective peptides were used to produce EBViNT. The produced autologous EBViNTs were single infused to patients with EBV-associated malignancy who had failed to standard treatments and were of HLA-A02 or A24 type. Of 11 patients enrolled, 8 patients received a single infusion of EBViNT: 4 with nasopharyngeal carcinomas, 1 with Hodgkin lymphoma, 2 with extranodal NK/T lymphomas, and 1 with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Single infusion of EBViNT was well tolerated by all the patients and generated objective antitumor responses in 3 of them. EBViNT infusion induced 2 waves of interferon-γ response: 1 approximately 1 week and the other 4–8 weeks after the treatment. The strength of the second wave was related to the efficacy of the treatment. The current trial shows that EBViNT therapy is safe and may provide a new option for treating EBV-positive recurrent cancer patients resistant to conventional therapy. PMID:26938947

  18. Durable Complete Responses in Heavily Pretreated Patients with Metastatic Melanoma Using T Cell Transfer Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Rosenberg, Steven A.; Yang, James C.; Sherry, Richard M.; Kammula, Udai S.; Hughes, Marybeth S.; Phan, Giao Q.; Citrin, Deborah E.; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Robbins, Paul F.; Wunderlich, John R.; Morton, Kathleen E.; Laurencot, Carolyn M.; Steinberg, Seth M.; White, Donald E.; Dudley, Mark E.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose Most treatments for patients with metastatic melanoma have a low rate of complete regression and thus overall survival in these patients is poor. We have investigated the ability of adoptive cell transfer utilizing autologous, tumor infiltrating lymphocytes to mediate durable complete regressions in heavily pre-treated patients with metastatic melanoma. Experimental Design Ninety-three patients with measurable metastatic melanoma were treated with the adoptive transfer of autologous tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes administered in conjunction with interleukin-2 following a lymphodepleting preparative regimen on three sequential clinical trials. Ninety-five percent of these patients had progressive disease following a prior systemic treatment. Median potential followup was 62 months. Results Objective response rates by RECIST criteria in the three trials using lymphodepleting preparative regimens (chemotherapy alone or with 2Gy or 12Gy irradiation) were 49%, 52% and 72%. Twenty of the 93 patients (22%) achieved a complete tumor regression and 19 have ongoing complete regressions beyond three years The actuarial three and five year survivals for the entire group were 36% and 29% respectively but for the 20 complete responders were 100% and 93%. The likelihood of achieving a complete response was similar regardless of prior therapy. Factors associated with objective response included longer telomeres of the infused cells, the number of CD8+ CD27+ cells infused and the persistence of the infused cells in the circulation at one month (all p2<0.001). Conclusions Cell transfer therapy with autologous tumor infiltrating can mediate durable complete responses in patients with metastatic melanoma and has similar efficacy irrespective of prior treatment. PMID:21498393

  19. Adoptive transfer of autologous, HER2-specific, cytotoxic T lymphocytes for the treatment of HER2-overexpressing breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bernhard, Helga; Neudorfer, Julia; Gebhard, Kerstin; Conrad, Heinke; Hermann, Christine; Nährig, Jörg; Fend, Falko; Weber, Wolfgang; Busch, Dirk H; Peschel, Christian

    2008-02-01

    The human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) has been targeted as a breast cancer-associated antigen by immunotherapeutical approaches based on HER2-directed monoclonal antibodies and cancer vaccines. We describe the adoptive transfer of autologous HER2-specific T-lymphocyte clones to a patient with metastatic HER2-overexpressing breast cancer. The HLA/multimer-based monitoring of the transferred T lymphocytes revealed that the T cells rapidly disappeared from the peripheral blood. The imaging studies indicated that the T cells accumulated in the bone marrow (BM) and migrated to the liver, but were unable to penetrate into the solid metastases. The disseminated tumor cells in the BM disappeared after the completion of adoptive T-cell therapy. This study suggests the therapeutic potential for HER2-specific T cells for eliminating disseminated HER2-positive tumor cells and proposes the combination of T cell-based therapies with strategies targeting the tumor stroma to improve T-cell infiltration into solid tumors. PMID:17646988

  20. Optimized human CYP4B1 in combination with the alkylator prodrug 4-ipomeanol serves as a novel suicide gene system for adoptive T-cell therapies.

    PubMed

    Roellecke, K; Virts, E L; Einholz, R; Edson, K Z; Altvater, B; Rossig, C; von Laer, D; Scheckenbach, K; Wagenmann, M; Reinhardt, D; Kramm, C M; Rettie, A E; Wiek, C; Hanenberg, H

    2016-07-01

    Engineering autologous or allogeneic T cells to express a suicide gene can control potential toxicity in adoptive T-cell therapies. We recently reported the development of a novel human suicide gene system that is based on an orphan human cytochrome P450 enzyme, CYP4B1, and the naturally occurring alkylator prodrug 4-ipomeanol. The goal of this study was to systematically develop a clinically applicable self-inactivating lentiviral vector for efficient co-expression of CYP4B1 as an ER-located protein with two distinct types of cell surface proteins, either MACS selection genes for donor lymphocyte infusions after allogeneic stem cell transplantation or chimeric antigen receptors for retargeting primary T cells. The U3 region of the myeloproliferative sarcoma virus in combination with the T2A site was found to drive high-level expression of our CYP4B1 mutant with truncated CD34 or CD271 as MACS suitable selection markers. This lentiviral vector backbone was also well suited for co-expression of CYP4B1 with a codon-optimized CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) construct. Finally, 4-ipomeanol efficiently induced apoptosis in primary T cells that co-express mutant CYP4B1 and the divergently located MACS selection and CAR genes. In conclusion, we here developed a clinically suited lentiviral vector that supports high-level co-expression of cell surface proteins with a potent novel human suicide gene. PMID:27092941

  1. Stable activity of diabetogenic cells with age in NOD mice: dynamics of reconstitution and adoptive diabetes transfer in immunocompromised mice

    PubMed Central

    Kaminitz, Ayelet; Mizrahi, Keren; Ash, Shifra; Ben-Nun, Avi; Askenasy, Nadir

    2014-01-01

    The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse is a prevalent disease model of type 1 diabetes. Immune aberrations that cause and propagate autoimmune insulitis in these mice are being continually debated, with evidence supporting both dominance of effector cells and insufficiency of suppressor mechanisms. In this study we assessed the behaviour of NOD lymphocytes under extreme expansion conditions using adoptive transfer into immunocompromised NOD.SCID (severe combined immunodeficiency) mice. CD4+ CD25+ T cells do not cause islet inflammation, whereas splenocytes and CD4+ CD25− T cells induce pancreatic inflammation and hyperglycaemia in 80–100% of the NOD.SCID recipients. Adoptively transferred effector T cells migrate to the lymphoid organs and pancreas, proliferate, are activated in the target organ in situ and initiate inflammatory insulitis. Reconstitution of all components of the CD4+ subset emphasizes the plastic capacity of different cell types to adopt effector and suppressor phenotypes. Furthermore, similar immune profiles of diabetic and euglycaemic NOD.SCID recipients demonstrate dissociation between fractional expression of CD25 and FoxP3 and the severity of insulitis. There were no evident and consistent differences in diabetogenic activity and immune reconstituting activity of T cells from pre-diabetic (11 weeks) and new onset diabetic NOD females. Similarities in immune phenotypes and variable distribution of effector and suppressor subsets in various stages of inflammation commend caution in interpretation of quantitative and qualitative aberrations as markers of disease severity in adoptive transfer experiments. PMID:24601987

  2. Stable activity of diabetogenic cells with age in NOD mice: dynamics of reconstitution and adoptive diabetes transfer in immunocompromised mice.

    PubMed

    Kaminitz, Ayelet; Mizrahi, Keren; Ash, Shifra; Ben-Nun, Avi; Askenasy, Nadir

    2014-07-01

    The non-obese diabetic (NOD) mouse is a prevalent disease model of type 1 diabetes. Immune aberrations that cause and propagate autoimmune insulitis in these mice are being continually debated, with evidence supporting both dominance of effector cells and insufficiency of suppressor mechanisms. In this study we assessed the behaviour of NOD lymphocytes under extreme expansion conditions using adoptive transfer into immunocompromised NOD.SCID (severe combined immunodeficiency) mice. CD4(+)  CD25(+) T cells do not cause islet inflammation, whereas splenocytes and CD4(+)  CD25(-) T cells induce pancreatic inflammation and hyperglycaemia in 80-100% of the NOD.SCID recipients. Adoptively transferred effector T cells migrate to the lymphoid organs and pancreas, proliferate, are activated in the target organ in situ and initiate inflammatory insulitis. Reconstitution of all components of the CD4(+) subset emphasizes the plastic capacity of different cell types to adopt effector and suppressor phenotypes. Furthermore, similar immune profiles of diabetic and euglycaemic NOD.SCID recipients demonstrate dissociation between fractional expression of CD25 and FoxP3 and the severity of insulitis. There were no evident and consistent differences in diabetogenic activity and immune reconstituting activity of T cells from pre-diabetic (11 weeks) and new onset diabetic NOD females. Similarities in immune phenotypes and variable distribution of effector and suppressor subsets in various stages of inflammation commend caution in interpretation of quantitative and qualitative aberrations as markers of disease severity in adoptive transfer experiments.

  3. Neoantigen landscape dynamics during human melanoma-T cell interactions.

    PubMed

    Verdegaal, Els M E; de Miranda, Noel F C C; Visser, Marten; Harryvan, Tom; van Buuren, Marit M; Andersen, Rikke S; Hadrup, Sine R; van der Minne, Caroline E; Schotte, Remko; Spits, Hergen; Haanen, John B A G; Kapiteijn, Ellen H W; Schumacher, Ton N; van der Burg, Sjoerd H

    2016-08-01

    Recognition of neoantigens that are formed as a consequence of DNA damage is likely to form a major driving force behind the clinical activity of cancer immunotherapies such as T-cell checkpoint blockade and adoptive T-cell therapy. Therefore, strategies to selectively enhance T-cell reactivity against genetically defined neoantigens are currently under development. In mouse models, T-cell pressure can sculpt the antigenicity of tumours, resulting in the emergence of tumours that lack defined mutant antigens. However, whether the T-cell-recognized neoantigen repertoire in human cancers is constant over time is unclear. Here we analyse the stability of neoantigen-specific T-cell responses and the antigens they recognize in two patients with stage IV melanoma treated by adoptive T-cell transfer. The T-cell-recognized neoantigens can be selectively lost from the tumour cell population, either by overall reduced expression of the genes or loss of the mutant alleles. Notably, loss of expression of T-cell-recognized neoantigens was accompanied by development of neoantigen-specific T-cell reactivity in tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes. These data demonstrate the dynamic interactions between cancer cells and T cells, which suggest that T cells mediate neoantigen immunoediting, and indicate that the therapeutic induction of broad neoantigen-specific T-cell responses should be used to avoid tumour resistance. PMID:27350335

  4. Ex vivo priming for long-term maintenance of antileukemia human cytotoxic T cells suggests a general procedure for adoptive immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Montagna, D; Maccario, R; Locatelli, F; Rosti, V; Yang, Y; Farness, P; Moretta, A; Comoli, P; Montini, E; Vitiello, A

    2001-12-01

    Adoptive cellular immunotherapy has proven to be a successful approach in preventing and curing cytomegalovirus infection and Epstein-Barr virus-associated lymphomas after bone marrow transplantation. Translation of this approach for preventing leukemia relapse after bone marrow transplantation might require ex vivo priming and long-term maintenance of leukemia blast-specific T cells. To accomplish this goal, procedures were optimized for the in vitro priming of naive CD8 using dendritic cells activated by CD40 ligation, interleukin-12 (IL-12), and IL-7. Using T lymphocytes and dendritic cells obtained from HLA-matched allogeneic bone marrow transplantation donors and leukemia blasts as a source of tumor antigens, anti-acute myeloid leukemia cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) were induced. In these experiments, it was found that though it is possible to induce CTLs using immature dendritic cells, IL-12, and IL-7, obtaining long-term CTLs requires the presence of CD4 T cells in the priming phase. Using this approach, long-term antileukemia CTL lines could be generated from 4 of 4 bone marrow donors. Because this procedure does not require definition of the target antigen and because it selects responding cells from a virgin T-cell repertoire, its general application is suggested in adoptive immunotherapy and in the definition of tumor rejection antigens. PMID:11719375

  5. Monoclonal T-cell receptors: new reagents for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Stauss, Hans J; Cesco-Gaspere, Michela; Thomas, Sharyn; Hart, Daniel P; Xue, Shao-An; Holler, Angelika; Wright, Graham; Perro, Mario; Little, Ann-Margaret; Pospori, Constantina; King, Judy; Morris, Emma C

    2007-10-01

    Adoptive transfer of antigen-specific T lymphocytes is an effective form of immunotherapy for persistent virus infections and cancer. A major limitation of adoptive therapy is the inability to isolate antigen-specific T lymphocytes reproducibly. The demonstration that cloned T-cell receptor (TCR) genes can be used to produce T lymphocyte populations of desired specificity offers new opportunities for antigen-specific T-cell therapy. TCR gene-modified lymphocytes display antigen-specific function in vitro, and were shown to protect against virus infection and tumor growth in animal models. A recent trial in humans demonstrated that TCR gene-modified T cells persisted in all and reduced melanoma burden in 2/15 patients. In future trials, it may be possible to use TCR gene transfer to equip helper and cytotoxic T cells with new antigen-specificity, allowing both T-cell subsets to cooperate in achieving improved clinical responses. Sequence modifications of TCR genes are being explored to enhance TCR surface expression, while minimizing the risk of pairing between introduced and endogenous TCR chains. Current T-cell transduction protocols that trigger T-cell differentiation need to be modified to generate "undifferentiated" T cells, which, upon adoptive transfer, display improved in vivo expansion and survival. Both, expression of only the introduced TCR chains and the production of naïve T cells may be possible in the future by TCR gene transfer into stem cells.

  6. Monoclonal T-cell receptors: new reagents for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Stauss, Hans J; Cesco-Gaspere, Michela; Thomas, Sharyn; Hart, Daniel P; Xue, Shao-An; Holler, Angelika; Wright, Graham; Perro, Mario; Little, Ann-Margaret; Pospori, Constantina; King, Judy; Morris, Emma C

    2007-10-01

    Adoptive transfer of antigen-specific T lymphocytes is an effective form of immunotherapy for persistent virus infections and cancer. A major limitation of adoptive therapy is the inability to isolate antigen-specific T lymphocytes reproducibly. The demonstration that cloned T-cell receptor (TCR) genes can be used to produce T lymphocyte populations of desired specificity offers new opportunities for antigen-specific T-cell therapy. TCR gene-modified lymphocytes display antigen-specific function in vitro, and were shown to protect against virus infection and tumor growth in animal models. A recent trial in humans demonstrated that TCR gene-modified T cells persisted in all and reduced melanoma burden in 2/15 patients. In future trials, it may be possible to use TCR gene transfer to equip helper and cytotoxic T cells with new antigen-specificity, allowing both T-cell subsets to cooperate in achieving improved clinical responses. Sequence modifications of TCR genes are being explored to enhance TCR surface expression, while minimizing the risk of pairing between introduced and endogenous TCR chains. Current T-cell transduction protocols that trigger T-cell differentiation need to be modified to generate "undifferentiated" T cells, which, upon adoptive transfer, display improved in vivo expansion and survival. Both, expression of only the introduced TCR chains and the production of naïve T cells may be possible in the future by TCR gene transfer into stem cells. PMID:17637721

  7. Identification of a Novel Immunodominant HLA-B*07: 02-restricted Adenoviral Peptide Epitope and Its Potential in Adoptive Transfer Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Günther, Patrick S; Peper, Janet K; Faist, Benjamin; Kayser, Simone; Hartl, Lena; Feuchtinger, Tobias; Jahn, Gerhard; Neuenhahn, Michael; Busch, Dirk H; Stevanović, Stefan; Dennehy, Kevin M

    2015-09-01

    Adenovirus infections of immunocompromised patients, particularly following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, are associated with morbidity and mortality. Immunotherapy by adoptive transfer of hexon-specific and penton-specific T cells has been successfully applied, but many approaches are impeded by the low number of HLA class I-restricted adenoviral peptide epitopes described to date. We use a novel method to identify naturally presented adenoviral peptide epitopes from infected human cells, ectopically expressing defined HLA, using peptide elution and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis. We show that the previously described HLA-A*01:01-restricted peptide epitope LTDLGQNLLY from hexon protein is naturally presented, and demonstrate the functionality of LTDLGQNLLY-specific T cells. We further identify a novel immunodominant HLA-B*07:02-restricted peptide epitope VPATGRTLVL from protein 13.6 K, and demonstrate the high proliferative, cytotoxic, and IFN-γ-producing capacity of peptide-specific T cells. Lastly, LTDLGQNLLY-specific T cells can be detected ex vivo following adoptive transfer therapy, and LTDLGQNLLY-specific and VPATGRTLVL-specific T cells have memory phenotypes ex vivo. Given their proliferative and cytotoxic capacity, such epitope-specific T cells are promising candidates for adoptive T-cell transfer therapy of adenovirus infection.

  8. Adoptive T-Cell Therapy for Cancer in the United Kingdom: A Review of Activity for the British Society of Gene and Cell Therapy Annual Meeting 2015

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, John; Bridgeman, John Stephen; Hawkins, Robert Edward; Exley, Mark Adrian; Stauss, Hans; Maher, John; Pule, Martin; Sewell, Andrew Kelvin; Bendle, Gavin; Lee, Steven; Qasim, Waseem; Thrasher, Adrian; Morris, Emma

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Adoptive T-cell therapy is delivering objective clinical responses across a number of cancer indications in the early phase clinical setting. Much of this clinical activity is taking place at major clinical academic centers across the United States. This review focuses upon cancer-focused cell therapy activity within the United Kingdom as a contribution to the 2015 British Society of Gene and Cell Therapy annual general meeting. This overview reflects the diversity and expansion of clinical and preclinical studies within the United Kingdom while considering the background context of this work against new infrastructural developments and the requirements of nationalized healthcare delivery within the UK National Health Service. PMID:25860661

  9. Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) A*1101-Restricted Epstein-Barr Virus-Specific T-cell Receptor Gene Transfer to Target Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yong; Parsonage, Greg; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Machado, Lee R; James, Christine H; Salman, Asmaa; Searle, Peter F; Hui, Edwin P; Chan, Anthony T C; Lee, Steven P

    2015-10-01

    Infusing virus-specific T cells is effective treatment for rare Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated posttransplant lymphomas, and more limited success has been reported using this approach to treat a far more common EBV-associated malignancy, nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). However, current approaches using EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines to reactivate EBV-specific T cells for infusion take 2 to 3 months of in vitro culture and favor outgrowth of T cells targeting viral antigens expressed within EBV(+) lymphomas, but not in NPC. Here, we explore T-cell receptor (TCR) gene transfer to rapidly and reliably generate T cells specific for the NPC-associated viral protein LMP2. We cloned a human leukocyte antigen (HLA) A*1101-restricted TCR, which would be widely applicable because 40% of NPC patients carry this HLA allele. Studying both the wild-type and modified forms, we have optimized expression of the TCR and demonstrated high-avidity antigen-specific function (proliferation, cytotoxicity, and cytokine release) in both CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells. The engineered T cells also inhibited LMP2(+) epithelial tumor growth in a mouse model. Furthermore, transduced T cells from patients with advanced NPC lysed LMP2-expressing NPC cell lines. Using this approach, within a few days large numbers of high-avidity LMP2-specific T cells can be generated reliably to treat NPC, thus providing an ideal clinical setting to test TCR gene transfer without the risk of autoimmunity through targeting self-antigens.

  10. Human MHC Class I-restricted high avidity CD4(+) T cells generated by co-transfer of TCR and CD8 mediate efficient tumor rejection in vivo.

    PubMed

    Xue, Shao-An; Gao, Liquan; Ahmadi, Maryam; Ghorashian, Sara; Barros, Rafael D; Pospori, Constandina; Holler, Angelika; Wright, Graham; Thomas, Sharyn; Topp, Max; Morris, Emma C; Stauss, Hans J

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we generated human MHC Class I-restricted CD4(+) T cells specific for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and cytomegalovirus (CMV), two herpesviridae associated with lymphoma, nasopharyngeal carcinoma and medulloblastoma, respectively. Retroviral transfer of virus-specific, HLA-A2-restricted TCR-coding genes generated CD4(+) T cells that recognized HLA-A2/peptide multimers and produced cytokines when stimulated with MHC Class II-deficient cells presenting the relevant viral peptides in the context of HLA-A2. Peptide titration revealed that CD4(+) T cells had a 10-fold lower avidity than CD8(+) T cells expressing the same TCR. The impaired avidity of CD4(+) T cells was corrected by simultaneously transferring TCR- and CD8-coding genes. The CD8 co-receptor did not alter the cytokine signature of CD4(+) T cells, which remained distinct from that of CD8(+) T cells. Using the xenogeneic NOD/SCID mouse model, we demonstrated that human CD4(+) T cells expressing a specific TCR and CD8 can confer efficient protection against the growth of tumors expressing the EBV or CMV antigens recognized by the TCR. In summary, we describe a robust approach for generating therapeutic CD4(+) T cells capable of providing MHC Class I-restricted immunity against MHC Class II-negative tumors in vivo.

  11. Programmed Death-Ligand 1 on Antigen-presenting Cells Facilitates the Induction of Antigen-specific Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes: Application to Adoptive T-Cell Immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Goto, Tatsunori; Nishida, Tetsuya; Takagi, Erina; Miyao, Kotaro; Koyama, Daisuke; Sakemura, Reona; Hanajiri, Ryo; Watanabe, Keisuke; Imahashi, Nobuhiko; Terakura, Seitaro; Murata, Makoto; Kiyoi, Hitoshi

    2016-10-01

    Programmed death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) binds to programmed death-1 (PD-1) on activated T cells and contributes to T-cell exhaustion. PD-L1 expressed on antigen-presenting cells (APCs) could be thought to inhibit the induction of Ag-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) by transducing negative signal into T cells; however, the roles of PD-L1 on APCs have not yet been well examined. Therefore, we evaluated the roles of PD-L1 on APCs in the induction of Ag-specific CTLs. CD3 T cells isolated from cytomegalovirus (CMV)-seropositive healthy donors were stimulated with mature dendritic cells pulsed with CMV pp65-derived HLA-restricted peptides in the presence of anti-PD-L1 blocking antibody. Unexpectedly, PD-L1 blockade resulted in a less efficient induction of CMV-specific CTLs, suggesting that PD-L1 play a positive role in the induction of Ag-specific CTLs. For further evaluations and application to adoptive immunotherapy, we generated K562-based artificial APCs, which were retrovirally transduced with HLA class I molecules and various combinations of CD80/86 and PD-L1. K562/HLA+CD80/86+PD-L1 cells produced significantly higher induction of CMV-specific CTLs than K562/HLA or K562/HLA+CD80/86 cells without causing excessive differentiation or functional exhaustion of the induced CTLs, whereas PD-L1 itself did not have a stimulatory effect. Furthermore, only K562/HLA+CD80/86+PD-L1 cells pulsed with HLA-A*24:02-restricted Wilms tumor 1 (WT1) peptide clearly expanded WT1-specific CTLs from healthy donors. Our findings presumed that PD-L1 expressed on APCs along with CD80/86 enhanced the induction of Ag-specific CTLs probably depending on fine-tuning excessive stimulation of CD80/86, and that K562/HLA+CD80/86+PD-L1 cells has therapeutic potential as a novel type of artificial APCs for adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:27548033

  12. Sodium phenylacetate inhibits adoptive transfer of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis in SJL/J mice at multiple steps.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Subhajit; Zhou, You; Jana, Malabendu; Banik, Naren L; Pahan, Kalipada

    2003-04-01

    Experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) is the animal model for multiple sclerosis. The present study underlines the importance of sodium phenylacetate (NaPA), a drug approved for urea cycle disorders, in inhibiting the disease process of adoptively transferred EAE in female SJL/J mice at multiple steps. Myelin basic protein (MBP)-primed T cells alone induced the expression of NO synthase (iNOS) and the activation of NF-kappaB in mouse microglial cells through cell-cell contact. However, pretreatment of MBP-primed T cells with NaPA markedly inhibited its ability to induce microglial expression of iNOS and activation of NF-kappaB. Consistently, adoptive transfer of MBP-primed T cells, but not that of NaPA-pretreated MBP-primed T cells, induced the clinical symptoms of EAE in female SJL/J mice. Furthermore, MBP-primed T cells isolated from NaPA-treated donor mice were also less efficient than MBP-primed T cells isolated from normal donor mice in inducing iNOS in microglial cells and transferring EAE to recipient mice. Interestingly, clinical symptoms of EAE were much less in mice receiving NaPA through drinking water than those without NaPA. Similar to NaPA, sodium phenylbutyrate, a chemically synthesized precursor of NaPA, also inhibited the disease process of EAE. Histological and immunocytochemical analysis showed that NaPA inhibited EAE-induced spinal cord mononuclear cell invasion and normalized iNOS, nitrotyrosine, and p65 (the RelA subunit of NF-kappaB) expression within the spinal cord. Taken together, our results raise the possibility that NaPA or sodium phenylbutyrate taken through drinking water or milk may reduce the observed neuroinflammation and disease process in multiple sclerosis patients. PMID:12646656

  13. Anti-Tumor Effects after Adoptive Transfer of IL-12 Transposon-Modified Murine Splenocytes in the OT-I-Melanoma Mouse Model.

    PubMed

    Galvan, Daniel L; O'Neil, Richard T; Foster, Aaron E; Huye, Leslie; Bear, Adham; Rooney, Cliona M; Wilson, Matthew H

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of gene modified T cells provides possible immunotherapy for patients with cancers refractory to other treatments. We have previously used the non-viral piggyBac transposon system to gene modify human T cells for potential immunotherapy. However, these previous studies utilized adoptive transfer of modified human T cells to target cancer xenografts in highly immunodeficient (NOD-SCID) mice that do not recapitulate an intact immune system. Currently, only viral vectors have shown efficacy in permanently gene-modifying mouse T cells for immunotherapy applications. Therefore, we sought to determine if piggyBac could effectively gene modify mouse T cells to target cancer cells in a mouse cancer model. We first demonstrated that we could gene modify cells to express murine interleukin-12 (p35/p40 mIL-12), a transgene with proven efficacy in melanoma immunotherapy. The OT-I melanoma mouse model provides a well-established T cell mediated immune response to ovalbumin (OVA) positive B16 melanoma cells. B16/OVA melanoma cells were implanted in wild type C57Bl6 mice. Mouse splenocytes were isolated from C57Bl6 OT-I mice and were gene modified using piggyBac to express luciferase. Adoptive transfer of luciferase-modified OT-I splenocytes demonstrated homing to B16/OVA melanoma tumors in vivo. We next gene-modified OT-I cells to express mIL-12. Adoptive transfer of mIL-12-modified mouse OT-I splenocytes delayed B16/OVA melanoma tumor growth in vivo compared to control OT-I splenocytes and improved mouse survival. Our results demonstrate that the piggyBac transposon system can be used to gene modify splenocytes and mouse T cells for evaluating adoptive immunotherapy strategies in immunocompetent mouse tumor models that may more directly mimic immunotherapy applications in humans. PMID:26473608

  14. Anti-Tumor Effects after Adoptive Transfer of IL-12 Transposon-Modified Murine Splenocytes in the OT-I-Melanoma Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Aaron E.; Huye, Leslie; Bear, Adham; Rooney, Cliona M.; Wilson, Matthew H.

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of gene modified T cells provides possible immunotherapy for patients with cancers refractory to other treatments. We have previously used the non-viral piggyBac transposon system to gene modify human T cells for potential immunotherapy. However, these previous studies utilized adoptive transfer of modified human T cells to target cancer xenografts in highly immunodeficient (NOD-SCID) mice that do not recapitulate an intact immune system. Currently, only viral vectors have shown efficacy in permanently gene-modifying mouse T cells for immunotherapy applications. Therefore, we sought to determine if piggyBac could effectively gene modify mouse T cells to target cancer cells in a mouse cancer model. We first demonstrated that we could gene modify cells to express murine interleukin-12 (p35/p40 mIL-12), a transgene with proven efficacy in melanoma immunotherapy. The OT-I melanoma mouse model provides a well-established T cell mediated immune response to ovalbumin (OVA) positive B16 melanoma cells. B16/OVA melanoma cells were implanted in wild type C57Bl6 mice. Mouse splenocytes were isolated from C57Bl6 OT-I mice and were gene modified using piggyBac to express luciferase. Adoptive transfer of luciferase-modified OT-I splenocytes demonstrated homing to B16/OVA melanoma tumors in vivo. We next gene-modified OT-I cells to express mIL-12. Adoptive transfer of mIL-12-modified mouse OT-I splenocytes delayed B16/OVA melanoma tumor growth in vivo compared to control OT-I splenocytes and improved mouse survival. Our results demonstrate that the piggyBac transposon system can be used to gene modify splenocytes and mouse T cells for evaluating adoptive immunotherapy strategies in immunocompetent mouse tumor models that may more directly mimic immunotherapy applications in humans. PMID:26473608

  15. HIV-1 Nef Is Transferred from Expressing T Cells to Hepatocytic Cells through Conduits and Enhances HCV Replication

    PubMed Central

    Park, In-Woo; Fan, Yan; Luo, Xiaoyu; Ryou, Myoung-Gwi; Liu, Jinfeng; Green, Linden; He, Johnny J.

    2014-01-01

    HIV-1 infection enhances HCV replication and as a consequence accelerates HCV-mediated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). However, the precise molecular mechanism by which this takes place is currently unknown. Our data showed that infectious HIV-1 failed to replicate in human hepatocytic cell lines. No discernible virus replication was observed, even when the cell lines transfected with HIV-1 proviral DNA were co-cultured with Jurkat T cells, indicating that the problem of liver deterioration in the co-infected patient is not due to the replication of HIV-1 in the hepatocytes of the HCV infected host. Instead, HIV-1 Nef protein was transferred from nef-expressing T cells to hepatocytic cells through conduits, wherein up to 16% (average 10%) of the cells harbored the transferred Nef, when the hepatocytic cells were co-cultured with nef-expressing Jurkat cells for 24 h. Further, Nef altered the size and numbers of lipid droplets (LD), and consistently up-regulated HCV replication by 1.5∼2.5 fold in the target subgenomic replicon cells, which is remarkable in relation to the initially indolent viral replication. Nef also dramatically augmented reactive oxygen species (ROS) production and enhanced ethanol-mediated up-regulation of HCV replication so as to accelerate HCC. Taken together, these data indicate that HIV-1 Nef is a critical element in accelerating progression of liver pathogenesis via enhancing HCV replication and coordinating modulation of key intra- and extra-cellular molecules for liver decay. PMID:24911518

  16. Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cell Therapy in Hematology.

    PubMed

    Ataca, Pınar; Arslan, Önder

    2015-12-01

    It is well demonstrated that the immune system can control and eliminate cancer cells. Immune-mediated elimination of tumor cells has been discovered and is the basis of both cancer vaccines and cellular therapies including hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Adoptive T cell transfer has been improved to be more specific and potent and to cause less off-target toxicity. Currently, there are two forms of engineered T cells being tested in clinical trials: T cell receptor (TCR) and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) modified T cells. On 1 July 2014, the United States Food and Drug Administration granted 'breakthrough therapy' designation to anti-CD19 CAR T cell therapy. Many studies were conducted to evaluate the benefits of this exciting and potent new treatment modality. This review summarizes the history of adoptive immunotherapy, adoptive immunotherapy using CARs, the CAR manufacturing process, preclinical and clinical studies, and the effectiveness and drawbacks of this strategy.

  17. Chimeric Antigen Receptor T Cell Therapy in Hematology

    PubMed Central

    Ataca, Pınar; Arslan, Önder

    2015-01-01

    It is well demonstrated that the immune system can control and eliminate cancer cells. Immune-mediated elimination of tumor cells has been discovered and is the basis of both cancer vaccines and cellular therapies including hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Adoptive T cell transfer has been improved to be more specific and potent and to cause less off-target toxicity. Currently, there are two forms of engineered T cells being tested in clinical trials: T cell receptor (TCR) and chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) modified T cells. On 1 July 2014, the United States Food and Drug Administration granted ‘breakthrough therapy’ designation to anti-CD19 CAR T cell therapy. Many studies were conducted to evaluate the benefits of this exciting and potent new treatment modality. This review summarizes the history of adoptive immunotherapy, adoptive immunotherapy using CARs, the CAR manufacturing process, preclinical and clinical studies, and the effectiveness and drawbacks of this strategy. PMID:26377367

  18. A robust, good manufacturing practice-compliant, clinical-scale procedure to generate regulatory T cells from patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis for adoptive cell therapy.

    PubMed

    Alsuliman, Abdullah; Appel, Stanley H; Beers, David R; Basar, Rafet; Shaim, Hila; Kaur, Indresh; Zulovich, Jane; Yvon, Eric; Muftuoglu, Muharrem; Imahashi, Nobuhiko; Kondo, Kayo; Liu, Enli; Shpall, Elizabeth J; Rezvani, Katayoun

    2016-10-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) play a fundamental role in the maintenance of self-tolerance and immune homeostasis. Defects in Treg function and/or frequencies have been reported in multiple disease models. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder affecting upper and lower motor neurons. Compelling evidence supports a neuroprotective role for Tregs in this disease. Indeed, rapid progression in ALS patients is associated with decreased FoxP3 expression and Treg frequencies. Thus, we propose that strategies to restore Treg number and function may slow disease progression in ALS. In this study, we developed a robust, Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP)-compliant procedure to enrich and expand Tregs from ALS patients. Tregs isolated from these patients were phenotypically similar to those from healthy individuals but were impaired in their ability to suppress T-cell effector function. In vitro expansion of Tregs for 4 weeks in the presence of GMP-grade anti-CD3/CD28 beads, interleukin (IL)-2 and rapamcyin resulted in a 25- to 200-fold increase in their number and restored their immunoregulatory activity. Collectively, our data facilitate and support the implementation of clinical trials of adoptive therapy with ex vivo expanded and highly suppressive Tregs in patients with ALS.

  19. Transfer of immunity against lethal murine Francisella infection by specific antibody depends on host gamma interferon and T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Rhinehart-Jones, T R; Fortier, A H; Elkins, K L

    1994-01-01

    Both serum and spleen cells from mice immune to Francisella tularensis transfer protection to naive recipients. Here we characterize the mechanism of protection induced by transfer of immune mouse serum (IMS). IMS obtained 4 weeks after intradermal infection with 10(3) bacteria of the live vaccine strain (LVS) contained high levels of immunoglobulin G2 (IgG2a) and IgM (end point titers, 1:16,600 and 1:7,200, respectively) and little IgG1, IgG2b, or IgG3. LVS-specific antibodies were detected 5 days after intradermal infection, and reached peak levels by 2 weeks postinfection. Only sera obtained 10 days or more after sublethal infection, when IgG titers peaked, transferred protection against a challenge of 100 50% lethal doses (LD50s). Purified high-titer IgG anti-LVS antibody but not IgM anti-LVS antibody was responsible for transfer of protection against an intraperitoneal challenge of up to 3,000 LD50s. IMS had no direct toxic effects on LVS and did not affect uptake or growth of bacteria in association with peritoneal cells. One day after LVS infection, liver, spleen, and lung tissue from mice treated with IMS contained 1 to 2 log units fewer bacteria than did tissue from mice treated with normal mouse serum or phosphate-buffered saline. Between 2 and 4 days after infection, however, bacterial growth rates in tissues were similar in both serum-protected mice and unprotected mice. Bacterial burdens in IMS-treated, LVS-infected mice declined in infected tissues after day 5, whereas control animals died. This lag phase suggested that development of a host response was involved in complete bacterial clearance. In fact, transfer of IMS into normal recipients that were simultaneously treated with anti-gamma interferon and challenged with LVS did not protect mice from death. Further, transfer of IMS into athymic nu/nu mice did not protect against LVS challenge; protection was, however, reconstituted by transfer of normal T cells into nu/nu mice. Thus, "passive

  20. HIV-1-Induced Small T Cell Syncytia Can Transfer Virus Particles to Target Cells through Transient Contacts.

    PubMed

    Symeonides, Menelaos; Murooka, Thomas T; Bellfy, Lauren N; Roy, Nathan H; Mempel, Thorsten R; Thali, Markus

    2015-12-01

    HIV-1 Env mediates fusion of viral and target cell membranes, but it can also mediate fusion of infected (producer) and target cells, thus triggering the formation of multinucleated cells, so-called syncytia. Large, round, immobile syncytia are readily observable in cultures of HIV-1-infected T cells, but these fast growing "fusion sinks" are largely regarded as cell culture artifacts. In contrast, small HIV-1-induced syncytia were seen in the paracortex of peripheral lymph nodes and other secondary lymphoid tissue of HIV-1-positive individuals. Further, recent intravital imaging of lymph nodes in humanized mice early after their infection with HIV-1 demonstrated that a significant fraction of infected cells were highly mobile, small syncytia, suggesting that these entities contribute to virus dissemination. Here, we report that the formation of small, migratory syncytia, for which we provide further quantification in humanized mice, can be recapitulated in vitro if HIV-1-infected T cells are placed into 3D extracellular matrix (ECM) hydrogels rather than being kept in traditional suspension culture systems. Intriguingly, live-cell imaging in hydrogels revealed that these syncytia, similar to individual infected cells, can transiently interact with uninfected cells, leading to rapid virus transfer without cell-cell fusion. Infected cells were also observed to deposit large amounts of viral particles into the extracellular space. Altogether, these observations suggest the need to further evaluate the biological significance of small, T cell-based syncytia and to consider the possibility that these entities do indeed contribute to virus spread and pathogenesis.

  1. The Tumor Antigen NY-ESO-1 Mediates Direct Recognition of Melanoma Cells by CD4+ T Cells after Intercellular Antigen Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Fonteneau, Jean Francois; Brilot, Fabienne; Münz, Christian

    2016-01-01

    NY-ESO-1–specific CD4+ T cells are of interest for immune therapy against tumors, because it has been shown that their transfer into a patient with melanoma resulted in tumor regression. Therefore, we investigated how NY-ESO-1 is processed onto MHC class II molecules for direct CD4+ T cell recognition of melanoma cells. We could rule out proteasome and autophagy-dependent endogenous Ag processing for MHC class II presentation. In contrast, intercellular Ag transfer, followed by classical MHC class II Ag processing via endocytosis, sensitized neighboring melanoma cells for CD4+ T cell recognition. However, macroautophagy targeting of NY-ESO-1 enhanced MHC class II presentation. Therefore, both elevated NY-ESO-1 release and macroautophagy targeting could improve melanoma cell recognition by CD4+ T cells and should be explored during immunotherapy of melanoma. PMID:26608910

  2. The Tumor Antigen NY-ESO-1 Mediates Direct Recognition of Melanoma Cells by CD4+ T Cells after Intercellular Antigen Transfer.

    PubMed

    Fonteneau, Jean Francois; Brilot, Fabienne; Münz, Christian; Gannagé, Monique

    2016-01-01

    NY-ESO-1-specific CD4(+) T cells are of interest for immune therapy against tumors, because it has been shown that their transfer into a patient with melanoma resulted in tumor regression. Therefore, we investigated how NY-ESO-1 is processed onto MHC class II molecules for direct CD4(+) T cell recognition of melanoma cells. We could rule out proteasome and autophagy-dependent endogenous Ag processing for MHC class II presentation. In contrast, intercellular Ag transfer, followed by classical MHC class II Ag processing via endocytosis, sensitized neighboring melanoma cells for CD4(+) T cell recognition. However, macroautophagy targeting of NY-ESO-1 enhanced MHC class II presentation. Therefore, both elevated NY-ESO-1 release and macroautophagy targeting could improve melanoma cell recognition by CD4(+) T cells and should be explored during immunotherapy of melanoma.

  3. T cell receptor (TCR)-transgenic CD8 lymphocytes rendered insensitive to transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) signaling mediate superior tumor regression in an animal model of adoptive cell therapy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Tumor antigen-reactive T cells must enter into an immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment, continue to produce cytokine and deliver apoptotic death signals to affect tumor regression. Many tumors produce transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ), which inhibits T cell activation, proliferation and cytotoxicity. In a murine model of adoptive cell therapy, we demonstrate that transgenic Pmel-1 CD8 T cells, rendered insensitive to TGFβ by transduction with a TGFβ dominant negative receptor II (DN), were more effective in mediating regression of established B16 melanoma. Smaller numbers of DN Pmel-1 T cells effectively mediated tumor regression and retained the ability to produce interferon-γ in the tumor microenvironment. These results support efforts to incorporate this DN receptor in clinical trials of adoptive cell therapy for cancer. PMID:22713761

  4. B7-deficient autoreactive T cells are highly susceptible to suppression by CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    May, Kenneth F; Chang, Xing; Zhang, Huiming; Lute, Kenneth D; Zhou, Penghui; Kocak, Ergun; Zheng, Pan; Liu, Yang

    2007-02-01

    CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) suppress immunity to infections and tumors as well as autoimmunity and graft-vs-host disease. Since Tregs constitutively express CTLA-4 and activated T cells express B7-1 and B7-2, it has been suggested that the interaction between CTLA-4 on Tregs and B7-1/2 on the effector T cells may be required for immune suppression. In this study, we report that autopathogenic T cells from B7-deficient mice cause multiorgan inflammation when adoptively transferred into syngeneic RAG-1-deficient hosts. More importantly, this inflammation is suppressed by adoptive transfer of purified wild-type (WT) CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells. WT Tregs also inhibited lymphoproliferation and acquisition of activation markers by the B7-deficient T cells. An in vitro suppressor assay revealed that WT and B7-deficient T cells are equally susceptible to WT Treg regulation. These results demonstrate that B7-deficient T cells are highly susceptible to immune suppression by WT Tregs and refute the hypothesis that B7-CTLA-4 interaction between effector T cells and Tregs plays an essential role in Treg function.

  5. T-cell receptor gene therapy in human melanoma-bearing immune-deficient mice: human but not mouse T cells recapitulate outcome of clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Straetemans, Trudy; Coccoris, Miriam; Berrevoets, Cor; Treffers-Westerlaken, Elike; Scholten, Csilla E V; Schipper, Debby; Ten Hagen, Timo L M; Debets, Reno

    2012-02-01

    Adoptive cell therapy using T-cell receptor (TCR)-engineered T cells is a clinically feasible and promising approach to target tumors, but is currently faced with compromised antitumor efficacies in patients. Here, we extensively validated immune-deficient mice to facilitate further development of the therapeutic potential of TCR-engineered T cells. Treatment of human melanoma-bearing SCID or NSG mice with high doses of human T cells transduced with an hgp100/HLA-A2-specific TCR did not result in antitumor responses irrespective of chemotherapeutic preconditioning. Imaging of human green fluorescent protein-labeled T cells demonstrated significant T-cell accumulation in intratumoral vasculature directly upon T-cell transfer, which was followed by loss of T cells within 72 hr. Peripheral persistence of human T cells was highly compromised and appeared related to T-cell differentiation. On the contrary, adoptive transfer (AT) of relatively low numbers of hgp100/HLA-A2 TCR-transduced mouse T cells resulted in rapid clearance of large established human melanomas. Unexpectedly and in contrast to reported studies with chimeric antibody receptor-engineered T cells, antitumor activity and homeostatic expansion of T cells were independent of TCR transgene as evidenced in two SCID strains and using two different human melanoma cell lines. Interestingly, the xeno-reactive melanoma response of mouse T cells appeared to be dictated by CD4(+) tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes and did not require in vitro T-cell activation, retroviral gene transfer, or subcutaneous interleukin-2 support. Taken together, AT of human but not mouse T cells in human melanoma-bearing immune-deficient mice is in close accordance with clinical studies. PMID:21958294

  6. Preclinical targeting of human T-cell malignancies using CD4-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered T cells.

    PubMed

    Pinz, K; Liu, H; Golightly, M; Jares, A; Lan, F; Zieve, G W; Hagag, N; Schuster, M; Firor, A E; Jiang, X; Ma, Y

    2016-03-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCLs) are aggressive lymphomas with no effective upfront standard treatment and ineffective options in relapsed disease, resulting in poorer clinical outcomes as compared with B-cell lymphomas. The adoptive transfer of T cells engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) is a promising new approach for treatment of hematological malignancies. However, preclinical reports of targeting T-cell lymphoma with CARs are almost non-existent. Here we have designed a CAR, CD4CAR, which redirects the antigen specificity of CD8+ cytotoxic T cells to CD4-expressing cells. CD4CAR T cells derived from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and cord blood effectively redirected T-cell specificity against CD4+ cells in vitro. CD4CAR T cells efficiently eliminated a CD4+ leukemic cell line and primary CD4+ PTCL patient samples in co-culture assays. Notably, CD4CAR T cells maintained a central memory stem cell-like phenotype (CD8+CD45RO+CD62L+) under standard culture conditions. Furthermore, in aggressive orthotropic T-cell lymphoma models, CD4CAR T cells efficiently suppressed the growth of lymphoma cells while also significantly prolonging mouse survival. Combined, these studies demonstrate that CD4CAR-expressing CD8+ T cells are efficacious in ablating malignant CD4+ populations, with potential use as a bridge to transplant or stand-alone therapy for the treatment of PTCLs.

  7. Preclinical targeting of human T-cell malignancies using CD4-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-engineered T cells.

    PubMed

    Pinz, K; Liu, H; Golightly, M; Jares, A; Lan, F; Zieve, G W; Hagag, N; Schuster, M; Firor, A E; Jiang, X; Ma, Y

    2016-03-01

    Peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTCLs) are aggressive lymphomas with no effective upfront standard treatment and ineffective options in relapsed disease, resulting in poorer clinical outcomes as compared with B-cell lymphomas. The adoptive transfer of T cells engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) is a promising new approach for treatment of hematological malignancies. However, preclinical reports of targeting T-cell lymphoma with CARs are almost non-existent. Here we have designed a CAR, CD4CAR, which redirects the antigen specificity of CD8+ cytotoxic T cells to CD4-expressing cells. CD4CAR T cells derived from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells and cord blood effectively redirected T-cell specificity against CD4+ cells in vitro. CD4CAR T cells efficiently eliminated a CD4+ leukemic cell line and primary CD4+ PTCL patient samples in co-culture assays. Notably, CD4CAR T cells maintained a central memory stem cell-like phenotype (CD8+CD45RO+CD62L+) under standard culture conditions. Furthermore, in aggressive orthotropic T-cell lymphoma models, CD4CAR T cells efficiently suppressed the growth of lymphoma cells while also significantly prolonging mouse survival. Combined, these studies demonstrate that CD4CAR-expressing CD8+ T cells are efficacious in ablating malignant CD4+ populations, with potential use as a bridge to transplant or stand-alone therapy for the treatment of PTCLs. PMID:26526988

  8. Engineered T cells: the promise and challenges of cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Fesnak, Andrew D; June, Carl H; Levine, Bruce L

    2016-08-23

    The immune system evolved to distinguish non-self from self to protect the organism. As cancer is derived from our own cells, immune responses to dysregulated cell growth present a unique challenge. This is compounded by mechanisms of immune evasion and immunosuppression that develop in the tumour microenvironment. The modern genetic toolbox enables the adoptive transfer of engineered T cells to create enhanced anticancer immune functions where natural cancer-specific immune responses have failed. Genetically engineered T cells, so-called 'living drugs', represent a new paradigm in anticancer therapy. Recent clinical trials using T cells engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) or engineered T cell receptors (TCRs) have produced stunning results in patients with relapsed or refractory haematological malignancies. In this Review we describe some of the most recent and promising advances in engineered T cell therapy with a particular emphasis on what the next generation of T cell therapy is likely to entail. PMID:27550819

  9. Engineered T cells: the promise and challenges of cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Fesnak, Andrew D; June, Carl H; Levine, Bruce L

    2016-08-23

    The immune system evolved to distinguish non-self from self to protect the organism. As cancer is derived from our own cells, immune responses to dysregulated cell growth present a unique challenge. This is compounded by mechanisms of immune evasion and immunosuppression that develop in the tumour microenvironment. The modern genetic toolbox enables the adoptive transfer of engineered T cells to create enhanced anticancer immune functions where natural cancer-specific immune responses have failed. Genetically engineered T cells, so-called 'living drugs', represent a new paradigm in anticancer therapy. Recent clinical trials using T cells engineered to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) or engineered T cell receptors (TCRs) have produced stunning results in patients with relapsed or refractory haematological malignancies. In this Review we describe some of the most recent and promising advances in engineered T cell therapy with a particular emphasis on what the next generation of T cell therapy is likely to entail.

  10. Protection against rat vaginal candidiasis by adoptive transfer of vaginal B lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    De Bernardis, Flavia; Santoni, Giorgio; Boccanera, Maria; Lucciarini, Roberta; Arancia, Silvia; Sandini, Silvia; Amantini, Consuelo; Cassone, Antonio

    2010-06-01

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis is a mucosal infection affecting many women, but the immune mechanisms operating against Candida albicans at the mucosal level remain unknown. A rat model was employed to further characterize the contribution of B and T cells to anti-Candida vaginal protection. Particularly, the protective role of vaginal B cells was studied by means of adoptive transfer of vaginal CD3(-) CD5(+) IgM(+) cells from Candida-immunized rats to naïve animals. This passive transfer of B cells resulted into a number of vaginal C. albicans CFU approximately 50% lower than their controls. Sorted CD3(-) CD5(+) IgM(+) vaginal B lymphocytes from Candida-infected rats proliferated in response to stimulation with an immunodominant mannoprotein (MP) antigen of the fungus. Importantly, anti-MP antibodies and antibody-secreting B cells were detected in the supernatant and cell cultures, respectively, of vaginal B lymphocytes from infected rats incubated in vitro with vaginal T cells and stimulated with MP. No such specific antibodies were found when using vaginal B cells from uninfected rats. Furthermore, inflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines, such as interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-6 and IL-10, were found in the supernatant of vaginal B cells from infected rats. These data are evidence of a partial anti-Candida protective role of CD3(-) CD5(+) IgM(+) vaginal B lymphocytes in our experimental model.

  11. Information Transfer and the Adoption of Agricultural Innovations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longo, Rose Mary Juliano

    1990-01-01

    Data collected in the Federal District of Brazil were analyzed in terms of information transfer through mass media and interpersonal communication and how they influence farmers in the Federal District of Brazil in their decisions to adopt agricultural innovations. (42 references) (EAM)

  12. Magnetic Field-Induced T Cell Receptor Clustering by Nanoparticles Enhances T Cell Activation and Stimulates Antitumor Activity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Iron–dextran nanoparticles functionalized with T cell activating proteins have been used to study T cell receptor (TCR) signaling. However, nanoparticle triggering of membrane receptors is poorly understood and may be sensitive to physiologically regulated changes in TCR clustering that occur after T cell activation. Nano-aAPC bound 2-fold more TCR on activated T cells, which have clustered TCR, than on naive T cells, resulting in a lower threshold for activation. To enhance T cell activation, a magnetic field was used to drive aggregation of paramagnetic nano-aAPC, resulting in a doubling of TCR cluster size and increased T cell expansion in vitro and after adoptive transfer in vivo. T cells activated by nano-aAPC in a magnetic field inhibited growth of B16 melanoma, showing that this novel approach, using magnetic field-enhanced nano-aAPC stimulation, can generate large numbers of activated antigen-specific T cells and has clinically relevant applications for adoptive immunotherapy. PMID:24564881

  13. Engineering higher affinity T cell receptors using a T cell display system

    PubMed Central

    Chervin, Adam S.; Aggen, David H.; Raseman, John M.; Kranz, David M.

    2008-01-01

    The T cell receptor (TCR) determines the cellular response to antigens, which are presented on the surface of target cells in the form of a peptide bound to a product of the major histocompatibility complex (pepMHC). The response of the T cell depends on the affinity of the TCR for the pepMHC, yet many TCRs have been shown to be of low affinity, and some naturally occurring T cell responses are poor due to low affinities. Accordingly, engineering the TCR for increased affinity for pepMHC, particularly tumor-associated antigens, has become an increasingly desirable goal, especially with the advent of adoptive T cell therapies. For largely technical reasons, to date there have been only a handful of TCRs engineered in vitro for higher affinity using well established methods of protein engineering. Here we report the use of a T cell display system, using a retroviral vector, for generating a high affinity TCR from the mouse T cell clone 2C. The method relies on the display of the TCR, in its normal, signaling competent state, as a CD3 complex on the T cell surface. A library in the CDR3α of the 2C TCR was generated in the MSCV retroviral vector and transduced into a TCR-negative hybridoma. Selection of a high affinity, CD8-independent TCR was accomplished after only two rounds of flow cytometric sorting using the pepMHC SIYRYYGL/Kb (SIY/Kb). The selected TCR contained a sequence motif in the CDR3α with characteristics of several other TCRs previously selected by yeast display. In addition, it was possible to directly use the selected T cell hybridoma in functional assays without the need for sub-cloning, revealing that the selected TCR was capable of mediating CD8-independent activity. The method may be useful in the direct isolation and characterization of TCRs that could be used in therapies with adoptive transferred T cells. PMID:18854190

  14. In healthy primates, circulating autoreactive T cells mediate autoimmune disease.

    PubMed Central

    Genain, C P; Lee-Parritz, D; Nguyen, M H; Massacesi, L; Joshi, N; Ferrante, R; Hoffman, K; Moseley, M; Letvin, N L; Hauser, S L

    1994-01-01

    A T cell response against myelin basic protein (MBP) is thought to contribute to the central nervous system (CNS) inflammation that occurs in the human demyelinating disease multiple sclerosis. To test whether MBP-reactive T cells that are normally retrieved from the circulation are capable of inducing CNS disease, MBP-reactive T cell clones were isolated from the peripheral blood of healthy, unimmunized Callithrix jacchus (C. jacchus) marmosets. This primate species is characterized by a natural chimerism of bone marrow elements between siblings that should make possible adoptive transfer of MBP-reactive T cells. We report that MBP-reactive T cell clones efficiently and reproducibly transfer CNS inflammatory disease between members of C. jacchus chimeric sets. The demyelination that is characteristic of experimental allergic encephalomyelitis induced in C. jacchus by immunization against human white matter did not occur after adoptive transfer of the MBP-reactive clones. It was noteworthy that encephalitogenic T cell clones were diverse in terms of their recognition of different epitopes of MBP, distinguishing the response in C. jacchus from that in some inbred rodents in which restricted recognition of MBP occurs. These findings are the first direct evidence that natural populations of circulating T cells directed against a CNS antigen can mediate an inflammatory autoimmune disease. Images PMID:7521889

  15. Resolution of murine chlamydial genital infection by the adoptive transfer of a biovar-specific, Th1 lymphocyte clone.

    PubMed

    Igietseme, J U; Ramsey, K H; Magee, D M; Williams, D M; Kincy, T J; Rank, R G

    1993-01-01

    MoPn-specific T-cell clones were isolated from a T-cell line that was capable of curing chlamydial genital infection by the Chlamydia trachomatis agent of mouse pneumonitis (MoPn) after adoptive transfer. Two clones (designated as 2.14-0 and 2.14-3) were characterized by flow cytometry techniques to be homogenous for L3T4, CD3, and alpha/beta T cell receptor (TcR) T-helper cell markers. The two clones were biovar specific, because they reacted to MoPn but not the Chlamydia psittaci agent of guinea pig inclusion conjunctivitis (GPIC) or C. trachomatis, serovar type E. Cytokine profile analysis, by a combination of bioassays, ELISA, and slot/Northern blotting for specific cytokine messenger RNAs, further revealed that cultures of antigen-stimulated clone 2.14-0 contained interleukin-2 (IL-2), tumor necrosis factor-alpha, and gamma interferon (a T helper 1 cell [Th1] profile). Clone 2.14-3 was also positive for gamma interferon, a level much lower than that of clone 2.14-0, and negative for IL-4 secretion, suggesting a Th1 profile as well. The ability of these clones to bring about the resolution of the chronic genital chlamydial infection of nude mice was tested by the adoptive transfer of 10(7) cells of each clone into the mice. By 4 weeks after cell transfer of clone 2.14-0, 81% of recipient nude mice (30 of 37) resolved the disease. In contrast, clone 2.14-3 or a control T-cell clone specific for a heterologous antigen were unable to resolve the infection in 20 recipients in each case, even after 100 days.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Tumor eradication after cyclophosphamide depends on concurrent depletion of regulatory T cells: a role for cycling TNFR2-expressing effector-suppressor T cells in limiting effective chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    van der Most, Robbert G; Currie, Andrew J; Mahendran, Sathish; Prosser, Amy; Darabi, Anna; Robinson, Bruce W S; Nowak, Anna K; Lake, Richard A

    2009-08-01

    Tumor cell death potentially engages with the immune system. However, the efficacy of anti-tumor chemotherapy may be limited by tumor-driven immunosuppression, e.g., through CD25+ regulatory T cells. We addressed this question in a mouse model of mesothelioma by depleting or reconstituting CD25+ regulatory T cells in combination with two different chemotherapeutic drugs. We found that the efficacy of cyclophosphamide to eradicate established tumors, which has been linked to regulatory T cell depletion, was negated by adoptive transfer of CD25+ regulatory T cells. Analysis of post-chemotherapy regulatory T cell populations revealed that cyclophosphamide depleted cycling (Ki-67(hi)) T cells, including foxp3+ regulatory CD4+ T cells. Ki-67(hi) CD4+ T cells expressed increased levels of two markers, TNFR2 and ICOS, that have been associated with a maximally suppressive phenotype according to recently published studies. This suggest that cyclophosphamide depletes a population of maximally suppressive regulatory T cells, which may explain its superior anti-tumor efficacy in our model. Our data suggest that regulatory T cell depletion could be used to improve the efficacy of anti-cancer chemotherapy regimens. Indeed, we observed that the drug gemcitabine, which does not deplete cycling regulatory T cells, eradicates established tumors in mice only when CD25+ CD4+ T cells are concurrently depleted. Cyclophosphamide could be used to achieve regulatory T cell depletion in combination with chemotherapy.

  17. Prevention of Allogeneic Cardiac Graft Rejection by Transfer of Ex Vivo Expanded Antigen-Specific Regulatory T-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Takasato, Fumika; Morita, Rimpei; Schichita, Takashi; Sekiya, Takashi; Morikawa, Yasuhide; Kuroda, Tatsuo; Niimi, Masanori; Yoshimura, Akihiko

    2014-01-01

    The rate of graft survival has dramatically increased using calcineurin inhibitors, however chronic graft rejection and risk of infection are difficult to manage. Induction of allograft-specific regulatory T-cells (Tregs) is considered an ideal way to achieve long-term tolerance for allografts. However, efficient in vitro methods for developing allograft-specific Tregs which is applicable to MHC full-mismatched cardiac transplant models have not been established. We compared antigen-nonspecific polyclonal-induced Tregs (iTregs) as well as antigen-specific iTregs and thymus-derived Tregs (nTregs) that were expanded via direct and indirect pathways. We found that iTregs induced via the indirect pathway had the greatest ability to prolong graft survival and suppress angiitis. Antigen-specific iTregs generated ex vivo via both direct and indirect pathways using dendritic cells from F1 mice also induced long-term engraftment without using MHC peptides. In antigen-specific Treg transferred models, activation of dendritic cells and allograft-specific CTL generation were suppressed. The present study demonstrated the potential of ex vivo antigen-specific Treg expansion for clinical cell-based therapeutic approaches to induce lifelong immunological tolerance for allogeneic cardiac transplants. PMID:24498362

  18. Microbiota innate stimulation is a prerequisite for T cell spontaneous proliferation and induction of experimental colitis

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Ting; Wang, Lanfang; Schoeb, Trenton R.; Elson, Charles O.

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about how the microbiota regulates T cell proliferation and whether spontaneous T cell proliferation is involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease. In this study, we show that stimulation of innate pathways by microbiota-derived ligands and antigen-specific T cell stimulation are both required for intestinal inflammation. Microbiota-derived ligands promoted spontaneous T cell proliferation by activating dendritic cells (DCs) to produce IL-6 via Myd88, as shown by the spontaneous proliferation of T cells adoptively transferred into specific pathogen–free (SPF) RAG−/− mice, but not in germfree RAG−/− mice. Reconstitution of germfree RAG−/− mice with cecal bacterial lysate–pulsed DCs, but not with IL-6−/− or Myd88−/− DCs, restored spontaneous T cell proliferation. CBir1 TCR transgenic (CBir1 Tg) T cells, which are specific for an immunodominant microbiota antigen, induced colitis in SPF RAG−/− mice. Blocking the spontaneous proliferation of CBir1 Tg T cells by co-transferring bulk OT II CD4+ T cells abrogated colitis development. Although transferred OT II T cells underwent spontaneous proliferation in RAG−/− mice, the recipients failed to develop colitis because of the lack of cognate antigen in the intestinal lumen. Collectively, our data demonstrate that induction of colitis requires both spontaneous proliferation of T cells driven by microbiota-derived innate signals and antigen-specific T cell proliferation. PMID:20498021

  19. Genetic engineering with T cell receptors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ling; Morgan, Richard A

    2012-06-01

    In the past two decades, human gene transfer research has been translated from a laboratory technology to clinical evaluation. The success of adoptive transfer of tumor-reactive lymphocytes to treat the patients with metastatic melanoma has led to new strategies to redirect normal T cells to recognize tumor antigens by genetic engineering with tumor antigen-specific T cell receptor (TCR) genes. This new strategy can generate large numbers of defined antigen-specific cells for therapeutic application. Much progress has been made to TCR gene transfer systems by optimizing gene expression and gene transfer protocols. Vector and protein modifications have enabled excellent expression of introduced TCR chains in human lymphocytes with reduced mis-pairing between the introduced and endogenous TCR chains. Initial clinical studies have demonstrated that TCR gene-engineered T cells could mediate tumor regression in vivo. In this review, we discuss the progress and prospects of TCR gene-engineered T cells as a therapeutic strategy for treating patients with melanoma and other cancers.

  20. CD8+ T cell migration to the skin requires CD4+ help in a murine model of contact hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Fyhrquist, Nanna; Wolff, Henrik; Lauerma, Antti; Alenius, Harri

    2012-01-01

    The relative roles of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in contact hypersensitivity responses have not been fully solved, and remain an important question. Using an adoptive transfer model, we investigated the role of the respective T cell subset. Magnetic bead separated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from oxazolone sensitized C57BL/6 mice were transferred into RAG-/- mice, followed by hapten challenge and analysis of inflammatory parameters at 24 hours post exposure. The CD4+ T cell recipient mice developed partial contact hypersensitivity responses to oxazolone. CD8+ T cells caused significant amplification of the response in recipients of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells including ear swelling, type 1 inflammatory mediators, and cell killing. Unexpectedly, CD8+ T cells were not sufficient to mediate contact hypersensitivity, although abundantly present in the lymph nodes in the CD8+ T cell reconstituted mice. There were no signs of inflammation at the site of hapten exposure, indicating impaired recruitment of CD8+ T cells in the absence of CD4+ T cells. These data show that CD4+ T cells mediate contact hypersensitivity to oxazolone, but CD8+ T cells contribute with the most potent effector mechanisms. Moreover, our results suggest that CD4+ T cell function is required for the mobilization of CD8+ effector T cells to the site of hapten exposure. The results shed new light on the relative importance of CD4+ and CD8+ T cells during the effector phase of contact hypersensitivity. PMID:22916101

  1. Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) and T cell receptor (TCR) Modified T cells Enter Main Street and Wall Street

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, David M; Grupp, Stephan A; June, Carl H

    2015-01-01

    The field of adoptive cell transfer (ACT) is currently comprised of CAR and TCR engineered T cells and has emerged from principles of basic immunology to paradigm-shifting clinical immunotherapy. ACT of T cells engineered to express artificial receptors that target cells of choice is an exciting new approach for cancer, and holds equal promise for chronic infection and autoimmunity. Using principles of synthetic biology, advances in immunology and genetic engineering have made it possible to generate human T-cells that display desired specificities and enhanced functionalities. Clinical trials in patients with advanced B cell leukemias and lymphomas treated with CD19-specific CAR T cells have induced durable remissions in adults and children. The prospects for the widespread availability of engineered T cells have changed dramatically given the recent entry of the pharmaceutical industry to this arena. Here, we discuss some of the challenges and opportunities that face the field of ACT. PMID:26188068

  2. Improvement of adoptive cellular immunotherapy of human cancer using ex-vivo gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Paul, Stephane; Calmels, Bastien; Acres, R Bruce

    2002-02-01

    A variety of adoptive cellular strategies, aimed at boosting the immune system, have been tested in the management of metastatic diseases. Despite the drawbacks associated with ex vivo cell manipulation and upscaling, several such approaches have been assessed in the clinic. The use of lymphokine-activated killer (LAK) cells, auto-lymphocyte therapy (ALT) and tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL) have been the best studied and further trials are ongoing. Thus far, these approaches have not consistently shown benefit when compared to standard immune-based treatment with biologic response modifiers, notably, high-dose interleukin-2 (IL-2). More recently, it has been shown, in various animal models, that the ex vivo transfer of genes to cells of the immune system can have a dramatic impact on cancer immunotherapy. The application of gene transfer techniques to immunotherapy has animated the field of cell-based cancer therapy research. A wide variety of viral and non-viral gene transfer methods have been investigated in this context. Ex vivo strategies include gene delivery into tumor cells and into cellular components of the immune system, including cytotoxic T cells, NK, macrophages and dendritic cells (DC). Several of these approaches have already been translated into cancer therapy clinical trials. In this review, we focus on the rationale and types of ex vivo gene-based immunotherapy of cancer. Finally, the use of genetically modified DC for tumor vaccination and its prospects are discussed. PMID:12108977

  3. Switching CAR T cells on and off: a novel modular platform for retargeting of T cells to AML blasts

    PubMed Central

    Cartellieri, M; Feldmann, A; Koristka, S; Arndt, C; Loff, S; Ehninger, A; von Bonin, M; Bejestani, E P; Ehninger, G; Bachmann, M P

    2016-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor engineered T cells (CAR T cells) resulted in encouraging clinical trials in indolent B-cell malignancies. However, they also show the limitations of this fascinating technology: CAR T cells can lead to even life-threatening off-tumor, on-target side effects if CAR T cells crossreact with healthy tissues. Here, we describe a novel modular universal CAR platform technology termed UniCAR that reduces the risk of on-target side effects by a rapid and reversible control of CAR T-cell reactivity. The UniCAR system consists of two components: (1) a CAR for an inert manipulation of T cells and (2) specific targeting modules (TMs) for redirecting UniCAR T cells in an individualized time- and target-dependent manner. UniCAR T cells can be armed against different tumor targets simply by replacement of the respective TM for (1) targeting more than one antigen simultaneously or subsequently to enhance efficacy and (2) reducing the risk for development of antigen-loss tumor variants under treatment. Here we provide ‘proof of concept' for retargeting of UniCAR T cells to CD33- and/or CD123-positive acute myeloid leukemia blasts in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27518241

  4. Switching CAR T cells on and off: a novel modular platform for retargeting of T cells to AML blasts.

    PubMed

    Cartellieri, M; Feldmann, A; Koristka, S; Arndt, C; Loff, S; Ehninger, A; von Bonin, M; Bejestani, E P; Ehninger, G; Bachmann, M P

    2016-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor engineered T cells (CAR T cells) resulted in encouraging clinical trials in indolent B-cell malignancies. However, they also show the limitations of this fascinating technology: CAR T cells can lead to even life-threatening off-tumor, on-target side effects if CAR T cells crossreact with healthy tissues. Here, we describe a novel modular universal CAR platform technology termed UniCAR that reduces the risk of on-target side effects by a rapid and reversible control of CAR T-cell reactivity. The UniCAR system consists of two components: (1) a CAR for an inert manipulation of T cells and (2) specific targeting modules (TMs) for redirecting UniCAR T cells in an individualized time- and target-dependent manner. UniCAR T cells can be armed against different tumor targets simply by replacement of the respective TM for (1) targeting more than one antigen simultaneously or subsequently to enhance efficacy and (2) reducing the risk for development of antigen-loss tumor variants under treatment. Here we provide 'proof of concept' for retargeting of UniCAR T cells to CD33- and/or CD123-positive acute myeloid leukemia blasts in vitro and in vivo. PMID:27518241

  5. WT1-specific T cell receptor gene therapy: improving TCR function in transduced T cells.

    PubMed

    Stauss, Hans J; Thomas, Sharyn; Cesco-Gaspere, Michela; Hart, Daniel P; Xue, Shao-An; Holler, Angelika; King, Judy; Wright, Graham; Perro, Mario; Pospori, Constantina; Morris, Emma

    2008-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of antigen-specific T lymphocytes is an attractive form of immunotherapy for haematological malignancies and cancer. The difficulty of isolating antigen-specific T lymphocytes for individual patients limits the more widespread use of adoptive T cell therapy. The demonstration that cloned T cell receptor (TCR) genes can be used to produce T lymphocyte populations of desired specificity offers new opportunities for antigen-specific T cell therapy. The first trial in humans demonstrated that TCR gene-modified T cells persisted for an extended time period and reduced tumor burden in some patients. The WT1 protein is an attractive target for immunotherapy of leukemia and solid cancer since elevated expression has been demonstrated in AML, CML, MDS and in breast, colon and ovarian cancer. In the past, we have isolated high avidity CTL specific for a WT1-derived peptide presented by HLA-A2 and cloned the TCR alpha and beta genes of a WT1-specific CTL line. The genes were inserted into retroviral vectors for transduction of human peripheral blood T lymphocytes of leukemia patients and normal donors. The treatment of leukemia-bearing NOD/SCID mice with T cells transduced with the WT1-specific TCR eliminated leukemia cells in the bone marrow of most mice, while treatment with T cells transduced with a TCR of irrelevant specificity did not diminish the leukemia burden. In order to improve the safety and efficacy of TCR gene therapy, we have developed lentiviral TCR gene transfer. In addition, we employed strategies to enhance TCR expression while avoiding TCR mis-pairing. It may be possible to generate dominant TCR constructs that can suppress the expression of the endogenous TCR on the surface of transduced T cells. The development of new TCR gene constructs holds great promise for the safe and effective delivery of TCR gene therapy for the treatment of malignancies.

  6. WT1-specific T cell receptor gene therapy: improving TCR function in transduced T cells.

    PubMed

    Stauss, Hans J; Thomas, Sharyn; Cesco-Gaspere, Michela; Hart, Daniel P; Xue, Shao-An; Holler, Angelika; King, Judy; Wright, Graham; Perro, Mario; Pospori, Constantina; Morris, Emma

    2008-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of antigen-specific T lymphocytes is an attractive form of immunotherapy for haematological malignancies and cancer. The difficulty of isolating antigen-specific T lymphocytes for individual patients limits the more widespread use of adoptive T cell therapy. The demonstration that cloned T cell receptor (TCR) genes can be used to produce T lymphocyte populations of desired specificity offers new opportunities for antigen-specific T cell therapy. The first trial in humans demonstrated that TCR gene-modified T cells persisted for an extended time period and reduced tumor burden in some patients. The WT1 protein is an attractive target for immunotherapy of leukemia and solid cancer since elevated expression has been demonstrated in AML, CML, MDS and in breast, colon and ovarian cancer. In the past, we have isolated high avidity CTL specific for a WT1-derived peptide presented by HLA-A2 and cloned the TCR alpha and beta genes of a WT1-specific CTL line. The genes were inserted into retroviral vectors for transduction of human peripheral blood T lymphocytes of leukemia patients and normal donors. The treatment of leukemia-bearing NOD/SCID mice with T cells transduced with the WT1-specific TCR eliminated leukemia cells in the bone marrow of most mice, while treatment with T cells transduced with a TCR of irrelevant specificity did not diminish the leukemia burden. In order to improve the safety and efficacy of TCR gene therapy, we have developed lentiviral TCR gene transfer. In addition, we employed strategies to enhance TCR expression while avoiding TCR mis-pairing. It may be possible to generate dominant TCR constructs that can suppress the expression of the endogenous TCR on the surface of transduced T cells. The development of new TCR gene constructs holds great promise for the safe and effective delivery of TCR gene therapy for the treatment of malignancies. PMID:17855129

  7. CMV-Specific T-cells Generated From Naïve T-cells Recognize Atypical Epitopes And May Be Protective in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hanley, Patrick J.; Melenhorst, Jan J.; Nikiforow, Sarah; Scheinberg, Phillip; Blaney, James W.; Demmler-Harrison, Gail; Cruz, C. Russell; Lam, Sharon; Krance, Robert A.; Leung, Kathryn S.; Martinez, Caridad A.; Liu, Hao; Heslop, Helen E.; Rooney, Cliona M.; Shpall, Elizabeth J.; Barrett, A. John; Rodgers, John R.; Bollard, Catherine M.

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of adult-seropositive, cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific T-cells can effectively restore antiviral immunity after transplantation. Lack of CMV-specific memory T-cells in blood from CMV-seronegative adult and cord blood (CB) donors restricts the availability of donor-derived virus-specific T-cells for immunoprophylaxis. Here we demonstrate the feasibility of naïve-donor-derived CMV-specific T-cell therapy for transplant recipients. Primed naïve T-cells recognized only atypical epitopes and with a similar avidity to CMV-seropositive-derived T-cells recognizing typical epitopes, but T-cells from CMV-seropositive donors recognizing atypical epitopes had a lower avidity suggesting the loss of high-avidity T-cells over time. Clonotypic analysis revealed T-cells recognizing atypical CMVpp65 epitopes in the peripheral blood of recipients of CB grafts who did not develop CMV. T-cell receptors from atypical epitopes were most common in unmanipulated CB units explaining why these T-cells expanded. When infused to recipients, naïve donor-derived virus specific T-cells that recognized atypical epitopes were associated with prolonged periods of CMV-free survival and complete remission. PMID:25925682

  8. Adoptive immunotherapy with genetically engineered T cells: modification of the IgG1 Fc 'spacer' domain in the extracellular moiety of chimeric antigen receptors avoids 'off-target' activation and unintended initiation of an innate immune response.

    PubMed

    Hombach, A; Hombach, A A; Abken, H

    2010-10-01

    Chimeric antigen receptors (CARs, immunoreceptors) are frequently used to redirect T cells with pre-defined specificity, in particular towards tumour cells for use in adoptive immunotherapy of malignant diseases. Specific targeting is mediated by an extracellularly located antibody-derived binding domain, which is joined to the transmembrane and intracellular CD3ζ moiety for T-cell activation. Stable CAR expression in T cells, however, requires a spacer domain interposed between the binding and the transmembrane domain and which is commonly the constant IgG1 Fc domain. We here revealed that CARs with Fc spacer domain bind to IgG Fc gamma receptors (FcγRs), thereby unintentionally activating innate immune cells, including monocytes and natural killer (NK) cells, which consequently secrete high amounts of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Engineered T cells, on the other hand, are likewise activated by FcγR binding resulting in cytokine secretion and lysis of monocytes and NK cells independently of the redirected specificity. To reduce FcγR binding, we modified the spacer domain without affecting CAR expression and antigen binding. Engineered with the modified CAR, T cells are not activated in presence of FcγR(+) cells, thereby minimizing the risk of off-target activation while preserving their redirected targeting specificity.

  9. Inducible T-cell receptor expression in precursor T cells for leukemia control.

    PubMed

    Hoseini, S S; Hapke, M; Herbst, J; Wedekind, D; Baumann, R; Heinz, N; Schiedlmeier, B; Vignali, D A A; van den Brink, M R M; Schambach, A; Blazar, B R; Sauer, M G

    2015-07-01

    Co-transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells with those engineered to express leukemia-reactive T-cell receptors (TCRs) and differentiated ex vivo into precursor T cells (preTs) may reduce the risk of leukemia relapse. As expression of potentially self-(leukemia-) reactive TCRs will lead to negative selection or provoke autoimmunity upon thymic maturation, we investigated a novel concept whereby TCR expression set under the control of an inducible promoter would allow timely controlled TCR expression. After in vivo maturation and gene induction, preTs developed potent anti-leukemia effects. Engineered preTs provided protection even after repeated leukemia challenges by giving rise to effector and central memory cells. Importantly, adoptive transfer of TCR-transduced allogeneic preTs mediated anti-leukemia effect without evoking graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Earlier transgene induction forced CD8(+) T-cell development was required to obtain a mature T-cell subset of targeted specificity, allowed engineered T cells to efficiently pass positive selection and abrogated the endogenous T-cell repertoire. Later induction favored CD4 differentiation and failed to produce a leukemia-reactive population emphasizing the dominant role of positive selection. Taken together, we provide new functional insights for the employment of TCR-engineered precursor cells as a controllable immunotherapeutic modality with significant anti-leukemia activity.

  10. Inducible T-cell receptor expression in precursor T cells for leukemia control.

    PubMed

    Hoseini, S S; Hapke, M; Herbst, J; Wedekind, D; Baumann, R; Heinz, N; Schiedlmeier, B; Vignali, D A A; van den Brink, M R M; Schambach, A; Blazar, B R; Sauer, M G

    2015-07-01

    Co-transplantation of hematopoietic stem cells with those engineered to express leukemia-reactive T-cell receptors (TCRs) and differentiated ex vivo into precursor T cells (preTs) may reduce the risk of leukemia relapse. As expression of potentially self-(leukemia-) reactive TCRs will lead to negative selection or provoke autoimmunity upon thymic maturation, we investigated a novel concept whereby TCR expression set under the control of an inducible promoter would allow timely controlled TCR expression. After in vivo maturation and gene induction, preTs developed potent anti-leukemia effects. Engineered preTs provided protection even after repeated leukemia challenges by giving rise to effector and central memory cells. Importantly, adoptive transfer of TCR-transduced allogeneic preTs mediated anti-leukemia effect without evoking graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Earlier transgene induction forced CD8(+) T-cell development was required to obtain a mature T-cell subset of targeted specificity, allowed engineered T cells to efficiently pass positive selection and abrogated the endogenous T-cell repertoire. Later induction favored CD4 differentiation and failed to produce a leukemia-reactive population emphasizing the dominant role of positive selection. Taken together, we provide new functional insights for the employment of TCR-engineered precursor cells as a controllable immunotherapeutic modality with significant anti-leukemia activity. PMID:25652739

  11. Double-Negative αβ T Cells Are Early Responders to AKI and Are Found in Human Kidney.

    PubMed

    Martina, Maria N; Noel, Sanjeev; Saxena, Ankit; Bandapalle, Samatha; Majithia, Richa; Jie, Chunfa; Arend, Lois J; Allaf, Mohamad E; Rabb, Hamid; Hamad, Abdel Rahim A

    2016-04-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) is a major cause of AKI, and previous studies established important roles for conventional CD4(+) T cells, natural killer T cells, and CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) Tregs in AKI pathogenesis. We recently identified CD4(-)CD8(-) (double-negative; DN) T cells as an important subset of αβ T cell receptor-positive cells residing in mouse kidney. However, little is known about the pathophysiologic functions of kidney DN T cells. In this study, we phenotypically and functionally characterized murine kidney DN T cells in the steady state and in response to IRI. Unlike CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, DN T cells in the steady state expressed high levels of CD69, CD28, and CD40L; differentially expressed IL-27 and IL-10 anti-inflammatory cytokines; spontaneously proliferated at a very high rate; and suppressed in vitro proliferation of activated CD4(+) T cells. Within the first 3-24 hours after IRI, kidney DN T cells expanded significantly and upregulated expression of IL-10. In adoptive transfer experiments, DN T cells significantly protected recipients from AKI by an IL-10-dependent mechanism. DN T cells also made up a large fraction of the T cell compartment in human kidneys. Our results indicate that DN T cells are an important subset of the resident αβ(+) T cell population in the mammalian kidney and are early responders to AKI that have anti-inflammatory properties.

  12. T Cells Expressing Constitutively Active Akt Resist Multiple Tumor-associated Inhibitory Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jiali; Dotti, Gianpietro; Huye, Leslie E; Foster, Aaron E; Savoldo, Barbara; Gramatges, Maria M; Spencer, David M; Rooney, Cliona M

    2010-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes has shown promise for the therapy of cancer. However, tumor-specific T cells are susceptible to diverse inhibitory signals from the tumor microenvironment. The Akt/protein kinase B plays a central role in T-cell proliferation, function, and survival and we hypothesized that expression of constitutively active Akt (caAkt) in T cells could provide resistance to many of these tumor-associated inhibitory mechanisms. caAkt expression in activated human T cells increased proliferation and cytokine production, a likely result of their sustained expression of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) and provided resistance to apoptosis by upregulating antiapoptotic molecules. caAkt expressing T cells (caAkt-T-cells) were also relatively resistant to suppression by and conversion into regulatory T cells (Tregs). These characteristics provided a survival advantage to T cells cocultured with tumor cells in vitro; CD3/28-stimulated T cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) specific for disialoganglioside (GD2) that redirected their activity to the immunosuppressive, GD2-expressing neuroblastoma cell line, LAN-1, resisted tumor-induced apoptosis when co-expressing transgenic caAkt. In conclusion, caAkt-transduced T cells showed resistance to several evasion strategies employed by tumors and may therefore enhance the antitumor activity of adoptively transferred T lymphocytes. PMID:20842106

  13. [Adoptive transfer of immunity against Nippostrongylus brasiliensis in mice. In vitro restimulation of immune cells before their transfer].

    PubMed

    Rhalem, A; Bourdieu, C; Luffau, G; Péry, P

    1989-01-01

    When mesenteric lymph node cells from infected mice were stimulated during an in vitro culture with exoantigens or with a purified protective antigen of Nippostrongylus brasiliensis, a drop was noted in the number of cells required to transfer protection to new mice. A maximal effect was already obtained after 4 hrs. of culture, but irradiated cells or cells from another mouse strain were unable to mediate this transfer. T cells were more effective than B cells in transferring the protection.

  14. Cancer Therapeutic Based on T Cell Receptors Designed to Regiospecifically Release Interleukin-12 | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute's Surgery Branch is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research to further develop, evaluate, or commercialize a potential cancer therapeutic based on T cells genetically engineered to express the human interleukin 12 (IL-12) cytokine only in the tumor environment.

  15. The Evolution of T-cell Therapies for Solid Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Fousek, Kristen; Ahmed, Nabil

    2015-01-01

    Primary resistant, recurrent and relapsed solid tumors are often non-responsive to conventional anti-neoplastic therapies. Moreover, in responsive tumors, the therapeutic to toxic range of these interventions remains quite narrow, such that side effects of therapy are substantial. Targeted therapies, such as adoptive T cell transfer, not only spare normal tissues but also use alternative killing mechanisms to which the tumor cells are usually not immune. Adoptive T cell transfer for solid tumors faces unique challenges because of the inherent heterogeneity of tumor parenchyma, the complexity of the tumor microenvironment, and tumor occurrence in areas with limited therapeutic accessibility. In this review, we examine the recent evolution of various T cell-based immunotherapeutics, the mechanisms of action behind their antitumor activity, their increasing complexity, and the prospect of building on previous successes in the treatment of solid tumors. PMID:26240290

  16. Lymph node trafficking of regulatory T cells is prerequisite for immune suppression.

    PubMed

    Huang, Miao-Tzu; Lin, Been-Ren; Liu, Wei-Liang; Lu, Chun-Wei; Chiang, Bor-Luen

    2016-04-01

    Regulatory T cells have a crucial role in health and disease because of their immune regulation function. However, the anatomic sites where regulatory T cells exert optimal immune regulation are open to debate. In our current study with the use of a shear-stress flow assay, we found that regulatory T cells exhibited significantly decreased adhesion to either activated endothelial monolayer or intercellular adhesion molecule 1 or E-selectin-coated surfaces compared with activated effector T cells. The less transmigration capacity of the regulatory T cells prompted our speculation of preferential lymph node localization for the regulatory T cells that endowed these cells with immune regulation function in the most efficient manner. To test this hypothesis, the role of lymph node localization in regulatory T cell-mediated immune suppression was evaluated with a footpad inflammation model. We found that adoptively transferred regulatory T cells inhibited the development of footpad inflammation. In addition, although blockage of CCR7 or CD62L had no effect on the immune suppressive function of the regulatory T cells per se, pretreatment of the regulatory T cells with either CCR7 or CD62L blocking antibodies prevented their recruitment into draining lymph nodes and concomitantly abrogated the immune suppressive effects of adoptively transferred regulatory T cells during footpad inflammation. Our data demonstrate the crucial role of lymph node localization in regulatory T cell-mediated immune suppression and suggest a probable hierarchy in the anatomic sites for optimal immune regulation. Elucidating the relationships between the transmigration characteristics of the regulatory T cells and their immune regulation function will provide insightful information for regulatory T cell-based cell therapy. PMID:26543091

  17. Lymph node trafficking of regulatory T cells is prerequisite for immune suppression.

    PubMed

    Huang, Miao-Tzu; Lin, Been-Ren; Liu, Wei-Liang; Lu, Chun-Wei; Chiang, Bor-Luen

    2016-04-01

    Regulatory T cells have a crucial role in health and disease because of their immune regulation function. However, the anatomic sites where regulatory T cells exert optimal immune regulation are open to debate. In our current study with the use of a shear-stress flow assay, we found that regulatory T cells exhibited significantly decreased adhesion to either activated endothelial monolayer or intercellular adhesion molecule 1 or E-selectin-coated surfaces compared with activated effector T cells. The less transmigration capacity of the regulatory T cells prompted our speculation of preferential lymph node localization for the regulatory T cells that endowed these cells with immune regulation function in the most efficient manner. To test this hypothesis, the role of lymph node localization in regulatory T cell-mediated immune suppression was evaluated with a footpad inflammation model. We found that adoptively transferred regulatory T cells inhibited the development of footpad inflammation. In addition, although blockage of CCR7 or CD62L had no effect on the immune suppressive function of the regulatory T cells per se, pretreatment of the regulatory T cells with either CCR7 or CD62L blocking antibodies prevented their recruitment into draining lymph nodes and concomitantly abrogated the immune suppressive effects of adoptively transferred regulatory T cells during footpad inflammation. Our data demonstrate the crucial role of lymph node localization in regulatory T cell-mediated immune suppression and suggest a probable hierarchy in the anatomic sites for optimal immune regulation. Elucidating the relationships between the transmigration characteristics of the regulatory T cells and their immune regulation function will provide insightful information for regulatory T cell-based cell therapy.

  18. Immunosuppressive Effects of Erythropoietin on Human Alloreactive T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cravedi, Paolo; Manrique, Joaquin; Hanlon, Katherine E.; Reid-Adam, Jessica; Brody, Joshua; Prathuangsuk, Praeophayom; Mehrotra, Anita

    2014-01-01

    Correction of anemia with erythropoietin (EPO) is associated with improved kidney transplant outcomes. Emerging evidence, predominantly from animal models, indicates that these observations may be erythropoiesis-independent and that EPO exhibits immunosuppressive properties. We examined the effects of EPO on human T-cell alloimmunity by first documenting that CD4+ and CD8+ T cells express EPO receptor (EPO-R) on their surfaces. In mixed lymphocyte reactions, EPO induced a dose-dependent decrease in allogeneic CD4+ T-cell proliferation (EPO 1000 U/ml: 44.6%±22.9% of vehicle, P<0.05; 2000 U/ml: 11.1%±4% of vehicle, P<0.001) without inducing cell death. The effects required signals transmitted directly through the EPO-R expressed on T cells, resulting in diminished Th1 differentiation without effects on regulatory T-cell induction. Mechanistic studies revealed that EPO prevented IL-2–induced proliferation by uncoupling IL-2 receptor signaling, inhibiting phosphorylation of the intracellular intermediaries AKT and extracellular signal-regulated kinase that are known to mediate T-cell expansion. EPO treatment reduced expansion of human naïve CD4+ T cells after adoptive transfer into NOD scid γcnull mouse recipients, verifying the effects in vivo. Although activated T cells expressed CD131, an alternative EPO receptor, addition of a specific CD131 agonist peptide, ARA290, did not alter T-cell proliferation or cytokine production. Our findings link EPO-R signaling on T cells to inhibition of T-cell immunity, providing one mechanism that could explain the observed protective effects of EPO in kidney transplant recipients. PMID:24676641

  19. Immunosuppressive effects of erythropoietin on human alloreactive T cells.

    PubMed

    Cravedi, Paolo; Manrique, Joaquin; Hanlon, Katherine E; Reid-Adam, Jessica; Brody, Joshua; Prathuangsuk, Praeophayom; Mehrotra, Anita; Heeger, Peter S

    2014-09-01

    Correction of anemia with erythropoietin (EPO) is associated with improved kidney transplant outcomes. Emerging evidence, predominantly from animal models, indicates that these observations may be erythropoiesis-independent and that EPO exhibits immunosuppressive properties. We examined the effects of EPO on human T-cell alloimmunity by first documenting that CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells express EPO receptor (EPO-R) on their surfaces. In mixed lymphocyte reactions, EPO induced a dose-dependent decrease in allogeneic CD4(+) T-cell proliferation (EPO 1000 U/ml: 44.6%±22.9% of vehicle, P<0.05; 2000 U/ml: 11.1%±4% of vehicle, P<0.001) without inducing cell death. The effects required signals transmitted directly through the EPO-R expressed on T cells, resulting in diminished Th1 differentiation without effects on regulatory T-cell induction. Mechanistic studies revealed that EPO prevented IL-2-induced proliferation by uncoupling IL-2 receptor signaling, inhibiting phosphorylation of the intracellular intermediaries AKT and extracellular signal-regulated kinase that are known to mediate T-cell expansion. EPO treatment reduced expansion of human naïve CD4(+) T cells after adoptive transfer into NOD scid γc(null) mouse recipients, verifying the effects in vivo. Although activated T cells expressed CD131, an alternative EPO receptor, addition of a specific CD131 agonist peptide, ARA290, did not alter T-cell proliferation or cytokine production. Our findings link EPO-R signaling on T cells to inhibition of T-cell immunity, providing one mechanism that could explain the observed protective effects of EPO in kidney transplant recipients.

  20. Adoptive Transfer of Dendritic Cells Expressing Fas Ligand Modulates Intestinal Inflammation in a Model of Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    de Jesus, Edelmarie Rivera; Isidro, Raymond A; Cruz, Myrella L; Marty, Harry; Appleyard, Caroline B

    2016-01-01

    Background Inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) are chronic relapsing inflammatory conditions of unknown cause and likely result from the loss of immunological tolerance, which leads to over-activation of the gut immune system. Gut macrophages and dendritic cells (DCs) are essential for maintaining tolerance, but can also contribute to the inflammatory response in conditions such as IBD. Current therapies for IBD are limited by high costs and unwanted toxicities and side effects. The possibility of reducing intestinal inflammation with DCs genetically engineered to over-express the apoptosis-inducing FasL (FasL-DCs) has not yet been explored. Objective Investigate the immunomodulatory effect of administering FasL-DCs in the rat trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) model of acute colitis. Methods Expression of FasL on DCs isolated from the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) of normal and TNBS-colitis rats was determined by flow cytometry. Primary rat bone marrow DCs were transfected with rat FasL plasmid (FasL-DCs) or empty vector (EV-DCs). The effect of these DCs on T cell IFNγ secretion and apoptosis was determined by ELISPOT and flow cytometry for Annexin V, respectively. Rats received FasL-DCs or EV-DCs intraperitoneally 96 and 48 hours prior to colitis induction with TNBS. Colonic T cell and neutrophil infiltration was determined by immunohistochemistry for CD3 and myeloperoxidase activity assay, respectively. Macrophage number and phenotype was measured by double immunofluorescence for CD68 and inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase. Results MLN dendritic cells from normal rats expressed more FasL than those from colitic rats. Compared to EV-DCs, FasL-DCs reduced T cell IFNγ secretion and increased T cell apoptosis in vitro. Adoptive transfer of FasL-DCs decreased macroscopic and microscopic damage scores and reduced colonic T cells, neutrophils, and proinflammatory macrophages when compared to EV-DC adoptive transfer. Conclusion FasL-DCs are effective at treating colonic

  1. Antimicrobial peptides from amphibian skin potently inhibit human immunodeficiency virus infection and transfer of virus from dendritic cells to T cells.

    PubMed

    VanCompernolle, Scott E; Taylor, R Jeffery; Oswald-Richter, Kyra; Jiang, Jiyang; Youree, Bryan E; Bowie, John H; Tyler, Michael J; Conlon, J Michael; Wade, David; Aiken, Christopher; Dermody, Terence S; KewalRamani, Vineet N; Rollins-Smith, Louise A; Unutmaz, Derya

    2005-09-01

    Topical antimicrobicides hold great promise in reducing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) transmission. Amphibian skin provides a rich source of broad-spectrum antimicrobial peptides including some that have antiviral activity. We tested 14 peptides derived from diverse amphibian species for the capacity to inhibit HIV infection. Three peptides (caerin 1.1, caerin 1.9, and maculatin 1.1) completely inhibited HIV infection of T cells within minutes of exposure to virus at concentrations that were not toxic to target cells. These peptides also suppressed infection by murine leukemia virus but not by reovirus, a structurally unrelated nonenveloped virus. Preincubation with peptides prevented viral fusion to target cells and disrupted the HIV envelope. Remarkably, these amphibian peptides also were highly effective in inhibiting the transfer of HIV by dendritic cells (DCs) to T cells, even when DCs were transiently exposed to peptides 8 h after virus capture. These data suggest that amphibian-derived peptides can access DC-sequestered HIV and destroy the virus before it can be transferred to T cells. Thus, amphibian-derived antimicrobial peptides show promise as topical inhibitors of mucosal HIV transmission and provide novel tools to understand the complex biology of HIV capture by DCs.

  2. Production of IL-10 by CD4+ regulatory T cells during the resolution of infection promotes the maturation of memory CD8+ T cells

    PubMed Central

    Laidlaw, Brian J; Cui, Weiguo; Amezquita, Robert A; Gray, Simon M; Guan, Tianxia; Lu, Yisi; Kobayashi, Yasushi; Flavell, Richard A; Kleinstein, Steven H; Craft, Joe; Kaech, Susan M

    2016-01-01

    Memory CD8+ T cells are critical for host defense upon reexposure to intracellular pathogens. We found that interleukin 10 (IL-10) derived from CD4+ regulatory T cells (Treg cells) was necessary for the maturation of memory CD8+ T cells following acute infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). Treg cell–derived IL-10 was most important during the resolution phase, calming inflammation and the activation state of dendritic cells. Adoptive transfer of IL-10-sufficient Treg cells during the resolution phase ‘restored’ the maturation of memory CD8+ T cells in IL-10-deficient mice. Our data indicate that Treg cell–derived IL-10 is needed to insulate CD8+ T cells from inflammatory signals, and reveal that the resolution phase of infection is a critical period that influences the quality and function of developing memory CD8+ T cells. PMID:26147684

  3. Direct Toll-Like Receptor 8 signaling increases the functional avidity of human CD8+ T lymphocytes generated for adoptive T cell therapy strategies

    PubMed Central

    Chatillon, Jean-François; Hamieh, Mohamad; Bayeux, Florence; Abasq, Claire; Fauquembergue, Emilie; Drouet, Aurélie; Guisier, Florian; Latouche, Jean-Baptiste; Musette, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of in vitro activated and expanded antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) is a promising therapeutic strategy for infectious diseases and cancers. Obtaining in vitro a sufficient amount of highly specific cytotoxic cells and capable of retaining cytotoxic activity in vivo remains problematic. We studied the role of Toll-Like Receptor-8 (TLR8) engagement on peripheral CTLs activated with melanoma antigen MART-1-expressing artificial antigen-presenting cells (AAPCs). After a 3-week co-culture, 3–27% of specific CTLs were consistently obtained. CTLs expressed TLR8 in the intracellular compartment and at the cell surface. Specific CTLs activated with a TLR8 agonist (CL075) 24 h before the end of the culture displayed neither any change in their production levels of molecules involved in cytotoxicity (IFN-γ, Granzyme B, and TNF-α) nor major significant change in their cell surface phenotype. However, these TLR8-stimulated lymphocytes displayed increased cytotoxic activity against specific peptide-pulsed target cells related to an increase in specific anti-melanoma CTL functional avidity. TLR8 engagement on CTLs could, therefore, be useful in different immunotherapy strategies. PMID:25866635

  4. Direct Toll-Like Receptor 8 signaling increases the functional avidity of human CD8+ T lymphocytes generated for adoptive T cell therapy strategies.

    PubMed

    Chatillon, Jean-François; Hamieh, Mohamad; Bayeux, Florence; Abasq, Claire; Fauquembergue, Emilie; Drouet, Aurélie; Guisier, Florian; Latouche, Jean-Baptiste; Musette, Philippe

    2015-03-01

    Adoptive transfer of in vitro activated and expanded antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) is a promising therapeutic strategy for infectious diseases and cancers. Obtaining in vitro a sufficient amount of highly specific cytotoxic cells and capable of retaining cytotoxic activity in vivo remains problematic. We studied the role of Toll-Like Receptor-8 (TLR8) engagement on peripheral CTLs activated with melanoma antigen MART-1-expressing artificial antigen-presenting cells (AAPCs). After a 3-week co-culture, 3-27% of specific CTLs were consistently obtained. CTLs expressed TLR8 in the intracellular compartment and at the cell surface. Specific CTLs activated with a TLR8 agonist (CL075) 24 h before the end of the culture displayed neither any change in their production levels of molecules involved in cytotoxicity (IFN-γ, Granzyme B, and TNF-α) nor major significant change in their cell surface phenotype. However, these TLR8-stimulated lymphocytes displayed increased cytotoxic activity against specific peptide-pulsed target cells related to an increase in specific anti-melanoma CTL functional avidity. TLR8 engagement on CTLs could, therefore, be useful in different immunotherapy strategies. PMID:25866635

  5. Adoption

    MedlinePlus

    ... the birth nor adoptive parents know the others' identities. Other adoptions are handled more openly. Open adoptions, ... desire to seek out more information about the identity of the birth family. Most of us (whether ...

  6. Potential Limitations of the NSG Humanized Mouse as a Model System to Optimize Engineered Human T cell Therapy for Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Alcantar-Orozco, Erik M.; Gornall, Hannah; Baldan, Vania; Hawkins, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The genetic modification of peripheral blood lymphocytes using retroviral vectors to redirect T cells against tumor cells has been recently used as a means to generate large numbers of antigen-specific T cells for adoptive cell therapy protocols. However, commonly used retroviral vector-based genetic modification requires T cells to be driven into cell division; this potent mitogenic stimulus is associated with the development of an effector phenotype that may adversely impact upon the long-term engraftment potential and subsequent antitumor effects of T cells. To investigate whether the cytokines used during culture impact upon the engraftment potential of gene-modified T cells, a humanized model employing T cells engrafted with a MART-1-specific T cell receptor adoptively transferred into NOD/Shi-scid IL-2rγ−/− (NSG) immune-deficient mice bearing established melanoma tumors was used to compare the effects of the common γ chain cytokines IL-2, IL-7, and IL-15 upon gene-modified T cell activity. MART-1-specific T cells cultured in IL-7 and IL-15 demonstrated greater relative in vitro proliferation and viability of T cells compared with the extensively used IL-2. Moreover, the IL-15 culture prolonged the survival of animals bearing melanoma tumors after adoptive transfer. However, the combination of IL-7 and IL-15 produced T cells with improved engraftment potential compared with IL-15 alone; however, a high rate of xenogeneic graft-versus-host disease prevented the identification of a clear improvement in antitumor effect of these T cells. These results clearly demonstrate modulation of gene-modified T cell engraftment in the NSG mouse, which supports the future testing of the combination of IL-7 and IL-15 in adoptive cell therapy protocols; however, this improved engraftment is also associated with the long-term maintenance of xenoreactive T cells, which limits the ultimate usefulness of the NSG mouse model in this situation. PMID:23931270

  7. CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells reduce atherosclerosis in apoE(−/−) mice

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jianchang; Dimayuga, Paul C.; Zhao, Xiaoning; Yano, Juliana; Lio, Wai Man; Trinidad, Portia; Honjo, Tomoyuki; Cercek, Bojan; Shah, Prediman K.; Chyu, Kuang-Yuh

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •The role of a sub-population of CD8{sup +} T cells with suppressor functions was investigated in atherosclerosis. •CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells from adult apoE(−/−) mice had phenotype characteristics of T suppressor cells. •These CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells reduced CD4{sup +} T cell proliferation and CD8{sup +} cytotoxic activity in vitro. •Adoptive transfer of CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells significantly reduced atherosclerosis. •CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells have a suppressive function in atherosclerosis. -- Abstract: Background: It is increasingly evident that CD8{sup +} T cells are involved in atherosclerosis but the specific subtypes have yet to be defined. CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells exert suppressive effects on immune signaling and modulate experimental autoimmune disorders but their role in atherosclerosis remains to be determined. The phenotype and functional role of CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells in experimental atherosclerosis were investigated in this study. Methods and results: CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells were observed in atherosclerotic plaques of apoE(−/−) mice fed hypercholesterolemic diet. Characterization by flow cytometric analysis and functional evaluation using a CFSE-based proliferation assays revealed a suppressive phenotype and function of splenic CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells from apoE(−/−) mice. Depletion of CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} from total CD8{sup +} T cells rendered higher cytolytic activity of the remaining CD8{sup +}CD25{sup −} T cells. Adoptive transfer of CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells into apoE(−/−) mice suppressed the proliferation of splenic CD4{sup +} T cells and significantly reduced atherosclerosis in recipient mice. Conclusions: Our study has identified an athero-protective role for CD8{sup +}CD25{sup +} T cells in experimental atherosclerosis.

  8. Improved Personalized Cancer Immunotherapy: Rapid Selection of Tumor-Reactive T Cells based on Expression of Specific Cell Surface Markers | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute’s Surgery Branch seeks partners interested in collaborative research to co-develop adoptive transfer of tumor infiltrating leukocytes (TIL) for cancers other than melanoma.

  9. Clonal deletion of self-reactive T cells in irradiation bone marrow chimeras and neonatally tolerant mice. Evidence for intercellular transfer of Mlsa

    PubMed Central

    1989-01-01

    Tolerance to Mlsa has been shown to be associated with clonal deletion of cells carrying TCR beta chain variable regions V beta 6 or V beta 8.1 in mice possessing I-E antigens. To evaluate the rules of tolerance induction to Mlsa we prepared irradiation bone marrow chimeras expressing Mlsa or Mlsb and I-E by different cell types. Deletion of V beta 6+, Mlsa-reactive T cells required the presence of Mlsa and I-E products either on bone marrow-derived cells or on irradiated recipient cells. Tolerance was induced when Mlsa and I-E were expressed by distinct cells of the chimera. Also neonatally tolerized mice exhibited depletion of V beta 6+ cells after injection of I-E- Mlsa spleen cells (DBA/1) into newborn I-E+ Mlsb mice (BALB/c x B10.G)F1. These results suggest that the product of the Mlsa locus is soluble and/or may be transferred from cell to cell and bound to I-E antigens. The chimera experiments also showed that tolerance to Mlsa is H-2 allele independent, i.e., is apparently unrestricted. Differentiation of chimeric (H-2d/Mlsa x H-2q/Mlsb)F1 stem cells in either an H-2d or an H- 2q thymus revealed that tolerance assessed by absence of V beta 6+ T cells is not dependent on the thymically determined restriction specificity of T cells. PMID:2526850

  10. Alpha tumor necrosis factor contributes to CD8{sup +} T cell survival in the transition phase

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Meiqing; Ye, Zhenmin; Umeshappa, Keshav Sokke; Moyana, Terence; Xiang, Jim . E-mail: jxiang@scf.sk.ca

    2007-08-31

    Cytokine and costimulation signals determine CD8{sup +} T cell responses in proliferation phase. In this study, we assessed the potential effect of cytokines and costimulations to CD8{sup +} T cell survival in transition phase by transferring in vitro ovalbumin (OVA)-pulsed dendritic cell-activated CD8{sup +} T cells derived from OVA-specific T cell receptor transgenic OT I mice into wild-type C57BL/6 mice or mice with designated gene knockout. We found that deficiency of IL-10, IL-12, IFN-{gamma}, CD28, CD40, CD80, CD40L, and 41BBL in recipients did not affect CD8{sup +} T cell survival after adoptive transfer. In contrast, TNF-{alpha} deficiency in both recipients and donor CD8{sup +} effector T cells significantly reduced CD8{sup +} T cell survival. Therefore, our data demonstrate that the host- and T cell-derived TNF-{alpha} signaling contributes to CD8{sup +} effector T cell survival and their transition to memory T cells in the transition phase, and may be useful information when designing vaccination.

  11. Peptide p277 of HSP60 signals T cells: inhibition of inflammatory chemotaxis.

    PubMed

    Nussbaum, Gabriel; Zanin-Zhorov, Alexandra; Quintana, Francisco; Lider, Ofer; Cohen, Irun R

    2006-10-01

    Peptide p277 is a 24-amino acid fragment of the heat shock protein 60 molecule, first discovered to be an antigen for diabetogenic T-cell clones in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. Therapeutic vaccination with p277 can arrest the spontaneous diabetogenic process both in NOD mice and in humans associated with a T(h)1 to T(h)2 cytokine shift specific for the autoimmune T cells. We now report that p277 can directly signal human T cells via innate toll-like receptor (TLR)-2, leading to up-regulation of integrin-mediated adhesion to fibronectin, and inhibition of chemotaxis to the chemokine SDF-1alpha in vitro. Resting CD45RA(+) T cells responded to lower concentrations of p277 than resting CD45RO(+) T cells, but activation of CD45RO(+) T cells greatly increased their sensitivity to p277. Mouse T cells, but not macrophages, were also sensitive to the innate effects of peptide p277, and adoptive transfer of diabetes by splenic T cells from NOD mice could be inhibited by p277 treatment before transfer. Thus, T cells do respond innately to p277, and signaling by soluble p277 through TLR2 could contribute to the treatment of type 1 diabetes; p277 may stop the destruction of beta cells by signaling in concert both innate and adaptive receptors on T cells. PMID:16893923

  12. Molecular profiling of CD8 T cells in autochthonous melanoma identifies Maf as driver of exhaustion

    PubMed Central

    Giordano, Marilyn; Henin, Coralie; Maurizio, Julien; Imbratta, Claire; Bourdely, Pierre; Buferne, Michel; Baitsch, Lukas; Vanhille, Laurent; Sieweke, Michael H; Speiser, Daniel E; Auphan-Anezin, Nathalie; Schmitt-Verhulst, Anne-Marie; Verdeil, Grégory

    2015-01-01

    T cells infiltrating neoplasms express surface molecules typical of chronically virus-stimulated T cells, often termed “exhausted” T cells. We compared the transcriptome of “exhausted” CD8 T cells infiltrating autochthonous melanomas to those of naïve and acutely stimulated CD8 T cells. Despite strong similarities between transcriptional signatures of tumor- and virus-induced exhausted CD8 T cells, notable differences appeared. Among transcriptional regulators, Nr4a2 and Maf were highly overexpressed in tumor-exhausted T cells and significantly upregulated in CD8 T cells from human melanoma metastases. Transduction of murine tumor-specific CD8 T cells to express Maf partially reproduced the transcriptional program associated with tumor-induced exhaustion. Upon adoptive transfer, the transduced cells showed normal homeostasis but failed to accumulate in tumor-bearing hosts and developed defective anti-tumor effector responses. We further identified TGFβ and IL-6 as main inducers of Maf expression in CD8 T cells and showed that Maf-deleted tumor-specific CD8 T cells were much more potent to restrain tumor growth in vivo. Therefore, the melanoma microenvironment contributes to skewing of CD8 T cell differentiation programs, in part by TGFβ/IL-6-mediated induction of Maf. PMID:26139534

  13. Allogeneic Splenocyte Transfer and Lipopolysaccharide Inhalations Induce Differential T Cell Expansion and Lung Injury: A Novel Model of Pulmonary Graft-versus-Host Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jesse; Kelly, Francine L.; Nelson, Margaret E.; Garantziotis, Stavros; Foster, W. Michael; Palmer, Scott M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Pulmonary GVHD (pGVHD) is an important complication of hematopoietic cell transplant (HCT) and is thought to be a consequence of the HCT conditioning regimen, allogeneic donor cells, and posttransplant lung exposures. We have previously demonstrated that serial inhaled lipopolysaccharide (LPS) exposures potentiate the development of pGVHD after murine allogeneic HCT. In the current study we hypothesized that allogeneic lymphocytes and environmental exposures alone, in the absence of a pre-conditioning regimen, would cause features of pGVHD and would lead to a different T cell expansion pattern compared to syngeneic cells. Methods Recipient Rag1−/− mice received a transfer of allogeneic (Allo) or syngeneic (Syn) spleen cells. After 1 week of immune reconstitution, mice received 5 daily inhaled LPS exposures and were sacrificed 72 hours after the last LPS exposure. Lung physiology, histology, and protein levels in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) were assessed. Lung cells were analyzed by flow cytometry. Results Both Allo and Syn mice that undergo LPS exposures (AlloLPS and SynLPS) have prominent lymphocytic inflammation in their lungs, resembling pGVHD pathology, not seen in LPS-unexposed or non-transplanted controls. Compared to SynLPS, however, AlloLPS have significantly increased levels of BAL protein and enhancement of airway hyperreactivity, consistent with more severe lung injury. This injury in AlloLPS mice is associated with an increase in CD8 T cells and effector CD4 T cells, as well as a decrease in regulatory to effector CD4 T cell ratio. Additionally, cytokine analysis is consistent with a preferential Th1 differentiation and upregulation of pulmonary CCL5 and granzyme B. Conclusions Allogeneic lymphocyte transfer into lymphocyte-deficient mice, followed by LPS exposures, causes features of pGVHD and lung injury in the absence of a pre-conditioning HCT regimen. This lung disease associated with an expansion of allogeneic effector T cells

  14. T-Cell-Based Immunotherapy for Osteosarcoma: Challenges and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhan; Li, Binghao; Ren, Yingqing; Ye, Zhaoming

    2016-01-01

    Even though combining surgery with chemotherapy has significantly improved the prognosis of osteosarcoma patients, advanced, metastatic, or recurrent osteosarcomas are often non-responsive to chemotherapy, making development of novel efficient therapeutic methods an urgent need. Adoptive immunotherapy has the potential to be a useful non-surgical modality for treatment of osteosarcoma. Recently, alternative strategies, including immunotherapies using naturally occurring or genetically modified T cells, have been found to hold promise in the treatment of hematologic malignancies and solid tumors. In this review, we will discuss possible T-cell-based therapies against osteosarcoma with a special emphasis on combination strategies to improve the effectiveness of adoptive T cell transfer and, thus, to provide a rationale for the clinical development of immunotherapies.

  15. T-Cell-Based Immunotherapy for Osteosarcoma: Challenges and Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhan; Li, Binghao; Ren, Yingqing; Ye, Zhaoming

    2016-01-01

    Even though combining surgery with chemotherapy has significantly improved the prognosis of osteosarcoma patients, advanced, metastatic, or recurrent osteosarcomas are often non-responsive to chemotherapy, making development of novel efficient therapeutic methods an urgent need. Adoptive immunotherapy has the potential to be a useful non-surgical modality for treatment of osteosarcoma. Recently, alternative strategies, including immunotherapies using naturally occurring or genetically modified T cells, have been found to hold promise in the treatment of hematologic malignancies and solid tumors. In this review, we will discuss possible T-cell-based therapies against osteosarcoma with a special emphasis on combination strategies to improve the effectiveness of adoptive T cell transfer and, thus, to provide a rationale for the clinical development of immunotherapies. PMID:27683579

  16. Evaluation of the Therapeutic Potential of Bone Marrow-Derived Myeloid Suppressor Cell (MDSC) Adoptive Transfer in Mouse Models of Autoimmunity and Allograft Rejection

    PubMed Central

    Bouchet-Delbos, Laurence; Beriou, Gaelle; Merieau, Emmanuel; Hill, Marcelo; Delneste, Yves; Cuturi, Maria Cristina; Louvet, Cedric

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic use of immunoregulatory cells represents a promising approach for the treatment of uncontrolled immunity. During the last decade, myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) have emerged as novel key regulatory players in the context of tumor growth, inflammation, transplantation or autoimmunity. Recently, MDSC have been successfully generated in vitro from naive mouse bone marrow cells or healthy human PBMCs using minimal cytokine combinations. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the potential of adoptive transfer of such cells to control auto- and allo-immunity in the mouse. Culture of bone marrow cells with GM-CSF and IL-6 consistently yielded a majority of CD11b+Gr1hi/lo cells exhibiting strong inhibition of CD8+ T cell proliferation in vitro. However, adoptive transfer of these cells failed to alter antigen-specific CD8+ T cell proliferation and cytotoxicity in vivo. Furthermore, MDSC could not prevent the development of autoimmunity in a stringent model of type 1 diabetes. Rather, loading the cells prior to injection with a pancreatic neo-antigen peptide accelerated the development of the disease. Contrastingly, in a model of skin transplantation, repeated injection of MDSC or single injection of LPS-activated MDSC resulted in a significant prolongation of allograft survival. The beneficial effect of MDSC infusions on skin graft survival was paradoxically not explained by a decrease of donor-specific T cell response but associated with a systemic over-activation of T cells and antigen presenting cells, prominently in the spleen. Taken together, our results indicate that in vitro generated MDSC bear therapeutic potential but will require additional in vitro factors or adjunct immunosuppressive treatments to achieve safe and more robust immunomodulation upon adoptive transfer. PMID:24927018

  17. Blimp-1-mediated CD4 T cell exhaustion causes CD8 T cell dysfunction during chronic toxoplasmosis.

    PubMed

    Hwang, SuJin; Cobb, Dustin A; Bhadra, Rajarshi; Youngblood, Ben; Khan, Imtiaz A

    2016-08-22

    CD8, but not CD4, T cells are considered critical for control of chronic toxoplasmosis. Although CD8 exhaustion has been previously reported in Toxoplasma encephalitis (TE)-susceptible model, our current work demonstrates that CD4 not only become exhausted during chronic toxoplasmosis but this dysfunction is more pronounced than CD8 T cells. Exhausted CD4 population expressed elevated levels of multiple inhibitory receptors concomitant with the reduced functionality and up-regulation of Blimp-1, a transcription factor. Our data demonstrates for the first time that Blimp-1 is a critical regulator for CD4 T cell exhaustion especially in the CD4 central memory cell subset. Using a tamoxifen-dependent conditional Blimp-1 knockout mixed bone marrow chimera as well as an adoptive transfer approach, we show that CD4 T cell-intrinsic deletion of Blimp-1 reversed CD8 T cell dysfunction and resulted in improved pathogen control. To the best of our knowledge, this is a novel finding, which demonstrates the role of Blimp-1 as a critical regulator of CD4 dysfunction and links it to the CD8 T cell dysfunctionality observed in infected mice. The critical role of CD4-intrinsic Blimp-1 expression in mediating CD4 and CD8 T cell exhaustion may provide a rational basis for designing novel therapeutic approaches. PMID:27481131

  18. T-cell count

    MedlinePlus

    Thymus derived lymphocyte count; T-lymphocyte count; T cell count ... T cells are a type of lymphocyte. Lymphocytes are white blood cells. They make up part of the immune system. T cells help the body fight diseases or harmful ...

  19. Chronic activation of the kinase IKKβ impairs T cell function and survival

    PubMed Central

    Krishna, Sruti; Xie, Danli; Gorentla, Balachandra; Shin, Jinwook; Gao, Jimin; Zhong, Xiao-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Activation of the transcription factor NF-κB is critical for cytokine production and T cell survival after T cell receptor (TCR) engagement. The effects of persistent NF-κB activity on T cell function and survival are poorly understood. In this study, using a murine model that expresses a constitutively active form of inhibitor of κB kinase β(caIKKβ) in a T-cell specific manner, we demonstrate that chronic IKKβ signaling promotes T cell apoptosis, attenuates responsiveness to TCR-mediated stimulation in vitro, and impairs T cell responses to bacterial infection in vivo. CaIKKβ T cells showed increased FasL expression and caspase-8 activation, and blocking Fas/FasL interactions enhanced cell survival. T cell unresponsiveness was associated with defects in TCR proximal signaling, and elevated levels of Blimp1, a transcriptional repressor that promotes T cell exhaustion. CaIKKβ T cells also showed a defect in IL-2 production, and addition of exogenous IL-2 enhanced their survival and proliferation. Conditional deletion of Blimp1 partially rescued sensitivity of caIKKβ T cells to TCR triggering. Furthermore, adoptively transferred caIKKβ T cells showed diminished expansion and increased contraction in response to infection with Listeria monocytogenes expressing a cognate antigen. Despite their functional defects, caIKKβ T cells readily produced pro-inflammatory cytokines and mice developed autoimmunity. In contrast to NF-κB's critical role in T cell activation and survival, our study demonstrates that persistent IKK-NF-κB signaling is sufficient to impair both T cell function and survival. PMID:22753932

  20. The impact of regulatory T cells on T-cell immunity following hematopoietic cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Vu H.; Shashidhar, Sumana; Chang, Daisy S.; Ho, Lena; Kambham, Neeraja; Bachmann, Michael; Brown, Janice M.

    2008-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) prevent graft-versus-host disease (GvHD) by inhibiting the proliferation and function of conventional T cells (Tcons). However, the impact of Tregs on T-cell development and immunity following hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) is unknown. Using a murine GvHD model induced by Tcons, we demonstrate that adoptive transfer of Tregs leads to (1) abrogration of GvHD, (2) preservation of thymic and peripheral lymph node architecture, and (3) an accelerated donor lymphoid reconstitution of a diverse TCR-Vβ repertoire. The resultant enhanced lymphoid reconstitution in Treg recipients protects them from lethal cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection. By contrast, mice that receive Tcons alone have disrupted lymphoid organs from GvHD and remain lymphopenic with a restricted TCR-Vβ repertoire and rapid death on MCMV challenge. Lymphocytes from previously infected Treg recipients generate secondary response specific to MCMV, indicating long-term protective immunity with transferred Tregs. Thymectomy significantly reduces survival after MCMV challenge in Treg recipients compared with euthymic controls. Our results indicate that Tregs enhance immune reconstitution by preventing GvHD-induced damage of the thymic and secondary lymphoid microenvironment. These findings provide new insights into the role of Tregs in affording protection to lymphoid stromal elements important for T-cell immunity. PMID:17916743

  1. A Multidrug-resistant Engineered CAR T Cell for Allogeneic Combination Immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Valton, Julien; Guyot, Valérie; Marechal, Alan; Filhol, Jean-Marie; Juillerat, Alexandre; Duclert, Aymeric; Duchateau, Philippe; Poirot, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell represents a highly promising strategy to fight against multiple cancers. The clinical outcome of such therapies is intimately linked to the ability of effector cells to engraft, proliferate, and specifically kill tumor cells within patients. When allogeneic CAR T-cell infusion is considered, host versus graft and graft versus host reactions must be avoided to prevent rejection of adoptively transferred cells, host tissue damages and to elicit significant antitumoral outcome. This work proposes to address these three requirements through the development of multidrug-resistant T cell receptor αβ-deficient CAR T cells. We demonstrate that these engineered T cells displayed efficient antitumor activity and proliferated in the presence of purine and pyrimidine nucleoside analogues, currently used in clinic as preconditioning lymphodepleting regimens. The absence of TCRαβ at their cell surface along with their purine nucleotide analogues-resistance properties could prevent their alloreactivity and enable them to resist to lymphodepleting regimens that may be required to avoid their ablation via HvG reaction. By providing a basic framework to develop a universal T cell compatible with allogeneic adoptive transfer, this work is laying the foundation stone of the large-scale utilization of CAR T-cell immunotherapies. PMID:26061646

  2. Inclusion of Strep-tag II in design of antigen receptors for T-cell immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lingfeng; Sommermeyer, Daniel; Cabanov, Alexandra; Kosasih, Paula; Hill, Tyler; Riddell, Stanley R

    2016-04-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy with genetically engineered T cells has the potential to treat cancer and other diseases. The introduction of Strep-tag II sequences into specific sites in synthetic chimeric antigen receptors or natural T-cell receptors of diverse specificities provides engineered T cells with a marker for identification and rapid purification, a method for tailoring spacer length of chimeric receptors for optimal function, and a functional element for selective antibody-coated, microbead-driven, large-scale expansion. These receptor designs facilitate cGMP manufacturing of pure populations of engineered T cells for adoptive T-cell therapies and enable in vivo tracking and retrieval of transferred cells for downstream research applications.

  3. Lack of p53 Augments Antitumor Functions in Cytolytic T Cells.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Anirban; Thyagarajan, Krishnamurthy; Chatterjee, Shilpak; Chakraborty, Paramita; Kesarwani, Pravin; Soloshchenko, Myroslawa; Al-Hommrani, Mazen; Andrijauskaite, Kristina; Moxley, Kelly; Janakiraman, Harinarayanan; Scheffel, Matthew J; Helke, Kristi; Armenson, Kent; Palanisamy, Viswanathan; Rubinstein, Mark P; Mayer, Elizabeth-Garrett; Cole, David J; Paulos, Chrystal M; Voelkel-Johnson, Christina; Nishimura, Michael I; Mehrotra, Shikhar

    2016-09-15

    Repetitive stimulation of T-cell receptor (TCR) with cognate antigen results in robust proliferation and expansion of the T cells, and also imprints them with replicative senescence signatures. Our previous studies have shown that life-span and antitumor function of T cells can be enhanced by inhibiting reactive oxygen species (ROS) or intervening with ROS-dependent JNK activation that leads to its activation-induced cell death. Because tumor suppressor protein p53 is also a redox active transcription factor that regulates cellular ROS generation that triggers downstream factor-mediating apoptosis, we determined if p53 levels could influence persistence and function of tumor-reactive T cells. Using h3T TCR transgenic mice, with human tyrosinase epitope-reactive T cells developed on p53 knockout (KO) background, we determined its role in regulating antitumor T-cell function. Our data show that as compared with h3T cells, h3T-p53 KO T cells exhibited enhanced glycolytic commitment that correlated with increased proliferation, IFNγ secretion, cytolytic capacity, expression of stemness gene signature, and decreased TGF-β signaling. This increased effector function correlated to the improved control of subcutaneously established murine melanoma after adoptive transfer of p53-KO T cells. Pharmacological inhibition of human TCR-transduced T cells using a combination of p53 inhibitors also potentiated the T-cell effector function and improved persistence. Thus, our data highlight the key role of p53 in regulating the tumor-reactive T-cell response and that targeting this pathway could have potential translational significance in adoptive T-cell therapy. Cancer Res; 76(18); 5229-40. ©2016 AACR.

  4. Extending the lifespan and efficacies of immune cells used in adoptive transfer for cancer immunotherapies–A review

    PubMed Central

    Nayar, Sandeep; Dasgupta, Prokar; Galustian, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Cells used in adoptive cell-transfer immunotherapies against cancer include dendritic cells (DCs), natural-killer cells, and CD8+ T-cells. These cells may have limited efficacy due to their lifespan, activity, and immunosuppressive effects of tumor cells. Therefore, increasing longevity and activity of these cells may boost their efficacy. Four cytokines that can extend immune effector-cell longevity are IL-2, IL-7, IL-21, and IL-15. This review will discuss current knowledge on effector-cell lifespans and the mechanisms by which IL-2, IL-7, IL-15, and IL-21 can extend effector-cell longevity. We will also discuss how lifespan and efficacy of these cells can be regulated to allow optimal clinical benefits. PMID:26155387

  5. Toward immunotherapy with redirected T cells in a large animal model: ex vivo activation, expansion, and genetic modification of canine T cells.

    PubMed

    Mata, Melinda; Vera, Juan F; Gerken, Claudia; Rooney, Cliona M; Miller, Tasha; Pfent, Catherine; Wang, Lisa L; Wilson-Robles, Heather M; Gottschalk, Stephen

    2014-10-01

    Adoptive transfer of T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) has shown promising antitumor activity in early phase clinical studies, especially for hematological malignancies. However, most preclinical models do not reliably mimic human disease. We reasoned that developing an adoptive T-cell therapy approach for spontaneous osteosarcoma (OS) occurring in dogs would more closely reproduce the condition in human cancer. To generate CAR-expressing canine T cells, we developed expansion and transduction protocols that allow for the generation of sufficient numbers of CAR-expressing canine T cells for future clinical studies in dogs within 2 weeks of ex vivo culture. To evaluate the functionality of CAR-expressing canine T cells, we targeted HER2(+) OS. We demonstrate that canine OS is positive for HER2, and that canine T cells expressing a HER2-specific CAR with human-derived transmembrane and CD28.ζ signaling domains recognize and kill HER2(+) canine OS cell lines in an antigen-dependent manner. To reduce the potential immunogenicity of the CAR, we evaluated a CAR with canine-derived transmembrane and signaling domains, and found no functional difference between human and canine CARs. Hence, we have successfully developed a strategy to generate CAR-expressing canine T cells for future preclinical studies in dogs. Testing T-cell therapies in an immunocompetent, outbred animal model may improve our ability to predict their safety and efficacy before conducting studies in humans.

  6. Increased competition for antigen during priming negatively impacts the generation of memory CD4 T cells

    PubMed Central

    Blair, David A.; Lefrançois, Leo

    2007-01-01

    The factors involved in the differentiation of memory CD4 T cells from naïve precursors are poorly understood. We developed a system to examine the effect of increased competition for antigen by CD4 T cells on the generation of memory in response to infection with a recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus. Competition was initially regulated by increasing the precursor frequency of adoptively transferred naïve T cell antigen receptor transgenic CD4 T cells. Despite robust proliferation at high precursor frequencies, memory CD4 T cells did not develop, whereas decreasing the input number of naïve CD4 T cells promoted memory development after infection. The lack of memory development was linked to reduced blastogenesis and poor effector cell induction, but not to initial recruitment or proliferation of antigen-specific CD4 T cells. To prove that availability of antigen alone could regulate memory CD4 T cell development, we used treatment with an mAb specific for the epitope recognized by the transferred CD4 T cells. At high doses, this mAb effectively inhibited the antigen-specific CD4 T cell response. However, at a very low dose of mAb, primary CD4 T cell expansion was unaffected, although memory development was dramatically reduced. Moreover, the induction of effector function was concomitantly inhibited. Thus, competition for antigen during CD4 T cell priming is a major contributing factor to the development of the memory CD4 T cell pool. PMID:17827281

  7. PD-1 expression conditions T cell avidity within an antigen-specific repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Sylvain; Vignard, Virginie; Florenceau, Laetitia; Dreno, B.; Khammari, A.; Lang, F.; Labarriere, N.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Despite its negative regulatory role on tumor-specific T cells, Programmed cell death 1 (PD-1) is also a marker of activated tumor-infiltrating T cells. In cancer, PD-1 blockade partially reverses T cell dysfunction allowing the amplification of tumor reactive T cells. Here, we investigated the role of PD-1 signaling on effector/memory human T cells specific for shared melanoma antigens, derived from blood. We documented for the first time the existence of melanoma-specific T cell clones unable to express PD-1. This stable feature was due to the persistent methylation of the PDCD1 promoter. These PD-1neg clones were of lower avidity than their PD-1pos counterparts, suggesting that high-affinity-specific T cell clones unable to express PD-1 are not or rarely present in peripheral blood, as they are probably eliminated by negative selection, due to their high reactivity. We also documented the existence of such PD-1neg T cell clones in melanoma tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TIL), which also exhibited a lower functional avidity than PD-1pos TIL clones. This clearly shows that PD-1 expression identifies antigen-specific T cell clonotypes of high functional avidity. Finally, we demonstrated that PD-1 blockade during the in vitro selection process of Melan-A-specific T cells favored the amplification of higher avidity T cell clonotypes. This preferential amplification of high-avidity memory T cells upon PD-1 blockade resonates with the expansion of reactive T cells, including neo-antigen-specific T cells observed in anti-PD-1-treated patients. This feature should also be a useful biomarker of clinical efficiency, while providing new insights for adoptive transfer treatments. PMID:26942093

  8. γδ T Cells Confer Protection against Murine Cytomegalovirus (MCMV)

    PubMed Central

    Villacreces, Arnaud; Juzan, Marina; Rousseau, Benoît; Dulanto, Sara; Giese, Alban; Costet, Pierre; Praloran, Vincent; Moreau, Jean-François; Dubus, Pierre; Vermijlen, David

    2015-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a leading infectious cause of morbidity in immune-compromised patients. γδ T cells have been involved in the response to CMV but their role in protection has not been firmly established and their dependency on other lymphocytes has not been addressed. Using C57BL/6 αβ and/or γδ T cell-deficient mice, we here show that γδ T cells are as competent as αβ T cells to protect mice from CMV-induced death. γδ T cell-mediated protection involved control of viral load and prevented organ damage. γδ T cell recovery by bone marrow transplant or adoptive transfer experiments rescued CD3ε−/− mice from CMV-induced death confirming the protective antiviral role of γδ T cells. As observed in humans, different γδ T cell subsets were induced upon CMV challenge, which differentiated into effector memory cells. This response was observed in the liver and lungs and implicated both CD27+ and CD27− γδ T cells. NK cells were the largely preponderant producers of IFNγ and cytotoxic granules throughout the infection, suggesting that the protective role of γδ T cells did not principally rely on either of these two functions. Finally, γδ T cells were strikingly sufficient to fully protect Rag−/−γc−/− mice from death, demonstrating that they can act in the absence of B and NK cells. Altogether our results uncover an autonomous protective antiviral function of γδ T cells, and open new perspectives for the characterization of a non classical mode of action which should foster the design of new γδ T cell based therapies, especially useful in αβ T cell compromised patients. PMID:25747674

  9. γδ T cells confer protection against murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV).

    PubMed

    Khairallah, Camille; Netzer, Sonia; Villacreces, Arnaud; Juzan, Marina; Rousseau, Benoît; Dulanto, Sara; Giese, Alban; Costet, Pierre; Praloran, Vincent; Moreau, Jean-François; Dubus, Pierre; Vermijlen, David; Déchanet-Merville, Julie; Capone, Myriam

    2015-03-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a leading infectious cause of morbidity in immune-compromised patients. γδ T cells have been involved in the response to CMV but their role in protection has not been firmly established and their dependency on other lymphocytes has not been addressed. Using C57BL/6 αβ and/or γδ T cell-deficient mice, we here show that γδ T cells are as competent as αβ T cells to protect mice from CMV-induced death. γδ T cell-mediated protection involved control of viral load and prevented organ damage. γδ T cell recovery by bone marrow transplant or adoptive transfer experiments rescued CD3ε-/- mice from CMV-induced death confirming the protective antiviral role of γδ T cells. As observed in humans, different γδ T cell subsets were induced upon CMV challenge, which differentiated into effector memory cells. This response was observed in the liver and lungs and implicated both CD27+ and CD27- γδ T cells. NK cells were the largely preponderant producers of IFNγ and cytotoxic granules throughout the infection, suggesting that the protective role of γδ T cells did not principally rely on either of these two functions. Finally, γδ T cells were strikingly sufficient to fully protect Rag-/-γc-/- mice from death, demonstrating that they can act in the absence of B and NK cells. Altogether our results uncover an autonomous protective antiviral function of γδ T cells, and open new perspectives for the characterization of a non classical mode of action which should foster the design of new γδ T cell based therapies, especially useful in αβ T cell compromised patients.

  10. T cytotoxic-1 CD8+ T cells are effector cells against pneumocystis in mice.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Florencia; Mc Allister, Florencia; Steele, Chad; Zheng, Mingquan; Young, Erana; Shellito, Judd E; Marrero, Luis; Kolls, Jay K

    2004-01-15

    Host defenses are profoundly compromised in HIV-infected hosts due to progressive depletion of CD4+ T lymphocytes. A hallmark of HIV infection is Pneumocystis carinii (PC) pneumonia. Recently, CD8+ T cells, which are recruited to the lung in large numbers in response to PC infection, have been associated with some level of host defense as well as contributing to lung injury in BALB/c mice. In this study, we show that CD8+ T cells that have a T cytotoxic-1 response to PC in BALB/c mice, as determined by secretion of IFN-gamma, have in vitro killing activity against PC and effect clearance of the organism in adoptive transfer studies. Moreover, non-T cytotoxic-1 CD8+ T cells lacked in vitro effector activity and contributed to lung injury upon adoptive transfer. This dichotomous response in CD8+ T cell response may in part explain the clinical heterogeneity in the severity of PC pneumonia.

  11. IFT20 controls LAT recruitment to the immune synapse and T-cell activation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Vivar, Omar I; Masi, Giulia; Carpier, Jean-Marie; Magalhaes, Joao G; Galgano, Donatella; Pazour, Gregory J; Amigorena, Sebastian; Hivroz, Claire; Baldari, Cosima T

    2016-01-12

    Biogenesis of the immune synapse at the interface between antigen-presenting cells and T cells assembles and organizes a large number of membrane proteins required for effective signaling through the T-cell receptor. We showed previously that the intraflagellar transport protein 20 (IFT20), a component of the intraflagellar transport system, controls polarized traffic during immune synapse assembly. To investigate the role of IFT20 in primary CD4(+) T cells in vitro and in vivo, we generated mice bearing a conditional defect of IFT20 expression in T cells. We show that in the absence of IFT20, although cell spreading and the polarization of the centrosome were unaffected, T-cell receptor (TCR)-mediated signaling and recruitment of the signaling adaptor LAT (linker for activation of T cells) at the immune synapse were reduced. As a consequence, CD4(+) T-cell activation and proliferation were also defective. In vivo, conditional IFT20-deficient mice failed to mount effective antigen-specific T-cell responses, and their T cells failed to induce colitis after adoptive transfer to Rag(-/-) mice. IFT20 is therefore required for the delivery of the intracellular pool of LAT to the immune synapse in naive primary T lymphocytes and for effective T-cell responses in vivo. PMID:26715756

  12. IFT20 controls LAT recruitment to the immune synapse and T-cell activation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Vivar, Omar I.; Masi, Giulia; Carpier, Jean-Marie; Magalhaes, Joao G.; Galgano, Donatella; Pazour, Gregory J.; Amigorena, Sebastian; Hivroz, Claire; Baldari, Cosima T.

    2016-01-01

    Biogenesis of the immune synapse at the interface between antigen-presenting cells and T cells assembles and organizes a large number of membrane proteins required for effective signaling through the T-cell receptor. We showed previously that the intraflagellar transport protein 20 (IFT20), a component of the intraflagellar transport system, controls polarized traffic during immune synapse assembly. To investigate the role of IFT20 in primary CD4+ T cells in vitro and in vivo, we generated mice bearing a conditional defect of IFT20 expression in T cells. We show that in the absence of IFT20, although cell spreading and the polarization of the centrosome were unaffected, T-cell receptor (TCR)-mediated signaling and recruitment of the signaling adaptor LAT (linker for activation of T cells) at the immune synapse were reduced. As a consequence, CD4+ T-cell activation and proliferation were also defective. In vivo, conditional IFT20-deficient mice failed to mount effective antigen-specific T-cell responses, and their T cells failed to induce colitis after adoptive transfer to Rag−/− mice. IFT20 is therefore required for the delivery of the intracellular pool of LAT to the immune synapse in naive primary T lymphocytes and for effective T-cell responses in vivo. PMID:26715756

  13. Ex vivo culture of chimeric antigen receptor T cells generates functional CD8+ T cells with effector and central memory-like phenotype.

    PubMed

    Neeson, P; Shin, A; Tainton, K M; Guru, P; Prince, H M; Harrison, S J; Peinert, S; Smyth, M J; Trapani, J A; Kershaw, M H; Darcy, P K; Ritchie, D S

    2010-09-01

    The anti-tumor efficacy of adoptively transferred T cells requires their in vivo persistence and memory polarization. It is unknown if human chimeric antigen receptor (CAR)-expressing T cells can also undergo memory polarization. We examined the functional status of CAR CD8(+) T cells, re-directed to Lewis Y antigen (LeY-T), throughout a period of ex vivo expansion. Immediately before culture CD8(+) T cells comprised a mixture of phenotypes including naive (CD45RA(+)/CCR7(+)/CD27(+)/CD28(+)/perforin-), central memory (CM, CD45RA(-)/CCR7(lo)/CD27(+)/CD28(+)/perforin(lo)), effector memory (EM, CD45RA(-)/CCR7(-)/CD27(+)/CD28(+)/perforin(mod)) and effector (Eff, CD45RA(+)/CCR7(-)/CD27(-)/CD28(-)/perforin(hi)) cells. After transduction and expansion culture of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from normal donors or multiple myeloma patients, CD8(+) LeY-T cells polarized to EM- and CM-like phenotype. CD8(+) LeY-T cells differed from starting CD8(+) CM and EM T cells in that CD27, but not CD28, was downregulated. In addition, CD8(+) LeY-T cells expressed high levels of perforin, similar to starting CD8(+) Eff. CD8(+) LeY-T cells also showed hallmarks of both memory and Eff function, underwent homeostatic proliferation in response to interleukin (IL)-15, and showed interferon (IFN)-γ production and cytotoxicity in response to Le-Y antigen on OVCAR-3 (human ovarian adenocarcinoma) cells. This study confirms CD8(+) LeY-T cells have a CM- and EM-like phenotype and heterogeneous function consistent with potential to persist in vivo after adoptive transfer.

  14. Successful induction of severe destructive arthritis by the transfer of in vitro-activated synovial fluid T cells from patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice.

    PubMed

    Sakata, A; Sakata, K; Ping, H; Ohmura, T; Tsukano, M; Kakimoto, K

    1996-05-01

    In order to investigate the role of pathogenic T cells in RA, the establishment of an RA model using patients' T cells is thought to be essential. In this study, multiple and severe destructive arthritis was established by transferring in vitro-stimulated synovial fluid T (SFT) cells from patients with RA through simultaneous injection into knee joint and peritoneal cavity of SCID mice without causing xenogeneic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Neither the transfer of unstimulated SFT cells nor sole i.p. injection was sufficient to induce severe arthritis. Interestingly, in contrast with SFT cells, in vitro-activated peripheral blood lymphocytes from RA patients failed to trigger such arthritis, suggesting that pathogenic T cells might be concentrated in synovial fluid of RA patients. This, the first severe arthritis model mimicking RA induced by RA patients' T cells, is expected to provide important information about RA pathogenesis and a possible therapeutic approach.

  15. Regulating functional cell fates in CD8 T cells

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Rajesh; Li, Qingsheng; Kesterson, Joshua; Eppolito, Cheryl; Mischo, Axel; Singhal, Pankaj

    2016-01-01

    The attributes of specificity and memory enable CD8+ T cells to provide long-lasting protection against a variety of challenges. Although, the importance of CD8+ T cells for protection against intracellular infections and transformation is well-established, the functional type; effector phenotypes (Tc1, Tc2, Tc17 and/or Tcreg) and/or memory (effector or central), of CD8+ T cells most desirable for tumor immunity is not established. To determine the tumor efficacy of various effector types and/or memory CD8 T cells, it is imperative to better understand intrinsic and extrinsic factors that regulate CD8+ T cell differentiation and use this information to generate and test distinct functional cell types in tumor models. The focus of our laboratory investigations is to identify the extrinsic factors such as antigen strength, co-stimulatory molecules, cytokines, and small molecule modifiers that regulate intrinsic programs for various effector and/or memory cell fate in antigen specific CD8 T cells. The use of this information to generate immunity in murine tumor models has facilitated development of new adoptive cell transfer (ACT) as well as immunization strategies for cancer treatment. PMID:19859830

  16. Depletion of CD25⁺ T cells from hematopoietic stem cell grafts increases posttransplantation vaccine-induced immunity to neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Jing, Weiqing; Yan, Xiaocai; Hallett, William H D; Gershan, Jill A; Johnson, Bryon D

    2011-06-23

    A multifaceted immunotherapeutic strategy that includes hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) transplantation, T-cell adoptive transfer, and tumor vaccination can effectively eliminate established neuroblastoma tumors in mice. In vivo depletion of CD4⁺ T cells in HSC transplantation recipients results in increased antitumor immunity when adoptively transferred T cells are presensitized, but development of T-cell memory is severely compromised. Because increased percentages of regulatory T (Treg) cells are seen in HSC transplantation recipients, here we hypothesized that the inhibitory effect of CD4⁺ T cells is primarily because of the presence of expanded Treg cells. Remarkably, adoptive transfer of presensitized CD25-depleted T cells increased tumor vaccine efficacy. The enhanced antitumor effect achieved by ex vivo depletion of CD25⁺ Treg cells was similar to that achieved by in vivo depletion of all CD4⁺ T cells. Depletion of CD25⁺ Treg cells resulted in elevated frequencies of tumor-reactive CD8 and CD4⁺ T cells and increased CD8-to-Treg cell ratios inside tumor masses. All mice given presensitized CD25-depleted T cells survived a tumor rechallenge, indicating the development of long-term CD8⁺ T-cell memory to tumor antigens. These observations should aid in the future design of immunotherapeutic approaches that promote the generation of both acute and long-term antitumor immunity.

  17. Peptide-β2-microglobulin-major histocompatibility complex expressing cells are potent antigen-presenting cells that can generate specific T cells

    PubMed Central

    Obermann, Sonja; Petrykowska, Susanne; Manns, Michael P; Korangy, Firouzeh; Greten, Tim F

    2007-01-01

    Adoptive T-cell therapy represents a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of cancer. Successful adoptive immunotherapy depends on the ex vivo priming and expansion of antigen-specific T cells. However, the in vitro generation of adequate numbers of functional antigen-specific T cell remains a major obstacle. It is important to develop efficient and reproducible methods to generate high numbers of antigen-specific T cells for adoptive T-cell transfer. We have developed a new artificial antigen-presenting cell (aAPC) by transfection of major histocompatibility (MHC) class I negative Daudi cells with a peptide-β2-microglobulin–MHC fusion construct (single-chain aAPC) ensuring presentation of the peptide–MHC complex of interest. Using this artificial antigen-presenting cell, we could generate up to 9·2 × 108 antigen-specific cytotoxic CD8+ T cells from 10 ml blood. In vitro generated T cells lysed endogenously presented antigens. Direct comparison of the single-chain aAPC with autologous monocyte-derived dendritic cells demonstrated that these cells were equally efficient in stimulation of T cells. Finally, we were able to generate antigen-specific T cell lines from perpheral blood mononuclear cells of patients receiving cytotoxic chemotherapy. The use of single-chain aAPC represent a promising option for the generation of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells, which could be used for adoptive T-cell therapy. PMID:17472719

  18. Peptide-beta2-microglobulin-major histocompatibility complex expressing cells are potent antigen-presenting cells that can generate specific T cells.

    PubMed

    Obermann, Sonja; Petrykowska, Susanne; Manns, Michael P; Korangy, Firouzeh; Greten, Tim F

    2007-09-01

    Adoptive T-cell therapy represents a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of cancer. Successful adoptive immunotherapy depends on the ex vivo priming and expansion of antigen-specific T cells. However, the in vitro generation of adequate numbers of functional antigen-specific T cell remains a major obstacle. It is important to develop efficient and reproducible methods to generate high numbers of antigen-specific T cells for adoptive T-cell transfer. We have developed a new artificial antigen-presenting cell (aAPC) by transfection of major histocompatibility (MHC) class I negative Daudi cells with a peptide-beta2-microglobulin-MHC fusion construct (single-chain aAPC) ensuring presentation of the peptide-MHC complex of interest. Using this artificial antigen-presenting cell, we could generate up to 9.2 x 10(8) antigen-specific cytotoxic CD8(+) T cells from 10 ml blood. In vitro generated T cells lysed endogenously presented antigens. Direct comparison of the single-chain aAPC with autologous monocyte-derived dendritic cells demonstrated that these cells were equally efficient in stimulation of T cells. Finally, we were able to generate antigen-specific T cell lines from perpheral blood mononuclear cells of patients receiving cytotoxic chemotherapy. The use of single-chain aAPC represent a promising option for the generation of antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells, which could be used for adoptive T-cell therapy.

  19. A murine model for genetic manipulation of the T cell compartment.

    PubMed

    Gu, J; Kuo, M L; Rivera, A; Sutkowski, N; Ron, Y; Dougherty, J P

    1996-10-01

    The expression of exogenous genes in long-lived primary T cells is potentially beneficial for the treatment of various diseases including cancer, AIDS, genetic defects of the lymphoid compartment, and systemic enzyme deficiencies such as hemophilia. One approach for genetic modification of T cells is to introduce therapeutic genes into hematopoietic stem cells that would give rise to cells of the lymphoid lineage. Efficient gene transfer and expression in stem cells is often problematic, however. A more direct approach is to introduce the genes into mature primary T lymphocytes since the transferred genes can be maintained and expressed for long periods by long-lived peripheral T cells. In this report, we describe the adoptive transfer into SCID mice of both murine and human primary T cells that have been efficiently transduced with exogenous genes. Primary murine T cells transduced with a retroviral vector containing the human adenosine deaminase (ADA) gene persisted for at least 5 months in lymphoid organs of SCID mice, continuously expressing the exogenous gene. Primary human T cells were also used as target cells for transfer of the beta-galactosidase (lacZ) gene. Expression of the lacZ gene could be detected in over 20% of the transduced primary T cells before adoptive transfer into SCID mice. Transduced human T cells were injected into SCID mice intraperitoneally (ip), and the beta-galactosidase activity could be detected in cells collected from peritoneal exudate washes of recipient mice 6 weeks post-injection. These results demonstrate the availability of a murine model in which the long-term effects of expression of exogenous genes in both murine and human T cells can be tested. PMID:8913290

  20. A novel differentiation pathway from CD4+ T cells to CD4− T cells for maintaining immune system homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, X; Sun, G; Sun, X; Tian, D; Liu, K; Liu, T; Cong, M; Xu, H; Li, X; Shi, W; Tian, Y; Yao, J; Guo, H; Zhang, D

    2016-01-01

    CD4+ T lymphocytes are key players in the adaptive immune system and can differentiate into a variety of effector and regulatory T cells. Here, we provide evidence that a novel differentiation pathway of CD4+ T cells shifts the balance from a destructive T-cell response to one that favors regulation in an immune-mediated liver injury model. Peripheral CD4−CD8−NK1.1− double-negative T cells (DNT) was increased following Concanavalin A administration in mice. Adoptive transfer of DNT led to significant protection from hepatocyte necrosis by direct inhibition on the activation of lymphocytes, a process that occurred primarily through the perforin-granzyme B route. These DNT converted from CD4+ rather than CD8+ T cells, a process primarily regulated by OX40. DNT migrated to the liver through the CXCR3-CXCL9/CXCL10 interaction. In conclusion, we elucidated a novel differentiation pathway from activated CD4+ T cells to regulatory DNT cells for maintaining homeostasis of the immune system in vivo, and provided key evidence that utilizing this novel differentiation pathway has potential application in the prevention and treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:27077809

  1. Functional attributes of responding T cells in HCV infection: the recent advances in engineering functional antiviral T cells.

    PubMed

    Pasetto, Anna; Aleman, Soo; Chen, Margaret

    2014-02-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is one of the major causes of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) around the world. HCV promotes characteristics of cancer stem cells and the infected cells are insensitive to apoptotic signals, which lead to persistent antigen stimulation and T cell exhaustion in the host. In spite of new effective antiviral drugs, new challenges are around the corner as drug-resistant viral strains and drug-drug interactions have already been reported. Considering that there are few effective treatments available for HCC, novel immunotherapies to prevent HCC and late stage HCV-related liver diseases should be considered. Given that adoptive immunotherapy with antigen-specific T lymphocytes has emerged as an effective therapeutic strategy for combating cancer, there is, therefore, reason to examine the possibility of using highly functional HCV-reactive T cells in immunotherapy. This review aims to provide the current understanding of natural HCV responding T cells in HCV infection and to give an update on the novel approaches that have the capacity to ex vivo generate functional T cells for potential adoptive cell therapy. Approaches based on the pMHC tetramer-associated magnetic enrichment, exogenous HCV T cell receptor transfer, and induced pluripotent stem cell technologies are described herein. Their potentials as immunotherapeutic against HCV-related diseases are discussed.

  2. The human application of gene therapy to re-program T-cell specificity using chimeric antigen receptors

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Alan D; Moyes, Judy S; Cooper, Laurence JN

    2014-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of T cells is a promising approach to treat cancers. Primary human T cells can be modified using viral and non-viral vectors to promote the specific targeting of cancer cells via the introduction of exogenous T-cell receptors (TCRs) or chimeric antigen receptors (CARs). This gene transfer displays the potential to increase the specificity and potency of the anticancer response while decreasing the systemic adverse effects that arise from conventional treatments that target both cancerous and healthy cells. This review highlights the generation of clinical-grade T cells expressing CARs for immunotherapy, the use of these cells to target B-cell malignancies and, particularly, the first clinical trials deploying the Sleeping Beauty gene transfer system, which engineers T cells to target CD19+ leukemia and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. PMID:25189715

  3. TLR2 engagement on CD4(+) T cells enhances effector functions and protective responses to Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Reba, Scott M; Li, Qing; Onwuzulike, Sophia; Ding, Xuedong; Karim, Ahmad F; Hernandez, Yeritza; Fulton, Scott A; Harding, Clifford V; Lancioni, Christina L; Nagy, Nancy; Rodriguez, Myriam E; Wearsch, Pamela A; Rojas, Roxana E

    2014-05-01

    We have previously demonstrated that mycobacterial lipoproteins engage TLR2 on human CD4(+) T cells and upregulate TCR-triggered IFN-γ secretion and cell proliferation in vitro. Here we examined the role of CD4(+) T-cell-expressed TLR2 in Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) Ag-specific T-cell priming and in protection against MTB infection in vivo. Like their human counterparts, mouse CD4(+) T cells express TLR2 and respond to TLR2 costimulation in vitro. This Th1-like response was observed in the context of both polyclonal and Ag-specific TCR stimulation. To evaluate the role of T-cell TLR2 in priming of CD4(+) T cells in vivo, naive MTB Ag85B-specific TCR transgenic CD4(+) T cells (P25 TCR-Tg) were adoptively transferred into Tlr2(-/-) recipient C57BL/6 mice that were then immunized with Ag85B and with or without TLR2 ligand Pam3 Cys-SKKKK. TLR2 engagement during priming resulted in increased numbers of IFN-γ-secreting P25 TCR-Tg T cells 1 week after immunization. P25 TCR-Tg T cells stimulated in vitro via TCR and TLR2 conferred more protection than T cells stimulated via TCR alone when adoptively transferred before MTB infection. Our findings indicate that TLR2 engagement on CD4(+) T cells increases MTB Ag-specific responses and may contribute to protection against MTB infection.

  4. Adoptive transfer of helminth antigen-pulsed dendritic cells protects against the development of experimental colitis in mice.

    PubMed

    Matisz, Chelsea E; Leung, Gabriella; Reyes, Jose Luis; Wang, Arthur; Sharkey, Keith A; McKay, Derek M

    2015-11-01

    Infection with helminth parasites and treatment with worm extracts can suppress inflammatory disease, including colitis. Postulating that dendritic cells (DCs) participated in the suppression of inflammation and seeking to move beyond the use of helminths per se, we tested the ability of Hymenolepis diminuta antigen-pulsed DCs to suppress colitis as a novel cell-based immunotherapy. Bone marrow derived DCs pulsed with H. diminuta antigen (HD-DCs), or PBS-, BSA-, or LPS-DCs as controls, were transferred into wild-type (WT), interleukin-10 (IL-10) knock-out (KO), and RAG-1 KO mice, and the impact on dinitrobenzene sulphonic acid (DNBS)-induced colitis and splenic cytokine production assessed 72 h later. Mice receiving HD-DCs were significantly protected from DNBS-induced colitis and of the experimental groups only these mice displayed increased Th2 cytokines and IL-10 production. Adoptive transfer of HD-DCs protected neither RAG-1 nor IL-10 KO mice from DNBS-colitis. Furthermore, the transfer of CD4(+) splenocytes from recipients of HD-DCs protected naïve mice against DNBS-colitis, in an IL-10 dependent manner. Thus, HD-DCs are a novel anti-colitic immunotherapy that can educate anti-colitic CD4(+) T cells: mechanistically, the anti-colitic effect of HD-DCs requires that the host has an adaptive immune response and the ability to mobilize IL-10.

  5. Tumor lysing genetically engineered T cells loaded with multi-modal imaging agents.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Parijat; Alauddin, Mian; Bankson, James A; Kirui, Dickson; Seifi, Payam; Huls, Helen; Lee, Dean A; Babakhani, Aydin; Ferrari, Mauro; Li, King C; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2014-03-28

    Genetically-modified T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) exert anti-tumor effect by identifying tumor-associated antigen (TAA), independent of major histocompatibility complex. For maximal efficacy and safety of adoptively transferred cells, imaging their biodistribution is critical. This will determine if cells home to the tumor and assist in moderating cell dose. Here, T cells are modified to express CAR. An efficient, non-toxic process with potential for cGMP compliance is developed for loading high cell number with multi-modal (PET-MRI) contrast agents (Super Paramagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles - Copper-64; SPION-(64)Cu). This can now be potentially used for (64)Cu-based whole-body PET to detect T cell accumulation region with high-sensitivity, followed by SPION-based MRI of these regions for high-resolution anatomically correlated images of T cells. CD19-specific-CAR(+)SPION(pos) T cells effectively target in vitro CD19(+) lymphoma.

  6. Tumor Lysing Genetically Engineered T Cells Loaded with Multi-Modal Imaging Agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatnagar, Parijat; Alauddin, Mian; Bankson, James A.; Kirui, Dickson; Seifi, Payam; Huls, Helen; Lee, Dean A.; Babakhani, Aydin; Ferrari, Mauro; Li, King C.; Cooper, Laurence J. N.

    2014-03-01

    Genetically-modified T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) exert anti-tumor effect by identifying tumor-associated antigen (TAA), independent of major histocompatibility complex. For maximal efficacy and safety of adoptively transferred cells, imaging their biodistribution is critical. This will determine if cells home to the tumor and assist in moderating cell dose. Here, T cells are modified to express CAR. An efficient, non-toxic process with potential for cGMP compliance is developed for loading high cell number with multi-modal (PET-MRI) contrast agents (Super Paramagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles - Copper-64; SPION-64Cu). This can now be potentially used for 64Cu-based whole-body PET to detect T cell accumulation region with high-sensitivity, followed by SPION-based MRI of these regions for high-resolution anatomically correlated images of T cells. CD19-specific-CAR+SPIONpos T cells effectively target in vitro CD19+ lymphoma.

  7. A novel T cell receptor single-chain signaling complex mediates antigen-specific T cell activity and tumor control

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Jennifer D.; Harris, Daniel T.; Soto, Carolina M.; Chervin, Adam S.; Aggen, David H.; Roy, Edward J.; Kranz, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of genetically modified T cells to treat cancer has shown promise in several clinical trials. Two main strategies have been applied to redirect T cells against cancer: 1) introduction of a full-length T cell receptor (TCR) specific for a tumor-associated peptide-MHC, or 2) introduction of a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR), including an antibody fragment specific for a tumor cell surface antigen, linked intracellularly to T cell signaling domains. Each strategy has advantages and disadvantages for clinical applications. Here, we present data on the in vitro and in vivo effectiveness of a single-chain signaling receptor incorporating a TCR variable fragment as the targeting element (referred to as TCR-SCS). This receptor contained a single-chain TCR (Vβ-linker-Vα) from a high-affinity TCR called m33, linked to the intracellular signaling domains of CD28 and CD3ζ. This format avoided mispairing with endogenous TCR chains, and mediated specific T cell activity when expressed in either CD4 or CD8 T cells. TCR-SCS-transduced CD8-negative cells showed an intriguing sensitivity, compared to full-length TCRs, to higher densities of less stable pepMHC targets. T cells that expressed this peptide-specific receptor persisted in vivo, and exhibited polyfunctional responses. Growth of metastatic antigen-positive tumors was significantly inhibited by T cells that expressed this receptor, and tumor cells that escaped were antigen loss variants. TCR-SCS receptors represent an alternative targeting receptor strategy that combines the advantages of single-chain expression, avoidance of TCR chain mispairing, and targeting of intracellular antigens presented in complex with MHC proteins. PMID:25082071

  8. De novo recruitment of antigen-experienced and naïve T cells contributes to the long term maintenance of anti-viral T cell populations in the persistently infected CNS

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jingxian; Zhao, Jincun; Perlman, Stanley

    2010-01-01

    Mice infected with attenuated strains of mouse hepatitis virus, strain JHM develop a chronic infection in the brain and spinal cord characterized by low levels of viral antigen persistence and retention of virus-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells at the site of infection. It is not known whether these cells are maintained by proliferation of T cells that entered the CNS during acute infection or are newly recruited from antigen-experienced or naïve T cell pools. Here, using adoptive transfer experiments and bone marrow chimeras, we show that at least some of these cells are recruited from the periphery, predominantly from the viral antigen-experienced T cell pool. Both virus-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells are functional, as assessed by cytokine expression and degranulation after peptide exposure. In addition, populations of virus-specific CD4 T cells undergo dynamic changes in the infected CNS, as previously shown for CD8 T cells, since ratios of cells responding to two CD4 T cell epitopes change by a factor of 5 during the course of persistence. Collectively, these results show that maintenance of T cell responses in the virus-infected CNS is a dynamic process. Further, virus-specific T cell numbers at this site of infection are maintained by recruitment from peripheral antigen-experienced and naïve T cell pools. PMID:19786545

  9. Arthritis protective regulatory potential of self–heat shock protein cross-reactive T cells

    PubMed Central

    van Eden, Willem; Wendling, Uwe; Paul, Liesbeth; Prakken, Berent; van Kooten, Peter; van der Zee, Ruurd

    2000-01-01

    Immunization with heat shock proteins has protective effects in models of induced arthritis. Analysis has shown a reduced synovial inflammation in such protected animals. Adoptive transfer and immunization with selected T cell epitopes (synthetic peptides) have indicated the protection to be mediated by T cells directed to conserved hsp epitopes. This was shown first for mycobacterial hsp60 and later for mycobacterial hsp70. Fine specificity analysis showed that such T cells were cross-reactive with the homologous self hsp. Therefore protection by microbial hsp reactive T cells can be by cross-recognition of self hsp overexpressed in the inflamed tissue. Preimmunization with hsp leads to a relative expansion of such self hsp cross-responsive T cells. The regulatory nature of such T cells may originate from mucosal tolerance maintained by commensal flora derived hsp or from partial activation through recognition of self hsp as a partial agonist (Altered Peptide Ligand) or in the absence of proper costimulation. Recently, we reported the selective upregulation of B7.2 on microbial hsp60 specific T cells in response to self hsp60. Through a preferred interaction with CTLA-4 on proinflammatory T cells this may constitute an effector mechanism of regulation. Also, regulatory T cells produced IL10. PMID:11189451

  10. Kindlin-3 regulates integrin activation and adhesion reinforcement of effector T cells.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Federico A; Moser, Markus; Lyck, Ruth; Abadier, Michael; Ruppert, Raphael; Engelhardt, Britta; Fässler, Reinhard

    2013-10-15

    Activated T cells use very late antigen-4/α4β1 integrin for capture, rolling on, and firm adhesion to endothelial cells, and use leukocyte function-associated antigen-1/αLβ2 integrin for subsequent crawling and extravasation. Inhibition of α4β1 is sufficient to prevent extravasation of activated T cells and is successfully used to combat autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis. Here we show that effector T cells lacking the integrin activator Kindlin-3 extravasate and induce experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in mice immunized with autoantigen. In sharp contrast, adoptively transferred autoreactive T cells from Kindlin-3-deficient mice fail to extravasate into the naïve CNS. Mechanistically, autoreactive Kindlin-3-null T cells extravasate when the CNS is inflamed and the brain microvasculature expresses high levels of integrin ligands. Flow chamber assays under physiological shear conditions confirmed that Kindlin-3-null effector T cells adhere to high concentrations of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1, albeit less efficiently than WT T cells. Although these arrested T cells polarize and start crawling, only few remain firmly adherent over time. Our data demonstrate that the requirement of Kindlin-3 for effector T cells to induce α4β1 and αLβ2 integrin ligand binding and stabilization of integrin-ligand bonds is critical when integrin ligand levels are low, but of less importance when integrin ligand levels are high. PMID:24089451

  11. Foxp3(+) T cells expressing RORγt represent a stable regulatory T-cell effector lineage with enhanced suppressive capacity during intestinal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Yang, B-H; Hagemann, S; Mamareli, P; Lauer, U; Hoffmann, U; Beckstette, M; Föhse, L; Prinz, I; Pezoldt, J; Suerbaum, S; Sparwasser, T; Hamann, A; Floess, S; Huehn, J; Lochner, M

    2016-03-01

    Foxp3 (forkhead box P3 transcription factor)-expressing regulatory T cells (Tregs) are essential for immunological tolerance, best illustrated by uncontrolled effector T-cell responses and autoimmunity upon loss of Foxp3 expression. Tregs can adopt specific effector phenotypes upon activation, reflecting the diversity of functional demands in the different tissues of the body. Here, we report that Foxp3(+)CD4(+) T cells coexpressing retinoic acid-related orphan receptor-γt (RORγt), the master transcription factor for T helper type 17 (Th17) cells, represent a stable effector Treg lineage. Transcriptomic and epigenetic profiling revealed that Foxp3(+)RORγt(+) T cells display signatures of both Tregs and Th17 cells, although the degree of similarity was higher to Foxp3(+)RORγt(-) Tregs than to Foxp3(-)RORγt(+) T cells. Importantly, Foxp3(+)RORγt(+) T cells were significantly demethylated at Treg-specific epigenetic signature genes such as Foxp3, Ctla-4, Gitr, Eos, and Helios, suggesting that these cells have a stable regulatory rather than inflammatory function. Indeed, adoptive transfer of Foxp3(+)RORγt(+) T cells in the T-cell transfer colitis model confirmed their Treg function and lineage stability in vivo, and revealed an enhanced suppressive capacity as compared with Foxp3(+)RORγt(-) Tregs. Thus, our data suggest that RORγt expression in Tregs contributes to an optimal suppressive capacity during gut-specific immune responses, rendering Foxp3(+)RORγt(+) T cells as an important effector Treg subset in the intestinal system. PMID:26307665

  12. Enhancing B- and T-Cell Immune Response to a Hepatitis C Virus E2 DNA Vaccine by Intramuscular Electrical Gene Transfer

    PubMed Central

    Zucchelli, Silvia; Capone, Stefania; Fattori, Elena; Folgori, Antonella; Di Marco, Annalise; Casimiro, Danilo; Simon, Adam J.; Laufer, Ralph; La Monica, Nicola; Cortese, Riccardo; Nicosia, Alfredo

    2000-01-01

    We describe an improved genetic immunization strategy for eliciting a full spectrum of anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) envelope 2 (E2) glycoprotein responses in mammals through electrical gene transfer (EGT) of plasmid DNA into muscle fibers. Intramuscular injection of a plasmid encoding a cross-reactive hypervariable region 1 (HVR1) peptide mimic fused at the N terminus of the E2 ectodomain, followed by electrical stimulation treatment in the form of high-frequency, low-voltage electric pulses, induced more than 10-fold-higher expression levels in the transfected mouse tissue. As a result of this substantial increment of in vivo antigen production, the humoral response induced in mice, rats, and rabbits ranged from 10- to 30-fold higher than that induced by conventional naked DNA immunization. Consequently, immune sera from EGT-treated mice displayed a broader cross-reactivity against HVR1 variants from natural isolates than sera from injected animals that were not subjected to electrical stimulation. Cellular response against E2 epitopes specific for helper and cytotoxic T cells was significantly improved by EGT. The EGT-mediated enhancement of humoral and cellular immunity is antigen independent, since comparable increases in antibody response against ciliary neurotrophic factor or in specific anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gag CD8+ T cells were obtained in rats and mice. Thus, the method described potentially provides a safe, low-cost treatment that may be scaled up to humans and may hold the key for future development of prophylactic or therapeutic vaccines against HCV and other infectious diseases. PMID:11090158

  13. Safety of targeting ROR1 in primates with chimeric antigen receptor-modified T cells.

    PubMed

    Berger, Carolina; Sommermeyer, Daniel; Hudecek, Michael; Berger, Michael; Balakrishnan, Ashwini; Paszkiewicz, Paulina J; Kosasih, Paula L; Rader, Christoph; Riddell, Stanley R

    2015-02-01

    Genetic engineering of T cells for adoptive transfer by introducing a tumor-targeting chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) is a new approach to cancer immunotherapy. A challenge for the field is to define cell surface molecules that are both preferentially expressed on tumor cells and can be safely targeted with T cells. The orphan tyrosine kinase receptor ROR1 is a candidate target for T-cell therapy with CAR-modified T cells (CAR-T cells) because it is expressed on the surface of many lymphatic and epithelial malignancies and has a putative role in tumor cell survival. The cell surface isoform of ROR1 is expressed in embryogenesis but absent in adult tissues except for B-cell precursors and low levels of transcripts in adipocytes, pancreas, and lung. ROR1 is highly conserved between humans and macaques and has a similar pattern of tissue expression. To determine if low-level ROR1 expression on normal cells would result in toxicity or adversely affect CAR-T cell survival and/or function, we adoptively transferred autologous ROR1 CAR-T cells into nonhuman primates. ROR1 CAR-T cells did not cause overt toxicity to normal organs and accumulated in bone marrow and lymph node sites, where ROR1-positive B cells were present. The findings support the clinical evaluation of ROR1 CAR-T cells for ROR1(+) malignancies and demonstrate the utility of nonhuman primates for evaluating the safety of immunotherapy with engineered T cells specific for tumor-associated molecules that are homologous between humans and nonhuman primates.

  14. IL-7 signaling imparts polyfunctionality and stemness potential to CD4(+) T cells.

    PubMed

    Ding, Zhi-Chun; Liu, Chufeng; Cao, Yang; Habtetsion, Tsadik; Kuczma, Michal; Pi, Wenhu; Kong, Heng; Cacan, Ercan; Greer, Susanna F; Cui, Yan; Blazar, Bruce R; Munn, David H; Zhou, Gang

    2016-06-01

    The functional status of CD4(+) T cells is a critical determinant of antitumor immunity. Polyfunctional CD4(+) T cells possess the ability to concomitantly produce multiple Th1-type cytokines, exhibiting a functional attribute desirable for cancer immunotherapy. However, the mechanisms by which these cells are induced are neither defined nor it is clear if these cells can be used therapeutically to treat cancer. Here, we report that CD4(+) T cells exposed to exogenous IL-7 during antigenic stimulation can acquire a polyfunctional phenotype, characterized by their ability to simultaneously express IFNγ, IL-2, TNFα and granzyme B. This IL-7-driven polyfunctional phenotype was associated with increased histone acetylation in the promoters of the effector genes, indicative of increased chromatin accessibility. Moreover, forced expression of a constitutively active (CA) form of STAT5 recapitulated IL-7 in inducing CD4(+) T-cell polyfunctionality. Conversely, the expression of a dominant negative (DN) form of STAT5 abolished the ability of IL-7 to induce polyfunctional CD4(+) T cells. These in-vitro-generated polyfunctional CD4(+) T cells can traffic to tumor and expand intratumorally in response to immunization. Importantly, adoptive transfer of polyfunctional CD4(+) T cells following lymphodepletive chemotherapy was able to eradicate large established tumors. This beneficial outcome was associated with the occurrence of antigen epitope spreading, activation of the endogenous CD8(+) T cells and persistence of donor CD4(+) T cells exhibiting memory stem cell attributes. These findings indicate that IL-7 signaling can impart polyfunctionality and stemness potential to CD4(+) T cells, revealing a previously unknown property of IL-7 that can be exploited in adoptive T-cell immunotherapy.

  15. Human melanoma immunotherapy using tumor antigen-specific T cells generated in humanized mice

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zheng; Xia, Jinxing; Fan, Wei; Wargo, Jennifer; Yang, Yong-Guang

    2016-01-01

    A major factor hindering the exploration of adoptive immunotherapy in preclinical settings is the limited availability of tumor-reactive human T cells. Here we developed a humanized mouse model that permits large-scale production of human T cells expressing the engineered melanoma antigen MART-1-specific TCR. Humanized mice, made by transplantation of human fetal thymic tissue and CD34+ cells virally-transduced with HLA class I-restricted melanoma antigen (MART-1)-specific TCR gene, showed efficient development of MART-1-TCR+ human T cells with predominantly CD8+ cells. Importantly, MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells developing in these mice were capable of mounting antigen-specific responses in vivo, as evidenced by their proliferation, phenotypic conversion and IFN-γ production following MART-1 peptide immunization. Moreover, these MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells mediated efficient killing of melanoma cells in an HLA/antigen-dependent manner. Adoptive transfer of in vitro expanded MART-1-TCR+CD8+ T cells induced potent antitumor responses that were further enhanced by IL-15 treatment in melanoma-bearing recipients. Finally, a short incubation of MART-1-specific T cells with rapamycin acted synergistically with IL-15, leading to significantly improved tumor-free survival in recipients with metastatic melanoma. These data demonstrate the practicality of using humanized mice to produce potentially unlimited source of tumor-specific human T cells for experimental and preclinical exploration of cancer immunotherapy. This study also suggests that pretreatment of tumor-reactive T cells with rapamycin in combination with IL-15 administration may be a novel strategy to improve the efficacy of adoptive T cell therapy. PMID:26824989

  16. Bispecific T-cells Expressing Polyclonal Repertoire of Endogenous γδ T-cell Receptors and Introduced CD19-specific Chimeric Antigen Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Deniger, Drew C; Switzer, Kirsten; Mi, Tiejuan; Maiti, Sourindra; Hurton, Lenka; Singh, Harjeet; Huls, Helen; Olivares, Simon; Lee, Dean A; Champlin, Richard E; Cooper, Laurence JN

    2013-01-01

    Even though other γδ T-cell subsets exhibit antitumor activity, adoptive transfer of γδ Tcells is currently limited to one subset (expressing Vγ9Vδ2 T-cell receptor (TCR)) due to dependence on aminobisphosphonates as the only clinically appealing reagent for propagating γδ T cells. Therefore, we developed an approach to propagate polyclonal γδ T cells and rendered them bispecific through expression of a CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were electroporated with Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon and transposase to enforce expression of CAR in multiple γδ T-cell subsets. CAR+γδ T cells were expanded on CD19+ artificial antigen-presenting cells (aAPC), which resulted in >109 CAR+γδ T cells from <106 total cells. Digital multiplex assay detected TCR mRNA coding for Vδ1, Vδ2, and Vδ3 with Vγ2, Vγ7, Vγ8, Vγ9, and Vγ10 alleles. Polyclonal CAR+γδ T cells were functional when TCRγδ and CAR were stimulated and displayed enhanced killing of CD19+ tumor cell lines compared with CARnegγδ T cells. CD19+ leukemia xenografts in mice were reduced with CAR+γδ T cells compared with control mice. Since CAR, SB, and aAPC have been adapted for human application, clinical trials can now focus on the therapeutic potential of polyclonal γδ T cells. PMID:23295945

  17. Bispecific T-cells expressing polyclonal repertoire of endogenous γδ T-cell receptors and introduced CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor.

    PubMed

    Deniger, Drew C; Switzer, Kirsten; Mi, Tiejuan; Maiti, Sourindra; Hurton, Lenka; Singh, Harjeet; Huls, Helen; Olivares, Simon; Lee, Dean A; Champlin, Richard E; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2013-03-01

    Even though other γδ T-cell subsets exhibit antitumor activity, adoptive transfer of γδ Tcells is currently limited to one subset (expressing Vγ9Vδ2 T-cell receptor (TCR)) due to dependence on aminobisphosphonates as the only clinically appealing reagent for propagating γδ T cells. Therefore, we developed an approach to propagate polyclonal γδ T cells and rendered them bispecific through expression of a CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR). Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were electroporated with Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon and transposase to enforce expression of CAR in multiple γδ T-cell subsets. CAR(+)γδ T cells were expanded on CD19(+) artificial antigen-presenting cells (aAPC), which resulted in >10(9) CAR(+)γδ T cells from <10(6) total cells. Digital multiplex assay detected TCR mRNA coding for Vδ1, Vδ2, and Vδ3 with Vγ2, Vγ7, Vγ8, Vγ9, and Vγ10 alleles. Polyclonal CAR(+)γδ T cells were functional when TCRγδ and CAR were stimulated and displayed enhanced killing of CD19(+) tumor cell lines compared with CAR(neg)γδ T cells. CD19(+) leukemia xenografts in mice were reduced with CAR(+)γδ T cells compared with control mice. Since CAR, SB, and aAPC have been adapted for human application, clinical trials can now focus on the therapeutic potential of polyclonal γδ T cells. PMID:23295945

  18. C3 Promotes Expansion of CD8+ and CD4+ T cells in a Listeria monocytogenes infection

    PubMed Central

    Nakayama, Yumi; Kim, Shin-Il; Kim, Eui Ho; Lambris, John D.; Sandor, Matyas; Suresh, M.

    2009-01-01

    It is known that C3 is required for optimal expansion of T cells during acute viral infections. However, it is not yet determined whether T cell responses to intracellular bacterial infections require C3. Therefore, we have investigated the requirement for C3 to elicit potent T cell responses to Listeria monocytogenes (LM). We show that expansion of antigen-specific CD8 and CD4 T cells during a primary response to LM was markedly reduced in the absence of C3 activity. Further studies indicated that, unlike in an influenza virus infection, the regulation of LM-specific T cell responses by C3 might not involve the downstream effector C5a. Moreover, reduced T cell responses to LM was not linked to defective maturation of DCs or developmental anomalies in the peripheral T cell compartment of C3-deficient mice. Experiments involving adoptive transfer of C3-deficient CD8 T cells into the C3-sufficient environment of wild type mice showed that these T cells do not have intrinsic proliferative defects and paracrine source of C3 will suffice for clonal expansion of CD8 T cells in vivo. However, stimulation of purified C3-deficient CD8 T cells by plastic-immobilized anti-CD3 showed that C3 promotes T cell proliferation directly, independent of its effects on antigen-presenting cells. Based on these findings, we propose that diminished T cell responses to LM in C3-deficient mice might be at least in part due to lack of direct effects of C3 on T cells. These studies have furthered our understanding of C3-mediated regulation of T cell immunity to intracellular pathogens. PMID:19648268

  19. Genetic modification of T cells.

    PubMed

    Morgan, Richard A; Kakarla, Sunitha

    2014-01-01

    Gene transfer technology has advanced rapidly from simple physical-chemical laboratory methods in the 1970s and 1980s to the sophisticated viral and nonviral methods currently in clinical practice. Herein, we review 4 gene transfer methodologies applied in human gene therapy clinical trials transferring chimeric antigen receptors into T cells for the treatment of B-cell malignancies. The 4 methods include 2 viral vector gene transfer technologies, gamma retroviral vectors and lentiviral vectors, and 2 nonviral methods, transposons and mRNA electroporation.

  20. TCR Signaling in T Cell Memory.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Mark A; Teixeiro, Emma

    2015-01-01

    T cell memory plays a critical role in our protection against pathogens and tumors. The antigen and its interaction with the T cell receptor (TCR) is one of the initiating elements that shape T cell memory together with inflammation and costimulation. Over the last decade, several transcription factors and signaling pathways that support memory programing have been identified. However, how TCR signals regulate them is still poorly understood. Recent studies have shown that the biochemical rules that govern T cell memory, strikingly, change depending on the TCR signal strength. Furthermore, TCR signal strength regulates the input of cytokine signaling, including pro-inflammatory cytokines. These highlight how tailoring antigenic signals can improve immune therapeutics. In this review, we focus on how TCR signaling regulates T cell memory and how the quantity and quality of TCR-peptide-MHC interactions impact the multiple fates a T cell can adopt in the memory pool. PMID:26697013

  1. Immune cell-mediated protection against vaginal candidiasis: evidence for a major role of vaginal CD4(+) T cells and possible participation of other local lymphocyte effectors.

    PubMed

    Santoni, Giorgio; Boccanera, Maria; Adriani, Daniela; Lucciarini, Roberta; Amantini, Consuelo; Morrone, Stefania; Cassone, Antonio; De Bernardis, Flavia

    2002-09-01

    The protective roles of different lymphocyte subsets were investigated in a rat vaginal candidiasis model by adoptive transfer of vaginal lymphocytes (VL) or sorted, purified CD3(+) T cells, CD4(+) or CD8(+) T cells, or CD3(-) CD5(+) B cells from the vaginas of naïve or immune rats following three rounds of Candida albicans infection. The adoptive transfer of total VL from nonimmune animals did not alter the course of vaginal candidiasis of the recipient rats. In contrast, the animals receiving total VL or CD3(+) T cells from immune rats showed a highly significant acceleration of fungus clearance compared with animals which received nonimmune VL. The animals with vaginal CD3(-) CD5(+) B cells transferred from immune rats also had fewer Candida CFU than the controls, but fungal clearance was significantly retarded with respect to the animals administered immune T cells. Sorted, purified CD4(+) and CD8(+) vaginal T cells from immune rats were also adoptively transferred to naïve animals. Although both populations were seen to accelerate the clearance of the fungus from the vagina, CD4(+) T cells were much more effective than CD8(+) T cells. Overall, there was no difference between the antifungal effects of immune vaginal CD4(+) T cells and those achievable with the transfer of whole, immune VL. Histological observations of the vaginal tissues of rats with adoptively transferred immune T cells demonstrated a remarkable accumulation of lymphocytes in the subepithelial lamina propria and also infiltrating the mucosal epithelium. These results strongly suggest that distinct vaginal lymphocyte subsets participate in the adaptive anti-Candida immunity at the vaginal level, with the vaginal CD4(+) T cells probably playing a major role.

  2. CD8 T Cells Enter the Splenic T Cell Zones Independently of CCR7, but the Subsequent Expansion and Trafficking Patterns of Effector T Cells after Infection Are Dysregulated in the Absence of CCR7 Migratory Cues.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Naveen; Benechet, Alexandre P; Lefrançois, Leo; Khanna, Kamal M

    2015-12-01

    CCR7 is an important chemokine receptor that regulates T cell trafficking and compartmentalization within secondary lymphoid organs. However, the T cell-intrinsic role of CCR7 during infection in the spleen is not well understood. This study was designed to understand how CCR7-dependent localization and migration of CD8(+) T cells in different compartments of the spleen affected the primary and recall responses after infection. To this end, we used adoptive transfer of naive Ag-specific CD8 T cells (OT-I) that either lacked CCR7 or constitutively expressed CCR7 (CD2-CCR7) in mice that were subsequently infected i.v. with Listeria monocytogenes. We show that naive CCR7(-/-)CD8(+) T cells failed to enter the T cell zone, whereas CD2-CCR7 OT-I cells were exclusively confined to the T cell zones of the spleen. Surprisingly, however, CCR7(-/-) OT-I cells entered the T cell zones after infection, but the entry and egress migratory pattern of these cells was dysregulated and very distinct compared with wild-type OT-I cells. Moreover, CCR7-deficient OT-I cells failed to expand robustly when compared with wild-type OT-I cells and were preferentially skewed toward a short-lived effector cell differentiation pattern. Interestingly, CCR7(-/-), CD2-CCR7, and wild-type OT-I memory cells responded equally well to rechallenge infection. These results highlight a novel role of CCR7 in regulating effector CD8 T cell migration in the spleen and demonstrate differential requirement of CCR7 for primary and secondary CD8 T cell responses to infection.

  3. Technological advances in adoptive immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Oelke, Mathias; Krueger, Christine; Schneck, Jonathan P

    2005-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy is an attractive and elegant strategy for treating a variety of life-threatening diseases. Several approaches have been developed to generate antigen-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells for adoptive T-cell therapy in cancer and infectious diseases. Currently, many approaches are based on either the use of autologous peptide pulsed dendritic cells as antigen-presenting cells or nonspecific expansion of T cells. Unfortunately, current approaches lack the ability to serve as reproducible and economically viable methods. Several groups are developing new artificial approaches to overcome problems associated with dendritic cells and the nonspecific expansion of T-cell clones in order to make adoptive immunotherapy more feasible and effective. Thus, by increasing the availability of adoptive immunotherapy, we will be able to better determine the efficacy of the approaches in the treatment of a variety of diseases. In this review, we focus on technological advances that will facilitate adoptive immunotherapy. Specifically, we summarize current strategies which are either based on artificial antigen-presenting cells or on T-cell receptor gene transfer. PMID:15753966

  4. Regulatory T cells inhibit T cell proliferation and decrease demyelination in mice chronically infected with a coronavirus1

    PubMed Central

    Trandem, Kathryn; Anghelina, Daniela; Zhao, Jingxian; Perlman, Stanley

    2010-01-01

    Mice infected with the neurotropic JHM strain of mouse hepatitis virus (JHMV) develop acute and chronic demyelinating diseases with histopathological similarities to MS. The process of demyelination is largely immune-mediated, as immunodeficient mice (RAG1−/− mice) do not develop demyelination upon infection; however, demyelination develops if these mice are reconstituted with either JHMV-immune CD4 or CD8 T cells. Since myelin destruction is a consequence of the inflammatory response associated with virus clearance, we reasoned that decreasing the amount of inflammation would diminish clinical disease and demyelination. Given that regulatory T cells (Tregs) have potent anti-inflammatory effects, we adoptively transferred Tregs into infected C57BL/6 and RAG1−/− mice. In both instances, transfer of Tregs decreased weight loss, clinical scores and demyelination. Transferred Tregs were not detected in the CNS of infected RAG1−/− mice, but rather appeared to mediate their effects in the draining cervical lymph nodes. We show that Tregs dampen the inflammatory response mediated by transferred JHMV-immune splenocytes in infected RAG1−/− mice by decreasing T cell proliferation, dendritic cell activation and pro-inflammatory cytokine/chemokine production, without inducing apoptosis. By extension, decreasing inflammation, whether by Treg transfer or by otherwise enhancing the anti-inflammatory milieu, could contribute to improved clinical outcomes in patients with virus-induced demyelination. PMID:20208000

  5. T Cells Engineered With Chimeric Antigen Receptors Targeting NKG2D Ligands Display Lethal Toxicity in Mice.

    PubMed

    VanSeggelen, Heather; Hammill, Joanne A; Dvorkin-Gheva, Anna; Tantalo, Daniela G M; Kwiecien, Jacek M; Denisova, Galina F; Rabinovich, Brian; Wan, Yonghong; Bramson, Jonathan L

    2015-10-01

    Ligands for the NKG2D receptor are overexpressed on tumors, making them interesting immunotherapy targets. To assess the tumoricidal properties of T cells directed to attack NKG2D ligands, we engineered murine T cells with two distinct NKG2D-based chimeric antigen receptors (CARs): (i) a fusion between the NKG2D receptor and the CD3ζ chain and (ii) a conventional second-generation CAR, where the extracellular domain of NKG2D was fused to CD28 and CD3ζ. To enhance the CAR surface expression, we also engineered T cells to coexpress DAP10. In vitro functionality and surface expression levels of all three CARs was greater in BALB/c T cells than C57BL/6 T cells, indicating strain-specific differences. Upon adoptive transfer of NKG2D-CAR-T cells into syngeneic animals, we observed significant clinical toxicity resulting in morbidity and mortality. The severity of these toxicities varied between the CAR configurations and paralleled their in vitro NKG2D surface expression. BALB/c mice were more sensitive to these toxicities than C57BL/6 mice, consistent with the higher in vitro functionality of BALB/c T cells. Treatment with cyclophosphamide prior to adoptive transfer exacerbated the toxicity. We conclude that while NKG2D ligands may be useful targets for immunotherapy, the pursuit of NKG2D-based CAR-T cell therapies should be undertaken with caution. PMID:26122933

  6. ADOPTIVE-CELL-TRANSFER THERAPY FOR THE TREATMENT OF PATIENTS WITH CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Dudley, Mark E.; Rosenberg, Steven A.

    2008-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy — the isolation of antigen-specific cells, their ex vivo expansion and activation, and subsequent autologous administration — is a promising approach to inducing antitumour immune responses. The molecular identification of tumour antigens and the ability to monitor the persistence and transport of transferred cells has provided new insights into the mechanisms of tumour immunotherapy. Recent studies have shown the effectiveness of cell-transfer therapies for the treatment of patients with selected metastatic cancers. These studies provide a blueprint for the wider application of adoptive-cell-transfer therapy, and emphasize the requirement for in vivo persistence of the cells for therapeutic efficacy. PMID:12951585

  7. Defective CD8+ T cell peripheral tolerance in nonobese diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Kreuwel, H T; Biggs, J A; Pilip, I M; Pamer, E G; Lo, D; Sherman, L A

    2001-07-15

    Nonobese diabetic (NOD) mice develop spontaneous autoimmune diabetes that involves participation of both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. Previous studies have demonstrated spontaneous reactivity to self-Ags within the CD4+ T cell compartment in this strain. Whether CD8+ T cells in NOD mice achieve and maintain tolerance to self-Ags has not previously been evaluated. To investigate this issue, we have assessed the extent of tolerance to a model pancreatic Ag, the hemagglutinin (HA) molecule of influenza virus, that is transgenically expressed by pancreatic islet beta cells in InsHA mice. Previous studies have demonstrated that BALB/c and B10.D2 mice that express this transgene exhibit tolerance of HA and retain only low-avidity CD8+ T cells specific for the dominant peptide epitope of HA. In this study, we present data that demonstrate a deficiency in peripheral tolerance within the CD8+ T cell repertoire of NOD-InsHA mice. CD8+ T cells can be obtained from NOD-InsHA mice that exhibit high avidity for HA, as measured by tetramer (K(d)HA) binding and dose titration analysis. Significantly, these autoreactive CD8+ T cells can cause diabetes very rapidly upon adoptive transfer into NOD-InsHA recipient mice. The data presented demonstrate a retention in the repertoire of CD8+ T cells with high avidity for islet Ags that could contribute to autoimmune diabetes in NOD mice.

  8. Versatile strategy for controlling the specificity and activity of engineered T cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jennifer S Y; Kim, Ji Young; Kazane, Stephanie A; Choi, Sei-Hyun; Yun, Hwa Young; Kim, Min Soo; Rodgers, David T; Pugh, Holly M; Singer, Oded; Sun, Sophie B; Fonslow, Bryan R; Kochenderfer, James N; Wright, Timothy M; Schultz, Peter G; Young, Travis S; Kim, Chan Hyuk; Cao, Yu

    2016-01-26

    The adoptive transfer of autologous T cells engineered to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) has emerged as a promising cancer therapy. Despite impressive clinical efficacy, the general application of current CAR-T--cell therapy is limited by serious treatment-related toxicities. One approach to improve the safety of CAR-T cells involves making their activation and proliferation dependent upon adaptor molecules that mediate formation of the immunological synapse between the target cancer cell and T-cell. Here, we describe the design and synthesis of structurally defined semisynthetic adaptors we refer to as "switch" molecules, in which anti-CD19 and anti-CD22 antibody fragments are site-specifically modified with FITC using genetically encoded noncanonical amino acids. This approach allows the precise control over the geometry and stoichiometry of complex formation between CD19- or CD22-expressing cancer cells and a "universal" anti-FITC-directed CAR-T cell. Optimization of this CAR-switch combination results in potent, dose-dependent in vivo antitumor activity in xenograft models. The advantage of being able to titrate CAR-T-cell in vivo activity was further evidenced by reduced in vivo toxicity and the elimination of persistent B-cell aplasia in immune-competent mice. The ability to control CAR-T cell and cancer cell interactions using intermediate switch molecules may expand the scope of engineered T-cell therapy to solid tumors, as well as indications beyond cancer therapy. PMID:26759368

  9. Uncoupling protein 2 regulates metabolic reprogramming and fate of antigen-stimulated CD8+ T cells.

    PubMed

    Chaudhuri, Leena; Srivastava, Rupesh K; Kos, Ferdynand; Shrikant, Protul A

    2016-07-01

    Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) employing ex vivo-generated tumor antigen-specific CD8+ T cells shows tumor efficacy when the transferred cells possess both effector and memory functions. New strategies based on understanding of mechanisms that balance CD8+ T cell differentiation toward effector and memory responses are highly desirable. Emerging information confirms a central role for antigen-induced metabolic reprogramming in CD8+ T cell differentiation and clonal expansion. The mitochondrial protein uncoupling protein 2 (UCP2) is induced by antigen stimulation of CD8+ T cells; however, its role in metabolic reprogramming underlying differentiation and clonal expansion has not been reported. Employing genetic (siRNA) and pharmacologic (Genipin) approaches, we note that antigen-induced UCP2 expression reduces glycolysis, fatty acid synthesis and production of reactive oxygen species to balance differentiation with survival of effector CD8+ T cells. Inhibition of UCP2 promotes CD8+ T cell terminal differentiation into short-lived effector cells (CD62L(lo)KLRG1(Hi)IFNγ(Hi)) that undergo clonal contraction. These findings are the first to reveal a role for antigen-induced UCP2 expression in balancing CD8+ T cell differentiation and survival. Targeting UCP2 to regulate metabolic reprogramming of CD8+ T cells is an attractive new approach to augment efficacy of tumor therapy by ACT. PMID:27271549

  10. Distinct Effects of IL-18 on the Engraftment and Function of Human Effector CD8+ T Cells and Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Danet-Desnoyers, Gwenn; Liu, Ronghua; Jiang, Shuguang; Albelda, Steven M.; Golovina, Tatiana; Coukos, George; Riley, James L.; Jonak, Zdenka L.; June, Carl H.

    2008-01-01

    IL-18 has pleotropic effects on the activation of T cells during antigen presentation. We investigated the effects of human IL-18 on the engraftment and function of human T cell subsets in xenograft mouse models. IL-18 enhanced the engraftment of human CD8+ effector T cells and promoted the development of xenogeneic graft versus host disease (GVHD). In marked contrast, IL-18 had reciprocal effects on the engraftment of CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) in the xenografted mice. Adoptive transfer experiments indicated that IL-18 prevented the suppressive effects of Tregs on the development of xenogeneic GVHD. The IL-18 results were robust as they were observed in two different mouse strains. In addition, the effects of IL-18 were systemic as IL-18 promoted engraftment and persistence of human effector T cells and decreased Tregs in peripheral blood, peritoneal cavity, spleen and liver. In vitro experiments indicated that the expression of the IL-18Rα was induced on both CD4 and CD8 effector T cells and Tregs, and that the duration of expression was less sustained on Tregs. These preclinical data suggest that human IL-18 may have use as an adjuvant for immune reconstitution after cytotoxic therapies, and to augment adoptive immunotherapy, donor leukocyte infusions, and vaccine strategies. PMID:18818761

  11. Genetically engineered donor T cells to optimize graft-versus-tumor effects across MHC barriers

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arnab; Holland, Amanda M.; van den Brink, Marcel R.M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been used for more than 50 years to combat hematologic malignancies. In addition to being the first stem cell therapy, transplantation has provided evidence for the potent anti-tumor effects of T cells. Facilitating T-cell-based immunity against malignancies requires a careful balancing act between generating a robust response and avoiding off-target killing of healthy tissues, which is difficult to accomplish using bulk donor T cells. To address these issues, several approaches have been developed, drawing on basic T-cell biology, to potentiate graft-versus-tumor activity while avoiding graft-versus-host disease. Current strategies for anti-tumor cell therapies include (i) selecting optimal T cells for transfer, (ii) engineering T cells to possess enhanced effector functions, and (iii) generating T-cell precursors that complete development after adoptive transfer. In this review, we assess the current state of the art in T-lineage cell therapy to treat malignancies in the context of allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:24329800

  12. T Cell Receptor Gene Therapy for Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Thomas M.; Ragnarsson, Gunnar B.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract T cell-based adoptive immunotherapy has been shown to be a promising treatment for various types of cancer. However, adoptive T cell therapy currently requires the custom isolation and characterization of tumor-specific T cells from each patient—a process that can be not only difficult and time-consuming but also often fails to yield high-avidity T cells, which together have limited the broad application of this approach as a clinical treatment. Employing T cell receptor (TCR) gene therapy as a component of adoptive T cell therapy strategies can overcome many of these obstacles, allowing autologous T cells with a defined specificity to be generated in a much shorter time period. Initial studies using this approach have been hampered by a number of technical difficulties resulting in low TCR expression and acquisition of potentially problematic specificities due to mispairing of introduced TCR chains with endogenous TCR chains. The last several years have seen substantial progress in our understanding of the multiple facets of TCR gene therapy that will have to be properly orchestrated for this strategy to succeed. Here we outline the challenges of TCR gene therapy and the advances that have been made toward realizing the promise of this approach. PMID:19702439

  13. Augmentation of CAR T-cell Trafficking and Antitumor Efficacy by Blocking Protein Kinase A Localization.

    PubMed

    Newick, Kheng; O'Brien, Shaun; Sun, Jing; Kapoor, Veena; Maceyko, Steven; Lo, Albert; Puré, Ellen; Moon, Edmund; Albelda, Steven M

    2016-06-01

    Antitumor treatments based on the infusion of T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CAR T cells) are still relatively ineffective for solid tumors, due to the presence of immunosuppressive mediators [such as prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and adenosine] and poor T-cell trafficking. PGE2 and adenosine activate protein kinase A (PKA), which then inhibits T-cell receptor (TCR) activation. This inhibition process requires PKA to localize to the immune synapse via binding to the membrane protein ezrin. We generated CAR T cells that expressed a small peptide called the "regulatory subunit I anchoring disruptor" (RIAD) that inhibits the association of PKA with ezrin, thus blunting the negative effects of PKA on TCR activation. After exposure to PGE2 or adenosine in vitro, CAR-RIAD T cells showed increased TCR signaling, released more cytokines, and showed enhanced killing of tumor cells compared with CAR T cells. When injected into tumor-bearing mice, the antitumor efficacy of murine and human CAR-RIAD T cells was enhanced compared with that of CAR T cells, due to resistance to tumor-induced hypofunction and increased T-cell infiltration of established tumors. Subsequent in vitro assays showed that both mouse and human CAR-RIAD cells migrated more efficiently than CAR cells did in response to the chemokine CXCL10 and also had better adhesion to various matrices. Thus, the intracellular addition of the RIAD peptide to adoptively transferred CAR T cells augments their efficacy by increasing their effector function and by improving trafficking into tumor sites. This treatment strategy, therefore, shows potential clinical application for treating solid tumors. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(6); 541-51. ©2016 AACR.

  14. Augmentation of CAR T-cell Trafficking and Antitumor Efficacy by Blocking Protein Kinase A Localization.

    PubMed

    Newick, Kheng; O'Brien, Shaun; Sun, Jing; Kapoor, Veena; Maceyko, Steven; Lo, Albert; Puré, Ellen; Moon, Edmund; Albelda, Steven M

    2016-06-01

    Antitumor treatments based on the infusion of T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CAR T cells) are still relatively ineffective for solid tumors, due to the presence of immunosuppressive mediators [such as prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and adenosine] and poor T-cell trafficking. PGE2 and adenosine activate protein kinase A (PKA), which then inhibits T-cell receptor (TCR) activation. This inhibition process requires PKA to localize to the immune synapse via binding to the membrane protein ezrin. We generated CAR T cells that expressed a small peptide called the "regulatory subunit I anchoring disruptor" (RIAD) that inhibits the association of PKA with ezrin, thus blunting the negative effects of PKA on TCR activation. After exposure to PGE2 or adenosine in vitro, CAR-RIAD T cells showed increased TCR signaling, released more cytokines, and showed enhanced killing of tumor cells compared with CAR T cells. When injected into tumor-bearing mice, the antitumor efficacy of murine and human CAR-RIAD T cells was enhanced compared with that of CAR T cells, due to resistance to tumor-induced hypofunction and increased T-cell infiltration of established tumors. Subsequent in vitro assays showed that both mouse and human CAR-RIAD cells migrated more efficiently than CAR cells did in response to the chemokine CXCL10 and also had better adhesion to various matrices. Thus, the intracellular addition of the RIAD peptide to adoptively transferred CAR T cells augments their efficacy by increasing their effector function and by improving trafficking into tumor sites. This treatment strategy, therefore, shows potential clinical application for treating solid tumors. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(6); 541-51. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27045023

  15. West Nile virus-specific CD4 T cells exhibit direct anti-viral cytokine secretion and cytotoxicity and are sufficient for antiviral protection

    PubMed Central

    Brien, James D.; Uhrlaub, Jennifer L.; Nikolich-Zugich, Janko

    2012-01-01

    CD4 T cells have been shown to be necessary for the prevention of encephalitis during West Nile virus infection. However, the mechanisms used by antigen-specific CD4 T cells to protect mice from West Nile virus encephalitis remain incompletely understood. Contrary to the belief that CD4 T cells are protective because they merely maintain the CD8 T cell response and improve antibody production, we here provide evidence for the direct anti-viral activity of CD4 T cells which functions to protect the host from WNV encephalitis. In adoptive transfers, naïve CD4 T cells protected a significant number of lethally infected RAG−/− mice, demonstrating the protective effect of CD4 T cells independent of B cells and CD8 T cells. To shed light on the mechanism of this protection, we defined the peptide specificities of the CD4 T cells responding to West Nile virus infection in C57BL/6 (H-2b) mice, and used these peptides to characterize the in vivo function of antiviral CD4 T cells. WNV-specific CD4 T cells produced IFN-γ and IL-2, but also showed potential for in vivo and ex vivo cytotoxicity. Furthermore, peptide vaccination using CD4 epitopes conferred protection against lethal West Nile virus infection in immunocompetent mice. These results demonstrate the role of direct effector function of antigen-specific CD4 T cell in preventing severe West Nile virus disease. PMID:19050276

  16. T Cells in Fish

    PubMed Central

    Nakanishi, Teruyuki; Shibasaki, Yasuhiro; Matsuura, Yuta

    2015-01-01

    Cartilaginous and bony fish are the most primitive vertebrates with a thymus, and possess T cells equivalent to those in mammals. There are a number of studies in fish demonstrating that the thymus is the essential organ for development of T lymphocytes from early thymocyte progenitors to functionally competent T cells. A high number of T cells in the intestine and gills has been reported in several fish species. Involvement of CD4+ and CD8α+ T cells in allograft rejection and graft-versus-host reaction (GVHR) has been demonstrated using monoclonal antibodies. Conservation of CD4+ helper T cell functions among teleost fishes has been suggested in a number studies employing mixed leukocyte culture (MLC) and hapten/carrier effect. Alloantigen- and virus-specific cytotoxicity has also been demonstrated in ginbuna and rainbow trout. Furthermore, the important role of cell-mediated immunity rather than humoral immunity has been reported in the protection against intracellular bacterial infection. Recently, the direct antibacterial activity of CD8α+, CD4+ T-cells and sIgM+ cells in fish has been reported. In this review, we summarize the recent progress in T cell research focusing on the tissue distribution and function of fish T cells. PMID:26426066

  17. MmuPV1 infection and tumor development of T cell-deficient mice is prevented by passively transferred hyperimmune sera from normal congenic mice immunized with MmuPV1 virus-like particles (VLPs).

    PubMed

    Joh, Joongho; Ghim, Shin-je; Chilton, Paula M; Sundberg, John P; Park, Jino; Wilcher, Sarah A; Proctor, Mary L; Bennett Jenson, A

    2016-02-01

    Infection by mouse papillomavirus (PV), MmuPV1, of T cell-deficient, B6.Cg-Foxn1(nu)/J nude mice revealed that four, distinct squamous papilloma phenotypes developed simultaneously after infection of experimental mice. Papillomas appeared on the muzzle, vagina, and tail at or about day 42days post-inoculation. The dorsal skin developed papillomas and hair follicle tumors (trichoblastomas) as early as 26days after infection. Passive transfer of hyperimmune sera from normal congenic mice immunized with MmuPV1 virus-like particles (VLPs) to T cell-deficient strains of mice prevented infection by virions of experimental mice. This study provides further evidence that T cell deficiency is critical for tumor formation by MmuPV1 infection. PMID:26778691

  18. Interleukin-7 Modulates Anti-Tumor CD8+ T Cell Responses via Its Action on Host Cells.

    PubMed

    Deiser, Katrin; Stoycheva, Diana; Bank, Ute; Blankenstein, Thomas; Schüler, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells is a promising approach for the treatment of chronic viral and malignant diseases. In order to improve adoptive T cell therapy (ATT) of cancer, recent strategies aim at the antibody-based blockade of immunosuppressive signaling pathways in CD8+ T cells. Alternatively, adjuvant effects of immunostimulatory cytokines might be exploited to improve therapeutic CD8+ T cell responses. For example, Interleukin-7 (IL-7) is a potent growth, activation and survival factor for CD8+ T cells that can be used to improve virus- and tumor-specific CD8+ T cell responses. Although direct IL-7 effects on CD8+ T cells were studied extensively in numerous models, the contribution of IL-7 receptor-competent (IL-7R+) host cells remained unclear. In the current study we provide evidence that CD8+ T cell-mediated tumor rejection in response to recombinant IL-7 (rIL-7) therapy is strictly dependent on IL-7R+ host cells. On the contrary, CD8+ T cell expansion is independent of host IL-7R expression. If, however, rIL-7 therapy and peptide vaccination are combined, host IL-7R signaling is crucial for CD8+ T cell expansion. Unexpectedly, maximum CD8+ T cell expansion relies mainly on IL-7R signaling in non-hematopoietic host cells, similar to the massive accumulation of dendritic cells and granulocytes. In summary, we provide evidence that IL-7R+ host cells are major targets of rIL-7 that modulate therapeutic CD8+ T cell responses and the outcome of rIL-7-assisted ATT. This knowledge may have important implications for the design and optimization of clinical ATT protocols.

  19. Interleukin-7 Modulates Anti-Tumor CD8+ T Cell Responses via Its Action on Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Deiser, Katrin; Stoycheva, Diana; Bank, Ute; Blankenstein, Thomas; Schüler, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells is a promising approach for the treatment of chronic viral and malignant diseases. In order to improve adoptive T cell therapy (ATT) of cancer, recent strategies aim at the antibody-based blockade of immunosuppressive signaling pathways in CD8+ T cells. Alternatively, adjuvant effects of immunostimulatory cytokines might be exploited to improve therapeutic CD8+ T cell responses. For example, Interleukin-7 (IL-7) is a potent growth, activation and survival factor for CD8+ T cells that can be used to improve virus- and tumor-specific CD8+ T cell responses. Although direct IL-7 effects on CD8+ T cells were studied extensively in numerous models, the contribution of IL-7 receptor-competent (IL-7R+) host cells remained unclear. In the current study we provide evidence that CD8+ T cell-mediated tumor rejection in response to recombinant IL-7 (rIL-7) therapy is strictly dependent on IL-7R+ host cells. On the contrary, CD8+ T cell expansion is independent of host IL-7R expression. If, however, rIL-7 therapy and peptide vaccination are combined, host IL-7R signaling is crucial for CD8+ T cell expansion. Unexpectedly, maximum CD8+ T cell expansion relies mainly on IL-7R signaling in non-hematopoietic host cells, similar to the massive accumulation of dendritic cells and granulocytes. In summary, we provide evidence that IL-7R+ host cells are major targets of rIL-7 that modulate therapeutic CD8+ T cell responses and the outcome of rIL-7-assisted ATT. This knowledge may have important implications for the design and optimization of clinical ATT protocols. PMID:27447484

  20. Targeting T cell metabolism for therapy

    PubMed Central

    O’Sullivan, David

    2015-01-01

    In the past several years, a wealth of evidence has emerged illustrating how metabolism supports many aspects of T cell biology, as well as how metabolic changes drive T cell differentiation and fate. Here we outline developing principles in the regulation of T cell metabolism, and discuss how these processes are impacted in settings of inflammation and cancer. In this context we discuss how metabolic pathways might be manipulated for the treatment of human disease, including how metabolism may be targeted to prevent T cell dysfunction in inhospitable microenvironments, to generate more effective adoptive cellular immunotherapies in cancer, and to direct T cell differentiation and function towards non-pathogenic phenotypes in settings of autoimmunity. PMID:25601541

  1. Intermediary role of macrophages in the passage of suppressor signals between T-cell subsets

    PubMed Central

    1978-01-01

    We have examined the ability of macrophages (Mphi) to transmit T-cell derived suppressor signals to other T cells. The suppressor signal studied is an antigen-specific factor which suppresses the ability of adoptively transferred, sensitized lymphocytes to express contact hypersensitivity in normal recipients. We have found that this factor binds to peritoneal exudate Mphi via cell surface structures which can be blocked with heat-aggregated gamma globulin. Dead (HK) Mphi bind the factor but fail to present it in a functional way to assay (immune) T cells, whereas live (L) Mphi perform both functions. Further, L Mphi can retrieve the factor in an active form from the surfaces of HK Mphi. Based on these and other findings (1-5), we discuss the possibility that Mphi may play as important a role in presenting T-cell communication signals to the cells of the immune system as they do in presenting antigen. PMID:308980

  2. Mechanism of T cell mediated protection in newborn mice against a Chlamydia infection

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Sukumar; de la Maza, Luis M.

    2013-01-01

    To determine the immune components needed for protection of newborn mice against Chlamydia muridarum, animals born to Chlamydia-immunized and to sham-immunized dams were infected intranasally with C. muridarum at 2 post-natal days. T-cells isolated from immunized or sham-immunized adult mice were adoptively transferred to newborn mice at the time of infection. Also, to establish what cytokines are involved in protection, IFN-γ TNF-α, IL-10, and IL-12 were passively transferred to newborn mice. To assess the Chlamydia burden in the lungs mice were euthanized at 12 post-natal days. When T-cells from immunized adult mice were transferred, mice born to and fed by immunized dams were significantly protected as evidenced by the reduced number of Chlamydia isolated from the lungs compared to mice born to and fed by sham-immunized dams. Transfer of IFN-γ and TNF-α also significantly reduced the number of Chlamydia in the lungs of mice born to immunized dams. Transfer of IL-10 or IL-12 did not result in a significant reduction of Chlamydia. In vitro T-cell proliferation data suggest that neonatal antigen presenting cells can present Chlamydia antigens to adult T-cells. In conclusion, maternal antibodies and Chlamydia specific T-cells or Th1 cytokines are required for protection of neonates against this pathogen. PMID:23644176

  3. Mechanism of T-cell mediated protection in newborn mice against a Chlamydia infection.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sukumar; de la Maza, Luis M

    2013-01-01

    To determine the immune components needed for protection of newborn mice against Chlamydia muridarum, animals born to Chlamydia-immunized and to sham-immunized dams were infected intranasally with C. muridarum at 2 post-natal days. T-cells isolated from immunized or sham-immunized adult mice were adoptively transferred to newborn mice at the time of infection. Also, to establish what cytokines are involved in protection, IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-10, and IL-12 were passively transferred to newborn mice. To assess the Chlamydia burden in the lungs mice were euthanized at 12 post-natal days. When T-cells from immunized adult mice were transferred, mice born to and fed by immunized dams were significantly protected as evidenced by the reduced number of Chlamydia isolated from the lungs compared to mice born to and fed by sham-immunized dams. Transfer of IFN-γ and TNF-α also significantly reduced the number of Chlamydia in the lungs of mice born to immunized dams. Transfer of IL-10 or IL-12 did not result in a significant reduction of Chlamydia. In vitro T-cell proliferation data suggest that neonatal antigen presenting cells can present Chlamydia antigens to adult T-cells. In conclusion, maternal antibodies and Chlamydia specific T-cells or Th1 cytokines are required for protection of neonates against this pathogen.

  4. Adenoviral Delivery of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α and Interleukin-2 Enables Successful Adoptive Cell Therapy of Immunosuppressive Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Siurala, Mikko; Havunen, Riikka; Saha, Dipongkor; Lumen, Dave; Airaksinen, Anu J; Tähtinen, Siri; Cervera-Carrascon, Víctor; Bramante, Simona; Parviainen, Suvi; Vähä-Koskela, Markus; Kanerva, Anna; Hemminki, Akseli

    2016-08-01

    Adoptive T-cell transfer is a promising treatment approach for metastatic cancer, but efficacy in solid tumors has only been achieved with toxic pre- and postconditioning regimens. Thus, adoptive T-cell therapies would benefit from complementary modalities that enable their full potential without excessive toxicity. We aimed to improve the efficacy and safety of adoptive T-cell transfer by using adenoviral vectors for direct delivery of immunomodulatory murine cytokines into B16.OVA melanoma tumors with concomitant T-cell receptor transgenic OT-I T-cell transfer. Armed adenoviruses expressed high local and low systemic levels of cytokine when injected into B16.OVA tumors, suggesting safety of virus-mediated cytokine delivery. Antitumor efficacy was significantly enhanced with adenoviruses coding for murine interleukin-2 (mIL-2) and tumor necrosis factor-α (mTNFα) when compared with T-cell transfer alone or viruses alone. Further improvement in efficacy was achieved with a triple combination of mIL-2, mTNFα, and OT-I T-cells. Mechanistic studies suggest that mIL-2 has an important role in activating T-cells at the tumor, while mTNFα induces chemokine expression. Furthermore, adenovirus treatments enhanced tumor-infiltration of OT-I T-cells as demonstrated by SPECT/CT imaging of (111)In-labeled cells. Our results suggest the utility of cytokine-coding adenoviruses for improving the efficacy of adoptive T-cell therapies.

  5. Adoptive transfer of the generalized lymphoproliferative disease (gld) syndrome in nude beige mice.

    PubMed Central

    Froidevaux, S; Rosenblatt, N; Loor, F

    1992-01-01

    C57BL/6 nude beige mice (B6 nubg) were used as recipients for the transfer of haematopoietic cells from either B6 wild as control mice, or systemic lupus erythematous B6 mice homozygous for the recessive generalized lymphadenopathy disease (gld) locus. Both gld and wild cell grafts prolonged survival of the short-living B6 nubg recipients and restored some T-cell functions, as monitored by the presence of T-dependent Ig isotypes in the serum and responsiveness of spleen cells to a T-cell mitogen. Moreover, the [gld----nubg] chimeras but not the [wild----nubg] chimeras showed several similarities with gld control mice, particularly, a spleen and lymph node hyperplasia, elevated anti-single-stranded DNA antibody titres and a hyperglobulinaemia. This hyperglobulinaemia was however qualitatively different from the gld-type hyperglobulinaemia with an important contribution of the IgG1 isotype; the lymph node hyperplasia was also less marked than in B6 gld mice. PMID:1592442

  6. Recovery from T cell depletion during murine listeriosis and effect on a T-dependent antibody response.

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Y Y; Cheers, C

    1982-01-01

    During the infection of mice with Listeria monocytogenes, there is a profound depletion of T (Thy-1+ Ig-) lymphocytes between days 1 and 4, followed by an increase in T cells to three times normal levels by day 9. The recovery of T cell numbers required cell proliferation, being sensitive to vinblastin and cyclophosphamide. Adult thymectomy 6 months before infection had no effect on recovery. The repopulating cells were no more sensitive than normal T cells to hydrocortisone. B lymphocytes (Ig+ cells) and null (Thy-1-Ig-) cells increased from day 1 after the injection of either live or (in contrast to T cells) killed Listeria organisms. Their increase was inhibited by vinblastin and cyclophosphamide. Despite T cell depletion, no depression of the antibody response to the T-dependent antigen, sheep erythrocytes, occurred during infection or when spleen cells were adoptively transferred from infected mice to irradiated recipients. PMID:6982870

  7. T-Cell Lymphoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... are extremely rare. T-cell lymphomas can be aggressive (fast-growing) or indolent (slow-growing). Lymphomas are ... also be involved. This group of PTCLs is aggressive and requires combination chemotherapy upon diagnosis. For more ...

  8. Depletion of CD4 T cells enhances immunotherapy for neuroblastoma after syngeneic HSCT but compromises development of antitumor immune memory.

    PubMed

    Jing, Weiqing; Gershan, Jill A; Johnson, Bryon D

    2009-04-30

    High-risk neuroblastoma remains a clinically challenging disease. Here, we report that a multifaceted immunotherapeutic approach including syngeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), adoptive transfer of sensitized T cells (from syngeneic donors vaccinated to tumor antigens), and early posttransplantation tumor vaccination can effectively treat mice with established neuroblastoma. Vaccination was an important component of this immunotherapy, as it resulted in enhanced and prolonged tumor-specific CD8 T-cell activity and improved antitumor efficacy. Surprisingly, CD4 cell depletion of mice given sensitized T cells resulted in better tumor-free survival, which was associated with an early increased expansion of CD8 T cells with an effector phenotype, increased numbers of tumor-reactive CD8 T cells, and increased tumor infiltration by CD8 T cells. However, in the absence of CD4 T cells, development of long-term tumor immunity (memory) was severely compromised as reflected by diminished CD8 T-cell recall responses and an inability to resist tumor rechallenge in vivo. Based on these results, a major challenge with this immunotherapeutic approach is how to obtain the ideal initial antitumor response but still preserve antitumor immune memory. These data suggest that identification and selective depletion of immune inhibitory CD4 T cells may be a strategy to enhance early antitumor immunity and induce a long-lasting tumor response after HSCT.

  9. Oligoclonal CD8+ T cells play a critical role in the development of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Trott, Daniel W; Thabet, Salim R; Kirabo, Annet; Saleh, Mohamed A; Itani, Hana; Norlander, Allison E; Wu, Jing; Goldstein, Anna; Arendshorst, William J; Madhur, Meena S; Chen, Wei; Li, Chung-I; Shyr, Yu; Harrison, David G

    2014-11-01

    Recent studies have emphasized a role of adaptive immunity, and particularly T cells, in the genesis of hypertension. We sought to determine the T-cell subtypes that contribute to hypertension and renal inflammation in angiotensin II-induced hypertension. Using T-cell receptor spectratyping to examine T-cell receptor usage, we demonstrated that CD8(+) cells, but not CD4(+) cells, in the kidney exhibited altered T-cell receptor transcript lengths in Vβ3, 8.1, and 17 families in response to angiotensin II-induced hypertension. Clonality was not observed in other organs. The hypertension caused by angiotensin II in CD4(-/-) and MHCII(-/-) mice was similar to that observed in wild-type mice, whereas CD8(-/-) mice and OT1xRAG-1(-/-) mice, which have only 1 T-cell receptor, exhibited a blunted hypertensive response to angiotensin II. Adoptive transfer of pan T cells and CD8(+) T cells but not CD4(+)/CD25(-) cells conferred hypertension to RAG-1(-/-) mice. In contrast, transfer of CD4(+)/CD25(+) cells to wild-type mice receiving angiotensin II decreased blood pressure. Mice treated with angiotensin II exhibited increased numbers of kidney CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. In response to a sodium/volume challenge, wild-type and CD4(-/-) mice infused with angiotensin II retained water and sodium, whereas CD8(-/-) mice did not. CD8(-/-) mice were also protected against angiotensin-induced endothelial dysfunction and vascular remodeling in the kidney. These data suggest that in the development of hypertension, an oligoclonal population of CD8(+) cells accumulates in the kidney and likely contributes to hypertension by contributing to sodium and volume retention and vascular rarefaction.

  10. Chimeric antigen receptor–engineered T cells as oncolytic virus carriers

    PubMed Central

    VanSeggelen, Heather; Tantalo, Daniela GM; Afsahi, Arya; Hammill, Joanne A; Bramson, Jonathan L

    2015-01-01

    The use of engineered T cells in adoptive transfer therapies has shown significant promise in treating hematological cancers. However, successes treating solid tumors are much less prevalent. Oncolytic viruses (OVs) have the capacity to induce specific lysis of tumor cells and indirectly impact tumor growth via vascular shutdown. These viruses bear natural abilities to associate with lymphocytes upon systemic administration, but therapeutic doses must be very high in order to evade antibodies and other components of the immune system. As T cells readily circulate through the body, using these cells to deliver OVs directly to tumors may provide an ideal combination. Our studies demonstrate that loading chimeric antigen receptor–engineered T cells with low doses of virus does not impact receptor expression or function in either murine or human T cells. Engineered T cells can deposit virus onto a variety of tumor targets, which can enhance the tumoricidal activity of the combination treatment. This concept appears to be broadly applicable, as we observed similar results using murine or human T cells, loaded with either RNA or DNA viruses. Overall, loading of engineered T cells with OVs represents a novel combination therapy that may increase the efficacy of both treatments. PMID:27119109

  11. Regulatory T-cells are essential to promote proper CD4 T-cell priming upon mucosal infection

    PubMed Central

    Soerens, Andrew G.; Da Costa, Andreia; Lund, Jennifer M.

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T-cells (Tregs) limit autoimmunity and immunopathology using a variety of suppressive mechanisms, but their roles during pathogen-directed immune responses remain unclear. Following Herpes Simplex virus-2 (HSV-2) infection, mice lacking Tregs fail to control viral replication, pointing to a role for Tregs in facilitating productive immune responses. Using adoptive transfer of TCR transgenic CD4 T-cells into Treg-sufficient or Treg-depleted mice prior to HSV-2 infection, we found that Tregs are required for timely accumulation of HSV-2-specific CD4 T-cells within the infected tissues. Further, Tregs are critical for appropriate trafficking of dendritic cells (DCs) from the vaginal mucosa to the dLN, which results in fully effective CD4 T-cell priming, activation, and ultimately migration to the infected tissues. Using CTLA-4 conditional knockout mice, we demonstrate that Tregs impact DC migration through a CTLA-4-mediated mechanism. Together, our data highlight the critical role of Tregs in proper potentiation of adaptive immune responses to microbial infection. PMID:27007674

  12. Expansion of brain T cells in homeostatic conditions in lymphopenic Rag2(-/-) mice.

    PubMed

    Song, Chang; Nicholson, James D; Clark, Sarah M; Li, Xin; Keegan, Achsah D; Tonelli, Leonardo H

    2016-10-01

    The concept of the brain as an immune privileged organ is rapidly evolving in light of new findings outlining the sophisticated relationship between the central nervous and the immune systems. The role of T cells in brain development and function, as well as modulation of behavior has been demonstrated by an increasing number of studies. Moreover, recent studies have redefined the existence of a brain lymphatic system and the presence of T cells in specific brain structures, such as the meninges and choroid plexus. Nevertheless, much information is needed to further the understanding of brain T cells and their relationship with the central nervous system under non-inflammatory conditions. In the present study we employed the Rag2(-/-) mouse model of lymphocyte deficiency and reconstitution by adoptive transfer to study the temporal and anatomical expansion of T cells in the brain under homeostatic conditions. Lymphopenic Rag2(-/-) mice were reconstituted with 10 million lymphoid cells and studied at one, two and four weeks after transfer. Moreover, lymphoid cells and purified CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells from transgenic GFP expressing mice were used to define the neuroanatomical localization of transferred cells. T cell numbers were very low in the brain of reconstituted mice up to one week after transfer and significantly increased by 2weeks, reaching wild type values at 4weeks after transfer. CD4(+) T cells were the most abundant lymphocyte subtype found in the brain followed by CD8(+) T cells and lastly B cells. Furthermore, proliferation studies showed that CD4(+) T cells expand more rapidly than CD8(+) T cells. Lymphoid cells localize abundantly in meningeal structures, choroid plexus, and circumventricular organs. Lymphocytes were also found in vascular and perivascular spaces and in the brain parenchyma across several regions of the brain, in particular in structures rich in white matter content. These results provide proof of concept that the brain meningeal

  13. Expansion of brain T cells in homeostatic conditions in lymphopenic Rag2(-/-) mice.

    PubMed

    Song, Chang; Nicholson, James D; Clark, Sarah M; Li, Xin; Keegan, Achsah D; Tonelli, Leonardo H

    2016-10-01

    The concept of the brain as an immune privileged organ is rapidly evolving in light of new findings outlining the sophisticated relationship between the central nervous and the immune systems. The role of T cells in brain development and function, as well as modulation of behavior has been demonstrated by an increasing number of studies. Moreover, recent studies have redefined the existence of a brain lymphatic system and the presence of T cells in specific brain structures, such as the meninges and choroid plexus. Nevertheless, much information is needed to further the understanding of brain T cells and their relationship with the central nervous system under non-inflammatory conditions. In the present study we employed the Rag2(-/-) mouse model of lymphocyte deficiency and reconstitution by adoptive transfer to study the temporal and anatomical expansion of T cells in the brain under homeostatic conditions. Lymphopenic Rag2(-/-) mice were reconstituted with 10 million lymphoid cells and studied at one, two and four weeks after transfer. Moreover, lymphoid cells and purified CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells from transgenic GFP expressing mice were used to define the neuroanatomical localization of transferred cells. T cell numbers were very low in the brain of reconstituted mice up to one week after transfer and significantly increased by 2weeks, reaching wild type values at 4weeks after transfer. CD4(+) T cells were the most abundant lymphocyte subtype found in the brain followed by CD8(+) T cells and lastly B cells. Furthermore, proliferation studies showed that CD4(+) T cells expand more rapidly than CD8(+) T cells. Lymphoid cells localize abundantly in meningeal structures, choroid plexus, and circumventricular organs. Lymphocytes were also found in vascular and perivascular spaces and in the brain parenchyma across several regions of the brain, in particular in structures rich in white matter content. These results provide proof of concept that the brain meningeal

  14. NY-ESO-1 antigen-reactive T cell receptors exhibit diverse therapeutic capability.

    PubMed

    Sommermeyer, Daniel; Conrad, Heinke; Krönig, Holger; Gelfort, Haike; Bernhard, Helga; Uckert, Wolfgang

    2013-03-15

    The cancer-testis antigen NY-ESO-1 has been used as a target for different immunotherapies like vaccinations and adoptive transfer of antigen-specific cytotoxic T cells, as it is expressed in various tumor types and has limited expression in normal cells. The in vitro generation of T cells with defined antigen specificity by T cell receptor (TCR) gene transfer is an established method to create cells for immunotherapy. However, an extensive characterization of TCR which are candidates for treatment of patients is crucial for successful therapies. The TCR has to be efficiently expressed, their affinity to the desired antigen should be high enough to recognize low amounts of endogenously processed peptides on tumor cells, and the TCR should not be cross-reactive to other antigens. We characterized three NY-ESO-1 antigen-reactive cytotoxic T lymphocyte clones which were generated by different approaches of T cell priming (autologous, allogeneic), and transferred their TCR into donor T cells for more extensive evaluations. Although one TCR most efficiently bound MHC-multimers loaded with NY-ESO-1 peptide, T cells expressing this transgenic TCR were not able to recognize endogenously processed antigen. A second TCR recognized HLA-A2 independent of the bound peptide beside its much stronger recognition of NY-ESO-1 bound to HLA-A2. A third TCR displayed an intermediate but peptide-specific performance in all functional assays and, therefore, is the most promising candidate TCR for further clinical development. Our data indicate that multiple parameters of TCR gene-modified T cells have to be evaluated to identify an optimal TCR candidate for adoptive therapy.

  15. T cell treatment with small interfering RNA for suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 modulates allergic airway responses in a murine model of asthma.

    PubMed

    Moriwaki, Atsushi; Inoue, Hiromasa; Nakano, Takako; Matsunaga, Yuko; Matsuno, Yukiko; Matsumoto, Takafumi; Fukuyama, Satoru; Kan-O, Keiko; Matsumoto, Koichiro; Tsuda-Eguchi, Miyuki; Nagakubo, Daisuke; Yoshie, Osamu; Yoshimura, Akihiko; Kubo, Masato; Nakanishi, Yoichi

    2011-04-01

    CD4(+) T cells, particularly T helper (Th) 2 cells, play a pivotal role in the pathophysiology of allergic asthma. Suppressor of cytokine signaling (SOCS) proteins control the balance of CD4(+) T cell differentiation. Mice that lack SOCS3 in T cells by crossing SOCS3-floxed mice with Lck-Cre-transgenic mice have reduced allergen-induced eosinophilia in the airways. Here, we studied the effects of SOCS3 silencing with small interfering (si) RNA in primary CD4(+) T cells on Th2 cell differentiation and on asthmatic responses in mice. Th2 cells were generated from ovalbumin (OVA)-specific T cell receptor-transgenic mice in vitro and transferred into recipient mice. Transfection of SOCS3-specific siRNA attenuated Th2 response in vitro. Adoptive transfer of SOCS3-siRNA T cells exhibited markedly suppressed airway hyperresponsiveness and eosinophilia after OVA challenge, with a concomitant decrease in OVA-specific CD4(+) T cell accumulation in the airways. To investigate the mechanism of this impaired CD4(+) T cell accumulation, we inactivated SOCS3 of T cells by crossing SOCS3-floxed (SOCS3(flox/flox)) mice with CD4-Cre transgenic mice. CD4-Cre × SOCS3(flox/flox) mice exhibited fewer IL-4-producing cells and more reduced eosinophil infiltration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids than control mice in a model of OVA-induced asthma. Expression of CCR3 and CCR4 in CD4(+) T cells was decreased in CD4-Cre × SOCS3(flox/flox) mice. CCR4 expression was also decreased in CD4(+) T cells after transfer of SOCS3 siRNA-treated T cells. These findings suggest that the therapeutic modulation of SOCS3 expression in CD4(+) T cells might be effective in preventing the development of allergic asthma.

  16. A novel differentiation pathway from CD4⁺ T cells to CD4⁻ T cells for maintaining immune system homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, X; Sun, G; Sun, X; Tian, D; Liu, K; Liu, T; Cong, M; Xu, H; Li, X; Shi, W; Tian, Y; Yao, J; Guo, H; Zhang, D

    2016-01-01

    CD4(+) T lymphocytes are key players in the adaptive immune system and can differentiate into a variety of effector and regulatory T cells. Here, we provide evidence that a novel differentiation pathway of CD4(+) T cells shifts the balance from a destructive T-cell response to one that favors regulation in an immune-mediated liver injury model. Peripheral CD4(-)CD8(-)NK1.1(-) double-negative T cells (DNT) was increased following Concanavalin A administration in mice. Adoptive transfer of DNT led to significant protection from hepatocyte necrosis by direct inhibition on the activation of lymphocytes, a process that occurred primarily through the perforin-granzyme B route. These DNT converted from CD4(+) rather than CD8(+) T cells, a process primarily regulated by OX40. DNT migrated to the liver through the CXCR3-CXCL9/CXCL10 interaction. In conclusion, we elucidated a novel differentiation pathway from activated CD4(+) T cells to regulatory DNT cells for maintaining homeostasis of the immune system in vivo, and provided key evidence that utilizing this novel differentiation pathway has potential application in the prevention and treatment of autoimmune diseases. PMID:27077809

  17. Specific increase in potency via structure-based design of a T cell receptor

    PubMed Central

    Malecek, Karolina; Grigoryan, Arsen; Zhong, Shi; Gu, Wei Jun; Johnson, Laura A.; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Cardozo, Timothy; Krogsgaard, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy with antigen-specific T lymphocytes is a powerful strategy for cancer treatment. However, most tumor antigens are non-reactive “self” proteins, which presents an immunotherapy design challenge. Recent studies have shown that tumor-specific T cell receptors (TCRs) can be transduced into normal peripheral blood lymphocytes, which persist after transfer in about 30% of patients and effectively destroy tumor cells in vivo. Although encouraging, the limited clinical responses underscore the need for enrichment of T cells with desirable anti-tumor capabilities prior to patient transfer. In this study, we used structure-based design to predict point mutations of a TCR (DMF5) that enhance its binding affinity for an agonist tumor antigen-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC), Mart-1(27L)-HLA-A2, which elicits full T cell activation to trigger immune responses. We analyzed the effects of selected TCR point mutations on T cell activation potency and analyzed cross-reactivity with related antigens. Our results showed that the mutated TCRs had improved T cell activation potency, while retaining a high degree of specificity. Such affinity-optimized TCRs have demonstrated to be very specific for Mart-1 (27L), the epitope for which they were structurally designed. And even though of limited clinical relevance, these studies open the possibility for future structural-based studies that could potentially be used in adoptive immunotherapy to treat melanoma while avoiding adverse autoimmunity-derived effects. PMID:25070852

  18. CD8+ T cell recognition of epitopes within the capsid of adeno-associated virus 8-based gene transfer vectors depends on vectors' genome.

    PubMed

    Wu, Te-Lang; Li, Hua; Faust, Susan M; Chi, Emily; Zhou, Shangzhen; Wright, Fraser; High, Katherine A; Ertl, Hildegund C J

    2014-01-01

    Self-complementary adeno-associated viral (AAV) vectors expressing human factor IX (hF.IX) have achieved transient or sustained correction of hemophilia B in human volunteers. High doses of AAV2 or AAV8 vectors delivered to the liver caused in several patients an increase in transaminases accompanied by a rise in AAV capsid-specific T cells and a decrease in circulating hF.IX levels suggesting immune-mediated destruction of vector-transduced cells. Kinetics of these adverse events differed in patients receiving AAV2 or AAV8 vectors causing rise in transaminases at 3 versus 8 weeks after vector injection, respectively. To test if CD8+ T cells to AAV8 vectors, which are similar to AAV2 vectors are fully-gutted vectors and thereby fail to encode structural viral proteins, could cause damage at this late time point, we tested in a series of mouse studies how long major histocompatibility (MHC) class I epitopes within AAV8 capsid can be presented to CD8+ T cells. Our results clearly show that depending on the vectors' genome, CD8+ T cells can detect such epitopes on AAV8's capsid for up to 6 months indicating that the capsid of AAV8 degrades slowly in mice.

  19. Type 1 diabetes immunotherapy using polyclonal regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Bluestone, Jeffrey A; Buckner, Jane H; Fitch, Mark; Gitelman, Stephen E; Gupta, Shipra; Hellerstein, Marc K; Herold, Kevan C; Lares, Angela; Lee, Michael R; Li, Kelvin; Liu, Weihong; Long, S Alice; Masiello, Lisa M; Nguyen, Vinh; Putnam, Amy L; Rieck, Mary; Sayre, Peter H; Tang, Qizhi

    2015-11-25

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease that occurs in genetically susceptible individuals. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been shown to be defective in the autoimmune disease setting. Thus, efforts to repair or replace Tregs in T1D may reverse autoimmunity and protect the remaining insulin-producing β cells. On the basis of this premise, a robust technique has been developed to isolate and expand Tregs from patients with T1D. The expanded Tregs retained their T cell receptor diversity and demonstrated enhanced functional activity. We report on a phase 1 trial to assess safety of Treg adoptive immunotherapy in T1D. Fourteen adult subjects with T1D, in four dosing cohorts, received ex vivo-expanded autologous CD4(+)CD127(lo/-)CD25(+) polyclonal Tregs (0.05 × 10(8) to 26 × 10(8) cells). A subset of the adoptively transferred Tregs was long-lived, with up to 25% of the peak level remaining in the circulation at 1 year after transfer. Immune studies showed transient increases in Tregs in recipients and retained a broad Treg FOXP3(+)CD4(+)CD25(hi)CD127(lo) phenotype long-term. There were no infusion reactions or cell therapy-related high-grade adverse events. C-peptide levels persisted out to 2+ years after transfer in several individuals. These results support the development of a phase 2 trial to test efficacy of the Treg therapy. PMID:26606968

  20. Engineered T cell therapies.

    PubMed

    Field, Anne-Christine; Qasim, Waseem

    2015-11-04

    Alongside advancements in gene therapy for inherited immune disorders, the need for effective alternative therapeutic options for other conditions has resulted in an expansion in the field of research for T cell gene therapy. T cells are easily obtained and can be induced to divide robustly ex vivo, a characteristic that allows them to be highly permissible to viral vector-mediated introduction of transgenes. Pioneering clinical trials targeting cancers and infectious diseases have provided safety and feasibility data and important information about persistence of engineered cells in vivo. Here, we review clinical experiences with γ-retroviral and lentiviral vectors and consider the potential of integrating transposon-based vectors as well as specific genome editing with designer nucleases in engineered T cell therapies.

  1. CD4+ invariant natural killer T cells protect from murine GVHD lethality through expansion of donor CD4+CD25+FoxP3+ regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Schneidawind, Dominik; Pierini, Antonio; Alvarez, Maite; Pan, Yuqiong; Baker, Jeanette; Buechele, Corina; Luong, Richard H; Meyer, Everett H; Negrin, Robert S

    2014-11-20

    Dysregulated donor T cells lead to destruction of host tissues resulting in graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). We investigated the impact of highly purified (>95%) donor CD4(+) invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells on GVHD in a murine model of allogeneic HCT. We found that low doses of adoptively transferred donor CD4(+) iNKT cells protect from GVHD morbidity and mortality through an expansion of donor CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs). These Tregs express high levels of the Ikaros transcription factor Helios and expand from the Treg pool of the donor graft. Furthermore, CD4(+) iNKT cells preserve T-cell-mediated graft-versus-tumor effects. Our studies reveal new aspects of the cellular interplay between iNKT cells and Tregs in the context of tolerance induction after allogeneic HCT and set the stage for clinical translation. PMID:25293774

  2. Quantitative high-throughput single-cell cytotoxicity assay for T cells.

    PubMed

    Liadi, Ivan; Roszik, Jason; Romain, Gabrielle; Cooper, Laurence J N; Varadarajan, Navin

    2013-02-02

    Cancer immunotherapy can harness the specificity of immune response to target and eliminate tumors. Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) based on the adoptive transfer of T cells genetically modified to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) has shown considerable promise in clinical trials(1-4). There are several advantages to using CAR(+) T cells for the treatment of cancers including the ability to target non-MHC restricted antigens and to functionalize the T cells for optimal survival, homing and persistence within the host; and finally to induce apoptosis of CAR(+) T cells in the event of host toxicity(5). Delineating the optimal functions of CAR(+) T cells associated with clinical benefit is essential for designing the next generation of clinical trials. Recent advances in live animal imaging like multiphoton microscopy have revolutionized the study of immune cell function in vivo(6,7). While these studies have advanced our understanding of T-cell functions in vivo, T-cell based ACT in clinical trials requires the need to link molecular and functional features of T-cell preparations pre-infusion with clinical efficacy post-infusion, by utilizing in vitro assays monitoring T-cell functions like, cytotoxicity and cytokine secretion. Standard flow-cytometry based assays have been developed that determine the overall functioning of populations of T cells at the single-cell level but these are not suitable for monitoring conjugate formation and lifetimes or the ability of the same cell to kill multiple targets(8). Microfabricated arrays designed in biocompatible polymers like polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) are a particularly attractive method to spatially confine effectors and targets in small volumes(9). In combination with automated time-lapse fluorescence microscopy, thousands of effector-target interactions can be monitored simultaneously by imaging individual wells of a nanowell array. We present here a high-throughput methodology for monitoring T-cell mediated

  3. Macrophages transfer antigens to dendritic cells by releasing exosomes containing dead-cell-associated antigens partially through a ceramide-dependent pathway to enhance CD4(+) T-cell responses.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yingping; Liu, Yi; Yang, Chunqing; Kang, Li; Wang, Meixiang; Hu, Jingxia; He, Hao; Song, Wengang; Tang, Hua

    2016-10-01

    Defects in rapid clearance of apoptotic cells lead to an accumulation of dead cells (late apoptotic or secondary necrotic cells), which results in an aberrant immune response. However, little is known about whether and how macrophages (Mφs) cooperate with dendritic cells (DCs) in the presentation of dead-cell-associated antigens in this process. By transferring high numbers of dead cells to mimic a failure of apoptotic cell clearance in vivo, we found that Mφs and neutrophils were the predominant phagocytes in the uptake of dead cells in the spleen. Moreover, both Mφs and DCs were required for an optimal CD4(+) T-cell response triggered by dead-cell-associated antigens. Importantly, although Mφs alone had a poor capacity for antigen presentation, they could transfer phagocytosed antigens to DCs for potent antigen presentation to enhance T-cell responses. Finally, we found that exosomes released from Mφs acted as a transmitter to convey antigens to DCs partially in a ceramide-dependent manner, since treatment with the neutral sphingomyelinase inhibitor GW4869 and spiroepoxide resulted in a significant reduction of T-cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo. These findings point to a novel pathway of cross-talk between Mφs and DCs, which will be helpful to explain possible mechanisms for autoimmune diseases characterized by increased rates of apoptosis. PMID:27278624

  4. Macrophages transfer antigens to dendritic cells by releasing exosomes containing dead-cell-associated antigens partially through a ceramide-dependent pathway to enhance CD4(+) T-cell responses.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yingping; Liu, Yi; Yang, Chunqing; Kang, Li; Wang, Meixiang; Hu, Jingxia; He, Hao; Song, Wengang; Tang, Hua

    2016-10-01

    Defects in rapid clearance of apoptotic cells lead to an accumulation of dead cells (late apoptotic or secondary necrotic cells), which results in an aberrant immune response. However, little is known about whether and how macrophages (Mφs) cooperate with dendritic cells (DCs) in the presentation of dead-cell-associated antigens in this process. By transferring high numbers of dead cells to mimic a failure of apoptotic cell clearance in vivo, we found that Mφs and neutrophils were the predominant phagocytes in the uptake of dead cells in the spleen. Moreover, both Mφs and DCs were required for an optimal CD4(+) T-cell response triggered by dead-cell-associated antigens. Importantly, although Mφs alone had a poor capacity for antigen presentation, they could transfer phagocytosed antigens to DCs for potent antigen presentation to enhance T-cell responses. Finally, we found that exosomes released from Mφs acted as a transmitter to convey antigens to DCs partially in a ceramide-dependent manner, since treatment with the neutral sphingomyelinase inhibitor GW4869 and spiroepoxide resulted in a significant reduction of T-cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo. These findings point to a novel pathway of cross-talk between Mφs and DCs, which will be helpful to explain possible mechanisms for autoimmune diseases characterized by increased rates of apoptosis.

  5. CD4(+) T cells epigenetically modified by oxidative stress cause lupus-like autoimmunity in mice.

    PubMed

    Strickland, Faith M; Li, YePeng; Johnson, Kent; Sun, Zhichao; Richardson, Bruce C

    2015-08-01

    Lupus develops when genetically predisposed people encounter environmental agents such as UV light, silica, infections and cigarette smoke that cause oxidative stress, but how oxidative damage modifies the immune system to cause lupus flares is unknown. We previously showed that oxidizing agents decreased ERK pathway signaling in human T cells, decreased DNA methyltransferase 1 and caused demethylation and overexpression of genes similar to those from patients with active lupus. The current study tested whether oxidant-treated T cells can induce lupus in mice. We adoptively transferred CD4(+) T cells treated in vitro with oxidants hydrogen peroxide or nitric oxide or the demethylating agent 5-azacytidine into syngeneic mice and studied the development and severity of lupus in the recipients. Disease severity was assessed by measuring anti-dsDNA antibodies, proteinuria, hematuria and by histopathology of kidney tissues. The effect of the oxidants on expression of CD40L, CD70, KirL1 and DNMT1 genes and CD40L protein in the treated CD4(+) T cells was assessed by Q-RT-PCR and flow cytometry. H2O2 and ONOO(-) decreased Dnmt1 expression in CD4(+) T cells and caused the upregulation of genes known to be suppressed by DNA methylation in patients with lupus and animal models of SLE. Adoptive transfer of oxidant-treated CD4(+) T cells into syngeneic recipients resulted in the induction of anti-dsDNA antibody and glomerulonephritis. The results show that oxidative stress may contribute to lupus disease by inhibiting ERK pathway signaling in T cells leading to DNA demethylation, upregulation of immune genes and autoreactivity.

  6. CD19 chimeric antigen receptor (CD19 CAR)-redirected adoptive T-cell immunotherapy for the treatment of relapsed or refractory B-cell Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    Onea, Alexandra S; Jazirehi, Ali R

    2016-01-01

    Recovery rates for B-cell Non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma (NHL) are up to 70% with current standard-of-care treatments including rituximab (chimeric anti-CD20 monoclonal antibody) in combination with chemotherapy (R-CHOP). However, patients who do not respond to first-line treatment or develop resistance have a very poor prognosis. This signifies the need for the development of an optimal treatment approach for relapsed/refractory B-NHL. Novel CD19- chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell redirected immunotherapy is an attractive option for this subset of patients. Anti-CD19 CAR T-cell therapy has already had remarkable efficacy in various leukemias as well as encouraging outcomes in phase I clinical trials of relapsed/refractory NHL. In going forward with additional clinical trials, complementary treatments that may circumvent potential resistance mechanisms should be used alongside anti-CD19 T-cells in order to prevent relapse with resistant strains of disease. Some such supplementary tactics include conditioning with lymphodepletion agents, sensitizing with kinase inhibitors and Bcl-2 inhibitors, enhancing function with multispecific CAR T-cells and CD40 ligand-expressing CAR T-cells, and safeguarding with lymphoma stem cell-targeted treatments. A therapy regimen involving anti-CD19 CAR T-cells and one or more auxiliary treatments could dramatically improve prognoses for patients with relapsed/refractory B-cell NHL. This approach has the potential to revolutionize B-NHL salvage therapy in much the same way rituximab did for first-line treatments. PMID:27186412

  7. Rejection of cardiac allografts by T cells expressing a restricted repertoire of T-cell receptor V beta genes.

    PubMed Central

    Shirwan, H; Barwari, L; Cramer, D V

    1997-01-01

    We have recently shown that T cells infiltrating cardiac allografts early in graft rejection use a limited T-cell receptor (TCR) V beta repertoire. In this study we tested whether this limited repertoire of V beta genes is important for graft rejection. A cell line, AL2-L3, was established from LEW lymphocytes infiltrating ACI heart allografts 2 days after transplantation. This cell line is composed of CD4+ T cells that primarily recognize the class II RTI.B major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule expressed by the donor graft. This cell line precipitated acute rejection of donor hearts with a median survival time (MST) of 10.5 days following adoptive transfer to sublethally irradiated LEW recipients. This rate of graft rejection was significantly (P < 0.0007) accelerated when compared with a MST of 60 days for allografts in irradiated control recipients. The AL2-L3-mediated acceleration of graft rejection was donor specific as WF third-party heart allografts were rejected with a delayed tempo (MST = 28.5 days). The V beta repertoire of this cell line was primarily restricted to the expression of V beta 4, 15 and 19 genes. The nucleotide sequence analysis of the beta-chain cDNAs from this cell line demonstrated that the restricted use of the V gene repertoire was not shared with the N, D and J regions. A wide variety of CDR3 loops and J beta genes were used in association with selected V beta genes. These data provide evidence for the role a restricted repertoire of V beta genes plays in cardiac allograft rejection in this model. The restricted usage of the V beta repertoire in an early T-cell response to allografts may provide the opportunity to therapeutically disrupt the rejection reaction by targeting selected T-cell populations for elimination at the time of organ transplantation. Images Figure 2 PMID:9176111

  8. Preventing T cell rejection of pig xenografts.

    PubMed

    Higginbotham, Laura; Ford, Mandy L; Newell, Kenneth A; Adams, Andrew B

    2015-11-01

    Xenotransplantation is a potential solution to the limited supply of donor organs. While early barriers to xenograft acceptance, such as hyperacute rejection, are now largely avoided through genetic engineering, the next frontier in successful xenograft survival will require prevention of T cell-mediated rejection. Most successful immunosuppressive regimens in xenotransplantation utilize T cell depletion with antibody therapy. Additionally, the use of T cell costimulatory blockade - specifically blockade of the CD40-CD154 pathway - shows promise with several reports of long-term xenograft survival. Additional therapies, such as transgenic expression of T cell coinhibitory molecules or transfer of immunomodulatory cells to promote tolerance, may be necessary to achieve reliable long-term xenograft acceptance. Further studies in pre-clinical models are essential in order to optimize these regimens prior to trials in patients.

  9. T-cell receptor (TCR) usage in Lewis rat experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis: TCR beta-chain-variable-region V beta 8.2-positive T cells are not essential for induction and course of disease.

    PubMed Central

    Gold, R; Giegerich, G; Hartung, H P; Toyka, K V

    1995-01-01

    Predominant usage of V beta 8.2 gene segments, encoding a T-cell receptor (TCR) beta chain variable region, has been reported for pathogenic Lewis rat T cells reactive to myelin basic protein (MBP). However, up to 75% of the alpha/beta T cells in a panel of MBP-specific T-cell lines did not display TCR V beta 8.2, V beta 8.5, V beta 10, or V beta 16 elements. To further investigate TCR usage, we sorted the T-cell lines for V beta 8.2- and V beta 10-positive T cells or depleted the lines of cells with these TCRs. V beta 8.2-positive T cells and one of the depleted T-cell lines strongly reacted against the MBP peptide MBP-(68-88). The depleted T-cell line caused marked experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) even in Lewis rats in which endogenous V beta 8.2-positive T cells had been eliminated by neonatal treatment with anti-V beta 8.2 monoclonal antibodies. T-cell hybridomas generated from this line predominantly used V beta 3 TCR genes coexpressed with TCR V alpha 2 transcripts, which were also used by V beta 8.2-positive T cells. Furthermore, V beta 10-positive T cells reactive to MBP-(44-67) were encephalitogenic when injected immediately after positive selection. After induction of EAE by sorted V beta 8.2- or V beta 10-positive T-cell lines, immunocytochemical analysis of the spinal cord tissue showed a predominance of the injected TCR or of nontypable alpha/beta T cells after injection of the depleted line. Our results demonstrate heterogeneity of TCR beta-chain usage even for a single autoantigen in an inbred strain. Moreover, V beta 8.2-positive T cells are not essential for the induction and progression of adoptive-transfer EAE. Images Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:7597040

  10. Adoptive transfer of cytotoxic T lymphocytes induced by CD86-transfected tumor cells suppresses multi-organ metastases of C1300 neuroblastoma in mice.

    PubMed

    Enomoto, A; Kato, K; Yagita, H; Okumura, K

    1997-06-01

    In this study, we examined the therapeutic antitumor effect of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) generated against CD86-transfected mouse neuroblastoma C1300. We first generated the transfectant, CD86 + C1300, expressing a high level of mouse CD86 on the cell surface. While CD86 + C1300 cells were rejected in syngeneic A/J mice when inoculated subcutaneously, neither vaccination nor any therapeutic antitumor effect was obtained, implying that C1300 may be a poorly immunogenic tumor. However, in vitro stimulation of splenocytes from either C1300-bearing or CD86 + C1300-rejecting mice with CD86 + C1300 cells resulted in remarkable CTL activity against C1300 cells. The CTL activity induced by CD86 + C1300 was mediated by T cell receptor/CD3 and CD8 and was further enhanced by the addition of interleukin-2. Intravenous inoculation of C1300 cells led to multiple organ metastases including the liver, lung, kidney, ovary, lymph node and bone marrow. To examine the therapeutic effect of CTL in this metastasis model, CTL induced by parental or CD86 + C1300 cells were administrated into C1300-bearing mice. Adoptive transfer of CD86 + C1300-induced CTL resulted in marked elimination of multi-organ metastases and prolonged survival in almost all mice, 70% of which survived indefinitely. These results indicate that adoptive transfer of CTL induced by CD86-transfected tumor cells in vitro would be effective and useful for tumor immunotherapy against poorly immunogenic tumors.

  11. Immunotherapy for Osteosarcoma: Genetic Modification of T cells Overcomes Low Levels of Tumor Antigen Expression

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Nabil; Salsman, Vita S; Yvon, Eric; Louis, Chrystal U; Perlaky, Laszlo; Wels, Winfried S; Dishop, Meghan K; Kleinerman, Eugenie E; Pule, Martin; Rooney, Cliona M; Heslop, Helen E; Gottschalk, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is expressed by the majority of human osteosarcomas and is a risk factor for poor outcome. Unlike breast cancer, osteosarcoma cells express HER2 at too low, a level for patients to benefit from HER2 monoclonal antibodies. We reasoned that this limitation might be overcome by genetically modifying T cells with HER2-specific chimeric antigen receptors (CARs), because even a low frequency of receptor engagement could be sufficient to induce effector cell killing of the tumor. HER2-specific T cells were generated by retroviral transduction with a HER2-specific CAR containing a CD28.ζ signaling domain. HER2-specific T cells recognized HER2-positive osteosarcoma cells as judged by their ability to proliferate, produce immunostimulatory T helper 1 cytokines, and kill HER2-positive osteosarcoma cell lines in vitro. The adoptive transfer of HER2-specific T cells caused regression of established osteosarcoma xenografts in locoregional as well as metastatic mouse models. In contrast, delivery of nontransduced (NT) T cells did not change the tumor growth pattern. Genetic modification of T cells with CARs specific for target antigens, expressed at too low a level to be effectively recognized by monoclonal antibodies, may allow immunotherapy to be more broadly applicable for human cancer therapy. PMID:19532139

  12. Characterization of Immunodominant BK Polyomavirus 9mer Epitope T Cell Responses

    PubMed Central

    Cioni, M.; Leboeuf, C.; Comoli, P.; Ginevri, F.

    2016-01-01

    Uncontrolled BK polyomavirus (BKPyV) replication in kidney transplant recipients (KTRs) causes polyomavirus‐associated nephropathy and allograft loss. Reducing immunosuppression is associated with clearing viremia and nephropathy and increasing BKPyV‐specific T cell responses in most patients; however, current immunoassays have limited sensitivity, target mostly CD4+ T cells, and largely fail to predict onset and clearance of BKPyV replication. To characterize BKPyV‐specific CD8+ T cells, bioinformatics were used to predict 9mer epitopes in the early viral gene region (EVGR) presented by 14 common HLAs in Europe and North America. Thirty‐nine EVGR epitopes were experimentally confirmed by interferon‐γ enzyme‐linked immunospot assays in at least 30% of BKPyV IgG–seropositive healthy participants. Most 9mers clustered in domains, and some were presented by more than one HLA class I, as typically seen for immunodominant epitopes. Specific T cell binding using MHC class I streptamers was demonstrated for 21 of 39 (54%) epitopes. In a prospective cohort of 118 pediatric KTRs, 19 patients protected or recovering from BKPyV viremia were experimentally tested, and 13 epitopes were validated. Single HLA mismatches were not associated with viremia, suggesting that failing immune control likely involves multiple factors including maintenance immunosuppression. Combining BKPyV load and T cell assays using immunodominant epitopes may help in evaluating risk and reducing immunosuppression and may lead to safe adoptive T cell transfer. PMID:26663765

  13. Regulatory T cells ameliorate acetaminophen-induced immune-mediated liver injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuefu; Sun, Rui; Chen, Yongyan; Lian, Zhe-Xiong; Wei, Haiming; Tian, Zhigang

    2015-04-01

    The contribution of innate immune cells to acetaminophen (APAP)-induced liver injury has been extensively investigated. However, the roles of T cell populations among adaptive immune cells in APAP-induced liver injury remain to be elucidated. Herein, we found that distinct CD4(+) T cell subsets but not CD8(+) T cells modulated APAP-induced liver injury in mice. After APAP challenge, more CD62L(low)CD44(hi)CD4(+) T cells appeared in the liver, accompanied by increased IFN-γ. The removal of CD4(+) T cells by either antibody depletion or genetic deficiency markedly compromised pro-inflammatory cytokine levels and ameliorated liver injury. Meanwhile, we also found that the frequency and absolute number of Treg cells also increased. Treg cell depletion increased hepatic CD62L(low)CD44(hi)CD4(+) T cells, augmented pro-inflammatory cytokines, and exacerbated liver injury, while adoptive transfer of Treg cells ameliorated APAP-induced liver injury. Furthermore, the recruitment of Treg cells into the liver through specific expression of CXCL10 in the liver could ameliorate APAP-induced liver injury. Our investigation suggests that Th1 and Treg subsets are involved in regulating APAP-induced liver injury. Thus, modulating the Th1/Treg balance may be an effective strategy to prevent and/or treat APAP-induced liver injury.

  14. Treatment of dextran sodium sulfate-induced experimental colitis by adoptive transfer of peritoneal cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ting; Ren, Jun; Wang, Wei; Wei, Xia-wei; Shen, Guo-bo; Liu, Yan-tong; Luo, Min; Xu, Guang-chao; Shao, Bin; Deng, Sen-yi; He, Zhi-yao; Liang, Xiao; Liu, Yu; Wen, Yan-Zhu; Xiang, Rong; Yang, Li; Deng, Hong-xin; Wei, Yu-quan

    2015-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of the natural regulatory B cells and macrophages should be a useful treatment for inflammation and autoimmune disease. However, it is usually difficult to isolate these cells from the tissues and expand them. Here, we investigated the feasibility of adoptively transferring peritoneal cells (PCs) as a treatment for DSS-induced colitis. We found that peritoneal cavity can provide an easily accessible site for harvesting enough number of PCs, namely, two-dose PCs for the treatment from a mouse in one operation. Adoptive therapy of these cells from healthy mice or those with disease is effectively in reducing the disease activity score. The natural B cells and macrophages of the infused PCs can selectively migrate to lesion sites and regulate the expression of Stat3, NF−κB, Smad3 and Smad7. Additionally, PCs exert dual activity of IL-10 and TGF-β secreted spontaneously by both peritoneal B cells and macrophages, which in turn enhance the induction of regulatory B cells and Macrophages in microenvironment of inflammation. Moreover, PCs can re-establish immunological tolerance in the OVA-immunized mice. Thus, our findings provide a new strategy for colitis therapy and could be of importance in additional exploration of other inflammation and autoimmune diseases therapy. PMID:26565726

  15. Consequences of exposure to ionizing radiation for effector T cell function in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Rouse, B.T.; Hartley, D.; Doherty, P.C. )

    1989-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of acutely primed and memory virus-immune CD8+ T cells causes enhanced meningitis in both cyclophosphamide (Cy) suppressed, and unsuppressed, recipients infected with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV). The severity of meningitis is assessed by counting cells in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) obtained from the cisterna magna, which allows measurement of significant inflammatory process ranging from 3 to more than 300 times the background number of cells found in mice injected with virus alone. Exposure of the donor immune population to ionizing radiation prior to transfer has shown that activated T cells from mice primed 7 or 8 days previously with virus may still promote a low level of meningitis in unsuppressed recipients following as much as 800 rads, while this effect is lost totally in Cy-suppressed mice at 600 rads. Memory T cells are more susceptible and show no evidence of in vivo effector function in either recipient population subsequent to 400 rads, a dose level which also greatly reduces the efficacy of acutely-primed T cells. The results are interpreted as indicating that heavily irradiated cells that are already fully functional show evidence of primary localization to the CNS and a limited capacity to cause pathology. Secondary localization, and events that require further proliferation of the T cells in vivo, are greatly inhibited by irradiation.

  16. Differential contributions of central and effector memory T cells to recall responses

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Alan D.; Ely, Kenneth H.; Woodland, David L.

    2005-01-01

    Although the absolute number of memory CD8+ T cells established in the spleen following antigen encounter remains stable for many years, the relative capacity of these cells to mediate recall responses is not known. Here we used a dual adoptive transfer approach to demonstrate a progressive increase in the quality of memory T cell pools in terms of their ability to proliferate and accumulate at effector sites in response to secondary pathogen challenge. This temporal increase in efficacy occurred in CD62Llo (effector memory) and CD62Lhi (central memory) subpopulations, but was most prominent in the CD62Lhi subpopulation. These data indicate that the contribution of effector memory and central memory T cells to the recall response changes substantially over time. PMID:15983064

  17. CD19-targeted CAR T-cell therapeutics for hematologic malignancies: interpreting clinical outcomes to date.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae H; Geyer, Mark B; Brentjens, Renier J

    2016-06-30

    Adoptive transfer of T cells genetically modified to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) targeting CD19 has produced impressive results in treating patients with B-cell malignancies. Although these CAR-modified T cells target the same antigen, the designs of CARs vary as well as several key aspects of the clinical trials in which these CARs have been studied. It is unclear whether these differences have any impact on clinical outcome and treatment-related toxicities. Herein, we review clinical results reflecting the investigational use of CD19-targeted CAR T-cell therapeutics in patients with B-cell hematologic malignancies, in light of differences in CAR design and production, and outline the limitations inherent in comparing outcomes between studies. PMID:27207800

  18. Interplay between T Cell Receptor Binding Kinetics and the Level of Cognate Peptide Presented by Major Histocompatibility Complexes Governs CD8+ T Cell Responsiveness*

    PubMed Central

    Irving, Melita; Zoete, Vincent; Hebeisen, Michael; Schmid, Daphné; Baumgartner, Petra; Guillaume, Philippe; Romero, Pedro; Speiser, Daniel; Luescher, Immanuel; Rufer, Nathalie; Michielin, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Through a rational design approach, we generated a panel of HLA-A*0201/NY-ESO-1157–165-specific T cell receptors (TCR) with increasing affinities of up to 150-fold from the wild-type TCR. Using these TCR variants which extend just beyond the natural affinity range, along with an extreme supraphysiologic one having 1400-fold enhanced affinity, and a low-binding one, we sought to determine the effect of TCR binding properties along with cognate peptide concentration on CD8+ T cell responsiveness. Major histocompatibility complexes (MHC) expressed on the surface of various antigen presenting cells were peptide-pulsed and used to stimulate human CD8+ T cells expressing the different TCR via lentiviral transduction. At intermediate peptide concentration we measured maximum cytokine/chemokine secretion, cytotoxicity, and Ca2+ flux for CD8+ T cells expressing TCR within a dissociation constant (KD) range of ∼1–5 μm. Under these same conditions there was a gradual attenuation in activity for supraphysiologic affinity TCR with KD < ∼1 μm, irrespective of CD8 co-engagement and of half-life (t1/2 = ln 2/koff) values. With increased peptide concentration, however, the activity levels of CD8+ T cells expressing supraphysiologic affinity TCR were gradually restored. Together our data support the productive hit rate model of T cell activation arguing that it is not the absolute number of TCR/pMHC complexes formed at equilibrium, but rather their productive turnover, that controls levels of biological activity. Our findings have important implications for various immunotherapies under development such as adoptive cell transfer of TCR-engineered CD8+ T cells, as well as for peptide vaccination strategies. PMID:22549784

  19. Pharmacological prion protein silencing accelerates central nervous system autoimmune disease via T cell receptor signalling

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei; Nessler, Stefan; Hemmer, Bernhard; Eagar, Todd N.; Kane, Lawrence P.; Leliveld, S. Rutger; Müller-Schiffmann, Andreas; Gocke, Anne R.; Lovett-Racke, Amy; Ben, Li-Hong; Hussain, Rehana Z.; Breil, Andreas; Elliott, Jeffrey L.; Puttaparthi, Krishna; Cravens, Petra D.; Singh, Mahendra P.; Petsch, Benjamin; Stitz, Lothar; Racke, Michael K.

    2010-01-01

    The primary biological function of the endogenous cellular prion protein has remained unclear. We investigated its biological function in the generation of cellular immune responses using cellular prion protein gene-specific small interfering ribonucleic acid in vivo and in vitro. Our results were confirmed by blocking cellular prion protein with monovalent antibodies and by using cellular prion protein-deficient and -transgenic mice. In vivo prion protein gene-small interfering ribonucleic acid treatment effects were of limited duration, restricted to secondary lymphoid organs and resulted in a 70% reduction of cellular prion protein expression in leukocytes. Disruption of cellular prion protein signalling augmented antigen-specific activation and proliferation, and enhanced T cell receptor signalling, resulting in zeta-chain-associated protein-70 phosphorylation and nuclear factor of activated T cells/activator protein 1 transcriptional activity. In vivo prion protein gene-small interfering ribonucleic acid treatment promoted T cell differentiation towards pro-inflammatory phenotypes and increased survival of antigen-specific T cells. Cellular prion protein silencing with small interfering ribonucleic acid also resulted in the worsening of actively induced and adoptively transferred experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Finally, treatment of myelin basic protein1–11 T cell receptor transgenic mice with prion protein gene-small interfering ribonucleic acid resulted in spontaneous experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. Thus, central nervous system autoimmune disease was modulated at all stages of disease: the generation of the T cell effector response, the elicitation of T effector function and the perpetuation of cellular immune responses. Our findings indicate that cellular prion protein regulates T cell receptor-mediated T cell activation, differentiation and survival. Defects in autoimmunity are restricted to the immune system and not the central

  20. Blockade of Retinol Metabolism Protects T Cell-Induced Hepatitis by Increasing Migration of Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young-Sun; Yi, Hyon-Seung; Suh, Yang-Gun; Byun, Jin-Seok; Eun, Hyuk Soo; Kim, So Yeon; Seo, Wonhyo; Jeong, Jong-Min; Choi, Won-Mook; Kim, Myung-Ho; Kim, Ji Hoon; Park, Keun-Gyu; Jeong, Won-Il

    2015-01-01

    Retinols are metabolized into retinoic acids by alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and retinaldehyde dehydrogenase (Raldh). However, their roles have yet to be clarified in hepatitis despite enriched retinols in hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Therefore, we investigated the effects of retinols on Concanavalin A (Con A)-mediated hepatitis. Con A was injected into wild type (WT), Raldh1 knock-out (Raldh1−/−), CCL2−/− and CCR2−/− mice. For migration study of regulatory T cells (Tregs), we used in vivo and ex vivo adoptive transfer systems. Blockade of retinol metabolism in mice given 4-methylpyrazole, an inhibitor of ADH, and ablated Raldh1 gene manifested increased migration of Tregs, eventually protected against Con A-mediated hepatitis by decreasing interferon-γ in T cells. Moreover, interferon-γ treatment increased the expression of ADH3 and Raldh1, but it suppressed that of CCL2 and IL-6 in HSCs. However, the expression of CCL2 and IL-6 was inversely increased upon the pharmacologic or genetic ablation of ADH3 and Raldh1 in HSCs. Indeed, IL-6 treatment increased CCR2 expression of Tregs. In migration assay, ablated CCR2 in Tregs showed reduced migration to HSCs. In adoptive transfer of Tregs in vivo and ex vivo, Raldh1-deficient mice showed more increased migration of Tregs than WT mice. Furthermore, inhibited retinol metabolism increased survival rate (75%) compared with that of the controls (25%) in Con A-induced hepatitis. These results suggest that blockade of retinol metabolism protects against acute liver injury by increased Treg migration, and it may represent a novel therapeutic strategy to control T cell-mediated acute hepatitis. PMID:26537191

  1. Foxp3+ T cells inhibit antitumor immune memory modulated by mTOR inhibition.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanping; Sparwasser, Tim; Figlin, Robert; Kim, Hyung L

    2014-04-15

    Inhibition of mTOR signaling enhances antitumor memory lymphocytes. However, pharmacologic mTOR inhibition also enhances regulatory T-cell (Treg) activity. To counter this effect, Treg control was added to mTOR inhibition in preclinical models. Tregs were controlled with CD4-depleting antibodies because CD4 depletion has high translational potential and already has a well-established safety profile in patients. The antitumor activity of the combination therapy was CD8 dependent and controlled growth of syngeneic tumors even when an adoptive immunotherapy was not used. Lymphocytes resulting from the combination therapy could be transferred into naïve mice to inhibit aggressive growth of lung metastases. The combination therapy enhanced CD8 memory formation as determined by memory markers and functional studies of immune recall. Removal of FoxP3-expressing T lymphocytes was the mechanism underlying immunologic memory formation following CD4 depletion. This was confirmed using transgenic DEREG (depletion of regulatory T cells) mice to specifically remove Foxp3(+) T cells. It was further confirmed with reciprocal studies where stimulation of immunologic memory because of CD4 depletion was completely neutralized by adoptively transferring tumor-specific Foxp3(+) T cells. Also contributing to tumor control, Tregs that eventually recovered following CD4 depletion were less immunosuppressive. These results provide a rationale for further study of mTOR inhibition and CD4 depletion in patients.

  2. Membrane-attached Cytokines Expressed by mRNA Electroporation Act as Potent T-Cell Adjuvants.

    PubMed

    Weinstein-Marom, Hadas; Pato, Aviad; Levin, Noam; Susid, Keren; Itzhaki, Orit; Besser, Michal J; Peretz, Tamar; Margalit, Alon; Lotem, Michal; Gross, Gideon

    2016-01-01

    Proinflammatory cytokines are widely explored in different adoptive cell therapy protocols for enhancing survival and function of the transferred T cells, but their systemic administration is often associated with severe toxicity which limits their clinical use. To confine cytokine availability to the therapeutic T cells, we expressed 3 key cytokines, IL-2, IL-12, and IL-15, as integral T-cell membrane proteins. To prevent permanent activation of growth signaling pathways, we delivered these genes to T cells through mRNA electroporation. The engineered cytokines could be detected on the surface of mRNA-transfected cells and binding to their cell-surface receptors mainly occurred in cis. The 3 human cytokines supported the ex vivo growth of activated human CD8 and CD4 T cells for at least 6 days posttransfection, comparably to high-dose soluble IL-2. Similarly, membrane IL-2, membrane IL-12, and, to a lesser extent, membrane IL-15, were comparable with their soluble counterparts in supporting proliferation of splenic mouse CD8 T cells. Following electroporation of human CD8 T cells and antimelanoma tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, membrane cytokines synergized with constitutively active toll-like receptor 4 in inducing interferon-γ secretion. Efficient cooperation with TLR4 was also evident in the upregulation of the activation molecules CD25, CD69, CD137 (4-1BB), and CD134 (OX40). Taken together, membrane cytokines expressed through mRNA transfection emerge as effective tools for enhancing T-cell proliferation and function and may have potential use in adoptive T-cell therapy. PMID:26849075

  3. I spy alloreactive T cells.

    PubMed

    Alegre, Maria-Luisa

    2015-01-28

    High-throughput sequencing of the T cell receptor Vβ CDR3 region allowed longitudinal tracking of alloreactive T cells in kidney transplant patients, revealing clonal deletion as a mechanism of transplantation tolerance (Morris et al., this issue). PMID:25632032

  4. Memory T cell–driven differentiation of naive cells impairs adoptive immunotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Klebanoff, Christopher A.; Scott, Christopher D.; Leonardi, Anthony J.; Yamamoto, Tori N.; Cruz, Anthony C.; Ouyang, Claudia; Ramaswamy, Madhu; Roychoudhuri, Rahul; Ji, Yun; Eil, Robert L.; Sukumar, Madhusudhanan; Crompton, Joseph G.; Palmer, Douglas C.; Borman, Zachary A.; Clever, David; Thomas, Stacy K.; Patel, Shashankkumar; Yu, Zhiya; Muranski, Pawel; Liu, Hui; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco M.; Gros, Alena; Gattinoni, Luca; Rosenberg, Steven A.; Siegel, Richard M.; Restifo, Nicholas P.

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive cell transfer (ACT) of purified naive, stem cell memory, and central memory T cell subsets results in superior persistence and antitumor immunity compared with ACT of populations containing more-differentiated effector memory and effector T cells. Despite a clear advantage of the less-differentiated populations, the majority of ACT trials utilize unfractionated T cell subsets. Here, we have challenged the notion that the mere presence of less-differentiated T cells in starting populations used to generate therapeutic T cells is sufficient to convey their desirable attributes. Using both mouse and human cells, we identified a T cell–T cell interaction whereby antigen-experienced subsets directly promote the phenotypic, functional, and metabolic differentiation of naive T cells. This process led to the loss of less-differentiated T cell subsets and resulted in impaired cellular persistence and tumor regression in mouse models following ACT. The T memory–induced conversion of naive T cells was mediated by a nonapoptotic Fas signal, resulting in Akt-driven cellular differentiation. Thus, induction of Fas signaling enhanced T cell differentiation and impaired antitumor immunity, while Fas signaling blockade preserved the antitumor efficacy of naive cells within mixed populations. These findings reveal that T cell subsets can synchronize their differentiation state in a process similar to quorum sensing in unicellular organisms and suggest that disruption of this quorum-like behavior among T cells has potential to enhance T cell–based immunotherapies. PMID:26657860

  5. MHC-compatible bone marrow stromal/stem cells trigger fibrosis by activating host T cells in a scleroderma mouse model.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Yoko; Morikawa, Satoru; Okano, Hideyuki; Mabuchi, Yo; Suzuki, Sadafumi; Yaguchi, Tomonori; Sato, Yukio; Mukai, Shin; Yaguchi, Saori; Inaba, Takaaki; Okamoto, Shinichiro; Kawakami, Yutaka; Tsubota, Kazuo; Matsuzaki, Yumi; Shimmura, Shigeto

    2016-01-26

    Fibrosis of organs is observed in systemic autoimmune disease. Using a scleroderma mouse, we show that transplantation of MHC compatible, minor antigen mismatched bone marrow stromal/stem cells (BMSCs) play a role in the pathogenesis of fibrosis. Removal of donor BMSCs rescued mice from disease. Freshly isolated PDGFRα(+) Sca-1(+) BMSCs expressed MHC class II following transplantation and activated host T cells. A decrease in FOXP3(+) CD25(+) Treg population was observed. T cells proliferated and secreted IL-6 when stimulated with mismatched BMSCs in vitro. Donor T cells were not involved in fibrosis because transplanting T cell-deficient RAG2 knock out mice bone marrow still caused disease. Once initially triggered by mismatched BMSCs, the autoimmune phenotype was not donor BMSC dependent as the phenotype was observed after effector T cells were adoptively transferred into naïve syngeneic mice. Our data suggest that minor antigen mismatched BMSCs trigger systemic fibrosis in this autoimmune scleroderma model.

  6. T Cell Responses: Naive to Memory and Everything in Between

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pennock, Nathan D.; White, Jason T.; Cross, Eric W.; Cheney, Elizabeth E.; Tamburini, Beth A.; Kedl, Ross M.

    2013-01-01

    The authors describe the actions that take place in T cells because of their amazing capacity to proliferate and adopt functional roles aimed at clearing a host of an infectious agent. There is a drastic decline in the T cell population once the primary response is over and the infection is terminated. What remains afterward is a population of T…

  7. Boosting the Potency of T-cell Therapies.

    PubMed

    Poh, Alissa

    2016-04-01

    Researchers in the adoptive T-cell therapy field are continuing to refine the ways in which the specificity of these immune cells can be redirected toward tumors. They've found that selecting the most persistent, proliferative T cells-and genetically manipulating only these defined subsets-ensures a potent therapeutic product that's effective even at minuscule doses.

  8. On the optimization of the generalized coplanar Hohmann impulsive transfer adopting energy change concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamel, Osman M.; Soliman, Adel S.

    2005-02-01

    We considered the problem of transferring the rocket's orbit to higher energy orbit, using minimum fuel cost, as a problem in change of energy, since this is most convenient. For the generalized Hohmann case (the departure; the transferring and the destination orbits are ellipses), we adopt the first configuration only, when the apogee of transfer orbit, and the apogee of destination orbit are coincident. Firstly, we assign the ΔvA, ΔvB increments in velocity at points A,B (the position of peri-apse and apo-apse impulses respectively), as functions of the eccentricity of the transfer orbit, eT. Subsequently, we apply the optimum condition leading to the derivation of the quartic equation in eT, and showed how to deduce (ΔvA+ΔvB)Min. A numerical example is presented, in which we determined the four roots of the quartic equation, by a numerical Mathematica Version 2.2. We selected the adequate consistent root, only one in this case, and evaluated (ΔvA+ΔvB)Min for the two orbits of the couple Earth and Mars. This article is a new approach and leads to new discoveries involved in the problem, consequently adds new insight and avoids complexities of previous procedures.

  9. Genetically modified human CD4(+) T cells can be evaluated in vivo without lethal graft-versus-host disease.

    PubMed

    Ali, Riyasat; Babad, Jeffrey; Follenzi, Antonia; Gebe, John A; Brehm, Michael A; Nepom, Gerald T; Shultz, Leonard D; Greiner, Dale L; DiLorenzo, Teresa P

    2016-08-01

    Adoptive cell immunotherapy for human diseases, including the use of T cells modified to express an anti-tumour T-cell receptor (TCR) or chimeric antigen receptor, is showing promise as an effective treatment modality. Further advances would be accelerated by the availability of a mouse model that would permit human T-cell engineering protocols and proposed genetic modifications to be evaluated in vivo. NOD-scid IL2rγ(null) (NSG) mice accept the engraftment of mature human T cells; however, long-term evaluation of transferred cells has been hampered by the xenogeneic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) that occurs soon after cell transfer. We modified human primary CD4(+) T cells by lentiviral transduction to express a human TCR that recognizes a pancreatic beta cell-derived peptide in the context of HLA-DR4. The TCR-transduced cells were transferred to NSG mice engineered to express HLA-DR4 and to be deficient for murine class II MHC molecules. CD4(+) T-cell-depleted peripheral blood mononuclear cells were also transferred to facilitate engraftment. The transduced cells exhibited long-term survival (up to 3 months post-transfer) and lethal GVHD was not observed. This favourable outcome was dependent upon the pre-transfer T-cell transduction and culture conditions, which influenced both the kinetics of engraftment and the development of GVHD. This approach should now permit human T-cell transduction protocols and genetic modifications to be evaluated in vivo, and it should also facilitate the development of human disease models that incorporate human T cells. PMID:27124592

  10. Expression of CXCR3 on specific T cells is essential for homing to the prostate gland in an experimental model of chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Breser, Maria L; Motrich, Ruben D; Sanchez, Leonardo R; Mackern-Oberti, Juan P; Rivero, Virginia E

    2013-04-01

    Experimental autoimmune prostatitis (EAP) is considered a valid model for the human disease chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome. In this report, we analyzed phenotypic characteristics of T cells that gain access to the prostate and induce leukocyte recruitment in mice with different susceptibility to EAP. After EAP induction, NOD mice developed a specific cellular response characterized by a mixed Th1/Th17 pattern with specific T cells mainly expressing CXCR3 that infiltrated and damaged the prostate. In contrast, BALB/c mice, as well as NOD-IFN-γ(-/-), exhibited only Th17 cells mainly expressing CCR6 that were not capable of infiltrating the prostate gland. Adoptive transfer experiments of T cells from NOD or NOD-IFN-γ(-/-) mice to NOD-SCID recipients showed that only T cells from NOD mice successfully infiltrated the prostate. However, after "in vitro" or "in vivo" treatment with rIFN-γ, T cells from NOD-IFN-γ(-/-) mice became capable of homing to the prostate and induced leukocyte recruitment. Chemokine levels in prostate tissue from NOD mice showed increased expression levels of CXCR3 ligands. Additional experiments using adoptive transfer of sorted CXCR3(+)CD3(+) T cells or administrating a CXCR3 antagonist treatment confirmed these previous results. Altogether, our results demonstrate that the expression of CXCR3 on effector T cells is essential for their homing to the prostate gland in EAP. CXCR3 emerges as a potential therapeutic target to control chronic prostatitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome.

  11. Receptor affinity and extracellular domain modifications affect tumor recognition by ROR1-specific chimeric antigen receptor T-cells

    PubMed Central

    Hudecek, Michael; Lupo-Stanghellini, Maria-Teresa; Kosasih, Paula L.; Sommermeyer, Daniel; Jensen, Michael C.; Rader, Christoph; Riddell, Stanley R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The adoptive transfer of T-cells modified to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) comprised of an extracellular single chain antibody (scFV) fragment specific for a tumor cell surface molecule, and linked to an intracellular signaling module has activity in advanced malignancies. ROR1 is a tumor-associated molecule expressed on prevalent B-lymphoid and epithelial cancers, and is absent on normal mature B-cells and vital tissues, making it a candidate for CAR T-cell therapy. Experimental Design We constructed ROR1-CARs from scFVs with different affinities and containing extracellular IgG4-Fc spacer domains of different lengths, and evaluated the ability of T-cells expressing each CAR to recognize ROR1+ hematopoietic and epithelial tumors in vitro, and to eliminate human mantle cell lymphoma engrafted into immunodeficient mice. Results ROR1-CARs containing a short ‘Hinge-only’ extracellular spacer conferred superior lysis of ROR1+ tumor cells and induction of T-cell effector functions compared to CARs with long ‘Hinge-CH2-CH3’ spacers. CARs derived from a higher affinity scFV conferred maximum T-cell effector function against primary CLL and ROR1+ epithelial cancer lines in vitro without inducing activation induced T-cell death. T-cells modified with an optimal ROR1-CAR were equivalently effective as CD19-CAR modified T-cells in mediating regression of JeKo-1 mantle cell lymphoma in immunodeficient mice. Conclusions Our results demonstrate that customizing spacer design and increasing affinity of ROR1-CARs enhances T-cell effector function and recognition of ROR1+ tumors. T-cells modified with an optimized ROR1-CAR have significant anti-tumor efficacy in a preclinical model in vivo, suggesting they may be useful to treat ROR1+ tumors in clinical applications. PMID:23620405

  12. Hoxb4 Overexpression in CD4 Memory Phenotype T Cells Increases the Central Memory Population upon Homeostatic Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Fournier, Marilaine; Labrecque, Nathalie; Bijl, Janet J.

    2013-01-01

    Memory T cell populations allow a rapid immune response to pathogens that have been previously encountered and thus form the basis of success in vaccinations. However, the molecular pathways underlying the development and maintenance of these cells are only starting to be unveiled. Memory T cells have the capacity to self renew as do hematopoietic stem cells, and overlapping gene expression profiles suggested that these cells might use the same self-renewal pathways. The transcription factor Hoxb4 has been shown to promote self-renewal divisions of hematopoietic stem cells resulting in an expansion of these cells. In this study we investigated whether overexpression of Hoxb4 could provide an advantage to CD4 memory phenotype T cells in engrafting the niche of T cell deficient mice following adoptive transfer. Competitive transplantation experiments demonstrated that CD4 memory phenotype T cells derived from mice transgenic for Hoxb4 contributed overall less to the repopulation of the lymphoid organs than wild type CD4 memory phenotype T cells after two months. These proportions were relatively maintained following serial transplantation in secondary and tertiary mice. Interestingly, a significantly higher percentage of the Hoxb4 CD4 memory phenotype T cell population expressed the CD62L and Ly6C surface markers, characteristic for central memory T cells, after homeostatic proliferation. Thus Hoxb4 favours the maintenance and increase of the CD4 central memory phenotype T cell population. These cells are more stem cell like and might eventually lead to an advantage of Hoxb4 T cells after subjecting the cells to additional rounds of proliferation. PMID:24324706

  13. Adoptive transfer of macrophages from adult mice reduces mortality in mice infected with human enterovirus 71.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiangning; Li, Xiaoying; Fan, Xiaoxu; Ma, Chunmei; Qin, Chuan; Zhang, Lianfeng

    2013-02-01

    Human enterovirus 71 (EV71) causes hand, foot and mouth disease in children under 6 years of age, and the neurological complications of this virus can lead to death. Until now, no vaccines or drugs have been available for the clinical control of this epidemic. Macrophages can engulf pathogens and mediate a series of host immune responses that play a role in the defence against infectious diseases. Using immunohistochemistry, we observed the localizations of virus in muscle tissues of EV71-infected mice. The macrophages isolated from the adult mice could kill the virus gradually in vitro, as shown using quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) and virus titration. Co-localisation of lysosomes and virus within macrophages suggested that the lysosomes were possibly responsible for the phagocytosis of EV71. Activation of the macrophages in the peritoneal cavity of mice four days pre-infection reduced the mortality of mice upon lethal EV71 infection. The adoptive transfer of macrophages from adult mice inhibited virus replication in the muscle tissues of infected mice, and this was followed by a relief of symptoms and a significant reduction of mortality, which suggested that the adoptive transfer of macrophages from adult humans represents a potential strategy to treat EV71-infected patients.

  14. The potential of human regulatory T cells generated ex vivo as a treatment for lupus and other chronic inflammatory diseases

    PubMed Central

    Horwitz, David A; Gray, J Dixon; Zheng, Song Guo

    2002-01-01

    Regulatory T cells prevent autoimmunity by suppressing the reactivity of potentially aggressive self-reactive T cells. Contact-dependent CD4+ CD25+ 'professional' suppressor cells and other cytokine-producing CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell subsets mediate this protective function. Evidence will be reviewed that T cells primed with transforming growth factor (TGF)-β expand rapidly following restimulation. Certain CD4+ T cells become contact-dependent suppressor cells and other CD4+ and CD8+ cells become cytokine-producing regulatory cells. This effect is dependent upon a sufficient amount of IL-2 in the microenvironment to overcome the suppressive effects of TGF-β. The adoptive transfer of these suppressor cells generated ex vivo can protect mice from developing chronic graft-versus-host disease with a lupus-like syndrome and alter the course of established disease. These data suggest that autologous T cells primed and expanded with TGF-β have the potential to be used as a therapy for patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and other chronic inflammatory diseases. This novel adoptive immunotherapy also has the potential to prevent the rejection of allogeneic transplants. PMID:12106494

  15. IL-2 and IL-15 regulate CD8+ memory T-cell differentiation but are dispensable for protective recall responses.

    PubMed

    Mathieu, Cédric; Beltra, Jean-Christophe; Charpentier, Tania; Bourbonnais, Sara; Di Santo, James P; Lamarre, Alain; Decaluwe, Hélène

    2015-12-01

    The ability to mount effective secondary responses is a cardinal feature of memory CD8(+) T cells. An understanding of the factors that regulate the generation and recall capacities of memory T cells remains to be ascertained. Several cues indicate that two highly related cytokines, IL-2 and IL-15, share redundant functions in this process. To establish their combined roles in memory CD8(+) T-cell development, maintenance, and secondary responses, we compared the outcome of adoptively transferred IL2Rβ(+/-) or IL2Rβ(-/-) CD8(+) T cells after an acute viral infection in mice. Our results demonstrate that both IL-2 and IL-15 signals condition the differentiation of primary and secondary short-lived effector cells by altering the transcriptional network governing lineage choices. These two cytokines also regulate the homeostasis of the memory T-cell pool, with effector memory CD8(+) T cells being the most sensitive to these two interleukins. Noticeably, the inability to respond to both cytokines limits the proliferation and survival of primary and secondary effectors cells, whereas it does not preclude potent cytotoxic functions and viral control either initially or upon rechallenge. Globally, these results indicate that lack of IL-2 and IL-15 signaling modulates the CD8(+) T-cell differentiation program but does not impede adequate effector functions.

  16. Partial reconstitution of virus-specific memory CD8{sup +} T cells following whole body {gamma}-irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Grayson, Jason M. . E-mail: jgrayson@wfubmc.edu; Laniewski, Nathan G.; Holbrook, Beth C.

    2006-04-25

    CD8{sup +} memory T cells are critical in providing immunity to viral infection. Previous studies documented that antigen-specific CD8{sup +} memory T cells are more resistant to radiation-induced apoptosis than naive T cells. Here, we determined the number and in vivo function of memory CD8{sup +} T cells as immune reconstitution progressed following irradiation. Immediately following irradiation, the number of memory CD8{sup +} T cells declined 80%. As reconstitution progressed, the number of memory cells reached a zenith at 33% of pre-irradiation levels, and was maintained for 120 days post-irradiation. In vitro, memory CD8{sup +} T cells were able to produce cytokines at all times post-irradiation, but when adoptively transferred, they were not able to expand upon rechallenge immediately following irradiation, but regained this ability as reconstitution progressed. When proliferation was examined in vitro, irradiated memory CD8{sup +} T cells were able to respond to mitogenic growth but were unable to divide.

  17. IFNγR signaling in non-T cell targets regulates T cell-mediated intestinal inflammation through multiple mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Do, Jeong-su; Asosingh, Kewal; Baldwin, William M.; Min, Booki

    2014-01-01

    Naïve CD4 T cells transferred into lymphopenic mice undergo spontaneous proliferation and induce chronic inflammation in the intestine. Cellular mechanisms regulating the proliferative and inflammatory processes are not fully understood. In this study, we report that IFNγ signaling in host cells plays a major role in limiting both T cell expansion and T cell-induced intestinal inflammation. However, the role for IFNγ appears to be distinct depending on the target cells. IFNγ signaling in DCs controls T cell expansion, while IFNγ signaling in neutrophils seems to regulate both T cell expansion and inflammation. IFNγ signaling in non-hematopoietic cells may control inflammation. Therefore, our results suggest novel immunoregulatory functions for IFNγ to orchestrate colitogenic T cell responses through its distinct action on different non-T cell target cells. PMID:24523506

  18. Antibody responses to allergen Lol pIV are suppressed following adoptive transfer of B lymphocytes from the internal image anti-idiotypic antibody-treated mice.

    PubMed

    Zhou, E M; Kisil, F T

    1995-10-01

    An internal image anti-idiotypic antibody, designated B1/1, was generated against an idiotope (Id91) of the monoclonal antibody (mAb91) specific for Lol pIV. The administration of B1/1 in PBS, at doses ranging from 100 ng to 100 micrograms/mouse, to syngeneic Balb/c mice resulted in the suppression of the formation of anti-Lol pIV antibodies that possessed the Id91. Spleen cells obtained from the mice 2 weeks after the treatment with B1/1 (25 micrograms/mouse) were adoptively transferred intravenously into the syngeneic recipients which were challenged intraperitoneally with Lol pIV in alum 2 hr after the transfer. The recipients were boosted with Lol pIV 14 days later. It was demonstrated that the transfer of splenic B cells (but not of T cells) from B1/1-treated donors induced a significant suppression of not only the level of IgE and IgG antibodies to Lol pIV, but also the level of antibodies possessing the Id91. Treatment of the B cells with mAb91 plus complement abrogated their ability to transfer the suppression. This study indicates that the treatment with the anti-Id B1/1 generated B cells that were characterized, serologically, as possessing the anti-Id-like antibodies on their surface and were responsible for transferring the suppression of the formation of antibodies to allergen Lol pIV and the expression of Id91.

  19. PTPN2 attenuates T-cell lymphopenia-induced proliferation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiede, Florian; La Gruta, Nicole L.; Tiganis, Tony

    2014-01-01

    When the peripheral T-cell pool is depleted, T cells undergo homoeostatic expansion. This expansion is reliant on the recognition of self-antigens and/or cytokines, in particular interleukin-7. The T cell-intrinsic mechanisms that prevent excessive homoeostatic T-cell responses and consequent overt autoreactivity remain poorly defined. Here we show that protein tyrosine phosphatase N2 (PTPN2) is elevated in naive T cells leaving the thymus to restrict homoeostatic T-cell proliferation and prevent excess responses to self-antigens in the periphery. PTPN2-deficient CD8+ T cells undergo rapid lymphopenia-induced proliferation (LIP) when transferred into lymphopenic hosts and acquire the characteristics of antigen-experienced effector T cells. The enhanced LIP is attributed to elevated T-cell receptor-dependent, but not interleukin-7-dependent responses, results in a skewed T-cell receptor repertoire and the development of autoimmunity. Our results identify a major mechanism by which homoeostatic T-cell responses are tuned to prevent the development of autoimmune and inflammatory disorders.

  20. CD101 inhibits the expansion of colitogenic T cells

    PubMed Central

    Schey, Regina; Dornhoff, Heike; Baier, Julia L.C.; Purtak, Martin; Opoka, Robert; Koller, Anna Katharina; Atreya, Raya; Rau, Tilman T.; Daniel, Christoph; Amann, Kerstin; Bogdan, Christian; Mattner, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    CD101 exerts negative-costimulatory effects in vitro, but its function in vivo remains poorly defined. CD101 is abundantly expressed on lymphoid and myeloid cells in intestinal tissues, but absent from naïve splenic T cells. Here, we assessed the impact of CD101 on the course of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Using a T cell transfer model of chronic colitis, we found that in recipients of naïve T cells from CD101+/+ donors up to 30% of the recovered lymphocytes expressed CD101, correlating with an increased IL-2-mediated FoxP3-expression. Transfer of CD101−/− T cells caused more severe colitis and was associated with an expansion of IL-17-producing T cells and an enhanced expression of IL-2Rα/β independently of FoxP3. The co-transfer of naïve and regulatory T cells (Treg) protected most effectively from colitis, when both donor and recipient mice expressed CD101. While the expression of CD101 on T cells was sufficient for Treg-function and the inhibition of T cell proliferation, sustained IL-10-production required additional CD101-expression by myeloid cells. Finally, in patients with IBD a reduced CD101-expression on peripheral and intestinal monocytes and CD4+ T cells correlated with enhanced IL-17-production and disease activity. Thus, CD101-deficiency is a novel marker for progressive colitis and potential target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:26813346

  1. Tumor lysing genetically engineered T cells loaded with multi-modal imaging agents.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Parijat; Alauddin, Mian; Bankson, James A; Kirui, Dickson; Seifi, Payam; Huls, Helen; Lee, Dean A; Babakhani, Aydin; Ferrari, Mauro; Li, King C; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2014-01-01

    Genetically-modified T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CAR) exert anti-tumor effect by identifying tumor-associated antigen (TAA), independent of major histocompatibility complex. For maximal efficacy and safety of adoptively transferred cells, imaging their biodistribution is critical. This will determine if cells home to the tumor and assist in moderating cell dose. Here, T cells are modified to express CAR. An efficient, non-toxic process with potential for cGMP compliance is developed for loading high cell number with multi-modal (PET-MRI) contrast agents (Super Paramagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles - Copper-64; SPION-(64)Cu). This can now be potentially used for (64)Cu-based whole-body PET to detect T cell accumulation region with high-sensitivity, followed by SPION-based MRI of these regions for high-resolution anatomically correlated images of T cells. CD19-specific-CAR(+)SPION(pos) T cells effectively target in vitro CD19(+) lymphoma. PMID:24675806

  2. Chronic exposure to IFNα drives medullar lymphopoiesis towards T-cell differentiation in mice.

    PubMed

    Di Scala, Marianna; Gil-Fariña, Irene; Vanrell, Lucia; Sánchez-Bayona, Rodrigo; Alignani, Diego; Olagüe, Cristina; Vales, Africa; Berraondo, Pedro; Prieto, Jesús; González-Aseguinolaza, Gloria

    2015-08-01

    Interferon-α is a potent antiviral agent and a vigorous adjuvant in the induction of T-cell responses but its use is limited by hematologic toxicity. Interferon-α alters hematopoietic stem cell dormancy and impairs myelocytic and erythrocytic/megakaryocytic differentiation from hematopoietic progenitors. However, the effect of chronic interferon-α exposure on hematopoietic precursors has still not been well characterized. Here, we transduced the liver of mice with an adenoassociated vector encoding interferon-α to achieve sustained high serum levels of the cytokine. The bone marrow of these animals showed diminished long-term and short-term hematopoietic stem cells, reduction of multipotent progenitor cells, and marked decrease of B cells, but significant increase in the proportion of CD8(+) and CD4(+)CD8(+) T cells. Upon adoptive transfer to RAG(-/-) mice, bone marrow cells from interferon-α-treated animals generated CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells while CD19(+), CD11b(+) and NK1.1(+) lineages failed to develop. These effects are associated with the transcriptional downregulation of transcription factors involved in B-cell differentiation and modulation of key factors for T-cell development. Thus, sustained interferon-α exposure causes hematopoietic stem cells exhaustion and drives common lymphoid progenitors towards T-cell generation. PMID:25715405

  3. TRAIL-expressing T cells induce apoptosis of vascular smooth muscle cells in the atherosclerotic plaque

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Kayoko; Niessner, Alexander; Kopecky, Stephen L.; Frye, Robert L.; Goronzy, Jörg J.; Weyand, Cornelia M.

    2006-01-01

    Acute coronary syndromes (ACS) are precipitated by a rupture of the atherosclerotic plaque, often at the site of T cell and macrophage infiltration. Here, we show that plaque-infiltrating CD4 T cells effectively kill vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). VSMCs sensitive to T cell–mediated killing express the death receptor DR5 (TNF-related apoptosis-inducing ligand [TRAIL] receptor 2), and anti-TRAIL and anti-DR5 antibodies block T cell–mediated apoptosis. CD4 T cells that express TRAIL upon stimulation are expanded in patients with ACS and more effectively induce VSMC apoptosis. Adoptive transfer of plaque-derived CD4 T cells into immunodeficient mice that are engrafted with human atherosclerotic plaque results in apoptosis of VSMCs, which was prevented by coadministration of anti-TRAIL antibody. These data identify that the death pathway is triggered by TRAIL-producing CD4 T cells as a direct mechanism of VSMC apoptosis, a process which may lead to plaque destabilization. PMID:16418392

  4. Chronic exposure to IFNα drives medullar lymphopoiesis towards T-cell differentiation in mice

    PubMed Central

    Di Scala, Marianna; Gil-Fariña, Irene; Vanrell, Lucia; Sánchez-Bayona, Rodrigo; Alignani, Diego; Olagüe, Cristina; Vales, Africa; Berraondo, Pedro; Prieto, Jesús; González-Aseguinolaza, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Interferon-α is a potent antiviral agent and a vigorous adjuvant in the induction of T-cell responses but its use is limited by hematologic toxicity. Interferon-α alters hematopoietic stem cell dormancy and impairs myelocytic and erythrocytic/megakaryocytic differentiation from hematopoietic progenitors. However, the effect of chronic interferon-α exposure on hematopoietic precursors has still not been well characterized. Here, we transduced the liver of mice with an adenoassociated vector encoding interferon-α to achieve sustained high serum levels of the cytokine. The bone marrow of these animals showed diminished long-term and short-term hematopoietic stem cells, reduction of multipotent progenitor cells, and marked decrease of B cells, but significant increase in the proportion of CD8+ and CD4+CD8+ T cells. Upon adoptive transfer to RAG−/− mice, bone marrow cells from interferon-α-treated animals generated CD4+ and CD8+ T cells while CD19+, CD11b+ and NK1.1+ lineages failed to develop. These effects are associated with the transcriptional downregulation of transcription factors involved in B-cell differentiation and modulation of key factors for T-cell development. Thus, sustained interferon-α exposure causes hematopoietic stem cells exhaustion and drives common lymphoid progenitors towards T-cell generation. PMID:25715405

  5. Pb exposure attenuates hypersensitivity in vivo by increasing regulatory T cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Liang; Zhao, Fang; Shen, Xuefeng; Ouyang, Weiming; Liu, Xinqin; Xu, Yan; Yu, Tao; Jin, Boquan; Chen, Jingyuan; Luo, Wenjing

    2012-12-01

    Pb is a common environmental pollutant affecting various organs. Exposure of the immune system to Pb leads to immunosuppression or immunodysregulation. Although previous studies showed that Pb exposure can modulate the function of helper T cells, Pb immunotoxicity remains incompletely understood. In this study, we investigated the effect of Pb exposure on T cell development, and the underlying mechanism of Pb-induced suppression of the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response in vivo. Sprague–Dawley rats were exposed to 300 ppm Pb-acetate solution via the drinking water for six weeks, and we found that Pb exposure significantly increased Pb concentrations in the blood by 4.2-fold (p < 0.05) as compared to those in the control rats. In Pb-exposed rats, the amount of thymic CD4{sup +}CD8{sup −} and peripheral CD4{sup +} T cells was significantly reduced, whereas, CD8{sup +} population was not affected. In contrast to conventional CD4{sup +} T cells, Foxp3{sup +} regulatory T cells (Tregs) were increased in both the thymus and peripheral lymphoid organs of Pb-exposed rats. In line with the increase of Tregs, the DTH response of Pb-exposed rats was markedly suppressed. Depletion of Tregs reversed the suppression of DTH response by Pb-exposed CD4{sup +} T cells in an adoptive transfer model, suggesting a critical role of the increased Tregs in suppressing the DTH response. Collectively, this study revealed that Pb-exposure may upregulate Tregs, thereby leading to immunosuppression. -- Highlights: ► Pb exposure impaired CD4{sup +} thymic T cell development. ► Peripheral T lymphocytes were reduced following Pb exposure. ► Pb exposure increases thymic and peripheral Treg cells in rats. ► Tregs played a critical role in Pb-exposure-induced immune suppression.

  6. Sex-specific T-cell regulation of angiotensin II-dependent hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hong; Zheng, Wei; Li, Xiangjun; Liu, Jun; Wu, Xie; Zhang, Monan Angela; Umans, Jason G; Hay, Meredith; Speth, Robert C; Dunn, Shannon E; Sandberg, Kathryn

    2014-09-01

    Studies suggest T cells modulate arterial pressure. Because robust sex differences exist in the immune system and in hypertension, we investigated sex differences in T-cell modulation of angiotensin II-induced increases in mean arterial pressure in male (M) and female (F) wild-type and recombination-activating-gene-1-deficient (Rag1(-/-)) mice. Sex differences in peak mean arterial pressure in wild-type were lost in Rag1(-/-) mice (mm Hg: wild-type-F, 136±4.9 versus wild-type-M, 153±1.7; P<0.02; Rag1(-/-)-F, 135±2.1 versus Rag1(-/-)-M, 141±3.8). Peak mean arterial pressure was 13 mm Hg higher after adoptive transfer of male (CD3(M)→Rag1(-/-)-M) versus female (CD3(F)→Rag1(-/-)-M) T cells. CD3(M)→Rag1(-/-)-M mice exhibited higher splenic frequencies of proinflammatory interleukin-17A (2.4-fold) and tumor necrosis factor-α (2.2-fold)-producing T cells and lower plasma levels (13-fold) and renal mRNA expression (2.4-fold) of interleukin-10, whereas CD3(F)→Rag1(-/-)-M mice displayed a higher activation state in general and T-helper-1-biased renal inflammation. Greater T-cell infiltration into perivascular adipose tissue and kidney associated with increased pressor responses to angiotensin II if the T cell donor was male but not female and these sex differences in T-cell subset expansion and tissue infiltration were maintained for 7 to 8 weeks within the male host. Thus, the adaptive immune response and role of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine signaling in hypertension are distinct between the sexes and need to be understood to improve therapeutics for hypertension-associated disease in both men and women.

  7. Noninvasive detection of tumor-infiltrating T cells by PET reporter imaging

    PubMed Central

    McCracken, Melissa N.; Vatakis, Dimitrios N.; Dixit, Dhaval; McLaughlin, Jami; Zack, Jerome A.; Witte, Owen N.

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of tumor-reactive T cells can successfully reduce tumor burden; however, in rare cases, lethal on-target/off-tumor effects have been reported. A noninvasive method to track engineered cells with high sensitivity and resolution would allow observation of correct cell homing and/or identification of dangerous off-target locations in preclinical and clinical applications. Human deoxycytidine kinase triple mutant (hdCK3mut) is a nonimmunogenic PET reporter that was previously shown to be an effective tool to monitor whole-body hematopoiesis. Here, we engineered a construct in which hdCK3mut is coexpressed with the anti-melanoma T cell receptor F5, introduced this construct into human CD34 cells or PBMCs, and evaluated this approach in multiple immunotherapy models. Expression of hdCK3mut allowed engrafted cells to be visualized within recipient bone marrow, while accumulation of [18F]-L-FMAU in hdCK3mut-expressing T cells permitted detection of intratumoral homing. Animals that received T cells coexpressing hdCK3mut and the anti-melanoma T cell receptor had demonstrably higher signals in HLA-matched tumors compared with those in animals that received cells solely expressing hdCK3mut. Engineered T cells caused cytotoxicity in HLA/antigen-matched tumors and induced IFN-γ production and activation. Moreover, hdCK3mut permitted simultaneous monitoring of engraftment and tumor infiltration, without affecting T cell function. Our findings suggest that hdCK3mut reporter imaging can be applied in clinical immunotherapies for whole-body detection of engineered cell locations. PMID:25822024

  8. The complement inhibitor FUT-175 suppresses T cell autoreactivity in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Li, Qing; Nacion, Kristine; Bu, Hong; Lin, Feng

    2009-08-01

    Several recent studies have shown that interacting antigen presenting cells and/or T cells produced complement activation products C5a and C3a, are integrally involved in T-cell activation, and promote the generation of myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG(35-55))-specific interferon-gamma and interleukin-17-producing T cells in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, a rodent model of multiple sclerosis. In this study, we tested whether FUT-175, a clinical pharmaceutical that has been shown to inhibit the formation of C3/C5 convertases, can attenuate myelin-specific T-cell responses, as well as disease severity in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. In vitro, FUT-175 inhibited local C5a/C3a production by antigen presenting cell-T-cell complexes and attenuated MOG(35-55)-specific Th1 and Th17 responses with little nonspecific cytotoxicity. In vivo administration of FUT-175 delayed experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis disease onset, lowered clinical scores, decreased central nervous system inflammation, and reduced demyelination. The FUT-175-treated mice exhibited decreased numbers of MOG(35-55)-specific interferon-gamma- and interleukin-17-producing T cells. In addition, results from the FUT-175 treatment of naive recipients of adoptively transferred splenocytes from MOG(35-55)-immunized mice suggested that the effect of FUT-175 was on MOG-specific cellular responses and not on anti-MOG antibodies. These results argue that complement regulators, which inhibit C5a/C3a production, may have therapeutic efficacy in multiple sclerosis and in other clinical conditions in which T cells drive disease pathogenesis. PMID:19608865

  9. YB-1 immunization combined with regulatory T-cell depletion induces specific T-cell responses that protect against neuroblastoma in the early stage.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Jin; Liu, Ping; Yang, Xiaofeng

    2012-12-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial solid cancer in childhood and the most common cancer in infancy. Currently, no effective clinical treatments are available for advanced neuroblastoma. In a previous study, we screened Y Box protein 1 (YB-1) as a potential neuroblastoma-associated antigen from sera of AGN2a-immunized mice by serological analysis of recombinant cDNA expression libraries technique. The aim of this study is to explore if YB-1 immunization in the context of Treg depletion could induce protective immune response against the neuroblastoma in mice. YB-1 was expressed and purified by pET-15b prokaryotic expression system. It was demonstrated that anti-YB-1 CD8(+) T-cell responses could be induced by AGN2a immunization, and the strongest CD8(+) T-cell responses against AGN2a were induced by YB-1-immunized mice in the context of Treg depletion compared with YB-1 only immunization group and control group. Importantly, the survival rate of mice treated with YB-1 immunization combined with Treg depletion was 80% when challenged by 1 × 10(4) AGN2a cells, significantly higher than that of mice immunized with YB-1 alone (P < 0.01). Furthermore, T-cell adoptive therapy showed that the neuroblastoma growth was inhibited when T cells or splenic cells from YB-1-immunized mice with Treg depletion were transferred to AGN2a bearing mice. Both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells were involved in the anti-neuroblastoma responses induced by YB-1 immunization combined with Treg depletion. These results indicated that YB-1 immunization combined with Treg depletion could induce specific T-cell responses against neuroblastoma and could be a potential strategy for the prevention and treatment of neuroblastoma in the early stage.

  10. CCR7 is required for the in vivo function of CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T cells

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Martin A.; Meingassner, Josef G.; Lipp, Martin; Moore, Henrietta D.; Rot, Antal

    2007-01-01

    CCR7-mediated migration of naive T cells into the secondary lymphoid organs is a prerequisite for their encounter with mature dendritic cells, the productive presentation of cognate antigen, and consequent T cell proliferation and effector differentiation. Therefore, CCR7 was suggested to play an important role in the initiation of adaptive immune responses. In this study, we show that primary immunity can also develop in the absence of CCR7. Moreover, CCR7-deficient knockout (KO) mice display augmented immune responses. Our data cumulatively suggest that enhanced immunity in CCR7 KO mice is caused by the defective lymph node (LN) positioning of FoxP3+ CD4+ CD25+ regulatory T cells (T reg cells) and the consequent impediment of their function. The FoxP3+ T reg cells express CCR7 and, after their adoptive transfer, migrate into the LNs of wild-type mice. Here, they proliferate in situ upon antigen stimulation and inhibit the generation of antigen-specific T cells. Conversely, transferred CCR7-deficient T reg cells fail to migrate into the LNs and suppress antigen-induced T cell responses. The transfer of combinations of naive and T reg cells from wild-type and CCR7 KO mice into syngeneic severe combined immunodeficient mice directly demonstrates that CCR7-deficient T reg cells are less effective than their wild-type counterparts in preventing the development of inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:17371928

  11. A T Cell Epitope-Based Vaccine Protects Against Chlamydial Infection in HLA-DR4 Transgenic Mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weidang; Murthy, Ashlesh K.; Lanka, Gopala Krishna; Chetty, Senthilnath L; Yu, Jieh-Juen; Chambers, James P.; Zhong, Guangming; Forsthuber, Thomas G.; Guentzel, M. Neal; Arulanandam, Bernard P.

    2013-01-01

    Vaccination with recombinant chlamydial protease-like activity factor (rCPAF) has been shown to provide robust protection against genital Chlamydia infection. Adoptive transfer of IFN-γ competent CPAF-specific CD4+ T cells was sufficient to induce early resolution of chlamydial infection and reduction of subsequent pathology in recipient IFN-γ-deficient mice indicating the importance of IFN-γ secreting CD4+ T cells in host defense against Chlamydia. In this study, we identify CD4+ T cell reactive CPAF epitopes and characterize the activation of epitope-specific CD4+ T cells following antigen immunization or Chlamydia challenge. Using the HLA-DR4 (HLA-DRB1*0401) transgenic mouse for screening overlapping peptides that induced T cell IFN-γ production, we identified at least 5 CPAF T cell epitopes presented by the HLA-DR4 complex. Immunization of HLA-DR4 transgenic mice with a rCPAFep fusion protein containing these 5 epitopes induced a robust cell-mediated immune response and significantly accelerated the resolution of genital and pulmonary Chlamydia infection. rCPAFep vaccination induced CPAF-specific CD4+ T cells in the spleen were detected using HLA-DR4/CPAF-epitope tetramers. Additionally, CPAF-specific CD4+ clones could be detected in the mouse spleen following C. muridarum and a human C. trachomatis strain challenge using these novel tetramers. These results provide the first direct evidence that a novel CPAF epitope vaccine can provide protection and that HLA-DR4/CPAF-epitope tetramers can detect CPAF epitope-specific CD4+ T cells in HLA-DR4 mice following C. muridarum or C. trachomatis infection. Such tetramers could be a useful tool for monitoring CD4+ T cells in immunity to Chlamydia infection and in developing epitope-based human vaccines using the murine model. PMID:24096029

  12. Serine protease inhibitor-6 differentially affects the survival of effector and memory alloreactive CD8-T cells.

    PubMed

    Azzi, J; Ohori, S; Ting, C; Uehara, M; Abdoli, R; Smith, B D; Safa, K; Solhjou, Z; Lukyanchykov, P; Patel, J; McGrath, M; Abdi, R

    2015-01-01

    The clonal expansion of effector T cells and subsequent generation of memory T cells are critical in determining the outcome of transplantation. While cytotoxic T lymphocytes induce direct cytolysis of target cells through secretion of Granzyme-B (GrB), they also express cytoplasmic serine protease inhibitor-6 (Spi6) to protect themselves from GrB that has leaked from granules. Here, we studied the role of GrB/Spi6 axis in determining clonal expansion of alloreactive CD8-T cells and subsequent generation of memory CD8-T cells in transplantation. CD8-T cells from Spi6(-/-) mice underwent more GrB mediated apoptosis upon alloantigen stimulation in vitro and in vivo following adoptive transfer into an allogeneic host. Interestingly, while OT1.Spi6(-/-) CD8 T cells showed significantly lower clonal expansion following skin transplants from OVA mice, there was no difference in the size of the effector memory CD8-T cells long after transplantation. Furthermore, lack of Spi6 resulted in a decrease of short-lived-effector-CD8-cells but did not impact the pool of memory-precursor-effector-CD8-cells. Similar results were found in heart transplant models. Our findings suggest that the final alloreactive CD8-memory-pool-size is independent from the initial clonal-proliferation as memory precursors express low levels of GrB and therefore are independent of Spi6 for survival. These data advance our understanding of memory T cells generation in transplantation and provide basis for Spi6 based strategies to target effector T cells.

  13. Serine Protease Inhibitor-6 Differentially Affects the Survival of Effector and Memory Alloreactive CD8-T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Azzi, J.; Ohori, S.; Ting, C.; Uehara, M.; Abdoli, R.; Smith, B. D.; Safa, K.; Solhjou, Z.; Lukyanchykov, P.; Patel, J.; McGrath, M.; Abdi, R.

    2016-01-01

    The clonal expansion of effector T cells and subsequent generation of memory T cells are critical in determining the outcome of transplantation. While cytotoxic T lymphocytes induce direct cytolysis of target cells through secretion of Granzyme-B (GrB), they also express cytoplasmic serine protease inhibitor-6 (Spi6) to protect themselves from GrB that has leaked from granules. Here, we studied the role of GrB/Spi6 axis in determining clonal expansion of alloreactive CD8-T cells and subsequent generation of memory CD8-T cells in transplantation. CD8-T cells from Spi6−/− mice underwent more GrB mediated apoptosis upon alloantigen stimulation in vitro and in vivo following adoptive transfer into an allogeneic host. Interestingly, while OT1.Spi6−/− CD8 T cells showed significantly lower clonal expansion following skin transplants from OVA mice, there was no difference in the size of the effector memory CD8-T cells long after transplantation. Furthermore, lack of Spi6 resulted in a decrease of short-lived-effector-CD8-cells but did not impact the pool of memory-precursor-effector-CD8-cells. Similar results were found in heart transplant models. Our findings suggest that the final alloreactive CD8-memory-pool-size is independent from the initial clonal-proliferation as memory precursors express low levels of GrB and therefore are independent of Spi6 for survival. These data advance our understanding of memory T cells generation in transplantation and provide basis for Spi6 based strategies to target effector T cells. PMID:25534448

  14. The Tol2 transposon system mediates the genetic engineering of T-cells with CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptors for B-cell malignancies.

    PubMed

    Tsukahara, T; Iwase, N; Kawakami, K; Iwasaki, M; Yamamoto, C; Ohmine, K; Uchibori, R; Teruya, T; Ido, H; Saga, Y; Urabe, M; Mizukami, H; Kume, A; Nakamura, M; Brentjens, R; Ozawa, K

    2015-02-01

    Engineered T-cell therapy using a CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CD19-CAR) is a promising strategy for the treatment of advanced B-cell malignancies. Gene transfer of CARs to T-cells has widely relied on retroviral vectors, but transposon-based gene transfer has recently emerged as a suitable nonviral method to mediate stable transgene expression. The advantages of transposon vectors compared with viral vectors include their simplicity and cost-effectiveness. We used the Tol2 transposon system to stably transfer CD19-CAR into human T-cells. Normal human peripheral blood lymphocytes were co-nucleofected with the Tol2 transposon donor plasmid carrying CD19-CAR and the transposase expression plasmid and were selectively propagated on NIH3T3 cells expressing human CD19. Expanded CD3(+) T-cells with stable and high-level transgene expression (~95%) produced interferon-γ upon stimulation with CD19 and specifically lysed Raji cells, a CD19(+) human B-cell lymphoma cell line. Adoptive transfer of these T-cells suppressed tumor progression in Raji tumor-bearing Rag2(-/-)γc(-/-) immunodeficient mice compared with control mice. These results demonstrate that the Tol2 transposon system could be used to express CD19-CAR in genetically engineered T-cells for the treatment of refractory B-cell malignancies.

  15. Temporal Genome Expression Profile Analysis during T Cell Mediated Colitis: Identification of novel targets and pathways

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Kai; Zhang, Songlin; Glawe, John; Grisham, Matthew B.; Kevil, Christopher G

    2015-01-01

    T cells critically regulate IBD with T cell dependent experimental colitis models gaining favor in identifying potential pathogenic mechanisms; yet, limited understanding of specific pathogenic molecules or pathways still exists. In this study, we sought to identify changes in whole genome expression profiles using the CD4CD45Rbhi T cell transfer colitis model compared to genome expression differences from Crohn's disease tissue specimens. Colon tissue was used for histopathological and genome expression profiling analysis at 0, 2, 4, or 6 weeks after adoptive T cell transfer. We identified 1,775 genes that were significantly altered during disease progression with 361 being progressively down regulated and 341 progressively up regulated. Gene expression changes were validated by qRT-PCR confirming genome expression analysis data. Differentially expressed genes were clearly related to inflammation/immune responses but also strongly associated with metabolic, chemokine signaling, Jak-STAT signaling, and angiogenesis pathways. Ingenuity network analysis revealed 25 unique network associations that were associated with functions such as antigen presentation, cell morphology, cell-to-cell signaling and interaction, as well as nervous system development and function. Moreover, many of these genes and pathways were similarly identified in Crohn's disease specimens. These findings reveal novel, complex, and dynamic changes in gene expression that may provide useful targets for future therapeutic approaches. PMID:22179924

  16. PD-1 expression on dendritic cells suppresses CD8+ T cell function and antitumor immunity

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Tong Seng; Chew, Valerie; Sieow, Je Lin; Goh, Siting; Yeong, Joe Poh-Sheng; Soon, Ai Ling; Ricciardi-Castagnoli, Paola

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Programmed death one (PD-1) is a well-established co-inhibitory regulator that suppresses proliferation and cytokine production of T cells. Despite remarkable progress in delineating the functional roles of PD-1 on T lymphocytes, little is known about the regulatory role of PD-1 expressed on myeloid cells such as dendritic cells (DCs). Here, we show that CD8+ T cells can be more potently activated to secrete IL-2 and IFNγ by PD-1-deficient DCs compared to wild-type DCs. Adoptive transfer of PD-1-deficient DCs demonstrated their superior capabilities in inducing antigen-specific CD8+ T cell proliferation in vivo. In addition, we provide first evidence demonstrating the existence of peripheral blood DCs and CD11c+ tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells that co-express PD-1 in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The existence of PD-1-expressing HCC-infiltrating DCs (HIDCs) was further supported in a mouse model of HCC. Intratumoral transfer of PD-1-deficient DCs rendered recipient mice resistant to the growth of HCC by promoting tumor-infiltrating CD8+ effector T cells to secrete perforin and granzyme B. This novel finding provides a deeper understanding of the role of PD-1 in immune regulation and has significant implications for cancer immunotherapies targeting PD-1. PMID:27141339

  17. The tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced protein 3 (TNFAIP3, A20) imposes a brake on antitumor activity of CD8 T cells.

    PubMed

    Giordano, Marilyn; Roncagalli, Romain; Bourdely, Pierre; Chasson, Lionel; Buferne, Michel; Yamasaki, Sho; Beyaert, Rudi; van Loo, Geert; Auphan-Anezin, Nathalie; Schmitt-Verhulst, Anne-Marie; Verdeil, Grégory

    2014-07-29

    The transcription factor NF-κB is central to inflammatory signaling and activation of innate and adaptive immune responses. Activation of the NF-κB pathway is tightly controlled by several negative feedback mechanisms, including A20, an ubiquitin-modifying enzyme encoded by the tnfaip3 gene. Mice with selective deletion of A20 in myeloid, dendritic, or B cells recapitulate some human inflammatory pathology. As we observed high expression of A20 transcripts in dysfunctional CD8 T cells in an autochthonous melanoma, we analyzed the role of A20 in regulation of CD8 T-cell functions, using mice in which A20 was selectively deleted in mature conventional T cells. These mice developed lymphadenopathy and some organ infiltration by T cells but no splenomegaly and no detectable pathology. A20-deleted CD8 T cells had increased sensitivity to antigen stimulation with production of large amounts of IL-2 and IFNγ, correlated with sustained nuclear expression of NF-κB components reticuloendotheliosis oncogene c-Rel and p65. Overexpression of A20 by retroviral transduction of CD8 T cells dampened their intratumor accumulation and antitumor activity. In contrast, relief from the A20 brake in NF-κB activation in adoptively transferred antitumor CD8 T cells led to improved control of melanoma growth. Tumor-infiltrating A20-deleted CD8 T cells had enhanced production of IFNγ and TNFα and reduced expression of the inhibitory receptor programmed cell death 1. As manipulation of A20 expression in CD8 T cells did not result in pathologic manifestations in the mice, we propose it as a candidate to be targeted to increase antitumor efficiency of adoptive T-cell immunotherapy. PMID:25024217

  18. CD40 engagement on dendritic cells, but not on B or T cells, is required for long-term control of murine gammaherpesvirus 68.

    PubMed

    Giannoni, Francesca; Shea, Ashley; Inglis, Chandra; Lee, Lian Ni; Sarawar, Sally R

    2008-11-01

    CD4 T cells are not essential for primary clearance of replicating murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV-68) but are required for effective long-term control. The virus reactivates in the lungs of major histocompatibility complex class II-deficient (CII-/-) mice that lack functional CD4 T cells. CD40 ligand (CD40L) is upregulated on activated CD4 T cells, and it is thought that CD40-CD40L interactions are an important component of CD4 T-cell help. Our previous studies have shown that agonistic antibodies to CD40 can substitute for CD4 T-cell function in the long-term control of MHV-68. In the present study, we sought to identify the CD40-positive cell type mediating this effect. To address this question, we adoptively transferred MHV-68 peptide-pulsed CII(-/-) dendritic cells (DC) that had been treated with an agonistic antibody to CD40 into MHV-68-infected CII(-/-) recipients. Viral reactivation was significantly lower in mice injected with anti-CD40-treated DC than in those injected with control DC or in mice that did not receive any DC. However, in similar experiments with B cells, anti-CD40 treatment had no effect. We also investigated the requirement for CD40 expression on T cells by adoptive transfer of T cells from CD40(+/+) or CD40(-/-) mice into T-cell-deficient recipients that were subsequently infected with MHV-68. The results showed that CD40 expression on T cells is not necessary for preventing viral reactivation. Taken together, our data suggest that CD40 engagement on DC, but not on T or B cells, is essential for effective long-term control of MHV-68.

  19. T Cell Allorecognition via Molecular Mimicry

    SciTech Connect

    Macdonald, Whitney A.; Chen, Zhenjun; Gras, Stephanie; Archbold, Julia K.; Tynan, Fleur E.; Clements, Craig S.; Bharadwaj, Mandvi; Kjer-Nielsen, Lars; Saunders, Philippa M.; Wilce, Matthew C.J.; Crawford, Fran; Stadinsky, Brian; Jackson, David; Brooks, Andrew G.; Purcell, Anthony W.; Kappler, John W.; Burrows, Scott R.; Rossjohn, Jamie; McCluskey, James

    2010-08-16

    T cells often alloreact with foreign human leukocyte antigens (HLA). Here we showed the LC13 T cell receptor (TCR), selected for recognition on self-HLA-B*0801 bound to a viral peptide, alloreacts with B44 allotypes (HLA-B*4402 and HLA-B*4405) bound to two different allopeptides. Despite extensive polymorphism between HLA-B*0801, HLA-B*4402, and HLA-B*4405 and the disparate sequences of the viral and allopeptides, the LC13 TCR engaged these peptide-HLA (pHLA) complexes identically, accommodating mimicry of the viral peptide by the allopeptide. The viral and allopeptides adopted similar conformations only after TCR ligation, revealing an induced-fit mechanism of molecular mimicry. The LC13 T cells did not alloreact against HLA-B*4403, and the single residue polymorphism between HLA-B*4402 and HLA-B*4403 affected the plasticity of the allopeptide, revealing that molecular mimicry was associated with TCR specificity. Accordingly, molecular mimicry that is HLA and peptide dependent is a mechanism for human T cell alloreactivity between disparate cognate and allogeneic pHLA complexes.

  20. The myeloid differentiation factor 88 (MyD88) is required for CD4+ T cell effector function in a murine model of inflammatory bowel disease1

    PubMed Central

    Fukata, Masayuki; Breglio, Keith; Chen, Anli; Vamadevan, Arunan S.; Goo, Tyralee; Hsu, David; Conduah, Daisy; Xu, Ruliang; Abreu, Maria T.

    2009-01-01

    Abnormal T cell responses to commensal bacteria are involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). MyD88 is an essential signal transducer for TLRs in response to the microflora. We hypothesized that TLR signaling via MyD88 was important for effector T cell responses in the intestine. TLR expression on murine T cells was examined by flow cytometry. CD4+CD45Rbhigh T cells and/or CD4+CD45RblowCD25+ regulatory T cells (Tregs) were isolated and adoptively transferred to RAG1−/− mice. Colitis was assessed by changes in body weight and histology score. Cytokine production was assessed by ELISA. In vitro proliferation of T cells was assessed by [3H]thymidine assay. In vivo proliferation of T cells was assessed by BrdU and CFSE labeling. CD4+CD45Rbhigh T cells expressed TLR2, TLR4, TLR9, and TLR3 and TLR ligands could act as co-stimulatory molecules. MyD88−/− CD4+ T cells showed decreased proliferation compared with WT CD4+ T cells both in vivo and in vitro. CD4+CD45Rbhigh T cells from MyD88−/− mice did not induce wasting disease when transferred into RAG1−/− recipients. Lamina propria CD4+ T cell expression of IL-2 and IL-17 and colonic expression of IL-6 and IL-23 were significantly lower in mice receiving MyD88−/− cells than mice receiving WT cells. In vitro, MyD88−/− T cells were blunted in their ability to secrete IL-17 but not IFN-γ. Absence of MyD88 in CD4+CD45Rbhigh cells results in defective T cell function, especially Th17 differentiation. These results suggest a role for TLR signaling by T cells in the development of IBD. PMID:18209086

  1. Stable, Nonviral Expression of Mutated Tumor Neoantigen-specific T-cell Receptors Using the Sleeping Beauty Transposon/Transposase System.

    PubMed

    Deniger, Drew C; Pasetto, Anna; Tran, Eric; Parkhurst, Maria R; Cohen, Cyrille J; Robbins, Paul F; Cooper, Laurence Jn; Rosenberg, Steven A

    2016-06-01

    Neoantigens unique to each patient's tumor can be recognized by autologous T cells through their T-cell receptor (TCR) but the low frequency and/or terminal differentiation of mutation-specific T cells in tumors can limit their utility as adoptive T-cell therapies. Transfer of TCR genes into younger T cells from peripheral blood with a high proliferative potential could obviate this problem. We generated a rapid, cost-effective strategy to genetically engineer cancer patient T cells with TCRs using the clinical Sleeping Beauty transposon/transposase system. Patient-specific TCRs reactive against HLA-A*0201-restriced neoantigens AHNAK(S2580F) or ERBB2(H473Y) or the HLA-DQB*0601-restricted neoantigen ERBB2IP(E805G) were assembled with murine constant chains and cloned into Sleeping Beauty transposons. Patient peripheral blood lymphocytes were coelectroporated with SB11 transposase and Sleeping Beauty transposon, and transposed T cells were enriched by sorting on murine TCRβ (mTCRβ) expression. Rapid expansion of mTCRβ(+) T cells with irradiated allogeneic peripheral blood lymphocytes feeders, OKT3, interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-15, and IL-21 resulted in a preponderance of effector (CD27(-)CD45RA(-)) and less-differentiated (CD27(+)CD45RA(+)) T cells. Transposed T cells specifically mounted a polyfunctional response against cognate mutated neoantigens and tumor cell lines. Thus, Sleeping Beauty transposition of mutation-specific TCRs can facilitate the use of personalized T-cell therapy targeting unique neoantigens.

  2. Stable, Nonviral Expression of Mutated Tumor Neoantigen-specific T-cell Receptors Using the Sleeping Beauty Transposon/Transposase System.

    PubMed

    Deniger, Drew C; Pasetto, Anna; Tran, Eric; Parkhurst, Maria R; Cohen, Cyrille J; Robbins, Paul F; Cooper, Laurence Jn; Rosenberg, Steven A

    2016-06-01

    Neoantigens unique to each patient's tumor can be recognized by autologous T cells through their T-cell receptor (TCR) but the low frequency and/or terminal differentiation of mutation-specific T cells in tumors can limit their utility as adoptive T-cell therapies. Transfer of TCR genes into younger T cells from peripheral blood with a high proliferative potential could obviate this problem. We generated a rapid, cost-effective strategy to genetically engineer cancer patient T cells with TCRs using the clinical Sleeping Beauty transposon/transposase system. Patient-specific TCRs reactive against HLA-A*0201-restriced neoantigens AHNAK(S2580F) or ERBB2(H473Y) or the HLA-DQB*0601-restricted neoantigen ERBB2IP(E805G) were assembled with murine constant chains and cloned into Sleeping Beauty transposons. Patient peripheral blood lymphocytes were coelectroporated with SB11 transposase and Sleeping Beauty transposon, and transposed T cells were enriched by sorting on murine TCRβ (mTCRβ) expression. Rapid expansion of mTCRβ(+) T cells with irradiated allogeneic peripheral blood lymphocytes feeders, OKT3, interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-15, and IL-21 resulted in a preponderance of effector (CD27(-)CD45RA(-)) and less-differentiated (CD27(+)CD45RA(+)) T cells. Transposed T cells specifically mounted a polyfunctional response against cognate mutated neoantigens and tumor cell lines. Thus, Sleeping Beauty transposition of mutation-specific TCRs can facilitate the use of personalized T-cell therapy targeting unique neoantigens. PMID:26945006

  3. Eradication of B-ALL using chimeric antigen receptor–expressing T cells targeting the TSLPR oncoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Haiying; Cho, Monica; Haso, Waleed; Zhang, Ling; Tasian, Sarah K.; Oo, Htoo Zarni; Negri, Gian Luca; Lin, Yongshun; Zou, Jizhong; Mallon, Barbara S.; Maude, Shannon; Teachey, David T.; Barrett, David M.; Orentas, Rimas J.; Daugaard, Mads; Sorensen, Poul H. B.; Grupp, Stephan A.

    2015-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of T cells genetically modified to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) targeting the CD19 B cell–associated protein have demonstrated potent activity against relapsed/refractory B-lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL). Not all patients respond, and CD19-negative relapses have been observed. Overexpression of the thymic stromal lymphopoietin receptor (TSLPR; encoded by CRLF2) occurs in a subset of adults and children with B-ALL and confers a high risk of relapse. Recent data suggest the TSLPR signaling axis is functionally important, suggesting that TSLPR would be an ideal immunotherapeutic target. We constructed short and long CARs targeting TSLPR and tested efficacy against CRLF2-overexpressing B-ALL. Both CARs demonstrated activity in vitro, but only short TSLPR CAR T cells mediated leukemia regression. In vivo activity of the short CAR was also associated with long-term persistence of CAR-expressing T cells. Short TSLPR CAR treatment of mice engrafted with a TSLPR-expressing ALL cell line induced leukemia cytotoxicity with efficacy comparable with that of CD19 CAR T cells. Short TSLPR CAR T cells also eradicated leukemia in 4 xenograft models of human CRLF2-overexpressing ALL. Finally, TSLPR has limited surface expression on normal tissues. TSLPR-targeted CAR T cells thus represent a potent oncoprotein-targeted immunotherapy for high-risk ALL. PMID:26041741

  4. CD4(+) T cells confer anxiolytic and antidepressant-like effects, but enhance fear memory processes in Rag2(-/-) mice.

    PubMed

    Clark, Sarah M; Soroka, Jennifer A; Song, Chang; Li, Xin; Tonelli, Leonardo H

    2016-05-01

    Accumulating evidence supports a role of T cells in behavioral stress responsiveness. Our laboratory previously reported that lymphocyte deficient Rag2(-/-) mice on a BALB/c background display resilience to maladaptive stress responses when compared with immune competent mice in the predator odor exposure (POE) paradigm, while exhibiting similar behavior in a cued fear-conditioning (FC) paradigm. In the present study, Rag2(-/-) mice on a C57BL/6 background were assessed in the same behavioral paradigms, as well as additional tests of anxiety and depressive-like behavior. Furthermore, the effects of naïve CD4(+ ) T cells were evaluated by adoptive transfer of functional cells from nonstressed, wild-type donors to Rag2(-/-) mice. Consistent with our prior results, Rag2(-/-) mice displayed an attenuated startle response after POE. Nevertheless, reconstitution of Rag2(-/-) mice with CD4(+ ) T cells did not modify startle reactivity. Additionally, in contrast with our previous findings, Rag2(-/-) mice showed attenuated fear responses in the FC paradigm compared to wild-type mice and reconstitution with CD4(+ ) T cells promoted fear learning and memory. Notably, reconstitution with CD4(+ ) T cells had anxiolytic and antidepressant-like effects in Rag2(-/-) mice that had not been previously stressed, but had no effect after POE. Taken together, our results support a role of CD4(+ ) T cells in emotionality, but also indicate that they may promote fear responses by enhancing learning and memory processes.

  5. Identification of a novel human memory T-cell population with the characteristics of stem-like chemo-resistance

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Kenji; Tsukahara, Tomohide; Emori, Makoto; Shibayama, Yuji; Mizushima, Emi; Matsumiya, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Keiji; Kaya, Mitsunori; Hirohashi, Yoshihiko; Kanaseki, Takayuki; Kubo, Terufumi; Himi, Tetsuo; Ichimiya, Shingo; Yamashita, Toshihiko; Sato, Noriyuki; Torigoe, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT High-dose chemotherapy may kill not only tumor cells but also immunocytes, and frequently induces severe lymphocytopenia. On the other hand, patients who recover from the nadir maintain immunity against infection, suggesting the existence of an unknown memory T-cell population with stress resistance, long-living capacity, proliferation and differentiation. Recently, the differentiation system of T-cell memory has been clarified using mouse models. However, the human T-cell memory system has great diversity induced by natural antigens derived from many pathogens and tumor cells throughout life, and profoundly differs from the mouse memory system constructed using artificial antigens and transgenic T cells. Here we report a novel human T-cell memory population, “young memory” T (TYM) cells. TYM cells are defined by positive expression of CD73, which represents high aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) activity and CXCR3 among CD8+CD45RA+CD62L+ T cells. TYM proliferate upon TCR stimulation, with differentiation capacity into TCM and TEM and drug resistance. Moreover, TYM are involved in memory function for viral and tumor-associated antigens in healthy donors and cancer patients, respectively. Regulation of TYM might be very attractive for peptide vaccination, adoptive cell-transfer therapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:27471640

  6. Large-scale in vitro expansion of polyclonal human CD4(+)CD25high regulatory T cells.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Petra; Eder, Ruediger; Kunz-Schughart, Leoni A; Andreesen, Reinhard; Edinger, Matthias

    2004-08-01

    CD4(+)CD25+ regulatory T (Treg) cells are pivotal for the maintenance of self-tolerance, and their adoptive transfer gives protection from autoimmune diseases and pathogenic alloresponses after solid organ or bone marrow transplantation in murine model systems. In vitro, human CD4(+)CD25+ Treg cells display phenotypic and functional characteristics similar to those of murine CD4(+)CD25+ Treg cells: namely, hyporesponsiveness to T-cell receptor (TCR) stimulation and suppression of CD25- T cells. Thus far, the detailed characterization and potential clinical application of human CD4(+)CD25+ Treg cells have been hampered by their paucity in peripheral blood and the lack of appropriate expansion protocols. Here we describe the up to 40 000-fold expansion of highly purified human CD4(+)CD25high T cells in vitro through the use of artificial antigen-presenting cells for repeated stimulation via CD3 and CD28 in the presence of high-dose interleukin 2 (IL-2). Expanded CD4(+)CD25high T cells were polyclonal, maintained their phenotype, exceeded the suppressive activity of freshly isolated CD4(+)CD25high T cells, and maintained expression of the lymph node homing receptors L-selectin (CD62L) and CCR7. The ability to rapidly expand human CD4(+)CD25high Treg cells on a large scale will not only facilitate their further exploration but also accelerate their potential clinical application in T cell-mediated diseases and transplantation medicine. PMID:15090447

  7. Establishment of HIV-1 resistance in CD4+ T cells by genome editing using zinc-finger nucleases

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Elena E; Wang, Jianbin; Miller, Jeffrey C; Jouvenot, Yann; Kim, Kenneth A; Liu, Olga; Wang, Nathaniel; Lee, Gary; Bartsevich, Victor V; Lee, Ya-Li; Guschin, Dmitry Y; Rupniewski, Igor; Waite, Adam J; Carpenito, Carmine; Carroll, Richard G; Orange, Jordan S; Urnov, Fyodor D; Rebar, Edward J; Ando, Dale; Gregory, Philip D; Riley, James L; Holmes, Michael C; June, Carl H

    2012-01-01

    Homozygosity for the naturally occurring Δ32 deletion in the HIV co-receptor CCR5 confers resistance to HIV-1 infection. We generated an HIV-resistant genotype de novo using engineered zinc-finger nucleases (ZFNs) to disrupt endogenous CCR5. Transient expression of CCR5 ZFNs permanently and specifically disrupted ~50% of CCR5 alleles in a pool of primary human CD4+ T cells. Genetic disruption of CCR5 provided robust, stable and heritable protection against HIV-1 infection in vitro and in vivo in a NOG model of HIV infection. HIV-1-infected mice engrafted with ZFN-modified CD4+ T cells had lower viral loads and higher CD4+ T-cell counts than mice engrafted with wild-type CD4+ T cells, consistent with the potential to reconstitute immune function in individuals with HIV/AIDS by maintenance of an HIV-resistant CD4+ T-cell population. Thus adoptive transfer of ex vivo expanded CCR5 ZFN–modified autologous CD4+ T cells in HIV patients is an attractive approach for the treatment of HIV-1 infection. PMID:18587387

  8. Identification of a novel human memory T-cell population with the characteristics of stem-like chemo-resistance.

    PubMed

    Murata, Kenji; Tsukahara, Tomohide; Emori, Makoto; Shibayama, Yuji; Mizushima, Emi; Matsumiya, Hiroshi; Yamashita, Keiji; Kaya, Mitsunori; Hirohashi, Yoshihiko; Kanaseki, Takayuki; Kubo, Terufumi; Himi, Tetsuo; Ichimiya, Shingo; Yamashita, Toshihiko; Sato, Noriyuki; Torigoe, Toshihiko

    2016-06-01

    High-dose chemotherapy may kill not only tumor cells but also immunocytes, and frequently induces severe lymphocytopenia. On the other hand, patients who recover from the nadir maintain immunity against infection, suggesting the existence of an unknown memory T-cell population with stress resistance, long-living capacity, proliferation and differentiation. Recently, the differentiation system of T-cell memory has been clarified using mouse models. However, the human T-cell memory system has great diversity induced by natural antigens derived from many pathogens and tumor cells throughout life, and profoundly differs from the mouse memory system constructed using artificial antigens and transgenic T cells. Here we report a novel human T-cell memory population, "young memory" T (TYM) cells. TYM cells are defined by positive expression of CD73, which represents high aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1) activity and CXCR3 among CD8(+)CD45RA(+)CD62L(+) T cells. TYM proliferate upon TCR stimulation, with differentiation capacity into TCM and TEM and drug resistance. Moreover, TYM are involved in memory function for viral and tumor-associated antigens in healthy donors and cancer patients, respectively. Regulation of TYM might be very attractive for peptide vaccination, adoptive cell-transfer therapy and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. PMID:27471640

  9. CCR7 Deficiency Exacerbates Injury in Acute Nephritis Due to Aberrant Localization of Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Eller, Kathrin; Weber, Tobias; Pruenster, Monika; Wolf, Anna M.; Mayer, Gert

    2010-01-01

    The homing of dendritic cells and T cells to secondary lymphoid organs requires chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7) expression on these cells. T cells mediate the pathogenesis of experimental accelerated nephrotoxic serum nephritis (NTS), including its suppression by regulatory T cells (Tregs), but the contribution of CCR7 to this disease is unknown. Here, we compared the development of NTS in CCR7-knockout (KO) and wild-type (WT) mice. Compared with WT mice, CCR7KO mice developed more severe disease with significantly more inflammatory cells infiltrating the kidney. These cells included FoxP3+ Tregs, which were virtually absent from WT kidneys. The adoptive transfer of WT Tregs into CCR7KO mice at the time of immunization protected the recipients from disease; these cells homed to secondary lymphoid organs but not to kidneys. Conversely, adoptive transfer of CCR7KO Tregs into WT mice did not inhibit development of NTS. These data suggest that NTS can develop without CCR7 expression, but Treg-mediated disease suppression, which seems to occur in secondary lymphoid organs, requires CCR7. PMID:19917782

  10. Adoptive immunotherapy combined with intratumoral TLR agonist delivery eradicates established melanoma in mice

    PubMed Central

    Amos, Sally M.; Pegram, Hollie J.; Westwood, Jennifer A.; John, Liza B.; Devaud, Christel; Clarke, Chris J.; Restifo, Nicholas P.; Smyth, Mark J.; Darcy, Phillip K.; Kershaw, Michael H.

    2012-01-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists can trigger broad inflammatory responses that elicit rapid innate immunity and promote the activities of lymphocytes, which can potentially enhance adoptive immunotherapy in the tumor-bearing setting. In the present study, we found that Polyinosinic:Polycytidylic Acid [Poly(I:C)] and CpG oligodeoxynucleotide 1826 [CpG], agonists for TLR 3 and 9, respectively, potently activated adoptively transferred T cells against a murine model of established melanoma. Intratumoral injection of Poly(I:C) and CpG, combined with systemic transfer of activated pmel-1 T cells, specific for gp10025–33, led to enhanced survival and eradication of 9-day established subcutaneous B16F10 melanomas in a proportion of mice. A series of survival studies in knockout mice supported a key mechanistic pathway, whereby TLR agonists acted via host cells to enhance IFN-γ production by adoptively transferred T cells. IFN-γ, in turn, enhanced the immunogenicity of the B16F10 melanoma line, leading to increased killing by adoptively transferred T cells. Thus, this combination approach counteracted tumor escape from immunotherapy via downregulation of immunogenicity. In conclusion, TLR agonists may represent advanced adjuvants within the setting of adoptive T-cell immunotherapy of cancer and hold promise as a safe means of enhancing this approach within the clinic. PMID:21327636

  11. Strategies to genetically engineer T cells for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Spear, Timothy T; Nagato, Kaoru; Nishimura, Michael I

    2016-06-01

    Immunotherapy is one of the most promising and innovative approaches to treat cancer, viral infections, and other immune-modulated diseases. Adoptive immunotherapy using gene-modified T cells is an exciting and rapidly evolving field. Exploiting knowledge of basic T cell biology and immune cell receptor function has fostered innovative approaches to modify immune cell function. Highly translatable clinical technologies have been developed to redirect T cell specificity by introducing designed receptors. The ability to engineer T cells to manifest desired phenotypes and functions is now a thrilling reality. In this review, we focus on outlining different varieties of genetically engineered T cells, their respective advantages and disadvantages as tools for immunotherapy, and their promise and drawbacks in the clinic. PMID:27138532

  12. Preassembly of interleukin 2 (IL-2) receptor subunits on resting Kit 225 K6 T cells and their modulation by IL-2, IL-7, and IL-15: a fluorescence resonance energy transfer study.

    PubMed

    Damjanovich, S; Bene, L; Matkó, J; Alileche, A; Goldman, C K; Sharrow, S; Waldmann, T A

    1997-11-25

    Assembly and mutual proximities of alpha, beta, and gamma(c) subunits of the interleukin 2 receptors (IL-2R) in plasma membranes of Kit 225 K6 T lymphoma cells were investigated by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) using fluorescein isothiocyanate- and Cy3-conjugated monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that were directed against the IL-2R alpha, IL-2R beta, and gamma(c) subunits of IL-2R. The cell-surface distribution of subunits was analyzed at the nanometer scale (2-10 nm) by FRET on a cell-by-cell basis. The cells were probed in resting phase and after coculture with saturating concentrations of IL-2, IL-7, and IL-15. FRET data from donor- and acceptor-labeled IL-2R beta-alpha, gamma-alpha, and gamma-beta pairs demonstrated close proximity of all subunits to each other in the plasma membrane of resting T cells. These mutual proximities do not appear to represent mAb-induced microaggregation, because FRET measurements with Fab fragments of the mAbs gave similar results. The relative proximities were meaningfully modulated by binding of IL-2, IL-7, and IL-15. Based on FRET analysis the topology of the three subunits at the surface of resting cells can be best described by a "triangular model" in the absence of added interleukins. IL-2 strengthens the bridges between the subunits, making the triangle more compact. IL-7 and IL-15 act in the opposite direction by opening the triangle possibly because they associate their private specific alpha receptors with the beta and/or gamma(c) subunits of the IL-2R complex. These data suggest that IL-2R subunits are already colocalized in resting T cells and do not require cytokine-induced redistribution. This colocalization is significantly modulated by binding of relevant interleukins in a cytokine-specific manner.

  13. An initial examination of the potential role of T-cell immunity in protection against feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) infection.

    PubMed

    Aranyos, Alek M; Roff, Shannon R; Pu, Ruiyu; Owen, Jennifer L; Coleman, James K; Yamamoto, Janet K

    2016-03-14

    The importance of vaccine-induced T-cell immunity in conferring protection with prototype and commercial FIV vaccines is still unclear. Current studies performed adoptive transfer of T cells from prototype FIV-vaccinated cats to partial-to-complete feline leukocyte antigen (FLA)-matched cats a day before either homologous FIVPet or heterologous-subtype pathogenic FIVFC1 challenge. Adoptive-transfer (A-T) conferred a protection rate of 87% (13 of 15, p < 0.001) against FIVPet using the FLA-matched T cells, whereas all 12 control cats were unprotected. Furthermore, A-T conferred protection rate of 50% (6 of 12, p<0.023) against FIVFC1 using FLA-matched T cells, whereas all 8 control cats were unprotected. Transfer of FLA-matched T and B cells demonstrated that T cells are needed to confer A-T protection. In addition, complete FLA-matching and addition of T-cell numbers > 13 × 10(6) cells were required for A-T protection against FIVFC1 strain, reported to be a highly pathogenic virus resistant to vaccine-induced neutralizing-antibodies. The addition of FLA-matched B cells alone was not protective. The poor quality of the anti-FIV T-cell immunity induced by the vaccine likely contributed to the lack of protection in an FLA-matched recipient against FIVFC1. The quality of the immune response was determined by the presence of high mRNA levels of cytolysin (perforin) and cytotoxins (granzymes A, B, and H) and T helper-1 cytokines (interferon-γ [IFNγ] and IL2). Increased cytokine, cytolysin and cytotoxin production was detected in the donors which conferred protection in A-T studies. In addition, the CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell proliferation and/or IFNγ responses to FIV p24 and reverse transcriptase increased with each year in cats receiving 1X-3X vaccine boosts over 4 years. These studies demonstrate that anti-FIV T-cell immunity induced by vaccination with a dual-subtype FIV vaccine is essential for prophylactic protection against AIDS lentiviruses such as FIV and

  14. BRAF and MEK inhibition variably affect GD2-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell function in vitro.

    PubMed

    Gargett, Tessa; Fraser, Cara K; Dotti, Gianpietro; Yvon, Eric S; Brown, Michael P

    2015-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy has long been used in the treatment of metastatic melanoma, and an anti-CTLA-4 monoclonal antibody treatment has recently been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Targeted therapies such as small molecule kinase inhibitors targeting deregulated mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling have markedly improved melanoma control in up to 50% of metastatic disease patients and have likewise been recently approved. Combination therapies for melanoma have been proposed as a way to exploit the high-level but short-term responses associated with kinase inhibitor therapies and the low-level but longer-term responses associated with immunotherapy. Cancer immunotherapy now includes adoptive transfer of autologous tumor-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cells and this mode of therapy is a candidate for combination with small molecule drugs. This paper describes CART cells that target GD2-expressing melanoma cells and investigates the effects of approved MAPK pathway-targeted therapies for melanoma [vemurafenib (Vem), dabrafenib (Dab), and trametinib (Tram)] on the viability, activation, proliferation, and cytotoxic T lymphocyte activity of these CAR T cells, as well as on normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells. We report that, although all these drugs lead to inhibition of stimulated T cells at high concentrations in vitro, only Vem inhibited T cells at concentrations equivalent to reported plasma concentrations in treated patients. Although the combination of Dab and Tram also resulted in inhibition of T-cell effector functions at some therapeutic concentrations, Dab itself had little adverse effect on CAR T-cell function. These findings may have implications for novel therapeutic combinations of adoptive CAR T-cell immunotherapy and MAPK pathway inhibitors.

  15. Loss of NOX-Derived Superoxide Exacerbates Diabetogenic CD4 T-Cell Effector Responses in Type 1 Diabetes.

    PubMed

    Padgett, Lindsey E; Anderson, Brian; Liu, Chao; Ganini, Douglas; Mason, Ronald P; Piganelli, Jon D; Mathews, Clayton E; Tse, Hubert M

    2015-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play prominent roles in numerous biological systems. While classically expressed by neutrophils and macrophages, CD4 T cells also express NADPH oxidase (NOX), the superoxide-generating multisubunit enzyme. Our laboratory recently demonstrated that superoxide-deficient nonobese diabetic (NOD.Ncf1(m1J)) mice exhibited a delay in type 1 diabetes (T1D) partially due to blunted IFN-γ synthesis by CD4 T cells. For further investigation of the roles of superoxide on CD4 T-cell diabetogenicity, the NOD.BDC-2.5.Ncf1(m1J) (BDC-2.5.Ncf1(m1J)) mouse strain was generated, possessing autoreactive CD4 T cells deficient in NOX-derived superoxide. Unlike NOD.Ncf1(m1J), stimulated BDC-2.5.Ncf1(m1J) CD4 T cells and splenocytes displayed elevated synthesis of Th1 cytokines and chemokines. Superoxide-deficient BDC-2.5 mice developed spontaneous T1D, and CD4 T cells were more diabetogenic upon adoptive transfer into NOD.Rag recipients due to a skewing toward impaired Treg suppression. Exogenous superoxide blunted exacerbated Th1 cytokines and proinflammatory chemokines to approximately wild-type levels, concomitant with reduced IL-12Rβ2 signaling and P-STAT4 (Y693) activation. These results highlight the importance of NOX-derived superoxide in curbing autoreactivity due, in part, to control of Treg function and as a redox-dependent checkpoint of effector T-cell responses. Ultimately, our studies reveal the complexities of free radicals in CD4 T-cell responses.

  16. Predominant role of interferon-γ in the host protective effect of CD8+ T cells against Neospora caninum infection

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Alexandra; Ferreirinha, Pedro; Botelho, Sofia; Belinha, Ana; Leitão, Catarina; Caramalho, Íris; Teixeira, Luzia; González-Fernandéz, África; Appelberg, Rui; Vilanova, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    It is well established that CD8+ T cells play an important role in protective immunity against protozoan infections. However, their role in the course of Neospora caninum infection has not been fully elucidated. Here we report that CD8-deficient mice infected with N. caninum presented higher parasitic loads in the brain and lungs and lower spleen and brain immunity-related GTPases than their wild-type counterparts. Moreover, adoptive transfer of splenic CD8+ T cells sorted from N. caninum-primed immunosufficient C57BL/10 ScSn mice prolonged the survival of infected IL-12-unresponsive C57BL/10 ScCr recipients. In both C57BL/6 and C57BL/10 ScSn mice CD8+ T cells are activated and produce interferon-γ (IFN-γ) upon challenged with N. caninum. The host protective role of IFN-γ produced by CD8+ T cells was confirmed in N. caninum-infected RAG2-deficient mice reconstituted with CD8+ T cells obtained from either IFN-γ-deficient or wild-type donors. Mice receiving IFN-γ-expressing CD8+ T cells presented lower parasitic burdens than counterparts having IFN-γ-deficient CD8+ T cells. Moreover, we observed that N. caninum-infected perforin-deficient mice presented parasitic burdens similar to those of infected wild-type controls. Altogether these results demonstrate that production of IFN-γ is a predominant protective mechanism conferred by CD8+ T cells in the course of neosporosis. PMID:26449650

  17. Preserved Activity of CD20-Specific Chimeric Antigen Receptor-Expressing T Cells in the Presence of Rituximab.

    PubMed

    Rufener, Gregory A; Press, Oliver W; Olsen, Philip; Lee, Sang Yun; Jensen, Michael C; Gopal, Ajay K; Pender, Barbara; Budde, Lihua E; Rossow, Jeffrey K; Green, Damian J; Maloney, David G; Riddell, Stanley R; Till, Brian G

    2016-06-01

    CD20 is an attractive immunotherapy target for B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphomas, and adoptive transfer of T cells genetically modified to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) targeting CD20 is a promising strategy. A theoretical limitation is that residual serum rituximab might block CAR binding to CD20 and thereby impede T cell-mediated anti-lymphoma responses. The activity of CD20 CAR-modified T cells in the presence of various concentrations of rituximab was tested in vitro and in vivo CAR-binding sites on CD20(+) tumor cells were blocked by rituximab in a dose-dependent fashion, although at 37°C blockade was incomplete at concentrations up to 200 μg/mL. T cells with CD20 CARs also exhibited modest dose-dependent reductions in cytokine secretion and cytotoxicity, but not proliferation, against lymphoma cell lines. At rituximab concentrations of 100 μg/mL, CAR T cells retained ≥50% of baseline activity against targets with high CD20 expression, but were more strongly inhibited when target cells expressed low CD20. In a murine xenograft model using a rituximab-refractory lymphoma cell line, rituximab did not impair CAR T-cell activity, and tumors were eradicated in >85% of mice. Clinical residual rituximab serum concentrations were measured in 103 lymphoma patients after rituximab therapy, with the median level found to be only 38 μg/mL (interquartile range, 19-72 μg/mL). Thus, despite modest functional impairment in vitro, the in vivo activity of CD20-targeted CAR T cells remains intact at clinically relevant levels of rituximab, making use of these T cells clinically feasible. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(6); 509-19. ©2016 AACRSee related Spotlight by Sadelain, p. 473.

  18. Predominant role of interferon-γ in the host protective effect of CD8(+) T cells against Neospora caninum infection.

    PubMed

    Correia, Alexandra; Ferreirinha, Pedro; Botelho, Sofia; Belinha, Ana; Leitão, Catarina; Caramalho, Íris; Teixeira, Luzia; González-Fernandéz, África; Appelberg, Rui; Vilanova, Manuel

    2015-10-09

    It is well established that CD8(+) T cells play an important role in protective immunity against protozoan infections. However, their role in the course of Neospora caninum infection has not been fully elucidated. Here we report that CD8-deficient mice infected with N. caninum presented higher parasitic loads in the brain and lungs and lower spleen and brain immunity-related GTPases than their wild-type counterparts. Moreover, adoptive transfer of splenic CD8(+) T cells sorted from N. caninum-primed immunosufficient C57BL/10 ScSn mice prolonged the survival of infected IL-12-unresponsive C57BL/10 ScCr recipients. In both C57BL/6 and C57BL/10 ScSn mice CD8(+) T cells are activated and produce interferon-γ (IFN-γ) upon challenged with N. caninum. The host protective role of IFN-γ produced by CD8(+) T cells was confirmed in N. caninum-infected RAG2-deficient mice reconstituted with CD8(+) T cells obtained from either IFN-γ-deficient or wild-type donors. Mice receiving IFN-γ-expressing CD8(+) T cells presented lower parasitic burdens than counterparts having IFN-γ-deficient CD8(+) T cells. Moreover, we observed that N. caninum-infected perforin-deficient mice presented parasitic burdens similar to those of infected wild-type controls. Altogether these results demonstrate that production of IFN-γ is a predominant protective mechanism conferred by CD8(+) T cells in the course of neosporosis.

  19. Spontaneous Intestinal Tumorigenesis in Apc/Min+ Mice Requires Altered T Cell Development with IL-17A

    PubMed Central

    Chae, Wook-Jin; Bothwell, Alfred L. M.

    2015-01-01

    The control of inflammatory diseases requires functional regulatory T cells (Tregs) with significant Gata-3 expression. Here we address the inhibitory role of Tregs on intestinal tumorigenesis in the Apc/Min+ mouse model that resembles human familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP). Apc/Min+ mice had a markedly increased frequency of Foxp3+ Tregs and yet decreased Gata-3 expression in the lamina propria. To address the role of heterozygous Apc gene mutation in Tregs, we generated Foxp3-Cre, Apcflox/+ mice. Tregs from these mice effectively inhibited tumorigenesis comparable to wild type Tregs after adoptive transfer into Apc/Min+ mice, demonstrating that the heterozygous Apc gene mutation in Tregs does not induce the loss of control over tumor microenvironment. Adoptive transfer of in vitro generated Apc/Min+ iTregs (inducible Tregs) failed to inhibit intestinal tumorigenesis, suggesting that naïve CD4 T cells generated from Apc/Min+ mice thymus were impaired. We also showed that adoptively transferred IL-17A-deficient Apc/Min+ Tregs inhibited tumor growth, suggesting that IL-17A was critical to impair the tumor regression function of Apc/Min+ Tregs. Taken together, our results suggest that both T cell development in a functional thymus and IL-17A control the ability of Treg to inhibit intestinal tumorigenesis in Apc/Min+ mice. PMID:26146642

  20. 4-1BB Signaling Enhances Primary and Secondary Population Expansion of CD8+ T Cells by Maximizing Autocrine IL-2/IL-2 Receptor Signaling.

    PubMed

    Oh, Ho S; Choi, Beom K; Kim, Young H; Lee, Don G; Hwang, Sunhee; Lee, Myoung J; Park, Sang H; Bae, Yong-Soo; Kwon, Byoung S

    2015-01-01

    4-1BB (CD137), a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily (TNFRSF), is primarily expressed on activated T cells and is known to enhance proliferation of T cells, prevent activation-induced cell death, and promote memory formation of CD8+ T cells. In particular, it is well acknowledged that 4-1BB triggering preferentially enhances the expansion of CD8+ T cells rather than CD4+ T cells, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here we found that 4-1BB triggering markedly increased IL-2Rα (CD25) and IL-2 expressions of CD8+ T cells but minimally for CD4+ T cells. Proliferation of CD8+ T cells was moderately enhanced by direct 4-1BB triggering in the absence of signaling through IL-2Rα/IL-2 interactions, but further promoted in the presence of IL-2Rα/IL-2 interactions. Among the TNFRSF members including OX40, GITR, CD30, and CD27, 4-1BB was superior in the ability to induce IL-2Rα expression on CD8+ T cells. When the primary and secondary expansions of CD8+ T cells in vivo were examined by adoptively transferring OVA-specific CD8+ T cells along with the treatment with agonistic anti-4-1BB and/or antagonistic anti-CD25 F(ab')2 mAb, 4-1BB triggering enhanced both primary and secondary expansion of CD8+ T cells in vivo, and the 4-1BB effects were moderately suppressed in primary expansion while completely abolished in secondary expansion of OVA-specific CD8+ T cells by blocking IL-2Rα. These results suggest that 4-1BB-mediated increases of IL-2Rα and IL-2 prolong the effects of transient TCR- and 4-1BB-mediated signaling in CD8+ T cells, and that 4-1BB triggering preferentially enhances the expansion of CD8+ T cells through the amplification of autocrine IL-2/IL-2R signaling loop. PMID:25962156

  1. 4-1BB Signaling Enhances Primary and Secondary Population Expansion of CD8+ T Cells by Maximizing Autocrine IL-2/IL-2 Receptor Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Ho S.; Choi, Beom K.; Kim, Young H.; Lee, Don G.; Hwang, Sunhee; Lee, Myoung J.; Park, Sang H.; Bae, Yong-Soo; Kwon, Byoung S.

    2015-01-01

    4-1BB (CD137), a member of the tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily (TNFRSF), is primarily expressed on activated T cells and is known to enhance proliferation of T cells, prevent activation-induced cell death, and promote memory formation of CD8+ T cells. In particular, it is well acknowledged that 4-1BB triggering preferentially enhances the expansion of CD8+ T cells rather than CD4+ T cells, but the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here we found that 4-1BB triggering markedly increased IL-2Rα (CD25) and IL-2 expressions of CD8+ T cells but minimally for CD4+ T cells. Proliferation of CD8+ T cells was moderately enhanced by direct 4-1BB triggering in the absence of signaling through IL-2Rα/IL-2 interactions, but further promoted in the presence of IL-2Rα/IL-2 interactions. Among the TNFRSF members including OX40, GITR, CD30, and CD27, 4-1BB was superior in the ability to induce IL-2Rα expression on CD8+ T cells. When the primary and secondary expansions of CD8+ T cells in vivo were examined by adoptively transferring OVA-specific CD8+ T cells along with the treatment with agonistic anti-4-1BB and/or antagonistic anti-CD25 F(ab’)2 mAb, 4-1BB triggering enhanced both primary and secondary expansion of CD8+ T cells in vivo, and the 4-1BB effects were moderately suppressed in primary expansion while completely abolished in secondary expansion of OVA-specific CD8+ T cells by blocking IL-2Rα. These results suggest that 4-1BB-mediated increases of IL-2Rα and IL-2 prolong the effects of transient TCR- and 4-1BB-mediated signaling in CD8+ T cells, and that 4-1BB triggering preferentially enhances the expansion of CD8+ T cells through the amplification of autocrine IL-2/IL-2R signaling loop. PMID:25962156

  2. Immune escape from NY-ESO-1-specific T-cell therapy via loss of heterozygosity in the MHC.

    PubMed

    Klippel, Z K; Chou, J; Towlerton, A M; Voong, L N; Robbins, P; Bensinger, W I; Warren, E H

    2014-03-01

    Adoptive immunotherapy of tumors with T cells specific for the cancer-testis antigen NY-ESO-1 has shown great promise in preclinical models and in early stage clinical trials. Tumor persistence or recurrence after NY-ESO-1-specific therapy occurs, however, and the mechanisms of recurrence remain poorly defined. In a murine xenograft model of NY-ESO-1(+) multiple myeloma, we observed tumor recurrence after adoptive transfer of CD8(+) T cells genetically redirected to the prototypic NY-ESO-1157-165 peptide presented by HLA-A*02:01. Analysis of the myeloma cells that had escaped from T-cell control revealed intact expression of NY-ESO-1 and B2M, but selective, complete loss of HLA-A*02:01 expression from the cell surface. Loss of heterozygosity (LOH) in the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) involving the HLA-A locus was identified in the tumor cells, and further analysis revealed selective loss of the allele encoding HLA-A*02:01. Although LOH involving the MHC has not been described in myeloma patients with persistent or recurrent disease after immune therapies such as allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT), it has been described in patients with acute myelogenous leukemia who relapsed after allogeneic HCT. These results suggest that MHC loss should be evaluated in patients with myeloma and other cancers who relapse after adoptive NY-ESO-1-specific T-cell therapy.

  3. CD19-targeted chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy for acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Maude, Shannon L.; Teachey, David T.; Porter, David L.

    2015-01-01

    Relapsed and refractory acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) remains difficult to treat, with minimal improvement in outcomes seen in more than 2 decades despite advances in upfront therapy and improved survival for de novo ALL. Adoptive transfer of T cells engineered to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) has emerged as a powerful targeted immunotherapy, showing striking responses in highly refractory populations. Complete remission (CR) rates as high as 90% have been reported in children and adults with relapsed and refractory ALL treated with CAR-modified T cells targeting the B-cell–specific antigen CD19. Distinct CAR designs across several studies have produced similar promising CR rates, an encouraging finding. Even more encouraging are durable remissions observed in some patients without additional therapy. Duration of remission and CAR-modified T-cell persistence require further study and more mature follow-up, but emerging data suggest these factors may distinguish CAR designs. Supraphysiologic T-cell proliferation, a hallmark of this therapy, contributes to both efficacy and the most notable toxicity, cytokine release syndrome (CRS), posing a unique challenge for toxicity management. This review will discuss the current landscape of CD19 CAR clinical trials, CRS pathophysiology and management, and remaining challenges. PMID:25999455

  4. Broad spectrum antiviral T cells for viral complications after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Maecker-Kolhoff, Britta

    2015-01-01

    Major complications of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) or solid organ transplantation (SOT), such as graft rejection and graft-versus-host-disease (GvHD), are countered by suppressing the host immune system via chemotherapy and radiation, immunosuppressive drugs, or conditioning regimens such as in vivo or in vitro T-cell depletion. While immunocompromised, the patient is rendered susceptible to a number of viral infections and reactivations mainly caused by endogenous herpes viruses like cytomegalovirus (CMV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and by lytic agents such as adenovirus (ADV). In the paper entitled “Activity of broad-spectrum T cells as treatment for ADV, EBV, CMV, BKV, and HHV6 Infections after HSCT” published recently in Science Translational Medicine, Anastasia Papadopoulou and colleagues reported a suitable technology for rapid generation of antiviral T cells with a broad specificity in a single-culture for clinical application. In a small clinical trial with 11 patients they demonstrated safety and efficacy of adoptive multivirus-specific T-cell transfer. PMID:26046087

  5. Murine autoimmune hearing loss mediated by CD4+ T cells specific for inner ear peptides.

    PubMed

    Solares, C Arturo; Edling, Andrea E; Johnson, Justin M; Baek, Moo-Jin; Hirose, Keiko; Hughes, Gordon B; Tuohy, Vincent K

    2004-04-01

    Autoimmune sensorineural hearing loss (ASNHL) is characterized typically by bilateral, rapidly progressive hearing loss that responds therapeutically to corticosteroid treatment. Despite its name, data implicating autoimmunity in the etiopathogenesis of ASNHL have been limited, and targeted self-antigens have not been identified. In the current study we show that the inner ear-specific proteins cochlin and beta-tectorin are capable of targeting experimental autoimmune hearing loss (EAHL) in mice. Five weeks after immunization of SWXJ mice with either Coch 131-150 or beta-tectorin 71-90, auditory brainstem responses (ABR) showed significant hearing loss at all frequencies tested. Flow cytometry analysis showed that each peptide selectively activated CD4(+) T cells with a proinflammatory Th1-like phenotype. T cell mediation of EAHL was determined by showing significantly increased ABR thresholds 6 weeks after adoptive transfer of peptide-activated CD4(+) T cells into naive SWXJ recipients. Immunocytochemical analysis showed that leukocytic infiltration of inner ear tissues coincided with onset of hearing loss. Our study provides a contemporary mouse model for clarifying our understanding of ASNHL and facilitating the development of novel effective treatments for this clinical entity. Moreover, our data provide experimental confirmation that ASNHL may be a T cell-mediated organ-specific autoimmune disorder of the inner ear.

  6. Genetically engineered T cells for the treatment of cancer

    PubMed Central

    Essand, M; Loskog, A S I

    2013-01-01

    T-cell immunotherapy is a promising approach to treat disseminated cancer. However, it has been limited by the ability to isolate and expand T cells restricted to tumour-associated antigens. Using ex vivo gene transfer, T cells from patients can be genetically engineered to express a novel T cell receptor or chimeric antigen receptor to specifically recognize a tumour-associated antigen and thereby selectively kill tumour cells. Indeed, genetically engineered T cells have recently been successfully used for cancer treatment in a small number of patients. Here we review the recent progress in the field, and summarize the challenges that lie ahead and the strategies being used to overcome them. PMID:23198862

  7. B and T cell screen

    MedlinePlus

    Direct immunofluorescence; E-rosetting; T and B lymphocyte assays; B and T lymphocyte assays ... to distinguish between T and B cells. The E-rosetting test identifies T cells and direct immunofluorescence ...

  8. Transfer and adoption of advanced information technology solutions in resource-poor environments: the case of telemedicine systems adoption in Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Kifle, Mengistu; Payton, Fay Cobb; Mbarika, Victor; Meso, Peter

    2010-04-01

    The study of the adoption of information technology (IT) by individuals has taken two approaches, one emphasizing rationalistic goal-oriented behavior and the other focusing on poignant forces that influence an individual's reaction to a new IT. These approaches are not necessarily mutually exclusive. Individuals' acceptance and subsequent usage of a new IT is predicated on both. Additionally, the tendency in past studies has been to examine either the rational or the poignant factors in the context of a "resource-rich" environment-one in which there is an abundance of IT, adequate infrastructure, and a high level of acculturation to technology solutions. Consequently, there is a clear need for the examination of these factors in resource-poor environments, where assumptions on technology abundance and technology culturation do not hold. We empirically test a model that explains the intention of physicians in a resource-poor environment (epitomized by rural Ethiopia) to adopt telemedicine systems. This model integrates the rational factors driving goal-oriented behavior with the poignant/emotive factors that are an innate part of each adopter's reaction to the new technology. We use the model to expose salient contextual factors that explain the acceptance behavior of individuals toward complex information and communications technology (ICT) solutions and implications of these on the management of technology transfer initiatives in a resource-poor environment. The model is parsimonious, yet explains 28% of the variance in the intention to adopt telemedicine systems and 58% in perceived ease of use. The theoretical and practical implications of this model are discussed. Namely, Sub-Saharan African, in general, and Ethiopian culture, in particular, plays an integral role in the adoption of ICT solutions. Organizational positions and roles among physicians, clinical professionals, and superiors stand to impact the adoption of telemedicine and other healthcare

  9. Adoptive cell therapy for sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Mata, Melinda; Gottschalk, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Current therapy for sarcomas, though effective in treating local disease, is often ineffective for patients with recurrent or metastatic disease. To improve outcomes, novel approaches are needed and cell therapy has the potential to meet this need since it does not rely on the cytotoxic mechanisms of conventional therapies. The recent successes of T-cell therapies for hematological malignancies have led to renewed interest in exploring cell therapies for solid tumors such as sarcomas. In this review, we will discuss current cell therapies for sarcoma with special emphasis on genetic approaches to improve the effector function of adoptively transferred cells. PMID:25572477

  10. T cell engineering as therapy for cancer and HIV: our synthetic future.

    PubMed

    June, Carl H; Levine, Bruce L

    2015-10-19

    It is now well established that the immune system can control and eliminate cancer cells. Adoptive T cell transfer has the potential to overcome the significant limitations associated with vaccine-based strategies in patients who are often immune compromised. Application of the emerging discipline of synthetic biology to cancer, which combines elements of genetic engineering and molecular biology to create new biological structures with enhanced functionalities, is the subject of this overview. Various chimeric antigen receptor designs, manufacturing processes and study populations, among other variables, have been tested and reported in recent clinical trials. Many questions remain in the field of engineered T cells, but the encouraging response rates pave a wide road for future investigation into fields as diverse as cancer and chronic infections.

  11. T cell engineering as therapy for cancer and HIV: our synthetic future

    PubMed Central

    June, Carl H.; Levine, Bruce L.

    2015-01-01

    It is now well established that the immune system can control and eliminate cancer cells. Adoptive T cell transfer has the potential to overcome the significant limitations associated with vaccine-based strategies in patients who are often immune compromised. Application of the emerging discipline of synthetic biology to cancer, which combines elements of genetic engineering and molecular biology to create new biological structures with enhanced functionalities, is the subject of this overview. Various chimeric antigen receptor designs, manufacturing processes and study populations, among other variables, have been tested and reported in recent clinical trials. Many questions remain in the field of engineered T cells, but the encouraging response rates pave a wide road for future investigation into fields as diverse as cancer and chronic infections. PMID:26416683

  12. Manufacture of Clinical-Grade CD19-Specific T Cells Stably Expressing Chimeric Antigen Receptor Using Sleeping Beauty System and Artificial Antigen Presenting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Harjeet; Figliola, Matthew J.; Dawson, Margaret J.; Olivares, Simon; Zhang, Ling; Yang, Ge; Maiti, Sourindra; Manuri, Pallavi; Senyukov, Vladimir; Jena, Bipulendu; Kebriaei, Partow; Champlin, Richard E.; Huls, Helen; Cooper, Laurence J. N.

    2013-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of T cells expressing a CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) is being evaluated in multiple clinical trials. Our current approach to adoptive immunotherapy is based on a second generation CAR (designated CD19RCD28) that signals through a CD28 and CD3-ζ endodomain. T cells are electroporated with DNA plasmids from the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon/transposase system to express this CAR. Stable integrants of genetically modified T cells can then be retrieved when co-cultured with designer artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC) in the presence of interleukin (IL)-2 and 21. Here, we reveal how the platform technologies of SB-mediated transposition and CAR-dependent propagation on aAPC were adapted for human application. Indeed, we have initiated clinical trials in patients with high-risk B-lineage malignancies undergoing autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT). We describe the process to manufacture clinical grade CD19-specific T cells derived from healthy donors. Three validation runs were completed in compliance with current good manufacturing practice for Phase I/II trials demonstrating that by 28 days of co-culture on γ-irradiated aAPC ∼1010 T cells were produced of which >95% expressed CAR. These genetically modified and propagated T cells met all quality control testing and release criteria in support of infusion. PMID:23741305

  13. Manufacture of clinical-grade CD19-specific T cells stably expressing chimeric antigen receptor using Sleeping Beauty system and artificial antigen presenting cells.

    PubMed

    Singh, Harjeet; Figliola, Matthew J; Dawson, Margaret J; Olivares, Simon; Zhang, Ling; Yang, Ge; Maiti, Sourindra; Manuri, Pallavi; Senyukov, Vladimir; Jena, Bipulendu; Kebriaei, Partow; Champlin, Richard E; Huls, Helen; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2013-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of T cells expressing a CD19-specific chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) is being evaluated in multiple clinical trials. Our current approach to adoptive immunotherapy is based on a second generation CAR (designated CD19RCD28) that signals through a CD28 and CD3-ζ endodomain. T cells are electroporated with DNA plasmids from the Sleeping Beauty (SB) transposon/transposase system to express this CAR. Stable integrants of genetically modified T cells can then be retrieved when co-cultured with designer artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPC) in the presence of interleukin (IL)-2 and 21. Here, we reveal how the platform technologies of SB-mediated transposition and CAR-dependent propagation on aAPC were adapted for human application. Indeed, we have initiated clinical trials in patients with high-risk B-lineage malignancies undergoing autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT). We describe the process to manufacture clinical grade CD19-specific T cells derived from healthy donors. Three validation runs were completed in compliance with current good manufacturing practice for Phase I/II trials demonstrating that by 28 days of co-culture on γ-irradiated aAPC ∼10(10) T cells were produced of which >95% expressed CAR. These genetically modified and propagated T cells met all quality control testing and release criteria in support of infusion. PMID:23741305

  14. Third-party CD4+ invariant natural killer T cells protect from murine GVHD lethality.

    PubMed

    Schneidawind, Dominik; Baker, Jeanette; Pierini, Antonio; Buechele, Corina; Luong, Richard H; Meyer, Everett H; Negrin, Robert S

    2015-05-28

    Graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) is driven by extensive activation and proliferation of alloreactive donor T cells causing significant morbidity and mortality following allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells are a potent immunoregulatory T-cell subset in both humans and mice. Here, we explored the role of adoptively transferred third-party CD4(+) iNKT cells for protection from lethal GVHD in a murine model of allogeneic HCT across major histocompatibility barriers. We found that low numbers of CD4(+) iNKT cells from third-party mice resulted in a significant survival benefit with retained graft-versus-tumor effects. In vivo expansion of alloreactive T cells was diminished while displaying a T helper cell 2-biased phenotype. Notably, CD4(+) iNKT cells from third-party mice were as protective as CD4(+) iNKT cells from donor mice although third-party CD4(+) iNKT cells were rejected early after allogeneic HCT. Adoptive transfer of third-party CD4(+) iNKT cells resulted in a robust expansion of donor CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) that were required for protection from lethal GVHD. However, in vivo depletion of myeloid-derived suppressor cells abrogated both Treg expansion and protection from lethal GVHD. Despite the fact that iNKT cells are a rare cell population, the almost unlimited third-party availability and feasibility of in vitro expansion provide the basis for clinical translation.

  15. The 17D-204 Vaccine Strain-Induced Protection against Virulent Yellow Fever Virus Is Mediated by Humoral Immunity and CD4+ but not CD8+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lam, L. K. Metthew; Klimstra, William B.

    2016-01-01

    A gold standard of antiviral vaccination has been the safe and effective live-attenuated 17D-based yellow fever virus (YFV) vaccines. Among more than 500 million vaccinees, only a handful of cases have been reported in which vaccinees developed a virulent wild type YFV infection. This efficacy is presumed to be the result of both neutralizing antibodies and a robust T cell response. However, the particular immune components required for protection against YFV have never been evaluated. An understanding of the immune mechanisms that underlie 17D-based vaccine efficacy is critical to the development of next-generation vaccines against flaviviruses and other pathogens. Here we have addressed this question for the first time using a murine model of disease. Similar to humans, vaccination elicited long-term protection against challenge, characterized by high neutralizing antibody titers and a robust T cell response that formed long-lived memory. Both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were polyfunctional and cytolytic. Adoptive transfer of immune sera or CD4+ T cells provided partial protection against YFV, but complete protection was achieved by transfer of both immune sera and CD4+ T cells. Thus, robust CD4+ T cell activity may be a critical contributor to protective immunity elicited by highly effective live attenuated vaccines. PMID:27463517

  16. Infusing CD19-directed T cells to augment disease control in patients undergoing autologous hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation for advanced B-lymphoid malignancies.

    PubMed

    Kebriaei, Partow; Huls, Helen; Jena, Bipulendu; Munsell, Mark; Jackson, Rineka; Lee, Dean A; Hackett, Perry B; Rondon, Gabriela; Shpall, Elizabeth; Champlin, Richard E; Cooper, Laurence J N

    2012-05-01

    Limited curative treatment options exist for patients with advanced B-lymphoid malignancies, and new therapeutic approaches are needed to augment the efficacy of hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT). Cellular therapies, such as adoptive transfer of T cells that are being evaluated to target malignant disease, use mechanisms independent of chemo- and radiotherapy with nonoverlapping toxicities. Gene therapy is employed to generate tumor-specific T cells, as specificity can be redirected through enforced expression of a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) to achieve antigen recognition based on the specificity of a monoclonal antibody. By combining cell and gene therapies, we have opened a new Phase I protocol at the MD Anderson Cancer Center (Houston, TX) to examine the safety and feasibility of administering autologous genetically modified T cells expressing a CD19-specific CAR (capable of signaling through chimeric CD28 and CD3-ζ) into patients with high-risk B-lymphoid malignancies undergoing autologous HSCT. The T cells are genetically modified by nonviral gene transfer of the Sleeping Beauty system and CAR(+) T cells selectively propagated in a CAR-dependent manner on designer artificial antigen-presenting cells. The results of this study will lay the foundation for future protocols including CAR(+) T-cell infusions derived from allogeneic sources. PMID:22107246

  17. Infusing CD19-Directed T Cells to Augment Disease Control in Patients Undergoing Autologous Hematopoietic Stem-Cell Transplantation for Advanced B-Lymphoid Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Kebriaei, Partow; Huls, Helen; Jena, Bipulendu; Munsell, Mark; Jackson, Rineka; Lee, Dean A.; Hackett, Perry B.; Rondon, Gabriela; Shpall, Elizabeth; Champlin, Richard E.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Limited curative treatment options exist for patients with advanced B-lymphoid malignancies, and new therapeutic approaches are needed to augment the efficacy of hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation (HSCT). Cellular therapies, such as adoptive transfer of T cells that are being evaluated to target malignant disease, use mechanisms independent of chemo- and radiotherapy with nonoverlapping toxicities. Gene therapy is employed to generate tumor-specific T cells, as specificity can be redirected through enforced expression of a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) to achieve antigen recognition based on the specificity of a monoclonal antibody. By combining cell and gene therapies, we have opened a new Phase I protocol at the MD Anderson Cancer Center (Houston, TX) to examine the safety and feasibility of administering autologous genetically modified T cells expressing a CD19-specific CAR (capable of signaling through chimeric CD28 and CD3-ζ) into patients with high-risk B-lymphoid malignancies undergoing autologous HSCT. The T cells are genetically modified by nonviral gene transfer of the Sleeping Beauty system and CAR+ T cells selectively propagated in a CAR-dependent manner on designer artificial antigen-presenting cells. The results of this study will lay the foundation for future protocols including CAR+ T-cell infusions derived from allogeneic sources. PMID:22107246

  18. The 17D-204 Vaccine Strain-Induced Protection against Virulent Yellow Fever Virus Is Mediated by Humoral Immunity and CD4+ but not CD8+ T Cells.

    PubMed

    Watson, Alan M; Lam, L K Metthew; Klimstra, William B; Ryman, Kate D

    2016-07-01

    A gold standard of antiviral vaccination has been the safe and effective live-attenuated 17D-based yellow fever virus (YFV) vaccines. Among more than 500 million vaccinees, only a handful of cases have been reported in which vaccinees developed a virulent wild type YFV infection. This efficacy is presumed to be the result of both neutralizing antibodies and a robust T cell response. However, the particular immune components required for protection against YFV have never been evaluated. An understanding of the immune mechanisms that underlie 17D-based vaccine efficacy is critical to the development of next-generation vaccines against flaviviruses and other pathogens. Here we have addressed this question for the first time using a murine model of disease. Similar to humans, vaccination elicited long-term protection against challenge, characterized by high neutralizing antibody titers and a robust T cell response that formed long-lived memory. Both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells were polyfunctional and cytolytic. Adoptive transfer of immune sera or CD4+ T cells provided partial protection against YFV, but complete protection was achieved by transfer of both immune sera and CD4+ T cells. Thus, robust CD4+ T cell activity may be a critical contributor to protective immunity elicited by highly effective live attenuated vaccines. PMID:27463517

  19. Monoclonal regulatory T cells provide insights into T cell suppression

    PubMed Central

    Gubser, Céline; Schmaler, Mathias; Rossi, Simona W.; Palmer, Ed

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have a crucial role in maintaining lymphocyte homeostasis. However an understanding of how Tregs function at a cellular and molecular level has not yet been fully elucidated. Here, we make use of a T cell receptor (TCR) transgenic, Rag−/− mouse expressing a Forkhead-Box-Protein P3 (Foxp3) transgene. This mouse provides a source of monoclonal CD4+ Foxp3+ T cells with a defined specificity. Here we show that monoclonal B3K506 Tregs are functional in vitro and in vivo and clearly require cognate antigen to be suppressive. We further show that the strength of Treg stimulation determines the strength of Treg mediated suppression. Finally we analysed various suppressive mechanisms used by monoclonal Tregs and found that Treg-Tconv proximity is a parameter, which correlates with enhanced suppression. PMID:27210828

  20. Mechanisms of drug-induced lupus. II. T cells overexpressing lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 become autoreactive and cause a lupuslike disease in syngeneic mice.

    PubMed

    Yung, R; Powers, D; Johnson, K; Amento, E; Carr, D; Laing, T; Yang, J; Chang, S; Hemati, N; Richardson, B

    1996-06-15

    Current theories propose that systemic lupus erythematosus develops when genetically predisposed individuals are exposed to certain environmental agents, although how these agents trigger lupus is uncertain. Some of these agents, such as procainamide, hydralazine, and UV-light inhibit T cell DNA methylation, increase lymphocyte function-associated antigen 1 (LFA-1) (CD11a/CD18) expression, and induce autoreactivity in vitro, and adoptive transfer of T cells that are made autoreactive by this mechanism causes a lupuslike disease. The mechanism by which these cells cause autoimmunity is unknown. In this report, we present evidence that LFA-1 overexpression is sufficient to induce autoimmunity. LFA-1 overexpression was induced on cloned murine Th2 cells by transfection, resulting in autoreactivity. Adoptive transfer of the transfected, autoreactive cells into syngeneic recipients caused a lupuslike disease with anti-DNA antibodies, an immune complex glomerulonephritis and pulmonary alveolitis, similar to that caused by cells treated with procainamide. These results indicate that agents or events which modify T cell DNA methylation may induce autoimmunity by causing T cell LFA-1 overexpression. Since T cells from patients with active lupus have hypomethylated DNA and overexpressed LFA-1, this mechanism could be important in the development of human autoimmunity.

  1. Memory CD4+ T cells are required for optimal NK cell effector functions against the opportunistic fungal pathogen Pneumocystis murina.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Michelle N; Zheng, Mingquan; Ruan, Sanbao; Kolls, Jay; D'Souza, Alain; Shellito, Judd E

    2013-01-01

    Little is known about the role of NK cells or their interplay with other immune cells during opportunistic infections. Using our murine model of Pneumocystis pneumonia, we found that loss of NK cells during immunosuppression results in substantial Pneumocystis lung burden. During early infection of C57B/6 CD4(+) T cell-depleted mice, there were significantly fewer NK cells in the lung tissue compared with CD4(+) T cell-intact animals, and the NK cells present demonstrated decreased upregulation of the activation marker NKp46 and production of the effector cytokine, IFN-γ. Furthermore, coincubation studies revealed a significant increase in fungal killing when NK cells were combined with CD4(+) T cells compared with either cell alone, which was coincident with a significant increase in perforin production by NK cells. Finally, however, we found through adoptive transfer that memory CD4(+) T cells are required for significant NK cell upregulation of the activation marker NK group 2D and production of IFN-γ, granzyme B, and perforin during Pneumocystis infection. To the best of our knowledge, this study is the first to demonstrate a role for NK cells in immunity to Pneumocystis pneumonia, as well as to establish a functional relationship between CD4(+) T cells and NK cells in the host response to an opportunistic fungal pathogen.

  2. Expression of TCR-Vβ peptides by murine bone marrow cells does not identify T-cell progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Abbey, Janice L; Karsunky, Holger; Serwold, Thomas; Papathanasiou, Peter; Weissman, Irving L; O’Neill, Helen C

    2015-01-01

    Germline transcription has been described for both immunoglobulin and T-cell receptor (TCR) genes, raising questions of their functional significance during haematopoiesis. Previously, an immature murine T-cell line was shown to bind antibody to TCR-Vβ8.2 in absence of anti-Cβ antibody binding, and an equivalent cell subset was also identified in the mesenteric lymph node. Here, we investigate whether germline transcription and cell surface Vβ8.2 expression could therefore represent a potential marker of T-cell progenitors. Cells with the TCR phenotype of Vβ8.2+Cβ− are found in several lymphoid sites, and among the lineage-negative (Lin−) fraction of hematopoietic progenitors in bone marrow (BM). Cell surface marker analysis of these cells identified subsets reflecting common lymphoid progenitors, common myeloid progenitors and multipotential progenitors. To assess whether the Lin−Vβ8.2+Cβ− BM subset contains hematopoietic progenitors, cells were sorted and adoptively transferred into sub-lethally irradiated recipients. No T-cell or myeloid progeny were detected following introduction of cells via the intrathymic or intravenous routes. However, B-cell development was detected in spleen. This pattern of restricted in vivo reconstitution disputes Lin−Vβ8.2+Cβ− BM cells as committed T-cell progenitors, but raises the possibility of progenitors with potential for B-cell development. PMID:25754612

  3. Modulation of mTOR Signalling Triggers the Formation of Stem Cell-like Memory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Scholz, Godehard; Jandus, Camilla; Zhang, Lianjun; Grandclément, Camille; Lopez-Mejia, Isabel C.; Soneson, Charlotte; Delorenzi, Mauro; Fajas, Lluis; Held, Werner; Dormond, Olivier; Romero, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    Robust, long-lasting immune responses are elicited by memory T cells that possess properties of stem cells, enabling them to persist long-term and to permanently replenish the effector pools. Thus, stem cell-like memory T (TSCM) cells are of key therapeutic value and efforts are underway to characterize TSCM cells and to identify means for their targeted induction. Here, we show that inhibition of mechanistic/mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 (mTORC1) by rapamycin or the Wnt-β-catenin signalling activator TWS119 in activated human naive T cells leads to the induction of TSCM cells. We show that these compounds switch T cell metabolism to fatty acid oxidation as favoured metabolic programme for TSCM cell generation. Of note, pharmacologically induced TSCM cells possess superior functional features as a long-term repopulation capacity after adoptive transfer. Furthermore, we provide insights into the transcriptome of TSCM cells. Our data identify a mechanism of pharmacological mTORC1 inhibitors, allowing us to confer stemness to human naive T cells which may be significantly relevant for the design of innovative T cell-based cancer immunotherapies. PMID:26981571

  4. Partial tolerance of autoreactive B and T cells to erythrocyte-specific self-antigens in mice

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Krystalyn E.; Hendrickson, Jeanne E.; Cadwell, Chantel M.; Iwakoshi, Neal N.; Zimring, James C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Breakdown of humoral tolerance to RBC antigens may lead to autoimmune hemolytic anemia, a severe and sometimes fatal disease. The underlying mechanisms behind the breakdown of humoral tolerance to RBC antigens are poorly understood. Design and Methods In order to study the pathogenesis of autoimmune hemolytic anemia, we developed a murine model with RBC-specific expression of a model antigen carrying epitopes from hen egg lysozyme and ovalbumin. Results Humoral tolerance was observed; this was not broken even by strong immunogenic stimulation (lysozyme or ovalbumin with adjuvant). Autoreactive CD4+ T cells were detected by tetramer enrichment assays, but failed to activate or expand despite repeat stimulation, indicating a nonresponsive population rather than deletion. Adoptive transfer of autoreactive CD4+ T cells (OT-II mice) led to autoantibody (anti-lysozyme) production by B cells in multiple anatomic compartments, including the bone marrow. Conclusions These data demonstrate that B cells autoreactive to RBC antigens survive in healthy mice with normal immune systems. Furthermore, autoreactive B cells are not centrally tolerized and are receptive to T-cell help. As the autoreactive T cells are present but non-responsive, these data indicate that factors that reverse T-cell non-responsiveness may be central to the pathogenesis of autoimmune hemolytic anemia. PMID:22733018

  5. B cells promote induction of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis by facilitating reactivation of T cells in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Pierson, Emily R; Stromnes, Ingunn M; Goverman, Joan M

    2014-02-01

    The efficacy of rituximab treatment in multiple sclerosis has renewed interest in the role of B cells in CNS autoimmunity. In this study, we show that B cells are the predominant MHC class II(+) subset in the naive CNS in mice, and they constitutively express proinflammatory cytokines. Incidence of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis induced by adoptive transfer was significantly reduced in C3HeB/Fej μMT (B cell-deficient) mice, suggesting an important role for CNS B cells in initiating inflammatory responses. Initial T cell infiltration of the CNS occurred normally in μMT mice; however, lack of production of T cell cytokines and other immune mediators indicated impaired T cell reactivation. Subsequent recruitment of immune cells from the periphery driven by this initial T cell reactivation did not occur in μMT mice. B cells required exogenous IL-1β to reactivate Th17 but not Th1 cells in vitro. Similarly, reactivation of Th1 cells infiltrating the CNS was selectively impaired compared with Th17 cells in μMT mice, causing an increased Th17/Th1 ratio in the CNS at experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis onset and enhanced brain inflammation. These studies reveal an important role for B cells within the CNS in reactivating T cells and influencing the clinical manifestation of disease.

  6. Engineering T Cells to Functionally Cure HIV-1 Infection.

    PubMed

    Leibman, Rachel S; Riley, James L

    2015-07-01

    Despite the ability of antiretroviral therapy to minimize human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication and increase the duration and quality of patients' lives, the health consequences and financial burden associated with the lifelong treatment regimen render a permanent cure highly attractive. Although T cells play an important role in controlling virus replication, they are themselves targets of HIV-mediated destruction. Direct genetic manipulation of T cells for adoptive cellular therapies could facilitate a functional cure by generating HIV-1-resistant cells, redirecting HIV-1-specific immune responses, or a combination of the two strategies. In contrast to a vaccine approach, which relies on the production and priming of HIV-1-specific lymphocytes within a patient's own body, adoptive T-cell therapy provides an opportunity to customize the therapeutic T cells prior to administration. However, at present, it is unclear how to best engineer T cells so that sustained control over HIV-1 replication can be achieved in the absence of antiretrovirals. This review focuses on T-cell gene-engineering and gene-editing strategies that have been performed in efforts to inhibit HIV-1 replication and highlights the requirements for a successful gene therapy-mediated functional cure.

  7. Engineering T Cells to Functionally Cure HIV-1 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Leibman, Rachel S; Riley, James L

    2015-01-01

    Despite the ability of antiretroviral therapy to minimize human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication and increase the duration and quality of patients' lives, the health consequences and financial burden associated with the lifelong treatment regimen render a permanent cure highly attractive. Although T cells play an important role in controlling virus replication, they are themselves targets of HIV-mediated destruction. Direct genetic manipulation of T cells for adoptive cellular therapies could facilitate a functional cure by generating HIV-1–resistant cells, redirecting HIV-1–specific immune responses, or a combination of the two strategies. In contrast to a vaccine approach, which relies on the production and priming of HIV-1–specific lymphocytes within a patient's own body, adoptive T-cell therapy provides an opportunity to customize the therapeutic T cells prior to administration. However, at present, it is unclear how to best engineer T cells so that sustained control over HIV-1 replication can be achieved in the absence of antiretrovirals. This review focuses on T-cell gene-engineering and gene-editing strategies that have been performed in efforts to inhibit HIV-1 replication and highlights the requirements for a successful gene therapy–mediated functional cure. PMID:25896251

  8. Protective cellular retroviral immunity requires both CD4+ and CD8+ immune T cells.

    PubMed Central

    Hom, R C; Finberg, R W; Mullaney, S; Ruprecht, R M

    1991-01-01

    We have found previously that postexposure chemoprophylaxis with 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (also known as zidovudine or AZT) in combination with recombinant human alpha A/D interferon fully protected mice exposed to a lethal dose of Rauscher murine leukemia virus (RLV) against viremia and disease. After cessation of therapy, over 90% of these mice were able to resist rechallenge with live RLV, thus demonstrating an acquired immunity. Adoptive cell transfer of 4 x 10(7) cells from immunized mice fully protected naive recipients from viremia and splenomegaly after RLV challenge. However, when these immune T cells were fractionated into CD4+ and CD8+ subpopulations, only partial protection was found when 4 x 10(7) T cells of either subset were given. Full protection against RLV challenge was seen again when the T-cell subsets from immunized mice were recombined and transferred at the same number into naive mice. We conclude that cellular immunity alone is protective and that both CD4+ and CD8+ cell types are required for conferring full protection against live virus challenge. Images PMID:1898666

  9. Synergy Between Intraepithelial Lymphocytes and Lamina Propria T Cells Drives Intestinal Inflammation During Infection

    PubMed Central

    Egan, C. E.; Maurer, K. J.; Cohen, S. B.; Mack, M.; Simpson, K. W.; Denkers, E. Y.

    2011-01-01

    Oral infection of C57BL/6 mice with Toxoplasma gondii triggers severe necrosis in the ileum within 7–10 days of infection. Lesion development is mediated by Th-1 cytokines, CD4+ T cells, and sub-epithelial bacterial translocation. As such, these features share similarity to Crohn’s disease. Recently, we uncovered a role for intraepithelial lymphocytes (IEL) in mediating pathology after Toxoplasma infection. We show here that αβ and not γδ T cell IELs mediate intestinal damage. By adoptive transfer of mucosal T cells into naive Rag1−/− mice, we demonstrate that IEL do not function alone to cause inflammatory lesions, but act with CD4+ T lymphocytes from the lamina propria. Furthermore, recipient mice pretreated with broad-spectrum antibiotics to eliminate intestinal flora resisted intestinal disease after transfer of IEL and lamina propria lymphocytes. Our data provide valuable new insight into mechanisms of intestinal inflammation, findings that have important implications for understanding human inflammatory bowel disease. PMID:21796113

  10. Silymarin inhibits ultraviolet radiation-induced immune suppression through DNA repair-dependent activation of dendritic cells and stimulation of effector T cells.

    PubMed

    Vaid, Mudit; Prasad, Ram; Singh, Tripti; Elmets, Craig A; Xu, Hui; Katiyar, Santosh K

    2013-04-15

    Silymarin inhibits UVB-induced immunosuppression in mouse skin. To identify the molecular mechanisms underlying this effect, we used an adoptive transfer approach in which dendritic cells (DCs) from the draining lymph nodes of donor mice that had been UVB-exposed and sensitized to 2,4,-dinitrofluorobenzene (DNFB) were transferred into naïve recipient mice. The contact hypersensitivity (CHS) response of the recipient mice to DNFB was then measured. When DCs were obtained from UVB-exposed donor mice that were not treated with silymarin, the CHS response was suppressed confirming the role of DCs in the UVB-induced immunosuppression. Silymarin treatment of UVB-exposed donor mice relieved this suppression of the CHS response in the recipients. Silymarin treatment was associated with rapid repair of UVB-induced cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers (CPDs) in DCs and silymarin treatment did not prevent UV-induced immunosuppression in XPA-deficient mice which are unable to repair UV-induced DNA damage. The CHS response in mice receiving DCs from silymarin-treated UV-exposed donor mice also was associated with enhanced secretion of Th1-type cytokines and stimulation of T cells. Adoptive transfer of T cells revealed that transfer of either CD8(+) or CD4(+) cells from silymarin-treated, UVB-exposed donors resulted in enhancement of the CHS response. Cell culture study showed enhanced secretion of IL-2 and IFNγ by CD8(+) T cells, and reduced secretion of Th2 cytokines by CD4(+) T cells, obtained from silymarin-treated UVB-exposed mice. These data suggest that DNA repair-dependent functional activation of DCs, a reduction in CD4(+) regulatory T-cell activity, and stimulation of CD8(+) effector T cells contribute to silymarin-mediated inhibition of UVB-induced immunosuppression. PMID:23395695

  11. Chimeric Antigen Receptor (CAR)-Specific Monoclonal Antibody to Detect CD19-Specific T Cells in Clinical Trials

    PubMed Central

    Jena, Bipulendu; Maiti, Sourindra; Huls, Helen; Singh, Harjeet; Lee, Dean A.; Champlin, Richard E.; Cooper, Laurence J. N.

    2013-01-01

    Clinical trials targeting CD19 on B-cell malignancies are underway with encouraging anti-tumor responses. Most infuse T cells genetically modified to express a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) with specificity derived from the scFv region of a CD19-specific mouse monoclonal antibody (mAb, clone FMC63). We describe a novel anti-idiotype monoclonal antibody (mAb) to detect CD19-specific CAR+ T cells before and after their adoptive transfer. This mouse mAb was generated by immunizing with a cellular vaccine expressing the antigen-recognition domain of FMC63. The specificity of the mAb (clone no. 136.20.1) was confined to the scFv region of the CAR as validated by inhibiting CAR-dependent lysis of CD19+ tumor targets. This clone can be used to detect CD19-specific CAR+ T cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells at a sensitivity of 1∶1,000. In clinical settings the mAb is used to inform on the immunophenotype and persistence of administered CD19-specific T cells. Thus, our CD19-specific CAR mAb (clone no. 136.20.1) will be useful to investigators implementing CD19-specific CAR+ T cells to treat B-lineage malignancies. The methodology described to develop a CAR-specific anti-idiotypic mAb could be extended to other gene therapy trials targeting different tumor associated antigens in the context of CAR-based adoptive T-cell therapy. PMID:23469246

  12. Neuritogenic Lewis rat T cells use Tcrb chains that include a new Tcrb-V8 family member.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X M; Esch, T R; Clark, L; Gregorian, S; Rostami, A; Otvos, L; Heber-Katz, E

    1994-01-01

    The P2 protein obtained from Schwann cells induces a population of T cells which, upon adoptive transfer, causes the disease experimental allergic neuritis (EAN), an animal model for Guillain-Barre syndrome. In this report, a truncated peptide, FR22, derived from a previously reported neuritogenic T-cell determinant, was used to generate from Lewis rats T cells that were shown to cause EAN. Since our previous studies showed that Tcrb-V8 was used by a majority of T-cell hybridomas specific for the neuritogenic peptide P26, which contains the FR22 sequence, we sequenced the Tcrb-V8+ mRNA from FR22-specific T-cell lines, and compared the sequences obtained with those obtained from similarly generated myelin basic protein (MBP) 68-88-specific Lewis rat T-cell lines. We found that in the EAN lines, several members of the Tcrb-V8 family were used, including a new family member, Tcrb-V8E. This was more diverse than the MBP-68-88-specific response in which only a single Tcrb-V8 family member was used. Also, in the EAN lines, the beta chain sequences did not show the same conserved junctional regions seen in the MBP lines. Thus, T-cell receptor beta chain usage in the response to this dominant neuritogenic peptide appears to be less restricted than the respo