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Sample records for adp receptor p2y12

  1. Identification of Determinants Required for Agonistic and Inverse Agonistic Ligand Properties at the ADP Receptor P2Y12

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Philipp; Ritscher, Lars; Dong, Elizabeth N.; Hermsdorf, Thomas; Cöster, Maxi; Wittkopf, Doreen; Meiler, Jens

    2013-01-01

    The ADP receptor P2Y12 belongs to the superfamily of G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs), and its activation triggers platelet aggregation. Therefore, potent antagonists, such as clopidogrel, are of high clinical relevance in prophylaxis and treatment of thromboembolic events. P2Y12 displays an elevated basal activity in vitro, and as such, inverse agonists may be therapeutically beneficial compared with antagonists. Only a few inverse agonists of P2Y12 have been described. To expand this limited chemical space and improve understanding of structural determinants of inverse agonist-receptor interaction, this study screened a purine compound library for lead structures using wild-type (WT) human P2Y12 and 28 constitutively active mutants. Results showed that ATP and ATP derivatives are agonists at P2Y12. The potency at P2Y12 was 2-(methylthio)-ADP > 2-(methylthio)-ATP > ADP > ATP. Determinants required for agonistic ligand activity were identified. Molecular docking studies revealed a binding pocket for the ATP derivatives that is bordered by transmembrane helices 3, 5, 6, and 7 in human P2Y12, with Y105, E188, R256, Y259, and K280 playing a particularly important role in ligand interaction. N-Methyl-anthraniloyl modification at the 3′-OH of the 2′-deoxyribose leads to ligands (mant-deoxy-ATP [dATP], mant-deoxy-ADP) with inverse agonist activity. Inverse agonist activity of mant-dATP was found at the WT human P2Y12 and half of the constitutive active P2Y12 mutants. This study showed that, in addition to ADP and ATP, other ATP derivatives are not only ligands of P2Y12 but also agonists. Modification of the ribose within ATP can result in inverse activity of ATP-derived ligands. PMID:23093496

  2. P2Y12-ADP receptor antagonists: Days of future and past.

    PubMed

    Laine, Marc; Paganelli, Franck; Bonello, Laurent

    2016-05-26

    Antiplatelet therapy is the cornerstone of the therapeutic arsenal in coronary artery disease. Thanks to a better understanding in physiology, pharmacology and pharmacogenomics huge progress were made in the field of platelet reactivity inhibition thus allowing the expansion of percutaneous coronary intervention. Stent implantation requires the combination of two antiplatelet agents acting in a synergistic way. Asprin inhibit the cyclo-oxygenase pathway of platelet activation while clopidogrel is a P2Y12 adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-receptor antagonist. This dual antiplatelet therapy has dramatically improved the prognosis of stented patients. However, due to pharmacological limitations of clopidogrel (interindividual variability in its biological efficacy, slow onset of action, mild platelet reactivity inhibition) ischemic recurrences remained high following stent implantation especially in acute coronary syndrome patients. Thus, more potent P2Y12-ADP receptor inhibitors were developped including prasugrel, ticagrelor and more recently cangrelor to overcome these pitfalls. These new agents reduced the rate of thrombotic events in acute coronary syndrome patients at the cost of an increased bleeding risk. The abundance in antiplatelet agents allow us to tailor our strategy based on the thrombotic/bleeding profile of each patient. Recently, the ACCOAST trial cast a doubt on the benefit of pre treatment in non-ST segment elevation acute coronary syndrome. The aim of the present review is to summarize the results of the main studies dealing with antiplatelet therapy in stented/acute coronary syndromes patients. PMID:27231519

  3. P2Y12-ADP receptor antagonists: Days of future and past

    PubMed Central

    Laine, Marc; Paganelli, Franck; Bonello, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    Antiplatelet therapy is the cornerstone of the therapeutic arsenal in coronary artery disease. Thanks to a better understanding in physiology, pharmacology and pharmacogenomics huge progress were made in the field of platelet reactivity inhibition thus allowing the expansion of percutaneous coronary intervention. Stent implantation requires the combination of two antiplatelet agents acting in a synergistic way. Asprin inhibit the cyclo-oxygenase pathway of platelet activation while clopidogrel is a P2Y12 adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-receptor antagonist. This dual antiplatelet therapy has dramatically improved the prognosis of stented patients. However, due to pharmacological limitations of clopidogrel (interindividual variability in its biological efficacy, slow onset of action, mild platelet reactivity inhibition) ischemic recurrences remained high following stent implantation especially in acute coronary syndrome patients. Thus, more potent P2Y12-ADP receptor inhibitors were developped including prasugrel, ticagrelor and more recently cangrelor to overcome these pitfalls. These new agents reduced the rate of thrombotic events in acute coronary syndrome patients at the cost of an increased bleeding risk. The abundance in antiplatelet agents allow us to tailor our strategy based on the thrombotic/bleeding profile of each patient. Recently, the ACCOAST trial cast a doubt on the benefit of pre treatment in non-ST segment elevation acute coronary syndrome. The aim of the present review is to summarize the results of the main studies dealing with antiplatelet therapy in stented/acute coronary syndromes patients. PMID:27231519

  4. Residual platelet ADP reactivity after clopidogrel treatment is dependent on activation of both the unblocked P2Y1 and the P2Y12 receptor and is correlated with protein expression of P2Y12

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Oscar Ö; Amisten, Stefan; Wihlborg, Anna-Karin; Hunting, Karen; Nilsson, David

    2006-01-01

    Two ADP receptors have been identified on human platelets: P2Y1 and P2Y12. The P2Y12 receptor blocker clopidogrel is widely used to reduce the risks in acute coronary syndromes, but, currently, there is no P2Y1 blocker in clinical use. Evidence for variable responses to clopidogrel has been described in several reports. The mechanistic explanation for this phenomenon is not fully understood. The aim of this study was to examine mechanisms responsible for variability of 2MeS-ADP, a stable ADP analogue, induced platelet reactivity in clopidogrel-treated patients. Platelet reactivity was assessed by flow cytometry measurements of P-selectin (CD62P) and activated GpIIb/IIIa complex (PAC-1). Residual 2MeS-ADP activation via the P2Y12 and P2Y1 receptors was determined by co-incubation with the selective antagonists AR-C69931 and MRS2179 in vitro. P2Y1 and P2Y12 receptor expression on both RNA and protein level were determined, as well as the P2Y12 H1 or H2 haplotypes. Our data suggest that the residual platelet activation of 2MeS-ADP after clopidogrel treatment is partly due to an inadequate antagonistic effect of clopidogrel on the P2Y12 receptor and partly due to activation of the P2Y1 receptor, which is unaffected by clopidogrel. Moreover, a correlation between increased P2Y12 protein expression on platelets and decreased response to clopidogrel was noticed, r2=0.43 (P<0.05). No correlation was found between P2Y12 mRNA levels and clopidogrel resistance, indicating post-transcriptional mechanisms. To achieve additional ADP inhibition in platelets, antagonists directed at the P2Y1 receptor could be more promising than the development of more potent P2Y12 receptor antagonists. PMID:18404433

  5. P2Y1 and P2Y12 receptors for ADP desensitize by distinct kinase-dependent mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Adam R; Conley, Pamela B; Luo, Jiansong; Benovic, Jeffrey L; Poole, Alastair W; Mundell, Stuart J

    2005-05-01

    Adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP) plays a central role in regulating platelet function by the activation of the G protein-coupled receptors P2Y(1) and P2Y(12). Although it is well established that aggregation responses of platelets to ADP desensitize, the underlying mechanisms involved remain unclear. In this study we demonstrate that P2Y(1)- and P2Y(12)-mediated platelet responses desensitize rapidly. Furthermore, we have established that these receptors desensitize by different kinase-dependent mechanisms. G protein-coupled receptor kinase (GRK) 2 and GRK6 are both endogenously expressed in platelets. Transient overexpression of dominant-negative mutants of these kinases or reductions in endogenous GRK expression by the use of specific siRNAs in 1321N1 cells showed that P2Y(12), but not P2Y(1), desensitization is mediated by GRKs. In contrast, desensitization of P2Y(1), but not P2Y(12), is largely dependent on protein kinase C activity. This study is the first to show that both P2Y(1) and P2Y(12) desensitize in human platelets, and it reveals ways in which their sensitivity to ADP may be differentially and independently altered. PMID:15665114

  6. Molecular mechanisms of platelet P2Y(12) receptor regulation.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Margaret R; Nisar, Shaista P; Mundell, Stuart J

    2013-02-01

    Platelets are critical for haemostasis, however inappropriate activation can lead to the development of arterial thrombosis, which can result in heart attack and stroke. ADP is a key platelet agonist that exerts its actions via stimulation of two surface GPCRs (G-protein-coupled receptors), P2Y(1) and P2Y(12). Similar to most GPCRs, P2Y receptor activity is tightly regulated by a number of complex mechanisms including receptor desensitization, internalization and recycling. In the present article, we review the molecular mechanisms that underlie P2Y(1) and P2Y(12) receptor regulation, with particular emphasis on the structural motifs within the P2Y(12) receptor, which are required to maintain regulatory protein interaction. The implications of these findings for platelet responsiveness are also discussed. PMID:23356287

  7. [Genetic variants of platelet ADP receptor P2Y12 associated with changed platelet functional activity and development of cardiovascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Sirotkina, O V; Zabotina, A M; Berkovich, O A; Bazhenova, E A; Vavilova, T V; Shvartsman, A L

    2009-02-01

    The key role in platelet aggregation is played by the platelet ADP receptor P2Y12, which is the target for antiaggregant drugs, clopidogrel and ticlopidine. At present, only sporadic data on genetic variants of platelet ADP receptor P2Y12 are available from literature, and their association with thromboembolic and cardiovascular diseases still remains obscure. Analysis of the group of subjects with high platelet reactivity resulted in identification of two nucleotide substitutions, C18T and G36T, in the coding region of the P2Y12 gene. The frequency of the P2Y12 T1 8 allele was higher in control group than in the group of patients survived from myocardial infarction at the age under 45 years (39% versus 28%, respectively, P = 0.04). Moreover, in the T18 carriers, platelet aggregation activity was lower than in the carriers of the wild-type genotype (0.84 +/- 0.05% versus 1.01 +/- 0.08%, respectively, P = 0.03). In the group of patients with early myocardial infarctions, a tendency towards the increased frequency of 16T allele in comparison with control group (20 and 12%, respectively, P = 0.07) was observed. The rate of ADP-induced platelet aggregation in the carriers of 16T allele from the control group was somewhat higher than in the subjects with the GG36 genotype (1.31 +/- 0.16% versus 1.12 +/- 0.06%, respectively, P = 0.07). The nucleotide substitutions identified were in absolute disequilibrium, i.e., allele T18 conformed to allele G36. On the contrary, allele C18 conformed to allele T36. Haplotype T18G36 was found to be responsible for the decreased risk of myocardial infarction and decreased platelet reactivity. It is suggested that polymorphisms of the P2Y12 gene identified can be used for determination of the risk group for myocardial infarction in the young males. PMID:19334620

  8. Structural and functional evolution of the P2Y12-like receptor group

    PubMed Central

    Hermsdorf, Thomas; Engemaier, Eva; Engel, Kathrin; Liebscher, Ines; Thor, Doreen; Zierau, Klaas; Römpler, Holger; Schulz, Angela

    2007-01-01

    Metabotropic pyrimidine and purine nucleotide receptors (P2Y receptors) belong to the superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR). They are distinguishable from adenosine receptors (P1) as they bind adenine and/or uracil nucleotide triphosphates or diphosphates depending on the subtype. Over the past decade, P2Y receptors have been cloned from a variety of tissues and species, and as many as eight functional subtypes have been characterized. Most recently, several members of the P2Y12-like receptor group, which includes the clopidogrel-sensitive ADP receptor P2Y12, have been deorphanized. The P2Y12-like receptor group comprises several structurally related GPCR which, however, display heterogeneous agonist specificity including nucleotides, their derivatives, and lipids. Besides the established function of P2Y12 in platelet activation, expression in macrophages, neuronal and glial cells as well as recent results from functional studies implicate that several members of this group may have specific functions in neurotransmission, inflammation, chemotaxis, and response to tissue injury. This review focuses specifically on the structure-function relation and shortly summarizes some aspects of the physiological relevance of P2Y12-like receptor members. PMID:18404440

  9. Agonist-bound structure of the human P2Y12 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jin; Zhang, Kaihua; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Paoletta, Silvia; Zhang, Dandan; Han, Gye Won; Li, Tingting; Ma, Limin; Zhang, Wenru; Müller, Christa E.; Yang, Huaiyu; Jiang, Hualiang; Cherezov, Vadim; Katritch, Vsevolod; Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Stevens, Raymond C.; Wu, Beili; Zhao, Qiang

    2014-01-01

    The P2Y12 receptor (P2Y12R), one of eight members of the P2YR family expressed in humans, has been identified as one of the most prominent clinical drug targets for inhibition of platelet aggregation. Consequently, extensive mutagenesis and modeling studies of the P2Y12R have revealed many aspects of agonist/antagonist binding1-4. However, the details of agonist and antagonist recognition and function at the P2Y12R remain poorly understood at the molecular level. Here, we report the structures of the human P2Y12R in complex with a full agonist 2-methylthio-adenosine-5′-diphosphate (2MeSADP, a close analogue of endogenous agonist ADP) at 2.5 Å resolution, and the corresponding ATP derivative 2-methylthio-adenosine-5′-triphosphate (2MeSATP) at 3.1 Å resolution. Analysis of these structures, together with the structure of the P2Y12R with antagonist ethyl 6-(4-((benzylsulfonyl)carbamoyl)piperidin-1-yl)-5-cyano-2-methylnicotinate (AZD1283)5, reveals dramatic conformational changes between nucleotide and non-nucleotide ligand complexes in the extracellular regions, providing the first insight into a different ligand binding landscape in the δ-group of class A G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). Agonist and non-nucleotide antagonist adopt different orientations in the P2Y12R, with only partially overlapped binding pockets. The agonist-bound P2Y12R structure answers long-standing ambiguities surrounding P2Y12R-agonist recognition, and reveals interactions with several residues that had not been reported to be involved in agonist binding. As a first example of a GPCR where agonist access to the binding pocket requires large scale rearrangements in the highly malleable extracellular region, the structural studies therefore will provide invaluable insight into the pharmacology and mechanisms of action of agonists and different classes of antagonists for the P2Y12R and potentially for other closely related P2YRs. PMID:24784220

  10. The influence of P2Y12 receptor deficiency on the platelet inhibitory activities of prasugrel in a mouse model: evidence for specific inhibition of P2Y12 receptors by prasugrel.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Masami; Sugidachi, Atsuhiro; Isobe, Takashi; Niitsu, Yoichi; Ogawa, Taketoshi; Jakubowski, Joseph A; Asai, Fumitoshi

    2007-10-01

    Prasugrel is a novel orally active thienopyridine with faster, higher and more reliable inhibition of platelet aggregation than clopidogrel reflecting its metabolism in vivo to an active metabolite with selective P2Y(12) antagonistic activity. Several lines of evidence support the contention that prasugrel provides selective P2Y(12) receptor antagonistic activity. To date, however, direct evidence of P2Y(12) specific action by prasugrel in vivo is limited. In the present study, effects of prasugrel on ex vivo platelet aggregation were examined in wild type (WT) and P2Y(12)(-/-) mice. In WT mice, prasugrel showed platelet inhibition that was 8.2 times more potent than clopidogrel. In P2Y(12)(-/-) mice, ADP induced platelet aggregation was minimal, and its extent was similar to that in prasugrel-treated WT mice. In addition, no further inhibition of platelet aggregation was observed after administration of prasugrel to P2Y(12)(-/-) mice. Furthermore, prasugrel-treated WT mice showed similar aggregation patterns using collagen- and murine PAR-4 agonist peptide to those of P2Y(12)(-/-) mice treated with vehicle or prasugrel. Overall, these results clearly provide additional in vivo evidence that prasugrel has selective P2Y(12) antagonistic activity. PMID:17681285

  11. Antipsychotic Drugs Inhibit Platelet Aggregation via P2Y1 and P2Y12 Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chang-Chieh; Tsai, Fu-Ming; Chen, Mao-Liang; Wu, Semon; Lee, Ming-Cheng; Tsai, Tzung-Chieh; Wang, Lu-Kai; Wang, Chun-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Antipsychotic drugs (APDs) used to treat clinical psychotic syndromes cause a variety of blood dyscrasias. APDs suppress the aggregation of platelets; however, the underlying mechanism remains unknown. We first analyzed platelet aggregation and clot formation in platelets treated with APDs, risperidone, clozapine, or haloperidol, using an aggregometer and rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM). Our data indicated that platelet aggregation was inhibited, that clot formation time was increased, and that clot firmness was decreased in platelets pretreated with APDs. We also examined the role two major adenosine diphosphate (ADP) receptors, P2Y1 and P2Y12, play in ADP-mediated platelet activation and APD-mediated suppression of platelet aggregation. Our results show that P2Y1 receptor stimulation with ADP-induced calcium influx was inhibited by APDs in human and rats' platelets, as assessed by in vitro or ex vivo approach, respectively. In contrast, APDs, risperidone and clozapine, alleviated P2Y12-mediated cAMP suppression, and the release of thromboxane A2 and arachidonic acid by activated platelets decreased after APD treatment in human and rats' platelets. Our data demonstrate that each APD tested significantly suppressed platelet aggregation via different mechanisms. PMID:27069920

  12. Microglial P2Y12 receptors regulate microglial activation and surveillance during neuropathic pain.

    PubMed

    Gu, Nan; Eyo, Ukpong B; Murugan, Madhuvika; Peng, Jiyun; Matta, Sanjana; Dong, Hailong; Wu, Long-Jun

    2016-07-01

    Microglial cells are critical in the pathogenesis of neuropathic pain and several microglial receptors have been proposed to mediate this process. Of these receptors, the P2Y12 receptor is a unique purinergic receptor that is exclusively expressed by microglia in the central nervous system (CNS). In this study, we set forth to investigate the role of P2Y12 receptors in microglial electrophysiological and morphological (static and dynamic) activation during spinal nerve transection (SNT)-induced neuropathic pain in mice. First, we found that a genetic deficiency of the P2Y12 receptor (P2Y12(-/-) mice) ameliorated pain hypersensitivities during the initiation phase of neuropathic pain. Next, we characterised both the electrophysiological and morphological properties of microglia in the superficial spinal cord dorsal horn following SNT injury. We show dramatic alterations including a peak at 3days post injury in microglial electrophysiology while high resolution two-photon imaging revealed significant changes of both static and dynamic microglial morphological properties by 7days post injury. Finally, in P2Y12(-/-) mice, these electrophysiological and morphological changes were ameliorated suggesting roles for P2Y12 receptors in SNT-induced microglial activation. Our results therefore indicate that P2Y12 receptors regulate microglial electrophysiological as well as static and dynamic microglial properties after peripheral nerve injury, suggesting that the microglial P2Y12 receptor could be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of neuropathic pain. PMID:26576724

  13. Arrestin Scaffolds NHERF1 to the P2Y12 Receptor to Regulate Receptor Internalization*

    PubMed Central

    Nisar, Shaista P.; Cunningham, Margaret; Saxena, Kunal; Pope, Robert J.; Kelly, Eamonn; Mundell, Stuart J.

    2012-01-01

    We have recently shown in a patient with mild bleeding that the PDZ-binding motif of the platelet G protein-coupled P2Y12 receptor (P2Y12R) is required for effective receptor traffic in human platelets. In this study we show for the first time that the PDZ motif-binding protein NHERF1 exerts a major role in potentiating G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) internalization. NHERF1 interacts with the C-tail of the P2Y12R and unlike many other GPCRs, NHERF1 interaction is required for effective P2Y12R internalization. In vitro and prior to agonist stimulation P2Y12R/NHERF1 interaction requires the intact PDZ binding motif of this receptor. Interestingly on receptor stimulation NHERF1 no longer interacts directly with the receptor but instead binds to the receptor via the endocytic scaffolding protein arrestin. These findings suggest a novel model by which arrestin can serve as an adaptor to promote NHERF1 interaction with a GPCR to facilitate effective NHERF1-dependent receptor internalization. PMID:22610101

  14. Arrestin scaffolds NHERF1 to the P2Y12 receptor to regulate receptor internalization.

    PubMed

    Nisar, Shaista P; Cunningham, Margaret; Saxena, Kunal; Pope, Robert J; Kelly, Eamonn; Mundell, Stuart J

    2012-07-13

    We have recently shown in a patient with mild bleeding that the PDZ-binding motif of the platelet G protein-coupled P2Y(12) receptor (P2Y(12)R) is required for effective receptor traffic in human platelets. In this study we show for the first time that the PDZ motif-binding protein NHERF1 exerts a major role in potentiating G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) internalization. NHERF1 interacts with the C-tail of the P2Y(12)R and unlike many other GPCRs, NHERF1 interaction is required for effective P2Y(12)R internalization. In vitro and prior to agonist stimulation P2Y(12)R/NHERF1 interaction requires the intact PDZ binding motif of this receptor. Interestingly on receptor stimulation NHERF1 no longer interacts directly with the receptor but instead binds to the receptor via the endocytic scaffolding protein arrestin. These findings suggest a novel model by which arrestin can serve as an adaptor to promote NHERF1 interaction with a GPCR to facilitate effective NHERF1-dependent receptor internalization. PMID:22610101

  15. Identification of a New Morpholine Scaffold as a P2Y12 Receptor Antagonist.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Young Ha; Lee, Joo-Youn; Park, Hee Dong; Kim, Tae Hun; Park, Min Chul; Choi, Gildon; Kim, Sunghoon

    2016-01-01

    The P2Y12 receptor is critical for platelet activation and is an attractive drug target for the prevention of atherothrombotic events. Despite the proven antithrombotic efficacy of P2Y12 inhibitors, these thienopyridine scaffolds are prodrugs that lack important features of the ideal antithrombotic agent. For this reason, ticagrelor-a new chemical class of P2Y12 receptor antagonist-was developed, but it can cause shortness of breath and various types of bleeding. Moreover, ticagrelor is a cytochrome P450 3A4 substrate/inhibitor and, therefore, caution should be exercised when it is used concomitantly with strong CYP3A4 inducers/inhibitors. There is a need for novel P2Y12 receptor antagonist scaffolds that are reversible and have high efficacy without associated side effects. Here, we describe a novel antagonist containing a morpholine moiety that was identified by screening libraries of commercially available compounds. The molecule, Compound E, acted on P2Y12, but not P2Y1 and P2Y13, and exhibited pharmacological characteristics that were distinct from those of ticagrelor, acting instead on P2Y12 via an allosteric mechanism. These results provide a basis for the development/optimization of a new class of P2Y12 antagonists. PMID:27563870

  16. P2Y12 receptor inhibition and LPS-induced coagulation.

    PubMed

    Essex, David W; Rao, A Koneti

    2016-03-01

    Platelets play a major role in the complex interactions involved in blood coagulation via multiple mechanisms. As reported in this issue, Schoergenhofer et al. tested the hypothesis that platelet inhibition by prasugrel, a potent platelet P2Y12 ADP receptor antagonist, attenuates the effect of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on the blood coagulation system in healthy human subjects. LPS, a bacterial product with potent pro-inflammatory and pro-thrombotic effects, plays a central role in sepsis. It activates monocytes and endothelial cells via Toll-like receptor (TLR) 4 and other TLRs to stimulate production of TF and other pro-coagulant molecules, chemokines and cytokines. Treatment with prasugrel did not decrease biomarkers of coagulaion. A better understanding of the relative roles of platelet and coagulation mechanisms in triggering the pro-thrombotic state may lead to more effective antithrombotic strategies. PMID:26846581

  17. Effects of P2Y12 receptor antagonists beyond platelet inhibition - comparison of ticagrelor with thienopyridines.

    PubMed

    Nylander, Sven; Schulz, Rainer

    2016-04-01

    The effect and clinical benefit of P2Y12 receptor antagonists may not be limited to platelet inhibition and the prevention of arterial thrombus formation. Potential additional effects include reduction of the pro-inflammatory role of activated platelets and effects related to P2Y12 receptor inhibition on other cells apart from platelets. P2Y12 receptor antagonists, thienopyridines and ticagrelor, differ in their mode of action being prodrugs instead of direct acting and irreversibly instead of reversibly binding to P2Y12 . These key differences may provide different potential when it comes to additional effects. In addition to P2Y12 receptor blockade, ticagrelor is unique in having the only well-documented additional target of inhibition, the equilibrative nucleoside transporter 1. The current review will address the effects of P2Y12 receptor antagonists beyond platelets and the protection against arterial thrombosis. The discussion will include the potential for thienopyridines and ticagrelor to mediate anti-inflammatory effects, to conserve vascular function, to affect atherosclerosis, to provide cardioprotection and to induce dyspnea. PMID:26758983

  18. Reciprocal cross-talk between P2Y1 and P2Y12 receptors at the level of calcium signaling in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Adam R; Jones, Matthew L; Mundell, Stuart J; Poole, Alastair W

    2004-09-15

    Adenosine diphosphate (ADP), an important platelet agonist, acts through 2 G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), P2Y(1) and P2Y(12), which signal through Gq and Gi, respectively. There is increasing evidence for cross-talk between signaling pathways downstream of GPCRs and here we demonstrate cross-talk between these 2 ADP receptors in human platelets. We show that P2Y(12) contributes to platelet signaling by potentiating the P2Y(1)-induced calcium response. This potentiation is mediated by 2 mechanisms: inhibition of adenylate cyclase and activation of phosphatidylinositol 3 (PI 3)-kinase. Furthermore, the Src family kinase inhibitor PP1 selectively potentiates the contribution to the calcium response by P2Y(12), although inhibition of adenylate cyclase by P2Y(12) is unaffected. Using PP1 in combination with the inhibitor of PI 3-kinase LY294002, we show that Src negatively regulates the PI 3-kinase-mediated component of the P2Y(12) calcium response. Finally, we were able to show that Src kinase is activated through P2Y(1) but not P2Y(12). Taken together, we present evidence for a complex signaling interplay between P2Y(1) and P2Y(12), where P2Y(12) is able to positively regulate P2Y(1) action and P2Y(1) negatively regulates this action of P2Y(12). It is likely that this interplay between receptors plays an important role in maintaining the delicate balance between platelet activation and inhibition during normal hemostasis. PMID:15187029

  19. Clopidogrel and ticlopidine: P2Y12 adenosine diphosphate-receptor antagonists for the prevention of atherothrombosis.

    PubMed

    Savi, Pierre; Herbert, Jean-Marc

    2005-04-01

    Ticlopidine and clopidogrel belong to the same chemical family of thienopyridine adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-receptor antagonists. They have shown their efficacy as platelet antiaggregant and antithrombotic agents in many animal models, both ex vivo and in vivo. Although ticlopidine was discovered more than 30 years ago, it was only recently that the mechanism of action of ADP-receptor antagonists was characterized in detail. Ticlopidine and clopidogrel both behave in vivo as specific antagonists of P2Y (12), one of the ADP receptors on platelets. Metabolic steps that involve cytochrome P450-dependent pathways are required to generate the active metabolite responsible for this in vivo activity. The active moiety is a reactive thiol derivative that targets P2Y (12) on platelets. The interaction is irreversible, accounting for the observation that platelets are definitely antiaggregated, even if no active metabolite is detectable in plasma. The interaction is specific for P2Y (12); other purinoceptors such as P2Y (1) and P2Y (13) are spared. This results in inhibition of the binding of the P2Y (12) agonist 2-methylthio-ADP and the ADP-induced downregulation of adenylyl cyclase. Platelet aggregation is affected not only when triggered by ADP but also by aggregation inducers when used at concentrations requiring released ADP as an amplifier. The efficacy and safety of clopidogrel has been established in several large, randomized, controlled trials. The clopidogrel versus aspirin in patients at risk of ischaemic events (CAPRIE) trial demonstrated the superiority of clopidogrel over acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) in patients at risk of ischemic events, including ischemic stroke, myocardial infarction (MI), and peripheral arterial disease. The clopidogrel in unstable angina to prevent recurrent ischemic events (CURE) trial showed a sustained, incremental benefit when clopidogrel was added to standard therapy (including ASA) in patients with unstable angina and non-Q-wave MI

  20. Personalized antiplatelet therapy with P2Y12 receptor inhibitors: benefits and pitfalls

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Max-Paul; Koziński, Marek; Kubica, Jacek; Aradi, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Antiplatelet therapy with P2Y12 receptor inhibitors has become the cornerstone of medical treatment in patients with acute coronary syndrome, after percutaneous coronary intervention and in secondary prevention of atherothrombotic events. Clopidogrel used to be the most broadly prescribed P2Y12 receptor inhibitor with undisputable benefits especially in combination with aspirin, but a considerable number of clopidogrel-treated patients experience adverse thrombotic events in whom insufficient P2Y12-inhibition and a consequential high on-treatment platelet reactivity is a common finding. This clinically relevant limitation of clopidogrel has driven the increased use of new antiplatelet agents. Prasugrel (a third generation thienopyridine) and ticagrelor (a cyclopentyl-triazolo-pyrimidine) feature more potent and predictable P2Y12-inhibition compared to clopidogrel, which translates into improved ischemic outcomes. However, excessive platelet inhibition and consequential low on-treatment platelet reactivity comes at the price of increased risk of major bleeding. The majority of randomized clinical trials failed to demonstrate improved clinical outcomes with platelet function testing and tailored antiplatelet therapy, but results of all recent trials of potent antiplatelets and prolonged antiplatelet durations point towards a need for individualized antiplatelet approach in order to decrease thrombotic events without increasing bleeding. This review focuses on potential strategies for personalizing antiplatelet treatment. PMID:26677375

  1. Another “String to the Bow” of PJ34, a Potent Poly(ADP-Ribose)Polymerase Inhibitor: An Antiplatelet Effect through P2Y12 Antagonism?

    PubMed Central

    Lechaftois, Marie; Dreano, Elise; Palmier, Bruno; Margaill, Isabelle; Marchand-Leroux, Catherine; Bachelot-Loza, Christilla; Lerouet, Dominique

    2014-01-01

    Background Neuro- and vasoprotective effects of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (PARP) inhibition have been largely documented in models of cerebral ischemia, particularly with the potent PARP inhibitor PJ34. Furthermore, after ischemic stroke, physicians are faced with incomplete tissue reperfusion and reocclusion, in which platelet activation/aggregation plays a key role. Data suggest that certain PARP inhibitors could act as antiplatelet agents. In that context, the present in vitro study investigated on human blood the potential antiplatelet effect of PJ34 and two structurally different PARP inhibitors, DPQ and INO-1001. Methods and results ADP concentrations were chosen to induce a biphasic aggregation curve resulting from the successive activation of both its receptors P2Y1 and P2Y12. In these experimental conditions, PJ34 inhibited the second phase of aggregation; this effect was reduced by incremental ADP concentrations. In addition, in line with a P2Y12 pathway inhibitory effect, PJ34 inhibited the dephosphorylation of the vasodilator stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) in a concentration-dependent manner. Besides, PJ34 had no effect on platelet aggregation induced by collagen or PAR1 activating peptide, used at concentrations inducing a strong activation independent on secreted ADP. By contrast, DPQ and INO-1001 were devoid of any effect whatever the platelet agonist used. Conclusions We showed that, in addition to its already demonstrated beneficial effects in in vivo models of cerebral ischemia, the potent PARP inhibitor PJ34 exerts in vitro an antiplatelet effect. Moreover, this is the first study to report that PJ34 could act via a competitive P2Y12 antagonism. Thus, this antiplatelet effect could improve post-stroke reperfusion and/or prevent reocclusion, which reinforces the interest of this drug for stroke treatment. PMID:25329809

  2. P2Y12 Receptor Antagonists and Morphine: A Dangerous Liaison?

    PubMed

    Giannopoulos, Georgios; Deftereos, Spyridon; Kolokathis, Fotios; Xanthopoulou, Ioanna; Lekakis, John; Alexopoulos, Dimitrios

    2016-09-01

    P2Y12 receptor antagonists, concurrently administered with aspirin in what has come to be commonly called dual antiplatelet therapy, are a mainstay of treatment for patients with acute coronary syndromes. Morphine, on the contrary, is a commonly used drug in the acute phase of acute coronary syndromes to relieve pain-with the added potential benefit of attenuating acutely raised sympathetic tone. In current guidelines, though, morphine is recommended with decreasing strength of recommendation. One reason is that it raises concern regarding the potentially significant interaction with antiplatelet agents, leading to impaired inhibition of platelet activation. In any case, it is still considered a mandatory part of the inventory of available medications in prehospital acute myocardial infarction management. The goal of the present review is to present published evidence on morphine and its potential interactions with P2Y12 receptor antagonists, as well as on the central issue of whether such interactions may underlie clinically significant effects on patient outcomes. PMID:27586412

  3. Central P2Y12 receptor blockade alleviates inflammatory and neuropathic pain and cytokine production in rodents

    PubMed Central

    Horváth, Gergely; Gölöncsér, Flóra; Csölle, Cecilia; Király, Kornél; Andó, Rómeó D.; Baranyi, Mária; Koványi, Bence; Máté, Zoltán; Hoffmann, Kristina; Algaier, Irina; Baqi, Younis; Müller, Christa E.; Von Kügelgen, Ivar; Sperlágh, Beáta

    2014-01-01

    In this study the role of P2Y12 receptors (P2Y12R) was explored in rodent models of inflammatory and neuropathic pain and in acute thermal nociception. In correlation with their activity to block the recombinant human P2Y12R, the majority of P2Y12R antagonists alleviated mechanical hyperalgesia dose-dependently, following intraplantar CFA injection, and after partial ligation of the sciatic nerve in rats. They also caused an increase in thermal nociceptive threshold in the hot plate test. Among the six P2Y12R antagonists evaluated in the pain studies, the selective P2Y12 receptor antagonist PSB-0739 was most potent upon intrathecal application. P2Y12R mRNA and IL-1β protein were time-dependently overexpressed in the rat hind paw and lumbar spinal cord following intraplantar CFA injection. This was accompanied by the upregulation of TNF-α, IL-6 and IL-10 in the hind paw. PSB-0739 (0.3 mg/kg i.t.) attenuated CFA-induced expression of cytokines in the hind paw and of IL-1β in the spinal cord. Subdiaphragmatic vagotomy and the α7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor antagonist MLA occluded the effect of PSB-0739 (i.t.) on pain behavior and peripheral cytokine induction. Denervation of sympathetic nerves by 6-OHDA pretreatment did not affect the action of PSB-0739. PSB-0739, in an analgesic dose, did not influence motor coordination and platelet aggregation. Genetic deletion of the P2Y12R in mice reproduced the effect of P2Y12R antagonists on mechanical hyperalgesia in inflammatory and neuropathic pain models, on acute thermal nociception and on the induction of spinal IL-1β. Here we report the robust involvement of the P2Y12R in inflammatory pain. The anti-hyperalgesic effect of P2Y12R antagonism could be mediated by the inhibition of both central and peripheral cytokine production and involves α7-receptor mediated efferent pathways. PMID:24971933

  4. Platelet P2Y12 receptors are involved in the haemostatic effect of notoginsenoside Ft1, a saponin isolated from Panax notoginseng

    PubMed Central

    Gao, B; Huang, L; Liu, H; Wu, H; Zhang, E; Yang, L; Wu, X; Wang, Z

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Saponins isolated from Panax notoginseng (Burk.) F.H. Chen have been shown to relieve thrombogenesis and facilitate haemostasis. However, it is not known which saponin accounts for this haemostatic effect. Hence, in the present study we aimed to identify which saponins contribute to its haemostatic activity and to elucidate the possible underlying mechanisms. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Platelet aggregation was analysed using a platelet aggregometer. Prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time and thrombin time were measured using a blood coagulation analyser, which was further corroborated with bleeding time and thrombotic assays. The interaction of notoginsenoside Ft1 with the platelet P2Y12 receptor was determined by molecular docking analysis, cytosolic Ca2+ and cAMP measurements, and phosphorylation of PI3K and Akt assays. KEY RESULTS Among the saponins examined, Ft1 was the most potent procoagulant and induced dose-dependent platelet aggregation. Ft1 reduced plasma coagulation indexes, decreased tail bleeding time and increased thrombogenesis. Moreover, it potentiated ADP-induced platelet aggregation and increased cytosolic Ca2+ accumulation, effects that were attenuated by clopidogrel. Molecular docking analysis suggested that Ft1 binds to platelet P2Y12 receptors. The increase in intracellular Ca2+ evoked by Ft1 in HEK293 cells overexpressing P2Y12 receptors could be blocked by ticagrelor. Ft1 also affected the production of cAMP and increased phosphorylation of PI3K and Akt downstream of P2Y12 signalling pathways. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS Ft1 enhanced platelet aggregation by activating a signalling network mediated through P2Y12 receptors. These novel findings may contribute to the effective utilization of this compound in the therapy of haematological disorders. PMID:24117220

  5. The Ratio of ADP- to TRAP-Induced Platelet Aggregation Quantifies P2Y12-Dependent Platelet Inhibition Independently of the Platelet Count

    PubMed Central

    Olivier, Christoph B.; Meyer, Melanie; Bauer, Hans; Schnabel, Katharina; Weik, Patrick; Zhou, Qian; Bode, Christoph; Moser, Martin; Diehl, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to assess the association of clinical factors with P2Y12-dependent platelet inhibition as monitored by the ratio of ADP- to TRAP-induced platelet aggregation and conventional ADP-induced aggregation, respectively. Background Controversial findings to identify and overcome high platelet reactivity (HPR) after coronary stent-implantation and to improve clinical outcome by tailored anti-platelet therapy exist. Monitoring anti-platelet therapy ex vivo underlies several confounding parameters causing that ex vivo platelet aggregation might not reflect in vivo platelet inhibition. Methods In a single centre observational study, multiple electrode aggregometry was performed in whole blood of patients after recent coronary stent-implantation. Relative ADP-induced aggregation (r-ADP-agg) was defined as the ratio of ADP- to TRAP- induced aggregation reflecting the individual degree of P2Y12-mediated platelet reactivity. Results Platelet aggregation was assessed in 359 patients. Means (± SD) of TRAP-, ADP-induced aggregation and r-ADP-agg were 794 ± 239 AU*min, 297 ± 153 AU*min and 37 ± 14%, respectively. While ADP- and TRAP-induced platelet aggregation correlated significantly with platelet count (ADP: r = 0.302; p<0.001; TRAP: r = 0.509 p<0.001), r-ADP-agg values did not (r = -0.003; p = 0.960). These findings were unaltered in multivariate analyses adjusting for a range of factors potentially influencing platelet aggregation. The presence of an acute coronary syndrome and body weight were found to correlate with both ADP-induced platelet aggregation and r-ADP-agg. Conclusion The ratio of ADP- to TRAP-induced platelet aggregation quantifies P2Y12-dependent platelet inhibition independently of the platelet count in contrast to conventional ADP-induced aggregation. Furthermore, r-ADP-agg was associated with the presence of an acute coronary syndrome and body weight as well as ADP-induced aggregation. Thus, the r-ADP-agg is a more valid

  6. Bradykinin-induced Ca2+ signaling in human subcutaneous fibroblasts involves ATP release via hemichannels leading to P2Y12 receptors activation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Chronic musculoskeletal pain involves connective tissue remodeling triggered by inflammatory mediators, such as bradykinin. Fibroblast cells signaling involve changes in intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i). ATP has been related to connective tissue mechanotransduction, remodeling and chronic inflammatory pain, via P2 purinoceptors activation. Here, we investigated the involvement of ATP in bradykinin-induced Ca2+ signals in human subcutaneous fibroblasts. Results Bradykinin, via B2 receptors, caused an abrupt rise in [Ca2+]i to a peak that declined to a plateau, which concentration remained constant until washout. The plateau phase was absent in Ca2+-free medium; [Ca2+]i signal was substantially reduced after depleting intracellular Ca2+ stores with thapsigargin. Extracellular ATP inactivation with apyrase decreased the [Ca2+]i plateau. Human subcutaneous fibroblasts respond to bradykinin by releasing ATP via connexin and pannexin hemichannels, since blockade of connexins, with 2-octanol or carbenoxolone, and pannexin-1, with 10Panx, attenuated bradykinin-induced [Ca2+]i plateau, whereas inhibitors of vesicular exocytosis, such as brefeldin A and bafilomycin A1, were inactive. The kinetics of extracellular ATP catabolism favors ADP accumulation in human fibroblast cultures. Inhibition of ectonucleotidase activity and, thus, ADP formation from released ATP with POM-1 or by Mg2+ removal from media reduced bradykinin-induced [Ca2+]i plateau. Selective blockade of the ADP-sensitive P2Y12 receptor with AR-C66096 attenuated bradykinin [Ca2+]i plateau, whereas the P2Y1 and P2Y13 receptor antagonists, respectively MRS 2179 and MRS 2211, were inactive. Human fibroblasts exhibited immunoreactivity against connexin-43, pannexin-1 and P2Y12 receptor. Conclusions Bradykinin induces ATP release from human subcutaneous fibroblasts via connexin and pannexin-1-containing hemichannels leading to [Ca2+]i mobilization through the cooperation of B2 and P2Y12 receptors. PMID

  7. State of affairs: Design and structure-activity relationships of reversible P2Y12 receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Zetterberg, Fredrik; Svensson, Peder

    2016-06-15

    Myocardial infarction and stroke are the most common causes of mortality and morbidity in the developed world. Therefore the search for antiplatelet therapy has been in focus for the last decades, in particular the search for new P2Y12R antagonists. The first P2Y12R drug developed, clopidogrel, is a major success but there is still room for improvement with respect to bleeding profile and non-responders. These liabilities could be due to the fact that clopidogrel is a pro-drug and upon activation binds covalently to the receptor. Therefore a lot of effort has gone into identifying reversible inhibitors. One recent example is ticagrelor, which in clinical studies have been shown to be safer and even reduce rate of death from vascular events as compared head to head with clopidogrel. We here review the medicinal chemistry strategies used in the design of new reversible P2Y12R antagonists. In addition, we also present structure based design studies based on the recently published agonist and antagonist X-ray structures of P2Y12R. PMID:27133596

  8. Long-Term P2Y12-Receptor Antagonists in Post-Myocardial Infarction Patients: Facing a New Trilemma?

    PubMed

    Alexopoulos, Dimitrios; Xanthopoulou, Ioanna; Moulias, Athanasios; Lekakis, John

    2016-09-13

    Physicians considering prescription of P2Y12-receptor antagonist for long-term (>1 year) protection of patients post-myocardial infarction face the trilemma of selecting between clopidogrel, prasugrel, or ticagrelor. Differential ischemic benefits derived from relevant trials may assist in tailoring treatment, although the different bleeding definitions applied make any meaningful comparison of each agent's bleeding potential very difficult. Considering the available data and recognizing the significant limitation of observations obtained thus far from subgroup analyses, prasugrel appears to provide higher anti-ischemic protection than clopidogrel. Ticagrelor seems to be an attractive option for patients with renal dysfunction, peripheral arterial disease, or following a brief P2Y12-receptor antagonist interruption, whereas clopidogrel may be advised in the presence of cost and availability issues. As head-to-head comparative trials between P2Y12-receptor antagonists are lacking, selection of a specific agent by the clinician should be made on the basis of critical appraisal of available large clinical datasets. PMID:27609686

  9. Platelet Antistaphylococcal Responses Occur through P2X1 and P2Y12 Receptor-Induced Activation and Kinocidin Release▿

    PubMed Central

    Trier, Darin A.; Gank, Kimberly D.; Kupferwasser, Deborah; Yount, Nannette Y.; French, William J.; Michelson, Alan D.; Kupferwasser, Leon I.; Xiong, Yan Q.; Bayer, Arnold S.; Yeaman, Michael R.

    2008-01-01

    Platelets (PLTs) act in antimicrobial host defense by releasing PLT microbicidal proteins (PMPs) or PLT kinocidins (PKs). Receptors mediating staphylocidal efficacy and PMP or PK release versus isogenic PMP-susceptible (ISP479C) and -resistant (ISP479R) Staphylococcus aureus strains were examined in vitro. Isolated PLTs were incubated with ISP479C or ISP479R (PLT/S. aureus ratio range, 1:1 to 10,000:1) in the presence or absence of a panel of PLT inhibitors, including P2X and P2Y receptor antagonists of increasingly narrow specificity, and PLT adhesion receptors (CD41, CD42b, and CD62P). PLT-to-S. aureus exposure ratios of ≥10:1 yielded significant reductions in the viability of both strains. Results from reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography indicated that staphylocidal PLT releasates contained PMPs and PKs. At ratios below 10:1, the PLT antistaphylococcal efficacy relative to the intrinsic S. aureus PMP-susceptible or -resistant phenotype diminished. Apyrase (an agent of ADP degradation), suramin (a general P2 receptor antagonist), pyridoxal 5′-phosphonucleotide derivative (a specific P2X1 antagonist), and cangrelor (a specific P2Y12 antagonist) mitigated the PLT staphylocidal response against both strains, correlating with reduced levels of PMP and PK release. Specific inhibition occurred in the presence and absence of homologous plasma. The antagonism of the thromboxane A2, cyclooxygenase-1/cyclooxygenase-2, or phospholipase C pathway or the hindrance of surface adhesion receptors failed to impede PLT anti-S. aureus responses. These results suggest a multifactorial PLT anti-S. aureus response mechanism involving (i) a PLT-to-S. aureus ratio sufficient for activation; (ii) the ensuing degranulation of PMPs, PKs, ADP, and/or ATP; (iii) the activation of P2X1/P2Y12 receptors on adjacent PLTs; and (iv) the recursive amplification of PMP and PK release from these PLTs. PMID:18824536

  10. Switching of platelet P2Y12 receptor inhibitors in patients with acute coronary syndromes undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention: Review of the literature and practical considerations.

    PubMed

    De Luca, Leonardo; Capranzano, Piera; Patti, Giuseppe; Parodi, Guido

    2016-06-01

    The combination of aspirin and a P2Y12 receptor inhibitor is the cornerstone of treatment in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACSs) and in those undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). At the present time, 3 different oral P2Y12 receptor inhibitors are available on the market; 2 have obtained the indication for ACS (clopidogrel and ticagrelor) and 1 for ACS with planned PCI (prasugrel). An intravenous direct acting P2Y12 inhibitor, cangrelor, has also been recently approved by US and European regulatory agencies for patients undergoing PCI. Although the correct timing and modality of transition from intravenous cangrelor to oral P2Y12 inhibitors is still controversial and needs further evidence, switching between oral P2Y12 receptor inhibitors frequently occurs in clinical practice for several reasons. This practice raises the question of the relative safety of this strategy and of which switching approaches are preferable. In this article, we review the data on switching antiplatelet treatment strategies with P2Y12 receptor inhibitors and discuss practical considerations for switching therapies in patients with ACS undergoing PCI. PMID:27264219

  11. A novel series of piperazinyl-pyridine ureas as antagonists of the purinergic P2Y12 receptor.

    PubMed

    Bach, Peter; Boström, Jonas; Brickmann, Kay; van Giezen, J J J; Hovland, Ragnar; Petersson, Annika U; Ray, Asim; Zetterberg, Fredrik

    2011-05-15

    A novel series of P2Y(12) antagonists for development of drugs within the antiplatelet area is presented. The synthesis of the piperazinyl-pyridine urea derivatives and their structure-activity relationships (SAR) are described. Several compounds showed P2Y(12) antagonistic activities in the sub-micromolar range. PMID:21507636

  12. Comparison of P2Y12 receptor inhibition by clopidogrel and prasugrel in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention.

    PubMed

    Haq, M M; Ahsan, C H; Amin, M N; Karim, M R; Ali, M L; Khan, S R; Chowdhury, M Z; Mansur, M; Millat, M H; Rashid, M A

    2013-12-01

    Dual antiplatelet treatment (DAPT) with aspirin and clopidogrel is vital after percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Clopidogrel and prasugrel act on P2Y12 platelet surface receptors. Both these P2Y12 inhibitors are pro-drugs and depend on cytochrome system of the liver for their conversion to active metabolite. There is growing concern regarding suboptimal response in platelet inhibition by clopidogrel. Verify Now system got approval by Federal Drug Administration, USA, for assessing platelet function as its result is almost comparable to gold standard Light Transmission Aggregometry (LTA). There are no data on the prevalence of clopidogrel resistance in Bangladeshi population. Prasugrel, as an antiplatelet drug, is a newer introduction in this country. This study will show light on the efficacy of these drugs on our population especially in patients who undergo PCI where DAPT is mandatory. A total 120 (60 diabetics) patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS), were alternatively given 600 mg clopidogrel loading dose (LD) followed by 75 mg maintenance dose (MD) daily or 60 mg LD of prasugrel followed by 10 mg MD daily. Five samples of blood were taken at different time intervals over a period of 2 weeks. Measurement of percent inhibition of P2Y12 was done by VerifyNow. Patients who showed less than 20% inhibition (clopidogrel resistant) at any stage were switched to prasugrel. The outcomes of clopidogrel, prasugrel and clopidogrel switched to prasugrel groups were then compared. Nearly half (46.7%) of the patients in the clopidogrel group was found resistant to the drug as opposed to none in the prasugrel group. No difference was found between diabetic and non-diabetic subjects with respect to drug resistance. Intracoronary blood samples showed high degree of platelet inhibition with prasugrel. There was a gradual decline of platelet inhibition over two weeks with prasugrel. Almost fifty percent of the population is clopidogrel resistant in our study

  13. P2Y12 Receptor Localizes in the Renal Collecting Duct and Its Blockade Augments Arginine Vasopressin Action and Alleviates Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yue; Peti-Peterdi, Janos; Müller, Christa E; Carlson, Noel G; Baqi, Younis; Strasburg, David L; Heiney, Kristina M; Villanueva, Karie; Kohan, Donald E; Kishore, Bellamkonda K

    2015-12-01

    P2Y12 receptor (P2Y12-R) signaling is mediated through Gi, ultimately reducing cellular cAMP levels. Because cAMP is a central modulator of arginine vasopressin (AVP)-induced water transport in the renal collecting duct (CD), we hypothesized that if expressed in the CD, P2Y12-R may play a role in renal handling of water in health and in nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. We found P2Y12-R mRNA expression in rat kidney, and immunolocalized its protein and aquaporin-2 (AQP2) in CD principal cells. Administration of clopidogrel bisulfate, an irreversible inhibitor of P2Y12-R, significantly increased urine concentration and AQP2 protein in the kidneys of Sprague-Dawley rats. Notably, clopidogrel did not alter urine concentration in Brattleboro rats that lack AVP. Clopidogrel administration also significantly ameliorated lithium-induced polyuria, improved urine concentrating ability and AQP2 protein abundance, and reversed the lithium-induced increase in free-water excretion, without decreasing blood or kidney tissue lithium levels. Clopidogrel administration also augmented the lithium-induced increase in urinary AVP excretion and suppressed the lithium-induced increase in urinary nitrates/nitrites (nitric oxide production) and 8-isoprostane (oxidative stress). Furthermore, selective blockade of P2Y12-R by the reversible antagonist PSB-0739 in primary cultures of rat inner medullary CD cells potentiated the expression of AQP2 and AQP3 mRNA, and cAMP production induced by dDAVP (desmopressin). In conclusion, pharmacologic blockade of renal P2Y12-R increases urinary concentrating ability by augmenting the effect of AVP on the kidney and ameliorates lithium-induced NDI by potentiating the action of AVP on the CD. This strategy may offer a novel and effective therapy for lithium-induced NDI. PMID:25855780

  14. Differential endosomal sorting of a novel P2Y12 purinoreceptor mutant.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Margaret R; Nisar, Shaista P; Cooke, Alexandra E; Emery, Elizabeth D; Mundell, Stuart J

    2013-05-01

    P2Y12 receptor internalization and recycling play an essential role in ADP-induced platelet activation. Recently, we identified a patient with a mild bleeding disorder carrying a heterozygous mutation of P2Y12 (P341A) whose P2Y12 receptor recycling was significantly compromised. Using human cell line models, we identified key proteins regulating wild-type (WT) P2Y12 recycling and investigated P2Y12 -P341A receptor traffic. Treatment with ADP resulted in delayed Rab5-dependent internalization of P341A when compared with WT P2Y12 . While WT P2Y12 rapidly recycled back to the membrane via Rab4 and Rab11 recycling pathways, limited P341A recycling was observed, which relied upon Rab11 activity. Although minimal receptor degradation was evident, P341A was localized in Rab7-positive endosomes with considerable agonist-dependent accumulation in the trans-Golgi network (TGN). Rab7 activity is known to facilitate recruitment of retromer complex proteins to endosomes to transport cargo to the TGN. Here, we identified that P341A colocalized with Vps26; depletion of which blocked limited recycling and promoted receptor degradation. This study has identified key points of divergence in the endocytic traffic of P341A versus WT-P2Y12 . Given that these pathways are retained in human platelets, this research helps define the molecular mechanisms regulating P2Y12 receptor traffic and explain the compromised receptor function in the platelets of the P2Y12 -P341A-expressing patient. PMID:23387322

  15. Caged Agonist of P2Y1 and P2Y12 Receptors for Light-Directed Facilitation of Platelet Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Zhan-Guo; Hechler, Béatrice; Besada, Pedro; Gachet, Christian; Jacobson, Kenneth A.

    2008-01-01

    We have prepared a caged form (MRS2703) of a potent dual agonist of the P2Y1 and P2Y12 nucleotide receptors, 2-MeSADP, by blocking the β-phosphate group with a 1-(3,4-dimethyloxyphenyl)eth-1-yl phosphoester. Although MRS2703 is itself inactive at human P2Y1 and P2Y12 receptors expressed heterologously in 1321N1 astrocytoma cells or in washed human platelets, this derivative readily regenerates the parent agonist upon mild irradiation with long-wave UV light (360 nm). The functional effect of the regenerated agonist was demonstrated by a rise in intracellular calcium mediated by either P2Y1 or P2Y12 receptors in transfected cells. Washed human platelets exposed to a solution of MRS2703 were induced to aggregate upon UV irradiation. At 1.0 μM MRS2703, full aggregation was achieved within one minute of irradiation. Thus, this caged nucleotide promises to be a useful probe for potent P2Y receptor activation with light-directed spatial and temporal control. PMID:18199424

  16. Caged agonist of P2Y1 and P2Y12 receptors for light-directed facilitation of platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhan-Guo; Hechler, Béatrice; Besada, Pedro; Gachet, Christian; Jacobson, Kenneth A

    2008-03-15

    We have prepared a caged form (MRS2703) of a potent dual agonist of the P2Y(1) and P2Y(12) nucleotide receptors, 2-MeSADP, by blocking the beta-phosphate group with a 1-(3,4-dimethyloxyphenyl)eth-1-yl phosphoester. Although MRS2703 is itself inactive at human P2Y(1) and P2Y(12) receptors expressed heterologously in 1321N1 astrocytoma cells or in washed human platelets, this derivative readily regenerates the parent agonist upon mild irradiation with long-wave UV light (360 nm). The functional effect of the regenerated agonist was demonstrated by a rise in intracellular calcium mediated by either P2Y(1) or P2Y(12) receptors in transfected cells. Washed human platelets exposed to a solution of MRS2703 were induced to aggregate upon UV irradiation. At 1.0 microM MRS2703, full aggregation was achieved within 1 min of irradiation. Thus, this caged nucleotide promises to be a useful probe for potent P2Y receptor activation with light-directed spatial and temporal control. PMID:18199424

  17. Disposition and metabolism of ticagrelor, a novel P2Y12 receptor antagonist, in mice, rats, and marmosets.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Landqvist, Claire; Grimm, Scott W

    2011-09-01

    Ticagrelor is a reversibly binding and selective oral P2Y(12) antagonist, developed for the prevention of atherothrombotic events in patients with acute coronary syndromes. The disposition and metabolism of [(14)C]ticagrelor was investigated in mice, rats, and marmosets to demonstrate that these preclinical toxicity species showed similar metabolic profiles to human. Incubations with hepatocytes or microsomes from multiple species were also studied to compare with in vivo metabolic profiles. The routes of excretion were similar for both oral and intravenous administration in mice, rats, and marmosets with fecal excretion being the major elimination pathway accounting for 59 to 96% of the total radioactivity administered. Urinary excretion of drug-related material accounted for only 1 to 15% of the total radioactivity administered. Milk samples from lactating rats displayed significantly higher levels of total radioactivity than plasma after oral administration of ticagrelor. This demonstrated that ticagrelor and/or its metabolites were readily transferred into rat milk and that neonatal rats could be exposed to ticagrelor-related compounds via maternal milk. Ticagrelor and active metabolite AR-C124910 (loss of hydroxyethyl side chain) were the major components in plasma from all species studied and similar to human plasma profiles. The primary metabolite of ticagrelor excreted in urine across all species was an inactive metabolite, AR-C133913 (loss of difluorophenylcyclopropyl group). Ticagrelor, AR-C124910, and AR-C133913 were the major components found in feces from the three species examined. Overall, in vivo metabolite profiles were qualitatively similar across all species and consistent with in vitro results. PMID:21670219

  18. Combined cardioprotectant and antithrombotic actions of platelet P2Y12 receptor antagonists in acute coronary syndrome: just what the doctor ordered.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Michael V; Downey, James M

    2014-03-01

    Since the P2Y12 receptor antagonists were first introduced, they have been extensively tested in patients with acute coronary syndrome and are now standard of care. These antiplatelet drugs are very effective in reducing subsequent cardiovascular events, stent thromboses, and mortality in patients with acute myocardial infarction undergoing reperfusion therapy. Although the prevailing view is that their benefit derives from their antithrombotic properties, other unrelated pleiotropic effects appear to be equally beneficial. Accumulating clinical and animal evidence indicates that, if present at the time of reperfusion, these drugs have a direct anti-infarct effect similar to that of ischemic postconditioning. Four oral antagonists have been developed in rapid succession: ticlopidine, clopidogrel, prasugrel, and ticagrelor. Each agent had a more consistent and rapid onset of action than the previous one, and this has correlated with improved clinical outcomes when given early in treatment. Unfortunately, gut absorption causes an appreciable delay in the onset of effect, especially when morphine is used, and the constant push to minimize the door-to-balloon time has made it difficult to achieve adequate platelet inhibition at the time of percutaneous coronary intervention with an oral agent. An intravenous P2Y12 antagonist such as cangrelor may optimize treatment because it produces nearly maximal inhibition of platelet aggregation within minutes. If antiplatelet agents do protect through postconditioning's mechanism, then they would render any other intervention that protects through that mechanism redundant. Indeed, animals treated with cangrelor cannot be further protected by pre- or postconditioning. However, interventions that use a different mechanism such as mild hypothermia or cariporide, a Na(+)-H(+) exchange blocker, do add to cangrelor's protection. Future research should be directed toward identifying interventions that can augment the protection from

  19. Microglial Kv1.3 Channels and P2Y12 Receptors Differentially Regulate Cytokine and Chemokine Release from Brain Slices of Young Adult and Aged Mice

    PubMed Central

    Eder, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Brain tissue damage following stroke or traumatic brain injury is accompanied by neuroinflammatory processes, while microglia play a central role in causing and regulating neuroinflammation via production of proinflammatory substances, including cytokines and chemokines. Here, we used brain slices, an established in situ brain injury model, from young adult and aged mice to investigate cytokine and chemokine production with particular focus on the role of microglia. Twenty four hours after slice preparation, higher concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines, i.e. TNF-α and IL-6, and chemokines, i.e. CCL2 and CXCL1, were released from brain slices of aged mice than from slices of young adult mice. However, maximal microglial stimulation with LPS for 24 h did not reveal age-dependent differences in the amounts of released cytokines and chemokines. Mechanisms underlying microglial cytokine and chemokine production appear to be similar in young adult and aged mice. Inhibition of microglial Kv1.3 channels with margatoxin reduced release of IL-6, but not release of CCL2 and CXCL1. In contrast, blockade of microglial P2Y12 receptors with PSB0739 inhibited release of CCL2 and CXCL1, whereas release of IL-6 remained unaffected. Cytokine and chemokine production was not reduced by inhibitors of Kir2.1 K+ channels or adenosine receptors. In summary, our data suggest that brain tissue damage-induced production of cytokines and chemokines is age-dependent, and differentially regulated by microglial Kv1.3 channels and P2Y12 receptors. PMID:26011191

  20. Adherence to antiplatelet treatment with P2Y12 receptor inhibitors. Is there anything we can do to improve it? A systematic review of randomized trials.

    PubMed

    Kubica, Aldona; Obońska, Karolina; Fabiszak, Tomasz; Kubica, Jacek

    2016-08-01

    Antiplatelet therapy is the cornerstone of treatment for patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and/or undergoing percutaneous coronary interventions. Non-adherence to medication after ACS may lead to increased morbidity, mortality, and costs to the healthcare system due to elevated risk of stent thrombosis, myocardial infarction or death. Medication adherence is an issue of growing concern regarding the improvement of health system performance. Promoting medication adherence offers a rare opportunity to simultaneously improve health outcomes while reducing costs of treatment in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). The aim of this systematic review was to critically discuss adherence to antiplatelet treatment with P2Y12 receptor inhibitors in CAD patients. After a systematic investigation of the literature in databases including PubMed, CENTRAL and Google Scholar, using appropriate keywords, and considering clinical randomized, prospective observational and retrospective studies, reporting on adherence to treatment with inhibitors of P2Y12 platelet receptors or educational interventions aimed to improve medication adherence in patients with CAD, seven articles were considered eligible for inclusion in this systematic review. Reported adherence to clopidogrel, despite catastrophic consequences of its premature discontinuation, is low. We identified several determinants of low adherence and early discontinuation of clopidogrel. We also present data on the usefulness, utilization and credibility of different methods of medication adherence assessment, and suggest and critically discuss available interventions aimed at improvement of adherence to clopidogrel, still showing the need for innovative approaches to achieve enhanced medication adherence and improve health outcomes after acute myocardial infarction. PMID:27112628

  1. Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa and P2Y12 Induction by Oligochitosan Accelerates Platelet Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Halim, Ahmad Sukari; Hussein, Abdul Rahim; Ujang, Zanariah

    2014-01-01

    Platelet membrane receptor glycoprotein IIb/IIIa (gpiibiiia) is a receptor detected on platelets. Adenosine diphosphate (ADP) activates gpiibiiia and P2Y12, causing platelet aggregation and thrombus stabilization during blood loss. Chitosan biomaterials were found to promote surface induced hemostasis and were capable of activating blood coagulation cascades by enhancing platelet aggregation. Our current findings show that the activation of the gpiibiiia complex and the major ADP receptor P2Y12 is required for platelet aggregation to reach hemostasis following the adherence of various concentrations of chitosan biomaterials [7% N,O-carboxymethylchitosan (NO-CMC) with 0.45 mL collagen, 8% NO-CMC, oligochitosan (O-C), and oligochitosan 53 (O-C 53)]. We studied gpiibiiia and P2Y12 through flow cytometric analysis and western blotting techniques. The highest expression of gpiibiiia was observed with Lyostypt (74.3 ± 7.82%), followed by O-C (65.5 ± 7.17%). Lyostypt and O-C resulted in gpiibiiia expression increases of 29.2% and 13.9%, respectively, compared with blood alone. Western blot analysis revealed that only O-C 53 upregulated the expression of P2Y12 (1.12 ± 0.03-fold) compared with blood alone. Our findings suggest that the regulation of gpiibiiia and P2Y12 levels could be clinically useful to activate platelets to reach hemostasis. Further, we show that the novel oligochitosan is able to induce the increased expression of gpiibiiia and P2Y12, thus accelerating platelet aggregation in vitro. PMID:25247182

  2. P2Y12 receptor inhibition and effect of morphine in patients undergoing primary PCI for ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction. The PRIVATE-ATLANTIC study.

    PubMed

    Silvain, Johanne; Storey, Robert F; Cayla, Guillaume; Esteve, Jean-Baptiste; Dillinger, Jean-Guillaume; Rousseau, Hélène; Tsatsaris, Anne; Baradat, Caroline; Salhi, Néjoua; Hamm, Christian W; Lapostolle, Frédéric; Lassen, Jens Flensted; Collet, Jean-Philippe; Ten Berg, Jurriën M; Van't Hof, Arnoud W; Montalescot, Gilles

    2016-08-01

    PRIVATE-ATLANTIC (P2Y12 Receptor Inhibition with VASP Testing using Elisa kit during the ATLANTIC study) is a pre-specified substudy of the randomised, double-blind ATLANTIC trial in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, designed to help interpret the main trial results. The primary objective of ATLANTIC was to assess coronary reperfusion prior to percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) with pre- vs in-hospital ticagrelor 180 mg loading dose (LD). PRIVATE-ATLANTIC assessed platelet inhibition in 37 patients by measurement of vasodilator-associated stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) platelet reactivity index (PRI) and VerifyNow platelet reactivity units (PRU) before angiogram (T1), immediately after PCI (T2), 1 (T3), and 6 (T4) hours (h) after PCI, and before next study drug administration (T5). The median time difference between the two ticagrelor LD was 41 minutes. Platelet reactivity was unaffected at T1 when measured by VASP-PRI (89.8 vs 93.9 % for pre- and in-hospital ticagrelor, respectively; p = 0.18) or PRU (239 vs 241; p = 0.82). Numerical differences were apparent at T2 and maximal at T3. Morphine administration significantly delayed onset of platelet inhibition at T3 (VASP-PRI 78.2 vs 23.4 % without morphine; p = 0.0116) and T4 (33.1 vs 11.0 %; p = 0.0057). In conclusion, platelet inhibition in ATLANTIC was unaffected by pre-hospital ticagrelor administration at the time of initial angiogram due to the short transfer delay. The maximum difference in platelet inhibition was detected 1 h after PCI (T3). Morphine administration was associated with delayed onset of action of ticagrelor and appeared more important than timing of ticagrelor administration. PMID:27196998

  3. Variable Effect of P2Y12 Inhibition on Platelet Thrombus Volume in Flowing Blood

    PubMed Central

    Mendolicchio, G. L.; Zavalloni, D.; Bacci, M.; Corrada, E.; Marconi, M.; Lodigiani, C.; Presbitero, P.; Rota, L.; Ruggeri, Z. M.

    2010-01-01

    Background and objectives Patients treated by percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) receive aspirin and P2Y12 ADP receptor inhibitors to reduce thrombotic complications. The choice of methodology for monitoring the effects of treatment and assessing its efficacy is still a topic of debate. We evaluated how decreased P2Y12 function influences platelet aggregate (thrombus) size measured ex vivo. Methods and Results We used confocal videomicroscopy to measure in real time the volume of platelet thrombi forming upon blood perfusion over fibrillar collagen type I at the wall shear rate of 1,500 s−1. The average volume was significantly smaller in 31 patients receiving aspirin and clopidogrel (19) or ticlopidine (12) than 21 controls, but individual values were above the lower limit of the normal distribution, albeit mostly within the lower quartile, in 61.3% of cases. Disaggregation of platelet thrombi at later perfusion times occurred frequently in the patients. Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) phosphorylation, reflecting P2Y12 inhibition, was also decreased in the patient group and only 22.6% of individual values were above the lower normal limit. We found no correlation between thrombus volume formed onto collagen fibrils and level of P2Y12 inhibition, suggesting that additional and individually variable factors can influence the inhibitory effect of treatment on platelet function. Conclusions Measuring platelet thrombus formation in flowing blood reflects the consequences of anti-platelet therapy in a manner that is not proportional to P2Y12 inhibition. Combining the results of the two assays may improve the assessment of thrombotic risk. PMID:21083646

  4. Characteristics of new P2Y12 inhibitors: selection of P2Y12 inhibitors in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Golino, Paolo

    2013-12-01

    The options for antithrombotic therapy have recently been expanded, facilitating optimal tailored treatment. Dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and an approved adenosine diphosphate P2Y12 receptor antagonist is recommended for the management of patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). However, there are a number of controversies: which P2Y12 inhibitor to choose; how long should antiplatelet therapy be used so as to prevent thrombotic events and minimize bleeding risks; whether to use drug-eluting (DES) or bare-metal stents (BMS) and how to manage the individual variability in response to clopidogrel. Clopidogrel in combination with aspirin has been the standard dual antiplatelet regimen for ACS. The new, more potent P2Y12 inhibitors, prasugrel and ticagrelor, have shown improved antithrombotic effects compared with clopidogrel in patients with ACS (with or without ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction) in landmark trials, even if they were associated with an increased risk of major bleeding. Different pharmacogenetic and pharmacodynamic characteristics may explain, in part, the different pharmacologic and clinical responses to these antiplatelet agents. Importantly, both clopidogrel and prasugrel are prodrugs, i.e., they need to be converted in vivo into active metabolites that selectively and irreversibly bind the P2Y12 receptor. Unlike clopidogrel, however, common functional cytochrome P450 genetic variants do not affect prasugrel active metabolite levels or inhibition of platelet aggregation. In contrast, ticagrelor is not a prodrug (i.e., does not require hepatic metabolism to exert its antiplatelet effect) and represents the first oral P2Y12 receptor antagonist that is reversibly bound. Similar to prasugrel, ticagrelor achieves greater and more rapid inhibition of platelet function than clopidogrel. Evidence suggests that the new P2Y12 antagonists may offer improved antithrombotic effects compared with clopidogrel in selected patients for the

  5. Phenotypic approaches to gene mapping in platelet function disorders - identification of new variant of P2Y12, TxA2 and GPVI receptors.

    PubMed

    Watson, S; Daly, M; Dawood, B; Gissen, P; Makris, M; Mundell, S; Wilde, J; Mumford, A

    2010-01-01

    Platelet number or function disorders cause a range of bleeding symptoms from mild to severe. Patients with platelet dysfunction but normal platelet number are the most prevalent and typically have mild bleeding symptoms. The study of this group of patients is particularly difficult because of the lack of a gold-standard test of platelet function and the variable penetrance of the bleeding phenotype among affected individuals. The purpose of this short review is to discuss the way in which this group of patients can be investigated through platelet phenotyping in combination with targeted gene sequencing. This approach has been used recently to identify patients with mutations in key platelet activation receptors, namely those for ADP, collagen and thromboxane A2 (TxA2). One interesting finding from this work is that for some patients, mild bleeding is associated with heterozygous mutations in platelet proteins that are co-inherited with other genetic disorders of haemostasis such as type 1 von Willebrand's disease. Thus, the phenotype of mild bleeding may be multifactorial in some patients and may be considered to be a complex trait. PMID:20162250

  6. Identification and characterization of a novel P2Y 12 variant in a patient diagnosed with type 1 von Willebrand disease in the European MCMDM-1VWD study.

    PubMed

    Daly, Martina E; Dawood, Ban B; Lester, William A; Peake, Ian R; Rodeghiero, Francesco; Goodeve, Anne C; Makris, Michael; Wilde, Jonathan T; Mumford, Andrew D; Watson, Stephen P; Mundell, Stuart J

    2009-04-23

    We investigated whether defects in the P2Y(12) ADP receptor gene (P2RY12) contribute to the bleeding tendency in 92 index cases enrolled in the European MCMDM-1VWD study. A heterozygous mutation, predicting a lysine to glutamate (K174E) substitution in P2Y(12), was identified in one case with mild type 1 von Willebrand disease (VWD) and a VWF defect. Platelets from the index case and relatives carrying the K174E defect changed shape in response to ADP, but showed reduced and reversible aggregation in response to 10 muM ADP, unlike the maximal, sustained aggregation observed in controls. The reduced response was associated with an approximate 50% reduction in binding of [(3)H]2MeS-ADP to P2Y(12), whereas binding to the P2Y(1) receptor was normal. A hemagglutinin-tagged K174E P2Y(12) variant showed surface expression in CHO cells, markedly reduced binding to [(3)H]2MeS-ADP, and minimal ADP-mediated inhibition of forskolin-induced adenylyl cyclase activity. Our results provide further evidence for locus heterogeneity in type 1 VWD. PMID:19237732

  7. P2Y12 expression and function in alternatively activated human microglia

    PubMed Central

    Ase, Ariel R.; Kinsara, Angham; Rao, Vijayaraghava T.S.; Michell-Robinson, Mackenzie; Leong, Soo Yuen; Butovsky, Oleg; Ludwin, Samuel K.; Séguéla, Philippe; Bar-Or, Amit; Antel, Jack P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate and measure the functional significance of altered P2Y12 expression in the context of human microglia activation. Methods: We performed in vitro and in situ experiments to measure how P2Y12 expression can influence disease-relevant functional properties of classically activated (M1) and alternatively activated (M2) human microglia in the inflamed brain. Results: We demonstrated that compared to resting and classically activated (M1) human microglia, P2Y12 expression is increased under alternatively activated (M2) conditions. In response to ADP, the endogenous ligand of P2Y12, M2 microglia have increased ligand-mediated calcium responses, which are blocked by selective P2Y12 antagonism. P2Y12 antagonism was also shown to decrease migratory and inflammatory responses in human microglia upon exposure to nucleotides that are released during CNS injury; no effects were observed in human monocytes or macrophages. In situ experiments confirm that P2Y12 is selectively expressed on human microglia and elevated under neuropathologic conditions that promote Th2 responses, such as parasitic CNS infection. Conclusion: These findings provide insight into the roles of M2 microglia in the context of neuroinflammation and suggest a mechanism to selectively target a functionally unique population of myeloid cells in the CNS. PMID:25821842

  8. Optimal timing of initiation of oral P2Y12-receptor antagonist therapy in patients with non-ST elevation acute coronary syndromes. Lessons learnt from the ACCOAST-trial.

    PubMed

    Zeymer, Uwe; Montalescot, Gilles; Ardissino, Diego; Bolognese, Leonardo; Clemmensen, Peter; Collet, Jean-Philippe; Lopez-Sendon, Jose; Widimsky, Petr

    2016-06-01

    The optimal time-point of the initiation of P2Y12 antagonist therapy in patients with non-ST elevation acute coronary syndromes (NTSE-ACS) is still a matter of debate. European guidelines recommend P2Y12 as soon as possible after first medical contact. However, the only trial which compared the two strategies did not demonstrate any benefit of pre-treatment with prasugrel before angiography compared to starting therapy after angiography and just prior to percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). This paper summarizes the results of pharmacodynamic and previous studies, and gives recommendations for the initiation of P2Y12 antagonist therapy in NSTE-ACS in different clinical situations. PMID:25921481

  9. Clinical effects and outcomes with new P2Y12 inhibitors in ACS.

    PubMed

    Collet, Jean-Philippe; O'Connor, Stephen

    2012-02-01

    Thienopyridines have become the cornerstone of treatment for percutaneous coronary intervention although no survival benefit has ever been shown with clopidogrel despite increasing loading doses. Newly developed P2Y12 inhibitors are more potent, more predictable, and have a faster onset of action than clopidogrel, characteristics that make them particularly attractive for high-risk percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Four new P2Y12 inhibitors have been tested each of them having particular individual properties. Prasugrel is an oral pro-drug leading to irreversible blockade of the P2Y12 receptor and is approved worldwide for ACS PCI. Ticagrelor is a direct-acting and reversible inhibitor of the P2Y12 receptor with potentially more pleiotropic effects. Cangrelor is an intravenous direct and reversible inhibitor of the P2Y12 receptor providing the highest level of inhibition, and elinogrel is an intravenous and oral P2Y12 antagonist with a direct and reversible action. Both prasugrel and ticagrelor, opposed to clopidogrel, have shown that stronger P2Y12 inhibition led respectively to significant 19 and 16% relative risk reduction of a similar primary end point combining cardiovascular death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, or non-fatal stroke. Both drugs showed a significant 0.6% absolute excess of TIMI major bleeding not related to CABG surgery. Because in clinical trials, patients perceived to be at higher risk of bleeding usually are excluded, the risk of major and even fatal bleeding might even be higher in a 'real-world' setting, i.e. in the elderly patient with comorbidities. On the other hand, these newly developed P2Y12 inhibitors decrease mortality after PCI compared with clopidogrel. The risk/benefit ratio is particularly favorable in PCI for patients with STEMI. PMID:21895760

  10. Effect of P2Y12 inhibitors on inflammation and immunity.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Mark R; Storey, Robert F

    2015-08-31

    Platelet P2Y12 inhibitors form a major part of the treatment strategy for patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) due to the importance of the platelet P2Y12 receptor in mediating the pathophysiology of arterial thrombosis. It has been increasingly recognised that platelets also have a critical role in inflammation and immune responses. P2Y12 inhibitors reduce platelet release of pro-inflammatory α-granule contents and the formation of pro-inflammatory platelet-leukocyte aggregates. These are important mediators of inflammation in a variety of different contexts. Clinical evidence shows that P2Y12 inhibition by clopidogrel is associated with a reduction in platelet-related mediators of inflammation, such as soluble P-selectin and CD40L, following atherothrombosis. Clopidogrel in addition to aspirin, compared to aspirin alone, also reduces markers of systemic inflammation such as tumour necrosis factor (TNF) α and C-reactive protein (CRP) following ACS. The more potent thienopyridine P2Y12 inhibitor, prasugrel, has been shown to decrease platelet P-selectin expression and platelet-leukocyte aggregate formation compared to clopidogrel. The PLATO study suggested that the novel P2Y12 inhibitor ticagrelor might improve clinical outcomes from pulmonary infections and sepsis compared to clopidogrel in patients with ACS. Ticagrelor is a more potent P2Y12 inhibitor than clopidogrel and also inhibits cellular adenosine uptake via equilibrative nucleoside transporter (ENT) 1, whereas clopidogrel does not. Further examination of the involvement of these mechanisms in inflammation and immunity is therefore warranted. PMID:26156883

  11. LPS-induced systemic inflammation is more severe in P2Y12 null mice.

    PubMed

    Liverani, Elisabetta; Rico, Mario C; Yaratha, Laxmikausthubha; Tsygankov, Alexander Y; Kilpatrick, Laurie E; Kunapuli, Satya P

    2014-02-01

    Thienopyridines are a class of antiplatelet drugs that are metabolized in the liver to several metabolites, of which only one active metabolite can irreversibly antagonize the platelet P2Y12 receptor. Possible effects of these drugs and the role of activated platelets in inflammatory responses have also been investigated in a variety of animal models, demonstrating that thienopyridines could alter inflammation. However, it is not clear whether it is caused only by the P2Y12 antagonism or whether off-target effects of other metabolites also intervene. To address this question, we investigated P2Y12 KO mice during a LPS-induced model of systemic inflammation, and we treated these KO mice with a thienopyridine drug (clopidogrel). Contrary to the reported effects of clopidogrel, numbers of circulating WBCs and plasma levels of cytokines were increased in LPS-exposed KO mice compared with WT in this inflammation model. Moreover, both spleen and bone marrow show an increase in cell content, suggesting a role for P2Y12 in regulation of bone marrow and spleen cellular composition. Finally, the injury was more severe in the lungs of KO mice compared with WT. Interestingly, clopidogrel treatments also exerted protective effects in KO mice, suggesting off-target effects for this drug. In conclusion, the P2Y12 receptor plays an important role during LPS-induced inflammation, and this signaling pathway may be involved in regulating cell content in spleen and bone marrow during LPS systemic inflammation. Furthermore, clopidogrel may have effects that are independent of P2Y12 receptor blockade. PMID:24142066

  12. Platelet reactivity after administration of third generation P2Y12-antagonists does not depend on body weight in contrast to clopidogrel.

    PubMed

    Olivier, Christoph B; Schnabel, Katharina; Weber, Susanne; Zhou, Qian; Bode, Christoph; Moser, Martin; Diehl, Philipp

    2016-07-01

    The current standard of antiplatelet therapy for patients with myocardial infarction (MI) includes the P2Y12-receptor antagonist clopidogrel, prasugrel or ticagrelor. While it has been shown that platelet reactivity after clopidogrel administration depends on factors such as body weight, it is not known if these factors have an effect on the activity of prasugrel or ticagrelor. Thus, this study aimed to analyse factors associated with high residual platelet reactivity after administration of third generation P2Y12-antagonists compared to clopidogrel. In a single centre registry the antiplatelet effect of clopidogrel, prasugrel or ticagrelor was investigated by aggregometry in patients after MI. To assess the overall capacity of platelet aggregation whole blood was induced with thrombin receptor activating peptide (TRAP; 32 µM). To specifically quantify the effect of P2Y12-antagonists, blood was stimulated with 6.4 µM adenosine diphophosphate (ADP). Relative ADP induced aggregation (r-ADP-agg) was defined as the ADP-TRAP-ratio to reflect an individual degree of P2Y12-dependent platelet inhibition. Platelet function of 238 patients was analysed [clopidogrel (n = 58), prasugrel (n = 65), ticagrelor (n = 115)]. It was found that the r-ADP-agg correlated significantly with body weight in patients after clopidogrel administration (r = 0.423; p < 0.001). In contrast, this association was not present in patients after prasugrel (r = -0.117; p = 0.354) or ticagrelor (r = -0.082; p = 0.382) administration. Comparison of the correlation coefficients showed a significant difference (p = 0.003). In contrast to clopidogrel, platelet reactivity after administration of prasugrel or ticagrelor does not depend on body weight in patients after MI. Hence, our mechanistic data support the results of large clinical trials indicating that patients with high body weight do not need to be treated with increased doses of third generation P2Y12-antagonists to achieve

  13. Salvianolic acid B inhibits platelets as a P2Y12 antagonist and PDE inhibitor: evidence from clinic to laboratory.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lei; Li, Jian; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Shenghui; Ye, Jianqin; Wen, Zhichao; Ding, Jianping; Kunapuli, Satya P; Luo, Xinping; Ding, Zhongren

    2014-10-01

    Salviae miltiorrhiza (Danshen) has been used for thousands of years in China and some other Asian countries to treat atherothrombotic diseases. Salvianolate which consists of three water-soluble ingredients purified from Salviae miltiorrhiza, has been approved by Chinese SFDA to treat coronary artery disease. So far, there is no evidence clearly showing the clinical efficiency of salvianolate and the underlying mechanism. This study is to evaluate the effects of salvianolate on platelets in patients with acute coronary syndrome and explore the underlying mechanism. We evaluated the effects of salvianolate on platelets in patients with acute coronary syndrome by measuring ADP-induced PAC-1 binding and P-selectin expression on platelets. Salvianolate significantly potentiated the antiplatelet effects of standard dual antiplatelet therapy. We also investigated the antiplatelet effects of salvianolatic acid B (Sal-B), the major component which composes 85% of salvianolate. Sal-B inhibits human platelet activation induced by multiple agonists in vitro by inhibiting phosphodiesterase (PDE) and antagonizing P2Y12 receptor. For the first time, we show the antiplatelet efficiency of salvianolate in ACS patients undergoing treatment with clopidogrel plus aspirin, and demonstrate that Sal-B, the major component of salvianolate inhibits human platelet activation via PDE inhibition and P2Y12 antagonism which may account for the clinical antiplatelet effects of salvianolate. Our results suggest that Sal-B may substitute salvianolate for clinical use. PMID:25077998

  14. P2Y12 antagonists in non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes: latest evidence and optimal use

    PubMed Central

    DiNicolantonio, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Dual antiplatelet therapy (DAPT), which includes the combination of aspirin and a P2Y12 platelet receptor inhibitor, is a well-established antiplatelet regimen in the treatment of patients with non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS). Three P2Y12 inhibitor options (clopidogrel, prasugrel and ticagrelor) are currently available, all having different efficacy and safety profiles along with contrasting contraindications, special warnings and precautions for use. This review compares and contrasts the unique P2Y12 antagonists in the NSTE-ACS setting, covering the latest evidence and their optimal use. PMID:26137210

  15. An intact PDZ motif is essential for correct P2Y12 purinoceptor traffic in human platelets

    PubMed Central

    Nisar, Shaista; Daly, Martina E.; Federici, Augusto B.; Artoni, Andrea; Mumford, Andrew D.; Watson, Stephen P.

    2011-01-01

    The platelet P2Y12 purinoceptor (P2Y12R), which plays a crucial role in hemostasis, undergoes internalization and subsequent recycling to maintain receptor responsiveness, processes that are essential for normal platelet function. Here, we observe that P2Y12R function is compromised after deletion or mutation of the 4 amino acids at the extreme C-terminus of this receptor (ETPM), a putative postsynaptic density 95/disc large/zonula occludens-1 (PDZ)–binding motif. In cell line models, removal of this sequence or mutation of one of its core residues (P341A), attenuates receptor internalization and receptor recycling back to the membrane, thereby blocking receptor resensitization. The physiologic significance of these findings in the regulation of platelet function is shown by identification of a patient with a heterozygous mutation in the PDZ binding sequence of their P2Y12R (P341A) that is associated with reduced expression of the P2Y12R on the cell surface. Importantly, platelets from this subject showed significantly compromised P2Y12R recycling, emphasizing the importance of the extreme C-terminus of this receptor to ensure correct receptor traffic. PMID:21937696

  16. An intact PDZ motif is essential for correct P2Y12 purinoceptor traffic in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Nisar, Shaista; Daly, Martina E; Federici, Augusto B; Artoni, Andrea; Mumford, Andrew D; Watson, Stephen P; Mundell, Stuart J

    2011-11-17

    The platelet P2Y(12) purinoceptor (P2Y(12)R), which plays a crucial role in hemostasis, undergoes internalization and subsequent recycling to maintain receptor responsiveness, processes that are essential for normal platelet function. Here, we observe that P2Y(12)R function is compromised after deletion or mutation of the 4 amino acids at the extreme C-terminus of this receptor (ETPM), a putative postsynaptic density 95/disc large/zonula occludens-1 (PDZ)-binding motif. In cell line models, removal of this sequence or mutation of one of its core residues (P341A), attenuates receptor internalization and receptor recycling back to the membrane, thereby blocking receptor resensitization. The physiologic significance of these findings in the regulation of platelet function is shown by identification of a patient with a heterozygous mutation in the PDZ binding sequence of their P2Y(12)R (P341A) that is associated with reduced expression of the P2Y(12)R on the cell surface. Importantly, platelets from this subject showed significantly compromised P2Y(12)R recycling, emphasizing the importance of the extreme C-terminus of this receptor to ensure correct receptor traffic. PMID:21937696

  17. Involvement of Microglial P2Y12 Signaling in Tongue Cancer Pain.

    PubMed

    Tamagawa, T; Shinoda, M; Honda, K; Furukawa, A; Kaji, K; Nagashima, H; Akasaka, R; Chen, J; Sessle, B J; Yonehara, Y; Iwata, K

    2016-09-01

    To elucidate if microglial P2Y12 receptor (P2Y12R) mechanisms are involved in the trigeminal spinal subnucleus caudalis (Vc; also known as the medullary dorsal horn) in intraoral cancer pain, we developed a rat model of tongue cancer pain. Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) cells were inoculated into the tongue of rats; sham control rats received the vehicle instead. Nociceptive behavior was measured as the head-withdrawal reflex threshold (HWRT) to mechanical or heat stimulation applied to the tongue under light anesthesia. On day 14 after the SCC inoculation, activated microglia and P2Y12R expression were examined immunohistochemically in the Vc. The HWRT was also studied in SCC-inoculated rats with successive intra-cisterna magna (i.c.m.) administration of specific P2Y12R antagonist (MRS2395) or intraperitoneal administration of minocycline, a microglial activation inhibitor. Tongue cancer was histologically verified in SCC-inoculated rats, within which the HWRT to mechanical stimulation of the tongue was significantly decreased, as compared with that of vehicle-inoculated rats, although the HWRT to heat stimulation was not. Microglia was strongly activated on day 14, and the administration of MRS2395 or minocycline reversed associated nocifensive behavior and microglial activation in SCC-inoculated rats for 14 d. The activity of Vc wide dynamic range nociceptive neurons was also recorded electrophysiologically in SCC-inoculated and sham rats. Background activity and noxious mechanically evoked responses of wide dynamic range neurons were significantly increased in SCC-inoculated rats versus sham rats, and background activity and mechanically evoked responses were significantly suppressed following i.c.m. administration of MRS2395 in SCC-inoculated rats as compared with sham. The present findings suggest that SCC inoculation that produces tongue cancer results in strong activation of microglia via P2Y12 signaling in the Vc, in association with increased excitability

  18. Omega-3 Fatty Acid Ethyl Esters do not Improve Clopidogrel Associated P2Y12 Inhibition in Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ping; Kamal, Haris; Baxter, Melissa; Mehta, Bijal K.

    2015-01-01

    The specific action of omega-3 fatty acid ethyl esters (OFA) in preventing cerebrovascular disease remains unknown, but research has demonstrated multiple possible mechanisms. In addition to altering lipid profiles, OFA may inhibit platelet aggregation. Clopidogrel inhibits platelets via the P2Y12 receptor. OFA may alter clopidogrel-associated platelet-inhibition via a possible combined effect on P2Y12 inhibition. To determine if OFA affects clopidogrel associated P2Y12 platelet receptor inhibition by comparing the percentage of responders in patients with cerebrovascular disease who were taking clopidogrel with or without OFA. We retrospectively reviewed data from adult patients with cerebrovascular disease or cerebral aneurysms and taking clopidogrel, who were seen at a single hospital between March 2010 to September 2011. We included 438 subjects in the study. For the 67 subjects who received loading doses of both clopidogrel and OFA, 71.6% had a P2Y12 inhibition response more than 20%, which is considered a positive response. For the 55 subjects who received just clopidogrel load, 67.2% of subjects were responders. There were 70.4% responders in the 274 subjects who were taking 75 mg of clopidogrel alone at home, and 73.8% responders in the 42 subjects who were taking both clopidogrel and OFA at home. However, these percentage differences were not statistically significant. This study did not find additional P2Y12 platelet inhibition when patients were given OFA, either given as a loading dose or taking it daily. PMID:26294943

  19. Microglial P2Y12 is necessary for synaptic plasticity in mouse visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Sipe, G O; Lowery, R L; Tremblay, M-È; Kelly, E A; Lamantia, C E; Majewska, A K

    2016-01-01

    Microglia are the resident immune cells of the brain. Increasingly, they are recognized as important mediators of normal neurophysiology, particularly during early development. Here we demonstrate that microglia are critical for ocular dominance plasticity. During the visual critical period, closure of one eye elicits changes in the structure and function of connections underlying binocular responses of neurons in the visual cortex. We find that microglia respond to monocular deprivation during the critical period, altering their morphology, motility and phagocytic behaviour as well as interactions with synapses. To explore the underlying mechanism, we focused on the P2Y12 purinergic receptor, which is selectively expressed in non-activated microglia and mediates process motility during early injury responses. We find that disrupting this receptor alters the microglial response to monocular deprivation and abrogates ocular dominance plasticity. These results suggest that microglia actively contribute to experience-dependent plasticity in the adolescent brain. PMID:26948129

  20. Microglial P2Y12 is necessary for synaptic plasticity in mouse visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Sipe, G. O.; Lowery,, R. L.; Tremblay, M-È; Kelly, E. A.; Lamantia, C. E.; Majewska, A. K.

    2016-01-01

    Microglia are the resident immune cells of the brain. Increasingly, they are recognized as important mediators of normal neurophysiology, particularly during early development. Here we demonstrate that microglia are critical for ocular dominance plasticity. During the visual critical period, closure of one eye elicits changes in the structure and function of connections underlying binocular responses of neurons in the visual cortex. We find that microglia respond to monocular deprivation during the critical period, altering their morphology, motility and phagocytic behaviour as well as interactions with synapses. To explore the underlying mechanism, we focused on the P2Y12 purinergic receptor, which is selectively expressed in non-activated microglia and mediates process motility during early injury responses. We find that disrupting this receptor alters the microglial response to monocular deprivation and abrogates ocular dominance plasticity. These results suggest that microglia actively contribute to experience-dependent plasticity in the adolescent brain. PMID:26948129

  1. 4-((R)-2-{[6-((S)-3-Methoxypyrrolidin-1-yl)-2-phenylpyrimidine-4-carbonyl]amino}-3-phosphonopropionyl)piperazine-1-carboxylic Acid Butyl Ester (ACT-246475) and Its Prodrug (ACT-281959), a Novel P2Y12 Receptor Antagonist with a Wider Therapeutic Window in the Rat Than Clopidogrel.

    PubMed

    Caroff, Eva; Hubler, Francis; Meyer, Emmanuel; Renneberg, Dorte; Gnerre, Carmela; Treiber, Alexander; Rey, Markus; Hess, Patrick; Steiner, Beat; Hilpert, Kurt; Riederer, Markus A

    2015-12-10

    Recent post hoc analyses of several clinical trials with P2Y12 antagonists showed the need for new molecules being fully efficacious as antiplatelet agents and having a reduced propensity to cause major bleeding. We have previously reported the discovery of the 2-phenylpyrimidine-4-carboxamide analogs as P2Y12 antagonists with nanomolar potency in the disease-relevant platelet aggregation assay in human plasma. Herein we present the optimization steps that led to the discovery of clinical candidate ACT-246475 (30d). The key step was the replacement of the carboxylic acid functionality by a phosphonic acid group which delivered the most potent molecules of the program. In addition, low in vivo clearance in rat and dog was achieved for the first time. Since the bioavailability of 30d was low in rat and dog, we developed the bis((isopropoxycarbonyl)oxy)methyl ester prodrug (ACT-281959, 45). Compound 30d showed efficacy in the rat ferric chloride thrombosis model when administered intravenously as parent or orally as its prodrug 45. Moreover, 30d displays a wider therapeutic window as compared to clopidogrel in the rat surgical blood loss model. PMID:26550844

  2. Dyspnea related to reversibly-binding P2Y12 inhibitors: A review of the pathophysiology, clinical presentation and diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Unverdorben, Martin; Parodi, Guido; Pistolesi, Massimo; Storey, Robert F

    2016-01-01

    Dyspnea is a common symptom physiologically associated with strenuous exercise and pathologically reflecting well-known diseases and conditions that are predominantly pulmonary, cardiovascular, and weight-related in origin. Dyspnea improves with appropriate measures that enhance physical performance and treatment of the underlying diseases. Dyspnea is less commonly triggered by other causes such as the environment (e.g., ozone), drugs, and others, some of which do not seem to affect bronchopulmonary function as evidenced by normal results of comprehensive pulmonary function testing. In cardiovascular medicine, dyspnea has recently attracted attention because it has been reported that this symptom occurs more frequently with the administration of the new oral reversibly-binding platelet P2Y12 receptor inhibitors ticagrelor [1-6], cangrelor [7-10], and elinogrel [11]. This paper succinctly addresses the current understanding of the pathophysiology, clinical presentation, and diagnostics of dyspnea, associated either with bronchopulmonary function impairment, as triggered mainly by pulmonary and cardiovascular diseases, or without bronchopulmonary function impairment, as induced by endogenous or external compounds such as drugs in order to provide a context for understanding, recognizing and managing P2Y12 inhibitor-induced dyspnea. PMID:26386945

  3. Resolvin E1 Regulates ADP Activation of Human Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Fredman, Gabrielle; Van Dyke, Thomas E.; Serhan, Charles N.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Resolvin E1 (RvE1) is an eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA)-derived specialized pro-resolving mediator generated during resolution of acute inflammation. RvE1 exhibits potent organ-protective actions in vivo and acts on specific cell types including platelets. Here, we investigated the ability of RvE1 to regulate adenosine diphosphate (ADP) activation of platelets via specific receptors because RvE1 reduces platelet aggregation with certain agonists including ADP. Methods and Results RvE1 (0.1nM–100nM) incubated with platelets gave reduced ADP-stimulated P-selectin mobilization (IC50 ~1.6×10−12 M) and polymerized actin content compared to control platelets. RvE1 (1–100nM) did not stimulate or block intracellular calcium mobilization. Using a new P2Y12-β-arrestin-coupled cell system, ADP-activated P2Y12 with an EC50 of 5×10−6 M and RvE1 did not directly stimulate P2Y12 or block ADP-P2Y12 signals. In this system, another eicosanoid LTE4 (EC50 1.3×10−11 M) dose dependently activated P2Y12. When recombinant P2Y12-expressing cells were transiently transfected with an RvE1 receptor, human ChemR23 (present on human platelets), addition of RvE1 (0.1nM-10.0nM) blocked ADP signals (IC50 ~1.6×10−11 M) in P2Y12-ChemR23-expressing cells compared to mock transfections. Conclusions These results demonstrate that RvE1’s regulatory actions (i.e reducing ADP-stimulated P-selectin mobilization and actin polymerization) are hChemR23-dependent. Moreover, they document specific platelet actions of RvE1 selectively engaged with ADP-activated platelets that illuminate a new cellular mechanism and impact of omega-3 EPA that may contribute to both resolution of vascular inflammation and ADP-dependent platelet activation relevant in pathologic cardiovascular events. PMID:20702811

  4. Distinct roles for protein kinase C isoforms in regulating platelet purinergic receptor function.

    PubMed

    Mundell, Stuart J; Jones, Matthew L; Hardy, Adam R; Barton, Johanna F; Beaucourt, Stephanie M; Conley, Pamela B; Poole, Alastair W

    2006-09-01

    ADP is a critical regulator of platelet activation, mediating its actions through two G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), P2Y1 and P2Y12. We have shown previously that the receptors are functionally desensitized, in a homologous manner, by distinct kinase-dependent mechanisms in which P2Y1 is regulated by protein kinase C (PKC) and P2Y12 by G protein-coupled receptor kinases. In this study, we addressed whether different PKC isoforms play different roles in regulating the trafficking and activity of these two GPCRs. Expression of PKCalpha and PKCdelta dominant-negative mutants in 1321N1 cells revealed that both isoforms regulated P2Y1 receptor signaling and trafficking, although only PKCdelta was capable of regulating P2Y12, in experiments in which PKC was directly activated by the phorbol ester phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). These results were paralleled in human platelets, in which PMA reduced subsequent ADP-induced P2Y1 and P2Y12 receptor signaling. PKC isoform-selective inhibitors revealed that novel, but not conventional, isoforms of PKC regulate P2Y12 function, whereas both novel and classic isoforms regulate P2Y1 activity. It is also noteworthy that we studied receptor internalization in platelets by a radioligand binding approach showing that both receptors internalize rapidly in these cells. ADP-induced P2Y1 receptor internalization is attenuated by PKC inhibitors, whereas that of the P2Y12 receptor is unaffected. Both P2Y1 and P2Y12 receptors can also undergo PMA-stimulated internalization, and here again, novel but not classic PKCs regulate P2Y12, whereas both novel and classic isoforms regulate P2Y1 internalization. This study therefore is the first to reveal distinct roles for PKC isoforms in the regulation of platelet P2Y receptor function and trafficking. PMID:16804093

  5. Reviewing the controversy surrounding pre-treatment with P2Y12 inhibitors in acute coronary syndrome patients.

    PubMed

    Capodanno, Davide; Angiolillo, Dominick J

    2016-07-01

    Pretreatment with oral P2Y12 inhibitors occurs each time clopidogrel, prasugrel, ticagrelor are given to patients with suspected coronary artery disease before definition of the coronary anatomy. In acute coronary syndromes, the practice of administering oral P2Y12 inhibitors upstream has been the object of significant controversy in recent years, following the publication of two trials of pretreatment in non-ST-segment elevation acute coronary syndromes and ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, respectively. The introduction in the market of cangrelor - the first intravenous P2Y12 inhibitor - represents a new opportunity but also a new challenge for clinicians. This article reviews current recommendations and supporting evidence surrounding pretreatment with oral and intravenous P2Y12 inhibitors in patients with acute coronary syndromes. PMID:26953527

  6. Comparison of VerifyNow P2Y12 and thrombelastography for assessing clopidogrel response in stroke patients in China.

    PubMed

    Lv, Hui-Hui; Wu, Shuai; Liu, Xu; Yang, Xiao-Li; Xu, Jian-Feng; Guan, Yang-Tai; Dong, Qiang; Zheng, S Lilly; Jiang, Jian-Ming; Li, Shi-Xu; Luo, Zheng; Li, Li; An, Li-Xian; Han, Yan

    2016-02-01

    Poor response to clopidogrel is often associated with recurrent ischemic events, and reliable platelet function tests are needed to identify clopidogrel low response (CLR). The aim of the study was to compare the consistency of VerifyNow P2Y12 and thrombelastography (TEG) in acute ischemic stroke patients treated with clopidogrel. Patients hospitalized in Changhai Hospital from August 2012 to September 2013 and assigned to treatment with a daily 75-mg dose of clopidogrel. The blood samples were taken on the 5-7th day to assess the capability of VerifyNow P2Y12 and TEG for evaluation of clopidogrel response, and all instrument parameters were used to perform correlation analysis. Patients with CLR were detected by using the methods and criteria published earlier (PRU ≥ 230 assayed by VerifyNow P2Y12 or TEG-Inhib% ≤30 % measured by TEG). Totally 58 patients were enrolled for the study and there were wide varieties in parameters of VerifyNow P2Y12 and TEG. Results showed a total of 17 and 9 patients, respectively, identified as CLR assessed by VerifyNow P2Y12 and TEG, but only three patients were detected to be clopidogrel low responders with both tests. The kappa consistency analysis showed poor consistency between VerifyNow P2Y12 and TEG results in terms of CLR (Kappa = -0.0349, p = 0.7730). Linear regression also demonstrated poor correlation between VerifyNow-PRU/VerifyNow-Inhib% and TEG-Inhib% (p = 0.07901 and p = 0.3788, respectively). Our study demonstrated that there was poor correlation between VerifyNow P2Y12 and TEG results, and VerifyNow P2Y12 showed a larger proportion of CLR than TEG. PMID:26520845

  7. Incidence and Clinical Features of Early Stent Thrombosis in the Era of New P2y12 Inhibitors (PLATIS-2)

    PubMed Central

    Asher, Elad; Abu-Much, Arsalan; Goldenberg, Ilan; Segev, Amit; Sabbag, Avi; Mazin, Israel; Shlezinger, Meital; Atar, Shaul; Zahger, Doron; Polak, Arthur; Beigel, Roy; Matetzky, Shlomi

    2016-01-01

    Early stent thrombosis (EST) (≤ 30 days after stent implantation) is a relatively rare but deleterious complication of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). Administration of newer P2Y12 inhibitors (prasugrel and ticagrelor) combined with aspirin has been shown to reduce the incidence of sub-acute and late stent thrombosis, compared with clopidogrel. We investigated the “real life” incidence of EST in patients from a large acute coronary syndrome (ACS) national registry, where newer P2Y12 inhibitors are widely used. Patients were derived from the ACS Israeli Survey (ACSIS), conducted during 2006, 2008, 2010 and 2013. Major adverse cardiac events (MACE) at 30days were defined as all-cause death, recurrent ACS, EST and stroke.Of the 4717 ACS patients who underwent PCI and stenting, 83% received clopidogrel and 17% newer P2Y12 inhibitors. The rate of EST was similar in both groups (1.7% in the newer P2Y12 inhibitor group vs. 1.4% in the clopidogrel-treated patients, p = 0.42). Results were consistent after multivariate analysis (adjusted HR = 1.06 [p = 0.89]). MACE occurred in 6.4% in the newer P2Y12 inhibitor group compared with 9.2% in the clopidogrel group (P<0.01). However, multivariate logistic regression modeling showed that treatment with newer P2Y12 inhibitors was not significantly associated with the secondary endpoint of MACE when compared with clopidogrel therapy [OR = 1.26 95%CI (0.93–1.73), P = 0.136]. The incidence of "real life" EST at 1month is relatively low, and appears to be similar in patients who receive newer P2Y12 inhibitors as well as in those who receive clopidogrel. PMID:27310147

  8. Combined blockade of ADP receptors and PI3-kinase p110β fully prevents platelet and leukocyte activation during hypothermic extracorporeal circulation.

    PubMed

    Krajewski, Stefanie; Kurz, Julia; Geisler, Tobias; Peter, Karlheinz; Wendel, Hans Peter; Straub, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Extracorporeal circulation (ECC) and hypothermia are used to maintain stable circulatory parameters and improve the ischemia tolerance of patients in cardiac surgery. However, ECC and hypothermia induce activation mechanisms in platelets and leukocytes, which are mediated by the platelet agonist ADP and the phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) p110β. Under clinical conditions these processes are associated with life-threatening complications including thromboembolism and inflammation. This study analyzes effects of ADP receptor P(2)Y(12) and P(2)Y(1) blockade and PI3K p110β inhibition on platelets and granulocytes during hypothermic ECC. Human blood was treated with the P(2)Y(12) antagonist 2-MeSAMP, the P(2)Y(1) antagonist MRS2179, the PI3K p110β inhibitor TGX-221, combinations thereof, or PBS and propylene glycol (controls). Under static in vitro conditions a concentration-dependent effect regarding the inhibition of ADP-induced platelet activation was found using 2-MeSAMP or TGX-221. Further inhibition of ADP-mediated effects was achieved with MRS2179. Next, blood was circulated in an ex vivo ECC model at 28°C for 30 minutes and various platelet and granulocyte markers were investigated using flow cytometry, ELISA and platelet count analysis. GPIIb/IIIa activation induced by hypothermic ECC was inhibited using TGX-221 alone or in combination with P(2)Y blockers (p<0.05), while no effect of hypothermic ECC or antiplatelet agents on GPIIb/IIIa and GPIbα expression and von Willebrand factor binding was observed. Sole P(2)Y and PI3K blockade or a combination thereof inhibited P-selectin expression on platelets and platelet-derived microparticles during hypothermic ECC (p<0.05). P(2)Y blockade alone or combined with TGX-221 prevented ECC-induced platelet-granulocyte aggregate formation (p<0.05). Platelet adhesion to the ECC surface, platelet loss and Mac-1 expression on granulocytes were inhibited by combined P(2)Y and PI3K blockade (p<0.05). Combined blockade of P

  9. A pharmacodynamic study of the optimal P2Y12 inhibitor regimen for East Asian patients with acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ji Hyun; Ahn, Sung Gyun; Park, Bonil; Park, Sang Wook; Kang, Yong Seok; Lee, Jun-Won; Youn, Young Jin; Ahn, Min-Soo; Kim, Jang-Young; Yoo, Byung-Su; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Yoon, Junghan

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims: Newer P2Y12 inhibitors, such as prasugrel and ticagrelor, have greater antiplatelet efficacy but may increase the risk of bleeding. In this study, we compared the pharmacodynamic efficacy of prasugrel and ticagrelor in East Asian patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Methods: We selected 83 ACS patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention who were discharged with 90 mg ticagrelor twice daily (n = 24), 10 mg prasugrel daily (n = 39) or 5 mg prasugrel daily (n = 20). After 2 to 4 weeks, on-treatment platelet reactivity (OPR) was assessed in terms of P2Y12 reaction units (PRUs) using the VerifyNow P2Y12 assay (Accumetrics). We compared East Asian (85 < PRU ≤ 275) and Caucasian (85 < PRU ≤ 208) criteria for assessing the therapeutic window of OPR. Results: OPR was lowest in the ticagrelor group, followed by the 10 mg prasugrel and 5 mg prasugrel groups (49.1 ± 29.9 vs. 83.7 ± 57.1 vs. 168.5 ± 60.8, respectively; p < 0.001). The 5 mg prasugrel group had the highest proportion of patients with OPR values within the therapeutic window, followed by the 10 mg prasugrel and ticagrelor groups (90.0% vs. 46.2% vs. 12.5%, respectively; p < 0.001 for East Asian criteria; 60.0% vs. 43.6% vs. 12.5%, respectively; p < 0.001 for Caucasian criteria). Conclusions: Short-term administration of 5 mg prasugrel facilitated maintenance within the therapeutic window of OPR compared with the 10 mg prasugrel and ticagrelor groups. Thus, 5 mg prasugrel daily may be the optimal antiplatelet regimen for stabilized East Asian ACS patients. PMID:26354056

  10. Contemporary registries on P2Y12 inhibitors in patients with acute coronary syndromes in Europe: overview and methodological considerations.

    PubMed

    Jukema, J Wouter; Lettino, Maddalena; Widimský, Petr; Danchin, Nicolas; Bardaji, Alfredo; Barrabes, Jose A; Cequier, Angel; Claeys, Marc J; De Luca, Leonardo; Dörler, Jakob; Erlinge, David; Erne, Paul; Goldstein, Patrick; Koul, Sasha M; Lemesle, Gilles; Lüscher, Thomas F; Matter, Christian M; Montalescot, Gilles; Radovanovic, Dragana; Lopez-Sendón, Jose; Tousek, Petr; Weidinger, Franz; Weston, Clive F M; Zaman, Azfar; Zeymer, Uwe

    2015-10-01

    Patient registries that document real-world clinical experience play an important role in cardiology as they complement the data from randomized controlled trials, provide valuable information on drug use and clinical outcomes, and evaluate to what extent guidelines are followed in practice. The Platelet Inhibition Registry in ACS EvalUation Study (PIRAEUS) project is an initiative of registry holders who are managing national or international registries observing patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS). The aim of PIRAEUS is to systematically compare and combine available information/insights from various European ACS registries with a focus on P2Y12 inhibitors. The present publication introduces the 17 participating registries in a narrative and tabular form, and describes which ACS groups and which dual antiplatelet therapies were investigated. It sets the basis for upcoming publications that will focus on effectiveness and safety of the antiplatelets used. PMID:27532447

  11. Effect of Fibrinogen on Platelet Reactivity Measured by the VerifyNow P2Y12 Assay.

    PubMed

    Dobrovolsky, A B; Laguta, P S; Guskova, E V; Yarovaya, E B; Titaeva, E V; Storozhilova, A N; Panchenko, E P

    2016-05-01

    The VerifyNow assay is based upon the ability of activated platelets to cross-link beads coated with fibrinogen. However, fibrinogen is an abundant protein of blood, and therefore it may affect test results by competing with fibrinogen of beads for binding to platelets. To test this assumption, we assessed the influence of artificial alteration of fibrinogen level in blood samples obtained from donors (n = 9) and patients on clopidogrel therapy (n = 8) on the results of the VerifyNow P2Y12 assay. Fibrinogen level was altered by adding to blood samples 1/10 volume of fibrinogen solution (10.56 g/liter) or corresponding buffer. Relative to baseline, addition of buffer significantly increased platelet reactivity, whereas addition of fibrinogen decreased it. Analysis of the relationship between change in platelet reactivity values (dBase and dPRU) and change in fibrinogen concentration (dFg) revealed strong negative correlations: dBase = -63.3 × dFg - 27.1 (r = -0.924, p < 0.0005) and dPRU = -54.4 × dFg - 21.8 (r = -0.764, p < 0.0005). Thus, the results of our experiments suggest that: (i) blood fibrinogen strongly influences results of the VerifyNow P2Y12 assay, and (ii) correcting for fibrinogen effect may be needed to improve the accuracy of the test in the measuring of antiplatelet effect of clopidogrel therapy. PMID:27297894

  12. ARF6-dependent regulation of P2Y receptor traffic and function in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Kanamarlapudi, Venkateswarlu; Owens, Sian E; Saha, Keya; Pope, Robert J; Mundell, Stuart J

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine diphosphate (ADP) is a critical regulator of platelet activation, mediating its actions through two G protein-coupled receptors, the P2Y(1) and P2Y(12) purinoceptors. Recently, we demonstrated that P2Y(1) and P2Y(12) purinoceptor activities are rapidly and reversibly modulated in human platelets, revealing that the underlying mechanism requires receptor internalization and subsequent trafficking as an essential part of this process. In this study we investigated the role of the small GTP-binding protein ADP ribosylation factor 6 (ARF6) in the internalization and function of P2Y(1) and P2Y(12) purinoceptors in human platelets. ARF6 has been implicated in the internalization of a number of GPCRs, although its precise molecular mechanism in this process remains unclear. In this study we show that activation of either P2Y(1) or P2Y(12) purinoceptors can stimulate ARF6 activity. Further blockade of ARF6 function either in cell lines or human platelets blocks P2Y purinoceptor internalization. This blockade of receptor internalization attenuates receptor resensitization. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Nm23-H1, a nucleoside diphosphate (NDP) kinase regulated by ARF6 which facilitates dynamin-dependent fission of coated vesicles during endocytosis, is also required for P2Y purinoceptor internalization. These data describe a novel function of ARF6 in the internalization of P2Y purinoceptors and demonstrate the integral importance of this small GTPase upon platelet ADP receptor function. PMID:22916275

  13. ARF6-Dependent Regulation of P2Y Receptor Traffic and Function in Human Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Kanamarlapudi, Venkateswarlu; Owens, Sian E.; Saha, Keya; Pope, Robert J.; Mundell, Stuart J.

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine diphosphate (ADP) is a critical regulator of platelet activation, mediating its actions through two G protein-coupled receptors, the P2Y1 and P2Y12 purinoceptors. Recently, we demonstrated that P2Y1 and P2Y12 purinoceptor activities are rapidly and reversibly modulated in human platelets, revealing that the underlying mechanism requires receptor internalization and subsequent trafficking as an essential part of this process. In this study we investigated the role of the small GTP-binding protein ADP ribosylation factor 6 (ARF6) in the internalization and function of P2Y1 and P2Y12 purinoceptors in human platelets. ARF6 has been implicated in the internalization of a number of GPCRs, although its precise molecular mechanism in this process remains unclear. In this study we show that activation of either P2Y1 or P2Y12 purinoceptors can stimulate ARF6 activity. Further blockade of ARF6 function either in cell lines or human platelets blocks P2Y purinoceptor internalization. This blockade of receptor internalization attenuates receptor resensitization. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Nm23-H1, a nucleoside diphosphate (NDP) kinase regulated by ARF6 which facilitates dynamin-dependent fission of coated vesicles during endocytosis, is also required for P2Y purinoceptor internalization. These data describe a novel function of ARF6 in the internalization of P2Y purinoceptors and demonstrate the integral importance of this small GTPase upon platelet ADP receptor function. PMID:22916275

  14. Trends in P2Y12 Inhibitor Use in Patients Referred for Invasive Evaluation of Coronary Artery Disease in Contemporary US Practice.

    PubMed

    Fan, Weihong; Plent, Stephanie; Prats, Jayne; Deliargyris, Efthymios N

    2016-05-01

    Practice in patients undergoing invasive evaluation for coronary artery disease is variable regarding choice of P2Y12 inhibitor and timing of treatment initiation and is usually dictated by institutional or even individual operator preference. Limited data are available on the actual patterns of P2Y12 inhibitor use in contemporary practice in the United States. We used electronic medical records from the Cerner "Health Facts" database of adults who underwent coronary angiography with or without percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) from January 2008 to June 2013 and who received a loading dose of clopidogrel, prasugrel, or ticagrelor at any time from 48 hours before the start of procedure up to 6 hours after. Timing of P2Y12 inhibitor administration was categorized as >2 hours before, 0 to 2 hours before (pretreatment groups), or after the start of procedure. Results were also evaluated according to type of P2Y12 inhibitor and patient clinical presentation. A total of 37,964 patients underwent coronary angiography, and 28,306 proceeded to PCI. Pretreatment with a P2Y12 inhibitor was observed in 28% and 23% in the overall and PCI populations, respectively. Moderate variability of pretreatment rates was noted relative to clinical presentation and P2Y12 inhibitor type. Pretreatment rates remained fairly constant over time with the exception of a decreasing trend with prasugrel. In conclusion, among patients referred for invasive evaluation of coronary artery disease, P2Y12 inhibitor pretreatment was low in contemporary US practice, an observation consistent over time and for all available agents and clinical presentations. PMID:27001447

  15. G-Protein–Coupled Receptors Signaling Pathways in New Antiplatelet Drug Development

    PubMed Central

    Gurbel, Paul A.; Kuliopulos, Athan; Tantry, Udaya S.

    2016-01-01

    Platelet G-protein–coupled receptors influence platelet function by mediating the response to various agonists, including ADP, thromboxane A2, and thrombin. Blockade of the ADP receptor, P2Y12, in combination with cyclooxygenase-1 inhibition by aspirin has been among the most widely used pharmacological strategies to reduce cardiovascular event occurrence in high-risk patients. The latter dual pathway blockade strategy is one of the greatest advances in the field of cardiovascular medicine. In addition to P2Y12, the platelet thrombin receptor, protease activated receptor-1, has also been recently targeted for inhibition. Blockade of protease activated receptor-1 has been associated with reduced thrombotic event occurrence when added to a strategy using P2Y12 and cyclooxygenase-1 inhibition. At this time, the relative contributions of these G-protein–coupled receptor signaling pathways to in vivo thrombosis remain incompletely defined. The observation of treatment failure in ≈10% of high-risk patients treated with aspirin and potent P2Y12 inhibitors provides the rationale for targeting novel pathways mediating platelet function. Targeting intracellular signaling downstream from G-protein–coupled receptor receptors with phosphotidylionisitol 3-kinase and Gq inhibitors are among the novel strategies under investigation to prevent arterial ischemic event occurrence. Greater understanding of the mechanisms of G-protein–coupled receptor–mediated signaling may allow the tailoring of antiplatelet therapy. PMID:25633316

  16. Type 2 Diabetes and ADP Receptor Blocker Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Samoš, Matej; Fedor, Marián; Kovář, František; Mokáň, Michal; Bolek, Tomáš; Galajda, Peter; Kubisz, Peter; Mokáň, Marián

    2016-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is associated with several abnormalities in haemostasis predisposing to thrombosis. Moreover, T2D was recently connected with a failure in antiplatelet response to clopidogrel, the most commonly used ADP receptor blocker in clinical practice. Clopidogrel high on-treatment platelet reactivity (HTPR) was repeatedly associated with the risk of ischemic adverse events. Patients with T2D show significantly higher residual platelet reactivity on ADP receptor blocker therapy and are more frequently represented in the group of patients with HTPR. This paper reviews the current knowledge about possible interactions between T2D and ADP receptor blocker therapy. PMID:26824047

  17. Plant extracts inhibit ADP-induced platelet activation in humans: their potential therapeutic role as ADP antagonists.

    PubMed

    Jagroop, Indera Anita

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine diphosphate (ADP) plays a pivotal role in platelet activation. Platelet hyperactivity is associated with vascular disease and also has a key role in haemostasis and thrombosis. ADP activates platelets through three purinoceptor subtypes, the G(q)-coupled P2Y(1) receptor, G(i)-coupled P2Y(12) receptor and P2X(1) ligand-gated cation channel. Platelet ADP purinergic receptors are therefore suitable targets for antiplatelet drugs. Thienopyridines such as clopidogrel and ticlopidine, as well as other ADP receptor antagonists like prasugrel, ticagrelor, cangrelor and elinogrel have demonstrated clinical benefits via the inhibition of the selective purinergic ADP receptor, P2Y(12). However, they still have limitations in their mode of action and efficacy, like increased risk of bleeding. Thus, the ongoing pursuit to develop newer and more effective antiplatelet agents continues. There is a growing interest in the purinergic antiplatelet properties exhibited by plant extracts. This article considers the following: pomolic acid isolated from Licania pittieri, brazilin isolated from the heartwood of Caesalpinia sappan L, phylligenin isolated from the twigs of Muraltia vulpina, bark oil of Gonystylus velutinus, seed and bark extracts from Aesculus hippocastanum L. and red wine phenolics and catechins isolated from green tea. Moreover, the method used to investigate platelet purinergic receptors should be considered, since using a more sensitive, high-resolution platelet sizer can sometimes detect platelet variations when the light transmission method was not able to do so. The exact mechanisms by which these plant extracts work need further investigation. They all however inhibit ADP-induced activation in human platelets. This could explain, at least in part, the protective effect of plant extracts as antiplatelet agents. PMID:24190032

  18. P2Y13 receptor-mediated rapid increase in intracellular calcium induced by ADP in cultured dorsal spinal cord microglia.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Junwei; Wang, Gaoxia; Liu, Xiaohong; Wang, Chunmei; Tian, Hong; Liu, Aidong; Jin, Huan; Luo, Xiaomei; Chen, Yuanshou

    2014-11-01

    P2Y receptors have been implicated in the calcium mobilization by the response to neuroexcitatory substances in neurons and astrocytes, but little is known about P2Y receptors in microglia cells. In the present study, the effects of ADP on the intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in cultured dorsal spinal cord microglia were detected with confocal laser scanning microscopy using fluo-4/AM as a calcium fluorescence indicator that could monitor real-time alterations of [Ca(2+)]i. Here we show that ADP (0.01-100 μM) causes a rapid increase in [Ca(2+)]i with a dose-dependent manner in cultured microglia. The action of ADP on [Ca(2+)]i was significantly blocked by MRS2211 (a selective P2Y13 receptor antagonist), but was unaffected by MRS2179 (a selective P2Y1 receptor antagonist) or MRS2395 (a selective P2Y12 receptor antagonist), which suggest that P2Y13 receptor may be responsible for ADP-evoked Ca(2+) mobilization in cultured microglia. P2Y13-evoked Ca(2+) response can be obviously inhibited by BAPTA-AM and U-73122, respectively. Moreover, removal of extracellular Ca(2+) (by EGTA) also can obvious suppress the Ca(2+) mobilization. These results means both intracellular calcium and extracellular calcium are potentially important mechanisms in P2Y13 receptor-evoked Ca(2+) mobilization. However, P2Y13 receptor-evoked Ca(2+) response was not impaired after CdCl2 and verapamil administration, which suggest that voltage-operated Ca(2+) channels may be not related with P2Y13-evoked Ca(2+) response. In addition, Ca(2+) mobilization induced by ADP was abolished by different store-operated Ca(2+) channels (SOCs) blocker, 2-APB (50 μM) and SKF-96365 (1 mM), respectively. These observations suggest that the activation of P2Y13 receptor might be involved in the effect of ADP on [Ca(2+)]i in cultured dorsal spinal cord microglia. Furthermore, our results raise a possibility that P2Y13 receptor activation causes Ca(2+) release from Ca(2+) store, which leads to the

  19. The active metabolite of prasugrel inhibits ADP-stimulated thrombo-inflammatory markers of platelet activation: Influence of other blood cells, calcium, and aspirin.

    PubMed

    Frelinger, Andrew L; Jakubowski, Joseph A; Li, Youfu; Barnard, Marc R; Fox, Marsha L; Linden, Matthew D; Sugidachi, Atsuhiro; Winters, Kenneth J; Furman, Mark I; Michelson, Alan D

    2007-07-01

    The novel thienopyridine prodrug prasugrel, a platelet P2Y(12) ADP receptor antagonist, requires in vivo metabolism for activity. Although pharmacological data have been collected on the effects of prasugrel on platelet aggregation, there are few data on the direct effects of the prasugrel's active metabolite, R-138727, on other aspects of platelet function. Here we examined the effects of R-138727 on thrombo-inflammatory markers of platelet activation, and the possible modulatory effects of other blood cells, calcium, and aspirin. Blood (PPACK or citrate anticoagulated) from healthy donors pre- and post-aspirin was incubated with R-138727 and the response to ADP assessed in whole blood or platelet-rich plasma (PRP) by aggregometry and flow cytometric analysis of leukocyte-platelet aggregates, platelet surface P-selectin, and GPIIb-IIIa activation. Low-micromolar concentrations of R-138727 resulted in a rapid and consistent inhibition of these ADP-stimulated thrombo-inflammatory markers. These rapid kinetics required physiological calcium levels, but were largely unaffected by aspirin. Lower IC(50) values in whole blood relative to PRP suggested that other blood cells affect ADP-induced platelet activation and hence the net inhibition by R-138727. R-138727 did not inhibit P2Y(12)-mediated ADP-induced shape change, even at concentrations that completely inhibited platelet aggregation, confirming the specificity of R-138727 for P2Y(12). In conclusion, R-138727, the active metabolite of prasugrel, results in rapid, potent, consistent, and selective inhibition of P2Y(12)-mediated up-regulation of thrombo-inflammatory markers of platelet activation. This inhibition is enhanced in the presence other blood cells and calcium, but not aspirin. PMID:17598013

  20. Antagonists of the EP3 receptor for prostaglandin E2 are novel antiplatelet agents that do not prolong bleeding.

    PubMed

    Singh, Jasbir; Zeller, Wayne; Zhou, Nian; Hategen, Georgeta; Mishra, Rama; Polozov, Alex; Yu, Peng; Onua, Emmanuel; Zhang, Jun; Zembower, David; Kiselyov, Alex; Ramírez, José L; Sigthorsson, Gudmundur; Bjornsson, Jon Mar; Thorsteinsdottir, Margret; Andrésson, Thorkell; Bjarnadottir, Maria; Magnusson, Olafur; Fabre, Jean-Etienne; Stefansson, Kari; Gurney, Mark E

    2009-02-20

    Myocardial infarction and stroke are caused by blood clots forming over a ruptured or denuded atherosclerotic plaque (atherothrombosis). Production of prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)) by an inflamed plaque exacerbates atherothrombosis and may limit the effectiveness of current therapeutics. Platelets express multiple G-protein coupled receptors, including receptors for ADP and PGE(2). ADP can mobilize Ca(2+) and through the P(2)Y(12) receptor can inhibit cAMP production, causing platelet activation and aggregation. Clopidogrel (Plavix), a selective P(2)Y(12) antagonist, prevents platelets from clotting but thereby increases the risk of severe or fatal bleeding. The platelet EP(3) receptor for PGE(2), like the P(2)Y(12) receptor, also inhibits cAMP synthesis. However, unlike ADP, facilitation of platelet aggregation via the PGE(2)/EP(3) pathway is dependent on co-agonists that can mobilize Ca(2+). We used a ligand-based design strategy to develop peri-substituted bicylic acylsulfonamides as potent and selective EP(3) antagonists. We show that DG-041, a selective EP(3) antagonist, inhibits PGE(2) facilitation of platelet aggregation in vitro and ex vivo. PGE(2) can resensitize platelets to agonist even when the P(2)Y(12) receptor has been blocked by clopidogrel, and this can be inhibited by DG-041. Unlike clopidogrel, DG-041 does not affect bleeding time in rats, nor is bleeding time further increased when DG-041 is co-administered with clopidogrel. This indicates that EP(3) antagonists potentially have a superior safety profile compared to P(2)Y(12) antagonists and represent a novel class of antiplatelet agents. PMID:19193156

  1. P2 receptors and platelet function.

    PubMed

    Hechler, Béatrice; Gachet, Christian

    2011-09-01

    Following vessel wall injury, platelets adhere to the exposed subendothelium, become activated and release mediators such as TXA(2) and nucleotides stored at very high concentration in the so-called dense granules. Released nucleotides and other soluble agents act in a positive feedback mechanism to cause further platelet activation and amplify platelet responses induced by agents such as thrombin or collagen. Adenine nucleotides act on platelets through three distinct P2 receptors: two are G protein-coupled ADP receptors, namely the P2Y(1) and P2Y(12) receptor subtypes, while the P2X(1) receptor ligand-gated cation channel is activated by ATP. The P2Y(1) receptor initiates platelet aggregation but is not sufficient for a full platelet aggregation in response to ADP, while the P2Y(12) receptor is responsible for completion of the aggregation to ADP. The latter receptor, the molecular target of the antithrombotic drugs clopidogrel, prasugrel and ticagrelor, is responsible for most of the potentiating effects of ADP when platelets are stimulated by agents such as thrombin, collagen or immune complexes. The P2X(1) receptor is involved in platelet shape change and in activation by collagen under shear conditions. Each of these receptors is coupled to specific signal transduction pathways in response to ADP or ATP and is differentially involved in all the sequential events involved in platelet function and haemostasis. As such, they represent potential targets for antithrombotic drugs. PMID:21792575

  2. Antiplatelet efficacy of P2Y12 inhibitors (prasugrel, ticagrelor, clopidogrel) in patients treated with mild therapeutic hypothermia after cardiac arrest due to acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Bednar, Frantisek; Kroupa, Josef; Ondrakova, Martina; Osmancik, Pavel; Kopa, Milos; Motovska, Zuzana

    2016-05-01

    Survivors after cardiac arrest (CA) due to AMI undergo PCI and then receive dual antiplatelet therapy. Mild therapeutic hypothermia (MTH) is recommended for unconscious patients after CA to improve neurological outcomes. MTH can attenuate the effectiveness of P2Y12 inhibitors by reducing gastrointestinal absorption and metabolic activation. The combined effect of these conditions on the efficacy of P2Y12 inhibitors is unknown. We compared the antiplatelet efficacies of new P2Y12 inhibitors in AMI patients after CA treated with MTH. Forty patients after CA for AMI treated with MTH and received one P2Y12 inhibitor (clopidogrel, prasugrel or ticagrelor) were enrolled in a prospective observational single-center study. Platelet inhibition was measured by VASP (PRI) on days 1, 2, and 3 after drug administration. In-hospital clinical data and 1-year survival data were obtained. The proportion of patients with ineffective platelet inhibition (PRI > 50 %, high on-treatment platelet reactivity) for clopidogrel, prasugrel, and ticagrelor was 77 vs. 19 vs. 1 % on day 1; 77 vs. 17 vs. 0 % on day 2; and 85 vs. 6 vs. 0 % on day 3 (P < 0.001). The platelet inhibition was significantly worse in clopidogrel group than in prasugrel or ticagrelor group. Prasugrel and ticagrelor are very effective for platelet inhibition in patients treated with MTH after CA due to AMI, but clopidogrel is not. Using prasugrel or ticagrelor seems to be a more suitable option in this high-risk group of acute patients. PMID:26340851

  3. P2Y12 Inhibitor Pre-Treatment in Non-ST-Elevation Acute Coronary Syndrome: A Decision-Analytic Model

    PubMed Central

    Gunton, James; Hartshorne, Trent; Langrish, Jeremy; Chuang, Anthony; Chew, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Current guidelines recommend initiation of a P2Y12 inhibitor for all patients with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS) at the time of diagnosis (pre-treatment); however, there are no randomized trials directly comparing pre-treatment with initiation at the time of angiography to support this practice. We explore clinical and institutional parameters potentially associated with benefit with this strategy in a decision-analytic model based on available evidence from randomised trials. A decision analysis model was constructed comparing three P2Y12 inhibitors in addition to aspirin in patients with NSTE-ACS. Based on clinical trial data, the cumulative probability of 30 day mortality, myocardial infarction (MI) and major bleeding were determined, and used to calculate the net clinical benefit (NCB) with and without pre-treatment. Sensitivity analysis was performed to assess the relationship between NCB and baseline ischemic risk, bleeding risk, time to angiography and local surgical revascularization rates. Pre-treatment with ticagrelor and clopidogrel was associated with a greater than 50% likelihood of providing a >1% increase in 30 day NCB when baseline estimated ischemic risk exceeds 11% and 14%, respectively. Prasugrel pre-treatment did not achieve a greater than 50% probability of an increase in NCB regardless of baseline ischemic risk. Institutional surgical revascularization rates and time to coronary angiography did not correlate with the likelihood of benefit from P2Y12 pre-treatment. In conclusion, pre-treatment with P2Y12 inhibition is unlikely to be beneficial to the majority of patients presenting with NSTE-ACS. A tailored assessment of each patient’s individual ischemic and bleeding risk may identify those likely to benefit. PMID:27548237

  4. P2Y12 Inhibitor Pre-Treatment in Non-ST-Elevation Acute Coronary Syndrome: A Decision-Analytic Model.

    PubMed

    Gunton, James; Hartshorne, Trent; Langrish, Jeremy; Chuang, Anthony; Chew, Derek

    2016-01-01

    Current guidelines recommend initiation of a P2Y12 inhibitor for all patients with non-ST-elevation acute coronary syndrome (NSTE-ACS) at the time of diagnosis (pre-treatment); however, there are no randomized trials directly comparing pre-treatment with initiation at the time of angiography to support this practice. We explore clinical and institutional parameters potentially associated with benefit with this strategy in a decision-analytic model based on available evidence from randomised trials. A decision analysis model was constructed comparing three P2Y12 inhibitors in addition to aspirin in patients with NSTE-ACS. Based on clinical trial data, the cumulative probability of 30 day mortality, myocardial infarction (MI) and major bleeding were determined, and used to calculate the net clinical benefit (NCB) with and without pre-treatment. Sensitivity analysis was performed to assess the relationship between NCB and baseline ischemic risk, bleeding risk, time to angiography and local surgical revascularization rates. Pre-treatment with ticagrelor and clopidogrel was associated with a greater than 50% likelihood of providing a >1% increase in 30 day NCB when baseline estimated ischemic risk exceeds 11% and 14%, respectively. Prasugrel pre-treatment did not achieve a greater than 50% probability of an increase in NCB regardless of baseline ischemic risk. Institutional surgical revascularization rates and time to coronary angiography did not correlate with the likelihood of benefit from P2Y12 pre-treatment. In conclusion, pre-treatment with P2Y12 inhibition is unlikely to be beneficial to the majority of patients presenting with NSTE-ACS. A tailored assessment of each patient's individual ischemic and bleeding risk may identify those likely to benefit. PMID:27548237

  5. Systematic review and meta-analysis of optimal P2Y12 blockade in dual antiplatelet therapy for patients with diabetes with acute coronary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Rossington, Jennifer A; Brown, Oliver I; Hoye, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Background Patients with diabetes are at increased risk of acute coronary syndromes (ACS) and their mortality and morbidity outcomes are significantly worse following ACS events, independent of other comorbidities. This systematic review sought to establish the optimum management strategy with focus on P2Y12 blockade in patients with diabetes with ACS. Methods MEDLINE (1946 to present) and EMBASE (1974 to present) databases, abstracts from major cardiology conferences and previously published systematic reviews were searched to June 2014. Relevant randomised control trials with clinical outcomes for P2Y12 inhibitors in adult patients with diabetes with ACS were scrutinised independently by 2 authors with applicable data was extracted for primary composite end point of cardiovascular death, myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke; enabling calculation of relative risks with 95% CI with subsequent direct and indirect comparison. Results Four studies studied clopidogrel in patients with diabetes, with two (3122 patients) having primary outcome data showing superiority of clopidogrel against placebo with RR0.84 (95% CI 0.72–0.99). Irrespective of management strategy, the newer agents prasugrel (2 studies) and ticagrelor (1 study) had a lower primary event rate compared with clopidogrel; RR 0.80 (95% CI 0.66 to 0.97) and RR 0.89 (95% CI 0.77 to 1.02), respectively. When ticagrelor was indirectly compared with prasugrel, there was a trend to an improved primary outcome with prasugrel (RR 1.11 (95% CI 0.94 to 1.31)) particularly in those managed with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) (RR 1.23 (95% CI 0.95 to 1.59)). Prasugrel demonstrated a statistical superiority with prevention of further MI with RR 1.48 (95% CI 1.11 to 1.97). This was not at the expense of increased major thrombolysis in MI (TIMI) bleeding rates RR 0.94 (95% CI 0.59 to 1.51). Conclusions This meta-analysis shows the addition of a P2Y12 inhibitor is superior to placebo, with a trend favouring the

  6. Association of PON1, P2Y12 and COX1 with Recurrent Ischemic Events in Patients with Extracranial or Intracranial Stenting

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bo; Sun, Shu-Sen; Gao, Feng; Mo, Da-Peng; Song, Li-Gang; Sun, Xuan; Liu, Lian; Zhao, Xing-Quan; Wang, Yi-Long; Wang, Yong-Jun; Zhao, Zhi-Gang; Miao, Zhong-Rong

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose Short-term combined use of clopidogrel and aspirin improves cerebrovascular outcomes in patients with symptomatic extracranial or intracranial stenosis. Antiplatelet non-responsiveness is related to recurrent ischemic events, but the culprit genetic variants responsible for the non-responsiveness have not been well studied. We aimed to identify the genetic variants associated with poor clinical outcomes. Methods Patients with symptomatic extracranial or intracranial stenosis scheduled for stenting and receiving dual antiplatelets (clopidogrel 75 mg and aspirin 100 mg daily) for at least 5 days before intervention were enrolled. Ischemic events including recurrent transient ischemic attack, stroke, myocardial infarction, and vascular-related mortality within 12 months follow-up were recorded. We examined the influence of genetic polymorphisms on treatment outcome in our patients. Results A total of 268 patients were enrolled into our study and ischemic events were observed in 39 patients. For rs662 of paraoxonase 1 (PON1), allele C was associated with an increased risk of ischemic events (OR = 1.64, 95%CI = 1.03–2.62, P = 0.029). The A-allele carriers of rs2046934 of P2Y12 had a significant association with adverse events (OR = 2.01, 95%CI = 1.10–3.67, P = 0.041). The variant T-allele of cyclooxygenase-1 (COX1) rs1330344 significantly increased the risk of recurrent clinical events (OR = 1.85, 95%CI = 1.12–3.03, P = 0.017). The other single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) had no association with ischemic events. Conclusions PON1, P2Y12 and COX1 polymorphisms were associated with poorer vascular outcomes. Testing for these polymorphisms may be valuable in the identification of patients at risk for recurrent ischemic events. PMID:26870959

  7. Nucleolin Down-Regulation Is Involved in ADP-Induced Cell Cycle Arrest in S Phase and Cell Apoptosis in Vascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wenmeng; Luo, Junqing; Xiang, Fang; Liu, Xueting; Jiang, Manli; Liao, Lingjuan; Hu, Jinyue

    2014-01-01

    High concentration of extracellular ADP has been reported to induce cell apoptosis, but the molecular mechanisms remain not fully elucidated. In this study, we found by serendipity that ADP treatment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) down-regulated the protein level of nucleolin in a dose- and time-dependent manner. ADP treatment did not decrease the transcript level of nucloelin, suggesting that ADP might induce nucleolin protein degradation. HUVEC and HAEC expressed ADP receptor P2Y13 receptor, but did not express P2Y1 or P2Y12 receptors. However, P2Y1, 12, 13 receptor antagonists MRS2179, PSB0739, MRS2211 did not inhibit ADP-induced down-regulation of nucleolin. Moreover, MRS2211 itself down-regulated nucleolin protein level. In addition, 2-MeSADP, an agonist for P2Y1, 12 and 13 receptors, did not down-regulate nucleolin protein. These results suggested that ADP-induced nucleolin down-regulation was not due to the activation of P2Y1, 12, or 13 receptors. We also found that ADP treatment induced cell cycle arrest in S phase, cell apoptosis and cell proliferation inhibition via nucleolin down-regulation. The over-expression of nucleolin by gene transfer partly reversed ADP-induced cell cycle arrest, cell apoptosis and cell proliferation inhibition. Furthermore, ADP sensitized HUVEC to cisplatin-induced cell death by the down-regulation of Bcl-2 expression. Taken together, we found, for the first time to our knowledge, a novel mechanism by which ADP regulates cell proliferation by induction of cell cycle arrest and cell apoptosis via targeting nucelolin. PMID:25290311

  8. Nucleolin down-regulation is involved in ADP-induced cell cycle arrest in S phase and cell apoptosis in vascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wenmeng; Luo, Junqing; Xiang, Fang; Liu, Xueting; Jiang, Manli; Liao, Lingjuan; Hu, Jinyue

    2014-01-01

    High concentration of extracellular ADP has been reported to induce cell apoptosis, but the molecular mechanisms remain not fully elucidated. In this study, we found by serendipity that ADP treatment of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) and human aortic endothelial cells (HAEC) down-regulated the protein level of nucleolin in a dose- and time-dependent manner. ADP treatment did not decrease the transcript level of nucloelin, suggesting that ADP might induce nucleolin protein degradation. HUVEC and HAEC expressed ADP receptor P2Y13 receptor, but did not express P2Y1 or P2Y12 receptors. However, P2Y1, 12, 13 receptor antagonists MRS2179, PSB0739, MRS2211 did not inhibit ADP-induced down-regulation of nucleolin. Moreover, MRS2211 itself down-regulated nucleolin protein level. In addition, 2-MeSADP, an agonist for P2Y1, 12 and 13 receptors, did not down-regulate nucleolin protein. These results suggested that ADP-induced nucleolin down-regulation was not due to the activation of P2Y1, 12, or 13 receptors. We also found that ADP treatment induced cell cycle arrest in S phase, cell apoptosis and cell proliferation inhibition via nucleolin down-regulation. The over-expression of nucleolin by gene transfer partly reversed ADP-induced cell cycle arrest, cell apoptosis and cell proliferation inhibition. Furthermore, ADP sensitized HUVEC to cisplatin-induced cell death by the down-regulation of Bcl-2 expression. Taken together, we found, for the first time to our knowledge, a novel mechanism by which ADP regulates cell proliferation by induction of cell cycle arrest and cell apoptosis via targeting nucelolin. PMID:25290311

  9. Effects of cigarette smoking on platelet reactivity during P2Y12 inhibition in patients with myocardial infarction undergoing drug-eluting stent implantation: results from the prospective cigarette smoking on platelet reactivity (COPTER) study.

    PubMed

    Patti, Giuseppe; Polacco, Marina; Taurino, Ester; Gaudio, Carlo; Greco, Cesare

    2016-05-01

    Interaction between cigarette smoking and efficacy of oral antiplatelet drugs is not definitely elucidated. We evaluated the effects of cigarette smoking on platelet reactivity in patients receiving different oral P2Y12 antagonists after myocardial infarction (MI) and drug-eluting stent (DES) implantation. Two-hundred-five consecutive current smokers receiving DES implantation after ST-segment elevation MI were enrolled. All patients were aspirin-treated and were on chronic therapy with clopidogrel (N = 59), prasugrel (N = 71) or ticagrelor (N = 75); by protocol, all patients at baseline had no high on-treatment platelet reactivity by the VerifyNow P2Y12 assay. Platelet reactivity, expressed by P2Y12 reaction units (PRU), was measured in all patients at baseline (T0), after a 15-day period of smoking cessation (T1) and after further 15 days of smoking resumption (T2). In the overall population there was a modest, albeit significant, reduction of PRU values from T0 to T1 (from 173 ± 14 to 165 ± 17, P < 0.0001); resumption of cigarette smoking was associated with re-increase of platelet reactivity (from 165 ± 17 at T1 to 170 ± 17 at T2, P = 0.0002). These variations were consistent in the subgroups receiving clopidogrel, prasugrel or ticagrelor and were irrespective of the number of cigarettes smoked. In conclusion, cigarette smoking weakly influences antiplatelet effects of oral P2Y12 inhibition and this was irrespective of the type of antiplatelet agent; thus, interaction between cigarette smoking and efficacy of oral antiplatelet drugs is modest and unlikely translates into clinical effects (ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02026713). PMID:26849144

  10. P2Y13 receptors mediate presynaptic inhibition of acetylcholine release induced by adenine nucleotides at the mouse neuromuscular junction.

    PubMed

    Guarracino, Juan F; Cinalli, Alejandro R; Fernández, Verónica; Roquel, Liliana I; Losavio, Adriana S

    2016-06-21

    It is known that adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) is released along with the neurotransmitter acetylcholine (ACh) from motor nerve terminals. At mammalian neuromuscular junctions (NMJs), we have previously demonstrated that ATP is able to decrease ACh secretion by activation of P2Y receptors coupled to pertussis toxin-sensitive Gi/o protein. In this group, the receptor subtypes activated by adenine nucleotides are P2Y12 and P2Y13. Here, we investigated, by means of pharmacological and immunohistochemical assays, the P2Y receptor subtype that mediates the modulation of spontaneous and evoked ACh release in mouse phrenic nerve-diaphragm preparations. First, we confirmed that the preferential agonist for P2Y12-13 receptors, 2-methylthioadenosine 5'-diphosphate trisodium salt hydrate (2-MeSADP), reduced MEPP frequency without affecting MEPP amplitude as well as the amplitude and quantal content of end-plate potentials (EPPs). The effect on spontaneous secretion disappeared after the application of the selective P2Y12-13 antagonists AR-C69931MX or 2-methylthioadenosine 5'-monophosphate triethylammonium salt hydrate (2-MeSAMP). 2-MeSADP was more potent than ADP and ATP in reducing MEPP frequency. Then we demonstrated that the selective P2Y13 antagonist MRS-2211 completely prevented the inhibitory effect of 2-MeSADP on MEPP frequency and EPP amplitude, whereas the P2Y12 antagonist MRS-2395 failed to do this. The preferential agonist for P2Y13 receptors inosine 5'-diphosphate sodium salt (IDP) reduced spontaneous and evoked ACh secretion and MRS-2211 abolished IDP-mediated modulation. Immunohistochemical studies confirmed the presence of P2Y13 but not P2Y12 receptors at the end-plate region. Disappearance of P2Y13 receptors after denervation suggests the presynaptic localization of the receptors. We conclude that, at motor nerve terminals, the Gi/o protein-coupled P2Y receptors implicated in presynaptic inhibition of spontaneous and evoked ACh release are of the subtype P2Y

  11. TCDD-inducible poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (TIPARP/PARP7) mono-ADP-ribosylates and co-activates liver X receptors.

    PubMed

    Bindesbøll, Christian; Tan, Susanna; Bott, Debbie; Cho, Tiffany; Tamblyn, Laura; MacPherson, Laura; Grønning-Wang, Line; Nebb, Hilde Irene; Matthews, Jason

    2016-04-01

    Members of the poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) family catalyse the ADP-ribosylation of target proteins and are known to play important roles in many cellular processes, including DNA repair, differentiation and transcription. The majority of PARPs exhibit mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase activity rather than PARP activity; however, little is known about their biological activity. In the present study, we report that 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-inducible poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (TIPARP), mono-ADP-ribosylates and positively regulates liver X receptor α (LXRα) and LXRβ activity. Overexpression of TIPARP enhanced LXR-reporter gene activity. TIPARP knockdown or deletion reduced LXR regulated target gene expression levels in HepG2 cells and inTiparp(-/-)mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) respectively. Deletion and mutagenesis studies showed that TIPARP's zinc-finger and catalytic domains were required to enhance LXR activity. Protein interaction studies using TIPARP and LXRα/β peptide arrays revealed that LXRs interacted with an N-terminal sequence (a.a. 209-236) of TIPARP, which also overlapped with a putative co-activator domain of TIPARP (a.a. 200-225). Immunofluorescence studies showed that TIPARP and LXRα or LXRβ co-localized in the nucleus.In vitroribosylation assays provided evidence that TIPARP mono-ADP-ribosylated both LXRα and LXRβ. Co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) studies revealed that ADP-ribosylase macrodomain 1 (MACROD1), but not MACROD2, interacted with LXRs in a TIPARP-dependent manner. This was complemented by reporter gene studies showing that MACROD1, but not MACROD2, prevented the TIPARP-dependent increase in LXR activity. GW3965-dependent increases in hepatic Srebp1 mRNA and protein expression levels were reduced inTiparp(-/-)mice compared withTiparp(+/+)mice. Taken together, these data identify a new mechanism of LXR regulation that involves TIPARP, ADP-ribosylation and MACROD1. PMID:26814197

  12. β-Arrestin 2-dependent activation of ERK1/2 is required for ADP-induced paxillin phosphorylation at Ser83 and microglia chemotaxis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Hyun; Hollingsworth, Ryan; Kwon, Hyeok-Yil; Lee, Narae; Chung, Chang Y.

    2014-01-01

    Microglia play crucial roles in increased inflammation in the CNS upon brain injuries and diseases. Extracellular ADP has been reported to induce microglia chemotaxis and membrane ruffle formation through P2Y12 receptor. In this study, we examined the role of ERK1/2 activation in ADP-induced microglia chemotaxis. ADP stimulation increases the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and paxillin phosphorylation at Tyr31 and Ser83. Inhibition of ERK1/2 significantly inhibited paxillin phosphorylation at Ser83 and the retraction of membrane ruffles, causing inefficient chemotaxis. Close examination of dynamics of focal adhesion formation with GFP-paxillin revealed that the disassembly of focal adhesions in U0126-treated cells was significantly impaired. Depletion of β-Arr2 with shRNA markedly reduced the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and Pax/Ser83, indicating that β-Arr2 is required for ERK1/2 activation upon ADP stimulation. A large fraction of phosphorylated ERK1/2 and β-Arr2 were translocated and co-localized at focal contacts in the newly forming lamellipodia. Examination of kinetics and rate constant of paxillin formation and disassembly revealed that the phosphorylation of paxillin at Tyr31 by c-Src appears to be involved in adhesion formation upon ADP stimulation while Ser83 required for adhesion disassembly. PMID:22638989

  13. Calmodulin interacts with the platelet ADP receptor P2Y1

    PubMed Central

    Arthur, Jane F.; Shen, Yang; Mu, Fi-Tjen; Leon, Catherine; Gachet, Christian; Berndt, Michael C.; Andrews, Robert K.

    2006-01-01

    P2Y1 [P2 (purinergic type-2)-receptor 1] is a G-protein-coupled ADP receptor that regulates platelet activation and ADP-induced Ca2+ signalling. Studies using P2Y1-knockout mice, Gq-deficient mice or P2Y1-selective inhibitors have previously identified a key role for P2Y1 in pathophysiological thrombus formation at high shear stress. We provide evidence that a positively charged juxtamembrane sequence within the cytoplasmic C-terminal tail of P2Y1 can bind directly to the cytosolic regulatory protein calmodulin. Deletion by mutagenesis of the calmodulin-binding domain of P2Y1 inhibits intracellular Ca2+ flux in transfected cells. These results suggest that the interaction of calmodulin with the P2Y1 C-terminal tail may regulate P2Y1-dependent platelet aggregation. PMID:16848759

  14. Agonists and antagonists for P2 receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Costanzi, Stefano; Joshi, Bhalchandra V.; Besada, Pedro; Shin, Dae Hong; Ko, Hyojin; Ivanov, Andrei A.; Mamedova, Liaman

    2015-01-01

    Recent work has identified nucleotide agonists selective for P2Y1, P2Y2 and P2Y6 receptors and nucleotide antagonists selective for P2Y1, P2Y12 and P2X1 receptors. Selective non-nucleotide antagonists have been reported for P2Y1, P2Y2, P2Y6, P2Y12, P2Y13, P2X2/3/P2X3 and P2X7 receptors. For example, the dinucleotide INS 37217 (Up4dC) potently activates the P2Y2 receptor, and the non-nucleotide antagonist A-317491 is selective for P2X2/3/P2X3 receptors. Nucleotide analogues in which the ribose moiety is substituted by a variety of novel ring systems, including conformation-ally locked moieties, have been synthesized as ligands for P2Y receptors. The focus on conformational factors of the ribose-like moiety allows the inclusion of general modifications that lead to enhanced potency and selectivity. At P2Y1,2,4,11 receptors, there is a preference for the North conformation as indicated with (N)-methanocarba analogues. The P2Y1 antagonist MRS2500 inhibited ADP-induced human platelet aggregation with an IC50 of 0.95 nM. MRS2365, an (N)-methanocarba analogue of 2-MeSADP, displayed potency (EC50) of 0.4 nM at the P2Y1 receptor, with >10 000-fold selectivity in comparison to P2Y12 and P2Y13 receptors. At P2Y6 receptors there is a dramatic preference for the South conformation. Three-dimensional structures of P2Y receptors have been deduced from structure activity relationships (SAR), mutagenesis and modelling studies. Detailed three-dimensional structures of P2X receptors have not yet been proposed. PMID:16805423

  15. Central role for hydrogen peroxide in P2Y1 ADP receptor-mediated cellular responses in vascular endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Kalwa, Hermann; Sartoretto, Juliano L.; Martinelli, Roberta; Romero, Natalia; Steinhorn, Benjamin S.; Tao, Ming; Ozaki, C. Keith; Carman, Christopher V.; Michel, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    ADP activates a family of cell surface receptors that modulate signaling pathways in a broad range of cells. ADP receptor antagonists are widely used to treat cardiovascular disease states. These studies identify a critical role for the stable reactive oxygen species hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in mediating cellular responses activated by the G protein-coupled P2Y1 receptor for ADP. We found that ADP-dependent phosphorylation of key endothelial signaling proteins—including endothelial nitric oxide synthase, AMP-activated protein kinase, and the actin-binding MARCKS protein—was blocked by preincubation with PEG-catalase, which degrades H2O2. ADP treatment promoted the H2O2-dependent phosphorylation of c-Abl, a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase that modulates the actin cytoskeleton. Cellular imaging experiments using fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based biosensors revealed that ADP-stimulated activation of the cytoskeleton-associated small GTPase Rac1 was independent of H2O2. However, Rac1-dependent activation of AMP-activated protein kinase, the signaling phospholipid phosphatidylinositol-(4, 5)-bisphosphate, and the c-Abl–interacting protein CrkII are mediated by H2O2. We transfected endothelial cells with differentially targeted HyPer2 H2O2 biosensors and found that ADP promoted a marked increase in H2O2 levels in the cytosol and caveolae, and a smaller increase in mitochondria. We performed a screen for P2Y1 receptor-mediated receptor tyrosine kinase transactivation and discovered that ADP transactivates Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (Flt3), a receptor tyrosine kinase expressed in these cells. Our observation that P2Y1 receptor-mediated responses involve Flt3 transactivation may identify a unique mechanism whereby cancer chemotherapy with receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors promotes vascular dysfunction. Taken together, these findings establish a critical role for endogenous H2O2 in control of ADP-mediated signaling responses in the vascular wall. PMID:24550450

  16. (N)-methanocarba-2MeSADP (MRS2365) is a subtype-specific agonist that induces rapid desensitization of the P2Y1 receptor of human platelets

    PubMed Central

    Bourdon, D. M.; Mahanty, S. K.; Jacobson, K. A.; Boyer, J. L.; Harden, T. K.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Adenosine diphosphate (ADP) initiates and maintains sustained aggregation of platelets through simultaneous activation of both the Gq-coupled P2Y1 receptor and the Gi-coupled P2Y12 receptor. We recently described the synthesis and P2Y1 receptor-specific agonist activity of (N)-methano-carba-2MeSADP (MRS2365). Consequences of selective activation of the P2Y1 receptor by MRS2365 have been further examined in human platelets. Whereas MRS2365 alone only induced shape change, addition of MRS2365 following epinephrine treatment, which activates the Gi/z-linked, α2A-adrenergic receptor, resulted in sustained aggregation that was indistinguishable from that observed with ADP. Conversely, the platelet shape change promoted by ADP in the presence of the GPIIb/IIIa antagonist eptifibatide was similar to that promoted by MRS2365. Preaddition of the high affinity P2Y1 receptor antagonist MRS2500 inhibited the effect of MRS2365, whereas addition of MRS2500 subsequent to MRS2365 reversed the MRS2365-induced shape change. Preactivation of the P2Y1 receptor with MRS2365 for 2 min resulted in marked loss of capacity of ADP to induce aggregation as evidenced by a greater than 20-fold rightward shift in the concentration effect curve of ADP. This inhibitory effect of P2Y1 receptor activation was dependent on the concentration of MRS2365 (EC50 = 34 nM). The inhibitory effect of preincubation with MRS2365 was circumvented by activation of the Gq-coupled 5-HT2a receptor suggesting that MRS2365 induces loss of the ADP response as a consequence of desensitization of the Gq-coupled P2Y1 receptor. The time course of MRS2365-induced loss of aggregation response to epinephrine was similar to that observed with ADP. These results further demonstrate the P2Y1 receptor selectivity of MRS2365 and illustrate the occurrence of agonist-induced desensitization of the P2Y1 receptor of human platelets studied in the absence of P2Y12 receptor activation. PMID:16634757

  17. Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Activation by Dioxin Targets Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase (PEPCK) for ADP-ribosylation via 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-inducible Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase (TiPARP)*

    PubMed Central

    Diani-Moore, Silvia; Zhang, Sheng; Ram, Payal; Rifkind, Arleen B.

    2013-01-01

    Effects of the environmental toxin and carcinogen 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD, dioxin) include a wasting syndrome associated with decreased gluconeogenesis. TCDD is a potent activator of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), a ligand activated transcription factor. The relationship between gene activation by the AHR and TCDD toxicities is not well understood. We recently identified a pathway by which the AHR target gene TiPARP (TCDD-inducible poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase) contributes to TCDD suppression of transcription of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), a key regulator of gluconeogenesis, by consuming NAD+ and decreasing Sirtuin 1 activation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC1α), a transcriptional activator of PEPCK. We report here that TCDD-induced TiPARP also targets PEPCK for ADP-ribosylation. Both cytosolic and mitochondrial forms of PEPCK were found to undergo ADP-ribosylation. Unexpectedly, AHR suppression also enhanced ADP-ribosylation and did so by a poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-independent mechanism. This report 1) identifies ADP-ribosylation as a new posttranslational modification for PEPCK, 2) describes a pathway by which transcriptional induction of TiPARP by the AHR can lead to a downstream posttranslational change in a TCDD target protein (PEPCK), and 3) reveals that the AHR exerts complex, previously unidentified modulatory effects on ADP-ribosylation. PMID:23770670

  18. Protease Activated Receptor-1 (PAR-1) Mediated Platelet Aggregation is Dependant on Clopidogrel Response

    PubMed Central

    Kreutz, Rolf P.; Breall, Jeffrey A.; Kreutz, Yvonne; Owens, Janelle; Lu, Deshun; Bolad, Islam; von der Lohe, Elisabeth; Sinha, Anjan; Flockhart, David A.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Clopidogrel inhibits ADP mediated platelet aggregation through inhibition of the P2Y12 receptor by its active metabolite. Thrombin induces platelet aggregation by binding to protease activated receptor-1 (PAR-1), and inhibition of PAR-1 has been evaluated in patients treated with clopidogrel to reduce ischemic events after acute coronary syndromes. Residual PAR-1 mediated platelet aggregation may be dependent on extent of clopidogrel response. Material and Methods Platelet aggregation was measured in 55 patients undergoing elective PCI at 16-24 hours after 600mg clopidogrel loading dose by light transmittance aggregometry using ADP 20μM and thrombin receptor agonist peptide (TRAP) at 15 μM and 25 μM as agonists. Genomic DNA was genotyped for common CYP2C19 variants. Results Increasing quartiles of 20 μM ADP induced platelet aggregation after clopidogrel loading were associated with increasing levels of TRAP mediated platelet aggregation. Patients in the highest quartile (clopidogrel non-responders) of post treatment ADP aggregation had significantly higher TRAP mediated aggregation than the patients in the lowest quartile (clopidogrel responders) [TRAP 15 μM: 79.6±5% vs. 69.5±8%, p<0.001]. Conclusions Non-responders to clopidogrel show increased residual platelet aggregation induced by TRAP, whereas clopidogrel responders exhibit attenuated response to TRAP. Addition of PAR-1 antiplatelet drugs may be most effective in patients with reduced clopidogrel response and high residual TRAP mediated platelet aggregation. PMID:22459907

  19. Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase Inhibitors Sensitize Cancer Cells to Death Receptor-mediated Apoptosis by Enhancing Death Receptor Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Meng, X. Wei; Koh, Brian D.; Zhang, Jin-San; Flatten, Karen S.; Schneider, Paula A.; Billadeau, Daniel D.; Hess, Allan D.; Smith, B. Douglas; Karp, Judith E.; Kaufmann, Scott H.

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant human tumor necrosis factor-α-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL), agonistic monoclonal antibodies to TRAIL receptors, and small molecule TRAIL receptor agonists are in various stages of preclinical and early phase clinical testing as potential anticancer drugs. Accordingly, there is substantial interest in understanding factors that affect sensitivity to these agents. In the present study we observed that the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors olaparib and veliparib sensitize the myeloid leukemia cell lines ML-1 and K562, the ovarian cancer line PEO1, non-small cell lung cancer line A549, and a majority of clinical AML isolates, but not normal marrow, to TRAIL. Further analysis demonstrated that PARP inhibitor treatment results in activation of the FAS and TNFRSF10B (death receptor 5 (DR5)) promoters, increased Fas and DR5 mRNA, and elevated cell surface expression of these receptors in sensitized cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated enhanced binding of the transcription factor Sp1 to the TNFRSF10B promoter in the presence of PARP inhibitor. Knockdown of PARP1 or PARP2 (but not PARP3 and PARP4) not only increased expression of Fas and DR5 at the mRNA and protein level, but also recapitulated the sensitizing effects of the PARP inhibition. Conversely, Sp1 knockdown diminished the PARP inhibitor effects. In view of the fact that TRAIL is part of the armamentarium of natural killer cells, these observations identify a new facet of PARP inhibitor action while simultaneously providing the mechanistic underpinnings of a novel therapeutic combination that warrants further investigation. PMID:24895135

  20. The Impact of Type 2 Diabetes on the Efficacy of ADP Receptor Blockers in Patients with Acute ST Elevation Myocardial Infarction: A Pilot Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Fedor, Marián; Kovář, František; Galajda, Peter; Bolek, Tomáš; Stančiaková, Lucia; Fedorová, Jana; Staško, Ján; Kubisz, Peter; Mokáň, Marián

    2016-01-01

    Background. The aim of this study was to validate the impact of type 2 diabetes (T2D) on the platelet reactivity in patients with acute ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) treated with adenosine diphosphate (ADP) receptor blockers. Methods. A pilot prospective study was performed. Totally 67 patients were enrolled. 21 patients had T2D. Among all study population, 33 patients received clopidogrel and 34 patients received prasugrel. The efficacy of ADP receptor blocker therapy had been tested in two time intervals using light transmission aggregometry with specific inducer and vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein phosphorylation (VASP-P) flow cytometry assay. Results. There were no significant differences in platelet aggregability among T2D and nondiabetic (ND) group. The platelet reactivity index of VASP-P did not differ significantly between T2D and ND group (59.4 ± 30.9% versus 60.0 ± 25.2% and 33.9 ± 25.3% versus 38.6 ± 29.3% in second testing). The number of ADP receptor blocker nonresponders did not differ significantly between T2D and ND patients. The time interval from ADP receptor blocker loading dosing to the blood sampling was similar in T2D and ND patients in both examinations. Conclusion. This prospective study did not confirm the higher platelet reactivity and higher prevalence of ADP receptor blocker nonresponders in T2D acute STEMI patients. PMID:27493970

  1. Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase 1 Represses Liver X Receptor-mediated ABCA1 Expression and Cholesterol Efflux in Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Elina; Hussein, Maryem A; Savas, Jeffery N; Ouimet, Mireille; Barrett, Tessa J; Leone, Sarah; Yates, John R; Moore, Kathryn J; Fisher, Edward A; Garabedian, Michael J

    2016-05-20

    Liver X receptors (LXR) are oxysterol-activated nuclear receptors that play a central role in reverse cholesterol transport through up-regulation of ATP-binding cassette transporters (ABCA1 and ABCG1) that mediate cellular cholesterol efflux. Mouse models of atherosclerosis exhibit reduced atherosclerosis and enhanced regression of established plaques upon LXR activation. However, the coregulatory factors that affect LXR-dependent gene activation in macrophages remain to be elucidated. To identify novel regulators of LXR that modulate its activity, we used affinity purification and mass spectrometry to analyze nuclear LXRα complexes and identified poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) as an LXR-associated factor. In fact, PARP-1 interacted with both LXRα and LXRβ. Both depletion of PARP-1 and inhibition of PARP-1 activity augmented LXR ligand-induced ABCA1 expression in the RAW 264.7 macrophage line and primary bone marrow-derived macrophages but did not affect LXR-dependent expression of other target genes, ABCG1 and SREBP-1c. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments confirmed PARP-1 recruitment at the LXR response element in the promoter of the ABCA1 gene. Further, we demonstrated that LXR is poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated by PARP-1, a potential mechanism by which PARP-1 influences LXR function. Importantly, the PARP inhibitor 3-aminobenzamide enhanced macrophage ABCA1-mediated cholesterol efflux to the lipid-poor apolipoprotein AI. These findings shed light on the important role of PARP-1 on LXR-regulated lipid homeostasis. Understanding the interplay between PARP-1 and LXR may provide insights into developing novel therapeutics for treating atherosclerosis. PMID:27026705

  2. Comparison of common platelet receptors between the chacma baboon (Papio ursinus) and human for use in pre-clinical human-targeted anti-platelet studies.

    PubMed

    Janse van Rensburg, Walter J

    2016-06-01

    Anti-platelet agents play a central part in the treatment and prevention of acute thrombotic events. Discriminating animal models are needed for the development of novel agents. The chacma baboon has been extensively used as a model to evaluate anti-platelet agents. However, limited data exist to prove the translatability of this species to humans. We aimed to determine the suitability of the chacma baboon in preclinical human targeted GPIIb/IIIa, GPIbα and P2Y12 studies. Light-transmission platelet aggregometry (LTA), whole blood impedance aggregometry, receptor number quantification and genomic DNA sequencing were performed. Baboon ADP and arachidonic acid-induced LTA aggregation results differed significantly from human values, even at increased concentrations. LTA ristocetin-induced agglutination was comparable between species, but baboon platelets needed twice the concentration of ristocetin to elicit a similar response. Citrated baboon blood had significantly less aggregation than humans when evaluated with impedance aggregometry. However, hirudinised baboon whole blood gave similar aggregation as humans at the same agonist concentrations. GPIIb, GPIIIa and GPIbα numbers were significantly more on the baboon platelets. None of the amino acids deemed vital for receptor function, ligand binding or receptor inhibition, were radically different between the species. However, a conservative change in a calcium-binding region of GPIIb may render the baboon platelets more sensitive to calcium-binding agents. The chacma baboon may be used for the evaluation of human-targeted GPIIb/IIIa-, GPIbα- and P2Y12-inhibiting agents. However, the best anticoagulant, optimal agonist concentrations, increase in receptor number and sequence differences must be considered for any future studies. PMID:26559117

  3. The human D2 dopamine receptor synergizes with the A2A adenosine receptor to stimulate adenylyl cyclase in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Kudlacek, Oliver; Just, Herwig; Korkhov, Vladimir M; Vartian, Nina; Klinger, Markus; Pankevych, Halyna; Yang, Qiong; Nanoff, Christian; Freissmuth, Michael; Boehm, Stefan

    2003-07-01

    The adenosine A(2A) receptor and the dopamine D(2) receptor are prototypically coupled to G(s) and G(i)/G(o), respectively. In striatal intermediate spiny neurons, these receptors are colocalized in dendritic spines and act as mutual antagonists. This antagonism has been proposed to occur at the level of the receptors or of receptor-G protein coupling. We tested this model in PC12 cells which endogenously express A(2A) receptors. The human D(2) receptor was introduced into PC12 cells by stable transfection. A(2A)-agonist-mediated inhibition of D(2) agonist binding was absent in PC12 cell membranes but present in HEK293 cells transfected as a control. However, in the resulting PC12 cell lines, the action of the D(2) agonist quinpirole depended on the expression level of the D(2) receptor: at low and high receptor levels, the A(2A)-agonist-induced elevation of cAMP was enhanced and inhibited, respectively. Forskolin-stimulated cAMP formation was invariably inhibited by quinpirole. The effects of quinpirole were abolished by pretreatment with pertussis toxin. A(2A)-receptor-mediated cAMP formation was inhibited by other G(i)/G(o)-coupled receptors that were either endogenously present (P(2y12)-like receptor for ADP) or stably expressed after transfection (A(1) adenosine, metabotropic glutamate receptor-7A). Similarly, voltage activated Ca(2+) channels were inhibited by the endogenous P(2Y) receptor and by the heterologously expressed A(1) receptor but not by the D(2) receptor. These data indicate functional segregation of signaling components. Our observations are thus compatible with the proposed model that D(2) and A(2A) receptors are closely associated, but they highlight the fact that this interaction can also support synergism. PMID:12784121

  4. The proposed channel-enzyme transient receptor potential melastatin 2 does not possess ADP ribose hydrolase activity

    PubMed Central

    Iordanov, Iordan; Mihályi, Csaba; Tóth, Balázs; Csanády, László

    2016-01-01

    Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 2 (TRPM2) is a Ca2+-permeable cation channel essential for immunocyte activation, insulin secretion, and postischemic cell death. TRPM2 is activated by ADP ribose (ADPR) binding to its C-terminal cytosolic NUDT9-homology (NUDT9H) domain, homologous to the soluble mitochondrial ADPR pyrophosphatase (ADPRase) NUDT9. Reported ADPR hydrolysis classified TRPM2 as a channel-enzyme, but insolubility of isolated NUDT9H hampered further investigations. Here we developed a soluble NUDT9H model using chimeric proteins built from complementary polypeptide fragments of NUDT9H and NUDT9. When expressed in E.coli, chimeras containing up to ~90% NUDT9H sequence remained soluble and were affinity-purified. In ADPRase assays the conserved Nudix-box sequence of NUDT9 proved essential for activity (kcat~4-9s-1), that of NUDT9H did not support catalysis. Replacing NUDT9H in full-length TRPM2 with soluble chimeras retained ADPR-dependent channel gating (K1/2~1-5 μM), confirming functionality of chimeric domains. Thus, TRPM2 is not a 'chanzyme'. Chimeras provide convenient soluble NUDT9H models for structural/biochemical studies. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17600.001 PMID:27383051

  5. The proposed channel-enzyme transient receptor potential melastatin 2 does not possess ADP ribose hydrolase activity.

    PubMed

    Iordanov, Iordan; Mihályi, Csaba; Tóth, Balázs; Csanády, László

    2016-01-01

    Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 2 (TRPM2) is a Ca(2+)-permeable cation channel essential for immunocyte activation, insulin secretion, and postischemic cell death. TRPM2 is activated by ADP ribose (ADPR) binding to its C-terminal cytosolic NUDT9-homology (NUDT9H) domain, homologous to the soluble mitochondrial ADPR pyrophosphatase (ADPRase) NUDT9. Reported ADPR hydrolysis classified TRPM2 as a channel-enzyme, but insolubility of isolated NUDT9H hampered further investigations. Here we developed a soluble NUDT9H model using chimeric proteins built from complementary polypeptide fragments of NUDT9H and NUDT9. When expressed in E.coli, chimeras containing up to ~90% NUDT9H sequence remained soluble and were affinity-purified. In ADPRase assays the conserved Nudix-box sequence of NUDT9 proved essential for activity (kcat~4-9s(-1)), that of NUDT9H did not support catalysis. Replacing NUDT9H in full-length TRPM2 with soluble chimeras retained ADPR-dependent channel gating (K1/2~1-5 μM), confirming functionality of chimeric domains. Thus, TRPM2 is not a 'chanzyme'. Chimeras provide convenient soluble NUDT9H models for structural/biochemical studies. PMID:27383051

  6. Multiple receptor conformation docking, dock pose clustering and 3D QSAR studies on human poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Fatima, Sabiha; Jatavath, Mohan Babu; Bathini, Raju; Sivan, Sree Kanth; Manga, Vijjulatha

    2014-10-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) functions as a DNA damage sensor and signaling molecule. It plays a vital role in the repair of DNA strand breaks induced by radiation and chemotherapeutic drugs; inhibitors of this enzyme have the potential to improve cancer chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Three-dimensional quantitative structure activity relationship (3D QSAR) models were developed using comparative molecular field analysis, comparative molecular similarity indices analysis and docking studies. A set of 88 molecules were docked into the active site of six X-ray crystal structures of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP-1), by a procedure called multiple receptor conformation docking (MRCD), in order to improve the 3D QSAR models through the analysis of binding conformations. The docked poses were clustered to obtain the best receptor binding conformation. These dock poses from clustering were used for 3D QSAR analysis. Based on MRCD and QSAR information, some key features have been identified that explain the observed variance in the activity. Two receptor-based QSAR models were generated; these models showed good internal and external statistical reliability that is evident from the [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]. The identified key features enabled us to design new PARP-1 inhibitors. PMID:25046176

  7. P2Y Receptors Sensitize Mouse and Human Colonic Nociceptors

    PubMed Central

    Hockley, James R. F.; Tranter, Michael M.; McGuire, Cian; Boundouki, George; Cibert-Goton, Vincent; Thaha, Mohamed A.; Blackshaw, L. Ashley; Michael, Gregory J.; Baker, Mark D.; Knowles, Charles H.; Winchester, Wendy J.

    2016-01-01

    Activation of visceral nociceptors by inflammatory mediators contributes to visceral hypersensitivity and abdominal pain associated with many gastrointestinal disorders. Purine and pyrimidine nucleotides (e.g., ATP and UTP) are strongly implicated in this process following their release from epithelial cells during mechanical stimulation of the gut, and from immune cells during inflammation. Actions of ATP are mediated through both ionotropic P2X receptors and metabotropic P2Y receptors. P2X receptor activation causes excitation of visceral afferents; however, the impact of P2Y receptor activation on visceral afferents innervating the gut is unclear. Here we investigate the effects of stimulating P2Y receptors in isolated mouse colonic sensory neurons, and visceral nociceptor fibers in mouse and human nerve-gut preparations. Additionally, we investigate the role of Nav1.9 in mediating murine responses. The application of UTP (P2Y2 and P2Y4 agonist) sensitized colonic sensory neurons by increasing action potential firing to current injection and depolarizing the membrane potential. The application of ADP (P2Y1, P2Y12, and P2Y13 agonist) also increased action potential firing, an effect blocked by the selective P2Y1 receptor antagonist MRS2500. UTP or ADP stimulated afferents, including mouse and human visceral nociceptors, in nerve-gut preparations. P2Y1 and P2Y2 transcripts were detected in 80% and 56% of retrogradely labeled colonic neurons, respectively. Nav1.9 transcripts colocalized in 86% of P2Y1-positive and 100% of P2Y2-positive colonic neurons, consistent with reduced afferent fiber responses to UTP and ADP in Nav1.9−/− mice. These data demonstrate that P2Y receptor activation stimulates mouse and human visceral nociceptors, highlighting P2Y-dependent mechanisms in the generation of visceral pain during gastrointestinal disease. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Chronic visceral pain is a debilitating symptom of many gastrointestinal disorders. The activation of

  8. Cutting edge: Leukotriene C4 activates mouse platelets in plasma exclusively through the type 2 cysteinyl leukotriene receptor.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Hannah E; Liu, Tao; Feng, Chunli; Laidlaw, Tanya M; Conley, Pamela B; Kanaoka, Yoshihide; Boyce, Joshua A

    2013-12-15

    Leukotriene C4 (LTC4) and its extracellular metabolites, LTD4 and LTE4, mediate airway inflammation. They signal through three specific receptors (type 1 cys-LT receptor [CysLT1R], CysLT2R, and GPR99) with overlapping ligand preferences. In this article, we demonstrate that LTC4, but not LTD4 or LTE4, activates mouse platelets exclusively through CysLT2R. Platelets expressed CysLT1R and CysLT2R proteins. LTC4 induced surface expression of CD62P by wild-type mouse platelets in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) and caused their secretion of thromboxane A2 and CXCL4. LTC4 was fully active on PRP from mice lacking either CysLT1R or GPR99, but completely inactive on PRP from CysLT2R-null (Cysltr2(-/-)) mice. LTC4/CysLT2R signaling required an autocrine ADP-mediated response through P2Y12 receptors. LTC4 potentiated airway inflammation in a platelet- and CysLT2R-dependent manner. Thus, CysLT2R on platelets recognizes LTC4 with unexpected selectivity. Nascent LTC4 may activate platelets at a synapse with granulocytes before it is converted to LTD4, promoting mediator generation and the formation of leukocyte-platelet complexes that facilitate inflammation. PMID:24244016

  9. P2X1 receptor inhibition and soluble CD39 administration as novel approaches to widen the cardiovascular therapeutic window

    PubMed Central

    Fung, C.Y. Eleanor; Marcus, Aaron J.; Broekman, M. Johan; Mahaut-Smith, Martyn P.

    2010-01-01

    Thrombus formation at sites of disrupted atherosclerotic plaques is a leading cause of death and disability worldwide. Although the platelet is now recognized to be a central regulator of thrombus formation, development of antiplatelet reagents that selectively target thrombosis over hemostasis represents a challenge. Existing prophylactic antiplatelet therapies are centered on the use of aspirin, an irreversible cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor, and a thienopyridine such as clopidogrel (Plavix), which inactivates the ADP-stimulated P2Y12 receptor. Whilst these compounds are widely used and have beneficial effects for patients, their antithrombotic benefit is complicated by an elevated bleeding risk and substantial or partial “resistance”. Moreover, combination therapy with these two drugs increases the hemorrhagic risk even further. This review explores the possibility of inhibiting the platelet-surface ionotropic P2X1 receptor and/or elevating CD39/NTPDase1 activity as new therapeutic approaches to reduce overall platelet reactivity and recruitment of surrounding platelets at pro-thrombotic locations. Since both proteins affect platelet activation at an early stage in the events leading to thrombosis, but are less crucial in hemostasis, they provide new strategies to widen the cardiovascular therapeutic window without compromising safety. PMID:19467446

  10. A Potential Mechanism of High-Dose Ticagrelor in Modulating Platelet Activity and Atherosclerosis Mediated by Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Yi; Peng, Yudong; Zeng, Qiutang; Cheng, Longxian; Wang, Boyuan; Mao, Xiaobo; Meng, Kai; Liu, Yuzhou; Lian, Yitian; Li, Dazhu

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal expression of thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) and its receptor (TSLPR) was found in patients with acute coronary syndrome. Ticagrelor, an oral platelet ADP P2Y12 receptor antagonist, is widely used in these patients. The aim of this study was to verify whether different doses of ticagrelor regulated plaque progression and platelet activity by modulating TSLP/TSLPR. Seventy-five ApoE-/- mice were randomly divided into five groups: (1) high-cholesterol diet (HCD, n = 15); (2) HCD plus ticagrelor 25 mg/kg/d (T1, n = 15); (3) HCD plus ticagrelor 50 mg/kg/d (T2, n = 15); (4) HCD plus ticagrelor 100 mg/kg/d (T3, n = 15); and (5) a normal diet group (ND, n = 15). At day 0 and at week 16, blood lipids and serum TSLP levels, expression of TSLPR, CD62, and CD63, platelet aggregation, platelet ATP release, PI3K/Akt signaling pathway, and plaque morphology were assessed. HCD increased TSLPR expression and atherosclerosis progression but high-dose ticagrelor (100 mg/kg) moderated this trend. TSLPR was positively correlated with Akt1, platelet aggregation, corrected plaque area, and vulnerability index in the T3 group (P<0.01). In conclusion, low-dose ticagrelor only inhibited platelet activity. Besides this inhibition, high-dose ticagrelor modulated platelet activity and atherosclerosis mediated by TSLPR, potentially through the PI3K/Akt signal pathway. PMID:26517374

  11. Genetic Polymorphisms of Platelet Receptors in Patients with Acute Myocardial Infarction and Resistance to Antiplatelet Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ulehlova, Jana; Kucerova, Jana; Krcova, Vera; Vaclavik, Jan; Indrak, Karel

    2014-01-01

    Methods: The studied group comprises 124 patients with acute myocardial infarction on dual antiplatelet therapy with acetylsalicylic acid (ASA) and thienopyridines. Antiplatelet therapy was monitored by platelet-rich plasma light transmittance aggregometry (LTA) using the APACT 4004 analyzer (Helena Laboratories) and by whole blood impedance aggregometry (multiple electrode aggregometry [MEA]) using the Multiplate analyzer (Dynabyte). Platelet aggregation was detected after stimulation with arachidonic acid for detection of aspirin resistance and with adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and prostaglandin E1 for detection of thienopyridine resistance. To determine the frequencies of P2Y12 (i-744T>C; rs2046934), P2Y12 (34C>T; rs6785930), COX-1 (-842A>G; rs10306114), GPVI (13254T>C; rs1613662), and GPIbA (5T>C; rs2243093) polymorphisms, DNA of patients with AIM was tested by real-time-polymerase chain reaction and melting curve analysis using the LightCycler 480 analyzer (Roche Diagnostics). Results: The cut-off points used for patients with effective ASA therapy are 25% of aggregated platelets and 220 area under the curve (AUC)/min if LTA or MEA, respectively. The cut-off points used for effective thienopyridine therapy are 45% of aggregated platelets or 298 AUC/min, respectively. Both LTA and MEA found that aspirin and thienopyridine therapies failed in 14.51% and 25.8%, respectively. The data were statistically processed using the SPSS version 15 software (SPSS, Inc.). Associations between receptor mutation status and response to therapy were assessed with Fisher's exact test. The significance level was set at 0.05. Conclusion: The aim of our work was to use the two functional laboratory methods described earlier to assess both aspirin and thienopyridine resistance and to determine the contribution of genetic polymorphisms of platelet receptors to resistance to antiplatelet therapy in AIM. Fisher's exact test showed a significant statistical correlation between platelet

  12. MRS2500 [2-Iodo-N6-methyl-(N)-methanocarba-2′-deoxyadenosine-3′,5′-bisphosphate], a Potent, Selective, and Stable Antagonist of the Platelet P2Y1 Receptor with Strong Antithrombotic Activity in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Hechler, Béatrice; Nonne, Christelle; Roh, Eun Joo; Cattaneo, Marco; Cazenave, Jean-Pierre; Lanza, François; Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Gachet, Christian

    2012-01-01

    The platelet P2Y1 ADP receptor is an attractive target for new antiplatelet drugs. However, because of the lack of strong and stable antagonists, only a few studies have suggested that pharmacological inhibition of the P2Y1 receptor could efficiently inhibit experimental thrombosis in vivo. Our aim was to determine whether the newly described potent and selective P2Y1 receptor antagonist MRS2500 [2-iodo-N6-methyl-(N)-methanocarba-2′-deoxyadenosine-3′,5′-bisphosphate] could inhibit platelet function ex vivo and experimental thrombosis in mice in vivo. MRS2500 was injected intravenously into mice, and its effect on ex vivo platelet aggregation and in several models of thrombosis in vivo was determined. MRS2500 displayed high potency and stable and selective P2Y1 receptor inhibition ex vivo. Although MRS2500 injection resulted in only moderate prolongation of the bleeding time, it provided strong protection in systemic thromboembolism induced by infusion of a mixture of collagen and adrenaline. MRS2500 also potently inhibited localized arterial thrombosis in a model of laser-induced vessel wall injury with two degrees of severity. Moreover, combination of MRS2500 with clopidogrel, the irreversible inhibitor of the platelet P2Y12 receptor for ADP, led to increased antithrombotic efficacy compared with each alone. These results add further evidence for a role of the P2Y1 receptor in thrombosis and validate the concept that targeting the P2Y1 receptor could be a relevant alternative or complement to current antiplatelet strategies. PMID:16236815

  13. Comparative pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of platelet adenosine diphosphate receptor antagonists and their clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Floyd, Christopher N; Passacquale, Gabriella; Ferro, Albert

    2012-07-01

    Over the last two decades or more, anti-platelet therapy has become established as a cornerstone in the treatment of patients with ischaemic cardiovascular disease, since such drugs effectively reduce arterial thrombotic events. The original agent used in this context was aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid) but, with the advent of adenosine diphosphate (ADP) receptor antagonists, the use of dual anti-platelet therapy has resulted in further improvement in cardiovascular outcomes when compared with aspirin alone. The first group of platelet ADP receptor antagonists to be developed was the thienopyridine class, which comprise inactive pro-drugs that require in vivo metabolism to their active metabolites before exerting their inhibitory effect on the P2Y(12) receptor. Clopidogrel has been the principal ADP receptor antagonist in use over the past decade, but is limited by variability in its in vivo inhibition of platelet aggregation (IPA). The pharmacokinetics of clopidogrel are unpredictable due to their vulnerability to multiple independent factors including genetic polymorphisms. Expression of the 3435T/T genetic variant encoding the MDR1 gene for the P-glycoprotein efflux transporter results in a significantly reduced maximum drug concentration and area under the plasma concentration-time curve as intestinal absorption of clopidogrel is reduced; and the expression of the mutant *2 allele of CYP2C19 results in similar pharmacokinetic effects as the two cytochrome P450 (CYP)-mediated steps required for the production of the active metabolite of clopidogrel are impaired. These variable pharmacokinetics lead to erratic pharmacodynamics and cannot reliably be overcome with increased dosing. Both prasugrel, a third-generation thienopyridine, and ticagrelor, a cyto-pentyl-triazolo-pyrimidine, have more predictable pharmacokinetics and enhanced pharmacodynamics than clopidogrel. Neither appears to be affected by the same genetic polymorphisms as clopidogrel; prasugrel requires

  14. Agonist-selective, Receptor-specific Interaction of Human P2Y Receptors with β-Arrestin-1 and -2*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Carsten; Ziegler, Nicole; Reiner, Susanne; Krasel, Cornelius; Lohse, Martin J.

    2008-01-01

    Interaction of G-protein-coupled receptors with β-arrestins is an important step in receptor desensitization and in triggering “alternative” signals. By means of confocal microscopy and fluorescence resonance energy transfer, we have investigated the internalization of the human P2Y receptors 1, 2, 4, 6, 11, and 12 and their interaction with β-arrestin-1 and -2. Co-transfection of each individual P2Y receptor with β-arrestin-1-GFP or β-arrestin-2-YFP into HEK-293 cells and stimulation with the corresponding agonists resulted in a receptor-specific interaction pattern. The P2Y1 receptor stimulated with ADP strongly translocated β-arrestin-2-YFP, whereas only a slight translocation was observed for β-arrestin-1-GFP. The P2Y4 receptor exhibited equally strong translocation for β-arrestin-1-GFP and β-arrestin-2-YFP when stimulated with UTP. The P2Y6, P2Y11, and P2Y12 receptor internalized only when GRK2 was additionally co-transfected, but β-arrestin translocation was only visible for the P2Y6 and P2Y11 receptor. The P2Y2 receptor showed a β-arrestin translocation pattern that was dependent on the agonist used for stimulation. UTP translocated β-arrestin-1-GFP and β-arrestin-2-YFP equally well, whereas ATP translocated β-arrestin-1-GFP to a much lower extent than β-arrestin-2-YFP. The same agonist-dependent pattern was seen in fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments between the fluorescently labeled P2Y2 receptor and β-arrestins. Thus, the P2Y2 receptor would be classified as a class A receptor when stimulated with ATP or as a class B receptor when stimulated with UTP. The ligand-specific recruitment of β-arrestins by ATP and UTP stimulation of P2Y2 receptors was further found to result in differential stimulation of ERK phosphorylation. This suggests that the two different agonists induce distinct active states of this receptor that show differential interactions with β-arrestins. PMID:18703513

  15. Renal vasoconstriction by vasopressin V1a receptors is modulated by nitric oxide, prostanoids, and superoxide but not the ADP ribosyl cyclase CD38

    PubMed Central

    Kopple, Tayler E.; Arendshorst, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Renal blood flow (RBF) responses to arginine vasopressin (AVP) were tested in anesthetized wild-type (WT) and CD38−/− mice that lack the major calcium-mobilizing second messenger cyclic ADP ribose. AVP (3–25 ng) injected intravenously produced dose-dependent decreases in RBF, reaching a maximum of 25 ± 2% below basal RBF in WT and 27 ± 2% in CD38−/− mice with 25 ng of AVP. Renal vascular resistance (RVR) increased 75 ± 6% and 78 ± 6% in WT and CD38−/− mice. Inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) synthase with nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) increased the maximum RVR response to AVP to 308 ± 76% in WT and 388 ± 81% in CD38−/− (P < 0.001 for both). Cyclooxygenase inhibition with indomethacin increased the maximum RVR response to 125 ± 15% in WT and 120 ± 14% in CD38−/− mice (P < 0.001, <0.05). Superoxide suppression with tempol inhibited the maximum RVR response to AVP by 38% in both strains (P < 0.005) but was ineffective when administered after l-NAME. The rate of RBF recovery (relaxation) after AVP was slowed by l-NAME and indomethacin (P < 0.001, <0.005) but was unchanged by tempol. All vascular responses to AVP were abolished by an AVP V1a receptor antagonist. A V2 receptor agonist or antagonist had no effect on AVP-induced renal vasoconstriction. Taken together, the results indicate that renal vasoconstriction by AVP in the mouse is strongly buffered by vasodilatory actions of NO and prostanoids. The vasoconstriction depends on V1a receptor activation without involvement of CD38 or concomitant vasodilatation by V2 receptors. The role of superoxide is to enhance the contractile response to AVP, most likely by reducing the availability of NO rather than directly stimulating intracellular contraction signaling pathways. PMID:24623148

  16. Modulation of farnesoid X receptor results in post-translational modification of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 in the liver

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Yan; Li, Guodong; Dong, Yafeng; Zhou, Helen H.; Kong, Bo; Aleksunes, Lauren M.; Richardson, Jason R.; Li, Fei; Guo, Grace L.

    2013-01-15

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a bile acid-activated transcription factor belonging to the nuclear receptor superfamily. FXR deficiency in mice results in cholestasis, metabolic disorders, and tumorigenesis in liver and intestine. FXR is known to contribute to pathogenesis by regulating gene transcription; however, changes in the post-transcriptional modification of proteins associated with FXR modulation have not been determined. In the current study, proteomic analysis of the livers of wild-type (WT) and FXR knockout (FXR-KO) mice treated with a FXR synthetic ligand or vehicle was performed. The results identified five proteins as novel FXR targets. Since FXR deficiency in mice leads to liver tumorigenesis, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase family, member 1 (Parp1) that is important for DNA repair, was validated in the current study by quantitative real-time PCR, and 1- and 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis/western blot. The results showed that Parp1 mRNA levels were not altered by FXR genetic status or by agonist treatment. However, total Parp1 protein levels were increased in FXR-KO mice as early as 3 month old. Interestingly, total Parp1 protein levels were increased in WT mice in an age-dependent manner (from 3 to 18 months), but not in FXR-KO mice. Finally, activation of FXR in WT mice resulted in reduction of phosporylated Parp1 protein in the liver without affecting total Parp1 protein levels. In conclusion, this study reveals that FXR genetic status and agonist treatment affects basal levels and phosphorylation state of Parp1, respectively. These alterations, in turn, may be associated with the hepatobiliary alterations observed in FXR-KO mice and participate in FXR agonist-induced protection in the liver. -- Highlights: ► Proteomic analysis identified novel FXR targets. ► FXR modification altered post-translational modification of the Parp1 protein. ► Altered Parp1 function may contribute to mechanisms of FXR regulation of liver functions.

  17. Impact of aspirin dose on adenosine diphosphate-mediated platelet activities. Results of an in vitro pilot investigation.

    PubMed

    Tello-Montoliu, Antonio; Thano, Estela; Rollini, Fabiana; Patel, Ronakkumar; Wilson, Ryan E; Muñiz-Lozano, Ana; Franchi, Francesco; Darlington, Andrew; Desai, Bhaloo; Guzman, Luis A; Bass, Theodore A; Angiolillo, Dominick J

    2013-10-01

    Different aspirin dosing regimens have been suggested to impact outcomes when used in combination with adenosine diphosphate (ADP) P2Y12 receptor antagonists. Prior investigations have shown that not only aspirin, but also potent ADP P2Y12 receptor blockade can inhibit thromboxane A2-mediated platelet activation. The impact of aspirin dosing on ADP mediated platelet activities is unknown and represents the aim of this in vitro pilot pharmacodynamic (PD) investigation. Twenty-six patients with stable coronary artery disease on aspirin 81 mg/day and P2Y12 naïve were enrolled. PD assessments were performed at baseline, while patients were on 81 mg/day aspirin and after switching to 325 mg/day for 7 ± 2 days with and without escalating concentrations (vehicle, 1, 3, and 10 μM) of prasugrel's active metabolite (P-AM). PD assays included flow cytometric assessment of VASP to define the platelet reactivity index (PRI) and the Multiplate Analyzer (MEA) using multiple agonists [ADP, ADP + prostaglandin (PGE1), arachidonic acid (AA), and collagen]. Escalating P-AM concentrations showed incremental platelet P2Y12 inhibition measured by VASP-PRI (p<0.001). However, there were no differences according to aspirin dosing regimen at any P-AM concentration (vehicle: p=0.899; 1 μM: p=0.888; 3 μM: p=0.524; 10 μM: p=0.548). Similar findings were observed in purinergic markers assessed by MEA (ADP and ADP+PGE1). P-AM addition significantly reduced AA and collagen induced platelet aggregation (p<0.001 for all measures), irrespective of aspirin dose. In conclusion, aspirin dosing does not appear to affect PD measures of ADP-mediated platelet reactivity irrespective of the degree of P2Y12 receptor blockade. P2Y12 receptor blockade modulates platelet reactivity mediated by alternative activators. PMID:23884248

  18. ADP-Ribosyltransferases and Poly ADP-Ribosylation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chao; Yu, Xiaochun

    2016-01-01

    Protein ADP-ribosylation is an important posttranslational modification that plays versatile roles in multiple biological processes. ADP-ribosylation is catalyzed by a group of enzymes known as ADP-ribosyltransferases (ARTs). Using nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) as the donor, ARTs covalently link single or multiple ADP-ribose moieties from NAD+ to the substrates, forming mono ADP-ribosylation or poly ADP-ribosylation (PARylation). Novel functions of ARTs and ADP-ribosylation have been revealed over the past few years. Here we summarize the current knowledge on ARTs and PARylation. PMID:25938242

  19. Historical Lessons in Translational Medicine: Cyclooxygenase Inhibition and P2Y12 Antagonism

    PubMed Central

    Fitzgerald, Desmond J.; FitzGerald, Garret A.

    2013-01-01

    The development of drugs that inhibit platelets has been driven by a combination of clinical insights, fundamental science and sheer luck. The process has evolved as the days of stumbling upon therapeutic gems like aspirin have long passed and have been replaced by an arduous process where a drug is designed to target a specific protein implicated in a well-characterized pathophysiological process. Or so we would like to believe. The development of antiplatelet therapy illustrates the importance of understanding the mechanisms of disease and the pharmacology of the compounds we develop, coupled with careful clinical experimentation and observation. And yes, still, a fair bit of luck. PMID:23287454

  20. Historical lessons in translational medicine: cyclooxygenase inhibition and P2Y12 antagonism.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Desmond J; Fitzgerald, Garret A

    2013-01-01

    The development of drugs that inhibit platelets has been driven by a combination of clinical insights, fundamental science, and sheer luck. The process has evolved as the days of stumbling on therapeutic gems, such as aspirin, have long passed and have been replaced by an arduous process in which a drug is designed to target a specific protein implicated in a well-characterized pathophysiological process, or so we would like to believe. The development of antiplatelet therapy illustrates the importance of understanding the mechanisms of disease and the pharmacology of the compounds we develop, coupled with careful clinical experimentation and observation and, yes, still, a fair bit of luck. PMID:23287454

  1. ADP's ABCs of Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinstein, Margery

    2010-01-01

    When a company's core competence is processing data, it is sometimes easy to lose sight of the obvious--the information right under its nose. In the case of Automatic Data Processing, Inc. (ADP), a business outsourcing company specializing in human resources, payroll, tax, and benefits administrations solutions, that is not a problem. Through…

  2. Recent advances in the Okamoto model: the CD38-cyclic ADP-ribose signal system and the regenerating gene protein (Reg)-Reg receptor system in beta-cells.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Hiroshi; Takasawa, Shin

    2002-12-01

    Twenty years ago, we first proposed our hypothesis on beta-cell damage and its prevention (the Okamoto model), according to which poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase/polymerase (PARP) activation is critically involved in the consumption of NAD(+), leading to energy depletion and cell death by necrosis. Recently, the model was reconfirmed by results using PARP knockout mice and has been recognized as providing the basis for necrotic death of various cells and tissues. Based on the model, we proposed two signal systems in beta-cells: one is the CD38-cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) signal system for insulin secretion, and the other is the regenerating gene protein (Reg)-Reg receptor system for beta-cell regeneration. The physiological and pathological significance of the two signal systems in a variety of cells and tissues as well as in pancreatic beta-cells has recently been recognized. Here, we describe the Okamoto model and its descendents, the CD38-cADPR signal system and the Reg-Reg receptor system, focusing on recent advances and how their significance came to light. Because PARP is involved in Reg gene transcription to induce beta-cell regeneration, and the PARP activation reduces the cellular NAD(+) to decrease the formation of cADPR (a second messenger for insulin secretion) and further to cause necrotic beta-cell death, PARP and its inhibitors have key roles in the induction of beta-cell regeneration, the maintenance of insulin secretion, and the prevention of beta-cell death. PMID:12475791

  3. Wnt pathway activation by ADP-ribosylation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Eungi; Tacchelly-Benites, Ofelia; Wang, Zhenghan; Randall, Michael P.; Tian, Ai; Benchabane, Hassina; Freemantle, Sarah; Pikielny, Claudio; Tolwinski, Nicholas S.; Lee, Ethan; Ahmed, Yashi

    2016-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signalling directs fundamental processes during metazoan development and can be aberrantly activated in cancer. Wnt stimulation induces the recruitment of the scaffold protein Axin from an inhibitory destruction complex to a stimulatory signalosome. Here we analyse the early effects of Wnt on Axin and find that the ADP-ribose polymerase Tankyrase (Tnks)—known to target Axin for proteolysis—regulates Axin's rapid transition following Wnt stimulation. We demonstrate that the pool of ADP-ribosylated Axin, which is degraded under basal conditions, increases immediately following Wnt stimulation in both Drosophila and human cells. ADP-ribosylation of Axin enhances its interaction with the Wnt co-receptor LRP6, an essential step in signalosome assembly. We suggest that in addition to controlling Axin levels, Tnks-dependent ADP-ribosylation promotes the reprogramming of Axin following Wnt stimulation; and propose that Tnks inhibition blocks Wnt signalling not only by increasing destruction complex activity, but also by impeding signalosome assembly. PMID:27138857

  4. Wnt pathway activation by ADP-ribosylation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Eungi; Tacchelly-Benites, Ofelia; Wang, Zhenghan; Randall, Michael P; Tian, Ai; Benchabane, Hassina; Freemantle, Sarah; Pikielny, Claudio; Tolwinski, Nicholas S; Lee, Ethan; Ahmed, Yashi

    2016-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signalling directs fundamental processes during metazoan development and can be aberrantly activated in cancer. Wnt stimulation induces the recruitment of the scaffold protein Axin from an inhibitory destruction complex to a stimulatory signalosome. Here we analyse the early effects of Wnt on Axin and find that the ADP-ribose polymerase Tankyrase (Tnks)--known to target Axin for proteolysis-regulates Axin's rapid transition following Wnt stimulation. We demonstrate that the pool of ADP-ribosylated Axin, which is degraded under basal conditions, increases immediately following Wnt stimulation in both Drosophila and human cells. ADP-ribosylation of Axin enhances its interaction with the Wnt co-receptor LRP6, an essential step in signalosome assembly. We suggest that in addition to controlling Axin levels, Tnks-dependent ADP-ribosylation promotes the reprogramming of Axin following Wnt stimulation; and propose that Tnks inhibition blocks Wnt signalling not only by increasing destruction complex activity, but also by impeding signalosome assembly. PMID:27138857

  5. Distinct clathrin-coated pits sort different G protein-coupled receptor cargo.

    PubMed

    Mundell, Stuart J; Luo, Jiansong; Benovic, Jeffrey L; Conley, Pamela B; Poole, Alastair W

    2006-10-01

    Upon activation, many G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) internalize by clathrin-mediated endocytosis and are subsequently sorted to undergo recycling or lysosomal degradation. Here we observe that sorting can take place much earlier than previously thought, by entry of different GPCRs into distinct populations of clathrin-coated pit (CCP). These distinct populations were revealed by analysis of two purinergic GPCRs, P2Y(1) and P2Y(12), which enter two populations of CCPs in a mutually exclusive manner. The mechanisms underlying early GPCR sorting involve differential kinase-dependent processes because internalization of P2Y(12) is mediated by GPCR kinases (GRKs) and arrestin, whereas P2Y(1) internalization is GRK- and arrestin-independent but requires protein kinase C. Importantly, the beta(2) adrenoceptor which also internalizes in a GRK-dependent manner also traffics exclusively to P2Y(12)-containing CCPs. Our data therefore reveal distinct populations of CCPs that sort GPCR cargo at the plasma membrane using different kinase-dependent mechanisms. PMID:16899088

  6. The Prognostic Impact of High On-Treatment Platelet Reactivity with Aspirin or ADP Receptor Antagonists: Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    D'Ascenzo, Fabrizio; Barbero, Umberto; Bisi, Marta; Moretti, Claudio; Omedè, Pierluigi; Cerrato, Enrico; Quadri, Giorgio; Zoccai, Giuseppe Biondi; DiNicolantonio, James J.; Gasparini, Mauro; Bangalore, Sripal; Gaita, Fiorenzo

    2014-01-01

    Objective. Negative results of recent randomized clinical trials testing the hypothesis of target therapy for patients with high on-treatment platelet reactivity (HOPR) have questioned its independent impact on clinical outcomes. 26 studies with 28.178 patients were included, with a median age of 66.8 (64–68) and 22.7% (22.4–27.8), of female gender. After a median follow-up of 1 year (0.1–1), cardiac adverse events occurred in 8.3% (3–11; all results are reported as median and interquartile range) of patients. Pooling all studies together, on-treatment platelet reactivity significantly increased the risk of adverse events (OR 1.33 [1.09, 1.64], I2 = 0%). However, a sensitivity analysis showed that HOPR did not increase the risk of adverse events for patients with ACS, AMI, or stable angina as well as patients resistant to aspirin, ADP antagonists, or both. For all studies, publication bias was formally evident; after adjusting for this, HOPR did not significantly increase adverse cardiac events (OR 1.1 : 0.89–1.22, I2 0%). Conclusions. After adjusting for clinical confounders (like risk factors and clinical presentation) and for relevant publication bias, HOPR was not an independent prognostic indicator in unselected patients with both stable and unstable coronary disease for an adverse cardiac event. The clinical importance of HOPR for high-risk populations remains to be assessed. PMID:25374889

  7. RASA3 is a critical inhibitor of RAP1-dependent platelet activation

    PubMed Central

    Stefanini, Lucia; Paul, David S.; Robledo, Raymond F.; Chan, E. Ricky; Getz, Todd M.; Campbell, Robert A.; Kechele, Daniel O.; Casari, Caterina; Piatt, Raymond; Caron, Kathleen M.; Mackman, Nigel; Weyrich, Andrew S.; Parrott, Matthew C.; Boulaftali, Yacine; Adams, Mark D.; Peters, Luanne L.; Bergmeier, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    The small GTPase RAP1 is critical for platelet activation and thrombus formation. RAP1 activity in platelets is controlled by the GEF CalDAG-GEFI and an unknown regulator that operates downstream of the adenosine diphosphate (ADP) receptor, P2Y12, a target of antithrombotic therapy. Here, we provide evidence that the GAP, RASA3, inhibits platelet activation and provides a link between P2Y12 and activation of the RAP1 signaling pathway. In mice, reduced expression of RASA3 led to premature platelet activation and markedly reduced the life span of circulating platelets. The increased platelet turnover and the resulting thrombocytopenia were reversed by concomitant deletion of the gene encoding CalDAG-GEFI. Rasa3 mutant platelets were hyperresponsive to agonist stimulation, both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, activation of Rasa3 mutant platelets occurred independently of ADP feedback signaling and was insensitive to inhibitors of P2Y12 or PI3 kinase. Together, our results indicate that RASA3 ensures that circulating platelets remain quiescent by restraining CalDAG-GEFI/RAP1 signaling and suggest that P2Y12 signaling is required to inhibit RASA3 and enable sustained RAP1-dependent platelet activation and thrombus formation at sites of vascular injury. These findings provide insight into the antithrombotic effect of P2Y12 inhibitors and may lead to improved diagnosis and treatment of platelet-related disorders. PMID:25705885

  8. Identification and Characterization of Novel Variations in Platelet G-Protein Coupled Receptor (GPCR) Genes in Patients Historically Diagnosed with Type 1 von Willebrand Disease

    PubMed Central

    Leo, Vincenzo C.; Sabi, Essa; Cunningham, Margaret R.; Eikenboom, Jeroen C.; Lethagen, Stefan; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Goodeve, Anne C.; Watson, Steve P.; Mundell, Stuart J.; Daly, Martina E.

    2015-01-01

    The clinical expression of type 1 von Willebrand disease may be modified by co-inheritance of other mild bleeding diatheses. We previously showed that mutations in the platelet P2Y12 ADP receptor gene (P2RY12) could contribute to the bleeding phenotype in patients with type 1 von Willebrand disease. Here we investigated whether variations in platelet G protein-coupled receptor genes other than P2RY12 also contributed to the bleeding phenotype. Platelet G protein-coupled receptor genes P2RY1, F2R, F2RL3, TBXA2R and PTGIR were sequenced in 146 index cases with type 1 von Willebrand disease and the potential effects of identified single nucleotide variations were assessed using in silico methods and heterologous expression analysis. Seven heterozygous single nucleotide variations were identified in 8 index cases. Two single nucleotide variations were detected in F2R; a novel c.-67G>C transversion which reduced F2R transcriptional activity and a rare c.1063C>T transition predicting a p.L355F substitution which did not interfere with PAR1 expression or signalling. Two synonymous single nucleotide variations were identified in F2RL3 (c.402C>G, p.A134 =; c.1029 G>C p.V343 =), both of which introduced less commonly used codons and were predicted to be deleterious, though neither of them affected PAR4 receptor expression. A third single nucleotide variation in F2RL3 (c.65 C>A; p.T22N) was co-inherited with a synonymous single nucleotide variation in TBXA2R (c.6680 C>T, p.S218 =). Expression and signalling of the p.T22N PAR4 variant was similar to wild-type, while the TBXA2R variation introduced a cryptic splice site that was predicted to cause premature termination of protein translation. The enrichment of single nucleotide variations in G protein-coupled receptor genes among type 1 von Willebrand disease patients supports the view of type 1 von Willebrand disease as a polygenic disorder. PMID:26630678

  9. Identification and Characterization of Novel Variations in Platelet G-Protein Coupled Receptor (GPCR) Genes in Patients Historically Diagnosed with Type 1 von Willebrand Disease.

    PubMed

    Stockley, Jacqueline; Nisar, Shaista P; Leo, Vincenzo C; Sabi, Essa; Cunningham, Margaret R; Eikenboom, Jeroen C; Lethagen, Stefan; Schneppenheim, Reinhard; Goodeve, Anne C; Watson, Steve P; Mundell, Stuart J; Daly, Martina E

    2015-01-01

    The clinical expression of type 1 von Willebrand disease may be modified by co-inheritance of other mild bleeding diatheses. We previously showed that mutations in the platelet P2Y12 ADP receptor gene (P2RY12) could contribute to the bleeding phenotype in patients with type 1 von Willebrand disease. Here we investigated whether variations in platelet G protein-coupled receptor genes other than P2RY12 also contributed to the bleeding phenotype. Platelet G protein-coupled receptor genes P2RY1, F2R, F2RL3, TBXA2R and PTGIR were sequenced in 146 index cases with type 1 von Willebrand disease and the potential effects of identified single nucleotide variations were assessed using in silico methods and heterologous expression analysis. Seven heterozygous single nucleotide variations were identified in 8 index cases. Two single nucleotide variations were detected in F2R; a novel c.-67G>C transversion which reduced F2R transcriptional activity and a rare c.1063C>T transition predicting a p.L355F substitution which did not interfere with PAR1 expression or signalling. Two synonymous single nucleotide variations were identified in F2RL3 (c.402C>G, p.A134 =; c.1029 G>C p.V343 =), both of which introduced less commonly used codons and were predicted to be deleterious, though neither of them affected PAR4 receptor expression. A third single nucleotide variation in F2RL3 (c.65 C>A; p.T22N) was co-inherited with a synonymous single nucleotide variation in TBXA2R (c.6680 C>T, p.S218 =). Expression and signalling of the p.T22N PAR4 variant was similar to wild-type, while the TBXA2R variation introduced a cryptic splice site that was predicted to cause premature termination of protein translation. The enrichment of single nucleotide variations in G protein-coupled receptor genes among type 1 von Willebrand disease patients supports the view of type 1 von Willebrand disease as a polygenic disorder. PMID:26630678

  10. Dabigatran and rivaroxaban do not affect AA- and ADP-induced platelet aggregation in patients receiving concomitant platelet inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Olivier, Christoph B; Weik, Patrick; Meyer, Melanie; Weber, Susanne; Diehl, Philipp; Bode, Christoph; Moser, Martin; Zhou, Qian

    2016-08-01

    Dabigatran and rivaroxaban are novel, vitamin K-independent oral anticoagulants (NOACs) and act via antagonism of the coagulation factor (F) IIa (dabigatran) or FXa (rivaroxaban), respectively. Compared to vitamin-K-antagonists, NOACs have shown non-inferiority of risk and benefit in patients with non valvular atrial fibrillation (AF). In clinical practice there is increasing use of NOACs combined with platelet inhibitors in patients with AF and coronary artery disease. However, whether NOACs affect the function of platelet inhibitors remains incompletely known. This observational study aimed to assess the platelet function in patients receiving dabigatran or rivaroxaban and concomitant platelet inhibitors. A single centre observational study was performed analysing the platelet aggregation of patients treated with dabigatran or rivaroxaban with or without concomitant platelet inhibitors. Measurements before the initiation of NOAC therapy served as the respective control group. Platelet aggregation was measured by multiple electrode aggregometry and was induced with adenosine diphosphate (ADP, 6.5 µM) and arachidonic acid (AA, 0.5 mM), respectively. In order to evaluate whether NOACs interact with platelet inhibition by ASA or the P2Y12-antagonist clopidogrel, 87 patients were grouped according to their concomitant antiplatelet medication. Comparing the ADP- and AA-induced platelet aggregation in patients without concomitant platelet inhibitors (n = 45) no significant differences under therapy with dabigatran (d) or rivaroxaban (r) compared to the control group (c) were observed. In patients taking clopidogrel as a concomitant platelet inhibitor (n = 21), neither dabigatran nor rivaroxaban affected the ADP-induced platelet aggregation (c 20 ± 11, d 21 ± 14, r 18 ± 8 AU*min, p = 0.200). Patients receiving dabigatran or rivaroxaban in combination with ASA (n = 42; 21 ASA only, 21 ASA + clopidogrel) showed no significant differences of the AA

  11. Structural Basis and Target-specific Modulation of ADP Sensing by the Synechococcus elongatus PII Signaling Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Zeth, Kornelius; Fokina, Oleksandra; Forchhammer, Karl

    2014-01-01

    PII signaling proteins comprise one of the most versatile signaling devices in nature and have a highly conserved structure. In cyanobacteria, PipX and N-acetyl-l-glutamate kinase are receptors of PII signaling, and these interactions are modulated by ADP, ATP, and 2-oxoglutarate. These effector molecules bind interdependently to three anti-cooperative binding sites on the trimeric PII protein and thereby affect its structure. Here we used the PII protein from Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 to reveal the structural basis of anti-cooperative ADP binding. Furthermore, we clarified the mutual influence of PII-receptor interaction and sensing of the ATP/ADP ratio. The crystal structures of two forms of trimeric PII, one with one ADP bound and the other with all three ADP-binding sites occupied, revealed significant differences in the ADP binding mode: at one site (S1) ADP is tightly bound through side-chain and main-chain interactions, whereas at the other two sites (S2 and S3) the ADP molecules are only bound by main-chain interactions. In the presence of the PII-receptor PipX, the affinity of ADP to the first binding site S1 strongly increases, whereas the affinity for ATP decreases due to PipX favoring the S1 conformation of PII-ADP. In consequence, the PII-PipX interaction is highly sensitive to subtle fluctuations in the ATP/ADP ratio. By contrast, the PII-N-acetyl-l-glutamate kinase interaction, which is negatively affected by ADP, is insensitive to these fluctuations. Modulation of the metabolite-sensing properties of PII by its receptors allows PII to differentially perceive signals in a target-specific manner and to perform multitasking signal transduction. PMID:24519945

  12. ADP-Ribosylation: Activation, Recognition, and Removal

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nan; Chen, Junjie

    2014-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation is a type of posttranslational modification catalyzed by members of the poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymerase superfamily. ADP-ribosylation is initiated by PARPs, recognized by PAR binding proteins, and removed by PARG and other ADP-ribose hydrolases. These three groups of proteins work together to regulate the cellular and molecular response of PAR signaling, which is critical for a wide range of cellular and physiological functions. PMID:24552704

  13. 45 CFR 95.621 - ADP reviews.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... all ADP systems used by State and local governments to administer programs covered under 45 CFR part... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false ADP reviews. 95.621 Section 95.621 Public Welfare....621 ADP reviews. The Department will conduct periodic onsite surveys and reviews of State and...

  14. Regulation of P2Y1 receptor traffic by sorting Nexin 1 is retromer independent.

    PubMed

    Nisar, Shaista; Kelly, Eamonn; Cullen, Pete J; Mundell, Stuart J

    2010-04-01

    The activity and traffic of G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) is tightly controlled. Recent work from our laboratory has shown that P2Y(1) and P2Y(12) responsiveness is rapidly and reversibly modulated in human platelets and that the underlying mechanism requires receptor trafficking as an essential part of this process. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying P2Y receptor traffic. Sorting nexin 1 (SNX1) has been shown to regulate the endosomal sorting of cell surface receptors either to lysosomes where they are downregulated or back to the cell surface. These functions may in part be due to interactions of SNX1 with the mammalian retromer complex. In this study, we investigated the role of SNX1 in P2Y receptor trafficking. We show that P2Y(1) receptors recycle via a slow recycling pathway that is regulated by SNX1, whereas P2Y(12) receptors return to the cell surface via a rapid route that is SNX1 independent. SNX1 inhibition caused a dramatic increase in the rate of P2Y(1) receptor recycling, whereas inhibition of Vps26 and Vps35 known to be present in retromer had no effect, indicating that SNX1 regulation of P2Y(1) receptor recycling is retromer independent. In addition, inhibition of SNX4, 6 and 17 proteins did not affect P2Y(1) receptor recycling. SNX1 has also been implicated in GPCR degradation; however, we provide evidence that P2Y receptor degradation is SNX1 independent. These data describe a novel function of SNX1 in the regulation of P2Y(1) receptor recycling and suggest that SNX1 plays multiple roles in endocytic trafficking of GPCRs. PMID:20070609

  15. Pierisins and CARP-1: ADP-ribosylation of DNA by ARTCs in butterflies and shellfish.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi-Nakaguchi, Azusa; Yamamoto, Masafumi; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    The cabbage butterfly, Pieris rapae, and related species possess a previously unknown ADP-ribosylating toxin, guanine specific ADP-ribosyltransferase. This enzyme toxin, known as pierisin, consists of enzymatic N-terminal domain and receptor-binding C-terminal domain, or typical AB-toxin structure. Pierisin efficiently transfers an ADP-ribosyl moiety to the N(2) position of the guanine base of dsDNA. Receptors for pierisin are suggested to be the neutral glycosphingolipids, globotriaosylceramide (Gb3), and globotetraosylceramide (Gb4). This DNA-modifying toxin exhibits strong cytotoxicity and induces apoptosis in various human cell lines, which can be blocked by Bcl-2. Pierisin also produces detrimental effects on the eggs and larvae of the non-habitual parasitoids. In contrast, a natural parasitoid of the cabbage butterfly, Cotesia glomerata, was resistant to this toxin. The physiological role of pierisin in the butterfly is suggested to be a defense factor against parasitization by wasps. Other type of DNA ADP-ribosyltransferase is present in certain kinds of edible clams. For example, the CARP-1 protein found in Meretrix lamarckii consists of an enzymatic domain without a possible receptor-binding domain. Pierisin and CARP-1 are almost fully non-homologous at the amino acid sequence level, but other ADP-ribosyltransferases homologous to pierisin are present in different biological species such as eubacterium Streptomyces. Possible diverse physiological roles of the DNA ADP-ribosyltransferases are discussed. PMID:25033755

  16. State of the art of protein mono-ADP-ribosylation: biological role and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Fabrizio, Gaia; Scarpa, Emanuele Salvatore; Di Girolamo, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Mono-ADP-ribosylation is a post-translational modification that was discovered more than five decades ago, and it consists of the enzymatic transfer of ADP-ribose from NAD⁺ to acceptor proteins. In viruses and prokaryotes, mono-ADP-ribosylation is mainly, but not exclusively, a mechanism used to take control of the host cell. In mammals, mono-ADP-ribosylation serves to regulate protein functions, and it is catalysed by two families of toxin-related cellular ADP-ribosyltransferases: ecto-enzymes that modify various cell-surface proteins, like integrins and receptors, and intracellular enzymes that act on a variety of nuclear and cytosolic proteins. These two families have been recently renamed the ARTCs (clostridia toxin like) and ARTDs (diphtheria toxin like), depending on their conserved structural features, and in terms of their relationships to the bacterial toxins. In addition, two members of the structurally non-related sirtuin family can also modify cellular proteins by mono-ADP-ribosylation. Recently, new examples of ADP-ribosylation of proteins involved in signal transduction and intracellular trafficking have been discovered, thus opening the route to the better molecular understanding of this reaction and of its role in human cell physiology and pathology. PMID:25553458

  17. Isoflurane Prevents Acute Lung Injury Through ADP-Mediated Platelet Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Harr, Jeffrey N.; Moore, Ernest E.; Stringham, John; Wohlauer, Max V.; Fragoso, Miguel; Jones, Wilbert L.; Gamboni, Fabia; Silliman, Christopher C.; Banerjee, Anirban

    2012-01-01

    Background Growing evidence suggests platelets are essential in post-traumatic acute lung injury (ALI). Halogenated ethers interfere with platelet-granulocyte aggregate formation. The potential benefit of halogenated ethers has not been investigated in trauma/hemorrhagic shock (T/HS) models. Therefore, we hypothesized that isoflurane decreases T/HS-mediated ALI through platelet inhibition. Methods Sprauge-Dawley rats (n=47) were anesthetized by either pentobarbital or inhaled isoflurane, and placed into groups: control, trauma (laparotomy) sham shock, T/HS (MAP of 30 mmHg × 45 min), pre-treatment with an ADP receptor antagonist, or T/HS with isoflurane initiated during resuscitation. ALI was determined by BALF protein and pulmonary immunofluorescence. PlateletMapping™ specifically evaluated thrombin-independent inhibition of the ADP and AA pathways of platelet activation. Results Pre-treatment with isoflurane abrogated ALI as measured by both BAL fluid protein and pulmonary immunofluorescence (p<0.001). PlateletMapping™, revealed specific platelet ADP-pathway inhibition with isoflurane (p<0.001). Pre-treatment with an ADP receptor antagonist decreased ALI to sham levels, confirming that specific platelet ADP inhibition decreases ALI. Isoflurane initiated during resuscitation also decreased ALI (p<0.001). Conclusion Isoflurane attenuates ALI through an anti-platelet mechanism, in part, through inhibition of the platelet ADP pathway. Isoflurane given post-injury also protects against ALI, and highlights the potential applications of this therapy in various ischemia/reperfusion clinical scenarios. PMID:22828148

  18. Purinergic Receptors in Thrombosis and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Hechler, Béatrice; Gachet, Christian

    2015-11-01

    Under various pathological conditions, including thrombosis and inflammation, extracellular nucleotide levels may increase because of both active release and passive leakage from damaged or dying cells. Once in the extracellular compartment, nucleotides interact with plasma membrane receptors belonging to the P2 purinergic family, which are expressed by virtually all circulating blood cells and in most blood vessels. In this review, we focus on the specific role of the 3 platelet P2 receptors P2Y1, P2Y12, and P2X1 in hemostasis and arterial thrombosis. Beyond platelets, these 3 receptors, along with the P2Y2, P2Y6, and P2X7 receptors, constitute the main P2 receptors mediating the proinflammatory effects of nucleotides, which play important roles in various functions of circulating blood cells and cells of the vessel wall. Each of these P2 receptor subtypes specifically contributes to chronic or acute vascular inflammation and related diseases, such as atherosclerosis, restenosis, endotoxemia, and sepsis. The potential for therapeutic targeting of these P2 receptor subtypes is also discussed. PMID:26359511

  19. Molecular Dynamics Study of Hsp90 and ADP: Hydrogen Bond Analysis for ADP Dissociation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Kazutomo; Saito, Hiroaki; Nagao, Hidemi

    The contacts between the N-terminal domain of heat shock protein 90 (N-Hsp90) and ADP involve both direct and water-mediated hydrogen bonds in X-ray crystallographic structure. We perform all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of N-Hsp90 and ADP to investigate the changes of the hydrogen bond lengths during ADP dissociation. We show the difference between the hydrogen bonds in the crystal structure and MD simulations. Moreover, the N6 group of ADP does not contact with the Cγ group of Asp93, and the hydrogen bonds between Asn51 side chain and ADP are stable in the early step of ADP dissociation.

  20. ADP-ribosylation of transducin by pertussis toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, P.A.; Burns, D.L.; Kanaho, Y.; Liu, T.Y.; Hewlett, E.L.; Moss, J.

    1985-11-05

    Transducin, the guanyl nucleotide-binding regulatory protein of retinal rod outer segments that couples the photon receptor, rhodopsin, with the light-activated cGMP phosphodiesterase, can be resolved into two functional components, T alpha and T beta gamma. T alpha (39 kDa), which is (TSP)ADP-ribosylated by pertussis toxin and (TSP)NAD in rod outer segments and in purified transducin, was also labeled by the toxin after separation from T beta gamma (36 kDa and approximately 10 kDa); neither component of T beta gamma was a pertussis toxin substrate. Labeling of T alpha was enhanced by T beta gamma and was maximal at approximately 1:1 molar ratio of T alpha : T beta gamma. Limited proteolysis by trypsin of T alpha in the presence of guanyl-5'-yl imidodiphosphate (Gpp(NH)p) resulted in the sequential appearance of proteins of 38 and TS kDa. The amino terminus of both 38- and TS-kDa proteins was leucine, whereas that of T alpha could not be identified and was assumed to be blocked. The TS-kDa peptide was not a pertussis toxin substrate. Labeling of the 38-kDa protein was poor and was not enhanced by T beta gamma. Trypsin treatment of (TSP)ADP-ribosyl-T alpha produced a labeled 37-38-kDa doublet followed by appearance of radioactivity at the dye front. It appears, therefore, that, although the 38-kDa protein was poor toxin substrate, it contained the ADP-ribosylation site. Without rhodopsin, labeling of T alpha (in the presence of T beta gamma) was unaffected by Gpp(NH)p, guanosine 5'-O-(thiotriphosphate) (GTP gamma S), GTP, GDP, and guanosine 5'-O-(thiodiphosphate) (GDP beta S) but was increased by ATP. When photolyzed rhodopsin and T beta gamma were present, Gpp(NH)p and GTP gamma S decreased (TSP)ADP-ribosylation by pertussis toxin. Thus, pertussis toxin-catalyzed (TSP)ADP-ribosylation of T alpha was affected by nucleotides, rhodopsin and light in addition to T beta gamma.

  1. Kinesin ATPase: Rate-Limiting ADP Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackney, David D.

    1988-09-01

    The ATPase rate of kinesin isolated from bovine brain by the method of S. A. Kuznetsov and V. I. Gelfand [(1986) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 83, 8530-8534)] is stimulated 1000-fold by interaction with tubulin (turnover rate per 120-kDa peptide increases from ≈ 0.009 sec-1 to 9 sec-1). The tubulin-stimulated reaction exhibits no extra incorporation of water-derived oxygens over a wide range of ATP and tubulin concentrations, indicating that Pi release is faster than the reversal of hydrolysis. ADP release, however, is slow for the basal reaction and its release is rate limiting as indicated by the very tight ADP binding (Ki < 5 nM), the retention of a stoichiometric level of bound ADP through ion-exchange chromatography and dialysis, and the reversible labeling of a bound ADP by [14C]ATP at the steady-state ATPase rate as shown by centrifuge gel filtration and inaccessibility to pyruvate kinase. Tubulin accelerates the release of the bound ADP consistent with its activation of the net ATPase reaction. The detailed kinetics of ADP release in the presence of tubulin are biphasic indicating apparent heterogeneity with a fraction of the kinesin active sites being unaffected by tubulin.

  2. Kinesin ATPase: Rate-limiting ADP release

    SciTech Connect

    Hackney, D.D.

    1988-09-01

    The ATPase rate of kinesin isolated from bovine brain by the method of S.A. Kuznetsov and V.I. Gelfand is stimulated 1000-fold by interaction with tubulin. The tubulin-stimulated reaction exhibits no extra incorporation of water-derived oxygens over a wide range of ATP and tubulin concentrations, indicating that P/sub i/ release is faster than the reversal of hydrolysis. ADP release, however, is slow for the basal reaction and its release is rate limiting as indicated by the very tight ADP binding (K/sub i/ < 5 nM), the retention of a stoichiometric level of bound ADP through ion-exchange chromatography and dialysis, and the reversible labeling of a bound ADP by (/sup 14/C)ATP at the steady-state ATPase rate as shown by centrifuge gel filtration and inaccessibility to pyruvate kinase. Tubulin accelerates the release of the bound ADP consistent with its activation of the net ATPase reaction. The detailed kinetics of ADP release in the presence of tubulin are biphasic indicating apparent heterogeneity with a fraction of the kinesin active sites being unaffected by tubulin.

  3. Hydrogen bonding nature during ADP crystallization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Congting; Xue, Dongfeng

    2014-02-01

    The hydrogen bonding nature during ADP crystallization is studied on the basis of anisotropic chemical bonding conditions in ADP crystal combined with in situ IR observation. The variations of hydrogen bonding nature of NH4+ and HPO4- groups dominate the transformation from the free hydrated ionic state to crystalline state during ADP crystallization. Anisotropic ADP crystal morphology depends on the anisotropic chemical bonding conditions along [1 0 0] and [1 0 1] directions. ADP crystal morphologies with different HPO4-n (n = 1-8) clusters can be calculated on the basis of hydrogen bonding conditions and HPO4-n cluster structures at the growth interface. Experimentally, in situ IR spectrum can record the breaking of P-O⋯H-O-H and H-N⋯H-O-H, and the formation of P-O⋯H-O-P and H-N⋯H-O-P hydrogen bonding during ADP crystallization. The present work provides a promising strategy to identify the chemical bonding nature during crystallization processes of molecular crystals from aqueous solution.

  4. Txk, a member of the non-receptor tyrosine kinase of the Tec family, forms a complex with poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 and elongation factor 1α and regulates interferon-γ gene transcription in Th1 cells

    PubMed Central

    Maruyama, T; Nara, K; Yoshikawa, H; Suzuki, N

    2007-01-01

    We have found previously that Txk, a member of the Tec family tyrosine kinases, is involved importantly in T helper 1 (Th1) cytokine production. However, how Txk regulates interferon (IFN)-γ gene transcription in human T lymphocytes was not fully elucidated. In this study, we identified poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) and elongation factor 1α (EF-1α) as Txk-associated molecules that bound to the Txk responsive element of the IFN-γ gene promoter. Txk phosphorylated EF-1α and PARP1 formed a complex with them, and bound to the IFN-γ gene promoter in vitro. In particular, the N terminal region containing the DNA binding domain of PARP1 was important for the trimolecular complex formation involving Txk, EF-1α and PARP1. Several mutant Txk which lacked kinase activity were unable to form the trimolecular complex. A PARP1 inhibitor, PJ34, suppressed IFN-γ but not interleukin (IL)-4 production by normal peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL). Multi-colour confocal analysis revealed that Txk and EF-1α located in the cytoplasm in the resting condition. Upon activation, a complex involving Txk, EF-1α and PARP1 was formed and was located in the nucleus. Collectively, Txk in combination with EF-1α and PARP1 bound to the IFN-γ gene promoter, and exerted transcriptional activity on the IFN-γ gene. PMID:17177976

  5. Antiplatelet therapy: thrombin receptor antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Tello-Montoliu, Antonio; Tomasello, Salvatore D; Ueno, Masafumi; Angiolillo, Dominick J

    2011-01-01

    Activated platelets stimulate thrombus formation in response to rupture of an atherosclerotic plaque or endothelial cell erosion, promoting atherothrombotic disease. Multiple pathways contribute to platelet activation. Aspirin, an irreversible inhibitor of thromboxane A2 synthesis, in combination with clopidogrel, an inhibitor of P2Y12 adenosine diphosphate platelet receptors, represent the current standard-of-care of antiplatelet therapy for patients with acute coronary syndrome and for those undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention. Although these agents have demonstrated significant clinical benefit, the increased risk of bleeding and the recurrence of thrombotic events represent substantial limitations. Thrombin is one of the most important platelet activators. The inhibition of protease-activated receptor 1 showed a good safety profile in preclinical studies. In fact, phase II studies with vorapaxar (SCH530348) and atopaxar (E5555) showed no increase of bleeding events in addition to the current standard-of-care of antiplatelet therapy. Although the results of phase III trials for both drugs are awaited, this family is a promising new addition to the current clinical practice for patients with atherothrombotic disease, not only as an alternative, but also as additional therapy. PMID:21906120

  6. Proteomics Approaches to Identify Mono(ADP-ribosyl)ated and Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated proteins

    PubMed Central

    Vivelo, Christina A.; Leung, Anthony K. L.

    2015-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation refers to the addition of one or more ADP-ribose units onto protein substrates and this protein modification has been implicated in various cellular processes including DNA damage repair, RNA metabolism, transcription and cell cycle regulation. This review focuses on a compilation of large-scale proteomics studies that identify ADP-ribosylated proteins and their associated proteins by mass spectrometry using a variety of enrichment strategies. Some methods, such as the use of a poly(ADP-ribose)-specific antibody and boronate affinity chromatography and NAD+ analogues, have been employed for decades while others, such as the use of protein microarrays and recombinant proteins that bind ADP-ribose moieties (such as macrodomains), have only recently been developed. The advantages and disadvantages of each method and whether these methods are specific for identifying mono(ADP-ribosyl)ated and poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated proteins will be discussed. Lastly, since poly(ADP-ribose) is heterogeneous in length, it has been difficult to attain a mass signature associated with the modification sites. Several strategies on how to reduce polymer chain length heterogeneity for site identification will be reviewed. PMID:25263235

  7. Proteomics approaches to identify mono-(ADP-ribosyl)ated and poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated proteins.

    PubMed

    Vivelo, Christina A; Leung, Anthony K L

    2015-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation refers to the addition of one or more ADP-ribose units onto protein substrates and this protein modification has been implicated in various cellular processes including DNA damage repair, RNA metabolism, transcription, and cell cycle regulation. This review focuses on a compilation of large-scale proteomics studies that identify ADP-ribosylated proteins and their associated proteins by MS using a variety of enrichment strategies. Some methods, such as the use of a poly(ADP-ribose)-specific antibody and boronate affinity chromatography and NAD(+) analogues, have been employed for decades while others, such as the use of protein microarrays and recombinant proteins that bind ADP-ribose moieties (such as macrodomains), have only recently been developed. The advantages and disadvantages of each method and whether these methods are specific for identifying mono(ADP-ribosyl)ated and poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated proteins will be discussed. Lastly, since poly(ADP-ribose) is heterogeneous in length, it has been difficult to attain a mass signature associated with the modification sites. Several strategies on how to reduce polymer chain length heterogeneity for site identification will be reviewed. PMID:25263235

  8. Raman gains of ADP and KDP crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hai-Liang; Zhang, Qing-Hua; Wang, Bo; Xu, Xin-Guang; Wang, Zheng-Ping; Sun, Xun; Zhang, Fang; Zhang, Li-Song; Liu, Bao-An; Chai, Xiang-Xu

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, the Raman gain coefficients of ammonium dihydrogen phosphate (ADP) and potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystals are measured. By using a pump source of a 30-ps, 532-nm laser, the gain coefficients of ADP and KDP are 1.22 cm/GW, and 0.91 cm/GW, respectively. While for a 20-ps, 355-nm pump laser, the gain coefficients of these two crystals are similar, which are 1.95 cm/GW for ADP and 1.86 for KDP. The present results indicate that for ultra-violet frequency conversion, the problem of stimulated Raman scattering for ADP crystal will not be more serious than that for KDP crystal. Considering other advantages such the larger nonlinear optical coefficient, higher laser damage threshold, and lower noncritical phase-matching temperature, it can be anticipated that ADP will be a powerful competitor to KDP in large aperture, high energy third-harmonic generation or fourth-harmonic generation applications. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51323002 and 51402173), the Independent Innovation Foundation of Shandong University, China (Grant Nos. IIFSDU and 2012JC016), the Program for New Century Excellent Talents in University, China (Grant No. NCET-10-0552), the Fund from the Key Laboratory of Neutron Physics, China Academy of Engineering Physics (Grant No. 2014BB07), and the Natural Science Foundation for Distinguished Young Scholar of Shandong Province, China (Grant No. JQ201218).

  9. Auto ADP-ribosylation of NarE, a Neisseria meningitidis ADP-ribosyltransferase, regulates its catalytic activities.

    PubMed

    Picchianti, Monica; Del Vecchio, Mariangela; Di Marcello, Federica; Biagini, Massimiliano; Veggi, Daniele; Norais, Nathalie; Rappuoli, Rino; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Balducci, Enrico

    2013-12-01

    NarE is an arginine-specific mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase identified in Neisseria meningitidis that requires the presence of iron in a structured cluster for its enzymatic activities. In this study, we show that NarE can perform auto-ADP-ribosylation. This automodification occurred in a time- and NAD-concentration-dependent manner; was inhibited by novobiocin, an ADP-ribosyltransferase inhibitor; and did not occur when NarE was heat inactivated. No reduction in incorporation was evidenced in the presence of high concentrations of ATP, GTP, ADP-ribose, or nicotinamide, which inhibits NAD-glycohydrolase, impeding the formation of free ADP-ribose. Based on the electrophoretic profile of NarE on auto-ADP-ribosylation and on the results of mutagenesis and mass spectrometry analysis, the auto-ADP-ribosylation appeared to be restricted to the addition of a single ADP-ribose. Chemical stability experiments showed that the ADP-ribosyl linkage was sensitive to hydroxylamine, which breaks ADP-ribose-arginine bonds. Site-directed mutagenesis suggested that the auto-ADP-ribosylation site occurred preferentially on the R(7) residue, which is located in the region I of the ADP-ribosyltransferase family. After auto-ADP-ribosylation, NarE showed a reduction in ADP-ribosyltransferase activity, while NAD-glycohydrolase activity was increased. Overall, our findings provide evidence for a novel intramolecular mechanism used by NarE to regulate its enzymatic activities. PMID:23964075

  10. Activation of exocytosis by cross-linking of the IgE receptor is dependent on ADP-ribosylation factor 1-regulated phospholipase D in RBL-2H3 mast cells: evidence that the mechanism of activation is via regulation of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Way, G; O'luanaigh, N; Cockcroft, S

    2000-01-01

    The physiological stimulus to exocytosis in mast cells is the cross-linking of the high-affinity IgE receptor, FcepsilonR1, with antigen. We demonstrate a novel function for ADP-ribosylation factor 1 (ARF1) in the regulation of antigen-stimulated secretion using cytosol-depleted RBL-2H3 mast cells for reconstitution of secretory responses. When antigen is used as the stimulus, ARF1 also reconstitutes phospholipase D activation. Using ethanol to divert the phosphatidic acid (the product of phospholipase D activity) to phosphatidylethanol causes inhibition of ARF1-reconstituted secretion. In addition. ARF1 causes an increase in phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP(2)) levels at the expense of phosphatidylinositol 4-monophosphate. The requirement for PIP(2) in exocytosis was confirmed by using phosphatidylinositol transfer protein (PITPalpha) to increase PIP(2) levels. Exocytosis, restored by either ARF1 or PITPalpha, was inhibited when PIP(2) levels were depleted by phospholipase Cdelta1. We conclude that the function of ARF1 and PITPalpha is to increase the local synthesis of PIP(2), the function of which in exocytosis is likely to be linked to lipid-protein interactions, whereby recruitment of key components of the exocytotic machinery are targeted to the appropriate membrane compartment. PMID:10657240

  11. The fate of P2Y-related orphan receptors: GPR80/99 and GPR91 are receptors of dicarboxylic acids.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Nathalie Suarez; Communi, Didier; Hannedouche, Sébastien; Boeynaems, Jean-Marie

    2004-12-01

    Several orphan G protein-coupled receptors are structurally close to the family of P2Y nucleotide receptors: GPR80/99 and GPR91 are close to P2Y(1/2/4/6/11) receptors, whereas GPR87, H963 and GPR34 are close to P2Y(12/13/14). Over the years, several laboratories have attempted without success to identify the ligands of those receptors. In early 2004, two papers have been published: One claiming that GPR80/99 is an AMP receptor, called P2Y(15), and the other one showing that GPR80/99 is a receptor for alpha-ketoglutarate, while GPR91 is a succinate receptor. The accompanying paper by Qi et al. entirely supports that GPR80/99 is an alpha-ketoglutarate receptor and not an AMP receptor. The closeness of dicarboxylic acid and P2Y nucleotide receptors might be linked to the negative charges of both types of ligands and the involvement of conserved Arg residues in their neutralization. PMID:18404396

  12. Roles of Asp179 and Glu270 in ADP-Ribosylation of Actin by Clostridium perfringens Iota Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Belyy, Alexander; Tabakova, Irina; Lang, Alexander E.; Jank, Thomas; Belyi, Yury; Aktories, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens iota toxin is a binary toxin composed of the enzymatically active component Ia and receptor binding component Ib. Ia is an ADP-ribosyltransferase, which modifies Arg177 of actin. The previously determined crystal structure of the actin-Ia complex suggested involvement of Asp179 of actin in the ADP-ribosylation reaction. To gain more insights into the structural requirements of actin to serve as a substrate for toxin-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation, we engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, in which wild type actin was replaced by actin variants with substitutions in residues located on the Ia-actin interface. Expression of the actin mutant Arg177Lys resulted in complete resistance towards Ia. Actin mutation of Asp179 did not change Ia-induced ADP-ribosylation and growth inhibition of S. cerevisiae. By contrast, substitution of Glu270 of actin inhibited the toxic action of Ia and the ADP-ribosylation of actin. In vitro transcribed/translated human β-actin confirmed the crucial role of Glu270 in ADP-ribosylation of actin by Ia. PMID:26713879

  13. 45 CFR 95.621 - ADP reviews.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... CFR part 74 and the conditions of this subpart and to determine the efficiency, economy and... claim provisions of 45 CFR part 95, subpart A; and (iv) The service agreement was not previously... all ADP systems used by State and local governments to administer programs covered under 45 CFR...

  14. 45 CFR 95.621 - ADP reviews.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... all ADP systems used by State and local governments to administer programs covered under 45 CFR part... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION GENERAL ADMINISTRATION-GRANT PROGRAMS (PUBLIC... services, equipment or system when installed and operational. (b) Post-installation. A review...

  15. 45 CFR 95.621 - ADP reviews.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... all ADP systems used by State and local governments to administer programs covered under 45 CFR part... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION GENERAL ADMINISTRATION-GRANT PROGRAMS (PUBLIC... services, equipment or system when installed and operational. (b) Post-installation. A review...

  16. 45 CFR 95.621 - ADP reviews.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... all ADP systems used by State and local governments to administer programs covered under 45 CFR part... Department of Health and Human Services GENERAL ADMINISTRATION GENERAL ADMINISTRATION-GRANT PROGRAMS (PUBLIC... services, equipment or system when installed and operational. (b) Post-installation. A review...

  17. 42 CFR 457.230 - FFP for State ADP expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... procedures regarding the availability of FFP for ADP expenditures are in 45 CFR part 74, 45 CFR part 95... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false FFP for State ADP expenditures. 457.230 Section 457...; Reduction of Federal Medical Payments § 457.230 FFP for State ADP expenditures. FFP is available for...

  18. Cholix Toxin, a Novel ADP-ribosylating Factor from Vibrio cholerae

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, Rene; Purdy, Alexandra E.; Fieldhouse, Robert J.; Kimber, Matthew S.; Bartlett, Douglas H.; Merrill, A. Rod

    2008-07-15

    The ADP-ribosyltransferases are a class of enzymes that display activity in a variety of bacterial pathogens responsible for causing diseases in plants and animals, including those affecting mankind, such as diphtheria, cholera, and whooping cough. We report the characterization of a novel toxin from Vibrio cholerae, which we call cholix toxin. The toxin is active against mammalian cells (IC50 = 4.6 {+-} 0.4 ng/ml) and crustaceans (Artemia nauplii LD50 = 10 {+-} 2 {mu}g/ml). Here we show that this toxin is the third member of the diphthamide-specific class of ADP-ribose transferases and that it possesses specific ADP-ribose transferase activity against ribosomal eukaryotic elongation factor 2. We also describe the high resolution crystal structures of the multidomain toxin and its catalytic domain at 2.1- and 1.25-{angstrom} resolution, respectively. The new structural data show that cholix toxin possesses the necessary molecular features required for infection of eukaryotes by receptor-mediated endocytosis, translocation to the host cytoplasm, and inhibition of protein synthesis by specific modification of elongation factor 2. The crystal structures also provide important insight into the structural basis for activation of toxin ADP-ribosyltransferase activity. These results indicate that cholix toxin may be an important virulence factor of Vibrio cholerae that likely plays a significant role in the survival of the organism in an aquatic environment.

  19. The natural history of ADP-ribosyltransferases and the ADP-ribosylation system.

    PubMed

    Aravind, L; Zhang, Dapeng; de Souza, Robson F; Anand, Swadha; Iyer, Lakshminarayan M

    2015-01-01

    Catalysis of NAD(+)-dependent ADP-ribosylation of proteins, nucleic acids, or small molecules has evolved in at least three structurally unrelated superfamilies of enzymes, namely ADP-ribosyltransferase (ART), the Sirtuins, and probably TM1506. Of these, the ART superfamily is the most diverse in terms of structure, active site residues, and targets that they modify. The primary diversification of the ART superfamily occurred in the context of diverse bacterial conflict systems, wherein ARTs play both offensive and defensive roles. These include toxin-antitoxin systems, virus-host interactions, intraspecific antagonism (polymorphic toxins), symbiont/parasite effectors/toxins, resistance to antibiotics, and repair of RNAs cleaved in conflicts. ARTs evolving in these systems have been repeatedly acquired by lateral transfer throughout eukaryotic evolution, starting from the PARP family, which was acquired prior to the last eukaryotic common ancestor. They were incorporated into eukaryotic regulatory/epigenetic control systems (e.g., PARP family and NEURL4), and also used as defensive (e.g., pierisin and CARP-1 families) or immunity-related proteins (e.g., Gig2-like ARTs). The ADP-ribosylation system also includes other domains, such as the Macro, ADP-ribosyl glycohydrolase, NADAR, and ADP-ribosyl cyclase, which appear to have initially diversified in bacterial conflict-related systems. Unlike ARTs, sirtuins appear to have a much smaller presence in conflict-related systems. PMID:25027823

  20. Novel Oral P2Y12 Inhibitor Prasugrel vs. Clopidogrel in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome: Evidence Based on 6 Studies

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Min; Li, Zaibo; Chu, Hongtao; Li, Lin; Chen, Keyong

    2015-01-01

    Background Whether prasugrel can take the place of clopidogrel for patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is not clear. The aim of this study was to perform a meta-analysis for systematically reviewing the evidence on prasugrel in comparison to clopidogrel in patients with ACS. Material/Methods Relevant prospective and retrospective studies were searched in databases. Six studies were finally included. Pooled risk ratios (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to assess all causes of death, myocardial infarction (MI), stroke, major bleeding, major/minor bleeding, and stent thrombosis (for PCI performed). Results Compared with clopidogrel, prasugrel had similar risks of all cause of death (Pooled RR: 0.83; 95% CI: 0.64–1.06, p=0.14, I2=55%), MI (Pooled RR: 0.86; 95% CI: 0.71–1.04, p=0.12) and stroke (pooled RR: 0.88; 95% CI: 0.70–1.10, p=0.25). However, prasugrel was associated with significantly higher risk of both major bleeding (Pooled RR: 1.19; 95% CI: 0.99–1.44, p=0.06, I2=0%) and the risk of total major and minor bleeding (Pooled RR: 1.30; 95% CI: 1.15–1.48, p<0.0001, I2=0%). For the patients who underwent percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), prasugrel was associated with significantly lower risk of stent thrombosis (Pooled RR: 0.47; 95% CI: 0.34–0.61, p<0.00001, I2=0%). Conclusions Prasugrel has similar effects as clopidogrel in terms of all causes of death, MI, and stroke in ACS patients. For the patients who underwent PCI, prasugrel contributes to lower risk of stent thrombosis. However, prasugrel is associated with significantly higher risk of bleeding. For the patients with active pathological bleeding or a history of stroke and/or TIA, prasugrel should not be recommended. PMID:25893318

  1. Loss of the Mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase, Tiparp, Increases Sensitivity to Dioxin-induced Steatohepatitis and Lethality*

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Shaimaa; Bott, Debbie; Gomez, Alvin; Tamblyn, Laura; Rasheed, Adil; Cho, Tiffany; MacPherson, Laura; Sugamori, Kim S.; Yang, Yang; Grant, Denis M.; Cummins, Carolyn L.; Matthews, Jason

    2015-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) mediates the toxic effects of the environmental contaminant dioxin (2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin; TCDD). Dioxin causes a range of toxic responses, including hepatic damage, steatohepatitis, and a lethal wasting syndrome; however, the mechanisms are still unknown. Here, we show that the loss of TCDD-inducible poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (Tiparp), an ADP-ribosyltransferase and AHR repressor, increases sensitivity to dioxin-induced toxicity, steatohepatitis, and lethality. Tiparp−/− mice given a single injection of 100 μg/kg dioxin did not survive beyond day 5; all Tiparp+/+ mice survived the 30-day treatment. Dioxin-treated Tiparp−/− mice exhibited increased liver steatosis and hepatotoxicity. Tiparp ADP-ribosylated AHR but not its dimerization partner, the AHR nuclear translocator, and the repressive effects of TIPARP on AHR were reversed by the macrodomain containing mono-ADP-ribosylase MACROD1 but not MACROD2. These results reveal previously unidentified roles for Tiparp, MacroD1, and ADP-ribosylation in AHR-mediated steatohepatitis and lethality in response to dioxin. PMID:25975270

  2. Poly(ADP-ribose): An organizer of cellular architecture

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Distinct properties of poly(ADP-ribose)—including its structural diversity, nucleation potential, and low complexity, polyvalent, highly charged nature—could contribute to organizing cellular architectures. Emergent data indicate that poly(ADP-ribose) aids in the formation of nonmembranous structures, such as DNA repair foci, spindle poles, and RNA granules. Informatics analyses reported here show that RNA granule proteins enriched for low complexity regions, which aid self-assembly, are preferentially modified by poly(ADP-ribose), indicating how poly(ADP-ribose) could direct cellular organization. PMID:24914234

  3. ADP Analysis project for the Human Resources Management Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tureman, Robert L., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The ADP (Automated Data Processing) Analysis Project was conducted for the Human Resources Management Division (HRMD) of NASA's Langley Research Center. The three major areas of work in the project were computer support, automated inventory analysis, and an ADP study for the Division. The goal of the computer support work was to determine automation needs of Division personnel and help them solve computing problems. The goal of automated inventory analysis was to find a way to analyze installed software and usage on a Macintosh. Finally, the ADP functional systems study for the Division was designed to assess future HRMD needs concerning ADP organization and activities.

  4. Pravastatin and C reactive protein modulate protease- activated receptor-1 expression in vitro blood platelets.

    PubMed

    Chu, L-X; Zhou, S-X; Yang, F; Qin, Y-Q; Liang, Z-S; Mo, C-G; Wang, X-D; Xie, J; He, L-P

    2016-01-01

    Protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR-1) plays an important role in mediating activation of human platelets by thrombin. However, mechanism of statin in ADP-induced platelet PAR-1 expression is also unknown. Aggregometry, flow cytometry, immunoblotting and ELISA were used to determine role of pravastatin participating in ADP-induced platelet activation and PAR-1 expression. ADP stimulation significantly increased PAR-1 expression on platelets. PAR-1 antagonist SCH-79797 inhibited platelet aggregation as well as decreased platelet P-selectin expression induced by ADP. CRP inhibited PAR-1 expression induced by ADP in a concentration-dependent manner. Pravastatin treatment reduced PAR-1 expression in a concentration-dependent manner. Combination treatment of CRP and Pravastatin significantly reduced platelet PAR-1 expression induced by ADP. By western-blot analysis, pravastatin treatment did not influence total PAR-1 after ADP treatment. CRP decreased platelet total PAR-1 expression induced by ADP. Pravastatin and CRP reduced TXB2 formation by ADP significantly. CRP decreased thrombin fragment F1+2 level with ADP treatment. Pravastatin, in contrast, did not influence F1+2 level. Upon treatment with Pravastatin reduced platelet LOX-1 expression induced by ADP. In conclusion, PAR-1 served as a critical mechanism to relay platelet activation process induced by ADP. CRP and pravastatin reduce PAR-1 expression in platelet by ADP pathway. PMID:26950455

  5. LACIE ADP/PI joint case study: ADP analysis guidelines. [using ERTS 1 photographs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minter, T. C.

    1974-01-01

    The procedure is described which was used to train automatic data processing (ADP) analysts to process ERTS 1 imagery from a 5 nm by 6 nm area in Delisle, Canada, and to estimate wheat acreage using training fields provided by photointerpreters. The exercise also served to evaluate and test current large area crop inventory experiment (LACIE) procedures.

  6. Nudix hydrolases degrade protein-conjugated ADP-ribose.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Casey M; Thirawatananond, Puchong; Ong, Shao-En; Gabelli, Sandra B; Leung, Anthony K L

    2015-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation refers to the transfer of the ADP-ribose group from NAD(+) to target proteins post-translationally, either attached singly as mono(ADP-ribose) (MAR) or in polymeric chains as poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR). Though ADP-ribosylation is therapeutically important, investigation of this protein modification has been limited by a lack of proteomic tools for site identification. Recent work has demonstrated the potential of a tag-based pipeline in which MAR/PAR is hydrolyzed down to phosphoribose, leaving a 212 Dalton tag at the modification site. While the pipeline has been proven effective by multiple groups, a barrier to application has become evident: the enzyme used to transform MAR/PAR into phosphoribose must be purified from the rattlesnake Crotalus adamanteus venom, which is contaminated with proteases detrimental for proteomic applications. Here, we outline the steps necessary to purify snake venom phosphodiesterase I (SVP) and describe two alternatives to SVP-the bacterial Nudix hydrolase EcRppH and human HsNudT16. Importantly, expression and purification schemes for these Nudix enzymes have already been proven, with high-quality yields easily attainable. We demonstrate their utility in identifying ADP-ribosylation sites on Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase 1 (PARP1) with mass spectrometry and discuss a structure-based rationale for this Nudix subclass in degrading protein-conjugated ADP-ribose, including both MAR and PAR. PMID:26669448

  7. A Clickable Aminooxy Probe for Monitoring Cellular ADP-Ribosylation

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Rory K.; Cohen, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation is essential for cell function, yet there is a dearth of methods for detecting this post-translational modification in cells. Here, we describe a clickable aminooxy alkyne (AO-alkyne) probe that can detect cellular ADP-ribosylation on acidic amino acids following Cu-catalyzed conjugation to an azide-containing reporter. Using AO-alkyne, we show that PARP10 and PARP11 are auto-ADP-ribosylated in cells. We also demonstrate that AO-alkyne can be used to monitor stimulus-induced ADP-ribosylation in cells. Functional studies using AO-alkyne support a previously unknown mechanism for ADP-ribosylation on acidic amino acids, wherein a glutamate or aspartate at the initial C1′-position of ADP-ribose transfers to the C2′ position. This new mechanism for ADP-ribosylation has important implications for how glutamyl/aspartyl-ADP-ribose is recognized by proteins in cells. PMID:25978521

  8. Effect of EDTA on the metastable zone width of ADP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajesh, N. P.; Meera, K.; Srinivasan, K.; Santhana Raghavan, P.; Ramasamy, P.

    2000-06-01

    Enhancement of the metastable zone width in ammonium dihydrogen ortho phosphate (ADP) was achieved by the addition of 1 mol% of the chelating agent ethylenediaminetetra acetic acid (EDTA) to ADP solution. The metastable zone width studies were conducted and the nucleation parameters were calculated from the measurements of the dependence of the metastable zone width on the cooling rate.

  9. Nudix hydrolases degrade protein-conjugated ADP-ribose

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Casey M.; Thirawatananond, Puchong; Ong, Shao-En; Gabelli, Sandra B.; Leung, Anthony K. L.

    2015-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation refers to the transfer of the ADP-ribose group from NAD+ to target proteins post-translationally, either attached singly as mono(ADP-ribose) (MAR) or in polymeric chains as poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR). Though ADP-ribosylation is therapeutically important, investigation of this protein modification has been limited by a lack of proteomic tools for site identification. Recent work has demonstrated the potential of a tag-based pipeline in which MAR/PAR is hydrolyzed down to phosphoribose, leaving a 212 Dalton tag at the modification site. While the pipeline has been proven effective by multiple groups, a barrier to application has become evident: the enzyme used to transform MAR/PAR into phosphoribose must be purified from the rattlesnake Crotalus adamanteus venom, which is contaminated with proteases detrimental for proteomic applications. Here, we outline the steps necessary to purify snake venom phosphodiesterase I (SVP) and describe two alternatives to SVP—the bacterial Nudix hydrolase EcRppH and human HsNudT16. Importantly, expression and purification schemes for these Nudix enzymes have already been proven, with high-quality yields easily attainable. We demonstrate their utility in identifying ADP-ribosylation sites on Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase 1 (PARP1) with mass spectrometry and discuss a structure-based rationale for this Nudix subclass in degrading protein-conjugated ADP-ribose, including both MAR and PAR. PMID:26669448

  10. ADP Protects Cardiac Mitochondria under Severe Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Sokolova, Niina; Pan, Shi; Provazza, Sarah; Beutner, Gisela; Vendelin, Marko; Birkedal, Rikke; Sheu, Shey-Shing

    2013-01-01

    ADP is not only a key substrate for ATP generation, but also a potent inhibitor of mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP). In this study, we assessed how oxidative stress affects the potency of ADP as an mPTP inhibitor and whether its reduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) production might be involved. We determined quantitatively the effects of ADP on mitochondrial Ca2+ retention capacity (CRC) until the induction of mPTP in normal and stressed isolated cardiac mitochondria. We used two models of chronic oxidative stress (old and diabetic mice) and two models of acute oxidative stress (ischemia reperfusion (IR) and tert-butyl hydroperoxide (t-BH)). In control mitochondria, the CRC was 344 ± 32 nmol/mg protein. 500 μmol/L ADP increased CRC to 774 ± 65 nmol/mg protein. This effect of ADP seemed to relate to its concentration as 50 μmol/L had a significantly smaller effect. Also, oligomycin, which inhibits the conversion of ADP to ATP by F0F1ATPase, significantly increased the effect of 50 μmol/L ADP. Chronic oxidative stress did not affect CRC or the effect of 500 μmol/L ADP. After IR or t-BH exposure, CRC was drastically reduced to 1 ± 0.2 and 32 ± 4 nmol/mg protein, respectively. Surprisingly, ADP increased the CRC to 447 ± 105 and 514 ± 103 nmol/mg protein in IR and t-BH, respectively. Thus, it increased CRC by the same amount as in control. In control mitochondria, ADP decreased both substrate and Ca2+-induced increase of ROS. However, in t-BH mitochondria the effect of ADP on ROS was relatively small. We conclude that ADP potently restores CRC capacity in severely stressed mitochondria. This effect is most likely not related to a reduction in ROS production. As the effect of ADP relates to its concentration, increased ADP as occurs in the pathophysiological situation may protect mitochondrial integrity and function. PMID:24349464

  11. Ticagrelor--a new platelet aggregation inhibitor in patients with acute coronary syndromes. An improvement of other inhibitors?

    PubMed

    Kowalczyk, Mariusz; Banach, Maciej; Mikhailidis, Dimitri P; Hannam, Simon; Rysz, Jacek

    2009-12-01

    Antiplatelet agents play an essential role in the treatment of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). Thienopyridines are a class of drugs that function via inhibition of the adenosine diphosphate (ADP) P2Y12 platelet receptors. Currently, clopidogrel, a second generation thienopyridine, is the main drug of choice and the combination of aspirin and clopidogrel is administered orally for the treatment of ACS. Clopidogrel, is a pro-drug that needs to be metabolized in the liver and intestines to form active metabolites. Prasugrel, a third generation thienopyridine, was approved for use in Europe in February 2009, and is currently available in the United Kingdom. All thienopyridines however, have pharmacological limitations that lead to a search for more effective non-thienopyridine P2Y12 inhibitors. Promising results have been reported with ticagrelor, an oral first reversible, direct-acting inhibitor of the P2Y12 receptor. Ticagrelor is the first oral P2Y12 receptor binding antagonist that does not require metabolic activation. Furthermore, ticagrelor has at last 1 active metabolite, which has very similar pharmacokinetics to the parent compound. Therefore, ticagrelor has more rapid onset and more pronounced platelet inhibition than other antiplatelet agents. The safety and efficacy of ticagrelor compared with clopidogrel in ACS patient has been recently evaluated by the PLATelet inhibition and patient Outcomes (PLATO) trial. Ticagrelor compared with clopidogrel had a significantly greater reduction in the death rate from vascular causes, myocardial infarction, or stroke without major bleeding. There was however, an increase in non-procedure related bleeding, dyspnoea and ventricular pauses in the first week of treatment. Further studies on new antiplatelet agents are needed to establish a new "gold standard" antiplatelet therapy. PMID:19946242

  12. Role of CD38, a cyclic ADP-ribosylcyclase, in morphine antinociception and tolerance.

    PubMed

    Hull, Lynn C; Rabender, Christopher; Gabra, Bichoy H; Zhang, Fan; Li, Pin-Lan; Dewey, William L

    2010-09-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that an increase in intracellular levels of Ca(2+) in neurons is an important component of both the antinociception produced by morphine and morphine's tolerance. The present study tested the hypothesis that the Ca(2+) signaling second messenger, cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR), derived from CD38 activation participates in morphine antinociception and tolerance. We first showed that morphine's antinociceptive potency was increased by the intracerebroventricular injection of CD38 substrate beta-NAD(+) in mice. Furthermore, morphine tolerance was reversed by intracerebroventricular administration of each of three different inhibitors of the CD38-cADPR-ryanodine receptor Ca(2+) signaling pathway. These inhibitors were the ADP-ribosylcyclase inhibitor nicotinamide, cADPR analog 8-bromo-cADPR, and a large dose of ryanodine (>50 muM) that blocks the ryanodine receptor. In CD38 gene knockout [CD38(-/-)] mice, the antinociceptive action of morphine was found to be less potent compared with wild-type (WT) mice, as measured by tail-flick response, hypothermia assay, and observations of straub tail. However, there was no difference in locomotor activation between CD38(-/-) and WT animals. It was also found that less tolerance to morphine developed in CD38(-/-) mice compared with WT animals. These results indicate that cADRP-ryanodine receptor Ca(2+) signaling associated with CD38 plays an important role in morphine tolerance. PMID:20551293

  13. Inhalation of nitric oxide inhibits ADP-induced platelet aggregation and alpha-granule release.

    PubMed

    Hagberg, I A; Sølvik, U Ø; Opdahl, H; Roald, H E; Lyberg, T

    1999-01-01

    To gather further information about the effects on blood platelet activation of in vivo exposure to nitric oxide (NO), platelet reactivity was studied in blood from healthy, non-smoking male volunteers before and after 30 min inhalation of 40 ppm NO. Whole blood was stimulated in vitro with adenosine diphosphate or thrombin receptor activation peptide (TRAP-6). In an ex vivo perfusion model, non-anticoagulated blood was exposed to immobilised collagen at arterial blood flow conditions (2600 s(-1)). Blood samples from both the in vitro and ex vivo experiments were stained with fluorochrome-labelled Annexin-V and antibodies against CD42a, CD45, CD49b, CD61, CD62P and fibrinogen, and analysed with a three-colour flow cytometry technique. NO inhalation reduced the platelet activation response to adenosine diphosphate (ADP) stimulation by decreasing platelet-platelet aggregation, alpha-granule release and platelet-leukocyte conjugate formation. TRAP-stimulated platelet activation, collagen-induced platelet activation and thrombus growth was unaffected by NO inhalation. We therefore suggest an ADP receptor inhibitor mode of action of inhaled NO, selective on the newly suggested G protein- and phospholipase C-coupled P2Y1 receptor. Our results demonstrate that blood platelet activation in healthy subjects is modulated by inhalation of NO in therapeutically relevant doses, although the clinical impact of our findings remains unclear. PMID:16801117

  14. The NLRP3 inflammasome is activated by nanoparticles through ATP, ADP and adenosine

    PubMed Central

    Baron, L; Gombault, A; Fanny, M; Villeret, B; Savigny, F; Guillou, N; Panek, C; Le Bert, M; Lagente, V; Rassendren, F; Riteau, N; Couillin, I

    2015-01-01

    The NLR pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome is a major component of the innate immune system, but its mechanism of activation by a wide range of molecules remains largely unknown. Widely used nano-sized inorganic metal oxides such as silica dioxide (nano-SiO2) and titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2) activate the NLRP3 inflammasome in macrophages similarly to silica or asbestos micro-sized particles. By investigating towards the molecular mechanisms of inflammasome activation in response to nanoparticles, we show here that active adenosine triphosphate (ATP) release and subsequent ATP, adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine receptor signalling are required for inflammasome activation. Nano-SiO2 or nano-TiO2 caused a significant increase in P2Y1, P2Y2, A2A and/or A2B receptor expression, whereas the P2X7 receptor was downregulated. Interestingly, IL-1β secretion in response to nanoparticles is increased by enhanced ATP and ADP hydrolysis, whereas it is decreased by adenosine degradation or selective A2A or A2B receptor inhibition. Downstream of these receptors, our results show that nanoparticles activate the NLRP3 inflammasome via activation of PLC-InsP3 and/or inhibition of adenylate cyclase (ADCY)-cAMP pathways. Finally, a high dose of adenosine triggers inflammasome activation and IL-1β secretion through adenosine cellular uptake by nucleotide transporters and by its subsequent transformation in ATP by adenosine kinase. In summary, we show for the first time that extracellular adenosine activates the NLRP3 inflammasome by two ways: by interacting with adenosine receptors at nanomolar/micromolar concentrations and through cellular uptake by equilibrative nucleoside transporters at millimolar concentrations. These findings provide new molecular insights on the mechanisms of NLRP3 inflammasome activation and new therapeutic strategies to control inflammation. PMID:25654762

  15. The NLRP3 inflammasome is activated by nanoparticles through ATP, ADP and adenosine.

    PubMed

    Baron, L; Gombault, A; Fanny, M; Villeret, B; Savigny, F; Guillou, N; Panek, C; Le Bert, M; Lagente, V; Rassendren, F; Riteau, N; Couillin, I

    2015-01-01

    The NLR pyrin domain containing 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome is a major component of the innate immune system, but its mechanism of activation by a wide range of molecules remains largely unknown. Widely used nano-sized inorganic metal oxides such as silica dioxide (nano-SiO2) and titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2) activate the NLRP3 inflammasome in macrophages similarly to silica or asbestos micro-sized particles. By investigating towards the molecular mechanisms of inflammasome activation in response to nanoparticles, we show here that active adenosine triphosphate (ATP) release and subsequent ATP, adenosine diphosphate (ADP) and adenosine receptor signalling are required for inflammasome activation. Nano-SiO2 or nano-TiO2 caused a significant increase in P2Y1, P2Y2, A2A and/or A2B receptor expression, whereas the P2X7 receptor was downregulated. Interestingly, IL-1β secretion in response to nanoparticles is increased by enhanced ATP and ADP hydrolysis, whereas it is decreased by adenosine degradation or selective A2A or A2B receptor inhibition. Downstream of these receptors, our results show that nanoparticles activate the NLRP3 inflammasome via activation of PLC-InsP3 and/or inhibition of adenylate cyclase (ADCY)-cAMP pathways. Finally, a high dose of adenosine triggers inflammasome activation and IL-1β secretion through adenosine cellular uptake by nucleotide transporters and by its subsequent transformation in ATP by adenosine kinase. In summary, we show for the first time that extracellular adenosine activates the NLRP3 inflammasome by two ways: by interacting with adenosine receptors at nanomolar/micromolar concentrations and through cellular uptake by equilibrative nucleoside transporters at millimolar concentrations. These findings provide new molecular insights on the mechanisms of NLRP3 inflammasome activation and new therapeutic strategies to control inflammation. PMID:25654762

  16. Arginine-Specific Mono ADP-Ribosylation In Vitro of Antimicrobial Peptides by ADP-Ribosylating Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Castagnini, Marta; Picchianti, Monica; Talluri, Eleonora; Biagini, Massimiliano; Del Vecchio, Mariangela; Di Procolo, Paolo; Norais, Nathalie; Nardi-Dei, Vincenzo; Balducci, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    Among the several toxins used by pathogenic bacteria to target eukaryotic host cells, proteins that exert ADP-ribosylation activity represent a large and studied family of dangerous and potentially lethal toxins. These proteins alter cell physiology catalyzing the transfer of the ADP-ribose unit from NAD to cellular proteins involved in key metabolic pathways. In the present study, we tested the capability of four of these toxins, to ADP-ribosylate α- and β- defensins. Cholera toxin (CT) from Vibrio cholerae and heat labile enterotoxin (LT) from Escherichia coli both modified the human α-defensin (HNP-1) and β- defensin-1 (HBD1), as efficiently as the mammalian mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase-1. Pseudomonas aeruginosa exoenzyme S was inactive on both HNP-1 and HBD1. Neisseria meningitidis NarE poorly recognized HNP-1 as a substrate but it was completely inactive on HBD1. On the other hand, HNP-1 strongly influenced NarE inhibiting its transferase activity while enhancing auto-ADP-ribosylation. We conclude that only some arginine-specific ADP-ribosylating toxins recognize defensins as substrates in vitro. Modifications that alter the biological activities of antimicrobial peptides may be relevant for the innate immune response. In particular, ADP-ribosylation of antimicrobial peptides may represent a novel escape mechanism adopted by pathogens to facilitate colonization of host tissues. PMID:22879887

  17. Oral antiplatelet therapy for atherothrombotic disease: overview of current and emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Fintel, Dan J

    2012-01-01

    Clinical presentations of atherothrombotic vascular disease, such as acute coronary syndromes, ischemic stroke or transient ischemic attack, and symptomatic peripheral arterial disease, are major causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Platelet activation and aggregation play a seminal role in the arterial thrombus formation that precipitates acute manifestations of atherothrombotic disease. As a result, antiplatelet therapy has become the cornerstone of therapy for the prevention and treatment of atherothrombotic disease. Dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and a P2Y12 adenosine diphosphate (ADP) receptor inhibitor, such as clopidogrel or prasugrel, is the current standard-of-care antiplatelet therapy in patients with acute coronary syndromes managed with an early invasive strategy. However, these agents are associated with several important clinical limitations, including significant residual risk for ischemic events, bleeding risk, and variability in the degree of platelet inhibition. The residual risk can be attributed to the fact that aspirin and P2Y12 inhibitors block only the thromboxane A2 and ADP platelet activation pathways but do not affect the other pathways that lead to thrombosis, such as the protease-activated receptor-1 pathway stimulated by thrombin, the most potent platelet agonist. Bleeding risk associated with aspirin and P2Y12 inhibitors can be explained by their inhibitory effects on the thromboxane A2 and ADP pathways, which are critical for protective hemostasis. Interpatient variability in the degree of platelet inhibition in response to antiplatelet therapy may have a genetic component and contribute to poor clinical outcomes. These considerations underscore the clinical need for therapies with a novel mechanism of action that may reduce ischemic events without increasing the bleeding risk. PMID:22393298

  18. ADP-ribosylation of proteins: Enzymology and biological significance

    SciTech Connect

    Althaus, F.R.; Richter, C.

    1987-01-01

    This book presents an overview of the molecular and biological consequences of the posttranslational modification of proteins with ADP-ribose monomers and polymers. Part one focuses on chromatin-associated poly ADP-ribosylation reactions which have evolved in higher eukaryotes as modulators of chromatin functions. The significance of poly ADP-ribosylation in DNA repair, carcinogenesis, and gene expression during terminal differentiation is discussed. Part two reviews mono ADP-ribosylation reactions which are catalyzed by prokaryotic and eukaryotic enzymes. Consideration is given to the action of bacterial toxins, such as cholera toxin, pertussis toxin, and diphtheria toxin. These toxins have emerged as tools for the molecular probing of proteins involved in signal transduction and protein biosynthesis.

  19. Issues on stability of ADP feedback controllers for dynamical systems.

    PubMed

    Balakrishnan, S N; Ding, Jie; Lewis, Frank L

    2008-08-01

    This paper traces the development of neural-network (NN)-based feedback controllers that are derived from the principle of adaptive/approximate dynamic programming (ADP) and discusses their closed-loop stability. Different versions of NN structures in the literature, which embed mathematical mappings related to solutions of the ADP-formulated problems called "adaptive critics" or "action-critic" networks, are discussed. Distinction between the two classes of ADP applications is pointed out. Furthermore, papers in "model-free" development and model-based neurocontrollers are reviewed in terms of their contributions to stability issues. Recent literature suggests that work in ADP-based feedback controllers with assured stability is growing in diverse forms. PMID:18632377

  20. 42 CFR 457.230 - FFP for State ADP expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... information retrieval systems and for the operation of certain systems. Additional HHS regulations and CMS procedures regarding the availability of FFP for ADP expenditures are in 45 CFR part 74, 45 CFR part...

  1. 42 CFR 457.230 - FFP for State ADP expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... information retrieval systems and for the operation of certain systems. Additional HHS regulations and CMS procedures regarding the availability of FFP for ADP expenditures are in 45 CFR part 74, 45 CFR part...

  2. 42 CFR 457.230 - FFP for State ADP expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... information retrieval systems and for the operation of certain systems. Additional HHS regulations and CMS procedures regarding the availability of FFP for ADP expenditures are in 45 CFR part 74, 45 CFR part...

  3. ADP study of the structure of the IUE halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massa, Derck

    1992-01-01

    Results of a two year ADP study of gas in the Galactic halo are presented. This is partly a summary of 2 papers which were published in referred journals and partly a discussion of work currently underway.

  4. PARPs and ADP-Ribosylation: Fifty Years… and Counting

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, W. Lee

    2015-01-01

    Summary Over 50 years ago, the discovery of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) set a new field of science in motion - the field of poly(ADP-ribosyl) transferases (PARPs) and ADP-ribosylation. The field is still flourishing today. The diversity of biological processes now known to require PARPs and ADP-ribosylation was practically unimaginable even two decades ago. From an initial focus on DNA damage detection and repair in response to genotoxic stresses, the field has expanded to include the regulation of chromatin structure, gene expression, and RNA processing in a wide range of biological systems, including reproduction, development, aging, stem cells, inflammation, metabolism, and cancer. This special focus issue of Molecular Cell includes a collection of three Reviews, three Perspectives, and a SnapShot, which together summarize the current state of the field and suggest where it may be headed. PMID:26091339

  5. Thromboxane-induced renal vasoconstriction is mediated by the ADP-ribosyl cyclase CD38 and superoxide anion

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Paul A.; Kopple, Tayler E.; Arendshorst, William J.

    2013-01-01

    The present renal hemodynamic study tested the hypothesis that CD38 and superoxide anion (O2·−) participate in the vasoconstriction produced by activation of thromboxane prostanoid (TP) receptors in the mouse kidney. CD38 is the major mammalian ADP-ribosyl cyclase contributing to vasomotor tone through the generation of cADP-ribose, a second messenger that activates ryanodine receptors to release Ca2+ from the sarcoplasmic reticulum in vascular smooth muscle cells. We evaluated whether the stable thromboxane mimetic U-46619 causes less pronounced renal vasoconstriction in CD38-deficient mice and the involvement of O2·− in U-46619-induced renal vasoconstriction. Our results indicate that U-46619 activation of TP receptors causes renal vasoconstriction in part by activating cADP-ribose signaling in renal resistance arterioles. Based on maximal renal blood flow and renal vascular resistance responses to bolus injections of U-46619, CD38 contributes 30–40% of the TP receptor-induced vasoconstriction. We also found that the antioxidant SOD mimetic tempol attenuated the magnitude of vasoconstriction by U-46619 in both groups of mice, suggesting mediation by O2·−. The degree of tempol blockage of U-46619-induced renal vasoconstriction was greater in wild-type mice, attenuating renal vasoconstriction by 40% compared with 30% in CD38-null mice. In other experiments, U-46619 rapidly stimulated O2·− production (dihydroethidium fluorescence) in isolated mouse afferent arterioles, an effect abolished by tempol. These observations provide the first in vivo demonstration of CD38 and O2·− involvement in the vasoconstrictor effects of TP receptor activation in the kidney and in vitro evidence for TP receptor stimulation of O2·− production by the afferent arteriole. PMID:23884143

  6. Intracellular Mono-ADP-Ribosylation in Signaling and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bütepage, Mareike; Eckei, Laura; Verheugd, Patricia; Lüscher, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    A key process in the regulation of protein activities and thus cellular signaling pathways is the modification of proteins by post-translational mechanisms. Knowledge about the enzymes (writers and erasers) that attach and remove post-translational modifications, the targets that are modified and the functional consequences elicited by specific modifications, is crucial for understanding cell biological processes. Moreover detailed knowledge about these mechanisms and pathways helps to elucidate the molecular causes of various diseases and in defining potential targets for therapeutic approaches. Intracellular adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-ribosylation refers to the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+)-dependent modification of proteins with ADP-ribose and is catalyzed by enzymes of the ARTD (ADP-ribosyltransferase diphtheria toxin like, also known as PARP) family as well as some members of the Sirtuin family. Poly-ADP-ribosylation is relatively well understood with inhibitors being used as anti-cancer agents. However, the majority of ARTD enzymes and the ADP-ribosylating Sirtuins are restricted to catalyzing mono-ADP-ribosylation. Although writers, readers and erasers of intracellular mono-ADP-ribosylation have been identified only recently, it is becoming more and more evident that this reversible post-translational modification is capable of modulating key intracellular processes and signaling pathways. These include signal transduction mechanisms, stress pathways associated with the endoplasmic reticulum and stress granules, and chromatin-associated processes such as transcription and DNA repair. We hypothesize that mono-ADP-ribosylation controls, through these different pathways, the development of cancer and infectious diseases. PMID:26426055

  7. Trapping Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yuqiao; Aoyagi-Scharber, Mika; Wang, Bing

    2015-06-01

    Recent findings indicate that a major mechanism by which poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors kill cancer cells is by trapping PARP1 and PARP2 to the sites of DNA damage. The PARP enzyme-inhibitor complex "locks" onto damaged DNA and prevents DNA repair, replication, and transcription, leading to cell death. Several clinical-stage PARP inhibitors, including veliparib, rucaparib, olaparib, niraparib, and talazoparib, have been evaluated for their PARP-trapping activity. Although they display similar capacity to inhibit PARP catalytic activity, their relative abilities to trap PARP differ by several orders of magnitude, with the ability to trap PARP closely correlating with each drug's ability to kill cancer cells. In this article, we review the available data on molecular interactions between these clinical-stage PARP inhibitors and PARP proteins, and discuss how their biologic differences might be explained by the trapping mechanism. We also discuss how to use the PARP-trapping mechanism to guide the development of PARP inhibitors as a new class of cancer therapy, both for single-agent and combination treatments. PMID:25758918

  8. Regulation of Bone Morphogenetic Protein Signaling by ADP-ribosylation.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yukihide; Papoutsoglou, Panagiotis; Maturi, Varun; Tsubakihara, Yutaro; Hottiger, Michael O; Heldin, Carl-Henrik; Moustakas, Aristidis

    2016-06-10

    We previously established a mechanism of negative regulation of transforming growth factor β signaling mediated by the nuclear ADP-ribosylating enzyme poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) and the deribosylating enzyme poly-(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG), which dynamically regulate ADP-ribosylation of Smad3 and Smad4, two central signaling proteins of the pathway. Here we demonstrate that the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathway can also be regulated by the opposing actions of PARP1 and PARG. PARG positively contributes to BMP signaling and forms physical complexes with Smad5 and Smad4. The positive role PARG plays during BMP signaling can be neutralized by PARP1, as demonstrated by experiments where PARG and PARP1 are simultaneously silenced. In contrast to PARG, ectopic expression of PARP1 suppresses BMP signaling, whereas silencing of endogenous PARP1 enhances signaling and BMP-induced differentiation. The two major Smad proteins of the BMP pathway, Smad1 and Smad5, interact with PARP1 and can be ADP-ribosylated in vitro, whereas PARG causes deribosylation. The overall outcome of this mode of regulation of BMP signal transduction provides a fine-tuning mechanism based on the two major enzymes that control cellular ADP-ribosylation. PMID:27129221

  9. Structure-based Mechanism of ADP-ribosylation by Sirtuins

    SciTech Connect

    Hawse, William F.; Wolberger, Cynthia

    2009-12-01

    Sirtuins comprise a family of enzymes found in all organisms, where they play a role in diverse processes including transcriptional silencing, aging, regulation of transcription, and metabolism. The predominant reaction catalyzed by these enzymes is NAD{sup +}-dependent lysine deacetylation, although some sirtuins exhibit a weaker ADP-ribosyltransferase activity. Although the Sir2 deacetylation mechanism is well established, much less is known about the Sir2 ADP-ribosylation reaction. We have studied the ADP-ribosylation activity of a bacterial sirtuin, Sir2Tm, and show that acetylated peptides containing arginine or lysine 2 residues C-terminal to the acetyl lysine, the +2 position, are preferentially ADP-ribosylated at the +2 residue. A structure of Sir2Tm bound to the acetylated +2 arginine peptide shows how this arginine could enter the active site and react with a deacetylation reaction intermediate to yield an ADP-ribosylated peptide. The new biochemical and structural studies presented here provide mechanistic insights into the Sir2 ADP-ribosylation reaction and will aid in identifying substrates of this reaction.

  10. A comparative analysis of the activity of ligands acting at P2X and P2Y receptor subtypes in models of neuropathic, acute and inflammatory pain

    PubMed Central

    Andó, RD; Méhész, B; Gyires, K; Illes, P; Sperlágh, B

    2010-01-01

    Background and purpose: This study was undertaken to compare the analgesic activity of antagonists acting at P2X1, P2X7, and P2Y12 receptors and agonists acting at P2Y1, P2Y2, P2Y4, and P2Y6 receptors in neuropathic, acute, and inflammatory pain. Experimental approach: The effect of the wide spectrum P2 receptor antagonist PPADS, the selective P2X7 receptor antagonist Brilliant Blue G (BBG), the P2X1 receptor antagonist (4,4′,4″,4-[carbonylbis(imino-5,1,3-benzenetriyl-bis(carbonylimino))]tetrakis-1,3-benzenedisulfonic acid, octasodium salt (NF449) and (8,8′-[carbonylbis(imino-3,1-phenylenecarbonylimino)]bis-1,3,5-naphthalene-trisulphonic acid, hexasodium salt (NF023), the P2Y12 receptor antagonist (2,2-dimethyl-propionic acid 3-(2-chloro-6-methylaminopurin-9-yl)-2-(2,2-dimethyl-propionyloxymethyl)-propylester (MRS2395), the selective P2Y1 receptor agonist ([[(1R,2R,3S,4R,5S)-4-[6-amino-2-(methylthio)-9H-purin-9-yl]-2,3-dihydroxybicyclo[3.1.0]hex-1-yl]methyl] diphosphoric acid mono ester trisodium salt (MRS2365), the P2Y2/P2Y4 agonist uridine-5′-triphosphate (UTP), and the P2Y4/P2Y6 agonist uridine-5′-diphosphate (UDP) were examined on mechanical allodynia in the Seltzer model of neuropathic pain, on acute thermal nociception, and on the inflammatory pain and oedema induced by complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). Key results: MRS2365, MRS2395 and UTP, but not the other compounds, significantly alleviated mechanical allodynia in the neuropathic pain model, with the following rank order of minimal effective dose (mED) values: MRS2365 > MRS2395 > UTP. All compounds had a dose-dependent analgesic action in acute pain except BBG, which elicited hyperalgesia at a single dose. The rank order of mED values in acute pain was the following: MRS2365 > MRS2395 > NF449 > NF023 > UDP = UTP > PPADS. MRS2365 and MRS2395 had a profound, while BBG had a mild effect on inflammatory pain, with a following rank order of mED values: MRS2395 > MRS2365 > BBG. None of the tested

  11. Structural basis for lack of ADP-ribosyltransferase activity in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-13/zinc finger antiviral protein.

    PubMed

    Karlberg, Tobias; Klepsch, Mirjam; Thorsell, Ann-Gerd; Andersson, C David; Linusson, Anna; Schüler, Herwig

    2015-03-20

    The mammalian poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) family includes ADP-ribosyltransferases with diphtheria toxin homology (ARTD). Most members have mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase activity. PARP13/ARTD13, also called zinc finger antiviral protein, has roles in viral immunity and microRNA-mediated stress responses. PARP13 features a divergent PARP homology domain missing a PARP consensus sequence motif; the domain has enigmatic functions and apparently lacks catalytic activity. We used x-ray crystallography, molecular dynamics simulations, and biochemical analyses to investigate the structural requirements for ADP-ribosyltransferase activity in human PARP13 and two of its functional partners in stress granules: PARP12/ARTD12, and PARP15/BAL3/ARTD7. The crystal structure of the PARP homology domain of PARP13 shows obstruction of the canonical active site, precluding NAD(+) binding. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that this closed cleft conformation is maintained in solution. Introducing consensus side chains in PARP13 did not result in 3-aminobenzamide binding, but in further closure of the site. Three-dimensional alignment of the PARP homology domains of PARP13, PARP12, and PARP15 illustrates placement of PARP13 residues that deviate from the PARP family consensus. Introducing either one of two of these side chains into the corresponding positions in PARP15 abolished PARP15 ADP-ribosyltransferase activity. Taken together, our results show that PARP13 lacks the structural requirements for ADP-ribosyltransferase activity. PMID:25635049

  12. Two disparate ligand binding sites in the human P2Y1 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dandan; Gao, Zhan-Guo; Zhang, Kaihua; Kiselev, Evgeny; Crane, Steven; Wang, Jiang; Paoletta, Silvia; Yi, Cuiying; Ma, Limin; Zhang, Wenru; Han, Gye Won; Liu, Hong; Cherezov, Vadim; Katritch, Vsevolod; Jiang, Hualiang; Stevens, Raymond C.; Jacobson, Kenneth A.; Zhao, Qiang; Wu, Beili

    2015-01-01

    In response to adenosine 5′-diphosphate, the P2Y1 receptor (P2Y1R) facilitates platelet aggregation, and thus serves as an important antithrombotic drug target. Here we report the crystal structures of the human P2Y1R in complex with a nucleotide antagonist MRS2500 at 2.7Å resolution, and with a non-nucleotide antagonist BPTU at 2.2Å resolution. The structures reveal two distinct ligand binding sites, providing atomic details of P2Y1R’s unique ligand binding modes. MRS2500 recognizes a binding site within the seven transmembrane bundle of P2Y1R, which, however, is different in shape and location from the nucleotide binding site in previously determined P2Y12R structure. BPTU binds to an allosteric pocket on the external receptor interface with the lipid bilayer, making it the first structurally characterized selective G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) ligand located entirely outside of the helical bundle. These high-resolution insights into P2Y1R should enable discovery of new orthosteric and allosteric antithrombotic drugs with reduced adverse effects. PMID:25822790

  13. Connexin-43 hemichannels mediate cyclic ADP-ribose generation and its Ca2+-mobilizing activity by NAD+/cyclic ADP-ribose transport.

    PubMed

    Song, Eun-Kyung; Rah, So-Young; Lee, Young-Rae; Yoo, Chae-Hwa; Kim, Yu-Ri; Yeom, Ji-Hyun; Park, Kwang-Hyun; Kim, Jong-Suk; Kim, Uh-Hyun; Han, Myung-Kwan

    2011-12-30

    The ADP-ribosyl cyclase CD38 whose catalytic domain resides in outside of the cell surface produces the second messenger cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) from NAD(+). cADPR increases intracellular Ca(2+) through the intracellular ryanodine receptor/Ca(2+) release channel (RyR). It has been known that intracellular NAD(+) approaches ecto-CD38 via its export by connexin (Cx43) hemichannels, a component of gap junctions. However, it is unclear how cADPR extracellularly generated by ecto-CD38 approaches intracellular RyR although CD38 itself or nucleoside transporter has been proposed to import cADPR. Moreover, it has been unknown what physiological stimulation can trigger Cx43-mediated export of NAD(+). Here we demonstrate that Cx43 hemichannels, but not CD38, import cADPR to increase intracellular calcium through RyR. We also demonstrate that physiological stimulation such as Fcγ receptor (FcγR) ligation induces calcium mobilization through three sequential steps, Cx43-mediated NAD(+) export, CD38-mediated generation of cADPR and Cx43-mediated cADPR import in J774 cells. Protein kinase A (PKA) activation also induced calcium mobilization in the same way as FcγR stimulation. FcγR stimulation-induced calcium mobilization was blocked by PKA inhibition, indicating that PKA is a linker between FcγR stimulation and NAD(+)/cADPR transport. Cx43 knockdown blocked extracellular cADPR import and extracellular cADPR-induced calcium mobilization in J774 cells. Cx43 overexpression in Cx43-negative cells conferred extracellular cADPR-induced calcium mobilization by the mediation of cADPR import. Our data suggest that Cx43 has a dual function exporting NAD(+) and importing cADPR into the cell to activate intracellular calcium mobilization. PMID:22033928

  14. The inhibitory G protein G(i) identified as pertussis toxin-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation.

    PubMed

    Katada, Toshiaki

    2012-01-01

    Pertussis toxin (PTX) produced by Bordetella pertussis was first introduced by Ui and his colleagues in research on signal transduction under the name islet-activating protein in 1979, when the mechanism of toxin-induced stimulation of insulin release from pancreatic islets was reported in the rat. The stimulatory effect of PTX in vivo results from the blockage of α(2)-adrenergic receptor-mediated inhibition of insulin release. The receptor-induced inhibition of cAMP formation was also abolished in pancreatic islets isolated from PTX-treated rats, suggesting that the toxin caused uncoupling of adenylyl cyclase inhibition from receptor stimulation. The action of PTX on isolated membranes required a cytosolic factor, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), and the uncoupling induced by PTX was shown to be due to the toxin-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation of a 41-kDa protein with NAD as another substrate. The 41-kDa PTX substrate was soon identified and purified as the α-subunit of the inhibitory G protein that transmits an inhibitory signal from membrane receptors to adenylyl cyclase. After demonstration of the molecular mechanism of PTX, the toxin was widely utilized as a probe for identifying and analyzing major αβγ-trimeric G proteins. Thus, PTX-sensitive G proteins appeared to carry positive and negative signals from many membrane receptors to a variety of effectors other than adenylyl cyclase. PMID:23207763

  15. Cyclic ADP ribose-mediated Ca2+ signaling in mediating endothelial nitric oxide production in bovine coronary arteries.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guo; Teggatz, Eric G; Zhang, Andrew Y; Koeberl, Matthew J; Yi, Fan; Chen, Li; Li, Pin-Lan

    2006-03-01

    The present study tested the hypothesis that cyclic ADP ribose (cADPR) serves as a novel second messenger to mediate intracellular Ca2+ mobilization in coronary arterial endothelial cells (CAECs) and thereby contributes to endothelium-dependent vasodilation. In isolated and perfused small bovine coronary arteries, bradykinin (BK)-induced concentration-dependent vasodilation was significantly attenuated by 8-bromo-cADPR (a cell-permeable cADPR antagonist), ryanodine (an antagonist of ryanodine receptors), or nicotinamide (an ADP-ribosyl cyclase inhibitor). By in situ simultaneously fluorescent monitoring, Ca2+ transient and nitric oxide (NO) levels in the intact coronary arterial endothelium preparation, 8-bromo-cADPR (30 microM), ryanodine (50 microM), and nicotinamide (6 mM) substantially attenuated BK (1 microM)-induced increase in intracellular [Ca2+] by 78%, 80%, and 74%, respectively, whereas these compounds significantly blocked BK-induced NO increase by about 80%, and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor blockade with 2-aminethoxydiphenyl borate (50 microM) only blunted BK-induced Ca2+-NO signaling by about 30%. With the use of cADPR-cycling assay, it was found that inhibition of ADP-ribosyl cyclase by nicotinamide substantially blocked BK-induced intracellular cADPR production. Furthermore, HPLC analysis showed that the conversion rate of beta-nicotinamide guanine dinucleotide into cyclic GDP ribose dramatically increased by stimulation with BK, which was blockable by nicotinamide. However, U-73122, a phospholipase C inhibitor, had no effect on this BK-induced increase in ADP-ribosyl cyclase activity for cADPR production. In conclusion, these results suggest that cADPR importantly contributes to BK- and A-23187-induced NO production and vasodilator response in coronary arteries through its Ca2+ signaling mechanism in CAECs. PMID:16243917

  16. Reprogramming cellular events by poly(ADP-ribose)-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pic, Émilie; Ethier, Chantal; Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.; Masson, Jean-Yves; Poirier, Guy G.; Gagné, Jean-Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is a posttranslational modification catalyzed by the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs). These enzymes covalently modify glutamic, aspartic and lysine amino acid side chains of acceptor proteins by the sequential addition of ADP-ribose (ADPr) units. The poly(ADP-ribose) (pADPr) polymers formed alter the physico-chemical characteristics of the substrate with functional consequences on its biological activities. Recently, non-covalent binding to pADPr has emerged as a key mechanism to modulate and coordinate several intracellular pathways including the DNA damage response, protein stability and cell death. In this review, we describe the basis of non-covalent binding to pADPr that has led to the emerging concept of pADPr-responsive signaling pathways. This review emphasizes the structural elements and the modular strategies developed by pADPr-binding proteins to exert a fine-tuned control of a variety of pathways. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation reactions are highly regulated processes, both spatially and temporally, for which at least four specialized pADPr-binding modules accommodate different pADPr structures and reprogram protein functions. In this review, we highlight the role of well-characterized and newly discovered pADPr-binding modules in a diverse set of physiological functions. PMID:23268355

  17. Force-producing ADP state of myosin bound to actin

    PubMed Central

    Wulf, Sarah F.; Ropars, Virginie; Fujita-Becker, Setsuko; Oster, Marco; Hofhaus, Goetz; Trabuco, Leonardo G.; Pylypenko, Olena; Sweeney, H. Lee; Houdusse, Anne M.; Schröder, Rasmus R.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular motors produce force when they interact with their cellular tracks. For myosin motors, the primary force-generating state has MgADP tightly bound, whereas myosin is strongly bound to actin. We have generated an 8-Å cryoEM reconstruction of this state for myosin V and used molecular dynamics flexed fitting for model building. We compare this state to the subsequent state on actin (Rigor). The ADP-bound structure reveals that the actin-binding cleft is closed, even though MgADP is tightly bound. This state is accomplished by a previously unseen conformation of the β-sheet underlying the nucleotide pocket. The transition from the force-generating ADP state to Rigor requires a 9.5° rotation of the myosin lever arm, coupled to a β-sheet rearrangement. Thus, the structure reveals the detailed rearrangements underlying myosin force generation as well as the basis of strain-dependent ADP release that is essential for processive myosins, such as myosin V. PMID:26976594

  18. Force-producing ADP state of myosin bound to actin.

    PubMed

    Wulf, Sarah F; Ropars, Virginie; Fujita-Becker, Setsuko; Oster, Marco; Hofhaus, Goetz; Trabuco, Leonardo G; Pylypenko, Olena; Sweeney, H Lee; Houdusse, Anne M; Schröder, Rasmus R

    2016-03-29

    Molecular motors produce force when they interact with their cellular tracks. For myosin motors, the primary force-generating state has MgADP tightly bound, whereas myosin is strongly bound to actin. We have generated an 8-Å cryoEM reconstruction of this state for myosin V and used molecular dynamics flexed fitting for model building. We compare this state to the subsequent state on actin (Rigor). The ADP-bound structure reveals that the actin-binding cleft is closed, even though MgADP is tightly bound. This state is accomplished by a previously unseen conformation of the β-sheet underlying the nucleotide pocket. The transition from the force-generating ADP state to Rigor requires a 9.5° rotation of the myosin lever arm, coupled to a β-sheet rearrangement. Thus, the structure reveals the detailed rearrangements underlying myosin force generation as well as the basis of strain-dependent ADP release that is essential for processive myosins, such as myosin V. PMID:26976594

  19. ADP-ribosyltransferase from Helix pomatia. Purification and characterization.

    PubMed

    Burtscher, H J; Klocker, H; Schneider, R; Auer, B; Hirsch-Kauffmann, M; Schweiger, M

    1987-12-15

    ADP-ribosyltransferases from several higher eukaryotes have been purified and characterized, but little is known about ADP-ribosyltransferases in lower eukaryotes. We have purified an ADP-ribosyltransferase (EC 2.4.2.30) from Helix pomatia. The enzyme has an apparent Km of 26.7 microM. Optimal conditions for the enzyme reaction are 17.5 degrees C and pH 8. The time course is linear during the first 10 min of the reaction. The enzyme is capable of poly-ADP-ribosylation. The most highly purified preparation shows one major band at an Mr of 75,000 on electrophoresis in an SDS/polyacrylamide gel, with minor bands at Mr 115,000 and 155,000. Re-activation of SDS/polyacrylamide gels in situ shows the 75,000-Mr band to be enzymically active and additional active bands with Mr values of 115,000, 90,000 and 87,000 respectively. The 115,000-Mr and 75,000-Mr bands cross-react with a polyclonal affinity-purified antiserum against human ADP-ribosyltransferase. Like enzymes from higher eukaryotes, the activity from Helix pomatia is inhibited by thymidine, theophylline, theobromine nicotinamide, 3-methoxybenzamide and 3-aminobenzamide, and is dependent on histone and DNA. PMID:3124818

  20. Medicinal chemistry of adenosine, P2Y and P2X receptors.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Kenneth A; Müller, Christa E

    2016-05-01

    Pharmacological tool compounds are now available to define action at the adenosine (ARs), P2Y and P2X receptors. We present a selection of the most commonly used agents to study purines in the nervous system. Some of these compounds, including A1 and A3 AR agonists, P2Y1R and P2Y12R antagonists, and P2X3, P2X4 and P2X7 antagonists, are potentially of clinical use in treatment of disorders of the nervous system, such as chronic pain, neurodegeneration and brain injury. Agonists of the A2AAR and P2Y2R are already used clinically, P2Y12R antagonists are widely used antithrombotics and an antagonist of the A2AAR is approved in Japan for treating Parkinson's disease. The selectivity defined for some of the previously introduced compounds has been revised with updated pharmacological characterization, for example, various AR agonists and antagonists were deemed A1AR or A3AR selective based on human data, but species differences indicated a reduction in selectivity ratios in other species. Also, many of the P2R ligands still lack bioavailability due to charged groups or hydrolytic (either enzymatic or chemical) instability. X-ray crystallographic structures of AR and P2YRs have shifted the mode of ligand discovery to structure-based approaches rather than previous empirical approaches. The X-ray structures can be utilized either for in silico screening of chemically diverse libraries for the discovery of novel ligands or for enhancement of the properties of known ligands by chemical modification. Although X-ray structures of the zebrafish P2X4R have been reported, there is scant structural information about ligand recognition in these trimeric ion channels. In summary, there are definitive, selective agonists and antagonists for all of the ARs and some of the P2YRs; while the pharmacochemistry of P2XRs is still in nascent stages. The therapeutic potential of selectively modulating these receptors is continuing to gain interest in such fields as cancer, inflammation, pain

  1. 50Years of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation.

    PubMed

    Virág, László

    2013-12-01

    The seminal paper published in 1963 by Chambon, Weil and Mandel reporting a new NAD-dependent protein modification now known as poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) marked the launch of a new era in both protein research and cell biology. In the coming decades, the identity, biochemical characteristics and regulation of enzymes responsible for the synthesis and degradation of protein-bound poly(ADP-ribose) have been discovered and the surprisingly multifarious biological roles of PARylation have not ceased to amaze cell and molecular biologists ever since. The review series on PARylation following this preface is comprised of ten papers written by great experts of the field and aims to provide practicing physicians and basic scientists with the state-of-the-art on the "writers, readers and erasers" of poly(ADP-ribose), some recent paradigm shifts of the field and its translational potential. PMID:23727362

  2. The family of bacterial ADP-ribosylating exotoxins.

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, K M; Barbieri, J T

    1995-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria utilize a variety of virulence factors that contribute to the clinical manifestation of their pathogenesis. Bacterial ADP-ribosylating exotoxins (bAREs) represent one family of virulence factors that exert their toxic effects by transferring the ADP-ribose moiety of NAD onto specific eucaryotic target proteins. The observations that some bAREs ADP-ribosylate eucaryotic proteins that regulate signal transduction, like the heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins and the low-molecular-weight GTP-binding proteins, has extended interest in bAREs beyond the bacteriology laboratory. Molecular studies have shown that bAREs possess little primary amino acid homology and have diverse quaternary structure-function organization. Underlying this apparent diversity, biochemical and crystallographic studies have shown that several bAREs have conserved active-site structures and possess a conserved glutamic acid within their active sites. PMID:7704894

  3. Proteome-wide identification of poly(ADP-ribose) binding proteins and poly(ADP-ribose)-associated protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Gagné, Jean-Philippe; Isabelle, Maxim; Lo, Ken Sin; Bourassa, Sylvie; Hendzel, Michael J; Dawson, Valina L; Dawson, Ted M; Poirier, Guy G

    2008-12-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) (pADPr) is a polymer assembled from the enzymatic polymerization of the ADP-ribosyl moiety of NAD by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs). The dynamic turnover of pADPr within the cell is essential for a number of cellular processes including progression through the cell cycle, DNA repair and the maintenance of genomic integrity, and apoptosis. In spite of the considerable advances in the knowledge of the physiological conditions modulated by poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation reactions, and notwithstanding the fact that pADPr can play a role of mediator in a wide spectrum of biological processes, few pADPr binding proteins have been identified so far. In this study, refined in silico prediction of pADPr binding proteins and large-scale mass spectrometry-based proteome analysis of pADPr binding proteins were used to establish a comprehensive repertoire of pADPr-associated proteins. Visualization and modeling of these pADPr-associated proteins in networks not only reflect the widespread involvement of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation in several pathways but also identify protein targets that could shed new light on the regulatory functions of pADPr in normal physiological conditions as well as after exposure to genotoxic stimuli. PMID:18981049

  4. Proteome-wide identification of poly(ADP-ribose) binding proteins and poly(ADP-ribose)-associated protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    Gagné, Jean-Philippe; Isabelle, Maxim; Lo, Ken Sin; Bourassa, Sylvie; Hendzel, Michael J.; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.; Poirier, Guy G.

    2008-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) (pADPr) is a polymer assembled from the enzymatic polymerization of the ADP-ribosyl moiety of NAD by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs). The dynamic turnover of pADPr within the cell is essential for a number of cellular processes including progression through the cell cycle, DNA repair and the maintenance of genomic integrity, and apoptosis. In spite of the considerable advances in the knowledge of the physiological conditions modulated by poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation reactions, and notwithstanding the fact that pADPr can play a role of mediator in a wide spectrum of biological processes, few pADPr binding proteins have been identified so far. In this study, refined in silico prediction of pADPr binding proteins and large-scale mass spectrometry-based proteome analysis of pADPr binding proteins were used to establish a comprehensive repertoire of pADPr-associated proteins. Visualization and modeling of these pADPr-associated proteins in networks not only reflect the widespread involvement of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation in several pathways but also identify protein targets that could shed new light on the regulatory functions of pADPr in normal physiological conditions as well as after exposure to genotoxic stimuli. PMID:18981049

  5. Optical, dielectric and microhardness studies on (100) directed ADP crystal.

    PubMed

    Rajesh, P; Ramasamy, P

    2009-09-15

    (100) directed ammonium dihydrogen phosphate single crystal has been grown using the uniaxially solution-crystallization method of Sankaranarayanan-Ramasamy (SR). The size of the grown crystal is 40 mm in diameter and 50mm in thickness. The grown crystals were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, Vickers hardness and dielectric studies. Comparing the (100) plane of the conventional method grown ADP crystal with (100) directed SR method grown ADP crystal, optical transparency, dielectric constant and Vickers hardness number are increased and dielectric loss is decreased in SR method grown crystal. PMID:19592298

  6. Purinergic receptor P2RY12-dependent microglial closure of the injured blood-brain barrier.

    PubMed

    Lou, Nanhong; Takano, Takahiro; Pei, Yong; Xavier, Anna L; Goldman, Steven A; Nedergaard, Maiken

    2016-01-26

    Microglia are integral functional elements of the central nervous system, but the contribution of these cells to the structural integrity of the neurovascular unit has not hitherto been assessed. We show here that following blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown, P2RY12 (purinergic receptor P2Y, G-protein coupled, 12)-mediated chemotaxis of microglia processes is required for the rapid closure of the BBB. Mice treated with the P2RY12 inhibitor clopidogrel, as well as those in which P2RY12 was genetically ablated, exhibited significantly diminished movement of juxtavascular microglial processes and failed to close laser-induced openings of the BBB. Thus, microglial cells play a previously unrecognized protective role in the maintenance of BBB integrity following cerebrovascular damage. Because clopidogrel antagonizes the platelet P2Y12 receptor, it is widely prescribed for patients with coronary artery and cerebrovascular disease. As such, these observations suggest the need for caution in the postincident continuation of P2RY12-targeted platelet inhibition. PMID:26755608

  7. CryoEM reveals different coronin binding modes for ADP- and ADP-BeFx- actin filaments

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Peng; Oztug Durer, Zeynep A.; Kudryashov, Dmitri; Zhou, Z. Hong; Reisler, Emil

    2015-01-01

    Essential cellular processes involving the actin cytoskeleton are regulated by auxiliary proteins which can sense the nucleotide state of actin. Here we report cryo electron microscopy (cryoEM) structures at 8.6 Å resolution for ADP- and ADP-BeFx- (mimicking ADP-Pi) bound actin filaments in complex with the β-propeller domain (residues 1–600) of yeast coronin 1 (crn1). Our structures identify the main differences in the interaction of coronin with the two nucleotide states of F-actin. We derived pseudo-atomic models by fitting the atomic structures of actin and coronin into these structures. The identified binding interfaces on actin were confirmed by chemical crosslinking, fluorescence spectroscopy and actin mutagenesis. Importantly, the structures of actin and coronin mapped in this study offer a structural explanation for the nucleotide-dependent effects of coronin on cofilin-assisted remodeling of F-actin. PMID:25362487

  8. Targeting Renal Purinergic Signalling for the Treatment of Lithium-induced Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus

    PubMed Central

    Kishore, B. K.; Carlson, N. G.; Ecelbarger, C. M.; Kohan, D. E.; Müller, C. E.; Nelson, R. D.; Peti-Peterdi, J.; Zhang, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Lithium still retains its critical position in the treatment of bipolar disorder by virtue of its ability to prevent suicidal tendencies. However, chronic use of lithium is often limited by the development nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI), a debilitating condition. Lithium-induced NDI is due to resistance of the kidney to arginine vasopressin (AVP), leading to polyuria, natriuresis and kaliuresis. Purinergic signalling mediated by extracellular nucleotides (ATP/UTP), acting via P2Y receptors, opposes the action of AVP on renal collecting duct (CD) by decreasing the cellular cAMP and thus AQP2 protein levels. Taking a cue from this phenomenon, we discovered the potential involvement of ATP/UTP-activated P2Y2 receptor in lithium-induced NDI in rats, and showed that P2Y2 receptor knockout mice are significantly resistant to Li-induced polyuria, natriuresis and kaliuresis. Extension of these studies revealed that ADP-activated P2Y12 receptor is expressed in the kidney, and its irreversible blockade by the administration of clopidogrel bisulfate (Plavix®) ameliorates Li-induced NDI in rodents. Parallel in vitro studies showed that P2Y12 receptor blockade by the reversible antagonist PSB-0739 sensitizes CD to the action of AVP. Thus, our studies unraveled the potential beneficial effects of targeting P2Y2 or P2Y12 receptors to counter AVP resistance in lithium-induced NDI. If established in further studies, our findings may pave the way for the development of better and safer methods for the treatment of NDI by bringing a paradigm shift in the approach from the current therapies that predominantly counter the anti-AVP effects to those that enhance the sensitivity of the kidney to AVP action. PMID:25877068

  9. Studies on protein poly(ADP-ribosylation) using high resolution gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Boulikas, T

    1990-08-25

    Analysis of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesized in cellular lysates or in isolated nuclei on 100-cm-long thin gels of 20% polyacrylamide, 2.5 M urea permits determination of the exact size of poly(ADP-ribose) molecules using labeled oligonucleotides as molecular weight markers. The size and concentration of poly(ADP-ribose) molecules increase at time intervals during its synthesis. Differences in the concentration of poly(ADP-ribose) size classes among cell lines are also shown. Inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) degradation by ethacridine that directly interacts with the polymer and inhibits its hydrolysis by poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase shows a dramatic increase in both polymer size and concentration. Use of alkaline conditions for the hydrolysis of poly(ADP-ribose)-protein linkages reveals a specific shortening of all size classes of poly(ADP-ribose) compared with its size in preparations obtained by extensive digestion of nuclei with nucleases, RNases, and proteases. PMID:2167322

  10. Development of second generation peptides modulating cellular adiponectin receptor responses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otvos, Laszlo; Knappe, Daniel; Hoffmann, Ralf; Kovalszky, Ilona; Olah, Julia; Hewitson, Tim; Stawikowska, Roma; Stawikowski, Maciej; Cudic, Predrag; Lin, Feng; Wade, John; Surmacz, Eva; Lovas, Sandor

    2014-10-01

    The adipose tissue participates in the regulation of energy homeostasis as an important endocrine organ that secretes a number of biologically active adipokines, including adiponectin. Recently we developed and characterized a first-in-class peptide-based adiponectin receptor agonist by using in vitro and in vivo models of glioblastoma and breast cancer (BC). In the current study, we further explored the effects of peptide ADP355 in additional cellular models and found that ADP355 inhibited chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cell proliferation and renal myofibroblast differentiation with mid-nanomolar IC50 values. According to molecular modeling calculations, ADP355 was remarkably flexible in the global minimum with a turn present in the middle of the peptide. Considering these structural features of ADP355 and the fact that adiponectin normally circulates as multimeric complexes, we developed and tested the activity of a linear branched dimer (ADP399). The dimer exhibited approximately 20-fold improved cellular activity inhibiting K562 CML and MCF-7 cell growth with high pM - low nM relative IC50 values. Biodistribution studies suggested superior tissue dissemination of both peptides after subcutaneous administration relative to intraperitoneal inoculation. After screening of a 397-member adiponectin active site library, a novel octapeptide (ADP400) was designed that counteracted 10-1000 nM ADP355- and ADP399-mediated effects on CML and BC cell growth at nanomolar concentrations. ADP400 induced mitogenic effects in MCF-7 BC cells perhaps due to antagonizing endogenous adiponectin actions or acting as an inverse agonist. While the linear dimer agonist ADP399 meets pharmacological criteria of a contemporary peptide drug lead, the peptide showing antagonist activity (ADP400) at similar concentrations will be an important target validation tool to study adiponectin functions.

  11. Development of second generation peptides modulating cellular adiponectin receptor responses

    PubMed Central

    Otvos, Laszlo; Knappe, Daniel; Hoffmann, Ralf; Kovalszky, Ilona; Olah, Julia; Hewitson, Tim D.; Stawikowska, Roma; Stawikowski, Maciej; Cudic, Predrag; Lin, Feng; Wade, John D.; Surmacz, Eva; Lovas, Sandor

    2014-01-01

    The adipose tissue participates in the regulation of energy homeostasis as an important endocrine organ that secretes a number of biologically active adipokines, including adiponectin. Recently we developed and characterized a first-in-class peptide-based adiponectin receptor agonist by using in vitro and in vivo models of glioblastoma and breast cancer (BC). In the current study, we further explored the effects of peptide ADP355 in additional cellular models and found that ADP355 inhibited chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) cell proliferation and renal myofibroblast differentiation with mid-nanomolar IC50 values. According to molecular modeling calculations, ADP355 was remarkably flexible in the global minimum with a turn present in the middle of the peptide. Considering these structural features of ADP355 and the fact that adiponectin normally circulates as multimeric complexes, we developed and tested the activity of a linear branched dimer (ADP399). The dimer exhibited approximately 20-fold improved cellular activity inhibiting K562 CML and MCF-7 cell growth with high pM—low nM relative IC50 values. Biodistribution studies suggested superior tissue dissemination of both peptides after subcutaneous administration relative to intraperitoneal inoculation. After screening of a 397-member adiponectin active site library, a novel octapeptide (ADP400) was designed that counteracted 10–1000 nM ADP355- and ADP399-mediated effects on CML and BC cell growth at nanomolar concentrations. ADP400 induced mitogenic effects in MCF-7 BC cells perhaps due to antagonizing endogenous adiponectin actions or acting as an inverse agonist. While the linear dimer agonist ADP399 meets pharmacological criteria of a contemporary peptide drug lead, the peptide showing antagonist activity (ADP400) at similar concentrations will be an important target validation tool to study adiponectin functions. PMID:25368867

  12. 7 CFR 272.10 - ADP/CIS Model Plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false ADP/CIS Model Plan. 272.10 Section 272.10 Agriculture... Model Plan. (a) General purpose and content—(1) Purpose. All State agencies are required to sufficiently.... (ii) State agencies that plan to automate operations using any method other than transfers will...

  13. 7 CFR 272.10 - ADP/CIS Model Plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false ADP/CIS Model Plan. 272.10 Section 272.10 Agriculture... Model Plan. (a) General purpose and content—(1) Purpose. All State agencies are required to sufficiently.... (ii) State agencies that plan to automate operations using any method other than transfers will...

  14. 7 CFR 272.10 - ADP/CIS Model Plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false ADP/CIS Model Plan. 272.10 Section 272.10 Agriculture... Model Plan. (a) General purpose and content—(1) Purpose. All State agencies are required to sufficiently.... (ii) State agencies that plan to automate operations using any method other than transfers will...

  15. Abiogenic photophosphorylation of ADP to ATP sensitized by flavoproteinoid microspheres.

    PubMed

    Kolesnikov, Michael P; Telegina, Taisiya A; Lyudnikova, Tamara A; Kritsky, Mikhail S

    2008-06-01

    A model for abiogenic photophosphorylation of ADP by orthophosphate to yield ATP was studied. The model is based on the photochemical activity of flavoproteinoid microspheres that are formed by aggregation in an aqueous medium of products of thermal condensation of a glutamic acid, glycine and lysine mixture (8:3:1) and contain, along with amino acid polymers (proteinoids), abiogenic isoalloxazine (flavin) pigments. Irradiation of aqueous suspensions of microspheres with blue visible light or ultraviolet in the presence of ADP and orthophosphate resulted in ATP formation. The yield of ATP in aerated suspensions was 10-20% per one mol of starting ADP. Deaeration reduced the photophosphorylating activity of microspheres five to 10 times. Treatment of aerated microsphere suspensions with superoxide dismutase during irradiation partially suppressed ATP formation. Deaerated microspheres restored completely their photophosphorylating activity after addition of hydrogen peroxide to the suspension. The photophosphorylating activity of deaerated suspensions of flavoproteinoid microspheres was also recovered by introduction of Fe3+-cytochrome c, an electron acceptor alternative to oxygen. On the basis of the results obtained, a chemical mechanism of phosphorylation is proposed in which the free radical form of reduced flavin sensitizer (F1H*) and ADP are involved. PMID:18386156

  16. 45 CFR 95.619 - Use of ADP systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Use of ADP systems. 95.619 Section 95.619 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION GENERAL ADMINISTRATION-GRANT PROGRAMS (PUBLIC ASSISTANCE, MEDICAL ASSISTANCE AND STATE CHILDREN'S HEALTH INSURANCE PROGRAMS) Automatic Data Processing Equipment...

  17. 45 CFR 95.619 - Use of ADP systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Use of ADP systems. 95.619 Section 95.619 Public Welfare DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL ADMINISTRATION GENERAL ADMINISTRATION-GRANT PROGRAMS (PUBLIC ASSISTANCE, MEDICAL ASSISTANCE AND STATE CHILDREN'S HEALTH INSURANCE PROGRAMS) Automatic Data Processing Equipment...

  18. ADP correspondence system: Unsolicited proposal evaluation tracking application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, W. A.; Goodwin, D. J.

    1976-01-01

    A complete description of a correspondence control system, designed to be used by non-ADP clerical personnel is provided. In addition to operating instructions, sufficient design and conceptual information is provided to allow use or adaption of the system in related applications. The complete COBOL program and documentation are available.

  19. 41 CFR 109-45.309-54 - Automatic Data Processing Equipment (ADPE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Personal Property § 109-45.309-54 Automatic Data Processing Equipment (ADPE). ADPE shall be made available... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Automatic Data Processing Equipment (ADPE). 109-45.309-54 Section 109-45.309-54 Public Contracts and Property...

  20. 41 CFR 109-45.309-54 - Automatic Data Processing Equipment (ADPE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Personal Property § 109-45.309-54 Automatic Data Processing Equipment (ADPE). ADPE shall be made available... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Automatic Data Processing Equipment (ADPE). 109-45.309-54 Section 109-45.309-54 Public Contracts and Property...

  1. 41 CFR 109-45.309-54 - Automatic Data Processing Equipment (ADPE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Personal Property § 109-45.309-54 Automatic Data Processing Equipment (ADPE). ADPE shall be made available... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Automatic Data Processing Equipment (ADPE). 109-45.309-54 Section 109-45.309-54 Public Contracts and Property...

  2. 41 CFR 109-45.309-54 - Automatic Data Processing Equipment (ADPE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Personal Property § 109-45.309-54 Automatic Data Processing Equipment (ADPE). ADPE shall be made available... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Automatic Data Processing Equipment (ADPE). 109-45.309-54 Section 109-45.309-54 Public Contracts and Property...

  3. 41 CFR 109-43.307-53 - Automatic data processing equipment (ADPE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ....307-53 Automatic data processing equipment (ADPE). All ADPE shall be sanitized before being... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Automatic data processing equipment (ADPE). 109-43.307-53 Section 109-43.307-53 Public Contracts and Property...

  4. 41 CFR 109-45.309-54 - Automatic Data Processing Equipment (ADPE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Personal Property § 109-45.309-54 Automatic Data Processing Equipment (ADPE). ADPE shall be made available... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Automatic Data Processing Equipment (ADPE). 109-45.309-54 Section 109-45.309-54 Public Contracts and Property...

  5. [Efficacy of clopidogrel as ADP-dependent platelet aggregation inhibitor. Study on individuals with coronary artery disease].

    PubMed

    Izaguirre Avila, R; de la Peña, A; González Pacheco, H; Ramírez Gutiérrez, A; González Valdez, H; Quiroz, A; Cortina, E; Huerta, M; Lupi, E

    2000-01-01

    Acetyl-salicylic acid inhibits thromboxane A2 production and reduces the risk of vascular occlusive events by 20 to 25%. Ticlopidine inhibits ADP-dependent platelet aggregation and reduces the same risk by 30 to 35%, but produces some adverse effects. Clopidogrel is a ticlopidin-derived antiplatelet-drug, with the same mechanism of action; reduces the expression of the glycoprotein IIb/IIIa, the fibrinogen receptor on the platelet surface. Clopidogrel has the same clinical efficacy of ticlopidin and lowers the incidence of adverse effects. In this study, we evaluated the effects of one daily dosis of 75 mg of clopidogrel on platelet function in 33 subjects with coronary artery disease. Before treatment and after the 6th and 12th week, the following parameters were evaluated: 5 microM-ADP and 20 micrograms/mL collagen-induced platelet aggregation, bleeding time and fibrinogen concentration. In basal and in the 6th and 12th week samples, ADP-induced platelet aggregation was 90.7% +/- 13.2, 54.6% +/- 23.2 and 49.2% +/- 23.7 respectively, that represents a significant reduction of 38.6% and 44.4%. Reduction of collagen-induced platelet aggregation was not significative. Plasmatic fibrinogen did not suffer variation during treatment. Bleeding time was significant prolonged from 4.1 minutes to 15.4 and 14.6 minutes (3.7-3.5 times compared with the test before treatment). There were no haemorrhagic complications, only digestive discomfort in fewer than 3% of patients. We concluded that clopidogrel is a safe and efficacious drug for patients, it efficiently reduces ADP-induced platelet aggregation and prolongs bleeding time. PMID:11534098

  6. Phosphate and ADP differently inhibit coordinated smooth muscle myosin groups.

    PubMed

    Hilbert, Lennart; Balassy, Zsombor; Zitouni, Nedjma B; Mackey, Michael C; Lauzon, Anne-Marie

    2015-02-01

    Actin filaments propelled in vitro by groups of skeletal muscle myosin motors exhibit distinct phases of active sliding or arrest, whose occurrence depends on actin length (L) within a range of up to 1.0 μm. Smooth muscle myosin filaments are exponentially distributed with ≈150 nm average length in vivo--suggesting relevance of the L-dependence of myosin group kinetics. Here, we found L-dependent actin arrest and sliding in in vitro motility assays of smooth muscle myosin. We perturbed individual myosin kinetics with varying, physiological concentrations of phosphate (Pi, release associated with main power stroke) and adenosine diphosphate (ADP, release associated with minor mechanical step). Adenosine triphosphate was kept constant at physiological concentration. Increasing [Pi] lowered the fraction of time for which actin was actively sliding, reflected in reduced average sliding velocity (ν) and motile fraction (fmot, fraction of time that filaments are moving); increasing [ADP] increased the fraction of time actively sliding and reduced the velocity while sliding, reflected in reduced ν and increased fmot. We introduced specific Pi and ADP effects on individual myosin kinetics into our recently developed mathematical model of actin propulsion by myosin groups. Simulations matched our experimental observations and described the inhibition of myosin group kinetics. At low [Pi] and [ADP], actin arrest and sliding were reflected by two distinct chemical states of the myosin group. Upon [Pi] increase, the probability of the active state decreased; upon [ADP] increase, the probability of the active state increased, but the active state became increasingly similar to the arrested state. PMID:25650929

  7. Structure and function of the ARH family of ADP-ribose-acceptor hydrolases

    PubMed Central

    Mashimo, Masato; Kato, Jiro; Moss, Joel

    2014-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation is a post-translational protein modification, in which ADP-ribose is transferred from nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) to specific acceptors, thereby altering their activities. The ADP-ribose transfer reactions are divided into mono- and poly-(ADP-ribosyl)ation. Cellular ADP-ribosylation levels are tightly regulated by enzymes that transfer ADP-ribose to acceptor proteins (e.g. ADP-ribosyltransferases, poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARP)) and those that cleave the linkage between ADP-ribose and acceptor (e.g. ADP-ribosyl-acceptor hydrolases (ARH), poly-(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolases (PARG)), thereby constituting an ADP-ribosylation cycle. This review summarizes current findings related to the ARH family of proteins. This family comprises three members (ARH1-3) with similar size (39 kDa) and amino acid sequence. ARH1 catalyzes the hydrolysis of the N-glycosidic bond of mono-(ADP-ribosyl)ated arginine. ARH3 hydrolyzes poly-(ADP-ribose) (PAR) and O-acetyl-ADP-ribose. The different substrate specificities of ARH1 and ARH3 contribute to their unique roles in the cell. Based on a phenotype analysis of ARH1−/− and ARH3−/− mice, ARH1 is involved in the action by bacterial toxins as well as in tumorigenesis. ARH3 participates in the degradation of PAR that is synthesized by PARP1 in response to oxidative stress-induced DNA damage; this hydrolytic reaction suppresses PAR-mediated cell death, a pathway termed parthanatos. PMID:24746921

  8. ADP-Ribose Activates the TRPM2 Channel from the Sea Anemone Nematostella vectensis Independently of the NUDT9H Domain.

    PubMed

    Kühn, Frank J P; Kühn, Cornelia; Winking, Mathis; Hoffmann, Daniel C; Lückhoff, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The human redox-sensitive Transient receptor potential melastatin type 2 (hTRPM2) channel contains the C-terminal Nudix hydrolase domain NUDT9H which most likely binds ADP-ribose. During oxidative stress, the intracellular release of ADP-ribose triggers the activation of hTRPM2. The TRPM2 orthologue from Nematostella vectensis (nv) is also stimulated by ADP-ribose but not by the oxidant hydrogen peroxide. For further clarification of the structure-function relationships of these two distantly related channel orthologues, we performed whole-cell as well as single channel patch-clamp recordings, Ca2+-imaging and Western blot analysis after heterologous expression of wild-type and mutated channels in HEK-293 cells. We demonstrate that the removal of the entire NUDT9H domain does not disturb the response of nvTRPM2 to ADP-ribose. The deletion, however, created channels that were activated by hydrogen peroxide, as did mutations within the NUDT9H domain of nvTRPM2 that presumably suppress its enzymatic function. The same findings were obtained with the nvTRPM2 channel when the NUDT9H domain was replaced by the corresponding sequences of the original hNUDT9 enzyme. Whenever the enzyme domain was mutated to presumably inactive variants, channel activation by hydrogen peroxide could be achieved. Moreover, we found strong evidences for ADPRase activity of the isolated NUDT9H domain of nvTRPM2 in co-expression experiments with the C-terminally truncated nvTRPM2 channel. Thus, there is a clear correlation between the loss of enzymatic activity and the capability of nvTRPM2 to respond to oxidative stress. In striking contrast, the channel function of the hTRPM2 orthologue, in particular its sensitivity to ADP-ribose, was abrogated by already small changes of the NUDT9H domain. These findings establish nvTRPM2 as a channel gated by ADP-ribose through a novel mechanism. We conclude that the endogenous NUDT9H domain does not directly affect ADP-ribose-dependent gating of the nv

  9. ADP-Ribose Activates the TRPM2 Channel from the Sea Anemone Nematostella vectensis Independently of the NUDT9H Domain

    PubMed Central

    Kühn, Frank J. P.; Kühn, Cornelia; Winking, Mathis; Hoffmann, Daniel C.; Lückhoff, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The human redox-sensitive Transient receptor potential melastatin type 2 (hTRPM2) channel contains the C-terminal Nudix hydrolase domain NUDT9H which most likely binds ADP-ribose. During oxidative stress, the intracellular release of ADP-ribose triggers the activation of hTRPM2. The TRPM2 orthologue from Nematostella vectensis (nv) is also stimulated by ADP-ribose but not by the oxidant hydrogen peroxide. For further clarification of the structure-function relationships of these two distantly related channel orthologues, we performed whole-cell as well as single channel patch-clamp recordings, Ca2+-imaging and Western blot analysis after heterologous expression of wild-type and mutated channels in HEK-293 cells. We demonstrate that the removal of the entire NUDT9H domain does not disturb the response of nvTRPM2 to ADP-ribose. The deletion, however, created channels that were activated by hydrogen peroxide, as did mutations within the NUDT9H domain of nvTRPM2 that presumably suppress its enzymatic function. The same findings were obtained with the nvTRPM2 channel when the NUDT9H domain was replaced by the corresponding sequences of the original hNUDT9 enzyme. Whenever the enzyme domain was mutated to presumably inactive variants, channel activation by hydrogen peroxide could be achieved. Moreover, we found strong evidences for ADPRase activity of the isolated NUDT9H domain of nvTRPM2 in co-expression experiments with the C-terminally truncated nvTRPM2 channel. Thus, there is a clear correlation between the loss of enzymatic activity and the capability of nvTRPM2 to respond to oxidative stress. In striking contrast, the channel function of the hTRPM2 orthologue, in particular its sensitivity to ADP-ribose, was abrogated by already small changes of the NUDT9H domain. These findings establish nvTRPM2 as a channel gated by ADP-ribose through a novel mechanism. We conclude that the endogenous NUDT9H domain does not directly affect ADP-ribose-dependent gating of the nv

  10. Effect and mechanism of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 in aldosterone-induced apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    QIAO, WEIWEI; ZHANG, WEILI; SHAO, SHUHONG; GAI, YUSHENG; ZHANG, MINGXIANG

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effects of aldosterone on vascular endothelial cells and the viability of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) in cells, and to examine the molecular mechanisms underlying the effects of aldosterone on vascular endothelial cell injury. Cultured endothelial cells were treated either with different concentrations of aldosterone for the same duration or with the same concentrations of aldosterone for different durations, and the levels of apoptosis and activity of PARP1 in the cells were detected, respectively. Aldosterone receptor antagonists or PARP1 inhibitors were added to cells during treatment with aldosterone and the levels of apoptosis and activity of PARP1 were detected. As the concentration of aldosterone increased or the treatment time increased, the number of apoptotic cells and the activity of PARP1 increased. The aldosterone receptor antagonists and PARP1 inhibitors inhibited the increase of apoptosis and PARP1 activity caused by aldosterone treatment. Aldosterone activated the activity of PARP1 via the aldosterone receptor, inhibiting cell proliferation and inducing apoptosis. Treatment with PARP1 may be used as a target for vascular diseases caused by aldosterone at high concentrations. PMID:25872931

  11. Role of CD38, a Cyclic ADP-Ribosylcyclase, in Morphine Antinociception and Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Hull, Lynn C.; Rabender, Christopher; Gabra, Bichoy H.; Zhang, Fan; Li, Pin-Lan

    2010-01-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that an increase in intracellular levels of Ca2+ in neurons is an important component of both the antinociception produced by morphine and morphine's tolerance. The present study tested the hypothesis that the Ca2+ signaling second messenger, cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR), derived from CD38 activation participates in morphine antinociception and tolerance. We first showed that morphine's antinociceptive potency was increased by the intracerebroventricular injection of CD38 substrate β-NAD+ in mice. Furthermore, morphine tolerance was reversed by intracerebroventricular administration of each of three different inhibitors of the CD38–cADPR–ryanodine receptor Ca2+ signaling pathway. These inhibitors were the ADP–ribosylcyclase inhibitor nicotinamide, cADPR analog 8-bromo-cADPR, and a large dose of ryanodine (>50 μM) that blocks the ryanodine receptor. In CD38 gene knockout [CD38(−/−)] mice, the antinociceptive action of morphine was found to be less potent compared with wild-type (WT) mice, as measured by tail-flick response, hypothermia assay, and observations of straub tail. However, there was no difference in locomotor activation between CD38(−/−) and WT animals. It was also found that less tolerance to morphine developed in CD38(−/−) mice compared with WT animals. These results indicate that cADRP–ryanodine receptor Ca2+ signaling associated with CD38 plays an important role in morphine tolerance. PMID:20551293

  12. Proximal ADP-ribose Hydrolysis in Trypanosomatids is Catalyzed by a Macrodomain.

    PubMed

    Haikarainen, Teemu; Lehtiö, Lari

    2016-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation is a ubiquitous protein modification utilized by both prokaryotes and eukaryotes for several cellular functions, such as DNA repair, proliferation, and cell signaling. Higher eukaryotes, such as humans, utilize various enzymes to reverse the modification and to regulate ADP-ribose dependent signaling. In contrast, some lower eukaryotes, including trypanosomatids, lack many of these enzymes and therefore have a much more simplified ADP-ribose metabolism. Here we identified and characterized ADP-ribose hydrolases from Trypanosoma brucei and Trypanosoma cruzi, which are homologous to human O-acetyl-ADP-ribose deacetylases MacroD1 and MacroD2. The enzymes are capable for hydrolysis of protein linked ADP-ribose and a product of sirtuin-mediated lysine deacetylation, O-acetyl-ADP-ribose. Crystal structures of the trypanosomatid macrodomains revealed a conserved catalytic site with distinct differences to human MacroD1 and MacroD2. PMID:27064071

  13. Proximal ADP-ribose Hydrolysis in Trypanosomatids is Catalyzed by a Macrodomain

    PubMed Central

    Haikarainen, Teemu; Lehtiö, Lari

    2016-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation is a ubiquitous protein modification utilized by both prokaryotes and eukaryotes for several cellular functions, such as DNA repair, proliferation, and cell signaling. Higher eukaryotes, such as humans, utilize various enzymes to reverse the modification and to regulate ADP-ribose dependent signaling. In contrast, some lower eukaryotes, including trypanosomatids, lack many of these enzymes and therefore have a much more simplified ADP-ribose metabolism. Here we identified and characterized ADP-ribose hydrolases from Trypanosoma brucei and Trypanosoma cruzi, which are homologous to human O-acetyl-ADP-ribose deacetylases MacroD1 and MacroD2. The enzymes are capable for hydrolysis of protein linked ADP-ribose and a product of sirtuin-mediated lysine deacetylation, O-acetyl-ADP-ribose. Crystal structures of the trypanosomatid macrodomains revealed a conserved catalytic site with distinct differences to human MacroD1 and MacroD2. PMID:27064071

  14. Diurnal dynamic behavior of microglia in response to infected bacteria through the UDP-P2Y6 receptor system

    PubMed Central

    Takayama, Fumiko; Hayashi, Yoshinori; Wu, Zhou; Liu, Yicong; Nakanishi, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    It has long been believed that microglia morphologically transform into the activated state by retracting their long processes and consuming pathogens when bacteria infect into the brain parenchyma. In the present study, however, we showed for the first time that murine cortical microglia extend their processes towards focally injected Porphyromonas gingivalis. This P. gingivalis-induced microglial process extension was significantly increased during the light (sleeping) phase than the dark (waking) phase. In contrast, focally injected ATP-induced microglial process extension was significantly increased during the dark phase than the light phase. Furthermore, in contrast to the P2Y12 receptor-mediated mechanism of ATP-induced microglial process extension, the P. gingivalis-mediated microglial process extension was mediated by P2Y6 receptors. The infection of bacteria such as P. gingivalis to the brain parenchyma may induce the secretion of UDP from microglia at the site of infection, which in turn induces the process extension of the neighboring microglia. PMID:27445174

  15. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation reactions in the regulation of nuclear functions.

    PubMed Central

    D'Amours, D; Desnoyers, S; D'Silva, I; Poirier, G G

    1999-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is a post-translational modification of proteins. During this process, molecules of ADP-ribose are added successively on to acceptor proteins to form branched polymers. This modification is transient but very extensive in vivo, as polymer chains can reach more than 200 units on protein acceptors. The existence of the poly(ADP-ribose) polymer was first reported nearly 40 years ago. Since then, the importance of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis has been established in many cellular processes. However, a clear and unified picture of the physiological role of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation still remains to be established. The total dependence of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis on DNA strand breaks strongly suggests that this post-translational modification is involved in the metabolism of nucleic acids. This view is also supported by the identification of direct protein-protein interactions involving poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (113 kDa PARP), an enzyme catalysing the formation of poly(ADP-ribose), and key effectors of DNA repair, replication and transcription reactions. The presence of PARP in these multiprotein complexes, in addition to the actual poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of some components of these complexes, clearly supports an important role for poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation reactions in DNA transactions. Accordingly, inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis by any of several approaches and the analysis of PARP-deficient cells has revealed that the absence of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation strongly affects DNA metabolism, most notably DNA repair. The recent identification of new poly(ADP-ribosyl)ating enzymes with distinct (non-standard) structures in eukaryotes and archaea has revealed a novel level of complexity in the regulation of poly(ADP-ribose) metabolism. PMID:10455009

  16. Effects of Site-Directed Mutagenesis of Escherichia coli Heat-Labile Enterotoxin on ADP-Ribosyltransferase Activity and Interaction with ADP-Ribosylation Factors

    PubMed Central

    A. Stevens, Linda; Moss, Joel; Vaughan, Martha; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Rappuoli, Rino

    1999-01-01

    Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin (LT), an oligomeric protein with one A subunit (LTA) and five B subunits, exerts its effects via the ADP-ribosylation of Gsα, a guanine nucleotide-binding (G) protein that activates adenylyl cyclase. LTA also ADP-ribosylates simple guanidino compounds (e.g., arginine) and catalyzes its own auto-ADP-ribosylation. All LTA-catalyzed reactions are enhanced by ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs), 20-kDa guanine nucleotide-binding proteins. Replacement of arginine-7 (R7K), valine-53 (V53D), serine-63 (S63K), valine 97 (V97K), or tyrosine-104 (Y104K) in LTA resulted in fully assembled but nontoxic proteins. S63K, V53D, and R7K are catalytic-site mutations, whereas V97K and Y104K are amino acid replacements adjacent to and outside of the catalytic site, respectively. The effects of mutagenesis were quantified by measuring ADP-ribosyltransferase activity (i.e., auto-ADP-ribosylation and ADP-ribosylagmatine synthesis) and interaction with ARF (i.e., inhibition of ARF-stimulated cholera toxin ADP-ribosyltransferase activity and effects of ARF on mutant auto-ADP-ribosylation). All mutants were inactive in the ADP-ribosyltransferase assay; however, auto-ADP-ribosylation in the presence of recombinant human ARF6 was detected, albeit much less than that of native LT (Y104K > V53D > V97K > R7K, S63K). Based on the lack of inhibition by free ADP-ribose, the observed auto-ADP-ribosylation activity was enzymatic and not due to the nonenzymatic addition of free ADP-ribose. V53D, S63K, and R7K were more effective than Y104K or V97K in blocking ARF stimulation of cholera toxin ADP-ribosyltransferase. Based on these data, it appears that ARF-binding and catalytic sites are not identical and that a region outside the NAD cleft may participate in the LTA-ARF interaction. PMID:9864224

  17. Effects of site-directed mutagenesis of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin on ADP-ribosyltransferase activity and interaction with ADP-ribosylation factors.

    PubMed

    Stevens, L A; Moss, J; Vaughan, M; Pizza, M; Rappuoli, R

    1999-01-01

    Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin (LT), an oligomeric protein with one A subunit (LTA) and five B subunits, exerts its effects via the ADP-ribosylation of Gsalpha, a guanine nucleotide-binding (G) protein that activates adenylyl cyclase. LTA also ADP-ribosylates simple guanidino compounds (e.g., arginine) and catalyzes its own auto-ADP-ribosylation. All LTA-catalyzed reactions are enhanced by ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs), 20-kDa guanine nucleotide-binding proteins. Replacement of arginine-7 (R7K), valine-53 (V53D), serine-63 (S63K), valine 97 (V97K), or tyrosine-104 (Y104K) in LTA resulted in fully assembled but nontoxic proteins. S63K, V53D, and R7K are catalytic-site mutations, whereas V97K and Y104K are amino acid replacements adjacent to and outside of the catalytic site, respectively. The effects of mutagenesis were quantified by measuring ADP-ribosyltransferase activity (i.e., auto-ADP-ribosylation and ADP-ribosylagmatine synthesis) and interaction with ARF (i.e., inhibition of ARF-stimulated cholera toxin ADP-ribosyltransferase activity and effects of ARF on mutant auto-ADP-ribosylation). All mutants were inactive in the ADP-ribosyltransferase assay; however, auto-ADP-ribosylation in the presence of recombinant human ARF6 was detected, albeit much less than that of native LT (Y104K > V53D > V97K > R7K, S63K). Based on the lack of inhibition by free ADP-ribose, the observed auto-ADP-ribosylation activity was enzymatic and not due to the nonenzymatic addition of free ADP-ribose. V53D, S63K, and R7K were more effective than Y104K or V97K in blocking ARF stimulation of cholera toxin ADP-ribosyltransferase. Based on these data, it appears that ARF-binding and catalytic sites are not identical and that a region outside the NAD cleft may participate in the LTA-ARF interaction. PMID:9864224

  18. 26 CFR 1.401(k)-2 - ADP test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... determined under § 1.401(k)-2(b)(2)(vi) (as it appeared in the April 1, 2007, edition of 26 CFR Part 1). (C...)(2)(iv) (as it appeared in the April 1, 2007, edition of 26 CFR part 1). (v) Distribution. Within 12... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true ADP test. 1.401(k)-2 Section 1.401(k)-2...

  19. 26 CFR 1.401(k)-2 - ADP test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... determined under § 1.401(k)-2(b)(2)(vi) (as it appeared in the April 1, 2007, edition of 26 CFR Part 1). (C...)(2)(iv) (as it appeared in the April 1, 2007, edition of 26 CFR part 1). (v) Distribution. Within 12... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false ADP test. 1.401(k)-2 Section 1.401(k)-2...

  20. 26 CFR 1.401(k)-2 - ADP test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... determined under § 1.401(k)-2(b)(2)(vi) (as it appeared in the April 1, 2007, edition of 26 CFR Part 1). (C...)(2)(iv) (as it appeared in the April 1, 2007, edition of 26 CFR part 1). (v) Distribution. Within 12... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false ADP test. 1.401(k)-2 Section 1.401(k)-2...

  1. 26 CFR 1.401(k)-2 - ADP test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...)(2)(iv) (as it appeared in the April 1, 2007, edition of 26 CFR part 1). (v) Distribution. Within 12... determined under § 1.401(k)-2(b)(2)(vi) (as it appeared in the April 1, 2007, edition of 26 CFR Part 1). (C... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false ADP test. 1.401(k)-2 Section 1.401(k)-2...

  2. 26 CFR 1.401(k)-2 - ADP test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...)(2)(iv) (as it appeared in the April 1, 2007, edition of 26 CFR part 1). (v) Distribution. Within 12... determined under § 1.401(k)-2(b)(2)(vi) (as it appeared in the April 1, 2007, edition of 26 CFR Part 1). (C... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false ADP test. 1.401(k)-2 Section 1.401(k)-2...

  3. The 1994 NASA/USRA/ADP Design Projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruse, Thomas; Richardson, Joseph; Tryon, Robert

    1994-01-01

    The NASA/USRA/ADP Design Projects from Vanderbilt University, Department of Mechanical Engineering (1994) are enclosed in this final report. Design projects include: (1) Protein Crystal Growth, both facilities and methodology; (2) ACES Deployable Space Boom; (3) Hybrid Launch System designs for both manned and unmanned systems; (4) LH2 Fuel Tank design (SSTO); (5) SSTO design; and (6) Pressure Tank Feed System design.

  4. Structure of Plasmodium falciparum ADP-ribosylation factor 1

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, William J.; Smith, Craig D.; Senkovich, Olga; Holder, Anthony A.; Chattopadhyay, Debasish

    2011-09-26

    Vesicular trafficking may play a crucial role in the pathogenesis and survival of the malaria parasite. ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs) are among the major components of vesicular trafficking pathways in eukaryotes. The crystal structure of ARF1 GTPase from Plasmodium falciparum has been determined in the GDP-bound conformation at 2.5 {angstrom} resolution and is compared with the structures of mammalian ARF1s.

  5. Poly(ADP-Ribosyl)ation Affects Histone Acetylation and Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Verdone, Loredana; La Fortezza, Marco; Ciccarone, Fabio; Caiafa, Paola; Zampieri, Michele; Caserta, Micaela

    2015-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) is a posttranslational protein modification catalyzed by members of the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) enzyme family. PARylation regulates a wide variety of biological processes in most eukaryotic cells including energy metabolism and cell death, maintenance of genomic stability, chromatin structure and transcription. Inside the nucleus, cross-talk between PARylation and other epigenetic modifications, such as DNA and histone methylation, was already described. In the present work, using PJ34 or ABT888 to inhibit PARP activity or over-expressing poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG), we show decrease of global histone H3 and H4 acetylation. This effect is accompanied by a reduction of the steady state mRNA level of p300, Pcaf, and Tnfα, but not of Dnmt1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analyses, performed at the level of the Transcription Start Site (TSS) of these four genes, reveal that changes in histone acetylation are specific for each promoter. Finally, we demonstrate an increase of global deacetylase activity in nuclear extracts from cells treated with PJ34, whereas global acetyltransferase activity is not affected, suggesting a role for PARP in the inhibition of histone deacetylases. Taken together, these results show an important link between PARylation and histone acetylation regulated transcription. PMID:26636673

  6. Molecular Insights into Poly(ADP-ribose) Recognition and Processing

    PubMed Central

    Žaja, Roko; Mikoč, Andreja; Barkauskaite, Eva; Ahel, Ivan

    2012-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is a post-translational protein modification involved in the regulation of important cellular functions including DNA repair, transcription, mitosis and apoptosis. The amount of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PAR) in cells reflects the balance of synthesis, mediated by the PARP protein family, and degradation, which is catalyzed by a glycohydrolase, PARG. Many of the proteins mediating PAR metabolism possess specialised high affinity PAR-binding modules that allow the efficient sensing or processing of the PAR signal. The identification of four such PAR-binding modules and the characterization of a number of proteins utilising these elements during the last decade has provided important insights into how PAR regulates different cellular activities. The macrodomain represents a unique PAR-binding module which is, in some instances, known to possess enzymatic activity on ADP-ribose derivatives (in addition to PAR-binding). The most recently discovered example for this is the PARG protein, and several available PARG structures have provided an understanding into how the PARG macrodomain evolved into a major enzyme that maintains PAR homeostasis in living cells. PMID:24970154

  7. Regulation of chromatin structure by poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation

    PubMed Central

    Beneke, Sascha

    2012-01-01

    The interaction of DNA with proteins in the context of chromatin has to be tightly regulated to achieve so different tasks as packaging, transcription, replication and repair. The very rapid and transient post-translational modification of proteins by poly(ADP-ribose) has been shown to take part in all four. Originally identified as immediate cellular answer to a variety of genotoxic stresses, already early data indicated the ability of this highly charged nucleic acid-like polymer to modulate nucleosome structure, the basic unit of chromatin. At the same time the enzyme responsible for synthesizing poly(ADP-ribose), the zinc-finger protein poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP1), was shown to control transcription initiation as basic factor TFIIC within the RNA-polymerase II machinery. Later research focused more on PARP-mediated regulation of DNA repair and cell death, but in the last few years, transcription as well as chromatin modulation has re-appeared on the scene. This review will discuss the impact of PARP1 on transcription and transcription factors, its implication in chromatin remodeling for DNA repair and probably also replication, and its role in controlling epigenetic events such as DNA methylation and the functionality of the insulator protein CCCTC-binding factor. PMID:22969794

  8. [Suggested mitochondrial ancestry of non-mitochondrial ATP/ADP].

    PubMed

    Emel'ianov, V V

    2007-01-01

    One of the major evolutionary events that transformed endosymbiotic bacterium into mitochondrion was an acquisition of ATP/ADP carrier in order to supply the host with respiration-derived ATP. Along with mitochondrial carrier, unrelated carrier is known which is characteristic of intracellular chlamydiae, plastids, parasitic intracellular eukaryote Encephalitozoon cuniculi, and the genus Rickettsia of obligate endosymbiotic alpha-Proteobacteria. This non-mitochondrial ATP/ADP carrier was recently described in rickettsia-like endosymbionts - a group of obligate intracellular bacteria, classified with the order Rickettsiales, which have diverged after free-living alpha-Proteobacteria but before sister groups of the Rickettsiaceae assemblage (true rickettsiae) and mitochondria. Published controversial phylogenetic data on the non-mitochondrial carrier were reanalysed in the present work using both DNA and protein sequences, and various methods including Bayesian analysis. The data presented are consistent with classic endosymbiont theory for the origin of mitochondria and also suggest that even last but one common ancestor of rickettsiae and organelles may have been an endosymbiotic bacterium in which ATP/ADP carrier has first originated. PMID:17380892

  9. Poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymer is a death signal

    PubMed Central

    Andrabi, Shaida A.; Kim, No Soo; Yu, Seong-Woon; Wang, Hongmin; Koh, David W.; Sasaki, Masayuki; Klaus, Judith A.; Otsuka, Takashi; Zhang, Zhizheng; Koehler, Raymond C.; Hurn, Patricia D.; Poirier, Guy G.; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2006-01-01

    Excessive activation of the nuclear enzyme, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) plays a prominent role in various of models of cellular injury. Here, we identify poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymer, a product of PARP-1 activity, as a previously uncharacterized cell death signal. PAR polymer is directly toxic to neurons, and degradation of PAR polymer by poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) or phosphodiesterase 1 prevents PAR polymer-induced cell death. PARP-1-dependent, NMDA excitotoxicity of cortical neurons is reduced by neutralizing antibodies to PAR and by overexpression of PARG. Neuronal cultures with reduced levels of PARG are more sensitive to NMDA excitotoxicity than WT cultures. Transgenic mice overexpressing PARG have significantly reduced infarct volumes after focal ischemia. Conversely, mice with reduced levels of PARG have significantly increased infarct volumes after focal ischemia compared with WT littermate controls. These results reveal PAR polymer as a signaling molecule that induces cell death and suggests that interference with PAR polymer signaling may offer innovative therapeutic approaches for the treatment of cellular injury. PMID:17116882

  10. Genome-wide Distribution of AdpA, a Global Regulator for Secondary Metabolism and Morphological Differentiation in Streptomyces, Revealed the Extent and Complexity of the AdpA Regulatory Network

    PubMed Central

    Higo, Akiyoshi; Hara, Hirofumi; Horinouchi, Sueharu; Ohnishi, Yasuo

    2012-01-01

    AdpA is a global transcriptional activator triggering morphological differentiation and secondary metabolism in Streptomyces griseus. AdpA influences the expression of >1000 genes; however, the overall picture of the AdpA regulon remains obscure. Here, we took snapshots of the distribution of AdpA across the chromosome in living S. griseus cells using chromatin immunoprecipitation/chromatin affinity precipitation-seq analysis. In both liquid and solid cultures, AdpA bound to >1200 similar sites, which were located on not only in putative regulatory regions (65%), but also in regions (35%) that appeared not to affect transcription. Transcriptome analysis indicated that ∼40% of the AdpA-binding sites in putative regulatory regions were involved in gene regulation. AdpA was indicated to act as a transcriptional repressor as well as an activator. Expression profiles of AdpA-target genes were very different between liquid and solid cultures, despite their similar AdpA-binding profiles. We concluded that AdpA directly controls >500 genes in cooperation with other regulatory proteins. A comprehensive competitive gel mobility shift assay of AdpA with 304 selected AdpA-binding sites revealed several unique characteristics of the DNA-binding property of AdpA. This study provides the first experimental insight into the extent of the AdpA regulon, indicating that many genes are under the direct control of AdpA. PMID:22449632

  11. How to test the effect of aspirin and clopidogrel in patients on dual antiplatelet therapy?

    PubMed

    Bagoly, Zsuzsa; Homoródi, Nóra; Kovács, Emese Gyöngyvér; Sarkady, Ferenc; Csiba, László; Édes, István; Muszbek, László

    2016-01-01

    Dual antiplatelet therapy with clopidogrel and aspirin is frequently used for the prevention of recurrent ischemic events. Various laboratory methods are used to detect the effect of these drugs administered in monotherapy, however their value in dual therapy has not been explored. Here, we determined which methods used for testing the effect of clopidogrel or aspirin are influenced by the other antiplatelet agent. One arm of the study included 53 ischemic stroke patients being on clopidogrel monotherapy showing effective inhibition of the P2Y12 ADP receptor. Laboratory tests routinely used for the detection of aspirin resistance (arachidonic acid (AA)-induced platelet aggregation/secretion, AA-induced thromboxane B2 (TXB2) production in platelet-rich plasma and VerifyNow Aspirin assay) were carried out on samples obtained from these patients. The other arm of the study involved 52 patients with coronary artery disease being on aspirin monotherapy. Methods used for testing the effect of clopidogrel (ADP-induced platelet aggregation and secretion, flow cytometric analysis of vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) phosphorylation and a newly developed P2Y12-specific platelet aggregation (ADP[PGE1] test)) were performed on samples obtained from these patients. Clopidogrel monotherapy significantly inhibited AA-induced platelet aggregation and secretion, moreover, AA-induced TXB2 production was also significantly decreased. VASP phosphorylation and AA-induced platelet aggregation showed fair correlation in patients taking clopidogrel only. Clopidogrel did not inhibit the VerifyNow Aspirin test significantly. Aspirin monotherapy influenced ADP-induced platelet aggregation and secretion, but did not have an effect on VASP phosphorylation and on the ADP[PGE1] platelet aggregation test. PMID:26083485

  12. The Promise of Proteomics for the Study of ADP-ribosylation

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Casey M.; Ong, Shao-En; Leung, Anthony K. L.

    2015-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation is a post-translational modification where single units (mono-ADP-ribosylation) or polymeric chains (poly-ADP-ribosylation) of ADP-ribose are conjugated to proteins by ADP-ribosyltransferases. This post-translational modification and the ADP-ribosyltransferases (also known as PARPs) responsible for its synthesis have been found to play a role in nearly all major cellular processes, including DNA repair, transcription, translation, cell signaling and cell death. Furthermore, dysregulation of ADP-ribosylation has been linked to diseases including cancers, diabetes, neurodegenerative disorders and heart failure, leading to the development of therapeutic PARP inhibitors, many of which are currently in clinical trials. The study of this therapeutically important modification has recently been bolstered by the application of mass spectrometry-based proteomics, arguably the most powerful tool for the unbiased analysis of protein modifications. Unfortunately, progress has been hampered by the inherent challenges that stem from the physicochemical properties of ADP-ribose which as a post-translational modification is highly charged, heterogeneous (linear or branched polymers, as well as monomers), labile, and found on a wide range of amino acid acceptors. In this perspective, we discuss the progress that has been made in addressing these challenges, including the recent breakthroughs in proteomics techniques to identify ADP-ribosylation sites, and future developments to provide a proteome-wide view of the many cellular processes regulated by ADP-ribosylation. PMID:26091340

  13. Practical Experience of Discharge Measurement in Flood Conditions with ADP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidmar, A.; Brilly, M.; Rusjan, S.

    2009-04-01

    Accurate discharge estimation is important for an efficient river basin management and especially for flood forecasting. The traditional way of estimating the discharge in hydrological practice is to measure the water stage and to convert the recorded water stage values into discharge by using the single-valued rating curve .Relationship between the stage and discharge values of the rating curve for the extreme events are usually extrapolated by using different mathematical methods and are not directly measured. Our practice shows that by using the Accoustic Doppler Profiler (ADP) instrument we can record the actual relation between the water stage and the flow velocity at the occurrence of flood waves very successfully. Measurement in flood conditions it is not easy task, because of high water surface velocity and large amounts of sediments in the water and floating objects on the surface like branches, bushes, trees, piles and others which can also easily damage ADP instrument. We made several measurements in such extreme events on the Sava River down to the nuclear power plant Kr\\vsko where we have install fixed cable way. During the several measurement with traditional "moving-boat" measurement technique a mowing bed phenomenon was clearly seen. Measuring flow accurately using ADP that uses the "moving-boat" technique, the system needs a reference against which to relate water velocities to. This reference is river bed and must not move. During flood events we detected difficulty finding a static bed surface to which to relate water velocities. This is caused by motion of the surface layer of bed material or also sediments suspended in the water near bed very densely. So these traditional »moving-boat« measurement techniques that we normally use completely fail. Using stationary measurement method to making individual velocity profile measurements, using an Acoustic Doppler Profiler (ADP), at certain time at fixed locations across the width of a stream gave

  14. Diversity and impact of rare variants in genes encoding the platelet G protein-coupled receptors.

    PubMed

    Jones, Matthew L; Norman, Jane E; Morgan, Neil V; Mundell, Stuart J; Lordkipanidzé, Marie; Lowe, Gillian C; Daly, Martina E; Simpson, Michael A; Drake, Sian; Watson, Steve P; Mumford, Andrew D

    2015-04-01

    Platelet responses to activating agonists are influenced by common population variants within or near G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) genes that affect receptor activity. However, the impact of rare GPCR gene variants is unknown. We describe the rare single nucleotide variants (SNVs) in the coding and splice regions of 18 GPCR genes in 7,595 exomes from the 1,000-genomes and Exome Sequencing Project databases and in 31 cases with inherited platelet function disorders (IPFDs). In the population databases, the GPCR gene target regions contained 740 SNVs (318 synonymous, 410 missense, 7 stop gain and 6 splice region) of which 70 % had global minor allele frequency (MAF) < 0.05 %. Functional annotation using six computational algorithms, experimental evidence and structural data identified 156/740 (21 %) SNVs as potentially damaging to GPCR function, most commonly in regions encoding the transmembrane and C-terminal intracellular receptor domains. In 31 index cases with IPFDs (Gi-pathway defect n=15; secretion defect n=11; thromboxane pathway defect n=3 and complex defect n=2) there were 256 SNVs in the target regions of 15 stimulatory platelet GPCRs (34 unique; 12 with MAF< 1 % and 22 with MAF≥ 1 %). These included rare variants predicting R122H, P258T and V207A substitutions in the P2Y12 receptor that were annotated as potentially damaging, but only partially explained the platelet function defects in each case. Our data highlight that potentially damaging variants in platelet GPCR genes have low individual frequencies, but are collectively abundant in the population. Potentially damaging variants are also present in pedigrees with IPFDs and may contribute to complex laboratory phenotypes. PMID:25567036

  15. Diversity and impact of rare variants in genes encoding the platelet G protein-coupled receptors

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Matthew L.; Norman, Jane E.; Morgan, Neil V.; Mundell, Stuart J.; Lordkipanidzé, Marie; Lowe, Gillian C.; Daly, Martina E.; Simpson, Michael A.; Drake, Sian; Watson, Steve P.; Mumford, Andrew D.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Platelet responses to activating agonists are influenced by common population variants within or near G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) genes that affect receptor activity. However, the impact of rare GPCR gene variants is unknown. We describe the rare single nucleotide variants (SNVs) in the coding and splice regions of 18 GPCR genes in 7,595 exomes from the 1,000-genomes and Exome Sequencing Project databases and in 31 cases with inherited platelet function disorders (IPFDs). In the population databases, the GPCR gene target regions contained 740 SNVs (318 synonymous, 410 missense, 7 stop gain and 6 splice region) of which 70% had global minor allele frequency (MAF) < 0.05%. Functional annotation using six computational algorithms, experimental evidence and structural data identified 156/740 (21%) SNVs as potentially damaging to GPCR function, most commonly in regions encoding the transmembrane and C-terminal intracellular receptor domains. In 31 index cases with IPFDs (Gi-pathway defect n=15; secretion defect n=11; thromboxane pathway defect n=3 and complex defect n=2) there were 256 SNVs in the target regions of 15 stimulatory platelet GPCRs (34 unique; 12 with MAF<1% and 22 with MAF≥1%). These included rare variants predicting R122H, P258T and V207A substitutions in the P2Y12 receptor that were annotated as potentially damaging, but only partially explained the platelet function defects in each case. Our data highlight that potentially damaging variants in platelet GPCR genes have low individual frequencies, but are collectively abundant in the population. Potentially damaging variants are also present in pedigrees with IPFDs and may contribute to complex laboratory phenotypes. PMID:25567036

  16. Seasonal cycles of mitochondrial ADP sensitivity and oxidative capacities in trout oxidative muscle.

    PubMed

    Guderley, H; St Pierre, J

    1999-10-01

    Mitochondria from red myotomal muscle of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, showed seasonal cycles of their maximal rates of substrate oxidation (nmol.min-1 mg-1 mitochondrial protein) and their apparent ADP affinity (Kmapp), as well as in the thermal sensitivity of these properties. Increases in the maximal capacity of pyruvate oxidation were sufficient to compensate for seasonal changes in temperature, except during the winter months when rates at habitat temperature were depressed relative to other periods. The ADP affinity of isolated mitochondria was highest during cold months. Thus, the Kmapp for ADP at habitat temperature showed less seasonal variation than the ADP Kmapp at a given temperature. A loss in ADP affinity with decreasing temperature occurred through much of the year, and only was definitively suppressed in December and July. Both the ADP affinity and the maximal oxidative capacities of muscle mitochondria seem to be regulated parameters. PMID:10595316

  17. Structures of the Human Poly (ADP-Ribose) Glycohydrolase Catalytic Domain Confirm Catalytic Mechanism and Explain Inhibition by ADP-HPD Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Julie A.; Bennett, Neil; Brassington, Claire; Durant, Stephen T.; Hassall, Giles; Holdgate, Geoff; McAlister, Mark; Nissink, J. Willem M.; Truman, Caroline; Watson, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) is the only enzyme known to catalyse hydrolysis of the O-glycosidic linkages of ADP-ribose polymers, thereby reversing the effects of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases. PARG deficiency leads to cell death whilst PARG depletion causes sensitisation to certain DNA damaging agents, implicating PARG as a potential therapeutic target in several disease areas. Efforts to develop small molecule inhibitors of PARG activity have until recently been hampered by a lack of structural information on PARG. We have used a combination of bio-informatic and experimental approaches to engineer a crystallisable, catalytically active fragment of human PARG (hPARG). Here, we present high-resolution structures of the catalytic domain of hPARG in unliganded form and in complex with three inhibitors: ADP-ribose (ADPR), adenosine 5′-diphosphate (hydroxymethyl)pyrrolidinediol (ADP-HPD) and 8-n-octyl-amino-ADP-HPD. Our structures confirm conservation of overall fold amongst mammalian PARG glycohydrolase domains, whilst revealing additional flexible regions in the catalytic site. These new structures rationalise a body of published mutational data and the reported structure-activity relationship for ADP-HPD based PARG inhibitors. In addition, we have developed and used biochemical, isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance assays to characterise the binding of inhibitors to our PARG protein, thus providing a starting point for the design of new inhibitors. PMID:23251397

  18. Bovine spermatozoa incorporate 32Pi into ADP by an unknown pathway.

    PubMed

    Cheetham, J A; Lardy, H A

    1992-03-15

    Intact ejaculated bovine sperm incorporate 32Pi into ADP to a specific activity two to three times higher than into ATP. This contrasts with other cell types where ATP specific activity is higher than that of ADP. Predominant labeling of ADP may be partially due to compartmentation of ATP, but removal of cytosolic ATP does not change the relative labeling of ADP and ATP. Dilution of extracellular 32Pi following labeling resulted in loss of 70% of label from ADP but only 50% loss from gamma-ATP at 26 min. ADP was labeled in the absence of detectable ATP in the presence of rotenone plus antimycin. Fractionation of ejaculated sperm yielded midpieces that are depleted of adenylate kinase and have coupled respiration. ATP was labeled with 32Pi, but ADP was not in midpieces. Evidence for mitochondrial substrate level phosphorylation-supported incorporation of 32Pi into nucleotides was observed for intact sperm incubated with pyruvate and inhibitors of oxidative phosphorylation, but this activity did not occur in midpieces and does not appear to explain disproportionate labeling of ADP. We conclude that labeling of ADP in intact and permeabilized cells occurs by two pathways; one involves adenylate kinase, and the other is an unknown pathway which may be independent of ATP. PMID:1544901

  19. The structure and catalytic mechanism of a poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Slade, Dea; Dunstan, Mark S.; Barkauskaite, Eva; Weston, Ria; Lafite, Pierre; Dixon, Neil; Ahel, Marijan; Leys, David; Ahel, Ivan

    2011-01-01

    Posttranslational modification of proteins by poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation regulates many cellular pathways that are critical for genome stability, including DNA repair, chromatin structure, mitosis and apoptosis1. Poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) is composed of repeating ADP-ribose units linked via a unique glycosidic ribose-ribose bond, and is synthesised from NAD by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs)1,2. Poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) is the only protein capable of specific hydrolysis of the ribose-ribose bonds present in PAR chains; its deficiency leads to cell death3,4. Here we show that filamentous fungi and a number of bacteria possess a divergent form of PARG that exhibits all the main characteristics of the human PARG enzyme. We present the first PARG crystal structure (derived from the bacterium Thermomonospora curvata), which reveals that the PARG catalytic domain is a distant member of the ubiquitous ADP-ribose-binding macro domain family5,6. High resolution structures of T. curvata PARG in complexes with ADP-ribose and the PARG inhibitor ADP-HPD, complemented by biochemical studies, allow us to propose a model for PAR binding and catalysis by PARG. Our insights into the PARG structure and catalytic mechanism should greatly improve our understanding of how PARG activity controls reversible protein poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation and potentially of how the defects in this regulation link to human disease. PMID:21892188

  20. The transport mechanism of the mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier.

    PubMed

    Kunji, Edmund R S; Aleksandrova, Antoniya; King, Martin S; Majd, Homa; Ashton, Valerie L; Cerson, Elizabeth; Springett, Roger; Kibalchenko, Mikhail; Tavoulari, Sotiria; Crichton, Paul G; Ruprecht, Jonathan J

    2016-10-01

    The mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier imports ADP from the cytosol and exports ATP from the mitochondrial matrix, which are key transport steps for oxidative phosphorylation in eukaryotic organisms. The transport protein belongs to the mitochondrial carrier family, a large transporter family in the inner membrane of mitochondria. It is one of the best studied members of the family and serves as a paradigm for the molecular mechanism of mitochondrial carriers. Structurally, the carrier consists of three homologous domains, each composed of two transmembrane α-helices linked with a loop and short α-helix on the matrix side. The transporter cycles between a cytoplasmic and matrix state in which a central substrate binding site is alternately accessible to these compartments for binding of ADP or ATP. On both the cytoplasmic and matrix side of the carrier are networks consisting of three salt bridges each. In the cytoplasmic state, the matrix salt bridge network is formed and the cytoplasmic network is disrupted, opening the central substrate binding site to the intermembrane space and cytosol, whereas the converse occurs in the matrix state. In the transport cycle, tighter substrate binding in the intermediate states allows the interconversion of conformations by lowering the energy barrier for disruption and formation of these networks, opening and closing the carrier to either side of the membrane in an alternating way. Conversion between cytoplasmic and matrix states might require the simultaneous rotation of three domains around a central translocation pathway, constituting a unique mechanism among transport proteins. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mitochondrial Channels edited by Pierre Sonveaux, Pierre Maechler and Jean-Claude Martinou. PMID:27001633

  1. Molecular Bases of Catalysis and ADP-Ribose Preference of Human Mn2+-Dependent ADP-Ribose/CDP-Alcohol Diphosphatase and Conversion by Mutagenesis to a Preferential Cyclic ADP-Ribose Phosphohydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Cabezas, Alicia; Ribeiro, João Meireles; Rodrigues, Joaquim Rui; López-Villamizar, Iralis; Fernández, Ascensión; Canales, José; Pinto, Rosa María; Costas, María Jesús; Cameselle, José Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Among metallo-dependent phosphatases, ADP-ribose/CDP-alcohol diphosphatases form a protein family (ADPRibase-Mn-like) mainly restricted, in eukaryotes, to vertebrates and plants, with preferential expression, at least in rodents, in immune cells. Rat and zebrafish ADPRibase-Mn, the only biochemically studied, are phosphohydrolases of ADP-ribose and, somewhat less efficiently, of CDP-alcohols and 2´,3´-cAMP. Furthermore, the rat but not the zebrafish enzyme displays a unique phosphohydrolytic activity on cyclic ADP-ribose. The molecular basis of such specificity is unknown. Human ADPRibase-Mn showed similar activities, including cyclic ADP-ribose phosphohydrolase, which seems thus common to mammalian ADPRibase-Mn. Substrate docking on a homology model of human ADPRibase-Mn suggested possible interactions of ADP-ribose with seven residues located, with one exception (Cys253), either within the metallo-dependent phosphatases signature (Gln27, Asn110, His111), or in unique structural regions of the ADPRibase-Mn family: s2s3 (Phe37 and Arg43) and h7h8 (Phe210), around the active site entrance. Mutants were constructed, and kinetic parameters for ADP-ribose, CDP-choline, 2´,3´-cAMP and cyclic ADP-ribose were determined. Phe37 was needed for ADP-ribose preference without catalytic effect, as indicated by the increased ADP-ribose Km and unchanged kcat of F37A-ADPRibase-Mn, while the Km values for the other substrates were little affected. Arg43 was essential for catalysis as indicated by the drastic efficiency loss shown by R43A-ADPRibase-Mn. Unexpectedly, Cys253 was hindering for cADPR phosphohydrolase, as indicated by the specific tenfold gain of efficiency of C253A-ADPRibase-Mn with cyclic ADP-ribose. This allowed the design of a triple mutant (F37A+L196F+C253A) for which cyclic ADP-ribose was the best substrate, with a catalytic efficiency of 3.5´104 M-1s-1 versus 4´103 M-1s-1 of the wild type. PMID:25692488

  2. Abscisic acid signaling through cyclic ADP-ribose in plants

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yan; Kuzma, J.; Marechal, E.

    1997-12-19

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is the primary hormone that mediates plant responses to stresses such as cold, drought, and salinity. Single-cell microinjection experiments in tomato were used to identify possible intermediates involved in ABA signal transduction. Cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) was identified as a signaling molecule in the ABA response and was shown to exert its effects by way of calcium. Bioassay experiments showed that the amounts of cADPR in Arabidopsis thaliana plants increased in response to ABA treatment and before ABA-induced gene expression.

  3. Poly(ADP-ribose): From chemical synthesis to drug design.

    PubMed

    Drenichev, Mikhail S; Mikhailov, Sergey N

    2016-08-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) is an important biopolymer, which is involved in various life processes such as DNA repair and replication, modulation of chromatin structure, transcription, cell differentiation, and in pathogenesis of various diseases such as cancer, diabetes, ischemia and inflammations. PAR is the most electronegative biopolymer and this property is essential for its binding with a wide range of proteins. Understanding of PAR functions in cell on molecular level requires chemical synthesis of regular PAR oligomers. Recently developed methodologies for chemical synthesis of PAR oligomers, will facilitate the study of various cellular processes, involving PAR. PMID:27318540

  4. Presence of diadenosine polyphosphates in microdialysis samples from rat cerebellum in vivo: effect of mild hyperammonemia on their receptors.

    PubMed

    Gualix, Javier; Gómez-Villafuertes, Rosa; Pintor, Jesús; Llansola, Marta; Felipo, Vicente; Miras-Portugal, M Teresa

    2014-01-01

    Diadenosine triphosphate (Ap(3)A), diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap(4)A), and diadenosine pentaphosphate (Ap(5)A) have been identified in microdialysis samples from the cerebellum of conscious freely moving rats, under basal conditions, by means of a high-performance liquid chromatography method. The occurrence of Ap(3)A in the cerebellar microdyalisates is noteworthy, as the presence of this compound in the interstitial medium in neural tissues has not been previously described. The concentrations measured for the diadenosine polyphosphates in the cerebellar dialysate were (in nanomolar) 10.5 ± 2.9, 5.4 ± 1.2, and 5.8 ± 1.3 for Ap(3)A, Ap(4)A, and Ap(5)A, respectively. These concentrations are in the range that allows the activation of the presynaptic dinucleotide receptor in nerve terminals. However, a possible interaction of these dinucleotides with other purinergic receptors cannot be ruled out, as rat cerebellum expresses a variety of P2X or P2Y receptors susceptible to be activated by diadenosine polyphosphates, such as the P2X1-4, P2Y(1), P2Y(2), P2Y(4), and P2Y(12) receptors, as demonstrated by quantitative real-time PCR. Also, the ecto-nucleotide pyrophosphatases/phosphodiesterases NPP1 and NPP3, able to hydrolyze the diadenosine polyphosphates and terminate their extracellular actions, are expressed in the rat cerebellum. All these evidences contribute to reinforce the role of diadenosine polyphosphates as signaling molecules in the central nervous system. Finally, we have analyzed the possible differences in the concentration of diadenosine polyphosphates in the cerebellar extracellular medium and changes in the expression levels of their receptors and hydrolyzing enzymes in an animal model of moderate hyperammonemia. PMID:23943472

  5. 8-Bromo-cyclic inosine diphosphoribose: towards a selective cyclic ADP-ribose agonist

    PubMed Central

    Kirchberger, Tanja; Moreau, Christelle; Wagner, Gerd K.; Fliegert, Ralf; Siebrands, Cornelia C.; Nebel, Merle; Schmid, Frederike; Harneit, Angelika; Odoardi, Francesca; Flügel, Alexander; Potter, Barry V. L.; Guse, Andreas H.

    2009-01-01

    cADPR (cyclic ADP-ribose) is a universal Ca2+ mobilizing second messenger. In T-cells cADPR is involved in sustained Ca2+ release and also in Ca2+ entry. Potential mechanisms for the latter include either capacitative Ca2+ entry, secondary to store depletion by cADPR, or direct activation of the non-selective cation channel TRPM2 (transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily melastatin, member 2). Here we characterize the molecular target of the newly-described membrane-permeant cADPR agonist 8-Br-N1-cIDPR (8-bromo-cyclic IDP-ribose). 8-Br-N1-cIDPR evoked Ca2+ signalling in the human T-lymphoma cell line Jurkat and in primary rat T-lymphocytes. Ca2+ signalling induced by 8-Br-N1-cIDPR consisted of Ca2+ release and Ca2+ entry. Whereas Ca2+ release was sensitive to both the RyR (ryanodine receptor) blocker RuRed (Ruthenium Red) and the cADPR antagonist 8-Br-cADPR (8-bromo-cyclic ADP-ribose), Ca2+ entry was inhibited by the Ca2+ entry blockers Gd3+ (gadolinium ion) and SKF-96365, as well as by 8-Br-cADPR. To unravel a potential role for TRPM2 in sustained Ca2+ entry evoked by 8-Br-N1-cIDPR, TRPM2 was overexpressed in HEK (human embryonic kidney)-293 cells. However, though activation by H2O2 was enhanced dramatically in those cells, Ca2+ signalling induced by 8-Br-N1-cIDPR was almost unaffected. Similarly, direct analysis of TRPM2 currents did not reveal activation or co-activation of TRPM2 by 8-Br-N1-cIDPR. In summary, the sensitivity to the Ca2+ entry blockers Gd3+ and SKF-96365 is in favour of the concept of capacitative Ca2+ entry, secondary to store depletion by 8-Br-N1-cIDPR. Taken together, 8-Br-N1-cIDPR appears to be the first cADPR agonist affecting Ca2+ release and secondary Ca2+ entry, but without effect on TRPM2. PMID:19492987

  6. Regulation of force development studied by photolysis of caged ADP in rabbit skinned psoas fibers.

    PubMed

    Lu, Z; Swartz, D R; Metzger, J M; Moss, R L; Walker, J W

    2001-07-01

    The present study examined the effects of Ca(2+) and strongly bound cross-bridges on tension development induced by changes in the concentration of MgADP. Addition of MgADP to the bath increased isometric tension over a wide range of [Ca(2+)] in skinned fibers from rabbit psoas muscle. Tension-pCa (pCa is -log [Ca(2+)]) relationships and stiffness measurements indicated that MgADP increased mean force per cross-bridge at maximal Ca(2+) and increased recruitment of cross-bridges at submaximal Ca(2+). Photolysis of caged ADP to cause a 0.5 mM MgADP jump initiated an increase in isometric tension under all conditions examined, even at pCa 6.4 where there was no active tension before ADP release. Tension increased monophasically with an observed rate constant, k(ADP), which was similar in rate and Ca(2+) sensitivity to the rate constant of tension re-development, k(tr), measured in the same fibers by a release-re-stretch protocol. The amplitude of the caged ADP tension transient had a bell-shaped dependence on Ca(2+), reaching a maximum at intermediate Ca(2+) (pCa 6). The role of strong binding cross-bridges in the ADP response was tested by treatment of fibers with a strong binding derivative of myosin subfragment 1 (NEM-S1). In the presence of NEM-S1, the rate and amplitude of the caged ADP response were no longer sensitive to variations in the level of activator Ca(2+). The results are consistent with a model in which ADP-bound cross-bridges cooperatively activate the thin filament regulatory system at submaximal Ca(2+). This cooperative interaction influences both the magnitude and kinetics of force generation in skeletal muscle. PMID:11423418

  7. Rapamycin inhibits poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation in intact cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fahrer, Joerg; Wagner, Silvia; Buerkle, Alexander; Koenigsrainer, Alfred

    2009-08-14

    Rapamycin is an immunosuppressive drug, which inhibits the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase activity inducing changes in cell proliferation. Synthesis of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) is an immediate cellular response to genotoxic stress catalyzed mostly by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1), which is also controlled by signaling pathways. Therefore, we investigated whether rapamycin affects PAR production. Strikingly, rapamycin inhibited PAR synthesis in living fibroblasts in a dose-dependent manner as monitored by immunofluorescence. PARP-1 activity was then assayed in vitro, revealing that down-regulation of cellular PAR production by rapamycin was apparently not due to competitive PARP-1 inhibition. Further studies showed that rapamycin did not influence the cellular NAD pool and the activation of PARP-1 in extracts of pretreated fibroblasts. Collectively, our data suggest that inhibition of cellular PAR synthesis by rapamycin is mediated by formation of a detergent-sensitive complex in living cells, and that rapamycin may have a potential as therapeutic PARP inhibitor.

  8. Both subunits of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase are regulatory.

    PubMed

    Cross, Joanna M; Clancy, Maureen; Shaw, Janine R; Greene, Thomas W; Schmidt, Robert R; Okita, Thomas W; Hannah, L Curtis

    2004-05-01

    The allosteric enzyme ADP-Glc pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) catalyzes the synthesis of ADP-Glc, a rate-limiting step in starch synthesis. Plant AGPases are heterotetramers, most of which are activated by 3-phosphoglyceric acid (3-PGA) and inhibited by phosphate. The objectives of these studies were to test a hypothesis concerning the relative roles of the two subunits and to identify regions in the subunits important in allosteric regulation. We exploited an Escherichia coli expression system and mosaic AGPases composed of potato (Solanum tuberosum) tuber and maize (Zea mays) endosperm subunit fragments to pursue this objective. Whereas potato and maize subunits have long been separated by speciation and evolution, they are sufficiently similar to form active mosaic enzymes. Potato tuber and maize endosperm AGPases exhibit radically different allosteric properties. Hence, comparing the kinetic properties of the mosaics to those of the maize endosperm and potato tuber AGPases has enabled us to identify regions important in regulation. The data herein conclusively show that both subunits are involved in the allosteric regulation of AGPase. Alterations in the small subunit condition drastically different allosteric properties. In addition, extent of 3-PGA activation and extent of 3-PGA affinity were found to be separate entities, mapping to different regions in both subunits. PMID:15122037

  9. Frequency doubling of copper lasers using temperature-tuned ADP

    SciTech Connect

    Molander, W.A.

    1994-03-01

    The ability to generate high average power uv at 255 nm by frequency doubling the green line (510.6 nm) of copper lasers would greatly extend the utility of copper lasers. Material processing and microlithography are two areas of interest. The frequency-doubled copper laser could replace the KrF excimer laser, which has a similar wavelength (248 nm), in some applications. The frequency-doubled copper laser has a narrow linewidth and excellent beam quality at a competitive cost. Other attractive features are high reliability, low operating costs, and the absence of toxic gases. This paper will report recent progress in high-efficiency, high-average-power harmonic generation of the copper laser green line using noncritical phase matching in ADP. Frequency doubling of the yellow line (578.2 nm) and sum-frequency mixing of the two lines are also of interest. These processes, however, cannot be phase-matched in ADP and, therefore, will not be discussed here. The results reported and the issues identified here would be important in these other processes and also in many other frequency conversion schemes in the uv such as 4{omega} conversion of Nd{sup 3+}:YAG lasers.

  10. Nuclear ADP-Ribosylation Reactions in Mammalian Cells: Where Are We Today and Where Are We Going?

    PubMed Central

    Hassa, Paul O.; Haenni, Sandra S.; Elser, Michael; Hottiger, Michael O.

    2006-01-01

    Since poly-ADP ribose was discovered over 40 years ago, there has been significant progress in research into the biology of mono- and poly-ADP-ribosylation reactions. During the last decade, it became clear that ADP-ribosylation reactions play important roles in a wide range of physiological and pathophysiological processes, including inter- and intracellular signaling, transcriptional regulation, DNA repair pathways and maintenance of genomic stability, telomere dynamics, cell differentiation and proliferation, and necrosis and apoptosis. ADP-ribosylation reactions are phylogenetically ancient and can be classified into four major groups: mono-ADP-ribosylation, poly-ADP-ribosylation, ADP-ribose cyclization, and formation of O-acetyl-ADP-ribose. In the human genome, more than 30 different genes coding for enzymes associated with distinct ADP-ribosylation activities have been identified. This review highlights the recent advances in the rapidly growing field of nuclear mono-ADP-ribosylation and poly-ADP-ribosylation reactions and the distinct ADP-ribosylating enzyme families involved in these processes, including the proposed family of novel poly-ADP-ribose polymerase-like mono-ADP-ribose transferases and the potential mono-ADP-ribosylation activities of the sirtuin family of NAD+-dependent histone deacetylases. A special focus is placed on the known roles of distinct mono- and poly-ADP-ribosylation reactions in physiological processes, such as mitosis, cellular differentiation and proliferation, telomere dynamics, and aging, as well as “programmed necrosis” (i.e., high-mobility-group protein B1 release) and apoptosis (i.e., apoptosis-inducing factor shuttling). The proposed molecular mechanisms involved in these processes, such as signaling, chromatin modification (i.e., “histone code”), and remodeling of chromatin structure (i.e., DNA damage response, transcriptional regulation, and insulator function), are described. A potential cross talk between nuclear

  11. NO-Mediated [Ca2+]cyt Increases Depend on ADP-Ribosyl Cyclase Activity in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hotta, Carlos T.; Davey, Matthew P.; Dodd, Antony N.

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic ADP ribose (cADPR) is a Ca2+-mobilizing intracellular second messenger synthesized from NAD by ADP-ribosyl cyclases (ADPR cyclases). In animals, cADPR targets the ryanodine receptor present in the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum to promote Ca2+ release from intracellular stores to increase the concentration of cytosolic free Ca2+ in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), and cADPR has been proposed to play a central role in signal transduction pathways evoked by the drought and stress hormone, abscisic acid, and the circadian clock. Despite evidence for the action of cADPR in Arabidopsis, no predicted proteins with significant similarity to the known ADPR cyclases have been reported in any plant genome database, suggesting either that there is a unique route for cADPR synthesis or that a homolog of ADPR cyclase with low similarity might exist in plants. We sought to determine whether the low levels of ADPR cyclase activity reported in Arabidopsis are indicative of a bona fide activity that can be associated with the regulation of Ca2+ signaling. We adapted two different fluorescence-based assays to measure ADPR cyclase activity in Arabidopsis and found that this activity has the characteristics of a nucleotide cyclase that is activated by nitric oxide to increase cADPR and mobilize Ca2+. PMID:26932235

  12. Poly-ADP-ribosylation-mediated degradation of ARTD1 by the NLRP3 inflammasome is a prerequisite for osteoclast maturation.

    PubMed

    Wang, C; Qu, C; Alippe, Y; Bonar, S L; Civitelli, R; Abu-Amer, Y; Hottiger, M O; Mbalaviele, G

    2016-01-01

    Evidence implicates ARTD1 in cell differentiation, but its role in skeletal metabolism remains unknown. Osteoclasts (OC), the bone-resorbing cells, differentiate from macrophages under the influence of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor-activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL). We found that M-CSF induced ADP-ribosyltransferase diphtheria toxin-like 1 (ARTD1) auto-ADP-ribosylation in macrophages, a modification that marked ARTD1 for cleavage, and subsequently, for degradation upon RANKL exposure. We established that ARTD1 proteolysis was NLRP3 inflammasome-dependent, and occurred via the proteasome pathway. Since ARTD1 is cleaved at aspartate(214), we studied the impact of ARTD1 rendered uncleavable by D214N substitution (ARTD1(D214N)) on skeletal homeostasis. ARTD1(D214N), unlike wild-type ARTD1, was resistant to cleavage and degradation during osteoclastogenesis. As a result, ARTD1(D214N) altered histone modification and promoted the abundance of the repressors of osteoclastogenesis by interfering with the expression of B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein 1 (Blimp1), the master regulator of anti-osteoclastogenic transcription factors. Importantly, ARTD1(D214N)-expressing mice exhibited higher bone mass compared with controls, owing to decreased osteoclastogenesis while bone formation was unaffected. Thus, unless it is degraded, ARTD1 represses OC development through transcriptional regulation. PMID:27010854

  13. Poly-ADP-ribosylation-mediated degradation of ARTD1 by the NLRP3 inflammasome is a prerequisite for osteoclast maturation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, C; Qu, C; Alippe, Y; Bonar, S L; Civitelli, R; Abu-Amer, Y; Hottiger, M O; Mbalaviele, G

    2016-01-01

    Evidence implicates ARTD1 in cell differentiation, but its role in skeletal metabolism remains unknown. Osteoclasts (OC), the bone-resorbing cells, differentiate from macrophages under the influence of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor-activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL). We found that M-CSF induced ADP-ribosyltransferase diphtheria toxin-like 1 (ARTD1) auto-ADP-ribosylation in macrophages, a modification that marked ARTD1 for cleavage, and subsequently, for degradation upon RANKL exposure. We established that ARTD1 proteolysis was NLRP3 inflammasome-dependent, and occurred via the proteasome pathway. Since ARTD1 is cleaved at aspartate214, we studied the impact of ARTD1 rendered uncleavable by D214N substitution (ARTD1D214N) on skeletal homeostasis. ARTD1D214N, unlike wild-type ARTD1, was resistant to cleavage and degradation during osteoclastogenesis. As a result, ARTD1D214N altered histone modification and promoted the abundance of the repressors of osteoclastogenesis by interfering with the expression of B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein 1 (Blimp1), the master regulator of anti-osteoclastogenic transcription factors. Importantly, ARTD1D214N-expressing mice exhibited higher bone mass compared with controls, owing to decreased osteoclastogenesis while bone formation was unaffected. Thus, unless it is degraded, ARTD1 represses OC development through transcriptional regulation. PMID:27010854

  14. Microtubule protein ADP-ribosylation in vitro leads to assembly inhibition and rapid depolymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Scaife, R.M. ); Wilson, L. ); Purich, D.L. )

    1992-01-14

    Bovine brain microtubule protein, containing both tubulin and microtubule-associated proteins, undergoes ADP-ribosylation in the presence of ({sup 14}C)NAD{sup +} and a turkey erythrocyte mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase in vitro. The modification reaction could be demonstrated in crude brain tissue extracts where selective ADP-ribosylation of both the {alpha} and {beta} chains of tubulin and of the high molecular weight microtubule-associated protein MAP-2 occurred. In experiments with purified microtubule protein, tubulin dimer, the high molecular weight microtubule-associated protein MAP-2, and another high molecular weight microtubule-associated protein which may be a MAP-1 species were heavily labeled. Tubulin and MAP-2 incorporated ({sup 14}C)ADP-ribose to an average extent of approximately 2.4 and 30 mol of ADP-ribose/mol of protein, respectively. Assembly of microtubule protein into microtubules in vitro was inhibited by ADP-ribosylation, and incubation of assembled steady-state microtubules with ADP-ribosyltransferase and NAD{sup +} resulted in rapid depolymerization of the microtubules. Thus, the eukaryotic enzyme can ADP-ribosylate tubulin and microtubule-associated proteins to much greater extents than previously observed with cholera and pertussis toxins, and the modification can significantly modulate microtubule assembly and disassembly.

  15. Effect of ADP on binding of skeletal S1 to F-actin.

    PubMed

    Andreev, O A; Ushakov, D S; Borejdo, J

    1998-12-22

    The proximity of skeletal myosin subfragment-1 (S1) to actin, and its orientation with respect to thin filaments of single muscle fibers, were compared in the presence and in the absence of ADP. The proximity was assessed by the efficiency of carbodiimide-induced cross-linking and the orientation by polarization of fluorescence of probes attached to the essential light chains. ADP made no difference in proximity or orientation when the molar ratio of S1 to actin was low or high. However, at the intermediate ratios, ADP made a significant difference. Strong dissociating agents, AMP-PNP and PPi, made significant differences at all ratios. To explain this behavior, it is unnecessary to invoke the ADP-induced "swinging" of the tail of S1. Rather, it is simply explained by the "two-state" model which we proposed earlier, in which S1 binds to one or to two actin protomers, depending on the saturation of the filaments with S1s. The dissociation induced by the ADP shifts the equilibrium between the two bound states. At high and low degrees of saturation, ADP is unable to significantly decrease the amount of S1 bound to F-actin. However, at intermediate saturation levels, ADP causes significantly more S1s to bind to two actins. These results suggest that the ADP-induced changes seen at the intermediate molar ratios are due to the dissociation-induced reorientation of S1. PMID:9922150

  16. ADP modifies the function of the glucose transporter: studies with reconstituted liposomes.

    PubMed Central

    Sofue, M; Yoshimura, Y; Nishida, M; Kawada, J

    1993-01-01

    Modification of function of the glucose transporter by nucleotides was studied by using liposomes reconstituted with the human erythrocyte glucose transporter. ADP enclosed in the liposomes inhibited the uptake of D-glucose and nicotinamide in a dose-dependent manner, but other enclosed nucleotides (ATP, AMP, CDP, GDP, UDP) showed no effect on the uptake of both. Only intraliposomal ADP was effective, and extra-liposomal ADP was not, under our experimental conditions. Intraliposomal ADP did not change Km, but decreased Vmax to approximately one-third of control for uptake of both D-glucose and nicotinamide. However, the binding and the affinity of cytochalasin B to the reconstituted liposomes were not affected by intraliposomal ADP. The uptake of uridine was not changed in the presence of ADP, indicating that the nucleoside transporter co-existing in the liposomal membranes is not regulated by ADP. Human erythrocytes whose intracellular ATP was decreased by Ca2+ ionophore A23187 also showed decreased uptake of 2-deoxy-D-glucose and nicotinamide. This phenomenon was very similar to that found in the liposomes. These findings suggest the possibility that the function of the glucose transporter is directly and negatively modified by an increased concentration of intracellular ADP. PMID:8318016

  17. 10 CFR 95.49 - Security of automatic data processing (ADP) systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Security of automatic data processing (ADP) systems. 95.49 Section 95.49 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) FACILITY SECURITY CLEARANCE AND... automatic data processing (ADP) systems. Classified data or information may not be processed or produced...

  18. 10 CFR 95.49 - Security of automatic data processing (ADP) systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Security of automatic data processing (ADP) systems. 95.49 Section 95.49 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) FACILITY SECURITY CLEARANCE AND SAFEGUARDING OF NATIONAL SECURITY INFORMATION AND RESTRICTED DATA Control of Information § 95.49 Security of automatic data processing (ADP)...

  19. 10 CFR 95.49 - Security of automatic data processing (ADP) systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Security of automatic data processing (ADP) systems. 95.49 Section 95.49 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) FACILITY SECURITY CLEARANCE AND... automatic data processing (ADP) systems. Classified data or information may not be processed or produced...

  20. 10 CFR 95.49 - Security of automatic data processing (ADP) systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Security of automatic data processing (ADP) systems. 95.49 Section 95.49 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) FACILITY SECURITY CLEARANCE AND... automatic data processing (ADP) systems. Classified data or information may not be processed or produced...

  1. 10 CFR 95.49 - Security of automatic data processing (ADP) systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Security of automatic data processing (ADP) systems. 95.49 Section 95.49 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) FACILITY SECURITY CLEARANCE AND... automatic data processing (ADP) systems. Classified data or information may not be processed or produced...

  2. Effect of heat shock on poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase and DNA repair in Drosophila cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, N.L.; Kidwell, W.R.

    1982-04-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase, a chromatin-bound enzyme which attaches polyanionic chains of ADP-ribose to nuclear proteins, was found to be temperature sensitive in intact Drosophila melanogaster cells. The synthetase was completely inactivated by heat-shocking the cells at 37/sup 0/C for 5 min, a condition which had no appreciable effect on the subsequent growth of Drosophila cells at their physiological temperature. The heat-shock effect on synthetase was reversible; enzyme activity began to reappear about 2 hr post heat shock. During the 2-hr interval when poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase was absent, the cells were competent in repair of ..gamma..-ray-induced DNA strand breaks as shown by DNA sedimentation studies on alkaline sucrose gradients. It is thus concluded that poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis is unnecessary for repair of DNA strand breaks introduced by irradiation. The same conclusion was reached from the fact that two inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase 3-aminobenzamide and 5-methylnicotinamide, failed to block repair of ..gamma..-ray-induced DNA chain breaks even though both inhibitors reduced the amount of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesized in cells by 50-75%. Although it was found that the repair of DNA strand breaks is independent of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis, irradiation does activate the synthetase in control cells, as shown by radioimmunoassay of poly(ADP-ribose) levels.

  3. 32 CFR Appendix J to Part 154 - ADP Position Categories and Criteria for Designating Positions

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false ADP Position Categories and Criteria for Designating Positions J Appendix J to Part 154 National Defense Department of Defense OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY OF DEFENSE SECURITY DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE PERSONNEL SECURITY PROGRAM REGULATION Pt. 154, App. J Appendix J to Part 154—ADP Position Categories...

  4. A SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC ASSAY TO MEASURE RUBISCO ACTIVASE ACTIVATION ACTIVITY UNDER VARYING ATP:ADP RATIOS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ratio of ATP to ADP in the stroma is an important regulatory mechanism for controlling the activation state of Rubisco via Rubisco activase (activase). Understanding the response of activase to a varying ATP:ADP ratio should reveal insights into the regulation of photosynthesis. However, the cur...

  5. AdpA, key regulator for morphological differentiation regulates bacterial chromosome replication

    PubMed Central

    Wolański, Marcin; Jakimowicz, Dagmara; Zakrzewska-Czerwińska, Jolanta

    2012-01-01

    AdpA, one of the most pleiotropic transcription regulators in bacteria, controls expression of several dozen genes during Streptomyces differentiation. Here, we report a novel function for the AdpA protein: inhibitor of chromosome replication at the initiation stage. AdpA specifically recognizes the 5′ region of the Streptomyces coelicolor replication origin (oriC). Our in vitro results show that binding of AdpA protein decreased access of initiator protein (DnaA) to the oriC region. We also found that mutation of AdpA-binding sequences increased the accessibility of oriC to DnaA, which led to more frequent replication and acceleration of Streptomyces differentiation (at the stage of aerial hyphae formation). Moreover, we also provide evidence that AdpA and DnaA proteins compete for oriC binding in an ATP-dependent manner, with low ATP levels causing preferential binding of AdpA, and high ATP levels causing dissociation of AdpA and association of DnaA. This would be consistent with a role for ATP levels in determining when aerial hyphae emerge. PMID:22870392

  6. The NarE protein of Neisseria gonorrhoeae catalyzes ADP-ribosylation of several ADP-ribose acceptors despite an N-terminal deletion.

    PubMed

    Rodas, Paula I; Álamos-Musre, A Said; Álvarez, Francisca P; Escobar, Alejandro; Tapia, Cecilia V; Osorio, Eduardo; Otero, Carolina; Calderón, Iván L; Fuentes, Juan A; Gil, Fernando; Paredes-Sabja, Daniel; Christodoulides, Myron

    2016-09-01

    The ADP-ribosylating enzymes are encoded in many pathogenic bacteria in order to affect essential functions of the host. In this study, we show that Neisseria gonorrhoeae possess a locus that corresponds to the ADP-ribosyltransferase NarE, a previously characterized enzyme in N. meningitidis The 291 bp coding sequence of gonococcal narE shares 100% identity with part of the coding sequence of the meningococcal narE gene due to a frameshift previously described, thus leading to a 49-amino-acid deletion at the N-terminus of gonococcal NarE protein. However, we found a promoter region and a GTG start codon, which allowed expression of the protein as demonstrated by RT-PCR and western blot analyses. Using a gonococcal NarE-6xHis fusion protein, we demonstrated that the gonococcal enzyme underwent auto-ADP-ribosylation but to a lower extent than meningococcal NarE. We also observed that gonoccocal NarE exhibited ADP-ribosyltransferase activity using agmatine and cell-free host proteins as ADP-ribose acceptors, but its activity was inhibited by human β-defensins. Taken together, our results showed that NarE of Neisseria gonorrhoeae is a functional enzyme that possesses key features of bacterial ADP-ribosylating enzymes. PMID:27465490

  7. Phosphoproteomic Approach to Characterize Protein Mono- and Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation Sites from Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose), or PAR, is a cellular polymer implicated in DNA/RNA metabolism, cell death, and cellular stress response via its role as a post-translational modification, signaling molecule, and scaffolding element. PAR is synthesized by a family of proteins known as poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases, or PARPs, which attach PAR polymers to various amino acids of substrate proteins. The nature of these polymers (large, charged, heterogeneous, base-labile) has made these attachment sites difficult to study by mass spectrometry. Here we propose a new pipeline that allows for the identification of mono(ADP-ribosyl)ation and poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation sites via the enzymatic product of phosphodiesterase-treated ADP-ribose, or phospho(ribose). The power of this method lies in the enrichment potential of phospho(ribose), which we show to be enriched by phosphoproteomic techniques when a neutral buffer, which allows for retention of the base-labile attachment site, is used for elution. Through the identification of PARP-1 in vitro automodification sites as well as endogenous ADP-ribosylation sites from whole cells, we have shown that ADP-ribose can exist on adjacent amino acid residues as well as both lysine and arginine in addition to known acidic modification sites. The universality of this technique has allowed us to show that enrichment of ADP-ribosylated proteins by macrodomain leads to a bias against ADP-ribose modifications conjugated to glutamic acids, suggesting that the macrodomain is either removing or selecting against these distinct protein attachments. Ultimately, the enrichment pipeline presented here offers a universal approach for characterizing the mono- and poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated proteome. PMID:24920161

  8. Purification of recombinant poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases.

    PubMed

    Amé, Jean-Christophe; Kalisch, Thomas; Dantzer, Françoise; Schreiber, Valérie

    2011-01-01

    The purification of Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases from overexpressing cells (Sf9 insect cells, Escherichia coli) has been updated to a fast and reproducible three chromatographic steps protocol. After cell lysis, proteins from the crude extract are separated on a Heparine Sepharose™ column. The PARP-containing fractions are then affinity purified on a 3-aminobenzamide Sepharose™ chromatographic step. The last contaminants and the 3-methoxybenzamide used to elute the PARP from the previous affinity column are removed on the high-performance strong cations exchanger Source™ 15S matrix. The columns connected to an ÄKTA™ purifier system allow the purification of PARPs in 3 days with a high-yield recovery. As described in the protocol, more than 11 mg of pure and highly active mouse PARP-2 can be obtained from 1 L of Sf9 insect cell culture. PMID:21870259

  9. Crosstalk between poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and sirtuin enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Cantó, Carles; Sauve, Anthony A.; Bai, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) are NAD+ dependent enzymes that were identified as DNA repair proteins, however, today it seems clear that PARPs are responsible for a plethora of biological functions. Sirtuins (SIRTs) are NAD+-dependent deacetylase enzymes involved in the same biological processes as PARPs raising the question whether PARP and SIRT enzymes may interact with each other in physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Hereby we review the current understanding of the SIRT-PARP interplay in regard to the biochemical nature of the interaction (competition for the common NAD+ substrate, mutual posttranslational modifications and direct transcriptional effects) and the physiological, or pathophysiological consequences of the interactions (metabolic events, oxidative stress response, genomic stability and ageing). Finally, we give an overview of the possibilities of pharmacological intervention to modulate PARP and SIRT enzymes either directly, or through modulating NAD+ homeostasis. PMID:23357756

  10. Cholera toxin-induced ADP-ribosylation of a 46 kDa protein is decreased in brains of ethanol-fed mice

    SciTech Connect

    Nhamburo, P.T.; Hoffman, P.L.; Tabakoff, B.

    1988-01-01

    The acute in vitro effects of ethanol on cerebral cortical adenylate cyclase activity and beta-adrenergic receptor characteristics suggested a site of action of ethanol at Gs, the stimulatory guanine nucleotide binding protein. After chronic ethanol ingestion, the beta-adrenergic receptor appeared to be uncoupled (i.e., the form of the receptor with high affinity for agonist was undetectable), and stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity by isoproterenol or guanine nucleotides was reduced, suggesting an alteration in the properties of Gs. To further characterize this change, cholera and pertussis toxin-mediated /sup 32/P-ADP-ribosylation of mouse cortical membranes was assessed in mice that had chronically ingested ethanol in a liquid diet. /sup 32/P-labeled proteins were separated by SDS-PAGE and quantitated by autoradiography. There was a selective 30-50% decrease in cholera toxin-induced labeling of 46 kDa protein band in membranes of ethanol-fed mice, with no apparent change in pertussis toxin-induced labeling. The 46 kDa protein has a molecular weight similar to that of the alpha subunit of Gs, suggesting a reduced amount of this protein or a change in its characteristics as a substrate for cholera toxin-induced ADP-ribosylation in cortical membranes of ethanol-fed mice.

  11. Iduna protects the brain from glutamate excitotoxicity and stroke by interfering with poly(ADP-ribose) polymer-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Andrabi, Shaida A; Kang, Ho Chul; Haince, Jean-François; Lee, Yun-Il; Zhang, Jian; Chi, Zhikai; West, Andrew B; Koehler, Raymond C; Poirier, Guy G; Dawson, Ted M; Dawson, Valina L

    2011-06-01

    Glutamate acting on N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors induces neuronal injury following stroke, through activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) and generation of the death molecule poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymer. Here we identify Iduna, a previously undescribed NMDA receptor-induced survival protein that is neuroprotective against glutamate NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity both in vitro and in vivo and against stroke through interfering with PAR polymer-induced cell death (parthanatos). Iduna's protective effects are independent and downstream of PARP-1 activity. Iduna is a PAR polymer-binding protein, and mutation at the PAR polymer binding site abolishes the PAR binding activity of Iduna and attenuates its protective actions. Iduna is protective in vivo against NMDA-induced excitotoxicity and middle cerebral artery occlusion-induced stroke in mice. To our knowledge, these results define Iduna as the first known endogenous inhibitor of parthanatos. Interfering with PAR polymer signaling could be a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of neurologic disorders. PMID:21602803

  12. [Assessment of platelet function in man].

    PubMed

    Gaussem, Pascale

    2006-01-01

    Assessment of platelet function was primarily designed to explore patients with hemostatic disorders, but is becoming important for the monitoring of anti platelet agents, mostly aspirin and clopidogrel. Beside platelet counting, morphological analysis and bleeding time, a number of dedicated platelet function instruments are now available, generally allowing a rapid evaluation of platelet function in whole blood. The other tests including aggregometry and ELISA measurement of activation markers are generally restricted to specialized laboratories. Although aggregometry is still considered as the "gold standard", the recently developed flow cytometric-based platelet function analysis provides a wide choice of tests that assess the number of surface receptors, the measure of secretion and aggregation, the quantification of microparticules and leukocyte-platelet aggregates. It also allows the measure of the function of the ADP receptor P2Y12 by the phosphorylation level of the VASP protein, method currently under evaluation to monitor the platelet response to clopidogrel treatment. PMID:17243268

  13. Structure-Based Design of 3-(4-Aryl-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl)-Biphenyl Derivatives as P2Y14 Receptor Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Junker, Anna; Balasubramanian, Ramachandran; Ciancetta, Antonella; Uliassi, Elisa; Kiselev, Evgeny; Martiriggiano, Chiara; Trujillo, Kevin; Mtchedlidze, Giorgi; Birdwell, Leah; Brown, Kyle A; Harden, T Kendall; Jacobson, Kenneth A

    2016-07-14

    UDP and UDP-glucose activate the P2Y14 receptor (P2Y14R) to modulate processes related to inflammation, diabetes, and asthma. A computational pipeline suggested alternatives to naphthalene of a previously reported P2Y14R antagonist (3, PPTN) using docking and molecular dynamics simulations on a hP2Y14R homology model based on P2Y12R structures. By reevaluating the binding of 3 to P2Y14R computationally, two alternatives, i.e., alkynyl and triazolyl derivatives, were identified. Improved synthesis of fluorescent antagonist 4 enabled affinity quantification (IC50s, nM) using flow cytometry of P2Y14R-expressing CHO cells. p-F3C-phenyl-triazole 65 (32) was more potent than a corresponding alkyne 11. Thus, additional triazolyl derivatives were prepared, as guided by docking simulations, with nonpolar aryl substituents favored. Although triazoles were less potent than 3 (6), simpler synthesis facilitated further structural optimization. Additionally, relative P2Y14R affinities agreed with predicted binding of alkynyl and triazole analogues. These triazoles, designed through a structure-based approach, can be assessed in disease models. PMID:27331270

  14. Structure-Based Design of 3-(4-Aryl-1H-1,2,3-triazol-1-yl)-Biphenyl Derivatives as P2Y14 Receptor Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    UDP and UDP-glucose activate the P2Y14 receptor (P2Y14R) to modulate processes related to inflammation, diabetes, and asthma. A computational pipeline suggested alternatives to naphthalene of a previously reported P2Y14R antagonist (3, PPTN) using docking and molecular dynamics simulations on a hP2Y14R homology model based on P2Y12R structures. By reevaluating the binding of 3 to P2Y14R computationally, two alternatives, i.e., alkynyl and triazolyl derivatives, were identified. Improved synthesis of fluorescent antagonist 4 enabled affinity quantification (IC50s, nM) using flow cytometry of P2Y14R-expressing CHO cells. p-F3C-phenyl-triazole 65 (32) was more potent than a corresponding alkyne 11. Thus, additional triazolyl derivatives were prepared, as guided by docking simulations, with nonpolar aryl substituents favored. Although triazoles were less potent than 3 (6), simpler synthesis facilitated further structural optimization. Additionally, relative P2Y14R affinities agreed with predicted binding of alkynyl and triazole analogues. These triazoles, designed through a structure-based approach, can be assessed in disease models. PMID:27331270

  15. Binding of ATP to the progesterone receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Moudgil, V K; Toft, D O

    1975-01-01

    The possible interaction of progesterone--receptor complexes with nucleotides was tested by affinity chromatography. The cytosol progesterone receptor from hen oviduct was partially purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation before use. When progesterone was bound to the receptor, the resulting complex could be selectively adsorbed onto columns of ATP-Sepharose. This interaction was reversible and of an ionic nature since it could be disrupted by high-salt conditions. A competitive binding assay was used to test the specificity of receptor binding to several other nucleotides, including ADP, AMP, and cAMP. A clear specificity for binding ATP was evident from these studies. When ATP was added to receptor preparations, the nucleotide did not affect the sedimentation properties or hormone binding characteristics of the receptor. Although the function of ATP remains unknown, these studies indicate a role of this nucleotide in some aspect of hormone receptor activity. PMID:165493

  16. The inhibitory input to mouse cerebellar Purkinje cells is reciprocally modulated by Bergmann glial P2Y1 and AMPA receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Rudolph, Ramona; Jahn, Hannah M; Courjaret, Raphael; Messemer, Nanette; Kirchhoff, Frank; Deitmer, Joachim W

    2016-07-01

    Synaptic transmission has been shown to be modulated by glial functions, but the modes of specific glial action may vary in different neural circuits. We have tested the hypothesis, if Bergmann GLIA (BG) are involved in shaping neuronal communication in the mouse cerebellar cortex, using acutely isolated cerebellar slices of wild-type (WT) and of glia-specific receptor knockout mice. Activation of P2Y1 receptors by ADP (100 µM) or glutamatergic receptors by AMPA (0.3 µM) resulted in a robust, reversible and repeatable rise of evoked inhibitory input in Purkinje cells by 80% and 150%, respectively. The ADP-induced response was suppressed by prior application of AMPA, and the AMPA-induced response was suppressed by prior application of ADP. Genetic deletion or pharmacological blockade of either receptor restored the response to the other receptor agonist. Both ADP and AMPA responses were sensitive to Rose Bengal, which blocks vesicular glutamate uptake, and to the NMDA receptor antagonist D-AP5. Our results provide strong evidence that activation of both ADP and AMPA receptors, located on BGs, results in the release of glutamate, which in turn activates inhibitory interneurons via NMDA-type glutamate receptors. This infers that BG cells, by means of metabotropic signaling via their AMPA and P2Y1 receptors, which mutually suppress each other, would interdependently contribute to the fine-tuning of Purkinje cell activity in the cerebellar cortex. GLIA 2016. GLIA 2016;64:1265-1280. PMID:27144942

  17. Exploring a 2-Naphthoic Acid Template for the Structure-Based Design of P2Y14 Receptor Antagonist Molecular Probes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The P2Y14 receptor (P2Y14R), one of eight P2Y G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR), is involved in inflammatory, endocrine, and hypoxic processes and is an attractive pharmaceutical target. The goal of this research is to develop high-affinity P2Y14R fluorescent probes based on the potent and highly selective antagonist 4-(4-(piperidin-4-yl)-phenyl)-7-(4-(trifluoromethyl)-phenyl)-2-naphthoic acid (6, PPTN). A model of hP2Y14R based on recent hP2Y12R X-ray structures together with simulated antagonist docking suggested that the piperidine ring is suitable for fluorophore conjugation while preserving affinity. Chain-elongated alkynyl or amino derivatives of 6 for click or amide coupling were synthesized, and their antagonist activities were measured in hP2Y14R-expressing CHO cells. Moreover, a new Alexa Fluor 488 (AF488) containing derivative 30 (MRS4174, Ki = 80 pM) exhibited exceptionally high affinity, as compared to 13 nM for the alkyne precursor 22. A flow cytometry assay employing 30 as a fluorescent probe was used to quantify specific binding to P2Y14R. Known P2Y receptor ligands inhibited binding of 30 with properties consistent with their previously established receptor selectivities and affinities. These results illustrate that potency in this series of 2-naphthoic acid derivatives can be preserved by chain functionalization, leading to highly potent fluorescent molecular probes for P2Y14R. Such conjugates will be useful tools in expanding the SAR of this receptor, which still lacks chemical diversity in its collective ligands. This approach demonstrates the predictive power of GPCR homology modeling and the relevance of newly determined X-ray structures to GPCR medicinal chemistry. PMID:25299434

  18. ADP ribosylation of human neutrophil peptide-1 regulates its biological properties.

    PubMed

    Paone, Gregorino; Wada, Akihiro; Stevens, Linda A; Matin, Abul; Hirayama, Toshiya; Levine, Rodney L; Moss, Joel

    2002-06-11

    In human airways, epithelial cells lining the lumen and intraluminal cells (e.g., polymorphonuclear cells) participate in the innate immune response. These cells secrete or express on their surfaces arginine-specific ADP ribosyltransferases. Defensins, antimicrobial proteins secreted by immune cells, are arginine-rich, leading us to hypothesize that ADP ribosylation could modify their biological activities. We found that an arginine-specific ADP ribosyltransferase-1 present on airway epithelial cells modifies Arg-14 of alpha defensin-1. ADP-ribosylated defensin-1 had decreased antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities but still stimulated T cell chemotaxis and IL-8 release from A549 cells. Further, ADP-ribosylated defensin-1 inhibited cytotoxic and antimicrobial activities of unmodified defensin-1. We identified ADP-ribosylated defensin-1 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from smokers but not from nonsmokers, confirming its existence in vivo. Thus, airway mono-ADP-ribosyltransferases could have an important regulatory role in the innate immune response through modification of alpha defensin-1 and perhaps other basic molecules, with alteration of their biological properties. PMID:12060767

  19. Molecular and biochemical characterization of the ADP-dependent phosphofructokinase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus.

    PubMed

    Tuininga, J E; Verhees, C H; van der Oost, J; Kengen, S W; Stams, A J; de Vos, W M

    1999-07-23

    Pyrococcus furiosus uses a modified Embden-Meyerhof pathway involving two ADP-dependent kinases. Using the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the previously purified ADP-dependent glucokinase, the corresponding gene as well as a related open reading frame were detected in the genome of P. furiosus. Both genes were successfully cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli, yielding highly thermoactive ADP-dependent glucokinase and phosphofructokinase. The deduced amino acid sequences of both kinases were 21.1% identical but did not reveal significant homology with those of other known sugar kinases. The ADP-dependent phosphofructokinase was purified and characterized. The oxygen-stable protein had a native molecular mass of approximately 180 kDa and was composed of four identical 52-kDa subunits. It had a specific activity of 88 units/mg at 50 degrees C and a pH optimum of 6.5. As phosphoryl group donor, ADP could be replaced by GDP, ATP, and GTP to a limited extent. The K(m) values for fructose 6-phosphate and ADP were 2.3 and 0.11 mM, respectively. The phosphofructokinase did not catalyze the reverse reaction, nor was it regulated by any of the known allosteric modulators of ATP-dependent phosphofructokinases. ATP and AMP were identified as competitive inhibitors of the phosphofructokinase, raising the K(m) for ADP to 0.34 and 0.41 mM, respectively. PMID:10409652

  20. Adiponectin Agonist ADP355 Attenuates CCl4-Induced Liver Fibrosis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pradeep; Smith, Tekla; Rahman, Khalidur; Thorn, Natalie E.; Anania, Frank A.

    2014-01-01

    Liver fibrosis is a growing global health problem characterized by excess deposition of fibrillar collagen, and activation of hepatic stellate cells (HSCs). Adiponectin is known to possess anti-fibrotic properties; however a high physiological concentration and multiple forms circulating in blood prohibit clinical use. Recently, an adiponectin-like small synthetic peptide agonist (ADP355: H-DAsn-Ile-Pro-Nva-Leu-Tyr-DSer-Phe-Ala-DSer-NH2) was synthesized for the treatment of murine breast cancer. The present study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of ADP355 as an anti-fibrotic agent in the in vivo carbon tetrachloride (CCl4)-induced liver fibrosis model. Liver fibrosis was induced in eight-week old male C57BL/6J mice by CCl4-gavage every other day for four weeks before injection of a nanoparticle-conjugated with ADP355 (nano-ADP355). Control gold nanoparticles and nano-ADP355 were administered by intraperitoneal injection for two weeks along with CCl4-gavage. All mice were sacrificed after 6 weeks, and serum and liver tissue were collected for biochemical, histopathologic and molecular analyses. Biochemical studies suggested ADP355 treatment attenuates liver fibrosis, determined by reduction of serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase ALT) and hydroxyproline. Histopathology revealed chronic CCl4-treatment results in significant fibrosis, while ADP355 treatment induced significantly reversed fibrosis. Key markers for fibrogenesis–α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-β1), connective tissue growth factor (CTGF), and the tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase I (TIMP1) were also markedly attenuated. Conversely, liver lysates from ADP355 treated mice increased phosphorylation of both endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and AMPK while AKT phosphorylation was diminished. These findings suggest ADP355 is a potent anti-fibrotic agent that can be an effective intervention against liver fibrosis. PMID

  1. The Level of AdpA Directly Affects Expression of Developmental Genes in Streptomyces coelicolor ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Wolański, Marcin; Donczew, Rafał; Kois-Ostrowska, Agnieszka; Masiewicz, Paweł; Jakimowicz, Dagmara; Zakrzewska-Czerwińska, Jolanta

    2011-01-01

    AdpA is a key regulator of morphological differentiation in Streptomyces. In contrast to Streptomyces griseus, relatively little is known about AdpA protein functions in Streptomyces coelicolor. Here, we report for the first time the translation accumulation profile of the S. coelicolor adpA (adpASc) gene; the level of S. coelicolor AdpA (AdpASc) increased, reaching a maximum in the early stage of aerial mycelium formation (after 36 h), and remained relatively stable for the next several hours (48 to 60 h), and then the signal intensity decreased considerably. AdpASc specifically binds the adpASc promoter region in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that its expression is autoregulated; surprisingly, in contrast to S. griseus, the protein presumably acts as a transcriptional activator. We also demonstrate a direct influence of AdpASc on the expression of several genes whose products play key roles in the differentiation of S. coelicolor: STI, a protease inhibitor; RamR, an atypical response regulator that itself activates expression of the genes for a small modified peptide that is required for aerial growth; and ClpP1, an ATP-dependent protease. The diverse influence of AdpASc protein on the expression of the analyzed genes presumably results mainly from different affinities of AdpASc protein to individual promoters. PMID:21926228

  2. ADP inhibits function of the ABC transporter cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator via its adenylate kinase activity.

    PubMed

    Randak, Christoph O; Welsh, Michael J

    2005-02-01

    ADP interacts with the nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) to inhibit its Cl- channel activity. Because CFTR NBD2 has reversible adenylate kinase activity (ATP + AMP<==> ADP + ADP) that gates the channel, we asked whether ADP might inhibit current through this enzymatic activity. In adenylate kinases, binding of the two ADP molecules is cooperative. Consistent with this hypothesis, CFTR current inhibition showed positive cooperativity for ADP. We also found that ADP inhibition of current was attenuated when we prevented adenylate kinase activity with P1,P5-di(adenosine-5') pentaphosphate. Additional studies suggested that adenylate kinase-dependent inhibition involved phosphotransfer between two nucleotide diphosphates. These data indicate that the adenylate kinase reaction at NBD2 contributed to the inhibitory effect of ADP. Finding that ADP inhibits function via an adenylate kinase activity also helps explain the earlier observation that mutations that disrupt adenylate kinase activity also disrupt ADP inhibition. Thus, the results reveal a previously unrecognized mechanism by which ADP inhibits an ABC transporter. PMID:15684079

  3. ADP inhibits function of the ABC transporter cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator via its adenylate kinase activity

    PubMed Central

    Randak, Christoph O.; Welsh, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    ADP interacts with the nucleotide-binding domains (NBDs) of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) to inhibit its Cl- channel activity. Because CFTR NBD2 has reversible adenylate kinase activity (ATP + AMP ⇆ ADP + ADP) that gates the channel, we asked whether ADP might inhibit current through this enzymatic activity. In adenylate kinases, binding of the two ADP molecules is cooperative. Consistent with this hypothesis, CFTR current inhibition showed positive cooperativity for ADP. We also found that ADP inhibition of current was attenuated when we prevented adenylate kinase activity with P1,P5-di(adenosine-5′) pentaphosphate. Additional studies suggested that adenylate kinase-dependent inhibition involved phosphotransfer between two nucleotide diphosphates. These data indicate that the adenylate kinase reaction at NBD2 contributed to the inhibitory effect of ADP. Finding that ADP inhibits function via an adenylate kinase activity also helps explain the earlier observation that mutations that disrupt adenylate kinase activity also disrupt ADP inhibition. Thus, the results reveal a previously unrecognized mechanism by which ADP inhibits an ABC transporter. PMID:15684079

  4. Ticagrelor: Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics, Clinical Efficacy, and Safety

    PubMed Central

    Dobesh, Paul P; Oestreich, Julie H

    2014-01-01

    Dual antiplatelet therapy, composed of aspirin plus a P2Y12-receptor antagonist, is the cornerstone of treatment for patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). A number of U.S. Food and Drug Administration–approved P2Y12-receptor antagonists are available for treating patients with ACS, including the thienopyridine compounds clopidogrel and prasugrel. Ticagrelor, the first of a new class of antiplatelet agents, is a noncompetitive, direct-acting P2Y12-receptor antagonist. Unlike the thienopyridine compounds, ticagrelor does not require metabolism for activity. Also, whereas clopidogrel and prasugrel are irreversible inhibitors of the P2Y12 receptor, ticagrelor binds reversibly to inhibit receptor signaling and subsequent platelet activation. In pharmacodynamic studies, ticagrelor demonstrated faster onset and more potent inhibition of platelet aggregation than clopidogrel. These properties of ticagrelor may contribute to reduced rates of thrombotic outcomes compared with clopidogrel, as demonstrated in a phase III clinical trial. However, in addition to bleeding, distinctive adverse effects of this new chemical entity have not been reported with the thienopyridine P2Y12-receptor inhibitors. Although ticagrelor represents an advancement in P2Y12-receptor inhibition therapy, a thorough understanding of this compound as an antiplatelet therapy remains to be elucidated. PMID:25164528

  5. Excitotoxicity in the Lung: N-Methyl-D-Aspartate-Induced, Nitric Oxide-Dependent, Pulmonary Edema is Attenuated by Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide and by Inhibitors of Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Said, Sami I.; Berisha, Hasan I.; Pakbaz, Hedayatollah

    1996-05-01

    Excitatory amino acid toxicity, resulting from overactivation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptors, is a major mechanism of neuronal cell death in acute and chronic neurological diseases. We have investigated whether excitotoxicity may occur in peripheral organs, causing tissue injury, and report that NMDA receptor activation in perfused, ventilated rat lungs triggered acute injury, marked by increased pressures needed to ventilate and perfuse the lung, and by high-permeability edema. The injury was prevented by competitive NMDA receptor antagonists or by channel-blocker MK-801, and was reduced in the presence of Mg2+. As with NMDA toxicity to central neurons, the lung injury was nitric oxide (NO) dependent: it required L-arginine, was associated with increased production of NO, and was attenuated by either of two NO synthase inhibitors. The neuropeptide vasoactive intestinal peptide and inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase also prevented this injury, but without inhibiting NO synthesis, both acting by inhibiting a toxic action of NO that is critical to tissue injury. The findings indicate that: (i) NMDA receptors exist in the lung (and probably elsewhere outside the central nervous system), (ii) excessive activation of these receptors may provoke acute edematous lung injury as seen in the ``adult respiratory distress syndrome,'' and (iii) this injury can be modulated by blockade of one of three critical steps: NMDA receptor binding, inhibition of NO synthesis, or activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase.

  6. Excitotoxicity in the lung: N-methyl-D-aspartate-induced, nitric oxide-dependent, pulmonary edema is attenuated by vasoactive intestinal peptide and by inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    Said, S I; Berisha, H I; Pakbaz, H

    1996-01-01

    Excitatory amino acid toxicity, resulting from overactivation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptors, is a major mechanism of neuronal cell death in acute and chronic neurological diseases. We have investigated whether excitotoxicity may occur in peripheral organs, causing tissue injury, and report that NMDA receptor activation in perfused, ventilated rat lungs triggered acute injury, marked by increased pressures needed to ventilate and perfuse the lung, and by high-permeability edema. The injury was prevented by competitive NMDA receptor antagonists or by channel-blocker MK-801, and was reduced in the presence of Mg2+. As with NMDA toxicity to central neurons, the lung injury was nitric oxide (NO) dependent: it required L-arginine, was associated with increased production of NO, and was attenuated by either of two NO synthase inhibitors. The neuropeptide vasoactive intestinal peptide and inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase also prevented this injury, but without inhibiting NO synthesis, both acting by inhibiting a toxic action of NO that is critical to tissue injury. The findings indicate that: (i) NMDA receptors exist in the lung (and probably elsewhere outside the central nervous system), (ii) excessive activation of these receptors may provoke acute edematous lung injury as seen in the "adult respiratory distress syndrome," and (iii) this injury can be modulated by blockade of one of three critical steps: NMDA receptor binding, inhibition of NO synthesis, or activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. Images Fig. 3 PMID:8643465

  7. ADP-ribosylation of membrane components by pertussis and cholera toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Ribeiro-Neto, F.A.P.; Mattera, F.; Hildebrandt, J.D.; Codina, J.; Field, J.B.; Birnbaumer, L.; Sekura, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    Pertussis and cholera toxins are important tools to investigate functional and structural aspects of the stimulatory (N/sub s/) and inhibitory (N/sub i/) regulatory components of adenylyl cyclase. Cholera toxin acts on N/sub s/ by ADP-ribosylating its ..cap alpha../sub s/ subunit; pertussis toxin acts on N/sub i/ by ADP-ribosylating its ..cap alpha..; subunit. By using (/sup 32/P)NAD/sup +/ and determining the transfer of its (/sup 32/P)ADP-ribose moiety to membrane components, it is possible to obtain information on N/sub s/ and N/sub i/. A set of protocols is presented that can be used to study simultaneously and comparatively the susceptibility of N/sub s/ and N/sub i/ to be ADP-ribosylated by cholera and pertussis toxin.

  8. Effect of ADP on Na+-Na+ Exchange Reaction Kinetics of Na,K-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Peluffo, R. Daniel

    2004-01-01

    The whole-cell voltage-clamp technique was used in rat cardiac myocytes to investigate the kinetics of ADP binding to phosphorylated states of Na,K-ATPase and its effects on presteady-state Na+-dependent charge movements by this enzyme. Ouabain-sensitive transient currents generated by Na,K-ATPase functioning in electroneutral Na+-Na+ exchange mode were measured at 23°C with pipette ADP concentrations ([ADP]) of up to 4.3 mM and extracellular Na+ concentrations ([Na]o) between 36 and 145 mM at membrane potentials (VM) from −160 to +80 mV. Analysis of charge-VM curves showed that the midpoint potential of charge distribution was shifted toward more positive VM both by increasing [ADP] at constant Na+o and by increasing [Na]o at constant ADP. The total quantity of mobile charge, on the other hand, was found to be independent of changes in [ADP] or [Na]o. The presence of ADP increased the apparent rate constant for current relaxation at hyperpolarizing VM but decreased it at depolarizing VM as compared to control (no added ADP), an indication that ADP binding facilitates backward reaction steps during Na+-Na+ exchange while slowing forward reactions. Data analysis using a pseudo three-state model yielded an apparent Kd of ∼6 mM for ADP binding to and release from the Na,K-ATPase phosphoenzyme; a value of 130 s−1 for k2, a rate constant that groups Na+ deocclusion/release and the enzyme conformational transition E1∼P → E2-P; a value of 162 s−1M−1 for k−2, a lumped second-order VM-independent rate constant describing the reverse reactions; and a Hill coefficient of ∼1 for Na+o binding to E2-P. The results are consistent with electroneutral release of ADP before Na+ is deoccluded and released through an ion well. The same approach can be used to study additional charge-moving reactions and associated electrically silent steps of the Na,K-pump and other transporters. PMID:15298896

  9. Distribution of protein poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation systems across all domains of life

    PubMed Central

    Perina, Dragutin; Mikoč, Andreja; Ahel, Josip; Ćetković, Helena; Žaja, Roko; Ahel, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is a post-translational modification of proteins involved in regulation of many cellular pathways. Poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) consists of chains of repeating ADP-ribose nucleotide units and is synthesized by the family of enzymes called poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs). This modification can be removed by the hydrolytic action of poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) and ADP-ribosylhydrolase 3 (ARH3). Hydrolytic activity of macrodomain proteins (MacroD1, MacroD2 and TARG1) is responsible for the removal of terminal ADP-ribose unit and for complete reversion of protein ADP-ribosylation. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is widely utilized in eukaryotes and PARPs are present in representatives from all six major eukaryotic supergroups, with only a small number of eukaryotic species that do not possess PARP genes. The last common ancestor of all eukaryotes possessed at least five types of PARP proteins that include both mono and poly(ADP-ribosyl) transferases. Distribution of PARGs strictly follows the distribution of PARP proteins in eukaryotic species. At least one of the macrodomain proteins that hydrolyse terminal ADP-ribose is also always present. Therefore, we can presume that the last common ancestor of all eukaryotes possessed a fully functional and reversible PAR metabolism and that PAR signalling provided the conditions essential for survival of the ancestral eukaryote in its ancient environment. PARP proteins are far less prevalent in bacteria and were probably gained through horizontal gene transfer. Only eleven bacterial species possess all proteins essential for a functional PAR metabolism, although it is not known whether PAR metabolism is truly functional in bacteria. Several dsDNA viruses also possess PARP homologues, while no PARP proteins have been identified in any archaeal genome. Our analysis of the distribution of enzymes involved in PAR metabolism provides insight into the evolution of these important signalling systems, as well as

  10. The energetics of allosteric regulation of ADP release from myosin heads.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Del R; Baker, Josh E

    2009-06-28

    Myosin molecules are involved in a wide range of transport and contractile activities in cells. A single myosin head functions through its ATPase reaction as a force generator and as a mechanosensor, and when two or more myosin heads work together in moving along an actin filament, the interplay between these mechanisms contributes to collective myosin behaviors. For example, the interplay between force-generating and force-sensing mechanisms coordinates the two heads of a myosin V molecule in its hand-over-hand processive stepping along an actin filament. In muscle, it contributes to the Fenn effect and smooth muscle latch. In both examples, a key force-sensing mechanism is the regulation of ADP release via interhead forces that are generated upon actin-myosin binding. Here we present a model describing the mechanism of allosteric regulation of ADP release from myosin heads as a change, DeltaDeltaG(-D), in the standard free energy for ADP release that results from the work, Deltamicro(mech), performed by that myosin head upon ADP release, or DeltaDeltaG(-D) = Deltamicro(mech). We show that this model is consistent with previous measurements for strain-dependent kinetics of ADP release in both myosin V and muscle myosin II. The model makes explicit the energetic cost of accelerating ADP release, showing that acceleration of ADP release during myosin V processivity requires approximately 4 kT of energy whereas the energetic cost for accelerating ADP release in a myosin II-based actin motility assay is only approximately 0.4 kT. The model also predicts that the acceleration of ADP release involves a dissipation of interhead forces. To test this prediction, we use an in vitro motility assay to show that the acceleration of ADP release from both smooth and skeletal muscle myosin II correlates with a decrease in interhead force. Our analyses provide clear energetic constraints for models of the allosteric regulation of ADP release and provide novel, testable insights

  11. Quantitative site-specific ADP-ribosylation profiling of DNA-dependent PARPs.

    PubMed

    Gagné, Jean-Philippe; Ethier, Chantal; Defoy, Daniel; Bourassa, Sylvie; Langelier, Marie-France; Riccio, Amanda A; Pascal, John M; Moon, Kyung-Mee; Foster, Leonard J; Ning, Zhibin; Figeys, Daniel; Droit, Arnaud; Poirier, Guy G

    2015-06-01

    An important feature of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) is their ability to readily undergo automodification upon activation. Although a growing number of substrates were found to be poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated, including histones and several DNA damage response factors, PARPs themselves are still considered as the main acceptors of poly(ADP-ribose). By monitoring spectral counts of specific hydroxamic acid signatures generated after the conversion of the ADP-ribose modification onto peptides by hydroxylamine hydrolysis, we undertook a thorough mass spectrometry mapping of the glutamate and aspartate ADP-ribosylation sites onto automodified PARP-1, PARP-2 and PARP-3. Thousands of hydroxamic acid-conjugated peptides were identified with high confidence and ranked based on their spectral count. This semi-quantitative approach allowed us to locate the preferentially targeted residues in DNA-dependent PARPs. In contrast to what has been reported in the literature, automodification of PARP-1 is not predominantly targeted towards its BRCT domain. Our results show that interdomain linker regions that connect the BRCT to the WGR module and the WGR to the PRD domain undergo prominent ADP-ribosylation during PARP-1 automodification. We also found that PARP-1 efficiently automodifies the D-loop structure within its own catalytic fold. Interestingly, additional major ADP-ribosylation sites were identified in functional domains of PARP-1, including all three zinc fingers. Similar to PARP-1, specific residues located within the catalytic sites of PARP-2 and PARP-3 are major targets of automodification following their DNA-dependent activation. Together our results suggest that poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation hot spots make a dominant contribution to the overall automodification process. PMID:25800440

  12. ADP-stimulated contraction: A predictor of thin-filament activation in cardiac disease.

    PubMed

    Sequeira, Vasco; Najafi, Aref; Wijnker, Paul J M; Dos Remedios, Cristobal G; Michels, Michelle; Kuster, Diederik W D; van der Velden, Jolanda

    2015-12-15

    Diastolic dysfunction is general to all idiopathic dilated (IDCM) and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) patients. Relaxation deficits may result from increased actin-myosin formation during diastole due to altered tropomyosin position, which blocks myosin binding to actin in the absence of Ca(2+). We investigated whether ADP-stimulated force development (without Ca(2+)) can be used to reveal changes in actin-myosin blockade in human cardiomyopathy cardiomyocytes. Cardiac samples from HCM patients, harboring thick-filament (MYH7mut, MYBPC3mut) and thin-filament (TNNT2mut, TNNI3mut) mutations, and IDCM were compared with sarcomere mutation-negative HCM (HCMsmn) and nonfailing donors. Myofilament ADP sensitivity was higher in IDCM and HCM compared with donors, whereas it was lower for MYBPC3. Increased ADP sensitivity in IDCM, HCMsmn, and MYH7mut was caused by low phosphorylation of myofilament proteins, as it was normalized to donors by protein kinase A (PKA) treatment. Troponin exchange experiments in a TNNT2mut sample corrected the abnormal actin-myosin blockade. In MYBPC3trunc samples, ADP sensitivity highly correlated with cardiac myosin-binding protein-C (cMyBP-C) protein level. Incubation of cardiomyocytes with cMyBP-C antibody against the actin-binding N-terminal region reduced ADP sensitivity, indicative of cMyBP-C's role in actin-myosin regulation. In the presence of Ca(2+), ADP increased myofilament force development and sarcomere stiffness. Enhanced sarcomere stiffness in sarcomere mutation-positive HCM samples was irrespective of the phosphorylation background. In conclusion, ADP-stimulated contraction can be used as a tool to study how protein phosphorylation and mutant proteins alter accessibility of myosin binding on actin. In the presence of Ca(2+), pathologic [ADP] and low PKA-phosphorylation, high actin-myosin formation could contribute to the impaired myocardial relaxation observed in cardiomyopathies. PMID:26621701

  13. ADP-stimulated contraction: A predictor of thin-filament activation in cardiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Sequeira, Vasco; Najafi, Aref; Wijnker, Paul J. M.; Michels, Michelle; Kuster, Diederik W. D.; van der Velden, Jolanda

    2015-01-01

    Diastolic dysfunction is general to all idiopathic dilated (IDCM) and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) patients. Relaxation deficits may result from increased actin–myosin formation during diastole due to altered tropomyosin position, which blocks myosin binding to actin in the absence of Ca2+. We investigated whether ADP-stimulated force development (without Ca2+) can be used to reveal changes in actin–myosin blockade in human cardiomyopathy cardiomyocytes. Cardiac samples from HCM patients, harboring thick-filament (MYH7mut, MYBPC3mut) and thin-filament (TNNT2mut, TNNI3mut) mutations, and IDCM were compared with sarcomere mutation-negative HCM (HCMsmn) and nonfailing donors. Myofilament ADP sensitivity was higher in IDCM and HCM compared with donors, whereas it was lower for MYBPC3. Increased ADP sensitivity in IDCM, HCMsmn, and MYH7mut was caused by low phosphorylation of myofilament proteins, as it was normalized to donors by protein kinase A (PKA) treatment. Troponin exchange experiments in a TNNT2mut sample corrected the abnormal actin–myosin blockade. In MYBPC3trunc samples, ADP sensitivity highly correlated with cardiac myosin-binding protein-C (cMyBP-C) protein level. Incubation of cardiomyocytes with cMyBP-C antibody against the actin-binding N-terminal region reduced ADP sensitivity, indicative of cMyBP-C’s role in actin–myosin regulation. In the presence of Ca2+, ADP increased myofilament force development and sarcomere stiffness. Enhanced sarcomere stiffness in sarcomere mutation-positive HCM samples was irrespective of the phosphorylation background. In conclusion, ADP-stimulated contraction can be used as a tool to study how protein phosphorylation and mutant proteins alter accessibility of myosin binding on actin. In the presence of Ca2+, pathologic [ADP] and low PKA-phosphorylation, high actin–myosin formation could contribute to the impaired myocardial relaxation observed in cardiomyopathies. PMID:26621701

  14. Analytical Design Package (ADP2): A computer aided engineering tool for aircraft transparency design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wuerer, J. E.; Gran, M.; Held, T. W.

    1994-01-01

    The Analytical Design Package (ADP2) is being developed as a part of the Air Force Frameless Transparency Program (FTP). ADP2 is an integrated design tool consisting of existing analysis codes and Computer Aided Engineering (CAE) software. The objective of the ADP2 is to develop and confirm an integrated design methodology for frameless transparencies, related aircraft interfaces, and their corresponding tooling. The application of this methodology will generate high confidence for achieving a qualified part prior to mold fabrication. ADP2 is a customized integration of analysis codes, CAE software, and material databases. The primary CAE integration tool for the ADP2 is P3/PATRAN, a commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) software tool. The open architecture of P3/PATRAN allows customized installations with different applications modules for specific site requirements. Integration of material databases allows the engineer to select a material, and those material properties are automatically called into the relevant analysis code. The ADP2 materials database will be composed of four independent schemas: CAE Design, Processing, Testing, and Logistics Support. The design of ADP2 places major emphasis on the seamless integration of CAE and analysis modules with a single intuitive graphical interface. This tool is being designed to serve and be used by an entire project team, i.e., analysts, designers, materials experts, and managers. The final version of the software will be delivered to the Air Force in Jan. 1994. The Analytical Design Package (ADP2) will then be ready for transfer to industry. The package will be capable of a wide range of design and manufacturing applications.

  15. Multiple forms of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase from tomato fruit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, B. Y.; Janes, H. W.

    1997-01-01

    ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGP) was purified from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) fruit to apparent homogeneity. By sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis the enzyme migrated as two close bands with molecular weights of 50,000 and 51,000. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of the purified enzyme, however, revealed at least five major protein spots that could be distinguished by their slight differences in net charge and molecular weight. Whereas all of the spots were recognized by the antiserum raised against tomato fruit AGP holoenzyme, only three of them reacted strongly with antiserum raised against the potato tuber AGP large subunit, and the other two spots (with lower molecular weights) reacted specifically with antisera raised against spinach leaf AGP holoenzyme and the potato tuber AGP small subunit. The results suggest the existence of at least three isoforms of the AGP large subunit and two isoforms of the small subunit in tomato fruit in vivo. The native molecular mass of the enzyme determined by gel filtration was 220 +/- 10 kD, indicating a tetrameric structure for AGP from tomato fruit. The purified enzyme is very sensitive to 3-phosphoglycerate/inorganic phosphate regulation.

  16. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Exopolyphosphatase Is Also a Polyphosphate: ADP Phosphotransferase

    PubMed Central

    Beassoni, Paola R.; Gallarato, Lucas A.; Boetsch, Cristhian; Garrido, Mónica N.; Lisa, Angela T.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa exopolyphosphatase (paPpx; EC 3.6.1.11) catalyzes the hydrolysis of polyphosphates (polyP), producing polyPn−1 plus inorganic phosphate (Pi). In a recent work we have shown that paPpx is involved in the pathogenesis of P. aeruginosa. The present study was aimed at performing the biochemical characterization of this enzyme. We found some properties that were already described for E. coli Ppx (ecPpx) but we also discovered new and original characteristics of paPpx: (i) the peptide that connects subdomains II and III is essential for enzyme activity; (ii) NH4+ is an activator of the enzyme and may function at concentrations lower than those of K+; (iii) Zn2+ is also an activator of paPpx and may substitute Mg2+ in the catalytic site; and (iv) paPpx also has phosphotransferase activity, dependent on Mg2+ and capable of producing ATP regardless of the presence or absence of K+ or NH4+ ions. In addition, we detected that the active site responsible for the phosphatase activity is also responsible for the phosphotransferase activity. Through the combination of molecular modeling and docking techniques, we propose a model of the paPpx N-terminal domain in complex with a polyP chain of 7 residues long and a molecule of ADP to explain the phosphotransferase activity. PMID:26576296

  17. Poly (ADP-ribose) in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yunjong; Kang, Ho Chul; Lee, Byoung Dae; Lee, Yun-Il; Kim, Young Pil; Shin, Joo-Ho

    2014-01-01

    The defining feature of Parkinson’s disease is a progressive and selective demise of dopaminergic neurons. A recent report on Parkinson’s disease animal model demonstrates that poly (ADP-ribose) (PAR) dependent cell death, also named parthanatos, is accountable for selective dopaminergic neuronal loss. Parthanatos is a programmed necrotic cell death, characterized by PARP1 activation, apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) nuclear translocation, and large scale DNA fragmentation. Besides cell death regulation via interaction with AIF, PAR molecule mediates diverse cellular processes including genomic stability, cell division, transcription, epigenetic regulation, and stress granule formation. In this review, we will discuss the roles of PARP1 activation and PAR molecules in the pathological processes of Parkinson’s disease. Potential interaction between PAR molecule and Parkinson’s disease protein interactome are briefly introduced. Finally, we suggest promising points of therapeutic intervention in the pathological PAR signaling cascade to halt progression in Parkinson’s disease. [BMB Reports 2014; 47(8): 424-432] PMID:24874851

  18. Increased poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase activity in cells infected by human immunodeficiency virus type-1.

    PubMed

    Furlini, G; Re, M C; La Placa, M

    1991-04-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase is a chromatin-bound enzyme which is activated by free DNA ends and is therefore stimulated by a variety of DNA-damaging agents. The enzyme transfers the ADP moiety of NAD to nuclear proteins to create protein-bound ADP-ribose polymers. Under conditions favouring an accelerated poly(ADP-ribose) polymer formation, the enzyme may exhaust cellular NAD pools. At the same time, or shortly thereafter ATP levels drop and cell viability eventually declines. As a series of chemical and physical agents which may play a role in activating latent HIV-1 infection or favouring HIV-1 replication, have a DNA-damaging activity, we investigated the behaviour of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase activity in various types of HIV-1-infected cells. The results obtained show that HIV-1-infected cells to possess an increased poly(ADP-ribosol)ating activity together with an accentuated fragmentation of cellular DNA which are associated with the time course of HIV-1 replication. These data give circumstantial support to the hypothesis that a NAD-depdendent cellular suicide response to DNA damage, could play a role in the death of HIV-1 infected cells. In this respect, the impared immunocompetence of HIV-1-infected patients could bear some resemblance to immune attribution that sometimes accompanies some inborn errors affecting DNA precursor metabolism and DNA integrity. PMID:1906973

  19. Modulation of the chloroplast ATPase by tight ADP binding. Effect of uncouplers and ATP.

    PubMed

    Bar-Zvi, D; Shavit, N

    1982-12-01

    Inactivation of the membrane-bound ATPase by tight ADP binding was studied under nonenergized conditions. The energy state of the system was controlled either by omitting MgCl2, preventing ATP hydrolysis, or by addition of an uncoupler which dissipates the delta mu H+. In the absence of Mg2+, ATP prevents the inactivation of the enzyme by ADP, in a competitive manner. This effect of ATP resembles that of GDP with Mg2+ present. In the presence of nigericin, Mg2+, and ATP, inactivation occurs after a 10-15-sec interval, during which the enzyme is able to hydrolyze ATP at a relatively rapid rate. The degree of inactivation is proportional to the level of bound ADP detected. This behavior is different from that of the coupled ATPase (no uncoupler added), where inactivation is attained only upon exhaustion of the ATP by its hydrolysis, despite the finding that ADP binds tightly to the active ATPase at all stages of the reaction. Higher levels of tightly bound ADP were detected in the presence of an uncoupler. We suggest that the interval during which the enzyme becomes inactive is that required for the enzyme to generate and bind ADP, and to change from the active to the inactive conformation. These results support the mechanism suggested previously for the modulation of the ATPase by tight nucleotide binding. PMID:6219104

  20. Heterogeneity of ADP Diffusion and Regulation of Respiration in Cardiac Cells

    PubMed Central

    Saks, Valdur; Kuznetsov, Andrey; Andrienko, Tatiana; Usson, Yves; Appaix, Florence; Guerrero, Karen; Kaambre, Tuuli; Sikk, Peeter; Lemba, Maris; Vendelin, Marko

    2003-01-01

    Heterogeneity of ADP diffusion and regulation of respiration were studied in permeabilized cardiomyocytes and cardiac fibers in situ and in silico. Regular arrangement of mitochondria in cells was altered by short-time treatment with trypsin and visualized by confocal microscopy. Manipulation of matrix volumes by changing K+ and sucrose concentrations did not affect the affinity for ADP either in isolated heart mitochondria or in skinned fibers. Pyruvate kinase (PK)-phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) were used to trap ADP generated in Ca,MgATPase reactions. Inhibition of respiration by PK-PEP increased 2–3 times after disorganization of regular mitochondrial arrangement in cells. ADP produced locally in the mitochondrial creatine kinase reaction was not accessible to PK-PEP in intact permeabilized fibers, but some part of it was released from mitochondria after short proteolysis due to increased permeability of outer mitochondrial membrane. In in silico studies we show by mathematical modeling that these results can be explained by heterogeneity of ADP diffusion due to its restrictions at the outer mitochondrial membrane and in close areas, which is changed after proteolysis. Localized restrictions and heterogeneity of ADP diffusion demonstrate the importance of mitochondrial functional complexes with sarcoplasmic reticulum and myofibrillar structures and creatine kinase in regulation of oxidative phosphorylation. PMID:12719270

  1. Protein Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation Regulates Arabidopsis Immune Gene Expression and Defense Responses

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Baomin; Liu, Chenglong; de Oliveira, Marcos V. V.; Intorne, Aline C.; Li, Bo; Babilonia, Kevin; de Souza Filho, Gonçalo A.; Shan, Libo; He, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Perception of microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) elicits transcriptional reprogramming in hosts and activates defense to pathogen attacks. The molecular mechanisms underlying plant pattern-triggered immunity remain elusive. A genetic screen identified Arabidopsis poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase 1 (atparg1) mutant with elevated immune gene expression upon multiple MAMP and pathogen treatments. Poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) is predicted to remove poly(ADP-ribose) polymers on acceptor proteins modified by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) with three PARPs and two PARGs in Arabidopsis genome. AtPARP1 and AtPARP2 possess poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activity, and the activity of AtPARP2 was enhanced by MAMP treatment. AtPARG1, but not AtPARG2, carries glycohydrolase activity in vivo and in vitro. Importantly, mutation (G450R) in atparg1 blocks its activity and the corresponding residue is highly conserved and essential for human HsPARG activity. Consistently, mutant atparp1atparp2 plants exhibited compromised immune gene activation and enhanced susceptibility to pathogen infections. Our study indicates that protein poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation plays critical roles in plant immune gene expression and defense to pathogen attacks. PMID:25569773

  2. Analysis of poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase activity in nuclear extracts from mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, R; Rossi, L; Poirier, G G; Scovassi, A I

    1997-03-01

    We have analysed poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase, the enzyme responsible for in vivo degradation of ADP-ribose polymers, by means of a biochemical assay based on the capacity of the enzyme to use a synthetic 32P-labelled polymer as a substrate. The visualization of the reaction has been achieved by separation of poly and mono(ADP-ribose) by thin-layer chromatography followed by autoradiography, whereas polymer hydrolysis has been quantified by counting the spots corresponding to poly and mono(ADP-ribose). By addition of the enzyme inhibitor ethacridine to the reaction mixture, we have confirmed the specificity of the procedure we have developed. The protocol has been applied to study the specific activity of glycohydrolase in nuclear extracts from different mammalian cell lines and to an apoptotic experimental system, namely HL60 cells treated with etoposide. We have observed the activation of the enzyme after a two-hour drug treatment, that is concomitant with the activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, the enzyme which synthesizes the polymer. These data suggest a precise regulation of ADP-ribosylation process during cell death by apoptosis. PMID:9074616

  3. Two Arabidopsis ADP-Glucose Pyrophosphorylase Large Subunits (APL1 and APL2) Are Catalytic1

    PubMed Central

    Ventriglia, Tiziana; Kuhn, Misty L.; Ruiz, Ma Teresa; Ribeiro-Pedro, Marina; Valverde, Federico; Ballicora, Miguel A.; Preiss, Jack; Romero, José M.

    2008-01-01

    ADP-glucose (Glc) pyrophosphorylase (ADP-Glc PPase) catalyzes the first committed step in starch biosynthesis. Higher plant ADP-Glc PPase is a heterotetramer (α2β2) consisting of two small and two large subunits. There is increasing evidence that suggests that catalytic and regulatory properties of the enzyme from higher plants result from the synergy of both types of subunits. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), two genes encode small subunits (APS1 and APS2) and four large subunits (APL1–APL4). Here, we show that in Arabidopsis, APL1 and APL2, besides their regulatory role, have catalytic activity. Heterotetramers formed by combinations of a noncatalytic APS1 and the four large subunits showed that APL1 and APL2 exhibited ADP-Glc PPase activity with distinctive sensitivities to the allosteric activator (3-phosphoglycerate). Mutation of the Glc-1-P binding site of Arabidopsis and potato (Solanum tuberosum) isoforms confirmed these observations. To determine the relevance of these activities in planta, a T-DNA mutant of APS1 (aps1) was characterized. aps1 is starchless, lacks ADP-Glc PPase activity, APS1 mRNA, and APS1 protein, and is late flowering in long days. Transgenic lines of the aps1 mutant, expressing an inactivated form of APS1, recovered the wild-type phenotype, indicating that APL1 and APL2 have catalytic activity and may contribute to ADP-Glc synthesis in planta. PMID:18614708

  4. Two Arabidopsis ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase large subunits (APL1 and APL2) are catalytic.

    PubMed

    Ventriglia, Tiziana; Kuhn, Misty L; Ruiz, Ma Teresa; Ribeiro-Pedro, Marina; Valverde, Federico; Ballicora, Miguel A; Preiss, Jack; Romero, José M

    2008-09-01

    ADP-glucose (Glc) pyrophosphorylase (ADP-Glc PPase) catalyzes the first committed step in starch biosynthesis. Higher plant ADP-Glc PPase is a heterotetramer (alpha(2)beta(2)) consisting of two small and two large subunits. There is increasing evidence that suggests that catalytic and regulatory properties of the enzyme from higher plants result from the synergy of both types of subunits. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), two genes encode small subunits (APS1 and APS2) and four large subunits (APL1-APL4). Here, we show that in Arabidopsis, APL1 and APL2, besides their regulatory role, have catalytic activity. Heterotetramers formed by combinations of a noncatalytic APS1 and the four large subunits showed that APL1 and APL2 exhibited ADP-Glc PPase activity with distinctive sensitivities to the allosteric activator (3-phosphoglycerate). Mutation of the Glc-1-P binding site of Arabidopsis and potato (Solanum tuberosum) isoforms confirmed these observations. To determine the relevance of these activities in planta, a T-DNA mutant of APS1 (aps1) was characterized. aps1 is starchless, lacks ADP-Glc PPase activity, APS1 mRNA, and APS1 protein, and is late flowering in long days. Transgenic lines of the aps1 mutant, expressing an inactivated form of APS1, recovered the wild-type phenotype, indicating that APL1 and APL2 have catalytic activity and may contribute to ADP-Glc synthesis in planta. PMID:18614708

  5. ADP-dependent 6-Phosphofructokinase from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3: STRUCTURE DETERMINATION AND BIOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF PH1645

    SciTech Connect

    Currie, Mark A.; Merino, Felipe; Skarina, Tatiana; Wong, Andrew H.Y.; Singer, Alexander; Brown, Greg; Savchenko, Alexei; Caniuguir, Andrés; Guixé, Victoria; Yakunin, Alexander F.; Jia, Zongchao

    2009-12-01

    Some hyperthermophilic archaea use a modified glycolytic pathway that employs an ADP-dependent glucokinase (ADP-GK) and an ADP-dependent phosphofructokinase (ADP-PFK) or, in the case of Methanococcus jannaschii, a bifunctional ADP-dependent glucophosphofructokinase (ADP-GK/PFK). The crystal structures of three ADP-GKs have been determined. However, there is no structural information available for ADP-PFKs or the ADP-GK/PFK. Here, we present the first crystal structure of an ADP-PFK from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3 (PhPFK) in both apo- and AMP-bound forms determined to 2.0-{angstrom} and 1.9-{angstrom} resolution, respectively, along with biochemical characterization of the enzyme. The overall structure of PhPFK maintains a similar large and small {alpha}/{beta} domain structure seen in the ADP-GK structures. A large conformational change accompanies binding of phosphoryl donor, acceptor, or both, in all members of the ribokinase superfamily characterized thus far, which is believed to be critical to enzyme function. Surprisingly, no such conformational change was observed in the AMP-bound PhPFK structure compared with the apo structure. Through comprehensive site-directed mutagenesis of the substrate binding pocket we identified residues that were critical for both substrate recognition and the phosphotransfer reaction. The catalytic residues and many of the substrate binding residues are conserved between PhPFK and ADP-GKs; however, four key residues differ in the sugar-binding pocket, which we have shown determine the sugar-binding specificity. Using these results we were able to engineer a mutant PhPFK that mimics the ADP-GK/PFK and is able to phosphorylate both fructose 6-phosphate and glucose.

  6. Vault-poly-ADP-ribose polymerase in the Octopus vulgaris brain: a regulatory factor of actin polymerization dynamic.

    PubMed

    De Maio, Anna; Natale, Emiliana; Rotondo, Sergio; Di Cosmo, Anna; Faraone-Mennella, Maria Rosaria

    2013-09-01

    Our previous behavioural, biochemical and immunohistochemical analyses conducted in selected regions (supra/sub oesophageal masses) of the Octopus vulgaris brain detected a cytoplasmic poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (more than 90% of total enzyme activity). The protein was identified as the vault-free form of vault-poly-ADP-ribose polymerase. The present research extends and integrates the biochemical characterization of poly-ADP-ribosylation system, namely, reaction product, i.e., poly-ADP-ribose, and acceptor proteins, in the O. vulgaris brain. Immunochemical analyses evidenced that the sole poly-ADP-ribose acceptor was the octopus cytoskeleton 50-kDa actin. It was present in both free, endogenously poly-ADP-ribosylated form (70kDa) and in complex with V-poly-ADP-ribose polymerase and poly-ADP-ribose (260kDa). The components of this complex, alkali and high salt sensitive, were purified and characterized. The kind and the length of poly-ADP-ribose corresponded to linear chains of 30-35 ADP-ribose units, in accordance with the features of the polymer synthesized by the known vault-poly-ADP-ribose polymerase. In vitro experiments showed that V-poly-ADP-ribose polymerase activity of brain cytoplasmic fraction containing endogenous actin increased upon the addition of commercial actin and was highly reduced by ATP. Anti-actin immunoblot of the mixture in the presence and absence of ATP showed that the poly-ADP-ribosylation of octopus actin is a dynamic process balanced by the ATP-dependent polymerization of the cytoskeleton protein, a fundamental mechanism for synaptic plasticity. PMID:23831359

  7. Thermodynamics of nucleotide binding to actomyosin V and VI: a positive heat capacity change accompanies strong ADP binding.

    PubMed

    Robblee, James P; Cao, Wenxiang; Henn, Arnon; Hannemann, Diane E; De La Cruz, Enrique M

    2005-08-01

    We have measured the energetics of ATP and ADP binding to single-headed actomyosin V and VI from the temperature dependence of the rate and equilibrium binding constants. Nucleotide binding to actomyosin V and VI can be modeled as two-step binding mechanisms involving the formation of collision complexes followed by isomerization to states with high nucleotide affinity. Formation of the actomyosin VI-ATP collision complex is much weaker and slower than for actomyosin V. A three-step binding mechanism where actomyosin VI isomerizes between two conformations, one competent to bind ATP and one not, followed by rapid ATP binding best accounts for the data. ADP binds to actomyosin V more tightly than actomyosin VI. At 25 degrees C, the strong ADP-binding equilibria are comparable for actomyosin V and VI, and the different overall ADP affinities arise from differences in the ADP collision complex affinity. The actomyosin-ADP isomerization leading to strong ADP binding is entropy driven at >15 degrees C and occurs with a large, positive change in heat capacity (DeltaC(P) degrees ) for both actomyosin V and VI. Sucrose slows ADP binding and dissociation from actomyosin V and VI but not the overall equilibrium constants for strong ADP binding, indicating that solvent viscosity dampens ADP-dependent kinetic transitions, presumably a tail swing that occurs with ADP binding and release. We favor a mechanism where strong ADP binding increases the dynamics and flexibility of the actomyosin complex. The heat capacity (DeltaC(P) degrees ) and entropy (DeltaS degrees ) changes are greater for actomyosin VI than actomyosin V, suggesting different extents of ADP-induced structural rearrangement. PMID:16042401

  8. The use of a PC-ADP in Shallow Rivers: Potential and Limitations for Turbulence Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassista, A.; Roy, A. G.

    2005-12-01

    Turbulence plays an important role for processes such as mixing, sediment transport, scour and energy dissipation in rivers. Information in both space and time is essential to characterize flow turbulence in rivers, which would lead to a better understanding of sediment transport processes and bedform dynamics. Characterization of turbulent structures and their dynamics from conventionnal single point velocity measurements is time- and labor-intensive. Acoustic Doppler Profilers (ADP) have the ability to measure instantaneous velocity profiles in three dimensions and have shown a potential to measure turbulence characteristics. New Pulse-Coherent Acoustic Doppler Profiler (PC-ADP) technology provides a higher spatial resolution than conventional ADP and allows their use in shallow rivers. However, the measurement noise, the spreading of the instrument beams and the temporal and spatial averaging from this device may limit its application in rivers. The aim of this work is to evaluate the potential and the limitations of turbulence measurement using PC-ADP in shallow rivers. Field measurements were undertaken on the Rouge River (Quebec, Canada) during summer 2005 using a 1.5 MHz PC-ADP. The downward-looking PC-ADP was used to measure velocities at fixed river locations in ten 8-cm cells at a frequency of 1 Hz for long sampling duration. PC-ADP data were compared to a reference instrument, a 10 MHz Acoustic Doppler Velocimeter (ADV), that can measure flow velocities in three dimensions in a small sampling volume. Comparison with single point measurements were conducted to evaluate the effects of temporal and spatial averaging, Doppler noise and beam spreading in PC-ADP data. An algorithm for correcting ambiguity errors was developed to measure velocities up to 70 cms-1. Autocorrelation, power spectra and profiles of turbulence characteristics such as Reynolds stresses and TKE estimated from PC-ADP velocities were compared to those obtained from ADV data. Results show

  9. Role of NAD+ and ADP-Ribosylation in the Maintenance of the Golgi Structure

    PubMed Central

    Mironov, Alexander; Colanzi, Antonino; Silletta, Maria Giuseppina; Fiucci, Giusy; Flati, Silvio; Fusella, Aurora; Polishchuk, Roman; Mironov, Alexander; Tullio, Giuseppe Di; Weigert, Roberto; Malhotra, Vivek; Corda, Daniela; Matteis, Maria Antonietta De; Luini, Alberto

    1997-01-01

    We have investigated the role of the ADP- ribosylation induced by brefeldin A (BFA) in the mechanisms controlling the architecture of the Golgi complex. BFA causes the rapid disassembly of this organelle into a network of tubules, prevents the association of coatomer and other proteins to Golgi membranes, and stimulates the ADP-ribosylation of two cytosolic proteins of 38 and 50 kD (GAPDH and BARS-50; De Matteis, M.A., M. DiGirolamo, A. Colanzi, M. Pallas, G. Di Tullio, L.J. McDonald, J. Moss, G. Santini, S. Bannykh, D. Corda, and A. Luini. 1994. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 91:1114–1118; Di Girolamo, M., M.G. Silletta, M.A. De Matteis, A. Braca, A. Colanzi, D. Pawlak, M.M. Rasenick, A. Luini, and D. Corda. 1995. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 92:7065–7069). To study the role of ADP-ribosylation, this reaction was inhibited by depletion of NAD+ (the ADP-ribose donor) or by using selective pharmacological blockers in permeabilized cells. In NAD+-depleted cells and in the presence of dialized cytosol, BFA detached coat proteins from Golgi membranes with normal potency but failed to alter the organelle's structure. Readdition of NAD+ triggered Golgi disassembly by BFA. This effect of NAD+ was mimicked by the use of pre–ADP- ribosylated cytosol. The further addition of extracts enriched in native BARS-50 abolished the ability of ADP-ribosylated cytosol to support the effect of BFA. Pharmacological blockers of the BFA-dependent ADP-ribosylation (Weigert, R., A. Colanzi, A. Mironov, R. Buccione, C. Cericola, M.G. Sciulli, G. Santini, S. Flati, A. Fusella, J. Donaldson, M. DiGirolamo, D. Corda, M.A. De Matteis, and A. Luini. 1997. J. Biol. Chem. 272:14200–14207) prevented Golgi disassembly by BFA in permeabilized cells. These inhibitors became inactive in the presence of pre–ADP-ribosylated cytosol, and their activity was rescued by supplementing the cytosol with a native BARS-50–enriched fraction. These results indicate that ADP-ribosylation plays a role in the

  10. Characterization of an autonomously activated plant ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Boehlein, Susan K; Shaw, Janine R; Stewart, Jon D; Hannah, L Curtis

    2009-01-01

    ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) catalyzes the rate-limiting step in starch biosynthesis in plants and changes in its catalytic and/or allosteric properties can lead to increased starch production. Recently, a maize (Zea mays)/potato (Solanum tuberosum) small subunit mosaic, MP [Mos(1-198)], containing the first 198 amino acids of the small subunit of the maize endosperm enzyme and the last 277 amino acids from the potato tuber enzyme, was expressed with the maize endosperm large subunit and was reported to have favorable kinetic and allosteric properties. Here, we show that this mosaic, in the absence of activator, performs like a wild-type AGPase that is partially activated with 3-phosphoglyceric acid (3-PGA). In the presence of 3-PGA, enzyme properties of Mos(1-198)/SH2 are quite similar to those of the wild-type maize enzyme. In the absence of 3-PGA, however, the mosaic enzyme exhibits greater activity, higher affinity for the substrates, and partial inactivation by inorganic phosphate. The Mos(1-198)/SH2 enzyme is also more stable to heat inactivation. The different properties of this protein were mapped using various mosaics containing smaller portions of the potato small subunit. Enhanced heat stability of Mos(1-198) was shown to originate from five potato-derived amino acids between 322 and 377. These amino acids were shown previously to be important in small subunit/large subunit interactions. These five potato-derived amino acids plus other potato-derived amino acids distributed throughout the carboxyl-terminal portion of the protein are required for the enhanced catalytic and allosteric properties exhibited by Mos(1-198)/SH2. PMID:18715954

  11. Solution growth kinetics and mechanism: Prismatic face of ADP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, A. A.; Rashkovich, L. N.; Mkrtchan, A. A.

    1986-01-01

    Laser Michelson interferometry has been applied to in situ study the (001) ADP growth kinetics in aqueous solution in the kinetic regime. The technique allows one to simultaneously measure the slope p of a growth hillock and normal growth rate R provided by this hillock. From these data, the average step growth rate v=R/p has been determined as a function of relative supersaturation σ. The dependencev(σ) is found to be linear, demonstrating the unimportance of surface and bulk diffusion. The direct incorporation at steps is characterized by the step kinetic coefficient βl=(5.1-6.4)X10-3 cm/s. The specific step free energy αl=(1.2-1.9) X10-6 erg/cm was determined from the measured linear dependence of the hillock slope on supersaturation for the hillock around presumably single elementary dislocation. For complex dislocation sources with large total Burgers vectors, the tendency to saturationin the hillock slope-supersaturation curves has been found. The curve perfectly fits the BCF expression which takes into account the perimeter 2L of the region occupied by the points in which the dislocation of the complex step source cross the growing face. For two dislocation sources,L=0.92 μm andL=0.31 μm and total Burgers vectors ⋍12h and 6h (h=7.53Å) have been found. The supersaturation dependence of activities for various complex dislocation sources have been directly demonstrated.

  12. Visualization of poly(ADP-ribose) bound to PARG reveals inherent balance between exo- and endo-glycohydrolase activities

    PubMed Central

    Barkauskaite, Eva; Brassington, Amy; Tan, Edwin S.; Warwicker, Jim; Dunstan, Mark S.; Banos, Benito; Lafite, Pierre; Ahel, Marijan; Mitchison, Timothy J.; Ahel, Ivan; Leys, David

    2013-01-01

    Poly-ADP-ribosylation is a post-translational modification that regulates processes involved in genome stability. Breakdown of the poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymer is catalysed by poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG), whose endo-glycohydrolase activity generates PAR fragments. Here we present the crystal structure of PARG incorporating the PAR substrate. The two terminal ADP-ribose units of the polymeric substrate are bound in exo-mode. Biochemical and modelling studies reveal that PARG acts predominantly as an exo-glycohydrolase. This preference is linked to Phe902 (human numbering), which is responsible for low-affinity binding of the substrate in endo-mode. Our data reveal the mechanism of poly-ADP-ribosylation reversal, with ADP-ribose as the dominant product, and suggest that the release of apoptotic PAR fragments occurs at unusual PAR/PARG ratios. PMID:23917065

  13. Differential regulation by AMP and ADP of AMPK complexes containing different γ subunit isoforms

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Fiona A.; Jensen, Thomas E.; Hardie, D. Grahame

    2015-01-01

    The γ subunits of heterotrimeric AMPK complexes contain the binding sites for the regulatory adenine nucleotides AMP, ADP and ATP. We addressed whether complexes containing different γ isoforms display different responses to adenine nucleotides by generating cells stably expressing FLAG-tagged versions of the γ1, γ2 or γ3 isoform. When assayed at a physiological ATP concentration (5 mM), γ1- and γ2-containing complexes were allosterically activated almost 10-fold by AMP, with EC50 values one to two orders of magnitude lower than the ATP concentration. By contrast, γ3 complexes were barely activated by AMP under these conditions, although we did observe some activation at lower ATP concentrations. Despite this, all three complexes were activated, due to increased Thr172 phosphorylation, when cells were incubated with mitochondrial inhibitors that increase cellular AMP. With γ1 complexes, activation and Thr172 phosphorylation induced by the upstream kinase LKB1 [liver kinase B1; but not calmodulin-dependent kinase kinase (CaMKKβ)] in cell-free assays was markedly promoted by AMP and, to a smaller extent and less potently, by ADP. However, effects of AMP or ADP on activation and phosphorylation of the γ2 and γ3 complexes were small or insignificant. Binding of AMP or ADP protected all three γ subunit complexes against inactivation by Thr172 dephosphorylation; with γ2 complexes, ADP had similar potency to AMP, but with γ1 and γ3 complexes, ADP was less potent than AMP. Thus, AMPK complexes containing different γ subunit isoforms respond differently to changes in AMP, ADP or ATP. These differences may tune the responses of the isoforms to fit their differing physiological roles. PMID:26542978

  14. Overview on poly(ADP-ribose) immuno-biomedicine and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Kanai, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose), identified in 1966 independently by three groups Strassbourg, Kyoto and Tokyo, is synthesized by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARP) from NAD(+) as a substrate in the presence of Mg(2+). The structure was unique in that it has ribose-ribose linkage. In the early-1970s, however, its function in vivo/in vitro was still controversial and the antibody against it was desired to help clear its significance. Thereupon, the author tried to produce antibody against poly(ADP-ribose) in rabbits and succeeded in it for the first time in the world. Eventually, this success has led to the following two groundbreaking papers in Nature: "Naturally-occurring antibody against poly(ADP-ribose) in patients with autoimmune disease SLE", and "Induction of anti-poly(ADP-ribose) antibody by immunization with synthetic double-stranded RNA, poly(A)·poly(U)".On the way to the publication of the first paper, a reviewer gave me a friendly comment that there is "heteroclitic" fashion as a mechanism of the production of natural antibody. This comment was really a God-send for me, and became a train of power for publication of another paper, as described above. Accordingly, I thought this, I would say, episode is worth describing herein. Because of its importance in biomedical phenomena, a certain number of articles related to "heteroclitic" have become to be introduced in this review, although they were not always directly related to immuno-biological works on poly(ADP-ribose). Also, I tried to speculate on the future prospects of poly(ADP-ribose), product of PARP, as an immuno-regulatory molecule, including either induced or naturally-occurring antibodies, in view of "heteroclitic". PMID:27477457

  15. The ARTT motif and a unified structural understanding of substraterecognition in ADP ribosylating bacterial toxins and eukaryotic ADPribosyltransferases

    SciTech Connect

    Han, S.; Tainer, J.A.

    2001-08-01

    ADP-ribosylation is a widely occurring and biologically critical covalent chemical modification process in pathogenic mechanisms, intracellular signaling systems, DNA repair, and cell division. The reaction is catalyzed by ADP-ribosyltransferases, which transfer the ADP-ribose moiety of NAD to a target protein with nicotinamide release. A family of bacterial toxins and eukaryotic enzymes has been termed the mono-ADP-ribosyltransferases, in distinction to the poly-ADP-ribosyltransferases, which catalyze the addition of multiple ADP-ribose groups to the carboxyl terminus of eukaryotic nucleoproteins. Despite the limited primary sequence homology among the different ADP-ribosyltransferases, a central cleft bearing NAD-binding pocket formed by the two perpendicular b-sheet core has been remarkably conserved between bacterial toxins and eukaryotic mono- and poly-ADP-ribosyltransferases. The majority of bacterial toxins and eukaryotic mono-ADP-ribosyltransferases are characterized by conserved His and catalytic Glu residues. In contrast, Diphtheria toxin, Pseudomonas exotoxin A, and eukaryotic poly-ADP-ribosyltransferases are characterized by conserved Arg and catalytic Glu residues. The NAD-binding core of a binary toxin and a C3-like toxin family identified an ARTT motif (ADP-ribosylating turn-turn motif) that is implicated in substrate specificity and recognition by structural and mutagenic studies. Here we apply structure-based sequence alignment and comparative structural analyses of all known structures of ADP-ribosyltransfeases to suggest that this ARTT motif is functionally important in many ADP-ribosylating enzymes that bear a NAD binding cleft as characterized by conserved Arg and catalytic Glu residues. Overall, structure-based sequence analysis reveals common core structures and conserved active sites of ADP-ribosyltransferases to support similar NAD binding mechanisms but differing mechanisms of target protein binding via sequence variations within the ARTT

  16. Deficiency of terminal ADP-ribose protein glycohydrolase TARG1/C6orf130 in neurodegenerative disease

    PubMed Central

    Sharifi, Reza; Morra, Rosa; Denise Appel, C; Tallis, Michael; Chioza, Barry; Jankevicius, Gytis; Simpson, Michael A; Matic, Ivan; Ozkan, Ege; Golia, Barbara; Schellenberg, Matthew J; Weston, Ria; Williams, Jason G; Rossi, Marianna N; Galehdari, Hamid; Krahn, Juno; Wan, Alexander; Trembath, Richard C; Crosby, Andrew H; Ahel, Dragana; Hay, Ron; Ladurner, Andreas G; Timinszky, Gyula; Williams, R Scott; Ahel, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-ribosylation is a post-translational protein modification implicated in the regulation of a range of cellular processes. A family of proteins that catalyse ADP-ribosylation reactions are the poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymerases (PARPs). PARPs covalently attach an ADP-ribose nucleotide to target proteins and some PARP family members can subsequently add additional ADP-ribose units to generate a PAR chain. The hydrolysis of PAR chains is catalysed by PAR glycohydrolase (PARG). PARG is unable to cleave the mono(ADP-ribose) unit directly linked to the protein and although the enzymatic activity that catalyses this reaction has been detected in mammalian cell extracts, the protein(s) responsible remain unknown. Here, we report the homozygous mutation of the c6orf130 gene in patients with severe neurodegeneration, and identify C6orf130 as a PARP-interacting protein that removes mono(ADP-ribosyl)ation on glutamate amino acid residues in PARP-modified proteins. X-ray structures and biochemical analysis of C6orf130 suggest a mechanism of catalytic reversal involving a transient C6orf130 lysyl-(ADP-ribose) intermediate. Furthermore, depletion of C6orf130 protein in cells leads to proliferation and DNA repair defects. Collectively, our data suggest that C6orf130 enzymatic activity has a role in the turnover and recycling of protein ADP-ribosylation, and we have implicated the importance of this protein in supporting normal cellular function in humans. PMID:23481255

  17. Approach for determination of ATP:ADP molar ratio in mixed solution by surface-enhanced Raman scattering.

    PubMed

    Fang, Hui; Yin, Hong Jun; Lv, Ming Yang; Xu, Hai Jun; Zhao, Yong Mei; Zhang, Xin; Wu, Zheng Long; Liu, Luo; Tan, Tian Wei

    2015-07-15

    The ATP:ADP molar ratio is an important physiological factor. However, in previous literatures, ATP and ADP could not be distinguished by Raman spectroscopy due to the high similarity of molecular structure. To challenge this problem, also considering that the γ phosphate group may interact with adenine group and cause a different variation of the Raman spectrum than that of ADP, a highly sensitive, low-cost, environment protecting, flexible and super-hydrophobic Au nanoparticles/cicada wing (Au/CW) substrate with three-dimension structure was fabricated and employed as an active surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate to detect the ATP:ADP molar ratios. The concentration as low as 10(-8)M for ATP and ADP was analyzed to determine the limit of detection. This SERS study on various ATP:ADP molar ratios demonstrates that ATP:ADP could be distinguished and the quantitative determination of ATP content was achieved. Moreover, a principle was speculated based on the molecular structures of ATP and ADP of the Raman peaks centered at ~685 and ~731cm(-1) to explain the linear relationship between the area ratio and the molar ratio. A new method has been developed for quantitative determination of ATP:ADP molar ratio based on Au/CW substrate by the SERS method. PMID:25703730

  18. Poly(ADP-ribose) metabolism in young and old cells: response to cellular stresses

    SciTech Connect

    Gracy, R.W.; Sims, J.L.; Cini, J.

    1986-05-01

    The authors have examined the effect of several cellular stresses on poly(ADP-ribose) metabolism in human fibroblasts of low passage number derived from young and old donors. Poly(ADP-ribose) was synthesized in response to alkylation of DNA caused by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitroguanidine and by hyperthermic treatment at 43 /sup 0/C or 45 /sup 0/C. Ethanol is able to potentiate poly(ADP-ribose) accumulation following these treatments. There was little if any difference in the response of young and old cells to these stresses. Amino acid analogs are thought to induce a response in mammalian cells similar to that caused by hyperthermia and ethanol. However, amino acid analogs such as L-azetidine did not produce effects on poly(ADP-ribose) metabolism like those produced by ethanol or hyperthermia. The authors have also examined the poly(ADP-ribose) content of bovine eye lens. Each eye lens contains populations of young and old cells that are distributed in a fixed graduated manner. Thus, the eye lens allows the study of aging cells with identical genetic backgrounds without the complications of serial passage of young cultures in in vitro aging systems.

  19. TFIIF, a basal eukaryotic transcription factor, is a substrate for poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation.

    PubMed Central

    Rawling, J M; Alvarez-Gonzalez, R

    1997-01-01

    We have examined the susceptibility of some of the basal eukaryotic transcription factors as covalent targets for poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation. Human recombinant TATA-binding protein, transcription factor (TF)IIB and TFIIF (made up of the 30 and 74 kDa RNA polymerase II-associated proteins RAP30 and RAP74) were incubated with calf thymus poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and [32P]NAD+ at 37 degrees C. On lithium dodecyl sulphate/PAGE and autoradiography, two bands of radioactivity, coincident with RAP30 and RAP74, were observed. No radioactivity co-migrated with TATA-binding protein or TFIIB. The phenomenon was dependent on the presence of nicked DNA, which is essential for poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activity. Covalent modification of TFIIF increased with time of incubation, with increasing TFIIF concentration and with increasing NAD+ concentration. High-resolution PAGE confirmed that the radioactive species associated with RAP30 and RAP74 were ADP-ribose polymers. From these observations, we conclude that both TFIIF subunits are highly specific substrates for covalent poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation. PMID:9164864

  20. Genetic evidence of a high-affinity cyanuric acid transport system in Pseudomonas sp. ADP.

    PubMed

    Platero, Ana I; Santero, Eduardo; Govantes, Fernando

    2014-03-01

    The Pseudomonas sp. ADP plasmid pADP-1 encodes the activities involved in the hydrolytic degradation of the s-triazine herbicide atrazine. Here, we explore the presence of a specific transport system for the central intermediate of the atrazine utilization pathway, cyanuric acid, in Pseudomonas sp. ADP. Growth in fed-batch cultures containing limiting cyanuric acid concentrations is consistent with high-affinity transport of this substrate. Acquisition of the ability to grow at low cyanuric acid concentrations upon conjugal transfer of pADP1 to the nondegrading host Pseudomonas putida KT2442 suggests that all activities required for this phenotype are encoded in this plasmid. Co-expression of the pADP1-borne atzDEF and atzTUVW genes, encoding the cyanuric acid utilization pathway and the subunits of an ABC-type solute transport system, in P. putida KT2442 was sufficient to promote growth at cyanuric acid concentrations as low as 50 μM in batch culture. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that the atzTUVW gene products are involved in high-affinity transport of cyanuric acid. PMID:24484197

  1. Catalytic signal amplification for the discrimination of ATP and ADP using functionalised gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Pezzato, Cristian; Chen, Jack L-Y; Galzerano, Patrizia; Salvi, Michela; Prins, Leonard J

    2016-07-12

    Diagnostic assays that incorporate a signal amplification mechanism permit the detection of analytes with enhanced selectivity. Herein, we report a gold nanoparticle-based chemical system able to differentiate ATP from ADP by means of catalytic signal amplification. The discrimination between ATP and ADP is of relevance for the development of universal assays for the detection of enzymes which consume ATP. For example, protein kinases are a class of enzymes critical for the regulation of cellular functions, and act to modulate the activity of other proteins by transphosphorylation, transferring a phosphate group from ATP to give ADP as a byproduct. The system described here exploits the ability of cooperative catalytic head groups on gold nanoparticles to very efficiently catalyze chromogenic reactions such as the transphosphorylation of 2-hydroxypropyl-4-nitrophenyl phosphate (HPNPP). A series of chromogenic substrates have been synthesized and evaluated by means of Michaelis-Menten kinetics (compounds 2, 4-6). 2-Hydroxypropyl-(3-trifluoromethyl-4-nitro)phenyl phosphate (5) was found to display higher reactivity (kcat) and higher binding affinity (KM) when compared to HPNPP. This higher binding affinity allows phosphate 5 to compete with ATP and ADP to different extents for binding on the monolayer surface, thus enabling a catalytically amplified signal only when ATP is absent. Overall, this represents a viable new approach for monitoring the conversion of ATP into ADP with high sensitivity. PMID:27336846

  2. Family-wide analysis of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activity

    PubMed Central

    Uchima, Lilen; Rood, Jenny; Zaja, Roko; Hay, Ronald T.; Ahel, Ivan; Chang, Paul

    2014-01-01

    The poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) protein family generates ADP-ribose (ADPr) modifications onto target proteins using NAD+ as substrate. Based on the composition of three NAD+ coordinating amino acids, the H-Y-E motif, each PARP is predicted to generate either poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) or mono(ADP-ribose) (MAR). However, the reaction product of each PARP has not been clearly defined, and is an important priority since PAR and MAR function via distinct mechanisms. Here we show that the majority of PARPs generate MAR, not PAR, and demonstrate that the H-Y-E motif is not the sole indicator of PARP activity. We identify automodification sites on seven PARPs, and demonstrate that MAR and PAR generating PARPs modify similar amino acids, suggesting that the sequence and structural constraints limiting PARPs to MAR synthesis do not limit their ability to modify canonical amino acid targets. In addition, we identify cysteine as a novel amino acid target for ADP-ribosylation on PARPs. PMID:25043379

  3. A fluorometric assay for measurement of mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase activity.

    PubMed

    Klebl, B M; Pette, D

    1996-08-01

    Using 1,N6-etheno NAD, a fluorescent analog of NAD, we extended an existing assay for NAD glycohydrolase to the measurement of mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase (mADP-RT) activity using agmatine as acceptor for ADP-ribose. The reaction products were analyzed by reversed-phase chromatography. In the presence of agmatine two newly formed fluorescent products were tentatively identified as ADP-ribosylagmatine anomers. Fluorescence intensity increased upon splitting the N-glycoside bondage of 1,N6-etheno NAD. Therefore, 1, N6-etheno AMP could be used for calibration. The nonradioactive assay yielded values nearly identical to those obtained with the [carbonyl-14C]NAD method. It proved to be highly reproducible, rapid, and suitable for an improved purification protocol yielding a 76,000-fold enriched mADP-RT preparation from rabbit skeletal muscle. The identity and high purity of the enzyme were confirmed immunochemically. The assay served to determine the pH optimum of the enzyme (pH 9.0) and its KM for 1,N6-etheno NAD (287 microM). PMID:8811894

  4. Inhibiting poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase: a potential therapy against oligodendrocyte death

    PubMed Central

    Veto, Sara; Acs, Peter; Bauer, Jan; Lassmann, Hans; Berente, Zoltan; Setalo, Gyorgy; Borgulya, Gabor; Sumegi, Balazs; Komoly, Samuel; Gallyas, Ferenc; Illes, Zsolt

    2010-01-01

    Oligodendrocyte loss and demyelination are major pathological hallmarks of multiple sclerosis. In pattern III lesions, inflammation is minor in the early stages, and oligodendrocyte apoptosis prevails, which appears to be mediated at least in part through mitochondrial injury. Here, we demonstrate poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activation and apoptosis inducing factor nuclear translocation within apoptotic oligodendrocytes in such multiple sclerosis lesions. The same morphological and molecular pathology was observed in an experimental model of primary demyelination, induced by the mitochondrial toxin cuprizone. Inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase in this model attenuated oligodendrocyte depletion and decreased demyelination. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibition suppressed c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation, increased the activation of the cytoprotective phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase-Akt pathway and prevented caspase-independent apoptosis inducing factor-mediated apoptosis. Our data indicate that poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activation plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of pattern III multiple sclerosis lesions. Since poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibition was also effective in the inflammatory model of multiple sclerosis, it may target all subtypes of multiple sclerosis, either by preventing oligodendrocyte death or attenuating inflammation. PMID:20157013

  5. Interaction of ADP with skeletal and cardiac myosin and their active fragments observed by proton release.

    PubMed

    Kardami, E; De Bruin, S; Gratzer, W

    1979-07-01

    The technique of proton release measurement has been used to explore the binding of ADP to skeletal and cardiac myosins and their active fragments in a variety of conditions. It has proved possible to obtain binding profiles on intact myosin in the filamentous, undissolved form in physiological solvent conditions. Binding constants are given. At higher ionic strength (0.5 M potassium chloride) the binding profile of magnesium-ADP. is compatible with the presence of two types of site, differing from one another both in respect of affinity and the number of protons released per site. Studies with cardiac myosin reveal no such indications of heterogeneity, and are consistent with the presence of a single population of thermodynamically indistinguishable sites. In the absence of divalent cations, in solutions containing potassium ions and EDTA, ADP binds with absorption rather than liberation of protons. The pH profile of proton absorption at saturation can be fitted in terms of an ionising group with an unperturbed pK of 9.4, and at least one of lower pK(5.9). The dissociation constant (pH8 at 5 degrees C) is about 8 microM, and the affinity for uncomplexed ADP is thus only slightly weaker than that for magnesium-ADP PMID:38115

  6. Study on A.C. electrical properties of pure and L-serine doped ADP crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, J. H.; Dixit, K. P.; Joshi, M. J.; Parikh, K. D.

    2016-05-01

    Ammonium Dihydrogen Phosphate (ADP) crystals have a wide range of applications in integrated and nonlinear optics. Amino acids having significant properties like molecular chirality, zwitter ionic nature, etc. attracted many researchers to dope them in various NLO crystals. In the present study, pure and different weight percentage L-serine doped ADP crystals were grown by slow solvent evaporation technique at room temperature. The A.C. electrical study was carried out for palletized samples at room temperature. The Nyquist plot showed two semi circles for pure ADP indicated the effect of grain and grain boundary, whereas the doped ADP samples exhibited the single semi circle suggesting the effect of grain. The values resistance and capacitance for grain and grain boundary were calculated. The effect of doping was clearly seen in the grain capacitance and resistance values. The dielectric constant and dielectric loss decreased with increase in frequency for all samples. The Jonscher power law was applied for A.C. conductivity for pure and doped ADP samples. The imaginary part of modulus and impedance versus frequency were drawn and the value of stretch exponent (β) was calculated for all the samples.

  7. Growth of cerium(III)-doped ADP crystals and characterization studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanchinathan, K.; Muthu, K.; Bhagavannarayana, G.; Meenakshisundaram, SP.

    2012-09-01

    Single crystals of Ce(III)-doped ammonium dihydrogen phosphate (ADP) are grown by conventional slow evaporation of aqueous solution and Sankaranarayanan-Ramasamy (SR) technique. High-resolution X-ray diffraction (HRXRD) studies reveal that the crystalline perfection is substantially better in the case of SR-grown crystal. Morphological changes are observed in the doped specimen. Doping has some influence on the DRS spectra and the band gap energy is estimated by Kubelka-Munk algorithm. Lattice parameters are determined by single crystal XRD analysis. The powder X-ray diffraction and FT-IR analyses indicate that the crystal undergoes considerable stress as a result of doping. The incorporation of Ce(III) into the crystalline matrix of ADP is confirmed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Thermal studies reveal no decomposition up to the melting point and no significant changes are observed as a result of foreign ion incorporation in ADP crystalline matrix.

  8. Identification of a Class of Protein ADP-Ribosylating Sirtuins in Microbial Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Rack, Johannes Gregor Matthias; Morra, Rosa; Barkauskaite, Eva; Kraehenbuehl, Rolf; Ariza, Antonio; Qu, Yue; Ortmayer, Mary; Leidecker, Orsolya; Cameron, David R; Matic, Ivan; Peleg, Anton Y; Leys, David; Traven, Ana; Ahel, Ivan

    2015-07-16

    Sirtuins are an ancient family of NAD(+)-dependent deacylases connected with the regulation of fundamental cellular processes including metabolic homeostasis and genome integrity. We show the existence of a hitherto unrecognized class of sirtuins, found predominantly in microbial pathogens. In contrast to earlier described classes, these sirtuins exhibit robust protein ADP-ribosylation activity. In our model organisms, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes, the activity is dependent on prior lipoylation of the target protein and can be reversed by a sirtuin-associated macrodomain protein. Together, our data describe a sirtuin-dependent reversible protein ADP-ribosylation system and establish a crosstalk between lipoylation and mono-ADP-ribosylation. We propose that these posttranslational modifications modulate microbial virulence by regulating the response to host-derived reactive oxygen species. PMID:26166706

  9. ADP-ribose-derived nuclear ATP synthesis by NUDIX5 is required for chromatin remodeling.

    PubMed

    Wright, Roni H G; Lioutas, Antonios; Le Dily, Francois; Soronellas, Daniel; Pohl, Andy; Bonet, Jaume; Nacht, A S; Samino, Sara; Font-Mateu, Jofre; Vicent, Guillermo P; Wierer, Michael; Trabado, Miriam A; Schelhorn, Constanze; Carolis, Carlo; Macias, Maria J; Yanes, Oscar; Oliva, Baldo; Beato, Miguel

    2016-06-01

    Key nuclear processes in eukaryotes, including DNA replication, repair, and gene regulation, require extensive chromatin remodeling catalyzed by energy-consuming enzymes. It remains unclear how the ATP demands of such processes are met in response to rapid stimuli. We analyzed this question in the context of the massive gene regulation changes induced by progestins in breast cancer cells and found that ATP is generated in the cell nucleus via the hydrolysis of poly(ADP-ribose) to ADP-ribose. In the presence of pyrophosphate, ADP-ribose is used by the pyrophosphatase NUDIX5 to generate nuclear ATP. The nuclear source of ATP is essential for hormone-induced chromatin remodeling, transcriptional regulation, and cell proliferation. PMID:27257257

  10. Office of Inspector General report on audit of controls over the ADP support services contract

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-15

    In March 1995, the Department awarded a cost-plus-award-fee contract to DynCorp valued at approximately $246 million over 5 years for ADP support services at Headquarters. The performance period for the contract was a 3-year base period with two 1-year options. The contract statement of work identified 24 information management functional areas that required technical support services, including Automated Office Systems Support and Local Area Network support. The purpose of the audit was to evaluate the cost-plus-award-fee contract for ADP support services at Headquarters. The objective was to determine whether the Department`s program offices at Headquarters were managing their ADP support services contract costs.

  11. Bioorthogonally Functionalized NAD(+) Analogues for In-Cell Visualization of Poly(ADP-Ribose) Formation.

    PubMed

    Wallrodt, Sarah; Buntz, Annette; Wang, Yan; Zumbusch, Andreas; Marx, Andreas

    2016-06-27

    Poly(ADP-ribos)ylation (PARylation) is a major posttranslational modification and signaling event in most eukaryotes. Fundamental processes like DNA repair and transcription are coordinated by this transient polymer and its binding to proteins. ADP-ribosyltransferases (ARTs) build complex ADP-ribose chains from NAD(+) onto various acceptor proteins. Molecular studies of PARylation thus remain challenging. Herein, we present the development of bioorthogonally functionalized NAD(+) analogues for the imaging of PARylation in vitro and in cells. Our results show that 2-modified NAD(+) analogues perform remarkably well and can be applied to the in-cell visualization of PARylation simultaneously in two colors. This tool gives insight into the substrate scope of ARTs and will help to further elucidate the biological role of PARylation by offering fast optical, multichannel read-outs. PMID:27080423

  12. ADP-2Ho as a Phasing Tool for Nucleotide-Containing Proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Ku,S.; Smith, G.; Howell, P.

    2007-01-01

    Trivalent holmium ions were shown to isomorphously replace magnesium ions to form an ADP-2Ho complex in the nucleotide-binding domain of Bacillus subtilis 5-methylthioribose (MTR) kinase. This nucleotide-holmium complex provided sufficient phasing power to allow SAD and SIRAS phasing of this previously unknown structure using the L{sub III} absorption edge of holmium. The structure of ADP-2Ho reveals that the two Ho ions are approximately 4 {angstrom} apart and are likely to share their ligands: the phosphoryl O atoms of ADP and a water molecule. The structure determination of MTR kinase using data collected using Cu K X-radiation was also attempted. Although the heavy-atom substructure determination was successful, interpretation of the map was more challenging. The isomorphous substitution of holmium for magnesium in the MTR kinase-nucleotide complex suggests that this could be a useful phasing tool for other metal-dependent nucleotide-containing proteins.

  13. Substrate Modulated Dynamics of the ADP/ATP Transporter Revealed by NMR Relaxation Dispersion

    PubMed Central

    Brüschweiler, Sven; Yang, Qin; Run, Changqing; Chou, James J.

    2015-01-01

    The ADP/ATP carrier (AAC) transports ADP and ATP across the inner mitochondrial membrane. Unlike most transporters that have 2-fold direct or inverted quasi-symmetry, AAC has the apparent 3-fold rotational symmetry. Further, its transport rate is fast for transporters that carry large solutes. Here, we perform comprehensive NMR relaxation dispersion measurements for the yeast AAC carrier 3, which provide residue-specific information on the protein conformational exchange. Our data indicate that AAC is predominantly in the cytosol-facing open state and converts to a lowly populated state in an asymmetric manner despite its three-fold structural symmetry. Binding of the substrate ADP significantly increases the rate of conformational exchange, whereas the inhibitor CATR slows the exchange. These results suggest that while the transporter catalyzes the translocation of substrate, the substrate also facilitates interconversion between alternating states that may be relevant to the transport function. PMID:26167881

  14. Identification of a Class of Protein ADP-Ribosylating Sirtuins in Microbial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Rack, Johannes Gregor Matthias; Morra, Rosa; Barkauskaite, Eva; Kraehenbuehl, Rolf; Ariza, Antonio; Qu, Yue; Ortmayer, Mary; Leidecker, Orsolya; Cameron, David R.; Matic, Ivan; Peleg, Anton Y.; Leys, David; Traven, Ana; Ahel, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Summary Sirtuins are an ancient family of NAD+-dependent deacylases connected with the regulation of fundamental cellular processes including metabolic homeostasis and genome integrity. We show the existence of a hitherto unrecognized class of sirtuins, found predominantly in microbial pathogens. In contrast to earlier described classes, these sirtuins exhibit robust protein ADP-ribosylation activity. In our model organisms, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes, the activity is dependent on prior lipoylation of the target protein and can be reversed by a sirtuin-associated macrodomain protein. Together, our data describe a sirtuin-dependent reversible protein ADP-ribosylation system and establish a crosstalk between lipoylation and mono-ADP-ribosylation. We propose that these posttranslational modifications modulate microbial virulence by regulating the response to host-derived reactive oxygen species. PMID:26166706

  15. Pistacia chinensis Methanolic Extract Attenuated MAPK and Akt Phosphorylations in ADP Stimulated Rat Platelets In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Park, Ji Young; Hong, Mei; Jia, Qi; Lee, Young-Chul; Yayeh, Taddesse; Hyun, Eujin; Kwak, Dong-Mi; Cho, Jae Youl; Rhee, Man Hee

    2012-01-01

    Pistacia chinensis (Chinese pistache) is a widely grown plant in southern China where the galls extract is a common practice in folk medicine. However, extracts from this plant have never been attempted for their cardiovascular protective effects in experimental setting. Here therefore we aimed to investigate the antiplatelet activity of Pistacia chinensis methanolic extract (PCME) in ADP stimulated rat platelets in vitro. PCME (2.5-20 μg/mL) inhibited ADP-induced platelet aggregation. While PCME diminished [Ca(2+)]i, ATP, and TXA2 release in ADP-activated platelets, it enhanced cAMP production in resting platelets. Likewise, PCME inhibited fibrinogen binding to αIIbβ3 and downregulated JNK, ERK, and Akt phosphorylations. Thus, PCME contains potential antiplatelet compounds that could be deployed for their therapeutic values in cardiovascular pathology. PMID:22899962

  16. Pistacia chinensis Methanolic Extract Attenuated MAPK and Akt Phosphorylations in ADP Stimulated Rat Platelets In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ji Young; Hong, Mei; Jia, Qi; Lee, Young-Chul; Yayeh, Taddesse; Hyun, Eujin; Kwak, Dong-Mi; Cho, Jae Youl; Rhee, Man Hee

    2012-01-01

    Pistacia chinensis (Chinese pistache) is a widely grown plant in southern China where the galls extract is a common practice in folk medicine. However, extracts from this plant have never been attempted for their cardiovascular protective effects in experimental setting. Here therefore we aimed to investigate the antiplatelet activity of Pistacia chinensis methanolic extract (PCME) in ADP stimulated rat platelets in vitro. PCME (2.5–20 μg/mL) inhibited ADP-induced platelet aggregation. While PCME diminished [Ca2+]i, ATP, and TXA2 release in ADP-activated platelets, it enhanced cAMP production in resting platelets. Likewise, PCME inhibited fibrinogen binding to αIIbβ3 and downregulated JNK, ERK, and Akt phosphorylations. Thus, PCME contains potential antiplatelet compounds that could be deployed for their therapeutic values in cardiovascular pathology. PMID:22899962

  17. Extracellular poly(ADP-ribose) is a pro-inflammatory signal for macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Krukenberg, Kristin A.; Kim, Sujeong; Tan, Edwin S.; Maliga, Zoltan; Mitchison, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) synthesizes poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR), an essential post-translational modification whose function is important in many cellular processes including DNA damage signalling, cell death, and inflammation. All known PAR biology is intracellular, but we suspected it might also play a role in cell-to-cell communication during inflammation. We found that PAR activated cytokine release in human and mouse macrophages, a hallmark of innate immune activation, and determined structure-activity relationships. PAR was rapidly internalized by murine macrophages, while the monomer, ADP-ribose, was not. Inhibitors of TLR2 and TLR4 signaling blocked macrophage responses to PAR, and PAR induced TLR2 and TLR4 signaling in reporter cell lines suggesting it was recognized by these TLRs, much like bacterial pathogens. We propose that PAR acts as an extracellular “Damage Associated Molecular Pattern” (DAMP) that drives inflammatory signaling. PMID:25865309

  18. Effect of Co2+ doping on solubility, crystal growth and properties of ADP crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesh, V.; Shkir, Mohd.; AlFaify, S.; Yahia, I. S.

    2016-09-01

    Bulk size crystal growth of ADP with different concentrations doping of cobalt (Co2+) has been done by low cost slow evaporation technique at ambient conditions. The solubility measurement was carried out on pure and doped crystals and found that the solubility is decreasing with doping concentrations. The presence of Co2+ ion in crystalline matrix of ADP has been confirmed by structural, vibrational and elemental analyses. Scanning electron microscopic study reveals that the doping has strong effect on the quality of the crystals. The optical absorbance and transmission confirms the enhancement of quality of ADP crystals due to Co2+ doping and so the optical band gap. Further the dislocation, photoluminescence, dielectric and mechanical studies confirms that the properties of grown crystals with Co2+ doping has been enriched and propose it as a better candidate for optoelectronic applications.

  19. Thiol reagents are substrates for the ADP-ribosyltransferase activity of pertussis toxin.

    PubMed

    Lobban, M D; van Heyningen, S

    1988-06-20

    Thiols such as cysteine and dithiothreitol are substrates for the ADP-ribosyltransferase activity of pertussis toxin. When cysteine was incubated with NAD+ and toxin at pH 7.5, a product containing ADP-ribose and cysteine (presumably ADP-ribosylcysteine) was isolated by high-performance liquid chromatography, and characterized by its composition and release of AMP with phosphodiesterase. Cysteine has a Km of 105 mM at saturating NAD+ concentration. The ability of thiols to act as a substrate is one explanation for the very high concentrations (250 mM or greater) that have been observed to enhance the apparent NAD glycohydrolase activity of the toxin. PMID:3133246

  20. Host Cell Poly(ADP-Ribose) Glycohydrolase Is Crucial for Trypanosoma cruzi Infection Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Vilchez Larrea, Salomé C.; Schlesinger, Mariana; Kevorkian, María L.; Flawiá, Mirtha M.; Alonso, Guillermo D.; Fernández Villamil, Silvia H.

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, etiological agent of Chagas’ disease, has a complex life cycle which involves the invasion of mammalian host cells, differentiation and intracellular replication. Here we report the first insights into the biological role of a poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase in a trypanosomatid (TcPARG). In silico analysis of the TcPARG gene pointed out the conservation of key residues involved in the catalytic process and, by Western blot, we demonstrated that it is expressed in a life stage-dependant manner. Indirect immunofluorescence assays and electron microscopy using an anti-TcPARG antibody showed that this enzyme is localized in the nucleus independently of the presence of DNA damage or cell cycle stage. The addition of poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase inhibitors ADP-HPD (adenosine diphosphate (hydroxymethyl) pyrrolidinediol) or DEA (6,9-diamino-2-ethoxyacridine lactate monohydrate) to the culture media, both at a 1 µM concentration, reduced in vitro epimastigote growth by 35% and 37% respectively, when compared to control cultures. We also showed that ADP-HPD 1 µM can lead to an alteration in the progression of the cell cycle in hydroxyurea synchronized cultures of T. cruzi epimastigotes. Outstandingly, here we demonstrate that the lack of poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase activity in Vero and A549 host cells, achieved by chemical inhibition or iRNA, produces the reduction of the percentage of infected cells as well as the number of amastigotes per cell and trypomastigotes released, leading to a nearly complete abrogation of the infection process. We conclude that both, T. cruzi and the host, poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase activities are important players in the life cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi, emerging as a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of Chagas’ disease. PMID:23776710

  1. Detection and Quantification of ADP-Ribosylated RhoA/B by Monoclonal Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Rohrbeck, Astrid; Fühner, Viola; Schröder, Anke; Hagemann, Sandra; Vu, Xuan-Khang; Berndt, Sarah; Hust, Michael; Pich, Andreas; Just, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum exoenzyme C3 is the prototype of C3-like ADP-ribosyltransferases that modify the GTPases RhoA, B, and C. C3 catalyzes the transfer of an ADP-ribose moiety from the co-substrate nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) to asparagine-41 of Rho-GTPases. Although C3 does not possess cell-binding/-translocation domains, C3 is able to efficiently enter intact cells, including neuronal and macrophage-like cells. Conventionally, the detection of C3 uptake into cells is carried out via the gel-shift assay of modified RhoA. Since this gel-shift assay does not always provide clear, evaluable results an additional method to confirm the ADP-ribosylation of RhoA is necessary. Therefore, a new monoclonal antibody has been generated that specifically detects ADP-ribosylated RhoA/B, but not RhoC, in Western blot and immunohistochemical assay. The scFv antibody fragment was selected by phage display using the human naive antibody gene libraries HAL9/10. Subsequently, the antibody was produced as scFv-Fc and was found to be as sensitive as a commercially available RhoA antibody providing reproducible and specific results. We demonstrate that this specific antibody can be successfully applied for the analysis of ADP-ribosylated RhoA/B in C3-treated Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and HT22 cells. Moreover, ADP-ribosylation of RhoA was detected within 10 min in C3-treated CHO wild-type cells, indicative of C3 cell entry. PMID:27043630

  2. Detection and Quantification of ADP-Ribosylated RhoA/B by Monoclonal Antibody.

    PubMed

    Rohrbeck, Astrid; Fühner, Viola; Schröder, Anke; Hagemann, Sandra; Vu, Xuan-Khang; Berndt, Sarah; Hust, Michael; Pich, Andreas; Just, Ingo

    2016-04-01

    Clostridium botulinum exoenzyme C3 is the prototype of C3-like ADP-ribosyltransferases that modify the GTPases RhoA, B, and C. C3 catalyzes the transfer of an ADP-ribose moiety from the co-substrate nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) to asparagine-41 of Rho-GTPases. Although C3 does not possess cell-binding/-translocation domains, C3 is able to efficiently enter intact cells, including neuronal and macrophage-like cells. Conventionally, the detection of C3 uptake into cells is carried out via the gel-shift assay of modified RhoA. Since this gel-shift assay does not always provide clear, evaluable results an additional method to confirm the ADP-ribosylation of RhoA is necessary. Therefore, a new monoclonal antibody has been generated that specifically detects ADP-ribosylated RhoA/B, but not RhoC, in Western blot and immunohistochemical assay. The scFv antibody fragment was selected by phage display using the human naive antibody gene libraries HAL9/10. Subsequently, the antibody was produced as scFv-Fc and was found to be as sensitive as a commercially available RhoA antibody providing reproducible and specific results. We demonstrate that this specific antibody can be successfully applied for the analysis of ADP-ribosylated RhoA/B in C3-treated Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and HT22 cells. Moreover, ADP-ribosylation of RhoA was detected within 10 min in C3-treated CHO wild-type cells, indicative of C3 cell entry. PMID:27043630

  3. Structural basis of actin recognition and arginine ADP-ribosylation by Clostridium perfringens ι-toxin

    PubMed Central

    Tsuge, Hideaki; Nagahama, Masahiro; Oda, Masataka; Iwamoto, Shinobu; Utsunomiya, Hiroko; Marquez, Victor E.; Katunuma, Nobuhiko; Nishizawa, Mugio; Sakurai, Jun

    2008-01-01

    The ADP-ribosylating toxins (ADPRTs) produced by pathogenic bacteria modify intracellular protein and affect eukaryotic cell function. Actin-specific ADPRTs (including Clostridium perfringens ι-toxin and Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin) ADP-ribosylate G-actin at Arg-177, leading to disorganization of the cytoskeleton and cell death. Although the structures of many actin-specific ADPRTs are available, the mechanisms underlying actin recognition and selective ADP-ribosylation of Arg-177 remain unknown. Here we report the crystal structure of actin-Ia in complex with the nonhydrolyzable NAD analog βTAD at 2.8 Å resolution. The structure indicates that Ia recognizes actin via five loops around NAD: loop I (Tyr-60–Tyr-62 in the N domain), loop II (active-site loop), loop III, loop IV (PN loop), and loop V (ADP-ribosylating turn–turn loop). We used site-directed mutagenesis to confirm that loop I on the N domain and loop II are essential for the ADP-ribosyltransferase activity. Furthermore, we revealed that Glu-378 on the EXE loop is in close proximity to Arg-177 in actin, and we proposed that the ADP-ribosylation of Arg-177 proceeds by an SN1 reaction via first an oxocarbenium ion intermediate and second a cationic intermediate by alleviating the strained conformation of the first oxocarbenium ion. Our results suggest a common reaction mechanism for ADPRTs. Moreover, the structure might be of use in rational drug design to block toxin-substrate recognition. PMID:18490658

  4. Design, Synthesis, and Chemical and Biological Properties of Cyclic ADP-4-Thioribose as a Stable Equivalent of Cyclic ADP-Ribose

    PubMed Central

    Tsuzuki, Takayoshi; Takano, Satoshi; Sakaguchi, Natsumi; Kudoh, Takashi; Murayama, Takashi; Sakurai, Takashi; Hashii, Minako; Higashida, Haruhiro; Weber, Karin; Guse, Andreas H.; Kameda, Tomoshi; Hirokawa, Takatsugu; Kumaki, Yasuhiro; Arisawa, Mitsuhiro; Potter, Barry V. L.; Shuto, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Here we describe the successful synthesis of cyclic ADP-4-thioribose (cADPtR, 3), designed as a stable mimic of cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR, 1), a Ca2+-mobilizing second messenger, in which the key N1-β-thioribosyladenosine structure was stereoselectively constructed by condensation between the imidazole nucleoside derivative 8 and the 4-thioribosylamine 7 via equilibrium in 7 between the α-anomer (7α) and the β-anomer (7β) during the reaction course. cADPtR is, unlike cADPR, chemically and biologically stable, while it effectively mobilizes intracellular Ca2+ like cADPR in various biological systems, such as sea urchin homogenate, NG108-15 neuronal cells, and Jurkat T-lymphocytes. Thus, cADPtR is a stable equivalent of cADPR, which can be useful as a biological tool for investigating cADPR-mediated Ca2+-mobilizing pathways. PMID:27200225

  5. Relationship of tightly bound ADP and ATP to control and catalysis by chloroplast ATP synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, J.; Xue, Z.; Du, Z.; Melese, T.; Boyer, P.D.

    1988-07-12

    Whether the tightly bound ADP that can cause a pronounced inhibition of ATP hydrolysis by the chloroplast ATP synthase and F/sub 1/ ATPase (CF/sub 1/) is bound at catalytic sites or at noncatalytic regulatory sites or both has been uncertain. The authors have used photolabeling by 2-azido-ATP and 2-azido-ADP to ascertain the location, with Mg/sup 2 +/ activation, of tightly bound ADP (a) that inhibits the hydrolysis of ATP by chloroplast ATP synthase, (b) that can result in an inhibited form of CF/sub 1/ that slowly regains activity during ATP hydrolysis, and (c) that arises when low concentrations of ADP markedly inhibit the hydrolysis of GTP by CF/sub 1/. The data show that in all instances the inhibition is associated with ADP binding without inorganic phosphate (P/sub i/) at catalytic sites. After photophosphorylation of ADP or 2-azido-ADP with (/sup 32/P)P/sub i/, similar amounts of the corresponding triphosphates are present on washed thylakoid membranes. Trials with appropriately labeled substrates show that a small portion of the tightly bound 2-azido-ATP gives rise to covalent labeling with an ATP moiety at noncatalytic sites but that most of the bound 2-azido-ATP gives rise to covalent labeling with an ATP moiety at noncatalytic sites but that most of the bound 2-azido-ATP gives rise to covalent labeling by an ADP moiety at a catalytic site. They also report the occurrence of a 1-2-min delay in the onset of the Mg/sup 2 +/-induced inhibition after addition of CF/sub 1/ to solutions containing Mg/sup 2 +/ and ATP, and that this delay is not associated with the filling of noncatalytic sites. A rapid burst of P/sub i/ formation is followed by a much lower, constant steady-state rate. The burst is not observed with GTP as a substrate or with Ca/sup 2 +/ as the activating cation.

  6. Optical, dielectric and microhardness studies on <1 0 0> directed ADP crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajesh, P.; Ramasamy, P.

    2009-09-01

    <1 0 0> directed ammonium dihydrogen phosphate single crystal has been grown using the uniaxially solution-crystallization method of Sankaranarayanan-Ramasamy (SR). The size of the grown crystal is 40 mm in diameter and 50 mm in thickness. The grown crystals were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, Vickers hardness and dielectric studies. Comparing the <1 0 0> plane of the conventional method grown ADP crystal with <1 0 0> directed SR method grown ADP crystal, optical transparency, dielectric constant and Vickers hardness number are increased and dielectric loss is decreased in SR method grown crystal.

  7. Guanine nucleotide-binding proteins that enhance choleragen ADP-ribosyltransferase activity: nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequence of an ADP-ribosylation factor cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Price, S R; Nightingale, M; Tsai, S C; Williamson, K C; Adamik, R; Chen, H C; Moss, J; Vaughan, M

    1988-01-01

    Three (two soluble and one membrane) guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) that enhance ADP-ribosylation of the Gs alpha stimulatory subunit of the adenylyl cyclase (EC 4.6.1.1) complex by choleragen have recently been purified from bovine brain. To further define the structure and function of these ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs), we isolated a cDNA clone (lambda ARF2B) from a bovine retinal library by screening with a mixed heptadecanucleotide probe whose sequence was based on the partial amino acid sequence of one of the soluble ARFs from bovine brain. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence of lambda ARF2B with sequences of peptides from the ARF protein (total of 60 amino acids) revealed only two differences. Whether these are cloning artifacts or reflect the existence of more than one ARF protein remains to be determined. Deduced amino acid sequences of ARF, Go alpha (the alpha subunit of a G protein that may be involved in regulation of ion fluxes), and c-Ha-ras gene product p21 show similarities in regions believed to be involved in guanine nucleotide binding and GTP hydrolysis. ARF apparently lacks a site analogous to that ADP-ribosylated by choleragen in G-protein alpha subunits. Although both the ARF proteins and the alpha subunits bind guanine nucleotides and serve as choleragen substrates, they must interact with the toxin A1 peptide in different ways. In addition to serving as an ADP-ribose acceptor, ARF interacts with the toxin in a manner that modifies its catalytic properties. PMID:3135549

  8. Pratt & Whitney Advanced Ducted Propulsor (ADP) Engine Test in 40x80ft w.t.: Engineers Peter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Pratt & Whitney Advanced Ducted Propulsor (ADP) Engine Test in 40x80ft w.t.: Engineers Peter Zell (left) and Dr Clifton Horne (right) are shown preparing a laser light sheet for a flow visualization test. Shown standing in the nacelle of the ADP is John Girvin, senior test engineer for Pratt & Whitney.

  9. Pratt & Whitney Advanced Ducted Propulsor (ADP) Engine Test in 40x80ft w.t.: Engineers Peter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Pratt & Whitney Advanced Ducted Propulsor (ADP) Engine Test in 40x80ft w.t.: Engineers Peter Zell (left) and Dr Clifton Horne (right) are shown preparing for a laser light sheet for a flow visualization test. Shown standing in the nacelle of the ADP is John Girvin, senior test engineer for Pratt & Whitney.

  10. Increase in the ADP/ATP exchange in rat liver mitochondria irradiated in vitro by helium-neon laser

    SciTech Connect

    Passarella, S.; Ostuni, A.; Atlante, A.; Quagliariello, E.

    1988-10-31

    To gain some insight into the mechanism of cell photostimulation by laser light, measurements were made of the rate of ADP/ATP exchange in mitochondria irradiated with the low power continuous wave Helium Neon laser (energy dose 5 Joules/cm2). To do this a method has been developed to continuously monitor ATP efflux from phosphorylating mitochondria caused by externally added ADP, by photometrically following the NADP+ reduction which occurs in the presence of glucose, hexokinase, glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and effluxed ATP. The NADP+ reduction rate shows hyperbolic dependence on ADP concentration (Km and Vmax values 8.5 +/- 0.87 microM and 20.7 +/- 0.49 nmoles NADP+ reduced/min x mg mitochondrial protein, respectively), and proves to measure the activity of the ADP/ATP translocator as shown by inhibition experiments using atracyloside, powerful inhibitor of this carrier. Irradiation was found to enhance the rate of ADP/ATP antiport, with externally added ADP ranging between 5 and 100 microM. As a result of experiments carried out with mitochondria loaded with either ATP or ADP, the increase in the activity of the ADP/ATP translocator is here proposed to depend on the increase in the electrochemical proton gradient which occurs owing to irradiation of mitochondria.

  11. Gradual increase in thrombogenicity of juvenile platelets formed upon offset of prasugrel medication

    PubMed Central

    Baaten, Constance C. F. M. J.; Veenstra, Leo F.; Wetzels, Rick; van Geffen, Johanna P.; Swieringa, Frauke; de Witt, Susanne M.; Henskens, Yvonne M. C.; Crijns, Harry; Nylander, Sven; van Giezen, J. J. J.; Heemskerk, Johan W. M.; van der Meijden, Paola E. J.

    2015-01-01

    In patients with acute coronary syndrome, dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and a P2Y12 inhibitor like prasugrel is prescribed for one year. Here, we investigated how the hemostatic function of platelets recovers after discontinuation of prasugrel treatment. Therefore, 16 patients who suffered from ST-elevation myocardial infarction were investigated. Patients were treated with aspirin (100 mg/day, long-term) and stopped taking prasugrel (10 mg/day) after one year. Blood was collected at the last day of prasugrel intake and at 1, 2, 5, 12 and 30 days later. Platelet function in response to ADP was normalized between five and 30 days after treatment cessation and in vitro addition of the reversible P2Y12 receptor antagonist ticagrelor fully suppressed the regained activation response. Discontinuation of prasugrel resulted in the formation of an emerging subpopulation of ADP-responsive platelets, exhibiting high expression of active integrin αIIbβ3. Two different mRNA probes, thiazole orange and the novel 5′Cy5-oligo-dT probe revealed that this subpopulation consisted of juvenile platelets, which progressively contributed to platelet aggregation and thrombus formation under flow. During offset, juvenile platelets were overall more reactive than older platelets. Interestingly, the responsiveness of both juvenile and older platelets increased in time, pointing towards a residual inhibitory effect of prasugrel on the megakaryocyte level. In conclusion, the gradual increase in thrombogenicity after cessation of prasugrel treatment is due to the increased activity of juvenile platelets. PMID:26113418

  12. VERO cells harbor a poly-ADP-ribose belt partnering their epithelial adhesion belt

    PubMed Central

    Vilchez Larrea, Salomé C.; Kun, Alejandra

    2014-01-01

    Poly-ADP-ribose (PAR) is a polymer of up to 400 ADP-ribose units synthesized by poly-ADP-ribose-polymerases (PARPs) and degraded by poly-ADP-ribose-glycohydrolase (PARG). Nuclear PAR modulates chromatin compaction, affecting nuclear functions (gene expression, DNA repair). Diverse defined PARP cytoplasmic allocation patterns contrast with the yet still imprecise PAR distribution and still unclear functions. Based on previous evidence from other models, we hypothesized that PAR could be present in epithelial cells where cadherin-based adherens junctions are linked with the actin cytoskeleton (constituting the adhesion belt). In the present work, we have examined through immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy, the subcellular localization of PAR in an epithelial monkey kidney cell line (VERO). PAR was distinguished colocalizing with actin and vinculin in the epithelial belt, a location that has not been previously reported. Actin filaments disruption with cytochalasin D was paralleled by PAR belt disruption. Conversely, PARP inhibitors 3-aminobenzamide, PJ34 or XAV 939, affected PAR belt synthesis, actin distribution, cell shape and adhesion. Extracellular calcium chelation displayed similar effects. Our results demonstrate the existence of PAR in a novel subcellular localization. An initial interpretation of all the available evidence points towards TNKS-1 as the most probable PAR belt architect, although TNKS-2 involvement cannot be discarded. Forthcoming research will test this hypothesis as well as explore the existence of the PAR belt in other epithelial cells and deepen into its functional implications. PMID:25332845

  13. 41 CFR 109-43.307-53 - Automatic data processing equipment (ADPE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Automatic data processing equipment (ADPE). 109-43.307-53 Section 109-43.307-53 Public Contracts and Property Management Federal Property Management Regulations System (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT REGULATIONS UTILIZATION AND DISPOSAL...

  14. ATP/ADP Ratio, the Missed Connection between Mitochondria and the Warburg Effect

    PubMed Central

    Maldonado, Eduardo N.; Lemasters, John J.

    2014-01-01

    Non-proliferating cells generate the bulk of cellular ATP by fully oxidizing respiratory substrates in mitochondria. Respiratory substrates cross the mitochondrial outer membrane through only one channel, the voltage dependent anion channel (VDAC). Once in the matrix, respiratory substrates are oxidized in the tricarboxylic acid cycle to generate mostly NADH that is further oxidized in the respiratory chain to generate a proton motive force comprised mainly of membrane potential (ΔΨ) to synthesize ATP. Mitochondrial ΔΨ then drives release of ATP−4 from the matrix in exchange for ADP−3 in the cytosol via the adenine nucleotide translocator (ANT) located in the mitochondrial inner membrane. Thus, mitochondrial function in non-proliferating cells drives a high cytosolic ATP/ADP ratio, essential to inhibit glycolysis. By contrast, the bioenergetics of the Warburg phenotype of proliferating cells is characterized by enhanced aerobic glycolysis and suppression of mitochondrial metabolism. Suppressed mitochondrial function leads to lower production of mitochondrial ATP and hence lower cytosolic ATP/ADP ratios that favor enhanced glycolysis. Thus, cytosolic ATP/ADP ratio is a key feature that determines if cell metabolism is predominantly oxidative or glycolytic. Here, we describe two novel mechanisms to explain the suppression of mitochondrial metabolism in cancer cells: the relative closure of VDAC by free tubulin and inactivation of ANT. Both mechanisms contribute to low ATP/ADP ratios that activate glycolysis. PMID:25229666

  15. 7 CFR 277.18 - Establishment of an Automated Data Processing (ADP) and Information Retrieval System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ....g., system conversion, computer capacity planning, supplies, training, and miscellaneous ADP...; (5) Include assurances that information in the computer system as well as access, use and disposal of... property purchased with Food Stamp Program funds, which appear at 7 CFR 277.13 are applicable to...

  16. 7 CFR 277.18 - Establishment of an Automated Data Processing (ADP) and Information Retrieval System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ....g., system conversion, computer capacity planning, supplies, training, and miscellaneous ADP...; (5) Include assurances that information in the computer system as well as access, use and disposal of... property purchased with Food Stamp Program funds, which appear at 7 CFR 277.13 are applicable to...

  17. Extremely Conserved ATP- or ADP-dependent Enzymatic System for Nicotinamide Nucleotide Repair*

    PubMed Central

    Marbaix, Alexandre Y.; Noël, Gaëtane; Detroux, Aline M.; Vertommen, Didier; Van Schaftingen, Emile; Linster, Carole L.

    2011-01-01

    The reduced forms of NAD and NADP, two major nucleotides playing a central role in metabolism, are continuously damaged by enzymatic or heat-dependent hydration. We report the molecular identification of the eukaryotic dehydratase that repairs these nucleotides and show that this enzyme (Carkd in mammals, YKL151C in yeast) catalyzes the dehydration of the S form of NADHX and NADPHX, at the expense of ATP, which is converted to ADP. Surprisingly, the Escherichia coli homolog, YjeF, a bidomain protein, catalyzes a similar reaction, but using ADP instead of ATP. The latter reaction is ascribable to the C-terminal domain of YjeF. This represents an unprecedented example of orthologous enzymes using either ADP or ATP as phosphoryl donor. We also show that eukaryotic proteins homologous to the N-terminal domain of YjeF (apolipoprotein A-1-binding protein (AIBP) in mammals, YNL200C in yeast) catalyze the epimerization of the S and R forms of NAD(P)HX, thereby allowing, in conjunction with the energy-dependent dehydratase, the repair of both epimers of NAD(P)HX. Both enzymes are very widespread in eukaryotes, prokaryotes, and archaea, which together with the ADP dependence of the dehydratase in some species indicates the ancient origin of this repair system. PMID:21994945

  18. 45 CFR 95.625 - Increased FFP for certain ADP systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...-D program are contained in 45 CFR Part 307. The applicable regulations for the Title IV-E program are contained in 45 CFR 1355.55. The applicable regulations for the Title XIX program are contained in 42 CFR Part 433, Subpart C. Federal Financial Participation in Costs of ADP Acquisitions...

  19. Agonist-induced ADP-ribosylation of a cytosolic protein in human platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Bruene, B.; Molina Y Vedia, L.; Lapetina, E.G. )

    1990-05-01

    {alpha}-Thrombin and phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate stimulated the mono(ADP-ribosyl)ation of a 42-kDa cytosolic protein of human platelets. This effect was mediated by protein kinase C activation and was inhibited by protein kinase C inhibitor staurosporine. It also was prevented by prostacyclin, which is known to inhibit the phospholipase C-induced formation of 1,2-diacylglycerol, which is one of the endogenous activators of protein kinase C. On sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the 42-kDa protein that is ADP-ribosylated by {alpha}-thrombin was clearly distinct from the {alpha} subunits of membrane-bound inhibitory and stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins, respectively G{sub i{alpha}} and G{sub s{alpha}}; the 47-kDa protein that is phosphorylated by protein kinase C in platelets; and the 39-kDa protein that has been shown to be endogenously ADP-ribosylated by agents that release nitric oxide. This information shows that agonist-induced activation of protein kinase leads to the ADP-ribosylation of a specific protein. This covalent modification might have a functional role in platelet activation.

  20. NarE: a novel ADP-ribosyltransferase from Neisseria meningitidis.

    PubMed

    Masignani, Vega; Balducci, Enrico; Di Marcello, Federica; Savino, Silvana; Serruto, Davide; Veggi, Daniele; Bambini, Stefania; Scarselli, Maria; Aricò, Beatrice; Comanducci, Maurizio; Adu-Bobie, Jeannette; Giuliani, Marzia M; Rappuoli, Rino; Pizza, Mariagrazia

    2003-11-01

    Mono ADP-ribosyltransferases (ADPRTs) are a class of functionally conserved enzymes present in prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. In bacteria, these enzymes often act as potent toxins and play an important role in pathogenesis. Here we report a profile-based computational approach that, assisted by secondary structure predictions, has allowed the identification of a previously undiscovered ADP-ribosyltransferase in Neisseria meningitidis (NarE). NarE shows structural homologies with E. coli heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) and cholera toxin (CT) and possesses ADP-ribosylating and NAD-glycohydrolase activities. As in the case of LT and CT, NarE catalyses the transfer of the ADP-ribose moiety to arginine residues. Despite the absence of a signal peptide, the protein is efficiently exported into the periplasm of Neisseria. The narE gene is present in 25 out of 43 strains analysed, is always present in ET-5 and Lineage 3 but absent in ET-37 and Cluster A4 hypervirulent lineages. When present, the gene is 100% conserved in sequence and is inserted upstream of and co-transcribed with the lipoamide dehydrogenase E3 gene. Possible roles in the pathogenesis of N. meningitidis are discussed. PMID:14617161

  1. Does inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase prevent energy overconsumption under microgravity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrota, C.; Piso, M. I.; Keul, A.

    When plants are exposed to a stress signal they expend a lot of energy and exhibit enhanced respiration rates This is partially due to a breakdown in the NAD pool caused by the enhanced activity PARP which uses NAD as a substrate to synthesize polymers of ADP-ribose Stress-induced depletion of NAD results in a similar depletion of energy since ATP molecules are required to resynthesize the depleted NAD It seems that plants with lowered poly ADP ribosyl ation activity appear tolerant to multiple stresses Inhibiting PARP activity prevents energy overconsumption under stress allowing normal mitochondrial respiration We intend to study if the microgravity is perceived by plants as a stress factor and if experimental inhibition of poly ADP-ribose polymerase may improve the energetic level of the cells References DeBlock M Verduyn C De Brouwer D and Cornelissen M 2005 Poly ADP-ribose polymerase in plants affects energy homeostasis cell death and stress tolerance The Plant Journal 41 95--106 Huang S Greenway H Colmerm T D and Millar A H 2005 Protein synthesis by rice coleoptiles during prolonged anoxia Implications for glycolysis growth and energy utilization Annals of Botany 96 703--715 Mittler R Vanderauwera S Gollery M and Van Breusegem F 2005 Reactive oxygen gene network of plants Trends in Plant Science 9 10 490-498

  2. The ADP-ribosyl cyclases--the current evolutionary state of the ARCs.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, Enza; Lo Buono, Nicola; Horenstein, Alberto L; Funaro, Ada; Malavasi, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    The major ADP-ribosylating enzyme families are the focus of this special issue of Frontiers in Bioscience . However, there is room for another family of enzymes with the capacity to utilize nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD): the ADP-ribosyl cyclases (ARCs). These unique enzymes catalyse the cyclization of NAD to cyclic ADP ribose (cADPR), a widely distributed second messenger. However, the ARCs are versatile enzymes that can manipulate NAD, NAD phosphate (NADP) and other substrates to generate various bioactive molecules including nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide diphosphate (NAADP) and ADP ribose (ADPR). This review will focus on the group of well-characterized invertebrate and vertebrate ARCs whose common gene structure allows us to trace their origin to the ancestor of bilaterian animals. Behind a facade of gene and protein homology lies a family with a disparate functional repertoire dictated by the animal model and the physical trait under investigation. Here we present a phylogenetic view of the ARCs to better understand the evolution of function in this family. PMID:24896331

  3. Inhibition of Primary ADP-Induced Platelet Aggregation in Normal Subjects after Administration of Nitrofurantoin (Furadantin)

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Ennio C.; Levin, Nathan W.

    1973-01-01

    The evidence indicating that platelets may play a role in the occurrence of certain thromboembolic phenomena has stimulated a search for inhibitors of platelet function. This report presents data to indicate that nitrofurantoin is a potent inhibitor of primary ADP-induced platelet aggregation. The addition of 10 μM nitrofurantoin to citrated platelet-rich plasma obtained from 12 normal subjects produced a 29±6% (2 SD) inhibition of the velocity of platelet aggregation induced by 2 μM ADP. The inhibitory effect of nitrofurantoin demonstrated competitive kinetics in respect to ADP. The intravenous (180 mg) or oral (200 mg) administration of nitrofurantoin produced a serum nitrofurantoin concentration ranging from 2.7 to 23 μM in 28 normal subjects. Platelet-rich plasma obtained from these subjects demonstrated inhibition of the velocity of ADP-induced platelet aggregation that correlated with the log of the serum nitrofurantoin concentration (P < 0.001). Collagen-induced platelet aggregation was also inhibited in a dose-related manner, and the bleeding time was significantly prolonged in the two subjects with the highest serum nitrofurantoin concentration. These studies indicate that nitrofurantoin in vivo inhibits platelet function to a degree that is proportional to the serum nitrofurantoin concentration. PMID:4729043

  4. 48 CFR 245.608-72 - Screening excess automatic data processing equipment (ADPE).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Screening excess automatic... Reporting, Redistribution, and Disposal of Contractor Inventory 245.608-72 Screening excess automatic data... screening, including General Services Administration screening, for ADPE. (See the Defense...

  5. Aero-Propulsion Technology (APT) Task V Low Noise ADP Engine Definition Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holcombe, V.

    2003-01-01

    A study was conducted to identify and evaluate noise reduction technologies for advanced ducted prop propulsion systems that would allow increased capacity operation and result in an economically competitive commercial transport. The study investigated the aero/acoustic/structural advancements in fan and nacelle technology required to match or exceed the fuel burned and economic benefits of a constrained diameter large Advanced Ducted Propeller (ADP) compared to an unconstrained ADP propulsion system with a noise goal of 5 to 10 EPNDB reduction relative to FAR 36 Stage 3 at each of the three measuring stations namely, takeoff (cutback), approach and sideline. A second generation ADP was selected to operate within the maximum nacelle diameter constrain of 160 deg to allow installation under the wing. The impact of fan and nacelle technologies of the second generation ADP on fuel burn and direct operating costs for a typical 3000 nm mission was evaluated through use of a large, twin engine commercial airplane simulation model. The major emphasis of this study focused on fan blade aero/acoustic and structural technology evaluations and advanced nacelle designs. Results of this study have identified the testing required to verify the interactive performance of these components, along with noise characteristics, by wind tunnel testing utilizing and advanced interaction rig.

  6. Three-Dimensional Structures Reveal Multiple ADP/ATP Binding Modes

    SciTech Connect

    C Simmons; C Magee; D Smith; L Lauman; J Chaput; J Allen

    2011-12-31

    The creation of synthetic enzymes with predefined functions represents a major challenge in future synthetic biology applications. Here, we describe six structures of de novo proteins that have been determined using protein crystallography to address how simple enzymes perform catalysis. Three structures are of a protein, DX, selected for its stability and ability to tightly bind ATP. Despite the addition of ATP to the crystallization conditions, the presence of a bound but distorted ATP was found only under excess ATP conditions, with ADP being present under equimolar conditions or when crystallized for a prolonged period of time. A bound ADP cofactor was evident when Asp was substituted for Val at residue 65, but ATP in a linear configuration is present when Phe was substituted for Tyr at residue 43. These new structures complement previously determined structures of DX and the protein with the Phe 43 to Tyr substitution [Simmons, C. R., et al. (2009) ACS Chem. Biol. 4, 649-658] and together demonstrate the multiple ADP/ATP binding modes from which a model emerges in which the DX protein binds ATP in a configuration that represents a transitional state for the catalysis of ATP to ADP through a slow, metal-free reaction capable of multiple turnovers. This unusual observation suggests that design-free methods can be used to generate novel protein scaffolds that are tailor-made for catalysis.

  7. Guidelines for developing NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) ADP security risk management plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkins, F. G.

    1983-01-01

    This report presents guidance to NASA Computer security officials for developing ADP security risk management plans. The six components of the risk management process are identified and discussed. Guidance is presented on how to manage security risks that have been identified during a risk analysis performed at a data processing facility or during the security evaluation of an application system.

  8. Impaired ADP channeling to mitochondria and elevated reactive oxygen species in hypertensive hearts.

    PubMed

    Power, Amelia S C; Pham, Toan; Loiselle, Denis S; Crossman, David H; Ward, Marie-Louise; Hickey, Anthony J

    2016-06-01

    Systemic hypertension initially promotes a compensatory cardiac hypertrophy, yet it progresses to heart failure (HF), and energetic deficits appear to be central to this failure. However, the transfer of energy between the mitochondria and the myofibrils is not often considered as part of the energetic equation. We compared hearts from old spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) and normotensive Wistar controls. SHR hearts showed a 35% depression in mitochondrial function, yet produced at least double the amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in all respiration states in left ventricular (LV) homogenates. To test the connectivity between mitochondria and myofibrils, respiration was further tested in situ with LV permeabilized fibers by addition of multiple substrates and ATP, which requires hydrolysis to mediate oxidative phosphorylation. By trapping ADP using a pyruvate kinase enzyme system, we tested ADP channeling towards mitochondria, and this suppressed respiration and elevated ROS production more in the SHR fibers. The ADP-trapped state was also less relieved on creatine addition, likely reflecting the 30% depression in total CK activity in the SHR heart fibers. Confocal imaging identified a 34% longer distance between the centers of myofibril to mitochondria in the SHR hearts, which increases transverse metabolite diffusion distances (e.g., for ATP, ADP, and creatine phosphate). We propose that impaired connectivity between mitochondria and myofibrils may contribute to elevated ROS production. Impaired energy exchange could be the result of ultrastructural changes that occur with hypertrophy in this model of hypertension. PMID:27084386

  9. 7 CFR 277.18 - Establishment of an Automated Data Processing (ADP) and Information Retrieval System.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Establishment of an Automated Data Processing (ADP) and Information Retrieval System. 277.18 Section 277.18 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE FOOD STAMP AND FOOD DISTRIBUTION PROGRAM PAYMENTS OF...

  10. Genome Instability Mediates the Loss of Key Traits by Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1 during Laboratory Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Renda, Brian A.; Dasgupta, Aurko; Leon, Dacia

    2014-01-01

    Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1 has the potential to be a versatile bacterial host for synthetic biology because it is naturally transformable. To examine the genetic reliability of this desirable trait and to understand the potential stability of other engineered capabilities, we propagated ADP1 for 1,000 generations of growth in rich nutrient broth and analyzed the genetic changes that evolved by whole-genome sequencing. Substantially reduced transformability and increased cellular aggregation evolved during the experiment. New insertions of IS1236 transposable elements and IS1236-mediated deletions led to these phenotypes in most cases and were common overall among the selected mutations. We also observed a 49-kb deletion of a prophage region that removed an integration site, which has been used for genome engineering, from every evolved genome. The comparatively low rates of these three classes of mutations in lineages that were propagated with reduced selection for 7,500 generations indicate that they increase ADP1 fitness under common laboratory growth conditions. Our results suggest that eliminating transposable elements and other genetic failure modes that affect key organismal traits is essential for improving the reliability of metabolic engineering and genome editing in undomesticated microbial hosts, such as Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1. PMID:25512307

  11. Inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 attenuates the toxicity of carbon tetrachloride

    PubMed Central

    Banasik, Marek; Stedeford, Todd; Strosznajder, Robert P; Takehashi, Masanori; Tanaka, Seigo; Ueda, Kunihiro

    2011-01-01

    Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) is routinely used as a model compound for eliciting centrilobular hepatotoxicity. It can be bioactivated to the trichloromethyl radical, which causes extensive lipid peroxidation and ultimately cell death by necrosis. Overactivation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) can rapidly reduce the levels of (β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and adenosine triphosphate and ultimately promote necrosis. The aim of this study was to determine whether inhibition of PARP-1 could decrease CCl4-induced hepatotoxicity, as measured by degree of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation, serum levels of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), lipid peroxidation,and oxidative DNA damage. For this purpose, male ICR mice were administered intraperitoneally a hepatotoxic dose of CCl4 with or without 6(5H)-phenanthridinone, a potent inhibitor of PARP-1. Animals treated with CCl4 exhibited extensive poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation in centrilobular hepatocytes, elevated serum levels of LDH, and increased lipid peroxidation. In contrast, animals treated concomitantly with CCl4 and 6(5H)-phenanthridinone showed significantly lower levels of poly(ADP-ribosyl) ation, serum LDH, and lipid peroxidation. No changes were observed in the levels of oxidative DNA damage regardless of treatment. These results demonstrated that the hepatotoxicity of CCl4is dependent on the overactivation of PARP-1 and that inhibition of this enzyme attenuates the hepatotoxicity of CCl4. PMID:21395487

  12. The NASA/USRA ADP at the University of Central Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, L. A.; Armitage, P. K.

    1992-01-01

    An approach to learning engineering design is discussed with particular attention given to the impact of the NASA/Universities Space Research Association (USRA) Advanced Design Program (ADP) on that process. Attention is also given to a teaching method stressing science discipline and creativity and various selected space related designs.

  13. Benzofuran-substituted urea derivatives as novel P2Y(1) receptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Thalji, Reema K; Aiyar, Nambi; Davenport, Elizabeth A; Erhardt, Joseph A; Kallal, Lorena A; Morrow, Dwight M; Senadhi, Shobha; Burns-Kurtis, Cynthia L; Marino, Joseph P

    2010-07-15

    Benzofuran-substituted urea analogs have been identified as novel P2Y(1) receptor antagonists. Structure-activity relationship studies around the urea and the benzofuran moieties resulted in compounds having improved potency. Several analogs were shown to inhibit ADP-mediated platelet activation. PMID:20542694

  14. Differences in the transient kinetics of the binding of D-ADP and its mirror image L-ADP to human 3-phosphoglycerate kinase revealed by the presence of 3-phosphoglycerate.

    PubMed

    Gondeau, Claire; Chaloin, Laurent; Varga, Andrea; Roy, Béatrice; Lallemand, Perrine; Périgaud, Christian; Barman, Tom; Vas, Mária; Lionne, Corinne

    2008-03-18

    L-Nucleosides comprise a new class of antiviral and anticancer agents that are converted in vivo by a cascade of kinases to pharmacologically active nucleoside triphosphates. The last step of the cascade may be catalyzed by 3-phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK), an enzyme that has low specificity for nucleoside diphosphate (NDP): NDP + 1,3-bisphosphoglycerate <--> NTP + 3-phosphoglycerate. Here we compared the kinetics of the formation of the complexes of human PGK with d- and its mirror image l-ADP and the effect of 3-phosphoglycerate (PG) on these by exploiting the fluorescence signal of PGK that occurs upon its interaction with nucleotide substrate. Two types of experiment were carried out: equilibrium (estimation of dissociation constants) and stopped-flow (transient kinetics of the interactions). We show that under our experimental conditions (buffer containing 30% methanol, 4 degrees C) PGK binds d- and l-ADP with similar kinetics. However, whereas PG increased the dissociation rate constant for d-ADP by a factor of 8-which is a kinetic explanation for "substrate antagonism"-PG had little effect on this constant for l-ADP. We explain this difference by a molecular modeling study that showed that the beta-phosphates of d- and l-ADP have different orientations when bound to the active site of human PGK. The difference is unexpected because l-ADP is almost as catalytically competent as d-ADP [ Varga, A. et al. (2008) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 366, 994-1000]. PMID:18288812

  15. Cluster of Differentiation 38 (CD38) Mediates Bile Acid-induced Acinar Cell Injury and Pancreatitis through Cyclic ADP-ribose and Intracellular Calcium Release*

    PubMed Central

    Orabi, Abrahim I.; Muili, Kamaldeen A.; Javed, Tanveer A.; Jin, Shunqian; Jayaraman, Thottala; Lund, Frances E.; Husain, Sohail Z.

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant Ca2+ signals within pancreatic acinar cells are an early and critical feature in acute pancreatitis, yet it is unclear how these signals are generated. An important mediator of the aberrant Ca2+ signals due to bile acid exposure is the intracellular Ca2+ channel ryanodine receptor. One putative activator of the ryanodine receptor is the nucleotide second messenger cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR), which is generated by an ectoenzyme ADP-ribosyl cyclase, CD38. In this study, we examined the role of CD38 and cADPR in acinar cell Ca2+ signals and acinar injury due to bile acids using pharmacologic inhibitors of CD38 and cADPR as well as mice deficient in Cd38 (Cd38−/−). Cytosolic Ca2+ signals were imaged using live time-lapse confocal microscopy in freshly isolated mouse acinar cells during perifusion with the bile acid taurolithocholic acid 3-sulfate (TLCS; 500 μm). To focus on intracellular Ca2+ release and to specifically exclude Ca2+ influx, cells were perifused in Ca2+-free medium. Cell injury was assessed by lactate dehydrogenase leakage and propidium iodide uptake. Pretreatment with either nicotinamide (20 mm) or the cADPR antagonist 8-Br-cADPR (30 μm) abrogated TLCS-induced Ca2+ signals and cell injury. TLCS-induced Ca2+ release and cell injury were reduced by 30 and 95%, respectively, in Cd38-deficient acinar cells compared with wild-type cells (p < 0.05). Cd38-deficient mice were protected against a model of bile acid infusion pancreatitis. In summary, these data indicate that CD38-cADPR mediates bile acid-induced pancreatitis and acinar cell injury through aberrant intracellular Ca2+ signaling. PMID:23940051

  16. NADP/sup +/ enhances cholera and pertussis toxin-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation of membrane proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Kawai, Y.; Whitsel, C.; Arinze, I.J.

    1986-05-01

    Cholera or pertussis toxin-catalyzed (/sup 32/P)ADP-ribosylation is frequently used to estimate the concentration of the stimulatory (Ns) or inhibitory (Ni) guanine nucleotide regulatory proteins which modulate the activity of adenylate cyclase. With this assay, however, the degradation of the substrate, NAD/sup +/, by endogenous enzymes such as NAD/sup +/-glycohydrolase (NADase) present in the test membranes can influence the results. In this study the authors show that both cholera and pertussis toxin-catalyzed (/sup 32/P)ADP-ribosylation of liver membrane proteins is markedly enhanced by NADP/sup +/. The effect is concentration dependent; with 20 ..mu..M (/sup 32/P)NAD/sup +/ as substrate maximal enhancement is obtained at 0.5-1.0 mM NADP/sup +/. The enhancement of (/sup 32/P)ADP-ribosylation by NADP/sup +/ was much greater than that by other known effectors such as Mg/sup 2 +/, phosphate or isoniazid. The effect of NADP/sup +/ on ADP-ribosylation may occur by inhibition of the degradation of NAD/sup +/ probably by acting as an alternate substrate for NADase. Among inhibitors tested (NADP/sup +/, isoniazid, imidazole, nicotinamide, L-Arg-methyl-ester and HgCl/sub 2/) to suppress NADase activity, NADP/sup +/ was the most effective and, 10 mM, inhibited activity of the enzyme by about 90%. In membranes which contain substantial activities of NADase the inclusion of NADP/sup +/ in the assay is necessary to obtain maximal ADP-ribosylation.

  17. The ADP/ATP Carrier and Its Relationship to Oxidative Phosphorylation in Ancestral Protist Trypanosoma brucei

    PubMed Central

    Gnipová, Anna; Šubrtová, Karolína; Panicucci, Brian; Horváth, Anton; Lukeš, Julius

    2015-01-01

    The highly conserved ADP/ATP carrier (AAC) is a key energetic link between the mitochondrial (mt) and cytosolic compartments of all aerobic eukaryotic cells, as it exchanges the ATP generated inside the organelle for the cytosolic ADP. Trypanosoma brucei, a parasitic protist of medical and veterinary importance, possesses a single functional AAC protein (TbAAC) that is related to the human and yeast ADP/ATP carriers. However, unlike previous studies performed with these model organisms, this study showed that TbAAC is most likely not a stable component of either the respiratory supercomplex III+IV or the ATP synthasome but rather functions as a physically separate entity in this highly diverged eukaryote. Therefore, TbAAC RNA interference (RNAi) ablation in the insect stage of T. brucei does not impair the activity or arrangement of the respiratory chain complexes. Nevertheless, RNAi silencing of TbAAC caused a severe growth defect that coincides with a significant reduction of mt ATP synthesis by both substrate and oxidative phosphorylation. Furthermore, TbAAC downregulation resulted in a decreased level of cytosolic ATP, a higher mt membrane potential, an elevated amount of reactive oxygen species, and a reduced consumption of oxygen in the mitochondria. Interestingly, while TbAAC has previously been demonstrated to serve as the sole ADP/ATP carrier for ADP influx into the mitochondria, our data suggest that a second carrier for ATP influx may be present and active in the T. brucei mitochondrion. Overall, this study provides more insight into the delicate balance of the functional relationship between TbAAC and the oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) pathway in an early diverged eukaryote. PMID:25616281

  18. The ancestral activation promiscuity of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylases from oxygenic photosynthetic organisms

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (ADP-Glc PPase) catalyzes the first committed step in the synthesis of glycogen in bacteria and starch in algae and plants. In oxygenic photosynthetic organisms, ADP-Glc PPase is mainly activated by 3-phosphoglycerate (3-PGA) and to a lesser extent by other metabolites. In this work, we analyzed the activation promiscuity of ADP-Glc PPase subunits from the cyanobacterium Anabaena PCC 7120, the green alga Ostreococcus tauri, and potato (Solanum tuberosum) tuber by comparing a specificity constant for 3-PGA, fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP), fructose-6-phosphate, and glucose-6-phosphate. Results The 3-PGA specificity constant for the enzymes from Anabaena (homotetramer), O. tauri, and potato tuber was considerably higher than for other activators. O. tauri and potato tuber enzymes were heterotetramers comprising homologous small and large subunits. Conversely, the O. tauri small subunit (OtaS) homotetramer was more promiscuous because its FBP specificity constant was similar to that for 3-PGA. To explore the role of both OtaS and OtaL (O. tauri large subunit) in determining the specificity of the heterotetramer, we knocked out the catalytic activity of each subunit individually by site-directed mutagenesis. Interestingly, the mutants OtaSD148A/OtaL and OtaS/OtaLD171A had higher specificity constants for 3-PGA than for FBP. Conclusions After gene duplication, OtaS seemed to have lost specificity for 3-PGA compared to FBP. This was physiologically and evolutionarily feasible because co-expression of both subunits restored the specificity for 3-PGA of the resulting heterotetrameric wild type enzyme. This widespread promiscuity seems to be ancestral and intrinsic to the enzyme family. Its presence could constitute an efficient evolutionary mechanism to accommodate the ADP-Glc PPase regulation to different metabolic needs. PMID:23433303

  19. Ticagrelor: Pharmacokinetic, Pharmacodynamic and Pharmacogenetic Profile: An Update.

    PubMed

    Teng, Renli

    2015-11-01

    Despite advancements in treatments for acute coronary syndromes over the last 10 years, they continue to be life-threatening disorders. Currently, the standard of treatment includes dual antiplatelet therapy consisting of aspirin plus a P2Y12 receptor antagonist. The thienopyridine class of P2Y12 receptor antagonists, clopidogrel and prasugrel, have demonstrated efficacy. However, their use is associated with several limitations, including the need for metabolic activation and irreversible P2Y12 receptor binding causing prolonged recovery of platelet function. In addition, response to clopidogrel is variable and efficacy is reduced in patients with certain genotypes. Although prasugrel is a more consistent inhibitor of platelet aggregation than clopidogrel, it is associated with an increased risk of life-threatening and fatal bleeding. Ticagrelor is an oral antiplatelet agent of the cyclopentyltriazolopyrimidine class and also acts through the P2Y12 receptor. In contrast to clopidogrel and prasugrel, ticagrelor does not require metabolic activation and binds rapidly and reversibly to the P2Y12 receptor. In light of new data, this review provides an update on the pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and pharmacogenetic profiles of ticagrelor in different study populations. Recent studies report that no dose adjustment for ticagrelor is required on the basis of age, gender, ethnicity, severe renal impairment or mild hepatic impairment. The non-P2Y12 actions of ticagrelor are reviewed, showing indirect positive effects on cellular adenosine concentration and biological activity, by inhibition of equilibrative nucleoside transporter-1 independently of the P2Y12 receptor. CYP2C19 and ABCB1 genotypes do not appear to influence ticagrelor pharmacodynamics. A summary of drug interactions is also presented. PMID:26063049

  20. Evaluation of participants with suspected heritable platelet function disorders including recommendation and validation of a streamlined agonist panel

    PubMed Central

    Lowe, Gillian C.; Lordkipanidzé, Marie; Bem, Danai; Daly, Martina E.; Makris, Mike; Mumford, Andrew; Wilde, Jonathan T.; Watson, Steve P.

    2012-01-01

    Light transmission aggregometry (LTA) is used worldwide for the investigation of heritable platelet function disorders (PFDs), but interpretation of results is complicated by the feedback effects of ADP and thromboxane A2 (TxA2) and by the overlap with the response of healthy volunteers. Over 5 years, we have performed lumi-aggregometry on 9 platelet agonists in 111 unrelated research participants with suspected PFDs and in 70 healthy volunteers. Abnormal LTA or ATP secretion test results were identified in 58% of participants. In 84% of these, the patterns of response were consistent with defects in Gi receptor signaling, the TxA2 pathway, and dense granule secretion. Participants with defects in signaling to Gq-coupled receptor agonists and to collagen were also identified. Targeted genotyping identified 3 participants with function-disrupting mutations in the P2Y12 ADP and TxA2 receptors. The results of the present study illustrate that detailed phenotypic analysis using LTA and ATP secretion is a powerful tool for the diagnosis of PFDs. Our data also enable subdivision at the level of platelet-signaling pathways and in some cases to individual receptors. We further demonstrate that most PFDs can be reliably diagnosed using a streamlined panel of key platelet agonists and specified concentrations suitable for testing in most clinical diagnostic laboratories. PMID:23002116

  1. Purinergic Receptors in Ocular Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Guzman-Aranguez, Ana; Gasull, Xavier; Diebold, Yolanda; Pintor, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Inflammation is a complex process that implies the interaction between cells and molecular mediators, which, when not properly “tuned,” can lead to disease. When inflammation affects the eye, it can produce severe disorders affecting the superficial and internal parts of the visual organ. The nucleoside adenosine and nucleotides including adenine mononucleotides like ADP and ATP and dinucleotides such as P1,P4-diadenosine tetraphosphate (Ap4A), and P1,P5-diadenosine pentaphosphate (Ap5A) are present in different ocular locations and therefore they may contribute/modulate inflammatory processes. Adenosine receptors, in particular A2A adenosine receptors, present anti-inflammatory action in acute and chronic retinal inflammation. Regarding the A3 receptor, selective agonists like N6-(3-iodobenzyl)-5′-N-methylcarboxamidoadenosine (CF101) have been used for the treatment of inflammatory ophthalmic diseases such as dry eye and uveoretinitis. Sideways, diverse stimuli (sensory stimulation, large intraocular pressure increases) can produce a release of ATP from ocular sensory innervation or after injury to ocular tissues. Then, ATP will activate purinergic P2 receptors present in sensory nerve endings, the iris, the ciliary body, or other tissues surrounding the anterior chamber of the eye to produce uveitis/endophthalmitis. In summary, adenosine and nucleotides can activate receptors in ocular structures susceptible to suffer from inflammatory processes. This involvement suggests the possible use of purinergic agonists and antagonists as therapeutic targets for ocular inflammation. PMID:25132732

  2. Radiolabelling of bovine myristoylated alanine-rich protein kinase C substrate (MARCKS) in an ADP-ribosylation reaction.

    PubMed

    Chao, D; Severson, D L; Zwiers, H; Hollenberg, M D

    1994-01-01

    In an ADP-ribosylation reaction, we have observed the radiolabelling of a protein in a crude bovine brain homogenate, which upon two-dimensional gel electrophoresis migrated with an acidic pI (< 4.5) and an apparent molecular mass (80-90 kDa) consistent with the properties of the myristoylated, alanine-rich, protein kinase C substrate protein termed MARCKS. To establish the identity of this radiolabelled constituent in brain homogenates, we first purified bovine brain MARCKS using calmodulin-Sepharose affinity chromatography and we then supplemented the crude ADP-ribosylation reaction mixture with this purified MARCKS fraction. Concordant increases in radiolabelling and silver staining of the same protein component from the MARCKS-supplemented ADP-ribosylation reaction, as compared with the ADP-ribosylated crude homogenate, established the identity of this constituent as MARCKS. The radiolabelling of MARCKS was lower in comparison with the ADP-ribosylation of the related neuronal protein B-50/GAP-43 under identical reaction conditions. The potential functional consequences of the ADP-ribosylation of MARCKS are discussed and the possibility is raised that other members of the MARCKS family, such as the F52/MacMARCKS/MRP protein, may also be subject to ADP-ribosylation. PMID:7605610

  3. High K(m) of oxidative phosphorylation for ADP in skinned muscle fibers: where does it stem from?

    PubMed

    Kongas, Olav; Yuen, Tai L; Wagner, Marijke J; Van Beek, Johannes H G M; Krab, Klaas

    2002-09-01

    Mitochondria in saponin-skinned cardiac fiber bundles were reported to have an order of magnitude lower apparent affinity to ADP than isolated mitochondria. Although ADP was measured outside the bundles, it was thought that the low affinity was not caused by diffusion gradients because of relatively short diffusion distances. Here we test the hypothesis that considerable ADP diffusion gradients exist and can be diminished by increasing the intrafiber ADP production rate. We increased the ADP-producing activity in rat heart skinned fiber bundles by incubating with 100 IU/ml yeast hexokinase and glucose. Consequently, we observed a significant decrease of the apparent Michaelis constant (K(m)) to ADP of the respiration rate of bundles from 216 +/- 59 to 50 +/- 9 microM. Fitting the results with a mathematical model, we estimated the K(m) of mitochondria in the bundles to be 25 microM. We conclude that the affinity to ADP of in situ mitochondria in heart is of the same order of magnitude as that of isolated mitochondria. PMID:12176731

  4. Host cell cytotoxicity and cytoskeleton disruption by CerADPr, an ADP-ribosyltransferase of Bacillus cereus G9241.

    PubMed

    Simon, Nathan C; Vergis, James M; Ebrahimi, Avesta V; Ventura, Christy L; O'Brien, Alison D; Barbieri, Joseph T

    2013-04-01

    Bacillus cereus G9241 was isolated from a welder suffering from an anthrax-like inhalation illness. B. cereus G9241 encodes two megaplasmids, pBCXO1 and pBC210, which are analogous to the toxin- and capsule-encoding virulence plasmids of Bacillus anthracis. Protein modeling predicted that the pBC210 LF homologue contained an ADP-ribosyltransferase (ADPr) domain. This putative bacterial ADP-ribosyltransferase domain was denoted CerADPr. Iterative modeling showed that CerADPr possessed several conserved ADP-ribosyltransferase features, including an α-3 helix, an ADP-ribosyltransferase turn-turn loop, and a "Gln-XXX-Glu" motif. CerADPr ADP-ribosylated an ~120 kDa protein in HeLa cell lysates and intact cells. EGFP-CerADPr rounded HeLa cells, elicited cytoskeletal changes, and yielded a cytotoxic phenotype, indicating that CerADPr disrupts cytoskeletal signaling. CerADPr(E431D) did not possess ADP-ribosyltransferase or NAD glycohydrolase activities and did not elicit a phenotype in HeLa cells, implicating Glu431 as a catalytic residue. These experiments identify CerADPr as a cytotoxic ADP-ribosyltransferase that disrupts the host cytoskeleton. PMID:22934824

  5. Host cell cytotoxicity and cytoskeleton disruption by CerADPr, an ADP-ribosyltransferase of Bacillus cereus G9241

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Nathan C.; Vergis, James M.; Ebrahimi, Avesta V.; Ventura, Christy L.; O’Brien, Alison D.; Barbieri, Joseph T.

    2013-01-01

    Bacillus cereus G9241 was isolated from a welder suffering from an anthrax-like inhalation illness. B. cereus G9241 encodes two megaplasmids, pBCXO1 and pBC210, which are analogous to the toxin- and capsule-encoding virulence plasmids of B. anthracis. Protein modeling predicted that the pBC210 LF homolog contained an ADP-ribosyltransferase (ADPr) domain. This putative bacterial ADP-ribosyltransferase domain was denoted CerADPr. Iterative modeling showed that CerADPr possessed several conserved ADP-ribosyltransferase features, including an α-3 helix, an ADP-ribosyltransferase turn-turn loop, and a “Gln-XXX-Glu” motif. CerADPr ADP-ribosylated a ~120kDa protein in HeLa cell lysates and intact cells. EGFP-CerADPr rounded HeLa cells, elicited cytoskeletal changes, and yielded a cytotoxic phenotype, indicating that CerADPr disrupts cytoskeletal signaling. CerADPr(E431D) did not possess ADP-ribosyltransferase or NAD glycohydrolase activities and did not elicit a phenotype in HeLa cells, implicating Glu431 as a catalytic residue. These experiments identify CerADPr as a cytotoxic ADP-ribosyltransferase that disrupts the host cytoskeleton. PMID:22934824

  6. An Entamoeba histolytica ADP-ribosyl transferase from the diphtheria toxin family modifies the bacterial elongation factor Tu.

    PubMed

    Avila, Eva E; Rodriguez, Orlando I; Marquez, Jaqueline A; Berghuis, Albert M

    2016-06-01

    ADP-ribosyl transferases are enzymes involved in the post-translational modification of proteins; they participate in multiple physiological processes, pathogenesis and host-pathogen interactions. Several reports have characterized the functions of these enzymes in viruses, prokaryotes and higher eukaryotes, but few studies have reported ADP-ribosyl transferases in lower eukaryotes, such as parasites. The locus EHI_155600 from Entamoeba histolytica encodes a hypothetical protein that possesses a domain from the ADP-ribosylation superfamily; this protein belongs to the diphtheria toxin family according to a homology model using poly-ADP-ribosyl polymerase 12 (PARP12 or ARTD12) as a template. The recombinant protein expressed in Escherichia coli exhibited in vitro ADP-ribosylation activity that was dependent on the time and temperature. Unlabeled βNAD(+), but not ADP-ribose, competed in the enzymatic reaction using biotin-βNAD(+) as the ADP-ribose donor. The recombinant enzyme, denominated EhToxin-like, auto-ADP-ribosylated and modified an acceptor from E. coli that was identified by MS/MS as the elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to identify an ADP-ribosyl transferase from the diphtheria toxin family in a protozoan parasite. The known toxins from this family (i.e., the diphtheria toxin, the Pseudomonas aeruginosa toxin Exo-A, and Cholix from Vibrio cholerae) modify eukaryotic elongation factor two (eEF-2), whereas the amoeba EhToxin-like modified EF-Tu, which is another elongation factor involved in protein synthesis in bacteria and mitochondria. PMID:27234208

  7. Enhancement of choleragen ADP-ribosyltransferase activities by guanyl nucleotides and a 19-kDa membrane protein.

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, S C; Noda, M; Adamik, R; Moss, J; Vaughan, M

    1987-01-01

    Choleragen activates adenylate cyclase by catalyzing, in the presence of NAD, the ADP-ribosylation of Gs alpha, the stimulatory guanyl nucleotide-binding protein of the cyclase system. Kahn and Gilman [Kahn, R. A. & Gilman, A. G. (1986) J. Biol. Chem. 261, 7906-7911] identified another guanyl nucleotide-binding protein termed ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) that stimulated this reaction. It was proposed that the toxin substrate is an ARF-Gs alpha complex and that ARF may have a physiological role in regulation of Gs alpha activity. We have found that purified ARF from bovine brain enhances not only the ADP-ribosylation of Gs alpha but also Gs alpha-independent choleragen-catalyzed reactions. These are (i) ADP-ribosylation of agmatine, a low molecular weight guanidino compound; (ii) ADP-ribosylation of several proteins unrelated to Gs alpha; and (iii) auto-ADP-ribosylation of the toxin A1 peptide. These reactions, as well as the ADP-ribosylation of ARF itself, were stimulated by GTP or stable GTP analogues such as guanyl-5'-yl imido-beta gamma-diphosphate and guanosine 5'-O-[gamma-thio]triphosphate; GDP and guanosine 5'-O-[beta-thio]diphosphate were inactive. These observations are consistent with the conclusion that ARF interacts directly with the A subunit of choleragen in a GTP-dependent fashion thereby enhancing catalytic activity manifest as transfer of ADP-ribose to Gs alpha and other proteins, to the toxin A1 peptide, or to agmatine. It is tempting to speculate that ARF may be involved in regulating one or another of the ADP-ribosyltransferases found in animal cells. Images PMID:3110784

  8. Modulated anharmonic ADPs are intrinsic to aperiodic crystals: a case study on incommensurate Rb2ZnCl4

    PubMed Central

    Li, Liang; Wölfel, Alexander; Schönleber, Andreas; Mondal, Swastik; Schreurs, Antoine M. M.; Kroon-Batenburg, Loes M. J.; van Smaalen, Sander

    2011-01-01

    A combination of structure refinements, analysis of the superspace MEM density and interpretation of difference-Fourier maps has been used to characterize the incommensurate modulation of rubidium tetrachlorozincate, Rb2ZnCl4, at a temperature of T = 196 K, close to the lock-in transition at T lock-in = 192 K. The modulation is found to consist of a combination of displacement modulation functions, modulated atomic displacement parameters (ADPs) and modulated third-order anharmonic ADPs. Up to fifth-order Fourier coefficients could be refined against diffraction data containing up to fifth-order satellite reflections. The center-of-charge of the atomic basins of the MEM density and the displacive modulation functions of the structure model provide equivalent descriptions of the displacive modulation. Modulations of the ADPs and anharmonic ADPs are visible in the MEM density, but extracting quantitative information about these modulations appears to be difficult. In the structure refinements the modulation parameters of the ADPs form a dependent set, and ad hoc restrictions had to be introduced in the refinements. It is suggested that modulated harmonic ADPs and modulated third-order anharmonic ADPs form an intrinsic part, however small, of incommensurately modulated structures in general. Refinements of alternate models with and without parameters for modulated ADPs lead to significant differences between the parameters of the displacement modulation in these two types of models, thus showing the modulation of ADPs to be important for a correct description of the displacive modulation. The resulting functions do not provide evidence for an interpretation of the modulation by a soliton model. PMID:21586828

  9. Roles of glia limitans astrocytes and CO in ADP-induced pial arteriolar dilation in newborn pigs

    PubMed Central

    Kanu, Alie; Leffler, Charles W.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Purpose Astrocytes, neurons, and microvessels together form a neurovascular unit allowing blood flow to match neuronal activity. Adenosine diphosphate (ADP) is an important signaling molecule in the brain, and dilation in response to ADP is astrocyte-dependent in rats and newborn pigs. Carbon monoxide (CO), produced endogenously by catabolism of heme to CO, iron, and biliverdin via heme oxygenase (HO), is an important cell signaling molecule in the neonatal cerebral circulation. We hypothesize ADP stimulates CO production by glia limitans astrocytes and that this CO causes pial arteriolar dilation. Methods Experiments were performed using anesthetized piglet with closed cranial windows, and freshly isolated piglet astrocytes and microvessels. Astrocyte injury was caused by topical application of L-2-alpha aminoadipic acid (2 mM, 5 h). Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) was collected from under the cranial windows for measurement of ADP-stimulated CO production. CO was measured by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy analysis. Results Before, but not after, astrocyte injury in vivo, topical ADP stimulated both CO production and dilation of pial arterioles. Astrocyte injury did not block dilation to isoproterenol or bradykinin. Chromium mesoporphyrin, an inhibitor of HO, also prevented the ADP-induced increase in CSF CO and pial arteriolar dilation caused by ADP but not dilation to sodium nitroprusside. ADP also increased CO production by freshly isolated piglet astrocytes and cerebral microvessels, although the increase was smaller in the microvessels. Conclusions These data suggest that glia limitans astrocytes employ CO as a gasotransmitter to cause pial arteriolar dilation in response to ADP. PMID:19164779

  10. Altered poly(ADP-ribose) metabolism impairs cellular responses to genotoxic stress in a hypomorphic mutant of poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Hong; Coyle, Donna L.; Meyer-Ficca, Mirella L.; Meyer, Ralph G.; Jacobson, Elaine L.; Wang, Zhao-Qi; Jacobson, Myron K. . E-mail: mjacobson@pharmacy.arizona.edu

    2007-03-10

    Genotoxic stress activates nuclear poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) metabolism leading to PAR synthesis catalyzed by DNA damage activated poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) and rapid PAR turnover by action of nuclear poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG). The involvement of PARP-1 and PARP-2 in responses to DNA damage has been well studied but the involvement of nuclear PARG is less well understood. To gain insights into the function of nuclear PARG in DNA damage responses, we have quantitatively studied PAR metabolism in cells derived from a hypomorphic mutant mouse model in which exons 2 and 3 of the PARG gene have been deleted (PARG-{delta}2,3 cells), resulting in a nuclear PARG containing a catalytic domain but lacking the N-terminal region (A domain) of the protein. Following DNA damage induced by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG), we found that the activity of both PARG and PARPs in intact cells is increased in PARG-{delta}2,3 cells. The increased PARG activity leads to decreased PARP-1 automodification with resulting increased PARP activity. The degree of PARG activation is greater than PARP, resulting in decreased PAR accumulation. Following MNNG treatment, PARG-{delta}2,3 cells show reduced formation of XRCC1 foci, delayed H2AX phosphorylation, decreased DNA break intermediates during repair, and increased cell death. Our results show that a precise coordination of PARPs and PARG activities is important for normal cellular responses to DNA damage and that this coordination is defective in the absence of the PARG A domain.

  11. Molecular dynamics study on the free energy profile for dissociation of ADP from N-terminal domain of Hsp90

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Kazutomo; Saito, Hiroaki; Okazaki, Susumu; Nagao, Hidemi

    2013-11-01

    The free energy profile for dissociation of ADP from Hsp90 was calculated as a function of the distance r between the centers of mass of Hsp90 and ADP by using molecular dynamics simulations and the thermodynamic integration method. The free energy profile is defined as the difference from a reference state. We found that the free energy reaches a minimum at r = 0.8 nm and that the mean force at r = 1.0 nm was considerably difference-dependent on the trajectories. Our results suggest that Met98 blocks the dissociation pathway of ADP at r = 1.0 nm.

  12. Structural biology of the writers, readers, and erasers in mono- and poly(ADP-ribose) mediated signaling

    PubMed Central

    Karlberg, Tobias; Langelier, Marie-France; Pascal, John M.; Schüler, Herwig

    2013-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation of proteins regulates protein activities in various processes including transcription control, chromatin organization, organelle assembly, protein degradation, and DNA repair. Modulating the proteins involved in the metabolism of ADP-ribosylation can have therapeutic benefits in various disease states. Protein crystal structures can help understand the biological functions, facilitate detailed analysis of single residues, as well as provide a basis for development of small molecule effectors. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of the structural biology of the writers, readers, and erasers of ADP-ribosylation. PMID:23458732

  13. The Molecular Mechanism of P2Y1 Receptor Activation.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Shuguang; Chan, H C Stephen; Vogel, Horst; Filipek, Slawomir; Stevens, Raymond C; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2016-08-22

    Human purinergic G protein-coupled receptor P2Y1 (P2Y1 R) is activated by adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP) to induce platelet activation and thereby serves as an important antithrombotic drug target. Crystal structures of P2Y1 R revealed that one ligand (MRS2500) binds to the extracellular vestibule of this GPCR, whereas another (BPTU) occupies the surface between transmembrane (TM) helices TM2 and TM3. We introduced a total of 20 μs all-atom long-timescale molecular dynamic (MD) simulations to inquire why two molecules in completely different locations both serve as antagonists while ADP activates the receptor. Our results indicate that BPTU acts as an antagonist by stabilizing extracellular helix bundles leading to an increase of the lipid order, whereas MRS2500 blocks signaling by occupying the ligand binding site. Both antagonists stabilize an ionic lock within the receptor. However, binding of ADP breaks this ionic lock, forming a continuous water channel that leads to P2Y1 R activation. PMID:27460867

  14. The Molecular Mechanism of P2Y1 Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Chan, H. C. Stephen; Vogel, Horst; Filipek, Slawomir

    2016-01-01

    Human purinergic G protein-coupled receptor P2Y1 (P2Y1R) is activated by adenosine 5’-diphosphate (ADP) to induce platelet activation and thereby serves as an important antithrombotic drug target. Crystal structures of P2Y1R revealed that one ligand (MRS2500) binds to the extracellular vestibule of this GPCR, whereas another (BPTU) occupies the surface between transmembrane (TM) helices TM2 and TM3. We introduced a total of 20 µs all-atom long-timescale molecular dynamic (MD) simulations to inquire why two molecules in completely different locations both serve as antagonists while ADP activates the receptor. Our results indicate that BPTU acts as an antagonist by stabilizing extracellular helix bundles leading to an increase of the lipid order, whereas MRS2500 blocks signaling by occupying the ligand binding site. Both antagonists stabilize an ionic lock within the receptor. However, binding of ADP breaks this ionic lock, forming a continuous water channel that leads to P2Y1R activation. PMID:27460867

  15. Impact of non-inhibited platelet supplementation on platelet reactivity in patients treated with prasugrel or ticagrelor for an acute coronary syndrome: An ex vivo study.

    PubMed

    Bonhomme, Fanny; Bonvini, Robert; Reny, Jean-Luc; Poncet, Antoine; Fontana, Pierre

    2015-01-01

    Managing bleeding in patients receiving P2Y12 inhibitors is challenging. Few data are available regarding the efficacy of platelet transfusion in patients treated with prasugrel or ticagrelor. The aim of this study was to evaluate the minimal amount of platelet supplementation (in terms of ratio of non-inhibited platelets to inhibited platelets) necessary to restore platelet reactivity in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) of patients treated with aspirin and a prasugrel or ticagrelor loading dose for an acute coronary syndrome. PRP samples from patients were mixed ex vivo with increasing proportions of pooled PRP from healthy volunteers. Platelet reactivity was challenged with adenosine diphosphate (ADP), arachidonic acid, collagen or thrombin receptor activating peptide using light transmission aggregometry. The primary endpoint was the proportion of patient samples recovering an ADP-induced maximal aggregation (ADP-Aggmax) value above 40%. In patients treated with prasugrel (n = 32), ADP-Aggmax increased progressively with supplements of pooled PRP, with an average increase of 7.9% (95% CI [7.1; 8.8], p < 0.001) per each 20% increase in the ratio of non-inhibited platelets to inhibited platelets. A ratio of 60% was associated with 90% of patients reaching the primary endpoint. In patients treated with ticagrelor (n = 15), ADP-Aggmax did not significantly increase with any level of supplements. In conclusions, ex vivo addition of non-inhibited platelets significantly improved ADP-Aggmax in patients treated with prasugrel with a dose-dependent effect. There was no evidence of such a reversal in patients treated with ticagrelor. These results suggest that platelet transfusion may be more effective in blunting bleeding in patients treated with prasugrel, than those treated with ticagrelor. PMID:25905916

  16. Different Influences of Hematocrit on the Results of Two Point-Of-Care Platelet Function Tests, the VerifyNow Assay and Multiple Electrode Platelet Aggregometry

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yun Gi; Suh, Jung-Won; Park, Jin Joo; Oh, Il-Young; Yoon, Chang-Hwan; Cho, Young-Seok; Youn, Tae-Jin; Chae, In-Ho; Choi, Dong-Ju

    2014-01-01

    Objective Previous studies have reported a considerable association between the VerifyNow (Accumetrics, San Diego, CA, USA) P2Y12 assay results and hematocrit. No reports, however, have described an association between the multiple electrode platelet aggregometry (MEA; Dynabyte, Munich, Germany) adenosine diphosphate (ADP) assay results and hematocrit. This study was conducted to evaluate the influence of hematocrit on the results of 2 different point-of-care platelet function tests. Methods A total of 462 consecutive patients who were undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention were enrolled. Platelet function was evaluated with both the VerifyNow P2Y12 and MEA ADP assays. Results Anemic patients (n = 152, 32.9%) demonstrated a significantly higher rate of cardiac death, myocardial infarction, and stroke (5.3% vs. 2.3%, p = 0.046) during the follow-up (median: 18.8 months). Although the VerifyNow P2Y12 assay results demonstrated a significant inverse correlation with hematocrit (r = −0.409, p<0.001), there was no such correlation between the MEA ADP assay results and hematocrit (r = 0.039, p = 0.401). In the multivariate analysis, anemia was an independent predictor of high on-treatment platelet reactivity, defined as a VerifyNow P2Y12 reaction unit level of ≥252.5 (odds ratio = 2.21, 95% confidence interval = 1.39–3.52; p = 0.001). Importantly, this association was independent of an intrinsic change in platelet reactivity as measured by the MEA ADP assay. Adjusting for the influence of hematocrit improved the strength of the correlation between the VerifyNow P2Y12 and MEA ADP assay results. Conclusions Hematocrit significantly influenced the VerifyNow P2Y12 assay results, a phenomenon that was presumably in-vitro. Hematocrit level should therefore be considered when interpreting results of the VerifyNow P2Y12 assay. PMID:25427105

  17. Differential and Concordant Roles for Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase 1 and Poly(ADP-Ribose) in Regulating WRN and RECQL5 Activities.

    PubMed

    Khadka, Prabhat; Hsu, Joseph K; Veith, Sebastian; Tadokoro, Takashi; Shamanna, Raghavendra A; Mangerich, Aswin; Croteau, Deborah L; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2015-12-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymerase 1 (PARP1) catalyzes the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) of proteins, a posttranslational modification which forms the nucleic acid-like polymer PAR. PARP1 and PAR are integral players in the early DNA damage response, since PARylation orchestrates the recruitment of repair proteins to sites of damage. Human RecQ helicases are DNA unwinding proteins that are critical responders to DNA damage, but how their recruitment and activities are regulated by PARPs and PAR is poorly understood. Here we report that all human RecQ helicases interact with PAR noncovalently. Furthermore, we define the effects that PARP1, PARylated PARP1, and PAR have on RECQL5 and WRN, using both in vitro and in vivo assays. We show that PARylation is involved in the recruitment of RECQL5 and WRN to laser-induced DNA damage and that RECQL5 and WRN have differential responses to PARylated PARP1 and PAR. Furthermore, we show that the loss of RECQL5 or WRN resulted in increased sensitivity to PARP inhibition. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that PARP1 and PAR actively, and in some instances differentially, regulate the activities and cellular localization of RECQL5 and WRN, suggesting that PARylation acts as a fine-tuning mechanism to coordinate their functions in time and space during the genotoxic stress response. PMID:26391948

  18. Differential and Concordant Roles for Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase 1 and Poly(ADP-Ribose) in Regulating WRN and RECQL5 Activities

    PubMed Central

    Khadka, Prabhat; Hsu, Joseph K.; Veith, Sebastian; Tadokoro, Takashi; Shamanna, Raghavendra A.; Mangerich, Aswin; Croteau, Deborah L.

    2015-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymerase 1 (PARP1) catalyzes the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) of proteins, a posttranslational modification which forms the nucleic acid-like polymer PAR. PARP1 and PAR are integral players in the early DNA damage response, since PARylation orchestrates the recruitment of repair proteins to sites of damage. Human RecQ helicases are DNA unwinding proteins that are critical responders to DNA damage, but how their recruitment and activities are regulated by PARPs and PAR is poorly understood. Here we report that all human RecQ helicases interact with PAR noncovalently. Furthermore, we define the effects that PARP1, PARylated PARP1, and PAR have on RECQL5 and WRN, using both in vitro and in vivo assays. We show that PARylation is involved in the recruitment of RECQL5 and WRN to laser-induced DNA damage and that RECQL5 and WRN have differential responses to PARylated PARP1 and PAR. Furthermore, we show that the loss of RECQL5 or WRN resulted in increased sensitivity to PARP inhibition. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that PARP1 and PAR actively, and in some instances differentially, regulate the activities and cellular localization of RECQL5 and WRN, suggesting that PARylation acts as a fine-tuning mechanism to coordinate their functions in time and space during the genotoxic stress response. PMID:26391948

  19. Cyclic ADP ribose is a novel regulator of intracellular Ca2+ oscillations in human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Rong; Sun, Hai-Ying; Lau, Chu-Pak; Tse, Hung-Fat; Lee, Hon-Cheung; Li, Gui-Rong

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a promising cell source for regenerative medicine. However, the cellular biology of these cells is not fully understood. The present study characterizes the cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR)-mediated Ca2+ signals in human MSCs and finds that externally applied cADPR can increase the frequency of spontaneous intracellular Ca2+ (Ca2+i) oscillations. The increase was abrogated by a specific cADPR antagonist or an inositol trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) inhibitor, but not by ryanodine. In addition, the cADPR-induced increase of Ca2+i oscillation frequency was prevented by inhibitors of nucleoside transporter or by inhibitors of the transient receptor potential cation melastatin-2 (TRPM2) channel. RT-PCR revealed mRNAs for the nucleoside transporters, concentrative nucleoside transporters 1/2 and equilibrative nucleoside transporters 1/3, IP3R1/2/3 and the TRPM2 channel, but not those for ryanodine receptors and CD38 in human MSCs. Knockdown of the TRPM2 channel by specific short interference RNA abolished the effect of cADPR on the Ca2+i oscillation frequency, and prevented the stimulation of proliferation by cADPR. Moreover, cADPR remarkably increased phosphorylated extracellular-signal-regulated kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), but not Akt or p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). However, cADPR had no effect on adipogenesis or osteogenesis in human MSCs. Our results indicate that cADPR is a novel regulator of Ca2+i oscillations in human MSCs. It permeates the cell membrane through the nucleoside transporters and increases Ca2+ oscillation via activation of the TRPM2 channel, resulting in enhanced phosphorylation of ERK1/2 and, thereby, stimulation of human MSC proliferation. This study delineates an alternate signalling pathway of cADPR that is distinct from its well-established role of serving as a Ca2+ messenger for mobilizing the internal Ca2+ stores. Whether cADPR can be used clinically for stimulating marrow function in

  20. Poly(ADP-ribose) Signals to Mitochondrial AIF: A Key Event in Parthanatos

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yingfei; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2009-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) plays a pivotal role in multiple neurologic diseases by mediating caspase-independent cell death, which has recently been designated parthanatos to distinguish it from other forms of cell death such as apoptosis, necrosis and autophagy. Mitochondrial apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) release and translocation to the nucleus is the commitment point for parthanatos. This process involves a pathogenic role of poly (ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymer. It generates in the nucleus and translocates to the mitochondria to mediate AIF release following lethal PARP-1 activation. PAR polymer itself is toxic to cells. Thus, PAR polymer signaling to mitochondrial AIF is the key event initiating the deadly crosstalk between the nucleus and the mitochondria in parthanatos. Targeting PAR-mediated AIF release could be a potential approach for the therapy of neurologic disorders. PMID:19332058

  1. Localization and characterization of the human ADP-ribosylation factor 5 (ARF5) gene

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, R.E. |; Daiger, S.P.; Green, E.D.

    1997-05-01

    ADP-ribosylation factor 5 (ARF5) is a member of the ARF gene family. The ARF proteins stimulate the in vitro ADP-ribosyltransferase activity of cholera toxin and appear to play a role in vesicular trafficking in vivo. We have mapped ARF5, one of the six known mammalian ARF genes, to a well-defined yeast artificial chromosome contig on human chromosome 7q31.3. In addition, we have isolated and sequenced an {approximately}3.2-kb genomic segment that contains the entire ARF5 coding region, revealing the complete intron-exon structure of the gene. With six coding exons and five introns, the genomic structure of ARF5 is unique among the mammalian ARF genes and provides insight about the evolutionary history of this ancient gene family. 20 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Molecular dynamics studies of Hsp90 with ADP: Protein-ligand binding dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawaguchi, Kazutomo; Takagi, Hiroyuki; Takasu, Masako; Saito, Hiroaki; Nagao, Hidemi

    2013-02-01

    Ligand binding to a protein molecule plays a key role in the function of many proteins. We performed all-atom model molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of the N-terminal domain of human Hsp90 in complex with ADP, and calculated a free energy profile for ligand binding with thermodynamic integration method. The free energy profile as a function of the distance between the centers of mass of the N-terminal domain of Hsp90 and ADP was calculated using the results of the binding-distance constrained MD simulations. The free energy profile was fit to a harmonic oscillator. We obtained spring constant k = 3.84kJ/molṡnm2 = 9.17×10-1kcal/molṡÅ2. This result indicates that the dynamics of the ligand binding to the protein molecule is about 1,000 times slower than that of the covalent bond.

  3. Biology of Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerases: The Factotums of Cell Maintenance.

    PubMed

    Bai, Peter

    2015-06-18

    The protein family of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) or diphtheria toxin-type ADP-ribose transferases (ARTDs) are multidomain proteins originally identified as DNA repair factors. There are 17 PARP enzymes in humans, and it is now evident that PARPs undertake more tasks than DNA repair. The aim of this review is to give a comprehensive view of the biological roles of the PARP family starting from the simplest biochemical reactions to complex regulatory circuits. Special attention will be laid on discussing linkage of PARP enzymes with tumor biology, oxidative stress, inflammatory, and metabolic diseases. A better understanding of PARP-mediated processes and pathologies may help in identifying new pathways and, by these, new targets to combat diseases that affect large populations and seriously shorten life expectancy and the quality of life, such as cancer, metabolic, or inflammatory diseases. PMID:26091343

  4. Dual inhibitory effects of dimethyl sulfoxide on poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase.

    PubMed

    Banasik, M; Ueda, K

    1999-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), a solvent popularly used for dissolving water-insoluble compounds, is a weak inhibitor of poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase, that is a nuclear enzyme producing (ADP-ribose)n from NAD+. The inhibitory mode and potency depend on the concentration of substrate, NAD+, as well as the temperature of the reaction; at micromolar concentrations of NAD+, the inhibition by DMSO is biphasic at 37 degrees C, but is monophasic and apparently competitive with NAD+ at 25 degrees C. DMSO, on the other hand, diminishes dose-dependently and markedly the inhibitory potency of benzamide and other inhibitors. Other organic solvents, ethanol and methanol, also show a biphasic effect on the synthetase activity at different concentrations. PMID:10445046

  5. Calcium-dependent ADP-ribosylation of high-mobility-group I (HMGI) proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Giancotti, V; Bandiera, A; Sindici, C; Perissin, L; Crane-Robinson, C

    1996-01-01

    Micrococcal nuclease digestion of nuclei from mouse Lewis lung carcinoma cells releases a protein mixture into the supernatant that lacks histone H1 and contains a full complement of high-mobility-group I (HMGI) proteins (i.e. I, Y and I-C). This implies that all three HMGI proteins are localized at the nuclease-sensitive regions of active chromatin. It is also shown that if Ca2+ ions are present in the nuclear incubation buffer (with or without exogenous nuclease), all three HMGI proteins become ADP-ribosylated. We propose that this modification of HMGI family proteins is part of the general poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation that accompanies DNA damage in apoptosis and other processes. PMID:8760375

  6. Inhibition of Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase by Nucleic Acid Metabolite 7-Methylguanine

    PubMed Central

    Nilov, D. K.; Tararov, V. I.; Kulikov, A. V.; Zakharenko, A. L.; Gushchina, I. V.; Mikhailov, S. N.; Lavrik, O. I.; Švedas, V. K.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of 7-methylguanine, a nucleic acid metabolite, to inhibit poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP-1) and poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-2 (PARP-2) has been identified in silico and studied experimentally. The amino group at position 2 and the methyl group at position 7 were shown to be important substituents for the efficient binding of purine derivatives to PARPs. The activity of both tested enzymes, PARP-1 and PARP-2, was suppressed by 7-methylguanine with IC50 values of 150 and 50 μM, respectively. At the PARP inhibitory concentration, 7-methylguanine itself was not cytotoxic, but it was able to accelerate apoptotic death of BRCA1-deficient breast cancer cells induced by cisplatin and doxorubicin, the widely used DNA-damaging chemotherapeutic agents. 7-Methylguanine possesses attractive predictable pharmacokinetics and an adverse-effect profile and may be considered as a new additive to chemotherapeutic treatment. PMID:27437145

  7. The mitochondrial outer membrane is not a major diffusion barrier for ADP in mouse heart skinned fibre bundles.

    PubMed

    Kongas, Olav; Wagner, Marijke J; ter Veld, Frank; Nicolay, Klaas; van Beek, Johannes H G M; Krab, Klaas

    2004-03-01

    The response of mitochondrial oxygen consumption to ADP in saponin-skinned cardiac fibre bundles has an apparent Km an order of magnitude higher than that in isolated mitochondria. Here we report that incubating skinned cardiac fibre bundles from wild-type mice or double-knockout mice lacking both cytosolic and mitochondrial creatine kinase (CK) with CK and creatine or with yeast hexokinase and glucose as extramitochondrial ADP-producing systems decreases the apparent Km of the bundles for ADP severalfold. We conclude that the affinity of mitochondria for ADP in mouse heart is of the same order of magnitude as that of isolated mitochondria, while the high apparent Km of the bundles is caused by diffusion gradients outside the mitochondria. PMID:14722773

  8. Demonstration of a transitory tight binding of ATP and of committed Pi and ADP during ATP synthesis by chloroplasts

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Daniel J.; Boyer, Paul D.

    1976-01-01

    Rapid mixing, quenching, and filtration experiments with chloroplast thylakoid membranes, with energization by acid-base transition, demonstrate that an ATP tightly bound to the isolated membranes is a transient intermediate in the catalytic sequence for ATP synthesis. The experiments also show that most of the Pi and ADP bound at a catalytic site is committed to ATP formation without interchange with medium Pi or ADP. Other results give evidence that upon energization, the tightly bound ADP that is detectable in isolated thylakoid membranes or coupling factor ATPase is rapidly released to the medium from a catalytic site. These findings support an alternating site model in which an energy-requiring conformational transition loosens ATP binding at one site and simultaneously promotes Pi and ADP binding at the other site in a manner favoring ATP formation. PMID:16592374

  9. The Neisseria meningitidis ADP-Ribosyltransferase NarE Enters Human Epithelial Cells and Disrupts Epithelial Monolayer Integrity

    PubMed Central

    Ayala, Inmaculada; Colanzi, Antonino; Lapazio, Lucia; Corda, Daniela; Soriani, Marco; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Rossi Paccani, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Many pathogenic bacteria utilize ADP-ribosylating toxins to modify and impair essential functions of eukaryotic cells. It has been previously reported that Neisseria meningitidis possesses an ADP-ribosyltransferase enzyme, NarE, retaining the capacity to hydrolyse NAD and to transfer ADP-ribose moiety to arginine residues in target acceptor proteins. Here we show that upon internalization into human epithelial cells, NarE gains access to the cytoplasm and, through its ADP-ribosylating activity, targets host cell proteins. Notably, we observed that these events trigger the disruption of the epithelial monolayer integrity and the activation of the apoptotic pathway. Overall, our findings provide, for the first time, evidence for a biological activity of NarE on host cells, suggesting its possible involvement in Neisseria pathogenesis. PMID:25996923

  10. Crystal Structure of Human ADP-ribose Transferase ARTD15/PARP16 Reveals a Novel Putative Regulatory Domain*

    PubMed Central

    Karlberg, Tobias; Thorsell, Ann-Gerd; Kallas, Åsa; Schüler, Herwig

    2012-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation is involved in the regulation of DNA repair, transcription, and other processes. The 18 human ADP-ribose transferases with diphtheria toxin homology include ARTD1/PARP1, a cancer drug target. Knowledge of other family members may guide therapeutics development and help evaluate potential drug side effects. Here, we present the crystal structure of human ARTD15/PARP16, a previously uncharacterized enzyme. ARTD15 features an α-helical domain that packs against its transferase domain without making direct contact with the NAD+-binding crevice or the donor loop. Thus, this novel domain does not resemble the regulatory domain of ARTD1. ARTD15 displays auto-mono(ADP-ribosylation) activity and is affected by canonical poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors. These results add to a framework that will facilitate research on a medically important family of enzymes. PMID:22661712

  11. Effect of L-cysteine on optical, thermal and mechanical properties of ADP crystal for NLO application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaikh, R. N.; Shirsat, M. D.; Koinkar, P. M.; Hussaini, S. S.

    2015-06-01

    The ammonium dihydrogen phosphate (ADP) crystal doped with amino acid L-cysteine (LC) was grown by a slow evaporation technique. The grown crystal was transparent in the entire visible region, which is an essential requirement for a nonlinear crystal. The LC doping enhances the optical band gap of ADP (5.35 eV). The TG/DTA analysis of LC doped ADP crystal confirms the optimum thermal stability of grown crystal. The enhancement in the mechanical stability after LC doping was confirmed by Vicker's microhardness test. The LC doping showed significant impact on dielectric properties (dielectric constant and dielectric loss) of grown crystal. The third order nonlinear behavior of LC doped ADP crystal was investigated using a Z-scan technique at 632.8 nm and effective nonlinear optical parameters were evaluated.

  12. Molecular Physiological Analysis of the Two Plastidic ATP/ADP Transporters from Arabidopsis12

    PubMed Central

    Reiser, Jens; Linka, Nicole; Lemke, Lilia; Jeblick, Wolfgang; Neuhaus, H. Ekkehard

    2004-01-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) possesses two isoforms of plastidic ATP/ADP transporters (AtNTT1 and AtNTT2) exhibiting similar biochemical properties. To analyze the function of both isoforms on the molecular level, we examined the expression pattern of both genes by northern-blot analysis and promoter-β-glucuronidase fusions. AtNTT1 represents a sugar-induced gene mainly expressed in stem and roots, whereas AtNTT2 is expressed in several Arabidopsis tissues with highest accumulation in developing roots and young cotyledons. Developing lipid-storing seeds hardly contained AtNTT1 or -2 transcripts. The absence of a functional AtNTT1 gene affected plant development only slightly, whereas AtNTT2∷T-DNA, AtNTT1-2∷T-DNA, and RNA interference (RNAi) plants showed retarded plant development, mainly characterized by a reduced ability to generate primary roots and a delayed chlorophyll accumulation in seedlings. Electron microscopic examination of chloroplast substructure also revealed an impaired formation of thylakoids in RNAi seedlings. Moreover, RNAi- and AtNTT1-2∷T-DNA plants showed reduced accumulation of the nuclear-encoded protein CP24 during deetiolation. Under short-day conditions reduced plastidic ATP import capacity correlates with a substantially reduced plant growth rate. This effect is absent under long-day conditions, strikingly indicating that nocturnal ATP import into chloroplasts is important. Plastidic ATP/ADP transport activity exerts significant control on lipid synthesis in developing Arabidopsis seeds. In total we made the surprising observation that plastidic ATP/ADP transport activity is not required to pass through the complete plant life cycle. However, plastidic ATP/ADP-transporter activity is required for both an undisturbed development of young tissues and a controlled cellular metabolism in mature leaves. PMID:15516503

  13. ADP-ribosyltransferase in isolated nuclei during the cell cycle of Physarum polycephalum.

    PubMed Central

    Gröbner, P; Loidl, P

    1985-01-01

    ADP-ribosyltransferase was measured in isolated nuclei of Physarum polycephalum. Activity was determined with and without exogenous DNA and histones. During the synchronous cell cycle the activity measured with exogenous substrates exhibited a typical peak enzyme pattern with a maximum of activity in S-phase, whereas activity measured without exogenous substrates displayed a step enzyme pattern. Both activities doubled in each cell cycle. PMID:3002325

  14. Scabin, a Novel DNA-acting ADP-ribosyltransferase from Streptomyces scabies.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Bronwyn; Ravulapalli, Ravikiran; Lanoue, Jason; Lugo, Miguel R; Dutta, Debajyoti; Carlin, Stephanie; Merrill, A Rod

    2016-05-20

    A bioinformatics strategy was used to identify Scabin, a novel DNA-targeting enzyme from the plant pathogen 87.22 strain of Streptomyces scabies Scabin shares nearly 40% sequence identity with the Pierisin family of mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase toxins. Scabin was purified to homogeneity as a 22-kDa single-domain enzyme and was shown to possess high NAD(+)-glycohydrolase (Km (NAD) = 68 ± 3 μm; kcat = 94 ± 2 min(-1)) activity with an RSQXE motif; it was also shown to target deoxyguanosine and showed sigmoidal enzyme kinetics (K0.5(deoxyguanosine) = 302 ± 12 μm; kcat = 14 min(-1)). Mass spectrometry analysis revealed that Scabin labels the exocyclic amino group on guanine bases in either single-stranded or double-stranded DNA. Several small molecule inhibitors were identified, and the most potent compounds were found to inhibit the enzyme activity with Ki values ranging from 3 to 24 μm PJ34, a well known inhibitor of poly-ADP-ribosyltransferases, was shown to be the most potent inhibitor of Scabin. Scabin was crystallized, representing the first structure of a DNA-targeting mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase enzyme; the structures of the apo-form (1.45 Å) and with two inhibitors (P6-E, 1.4 Å; PJ34, 1.6 Å) were solved. These x-ray structures are also the first high resolution structures of the Pierisin subgroup of the mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase toxin family. A model of Scabin with its DNA substrate is also proposed. PMID:27002155

  15. Quantitative proteomics profiling of the poly(ADP-ribose)-related response to genotoxic stress

    PubMed Central

    Gagné, Jean-Philippe; Pic, Émilie; Isabelle, Maxim; Krietsch, Jana; Éthier, Chantal; Paquet, Éric; Kelly, Isabelle; Boutin, Michel; Moon, Kyung-Mee; Foster, Leonard J.; Poirier, Guy G.

    2012-01-01

    Upon DNA damage induction, DNA-dependent poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) synthesize an anionic poly(ADP-ribose) (pADPr) scaffold to which several proteins bind with the subsequent formation of pADPr-associated multiprotein complexes. We have used a combination of affinity-purification methods and proteomics approaches to isolate these complexes and assess protein dynamics with respect to pADPr metabolism. As a first approach, we developed a substrate trapping strategy by which we demonstrate that a catalytically inactive Poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) mutant can act as a physiologically selective bait for the isolation of specific pADPr-binding proteins through its macrodomain-like domain. In addition to antibody-mediated affinity-purification methods, we used a pADPr macrodomain affinity resin to recover pADPr-binding proteins and their complexes. Second, we designed a time course experiment to explore the changes in the composition of pADPr-containing multiprotein complexes in response to alkylating DNA damage-mediated PARP activation. Spectral count clustering based on GeLC-MS/MS analysis was complemented with further analyses using high precision quantitative proteomics through isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)- and Stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based proteomics. Here, we present a valuable resource in the interpretation of systems biology of the DNA damage response network in the context of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation and provide a basis for subsequent investigations of pADPr-binding protein candidates. PMID:22669911

  16. Guidelines for contingency planning NASA (National Aeronautics and Space Administration) ADP security risk reduction decision studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkins, F. G.

    1984-01-01

    Guidance is presented to NASA Computer Security Officials for determining the acceptability or unacceptability of ADP security risks based on the technical, operational and economic feasibility of potential safeguards. The risk management process is reviewed as a specialized application of the systems approach to problem solving and information systems analysis and design. Reporting the results of the risk reduction analysis to management is considered. Report formats for the risk reduction study are provided.

  17. The switching mechanism of the mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier explored by free-energy landscapes.

    PubMed

    Pietropaolo, Adriana; Pierri, Ciro Leonardo; Palmieri, Ferdinando; Klingenberg, Martin

    2016-06-01

    The ADP/ATP carrier (AAC) of mitochondria has been an early example for elucidating the transport mechanism alternating between the external (c-) and internal (m-) states (M. Klingenberg, Biochim. Biophys. Acta 1778 (2008) 1978-2021). An atomic resolution crystal structure of AAC is available only for the c-state featuring a three repeat transmembrane domain structure. Modeling of transport mechanism remained hypothetical for want of an atomic structure of the m-state. Previous molecular dynamics studies simulated the binding of ADP or ATP to the AAC remaining in the c-state. Here, a full description of the AAC switching from the c- to the m-state is reported using well-tempered metadynamics simulations. Free-energy landscapes of the entire translocation from the c- to the m-state, based on the gyration radii of the c- and m-gates and of the center of mass, were generated. The simulations revealed three free-energy basins attributed to the c-, intermediate- and m-states separated by activation barriers. These simulations were performed with the empty and with the ADP- and ATP-loaded AAC as well as with the poorly transported AMP and guanine nucleotides, showing in the free energy landscapes that ADP and ATP lowered the activation free-energy barriers more than the other substrates. Upon binding AMP and guanine nucleotides a deeper free-energy level stabilized the intermediate-state of the AAC2 hampering the transition to the m-state. The structures of the substrate binding sites in the different states are described producing a full picture of the translocation events in the AAC. PMID:26874054

  18. Quantitative proteomics profiling of the poly(ADP-ribose)-related response to genotoxic stress.

    PubMed

    Gagné, Jean-Philippe; Pic, Emilie; Isabelle, Maxim; Krietsch, Jana; Ethier, Chantal; Paquet, Eric; Kelly, Isabelle; Boutin, Michel; Moon, Kyung-Mee; Foster, Leonard J; Poirier, Guy G

    2012-09-01

    Upon DNA damage induction, DNA-dependent poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) synthesize an anionic poly(ADP-ribose) (pADPr) scaffold to which several proteins bind with the subsequent formation of pADPr-associated multiprotein complexes. We have used a combination of affinity-purification methods and proteomics approaches to isolate these complexes and assess protein dynamics with respect to pADPr metabolism. As a first approach, we developed a substrate trapping strategy by which we demonstrate that a catalytically inactive Poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) mutant can act as a physiologically selective bait for the isolation of specific pADPr-binding proteins through its macrodomain-like domain. In addition to antibody-mediated affinity-purification methods, we used a pADPr macrodomain affinity resin to recover pADPr-binding proteins and their complexes. Second, we designed a time course experiment to explore the changes in the composition of pADPr-containing multiprotein complexes in response to alkylating DNA damage-mediated PARP activation. Spectral count clustering based on GeLC-MS/MS analysis was complemented with further analyses using high precision quantitative proteomics through isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)- and Stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC)-based proteomics. Here, we present a valuable resource in the interpretation of systems biology of the DNA damage response network in the context of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation and provide a basis for subsequent investigations of pADPr-binding protein candidates. PMID:22669911

  19. Metabotropic glutamate receptor agonists potentiate a slow afterdepolarization in CNS neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, F.; Gallagher, J. P.

    1992-01-01

    We have previously reported that, in the rat dorsolateral septal nucleus (DLSN), metabotropic glutamate receptor (met-GluR) agonists evoked a slow depolarization accompanied by an increase in membrane conductance and burst firing. We have speculated that the burst firing elicited by met-GluR agonists may be due to activation or enhancement of a non-specific cation current, which exists in some DLSN neurons. Now we report that a slow afterdepolarization (sADP) mediated by a non-specific cation current was potentiated by both 1S,3R-ACPD and quisqualate. In addition, met-GluR agonists unmask a sADP in DLSN neurons which did not show a sADP under control conditions. Our data suggest that a non-specific cation current can be potentiated by activation of the met-GluR.

  20. Exchange of ATP for ADP on high-force cross-bridges of skinned rabbit muscle fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Seow, C Y; Ford, L E

    1997-01-01

    The contractile properties of rabbit skinned muscle fibers were studied at 1-2 degrees C in different concentrations of MgATP and MgADP. Double-reciprocal plots of maximum velocity against MgATP concentration at different MgADP concentrations all extrapolated to the same value. This finding suggests that MgATP and MgADP compete for the same site on the cross-bridge, and that the exchange of MgATP for MgADP occurs without a detectable step intervening. The K(m) for ATP was 0.32 mM. The K(i) for MgADP was 0.33 mM. Control experiments suggested that the tortuosity of diffusion paths within the fibers reduced the radial diffusion coefficients for reactants about sixfold. Increasing MgADP from 0.18 to 2 mM at 5 mM ATP or lowering MgATP from 10 to 2 mM at 0.18 mM MgADP, respectively, increased isometric force by 25% and 23%, increased stiffness by 10% and 20%, and decreased maximum velocity by 35% and 31%. Two mechanisms appeared to be responsible. One detained bridges in high-force states, where they recovered from a length step with a slower time course. The other increased the fraction of attached bridges without altering the kinetics of their responses, possibly by an increased activation resulting from cooperative effects of the detained, high-force bridges. The rigor bridge was more effective than the ADP-bound bridge in increasing the number of attached bridges with unaltered kinetics. PMID:9168047

  1. Pre-steady-state studies of the adenosine triphosphatase activity of coupled submitochondrial particles. Regulation by ADP.

    PubMed

    Martins, O B; Tuena de Gómez-Puyou, M; Gómez-Puyou, A

    1988-09-20

    ATPase activities were measured in 10 mM MgCl2, 5 mM ATP, 1 mM ADP, and 1 microM FCCP with submitochondrial particles from bovine heart that had been stimulated by delta mu H+-forming substrates and with particles whose natural inhibitor protein was partially removed by heating. The activities were not linear with time. With both particles, the rate of ATP hydrolysis in the 7-fold greater than that in the steady state. Pre-steady-state and steady-state kinetic studies showed that the decrease of ATPase activity was due to the binding of ADP in a high-affinity site of the enzyme (K0.5 of 10 microM). Inhibition of ATP hydrolysis was accompanied by the binding of approximately 1 mol of ADP/mol of particulate F1; 10 microM ADP gave half-maximal binding. ADP could be replaced by IDP, but with an affinity 50-fold lower (K0.5 of 0.5 mM). Maximal inhibition by ADP and IDP was achieved in less than 5 s. Inhibition was enhanced by uncouplers. Even in the presence of pyruvate kinase and phosphoenolpyruvate, the rates of hydrolysis were about 2.5-fold higher in the first seconds of reaction than in the steady state. This decrease of ATPase activity also correlated with the binding of nearly 1 mol of ADP/mol of F1. This inhibitory ADP remained bound to the enzyme after several thousand turnovers. Apparently, it is possible to observe maximal rates of hydrolysis only in the first few catalytic cycles of the enzyme. PMID:2974725

  2. Brefeldin A-induced ADP-ribosylation in the structure and function of the Golgi complex.

    PubMed

    Colanzi, A; Mironov, A; Weigert, R; Limina, C; Flati, S; Cericola, C; Di Tullio, G; Di Girolamo, M; Corda, D; De Matteis, M A; Luini, A

    1997-01-01

    Brefeldin A (BFA) is a fungal metabolite that exerts generally inhibitory actions on membrane transport and induces the disappearance of the Golgi complex. Previously we have shown that BFA stimulates the ADP-ribosylation of two cytosolic proteins of 38 and 50 KD. The BFA-binding components mediating the BFA-sensitive ADP-ribosylation (BAR) and the effect of BFA on ARF binding to Golgi membranes have similar specificities and affinities for BFA and its analogues, suggesting that BAR may have a role in the cellular effects of BFA. To investigate this we used the approach to impair BAR activity by the use of BAR inhibitors. A series of BAR inhibitors was developed and their effects were studied in RBL cells treated with BFA. In addition to the common ADP-ribosylation inhibitors (nicotinamide and aminobenzamide), compounds belonging to the cumarin (novobiocin, cumermycin, dicumarol) class were active BAR inhibitors. All BAR inhibitors were able to prevent the BFA-induced redistribution of a Golgi marker (Helix pomatia lectin) into the endoplasmic reticulum, as assessed in immunofluorescence experiments. At the ultrastructural level, BAR inhibitors prevented the tubular-vesicular transformation of the Golgi complex caused by BFA. The potencies of these compounds in preventing the BFA effects on the Golgi complex were similar to those at which they inhibited BAR. Altogether these data support the hypothesis that BAR mediates at least some of the effects of BFA on the Golgi structure and function. PMID:9193673

  3. PARP1 Is a TRF2-associated Poly(ADP-Ribose)Polymerase and Protects Eroded Telomeres

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yie; Wu, Jun; Schreiber, Valerie; Dunlap, John; Dantzer, Francoise; Wang, Yisong

    2006-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase 1 (PARP1) is well characterized for its role in base excision repair (BER), where it is activated by and binds to DNA breaks and catalyzes the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of several substrates involved in DNA damage repair. Here we demonstrate that PARP1 associates with telomere repeat binding factor 2 (TRF2) and is capable of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of TRF2, which affects binding of TRF2 to telomeric DNA. Immunostaining of interphase cells or metaphase spreads shows that PARP1 is detected sporadically at normal telomeres, but it appears preferentially at eroded telomeres caused by telomerase deficiency or damaged telomeres induced by DNA-damaging reagents. Although PARP1 is dispensable in the capping of normal telomeres, Parp1 deficiency leads to an increase in chromosome end-to-end fusions or chromosome ends without detectable telomeric DNA in primary murine cells after induction of DNA damage. Our results suggest that upon DNA damage, PARP1 is recruited to damaged telomeres, where it can help protect telomeres against chromosome end-to-end fusions and genomic instability.

  4. Residual force depression in single sarcomeres is abolished by MgADP-induced activation.

    PubMed

    Trecarten, Neal; Minozzo, Fabio C; Leite, Felipe S; Rassier, Dilson E

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms behind the shortening-induced force depression commonly observed in skeletal muscles remain unclear, but have been associated with sarcomere length non-uniformity and/or crossbridge inhibition. The purpose of this study was twofold: (i) to evaluate if force depression is present in isolated single sarcomeres, a preparation that eliminates sarcomere length non-uniformities and (ii) to evaluate if force depression is inhibited when single sarcomeres are activated with MgADP, which biases crossbridges into a strongly-bound state. Single sarcomeres (n = 16) were isolated from rabbit psoas myofibrils using two micro-needles (one compliant, one rigid), piercing the sarcomere externally adjacent to the Z-lines. The sarcomeres were contracted isometrically and subsequently shortened, in both Ca(2+)- and MgADP-activating solutions. Shortening in Ca(2+)-activated samples resulted in a 27.44 ± 9.04% force depression when compared to isometric contractions produced at similar final sarcomere lengths (P < 0.001). There was no force depression in MgADP-activated sarcomeres (force depression = -1.79 ± 9.69%, P =  0.435). These results suggest that force depression is a sarcomeric property, and that is associated with an inhibition of myosin-actin interactions. PMID:26037312

  5. Residual force depression in single sarcomeres is abolished by MgADP-induced activation

    PubMed Central

    Trecarten, Neal; Minozzo, Fabio C.; Leite, Felipe S.; Rassier, Dilson E.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms behind the shortening-induced force depression commonly observed in skeletal muscles remain unclear, but have been associated with sarcomere length non-uniformity and/or crossbridge inhibition. The purpose of this study was twofold: (i) to evaluate if force depression is present in isolated single sarcomeres, a preparation that eliminates sarcomere length non-uniformities and (ii) to evaluate if force depression is inhibited when single sarcomeres are activated with MgADP, which biases crossbridges into a strongly-bound state. Single sarcomeres (n = 16) were isolated from rabbit psoas myofibrils using two micro-needles (one compliant, one rigid), piercing the sarcomere externally adjacent to the Z-lines. The sarcomeres were contracted isometrically and subsequently shortened, in both Ca2+- and MgADP-activating solutions. Shortening in Ca2+-activated samples resulted in a 27.44 ± 9.04% force depression when compared to isometric contractions produced at similar final sarcomere lengths (P < 0.001). There was no force depression in MgADP-activated sarcomeres (force depression = −1.79 ± 9.69%, P =  0.435). These results suggest that force depression is a sarcomeric property, and that is associated with an inhibition of myosin-actin interactions. PMID:26037312

  6. Structural analysis of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase in higher and lower eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Scovassi, A I; Izzo, R; Franchi, E; Bertazzoni, U

    1986-08-15

    A phylogenetic survey for the poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase has been conducted by analyzing enzyme activity in various organisms and determining the structure of the catalytic peptides by renaturation of functional activities of the enzyme in situ after electrophoresis in denaturing conditions (activity gel). The enzyme is widely distributed in cells from all different classes of vertebrates, from arthropods, mollusks and plant cells but could not be detected in echinoderms, nematodes, platyhelminths, thallophytes (including yeast) and bacteria. The presence on activity gels of a catalytic peptide with Mr = 115,000-120,000 was demonstrated in vertebrates, arthropods and mollusks but no activity bands were recovered in many lower eukaryotes, in plant cells and bacteria. By using an immunological procedure that used an antiserum against homogeneous calf thymus poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, common immunoreactive peptides were visualized in mammals, avians, reptiles, amphibians and fishes, while lacking in non-vertebrate organisms. Our results indicate that the structure of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase is conserved down to the mollusks suggesting its important role for DNA metabolism of multicellular organisms. PMID:3091369

  7. A complete collection of single-gene deletion mutants of Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1

    PubMed Central

    de Berardinis, Véronique; Vallenet, David; Castelli, Vanina; Besnard, Marielle; Pinet, Agnès; Cruaud, Corinne; Samair, Sumitta; Lechaplais, Christophe; Gyapay, Gabor; Richez, Céline; Durot, Maxime; Kreimeyer, Annett; Le Fèvre, François; Schächter, Vincent; Pezo, Valérie; Döring, Volker; Scarpelli, Claude; Médigue, Claudine; Cohen, Georges N; Marlière, Philippe; Salanoubat, Marcel; Weissenbach, Jean

    2008-01-01

    We have constructed a collection of single-gene deletion mutants for all dispensable genes of the soil bacterium Acinetobacter baylyi ADP1. A total of 2594 deletion mutants were obtained, whereas 499 (16%) were not, and are therefore candidate essential genes for life on minimal medium. This essentiality data set is 88% consistent with the Escherichia coli data set inferred from the Keio mutant collection profiled for growth on minimal medium, while 80% of the orthologous genes described as essential in Pseudomonas aeruginosa are also essential in ADP1. Several strategies were undertaken to investigate ADP1 metabolism by (1) searching for discrepancies between our essentiality data and current metabolic knowledge, (2) comparing this essentiality data set to those from other organisms, (3) systematic phenotyping of the mutant collection on a variety of carbon sources (quinate, 2-3 butanediol, glucose, etc.). This collection provides a new resource for the study of gene function by forward and reverse genetic approaches and constitutes a robust experimental data source for systems biology approaches. PMID:18319726

  8. Failure to degrade poly(ADP-ribose) causes increased sensitivity to cytotoxicity and early embryonic lethality

    PubMed Central

    Koh, David W.; Lawler, Ann M.; Poitras, Marc F.; Sasaki, Masayuki; Wattler, Sigrid; Nehls, Michael C.; Stöger, Tobias; Poirier, Guy G.; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2004-01-01

    The metabolism of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) is critical for genomic stability in multicellular eukaryotes. Here, we show that the failure to degrade PAR by means of disruption of the murine poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) gene unexpectedly causes early embryonic lethality and enhanced sensitivity to genotoxic stress. This lethality results from the failure to hydrolyze PAR, because PARG null embryonic day (E) 3.5 blastocysts accumulate PAR and concurrently undergo apoptosis. Moreover, embryonic trophoblast stem cell lines established from early PARG null embryos are viable only when cultured in medium containing the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor benzamide. Cells lacking PARG also show reduced growth, accumulation of PAR, and increased sensitivity to cytotoxicity induced by N-methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine and menadione after benzamide withdrawal. These results provide compelling evidence that the failure to degrade PAR has deleterious consequences. Further, they define a role for PARG in embryonic development and a protective role in the response to genotoxic stress. PMID:15591342

  9. Rifamycin Antibiotic Resistance by ADP-Ribosylation: Structure and Diversity of Arr

    SciTech Connect

    Baysarowich, J.; Koteva, K; Hughes, D; Ejim, L; Griffiths, E; Zhang, K; Junop, M; Wright, G

    2008-01-01

    The rifamycin antibiotic rifampin is important for the treatment of tuberculosis and infections caused by multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Recent iterations of the rifampin core structure have resulted in new drugs and drug candidates for the treatment of a much broader range of infectious diseases. This expanded use of rifamycin antibiotics has the potential to select for increased resistance. One poorly characterized mechanism of resistance is through Arr enzymes that catalyze ADP-ribosylation of rifamycins. We find that genes encoding predicted Arr enzymes are widely distributed in the genomes of pathogenic and nonpathogenic bacteria. Biochemical analysis of three representative Arr enzymes from environmental and pathogenic bacterial sources shows that these have equally efficient drug resistance capacity in vitro and in vivo. The 3D structure of one of these orthologues from Mycobacterium smegmatis was determined and reveals structural homology with ADP-ribosyltransferases important in eukaryotic biology, including poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) and bacterial toxins, despite no significant amino acid sequence homology with these proteins. This work highlights the extent of the rifamycin resistome in microbial genera with the potential to negatively impact the expanded use of this class of antibiotic.

  10. Poly(ADP-ribose) in the bone: from oxidative stress signal to structural element.

    PubMed

    Hegedűs, Csaba; Robaszkiewicz, Agnieszka; Lakatos, Petra; Szabó, Éva; Virág, László

    2015-05-01

    Contrary to common perception bone is a dynamic organ flexibly adapting to changes in mechanical loading by shifting the delicate balance between bone formation and bone resorption carried out by osteoblasts and osteoclasts, respectively. In the past decades numerous studies demonstrating production of reactive oxygen or nitrogen intermediates, effects of different antioxidants, and involvement of prototypical redox control mechanisms (Nrf2-Keap1, Steap4, FoxO, PAMM, caspase-2) have proven the central role of redox regulation in the bone. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation), a NAD-dependent protein modification carried out by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) enzymes recently emerged as a new regulatory mechanism fine-tuning osteoblast differentiation and mineralization. Interestingly PARylation does not simply serve as a signaling mechanism during osteoblast differentiation but also couples it to osteoblast death. Even more strikingly, the poly(ADP-ribose) polymer likely released from succumbed cells at the terminal stage of differentiation is incorporated into the bone matrix representing the first structural role of this versatile biopolymer. Moreover, this new paradigm explains why and how osteodifferentiation and death of cells entering this pathway are closely coupled to each other. Here we review the role of reactive oxygen and nitrogen intermediates as well as PARylation in osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation, function, and cell death. PMID:25660995

  11. An assay to measure poly(ADP ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) activity in cells

    PubMed Central

    James, Dominic I.; Durant, Stephen; Eckersley, Kay; Fairweather, Emma; Griffiths, Louise A.; Hamilton, Nicola; Kelly, Paul; O'Connor, Mark; Shea, Kerry; Waddell, Ian D.; Ogilvie, Donald J.

    2016-01-01

    After a DNA damage signal multiple polymers of ADP ribose attached to poly(ADP) ribose (PAR) polymerases (PARPs) are broken down by the enzyme poly(ADP) ribose glycohydrolase (PARG). Inhibition of PARG leads to a failure of DNA repair and small molecule inhibition of PARG has been a goal for many years. To determine whether biochemical inhibitors of PARG are active in cells we have designed an immunofluorescence assay to detect nuclear PAR after DNA damage. This 384-well assay is suitable for medium throughput high-content screening and can detect cell-permeable inhibitors of PARG from nM to µM potency. In addition, the assay has been shown to work in murine cells and in a variety of human cancer cells. Furthermore, the assay is suitable for detecting the DNA damage response induced by treatment with temozolomide and methylmethane sulfonate (MMS). Lastly, the assay has been shown to be robust over a period of several years.

  12. Deciphering the kinetic mechanisms controlling selected plant ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylases.

    PubMed

    Boehlein, Susan K; Shaw, Janine R; Hwang, Seon K; Stewart, Jon D; Curtis Hannah, L

    2013-07-15

    ADP-Glc pyrophosphorylase (AGPase), a rate-limiting enzyme in starch biosynthesis, is controlled by thermostability and allosteric regulation. Previous studies suggested that redox affects turnover number and heat stability of AGPases. Here, we investigated how allostery and redox state affect kinetic mechanisms of the reduced, heat labile and the oxidized, heat stable potato tuber enzymes; the heat labile maize endosperm enzyme and a chimeric maize/potato heat stable enzyme that lacks the cysteine responsible for redox changes. With 3-PGA, all AGPases followed a Theorell-Chance Bi Bi mechanism with ATP binding first and ADP-Glc releasing last. 3-PGA increases the binding affinity for both substrates with little effect on velocity for the maize and MP isoforms. By contrast, 3-PGA increases the velocity and the affinity for G-1-P for the potato enzymes. Redox state does not affect kcat of the two potato isoforms. Without 3-PGA the oxidized potato enzyme exhibits a rapid equilibrium random Bi Bi mechanism with a dead end ternary complex. This fundamental change from rapid, ordered binding with little buildup of intermediates to a mechanism featuring relatively slow, random binding is unique to the oxidized potato tuber enzyme. Finally, ADP-Glc the physiologically relevant product of this enzyme has complex, isoform-specific effects on catalysis. PMID:23603314

  13. [From poly(ADP-ribose) discovery to PARP inhibitors in cancer therapy].

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Valérie; Illuzzi, Giuditta; Héberlé, Eléa; Dantzer, Françoise

    2015-10-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is a post-translational modification catalyzed by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases. PARP-1 is a molecular sensor of DNA breaks, playing a key role in the spatial and temporal organization of their repair, contributing to the maintenance of genome integrity and cell survival. The fact that PARP inhibition impairs efficacy of break repair has been exploited as anticancer strategies to potentiate the cytotoxicity of anticancer drugs and radiotherapy. Numerous clinical trials based on this innovative approach are in progress. PARP inhibition has also proved to be exquisitely efficient to kill tumour cells deficient in double strand break repair by homologous recombination, such as cells mutated for the breast cancer early onset genes BRCA1 or BRCA2, by synthetic lethality. Several phase III clinical trials are in progress for the treatment of breast and ovarian cancers with BRCA mutations and the PARP inhibitor olaparib has just been approved for advanced ovarian cancers with germline BRCA mutation. This review recapitulates the history from the discovery of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation reaction to the promising therapeutic applications of its inhibition in innovating anticancer strategies. Benefits, hopes and obstacles are discussed. PMID:26384693

  14. PARP1 is a TRF2-associated poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and protects eroded telomeres

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, Marla V; Wu, Jun; Wang, Yisong; Liu, Yie

    2006-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase 1 (PARP1) is well characterized for its role in base excision repair (BER), where it is activated by and binds to DNA breaks and catalyzes the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of several substrates involved in DNA damage repair. Here we demonstrate that PARP1 associates with telomere repeat binding factor 2 (TRF2) and is capable of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of TRF2, which affects binding of TRF2 to telomeric DNA. Immunostaining of interphase cells or metaphase spreads shows that PARP1 is detected sporadically at normal telomeres, but it appears preferentially at eroded telomeres caused by telomerase deficiency or damaged telomeres induced by DNA-damaging reagents. Although PARP1 is dispensable in the capping of normal telomeres, Parp1 deficiency leads to an increase in chromosome end-to-end fusions or chromosome ends without detectable telomeric DNA in primary murine cells after induction of DNA damage. Our results suggest that upon DNA damage, PARP1 is recruited to damaged telomeres, where it can help protect telomeres against chromosome end-to-end fusions and genomic instability.

  15. cADP-ribose formation by blood platelets is not responsible for intracellular calcium mobilization.

    PubMed Central

    Ohlmann, P; Leray, C; Ravanat, C; Hallia, A; Cassel, D; Cazenave, J P; Gachet, C

    1998-01-01

    Human platelet CD38 is a multifunctional ectoenzyme catalysing the synthesis and hydrolysis of cADP-ribose (cADPR), a recently identified calcium-mobilizing agent that acts independently of D-myo-inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate and is known to be expressed by human platelets. The present work shows that ADP-ribosyl cyclase activity is exclusively a membrane activity, of which the major part is located in plasma membranes and a small part in internal membranes. In broken cells, cyclase activity was insensitive to the presence of calcium and was not modulated by agonists such as thrombin or ADP, whereas in intact cells thrombin increased cADPR formation by 30%, an effect due to fusion of granules with the plasma membrane. In order to assess the role of cADPR as a calcium-mobilizing agent, vesicles were prepared from internal membranes and loaded with 45CaCl2. These vesicles were efficiently discharged by IP3 in a dose-dependent manner, but were not responsive to cADPR or ryanodine in the presence or absence of calmodulin. Thus cADPR is unlikely to play a role in intracellular calcium release in human blood platelets. PMID:9531481

  16. Yeast Mitochondrial Interactosome Model: Metabolon Membrane Proteins Complex Involved in the Channeling of ADP/ATP

    PubMed Central

    Clémençon, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    The existence of a mitochondrial interactosome (MI) has been currently well established in mammalian cells but the exact composition of this super-complex is not precisely known, and its organization seems to be different from that in yeast. One major difference is the absence of mitochondrial creatine kinase (MtCK) in yeast, unlike that described in the organization model of MI, especially in cardiac, skeletal muscle and brain cells. The aim of this review is to provide a detailed description of different partner proteins involved in the synergistic ADP/ATP transport across the mitochondrial membranes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and to propose a new mitochondrial interactosome model. The ADP/ATP (Aacp) and inorganic phosphate (PiC) carriers as well as the VDAC (or mitochondrial porin) catalyze the import and export of ADP, ATP and Pi across the mitochondrial membranes. Aacp and PiC, which appear to be associated with the ATP synthase, consist of two nanomotors (F0, F1) under specific conditions and form ATP synthasome. Identification and characterization of such a complex were described for the first time by Pedersen and co-workers in 2003. PMID:22408429

  17. Regulation of Myofibroblast Differentiation by Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase 1

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Biao; Wu, Zhe; Hergert, Polla; Henke, Craig A.; Bitterman, Peter B.; Phan, Sem H.

    2014-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) is a post-translational protein modification effected by enzymes belonging to the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) superfamily, mainly by PARP-1. The key acceptors of poly(ADP-ribose) include PARP-1 itself, histones, DNA repair proteins, and transcription factors. Because many of these factors are involved in the regulation of myofibroblast differentiation, we examined the role of PARylation on myofibroblast differentiation. Overexpression of PARP-1 with an expression plasmid activated expression of the α-SMA gene (Acta2), a marker of myofibroblast differentiation in lung fibroblasts. Suppression of PARP-1 activity or gene expression with PARP-1 inhibitors or siRNA, respectively, had the opposite effect on these cells. PARP-1–deficient cells also had reduced α-SMA gene expression. DNA pyrosequencing identified hypermethylated regions of the α-SMA gene in PARP-1–deficient cells, relative to wild-type cells. Interestingly, and of potential relevance to human idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, PARP activity in lung fibroblasts isolated from idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis patients was significantly higher than that in cells isolated from control subjects. Furthermore, PARP-1–deficient mice exhibited reduced pulmonary fibrosis in response to bleomycin-induced lung injury, relative to wild-type controls. These results suggest that PARylation is important for myofibroblast differentiation and the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:23260200

  18. Regulation of myofibroblast differentiation by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1.

    PubMed

    Hu, Biao; Wu, Zhe; Hergert, Polla; Henke, Craig A; Bitterman, Peter B; Phan, Sem H

    2013-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) is a post-translational protein modification effected by enzymes belonging to the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) superfamily, mainly by PARP-1. The key acceptors of poly(ADP-ribose) include PARP-1 itself, histones, DNA repair proteins, and transcription factors. Because many of these factors are involved in the regulation of myofibroblast differentiation, we examined the role of PARylation on myofibroblast differentiation. Overexpression of PARP-1 with an expression plasmid activated expression of the α-SMA gene (Acta2), a marker of myofibroblast differentiation in lung fibroblasts. Suppression of PARP-1 activity or gene expression with PARP-1 inhibitors or siRNA, respectively, had the opposite effect on these cells. PARP-1-deficient cells also had reduced α-SMA gene expression. DNA pyrosequencing identified hypermethylated regions of the α-SMA gene in PARP-1-deficient cells, relative to wild-type cells. Interestingly, and of potential relevance to human idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, PARP activity in lung fibroblasts isolated from idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis patients was significantly higher than that in cells isolated from control subjects. Furthermore, PARP-1-deficient mice exhibited reduced pulmonary fibrosis in response to bleomycin-induced lung injury, relative to wild-type controls. These results suggest that PARylation is important for myofibroblast differentiation and the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:23260200

  19. An assay to measure poly(ADP ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) activity in cells.

    PubMed

    James, Dominic I; Durant, Stephen; Eckersley, Kay; Fairweather, Emma; Griffiths, Louise A; Hamilton, Nicola; Kelly, Paul; O'Connor, Mark; Shea, Kerry; Waddell, Ian D; Ogilvie, Donald J

    2016-01-01

    After a DNA damage signal multiple polymers of ADP ribose attached to poly(ADP) ribose (PAR) polymerases (PARPs) are broken down by the enzyme poly(ADP) ribose glycohydrolase (PARG). Inhibition of PARG leads to a failure of DNA repair and small molecule inhibition of PARG has been a goal for many years. To determine whether biochemical inhibitors of PARG are active in cells we have designed an immunofluorescence assay to detect nuclear PAR after DNA damage. This 384-well assay is suitable for medium throughput high-content screening and can detect cell-permeable inhibitors of PARG from nM to µM potency. In addition, the assay has been shown to work in murine cells and in a variety of human cancer cells. Furthermore, the assay is suitable for detecting the DNA damage response induced by treatment with temozolomide and methylmethane sulfonate (MMS). Lastly, the assay has been shown to be robust over a period of several years. PMID:27610220

  20. Halovibrin, secreted from the light organ symbiont Vibrio fischeri, is a member of a new class of ADP-ribosyltransferases.

    PubMed Central

    Reich, K A; Schoolnik, G K

    1996-01-01

    The purification, cloning, and deduced amino acid sequence of an ADP-ribosyltransferase secreted from the marine bacterium Vibrio fischeri (V. fischeri ADP-r) is described. This enzyme was purified from culture supernatant, and partial amino acid sequence obtained from the purified protein was used to design a degenerate oligonucleotide probe that was used to clone a cross-hybridizing DNA fragment from V. fischeri genomic DNA. Recombinant Escherichia coli clones harboring this fragment possessed ADP-ribosyltransferase activity. The DNA fragment was sequenced, and deletion analysis localized the ADP-ribosyltransferase activity to one of the three possible open reading frames in the fragment; the deduced amino acid sequence from this open reading frame matched the amino acid sequence obtained from the purified protein. V. fischeri ADP-r has no significant homology (DNA