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Sample records for adp induced platelet

  1. The Ratio of ADP- to TRAP-Induced Platelet Aggregation Quantifies P2Y12-Dependent Platelet Inhibition Independently of the Platelet Count

    PubMed Central

    Olivier, Christoph B.; Meyer, Melanie; Bauer, Hans; Schnabel, Katharina; Weik, Patrick; Zhou, Qian; Bode, Christoph; Moser, Martin; Diehl, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to assess the association of clinical factors with P2Y12-dependent platelet inhibition as monitored by the ratio of ADP- to TRAP-induced platelet aggregation and conventional ADP-induced aggregation, respectively. Background Controversial findings to identify and overcome high platelet reactivity (HPR) after coronary stent-implantation and to improve clinical outcome by tailored anti-platelet therapy exist. Monitoring anti-platelet therapy ex vivo underlies several confounding parameters causing that ex vivo platelet aggregation might not reflect in vivo platelet inhibition. Methods In a single centre observational study, multiple electrode aggregometry was performed in whole blood of patients after recent coronary stent-implantation. Relative ADP-induced aggregation (r-ADP-agg) was defined as the ratio of ADP- to TRAP- induced aggregation reflecting the individual degree of P2Y12-mediated platelet reactivity. Results Platelet aggregation was assessed in 359 patients. Means (± SD) of TRAP-, ADP-induced aggregation and r-ADP-agg were 794 ± 239 AU*min, 297 ± 153 AU*min and 37 ± 14%, respectively. While ADP- and TRAP-induced platelet aggregation correlated significantly with platelet count (ADP: r = 0.302; p<0.001; TRAP: r = 0.509 p<0.001), r-ADP-agg values did not (r = -0.003; p = 0.960). These findings were unaltered in multivariate analyses adjusting for a range of factors potentially influencing platelet aggregation. The presence of an acute coronary syndrome and body weight were found to correlate with both ADP-induced platelet aggregation and r-ADP-agg. Conclusion The ratio of ADP- to TRAP-induced platelet aggregation quantifies P2Y12-dependent platelet inhibition independently of the platelet count in contrast to conventional ADP-induced aggregation. Furthermore, r-ADP-agg was associated with the presence of an acute coronary syndrome and body weight as well as ADP-induced aggregation. Thus, the r-ADP-agg is a more valid

  2. Plant extracts inhibit ADP-induced platelet activation in humans: their potential therapeutic role as ADP antagonists.

    PubMed

    Jagroop, Indera Anita

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine diphosphate (ADP) plays a pivotal role in platelet activation. Platelet hyperactivity is associated with vascular disease and also has a key role in haemostasis and thrombosis. ADP activates platelets through three purinoceptor subtypes, the G(q)-coupled P2Y(1) receptor, G(i)-coupled P2Y(12) receptor and P2X(1) ligand-gated cation channel. Platelet ADP purinergic receptors are therefore suitable targets for antiplatelet drugs. Thienopyridines such as clopidogrel and ticlopidine, as well as other ADP receptor antagonists like prasugrel, ticagrelor, cangrelor and elinogrel have demonstrated clinical benefits via the inhibition of the selective purinergic ADP receptor, P2Y(12). However, they still have limitations in their mode of action and efficacy, like increased risk of bleeding. Thus, the ongoing pursuit to develop newer and more effective antiplatelet agents continues. There is a growing interest in the purinergic antiplatelet properties exhibited by plant extracts. This article considers the following: pomolic acid isolated from Licania pittieri, brazilin isolated from the heartwood of Caesalpinia sappan L, phylligenin isolated from the twigs of Muraltia vulpina, bark oil of Gonystylus velutinus, seed and bark extracts from Aesculus hippocastanum L. and red wine phenolics and catechins isolated from green tea. Moreover, the method used to investigate platelet purinergic receptors should be considered, since using a more sensitive, high-resolution platelet sizer can sometimes detect platelet variations when the light transmission method was not able to do so. The exact mechanisms by which these plant extracts work need further investigation. They all however inhibit ADP-induced activation in human platelets. This could explain, at least in part, the protective effect of plant extracts as antiplatelet agents. PMID:24190032

  3. Inhibition of Primary ADP-Induced Platelet Aggregation in Normal Subjects after Administration of Nitrofurantoin (Furadantin)

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Ennio C.; Levin, Nathan W.

    1973-01-01

    The evidence indicating that platelets may play a role in the occurrence of certain thromboembolic phenomena has stimulated a search for inhibitors of platelet function. This report presents data to indicate that nitrofurantoin is a potent inhibitor of primary ADP-induced platelet aggregation. The addition of 10 μM nitrofurantoin to citrated platelet-rich plasma obtained from 12 normal subjects produced a 29±6% (2 SD) inhibition of the velocity of platelet aggregation induced by 2 μM ADP. The inhibitory effect of nitrofurantoin demonstrated competitive kinetics in respect to ADP. The intravenous (180 mg) or oral (200 mg) administration of nitrofurantoin produced a serum nitrofurantoin concentration ranging from 2.7 to 23 μM in 28 normal subjects. Platelet-rich plasma obtained from these subjects demonstrated inhibition of the velocity of ADP-induced platelet aggregation that correlated with the log of the serum nitrofurantoin concentration (P < 0.001). Collagen-induced platelet aggregation was also inhibited in a dose-related manner, and the bleeding time was significantly prolonged in the two subjects with the highest serum nitrofurantoin concentration. These studies indicate that nitrofurantoin in vivo inhibits platelet function to a degree that is proportional to the serum nitrofurantoin concentration. PMID:4729043

  4. Dabigatran and rivaroxaban do not affect AA- and ADP-induced platelet aggregation in patients receiving concomitant platelet inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Olivier, Christoph B; Weik, Patrick; Meyer, Melanie; Weber, Susanne; Diehl, Philipp; Bode, Christoph; Moser, Martin; Zhou, Qian

    2016-08-01

    Dabigatran and rivaroxaban are novel, vitamin K-independent oral anticoagulants (NOACs) and act via antagonism of the coagulation factor (F) IIa (dabigatran) or FXa (rivaroxaban), respectively. Compared to vitamin-K-antagonists, NOACs have shown non-inferiority of risk and benefit in patients with non valvular atrial fibrillation (AF). In clinical practice there is increasing use of NOACs combined with platelet inhibitors in patients with AF and coronary artery disease. However, whether NOACs affect the function of platelet inhibitors remains incompletely known. This observational study aimed to assess the platelet function in patients receiving dabigatran or rivaroxaban and concomitant platelet inhibitors. A single centre observational study was performed analysing the platelet aggregation of patients treated with dabigatran or rivaroxaban with or without concomitant platelet inhibitors. Measurements before the initiation of NOAC therapy served as the respective control group. Platelet aggregation was measured by multiple electrode aggregometry and was induced with adenosine diphosphate (ADP, 6.5 µM) and arachidonic acid (AA, 0.5 mM), respectively. In order to evaluate whether NOACs interact with platelet inhibition by ASA or the P2Y12-antagonist clopidogrel, 87 patients were grouped according to their concomitant antiplatelet medication. Comparing the ADP- and AA-induced platelet aggregation in patients without concomitant platelet inhibitors (n = 45) no significant differences under therapy with dabigatran (d) or rivaroxaban (r) compared to the control group (c) were observed. In patients taking clopidogrel as a concomitant platelet inhibitor (n = 21), neither dabigatran nor rivaroxaban affected the ADP-induced platelet aggregation (c 20 ± 11, d 21 ± 14, r 18 ± 8 AU*min, p = 0.200). Patients receiving dabigatran or rivaroxaban in combination with ASA (n = 42; 21 ASA only, 21 ASA + clopidogrel) showed no significant differences of the AA-induced

  5. Inhalation of nitric oxide inhibits ADP-induced platelet aggregation and alpha-granule release.

    PubMed

    Hagberg, I A; Sølvik, U Ø; Opdahl, H; Roald, H E; Lyberg, T

    1999-01-01

    To gather further information about the effects on blood platelet activation of in vivo exposure to nitric oxide (NO), platelet reactivity was studied in blood from healthy, non-smoking male volunteers before and after 30 min inhalation of 40 ppm NO. Whole blood was stimulated in vitro with adenosine diphosphate or thrombin receptor activation peptide (TRAP-6). In an ex vivo perfusion model, non-anticoagulated blood was exposed to immobilised collagen at arterial blood flow conditions (2600 s(-1)). Blood samples from both the in vitro and ex vivo experiments were stained with fluorochrome-labelled Annexin-V and antibodies against CD42a, CD45, CD49b, CD61, CD62P and fibrinogen, and analysed with a three-colour flow cytometry technique. NO inhalation reduced the platelet activation response to adenosine diphosphate (ADP) stimulation by decreasing platelet-platelet aggregation, alpha-granule release and platelet-leukocyte conjugate formation. TRAP-stimulated platelet activation, collagen-induced platelet activation and thrombus growth was unaffected by NO inhalation. We therefore suggest an ADP receptor inhibitor mode of action of inhaled NO, selective on the newly suggested G protein- and phospholipase C-coupled P2Y1 receptor. Our results demonstrate that blood platelet activation in healthy subjects is modulated by inhalation of NO in therapeutically relevant doses, although the clinical impact of our findings remains unclear. PMID:16801117

  6. Interaction of salvianolic acids and notoginsengnosides in inhibition of ADP-induced platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yan; Wu, Wan-Ying; Liu, Ai-Hua; Deng, Shao-Sheng; Bi, Kai-Shun; Liu, Xuan; Guo, De-An

    2008-01-01

    Salvia miltiorrhiza and Panax notoginseng were both considered to be beneficial to cardiovascular diseases in traditional Chinese medicine and often used in combination. To examine the possible interaction between them, the effects of the active fractions of these two herbs, salvianolic acids (SA) and notoginsengnosides (NG), on platelet aggregation were checked respectively or in combination in vitro and in vivo. Both the platelet aggregation of platelet rich plasma (PRP) and washed platelet after ADP induction were checked. In vitro study showed that both SA and NG had an inhibitory effect on platelet aggregation. However, there is no synergistic effect of the combination of SA and NG in vitro. In vivo study showed that i.g. 550 mg/kg/day SA or NG for 5 days could significantly inhibit ADP-induced platelet aggregation of PRP. Moreover, combination of SA and NG at a ratio of 5:1 had a synergistic effect on platelet aggregation of PRP. The mechanism for the synergism of SA and NG in vivo was not clear. High performance liquid chromatography analysis of the plasma of rats received SA, NG or combination of SA and NG showed that co-administration of NG caused change in the plasma distribution profile of SA. The influence of combination on the absorption and/or metabolism of SA may be one of the reasons for the synergism of SA and NG in vivo. PMID:18457363

  7. Agonist-induced ADP-ribosylation of a cytosolic protein in human platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Bruene, B.; Molina Y Vedia, L.; Lapetina, E.G. )

    1990-05-01

    {alpha}-Thrombin and phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate stimulated the mono(ADP-ribosyl)ation of a 42-kDa cytosolic protein of human platelets. This effect was mediated by protein kinase C activation and was inhibited by protein kinase C inhibitor staurosporine. It also was prevented by prostacyclin, which is known to inhibit the phospholipase C-induced formation of 1,2-diacylglycerol, which is one of the endogenous activators of protein kinase C. On sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the 42-kDa protein that is ADP-ribosylated by {alpha}-thrombin was clearly distinct from the {alpha} subunits of membrane-bound inhibitory and stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins, respectively G{sub i{alpha}} and G{sub s{alpha}}; the 47-kDa protein that is phosphorylated by protein kinase C in platelets; and the 39-kDa protein that has been shown to be endogenously ADP-ribosylated by agents that release nitric oxide. This information shows that agonist-induced activation of protein kinase leads to the ADP-ribosylation of a specific protein. This covalent modification might have a functional role in platelet activation.

  8. Methodological considerations for the assessment of ADP induced platelet aggregation using the Multiplate® analyser.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Lisa R; Larsen, Peter D; La Flamme, Anne C; Harding, Scott A

    2013-01-01

    Factors affecting the Multiplate® assay's analytical precision have not been well defined. We investigated the effect of methodological factors on the measurement of ADP-induced platelet aggregation using the Multiplate® assay. ADP-induced platelet aggregation was analysed in whole blood using the Multiplate® assay. We tested the reproducibility of measurement, the effect of different anticoagulants (hirudin, citrate and heparin) and the effect of time delay (15, 30, 45, 60, 120 and 180 minutes) between sampling and analysis in patients. The use of a manual calibrated pipette with the Multiplate® analyser was also tested. The mean coefficient of variation (CV) using the manufacturers recommended methods was 10.8 ± 8.7% (n = 30). When compared to hirudin (359.5 ± 309 AU*min) the use of heparin (521.0 ± 316 AU*min, p = 0.0015) increased platelet aggregation, while the use of sodium citrate (245.0 ± 209 AU*min, p = 0.003) decreased the platelet aggregation (n = 20). The addition of CaCl2 to the citrate-anticoagulated blood resulted in platelet aggregation levels similar to hirudin. Platelet aggregation varied with time delay (n = 20). When compared to platelet aggregation at 30 minutes (391.1 ± 283 AU*min), platelet aggregation was reduced at 60 minutes (335.2 ± 251.6 AU*min, p < 0.05), 120 minutes (198.8 ± 122.9 AU*min, p < 0.001) and 180 minutes (160.7 ± 92 AU*min, p < 0.001). The use of a manual calibrated pipette did not significantly reduce the mean CV in the assay (n = 20). Methodological factors such as the anticoagulant used and the time delay should be standardised where possible to reduce variability, and allow thresholds derived from one study to be comparable across multiple studies. PMID:22686487

  9. Effects of oral contraceptives, or lanosterol, on ADP-induced aggregation and binding of /sup 125/I-fibrinogen to rat platelets

    SciTech Connect

    McGregor, L.; Toor, B.; McGregor, J.L.; Renaud, S.; Clemetson, K.J.

    1984-03-01

    The aggregation to ADP and the binding of /sup 125/I-fibrinogen to platelets from rats treated with oral contraceptives or normal platelets treated in vitro with lanosterol were compared to their respective controls. Both types of platelets showed a significant increase in ADP-induced aggregation and in binding of fibrinogen, indicating that the effect of oral contraceptives could be partly due to increased levels of lanosterol in platelet membrane.

  10. Inhibitory effects and mechanisms of high molecular-weight phlorotannins from Sargassum thunbergii on ADP-induced platelet aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Yuxi; Wang, Changyun; Li, Jing; Guo, Qi; Qi, Hongtao

    2009-09-01

    We evaluated the effects of high molecular-weight phlorotannins from Sargassum thunbergii (STP) on ADP-induced platelet aggregation and arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism in New Zealand white rabbits and Wistar rats. The inhibition of STP on platelet aggregation was investigated using a turbidimetric method, and the levels of the terminal products of AA metabolism were measured using the corresponding kits for maleic dialdehyde (MDA), thromboxane B2 (TXB2) and 6-keto-prostaglandin F1α (6-keto-PGF1α) by colorimetry and radioimmunoassay, as appropriate. We found that STP could inhibit ADP-induced platelet aggregation, and the inhibitory ratio was 91.50% at the STP concentration of 4.0 mg/mL. Furthermore, STP markedly affected AA metabolism by decreasing the synthesis of MDA ( P<0.01) and increasing the synthesis of 6-keto-PGF1α, thus changing the plasma TXB2/6-keto-PGF1α balance when the platelets were activated ( P<0.01). Therefore, STP altered AA metabolism and these findings partly revealed the molecular mechanism by which STP inhibits ADP-induced platelet aggregation.

  11. Relationship between ADP-induced platelet-fibrin clot strength and anti-platelet responsiveness in ticagrelor treated ACS patients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dan-Dan; Wang, Xu-Yun; Xi, Shao-Zhi; Liu, Jia; Qin, Liu-An; Jing, Jing; Yin, Tong; Chen, Yun-Dai

    2016-01-01

    Background Ticagrelor provides enhanced antiplatelet efficacy but increased risk of bleeding and dyspnea. This study aimed to display the relationship between ADP-induced platelet-fibrin clot strength (MAADP) and clinical outcomes in acute coronary syndrome (ACS) patients treated by ticagrelor. Methods Consecutive Chinese-Han patients with ACS who received maintenance dose of ticagrelor on top of aspirin were recruited. After 5-day ticagrelor maintenance treatment, MAADP measured by thrombelastography (TEG) were recorded for the evaluation of ticagrelor anti-platelet reactivity. Pre-specified cutoffs of MAADP > 47 mm for high on-treatment platelet reactivity (HTPR) and MAADP < 31 mm for low on-treatment platelet reactivity (LTPR) were applied for evaluation. The occurrences of primary ischemic cardiovascular events (including a composite of cardiac death, non-fatal myocardial infarction and stroke), the Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) defined bleeding events, and ticagrelor related dyspnea were recorded after a follow-up of three months. Results Overall, 176 ACS patients (Male: 79.55%, Age: 59.91 ± 10.54 years) under ticagrelor maintenance treatment were recruited. The value of MAADP ranged from 4.80% to 72.90% (21.27% ± 12.07% on average), with the distribution higher skewed towards the lower values. Using the pre-specific cutoffs for HTPR and LTPR, seven patients (3.98%) were identified as HTPR and 144 patients (81.82%) as LTPR. After a follow-up of three months in 172 patients, major cardiovascular events occurred in no patient, but TIMI bleeding events in 81 (47.09%) with major bleedings in three patients. All patients with major bleedings were classified as LTPR. Ticagrelor related dyspnea occurred in 31 (18.02%) patients, with 30 (21.28%) classified as LTPR and no one as HTPR (P = 0.02). Conclusions In ticagrelor treated ACS patients, MAADP measured by TEG might be valuable for the prediction of major bleeding and ticagrelor related dyspnea

  12. Inhibitory effect of caffeic acid on ADP-induced thrombus formation and platelet activation involves mitogen-activated protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Yu; Li, Quan; Liu, Yu-Ying; Sun, Kai; Fan, Jing-Yu; Wang, Chuan-She; Han, Jing-Yan

    2015-01-01

    Caffeic acid (CA), one of the active constituents of Radix Salvia miltiorrhizae, exhibits antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. However, few studies have assessed the ability of CA to inhibit platelet mediated thrombus generation in vivo. In this study, we investigated the antithrombotic effect of CA in mouse cerebral arterioles and venules using intravital microscopy. The antiplatelet activity of CA in ADP stimulated mouse platelets in vitro was also examined in attempt to explore the underlying mechanism. Our results demonstrated that CA (1.25–5 mg/kg) significantly inhibited thrombus formation in vivo. In vitro, CA (25–100 μM) inhibited ADP-induced platelet aggregation, P-selectin expression, ATP release, Ca2+ mobilization, and integrin αIIbβ3 activation. Additionally, CA attenuated p38, ERK, and JNK activation, and enhanced cAMP levels. Taken together, these data provide evidence for the inhibition of CA on platelet-mediated thrombosis in vivo, which is, at least partly, mediated by interference in phosphorylation of ERK, p38, and JNK leading to elevation of cAMP and down-regulation of P-selectin expression and αIIbβ3 activation. These results suggest that CA may have potential for the treatment of aberrant platelet activation-related diseases. PMID:26345207

  13. Calmodulin antagonists induce platelet apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhicheng; Li, Suping; Shi, Quanwei; Yan, Rong; Liu, Guanglei; Dai, Kesheng

    2010-04-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) antagonists induce apoptosis in various tumor models and inhibit tumor cell invasion and metastasis, thus some of which have been extensively used as anti-cancer agents. In platelets, CaM has been found to bind directly to the cytoplasmic domains of several platelet receptors. Incubation of platelets with CaM antagonists impairs the receptors-related platelet functions. However, it is still unknown whether CaM antagonists induce platelet apoptosis. Here we show that CaM antagonists N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalene sulfonamide (W7), tamoxifen (TMX), and trifluoperazine (TFP) induce apoptotic events in human platelets, including depolarization of mitochondrial inner transmembrane potential, caspase-3 activation, and phosphatidylserine exposure. CaM antagonists did not incur platelet activation as detected by P-selectin surface expression and PAC-1 binding. However, ADP-, botrocetin-, and alpha-thrombin-induced platelet aggregation, platelet adhesion and spreading on von Willebrand factor surface were significantly reduced in platelets pre-treated with CaM antagonists. Furthermore, cytosolic Ca(2+) levels were obviously elevated by both W7 and TMX, and membrane-permeable Ca(2+) chelator BAPTA-AM significantly reduced apoptotic events in platelets induced by W7. Therefore, these findings indicate that CaM antagonists induce platelet apoptosis. The elevation of the cytosolic Ca(2+) levels may be involved in the regulation of CaM antagonists-induced platelet apoptosis. PMID:20172594

  14. Platelet cytosolic 44-kDa protein is a substrate of cholera toxin-induced ADP-ribosylation and is not recognized by antisera against the. alpha. subunit of the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein

    SciTech Connect

    Molina Y Vedia, L.M.; Reep, B.R.; Lapetina, E.G. )

    1988-08-01

    ADP-ribosylation induced by cholera toxin and pertussis toxin was studied in particulate and cytosolic fractions of human platelets. Platelets were disrupted by a cycle of freezing and thawing in the presence of a hyposmotic buffer containing protease inhibitors. In both fractions, the A subunit of cholera toxin ADP-ribosylates two proteins with molecular masses of 42 and 44 kDa, whereas pertussis toxin ADP-ribosylates a 41-kDa polypeptide. Two antisera against the {alpha} subunit of the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein recognize only the 42-kDa polypeptide. Cholera toxin-induced ADP-ribosylation of the 42- and 44-kDa proteins is reduced by pretreatment of platelets with iloprost, a prostacyclin analog. The 44-kDa protein, which is substrate of cholera toxin, could be extracted completely from the membrane and recovered in the cytosolic fraction when the cells were disrupted by Dounce homogenization and the pellet was extensively washed. A 44-kDa protein can also be labeled with 8-azidoguanosine 5{prime}-({alpha}-{sup 32}P)triphosphate in the cytosol and membranes. These finding indicate that cholera and pertussis toxins produced covalent modifications of proteins present in particulate and cytosolic platelet fractions. Moreover, the 44-kDa protein might be an {alpha} subunit of a guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein that is not recognized by available antisera.

  15. Pistacia chinensis Methanolic Extract Attenuated MAPK and Akt Phosphorylations in ADP Stimulated Rat Platelets In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji Young; Hong, Mei; Jia, Qi; Lee, Young-Chul; Yayeh, Taddesse; Hyun, Eujin; Kwak, Dong-Mi; Cho, Jae Youl; Rhee, Man Hee

    2012-01-01

    Pistacia chinensis (Chinese pistache) is a widely grown plant in southern China where the galls extract is a common practice in folk medicine. However, extracts from this plant have never been attempted for their cardiovascular protective effects in experimental setting. Here therefore we aimed to investigate the antiplatelet activity of Pistacia chinensis methanolic extract (PCME) in ADP stimulated rat platelets in vitro. PCME (2.5-20 μg/mL) inhibited ADP-induced platelet aggregation. While PCME diminished [Ca(2+)]i, ATP, and TXA2 release in ADP-activated platelets, it enhanced cAMP production in resting platelets. Likewise, PCME inhibited fibrinogen binding to αIIbβ3 and downregulated JNK, ERK, and Akt phosphorylations. Thus, PCME contains potential antiplatelet compounds that could be deployed for their therapeutic values in cardiovascular pathology. PMID:22899962

  16. Pistacia chinensis Methanolic Extract Attenuated MAPK and Akt Phosphorylations in ADP Stimulated Rat Platelets In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ji Young; Hong, Mei; Jia, Qi; Lee, Young-Chul; Yayeh, Taddesse; Hyun, Eujin; Kwak, Dong-Mi; Cho, Jae Youl; Rhee, Man Hee

    2012-01-01

    Pistacia chinensis (Chinese pistache) is a widely grown plant in southern China where the galls extract is a common practice in folk medicine. However, extracts from this plant have never been attempted for their cardiovascular protective effects in experimental setting. Here therefore we aimed to investigate the antiplatelet activity of Pistacia chinensis methanolic extract (PCME) in ADP stimulated rat platelets in vitro. PCME (2.5–20 μg/mL) inhibited ADP-induced platelet aggregation. While PCME diminished [Ca2+]i, ATP, and TXA2 release in ADP-activated platelets, it enhanced cAMP production in resting platelets. Likewise, PCME inhibited fibrinogen binding to αIIbβ3 and downregulated JNK, ERK, and Akt phosphorylations. Thus, PCME contains potential antiplatelet compounds that could be deployed for their therapeutic values in cardiovascular pathology. PMID:22899962

  17. Resolvin E1 Regulates ADP Activation of Human Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Fredman, Gabrielle; Van Dyke, Thomas E.; Serhan, Charles N.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Resolvin E1 (RvE1) is an eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA)-derived specialized pro-resolving mediator generated during resolution of acute inflammation. RvE1 exhibits potent organ-protective actions in vivo and acts on specific cell types including platelets. Here, we investigated the ability of RvE1 to regulate adenosine diphosphate (ADP) activation of platelets via specific receptors because RvE1 reduces platelet aggregation with certain agonists including ADP. Methods and Results RvE1 (0.1nM–100nM) incubated with platelets gave reduced ADP-stimulated P-selectin mobilization (IC50 ~1.6×10−12 M) and polymerized actin content compared to control platelets. RvE1 (1–100nM) did not stimulate or block intracellular calcium mobilization. Using a new P2Y12-β-arrestin-coupled cell system, ADP-activated P2Y12 with an EC50 of 5×10−6 M and RvE1 did not directly stimulate P2Y12 or block ADP-P2Y12 signals. In this system, another eicosanoid LTE4 (EC50 1.3×10−11 M) dose dependently activated P2Y12. When recombinant P2Y12-expressing cells were transiently transfected with an RvE1 receptor, human ChemR23 (present on human platelets), addition of RvE1 (0.1nM-10.0nM) blocked ADP signals (IC50 ~1.6×10−11 M) in P2Y12-ChemR23-expressing cells compared to mock transfections. Conclusions These results demonstrate that RvE1’s regulatory actions (i.e reducing ADP-stimulated P-selectin mobilization and actin polymerization) are hChemR23-dependent. Moreover, they document specific platelet actions of RvE1 selectively engaged with ADP-activated platelets that illuminate a new cellular mechanism and impact of omega-3 EPA that may contribute to both resolution of vascular inflammation and ADP-dependent platelet activation relevant in pathologic cardiovascular events. PMID:20702811

  18. Full activation of mouse platelets requires ADP secretion regulated by SERCA3 ATPase-dependent calcium stores.

    PubMed

    Elaïb, Ziane; Adam, Frédéric; Berrou, Eliane; Bordet, Jean-Claude; Prévost, Nicolas; Bobe, Régis; Bryckaert, Marijke; Rosa, Jean-Philippe

    2016-08-25

    The role of the sarco-endoplasmic reticulum calcium (Ca(2+)) adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) 3 (SERCA3) in platelet physiology remains poorly understood. Here, we show that SERCA3 knockout (SERCA3(-/-)) mice exhibit prolonged tail bleeding time and rebleeding. Thrombus formation was delayed both in arteries and venules in an in vivo ferric chloride-induced thrombosis model. Defective platelet adhesion and thrombus growth over collagen was confirmed in vitro. Adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP) removal by apyrase diminished adhesion and thrombus growth of control platelets to the level of SERCA3(-/-) platelets. Aggregation, dense granule secretion, and Ca(2+) mobilization of SERCA3(-/-) platelets induced by low collagen or low thrombin concentration were weaker than controls. Accordingly, SERCA3(-/-) platelets exhibited a partial defect in total stored Ca(2+) and in Ca(2+) store reuptake following thrombin stimulation. Importantly ADP, but not serotonin, rescued aggregation, secretion, and Ca(2+) mobilization in SERCA3(-/-) platelets, suggesting specificity. Dense granules appeared normal upon electron microscopy, mepacrine staining, and total serotonin content, ruling out a dense granule defect. ADP induced normal platelet aggregation, excluding a defect in ADP activation pathways. The SERCA3-specific inhibitor 2,5-di-(tert-butyl)-1,4-benzohydroquinone diminished both Ca(2+) mobilization and secretion of control platelets, as opposed to the SERCA2b inhibitor thapsigargin. This confirmed the specific role of catalytically active SERCA3 in ADP secretion. Accordingly, SERCA3-dependent Ca(2+) stores appeared depleted in SERCA3(-/-) platelets. Finally, αIIbβ3 integrin blockade did not affect SERCA3-dependent secretion, therefore proving independent of αIIbβ3 engagement. Altogether, these results show that SERCA3-dependent Ca(2+) stores control a specific ADP secretion pathway required for full platelet secretion induced by agonists at low concentration and independent

  19. Isolation and characterization of two disintegrins inhibiting ADP-induced human platelet aggregation from the venom of Crotalus scutulatus scutulatus (Mohave Rattlesnake)

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, Elda E.; Galan, Jacob A.; Russell, William K.; Soto, Julio G.; Russell, David H.; Perez, John C. . E-mail: kfjcp00@tamuk.edu

    2006-04-01

    Disintegrins and disintegrin-like proteins are molecules found in the venom of four snake families (Atractaspididae, Elapidae, Viperidae, and Colubridae). The disintegrins are nonenzymatic proteins that inhibit cell-cell interactions, cell-matrix interactions, and signal transduction, and may have potential in the treatment of strokes, heart attacks, cancers, and osteoporosis. Prior to 1983, the venom of Crotalus scutulatus scutulatus (Mohave Rattlesnake) was known to be only neurotoxic; however, now there is evidence that these snakes can contain venom with: (1) neurotoxins; (2) hemorrhagins; and (3) both neurotoxins and hemorrhagins. In this study, two disintegrins, mojastin 1 and mojastin 2, from the venom of a Mohave rattlesnake collected in central Arizona (Pinal County), were isolated and characterized. The disintegrins in these venoms were identified by mass-analyzed laser desorption ionization/time-of-flight/time-of-flight (MALDI/TOF/TOF) mass spectrometry as having masses of 7.436 and 7.636 kDa. Their amino acid sequences are similar to crotratroxin, a disintegrin isolated from the venom of the western diamondback rattlesnake (C. atrox). The amino acid sequence of mojastin 1 was identical to the amino acid sequence of a disintegrin isolated from the venom of the Timber rattlesnake (C. horridus). The disintegrins from the Mohave rattlesnake venom were able to inhibit ADP-induced platelet aggregation in whole human blood both having IC{sub 5}s of 13.8 nM, but were not effective in inhibiting the binding of human urinary bladder carcinoma cells (T24) to fibronectin.

  20. A study of the kinetics of ADP-triggered platelet shape change.

    PubMed

    Hantgan, R R

    1984-10-01

    The rapid transformation of human blood platelets from inert discoid cells to spheroechinocytes that is induced by adenosine diphosphate (ADP) has been followed by right-angle light scattering intensity measurements using a laser light source and a sensitive photomultiplier. Two steps have been observed, and their rate constants have been determined as a function of pH and [ADP] and in the presence and absence of calcium for both platelet-rich plasma and gel-filtered platelets. Both steps are significantly faster in the presence of physiologic levels of calcium. Platelets were fixed prior to and during activation, then examined by phase-contrast and scanning electron microscopy. The light scattering and morphological changes support a model in which, under physiologic conditions of pH, temperature, ionic strength, and calcium concentration, the initial rapid event in platelet shape change is the loss of discoid shape, with a decay time of two to three seconds, leading to an intermediate with short pseudopods. The slower extension of long pseudopods occurs next, with a time constant of approximately seven to eight seconds. These results may help to resolve the contradictory descriptions of the mechanism of platelet shape change that have recently appeared in the literature. PMID:6383500

  1. Calmodulin interacts with the platelet ADP receptor P2Y1

    PubMed Central

    Arthur, Jane F.; Shen, Yang; Mu, Fi-Tjen; Leon, Catherine; Gachet, Christian; Berndt, Michael C.; Andrews, Robert K.

    2006-01-01

    P2Y1 [P2 (purinergic type-2)-receptor 1] is a G-protein-coupled ADP receptor that regulates platelet activation and ADP-induced Ca2+ signalling. Studies using P2Y1-knockout mice, Gq-deficient mice or P2Y1-selective inhibitors have previously identified a key role for P2Y1 in pathophysiological thrombus formation at high shear stress. We provide evidence that a positively charged juxtamembrane sequence within the cytoplasmic C-terminal tail of P2Y1 can bind directly to the cytosolic regulatory protein calmodulin. Deletion by mutagenesis of the calmodulin-binding domain of P2Y1 inhibits intracellular Ca2+ flux in transfected cells. These results suggest that the interaction of calmodulin with the P2Y1 C-terminal tail may regulate P2Y1-dependent platelet aggregation. PMID:16848759

  2. Isoflurane Prevents Acute Lung Injury Through ADP-Mediated Platelet Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Harr, Jeffrey N.; Moore, Ernest E.; Stringham, John; Wohlauer, Max V.; Fragoso, Miguel; Jones, Wilbert L.; Gamboni, Fabia; Silliman, Christopher C.; Banerjee, Anirban

    2012-01-01

    Background Growing evidence suggests platelets are essential in post-traumatic acute lung injury (ALI). Halogenated ethers interfere with platelet-granulocyte aggregate formation. The potential benefit of halogenated ethers has not been investigated in trauma/hemorrhagic shock (T/HS) models. Therefore, we hypothesized that isoflurane decreases T/HS-mediated ALI through platelet inhibition. Methods Sprauge-Dawley rats (n=47) were anesthetized by either pentobarbital or inhaled isoflurane, and placed into groups: control, trauma (laparotomy) sham shock, T/HS (MAP of 30 mmHg × 45 min), pre-treatment with an ADP receptor antagonist, or T/HS with isoflurane initiated during resuscitation. ALI was determined by BALF protein and pulmonary immunofluorescence. PlateletMapping™ specifically evaluated thrombin-independent inhibition of the ADP and AA pathways of platelet activation. Results Pre-treatment with isoflurane abrogated ALI as measured by both BAL fluid protein and pulmonary immunofluorescence (p<0.001). PlateletMapping™, revealed specific platelet ADP-pathway inhibition with isoflurane (p<0.001). Pre-treatment with an ADP receptor antagonist decreased ALI to sham levels, confirming that specific platelet ADP inhibition decreases ALI. Isoflurane initiated during resuscitation also decreased ALI (p<0.001). Conclusion Isoflurane attenuates ALI through an anti-platelet mechanism, in part, through inhibition of the platelet ADP pathway. Isoflurane given post-injury also protects against ALI, and highlights the potential applications of this therapy in various ischemia/reperfusion clinical scenarios. PMID:22828148

  3. [Efficacy of clopidogrel as ADP-dependent platelet aggregation inhibitor. Study on individuals with coronary artery disease].

    PubMed

    Izaguirre Avila, R; de la Peña, A; González Pacheco, H; Ramírez Gutiérrez, A; González Valdez, H; Quiroz, A; Cortina, E; Huerta, M; Lupi, E

    2000-01-01

    Acetyl-salicylic acid inhibits thromboxane A2 production and reduces the risk of vascular occlusive events by 20 to 25%. Ticlopidine inhibits ADP-dependent platelet aggregation and reduces the same risk by 30 to 35%, but produces some adverse effects. Clopidogrel is a ticlopidin-derived antiplatelet-drug, with the same mechanism of action; reduces the expression of the glycoprotein IIb/IIIa, the fibrinogen receptor on the platelet surface. Clopidogrel has the same clinical efficacy of ticlopidin and lowers the incidence of adverse effects. In this study, we evaluated the effects of one daily dosis of 75 mg of clopidogrel on platelet function in 33 subjects with coronary artery disease. Before treatment and after the 6th and 12th week, the following parameters were evaluated: 5 microM-ADP and 20 micrograms/mL collagen-induced platelet aggregation, bleeding time and fibrinogen concentration. In basal and in the 6th and 12th week samples, ADP-induced platelet aggregation was 90.7% +/- 13.2, 54.6% +/- 23.2 and 49.2% +/- 23.7 respectively, that represents a significant reduction of 38.6% and 44.4%. Reduction of collagen-induced platelet aggregation was not significative. Plasmatic fibrinogen did not suffer variation during treatment. Bleeding time was significant prolonged from 4.1 minutes to 15.4 and 14.6 minutes (3.7-3.5 times compared with the test before treatment). There were no haemorrhagic complications, only digestive discomfort in fewer than 3% of patients. We concluded that clopidogrel is a safe and efficacious drug for patients, it efficiently reduces ADP-induced platelet aggregation and prolongs bleeding time. PMID:11534098

  4. The active metabolite of prasugrel inhibits ADP-stimulated thrombo-inflammatory markers of platelet activation: Influence of other blood cells, calcium, and aspirin.

    PubMed

    Frelinger, Andrew L; Jakubowski, Joseph A; Li, Youfu; Barnard, Marc R; Fox, Marsha L; Linden, Matthew D; Sugidachi, Atsuhiro; Winters, Kenneth J; Furman, Mark I; Michelson, Alan D

    2007-07-01

    The novel thienopyridine prodrug prasugrel, a platelet P2Y(12) ADP receptor antagonist, requires in vivo metabolism for activity. Although pharmacological data have been collected on the effects of prasugrel on platelet aggregation, there are few data on the direct effects of the prasugrel's active metabolite, R-138727, on other aspects of platelet function. Here we examined the effects of R-138727 on thrombo-inflammatory markers of platelet activation, and the possible modulatory effects of other blood cells, calcium, and aspirin. Blood (PPACK or citrate anticoagulated) from healthy donors pre- and post-aspirin was incubated with R-138727 and the response to ADP assessed in whole blood or platelet-rich plasma (PRP) by aggregometry and flow cytometric analysis of leukocyte-platelet aggregates, platelet surface P-selectin, and GPIIb-IIIa activation. Low-micromolar concentrations of R-138727 resulted in a rapid and consistent inhibition of these ADP-stimulated thrombo-inflammatory markers. These rapid kinetics required physiological calcium levels, but were largely unaffected by aspirin. Lower IC(50) values in whole blood relative to PRP suggested that other blood cells affect ADP-induced platelet activation and hence the net inhibition by R-138727. R-138727 did not inhibit P2Y(12)-mediated ADP-induced shape change, even at concentrations that completely inhibited platelet aggregation, confirming the specificity of R-138727 for P2Y(12). In conclusion, R-138727, the active metabolite of prasugrel, results in rapid, potent, consistent, and selective inhibition of P2Y(12)-mediated up-regulation of thrombo-inflammatory markers of platelet activation. This inhibition is enhanced in the presence other blood cells and calcium, but not aspirin. PMID:17598013

  5. [Genetic variants of platelet ADP receptor P2Y12 associated with changed platelet functional activity and development of cardiovascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Sirotkina, O V; Zabotina, A M; Berkovich, O A; Bazhenova, E A; Vavilova, T V; Shvartsman, A L

    2009-02-01

    The key role in platelet aggregation is played by the platelet ADP receptor P2Y12, which is the target for antiaggregant drugs, clopidogrel and ticlopidine. At present, only sporadic data on genetic variants of platelet ADP receptor P2Y12 are available from literature, and their association with thromboembolic and cardiovascular diseases still remains obscure. Analysis of the group of subjects with high platelet reactivity resulted in identification of two nucleotide substitutions, C18T and G36T, in the coding region of the P2Y12 gene. The frequency of the P2Y12 T1 8 allele was higher in control group than in the group of patients survived from myocardial infarction at the age under 45 years (39% versus 28%, respectively, P = 0.04). Moreover, in the T18 carriers, platelet aggregation activity was lower than in the carriers of the wild-type genotype (0.84 +/- 0.05% versus 1.01 +/- 0.08%, respectively, P = 0.03). In the group of patients with early myocardial infarctions, a tendency towards the increased frequency of 16T allele in comparison with control group (20 and 12%, respectively, P = 0.07) was observed. The rate of ADP-induced platelet aggregation in the carriers of 16T allele from the control group was somewhat higher than in the subjects with the GG36 genotype (1.31 +/- 0.16% versus 1.12 +/- 0.06%, respectively, P = 0.07). The nucleotide substitutions identified were in absolute disequilibrium, i.e., allele T18 conformed to allele G36. On the contrary, allele C18 conformed to allele T36. Haplotype T18G36 was found to be responsible for the decreased risk of myocardial infarction and decreased platelet reactivity. It is suggested that polymorphisms of the P2Y12 gene identified can be used for determination of the risk group for myocardial infarction in the young males. PMID:19334620

  6. Combined blockade of ADP receptors and PI3-kinase p110β fully prevents platelet and leukocyte activation during hypothermic extracorporeal circulation.

    PubMed

    Krajewski, Stefanie; Kurz, Julia; Geisler, Tobias; Peter, Karlheinz; Wendel, Hans Peter; Straub, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Extracorporeal circulation (ECC) and hypothermia are used to maintain stable circulatory parameters and improve the ischemia tolerance of patients in cardiac surgery. However, ECC and hypothermia induce activation mechanisms in platelets and leukocytes, which are mediated by the platelet agonist ADP and the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) p110β. Under clinical conditions these processes are associated with life-threatening complications including thromboembolism and inflammation. This study analyzes effects of ADP receptor P(2)Y(12) and P(2)Y(1) blockade and PI3K p110β inhibition on platelets and granulocytes during hypothermic ECC. Human blood was treated with the P(2)Y(12) antagonist 2-MeSAMP, the P(2)Y(1) antagonist MRS2179, the PI3K p110β inhibitor TGX-221, combinations thereof, or PBS and propylene glycol (controls). Under static in vitro conditions a concentration-dependent effect regarding the inhibition of ADP-induced platelet activation was found using 2-MeSAMP or TGX-221. Further inhibition of ADP-mediated effects was achieved with MRS2179. Next, blood was circulated in an ex vivo ECC model at 28°C for 30 minutes and various platelet and granulocyte markers were investigated using flow cytometry, ELISA and platelet count analysis. GPIIb/IIIa activation induced by hypothermic ECC was inhibited using TGX-221 alone or in combination with P(2)Y blockers (p<0.05), while no effect of hypothermic ECC or antiplatelet agents on GPIIb/IIIa and GPIbα expression and von Willebrand factor binding was observed. Sole P(2)Y and PI3K blockade or a combination thereof inhibited P-selectin expression on platelets and platelet-derived microparticles during hypothermic ECC (p<0.05). P(2)Y blockade alone or combined with TGX-221 prevented ECC-induced platelet-granulocyte aggregate formation (p<0.05). Platelet adhesion to the ECC surface, platelet loss and Mac-1 expression on granulocytes were inhibited by combined P(2)Y and PI3K blockade (p<0.05). Combined blockade of P

  7. cADP-ribose formation by blood platelets is not responsible for intracellular calcium mobilization.

    PubMed Central

    Ohlmann, P; Leray, C; Ravanat, C; Hallia, A; Cassel, D; Cazenave, J P; Gachet, C

    1998-01-01

    Human platelet CD38 is a multifunctional ectoenzyme catalysing the synthesis and hydrolysis of cADP-ribose (cADPR), a recently identified calcium-mobilizing agent that acts independently of D-myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and is known to be expressed by human platelets. The present work shows that ADP-ribosyl cyclase activity is exclusively a membrane activity, of which the major part is located in plasma membranes and a small part in internal membranes. In broken cells, cyclase activity was insensitive to the presence of calcium and was not modulated by agonists such as thrombin or ADP, whereas in intact cells thrombin increased cADPR formation by 30%, an effect due to fusion of granules with the plasma membrane. In order to assess the role of cADPR as a calcium-mobilizing agent, vesicles were prepared from internal membranes and loaded with 45CaCl2. These vesicles were efficiently discharged by IP3 in a dose-dependent manner, but were not responsive to cADPR or ryanodine in the presence or absence of calmodulin. Thus cADPR is unlikely to play a role in intracellular calcium release in human blood platelets. PMID:9531481

  8. Platelet-collagen adhesion enhances platelet aggregation induced by binding of VWF to platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Laduca, F.M.; Bell, W.R.; Bettigole, R.E. State Univ. of New York, Buffalo )

    1987-11-01

    Ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation (RIPA) was evaluated in the presence of platelet-collagen adhesion. RIPA of normal donor platelet-rich plasma (PRP) demonstrated a primary wave of aggregation mediated by the binding of von Willebrand factor (VWF) to platelets and a secondary aggregation wave, due to a platelet-release reaction, initiated by VWF-platelet binding and inhibitable by acetylsalicylic acid (ASA). An enhanced RIPA was observed in PRP samples to which collagen had been previously added. These subthreshold concentrations of collagen, which by themselves were insufficient to induce aggregation, caused measurable platelet-collagen adhesion. Subthreshold collagen did not cause microplatelet aggregation, platelet release of ({sup 3}H)serotonin, or alter the dose-responsive binding of {sup 125}I-labeled VWF to platelets, which occurred with increasing ristocetin concentrations. However, ASA inhibition of the platelet release reaction prevented collagen-enhanced RIPA. These results demonstrate that platelet-collagen adhesion altered the platelet-release reaction induced by the binding of VWF to platelets causing a platelet-release reaction at a level of VWF-platelet binding not normally initiating a secondary aggregation. These findings suggest that platelet-collagen adhesion enhances platelet function mediated by VWF.

  9. Lonomia obliqua venomous secretion induces human platelet adhesion and aggregation.

    PubMed

    Berger, Markus; Reck, José; Terra, Renata M S; Beys da Silva, Walter O; Santi, Lucélia; Pinto, Antônio F M; Vainstein, Marilene H; Termignoni, Carlos; Guimarães, Jorge A

    2010-10-01

    The caterpillar Lonomia obliqua is a venomous animal that causes numerous accidents, especially in southern Brazil, where it is considered a public health problem. The clinical manifestations include several haemostatic disturbances that lead to a hemorrhagic syndrome. Considering that platelets play a central role in hemostasis, in this work we investigate the effects of L. obliqua venomous secretion upon blood platelets responses in vitro. Results obtained shows that L. obliqua venom directly induces aggregation and ATP secretion in human washed platelets in a dose-dependent manner. Electron microscopy studies clearly showed that the venomous bristle extract was also able to produce direct platelets shape change and adhesion as well as activation and formation of platelet aggregates. Differently from other enzyme inhibitors, the venom-induced platelet aggregation was significatively inhibited by p-bromophenacyl bromide, a specific inhibitor of phospholipases A2. Additional experiments with different pharmacological antagonists indicate that the aggregation response triggered by the venom active components occurs through a calcium-dependent mechanism involving arachidonic acid metabolite(s) of the cyclooxygenase pathway and activation of phosphodiesterase 3A, an enzyme that leads to the consumption of intracellular cAMP content. It was additionally found that L. obliqua-induced platelet aggregation was independent of ADP release. Altogether, these findings are in line with the need for a better understanding of the complex hemorrhagic syndrome resulting from the envenomation caused by L. obliqua caterpillars, and can also give new insights into the management of its clinical profile. PMID:20157842

  10. Point-of-care platelet function tests: detection of platelet inhibition induced by nonopioid analgesic drugs.

    PubMed

    Scharbert, Gisela; Gebhardt, Kristina; Sow, Zacharia; Duris, Monika; Deusch, Engelbert; Kozek-Langenecker, Sibylle

    2007-12-01

    Detection of platelet inhibition is of clinical relevance in the preinterventional risk-benefit assessment in chronic low-back-pain patients scheduled for invasive pain therapy. We evaluated the sensitivity of various point-of-care platelet function tests for the detection of platelet inhibition induced by nonopioid analgesic drugs. After Institutional Review Board approval and informed consent, citrated whole blood from 40 patients with chronic unspecific low back pain was investigated before and 30 min after intravenous infusion of the study medication consisting of diclofenac 75 mg (plus orphenadrin 30 mg; Neodolpasse; Fresenius Kabi Austria GmbH, Austria), parecoxib 40 mg (Dynastat; Pharmacia Europe EEIG, UK), paracetamol 1 g (Perfalgan; Bieffe Medital S.P.A., Italy), or normal saline in a randomized, cross-over, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study. Platelet function was assessed using the PFA-100 platelet function analyzer and thromboelastometry, as well as impedance aggregometry (in the last 17 patients recruited after it became commercially available). Sensitivity for detecting diclofenac-induced platelet inhibition was 85% for the PFA-100 using epinephrine as agonist and 94% for arachidonic acid-induced impedance aggregometry. ADP-induced platelet function tests, as well as cytochalasin D-modified thromboelastometry were unreliable. All tests had a low incidence of false-positive test results after normal saline. Paracetamol and parecoxib had no significant platelet inhibiting effect. The PFA-100 using epinephrine as agonist and arachidonic acid-induced impedance aggregometry are recommended for the detection of cyclooxygenase-I-inhibiting effects of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as diclofenac. Our findings confirm that a single rescue dose of paracetamol and parecoxib has no antiplatelet effect. PMID:17982319

  11. Pravastatin and C reactive protein modulate protease- activated receptor-1 expression in vitro blood platelets.

    PubMed

    Chu, L-X; Zhou, S-X; Yang, F; Qin, Y-Q; Liang, Z-S; Mo, C-G; Wang, X-D; Xie, J; He, L-P

    2016-01-01

    Protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) plays an important role in mediating activation of human platelets by thrombin. However, mechanism of statin in ADP-induced platelet PAR-1 expression is also unknown. Aggregometry, flow cytometry, immunoblotting and ELISA were used to determine role of pravastatin participating in ADP-induced platelet activation and PAR-1 expression. ADP stimulation significantly increased PAR-1 expression on platelets. PAR-1 antagonist SCH-79797 inhibited platelet aggregation as well as decreased platelet P-selectin expression induced by ADP. CRP inhibited PAR-1 expression induced by ADP in a concentration-dependent manner. Pravastatin treatment reduced PAR-1 expression in a concentration-dependent manner. Combination treatment of CRP and Pravastatin significantly reduced platelet PAR-1 expression induced by ADP. By western-blot analysis, pravastatin treatment did not influence total PAR-1 after ADP treatment. CRP decreased platelet total PAR-1 expression induced by ADP. Pravastatin and CRP reduced TXB2 formation by ADP significantly. CRP decreased thrombin fragment F1+2 level with ADP treatment. Pravastatin, in contrast, did not influence F1+2 level. Upon treatment with Pravastatin reduced platelet LOX-1 expression induced by ADP. In conclusion, PAR-1 served as a critical mechanism to relay platelet activation process induced by ADP. CRP and pravastatin reduce PAR-1 expression in platelet by ADP pathway. PMID:26950455

  12. Residual platelet ADP reactivity after clopidogrel treatment is dependent on activation of both the unblocked P2Y1 and the P2Y12 receptor and is correlated with protein expression of P2Y12

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Oscar Ö; Amisten, Stefan; Wihlborg, Anna-Karin; Hunting, Karen; Nilsson, David

    2006-01-01

    Two ADP receptors have been identified on human platelets: P2Y1 and P2Y12. The P2Y12 receptor blocker clopidogrel is widely used to reduce the risks in acute coronary syndromes, but, currently, there is no P2Y1 blocker in clinical use. Evidence for variable responses to clopidogrel has been described in several reports. The mechanistic explanation for this phenomenon is not fully understood. The aim of this study was to examine mechanisms responsible for variability of 2MeS-ADP, a stable ADP analogue, induced platelet reactivity in clopidogrel-treated patients. Platelet reactivity was assessed by flow cytometry measurements of P-selectin (CD62P) and activated GpIIb/IIIa complex (PAC-1). Residual 2MeS-ADP activation via the P2Y12 and P2Y1 receptors was determined by co-incubation with the selective antagonists AR-C69931 and MRS2179 in vitro. P2Y1 and P2Y12 receptor expression on both RNA and protein level were determined, as well as the P2Y12 H1 or H2 haplotypes. Our data suggest that the residual platelet activation of 2MeS-ADP after clopidogrel treatment is partly due to an inadequate antagonistic effect of clopidogrel on the P2Y12 receptor and partly due to activation of the P2Y1 receptor, which is unaffected by clopidogrel. Moreover, a correlation between increased P2Y12 protein expression on platelets and decreased response to clopidogrel was noticed, r2=0.43 (P<0.05). No correlation was found between P2Y12 mRNA levels and clopidogrel resistance, indicating post-transcriptional mechanisms. To achieve additional ADP inhibition in platelets, antagonists directed at the P2Y1 receptor could be more promising than the development of more potent P2Y12 receptor antagonists. PMID:18404433

  13. Alterations in bovine platelet function and acute phase proteins induced by Pasteurella haemolytica A1.

    PubMed Central

    Cheryk, L A; Hooper-McGrevy, K E; Gentry, P A

    1998-01-01

    Platelet function was assessed by aggregometry in 10 Holstein calves before and after exposure to Pasteurella haemolytica (biotype A, serotype 1) by intrabronchial challenge. At 24 h after exposure the platelets had become more reactive to stimulation with known platelet agonists such as adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and platelet-activating factor (PAF) and the platelet aggregates that formed were more resistant to disaggregation. The activation of platelets was an early response in the challenged calves as platelet function had returned to pretreatment levels 72 h after exposure to the bacteria while the acute phase reactant proteins, haptoglobin and fibrinogen, were approaching their peak values and alpha 2-macroglobulin levels had also risen significantly (P < 0.05) at this time. The plasma levels of these proteins were still elevated and albumin levels were depressed 6 d post-treatment. At post-mortem all calves exhibited pneumonic tissue damage. When P. haemolytica leukotoxin was added directly to bovine platelet suspensions both spontaneous aggregation and an increase in the aggregation response to ADP and PAF stimulation were observed. The morphological appearance of the platelet aggregates exhibited the typical pattern for bovine platelets with 2 distinct zones of cells being visible within each aggregate. One zone contained platelets in which the cytoplasmic granules were still evident and the other zone contained irregularly shaped platelets devoid of granular content. In the latter zone, discrete gaps, or pores, were evident in the plasma membrane of numerous platelets. This pore formation is characteristic of leukotoxin action and is not observed in ADP or PAF induced aggregates. Images Figure 2. PMID:9442932

  14. Myeloperoxidase induces the priming of platelets.

    PubMed

    Kolarova, H; Klinke, A; Kremserova, S; Adam, M; Pekarova, M; Baldus, S; Eiserich, J P; Kubala, L

    2013-08-01

    The release of myeloperoxidase (MPO) from polymorphonuclear neutrophils is a hallmark of vascular inflammation and contributes to the pathogenesis of vascular inflammatory processes. However, the effects of MPO on platelets as a contributory mechanism in vascular inflammatory diseases remain unknown. Thus, MPO interaction with platelets and its effects on platelet function were examined. First, dose-dependent binding of MPO (between 1.7 and 13.8nM) to both human and mouse platelets was observed. This was in direct contrast to the absence of MPO in megakaryocytes. MPO was localized both on the surface of and inside platelets. Cytoskeleton inhibition did not prevent MPO localization inside the three-dimensional platelet structure. MPO peroxidase activity was preserved upon the MPO binding to platelets. MPO sequestered in platelets catabolized NO, documented by the decreased production of NO (on average, an approximately 2-fold decrease). MPO treatment did not affect the viability of platelets during short incubations; however, it decreased platelet viability after long-term storage for 7 days (an approximately 2-fold decrease). The activation of platelets by MPO was documented by an MPO-mediated increase in the expression of surface platelet receptors P-selectin and PECAM-1 (of about 5 to 20%) and the increased formation of reactive oxygen species (of about 15 to 200%). However, the activation was only partial, as MPO did not induce the aggregation of platelets nor potentiate platelet response to classical activators. Nor did MPO induce a significant release of the content of granules. The activation of platelets by MPO was connected with increased MPO-treated platelet interaction with polymorphonuclear leukocytes (an approximately 1.2-fold increase) in vitro. In conclusion, it can be suggested that MPO can interact with and activate platelets, which can induce priming of platelets, rather than the classical robust activation of platelets. This can contribute to the

  15. Effects of anticoagulant on pH, ionized calcium concentration, and agonist-induced platelet aggregation in canine platelet-rich plasma.

    PubMed

    Callan, Mary Beth; Shofer, Frances S; Catalfamo, James L

    2009-04-01

    OBJECTIVE-To compare effects of 3.8% sodium citrate and anticoagulant citrate dextrose solution National Institutes of Health formula A (ACD-A) on pH, extracellular ionized calcium (iCa) concentration, and platelet aggregation in canine platelet-rich plasma (PRP). SAMPLE POPULATION-Samples from 12 dogs. PROCEDURES-Blood samples were collected into 3.8% sodium citrate (dilution, 1:9) and ACD-A (dilution, 1:5). Platelet function, pH, and iCa concentration were evaluated in PRP. Platelet agonists were ADP, gamma-thrombin, and convulxin; final concentrations of each were 20microm, 100nM, and 20nM, respectively. Washed platelets were used to evaluate effects of varying the pH and iCa concentration. RESULTS-Mean pH and iCa concentration were significantly greater in 3.8% sodium citrate PRP than ACD-A PRP. Platelet aggregation induced by ADP and gamma-thrombin was markedly diminished in ACD-A PRP, compared with results for 3.8% sodium citrate PRP. Anticoagulant had no effect on amplitude of convulxin-induced platelet aggregation. In washed platelet suspensions (pH, 7.4), there were no differences in amplitude of platelet aggregation induced by convulxin or gamma-thrombin at various iCa concentrations. Varying the pH had no effect on amplitude of aggregation induced by convulxin or gamma-thrombin, but the aggregation rate increased with increasing pH for both agonists. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE-Aggregation of canine platelets induced by ADP and gamma-thrombin was negligible in ACD-A PRP, which suggested an increase in extraplatelet hydrogen ion concentration inhibits signaling triggered by these agonists but not by convulxin. Choice of anticoagulant may influence results of in vitro evaluation of platelet function, which can lead to erroneous conclusions. PMID:19335102

  16. PPARγ Ligands Decrease Hydrostatic Pressure-Induced Platelet Aggregation and Proinflammatory Activity

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiao-Shu; Xu, Jin-Song; Fu, Hui-Min; Su, Hai; Wang, Ling

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension is known to be associated with platelet overactivity, but the direct effects of hydrostatic pressure on platelet function remain unclear. The present study sought to investigate whether elevated hydrostatic pressure is responsible for platelet activation and to address the potential role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ). We observed that hypertensive patients had significantly higher platelet volume and rate of ADP-induced platelets aggregation compared to the controls. In vitro, Primary human platelets were cultured under standard (0 mmHg) or increased (120, 180, 240 mmHg) hydrostatic pressure for 18 h. Exposure to elevated pressure was associated with morphological changes in platelets. Platelet aggregation and PAC-1 (the active confirmation of GPIIb/IIIa) binding were increased, CD40L was translocated from cytoplasm to the surface of platelet and soluble CD40L (sCD40L) was released into the medium in response to elevated hydrostatic pressure (180 and 240 mmHg). The PPARγ activity was up-regulated as the pressure was increased from 120 mmHg to 180 mmHg. Pressure-induced platelet aggregation, PAC-1 binding, and translocation and release of CD40L were all attenuated by the PPARγ agonist Thiazolidinediones (TZDs). These results demonstrate that platelet activation and aggregation are increased by exposure to elevated pressure and that PPARγ may modulate platelet activation induced by high hydrostatic pressure. PMID:24586940

  17. Effects of platelet inhibitors on propyl gallate-induced platelet aggregation, protein tyrosine phosphorylation, and platelet factor 3 activation.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Hongyan; Kovics, Richard; Jackson, Van; Remick, Daniel G

    2004-04-01

    Propyl gallate (PG) is a platelet agonist characterized by inducing platelet aggregation, protein tyrosine phosphorylation, and platelet factor 3 activity. The mechanisms of platelet activation following PG stimulation were examined by pre-incubating platelets with well-defined platelet inhibitors using platelet aggregation, protein tyrosine phosphorylation, activated plasma clotting time, and annexin V binding by flow cytometry. PG-induced platelet aggregation and tyrosine phosphorylation of multiple proteins were substantially abolished by aspirin, apyrase, and abciximab (c7E3), suggesting that PG is associated with activation of platelet cyclooxygenase 1, adenosine phosphate receptors, and glycoprotein IIb/IIIa, respectively. The phosphorylation of the cytoskeletal enzyme pp60(c-src) increased following PG stimulation, but was blunted by pre-incubation of platelets with aspirin, apyrase, and c7E3, suggesting that tyrosine kinase is important for the signal transduction of platelet aggregation. Propyl gallate also activates platelet factor 3 by decreasing the platelet coagulation time and increasing platelet annexin V binding. Platelet incubation with aspirin, apyrase, and c7E3 did not alter PG-induced platelet coagulation and annexin V binding. The results suggest that platelet factor 3 activation and membrane phosphotidylserine expression were not involved with activation of platelet cyclooxygenase, adenosine phosphate receptors, and glycoprotein IIb/IIIa. PG is unique in its ability to stimulate platelet aggregation and coagulation simultaneously, and platelet inhibitors in this study affect only platelet aggregation but not platelet coagulation. PMID:15060414

  18. High on-treatment platelet reactivity by ADP and increased risk of MACE in good clopidogrel metabolizers.

    PubMed

    Marcucci, Rossella; Giusti, Betti; Paniccia, Rita; Gori, Anna Maria; Saracini, Claudia; Valente, Serafina; Giglioli, Cristina; Parodi, Guido; Antoniucci, David; Gensini, Gian Franco; Abbate, Rosanna

    2012-01-01

    High on-treatment platelet reactivity (HPR) by ADP, which primarily reflects the effect of thienopyridines, has been found to be an independent predictor of ischemic events in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) on dual antiplatelet therapy. CYP2C19*2 is associated with HPR by ADP. The aim of our study was to evaluate if high on-clopidogrel platelet reactivity (HPR) by ADP is associated with an increased risk of major adverse coronary events (MACE) after ACS independent of CYP2C19*2 allele, i.e. whether genotyping patients for CYP2C19*2 polymorphism is sufficient to identify those to be switched to novel antiplatelets. A total of 1187 patients were included (CYP2C19 *1/*1 n = 892; *1/*2 n = 264; *2/*2 n = 31); 76 MACE (CV death and non-fatal MI) were recorded in non-carriers of CYP2C19*2 (8.5%) and 39 in carriers of CYP2C19*2 (13.2%). At the landmark analysis in the first 6 months, HPR by ADP and CYP2C19*2 allele were both significantly and independently associated with MACE [HPR by ADP: HR = 2.0 (95% CI 1.2-3.4), p = 0.01; CYP2C19*2 allele: HR = 2.3 (95% CI 1.3-3.9), p = 0.003]. At the land mark analysis from 7 to 12 months, only HPR by ADP remained significantly associated with the risk of MACE [HPR by ADP: HR = 2.7 (95% CI 1.4-5.3), p = 0.003; CYP2C19*2: HR = 0.8 (95% CI 0.2-1.1), p = ns]. CYP2C19*2 allele and HPR by ADP are both independently associated with an increased risk of MACE in the first 6 months after ACS. HPR by ADP is associated with an increased risk until 12 months of follow-up. Therefore, both phenotype and genotype are clinically relevant for the evaluation of the antiplatelet effect of clopidogrel and for the prognostic stratification of ACS patients. PMID:22390861

  19. Platelet Dynamics during Natural and Pharmacologically Induced Torpor and Forced Hypothermia

    PubMed Central

    de Vrij, Edwin L.; Vogelaar, Pieter C.; Goris, Maaike; Houwertjes, Martin C.; Herwig, Annika; Dugbartey, George J.; Boerema, Ate S.; Strijkstra, Arjen M.; Bouma, Hjalmar R.; Henning, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    Hibernation is an energy-conserving behavior in winter characterized by two phases: torpor and arousal. During torpor, markedly reduced metabolic activity results in inactivity and decreased body temperature. Arousal periods intersperse the torpor bouts and feature increased metabolism and euthermic body temperature. Alterations in physiological parameters, such as suppression of hemostasis, are thought to allow hibernators to survive periods of torpor and arousal without organ injury. While the state of torpor is potentially procoagulant, due to low blood flow, increased viscosity, immobility, hypoxia, and low body temperature, organ injury due to thromboembolism is absent. To investigate platelet dynamics during hibernation, we measured platelet count and function during and after natural torpor, pharmacologically induced torpor and forced hypothermia. Splenectomies were performed to unravel potential storage sites of platelets during torpor. Here we show that decreasing body temperature drives thrombocytopenia during torpor in hamster with maintained functionality of circulating platelets. Interestingly, hamster platelets during torpor do not express P-selectin, but expression is induced by treatment with ADP. Platelet count rapidly restores during arousal and rewarming. Platelet dynamics in hibernation are not affected by splenectomy before or during torpor. Reversible thrombocytopenia was also induced by forced hypothermia in both hibernating (hamster) and non-hibernating (rat and mouse) species without changing platelet function. Pharmacological torpor induced by injection of 5′-AMP in mice did not induce thrombocytopenia, possibly because 5′-AMP inhibits platelet function. The rapidness of changes in the numbers of circulating platelets, as well as marginal changes in immature platelet fractions upon arousal, strongly suggest that storage-and-release underlies the reversible thrombocytopenia during natural torpor. Possibly, margination of platelets

  20. Platelet Aggregation and Mental Stress Induced Myocardial Ischemia: Results from the REMIT Study

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wei; Boyle, Stephen H.; Ortel, Thomas L.; Samad, Zainab; Velazquez, Eric J.; Harrison, Robert W.; Wilson, Jennifer; Kuhn, Cynthia; Williams, Redford B.; O’Connor, Christopher M.; Becker, Richard C.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Mental stress-induced myocardial ischemia (MSIMI) is common in patients with ischemic heart disease (IHD) and associated with a poorer cardiovascular prognosis. Platelet hyperactivity is an important factor in acute coronary syndrome. This study examined associations between MSIMI and resting and mental stress-induced platelet activity. METHODS Eligible patients with clinically stable IHD underwent a battery of 3 mental stress tests during the recruitment phase of REMIT (Responses of Myocardial Ischemia to Escitalopram Treatment) study. MSIMI was assessed by echocardiography and electrocardiography. Ex vivo platelet aggregation in response to ADP, epinephrine, collagen, serotonin, and combinations of serotonin plus ADP, epinephrine, and collagen were evaluated as was platelet serotonin transporter expression. RESULTS Of the 270 participants who completed mental stress testing, and had both resting and post-stress platelet aggregation evaluation, 43.33% (N=117) met criteria for MSIMI and 18.15% (N=49) had normal left ventricular response to stress (NLVR). The MSIMI group, relative to the NLVR groups, demonstrated heightened mental stress-induced aggregation responses, as measured by area under the curve, to collagen 10 μM (6.95[5.54] vs. −14.23[8.75].; p=0.045), epinephrine 10 μM (12.84[4.84] vs. −6.40[7.61].; p=0.037) and to serotonin 10 μM plus ADP 1 μM (6.64[5.29] vs. −27.34[8.34]; p < .001). The resting platelet aggregation and serotonin transporter expression, however, were not different between the two groups. CONCLUSIONS These findings suggest that the dynamic change of platelet aggregation caused by mental stress may underlie MSIMI. While the importance of these findings requires additional investigation, they raise concern given the recognized relationship between mental stress-induced platelet hyperactivity and cardiovascular events in patients with IHD. PMID:25819856

  1. Thrombospondin-induced adhesion of human platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Tuszynski, G P; Kowalska, M A

    1991-01-01

    Washed human unactivated platelets attached and spread on thrombospondin (TSP)-coated microtiter plates. Platelet adhesion was promoted by divalent cations Mn2+, Mg2+, and Ca2+ as compared to buffer having all divalent cations complexed with EDTA. TSP-dependent adhesion was inhibited by anti-TSP fab fragments, an anti-TSP monoclonal antibody, an RGD-containing peptide, complex-specific anti-glycoprotein (GP)IIb-IIIa monoclonal antibodies (A2A9 or AP-2) and anti-VLA-2 monoclonal antibodies (6F1 and Gi9), but not by rabbit preimmune fab fragments, mouse IgG, an anti-GPIIIa monoclonal antibody, or monoclonal antibodies against either the human vitronectin receptor, glycocalicin, or GPIV. At saturating concentrations, anti-GPIIb-IIIa inhibited adhesion by 40-60%. Glanzman's thrombasthenic platelets, which lack GPIIb-IIIa, adhered to TSP to the same extent as anti-GPIIb-IIIa-treated normal platelets or 40-60% as well as untreated normal platelets. Antibody 6F1 (5-10 micrograms/ml) inhibited platelet adhesion of both normal and thrombasthenic platelets by 84-100%. Both VLA-2 antibodies also inhibited collagen-induced platelet adhesion, but had no effect on fibronectin-induced adhesion of normal platelets. These data indicate that platelets specifically adhere to TSP and that this adhesion is mediated through GPIIb-IIIa and/or VLA-2. Images PMID:2010551

  2. Inhibition of adrenaline and adenosine diphosphate induced platelet aggregation by Lansberg's hognose pit viper (Porthidium lansbergii hutmanni) venom.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Johnston, J C; de Bosch, N; Scannone, H; Rodríguez-Acosta, A

    2007-12-01

    The haemostatic components of venom from the genus Porthidium has been poorly studied, although it is known that severe manifestations occur when humans are envenomed, which include invasive oedema and disseminated ecchymosis. The effects of venom on blood platelets are commonly studied and are normally carried out with platelet-rich plasma (PRP). A series of crude venom dilutions was used to determine the effects of adenosine diphosphate (2 microM) and adrenaline (11 microM) induced platelet aggregation. Venom of Porthidium lansbergii hutmanni was fractioned by anionic exchange chromatography, and the fractions were also used to determine the 50% inhibition of adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and adrenaline-induced platelet aggregating dose (AD50). Crude venom has more effect in inhibiting adrenaline-induced aggregation (AD50 = 0.0043 microg) followed by the adenosine diphosphate (AD50 = 17 microg). Peaks I and II obtained by chromatography also inhibited adrenaline-induced platelet aggregation with an AD50 of 3.2 and 0.013 microg, respectively, and both peaks inhibited ADP-induced platelet aggregation with an AD50 of 10 microg. The main purpose of this work was to characterise the in vitro effects caused by P. lansbergii hutmanni crude venom and its fractions on the platelet aggregation mediated by adrenaline and ADP agonists. PMID:17891398

  3. Arsenic Trioxide Induces Apoptosis in Human Platelets via C-Jun NH2-Terminal Kinase Activation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yicun; Dai, Jin; Zhang, Weilin; Yan, Rong; Zhang, Yiwen; Ruan, Changgeng; Dai, Kesheng

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO), one of the oldest drugs in both Western and traditional Chinese medicine, has become an effective anticancer drug, especially in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). However, thrombocytopenia occurred in most of ATO-treated patients with APL or other malignant diseases, and the pathogenesis remains unclear. Here we show that ATO dose-dependently induces depolarization of mitochondrial inner transmembrane potential (ΔΨm), up-regulation of Bax and down-regulation of Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL, caspase-3 activation, and phosphotidylserine (PS) exposure in platelets. ATO did not induce surface expression of P-selectin and PAC-1 binding, whereas, obviously reduced collagen, ADP, and thrombin induced platelet aggregation. ATO dose-dependently induced c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) activation, and JNK specific inhibitor dicumarol obviously reduced ATO-induced ΔΨm depolarization in platelets. Clinical therapeutic dosage of ATO was intraperitoneally injected into C57 mice, and the numbers of circulating platelets were significantly reduced after five days of continuous injection. The data demonstrate that ATO induces caspase-dependent apoptosis via JNK activation in platelets. ATO does not incur platelet activation, whereas, it not only impairs platelet function but also reduces circulating platelets in vivo, suggesting the possible pathogenesis of thrombocytopenia in patients treated with ATO. PMID:24466103

  4. Arsenic trioxide induces apoptosis in human platelets via C-Jun NH2-terminal kinase activation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yicun; Dai, Jin; Zhang, Weilin; Yan, Rong; Zhang, Yiwen; Ruan, Changgeng; Dai, Kesheng

    2014-01-01

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO), one of the oldest drugs in both Western and traditional Chinese medicine, has become an effective anticancer drug, especially in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). However, thrombocytopenia occurred in most of ATO-treated patients with APL or other malignant diseases, and the pathogenesis remains unclear. Here we show that ATO dose-dependently induces depolarization of mitochondrial inner transmembrane potential (ΔΨm), up-regulation of Bax and down-regulation of Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL, caspase-3 activation, and phosphotidylserine (PS) exposure in platelets. ATO did not induce surface expression of P-selectin and PAC-1 binding, whereas, obviously reduced collagen, ADP, and thrombin induced platelet aggregation. ATO dose-dependently induced c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) activation, and JNK specific inhibitor dicumarol obviously reduced ATO-induced ΔΨm depolarization in platelets. Clinical therapeutic dosage of ATO was intraperitoneally injected into C57 mice, and the numbers of circulating platelets were significantly reduced after five days of continuous injection. The data demonstrate that ATO induces caspase-dependent apoptosis via JNK activation in platelets. ATO does not incur platelet activation, whereas, it not only impairs platelet function but also reduces circulating platelets in vivo, suggesting the possible pathogenesis of thrombocytopenia in patients treated with ATO. PMID:24466103

  5. CD8+ T cells induce platelet clearance in the liver via platelet desialylation in immune thrombocytopenia

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Jihua; Liu, Xuena; Li, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Xu; Han, Panpan; Zhou, Hai; Shao, Linlin; Hou, Yu; Min, Yanan; Kong, Zhangyuan; Wang, Yawen; Wei, Yu; Liu, Xinguang; Ni, Heyu; Peng, Jun; Hou, Ming

    2016-01-01

    In addition to antiplatelet autoantibodies, CD8+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) play an important role in the increased platelet destruction in immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). Recent studies have highlighted that platelet desialylation leads to platelet clearance via hepatocyte asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGPRs). Whether CD8+ T cells induce platelet desialylation in ITP remains unclear. Here, we investigated the cytotoxicity of CD8+ T cells towards platelets and platelet desialylation in ITP. We found that the desialylation of fresh platelets was significantly higher in ITP patients with positive cytotoxicity of CD8+ T cells than those without cytotoxicity and controls. In vitro, CD8+ T cells from ITP patients with positive cytotoxicity induced significant platelet desialylation, neuraminidase-1 expression on the platelet surface, and platelet phagocytosis by hepatocytes. To study platelet survival and clearance in vivo, CD61 knockout mice were immunized and their CD8+ splenocytes were used. Platelets co-cultured with these CD8+ splenocytes demonstrated decreased survival in the circulation and increased phagocytosis in the liver. Both neuraminidase inhibitor and ASGPRs competitor significantly improved platelet survival and abrogated platelet clearance caused by CD8+ splenocytes. These findings suggest that CD8+ T cells induce platelet desialylation and platelet clearance in the liver in ITP, which may be a novel mechanism of ITP. PMID:27321376

  6. CD8(+) T cells induce platelet clearance in the liver via platelet desialylation in immune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jihua; Liu, Xuena; Li, Xiaoqing; Zhang, Xu; Han, Panpan; Zhou, Hai; Shao, Linlin; Hou, Yu; Min, Yanan; Kong, Zhangyuan; Wang, Yawen; Wei, Yu; Liu, Xinguang; Ni, Heyu; Peng, Jun; Hou, Ming

    2016-01-01

    In addition to antiplatelet autoantibodies, CD8(+) cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) play an important role in the increased platelet destruction in immune thrombocytopenia (ITP). Recent studies have highlighted that platelet desialylation leads to platelet clearance via hepatocyte asialoglycoprotein receptors (ASGPRs). Whether CD8(+) T cells induce platelet desialylation in ITP remains unclear. Here, we investigated the cytotoxicity of CD8(+) T cells towards platelets and platelet desialylation in ITP. We found that the desialylation of fresh platelets was significantly higher in ITP patients with positive cytotoxicity of CD8(+) T cells than those without cytotoxicity and controls. In vitro, CD8(+) T cells from ITP patients with positive cytotoxicity induced significant platelet desialylation, neuraminidase-1 expression on the platelet surface, and platelet phagocytosis by hepatocytes. To study platelet survival and clearance in vivo, CD61 knockout mice were immunized and their CD8(+) splenocytes were used. Platelets co-cultured with these CD8(+) splenocytes demonstrated decreased survival in the circulation and increased phagocytosis in the liver. Both neuraminidase inhibitor and ASGPRs competitor significantly improved platelet survival and abrogated platelet clearance caused by CD8(+) splenocytes. These findings suggest that CD8(+) T cells induce platelet desialylation and platelet clearance in the liver in ITP, which may be a novel mechanism of ITP. PMID:27321376

  7. Pharmacological characterization of nanoparticle-induced platelet microaggregation using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation: comparison with light aggregometry

    PubMed Central

    Santos-Martinez, Maria J; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof A; Medina, Carlos; Bazou, Despina; Gilmer, John F; Radomski, Marek W

    2015-01-01

    Background Engineered nanoparticles (NPs) can induce platelet activation and aggregation, but the mechanisms underlying these interactions are not well understood. This could be due in part to use of devices that study platelet function under quasi-static conditions with low sensitivity to measure platelet microaggregation. Therefore, in this study we investigated the pharmacological pathways and regulators of NP-induced platelet microaggregation under flow conditions at nanoscale using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) and compared the data thus obtained with those generated by light aggregometry. Methods Blood was collected from healthy volunteers, and platelet-rich plasma was obtained. Thrombin receptor-activating peptide, a potent stimulator of platelet function, and pharmacological inhibitors were used to modulate platelet microaggregation in the presence/absence of silica (10 nm and 50 nm) and polystyrene (23 nm) NPs. Light aggregometry was used to study platelet aggregation in macroscale. Optical, immunofluorescence, and scanning electron microscopy were also used to visualize platelet aggregates. Results Platelet microaggregation was enhanced by thrombin receptor-activating peptide, whereas prostacyclin, nitric oxide donors, acetylsalicylic acid, and phenanthroline, but not adenosine diphosphate (ADP) blockers, were able to inhibit platelet microaggregation. NPs caused platelet microaggregation, an effect not detectable by light aggregometry. NP-induced microaggregation was attenuated by platelet inhibitors. Conclusion NP-induced platelet microaggregation appears to involve classical proaggregatory pathways (thromboxane A2-mediated and matrix metalloproteinase-2-mediated) and can be regulated by endogenous (prostacyclin) and pharmacological (acetylsalicylic acid, phenanthroline, and nitric oxide donors) inhibitors of platelet function. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation, but not light aggregometry, is an appropriate method for

  8. Differential inhibition of tumour cell-induced platelet aggregation by the nicotinate aspirin prodrug (ST0702) and aspirin

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Carlos; Harmon, Shona; Inkielewicz, Iwona; Santos-Martinez, Maria Jose; Jones, Michael; Cantwell, Paula; Bazou, Despina; Ledwidge, Mark; Radomski, Marek W; Gilmer, John F

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Tumour cell-induced platelet aggregation (TCIPA) facilitates cancer cell invasion, angiogenesis and the formation of metastatic foci. TCIPA can be modulated by pharmacological inhibitors of MMP-2 and ADP; however, the COX inhibitor aspirin did not prevent TCIPA. In this study, we have tested the pharmacological effects of a new group of isosorbide-based aspirin prodrugs on TCIPA. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH TCIPA was induced in human platelets by mixing with human adenocarcinoma or fibrosarcoma cells under no flow and flow conditions. The release of gelatinases and P-selectin expression during TCIPA were studied by zymography and flow cytometry respectively. KEY RESULTS Tumour cells caused platelet aggregation. This aggregation resulted in the release of MMP-2 and a significant up-regulation of P-selectin on platelets, indicative of platelet activation. Pharmacological modulation of TCIPA revealed that ST0702, one of the aspirin prodrugs, down-regulated TCIPA while aspirin was ineffective. The deacetylated metabolite of ST0702, 5-nicotinate salicylate (ST0702 salicylate), down-regulated both ADP-stimulated platelet aggregation and TCIPA. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS Our results show that ST0702 was an effective inhibitor of TCIPA in vitro. Its deacetylated metabolite may contribute to the effects of ST0702 by inhibiting ADP-mediated TCIPA. PMID:22122360

  9. α- and γ-mangostin cause shape changes, inhibit aggregation and induce cytolysis of rat platelets.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingqiu; Park, Jung-Min; Chang, Kyung-Hwa; Chin, Young-Won; Lee, Moo-Yeol

    2015-10-01

    α- and γ-mangostin are natural xanthones isolated from mangosteen (Garcinia mangostana) and the major constituents responsible for the plant's diverse biological activities. In this study, the effects of α- and γ-mangostin on platelets were investigated based on their possible antiplatelet activity. Treatment of isolated platelets with α-mangostin resulted in attenuation of platelet aggregatory response to collagen, thrombin or ADP. Such antiaggregatory effects were concentration-dependent in ranges of 1-10 μM. Interestingly, α-mangostin alone induced shape changes in platelets at the same concentration, and higher levels, 25 and 50 μM caused platelet lysis. Similarly, γ-mangostin induced shape changes and inhibited aggregation at 2.5-25 μM, while 50 and 100 μM γ-mangostin exhibited cytotoxicity. Platelet shape change induced by α- and γ-mangostin was accompanied by increases in myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation. MLC phosphorylation and subsequent shape changes were prevented by pretreatment with Rho kinase (ROCK) inhibitor Y-27632, but not by the intracellular Ca(2+) chelating with BAPTA-AM and extracellular Ca(2+) removal. Cytolysis by both α- and γ-mangostin was abolished in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+). Taken together, α- and γ-mangostin have differential effects on platelets depending on their concentration, which includes inducing shape change, inhibiting aggregation and causing cytolysis. Platelet shape change is attributed to stimulation of the Rho/ROCK signaling pathway, while platelet lysis is presumably mediated by extracellular Ca(2+) influx. These results suggest that mangosteen consumption may have potential platelet effects, although the in vivo or clinical consequences have yet to be assessed. PMID:26343955

  10. Bubble-induced aggregation of platelets: effects of gas species, proteins, and decompression.

    PubMed

    Thorsen, T; Klausen, H; Lie, R T; Holmsen, H

    1993-06-01

    We show that bubbles containing different gases (N2, He, Ne, Ar, or an O2-CO2-N2 mixture) are equally potent platelet agonists. The synergistic effect of different platelet antagonists does not seem to be affected by the type of gas in the bubbles. In contrast to aggregation in platelet-rich plasma (PRP), bubbles cause only a weak response in gel-filtered platelets (GFP), i.e., comparison of aggregation in protein-rich and protein-poor platelet suspensions may shed light on the role of different plasma proteins. Extracellular fibrinogen promotes bubble-induced platelet aggregation similar to known physiologic agonists, whereas albumin counteracts this aggregation. Bubble-induced aggregation is inhibited in GFP-fibrinogen by 2-deoxy-D-glucose plus antimycin A, suggesting dependency on ATP generation in the platelets and evidence for direct exposure of the "cryptic" fibrinogen receptor by bubbles. Hyperbaric compression and subsequent rapid, inadequate decompression of PRP caused little change in the aggregation response to gas bubbles and epinephrine at 1 bar, but reduced the response to ADP. Bubbles tended not to form before the surface film was broken. Pressure-induced aggregation was apparently metabolically active and not due to passive agglutination; electron microscopic studies and PRP with added glutaraldehyde did not show platelet activation, clumping, or reduced platelet count. In contrast to aggregation caused by pressure, bubble-induced aggregation in PRP at 1 bar (after treatment in the pressure chamber) was nearly completely inhibited by theophylline, a phosphodiesterase inhibitor that increases intracellular platelet cyclic AMP. PMID:8392414

  11. Comparison of Aggregometry with Flow Cytometry for the Assessment of Agonists´-Induced Platelet Reactivity in Patients on Dual Antiplatelet Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gremmel, Thomas; Koppensteiner, Renate; Panzer, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Data on the agreement between aggregometry and platelet activation by flow cytometry regarding the measurement of on-treatment platelet reactivity to arachidonic acid (AA) and adenosine diphosphate (ADP) are scarce. We therefore sought to compare three platelet aggregation tests with flow cytometry for the assessment of the response to antiplatelet therapy. Platelet aggregation in response to AA and ADP was determined by light transmission aggregometry (LTA), the VerifyNow assays, and multiple electrode aggregometry (MEA) in 316 patients receiving aspirin and clopidogrel therapy after angioplasty with stent implantation. AA- and ADP-induced P-selectin expression and activated glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa were determined by flow cytometry. LTA, the VerifyNow P2Y12 assay and MEA in response to ADP correlated significantly (all p<0.001), and the best correlation was observed between LTA and the VerifyNow P2Y12 assay (r = 0.63). ADP-induced platelet reactivity by all aggregation tests correlated significantly with ADP-induced P-selectin expression and activated GPIIb/IIIa (all p<0.001). The best correlation was seen between the VerifyNow P2Y12 assay and activated GPIIb/IIIa (r = 0.68). The platelet surface expressions of P-selectin and activated GPIIb/IIIa in response to ADP were significantly higher in patients with high on-treatment residual platelet reactivity (HRPR) to ADP by all test systems (all p<0.001). A rather poor correlation was observed between AA-induced platelet reactivity by LTA and the VerifyNow aspirin assay (r = 0.15, p = 0.007), while both methods did not correlate with MEA. AA-induced platelet reactivity by all aggregation tests correlated significantly, but rather poorly with AA-induced P-selectin expression (all p<0.05), while only AA-induced platelet reactivity by LTA correlated significantly with AA-induced activated GPIIb/IIIa (r = 0.21, p<0.001). The platelet surface expression of P-selectin in response to AA was significantly higher in

  12. Pharmacokinetic study of adenosine diphosphate-encapsulated liposomes coated with fibrinogen γ-chain dodecapeptide as a synthetic platelet substitute in an anticancer drug-induced thrombocytopenia rat model.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Kazuaki; Ujihira, Hayato; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Fujiyama, Atsushi; Doi, Mami; Takeoka, Shinji; Ikeda, Yasuo; Handa, Makoto; Otagiri, Masaki; Maruyama, Toru

    2013-10-01

    A fibrinogen γ-chain (dodecapeptide HHLGGAKQAGDV, H12)-coated, adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-encapsulated liposome [H12-(ADP)-liposome] was designed to achieve optimal performance as a homeostatic agent and expected as a synthetic platelet alternative. For the purpose of efficient function as platelet substitute, H12-(ADP)-liposomes should potentially have both acceptable pharmacokinetic and biodegradable properties under conditions of an adaptation disease including thrombocytopenia induced by anticancer drugs. The aim of this study was to characterize the pharmacokinetics of H12-(ADP)-liposomes in busulphan-induced thrombocytopenic rats using (14) C, (3) H double radiolabeled H12-(ADP)-liposomes, in which the encapsulated ADP and liposomal membrane (cholesterol) were labeled with (14) C and (3) H, respectively. After the administration of H12-(ADP)-liposomes, they were determined to be mainly distributed to the liver and spleen and disappeared from organs within 7 days after injection. The encapsulated ADP was mainly eliminated in the urine, whereas the outer membrane (cholesterol) was mainly eliminated in feces. The successive dispositions of the H12-(ADP)-liposomes were similar in both normal and thrombocytopenic rats. However, the kinetics of H12-(ADP)-liposomes in thrombocytopenic rats was more rapid, compared with the corresponding values for normal rats. These findings, which well reflect the clinical features of patients with anticancer drug-induced thrombocytopenia, provide useful information for the development of the H12-(ADP)-liposomes for future clinical use. PMID:23918456

  13. Adenosine diphosphate-induced aggregation of human platelets in flow through tubes. I. Measurement of concentration and size of single platelets and aggregates.

    PubMed Central

    Bell, D N; Spain, S; Goldsmith, H L

    1989-01-01

    A double infusion flow system and particle sizing technique were developed to study the effect of time and shear rate on adenosine diphosphate-induced platelet aggregation in Poiseuille flow. Citrated platelet-rich plasma, PRP, and 2 microM ADP were simultaneously infused into a 40-microliters cylindrical mixing chamber at a fixed flow ratio, PRP/ADP = 9:1. After rapid mixing by a rotating magnetic stirbar, the platelet suspension flowed through 1.19 or 0.76 mm i.d. polyethylene tubing for mean transit times, t, from 0.1 to 86 s, over a range of mean tube shear rate, G, from 41.9 to 1,000 s-1. Known volumes of suspension were collected into 0.5% buffered glutaraldehyde, and all particles in the volume range 1-10(5) microns 3 were counted and sized using a model ZM particle counter (Coulter Electronics Inc., Hialeah, FL) and a logarithmic amplifier. The decrease in the single platelet concentration served as an overall index of aggregation. The decrease in the total particle concentration was used to calculate the collision capture efficiency during the early stages of aggregation, and aggregate growth was followed by changes in the volume fraction of particles of successively increasing size. Preliminary results demonstrate that both collision efficiency and particle volume fraction reveal important aspects of the aggregation process not indicated by changes in the single platelet concentration alone. PMID:2605298

  14. Cholesterol-induced stimulation of platelet aggregation is prevented by a hempseed-enriched diet.

    PubMed

    Prociuk, M A; Edel, A L; Richard, M N; Gavel, N T; Ander, B P; Dupasquier, C M C; Pierce, G N

    2008-04-01

    Hypercholesterolemia indirectly increases the risk for myocardial infarction by enhancing the ability of platelets to aggregate. Diets enriched with polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) have been shown to reduce the detrimental effects of cholesterol on platelet aggregation. This study investigated whether dietary hempseed, a rich source of PUFAs, inhibits platelet aggregation under normal and hypercholesterolemic conditions. Male New Zealand white rabbits were fed one of 6 dietary interventions: regular control diet (RG); control diet + 10% hempseed (HP); control diet + 10% partially delipidated hempseed (DHP); control diet + 0.5% cholesterol (OL); control diet + 0.5% cholesterol + 10% hempseed (OLHP); control diet + 5% coconut oil (CO). After 8 weeks, blood was collected to measure ADP- and collagen-induced platelet aggregation and plasma levels of fatty acids, cholesterol, and triglycerides. The hempseed-fed animals (HP and OLHP) displayed elevated plasma levels of PUFAs and a prominent enhancement in 18:3n-6 (gamma-linolenic acid, GLA) levels, a unique PUFA found in hempseed. The cholesterol-supplemented groups (OL and OLHP) had significantly elevated plasma levels of cholesterol and triglycerides, but platelet aggregation was significantly augmented only in the OL group. The addition of hempseed to this diet (OLHP) normalized aggregation. The direct addition of GLA to the OL platelet samples blocked the cholesterol-induced stimulation of platelet aggregation. The results of this study demonstrate that when hempseed is added to a cholesterol-enriched diet, cholesterol-induced platelet aggregation returns to control levels. This normalization is not due to a reduction in plasma cholesterol levels, but may be partly due to increased levels of plasma GLA. PMID:18418423

  15. Identification and characterization of a collagen-induced platelet aggregation inhibitor, triplatin, from salivary glands of the assassin bug, Triatoma infestans.

    PubMed

    Morita, Akihiro; Isawa, Haruhiko; Orito, Yuki; Iwanaga, Shiroh; Chinzei, Yasuo; Yuda, Masao

    2006-07-01

    To facilitate feeding, certain hematophagous invertebrates possess inhibitors of collagen-induced platelet aggregation in their saliva. However, their mechanisms of action have not been fully elucidated. Here, we describe two major salivary proteins, triplatin-1 and -2, from the assassin bug, Triatoma infestans, which inhibited platelet aggregation induced by collagen but not by other agents including ADP, arachidonic acid, U46619 and thrombin. Furthermore, these triplatins also inhibited platelet aggregation induced by collagen-related peptide, a specific agonist of the major collagen-signaling receptor glycoprotein (GP)VI. Moreover, triplatin-1 inhibited Fc receptor gamma-chain phosphorylation induced by collagen, which is the first step of GPVI-mediated signaling. These results strongly suggest that triplatins target GPVI and inhibit signal transduction necessary for platelet activation by collagen. This is the first report on the mechanism of action of collagen-induced platelet aggregation inhibitors from hematophagus invertebrates. PMID:16759235

  16. High residual platelet reactivity (HRPR) for adenosine diphosphate (ADP) stimuli is a determinant factor for long-term outcomes in acute ischemic stroke with anti-platelet agents: The meaning of HRPR after ADP might be more prominent in large atherosclerotic infarction than other subtypes of AIS.

    PubMed

    Cha, Jae-Kwan; Park, Hyun-Seok; Nah, Hyun-Wook; Kim, Dae-Hyun; Kang, Myong-Jin; Choi, Jae-Hyung; Huh, Jae-Taeck; Suh, Hyun-Kyung

    2016-07-01

    High residual platelet activation (HRPA) after ADP stimuli has associated with recurrent vascular events in acute atherothrombosis with the use of antiplatelet agents (APAs). However, there has been little evidence supporting this association in acute ischemic stroke (AIS). In this study, we evaluated the influences of HRPR after ADP stimuli on the 1-year incidence of recurrent cardiovascular events and mortality in AIS with APAs. We conducted an observational, referral center cohort study on 968 AIS patients with APAs from January 2010 to December 2013 who were evaluated using optical platelet aggregometry (OPA). All patients received the dual APA combination of aspirin and clopidogrel or aspirin alone. We evaluated their platelet function 5 days after hospital admission using OPA. HRPR after ADP stimuli was defined as platelet aggregation of 70 % or greater according to OPA after 10 µM ADP stimuli. The primary endpoint was a composite of all causes of death, myocardial infarction, and stroke at the 1-year follow-up. The secondary endpoints were each component of the primary endpoint. The event rate of primary endpoint was 11.3 % (109/968). Its rate was significantly higher in the patients with HRPR (16.7 %) than in those without (9.7 %). HPRP was independently associated with the primary endpoint (OR = 1.97, CI 1.22-3.18, p < 0.01). According to the AIS subtype, the presence of HRPR was independently significant for the occurrence of the primary endpoint in the large artery atherosclerosis (LAA) subtype only (OR = 2.26, CI 1.15-4.45, p = 0.02). In this study, the presence of HRPR after ADP stimuli is associated with a poor long-term outcome after acute ischemic stroke. In particular, the influence of this factor might be more prominent in LAA compared with other types of AIS. PMID:26680778

  17. Adiponectin Agonist ADP355 Attenuates CCl4-Induced Liver Fibrosis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pradeep; Smith, Tekla; Rahman, Khalidur; Thorn, Natalie E.; Anania, Frank A.

    2014-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is a growing global health problem characterized by excess deposition of fibrillar collagen, and activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Adiponectin is known to possess anti-fibrotic properties; however a high physiological concentration and multiple forms circulating in blood prohibit clinical use. Recently, an adiponectin-like small synthetic peptide agonist (ADP355: H-DAsn-Ile-Pro-Nva-Leu-Tyr-DSer-Phe-Ala-DSer-NH2) was synthesized for the treatment of murine breast cancer. The present study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of ADP355 as an anti-fibrotic agent in the in vivo carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced liver fibrosis model. Liver fibrosis was induced in eight-week old male C57BL/6J mice by CCl4-gavage every other day for four weeks before injection of a nanoparticle-conjugated with ADP355 (nano-ADP355). Control gold nanoparticles and nano-ADP355 were administered by intraperitoneal injection for two weeks along with CCl4-gavage. All mice were sacrificed after 6 weeks, and serum and liver tissue were collected for biochemical, histopathologic and molecular analyses. Biochemical studies suggested ADP355 treatment attenuates liver fibrosis, determined by reduction of serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase ALT) and hydroxyproline. Histopathology revealed chronic CCl4-treatment results in significant fibrosis, while ADP355 treatment induced significantly reversed fibrosis. Key markers for fibrogenesis–α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-β1), connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), and the tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase I (TIMP1) were also markedly attenuated. Conversely, liver lysates from ADP355 treated mice increased phosphorylation of both endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and AMPK while AKT phosphorylation was diminished. These findings suggest ADP355 is a potent anti-fibrotic agent that can be an effective intervention against liver fibrosis. PMID

  18. Platelets

    MedlinePlus

    ... are related to immunity and fighting infection. Platelet Production Platelets are produced in the bone marrow, the ... platelet destruction and also decreased bone marrow platelet production. These problems are caused by autoantibodies. Antibodies are ...

  19. P2 receptors and platelet function.

    PubMed

    Hechler, Béatrice; Gachet, Christian

    2011-09-01

    Following vessel wall injury, platelets adhere to the exposed subendothelium, become activated and release mediators such as TXA(2) and nucleotides stored at very high concentration in the so-called dense granules. Released nucleotides and other soluble agents act in a positive feedback mechanism to cause further platelet activation and amplify platelet responses induced by agents such as thrombin or collagen. Adenine nucleotides act on platelets through three distinct P2 receptors: two are G protein-coupled ADP receptors, namely the P2Y(1) and P2Y(12) receptor subtypes, while the P2X(1) receptor ligand-gated cation channel is activated by ATP. The P2Y(1) receptor initiates platelet aggregation but is not sufficient for a full platelet aggregation in response to ADP, while the P2Y(12) receptor is responsible for completion of the aggregation to ADP. The latter receptor, the molecular target of the antithrombotic drugs clopidogrel, prasugrel and ticagrelor, is responsible for most of the potentiating effects of ADP when platelets are stimulated by agents such as thrombin, collagen or immune complexes. The P2X(1) receptor is involved in platelet shape change and in activation by collagen under shear conditions. Each of these receptors is coupled to specific signal transduction pathways in response to ADP or ATP and is differentially involved in all the sequential events involved in platelet function and haemostasis. As such, they represent potential targets for antithrombotic drugs. PMID:21792575

  20. Platelet-activating factor (PAF-acether) induces high- and low-affinity binding of fibrinogen to human platelets via independent mechanisms.

    PubMed Central

    Kloprogge, E; Akkerman, J W

    1986-01-01

    When human platelets are incubated with 500 nM-PAF-acether (platelet-activating factor. 1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) under equilibrium conditions (60 min, 22 degrees C, non-stirred suspensions), two classes of fibrinogen binding sites are exposed: one class with a high affinity [Kd (7.2 +/- 2.1) X 10(-8) M, 2367 +/- 485 sites/platelet, n = 9] and one class with a low affinity [Kd (5.9 +/- 2.4) X 10(-7) M, 26972 +/- 8267 sites/platelet]. Preincubation with inhibitors of cyclo-oxygenase (acetylsalicylic acid, indomethacin) or thromboxane synthetase (UK 38.485) completely abolishes high-affinity binding, leaving low-affinity binding unchanged. In contrast, ADP scavengers (phosphocreatine/creatine kinase or phosphoenol pyruvate/pyruvate kinase) completely prevent low-affinity binding, leaving high-affinity binding unaltered. Initial binding studies (2-10 min incubation) confirm these findings with a major part of the binding being sensitive to ADP scavengers, a minor part sensitive to indomethacin and complete blockade with both inhibitors. Increasing the temperature to 37 degrees C decreases the number of low affinity-binding sites 6-fold without changing high-affinity binding. Aggregation, measured as the rate of single platelet disappearance, then depends on high-affinity binding at 10 nM-fibrinogen or less, whereas at 100 nM-fibrinogen or more low-affinity binding becomes predominant. These findings point at considerable platelet activation during binding experiments. However, arachidonate metabolism [( 3H]arachidonate mobilization and thromboxane synthesis) and secretion [( 14C]serotonin and beta-thromboglobulin) are about 10% or less of the amounts found under optimal conditions (5 units of thrombin/ml 37 degrees C, stirring). We conclude that PAF-acether induces little platelet activation under binding conditions. The amounts of thromboxane A2 and secreted ADP, however, are sufficient for initiating high- and low-affinity fibrinogen binding

  1. Membrane Changes Associated with Platelet Activation

    PubMed Central

    George, James N.; Lyons, Roger M.; Morgan, Rebecca K.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of aggregation and secretion on membrane proteins was studied in washed human platelets. Reversible aggregation without secretion was stimulated by ADP and secretion without aggregation was stimulated by thrombin in the presence of EDTA. No loss of platelet surface glycoproteins occurred during reversible ADP-induced platelet aggregation, as measured by quantitative polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of platelets that were labeled with 125I-diazotized diiodosulfanilic acid (DD125ISA) before ADP stimulation. Also, no new proteins became exposed on the platelet surface after ADP aggregation, as determined by DD125ISA labeling after stimulation. Thrombin-induced platelet secretion also caused no loss of platelet surface glycoproteins. However, after platelet secretion two new proteins were labeled by DD125ISA: (a) actin and (b) the 149,000-mol wt glycoprotein (termed GP-G), which is contained in platelet granules and secreted in response to thrombin. The identity of DD125ISA-labeled actin was confirmed by four criteria: (a) comigration with actin in three different sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis systems, (b) elution from a particulate fraction in low ionic strength buffer, (c) co-migration with actin in isoelectric focusing, and (d) binding to DNase I. The identity of actin and its appearance on the platelet surface after thrombin-induced secretion was also demonstrated by the greater binding of an anti-actin antibody to thrombin-treated platelets, measured with 125I-staphylococcal protein A. Therefore, major platelet membrane changes occur after secretion but not after reversible aggregation. The platelet surface changes occurring with secretion may be important in the formation of irreversible platelet aggregates and in the final retraction of the blood clot. Images PMID:6772667

  2. Pharmacological intervention against bubble-induced platelet aggregation in a rat model of decompression sickness

    PubMed Central

    Vallée, Nicolas; Ignatescu, Mihaela; Bourdon, Lionel

    2011-01-01

    generation, have no protective effect on DCS incidence. Clo, a specific ADP-receptor antagonist, reduces post-decompression platelet consumption. These results point to the predominant involvement of the ADP release in BIPA but cannot differentiate definitively between bubble-induced vessel wall injury and bubble-blood component interactions in DCS. PMID:21212250

  3. Pharmacological intervention against bubble-induced platelet aggregation in a rat model of decompression sickness.

    PubMed

    Pontier, Jean-Michel; Vallée, Nicolas; Ignatescu, Mihaela; Bourdon, Lionel

    2011-03-01

    generation, have no protective effect on DCS incidence. Clo, a specific ADP-receptor antagonist, reduces post-decompression platelet consumption. These results point to the predominant involvement of the ADP release in BIPA but cannot differentiate definitively between bubble-induced vessel wall injury and bubble-blood component interactions in DCS. PMID:21212250

  4. TCDD-inducible poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (TIPARP/PARP7) mono-ADP-ribosylates and co-activates liver X receptors.

    PubMed

    Bindesbøll, Christian; Tan, Susanna; Bott, Debbie; Cho, Tiffany; Tamblyn, Laura; MacPherson, Laura; Grønning-Wang, Line; Nebb, Hilde Irene; Matthews, Jason

    2016-04-01

    Members of the poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) family catalyse the ADP-ribosylation of target proteins and are known to play important roles in many cellular processes, including DNA repair, differentiation and transcription. The majority of PARPs exhibit mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase activity rather than PARP activity; however, little is known about their biological activity. In the present study, we report that 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-inducible poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (TIPARP), mono-ADP-ribosylates and positively regulates liver X receptor α (LXRα) and LXRβ activity. Overexpression of TIPARP enhanced LXR-reporter gene activity. TIPARP knockdown or deletion reduced LXR regulated target gene expression levels in HepG2 cells and inTiparp(-/-)mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) respectively. Deletion and mutagenesis studies showed that TIPARP's zinc-finger and catalytic domains were required to enhance LXR activity. Protein interaction studies using TIPARP and LXRα/β peptide arrays revealed that LXRs interacted with an N-terminal sequence (a.a. 209-236) of TIPARP, which also overlapped with a putative co-activator domain of TIPARP (a.a. 200-225). Immunofluorescence studies showed that TIPARP and LXRα or LXRβ co-localized in the nucleus.In vitroribosylation assays provided evidence that TIPARP mono-ADP-ribosylated both LXRα and LXRβ. Co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) studies revealed that ADP-ribosylase macrodomain 1 (MACROD1), but not MACROD2, interacted with LXRs in a TIPARP-dependent manner. This was complemented by reporter gene studies showing that MACROD1, but not MACROD2, prevented the TIPARP-dependent increase in LXR activity. GW3965-dependent increases in hepatic Srebp1 mRNA and protein expression levels were reduced inTiparp(-/-)mice compared withTiparp(+/+)mice. Taken together, these data identify a new mechanism of LXR regulation that involves TIPARP, ADP-ribosylation and MACROD1. PMID:26814197

  5. Distinct roles of GPVI and integrin α2β1 in platelet shape change and aggregation induced by different collagens

    PubMed Central

    Jarvis, Gavin E; Atkinson, Ben T; Snell, Daniel C; Watson, Steve P

    2002-01-01

    Various platelet membrane glycoproteins have been proposed as receptors for collagen, in some cases as receptors for specific collagen types. In this study we have compared the ability of a range of collagen types to activate platelets. Bovine collagen types I–V, native equine tendon collagen fibrils and collagen-related peptide (CRP) all induced platelet aggregation and shape change. Responses were abolished in FcRγ chain-deficient platelets, which also lack GPVI, indicating a critical dependence on the GPVI/FcRγ chain complex. Responses to all collagens were unaffected in CD36-deficient platelets. A monoclonal antibody (6F1) which binds to the α2 integrin subunit of human platelets had a minimal effect on the rate and extent of aggregation induced by the collagens; however, it delayed the onset of aggregation following addition of all collagens. For shape change, 6F1 abolished the response induced by collagen types I and IV, substantially attenuated that to collagen types II, III and V, but only partially inhibited Horm collagen. Simultaneous blockade of the P2Y1 and P2Y12 receptors, and inhibition of cyclo-oxygenase demonstrated that CRP can activate platelets independently of ADP and TxA2; however, responses to the collagens were dependent on these mediators. This study confirms the importance of the GPVI/FcRγ chain complex in platelet responses induced by a range of collagen agonists, while providing no evidence for collagen type-specific receptors. It also provides evidence for a modulatory role of α2β1, the significance of which depends on the collagen preparation. PMID:12183336

  6. The Catalytic Subunit of Protein Phosphatase 1 Gamma Regulates Thrombin-Induced Murine Platelet αIIbβ3 Function

    PubMed Central

    Gushiken, Francisca C.; Hyojeong, Han; Pradhan, Subhashree; Langlois, Kimberly W.; Alrehani, Nawaf; Cruz, Miguel A.; Rumbaut, Rolando E.; Vijayan, K. Vinod

    2009-01-01

    Background Hemostasis and thrombosis are regulated by agonist-induced activation of platelet integrin αIIbβ3. Integrin activation, in turn is mediated by cellular signaling via protein kinases and protein phosphatases. Although the catalytic subunit of protein phosphatase 1 (PP1c) interacts with αIIbβ3, the role of PP1c in platelet reactivity is unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings Using γ isoform of PP1c deficient mice (PP1cγ−/−), we show that the platelets have moderately decreased soluble fibrinogen binding and aggregation to low concentrations of thrombin or protease-activated receptor 4 (PAR4)-activating peptide but not to adenosine diphosphate (ADP), collagen or collagen-related peptide (CRP). Thrombin-stimulated PP1cγ−/− platelets showed decreased αIIbβ3 activation despite comparable levels of αIIbβ3, PAR3, PAR4 expression and normal granule secretion. Functions regulated by outside-in integrin αIIbβ3 signaling like adhesion to immobilized fibrinogen and clot retraction were not altered in PP1cγ−/− platelets. Thrombus formation induced by a light/dye injury in the cremaster muscle venules was significantly delayed in PP1cγ−/− mice. Phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase (GSK3)β-serine 9 that promotes platelet function, was reduced in thrombin-stimulated PP1cγ−/− platelets by an AKT independent mechanism. Inhibition of GSK3β partially abolished the difference in fibrinogen binding between thrombin-stimulated wild type and PP1cγ−/− platelets. Conclusions/Significance These studies illustrate a role for PP1cγ in maintaining GSK3β-serine9 phosphorylation downstream of thrombin signaling and promoting thrombus formation via fibrinogen binding and platelet aggregation. PMID:20016849

  7. Taurine and platelet aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Nauss-Karol, C.; VanderWende, C.; Gaut, Z.N.

    1986-03-01

    Taurine is a putative neurotransmitter or neuromodulator. The endogenous taurine concentration in human platelets, determined by amino acid analysis, is 15 ..mu..M/g. In spite of this high level, taurine is actively accumulated. Uptake is saturable, Na/sup +/ and temperature dependent, and suppressed by metabolic inhibitors, structural analogues, and several classes of centrally active substances. High, medium and low affinity transport processes have been characterized, and the platelet may represent a model system for taurine transport in the CNS. When platelets were incubated with /sup 14/C-taurine for 30 minutes, then resuspended in fresh medium and reincubated for one hour, essentially all of the taurine was retained within the cells. Taurine, at concentrations ranging from 10-1000 ..mu..M, had no effect on platelet aggregation induced by ADP or epinephrine. However, taurine may have a role in platelet aggregation since 35-39% of the taurine taken up by human platelets appears to be secreted during the release reaction induced by low concentrations of either epinephrine or ADP, respectively. This release phenomenon would imply that part of the taurine taken up is stored directly in the dense bodies of the platelet.

  8. Conventional protein kinase C isoforms differentially regulate ADP- and thrombin-evoked Ca²⁺ signalling in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Lever, Robert A; Hussain, Azhar; Sun, Benjamin B; Sage, Stewart O; Harper, Alan G S

    2015-12-01

    Rises in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]cyt) are central in platelet activation, yet many aspects of the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Most studies examine how experimental manipulations affect agonist-evoked rises in [Ca(2+)]cyt, but these only monitor the net effect of manipulations on the processes controlling [Ca(2+)]cyt (Ca(2+) buffering, sequestration, release, entry and removal), and cannot resolve the source of the Ca(2+) or the transporters or channels affected. To investigate the effects of protein kinase C (PKC) on platelet Ca(2+) signalling, we here monitor Ca(2+) flux around the platelet by measuring net Ca(2+) fluxes to or from the extracellular space and the intracellular Ca(2+) stores, which act as the major sources and sinks for Ca(2+) influx into and efflux from the cytosol, as well as monitoring the cytosolic Na(+) concentration ([Na(+)]cyt), which influences platelet Ca(2+) fluxes via Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange. The intracellular store Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]st) was monitored using Fluo-5N, the extracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]ext) was monitored using Fluo-4 whilst [Ca(2+)]cyt and [Na(+)]cyt were monitored using Fura-2 and SFBI, respectively. PKC inhibition using Ro-31-8220 or bisindolylmaleimide I potentiated ADP- and thrombin-evoked rises in [Ca(2+)]cyt in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+). PKC inhibition potentiated ADP-evoked but reduced thrombin-evoked intracellular Ca(2+) release and Ca(2+) removal into the extracellular medium. SERCA inhibition using thapsigargin and 2,5-di(tert-butyl) l,4-benzohydroquinone abolished the effect of PKC inhibitors on ADP-evoked changes in [Ca(2+)]cyt but only reduced the effect on thrombin-evoked responses. Thrombin evokes substantial rises in [Na(+)]cyt which would be expected to reduce Ca(2+) removal via the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX). Thrombin-evoked rises in [Na(+)]cyt were potentiated by PKC inhibition, an effect which was not due to altered changes in non

  9. Involvement of platelet cyclic GMP but not cyclic AMP suppression in leukocyte-dependent platelet adhesion to endothelial cells induced by platelet-activating factor in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Hirafuji, M.; Nezu, A.; Shinoda, H.; Minami, M.

    1996-01-01

    1. Incubation of endothelial cells with platelets in the absence or the presence of PAF (10 nM) markedly increased platelet cyclic AMP levels, which were significantly decreased by indomethacin (3 microM). Co-incubation of endothelial cells and platelets with polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) did not change the platelet cyclic AMP levels. 2. Incubation of endothelial cells with platelets in the absence of PAF increased platelet cyclic GMP levels, which were increased 3.5 fold by PAF. These cyclic GMP levels were significantly decreased by NG-nitro-L-arginine (100 microM), and completely by methylene blue (10 microM). When endothelial cells and platelets were co-incubated with PMNs, the cyclic GMP level in the cell mixture was 42.5 and 65.3% lower than that in endothelial cells and platelets without and with PAF stimulation, respectively. 3. PAF induced platelet adhesion to endothelial cells only when PMNs were present. Methylene blue dose-dependently potentiated the PMN-dependent platelet adhesion induced by PAF, although it had no effect in the absence of PMNs. 4. Sodium nitroprusside and 8-bromo cyclic GMP but not dibutyryl cyclic AMP significantly, although partially, inhibited the platelet adhesion. Inhibition of cyclic GMP-specific phosphodiesterase by zaprinast slightly inhibited the PMN-induced platelet adhesion and potentiated the inhibitory effect of 8-bromo cyclic GMP, while these drugs markedly inhibited the adhesion of platelet aggregates induced by PMN sonicates. 5. These results suggest that the impairment by activated PMNs of EDRF-induced platelet cyclic GMP formation is involved in part in the mechanism of PMN-dependent platelet adhesion to endothelial cells induced by PAF in vitro. The precise mechanism still remains to be clarified. PMID:8789382

  10. Protease-induced immunoregulatory activity of platelet factor 4.

    PubMed Central

    Katz, I R; Thorbecke, G J; Bell, M K; Yin, J Z; Clarke, D; Zucker, M B

    1986-01-01

    Intravenous injection of human or mouse serum or platelet material secreted from appropriately stimulated platelets ("releasate") together with antigen alleviates the immunosuppression in SJL/J mice induced by injection of irradiated lymphoma cells or in (CB6)F1 mice induced by injection of concanavalin A. We now report that injection of releasate from 10(6) human platelets restores plaque-forming cells to the unsuppressed number; greater amounts increase responses further. Immunoregulatory activity is released from platelets exposed to thrombin in parallel with other alpha-granule components. Heparin-agarose absorbs activity. Purified platelet factor 4 (PF4) has activity; beta-thromboglobulin and platelet-derived growth factor have little or none. Activity in serum is neutralized by goat anti-human PF4. An enzymatic step is necessary for production of immunoregulatory activity. Releasates boiled immediately after platelet aggregation with 250 nM A23187 or those produced by adding A23187 in the presence of 100 microM serine protease inhibitor (p-amidinophenyl)methanesulfonyl fluoride (APMSF) are ineffective, whereas releasates boiled or mixed with APMSF after incubation for 60 min are active. Activity is generated by incubating a mixture of heparin-absorbed releasate (as enzyme source) and heparin-agarose eluate of releasate made in the presence of APMSF (as substrate source). The enzymatic step does not alter the heparin-neutralizing activity of PF4. Apparently a secreted platelet protease converts PF4 to a form with immunoregulatory activity. PMID:3517862

  11. Platelets Potentiate Brain Endothelial Alterations Induced by Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Wassmer, Samuel C.; Combes, Valéry; Candal, Francisco J.; Juhan-Vague, Irène; Grau, Georges E.

    2006-01-01

    Brain lesions of cerebral malaria (CM) are characterized by a sequestration of Plasmodium falciparum-parasitized red blood cells (PRBC) and platelets within brain microvessels, as well as by blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption. In the present study, we evaluated the possibility that PRBC and platelets induce functional alterations in brain endothelium. In a human brain endothelial cell line, named HBEC-5i, exhibiting most of the features demanded for a pathophysiological study of BBB, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) or lymphotoxin α (LT-α) reduced transendothelial electrical resistance (TEER), enhanced the permeability to 70-kDa dextran, and increased the release of microparticles, a recently described indicator of disease severity in CM patients. In vitro cocultures showed that platelets or PRBC can have a direct cytotoxic effect on activated, but not on resting, HBEC-5i cells. Platelet binding was required, as platelet supernatant had no effect. Furthermore, platelets potentiated the cytotoxicity of PRBC for TNF- or LT-α-activated HBEC-5i cells when they were added prior to these cells on the endothelial monolayers. This effect was not observed when platelets were added after PRBC. Both permeability and TEER were strongly affected, and the apoptosis rate of HBEC-5i cells was dramatically increased. These findings provide insights into the mechanisms by which platelets can be deleterious to the brain endothelium during CM. PMID:16369021

  12. Characteristics of rat platelets and relative contributions of platelets and blood coagulation to haemostasis.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, O

    2000-01-01

    In order to understand some of the haemostatic mechanisms in rats for the interpretation of toxicological data, basic haemostatic parameters with a special emphasis on platelet functions were first measured in vitro. The results of reactions of rat platelets to many aggregating agents suggest that only ADP may be a consistently significant aggregator. The search for physiologic aggregators revealed ADP to be available from erythrocytes. Adhesion reaction also required ADP. Collagen was not considered to be essential for either reaction. Aggregation and adhesion were probably both reversible in flowing blood, while irreversible thrombi were formed in blood at rest ex vivo. Blood coagulation parameters determined revealed that the intrinsic pathway may be more important than the extrinsic one. The rate of intrinsic coagulation reaction was rapid, and plasma coagulation appeared to be of primary importance while the influence of platelet aggregation was minor. A simple model of rat haemostatic mechanism is proposed based on these results. Additionally, to define the relative contribution of platelets versus other cellular and plasma coagulation in vivo, rats were administered antiplatelet drugs (ticlopidine, suprofen and clopidogrel) and an anticoagulant (warfarin) intraperitoneally. Bleeding times (BTs) were significantly increased in all treated groups. ADP-induced platelet aggregations were significantly depressed by the administration of the three antiplatelet drugs, while kaolon-activated partial thromboplastin time and prothrombin time were greatly increased in the warfarin-treated rats. The increase in BT may be due to the inhibition of platelet activity or blood coagulation defect in rats given antiplatelet drugs or warfarin, respectively. These results suggest that platelets play a key role in haemostasis in the rat. Two possible explanations of the disparity between in vitro and in vivo results may be that functional tests used here are not adequate to cover

  13. Platelet Inhibition by Nitrite Is Dependent on Erythrocytes and Deoxygenation

    PubMed Central

    Srihirun, Sirada; Sriwantana, Thanaporn; Unchern, Supeenun; Kittikool, Dusadee; Noulsri, Egarit; Pattanapanyasat, Kovit; Fucharoen, Suthat; Piknova, Barbora; Schechter, Alan N.; Sibmooh, Nathawut

    2012-01-01

    Background Nitrite is a nitric oxide (NO) metabolite in tissues and blood, which can be converted to NO under hypoxia to facilitate tissue perfusion. Although nitrite is known to cause vasodilation following its reduction to NO, the effect of nitrite on platelet activity remains unclear. In this study, the effect of nitrite and nitrite+erythrocytes, with and without deoxygenation, on platelet activity was investigated. Methodology/Finding Platelet aggregation was studied in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and PRP+erythrocytes by turbidimetric and impedance aggregometry, respectively. In PRP, DEANONOate inhibited platelet aggregation induced by ADP while nitrite had no effect on platelets. In PRP+erythrocytes, the inhibitory effect of DEANONOate on platelets decreased whereas nitrite at physiologic concentration (0.1 µM) inhibited platelet aggregation and ATP release. The effect of nitrite+erythrocytes on platelets was abrogated by C-PTIO (a membrane-impermeable NO scavenger), suggesting an NO-mediated action. Furthermore, deoxygenation enhanced the effect of nitrite as observed from a decrease of P-selectin expression and increase of the cGMP levels in platelets. The ADP-induced platelet aggregation in whole blood showed inverse correlations with the nitrite levels in whole blood and erythrocytes. Conclusion Nitrite alone at physiological levels has no effect on platelets in plasma. Nitrite in the presence of erythrocytes inhibits platelets through its reduction to NO, which is promoted by deoxygenation. Nitrite may have role in modulating platelet activity in the circulation, especially during hypoxia. PMID:22276188

  14. The involvement of platelet activating factor in endotoxin-induced pulmonary platelet recruitment in the guinea-pig.

    PubMed Central

    Beijer, L.; Botting, J.; Crook, P.; Oyekan, A. O.; Page, C. P.; Rylander, R.

    1987-01-01

    1 Exposure of conscious guinea-pigs to an aerosol of endotoxin (25-100 micrograms ml-1) resulted in a dose-related, progressive accumulation of platelets in the thoracic region. Accumulation of 111indium oxine labelled erythrocytes was not observed following exposure to an aerosol of endotoxin (50 micrograms ml-1). 2 Pretreatment of guinea-pigs with the selective platelet activating factor (Paf)-antagonists. CV-3988 or brotizolam resulted in a dose-related inhibition of endotoxin-induced pulmonary platelet recruitment. Pretreatment of guinea-pigs with the selective Paf-antagonist BN 52021 resulted in significant inhibition of endotoxin-induced pulmonary platelet recruitment, although the effects of BN 52021 were not dose-related. 3 Pretreatment of guinea-pigs with indomethacin at doses known to inhibit cyclo-oxygenase did not inhibit endotoxin-induced pulmonary platelet recruitment, whereas higher doses of indomethacin produced a reduction in platelet recruitment in the lung. 4 Pretreatment of guinea-pigs with the anticoagulant heparin and the prostacyclin analogue ZK 36374 inhibited endotoxin-induced platelet recruitment. 5 These observations suggest that endotoxin-induced pulmonary platelet recruitment in the guinea-pig is secondary to the release of platelet activating factor, but not to cyclo-oxygenase products of arachidonic acid and may also involve activation of the coagulation cascade. PMID:2447993

  15. Brefeldin A-induced ADP-ribosylation in the structure and function of the Golgi complex.

    PubMed

    Colanzi, A; Mironov, A; Weigert, R; Limina, C; Flati, S; Cericola, C; Di Tullio, G; Di Girolamo, M; Corda, D; De Matteis, M A; Luini, A

    1997-01-01

    Brefeldin A (BFA) is a fungal metabolite that exerts generally inhibitory actions on membrane transport and induces the disappearance of the Golgi complex. Previously we have shown that BFA stimulates the ADP-ribosylation of two cytosolic proteins of 38 and 50 KD. The BFA-binding components mediating the BFA-sensitive ADP-ribosylation (BAR) and the effect of BFA on ARF binding to Golgi membranes have similar specificities and affinities for BFA and its analogues, suggesting that BAR may have a role in the cellular effects of BFA. To investigate this we used the approach to impair BAR activity by the use of BAR inhibitors. A series of BAR inhibitors was developed and their effects were studied in RBL cells treated with BFA. In addition to the common ADP-ribosylation inhibitors (nicotinamide and aminobenzamide), compounds belonging to the cumarin (novobiocin, cumermycin, dicumarol) class were active BAR inhibitors. All BAR inhibitors were able to prevent the BFA-induced redistribution of a Golgi marker (Helix pomatia lectin) into the endoplasmic reticulum, as assessed in immunofluorescence experiments. At the ultrastructural level, BAR inhibitors prevented the tubular-vesicular transformation of the Golgi complex caused by BFA. The potencies of these compounds in preventing the BFA effects on the Golgi complex were similar to those at which they inhibited BAR. Altogether these data support the hypothesis that BAR mediates at least some of the effects of BFA on the Golgi structure and function. PMID:9193673

  16. Poly(ADP-Ribose) Glycohydrolase (PARG) Silencing Suppresses Benzo(a)pyrene Induced Cell Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Peiwu; Zhuang, Zhixiong; Liu, Jianjun; Gao, Wei; Liu, Yinpin; Huang, Haiyan

    2016-01-01

    Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) is a ubiquitously distributed environmental pollutant and known carcinogen, which can induce malignant transformation in rodent and human cells. Poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG), the primary enzyme that catalyzes the degradation of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR), has been known to play an important role in regulating DNA damage repair and maintaining genomic stability. Although PARG has been shown to be a downstream effector of BaP, the role of PARG in BaP induced carcinogenesis remains unclear. In this study, we used the PARG-deficient human bronchial epithelial cell line (shPARG) as a model to examine how PARG contributed to the carcinogenesis induced by chronic BaP exposure under various concentrations (0, 10, 20 and 40 μM). Our results showed that PARG silencing dramatically reduced DNA damages, chromosome abnormalities, and micronuclei formations in the PARG-deficient human bronchial epithelial cells compared to the control cells (16HBE cells). Meanwhile, the wound healing assay showed that PARG silencing significantly inhibited BaP-induced cell migration. Furthermore, silencing of PARG significantly reduced the volume and weight of tumors in Balb/c nude mice injected with BaP induced transformed human bronchial epithelial cells. This was the first study that reported evidences to support an oncogenic role of PARG in BaP induced carcinogenesis, which provided a new perspective for our understanding in BaP exposure induced cancer. PMID:27003318

  17. Poly(ADP-Ribose) Glycohydrolase (PARG) Silencing Suppresses Benzo(a)pyrene Induced Cell Transformation.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuan; Li, Xiyi; Zhu, Zhiliang; Huang, Peiwu; Zhuang, Zhixiong; Liu, Jianjun; Gao, Wei; Liu, Yinpin; Huang, Haiyan

    2016-01-01

    Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) is a ubiquitously distributed environmental pollutant and known carcinogen, which can induce malignant transformation in rodent and human cells. Poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG), the primary enzyme that catalyzes the degradation of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR), has been known to play an important role in regulating DNA damage repair and maintaining genomic stability. Although PARG has been shown to be a downstream effector of BaP, the role of PARG in BaP induced carcinogenesis remains unclear. In this study, we used the PARG-deficient human bronchial epithelial cell line (shPARG) as a model to examine how PARG contributed to the carcinogenesis induced by chronic BaP exposure under various concentrations (0, 10, 20 and 40 μM). Our results showed that PARG silencing dramatically reduced DNA damages, chromosome abnormalities, and micronuclei formations in the PARG-deficient human bronchial epithelial cells compared to the control cells (16HBE cells). Meanwhile, the wound healing assay showed that PARG silencing significantly inhibited BaP-induced cell migration. Furthermore, silencing of PARG significantly reduced the volume and weight of tumors in Balb/c nude mice injected with BaP induced transformed human bronchial epithelial cells. This was the first study that reported evidences to support an oncogenic role of PARG in BaP induced carcinogenesis, which provided a new perspective for our understanding in BaP exposure induced cancer. PMID:27003318

  18. Residual force depression in single sarcomeres is abolished by MgADP-induced activation.

    PubMed

    Trecarten, Neal; Minozzo, Fabio C; Leite, Felipe S; Rassier, Dilson E

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms behind the shortening-induced force depression commonly observed in skeletal muscles remain unclear, but have been associated with sarcomere length non-uniformity and/or crossbridge inhibition. The purpose of this study was twofold: (i) to evaluate if force depression is present in isolated single sarcomeres, a preparation that eliminates sarcomere length non-uniformities and (ii) to evaluate if force depression is inhibited when single sarcomeres are activated with MgADP, which biases crossbridges into a strongly-bound state. Single sarcomeres (n = 16) were isolated from rabbit psoas myofibrils using two micro-needles (one compliant, one rigid), piercing the sarcomere externally adjacent to the Z-lines. The sarcomeres were contracted isometrically and subsequently shortened, in both Ca(2+)- and MgADP-activating solutions. Shortening in Ca(2+)-activated samples resulted in a 27.44 ± 9.04% force depression when compared to isometric contractions produced at similar final sarcomere lengths (P < 0.001). There was no force depression in MgADP-activated sarcomeres (force depression = -1.79 ± 9.69%, P =  0.435). These results suggest that force depression is a sarcomeric property, and that is associated with an inhibition of myosin-actin interactions. PMID:26037312

  19. Residual force depression in single sarcomeres is abolished by MgADP-induced activation

    PubMed Central

    Trecarten, Neal; Minozzo, Fabio C.; Leite, Felipe S.; Rassier, Dilson E.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms behind the shortening-induced force depression commonly observed in skeletal muscles remain unclear, but have been associated with sarcomere length non-uniformity and/or crossbridge inhibition. The purpose of this study was twofold: (i) to evaluate if force depression is present in isolated single sarcomeres, a preparation that eliminates sarcomere length non-uniformities and (ii) to evaluate if force depression is inhibited when single sarcomeres are activated with MgADP, which biases crossbridges into a strongly-bound state. Single sarcomeres (n = 16) were isolated from rabbit psoas myofibrils using two micro-needles (one compliant, one rigid), piercing the sarcomere externally adjacent to the Z-lines. The sarcomeres were contracted isometrically and subsequently shortened, in both Ca2+- and MgADP-activating solutions. Shortening in Ca2+-activated samples resulted in a 27.44 ± 9.04% force depression when compared to isometric contractions produced at similar final sarcomere lengths (P < 0.001). There was no force depression in MgADP-activated sarcomeres (force depression = −1.79 ± 9.69%, P =  0.435). These results suggest that force depression is a sarcomeric property, and that is associated with an inhibition of myosin-actin interactions. PMID:26037312

  20. Detection and effects on platelet function of anti-platelet antibody in mule foals with experimentally induced neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Ramirez, S; Gaunt, S D; McClure, J J; Oliver, J

    1999-01-01

    Horse mares carrying mule foals were immunized during the last trimester of pregnancy with whole acid-citrate-dextrose-anticoagulated donkey blood to experimentally induce neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia. Thrombocytopenia occurred in the neonatal mule foals born to immunized horse mares within 24 hours after ingestion of their dams' colostrum. Mule foals born to mares not immunized with donkey blood did not develop thrombocytopenia. These findings suggest that antibodies may have been directed against a donkey platelet antigen present in the mule foals but not present in their dams. The objectives of this study were to determine whether anti-platelet antibody could be detected in mule foals with experimentally induced neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia, to identify any platelet proteins recognized by serum antibody in these foals, and to determine if platelet function was altered by sera from these mule foals. An indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay demonstrated significantly higher absorption at 1:200 of platelet-bindable immunoglobulin G in serum from thrombocytopenic mule foals, compared with nonthrombocytopenic mule foals. Sera from thrombocytopenic and nonthrombocytopenic mule foals produced similar binding patterns in western immunoblots with donkey platelet proteins separated on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gels. Maximal platelet aggregation and relative slope of aggregation in response to collagen were significantly inhibited after incubation with sera from thrombocytopenic mule foals. These results suggest that mule foals with induced alloimmune thrombocytopenia have serum antibodies that bind to platelets and may compete with collagen binding sites to impair platelet aggregation. PMID:10587252

  1. The Prognostic Impact of High On-Treatment Platelet Reactivity with Aspirin or ADP Receptor Antagonists: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    D'Ascenzo, Fabrizio; Barbero, Umberto; Bisi, Marta; Moretti, Claudio; Omedè, Pierluigi; Cerrato, Enrico; Quadri, Giorgio; Zoccai, Giuseppe Biondi; DiNicolantonio, James J.; Gasparini, Mauro; Bangalore, Sripal; Gaita, Fiorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Negative results of recent randomized clinical trials testing the hypothesis of target therapy for patients with high on-treatment platelet reactivity (HOPR) have questioned its independent impact on clinical outcomes. 26 studies with 28.178 patients were included, with a median age of 66.8 (64–68) and 22.7% (22.4–27.8), of female gender. After a median follow-up of 1 year (0.1–1), cardiac adverse events occurred in 8.3% (3–11; all results are reported as median and interquartile range) of patients. Pooling all studies together, on-treatment platelet reactivity significantly increased the risk of adverse events (OR 1.33 [1.09, 1.64], I2 = 0%). However, a sensitivity analysis showed that HOPR did not increase the risk of adverse events for patients with ACS, AMI, or stable angina as well as patients resistant to aspirin, ADP antagonists, or both. For all studies, publication bias was formally evident; after adjusting for this, HOPR did not significantly increase adverse cardiac events (OR 1.1 : 0.89–1.22, I2 0%). Conclusions. After adjusting for clinical confounders (like risk factors and clinical presentation) and for relevant publication bias, HOPR was not an independent prognostic indicator in unselected patients with both stable and unstable coronary disease for an adverse cardiac event. The clinical importance of HOPR for high-risk populations remains to be assessed. PMID:25374889

  2. Predictive value of mean platelet volume in gold induced thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed Central

    Klimiuk, P S; Holt, P J; Clague, R B; Herod, E; Dyer, P A

    1987-01-01

    In rheumatoid arthritis the mean platelet volume does not alter with the institution of parenteral gold therapy and with long term gold therapy. It appears to have no value in predicting the onset of thrombocytopenia. It may, however, predict a haemorrhagic diathesis once gold induced thrombocytopenia is established. PMID:3813673

  3. Roles of glia limitans astrocytes and CO in ADP-induced pial arteriolar dilation in newborn pigs

    PubMed Central

    Kanu, Alie; Leffler, Charles W.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose Astrocytes, neurons, and microvessels together form a neurovascular unit allowing blood flow to match neuronal activity. Adenosine diphosphate (ADP) is an important signaling molecule in the brain, and dilation in response to ADP is astrocyte-dependent in rats and newborn pigs. Carbon monoxide (CO), produced endogenously by catabolism of heme to CO, iron, and biliverdin via heme oxygenase (HO), is an important cell signaling molecule in the neonatal cerebral circulation. We hypothesize ADP stimulates CO production by glia limitans astrocytes and that this CO causes pial arteriolar dilation. Methods Experiments were performed using anesthetized piglet with closed cranial windows, and freshly isolated piglet astrocytes and microvessels. Astrocyte injury was caused by topical application of L-2-alpha aminoadipic acid (2 mM, 5 h). Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was collected from under the cranial windows for measurement of ADP-stimulated CO production. CO was measured by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy analysis. Results Before, but not after, astrocyte injury in vivo, topical ADP stimulated both CO production and dilation of pial arterioles. Astrocyte injury did not block dilation to isoproterenol or bradykinin. Chromium mesoporphyrin, an inhibitor of HO, also prevented the ADP-induced increase in CSF CO and pial arteriolar dilation caused by ADP but not dilation to sodium nitroprusside. ADP also increased CO production by freshly isolated piglet astrocytes and cerebral microvessels, although the increase was smaller in the microvessels. Conclusions These data suggest that glia limitans astrocytes employ CO as a gasotransmitter to cause pial arteriolar dilation in response to ADP. PMID:19164779

  4. Radiolabeled anti platelet monoclonal antibody for imaging in-vivo thrombi

    SciTech Connect

    Srivastava, S.C.; Coller, B.S.; Meinken, G.E.

    1993-07-06

    A radiolabeled monoclonal antibody radiolabeled with a halogen or metallic radionuclide selected from the group consisting of [sup 123]I, [sup 125]I, [sup 131]I, [sup 111]In-DTPA, [sup 99]mTc and [sup 97]Ru, wherein the monoclonal antibody is of the class IgG, produced by a hybridoma formed by fusion of cells from a BALB/C mouse myeloma line, X63.Ag8.653 and spleen cells from a BALB/c mouse previously immunized with human blood platelets, which antibody: (a) reacts readily with normal human platelets and with dog platelets; (b) fails to react with thrombasthenic human platelets or human platelets whose GPIIb/IIIa complex is dissociated with EDTA and (c) reacts slowly with inactivated platelets and substantially twice as rapidly with ADP activated platelets; and (d) completely blocks the interaction of fibrinogen with platelets induced by ADP.

  5. Rhesus monkey platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Harbury, C.B.

    1986-03-01

    The purpose of this abstract is to describe the adenine nucleotide metabolism of Rhesus monkey platelets. Nucleotides are labelled with /sup 14/C-adenine and extracted with EDTA-ethanol (EE) and perchlorate (P). Total platelet ATP and ADP (TATP, TADP) is measured in the Holmsen Luciferase assay, and expressed in nanomoles/10/sup 8/ platelets. TR=TATP/TADP. Human platelets release 70% of their TADP, with a ratio of released ATP/ADP of 0.7. Rhesus platelets release 82% of their TADP, with a ratio of released ATP/ADP of 0.33. Thus, monkey platelets contain more ADP than human platelets. Thin layer chromatography of EE gives a metabolic ratio of 11 in human platelets and 10.5 in monkey platelets. Perchlorate extracts metabolic and actin bound ADP. The human and monkey platelets ratios were 5, indicating they contain the same proportion of actin. Thus, the extra ADP contained in monkey platelets is located in the secretory granules.

  6. Busulfan Triggers Intrinsic Mitochondrial-Dependent Platelet Apoptosis Independent of Platelet Activation.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Jianlin; Wu, Yulu; Liu, Yun; Li, Xiaoqian; Wu, Xiaoqing; Liu, Na; Zhu, Feng; Qi, Kunming; Cheng, Hai; Li, Depeng; Li, Hongchun; Li, Zhenyu; Zeng, Lingyu; Ma, Ping; Xu, Kailin

    2016-09-01

    As a nonspecific alkylating antineoplastic agent, busulfan has been widely used in the treatment of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia. In vitro and in vivo studies demonstrated busulfan-induced cell apoptosis. Whether busulfan triggers platelet apoptosis remains unclear. This study aimed to evaluate the role of busulfan in platelet apoptosis. Isolated human platelets were incubated with busulfan followed by analysis of platelet apoptosis by flow cytometry or western blot, including mitochondrial depolarization, expression of Bcl-2, and Bax and caspase 3 activation. Meanwhile, platelet activation, expression of glycoprotein Ibα (GPIbα), glycoprotein VI (GPVI), and IIb3 and platelet aggregation in response to collagen and adenosine diphosphate (ADP) were measured. Additionally, busulfan was injected into mice with or without administration of caspase inhibitor QVD-Oph to investigate its effect on platelet lifespan. Our results showed that busulfan-treated platelets displayed increased mitochondrial membrane depolarization, decreased expression of Bcl-2, increased expression of Bax and caspase 3 activation in dose-dependent manner, which were inhibited by QVD-Oph. Platelet activation was not observed in busulfan-treated platelets as showed by no increased P-selectin expression and PAC-1 binding. However, busulfan reduced collagen- or ADP-induced platelet aggregation without affecting expression of GPIbα, GPVI, and IIb3. Furthermore, busulfan reduced circulating platelet lifespan which was ameliorated by QVD-Oph in mice. In conclusion, busulfan triggers mitochondrial-dependent platelet apoptosis and reduces platelet lifespan in mice. These data suggest targeting caspase activation might be beneficial in the prophylaxis of platelet apoptosis-associated thrombocytopenia after administration of busulfan. PMID:27292166

  7. The effects of siguazodan, a selective phosphodiesterase inhibitor, on human platelet function.

    PubMed Central

    Murray, K. J.; England, P. J.; Hallam, T. J.; Maguire, J.; Moores, K.; Reeves, M. L.; Simpson, A. W.; Rink, T. J.

    1990-01-01

    1. The effects of siguazodan (SK&F 94836) a selective phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitor with inotropic and vasodilator activity, were studied on human platelets. 2. Siguazodan selectively inhibited the major cyclic AMP-hydrolysing PDE in human platelet supernatants. The inhibited enzyme has been variously termed cyclic GMP-inhibited PDE or PDE-III. 3. In platelet-rich plasma (PRP), siguazodan inhibited U46619-induced aggregation more potently than that induced by ADP and collagen. Treatment of the PRP with aspirin had no effect on the potency of siguazodan. 4. In washed platelets, siguazodan increased cyclic AMP levels and reduced cytoplasmic free calcium [( Ca2+]i). ADP decreased the ability of siguazodan to raise cyclic AMP and this may explain its lower potency in inhibiting responses to ADP. 5. Siguazodan has anti-platelet actions over the same concentration range that it is an inotrope and vasodilator. PMID:2158847

  8. Mechanism for release of arachidonic acid during guinea pig platelet aggregation: a role for the diacylglycerol lipase inhibitor RHC 80267

    SciTech Connect

    Amin, D.

    1986-01-01

    The mechanism of the release of arachidonic acid from phospholipids after the stimulation of guinea pig platelets with collagen, thrombin and platelet activating factor (PAF) was studied. RHC 80267, a diacylglycerol lipase inhibitor, and indomethacin, a cyclooxygenase inhibitor, were used. Various in vitro assays for enzymes involved in arachidonic acid release and metabolism were conducted. Platelet aggregation and simultaneous release of ADP from platelets were monitored using a Chrono-log Lumiaggregometer. Platelets were labeled with (/sup 14/C)arachidonic acid to facilitate sensitive determination of small changes in platelet phospholipids during platelet aggregation. In the present investigation it is shown that collagen, thrombin and PAF increased phospholipase C activity. It was also discovered that cyclooxygenase products were responsible for further stimulation (a positive feed-back) of phospholipase C activity, while diacylglycerol provided a negative feed-back control over receptor-stimulated phospholipase C activity and inhibited ADP release. The guinea pig platelet is an ideal model to study phospholipase C-diacylglycerol lipase pathway for the release of arachidonic acid from platelet phospholipids because it does not have any phospholipase A/sub 2/ activity. It was observed that cyclooxygenase products were responsible for collagen-induced guinea pig platelet aggregation. Indomethacin completely inhibited collagen-induced platelet aggregation, was less effective against thrombin, and had no effect on PAF-induced platelet aggregation. On the other hand, RHC 80267 was a powerful inhibitor of aggregation and ADP release induced by all three of these potent aggregating agents.

  9. An atypical IgM class platelet cold agglutinin induces GPVI-dependent aggregation of human platelets.

    PubMed

    Sánchez Guiu, I M; Martínez-Martinez, I; Martínez, C; Navarro-Fernandez, J; García-Candel, F; Ferrer-Marín, F; Vicente, V; Watson, S P; Andrews, R K; Gardiner, E E; Lozano, M L; Rivera, J

    2015-08-01

    Platelet cold agglutinins (PCA) cause pseudothrombocytopenia, spurious thrombocytopenia due to ex vivo platelet clumping, complicating clinical diagnosis, but mechanisms and consequences of PCA are not well defined. Here, we characterised an atypical immunoglobulin (Ig)M PCA in a 37-year-old woman with lifelong bleeding and chronic moderate thrombocytopenia, that induces activation and aggregation of autologous or allogeneic platelets via interaction with platelet glycoprotein (GP)VI. Patient temperature-dependent pseudothrombocytopenia was EDTA-independent, but was prevented by integrin αIIbβ3 blockade. Unstimulated patient platelets revealed elevated levels of bound IgM, increased expression of activation markers (P-selectin and CD63), low GPVI levels and abnormally high thromboxane (TX)A2 production. Patient serum induced temperature- and αIIbβ3-dependent decrease of platelet count in allogeneic donor citrated platelet-rich plasma (PRP), but not in PRP from Glanzmann's thrombasthenia or afibrinogenaemia patients. In allogeneic platelets, patient plasma induced shape change, P-selectin and CD63 expression, (14)C-serotonin release, and TXA2 production. Activation was not inhibited by aspirin, cangrelor or blocking anti-Fc receptor (FcγRIIA) antibody, but was abrogated by inhibitors of Src and Syk, and by a soluble GPVI-Fc fusion protein. GPVI-deficient platelets were not activated by patient plasma. These data provide the first evidence for an IgM PCA causing platelet activation/aggregation via GPVI. The PCA activity persisted over a five-year follow-up period, supporting a causative role in patient chronic thrombocytopenia and bleeding. PMID:25994029

  10. Signaling during platelet adhesion and activation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhenyu; Delaney, M. Keegan; O’Brien, Kelly A.; Du, Xiaoping

    2011-01-01

    Upon vascular injury, platelets are activated by adhesion to adhesive proteins like von Willebrand factor and collagen, or by soluble platelet agonists like ADP, thrombin, and thromboxane A2. These adhesive proteins and soluble agonists induce signal transduction via their respective receptors. The various receptor-specific platelet activation signaling pathways converge into common signaling events, which stimulate platelet shape change, granule secretion, and ultimately induce the “inside-out” signaling process leading to activation of the ligand binding function of integrin αIIbβ3. Ligand binding to integrin αIIbβ3 mediates platelet adhesion and aggregation and triggers “outside-in” signaling, resulting in platelet spreading, additional granule secretion, stabilization of platelet adhesion and aggregation, and clot retraction. It has become increasingly evident that agonist-induced platelet activation signals also crosstalk with integrin “outside-in” signals to regulate platelet responses. Platelet activation involves a series of rapid positive feedback loops that greatly amplify initial activation signals, and enable robust platelet recruitment and thrombus stabilization. Recent studies have provided novel insight into the molecular mechanisms of these processes. PMID:21071698

  11. Impact of non-inhibited platelet supplementation on platelet reactivity in patients treated with prasugrel or ticagrelor for an acute coronary syndrome: An ex vivo study.

    PubMed

    Bonhomme, Fanny; Bonvini, Robert; Reny, Jean-Luc; Poncet, Antoine; Fontana, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Managing bleeding in patients receiving P2Y12 inhibitors is challenging. Few data are available regarding the efficacy of platelet transfusion in patients treated with prasugrel or ticagrelor. The aim of this study was to evaluate the minimal amount of platelet supplementation (in terms of ratio of non-inhibited platelets to inhibited platelets) necessary to restore platelet reactivity in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) of patients treated with aspirin and a prasugrel or ticagrelor loading dose for an acute coronary syndrome. PRP samples from patients were mixed ex vivo with increasing proportions of pooled PRP from healthy volunteers. Platelet reactivity was challenged with adenosine diphosphate (ADP), arachidonic acid, collagen or thrombin receptor activating peptide using light transmission aggregometry. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patient samples recovering an ADP-induced maximal aggregation (ADP-Aggmax) value above 40%. In patients treated with prasugrel (n = 32), ADP-Aggmax increased progressively with supplements of pooled PRP, with an average increase of 7.9% (95% CI [7.1; 8.8], p < 0.001) per each 20% increase in the ratio of non-inhibited platelets to inhibited platelets. A ratio of 60% was associated with 90% of patients reaching the primary endpoint. In patients treated with ticagrelor (n = 15), ADP-Aggmax did not significantly increase with any level of supplements. In conclusions, ex vivo addition of non-inhibited platelets significantly improved ADP-Aggmax in patients treated with prasugrel with a dose-dependent effect. There was no evidence of such a reversal in patients treated with ticagrelor. These results suggest that platelet transfusion may be more effective in blunting bleeding in patients treated with prasugrel, than those treated with ticagrelor. PMID:25905916

  12. Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Activation by Dioxin Targets Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase (PEPCK) for ADP-ribosylation via 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-inducible Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase (TiPARP)*

    PubMed Central

    Diani-Moore, Silvia; Zhang, Sheng; Ram, Payal; Rifkind, Arleen B.

    2013-01-01

    Effects of the environmental toxin and carcinogen 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD, dioxin) include a wasting syndrome associated with decreased gluconeogenesis. TCDD is a potent activator of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), a ligand activated transcription factor. The relationship between gene activation by the AHR and TCDD toxicities is not well understood. We recently identified a pathway by which the AHR target gene TiPARP (TCDD-inducible poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase) contributes to TCDD suppression of transcription of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), a key regulator of gluconeogenesis, by consuming NAD+ and decreasing Sirtuin 1 activation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC1α), a transcriptional activator of PEPCK. We report here that TCDD-induced TiPARP also targets PEPCK for ADP-ribosylation. Both cytosolic and mitochondrial forms of PEPCK were found to undergo ADP-ribosylation. Unexpectedly, AHR suppression also enhanced ADP-ribosylation and did so by a poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-independent mechanism. This report 1) identifies ADP-ribosylation as a new posttranslational modification for PEPCK, 2) describes a pathway by which transcriptional induction of TiPARP by the AHR can lead to a downstream posttranslational change in a TCDD target protein (PEPCK), and 3) reveals that the AHR exerts complex, previously unidentified modulatory effects on ADP-ribosylation. PMID:23770670

  13. [Mechanism of cooked blanched garlic leaves against platelet aggregation].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xin-Hua; Di, Yan-Hui

    2014-06-01

    This study was purposed to explore the mechanism of cooked blanched garlic leave juice against platelet aggregation. The juice of blanched garlic leaves was mixed with platelet rich plasma (PRP), the human platelet aggregation, the activation of human platelets induced by adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and collagen were observed; the expression levels of the activated platelets (Fib-R) and P-selectin (CD62P), and the amount of platelet fibrinogen binding were detected by flow cytometry; 10 rabbits were randomly divided into two groups, in addition to the normal diet, they were fed with physiologic saline and cooked blanched garlic leave juice respectively. After 1, 3, 5 , 8 weeks, the maximum ratio of rabbit platelet aggregation induced by ADP and collagen were observed . The results showed that the cooked blanched garlic leave juice could significantly inhibit human platelet aggregation induced by ADP and collagen (P < 0.05), the inhibitory ratio were 87.37% and 86.24% respectively; the juice could not inhibit activated platelets Fib-R and CD62P expression levels (P > 0.05), but was able to inhibit platelet fibrinogen binding capacity (P < 0.05); the rabbit platelet aggregation rate in the group given cooked blanched garlic leave juice was significantly lower than that in control group (P < 0.05). It is concluded that the cooked blanched garlic leave juice can inhibit platelet aggregation in vitro and in vivo, the inhibition of aggregation pathway mainly is blocking the combination of fibrinogen with Fib-R, which finally results in the inhibition of platelet aggregation. Therefore, regular consumption of cooked blanched garlic leaves may prevent cardiovascular thrombotic diseases. PMID:24989289

  14. Mediation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1-dependent cell death by apoptosis-inducing factor.

    PubMed

    Yu, Seong-Woon; Wang, Hongmin; Poitras, Marc F; Coombs, Carmen; Bowers, William J; Federoff, Howard J; Poirier, Guy G; Dawson, Ted M; Dawson, Valina L

    2002-07-12

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) protects the genome by functioning in the DNA damage surveillance network. PARP-1 is also a mediator of cell death after ischemia-reperfusion injury, glutamate excitotoxicity, and various inflammatory processes. We show that PARP-1 activation is required for translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) from the mitochondria to the nucleus and that AIF is necessary for PARP-1-dependent cell death. N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, H2O2, and N-methyl-d-aspartate induce AIF translocation and cell death, which is prevented by PARP inhibitors or genetic knockout of PARP-1, but is caspase independent. Microinjection of an antibody to AIF protects against PARP-1-dependent cytotoxicity. These data support a model in which PARP-1 activation signals AIF release from mitochondria, resulting in a caspase-independent pathway of programmed cell death. PMID:12114629

  15. Loss of the Mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase, Tiparp, Increases Sensitivity to Dioxin-induced Steatohepatitis and Lethality*

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Shaimaa; Bott, Debbie; Gomez, Alvin; Tamblyn, Laura; Rasheed, Adil; Cho, Tiffany; MacPherson, Laura; Sugamori, Kim S.; Yang, Yang; Grant, Denis M.; Cummins, Carolyn L.; Matthews, Jason

    2015-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) mediates the toxic effects of the environmental contaminant dioxin (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin; TCDD). Dioxin causes a range of toxic responses, including hepatic damage, steatohepatitis, and a lethal wasting syndrome; however, the mechanisms are still unknown. Here, we show that the loss of TCDD-inducible poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (Tiparp), an ADP-ribosyltransferase and AHR repressor, increases sensitivity to dioxin-induced toxicity, steatohepatitis, and lethality. Tiparp−/− mice given a single injection of 100 μg/kg dioxin did not survive beyond day 5; all Tiparp+/+ mice survived the 30-day treatment. Dioxin-treated Tiparp−/− mice exhibited increased liver steatosis and hepatotoxicity. Tiparp ADP-ribosylated AHR but not its dimerization partner, the AHR nuclear translocator, and the repressive effects of TIPARP on AHR were reversed by the macrodomain containing mono-ADP-ribosylase MACROD1 but not MACROD2. These results reveal previously unidentified roles for Tiparp, MacroD1, and ADP-ribosylation in AHR-mediated steatohepatitis and lethality in response to dioxin. PMID:25975270

  16. In vitro effects of ethanol on the pathways of platelet aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Rand, M.L.; Kinlough-Rathbone, R.L.; Packham, M.A.; Mustard, J.F.

    1986-03-01

    Ethanol is reported to inhibit platelet aggregation in vivo and in vitro, but the mechanisms of its action on stimulus-response coupling in platelets is unknown. Platelet aggregation to thrombin occurs through at least three pathways: released ADP; thromboxane A/sub 2/ (TXA/sub 2/); and a third pathway(s). Aggregation of rabbit platelets in citrated platelet-rich plasma (PRP) or washed suspensions to ADP (0.5-10 ..mu..M) was not affected by ethanol, at concentrations up to 5 mg/ml (lethal). Primary ADP-induced (5 ..mu..M) aggregation of human platelets in PRP was also unaffected by ethanol, but secondary aggregation and release of /sup 14/C-serotonin, due to TXA/sub 2/ formation, was inhibited by ethanol (2 and 4 mg/ml). Since arachidonate (AA)-induced (25-250 ..mu..M) aggregation and release by washed rabbit platelets was unaltered by ethanol, it may inhibit mobilization of AA from platelet membrane phospholipids. Ethanol (2-4 mg/ml) inhibited rabbit platelet aggregation and release to low concentrations of thrombin (< 10 mU/ml) or collagen, and also inhibited aggregation and release of aspirin-treated (500 ..mu.. M) rabbit platelets (that cannot form TXA/sub 2/) to low concentrations of thrombin (< 10 mU/ml). Thus, ethanol does not inhibit the mobilization of AA, and partially inhibits the third pathway(s) of platelet aggregation.

  17. In vitro platelet activation, aggregation and platelet-granulocyte complex formation induced by surface modified single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Fent, János; Bihari, Péter; Vippola, Minnamari; Sarlin, Essi; Lakatos, Susan

    2015-08-01

    Surface modification of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) such as carboxylation, amidation, hydroxylation and pegylation is used to reduce the nanotube toxicity and render them more suitable for biomedical applications than their pristine counterparts. Toxicity can be manifested in platelet activation as it has been shown for SWCNTs. However, the effect of various surface modifications on the platelet activating potential of SWCNTs has not been tested yet. In vitro platelet activation (CD62P) as well as the platelet-granulocyte complex formation (CD15/CD41 double positivity) in human whole blood were measured by flow cytometry in the presence of 0.1mg/ml of pristine or various surface modified SWCNTs. The effect of various SWCNTs was tested by whole blood impedance aggregometry, too. All tested SWCNTs but the hydroxylated ones activate platelets and promote platelet-granulocyte complex formation in vitro. Carboxylated, pegylated and pristine SWCNTs induce whole blood aggregation as well. Although pegylation is preferred from biomedical point of view, among the samples tested by us pegylated SWCNTs induced far the most prominent activation and a well detectable aggregation of platelets in whole blood. PMID:25956790

  18. Platelets are relevant mediators of renal injury induced by primary endothelial lesions.

    PubMed

    Schwarzenberger, Claudia; Sradnick, Jan; Lerea, Kenneth M; Goligorsky, Michael S; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Hugo, Christian P M; Hohenstein, Bernd

    2015-06-01

    Several studies have suggested a prominent (pro)inflammatory and harmful role of platelets in renal disease, and newer work has also demonstrated platelet release of proangiogenic factors. In the present study, we investigated the role of platelets in a mouse model of selective endothelial cell injury using either platelet depletion or the pharmacological P2Y12 receptor blocker clopidogrel as an interventional strategy. The concanavalin A/anti-concanavalin A model was induced in left kidneys of C57bl/6J wild-type mice after initial platelet depletion or platelet-inhibiting therapy using clopidogrel. FACS analysis of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa/P-selectin double-positive platelets and platelet-derived microparticles demonstrated relevant platelet activation after the induction of selective endothelial injury in mice. Enhanced platelet activation persisted for 5 days after disease induction and was accompanied by increased amounts of circulating platelet-derived microparticles as potential mediators of a prolonged procoagulant state. By immunohistochemistry, we detected significantly reduced glomerular injury in platelet-depleted mice compared with control mice. In parallel, we also saw reduced endothelial loss and a consequently reduced repair response as indicated by diminished proliferative activity. The P2Y12 receptor blocker clopidogrel demonstrated efficacy in limiting platelet activation and subsequent endothelial injury in this mouse model of renal microvascular injury. In conclusion, platelets are relevant mediators of renal injury induced by primary endothelial lesions early on, as demonstrated by platelet depletion as well as platelet inhibition via the P2Y12 receptor. While strategies to prevent platelet-endothelial interactions have shown protective effects, the contribution of platelets during renal regeneration remains unknown. PMID:25834071

  19. Platelets are relevant mediators of renal injury induced by primary endothelial lesions

    PubMed Central

    Schwarzenberger, Claudia; Sradnick, Jan; Lerea, Kenneth M.; Goligorsky, Michael S.; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Hugo, Christian P. M.

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have suggested a prominent (pro)inflammatory and harmful role of platelets in renal disease, and newer work has also demonstrated platelet release of proangiogenic factors. In the present study, we investigated the role of platelets in a mouse model of selective endothelial cell injury using either platelet depletion or the pharmacological P2Y12 receptor blocker clopidogrel as an interventional strategy. The concanavalin A/anti-concanavalin A model was induced in left kidneys of C57bl/6J wild-type mice after initial platelet depletion or platelet-inhibiting therapy using clopidogrel. FACS analysis of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa/P-selectin double-positive platelets and platelet-derived microparticles demonstrated relevant platelet activation after the induction of selective endothelial injury in mice. Enhanced platelet activation persisted for 5 days after disease induction and was accompanied by increased amounts of circulating platelet-derived microparticles as potential mediators of a prolonged procoagulant state. By immunohistochemistry, we detected significantly reduced glomerular injury in platelet-depleted mice compared with control mice. In parallel, we also saw reduced endothelial loss and a consequently reduced repair response as indicated by diminished proliferative activity. The P2Y12 receptor blocker clopidogrel demonstrated efficacy in limiting platelet activation and subsequent endothelial injury in this mouse model of renal microvascular injury. In conclusion, platelets are relevant mediators of renal injury induced by primary endothelial lesions early on, as demonstrated by platelet depletion as well as platelet inhibition via the P2Y12 receptor. While strategies to prevent platelet-endothelial interactions have shown protective effects, the contribution of platelets during renal regeneration remains unknown. PMID:25834071

  20. Nucleolin Down-Regulation Is Involved in ADP-Induced Cell Cycle Arrest in S Phase and Cell Apoptosis in Vascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenmeng; Luo, Junqing; Xiang, Fang; Liu, Xueting; Jiang, Manli; Liao, Lingjuan; Hu, Jinyue

    2014-01-01

    High concentration of extracellular ADP has been reported to induce cell apoptosis, but the molecular mechanisms remain not fully elucidated. In this study, we found by serendipity that ADP treatment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) down-regulated the protein level of nucleolin in a dose- and time-dependent manner. ADP treatment did not decrease the transcript level of nucloelin, suggesting that ADP might induce nucleolin protein degradation. HUVEC and HAEC expressed ADP receptor P2Y13 receptor, but did not express P2Y1 or P2Y12 receptors. However, P2Y1, 12, 13 receptor antagonists MRS2179, PSB0739, MRS2211 did not inhibit ADP-induced down-regulation of nucleolin. Moreover, MRS2211 itself down-regulated nucleolin protein level. In addition, 2-MeSADP, an agonist for P2Y1, 12 and 13 receptors, did not down-regulate nucleolin protein. These results suggested that ADP-induced nucleolin down-regulation was not due to the activation of P2Y1, 12, or 13 receptors. We also found that ADP treatment induced cell cycle arrest in S phase, cell apoptosis and cell proliferation inhibition via nucleolin down-regulation. The over-expression of nucleolin by gene transfer partly reversed ADP-induced cell cycle arrest, cell apoptosis and cell proliferation inhibition. Furthermore, ADP sensitized HUVEC to cisplatin-induced cell death by the down-regulation of Bcl-2 expression. Taken together, we found, for the first time to our knowledge, a novel mechanism by which ADP regulates cell proliferation by induction of cell cycle arrest and cell apoptosis via targeting nucelolin. PMID:25290311

  1. Nucleolin down-regulation is involved in ADP-induced cell cycle arrest in S phase and cell apoptosis in vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenmeng; Luo, Junqing; Xiang, Fang; Liu, Xueting; Jiang, Manli; Liao, Lingjuan; Hu, Jinyue

    2014-01-01

    High concentration of extracellular ADP has been reported to induce cell apoptosis, but the molecular mechanisms remain not fully elucidated. In this study, we found by serendipity that ADP treatment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) down-regulated the protein level of nucleolin in a dose- and time-dependent manner. ADP treatment did not decrease the transcript level of nucloelin, suggesting that ADP might induce nucleolin protein degradation. HUVEC and HAEC expressed ADP receptor P2Y13 receptor, but did not express P2Y1 or P2Y12 receptors. However, P2Y1, 12, 13 receptor antagonists MRS2179, PSB0739, MRS2211 did not inhibit ADP-induced down-regulation of nucleolin. Moreover, MRS2211 itself down-regulated nucleolin protein level. In addition, 2-MeSADP, an agonist for P2Y1, 12 and 13 receptors, did not down-regulate nucleolin protein. These results suggested that ADP-induced nucleolin down-regulation was not due to the activation of P2Y1, 12, or 13 receptors. We also found that ADP treatment induced cell cycle arrest in S phase, cell apoptosis and cell proliferation inhibition via nucleolin down-regulation. The over-expression of nucleolin by gene transfer partly reversed ADP-induced cell cycle arrest, cell apoptosis and cell proliferation inhibition. Furthermore, ADP sensitized HUVEC to cisplatin-induced cell death by the down-regulation of Bcl-2 expression. Taken together, we found, for the first time to our knowledge, a novel mechanism by which ADP regulates cell proliferation by induction of cell cycle arrest and cell apoptosis via targeting nucelolin. PMID:25290311

  2. (N)-methanocarba-2MeSADP (MRS2365) is a subtype-specific agonist that induces rapid desensitization of the P2Y1 receptor of human platelets

    PubMed Central

    Bourdon, D. M.; Mahanty, S. K.; Jacobson, K. A.; Boyer, J. L.; Harden, T. K.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Adenosine diphosphate (ADP) initiates and maintains sustained aggregation of platelets through simultaneous activation of both the Gq-coupled P2Y1 receptor and the Gi-coupled P2Y12 receptor. We recently described the synthesis and P2Y1 receptor-specific agonist activity of (N)-methano-carba-2MeSADP (MRS2365). Consequences of selective activation of the P2Y1 receptor by MRS2365 have been further examined in human platelets. Whereas MRS2365 alone only induced shape change, addition of MRS2365 following epinephrine treatment, which activates the Gi/z-linked, α2A-adrenergic receptor, resulted in sustained aggregation that was indistinguishable from that observed with ADP. Conversely, the platelet shape change promoted by ADP in the presence of the GPIIb/IIIa antagonist eptifibatide was similar to that promoted by MRS2365. Preaddition of the high affinity P2Y1 receptor antagonist MRS2500 inhibited the effect of MRS2365, whereas addition of MRS2500 subsequent to MRS2365 reversed the MRS2365-induced shape change. Preactivation of the P2Y1 receptor with MRS2365 for 2 min resulted in marked loss of capacity of ADP to induce aggregation as evidenced by a greater than 20-fold rightward shift in the concentration effect curve of ADP. This inhibitory effect of P2Y1 receptor activation was dependent on the concentration of MRS2365 (EC50 = 34 nM). The inhibitory effect of preincubation with MRS2365 was circumvented by activation of the Gq-coupled 5-HT2a receptor suggesting that MRS2365 induces loss of the ADP response as a consequence of desensitization of the Gq-coupled P2Y1 receptor. The time course of MRS2365-induced loss of aggregation response to epinephrine was similar to that observed with ADP. These results further demonstrate the P2Y1 receptor selectivity of MRS2365 and illustrate the occurrence of agonist-induced desensitization of the P2Y1 receptor of human platelets studied in the absence of P2Y12 receptor activation. PMID:16634757

  3. Protease Activated Receptor-1 (PAR-1) Mediated Platelet Aggregation is Dependant on Clopidogrel Response

    PubMed Central

    Kreutz, Rolf P.; Breall, Jeffrey A.; Kreutz, Yvonne; Owens, Janelle; Lu, Deshun; Bolad, Islam; von der Lohe, Elisabeth; Sinha, Anjan; Flockhart, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Clopidogrel inhibits ADP mediated platelet aggregation through inhibition of the P2Y12 receptor by its active metabolite. Thrombin induces platelet aggregation by binding to protease activated receptor-1 (PAR-1), and inhibition of PAR-1 has been evaluated in patients treated with clopidogrel to reduce ischemic events after acute coronary syndromes. Residual PAR-1 mediated platelet aggregation may be dependent on extent of clopidogrel response. Material and Methods Platelet aggregation was measured in 55 patients undergoing elective PCI at 16-24 hours after 600mg clopidogrel loading dose by light transmittance aggregometry using ADP 20μM and thrombin receptor agonist peptide (TRAP) at 15 μM and 25 μM as agonists. Genomic DNA was genotyped for common CYP2C19 variants. Results Increasing quartiles of 20 μM ADP induced platelet aggregation after clopidogrel loading were associated with increasing levels of TRAP mediated platelet aggregation. Patients in the highest quartile (clopidogrel non-responders) of post treatment ADP aggregation had significantly higher TRAP mediated aggregation than the patients in the lowest quartile (clopidogrel responders) [TRAP 15 μM: 79.6±5% vs. 69.5±8%, p<0.001]. Conclusions Non-responders to clopidogrel show increased residual platelet aggregation induced by TRAP, whereas clopidogrel responders exhibit attenuated response to TRAP. Addition of PAR-1 antiplatelet drugs may be most effective in patients with reduced clopidogrel response and high residual TRAP mediated platelet aggregation. PMID:22459907

  4. Platelet size and density affect shear-induced thrombus formation in tortuous arterioles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chesnutt, Jennifer K. W.; Han, Hai-Chao

    2013-10-01

    Thrombosis accounts for 80% of deaths in patients with diabetes mellitus. Diabetic patients demonstrate tortuous microvessels and larger than normal platelets. Large platelets are associated with increased platelet activation and thrombosis, but the physical effects of large platelets in the microscale processes of thrombus formation are not clear. Therefore, the objective of this study was to determine the physical effects of mean platelet volume (MPV), mean platelet density (MPD) and vessel tortuosity on platelet activation and thrombus formation in tortuous arterioles. A computational model of the transport, shear-induced activation, collision, adhesion and aggregation of individual platelets was used to simulate platelet interactions and thrombus formation in tortuous arterioles. Our results showed that an increase in MPV resulted in a larger number of activated platelets, though MPD and level of tortuosity made little difference on platelet activation. Platelets with normal MPD yielded the lowest amount of mural thrombus. With platelets of normal MPD, the amount of mural thrombus decreased with increasing level of tortuosity but did not have a simple monotonic relationship with MPV. The physical mechanisms associated with MPV, MPD and arteriole tortuosity play important roles in platelet activation and thrombus formation.

  5. Impaired platelet activation and cAMP homeostasis in MRP4-deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Decouture, Benoit; Dreano, Elise; Belleville-Rolland, Tiphaine; Kuci, Orjeta; Dizier, Blandine; Bazaa, Amine; Coqueran, Bérard; Lompre, Anne-Marie; Denis, Cécile V.; Hulot, Jean-Sébastien; Gaussem, Pascale

    2015-01-01

    Molecules that reduce the level of cyclic adenosine 5′-monophosphate (cAMP) in the platelet cytosol, such as adenosine 5′-diphosphate (ADP) secreted from dense granules, trigger platelet activation. Therefore, any change in the distribution and/or availability of cyclic nucleotides or ADP may interfere with platelet reactivity. In this study, we evaluated the role of multidrug resistance protein 4 (MRP4, or ABCC4), a nucleotide transporter, in platelet functions in vivo and in vitro by investigating MRP4-deficient mice. MRP4 deletion resulted in a slight increase in platelet count but had no impact on platelet ultrastructure. In MRP4-deficient mice, the arterial occlusion was delayed and the tail bleeding time was prolonged. In a model of platelet depletion and transfusion mimicking a platelet-specific knockout, mice injected with MRP4−/− platelets also showed a significant increase in blood loss compared with mice injected with wild-type platelets. Defective thrombus formation and platelet activation were confirmed in vitro by studying platelet adhesion to collagen in flow conditions, integrin αIIbβ3 activation, washed platelet secretion, and aggregation induced by low concentrations of proteinase-activated receptor 4–activating peptide, U46619, or ADP. We found no role of MRP4 in ADP dense-granule storage, but MRP4 redistributed cAMP from the cytosol to dense granules, as confirmed by increased vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein phosphorylation in MRP4-deficient platelets. These data suggest that MRP4 promotes platelet aggregation by modulating the cAMP–protein kinase A signaling pathway, suggesting that MRP4 might serve as a target for novel antiplatelet agents. PMID:26316625

  6. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 and apoptosis inducing factor in neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Yu, Seong-Woon; Wang, Hongmin; Dawson, Ted M; Dawson, Valina L

    2003-12-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is the guardian of the genome acting as a sentinel for genomic damage. However, PARP-1 is also mediator of cell death after ischemia-reperfusion injury, glutamate excitotoxicity, and various inflammatory processes. The biochemistry underlying PARP-1-mediated cell death has remained elusive, although NAD(+) consumption and energy failure have been thought to be one of the possible molecular mechanisms. Recent observations link PARP-1 activation with translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) to the nucleus and indicate that AIF is an essential downstream effector of PARP-1-mediated cell death. PARP-1 activation signals AIF release from the mitochondria, resulting in a novel, caspase-independent pathway of programmed cell death. These recent findings suggest that AIF maybe a target for development of future therapeutic treatment for many neurological disorders involving excitotoxicity. PMID:14678748

  7. Enhanced platelet reactivity in pediatric depression: an observational study.

    PubMed

    Can, Mehmet M; Guler, Gamze; Guler, Ekrem; Ozveren, Olcay; Turan, Burak; DiNicolantinio, James J; Kipshidze, Nodar; Serebruany, Victor

    2015-10-01

    Depression is associated with poor prognosis for cardiovascular disease (CVD) including mortality. Among multiple mechanisms linking depression and CVD, changes in platelet reactivity are known to be one of the major confounders of such adverse association. However, there are very limited data in children. Thus, we evaluated some conventional hemostatic indices including whole blood platelet aggregation in patients with documented pediatric depression and compared these data with those obtained from healthy children. The pediatric patients fulfilled criteria for major depression with a minimum score of 19 on the 21-item Beck Depression Inventory Scale. Plasma fibrinogen, D-dimer, platelet count, mean platelet volume, and platelet aggregation induced by ADP and collagen were measured in 67 pediatric patients with depression and matched by age and sex with 78 healthy controls. As expected, the depressed children had significantly higher BECK scales (P = 0.001) compared with the normal subjects. Platelet aggregation induced by ADP and collagen (P = 0.0001 for both) was significantly higher in depressed children. BECK scale scores correlated significantly with platelet aggregation induced by ADP (r = 0.3, P = 0.001) and collagen (r = 0.4, P = 0.01). In contrast, platelet counts, fibrinogen, D-dimer, mean platelet volume, and antithrombin-III levels were almost identical between both groups. Children with depression exhibit mostly intact hemostatic parameters, with the exception of significantly higher platelet activity when compared with healthy controls. These data match well with prior evidence from depressed adults supporting the hypothesis that platelets participate in the pathogenesis of depression. However, beyond pure assessment of platelet activity, other elements including serotonin content and cell receptor changes in pediatric depression should be elucidated before randomized trial(s) can be justified. PMID:25688456

  8. Comparative evaluation of antiplatelet effect of lycopene with aspirin and the effect of their combination on platelet aggregation: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Sawardekar, Swapna B.; Patel, Tejal C.; Uchil, Dinesh

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The objective was to compare antiplatelet effect of lycopene with aspirin and to study effect of combination of the two on platelet aggregation in vitro, using platelets from healthy volunteers. Materials and Methods: Platelets were harvested; platelet count of platelet-rich plasma adjusted to 2.5 Χ 105/μL. Aspirin (140 μmol/L) and lycopene (4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 μmol/L) were studied in vitro against adenosine-5’- diphosphate (ADP) (2.5 μM/L) and collagen Results: All the concentrations of lycopene (4–12 μmol/L) exhibited reduction in maximum platelet aggregation induced by aggregating agents ADP and collagen (P < 0.01 vs. vehicle) and were comparable with aspirin. Lycopene at concentration 10 μmol/L showed maximum platelet inhibition (47.05% ± 19.56%) against ADP, whereas lycopene at concentration 8 μmol/L showed maximum platelet inhibition (54.26% ± 30.71%) against collagen. Four μmol/L of lycopene combined with 140 μmol/L and 70 μmol/L aspirin showed greater inhibition of platelets as compared to aspirin 140 μmol/L alone, against both ADP and collagen. Conclusion: The study favorably compares lycopene and aspirin with respect to their antiplatelet activities against ADP and collagen. Lycopene can be considered as a potential target for modifying the thrombotic and pro-inflammatory events associated with platelet activation. PMID:26997718

  9. Mechanisms of andrographolide-induced platelet apoptosis in human platelets: regulatory roles of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway.

    PubMed

    Lien, Li-Ming; Su, Cheng-Chen; Hsu, Wen-Hsien; Lu, Wan-Jung; Chung, Chi-Li; Yen, Ting-Lin; Chiu, Hou-Chang; Sheu, Joen-Rong; Lin, Kuan-Hung

    2013-11-01

    Andrographolide, a novel nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) inhibitor, is isolated from the leaves of Andrographis paniculata. Platelet activation is relevant to a variety of coronary heart diseases. Our recent studies revealed that andrographolide possesses potent antiplatelet activity by inhibition of the p38 MAPK/(●) HO-NF-κB-ERK2 cascade. Although platelets are anucleated cells, apoptotic machinery apparatus recently has been found to regulate platelet activation and limit platelet lifespan. Therefore, we further investigated the regulatory effects of andrographolide on platelet apoptotic events. In this study, apoptotic signaling events for caspase-3, -8, and Bid were time (10-60 min)- and dose (25-100 μΜ)-dependently activated by andrographolide in human platelets. Andrographolide could also disrupt mitrochondrial membrane potential. In addition, caspase-8 inhibitor (z-IETD-fmk, 50 μΜ) was found to reverse andrographolide-induced caspase-8 activation, whereas the antagonistic anti-Fas receptor (ZB4, 500 ng/mL) and anti-tumor necrosis factor-R1 (H398, 10 µg/mL) monoclonal antibodies did not. In conclusion, this study for the first time demonstrated that andrographolide might limit platelet lifespan by initiating the caspase-8-dependent extrinsic apoptotic pathway, in spite of no direct evidence that death receptors are involved in this process proved. Overall, the various medicinal properties of andrographolide suggest its potential value in treating patients with thromboembolic disorders. PMID:23292890

  10. Hormonal contraception and platelet function.

    PubMed

    Saleh, A A; Ginsburg, K A; Duchon, T A; Dorey, L G; Hirata, J; Alshameeri, R S; Dombrowski, M P; Mammen, E F

    1995-05-15

    73 healthy women (29 controls, 25 using OCs, and 19 using Norplant) were selected from the clinic population at North Oakland Medical Center for inclusion in this study after obtaining informed consent. Age, race, height, weight, blood pressure, and cigarette smoking were recorded for each subject. 12 patients were on monophasic OCs while 13 were on triphasic preparations. Both hormonal contraceptive groups had used their particular contraceptive for at least 3 months prior to blood drawing. Platelet tests were performed within 2 hours of sample collection: platelet counts (PLC) and mean platelet volume (MPV) were determined on an Automated Platelet Counter (Baker 810 Platelet Analyzer). Whole blood aggregation was performed on a platelet aggregometer (Chrono-Log, Model 550) using both ADP (ADP, 5 mM) and collagen (COLL, 2 mcg/ml) as inducing agents. Demographic differences were not significant (p 0.05) among the 3 treatment groups, whose average age was 25.3-25.8 years old. Furthermore, no significant differences (p 0.05) in platelet function were detected among controls or subjects receiving either oral contraceptives or Norplant, compared to control patients. The mean platelet counts (X 10/9/L) were 223 for OC users, 231 for Norplant users, and 232 for controls. The respective platelet aggregation (ADP, ohms) values were 12.5, 18.0, and 19.2 as well as (COLL, ohms) 35.6, 40.7, and 39.0. These results demonstrated that there is no evidence for altered platelet function, with the testing methods employed, in women using either Norplant or combination low dose oral contraceptives. To date, several studies have examined this issue, with contradictory reports about the effects of hormonal contraceptives in platelet function. After controlling for differences between various steroid preparations and other such confounding variables, some of these conflicting conclusions could be the result of a lack of uniformity among the methods used to evaluate platelet aggregation

  11. Antipsychotic Drugs Inhibit Platelet Aggregation via P2Y1 and P2Y12 Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chang-Chieh; Tsai, Fu-Ming; Chen, Mao-Liang; Wu, Semon; Lee, Ming-Cheng; Tsai, Tzung-Chieh; Wang, Lu-Kai; Wang, Chun-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Antipsychotic drugs (APDs) used to treat clinical psychotic syndromes cause a variety of blood dyscrasias. APDs suppress the aggregation of platelets; however, the underlying mechanism remains unknown. We first analyzed platelet aggregation and clot formation in platelets treated with APDs, risperidone, clozapine, or haloperidol, using an aggregometer and rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM). Our data indicated that platelet aggregation was inhibited, that clot formation time was increased, and that clot firmness was decreased in platelets pretreated with APDs. We also examined the role two major adenosine diphosphate (ADP) receptors, P2Y1 and P2Y12, play in ADP-mediated platelet activation and APD-mediated suppression of platelet aggregation. Our results show that P2Y1 receptor stimulation with ADP-induced calcium influx was inhibited by APDs in human and rats' platelets, as assessed by in vitro or ex vivo approach, respectively. In contrast, APDs, risperidone and clozapine, alleviated P2Y12-mediated cAMP suppression, and the release of thromboxane A2 and arachidonic acid by activated platelets decreased after APD treatment in human and rats' platelets. Our data demonstrate that each APD tested significantly suppressed platelet aggregation via different mechanisms. PMID:27069920

  12. Natriuretic peptides induce weak VASP phosphorylation at Serine 239 in platelets

    PubMed Central

    Borgognone, Alessandra; Lowe, Kate L; Watson, Stephen P; Madhani, Melanie

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic guanosine-3′,5′-monophoshate (cGMP) is the common second messenger for the cardiovascular effects of nitric oxide (NO) and natriuretic peptides (NP; for example, atrial natriuretic peptide [ANP]), which activate soluble and particulate guanylyl cyclases (sGC and pGC), respectively. The role of NO in regulating cGMP and platelet function is well documented, whereas there is little evidence supporting a role for NPs in regulating platelet reactivity. By studying platelet aggregation and secretion in response to a PAR-1 peptide, collagen and ADP, and phosphorylation of the cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) substrate VASP at serine 239, we evaluated the effects of NPs in the absence or presence of the non-selective cGMP and cAMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitor, 3-isobutyl-1-methylanxthine (IBMX). Our results show that NPs, possibly through the clearance receptor (natriuretic peptide receptor-C, NPR-C) expressed on platelet membranes, increase VASP phosphorylation but only following PDE inhibition, indicating a small, localised cGMP synthesis. As platelet aggregation and secretion measured under the same conditions were not affected, we conclude that the magnitude of PKG activation achieved by NPs in platelets per se is not sufficient to exert functional inhibition of platelet involvement in haemostasis. PMID:23469931

  13. Analysis of Shear-Induced Platelet Aggregation and Breakup.

    PubMed

    Hellmuth, Rudolf; Bruzzi, Mark S; Quinlan, Nathan J

    2016-04-01

    To better understand the mechanisms leading to the formation of thrombi of hazardous sizes in the bulk of the blood, we have developed a kinetic model of shear-induced platelet aggregation (SIPA). In our model, shear rate regulates a mass-conservative population balance equation which computes the aggregation and disaggregation of platelets in a cluster mass distribution. Aggregation is modeled by the Smoluchowski coagulation equation, and disaggregation is incorporated using the aggregate breakup model of Pandya and Spielman. Previous experimental data for SIPA have been correlated with a special case of this model where only the two-body collision of free platelets was considered. However, the two-body collision theory is oblivious to the steady-state condition, and it required the use of a shear-dependent aggregation efficiency parameter to fit it to experimental data. Our method not only predicts steady states but also correlates with literature data without employing a shear-dependent aggregation efficiency. PMID:26228488

  14. [STRUCTURAL CHARACTERIZATION OF PLATELETS AND PLATELET-DERIVED MICROVESICLES].

    PubMed

    Ponomareva, A A; Nevzorova, T A; Mordakhanova, E R; Andrianova, I A; Litvinov, R I

    2016-01-01

    Platelets are the anucleated blood cells, wich together with the fibrin stop bleeding (hemostasis). Cellular microvesicles are membrane-surrounded microparticles released into extracellular space upon activation and/or apoptosis of various cells. Platelet-derived macrovesicles from the major population of circulating blood microparticles that play an important role in hemostasis and thrombosis. Despite numerous studies on the pathophysiology of platelet-derived macrovesicles, mechanisms of their formation and structural details remain poorly understood. Here we investigated the ultrastructure of parental platelets and platelet-derived microvesicles formed in vitro by quiescent cells as well as by cells stimulated with one of the following activators: arachidonic acid, ADP, thrombin, calcium ionophore A23187. Using transmission electron microscopy of human platelets and isolated microvesicles, we analyzed the intracellular origin, steps of formation, structural diversity, and size distributions of the subcellular particles. We have revealed that thrombin, unlike other stimuli, not only induced vesiculation of the plasma membrane but also caused break-up of the cells followed by formation of microparticles that are comparable with microvesicles by size. A fraction of these microparticles contained cellular organelles surrounded by a thin membrane. The size of platelet-derived macrovesicles varied from 30 nm to 500 nm, however, the size distributions depended on the nature of a cell-activating stimulus. The results obtained provide new information about the formation of platelet-derived macrovesicles and their structural diversity, wich is important to understand their multiple functions in normal and disease states. PMID:27228656

  15. Poly (ADP-Ribose) Polymerase Mediates Diabetes-Induced Retinal Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad, Ghulam; Siddiquei, Mohammad Mairaj

    2013-01-01

    Retinal neuropathy is an early event in the development of diabetic retinopathy. One of the potential enzymes that are activated by oxidative stress in the diabetic retina is poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). We investigated the effect of the PARP inhibitor 1,5-isoquinolinediol on the expression of the neurodegeneration mediators and markers in the retinas of diabetic rats. After two weeks of streptozotocin-induced diabetes, rats were treated with 1,5-isoquinolinediol (3 mg/kg/day). After 4 weeks of diabetes, the retinas were harvested and the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were determined fluorometrically and the expressions of PARP, phosporylated-ERK1/2, BDNF, synaptophysin, glutamine synthetase (GS), and caspase-3 were determined by Western blot analysis. Retinal levels of ROS, PARP-1/2, phosphorylated ERK1/2, and cleaved caspase-3 were significantly increased, whereas the expressions of BDNF synaptophysin and GS were significantly decreased in the retinas of diabetic rats, compared to nondiabetic rats. Administration of 1,5-isoquinolinediol did not affect the metabolic status of the diabetic rats, but it significantly attenuated diabetes-induced upregulation of PARP, ROS, ERK1/2 phosphorylation, and cleaved caspase-3 and downregulation of BDNF, synaptophysin, and GS. These findings suggest a beneficial effect of the PARP inhibitor in increasing neurotrophic support and ameliorating early retinal neuropathy induced by diabetes. PMID:24347828

  16. Ovine platelet function is unaffected by extracorporeal membrane oxygenation within the first 24 h.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Rylan A; Foley, Samuel; Shekar, Kiran; Diab, Sara; Dunster, Kimble R; McDonald, Charles; Fraser, John F

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated platelet dysfunction during short-term extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) and secondarily to determine if hyperoxaemia contributes to this dysfunction. Healthy sheep were anaesthetized and maintained on ECMO for either 2 or 24 h, with or without induction of smoke inhalation acute lung injury. A specialized animal-operating theatre was used to conduct the experimentation. Forty-three healthy female sheep were randomized into either a test or a control group. Following anaesthesia, test groups received ECMO ± smoke inhalation acute lung injury (SALI), whereas control groups were maintained with ventilation only ± SALI. Physiological, biochemical and coagulation data were obtained throughout via continuous monitoring and blood sampling. Platelet function was quantified through whole blood impedance aggregometry using Multiplate. Ovine platelet activity induced by adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and collagen was unaffected during the first 24 h of ECMO. However, progressive divergence of ADP-induced platelet activity was noted at cessation of the experiment. PaO2 was inversely related to ADP-dependent platelet activity in the ECMO groups--a relationship not identified in the control groups. ADP and collagen-dependent platelet activity are not significantly affected within the first 24 h of ECMO in sheep. However, dysfunction in ADP-dependent platelet activity may have continued to develop if observed beyond 24 h. Hyperoxaemia during ECMO does appear to affect how platelets react to ADP and may contribute to this developing dysfunction. Long-term animal models and investigation in clinical animals are warranted to fully investigate platelet function during ECMO. PMID:26196193

  17. Lactodifucotetraose, a human milk oligosaccharide, attenuates platelet function and inflammatory cytokine release.

    PubMed

    Newburg, David S; Tanritanir, Ayse C; Chakrabarti, Subrata

    2016-07-01

    Human milk strongly quenches inflammatory processes in vitro, and breastfed infants have lower incidence of inflammatory diseases than those fed artificially. Platelets from neonates, in contrast to those from adults, are less responsive to platelet agonists such as collagen, thrombin, ADP, and epinephrine. Breastfed infants absorb oligosaccharides intact from the human milk in their gut to the circulation. This study was to determine whether these oligosaccharides can attenuate platelet function and platelet secretion of pro-inflammatory proteins, and to identify the active component. The natural mixture of oligosaccharides from human milk and pure individual human milk oligosaccharides were tested for their ability to modulate responses of platelets isolated from human blood following exposure to thrombin, ADP, and collagen. Human milk and the natural mixture of human milk oligosaccharides inhibited platelet release of inflammatory proteins. Of the purified human milk oligosaccharides tested, only lactodifucotetraose (LDFT) significantly inhibited thrombin induced release of the pro-inflammatory proteins RANTES and sCD40L. LDFT also inhibited platelet adhesion to a collagen-coated surface, as well as platelet aggregation induced by ADP or collagen. These data indicate that LDFT may help modulate hemostasis by suppressing platelet-induced inflammatory processes in breastfed infants. This activity suggests further study of LDFT for its potential as a therapeutic agent in infants and adults. PMID:26743063

  18. Anti-platelet activity of a three-finger toxin (3FTx) from Indian monocled cobra (Naja kaouthia) venom.

    PubMed

    Chanda, Chandrasekhar; Sarkar, Angshuman; Sistla, Srinivas; Chakrabarty, Dibakar

    2013-11-22

    A low molecular weight anti-platelet peptide (6.9 kDa) has been purified from Naja kaouthia venom and was named KT-6.9. MALDI-TOF/TOF mass spectrometry analysis revealed the homology of KT-6.9 peptide sequence with many three finger toxin family members. KT-6.9 inhibited human platelet aggregation process in a dose dependent manner. It has inhibited ADP, thrombin and arachidonic acid induced platelet aggregation process in dose dependent manner, but did not inhibit collagen and ristocetin induced platelet aggregation. Strong inhibition (70%) of the ADP induced platelet aggregation by KT-6.9 suggests competition with ADP for its receptors on platelet surface. Anti-platelet activity of KT-6.9 was found to be 25 times stronger than that of anti-platelet drug clopidogrel. Binding of KT-6.9 to platelet surface was confirmed by surface plasma resonance analysis using BIAcore X100. Binding was also observed by a modified sandwich ELISA method using anti-KT-6.9 antibodies. KT-6.9 is probably the first 3 FTx from Indian monocled cobra venom reported as a platelet aggregation inhibitor. PMID:24183721

  19. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 protects from oxidative stress induced endothelial dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Gebhard, Catherine; Staehli, Barbara E.; Shi, Yi; Camici, Giovanni G.; Akhmedov, Alexander; Hoegger, Lisa; Lohmann, Christine; Matter, Christian M.; Hassa, Paul O.; Hottiger, Michael O.; Malinski, Tadeusz; Luescher, Thomas F.; and others

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nuclear enzyme PARP-1 is a downstream effector of oxidative stress. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PARP-1 protects from oxidative stress induced endothelial dysfunction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This effect is mediated through inhibition of vasoconstrictor prostanoid production. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thus, PARP-1 may play a protective role as antioxidant defense mechanism. -- Abstract: Background: Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a key feature of vascular disease. Activation of the nuclear enzyme poly (adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is a downstream effector of oxidative stress. Methods: PARP-1(-/-) and PARP-1(+/+) mice were injected with paraquat (PQ; 10 mg/kg i.p.) to induce intracellular oxidative stress. Aortic rings were suspended in organ chambers for isometric tension recording to analyze vascular function. Results: PQ treatment markedly impaired endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine in PARP-1(-/-), but not PARP-1(+/+) mice (p < 0.0001). Maximal relaxation was 45% in PQ treated PARP-1(-/-) mice compared to 79% in PARP-1(+/+) mice. In contrast, endothelium-independent relaxations to sodium nitroprusside (SNP) were not altered. After PQ treatment, L-NAME enhanced contractions to norepinephrine by 2.0-fold in PARP-1(-/-) mice, and those to acetylcholine by 3.3-fold, respectively, as compared to PARP-1(+/+) mice. PEG-superoxide dismutase (SOD) and PEG-catalase prevented the effect of PQ on endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine in PARP-1(-/-) mice (p < 0.001 vs. PQ treated PARP-1(+/+) mice. Indomethacin restored endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine in PQ treated PARP-1(-/-) mice (p < 0.05 vs. PQ treated PARP-1(+/+). Conclusion: PARP-1 protects from acute intracellular oxidative stress induced endothelial dysfunction by inhibiting ROS induced production of vasoconstrictor prostanoids.

  20. Chrono-lume and magnesium potentiate aggregation of canine but not human platelets in citrated platelet-rich plasma.

    PubMed

    Callan, M B; Shofer, F S; Wojenski, C; Giger, U

    1998-07-01

    The effects of Chrono-lume (CL) and magnesium sulfate (Mg2+), a component of this luciferin-luciferase reagent, on platelet aggregation were studied in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) obtained from blood anticoagulated with sodium citrate from humans, dogs, cats, horses, and cows. The final added Mg2+ concentration of both solutions ranged from 0.75-3.7 mM. CL and Mg2+ had no effect on maximum aggregation of platelets from humans induced by sub-threshold concentrations of collagen and ADP. In contrast, addition of CL or Mg2+ to canine PRP resulted in a dose-dependent and equal potentiation of platelet aggregation in response to sub-threshold concentrations of collagen, ADP, and thrombin in normal and thrombopathic dogs. The effect of CL on platelet aggregation induced by sub-threshold concentrations of agonists was less pronounced and varied in other species according to the agonist. The reason for the marked difference in sensitivity of human and canine platelets to CL or Mg2+ is not clear, although a difference in releasable cation pools of the platelets from these two species has been recognized. Platelet aggregation studies of animals with suspected thrombopathias should be performed without CL to prevent masking of a platelet function defect. PMID:9684806

  1. Poliovirus Proteins Induce Membrane Association of GTPase ADP-Ribosylation Factor

    PubMed Central

    Belov, George A.; Fogg, Mark H.; Ehrenfeld, Ellie

    2005-01-01

    Poliovirus infection results in the disintegration of intracellular membrane structures and formation of specific vesicles that serve as sites for replication of viral RNA. The mechanism of membrane rearrangement has not been clearly defined. Replication of poliovirus is sensitive to brefeldin A (BFA), a fungal metabolite known to prevent normal function of the ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) family of small GTPases. During normal membrane trafficking in uninfected cells, ARFs are involved in vesicle formation from different intracellular sites through interaction with numerous regulatory and coat proteins as well as in regulation of phospholipase D activity and cytoskeleton modifications. We demonstrate here that ARFs 3 and 5, but not ARF6, are translocated to membranes in HeLa cell extracts that are engaged in translation of poliovirus RNA. The accumulation of ARFs on membranes correlates with active replication of poliovirus RNA in vitro, whereas ARF translocation to membranes does not occur in the presence of BFA. ARF translocation can be induced independently by synthesis of poliovirus 3A or 3CD proteins, and we describe mutations that abolished this activity. In infected HeLa cells, an ARF1-enhanced green fluorescent protein fusion redistributes from Golgi stacks to the perinuclear region, where poliovirus RNA replication occurs. Taken together, the data suggest an involvement of ARF in poliovirus RNA replication. PMID:15890959

  2. Effect and mechanism of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 in aldosterone-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    QIAO, WEIWEI; ZHANG, WEILI; SHAO, SHUHONG; GAI, YUSHENG; ZHANG, MINGXIANG

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of aldosterone on vascular endothelial cells and the viability of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) in cells, and to examine the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of aldosterone on vascular endothelial cell injury. Cultured endothelial cells were treated either with different concentrations of aldosterone for the same duration or with the same concentrations of aldosterone for different durations, and the levels of apoptosis and activity of PARP1 in the cells were detected, respectively. Aldosterone receptor antagonists or PARP1 inhibitors were added to cells during treatment with aldosterone and the levels of apoptosis and activity of PARP1 were detected. As the concentration of aldosterone increased or the treatment time increased, the number of apoptotic cells and the activity of PARP1 increased. The aldosterone receptor antagonists and PARP1 inhibitors inhibited the increase of apoptosis and PARP1 activity caused by aldosterone treatment. Aldosterone activated the activity of PARP1 via the aldosterone receptor, inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis. Treatment with PARP1 may be used as a target for vascular diseases caused by aldosterone at high concentrations. PMID:25872931

  3. Scalable Generation of Universal Platelets from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Qiang; Shabrani, Namrata; Thon, Jonathan N.; Huo, Hongguang; Thiel, Austin; Machlus, Kellie R.; Kim, Kyungho; Brooks, Julie; Li, Feng; Luo, Chenmei; Kimbrel, Erin A.; Wang, Jiwu; Kim, Kwang-Soo; Italiano, Joseph; Cho, Jaehyung; Lu, Shi-Jiang; Lanza, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Summary Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) provide a potentially replenishable source for the production of transfusable platelets. Here, we describe a method to generate megakaryocytes (MKs) and functional platelets from iPSCs in a scalable manner under serum/feeder-free conditions. The method also permits the cryopreservation of MK progenitors, enabling a rapid “surge” capacity when large numbers of platelets are needed. Ultrastructural/morphological analyses show no major differences between iPSC platelets and human blood platelets. iPSC platelets form aggregates, lamellipodia, and filopodia after activation and circulate in macrophage-depleted animals and incorporate into developing mouse thrombi in a manner identical to human platelets. By knocking out the β2-microglobulin gene, we have generated platelets that are negative for the major histocompatibility antigens. The scalable generation of HLA-ABC-negative platelets from a renewable cell source represents an important step toward generating universal platelets for transfusion as well as a potential strategy for the management of platelet refractoriness. PMID:25418726

  4. Alterations of platelet aggregation kinetics with ultraviolet laser emission: the "stunned platelet" phenomenon.

    PubMed

    Topaz, O; Minisi, A J; Bernardo, N L; McPherson, R A; Martin, E; Carr, S L; Carr, M E

    2001-10-01

    Platelets, a major constituent of thrombus, play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of acute ischemic coronary syndromes. The effect of ultraviolet laser emission on platelets within thrombi is unknown. The effects of increasing levels of laser energy on platelets in whole blood were investigated. Blood samples were obtained by aseptic venipuncture and anticoagulated with 3.8% sodium citrate. Samples were exposed to increased levels (0, 30, 45, 60 mJ/mm2; 25 Hz) of ultraviolet excimer laser fluence (308 nm wave-length) and then tested for ADP and collagen induced platelet aggregation, platelet concentration, and for platelet contractile force (PCF) development. Scanning electron microscopy was used to detect laser induced morphologic changes of platelets and by flow cytometric analysis to detect changes in expression of platelet surface antigens p-selectin (CD 62) and glycoprotein IIb/IIIa (CD 43). Exposure to excimer laser energy produced dose dependent suppression of platelet aggregation and force development ("stunned platelets"). ADP aggregation decreased from 8.0+/-1.1 Ohms (mean+/-SEM) to 3.7+/-0.8 Ohms (p<0.001) to 2.7+/-0.6 Ohms (p <0.001) and to 1.8+/-0.5 Ohms (p <0.001) as the laser energy increased from 0 to 30 to 45 to 60 mJ/mm2, respectively. Collagen induced aggregation decreased from 21.4+/-1.4 Ohms to 15.7+/-1.2 Ohms (p <0.001) to 11.7+/-1.1 Ohms (p <0.001) and to 9.9+/-1.0 Ohms (p <0.001), in response to the same incremental range of laser energy. Platelet contractile forces declined from 34,500+/-3700 to 27.800+/-2700 dynes as laser energy increased from 0 to 60 mJ/mm2 (p <0.03). Platelet concentration did not change with increasing laser energy. The expression of platelet surface antigen p-selectin (CD 62) remained stable through increasing levels of laser energy exposures while the percentage of CD 43 positive platelets significantly increased with exposure to laser energy, yet the level of expression did not exceed 0.5% of cells. Thus

  5. Platelet-adenovirus vs. inert particles interaction: effect on aggregation and the role of platelet membrane receptors.

    PubMed

    Gupalo, Elena; Kuk, Cynthia; Qadura, Mohammad; Buriachkovskaia, Liudmila; Othman, Maha

    2013-01-01

    Platelets are involved in host defense via clearance of bacteria from the circulation, interaction with virus particles, and uptake of various size particulates. There is a growing interest in micro- and nanoparticles for drug delivery and there is evidence that the properties of these particles critically influence their interaction and uptake by various tissues and cells including platelets. Virus mediated gene therapy applications are still challenged by the resultant thrombocytopenia and the mechanism(s) of platelet-foreign particles interaction remains unclear. We studied the specifics of platelet interaction with an active biological agent (adenovirus) and inert latex microspheres (MS) and investigated the role of platelet proteins in this interaction. We show that activated and not resting platelets internalize MS, without influencing platelet aggregation. In contrast, adenovirus induces and potentiates ADP-induced platelet aggregation and results in rapid expression of P-selectin. Platelets then internalize adenovirus and viral particles appear inside the open canalicular system. Inhibition of platelet αIIbβ3, GPIbα, and P-selectin decreases both platelet aggregation and internalization of MS. Inhibition of αIIbβ3 and αVβ3 does not abolish adenovirus platelet internalization and adenovirus-induced platelet activation is maintained. Our study demonstrates that platelets react differentially with foreign particles and that αIIbβ3 is a key player in platelet engulfing of foreign particles but not in mediating adenovirus internalization. Other platelet candidate molecules remain to be investigated as potential targets for management of adenovirus-induced thrombocytopenia. PMID:22812520

  6. Platelets induce apoptosis via membrane-bound FasL

    PubMed Central

    Schleicher, Rebecca I.; Reichenbach, Frank; Kraft, Peter; Kumar, Anil; Lescan, Mario; Todt, Franziska; Göbel, Kerstin; Hilgendorf, Ingo; Geisler, Tobias; Bauer, Axel; Olbrich, Marcus; Schaller, Martin; Wesselborg, Sebastian; O’Reilly, Lorraine; Meuth, Sven G.; Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus; Gawaz, Meinrad; Li, Xuri; Kleinschnitz, Christoph; Edlich, Frank

    2015-01-01

    After tissue injury, both wound sealing and apoptosis contribute to restoration of tissue integrity and functionality. Although the role of platelets (PLTs) for wound closure and induction of regenerative processes is well established, the knowledge about their contribution to apoptosis is incomplete. Here, we show that PLTs present the death receptor Fas ligand (FasL) on their surface after activation. Activated PLTs as well as the isolated membrane fraction of activated PLTs but not of resting PLTs induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner in primary murine neuronal cells, human neuroblastoma cells, and mouse embryonic fibroblasts. Membrane protein from PLTs lacking membrane-bound FasL (FasL△m/△m) failed to induce apoptosis. Bax/Bak-mediated mitochondrial apoptosis signaling in target cells was not required for PLT-induced cell death, but increased the apoptotic response to PLT-induced Fas signaling. In vivo, PLT depletion significantly reduced apoptosis in a stroke model and an inflammation-independent model of N-methyl-d-aspartic acid-induced retinal apoptosis. Furthermore, experiments using PLT-specific PF4Cre+ FasLfl/fl mice demonstrated a role of PLT-derived FasL for tissue apoptosis. Because apoptosis secondary to injury prevents inflammation, our findings describe a novel mechanism on how PLTs contribute to tissue homeostasis. PMID:26232171

  7. Epicatechin and Catechin Modulate Endothelial Activation Induced by Platelets of Patients with Peripheral Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Carnevale, R.; Loffredo, L.; Nocella, C.; Bartimoccia, S.; Bucci, T.; De Falco, E.; Peruzzi, M.; Chimenti, I.; Biondi-Zoccai, G.; Pignatelli, P.; Violi, F.; Frati, G.

    2014-01-01

    Platelet activation contributes to the alteration of endothelial function, a critical initial step in atherogenesis through the production and release of prooxidant mediators. There is uncertainty about the precise role of polyphenols in interaction between platelets and endothelial cells (ECs). We aimed to investigate whether polyphenols are able to reduce endothelial activation induced by activated platelets. First, we compared platelet activation and flow-mediated dilation (FMD) in 10 healthy subjects (HS) and 10 patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD). Then, we evaluated the effect of epicatechin plus catechin on platelet-HUVEC interaction by measuring soluble cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), NOx production, and eNOS phosphorylation (p-eNOS) in HUVEC. Compared to HS, PAD patients had enhanced platelet activation. Conversely, PAD patients had lower FMD than HS. Supernatant of activated platelets from PAD patients induced an increase of sCAMs release and a decrease of p-eNOS and nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability compared to unstimulated HUVEC. Coincubation of HUVEC, with supernatant of PAD platelets patients, pretreated with a scalar dose of the polyphenols, resulted in a decrease of sCAMs release and in an increase of p-eNOS and NO bioavailability. This study demonstrates that epicatechin plus catechin reduces endothelial activation induced by activated platelets. PMID:25180068

  8. In vivo evidence for platelet-induced physiological angiogenesis by a COX driven mechanism.

    PubMed

    Packham, Ian M; Watson, Steve P; Bicknell, Roy; Egginton, Stuart

    2014-01-01

    We sought to determine a role for platelets in in vivo angiogenesis, quantified by changes in the capillary to fibre ratio (C:F) of mouse skeletal muscle, utilising two distinct forms of capillary growth to identify differential effects. Capillary sprouting was induced by muscle overload, and longitudinal splitting by chronic hyperaemia. Platelet depletion was achieved by anti-GPIbα antibody treatment. Sprouting induced a significant increase in C:F (1.42±0.02 vs. contralateral 1.29±0.02, P<0.001) that was abolished by platelet depletion, while the significant C:F increase caused by splitting (1.40±0.03 vs. control 1.28±0.03, P<0.01) was unaffected. Granulocyte/monocyte depletion showed this response was not immune-regulated. VEGF overexpression failed to rescue angiogenesis following platelet depletion, suggesting the mechanism is not simply reliant on growth factor release. Sprouting occurred normally following antibody-induced GPVI shedding, suggesting platelet activation via collagen is not involved. BrdU pulse-labelling showed no change in the proliferative potential of cells associated with capillaries after platelet depletion. Inhibition of platelet activation by acetylsalicylic acid abolished sprouting, but not splitting angiogenesis, paralleling the response to platelet depletion. We conclude that platelets differentially regulate mechanisms of angiogenesis in vivo, likely via COX signalling. Since endothelial proliferation is not impaired, we propose a link between COX1 and induction of endothelial migration. PMID:25238071

  9. Epicatechin and catechin modulate endothelial activation induced by platelets of patients with peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Carnevale, R; Loffredo, L; Nocella, C; Bartimoccia, S; Bucci, T; De Falco, E; Peruzzi, M; Chimenti, I; Biondi-Zoccai, G; Pignatelli, P; Violi, F; Frati, G

    2014-01-01

    Platelet activation contributes to the alteration of endothelial function, a critical initial step in atherogenesis through the production and release of prooxidant mediators. There is uncertainty about the precise role of polyphenols in interaction between platelets and endothelial cells (ECs). We aimed to investigate whether polyphenols are able to reduce endothelial activation induced by activated platelets. First, we compared platelet activation and flow-mediated dilation (FMD) in 10 healthy subjects (HS) and 10 patients with peripheral artery disease (PAD). Then, we evaluated the effect of epicatechin plus catechin on platelet-HUVEC interaction by measuring soluble cell adhesion molecules (CAMs), NOx production, and eNOS phosphorylation (p-eNOS) in HUVEC. Compared to HS, PAD patients had enhanced platelet activation. Conversely, PAD patients had lower FMD than HS. Supernatant of activated platelets from PAD patients induced an increase of sCAMs release and a decrease of p-eNOS and nitric oxide (NO) bioavailability compared to unstimulated HUVEC. Coincubation of HUVEC, with supernatant of PAD platelets patients, pretreated with a scalar dose of the polyphenols, resulted in a decrease of sCAMs release and in an increase of p-eNOS and NO bioavailability. This study demonstrates that epicatechin plus catechin reduces endothelial activation induced by activated platelets. PMID:25180068

  10. Influence of gold nanoparticles on platelets functional activity in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akchurin, Garif G.; Akchurin, George G.; Ivanov, Alexey N.; Kirichuk, Vyacheslav F.; Terentyuk, George S.; Khlebtsov, Boris N.; Khlebtsov, Nikolay G.

    2008-02-01

    Now in the leading biomedical centers of the world approved new technology of laser photothermal destruction of cancer cells using plasmon gold nanoparticles. Investigations of influence of gold nanoparticles on white rat platelets aggregative activity in vitro have been made. Platelet aggregation was investigated in platelet rich plasma (PRP) with help of laser analyzer 230 LA <>, Russia). Aggregation inductor was ADP solution in terminal concentration 2.5 micromole (<>, Russia). Gold nanoshells soluted in salt solution were used for experiments. Samples of PRP were incubated with 50 or 100 μl gold nanoshells solution in 5 minute, after that we made definition ADP induced platelet aggregation. We found out increase platelet function activity after incubation with nanoparticles solution which shown in maximum ADP-induced aggregation degree increase. Increase platelet function activity during intravenous nanoshells injection can be cause of thrombosis on patients. That's why before clinical application of cancer cell destruction based on laser photothermal used with plasmon gold nanoparticles careful investigations of thrombosis process and detail analyze of physiological blood parameters are very necessary.

  11. The effect of time of day and exercise on platelet functions and platelet-neutrophil aggregates in healthy male subjects.

    PubMed

    Aldemir, Hatice; Kiliç, Nedret

    2005-12-01

    Platelet activation state changes by exercise. The effect of exercise time on platelet activation state and formation of platelet-neutrophil aggregates are not known yet. In this study the effect of exercise and time of day were examined on platelet activity with platelet-neutrophil aggregates. Ten moderately active males aged 27+/- 1.63 (mean+/-S.D.) years completed sub-maximal (70% VO(2max)) exercise trials for 30 min. Blood pressure (BP) was recorded. Venous blood samples were obtained at rest, immediately post-exercise and after 30 min of recovery. Whole blood was analysed for haematocrit (Hct), haemoglobin (Hb), platelet count (PC), mean platelet count (MPV) and platelet aggregation (PA). Platelet-neutrophil aggregates and beta-thromboglobulin (beta-TG) levels were assayed. Platelet count showed significant increase after morning exercise ((236+/- 32)x10(9) l(-1) versus (202+/- 34)x10(9) l(-1) baseline, p < 0.05). Exercise resulted in significantly lower MPV after the evening exercise (9.16+/- 0.5 fl versus 9.65+/- 0.36 fl, p < 0.05). Platelet aggregation by adenosine diphosphate (ADP) decreased after morning exercise and the recovery aggregation levels were significantly different at two different times of the day (68+/- 20% a.m. versus 80+/- 12% p.m., p < 0.05). It was also showed that platelet-neutrophil aggregates increased significantly from baseline after both exercises. Exercise-induced platelet-neutrophil aggregates were higher in the evening (10.7+/- 1.3% p.m. versus 6.4+/- 1.8% a.m., p < 0.0001). It is therefore concluded that besides platelet-platelet aggregation, exercise can cause platelet- neutrophil aggregates. In addition, time of day has an effect on platelet activation related events. Circadian variations of physiological parameters may have an effect on thrombus formation by platelet activation. PMID:16311912

  12. Hyaluronic acid influence on platelet-induced airway smooth muscle cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Svensson Holm, Ann-Charlotte B.; Bengtsson, Torbjoern; Grenegard, Magnus; Lindstroem, Eva G.

    2012-03-10

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is one of the main components of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and is expressed throughout the body including the lung and mostly in areas surrounding proliferating and migrating cells. Furthermore, platelets have been implicated as important players in the airway remodelling process, e.g. due to their ability to induce airway smooth muscle cell (ASMC) proliferation. The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of HA, the HA-binding surface receptor CD44 and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) in platelet-induced ASMC proliferation. Proliferation of ASMC was measured using the MTS-assay, and we found that the CD44 blocking antibody and the HA synthase inhibitor 4-Methylumbelliferone (4-MU) significantly inhibited platelet-induced ASMC proliferation. The interaction between ASMC and platelets was studied by fluorescent staining of F-actin. In addition, the ability of ASMC to synthesise HA was investigated by fluorescent staining using biotinylated HA-binding protein and a streptavidin conjugate. We observed that ASMC produced HA and that a CD44 blocking antibody and 4-MU significantly inhibited platelet binding to the area surrounding the ASMC. Furthermore, the FAK-inhibitor PF 573228 inhibited platelet-induced ASMC proliferation. Co-culture of ASMC and platelets also resulted in increased phosphorylation of FAK as detected by Western blot analysis. In addition, 4-MU significantly inhibited the increased FAK-phosphorylation. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate that ECM has the ability to influence platelet-induced ASMC proliferation. Specifically, we propose that HA produced by ASMC is recognised by platelet CD44. The platelet/HA interaction is followed by FAK activation and increased proliferation of co-cultured ASMC. We also suggest that the mitogenic effect of platelets represents a potential important and novel mechanism that may contribute to airway remodelling.

  13. Cellular regulation of poly ADP-ribosylation of proteins: II. Augmentation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase in SV40 3T3 cells following methotrexate-induced G1/S inhibition of cell cycle progression

    SciTech Connect

    Sooki-Toth, A.; Asghari, F.; Kirsten, E.; Kun, E. )

    1987-05-01

    SV40-3T3 cells were exposed in monolayer cultures to 5{times}10{sup {minus}7} M methotrexate (MTX), that inhibited thymidylate synthetase, arrested cell growth without cell killing in 24 h and did not induce single- (ss) or double-strand (ds) breaks in DNA. Following 24, up to 72 h, the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase content of attached cells was induced by 5{times}10{sup {minus}7} MTX and the augmentation of the enzyme increased with the time of exposure to the drug. Inhibition of protein or RNA synthesis abolished augmentation of enzymatic activity; so too did the initiation of maximal cell growth by thymidine + hypoxanthine, by-passing the inhibitory site of MTX. Isolation of the ADP-ribosylated enzyme protein by gel electrophoresis identified poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase protein as the molecule that was induced by 5{times}10{sup {minus}7} M MTX. Under identical conditions, the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase induction in 3T3 cells could not be demonstrated. A possible cell-cycle dependent biosynthesis of the enzyme protein is proposed in SV40 3T3 cells.

  14. Impact of aspirin dose on adenosine diphosphate-mediated platelet activities. Results of an in vitro pilot investigation.

    PubMed

    Tello-Montoliu, Antonio; Thano, Estela; Rollini, Fabiana; Patel, Ronakkumar; Wilson, Ryan E; Muñiz-Lozano, Ana; Franchi, Francesco; Darlington, Andrew; Desai, Bhaloo; Guzman, Luis A; Bass, Theodore A; Angiolillo, Dominick J

    2013-10-01

    Different aspirin dosing regimens have been suggested to impact outcomes when used in combination with adenosine diphosphate (ADP) P2Y12 receptor antagonists. Prior investigations have shown that not only aspirin, but also potent ADP P2Y12 receptor blockade can inhibit thromboxane A2-mediated platelet activation. The impact of aspirin dosing on ADP mediated platelet activities is unknown and represents the aim of this in vitro pilot pharmacodynamic (PD) investigation. Twenty-six patients with stable coronary artery disease on aspirin 81 mg/day and P2Y12 naïve were enrolled. PD assessments were performed at baseline, while patients were on 81 mg/day aspirin and after switching to 325 mg/day for 7 ± 2 days with and without escalating concentrations (vehicle, 1, 3, and 10 μM) of prasugrel's active metabolite (P-AM). PD assays included flow cytometric assessment of VASP to define the platelet reactivity index (PRI) and the Multiplate Analyzer (MEA) using multiple agonists [ADP, ADP + prostaglandin (PGE1), arachidonic acid (AA), and collagen]. Escalating P-AM concentrations showed incremental platelet P2Y12 inhibition measured by VASP-PRI (p<0.001). However, there were no differences according to aspirin dosing regimen at any P-AM concentration (vehicle: p=0.899; 1 μM: p=0.888; 3 μM: p=0.524; 10 μM: p=0.548). Similar findings were observed in purinergic markers assessed by MEA (ADP and ADP+PGE1). P-AM addition significantly reduced AA and collagen induced platelet aggregation (p<0.001 for all measures), irrespective of aspirin dose. In conclusion, aspirin dosing does not appear to affect PD measures of ADP-mediated platelet reactivity irrespective of the degree of P2Y12 receptor blockade. P2Y12 receptor blockade modulates platelet reactivity mediated by alternative activators. PMID:23884248

  15. Inducing mitophagy in diabetic platelets protects against severe oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Hee; Du, Jing; Stitham, Jeremiah; Atteya, Gourg; Lee, Suho; Xiang, Yaozu; Wang, Dandan; Jin, Yu; Leslie, Kristen L; Spollett, Geralyn; Srivastava, Anup; Mannam, Praveen; Ostriker, Allison; Martin, Kathleen A; Tang, Wai Ho; Hwa, John

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a growing international concern. Considerable mortality and morbidity associated with diabetes mellitus arise predominantly from thrombotic cardiovascular events. Oxidative stress-mediated mitochondrial damage contributes significantly to enhanced thrombosis in DM A basal autophagy process has recently been described as playing an important role in normal platelet activation. We now report a substantial mitophagy induction (above basal autophagy levels) in diabetic platelets, suggesting alternative roles for autophagy in platelet pathology. Using a combination of molecular, biochemical, and imaging studies on human DM platelets, we report that platelet mitophagy induction serves as a platelet protective mechanism that responds to oxidative stress through JNK activation. By removing damaged mitochondria (mitophagy), phosphorylated p53 is reduced, preventing progression to apoptosis, and preserving platelet function. The absence of mitophagy in DM platelets results in failure to protect against oxidative stress, leading to increased thrombosis. Surprisingly, this removal of damaged mitochondria does not require contributions from transcription, as platelets lack a nucleus. The considerable energy and resources expended in "prepackaging" the complex mitophagy machinery in a short-lived normal platelet support a critical role, in anticipation of exposure to oxidative stress. PMID:27221050

  16. Activated platelets release sphingosine 1-phosphate and induce hypersensitivity to noxious heat stimuli in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Weth, Daniela; Benetti, Camilla; Rauch, Caroline; Gstraunthaler, Gerhard; Schmidt, Helmut; Geisslinger, Gerd; Sabbadini, Roger; Proia, Richard L.; Kress, Michaela

    2015-01-01

    At the site of injury activated platelets release various mediators, one of which is sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P). It was the aim of this study to explore whether activated human platelets had a pronociceptive effect in an in vivo mouse model and whether this effect was based on the release of S1P and subsequent activation of neuronal S1P receptors 1 or 3. Human platelets were prepared in different concentrations (105/μl, 106/μl, 107/μl) and assessed in mice with different genetic backgrounds (WT, S1P1fl/fl, SNS-S1P1−/−, S1P3−/−). Intracutaneous injections of activated human platelets induced a significant, dose-dependent hypersensitivity to noxious thermal stimulation. The degree of heat hypersensitivity correlated with the platelet concentration as well as the platelet S1P content and the amount of S1P released upon platelet activation as measured with LC MS/MS. Despite the significant correlations between S1P and platelet count, no difference in paw withdrawal latency (PWL) was observed in mice with a global null mutation of the S1P3 receptor or a conditional deletion of the S1P1 receptor in nociceptive primary afferents. Furthermore, neutralization of S1P with a selective anti-S1P antibody did not abolish platelet induced heat hypersensitivity. Our results suggest that activated platelets release S1P and induce heat hypersensitivity in vivo. However, the platelet induced heat hypersensitivity was caused by mediators other than S1P. PMID:25954148

  17. Platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) inhibits low density lipoprotein-induced signaling in platelets.

    PubMed

    Relou, Ingrid A M; Gorter, Gertie; Ferreira, Irlando Andrade; van Rijn, Herman J M; Akkerman, Jan-Willem N

    2003-08-29

    At physiological concentrations, low density lipoprotein (LDL) increases the sensitivity of platelets to aggregation- and secretion-inducing agents without acting as an independent activator of platelet functions. LDL sensitizes platelets by inducing a transient activation of p38MAPK, a Ser/Thr kinase that is activated by the simultaneous phosphorylation of Thr180 and Tyr182 and is an upstream regulator of cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2). A similar transient phosphorylation of p38MAPK is induced by a peptide mimicking amino acids 3359-3369 in apoB100 called the B-site. Here we report that the transient nature of p38MAPK activation is caused by platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule 1 (PECAM-1), a receptor with an immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif. PECAM-1 activation by cross-linking induces tyrosine phosphorylation of PECAM-1 and a fall in phosphorylated p38MAPK and cPLA2. Interestingly, LDL and the B-site peptide also induce tyrosine phosphorylation of PECAM-1, and studies with immunoprecipitates indicate the involvement of c-Src. Inhibition of the Ser/Thr phosphatases PP1/PP2A (okadaic acid) makes the transient p38MAPK activation by LDL and the B-site peptide persistent. Inhibition of Tyr-phosphatases (vanadate) increases Tyr-phosphorylated PECAM-1 and blocks the activation of p38MAPK. Together, these findings suggest that, following a first phase in which LDL, through its B-site, phosphorylates and thereby activates p38MAPK, a second phase is initiated in which LDL activates PECAM-1 and induces dephosphorylation of p38MAPK via activation of the Ser/Thr phosphatases PP1/PP2A. PMID:12775720

  18. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against rat platelet GPIIb/IIIa

    SciTech Connect

    Miyazaki, H.; Tamura, S.; Sudo, T.; Suzuki, T. )

    1990-09-15

    Four murine monoclonal antibodies against rat platelets were produced by fusion of spleen cells from mice intravenously immunized with whole rat platelets. All four antibodies immunoprecipitated two major platelet membrane proteins with apparent molecular weights of 130,000 and 82,000 (nonreduced) and of 120,000 and 98,000 (reduced), which were structurally analogous to human glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa, i.e. rat GPIIb/IIIa. Two of four antibodies, named P9 and P55, strongly inhibited adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced aggregation of washed rat platelets and caused approximately 50% inhibition of human fibrinogen binding to ADP-stimulated rat platelets, suggesting that rat GPIIb/IIIa serves as a fibrinogen receptor in ADP-induced aggregation. In contrast, two other antibodies, named P14 and P34, themselves caused aggregation of rat platelets in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and the secretion of 14C-serotonin from 14C-serotonin-labeled PRP. These results indicate that rat GPIIb/IIIa plays an important role in platelet aggregation.

  19. Effect of ticlopidine ex vivo on platelet intracellular calcium mobilization

    SciTech Connect

    Derian, C.K.; Friedman, P.A.

    1988-04-01

    The antiplatelet compound ticlopidine exerts its potent inhibitory activity through an as yet undetermined mechanism(s). The goal of this study was to determine the effect, if any, of ticlopidine ex vivo on platelet calcium mobilization. Ticlopidine inhibited ADP-induced platelet aggregation by 50-80%. In the presence of 1 mM EGTA, ticlopidine inhibited ADP- and thrombin-stimulated increases in (Ca2+)i in fura-2 loaded platelets. We evaluated further the effect of ticlopidine on calcium mobilization by examining both agonist-stimulated formation of inositol trisphosphate in intact platelets and the ability of inositol trisphosphate to release /sup 45/Ca from intracellular sites in permeabilized cells. We show here that while ticlopidine significantly affected agonist-induced intracellular calcium mobilization in intact platelets, the drug was without effect on agonist-stimulated formation of inositol trisphosphate in intact platelets and on inositol trisphosphate-induced /sup 45/Ca release in saponin-permeabilized platelets. Our study demonstrates that ticlopidine exerts at least part of its effect via inhibition of intracellular calcium mobilization but that its site of action remains to be determined.

  20. Adiponectin-derived active peptide ADP355 exerts anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic activities in thioacetamide-induced liver injury.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huafeng; Zhang, Huan; Zhang, Zimu; Huang, Biao; Cheng, Xixi; Wang, Dan; la Gahu, Zha; Xue, Zhenyi; Da, Yurong; Li, Daiqing; Yao, Zhi; Gao, Fei; Xu, Aimin; Zhang, Rongxin

    2016-01-01

    Adiponectin is an adipocyte-derived circulating protein with beneficial effects on injured livers. Adiponectin-deficient (adipo(-/-)) mice develop enhanced liver fibrosis, suggesting that adiponectin could be a therapeutic target for liver injury. In the present study, we investigated the protective role of ADP355, an adiponectin-based active short peptide, in thioacetamide (TAA)-induced acute injury and chronic liver fibrosis in mice. ADP355 remarkably reduced TAA-induced necroinflammation and liver fibrosis. ADP355 treatment increased liver glycogen, decreased serum alanine transaminase and alkaline phosphatase activity, and promoted body weight gain, hyper-proliferation and hypo-apoptosis. In addition, ADP355 administration suppressed the TAA-induced activation of hepatic stellate cells and macrophages in the liver. These were associated with the inactivation of TGF-β1/SMAD2 signaling and the promotion of AMPK and STAT3 signaling. Sensitivity of adipo(-/-) mice to chronic liver injury was decreased with ADP355. In conclusion, ADP355 could mimic adiponectin's action and may be suitable for the preclinical or clinical therapy of chronic liver injury. PMID:26777428

  1. Adiponectin-derived active peptide ADP355 exerts anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic activities in thioacetamide-induced liver injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huafeng; Zhang, Huan; Zhang, Zimu; Huang, Biao; Cheng, Xixi; Wang, Dan; la Gahu, Zha; Xue, Zhenyi; Da, Yurong; Li, Daiqing; Yao, Zhi; Gao, Fei; Xu, Aimin; Zhang, Rongxin

    2016-01-01

    Adiponectin is an adipocyte-derived circulating protein with beneficial effects on injured livers. Adiponectin-deficient (adipo(−/−)) mice develop enhanced liver fibrosis, suggesting that adiponectin could be a therapeutic target for liver injury. In the present study, we investigated the protective role of ADP355, an adiponectin-based active short peptide, in thioacetamide (TAA)-induced acute injury and chronic liver fibrosis in mice. ADP355 remarkably reduced TAA-induced necroinflammation and liver fibrosis. ADP355 treatment increased liver glycogen, decreased serum alanine transaminase and alkaline phosphatase activity, and promoted body weight gain, hyper-proliferation and hypo-apoptosis. In addition, ADP355 administration suppressed the TAA-induced activation of hepatic stellate cells and macrophages in the liver. These were associated with the inactivation of TGF-β1/SMAD2 signaling and the promotion of AMPK and STAT3 signaling. Sensitivity of adipo(−/−) mice to chronic liver injury was decreased with ADP355. In conclusion, ADP355 could mimic adiponectin’s action and may be suitable for the preclinical or clinical therapy of chronic liver injury. PMID:26777428

  2. Anesthetics and anticoagulants used in the preparation of rat platelet-rich-plasma alter rat platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Dwyer, S D; Meyers, K M

    1986-04-15

    Aggregation of platelets in heparin- and citrate-anticoagulated platelet-rich-plasma (PRP) from rats anesthetized with methoxyflurane (M), diethyl ether (E), acepromazine/ketamine (A/K), or sodium pentobarbital (P) is described, as are platelet counts. Platelet counts were highest in heparin- or citrate-PRP from E and A/K anesthetized rats. Collagen and arachidonic acid (AA) induced aggregation in heparin-PRP only, and ADP induced greater aggregation in heparin-PRP than in citrate-PRP. Differences between citrate-PRP and heparin-PRP are probably due to citrate inhibition of platelet aggregation, since addition of citrate to heparin-PRP decreased aggregation, while addition of heparin to citrate-PRP did not alter aggregation. Aggregation of hirudin-PRP was slightly less than heparin-PRP. Anesthetics affected rat platelet aggregation: the rank order of the maximal extent of ADP-induced aggregation in citrate-PRP was M greater than E = A/K greater than P, and that for AA and collagen in heparin-PRP was E = A/K greater than M = P. The correlation between the effect of the anesthetics and activation of the sympathoadrenal system is discussed. It appeared that of the commonly used anticoagulants and anesthetics, heparin and methoxyflurane had the least influence on rat platelet aggregation. PMID:3087006

  3. Lysosomotropic agents selectively potentiate thrombin-induced acid hydrolase secretion from platelets.

    PubMed Central

    Van Oost, B A; Smith, J B; Holmsen, H; Vladutiu, G D

    1985-01-01

    Thrombin induces partial secretion (up to 60%) of beta-N-acetyl-D-hexosaminidase (EC 3.2.1.52) from untreated platelets. Preincubation of platelets with 10 mM NH4Cl for up to 2 hr resulted in a time-dependent and marked stimulation of thrombin-induced secretion of both this enzyme and other acid glycosidases from platelets. The enhancement of the thrombin-induced secretion was not due to cell lysis, and NH4Cl alone did not cause leakage of lysosomal enzymes into the medium. The effect could be reversed by reincubating the platelets in NH4Cl-free medium. Stimulation of thrombin-induced secretion also was produced by a series of aliphatic primary amines from methylamine to butylamine, and by micromolar concentrations of chloroquine. The effect of weak bases on platelets appeared to be quite specific for enhancing lysosomal enzyme secretion. Thrombin-induced secretion of adenine nucleotides from dense granules and of beta-thromboglobulin from alpha granules was slightly enhanced by NH4Cl but was slightly inhibited by methylamine. The only direct effect of the weak bases on platelets was the displacement of serotonin from dense granules. Accumulation of weak bases in acidic pools in the platelets (e.g., lysosomes) might, therefore, be responsible for the enhanced secretion of lysosomal enzymes. By using controlled digitonin-induced platelet lysis, it was found that preincubation of platelets with NH4Cl lowered the digitonin concentration required for enzyme solubilization. We suggest that loading of lysosomes with weak bases dissociates already bound enzyme inside the lysosomes, resulting in a more effective discharge upon stimulation by thrombin. PMID:3157989

  4. Mapuche Herbal Medicine Inhibits Blood Platelet Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Falkenberg, Susan Skanderup; Tarnow, Inge; Guzman, Alfonso; Mølgaard, Per; Simonsen, Henrik Toft

    2012-01-01

    12 plant species traditionally used by the Mapuche people in Chile to treat wounds and inflammations have been evaluated for their direct blood platelet inhibition. Seven of the 12 tested plant species showed platelet inhibitory effect in sheep blood, and four of these were also able to inhibit the ADP- (5.0 μM) and collagen- (2.0 μg/mL) induced aggregations in human blood. These four species in respective extracts (in brackets) were Blechnum chilense (MeOH), Luma apiculata (H2O), Amomyrtus luma (DCM : MeOH 1 : 1) and Cestrum parqui (DCM : MeOH 1 : 1). The platelet aggregating inhibitory effects of A. luma (DCM : MeOH 1 : 1), and L. apiculata (H2O) were substantial and confirmed by inhibition of platelet surface activation markers. PMID:22028732

  5. Mapuche herbal medicine inhibits blood platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Falkenberg, Susan Skanderup; Tarnow, Inge; Guzman, Alfonso; Mølgaard, Per; Simonsen, Henrik Toft

    2012-01-01

    12 plant species traditionally used by the Mapuche people in Chile to treat wounds and inflammations have been evaluated for their direct blood platelet inhibition. Seven of the 12 tested plant species showed platelet inhibitory effect in sheep blood, and four of these were also able to inhibit the ADP- (5.0 μM) and collagen- (2.0 μg/mL) induced aggregations in human blood. These four species in respective extracts (in brackets) were Blechnum chilense (MeOH), Luma apiculata (H(2)O), Amomyrtus luma (DCM : MeOH 1 : 1) and Cestrum parqui (DCM : MeOH 1 : 1). The platelet aggregating inhibitory effects of A. luma (DCM : MeOH 1 : 1), and L. apiculata (H(2)O) were substantial and confirmed by inhibition of platelet surface activation markers. PMID:22028732

  6. Impact of the bioresorbable vascular scaffold surface area on on-treatment platelet reactivity.

    PubMed

    Gross, Lisa; Sibbing, Dirk; Eickhoff, Madeleine; Baquet, Moritz; Orban, Martin; Krieg, Anne; Grujic, Katarina; Theiss, Hans D; Brunner, Stefan; Teupser, Daniel; Holdt, Lesca; Massberg, Steffen; Mehilli, Julinda

    2016-07-01

    While promising data with the novel bioresorbable vascular scaffold (BVS) are accumulating, signals of scaffold thrombosis (ST) were noted in recent reports. We aimed to assess the relationship between the total surface area (TSA) of implanted everolimus-eluting BVSs and the on-treatment adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced platelet reactivity in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). 202 consecutive patients undergoing BVS implantation and platelet function testing were included. For investigating the impact of the scaffold surface on platelet reactivity, patients were stratified into two groups regarding the median BVS TSA. The on-treatment ADP-induced platelet reactivity was determined with the Multiplate analyzer and 30-day follow-up was available in 98% of patients. ADP-induced platelet aggregation values (median, [IQR]) did not differ between the two study groups (12.0 [9.0-19.0] U for patients with TSA > 1.39 cm(2) and 13.0 [9.0-19.5] U for patients with TSA ≤ 1.39 cm(2); p = 0.69). No correlation was observed between the BVS TSA and levels of platelet reactivity (Spearman rank correlation = -0.10, p = 0.16). At 30 days after PCI, two early STs (1%) were documented. Thus, in patients on a dual antiplatelet treatment regimen following BVS implantation, the extent of blood-to-BVS contact surface does not negatively affect levels of on-treatment platelet reactivity. PMID:26940818

  7. Thromboxane-induced renal vasoconstriction is mediated by the ADP-ribosyl cyclase CD38 and superoxide anion

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Paul A.; Kopple, Tayler E.; Arendshorst, William J.

    2013-01-01

    The present renal hemodynamic study tested the hypothesis that CD38 and superoxide anion (O2·−) participate in the vasoconstriction produced by activation of thromboxane prostanoid (TP) receptors in the mouse kidney. CD38 is the major mammalian ADP-ribosyl cyclase contributing to vasomotor tone through the generation of cADP-ribose, a second messenger that activates ryanodine receptors to release Ca2+ from the sarcoplasmic reticulum in vascular smooth muscle cells. We evaluated whether the stable thromboxane mimetic U-46619 causes less pronounced renal vasoconstriction in CD38-deficient mice and the involvement of O2·− in U-46619-induced renal vasoconstriction. Our results indicate that U-46619 activation of TP receptors causes renal vasoconstriction in part by activating cADP-ribose signaling in renal resistance arterioles. Based on maximal renal blood flow and renal vascular resistance responses to bolus injections of U-46619, CD38 contributes 30–40% of the TP receptor-induced vasoconstriction. We also found that the antioxidant SOD mimetic tempol attenuated the magnitude of vasoconstriction by U-46619 in both groups of mice, suggesting mediation by O2·−. The degree of tempol blockage of U-46619-induced renal vasoconstriction was greater in wild-type mice, attenuating renal vasoconstriction by 40% compared with 30% in CD38-null mice. In other experiments, U-46619 rapidly stimulated O2·− production (dihydroethidium fluorescence) in isolated mouse afferent arterioles, an effect abolished by tempol. These observations provide the first in vivo demonstration of CD38 and O2·− involvement in the vasoconstrictor effects of TP receptor activation in the kidney and in vitro evidence for TP receptor stimulation of O2·− production by the afferent arteriole. PMID:23884143

  8. Important Role of Platelets in Modulating Endotoxin-Induced Lung Inflammation in CFTR-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Caiqi; Su, Emily M.; Yang, Xi; Gao, Zhaowei; Li, Ling; Wu, Haiya; Jiang, Yiyi; Su, Xiao

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Mutation of CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) leads to cystic fibrosis (CF). Patients with CF develop abnormalities of blood platelets and recurrent lung inflammation. However, whether CFTR-mutated platelets play a role in the development of lung inflammation is elusive. Therefore, we intratracheally challenged wildtype and F508del (a common type of CFTR mutation) mice with LPS to observe changes of F508del platelets in the peripheral blood and indexes of lung inflammation (BAL neutrophils and protein levels). Furthermore, we investigated whether or not and how F508del platelets modulate the LPS-induced acute lung inflammation by targeting anti-platelet aggregation, depletion of neutrophils, reconstitution of bone marrow or neutrophils, blockade of P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1), platelet activating factor (PAF), and correction of mutated CFTR trafficking. We found that LPS-challenged F508del mice developed severe thrombocytopenia and had higher levels of plasma TXB2 coincided with neutrophilic lung inflammation relative to wildtype control. Inhibition of F508del platelet aggregation or depletion of F508del neutrophils diminished the LPS-induced lung inflammation in the F508del mice. Moreover, wildtype mice reconstituted with either F508del bone marrow or neutrophils developed worse thrombocytopenia. Blocking PSGL-1, platelet activating factor (PAF), or rectifying trafficking of mutated CFTR in F508del mice diminished and alveolar neutrophil transmigration in the LPS-challenged F508del mice. These findings suggest that F508del platelets and their interaction with neutrophils are requisite for the development of LPS-induced lung inflammation and injury. As such, targeting platelets might be an emerging strategy for dampening recurrent lung inflammation in cystic fibrosis patients. PMID:24367540

  9. Bubble-induced platelet aggregation in a rat model of decompression sickness.

    PubMed

    Pontier, Jean-Michel; Vallée, Nicolas; Bourdon, Lionel

    2009-12-01

    Previous studies have highlighted that bubble-induced platelet aggregation is a predictor index of decompression sickness (DCS) severity in animals and bubble formation after a single air dive in humans. The present study attempted to investigate plasmatic indexes of the coagulation system and platelet activation in our rat model of DCS. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were assigned to one experimental group with a hyperbaric exposure and one control group maintained at atmospheric pressure. Rats were compressed to 1,000 kPa (90 m saltwater) for 45 min while breathing air. The onset of death time and DCS symptoms were recorded during a 30-min observed period after rats had surfaced. Plasmatic indexes were platelet factor 4 (PF4) for platelet activation, soluble glycoprotein V (sGPV) for thrombin generation, and thrombin-antithrombin complexes for the coagulation system. Blood samples for a platelet count and markers were taken 3 wk before the experimental protocol and within the 30 min after rats had surfaced. We confirmed a correlation between the percent fall in platelet count and DCS severity. Plasmatic levels of sGPV and PF4 were significantly increased after the hyperbaric exposure, with no change in the control group. The present study confirms platelet consumption as a potential index for evaluating decompression stress and DCS severity. The results point to the participation of thrombin generation in the coagulation cascade and platelet activation in bubble-induced platelet aggregation. In our animal model of DCS, the results cannot prejudge the mechanisms of platelet activation between bubble-induced vessel wall injury and bubble-blood component interactions. PMID:19850726

  10. Antioxidant and antiaggregatory effects of an extract from Conyza canadensis on blood platelets in vitro.

    PubMed

    Olas, Beata; Saluk-Juszczak, Joanna; Pawlaczyk, Izabela; Nowak, Pawel; Kolodziejczyk, Joanna; Gancarz, Roman; Wachowicz, Barbara

    2006-09-01

    The antioxidative activity of the polysaccharide extract from Conyza canadensis in blood platelets treated with peroxynitrite (ONOO-) was studied. Peroxynitrite as a strong biological oxidant has toxic effects on blood platelets and induces the oxidation of thiols, carbonylation and nitration of platelet proteins and lipid peroxidation. Therefore, the aim of our study was to assess if the natural extract from herbal plant, Conyza Canadensis, may protect platelet proteins against nitrative and oxidative damage induced by ONOO-. In our study we measured oxidative damage of platelet proteins induced by peroxynitrite and protectory effects of this extract by estimation of the level of carbonyl groups and nitrotyrosine (a marker of platelet protein nitration). We also used cytochrome c reduction method to test the ability of this extract to change O2-* generation in platelets. Moreover, we determined the effects of the extract on blood platelet aggregation induced by ADP. We observed that the extract from Conyza canadensis distinctly reduced oxidation and nitration of proteins in blood platelets treated with ONOO-(0.1mM) and O2-* production in these cells. The extract from Conyza canadensis also inhibited platelet aggregation. The ability of the extract to decrease O2-* generation in blood platelets supports the importance of free radicals in platelet functions, including aggregation process. The present study suggests that the natural polysaccharide extract from Conyza canadensis has antiaggregatory and antioxidative activities, and therefore may be beneficial in the prevention of peroxynitrite-related diseases, such as cardiovascular or inflammatory diseases. PMID:16973495

  11. Shear-induced platelet margination in a microchannel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Hong; Shaqfeh, Eric S. G.

    2011-06-01

    The lateral migration of platelets in a microchannel is studied numerically where the hydrodynamic interactions between red cells, platelets, and vessel walls are resolved by the Stokes flow boundary integral equations. The simulations provide a clear physical description of the expulsion of the platelets by the velocity fluctuations in the core cellular flow toward the cell-depleted layer near the wall. The lateral migration is shown to be diffusional, and we further demonstrate, in agreement with previous experiments, that the diffusivity scales sublinearly with the shear rate if the relevant capillary number, Ca<1, as a result of its intrinsic dependence on the deformation of red cells.

  12. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of Apoptosis Antagonizing Transcription Factor Involved in Hydroquinone-Induced DNA Damage Response.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xiao Xuan; Liu, Jia Xian; Yun, Lin; DU, Yu Jun; Chen, Shao Qian; Chen, Jia Long; Tang, Huan Wen; Liu, Lin Hua

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of DNA damage induced by hydroquinone (HQ) remains unclear. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) usually works as a DNA damage sensor, and hence, it is possible that PARP-1 is involved in the DNA damage response induced by HQ. In TK6 cells treated with HQ, PARP activity as well as the expression of apoptosis antagonizing transcription factor (AATF), PARP-1, and phosphorylated H2AX (γ-H2AX) were maximum at 0.5 h, 6 h, 3 h, and 3 h, respectively. To explore the detailed mechanisms underlying the prompt DNA repair reaction, the above indicators were investigated in PARP-1-silenced cells. PARP activity and expression of AATF and PARP-1 decreased to 36%, 32%, and 33%, respectively, in the cells; however, γ-H2AX expression increased to 265%. Co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) assays were employed to determine whether PARP-1 and AATF formed protein complexes. The interaction between these proteins together with the results from IP assays and confocal microscopy indicated that poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) regulated AATF expression. In conclusion, PARP-1 was involved in the DNA damage repair induced by HQ via increasing the accumulation of AATF through PARylation. PMID:26822515

  13. Investigation of stress-induced (100) platelet formation and surface exfoliation in plasma hydrogenated Si

    SciTech Connect

    Di Zengfeng; Wang Yongqiang; Nastasi, Michael; Rossi, Francois; Lee, Jung-Kun; Shao, Lin; Thompson, Phillip E.

    2007-12-10

    We have studied the mechanisms underlying stress-induced platelet formation during plasma hydrogenation. The stress is purposely introduced by a buried SiGe stained layer in a Si substrate. During plasma hydrogenation, diffusing H is trapped in the region of the SiGe layer and H platelets are formed. The platelet orientation is controlled by the in-plane compressive stress, which favors nucleation and growth of platelets in the plane of stress and parallel to the substrate surface, and ultimately leads to controlled fracture along the SiGe layer. Also, the Si/SiGe/Si structure is found to be more efficient in utilizing H for platelet formation and growth compared to H ion implanted Si because there are fewer defects to trap H (e.g., V{sub n}H{sub m} and I{sub n}H{sub m}); therefore, the total H dose needed for layer exfoliation is greatly reduced.

  14. Time-dependent inhibitory effects of cGMP-analogues on thrombin-induced platelet-derived microparticles formation, platelet aggregation, and P-selectin expression

    SciTech Connect

    Nygaard, Gyrid; Herfindal, Lars; Kopperud, Reidun; Aragay, Anna M.; Holmsen, Holm; Døskeland, Stein Ove; Kleppe, Rune; Selheim, Frode

    2014-07-04

    Highlights: • We investigated the impact of cyclic nucleotide analogues on platelet activation. • Different time dependence were found for inhibition of platelet activation. • Additive effect was found using PKA- and PKG-activating analogues. • Our results may explain some of the discrepancies reported for cNMP signalling. - Abstract: In platelets, nitric oxide (NO) activates cGMP/PKG signalling, whereas prostaglandins and adenosine signal through cAMP/PKA. Cyclic nucleotide signalling has been considered to play an inhibitory role in platelets. However, an early stimulatory effect of NO and cGMP-PKG signalling in low dose agonist-induced platelet activation have recently been suggested. Here, we investigated whether different experimental conditions could explain some of the discrepancy reported for platelet cGMP-PKG-signalling. We treated gel-filtered human platelets with cGMP and cAMP analogues, and used flow cytometric assays to detect low dose thrombin-induced formation of small platelet aggregates, single platelet disappearance (SPD), platelet-derived microparticles (PMP) and thrombin receptor agonist peptide (TRAP)-induced P-selectin expression. All four agonist-induced platelet activation phases were blocked when platelets were costimulated with the PKG activators 8-Br-PET-cGMP or 8-pCPT-cGMP and low-doses of thrombin or TRAP. However, extended incubation with 8-Br-PET-cGMP decreased its inhibition of TRAP-induced P-selectin expression in a time-dependent manner. This effect did not involve desensitisation of PKG or PKA activity, measured as site-specific VASP phosphorylation. Moreover, PKG activators in combination with the PKA activator Sp-5,6-DCL-cBIMPS revealed additive inhibitory effect on TRAP-induced P-selectin expression. Taken together, we found no evidence for a stimulatory role of cGMP/PKG in platelets activation and conclude rather that cGMP/PKG signalling has an important inhibitory function in human platelet activation.

  15. Thrombin-induced conversion of fibrinogen to fibrin results in rapid platelet trapping which is not dependent on platelet activation or GPIb

    PubMed Central

    Jarvis, Gavin E; Atkinson, Ben T; Frampton, Jon; Watson, Steve P

    2003-01-01

    Activation of human platelets by thrombin is mediated by the proteolytic cleavage of two G-protein coupled protease-activated receptors, PAR-1 and PAR-4. However, thrombin also binds specifically to the platelet surface glycoprotein GPIb. It has been claimed that thrombin can induce aggregation of platelets via a novel GPIb-mediated pathway, which is independent of PAR activation and fibrinogen binding to αIIbβ3 integrin, but dependent upon polymerizing fibrin and the generation of intracellular signals. In the presence of both fibrinogen and the αIIbβ3 receptor antagonist lotrafiban, thrombin induced a biphasic platelet aggregation response. The initial primary response was small but consistent and associated with the release of platelet granules. The delayed secondary response was more substantial and was abolished by the fibrin polymerization blocking peptide GPRP. Cleavage of the extracellular portion of GPIb by mocarhagin partially inhibited thrombin-induced αIIbβ3-dependent aggregation and release, but had no effect on the secondary fibrin-dependent response. Fixing of the platelets abolished αIIbβ3-dependent aggregation and release of adenine nucleotides, whereas the fibrin-dependent response remained, indicating that platelet activation and intracellular signalling are not necessary for this secondary ‘aggregation'. In conclusion, the secondary fibrin-dependent ‘aggregation' response observed in the presence of fibrinogen and lotrafiban is a platelet trapping phenomenon dependent primarily on the conversion of soluble fibrinogen to polymerizing fibrin by thrombin. PMID:12598411

  16. Soluble CD40 ligand induces β3 integrin tyrosine phosphorylation and triggers platelet activation by outside-in signaling

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, K. S. Srinivasa; Andre, Patrick; He, Ming; Bao, Ming; Manganello, Jeanne; Phillips, David R.

    2003-01-01

    We earlier reported that the soluble form of the CD40 ligand (sCD40L), is involved in thrombosis by stabilizing platelet thrombi. In this article, we have determined the mechanism by which this protein affects platelet biology. Addition of sCD40L to washed platelets was found to activate the receptor function of αIIbβ3 as measured by the induction of fibrinogen binding and the formation of platelet microparticles. Mutation in the KGD sequence (D117E) of sCD40L, the αIIbβ3-binding domain in the N terminus of the protein resulted in a loss of the platelet-stimulatory activity of this protein. Integrilin, a αIIbβ3 antagonist, but not an antibody to CD40 that blocked the ligand-binding activity, inhibited these platelet-stimulatory events. CD40-/- platelets bound fibrinogen and formed microparticles similar to WT platelets, again indicating that CD40 is not involved in sCD40L-induced platelet activation. Exposure of platelets to sCD40L, but not D117E-sCD40L-coated surfaces, induced platelet thrombi formation under arterial shear rate. sCD40L-induced platelet stimulation resulted in the phosphorylation of tyrosine-759 in the cytoplasmic domain of β3. Platelets from the diYF mouse strain, expressing β3 in which both cytoplasmic tyrosines are mutated to phenylalanine, were defective in sCD40L-induced platelet stimulation. These data indicate that sCD40L is a primary platelet agonist and that platelet stimulation is induced by the binding of the KGD domain of sCD40L to αIIbβ3, triggering outside-in signaling by tyrosine phosphorylation of β3. PMID:14519852

  17. Measurement of platelet aggregation functions using whole blood migration ratio in a microfluidic chip.

    PubMed

    Seo, Hong Seog; Choi, Sung Hyuk; Han, Miran; Kim, Kyeong Ah; Cho, Chi Hyun; An, Seong Soo A; Lim, Chae Seung; Shin, Sehyun

    2015-09-25

    Platelets play a major role in maintaining endothelial integrity and hemostasis. Of the various soluble agonists, ADP is an important in vivo stimulus for inducing platelet aggregation. In this study, a simple, rapid, and affordable method was designed for testing bleeding time (BT) and platelet aggregation with a two-channel microfluidic chip. Whole blood migration ratio (MR) from a microchip system was evaluated in comparison to the closure time (CT) from PFA-100 assays (Siemens, Germany) and CD62P expression on platelets. To induce platelet aggregation, a combination of collagen (1.84 mg/ml) and ADP (37.5 mg/ml) were used as agonists. After adding the agonists to samples, whole blood MR from the microchip system was measured. The outcome of the assessment depended on reaction time and agonist concentration. MR of whole blood from the microchip system was significantly correlated with CT from PFA-100 (r = 0.61, p <  0.05, n = 60). In addition, MR was negatively correlated with CD62P expression (r =-0.95, p <  0.05, n = 60). These results suggest that the measurement of MR using agonists is an easy, simple and efficient method for monitoring platelet aggregation in normal and ADP-receptors defective samples, along with the BT test. Thus, usage of the current microfluidic method could expand to diverse applications, including efficacy assessments in platelet therapy. PMID:26444593

  18. Inhibition of platelet thromboxane formation and phosphoinositides breakdown by osthole from Angelica pubescens.

    PubMed

    Ko, F N; Wu, T S; Liou, M J; Huang, T F; Teng, C M

    1989-11-24

    Osthole, isolated from Chinese herb Angelica pubescens, inhibited platelet aggregation and ATP release induced by ADP, arachidonic acid, PAF, collagen, ionophore A23187 and thrombin in washed rabbit platelets. It showed a weak activity in platelet-rich plasma. Osthole inhibited the thromboxane B2 formation caused by arachidonic acid, collagen, ionophore A23187 and thrombin in washed platelets, and also the thromboxane B2 formation caused by the incubation of lysed platelet homogenate with arachidonic acid. The generation of inositol phosphates in washed platelets caused by collagen, PAF and thrombin was suppressed by osthole. These data indicate that the inhibitory effect of osthole on platelet aggregation and release reaction was due to the inhibition of thromboxane formation and phosphoinositides breakdown. PMID:2556815

  19. Platelet receptor recognition and cross-talk in collagen-induced activation of platelets.

    PubMed

    Farndale, R W; Slatter, D A; Siljander, P R-M; Jarvis, G E

    2007-07-01

    Comprehensive mapping of protein-binding sites within human collagen III has allowed the recognition motifs for integrin alpha(2)beta(1) and VWF A3 domain to be identified. Glycoprotein VI-binding sites are understood, although less well defined. This information, together with recent developments in understanding collagen fiber architecture, and crystal structures of the receptor collagen-binding domains, allows a coherent model for the interaction of collagen with the platelet surface to be developed. This complements our understanding of the orchestration of receptor presentation by membrane microdomains, such that the polyvalent collagen surface may stabilize signaling complexes within the heterogeneous receptor composition of the lipid raft. The ensuing interactions lead to the convergence of signals from each of the adhesive receptors, mediated by FcR gamma-chain and/or FcgammaRIIa, leading to concerted and co-operative platelet activation. Each receptor has a shear-dependent role, VWF/GpIb essential at high shear, and alpha(2)beta(1) at low and intermediate shear, whilst GpVI provides core signals that contribute to enhanced integrin affinity, tighter binding to collagen and consequent platelet activation. PMID:17635730

  20. Platelet functional and transcriptional changes induced by intralipid infusion.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, Lea M; Vitseva, Olga; Tanriverdi, Kahraman; Kucukural, Alper; Mick, Eric; Hamburg, Naomi; Vita, Joseph; Freedman, Jane E

    2016-06-01

    Multiple studies have shown the effects of long-term exposure to high-fat or western diets on the vascular system. There is limited knowledge on the acute effects of high circulating fat levels, specifically on platelets, which have a role in many processes, including thrombosis and inflammation. This study investigated the effects of acute, high-fat exposure on platelet function and transcript profile. Twenty healthy participants were given an intravenous infusion of 20% Intralipid emulsion and heparin over 6 hours. Blood samples were taken prior to and the day after infusion to measure platelet function and transcript expression levels. Platelet aggregation was not significantly affected by Intralipid infusion, but, when mitochondria function was inhibited by carbonyl cyanide 3-chlorophenylhydrazone (CCCP) or oligomycin, platelet aggregation was higher in the post-infusion state compared to baseline. Through RNA sequencing, and verified by RT-qPCR, 902 miRNAs and 617 mRNAs were affected by Intralipid infusion. MicroRNAs increased include miR-4259 and miR-346, while miR-517b and miR-517c are both decreased. Pathway analysis identified two clusters significantly enriched, including cell motility. In conclusion, acute exposure to high fat affects mitochondrial-dependent platelet function, as well as the transcript profile. PMID:26940969

  1. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activation induces high mobility group box 1 release from proximal tubular cells during cisplatin nephrotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Kim, J

    2016-06-20

    Cisplatin is one of the most potent chemotherapy drugs against cancer, but its major side effect such as nephrotoxicity limits its use. Inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) protects against various renal diseases via gene transactivation and/or ADP-ribosylation. However, the role of PARP in necrotic cell death during cisplatin nephrotoxicity remains an open question. Here we demonstrated that pharmacological inhibition of PARP by postconditioning dose-dependently prevented tubular injury and renal dysfunction following cisplatin administration in mice. PARP inhibition by postconditioning also attenuated ATP depletion during cisplatin nephrotoxicity. Systemic release of high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) protein in plasma induced by cisplatin administration was significantly diminished by PARP inhibition by postconditioning. In in vitro kidney proximal tubular cell lines, PARP inhibition by postconditioning also diminished HMGB1 release from cells. These data demonstrate that cisplatin-induced PARP1 activation contributes to HMGB1 release from kidney proximal tubular cells, resulting in the promotion of inflammation during cisplatin nephrotoxicity. PMID:26447520

  2. The class I phosphoinositide 3-kinases α and β control antiphospholipid antibodies-induced platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Terrisse, Anne-Dominique; Laurent, Pierre-Alexandre; Garcia, Cédric; Gratacap, Marie-Pierre; Vanhaesebroeck, Bart; Sié, Pierre; Payrastre, Bernard

    2016-06-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is an autoimmune disease characterised by the presence of antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) associated with increased thrombotic risk and pregnancy morbidity. Although aPL are heterogeneous auto-antibodies, the major pathogenic target is the plasma protein β2-glycoprotein 1. The molecular mechanisms of platelet activation by aPL remain poorly understood. Here, we explored the role of the class IA phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) α and β isoforms in platelet activation by aPL. Compared to control IgG from healthy individuals, the IgG fraction isolated from patients with APS potentiates platelet aggregation induced by low dose of thrombin in vitro and increases platelet adhesion and thrombus growth on a collagen matrix under arterial shear rate through a mechanism involving glycoprotein Ib (GPIb) and Toll Like Receptor 2 (TLR-2). Using isoforms-selective pharmacological PI3K inhibitors and mice with megakaryocyte/platelet lineage-specific inactivation of class IA PI3K isoforms, we demonstrate a critical role of the PI3Kβ and PI3Kα isoforms in platelet activation induced by aPL. Our data show that aPL potentiate platelet activation through GPIbα and TLR-2 via a mechanism involving the class IA PI3Kα and β isoforms, which represent new potential therapeutic targets in the prevention or treatment of thrombotic events in patients with APS. PMID:26818901

  3. Red cabbage anthocyanins as inhibitors of lipopolysaccharide-induced oxidative stress in blood platelets.

    PubMed

    Saluk, Joanna; Bijak, Michal; Posmyk, Malgorzata M; Zbikowska, Halina M

    2015-09-01

    LPS is a Gram-negative bacteria endotoxin, which is an important pro-inflammatory agent. Blood platelets take part both in inflammatory processes and in pathogenesis of septic shock following accumulation of LPS. As a platelet agonist LPS causes the intraplatelet overproduction of ROS/RNS that are responsible for adverse modifications in the structure of platelet compounds being associated with a development of platelet-dependent diseases. Existing evidence suggests that anthocyanins (ATH) are able to protect the circulatory system. The antioxidative properties of ATH are believed to be mainly responsible for their positive health effects. The main goal of the present in vitro study was to investigate the potential protective properties of red cabbage ATH against oxidative damage induced by LPS in blood platelets. Exposure of platelets to LPS resulted in carbonyl group increase, 3-nitrotyrosine formation, lipid peroxidation and O2(•-) generation. We have shown that ATH extract effectively decreased oxidative stress induced by LPSs. The in silico analysis demonstrated that both cyanin and LPS were located at the same region of human TLR4-MD-2 complex. Our findings suggest that there could be two-way ATH platelet protection mechanism, by their antioxidant properties and directly by binding with TLRs. PMID:26208857

  4. Platelet dysfunction in vincristine treated patients.

    PubMed

    Steinherz, P G; Miller, D R; Hilgartner, M W; Schmalzer, E A

    1976-03-01

    Recent revival of interest in the use of vincristine (VCR) for the treatment of idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura prompted us to evaluate the platelet function of our patients on VCR. Eighteen patients with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) in remission, and nine children with solid tumours were studied on 80 occasions at different time intervals after their last VCR dose. A mildly elevated threshold for epinephrine-induced second phase aggregation and a delay in the onset of collagen-induced aggregation was found in patients with ALL not on VCR. Vincristine induced unobtainable second phase aggregation to epinephrine in 67%, 38%, 30% and to ADP in 53%, 13%, 33% of the patients 1 week, 2-3 weeks and 4 weeks respectively after administration. The thrombocytopathy was relative, not absolute, since collagen induced aggregation at all times. Platelet counts, uptake and release of serotonin, bleeding times, clot retractions and release of platelet factor 3 were normal. Platelet adhesion was abnormal in five of 12 patients tested. In vitro platelets are a hundred-fold less sensitive to VCR than in vivo. Cyclic adenosine monophosphate, cyclic guanosine monophosphate and dimethylsulfoxide do not protect platelets from VCR. The exact mechanism by which VCR abolishes second phase aggregation in patients is uncertain. Because of VCR's narrow therapeutic index between thrombocytopenia and thrombocythaemia, the use of VCR should be reserved for life-threatening haematologic disorders when treating non-malignant conditions. PMID:175822

  5. SDF-1α is a novel autocrine activator of platelets operating through its receptor CXCR4.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Tony G; Harper, Matthew T; Poole, Alastair W

    2015-01-01

    Platelets store and secrete the chemokine stromal cell-derived factor (SDF)-1α upon platelet activation, but the ability of platelet-derived SDF-1α to signal in an autocrine/paracrine manner mediating functional platelet responses relevant to thrombosis and haemostasis is unknown. We sought to explore the role of platelet-derived SDF-1α and its receptors, CXCR4 and CXCR7 in facilitating platelet activation and determine the mechanism facilitating SDF-1α-mediated regulation of platelet function. Using human washed platelets, CXCR4 inhibition, but not CXCR7 blockade significantly abrogated collagen-mediated platelet aggregation, dense granule secretion and thromboxane (Tx) A2 production. Time-dependent release of SDF-1α from collagen-activated platelets supports a functional role for SDF-1α in this regard. Using an in vitro whole blood perfusion assay, collagen-induced thrombus formation was substantially reduced with CXCR4 inhibition. In washed platelets, recombinant SDF-1α in the range of 20-100 ng/mL(-1) could significantly enhance platelet aggregation responses to a threshold concentration of collagen. These enhancements were completely dependent on CXCR4, but not CXCR7, which triggered TxA2 production and dense granule secretion. Rises in cAMP were significantly blunted by SDF-1α, which could also enhance collagen-mediated Ca2+ mobilisation, both of which were mediated by CXCR4. This potentiating effect of SDF-1α primarily required TxA2 signalling acting upstream of dense granule secretion, whereas blockade of ADP signalling could only partially attenuate SDF-1α-induced platelet activation. Therefore, this study supports a potentially novel autocrine/paracrine role for platelet-derived SDF-1α during thrombosis and haemostasis, through a predominantly TxA2-dependent and ADP-independent pathway. PMID:25283599

  6. Influenza Virus Infection Induces Platelet-Endothelial Adhesion Which Contributes to Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Michael G; Gamage, Asela; Zyla, Roman; Armstrong, Susan M; Advani, Suzanne; Advani, Andrew; Wang, Changsen; Lee, Warren L

    2016-02-01

    Lung injury after influenza infection is characterized by increased permeability of the lung microvasculature, culminating in acute respiratory failure. Platelets interact with activated endothelial cells and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of some forms of acute lung injury. Autopsy studies have revealed pulmonary microthrombi after influenza infection, and epidemiological studies suggest that influenza vaccination is protective against pulmonary thromboembolism; however, the effect of influenza infection on platelet-endothelial interactions is unclear. We demonstrate that endothelial infection with both laboratory and clinical strains of influenza virus increased the adhesion of human platelets to primary human lung microvascular endothelial cells. Platelets adhered to infected cells as well as to neighboring cells, suggesting a paracrine effect. Influenza infection caused the upregulation of von Willebrand factor and ICAM-1, but blocking these receptors did not prevent platelet-endothelial adhesion. Instead, platelet adhesion was inhibited by both RGDS peptide and a blocking antibody to platelet integrin α5β1, implicating endothelial fibronectin. Concordantly, lung histology from infected mice revealed viral dose-dependent colocalization of viral nucleoprotein and the endothelial marker PECAM-1, while platelet adhesion and fibronectin deposition also were observed in the lungs of influenza-infected mice. Inhibition of platelets using acetylsalicylic acid significantly improved survival, a finding confirmed using a second antiplatelet agent. Thus, influenza infection induces platelet-lung endothelial adhesion via fibronectin, contributing to mortality from acute lung injury. The inhibition of platelets may constitute a practical adjunctive strategy to the treatment of severe infections with influenza.IMPORTANCE There is growing appreciation of the involvement of the lung endothelium in the pathogenesis of severe infections with influenza virus. We have

  7. Influenza Virus Infection Induces Platelet-Endothelial Adhesion Which Contributes to Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, Michael G.; Gamage, Asela; Zyla, Roman; Armstrong, Susan M.; Advani, Suzanne; Advani, Andrew; Wang, Changsen

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Lung injury after influenza infection is characterized by increased permeability of the lung microvasculature, culminating in acute respiratory failure. Platelets interact with activated endothelial cells and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of some forms of acute lung injury. Autopsy studies have revealed pulmonary microthrombi after influenza infection, and epidemiological studies suggest that influenza vaccination is protective against pulmonary thromboembolism; however, the effect of influenza infection on platelet-endothelial interactions is unclear. We demonstrate that endothelial infection with both laboratory and clinical strains of influenza virus increased the adhesion of human platelets to primary human lung microvascular endothelial cells. Platelets adhered to infected cells as well as to neighboring cells, suggesting a paracrine effect. Influenza infection caused the upregulation of von Willebrand factor and ICAM-1, but blocking these receptors did not prevent platelet-endothelial adhesion. Instead, platelet adhesion was inhibited by both RGDS peptide and a blocking antibody to platelet integrin α5β1, implicating endothelial fibronectin. Concordantly, lung histology from infected mice revealed viral dose-dependent colocalization of viral nucleoprotein and the endothelial marker PECAM-1, while platelet adhesion and fibronectin deposition also were observed in the lungs of influenza-infected mice. Inhibition of platelets using acetylsalicylic acid significantly improved survival, a finding confirmed using a second antiplatelet agent. Thus, influenza infection induces platelet-lung endothelial adhesion via fibronectin, contributing to mortality from acute lung injury. The inhibition of platelets may constitute a practical adjunctive strategy to the treatment of severe infections with influenza. IMPORTANCE There is growing appreciation of the involvement of the lung endothelium in the pathogenesis of severe infections with influenza

  8. The Impact of Type 2 Diabetes on the Efficacy of ADP Receptor Blockers in Patients with Acute ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction: A Pilot Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Fedor, Marián; Kovář, František; Galajda, Peter; Bolek, Tomáš; Stančiaková, Lucia; Fedorová, Jana; Staško, Ján; Kubisz, Peter; Mokáň, Marián

    2016-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to validate the impact of type 2 diabetes (T2D) on the platelet reactivity in patients with acute ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) treated with adenosine diphosphate (ADP) receptor blockers. Methods. A pilot prospective study was performed. Totally 67 patients were enrolled. 21 patients had T2D. Among all study population, 33 patients received clopidogrel and 34 patients received prasugrel. The efficacy of ADP receptor blocker therapy had been tested in two time intervals using light transmission aggregometry with specific inducer and vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein phosphorylation (VASP-P) flow cytometry assay. Results. There were no significant differences in platelet aggregability among T2D and nondiabetic (ND) group. The platelet reactivity index of VASP-P did not differ significantly between T2D and ND group (59.4 ± 30.9% versus 60.0 ± 25.2% and 33.9 ± 25.3% versus 38.6 ± 29.3% in second testing). The number of ADP receptor blocker nonresponders did not differ significantly between T2D and ND patients. The time interval from ADP receptor blocker loading dosing to the blood sampling was similar in T2D and ND patients in both examinations. Conclusion. This prospective study did not confirm the higher platelet reactivity and higher prevalence of ADP receptor blocker nonresponders in T2D acute STEMI patients. PMID:27493970

  9. Piperlongumine Blocks JAK2-STAT3 to Inhibit Collagen-Induced Platelet Reactivity Independent of Reactive Oxygen Species†

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Hengjie; Houck, Katie L.; Tian, Ye; Bharadwaj, Uddalak; Hull, Ken; Zhou, Zhou; Zhou, Mingzhao; Wu, Xiaoping; Tweardy, David J.; Romo, Daniel; Fu, Xiaoyun; Zhang, Yanjun; Zhang, Jianning; Dong, Jing-fei

    2015-01-01

    Background Piperlongumine (PL) is a compound isolated from the piper longum plant. It possesses anti-cancer activities through blocking the transcription factor STAT3 and by inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) in cancer, but not normal cells. It also inhibits platelet aggregation induced by collagen, but the underlying mechanism is not known. Objective We conducted in vitro experiments to test the hypothesis that PL regulates a non-transcriptional activity of STAT3 to specifically reduce the reactivity of human platelets to collagen. Results PL dose-dependently blocked collagen-induced platelet aggregation, calcium influx, CD62p expression and thrombus formation on collagen with a maximal inhibition at 100 μM. It reduced platelet microvesiculation induced by collagen. PL blocked the activation of JAK2 and STAT3 in collagen-stimulated platelets. This inhibitory effect was significantly reduced in platelets pretreated with a STAT3 inhibitor. Although PL induced ROS production in platelets; quenching ROS using excessive reducing agents: 20 μM GSH and 0.5 mM L-Cysteine, did not block the inhibitory effects. The NADPH oxidase inhibitor Apocynin also had no effect. Conclusions PL inhibited collagen-induced platelet reactivity by targeting the JAK2-STAT3 pathway. We also provide experimental evidence that PL and collagen induce different oxidants that have differential effects on platelets. Studying these differential effects may uncover new mechanisms of regulating platelet functions by oxidants in redox signals. PMID:26645674

  10. Formulation and Storage of Platelet-Rich Plasma Homemade Product

    PubMed Central

    Giraudo, Laurent; Veran, Julie; Magalon, Jeremy; Coudreuse, Jean-Marie; Magalon, Guy; Dubois, Christophe; Serratrice, Nicolas; Dignat-George, Françoise; Sabatier, Florence

    2012-01-01

    Abstract The platelet-rich plasma (PRP) is an autologous biotherapy based on platelet-healing properties. Here, we developed a simple and reproducible PRP purification protocol based on two successive centrifugations. We evaluated different centrifugation speeds and time-storage durations on the platelet quantity and quality. Sterility and stability of our PRP homemade product were also performed. We prepared PRP from 54 healthy volunteers. We tested activation state, reactivity, and stability of platelets by flow cytometry using basal and adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced P-selectin expression markers; growth factor release after platelet activation by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA); platelet aggregation capacity by aggregrometry assays; clot formation and retraction by thromboelastography; and platelet morphology by ultrastructural analysis. About 130 and 250 g successive speed centrifugations further concentrated platelets while preserving their bioactivity during 6 h (after that, platelet functions were significantly altered). In these conditions, we obtained a highly concentrated pure PRP product (with a low leukocyte count) suitable to study platelet properties. To avoid the loss of efficacy, we recommend injecting PRP under 3 h after preparation. PMID:23516671

  11. Prolonged poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 activity regulates JP-8-induced sustained cytokine expression in alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Luis A; Smulson, Mark E; Chen, Zun

    2007-05-01

    Environmental pollutants inducing oxidative stress stimulate chronic inflammatory responses in the lung leading to pulmonary tissue dysfunction. In response to oxidative stress, alveolar macrophages produce both reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species, which induce the expression of a wide variety of immune-response genes. We found that a prolonged exposure of alveolar macrophages to a nonlethal dose (8 microg/ml) of JP-8, the kerosene-based hydrocarbon jet fuel, induced the persistent expression of IL-1, iNOS, and COX-2, as well as cell adhesion molecules (ICAM-1 and VCAM-1). Because poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP-1), a coactivator of NF-kappaB, regulates inflammatory responses and associated disorders in the airways, we determined whether JP-8 induces the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation automodification of PARP-1 in alveolar macrophages. We observed that PARP-1 is activated in a time-dependent manner, which was temporally coincident with the prolonged activation of NF-kappaB and with the augmented expression of the proinflammatory factors described above. The 4 microg/ml dilution of JP-8 also increased the activity of PARP-1 as well as the expression of iNOS and COX-2, indicating that lower doses of JP-8 also affect the regulation of proinflammatory factors in pulmonary macrophages. Together, these results demonstrate that an extensive induction of PARP-1 might coordinate the persistent expression of proinflammatory mediators in alveolar macrophages activated by aromatic hydrocarbons that can result in lung injury from occupational exposure. PMID:17395016

  12. Platelet Rich Fibrin Matrix Improves Wound Angiogenesis via Inducing Endothelial Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Roy, Sashwati; Driggs, Jason; Elgharably, Haytham; Biswas, Sabyasachi; Findley, Muna; Khanna, Savita; Gnyawali, Urmila; Bergdall, Valerie K.; Sen, Chandan K.

    2013-01-01

    The economic, social and public health burden of chronic ulcers and other compromised wounds are enormous and rapidly increasing with the aging population. The growth factors derived from platelets play an important role in tissue remodeling including neovascularization. Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been utilized and studied for the last four decades. Platelet gel and fibrin sealant, derived from PRP mixed with thrombin and calcium chloride, have been exogenously applied to tissues to promote wound healing, bone growth, hemostasis and tissue sealing. In this study we first characterized recovery and viability of as well as growth factor release from platelets in a novel preparation of platelet gel and fibrin matrix, namely, platelet rich fibrin matrix (PRFM). Next, the effect of PRFM application in a delayed model of ischemic wound angiogenesis was investigated. The study for the first-time shows the kinetics of the viability of platelet embedded fibrin matrix. A slow and steady release of growth factors from PRFM was observed. The VEGF released from PRFM was primarily responsible for endothelial mitogenic response via ERK activation pathway. Finally, this preparation of PRFM effectively induced endothelial cell proliferation and improved wound angiogenesis in chronic wounds, providing evidence of probable mechanisms of action of PRFM in healing of chronic ulcers. PMID:22092846

  13. Stacking fault induced tunnel barrier in platelet graphite nanofiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Yann-Wen; Chang, Wen-Hao; Li, Yuan-Yao; Chang, Yuan-Chih; Chang, Chia-Seng; Chen, Chii-Dong

    2014-09-01

    A correlation study using image inspection and electrical characterization of platelet graphite nanofiber devices is conducted. Close transmission electron microscopy and diffraction pattern inspection reveal layers with inflection angles appearing in otherwise perfectly stacked graphene platelets, separating nanofibers into two domains. Electrical measurement gives a stability diagram consisting of alternating small-large Coulomb blockade diamonds, suggesting that there are two charging islands coupled together through a tunnel junction. Based on these two findings, we propose that a stacking fault can behave as a tunnel barrier for conducting electrons and is responsible for the observed double-island single electron transistor characteristics.

  14. Stacking fault induced tunnel barrier in platelet graphite nanofiber

    SciTech Connect

    Lan, Yann-Wen E-mail: ywlan@phys.sinica.edu.tw; Chang, Yuan-Chih; Chang, Chia-Seng; Chen, Chii-Dong E-mail: ywlan@phys.sinica.edu.tw; Chang, Wen-Hao; Li, Yuan-Yao

    2014-09-08

    A correlation study using image inspection and electrical characterization of platelet graphite nanofiber devices is conducted. Close transmission electron microscopy and diffraction pattern inspection reveal layers with inflection angles appearing in otherwise perfectly stacked graphene platelets, separating nanofibers into two domains. Electrical measurement gives a stability diagram consisting of alternating small-large Coulomb blockade diamonds, suggesting that there are two charging islands coupled together through a tunnel junction. Based on these two findings, we propose that a stacking fault can behave as a tunnel barrier for conducting electrons and is responsible for the observed double-island single electron transistor characteristics.

  15. β-Arrestin 2-dependent activation of ERK1/2 is required for ADP-induced paxillin phosphorylation at Ser83 and microglia chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Hyun; Hollingsworth, Ryan; Kwon, Hyeok-Yil; Lee, Narae; Chung, Chang Y.

    2014-01-01

    Microglia play crucial roles in increased inflammation in the CNS upon brain injuries and diseases. Extracellular ADP has been reported to induce microglia chemotaxis and membrane ruffle formation through P2Y12 receptor. In this study, we examined the role of ERK1/2 activation in ADP-induced microglia chemotaxis. ADP stimulation increases the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and paxillin phosphorylation at Tyr31 and Ser83. Inhibition of ERK1/2 significantly inhibited paxillin phosphorylation at Ser83 and the retraction of membrane ruffles, causing inefficient chemotaxis. Close examination of dynamics of focal adhesion formation with GFP-paxillin revealed that the disassembly of focal adhesions in U0126-treated cells was significantly impaired. Depletion of β-Arr2 with shRNA markedly reduced the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Pax/Ser83, indicating that β-Arr2 is required for ERK1/2 activation upon ADP stimulation. A large fraction of phosphorylated ERK1/2 and β-Arr2 were translocated and co-localized at focal contacts in the newly forming lamellipodia. Examination of kinetics and rate constant of paxillin formation and disassembly revealed that the phosphorylation of paxillin at Tyr31 by c-Src appears to be involved in adhesion formation upon ADP stimulation while Ser83 required for adhesion disassembly. PMID:22638989

  16. Glutardialdehyde induced fluorescence technique (GIFT): a new method for the imaging of platelet adhesion on biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Frank, R D; Dresbach, H; Thelen, H; Sieberth, H G

    2000-11-01

    One of the major limitations of biomaterials used in medicine is the adhesion and subsequent activation of platelets upon contact with blood. The development of new or modified materials necessitates adequate methods for the detection and quantification of platelet/material interactions. These interactions are commonly investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), radioisotope and immunological techniques, or by quantification of released platelet contents. Given the lack of a simple, rapid, and inexpensive assay, we developed a novel method for the accurate assessment of platelet adhesion after contact with foreign surfaces, which enables quantitative measurements as well as imaging of the platelet shape change, and which omits conventional or immunological staining and time-consuming preparative steps. The glutardialdehyde induced fluorescence technique (GIFT) uses the epifluorescence of glutardialdehyde-fixed platelets detected by fluorescence microscopy and is suitable for opaque and transparent materials. Combined with computer-aided image analysis, numbers of adherent platelets, platelet-covered surface, and average platelet spread area can be determined as markers of surface thrombogenicity. To validate the technique, four materials of different thrombogenicity [polypropylene (PP), poly(D,L-lactide) (PDLLA), 2-hydroxyethyl-methacrylate-grafted PDLLA (PDLLA-HEMA), and heparin-coupled PDLLA-HEMA] were investigated by GIFT and SEM. We found concordant results with SEM and GIFT with the following ranking of thrombogenicity: PP > PDLLA > PDLLA-HEMA > or = PDLLA-HEMA-heparin. GIFT significantly discriminated between the investigated materials. The surface modifications led to improved thromboresistance with reduced platelet adhesion and shape change. The main advantages of GIFT as compared with SEM are: no vacuum-drying or dehydration, less time-consuming procedure, fixation and fluorescence "staining" in one step, and suitability for computer

  17. Staphylococci-induced Human Platelet Injury Mediated by Protein A and Immunoglobulin G Fc Fragment Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Hawiger, Jack; Steckley, Sylvia; Hammond, Dianne; Cheng, Charles; Timmons, Sheila; Glick, Alan D.; Des Prez, Roger M.

    1979-01-01

    Bloodstream infections with staphylococci are accompanied by thromboembolic complications. We have studied the mechanism of the interaction of staphylococci with human blood platelets. Staphylococci that possess protein A, a bacterial receptor for the Fc fragment of immunoglobulin G (IgG), caused aggregation of human platelets in whole plasma accompanied by release of [3H]serotonin. These reactions were time and concentration dependent, requiring two or more staphylococci per platelet to give maximal response within 5 min. The interaction between staphylococci and platelets required the presence of cell wall-bound protein A and of IgG with an intact Fc fragment. It did not require an intact complement system. Cell wall-bound protein A (solid phase) was capable of aggregating human platelets in whole plasma. In contrast, free, solubilized protein A (fluid phase) did not cause measurable aggregation, and release of [3H]serotonin was reduced. An excess of free, solubilized protein A blocked aggregation of human platelets induced by staphylococci in whole plasma. The role of the Fc fragment of IgG in the staphylococci-human platelet interaction was demonstrated by an experiment in which free, isolated Fc fragment blocked aggregation of platelets in whole plasma induced by staphylococci. Furthermore, binding of 125I-protein A to human platelets was demonstrated in the presence of complete IgG with intact Fc fragment but not in the presence of the F(ab)2 fragment. Binding of the protein A-IgG complex to the human platelet Fc receptor was paralleled by the release of [3H]serotonin. These results represent a novel example of the interaction of two phylogenetically different Fc receptors, one on prokaryotic staphylococci and the other on human platelets. Their common ligand, IgG, is amplified by one Fc receptor (protein A) to react with another Fc receptor present on human platelets, which results in membrane-mediated aggregation and release reaction occurring in whole

  18. Pathophysiological role of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activation during acetaminophen-induced liver cell necrosis in mice.

    PubMed

    Cover, Cathleen; Fickert, Peter; Knight, Tamara R; Fuchsbichler, Andrea; Farhood, Anwar; Trauner, Michael; Jaeschke, Hartmut

    2005-03-01

    DNA fragmentation in hepatocytes occurs early after acetaminophen (AAP) overdose in mice. DNA strandbreaks can induce excessive activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARP), which may lead to oncotic necrosis. Based on controversial findings with chemical PARP inhibitors, the role of PARP-1 activation in AAP hepatotoxicity remains unclear. To investigate PARP-1 activation and evaluate a pathophysiological role of PARP-1, we used both PARP inhibitors (3-aminobenzamide; 5-aminoisoquinolinone) and PARP gene knockout mice (PARP-/-). Treatment of C3Heb/FeJ mice with 300 mg/kg AAP resulted in DNA fragmentation and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) release as early as 3 h, with further increase of these parameters up to 12 h. Few nuclei of hepatocytes stained positive for poly-ADP-ribosylated nuclear proteins (PAR) as indicator for PARP-1 activation at 4.5 h. However, the number of PAR-positive cells and staining intensity increased substantially at 6 and 12 h. Pretreatment with 500 mg/kg 3-aminobenzamide before AAP attenuated hepatic glutathione depletion and completely eliminated DNA fragmentation and liver injury. Delayed treatment several hours after AAP was still partially protective. On the other hand, liver injury was not attenuated in PARP-/- mice compared to wild-type animals. Similarly, the specific PARP-1 inhibitor 5-aminoisoquinolinone (5 mg/kg) was not protective. However, 3-aminobenzamide attenuated liver injury in WT and PARP-/- mice. In summary, PARP-1 activation is a consequence of DNA fragmentation after AAP overdose. However, PARP-1 activation is not a relevant event for AAP-induced oncotic necrosis. The protection of 3-aminobenzamide against AAP-induced liver injury was due to reduced metabolic activation and potentially its antioxidant effect but independent of PARP-1 inhibition. PMID:15601672

  19. Spice active principles as the inhibitors of human platelet aggregation and thromboxane biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Raghavendra, R H; Naidu, K Akhilender

    2009-07-01

    Spice active principles are reported to have anti-diabetic, anti-hypercholesterolemic, antilithogenic, anti-inflammatory, anti-microbial and anti-cancer properties. In our previous report we have shown that spices and their active principles inhibit 5-lipoxygenase and also formation of leukotriene C4. In this study, we report the modulatory effect of spice active principles viz., eugenol, capsaicin, piperine, quercetin, curcumin, cinnamaldehyde and allyl sulphide on in vitro human platelet aggregation. We have demonstrated that spice active principles inhibit platelet aggregation induced by different agonists, namely ADP (50microM), collagen (500microg/ml), arachidonic acid (AA) (1.0mM) and calcium ionophore A-23187 (20microM). Spice active principles showed preferential inhibition of arachidonic acid-induced platelet aggregation compared to other agonists. Among the spice active principles tested, eugenol and capsaicin are found to be most potent inhibitors of AA-induced platelet aggregation with IC50 values of 0.5 and 14.6microM, respectively. The order of potency of spice principles in inhibiting AA-induced platelet aggregation is eugenol>capsaicin>curcumin>cinnamaldehyde>piperine>allyl sulphide>quercetin. Eugenol is found to be 29-fold more potent than aspirin in inhibiting AA-induced human platelet aggregation. Eugenol and capsaicin inhibited thromboxane B2 (TXB2) formation in platelets in a dose-dependent manner challenged with AA apparently by the inhibition of the cyclooxygenase (COX-1). Eugenol-mediated inhibition of platelet aggregation is further confirmed by dose-dependent decrease in malondialdehyde (MDA) in platelets. Further, eugenol and capsaicin inhibited platelet aggregation induced by agonists-collagen, ADP and calcium ionophore but to a lesser degree compared to AA. These results clearly suggest that spice principles have beneficial effects in modulating human platelet aggregation. PMID:19501497

  20. Identification of a novel platelet antagonist that binds to CLEC-2 and suppresses podoplanin-induced platelet aggregation and cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yu-Tsui; Lu, Meng-Hong; Huang, Tur-Fu; Chong, Kowit-Yu; Liao, Hsiang-Ruei; Cheng, Ju-Chien; Tseng, Ching-Ping

    2015-01-01

    Podoplanin (PDPN) enhances tumor metastases by eliciting tumor cell-induced platelet aggregation (TCIPA) through activation of platelet C-type lectin-like receptor 2 (CLEC-2). A novel and non-cytotoxic 5-nitrobenzoate compound 2CP was synthesized that specifically inhibited the PDPN/CLEC-2 interaction and TCIPA with no effect on platelet aggregation stimulated by other platelet agonists. 2CP possessed anti-cancer metastatic activity in vivo and augmented the therapeutic efficacy of cisplatin in the experimental animal model without causing a bleeding risk. Analysis of the molecular action of 2CP further revealed that Akt1/PDK1 and PKCμ were two alternative CLEC-2 signaling pathways mediating PDPN-induced platelet activation. 2CP directly bound to CLEC-2 and, by competing with the same binding pocket of PDPN in CLEC-2, inhibited PDPN-mediated platelet activation. This study provides evidence that 2CP is the first defined platelet antagonist with CLEC-2 binding activity. The augmentation in the therapeutic efficacy of cisplatin by 2CP suggests that a combination of a chemotherapeutic agent and a drug with anti-TCIPA activity such as 2CP may prove clinically effective. PMID:26528756

  1. Identification of a novel platelet antagonist that binds to CLEC-2 and suppresses podoplanin-induced platelet aggregation and cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yao-Wen; Hsieh, Pei-Wen; Chang, Yu-Tsui; Lu, Meng-Hong; Huang, Tur-Fu; Chong, Kowit-Yu; Liao, Hsiang-Ruei; Cheng, Ju-Chien; Tseng, Ching-Ping

    2015-12-15

    Podoplanin (PDPN) enhances tumor metastases by eliciting tumor cell-induced platelet aggregation (TCIPA) through activation of platelet C-type lectin-like receptor 2 (CLEC-2). A novel and non-cytotoxic 5-nitrobenzoate compound 2CP was synthesized that specifically inhibited the PDPN/CLEC-2 interaction and TCIPA with no effect on platelet aggregation stimulated by other platelet agonists. 2CP possessed anti-cancer metastatic activity in vivo and augmented the therapeutic efficacy of cisplatin in the experimental animal model without causing a bleeding risk. Analysis of the molecular action of 2CP further revealed that Akt1/PDK1 and PKCμ were two alternative CLEC-2 signaling pathways mediating PDPN-induced platelet activation. 2CP directly bound to CLEC-2 and, by competing with the same binding pocket of PDPN in CLEC-2, inhibited PDPN-mediated platelet activation. This study provides evidence that 2CP is the first defined platelet antagonist with CLEC-2 binding activity. The augmentation in the therapeutic efficacy of cisplatin by 2CP suggests that a combination of a chemotherapeutic agent and a drug with anti-TCIPA activity such as 2CP may prove clinically effective. PMID:26528756

  2. P-selectin increases angiotensin II-induced cardiac inflammation and fibrosis via platelet activation

    PubMed Central

    LIU, GAIZHEN; LIANG, BIN; SONG, XIAOSU; BAI, RUI; QIN, WEIWEI; SUN, XU; LU, YAN; BIAN, YUNFEI; XIAO, CHUANSHI

    2016-01-01

    Platelet activation is important in hypertension-induced cardiac inflammation and fibrosis. P-selectin expression significantly (P<0.05) increases when platelets are activated during hypertension. Although P-selectin recruits leukocytes to sites of inflammation, the role of P-selectin in cardiac inflammation and fibrosis remains to be elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate whether platelet-derived P-selectin promotes hypertensive cardiac inflammation and fibrosis. P-selectin knockout (P-sel KO) mice and wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 littermates were infused with angiotensin II (Ang II) at 1,500 ng/kg/min for 7 days and then cross-transplanted with platelets originating from either WT or P-sel KO mice. P-selectin expression was increased in the myocardium and plasma of hypertensive mice, and the P-sel KO mice exhibited significantly (P<0.05) reduced cardiac fibrosis. The fibrotic areas were markedly smaller in the hearts of P-sel KO mice compared with WT mice, as assessed by Masson's trichrome staining. In addition, α-smooth muscle actin and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) expression levels were decreased in the P-sel KO mice, as assessed by immunohistochemistry. Following platelet transplantation into P-sel KO mice, the number of Mac-2 (galectin-3)- and TGF-β1-positive cells was increased in mice that received WT platelets compared with those that received P-sel KO platelets, and the mRNA expression levels of collagen I and TGF-β1 were also increased. The results from the present study suggest that activated platelets secrete P-selectin to promote cardiac inflammation and fibrosis in Ang II-induced hypertension. PMID:27121797

  3. Endocannabinoids Control Platelet Activation and Limit Aggregate Formation under Flow

    PubMed Central

    De Angelis, Valentina; Koekman, Arnold C.; Weeterings, Cees; Roest, Mark; de Groot, Philip G.; Herczenik, Eszter; Maas, Coen

    2014-01-01

    Background The endocannabinoid system has previously been implicated in the regulation of neurons and inflammatory cells. Additionally, it has been reported that endocannabinoid receptors are present on circulating platelets, but there has been conflicting evidence on their contribution to platelet function. Objectives Our aim was to examine the role of endocannabinoids in platelet function in vitro and in vivo. Methods and Results We studied the effects of the well-characterized endogenous endocannabinoid anandamide on platelet aggregation in suspension, α-granule release, calcium mobilization, Syk phosphorylation, as well as platelet spreading and aggregate formation under flow. Anandamide inhibits platelet aggregation and α-granule release by collagen, collagen-derived peptide CRP-XL, ADP, arachidonic acid and thromboxane A2 analogue U46619. However, activation via thrombin receptor PAR-1 stays largely unaffected. Calcium mobilization is significantly impaired when platelets are stimulated with collagen or CRP-XL, but remains normal in the presence of the other agonists. In line with this finding, we found that anandamide prevents collagen-induced Syk phosphorylation. Furthermore, anandamide-treated platelets exhibit reduced spreading on immobilized fibrinogen, have a decreased capacity for binding fibrinogen in solution and show perturbed platelet aggregate formation under flow over collagen. Finally, we investigated the influence of Cannabis sativa consumption by human volunteers on platelet activation. Similar to our in vitro findings with anandamide, ex vivo collagen-induced platelet aggregation and aggregate formation on immobilized collagen under flow were impaired in whole blood of donors that had consumed Cannabis sativa. Conclusions Endocannabinoid receptor agonists reduce platelet activation and aggregate formation both in vitro and ex vivo after Cannabis sativa consumption. Further elucidation of this novel regulatory mechanism for platelet function

  4. Peptide LSARLAF induces integrin β3 dependent outside-in signaling in platelets

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Haixia; Xu, Zhenlu; Li, Ding; Zhang, Lin; Wang, Kemin; Taylor, Donald B.; Liu, Junling; Gartner, T. Kent

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Peptide LSARLAF (LSA) can bind and activate integrin αIIbβ3 in the absence of ‘inside-out’ signal. The active αIIbβ3 mediates ‘outside-in’ signaling that elicits platelet aggregation, granule secretion and TxA2 production. Here we identify the membrane glycoproteins which mediate LSA-induced platelet activation other than αIIbβ3, and determine the roles of Src, PLCγ2, FcRγ-chain, and SLP-76 in LSA-induced platelet activation. Method Ligand-receptor binding assay was performed to study the effect of peptide LSA or its control peptide FRALASL (FRA) on integrins binding to their ligands. Spreading of CHO cells expressing αIIbβ3 or αVβ3 on immobilized fibrinogen was measured in the presence of LSA or FRA. Washed β3, Src, FcRγ-chain, LAT and SLP-76 deficient platelets aggregation and secretion were tested in response to LSA. Results Ligand-receptor binding assay indicated that LSA promoted the binding of multiple ligands to αIIbβ3 or αVβ3. LSA also enhanced CHO cells with αIIbβ3 or αVβ3 expression spreading on immobilized fibrinogen. β3 deficient platelets failed to aggregate and secrete in response to LSA. The phosphorylation of PLCγ2 and Syk was also β3 dependent. Src, FcRγ-chain, LAT and SLP-76 deficient platelets did not aggregate, secrete ATP or produce TxA2 in response to LSA. Conclusion LSA-induced platelet activation is β3 dependent, and signaling molecules Src, FcRγ-chain, SLP-76 and LAT play crucial roles in LSA-induced β3 mediated signaling. PMID:22482832

  5. Platelet function in dogs with bacterial infections and leishmaniasis.

    PubMed

    Abid, Monia; Kalbantner, Kerstin; Mischke, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the influence of bacterial infections or leishmaniasis on primary haemostasis in dogs. Capillary bleeding time, automatic platelet function analysis (PFA-100), turbidimetric platelet aggregation, impedance aggregometry, platelet count and, in addition, the haematocrit were investigated in 25 dogs with bacterial infections or leishmaniasis . Results of these diseased dogs were compared to the control group and additionally classified into two subgroups based on criteria of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) (groups "SIRS" and "Non-SIRS"). Dogs with infections had a significantly prolonged closure time of the PFA-100 using both cartridges (e. g., collagen/ADP: 83 [55-301] vs. 65 [47-99 s; median [minimum-maximum]; p < 0.0001), a significant decrease in maximal aggregation of the turbidimetric aggregometry (e. g., ADP-induced: 45.2 ± 26.8 vs. 67.3 ± 21.8%; mean ± SD; P = 0.003), a significant increase of collagen-induced impedance aggregometry and a significant suppression of arachidonic acid-induced impedance aggregometry. An enhanced collagen-induced impedance aggregation was the only significant difference between subgroups "SIRS"and "Non-SIRS". In conclusion, although individual tests indicate enhanced platelet aggregation, most of the in vitro tests revealed a normal to moderately reduced functionality. The reduced aggregabiity may partly indicate preactivation of platelets. PMID:26281441

  6. The validity of canine platelet aggregometry in predicting vascular graft patency.

    PubMed

    Greisler, H P; McGurrin, J F; Klosak, J J; Tattersall, C W; Ellinger, J; Henderson, S C; Cabusao, E A

    1990-01-01

    Several laboratories have found canine platelet aggregometry predictive of thrombotic potential in vascular grafts. Adenosine diphosphate (ADP) is a frequently used agonist, often at unspecified or differing concentrations. This study was designed to evaluate the predictive value of ADP-induced platelet aggregometry and the validity of the methodology. Platelet aggregometry in response to 2 x 10(-5) M ADP was assayed in 70 dogs. Twenty-six percent were aggregators, 51% were non-aggregators, and 20% were indeterminant. All dogs were then treated with aspirin and dipyridamole. Vascular prostheses were implanted bilaterally (aorto-iliac) and anti-platelet therapy continued for two weeks. Dose-response to ADP was studied at three concentrations in 20 dogs. At 2 x 10(-5) 1/20 aggregated, at 4 x 10(-5) 3/19 aggregated and at 2 x 10(-4) 15/20 aggregated. Time between samples and study was evaluated in 11 dogs, with 2/11 changing from non-aggregator to aggregator at two or three hours. Daily reproducibility was studied in 70 dogs, 14 of which changed aggregation status between days. Patency was 58/68 (85%) for non-aggregators, 23/34 (68%) for aggregators (p = 0.038). Platelet aggregometry has significant predictive value for graft patency but methodology must be specified and standardized. PMID:2262494

  7. Collagen-induced binding to human platelets of platelet-derived growth factor leading to inhibition of P43 and P20 phosphorylation

    SciTech Connect

    Bryckaert, M.C.; Rendu, F.; Tobelem, G.; Wasteson, A.

    1989-03-15

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) is known to inhibit collagen-induced platelet aggregation. Collagen-induced binding of /sup 125/I-PDGF to human washed platelets was therefore investigated. It was found to be time-dependent, reaching a plateau at 20 degrees C after 30 min, collagen concentration-dependent, specifically inhibited by unlabeled PDGF, and saturable. Scatchard plot analysis showed a single class of sites with 3000 +/- 450 molecules bound/cell and an apparent KD of 1.2 +/- 0.2 10(-8) M. The effects of PDGF on collagen-induced phosphoinositide breakdown and protein phosphorylation were also investigated. At 50 ng/ml PDGF, a concentration which completely inhibited collagen-induced aggregation, the breakdown of (/sup 32/P)phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate (PIP2) and (/sup 32/P)phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PIP) was observed, but the subsequent replenishment of (/sup 32/P)PIP2 was inhibited. The same PDGF concentration totally inhibited collagen-induced phosphatidic acid formation. PDGF also completely prevented phosphorylation of P43 and P20, as a result of protein kinase C activation consecutive to phosphoinositide metabolism. These results suggest that a specific PDGF receptor can be induced by collagen, and PDGF can effect the early events of collagen-induced platelet activation by inhibiting PIP2 resynthesis and P43 and P20 phosphorylation. It is concluded that PDGF might be involved in a negative feed-back control of platelet activation.

  8. PKC and AKT Modulate cGMP/PKG Signaling Pathway on Platelet Aggregation in Experimental Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Lopes-Pires, M Elisa; Naime, Ana C Antunes; Almeida Cardelli, Nádia J; Anjos, Débora J; Antunes, Edson; Marcondes, Sisi

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis severity has been positively correlated with platelet dysfunction, which may be due to elevations in nitric oxide (NO) and cGMP levels. Protein kinase C, Src kinases, PI3K and AKT modulate platelet activity in physiological conditions, but no studies evaluated the role of these enzymes in platelet aggregation in sepsis. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that in sepsis these enzymes positively modulate upstream the NO-cGMP pathway resulting in platelet inhibition. Rats were injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 1 mg/kg, i.p.) and blood was collected after 6 h. Platelet aggregation was induced by ADP (10 μM). Western blotting assays were carried out to analyze c-Src and AKT activation in platelets. Intraplatelet cGMP levels were determined by enzyme immunoassay kit. Phosphorylation of c-SRC at Tyr416 was the same magnitude in platelets of control and LPS group. Incubation of the non-selective Src inhibitor PP2 (10 μM) had no effect on platelet aggregation of LPS-treated rats. LPS increased intraplatelet cGMP levels by 5-fold compared with control group, which was accompanied by 76% of reduction in ADP-induced platelet aggregation. The guanylyl cyclase inhibitor ODQ (25 μM) and the PKG inhibitor Rp-8-Br-PET-cGMPS (25 μM) fully reversed the inhibitory effect of LPS on platelet aggregation. Likewise, the PKC inhibitor GF109203X (10 μM) reversed the inhibition by LPS of platelet aggregation and decreased cGMP levels in platelets. AKT phosphorylation at Thr308 was significantly higher in platelets of LPS compared with control group, which was not reduced by PI3K inhibition. The AKT inhibitor API-1 (20 μM) significantly increased aggregation and reduced cGMP levels in platelets of LPS group. However, the PI3K inhibitor wortmannin and LY29004 had no effect on platelet aggregation of LPS-treated rats. Therefore, inhibition of ADP-induced platelet aggregation after LPS injection is mediated by cGMP/PKG-dependent mechanisms, and PKC and AKT act

  9. PKC and AKT Modulate cGMP/PKG Signaling Pathway on Platelet Aggregation in Experimental Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Lopes-Pires, M. Elisa; Naime, Ana C. Antunes; Almeida Cardelli, Nádia J.; Anjos, Débora J.; Antunes, Edson; Marcondes, Sisi

    2015-01-01

    Sepsis severity has been positively correlated with platelet dysfunction, which may be due to elevations in nitric oxide (NO) and cGMP levels. Protein kinase C, Src kinases, PI3K and AKT modulate platelet activity in physiological conditions, but no studies evaluated the role of these enzymes in platelet aggregation in sepsis. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that in sepsis these enzymes positively modulate upstream the NO-cGMP pathway resulting in platelet inhibition. Rats were injected with lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 1 mg/kg, i.p.) and blood was collected after 6 h. Platelet aggregation was induced by ADP (10 μM). Western blotting assays were carried out to analyze c-Src and AKT activation in platelets. Intraplatelet cGMP levels were determined by enzyme immunoassay kit. Phosphorylation of c-SRC at Tyr416 was the same magnitude in platelets of control and LPS group. Incubation of the non-selective Src inhibitor PP2 (10 μM) had no effect on platelet aggregation of LPS-treated rats. LPS increased intraplatelet cGMP levels by 5-fold compared with control group, which was accompanied by 76% of reduction in ADP-induced platelet aggregation. The guanylyl cyclase inhibitor ODQ (25 μM) and the PKG inhibitor Rp-8-Br-PET-cGMPS (25 μM) fully reversed the inhibitory effect of LPS on platelet aggregation. Likewise, the PKC inhibitor GF109203X (10 μM) reversed the inhibition by LPS of platelet aggregation and decreased cGMP levels in platelets. AKT phosphorylation at Thr308 was significantly higher in platelets of LPS compared with control group, which was not reduced by PI3K inhibition. The AKT inhibitor API-1 (20 μM) significantly increased aggregation and reduced cGMP levels in platelets of LPS group. However, the PI3K inhibitor wortmannin and LY29004 had no effect on platelet aggregation of LPS-treated rats. Therefore, inhibition of ADP-induced platelet aggregation after LPS injection is mediated by cGMP/PKG-dependent mechanisms, and PKC and AKT act

  10. Romiplostim promotes platelet recovery in a mouse model of multicycle chemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    McElroy, Patricia L; Wei, Ping; Buck, Keri; Sinclair, Angus M; Eschenberg, Michael; Sasu, Barbra; Molineux, Graham

    2015-06-01

    Chemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia can lead to chemotherapy treatment delays or dose reductions. The ability of romiplostim, a thrombopoietin (TPO) mimetic, to promote platelet recovery in a mouse model of multicycle chemotherapy/radiation therapy (CRT)-induced thrombocytopenia was examined. In humans, an inverse relationship between platelet counts and endogenous TPO (eTPO) concentration exists. In a CRT mouse model, eTPO was not elevated during the first 5 days after CRT treatment (the "eTPO gap"), then increased to a peak 10 days after each CRT treatment in an inverse relationship to platelet counts seen in humans. To bridge the eTPO gap, mice were treated with 10-1,000 μg/kg of romiplostim on day 0, 1, or 2 after CRT. In some mice, the romiplostim dose was approximately divided over 3 days. Platelet recovery occurred faster with romiplostim in most conditions tested. Romiplostim doses of ≥100 μg/kg given on day 0 significantly lessened the platelet nadir. Fractionating the dose over 3 days did not appear to confer a large advantage. These data may provide a rationale for clinical studies of romiplostim in chemotherapy-induced thrombocytopenia. PMID:25754671

  11. [THE INFLUENCE OF HYDROGEN SULFIDE ON COLLAGEN-INDUCED AGGREGATION OF HUMAN PLATELETS].

    PubMed

    Petrova, I V; Trubacheva, O A; Mangataeva, O S; Suslova, T E; Kovalev, I V; Gusakova, S V

    2015-10-01

    Study the impact of hydrogen sulfide on collagen-induced platelet aggregation from healthy donors and patients with type 2 diabetes. In healthy individuals, in contrast to patients with type 2 diabetes, NaHS significantly inhibited platelet aggregation. Activators of cAMP signaling (forskolin and phosphodiesterase inhibitor) significantly reduced platelet aggregation in both groups of examinees. NO-synthase inhibitors increased platelet aggregation in healthy volunteers, but not in patients with type 2 diabetes. The presence of H2S donor did not alter the extent of platelet aggregation at high concentrations of cAMP or decreased production of nitric oxide. It is assumed that the antiplatelet effect of H2S is not associated with the effect on the signal system, mediated cAMP or nitric oxide. Change H2S-dependent regulation of platelet aggregation in patients with type 2 diabetes is caused by disorders have been reported with this disease: the increase of intracellular calcium ion concentration, oxidative damage to proteins, hyperhomocysteinemia, glycosylation of key proteins involved in this process. PMID:26827498

  12. Reduced platelet-mediated and enhanced leukocyte-mediated fibrinolysis in experimentally induced diabetes in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Winocour, P.D.; Colwell, J.A.

    1985-05-01

    Studies of fibrinolytic activity in diabetes mellitus have produced conflicting results. This may be a result of methodologic insensitivity or of variable contributions of the different blood components to whole blood fibrinolysis. To explore these two possibilities, the authors used a sensitive solid-phase radiometric assay to examine the fibrinolytic activity of whole blood, platelet-rich plasma, leukocytes, and platelet- and leukocyte-poor plasma prepared from control rats and rats with streptozocin-induced diabetes at various times after induction of diabetes. Fibrinolytic activity of whole blood from diabetic rats after 7 days was significantly reduced, and remained reduced after longer durations of diabetes up to 28 days. Platelet-rich plasma from diabetic rats had decreased fibrinolytic activity, which followed the same time course of changes as in whole blood. The platelet contribution to whole blood fibrinolysis was further reduced in vivo after 14 days of diabetes by a reduced whole blood platelet count. In contrast, fibrinolytic activity of leukocytes from diabetic rats became enhanced after 7 days of diabetes. After 49 days of diabetes, the whole blood leukocyte count was reduced, and in vivo would offset the enhanced activity. Plasma fibrinolytic activity was small compared with that of whole blood and was unaltered in diabetic rats. The authors conclude that altered platelet function contributes to decreased fibrinolytic activity of whole blood in diabetic rats, and that this may be partially offset by enhanced leukocyte-mediated fibrinolysis.

  13. Platelet transactivation by monocytes promotes thrombosis in heparin-induced thrombocytopenia.

    PubMed

    Tutwiler, Valerie; Madeeva, Daria; Ahn, Hyun Sook; Andrianova, Izabella; Hayes, Vincent; Zheng, X Long; Cines, Douglas B; McKenzie, Steven E; Poncz, Mortimer; Rauova, Lubica

    2016-01-28

    Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) is characterized by a high incidence of thrombosis, unlike other antibody-mediated causes of thrombocytopenia. We have shown that monocytes complexed with surface-bound platelet factor 4 (PF4) activated by HIT antibodies contribute to the prothrombotic state in vivo, but the mechanism by which this occurs and the relationship to the requirement for platelet activation via fragment crystallizable (Fc)γRIIA is uncertain. Using a microfluidic model and human or murine blood, we confirmed that activation of monocytes contributes to the prothrombotic state in HIT and showed that HIT antibodies bind to monocyte FcγRIIA, which activates spleen tyrosine kinase and leads to the generation of tissue factor (TF) and thrombin. The combination of direct platelet activation by HIT immune complexes through FcγRIIA and transactivation by monocyte-derived thrombin markedly increases Annexin V and factor Xa binding to platelets, consistent with the formation of procoagulant coated platelets. These data provide a model of HIT wherein a combination of direct FcγRIIA-mediated platelet activation and monocyte-derived thrombin contributes to thrombosis in HIT and identifies potential new targets for lessening this risk. PMID:26518435

  14. Purification, cloning, expression, and mechanism of action of a novel platelet aggregation inhibitor from the salivary gland of the blood-sucking bug, Rhodnius prolixus.

    PubMed

    Francischetti, I M; Ribeiro, J M; Champagne, D; Andersen, J

    2000-04-28

    Rhodnius prolixus aggregation inhibitor 1 (RPAI-1), a 19-kDa protein isolated from the salivary gland of R. prolixus, was purified by strong cation exchange and reverse-phase high performance liquid chromatographies. Based on 49 amino-terminal amino acid sequences of RPAI-1, primers were produced to generate probes to screen an R. prolixus salivary gland cDNA library. A phage containing the full-length clone of RPAI-1 codes for a mature protein of 155 amino acids. RPAI-1 shows sequence homology to triabin and pallidipin, lipocalins from Triatoma pallidipennis. The cDNA sequence was cloned in Pet17B Escherichia coli expression vector, producing an active peptide. RPAI-1 inhibits human platelet-rich plasma aggregation triggered by low concentrations of ADP, collagen, arachidonic acid, thromboxane A(2) mimetics (U46619), and very low doses of thrombin and convulxin. Here we show that ADP is the target of RPAI-1 since (i) RPAI-1 inhibits ADP-dependent large aggregation formation and secretion triggered by U46619, without affecting Ca(2+) increase and shape change; (ii) ADP restored the inhibition of U46619-induced platelet aggregation by RPAI-1, (iii) PGE(1)-induced increase of cAMP (which is antagonized by U46619 in an ADP-dependent manner) was restored by RPAI-1, (iv) RPAI-1 inhibits low concentrations of ADP-mediated responses of indomethacin-treated platelets, and (v) RPAI-1 binds to ADP, as assessed by large zone chromatography. RPAI-1 affects neither integrin alpha(2)beta(1)- nor glycoprotein VI-mediated platelet responses. We conclude that RPAI-1 is the first lipocalin described that inhibits platelet aggregation by a novel mechanism, binding to ADP. PMID:10777556

  15. Pre-exposure to heat shock inhibits peroxynitrite-induced activation of poly(ADP) ribosyltransferase and protects against peroxynitrite cytotoxicity in J774 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Szabó, C; Wong, H R; Salzman, A L

    1996-11-14

    The reaction of nitric oxide (NO) with superoxide yields the cytotoxic oxidant peroxynitrite, produced during inflammation and shock. A novel pathway of peroxynitrite cytotoxicity involves activation of the nuclear enzyme poly(ADP) ribosyltransferase, and concomitant ADP-ribosylation. NAD+ consumption and exhaustion of intracellular energy stores. In the present report we provide evidence that pre-exposure of J774 macrophages to heat shock reduces peroxynitrite-induced activation of poly(ADP) ribosyltransferase and protects against the peroxynitrite-induced suppression of mitochondrial respiration. The protection was significant at 8 h after heat shock, but was absent at 24 h after heat shock. Thus, the protection showed a temporal correlation with the expression of heat shock protein 70, the expression of which was maximal at 8 h. Exposure to heat shock did not alter the expression of poly(ADP) ribosyltransferase over 24 h. In summary, the heat shock phenotype or heat shock proteins may protect against peroxynitrite induced cytotoxicity. PMID:8960887

  16. Enhancement of Platelet Aggregation by Ursolic Acid and Oleanolic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mikyung; Han, Chang-ho; Lee, Moo-Yeol

    2014-01-01

    The pentacyclic triterpenoid ursolic acid (UA) and its isomer oleanolic acid (OA) are ubiquitous in food and plant medicine, and thus are easily exposed to the population through natural contact or intentional use. Although they have diverse health benefits, reported cardiovascular protective activity is contentious. In this study, the effect of UA and OA on platelet aggregation was examined on the basis that alteration of platelet activity is a potential process contributing to cardiovascular events. Treatment of UA enhanced platelet aggregation induced by thrombin or ADP, which was concentration-dependent in a range of 5–50 μM. Quite comparable results were obtained with OA, in which OA-treated platelets also exhibited an exaggerated response to either thrombin or ADP. UA treatment potentiated aggregation of whole blood, while OA failed to increase aggregation by thrombin. UA and OA did not affect plasma coagulation assessed by measuring prothrombin time and activated partial thromboplastin time. These results indicate that both UA and OA are capable of making platelets susceptible to aggregatory stimuli, and platelets rather than clotting factors are the primary target of them in proaggregatory activity. These compounds need to be used with caution, especially in the population with a predisposition to cardiovascular events. PMID:25009707

  17. Platelet receptor interplay regulates collagen-induced thrombus formation in flowing human blood.

    PubMed

    Siljander, Pia R-M; Munnix, Imke C A; Smethurst, Peter A; Deckmyn, Hans; Lindhout, Theo; Ouwehand, Willem H; Farndale, Richard W; Heemskerk, Johan W M

    2004-02-15

    The platelet glycoproteins (GPs) Ib, integrin alpha(2)beta(1), and GPVI are considered central to thrombus formation. Recently, their relative importance has been re-evaluated based on data from murine knockout models. To examine their relationship during human thrombus formation on collagen type I fibers at high shear (1000 s(-1)), we tested a novel antibody against GPVI, an immunoglobulin single-chain variable fragment, 10B12, together with specific antagonists for GPIb alpha (12G1 Fab(2)) and alpha(2)beta(1) (6F1 mAb or GFOGER-GPP peptide). GPVI was found to be crucial for aggregate formation, Ca(2+) signaling, and phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure, but not for primary adhesion, even with more than 97% receptor blockade. Inhibiting alpha(2)beta(1) revealed its involvement in regulating Ca(2+) signaling, PS exposure, and aggregate size. Both GPIb alpha and alpha(2)beta(1) contributed to primary adhesion, showing overlapping function. The coinhibition of receptors revealed synergism in thrombus formation: the coinhibition of adenosine diphosphate (ADP) receptors with collagen receptors further decreased adhesion and aggregation, and, crucially, the complete eradication of thrombus formation required the coinhibition of GPVI with either GPIb alpha or alpha(2)beta(1). In summary, human platelet deposition on collagen depends on the concerted interplay of several receptors: GPIb in synergy with alpha(2)beta(1) mediating primary adhesion, reinforced by activation through GPVI, which further regulates the thrombus formation. PMID:14563646

  18. P‑selectin increases angiotensin II‑induced cardiac inflammation and fibrosis via platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gaizhen; Liang, Bin; Song, Xiaosu; Bai, Rui; Qin, Weiwei; Sun, Xu; Lu, Yan; Bian, Yunfei; Xiao, Chuanshi

    2016-06-01

    Platelet activation is important in hypertension‑induced cardiac inflammation and fibrosis. P-selectin expression significantly (P<0.05) increases when platelets are activated during hypertension. Although P‑selectin recruits leukocytes to sites of inflammation, the role of P‑selectin in cardiac inflammation and fibrosis remains to be elucidated. The present study aimed to investigate whether platelet‑derived P‑selectin promotes hypertensive cardiac inflammation and fibrosis. P‑selectin knockout (P‑sel KO) mice and wild‑type (WT) C57BL/6 littermates were infused with angiotensin II (Ang II) at 1,500 ng/kg/min for 7 days and then cross‑transplanted with platelets originating from either WT or P‑sel KO mice. P‑selectin expression was increased in the myocardium and plasma of hypertensive mice, and the P‑sel KO mice exhibited significantly (P<0.05) reduced cardiac fibrosis. The fibrotic areas were markedly smaller in the hearts of P‑sel KO mice compared with WT mice, as assessed by Masson's trichrome staining. In addition, α‑smooth muscle actin and transforming growth factor β1 (TGF‑β1) expression levels were decreased in the P‑sel KO mice, as assessed by immunohistochemistry. Following platelet transplantation into P‑sel KO mice, the number of Mac‑2 (galectin‑3)‑ and TGF‑β1‑positive cells was increased in mice that received WT platelets compared with those that received P‑sel KO platelets, and the mRNA expression levels of collagen I and TGF‑β1 were also increased. The results from the present study suggest that activated platelets secrete P‑selectin to promote cardiac inflammation and fibrosis in Ang II‑induced hypertension. PMID:27121797

  19. The involvement of platelets and the coronary vasculature in collagen-induced sudden death in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Mallarkey, G; Smith, G M

    1985-02-18

    The mechanism of collagen-induced sudden death in rabbits was studied by measuring blood pressure (BP), heart rate, ECG, the continuous platelet count and the plasma levels of thromboxane B2 (TXB2) and 6-keto prostaglandin F1a (6-keto PGF1a). Death was preceded by myocardial ischaemia and a sharp fall in BP which occurred before any fall in platelet count was observed. The calcium entry blockers (CEBS), verapamil, nifedipine and PY 108-068 protected the rabbits from sudden death without any significant effect on the decrease in the platelet count or increase in plasma TXB2 levels. 6-keto PGF1a could not be detected in any plasma samples. Indomethacin and tri-sodium citrate also protected the rabbits but significantly reduced the fall in platelet count and plasma TXB2. In vitro studies on isolated aortae indicated that verapamil non-specifically inhibited vasoconstriction induced by KCl, adrenaline and U46619 (a thromboxane agonist). It is concluded that CEBS physiologically antagonize the vasoconstricting actions of platelet-derived substances and that it is coronary vasoconstriction that is primarily the cause of death. PMID:3992523

  20. IL-1α induces thrombopoiesis through megakaryocyte rupture in response to acute platelet needs

    PubMed Central

    Nagasaki, Mika; Kunishima, Shinji; Sawaguchi, Akira; Sakata, Asuka; Sakaguchi, Hiroyasu; Ohmori, Tsukasa; Manabe, Ichiro; Italiano, Joseph E.; Ryu, Tomiko; Takayama, Naoya; Komuro, Issei; Kadowaki, Takashi; Nagai, Ryozo

    2015-01-01

    Intravital visualization of thrombopoiesis revealed that formation of proplatelets, which are cytoplasmic protrusions in bone marrow megakaryocytes (MKs), is dominant in the steady state. However, it was unclear whether this is the only path to platelet biogenesis. We have identified an alternative MK rupture, which entails rapid cytoplasmic fragmentation and release of much larger numbers of platelets, primarily into blood vessels, which is morphologically and temporally different than typical FasL-induced apoptosis. Serum levels of the inflammatory cytokine IL-1α were acutely elevated after platelet loss or administration of an inflammatory stimulus to mice, whereas the MK-regulator thrombopoietin (TPO) was not elevated. Moreover, IL-1α administration rapidly induced MK rupture–dependent thrombopoiesis and increased platelet counts. IL-1α–IL-1R1 signaling activated caspase-3, which reduced plasma membrane stability and appeared to inhibit regulated tubulin expression and proplatelet formation, and ultimately led to MK rupture. Collectively, it appears the balance between TPO and IL-1α determines the MK cellular programming for thrombopoiesis in response to acute and chronic platelet needs. PMID:25963822

  1. Platelet participation in the pathogenesis of dermonecrosis induced by Loxosceles gaucho venom.

    PubMed

    Tavares, F L; Peichoto, M E; Marcelino, J R; Barbaro, K C; Cirillo, M C; Santoro, M L; Sano-Martins, I S

    2016-06-01

    Loxosceles gaucho spider venom induces in vitro platelet activation and marked thrombocytopenia in rabbits. Herein, we investigated the involvement of platelets in the development of the dermonecrosis induced by L. gaucho venom, using thrombocytopenic rabbits as a model. L. gaucho venom evoked a drop in platelet and neutrophil counts 4 h after venom injection. Ecchymotic areas at the site of venom inoculation were noticed as soon as 4 h in thrombocytopenic animals but not in animals with initial normal platelet counts. After 5 days, areas of scars in thrombocytopenic animals were also larger, evidencing the marked development of lesions in the condition of thrombocytopenia. Histologically, local hemorrhage, collagen fiber disorganization, and edema were more severe in thrombocytopenic animals. Leukocyte infiltration, predominantly due to polymorphonuclears, was observed in the presence or not of thrombocytopenia. Thrombus formation was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry at the microvasculature, and it occurred even under marked thrombocytopenia. Taken together, platelets have an important role in minimizing not only the hemorrhagic phenomena but also the inflammatory and wound-healing processes, suggesting that cutaneous loxoscelism may be aggravated under thrombocytopenic conditions. PMID:26253591

  2. Effect of circulating epinephrine on platelet function and hematocrit.

    PubMed

    Kjeldsen, S E; Weder, A B; Egan, B; Neubig, R; Zweifler, A J; Julius, S

    1995-05-01

    We investigated the effect of raising arterial plasma epinephrine within the lower pathophysiological concentration range on various indicators of blood platelet function and hematocrit. Epinephrine was raised over 60 minutes by a stepwise increasing intravenous infusion in 40 healthy men aged 20 to 40 years. Platelet count increased progressively with increasing arterial epinephrine to a maximal change of 69 +/- 6 x 10(9)/L in EDTA-anticoagulated blood and a maximal change of 42 +/- 6 x 10(9)/L in acid-citrate-dextrose (ACD)-anticoagulated blood, and the weight of circulating platelets increased by 29% (P < .001). Platelet size increased significantly in EDTA and decreased in ACD, and the difference between EDTA and ACD was significant (P < .0001) for both count and size, suggesting that epinephrine not only recruits platelets into the circulation but also induces some microaggregation in vivo or adhesion ex vivo. Aggregation of platelets in vitro induced by epinephrine decreased (P < .003 for delta optical density and P = .038 for maximal optical density) after epinephrine infusion compared with saline but did not change when stimulated with ADP or collagen. These findings suggest a selective downregulation of the epinephrine-activating mechanisms concomitant with a rise in the platelet content of epinephrine by 81% (P < .001) and no change in the platelet sodium-proton membrane exchange. The release of granular content (beta-thromboglobulin and platelet factor 4) to the circulation in response to epinephrine was not significant. Thus, under acute conditions it seems that the platelets may protect themselves against inappropriate overstimulation by epinephrine. The importance of platelet epinephrine uptake is still unknown, but sodium-proton exchange does not seem to be involved in regulating the effects of circulating epinephrine on platelet function. Epinephrine has a pronounced effect on raising hematocrit (maximal change of 1.74 +/- 0.13 x 10(-2), P < .0001

  3. Mechanism of activation and functional role of protein kinase Ceta in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Bynagari, Yamini S; Nagy, Bela; Tuluc, Florin; Bhavaraju, Kamala; Kim, Soochong; Vijayan, K Vinod; Kunapuli, Satya P

    2009-05-15

    The novel class of protein kinase C (nPKC) isoform eta is expressed in platelets, but not much is known about its activation and function. In this study, we investigated the mechanism of activation and functional implications of nPKCeta using pharmacological and gene knock-out approaches. nPKCeta was phosphorylated (at Thr-512) in a time- and concentration-dependent manner by 2MeSADP. Pretreatment of platelets with MRS-2179, a P2Y1 receptor antagonist, or YM-254890, a G(q) blocker, abolished 2MeSADP-induced phosphorylation of nPKCeta. Similarly, ADP failed to activate nPKCeta in platelets isolated from P2Y1 and G(q) knock-out mice. However, pretreatment of platelets with P2Y12 receptor antagonist, AR-C69331MX did not interfere with ADP-induced nPKCeta phosphorylation. In addition, when platelets were activated with 2MeSADP under stirring conditions, although nPKCeta was phosphorylated within 30 s by ADP receptors, it was also dephosphorylated by activated integrin alpha(IIb)beta3 mediated outside-in signaling. Moreover, in the presence of SC-57101, a alpha(IIb)beta3 receptor antagonist, nPKCeta dephosphorylation was inhibited. Furthermore, in murine platelets lacking PP1cgamma, a catalytic subunit of serine/threonine phosphatase, alpha(IIb)beta3 failed to dephosphorylate nPKCeta. Thus, we conclude that ADP activates nPKCeta via P2Y1 receptor and is subsequently dephosphorylated by PP1gamma phosphatase activated by alpha(IIb)beta3 integrin. In addition, pretreatment of platelets with eta-RACK antagonistic peptides, a specific inhibitor of nPKCeta, inhibited ADP-induced thromboxane generation. However, these peptides had no affect on ADP-induced aggregation when thromboxane generation was blocked. In summary, nPKCeta positively regulates agonist-induced thromboxane generation with no effects on platelet aggregation. PMID:19286657

  4. Distribution of low molecular weight platelet aggregation inhibitors from snake venoms.

    PubMed

    Oyama, Etsuko; Takahashi, Hidenobu

    2007-03-01

    An assay of platelet aggregation inhibitors measured by the turbidimeter using Aggregometer PAM 8C (Mebanix) was performed after each crude snake venom (57 species) was subjected to ultrafiltration using MILLIPORE UFP 1 LGC. The snake venoms of Viperidae (three species), Elapidae (11 species), and Hydrophiidae (two species) inhibited ADP-induced rabbit platelet aggregation. In particular, six venoms of Bitis gabonica, Pseudocerastes persicus, Dendroaspis angusticeps, D. polylepis, Ophiophagus hannah, and N. nigricollis crawshawii strongly inhibited platelet aggregation. Furthermore, adenosine was identified from Bitis gabonica venom using HPLC and FAB/MS analysis. PMID:17141819

  5. Static platelet adhesion, flow cytometry and serum TXB2 levels for monitoring platelet inhibiting treatment with ASA and clopidogrel in coronary artery disease: a randomised cross-over study

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Andreas C; Jonasson, Lena; Lindahl, Tomas L; Hedbäck, Bo; Whiss, Per A

    2009-01-01

    Background Despite the use of anti-platelet agents such as acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and clopidogrel in coronary heart disease, some patients continue to suffer from atherothrombosis. This has stimulated development of platelet function assays to monitor treatment effects. However, it is still not recommended to change treatment based on results from platelet function assays. This study aimed to evaluate the capacity of a static platelet adhesion assay to detect platelet inhibiting effects of ASA and clopidogrel. The adhesion assay measures several aspects of platelet adhesion simultaneously, which increases the probability of finding conditions sensitive for anti-platelet treatment. Methods With a randomised cross-over design we evaluated the anti-platelet effects of ASA combined with clopidogrel as well as monotherapy with either drug alone in 29 patients with a recent acute coronary syndrome. Also, 29 matched healthy controls were included to evaluate intra-individual variability over time. Platelet function was measured by flow cytometry, serum thromboxane B2 (TXB2)-levels and by static platelet adhesion to different protein surfaces. The results were subjected to Principal Component Analysis followed by ANOVA, t-tests and linear regression analysis. Results The majority of platelet adhesion measures were reproducible in controls over time denoting that the assay can monitor platelet activity. Adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP)-induced platelet adhesion decreased significantly upon treatment with clopidogrel compared to ASA. Flow cytometric measurements showed the same pattern (r2 = 0.49). In opposite, TXB2-levels decreased with ASA compared to clopidogrel. Serum TXB2 and ADP-induced platelet activation could both be regarded as direct measures of the pharmacodynamic effects of ASA and clopidogrel respectively. Indirect pharmacodynamic measures such as adhesion to albumin induced by various soluble activators as well as SFLLRN-induced activation measured by flow

  6. Stimulus-response coupling in platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, E.M.

    1986-01-01

    To understand the mechanism of stimulus-response coupling in platelets, the potentiating effect of succinate and lithium on platelet activation was examined. The action of succinate was immediate; preincubation with succinate did not lead to desensitization. Succinate was comparable to ADP in lowering cAMP levels previously elevated by PGl/sub 2/. Since inhibition of cAMP is not a prerequisite for platelet activation, the mechanism of potentiation of succinate remains undefined. Lithium has also been shown to inhibit adenylate cyclase in PGl/sub 2/-pretreated platelets. Lithium, however, can also inhibit inositol phosphate (InsP) phosphatase and lead to an accumulation of InsP. In human platelets, lithium also enhanced the thrombin-induced accumulation of (/sup 3/H)inositol-labelled inositol trisphosphate (InsP/sub 3/), and inositol bisphosphate (InsP/sub 2/). One hour after thrombin addition, all 3 inositol phosphates returned to near basal levels. In the presence of lithium, while labelled InsP/sub 2/ and InsP/sub 3/ returned to their respective basal levels, the InsP level remained elevated, consistent with the known inhibitory effect of lithium on InsP phosphatase. In thrombin-stimulated platelets prelabeled with (/sup 32/P)phosphate, lithium led to a decrease in labelled phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PtdIns4P) as well as an enhanced production of labelled lysophosphatidylinositol, suggesting multiple effects of lithium on platelet phosphoinositide metabolism. These observed effects, however, occurred too slowly to be the mechanism by which lithium potentiated agonist-induced platelet activation. To study the agonist-receptor interaction, the effect of the specific, high affinity thrombin inhibitor, hirudin, on thrombin-induced accumulation of (/sup 3/H)inositol-labelled inositol phosphates was studied.

  7. Platelet adhesiveness in diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, S.; Pegrum, G. D.; Wolff, Sylvia; Ashton, W. L.

    1967-01-01

    Platelet adhesiveness has been assessed on whole blood from a series of 34 diabetics and 50 control subjects using adenosine diphosphate (A.D.P.) and by adherence to glass microspherules (ballotini). Using both techniques it was possible to demonstrate a significant increase in platelet adhesiveness in the diabetic patients. PMID:5614070

  8. Type 2 Diabetes and ADP Receptor Blocker Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Samoš, Matej; Fedor, Marián; Kovář, František; Mokáň, Michal; Bolek, Tomáš; Galajda, Peter; Kubisz, Peter; Mokáň, Marián

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is associated with several abnormalities in haemostasis predisposing to thrombosis. Moreover, T2D was recently connected with a failure in antiplatelet response to clopidogrel, the most commonly used ADP receptor blocker in clinical practice. Clopidogrel high on-treatment platelet reactivity (HTPR) was repeatedly associated with the risk of ischemic adverse events. Patients with T2D show significantly higher residual platelet reactivity on ADP receptor blocker therapy and are more frequently represented in the group of patients with HTPR. This paper reviews the current knowledge about possible interactions between T2D and ADP receptor blocker therapy. PMID:26824047

  9. Characterization of a myeloma patient with a life-threatening hemorrhagic diathesis: presence of a lambda dimer protein inhibiting shear-induced platelet aggregation by binding to the A1 domain of von Willebrand factor.

    PubMed

    Shinagawa, Atsushi; Kojima, Hiroshi; Berndt, Michael C; Kaneko, Shin; Suzukawa, Kazumi; Hasegawa, Yuichi; Shigeta, Osamu; Nagasawa, Toshiro

    2005-05-01

    We have identified a patient with IgD lambda-type multiple myeloma who was characterized by a severe bleeding tendency, especially after puncture of arterial vessels. Both the bleeding time (>25 min) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) were prolonged. To clarify the underlying pathogenesis, we purified the APTT-prolonging activity from the patient's serum. The purified protein was a highly negatively-charged homodimer of the lambda light chain. The lambda dimer protein (M-protein) inhibited ristocetinand high shear-induced platelet aggregation, dependent on platelet glycoprotein Ibalpha (GPIbalpha), but not epinephrine-, collagen-, ADP-, thrombin-, or botrocetin-induced platelet aggregation. The lambda dimer protein inhibited the binding of platelets to immobilized or ristocetin-treated von Willebrand factor (VWF). Furthermore, a 39/34 kD fragment of VWF encompassing the A1 domain specifically bound to the immobilized lambda dimer protein in the presence of ristocetin, suggesting that the lambda dimer protein directly binds to the A1 domain of VWF. To help elucidate the binding site within the A1 domain, binding of ristocetin-treated VWF to the immobilized lambda dimer protein was assayed in the presence of various anti-A1 domain monoclonal antibodies. Based on these data, we conclude that the lambda dimer protein binds to the region of the A1 domain composed of helices alpha3 and alpha4 and thus interferes with VWF-GPIbalpha interaction. The existence of a protein that inhibits high shear-induced platelet aggregation in acquired von Willebrand disease (VWD) has only rarely been reported. The results suggest that the hemostatic function in arteries with high shear force is profoundly disrupted if the binding of GPIbalpha to VWF is abrogated, supporting the relevance of shear-induced VWF interaction with GPIbalpha in the initiation of the hemostatic process. PMID:15886805

  10. Effects of the new glycopeptide antibiotic teicoplanin on platelet function and blood coagulation.

    PubMed Central

    Agnelli, G; Longetti, M; Guerciolini, R; Menichetti, F; Grasselli, S; Boldrini, F; Bucaneve, G; Nenci, G G; Del Favero, A

    1987-01-01

    Teicoplanin, a new glycopeptide antibiotic, is structurally related to ristocetin, an antibiotic known to induce human platelet agglutination and, thus, thrombocytopenia and thromboembolic side effects. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of teicoplanin on platelet function in vitro and ex vivo and on blood coagulation ex vivo. In the in vitro studies, spontaneous platelet aggregation; platelet aggregation induced by ADP, collagen, and ristocetin; and the release of beta-thromboglobulin from platelets were assessed. Platelets from healthy subjects were incubated with teicoplanin at final concentrations of 100, 1,500, 5,000, and 10,000 micrograms/ml. The maximal achievable concentration with therapeutic doses is 100 micrograms/ml. When compared with saline, teicoplanin at concentrations of 100 and 1,500 micrograms/ml had no effect on platelet function, but at concentrations of 5,000 and 10,000 micrograms/ml, it induced greater spontaneous platelet aggregation (P less than 0.01) and inhibited platelet aggregation induced by ADP, collagen, and ristocetin (P less than 0.01). Teicoplanin at concentrations of 100, 1,500, and 5,000 micrograms/ml did not induce the release of beta-thromboglobulin, in contrast to teicoplanin at a concentration of 10,000 micrograms/ml and ristocetin at a concentration of 1.5 mg/ml (P less than 0.01). In the ex vivo studies, platelet count, bleeding time, plasma beta-thromboglobulin, platelet aggregation induced by ADP, ristocetin, and epinephrine, activated partial thromboplastin time, prothrombin time, thrombin clotting time, and serum fibrinogen degradation products were evaluated at days 0, 3, and 6 and at 72 h after the end of therapy. All subjects completed the study without evidence of side effects. When compared with the pretreatment values, none of the values from these assays showed a significant change at any time during and after treatment. We concluded that platelet function and blood coagulation are not affected by

  11. Peroxynitrite-induced thymocyte apoptosis: the role of caspases and poly (ADP-ribose) synthetase (PARS) activation.

    PubMed Central

    Virág, L; Scott, G S; Cuzzocrea, S; Marmer, D; Salzman, A L; Szabó, C

    1998-01-01

    The mechanisms by which immature thymocyte apoptosis is induced during negative selection are poorly defined. Reports demonstrated that cross-linking of T-cell receptor leads to stromal cell activation, expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and, subsequently, to thymocyte apoptosis. Therefore we examined, whether NO directly or indirectly, through peroxynitrite formation, causes thymocyte apoptosis. Immuno-histochemical detection of nitrotyrosine revealed in vivo peroxynitrite formation in the thymi of naive mice. Nitrotyrosine, the footprint of peroxynitrite, was predominantly found in the corticomedullary junction and the medulla of naive mice. In the thymi of mice deficient in the inducible isoform of nitric oxide synthase, considerably less nitrotyrosine was found. Exposure of thymocytes in vitro to low concentrations (10 microM) of peroxynitrite led to apoptosis, whereas higher concentrations (50 microM) resulted in intense cell death with the characteristics of necrosis. We also investigated the effect of poly (ADP-ribose) synthetase (PARS) inhibition on thymocyte apoptosis. Using the PARS inhibitor 3-aminobenzamide (3-AB), or thymocytes from PARS-deficient animals, we established that PARS determines the fate of thymocyte death. Suppression of cellular ATP levels, and the cellular necrosis in response to peroxynitrite were prevented by PARS inhibition. Therefore, in the absence of PARS, cells are diverted towards the pathway of apoptotic cell death. Similar results were obtained with H2O2 treatment, while apoptosis induced by non-oxidative stimuli such as dexamethasone or anti-FAS antibody was unaffected by PARS inhibition. In conclusion, we propose that peroxynitrite-induced apoptosis may play a role in the process of thymocyte negative selection. Furthermore, we propose that the physiological role of PARS cleavage by apopain during apoptosis may serve as an energy-conserving step, enabling the cell to complete the process of apoptosis

  12. Beta-lactam antibiotic-induced platelet dysfunction: Evidence for irreversible inhibition of platelet activation in vitro and in vivo after prolonged exposure to penicillin

    SciTech Connect

    Burroughs, S.F.; Johnson, G.J. )

    1990-04-01

    beta-Lactam antibiotics cause platelet dysfunction with bleeding complications. Previous in vitro studies documented reversible inhibition of agonist-receptor interaction. This mechanism is inadequate to explain the effect of beta-lactam antibiotics in vivo. Platelet function does not return to normal immediately after drug treatment, implying irreversible inhibition of platelet function. We report here evidence of irreversible platelet functional and biochemical abnormalities after in vitro and in vivo exposure to beta-lactam antibiotics. Irreversible binding of (14C)-penicillin (Pen) occurred in vitro. After 24 hours' in vitro incubation with 10 to 20 mmol/L Pen, or ex vivo after antibiotic treatment, irreversible functional impairment occurred; but no irreversible inhibition of alpha 2 adrenergic receptors, measured with (3H)-yohimbine, or high-affinity thromboxane A2/prostaglandin H2 (TXA2/PGH2) receptors, measured with agonist (3H)-U46619 and antagonist (3H)-SQ29548, occurred. However, low-affinity platelet TXA2/PGH2 receptors were decreased 40% after Pen exposure in vitro or in vivo, indicating irreversible membrane alteration. Two postreceptor biochemical events were irreversibly inhibited in platelets incubated with Pen for 24 hours in vitro or ex vivo after antibiotic treatment. Thromboxane synthesis was inhibited 28.3% to 81.7%. Agonist-induced rises in cytosolic calcium ((Ca2+)i) were inhibited 40.1% to 67.5% in vitro and 26.6% to 52.2% ex vivo. Therefore, Pen binds to platelets after prolonged exposure, resulting in irreversible dysfunction attributable to inhibition of TXA2 synthesis and impairment of the rise in (Ca2+)i. The loss of low-affinity TXA2/PGH2 receptors suggests that the primary site of action of these drugs is on the platelet membrane.

  13. High Fat Diet Induces Adhesion of Platelets to Endothelium in Two Models of Dyslipidemia

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Jaime; Donoso, Wendy; Díaz, Natalia; Albornoz, María Eliana; Huilcaman, Ricardo; Morales, Erik

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) represent about 30% of all global deaths. It is currently accepted that, in the atherogenic process, platelets play an important role, contributing to endothelial activation and modulation of the inflammatory phenomenon, promoting the beginning and formation of lesions and their subsequent thrombotic complications. The objective of the present work was to study using immunohistochemistry, the presence of platelets, monocytes/macrophages, and cell adhesion molecules (CD61, CD163, and CD54), in two stages of the atheromatous process. CF-1 mice fed a fat diet were used to obtain early stages of atheromatous process, denominated early stage of atherosclerosis, and ApoE−/− mice fed a fat diet were used to observe advanced stages of atherosclerosis. The CF-1 mice model presented immunostaining on endothelial surface for all three markers studied; the advanced atherosclerosis model in ApoE−/− mice also presented granular immunostaining on lesion thickness, for the same markers. These results suggest that platelets participate in atheromatous process from early stages to advance d stages. High fat diet induces adhesion of platelets to endothelial cells in vivo. These findings support studying the participation of platelets in the formation of atheromatous plate. PMID:25328689

  14. Functional Comparison of Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell- and Blood-Derived GPIIbIIIa Deficient Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Haas, Jessica; Sandrock-Lang, Kirstin; Gärtner, Florian; Jung, Christian Billy; Zieger, Barbara; Parrotta, Elvira; Kurnik, Karin; Sinnecker, Daniel; Wanner, Gerhard; Laugwitz, Karl-Ludwig; Massberg, Steffen; Moretti, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) represent a versatile tool to model genetic diseases and are a potential source for cell transfusion therapies. However, it remains elusive to which extent patient-specific hiPSC-derived cells functionally resemble their native counterparts. Here, we generated a hiPSC model of the primary platelet disease Glanzmann thrombasthenia (GT), characterized by dysfunction of the integrin receptor GPIIbIIIa, and compared side-by-side healthy and diseased hiPSC-derived platelets with peripheral blood platelets. Both GT-hiPSC-derived platelets and their peripheral blood equivalents showed absence of membrane expression of GPIIbIIIa, a reduction of PAC-1 binding, surface spreading and adherence to fibrinogen. We demonstrated that GT-hiPSC-derived platelets recapitulate molecular and functional aspects of the disease and show comparable behavior to their native counterparts encouraging the further use of hiPSC-based disease models as well as the transition towards a clinical application. PMID:25607928

  15. The Role of Platelet Factor 4 in Radiation-Induced Thrombocytopenia

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, Michele P.; Xiao Liqing; Nguyen, Yvonne; Kowalska, M. Anna; Poncz, Mortimer

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: Factors affecting the severity of radiation-induced thrombocytopenia (RIT) are not well described. We address whether platelet factor 4 (PF4; a negative paracrine for megakaryopoiesis) affects platelet recovery postradiation. Methods and Materials: Using conditioned media from irradiated bone marrow (BM) cells from transgenic mice overexpressing human (h) PF4 (hPF4+), megakaryocyte colony formation was assessed in the presence of this conditioned media and PF4 blocking agents. In a model of radiation-induced thrombocytopenia, irradiated mice with varying PF4 expression levels were treated with anti-hPF4 and/or thrombopoietin (TPO), and platelet count recovery and survival were examined. Results: Conditioned media from irradiated BM from hPF4+ mice inhibited megakaryocyte colony formation, suggesting that PF4 is a negative paracrine released in RIT. Blocking with an anti-hPF4 antibody restored colony formation of BM grown in the presence of hPF4+ irradiated media, as did antibodies that block the megakaryocyte receptor for PF4, low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1). Irradiated PF4 knockout mice had higher nadir platelet counts than irradiated hPF4+/knockout litter mates (651 vs. 328 x 106/mcL, p = 0.02) and recovered earlier (15 days vs. 22 days, respectively, p <0.02). When irradiated hPF4+ mice were treated with anti-hPF4 antibody and/or TPO, they showed less severe thrombocytopenia than untreated mice, with improved survival and time to platelet recovery, but no additive effect was seen. Conclusions: Our studies show that in RIT, damaged megakaryocytes release PF4 locally, inhibiting platelet recovery. Blocking PF4 enhances recovery while released PF4 from megakaryocytes limits TPO efficacy, potentially because of increased release of PF4 stimulated by TPO. The clinical value of blocking this negative paracrine pathway post-RIT remains to be determined.

  16. Interaction of disintegrins with the alpha IIb beta 3 receptor on resting and activated human platelets.

    PubMed Central

    McLane, M A; Kowalska, M A; Silver, L; Shattil, S J; Niewiarowski, S

    1994-01-01

    Viper venom disintegrins contain the RGD/KGD motif. They inhibit platelet aggregation and cell adhesion, but show structural and functional heterogeneity. We investigated the interaction of four prototypic disintegrins with alpha IIb beta 3 expressed on the surface of resting and activated platelets. The binding affinity (Kd) of 125I-albolabrin, 125I-echistatin, 125I-bitistatin and 125I-eristostatin toward resting platelets was 294, 153, 48 and 18 nM respectively. The Kd value for albolabrin decreased 3-fold and 6-fold after ADP- or thrombin-induced activation. The Kd values for bitistatin and echistatin also decreased with ADP, but there was no further decrease with thrombin. In contrast, eristostatin bound with the same high affinity to resting and activated platelets. The pattern of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-eristostatin and FITC-albolabrin binding to resting and activated platelets was consistent with observations using radiolabelled material. Eristostatin showed faster and more irreversible binding to platelets, and greater potency compared with albolabrin in inducing conformational neo-epitopes in beta 3. The anti-alpha IIb beta 3 monoclonal antibody OP-G2 that is RGD-dependent inhibited disintegrin binding to activated platelets more strongly than binding to resting platelets and it inhibited the binding to platelets of albolabrin more strongly than eristostatin. The specificity of disintegrin interaction with alpha IIb beta 3 was confirmed by demonstrating cross-linking of these peptides to alpha IIb beta 3 on normal platelets, but not to thrombasthenic platelets deficient in alpha IIb beta 3. Images Figure 6 PMID:8042985

  17. Carotid endarterectomy in patients with heparin-induced platelet activation: comparative efficacy of aspirin and iloprost (ZK36374).

    PubMed

    Kappa, J R; Cottrell, E D; Berkowitz, H D; Fisher, C A; Sobel, M; Ellison, N; Addonizio, V P

    1987-05-01

    Patients with heparin-induced platelet activation who are reexposed to heparin may have recurrent thrombocytopenia, intravascular thrombosis, arterial emboli, or sudden death. To permit carotid endarterectomy in two patients with confirmed heparin-induced platelet activation, we compared the efficacies of aspirin and iloprost, a stable analogue of prostacyclin, in preventing heparin-induced platelet activation. In the first patient, although aspirin prevented both in vitro heparin-induced platelet aggregation (70% without and 7.5% with aspirin) and 14C serotonin release (48% without and 0% with aspirin), intraoperative administration of heparin resulted in an increase in plasma levels of platelet factor 4 from 8 to 260 ng/ml and beta-thromboglobulin levels from 29 to 39 ng/ml. In addition, the circulating platelet count decreased from 221,000 to 174,000 microliters, and 15% spontaneous platelet aggregation was observed. Fortunately, fibrinopeptide A levels remained less than 10 ng/ml intraoperatively, and no thrombotic complications occurred. In the second patient, aspirin did not prevent heparin-induced platelet aggregation in vitro (65% without and 41% with aspirin); however, iloprost (0.01 mumol/L) prevented both in vitro heparin-induced platelet aggregation (59.5% without and 0.0% with iloprost) and 14C serotonin release (56.7% without and 0.0% with iloprost). Therefore, a continuous infusion of iloprost was begun before administration of heparin and was continued until 20 minutes after reversal of heparin with protamine. After intraoperative administration of heparin, plasma levels of platelet factor 4 increased from 19 to 200 ng/ml, and beta-thromboglobulin levels increased from 56 to 76 ng/ml.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2437338

  18. Enhanced activity of ADP glucose pyrophosphorylase and formation of starch induced by Azospirillum brasilense in Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Choix, Francisco J; Bashan, Yoav; Mendoza, Alberto; de-Bashan, Luz E

    2014-05-10

    ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) regulates starch biosynthesis in higher plants and microalgae. This study measured the effect of the bacterium Azospirillum brasilense on AGPase activity in the freshwater microalga Chlorella vulgaris and formation of starch. This was done by immobilizing both microorganisms in alginate beads, either replete with or deprived of nitrogen or phosphorus and all under heterotrophic conditions, using d-glucose or Na-acetate as the carbon source. AGPase activity during the first 72h of incubation was higher in C. vulgaris when immobilized with A. brasilense. This happened simultaneously with higher starch accumulation and higher carbon uptake by the microalgae. Either carbon source had similar effects on enzyme activity and starch accumulation. Starvation either by N or P had the same pattern on AGPase activity and starch accumulation. Under replete conditions, the population of C. vulgaris immobilized alone was higher than when immobilized together, but under starvation conditions A. brasilense induced a larger population of C. vulgaris. In summary, adding A. brasilense enhanced AGPase activity, starch formation, and mitigation of stress in C. vulgaris. PMID:24576433

  19. Adhesion of human platelets to albumin is synergistically increased by lysophosphatidic acid and adrenaline in a donor-dependent fashion.

    PubMed

    Eriksson, Andreas C; Whiss, Per A; Nilsson, Ulrika K

    2006-07-01

    Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) and adrenaline are weak platelet activators considered important for thrombus formation, and were previously shown to synergistically increase platelet aggregation. Here we investigate synergistic activation by LPA and adrenaline when measuring platelet adhesion. Platelet-rich plasma from healthy blood donors together with adrenaline and/or LPA were added to protein-coated microplates. Platelets were allowed to adhere and the amount of adhesion detected enzymatically. The LPA and adrenaline combination induced a synergistic increase of platelet adhesion to a normally non-adhesive albumin surface. The degree of synergy varied markedly between individuals; these variations could not be explained by age, gender, blood type or different amounts of platelets, oxidized low-density lipoprotein, insulin or glucose in plasma. There was a trend indicating increased synergistic effect for platelets sensitive to adrenaline stimulation. The synergistic effect was blocked by the alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonist yohimbine and inhibited by the ADP scavenger system creatine phosphate/creatine phosphokinase and antibodies against alphaIIbbeta3. Furthermore, platelets adhering to albumin after adrenaline and LPA treatment expressed P-selectin. In conclusion, LPA and adrenaline act synergistically to increase alphaIIbbeta3-mediated platelet adhesion to albumin, dependent on alpha2-adrenoceptor signalling and platelet secretion. We also confirm that synergistic platelet activation achieved with LPA and adrenaline is highly donor dependent. PMID:16788312

  20. gamma. -hexachlorocyclohexane (. gamma. -HCH) activates washed rabbit platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Lalau-Keraly, C.; Delautier, D.; Benveniste, J.; Puiseux-Dao, S.

    1986-03-01

    In guinea-pig macrophages, ..gamma..-HCH triggers activation of the phosphatidylinositol cycle and Ca/sup 2 +/ mobilization. Since these two biochemical events are also involved in platelet activation, the authors examined the effects of ..gamma..-HCH on washed rabbit platelets. Release of /sup 14/C-serotonin (/sup 14/C-5HT) and ATP from platelets prelabelled with /sup 14/C-5HT was measured simultaneously with aggregation. ..gamma..-HCH induced shape-change, aggregation and release reaction of platelets. Maximal aggregation (89 arbitrary units, AU), was observed using 170 ..mu..M ..gamma..-HCH, and was associated with 38.1 +/- 6.9% and 161 +/- 48 nM for /sup 14/C-5HT and ATP release respectively (mean +/- 1 SD, n=3). Using 80 ..mu..M ..gamma..-HCH yielded 18 AU, 12.8 +/- 1.0% and 27 +/- 14 nM for aggregation, C-5HT and ATP release respectively (n=3). No effect was observed with 40 ..mu.. M ..gamma..-HCH. Aspirin (ASA), a cyclooxygenase blocker, did not affect ..gamma..-HCH-induced platelet activation. Apyrase (APY), an ADP scavenger, inhibited by 90% aggregation induced by 170 ..mu..M ..gamma..-HCH and slightly inhibited (15%) the /sup 14/C-5HT release. In the presence of both ASA and APY, 96% inhibition of aggregation and 48% inhibition of /sup 14/C-5HT release were observed. Thus, ..gamma..-HCH induced platelet activation in a dose-dependent manner ADP, but not cyclooxygenase-dependent arachidonate metabolites, is involved in ..gamma..-HCH-induced aggregation, whereas, both appear to play a role in ..gamma..-HCH-induced release reaction.

  1. Single platelets seal neutrophil-induced vascular breaches via GPVI during immune-complex-mediated inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Gros, Angèle; Syvannarath, Varouna; Lamrani, Lamia; Ollivier, Véronique; Loyau, Stéphane; Goerge, Tobias; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Jandrot-Perrus, Martine; Ho-Tin-Noé, Benoît

    2015-08-20

    Platelets protect vascular integrity during inflammation. Recent evidence suggests that this action is independent of thrombus formation and requires the engagement of glycoprotein VI (GPVI), but it remains unclear how platelets prevent inflammatory bleeding. We investigated whether platelets and GPVI act primarily by preventing detrimental effects of neutrophils using models of immune complex (IC)-mediated inflammation in mice immunodepleted in platelets and/or neutrophils or deficient in GPVI. Depletion of neutrophils prevented bleeding in thrombocytopenic and GPVI(-/-) mice during IC-mediated dermatitis. GPVI deficiency did not modify neutrophil recruitment, which was reduced by thrombocytopenia. Neutrophil cytotoxic activities were reduced in thrombocytopenic and GPVI(-/-) mice during IC-mediated inflammation. Intravital microscopy revealed that in this setting, intravascular binding sites for platelets were exposed by neutrophils, and GPVI supported the recruitment of individual platelets to these spots. Furthermore, the platelet secretory response accompanying IC-mediated inflammation was partly mediated by GPVI, and blocking of GPVI signaling impaired the vasculoprotective action of platelets. Together, our results show that GPVI plays a dual role in inflammation by enhancing neutrophil-damaging activities while supporting the activation and hemostatic adhesion of single platelets to neutrophil-induced vascular breaches. PMID:26036804

  2. Effects of different anticoagulants on human platelet size distribution and serotonin (5-HT) induced shape change and uptake kinetics.

    PubMed

    Malmgren, R; Beving, H; Olsson, P

    1985-06-15

    The effect of collecting blood with disodium ethylene diamine tetraacetate (EDTA), citrate (NAC) or acid sodium citrate-dextrose (ACD) as anticoagulants on platelet count and size distribution was investigated. No difference between the three preparations regarding platelet count was found in whole blood. Preparation of platelet-rich plasma (PRP) significantly reduced the platelet count in NAC-PRP (p less than 0.01) to a value of 288 X 10(9)/l compared to those of 365 X 10(9)/l and 368 X 10(9)/l in EDTA and ACD blood respectively. A significant shift in the platelet size in EDTA-PRP towards larger cell volumes was observed. There were no differences in the size distribution pattern between NAC-PRP and ACD-PRP in spite of the differences in platelet count. Platelet 5-HT uptake kinetics in EDTA-PRP showed a 50 per cent reduction in both Km and Vmax compared to that in ACD-PRP. The study shows that the receptor mediating 5-HT induced shape change has a direct opposite pH dependence than that of the 5-HT carrier. Interference of receptor-mediated responses in 5-HT uptake studies in human platelets is clearly minimized at a lowered pH. The finding is probably of importance in disorders associated with platelet hyperaggregability. PMID:3927509

  3. The use of quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) for studying nanoparticle-induced platelet aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Santos-Martinez, Maria Jose; Inkielewicz-Stepniak, Iwona; Medina, Carlos; Rahme, Kamil; D’Arcy, Deirdre M; Fox, Daniel; Holmes, Justin D; Zhang, Hongzhou; Radomski, Marek Witold

    2012-01-01

    Interactions between blood platelets and nanoparticles have both pharmacological and toxicological significance and may lead to platelet activation and aggregation. Platelet aggregation is usually studied using light aggregometer that neither mimics the conditions found in human microvasculature nor detects microaggregates. A new method for the measurement of platelet microaggregation under flow conditions using a commercially available quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) has recently been developed. The aim of the current study was to investigate if QCM-D could be used for the measurement of nanoparticle-platelet interactions. Silica, polystyrene, and gold nanoparticles were tested. The interactions were also studied using light aggregometry and flow cytometry, which measured surface abundance of platelet receptors. Platelet activation was imaged using phase contrast and scanning helium ion microscopy. QCM-D was able to measure nanoparticle-induced platelet microaggregation for all nanoparticles tested at concentrations that were undetectable by light aggregometry and flow cytometry. Microaggregates were measured by changes in frequency and dissipation, and the presence of platelets on the sensor surface was confirmed and imaged by phase contrast and scanning helium ion microscopy. PMID:22275839

  4. Platelets and galectins

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    A major function of platelets is keeping the vascular system intact. Platelet activation at sites of vascular injury leads to the formation of a hemostatic plug. Activation of platelets is therefore crucial for normal hemostasis; however, uncontrolled platelet activation may also lead to the formation of occlusive thrombi that can cause ischemic events. Although they are essential for proper hemostasis, platelet function extends to physiologic processes such as tissue repair, wound remodeling and antimicrobial host defense, or pathologic conditions such as thrombosis, atherosclerosis, chronic inflammatory diseases and cancer. Platelets can be activated by soluble molecules including thrombin, thromboxane A2 (TXA2), adenosine diphosphate (ADP), serotonin or by adhesive extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins such as von Willebrand factor (vWF) and collagen. Here we describe recent advances in the activation of platelets by non-canonical platelet agonists such as galectins. By acting either in soluble or immobilized form, these glycan-binding proteins trigger all platelet activation responses through modulation of discrete signaling pathways. We also offer new hypotheses and some speculations about the role of platelet-galectin interactions not only in hemostasis and thrombosis but also in inflammation and related diseases such as atherosclerosis and cancer. PMID:25405160

  5. [Isosorbide dinitrate inhibits in vitro platelet aggregation at submicromolar concentrations].

    PubMed

    Gachet, C; Guillou, J; Moog, S; Cazenave, J P

    1992-04-01

    Nitrate derivatives have in vivo and in vitro platelet anti-aggregant properties in addition to their vasodilatory effects. The mode of action is related to increased intracytoplasmic cyclic GMP concentrations. It has been shown that isosorbide dinitrate (ISDN) has this type of platelet anti-aggregant activity but the reported results about the active concentrations and the inhibited pathways of activation are contradictory. This study was designed to determine whether ISDN has in vitro platelet anti-aggregant activity at low doses and to verify if this effect is selective by aggregation induced by ADP. Finally, a possible potentialisation of the inhibitors due to ISDN was looked for with cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase inhibitors and with agents simulating the effect of adenylate cyclase. The results showed that: 1) ISDN had platelet anti-aggregant activity in vitro at concentrations of about 10-7 M, 2) that this effect was not limited to the aggregation induced by ADP as the aggregation induced by PAF-acether was also inhibited by low dose ISDN, 3) of the cyclic nucleotide modulators tested, only quercetine (flavonoide) potentialised the effects of ISDN. PMID:1326933

  6. Effect in vitro on platelet function of two compounds developed from the pyrimido-pyrimidines

    PubMed Central

    Slater, S. D.; Turpie, A. G. G.; Douglas, A. S.; McNicol, G. P.

    1972-01-01

    VK 774 and VK 744, two new compounds developed from the pyrimido-pyrimidines, have been found to be powerful inhibitors of platelet function tested in vitro. They inhibit adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced platelet aggregation, and the release of platelet factor 3 by kaolin, and VK 774 also reduces platelet adhesiveness and inhibits platelet aggregation (`snowstorm' effect) in the Chandler tube system. Although measured percentage whole blood clot retraction was uninfluenced by these drugs the clot produced with VK 774 was friable and soft. VK 774 appears to be the most powerful of these compounds reported so far, being active in some test systems at 10−6M, and, if the results of toxicity testing are satisfactory, it should be an important agent for therapeutic trial. PMID:5046075

  7. Hinokitiol inhibits platelet activation ex vivo and thrombus formation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kuan H; Kuo, Jinn R; Lu, Wan J; Chung, Chi L; Chou, Duen S; Huang, Shih Y; Lee, Hsiu C; Sheu, Joen R

    2013-05-15

    Hinokitiol is a tropolone-related bioactive compound that has been used in hair tonics, cosmetics, and food as an antimicrobial agent. Recently, hinokitiol has attracted considerable interest because of its anticancer activities. Platelet activation plays a crucial role in atherothrombotic processes. We examined the effects of hinokitiol treatment on platelet activation using human platelets. In the present study, hinokitiol (1 and 2 μM) inhibited the collagen-induced aggregation of human platelets, but did not inhibit the activation of platelets by other agonists, including thrombin, arachidonic acid, and ADP. Hinokitiol inhibited the phosphorylation of phospholipase C (PLC)γ2, protein kinase C (PKC), mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), and Akt in collagen-activated human platelets, and significantly reduced intracellular calcium mobilization and hydroxyl radical (OH·) formation. Hinokitiol also reduced the PKC activation and platelet aggregation stimulated by PDBu. In addition, hinokitiol significantly prolonged thrombogenesis in mice. Hinokitiol did not influence the binding of a fluorescent triflavin probe to the αIIbβ3 integrin on platelet membrane, and neither ODQ nor SQ22536 significantly reversed the hinokitiol-mediated inhibition of platelet aggregation. In conclusion, hinokitiol may inhibit platelet activation by inhibiting the PLCγ2-PKC cascade and hydroxyl radical formation, followed by suppressing the activation of MAPKs and Akt. Our study suggests that hinokitiol may represent a potential therapeutic agent for the prevention or treatment of thromboembolic disorders. PMID:23473801

  8. Beta-amyrin from Ardisia elliptica Thunb. is more potent than aspirin in inhibiting collagen-induced platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Ching, Jianhong; Chua, Tung-Kian; Chin, Lee-Cheng; Lau, Aik-Jiang; Pang, Yun-Keng; Jaya, Johannes Murti; Tan, Chay-Hoon; Koh, Hwee-Ling

    2010-03-01

    Ardisia elliptica Thunberg (Myrsinaceae) is a medicinal plant traditionally used for alleviating chest pains, treatment of fever, diarrhoea, liver poisoning and parturition complications. The objectives of the study were to investigate the effect of A. elliptica on collagen induced platelet aggregation and to isolate and purify potential antiplatelet components. Fresh A. elliptica leaves were extracted using methanol (70% v/v) by Soxhlet extraction and the extract was analysed for its inhibition of collagen-induced platelet aggregation. Inhibition of platelet aggregation was assessed by incubating the extracts with rabbit blood and collagen in a whole blood aggregometer and measuring the impedance. The leaf extract was found to inhibit platelet aggregation with an IC50 value of 167 microg/ml. Using bioassay guided fractionation, beta-amyrin was isolated and purified. The IC50 value of beta-amyrin was found to be 4.5 microg/ml (10.5 microM) while that of aspirin was found to be 11 microg/ml (62.7 microM), indicating that beta-amyrin was six times as active as aspirin in inhibiting platelet aggregation. This paper is the first report that beta-amyrin isolated from A. elliptica is more potent than aspirin in inhibiting collagen-induced platelet aggregation. In conclusion, A. elliptica leaves were found to inhibit collagen-induced platelet aggregation and one of the bioactive components responsible for the observed effect was determined to be beta-amyrin. PMID:21046981

  9. Effect of diabetic duration on hemorheological properties and platelet aggregation in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats

    PubMed Central

    Yeom, Eunseop; Byeon, Hyeokjun; Lee, Sang Joon

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus with abnormal glucose concentration is associated with changes in hemorheological properties, endothelial function, and platelets hyperactivity. Disturbances may significantly be responsible for diabetes-related vascular complications. In this study, hemorheological and hemodynamic properties were measured according to diabetic duration after streptozotocin treatment in rats. For ex vivo measurements, an extracorporeal model was adopted. Flow rate and blood viscosity were measured using a microfluidic device. Erythrocyte aggregation and morphological parameters of erythrocytes were measured by modified erythrocyte sedimentation rate and the phase-contrast holography under in vitro conditions. The platelet aggregation and mean pressure in the femoral artery were estimated under ex vivo conditions. Hemorheological properties including blood viscosity, erythrocyte aggregation and shape parameters for the control group are significantly different with those for diabetic groups. The changes with respect to diabetic duration were relatively unnoticeable. However, the platelet aggregation is strongly dependent on the diabetic duration. Based on these results, hyperglycemia exposure may induce hemorheological variations in early stages of diabetes mellitus. High platelet aggregation may become more pronounced according to the diabetic duration caused by variations in hemorheological properties resulting in endothelial dysfunction. This study would be helpful in understanding the effects of diabetic duration on biophysical properties. PMID:26898237

  10. Normal Platelet Integrin Function in Mice Lacking Hydrogen Peroxide-Induced Clone-5 (Hic-5)

    PubMed Central

    Popp, Michael; Thielmann, Ina; Nieswandt, Bernhard; Stegner, David

    2015-01-01

    Integrin αIIbβ3 plays a central role in the adhesion and aggregation of platelets and thus is essential for hemostasis and thrombosis. Integrin activation requires the transmission of a signal from the small cytoplasmic tails of the α or β subunit to the large extracellular domains resulting in conformational changes of the extracellular domains to enable ligand binding. Hydrogen peroxide-inducible clone-5 (Hic-5), a member of the paxillin family, serves as a focal adhesion adaptor protein associated with αIIbβ3 at its cytoplasmic tails. Previous studies suggested Hic-5 as a novel regulator of integrin αIIbβ3 activation and platelet aggregation in mice. To assess this in more detail, we generated Hic-5-null mice and analyzed activation and aggregation of their platelets in vitro and in vivo. Surprisingly, lack of Hic-5 had no detectable effect on platelet integrin activation and function in vitro and in vivo under all tested conditions. These results indicate that Hic-5 is dispensable for integrin αIIbβ3 activation and consequently for arterial thrombosis and hemostasis in mice. PMID:26172113

  11. Three-dimentional simulation of flow-induced platelet activation in artificial heart valves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hedayat, Mohammadali; Asgharzadeh, Hafez; Borazjani, Iman

    2015-11-01

    Since the advent of heart valve, several valve types such as mechanical and bio-prosthetic valves have been designed. Mechanical Heart Valves (MHV) are durable but suffer from thromboembolic complications that caused by shear-induced platelet activation near the valve region. Bio-prosthetic Heart Valves (BHV) are known for better hemodynamics. However, they usually have a short average life time. Realistic simulations of heart valves in combination with platelet activation models can lead to a better understanding of the potential risk of thrombus formation in such devices. In this study, an Eulerian approach is developed to calculate the platelet activation in three-dimensional simulations of flow through MHV and BHV using a parallel overset-curvilinear immersed boundary technique. A curvilinear body-fitted grid is used for the flow simulation through the anatomic aorta, while the sharp-interface immersed boundary method is used for simulation of the Left Ventricle (LV) with prescribed motion. In addition, dynamics of valves were calculated numerically using under-relaxed strong-coupling algorithm. Finally, the platelet activation results for BMV and MHV are compared with each other.

  12. Effect of diabetic duration on hemorheological properties and platelet aggregation in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Eunseop; Byeon, Hyeokjun; Lee, Sang Joon

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus with abnormal glucose concentration is associated with changes in hemorheological properties, endothelial function, and platelets hyperactivity. Disturbances may significantly be responsible for diabetes-related vascular complications. In this study, hemorheological and hemodynamic properties were measured according to diabetic duration after streptozotocin treatment in rats. For ex vivo measurements, an extracorporeal model was adopted. Flow rate and blood viscosity were measured using a microfluidic device. Erythrocyte aggregation and morphological parameters of erythrocytes were measured by modified erythrocyte sedimentation rate and the phase-contrast holography under in vitro conditions. The platelet aggregation and mean pressure in the femoral artery were estimated under ex vivo conditions. Hemorheological properties including blood viscosity, erythrocyte aggregation and shape parameters for the control group are significantly different with those for diabetic groups. The changes with respect to diabetic duration were relatively unnoticeable. However, the platelet aggregation is strongly dependent on the diabetic duration. Based on these results, hyperglycemia exposure may induce hemorheological variations in early stages of diabetes mellitus. High platelet aggregation may become more pronounced according to the diabetic duration caused by variations in hemorheological properties resulting in endothelial dysfunction. This study would be helpful in understanding the effects of diabetic duration on biophysical properties. PMID:26898237

  13. Degranulation of rabbit platelets with PAF-acether: a new procedure for unravelling the mode of action of platelet-activating substances.

    PubMed

    Vargaftig, B B; Joseph, D; Marlas, G; Chevance, L G

    1982-08-24

    Aggregation and secretion of ATP induced by thrombin, collagen, the snake venom component convulxin and platelet-activating factor (PAF-acether) were studied after the exposure of rabbit platelets to 1 microM of PAF-acether. This concentration, which is around 6 orders of magnitude above the concentration needed to induce full aggregation, was required to remove most of the releasable ATP from the platelets. The depleted platelets aggregated to PAF-acether, to thrombin and to convulxin under conditions where only very low amounts of ATP were secreted, confirming that these agents do not require the release of dense body components to trigger aggregation. Furthermore, when exposure to PAF-acether was associated to inactivation of platelet cyclooxygenase with aspirin, aggregation to thrombin persisted, validating the claim that thrombin induces aggregation by a third pathway unrelated to ADP and to thromboxane A2. Aggregation by collagen was markedly reduced by exposure of the platelets to PAF-acether or to aspirin; when both procedures were associated, aggregation was suppressed. Failure to desensitize the rabbit platelets to PAF-acether upon exposure to high amounts of it indicates the absence of irreversible membrane changes due to PAF-acether, and allows its use as a depleting procedure for the dense body materials, which does not affect platelet membrane components as is the case for thrombin. PMID:7135345

  14. Alterations of platelet functions in children and adolescents with iron-deficiency anemia and response to therapy.

    PubMed

    Mokhtar, Galila M; Ibrahim, Wafaa E; Kassim, Nevine A; Ragab, Iman A; Saad, Abeer A; Abdel Raheem, Heba G

    2015-01-01

    Several changes in platelets have been reported in patients with iron-deficiency anemia (IDA), so a relationship between iron metabolism and thrombopoiesis should be considered. We aimed to study the alterations of platelet functions in patients with IDA by assessment of platelet aggregation with epinephrine, adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and ristocetin and by measuring platelet function analyzer-100 (PFA-100) closure time together with the effect of iron therapy on the same tests. A follow-up study was conducted in Ain Shams University Children's hospital in the period from June 2011 to June 2012 including 20 patients with confirmed IDA and 20 healthy age- and sex-matched control. Bleeding manifestations were reported. Laboratory analysis included complete blood count, assessment of iron status by measuring serum iron, TIBC and ferritin, assessment of platelet functions by PFA-100 closure time and platelet aggregation with collagen, ADP and ristocetin. Patients with IDA were treated by oral iron therapy 6 mg/kg/day of ferrous sulfate and post-therapeutic re-assessment was done. Mean age of IDA patients was 5.7 ± 4.2 years. Bleeding manifestations were more common in patients group. Mean PFA-100 closure times (with epinephrine) were significantly longer in patients (179.1 ± 86.4 seconds) compared to control group (115 ± 28.5 seconds) (p < 0.05). Platelet aggregation by ADP (38.1 ± 22.2%), epinephrine (19.7 ± 14.2%) and ristocetin (58.8 ± 21.4%) were significantly reduced in patients compared to control (62.7 ± 6.2, 63.3 ± 6.9, 73.8 ± 8.3, respectively; p < 0.001). After treatment platelet aggregation tests induced by ADP (64.78 ± 18.25%), and epinephrine (55.47 ± 24%) were significantly increased in patients with IDA compared to before treatment (39.44 ± 21.85%, 20.33 ± 14.58%; p < 0.001). PFA-100 closure time as well showed significant decreased after treatment (118.4 ± 27.242) compared to before treatment (186.2 ± 90.35; p < 0.05). A negative

  15. The nature of interactions between tissue-type plasminogen activator and platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Torr, S.R.; Winters, K.J.; Santoro, S.A.; Sobel, B.E. )

    1990-07-15

    To elucidate interactions responsible for inhibition of aggregation of platelets in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) harvested from whole blood preincubated with t-PA, experiments were performed with PRP and washed platelets under diverse conditions of preincubation. Both ADP and collagen induced aggregation were inhibited in PRP unless aprotinin had been added to the preincubated whole blood concomitantly with t-PA. However, in washed platelets prepared after the same exposure aggregation was intact. When washed platelets were supplemented with fibrinogen degradation products (FDPs) in concentrations simulating those in whole blood preincubated with t-PA, aggregation induced with either ADP or collagen was inhibited. Thus, the inhibition in PRP depended on generation of FDPs by activated plasminogen. The functional integrity of surface glycoprotein (GP) IIb/IIIa receptors in washed platelets was documented by autoradiography after SDS-PAGE of surface labeled GPs and by fibrinogen binding despite preincubation of the whole blood or washed platelets themselves with t-PA and plasminogen as long as exogenous calcium (greater than or equal to 0.1 microM) was present. In contrast, when calcium was absent, the platelet GP IIb/IIIa receptor was rendered susceptible to degradation by plasmin, and aggregation was inhibited by preincubation at 37 degrees C even if aprotinin was present when aggregation was being assayed. These observations reconcile disparate results in the literature from studies in vivo and in vitro by demonstrating that inhibition of aggregation of platelets in PRP and in whole blood reflects indirect effects of plasminogen activation rather than direct effects of t-PA or plasmin on the platelets themselves.

  16. P2Y13 receptor-mediated rapid increase in intracellular calcium induced by ADP in cultured dorsal spinal cord microglia.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Junwei; Wang, Gaoxia; Liu, Xiaohong; Wang, Chunmei; Tian, Hong; Liu, Aidong; Jin, Huan; Luo, Xiaomei; Chen, Yuanshou

    2014-11-01

    P2Y receptors have been implicated in the calcium mobilization by the response to neuroexcitatory substances in neurons and astrocytes, but little is known about P2Y receptors in microglia cells. In the present study, the effects of ADP on the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in cultured dorsal spinal cord microglia were detected with confocal laser scanning microscopy using fluo-4/AM as a calcium fluorescence indicator that could monitor real-time alterations of [Ca(2+)]i. Here we show that ADP (0.01-100 μM) causes a rapid increase in [Ca(2+)]i with a dose-dependent manner in cultured microglia. The action of ADP on [Ca(2+)]i was significantly blocked by MRS2211 (a selective P2Y13 receptor antagonist), but was unaffected by MRS2179 (a selective P2Y1 receptor antagonist) or MRS2395 (a selective P2Y12 receptor antagonist), which suggest that P2Y13 receptor may be responsible for ADP-evoked Ca(2+) mobilization in cultured microglia. P2Y13-evoked Ca(2+) response can be obviously inhibited by BAPTA-AM and U-73122, respectively. Moreover, removal of extracellular Ca(2+) (by EGTA) also can obvious suppress the Ca(2+) mobilization. These results means both intracellular calcium and extracellular calcium are potentially important mechanisms in P2Y13 receptor-evoked Ca(2+) mobilization. However, P2Y13 receptor-evoked Ca(2+) response was not impaired after CdCl2 and verapamil administration, which suggest that voltage-operated Ca(2+) channels may be not related with P2Y13-evoked Ca(2+) response. In addition, Ca(2+) mobilization induced by ADP was abolished by different store-operated Ca(2+) channels (SOCs) blocker, 2-APB (50 μM) and SKF-96365 (1 mM), respectively. These observations suggest that the activation of P2Y13 receptor might be involved in the effect of ADP on [Ca(2+)]i in cultured dorsal spinal cord microglia. Furthermore, our results raise a possibility that P2Y13 receptor activation causes Ca(2+) release from Ca(2+) store, which leads to the

  17. Modulation of platelet aggregation by areca nut and betel leaf ingredients: roles of reactive oxygen species and cyclooxygenase.

    PubMed

    Jeng, Jiiang-Huei; Chen, Shiao-Yun; Liao, Chang-Hui; Tung, Yuan-Yii; Lin, Bor-Ru; Hahn, Liang-Jiunn; Chang, Mei-Chi

    2002-05-01

    There are 2 to 6 billion betel quid (BQ) chewers in the world. Areca nut (AN), a BQ component, modulates arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism, which is crucial for platelet function. AN extract (1 and 2 mg/ml) stimulated rabbit platelet aggregation, with induction of thromboxane B2 (TXB2) production. Contrastingly, Piper betle leaf (PBL) extract inhibited AA-, collagen-, and U46619-induced platelet aggregation, and TXB2 and prostaglandin-D2 (PGD2) production. PBL extract also inhibited platelet TXB2 and PGD2 production triggered by thrombin, platelet activating factor (PAF), and adenosine diphosphate (ADP), whereas little effect on platelet aggregation was noted. Moreover, PBL is a scavenger of O2(*-) and *OH, and inhibits xanthine oxidase activity and the (*)OH-induced PUC18 DNA breaks. Deferoxamine, 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (BAPTA) and neomycin prevented AN-induced platelet aggregation and TXB2 production. Indomethacin, genistein, and PBL extract inhibited only TXB2 production, but not platelet aggregation. Catalase, superoxide dismutase, and dimethylthiourea (DMT) showed little effect on AN-induced platelet aggregation, whereas catalase and DMT inhibited the AN-induced TXB2 production. These results suggest that AN-induced platelet aggregation is associated with iron-mediated reactive oxygen species production, calcium mobilization, phospholipase C activation, and TXB2 production. PBL inhibited platelet aggregation via both its antioxidative effects and effects on TXB2 and PGD2 production. Effects of AN and PBL on platelet aggregation and AA metabolism is crucial for platelet activation in the oral mucosa and cardiovascular system in BQ chewers. PMID:11978487

  18. Capsaicin-induced inhibition of platelet aggregation is not mediated by transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1.

    PubMed

    Mittelstadt, Scott W; Nelson, Richard A; Daanen, Jerome F; King, Andrew J; Kort, Michael E; Kym, Philip R; Lubbers, Nathan L; Cox, Bryan F; Lynch, James J

    2012-01-01

    Capsaicin is an agonist of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1), in which it can act as a neuronal stimulant and result in nociception. Capsaicin also affects a variety of nonneuronal tissues, in which its mechanisms of action are less certain. The present study investigated whether the inhibitory effects of capsaicin on platelet aggregation are mediated via TRPV1. Venous whole blood obtained from beagle dogs (n = 6) was preincubated with capsaicin and/or the potent and selective competitive TRPV1 antagonist, A-993610 and then exposed to collagen (2 μg/ml). An aggregometer was used to quantify the platelet response. Capsaicin exposure inhibited collagen-induced platelet aggregation in a concentration-dependent manner, with significant effects at 10 and 30 μg capsaicin per millilitre. A-993610 alone (0.1-1.0 μg/ml) had no effects on collagen-induced platelet aggregation, nor did it have any effects on capsaicin's ability to inhibit platelet aggregation. The current results agree with previous findings that capsaicin can inhibit platelet aggregation. In addition, the present study demonstrates that capsaicin's inhibitory effect on collagen-induced canine platelet aggregation is not mediated by TRPV1. PMID:22089942

  19. Plasma Fibrinogen Is a Natural Deterrent to Amyloid β–Induced Platelet Activation and Neuronal Toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Sonkar, Vijay K; Kulkarni, Paresh P; Chaurasia, Susheel N; Dash, Ayusman; Jauhari, Abhishek; Parmar, Devendra; Yadav, Sanjay; Dash, Debabrata

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder, characterized by extensive loss of neurons and deposition of amyloid β (Aβ) in the form of extracellular plaques. Aβ is considered to have a critical role in synaptic loss and neuronal death underlying cognitive decline. Platelets contribute to 95% of circulating amyloid precursor protein that releases Aβ into circulation. We have recently demonstrated that the Aβ active fragment containing amino acid sequence 25–35 (Aβ25–35) is highly thrombogenic in nature and elicits strong aggregation of washed human platelets in a RhoA-dependent manner. In this study, we evaluated the influence of fibrinogen on Aβ-induced platelet activation. Intriguingly, Aβ failed to induce aggregation of platelets suspended in plasma but not in buffer. Fibrinogen brought about dose-dependent decline in aggregatory response of washed human platelets elicited by Aβ25–35, which could be reversed by increasing doses of Aβ. Fibrinogen also attenuated Aβ-induced platelet responses such as secretion, clot retraction, rise in cytosolic Ca+2 and reactive oxygen species. Fibrinogen prevented intracellular accumulation of full-length Aβ peptide (Aβ42) in platelets as well as neuronal cells. We conclude that fibrinogen serves as a physiological check against the adverse effects of Aβ by preventing its interaction with cells. PMID:27262026

  20. Dermcidin isoform-2 induced nullification of the effect of acetyl salicylic acid in platelet aggregation in acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Bank, Sarbashri; Jana, Pradipta; Maiti, Smarajit; Guha, Santanu; Sinha, A. K.

    2014-01-01

    The aggregation of platelets on the plaque rupture site on the coronary artery is reported to cause both acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and acute myocardial infarction (AMI). While the inhibition of platelet aggregation by acetyl salicylic acid was reported to produce beneficial effects in ACS, it failed to do in AMI. The concentration of a stress induced protein (dermcidin isoform-2) was much higher in AMI than that in ACS. Incubation of normal platelet rich plasma (PRP) with dermcidin showed one high affinity (Kd = 40 nM) and one low affinity binding sites (Kd = 333 nM). When normal PRP was incubated with 0.4 μM dermcidin, the platelets became resistant to the inhibitory effect of aspirin similar to that in the case of AMI. Incubation of PRP from AMI with dermcidin antibody restored the sensitivity of the platelets to the aspirin effect. Incubation of AMI PRP pretreated with 15 μM aspirin, a stimulator of the NO synthesis, resulted in the increased production of NO in the platelets that removed the bound dermcidin by 40% from the high affinity binding sites of AMI platelets. When the same AMI PRP was retreated with 10 μM aspirin, the aggregation of platelets was completely inhibited by NO synthesis. PMID:25055737

  1. Comparison of Starch and ADP-Glucose Pyrophosphorylase Levels in Nonembryogenic Cells and Developing Embryos from Induced Carrot Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Gregory L.; Nikolau, Basil J.; Ulrich, Thomas H.; Wurtele, Eve Syrkin

    1988-01-01

    Cultures of carrot (Daucus carota L.) in a medium without added 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid were separated into fractions of embryos at different stages of development (large globular and heart, torpedo, and germinating) and nonembryogenic cells. The average starch content per cell in these fractions was similar. However, due to the smaller sizes of the cells of the embryos relative to the nonembryogenic cells, starch content per weight of tissue was higher in the embryos. The ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase activity per cell in the nonembryogenic cells was double that of the embryo cells. Furthermore, the ratio of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase to starch was over 2-fold higher in the nonembryogenic cells, indicating that starch content is not simply determined by ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase levels. ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase activity of all culture fractions was directly proportional to the level of a single 50 kilodalton polypeptide detected by immunoblot analysis, using antiserum raised to the purified spinach leaf enzyme. In the same immunoblot analysis, novel polypeptides of 63 and 100 kilodalton were detected in embryos but were absent from nonembryogenic cells. This is one of the few reported examples of specific proteins which differentially accumulate in embryos and nonembryogenic cells. Images Fig. 2 PMID:16665929

  2. Iduna protects the brain from glutamate excitotoxicity and stroke by interfering with poly(ADP-ribose) polymer-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Andrabi, Shaida A; Kang, Ho Chul; Haince, Jean-François; Lee, Yun-Il; Zhang, Jian; Chi, Zhikai; West, Andrew B; Koehler, Raymond C; Poirier, Guy G; Dawson, Ted M; Dawson, Valina L

    2011-06-01

    Glutamate acting on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors induces neuronal injury following stroke, through activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) and generation of the death molecule poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymer. Here we identify Iduna, a previously undescribed NMDA receptor-induced survival protein that is neuroprotective against glutamate NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity both in vitro and in vivo and against stroke through interfering with PAR polymer-induced cell death (parthanatos). Iduna's protective effects are independent and downstream of PARP-1 activity. Iduna is a PAR polymer-binding protein, and mutation at the PAR polymer binding site abolishes the PAR binding activity of Iduna and attenuates its protective actions. Iduna is protective in vivo against NMDA-induced excitotoxicity and middle cerebral artery occlusion-induced stroke in mice. To our knowledge, these results define Iduna as the first known endogenous inhibitor of parthanatos. Interfering with PAR polymer signaling could be a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of neurologic disorders. PMID:21602803

  3. Palmitic acid-labeled lipids selectively incorporated into platelet cytoskeleton during aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Packham, M.A.; Guccione, M.A.; Bryant, N.L.; Livne, A. )

    1990-07-01

    Previous experiments showed that during the early stages (20-30 seconds) of aggregation induced by adenosine diphosphate (ADP, 2 microM) or thrombin (0.1 U/mL) of rabbit or human platelets prelabeled with (3H)palmitic acid, labeled lipid became associated with the cytoskeleton isolated after lysis with 1% Triton X-100, 5 mM EGTA (ethylene glycol-bis-(beta-aminoethyl ether))-N,N,N',N'-tetra-acetic acid. The association appeared to be related to the number of sites of contact and was independent of the release of granule contents. We have now investigated the nature of the labeled lipids by thin-layer and column chromatography and found differences between the distribution of the label in intact platelets (both stimulated and unstimulated) and the isolated cytoskeletons. In both species, and with either ADP or thrombin as aggregating agent, 70-85% of the label in both intact platelets and in the cytoskeletons was in phospholipids. The distribution of label among the phospholipids in the cytoskeletons was similar to that in intact platelets except that the percentage of label in phosphatidylcholine was significantly higher in the cytoskeletons of human platelets than in the intact platelets, and the percentage of label in phosphatidylserine/phosphatidylinositol was significantly lower in the cytoskeletons of rabbit platelets and thrombin-aggregated human platelets than in intact platelets. The cytoskeletons contained a lower percentage of label in triacylglycerol, diacylglycerol, and cholesterol ester than the intact platelets. Contrary to a report in the literature, we found no evidence for the incorporation of diacylglycerol and palmitic acid into the cytoskeleton.

  4. Alleviation of viper venom induced platelet apoptosis by crocin (Crocus sativus): implications for thrombocytopenia in viper bites.

    PubMed

    Santhosh, M Sebastin; Thushara, R M; Hemshekhar, M; Sunitha, K; Devaraja, S; Kemparaju, K; Girish, K S

    2013-11-01

    Viper envenomations are characterized by prominent local and systemic manifestations including hematological alterations. Snake venom metalloproteinases (SVMPs) and phospholipase A2 (PLA2) plays crucial role in the pathophysiology of hemorrhage by targeting/altering the platelets function which may result in thrombocytopenia. Platelets undergo the classic events of mitochondria-mediated apoptotic pathway due to augmented endogenous reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. The observed anticoagulant effects during viper envenomations could be due to exacerbated platelet apoptosis and thrombocytopenia. Moreover, antivenin treatments are ineffective against the venom-induced oxidative stress; therefore, it necessitates an auxiliary therapy involving antioxidants which can effectively scavenge the endothelium-generated/endogenous ROS and protect the platelets. The present study explored the effects of viper venom on platelet apoptosis and its amelioration by a phytochemical crocin. The study evaluated the Vipera russelli venom-induced apoptotic events including endogenous ROS generation, intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization, mitochondrial membrane depolarization, cyt-c translocation, caspase activation and phosphatidylserine externalization which were effectively mitigated when the venom was pre-treated with crocin. The study highlights one of the less studied features of venom-induced secondary complications i.e. platelet apoptosis and sheds light on the underlying basis for venom-induced thrombocytopenia, systemic hemorrhage and in vivo anticoagulant effect. PMID:23412973

  5. Relationship between high on aspirin platelet reactivity and oxidative stress in coronary artery by-pass grafted patients.

    PubMed

    Kuliczkowski, Wiktor; Golanski, Ryszard; Bijak, Michal; Boryczka, Katarzyna; Kaczmarski, Jacek; Watala, Cezary; Golanski, Jacek

    2016-03-01

    The aim of the study was to assess the responsiveness of blood platelets to acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) in patients following coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) surgery with relation to oxidative and antioxidative plasma status. The study included 37 patients treated with the CABG procedure. During the first 24 h after CABG patients were given 300 mg of ASA with the following dose of 150 mg daily. The blood was collected before the procedure and 10 days after. Whole blood platelet aggregation induced with arachidonic acid, collagen and adenosine diphosphate (ADP) was performed together with whole blood generation of thromboxane B2 (TxB2). Oxidative stress was measured before and 10 days after CABG with total oxidative plasma status (TOS) and total antioxidative status of the plasma (TAS). TOS/TAS index was calculated. We observed a significant increase in the TOS and TOS/TAS index and ADP-induced aggregation 10 days after CABG in comparison with its level before operation. There was a significant decrease in the arachidonic acid-induced aggregation and serum TxB2 level. Patients with ADP-induced and collagen-induced aggregation in the upper quartile had significantly higher TOS and TOS/TAS index before (ADP) and after the operation (ADP and collagen). There were 19 patients (51%) with high on aspirin platelet reactivity after CABG who had also higher TOS and TOS/TAS index and lower TAS value in comparison with aspirin responders. Despite ASA use, increased oxidative stress after CABG can overcome its antiplatelet effect and increase platelet activation through other pathways. PMID:26523914

  6. Anti-platelet and anti-thrombogenic effects of shikimic acid in sedentary population.

    PubMed

    Veach, Daniel; Hosking, Holly; Thompson, Kiara; Santhakumar, Abishek Bommannan

    2016-08-10

    This ex vivo study was performed to evaluate the anti-platelet and anti-thrombogenic potential of shikimic acid (SA), a plant phenolic metabolite. Fasting blood samples were collected from 22 sedentary participants to analyse the effect of varying concentrations of SA (0.1 mM, 0.2 mM, 0.5 mM, 1 mM and 2 mM) on platelet surface-marker expression, platelet aggregation and biomarkers of thrombogenesis. Monocyte-platelet aggregates (CD14/CD42b) and platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1 or CD31), effective indicators of thrombus formation were evaluated. Procaspase-activating compound 1 (PAC-1) and P-selectin or CD62P were used to assess platelet activation-related thrombogenesis. Adenosine diphosphate (ADP) was used to stimulate the P2Y1/P2Y12 pathway of platelet activation to mimic the in vivo thrombogenic pathway. Platelet aggregation studies utilised both ADP and collagen as exogenous platelet agonists to target both P2Y1/P2Y12 and GPVI pathways of thrombus formation. It was observed with flow cytometry that SA produced a significant antiplatelet effect on PAC-1 (p = 0.03 at 2 mM) and CD62P (p = 0.017, p = 0.036 at 1 mM and 2 mM respectively) expression in addition to lowering monocyte-platelet aggregate formation (p = 0.013, p < 0.01 and p < 0.01 at 0.5 mM, 1 mM and 2 mM respectively). SA at 1 mM concentration reduced PECAM-1 expression (p = 0.035), signifying a reduction to endothelial leucocyte migration during thrombus growth. SA did not demonstrate a platelet aggregation inhibitory effect by targeting the GPVI collagen pathway but reduced ADP induced platelet aggregation at 2 mM concentration (p < 0.01 at 2 mM). The results suggest that SA, an active metabolite of polyphenol-rich food intake, could play an important role in reducing platelet activation, aggregation related thrombus formation and biomarkers of thrombogenesis in sedentary individuals. PMID:27480079

  7. Variability in platelet responses to collagen--comparison between whole blood perfusions, traditional platelet function tests and PFA-100.

    PubMed

    Lepäntalo, A; Beer, J H; Siljander, P; Syrjälä, M; Lassila, R

    2001-07-15

    The purpose of this study was to determine if the results obtained in platelet function tests and whole blood perfusions are associated with those in platelet function analyser (PFA)-100. We used collagen type I monomers and fibrils to analyse the distinct roles of glycoprotein (GP) Ia/IIa and other collagen receptors in flowing blood under a high shear rate (1600/s) and in aggregation studies. Also, anticoagulation [citrate vs. D-phenylalanyl-1-prolyl-1 arginine chloromethyl ketone (PPACK)] was varied to enhance the functions of GP Ia/IIa, since it has been shown that the cation-poor environment of citrated blood impairs GP Ia/IIa-dependent platelet recruitment. Large interindividual variability (45-fold) was detected in deposition of platelets in whole blood perfusions over collagen monomers, whereas this variation was only fourfold in fibrils. In PFA, this variation was reduced to 2.5-fold. However, platelet deposition on monomers is associated with epinephrine-enhanced PFA (r=-.49, P<.03), whereas platelet deposition on fibrils is correlated with adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-enhanced PFA (r=-.47, P<.05), suggesting a distinct synergism between epinephrine and monomers (GP Ia/IIa) as well as ADP with fibrils (other collagen receptors). Donors with 807 C/C polymorphism of GP Ia (n=14) had longer lag phase in aggregation experiments compared with C/T (n=7) both by monomers and fibrils (P<.04), but these polymorphisms with their mild impact on GP Ia/IIa activity did not markedly differ in other tests. In conclusion, the results obtained in perfusion studies and PFA experiments correlated, but PFA fails to reveal the large-scale variability related to collagen-induced platelet responses. PMID:11457470

  8. The influence of Rubus idaeus and Rubus caesius leaf extracts on platelet aggregation in whole blood. Cross-talk of platelets and neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Dudzinska, Dominika; Bednarska, Katarzyna; Boncler, Magdalena; Luzak, Boguslawa; Watala, Cezary

    2016-07-01

    Recently, polyphenols have gained attention as potential natural cardioprotective therapeutics, due to their antiplatelet, anti-inflammatory and anticoagulant activity. Species belonging to the genus Rubus sp. have been reported to be a source of polyphenolic compounds with antioxidative proprieties and beneficial biological activities. This study investigates the effects of leaf extracts obtained from red raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) and European dewberry (Rubus caesius L.) on the reactivity of blood platelets. In ADP-stimulated blood, raspberry and dewberry extracts (15 µg/ml) markedly decreased platelet surface membrane expression of activated GPIIbIIIa receptor by 16% and 21%, respectively (P < 0.01) and significantly inhibited platelet aggregation (by 31-41% for raspberry and by 38-55% for dewberry, P < 0.01). In platelet-rich plasma (PRP), the extracts had no effect on ADP-induced platelet aggregation. The effectiveness of the extracts in whole blood and the lack of their activity in PRP indicate that leukocytes are likely to participate in the platelet response to the extracts. Our experiments show that the extracts significantly reduced the amount of free radicals released by activated neutrophils in whole blood (P < 0.001), as well as in suspensions of isolated neutrophils (P < 0.05). Moreover, the reduced number of neutrophils leads to the decreased efficiency of the extracts in the inhibition of platelet aggregation. In summary, our findings show that the raspberry and dewberry leaf extracts considerably modulated blood platelet reactivity in whole blood: they influenced blood platelet aggregation, possibly via the modulation of the redox status dependent on the oxidative activity of neutrophils. PMID:26836594

  9. Exposure to acrolein by inhalation causes platelet activation

    SciTech Connect

    Sithu, Srinivas D.; Srivastava, Sanjay; Siddiqui, Maqsood A.; Vladykovskaya, Elena; Riggs, Daniel W.; Conklin, Daniel J.; Haberzettl, Petra; O'Toole, Timothy E.; Bhatnagar, Aruni; D'Souza, Stanley E.

    2010-10-15

    Acrolein is a common air pollutant that is present in high concentrations in wood, cotton, and tobacco smoke, automobile exhaust and industrial waste and emissions. Exposure to acrolein containing environmental pollutants such as tobacco smoke and automobile exhaust has been linked to the activation of the coagulation and hemostasis pathways and thereby to the predisposition of thrombotic events in human. To examine the effects of acrolein on platelets, adult male C57Bl/6 mice were subjected acute (5 ppm for 6 h) or sub-chronic (1 ppm, 6 h/day for 4 days) acrolein inhalation exposures. The acute exposure to acrolein did not cause pulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress, dyslipidemia or induce liver damage or muscle injury. Platelet GSH levels in acrolein-exposed mice were comparable to controls, but acrolein-exposure increased the abundance of protein-acrolein adducts in platelets. Platelets isolated from mice, exposed to both acute and sub-chronic acrolein levels, showed increased ADP-induced platelet aggregation. Exposure to acrolein also led to an increase in the indices of platelet activation such as the formation of platelet-leukocyte aggregates in the blood, plasma PF4 levels, and increased platelet-fibrinogen binding. The bleeding time was decreased in acrolein exposed mice. Plasma levels of PF4 were also increased in mice exposed to environmental tobacco smoke. Similar to inhalation exposure, acrolein feeding to mice also increased platelet activation and established a pro-thrombotic state in mice. Together, our data suggest that acrolein is an important contributing factor to the pro-thrombotic risk in human exposure to pollutants such as tobacco smoke or automobile exhaust, or through dietary consumption.

  10. EXPOSURE TO ACROLEIN BY INHALATION CAUSES PLATELET ACTIVATION

    PubMed Central

    Sithu, Srinivas D; Srivastava, Sanjay; Siddiqui, Maqsood A; Vladykovskaya, Elena; Riggs, Daniel W; Conklin, Daniel J; Haberzettl, Petra; O’Toole, Timothy E; Bhatnagar, Aruni; D’Souza, Stanley E

    2010-01-01

    Acrolein is a common air pollutant that is present in high concentrations in wood, cotton, and tobacco smoke, automobile exhaust and industrial waste and emissions. Exposure to acrolein containing environmental pollutants such as tobacco smoke and automobile exhaust has been linked to the activation of the coagulation and hemostasis pathways and thereby to the predisposition of thrombotic events in human. To examine the effects of acrolein on platelets, adult male C57Bl/6 mice were subjected acute (5 ppm for 6 h) or sub-chronic (1 ppm, 6h/day for 4 days) acrolein inhalation exposures. The acute exposure to acrolein did not cause pulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress, dyslipidemia or induce liver damage or muscle injury. Platelet GSH levels in acrolein-exposed mice were comparable to controls, but acrolein-exposure increased the abundance of protein-acrolein adducts in platelets. Platelets isolated from mice, exposed to both acute and sub-chronic acrolein levels, showed increased ADP-induced platelet aggregation. Exposure to acrolein also led to an increase in the indices of platelet activation such as the formation of platelet-leukocyte aggregates in the blood, plasma PF4 levels, and increased platelet-fibrinogen binding. The bleeding time was decreased in acrolein exposed mice. Plasma levels of PF4 were also increased in mice exposed to environmental tobacco smoke. Similar to inhalation exposure, acrolein feeding to mice also increased platelet activation and established a pro-thrombotic state in mice. Together, our data suggest that acrolein is an important contributing factor to the pro-thrombotic risk in human exposure to pollutants such as tobacco smoke or automobile exhaust, or through dietary consumption. PMID:20678513

  11. Analysis of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase expression during turion formation induced by abscisic acid in Spirodela polyrhiza (greater duckweed)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Aquatic plants differ in their development from terrestrial plants in their morphology and physiology, but little is known about the molecular basis of the major phases of their life cycle. Interestingly, in place of seeds of terrestrial plants their dormant phase is represented by turions, which circumvents sexual reproduction. However, like seeds turions provide energy storage for starting the next growing season. Results To begin a characterization of the transition from the growth to the dormant phase we used abscisic acid (ABA), a plant hormone, to induce controlled turion formation in Spirodela polyrhiza and investigated their differentiation from fronds, representing their growth phase, into turions with respect to morphological, ultra-structural characteristics, and starch content. Turions were rich in anthocyanin pigmentation and had a density that submerged them to the bottom of liquid medium. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of turions showed in comparison to fronds shrunken vacuoles, smaller intercellular space, and abundant starch granules surrounded by thylakoid membranes. Turions accumulated more than 60% starch in dry mass after two weeks of ABA treatment. To further understand the mechanism of the developmental switch from fronds to turions, we cloned and sequenced the genes of three large-subunit ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylases (APLs). All three putative protein and exon sequences were conserved, but the corresponding genomic sequences were extremely variable mainly due to the invasion of miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs) into introns. A molecular three-dimensional model of the SpAPLs was consistent with their regulatory mechanism in the interaction with the substrate (ATP) and allosteric activator (3-PGA) to permit conformational changes of its structure. Gene expression analysis revealed that each gene was associated with distinct temporal expression during turion formation. APL2 and APL3 were highly

  12. Antithrombotic activity of Vitis labrusca extract on rat platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Se-Uk; Lee, Hoon-Yeon; Xin, Mingjie; Ji, Su-Jeong; Cho, Hyoung-Kwon; Kim, Dae-Sung; Kim, Dae-Ki; Lee, Young-Mi

    2016-03-01

    Vitis labrusca is a grapevine that has antioxidant, neuroprotective, hepatoprotective, and anticarcinogenic activity. However, the antithrombotic effect of Vitis labrusca leaves on platelets is yet to be ascertained. We investigated the inhibitory effect of V. labrusca leaf extract (VLE) on platelet aggregation in vitro and ex vivo. The thromboxane B2 (TXB2) and serotonin concentrations were measured by ELISA. The flavonoids content was measured by ultraperformance liquid chromatography (UPLC). The antithrombotic activity of VLE was evaluated using various agonists in vitro. VLE strongly inhibited adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced platelet aggregation. In rats, VLE treatment (100 mg/kg) reduced ADP-stimulated platelet aggregation, without affecting tail bleeding and coagulation time. Moreover, VLE significantly suppressed TXB2 and serotonin secretion. UPLC analysis indicated that VLE contains quercetin, isorhamnetin, and rutin. Our results indicate that VLE possesses antiplatelet activity via the suppression of TXB2 and serotonin, without affecting bleeding. Further, we identified the flavonoids present in VLE. Thus, VLE may be a potential agent for the prevention of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26340455

  13. Inhibitory Effects of Yuzu and Its Components on Human Platelet Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Ho; Kim, Hye-Min; Park, Se Won; Jung, Yi-Sook

    2015-01-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that yuzu has an anti-platelet effect in rat blood. In the present study, we examined whether the anti-platelet effect of yuzu can be extended to human blood by investigating its ability to inhibit aggregations induced by various agonists in human platelet rich plasma (PRP). This study also investigated the underlying mechanism of yuzu focusing on ADP granule secretion, TXB2 formations, and PLCγ/Akt signaling. The results from this study showed that ethanolic yuzu extract (YE), and its components, hesperidin and naringin, inhibited human platelet aggregation in a concentration-dependent manner. YE, hesperidin and naringin also inhibited TXB2 formation and ADP release. The phosphorylation of PLCγ and Akt was significantly inhibited by YE, heperidin and naringin. Furthermore, we demonstrated that YE, heperidin and naringin has anti-platelet effects in rat ex vivo studies, and lower side effects in mice tail bleeding time studies. The results from this study suggest that YE, hesperidin and naringin can inhibit human platelet aggregation, at least partly through the inhibition of PLCγ and Akt, leading to a decrease in TXB2 formation and granule secretion. PMID:25767683

  14. Nitric oxide and platelet energy metabolism.

    PubMed

    Tomasiak, Marian; Stelmach, Halina; Rusak, Tomasz; Wysocka, Jolanta

    2004-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine whether nitric oxide (NO) can affect platelet responses through the inhibition of energy production. It was found that NO donors: S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicyllamine, SNAP, (5-50 microM) and sodium nitroprusside, SNP, (5-100 microM) inhibited collagen- and ADP-induced aggregation of porcine platelets. The corresponding IC50 values for SNAP and SNP varied from 5 to 30 microM and from 9 to 75 microM, respectively. Collagen- and thrombin-induced platelet secretion was inhibited by SNAP (IC50 = 50 microM) and by SNP (IC50 = 100 microM). SNAP (20-100 microM), SNP (10-200 microM) and collagen (20 microg/ml) stimulated glycolysis in intact platelets. The degree of glycolysis stimulation exerted by NO donors was similar to that produced by respiratory chain inhibitors (cyanide and antimycin A) or uncouplers (2,4-dinitrophenol). Neither the NO donors nor the respiratory chain blockers affected glycolysis in platelet homogenate. SNAP (20-100 microM) and SNP (50-200 microM) inhibited oxygen consumption by platelets. The effect of SNP and SNAP on glycolysis and respiration was not reduced by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo-[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one, a selective inhibitor of NO-stimulated guanylate cyclase. SNAP (5-100 microM) and SNP (10-300 microM) inhibited the activity of platelet cytochrome oxidase and had no effect on NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase and succinate dehydrogenase. Blocking of the mitochondrial energy production by antimycin A slightly affected collagen-evoked aggregation and strongly inhibited platelet secretion. The results indicate that: 1) in porcine platelets NO is able to diminish mitochondrial energy production through the inhibition of cytochrome oxidase, 2) the inhibitory effect of NO on platelet secretion (but not aggregation) can be attributed to the reduction of mitochondrial energy production. PMID:15448739

  15. Arachidonate metabolism, 5-hydroxytryptamine release and aggregation in human platelets activated by palmitaldehyde acetal phosphatidic acid.

    PubMed Central

    Brammer, J. P.; Maguire, M. H.

    1984-01-01

    Palmitaldehyde acetal phosphatidic acid ( PGAP ) caused dose-dependent aggregation of human platelets resuspended in modified Tyrode medium, with a threshold concentration of 0.5-1 microM and an EC50 of 4 microM. Concentrations of PGAP which elicited biphasic irreversible aggregation concomitantly induced formation of 1.02 +/- 0.029 nmol (mean +/- s.e. mean) of malondialdehyde (MDA) per 10(9) platelets and caused release of 58 +/- 2.8% of platelet [14C]-5-hydroxytryptamine ([14C]-5-HT) from prelabelled platelets; no MDA formation or [14C]-5-HT release occurred at lower doses of PGAP which elicited only monophasic reversible aggregation. Adenosine 5'-pyrophosphate (ADP)-induced platelet activation resulted in formation of 0.344 +/- 0.004 nmol of MDA per 10(9) platelets in association with irreversible aggregation and 49.1 +/- 1% release of [14C]-5-HT. Mepacrine, a phospholipase A2 inhibitor, at 2.5 microM reduced PGAP -induced MDA formation and [14C]-5-HT release by the resuspended platelets without affecting irreversible aggregation; higher concentrations of mepacrine abolished all three responses. Chlorpromazine, a calmodulin antagonist, similarly inhibited PGAP -induced MDA formation and irreversible aggregation, and at 100 microM abolished monophasic aggregation. The cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor indomethacin caused a concentration-dependent reduction of PGAP -induced MDA formation by resuspended human platelets without significantly inhibiting [14C]-5-HT release or irreversible aggregation; concentrations (greater than or equal to 1.75 microM) which inhibited MDA formation by more than 94% abolished [14C]-5-HT release, and converted second phase irreversible aggregation to an extensive reversible response. 2-Methylthioadenosine 5'-phosphate (2 methylthio-AMP), an ADP antagonist, inhibited PGAP -induced MDA formation, [14C]-5-HT release and second phase aggregation in the human platelet suspensions in a parallel, concentration-dependent manner; at 9.4 microM 2

  16. Chronic lead treatment accelerates photochemically induced platelet aggregation in cerebral microvessels of mice, in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Al Dhaheri, A.H.; El-Sabban, F.; Fahim, M.A.

    1995-04-01

    Effects of two chronic treatment levels with lead on platelet aggregation in cerebral (pial) microcirculation of the mouse were investigated. Exposure to lead was made by subcutaneous injections for 7 days of lead acetate dissolved in 5% glucose solution, vehicle. Two doses of lead were used, a low dose of 0.1 mg/kg and a high dose of 1.0 mg/kg. Adult male mice were divided into three groups, 10 each; one group was injected with vehicle (control), another was injected with the low dose, and the third was injected with the high dose. Additional mice were used for the determination of hematological parameters and for the lead level in serum of the three groups. On the eighth day, platelet aggregation in pial microvessels of these groups of mice was carried out in vivo. Animals were anesthetized (urethane, 1-2 mg/g, ip), the trachea was intubated, and a craniotomy was performed. Platelet aggregation in pial microvessels was induced photochemically, by activation of circulating sodium fluorescein (0.1 mg/25 g, iv) with an intense mercury light. The time required for the first platelet aggregate to appear in pial arterioles was significantly shorter in the lead-treated mice than in control. This effect was in a dose-dependent manner; 113 {+-} 44 sec for low dose and 71 {+-} 18 sec for high dose vs 155 {+-} 25 sec for control, P < 0.02 and P < 0.001, respectively. Between the two lead-treated groups, the high dose significantly (P < 0.05) shortened the time to first aggregate. These data evidenced an increased susceptibility to cerebrovascular thrombosis as a result of exposure to lead. 26 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Cholera toxin-induced ADP-ribosylation of a 46 kDa protein is decreased in brains of ethanol-fed mice

    SciTech Connect

    Nhamburo, P.T.; Hoffman, P.L.; Tabakoff, B.

    1988-01-01

    The acute in vitro effects of ethanol on cerebral cortical adenylate cyclase activity and beta-adrenergic receptor characteristics suggested a site of action of ethanol at Gs, the stimulatory guanine nucleotide binding protein. After chronic ethanol ingestion, the beta-adrenergic receptor appeared to be uncoupled (i.e., the form of the receptor with high affinity for agonist was undetectable), and stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity by isoproterenol or guanine nucleotides was reduced, suggesting an alteration in the properties of Gs. To further characterize this change, cholera and pertussis toxin-mediated /sup 32/P-ADP-ribosylation of mouse cortical membranes was assessed in mice that had chronically ingested ethanol in a liquid diet. /sup 32/P-labeled proteins were separated by SDS-PAGE and quantitated by autoradiography. There was a selective 30-50% decrease in cholera toxin-induced labeling of 46 kDa protein band in membranes of ethanol-fed mice, with no apparent change in pertussis toxin-induced labeling. The 46 kDa protein has a molecular weight similar to that of the alpha subunit of Gs, suggesting a reduced amount of this protein or a change in its characteristics as a substrate for cholera toxin-induced ADP-ribosylation in cortical membranes of ethanol-fed mice.

  18. DL-3-n-butylphthalide inhibits platelet activation via inhibition of cPLA2-mediated TXA2 synthesis and phosphodiesterase.

    PubMed

    Ye, Jianqin; Zhai, Lili; Zhang, Shenghui; Zhang, Yan; Chen, Leilei; Hu, Liang; Zhang, Si; Ding, Zhongren

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant platelet activation plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of heart attack and stroke. DL-3-n-butylphthalide (NBP) has been approved in China to treat stroke with multiple mechanisms. The anti-stroke effects of NBP may be related to its antiplatelet effects reported in rats in addition to its antioxidative, antiapoptotic, and angiogenic effects. However, the effects and the underlying mechanisms of NBP on human platelets are not yet clear. In this study, we found that NBP concentration-dependently inhibited human platelet aggregation and ATP release induced by ADP, thrombin, U46619, arachidonic acid, or collagen. NBP also inhibited PAC-1 binding induced by ADP or thrombin and platelet spreading on immobilized fibrinogen. NBP reduced TXA2 synthesis induced by thrombin or collagen via inhibiting cPLA2 phosphorylation, concomitantly with a marked decrease in intracellular calcium mobilization. Moreover, NBP also inhibited human platelet phosphodiesterase (PDE) and elevated 3,5-cyclic adenosine monophosphate level in platelets. In conclusion, NBP significantly inhibits human platelet activation via inhibition of cPLA2-mediated TXA2 synthesis and PDE, and may be effective as an antiplatelet drug to treat other arterial thrombotic diseases. PMID:25734213

  19. An antagonistic activity of etizolam on platelet-activating factor (PAF). In vitro effects on platelet aggregation and PAF receptor binding.

    PubMed

    Mikashima, H; Takehara, S; Muramoto, Y; Khomaru, T; Terasawa, M; Tahara, T; Maruyama, Y

    1987-08-01

    The antagonistic effect of etizolam, an anti-anxiety drug, on platelet-activating factor (PAF) was investigated in rabbit platelets in vitro. Etizolam inhibited PAF-induced aggregation in a dose-dependent manner, with an IC50 of 3.8 microM, about one tenth that of triazolam (IC50 = 30 microM). At 300 microM, it inhibited both ADP and arachidonic acid-induced aggregation only slightly, while the other anti-anxiety drugs tested had no effect on PAF-induced aggregation even at this concentration. Etizolam and triazolam inhibited the specific binding of 3H-PAF to PAF receptor sites on washed rabbit platelets with IC50 values of 22 nM and 320 nM, respectively. Diazepam and estazolam were inactive even at 1 microM. These results indicate that etizolam is a specific antagonist of PAF. PMID:2890779

  20. The effects of an inhibitor of diglyceride lipase on collagen-induced platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Elke C G; Ortar, Giorgio; McNicol, Archie

    2013-12-01

    Human platelet activation by collagen occurs in a dose-dependent manner. High concentrations of collagen bind to a pair of receptors, the α2β1 integrin and glycoprotein (GP)VI/Fc-receptor γ-chain (FcRγ), which stimulate a cascade of events including Syk, LAT, Btk, Gads, and phospholipase Cγ2, leading to calcium release and protein kinase C (PKC) activation. Calcium and PKC are responsible for a range of platelet responses including exocytosis and aggregation, as well as the cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2)-mediated release of arachidonic acid, which is converted to thromboxane (Tx)A2. In contrast, low concentrations of collagen are acutely aspirin-sensitive, and calcium release and aggregation are TxA2-dependent. Under these conditions, cPLA2 is not involved and it has been suggested that phospholipase C generates 1,2-diacylglycerol (DG) from which arachidonic acid is liberated by diglyceride lipase (DGL). Here a novel DGL blocker (OMDM-188) inhibited collagen-, but not arachidonic acid-induced aggregation and TxA2 synthesis. Furthermore, OMDM-188 inhibited collagen-induced arachidonic acid release. Finally OMDM-188 inhibited collagen-induced p38(MAPK) phosphorylation, but not extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) phosphorylation, with no effect on the phosphorylation of either enzyme in response to arachidonic acid. Taken together, these data suggest a role for a pathway involving phospholipase C liberating DG from membrane phospholipids in response to minimally activating concentrations of collagen. The DG serves as a substrate for DGL, potentially under the regulations of p38(MAPK), to release arachidonic acid, which is subsequently converted to TxA2, which mediates the final platelet response. PMID:24042163

  1. Nanosecond pulsed electric fields induce poly(ADP-ribose) formation and non-apoptotic cell death in HeLa S3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Morotomi-Yano, Keiko; Akiyama, Hidenori; Yano, Ken-ichi

    2013-08-30

    Highlights: •Nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF) is a new and unique means for life sciences. •Apoptosis was induced by nsPEF exposure in Jurkat cells. •No signs of apoptosis were detected in HeLa S3 cells exposed to nsPEFs. •Formation of poly(ADP-ribose) was induced in nsPEF-exposed HeLa S3 cells. •Two distinct modes of cell death were activated by nsPEF in a cell-dependent manner. -- Abstract: Nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) have recently gained attention as effective cancer therapy owing to their potency for cell death induction. Previous studies have shown that apoptosis is a predominant mode of nsPEF-induced cell death in several cell lines, such as Jurkat cells. In this study, we analyzed molecular mechanisms for cell death induced by nsPEFs. When nsPEFs were applied to Jurkat cells, apoptosis was readily induced. Next, we used HeLa S3 cells and analyzed apoptotic events. Contrary to our expectation, nsPEF-exposed HeLa S3 cells exhibited no molecular signs of apoptosis execution. Instead, nsPEFs induced the formation of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR), a hallmark of necrosis. PAR formation occurred concurrently with a decrease in cell viability, supporting implications of nsPEF-induced PAR formation for cell death. Necrotic PAR formation is known to be catalyzed by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), and PARP-1 in apoptotic cells is inactivated by caspase-mediated proteolysis. Consistently, we observed intact and cleaved forms of PARP-1 in nsPEF-exposed and UV-irradiated cells, respectively. Taken together, nsPEFs induce two distinct modes of cell death in a cell type-specific manner, and HeLa S3 cells show PAR-associated non-apoptotic cell death in response to nsPEFs.

  2. Elucidation of flow-mediated tumour cell-induced platelet aggregation using an ultrasound standing wave trap

    PubMed Central

    Bazou, D; Santos-Martinez, MJ; Medina, C; Radomski, MW

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Tumour cells activate and aggregate platelets [tumour cell-induced platelet aggregation (TCIPA)] and this process plays an important role in the successful metastasis of cancer cells. To date, most studies on TCIPA have been conducted under no-flow conditions. In this study, we have investigated TCIPA in real time under flow conditions, using an ultrasound standing wave trap that allows formation and levitation of cancer cell clusters in suspension, thus mimicking the conditions generated by flowing blood. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Using 59M adenocarcinoma and HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells and human platelets, cancer cell cluster–platelet aggregates were imaged in real time using epi-fluorescence microscopy (F-actin) and investigated in detail using confocal microscopy (matrix metalloproteinase-2-GPIIb/IIIa co-localization) and scanning electron and helium-ion microscopy (<1 nm resolution). The release of gelatinases from aggregates was studied using zymography. KEY RESULTS We found that platelet activation and aggregation takes place on the surface of cancer cells (TCIPA), leading to time-dependent disruption of cancer cell clusters. Pharmacological modulation of TCIPA revealed that EDTA, prostacyclin, o-phenanthroline and apyrase significantly down-regulated TCIPA and, in turn, delayed cell cluster disruption, However, EGTA and aspirin were ineffective. Pharmacological inhibition of TCIPA correlated with the down-regulation of platelet activation as shown by flow-cytometry assay of platelet P-selectin. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS Our results show for the first time, that during TCIPA, platelet activation disrupts cancer cell clusters and this can contribute to metastasis. Thus, selective targeting of platelet aggregate–cancer cell clusters may be an important strategy to control metastasis. PMID:21182493

  3. Staphylococcal enterotoxin B initiates protein kinase C translocation and eicosanoid metabolism while inhibiting thrombin-induced aggregation in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Tran, Uyen; Boyle, Thomas; Shupp, Jeffrey W; Hammamieh, Rasha; Jett, Marti

    2006-08-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxin (SE) B, a heat-stable toxin secreted by Staphylococcus aureus, has been implicated in the pathogenesis and exacerbation of several critical illnesses. It has been hypothesized that enterotoxins may interact with blood products such as platelets, in addition to T-lymphocytes and renal proximal tubule cells. The aim of this present study was to elucidate whether SEB directly alters human platelet function. Human platelet rich plasma (PRP) was pre-incubated with SEA, SEB, SEC or TSST-1, (at various concentrations and incubation times). After incubation, PRP was exposed to thrombin and aggregation was assessed. Incubation with all toxins tested resulted in decreased aggregation, specifically; exposure to 10mu g/ml of SEB for 30 min caused a 20% decrease and a 49% decrease at 90 min. A similar reduction in aggregation was seen in samples incubated with phorbol myristate acetate, a known stimulator of protein kinase C (PKC). Further, platelets exposed to SEB exhibited an increased plasma membrane PKC activity. Sphingosine, an inhibitor of PKC proved to block the SEB-induced reduction in aggregation. SEB effects on platelet metabolism were investigated using high performance liquid chromatography showing up to a 2-fold increase of active metabolites lipoxin A4 and 12-HETE, as compared to control. These data indicate that SEB is able to induce platelet dysfunction, and these effects may be mediated through activation of PKC. PMID:16550298

  4. Zinc carnosine protects against hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage in WIL2-NS lymphoblastoid cell line independent of poly (ADP-Ribose) polymerase expression.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Theng Choon; Mohammad, Nur Hafiza; Sharif, Razinah

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the ability of zinc carnosine to protect the human lymphoblastoid (WIL2-NS) cell line from hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage. Cells were cultured with medium containing zinc carnosine at the concentrations of 0.4, 4, 16 and 32 μM for 9 days prior to treatment with 30 μM of hydrogen peroxide (30 min). Zinc carnosine at the concentration 16 μM was optimal in protecting cells from hydrogen peroxide-induced cytotoxicity and gave the lowest percentage of apoptotic and necrotic cells. Results showed that zinc carnosine was able to induce glutathione production and protect cells from hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress at all concentration and the highest protection was observed at 32-μM zinc carnosine culture. Cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome assay showed that cells cultured with 4-32 μM of zinc carnosine showed significant reduction in micronuclei formation, nucleoplasmic bridges and nuclear bud frequencies (p < 0.05), suggesting that these concentrations maybe optimal in protecting cells from hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage. However, after being challenged with hydrogen peroxide, no increase in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase expression was observed. Thus, results from this study demonstrate that zinc carnosines possess antioxidant properties and are able to reduce hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage in vitro independent of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. Further studies are warranted to understand the mechanism of protection of zinc carnosine against hydrogen peroxide-induced damage. PMID:25326781

  5. Laser-induced noninvasive vascular injury models in mice generate platelet- and coagulation-dependent thrombi.

    PubMed

    Rosen, E D; Raymond, S; Zollman, A; Noria, F; Sandoval-Cooper, M; Shulman, A; Merz, J L; Castellino, F J

    2001-05-01

    A minimally invasive laser-induced injury model is described to study thrombus development in mice in vivo. The protocol involves focusing the beam of an argon-ion laser through a compound microscope on the vasculature of a mouse ear that is sufficiently thin such that blood flow can be visualized by intravital microscopy. Two distinct injury models have been established. The first involves direct laser illumination with a short, high-intensity pulse. In this case, thrombus formation is inhibited by the GPIIb/IIIa antagonist, G4120. However, the anticoagulants, hirulog, PPACK, and NapC2 have minimal effect. This indicates that thrombus development induced by this model mainly involves platelet interactions. The second model involves low-intensity laser illumination of mice injected with Rose Bengal dye to induce photochemical injury in the region of laser illumination. Thrombi generated by this latter procedure have a slower development and are inhibited by both anticoagulant and anti-platelet compounds. PMID:11337359

  6. β-sitosterol inhibits high cholesterol-induced platelet β-amyloid release.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chun; Liu, Jun; Wu, Fengming; Zhu, Xiaoming; Yew, David T; Xu, Jie

    2011-12-01

    Recently, increasing evidence has linked high cholesterol to the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD), suggesting that cholesterol may be a target for developing new compounds to prevent or treat AD. Plant sterols, a group of sterols enriched in plant oils, nuts, and avocados, have the structure very similar to that of cholesterol, and have been widely used to reduce blood cholesterol. Due to their cholesterol-lowering property, plant sterols such as β-sitosterol may also influence cholesterol-depending functions including its role in AD development. Using human platelets, a type of peripheral blood cells containing the most circulating amyloid precursor protein (APP), this study investigated the effect of β-sitosterol on high cholesterol-induced secretion of β amyloid protein (Aβ). It was found that β-sitosterol effectively inhibited high cholesterol-driven platelet Aβ release. In addition, β-sitosterol prevented high cholesterol-induced increase of activities of β- and γ-secretase, two APP cleaving enzymes to generate Aβ. Additional experiments showed that high cholesterol up-regulated lipid raft cholesterol. This effect of cholesterol could be suppressed by β-sitosterol. These findings suggest that β-sitosterol is able to inhibit high cholesterol-induced Aβ release probably through maintenance of membrane cholesterol homeostasis. Given that dietary plant sterols have the potential of penetrating the blood-brain barrier (BBB), these data suggest that plant sterols such as β-sitosterol may be useful in AD prevention. PMID:21969169

  7. Laser-Induced Noninvasive Vascular Injury Models in Mice Generate Platelet- and Coagulation-Dependent Thrombi

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Elliot D.; Raymond, Sylvain; Zollman, Amy; Noria, Francisco; Sandoval-Cooper, Mayra; Shulman, Alexis; Merz, James L.; Castellino, Francis J.

    2001-01-01

    A minimally invasive laser-induced injury model is described to study thrombus development in mice in vivo. The protocol involves focusing the beam of an argon-ion laser through a compound microscope on the vasculature of a mouse ear that is sufficiently thin such that blood flow can be visualized by intravital microscopy. Two distinct injury models have been established. The first involves direct laser illumination with a short, high-intensity pulse. In this case, thrombus formation is inhibited by the GPIIb/IIIa antagonist, G4120. However, the anticoagulants, hirulog, PPACK, and NapC2 have minimal effect. This indicates that thrombus development induced by this model mainly involves platelet interactions. The second model involves low-intensity laser illumination of mice injected with Rose Bengal dye to induce photochemical injury in the region of laser illumination. Thrombi generated by this latter procedure have a slower development and are inhibited by both anticoagulant and anti-platelet compounds. PMID:11337359

  8. Chlorogenic Acid Inhibits Human Platelet Activation and Thrombus Formation

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Caballero, Julio; Alarcón, Marcelo; Rojas, Armando; Palomo, Iván

    2014-01-01

    Background Chlorogenic acid is a potent phenolic antioxidant. However, its effect on platelet aggregation, a critical factor in arterial thrombosis, remains unclear. Consequently, chlorogenic acid-action mechanisms in preventing platelet activation and thrombus formation were examined. Methods and Results Chlorogenic acid in a dose-dependent manner (0.1 to 1 mmol/L) inhibited platelet secretion and aggregation induced by ADP, collagen, arachidonic acid and TRAP-6, and diminished platelet firm adhesion/aggregation and platelet-leukocyte interactions under flow conditions. At these concentrations chlorogenic acid significantly decreased platelet inflammatory mediators (sP-selectin, sCD40L, CCL5 and IL-1β) and increased intraplatelet cAMP levels/PKA activation. Interestingly, SQ22536 (an adenylate cyclase inhibitor) and ZM241385 (a potent A2A receptor antagonist) attenuated the antiplatelet effect of chlorogenic acid. Chlorogenic acid is compatible to the active site of the adenosine A2A receptor as revealed through molecular modeling. In addition, chlorogenic acid had a significantly lower effect on mouse bleeding time when compared to the same dose of aspirin. Conclusions Antiplatelet and antithrombotic effects of chlorogenic acid are associated with the A2A receptor/adenylate cyclase/cAMP/PKA signaling pathway. PMID:24598787

  9. Gender and tachycardia: independent modulation of platelet reactivity in patients with atrial fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Procter, Nathan EK; Ball, Jocasta; Ngo, Doan TM; Isenberg, Jeffrey S; Hylek, Elaine M; Chirkov, Yuliy Y; Stewart, Simon; Horowitz, John D

    2016-01-01

    Background Female patients with atrial fibrillation (AF) experience increased risk of thromboembolism compared to males, an observation that is reflected by its inclusion in the CHA2DS2VASc score. New onset AF (often associated with tachycardia) also confers upon patients increased thromboembolic risk. The mechanisms underlying this risk are uncertain, but new onset AF is associated with profound impairment of platelet nitric oxide (NO) signalling. Given that cardiovascular responses to catecholamines are gender-dependent, and that the presence of tachycardia in new onset AF may represent a response to catecholaminergic stimulation, we explored the potential impact of gender and tachycardia on platelet aggregation and NO signalling. Methods Interactions were sought in 87 AF patients between the extent of adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced platelet aggregation, the anti-aggregatory effects of the NO donor, sodium nitroprusside, gender, and admission heart rate. The potential impact of platelet expression of thioredoxin-interacting protein (Txnip) was also evaluated. Results Analysis of covariance confirmed the presence of physiological antagonism between platelet ADP and NO responses [F (1, 74) = 12.212, P < 0.01], while female sex correlated with impaired NO responses independent of platelet aggregability [F (2, 74) = 8.313, P < 0.01]. Admission heart rate correlated directly with platelet aggregation (r = 0.235, P < 0.05), and inversely with NO response (r = −0.331, P < 0.01). Txnip expression varied neither with gender nor with heart rate. Conclusions These results indicate that gender and heart rate are independent determinants of platelet function. Prospective studies of the putative benefit of reversal of tachycardia on restoration of normal platelet function are therefore a priority. PMID:27103914

  10. Arf6 plays an early role in platelet activation by collagen and convulxin.

    PubMed

    Choi, Wangsun; Karim, Zubair A; Whiteheart, Sidney W

    2006-04-15

    Small GTPases play critical roles in hemostasis, though the roster of such molecules in platelets is not complete. In this study, we report the presence of Ras-related GTPases of the ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf) family. Platelets contain Arf1 or 3 and Arf6, with the latter being predominantly membrane associated. Using effector domain pull-down assays, we show, counter to other GTPases, that Arf6-GTP is present in resting platelets and decreases rapidly upon activation with collagen or convulxin. This decrease does not completely rely on secondary agonists (ADP and thromboxane A2) or require integrin signaling. The decrease in free Arf6-GTP temporally precedes activation of Rho family GTPases (RhoA, Cdc42, and Rac1). Using a membrane-permeant, myristoylated peptide, which mimics the N-terminus of Arf6, we show that the Arf6-GTP decrease is essential for collagen- and convulxin-induced aggregation, platelet adherence, and spreading on collagen-coated glass. Treatment with this peptide also affects the activation of Rho family GTPases, but has little effect on RalA and Rap1 or on agonist-induced calcium mobilization. These data show that Arf6 is a key element in activation through GPVI, and is required for activation of the Rho family GTPases and the subsequent cytoskeletal rearrangements needed for full platelet function. PMID:16352809

  11. Platelet Reactivity Is Independent of Left Atrial Wall Deformation in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Procter, Nathan; Goh, Vincent; Mahadevan, Gnanadevan; Stewart, Simon; Horowitz, John

    2016-01-01

    It has been documented recently that left atrial (LA) deformation in AF patients (while in AF) is predictive of subsequent stroke risk. Additionally, diminished LA deformation during AF correlates with the presence of LA blood stasis. Given that endothelial function is dependent on laminar blood flow, the present study sought to investigate the effect of diminished LA deformation (during AF) on platelet reactivity and inflammation in AF patients. Patients (n = 17) hospitalised with AF underwent echocardiography (while in AF) for determination of peak positive LA strain (LASp). Whole blood impedance aggregometry was used to measure extent of ADP-induced aggregation and subsequent inhibitory response to the nitric oxide (NO) donor, sodium nitroprusside. Platelet thioredoxin-interacting protein (Txnip) content was determined by immunohistochemistry. LASp tended (p = 0.078) to vary inversely with CHA2DS2VASc scores. However, mediators of inflammation (C-reactive protein, Txnip) did not correlate significantly with LASp nor did extent of ADP-induced platelet aggregation or platelet NO response. These results suggest that the thrombogenic risk associated with LA stasis is independent of secondary effects on platelet aggregability or inflammation. PMID:27069318

  12. Platelet Reactivity Is Independent of Left Atrial Wall Deformation in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation

    PubMed Central

    Procter, Nathan; Goh, Vincent; Mahadevan, Gnanadevan; Stewart, Simon; Horowitz, John

    2016-01-01

    It has been documented recently that left atrial (LA) deformation in AF patients (while in AF) is predictive of subsequent stroke risk. Additionally, diminished LA deformation during AF correlates with the presence of LA blood stasis. Given that endothelial function is dependent on laminar blood flow, the present study sought to investigate the effect of diminished LA deformation (during AF) on platelet reactivity and inflammation in AF patients. Patients (n = 17) hospitalised with AF underwent echocardiography (while in AF) for determination of peak positive LA strain (LASp). Whole blood impedance aggregometry was used to measure extent of ADP-induced aggregation and subsequent inhibitory response to the nitric oxide (NO) donor, sodium nitroprusside. Platelet thioredoxin-interacting protein (Txnip) content was determined by immunohistochemistry. LASp tended (p = 0.078) to vary inversely with CHA2DS2VASc scores. However, mediators of inflammation (C-reactive protein, Txnip) did not correlate significantly with LASp nor did extent of ADP-induced platelet aggregation or platelet NO response. These results suggest that the thrombogenic risk associated with LA stasis is independent of secondary effects on platelet aggregability or inflammation. PMID:27069318

  13. Platelet-activating factor induces eosinophil peroxidase release from purified human eosinophils.

    PubMed Central

    Kroegel, C; Yukawa, T; Dent, G; Chanez, P; Chung, K F; Barnes, P J

    1988-01-01

    The degranulation response of purified human eosinophils to platelet-activating factor (PAF) has been studied. PAF induced release of eosinophil peroxidase (EPO) and beta-glucuronidase from highly purified human eosinophils with an EC50 of 0.9 nM. The order of release was comparable with that induced by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). The new specific PAF antagonist 3-[4-(2-chlorophenyl)-9-methyl-H-thieno[3,2-f] [1,2,4]triazolo-[4,3a][1,4]-diazepin-2-yl](4-morpholinyl)- 1-propane-one (WEB 2086) inhibited the PAF-induced enzyme release by human eosinophils in a dose-dependent manner. The viability of eosinophils were unaffected both by PAF and WEB 2086. The results suggest that PAF may amplify allergic and inflammatory reactions by release of preformed proteins from eosinophil granules. PMID:3410498

  14. Poly (ADP-ribose) (PAR) Binding to Apoptosis-Inducing Factor Is Critical For PAR Polymerase-1-Dependent Cell Death (Parthanatos)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yingfei; Kim, No Soo; Haince, Jean-Francois; Kang, HoChul; David, Karen K.; Andrabi, Shaida A.; Poirier, Guy G.; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2011-01-01

    The mitochondrial protein apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) plays a pivotal role in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1)-mediated cell death (parthanatos), during which it is released from the mitochondria and translocates to the nucleus. Here, we show that AIF is a high affinity poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR)–binding protein and that PAR binding to AIF is required for parthanatos both in vitro and in vivo. AIF bound PAR at a site distinct from AIF’s DNA binding site and this interaction triggered AIF release from the cytosolic side of the mitochondrial outer membrane. Mutation of the PAR binding site in AIF did not affect its NADH oxidase activity, its ability to bind FAD or DNA, or its ability to induce nuclear condensation. However, this AIF mutant was not released from mitochondria and did not translocate to the nucleus or mediate cell death following PARP-1 activation. These results suggest a mechanism for PARP-1 to initiate AIF-mediated cell death and indicate that AIF’s bioenergetic cell survival-promoting functions are separate from its effects as a mitochondrially-derived death effector. Interference with the PAR-AIF interaction or PAR signaling may provide unique opportunities for preventing cell death following activation of PARP-1. PMID:21467298

  15. Vascular pentraxin 3 controls arterial thrombosis by targeting collagen and fibrinogen induced platelets aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Bonacina, F.; Barbieri, S.S.; Cutuli, L.; Amadio, P.; Doni, A.; Sironi, M.; Tartari, S.; Mantovani, A.; Bottazzi, B.; Garlanda, C.; Tremoli, E.; Catapano, A.L.; Norata, G.D.

    2016-01-01

    Aim The long pentraxin PTX3 plays a non-redundant role during acute myocardial infarction, atherosclerosis and in the orchestration of tissue repair and remodeling during vascular injury, clotting and fibrin deposition. The aim of this work is to investigate the molecular mechanisms underlying the protective role of PTX3 during arterial thrombosis. Methods and results PTX3 KO mice transplanted with bone marrow from WT or PTX3 KO mice presented a significant reduction in carotid artery blood flow following FeCl3 induced arterial thrombosis (− 80.36 ± 11.5% and − 95.53 ± 4.46%), while in WT mice transplanted with bone marrow from either WT or PTX3 KO mice, the reduction was less dramatic (− 45.55 ± 1.37% and − 53.39 ± 9.8%), thus pointing to a protective effect independent of a hematopoietic cell's derived PTX3. By using P-selectin/PTX3 double KO mice, we further excluded a role for P-selectin, a target of PTX3 released by neutrophils, in vascular protection played by PTX3. In agreement with a minor role for hematopoietic cell-derived PTX3, platelet activation (assessed by flow cytometric expression of markers of platelet activation) was similar in PTX3 KO and WT mice as were haemostatic properties. Histological analysis indicated that PTX3 localizes within the thrombus and the vessel wall, and specific experiments with the N-terminal and the C-terminal PTX3 domain showed the ability of PTX3 to selectively dampen either fibrinogen or collagen induced platelet adhesion and aggregation. Conclusion PTX3 interacts with fibrinogen and collagen and, by dampening their pro-thrombotic effects, plays a protective role during arterial thrombosis. PMID:26976330

  16. Characterization of platelet-activating factor-induced cutaneous edema and erythema in dogs.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Miwa; Osada, Hironari; Shimizu, Sunao; Goto, Shun; Nagai, Makoto; Shirai, Junsuke; Sasaki, Kazuaki; Shimoda, Minoru; Itoh, Hiroshi; Ohmori, Keitaro

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE To characterize platelet-activating factor (PAF)-induced edema and erythema in the skin of dogs and compare those reactions with histamine-induced cutaneous reactions. ANIMALS 6 healthy Beagles. PROCEDURES Experiments were performed at ≥ 2-week intervals. Each dog received ID injections (5 μg/site) of PAF C16, PAF C18, lyso-PAF, and histamine. Edema (mean diameter) and erythema scores (none, mild, moderate, or severe) were assessed 30 minutes after the injections. Dogs received ID injections of PAF and histamine each with various concentrations of WEB 2086 (PAF receptor antagonist) or underwent ID testing with PAF and histamine before and 3 hours after oral administration of cetirizine hydrochloride or prednisolone (at 2 doses each). RESULTS ID injections of PAF C16 and PAF C18, but not lyso-PAF, induced comparable levels of edema and erythema. The PAF-induced edema and erythema peaked at 30 minutes and lasted for 6 hours after the injection; histamine-induced edema and erythema peaked at 30 minutes and lasted for 3 hours after the injection. Edema sizes and erythema scores were significantly smaller and lower, respectively, for PAF than for histamine. The WEB 2086 inhibited PAF-induced but not histamine-induced edema and erythema. Cetirizine slightly, but significantly, repressed PAF-induced edema and erythema as well as histamine-induced cutaneous reactions. Prednisolone suppressed both PAF-induced and histamine-induced edema and erythema. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE In canine skin, the duration of PAF-induced inflammation was longer than that of histamine-induced inflammation. The PAF- and histamine-induced cutaneous reactions were effectively suppressed by oral administration of prednisolone. The importance of PAF in dogs with anaphylaxis and allergic disorders warrants further investigation. PMID:27580108

  17. Suppression of hydrogen diffusion at the hydrogen-induced platelets in p-type Czochralski silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Y.L.; Ma, Y.; Job, R.; Fahrner, W.R.

    2005-03-28

    Hydrogen diffusion in p-type Czochralski silicon is investigated by combined Raman spectroscope, scanning electron microscope, and spreading resistance probe measurements. Exposure of silicon wafers to rf hydrogen plasma results in the formation of platelets. The increase of hydrogenation duration leads to the growth of the platelets and the reduction of the hydrogen diffusivity. The large platelets grow faster than the small ones. The growth of the platelets is based on the capture of hydrogen. The dependence of the hydrogen diffusivity upon the average size of the platelets suggests that the indiffusion of hydrogen is suppressed by the platelets.

  18. Albumin inhibits platelet-activating factor (PAF)-induced responses in platelets and macrophages: implications for the biologically active form of PAF.

    PubMed Central

    Grigoriadis, G.; Stewart, A. G.

    1992-01-01

    1. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) binds with high affinity to albumin leading Clay et al. (1990) to suggest that the active form of PAF is the albumin-PAF complex. 2. In the present study the proposal that albumin-bound, rather than monomeric PAF, is the active form of PAF at PAF receptors was critically evaluated by examining the effect of albumin on the potency of PAF in isolated platelets and macrophages. 3. Bovine serum albumin inhibited concentration-dependently PAF-induced responses in platelets and macrophages. The most probable explanation of this finding is that BSA reduced the concentration of free PAF. 4. Thus, we conclude that free PAF, rather than the albumin-PAF complex is the active form. Consequently, local concentrations of albumin will influence profoundly the potency of endogenously released PAF. Moreover, estimates of the affinity of PAF for PAF receptors made in buffers containing BSA, underestimate the true affinity of PAF for its receptors by approximately 3 orders of magnitude. PMID:1330167

  19. Regulation of hormone-induced Ca sup 2+ mobilization in the human platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Crouch, M.F.; Lapetina, E.G. )

    1990-03-01

    {alpha}-Thrombin, {gamma}-thrombin, and platelet-activating factor each stimulated the mobilization of intracellular Ca{sup 2+} stores in aspirin-treated human platelets. This was followed by desensitization of the receptors, as shown by the return of the Ca{sup 2+} level to basal values and by the fact that a subsequent addition of a second different agonist, but not the same agonist, could again elicit a response. Epinephrine, acting on {alpha}{sub 2}-adrenergic receptors, was by itself ineffective at mobilizing Ca{sup 2+} stores. However, when added after the thrombin-induced response, epinephrine could evoke a considerable release of Ca{sup 2+} from cellular stores. This appeared to be due to epinephrine recoupling thrombin receptors to phospholipase C. In support of this, epinephrine was able to induce the formation of inositol triphosphate when added after the response to thrombin had also become desensitized. Alone, epinephrine was without effect. Pre-activation of protein kinase C with the phorbol ester abolished these effects of epinephrine, suggesting that epinephrine was working by activating a protein which could be inactivated by phosphorylation. The current work is to characterize this protein that may be a member of the G{sub i}, GTP-binding protein family.

  20. Effect of Platelet-Rich Plasma on CCl4-Induced Chronic Liver Injury in Male Rats.

    PubMed

    Hesami, Zahra; Jamshidzadeh, Akram; Ayatollahi, Maryam; Geramizadeh, Bita; Farshad, Omid; Vahdati, Akbar

    2014-01-01

    Platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been of great concern to the scientists and doctors who are involved in wound healing and regenerative medicine which focuses on repairing and replacing damaged cells and tissues. Growth factors of platelet-rich plasma are cost-effective, available, and is more stable than recombinant human growth factors. Given these valuable properties, we decided to assess the effect of PRP on CCl4-induced hepatotoxicity on rats. The rats received CCl4 (1 mL/kg, i.p. 1 : 1 in olive oil) twice per week for 8 weeks. Five weeks after CCl4 injection, the rats also received PRP (0.5 mL/kg, s.c.) two days a week for three weeks. Twenty-four hours after last CCl4 injection, the animals bled and their livers dissected for biochemical and histopathological studies. Blood analysis was performed to evaluate enzyme activity. The results showed that PRP itself was not toxic for liver and could protect the liver from CCl4-induced histological damages and attenuated oxidative stress by increase in glutathione content and decrease in lipid peroxidative marker of liver tissue. The results of the present study lend support to our beliefs in hepatoprotective effects of PRP. PMID:24707405

  1. Membrane-associated 41-kDa GTP-binding protein in collagen-induced platelet activation

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, G.; Bourguignon, L.Y. )

    1990-08-01

    Initially we established that the binding of collagen to human blood platelets stimulates both the rapid loss of PIP2 and the generation of inositol-4,5-bisphosphate (IP2) and inositol-1,4,5-triphosphate (IP3). These results indicate that the binding of collagen stimulates inositol phospholipid-specific phospholipase C during platelet activation. The fact that GTP or GTP-gamma-S augments, and pertussis toxin inhibits, collagen-induced IP3 formation suggests that a GTP-binding protein or (or proteins) may be directly involved in the regulation of phospholipase C-mediated phosphoinositide turnover in human platelets. We have used several complementary techniques to isolate and characterize a platelet 41-kDa polypeptide (or polypeptides) that has a number of structural and functional similarities to the regulatory alpha i subunit of the GTP-binding proteins isolated from bovine brain. This 41-kDa polypeptide (or polypeptides) is found to be closely associated with at least four membrane glycoproteins (e.g., gp180, gp110, gp95, and gp75) in a 330-kDa complex that can be dissociated by treatment with high salt plus urea. Most important, we have demonstrated that antilymphoma 41-kDa (alpha i subunit of GTP-binding proteins) antibody cross-reacts with the platelet 41-kDa protein (or proteins) and the alpha i subunit of bovine brain Gi alpha proteins, and blocks GTP/collagen-induced IP3 formation. These data provide strong evidence that the 41-kDa platelet GTP-binding protein (or proteins) is directly involved in collagen-induced signal transduction during platelet activation.

  2. ENDOTHELIUM-DERIVED INHIBITORS EFFICIENTLY ATTENUATE THE AGGREGATION AND ADHESION RESPONSES OF REFRIGERATED PLATELETS

    PubMed Central

    Reddoch, Kristin M.; Montgomery, Robbie K.; Rodriguez, Armando C.; Meledeo, M. Adam; Pidcoke, Heather F.; Ramasubramanian, Anand K.; Cap, Andrew P.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Refrigeration of platelets (4°C) provides the possibility of improving transfusion practice over the current standard-of-care, room temperature (RT) storage. However, the increased level of platelet activation observed at 4°C in vitro is cause for concern of uncontrolled thrombosis in vivo. In this study, we assessed the safety of 4°C-stored platelets by evaluating their response to physiologic inhibitors prostacyclin (PGI2) and nitric oxide (NO). Apheresis platelets were collected from healthy donors (n = 4) and tested on Day 1 (fresh) or Day 5 (RT- and 4°C-stored) after treatment with PGI2 and NO or not for: thrombin generation; factor V (FV) activity; intracellular free calcium, cAMP and cGMP; ATP release; TRAP-induced activation; aggregation to ADP, collagen, and TRAP, and adhesion to collagen under arterial flow. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and post-hoc Tukey test for multiple comparisons, with significance set at P < 0.05. Treatment with inhibitors increased intracellular cAMP and cGMP levels in fresh and stored platelets. Thrombin generation was significantly accelerated in stored platelets consistent with increased factor V levels, PS exposure, CD62P expression, intracellular free calcium, and ATP release. While treatment with inhibitors did not attenuate thrombin generation in stored platelets, activation, aggregation, and adhesion responses were inhibited by both PGI2 and NO in 4°C-stored platelets. In contrast, though RT-stored platelets were activated, they did not adhere or aggregate in response to agonists. Thus, refrigerated platelets maintain their intracellular machinery, are responsive to agonists and platelet function inhibitors, and perform hemostatically better than RT-stored platelets. PMID:26555740

  3. Defect in regulation of Ca2+ movement in platelets from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed

    Cheng, He-Hsiung; Ho, Chin-Man; Huang, Chun-Jen; Hsu, Shu-Shong; Jiann, Bang-Ping; Chen, Jin-Shyr; Huang, Jong-Khing; Chang, Hong-Tai; Lo, Yuk-Keung; Yeh, Jeng-Hsien; Jan, Chung-Ren

    2005-03-01

    The differences in the intracellular Ca(2+) responses to hormones in platelets from systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients compared to normal humans have not been explored. This study examined the Ca(2+) signaling and density of platelets in normal, inactive and active SLE patients. The platelet number per mul in inactive and normal groups did not differ, whereas the number in active SLE patients was smaller than the other two groups by 60%. The intracellular free Ca(2+) levels ([Ca(2+)](i)) in response to stimulation of four endogenous Ca(2+) mobilizing hormones, 100 microM arachidonic acid (AA), 10 microM ADP, 10 nM platelet activation factor (PAF) and 1 microM thrombin, were investigated using the Ca(2+)-sensitive fluorescent dye, fura-2. The AA-induced [Ca(2+)](i) rises in normal and inactive groups were similar. In contrast, the AA-induced [Ca(2+)](i) rises in the active SLE group were significantly smaller than in the normal and inactive groups. The defect in the AA-induced [Ca(2+)](i) rises in active SLE groups appears to be caused by defective Ca(2+) influx and Ca(2+) releasing pathways because the AA-induced responses were not altered by removal of extracellular Ca(2+), whereas the AA-induced responses in normal and inactive SLE groups were reduced by removal of extracellular Ca(2+), and the AA-induced Ca(2+) release was smaller in the active SLE group. PAF, ADP and thrombin all induced [Ca(2+)](i) rises in the three groups, but no significant differences were found among the three groups. Together, the results indicate that cell density and Ca(2+) signaling in platelets from active SLE patients are altered in response to particular stimulators. In these regards, platelets from inactive SLE patients appear to be similar to those from normal humans. PMID:15591819

  4. Effect of BN 52021, a specific antagonist of platelet activating factor (PAF-acether), on calcium movements and phosphatidic acid production induced by PAF-acether in human platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Simon, M.F.; Chap, H.; Braquet, P.; Douste-Blazy, L.

    1987-02-15

    /sup 32/P-labelled human platelets loaded with quin 2 and pretreated with aspirin were stimulated with 1-100 nM platelet activating factor (PAF-acether or 1-0-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) in a medium containing the ADP-scavenging system creatine phosphate/creatine phosphokinase. Under these conditions, PAF-acether evoked a characteristic fluorescence change allowing to quantify elevations in cytoplasmic free Ca/sup 2 +/ from internal stores (Ca/sup 2 +/ mobilization) or from external medium (Ca/sup 2 +/ influx), as well as an increased production of phosphatidic acid, reflecting phospholipase C activation. These effects, which can be attributed to PAF-acether only and not to released products such as ADP or thromboxane A2, were strongly inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by BN 52021, a specific antagonist of PAF-acether isolated from Ginkgo biloba. As the drug remained inactive against the same effects elicited by thrombin, it is concluded that BN 52021 does not interfere directly with the mechanism of transmembrane signalling involving inositol-phospholipids or (and) some putative receptor-operated channels, but rather acts on the binding of PAF-acether to its presumed membrane receptor.

  5. Dose-dependent platelet stimulation and inhibition induced by anti-PIA1 IgG

    SciTech Connect

    Ryu, T.; Davis, J.M.; Schwartz, K.A. )

    1990-07-01

    The PIA1 antibody produces several clinically distinct and severe thrombocytopenias. Investigations have demonstrated divergent effects on platelet function; prior reports demonstrated inhibition, while a conflicting publication showed platelet activation. We have resolved this conflict using anti-PIA1 IgG produced by a patient with posttransfusion purpura. Relatively low concentrations stimulated platelet aggregation and release of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) whereas high concentrations inhibited platelet function, producing a thrombasthenia-like state. The number of molecules of platelet-associated IgG necessary to initiate aggregation and ATP release (2,086 +/- 556) or produce maximum aggregation (23,420 +/- 3,706) or complete inhibition (63,582 +/- 2654) were measured with a quantitative radiometric assay for bound anti-PIA1. Preincubation of platelets with high concentrations of PIA1 antibody inhibited platelet aggregation with 10 mumol/L adenosine diphosphate and blocked 125I-labeled fibrinogen platelet binding. Platelet activation with nonfibrinogen dependent agonist, 1 U/ml thrombin, was not inhibited by this high concentration of PIA1 IgG. In conclusion, anti-PIAI IgG produces (1) stimulation of platelet aggregation and ATP release that is initiated with 2000 molecules IgG per platelet and is associated with an increase of 125I-fibrinogen binding; (2) conversely, inhibition of platelet aggregation is observed with maximum antibody binding, 63,000 molecules IgG per platelet, and is mediated via a blockade of fibrinogen binding.

  6. Platelet-activating factor induces phospholipid turnover, calcium flux, arachidonic acid liberation, eicosanoid generation, and oncogene expression in a human B cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Schulam, P.G.; Kuruvilla, A.; Putcha, G.; Mangus, L.; Franklin-Johnson, J.; Shearer, W.T. )

    1991-03-01

    Platelet-activating factor is a potent mediator of the inflammatory response. Studies of the actions of platelet-activating factor have centered mainly around neutrophils, monocytes, and platelets. In this report we begin to uncover the influence of platelet-activating factor on B lymphocytes. Employing the EBV-transformed human B cell line SKW6.4, we demonstrate that platelet-activating factor significantly alters membrane phospholipid metabolism indicated by the incorporation of 32P into phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol, and phosphatidic acid but not significantly into phosphatidylethanolamine at concentrations ranging from 10(-9) to 10(-6) M. The inactive precursor, lyso-platelet-activating factor, at a concentration as high as 10(-7) M had no effect on any of the membrane phospholipids. We also show that platelet-activating factor from 10(-12) to 10(-6) M induced rapid and significant elevation in intracellular calcium levels, whereas lyso-platelet-activating factor was again ineffective. We further demonstrate the impact of platelet-activating factor binding to B cells by measuring platelet-activating factor induced arachidonic acid release and 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid production. Moreover, platelet-activating factor was capable of inducing transcription of the nuclear proto-oncogenes c-fos and c-jun. Finally we explored the possible role of 5-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid as a regulator of arachidonic acid liberation demonstrating that endogenous 5-lipoxygenase activity modulates platelet-activating factor induced arachidonic acid release perhaps acting at the level of phospholipase A2. In summary, platelet-activating factor is shown here to have a direct and profound effect on a pure B cell line.

  7. Characterization of cutaneous vascular permeability induced by platelet-activating factor in guinea pigs and rats and its inhibition by a platelet-activating factor receptor antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, S.B.; Li, C.L.; Lam, M.H.; Shen, T.Y.

    1985-06-01

    Mechanisms of platelet-activating factor (PAF)-induced increases of cutaneous vascular permeability in guinea pigs and in rats were further explored. PAF so far is the most potent vasoactive mediator, being more than 1000-fold more potent than histamine and bradykinin in both species. In guinea pigs, there is a time delay of 5 to 10 minutes before PAF action, whereas, in the rat, the increased vasopermeability occurs immediately following the intradermal PAF injection. Relative vasoactive potencies of PAF and several structure-related analogues in both species correlate very well with their relative inhibition of the binding of /sup 3/H-PAF to specific receptor sites on isolated rabbit platelet plasma membranes and their aggregatory abilities of rabbit platelets. Furthermore, the PAF-induced cutaneous vascular permeability is inhibitable by a competitive specific PAF receptor antagonist, kadsurenone, suggesting that binding of PAF to its specific receptor site is the first step to initiate its action of increased cutaneous vascular permeability. Several pure cyclooxygenase inhibitors, including indomethacin, diflunisal, and flurbiprofen, and the dual cyclooxygenase/lipoxygenase inhibitor, BW755C, but not the histamine antagonists, inhibit the PAF-induced vasopermeability in guinea pigs. The inhibition by indomethacin or BW755C can be fully reversed by coinjection intradermally with PAF and prostaglandin E1 but not leukotriene B4. Also, prostaglandin E1 but not leukotriene B4 enhances the guinea pig in vivo response to PAF in this model. However, in rats, none of the cyclooxygenase inhibitors, histamine antagonists, or BW755C inhibit the PAF effect of cutaneous phenomena.

  8. AmtB Is Necessary for NH4+-Induced Nitrogenase Switch-Off and ADP-Ribosylation in Rhodobacter capsulatus‡

    PubMed Central

    Yakunin, Alexander F.; Hallenbeck, Patrick C.

    2002-01-01

    Rhodobacter capsulatus possesses two genes potentially coding for ammonia transporters, amtB and amtY. In order to better understand their role in the physiology of this bacterium and their possible significance in nitrogen fixation, we created single-knockout mutants. Strains mutated in either amtB or amtY did not show a growth defect under any condition tested and were still capable of taking up ammonia at nearly wild-type rates, but an amtB mutant was no longer capable of transporting methylamine. The amtB strain but not the amtY strain was also totally defective in carrying out ADP-ribosylation of Fe-protein or the switch-off of in vivo nitrogenase activity in response to NH4+ addition. ADP-ribosylation in response to darkness was unaffected in amtB and amtBY strains, and glutamine synthetase activity was normally regulated in these strains in response to ammonium addition, suggesting that one role of AmtB is to function as an ammonia sensor for the processes that regulate nitrogenase activity. PMID:12107124

  9. A monoclonal antibody directed against a granule membrane glycoprotein (GMP-140/PADGEM, P-selectin, CD62P) inhibits ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Boukerche, H; Ruchaud-Sparagano, M H; Rouen, C; Brochier, J; Kaplan, C; McGregor, J L

    1996-02-01

    P-selectin (also called CD62, GMP-140, PADGEM, CD62P) is a recently described member of a family of vascular adhesion receptors expressed by activated platelets and endothelial cells that are involved in leucocyte cell adhesion. The aim of this study was to characterize a new monoclonal antibody (LYP7) directed against activated human blood platelets that inhibits ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation. Immunoadsorbent affinity chromatography and immunoprecipitation studies showed that LYP7 (IgG1) bound a surface-labelled glycoprotein (GP) which changed its apparent molecular mass (M(r)) on reduction from 138 kD (situated below GPIIb) to 148 kD (above GPIIb alpha). LYP7 and S12, a monoclonal antibody directed against P-selectin immunoprecipitated the same band. Using ELISA assay, purified P-selectin was shown to bind LYP7 and S12 monoclonal antibodies. Binding sites of 125I-labelled LYP7, which was greatly increased on thrombin-stimulated (2 U/ml) washed platelets (10825 +/- 2886, mean +/- SD) Kd = 1.5 +/- 0.5 nM) compared to resting platelets (2801 +/- 1278, mean +/- SD) (Kd = 1.5 +/- 0.6 nM), was found to be normal on thrombin-stimulated platelets taken from a patient with grey platelet syndrome or a patient with Glanzmann thrombasthenia. LYP7 (IgG1, F(ab')2 or Fab fragments) inhibited ristocetin-induced platelet aggregation of platelets in a dose-dependent fashion without affecting the binding of von Willebrand (vWf) factor. However, agglutination of formaldehyde-fixed platelets induced by ristocetin was not affected by monoclonal antibody LYP7. In addition, the binding of thrombin-activated platelets to neutrophils was inhibited by monoclonal antibody LYP7. These results strongly suggest that P-selectin, by promoting cell-cell contact, may play an active role in platelet-platelet interactions. PMID:8603015

  10. Northern elephant seal platelets: analysis of shape change and response to platelet agonists.

    PubMed

    Field, C L; Walker, N J; Tablin, F

    2001-02-15

    Blood platelets have a vital role in the maintenance of normal mammalian hemostasis. Rapid pressure changes and temperatures lower than 20 degrees C cause activation of human and terrestrial mammal platelets. Elephant seals are routinely subjected to pressures as high as 150 atm, yet do not suffer from the thrombotic effects of platelet activation associated with rapid decompression. We examined the ultrastructure of Northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris) platelets and their functional and morphological response to various platelet agonists. Unstimulated elephant seal platelets are discoid cells, with a microtubule coil, randomly dispersed alpha and dense granules, and glycogen granules. There are well-defined areas of membranous invaginations that indicate the presence of an open canalicular system (OCS). Aggregometry was used to determine the response of elephant seal platelets to various platelet agonists. Dose-dependent curves were generated for thrombin, collagen, and adenosine diphosphate (ADP). Platelet response to thrombin was dose-dependent and was maximal at 2.5 U/ml. Platelets collected in sodium citrate had blunted responses to both ADP and collagen. ADP stimulation caused only reversible, primary activation (shape change) at > or = 5 microM, while platelets did not aggregate in response to any concentration of collagen. Platelets collected in sodium heparin did respond fully to both to ADP and collagen. There was small, reversible shape change in response to ristocetin, but no response to epinephrine. Decreased sensitivity of elephant seal platelets to agonists may be a protective mechanism developed in response to rapid pressure changes and cold temperatures associated with adaptation to an extreme environment. PMID:11248288

  11. Signal transduction in human platelets and inflammatory mediator release induced by genetically cloned hemolysin-positive and -negative Escherichia coli strains.

    PubMed Central

    König, B; Schönfeld, W; Scheffer, J; König, W

    1990-01-01

    Incubation of human platelets with the hemolysin-producing Escherichia coli strain K-12 (pANN5211) induced the activation of protein kinase C, aggregation of platelets, calcium influx, low amounts of 12-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (12-HETE), and release of serotonin from dense granules. Nonhemolytic isogenic strains of E. coli 536/21 which differed only in their types of adhesins (MSH+ MS-Fim+; S-MRH+ S-Fim+; P-MRH+ P-Fim+) released neither serotonin nor 12-HETE from human platelets nor induced platelet aggregation. All hemolysin-negative bacteria except E. coli 536/21, without any adhesins, were able to activate protein kinase C reversibly but did not induce calcium influx. Activation of platelets with fluoride, an activator of the GTP-binding protein, was associated with protein kinase C activation, calcium influx, platelet aggregation, serotonin release, and 12-HETE formation. The simultaneous stimulation of platelets with NaF and the nonhemolytic E. coli strains suppressed several of the NaF-induced platelet responses. Membrane preparations isolated from stimulated platelets with hemolysin-negative and hemolysin-positive E. coli showed increased binding of guanylylimidodiphosphate, a nonhydrolyzable GTP analog, and enhanced GTPase activity. PMID:1971256

  12. Hypersensitivity to thrombin of platelets from hypercholesterolemic rats

    SciTech Connect

    Winocour, P.D.; Rand, M.L.; Kinlough-Rathbone, R.L.; Mustard, J.F.

    1986-03-01

    Hypersensitivity of platelets to thrombin has been associated with hypercholesterolemia. The authors have examined the mechanisms involved in this hypersensitivity. Rats were given diets rich in milk fat and containing added cholesterol and taurocholate to produce hypercholesterolemia (HC) (262 +/- 25 mg%) or added sitosterol as a normocholesterolemic control (NC) (89 +/- 6 mg%). Washed platelets were prelabelled with /sup 14/C-serotonin. In the presence of acetylsalicyclic acid (ASA) (to inhibit thromboxane A/sub 2/ (TXA/sub 2/) formation) and creatine phosphate/creatine phosphokinase (CP/CPK) (to remove released ADP), HC platelets aggregated more (26 +/- 1%) and released more /sup 14/C (9.1 +/- 2.0%) than NC platelets (aggregation: 0%, p < 0.001; /sup 14/C release: 1.5 +/- 0.5%, p < 0.002) in response to thrombin (0.075 U/ml). Thus, a pathway independent of released ADP or TXA/sub 2/ formation is involved in the hypersensitivity of HC platelets to thrombin. Total binding of /sup 125/I-thrombin to HC platelets was less than that to NC platelets but HC platelets were smaller and had less protein than NC platelets; the thrombin binding per mg platelet protein was the same for HC and NC platelets, indicating that hypersensitivity to thrombin of HC platelets does not result from increased thrombin binding. Thus, hypersensitivity of HC platelets to thrombin is not due to TXA/sub 2/ formation, the action of released ADP or increased thrombin binding.

  13. [Assessment of platelet function in man].

    PubMed

    Gaussem, Pascale

    2006-01-01

    Assessment of platelet function was primarily designed to explore patients with hemostatic disorders, but is becoming important for the monitoring of anti platelet agents, mostly aspirin and clopidogrel. Beside platelet counting, morphological analysis and bleeding time, a number of dedicated platelet function instruments are now available, generally allowing a rapid evaluation of platelet function in whole blood. The other tests including aggregometry and ELISA measurement of activation markers are generally restricted to specialized laboratories. Although aggregometry is still considered as the "gold standard", the recently developed flow cytometric-based platelet function analysis provides a wide choice of tests that assess the number of surface receptors, the measure of secretion and aggregation, the quantification of microparticules and leukocyte-platelet aggregates. It also allows the measure of the function of the ADP receptor P2Y12 by the phosphorylation level of the VASP protein, method currently under evaluation to monitor the platelet response to clopidogrel treatment. PMID:17243268

  14. Cluster of Differentiation 38 (CD38) Mediates Bile Acid-induced Acinar Cell Injury and Pancreatitis through Cyclic ADP-ribose and Intracellular Calcium Release*

    PubMed Central

    Orabi, Abrahim I.; Muili, Kamaldeen A.; Javed, Tanveer A.; Jin, Shunqian; Jayaraman, Thottala; Lund, Frances E.; Husain, Sohail Z.

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant Ca2+ signals within pancreatic acinar cells are an early and critical feature in acute pancreatitis, yet it is unclear how these signals are generated. An important mediator of the aberrant Ca2+ signals due to bile acid exposure is the intracellular Ca2+ channel ryanodine receptor. One putative activator of the ryanodine receptor is the nucleotide second messenger cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR), which is generated by an ectoenzyme ADP-ribosyl cyclase, CD38. In this study, we examined the role of CD38 and cADPR in acinar cell Ca2+ signals and acinar injury due to bile acids using pharmacologic inhibitors of CD38 and cADPR as well as mice deficient in Cd38 (Cd38−/−). Cytosolic Ca2+ signals were imaged using live time-lapse confocal microscopy in freshly isolated mouse acinar cells during perifusion with the bile acid taurolithocholic acid 3-sulfate (TLCS; 500 μm). To focus on intracellular Ca2+ release and to specifically exclude Ca2+ influx, cells were perifused in Ca2+-free medium. Cell injury was assessed by lactate dehydrogenase leakage and propidium iodide uptake. Pretreatment with either nicotinamide (20 mm) or the cADPR antagonist 8-Br-cADPR (30 μm) abrogated TLCS-induced Ca2+ signals and cell injury. TLCS-induced Ca2+ release and cell injury were reduced by 30 and 95%, respectively, in Cd38-deficient acinar cells compared with wild-type cells (p < 0.05). Cd38-deficient mice were protected against a model of bile acid infusion pancreatitis. In summary, these data indicate that CD38-cADPR mediates bile acid-induced pancreatitis and acinar cell injury through aberrant intracellular Ca2+ signaling. PMID:23940051

  15. Doxorubicin-induced necrosis is mediated by poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) but is independent of p53

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hyeon-Jun; Kwon, Hyuk-Kwon; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Gui, Xiangai; Achek, Asma; Kim, Jae-Ho; Choi, Sangdun

    2015-01-01

    Necrosis, unregulated cell death, is characterized by plasma membrane rupture as well as nuclear and cellular swelling. However, it has recently been reported that necrosis is a regulated form of cell death mediated by poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1). PARP1 is thought to mediate necrosis by inducing DNA damage, although this remains unconfirmed. In this study, we examined the mechanisms of PARP1-mediated necrosis following doxorubicin (DOX)-induced DNA damage in human kidney proximal tubular (HK-2) cells. DOX initiated DNA damage response (DDR) and upregulated PARP1 and p53 expression, resulting in morphological changes similar to those observed during necrosis. Additionally, DOX induced mitochondrial hyper-activation, as evidenced by increased mitochondrial respiration and cytosolic ATP (cATP) production. However, DOX affected mitochondrial mass. DOX-induced DNA damage, cytosolic reactive oxygen species (cROS) generation, and mitochondrial hyper-activation decreased in cells with inhibited PARP1 expression, while generation of nitric oxide (NO) and mitochondrial ROS (mROS) remained unaffected. Moreover, DOX-induced DNA damage, cell cycle changes, and oxidative stress were not affected by p53 inhibition. These findings suggest that DNA damage induced necrosis through a PARP1-dependent and p53-independent pathway. PMID:26522181

  16. Platelet-activating factor mediates angiotensin II-induced proteinuria in isolated perfused rat kidney.

    PubMed

    Perico, N; Lapinski, R; Konopka, K; Aiello, S; Noris, M; Remuzzi, G

    1997-09-01

    Isolated kidney preparations (IPK) from male Sprague Dawley rats perfused at constant pressure were used to evaluate the effect of angiotensin II (AII) and platelet-activating factor (PAF) on renal function and urinary protein excretion. Compared with basal, intrarenal infusion of AII at 8 ng/min caused a progressive increase in protein excretion (11 +/- 6 versus 73 +/- 21 micrograms/min) in parallel with a decline in renal perfusate flow (RPF) (29 +/- 3 versus 18 +/- 3 ml/min). Addition to the perfusate of PAF at 50 nM final concentration also induced proteinuria (9 +/- 4 versus 55 +/- 14 micrograms/min) but did not change RPF (29 +/- 3 versus 30 +/- 3 ml/min). Preexposure of isolated kidneys to the PAF receptor antagonist WEB 2086 prevented the increase in urinary protein excretion induced by AII infusion (basal: 13 +/- 6; post-AII: 12 +/- 7 micrograms/min) but failed to prevent the vasoactive effect of AII (RPF, basal: 30 +/- 2; post-AII: 21 +/- 3 ml/min). In additional experiments, dexamethasone reduced the proteinuric effect of PAF remarkably. These results indicate that in isolated kidney preparation: (1) AII infusion induced proteinuria and decreased RPF; and (2) the effect of AII in enhancing urinary protein excretion was completely prevented by a specific PAF receptor antagonist, which, however, did not influence the AII-induced fall in RPF. It is suggested that PAF plays a major role in AII-induced changes in the permselective function of the glomerular capillary barrier. PMID:9294830

  17. The Heparin-Induced Thrombocytopenia and Thrombosis Syndrome: Treatment with Intraarterial Urokinase and Systemic Platelet Aggregation Inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Kenneth D.; McCrohan, Gerard; DeMarta, Deborah A.; Shirodkar, Nitin B.; Kwon, Oun J.; Chopra, Paramjit S.

    1996-03-15

    We report a case of the heparin-induced thrombocytopenia and thrombosis syndrome presenting with acute ischemia of a lower limb. The patient was successfully treated by withdrawal of heparin products, intraarterial urokinase, and platelet anti-aggregation therapy consisting of Dextran and aspirin.

  18. Signaling-mediated cooperativity between glycoprotein Ib-IX and protease-activated receptors in thrombin-induced platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Estevez, Brian; Kim, Kyungho; Delaney, M Keegan; Stojanovic-Terpo, Aleksandra; Shen, Bo; Ruan, Changgeng; Cho, Jaehyung; Ruggeri, Zaverio M; Du, Xiaoping

    2016-02-01

    Thrombin-induced cellular response in platelets not only requires protease-activated receptors (PARs), but also involves another thrombin receptor, the glycoprotein Ib-IX complex (GPIb-IX). It remains controversial how thrombin binding to GPIb-IX stimulates platelet responses. It was proposed that GPIb-IX serves as a dock that facilitates thrombin cleavage of protease-activated receptors, but there are also reports suggesting that thrombin binding to GPIb-IX induces platelet activation independent of PARs. Here we show that GPIb is neither a passive thrombin dock nor a PAR-independent signaling receptor. We demonstrate a novel signaling-mediated cooperativity between PARs and GPIb-IX. Low-dose thrombin-induced PAR-dependent cell responses require the cooperativity of GPIb-IX signaling, and conversely, thrombin-induced GPIb-IX signaling requires cooperativity of PARs. This mutually dependent cooperativity requires a GPIb-IX-specific 14-3-3-Rac1-LIMK1 signaling pathway, and activation of this pathway also requires PAR signaling. The cooperativity between GPIb-IX signaling and PAR signaling thus drives platelet activation at low concentrations of thrombin, which are important for in vivo thrombosis. PMID:26585954

  19. Exogenous nitric oxide (NO) generation or IL-1[beta]-induced intracellular NO production stimulates inhibitory auto-ADP-ribosylation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in RINm5F cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dimmeler, S.; Bruene, B. ); Ankarcrona, M.; Nicotera, P. )

    1993-04-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) stimulates the auto-ADP-ribosylation of the glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) which results in the inhibition of enzyme activity. In the present work the authors show that addition of exogenous NO or IL-1[beta]-induced intracellular NO generation cause GAPDH ADP-ribosylation and inhibition of enzyme activity. Incubation of RINm5F cells with sodium nitroprusside (SNP) for 18 h caused a time- and dose-dependent inhibition of GAPDH activity. Half-maximal inhibition of GAPDH activity was observed with 80 [mu]M of the NO donor, with maximal inhibition after roughly 6 h of incubation. In parallel, SNP induced endogenous ADP-ribosylation of GAPDH measured by a decreased incorporation of [[sup 32]P]ADP-ribose from [[sup 32]P]NAD[sup +] in the cytosol of the SNP-treated cells. Stimulation of endogenous NO production by inducing the NO synthase by exposure to the cytokine IL-1[beta] results in decreased GAPDH activity. IL-1[beta] (10[sup [minus]9] M) inhibited GAPDH activity about 55%, compared with control values. Production of nitrite and inhibition of GAPDH was reversed by the NAD[sup +] synthease inhibitor N[sub G]-monomethyl-L-arginine, indicating the endogenous generated NO was the effective molecule. Again, GAPDH inhibition was associated with NO-stimulated endogenous ADP-ribosylation of the enzyme Western blot analysis of GAPDH excluded degradation of GAPDH by NO. NO-stimulated auto-ADP-ribosylation resulted in inhibition of the glycolytic enzyme GAPDH and may be relevant as a cytotoxic effect of NO. In concert with its inhibitory actions on iron-sulfur enzymes like aconitase and electron transport proteins of the respiratory chain, NO may mediate autocytotoxic effect in [beta]-cells. 40 refs., 7 figs.

  20. Ligands to the platelet fibrinogen receptor glycoprotein IIb-IIIa do not affect agonist-induced second messengers Ca2+ or cyclic AMP.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, J A; Ashby, B; Daniel, J L

    1990-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that the platelet glycoprotein complex GPIIb-IIIa, which is the putative fibrinogen receptor, regulates Ca2+ influx into platelets, possibly operating as a Ca2+ channel. We have used RGD-peptides (peptides containing the sequence Arg-Gly-Asp; disintegrins), isolated from snake venoms, that have a high affinity and specificity for the fibrinogen-binding site of GPIIb-IIIa to address the question of whether blocking this site inhibits Ca2+ movement from the extracellular medium to the cytosol. Using fura-2-loaded human platelets, we found that neither disintegrins nor a monoclonal antibody (M148) to the GPIIb-IIIa complex altered the level of cytosolic Ca2+ obtained when the cells were stimulated with various agonists in the presence of either nominal or 1 mM extracellular Ca2+. In the presence of Mn2+, an ion that quenches fura-2 fluorescence, fura-2-loaded platelets were stimulated with thrombin or ADP. Neither disintegrins nor the monoclonal antibody altered the kinetics or the amount of quenching of fura-2 fluorescence by Mn2+. These data indicate that the binding of ligands to the fibrinogen receptor is not associated with an inhibition of Ca2+ movement through a receptor-operated channel. Furthermore, the disintegrins have no effect on platelet cyclic AMP metabolism in either the presence or the absence of phosphodiesterase inhibitors. PMID:2168700

  1. ADP-Ribosyltransferases and Poly ADP-Ribosylation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chao; Yu, Xiaochun

    2016-01-01

    Protein ADP-ribosylation is an important posttranslational modification that plays versatile roles in multiple biological processes. ADP-ribosylation is catalyzed by a group of enzymes known as ADP-ribosyltransferases (ARTs). Using nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) as the donor, ARTs covalently link single or multiple ADP-ribose moieties from NAD+ to the substrates, forming mono ADP-ribosylation or poly ADP-ribosylation (PARylation). Novel functions of ARTs and ADP-ribosylation have been revealed over the past few years. Here we summarize the current knowledge on ARTs and PARylation. PMID:25938242

  2. Oncocalyxone A inhibits human platelet aggregation by increasing cGMP and by binding to GP Ibα glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, M A D; do Nascimento, N R F; de Sousa, C M; Pessoa, O D L; de Lemos, T L G; Ventura, J S; Schattner, M; Chudzinski-Tavassi, A M

    2008-01-01

    Background and purpose: Oncocalyxone A (OncoA) has a concentration-dependent anti-platelet activity. The present study aimed to further understand the mechanisms related to this effect. Experimental approach: Human platelet aggregation was measured by means of a turbidimetric method. OncoA (32–256 μM) was tested against several platelet-aggregating agents, such as adenosine diphosphate (ADP), collagen, arachidonic acid (AA), ristocetin and thrombin. Key results: OncoA completely inhibited platelet aggregation with a calculated mean inhibitory concentration (IC50-μM) of 122 for ADP, 161 for collagen, 159 for AA, 169 for ristocetin and 85 for thrombin. The anti-aggregatory activity of OncoA was not inhibited by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ). OncoA, at a concentration that caused no significant anti-aggregatory activity, potentiated sodium nitroprusside (SNP) anti-aggregatory activity (18.8±2.9%-SNP vs 85.0±8.2%-SNP+OncoA). The levels of nitric oxide (NO) or cAMP were not altered by OncoA while cGMP levels were increased more than 10-fold by OncoA in resting or ADP-activated platelets. Flow cytometry revealed that OncoA does not interact with receptors for fibrinogen, collagen or P-selectin. Nevertheless, OncoA decreased the binding of antibodies to GP Ibα, a glycoprotein that is related both to von Willebrand factor and to thrombin-induced platelet aggregation. Conclusion and implications: OncoA showed anti-aggregatory activity in platelets that was associated with increased cGMP levels, not dependent on NO and with blocking GP Ibα glycoprotein. This new mechanism has the prospect of leading to new anti-thrombotic drugs. PMID:18516074

  3. Restoration of Responsiveness of Phospholipase Cγ2-Deficient Platelets by Enforced Expression of Phospholipase Cγ1

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yongwei; Adams, Tamara; Zhi, Huiying; Yu, Mei; Wen, Renren; Newman, Peter J.; Wang, Demin; Newman, Debra K.

    2015-01-01

    Receptor-mediated platelet activation requires phospholipase C (PLC) activity to elevate intracellular calcium and induce actin cytoskeleton reorganization. PLCs are classified into structurally distinct β, γ, δ, ε, ζ, and η isoforms. There are two PLCγ isoforms (PLCγ1, PLCγ2), which are critical for activation by tyrosine kinase-dependent receptors. Platelets express both PLCγ1 and PLCγ2. Although PLCγ2 has been shown to play a dominant role in platelet activation, the extent to which PLCγ1 contributes has not been evaluated. To ascertain the relative contributions of PLCγ1 and PLCγ2 to platelet activation, we generated conditionally PLCγ1-deficient, wild-type (WT), PLCγ2-deficient, and PLCγ1/PLCγ2 double-deficient mice and measured the ability of platelets to respond to different agonists. We found that PLCγ2 deficiency abrogated αIIbβ3-dependent platelet spreading, GPVI-dependent platelet aggregation, and thrombus formation on collagen-coated surfaces under shear conditions, which is dependent on both GPVI and αIIbβ3. Addition of exogenous ADP overcame defective spreading of PLCγ2-deficient platelets on immobilized fibrinogen, suggesting that PLCγ2 is required for granule secretion in response to αIIbβ3 ligation. Consistently, αIIbβ3-mediated release of granule contents was impaired in the absence of PLCγ2. In contrast, PLCγ1-deficient platelets spread and released granule contents normally on fibrinogen, exhibited normal levels of GPVI-dependent aggregation, and formed thrombi normally on collagen-coated surfaces. Interestingly, enforced expression of PLCγ1 fully restored GPVI-dependent aggregation and αIIbβ3-dependent spreading of PLCγ2-deficient platelets. We conclude that platelet activation through GPVI and αIIbβ3 utilizes PLCγ2 because PLCγ1 levels are insufficient to support responsiveness, but that PLCγ1 can restore responsiveness if expressed at levels normally achieved by PLCγ2. PMID:25793864

  4. Inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-induced calcium release from platelet plasma membrane vesicles

    SciTech Connect

    Rengasamy, A.; Feinberg, H.

    1988-02-15

    A platelet membrane preparation, enriched in plasma membrane markers, took up /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ in exchange for intravesicular Na+ and released it after the addition of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3). The possibility that contaminating dense tubular membrane (DTS) vesicles contributed the Ca/sup 2 +/ released by IP3 was eliminated by the addition of vanadate to inhibit Ca/sup +/-ATPase-mediated DTS Ca/sup 2 +/ sequestration and by the finding that only plasma membrane vesicles exhibit Na/sup +/-dependent Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake. Ca/sup 2 +/ released by IP3 was dependent on low extravesicular Ca/sup 2 +/ concentrations. IP3-induced Ca/sup 2 +/ release was additive to that released by Na/sup +/ addition while GTP or polyethylene glycol (PEG) had no effect. These results strongly suggest that IP3 facilitates extracellular Ca/sup 2 +/ influx in addition to release from DTS membranes.

  5. Angiotensin peptides attenuate platelet-activating factor-induced inflammatory activity in rats.

    PubMed

    Sato, Akira; Yokoyama, Izumi; Ebina, Keiichi

    2015-11-01

    Angiotensin (Ang)--a peptide that is part of the renin-angiotensin system-induces vasoconstriction and a subsequent increase in blood pressure; Ang peptides, especially AngII, can also act as potent pro-inflammatory mediators. Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a potent phospholipid mediator that is implicated in many inflammatory diseases. In this study, we investigated the effects of Ang peptides (AngII, AngIII, and AngIV) on PAF-induced inflammatory activity. In experiments using a rat hind-paw oedema model, AngII markedly and dose-dependently attenuated the paw oedema induced by PAF. The inhibitory effects of AngIII and AngIV on PAF-induced paw oedema were lower than that of AngII. Two Ang receptors, the AT1 and AT2 receptors, did not affect the AngII-mediated attenuation of PAF-induced paw oedema. Moreover, intrinsic tyrosine fluorescence studies demonstrated that AngII, AngIII, and AngIV interact with PAF, and that their affinities were closely correlated with their inhibitory effects on PAF-induced rat paw oedema. Also, AngII interacted with metabolite/precursor of PAF (lyso-PAF), and an oxidized phospholipid, 1-palmitoyl-2-(5'-oxo-valeroyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POVPC), which bears a marked structural resemblance to PAF. Furthermore, POVPC dose-dependently inhibited AngII-mediated attenuation of PAF-induced paw oedema. These results suggest that Ang peptides can attenuate PAF-induced inflammatory activity through binding to PAF and lyso-PAF in rats. Therefore, Ang peptides may be closely involved in the regulation of many inflammatory diseases caused by PAF. PMID:26348270

  6. Cystamine immobilization on TiO 2 film surfaces and the influence on inhibition of collagen-induced platelet activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yujuan; Weng, Yajun; Zhang, Liping; Jing, Fengjuan; Huang, Nan; Chen, Junying

    2011-12-01

    Poor haemocompatibility is a main issue of artificial cardiovascular materials in clinical application. Nitric oxide (NO), produced by vascular endothelial cells, is a well known inhibitor of platelet adhesion and activation. Thus, NO-releasing biomaterials are beneficial for improving haemocompatibility of blood-contacting biomedical devices. In this paper, a novel method was developed for enhancement of haemocompatibility by exploiting endogenous NO donors. TiO 2 films were firstly synthesized on Si (1 0 0) wafers via unbalanced magnetron sputtering technology, and then polydopamine was grafted on TiO 2 films and used as a linker for further immobilization of cystamine. The obtained surfaces were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. NO generation is evaluated by saville-griess reagents, and it shows that cystamine immobilized samples are able to catalytically generate NO by decomposing endogenous S-nitrosothiols (RSNO). In vitro platelet adhesion results reveal that cystamine modified surfaces can inhibit collagen-induced platelet activation. ELISA analysis reveals that cGMP in platelets obviously increases on cystamine immobilized surface, which suggests the reducing of platelet activation is through NO/cGMP signal channel. It can be concluded that cystamine immobilized surface shows better blood compatibility by catalyzing NO release from the endogenous NO donor. It may be a promising method for improvement of haemocompatibility of blood-contacting implants.

  7. Modeling HIV-1 Induced Neuroinflammation in Mice: Role of Platelets in Mediating Blood-Brain Barrier Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Letitia D.; Jackson, Joseph W.; Maggirwar, Sanjay B.

    2016-01-01

    The number of HIV-1 positive individuals developing some form of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder (HAND) is increasing. In these individuals, the integrity of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) is compromised due to an increase in exposure to pro-inflammatory mediators, viral proteins, and virus released from infected cells. It has been shown that soluble CD40L (sCD40L) is released upon platelet activation and is an important mediator of the pathogenesis of HAND but the underlying mechanisms are unclear, emphasizing the need of an effective animal model. Here, we have utilized a novel animal model in which wild-type (WT) mice were infected with EcoHIV; a derivative of HIV-1 that contains a substitution of envelope protein gp120 with that of gp80 derived from murine leukemia virus-1 (MuLV-1). As early as two-weeks post-infection, EcoHIV led to increased permeability of the BBB associated with decreased expression of tight junction protein claudin-5, in CD40L and platelet activation-dependent manner. Treatment with an antiplatelet drug, eptifibatide, in EcoHIV-infected mice normalized BBB function, sCD40L release and platelet activity, thus implicating platelet activation and platelet-derived CD40L in virally induced BBB dysfunction. Our results also validate and underscore the importance of EcoHIV infection mouse model as a tool to explore therapeutic targets for HAND. PMID:26986758

  8. Ultraviolet irradiation of platelet concentrates: Feasibility in transfusion practice

    SciTech Connect

    Andreu, G.; Boccaccio, C.; Lecrubier, C.; Fretault, J.; Coursaget, J.; LeGuen, J.P.; Oleggini, M.; Fournel, J.J.; Samama, M. )

    1990-06-01

    Ultraviolet (UV)-B irradiation abolishes lymphocyte functions (the ability to respond and to stimulate) in mixed lymphocyte culture (MLC). This effect may have practical application in the prevention or reduction of transfusion-induced alloimmunization against HLA class I antigens. To study this, platelet concentrates (PCs) were obtained with a cell separator, suspended in autologous plasma in a final volume of 400 mL, and transferred into a large (22 X 30 cm) cell culture bag. This plastic showed a good transmittance of UV-B rays at 310 nm (54%). PCs were placed between two quartz plates (surface of irradiation = 25 X 37 cm), and the two sides were irradiated simultaneously. Energy delivered to the surface of the plastic bag was automatically monitored. The ability to respond (in MLC and to phytohemagglutinin) and to stimulate allogeneic lymphocytes was completely abolished with energy of 0.75 J per cm2 (irradiation time less than 3 min). The temperature increase during irradiation was negligible. Platelet aggregation (collagen, adrenalin, ADP, arachidonic acid, ristocetin) was not impaired if UV-B energy was below 3 J per cm2. Recovery and survival of autologous 111In-labeled platelets were studied in four volunteers; no differences were found between UV-B-treated (1.5 J/cm2) platelets and untreated platelets. These results show that a large-scale clinical trial using UV-B-irradiated PCs to prevent HLA alloimmunization is feasible.

  9. Effect of taurine on platelets and the plasma coagulation system.

    PubMed

    Miglis, Mitchell; Wilder, Donna; Reid, Thomas; Bakaltcheva, Irina

    2002-02-01

    It is not yet clear what exact mechanisms are at work in hibernating animals that prevent clot formation and maintain tissue perfusion under conditions of very slow blood flow and increased blood viscosity brought about by the low temperatures. It has been shown that the total amino acid pool increases more then two fold in hibernating animals with taurine accounting for about 50% of this increase [Storey et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 1988; 85(21): 8350-4]. This work investigates the effect of taurine on platelets and the plasma coagulation system. Taurine was added at different concentrations in the range between 5 and 25 mM to donor plasma. Using STA/STA Compact coagulation analyzer the following tests were performed: prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), and thrombin time (TT). At the highest concentration tested (25 mM) taurine prolonged TT by 9%. The prolongation was statistically significant but not clinically significant retaining TT within normal limits (16.7-20.7 s). PT and APTT remained unchanged by taurine. The effect of taurine on platelets was assessed by platelet aggregation by thrombin, extent of platelet shape change (ESC) induced by ADP, and thrombelastography. Taurine at 5 mM final concentration inhibited platelet aggregation by 10%. Increasing taurine concentration to 25 mM did not result in a further augmentation of the inhibitory effect. ESC was unaffected by taurine. Clot strength determined by thrombelastography also remained unchanged by taurine. PMID:11918831

  10. Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa and P2Y12 Induction by Oligochitosan Accelerates Platelet Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Halim, Ahmad Sukari; Hussein, Abdul Rahim; Ujang, Zanariah

    2014-01-01

    Platelet membrane receptor glycoprotein IIb/IIIa (gpiibiiia) is a receptor detected on platelets. Adenosine diphosphate (ADP) activates gpiibiiia and P2Y12, causing platelet aggregation and thrombus stabilization during blood loss. Chitosan biomaterials were found to promote surface induced hemostasis and were capable of activating blood coagulation cascades by enhancing platelet aggregation. Our current findings show that the activation of the gpiibiiia complex and the major ADP receptor P2Y12 is required for platelet aggregation to reach hemostasis following the adherence of various concentrations of chitosan biomaterials [7% N,O-carboxymethylchitosan (NO-CMC) with 0.45 mL collagen, 8% NO-CMC, oligochitosan (O-C), and oligochitosan 53 (O-C 53)]. We studied gpiibiiia and P2Y12 through flow cytometric analysis and western blotting techniques. The highest expression of gpiibiiia was observed with Lyostypt (74.3 ± 7.82%), followed by O-C (65.5 ± 7.17%). Lyostypt and O-C resulted in gpiibiiia expression increases of 29.2% and 13.9%, respectively, compared with blood alone. Western blot analysis revealed that only O-C 53 upregulated the expression of P2Y12 (1.12 ± 0.03-fold) compared with blood alone. Our findings suggest that the regulation of gpiibiiia and P2Y12 levels could be clinically useful to activate platelets to reach hemostasis. Further, we show that the novel oligochitosan is able to induce the increased expression of gpiibiiia and P2Y12, thus accelerating platelet aggregation in vitro. PMID:25247182

  11. Another “String to the Bow” of PJ34, a Potent Poly(ADP-Ribose)Polymerase Inhibitor: An Antiplatelet Effect through P2Y12 Antagonism?

    PubMed Central

    Lechaftois, Marie; Dreano, Elise; Palmier, Bruno; Margaill, Isabelle; Marchand-Leroux, Catherine; Bachelot-Loza, Christilla; Lerouet, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Background Neuro- and vasoprotective effects of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (PARP) inhibition have been largely documented in models of cerebral ischemia, particularly with the potent PARP inhibitor PJ34. Furthermore, after ischemic stroke, physicians are faced with incomplete tissue reperfusion and reocclusion, in which platelet activation/aggregation plays a key role. Data suggest that certain PARP inhibitors could act as antiplatelet agents. In that context, the present in vitro study investigated on human blood the potential antiplatelet effect of PJ34 and two structurally different PARP inhibitors, DPQ and INO-1001. Methods and results ADP concentrations were chosen to induce a biphasic aggregation curve resulting from the successive activation of both its receptors P2Y1 and P2Y12. In these experimental conditions, PJ34 inhibited the second phase of aggregation; this effect was reduced by incremental ADP concentrations. In addition, in line with a P2Y12 pathway inhibitory effect, PJ34 inhibited the dephosphorylation of the vasodilator stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) in a concentration-dependent manner. Besides, PJ34 had no effect on platelet aggregation induced by collagen or PAR1 activating peptide, used at concentrations inducing a strong activation independent on secreted ADP. By contrast, DPQ and INO-1001 were devoid of any effect whatever the platelet agonist used. Conclusions We showed that, in addition to its already demonstrated beneficial effects in in vivo models of cerebral ischemia, the potent PARP inhibitor PJ34 exerts in vitro an antiplatelet effect. Moreover, this is the first study to report that PJ34 could act via a competitive P2Y12 antagonism. Thus, this antiplatelet effect could improve post-stroke reperfusion and/or prevent reocclusion, which reinforces the interest of this drug for stroke treatment. PMID:25329809

  12. Glaucocalyxin A inhibits platelet activation and thrombus formation preferentially via GPVI signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Tang, Xiaorong; Yi, Wenxiu; Li, Qiang; Ren, Lijie; Liu, Xiaohui; Chu, Chunjun; Ozaki, Yukio; Zhang, Jian; Zhu, Li

    2013-01-01

    Platelets play a pivotal role in atherothrombosis and the antiplatelet agents have been proved to be useful in preventing onset of acute clinical events including myocardial infarction and stroke. Increasing number of natural compounds has been identified to be potential antiplatelet agents. Here we report the antiplatelet effect of glaucocalyxin A (GLA), an ent-diterpenoid that we isolated and purified from the aerial parts of Rabdosia japonica (Burm. f.) var. glaucocalyx (Maxim.) Hara, and investigate the molecular mechanisms by which GLA inhibits platelet activation and thrombus formation. The effect of GLA on platelet activation was measured using platelets freshly isolated from peripheral blood of healthy donors. Results showed that pretreatment of human platelets with lower concentrations of GLA (0.01 μg/ml, 0.1 μg/ml) significantly inhibited platelet aggregation induced by collagen (P<0.001) and CRP (P<0.01), a synthetic GPVI ligand, but not by ADP and U46619. Accordingly, GLA inhibited collagen-stimulated tyrosine phosphorylation of Syk, LAT, and phospholipase Cγ2, the signaling events in collagen receptor GPⅥ pathway. GLA also inhibited platelet p-selectin secretion and integrin activation by convulxin, a GPVI selective ligand. Additionally, GLA was found to inhibit low-dose thrombin-induced platelet activation. Using a flow chamber device, GLA was found to attenuate platelet adhesion on collagen surfaces in high shear condition. In vivo studies showed that GLA administration increased the time for complete occlusion upon vascular injury in mice, but did not extend tail-bleeding time when mice were administered with relatively lower doses of GLA. Therefore, the present results provide the molecular basis for the inhibition effect of GLA on platelet activation and its in vivo effect on thrombus formation, suggesting that GLA could potentially be developed as an antiplatelet and antithrombotic agent. PMID:24386454

  13. Circulating primers enhance platelet function and induce resistance to antiplatelet therapy

    PubMed Central

    Blair, T A; Moore, S F; Hers, I

    2015-01-01

    Background Aspirin and P2Y12 antagonists are antiplatelet compounds that are used clinically in patients with thrombosis. However, some patients are ‘resistant’ to antiplatelet therapy, which increases their risk of developing acute coronary syndromes. These patients often present with an underlying condition that is associated with altered levels of circulating platelet primers and platelet hyperactivity. Platelet primers cannot stimulate platelet activation, but, in combination with physiologic stimuli, significantly enhance platelet function. Objectives To explore the role of platelet primers in resistance to antiplatelet therapy, and to evaluate whether phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) contributes to this process. Methods and Results We used platelet aggregation, thromboxane A2 production and ex vivo thrombus formation as functional readouts of platelet activity. Platelets were treated with the potent P2Y12 inhibitor AR-C66096, aspirin, or a combination of both, in the presence or absence of the platelet primers insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and thrombopoietin (TPO), or the Gz-coupled receptor ligand epinephrine. We found that platelet primers largely overcame the inhibitory effects of antiplatelet compounds on platelet functional responses. IGF-1-mediated and TPO-mediated, but not epinephrine-mediated, enhancements in the presence of antiplatelet drugs were blocked by the PI3K inhibitors wortmannin and LY294002. Conclusions These results demonstrate that platelet primers can contribute to antiplatelet resistance. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that there are PI3K-dependent and PI3K-independent mechanisms driving primer-mediated resistance to antiplatelet therapy. PMID:26039631

  14. Effects on platelet function of combination etoposide and carboplatin chemotherapy in pediatric oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Pignatelli, P; Properzi, E; Pisani, M; Clerico, A; Schiavetti, A; Lenti, L; Pulcinelli, F M; Ferroni, P; Gazzaniga, P P

    1998-01-01

    The effects of a therapeutic course of the combination of carboplatin and etoposide on platelet function have been evaluated in 10 pediatric patients with brain tumors. Platelet count, in vitro aggregation tests, P-selectin expression and agonist-induced ATP release were evaluated before, and 7 and 15 days after one cycle of chemotherapy. The analysis of the results demonstrated the presence of an in vitro platelet aggregation defect in response to collagen and arachidonic acid in all patients 7 days after therapy. A concomitant decrease of collagen- and arachidonic acid-induced ATP release was also observed. Both platelet aggregation and ATP release returned to baseline values 15 days after chemotherapy administration. Conversely, in vitro platelet aggregation and secretion induced by ADP and epinephrine were unaltered by carboplatin and etoposide administration. Furthermore, P-selectin expression was negative at baseline and did not change after chemotherapy. These results support the hypothesis that combination etoposide and carboplatin chemotherapy in pediatric patients is responsible for possible disturbances in biochemical pathways required for platelet secretion and aggregation. PMID:16793755

  15. Thromboxane-induced phosphatidate formation in human platelets. Relationship to receptor occupancy and to changes in cytosolic free calcium.

    PubMed Central

    Pollock, W K; Armstrong, R A; Brydon, L J; Jones, R L; MacIntyre, D E

    1984-01-01

    The inter-relationships between receptor occupancy, inositol phospholipid metabolism and elevation of cytosolic free Ca2+ in thromboxane A2-induced human platelet activation were investigated by using the stable thromboxane A2 mimetic, 9,11-epoxymethanoprostaglandin H2, and the thromboxane A2 receptor antagonist, EPO45. 9,11-Epoxymethanoprostaglandin H2 stimulated platelet phosphatidylinositol metabolism as indicated by the rapid accumulation of [32P]phosphatidate and later accumulation of [32P]phosphatidylinositol in platelets pre-labelled with [32P]Pi. These effects of 9,11-epoxymethanoprostaglandin H2 were concentration-dependent and half-maximal [32P]phosphatidate formation occurred at an agonist concentration of 54 +/- 8 nM. With platelets labelled with the fluorescent Ca2+ indicator quin 2, resting cytosolic free Ca2+ was 86 +/- 12 nM. 9,11-Epoxymethanoprostaglandin H2 induced a rapid, concentration-dependent elevation of cytosolic free Ca2+ to a maximum of 300-700 nM. Half-maximal stimulation was observed at an agonist concentration of 80 +/- 23 nM. The thromboxane A2 receptor antagonist EPO45 selectively inhibited 9,11-epoxymethanoprostaglandin H2-induced [32P]phosphatidate formation and elevation of cytosolic free Ca2+, indicating that both events are sequelae of receptor occupancy. Human platelets contain a single class of stereospecific, saturable, high affinity (KD = 70 +/- 13 nM) binding sites for 9,11-epoxymethano[3H]prostaglandin H2. The concentration-response curve for receptor occupancy (9,11-epoxymethano-[3H]prostaglandin H2 binding) is similar to that for 9,11-epoxymethanoprostaglandin H2-induced [32P]phosphatidate formation and for elevation of cytosolic free Ca2+. These observations indicate that human platelet thromboxane A2 receptor occupation is closely linked to inositol phospholipid metabolism and to elevation of cytosolic free Ca2+. Both such events may be necessary for thromboxane A2-induced human platelet activation. PMID:6234886

  16. Sulfur and nitrogen mustards induce characteristic poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation responses in HaCaT keratinocytes with distinctive cellular consequences.

    PubMed

    Mangerich, Aswin; Debiak, Malgorzata; Birtel, Matthias; Ponath, Viviane; Balszuweit, Frank; Lex, Kirsten; Martello, Rita; Burckhardt-Boer, Waltraud; Strobelt, Romano; Siegert, Markus; Thiermann, Horst; Steinritz, Dirk; Schmidt, Annette; Bürkle, Alexander

    2016-02-26

    Mustard agents are potent DNA alkylating agents with mutagenic, cytotoxic and vesicant properties. They include bi-functional agents, such as sulfur mustard (SM) or nitrogen mustard (mustine, HN2), as well as mono-functional agents, such as "half mustard" (CEES). Whereas SM has been used as a chemical warfare agent, several nitrogen mustard derivatives, such as chlorambucil and cyclophosphamide, are being used as established chemotherapeutics. Upon induction of specific forms of genotoxic stimuli, several poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) synthesize the nucleic acid-like biopolymer poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) by using NAD(+) as a substrate. Previously, it was shown that SM triggers cellular poly(ADP-ribosyl) ation (PARylation), but so far this phenomenon is poorly characterized. In view of the protective effects of PARP inhibitors, the latter have been proposed as a treatment option of SM-exposed victims. In an accompanying article (Debiak et al., 2016), we have provided an optimized protocol for the analysis of the CEES-induced PARylation response in HaCaT keratinocytes, which forms an experimental basis to further analyze mustard-induced PARylation and its functional consequences, in general. Thus, in the present study, we performed a comprehensive characterization of the PARylation response in HaCaT cells after treatment with four different mustard agents, i.e., SM, CEES, HN2, and chlorambucil, on a qualitative, quantitative and functional level. In particular, we recorded substance-specific as well as dose- and time-dependent PARylation responses using independent bioanalytical methods based on single-cell immuno-fluorescence microscopy and quantitative isotope dilution mass spectrometry. Furthermore, we analyzed if and how PARylation contributes to mustard-induced toxicity by treating HaCaT cells with CEES, SM, and HN2 in combination with the clinically relevant PARP inhibitor ABT888. As evaluated by a novel immunofluorescence-based protocol for the detection of

  17. Platelet-Activating Factor Induces Epigenetic Modifications in Human Mast Cells.

    PubMed

    Damiani, Elisabetta; Puebla-Osorio, Nahum; Gorbea, Enrique; Ullrich, Stephen E

    2015-12-01

    UV radiation-induced systemic immune suppression is a major risk factor for skin cancer induction. The migration of dermal mast cells from the skin to the draining lymph nodes has a prominent role in activating systemic immune suppression. UV-induced keratinocyte-derived platelet-activating factor (PAF) activates mast cell migration, in part by upregulating the expression of CXCR4 on the surface of mast cells. Others have indicated that epigenetic mechanisms regulate CXCR4 expression; therefore, we asked whether PAF activates epigenetic mechanisms in mast cells. Human mast cells were treated with PAF, and the effect on DNA methylation and/or acetylation was measured. PAF suppressed the expression of DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) 1 and 3b. On the other hand, PAF increased p300 histone acetyltransferase expression, and the acetylation of histone H3, which coincided with a decreased expression of the histone deacetylase HDAC2. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that PAF treatment activated the acetylation of the CXCR4 promoter. Finally, inhibiting histone acetylation blocked p300 upregulation and suppressed PAF-induced surface expression of CXCR4. Our findings suggest a novel molecular mechanism for PAF, activation of epigenetic modifications. We suggest that PAF may serve as an endogenous molecular mediator that links the environment (UV radiation) with the epigenome. PMID:26316070

  18. Platelet-Activating Factor Induces Epigenetic Modifications in Human Mast Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gorbea, Enrique; Ullrich, Stephen E.

    2015-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation-induced systemic immune suppression is a major risk factor for skin cancer induction. The migration of dermal mast cells from the skin to the draining lymph nodes plays a prominent role in activating systemic immune suppression. UV-induced keratinocyte-derived platelet-activating factor (PAF) activates mast cell migration, in part by up regulating the expression of CXCR4 on the surface of mast cells. Others have indicated that epigenetic mechanisms regulate CXCR4 expression, so we asked whether PAF activates epigenetic mechanisms in mast cells. Human mast cells were treated with PAF and the effect on DNA methylation and/or acetylation was measured. PAF suppressed the expression of DNA methyltransferase (DNMT) 1 and 3b. On the other hand, PAF increased p300 histone acetyltransferase expression, and the acetylation of histone H3, which coincided with a decreased expression of the histone deacetylase HDAC2. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that PAF-treatment activated the acetylation of the CXCR4 promoter. Finally, inhibiting histone acetylation blocked p300 up-regulation and suppressed PAF-induced surface expression of CXCR4. Our findings suggest a novel molecular mechanism for PAF, activation of epigenetic modifications. We suggest that PAF may serve as an endogenous molecular mediator that links the environment (UV radiation) with the epigenome. PMID:26316070

  19. Differential changes in platelet reactivity induced by acute physical compared to persistent mental stress.

    PubMed

    Hüfner, Katharina; Koudouovoh-Tripp, Pia; Kandler, Christina; Hochstrasser, Tanja; Malik, Peter; Giesinger, Johannes; Semenitz, Barbara; Humpel, Christian; Sperner-Unterweger, Barbara

    2015-11-01

    Platelets are important in hemostasis, but also contain adhesion molecules, pro-inflammatory and immune-modulatory compounds, as well as most of the serotonin outside the central nervous system. Dysbalance in the serotonin pathways is involved in the pathogenesis of depressive symptoms. Thus, changes in platelet aggregation and content of bioactive compounds are of interest when investigating physiological stress-related mental processes as well as stress-related psychiatric diseases such as depression. In the present study, a characterization of platelet reactivity in acute physical and persistent mental stress was performed (aggregation, serotonin and serotonin 2A-receptor, P-selectin, CD40 ligand, matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 (MMP-2 and -9), platelet/endothelial adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), β-thromboglobulin (β-TG) and platelet factor 4 (PF-4). Acute physical stress increased platelet aggregability while leaving platelet content of bioactive compounds unchanged. Persistent mental stress led to changes in platelet content of bioactive compounds and serotonin 2A-receptor only. The values of most bioactive compounds correlated with each other. Acute physical and persistent mental stress influences platelets through distinct pathways, leading to differential changes in aggregability and content of bioactive compounds. PMID:26192713

  20. Natural and glucosyl flavonoids inhibit poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activity and induce synthetic lethality in BRCA mutant cells

    PubMed Central

    MAEDA, JUNKO; ROYBAL, ERICA J.; BRENTS, COLLEEN A.; UESAKA, MITSURU; AIZAWA, YASUSHI; KATO, TAKAMITSU A.

    2014-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors have been proven to represent superior clinical agents targeting DNA repair mechanisms in cancer therapy. We investigated PARP inhibitory effects of the natural and synthetic flavonoids (quercetin, rutin, monoglucosyl rutin and maltooligosyl rutin) and tested the synthetic lethality in BRCA2 mutated cells. In vitro ELISA assay suggested that the flavonoids have inhibitory effects on PARP activity, but glucosyl modifications reduced the inhibitory effect. Cytotoxicity tests of Chinese hamster cells defective in BRCA2 gene (V-C8) and its parental V79 cells showed BRCA2-dependent synthetic lethality when treated with the flavonoids. BRCA2 mutated cells were three times more sensitive to the flavonoids than the wild-type and gene complemented cells. Reduced toxicity was observed in a glucosyl modification-dependent manner. The present study provides support for the clinical use of new treatment drugs, and is the beginning of the potential application of flavonoids in cancer prevention and the periodic consumption of appropriate flavonoids to reduce cancer risk in individuals carrying a mutant allele of the BRCA2 gene. PMID:24317580

  1. The Ig-ITIM superfamily member PECAM-1 regulates the "outside-in" signaling properties of integrin alpha(IIb)beta3 in platelets.

    PubMed

    Wee, Janet L; Jackson, Denise E

    2005-12-01

    Previous studies have implicated the immunoglobulin (Ig)-immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM) superfamily member platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM-1) in the regulation of integrin function. While PECAM-1 has been demonstrated to play a role as an inhibitory coreceptor of immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif (ITAM)-associated Fcgamma receptor IIa (FcgammaRIIa) and glycoprotein VI (GPVI)/FcR gamma-chain signaling pathways in platelets, its physiologic role in integrin alpha(IIb)beta3-mediated platelet function is unclear. In this study, we investigate the functional importance of PECAM-1 in murine platelets. Using PECAM-1-deficient mice, we show that the platelets have impaired "outside-in" integrin alpha(IIb)beta3 signaling with impaired platelet spreading on fibrinogen, failure to retract fibrin clots in vitro, and reduced tyrosine phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase p125 (125FAK) following integrin alpha(IIb)beta3-mediated platelet aggregation. This functional integrin alpha(IIb)beta3 defect could not be attributed to altered expression of integrin alpha(IIb)beta3. PECAM-1-/- platelets displayed normal platelet alpha granule secretion, normal platelet aggregation to protease-activated receptor-4 (PAR-4), adenosine diphosphate (ADP), and calcium ionophore, and static platelet adhesion. In addition, PECAM-1-/- platelets displayed normal "inside-out" integrin alpha(IIb)beta3 signaling properties as demonstrated by normal agonist-induced binding of soluble fluoroscein isothiocyanate (FITC)-fibrinogen, JON/A antibody binding, and increases in cytosolic-free calcium and inositol (1,4,5)P3 triphosphate (IP3) levels. This study provides direct evidence that PECAM-1 is essential for normal integrin alpha(IIb)beta3-mediated platelet function and that disruption of PECAM-1 induced a moderate "outsidein" integrin alpha(IIb)beta3 signaling defect. PMID:16081692

  2. Cutting edge: Leukotriene C4 activates mouse platelets in plasma exclusively through the type 2 cysteinyl leukotriene receptor.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Hannah E; Liu, Tao; Feng, Chunli; Laidlaw, Tanya M; Conley, Pamela B; Kanaoka, Yoshihide; Boyce, Joshua A

    2013-12-15

    Leukotriene C4 (LTC4) and its extracellular metabolites, LTD4 and LTE4, mediate airway inflammation. They signal through three specific receptors (type 1 cys-LT receptor [CysLT1R], CysLT2R, and GPR99) with overlapping ligand preferences. In this article, we demonstrate that LTC4, but not LTD4 or LTE4, activates mouse platelets exclusively through CysLT2R. Platelets expressed CysLT1R and CysLT2R proteins. LTC4 induced surface expression of CD62P by wild-type mouse platelets in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and caused their secretion of thromboxane A2 and CXCL4. LTC4 was fully active on PRP from mice lacking either CysLT1R or GPR99, but completely inactive on PRP from CysLT2R-null (Cysltr2(-/-)) mice. LTC4/CysLT2R signaling required an autocrine ADP-mediated response through P2Y12 receptors. LTC4 potentiated airway inflammation in a platelet- and CysLT2R-dependent manner. Thus, CysLT2R on platelets recognizes LTC4 with unexpected selectivity. Nascent LTC4 may activate platelets at a synapse with granulocytes before it is converted to LTD4, promoting mediator generation and the formation of leukocyte-platelet complexes that facilitate inflammation. PMID:24244016

  3. In vivo effects of eltrombopag on platelet function in immune thrombocytopenia: no evidence of platelet activation

    PubMed Central

    Psaila, Bethan; Bussel, James B.; Linden, Matthew D.; Babula, Bracken; Li, Youfu; Barnard, Marc R.; Tate, Chinara; Mathur, Kanika; Frelinger, Andrew L.

    2012-01-01

    The effects of eltrombopag, a thrombopoietin-receptor agonist, on platelet function in immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) are not fully characterized. This study used whole blood flow cytometry to examine platelet function in 20 patients receiving eltrombopag treatment at days 0, 7, and 28. Platelet surface expression of activated GPIIb/IIIa, P-selectin, and GPIb was measured with and without low and high adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP) concentrations. Before eltrombopag treatment with no ex vivo agonist, platelet activation was higher in ITP patients than controls. Platelet GPIb and activated GPIIb/IIIa expression without added agonist was unchanged following eltrombopag treatment, whereas a slight increase in P-selectin was observed. Expression of P-selectin and activated GPIIb/IIIa in response to high-dose ADP was lower during eltrombopag treatment than at baseline. Eltrombopag led to a slight increase in platelet reactivity to TRAP only in responders to eltrombopag but not to levels above those in controls; whole blood experiments demonstrated that this increase was probably because of higher platelet counts rather than higher platelet reactivity. In conclusion, although thrombocytopenic ITP patients have higher baseline platelet activation than controls, eltrombopag did not cause platelet activation or hyper-reactivity, irrespective of whether the platelet count increased. PMID:22294727

  4. Magnetic-field-induced orientational order in the isotropic phase of hard colloidal platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Beek, D. van der; Petukhov, A.V.; Vroege, G.J.; Lekkerkerker, H.N.W.; Davidson, P.; Ferre, J.; Jamet, J.P.; Wensink, H.H.; Bras, W.

    2006-04-15

    The magnetic-field-induced orientational order in the isotropic phase of colloidal gibbsite [Al(OH){sub 3}] platelets is studied by means of optical birefringence and small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) techniques. The suspensions display field-induced ordering at moderate field strengths (a few Tesla), which increases with increasing particle concentration. The gibbsite particles align their normals perpendicular to the magnetic field and hence possess a negative anisotropy of their diamagnetic susceptibility {delta}{chi}. The results can be described following a simple, Onsager-like approach. A simplified model is derived that allows one to obtain the orientational distribution function directly from the scattering data. However, it leads to an underestimate of the diamagnetic susceptibility anisotropy {delta}{chi}. This accounts for the difference between the {delta}{chi} values provided by the two experimental techniques (SAXS and magneto-optics). The order of magnitude {delta}{chi}{approx}10{sup -22} J/T{sup 2} lies in between that of goethite suspensions and that of suspensions of organic particles.

  5. Investigating the fluid mechanics behind red blood cell-induced lateral platelet motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowl Erickson, Lindsay; Fogelson, Aaron

    2009-11-01

    Platelets play an essential role in blood clotting; they adhere to damaged tissue and release chemicals that activate other platelets. Yet in order to adhere, platelets must first come into contact with the injured vessel wall. Under arterial flow conditions, platelets have an enhanced concentration near blood vessel walls. This non-uniform cell distribution depends on the fluid dynamics of blood as a heterogeneous medium. We use a parallelized lattice Boltzmann-immersed boundary method to solve the flow dynamics of red cells and platelets in a periodic 2D vessel with no-slip boundary conditions. Red cells are treated as biconcave immersed boundary objects with isotropic Skalak membrane tension and an internal viscosity five times that of the surrounding plasma. Using this method we analyze the influence of shear rate, hematocrit, and red cell membrane properties on lateral platelet motion. We find that the effective diffusion of platelets is significantly lower near the vessel wall compared to the center of the vessel. Insight gained from this work could lead to significant improvements to current models for platelet adhesion where the presence of red blood cells is neglected due to computational intensity.

  6. Lectin-induced activation of platelets may require only limited phosphorylation of the 47K protein

    SciTech Connect

    Ganguly, C.; Chelladurai, M.; Ganguly, P.

    1986-05-01

    Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) is an N-acetylglucosamine (Glc-NAc) specific lectin which can activate platelets. Like thrombin, stimulation of platelets by WGA is accompanied by enhanced phosphorylation of two polypeptides of M/sub r/ 47K and 20K. Addition of GlcNAc at different time intervals arrested that aggregation of platelets by WGA and paralleled the modification of phosphorylation of the 47K polypeptide. So, the phosphorylation of the 47K polypeptide may regulate the WGA-receptor mediated stimulation of platelets. However, the ratio of phosphoserine to phosphothreonine in the 47K protein was markedly different in WGA-activated than thrombin-stimulated platelets. Thus, the molecular mechanism of action of thrombin and WGA could be different. To explore this idea, /sup 32/P/sub i/-labeled platelets were stimulated with WGA and the activation arrested with N-acetyl-glucosamine at different times. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of total protein at 5s showed only two phosphorylated species of 47K protein. At 60s, maximally four phosphorylated species were noted. In contrast, with thrombin using the same technique, seven to nine phosphorylated components have been reported. These results suggest that the different activators of platelets may act by different mechanisms. In addition, activation of platelets may require only limited levels of phosphorylation of the 47K polypeptide.

  7. Platelet preservation: agitation and containers.

    PubMed

    van der Meer, Pieter F; de Korte, Dirk

    2011-06-01

    For platelets to maintain their in vitro quality and in vivo effectiveness, they need to be stored at room temperature with gentle agitation in gas-permeable containers. The mode of agitation affects the quality of the platelets, and a gentle method of agitation, either a circular or a flat bed movement, provides the best results. Tumblers or elliptical agitators induce platelet activation and subsequent damage. As long as the platelets remain in suspension, the agitation speed is not important. Agitation of the platelet concentrates ensures that the platelets are continuously oxygenated, that sufficient oxygen can enter the storage container and that excess carbon dioxide can be expelled. During transportation of platelet concentrates, nowadays over long distances where they are held without controlled agitation, platelets may tolerate a certain period without agitation. However, evidence is accumulating that during the time without agitation, local hypoxia surrounding the platelets may induce irreversible harm to the platelets. Over the decades, more gas-permeable plastics have been used to manufacture platelet containers. The use of different plastics and their influence on the platelet quality both in vitro and in vivo is discussed. The improved gas-permeability has allowed the extension of platelet storage from 3 days in the early 1980s, to currently at least 7 days. In the light of new developments, particularly the introduction of pathogen reduction techniques, the use of platelet additive solutions and the availability of improved automated separators, further (renewed) research in this area is warranted. PMID:21514232

  8. CdTe quantum dots induce activation of human platelets: implications for nanoparticle hemocompatibility

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, Stephen P; Santos-Martinez, Maria J; Medina, Carlos; Jain, Namrata; Radomski, Marek W; Prina-Mello, Adriele; Volkov, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    New nanomaterials intended for systemic administration have raised concerns regarding their biocompatibility and hemocompatibility. Quantum dots (QD) nanoparticles have been used for diagnostics, and recent work suggests their use for in vivo molecular and cellular imaging. However, the hemocompatibility of QDs and their constituent components has not been fully elucidated. In the present study, comprehensive investigation of QD–platelet interactions is presented. These interactions were shown using transmission electron microscopy. The effects of QDs on platelet function were investigated using light aggregometry, quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation, flow cytometry, and gelatin zymography. Platelet morphology was also analyzed by phase-contrast, immunofluorescence, atomic-force and transmission electron microscopy. We show that the QDs bind to platelet plasma membrane with the resultant upregulation of glycoprotein IIb/IIIa and P-selectin receptors, and release of matrix metalloproteinase-2. These findings unravel for the first time the mechanism of functional response of platelets to ultrasmall QDs in vitro. PMID:25897218

  9. Binding of /sup 125/I-labeled endotoxin to bovine, canine, and equine platelets and endotoxin-induced agglutination of canine platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Meyers, K.M.; Boehme, M.; Inbar, O.

    1982-10-01

    Endotoxin from Escherichia coli O127:B8, Salmonella abortus-equi and S minnesota induced clumping of some canine platelets (PLT) at a final endotoxin concentration of 1 microgram/ml. Endotoxin-induced clumping of canine PLT was independent of PLT energy-requiring processes, because clumping was observed with canine PLT incubated with 2-deoxy-D-glucose and antimycin A. The PLT responded to adenosine diphosphate before, but not after, incubation with the metabolic inhibitors. Endotoxin induced a slight and inconsistant clumping of bovine and equine PLT at high (mg/ml) endotoxin concentration. High-affinity binding sites could not be demonstrated on canine, bovine, and equine PLT, using /sup 125/I-labeled E coli O127:B8 endotoxin. Nonspecific binding was observed and appeared to be due primarily to an extraneous coat on the PLT surface that was removed by gel filtration. The endotoxin that was bound to PLT did not appear to modify PLT function. An attempt to identify plasma proteins that bound physiologically relevant amounts of endotoxin was not successful. The significance of the endotoxin-induced clumping or lack of it on the pathophysiology of endotoxemia is discussed.

  10. Inhibition of collagen, and thrombin-induced platelet aggregation by Lansberg's hognose pit viper (Porthidium lansbergii hutmanni) venom.

    PubMed

    López-Johnston, Juan C; de Bosch, Norma; Scannone, Héctor; Rodríguez-Acosta, Alexis

    2007-12-01

    The Porthidium genus is represented by the P. lansbergii rozei and P. lansbergii hutmanni (Plh) subspecies in Venezuela. The venom components of these have been little studied, probably due to the low incidence of reported accidents, although acute and serious local effects such as invasive edema and disseminated ecchymosis are present during human envenonation. The aim of this work was to characterize the in vitro effects of crude P. l. hutmanni venom, and its fractions, on platelet aggregation triggered by two physiologic agonists: thrombin and collagen. The effects of thrombin and collagen were observed on a platelet-rich plasma (PRP) solution (3 x 10(5) platelets/microL) using serial dilutions of P. l. hutmanni venom (0.625-40 microg). The crude venom was fractionated by anionic exchange chromatography and two peaks obtained. Crude venom and both fractions were highly inhibitory on platelet aggregation mediated by the two agonists. The anti-aggregating dose (AD(50)) for both agonists was determined. PRP collagen-triggered aggregation was most inhibited by the crude venom (AD(50) = 0.67 microg) when compared with PRP thrombin-triggered aggregation (AD(50) = 4.92 microg). Collagen-induced aggregation was more intensely inhibited by venom than thrombin-induced aggregation. In conclusion, to specify the inhibition mechanisms involved for each of the active components in the venom from these subspecies, we must characterize and purify the inhibitors of aggregation from P. l. hutmanni venom, with the purpose of suggesting new pharmacological substances to be incorporated into the therapeutic arsenal to treat hemostatic pathologies related to high levels of platelet aggregation. PMID:17486300

  11. Water-soluble jack-knife prawn extract inhibits 5-hydroxytryptamine-induced vasoconstriction and platelet aggregation in humans.

    PubMed

    Gamoh, Shuji; Kanai, Tasuku; Tanaka-Totoribe, Naoko; Ohkura, Masamichi; Kuwabara, Masachika; Nakamura, Eisaku; Yokota, Atsuko; Yamasaki, Tetsuo; Watanabe, Akiko; Hayashi, Masahiro; Fujimoto, Shouichi; Yamamoto, Ryuichi

    2015-02-01

    Coronary artery spasm plays an important role in the pathogenesis of various ischemic heart diseases or serious arrhythmia. The aim of this study is to look for functional foods which have physiologically active substances preventing 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)-related vasospastic diseases including peri- and postoperative ischemic complications of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG) from ocean resources in Japanese coastal waters. First, we evaluated the effect of water-soluble ocean resource extracts on the response to 5-HT in HEK293 cells which have forcibly expressed cyan fluorescent protein-fused 5-HT2A receptors (5-HT2A-CFP). Among 5 different water-soluble extracts of ocean resources, the crude water-soluble jack-knife prawn extract (WJPE) significantly reduced maximal Ca(2+) influx induced by 0.1 μM 5-HT in a concentration-dependent manner. The Crude WJPE significantly inhibited, in a concentration-dependent manner, 5-HT-induced constriction of human saphenous vein. 5-HT released from activated platelets plays a crucial roles in the constriction of coronary artery. Next the WJPE was purified for applying the experiment of 5-HT-induced human platelet aggregation. The purified WJPE significantly inhibited 5-HT-induced human platelet aggregation also in a concentration-dependent manner. Based on our findings, jack-knife prawn could be one of a functional food with health-promoting benefits for most people with vasospastic diseases including patients who have gone CABG. PMID:25464143

  12. [Anti-platelet actions of salicylates: in vivo, ex vivo and in vitro effects of choline salicylate].

    PubMed

    Irino, O; Saitoh, K; Ohkubo, K

    1985-07-01

    Effects of choline salicylate, sodium salicylate, choline chloride and acetylsalicylic acid on platelet aggregation in vivo, ex vivo and in vitro in mice were studied. These drugs all inhibited adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-induced respiratory depression, which is closely related to platelet aggregation in vivo, with choline salicylate showing the strongest inhibitory effect. Choline salicylate had a tendency to reduce the mortality of animals injected intravenously with endotoxin, but the other drugs had no such effect. The inhibitory effects of these drugs on ADP-induced platelet aggregation ex vivo were in the order of choline salicylate greater than acetylsalicylic acid congruent to sodium salicylate greater than choline chloride congruent to no effect, and plasma concentrations of protein-unbound salicylic acid at 1 hr after oral administration of drugs were in the order of choline salicylate greater than acetylsalicylic acid congruent to sodium salicylate. The in vitro effects of these drugs were in the order of choline salicylate congruent to sodium salicylate greater than choline chloride congruent to acetylsalicylic acid congruent to no effect. Therefore, it was considered that salicylic acid played an important role on the in vivo, ex vivo and in vitro effects of choline salicylate and that choline increased plasma concentrations of salicylic acid and consequently enhanced the in vivo and ex vivo effects of salicylic acid. Furthermore, the ex vivo effects of choline salicylate were found when ADP-induced platelet aggregation was measured with platelet-rich plasma prepared from blood collected with heparin as anti-coagulant, but not when blood was collected with citrate.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:4043866

  13. Activation and shedding of platelet glycoprotein IIb/IIIa under non-physiological shear stress.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zengsheng; Mondal, Nandan K; Ding, Jun; Koenig, Steven C; Slaughter, Mark S; Griffith, Bartley P; Wu, Zhongjun J

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of non-physiological high shear stress on activation and shedding of platelet GP IIb/IIIa receptors. The healthy donor blood was exposed to three levels of high shear stresses (25, 75, 125 Pa) from the physiological to non-physiological status with three short exposure time (0.05, 0.5, 1.5 s), created by a specific blood shearing system. The activation and shedding of the platelet GPIIb/IIIa were analyzed using flow cytometry and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. In addition, platelet P-selectin expression of sheared blood, which is a marker for activated platelets, was also analyzed. The results from the present study showed that the number of activated platelets, as indicated by the surface GPIIb/IIIa activation and P-selectin expression, increased with increasing the shear stress level and exposure time. However, the mean fluorescence of GPIIb/IIIa on the platelet surface, decreased with increasing the shear stress level and exposure time. The reduction of GPIIb/IIIa on the platelet surface was further proved by the reduction of further activated platelet GPIIb/IIIa surface expression induced by ADP and the increase in GPIIb/IIIa concentration in microparticle-free plasma with increasing the applied shear stress and exposure time. It is clear that non-physiological shear stress induce a paradoxical phenomenon, in which both activation and shedding of the GPIIb/IIIa on the platelet surface occur simultaneously. This study may offer a new perspective to explain the reason of both increased thrombosis and bleeding events in patients implanted with high shear blood-contacting medical devices. PMID:26160282

  14. Hydroxyurea-induced replication stress causes poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-2 accumulation and changes its intranuclear location in root meristems of Vicia faba.

    PubMed

    Rybaczek, Dorota

    2016-07-01

    Replication stress induced by 24 and 48h exposure to 2.5mM hydroxyurea (HU) increased the activity of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-2 (PARP-2; EC 2.4.2.30) in root meristem cells of Vicia faba. An increase in the number of PARP-2 foci was accompanied by their delocalization from peripheral areas to the interior of the nucleus. Our results indicate that the increase in PARP-2 was connected with an increase in S139-phosphorylated H2AX histones. The findings suggest the possible role of PARP-2 in replication stress. We also confirm that the intranuclear location of PARP-2 depends on the duration of HU-induced replication stress, confirming the role of PARP-2 as an indicator of stress intensity. Finally, we conclude that the more intense the HU-mediated replication stress, the greater the probability of PARP-2 activation or H2AXS139 phosphorylation, but also the greater the chance of increasing the efficiency of repair processes and a return to normal cell cycle progression. PMID:27155387

  15. Dietary Supplementation of Ginger and Turmeric Rhizomes Modulates Platelets Ectonucleotidase and Adenosine Deaminase Activities in Normotensive and Hypertensive Rats.

    PubMed

    Akinyemi, Ayodele Jacob; Thomé, Gustavo Roberto; Morsch, Vera Maria; Bottari, Nathieli B; Baldissarelli, Jucimara; de Oliveira, Lizielle Souza; Goularte, Jeferson Ferraz; Belló-Klein, Adriane; Oboh, Ganiyu; Schetinger, Maria Rosa Chitolina

    2016-07-01

    Hypertension is associated with platelet alterations that could contribute to the development of cardiovascular complications. Several studies have reported antiplatelet aggregation properties of ginger (Zingiber officinale) and turmeric (Curcuma longa) with limited scientific basis. Hence, this study assessed the effect of dietary supplementation of these rhizomes on platelet ectonucleotidase and adenosine deaminase (ADA) activities in Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester hydrochloride (l-NAME) induced hypertensive rats. Animals were divided into seven groups (n = 10): normotensive control rats; induced (l-NAME hypertensive) rats; hypertensive rats treated with atenolol (10 mg/kg/day); normotensive and hypertensive rats treated with 4% supplementation of turmeric or ginger, respectively. After 14 days of pre-treatment, the animals were induced with hypertension by oral administration of l-NAME (40 mg/kg/day). The results revealed a significant (p < 0.05) increase in platelet ADA activity and ATP hydrolysis with a concomitant decrease in ADP and AMP hydrolysis of l-NAME hypertensive rats when compared with the control. However, dietary supplementation with turmeric or ginger efficiently prevented these alterations by modulating the hydrolysis of ATP, ADP and AMP with a concomitant decrease in ADA activity. Thus, these activities could suggest some possible mechanism of the rhizomes against hypertension-derived complications associated to platelet hyperactivity. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27151061

  16. Nitric oxide modulates lipopolysaccharide-induced endothelial platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule expression via interleukin-10.

    PubMed

    Hebeda, C B; Teixeira, S A; Tamura, E K; Muscará, M N; de Mello, S B V; Markus, R P; Farsky, S H P

    2011-08-01

    We have shown previously that nitric oxide (NO) controls platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM-1) expression on both neutrophils and endothelial cells under physiological conditions. Here, the molecular mechanism by which NO regulates lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endothelial PECAM-1 expression and the role of interleukin (IL)-10 on this control was investigated. For this purpose, N-(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 20 mg/kg/day for 14 days dissolved in drinking water) was used to inhibit both constitutive (cNOS) and inducible nitric oxide (iNOS) synthase activities in LPS-stimulated Wistar rats (5 mg/kg, intraperitoneally). This treatment resulted in reduced levels of serum NO. Under this condition, circulating levels of IL-10 was enhanced, secreted mainly by circulating lymphocytes, dependent on transcriptional activation, and endothelial PECAM-1 expression was reduced independently on reduced gene synthesis. The connection between NO, IL-10 and PECAM-1 expression was examined by incubating LPS-stimulated (1 µg/ml) cultured endothelial cells obtained from naive rats with supernatant of LPS-stimulated lymphocytes, which were obtained from blood of control or L-NAME-treated rats. Supernatant of LPS-stimulated lymphocytes obtained from L-NAME-treated rats, which contained higher levels of IL-10, reduced LPS-induced PECAM-1 expression by endothelial cells, and this reduction was reversed by adding the anti-IL-10 monoclonal antibody. Therefore, an association between NO, IL-10 and PECAM-1 was found and may represent a novel mechanism by which NO controls endothelial cell functions. PMID:21564091

  17. Demonstration of a specific C3a receptor on guinea pig platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuoka, Y.; Hugli, T.E.

    1988-05-15

    Guinea pig platelets reportedly contain receptors specific for the anaphylatoxin C3a based on both ligand-binding studies and functional responses. A portion of the human 125I-C3a that binds to guinea pig platelets is competitively displaced by excess unlabeled C3a; however, the majority of ligand uptake was nonspecific. Uptake of 125I-C3a by guinea pig platelets is maximal in 1 min, and stimulation of guinea pig platelets by thrombin, ADP, or the Ca2+ ionophore A23187 showed little influence on binding of the ligand. Scatchard analysis indicated that approximately 1200 binding sites for C3a exist per cell with an estimated Kd of 8 x 10(-10) M. Human C3a des Arg also binds to guinea pig platelets, but Scatchard analysis indicated that no specific binding occurred. Because the ligand-binding studies were complicated by high levels of nonspecific uptake, we attempted to chemically cross-link the C3a molecule to a specific component on the platelet surface. Cross-linkage of 125I-C3a to guinea pig platelets with bis(sulfosuccinimidyl)suberate revealed radioactive complexes at 105,000 and 115,000 m.w. on SDS-PAGE gels by autoradiographic analysis. In the presence of excess unlabeled C3a, complex formation was inhibited. No cross-linkage could be demonstrated between the inactive 125I-C3a des Arg and the putative C3a-R on guinea pig platelets. Human C3a, but not C3a des Arg induces serotonin release and aggregation of the guinea pig platelets. Human C3a was unable to induce either serotonin release or promote aggregation of human platelets. Uptake of human 125I-C3a by human platelets was not saturable, and Scatchard analysis was inconclusive. Attempts to cross-link 125I-C3a to components on the surface of human platelets also failed to reveal a ligand-receptor complex. Therefore, we conclude that guinea pig platelets have specific surface receptors to C3a and that human platelets appear devoid of receptors to the anaphylatoxin.

  18. Distinct roles for protein kinase C isoforms in regulating platelet purinergic receptor function.

    PubMed

    Mundell, Stuart J; Jones, Matthew L; Hardy, Adam R; Barton, Johanna F; Beaucourt, Stephanie M; Conley, Pamela B; Poole, Alastair W

    2006-09-01

    ADP is a critical regulator of platelet activation, mediating its actions through two G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), P2Y1 and P2Y12. We have shown previously that the receptors are functionally desensitized, in a homologous manner, by distinct kinase-dependent mechanisms in which P2Y1 is regulated by protein kinase C (PKC) and P2Y12 by G protein-coupled receptor kinases. In this study, we addressed whether different PKC isoforms play different roles in regulating the trafficking and activity of these two GPCRs. Expression of PKCalpha and PKCdelta dominant-negative mutants in 1321N1 cells revealed that both isoforms regulated P2Y1 receptor signaling and trafficking, although only PKCdelta was capable of regulating P2Y12, in experiments in which PKC was directly activated by the phorbol ester phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). These results were paralleled in human platelets, in which PMA reduced subsequent ADP-induced P2Y1 and P2Y12 receptor signaling. PKC isoform-selective inhibitors revealed that novel, but not conventional, isoforms of PKC regulate P2Y12 function, whereas both novel and classic isoforms regulate P2Y1 activity. It is also noteworthy that we studied receptor internalization in platelets by a radioligand binding approach showing that both receptors internalize rapidly in these cells. ADP-induced P2Y1 receptor internalization is attenuated by PKC inhibitors, whereas that of the P2Y12 receptor is unaffected. Both P2Y1 and P2Y12 receptors can also undergo PMA-stimulated internalization, and here again, novel but not classic PKCs regulate P2Y12, whereas both novel and classic isoforms regulate P2Y1 internalization. This study therefore is the first to reveal distinct roles for PKC isoforms in the regulation of platelet P2Y receptor function and trafficking. PMID:16804093

  19. Trivalent methylated arsenical-induced phosphatidylserine exposure and apoptosis in platelets may lead to increased thrombus formation

    SciTech Connect

    Bae, Ok-Nam; Lim, Kyung-Min; Chung, Jin-Ho

    2009-09-01

    Trivalent methylated metabolites of arsenic, monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}) and dimethylarsinous acid (DMA{sup III}), have been found highly reactive and toxic in various cells and in vivo animal models, suggesting their roles in the arsenic-associated toxicity. However, their effects on cardiovascular system including blood cells, one of the most important targets for arsenic toxicity, remain poorly understood. Here we found that MMA{sup III} and DMA{sup III} could induce procoagulant activity and apoptosis in platelets, which play key roles in the development of various cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) through excessive thrombus formation. In freshly isolated human platelets, treatment of MMA{sup III} resulted in phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure, a hallmark of procoagulant activation, accompanied by distinctive apoptotic features including mitochondrial membrane potential disruption, cytochrome c release, and caspase-3 activation. These procoagulant activation and apoptotic features were found to be mediated by the depletion of protein thiol and intracellular ATP, and flippase inhibition by MMA{sup III}, while the intracellular calcium increase or reactive oxygen species generation was not involved. Importantly, increased platelet procoagulant activity by MMA{sup III} resulted in enhanced blood coagulation and excessive thrombus formation in a rat in vivo venous thrombosis model. DMA{sup III} also induced PS-exposure with apoptotic features mediated by protein thiol depletion, which resulted in enhanced thrombin generation. In summary, we believe that this study provides an important evidence for the role of trivalent methylated arsenic metabolites in arsenic-associated CVDs, giving a novel insight into the role of platelet apoptosis in toxicant-induced cardiovascular toxicity.

  20. CV-6209, a highly potent antagonist of platelet activating factor in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Terashita, Z; Imura, Y; Takatani, M; Tsushima, S; Nishikawa, K

    1987-07-01

    2-[N-acetyl-N-(2-methoxy-3-octadecylcarbamoyloxypropoxycarbonyl) aminomethyl]-1-ethylpyridinium chloride (CV-6209) inhibited aggregation of rabbit and human platelets induced by platelet activating factor (PAF) with the IC50 values of 7.5 X 10(-8) and 1.7 X 10(-7) M, respectively, and had little effects on the aggregation induced by arachidonic acid, ADP and collagen. The inhibitory effect of CV-6209 on the PAF-induced rabbit platelet aggregation was 104, 9, 8 and 3 times more potent than the PAF antagonists CV-3988, ONO-6240, Ginkgolide B and etizolam, respectively. CV-6209 inhibited [3H]serotonin release from rabbit platelets stimulated with PAF (3 X 10(-8) M) with a similar potency as the inhibition on the platelet aggregation. CV-6209 inhibited PAF (0.3 microgram/kg i.v.)-induced hypotension in rats (ED50, 0.009 mg/kg i.v.) with no effect on the hypotension induced by arachidonic acid, histamine, bradykinin and isoproterenol. CV-6209 (1 mg/kg) inhibited slightly the acetylcholine-induced hypotension. In rats, post-treatment with CV-6209 reversed the PAF (1 microgram/kg i.v.)-induced hypotension rapidly (ED50, 0.0046 mg/kg i.v.); CV-6209 was 74, 20, 185 and over 2100 times more potent than CV-3988, ONO-6240, Ginkgolide B and etizolam, respectively. Thus, the relative potency of the anti-PAF action of PAF analog (CV-6209, CV-3988 and ONO-6240) differed little between the inhibition of PAF-induced platelet aggregation and the reversal of PAF-induced hypotension, but that of nonPAF analogs (Ginkgolide B and etizolam) differed greatly with these assay systems, when standardized with CV-6209.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:3612533

  1. Traumatic brain injury causes platelet adenosine diphosphate and arachidonic acid receptor inhibition independent of hemorrhagic shock in humans and rats

    PubMed Central

    Castellino, Francis J.; Chapman, Michael P.; Donahue, Deborah L.; Thomas, Scott; Moore, Ernest E.; Wohlauer, Max V.; Fritz, Braxton; Yount, Robert; Ploplis, Victoria; Davis, Patrick; Evans, Edward; Walsh, Mark

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Coagulopathy in traumatic brain injury (CTBI) is a well-established phenomenon, but its mechanism is poorly understood. Various studies implicate protein C activation related to the global insult of hemorrhagic shock or brain tissue factor release with resultant platelet dysfunction and depletion of coagulation factors. We hypothesized that the platelet dysfunction of CTBI is a distinct phenomenon from the coagulopathy following hemorrhagic shock. METHODS We used thrombelastography with platelet mapping as a measure of platelet function, assessing the degree of inhibition of the adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and arachidonic acid (AA) receptor pathways. First, we studied the early effect of TBI on platelet inhibition by performing thrombelastography with platelet mapping on rats. We then conducted an analysis of admission blood samples from trauma patients with isolated head injury (n = 70). Patients in shock or on clopidogrel or aspirin were excluded. RESULTS In rats, ADP receptor inhibition at 15 minutes after injury was 77.6% ± 6.7% versus 39.0% ± 5.3% for controls (p < 0.0001). Humans with severe TBI (Glasgow Coma Scale [GCS] score ≤ 8) showed an increase in ADP receptor inhibition at 93.1% (interquartile range [IQR], 44.8–98.3%; n = 29) compared with 56.5% (IQR, 35–79.1%; n = 41) in milder TBI and 15.5% (IQR, 13.2–29.1%) in controls (p = 0.0014 and p < 0.0001, respectively). No patient had significant hypotension or acidosis. Parallel trends were noted in AA receptor inhibition. CONCLUSION Platelet ADP and AA receptor inhibition is a prominent early feature of CTBI in humans and rats and is linked to the severity of brain injury in patients with isolated head trauma. This phenomenon is observed in the absence of hemorrhagic shock or multisystem injury. Thus, TBI alone is shown to be sufficient to induce a profound platelet dysfunction. (J Trauma Acute Care Surg. 2014;76: 1169–1176. PMID:24747445

  2. ADP's ABCs of Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinstein, Margery

    2010-01-01

    When a company's core competence is processing data, it is sometimes easy to lose sight of the obvious--the information right under its nose. In the case of Automatic Data Processing, Inc. (ADP), a business outsourcing company specializing in human resources, payroll, tax, and benefits administrations solutions, that is not a problem. Through…

  3. Applications of ultraviolet light in the preparation of platelet concentrates

    SciTech Connect

    Pamphilon, D.H.; Corbin, S.A.; Saunders, J.; Tandy, N.P.

    1989-06-01

    Passenger lymphocytes in platelet concentrates (PCs) may induce the formation of lymphocytotoxic antibodies (LCTAbs) and subsequent refractoriness to platelet transfusions. Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation can prevent lymphocytes' acting as stimulator or responder cells in mixed-lymphocyte reactions (MLRs) and could theoretically prevent LCTAb formation in vivo. A system has been devised for the delivery of UV irradiation to PCs; platelet storage characteristics and MLRs were evaluated in UV-irradiated PCs harvested from healthy donors with the Haemonetics V50 and PCS cell separators. MLR and response to phytohemagglutinin stimulation were abolished by a dose of 3000 joules per m2 at a mean wavelength of 310 nm. Platelet aggregatory responses to adenosine diphosphate (ADP), ristocetin, collagen and epinephrine, hypotonic shock response, and pH showed no important differences when control PCs and PCs irradiated as above were compared during 5 days of storage in Fenwal PL-1240 packs. Lactate production during storage was significantly higher in UV-treated PCs (p less than 0.001), but values did not exceed 20 mmol per L. UV transmission at 310 nm in standard blood product containers, including the Fenwal PL-146, PL-1240, and PL-732, was low (less than 30%), but it was acceptable in the Delmed Cryostorage and DuPont SteriCell packs (greater than 50%). UV irradiation may provide a simple and inexpensive means of producing nonimmunogenic PCs.

  4. Some interactions between human platelets and glass: von Willebrand's disease compared with normal.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, J R; Heywood, J B

    1967-01-01

    If native or heparinized blood is passed slowly through a column of glass beads at room temperature, the number of platelets removed from the initial drop emerging from the column is less than that removed from the final drop. At 4 degrees C. this difference disappears. If the blood is passed rapidly through such columns at room temperature fewer platelets are removed, but the initial-final difference persists. Von Willebrand's platelets are removed normally at slow speeds; at fast speeds abnormally few platelets are removed. Platelets emerging from all such columns are in aggregates. On adding glass beads to normal heparinized plasma, the platelets at once become more rounded and after about 50 seconds' delay they aggregate: the delay and rate of aggregation can be quantitated. Aggregation occurs best at 20 to 30 degrees C. and is not inhibited by the addition of some enzyme inhibitors. In von Willebrand's disease all these glass-induced aggregation phenomena occur normally and aggregation in response to adenosine diphosphate (ADP), serotonin creatinine sulphate (5-HT), adrenaline, collagen, and glass is also normal. PMID:5297360

  5. Ibrutinib synergizes with poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase inhibitors to induce cell death in AML cells via a BTK-independent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Rotin, Lianne E.; Gronda, Marcela; MacLean, Neil; Hurren, Rose; Wang, XiaoMing; Lin, Feng-Hsu; Wrana, Jeff; Datti, Alessandro; Barber, Dwayne L.; Minden, Mark D.; Slassi, Malik; Schimmer, Aaron D.

    2016-01-01

    Targeting Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) with the small molecule BTK inhibitor ibrutinib has significantly improved patient outcomes in several B-cell malignancies, with minimal toxicity. Given the reported expression and constitutive activation of BTK in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells, there has been recent interest in investigating the anti-AML activity of ibrutinib. We noted that ibrutinib had limited single-agent toxicity in a panel of AML cell lines and primary AML samples, and therefore sought to identify ibrutinib-sensitizing drugs. Using a high-throughput combination chemical screen, we identified that the poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) inhibitor ethacridine lactate synergized with ibrutinib in TEX and OCI-AML2 leukemia cell lines. The combination of ibrutinib and ethacridine induced a synergistic increase in reactive oxygen species that was functionally important to explain the observed cell death. Interestingly, synergistic cytotoxicity of ibrutinib and ethacridine was independent of the inhibitory effect of ibrutinib against BTK, as knockdown of BTK did not sensitize TEX and OCI-AML2 cells to ethacridine treatment. Thus, our findings indicate that ibrutinib may have a BTK-independent role in AML and that PARG inhibitors may have utility as part of a combination therapy for this disease. PMID:26624983

  6. Ibrutinib synergizes with poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase inhibitors to induce cell death in AML cells via a BTK-independent mechanism.

    PubMed

    Rotin, Lianne E; Gronda, Marcela; MacLean, Neil; Hurren, Rose; Wang, XiaoMing; Lin, Feng-Hsu; Wrana, Jeff; Datti, Alessandro; Barber, Dwayne L; Minden, Mark D; Slassi, Malik; Schimmer, Aaron D

    2016-01-19

    Targeting Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) with the small molecule BTK inhibitor ibrutinib has significantly improved patient outcomes in several B-cell malignancies, with minimal toxicity. Given the reported expression and constitutive activation of BTK in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells, there has been recent interest in investigating the anti-AML activity of ibrutinib. We noted that ibrutinib had limited single-agent toxicity in a panel of AML cell lines and primary AML samples, and therefore sought to identify ibrutinib-sensitizing drugs. Using a high-throughput combination chemical screen, we identified that the poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) inhibitor ethacridine lactate synergized with ibrutinib in TEX and OCI-AML2 leukemia cell lines. The combination of ibrutinib and ethacridine induced a synergistic increase in reactive oxygen species that was functionally important to explain the observed cell death. Interestingly, synergistic cytotoxicity of ibrutinib and ethacridine was independent of the inhibitory effect of ibrutinib against BTK, as knockdown of BTK did not sensitize TEX and OCI-AML2 cells to ethacridine treatment. Thus, our findings indicate that ibrutinib may have a BTK-independent role in AML and that PARG inhibitors may have utility as part of a combination therapy for this disease. PMID:26624983

  7. The effects of the oral administration of fish oil concentrate on the release and the metabolism of (/sup 14/C)arachidonic acid and (/sup 14/C)eicosapentaenoic acid by human platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Hirai, A.; Terano, T.; Hamazaki, T.; Sajiki, J.; Kondo, S.; Ozawa, A.; Fujita, T.; Miyamoto, T.; Tamura, Y.; Kumagai, A.

    1982-11-01

    It has been suggested by several investigators that eicosapentaenoic acid (C20:5 omega 3, EPA) might have anti-thrombotic effects. In this experiment, the effect of the oral administration of EPA rich fish oil concentrate on platelet aggregation and the release and the metabolism of (/sup 1 -14/C)arachidonic acid and ((U)-/sup 14/C)eicosapentaenoic acid by human platelets was studied. Eight healthy male subjects ingested 18 capsules of fish oil concentrate (EPA 1.4 g) per day for 4 weeks. Plasma and platelet concentrations of EPA markedly increased, while those of arachidonic acid (C20:4 omega 6, AA) and docosahexaenoic acid (C22:6 omega 3, DHA) did not change. Platelet aggregation induced by collagen and ADP was reduced. Collagen induced (/sup 14/C)thromboxane B2 (TXB2) formation from (/sup 14/C)AA prelabeled platelets decreased. There was no detectable formation of (/sup 14/C)TXB3 from (/sup 14/C)EPA prelabeled platelets, and the conversion of exogenous (/sup 14/C)EPA to (/sup 14/C)TXB3 was lower than that of (/sup 14/C)AA to (/sup 14/C)TXB2. The release of (/sup 14/C)AA from (/sup 14/C)AA prelabeled platelets by collagen was significantly decreased. These observations raise the possibility that the release of arachidonic acid from platelet lipids might be affected by the alteration of EPA content in platelets.

  8. Aspirin sensitivity of platelet aggregation in diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Albert, Stewart G; Hasnain, Bibi I; Ritter, Detlef G; Joist, J Heinrich; Mooradian, Arshag D

    2005-11-01

    Although aspirin is cardioprotective in high-risk populations, many with diabetes mellitus (DM) are unresponsive to these benefits. We questioned whether cardiovascular unresponsiveness might be demonstrated by lack of aspirin sensitivity to in vitro platelet functions especially in subjects with poorly controlled diabetes. Six women and 4 men (48+/-8 years [mean+/-S.D.]), selected for poor control (glycohemoglobin 11.9+/-2.2%) and 10 sex-age (+/-5 years) matched controls received 81 mg aspirin daily. There was a 2-week washout from aspirin and related drugs. After the aspirin dose on day-7, blood for platelet aggregation assays, and 24-h urine for 2,3 dinor thromboxane B2 (TxB2) and 2,3 dinor 6-keto (PGF1alpha) were obtained. Aspirin sensitivity was defined as inhibition (i.e., lower than expected) platelet aggregation after exposure to an agonist. Those with diabetes and controls were sensitive to aspirin inhibition of platelet aggregation induced by 1.6 mM arachidonic acid (9.5+/-3.9% versus 9.1+/-3.1%, normal range 40-100%) and by 0.83 microg/mL collagen (17.4+/-13.9% versus 13.2+/-9.3%, normal range 60-93%), respectively. Aspirin sensitivity to 2 microM ADP was present in five with diabetes and five controls. Urinary prostaglandin metabolites were suppressed below reference ranges, without differences between those with DM or controls for TxB2 (350+/-149 pg/mg versus 348+/-93 pg/mg creatinine) and PGF1alpha (255+/-104 pg/mg versus 222+/-88 pg/mg creatinine). In conclusion, in poorly controlled diabetes, there was no differential lack of aspirin sensitivity to platelet aggregation, or lack of aspirin suppression of urinary TxB2 or PGF1alpha, compared with controls on aspirin. Despite suppression of urinary prostaglandin metabolites, aspirin resistance was most apparent to ADP-mediated platelet aggregation. It is not known what level of inhibition of in vitro tests is necessary for the cardioprotective benefits of aspirin in diabetes mellitus. Thus, the lack of

  9. The lateral diffusion and fibrinogen induced clustering of platelet integrin αIIbβ3 reconstituted into physiologically mimetic GUVs.

    PubMed

    Gaul, Vinnie; Lopez, Sergio G; Lentz, Barry R; Moran, Niamh; Forster, Robert J; Keyes, Tia E

    2015-04-01

    Platelet integrin αIIbβ3 is a key mediator of platelet activation and thrombosis. Upon activation αIIbβ3 undergoes significant conformational rearrangement, inducing complex bidirectional signalling and protein recruitment leading to platelet activation. Reconstituted lipid models of the integrin can enhance our understanding of the structural and mechanistic details of αIIbβ3 behaviour away from the complexity of the platelet machinery. Here, a novel method of αIIbβ3 insertion into Giant Unilamellar Vesicles (GUVs) is described that allows for effective integrin reconstitution unrestricted by lipid composition. αIIbβ3 was inserted into two GUV lipid compositions that seek to better mimic the platelet membrane. First, "nature's own", comprising 32% DOPC, 25% DOPE, 20% CH, 15% SM and 8% DOPS, intended to mimic the platelet cell membrane. Fluorescence Lifetime Correlation Spectroscopy (FLCS) reveals that exposure of the integrin to the activators Mn(2+) or DTT does not influence the diffusion coefficient of αIIbβ3. Similarly, exposure to αIIbβ3's primary ligand fibrinogen (Fg) alone does not affect αIIbβ3's diffusion coefficient. However, addition of Fg with either activator reduces the integrin diffusion coefficient from 2.52 ± 0.29 to μm(2) s(-1) to 1.56 ± 0.26 (Mn(2+)) or 1.49 ± 0.41 μm(2) s(-1) (DTT) which is consistent with aggregation of activated αIIbβ3 induced by fibrinogen binding. The Multichannel Scaler (MCS) trace shows that the integrin-Fg complex diffuses through the confocal volume in clusters. Using the Saffman-Delbrück model as a first approximation, the diffusion coefficient of the complex suggests at least a 20-fold increase in the radius of membrane bound protein, consistent with integrin clustering. Second, αIIbβ3 was also reconstituted into a "raft forming" GUV with well defined liquid disordered (Ld) and liquid ordered (Lo) phases. Using confocal microscopy and lipid partitioning dyes, αIIbβ3 showed an affinity for

  10. Modelling (1 0 0) hydrogen-induced platelets in silicon with a multi-scale molecular dynamics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morasa, G.; Colombi Ciacchi, L.; Csanyi, G.; de Vita, A.

    2007-12-01

    We introduce a multiscale molecular dynamics (MD) approach to study the thermal evolution of (1 0 0) hydrogen-induced platelets (HIPs) in silicon. The HIPs are modeled by ∼10 nm long planar defects in a periodically repeated crystalline model system containing ∼25,000 silicon atoms. The initial defect models are created either by cleavage of atomic planes or by planar assemblies of vacancies, and are stabilized by saturating the resulting surface dangling bonds with hydrogen atoms. The time evolution of the defects is studied by finite-temperature MD using the “Learn On The Fly” (LOTF) technique. This hybrid scheme allows us to perform accurate density-functional-tight-binding (DFTB) force calculations only on the chemically reactive platelet zone, while the surrounding silicon crystal is described by the Stillinger-Weber (SW) classical potential. Reliable dynamical trajectories are obtained by choosing the DFTB zone in a way which minimizes the errors on the atomic forces.

  11. Inhibition of platelet-aggregating activity in thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura plasma by normal adult immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed Central

    Lian, E C; Mui, P T; Siddiqui, F A; Chiu, A Y; Chiu, L L

    1984-01-01

    Plasma from patients with thrombotic thrombocytopenic purpura (TTP) caused the aggregation of autologous and homologous platelets, and effect which was inhibited by normal plasma. IgG purified from seven normal adults at a concentration of 0.7 mg/ml completely inhibited the platelet aggregation induced by plasma obtained from two TTP patients with active disease. The inhibition of platelet aggregation by human adult IgG was concentration dependent, and the inhibitory activity of human IgG was neutralized by rabbit antihuman IgG. Fab fragments inhibited the TTP plasma-induced platelet aggregation as well as intact IgG, whereas Fc fragments had no effect. Platelet aggregation caused by ADP, collagen, epinephrine, or thrombin was not affected by purified human IgG. The prior incubation of IgG with TTP plasma caused a significantly greater reduction of platelet aggregation by TTP plasma than that of IgG and platelet suspension, suggesting that the IgG inhibits TTP plasma-induced platelet aggregation through direct interaction with platelet aggregating factor in TTP plasma. IgG obtained initially from five infants and young children under the age of 4 yr did not possess any inhibitory activity. When one of the children reached 3 yr of age, his IgG inhibited the aggregation induced by one TTP plasma, but not that caused by another plasma. The IgG procured from the same boy at 4 yr of age inhibited the aggregation induced by both TTP plasmas. The IgG purified from the TTP plasma during active disease failed to inhibit the aggregation caused by the same plasma. After recovery, however, the IgG effectively inhibited aggregation. These observations suggest that platelet-aggregating factors present in the TTP plasma are heterogeneous in nature and that the IgG present in the normal adult plasma, which inhibits the TTP plasma-induced platelet aggregation, may be partially responsible for the success of plasma infusion therapy in TTP. Images PMID:6538207

  12. Inhibitory effects of kiwifruit extract on human platelet aggregation and plasma angiotensin-converting enzyme activity.

    PubMed

    Dizdarevic, Lili L; Biswas, Dipankar; Uddin, M D Main; Jørgenesen, Aud; Falch, Eva; Bastani, Nasser E; Duttaroy, Asim K

    2014-01-01

    Previous human studies suggest that supplementation with kiwifruits lowers several cardiovascular risk factors such as platelet hyperactivity, blood pressure and plasma lipids. The cardiovascular health benefit of fruit and vegetables is usually attributed to the complex mixture of phytochemicals therein; however, kiwifruit's cardioprotective factors are not well studied. In this study, we investigated the effects of kiwifruit extract on human blood platelet aggregation and plasma angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) activity. A sugar-free, heat-stable aqueous extract with molecular mass less than 1000 Da was prepared from kiwifruits. Typically, 100 g kiwifruits produced 66.3 ± 5.8 mg (1.2 ± 0.1 mg CE) of sugar-free kiwifruit extract (KFE). KFE inhibited both human platelet aggregation and plasma ACE activity in a dose-dependent manner. KFE inhibited platelet aggregation in response to ADP, collagen and arachidonic acid, and inhibitory action was mediated in part by reducing TxA2 synthesis. The IC50 for ADP-induced platelet aggregation was 1.6 ± 0.2 mg/ml (29.0 ± 3.0 μg CE/ml), whereas IC50 for serum ACE was 0.6 ± 0.1 mg/ml (11.0 ± 1.2 μg CE/ml). Consuming 500 mg of KFE (9.0 mg CE) in 10 g margarine inhibited ex vivo platelet aggregation by 12.7%, 2 h after consumption by healthy volunteers (n = 9). All these data indicate that kiwifruit contains very potent antiplatelet and anti-ACE components. Consuming kiwifruits might be beneficial as both preventive and therapeutic regime in cardiovascular disease. PMID:24219176

  13. Effects of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) inhibition on sulfur mustard-induced cutaneous injuries in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Feng; Jiang, Ning; Xiao, Zhi-yong; Cheng, Jun-ping; Mei, Yi-zhou; Zheng, Pan; Wang, Li; Zhang, Xiao-rui; Zhou, Xin-bo

    2016-01-01

    Early studies with first-generation poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors have already indicated some therapeutic potential for sulfur mustard (SM) injuries. The available novel and more potential PARP inhibitors, which are undergoing clinical trials as drugs for cancer treatment, bring it back to the centre of interest. However, the role of PARP-1 in SM-induced injury is not fully understood. In this study, we selected a high potent specific PARP inhibitor ABT-888 as an example to investigate the effect of PARP inhibitor in SM injury. The results showed that in both the mouse ear vesicant model (MEVM) and HaCaT cell model, PARP inhibitor ABT-888 can reduce cell damage induced by severe SM injury. ABT-888 significantly reduced SM induced edema and epidermal necrosis in MEVM. In the HaCaT cell model, ABT-888 can reduce SM-induced NAD+/ATP depletion and apoptosis/necrosis. Then, we studied the mechanism of PARP-1 in SM injury by knockdown of PARP-1 in HaCaT cells. Knockdown of PARP-1 protected cell viability and downregulated the apoptosis checkpoints, including p-JNK, p-p53, Caspase 9, Caspase 8, c-PARP and Caspase 3 following SM-induced injury. Furthermore, the activation of AKT can inhibit autophagy via the regulation of mTOR. Our results showed that SM exposure could significantly inhibit the activation of Akt/mTOR pathway. Knockdown of PARP-1 reversed the SM-induced suppression of the Akt/mTOR pathway. In summary, the results of our study indicated that the protective effects of downregulation of PARP-1 in SM injury may be due to the regulation of apoptosis, necrosis, energy crisis and autophagy. However, it should be noticed that PARP inhibitor ABT-888 further enhanced the phosphorylation of H2AX (S139) after SM exposure, which indicated that we should be very careful in the application of PARP inhibitors in SM injury treatment because of the enhancement of DNA damage. PMID:27077006

  14. Acquired Platelet Dysfunction with Eosinophilia (APDE) Syndrome: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Diksha D; Nayar, Priyanka S; Manchanda, Rumma V

    2016-06-01

    Acquired platelet dysfunction with eosinophilia (APDE) is a syndrome which has transient state of platelet dysfunction in the presence of marked eosinophilia. This bleeding disorder, otherwise known as "non-thrombocytopenic purpura with eosinophilia", occurs commonly in children from South-East Asia. We report an 11 years old male child, who presented with ecchymotic patches over lower limbs, of recent onset. His hemogram revealed increased eosinophils with a normal platelet count. Coagulation screen revealed normal parameters except increase in bleeding time. Platelet aggregation studies showed normal platelet aggregation with ristocetin, reduced aggregation with ADP and no aggregation was seen with collagen. PMID:27408400

  15. In vivo method for the assessment of platelet accumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.; Sanjar, S.; Herd, C.; Morley, J.

    1989-03-01

    Platelets labeled with 111-Indium have been injected intravenously into anesthetised guinea pigs, and intrathoracic content of 111-Indium-labeled platelets has been monitored continuously using a microcomputer-based system (AIMSplus). Dose-effect relationships have been described for ADP, collagen, and PAF, and effects of drugs upon selected responses illustrate the potential of this test system for routine in vivo screening of agents that may inhibit aggregation of platelets.

  16. Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 Protects against Hyperglycemic-Induced Endothelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition and Improves Myocardial Dysfunction by Suppressing Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase 1 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Fei; Zhang, Guang-hao; Feng, Min; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Jia-ning; Dong, Wen-qian; Zhang, Cheng; Zhang, Yun; Chen, Li; Zhang, Ming-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Under high glucose conditions, endothelial cells respond by acquiring fibroblast characteristics, that is, endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndMT), contributing to diabetic cardiac fibrosis. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) has cardioprotective properties independent of its glucose-lowering effect. However, the potential mechanism has not been fully clarified. Here we investigated whether GLP-1 inhibits myocardial EndMT in diabetic mice and whether this is mediated by suppressing poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1). Streptozotocin diabetic C57BL/6 mice were treated with or without GLP-1 analog (24 nmol/kg daily) for 24 wks. Transthoracic echocardiography was performed to assess cardiac function. Human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) were cultured in normal glucose (NG) (5.5 mmol/L) or high glucose (HG) (30 mmol/L) medium with or without GLP-1analog. Immunofluorescent staining and Western blot were performed to evaluate EndMT and PARP-1 activity. Diabetes mellitus attenuated cardiac function and increased cardiac fibrosis. Treatment with the GLP-1 analog improved diabetes mellitus–related cardiac dysfunction and cardiac fibrosis. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that hyperglycemia markedly increased the percentage of von Willebrand factor (vWF)+/alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA)+ cells in total α-SMA+ cells in diabetic hearts compared with controls, which was attenuated by GLP-1 analog treatment. In cultured HAECs, immunofluorescent staining and Western blot also showed that both GLP-1 analog and PARP-1 gene silencing could inhibit the HG-induced EndMT. In addition, GLP-1 analog could attenuate PARP-1 activation by decreasing the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Therefore, GLP-1 treatment could protect against the hyperglycemia-induced EndMT and myocardial dysfunction. This effect is mediated, at least partially, by suppressing PARP-1 activation. PMID:25715248

  17. Role of 5-hydroxytryptamine in platelet thrombus formation and mechanisms of inhibition of thrombus formation by 5-hydroxytryptamine2A antagonists in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Takano, S

    1995-01-01

    The role of 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) in platelet thrombus formation and in the mechanisms of inhibition of thrombus formation by 5-HT2A antagonists was investigated using a turbidimetric method. Collagen-induced platelet aggregation occurred simultaneously with a release of 5-HT from the platelets. The supernatant of collagen-aggregated platelets induced a further aggregation volume-dependently. This supernatant-induced aggregation was inhibited by either 5-HT2A antagonists or adenosine-diphosphate (ADP) scavenging. 5-Hydroxytryptamine and a small amount of the supernatant shifted the dose-response curves of collagen to the left. The aggregation velocity and the onset of aggregation by collagen were significantly increased by the supernatant, but not by 5-HT. The 5-HT2A antagonists, ketanserin and MCI-9042, returned the dose-response curves of the maximum aggregation and of the aggregation velocity of collagen, which were already amplified by the supernatant, to the original values. The onset of aggregation was delayed by the antagonists, but was not completely returned to the original points. There were distinct differences between the effects of endogenous 5-HT, derived from platelets which were stimulated by collagen, and those of exogenous 5-HT on both extensive platelet activation and amplification of the collagen-induced aggregation. These findings suggest that endogenous 5-HT activates platelets in synergism with ADP. The 5-HT2A antagonists used, block the synergism via 5-HT2A receptors and lead to inhibition of a positive feedback loop of thrombus formation. PMID:8836449

  18. Platelet-activating factor induces collagenase expression in corneal epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Bazan, H E; Tao, Y; Bazan, N G

    1993-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF), a potent lipid mediator involved in inflammatory and immune responses, accumulates rapidly in response to injury in a variety of tissues, including the corneal epithelium. However, the precise role of this compound in the cascade of events following insult has not been defined. Here we examined the effect of PAF on gene expression in the epithelial cells of rabbit corneas in organ culture. We found that incubation with 100 nM methylcarbamoyl PAF, a nonhydrolyzable analog of PAF, produced rapid transient 2.8- and 3.5-fold increases in the expression of c-fos and c-jun, respectively, at 1 hr, followed by increased expression of the collagenase type I gene beginning at 3 hr and peaking at 14-fold by 8 hr. Addition of the protein-synthesis-inhibitor cycloheximide superinduced c-fos and c-jun, strongly potentiating the PAF effect, but inhibited the induction of collagenase type I expression, suggesting the existence of a transcriptional factor linking the two events. BN-50730, a selective antagonist of intracellular PAF-binding sites, blocked the expression of the immediate-early genes as well as the increase in collagenase type I mRNA. Our results suggest that one of the functions of PAF may be to enhance the breakdown of the extracellular matrix as a part of the remodeling process during corneal wound healing after injury. Pathologically, a PAF-induced overproduction of collagenase may be a factor in the development of corneal ulcers, as well as other pathophysiological conditions such as cartilage destruction in arthritis. If so, inhibitors of this signal-transduction pathway may be useful as tools for further investigation and, eventually, as therapeutic agents to treat such disorders. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:8378347

  19. ROLE OF CELLULAR BIOENERGETICS IN SMOOTH MUSCLE CELL PROLIFERATION INDUCED BY PLATELET-DERIVED GROWTH FACTOR

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Jessica; Hill, Bradford G.; Benavides, Gloria A.; Dranka, Brian P.; Darley-Usmar, Victor M.

    2013-01-01

    SYNOPSIS Abnormal smooth muscle cell proliferation is a hallmark of vascular disease. Although growth factors are known to contribute to cell hyperplasia, the changes in metabolism associated with this response, particularly mitochondrial respiration, remain unclear. Given the increased energy requirements for proliferation, we hypothesized that platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) would stimulate glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration and that this elevated bioenergetic capacity is required for smooth muscle cell hyperplasia. To test this hypothesis, cell proliferation, glycolytic flux, and mitochondrial oxygen consumption were measured after treatment of primary rat aortic smooth muscle cells with PDGF. PDGF increased basal and maximal rates of glycolytic flux and mitochondrial oxygen consumption; enhancement of these bioenergetic pathways led to a substantial increase in the mitochondrial reserve capacity. Interventions with the PI3K inhibitor LY-294002 or the glycolysis inhibitor 2-deoxy-D-glucose abrogated PDGF-stimulated proliferation and prevented augmentation of glycolysis and mitochondrial reserve capacity. Similarly, when L-glucose was substituted for D-glucose, PDGF-dependent proliferation was abolished, as were changes in glycolysis and mitochondrial respiration. Interestingly, lactate dehydrogenase protein levels and activity were significantly increased after PDGF treatment. Moreover, L-lactate substitution for D-glucose was sufficient for increasing the mitochondrial reserve capacity and cell proliferation after treatment with PDGF; these effects were inhibited by the lactate dehydrogenase inhibitor, oxamate. These data suggest that glycolysis, by providing substrates that enhance the mitochondrial reserve capacity, plays an essential role in PDGF-induced cell proliferation, underscoring the integrated metabolic response required for proliferation of VSMC in the diseased vasculature. PMID:20331438

  20. Circulating and platelet-derived microparticles in human blood enhance thrombosis on atherosclerotic plaques.

    PubMed

    Suades, Rosa; Padró, Teresa; Vilahur, Gemma; Badimon, Lina

    2012-12-01

    Plaque rupture followed by thrombosis is the underlying cause of the majority of acute coronary syndromes. Circulating microparticles (cMPs), membrane blebs released into blood by activated cells, have been associated to vascular diseases. Specifically, high levels of platelet-derived microparticles (pMPs) have been found in patients with coronary disease. However, it is unknown whether microparticles have a contributing role to the development of damaged vessel wall-induced arterial thrombi. The aim of this proof of concept study was to investigate whether an increased number of cMPs and pMPs could functionally contribute to blood thrombogenicity on areas of arterial damage. Microparticles were isolated from blood of healthy volunteers and were characterised by flow cytometry. Effects of microparticles on platelet deposition were assessed under controlled flow conditions exposing damaged arterial wall in the Badimon perfusion chamber and collagen type-I in the flat perfusion chamber to human blood. Platelet deposition on damaged arteries was significantly increased in cMP- and pMP-enriched bloods (p<0.05). pMPs also induced increase in platelet (p<0.05) and fibrin (p<0.05) deposition on human atherosclerotic arteries and in platelet adhesion to purified collagen surfaces. pMP-enriched blood induced a dose-dependent shortening of epinephrine/collagen closure time evaluated by PFA-100 (p<0.001), increased low-dose ADP-induced platelet aggregation by LTA (p<0.05), and decreased clotting time by thromboelastography (p<0.01). In conclusion, an increased content of cMPs and pMPs, even in normal blood conditions, enhance platelet deposition and thrombus formation. This study shows for the first time that, beyond biomarkers of cell activation, blood microparticles have functional effects on cardiovascular atherothrombotic disease. PMID:23138460

  1. Mathematical analysis of mural thrombogenesis. Concentration profiles of platelet-activating agents and effects of viscous shear flow.

    PubMed Central

    Folie, B J; McIntire, L V

    1989-01-01

    The concentration profiles of adenosine diphosphate (ADP), thromboxane A2 (TxA2), thrombin, and von Willebrand factor (vWF) released extracellularly from the platelet granules or produced metabolically on the platelet membrane during thrombus growth, were estimated using finite element simulation of blood flow over model thrombi of various shapes and dimensions. The wall fluxes of these platelet-activating agents were estimated for each model thrombus at three different wall shear rates (100 s-1, 800 s-1, and 1,500 s-1), employing experimental data on thrombus growth rates and sizes. For that purpose, whole human blood was perfused in a parallel-plate flow chamber coated with type l fibrillar human collagen, and the kinetic data collected and analyzed by an EPl-fluorescence video microscopy system and a digital image processor. It was found that thrombin concentrations were large enough to cause irreversible platelet aggregation. Although heparin significantly accelerated thrombin inhibition by antithrombin lll, the remaining thrombin levels were still significantly above the minimum threshold required for irreversible platelet aggregation. While ADP concentrations were large enough to cause irreversible platelet aggregation at low shear rates and for small aggregate sizes, TxA2 concentrations were only sufficient to induce platelet shape change over the entire range of wall shear rates and thrombi dimensions studied. Our results also indicated that the local concentration of vWF multimers released from the platelet alpha-granules could be sufficient to modulate platelet aggregation at low and intermediate wall shear rates (less than 1,000 s-1). The sizes of standing vortices formed adjacent to a growing aggregate and the embolizing stresses and the torque, acting at the aggregate surface, were also estimated in this simulation. It was found that standing vortices developed on both sides of the thrombus even at low wall shear rates. Their sizes increased with

  2. Glutathione Peroxidase-3 Deficiency Promotes Platelet-dependent Thrombosis in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Richard C.; Mahoney, Christopher E.; Anderson, Laura (Coleman); Ottaviano, Filomena; Croce, Kevin; Leopold, Jane A.; Zhang, Yingyi; Tang, Shiow-Shih; Handy, Diane E.; Loscalzo, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Background Glutathione peroxidase-3 (GPx-3) is a selenocysteine-containing plasma protein that scavenges reactive oxygen species in the extracellular compartment. A deficiency of this enzyme has been associated with platelet-dependent thrombosis, and a promoter haplotype with reduced function has been associated with stroke risk in young individuals. Methods and Results We recently developed a genetic mouse model to assess platelet function in hemostasis and thrombosis in the setting of GPx-3 deficiency. GPx-3(−/−) mice showed an attenuated bleeding time compared with wild-type mice. Platelet aggregation studies revealed an enhanced aggregation response to the agonist ADP in GPx-3(−/−) compared to wild-type mice. We also found an increase in the plasma levels of soluble P-selectin and a decrease in plasma cyclic GMP in GPx-3(−/−) mice compared with wild-type mice. ADP was infused into the right ventricle of mice to induce platelet aggregation in the pulmonary vasculature, and produced a more robust platelet activation response in the GPx-3(−/−) mice than in wild-type mice; histological sections from the pulmonary vasculature of GPx-3(−/−) compared with wild-type mice show increased platelet-rich thrombi and a higher percentage of occluded vessels. Endothelial function studies using a cremaster muscle preparation revealed dysfunction in the GPx-3(−/−) compared to wild-type mice. Using a no-flow ischemia-reperfusion stroke model, GPx-3(−/−) mice had significantly larger cerebral infarctions compared with wild-type mice. To investigate the effect of platelet inhibition on stroke size in GPx-3 deficiency, we found that clopidogrel treatment reduced stroke size significantly in GPx-3(−/−) mice compared with vehicle-treated controls. To assess the neuroprotective role of antioxidants in this model, we found that MnTBAP treatment reduced stroke size in GPx-3(−/−) mice compared with vehicle-treated controls. Conclusions These findings

  3. Effect of Vitamin C Supplementation on Platelet Aggregation and Serum Electrolytes Levels in Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes Mellitus in Rats.

    PubMed

    Owu, Daniel U; Nwokocha, Chukwuemeka R; Ikpi, Daniel E; Ogar, Emmanuel I

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a disease condition characterised by hyperglycemia; free radical and abnormalhaematological indices. Vitamin C can reduce free radical generation and ameliorate adverse conditions of diabetes mellitus.The aim of the present study is to investigate the effect of vitamin C on platelet aggregation and electrolyte levels in Type 1DM. Male Wistar rats were divided into four groups namely control, DM, DM +Vitamin C and Vitamin C groups. Rats weremade diabetic with a single dose of streptozotocin (65 mg/kg) intraperitoneally. Vitamin C was administered orally todiabetic and normal rats at 200 mg/kg body weight for 28 days. Blood samples were analyzed for hematological parameters,platelet aggregation, and serum electrolyte levels. Blood glucose in DM+ Vitamin C group (9.9 ± 1.8 mmol/L) wassignificantly reduced (p<0.01) compared to DM group (32.2 ± 2.1 mmol/L) and significantly higher (p<0.05) than control(4.4 ± 0.8 mmol/L). Haemoglobin (Hb) concentration in DM group (12 ± 0.1 g/dL) was significantly reduced (p<0.01) whencompared with control groups (14 ± 0.24 g/dL) and significantly increased (p<0.05) in the DM+vitamin C group (13.5 ± 0.5g/dL) compared with the diabetic group. The mean corpuscular volume values in DM (68.66 ± 0.5 fL) and DM+vitamin Cgroups (68.11 ± 0.4 fL) were significantly higher (p<0.01) than the control (59.49 ± 0.5fL). Platelet count in DM group (523± 8.5 x109/L) was significantly raised (p<0.01) when compared to control (356 ± 6.2 x109/L) and significantly reduced(p<0.01) in DM+ vitamin C-treated group (385 ± 7.8 x109/L) compared with DM group. Platelet aggregation and serumsodium/potassium ratios was significantly reduced (p<0.01) in DM+vitamin C compared with DM group. These resultssuggest that oral vitamin C administration increases haemoglobin, reduced plasma glucose level, platelet count, serumsodium/potassium ion ratio and inhibits platelet aggregation in streptozotocin-induced DM in rats. PMID:27574765

  4. Identification of the epitope for a monoclonal antibody that blocks platelet aggregation induced by type III collagen.

    PubMed Central

    Glattauer, V; Werkmeister, J A; Kirkpatrick, A; Ramshaw, J A

    1997-01-01

    A library of eight conformation-dependent monoclonal antibodies that react with distinct epitopes on native human type III collagen has been examined for the ability of these antibodies to inhibit platelet aggregation induced by this collagen. Six of these antibodies had no effects; one, 1E7-D7/Col3, delayed the onset and slowed the rate of platelet aggregation, while another, 2G8-B1/Col3, completely inhibited aggregation. In order to identify the epitope recognized by this inhibitory antibody, a series of peptides that could fold to form triple-helical fragments was examined. Each peptide included six Gly-Xaa-Yaa triplets from the human type III collagen sequence, where Xaa and Yaa represent the particular amino acids in the sequence, and a C-terminal (Gly-Pro-Hyp)4 sequence to enhance triple-helical stability. Using these peptides we have identified the epitope as a nine-amino-acid sequence, GLAGAOGLR (where O is the one-letter code for 4-hydroxyproline), starting at position 520 in the human type III collagen helical domain. This sequence is proximal to the site proposed for the interaction of type III collagen with alpha2beta1-integrin of platelets. PMID:9173900

  5. A Clickable Aminooxy Probe for Monitoring Cellular ADP-Ribosylation

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Rory K.; Cohen, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation is essential for cell function, yet there is a dearth of methods for detecting this post-translational modification in cells. Here, we describe a clickable aminooxy alkyne (AO-alkyne) probe that can detect cellular ADP-ribosylation on acidic amino acids following Cu-catalyzed conjugation to an azide-containing reporter. Using AO-alkyne, we show that PARP10 and PARP11 are auto-ADP-ribosylated in cells. We also demonstrate that AO-alkyne can be used to monitor stimulus-induced ADP-ribosylation in cells. Functional studies using AO-alkyne support a previously unknown mechanism for ADP-ribosylation on acidic amino acids, wherein a glutamate or aspartate at the initial C1′-position of ADP-ribose transfers to the C2′ position. This new mechanism for ADP-ribosylation has important implications for how glutamyl/aspartyl-ADP-ribose is recognized by proteins in cells. PMID:25978521

  6. Interdependent genotoxic mechanisms of monomethylarsonous acid: Role of ROS-induced DNA damage and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 inhibition in the malignant transformation of urothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wnek, Shawn M.; Kuhlman, Christopher L.; Camarillo, Jeannie M.; Medeiros, Matthew K.; Liu, Ke J.; Lau, Serrine S.; Gandolfi, A.J.

    2011-11-15

    Exposure of human bladder urothelial cells (UROtsa) to 50 nM of the arsenic metabolite, monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}), for 12 weeks results in irreversible malignant transformation. The ability of continuous, low-level MMA{sup III} exposure to cause an increase in genotoxic potential by inhibiting repair processes necessary to maintain genomic stability is unknown. Following genomic insult within cellular systems poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), a zinc finger protein, is rapidly activated and recruited to sites of DNA strand breaks. When UROtsa cells are continuously exposed to 50 nM MMA{sup III}, PARP-1 activity does not increase despite the increase in MMA{sup III}-induced DNA single-strand breaks through 12 weeks of exposure. When UROtsa cells are removed from continuous MMA{sup III} exposure (2 weeks), PARP-1 activity increases coinciding with a subsequent decrease in DNA damage levels. Paradoxically, PARP-1 mRNA expression and protein levels are elevated in the presence of continuous MMA{sup III} indicating a possible mechanism to compensate for the inhibition of PARP-1 activity in the presence of MMA{sup III}. The zinc finger domains of PARP-1 contain vicinal sulfhydryl groups which may act as a potential site for MMA{sup III} to bind, displace zinc ion, and render PARP-1 inactive. Mass spectrometry analysis demonstrates the ability of MMA{sup III} to bind a synthetic peptide representing the zinc-finger domain of PARP-1, and displace zinc from the peptide in a dose-dependent manner. In the presence of continuous MMA{sup III} exposure, continuous 4-week zinc supplementation restored PARP-1 activity levels and reduced the genotoxicity associated with MMA{sup III}. Zinc supplementation did not produce an overall increase in PARP-1 protein levels, decrease the levels of MMA{sup III}-induced reactive oxygen species, or alter Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase levels. Overall, these results present two potential interdependent mechanisms in which MMA

  7. Soluble platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1, a biomarker of ventilator-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Endothelial cell injury is an important component of acute lung injury. Platelet-endothelial cell adhesion molecule-1 (PECAM1) is a transmembrane protein that connects endothelial cells to one another and can be detected as a soluble, truncated protein (sPECAM1) in serum. We hypothesized that injurious mechanical ventilation (MV) leads to shedding of PECAM1 from lung endothelial cells resulting in increasing sPECAM1 levels in the systemic circulation. Methods We studied 36 Sprague–Dawley rats in two prospective, randomized, controlled studies (healthy and septic) using established animal models of ventilator-induced lung injury. Animals (n = 6 in each group) were randomized to spontaneous breathing or two MV strategies: low tidal volume (VT) (6 ml/kg) and high-VT (20 ml/kg) on 2 cmH2O of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP). In low-VT septic animals, 10 cmH2O of PEEP was applied. We performed pulmonary histological and physiological evaluation and measured lung PECAM1 protein content and serum sPECAM1 levels after four hours ventilation period. Results High-VT MV caused severe lung injury in healthy and septic animals, and decreased lung PECAM1 protein content (P < 0.001). Animals on high-VT had a four- to six-fold increase of mean sPECAM1 serum levels than the unventilated counterpart (35.4 ± 10.4 versus 5.6 ± 1.7 ng/ml in healthy rats; 156.8 ± 47.6 versus 35.6 ± 12.6 ng/ml in septic rats) (P < 0.0001). Low-VT MV prevented these changes. Levels of sPECAM1 in healthy animals on high-VT MV paralleled the sPECAM1 levels of non-ventilated septic animals. Conclusions Our findings suggest that circulating sPECAM1 may represent a promising biomarker for the detection and monitoring of ventilator-induced lung injury. PMID:24588994

  8. Influence of experimental Anaplasma marginale infection and splenectomy on NTPDase and 5'nucleotidase activities in platelets of cattle.

    PubMed

    Doyle, Rovaina L; Oliveira, Camila B; França, Raqueli T; Doleski, Pedro H; Souza, Viviane C; Leal, Daniela B R; Martins, João R; Lopes, Sonia T A; Machado, Gustavo; Da Silva, Aleksandro S; Andrade, Cinthia M

    2016-06-01

    The objective of this paper was to evaluate NTPDase and 5'-nucleotidase activities in platelets of bovine with and without spleen and infected by Anaplasma marginale. Our results demonstrate that infection along with splenectomy is able of inducing a profile of cellular protection, which showed an increase in the degradation of the nucleotides ATP and ADP by NTPDase, in addition to AMP by 5'nucleotidase to form the nucleoside adenosine in platelets, i.e., the enzymatic activities of platelets were increased in splenectomized animals when compared to non-splenectomized group. It notes that adenosine is a molecule with anti-inflammatory function. But this profile is related to a deficiency in immune signaling triggered by nucleotide ATP, which may be related to the increase in bacteremia and disability in combating the parasite in splenectomized host. PMID:26945560

  9. Silica Nanoparticles Effects on Blood Coagulation Proteins and Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Gryshchuk, Volodymyr; Galagan, Natalya

    2016-01-01

    Interaction of nanoparticles with the blood coagulation is important prior to their using as the drug carriers or therapeutic agents. The aim of present work was studying of the primary effects of silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) on haemostasis in vitro. We studied the effect of SiNPs on blood coagulation directly estimating the activation of prothrombin and factor X and to verify any possible effect of SiNPs on human platelets. It was shown that SiNPs shortened coagulation time in APTT and PT tests and increased the activation of factor X induced by RVV possibly due to the sorption of intrinsic pathway factors on their surface. SiNPs inhibited the aggregation of platelet rich plasma induced by ADP but in the same time partially activated platelets as it was shown using flow cytometry. The possibility of SiNPs usage in nanomedicine is strongly dependant on their final concentration in bloodstream and the size of the particles that are used. However SiNPs are extremely promising as the haemostatic agents for preventing the blood loss after damage. PMID:26881078

  10. Aggregation of human platelets by endotoxic glycolipid-bearing Salmonella minnesota Re595 is prevented by synthetic peptide analogs of cell adhesion sites of fibrinogen and fibronectin

    SciTech Connect

    Timmons, S.; Grabarek, J.; Kloczewiak, M.; Hawiger, J.

    1986-03-01

    Thrombocytopenia often accompanies sepsis due to endotoxin producing gram-negative bacteria. The authors have observed that mutant Re595 of S. minnesota induced aggregation of human platelets separated from plasma fibrinogen (Theta) and other proteins. This aggregation is dependent on ADP secreted from storage granules in response to mutant Re595. Platelet aggregation induced by mutant Re595 was prevented by simultaneously added EDTA and EGTA (5mM), whereas secretion of /sup 14/C-serotonin was maintained. Preincubation of platelets with chelators (1 hr, 37/sup 0/C), known to dissociate irreversibly the platelet membrane glycoprotein IIb x IIIa complex, abolished aggregation while serotonin secretion was decreased by only one fourth. Since the GPIIb x IIIa complex constitutes the receptor for Theta, its role was examined using synthetic peptide analogs of sites on gamma and alpha chains of Theta. Gamma 400-411 (225 ..mu..M) inhibited platelet aggregation induced by mutant Re595 while serotonin secretion was unaffected. Alpha 572-575 (RGDS; 100 ..mu..M), analogous to cell adhesion site of fibronectin, also prevented aggregation induced by mutant Re595. Thus, mutant Re595 causes platelet aggregation which is divalent cation-dependent and proceeds via receptor pathway for secreted adhesive macromolecules.

  11. Approaches to synthetic platelet analogs.

    PubMed

    Modery-Pawlowski, Christa L; Tian, Lewis L; Pan, Victor; McCrae, Keith R; Mitragotri, Samir; Sen Gupta, Anirban

    2013-01-01

    Platelet transfusion is routinely used for treating bleeding complications in patients with hematologic or oncologic clotting disorders, chemo/radiotherapy-induced myelosuppression, trauma and surgery. Currently, these transfusions mostly use allogeneic platelet concentrates, while products like lyophilized platelets, cold-stored platelets and infusible platelet membranes are under investigation. These natural platelet-based products pose considerable risks of contamination, resulting in short shelf-life (3-5 days). Recent advances in pathogen reduction technologies have increased shelf-life to ~7 days. Furthermore, natural platelets are short in supply and also cause several biological side effects. Hence, there is significant clinical interest in platelet-mimetic synthetic analogs that can allow long storage-life and minimum side effects. Accordingly, several designs have been studied which decorate synthetic particles with motifs that promote platelet-mimetic adhesion or aggregation. Recent refinement in this design involves combining the adhesion and aggregation functionalities on a single particle platform. Further refinement is being focused on constructing particles that also mimic natural platelet's shape, size and elasticity, to influence margination and wall-interaction. The optimum design of a synthetic platelet analog would require efficient integration of platelet's physico-mechanical properties and biological functionalities. We present a comprehensive review of these approaches and provide our opinion regarding the future directions of this research. PMID:23092864

  12. Glycans and the platelet life cycle.

    PubMed

    Li, Renhao; Hoffmeister, Karin M; Falet, Hervé

    2016-09-01

    Platelet numbers are intricately regulated to avoid spontaneous bleeding or arterial occlusion and organ damage. The growth factor thrombopoietin (TPO) drives platelet biogenesis by inducing megakaryocyte production. A recent study in mice identified a feedback mechanism by which clearance of aged, desialylated platelets stimulates TPO synthesis by hepatocytes. This new finding generated renewed interest in platelet clearance mechanisms. Here, different established and emerging mechanisms of platelet senescence and clearance will be reviewed with specific emphasis on the role of posttranslational modifications. PMID:27135356

  13. Quantitative Glycoproteomic Analysis Identifies Platelet-Induced Increase of Monocyte Adhesion via the Up-Regulation of Very Late Antigen 5.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiqing; Kast, Juergen

    2015-08-01

    Physiological stimuli, such as thrombin, or pathological stimuli, such as lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), activate platelets circulating in blood. Once activated, platelets bind to monocytes via P-selectin-PSGL-1 interactions but also release the stored contents of their granules. These platelet releasates, in addition to direct platelet binding, activate monocytes and facilitate their recruitment to atherosclerotic sites. Consequently, understanding the changes platelet releasates induce in monocyte membrane proteins is critical. We studied the glyco-proteome changes of THP-1 monocytic cells affected by LPA- or thrombin-induced platelet releasates. We employed lectin affinity chromatography combined with filter aided sample preparation to achieve high glyco- and membrane protein and protein sequence coverage. Using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture, we quantified 1715 proteins, including 852 membrane and 500 glycoproteins, identifying the up-regulation of multiple proteins involved in monocyte extracellular matrix binding and transendothelial migration. Flow cytometry indicated expression changes of integrin α5, integrin β1, PECAM-1, and PSGL-1. The observed increase in monocyte adhesion to fibronectin was determined to be mediated by the up-regulation of very late antigen 5 via a P-selectin-PSGL-1 independent mechanism. This novel aspect could be validated on CD14+ human primary monocytes, highlighting the benefits of the improved enrichment method regarding high membrane protein coverage and reliable quantification. PMID:26159767

  14. Inducer responses of BenM, a LysR-type transcriptional regulator from Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1

    SciTech Connect

    Craven, Sarah H.; Ezezika, Obidimma C.; Haddad, Sandra; Hall, Ruth A.; Momany, Cory; Neidle, Ellen L.; Georgia

    2009-06-25

    BenM and CatM control transcription of a complex regulon for aromatic compound degradation. These Acinetobacter baylyi paralogues belong to the largest family of prokaryotic transcriptional regulators, the LysR-type proteins. Whereas BenM activates transcription synergistically in response to two effectors, benzoate and cis,cis-muconate, CatM responds only to cis,cis-muconate. Here, site-directed mutagenesis was used to determine the physiological significance of an unexpected benzoate-binding pocket in BenM discovered during structural studies. Residues in BenM were changed to match those of CatM in this hydrophobic pocket. Two BenM residues, R160 and Y293, were found to mediate the response to benzoate. Additionally, alteration of these residues caused benzoate to inhibit activation by cis,cis-muconate, positioned in a separate primary effector-binding site of BenM. The location of the primary site, in an interdomain cleft, is conserved in diverse LysR-type regulators. To improve understanding of this important family, additional regulatory mutants were analysed. The atomic-level structures were characterized of the effector-binding domains of variants that do not require inducers for activation, CatM(R156H) and BenM(R156H,T157S). These structures clearly resemble those of the wild-type proteins in their activated muconate-bound complexes. Amino acid replacements that enable activation without effectors reside at protein interfaces that may impact transcription through effects on oligomerization.

  15. [Coumarins from Leonurus japonicus and their anti-platelet aggregative activity].

    PubMed

    Yang, Huai; Zhou, Qin-mei; Peng, Cheng; Liu, Lu-si; Xie, Xiao-fang; Xiong, Liang; Liu, Zhao-hua

    2014-11-01

    Chemical constituents of Leonurus japonicus were isolated and purified by a combination of various chromatographic techniques including column chromatography over silica gel, Sephadex LH-20, MCI, and Rp C18. Structures of the isolates were determined by spectroscopic analysis as 10 coumarins: bergapten (1), xanthotoxin (2), isopimpinellin (3), isogosferal (4), imperatorin (5), meransin hydrate(6), isomeranzin(7), murrayone(8) , auraptenol(9), and osthol(10). In addition to compound 9, the others were isolated from the genus Leonurus for the first time. In the in vitro assay, compounds 4 and 8 significantly inhibited the abnormal increase of platelet aggregation induced by ADP. PMID:25850267

  16. Increased Platelet Reactivity Is Associated with Circulating Platelet-Monocyte Complexes and Macrophages in Human Atherosclerotic Plaques

    PubMed Central

    Vrijenhoek, Joyce E. P.; van Holten, Thijs C.; Elsenberg, Ellen H. A. M.; Mak-Nienhuis, Elske M.; de Borst, Gert Jan; Jukema, J. Wouter; Pijls, Nico H. J.; Waltenberger, Johannes; van Zonneveld, Anton Jan; Moll, Frans L.; McClellan, Elizabeth; Stubbs, Andrew; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Hoefer, Imo; de Groot, Philip G.; Roest, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Objective Platelet reactivity, platelet binding to monocytes and monocyte infiltration play a detrimental role in atherosclerotic plaque progression. We investigated whether platelet reactivity was associated with levels of circulating platelet-monocyte complexes (PMCs) and macrophages in human atherosclerotic carotid plaques. Methods Platelet reactivity was determined by measuring platelet P-selectin expression after platelet stimulation with increasing concentrations of adenosine diphosphate (ADP), in two independent cohorts: the Circulating Cells cohort (n = 244) and the Athero-Express cohort (n = 91). Levels of PMCs were assessed by flow cytometry in blood samples of patients who were scheduled for percutaneous coronary intervention (Circulating Cells cohort). Monocyte infiltration was semi-quantitatively determined by histological examination of atherosclerotic carotid plaques collected during carotid endarterectomy (Athero-Express cohort). Results We found increased platelet reactivity in patients with high PMCs as compared to patients with low PMCs (median (interquartile range): 4153 (1585–11267) area under the curve (AUC) vs. 9633 (3580–21565) AUC, P<0.001). Also, we observed increased platelet reactivity in patients with high macrophage levels in atherosclerotic plaques as compared to patients with low macrophage levels in atherosclerotic plaques (mean±SD; 8969±3485 AUC vs. 7020±3442 AUC, P = 0.02). All associations remained significant after adjustment for age, sex and use of drugs against platelet activation. Conclusion Platelet reactivity towards ADP is associated with levels of PMCs and macrophages in human atherosclerotic carotid plaques. PMID:25122139

  17. ADP Protects Cardiac Mitochondria under Severe Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Sokolova, Niina; Pan, Shi; Provazza, Sarah; Beutner, Gisela; Vendelin, Marko; Birkedal, Rikke; Sheu, Shey-Shing

    2013-01-01

    ADP is not only a key substrate for ATP generation, but also a potent inhibitor of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP). In this study, we assessed how oxidative stress affects the potency of ADP as an mPTP inhibitor and whether its reduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production might be involved. We determined quantitatively the effects of ADP on mitochondrial Ca2+ retention capacity (CRC) until the induction of mPTP in normal and stressed isolated cardiac mitochondria. We used two models of chronic oxidative stress (old and diabetic mice) and two models of acute oxidative stress (ischemia reperfusion (IR) and tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BH)). In control mitochondria, the CRC was 344 ± 32 nmol/mg protein. 500 μmol/L ADP increased CRC to 774 ± 65 nmol/mg protein. This effect of ADP seemed to relate to its concentration as 50 μmol/L had a significantly smaller effect. Also, oligomycin, which inhibits the conversion of ADP to ATP by F0F1ATPase, significantly increased the effect of 50 μmol/L ADP. Chronic oxidative stress did not affect CRC or the effect of 500 μmol/L ADP. After IR or t-BH exposure, CRC was drastically reduced to 1 ± 0.2 and 32 ± 4 nmol/mg protein, respectively. Surprisingly, ADP increased the CRC to 447 ± 105 and 514 ± 103 nmol/mg protein in IR and t-BH, respectively. Thus, it increased CRC by the same amount as in control. In control mitochondria, ADP decreased both substrate and Ca2+-induced increase of ROS. However, in t-BH mitochondria the effect of ADP on ROS was relatively small. We conclude that ADP potently restores CRC capacity in severely stressed mitochondria. This effect is most likely not related to a reduction in ROS production. As the effect of ADP relates to its concentration, increased ADP as occurs in the pathophysiological situation may protect mitochondrial integrity and function. PMID:24349464

  18. Effects of hydrostatic pressure and inert gases on platelet aggregation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Pickles, D M; Ogston, D; Macdonald, A G

    1990-12-01

    A novel cuvette was used to subject citrated platelet-rich plasma (PRP) to high hydrostatic pressure with negligible contamination by He (used for compression of the apparatus). Aggregation was induced at pressure by ADP and quantified turbidimetrically. The maximum degree of aggregation (MDA) was reduced from a control level of 82.2 to 53.6% by exposure to 101 ATA. Because decompression bubbles did not form, aggregation was also measured immediately after a compression cycle. After exposure to 101 ATA hydrostatic pressure, platelets responded normally to ADP at 1 ATA. In a matching apparatus, PRP was equilibrated with high partial pressures of inert gases. Normal physiological plasma Po2 and pH were maintained during equilibration. N2O (5 ATA) reduced the MDA from 86.5 (control) to 58.1%. N2 (51 ATA) reduced the MDA from 74.7 (control) to 51.6%, and 101 ATA Pn2 reduced the MDA from 78.0 (control) to 32.3%. He (100 ATA) reduced the MDA from 83.6 to 38.6%. It was concluded that platelet aggregation was relatively sensitive to hydrostatic pressure and less sensitive to inert gases than predicted from their anesthetic potency ratios. PMID:2077022

  19. Wnt pathway activation by ADP-ribosylation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Eungi; Tacchelly-Benites, Ofelia; Wang, Zhenghan; Randall, Michael P.; Tian, Ai; Benchabane, Hassina; Freemantle, Sarah; Pikielny, Claudio; Tolwinski, Nicholas S.; Lee, Ethan; Ahmed, Yashi

    2016-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signalling directs fundamental processes during metazoan development and can be aberrantly activated in cancer. Wnt stimulation induces the recruitment of the scaffold protein Axin from an inhibitory destruction complex to a stimulatory signalosome. Here we analyse the early effects of Wnt on Axin and find that the ADP-ribose polymerase Tankyrase (Tnks)—known to target Axin for proteolysis—regulates Axin's rapid transition following Wnt stimulation. We demonstrate that the pool of ADP-ribosylated Axin, which is degraded under basal conditions, increases immediately following Wnt stimulation in both Drosophila and human cells. ADP-ribosylation of Axin enhances its interaction with the Wnt co-receptor LRP6, an essential step in signalosome assembly. We suggest that in addition to controlling Axin levels, Tnks-dependent ADP-ribosylation promotes the reprogramming of Axin following Wnt stimulation; and propose that Tnks inhibition blocks Wnt signalling not only by increasing destruction complex activity, but also by impeding signalosome assembly. PMID:27138857

  20. Wnt pathway activation by ADP-ribosylation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Eungi; Tacchelly-Benites, Ofelia; Wang, Zhenghan; Randall, Michael P; Tian, Ai; Benchabane, Hassina; Freemantle, Sarah; Pikielny, Claudio; Tolwinski, Nicholas S; Lee, Ethan; Ahmed, Yashi

    2016-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signalling directs fundamental processes during metazoan development and can be aberrantly activated in cancer. Wnt stimulation induces the recruitment of the scaffold protein Axin from an inhibitory destruction complex to a stimulatory signalosome. Here we analyse the early effects of Wnt on Axin and find that the ADP-ribose polymerase Tankyrase (Tnks)--known to target Axin for proteolysis-regulates Axin's rapid transition following Wnt stimulation. We demonstrate that the pool of ADP-ribosylated Axin, which is degraded under basal conditions, increases immediately following Wnt stimulation in both Drosophila and human cells. ADP-ribosylation of Axin enhances its interaction with the Wnt co-receptor LRP6, an essential step in signalosome assembly. We suggest that in addition to controlling Axin levels, Tnks-dependent ADP-ribosylation promotes the reprogramming of Axin following Wnt stimulation; and propose that Tnks inhibition blocks Wnt signalling not only by increasing destruction complex activity, but also by impeding signalosome assembly. PMID:27138857

  1. Streptococcal SpeB Cleaved PAR-1 Suppresses ERK Phosphorylation and Blunts Thrombin-Induced Platelet Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Ender, Miriam; Andreoni, Federica; Zinkernagel, Annelies Sophie; Schuepbach, Reto Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Background The family of 4 related protease-activated receptors (PAR-1, 2, 3 & 4) expressed by mammalian cells allow to sense for and react to extracellular proteolytic activity. Since major human bacterial pathogens secret a wide array of protease(-s) we investigated whether they interfere with human PAR function. Methodology/Principal Findings Supernatants from cultures of major human bacterial pathogens were assayed for the presence of protease(-s) capable to cleave overexpressed human PAR-1, 2, 3 and 4 reporter constructs. Group A streptococcus (GAS) was found to secret a PAR-1-cleaving protease. Experiments involving genetical and pharmacological gain and loss of function identified streptococcal pyrogenic exotoxin B SpeB as the protease responsible. On the host’s side analysis of overexpressed PAR-1 carrying alanine substitutions and deletions showed the amino acid residue leucine44 on PAR-1’s extracellular N-terminus to be the only cleavage site. Complementary studies on endogenously expressed PAR-1 using PAR-1 blocking antibodies further supported our conclusion. Through PAR-1 cleavage SpeB efficiently blunted thrombin-induced induction of the ERK-pathway in endothelial cells and prevented platelets aggregation in response to thrombin. Conclusions/Significance Our results identify a novel function of the streptococcal virulence factor SpeB. By cleaving human PAR-1 at the N-terminal amino acid residue leucine44 SpeB rendered endothelial cells unresponsive to thrombin and prevented human platelets from thrombin-induced aggregation. These results suggest that by blunting PAR-1 signaling, SpeB modulates various innate host responses directed against invasive GAS potentially helping the invasive bacteria to escape. This may allow to tailor additional treatments in the future since upon invasion of the blood stream endothelial cells as well as platelets and mononuclear cells respond to PAR-1 agonists aiming to prevent further bacterial dissemination. PMID

  2. Arsenite induced poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of tumor suppressor P53 in human skin keratinocytes as a possible mechanism for carcinogenesis associated with arsenic exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Komissarova, Elena V.; Rossman, Toby G.

    2010-03-15

    Arsenite is an environmental pollutant. Exposure to inorganic arsenic in drinking water is associated with elevated cancer risk, especially in skin. Arsenite alone does not cause skin cancer in animals, but arsenite can enhance the carcinogenicity of solar UV. Arsenite is not a significant mutagen at non-toxic concentrations, but it enhances the mutagenicity of other carcinogens. The tumor suppressor protein P53 and nuclear enzyme PARP-1 are both key players in DNA damage response. This laboratory demonstrated earlier that in cells treated with arsenite, the P53-dependent increase in p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} expression, normally a block to cell cycle progression after DNA damage, is deficient. Here we show that although long-term exposure of human keratinocytes (HaCaT) to a nontoxic concentration (0.1 muM) of arsenite decreases the level of global protein poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation, it increases poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of P53 protein and PARP-1 protein abundance. We also demonstrate that exposure to 0.1 muM arsenite depresses the constitutive expression of p21 mRNA and P21 protein in HaCaT cells. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of P53 is reported to block its activation, DNA binding and its functioning as a transcription factor. Our results suggest that arsenite's interference with activation of P53 via poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation may play a role in the comutagenic and cocarcinogenic effects of arsenite.

  3. Effects of vitamin E on human platelet and mononuclear cell responses in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Williams, J C; Forster, L A; Tull, S P; Ferns, G A A

    1999-01-01

    Recent epidemiological studies have provided evidence supporting the potential benefits of antioxidants in coronary prevention. We have investigated the effects of vitamin E on platelets, monocytes and endothelial cells in vitro. Pre-incubation of platelets with vitamin E inhibited subsequent thrombin- (P < 0.05, n = 5), collagen- (P < 0.0001, n = 5) and ADP-(P < 0.05, n = 4) induced platelet aggregation measured using a microtitre plate method, or conventional aggregometry. The adhesion of thrombin-activated platelets to collagen was also inhibited by vitamin E (P < 0.05, n = 8), but not by vitamin C (P > 0.05, n = 8); nor was the adhesion of unstimulated platelets significantly affected (P > 0.05, n = 8). Pre-incubation of monocytes with vitamin E inhibited their subsequent adhesion to plastic (P < 0.05, n = 9), and was also associated with an 18% reduction in adhesion to EA.hy 926 endothelial cells (n = 8), although this failed to reach statistical significance. Pre-incubation of the endothelial cells with vitamin E also significantly reduced subsequent mononuclear cell adhesion by 56% (P < 0.05, n = 3). PMID:10583632

  4. A new variant of Glanzmann's thrombasthenia (Strasbourg I). Platelets with functionally defective glycoprotein IIb-IIIa complexes and a glycoprotein IIIa 214Arg----214Trp mutation.

    PubMed Central

    Lanza, F; Stierlé, A; Fournier, D; Morales, M; André, G; Nurden, A T; Cazenave, J P

    1992-01-01

    We describe a new variant of Glanzmann's thrombasthenia (variant Strasbourg I). The patient (M.S.) showed an absence of platelet aggregation to ADP, thrombin, and collagen, and a decreased clot retraction. Platelet fibrinogen was approximately 20% of normal levels. ADP-stimulated platelets bound markedly reduced amounts of soluble fibrinogen and platelet adhesion to surface-bound fibrinogen was defective. Normal to subnormal amounts of glycoprotein (GP) IIb-IIIa (alpha IIb beta 3) complexes, the platelet fibrinogen receptor, were revealed by SDS-PAGE, crossed immunoelectrophoresis, and antibody binding. However, the complexes were unusually sensitive to dissociation with EDTA at room temperature. Furthermore, flow cytometry showed that the platelets failed to bind the activation-dependent monoclonal antibody, PAC-1, after stimulation. In contrast, an RGDS-containing peptide induced significant binding of the anti-ligand-induced binding site antibody, D3GP3, suggesting the presence of a functional RGD binding domain on the patient's GPIIb-IIIa complex. Sequence analysis was performed after polymerase chain reaction amplification of selected patient's GPIIIa exons, and of the patient's platelet GPIIb and GPIIIa mRNAs. A point mutation (C to T) was localized in exon D (iv) of GPIIIa that resulted in an 214Arg to 214Trp amino acid substitution. The defect has been inherited from the parents who are heterozygous for the same mutation. This substitution points to an essential amino acid in a region of GPIIIa involved in the binding of fibrinogen and influencing the Ca(2+)-dependent stability of the GPIIb-IIIa complex. Images PMID:1602006

  5. Platelet CD36 mediates interactions with endothelial cell–derived microparticles and contributes to thrombosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Arunima; Li, Wei; Febbraio, Maria; Espinola, Ricardo G.; McCrae, Keith R.; Cockrell, Erin; Silverstein, Roy L.

    2008-01-01

    CD36 is a scavenger receptor that binds multiple ligands, including phosphatidyl serine (PS). Although CD36– mice do not have a bleeding diathesis, we show here that they do have significantly prolonged thrombotic occlusion times in response to FeCl3-induced vascular injury. Because cell-derived microparticles (MPs) are generated in response to vascular injury and circulate in patients with prothrombotic diseases, we hypothesized that PS exposed on their surfaces could be an endogenous CD36 ligand that transmits an activating signal to platelets. We found that MPs prepared from human ECs, monocytes, or platelets or isolated from blood of normal subjects bound to platelets. Binding was not observed with platelets from CD36– donors and was inhibited by an anti-CD36 antibody or by blockade of exposed PS by annexin V or anti-PS IgM. Preincubation of platelets with MPs led to CD36-dependent augmentation of platelet activation in response to low doses of ADP, as assessed by measuring α2bβ3 activation, P-selectin expression, and aggregation. Immunofluorescence confocal microscopy of murine carotid thrombi from CD36– mice showed a significant decrement in endothelial antigen accumulation, which suggests that CD36 plays a role in MP recruitment into thrombi. These results provide what we believe to be a novel role for CD36 in thrombosis. PMID:18431509

  6. Regulation of murine megakaryocyte size and ploidy by non-platelet-dependent mechanisms in radiation-induced megakaryocytopenia

    SciTech Connect

    Ebbe, S. )

    1991-09-01

    Megakaryocytic macrocytosis was evaluated in mice after irradiation with 6.5 Gy 60Co gamma rays. During the second and third months after sublethal irradiation, one or more of the following abnormalities of thrombocytopoiesis was present: thrombocytopenia, megakaryocytopenia, macromegakaryocytosis, a shift to higher ploidies, and enlargement of cells within ploidy groups. After transfusion-induced thrombocytosis, reductions in megakaryocyte size were delayed or absent relative to non-irradiated mice, and there was more of a tendency to shift to lower values for megakaryocyte ploidy. Mice with radiation-induced megakaryocytopenia failed to show rebound thrombocytosis during recovery from immunothrombocytopenia, in spite of further increases in megakaryocyte size and ploidy. The findings support the hypotheses that numbers of megakaryocytes may influence the regulation of megakaryocytopoiesis even when there is an excess of platelets and that ploidy distribution is not the sole determinant of the average size of a population of megakaryocytes. After irradiation, persistent megakaryocytopenia may not severely affect platelet production under steady-state conditions, but the ability of the marrow to respond to homeostatic regulation is compromised.

  7. Thrombin-receptor agonist peptides, in contrast to thrombin itself, are not full agonists for activation and signal transduction in human platelets in the absence of platelet-derived secondary mediators.

    PubMed Central

    Lau, L F; Pumiglia, K; Côté, Y P; Feinstein, M B

    1994-01-01

    Synthetic thrombin receptor peptides (TRPs), comprising the first 6-14 amino acids of the new N-terminus tethered ligand of the thrombin receptor that is generated by thrombin's proteolytic activity, were reported to activate platelets equally with thrombin itself and are considered to be full agonists [Vu et al. (1991) Cell 64, 1057-1068]. Using aspirin plus ADP-scavengers or the ADP-receptor antagonist adenosine 5'-[alpha-thio]triphosphate to prevent the secondary effects of the potent agonists that are normally released from stimulated platelets (i.e. ADP and thromboxane A2), we assessed the direct actions of thrombin and TRPs (i.e. TRP42-47 and TRP42-55). Compared with thrombin, under these conditions, TRPs: (1) failed to aggregate platelets completely; (2) produced less activation of glycoprotein (GP)IIb-IIIa; (3) did not cause association of GPIIb and pp60c-src with the cytoskeleton; and (4) caused less alpha-granule secretion, phosphorylation of cytoplasmic phospholipase A2, arachidonic acid release and phosphatidyl inositol (PtdOH) production. Furthermore, TRPs induced transient increases in protein phosphorylation mediated by protein kinase C and protein tyrosine phosphorylation, whereas these same responses to thrombin were greater and more sustained. Hirudin added after thrombin accelerated protein dephosphorylation, thereby mimicking the rate of spontaneous dephosphorylation seen after stimulation by TRPs. Platelets totally desensitized to very high concentrations of TRPs, by prior exposure to maximally effective concentrations of the peptides, remained responsive to alpha- and gamma-thrombins. Thrombin-stimulated PtdOH production in permeabilized platelets desensitized to TRPs was abolished by guanosine 5'-[beta-thio]diphosphate (GDP[beta S]), as in normal platelets. These results are discussed in terms of the allosteric Ternary Complex Model for G-protein linked receptors [Samama et al. (1993) J. Biol. Chem. 268, 4625-4636]. We conclude that: (1) TRPs

  8. Platelet-induced neurogenic coronary contractions due to accumulation of the false neurotransmitter, 5-hydroxytryptamine.

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, R A

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine if 5-hydroxytryptamine released from aggregating platelets could be accumulated and released by canine coronary adrenergic nerves, and if the false neurotransmitter resulted in an abnormal response of the smooth muscle to nerve stimulation. Isometric tension was measured in rings of epicardial coronary suspended in organ chambers filled with physiological salt solution. The response to electrical stimulation or exogenously added norepinephrine was elicited after contraction with prostaglandin F2 alpha. Electrical stimulation and exogenous norepinephrine caused beta-adrenergic relaxation of control rings. However, after rings were exposed for 2 h to aggregating platelets or 5-hydroxytryptamine, electrical stimulation caused frequency-dependent contractions. These contractions were prevented by the serotonergic antagonists, cyproheptadine or ketanserin, or by the neuronal uptake inhibitor, cocaine. The relaxation caused by exogenously added norepinephrine was unchanged after exposure to platelets or 5-hydroxytryptamine, indicating that smooth muscle alpha- and beta-adrenergic responsiveness was unchanged. The electrically stimulated overflow of radiolabeled norepinephrine from superfused strips of coronary artery was not altered by prior exposure to 5-hydroxytryptamine, indicating that the effect of exposure on the response to electrical stimulation is primarily at smooth muscle serotonergic receptors. Canine coronary arteries accumulated and metabolized radiolabeled 5-hydroxytryptamine in vitro. The accumulation of 5-hydroxytryptamine was inhibited by cocaine or by adrenergic denervation with 6-hydroxydopamine but unaffected by removal of endothelium, indicating that the adrenergic nerves were the primary site of accumulation. Electrical stimulation of superfused strips of coronary artery preincubated with radiolabeled 5-hydroxytryptamine caused the release of the intact indoleamine; this was blocked by the neurotoxin

  9. Platelet Activation Test in Unprocessed Blood (Pac-t-UB) to Monitor Platelet Concentrates and Whole Blood of Thrombocytopenic Patients

    PubMed Central

    Roest, Mark; van Holten, Thijs C.; Fleurke, Ger-Jan; Remijn, Jasper A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Background Platelet concentrate transfusion is the standard treatment for hemato-oncology patients to compensate for thrombocytopenia. We have developed a novel platelet activation test in anticoagulated unprocessed blood (pac-t-UB) to determine platelet function in platelet concentrates and in blood of thrombocytopenic patients. Methods We have measured platelet activity in a platelet concentrate and in anticoagulated unprocessed blood of a post-transfusion thrombocytopenic patient. Results Our data show time-dependent platelet activation by GPVI agonist (collagen related peptide; CRP), PAR-1 agonist (SFLLRN), P2Y12 agonist (ADP), and thromboxane receptor agonist (U46619) in a platelet concentrate. Furthermore, pac-t-UB showed time-dependent platelet activation in unprocessed blood of a post-transfusion patient with thrombocytopenia. Testing platelet function by different agonists in relation to storage show that 3-day-old platelet concentrates are still reactive to the studied agonists. This reactivity rapidly drops for each agonists during longer storage. Discussion Pac-t-UB is a novel tool to estimate platelet function by different agonists in platelet concentrates and in unprocessed blood of thrombocytopenic patients. In the near future, we will validate whether pac-t-UB is an adequate test to monitor the quality of platelet concentrates and whether pac-t-UB predicts the bleeding risk of transfused thrombocytopenic patients. PMID:23652405

  10. Human platelet activation by Escherichia coli: roles for FcγRIIA and integrin αIIbβ3

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Callum N.; Kerrigan, Steven W.; Cox, Dermot; Henderson, Ian R.; Watson, Steve P.; Arman, Mònica

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Gram-negative Escherichia coli cause diseases such as sepsis and hemolytic uremic syndrome in which thrombotic disorders can be found. Direct platelet–bacterium interactions might contribute to some of these conditions; however, mechanisms of human platelet activation by E. coli leading to thrombus formation are poorly understood. While the IgG receptor FcγRIIA has a key role in platelet response to various Gram-positive species, its role in activation to Gram-negative bacteria is poorly defined. This study aimed to investigate the molecular mechanisms of human platelet activation by E. coli, including the potential role of FcγRIIA. Using light-transmission aggregometry, measurements of ATP release and tyrosine-phosphorylation, we investigated the ability of two E. coli clinical isolates to activate platelets in plasma, in the presence or absence of specific receptors and signaling inhibitors. Aggregation assays with washed platelets supplemented with IgGs were performed to evaluate the requirement of this plasma component in activation. We found a critical role for the immune receptor FcγRIIA, αIIbβ3, and Src and Syk tyrosine kinases in platelet activation in response to E. coli. IgG and αIIbβ3 engagement was required for FcγRIIA activation. Moreover, feedback mediators adenosine 5’-diphosphate (ADP) and thromboxane A2 (TxA2) were essential for platelet aggregation. These findings suggest that human platelet responses to E. coli isolates are similar to those induced by Gram-positive organisms. Our observations support the existence of a central FcγRIIA-mediated pathway by which human platelets respond to both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. PMID:27025455

  11. Fluoxetine-induced alterations in human platelet serotonin transporter expression: serotonin transporter polymorphism effects

    PubMed Central

    Little, Karley Y.; Zhang, Lian; Cook, Edwin

    2006-01-01

    Objective Long-term antidepressant drug exposure may regulate its target molecule — the serotonin transporter (SERT). This effect could be related to an individual's genotype for an SERT promoter polymorphism (human serotonin transporter coding [5-HTTLPR]). We aimed to determine the effects of fluoxetine exposure on human platelet SERT levels. Method We harvested platelet samples from 21 healthy control subjects. The platelets were maintained alive ex vivo for 24 hours while being treated with 0.1 μM fluoxetine or vehicle. The effects on SERT immunoreactivity (IR) were then compared. Each individual's SERT promoter genotype was also determined to evaluate whether fluoxetine effects on SERT were related to genotype. Results Fluoxetine exposure replicably altered SERT IR within individuals. Both the magnitude and the direction of effect were related to a person's SERT genotype. People who were homozygous for the short gene (SS) displayed decreased SERT IR, whereas those who were homozygous for the long gene (LL) demonstrated increased SERT IR. A mechanistic experiment suggested that some individuals with the LL genotype might experience increased conversion of complexed SERT to primary SERT during treatment. Conclusions These preliminary results suggest that antidepressant effects after longer-term use may include changes in SERT expression levels and that the type and degree of effect may be related to the 5-HTTLPR polymorphism. PMID:16951736

  12. In vivo enrichment of genetically manipulated platelets corrects the murine hemophilic phenotype and induces immune tolerance even using a low MOI

    PubMed Central

    Schroeder, J. A.; Chen, Y.; Fang, J.; Wilcox, D. A.; Shi, Q.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Our previous studies have demonstrated that platelet-specific gene delivery to hematopoietic stem cells can induce sustained therapeutic levels of platelet-FVIII expression in hemophilia A (HA) mice. Objective In this study, we aimed to enhance platelet-FVIII expression while minimizing potential toxicities. Methods A novel lentiviral vector (LV), which harbors dual genes, the FVIII gene driven by the αIIb promoter (2bF8) and a drug-resistance gene, the MGMTP140K cassette, was constructed. Platelet-FVIII expression in HA mice was introduced by transduction of HSCs and transplantation. The recipients were treated with O6-benzylguanine followed by 1,3-bis-2 chloroethyl-1-nitrosourea monthly for 3 or 4 times. Animals were analyzed by PCR, qPCR, FVIII:C assays, and inhibitor assays. Phenotypic correction was assessed by tail clipping tests and ROTEM analysis. Results Even using a low MOI (multiplicity of infection) of 1 and a non-myeloablative conditioning regimen, after in vivo selection, the levels of platelet-FVIII expression in recipients increased to 4.33 ± 5.48 mU per 108 platelets (n = 16), which were 19.7-fold higher than the levels obtained from the recipients before treatment. qPCR results confirmed that 2bF8/MGMT-LV-transduced cells were effectively enriched after drug-selective treatment. Fifteen of 16 treated animals survived tail clipping. Blood loss and whole blood clotting time were normalized in the treated recipients. Notably, no anti-FVIII antibodies were detected in the treated animals even after rhF8 challenge. Conclusion we have established an effective in vivo selective system that allows us to enrich 2bF8LV-transduced cells, enhancing platelet-FVIII expression while reducing the potential toxicities associated with platelet gene therapy. PMID:24931217

  13. Lipopolysaccharide induces nitric oxide synthase expression and platelet-activating factor increases nitric oxide production in human fetal membranes in culture

    PubMed Central

    Seyffarth, Gunter; Nelson, Paul N; Dunmore, Simon J; Rodrigo, Nalinda; Murphy, Damian J; Carson, Ray J

    2004-01-01

    Background Platelet-activating factor and nitric oxide may be involved in the initiation of human labour as inflammatory mediators. The aim of this study was to test whether platelet-activating factor and lipopolysaccharide were able to induce nitric oxide synthase expression and stimulate the production of nitric oxide in human fetal membrane explants in culture. Methods Fetal membranes were collected from Caesarean sections at term. RNA was extracted from membranes and subjected to a qualitative RT-PCR to assess the baseline expression of iNOS. Discs of fetal membranes were cultured for 24 hours in the presence of platelet-activating factor at a dose range of 0.1 nanomolar – 1 micomolar or 1 microgram/ml lipopolysaccharide. Nitric oxide production was measured via nitrite ions in the culture medium and mRNA for iNOS was detected by RT-PCR. Results Culturing the membrane discs in medium containing serum induced nitric oxide synthase expression and platelet-activating factor significantly stimulated the production of nitric oxide under these conditions. When cultured without serum inducible nitric oxide synthase expression was induced by lipopolysaccharide, but not by platelet-activating factor. Conclusion Platelet-activating factor may have a role in the initiation of labour, at term or preterm, via the increased local production of nitric oxide as an inflammatory mediator. In this model of intrauterine infection, lipopolysaccharide was found to induce iNOS expression by fetal membranes, and this mechanism could be involved in preterm labour. PMID:15191613

  14. Platelet reactivity after administration of third generation P2Y12-antagonists does not depend on body weight in contrast to clopidogrel.

    PubMed

    Olivier, Christoph B; Schnabel, Katharina; Weber, Susanne; Zhou, Qian; Bode, Christoph; Moser, Martin; Diehl, Philipp

    2016-07-01

    The current standard of antiplatelet therapy for patients with myocardial infarction (MI) includes the P2Y12-receptor antagonist clopidogrel, prasugrel or ticagrelor. While it has been shown that platelet reactivity after clopidogrel administration depends on factors such as body weight, it is not known if these factors have an effect on the activity of prasugrel or ticagrelor. Thus, this study aimed to analyse factors associated with high residual platelet reactivity after administration of third generation P2Y12-antagonists compared to clopidogrel. In a single centre registry the antiplatelet effect of clopidogrel, prasugrel or ticagrelor was investigated by aggregometry in patients after MI. To assess the overall capacity of platelet aggregation whole blood was induced with thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP; 32 µM). To specifically quantify the effect of P2Y12-antagonists, blood was stimulated with 6.4 µM adenosine diphophosphate (ADP). Relative ADP induced aggregation (r-ADP-agg) was defined as the ADP-TRAP-ratio to reflect an individual degree of P2Y12-dependent platelet inhibition. Platelet function of 238 patients was analysed [clopidogrel (n = 58), prasugrel (n = 65), ticagrelor (n = 115)]. It was found that the r-ADP-agg correlated significantly with body weight in patients after clopidogrel administration (r = 0.423; p < 0.001). In contrast, this association was not present in patients after prasugrel (r = -0.117; p = 0.354) or ticagrelor (r = -0.082; p = 0.382) administration. Comparison of the correlation coefficients showed a significant difference (p = 0.003). In contrast to clopidogrel, platelet reactivity after administration of prasugrel or ticagrelor does not depend on body weight in patients after MI. Hence, our mechanistic data support the results of large clinical trials indicating that patients with high body weight do not need to be treated with increased doses of third generation P2Y12-antagonists to achieve

  15. Lipoteichoic Acid-Induced Nitric Oxide Production Depends on the Activation of Platelet-Activating Factor Receptor and Jak21

    PubMed Central

    Han, Seung Hyun; Kim, Je Hak; Seo, Ho Seong; Martin, Michael H.; Chung, Gook-Hyun; Michalek, Suzanne M.; Nahm, Moon H.

    2006-01-01

    NO production by macrophages in response to lipoteichoic acid (LTA) and a synthetic lipopeptide (Pam3CSK4) was investigated. LTA and Pam3CSK4 induced the production of both TNF-α and NO. Inhibitors of platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR) blocked LTA- or Pam3CSK4-induced production of NO but not TNF-α. Jak2 tyrosine kinase blocked LTA-induced production of NO but not TNF-α. PAFR inhibition blocked phosphorylation of Jak2 and STAT1, a key factor for expressing inducible NO synthase. In addition, LTA did not induce IFN-β expression, and p38 mitogen-activated protein serine kinase was necessary for LTA-induced NO production but not for TNF-α production. These findings suggest that Gram-positive bacteria induce NO production using a PAFR signaling pathway to activate STAT1 via Jak2. This PAFR/Jak2/STAT1 signaling pathway resembles the IFN-β, type I IFNR/Jak/STAT1 pathway described for LPS. Consequently, Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria appear to have different but analogous mechanisms for NO production. PMID:16365452

  16. Consumption of both low and high (-)-epicatechin apple puree attenuates platelet reactivity and increases plasma concentrations of nitric oxide metabolites: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Gasper, Amy; Hollands, Wendy; Casgrain, Amelie; Saha, Shikha; Teucher, Birgit; Dainty, Jack R; Venema, Dini P; Hollman, Peter C; Rein, Maarit J; Nelson, Rebecca; Williamson, Gary; Kroon, Paul A

    2014-10-01

    We hypothesised that consumption of flavanol-containing apple puree would modulate platelet activity and increase nitric oxide metabolite status, and that high flavanol apple puree would exert a greater effect than low flavanol apple puree. 25 subjects consumed 230 g of apple puree containing 25 and 100mg epicatechin (low and high flavanol apple puree, respectively) and aspirin (75 mg) in random order. Measurements were made at baseline, acutely after treatment (2, 6 and 24 h), and after 14 d of treatment. Low flavanol apple puree significantly attenuated ADP and epinephrine-induced integrin-β3 expression 2 h and 6 h after consumption and ADP and epinephrine-induced P-selectin expression within 2h of consumption. High flavanol apple puree attenuated epinephrine and ADP-induced integrin-β3 expression after 2 and 6h. ADP and epinephrine-induced integrin-β3 expression was significantly attenuated 2, 6 and 24 h after consumption of aspirin, whilst 14 d aspirin consumption attenuated collagen-induced P-selectin expression only. The plasma total nitric oxide metabolite conc. was significantly increased 6h after consumption of both low and high flavanol apple purees. In conclusion, consumption of apple purees containing ⩾25 or 100 mg flavanols transiently attenuated ex vivo integrin-β3 and P-selectin expression and increased plasma nitric oxide metabolite conc. in healthy subjects, but the effect was not enhanced for the high flavanol apple puree. PMID:24929184

  17. Structure and function of the ARH family of ADP-ribose-acceptor hydrolases

    PubMed Central

    Mashimo, Masato; Kato, Jiro; Moss, Joel

    2014-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation is a post-translational protein modification, in which ADP-ribose is transferred from nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) to specific acceptors, thereby altering their activities. The ADP-ribose transfer reactions are divided into mono- and poly-(ADP-ribosyl)ation. Cellular ADP-ribosylation levels are tightly regulated by enzymes that transfer ADP-ribose to acceptor proteins (e.g. ADP-ribosyltransferases, poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARP)) and those that cleave the linkage between ADP-ribose and acceptor (e.g. ADP-ribosyl-acceptor hydrolases (ARH), poly-(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolases (PARG)), thereby constituting an ADP-ribosylation cycle. This review summarizes current findings related to the ARH family of proteins. This family comprises three members (ARH1-3) with similar size (39 kDa) and amino acid sequence. ARH1 catalyzes the hydrolysis of the N-glycosidic bond of mono-(ADP-ribosyl)ated arginine. ARH3 hydrolyzes poly-(ADP-ribose) (PAR) and O-acetyl-ADP-ribose. The different substrate specificities of ARH1 and ARH3 contribute to their unique roles in the cell. Based on a phenotype analysis of ARH1−/− and ARH3−/− mice, ARH1 is involved in the action by bacterial toxins as well as in tumorigenesis. ARH3 participates in the degradation of PAR that is synthesized by PARP1 in response to oxidative stress-induced DNA damage; this hydrolytic reaction suppresses PAR-mediated cell death, a pathway termed parthanatos. PMID:24746921

  18. Comparison of common platelet receptors between the chacma baboon (Papio ursinus) and human for use in pre-clinical human-targeted anti-platelet studies.

    PubMed

    Janse van Rensburg, Walter J

    2016-06-01

    Anti-platelet agents play a central part in the treatment and prevention of acute thrombotic events. Discriminating animal models are needed for the development of novel agents. The chacma baboon has been extensively used as a model to evaluate anti-platelet agents. However, limited data exist to prove the translatability of this species to humans. We aimed to determine the suitability of the chacma baboon in preclinical human targeted GPIIb/IIIa, GPIbα and P2Y12 studies. Light-transmission platelet aggregometry (LTA), whole blood impedance aggregometry, receptor number quantification and genomic DNA sequencing were performed. Baboon ADP and arachidonic acid-induced LTA aggregation results differed significantly from human values, even at increased concentrations. LTA ristocetin-induced agglutination was comparable between species, but baboon platelets needed twice the concentration of ristocetin to elicit a similar response. Citrated baboon blood had significantly less aggregation than humans when evaluated with impedance aggregometry. However, hirudinised baboon whole blood gave similar aggregation as humans at the same agonist concentrations. GPIIb, GPIIIa and GPIbα numbers were significantly more on the baboon platelets. None of the amino acids deemed vital for receptor function, ligand binding or receptor inhibition, were radically different between the species. However, a conservative change in a calcium-binding region of GPIIb may render the baboon platelets more sensitive to calcium-binding agents. The chacma baboon may be used for the evaluation of human-targeted GPIIb/IIIa-, GPIbα- and P2Y12-inhibiting agents. However, the best anticoagulant, optimal agonist concentrations, increase in receptor number and sequence differences must be considered for any future studies. PMID:26559117

  19. Loss of high-affinity prostacyclin receptors in platelets and the lack of prostaglandin-induced inhibition of platelet-stimulated thrombin generation in subjects with spinal cord injury.

    PubMed Central

    Kahn, N N; Bauman, W A; Sinha, A K

    1996-01-01

    Coronary artery disease is a leading cause of death in individuals with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI). However, platelets of those with SCI (n = 30) showed neither increased aggregation nor resistance to the antiaggregatory effects of prostacyclin when compared with normal controls (n = 30). Prostanoid-induced cAMP synthesis was similar in both groups. In contrast, prostacyclin, which completely inhibited the platelet-stimulated thrombin generation in normal controls, failed to do so in those with SCI. Scatchard analysis of the binding of [3H]prostaglandin E1, used as a prostacyclin receptor probe, showed the presence of one high-affinity (Kd1 = 8.11 +/- 2.80 nM; n1 = 172 +/- 32 sites per cell) and one low-affinity (Kd2 = 1.01 +/- 0.3 microM; n2 = 1772 +/- 226 sites per cell) prostacyclin receptor in normal platelets. In contrast, the same analysis in subjects with SCI showed significant loss (P < 0.001) of high-affinity receptor sites (Kd1 = 6.34 +/- 1.91 nM; n1 = 43 +/- 10 sites per cell) with no significant change in the low affinity-receptors (Kd2 = 1.22 +/- 0.23; n2 = 1820 +/- 421). Treatment of these platelets with insulin, which has been demonstrated to restore both of the high- and low-affinity prostaglandin receptor numbers to within normal ranges in coronary artery disease, increased high-affinity receptor numbers and restored the prostacyclin effect on thrombin generation. These results demonstrate that the loss of the inhibitory effect of prostacyclin on the stimulation of thrombin generation was due to the loss of platelet high-affinity prostanoid receptors, which may contribute to atherogenesis in individuals with chronic SCI. PMID:8552614

  20. Bleomycin-induced lung injury in rats selectively abolishes hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction: evidence against a role for platelet-activating factor.

    PubMed

    McCormack, D G; Crawley, D E; Barnes, P J; Evans, T W

    1992-03-01

    1. The role of platelet-activating factor in the attenuated hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction associated with lung injury was evaluated using specific platelet-activating factor antagonists and an isolated perfused lung preparation. 2. Intratracheal bleomycin was administered to rats to produce acute lung injury. Animals received intratracheal saline (control), intratracheal bleomycin or the platelet-activating factor antagonists BN 52021, WEB 2170 or WEB 2086 before and after bleomycin treatment. Forty-eight hours after intratracheal administration of bleomycin or saline the animals were killed. 3. The increases in pulmonary artery pressure during two periods of hypoxic ventilation and in response to 0.2 microgram of angiotensin II were measured. Acetylcholine-induced vasodilatation after pre-constriction with prostaglandin F2 alpha was also measured. To quantify lung injury, the wet/dry ratio of lung weight was determined. 4. Bleomycin treatment attenuated the first and second hypoxic pressor responses by 93% and 77%, respectively, but not the pressor response to angiotensin II nor the vasodilator response to acetylcholine. BN 52021 plus bleomycin augmented the first hypoxic pressor response compared with bleomycin treatment alone, but the structurally unrelated platelet-activating factor antagonists WEB 2170 and WEB 2086 had no significant effect on the bleomycin-induced attenuation of hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction. None of the platelet-activating factor antagonists blocked the increase in the wet/dry lung weight ratio induced by bleomycin. 5. Bleomycin-induced lung injury selectively attenuates hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, an effect that does not appear to be mediated by platelet-activating factor. The mechanism remains to be elucidated, but may involve destruction of the hypoxic 'sensor' within the respiratory tract. PMID:1372199

  1. Inhibition of rat platelet aggregation by the diazeniumdiolate nitric oxide donor MAHMA NONOate

    PubMed Central

    Homer, Kerry L; Wanstall, Janet C

    2002-01-01

    Inhibition of rat platelet aggregation by the nitric oxide (NO) donor MAHMA NONOate (Z-1-{N-methyl-N-[6-(N-methylammoniohexyl)amino]}diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate) was investigated. The aims were to compare its anti-aggregatory effect with vasorelaxation, to determine the effects of the soluble guanylate cyclase inhibitor, ODQ (1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one), and to investigate the possible role of activation of sarco-endoplasmic reticulum calcium-ATPase (SERCA), independent of soluble guanylate cyclase, using thapsigargin. MAHMA NONOate concentration-dependently inhibited sub-maximal aggregation responses to collagen (2–10 μg ml−1) and adenosine diphosphate (ADP; 2 μM) in platelet rich plasma. It was (i) more effective at inhibiting aggregation induced by collagen than by ADP, and (ii) less potent at inhibiting platelet aggregation than relaxing rat pulmonary artery. ODQ (10 μM) caused only a small shift (approximately half a log unit) in the concentration-response curve to MAHMA NONOate irrespective of the aggregating agent. The NO-independent activator of soluble guanylate cyclase, YC-1 (3-(5′-hydroxymethyl-2′-furyl)-1-benzyl indazole; 1–100 μM), did not inhibit aggregation. The cGMP analogue, 8-pCPT-cGMP (8-(4-chlorophenylthio)guanosine 3′5′ cyclic monophosphate; 0.1–1 mM), caused minimal inhibition. On collagen-aggregated platelets responses to MAHMA NONOate (ODQ 10 μM present) were abolished by thapsigargin (200 nM). On ADP-aggregated platelets thapsigargin caused partial inhibition. Results with S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) resembled those with MAHMA NONOate. Glyceryl trinitrate and sodium nitroprusside were poor inhibitors of aggregation. Thus inhibition of rat platelet aggregation by MAHMA NONOate (like GSNO) is largely ODQ-resistant and, by implication, independent of soluble guanylate cyclase. A likely mechanism of inhibition is activation of SERCA. PMID:12429580

  2. Platelet-released growth factors induce the antimicrobial peptide human beta-defensin-2 in primary keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Bayer, Andreas; Lammel, Justus; Rademacher, Franziska; Groß, Justus; Siggelkow, Markus; Lippross, Sebastian; Klüter, Tim; Varoga, Deike; Tohidnezhad, Mersedeh; Pufe, Thomas; Cremer, Jochen; Gläser, Regine; Harder, Jürgen

    2016-06-01

    Platelet-released growth factors (PRGF) and its related clinically used formulations [e.g. Vivostat platelet-rich fibrin (PRF(®) )] are thrombocyte concentrate lysates that support healing of chronic, hard-to-heal and infected wounds. Human beta-defensin-2 (hBD-2) is an antimicrobial peptide expressed in human keratinocytes exhibiting potent antimicrobial activity against wound-related bacteria. In this study, we analysed the influence of PRGF on hBD-2 expression in human primary keratinocytes and the influence of Vivostat PRF(®) on hBD-2 expression in experimentally generated skin wounds in vivo. Treatment of primary keratinocytes with PRGF caused a significant increase in hBD-2 gene and protein expressions in a concentration- and time-dependent manner. The use of blocking antibodies revealed that the PRGF-mediated hBD-2 induction was partially mediated by the epidermal growth factor receptor and the interleukin-6 receptor (IL-6R). Luciferase gene reporter assays indicated that the hBD-2 induction through PRGF required activation of the transcription factor activator protein 1 (AP-1), but not of NF-kappaB. In concordance with these cell culture data, Vivostat PRF(®) induced hBD-2 expression when applied to experimentally generated skin wounds. Together, our results indicate that the induction of hBD-2 by thrombocyte concentrate lysates can contribute to the observed beneficial effects in the treatment of chronic and infected wounds. PMID:26843467

  3. Evaluation of Shear-Induced Platelet Activation Models Under Constant and Dynamic Shear Stress Loading Conditions Relevant to Devices

    PubMed Central

    Sheriff, Jawaad; Soares, João Silva; Xenos, Michalis; Jesty, Jolyon; Bluestein, Danny

    2013-01-01

    The advent of implantable blood-recirculating devices such as left ventricular assist devices and prosthetic heart valves provides a viable therapy for patients with end-stage heart failure and valvular disease. However, device-generated pathological flow patterns result in thromboembolic complications that require complex and lifelong anticoagulant therapy, which entails hemorrhagic risks and is not appropriate for certain patients. Optimizing the thrombogenic performance of such devices utilizing numerical simulations requires the development of predictive platelet activation models that account for variations in shear-loading rates characterizing blood flow through such devices. Platelets were exposed in vitro to both dynamic and constant shear stress conditions emulating those found in blood-recirculating devices in order to determine their shear-induced activation and sensitization response. Both these behaviors were found to be dependent on the shear loading rates, in addition to shear stress magnitude and exposure time. We then critically examined several current models and evaluated their predictive capabilities using these results. Shear loading rate terms were then included to account for dynamic aspects that are either ignored or partially considered by these models, and model parameters were optimized. Independent optimization for each of the two types of shear stress exposure conditions tested resulted in different sets of best-fit constants, indicating that universal optimization may not be possible. Inherent limitations of the current models require a paradigm shift from these integral-based discretized power law models to better address the dynamic conditions encountered in blood-recirculating devices. PMID:23400312

  4. Salvianolic acid B inhibits platelets as a P2Y12 antagonist and PDE inhibitor: evidence from clinic to laboratory.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Li, Jian; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Shenghui; Ye, Jianqin; Wen, Zhichao; Ding, Jianping; Kunapuli, Satya P; Luo, Xinping; Ding, Zhongren

    2014-10-01

    Salviae miltiorrhiza (Danshen) has been used for thousands of years in China and some other Asian countries to treat atherothrombotic diseases. Salvianolate which consists of three water-soluble ingredients purified from Salviae miltiorrhiza, has been approved by Chinese SFDA to treat coronary artery disease. So far, there is no evidence clearly showing the clinical efficiency of salvianolate and the underlying mechanism. This study is to evaluate the effects of salvianolate on platelets in patients with acute coronary syndrome and explore the underlying mechanism. We evaluated the effects of salvianolate on platelets in patients with acute coronary syndrome by measuring ADP-induced PAC-1 binding and P-selectin expression on platelets. Salvianolate significantly potentiated the antiplatelet effects of standard dual antiplatelet therapy. We also investigated the antiplatelet effects of salvianolatic acid B (Sal-B), the major component which composes 85% of salvianolate. Sal-B inhibits human platelet activation induced by multiple agonists in vitro by inhibiting phosphodiesterase (PDE) and antagonizing P2Y12 receptor. For the first time, we show the antiplatelet efficiency of salvianolate in ACS patients undergoing treatment with clopidogrel plus aspirin, and demonstrate that Sal-B, the major component of salvianolate inhibits human platelet activation via PDE inhibition and P2Y12 antagonism which may account for the clinical antiplatelet effects of salvianolate. Our results suggest that Sal-B may substitute salvianolate for clinical use. PMID:25077998

  5. New urushiols with platelet aggregation inhibitory activities from resin of Toxicodendron vernicifluum.

    PubMed

    Xie, Ya; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Wenyuan; Xie, Ning; Feng, Feng; Qu, Wei

    2016-07-01

    Eight new urushiol-type compounds (1-7b), along with seven known compounds were isolated from the resin of Toxicodendron vernicifluum Stokes. Their structures were determined by extensive spectroscopic methods, included (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, HMQC, HMBC, HRESIMS, EI-MS in combination with CD methods. All the compounds except 7a and 7b were evaluated for their anti-platelet aggregation activities in vitro. Among them, compound 5 (IC50=5.12±0.85μmol/L), with a vic-diol moiety in the long alkyl chain showed the most potent inhibitory of platelet aggregation activity induced by ADP. In addition, compound 6 showed the effect of anti-platelet aggregation induced by AA with the IC50 value of 3.09±0.70μmol/L. Thus, these compounds might be the active components to the traditional use of Resina Toxicodendri for breaking up blood stasis, which could be related to the anti-platelet aggregation. PMID:27156871

  6. Fluoxetine-induced transactivation of the platelet-derived growth factor type β receptor reveals a novel heterologous desensitization process.

    PubMed

    Kruk, Jeff S; Vasefi, Maryam S; Gondora, Nyasha; Ahmed, Nawaz; Heikkila, John J; Beazely, Michael A

    2015-03-01

    Many G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), including serotonin (5-HT) receptors promote the activity of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) via intracellular signaling pathways in a process termed transactivation. Although transactivation pathways are commonly initiated by a GPCR, a recent report demonstrated that serotonin-selective reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) were able to block 5-HT-induced transactivation of the platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) type β receptor. We show that a 45 min pretreatment of SH-SY5Y cells with the SSRI fluoxetine indeed blocked 5-HT-induced transactivation of the PDGFβ receptor. However, upon further examination, we discovered that during the pretreatment period, fluoxetine itself was transiently transactivating the PDGFβ receptor via 5-HT2 receptor activation. After 45min, the increase in PDGFβ receptor phosphorylation induced by fluoxetine had returned to baseline, but a subsequent transactivating stimulus (5-HT) failed to "re-transactivate" the PDGFβ receptor. We further demonstrate that 45min, but not 3h, 5-HT pretreatment blocks dopamine-induced PDGFβ receptor transactivation. This did not involve changes in PDGF receptor function, since ligand (PDGF)-induced PDGFβ receptor activation was not inhibited by 5-HT pretreatment. To our knowledge this is the first demonstration of the heterologous desensitization of an RTK transactivation pathway and reveals a previously unknown short-term "blackout" period where no additional transactivation signaling is possible. PMID:25702926

  7. Oxidative response of neutrophils to platelet-activating factor is altered during acute ruminal acidosis induced by oligofructose in heifers

    PubMed Central

    Concha, Claudia; Carretta, María Daniella; Alarcón, Pablo; Conejeros, Ivan; Gallardo, Diego; Hidalgo, Alejandra Isabel; Tadich, Nestor; Cáceres, Dante Daniel; Hidalgo, María Angélica

    2014-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is one of the main mechanisms used to kill microbes during innate immune response. D-lactic acid, which is augmented during acute ruminal acidosis, reduces platelet activating factor (PAF)-induced ROS production and L-selectin shedding in bovine neutrophils in vitro. This study was conducted to investigate whether acute ruminal acidosis induced by acute oligofructose overload in heifers interferes with ROS production and L-selectin shedding in blood neutrophils. Blood neutrophils and plasma were obtained by jugular venipuncture, while ruminal samples were collected using rumenocentesis. Lactic acid from plasma and ruminal samples was measured by HPLC. PAF-induced ROS production and L-selectin shedding were measured in vitro in bovine neutrophils by a luminol chemiluminescence assay and flow cytometry, respectively. A significant increase in ruminal and plasma lactic acid was recorded in these animals. Specifically, a decrease in PAF-induced ROS production was observed 8 h after oligofructose overload, and this was sustained until 48 h post oligofructose overload. A reduction in PAF-induced L-selectin shedding was observed at 16 h and 32 h post oligofructose overload. Overall, the results indicated that neutrophil PAF responses were altered in heifers with ruminal acidosis, suggesting a potential dysfunction of the innate immune response. PMID:25013355

  8. A Histologically Distinctive Interstitial Pneumonia Induced by Overexpression of the Interleukin 6, Transforming Growth Factor β1, or Platelet-Derived Growth Factor B Gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshida, Mitsuhiro; Sakuma, Junko; Hayashi, Seiji; Abe, Kin'ya; Saito, Izumu; Harada, Shizuko; Sakatani, Mitsunoir; Yamamoto, Satoru; Matsumoto, Norinao; Kaneda, Yasufumi; Kishmoto, Tadamitsu

    1995-10-01

    Interstitial pneumonia is characterized by alveolitis with resulting fibrosis of the interstitium. To determine the relevance of humoral factors in the pathogenesis of interstitial pneumonia, we introduced expression vectors into Wistar rats via the trachea to locally overexpress humoral factors in the lungs. Human interleukin (IL) 6 and IL-6 receptor genes induced lymphocytic alveolitis without marked fibroblast proliferation. In contrast, overexpression of human transforming growth factor β1 or human platelet-derived growth factor B gene induced only mild or apparent cellular infiltration in the alveoli, respectively. However, both factors induced significant proliferation of fibroblasts and deposition of collagen fibrils. These histopathologic changes induced by the transforming growth factor β1 and platelet-derived growth factor B gene are partly akin to those changes seen in lung tissues from patients with pulmonary fibrosis and markedly contrast with the changes induced by overexpression of the IL-6 and IL-6 receptor genes that mimics lymphocytic interstitial pneumonia.

  9. Platelet-activating factor: an endogenous mediator of mesenteric ischemia-reperfusion-induced shock.

    PubMed

    Mózes, T; Braquet, P; Filep, J

    1989-10-01

    The role of platelet-activating factor (PAF) in circulatory shock of intestinal origin was investigated in anesthetized dogs by measuring PAF levels in the superior mesenteric vein during reperfusion after 2-h occlusion of the superior mesenteric artery; by monitoring the effects of BN 52021, a specific PAF receptor antagonist; and by studying the circulatory effects of exogenous PAF injected into the superior mesenteric vein. PAF was measured by a platelet-aggregation assay. Identity of PAF-like bioactivity was ascertained by thin-layer chromatography, high-pressure liquid chromatography, and alkaline treatment. Removal of the superior mesenteric artery occlusion caused an immediate dramatic decrease in mean arterial blood pressure with concomitant increase in mean portal venous pressure and hematocrit values. PAF concentration in the superior mesenteric vein increased from 0.2 +/- 0.1 to 2.8 +/- 0.4 ng/ml (n = 4, P less than 0.05) within the first 5 min of reperfusion. Administration of exogenous PAF (0.1 microgram/kg) injected into the superior mesenteric vein produced similar hemodynamical effects. Pretreatment of the animals with BN 52021 (4 mg/kg), a specific PAF receptor antagonist, prevented the circulatory collapse. The present results suggest that PAF release during intestinal ischemia may play an important role in the development of circulatory collapse caused by mesenteric artery occlusion. PMID:2802004

  10. Evaluation of dose and route effects of platelet activating factor-induced extravasation in the guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Handley, D A; Van Valen, R G; Melden, M K; Saunders, R N

    1984-08-31

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a naturally occurring lipid that is reported to induce vessel hyperpermeability leading to loss of protein-rich plasma (extravasation). We have quantitated the systemic extravasation effects of synthetic PAF in the guinea pig by monitoring increases in hematocrit. When given intravenously (10-170 ng/kg), PAF produced dose-dependent increases in hematocrit, with maximal hemoconcentration developing in 5-7 min. In leukopenic animals the expected hematocrit increase was reduced by 57%. PAF given intra-arterially produced the dose-dependent changes in hematocrit similar to the intravenous effects of PAF. However, PAF given intraperitoneally (10-2500 micrograms/kg) was 800-1100-fold less effective than the other routes and hemoconcentration continued for 30-45 min until a maximal hematocrit was observed. These results show that PAF may markedly influence extravasation of plasma in a dose and route-dependent manner. PMID:6495262

  11. Effect of in-water oxygen prebreathing at different depths on decompression-induced bubble formation and platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Bosco, Gerardo; Yang, Zhong-jin; Di Tano, Guglielmo; Camporesi, Enrico M; Faralli, Fabio; Savini, Fabio; Landolfi, Angelo; Doria, Christian; Fanò, Giorgio

    2010-05-01

    Effect of in-water oxygen prebreathing at different depths on decompression-induced bubble formation and platelet activation in scuba divers was evaluated. Six volunteers participated in four diving protocols, with 2 wk of recovery between dives. On dive 1, before diving, all divers breathed normally for 20 min at the surface of the sea (Air). On dive 2, before diving, all divers breathed 100% oxygen for 20 min at the surface of the sea [normobaric oxygenation (NBO)]. On dive 3, before diving, all divers breathed 100% O2 for 20 min at 6 m of seawater [msw; hyperbaric oxygenation (HBO) 1.6 atmospheres absolute (ATA)]. On dive 4, before diving, all divers breathed 100% O2 for 20 min at 12 msw (HBO 2.2 ATA). Then they dove to 30 msw (4 ATA) for 20 min breathing air from scuba. After each dive, blood samples were collected as soon as the divers surfaced. Bubbles were measured at 20 and 50 min after decompression and converted to bubble count estimate (BCE) and numeric bubble grade (NBG). BCE and NBG were significantly lower in NBO than in Air [0.142+/-0.034 vs. 0.191+/-0.066 (P<0.05) and 1.61+/-0.25 vs. 1.89+/-0.31 (P<0.05), respectively] at 20 min, but not at 50 min. HBO at 1.6 ATA and 2.2 ATA has a similar significant effect of reducing BCE and NBG. BCE was 0.067+/-0.026 and 0.040+/-0.018 at 20 min and 0.030+/-0.022 and 0.020+/-0.020 at 50 min. NBG was 1.11+/-0.17 and 0.92+/-0.16 at 20 min and 0.83+/-0.18 and 0.75+/-0.16 at 50 min. Prebreathing NBO and HBO significantly alleviated decompression-induced platelet activation. Activation of CD62p was 3.0+/-0.4, 13.5+/-1.3, 10.7+/-0.9, 4.5+/-0.7, and 7.6+/-0.8% for baseline, Air, NBO, HBO at 1.6 ATA, and HBO at 2.2 ATA, respectively. The data show that prebreathing oxygen, more effective with HBO than NBO, decreases air bubbles and platelet activation and, therefore, may be beneficial in reducing the development of decompression sickness. PMID:20185629

  12. Glucosamine suppresses platelet-activating factor-induced activation of microglia through inhibition of store-operated calcium influx.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae-Hyung; Kim, Jeong-Nam; Jang, Byeong-Churl; Im, Seung-Soon; Song, Dae-Kyu; Bae, Jae-Hoon

    2016-03-01

    Microglia activation and subsequent release of inflammatory mediators are implicated in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases. Platelet-activating factor (PAF), a potent lipid mediator synthesized by microglia, is known to stimulate microglia functional responses. In this study, we determined that endogenous PAF exert autocrine effects on microglia activation, as well as the underlying mechanism involved. We also investigated the effect of D-glucosamine (GlcN) on PAF-induced cellular activation in human HMO6 microglial cells. PAF induced sustained intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) increase through store-operated Ca(2+) channels (SOC) and reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. PAF also induced pro-inflammatory markers through NFκB/COX-2 signaling. GlcN significantly inhibited PAF-induced Ca(2+) influx and ROS generation without significant cytotoxicity. GlcN downregulated excessive expression of pro-inflammatory markers and promoted filopodia formation through NFκB/COX-2 inhibition in PAF-stimulated HMO6 cells. Taken together, these data suggest that GlcN may offer substantial therapeutic potential for treating inflammatory and neurodegenerative diseases accompanied by microglial activation. PMID:26745504

  13. Experimental evaluation of analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-platelet potential of Dashamoola

    PubMed Central

    Parekar, Reshma R.; Bolegave, Somesh S.; Marathe, Padmaja A.; Rege, Nirmala N.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dashamoola, in the form of arishta and kwath, is a commonly used classical Ayurvedic multi-ingredient formulation for management of pain, arthritis and inflammatory disorders. Objective: To study analgesic, anti-inflammatory and anti-platelet activity of Dashamoola and its combination with aspirin. Materials and Methods: Wistar albino rats (180-200 g) and Swiss albino mice (20-25 g) of either sex were divided randomly into five groups: Distilled water, aspirin (500mg/kg in rats; 722.2 mg/kg in mice), Dashamoolarishta (1.8 mL/kg in rats; 2.5 mL/kg in mice) and Dashamoolarishta with aspirin. Anti-inflammatory activity was measured by change in paw volume in carrageenan-induced inflammation, protein content in model of peritonitis and granuloma weight in cotton pellet granuloma. Analgesic effect was evaluated by counting number of writhes in writhing model. Maximum platelet aggregation and percentage inhibition of ADP and collagen-induced platelet aggregation were estimated in vitro. Statistical analysis was done using one way ANOVA (post hoc Tukey's test) and P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: Dashamoolarishta and its combination with aspirin showed significantly (P < 0.01) less number of writhes. It showed significant (P < 0.001) anti-inflammatory activity by paw edema reduction in rats, decrease in proteins in peritoneal fluid (P < 0.001) and decrease in granuloma weight (P < 0.05) as compared to respective vehicle control groups. Dashamoola kwath alone and in combination with aspirin inhibited maximum platelet aggregation and percent inhibition of platelets as compared to vehicle (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Dashamoola formulation alone and its combination with aspirin showed comparable anti-inflammatory, analgesic and anti-platelet effects to aspirin. PMID:25878458

  14. The effect of polyphenolic-polysaccharide conjugates from selected medicinal plants of Asteraceae family on the peroxynitrite-induced changes in blood platelet proteins.

    PubMed

    Saluk-Juszczak, Joanna; Pawlaczyk, Izabela; Olas, Beata; Kołodziejczyk, Joanna; Ponczek, Michal; Nowak, Pawel; Tsirigotis-Wołoszczak, Marta; Wachowicz, Barbara; Gancarz, Roman

    2010-12-01

    Lots of plants belonging to Asteraceae family are very popular in folk medicine in Poland. These plants are also known as being rich in acidic polysaccharides, due to the presence of hexuronic acids or its derivatives. Our preliminary experiments have shown that the extract from Conyza canadensis L. possesses various biological activity, including antiplatelet, antiocoagulant and antioxidant properties. The aim of our study was to assess if macromolecular glycoconjugates from selected herbal plants of Asteraceae family: Achillea millefolium L., Arnica montana L., Echinacea purpurea L., Solidago virgaurea L., Chamomilla recutita (L.) Rauschert., and Conyza canadensis L. protect platelet proteins against nitrative and oxidative damage induced by peroxynitrite, which is responsible for oxidative/nitrative modifications of platelet proteins: the formation of 3-nitrotyrosine and carbonyl groups. These modifications may lead to changes of blood platelet functions and can have pathological consequences. The role of these different medicinal plants in the defence against oxidative/nitrative stress in human platelets is still unknown, therefore the oxidative damage to platelet proteins induced by peroxynitrite and protectory effects of tested conjugates by the estimation of carbonyl group level and nitrotyrosine formation (a marker of protein nitration) were studied in vitro. The antioxidative properties of the polyphenolic-polysaccharide conjugates from selected tested medicinal plants were also compared with the action of a well characterized antioxidative commercial polyphenol - resveratrol (3,4',5-trihydroxystilbene). The obtained results demonstrate that the compounds from herbal plants: A. millefolium, A. montana, E. purpurea, C. recutita, S. virgaurea, possess antioxidative properties and protect platelet proteins against peroxynitrite toxicity in vitro, similar to the glycoconjugates from C. canadensis. However, in the comparative studies, the polyphenolic

  15. Nuclear ADP-Ribosylation Reactions in Mammalian Cells: Where Are We Today and Where Are We Going?

    PubMed Central

    Hassa, Paul O.; Haenni, Sandra S.; Elser, Michael; Hottiger, Michael O.

    2006-01-01

    Since poly-ADP ribose was discovered over 40 years ago, there has been significant progress in research into the biology of mono- and poly-ADP-ribosylation reactions. During the last decade, it became clear that ADP-ribosylation reactions play important roles in a wide range of physiological and pathophysiological processes, including inter- and intracellular signaling, transcriptional regulation, DNA repair pathways and maintenance of genomic stability, telomere dynamics, cell differentiation and proliferation, and necrosis and apoptosis. ADP-ribosylation reactions are phylogenetically ancient and can be classified into four major groups: mono-ADP-ribosylation, poly-ADP-ribosylation, ADP-ribose cyclization, and formation of O-acetyl-ADP-ribose. In the human genome, more than 30 different genes coding for enzymes associated with distinct ADP-ribosylation activities have been identified. This review highlights the recent advances in the rapidly growing field of nuclear mono-ADP-ribosylation and poly-ADP-ribosylation reactions and the distinct ADP-ribosylating enzyme families involved in these processes, including the proposed family of novel poly-ADP-ribose polymerase-like mono-ADP-ribose transferases and the potential mono-ADP-ribosylation activities of the sirtuin family of NAD+-dependent histone deacetylases. A special focus is placed on the known roles of distinct mono- and poly-ADP-ribosylation reactions in physiological processes, such as mitosis, cellular differentiation and proliferation, telomere dynamics, and aging, as well as “programmed necrosis” (i.e., high-mobility-group protein B1 release) and apoptosis (i.e., apoptosis-inducing factor shuttling). The proposed molecular mechanisms involved in these processes, such as signaling, chromatin modification (i.e., “histone code”), and remodeling of chromatin structure (i.e., DNA damage response, transcriptional regulation, and insulator function), are described. A potential cross talk between nuclear

  16. Complementary effects of extracellular nucleotides and platelet-derived extracts on angiogenesis of vasa vasorum endothelial cells in vitro and subcutaneous Matrigel plugs in vivo

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Platelets contribute to vascular homeostasis and angiogenesis through the release of multiple growth factors, cytokines and nucleotides, such as ATP and ADP. Recent reports have demonstrated a marked growth-promoting effect of total platelet extracts and selected platelet growth factors on therapeutic angiogenesis. However, since endogenous adenine nucleotides are rapidly degraded during the platelet isolation and storage, we examined whether supplementing a platelet-derived extract with exogenous adenine nucleotides would augment their pro-angiogenic effects. Methods Pulmonary artery vasa vasorum endothelial cells (VVEC) were used to examine the effects of dialyzed platelet-derived soluble extracts and extracellular adenine nucleotides on proliferation, migration and tube formation. In addition, an in vivo Matrigel plug assay was used to examine the effects of platelet extracts and adenine nucleotides on neovascularization of plugs subcutaneously placed in 50 ICR mice. The number of vascular structures in Matrigel plugs were evaluated by histological and statistical methods. Results Platelet extracts (6.4-64 μg/ml) significantly induced DNA synthesis and at a concentration of 64 μg/ml had a biphasic effect on VVEC proliferation (an increase at 48 hrs followed by a decrease at 60 hrs). Stimulation of VVEC with platelet extracts also significantly (up to several-fold) increased cell migration and tube formation on Matrigel. Stimulation of VVEC with extracellular ATP (100 μM) dramatically (up to ten-fold) increased migration and tube formation on Matrigel; however, no significant effects on cell proliferation were observed. We also found that ATP moderately diminished platelet extract-induced VVEC proliferation (48 hrs) and migration, but potentiated tube formation. Neither ATP, or a mixture of non-hydrolyzable nucleotides (ATPγS, ADPβS, MeSATP, MeSADP) induced vascularization of Matrigel plugs subcutaneously injected in mice, however, the combination

  17. A Mathematical Model and Numerical Method for Studying Platelet Adhesion and Aggregation during Blood Clotting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fogelson, Aaron L.

    1984-10-01

    The repair of small blood vessels and the pathological growth of internal blood clots involve the formation of platelet aggregates adhering to portions of the vessel wall. Our microscopic model represents blood by a suspension of discrete massless platelets in a viscous incompressible fluid. Platelets are initially noncohesive; however, if stimulated by an above-threshold concentration of the chemical ADP or by contact with the adhesive injured region of the vessel wall, they b