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Sample records for adp ribose polymerase

  1. Presence of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase and poly (ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase in the dinoflagellate Crypthecodinium cohnii.

    PubMed

    Werner, E; Sohst, S; Gropp, F; Simon, D; Wagner, H; Kröger, H

    1984-02-15

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase have been detected in chromatin extracts from the dinoflagellate Crypthecodinium cohnii. Poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase was detected by the liberation of ADP-ribose from poly(ADP-ribose). Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase was proved by (a) demonstration of phosphoribosyl-AMP in the phosphodiesterase digest of the reaction product, (b) demonstration of ADP-ribose oligomers by fractionation of the reaction product on DEAE-Sephadex. The (ADP-ribose)-protein transfer is dependent on DNA; it is inhibited by nicotinamide, thymidine, theophylline and benzamide. The protein-(ADP-ribose bond is susceptible to 0.1 M NaOH (70%) and 0.4 M NH2OH (33%). Dinoflagellates, nucleated protists, are unique in that their chromatin lacks histones and shows a conformation like bacterial chromatin [Loeblich, A. R., III (1976) J. Protozool. 23, 13--28]; poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, however, has been found only in eucaryotes. Thus our results suggest that histones were not relevant to the establishment of poly(ADP-ribose) during evolution.

  2. Crosstalk between poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and sirtuin enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Cantó, Carles; Sauve, Anthony A.; Bai, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) are NAD+ dependent enzymes that were identified as DNA repair proteins, however, today it seems clear that PARPs are responsible for a plethora of biological functions. Sirtuins (SIRTs) are NAD+-dependent deacetylase enzymes involved in the same biological processes as PARPs raising the question whether PARP and SIRT enzymes may interact with each other in physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Hereby we review the current understanding of the SIRT-PARP interplay in regard to the biochemical nature of the interaction (competition for the common NAD+ substrate, mutual posttranslational modifications and direct transcriptional effects) and the physiological, or pathophysiological consequences of the interactions (metabolic events, oxidative stress response, genomic stability and ageing). Finally, we give an overview of the possibilities of pharmacological intervention to modulate PARP and SIRT enzymes either directly, or through modulating NAD+ homeostasis. PMID:23357756

  3. Crosstalk between poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and sirtuin enzymes.

    PubMed

    Cantó, Carles; Sauve, Anthony A; Bai, Peter

    2013-12-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) are NAD(+) dependent enzymes that were identified as DNA repair proteins, however, today it seems clear that PARPs are responsible for a plethora of biological functions. Sirtuins (SIRTs) are NAD(+)-dependent deacetylase enzymes involved in the same biological processes as PARPs raising the question whether PARP and SIRT enzymes may interact with each other in physiological and pathophysiological conditions. Hereby we review the current understanding of the SIRT-PARP interplay in regard to the biochemical nature of the interaction (competition for the common NAD(+) substrate, mutual posttranslational modifications and direct transcriptional effects) and the physiological or pathophysiological consequences of the interactions (metabolic events, oxidative stress response, genomic stability and aging). Finally, we give an overview of the possibilities of pharmacological intervention to modulate PARP and SIRT enzymes either directly, or through modulating NAD(+) homeostasis.

  4. Proteomic investigation of phosphorylation sites in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 and poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase.

    PubMed

    Gagné, Jean-Philippe; Moreel, Xavier; Gagné, Pierre; Labelle, Yves; Droit, Arnaud; Chevalier-Paré, Mélissa; Bourassa, Sylvie; McDonald, Darin; Hendzel, Michael J; Prigent, Claude; Poirier, Guy G

    2009-02-01

    Phosphorylation is a very common post-translational modification event known to modulate a wide range of biological responses. Beyond the regulation of protein activity, the interrelation of phosphorylation with other post-translational mechanisms is responsible for the control of diverse signaling pathways. Several observations suggest that phosphorylation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) regulates its activity. There is also accumulating evidence to suggest the establishment of phosphorylation-dependent assembly of PARP-1-associated multiprotein complexes. Although it is relatively straightforward to demonstrate phosphorylation of a defined target, identification of the actual amino acids involved still represents a technical challenge for many laboratories. With the use of a combination of bioinformatics-based predictions tools for generic and kinase-specific phosphorylation sites, in vitro phosphorylation assays and mass spectrometry analysis, we investigated the phosphorylation profile of PARP-1 and poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG), two major enzymes responsible for poly(ADP-ribose) turnover. Mass spectrometry analysis revealed the phosphorylation of several serine/threonine residues within important regulatory domains and motifs of both enzymes. With the use of in vivo microirradiation-induced DNA damage, we show that altered phosphorylation at specific sites can modify the dynamics of assembly and disassembly of PARP-1 at sites of DNA damage. By documenting and annotating a collection of known and newly identified phosphorylation sites, this targeted proteomics study significantly advances our understanding of the roles of phosphorylation in the regulation of PARP-1 and PARG.

  5. Niacin, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 and genomic stability.

    PubMed

    Hageman, G J; Stierum, R H

    2001-04-18

    Nicotinic acid (NA) and nicotinamide (NAM), commonly called niacin, are the dietary precursors for NAD(+) (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide), which is required for DNA synthesis, as well as for the activity of the enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1; EC 2.4.2.30) for which NAD(+) is the sole substrate. The enzyme PARP-1 is highly activated by DNA strand breaks during the cellular genotoxic stress response, is involved in base excision repair, plays a role in p53 expression and activation, and hence, is thought to be important for genomic stability. In this review, first the absorption, metabolism of niacin to NAD(+), as well as the assessment of niacin status are discussed. Since NAD(+) is important for PARP-1 activity, various aspects of PARP-1 in relation to DNA synthesis and repair, and regulation of gene expression are addressed. This is followed by a discussion on interactions between dietary methyl donor deficiency, niacin status, PARP-1 activity and genomic stability. In vitro studies show that PARP-1 function is impaired and genomic stability decreased when cells are either depleted from NAD(+) or incubated with high concentrations of NAM which is a PARP-1 inhibitor. In vitro as well as animal studies indicate that niacin deficiency increases genomic instability especially in combination with genotoxic and oxidative stress. Niacin deficiency may also increase the risk for certain tumors. Preliminary data suggest that niacin supplementation may protect against UV-induced tumors of the skin in mice, but data on similar preventive effects in humans are not available. NAM has been shown in vitro to have an antioxidant activity comparable to that of ascorbic acid. Data on niacin status and genomic stability in vivo in humans are limited and yield ambiguous results. Therefore, no firm conclusions with respect to optimal niacin intake are possible. As a consequence of oral niacin supplementation, however, NAM levels in the body may increase, which may

  6. Vault-poly-ADP-ribose polymerase in the Octopus vulgaris brain: a regulatory factor of actin polymerization dynamic.

    PubMed

    De Maio, Anna; Natale, Emiliana; Rotondo, Sergio; Di Cosmo, Anna; Faraone-Mennella, Maria Rosaria

    2013-09-01

    Our previous behavioural, biochemical and immunohistochemical analyses conducted in selected regions (supra/sub oesophageal masses) of the Octopus vulgaris brain detected a cytoplasmic poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (more than 90% of total enzyme activity). The protein was identified as the vault-free form of vault-poly-ADP-ribose polymerase. The present research extends and integrates the biochemical characterization of poly-ADP-ribosylation system, namely, reaction product, i.e., poly-ADP-ribose, and acceptor proteins, in the O. vulgaris brain. Immunochemical analyses evidenced that the sole poly-ADP-ribose acceptor was the octopus cytoskeleton 50-kDa actin. It was present in both free, endogenously poly-ADP-ribosylated form (70kDa) and in complex with V-poly-ADP-ribose polymerase and poly-ADP-ribose (260kDa). The components of this complex, alkali and high salt sensitive, were purified and characterized. The kind and the length of poly-ADP-ribose corresponded to linear chains of 30-35 ADP-ribose units, in accordance with the features of the polymer synthesized by the known vault-poly-ADP-ribose polymerase. In vitro experiments showed that V-poly-ADP-ribose polymerase activity of brain cytoplasmic fraction containing endogenous actin increased upon the addition of commercial actin and was highly reduced by ATP. Anti-actin immunoblot of the mixture in the presence and absence of ATP showed that the poly-ADP-ribosylation of octopus actin is a dynamic process balanced by the ATP-dependent polymerization of the cytoskeleton protein, a fundamental mechanism for synaptic plasticity.

  7. Inhibition of Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase by Nucleic Acid Metabolite 7-Methylguanine

    PubMed Central

    Nilov, D. K.; Tararov, V. I.; Kulikov, A. V.; Zakharenko, A. L.; Gushchina, I. V.; Mikhailov, S. N.; Lavrik, O. I.; Švedas, V. K.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of 7-methylguanine, a nucleic acid metabolite, to inhibit poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP-1) and poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-2 (PARP-2) has been identified in silico and studied experimentally. The amino group at position 2 and the methyl group at position 7 were shown to be important substituents for the efficient binding of purine derivatives to PARPs. The activity of both tested enzymes, PARP-1 and PARP-2, was suppressed by 7-methylguanine with IC50 values of 150 and 50 μM, respectively. At the PARP inhibitory concentration, 7-methylguanine itself was not cytotoxic, but it was able to accelerate apoptotic death of BRCA1-deficient breast cancer cells induced by cisplatin and doxorubicin, the widely used DNA-damaging chemotherapeutic agents. 7-Methylguanine possesses attractive predictable pharmacokinetics and an adverse-effect profile and may be considered as a new additive to chemotherapeutic treatment. PMID:27437145

  8. Does inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase prevent energy overconsumption under microgravity?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrota, C.; Piso, M. I.; Keul, A.

    When plants are exposed to a stress signal they expend a lot of energy and exhibit enhanced respiration rates This is partially due to a breakdown in the NAD pool caused by the enhanced activity PARP which uses NAD as a substrate to synthesize polymers of ADP-ribose Stress-induced depletion of NAD results in a similar depletion of energy since ATP molecules are required to resynthesize the depleted NAD It seems that plants with lowered poly ADP ribosyl ation activity appear tolerant to multiple stresses Inhibiting PARP activity prevents energy overconsumption under stress allowing normal mitochondrial respiration We intend to study if the microgravity is perceived by plants as a stress factor and if experimental inhibition of poly ADP-ribose polymerase may improve the energetic level of the cells References DeBlock M Verduyn C De Brouwer D and Cornelissen M 2005 Poly ADP-ribose polymerase in plants affects energy homeostasis cell death and stress tolerance The Plant Journal 41 95--106 Huang S Greenway H Colmerm T D and Millar A H 2005 Protein synthesis by rice coleoptiles during prolonged anoxia Implications for glycolysis growth and energy utilization Annals of Botany 96 703--715 Mittler R Vanderauwera S Gollery M and Van Breusegem F 2005 Reactive oxygen gene network of plants Trends in Plant Science 9 10 490-498

  9. Pancreatic β-Cell Death, Regeneration and Insulin Secretion: Roles of Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase and Cyclic ADP-Ribose

    PubMed Central

    Takasawa, Shin; Okamoto, Hiroshi

    2002-01-01

    In the early 1980s, we proposed a unifying model for β-cell damage (The OKAMOTO model), in which poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase/ polymerase (PARP) activation plays an essential role in the consumption of NAD+, which leads to energy depletion and necrotic cell death. In 1984, we demonstrated that the administration of PARP inhibitors to 90% depancreatized rats induces islet regeneration. From the regenerating islet-derived cDNA library we isolated Reg (Regenerating Gene) and demonstrated that Reg protein induces βcell replication via the Reg receptor and ameliorates experimental diabetes. More recently, we showed that the combined addition of IL-6 and dexamethasone induces the Reg gene expression in β-cells and that PARP inhibitors enhance the expression. In 1993, we found that cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR), a product synthesized from NAD+, is a second messenger for intracellular Ca+ mobilization for insulin secretion by glucose, and proposed a novel mechanism of insulin secretion, the CD38-cADPR signal system. Therefore, PARP inhibitors prevent β-cell necrosis, induce β-cell replication and maintain insulin secretion. In this paper, we would like to present a perspective view based on our studies concerning cell death, cell regeneration, and cell function, especially on insulin-producing pancreatic βcells, in the processes of which poly(ADPribose) synthetase/polymerase (PARP) and cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) are functioning. PMID:11991201

  10. Structural basis for lack of ADP-ribosyltransferase activity in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-13/zinc finger antiviral protein.

    PubMed

    Karlberg, Tobias; Klepsch, Mirjam; Thorsell, Ann-Gerd; Andersson, C David; Linusson, Anna; Schüler, Herwig

    2015-03-20

    The mammalian poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) family includes ADP-ribosyltransferases with diphtheria toxin homology (ARTD). Most members have mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase activity. PARP13/ARTD13, also called zinc finger antiviral protein, has roles in viral immunity and microRNA-mediated stress responses. PARP13 features a divergent PARP homology domain missing a PARP consensus sequence motif; the domain has enigmatic functions and apparently lacks catalytic activity. We used x-ray crystallography, molecular dynamics simulations, and biochemical analyses to investigate the structural requirements for ADP-ribosyltransferase activity in human PARP13 and two of its functional partners in stress granules: PARP12/ARTD12, and PARP15/BAL3/ARTD7. The crystal structure of the PARP homology domain of PARP13 shows obstruction of the canonical active site, precluding NAD(+) binding. Molecular dynamics simulations indicate that this closed cleft conformation is maintained in solution. Introducing consensus side chains in PARP13 did not result in 3-aminobenzamide binding, but in further closure of the site. Three-dimensional alignment of the PARP homology domains of PARP13, PARP12, and PARP15 illustrates placement of PARP13 residues that deviate from the PARP family consensus. Introducing either one of two of these side chains into the corresponding positions in PARP15 abolished PARP15 ADP-ribosyltransferase activity. Taken together, our results show that PARP13 lacks the structural requirements for ADP-ribosyltransferase activity.

  11. Bookmarking promoters in mitotic chromatin: poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 as an epigenetic mark

    PubMed Central

    Lodhi, Niraj; Kossenkov, Andrew V.; Tulin, Alexei V.

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetics are the heritable changes in gene expression or cellular phenotype caused by mechanisms other than changes in the underlying DNA sequence. After mitosis, it is thought that bookmarking transcription factors remain at promoters, regulating which genes become active and which remain silent. Herein, we demonstrate that poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is a genome-wide epigenetic memory mark in mitotic chromatin, and we further show that the presence of PARP-1 is absolutely crucial for reactivation of transcription after mitosis. Based on these findings, a novel molecular model of epigenetic memory transmission through the cell cycle is proposed. PMID:24861619

  12. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor: an evolving paradigm in the treatment of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingsong

    2014-01-01

    Recent phase I studies have reported single-agent activities of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor in sporadic and in BRCA-mutant prostate cancers. Two of the most common genetic alterations in prostate cancer, ETS gene rearrangement and loss of PTEN, have been linked to increased sensitivity to PARP inhibitor in preclinical models. Emerging evidence also suggests that PARP1 plays an important role in mediating the transcriptional activities of androgen receptor (AR) and ETS gene rearrangement. In this article, the preclinical work and early-phase clinical trials in developing PARP inhibitor-based therapy as a new treatment paradigm for metastatic prostate cancer are reviewed.

  13. Nuclear poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 rapidly triggers mitochondrial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Cipriani, Giulia; Rapizzi, Elena; Vannacci, Alfredo; Rizzuto, Rosario; Moroni, Flavio; Chiarugi, Alberto

    2005-04-29

    To obtain further information on time course and mechanisms of cell death after poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) hyperactivation, we used HeLa cells exposed for 1 h to the DNA alkylating agent N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. This treatment activated PARP-1 and caused a rapid drop of cellular NAD(H) and ATP contents, culminating 8-12 h later in cell death. PARP-1 antagonists fully prevented nucleotide depletion and death. Interestingly, in the early 60 min after challenge with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine, mitochondrial membrane potential and superoxide production significantly increased, whereas cellular ADP contents decreased. Again, these events were prevented by PARP-1 inhibitors, suggesting that PARP-1 hyperactivity leads to mitochondrial state 4 respiration. Mitochondrial membrane potential collapsed at later time points (3 h), when mitochondria released apoptosis-inducing factor and cytochrome c. Using immunocytochemistry and targeted luciferase transfection, we found that, despite an exclusive localization of PARP-1 and poly(ADP-ribose) in the nucleus, ATP levels first decreased in mitochondria and then in the cytoplasm of cells undergoing PARP-1 activation. PARP-1 inhibitors rescued ATP (but not NAD(H) levels) in cells undergoing hyper-poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation. Glycolysis played a central role in the energy recovery, whereas mitochondria consumed ATP in the early recovery phase and produced ATP in the late phase after PARP-1 inhibition, further indicating that nuclear poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation rapidly modulates mitochondrial functioning. Together, our data provide evidence for rapid nucleus-mitochondria cross-talk during hyper-poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation-dependent cell death.

  14. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor induces accelerated senescence in irradiated breast cancer cells and tumors

    PubMed Central

    Efimova, Elena V.; Mauceri, Helena J.; Golden, Daniel W.; Labay, Edwardine; Bindokas, Vytautas P.; Darga, Thomas E.; Chakraborty, Chaitali; Andrade, Juan Camilo Barreto; Crawley, Clayton; Sutton, Harold G.; Kron, Stephen J.; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.

    2010-01-01

    Persistent DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) may determine the anti-tumor effects of ionizing radiation (IR) by inducing apoptosis, necrosis, mitotic catastrophe or permanent growth arrest. Ionizing radiation (IR) induces rapid modification of megabase chromatin domains surrounding double strand breaks (DSBs) via poly-ADP-ribosylation, phosphorylation, acetylation, and protein assembly. The dynamics of these ionizing radiation-induced foci (IRIF) have been implicated in DNA damage signaling and DNA repair. As an IRIF reporter, we tracked relocalization of GFP fused to a chromatin binding domain of the checkpoint adapter protein 53BP1 after IR of breast cancer cells and tumors. To block DSB repair in breast cancer cells and tumors, we targeted poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase with ABT-888 (veliparib), one of several PARP inhibitors currently in clinical trials. PARP inhibition markedly enhanced IRIF persistence and increased breast cancer cell senescence both in vitro and in vivo, arguing for targeting IRIF resolution as a novel therapeutic strategy. PMID:20610628

  15. Inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 attenuates the toxicity of carbon tetrachloride

    PubMed Central

    Banasik, Marek; Stedeford, Todd; Strosznajder, Robert P; Takehashi, Masanori; Tanaka, Seigo; Ueda, Kunihiro

    2011-01-01

    Carbon tetrachloride (CCl4) is routinely used as a model compound for eliciting centrilobular hepatotoxicity. It can be bioactivated to the trichloromethyl radical, which causes extensive lipid peroxidation and ultimately cell death by necrosis. Overactivation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) can rapidly reduce the levels of (β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and adenosine triphosphate and ultimately promote necrosis. The aim of this study was to determine whether inhibition of PARP-1 could decrease CCl4-induced hepatotoxicity, as measured by degree of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation, serum levels of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), lipid peroxidation,and oxidative DNA damage. For this purpose, male ICR mice were administered intraperitoneally a hepatotoxic dose of CCl4 with or without 6(5H)-phenanthridinone, a potent inhibitor of PARP-1. Animals treated with CCl4 exhibited extensive poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation in centrilobular hepatocytes, elevated serum levels of LDH, and increased lipid peroxidation. In contrast, animals treated concomitantly with CCl4 and 6(5H)-phenanthridinone showed significantly lower levels of poly(ADP-ribosyl) ation, serum LDH, and lipid peroxidation. No changes were observed in the levels of oxidative DNA damage regardless of treatment. These results demonstrated that the hepatotoxicity of CCl4is dependent on the overactivation of PARP-1 and that inhibition of this enzyme attenuates the hepatotoxicity of CCl4. PMID:21395487

  16. PARP1 is a TRF2-associated poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and protects eroded telomeres

    SciTech Connect

    Gomez, Marla V; Wu, Jun; Wang, Yisong; Liu, Yie

    2006-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase 1 (PARP1) is well characterized for its role in base excision repair (BER), where it is activated by and binds to DNA breaks and catalyzes the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of several substrates involved in DNA damage repair. Here we demonstrate that PARP1 associates with telomere repeat binding factor 2 (TRF2) and is capable of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of TRF2, which affects binding of TRF2 to telomeric DNA. Immunostaining of interphase cells or metaphase spreads shows that PARP1 is detected sporadically at normal telomeres, but it appears preferentially at eroded telomeres caused by telomerase deficiency or damaged telomeres induced by DNA-damaging reagents. Although PARP1 is dispensable in the capping of normal telomeres, Parp1 deficiency leads to an increase in chromosome end-to-end fusions or chromosome ends without detectable telomeric DNA in primary murine cells after induction of DNA damage. Our results suggest that upon DNA damage, PARP1 is recruited to damaged telomeres, where it can help protect telomeres against chromosome end-to-end fusions and genomic instability.

  17. PARP1 Is a TRF2-associated Poly(ADP-Ribose)Polymerase and Protects Eroded Telomeres

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yie; Wu, Jun; Schreiber, Valerie; Dunlap, John; Dantzer, Francoise; Wang, Yisong

    2006-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase 1 (PARP1) is well characterized for its role in base excision repair (BER), where it is activated by and binds to DNA breaks and catalyzes the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of several substrates involved in DNA damage repair. Here we demonstrate that PARP1 associates with telomere repeat binding factor 2 (TRF2) and is capable of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of TRF2, which affects binding of TRF2 to telomeric DNA. Immunostaining of interphase cells or metaphase spreads shows that PARP1 is detected sporadically at normal telomeres, but it appears preferentially at eroded telomeres caused by telomerase deficiency or damaged telomeres induced by DNA-damaging reagents. Although PARP1 is dispensable in the capping of normal telomeres, Parp1 deficiency leads to an increase in chromosome end-to-end fusions or chromosome ends without detectable telomeric DNA in primary murine cells after induction of DNA damage. Our results suggest that upon DNA damage, PARP1 is recruited to damaged telomeres, where it can help protect telomeres against chromosome end-to-end fusions and genomic instability.

  18. Modulation of urokinase plasminogen activator system by poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Madunić, Josip; Antica, Mariastefania; Cvjetko, Petra; Požgaj, Lidija; Matulić, Maja

    2016-08-01

    The urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) system is a complex regulator of extracellular proteolysis which is involved in various physiological and pathological processes. The major components of this system are the serine protease uPA, two inhibitors PAI-1 and PAI-2, and the receptor uPAR. It has been previously shown by several groups that the uPA system has an important role in cancer progression and therefore its possible prognostic and therapeutic value has been evaluated. The aim of this study is to tackle the role of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation in the induction of uPA activity in a glioblastoma cell line, A1235. This cell line is sensitive to alkylation damage and is a model for drug treatment. The components of the uPA system and the level of DNA damage were analyzed after alkylation agent treatment in combination with poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP-1) inhibition. Here we show that the increase in uPA activity results from the net balance change between uPA and its inhibitor at mRNA level. Further, PARP-1 inhibition exerts its influence on uPA activity through DNA damage increase. Involvement of several signaling pathways, as well as cell specific regulation influencing the uPA system are discussed.

  19. Activation of the Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase Pathway in Human Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Molnár, Andrea; Tóth, Attila; Bagi, Zsolt; Papp, Zoltán; Édes, István; Vaszily, Miklós; Galajda, Zoltán; Papp, Julius Gy.; Varró, András; Szüts, Viktória; Lacza, Zsombor; Gerö, Domokos; Szabó, Csaba

    2006-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activation has been implicated in the pathogenesis of acute and chronic myocardial dysfunction and heart failure. The goal of the present study was to investigate PARP activation in human heart failure, and to correlate PARP activation with various indices of apoptosis and oxidative and nitrosative stress in healthy (donor) and failing (NYHA class III–IV) human heart tissue samples. Higher levels of oxidized protein end-products were found in failing hearts compared with donor heart samples. On the other hand, no differences in tyrosine nitration (a marker of peroxynitrite generation) were detected. Activation of PARP was demonstrated in the failing hearts by an increased abundance of poly-ADP ribosylated proteins. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that PARP activation was localized to the nucleus of the cardiomyocytes from the failing hearts. The expression of full-length PARP-1 was not significantly different in donor and failing hearts. The expression of caspase-9, in contrast, was significantly higher in the failing than in the donor hearts. Immunohistochemical analysis was used to detect the activation of mitochondrial apoptotic pathways. We found no significant translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) into the nucleus. Overall, the current data provide evidence of oxidative stress and PARP activation in human heart failure. Interventional studies with antioxidants or PARP inhibitors are required to define the specific roles of these factors in the pathogenesis of human heart failure. PMID:17088946

  20. Sumoylation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 inhibits its acetylation and restrains transcriptional coactivator function.

    PubMed

    Messner, Simon; Schuermann, David; Altmeyer, Matthias; Kassner, Ingrid; Schmidt, Darja; Schär, Primo; Müller, Stefan; Hottiger, Michael O

    2009-11-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) is a chromatin-associated nuclear protein and functions as a molecular stress sensor. At the cellular level, PARP1 has been implicated in a wide range of processes, such as maintenance of genome stability, cell death, and transcription. PARP1 functions as a transcriptional coactivator of nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) and hypoxia inducible factor 1 (HIF1). In proteomic studies, PARP1 was found to be modified by small ubiquitin-like modifiers (SUMOs). Here, we characterize PARP1 as a substrate for modification by SUMO1 and SUMO3, both in vitro and in vivo. PARP1 is sumoylated at the single lysine residue K486 within its automodification domain. Interestingly, modification of PARP1 with SUMO does not affect its ADP-ribosylation activity but completely abrogates p300-mediated acetylation of PARP1, revealing an intriguing crosstalk of sumoylation and acetylation on PARP1. Genetic complementation of PARP1-depleted cells with wild-type and sumoylation-deficient PARP1 revealed that SUMO modification of PARP1 restrains its transcriptional coactivator function and subsequently reduces gene expression of distinct PARP1-regulated target genes.

  1. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase regulates glycolytic activity in kidney proximal tubule epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hana; Yoon, Sang Pil

    2016-01-01

    After renal injury, selective damage occurs in the proximal tubules as a result of inhibition of glycolysis. The molecular mechanism of damage is not known. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activation plays a critical role of proximal tubular cell death in several renal disorders. Here, we studied the role of PARP on glycolytic flux in pig kidney proximal tubule epithelial LLC-PK1 cells using XFp extracellular flux analysis. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation by PARP activation was increased approximately 2-fold by incubation of the cells in 10 mM glucose for 30 minutes, but treatment with the PARP inhibitor 3-aminobenzamide (3-AB) does-dependently prevented the glucose-induced PARP activation (approximately 14.4% decrease in 0.1 mM 3-AB–treated group and 36.7% decrease in 1 mM 3-AB–treated group). Treatment with 1 mM 3-AB significantly enhanced the glucose-mediated increase in the extracellular acidification rate (61.1±4.3 mpH/min vs. 126.8±6.2 mpH/min or approximately 2-fold) compared with treatment with vehicle, indicating that PARP inhibition increases only glycolytic activity during glycolytic flux including basal glycolysis, glycolytic activity, and glycolytic capacity in kidney proximal tubule epithelial cells. Glucose increased the activities of glycolytic enzymes including hexokinase, phosphoglucose isomerase, phosphofructokinase-1, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, enolase, and pyruvate kinase in LLC-PK1 cells. Furthermore, PARP inhibition selectively augmented the activities of hexokinase (approximately 1.4-fold over vehicle group), phosphofructokinase-1 (approximately 1.6-fold over vehicle group), and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (approximately 2.2-fold over vehicle group). In conclusion, these data suggest that PARP activation may regulate glycolytic activity via poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of hexokinase, phosphofructokinase-1, and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in kidney proximal tubule epithelial cells. PMID:27382509

  2. Inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase interferes with Trypanosoma cruzi infection and proliferation of the parasite.

    PubMed

    Vilchez Larrea, Salomé C; Haikarainen, Teemu; Narwal, Mohit; Schlesinger, Mariana; Venkannagari, Harikanth; Flawiá, Mirtha M; Villamil, Silvia H Fernández; Lehtiö, Lari

    2012-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosylation) is a post-translational covalent modification of proteins catalyzed by a family of enzymes termed poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs). In the human genome, 17 different genes have been identified that encode members of the PARP superfamily. Poly (ADP-ribose) metabolism plays a role in a wide range of biological processes. In Trypanosoma cruzi, PARP enzyme appears to play a role in DNA repair mechanisms and may also be involved in controlling the different phases of cell growth. Here we describe the identification of potent inhibitors for T. cruzi PARP with a fluorescence-based activity assay. The inhibitors were also tested on T. cruzi epimastigotes, showing that they reduced ADP-ribose polymer formation in vivo. Notably, the identified inhibitors are able to reduce the growth rate of T. cruzi epimastigotes. The best inhibitor, Olaparib, is effective at nanomolar concentrations, making it an efficient chemical tool for chacterization of ADP-ribose metabolism in T. cruzi. PARP inhibition also decreases drastically the amount of amastigotes but interestingly has no effect on the amount of trypomastigotes in the cell culture. Knocking down human PARP-1 decreases both the amount of amastigotes and trypomastigotes in cell culture, indicating that the effect would be mainly due to inhibition of human PARP-1. The result suggests that the inhibition of PARP could be a potential way to interfere with T. cruzi infection. PMID:23049934

  3. Inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase Interferes with Trypanosoma cruzi Infection and Proliferation of the Parasite

    PubMed Central

    Vilchez Larrea, Salomé C.; Haikarainen, Teemu; Narwal, Mohit; Schlesinger, Mariana; Venkannagari, Harikanth; Flawiá, Mirtha M.; Villamil, Silvia H. Fernández; Lehtiö, Lari

    2012-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosylation) is a post-translational covalent modification of proteins catalyzed by a family of enzymes termed poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs). In the human genome, 17 different genes have been identified that encode members of the PARP superfamily. Poly (ADP-ribose) metabolism plays a role in a wide range of biological processes. In Trypanosoma cruzi, PARP enzyme appears to play a role in DNA repair mechanisms and may also be involved in controlling the different phases of cell growth. Here we describe the identification of potent inhibitors for T. cruzi PARP with a fluorescence-based activity assay. The inhibitors were also tested on T. cruzi epimastigotes, showing that they reduced ADP-ribose polymer formation in vivo. Notably, the identified inhibitors are able to reduce the growth rate of T. cruzi epimastigotes. The best inhibitor, Olaparib, is effective at nanomolar concentrations, making it an efficient chemical tool for chacterization of ADP-ribose metabolism in T. cruzi. PARP inhibition also decreases drastically the amount of amastigotes but interestingly has no effect on the amount of trypomastigotes in the cell culture. Knocking down human PARP-1 decreases both the amount of amastigotes and trypomastigotes in cell culture, indicating that the effect would be mainly due to inhibition of human PARP-1. The result suggests that the inhibition of PARP could be a potential way to interfere with T. cruzi infection. PMID:23049934

  4. Differential and Concordant Roles for Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase 1 and Poly(ADP-Ribose) in Regulating WRN and RECQL5 Activities

    PubMed Central

    Khadka, Prabhat; Hsu, Joseph K.; Veith, Sebastian; Tadokoro, Takashi; Shamanna, Raghavendra A.; Mangerich, Aswin; Croteau, Deborah L.

    2015-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymerase 1 (PARP1) catalyzes the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) of proteins, a posttranslational modification which forms the nucleic acid-like polymer PAR. PARP1 and PAR are integral players in the early DNA damage response, since PARylation orchestrates the recruitment of repair proteins to sites of damage. Human RecQ helicases are DNA unwinding proteins that are critical responders to DNA damage, but how their recruitment and activities are regulated by PARPs and PAR is poorly understood. Here we report that all human RecQ helicases interact with PAR noncovalently. Furthermore, we define the effects that PARP1, PARylated PARP1, and PAR have on RECQL5 and WRN, using both in vitro and in vivo assays. We show that PARylation is involved in the recruitment of RECQL5 and WRN to laser-induced DNA damage and that RECQL5 and WRN have differential responses to PARylated PARP1 and PAR. Furthermore, we show that the loss of RECQL5 or WRN resulted in increased sensitivity to PARP inhibition. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that PARP1 and PAR actively, and in some instances differentially, regulate the activities and cellular localization of RECQL5 and WRN, suggesting that PARylation acts as a fine-tuning mechanism to coordinate their functions in time and space during the genotoxic stress response. PMID:26391948

  5. Differential and Concordant Roles for Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase 1 and Poly(ADP-Ribose) in Regulating WRN and RECQL5 Activities.

    PubMed

    Khadka, Prabhat; Hsu, Joseph K; Veith, Sebastian; Tadokoro, Takashi; Shamanna, Raghavendra A; Mangerich, Aswin; Croteau, Deborah L; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2015-12-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymerase 1 (PARP1) catalyzes the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) of proteins, a posttranslational modification which forms the nucleic acid-like polymer PAR. PARP1 and PAR are integral players in the early DNA damage response, since PARylation orchestrates the recruitment of repair proteins to sites of damage. Human RecQ helicases are DNA unwinding proteins that are critical responders to DNA damage, but how their recruitment and activities are regulated by PARPs and PAR is poorly understood. Here we report that all human RecQ helicases interact with PAR noncovalently. Furthermore, we define the effects that PARP1, PARylated PARP1, and PAR have on RECQL5 and WRN, using both in vitro and in vivo assays. We show that PARylation is involved in the recruitment of RECQL5 and WRN to laser-induced DNA damage and that RECQL5 and WRN have differential responses to PARylated PARP1 and PAR. Furthermore, we show that the loss of RECQL5 or WRN resulted in increased sensitivity to PARP inhibition. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that PARP1 and PAR actively, and in some instances differentially, regulate the activities and cellular localization of RECQL5 and WRN, suggesting that PARylation acts as a fine-tuning mechanism to coordinate their functions in time and space during the genotoxic stress response.

  6. Differential and Concordant Roles for Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase 1 and Poly(ADP-Ribose) in Regulating WRN and RECQL5 Activities.

    PubMed

    Khadka, Prabhat; Hsu, Joseph K; Veith, Sebastian; Tadokoro, Takashi; Shamanna, Raghavendra A; Mangerich, Aswin; Croteau, Deborah L; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2015-12-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymerase 1 (PARP1) catalyzes the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) of proteins, a posttranslational modification which forms the nucleic acid-like polymer PAR. PARP1 and PAR are integral players in the early DNA damage response, since PARylation orchestrates the recruitment of repair proteins to sites of damage. Human RecQ helicases are DNA unwinding proteins that are critical responders to DNA damage, but how their recruitment and activities are regulated by PARPs and PAR is poorly understood. Here we report that all human RecQ helicases interact with PAR noncovalently. Furthermore, we define the effects that PARP1, PARylated PARP1, and PAR have on RECQL5 and WRN, using both in vitro and in vivo assays. We show that PARylation is involved in the recruitment of RECQL5 and WRN to laser-induced DNA damage and that RECQL5 and WRN have differential responses to PARylated PARP1 and PAR. Furthermore, we show that the loss of RECQL5 or WRN resulted in increased sensitivity to PARP inhibition. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that PARP1 and PAR actively, and in some instances differentially, regulate the activities and cellular localization of RECQL5 and WRN, suggesting that PARylation acts as a fine-tuning mechanism to coordinate their functions in time and space during the genotoxic stress response. PMID:26391948

  7. Poly (ADP-Ribose) Polymerase Mediates Diabetes-Induced Retinal Neuropathy

    PubMed Central

    Mohammad, Ghulam; Siddiquei, Mohammad Mairaj

    2013-01-01

    Retinal neuropathy is an early event in the development of diabetic retinopathy. One of the potential enzymes that are activated by oxidative stress in the diabetic retina is poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). We investigated the effect of the PARP inhibitor 1,5-isoquinolinediol on the expression of the neurodegeneration mediators and markers in the retinas of diabetic rats. After two weeks of streptozotocin-induced diabetes, rats were treated with 1,5-isoquinolinediol (3 mg/kg/day). After 4 weeks of diabetes, the retinas were harvested and the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were determined fluorometrically and the expressions of PARP, phosporylated-ERK1/2, BDNF, synaptophysin, glutamine synthetase (GS), and caspase-3 were determined by Western blot analysis. Retinal levels of ROS, PARP-1/2, phosphorylated ERK1/2, and cleaved caspase-3 were significantly increased, whereas the expressions of BDNF synaptophysin and GS were significantly decreased in the retinas of diabetic rats, compared to nondiabetic rats. Administration of 1,5-isoquinolinediol did not affect the metabolic status of the diabetic rats, but it significantly attenuated diabetes-induced upregulation of PARP, ROS, ERK1/2 phosphorylation, and cleaved caspase-3 and downregulation of BDNF, synaptophysin, and GS. These findings suggest a beneficial effect of the PARP inhibitor in increasing neurotrophic support and ameliorating early retinal neuropathy induced by diabetes. PMID:24347828

  8. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase mediates diabetes-induced retinal neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Mohammad, Ghulam; Siddiquei, Mohammad Mairaj; Abu El-Asrar, Ahmed M

    2013-01-01

    Retinal neuropathy is an early event in the development of diabetic retinopathy. One of the potential enzymes that are activated by oxidative stress in the diabetic retina is poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). We investigated the effect of the PARP inhibitor 1,5-isoquinolinediol on the expression of the neurodegeneration mediators and markers in the retinas of diabetic rats. After two weeks of streptozotocin-induced diabetes, rats were treated with 1,5-isoquinolinediol (3 mg/kg/day). After 4 weeks of diabetes, the retinas were harvested and the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were determined fluorometrically and the expressions of PARP, phosporylated-ERK1/2, BDNF, synaptophysin, glutamine synthetase (GS), and caspase-3 were determined by Western blot analysis. Retinal levels of ROS, PARP-1/2, phosphorylated ERK1/2, and cleaved caspase-3 were significantly increased, whereas the expressions of BDNF synaptophysin and GS were significantly decreased in the retinas of diabetic rats, compared to nondiabetic rats. Administration of 1,5-isoquinolinediol did not affect the metabolic status of the diabetic rats, but it significantly attenuated diabetes-induced upregulation of PARP, ROS, ERK1/2 phosphorylation, and cleaved caspase-3 and downregulation of BDNF, synaptophysin, and GS. These findings suggest a beneficial effect of the PARP inhibitor in increasing neurotrophic support and ameliorating early retinal neuropathy induced by diabetes. PMID:24347828

  9. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibition reverses vascular dysfunction after {gamma}-irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Beller, Carsten J. . E-mail: Carsten.Beller@urz.uni-heidelberg.de; Radovits, Tamas; Seres, Leila; Kosse, Jens; Krempien, Robert; Gross, Marie-Luise; Penzel, Roland; Berger, Irina; Huber, Peter E.; Hagl, Siegfried; Szabo, Csaba; Szabo, Gabor

    2006-08-01

    Purpose: The generation of reactive oxygen species during {gamma}-irradiation may induce DNA damage, leading to activation of the nuclear enzyme poly(adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose) polymerase (PARP) culminating in endothelial dysfunction. In the present study, we assessed the effect of PARP inhibition on changes in vascular function after acute and short-term irradiation. Methods and Materials: In the acute experiments, aortic rings were exposed to 20 Gy of {gamma}-irradiation. The aortae were harvested after 1 or 7 days. Two additional groups received the ultrapotent PARP inhibitor, INO-1001, for 1 or 7 days after irradiation. The aortic rings were precontracted by phenylephrine and relaxation to acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside were studied. Results: The vasoconstrictor response to phenylephrine was significantly lower both acutely and 1 and 7 days after irradiation. Vasorelaxation to acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside was not impaired acutely after irradiation. One and seven days after irradiation, vasorelaxation to acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside was significantly enhanced. Treatment with INO-1001 reversed vascular dysfunction after irradiation. Conclusion: Vascular dysfunction was observed 1 and 7 days after irradiation, as evidenced by reduced vasoconstriction, coupled with endothelium-dependent and -independent hyperrelaxation. PARP inhibition restored vascular function and may, therefore, be suitable to reverse vascular dysfunction after irradiation.

  10. Ethanol-induced changes in poly (ADP ribose) polymerase and neuronal developmental gene expression.

    PubMed

    Gavin, David P; Kusumo, Handojo; Sharma, Rajiv P; Guizzetti, Marina

    2016-11-01

    Prenatal alcohol exposure has profound effects on neuronal growth and development. Poly-ADP Ribose Polymerase (PARP) enzymes are perhaps unique in the field of epigenetics in that they directly participate in histone modifications, transcription factor modifications, DNA methylation/demethylation and are highly inducible by ethanol. It was our hypothesis that ethanol would induce PARP enzymatic activity leading to alterations in neurodevelopmental gene expression. Mouse E18 cortical neurons were treated with ethanol, PARP inhibitors, and nuclear hormone receptor transcription factor PPARγ agonists and antagonists. Subsequently, we measured PARP activity and changes in Bdnf, OKSM (Oct4, Klf4, Sox2, c-Myc), DNA methylating/demethylating factors, and Pparγ mRNA expression, promoter 5-methylcytosine (5MC) and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5HMC), and PPARγ promoter binding. We found that ethanol reduced Bdnf4, 9a, and Klf4 mRNA expression, and increased c-Myc expression. These changes were reversed with a PARP inhibitor. In agreement with its role in DNA demethylation PARP inhibition increased 5MC levels at the c-Myc promoter. In addition, we found that inhibition of PARP enzymatic activity increased PPARγ promoter binding, and this corresponded to increased Bdnf and Klf4 mRNA expression. Our results suggest that PARP participates in DNA demethylation and reduces PPARγ promoter binding. The current study underscores the importance of PARP in ethanol-induced changes to neurodevelopmental gene expression. PMID:27497606

  11. Poly(ADP-Ribose)Polymerase Activity Controls Plant Growth by Promoting Leaf Cell Number

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Philipp; Jansseune, Karel; Degenkolbe, Thomas; Méret, Michaël; Claeys, Hannes; Skirycz, Aleksandra; Teige, Markus; Willmitzer, Lothar; Hannah, Matthew A.

    2014-01-01

    A changing global environment, rising population and increasing demand for biofuels are challenging agriculture and creating a need for technologies to increase biomass production. Here we demonstrate that the inhibition of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase activity is a promising technology to achieve this under non-stress conditions. Furthermore, we investigate the basis of this growth enhancement via leaf series and kinematic cell analysis as well as single leaf transcriptomics and plant metabolomics under non-stress conditions. These data indicate a regulatory function of PARP within cell growth and potentially development. PARP inhibition enhances growth of Arabidopsis thaliana by enhancing the cell number. Time course single leaf transcriptomics shows that PARP inhibition regulates a small subset of genes which are related to growth promotion, cell cycle and the control of metabolism. This is supported by metabolite analysis showing overall changes in primary and particularly secondary metabolism. Taken together the results indicate a versatile function of PARP beyond its previously reported roles in controlling plant stress tolerance and thus can be a useful target for enhancing biomass production. PMID:24587323

  12. Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase Is a Substrate Recognized by Two Metacaspases of Podospora anserina

    PubMed Central

    Strobel, Ingmar

    2013-01-01

    The two metacaspases MCA1 and MCA2 of the fungal aging model organism Podospora anserina (PaMCA1 and PaMCA2, respectively) have previously been demonstrated to be involved in the control of programmed cell death (PCD) and life span. In order to identify specific pathways and components which are controlled by the activity of these enzymes, we set out to characterize them further. Heterologous overexpression in Escherichia coli of the two metacaspase genes resulted in the production of proteins which aggregate and form inclusion bodies from which the active protein has been recovered via refolding in appropriate buffers. The renaturated proteins are characterized by an arginine-specific activity and are active in caspase-like self-maturation leading to the generation of characteristic small protein fragments. Both activities are dependent on the presence of calcium. Incubation of the two metacaspases with recombinant poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), a known substrate of mammalian caspases, led to the identification of PARP as a substrate of the two P. anserina proteases. Using double mutants in which P. anserina Parp (PaParp) is overexpressed and PaMca1 is either overexpressed or deleted, we provide evidence for in vivo degradation of PaPARP by PaMCA1. These results support the idea that the substrate profiles of caspases and metacaspases are at least partially overlapping. Moreover, they link PCD and DNA maintenance in the complex network of molecular pathways involved in aging and life span control. PMID:23584991

  13. Inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 and DNA repair by uranium.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Karen L; Dashner, Erica J; Tsosie, Ranalda; Cho, Young Mi; Lewis, Johnnye; Hudson, Laurie G

    2016-01-15

    Uranium has radiological and non-radiological effects within biological systems and there is increasing evidence for genotoxic and carcinogenic properties attributable to uranium through its heavy metal properties. In this study, we report that low concentrations of uranium (as uranyl acetate; <10 μM) is not cytotoxic to human embryonic kidney cells or normal human keratinocytes; however, uranium exacerbates DNA damage and cytotoxicity induced by hydrogen peroxide, suggesting that uranium may inhibit DNA repair processes. Concentrations of uranyl acetate in the low micromolar range inhibited the zinc finger DNA repair protein poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-1 and caused zinc loss from PARP-1 protein. Uranyl acetate exposure also led to zinc loss from the zinc finger DNA repair proteins Xeroderma Pigmentosum, Complementation Group A (XPA) and aprataxin (APTX). In keeping with the observed inhibition of zinc finger function of DNA repair proteins, exposure to uranyl acetate enhanced retention of induced DNA damage. Co-incubation of uranyl acetate with zinc largely overcame the impact of uranium on PARP-1 activity and DNA damage. These findings present evidence that low concentrations of uranium can inhibit DNA repair through disruption of zinc finger domains of specific target DNA repair proteins. This may provide a mechanistic basis to account for the published observations that uranium exposure is associated with DNA repair deficiency in exposed human populations.

  14. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerases inhibitor, Zj6413, as a potential therapeutic agent against breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qin; Ji, Ming; Zhou, Jie; Jin, Jing; Xue, Nina; Chen, Ju; Xu, Bailing; Chen, Xiaoguang

    2016-05-01

    Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) facilitate repairing of cancer cell DNA damage as a mean to promote cancer proliferation and metastasis. Inhibitors of PARPs which interfering DNA repair, in context of defects in other DNA repair mechanisms, can thus be potentially exploited to inhibit or even kill cancer cells. However, nondiscriminatory inhibition of PARPs, such as PARP2, may lead to undesired consequences. Here, we demonstrated the design and development of the Zj6413 as a potent and selective PARP1 catalytic inhibitor. It trapped PARP1/2 at damaged sites of DNA. As expected, the Zj6413 showed notable anti-tumor activity against breast cancer gene (BRCA) deficient triple negative breast cancers (TNBCs). Zj6413 treated breast cancers (BCs) showed an elevated level of DNA damage evidenced by the accumulation of γ-H2AX foci and DNA damaged related proteins. Zj6413 also induced G2/M arrest and cell death in the MX-1, MDA-MB-453 BC cells, exerted chemo-sensitizing effect on BRCA proficient cancer cells and potentiated Temozolomide (TMZ)'s cytotoxicity in MX-1 xenograft tumors mice. In conclusion, our study provided evidence that a new PARP inhibitor strongly inhibited the catalytic activity of PARPs, trapped them on nicked DNA and damaged the cancer cells, eventually inhibiting the growth of breast tumor cells in vitro and in vivo. PMID:26920250

  15. Caspase-7 uses an exosite to promote poly(ADP ribose) polymerase 1 proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Dave; Blais, Véronique; Denault, Jean-Bernard

    2012-04-10

    During apoptosis, hundreds of proteins are cleaved by caspases, most of them by the executioner caspase-3. However, caspase-7, which shares the same substrate primary sequence preference as caspase-3, is better at cleaving poly(ADP ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP) and Hsp90 cochaperone p23, despite a lower intrinsic activity. Here, we identified key lysine residues (K(38)KKK) within the N-terminal domain of caspase-7 as critical elements for the efficient proteolysis of these two substrates. Caspase-7's N-terminal domain binds PARP and improves its cleavage by a chimeric caspase-3 by ∼30-fold. Cellular expression of caspase-7 lacking the critical lysine residues resulted in less-efficient PARP and p23 cleavage compared with cells expressing the wild-type peptidase. We further showed, using a series of caspase chimeras, the positioning of p23 on the enzyme providing us with a mechanistic insight into the binding of the exosite. In summary, we have uncovered a role for the N-terminal domain (NTD) and the N-terminal peptide of caspase-7 in promoting key substrate proteolysis.

  16. Functional characterization of the putative Aspergillus nidulans poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase homolog PrpA.

    PubMed

    Semighini, Camile P; Savoldi, Marcela; Goldman, Gustavo H; Harris, Steven D

    2006-05-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) is a highly conserved enzyme involved in multiple aspects of animal and plant cell physiology. For example, PARP is thought to be intimately involved in the early signaling events that trigger the DNA damage response. However, the genetic dissection of PARP function has been hindered by the presence of multiple homologs in most animal and plant species. Here, we present the first functional characterization of a putative PARP homolog (PrpA) in a microbial system (Aspergillus nidulans). PrpA belongs to a group of PARP homologs that includes representatives from filamentous fungi and protists. The genetic analysis of prpA demonstrates that it is an essential gene whose role in the DNA damage response is sensitive to gene dosage. Notably, temporal patterns of prpA expression and PrpA-GFP nuclear localization suggest that PrpA acts early in the A. nidulans DNA damage response. Additional studies implicate PrpA in farnesol-induced cell death and in the initiation of asexual development. Collectively, our results provide a gateway for probing the diverse functions of PARP in a sophisticated microbial genetic system.

  17. Ethanol-induced changes in poly (ADP ribose) polymerase and neuronal developmental gene expression.

    PubMed

    Gavin, David P; Kusumo, Handojo; Sharma, Rajiv P; Guizzetti, Marina

    2016-11-01

    Prenatal alcohol exposure has profound effects on neuronal growth and development. Poly-ADP Ribose Polymerase (PARP) enzymes are perhaps unique in the field of epigenetics in that they directly participate in histone modifications, transcription factor modifications, DNA methylation/demethylation and are highly inducible by ethanol. It was our hypothesis that ethanol would induce PARP enzymatic activity leading to alterations in neurodevelopmental gene expression. Mouse E18 cortical neurons were treated with ethanol, PARP inhibitors, and nuclear hormone receptor transcription factor PPARγ agonists and antagonists. Subsequently, we measured PARP activity and changes in Bdnf, OKSM (Oct4, Klf4, Sox2, c-Myc), DNA methylating/demethylating factors, and Pparγ mRNA expression, promoter 5-methylcytosine (5MC) and 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5HMC), and PPARγ promoter binding. We found that ethanol reduced Bdnf4, 9a, and Klf4 mRNA expression, and increased c-Myc expression. These changes were reversed with a PARP inhibitor. In agreement with its role in DNA demethylation PARP inhibition increased 5MC levels at the c-Myc promoter. In addition, we found that inhibition of PARP enzymatic activity increased PPARγ promoter binding, and this corresponded to increased Bdnf and Klf4 mRNA expression. Our results suggest that PARP participates in DNA demethylation and reduces PPARγ promoter binding. The current study underscores the importance of PARP in ethanol-induced changes to neurodevelopmental gene expression.

  18. PARP2 Is the Predominant Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase in Arabidopsis DNA Damage and Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Song, Junqi; Keppler, Brian D.; Wise, Robert R.; Bent, Andrew F.

    2015-01-01

    Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) catalyze the transfer of multiple poly(ADP-ribose) units onto target proteins. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation plays a crucial role in a variety of cellular processes including, most prominently, auto-activation of PARP at sites of DNA breaks to activate DNA repair processes. In humans, PARP1 (the founding and most characterized member of the PARP family) accounts for more than 90% of overall cellular PARP activity in response to DNA damage. We have found that, in contrast with animals, in Arabidopsis thaliana PARP2 (At4g02390), rather than PARP1 (At2g31320), makes the greatest contribution to PARP activity and organismal viability in response to genotoxic stresses caused by bleomycin, mitomycin C or gamma-radiation. Plant PARP2 proteins carry SAP DNA binding motifs rather than the zinc finger domains common in plant and animal PARP1 proteins. PARP2 also makes stronger contributions than PARP1 to plant immune responses including restriction of pathogenic Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato growth and reduction of infection-associated DNA double-strand break abundance. For poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) enzymes, we find that Arabidopsis PARG1 and not PARG2 is the major contributor to poly(ADP-ribose) removal from acceptor proteins. The activity or abundance of PARP2 is influenced by PARP1 and PARG1. PARP2 and PARP1 physically interact with each other, and with PARG1 and PARG2, suggesting relatively direct regulatory interactions among these mediators of the balance of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation. As with plant PARP2, plant PARG proteins are also structurally distinct from their animal counterparts. Hence core aspects of plant poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation are mediated by substantially different enzymes than in animals, suggesting the likelihood of substantial differences in regulation. PMID:25950582

  19. Burn and smoke injury activates poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase in circulating leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bartha, Eva; Asmussen, Sven; Olah, Gabor; Rehberg, Sebastian W.; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Traber, Daniel L.; Szabo, Csaba

    2011-01-01

    The nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (PARP) plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of various forms of critical illness. DNA strand breaks induced by oxidative and nitrative stress trigger the activation of PARP, and PARP, in turn, mediates cell death and promotes pro-inflammatory responses. Until recently, most studies focused on the role of PARP in solid organs such as heart, liver, kidney. Here we investigated the effect of burn and smoke inhalation on the levels of poly(ADP-ribosylated) proteins (PAR) in circulating sheep leukocytes ex vivo. Adult female merino sheep were subjected to burn injury (2×20% each flank, 3 degree) and smoke inhalation injury (insufflated with a total of 48 breaths of cotton smoke) under deep anesthesia. Arterial and venous blood were collected at baseline, immediately after the injury and 1-24 hours after the injury. Leukocytes were isolated with the Histopaque method. The levels of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated proteins were determined by Western blotting. The amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS) were quantified by the Oxyblot method. To examine whether PARP activation continues to increasing ex vivo in the leukocytes, blood samples were incubated at room temperature or at 37°C for 3h with or without the PARP inhibitor PJ34. To investigate whether the plasma of burn/smoke animals may trigger PARP activation, burn/smoke plasma was incubated with control leukocytes in vitro. The results show that burn and smoke injury induced a marked PARP activation in circulating leukocytes. The activity was the highest immediately after injury and at 1 hour, and decreased gradually over time. Incubation of whole blood at 37°C for 3 hours significantly increased PAR levels, indicative of the presence of an on-going cell activation process. In conclusion, PARP activity is elevated in leukocytes after burn and smoke inhalation injury and the response parallels the time-course of reactive oxygen species generation in these cells. PMID

  20. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 protects from oxidative stress induced endothelial dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Gebhard, Catherine; Staehli, Barbara E.; Shi, Yi; Camici, Giovanni G.; Akhmedov, Alexander; Hoegger, Lisa; Lohmann, Christine; Matter, Christian M.; Hassa, Paul O.; Hottiger, Michael O.; Malinski, Tadeusz; Luescher, Thomas F.; and others

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The nuclear enzyme PARP-1 is a downstream effector of oxidative stress. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PARP-1 protects from oxidative stress induced endothelial dysfunction. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This effect is mediated through inhibition of vasoconstrictor prostanoid production. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thus, PARP-1 may play a protective role as antioxidant defense mechanism. -- Abstract: Background: Generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a key feature of vascular disease. Activation of the nuclear enzyme poly (adenosine diphosphate [ADP]-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is a downstream effector of oxidative stress. Methods: PARP-1(-/-) and PARP-1(+/+) mice were injected with paraquat (PQ; 10 mg/kg i.p.) to induce intracellular oxidative stress. Aortic rings were suspended in organ chambers for isometric tension recording to analyze vascular function. Results: PQ treatment markedly impaired endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine in PARP-1(-/-), but not PARP-1(+/+) mice (p < 0.0001). Maximal relaxation was 45% in PQ treated PARP-1(-/-) mice compared to 79% in PARP-1(+/+) mice. In contrast, endothelium-independent relaxations to sodium nitroprusside (SNP) were not altered. After PQ treatment, L-NAME enhanced contractions to norepinephrine by 2.0-fold in PARP-1(-/-) mice, and those to acetylcholine by 3.3-fold, respectively, as compared to PARP-1(+/+) mice. PEG-superoxide dismutase (SOD) and PEG-catalase prevented the effect of PQ on endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine in PARP-1(-/-) mice (p < 0.001 vs. PQ treated PARP-1(+/+) mice. Indomethacin restored endothelium-dependent relaxations to acetylcholine in PQ treated PARP-1(-/-) mice (p < 0.05 vs. PQ treated PARP-1(+/+). Conclusion: PARP-1 protects from acute intracellular oxidative stress induced endothelial dysfunction by inhibiting ROS induced production of vasoconstrictor prostanoids.

  1. Disruption of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) protects against stress-evoked immunocompromise.

    PubMed Central

    Drazen, D. L.; Bilu, D.; Edwards, N.; Nelson, R. J.

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Chronic stress, mediated by adrenal hormones, is a major risk factor in the progression and outcome of human disease. While the secretion of adrenal hormones is known to be the primary endocrine mediator of stress-induced immunocompromise, the molecular mechanisms underlying the immunocompromise remain unspecified. Overproduction of the nuclear enzyme, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) has been implicated in the molecular pathway that leads to cell death by energy depletion following stress. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Wild-type (WT) mice and mice with targeted disruption of the gene encoding PARP-1 (PARP-1 -/-) were subjected to 2 wk daily cold-water swim; splenocyte proliferation, anti-KLH IgG, and serum corticosterone concentrations were assessed. Additional mice of each genotype received daily i.p. injections of dexamethasone (DEX) (0.75 mg/kg) for 2 wk, and splenocyte proliferation and anti-KLH IgG were assessed. RESULTS: Splenocyte proliferation and specific antibody concentrations of stressed WT mice were reduced by ~20% of their pre-stress levels. In contrast, PARP-1 -/- mice maintained normal cell-mediated and humoral immune function following enforced cold-water swim stress. PARP-1 -/- mice also failed to compromise immune function following DEX treatment, whereas WT mice displayed significant reductions of immune function following this treatment. CONCLUSIONS: These results provide support for the involvement of PARP activation in immunological damage following physical stress. These results suggest that glucocorticoid-induced immunosuppression may require the activation of PARP in order for apoptosis of immune cells to take place. Taken together, these results suggest that therapies designed to inhibit PARP may prove valuable in the treatment of stress-related diseases. PMID:11788790

  2. Effect of inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase on the radiation response of HeLa S3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Burgman, P.; Konings, A.W. )

    1989-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate possible involvement of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation reactions in X-ray-induced cell killing, repair of potentially lethal damage (PLD), and formation and repair of radiation-induced DNA damage. As tools we used the inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase, 3-aminobenzamide (3AB), and 4-aminobenzamide (4AB). Both drugs inhibited PLD repair equally well but did not increase radiation-induced cell killing when cells were plated immediately after irradiation. 3AB affected repair of radiation-induced DNA damage, while 4AB had no effect. When 3AB was combined with aphidicolin (APC), it was found that the amount of DNA damage increased during the postirradiation incubation period. This means that the presence of 3AB stimulates the formation of DNA damage after X-irradiation. It is concluded that 3AB and 4AB sensitize HeLaS3 cells for radiation-induced cell killing by inhibiting repair of PLD. Because of the different effects of both inhibitors on repair of PLD and repair of radiation-induced DNA damage (a process known to be affected by inhibition of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation), it is concluded that the observed inhibition of PLD repair is not caused by inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase, and that the inhibitors affect repair of PLD and repair of DNA damage through independent mechanisms.

  3. BGP-15, a nicotinic amidoxime derivate protecting heart from ischemia reperfusion injury through modulation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase.

    PubMed

    Szabados, E; Literati-Nagy, P; Farkas, B; Sumegi, B

    2000-04-15

    The protective effect of O-(3-piperidino-2-hydroxy-1-propyl)nicotinic amidoxime (BGP-15) against ischemia-reperfusion-induced injury was studied in the Langendorff heart perfusion system. To understand the molecular mechanism of the cardioprotection, the effect of BGP-15 on ischemic-reperfusion-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, lipid peroxidation single-strand DNA break formation, NAD(+) catabolism, and endogenous ADP-ribosylation reactions were investigated. These studies showed that BGP-15 significantly decreased leakage of lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase, and aspartate aminotransferase in reperfused hearts, and reduced the rate of NAD(+) catabolism. In addition, BGP-15 dramatically decreased the ischemia-reperfusion-induced self-ADP-ribosylation of nuclear poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase(PARP) and the mono-ADP-ribosylation of an endoplasmic reticulum chaperone GRP78. These data raise the possibility that BGP-15 may have a direct inhibitory effect on PARP. This hypothesis was tested on isolated enzyme, and kinetic analysis showed a mixed-type (noncompetitive) inhibition with a K(i) = 57 +/- 6 microM. Furthermore, BGP-15 decreased levels of ROS, lipid peroxidation, and single-strand DNA breaks in reperfused hearts. These data suggest that PARP may be an important molecular target of BGP-15 and that BGP-15 decreases ROS levels and cell injury during ischemia-reperfusion in the heart by inhibiting PARP activity.

  4. Purification and properties of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase from Crithidia fasciculata. Automodification and poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of DNA topoisomerase I.

    PubMed

    Podestá, Dolores; García-Herreros, María I; Cannata, Joaquín J B; Stoppani, Andrés O M; Fernández Villamil, Silvia H

    2004-06-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase has been purified more than 160000-fold from Crithidia fasciculata. This is the first PARP isolated to apparent homogeneity from trypanosomatids. The purified enzyme absolutely required DNA for catalytic activity and histones enhanced it 2.5-fold, when the DNA:histone ratio was 1:1.3. The enzyme required no magnesium or any other metal ion cofactor. The apparent molecular mass of 111 kDa, determined by gel filtration would correspond to a dimer of two identical 55-kDa subunits. Activity was inhibited by nicotinamide, 3-aminobenzamide, theophylline, thymidine, xanthine and hypoxanthine but not by adenosine. The enzyme was localized to the cell nucleus. Our findings suggest that covalent poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of PARP itself or DNA topoisomerase I resulted in the inhibition of their activities and provide an initial biochemical characterization of this covalent post-translational modification in trypanosomatids.

  5. Minocycline protects cardiac myocytes against simulated ischemia-reperfusion injury by inhibiting poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Rong; Kim, Sun Hee; Honbo, Norman; Karliner, Joel S.; Alano, Conrad C.

    2010-01-01

    There is an increase in reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in cardiomyocytes during myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury. This leads to oxidative DNA damage and activation of nuclear repair enzymes such as poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1). PARP-1 activation promotes DNA repair under normal conditions. However, excessive activation of PARP-1 leads to cell death. Here we report that PARP-1 enzymatic activity is directly inhibited by minocycline, and we propose that one mechanism of minocycline cardioprotection is due to PARP-1 inhibition. Using cultured adult rat cardiac myocytes, we evaluated the mechanism of minocycline protection in which PARP-1 activation was induced by simulated ischemia/reperfusion (sI/R) injury using oxygen-glucose deprivation. We found an increase in reactive oxygen species production, PARP-1 activation, and PARP-1-mediated cell death after sI/R. Cell death was significantly reduced by the PARP inhibitors DPQ (10 μM) and PJ-34 (500 nM), or by minocycline (500 nM). Cellular NAD+ depletion and poly(ADP-ribose) formation, which are biochemical markers of PARP-1 activation, were also blocked by minocycline. Finally, sI/R led to induction of the mitochondrial permeability transition (MPT), which was prevented by minocycline. Therefore, we propose that the protective effect of minocycline on cardiac myocyte survival is due to inhibition of PARP-1 activity. PMID:20881608

  6. ExpandplusCrystal Structures of Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase-1 (PARP-1) Zinc Fingers Bound to DNA

    SciTech Connect

    M Langelier; J Planck; S Roy; J Pascal

    2011-12-31

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) has two homologous zinc finger domains, Zn1 and Zn2, that bind to a variety of DNA structures to stimulate poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis activity and to mediate PARP-1 interaction with chromatin. The structural basis for interaction with DNA is unknown, which limits our understanding of PARP-1 regulation and involvement in DNA repair and transcription. Here, we have determined crystal structures for the individual Zn1 and Zn2 domains in complex with a DNA double strand break, providing the first views of PARP-1 zinc fingers bound to DNA. The Zn1-DNA and Zn2-DNA structures establish a novel, bipartite mode of sequence-independent DNA interaction that engages a continuous region of the phosphodiester backbone and the hydrophobic faces of exposed nucleotide bases. Biochemical and cell biological analysis indicate that the Zn1 and Zn2 domains perform distinct functions. The Zn2 domain exhibits high binding affinity to DNA compared with the Zn1 domain. However, the Zn1 domain is essential for DNA-dependent PARP-1 activity in vitro and in vivo, whereas the Zn2 domain is not strictly required. Structural differences between the Zn1-DNA and Zn2-DNA complexes, combined with mutational and structural analysis, indicate that a specialized region of the Zn1 domain is re-configured through the hydrophobic interaction with exposed nucleotide bases to initiate PARP-1 activation.

  7. Mass spectrometry-based functional proteomics of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1.

    PubMed

    Pic, Emilie; Gagné, Jean-Philippe; Poirier, Guy G

    2011-12-01

    PARP-1 is an abundant nuclear protein that plays an essential role in the regulation of many genome integrity and chromatin-based processes, such as DNA repair, replication or transcriptional regulation. PARP-1 modulates the function of chromatin and nuclear proteins through several poly(ADP-ribose) (pADPr)-dependent pathways. Aside from the clearly established role of PARP-1 in the maintenance of genome stability, PARP-1 also emerged as an important regulator that links chromatin functions with extranuclear compartments. pADPr signaling has notably been found to be responsible for PARP-1-mediated mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death. Defining the mechanisms that govern the intrinsic functions of PARP-1 is fundamental to the understanding of signaling networks regulated by pADPr. The emergence of mass spectrometry-based proteomics and its broad applications in the study of biological systems represents an outstanding opportunity to widen our knowledge of the functional spectrum of PARP-1. In this article, we summarize various PARP-1 targeted proteomics studies and proteome-wide analyses that shed light on its protein interaction partners, expression levels and post-translational modifications.

  8. Effects of an inhibitor of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, desmethylselegiline, trientine, and lipoic acid in transgenic ALS mice.

    PubMed

    Andreassen, O A; Dedeoglu, A; Friedlich, A; Ferrante, K L; Hughes, D; Szabo, C; Beal, M F

    2001-04-01

    The development of transgenic mouse models of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) allows the testing of neuroprotective agents. We evaluated the effects of five agents in transgenic mice with the G93A Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase mutation. A novel inhibitor of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase showed no effects on survival. Desmethylselegiline and CGP3466 are agents that exert antiapoptotic effects in vitro by preventing nuclear translocation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. They had no significant effects on survival in the G93A mice. Trientine, a copper chelator, produced a modest significant increase in survival. Similarly administration of lipoic acid in the diet produced a significant improvement in survival. These results therefore provide evidence for potential therapeutic effects of copper chelators and lipoic acid in the treatment of ALS.

  9. Poly ADP-Ribose Polymerase Inhibition Ameliorates Hind Limb Ischemia Reperfusion Injury in a Murine Model of Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Long, Chandler A.; Boloum, Valy; Albadawi, Hassan; Tsai, Shirling; Yoo, Hyung-Jin; Oklu, Rahmi; Goldman, Mitchell H.; Watkins, Michael T.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Diabetes is known to increase poly-ADP-ribose-polymerase (PARP) activity and posttranslational poly-ADP-ribosylation of several regulatory proteins involved in inflammation and energy metabolism. These experiments test the hypothesis that PARP inhibition will modulate hind limb ischemia reperfusion (IR) in a mouse model of type-II diabetes; ameliorate the ribosylation and the activity/transnuclear localization of the key glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). Methods db/db mice underwent 1.5hrs of hind limb ischemia followed by 1, 7, or 24hrs reperfusion. The treatment group received the PARP inhibitor PJ34 (PJ34) over a 24hrs period; the untreated group received Lactated ringer’s (LR) at the same time points. IR muscles were analyzed for indices of PARP activity, fiber injury, metabolic activity, inflammation, GAPDH activity /intracellular localization and poly-ADP-ribosylation of GAPDH. Results PARP activity was significantly lower in the PJ34 treated groups compared to the LR group at 7 and 24 hours reperfusion. There was significantly less muscle fiber injury in the PJ34 treated group compared to LR treated mice at 24 hrs reperfusion. PJ34 lowered levels of select proinflammatory molecules at 7hrs and 24hrs IR. There were significant increases in metabolic activity only at 24 hours IR in the PJ34 group, which temporally correlated with increase in GAPDH activity, decreased GAPDH poly ADP-ribosylation and nuclear translocation of GAPDH. Conclusions PJ34 reduced PARP activity, GAPDH ribosylation, GAPDH translocation, ameliorated muscle fiber injury, and increased metabolic activity following hind limb IR injury in a murine model of type-II diabetes. PARP inhibition might be a therapeutic strategy following IR in diabetic humans. PMID:23549425

  10. Higher cytoplasmic and nuclear poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase expression in familial than in sporadic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Klauke, Marie-Luise; Hoogerbrugge, Nicoline; Budczies, Jan; Bult, Peter; Prinzler, Judith; Radke, Cornelia; van Krieken, J Han J M; Dietel, Manfred; Denkert, Carsten; Müller, Berit Maria

    2012-10-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP) is a key element of the single-base excision pathway for repair of DNA single-strand breaks. To compare the cytoplasmic and nuclear poly(ADP-ribose) expression between familial (BRCA1, BRCA2, or non BRCA1/2) and sporadic breast cancer, we investigated 39 sporadic and 39 familial breast cancer cases. The two groups were matched for hormone receptor status and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 status. Additionally, they were matched by grading with a maximum difference of ±1 degree (e.g., G2 instead of G3). Cytoplasmic PARP (cPARP) expression was significantly higher in familial compared to sporadic breast cancer (P = 0.008, chi-squared test for trends) and a high nuclear PARP expression (nPARP) was significantly more frequently observed in familial breast cancer (64 %) compared with sporadic breast cancer (36 %) (P = 0.005, chi-squared test). The overall PARP expression was significantly higher in familial breast cancer (P = 0.042, chi-squared test). In familial breast cancer, a combination of high cPARP and high nPARP expression is the most common (33 %), whereas in sporadic breast cancer, a combination of low cPARP and intermediate nPARP expression is the most common (39 %). Our results show that the overall PARP expression in familial breast cancer is higher than in sporadic breast cancer which might suggest they might respond better to treatment with PARP inhibitors.

  11. Global Transcriptome Analysis Reveals That Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase 1 Regulates Gene Expression through EZH2

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Kayla A.; Cesaroni, Matteo; Denny, Michael F.; Lupey, Lena N.

    2015-01-01

    Posttranslational modifications, such as poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation), regulate chromatin-modifying enzymes, ultimately affecting gene expression. This study explores the role of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) on global gene expression in a lymphoblastoid B cell line. We found that inhibition of PARP catalytic activity with olaparib resulted in global gene deregulation, affecting approximately 11% of the genes expressed. Gene ontology analysis revealed that PARP could exert these effects through transcription factors and chromatin-remodeling enzymes, including the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) member EZH2. EZH2 mediates the trimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 27 (H3K27me3), a modification associated with chromatin compaction and gene silencing. Both pharmacological inhibition of PARP and knockdown of PARP1 induced the expression of EZH2, which resulted in increased global H3K27me3. Chromatin immunoprecipitation confirmed that PARP1 inhibition led to H3K27me3 deposition at EZH2 target genes, which resulted in gene silencing. Moreover, increased EZH2 expression is attributed to the loss of the occupancy of the transcription repressor E2F4 at the EZH2 promoter following PARP inhibition. Together, these data show that PARP plays an important role in global gene regulation and identifies for the first time a direct role of PARP1 in regulating the expression and function of EZH2. PMID:26370511

  12. BGP-15 - a novel poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor - protects against nephrotoxicity of cisplatin without compromising its antitumor activity.

    PubMed

    Racz, Ildiko; Tory, Kalman; Gallyas, Ferenc; Berente, Zoltán; Osz, Erzsebet; Jaszlits, Laszlo; Bernath, Sandor; Sumegi, Balazs; Rabloczky, Gyorgy; Literati-Nagy, Peter

    2002-03-15

    Nephrotoxicity is one of the major dose limiting side effects of cisplatin chemotherapy. The antitumor and toxic effects are mediated in part by different mechanisms, thus, permitting a selective inhibition of certain side effects. The influence of O-(3-piperidino-2-hydroxy-1-propyl)nicotinic amidoxime (BGP-15) - a poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor - on the nephrotoxicity and antitumor efficacy of cisplatin has been evaluated in experimental models. BGP-15 either blocked or significantly reduced (60-90% in 100-200 mg/kg oral dose) cisplatin induced increase in serum urea and creatinine level in mice and rats and prevented the structural degeneration of the kidney, as well. The nephroprotective effect of BGP-15 treatment was revealed also in living mice by MRI analysis manifesting in the lack of oedema which otherwise developed as a result of cisplatin treatment. The protective effect was accompanied by inhibition of cisplatin-induced poly-ADP-ribosylation and by the restoration of the disturbed energy metabolism. The preservation of ATP level in the kidney was demonstrated in vivo by localized NMR spectroscopy. BGP-15 decreased cisplatin-induced ROS production in rat kidney mitochondria and improved the antioxidant status of the kidney in mice with cisplatin-induced nephropathy. In rat kidney, cisplatin caused a decrease in the level of Bcl-x, a mitochondrial protective protein, and this was normalized by BGP-15 treatment. On the other hand, BGP-15 did not inhibit the antitumor efficacy of cisplatin in cell culture and in transplantable solid tumors of mice. Treatment with BGP-15 increased the mean survival time of cisplatin-treated P-388 leukemia bearing mice from 13 to 19 days. PARP inhibitors have been demonstrated to diminish the consequences of free radical-induced damage, and this is related to the chemoprotective effect of BGP-15, a novel PARP inhibitor. Based on these results, we propose that BGP-15 represents a novel, non-thiol chemoprotective

  13. Importance of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and its cleavage in apoptosis. Lesson from an uncleavable mutant.

    PubMed

    Oliver, F J; de la Rubia, G; Rolli, V; Ruiz-Ruiz, M C; de Murcia, G; Murcia, J M

    1998-12-11

    We have studied the apoptotic response of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-/- cells to different inducers and the consequences of the expression of an uncleavable mutant of PARP on the apoptotic process. The absence of PARP drastically increases the sensitivity of primary bone marrow PARP-/- cells to apoptosis induced by an alkylating agent but not by a topoisomerase I inhibitor CPT-11 or by interleukin-3 removal. cDNA of wild type or of an uncleavable PARP mutant (D214A-PARP) has been introduced into PARP-/- fibroblasts, which were exposed to anti-CD95 or an alkylating agent to induce apoptosis. The expression of D214A-PARP results in a significant delay of cell death upon CD95 stimulation. Morphological analysis shows a retarded cell shrinkage and nuclear condensation. Upon treatment with an alkylating agent, expression of wild-type PARP cDNA into PARP-deficient mouse embryonic fibroblasts results in the restoration of the cell viability, and the D214A-PARP mutant had no further effect on cell recovery. In conclusion, PARP-/- cells are extremely sensitive to apoptosis induced by triggers (like alkylating agents), which activates the base excision repair pathway of DNA, and the cleavage of PARP during apoptosis facilitates cellular disassembly and ensures the completion and irreversibility of the process.

  14. Effect of silicon dioxide on expression of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase mRNA and protein.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ai; Song, Shanshan; Wang, Danlin; Peng, Wei; Tian, Lin

    2009-07-01

    Silicon dioxide induces acute injury and chronic pulmonary fibrosis. International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) listed it as a human carcinogen in 1996. However, the molecular mechanisms to induce cancer are not understood yet. The content of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARP) mRNA and protein in Hela cells treated with concentrations of silicon dioxide up to 400microg/ml was determined by real-time fluorogenetic quantitative PCR (RQ-PCR) and immunofluorescence assay, respectively. MTT assay was used to determine cell viability. The results showed that viability at 400microg/ml silica was significantly decreased but not at lower concentrations. The protein content of gamma-H2AX in silica-treated group was significantly higher than the controls. The PARP mRNA and protein levels were significantly reduced with a dose response manner from the lowest silicon dioxide level. Our findings suggested that silicon dioxide increased the expression of gamma-H2AX and inhibited the expression of PARP mRNA and protein in Hela cells.

  15. Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase 1 (PARP1) Overexpression in Human Breast Cancer Stem Cells and Resistance to Olaparib

    PubMed Central

    Ginestier, Christophe; Bertucci, François; Audebert, Stéphane; Pophillat, Mathieu; Toiron, Yves; Baudelet, Emilie; Finetti, Pascal; Noguchi, Tetsuro; Sobol, Hagay; Birnbaum, Daniel; Borg, Jean-Paul; Charafe-Jauffret, Emmanuelle; Gonçalves, Anthony

    2014-01-01

    Background Breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) have been recognized as playing a major role in various aspects of breast cancer biology. To identify specific biomarkers of BCSCs, we have performed comparative proteomics of BCSC-enriched and mature cancer cell populations from the human breast cancer cell line (BCL), BrCA-MZ-01. Methods ALDEFLUOR assay was used to sort BCSC-enriched (ALDH+) and mature cancer (ALDH−) cell populations. Total proteins were extracted from both fractions and subjected to 2-Dimensional Difference In-Gel Electrophoresis (2-D DIGE). Differentially-expressed spots were excised and proteins were gel-extracted, digested and identified using MALDI-TOF MS. Results 2-D DIGE identified poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) as overexpressed in ALDH+ cells from BrCA-MZ-01. This observation was confirmed by western blot and extended to four additional human BCLs. ALDH+ cells from BRCA1-mutated HCC1937, which had the highest level of PARP1 overexpression, displayed resistance to olaparib, a specific PARP1 inhibitor. Conclusion An unbiased proteomic approach identified PARP1 as upregulated in ALDH+, BCSC-enriched cells from various human BCLs, which may contribute to clinical resistance to PARP inhibitors. PMID:25144364

  16. Mitochondrial Dysfunction Induced by Nuclear Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase-1: a Treatable Cause of Cell Death in Stroke

    PubMed Central

    Baxter, Paul; Chen, Yanting; Xu, Yun; Swanson, Raymond A.

    2014-01-01

    Many drugs targeting excitotoxic cell death have demonstrated robust neuroprotective effects in animal models of cerebral ischemia. However, these neuroprotective effects have almost universally required drug administration at relatively short time intervals after ischemia onset. This finding has translated to clinical trial results; interventions targeting excitotoxicity have had no demonstrable efficacy when initiated hours after ischemia onset, but beneficial effects have been reported with more rapid initiation. Consequently, there continues to be a need for interventions with efficacy at later time points after ischemia. Here, we focus on mitochondrial dysfunction as both a relatively late event in ischemic neuronal death and a recognized cause of delayed neuronal death. Activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is a primary cause of mitochondrial depolarization and subsequent mitochondria-triggered cell death in ischemia reperfusion. PARP-1 consumes cytosolic NAD+, thereby blocking both glycolytic ATP production and delivery of glucose carbon to mitochondria for oxidative metabolism. However, ketone bodies such as pyruvate, beta- and gamma-hydroxybutyrate, and 1,4-butanediol can fuel mitochondrial metabolism in cells with depleted cytosolic NAD+ as long as the mitochondria remain functional. Ketone bodies have repeatedly been shown to be highly effective in preventing cell death in animal models of ischemia, but a rigorous study of the time window of opportunity for this approach remains to be performed. PMID:24323707

  17. Latonduine Analogs Restore F508del-Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator Trafficking through the Modulation of Poly-ADP Ribose Polymerase 3 and Poly-ADP Ribose Polymerase 16 Activity.

    PubMed

    Carlile, Graeme W; Robert, Renaud; Matthes, Elizabeth; Yang, Qi; Solari, Roberto; Hatley, Richard; Edge, Colin M; Hanrahan, John W; Andersen, Raymond; Thomas, David Y; Birault, Véronique

    2016-08-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is a major lethal genetic disease caused by mutations in the CF transmembrane conductance regulator gene (CFTR). This encodes a chloride ion channel on the apical surface of epithelial cells. The most common mutation in CFTR (F508del-CFTR) generates a protein that is misfolded and retained in the endoplasmic reticulum. Identifying small molecules that correct this CFTR trafficking defect is a promising approach in CF therapy. However, to date only modest efficacy has been reported for correctors in clinical trials. We identified the marine sponge metabolite latonduine as a corrector. We have now developed a series of latonduine derivatives that are more potent F508del-CFTR correctors with one (MCG315 [2,3-dihydro-1H-2-benzazepin-1-one]) having 10-fold increased corrector activity and an EC50 of 72.25 nM. We show that the latonduine analogs inhibit poly-ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) isozymes 1, 3, and 16. Further our molecular modeling studies point to the latonduine analogs binding to the PARP nicotinamide-binding domain. We established the relationship between the ability of the latonduine analogs to inhibit PARP-16 and their ability to correct F508del-CFTR trafficking. We show that latonduine can inhibit both PARP-3 and -16 and that this is necessary for CFTR correction. We demonstrate that latonduine triggers correction by regulating the activity of the unfolded protein response activator inositol-requiring enzyme (IRE-1) via modulation of the level of its ribosylation by PARP-16. These results establish latonduines novel site of action as well as its proteostatic mechanism of action. PMID:27193581

  18. 3-aminobenzamide, a poly (ADP ribose) polymerase inhibitor, enhances wound healing in whole body gamma irradiated model.

    PubMed

    El-Hamoly, Tarek; El-Denshary, Ezzeddin S; Saad, Shokry Mohamed; El-Ghazaly, Mona A

    2015-09-01

    The custom use of radiotherapy was found to participate in the development of chronic unhealed wounds. In general, exposure to gamma radiation stimulates the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) that eventually leads to damaging effect. Conversely, overexpression of a nuclear poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase enzyme (PARP) after oxidative insult extremely brings about cellular injury due to excessive consumption of NAD and ATP. Here, we dedicated our study to investigate the role of 3-aminobenzamide (3-AB), a PARP inhibitor, on pregamma irradiated wounds. Two full-thickness (6 mm diameter) wounds were created on the dorsum of Swiss albino mouse. The progression of wound contraction was monitored by capturing daily photo images. Exposure to gamma radiation (6Gy) exacerbated the normal healing of excisional wounds. Remarkably, topical application of 3-AB cream (50 µM) revealed a marked acceleration in the rate of wound contraction. Likewise, PARP inhibition ameliorated the unbalanced oxidative/nitrosative status of granulated skin tissues. Such effect was significantly revealed by the correction of the reduced antioxidant capacity and the enhanced lipid peroxidation, hydrogen peroxide, and myeloperoxidase contents. Moreover, application of 3-AB modified the cutaneous nitrite content throughout healing process. Conversely, the expressions of pro-inflammatory cytokines were down-regulated by PARP inhibition. The mitochondrial ATP content showed a lower consumption rate on 3-AB-treated wound bed as well. In parallel, the mRNA expressions of Sirt-1 and acyl-COA oxidase-2 (ACOX-2) were up-regulated; whom functions control the mitochondrial ATP synthesis and lipid metabolism. The current data suggested that inhibition of PARP-1 enzyme may accelerate the delayed wound healing in whole body gamma irradiated mice by early modifying the oxidative stress as well as the inflammatory response. PMID:26080614

  19. Differential anti-proliferative activities of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors in triple-negative breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Chuang, Hsiao-Ching; Kapuriya, Naval; Kulp, Samuel K.; Chen, Ching-Shih

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent advances in the clinical evaluation of various poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) patients, data defining potential anti-tumor mechanisms beyond PARP inhibition for these agents are lacking. To address this issue, we investigated the effects of four different PARP inhibitors (AG-014699, AZD-2281, ABT-888, and BSI-201) in three genetically distinct TNBC cell lines (MDA-MB-468, MDA-MB-231, and Cal-51). Assays of cell viability and colony formation and flow cytometric analysis were used to determine effects on cell growth and cell cycle progression. PARP-dependent and -independent signaling mechanisms of each PARP inhibitor were investigated by western blotting and shRNA approaches. Potential synergistic interactions between PARP inhibitors and cisplatin in suppressing TNBC cell viability were assessed. These PARP inhibitors exhibited differential anti-tumor activities, with the relative potencies of AG-014699 > AZD-2281 > ABT-888 > BSI-201. The higher potencies of AG-014699 and AZD-2281 were associated with their effects on G2/M arrest and DNA damage as manifested by γ-H2AX formation and, for AG-014699, its unique ability to suppress Stat3 phosphorylation. Abilities of individual PARP inhibitors to sensitize TNBC cells to cisplatin varied to a great extent in a cell context- and cell line-specific manner. Differential activation of signaling pathways suggests that the PARP inhibitors currently in clinical trials have different anti-tumor mechanisms beyond PARP inhibition and these PARP-independent mechanisms warrant further investigation. PMID:22678161

  20. Replication-Dependent Radiosensitization of Human Glioma Cells by Inhibition of Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase: Mechanisms and Therapeutic Potential

    SciTech Connect

    Dungey, Fiona A.; Loeser, Dana A.; Chalmers, Anthony J.

    2008-11-15

    Purpose: Current treatments for glioblastoma multiforme are inadequate and limited by the radiation sensitivity of normal brain. Because glioblastoma multiforme are rapidly proliferating tumors within nondividing normal tissue, the therapeutic ratio might be enhanced by combining radiotherapy with a replication-specific radiosensitizer. KU-0059436 (AZD2281) is a potent and nontoxic inhibitor of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) undergoing a Phase II clinical trial as a single agent. Methods and Materials: Based on previous observations that the radiosensitizing effects of PARP inhibition are more pronounced in dividing cells, we investigated the mechanisms underlying radiosensitization of human glioma cells by KU-0059436, evaluating the replication dependence of this effect and its therapeutic potential. Results: KU-0059436 increased the radiosensitivity of four human glioma cell lines (T98G, U373-MG, UVW, and U87-MG). Radiosensitization was enhanced in populations synchronized in S phase and abrogated by concomitant exposure to aphidicolin. Sensitization was further enhanced when the inhibitor was combined with a fractionated radiation schedule. KU-0059436 delayed repair of radiation-induced DNA breaks and was associated with a replication-dependent increase in {gamma}H2AX and Rad51 foci. Conclusion: The results of our study have shown that KU-0059436 increases radiosensitivity in a replication-dependent manner that is enhanced by fractionation. A mechanism is proposed whereby PARP inhibition increases the incidence of collapsed replication forks after ionizing radiation, generating persistent DNA double-strand breaks. These observations indicate that KU-0059436 is likely to enhance the therapeutic ratio achieved by radiotherapy in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme. A Phase I clinical trial is in development.

  1. Thrombomodulin Is Silenced in Malignant Mesothelioma by a Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase-1-mediated Epigenetic Mechanism*

    PubMed Central

    Nocchi, Linda; Tomasetti, Marco; Amati, Monica; Neuzil, Jiri; Santarelli, Lory; Saccucci, Franca

    2011-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is often complicated by thromboembolic episodes, with thrombomodulin (TM) playing a critical role in the anticoagulant process. Heterogeneous expression of TM has been observed in cancer, and low or no TM expression in cancer cells is associated with poor prognosis. In this study, we analyzed TM expression in biopsies of MM patients and compared them with normal mesothelial tissue. The role of DNA methylation-associated gene silencing in TM expression was investigated. To evaluate poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP1) as responsible for gene promoter epigenetic modifications, nonmalignant mesothelial cells (Met-5A) and MM cells (H28) were silenced for PARP1 and the DNA methylation/acetylation-associated TM expression evaluated. A correlation between low TM expression and high level of TM promoter methylation was found in MM biopsies. Low expression of TM was restored in MM cells by their treatment with 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine and, to a lesser extent, with trichostatin, whereas the epigenetic agents did not affect TM expression in Met-5A cells. Silencing of PARP1 resulted in a strong down-regulation of TM expression in Met-5A cells, while restoring TM expression in H28 cells. PARP1 silencing induced TM promoter methylation in Met-5A cells and demethylation in MM cells, and this was paralleled by corresponding changes in the DNA methyltransferase activity. We propose that methylation of the TM promoter is responsible for silencing of TM expression in MM tissue, a process that is regulated by PARP1. PMID:21489980

  2. Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase-1 (PARP-1) Contributes to the Barrier Function of a Vertebrate Chromatin Insulator*

    PubMed Central

    Aker, Mari; Bomsztyk, Karol; Emery, David W.

    2010-01-01

    The prototypic chromatin insulator cHS4 has proven effective in reducing silencing chromosomal position effects in a variety of settings. Most of this barrier insulator activity has been mapped to a 250-bp core region, as well as to several proteins that bind this region. However, recent studies from our laboratory demonstrated that an extended 400-bp core region of the cHS4 element is necessary to achieve full barrier insulator activity when used as a single copy in the context of recombinant gammaretroviral and lentiviral vectors. In this study, electrophoretic gel mobility shift assays revealed specific DNA-protein binding activities associated with the distal portion of this extended core region. Affinity purification and tandem mass spectrometry studies led to the identification of one of these proteins as poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1). The identity of this binding activity as PARP-1 was subsequently verified by a variety of biochemical studies in vitro and by chromatin immunoprecipitation studies in vivo. Functional studies with gammaretroviral reporter vectors in cell lines and primary mouse bone marrow progenitor cultures showed that cHS4 barrier activity was abrogated upon mutation of the putative PARP-1-binding site or upon treatment with a PARP inhibitor, respectively. The barrier activity of the cHS4 element was also found to be abrogated in studies using bone marrow from Parp1-null mice. Taken together, this study demonstrates that binding of PARP-1 plays a key functional role in the barrier activity of the extended cHS4 insulator core element. PMID:20876582

  3. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 contributes to oxidative stress through downregulation of sirtuin 3 during cisplatin nephrotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sang Pil

    2016-01-01

    Enhanced oxidative stress is a hallmark of cisplatin nephrotoxicity, and inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) attenuates oxidative stress during cisplatin nephrotoxicity; however, the precise mechanisms behind its action remain elusive. Here, using an in vitro model of cisplatin-induced injury to human kidney proximal tubular cells, we demonstrated that the protective effect of PARP1 inhibition on oxidative stress is associated with sirtuin 3 (SIRT3) activation. Exposure to 400 µM cisplatin for 8 hours in cells decreased activity and expression of manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GPX), and SIRT3, while it increased their lysine acetylation. However, treatment with 1 µM PJ34 hydrochloride, a potent PARP1 inhibitor, restored activity and/or expression in those antioxidant enzymes, decreased lysine acetylation of those enzymes, and improved SIRT3 expression and activity in the cisplatin-injured cells. Using transfection with SIRT3 double nickase plasmids, SIRT3-deficient cells given cisplatin did not show the ameliorable effect of PARP1 inhibition on lysine acetylation and activity of antioxidant enzymes, including MnSOD, catalase and GPX. Furthermore, SIRT3 deficiency in cisplatin-injured cells prevented PARP1 inhibition-induced increase in forkhead box O3a transcriptional activity, and upregulation of MnSOD and catalase. Finally, loss of SIRT3 in cisplatin-exposed cells removed the protective effect of PARP1 inhibition against oxidative stress, represented by the concentration of lipid hydroperoxide and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine; and necrotic cell death represented by a percentage of propidium iodide–positively stained cells. Taken together, these results indicate that PARP1 inhibition protects kidney proximal tubular cells against oxidative stress through SIRT3 activation during cisplatin nephrotoxicity. PMID:27722009

  4. The Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase Enzyme Tankyrase Antagonizes Activity of the β-Catenin Destruction Complex through ADP-ribosylation of Axin and APC2.

    PubMed

    Croy, Heather E; Fuller, Caitlyn N; Giannotti, Jemma; Robinson, Paige; Foley, Andrew V A; Yamulla, Robert J; Cosgriff, Sean; Greaves, Bradford D; von Kleeck, Ryan A; An, Hyun Hyung; Powers, Catherine M; Tran, Julie K; Tocker, Aaron M; Jacob, Kimberly D; Davis, Beckley K; Roberts, David M

    2016-06-10

    Most colon cancer cases are initiated by truncating mutations in the tumor suppressor, adenomatous polyposis coli (APC). APC is a critical negative regulator of the Wnt signaling pathway that participates in a multi-protein "destruction complex" to target the key effector protein β-catenin for ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis. Prior work has established that the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) enzyme Tankyrase (TNKS) antagonizes destruction complex activity by promoting degradation of the scaffold protein Axin, and recent work suggests that TNKS inhibition is a promising cancer therapy. We performed a yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) screen and uncovered TNKS as a putative binding partner of Drosophila APC2, suggesting that TNKS may play multiple roles in destruction complex regulation. We find that TNKS binds a C-terminal RPQPSG motif in Drosophila APC2, and that this motif is conserved in human APC2, but not human APC1. In addition, we find that APC2 can recruit TNKS into the β-catenin destruction complex, placing the APC2/TNKS interaction at the correct intracellular location to regulate β-catenin proteolysis. We further show that TNKS directly PARylates both Drosophila Axin and APC2, but that PARylation does not globally regulate APC2 protein levels as it does for Axin. Moreover, TNKS inhibition in colon cancer cells decreases β-catenin signaling, which we find cannot be explained solely through Axin stabilization. Instead, our findings suggest that TNKS regulates destruction complex activity at the level of both Axin and APC2, providing further mechanistic insight into TNKS inhibition as a potential Wnt pathway cancer therapy. PMID:27068743

  5. 3-Aminobenzamide, an inhibitor of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, is a stimulator, not an inhibitor, of DNA repair

    SciTech Connect

    Cleaver, J.E.; Morgan, W.F. )

    1987-10-01

    An inhibitor of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis, 3-aminobenzamide (3AB), at low concentrations was found to reduce strand-break frequencies and increase repair replication in human lymphoid cells damaged by methyl methanoesulfonate. A concentration of 0.1 mM 3AB was adequate to produce a maximum effect on strand-break frequencies and repair replication. This evidence, together with previous measurements, demonstrates that 3AB cannot be regarded as an inhibitor of DNA repair; rather, it actually accelerates the ligation of DNA repair patches. Previous considerations of 3AB as a repair inhibitor may have derived from the use of excessive concentrations above 1 mM that may have stimulated additional damage and from the use of ethyl alcohol as a solvent for 3AB. Interpretations of the role of single-strand breaks and poly(ADP-ribose) in DNA repair, differentiation, and gene activity may need reevaluation because they have frequently been based on an erroneous notion of 3AB as a repair inhibitor, when its mode of action is, in fact, more complex.

  6. Effect of PD 128763, a new potent inhibitor of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, on X-ray-induced cellular recovery processes in Chinese hamster V79 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Arundel-Suto, C.M.; Scavone, S.V.; Turner, W.R.; Suto, M.J.; Sebolt-Leopold, J.S. )

    1991-06-01

    The modifying effects of PD 128763 (3,4-dihydro-5-methyl-1(2H)-isoquinolinone), a potent inhibitor of poly(adenosine-diphosphate (ADP)-ribose) polymerase, on radiation-induced cell killing were examined in Chinese hamster V79 cells. This compound has an IC50 value against the purified enzyme approximately 50X lower than 3-aminobenzamide (3-AB), a widely used specific inhibitor of the enzyme. Exposure of exponentially growing cells to a noncytotoxic concentration (0.5 mM) of PD 128763 for 2 h immediately following X irradiation increased their radiation sensitivity, modifying both the shoulder and the slope of the survival curve. When recovery from sublethal damage and potentially lethal damage was examined in exponential and plateau-phase cells, respectively, postirradiation incubation with 0.5 mM PD 128763 was found not only to inhibit both these processes fully, but also to enhance further the level of radiation-induced cell killing. This is in contrast to the slight effect seen with the less potent inhibitor, 3-AB. The results presented suggest that the mechanism of radiosensitization by PD 128763 is related to the potent inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase by this compound.

  7. Multiple receptor conformation docking, dock pose clustering and 3D QSAR studies on human poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Fatima, Sabiha; Jatavath, Mohan Babu; Bathini, Raju; Sivan, Sree Kanth; Manga, Vijjulatha

    2014-10-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) functions as a DNA damage sensor and signaling molecule. It plays a vital role in the repair of DNA strand breaks induced by radiation and chemotherapeutic drugs; inhibitors of this enzyme have the potential to improve cancer chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Three-dimensional quantitative structure activity relationship (3D QSAR) models were developed using comparative molecular field analysis, comparative molecular similarity indices analysis and docking studies. A set of 88 molecules were docked into the active site of six X-ray crystal structures of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP-1), by a procedure called multiple receptor conformation docking (MRCD), in order to improve the 3D QSAR models through the analysis of binding conformations. The docked poses were clustered to obtain the best receptor binding conformation. These dock poses from clustering were used for 3D QSAR analysis. Based on MRCD and QSAR information, some key features have been identified that explain the observed variance in the activity. Two receptor-based QSAR models were generated; these models showed good internal and external statistical reliability that is evident from the [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]. The identified key features enabled us to design new PARP-1 inhibitors. PMID:25046176

  8. Multiple receptor conformation docking, dock pose clustering and 3D QSAR studies on human poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Fatima, Sabiha; Jatavath, Mohan Babu; Bathini, Raju; Sivan, Sree Kanth; Manga, Vijjulatha

    2014-10-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) functions as a DNA damage sensor and signaling molecule. It plays a vital role in the repair of DNA strand breaks induced by radiation and chemotherapeutic drugs; inhibitors of this enzyme have the potential to improve cancer chemotherapy or radiotherapy. Three-dimensional quantitative structure activity relationship (3D QSAR) models were developed using comparative molecular field analysis, comparative molecular similarity indices analysis and docking studies. A set of 88 molecules were docked into the active site of six X-ray crystal structures of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP-1), by a procedure called multiple receptor conformation docking (MRCD), in order to improve the 3D QSAR models through the analysis of binding conformations. The docked poses were clustered to obtain the best receptor binding conformation. These dock poses from clustering were used for 3D QSAR analysis. Based on MRCD and QSAR information, some key features have been identified that explain the observed variance in the activity. Two receptor-based QSAR models were generated; these models showed good internal and external statistical reliability that is evident from the [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]. The identified key features enabled us to design new PARP-1 inhibitors.

  9. Nudix hydrolases degrade protein-conjugated ADP-ribose

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Casey M.; Thirawatananond, Puchong; Ong, Shao-En; Gabelli, Sandra B.; Leung, Anthony K. L.

    2015-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation refers to the transfer of the ADP-ribose group from NAD+ to target proteins post-translationally, either attached singly as mono(ADP-ribose) (MAR) or in polymeric chains as poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR). Though ADP-ribosylation is therapeutically important, investigation of this protein modification has been limited by a lack of proteomic tools for site identification. Recent work has demonstrated the potential of a tag-based pipeline in which MAR/PAR is hydrolyzed down to phosphoribose, leaving a 212 Dalton tag at the modification site. While the pipeline has been proven effective by multiple groups, a barrier to application has become evident: the enzyme used to transform MAR/PAR into phosphoribose must be purified from the rattlesnake Crotalus adamanteus venom, which is contaminated with proteases detrimental for proteomic applications. Here, we outline the steps necessary to purify snake venom phosphodiesterase I (SVP) and describe two alternatives to SVP—the bacterial Nudix hydrolase EcRppH and human HsNudT16. Importantly, expression and purification schemes for these Nudix enzymes have already been proven, with high-quality yields easily attainable. We demonstrate their utility in identifying ADP-ribosylation sites on Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase 1 (PARP1) with mass spectrometry and discuss a structure-based rationale for this Nudix subclass in degrading protein-conjugated ADP-ribose, including both MAR and PAR. PMID:26669448

  10. Structural basis for the inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases 1 and 2 by BMN 673, a potent inhibitor derived from dihydropyridophthalazinone.

    PubMed

    Aoyagi-Scharber, Mika; Gardberg, Anna S; Yip, Bryan K; Wang, Bing; Shen, Yuqiao; Fitzpatrick, Paul A

    2014-09-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases 1 and 2 (PARP1 and PARP2), which are involved in DNA damage response, are targets of anticancer therapeutics. BMN 673 is a novel PARP1/2 inhibitor with substantially increased PARP-mediated tumor cytotoxicity and is now in later-stage clinical development for BRCA-deficient breast cancers. In co-crystal structures, BMN 673 is anchored to the nicotinamide-binding pocket via an extensive network of hydrogen-bonding and π-stacking interactions, including those mediated by active-site water molecules. The novel di-branched scaffold of BMN 673 extends the binding interactions towards the outer edges of the pocket, which exhibit the least sequence homology among PARP enzymes. The crystallographic structural analyses reported here therefore not only provide critical insights into the molecular basis for the exceptionally high potency of the clinical development candidate BMN 673, but also new opportunities for increasing inhibitor selectivity. PMID:25195882

  11. Structural basis for the inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases 1 and 2 by BMN 673, a potent inhibitor derived from dihydropyridophthalazinone

    PubMed Central

    Aoyagi-Scharber, Mika; Gardberg, Anna S.; Yip, Bryan K.; Wang, Bing; Shen, Yuqiao; Fitzpatrick, Paul A.

    2014-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases 1 and 2 (PARP1 and PARP2), which are involved in DNA damage response, are targets of anticancer therapeutics. BMN 673 is a novel PARP1/2 inhibitor with substantially increased PARP-mediated tumor cytotoxicity and is now in later-stage clinical development for BRCA-deficient breast cancers. In co-crystal structures, BMN 673 is anchored to the nicotinamide-binding pocket via an extensive network of hydrogen-bonding and π-stacking interactions, including those mediated by active-site water molecules. The novel di-branched scaffold of BMN 673 extends the binding interactions towards the outer edges of the pocket, which exhibit the least sequence homology among PARP enzymes. The crystallographic structural analyses reported here therefore not only provide critical insights into the molecular basis for the exceptionally high potency of the clinical development candidate BMN 673, but also new opportunities for increasing inhibitor selectivity. PMID:25195882

  12. Zinc carnosine protects against hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage in WIL2-NS lymphoblastoid cell line independent of poly (ADP-Ribose) polymerase expression.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Theng Choon; Mohammad, Nur Hafiza; Sharif, Razinah

    2014-12-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the ability of zinc carnosine to protect the human lymphoblastoid (WIL2-NS) cell line from hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage. Cells were cultured with medium containing zinc carnosine at the concentrations of 0.4, 4, 16 and 32 μM for 9 days prior to treatment with 30 μM of hydrogen peroxide (30 min). Zinc carnosine at the concentration 16 μM was optimal in protecting cells from hydrogen peroxide-induced cytotoxicity and gave the lowest percentage of apoptotic and necrotic cells. Results showed that zinc carnosine was able to induce glutathione production and protect cells from hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress at all concentration and the highest protection was observed at 32-μM zinc carnosine culture. Cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome assay showed that cells cultured with 4-32 μM of zinc carnosine showed significant reduction in micronuclei formation, nucleoplasmic bridges and nuclear bud frequencies (p < 0.05), suggesting that these concentrations maybe optimal in protecting cells from hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage. However, after being challenged with hydrogen peroxide, no increase in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase expression was observed. Thus, results from this study demonstrate that zinc carnosines possess antioxidant properties and are able to reduce hydrogen peroxide-induced DNA damage in vitro independent of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. Further studies are warranted to understand the mechanism of protection of zinc carnosine against hydrogen peroxide-induced damage.

  13. Chromodomain Helicase DNA-binding Protein 4 (CHD4) Regulates Homologous Recombination DNA Repair, and Its Deficiency Sensitizes Cells to Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase (PARP) Inhibitor Treatment*

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Mei-Ren; Hsieh, Hui-Ju; Dai, Hui; Hung, Wen-Chun; Li, Kaiyi; Peng, Guang; Lin, Shiaw-Yih

    2012-01-01

    To ensure genome stability, cells have evolved a robust defense mechanism to detect, signal, and repair damaged DNA that is generated by exogenous stressors such as ionizing radiation, endogenous stressors such as free radicals, or normal physiological processes such as DNA replication. Homologous recombination (HR) repair is a critical pathway of repairing DNA double strand breaks, and it plays an essential role in maintaining genomic integrity. Previous studies have shown that BRIT1, also known as MCPH1, is a key regulator of HR repair. Here, we report that chromodomain helicase DNA-binding protein 4 (CHD4) is a novel BRIT1 binding partner that regulates the HR repair process. The BRCA1 C-terminal domains of BRIT1 are required for its interaction with CHD4. Depletion of CHD4 and overexpression of the ATPase-dead form of CHD4 impairs the recruitment of BRIT1 to the DNA damage lesions. As a functional consequence, CHD4 deficiency sensitizes cells to double strand break-inducing agents, reduces the recruitment of HR repair factor BRCA1, and impairs HR repair efficiency. We further demonstrate that CHD4-depleted cells are more sensitive to poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor treatment. In response to DNA damage induced by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors, CHD4 deficiency impairs the recruitment of DNA repair proteins BRIT1, BRCA1, and replication protein A at early steps of HR repair. Taken together, our findings identify an important role of CHD4 in controlling HR repair to maintain genome stability and establish the potential therapeutic implications of targeting CHD4 deficiency in tumors. PMID:22219182

  14. GDP-Mannose-4,6-Dehydratase Is a Cytosolic Partner of Tankyrase 1 That Inhibits Its Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Bisht, Kamlesh K.; Dudognon, Charles; Chang, William G.; Sokol, Ethan S.; Ramirez, Alejandro

    2012-01-01

    Tankyrase 1 is a poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) that participates in a broad range of cellular activities due to interaction with multiple binding partners. Tankyrase 1 recognizes a linear six-amino-acid degenerate motif and, hence, has hundreds of potential target proteins. Binding of partner proteins to tankyrase 1 usually results in their poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARsylation) and can lead to ubiquitylation and proteasomal degradation. However, it is not known how tankyrase 1 PARP activity is regulated. Here we identify GDP-mannose 4,6-dehydratase (GMD) as a binding partner of tankyrase 1. GMD is a cytosolic protein required for the first step of fucose synthesis. We show that GMD is complexed to tankyrase 1 in the cytosol throughout interphase, but its association with tankyrase 1 is reduced upon entry into mitosis, when tankyrase 1 binds to its other partners TRF1 (at telomeres) and NuMA (at spindle poles). In contrast to other binding partners, GMD is not PARsylated by tankyrase 1. Indeed, we show that GMD inhibits tankyrase 1 PARP activity in vitro, dependent on the GMD tankyrase 1 binding motif. In vivo, depletion of GMD led to degradation of tankyrase 1, dependent on the catalytic PARP activity of tankyrase 1. We speculate that association of tankyrase 1 with GMD in the cytosol sequesters tankyrase 1 in an inactive stable form that can be tapped by other target proteins as needed. PMID:22645305

  15. The rise and fall of poly(ADP-ribose): An enzymatic perspective.

    PubMed

    Pascal, John M; Ellenberger, Tom

    2015-08-01

    Human cells respond to DNA damage with an acute and transient burst in production of poly(ADP-ribose), a posttranslational modification that expedites damage repair and plays a pivotal role in cell fate decisions. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) and glycohydrolase (PARG) are the key set of enzymes that orchestrate the rise and fall in cellular levels of poly(ADP-ribose). In this perspective, we focus on recent structural and mechanistic insights into the enzymes involved in poly(ADP-ribose) production and turnover, and we highlight important questions that remain to be answered.

  16. Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase 1–Sirtuin 1 Functional Interplay Regulates LPS-Mediated High Mobility Group Box 1 Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Walko, Thomas D; Di Caro, Valentina; Piganelli, Jon; Billiar, Timothy R; Clark, Robert SB; Aneja, Rajesh K

    2014-01-01

    Pathophysiological conditions that lead to the release of the prototypic damage-associated molecular pattern molecule high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) also result in activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1; now known as ADP-ribosyl transferase 1 [ARTD1]). Persistent activation of PARP1 promotes energy failure and cell death. The role of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation in HMGB1 release has been explored previously; however, PARP1 is a versatile enzyme and performs several other functions including cross-talk with another nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide- (NAD+) dependent member of the Class III histone deacetylases (HDACs), sirtuin-1 (SIRT1). Previously, it has been shown that the hyperacetylation of HMGB1 is a seminal event prior to its secretion, a process that also is dependent on HDACs. Therefore, in this study, we seek to determine if PARP1 inhibition alters LPS-mediated HMGB1 hyperacetylation and subsequent secretion due to its effect on SIRT1. We demonstrate in an in vitro model that LPS treatment leads to hyperacetylated HMGB1 with concomitant reduction in nuclear HDAC activity. Treatment with PARP1 inhibitors mitigates the LPS-mediated reduction in nuclear HDAC activity and decreases HMGB1 acetylation. By utilizing an NAD+-based mechanism, PARP1 inhibition increases the activity of SIRT1. Consequently, there is an increased nuclear retention and decreased extracellular secretion of HMGB1. We also demonstrate that PARP1 physically interacts with SIRT1. Further confirmation of this data was obtained in a murine model of sepsis, that is, administration of PJ-34, a specific PARP1 inhibitor, led to decreased serum HMGB1 concentrations in mice subjected to cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) as compared with untreated mice. In conclusion, our study provides new insights in understanding the molecular mechanisms of HMGB1 secretion in sepsis. PMID:25517228

  17. Increased transcript level of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP-1) in human tricuspid compared with bicuspid aortic valves correlates with the stenosis severity

    SciTech Connect

    Nagy, Edit; Caidahl, Kenneth; Franco-Cereceda, Anders; Baeck, Magnus

    2012-04-13

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Oxidative stress has been implicated in the pathomechanism of calcific aortic valve stenosis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We assessed the transcript levels for PARP-1 (poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase), acts as a DNA damage nick sensor in stenotic valves. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Early stage of diseased tricuspid valves exhibited higher mRNA levels for PARP-1 compared to bicuspid valves. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The mRNA levels for PARP-1 inversely correlated with the clinical stenosis severity in tricuspid valves. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Our data demonstrated that DNA damage pathways might be associated with stenosis severity only in tricuspid valves. -- Abstract: Oxidative stress may contribute to the hemodynamic progression of aortic valve stenosis, and is associated with activation of the nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) 1. The aim of the present study was to assess the transcriptional profile and the topological distribution of PARP-1 in human aortic valves, and its relation to the stenosis severity. Human stenotic aortic valves were obtained from 46 patients undergoing aortic valve replacement surgery and used for mRNA extraction followed by quantitative real-time PCR to correlate the PARP-1 expression levels with the non invasive hemodynamic parameters quantifying the stenosis severity. Primary isolated valvular interstitial cells (VICs) were used to explore the effects of cytokines and leukotriene C{sub 4} (LTC{sub 4}) on valvular PARP-1 expression. The thickened areas of stenotic valves with tricuspid morphology expressed significantly higher levels of PARP-1 mRNA compared with the corresponding part of bicuspid valves (0.501 vs 0.243, P = 0.01). Furthermore, the quantitative gene expression levels of PARP-1 were inversely correlated with the aortic valve area (AVA) (r = -0.46, P = 0.0469) and AVA indexed for body surface area (BSA) (r = -0.498; P = 0.0298) only in tricuspid aortic valves

  18. Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase 1 Interacts with Nuclear Respiratory Factor 1 (NRF-1) and Plays a Role in NRF-1 Transcriptional Regulation*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Mohammad B.; Ji, Ping; Anish, Ramakrishnan; Jacobson, Raymond H.; Takada, Shinako

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1) is one of the key transcriptional activators for nuclear-coded genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and function as well as for many housekeeping genes. A transcriptional co-activator PGC-1 and its related family member PRC have previously been shown to interact with NRF-1 and co-activate NRF-1. We show here that NRF-1 can also directly interact with poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) and co-purify the PARP-1·DNA-PK·Ku80·Ku70·topoisomerase IIβ-containing protein complex. Our in vitro binding experiments show that DNA-binding/dimerization domain of NRF-1 and the N-terminal half of PARP-1, which contains two Zinc fingers and the auto-modification domain, are responsible for the interaction, and that this interaction occurs with or without PARP-1 poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation). DNA-bound NRF-1 can form a complex with PARP-1, suggesting that NRF-1 can recruit the PARP-1·DNA-PK·Ku80·Ku70·topoisomerase IIβ-containing protein complex to the promoter. PARP-1 can also PARylate the DNA-binding domain of NRF-1 and negatively regulate NRF-1·PARP-1 interaction. Transient transfection and chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments suggest that PARP-1 plays a role during transcriptional activation by NRF-1. Our finding identifies a new aspect of transcriptional regulation used by NRF-1. PMID:19181665

  19. Induction of Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase in Mouse Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Exposed to 900 MHz Radiofrequency Fields: Preliminary Observations

    PubMed Central

    He, Qina; Sun, Yulong; Zong, Lin; Tong, Jian; Cao, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Background. Several investigators have reported increased levels of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), a nuclear enzyme which plays an important role in the repair of damaged DNA, in cells exposed to extremely low dose ionizing radiation which does not cause measurable DNA damage. Objective. To examine whether exposure of the cells to nonionizing radiofrequency fields (RF) is capable of increasing messenger RNA of PARP-1 and its protein levels in mouse bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs). Methods. BMSCs were exposed to 900 MHz RF at 120 μW/cm2 power intensity for 3 hours/day for 5 days. PARP-1 mRNA and its protein levels were examined at 0, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 6, 8, and 10 hours after exposure using RT-PCR and Western blot analyses. Sham-exposed (SH) cells and those exposed to ionizing radiation were used as unexposed and positive control cells. Results. BMSCs exposed to RF showed significantly increased expression of PARP-1 mRNA and its protein levels after exposure to RF while such changes were not observed in SH-exposed cells. Conclusion. Nonionizing RF exposure is capable of inducing PARP-1. PMID:27190989

  20. Contributions of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 and -2 to nuclear translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor and injury from focal cerebral ischemia.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoling; Klaus, Judith A; Zhang, Jian; Xu, Zhenfeng; Kibler, Kathleen K; Andrabi, Shaida A; Rao, Karthik; Yang, Zeng-Jin; Dawson, Ted M; Dawson, Valina L; Koehler, Raymond C

    2010-05-01

    Excessive oxidative damage to DNA leads to activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), accumulation of PAR polymers, translocation of apoptosis-inducing factor (AIF) from mitochondria to the nucleus, and cell death. In this study, we compared the effect of gene deletion of PARP-1 and PARP-2, enzymes activated by DNA oxidative damage, in male mice subjected to 2 h of focal cerebral ischemia. Infarct volume at 3 days of reperfusion was markedly decreased to a similar extent in PARP-1- and PARP-2-null mice. The ischemia-induced increase in nuclear AIF accumulation was largely suppressed in both knockout genotypes. The transient increase in PAR during early reperfusion was nearly blocked in PARP-1-null mice, but only moderately decreased at 1-h reperfusion in PARP-2-null mice. Differences in the tissue volume at risk, as assessed by arterial casts and autoradiographic analysis of regional blood flow, did not fully account for the large reductions in AIF translocation and infarct volume in both PARP null mice. Cell death was attenuated in PARP-2-null neurons exposed to a submaximal concentration of 100 microM NMDA for 5 min, but not in those exposed to a near-maximal toxic concentration of 500 microM NMDA. We conclude that PARP-2 contributes substantially to nuclear translocation of AIF and infarct size after transient focal cerebral ischemia in male mice, but that protection is disproportionate to the attenuation of overall PARP activity.

  1. Tankyrase 2 Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase Domain-Deleted Mice Exhibit Growth Defects but Have Normal Telomere Length and Capping

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiao, Susan J; Poitras, Marc; Cook, Brandoch; Liu, Yie; Smith, Susan

    2006-03-01

    Regulation of telomere length maintenance and capping are a critical cell functions in both normal and tumor cells. Tankyrase 2 (Tnks2) is a poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) that has been shown to modify itself and TRF1, a telomere-binding protein. We show here by overexpression studies that tankyrase 2, like its closely related homolog tankyrase 1, can function as a positive regulator of telomere length in human cells, dependent on its catalytic PARP activity. To study the role of Tnks2 in vivo, we generated mice with the Tnks2 PARP domain deleted. These mice are viable and fertile but display a growth retardation phenotype. Telomere analysis by quantitative fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), flow-FISH, and restriction fragment analysis showed no change in telomere length or telomere capping in these mice. To determine the requirement foTnks2 in long-term maintenance of telomeres, we generated embryonic stem cells with the Tnks2 PARP domain deleted and observed no change, even upon prolonged growth, in telomere length or telomere capping. Together these results suggest that Tnkjs2 has a role in normal growth and development but is not essential for telomere length maintenance or telomere capping in mice.

  2. Doxorubicin-induced necrosis is mediated by poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) but is independent of p53

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Hyeon-Jun; Kwon, Hyuk-Kwon; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Gui, Xiangai; Achek, Asma; Kim, Jae-Ho; Choi, Sangdun

    2015-01-01

    Necrosis, unregulated cell death, is characterized by plasma membrane rupture as well as nuclear and cellular swelling. However, it has recently been reported that necrosis is a regulated form of cell death mediated by poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1). PARP1 is thought to mediate necrosis by inducing DNA damage, although this remains unconfirmed. In this study, we examined the mechanisms of PARP1-mediated necrosis following doxorubicin (DOX)-induced DNA damage in human kidney proximal tubular (HK-2) cells. DOX initiated DNA damage response (DDR) and upregulated PARP1 and p53 expression, resulting in morphological changes similar to those observed during necrosis. Additionally, DOX induced mitochondrial hyper-activation, as evidenced by increased mitochondrial respiration and cytosolic ATP (cATP) production. However, DOX affected mitochondrial mass. DOX-induced DNA damage, cytosolic reactive oxygen species (cROS) generation, and mitochondrial hyper-activation decreased in cells with inhibited PARP1 expression, while generation of nitric oxide (NO) and mitochondrial ROS (mROS) remained unaffected. Moreover, DOX-induced DNA damage, cell cycle changes, and oxidative stress were not affected by p53 inhibition. These findings suggest that DNA damage induced necrosis through a PARP1-dependent and p53-independent pathway. PMID:26522181

  3. The nuclear protein Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 3 (AtPARP3) is required for seed storability in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Rissel, D; Losch, J; Peiter, E

    2014-11-01

    The deterioration of seeds during prolonged storage results in a reduction of viability and germination rate. DNA damage is one of the major cellular defects associated with seed deterioration. It is provoked by the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) even in the quiescent state of the desiccated seed. In contrast to other stages of seed life, DNA repair during storage is hindered through the low seed water content; thereby DNA lesions can accumulate. To allow subsequent seedling development, DNA repair has thus to be initiated immediately upon imbibition. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) are important components in the DNA damage response in humans. Arabidopsis thaliana contains three homologues to the human HsPARP1 protein. Of these three, only AtPARP3 was very highly expressed in seeds. Histochemical GUS staining of embryos and endosperm layers revealed strong promoter activity of AtPARP3 during all steps of germination. This coincided with high ROS activity and indicated a role of the nuclear-localised AtPARP3 in DNA repair during germination. Accordingly, stored parp3-1 mutant seeds lacking AtPARP3 expression displayed a delay in germination as compared to Col-0 wild-type seeds. A controlled deterioration test showed that the mutant seeds were hypersensitive to unfavourable storage conditions. The results demonstrate that AtPARP3 is an important component of seed storability and viability.

  4. Prevention of rt-PA induced blood-brain barrier component degradation by the poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase inhibitor PJ34 after ischemic stroke in mice.

    PubMed

    Teng, Fei; Beray-Berthat, Virginie; Coqueran, Bérard; Lesbats, Clémentine; Kuntz, Mélanie; Palmier, Bruno; Garraud, Marie; Bedfert, Cyrielle; Slane, Niamh; Bérézowski, Vincent; Szeremeta, Frédéric; Hachani, Johan; Scherman, Daniel; Plotkine, Michel; Doan, Bich-Thuy; Marchand-Leroux, Catherine; Margaill, Isabelle

    2013-10-01

    Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rt-PA) is the only pharmacological treatment approved for thrombolysis in patients suffering from ischemic stroke, but its administration aggravates the risk of hemorrhagic transformations. Experimental data demonstrated that rt-PA increases the activity of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (PARP). The aim of the present study was to investigate whether PJ34, a potent (PARP) inhibitor, protects the blood-brain barrier components from rt-PA toxicity. In our mouse model of cerebral ischemia, administration of rt-PA (10 mg/kg, i.v.) 6h after ischemia aggravated the post-ischemic degradation of ZO-1, claudin-5 and VE-cadherin, increased the hemorrhagic transformations (assessed by brain hemoglobin content and magnetic resonance imaging). Furthermore, rt-PA also aggravated ischemia-induced functional deficits. Combining PJ34 with rt-PA preserved the expression of ZO-1, claudin-5 and VE-cadherin, reduced the hemorrhagic transformations and improved the sensorimotor performances. In vitro studies also demonstrated that PJ34 crosses the blood-brain barrier and may thus exert its protective effect by acting on endothelial and/or parenchymal cells. Thus, co-treatment with a PARP inhibitor seems to be a promising strategy to reduce rt-PA-induced vascular toxicity after stroke.

  5. Potentiation of anti-cancer agent cytotoxicity by the potent poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors NU1025 and NU1064.

    PubMed Central

    Bowman, K. J.; White, A.; Golding, B. T.; Griffin, R. J.; Curtin, N. J.

    1998-01-01

    The ability of the potent poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor, NU1025 (8-hydroxy-2-methyl-quinazolin-4-[3H]one) to potentiate the cytotoxicity of a panel of mechanistically diverse anti-cancer agents was evaluated in L1210 cells. NU1025 enhanced the cytotoxicity of the DNA-methylating agent MTIC, gamma-irradiation and bleomycin 3.5-, 1.4- and 2-fold respectively. The cytotoxicities of the thymidylate synthase inhibitor, nolatrexed, and the cytotoxic nucleoside, gemcitabine, were not increased. Potentiation of MTIC cytotoxicity by a delayed exposure to NU1025 was equally effective as by a simultaneous exposure to NU1025, indicating that the effects of NU1025 were mediated by an inhibition of the cellular recovery. The recovery from potentially lethal gamma-irradiation damage cytotoxicity in plateau-phase cells was also inhibited by NU1025. Investigation of DNA strand breakage and repair in gamma-irradiated cells by alkaline elution demonstrated that NU1025 caused a marked retardation of DNA repair. A structurally different PARP inhibitor, NU1064 (2-methylbenzimidazole-4-carboxamide), also potentiated the cytotoxicity of MTIC, to a similar extent to NU1025. NU1064 potentiated a sublethal concentration of a DNA methylating agent in a concentration-dependent manner. Collectively, these data suggest that the most suitable cytotoxic agents for use in combination with PARP inhibitors are methylating agents, bleomycin and ionizing radiation, but not anti-metabolites. PMID:9823965

  6. The nuclear protein Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 3 (AtPARP3) is required for seed storability in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Rissel, D; Losch, J; Peiter, E

    2014-11-01

    The deterioration of seeds during prolonged storage results in a reduction of viability and germination rate. DNA damage is one of the major cellular defects associated with seed deterioration. It is provoked by the formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) even in the quiescent state of the desiccated seed. In contrast to other stages of seed life, DNA repair during storage is hindered through the low seed water content; thereby DNA lesions can accumulate. To allow subsequent seedling development, DNA repair has thus to be initiated immediately upon imbibition. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) are important components in the DNA damage response in humans. Arabidopsis thaliana contains three homologues to the human HsPARP1 protein. Of these three, only AtPARP3 was very highly expressed in seeds. Histochemical GUS staining of embryos and endosperm layers revealed strong promoter activity of AtPARP3 during all steps of germination. This coincided with high ROS activity and indicated a role of the nuclear-localised AtPARP3 in DNA repair during germination. Accordingly, stored parp3-1 mutant seeds lacking AtPARP3 expression displayed a delay in germination as compared to Col-0 wild-type seeds. A controlled deterioration test showed that the mutant seeds were hypersensitive to unfavourable storage conditions. The results demonstrate that AtPARP3 is an important component of seed storability and viability. PMID:24533577

  7. Hydrogen-rich saline reduces cell death through inhibition of DNA oxidative stress and overactivation of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 in retinal ischemia-reperfusion injury

    PubMed Central

    LIU, HONGWEI; HUA, NING; XIE, KELIANG; ZHAO, TINGTING; YU, YONGHAO

    2015-01-01

    Overactivation of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1), as a result of sustained DNA oxidation in ischemia-reperfusion injury, triggers programmed cell necrosis and apoptosis. The present study was conducted to demonstrate whether hydrogen-rich saline (HRS) has a neuroprotective effect on retinal ischemia reperfusion (RIR) injury through inhibition of PARP-1 activation. RIR was induced by transient elevation of intraocular pressure in rats. HRS (5 ml/kg) was administered peritoneally every day from the beginning of reperfusion in RIR rats until the rats were sacrificed. Retinal damage and cell death was determined using hematoxylin and eosin and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling staining. DNA oxidative stress was evaluated by immunofluorescence staining of 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine. In addition, the expression of PARP-1 and caspase-3 was investigated by western blot analysis and/or immunohistochemical staining. The results demonstrated that HRS administration improved morphological alterations and reduced apoptosis following RIR injury. Furthermore, the present study found that HRS alleviated DNA oxidation and PARP-1 overactivation in RIR rats. HRS can protect RIR injury by inhibition of PARP-1, which may be involved in DNA oxidative stress and caspase-3-mediated apoptosis. PMID:25954991

  8. Hydroxyurea-induced replication stress causes poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-2 accumulation and changes its intranuclear location in root meristems of Vicia faba.

    PubMed

    Rybaczek, Dorota

    2016-07-01

    Replication stress induced by 24 and 48h exposure to 2.5mM hydroxyurea (HU) increased the activity of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-2 (PARP-2; EC 2.4.2.30) in root meristem cells of Vicia faba. An increase in the number of PARP-2 foci was accompanied by their delocalization from peripheral areas to the interior of the nucleus. Our results indicate that the increase in PARP-2 was connected with an increase in S139-phosphorylated H2AX histones. The findings suggest the possible role of PARP-2 in replication stress. We also confirm that the intranuclear location of PARP-2 depends on the duration of HU-induced replication stress, confirming the role of PARP-2 as an indicator of stress intensity. Finally, we conclude that the more intense the HU-mediated replication stress, the greater the probability of PARP-2 activation or H2AXS139 phosphorylation, but also the greater the chance of increasing the efficiency of repair processes and a return to normal cell cycle progression. PMID:27155387

  9. Protective actions of PJ34, a poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase inhibitor, on the blood-brain barrier after traumatic brain injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Tao, X; Chen, X; Hao, S; Hou, Z; Lu, T; Sun, M; Liu, B

    2015-04-16

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) is activated by oxidative stress and plays an important role in traumatic brain injury (TBI). The objective of this study was to investigate whether PARP activation participated in the blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption and edema formation in a mouse model of controlled cortical impact (CCI). N-(6-oxo-5,6-dihydrophenanthridin-2-yl)-N,N-dimethylacetamide (PJ34) (10 mg/kg), a selective PARP inhibitor, was administered intraperitoneally at 5 min and 8 h after experimental CCI. After 6 h and 24 h of CCI, the permeability of the cortical BBB was determined after Evans Blue administration. The water content of the brain was also measured. Treatment with PJ34 markedly attenuated the permeability of the BBB and decreased the brain edema at 6 h and 24 h after CCI. Our data showed the up-regulation of nuclear factor-κB in cytosolic fractions and nuclear fractions in the injured cortex, and these changes were reversed by PJ34. Moreover, PJ34 significantly lessened the activities of myeloperoxidase and the levels of matrix metalloproteinase-9, enhanced the levels of occludin, laminin, collagen IV and integrin β1, reduced neurological deficits, decreased the contusion volume, and attenuated the necrotic and apoptotic neuronal cell death. These data suggest the protective effects of PJ34 on BBB integrity and cell death during acute TBI. PMID:25668593

  10. Hydrogen-rich saline reduces cell death through inhibition of DNA oxidative stress and overactivation of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 in retinal ischemia-reperfusion injury.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongwei; Hua, Ning; Xie, Keliang; Zhao, Tingting; Yu, Yonghao

    2015-08-01

    Overactivation of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1), as a result of sustained DNA oxidation in ischemia-reperfusion injury, triggers programmed cell necrosis and apoptosis. The present study was conducted to demonstrate whether hydrogen-rich saline (HRS) has a neuroprotective effect on retinal ischemia reperfusion (RIR) injury through inhibition of PARP-1 activation. RIR was induced by transient elevation of intraocular pressure in rats. HRS (5 ml/kg) was administered peritoneally every day from the beginning of reperfusion in RIR rats until the rats were sacrificed. Retinal damage and cell death was determined using hematoxylin and eosin and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling staining. DNA oxidative stress was evaluated by immunofluorescence staining of 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine. In addition, the expression of PARP-1 and caspase-3 was investigated by western blot analysis and/or immunohistochemical staining. The results demonstrated that HRS administration improved morphological alterations and reduced apoptosis following RIR injury. Furthermore, the present study found that HRS alleviated DNA oxidation and PARP-1 overactivation in RIR rats. HRS can protect RIR injury by inhibition of PARP-1, which may be involved in DNA oxidative stress and caspase-3-mediated apoptosis.

  11. Structural basis for the inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases 1 and 2 by BMN 673, a potent inhibitor derived from dihydropyridophthalazinone

    SciTech Connect

    Aoyagi-Scharber, Mika; Gardberg, Anna S.; Yip, Bryan K.; Wang, Bing; Shen, Yuqiao; Fitzpatrick, Paul A.

    2014-08-29

    BMN 673, a novel PARP1/2 inhibitor in clinical development with substantial tumor cytotoxicity, forms extensive hydrogen-bonding and π-stacking in the nicotinamide pocket, with its unique disubstituted scaffold extending towards the less conserved edges of the pocket. These interactions might provide structural insight into the ability of BMN 673 to both inhibit catalysis and affect DNA-binding activity. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases 1 and 2 (PARP1 and PARP2), which are involved in DNA damage response, are targets of anticancer therapeutics. BMN 673 is a novel PARP1/2 inhibitor with substantially increased PARP-mediated tumor cytotoxicity and is now in later-stage clinical development for BRCA-deficient breast cancers. In co-crystal structures, BMN 673 is anchored to the nicotinamide-binding pocket via an extensive network of hydrogen-bonding and π-stacking interactions, including those mediated by active-site water molecules. The novel di-branched scaffold of BMN 673 extends the binding interactions towards the outer edges of the pocket, which exhibit the least sequence homology among PARP enzymes. The crystallographic structural analyses reported here therefore not only provide critical insights into the molecular basis for the exceptionally high potency of the clinical development candidate BMN 673, but also new opportunities for increasing inhibitor selectivity.

  12. Reprogramming cellular events by poly(ADP-ribose)-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pic, Émilie; Ethier, Chantal; Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.; Masson, Jean-Yves; Poirier, Guy G.; Gagné, Jean-Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is a posttranslational modification catalyzed by the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs). These enzymes covalently modify glutamic, aspartic and lysine amino acid side chains of acceptor proteins by the sequential addition of ADP-ribose (ADPr) units. The poly(ADP-ribose) (pADPr) polymers formed alter the physico-chemical characteristics of the substrate with functional consequences on its biological activities. Recently, non-covalent binding to pADPr has emerged as a key mechanism to modulate and coordinate several intracellular pathways including the DNA damage response, protein stability and cell death. In this review, we describe the basis of non-covalent binding to pADPr that has led to the emerging concept of pADPr-responsive signaling pathways. This review emphasizes the structural elements and the modular strategies developed by pADPr-binding proteins to exert a fine-tuned control of a variety of pathways. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation reactions are highly regulated processes, both spatially and temporally, for which at least four specialized pADPr-binding modules accommodate different pADPr structures and reprogram protein functions. In this review, we highlight the role of well-characterized and newly discovered pADPr-binding modules in a diverse set of physiological functions. PMID:23268355

  13. Deficiency in Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase-1 (PARP-1) Accelerates Aging and Spontaneous Carcinogenesis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Piskunova, Tatiana S.; Yurova, Maria N.; Ovsyannikov, Anton I.; Semenchenko, Anna V.; Zabezhinski, Mark A.; Popovich, Irina G.; Wang, Zhao-Qi; Anisimov, Vladimir N.

    2008-01-01

    Genetic and biochemical studies have shown that PARP-1 and poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation play an important role in DNA repair, genomic stability, cell death, inflammation, telomere maintenance, and suppressing tumorigenesis, suggesting that the homeostasis of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation and PARP-1 may also play an important role in aging. Here we show that PARP-1−/− mice exhibit a reduction of life span and a significant increase of population aging rate. Analysis of noninvasive parameters, including body weight gain, body temperature, estrous function, behavior, and a number of biochemical indices suggests the acceleration of biological aging in PARP-1−/− mice. The incidence of spontaneous tumors in both PARP-1−/− and PARP-1+/+ groups is similar; however, malignant tumors including uterine tumors, lung adenocarcinomas and hepatocellular carcinomas, develop at a significantly higher frequency in PARP-1−/− mice than PARP-1+/+ mice (72% and 49%, resp.; P < .05). In addition, spontaneous tumors appear earlier in PARP-1−/− mice compared to the wild type group. Histopathological studies revealed a wide spectrum of tumors in uterus, ovaries, liver, lungs, mammary gland, soft tissues, and lymphoid organs in both groups of the mice. These results demonstrate that inactivation of DNA repair gene PARP-1 in mice leads to acceleration of aging, shortened life span, and increased spontaneous carcinogenesis. PMID:19415146

  14. Structure and function of the ARH family of ADP-ribose-acceptor hydrolases

    PubMed Central

    Mashimo, Masato; Kato, Jiro; Moss, Joel

    2014-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation is a post-translational protein modification, in which ADP-ribose is transferred from nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) to specific acceptors, thereby altering their activities. The ADP-ribose transfer reactions are divided into mono- and poly-(ADP-ribosyl)ation. Cellular ADP-ribosylation levels are tightly regulated by enzymes that transfer ADP-ribose to acceptor proteins (e.g. ADP-ribosyltransferases, poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARP)) and those that cleave the linkage between ADP-ribose and acceptor (e.g. ADP-ribosyl-acceptor hydrolases (ARH), poly-(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolases (PARG)), thereby constituting an ADP-ribosylation cycle. This review summarizes current findings related to the ARH family of proteins. This family comprises three members (ARH1-3) with similar size (39 kDa) and amino acid sequence. ARH1 catalyzes the hydrolysis of the N-glycosidic bond of mono-(ADP-ribosyl)ated arginine. ARH3 hydrolyzes poly-(ADP-ribose) (PAR) and O-acetyl-ADP-ribose. The different substrate specificities of ARH1 and ARH3 contribute to their unique roles in the cell. Based on a phenotype analysis of ARH1−/− and ARH3−/− mice, ARH1 is involved in the action by bacterial toxins as well as in tumorigenesis. ARH3 participates in the degradation of PAR that is synthesized by PARP1 in response to oxidative stress-induced DNA damage; this hydrolytic reaction suppresses PAR-mediated cell death, a pathway termed parthanatos. PMID:24746921

  15. The angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor captopril inhibits poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase activation and exerts beneficial effects in an ovine model of burn and smoke injury

    PubMed Central

    Asmussen, Sven; Bartha, Eva; Olah, Gabor; Sbrana, Elena; Rehberg, Sebastian W.; Yamamoto, Yusuke; Enkhbaatar, Perenlei; Hawkins, Hal K.; Ito, Hiroshi; Cox, Robert A.; Traber, Lillian D.; Traber, Daniel L.; Szabo, Csaba

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the effect of the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor captopril in a clinically relevant ovine model of smoke and burn injury, with special reference to oxidative stress, activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase in the lung and in circulating leukocytes. Female, adult sheep (28–40 kg) were divided into 3 groups. After tracheostomy and under deep anesthesia both vehicle-control (n=5) and captopril (20 mg/kg/d, iv., starting 0.5 hour before the injury) treated (n=5) groups were subjected to 2×20%, third degree burn injury and were insufflated with 48 breaths of cotton smoke. A sham group not receiving burn/smoke was also studied (n=5). Animals were mechanically ventilated and fluid resuscitated for 24 h in the awake state. Burn and smoke injury resulted in an upregulation of ACE in the lung, evidenced by immunohistochemical determination and Western blotting. Burn and smoke injury resulted in pulmonary dysfunction, as well as systemic hemodynamic alterations. Captopril treatment of burn and smoke animals improved PaO2/FiO2 ratio and pulmonary shunt fraction and reduced the degree of lung edema. There was a marked increase in PAR levels in circulating leukocytes after burn/smoke injury, which was significantly decreased by captopril. The pulmonary level of ACE and the elevated pulmonary levels of TGF-β in response to burn and smoke injury were significantly decreased by captopril treatment. Our results suggest that the ACE inhibitor captopril exerts beneficial effects on the pulmonary function in burn/smoke injury. The effects of the ACE inhibitor may be related to the prevention of ROS-induced PARP over-activation. ACE inhibition may also exert additional beneficial effects by inhibiting the expression of the pro-fibrotic mediator TGF-β. PMID:21701415

  16. Glucagon-Like Peptide 1 Protects against Hyperglycemic-Induced Endothelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition and Improves Myocardial Dysfunction by Suppressing Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase 1 Activity

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Fei; Zhang, Guang-hao; Feng, Min; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Jia-ning; Dong, Wen-qian; Zhang, Cheng; Zhang, Yun; Chen, Li; Zhang, Ming-Xiang

    2015-01-01

    Under high glucose conditions, endothelial cells respond by acquiring fibroblast characteristics, that is, endothelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EndMT), contributing to diabetic cardiac fibrosis. Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) has cardioprotective properties independent of its glucose-lowering effect. However, the potential mechanism has not been fully clarified. Here we investigated whether GLP-1 inhibits myocardial EndMT in diabetic mice and whether this is mediated by suppressing poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1). Streptozotocin diabetic C57BL/6 mice were treated with or without GLP-1 analog (24 nmol/kg daily) for 24 wks. Transthoracic echocardiography was performed to assess cardiac function. Human aortic endothelial cells (HAECs) were cultured in normal glucose (NG) (5.5 mmol/L) or high glucose (HG) (30 mmol/L) medium with or without GLP-1analog. Immunofluorescent staining and Western blot were performed to evaluate EndMT and PARP-1 activity. Diabetes mellitus attenuated cardiac function and increased cardiac fibrosis. Treatment with the GLP-1 analog improved diabetes mellitus–related cardiac dysfunction and cardiac fibrosis. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that hyperglycemia markedly increased the percentage of von Willebrand factor (vWF)+/alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA)+ cells in total α-SMA+ cells in diabetic hearts compared with controls, which was attenuated by GLP-1 analog treatment. In cultured HAECs, immunofluorescent staining and Western blot also showed that both GLP-1 analog and PARP-1 gene silencing could inhibit the HG-induced EndMT. In addition, GLP-1 analog could attenuate PARP-1 activation by decreasing the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Therefore, GLP-1 treatment could protect against the hyperglycemia-induced EndMT and myocardial dysfunction. This effect is mediated, at least partially, by suppressing PARP-1 activation. PMID:25715248

  17. Defective control of mitotic and post-mitotic checkpoints in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1(-/-) fibroblasts after mitotic spindle disruption.

    PubMed

    Halappanavar, Sabina S; Shah, Girish M

    2004-03-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP), a DNA damage-responsive nuclear enzyme present in higher eukaryotes, is well-known for its roles in protecting the genome after DNA damage. However, even without exogenous DNA damage, PARP may play a role in stabilizing the genome because cells or mice deficient in PARP exhibit various signs of genomic instability, such as tetraploidy, aneuploidy, chromosomal abnormalities and susceptibility to spontaneous carcinogenesis. Normally, cell cycle checkpoints ensure elimination of cells with genomic abnormalities. Therefore, we examined efficiency of mitotic and post-mitotic checkpoints in PARP-/- and PARP+/+ mouse embryonic fibroblasts treated with mitotic spindle disrupting agent colcemid. PARP+/+ cells, like most mammalian cells, eventually escaped from spindle disruption-induced mitotic checkpoint arrest by 60 h. In contrast, PARP-/- cells rapidly escaped from mitotic arrest within 24 h by downregulation of cyclin B1/CDK-1 kinase activity. After escaping from mitotic arrest; both the PARP genotypes arrive in G1 tetraploid state, where they face post-mitotic checkpoints which either induce apoptosis or prevent DNA endoreduplication. While all the G1 tetraploid PARP+/+ cells were eliminated by apoptosis, the majority of the G1 tetraploid PARP-/- cells became polyploid by resisting apoptosis and carrying out DNA endoreduplication. Introduction of PARP in PARP-/- fibroblasts partially increased the stringency of mitotic checkpoint arrest and fully restored susceptibility to G1 tetraploidy checkpoint-induced apoptosis; and thus prevented formation of polyploid cells. Our results suggest that PARP may serve as a guardian angel of the genome even without exogenous DNA damage through its role in mitotic and post-mitotic G1 tetraploidy checkpoints. PMID:14726664

  18. Cross talk between poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 methylation and oxidative stress involved in the toxic effect of anatase titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Bai, Wenlin; Chen, Yujiao; Gao, Ai

    2015-01-01

    Given the tremendous growth in the application of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TNPs), concerns about the potential health hazards of TNPs to humans have been raised. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1), a highly conserved DNA-binding protein, is involved in many molecular and cellular processes. Limited data demonstrated that certain nanomaterials induced the aberrant hypermethylation of PARP-1. However, the mechanism involved in TNP-induced PARP-1 abnormal methylation has not been studied. A549 cells were incubated with anatase TNPs (22.1 nm) for 24 hours pretreatment with or without methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine and the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger α-lipoic acid to assess the possible role of methylation and ROS in the toxic effect of TNPs. After TNPs characterization, a battery of assays was performed to evaluate the toxic effect of TNPs, PARP-1 methylation status, and oxidative damage. Results showed that TNPs decreased the cell viability in a dose-dependent manner, in accordance with the increase of lactate dehydrogenase activity, which indicated membrane damage of cells. Similar to the high level of PARP-1 methylation, the generation of ROS was significantly increased after exposure to TNPs for 24 hours. Furthermore, α-lipoic acid decreased TNP-induced ROS generation and then attenuated TNP-triggered PARP-1 hypermethylation. Meanwhile, 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine simultaneously decreased the ROS generation induced by TNPs, resulting in the decline of PARP-1 methylation. In summary, TNPs triggered the aberrant hypermethylation of the PARP-1 promoter and there was a cross talk between oxidative stress and PARP-1 methylation in the toxic effect of TNPs.

  19. Interactions Between Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated Kinase Inhibition, Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase-1 Inhibition and BRCA1 Status in Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Węsierska-Gądek, Józefa; Heinzl, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cells harboring BRCA1/BRCA2 mutations are hypersensitive to inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1). We recently showed that interference with PARP-1 activity by NU1025 is strongly cytotoxic for BRCA1-positive BT-20 cells but not BRCA1-deficient SKBr-3 cells. These unexpected observations prompted speculation that other PARP-1 inhibitor(s) may be more cytotoxic towards SKBr-3 cells. In addition, interference with the DNA damage signaling pathway via (for instance) Ataxia telangiectasia mutated (ATM) kinase inhibition may induce synthetic lethality in DNA repair-deficient breast cancer cells and pharmacological interference with ATM activity may sensitize breast cancer cells to PARP-1 inactivation. Methods: We determined drug cytotoxicity in human MCF-7 and SKBr-3 breast cancer cells using the CellTiterGLO Luminescent cell viability assay and a Tecan multi-label, multitask plate counter to measure generated luminescence. Changes in cell cycle progression were monitored by flow cytometric measurement of DNA content in cells stained with propidium iodide. Results: Unlike NU1025, AZD2461, a new PARP-1 inhibitor, markedly reduced the numbers of living MCF-7 and SKBr-3 cells. ATM kinase inhibition (CP466722) was also cytotoxic for both MCF-7 and SKBr-3 cells. Furthermore, AZD2461 enhanced the cytotoxicity of CP466722 in both cell lines by inducing apoptosis, and concurrent inhibition of ATM and PARP-1 reduced cell proliferation more strongly than either single treatment. Conclusions: Our data show that inhibition of PARP-1 by AZD2461 is synthetically lethal for NU1025-resistant MCF-7 and SKBr-3 breast cancer cells. They also indicate that DNA damage signaling is essential for survival of both SKBr-3 and MCF-7 cells, especially after inactivation of PARP-1. PMID:25337581

  20. Differential transactivation by orphan nuclear receptor NOR1 and its fusion gene product EWS/NOR1: possible involvement of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase I, PARP-1.

    PubMed

    Ohkura, Naganari; Nagamura, Yuko; Tsukada, Toshihiko

    2008-10-15

    In extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma, a chromosomal translocation creates a gene fusion between EWS and an orphan nuclear receptor, NOR1. The resulting fusion protein EWS/NOR1 has been believed to lead to malignant transformation by functioning as a transactivator for NOR1-target genes. By comparing the gene expression profiles of NOR1- and EWS/NOR1-overexpressing cells, we found that they largely shared up-regulated genes, but no significant correlation was observed with respect to the transactivation levels of each gene. In addition, the proteins associated with NOR1 and EWS/NOR1 were mostly the same in these cells. The results suggest that these proteins differentially transactivate overlapping target genes through a similar transcriptional machinery. To clarify the mechanisms underlying the transcriptional divergence between NOR1 and EWS/NOR1, we searched for alternatively associated proteins, and identified poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase I (PARP-1) as an NOR1-specific binding protein. Consistent with its binding properties, PARP-1 acted as a transcriptional repressor of NOR1, but not EWS/NOR1, in a luciferase reporter assay employing PARP-1(-/-) fibroblasts. Interestingly, suppressive activity of PARP-1 was observed in a DNA response element-specific manner, and in a subtype-specific manner toward the NR4A family (Nur77, Nurr1, and NOR1), suggesting that PARP-1 plays a role in the diversity of transcriptional regulation mediated by the NR4A family in normal cells. Altogether, our findings suggest that NOR1 and EWS/NOR1 regulate overlapping target genes differently by utilizing associated proteins, including PARP-1; and that EWS/NOR1 may acquire oncogenic activities by avoiding (or gaining) transcription factor-specific modulation by the associated proteins.

  1. Induction of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 cleavage by antitumor triptycene bisquinones in wild-type and daunorubicin-resistant HL-60 cell lines.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Perchellet, Elisabeth M; Tamura, Masafumi; Hua, Duy H; Perchellet, Jean Pierre

    2002-12-15

    In contrast to their inactive parent compound triptycene (code name TT0), new synthetic analogs (TT code number) mimic the antitumor effects of the anthracycline quinone antibiotic daunorubicin (DAU) in the nM range in vitro but have the additional advantage of also blocking nucleoside transport and retaining their efficacy in multidrug-resistant (MDR) tumor cells. Since TT bisquinones may induce DNA fragmentation at 24 h by an active mechanism that requires RNA and protein syntheses and protease activities, the most cytotoxic of them, TT24, was tested for its ability to induce poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) cleavage, an early marker of apoptosis. PARP-1 cleavage starts at 2-3 h and is maximally induced at 6 h by 1.6 microM concentrations of TT24 and DAU in wild-type drug-sensitive HL-60-S cells. However, in MDR HL-60-RV cells, PARP-1 cleavage is still induced by 4 microM TT24 but not by 4-10 microM DAU. The magnitude of PARP-1 cleavage may increase with the number of quinoid rings in the triptych structure and, in contrast to TT0, all lead antitumor TT bisquinones share the ability to fully induce PARP-1 cleavage in HL-60-S cells. A 1 h pulse treatment is sufficient for TT24 and DAU to induce PARP-1 cleavage at 6 h. Since the abilities of TT24 and DAU to induce PARP-1 cleavage are inhibited by benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethyl ketone but not by N-tosyl-L-phenylalanine chloromethyl ketone, caspase-mediated apoptosis may be involved in the mechanism by which these quinone antitumor drugs induce the proteolytic cleavage of PARP-1 at 6 h and the internucleosomal fragmentation of DNA at 24 h in the HL-60 tumor cell system. PMID:12406551

  2. Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase-1 and DNA-Dependent Protein Kinase Have Equivalent Roles in Double Strand Break Repair Following Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Jody; Smith, Graeme; Curtin, Nicola J.

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: Radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) are predominantly repaired by nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ), involving DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), well characterized for its role in single strand break repair, may also facilitate DSB repair. We investigated the activation of these enzymes by differing DNA ends and their interaction in the cellular response to ionizing radiation (IR). Methods and Materials: The effect of PARP and DNA-PK inhibitors (KU-0058684 and NU7441) on repair of IR-induced DSBs was investigated in DNA-PK and PARP-1 proficient and deficient cells by measuring gammaH2AX foci and neutral comets. Complementary in vitro enzyme kinetics assays demonstrated the affinities of DNA-PK and PARP-1 for DSBs with varying DNA termini. Results: DNA-PK and PARP-1 both promoted the fast phase of resolution of IR-induced DSBs in cells. Inactivation of both enzymes was not additive, suggesting that PARP-1 and DNA-PK cooperate within the same pathway to promote DSB repair. The affinities of the two enzymes for oligonucleotides with blunt, 3' GGG or 5' GGG overhanging termini were similar and overlapping (K{sub dapp} = 2.6-6.4nM for DNA-PK; 1.7-4.5nM for PARP-1). DNA-PK showed a slightly greater affinity for overhanging DNA and was significantly more efficient when activated by a 5' GGG overhang. PARP-1 had a preference for blunt-ended DNA and required a separate factor for efficient stimulation by a 5' GGG overhang. Conclusion: DNA-PK and PARP-1 are both required in a pathway facilitating the fast phase of DNA DSB repair.

  3. The efficiency of Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase (PARP) cleavage on detection of apoptosis in an experimental model of testicular torsion.

    PubMed

    Aslan Koşar, Pınar; Tuncer, Hamdi; Cihangir Uğuz, Abdülhadi; Espino Palma, Javier; Darıcı, Hakan; Onaran, İbrahim; Çiğ, Bilal; Koşar, Alim; Rodriguez Moratinos, Ana Beatriz

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the histopathological and apoptotic changes occurring in the rat ipsilateral and contralateral testes, after experimental spermatic cord torsion, and to explore and the role of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage in testicular torsion-detorsion injury. A total of 37 Wistar albino rats were subjected to 720° unilateral spermatic cord torsion for 1, 2 and 4 h, followed by 4-h reperfusion, or else to a sham operation (control group). Histology of the testicle was evaluated using haematoxylin-eosin (H&E) staining and Johnsen's scoring system. Germ cell apoptosis was evaluated via active caspase-3 immunostaining, and PARP expression levels were evaluated via Western blotting. The mean Johnsen's tubular biopsy scores (JTBS) of the ipsilateral testicles were lower for all torsion groups than for the controls (P < 0.05), but the JTBS of the contralateral testicles were only lower in the 4-h torsion group (P < 0.05). The mean apoptosis score (AS) of the ipsilateral and contralateral testicles was significantly higher in the torsion groups than in the sham group. AS increased correlatively with torsion time, in both testicles. The effect of testicular torsion on PARP cleavage was time dependent, with the highest effect observed after 4 h of testicular torsion (P < 0.05). Testicular torsion caused time-dependent histological changes, apoptosis and increases in PARP cleavage. Our results suggest that testicular torsion-detorsion injury caused cell damage and germ cell apoptosis that apparently involved cleavage of PARP. Increased PARP cleavage could, in turn, lead to enhanced apoptosis.

  4. Cross talk between poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 methylation and oxidative stress involved in the toxic effect of anatase titanium dioxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Wenlin; Chen, Yujiao; Gao, Ai

    2015-01-01

    Given the tremendous growth in the application of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TNPs), concerns about the potential health hazards of TNPs to humans have been raised. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1), a highly conserved DNA-binding protein, is involved in many molecular and cellular processes. Limited data demonstrated that certain nanomaterials induced the aberrant hypermethylation of PARP-1. However, the mechanism involved in TNP-induced PARP-1 abnormal methylation has not been studied. A549 cells were incubated with anatase TNPs (22.1 nm) for 24 hours pretreatment with or without methyltransferase inhibitor 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine and the reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavenger α-lipoic acid to assess the possible role of methylation and ROS in the toxic effect of TNPs. After TNPs characterization, a battery of assays was performed to evaluate the toxic effect of TNPs, PARP-1 methylation status, and oxidative damage. Results showed that TNPs decreased the cell viability in a dose-dependent manner, in accordance with the increase of lactate dehydrogenase activity, which indicated membrane damage of cells. Similar to the high level of PARP-1 methylation, the generation of ROS was significantly increased after exposure to TNPs for 24 hours. Furthermore, α-lipoic acid decreased TNP-induced ROS generation and then attenuated TNP-triggered PARP-1 hypermethylation. Meanwhile, 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine simultaneously decreased the ROS generation induced by TNPs, resulting in the decline of PARP-1 methylation. In summary, TNPs triggered the aberrant hypermethylation of the PARP-1 promoter and there was a cross talk between oxidative stress and PARP-1 methylation in the toxic effect of TNPs. PMID:26366077

  5. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1-inhibiting flavonoids attenuate cytokine release in blood from male patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Weseler, Antje R; Geraets, Liesbeth; Moonen, Harald J J; Manders, Ralph J F; van Loon, Luc J C; Pennings, Herman-Jan; Wouters, Emiel F M; Bast, Aalt; Hageman, Geja J

    2009-05-01

    Recently, we identified several flavonoids as inhibitors of the nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-1 in vitro and in vivo. PARP-1 is recognized as coactivator of nuclear factor-kappaB and plays a role in the pathophysiology of diseases with low-grade systemic inflammation, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and type 2 diabetes (T2D). In this study, we assessed the antiinflammatory effects of flavonoids with varying PARP-1-inhibiting effects in whole blood from male patients with COPD or T2D and healthy men. A total of 10 COPD, 10 T2D patients, and 10 healthy volunteers matched for age and BMI were recruited. Blood from each participant was exposed to 1 microg/L lipopolysaccharide (LPS) over 16 h with or without preincubation with 10 micromol/L of flavone, fisetin, morin, or tricetin. Concentrations of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha, interleukin (IL)-6, -8, and -10 were measured in the supernatant. Preincubation with fisetin and tricetin strongly attenuated LPS-induced increases in concentrations of TNFalpha in blood from COPD patients [mean (+/- SEM): -41 +/- 4% (fisetin) and -31 +/- 4% (tricetin); P < 0.001] and IL-6 in blood from T2D patients [-31 +/- 5% (fisetin) and -29 +/- 6% (tricetin); P < or = 0.001]. Moreover, LPS-induced changes in TNFalpha and IL-6 concentrations were positively correlated with the extent of reduction by fisetin and tricetin. The PARP-1-inhibiting flavonoids fisetin and tricetin were able to attenuate LPS-induced cytokine release from leukocytes of patients with chronic systemic inflammation, indicating a potential application as nutraceutical agents for these patient groups.

  6. The dual action of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase -1 (PARP-1) inhibition in HIV-1 infection: HIV-1 LTR inhibition and diminution in Rho GTPase activity

    PubMed Central

    Rom, Slava; Reichenbach, Nancy L.; Dykstra, Holly; Persidsky, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    Multifactorial mechanisms comprising countless cellular factors and virus-encoded transactivators regulate the transcription of HIV-1 (HIV). Since poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) regulates numerous genes through its interaction with various transcription factors, inhibition of PARP-1 has surfaced recently as a powerful anti-inflammatory tool. We suggest a novel tactic to diminish HIV replication via PARP-1 inhibition in an in vitro model system, exploiting human primary monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM). PARP-1 inhibition was capable to lessen HIV replication in MDM by 60–80% after 7 days infection. Tat, tumor necrosis factor α (TNFα), and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) are known triggers of the Long Terminal Repeat (LTR), which can switch virus replication. Tat overexpression in MDM transfected with an LTR reporter plasmid resulted in a 4.2-fold increase in LTR activation; PARP inhibition caused 70% reduction of LTR activity. LTR activity, which increased 3-fold after PMA or TNFα treatment, was reduced by PARP inhibition (by 85–95%). PARP inhibition in MDM exhibited 90% diminution in NFκB activity (known to mediate TNFα- and PMA-induced HIV LTR activation). Cytoskeleton rearrangements are important in effective HIV-1 infection. PARP inactivation reduced actin cytoskeleton rearrangements by affecting Rho GTPase machinery. These discoveries suggest that inactivation of PARP suppresses HIV replication in MDM by via attenuation of LTR activation, NFκB suppression and its effects on the cytoskeleton. PARP appears to be essential for HIV replication and its inhibition may provide an effective approach to management of HIV infection. PMID:26379653

  7. Discovery of novel poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase inhibitors by a quantitative assay system using dot-blot with anti-poly(ADP-ribose)

    SciTech Connect

    Okita, Naoyuki; Ashizawa, Daisuke; Ohta, Ryo; Abe, Hideaki; Tanuma, Sei-ichi

    2010-02-19

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation, which is mainly regulated by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG), is a unique protein modification involved in cellular responses such as DNA repair and replication. PARG hydrolyzes glycosidic linkages of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesized by PARP and liberates ADP-ribose residues. Recent studies have suggested that inhibitors of PARG are able to be potent anti-cancer drug. In order to discover the potent and specific Inhibitors of PARG, a quantitative and high-throughput screening assay system is required. However, previous PARG assay systems are not appropriate for high-throughput screening because PARG activity is measured by radioactivities of ADP-ribose residues released from radioisotope (RI)-labeled poly(ADP-ribose). In this study, we developed a non-RI and quantitative assay system for PARG activity based on dot-blot assay using anti-poly(ADP-ribose) and nitrocellulose membrane. By our method, the maximum velocity (V{sub max}) and the michaelis constant (k{sub m}) of PARG reaction were 4.46 {mu}M and 128.33 {mu}mol/min/mg, respectively. Furthermore, the IC50 of adenosine diphosphate (hydroxymethyl) pyrrolidinediol (ADP-HPD), known as a non-competitive PARG inhibitor, was 0.66 {mu}M. These kinetics values were similar to those obtained by traditional PARG assays. By using our assay system, we discovered two novel PARG inhibitors that have xanthene scaffold. Thus, our quantitative and convenient method is useful for a high-throughput screening of PARG specific inhibitors.

  8. A duplicated region is responsible for the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase polymorphism, on chromosome 13, associated with a predisposition to cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lyn, D.; Cherney, B.W.; Lupold, S.; Smulson, M. ); Lalande, M. Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA ); Berenson, J.R.; Lichtenstein, A. Veterans Administration Medical Center, Los Angeles, CA ); Bhatia, K.G. )

    1993-01-01

    The poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PADPRP) gene (13q33-qter) depicts a two-allele (A/B) polymorphism. In the noncancer population, the frequency of the B allele is higher among blacks than among whites. Since the incidence of multiple myeloma and prostate and lung cancer is higher in the US black population, the authors have analyzed the B-allele frequency in germ-line DNA to determine whether the PADPRP gene correlates with a polymorphic susceptibility to these diseases. For multiple myeloma and prostate cancer, an increased frequency of the B allele appeared to be striking only in black patients. In contrast, the distribution of the B allele in germ-line DNA did not differ among white patients with these diseases, when compared with the control group. An elevated B-allele frequency was also found in germ-line DNA in blacks with colon cancer. These observations suggest that the PADPRP polymorphism may provide a valid marker for a predisposition to these cancers in black individuals. To determine the genomic structure of the polymorphic PADPRP sequences, a 2.68-kb HindIII clone was isolated and sequenced from a chromosome 13-enriched library. Sequence analysis of this clone (A allele) revealed a close sequence similarity (91.8%) to PADPRP cDNA (1q42) and an absence of introns, suggesting that the gene on 13q exists as a processed pseudogene. A 193-bp conserved duplicated region within the A allele was identified as the source of the polymorphism. The nucleotide differences between the PADPRP gene on chromosome 13 and related PADPRP genes were exploited to develop oligonucleotides that can detect the difference between the A/B genotypes in a PCR. This PCR assay offers the opportunity for analyzing additional black cancer patients, to determine how the PADPRP processed pseudogene or an unidentified gene that cosegregates with the PADPRP gene might be involved with the development of malignancy. 16 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  9. Effects of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) inhibition on sulfur mustard-induced cutaneous injuries in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Feng; Jiang, Ning; Xiao, Zhi-yong; Cheng, Jun-ping; Mei, Yi-zhou; Zheng, Pan; Wang, Li; Zhang, Xiao-rui; Zhou, Xin-bo

    2016-01-01

    Early studies with first-generation poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors have already indicated some therapeutic potential for sulfur mustard (SM) injuries. The available novel and more potential PARP inhibitors, which are undergoing clinical trials as drugs for cancer treatment, bring it back to the centre of interest. However, the role of PARP-1 in SM-induced injury is not fully understood. In this study, we selected a high potent specific PARP inhibitor ABT-888 as an example to investigate the effect of PARP inhibitor in SM injury. The results showed that in both the mouse ear vesicant model (MEVM) and HaCaT cell model, PARP inhibitor ABT-888 can reduce cell damage induced by severe SM injury. ABT-888 significantly reduced SM induced edema and epidermal necrosis in MEVM. In the HaCaT cell model, ABT-888 can reduce SM-induced NAD+/ATP depletion and apoptosis/necrosis. Then, we studied the mechanism of PARP-1 in SM injury by knockdown of PARP-1 in HaCaT cells. Knockdown of PARP-1 protected cell viability and downregulated the apoptosis checkpoints, including p-JNK, p-p53, Caspase 9, Caspase 8, c-PARP and Caspase 3 following SM-induced injury. Furthermore, the activation of AKT can inhibit autophagy via the regulation of mTOR. Our results showed that SM exposure could significantly inhibit the activation of Akt/mTOR pathway. Knockdown of PARP-1 reversed the SM-induced suppression of the Akt/mTOR pathway. In summary, the results of our study indicated that the protective effects of downregulation of PARP-1 in SM injury may be due to the regulation of apoptosis, necrosis, energy crisis and autophagy. However, it should be noticed that PARP inhibitor ABT-888 further enhanced the phosphorylation of H2AX (S139) after SM exposure, which indicated that we should be very careful in the application of PARP inhibitors in SM injury treatment because of the enhancement of DNA damage. PMID:27077006

  10. Interdependent genotoxic mechanisms of monomethylarsonous acid: Role of ROS-induced DNA damage and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 inhibition in the malignant transformation of urothelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wnek, Shawn M.; Kuhlman, Christopher L.; Camarillo, Jeannie M.; Medeiros, Matthew K.; Liu, Ke J.; Lau, Serrine S.; Gandolfi, A.J.

    2011-11-15

    Exposure of human bladder urothelial cells (UROtsa) to 50 nM of the arsenic metabolite, monomethylarsonous acid (MMA{sup III}), for 12 weeks results in irreversible malignant transformation. The ability of continuous, low-level MMA{sup III} exposure to cause an increase in genotoxic potential by inhibiting repair processes necessary to maintain genomic stability is unknown. Following genomic insult within cellular systems poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), a zinc finger protein, is rapidly activated and recruited to sites of DNA strand breaks. When UROtsa cells are continuously exposed to 50 nM MMA{sup III}, PARP-1 activity does not increase despite the increase in MMA{sup III}-induced DNA single-strand breaks through 12 weeks of exposure. When UROtsa cells are removed from continuous MMA{sup III} exposure (2 weeks), PARP-1 activity increases coinciding with a subsequent decrease in DNA damage levels. Paradoxically, PARP-1 mRNA expression and protein levels are elevated in the presence of continuous MMA{sup III} indicating a possible mechanism to compensate for the inhibition of PARP-1 activity in the presence of MMA{sup III}. The zinc finger domains of PARP-1 contain vicinal sulfhydryl groups which may act as a potential site for MMA{sup III} to bind, displace zinc ion, and render PARP-1 inactive. Mass spectrometry analysis demonstrates the ability of MMA{sup III} to bind a synthetic peptide representing the zinc-finger domain of PARP-1, and displace zinc from the peptide in a dose-dependent manner. In the presence of continuous MMA{sup III} exposure, continuous 4-week zinc supplementation restored PARP-1 activity levels and reduced the genotoxicity associated with MMA{sup III}. Zinc supplementation did not produce an overall increase in PARP-1 protein levels, decrease the levels of MMA{sup III}-induced reactive oxygen species, or alter Cu-Zn superoxide dismutase levels. Overall, these results present two potential interdependent mechanisms in which MMA

  11. Combretastatin-A4 prodrug induces mitotic catastrophe in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cell line independent of caspase activation and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase cleavage.

    PubMed

    Nabha, Sanaa M; Mohammad, Ramzi M; Dandashi, Mahmoud H; Coupaye-Gerard, Brigitte; Aboukameel, Amro; Pettit, George R; Al-Katib, Ayad M

    2002-08-01

    We have previously reported that combretastatin-A4 prodrug (CA4P), anantitubulin/antiangiogenic agent isolated from the South African willow tree Combretum caffrum, induced cell death primarily through mitotic catastrophe in a panel of human B-lymphoid tumors. In this study, we investigated the molecular aspects of the mitotic catastrophe and whether or not it shares the same pathways of apoptosis. For this we studied the effect of CA4P on selected markers of apoptosis [caspases 9 and 3, poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), bcl-2, and bax] and G2-M protein regulators (p53, MDM2, 14-3-3sigma, GADD45, cdc2, cdc25, chk1, wee1, p21, and cyclin B1). The chronic lymphocytic leukemia cell line WSU-CLL was used for this purpose. Western blot analysis showed that 24 h of CA4P (5 nM) exposure induces caspase 9 activation and PARP cleavage. However, the addition of Z-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethylketone (a general caspase inhibitor) or Z-Leu-Glu(OMe)-His-Asp(OMe)-CH2F (a caspase 9 inhibitor) before CA4P treatment did not block cell death. No change in bcl-2 or bax protein expression was observed. Exposure of WSU-CLL cells to 4 and 5 nM CA4P was associated with overproduction of total p53 and no dramatic change in MDM2, 14-3-3sigma, GADD45, the cyclin-dependent kinase cdc2, its inhibitory phosphorylation, the cdc2-inhibitory kinase (wee1), chk1, or cdc25 hyperphosphorylation. The overaccumulation of p21 and cyclin B1 protein was obvious at 24 h. Furthermore, CA4P treatment showed an increase in the expression of a marker of mitosis (mitotic protein monoclonal-2 antibody) and an overaccumulation of the cyclin B in the nucleus. Our findings suggest that CA4P induces mitotic catastrophe and arrest of WSU-CLL cells mostly in the M phase independent of p53 and independent of chk1 and cdc2 phosphorylation pathways. Apoptosis is a secondary mechanism of death in a small proportion of cells through activation of caspase 9 and PARP cleavage. The two mechanisms of cell death, i.e., mitotic

  12. Modulation of farnesoid X receptor results in post-translational modification of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 in the liver

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Yan; Li, Guodong; Dong, Yafeng; Zhou, Helen H.; Kong, Bo; Aleksunes, Lauren M.; Richardson, Jason R.; Li, Fei; Guo, Grace L.

    2013-01-15

    The farnesoid X receptor (FXR) is a bile acid-activated transcription factor belonging to the nuclear receptor superfamily. FXR deficiency in mice results in cholestasis, metabolic disorders, and tumorigenesis in liver and intestine. FXR is known to contribute to pathogenesis by regulating gene transcription; however, changes in the post-transcriptional modification of proteins associated with FXR modulation have not been determined. In the current study, proteomic analysis of the livers of wild-type (WT) and FXR knockout (FXR-KO) mice treated with a FXR synthetic ligand or vehicle was performed. The results identified five proteins as novel FXR targets. Since FXR deficiency in mice leads to liver tumorigenesis, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase family, member 1 (Parp1) that is important for DNA repair, was validated in the current study by quantitative real-time PCR, and 1- and 2-dimensional gel electrophoresis/western blot. The results showed that Parp1 mRNA levels were not altered by FXR genetic status or by agonist treatment. However, total Parp1 protein levels were increased in FXR-KO mice as early as 3 month old. Interestingly, total Parp1 protein levels were increased in WT mice in an age-dependent manner (from 3 to 18 months), but not in FXR-KO mice. Finally, activation of FXR in WT mice resulted in reduction of phosporylated Parp1 protein in the liver without affecting total Parp1 protein levels. In conclusion, this study reveals that FXR genetic status and agonist treatment affects basal levels and phosphorylation state of Parp1, respectively. These alterations, in turn, may be associated with the hepatobiliary alterations observed in FXR-KO mice and participate in FXR agonist-induced protection in the liver. -- Highlights: ► Proteomic analysis identified novel FXR targets. ► FXR modification altered post-translational modification of the Parp1 protein. ► Altered Parp1 function may contribute to mechanisms of FXR regulation of liver functions.

  13. Expression of human poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Effect on survival, homologous recombination and identification of genes involved in intracellular localization.

    PubMed

    La Ferla, Marco; Mercatanti, Alberto; Rocchi, Giulia; Lodovichi, Samuele; Cervelli, Tiziana; Pignata, Luca; Caligo, Maria Adelaide; Galli, Alvaro

    2015-04-01

    The poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) actively participates in a series of functions within the cell that include: mitosis, intracellular signaling, cell cycle regulation, transcription and DNA damage repair. Therefore, inhibition of PARP1 has a great potential for use in cancer therapy. As resistance to PARP inhibitors is starting to be observed in patients, thus the function of PARP-1 needs to be studied in depth in order to find new therapeutic targets. To gain more information on the PARP-1 activity, we expressed PARP-1 in yeast and investigated its effect on cell growth and UV induced homologous recombination. To identify candidate genes affecting PARP-1 activity and cellular localization, we also developed a yeast genome wide genetic screen. We found that PARP-1 strongly inhibited yeast growth, but when yeast was exposed to the PARP-1 inhibitor 6(5-H) phenantridinone (PHE), it recovered from the growth suppression. Moreover, we showed that PARP-1 produced PAR products in yeast and we demonstrated that PARP-1 reduced UV-induced homologous recombination. By genome wide screening, we identified 99 mutants that suppressed PARP-1 growth inhibition. Orthologues of human genes were found for 41 of these yeast genes. We determined whether the PARP-1 protein level was altered in strains which are deleted for the transcription regulator GAL3, the histone H1 gene HHO1, the HUL4 gene, the deubiquitination enzyme gene OTU1, the nuclear pore protein POM152 and the SNT1 that encodes for the Set3C subunit of the histone deacetylase complex. In these strains the PARP-1 level was roughly the same as in the wild type. PARP-1 localized in the nucleus more in the snt1Δ than in the wild type strain; after UV radiation, PARP-1 localized in the nucleus more in hho1 and pom152 deletion strains than in the wild type indicating that these functions may have a role on regulating PARP-1 level and activity in the nucleus.

  14. Unscheduled synthesis of DNA and poly(ADP-ribose) in human fibroblasts following DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    McCurry, L.S.; Jacobson, M.K.

    1981-01-01

    Unscheduled DNA synthesis has been measured in human fibroblasts under conditions of reduced rates of conversion of NAD to poly)ADP-ribose). Cells heterozygous for the xeroderma pigmentosum genotype showed normal rates of uv induced unscheduled DNA synthesis under conditions in which the rate of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis was one-half the rate of normal cells. The addition of theophylline, a potent inhibitor of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, to the culture medium of normal cells blocked over 90% of the conversion of NAD to poly(ADP-ribose) following treatment with uv or N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitro-soguanidine but did not affect the rate of unscheduled DNA synthesis.

  15. Identification and ranking of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors as protectors against sulfur mustard induced decrease in cellular energy and viability in in vitro assays with human lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, H.L.; Kelly, S.A.

    1993-05-13

    Lymphocyte were utilized as a model for investigating HD effects on resting cells. Lymphocytes exposed to HD demonstrated a concentration dependent decrease in ATP, NAD, and viability. The decrease began in 15 minutes for ATP, 2 hours for NAD, and 6 hours for viability. All three of these HD initiated biochemical changes can be blocked by poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors (PADPRPI). To completely inhibit HD initiated ATP, NAD, and viability decreases the PADPRPI had to be present at time 0, 1, and 4 hours respectfully. The amount of protection conferred by the PADPRPI in the viability assay decreased in a linear manner with the delay of the addition and the concentration of the inhibitor from 6-12 hours post HD exposure. There was a good correlation between IC50 to inhibit poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase and EC50 prevention of HD initiated cell death (r=O.94). Thus, three in vitro assays which can measure biochemical and pathologic changes induced by HD in G sub 0 lymphocytes have been developed. These assays have been employed to study the ability of candidate antidotes to prevent HD initiated changes. Benzamidine analogs, including the F.D.A. approved vitamin niacinamide, have been shown to be effective at inhibiting all of these changes.

  16. Excitotoxicity in the Lung: N-Methyl-D-Aspartate-Induced, Nitric Oxide-Dependent, Pulmonary Edema is Attenuated by Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide and by Inhibitors of Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Said, Sami I.; Berisha, Hasan I.; Pakbaz, Hedayatollah

    1996-05-01

    Excitatory amino acid toxicity, resulting from overactivation of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) glutamate receptors, is a major mechanism of neuronal cell death in acute and chronic neurological diseases. We have investigated whether excitotoxicity may occur in peripheral organs, causing tissue injury, and report that NMDA receptor activation in perfused, ventilated rat lungs triggered acute injury, marked by increased pressures needed to ventilate and perfuse the lung, and by high-permeability edema. The injury was prevented by competitive NMDA receptor antagonists or by channel-blocker MK-801, and was reduced in the presence of Mg2+. As with NMDA toxicity to central neurons, the lung injury was nitric oxide (NO) dependent: it required L-arginine, was associated with increased production of NO, and was attenuated by either of two NO synthase inhibitors. The neuropeptide vasoactive intestinal peptide and inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase also prevented this injury, but without inhibiting NO synthesis, both acting by inhibiting a toxic action of NO that is critical to tissue injury. The findings indicate that: (i) NMDA receptors exist in the lung (and probably elsewhere outside the central nervous system), (ii) excessive activation of these receptors may provoke acute edematous lung injury as seen in the ``adult respiratory distress syndrome,'' and (iii) this injury can be modulated by blockade of one of three critical steps: NMDA receptor binding, inhibition of NO synthesis, or activation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase.

  17. Overview on poly(ADP-ribose) immuno-biomedicine and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Kanai, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose), identified in 1966 independently by three groups Strassbourg, Kyoto and Tokyo, is synthesized by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARP) from NAD(+) as a substrate in the presence of Mg(2+). The structure was unique in that it has ribose-ribose linkage. In the early-1970s, however, its function in vivo/in vitro was still controversial and the antibody against it was desired to help clear its significance. Thereupon, the author tried to produce antibody against poly(ADP-ribose) in rabbits and succeeded in it for the first time in the world. Eventually, this success has led to the following two groundbreaking papers in Nature: "Naturally-occurring antibody against poly(ADP-ribose) in patients with autoimmune disease SLE", and "Induction of anti-poly(ADP-ribose) antibody by immunization with synthetic double-stranded RNA, poly(A)·poly(U)".On the way to the publication of the first paper, a reviewer gave me a friendly comment that there is "heteroclitic" fashion as a mechanism of the production of natural antibody. This comment was really a God-send for me, and became a train of power for publication of another paper, as described above. Accordingly, I thought this, I would say, episode is worth describing herein. Because of its importance in biomedical phenomena, a certain number of articles related to "heteroclitic" have become to be introduced in this review, although they were not always directly related to immuno-biological works on poly(ADP-ribose). Also, I tried to speculate on the future prospects of poly(ADP-ribose), product of PARP, as an immuno-regulatory molecule, including either induced or naturally-occurring antibodies, in view of "heteroclitic".

  18. Overview on poly(ADP-ribose) immuno-biomedicine and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Kanai, Yoshiyuki

    2016-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose), identified in 1966 independently by three groups Strassbourg, Kyoto and Tokyo, is synthesized by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARP) from NAD(+) as a substrate in the presence of Mg(2+). The structure was unique in that it has ribose-ribose linkage. In the early-1970s, however, its function in vivo/in vitro was still controversial and the antibody against it was desired to help clear its significance. Thereupon, the author tried to produce antibody against poly(ADP-ribose) in rabbits and succeeded in it for the first time in the world. Eventually, this success has led to the following two groundbreaking papers in Nature: "Naturally-occurring antibody against poly(ADP-ribose) in patients with autoimmune disease SLE", and "Induction of anti-poly(ADP-ribose) antibody by immunization with synthetic double-stranded RNA, poly(A)·poly(U)".On the way to the publication of the first paper, a reviewer gave me a friendly comment that there is "heteroclitic" fashion as a mechanism of the production of natural antibody. This comment was really a God-send for me, and became a train of power for publication of another paper, as described above. Accordingly, I thought this, I would say, episode is worth describing herein. Because of its importance in biomedical phenomena, a certain number of articles related to "heteroclitic" have become to be introduced in this review, although they were not always directly related to immuno-biological works on poly(ADP-ribose). Also, I tried to speculate on the future prospects of poly(ADP-ribose), product of PARP, as an immuno-regulatory molecule, including either induced or naturally-occurring antibodies, in view of "heteroclitic". PMID:27477457

  19. In vivo effect of benzamide and phenobarbital on liver enzymes: poly(adp-ribose) polymerase, cytochrome P-450, styrene oxide hydrolase, cholesterol oxide hydrolase, glutathione S-transferase and udp-glucuronyl transferase

    SciTech Connect

    Griffin, M.J.; Kirsten, E.; Carubelli, R.; Palakodety, R.B.; McLick, J.; Kun, E.

    1984-07-31

    Rats fed a synthetic diet containing 0.25% benzamide, 0.1% phenobarbital, separately or in combination, for two weeks showed a significant augmentation in the activity of nuclear poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase as well as changes in various nuclear, microsomal and cytosolic liver enzymes involved in the metabolism of xenobiotics. A selective depression of microsomal styrene oxide hydrolase activity by benzamide feeding, and a contrasting augmentation by phenobarbital, were confirmed by immunological titration of the enzyme-protein content suggesting actual enzyme repression and induction. The NAD content of these livers is not altered signficantly as a result of benzamide and phenobarbital feeding, indicating that the changes in enzymes are not a result of non-specific toxic effects. 22 references, 3 tables.

  20. Optimization of Phenyl-Substituted Benzimidazole Carboxamide Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase Inhibitors: Identification of (S)-2-(2-Fluoro-4-(pyrrolidin-2-yl)phenyl)-1H-benzimidazole-4-carboxamide (A-966492), a Highly Potent and Efficacious Inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Penning, Thomas D.; Zhu, Gui-Dong; Gong, Jianchun; Thomas, Sheela; Gandhi, Viraj B.; Liu, Xuesong; Shi, Yan; Klinghofer, Vered; Johnson, Eric F.; Park, Chang H.; Fry, Elizabeth H.; Donawho, Cherrie K.; Frost, David J.; Buchanan, Fritz G.; Bukofzer, Gail T.; Rodriguez, Luis E.; Bontcheva-Diaz, Velitchka; Bouska, Jennifer J.; Osterling, Donald J.; Olson, Amanda M.; Marsh, Kennan C.; Luo, Yan; Giranda, Vincent L.

    2010-06-21

    We have developed a series of phenylpyrrolidine- and phenylpiperidine-substituted benzimidazole carboxamide poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors with excellent PARP enzyme potency as well as single-digit nanomolar cellular potency. These efforts led to the identification of (S)-2-(2-fluoro-4-(pyrrolidin-2-yl)phenyl)-1H-benzimidazole-4-carboxamide (22b, A-966492). Compound 22b displayed excellent potency against the PARP-1 enzyme with a K{sub i} of 1 nM and an EC{sub 50} of 1 nM in a whole cell assay. In addition, 22b is orally bioavailable across multiple species, crosses the blood-brain barrier, and appears to distribute into tumor tissue. It also demonstrated good in vivo efficacy in a B16F10 subcutaneous murine melanoma model in combination with temozolomide and in an MX-1 breast cancer xenograft model both as a single agent and in combination with carboplatin.

  1. Deficiency of terminal ADP-ribose protein glycohydrolase TARG1/C6orf130 in neurodegenerative disease

    PubMed Central

    Sharifi, Reza; Morra, Rosa; Denise Appel, C; Tallis, Michael; Chioza, Barry; Jankevicius, Gytis; Simpson, Michael A; Matic, Ivan; Ozkan, Ege; Golia, Barbara; Schellenberg, Matthew J; Weston, Ria; Williams, Jason G; Rossi, Marianna N; Galehdari, Hamid; Krahn, Juno; Wan, Alexander; Trembath, Richard C; Crosby, Andrew H; Ahel, Dragana; Hay, Ron; Ladurner, Andreas G; Timinszky, Gyula; Williams, R Scott; Ahel, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-ribosylation is a post-translational protein modification implicated in the regulation of a range of cellular processes. A family of proteins that catalyse ADP-ribosylation reactions are the poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymerases (PARPs). PARPs covalently attach an ADP-ribose nucleotide to target proteins and some PARP family members can subsequently add additional ADP-ribose units to generate a PAR chain. The hydrolysis of PAR chains is catalysed by PAR glycohydrolase (PARG). PARG is unable to cleave the mono(ADP-ribose) unit directly linked to the protein and although the enzymatic activity that catalyses this reaction has been detected in mammalian cell extracts, the protein(s) responsible remain unknown. Here, we report the homozygous mutation of the c6orf130 gene in patients with severe neurodegeneration, and identify C6orf130 as a PARP-interacting protein that removes mono(ADP-ribosyl)ation on glutamate amino acid residues in PARP-modified proteins. X-ray structures and biochemical analysis of C6orf130 suggest a mechanism of catalytic reversal involving a transient C6orf130 lysyl-(ADP-ribose) intermediate. Furthermore, depletion of C6orf130 protein in cells leads to proliferation and DNA repair defects. Collectively, our data suggest that C6orf130 enzymatic activity has a role in the turnover and recycling of protein ADP-ribosylation, and we have implicated the importance of this protein in supporting normal cellular function in humans. PMID:23481255

  2. Niacin status, NAD distribution and ADP-ribose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kirkland, James B

    2009-01-01

    Dietary niacin deficiency, and pharmacological excesses of nicotinic acid or nicotinamide, have dramatic effects on cellular NAD pools, ADP-ribose metabolism, tissue function and health. ADP-ribose metabolism is providing new targets for pharmacological intervention, and it is important to consider how the supply of vitamin B3 may directly influence ADP-ribosylation reactions, or create interactions with other drugs designed to influence these pathways. In addition to its redox roles, NAD+ is used as a substrate for mono-, poly- and cyclic ADP-ribose formation. During niacin deficiency, not all of these processes can be maintained, and dramatic changes in tissue function and clinical condition take place. Conversely, these reactions may be differentially enhanced by pharmacological intakes of vitamin B3, and potentially by changing expression of specific NAD generating enzymes. A wide range of metabolic changes can take place following pharmacological supplementation of nicotinic acid or nicotinamide. As niacin status decreases towards a deficient state, the function of other types of pharmaceutical agents may be modified, including those that target ADP-ribosylation reactions, apoptosis and inflammation. This article will explore what is known and yet to be learned about the response of tissues, cells and subcellular compartments to excessive and limiting supplies of niacin, and will discuss the etiology of the resulting pathologies.

  3. VERO cells harbor a poly-ADP-ribose belt partnering their epithelial adhesion belt.

    PubMed

    Lafon-Hughes, Laura; Vilchez Larrea, Salomé C; Kun, Alejandra; Fernández Villamil, Silvia H

    2014-01-01

    Poly-ADP-ribose (PAR) is a polymer of up to 400 ADP-ribose units synthesized by poly-ADP-ribose-polymerases (PARPs) and degraded by poly-ADP-ribose-glycohydrolase (PARG). Nuclear PAR modulates chromatin compaction, affecting nuclear functions (gene expression, DNA repair). Diverse defined PARP cytoplasmic allocation patterns contrast with the yet still imprecise PAR distribution and still unclear functions. Based on previous evidence from other models, we hypothesized that PAR could be present in epithelial cells where cadherin-based adherens junctions are linked with the actin cytoskeleton (constituting the adhesion belt). In the present work, we have examined through immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy, the subcellular localization of PAR in an epithelial monkey kidney cell line (VERO). PAR was distinguished colocalizing with actin and vinculin in the epithelial belt, a location that has not been previously reported. Actin filaments disruption with cytochalasin D was paralleled by PAR belt disruption. Conversely, PARP inhibitors 3-aminobenzamide, PJ34 or XAV 939, affected PAR belt synthesis, actin distribution, cell shape and adhesion. Extracellular calcium chelation displayed similar effects. Our results demonstrate the existence of PAR in a novel subcellular localization. An initial interpretation of all the available evidence points towards TNKS-1 as the most probable PAR belt architect, although TNKS-2 involvement cannot be discarded. Forthcoming research will test this hypothesis as well as explore the existence of the PAR belt in other epithelial cells and deepen into its functional implications.

  4. VERO cells harbor a poly-ADP-ribose belt partnering their epithelial adhesion belt

    PubMed Central

    Vilchez Larrea, Salomé C.; Kun, Alejandra

    2014-01-01

    Poly-ADP-ribose (PAR) is a polymer of up to 400 ADP-ribose units synthesized by poly-ADP-ribose-polymerases (PARPs) and degraded by poly-ADP-ribose-glycohydrolase (PARG). Nuclear PAR modulates chromatin compaction, affecting nuclear functions (gene expression, DNA repair). Diverse defined PARP cytoplasmic allocation patterns contrast with the yet still imprecise PAR distribution and still unclear functions. Based on previous evidence from other models, we hypothesized that PAR could be present in epithelial cells where cadherin-based adherens junctions are linked with the actin cytoskeleton (constituting the adhesion belt). In the present work, we have examined through immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy, the subcellular localization of PAR in an epithelial monkey kidney cell line (VERO). PAR was distinguished colocalizing with actin and vinculin in the epithelial belt, a location that has not been previously reported. Actin filaments disruption with cytochalasin D was paralleled by PAR belt disruption. Conversely, PARP inhibitors 3-aminobenzamide, PJ34 or XAV 939, affected PAR belt synthesis, actin distribution, cell shape and adhesion. Extracellular calcium chelation displayed similar effects. Our results demonstrate the existence of PAR in a novel subcellular localization. An initial interpretation of all the available evidence points towards TNKS-1 as the most probable PAR belt architect, although TNKS-2 involvement cannot be discarded. Forthcoming research will test this hypothesis as well as explore the existence of the PAR belt in other epithelial cells and deepen into its functional implications. PMID:25332845

  5. Discovery of 2-{4-[(3S)-piperidin-3-yl]phenyl}-2H-indazole-7-carboxamide (MK-4827): a novel oral poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (PARP) inhibitor efficacious in BRCA-1 and -2 mutant tumors.

    PubMed

    Jones, Philip; Altamura, Sergio; Boueres, Julia; Ferrigno, Federica; Fonsi, Massimiliano; Giomini, Claudia; Lamartina, Stefania; Monteagudo, Edith; Ontoria, Jesus M; Orsale, Maria Vittoria; Palumbi, Maria Cecilia; Pesci, Silvia; Roscilli, Giuseppe; Scarpelli, Rita; Schultz-Fademrecht, Carsten; Toniatti, Carlo; Rowley, Michael

    2009-11-26

    We disclose the development of a novel series of 2-phenyl-2H-indazole-7-carboxamides as poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (PARP) 1 and 2 inhibitors. This series was optimized to improve enzyme and cellular activity, and the resulting PARP inhibitors display antiproliferation activities against BRCA-1 and BRCA-2 deficient cancer cells, with high selectivity over BRCA proficient cells. Extrahepatic oxidation by CYP450 1A1 and 1A2 was identified as a metabolic concern, and strategies to improve pharmacokinetic properties are reported. These efforts culminated in the identification of 2-{4-[(3S)-piperidin-3-yl]phenyl}-2H-indazole-7-carboxamide 56 (MK-4827), which displays good pharmacokinetic properties and is currently in phase I clinical trials. This compound displays excellent PARP 1 and 2 inhibition with IC(50) = 3.8 and 2.1 nM, respectively, and in a whole cell assay, it inhibited PARP activity with EC(50) = 4 nM and inhibited proliferation of cancer cells with mutant BRCA-1 and BRCA-2 with CC(50) in the 10-100 nM range. Compound 56 was well tolerated in vivo and demonstrated efficacy as a single agent in a xenograft model of BRCA-1 deficient cancer.

  6. Discovery and Structure–Activity Relationship of Novel 2,3-Dihydrobenzofuran-7-carboxamide and 2,3-Dihydrobenzofuran-3(2H)-one-7-carboxamide Derivatives as Poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Novel substituted 2,3-dihydrobenzofuran-7-carboxamide (DHBF-7-carboxamide) and 2,3-dihydrobenzofuran-3(2H)-one-7-carboxamide (DHBF-3-one-7-carboxamide) derivatives were synthesized and evaluated as inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP-1). A structure-based design strategy resulted in lead compound 3 (DHBF-7-carboxamide; IC50 = 9.45 μM). To facilitate synthetically feasible derivatives, an alternative core was designed, DHBF-3-one-7-carboxamide (36, IC50 = 16.2 μM). The electrophilic 2-position of this scaffold was accessible for extended modifications. Substituted benzylidene derivatives at the 2-position were found to be the most potent, with 3′,4′-dihydroxybenzylidene 58 (IC50 = 0.531 μM) showing a 30-fold improvement in potency. Various heterocycles attached at the 4′-hydroxyl/4′-amino of the benzylidene moiety resulted in significant improvement in inhibition of PARP-1 activity (e.g., compounds 66–68, 70, 72, and 73; IC50 values from 0.718 to 0.079 μM). Compound 66 showed selective cytotoxicity in BRCA2-deficient DT40 cells. Crystal structures of three inhibitors (compounds (−)-13c, 59, and 65) bound to a multidomain PARP-1 structure were obtained, providing insights into further development of these inhibitors. PMID:24922587

  7. Tetrandrine induces apoptosis Via caspase-8, -9, and -3 and poly (ADP ribose) polymerase dependent pathways and autophagy through beclin-1/ LC3-I, II signaling pathways in human oral cancer HSC-3 cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fu-Shun; Yu, Chun-Shu; Chen, Jaw-Chyun; Yang, Jiun-Long; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Chang, Shu-Jen; Lin, Meng-Wei; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2016-04-01

    Tetrandrine is a bisbenzylisoquinoline alkaloid that was found in the Radix Stephania tetrandra S Moore. It had been reported to induce cytotoxic effects on many human cancer cells. In this study, we investigated the cytotoxic effects of tetrandrine on human oral cancer HSC-3 cells in vitro. Treatments of HSC-3 cells with tetrandrine significantly decreased the percentage of viable cells through the induction of autophagy and apoptosis and these effects are in concentration-dependent manner. To define the mechanism underlying the cytotoxic effects of tetrandrine, we investigated the critical molecular events known to regulate the apoptotic and autophagic machinery. Tetrandrine induced chromatin condensation, internucleosomal DNA fragmentation, activation of caspases-3, -8, and -9, and cleavage of poly (ADP ribose) polymerase (PARP) that were associated with apoptosis, and it also enhanced the expression of LC3-I and -II that were associated with the induction of autophagy in human squamous carcinoma cell line (HSC-3) cells. Tetrandrine induced autophagy in HSC-3 cells was significantly attenuated by bafilomycin A1 (inhibitor of autophagy) pre-treatment that confirmed tetrandrine induced cell death may be associated with the autophagy. In conclusion, we suggest that tetrandrine induced cell death may be through the induction of apoptosis as well as autophagy in human oral cancer HSC-3 cells via PARP, caspases/Becline I/LC3-I/II signaling pathways. PMID:25266202

  8. Resveratrol inhibits inflammatory signaling implicated in ionizing radiation-induced premature ovarian failure through antagonistic crosstalk between silencing information regulator 1 (SIRT1) and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1).

    PubMed

    Said, Riham Soliman; El-Demerdash, Ebtehal; Nada, Ahmed Shafik; Kamal, Mohamed M

    2016-03-01

    This study hypothesized that resveratrol, a silencing information regulator 1 (SIRT1) activator, would counteract the inflammatory signaling associated with radiotherapy-induced premature ovarian failure (POF). Immature female Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to a single dose of γ-radiation to induce POF and treated with resveratrol (25mg/kg) once daily for two weeks before and three days post irradiation. Resveratrol preserves the entire ovarian follicle pool manifested by increasing serum anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) levels. Radiation triggered inflammatory process in the ovary through enhanced NF-κB and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-1 expression which convinced the expression of inflammatory markers including IL-6, IL-8, and visfatin mRNA levels, as well as inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 protein expression with a concomitant reduction in IL-10 mRNA levels. Resveratrol significantly counteracted the effect of radiation and upregulated the gene expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPAR-γ) and SIRT1. Resveratrol-activated SIRT1 expression was associated with inhibition of PARP-1 and NF-κB expression-mediated inflammatory cytokines. Our findings suggest that resveratrol restored ovarian function through increasing AMH levels, and diminishing ovarian inflammation, predominantly via upregulation of PPAR-γ and SIRT1 expression leading to inhibition of NF-κB provoked inflammatory cytokines. PMID:26827941

  9. Resveratrol inhibits inflammatory signaling implicated in ionizing radiation-induced premature ovarian failure through antagonistic crosstalk between silencing information regulator 1 (SIRT1) and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1).

    PubMed

    Said, Riham Soliman; El-Demerdash, Ebtehal; Nada, Ahmed Shafik; Kamal, Mohamed M

    2016-03-01

    This study hypothesized that resveratrol, a silencing information regulator 1 (SIRT1) activator, would counteract the inflammatory signaling associated with radiotherapy-induced premature ovarian failure (POF). Immature female Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to a single dose of γ-radiation to induce POF and treated with resveratrol (25mg/kg) once daily for two weeks before and three days post irradiation. Resveratrol preserves the entire ovarian follicle pool manifested by increasing serum anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) levels. Radiation triggered inflammatory process in the ovary through enhanced NF-κB and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-1 expression which convinced the expression of inflammatory markers including IL-6, IL-8, and visfatin mRNA levels, as well as inducible nitric oxide synthase and cyclooxygenase-2 protein expression with a concomitant reduction in IL-10 mRNA levels. Resveratrol significantly counteracted the effect of radiation and upregulated the gene expression of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPAR-γ) and SIRT1. Resveratrol-activated SIRT1 expression was associated with inhibition of PARP-1 and NF-κB expression-mediated inflammatory cytokines. Our findings suggest that resveratrol restored ovarian function through increasing AMH levels, and diminishing ovarian inflammation, predominantly via upregulation of PPAR-γ and SIRT1 expression leading to inhibition of NF-κB provoked inflammatory cytokines.

  10. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 transcriptional regulation: A novel crosstalk between histone modification H3K9ac and ETS1 motif hypomethylation in BRCA1-mutated ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Da; Bi, Fang-Fang; Cao, Ji-Min; Cao, Chen; Li, Chun-Yan; Liu, Bo; Yang, Qing

    2014-01-01

    Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) plays a critical role in ovarian cancer progression. However, the epigenetic mechanism regulating PARP1 transcription remains largely unknown. Here, we show that the hypomethylated ETS1 motif is a key regulatory element for the PARP1 gene in BRCA1-mutated ovarian cancer. Mechanistically, the ETS1 motif hypomethylation-mediated increase of active histone marker H3K9ac and transcription factor ETS1 enrichment synergistically activates PARP1 transcription. Clinicopathological data indicate that a hypomethylated ETS1 motif was associated with high-grade tumors (P = 0.026) and pN1 (P = 0.002). Univariate survival analysis demonstrated an association between the hypomethylated ETS1 motif and an increased risk of death in BRCA1-mutated ovarian cancer patients. Our findings imply that the genetic (such as BRCA1 mutation) and epigenetic mechanisms (such as hypomethylated ETS1 motif, and histone modification H3K9ac and transcription factor ETS1 binding) are jointly involved in the malignant progression of PARP1-related ovarian cancer. PMID:24448423

  11. The Septic Shock-associated IL-10 -1082 A>G Polymorphism Mediates Allele-specific Transcription via Poly ADP-ribose Polymerase 1 in Macrophages Engulfing Apoptotic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Xiaoyan; Kim, Ha-Jeong; Ramirez, Michelle; Salameh, Sarah; Ma, Xiaojing

    2013-01-01

    The biallelic Interleukin-10 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) at -1082 of the promoter region linked to individual variation in cytokine inducibility has been strongly implicated in several pathological conditions including the development of, and outcomes in, septic shock during pneumococcal infection, acute respiratory distress syndrome, and cardiac dysfunction. However, the molecular basis of the SNP-mediated variable IL-10 production levels has not been explored. Here we report that the -1082G>A alleles in the promoter region of the human IL-10 gene physically interact with a nuclear protein in an allele-specific manner that results in different levels of IL-10 transcription. This protein has been identified as poly ADP-ribose polymerase 1 (PARP-1). We show that PARP-1 acts as a transcription repressor, and its DNA-binding activity is strongly regulated in macrophages that engulf apoptotic cells but not stimulated with lippopolysaccharides. These findings unveil a novel role of PARP-1 in the regulation of IL-10 production in an allele-dependent way, which determines individual susceptibility to sepsis-induced inflammatory pathology and the immunological sequelae in a physiological process where clearance of infection-induced apoptotic cells by professional phagocytes triggers the cytokine synthesis. PMID:20181890

  12. Minocycline blocks asthma-associated inflammation in part by interfering with the T cell receptor-nuclear factor κB-GATA-3-IL-4 axis without a prominent effect on poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase.

    PubMed

    Naura, Amarjit S; Kim, Hogyoung; Ju, Jihang; Rodriguez, Paulo C; Jordan, Joaquin; Catling, Andrew D; Rezk, Bashir M; Abd Elmageed, Zakaria Y; Pyakurel, Kusma; Tarhuni, Abdelmetalab F; Abughazleh, Mohammad Q; Errami, Youssef; Zerfaoui, Mourad; Ochoa, Augusto C; Boulares, A Hamid

    2013-01-18

    Minocycline protects against asthma independently of its antibiotic function and was recently reported as a potent poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor. In an animal model of asthma, a single administration of minocycline conferred excellent protection against ovalbumin-induced airway eosinophilia, mucus hypersecretion, and Th2 cytokine production (IL-4/IL-5/IL-12(p70)/IL-13/GM-CSF) and a partial protection against airway hyperresponsiveness. These effects correlated with pronounced reduction in lung and sera allergen-specific IgE. A reduction in poly(ADP-ribose) immunoreactivity in the lungs of minocycline-treated/ovalbumin-challenged mice correlated with decreased oxidative DNA damage. The effect of minocycline on PARP may be indirect, as the drug failed to efficiently block direct PARP activation in lungs of N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitroso-guanidine-treated mice or H(2)O(2)-treated cells. Minocycline blocked allergen-specific IgE production in B cells potentially by modulating T cell receptor (TCR)-linked IL-4 production at the mRNA level but not through a modulation of the IL-4-JAK-STAT-6 axis, IL-2 production, or NFAT1 activation. Restoration of IL-4, ex vivo, rescued IgE production by minocycline-treated/ovalbumin-stimulated B cells. IL-4 blockade correlated with a preferential inhibition of the NF-κB activation arm of TCR but not GSK3, Src, p38 MAPK, or ERK1/2. Interestingly, the drug promoted a slightly higher Src and ERK1/2 phosphorylation. Inhibition of NF-κB was linked to a complete blockade of TCR-stimulated GATA-3 expression, a pivotal transcription factor for IL-4 expression. Minocycline also reduced TNF-α-mediated NF-κB activation and expression of dependent genes. These results show a potentially broad effect of minocycline but that it may block IgE production in part by modulating TCR function, particularly by inhibiting the signaling pathway, leading to NF-κB activation, GATA-3 expression, and subsequent IL-4 production.

  13. Structures of the Human Poly (ADP-Ribose) Glycohydrolase Catalytic Domain Confirm Catalytic Mechanism and Explain Inhibition by ADP-HPD Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Tucker, Julie A.; Bennett, Neil; Brassington, Claire; Durant, Stephen T.; Hassall, Giles; Holdgate, Geoff; McAlister, Mark; Nissink, J. Willem M.; Truman, Caroline; Watson, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) is the only enzyme known to catalyse hydrolysis of the O-glycosidic linkages of ADP-ribose polymers, thereby reversing the effects of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases. PARG deficiency leads to cell death whilst PARG depletion causes sensitisation to certain DNA damaging agents, implicating PARG as a potential therapeutic target in several disease areas. Efforts to develop small molecule inhibitors of PARG activity have until recently been hampered by a lack of structural information on PARG. We have used a combination of bio-informatic and experimental approaches to engineer a crystallisable, catalytically active fragment of human PARG (hPARG). Here, we present high-resolution structures of the catalytic domain of hPARG in unliganded form and in complex with three inhibitors: ADP-ribose (ADPR), adenosine 5′-diphosphate (hydroxymethyl)pyrrolidinediol (ADP-HPD) and 8-n-octyl-amino-ADP-HPD. Our structures confirm conservation of overall fold amongst mammalian PARG glycohydrolase domains, whilst revealing additional flexible regions in the catalytic site. These new structures rationalise a body of published mutational data and the reported structure-activity relationship for ADP-HPD based PARG inhibitors. In addition, we have developed and used biochemical, isothermal titration calorimetry and surface plasmon resonance assays to characterise the binding of inhibitors to our PARG protein, thus providing a starting point for the design of new inhibitors. PMID:23251397

  14. Selective Small Molecule Inhibition of Poly(ADP-Ribose) Glycohydrolase (PARG)

    PubMed Central

    Finch, Kristin E.; Knezevic, Claire E.; Nottbohm, Amanda C.; Partlow, Kathryn C.; Hergenrother, Paul J.

    2012-01-01

    The poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) post-translational modification is essential for diverse cellular functions, including regulation of transcription, response to DNA damage, and mitosis. Cellular PAR is predominantly synthesized by the enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1). PARP-1 is a critical node in the DNA damage response pathway, and multiple potent PARP-1 inhibitors have been described, some of which show considerable promise in the clinic for the treatment of certain cancers. Cellular PAR is efficiently degraded by poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG), an enzyme for which no potent, readily accessible, and specific inhibitors exist. Herein we report the discovery of small molecules that effectively inhibit PARG in vitro and in cellular lysates. These potent PARG inhibitors can be produced in two chemical steps from commercial starting materials and have complete specificity for PARG over the other known PAR glycohydrolase (ADP-ribosylhydrolase 3, ARH3) and over PARP-1, and thus will be useful tools to study the biochemistry of PAR signaling. PMID:22220926

  15. Common and unique genetic interactions of the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases PARP1 and PARP2 with DNA double-strand break repair pathways.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Rajib; Roy, Sanchita; Kamyab, Johan; Dantzer, Francoise; Franco, Sonia

    2016-09-01

    In mammalian cells, chromatin poly(ADP-ribos)ylation (PARylation) at sites of DNA Double-Strand Breaks (DSBs) is mediated by two highly related enzymes, PARP1 and PARP2. However, enzyme-specific genetic interactions with other DSB repair factors remain largely undefined. In this context, it was previously shown that mice lacking PARP1 and H2AX, a histone variant that promotes DSB repair throughout the cell cycle, or the core nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) factor Ku80 are not viable, while mice lacking PARP1 and the noncore NHEJ factor DNA-PKcs are severely growth retarded and markedly lymphoma-prone. Here, we have examined the requirement for PARP2 in these backgrounds. We find that, like PARP1, PARP2 is essential for viability in mice lacking H2AX. Moreover, treatment of H2AX-deficient primary fibroblasts or B lymphocytes with PARP inhibitors leads to activation of the G2/M checkpoint and accumulation of chromatid-type breaks in a lineage- and gene-dose dependent manner. In marked contrast to PARP1, loss of PARP2 does not result in additional phenotypes in growth, development or tumorigenesis in mice lacking either Ku80 or DNA-PKcs. Altogether these findings highlight specific nonoverlapping functions of PARP1 and PARP2 at H2AX-deficient chromatin during replicative phases of the cell cycle and uncover a unique requirement for PARP1 in NHEJ-deficient cells. PMID:27373144

  16. Proximal ADP-ribose Hydrolysis in Trypanosomatids is Catalyzed by a Macrodomain

    PubMed Central

    Haikarainen, Teemu; Lehtiö, Lari

    2016-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation is a ubiquitous protein modification utilized by both prokaryotes and eukaryotes for several cellular functions, such as DNA repair, proliferation, and cell signaling. Higher eukaryotes, such as humans, utilize various enzymes to reverse the modification and to regulate ADP-ribose dependent signaling. In contrast, some lower eukaryotes, including trypanosomatids, lack many of these enzymes and therefore have a much more simplified ADP-ribose metabolism. Here we identified and characterized ADP-ribose hydrolases from Trypanosoma brucei and Trypanosoma cruzi, which are homologous to human O-acetyl-ADP-ribose deacetylases MacroD1 and MacroD2. The enzymes are capable for hydrolysis of protein linked ADP-ribose and a product of sirtuin-mediated lysine deacetylation, O-acetyl-ADP-ribose. Crystal structures of the trypanosomatid macrodomains revealed a conserved catalytic site with distinct differences to human MacroD1 and MacroD2. PMID:27064071

  17. Male rats fed methyl- and folate-deficient diets with or without niacin develop hepatic carcinomas associated with decreased tissue NAD concentrations and altered poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activity.

    PubMed

    Henning, S M; Swendseid, M E; Coulson, W F

    1997-01-01

    Folate is an essential cofactor in the generation of endogenous methionine, and there is evidence that folate deficiency exacerbates the effects of a diet low in choline and methionine, including alterations in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activity, an enzyme associated with DNA replication and repair. Because PARP requires NAD as its substrate, we postulated that a deficiency of both folate and niacin would enhance the development of liver cancer in rats fed a diet deficient in methionine and choline. In two experiments, rats were fed choline- and folate-deficient, low methionine diets containing either 12 or 8% casein (12% MCFD, 8% MCFD) or 6% casein and 6% gelatin with niacin (MCFD) or without niacin (MCFND) and were compared with folate-supplemented controls. Liver NAD concentrations were lower in all methyl-deficient rats after 2-17 mo. At 17 mo, NAD concentrations in other tissues of rats fed these diets were also lower than in controls. Compared with control values, liver PARP activity was enhanced in rats fed the 12% MCFD diet but was lower in MCFND-fed rats following a further reduction in liver NAD concentration. These changes in PARP activity associated with lower NAD concentrations may slow DNA repair and enhance DNA damage. Only rats fed the MCFD and MCFND diets developed hepatocarcinomas after 12-17 mo. In Experiment 2, hepatocarcinomas were found in 100% of rats fed the MCFD and MCFND diets. These preliminary results indicate that folic acid deficiency enhances tumor development. Because tumors developed in 100% of the MCFD-fed rats and because tissue concentrations of NAD in these animals were also low, further studies are needed to clearly define the role of niacin in methyl-deficient rats.

  18. Advanced oxidation protein products induce intestine epithelial cell death through a redox-dependent, c-jun N-terminal kinase and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1-mediated pathway.

    PubMed

    Xie, F; Sun, S; Xu, A; Zheng, S; Xue, M; Wu, P; Zeng, J H; Bai, L

    2014-01-16

    Advanced oxidation protein products (AOPPs), a novel protein marker of oxidative damage, have been confirmed to accumulate in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), as well as those with diabetes and chronic kidney disease. However, the role of AOPPs in the intestinal epithelium remains unclear. This study was designed to investigate whether AOPPs have an effect on intestinal epithelial cell (IEC) death and intestinal injury. Immortalized rat intestinal epithelial (IEC-6) cells and normal Sprague Dawley rats were treated with AOPP-albumin prepared by incubation of rat serum albumin (RSA) with hypochlorous acid. Epithelial cell death, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase subunit activity, reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, apoptosis-related protein expression, and c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) phosphorylation were detected both in vivo and in vitro. In addition, we measured AOPPs deposition and IEC death in 23 subjects with Crohn's disease (CD). Extracellular AOPP-RSA accumulation induced apoptosis in IEC-6 cultures. The triggering effect of AOPPs was mainly mediated by a redox-dependent pathway, including NADPH oxidase-derived ROS generation, JNK phosphorylation, and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) activation. Chronic AOPP-RSA administration to normal rats resulted in AOPPs deposition in the villous epithelial cells and in inflammatory cells in the lamina propria. These changes were companied with IEC death, inflammatory cellular infiltration, and intestinal injury. Both cell death and intestinal injury were ameliorated by chronic treatment with apocynin. Furthermore, AOPPs deposition was also observed in IECs and inflammatory cells in the lamina propria of patients with CD. The high immunoreactive score of AOPPs showed increased apoptosis. Our results demonstrate that AOPPs trigger IEC death and intestinal tissue injury via a redox-mediated pathway. These data suggest that AOPPs may represent a novel pathogenic factor

  19. Poly(ADP-ribose)--a unique natural polymer structural features, biological role and approaches to the chemical synthesis.

    PubMed

    Drenichev, Mikhail S; Mikhailov, Sergey N

    2015-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) is a natural polymer, taking part in numerous important cellular processes. Several enzymes are involved in biosynthesis and degradation of PAR. One of them, poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is considered to be a perspective target for the design of new drugs, affecting PAR metabolism. The structure of PAR was established by enzymatic hydrolysis and further analysis of the products, but total chemical synthesis of PAR hasn't been described yet. Several approaches have been developed on the way to chemical synthesis of this unique biopolymer.

  20. An assay to measure poly(ADP ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) activity in cells.

    PubMed

    James, Dominic I; Durant, Stephen; Eckersley, Kay; Fairweather, Emma; Griffiths, Louise A; Hamilton, Nicola; Kelly, Paul; O'Connor, Mark; Shea, Kerry; Waddell, Ian D; Ogilvie, Donald J

    2016-01-01

    After a DNA damage signal multiple polymers of ADP ribose attached to poly(ADP) ribose (PAR) polymerases (PARPs) are broken down by the enzyme poly(ADP) ribose glycohydrolase (PARG). Inhibition of PARG leads to a failure of DNA repair and small molecule inhibition of PARG has been a goal for many years. To determine whether biochemical inhibitors of PARG are active in cells we have designed an immunofluorescence assay to detect nuclear PAR after DNA damage. This 384-well assay is suitable for medium throughput high-content screening and can detect cell-permeable inhibitors of PARG from nM to µM potency. In addition, the assay has been shown to work in murine cells and in a variety of human cancer cells. Furthermore, the assay is suitable for detecting the DNA damage response induced by treatment with temozolomide and methylmethane sulfonate (MMS). Lastly, the assay has been shown to be robust over a period of several years. PMID:27610220

  1. An assay to measure poly(ADP ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) activity in cells

    PubMed Central

    James, Dominic I.; Durant, Stephen; Eckersley, Kay; Fairweather, Emma; Griffiths, Louise A.; Hamilton, Nicola; Kelly, Paul; O'Connor, Mark; Shea, Kerry; Waddell, Ian D.; Ogilvie, Donald J.

    2016-01-01

    After a DNA damage signal multiple polymers of ADP ribose attached to poly(ADP) ribose (PAR) polymerases (PARPs) are broken down by the enzyme poly(ADP) ribose glycohydrolase (PARG). Inhibition of PARG leads to a failure of DNA repair and small molecule inhibition of PARG has been a goal for many years. To determine whether biochemical inhibitors of PARG are active in cells we have designed an immunofluorescence assay to detect nuclear PAR after DNA damage. This 384-well assay is suitable for medium throughput high-content screening and can detect cell-permeable inhibitors of PARG from nM to µM potency. In addition, the assay has been shown to work in murine cells and in a variety of human cancer cells. Furthermore, the assay is suitable for detecting the DNA damage response induced by treatment with temozolomide and methylmethane sulfonate (MMS). Lastly, the assay has been shown to be robust over a period of several years. PMID:27610220

  2. An assay to measure poly(ADP ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) activity in cells

    PubMed Central

    James, Dominic I.; Durant, Stephen; Eckersley, Kay; Fairweather, Emma; Griffiths, Louise A.; Hamilton, Nicola; Kelly, Paul; O'Connor, Mark; Shea, Kerry; Waddell, Ian D.; Ogilvie, Donald J.

    2016-01-01

    After a DNA damage signal multiple polymers of ADP ribose attached to poly(ADP) ribose (PAR) polymerases (PARPs) are broken down by the enzyme poly(ADP) ribose glycohydrolase (PARG). Inhibition of PARG leads to a failure of DNA repair and small molecule inhibition of PARG has been a goal for many years. To determine whether biochemical inhibitors of PARG are active in cells we have designed an immunofluorescence assay to detect nuclear PAR after DNA damage. This 384-well assay is suitable for medium throughput high-content screening and can detect cell-permeable inhibitors of PARG from nM to µM potency. In addition, the assay has been shown to work in murine cells and in a variety of human cancer cells. Furthermore, the assay is suitable for detecting the DNA damage response induced by treatment with temozolomide and methylmethane sulfonate (MMS). Lastly, the assay has been shown to be robust over a period of several years.

  3. Altered poly(ADP-ribose) metabolism impairs cellular responses to genotoxic stress in a hypomorphic mutant of poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Hong; Coyle, Donna L.; Meyer-Ficca, Mirella L.; Meyer, Ralph G.; Jacobson, Elaine L.; Wang, Zhao-Qi; Jacobson, Myron K. . E-mail: mjacobson@pharmacy.arizona.edu

    2007-03-10

    Genotoxic stress activates nuclear poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) metabolism leading to PAR synthesis catalyzed by DNA damage activated poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) and rapid PAR turnover by action of nuclear poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG). The involvement of PARP-1 and PARP-2 in responses to DNA damage has been well studied but the involvement of nuclear PARG is less well understood. To gain insights into the function of nuclear PARG in DNA damage responses, we have quantitatively studied PAR metabolism in cells derived from a hypomorphic mutant mouse model in which exons 2 and 3 of the PARG gene have been deleted (PARG-{delta}2,3 cells), resulting in a nuclear PARG containing a catalytic domain but lacking the N-terminal region (A domain) of the protein. Following DNA damage induced by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG), we found that the activity of both PARG and PARPs in intact cells is increased in PARG-{delta}2,3 cells. The increased PARG activity leads to decreased PARP-1 automodification with resulting increased PARP activity. The degree of PARG activation is greater than PARP, resulting in decreased PAR accumulation. Following MNNG treatment, PARG-{delta}2,3 cells show reduced formation of XRCC1 foci, delayed H2AX phosphorylation, decreased DNA break intermediates during repair, and increased cell death. Our results show that a precise coordination of PARPs and PARG activities is important for normal cellular responses to DNA damage and that this coordination is defective in the absence of the PARG A domain.

  4. Abscisic acid signaling through cyclic ADP-ribose in plants

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Yan; Kuzma, J.; Marechal, E.

    1997-12-19

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is the primary hormone that mediates plant responses to stresses such as cold, drought, and salinity. Single-cell microinjection experiments in tomato were used to identify possible intermediates involved in ABA signal transduction. Cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) was identified as a signaling molecule in the ABA response and was shown to exert its effects by way of calcium. Bioassay experiments showed that the amounts of cADPR in Arabidopsis thaliana plants increased in response to ABA treatment and before ABA-induced gene expression.

  5. Molecular bases of catalysis and ADP-ribose preference of human Mn2+-dependent ADP-ribose/CDP-alcohol diphosphatase and conversion by mutagenesis to a preferential cyclic ADP-ribose phosphohydrolase.

    PubMed

    Cabezas, Alicia; Ribeiro, João Meireles; Rodrigues, Joaquim Rui; López-Villamizar, Iralis; Fernández, Ascensión; Canales, José; Pinto, Rosa María; Costas, María Jesús; Cameselle, José Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Among metallo-dependent phosphatases, ADP-ribose/CDP-alcohol diphosphatases form a protein family (ADPRibase-Mn-like) mainly restricted, in eukaryotes, to vertebrates and plants, with preferential expression, at least in rodents, in immune cells. Rat and zebrafish ADPRibase-Mn, the only biochemically studied, are phosphohydrolases of ADP-ribose and, somewhat less efficiently, of CDP-alcohols and 2´,3´-cAMP. Furthermore, the rat but not the zebrafish enzyme displays a unique phosphohydrolytic activity on cyclic ADP-ribose. The molecular basis of such specificity is unknown. Human ADPRibase-Mn showed similar activities, including cyclic ADP-ribose phosphohydrolase, which seems thus common to mammalian ADPRibase-Mn. Substrate docking on a homology model of human ADPRibase-Mn suggested possible interactions of ADP-ribose with seven residues located, with one exception (Cys253), either within the metallo-dependent phosphatases signature (Gln27, Asn110, His111), or in unique structural regions of the ADPRibase-Mn family: s2s3 (Phe37 and Arg43) and h7h8 (Phe210), around the active site entrance. Mutants were constructed, and kinetic parameters for ADP-ribose, CDP-choline, 2´,3´-cAMP and cyclic ADP-ribose were determined. Phe37 was needed for ADP-ribose preference without catalytic effect, as indicated by the increased ADP-ribose Km and unchanged kcat of F37A-ADPRibase-Mn, while the Km values for the other substrates were little affected. Arg43 was essential for catalysis as indicated by the drastic efficiency loss shown by R43A-ADPRibase-Mn. Unexpectedly, Cys253 was hindering for cADPR phosphohydrolase, as indicated by the specific tenfold gain of efficiency of C253A-ADPRibase-Mn with cyclic ADP-ribose. This allowed the design of a triple mutant (F37A+L196F+C253A) for which cyclic ADP-ribose was the best substrate, with a catalytic efficiency of 3.5´104 M-1s-1 versus 4´103 M-1s-1 of the wild type.

  6. Molecular Bases of Catalysis and ADP-Ribose Preference of Human Mn2+-Dependent ADP-Ribose/CDP-Alcohol Diphosphatase and Conversion by Mutagenesis to a Preferential Cyclic ADP-Ribose Phosphohydrolase

    PubMed Central

    Cabezas, Alicia; Ribeiro, João Meireles; Rodrigues, Joaquim Rui; López-Villamizar, Iralis; Fernández, Ascensión; Canales, José; Pinto, Rosa María; Costas, María Jesús; Cameselle, José Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Among metallo-dependent phosphatases, ADP-ribose/CDP-alcohol diphosphatases form a protein family (ADPRibase-Mn-like) mainly restricted, in eukaryotes, to vertebrates and plants, with preferential expression, at least in rodents, in immune cells. Rat and zebrafish ADPRibase-Mn, the only biochemically studied, are phosphohydrolases of ADP-ribose and, somewhat less efficiently, of CDP-alcohols and 2´,3´-cAMP. Furthermore, the rat but not the zebrafish enzyme displays a unique phosphohydrolytic activity on cyclic ADP-ribose. The molecular basis of such specificity is unknown. Human ADPRibase-Mn showed similar activities, including cyclic ADP-ribose phosphohydrolase, which seems thus common to mammalian ADPRibase-Mn. Substrate docking on a homology model of human ADPRibase-Mn suggested possible interactions of ADP-ribose with seven residues located, with one exception (Cys253), either within the metallo-dependent phosphatases signature (Gln27, Asn110, His111), or in unique structural regions of the ADPRibase-Mn family: s2s3 (Phe37 and Arg43) and h7h8 (Phe210), around the active site entrance. Mutants were constructed, and kinetic parameters for ADP-ribose, CDP-choline, 2´,3´-cAMP and cyclic ADP-ribose were determined. Phe37 was needed for ADP-ribose preference without catalytic effect, as indicated by the increased ADP-ribose Km and unchanged kcat of F37A-ADPRibase-Mn, while the Km values for the other substrates were little affected. Arg43 was essential for catalysis as indicated by the drastic efficiency loss shown by R43A-ADPRibase-Mn. Unexpectedly, Cys253 was hindering for cADPR phosphohydrolase, as indicated by the specific tenfold gain of efficiency of C253A-ADPRibase-Mn with cyclic ADP-ribose. This allowed the design of a triple mutant (F37A+L196F+C253A) for which cyclic ADP-ribose was the best substrate, with a catalytic efficiency of 3.5´104 M-1s-1 versus 4´103 M-1s-1 of the wild type. PMID:25692488

  7. Drug repurposing screen identifies lestaurtinib amplifies the ability of the poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 inhibitor AG14361 to kill breast cancer associated gene-1 mutant and wild type breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Breast cancer is a devastating disease that results in approximately 40,000 deaths each year in the USA. Current drug screening and chemopreventatitive methods are suboptimal, due in part to the poor specificity of compounds for cancer cells. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) inhibitor (PARPi)-mediated therapy is a promising approach for familial breast cancers caused by mutations of breast cancer-associated gene-1 and -2 (BRCA1/2), yet drug resistance frequently occurs during the treatment. Moreover, PARPis exhibit very little effect on cancers that are proficient for DNA repair and clinical efficacy for PARPis as single-agent therapies has yet to be illustrated. Methods Using a quantitative high-throughput screening approach, we screened a library containing 2,816 drugs, most of which are approved for human or animal use by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) or other countries, to identify compounds that sensitize breast cancer cells to PARPi. After initial screening, we performed further cellular and molecular analysis on lestaurtinib, which is an orally bioavailable multikinase inhibitor and has been used in clinical trials for myeloproliferative disorders and acute myelogenous leukemia. Results Our study indicated that lestaurtinib is highly potent against breast cancers as a mono-treatment agent. It also strongly enhanced the activity of the potent PARPi AG14361 on breast cancer cell growth both in vitro and in vivo conditions. The inhibition of cancer growth is measured by increased apoptosis and reduced cell proliferation. Consistent with this, the treatment results in activation of caspase 3/7, and accumulation of cells in the G2 phase of the cell cycle, irrespective of their BRCA1 status. Finally, we demonstrated that AG14361 inhibits NF-κB signaling, which is further enhanced by lestaurtinib treatment. Conclusions Lestaurtinib amplifies the ability of the PARP1 inhibitor AG14361 to kill BRCA1 mutant and wild-type breast cancer

  8. Phase 2 multicentre trial investigating intermittent and continuous dosing schedules of the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor rucaparib in germline BRCA mutation carriers with advanced ovarian and breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Drew, Yvette; Ledermann, Jonathan; Hall, Geoff; Rea, Daniel; Glasspool, Ros; Highley, Martin; Jayson, Gordon; Sludden, Julieann; Murray, James; Jamieson, David; Halford, Sarah; Acton, Gary; Backholer, Zoe; Mangano, Raffaella; Boddy, Alan; Curtin, Nicola; Plummer, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Background: Rucaparib is an orally available potent selective small-molecule inhibitor of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) 1 and 2. Rucaparib induces synthetic lethality in cancer cells defective in the homologous recombination repair pathway including BRCA-1/2. We investigated the efficacy and safety of single-agent rucaparib in germline (g) BRCA mutation carriers with advanced breast and ovarian cancers. Methods: Phase II, open-label, multicentre trial of rucaparib in proven BRCA-1/2 mutation carriers with advanced breast and or ovarian cancer, WHO PS 0–1 and normal organ function. Intravenous (i.v.) and subsequently oral rucaparib were assessed, using a range of dosing schedules, to determine the safety, tolerability, dose-limiting toxic effects and pharmacodynamic (PD) and pharmacokinetic (PK) profiles. Results: Rucaparib was well tolerated in patients up to doses of 480 mg per day and is a potent inhibitor of PARP, with sustained inhibition ⩾24 h after single doses. The i.v. rucaparib (intermittent dosing schedule) resulted in an objective response rate (ORR) of only 2% but with 41% (18 out of 44) patients achieved stable disease for ⩾12 weeks and 3 patients maintaining disease stabilisation for >52 weeks. The ORR for oral rucaparib (across all six dose levels) was 15%. In the oral cohorts, 81% (22 out of 27) of the patients had ovarian cancer and 12 out of 13, who were dosed continuously, achieved RECIST complete response/partial response (CR/PR) or stable disease (SD) ⩾12 weeks, with a median duration of response of 179 days (range 84–567 days). Conclusions: Rucaparib is well tolerated and results in high levels of PARP inhibition in surrogate tissues even at the lowest dose levels. Rucaparib is active in gBRCA-mutant ovarian cancer and this activity correlates with platinum-free interval. The key lessons learned from this study is that continuous rucaparib dosing is required for optimal response, the recommended phase 2 dose (RP2D) for

  9. Differential activities of cellular and viral macro domain proteins in binding of ADP-ribose metabolites.

    PubMed

    Neuvonen, Maarit; Ahola, Tero

    2009-01-01

    Macro domain is a highly conserved protein domain found in both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. Macro domains are also encoded by a set of positive-strand RNA viruses that replicate in the cytoplasm of animal cells, including coronaviruses and alphaviruses. The functions of the macro domain are poorly understood, but it has been suggested to be an ADP-ribose-binding module. We have here characterized three novel human macro domain proteins that were found to reside either in the cytoplasm and nucleus [macro domain protein 2 (MDO2) and ganglioside-induced differentiation-associated protein 2] or in mitochondria [macro domain protein 1 (MDO1)], and compared them with viral macro domains from Semliki Forest virus, hepatitis E virus, and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus, and with a yeast macro protein, Poa1p. MDO2 specifically bound monomeric ADP-ribose with a high affinity (K(d)=0.15 microM), but did not bind poly(ADP-ribose) efficiently. MDO2 also hydrolyzed ADP-ribose-1'' phosphate, resembling Poa1p in all these properties. Ganglioside-induced differentiation-associated protein 2 did not show affinity for ADP-ribose or its derivatives, but instead bound poly(A). MDO1 was generally active in these reactions, including poly(A) binding. Individual point mutations in MDO1 abolished monomeric ADP-ribose binding, but not poly(ADP-ribose) binding; in poly(ADP-ribose) binding assays, the monomer did not compete against polymer binding. The viral macro proteins bound poly(ADP-ribose) and poly(A), but had a low affinity for monomeric ADP-ribose. Thus, the viral proteins do not closely resemble any of the human proteins in their biochemical functions. The differential activity profiles of the human proteins implicate them in different cellular pathways, some of which may involve RNA rather than ADP-ribose derivatives.

  10. Effect of heat shock on poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase and DNA repair in Drosophila cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nolan, N.L.; Kidwell, W.R.

    1982-04-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase, a chromatin-bound enzyme which attaches polyanionic chains of ADP-ribose to nuclear proteins, was found to be temperature sensitive in intact Drosophila melanogaster cells. The synthetase was completely inactivated by heat-shocking the cells at 37/sup 0/C for 5 min, a condition which had no appreciable effect on the subsequent growth of Drosophila cells at their physiological temperature. The heat-shock effect on synthetase was reversible; enzyme activity began to reappear about 2 hr post heat shock. During the 2-hr interval when poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase was absent, the cells were competent in repair of ..gamma..-ray-induced DNA strand breaks as shown by DNA sedimentation studies on alkaline sucrose gradients. It is thus concluded that poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis is unnecessary for repair of DNA strand breaks introduced by irradiation. The same conclusion was reached from the fact that two inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase 3-aminobenzamide and 5-methylnicotinamide, failed to block repair of ..gamma..-ray-induced DNA chain breaks even though both inhibitors reduced the amount of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesized in cells by 50-75%. Although it was found that the repair of DNA strand breaks is independent of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis, irradiation does activate the synthetase in control cells, as shown by radioimmunoassay of poly(ADP-ribose) levels.

  11. Comparative studies on antibodies to poly(ADP-ribose) in rabbits and patients with systemic lupus erythematosus.

    PubMed Central

    Kanai, Y; Sugimura, T

    1981-01-01

    Immunochemical studies were made on the antibodies induced in rabbits against poly(ADP-ribose) and naturally-occurring antibodies in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Antibodies against poly(ADP-ribose) could also be induced in rabbits by oligo(ADP-ribose) associated with rat liver histones and by a complex of poly(ADP-ribose) with methylated bovine serum albumin (MBSA). The two types of antibody were inhibited to the same extent by poly(ADP-ribose). However, the antibody induced by oligo(ADP-ribose) associated with histones was inhibited by oligo(ADP-ribose) with an average chain length if 4 ADP-ribosyl units and by phosphoribosyl adenosine monophosphate (PR-AMP) but not by mono ADP-ribose, whereas that induced by poly(ADP-ribose) was practically not inhibited by these related compounds even in excess amounts. The sera of ten cases of systemic lupus erythematosus showing high antibody activity against poly(ADP-ribose) were also examined immunochemically. It was found that the antibodies of three patients showed a similar inhibitory pattern to that of antibody induced in rabbits by oligo(ADP-ribose) associated with histones, those of three patients showed a similar pattern to that of antibody produced in rabbits by poly(ADP-ribose), and the remainder did not show either pattern. These findings suggest that oligo(ADP-ribose) associated with histones may serve as antigen to elicit naturally-occuring antibodies to poly(ADP-ribose) in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:7251045

  12. On PAR with PARP: cellular stress signaling through poly(ADP-ribose) and PARP-1

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Xin; Kraus, W. Lee

    2012-01-01

    Cellular stress responses are mediated through a series of regulatory processes that occur at the genomic, transcriptional, post-transcriptional, translational, and post-translational levels. These responses require a complex network of sensors and effectors from multiple signaling pathways, including the abundant and ubiquitous nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymerase-1 (PARP-1). PARP-1 functions at the center of cellular stress responses, where it processes diverse signals and, in response, directs cells to specific fates (e.g., DNA repair vs. cell death) based on the type and strength of the stress stimulus. Many of PARP-1's functions in stress response pathways are mediated by its regulated synthesis of PAR, a negatively charged polymer, using NAD+ as a donor of ADP-ribose units. Thus, PARP-1's functions are intimately tied to nuclear NAD+ metabolism and the broader metabolic profile of the cell. Recent studies in cell and animal models have highlighted the roles of PARP-1 and PAR in the response to a wide variety of extrinsic and intrinsic stress signals, including those initiated by oxidative, nitrosative, genotoxic, oncogenic, thermal, inflammatory, and metabolic stresses. These responses underlie pathological conditions, including cancer, inflammation-related diseases, and metabolic dysregulation. The development of PARP inhibitors is being pursued as a therapeutic approach to these conditions. In this review, we highlight the newest findings about PARP-1's role in stress responses in the context of the historical data. PMID:22391446

  13. Poly (ADP-ribose) in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yunjong; Kang, Ho Chul; Lee, Byoung Dae; Lee, Yun-Il; Kim, Young Pil; Shin, Joo-Ho

    2014-01-01

    The defining feature of Parkinson’s disease is a progressive and selective demise of dopaminergic neurons. A recent report on Parkinson’s disease animal model demonstrates that poly (ADP-ribose) (PAR) dependent cell death, also named parthanatos, is accountable for selective dopaminergic neuronal loss. Parthanatos is a programmed necrotic cell death, characterized by PARP1 activation, apoptosis inducing factor (AIF) nuclear translocation, and large scale DNA fragmentation. Besides cell death regulation via interaction with AIF, PAR molecule mediates diverse cellular processes including genomic stability, cell division, transcription, epigenetic regulation, and stress granule formation. In this review, we will discuss the roles of PARP1 activation and PAR molecules in the pathological processes of Parkinson’s disease. Potential interaction between PAR molecule and Parkinson’s disease protein interactome are briefly introduced. Finally, we suggest promising points of therapeutic intervention in the pathological PAR signaling cascade to halt progression in Parkinson’s disease. [BMB Reports 2014; 47(8): 424-432] PMID:24874851

  14. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymers regulate DNA topoisomerase I (Top1) nuclear dynamics and camptothecin sensitivity in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Das, Subhendu K.; Rehman, Ishita; Ghosh, Arijit; Sengupta, Souvik; Majumdar, Papiya; Jana, Biman; Das, Benu Brata

    2016-01-01

    Topoisomerase 1 (Top1) is essential for removing the DNA supercoiling generated during replication and transcription. Anticancer drugs like camptothecin (CPT) and its clinical derivatives exert their cytotoxicity by reversibly trapping Top1 in covalent complexes on the DNA (Top1cc). Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) catalyses the addition of ADP-ribose polymers (PAR) onto itself and Top1. PARP inhibitors enhance the cytotoxicity of CPT in the clinical trials. However, the molecular mechanism by which PARylation regulates Top1 nuclear dynamics is not fully understood. Using live-cell imaging of enhanced green fluorescence tagged-human Top1, we show that PARP inhibitors (Veliparib, ABT-888) delocalize Top1 from the nucleolus to the nucleoplasm, which is independent of Top1–PARP1 interaction. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and subsequent fitting of the data employing kinetic modelling we demonstrate that ABT-888 markedly increase CPT-induced bound/immobile fraction of Top1 (Top1cc) across the nuclear genome, suggesting Top1-PARylation counteracts CPT-induced stabilization of Top1cc. We further show Trp205 and Asn722 of Top1 are critical for subnuclear dynamics. Top1 mutant (N722S) was restricted to the nucleolus in the presence of CPT due to its deficiency in the accumulation of CPT-induced Top1-PARylation and Top1cc formation. This work identifies ADP-ribose polymers as key determinant for regulating Top1 subnuclear dynamics. PMID:27466387

  15. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymers regulate DNA topoisomerase I (Top1) nuclear dynamics and camptothecin sensitivity in living cells.

    PubMed

    Das, Subhendu K; Rehman, Ishita; Ghosh, Arijit; Sengupta, Souvik; Majumdar, Papiya; Jana, Biman; Das, Benu Brata

    2016-09-30

    Topoisomerase 1 (Top1) is essential for removing the DNA supercoiling generated during replication and transcription. Anticancer drugs like camptothecin (CPT) and its clinical derivatives exert their cytotoxicity by reversibly trapping Top1 in covalent complexes on the DNA (Top1cc). Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) catalyses the addition of ADP-ribose polymers (PAR) onto itself and Top1. PARP inhibitors enhance the cytotoxicity of CPT in the clinical trials. However, the molecular mechanism by which PARylation regulates Top1 nuclear dynamics is not fully understood. Using live-cell imaging of enhanced green fluorescence tagged-human Top1, we show that PARP inhibitors (Veliparib, ABT-888) delocalize Top1 from the nucleolus to the nucleoplasm, which is independent of Top1-PARP1 interaction. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching and subsequent fitting of the data employing kinetic modelling we demonstrate that ABT-888 markedly increase CPT-induced bound/immobile fraction of Top1 (Top1cc) across the nuclear genome, suggesting Top1-PARylation counteracts CPT-induced stabilization of Top1cc. We further show Trp205 and Asn722 of Top1 are critical for subnuclear dynamics. Top1 mutant (N722S) was restricted to the nucleolus in the presence of CPT due to its deficiency in the accumulation of CPT-induced Top1-PARylation and Top1cc formation. This work identifies ADP-ribose polymers as key determinant for regulating Top1 subnuclear dynamics.

  16. A novel and orally active poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor, KR-33889 [2-[methoxycarbonyl(4-methoxyphenyl) methylsulfanyl]-1H-benzimidazole-4-carboxylic acid amide], attenuates injury in in vitro model of cell death and in vivo model of cardiac ischemia.

    PubMed

    Oh, Kwang-Seok; Lee, Sunkyung; Yi, Kyu Yang; Seo, Ho Won; Koo, Hyun-Na; Lee, Byung Ho

    2009-01-01

    Blocking of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-1 has been expected to protect the heart from ischemia-reperfusion injury. We have recently identified a novel and orally active PARP-1 inhibitor, KR-33889 [2-[methoxycarbonyl(4-methoxyphenyl)-methylsulfanyl]-1H-benzimidazole-4-carboxylic acid amide], and its major metabolite, KR-34285 [2-[carboxy(4-methoxyphenyl)methylsulfanyl]-1H-benzimidazole-4-carboxylic acid amide]. KR-33889 potently inhibited PARP-1 activity with an IC(50) value of 0.52 +/- 0.10 microM. In H9c2 myocardial cells, KR-33889 (0.03-30 microM) showed a resistance to hydrogen peroxide (2 mM)-mediated oxidative insult and significantly attenuated activation of intracellular PARP-1. In anesthetized rats subjected to 30 min of coronary occlusion and 3 h of reperfusion, KR-33889 (0.3-3 mg/kg i.v.) dose-dependently reduced myocardial infarct size. KR-34285, a major metabolite of KR-33889, exerted similar patterns to the parent compound with equi- or weaker potency in the same studies described above. In separate experiments for the therapeutic time window study, KR-33889 (3 mg/kg i.v.) given at preischemia, at reperfusion or in both, in rat models also significantly reduced the myocardial infarction compared with their respective vehicle-treated group. Furthermore, the oral administration of KR-33889 (1-10 mg/kg p.o.) at 1 h before occlusion significantly reduced myocardial injury. The ability of KR-33889 to inhibit PARP in the rat model of ischemic heart was confirmed by immunohistochemical detection of poly(ADP-ribose) activation. These results indicate that the novel PARP inhibitor KR-33889 exerts its cardioprotective effect in in vitro and in vivo studies of myocardial ischemia via potent PARP inhibition and also suggest that KR-33889 could be an attractive therapeutic candidate with oral activity for several cardiovascular disorders, including myocardial infarction.

  17. ADP-ribose-derived nuclear ATP synthesis by NUDIX5 is required for chromatin remodeling.

    PubMed

    Wright, Roni H G; Lioutas, Antonios; Le Dily, Francois; Soronellas, Daniel; Pohl, Andy; Bonet, Jaume; Nacht, A S; Samino, Sara; Font-Mateu, Jofre; Vicent, Guillermo P; Wierer, Michael; Trabado, Miriam A; Schelhorn, Constanze; Carolis, Carlo; Macias, Maria J; Yanes, Oscar; Oliva, Baldo; Beato, Miguel

    2016-06-01

    Key nuclear processes in eukaryotes, including DNA replication, repair, and gene regulation, require extensive chromatin remodeling catalyzed by energy-consuming enzymes. It remains unclear how the ATP demands of such processes are met in response to rapid stimuli. We analyzed this question in the context of the massive gene regulation changes induced by progestins in breast cancer cells and found that ATP is generated in the cell nucleus via the hydrolysis of poly(ADP-ribose) to ADP-ribose. In the presence of pyrophosphate, ADP-ribose is used by the pyrophosphatase NUDIX5 to generate nuclear ATP. The nuclear source of ATP is essential for hormone-induced chromatin remodeling, transcriptional regulation, and cell proliferation. PMID:27257257

  18. Poly(ADP-ribose) binding to Chk1 at stalled replication forks is required for S-phase checkpoint activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Wookee; Bruhn, Christopher; Grigaravicius, Paulius; Zhou, Zhong-Wei; Li, Fu; Krüger, Anja; Siddeek, Bénazir; Greulich, Karl-Otto; Popp, Oliver; Meisezahl, Chris; Calkhoven, Cornelis F.; Bürkle, Alexander; Xu, Xingzhi; Wang, Zhao-Qi

    2013-12-01

    Damaged replication forks activate poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1), which catalyses poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) formation; however, how PARP1 or poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is involved in the S-phase checkpoint is unknown. Here we show that PAR, supplied by PARP1, interacts with Chk1 via a novel PAR-binding regulatory (PbR) motif in Chk1, independent of ATR and its activity. iPOND studies reveal that Chk1 associates readily with the unperturbed replication fork and that PAR is required for efficient retention of Chk1 and phosphorylated Chk1 at the fork. A PbR mutation, which disrupts PAR binding, but not the interaction with its partners Claspin or BRCA1, impairs Chk1 and the S-phase checkpoint activation, and mirrors Chk1 knockdown-induced hypersensitivity to fork poisoning. We find that long chains, but not short chains, of PAR stimulate Chk1 kinase activity. Collectively, we disclose a previously unrecognized mechanism of the S-phase checkpoint by PAR metabolism that modulates Chk1 activity at the replication fork.

  19. A specific isoform of poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase is targeted to the mitochondrial matrix by a N-terminal mitochondrial targeting sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Whatcott, Clifford J.; Meyer-Ficca, Mirella L.; Meyer, Ralph G.; Jacobson, Myron K.

    2009-12-10

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) convert NAD to polymers of ADP-ribose that are converted to free ADP-ribose by poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG). The activation of the nuclear enzyme PARP-1 following genotoxic stress has been linked to release of apoptosis inducing factor from the mitochondria, but the mechanisms by which signals are transmitted between nuclear and mitochondrial compartments are not well understood. The study reported here has examined the relationship between PARG and mitochondria in HeLa cells. Endogenous PARG associated with the mitochondrial fraction migrated in the range of 60 kDa. Transient transfection of cells with PARG expression constructs with amino acids encoded by exon 4 at the N-terminus was targeted to the mitochondria as demonstrated by subcellular fractionation and immunofluorescence microscopy of whole cells. Deletion and missense mutants allowed identification of a canonical N-terminal mitochondrial targeting sequence consisting of the first 16 amino acids encoded by PARG exon 4. Sub-mitochondrial localization experiments indicate that this mitochondrial PARG isoform is targeted to the mitochondrial matrix. The identification of a PARG isoform as a component of the mitochondrial matrix raises several interesting possibilities concerning mechanisms of nuclear-mitochondrial cross talk involved in regulation of cell death pathways.

  20. Host Cell Poly(ADP-Ribose) Glycohydrolase Is Crucial for Trypanosoma cruzi Infection Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Vilchez Larrea, Salomé C.; Schlesinger, Mariana; Kevorkian, María L.; Flawiá, Mirtha M.; Alonso, Guillermo D.; Fernández Villamil, Silvia H.

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, etiological agent of Chagas’ disease, has a complex life cycle which involves the invasion of mammalian host cells, differentiation and intracellular replication. Here we report the first insights into the biological role of a poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase in a trypanosomatid (TcPARG). In silico analysis of the TcPARG gene pointed out the conservation of key residues involved in the catalytic process and, by Western blot, we demonstrated that it is expressed in a life stage-dependant manner. Indirect immunofluorescence assays and electron microscopy using an anti-TcPARG antibody showed that this enzyme is localized in the nucleus independently of the presence of DNA damage or cell cycle stage. The addition of poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase inhibitors ADP-HPD (adenosine diphosphate (hydroxymethyl) pyrrolidinediol) or DEA (6,9-diamino-2-ethoxyacridine lactate monohydrate) to the culture media, both at a 1 µM concentration, reduced in vitro epimastigote growth by 35% and 37% respectively, when compared to control cultures. We also showed that ADP-HPD 1 µM can lead to an alteration in the progression of the cell cycle in hydroxyurea synchronized cultures of T. cruzi epimastigotes. Outstandingly, here we demonstrate that the lack of poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase activity in Vero and A549 host cells, achieved by chemical inhibition or iRNA, produces the reduction of the percentage of infected cells as well as the number of amastigotes per cell and trypomastigotes released, leading to a nearly complete abrogation of the infection process. We conclude that both, T. cruzi and the host, poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase activities are important players in the life cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi, emerging as a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of Chagas’ disease. PMID:23776710

  1. Host cell poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase is crucial for Trypanosoma cruzi infection cycle.

    PubMed

    Vilchez Larrea, Salomé C; Schlesinger, Mariana; Kevorkian, María L; Flawiá, Mirtha M; Alonso, Guillermo D; Fernández Villamil, Silvia H

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, etiological agent of Chagas' disease, has a complex life cycle which involves the invasion of mammalian host cells, differentiation and intracellular replication. Here we report the first insights into the biological role of a poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase in a trypanosomatid (TcPARG). In silico analysis of the TcPARG gene pointed out the conservation of key residues involved in the catalytic process and, by Western blot, we demonstrated that it is expressed in a life stage-dependant manner. Indirect immunofluorescence assays and electron microscopy using an anti-TcPARG antibody showed that this enzyme is localized in the nucleus independently of the presence of DNA damage or cell cycle stage. The addition of poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase inhibitors ADP-HPD (adenosine diphosphate (hydroxymethyl) pyrrolidinediol) or DEA (6,9-diamino-2-ethoxyacridine lactate monohydrate) to the culture media, both at a 1 µM concentration, reduced in vitro epimastigote growth by 35% and 37% respectively, when compared to control cultures. We also showed that ADP-HPD 1 µM can lead to an alteration in the progression of the cell cycle in hydroxyurea synchronized cultures of T. cruzi epimastigotes. Outstandingly, here we demonstrate that the lack of poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase activity in Vero and A549 host cells, achieved by chemical inhibition or iRNA, produces the reduction of the percentage of infected cells as well as the number of amastigotes per cell and trypomastigotes released, leading to a nearly complete abrogation of the infection process. We conclude that both, T. cruzi and the host, poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase activities are important players in the life cycle of Trypanosoma cruzi, emerging as a promising therapeutic target for the treatment of Chagas' disease. PMID:23776710

  2. Poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase and poly(ADP-ribose)-interacting protein Hrp38 regulate pattern formation during Drosophila eye development.

    PubMed

    Ji, Yingbiao; Jarnik, Michael; Tulin, Alexei V

    2013-09-10

    Drosophila Hrp38, a homolog of human hnRNP A1, has been shown to regulate splicing, but its function can be modified by poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation. Notwithstanding such findings, our understanding of the roles of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated Hrp38 on development is limited. Here, we have demonstrated that Hrp38 is essential for fly eye development based on a rough-eye phenotype with disorganized ommatidia observed in adult escapers of the hrp38 mutant. We also observed that poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (Parg) loss-of-function, which caused increased Hrp38 poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation, also resulted in the rough-eye phenotype with disrupted ommatidial lattice and reduced number of photoreceptor cells. In addition, ectopic expression of DE-cadherin, which is required for retinal morphogenesis, fully rescued the rough-eye phenotype of the hrp38 mutant. Similarly, Parg mutant eye clones had decreased expression level of DE-cadherin with orientation defects, which is reminiscent of DE-cadherin mutant eye phenotype. Therefore, our results suggest that Hrp38 poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation controls eye pattern formation via regulation of DE-cadherin expression, a finding which has implications for understanding the pathogenic mechanisms of Hrp38-related Fragile X syndrome and PARP1-related retinal degeneration diseases.

  3. Pharmacodynamic analyses in a multi-laboratory network: lessons from the poly(ADP-ribose) assay.

    PubMed

    Ferry-Galow, Katherine V; Ji, Jiuping; Kinders, Robert J; Zhang, Yiping; Czambel, R Kenneth; Schmitz, John C; Herzog, Josef; Evrard, Yvonne A; Parchment, Ralph E

    2016-08-01

    Clinical pharmacodynamic assays need to meet higher criteria for sensitivity, precision, robustness, and reproducibility than those expected for research-grade assays because of the long duration of clinical trials and the potentially unpredictable number of laboratories running the assays. This report describes the process of making an immunoassay based on commercially available reagents "clinically ready". The assay was developed to quantify poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) levels as a marker of PAR polymerase inhibitor activity for a proof-of-concept phase 0 clinical trial at the National Cancer Institute (NCI) and subsequent clinical trials. In this publication, we retrospectively examine the measures taken to validate the published PAR immunoassay and outline key lessons learned during the development and implementation of these procedures at both internal and external clinical trial sites; these measures included optimizing PAR measurements in tumor biopsies and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), reagent qualification, analytical validation and assay quality control, instrument qualification and method quality control, and support for external laboratories. PMID:27663481

  4. Human lymphocyte antigen CD38 catalyzes the production of cyclic ADP-ribose.

    PubMed

    Summerhill, R J; Jackson, D G; Galione, A

    1993-12-01

    The human lymphocyte antigen CD38 has been shown to share sequence homology with ADP-ribosyl cyclase, the enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of NAD+ to cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR), a potent Ca(2+)-mobilizing agent. In this study COS1 cells from African Green Monkey kidney were transiently transfected with CD38 cDNA, inducing expression of authentic CD38 on the cell surface. We demonstrate that CD38 expressed in this manner can convert NAD+ to cADPR in the extracellular medium as assessed by Ca2+ release from sea-urchin egg microsomes. PMID:8253202

  5. Ectocellular in vitro and in vivo metabolism of cADP-ribose in cerebellum.

    PubMed Central

    De Flora, A; Guida, L; Franco, L; Zocchi, E; Pestarino, M; Usai, C; Marchetti, C; Fedele, E; Fontana, G; Raiteri, M

    1996-01-01

    CD38, a type II transmembrane glycoprotein predominantly expressed in blood cells, is a bifunctional ectoenzyme directly involved in the metabolism of cADP-ribose (cADPR). This is a potent Ca2+ mobilizer in several types of cells. The relationship between the ectocellular site of cADPR production and its intracellular calcium-related functions is poorly understood. Cultured rat cerebellar granule cells showed both enzymic activities of CD38, ADP-ribosyl cyclase and cADPR hydrolase, at a ratio of 16 to 1 respectively, and were immunostained by the anti-(human CD38) monoclonal antibody IB4. In these cells externally added cADPR and beta-NAD+ (the precursor of cADPR), but not alpha-NAD+ or ADP-ribose, enhanced the peak of the depolarization-induced rise in intracellular Ca2+ concentration. This effect was inhibited by 1 microM ryanodine, suggesting a potentiation of calcium-induced calcium release by cADPR. CD38 ectoenzyme activities, ADP-ribosyl cyclase and cADPR hydrolase, were also demonstrated in vivo by microdialysis of adult rat cerebellum, where IB4 bound to granule neurons selectively. Trace amounts (11.5 +/- 3.8 nM) of NAD+ were detected by microdialysis sampling and sensitive assays in the basal interstitial fluid of the cerebellum. These results provide a link between ectocellular cADPR turnover and intracellular calcium mobilization in cerebellum. PMID:8973582

  6. The XRCC1 phosphate-binding pocket binds poly (ADP-ribose) and is required for XRCC1 function

    PubMed Central

    Breslin, Claire; Hornyak, Peter; Ridley, Andrew; Rulten, Stuart L.; Hanzlikova, Hana; Oliver, Antony W.; Caldecott, Keith W.

    2015-01-01

    Poly (ADP-ribose) is synthesized at DNA single-strand breaks and can promote the recruitment of the scaffold protein, XRCC1. However, the mechanism and importance of this process has been challenged. To address this issue, we have characterized the mechanism of poly (ADP-ribose) binding by XRCC1 and examined its importance for XRCC1 function. We show that the phosphate-binding pocket in the central BRCT1 domain of XRCC1 is required for selective binding to poly (ADP-ribose) at low levels of ADP-ribosylation, and promotes interaction with cellular PARP1. We also show that the phosphate-binding pocket is required for EGFP-XRCC1 accumulation at DNA damage induced by UVA laser, H2O2, and at sites of sub-nuclear PCNA foci, suggesting that poly (ADP-ribose) promotes XRCC1 recruitment both at single-strand breaks globally across the genome and at sites of DNA replication stress. Finally, we show that the phosphate-binding pocket is required following DNA damage for XRCC1-dependent acceleration of DNA single-strand break repair, DNA base excision repair, and cell survival. These data support the hypothesis that poly (ADP-ribose) synthesis promotes XRCC1 recruitment at DNA damage sites and is important for XRCC1 function. PMID:26130715

  7. The XRCC1 phosphate-binding pocket binds poly (ADP-ribose) and is required for XRCC1 function.

    PubMed

    Breslin, Claire; Hornyak, Peter; Ridley, Andrew; Rulten, Stuart L; Hanzlikova, Hana; Oliver, Antony W; Caldecott, Keith W

    2015-08-18

    Poly (ADP-ribose) is synthesized at DNA single-strand breaks and can promote the recruitment of the scaffold protein, XRCC1. However, the mechanism and importance of this process has been challenged. To address this issue, we have characterized the mechanism of poly (ADP-ribose) binding by XRCC1 and examined its importance for XRCC1 function. We show that the phosphate-binding pocket in the central BRCT1 domain of XRCC1 is required for selective binding to poly (ADP-ribose) at low levels of ADP-ribosylation, and promotes interaction with cellular PARP1. We also show that the phosphate-binding pocket is required for EGFP-XRCC1 accumulation at DNA damage induced by UVA laser, H2O2, and at sites of sub-nuclear PCNA foci, suggesting that poly (ADP-ribose) promotes XRCC1 recruitment both at single-strand breaks globally across the genome and at sites of DNA replication stress. Finally, we show that the phosphate-binding pocket is required following DNA damage for XRCC1-dependent acceleration of DNA single-strand break repair, DNA base excision repair, and cell survival. These data support the hypothesis that poly (ADP-ribose) synthesis promotes XRCC1 recruitment at DNA damage sites and is important for XRCC1 function. PMID:26130715

  8. Inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis enhance X-ray killing of log-phase Chinese hamster cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Hur, E.; Utsumi, H.; Elkind, M.M.

    1984-03-01

    Postirradiation incubation of V79 Chinese hamster cells with inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis was found to potentiate the killing of cells by X rays. Potentiation increased with incubation time and with concentration of the inhibitor. Preirradiation incubation had only a small effect. The enhanced response correlated well with the known extent of the inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis. A radiation-sensitive line, V79-AL162/S-10, was affected to a lesser extent than the normal cells. Cells repaired the radiation damage with which the inhibitors interacted within 1 hr, a process that has similar kinetics to what is observed when a postirradiation treatment with hypertonic buffer is used. However, the sectors of damage affected by inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis and hypertonic buffer do not entirely overlap. The inhibitor nicotinamide enhanced the killing mainly of late S-phase cells and did not affect cells at the G/sub 1//S border. It is concluded that the repair process(es) involving poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis is important for cell survival in repair-competent cells and that the radiation-sensitive cells that were examined are partially deficient in a repair pathway in which poly(ADP-ribose) participates.

  9. Abscisic acid signaling through cyclic ADP-ribose in hydroid regeneration.

    PubMed

    Puce, Stefania; Basile, Giovanna; Bavestrello, Giorgio; Bruzzone, Santina; Cerrano, Carlo; Giovine, Marco; Arillo, Attilio; Zocchi, Elena

    2004-09-17

    Cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) is an intracellular calcium (Ca(2+)(i)) mobilizer involved in fundamental cell functions from protists to higher plants and mammals. Biochemical similarities between the drought-signaling cascade in plants and the temperature-sensing pathway in marine sponges suggest an ancient evolutionary origin of a signaling cascade involving the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA), cADPR, and Ca(2+)(i). In Eudendrium racemosum (Hydrozoa, Cnidaria), exogenously added ABA stimulated ADP-ribosyl cyclase activity via a protein kinase A (PKA)-mediated phosphorylation and increased regeneration in the dark to levels observed under light conditions. Light stimulated endogenous ABA synthesis, which was conversely inhibited by the inhibitor of plant ABA synthesis Fluridone. The signal cascade of light-induced regeneration uncovered in E. racemosum: light --> increasing ABA --> PKA --> cyclase activation --> increasing [cADPR](i) --> increasing [Ca(2+)](i) --> regeneration is the first report of a complete signaling pathway in Eumetazoa involving a phytohormone.

  10. Quantification of Poly(ADP-ribose)-Modified Proteins in Cerebrospinal Fluid from Infants and Children after Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Fink, Ericka L.; Lai, Yichen; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Janesko-Feldman, Keri; Adelson, P. David; Szabó, Csaba; Berger, Rachel P.; Sarnaik, Ajit A.; Kochanek, Patrick M.; Clark, Robert S. B.

    2008-01-01

    Poly-ADP-ribosylation (PAR) of proteins by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARP) occurs after experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI) and modulates neurological outcome. Several promising pharmacological PARP inhibitors have been developed for use in humans, but there is currently no clinically relevant means of monitoring treatment effects. We therefore utilized an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to measure PAR-modified proteins in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). CSF samples from 17 pediatric TBI and 15 control patients were plated overnight then incubated with polyclonal antibody against PAR. Histone-1, a PARP substrate, was incubated with active PARP, NAD, and nicked DNA, and served as the standard. Both peak and mean CSF PAR-modified protein were increased in TBI patients versus controls. Peak CSF PAR-modified protein levels occurred on day 1 and levels remained increased on day 2 after TBI. Increases in peak CSF PAR-modified protein concentrations were independently associated with age and male sex, but not initial Glasgow coma scale score, Glasgow outcome score, or mechanism of injury. The increase in PAR-modified proteins in CSF after TBI may be due to increased PARP activation, decreased PAR degradation, or both. Since PAR-modified protein concentration correlated with age and male sex, developmental and sex-dependent roles for PARP after TBI are implicated. PMID:18506195

  11. Two small enzyme isoforms mediate mammalian mitochondrial poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) activity

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, Ralph G. . E-mail: meyerg@vet.upenn.edu; Meyer-Ficca, Mirella L.; Whatcott, Clifford J.; Jacobson, Elaine L.; Jacobson, Myron K.

    2007-08-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose)glycohydrolase (PARG) is the major enzyme capable of rapidly hydrolyzing poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) formed by the diverse members of the PARP enzyme family. This study presents an alternative splice mechanism by which two novel PARG protein isoforms of 60 kDa and 55 kDa are expressed from the human PARG gene, termed hPARG60 and hPARG55, respectively. Homologous forms were found in the mouse (mPARG63 and mPARG58) supporting the hypothesis that expression of small PARG isoforms is conserved among mammals. A PARG protein of {approx} 60 kDa has been described for decades but with its genetic basis unknown, it was hypothesized to be a product of posttranslational cleavage of larger PARG isoforms. While this is not excluded entirely, isolation and expression of cDNA clones from different sources of RNA indicate that alternative splicing leads to expression of a catalytically active hPARG60 in multiple cell compartments. A second enzyme, hPARG55, that can be expressed through alternative translation initiation from hPARG60 transcripts is strictly targeted to the mitochondria. Functional studies of a mitochondrial targeting signal (MTS) in PARG exon IV suggest that hPARG60 may be capable of shuttling between nucleus and mitochondria, which would be in line with a proposed function of PAR in genotoxic stress-dependent, nuclear-mitochondrial crosstalk.

  12. Poly(ADP-Ribose) Glycohydrolase (PARG) Silencing Suppresses Benzo(a)pyrene Induced Cell Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Peiwu; Zhuang, Zhixiong; Liu, Jianjun; Gao, Wei; Liu, Yinpin; Huang, Haiyan

    2016-01-01

    Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) is a ubiquitously distributed environmental pollutant and known carcinogen, which can induce malignant transformation in rodent and human cells. Poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG), the primary enzyme that catalyzes the degradation of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR), has been known to play an important role in regulating DNA damage repair and maintaining genomic stability. Although PARG has been shown to be a downstream effector of BaP, the role of PARG in BaP induced carcinogenesis remains unclear. In this study, we used the PARG-deficient human bronchial epithelial cell line (shPARG) as a model to examine how PARG contributed to the carcinogenesis induced by chronic BaP exposure under various concentrations (0, 10, 20 and 40 μM). Our results showed that PARG silencing dramatically reduced DNA damages, chromosome abnormalities, and micronuclei formations in the PARG-deficient human bronchial epithelial cells compared to the control cells (16HBE cells). Meanwhile, the wound healing assay showed that PARG silencing significantly inhibited BaP-induced cell migration. Furthermore, silencing of PARG significantly reduced the volume and weight of tumors in Balb/c nude mice injected with BaP induced transformed human bronchial epithelial cells. This was the first study that reported evidences to support an oncogenic role of PARG in BaP induced carcinogenesis, which provided a new perspective for our understanding in BaP exposure induced cancer. PMID:27003318

  13. Poly(ADP-Ribose) Glycohydrolase (PARG) Silencing Suppresses Benzo(a)pyrene Induced Cell Transformation.

    PubMed

    Li, Xuan; Li, Xiyi; Zhu, Zhiliang; Huang, Peiwu; Zhuang, Zhixiong; Liu, Jianjun; Gao, Wei; Liu, Yinpin; Huang, Haiyan

    2016-01-01

    Benzo(a)pyrene (BaP) is a ubiquitously distributed environmental pollutant and known carcinogen, which can induce malignant transformation in rodent and human cells. Poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG), the primary enzyme that catalyzes the degradation of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR), has been known to play an important role in regulating DNA damage repair and maintaining genomic stability. Although PARG has been shown to be a downstream effector of BaP, the role of PARG in BaP induced carcinogenesis remains unclear. In this study, we used the PARG-deficient human bronchial epithelial cell line (shPARG) as a model to examine how PARG contributed to the carcinogenesis induced by chronic BaP exposure under various concentrations (0, 10, 20 and 40 μM). Our results showed that PARG silencing dramatically reduced DNA damages, chromosome abnormalities, and micronuclei formations in the PARG-deficient human bronchial epithelial cells compared to the control cells (16HBE cells). Meanwhile, the wound healing assay showed that PARG silencing significantly inhibited BaP-induced cell migration. Furthermore, silencing of PARG significantly reduced the volume and weight of tumors in Balb/c nude mice injected with BaP induced transformed human bronchial epithelial cells. This was the first study that reported evidences to support an oncogenic role of PARG in BaP induced carcinogenesis, which provided a new perspective for our understanding in BaP exposure induced cancer. PMID:27003318

  14. High affinity interaction of poly(ADP-ribose) and the human DEK oncoprotein depends upon chain length†

    PubMed Central

    Fahrer, Jörg; Popp, Oliver; Malanga, Maria; Beneke, Sascha; Markovitz, David M.; Ferrando-May, Elisa; Bürkle, Alexander; Kappes, Ferdinand

    2010-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) is a molecular DNA damage sensor that catalyzes the synthesis of the complex biopolymer poly(ADP-ribose) [PAR] under consumption of NAD+. PAR engages in fundamental cellular processes such as DNA metabolism and transcription, and interacts non-covalently with specific binding proteins involved in DNA repair and regulation of chromatin structure. A factor implicated in DNA repair and chromatin organization is the DEK oncoprotein, an abundant and conserved constituent of metazoan chromatin, and the only member of its protein class. We have recently demonstrated that DEK, under stress conditions, is covalently modified with PAR by PARP-1, leading to a partial release of DEK into the cytoplasm. Additionally, we have also observed a non-covalent interaction between DEK and PAR, which we detail in the present work. Using sequence alignment, we identify three functional PAR-binding sites in the DEK primary sequence and confirm their functionality in PAR binding studies. Furthermore, we show that the non-covalent binding to DEK is dependent on PAR chain length as revealed by an overlay blot technique and PAR EMSA. Intriguingly, DEK promotes the formation of a defined complex with a 54mer PAR (KD=6 × 10−8 M), whereas no specific interaction is detected with a short PAR chain (18mer). In stark contrast to covalent poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of DEK, the non-covalent interaction does not affect the overall ability of DEK to bind to DNA. Instead the non-covalent interaction interferes with subsequent DNA-dependent multimerization activities of DEK, as seen in South-Western, EMSA, topology and aggregation assays. In particular, non-covalent attachment of PAR to DEK promotes the formation of DEK-DEK complexes by competing with DNA binding. This was seen by the reduced affinity of PAR-bound DEK for DNA templates in solution. Taken together, our findings deepen the molecular understanding of the DEK-PAR interplay and support the existence of a

  15. Liquid demixing of intrinsically disordered proteins is seeded by poly(ADP-ribose)

    PubMed Central

    Altmeyer, Matthias; Neelsen, Kai J.; Teloni, Federico; Pozdnyakova, Irina; Pellegrino, Stefania; Grøfte, Merete; Rask, Maj-Britt Druedahl; Streicher, Werner; Jungmichel, Stephanie; Nielsen, Michael Lund; Lukas, Jiri

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsically disordered proteins can phase separate from the soluble intracellular space, and tend to aggregate under pathological conditions. The physiological functions and molecular triggers of liquid demixing by phase separation are not well understood. Here we show in vitro and in vivo that the nucleic acid-mimicking biopolymer poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) nucleates intracellular liquid demixing. PAR levels are markedly induced at sites of DNA damage, and we provide evidence that PAR-seeded liquid demixing results in rapid, yet transient and fully reversible assembly of various intrinsically disordered proteins at DNA break sites. Demixing, which relies on electrostatic interactions between positively charged RGG repeats and negatively charged PAR, is amplified by aggregation-prone prion-like domains, and orchestrates the earliest cellular responses to DNA breakage. We propose that PAR-seeded liquid demixing is a general mechanism to dynamically reorganize the soluble nuclear space with implications for pathological protein aggregation caused by derailed phase separation. PMID:26286827

  16. [Influence of ADP-ribose, AMP and adenosine on bioelectric activity of hibernating ground squirrel atrium and papillary muscle].

    PubMed

    Kuz'min, V S; Abramochkin, D V; Sukhova, G S; Rozenshtraukh, L V

    2008-01-01

    The aim of work was to investigate effects of adenosine, AMP and ADP-ribose (1x10(-5)) on bioelectric activity of atrium and papillary muscle of nonhibernating (rat) and hibernating (Yakutian ground squirrel) animals. Action potential (AP) was registered with use of standard microelectrode technique. AP duration (APD) at level of 90% repolarisation in rat atrium in control experiments was 30+/-5 ms, APD at level of 50% repolarisation was 12+/-2 ms. APD at level of 90% repolarisation in rat papillary muscle was 56+/-7 ms, at level of 50% repolarisation was 18+/-2 ms. APD at level of 90% repolarisation in ground squirrel atrium was 77+/-6, APD at level of 50% repolarisation was 38+/-6 ms. APD at level of 90% repolarisation in ground squirrel papillary muscle was 105+/-9 ms, APD at level of 50% repolarisation was 42+/-8 ms. Purine nucleotides and nucleoside, that were tested in work, except ADP-ribose, act as inhibitory factors and decrease APD both in rat and hibernating ground squirrel heart. ADP-ribose decreases APD in papillary muscle of hibernator but did not in its atrium. In ground squirrel atrium AMP and adenosine decrease APD at level of 50% repolarisation by 10+/-3% and 18+/-3% respectively. AMP and adenosine decrease APD at level of 90% repolarisation by 9+/-2% and 11+/-2% respectively. In ground squirrel papillary muscle ADP-ribose, AMP and adenosine decrease APD at level of 50% repolarisation by 26+/-8%, 23+/-8% and 26+/-7%. ADP-ribose, AMP and adenosine decrease APD at level of 90% repolarisation by 12+/-3%, 10+/-3%, 13+/-3%. Thus, decrease of APD in ground squirrel papillary muscle at level of 90% repolarisation during nucleotides and adenosine action was 2-2.5 fold less, than the rat.

  17. Readers of poly(ADP-ribose): designed to be fit for purpose

    PubMed Central

    Teloni, Federico; Altmeyer, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Post-translational modifications (PTMs) regulate many aspects of protein function and are indispensable for the spatio-temporal regulation of cellular processes. The proteome-wide identification of PTM targets has made significant progress in recent years, as has the characterization of their writers, readers, modifiers and erasers. One of the most elusive PTMs is poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation), a nucleic acid-like PTM involved in chromatin dynamics, genome stability maintenance, transcription, cell metabolism and development. In this article, we provide an overview on our current understanding of the writers of this modification and their targets, as well as the enzymes that degrade and thereby modify and erase poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR). Since many cellular functions of PARylation are exerted through dynamic interactions of PAR-binding proteins with PAR, we discuss the readers of this modification and provide a synthesis of recent findings, which suggest that multiple structurally highly diverse reader modules, ranging from completely folded PAR-binding domains to intrinsically disordered sequence stretches, evolved as PAR effectors to carry out specific cellular functions. PMID:26673700

  18. 8-Bromo-cyclic inosine diphosphoribose: towards a selective cyclic ADP-ribose agonist

    PubMed Central

    Kirchberger, Tanja; Moreau, Christelle; Wagner, Gerd K.; Fliegert, Ralf; Siebrands, Cornelia C.; Nebel, Merle; Schmid, Frederike; Harneit, Angelika; Odoardi, Francesca; Flügel, Alexander; Potter, Barry V. L.; Guse, Andreas H.

    2009-01-01

    cADPR (cyclic ADP-ribose) is a universal Ca2+ mobilizing second messenger. In T-cells cADPR is involved in sustained Ca2+ release and also in Ca2+ entry. Potential mechanisms for the latter include either capacitative Ca2+ entry, secondary to store depletion by cADPR, or direct activation of the non-selective cation channel TRPM2 (transient receptor potential cation channel, subfamily melastatin, member 2). Here we characterize the molecular target of the newly-described membrane-permeant cADPR agonist 8-Br-N1-cIDPR (8-bromo-cyclic IDP-ribose). 8-Br-N1-cIDPR evoked Ca2+ signalling in the human T-lymphoma cell line Jurkat and in primary rat T-lymphocytes. Ca2+ signalling induced by 8-Br-N1-cIDPR consisted of Ca2+ release and Ca2+ entry. Whereas Ca2+ release was sensitive to both the RyR (ryanodine receptor) blocker RuRed (Ruthenium Red) and the cADPR antagonist 8-Br-cADPR (8-bromo-cyclic ADP-ribose), Ca2+ entry was inhibited by the Ca2+ entry blockers Gd3+ (gadolinium ion) and SKF-96365, as well as by 8-Br-cADPR. To unravel a potential role for TRPM2 in sustained Ca2+ entry evoked by 8-Br-N1-cIDPR, TRPM2 was overexpressed in HEK (human embryonic kidney)-293 cells. However, though activation by H2O2 was enhanced dramatically in those cells, Ca2+ signalling induced by 8-Br-N1-cIDPR was almost unaffected. Similarly, direct analysis of TRPM2 currents did not reveal activation or co-activation of TRPM2 by 8-Br-N1-cIDPR. In summary, the sensitivity to the Ca2+ entry blockers Gd3+ and SKF-96365 is in favour of the concept of capacitative Ca2+ entry, secondary to store depletion by 8-Br-N1-cIDPR. Taken together, 8-Br-N1-cIDPR appears to be the first cADPR agonist affecting Ca2+ release and secondary Ca2+ entry, but without effect on TRPM2. PMID:19492987

  19. Poly(Adenosine 5′-Diphosphate-Ribose) Polymerase Inhibition Counteracts Multiple Manifestations of Experimental Type 1 Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Drel, Viktor R.; Xu, Weizheng; Zhang, Jie; Pavlov, Ivan A.; Shevalye, Hanna; Slusher, Barbara; Obrosova, Irina G.

    2009-01-01

    This study was aimed at evaluating the role for poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) in early nephropathy associated with type 1 diabetes. Control and streptozotocin-diabetic rats were maintained with or without treatment with one of two structurally unrelated PARP inhibitors, 1,5-isoquinolinediol (ISO) and 10-(4-methyl-piperazin-1-ylmethyl)-2H-7-oxa-1,2-diaza-benzo[de] anthracen-3-one (GPI-15427), at 3 mg/kg−1 · d−1 ip and 30 mg/kg−1 · d−1, respectively, for 10 wk after the first 2 wk without treatment. PARP activity in the renal cortex was assessed by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated proteins. Variables of diabetic nephropathy in urine and renal cortex were evaluated by ELISA, Western blot analysis, immunohistochemistry, and colorimetry. Urinary albumin excretion was increased about 4-fold in diabetic rats, and this increase was prevented by ISO and GPI-15427. PARP inhibition counteracted diabetes-associated increase in poly(ADP-ribose) immunoreactivities in renal glomeruli and tubuli and poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated protein level. Renal concentrations of TGF-β1, vascular endothelial growth factor, endothelin-1, TNF-α, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, lipid peroxidation products, and nitrotyrosine were increased in diabetic rats, and all these changes as well as an increase in urinary TNF-α excretion were completely or partially prevented by ISO and GPI-15427. PARP inhibition counteracted diabetes-induced up-regulation of endothelin (B) receptor, podocyte loss, accumulation of collagen-α1 (IY), periodic acid-Schiff-positive substances, fibronectin, and advanced glycation end-products in the renal cortex. In conclusion, PARP activation is implicated in multiple changes characteristic for early nephropathy associated with type 1 diabetes. These findings provide rationale for development and further studies of PARP inhibitors and PARP inhibitor-containing combination therapies. PMID:19854869

  20. The specific, submicromolar-Km ADP-ribose pyrophosphatase purified from human placenta is enzymically indistinguishable from recombinant NUDT9 protein, including a selectivity for Mn2+ as activating cation and increase in Km for ADP-ribose, both elicited by H2O2.

    PubMed

    Carloto, António; Costas, María Jesús; Cameselle, José Carlos; McLennan, Alexander G; Ribeiro, João Meireles

    2006-10-01

    Free ADP-ribose is a putative second messenger and also a potentially toxic compound due to its non-enzymic reactivity towards protein side chains. ADP-ribose hydrolysis is catalysed by NDP-sugar/alcohol pyrophosphatases of differing specificity, including a highly specific, low-K(m) ADP-ribose pyrophosphatase. In humans, a submicromolar-K(m) ADP-ribose pyrophosphatase has been purified from placenta, while recombinant NUDT9 has been described as a similarly specific enzyme with a nudix motif, but with a 10(2)-10(3) higher K(m). Here, a comparative study of both proteins is presented showing that they are in fact enzymically indistinguishable; crucially, they both have submicromolar K(m) for ADP-ribose. This study firmly supports the view that the ADP-ribose pyrophosphatase present in human tissues is a product of the NUDT9 gene. In addition, this study reveals previously unknown properties of both enzyme forms. They display the same, differential properties in the presence of Mg(2+) or Mn(2+) as activating cations with respect to substrate specificity, ADP-ribose saturation kinetics, and inhibition by fluoride. Treatment with H(2)O(2) alters the Mg(2+)/Mn(2+) responses and increases the K(m) values for ADP-ribose, changes that are reversed by DTT. The results are discussed in relation to the proposed roles for ADP-ribose in oxidative/nitrosative stress and for ADP-ribose pyrophosphatase as a protective enzyme whose function is to limit the intracellular accumulation of ADP-ribose.

  1. Design, Synthesis, and Identification of 4″α-Azidoethyl-cyclic ADP-Carbocyclic-ribose as a Highly Potent Analogue of Cyclic ADP-Ribose, a Ca(2+)-Mobilizing Second Messenger.

    PubMed

    Sato, Takatoshi; Watanabe, Mizuki; Tsuzuki, Takayoshi; Takano, Satoshi; Murayama, Takashi; Sakurai, Takashi; Kameda, Tomoshi; Fukuda, Hayato; Arisawa, Mitsuhiro; Shuto, Satoshi

    2016-08-11

    Cyclic adenosine diphosphate-carbocyclic-ribose (cADPcR, 2) is a stable equivalent of cyclic adenosine diphosphate-ribose (cADPR, 1), a Ca(2+)-mobilizing second messenger. On the basis of the structure-activity relationship of cADPR-related compounds and three-dimensional structural modeling of cADPcR, we designed and synthesized cyclic-ADP-4″α-azidoethyl carbocyclic-ribose (N3-cADPcR, 3) to demonstrate that it has a highly potent Ca(2+)-mobilizing activity (EC50 = 24 nM). N3-cADPcR will be a useful precursor for the preparation of biological tools effective to investigate cADPR-mediated signaling pathways. PMID:27391373

  2. The NarE protein of Neisseria gonorrhoeae catalyzes ADP-ribosylation of several ADP-ribose acceptors despite an N-terminal deletion.

    PubMed

    Rodas, Paula I; Álamos-Musre, A Said; Álvarez, Francisca P; Escobar, Alejandro; Tapia, Cecilia V; Osorio, Eduardo; Otero, Carolina; Calderón, Iván L; Fuentes, Juan A; Gil, Fernando; Paredes-Sabja, Daniel; Christodoulides, Myron

    2016-09-01

    The ADP-ribosylating enzymes are encoded in many pathogenic bacteria in order to affect essential functions of the host. In this study, we show that Neisseria gonorrhoeae possess a locus that corresponds to the ADP-ribosyltransferase NarE, a previously characterized enzyme in N. meningitidis The 291 bp coding sequence of gonococcal narE shares 100% identity with part of the coding sequence of the meningococcal narE gene due to a frameshift previously described, thus leading to a 49-amino-acid deletion at the N-terminus of gonococcal NarE protein. However, we found a promoter region and a GTG start codon, which allowed expression of the protein as demonstrated by RT-PCR and western blot analyses. Using a gonococcal NarE-6xHis fusion protein, we demonstrated that the gonococcal enzyme underwent auto-ADP-ribosylation but to a lower extent than meningococcal NarE. We also observed that gonoccocal NarE exhibited ADP-ribosyltransferase activity using agmatine and cell-free host proteins as ADP-ribose acceptors, but its activity was inhibited by human β-defensins. Taken together, our results showed that NarE of Neisseria gonorrhoeae is a functional enzyme that possesses key features of bacterial ADP-ribosylating enzymes.

  3. The NarE protein of Neisseria gonorrhoeae catalyzes ADP-ribosylation of several ADP-ribose acceptors despite an N-terminal deletion.

    PubMed

    Rodas, Paula I; Álamos-Musre, A Said; Álvarez, Francisca P; Escobar, Alejandro; Tapia, Cecilia V; Osorio, Eduardo; Otero, Carolina; Calderón, Iván L; Fuentes, Juan A; Gil, Fernando; Paredes-Sabja, Daniel; Christodoulides, Myron

    2016-09-01

    The ADP-ribosylating enzymes are encoded in many pathogenic bacteria in order to affect essential functions of the host. In this study, we show that Neisseria gonorrhoeae possess a locus that corresponds to the ADP-ribosyltransferase NarE, a previously characterized enzyme in N. meningitidis The 291 bp coding sequence of gonococcal narE shares 100% identity with part of the coding sequence of the meningococcal narE gene due to a frameshift previously described, thus leading to a 49-amino-acid deletion at the N-terminus of gonococcal NarE protein. However, we found a promoter region and a GTG start codon, which allowed expression of the protein as demonstrated by RT-PCR and western blot analyses. Using a gonococcal NarE-6xHis fusion protein, we demonstrated that the gonococcal enzyme underwent auto-ADP-ribosylation but to a lower extent than meningococcal NarE. We also observed that gonoccocal NarE exhibited ADP-ribosyltransferase activity using agmatine and cell-free host proteins as ADP-ribose acceptors, but its activity was inhibited by human β-defensins. Taken together, our results showed that NarE of Neisseria gonorrhoeae is a functional enzyme that possesses key features of bacterial ADP-ribosylating enzymes. PMID:27465490

  4. Interplay between Ubiquitin, SUMO, and Poly(ADP-Ribose) in the Cellular Response to Genotoxic Stress

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrino, Stefania; Altmeyer, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Cells employ a complex network of molecular pathways to cope with endogenous and exogenous genotoxic stress. This multilayered response ensures that genomic lesions are efficiently detected and faithfully repaired in order to safeguard genome integrity. The molecular choreography at sites of DNA damage relies heavily on post-translational modifications (PTMs). Protein modifications with ubiquitin and the small ubiquitin-like modifier SUMO have recently emerged as important regulatory means to coordinate DNA damage signaling and repair. Both ubiquitylation and SUMOylation can lead to extensive chain-like protein modifications, a feature that is shared with yet another DNA damage-induced PTM, the modification of proteins with poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR). Chains of ubiquitin, SUMO, and PAR all contribute to the multi-protein assemblies found at sites of DNA damage and regulate their spatio-temporal dynamics. Here, we review recent advancements in our understanding of how ubiquitin, SUMO, and PAR coordinate the DNA damage response and highlight emerging examples of an intricate interplay between these chain-like modifications during the cellular response to genotoxic stress. PMID:27148359

  5. From eggs to hearts: what is the link between cyclic ADP-ribose and ryanodine receptors?

    PubMed

    Venturi, Elisa; Pitt, Samantha; Galfré, Elena; Sitsapesan, Rebecca

    2012-04-01

    It was first proposed that cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) could activate ryanodine receptors (RyR) in 1991. Following a subsequent report that cADPR could activate cardiac RyR (RyR2) reconstituted into artificial membranes and stimulate Ca(2+) -release from isolated cardiac SR, there has been a steadily mounting stockpile of publications proclaiming the physiological and pathophysiological importance of cADPR in the cardiovascular system. It was only 2 years earlier, in 1989, that cADPR was first identified as the active metabolite of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), responsible for triggering the release of Ca(2+) from crude homogenates of sea urchin eggs. Twenty years later, can we boast of being any closer to unraveling the mechanisms by which cADPR modulates intracellular Ca(2+) -release? This review sets out to examine the mechanisms underlying the effects of cADPR and ask whether cADPR is an important signaling molecule in the heart. PMID:21176119

  6. PKCα and HMGB1 antagonistically control hydrogen peroxide-induced poly-ADP-ribose formation

    PubMed Central

    Andersson, Anneli; Bluwstein, Andrej; Kumar, Nitin; Teloni, Federico; Traenkle, Jens; Baudis, Michael; Altmeyer, Matthias; Hottiger, Michael O.

    2016-01-01

    Harmful oxidation of proteins, lipids and nucleic acids is observed when reactive oxygen species (ROS) are produced excessively and/or the antioxidant capacity is reduced, causing ‘oxidative stress’. Nuclear poly-ADP-ribose (PAR) formation is thought to be induced in response to oxidative DNA damage and to promote cell death under sustained oxidative stress conditions. However, what exactly triggers PAR induction in response to oxidative stress is incompletely understood. Using reverse phase protein array (RPPA) and in-depth analysis of key stress signaling components, we observed that PAR formation induced by H2O2 was mediated by the PLC/IP3R/Ca2+/PKCα signaling axis. Mechanistically, H2O2-induced PAR formation correlated with Ca2+-dependent DNA damage, which, however, was PKCα-independent. In contrast, PAR formation was completely lost upon knockdown of PKCα, suggesting that DNA damage alone was not sufficient for inducing PAR formation, but required a PKCα-dependent process. Intriguingly, the loss of PAR formation observed upon PKCα depletion was overcome when the chromatin structure-modifying protein HMGB1 was co-depleted with PKCα, suggesting that activation and nuclear translocation of PKCα releases the inhibitory effect of HMGB1 on PAR formation. Together, these results identify PKCα and HMGB1 as important co-regulators involved in H2O2-induced PAR formation, a finding that may have important relevance for oxidative stress-associated pathophysiological conditions. PMID:27198223

  7. The PIN domain of EXO1 recognizes poly(ADP-ribose) in DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feng; Shi, Jiazhong; Chen, Shih-Hsun; Bian, Chunjing; Yu, Xiaochun

    2015-01-01

    Following DNA double-strand breaks, poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) is quickly and heavily synthesized to mediate fast and early recruitment of a number of DNA damage response factors to the sites of DNA lesions and facilitates DNA damage repair. Here, we found that EXO1, an exonuclease for DNA damage repair, is quickly recruited to the sites of DNA damage via PAR-binding. With further dissection of the functional domains of EXO1, we report that the PIN domain of EXO1 recognizes PAR both in vitro and in vivo and the interaction between the PIN domain and PAR is sufficient for the recruitment. We also found that the R93G variant of EXO1, generated by a single nucleotide polymorphism, abolishes the interaction and the early recruitment. Moreover, our study suggests that the PAR-mediated fast recruitment of EXO1 facilities early DNA end resection, the first step of homologous recombination repair. We observed that other PIN domains could also recognize DNA damage-induced PAR. Taken together, our study demonstrates a novel class of PAR-binding module that plays an important role in DNA damage response. PMID:26400172

  8. Poly(Adp-ribose) synthetase inhibition prevents lipopolysaccharide-induced peroxynitrite mediated damage in diaphragm.

    PubMed

    Ozdülger, Ali; Cinel, Ismail; Unlü, Ali; Cinel, Leyla; Mavioglu, Ilhan; Tamer, Lülüfer; Atik, Ugur; Oral, Ugur

    2002-07-01

    Although the precise mechanism by which sepsis causes impairment of respiratory muscle contractility has not been fully elucidated, oxygen-derived free radicals are thought to play an important role. In our experimental study, the effects of poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase (PARS) inhibition on the diaphragmatic Ca(2+)-ATPase, malondialdehyde (MDA), and 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) levels and additionally histopathology of the diaphragm in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endotoxemia are investigated.Thirty-two male Wistar rats, weighing between 180-200 g were randomly divided into four groups. The first group (control; n=8) received saline solution and the second (LPS group; n=8) 10 mgkg(-1) LPS i.p. 3-Aminobenzamide (3-AB) as a PARS inhibitor; was given to the third group (C+3-AB, n=8) 20 min before administration of saline solution while the fourth group (LPS+3-AB, n=8) received 3-AB 20 min before LPS injection. Six hours later, under ketamin/xylasine anesthesia diapraghmatic specimens were obtained and the rats were decapitated. Diaphragmatic specimens were divided into four parts, three for biochemical analyses and one for histopathologic assessment. In the LPS group, tissue Ca(2+)-ATPase levels were found to be decreased and tissue MDA and 3-NT levels were found to be increased (P<0.05). In the LPS+3-AB group, 3-AB pretreatment inhibited the increase in MDA and 3-NT levels and Ca(2+)-ATPase activity remained similar to those in the control group (P<0.05). Histopathologic examination of diaphragm showed edema between muscle fibers only in LPS group. PARS inhibition with 3-AB prevented not only lipid peroxidation but also the decrease of Ca(2+)-ATPase activity in endotoxemia. These results highlights the importance of nitric oxide (NO)-peroxynitrite (ONOO(-))-PARS pathway in preventing free radical mediated injury. PARS inhibitors should further be investigated as a new thearapetic alternative in sepsis treatment.

  9. Design, Synthesis, and Chemical and Biological Properties of Cyclic ADP-4-Thioribose as a Stable Equivalent of Cyclic ADP-Ribose

    PubMed Central

    Tsuzuki, Takayoshi; Takano, Satoshi; Sakaguchi, Natsumi; Kudoh, Takashi; Murayama, Takashi; Sakurai, Takashi; Hashii, Minako; Higashida, Haruhiro; Weber, Karin; Guse, Andreas H.; Kameda, Tomoshi; Hirokawa, Takatsugu; Kumaki, Yasuhiro; Arisawa, Mitsuhiro; Potter, Barry V. L.; Shuto, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    Here we describe the successful synthesis of cyclic ADP-4-thioribose (cADPtR, 3), designed as a stable mimic of cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR, 1), a Ca2+-mobilizing second messenger, in which the key N1-β-thioribosyladenosine structure was stereoselectively constructed by condensation between the imidazole nucleoside derivative 8 and the 4-thioribosylamine 7 via equilibrium in 7 between the α-anomer (7α) and the β-anomer (7β) during the reaction course. cADPtR is, unlike cADPR, chemically and biologically stable, while it effectively mobilizes intracellular Ca2+ like cADPR in various biological systems, such as sea urchin homogenate, NG108-15 neuronal cells, and Jurkat T-lymphocytes. Thus, cADPtR is a stable equivalent of cADPR, which can be useful as a biological tool for investigating cADPR-mediated Ca2+-mobilizing pathways. PMID:27200225

  10. Nanosecond pulsed electric fields induce poly(ADP-ribose) formation and non-apoptotic cell death in HeLa S3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Morotomi-Yano, Keiko; Akiyama, Hidenori; Yano, Ken-ichi

    2013-08-30

    Highlights: •Nanosecond pulsed electric field (nsPEF) is a new and unique means for life sciences. •Apoptosis was induced by nsPEF exposure in Jurkat cells. •No signs of apoptosis were detected in HeLa S3 cells exposed to nsPEFs. •Formation of poly(ADP-ribose) was induced in nsPEF-exposed HeLa S3 cells. •Two distinct modes of cell death were activated by nsPEF in a cell-dependent manner. -- Abstract: Nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEFs) have recently gained attention as effective cancer therapy owing to their potency for cell death induction. Previous studies have shown that apoptosis is a predominant mode of nsPEF-induced cell death in several cell lines, such as Jurkat cells. In this study, we analyzed molecular mechanisms for cell death induced by nsPEFs. When nsPEFs were applied to Jurkat cells, apoptosis was readily induced. Next, we used HeLa S3 cells and analyzed apoptotic events. Contrary to our expectation, nsPEF-exposed HeLa S3 cells exhibited no molecular signs of apoptosis execution. Instead, nsPEFs induced the formation of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR), a hallmark of necrosis. PAR formation occurred concurrently with a decrease in cell viability, supporting implications of nsPEF-induced PAR formation for cell death. Necrotic PAR formation is known to be catalyzed by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), and PARP-1 in apoptotic cells is inactivated by caspase-mediated proteolysis. Consistently, we observed intact and cleaved forms of PARP-1 in nsPEF-exposed and UV-irradiated cells, respectively. Taken together, nsPEFs induce two distinct modes of cell death in a cell type-specific manner, and HeLa S3 cells show PAR-associated non-apoptotic cell death in response to nsPEFs.

  11. Macro Domain from Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV) Is an Efficient ADP-ribose Binding Module: CRYSTAL STRUCTURE AND BIOCHEMICAL STUDIES.

    PubMed

    Cho, Chao-Cheng; Lin, Meng-Hsuan; Chuang, Chien-Ying; Hsu, Chun-Hua

    2016-03-01

    The newly emerging Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) encodes the conserved macro domain within non-structural protein 3. However, the precise biochemical function and structure of the macro domain is unclear. Using differential scanning fluorimetry and isothermal titration calorimetry, we characterized the MERS-CoV macro domain as a more efficient adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-ribose binding module than macro domains from other CoVs. Furthermore, the crystal structure of the MERS-CoV macro domain was determined at 1.43-Å resolution in complex with ADP-ribose. Comparison of macro domains from MERS-CoV and other human CoVs revealed structural differences in the α1 helix alters how the conserved Asp-20 interacts with ADP-ribose and may explain the efficient binding of the MERS-CoV macro domain to ADP-ribose. This study provides structural and biophysical bases to further evaluate the role of the MERS-CoV macro domain in the host response via ADP-ribose binding but also as a potential target for drug design.

  12. PARG is dispensable for recovery from transient replicative stress but required to prevent detrimental accumulation of poly(ADP-ribose) upon prolonged replicative stress

    PubMed Central

    Illuzzi, Giuditta; Fouquerel, Elise; Amé, Jean-Christophe; Noll, Aurélia; Rehmet, Kristina; Nasheuer, Heinz-Peter; Dantzer, Françoise; Schreiber, Valérie

    2014-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is involved in numerous bio-logical processes including DNA repair, transcription and cell death. Cellular levels of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) are regulated by PAR polymerases (PARPs) and the degrading enzyme PAR glycohydrolase (PARG), controlling the cell fate decision between life and death in response to DNA damage. Replication stress is a source of DNA damage, leading to transient stalling of replication forks or to their collapse followed by the generation of double-strand breaks (DSB). The involvement of PARP-1 in replicative stress response has been described, whereas the consequences of a deregulated PAR catabolism are not yet well established. Here, we show that PARG-deprived cells showed an enhanced sensitivity to the replication inhibitor hydroxyurea. PARG is dispensable to recover from transient replicative stress but is necessary to avoid massive PAR production upon prolonged replicative stress, conditions leading to fork collapse and DSB. Extensive PAR accumulation impairs replication protein A association with collapsed forks resulting in compromised DSB repair via homologous recombination. Our results highlight the critical role of PARG in tightly controlling PAR levels produced upon genotoxic stress to prevent the detrimental effects of PAR over-accumulation. PMID:24906880

  13. Silencing of poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase sensitizes lung cancer cells to radiation through the abrogation of DNA damage checkpoint

    SciTech Connect

    Nakadate, Yusuke; Kodera, Yasuo; Kitamura, Yuka; Tachibana, Taro; Tamura, Tomohide; Koizumi, Fumiaki

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •Radiosensitization by PARG silencing was observed in multiple lung cancer cells. •PAR accumulation was enhanced by PARG silencing after DNA damage. •Radiation-induced G2/M arrest and checkpoint activation were impaired by PARG siRNA. -- Abstract: Poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) is a major enzyme that plays a role in the degradation of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR). PARG deficiency reportedly sensitizes cells to the effects of radiation. In lung cancer, however, it has not been fully elucidated. Here, we investigated whether PARG siRNA contributes to an increased radiosensitivity using 8 lung cancer cell lines. Among them, the silencing of PARG induced a radiosensitizing effect in 5 cell lines. Radiation-induced G2/M arrest was largely suppressed by PARG siRNA in PC-14 and A427 cells, which exhibited significantly enhanced radiosensitivity in response to PARG knockdown. On the other hand, a similar effect was not observed in H520 cells, which did not exhibit a radiosensitizing effect. Consistent with a cell cycle analysis, radiation-induced checkpoint signals were not well activated in the PC-14 and A427 cells when treated with PARG siRNA. These results suggest that the increased sensitivity to radiation induced by PARG knockdown occurs through the abrogation of radiation-induced G2/M arrest and checkpoint activation in lung cancer cells. Our findings indicate that PARG could be a potential target for lung cancer treatments when used in combination with radiotherapy.

  14. Silencing of poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase sensitizes lung cancer cells to radiation through the abrogation of DNA damage checkpoint.

    PubMed

    Nakadate, Yusuke; Kodera, Yasuo; Kitamura, Yuka; Tachibana, Taro; Tamura, Tomohide; Koizumi, Fumiaki

    2013-11-29

    Poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) is a major enzyme that plays a role in the degradation of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR). PARG deficiency reportedly sensitizes cells to the effects of radiation. In lung cancer, however, it has not been fully elucidated. Here, we investigated whether PARG siRNA contributes to an increased radiosensitivity using 8 lung cancer cell lines. Among them, the silencing of PARG induced a radiosensitizing effect in 5 cell lines. Radiation-induced G2/M arrest was largely suppressed by PARG siRNA in PC-14 and A427 cells, which exhibited significantly enhanced radiosensitivity in response to PARG knockdown. On the other hand, a similar effect was not observed in H520 cells, which did not exhibit a radiosensitizing effect. Consistent with a cell cycle analysis, radiation-induced checkpoint signals were not well activated in the PC-14 and A427 cells when treated with PARG siRNA. These results suggest that the increased sensitivity to radiation induced by PARG knockdown occurs through the abrogation of radiation-induced G2/M arrest and checkpoint activation in lung cancer cells. Our findings indicate that PARG could be a potential target for lung cancer treatments when used in combination with radiotherapy. PMID:24211580

  15. ADP-Ribose Pyrophosphatase Reaction in Crystalline State Conducted by Consecutive Binding of Two Manganese(II) Ions as Cofactors.

    PubMed

    Furuike, Yoshihiko; Akita, Yuka; Miyahara, Ikuko; Kamiya, Nobuo

    2016-03-29

    Adenosine diphosphate ribose pyrophosphatase (ADPRase), a member of the Nudix family proteins, catalyzes the metal-induced and concerted general acid-base hydrolysis of ADP ribose (ADPR) into AMP and ribose-5'-phosphate (R5P). The ADPR-hydrolysis reaction of ADPRase from Thermus thermophilus HB8 (TtADPRase) requires divalent metal cations such as Mn(2+), Zn(2+), or Mg(2+) as cofactors. Here, we report the reaction pathway observed in the catalytic center of TtADPRase, based on cryo-trapping X-ray crystallography at atomic resolutions around 1.0 Å using Mn(2+) as the reaction trigger, which was soaked into TtADPRase-ADPR binary complex crystals. Integrating 11 structures along the reaction timeline, five reaction states of TtADPRase were assigned, which were ADPRase alone (E), the ADPRase-ADPR binary complex (ES), two ADPRase-ADPR-Mn(2+) reaction intermediates (ESM, ESMM), and the postreaction state (E'). Two Mn(2+) ions were inserted consecutively into the catalytic center of the ES-state and ligated by Glu86 and Glu82, which are highly conserved among the Nudix family, in the ESM- and ESMM-states. The ADPR-hydrolysis reaction was characterized by electrostatic, proximity, and orientation effects, and by preferential binding for the transition state. A new reaction mechanism is proposed, which differs from previous ones suggested from structure analyses with nonhydrolyzable substrate analogues or point-mutated ADPRases.

  16. ADP-Ribose Activates the TRPM2 Channel from the Sea Anemone Nematostella vectensis Independently of the NUDT9H Domain.

    PubMed

    Kühn, Frank J P; Kühn, Cornelia; Winking, Mathis; Hoffmann, Daniel C; Lückhoff, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The human redox-sensitive Transient receptor potential melastatin type 2 (hTRPM2) channel contains the C-terminal Nudix hydrolase domain NUDT9H which most likely binds ADP-ribose. During oxidative stress, the intracellular release of ADP-ribose triggers the activation of hTRPM2. The TRPM2 orthologue from Nematostella vectensis (nv) is also stimulated by ADP-ribose but not by the oxidant hydrogen peroxide. For further clarification of the structure-function relationships of these two distantly related channel orthologues, we performed whole-cell as well as single channel patch-clamp recordings, Ca2+-imaging and Western blot analysis after heterologous expression of wild-type and mutated channels in HEK-293 cells. We demonstrate that the removal of the entire NUDT9H domain does not disturb the response of nvTRPM2 to ADP-ribose. The deletion, however, created channels that were activated by hydrogen peroxide, as did mutations within the NUDT9H domain of nvTRPM2 that presumably suppress its enzymatic function. The same findings were obtained with the nvTRPM2 channel when the NUDT9H domain was replaced by the corresponding sequences of the original hNUDT9 enzyme. Whenever the enzyme domain was mutated to presumably inactive variants, channel activation by hydrogen peroxide could be achieved. Moreover, we found strong evidences for ADPRase activity of the isolated NUDT9H domain of nvTRPM2 in co-expression experiments with the C-terminally truncated nvTRPM2 channel. Thus, there is a clear correlation between the loss of enzymatic activity and the capability of nvTRPM2 to respond to oxidative stress. In striking contrast, the channel function of the hTRPM2 orthologue, in particular its sensitivity to ADP-ribose, was abrogated by already small changes of the NUDT9H domain. These findings establish nvTRPM2 as a channel gated by ADP-ribose through a novel mechanism. We conclude that the endogenous NUDT9H domain does not directly affect ADP-ribose-dependent gating of the nv

  17. ADP-Ribose Activates the TRPM2 Channel from the Sea Anemone Nematostella vectensis Independently of the NUDT9H Domain

    PubMed Central

    Kühn, Frank J. P.; Kühn, Cornelia; Winking, Mathis; Hoffmann, Daniel C.; Lückhoff, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The human redox-sensitive Transient receptor potential melastatin type 2 (hTRPM2) channel contains the C-terminal Nudix hydrolase domain NUDT9H which most likely binds ADP-ribose. During oxidative stress, the intracellular release of ADP-ribose triggers the activation of hTRPM2. The TRPM2 orthologue from Nematostella vectensis (nv) is also stimulated by ADP-ribose but not by the oxidant hydrogen peroxide. For further clarification of the structure-function relationships of these two distantly related channel orthologues, we performed whole-cell as well as single channel patch-clamp recordings, Ca2+-imaging and Western blot analysis after heterologous expression of wild-type and mutated channels in HEK-293 cells. We demonstrate that the removal of the entire NUDT9H domain does not disturb the response of nvTRPM2 to ADP-ribose. The deletion, however, created channels that were activated by hydrogen peroxide, as did mutations within the NUDT9H domain of nvTRPM2 that presumably suppress its enzymatic function. The same findings were obtained with the nvTRPM2 channel when the NUDT9H domain was replaced by the corresponding sequences of the original hNUDT9 enzyme. Whenever the enzyme domain was mutated to presumably inactive variants, channel activation by hydrogen peroxide could be achieved. Moreover, we found strong evidences for ADPRase activity of the isolated NUDT9H domain of nvTRPM2 in co-expression experiments with the C-terminally truncated nvTRPM2 channel. Thus, there is a clear correlation between the loss of enzymatic activity and the capability of nvTRPM2 to respond to oxidative stress. In striking contrast, the channel function of the hTRPM2 orthologue, in particular its sensitivity to ADP-ribose, was abrogated by already small changes of the NUDT9H domain. These findings establish nvTRPM2 as a channel gated by ADP-ribose through a novel mechanism. We conclude that the endogenous NUDT9H domain does not directly affect ADP-ribose-dependent gating of the nv

  18. Effect of mild temperature shift on poly(ADP-ribose) and γH2AX levels in cultured cells.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Sachiko; Tanaka, Masakazu; Sato, Teruaki; Ida, Chieri; Ohta, Narumi; Hamada, Takashi; Uetsuki, Taichi; Nishi, Yoshisuke; Moss, Joel; Miwa, Masanao

    2016-08-01

    Poly (ADP-ribose) (PAR) is rapidly synthesized by PAR polymerases (PARPs) upon activation by DNA single- and double-strand breaks. In this study, we examined the quantitative amount of PAR in HeLa cells cultured within the physiological temperatures below 41 °C for verification of the effect of shifting-up or -down the temperature from 37.0 °C on the DNA breaks, whether the temperature-shift caused breaks that could be monitored by the level of PAR. While PAR level did not change significantly when HeLa cells were cultured at 33.5 °C or 37.0 °C, it was significantly increased 2- and 3-fold when cells were cultured for 12 h and 24 h, respectively, at 40.5 °C as compared to 37.0 °C. Similar to the results with HeLa cells, PAR level was increased 2-fold in CHO-K1 cells cultured at 40.5 °C for 24 h as compared to 37.0 °C. As the cellular levels of PAR polymerase1 (PARP1) and PAR glycohydrolase (PARG), a major degradation enzyme for PAR, did not seem to change significantly, this increase could be caused by activation of PARP1 by DNA strand breaks. In fact, γH2AX, claimed to be a marker of DNA double-strand breaks, was found in cell extracts of HeLa cells and CHO-K1 cells at elevated temperature vs. 37.0 °C, and these γH2AX signals were intensified in the presence of 3-aminobenzamide, a PARP inhibitor. The γH2AX immunohistochemistry results in HeLa cells were consistent with Western blot analyses. In HeLa cells, proliferation was significantly suppressed at 40.5 °C in 72 h-continuous cultures and decreased viabilities were also observed after 24-72 h at 40.5 °C. Flow cytometric analyses showed that the HeLa cells were arrested at G2/M after temperature shift-up to 40.5 °C. These physiological changes were potentiated in the presence of 3-aminobenzamide. Decrease in growth rates, increased cytotoxicity and G2/M arrest, were associated with the temperature-shift to 40.5 °C and are indirect evidence of DNA breaks. In addition to γH2AX

  19. Concentrative uptake of cyclic ADP-ribose generated by BST-1+ stroma stimulates proliferation of human hematopoietic progenitors.

    PubMed

    Podestà, Marina; Benvenuto, Federica; Pitto, Anna; Figari, Osvaldo; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Bruzzone, Santina; Guida, Lucrezia; Franco, Luisa; Paleari, Laura; Bodrato, Nicoletta; Usai, Cesare; De Flora, Antonio; Zocchi, Elena

    2005-02-18

    Cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) is an intracellular calcium mobilizer generated from NAD(+) by the ADP-ribosyl cyclases CD38 and BST-1. cADPR, both exogenously added and paracrinally produced by a CD38(+) feeder layer, has recently been demonstrated to stimulate the in vitro proliferation of human hemopoietic progenitors (HP) and also the in vivo expansion of hemopoietic stem cells. The low density of BST-1 expression on bone marrow (BM) stromal cells and the low specific activity of the enzyme made it unclear whether cADPR generation by a BST-1(+) stroma could stimulate HP proliferation in the BM microenvironment. We developed and characterized two BST-1(+) stromal cell lines, expressing an ectocellular cyclase activity similar to that of BST-1(+) human mesenchymal stem cells, the precursors of BM stromal cells. Long term co-culture of cord blood-derived HP over these BST-1(+) feeders determined their expansion. Influx of paracrinally generated cADPR into clonogenic HP was mediated by a concentrative, nitrobenzylthioinosine- and dipyridamole-inhibitable nucleoside transporter, this providing a possible explanation to the effectiveness of the hormone-like concentrations of the cyclic nucleotide measured in the medium conditioned by BST-1(+) feeders. These results suggest that the BST-1-catalyzed generation of extracellular cADPR, followed by the concentrative uptake of the cyclic nucleotide by HP, may be physiologically relevant in normal hemopoiesis.

  20. Enhanced production and action of cyclic ADP-ribose during oxidative stress in small bovine coronary arterial smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Andrew Y; Yi, Fan; Teggatz, Eric G; Zou, Ai-Ping; Li, Pin-Lan

    2004-03-01

    Recent studies in our lab and by others have indicated that cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) as a novel second messenger is importantly involved in vasomotor response in various vascular beds. However, the mechanism regulating cADPR production and actions remains poorly understood. The present study determined whether changes in redox status influence the production and action of cADPR in coronary arterial smooth muscle cells (CASMCs) and thereby alters vascular tone in these arteries. HPLC analyses demonstrated that xanthine (X, 40 microM)/xanthine oxidase (XO, 0.1 U/ml), a superoxide-generating system, increased the ADP-ribosyl cyclase activity by 59% in freshly isolated bovine CASMCs. However, hydrogen peroxide (H2O2, 1-100 microM) had no significant effect on ADP-ribosyl cyclase activity. In these CASMCs, X/XO produced a rapid increase in [Ca2+]i (Delta[Ca2+]i=201 nM), which was significantly attenuated by a cADPR antagonist, 8-Br-cADPR. Both inhibition of cADPR production by nicotinamide (Nicot) and blockade of Ca2+-induced Ca2+ release (CICR) by tetracaine (TC) and ryanodine (Rya) significantly reduced X/XO-induced rapid Ca2+ responses. In isolated, perfused, and pressurized small bovine coronary arteries, X at 2.5-80 microM with a fixed XO level produced a concentration-dependent vasoconstriction with a maximal decrease in arterial diameter of 45%. This X/XO-induced vasoconstriction was significantly attenuated by 8-Br-cADPR, Nicot, TC, or Rya. We conclude that superoxide activates cADPR production, and thereby mobilizes intracellular Ca2+ from the SR and produces vasoconstriction in coronary arteries.

  1. Enhanced poly(adenosine diphosphate ribose) polymerase activity and gene expression in Ewing's sarcoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Prasad, S.C.; Thraves, P.J.; Bhatia, K.G.; Smulson, M.E.; Dritschilo, A. )

    1990-01-01

    Ewing's sarcoma (ES) is a highly malignant childhood bone tumor and is considered curable by moderate doses of radiotherapy. The addition of chemical inhibitors of the activity of the nuclear enzyme poly(adenosine diphosphate ribose) (poly(ADPR)) polymerase to ES cells in culture results in increased cell killing, a phenomenon called inhibitor sensitization. Since poly(ADPR) polymerase is thought to be associated with DNA repair, it has been suggested that ES cells and other inhibitor-sensitized cells may have a reduced capacity for polymer synthesis resulting in deficient postirradiation recovery. We present here the unexpected observation that in comparison to other cell lines tested, ES cells exhibit a high enzyme activity, higher constitutive levels of the protein, and elevated levels of its mRNA transcript for poly(ADPR) polymerase. No gross amplifications or rearrangements of the gene were observed; however, regulation of poly(ADPR) polymerase in these tumor cells takes place at the level of the gene transcript.

  2. NMR spectroscopy of native and in vitro tissues implicates polyADP ribose in biomineralization.

    PubMed

    Chow, W Ying; Rajan, Rakesh; Muller, Karin H; Reid, David G; Skepper, Jeremy N; Wong, Wai Ching; Brooks, Roger A; Green, Maggie; Bihan, Dominique; Farndale, Richard W; Slatter, David A; Shanahan, Catherine M; Duer, Melinda J

    2014-05-16

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is useful to determine molecular structure in tissues grown in vitro only if their fidelity, relative to native tissue, can be established. Here, we use multidimensional NMR spectra of animal and in vitro model tissues as fingerprints of their respective molecular structures, allowing us to compare the intact tissues at atomic length scales. To obtain spectra from animal tissues, we developed a heavy mouse enriched by about 20% in the NMR-active isotopes carbon-13 and nitrogen-15. The resulting spectra allowed us to refine an in vitro model of developing bone and to probe its detailed structure. The identification of an unexpected molecule, poly(adenosine diphosphate ribose), that may be implicated in calcification of the bone matrix, illustrates the analytical power of this approach. PMID:24833391

  3. Benadrostin, new inhibitor of poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase, produced by actinomycetes. I. Taxonomy, production, isolation, physico-chemical properties and biological activities.

    PubMed

    Aoyagi, T; Yoshida, S; Harada, S; Okuyama, A; Nakayama, C; Yoshida, T; Hamada, M; Takeuchi, T; Umezawa, H

    1988-08-01

    Benadrostin, a new inhibitor of poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase was discovered in the fermentation broth of Streptomyces flavovirens MH499-O'F1. It was purified by chromatography followed by solvent extraction and then isolated as colorless prisms. Benadrostin has the molecular formula of C8H5NO4. It was competitive with the substrate, and the inhibition constant (Ki) was 34 microM. PMID:3139601

  4. pH-tuneable binding of 2′-phospho-ADP-ribose to ketopantoate reductase: a structural and calorimetric study

    SciTech Connect

    Ciulli, Alessio; Lobley, Carina M. C.; Tuck, Kellie L.; Smith, Alison G.; Blundell, Tom L.; Abell, Chris

    2007-02-01

    A combined crystallographic, calorimetric and mutagenic study has been used to show how changes in pH give rise to two distinct binding modes of 2′-phospho-ADP-ribose to ketopantoate reductase. The crystal structure of Escherichia coli ketopantoate reductase in complex with 2′-monophosphoadenosine 5′-diphosphoribose, a fragment of NADP{sup +} that lacks the nicotinamide ring, is reported. The ligand is bound at the enzyme active site in the opposite orientation to that observed for NADP{sup +}, with the adenine ring occupying the lipophilic nicotinamide pocket. Isothermal titration calorimetry with R31A and N98A mutants of the enzyme is used to show that the unusual ‘reversed binding mode’ observed in the crystal is triggered by changes in the protonation of binding groups at low pH. This research has important implications for fragment-based approaches to drug design, namely that the crystallization conditions and the chemical modification of ligands can have unexpected effects on the binding modes.

  5. The proposed channel-enzyme transient receptor potential melastatin 2 does not possess ADP ribose hydrolase activity

    PubMed Central

    Iordanov, Iordan; Mihályi, Csaba; Tóth, Balázs; Csanády, László

    2016-01-01

    Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 2 (TRPM2) is a Ca2+-permeable cation channel essential for immunocyte activation, insulin secretion, and postischemic cell death. TRPM2 is activated by ADP ribose (ADPR) binding to its C-terminal cytosolic NUDT9-homology (NUDT9H) domain, homologous to the soluble mitochondrial ADPR pyrophosphatase (ADPRase) NUDT9. Reported ADPR hydrolysis classified TRPM2 as a channel-enzyme, but insolubility of isolated NUDT9H hampered further investigations. Here we developed a soluble NUDT9H model using chimeric proteins built from complementary polypeptide fragments of NUDT9H and NUDT9. When expressed in E.coli, chimeras containing up to ~90% NUDT9H sequence remained soluble and were affinity-purified. In ADPRase assays the conserved Nudix-box sequence of NUDT9 proved essential for activity (kcat~4-9s-1), that of NUDT9H did not support catalysis. Replacing NUDT9H in full-length TRPM2 with soluble chimeras retained ADPR-dependent channel gating (K1/2~1-5 μM), confirming functionality of chimeric domains. Thus, TRPM2 is not a 'chanzyme'. Chimeras provide convenient soluble NUDT9H models for structural/biochemical studies. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.17600.001 PMID:27383051

  6. The proposed channel-enzyme transient receptor potential melastatin 2 does not possess ADP ribose hydrolase activity.

    PubMed

    Iordanov, Iordan; Mihályi, Csaba; Tóth, Balázs; Csanády, László

    2016-01-01

    Transient Receptor Potential Melastatin 2 (TRPM2) is a Ca(2+)-permeable cation channel essential for immunocyte activation, insulin secretion, and postischemic cell death. TRPM2 is activated by ADP ribose (ADPR) binding to its C-terminal cytosolic NUDT9-homology (NUDT9H) domain, homologous to the soluble mitochondrial ADPR pyrophosphatase (ADPRase) NUDT9. Reported ADPR hydrolysis classified TRPM2 as a channel-enzyme, but insolubility of isolated NUDT9H hampered further investigations. Here we developed a soluble NUDT9H model using chimeric proteins built from complementary polypeptide fragments of NUDT9H and NUDT9. When expressed in E.coli, chimeras containing up to ~90% NUDT9H sequence remained soluble and were affinity-purified. In ADPRase assays the conserved Nudix-box sequence of NUDT9 proved essential for activity (kcat~4-9s(-1)), that of NUDT9H did not support catalysis. Replacing NUDT9H in full-length TRPM2 with soluble chimeras retained ADPR-dependent channel gating (K1/2~1-5 μM), confirming functionality of chimeric domains. Thus, TRPM2 is not a 'chanzyme'. Chimeras provide convenient soluble NUDT9H models for structural/biochemical studies. PMID:27383051

  7. Ring finger protein 146/Iduna is a Poly (ADP-ribose) polymer binding and PARsylation dependent E3 ubiquitin ligase

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhi-dong; Chan, Christine Hui-shan; Xiao, Zhi-cheng

    2011-01-01

    Recent findings suggest that Ring finger protein 146 (RNF146), also called Iduna, have neuroprotective property due to its inhibition of Parthanatos via binding with Poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR). The Parthanatos is a PAR dependent cell death that has been implicated in many human diseases. RNF146/Iduna acts as a PARsylation-directed E3 ubquitin ligase to mediate tankyrase-dependent degradation of axin, thereby positively regulates Wnt signaling. RNF146/Iduna can also facilitate DNA repair and protect against cell death induced by DNA damaging agents or γ-irradiation. It can translocate to the nucleus after cellular injury and promote the ubiquitination and degradation of various nuclear proteins involved in DNA damage repair. The PARsylation-directed ubquitination mediated by RNF146/Iduna is analogous to the phosphorylation-directed ubquitination catalyzed by Skp1-Cul1-F-box (SCF) E3 ubiquitin complex. RNF146/Iduna has been found to be implicated in neurodegenerative disease and cancer development. Therefore modulation of the PAR-binding and PARsylation dependent E3 ligase activity of RNF146/Iduna could have therapeutic significance for diseases, in which PAR and PAR-binding proteins play key pathophysiologic roles. PMID:22274711

  8. Cyclic ADP-ribose generation by CD38 improves human hemopoietic stem cell engraftment into NOD/SCID mice.

    PubMed

    Podestà, Marina; Pitto, Anna; Figari, Osvaldo; Bacigalupo, Andrea; Bruzzone, Santina; Guida, Lucrezia; Franco, Luisa; De Flora, Antonio; Zocchi, Elena

    2003-02-01

    Cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) is a potent and universal intracellular calcium mobilizer, recently shown to behave as a new hemopoietic cytokine stimulating the in vitro proliferation of both committed and uncommitted human hemopoietic progenitors (HP). Here, we investigated the effects of cADPR on engraftment of hemopoietic stem cells (HSC) into irradiated NOD/SCID mice. Two different protocols were used: i) a 24 h in vitro priming of cord blood-derived mononuclear cells (MNC) with micromolar cADPR, followed by their infusion into irradiated mice (both primary and secondary transplants); and ii) co-infusion of MNC with CD38-transfected, cADPR-generating, irradiated murine 3T3 fibroblasts. We demonstrated a dual effect of cADPR on human HP in vivo: i) enhanced proliferation of committed progenitors, responsible for improvement of short-term engraftment; ii) expansion of HSC, with increased long-term human engraftment into secondary recipients and a significantly higher expansion factor of CD34+ progenitors in mice co-infused with MNC and CD38+ 3T3 fibroblasts. These results hold promise for the possible therapeutic use of cADPR, and of cADPR-producing stroma, to achieve long-term expansion of human HSC, that is, those HP capable of self-renewal and responsible for repopulation of the bone marrow.

  9. TRPM2: a calcium influx pathway regulated by oxidative stress and the novel second messenger ADP-ribose.

    PubMed

    Kühn, Frank J P; Heiner, Inka; Lückhoff, Andreas

    2005-10-01

    A unique functional property within the transient receptor potential (TRP) family of cation channels is the gating of TRP (melastatin) 2 (TRPM2) channels by ADP-ribose (ADPR). ADPR binds to the intracellular C-terminal tail of TRPM2, a domain that shows homology to enzymes with pyrophosphatase activity. Cytosolic Ca(2+) enhances TRPM2 gating by ADPR; ADPR and Ca(2+) in concert may be an important messenger system mediating Ca(2+) influx. Other stimuli of TRPM2 include NAD and H(2)O(2) and cyclic ADPR, which may act synergistically with ADPR. H(2)O(2), an experimental paradigm of oxidative stress, may also induce the formation of ADPR in the nucleus or mitochondria. In this review, we summarize the gating properties of TRPM2 and the proposed pathways of channel activation in vivo. TRPM2 is likely to be a key player in several signalling pathways, mediating cell death in response to oxidative stress or in reperfusion injury. Moreover, it plays a decisive role in experimentally induced diabetes mellitus and in the activation of leukocytes.

  10. Peroxynitrite-induced thymocyte apoptosis: the role of caspases and poly (ADP-ribose) synthetase (PARS) activation.

    PubMed Central

    Virág, L; Scott, G S; Cuzzocrea, S; Marmer, D; Salzman, A L; Szabó, C

    1998-01-01

    The mechanisms by which immature thymocyte apoptosis is induced during negative selection are poorly defined. Reports demonstrated that cross-linking of T-cell receptor leads to stromal cell activation, expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and, subsequently, to thymocyte apoptosis. Therefore we examined, whether NO directly or indirectly, through peroxynitrite formation, causes thymocyte apoptosis. Immuno-histochemical detection of nitrotyrosine revealed in vivo peroxynitrite formation in the thymi of naive mice. Nitrotyrosine, the footprint of peroxynitrite, was predominantly found in the corticomedullary junction and the medulla of naive mice. In the thymi of mice deficient in the inducible isoform of nitric oxide synthase, considerably less nitrotyrosine was found. Exposure of thymocytes in vitro to low concentrations (10 microM) of peroxynitrite led to apoptosis, whereas higher concentrations (50 microM) resulted in intense cell death with the characteristics of necrosis. We also investigated the effect of poly (ADP-ribose) synthetase (PARS) inhibition on thymocyte apoptosis. Using the PARS inhibitor 3-aminobenzamide (3-AB), or thymocytes from PARS-deficient animals, we established that PARS determines the fate of thymocyte death. Suppression of cellular ATP levels, and the cellular necrosis in response to peroxynitrite were prevented by PARS inhibition. Therefore, in the absence of PARS, cells are diverted towards the pathway of apoptotic cell death. Similar results were obtained with H2O2 treatment, while apoptosis induced by non-oxidative stimuli such as dexamethasone or anti-FAS antibody was unaffected by PARS inhibition. In conclusion, we propose that peroxynitrite-induced apoptosis may play a role in the process of thymocyte negative selection. Furthermore, we propose that the physiological role of PARS cleavage by apopain during apoptosis may serve as an energy-conserving step, enabling the cell to complete the process of apoptosis

  11. Paternal poly (ADP-ribose) metabolism modulates retention of inheritable sperm histones and early embryonic gene expression.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Motomasa; Meyer-Ficca, Mirella L; Leu, N Adrian; Rao, Shilpa; Li, Fan; Gregory, Brian D; Zalenskaya, Irina A; Schultz, Richard M; Meyer, Ralph G

    2014-05-01

    To achieve the extreme nuclear condensation necessary for sperm function, most histones are replaced with protamines during spermiogenesis in mammals. Mature sperm retain only a small fraction of nucleosomes, which are, in part, enriched on gene regulatory sequences, and recent findings suggest that these retained histones provide epigenetic information that regulates expression of a subset of genes involved in embryo development after fertilization. We addressed this tantalizing hypothesis by analyzing two mouse models exhibiting abnormal histone positioning in mature sperm due to impaired poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) metabolism during spermiogenesis and identified altered sperm histone retention in specific gene loci genome-wide using MNase digestion-based enrichment of mononucleosomal DNA. We then set out to determine the extent to which expression of these genes was altered in embryos generated with these sperm. For control sperm, most genes showed some degree of histone association, unexpectedly suggesting that histone retention in sperm genes is not an all-or-none phenomenon and that a small number of histones may remain associated with genes throughout the genome. The amount of retained histones, however, was altered in many loci when PAR metabolism was impaired. To ascertain whether sperm histone association and embryonic gene expression are linked, the transcriptome of individual 2-cell embryos derived from such sperm was determined using microarrays and RNA sequencing. Strikingly, a moderate but statistically significant portion of the genes that were differentially expressed in these embryos also showed different histone retention in the corresponding gene loci in sperm of their fathers. These findings provide new evidence for the existence of a linkage between sperm histone retention and gene expression in the embryo.

  12. Large supplements of nicotinic acid and nicotinamide increase tissue NAD+ and poly(ADP-ribose) levels but do not affect diethylnitrosamine-induced altered hepatic foci in Fischer-344 rats.

    PubMed

    Jackson, T M; Rawling, J M; Roebuck, B D; Kirkland, J B

    1995-06-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) is a homopolymer of ADP-ribose units synthesized from NAD+ on nuclear acceptor proteins and is known to be involved in DNA repair. It is not known whether large oral doses of the clinically utilized NAD precursors nicotinic acid or nicotinamide affect poly(ADP-ribose) metabolism or the cellular response to DNA damage. In our first study, using Fischer-344 rats, 2 wk of dietary nicotinic acid supplementation (500 and 1000 mg/kg diet) caused elevated levels of NAD+ in the blood, liver, heart and kidney, while nicotinamide caused elevated levels only in the blood and liver, compared with controls fed a diet containing 30 mg/kg nicotinic acid. Both nicotinic acid and nicotinamide, at 1000 mg/kg diet, caused elevations in liver NAD+, by 44 and 43%, respectively. Only nicotinamide, however, elevated liver poly(ADP-ribose) (63% higher than control group). Following treatment with the hepatocarcinogen diethylnitrosamine, higher levels of hepatic NAD+ were observed in rats fed both nicotinic acid and nicotinamide at 1000 mg/kg diet, but only nicotinic acid supplementation caused a greater accumulation of hepatic poly(ADP-ribose) (61% higher than control group). Neither of the dietary treatments significantly affected the proportion of the liver occupied by placental glutathione-S-transferase positive foci. These results show that poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis is not directly responsive to hepatic NAD+ levels during niacin supplementation, and that the mechanisms of action of nicotinic acid and nicotinamide are different. The observed changes in poly(ADP-ribose) metabolism do not appear to cause any change in susceptibility to chemically induced carcinogenesis in this organ.

  13. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation reactions in the regulation of nuclear functions.

    PubMed Central

    D'Amours, D; Desnoyers, S; D'Silva, I; Poirier, G G

    1999-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is a post-translational modification of proteins. During this process, molecules of ADP-ribose are added successively on to acceptor proteins to form branched polymers. This modification is transient but very extensive in vivo, as polymer chains can reach more than 200 units on protein acceptors. The existence of the poly(ADP-ribose) polymer was first reported nearly 40 years ago. Since then, the importance of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis has been established in many cellular processes. However, a clear and unified picture of the physiological role of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation still remains to be established. The total dependence of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis on DNA strand breaks strongly suggests that this post-translational modification is involved in the metabolism of nucleic acids. This view is also supported by the identification of direct protein-protein interactions involving poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (113 kDa PARP), an enzyme catalysing the formation of poly(ADP-ribose), and key effectors of DNA repair, replication and transcription reactions. The presence of PARP in these multiprotein complexes, in addition to the actual poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of some components of these complexes, clearly supports an important role for poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation reactions in DNA transactions. Accordingly, inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis by any of several approaches and the analysis of PARP-deficient cells has revealed that the absence of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation strongly affects DNA metabolism, most notably DNA repair. The recent identification of new poly(ADP-ribosyl)ating enzymes with distinct (non-standard) structures in eukaryotes and archaea has revealed a novel level of complexity in the regulation of poly(ADP-ribose) metabolism. PMID:10455009

  14. Inhibition of poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase using quinazolinone nucleus.

    PubMed

    Hemalatha, K; Madhumitha, G

    2016-09-01

    Poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase (PARP) is a group of enzymes with several subtypes and it manages various ailment such as cancer, inflammatory disorders, diabetes mellitus, neuronal injury, HIV infection, Parkinsonism, aging, and ischemia-reperfusion injury. Various PARP inhibitors share a common property of bicyclic lactam in its main structural frame. The core moiety containing bicyclic lactam rings are isoquinolinones, dihydroisoquinolinones, quinazolinediones, phthalazinones, quinazolinones, and phenanthridones. The quinazolinone with diverse substituents displayed low nanomolar inhibition. Quinazolinone is an important and vital molecule in the field of medicinal chemistry possessing multitude pharmacological actions. Though the chemistry of quinazolinones has been discussed through centuries, its concise role on PARP inhibition needed a special consideration. The aim of this review is to discover the effect of quinazolinone substitutents and its role in PARP inhibition. This precise review will discuss the effect of quinazolinones on PARP subtypes such as PARP-1, PARP-2, PARP-5a, and PARP-5b. In addition to its pharmacological actions, PARP inhibitors can also act as a chemosensitizing agent, and it is used in combination with the other anticancer agents. This summarization will definitely be a supportive report for the scientist working toward the novelty in the quinazolinone nucleus and its role in PARP inhibition. PMID:27470142

  15. Molecular biology basis for the response of poly(ADP-rib) polymerase and NAD metabolism to dna damage caused by mustard alkylating agents. Final report, 30 April 1990-30 July 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Smulson, M.E.

    1994-08-30

    During the course of this contract, we have performed a variety of experiments whose intent has been to provide a strategy to modulate the nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PADPRP) in cultured keratinocytes. During this study, human keratinocyte lines were stably transfected with the cDNA for human PADPRP in the antisense orientation under an inducible promoter. Induction of this antisense RNA by dexamethasone in cultured cells selectively lowered levels of PADPRP in RNA, protein, and enzyme activity. Induction of antisense RNA led to a reduction in the levels of PADPRP in individual cell nuclei, as well as the loss of the ability of cells to synthesize and modify proteins by poly(ADP-ribose) polymer in response to an alkylating agent. When keratinocyte clones containing the antisense construct or empty vector alone were grafted onto nude mice they formed histologically normal human skin. The PADPRP antisense construct was also inducible in vivo by the topical application of dexamethasone to the reconstituted epidermis. In addition, poly(ADP-ribose) polymer could be induced and detected in vivo following the topical application of a sulfur mustard to the grafted transfected skin layers. Accordingly, a model system has been developed in which the levels of PADPRP can be selectively manipulated in human keratinocytes in cell culture, and potentially in reconstituted epidermis as well.

  16. Inhibiting poly(ADP-ribosylation) improves axon regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Alexandra B; McWhirter, Rebecca D; Sekine, Yuichi; Strittmatter, Stephen M; Miller, David M; Hammarlund, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The ability of a neuron to regenerate its axon after injury depends in part on its intrinsic regenerative potential. Here, we identify novel intrinsic regulators of axon regeneration: poly(ADP-ribose) glycohodrolases (PARGs) and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs). PARGs, which remove poly(ADP-ribose) from proteins, act in injured C. elegans GABA motor neurons to enhance axon regeneration. PARG expression is regulated by DLK signaling, and PARGs mediate DLK function in enhancing axon regeneration. Conversely, PARPs, which add poly(ADP-ribose) to proteins, inhibit axon regeneration of both C. elegans GABA neurons and mammalian cortical neurons. Furthermore, chemical PARP inhibitors improve axon regeneration when administered after injury. Our results indicate that regulation of poly(ADP-ribose) levels is a critical function of the DLK regeneration pathway, that poly-(ADP ribosylation) inhibits axon regeneration across species, and that chemical inhibition of PARPs can elicit axon regeneration. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12734.001 PMID:27697151

  17. Free ADP-ribose in human erythrocytes: pathways of intra-erythrocytic conversion and non-enzymic binding to membrane proteins.

    PubMed

    Zocchi, E; Guida, L; Franco, L; Silvestro, L; Guerrini, M; Benatti, U; De Flora, A

    1993-10-01

    We have previously identified free ADP-ribose (ADPR) as a normal metabolite in mature human erythrocytes. In this study the metabolic transformations of ADPR were investigated in both supernatants from erythrocyte lysates and intact erythrocytes, loaded with ADPR by means of a procedure involving hypotonic haemolysis and isotonic resealing. In both experimental systems, the main pathway was a dinucleotide pyrophosphatase-catalysed hydrolysis to yield AMP, which was readily converted into the adenylic and inosinic nucleotide pools. To a lesser extent, ADPR underwent conversion into a compound that was identified as ADP-ribulose (ADPRu), on the basis of m.s., n.m.r. spectroscopy and enzymic analysis. ADPRu was also susceptible to degradation by the dinucleotide pyrophosphatase, which was partially purified from erythrocyte lysates and characterized with respect to its substrate specificity. Isomerization of ADPR to ADPRu was markedly enhanced by ATP. Incubation of unsealed haemoglobin-free erythrocyte membranes with labelled ADPR did not cause any transformation of this nucleotide and resulted in its trichloroacetic acid- and formic acid-resistant binding to a number of membrane cytoskeletal proteins. These proteins include spectrin, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (Ga3PDH), three proteins of molecular masses 98, 79 and 72 kDa, which apparently comigrate with bands 3, 4.1 and 4.2 respectively, and two additional proteins of molecular masses 58 and 41 kDa. Acid-resistant binding of ADPR, as well as of NAD+, to Ga3PDH was confirmed for the enzyme purified from human erythrocytes.

  18. Molecular biological basis for the response of poly(ADP-rib) polymerase and NAD metabolism to DNA damage caused by mustard alkylating agents. Midterm report

    SciTech Connect

    Smulson, M.E.

    1996-07-01

    During the course of this contract, we have performed a variety of experiments to provide a strategy to modulate the nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), in cultured keratinocytes. This enzyme modifies a variety of nuclear proteins utilizing NAD. DNA is required for the catalytic activity of the enzyme and the activity is dependent upon the presence of strand breaks in this DNA. It has been hypothesized that human skin exposed to mustards may develop blisters due to a generalized lowering of NAD in exposed skin cells. During the contract period, we have established a stably transfected human keratinocyte cell line which expresses antisense transcripts to PARP mRNA when these keratinocyte were grafted onto nude mice they formed histologically normal human skin. Accordingly, a model system has been developed in which the levels of PARP can be selectively manipulated in human keratinocytes in reconstituted epidermis as well. We also showed that PARP was proteolytically cleaved at the onset of spontaneous apoptosis following proteolytic conversion of CPP32b to its active form, termed `apopain`. Having characterized the events associated with apoptosis, we determined, during the last period, whether any or all of these features could be observed following exposure of keratinocytes to SM.

  19. Ibrutinib synergizes with poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase inhibitors to induce cell death in AML cells via a BTK-independent mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Rotin, Lianne E.; Gronda, Marcela; MacLean, Neil; Hurren, Rose; Wang, XiaoMing; Lin, Feng-Hsu; Wrana, Jeff; Datti, Alessandro; Barber, Dwayne L.; Minden, Mark D.; Slassi, Malik; Schimmer, Aaron D.

    2016-01-01

    Targeting Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) with the small molecule BTK inhibitor ibrutinib has significantly improved patient outcomes in several B-cell malignancies, with minimal toxicity. Given the reported expression and constitutive activation of BTK in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells, there has been recent interest in investigating the anti-AML activity of ibrutinib. We noted that ibrutinib had limited single-agent toxicity in a panel of AML cell lines and primary AML samples, and therefore sought to identify ibrutinib-sensitizing drugs. Using a high-throughput combination chemical screen, we identified that the poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) inhibitor ethacridine lactate synergized with ibrutinib in TEX and OCI-AML2 leukemia cell lines. The combination of ibrutinib and ethacridine induced a synergistic increase in reactive oxygen species that was functionally important to explain the observed cell death. Interestingly, synergistic cytotoxicity of ibrutinib and ethacridine was independent of the inhibitory effect of ibrutinib against BTK, as knockdown of BTK did not sensitize TEX and OCI-AML2 cells to ethacridine treatment. Thus, our findings indicate that ibrutinib may have a BTK-independent role in AML and that PARG inhibitors may have utility as part of a combination therapy for this disease. PMID:26624983

  20. Ruling out pyridine dinucleotides as true TRPM2 channel activators reveals novel direct agonist ADP-ribose-2′-phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Tóth, Balázs; Iordanov, Iordan

    2015-01-01

    Transient receptor potential melastatin 2 (TRPM2), a Ca2+-permeable cation channel implicated in postischemic neuronal cell death, leukocyte activation, and insulin secretion, is activated by intracellular ADP ribose (ADPR). In addition, the pyridine dinucleotides nicotinamide-adenine-dinucleotide (NAD), nicotinic acid–adenine-dinucleotide (NAAD), and NAAD-2′-phosphate (NAADP) have been shown to activate TRPM2, or to enhance its activation by ADPR, when dialyzed into cells. The precise subset of nucleotides that act directly on the TRPM2 protein, however, is unknown. Here, we use a heterologously expressed, affinity-purified–specific ADPR hydrolase to purify commercial preparations of pyridine dinucleotides from substantial contaminations by ADPR or ADPR-2′-phosphate (ADPRP). Direct application of purified NAD, NAAD, or NAADP to the cytosolic face of TRPM2 channels in inside-out patches demonstrated that none of them stimulates gating, or affects channel activation by ADPR, indicating that none of these dinucleotides directly binds to TRPM2. Instead, our experiments identify for the first time ADPRP as a true direct TRPM2 agonist of potential biological interest. PMID:25918360

  1. Differential regulation of nicotinic acid-adenine dinucleotide phosphate and cADP-ribose production by cAMP and cGMP.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, H L; Galione, A

    1998-01-01

    The sea urchin egg has been used as a system to study calcium-release mechanisms induced by inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3), cADP-ribose (cADPR), and more recently, nicotinic acid-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP). In order that cADPR and NAADP may be established as endogenous messengers for calcium release, the existence of intracellular enzymes capable of metabolizing these molecules must be demonstrated. In addition, intracellular levels of cADPR and NAADP should be under the control of extracellular stimuli. It has been shown that cGMP stimulates the synthesis of cADPR in the sea urchin egg. The present study shows that the sea urchin egg is capable of synthesizing and degrading NAADP. cADPR and NAADP synthetic activities appear to be separate, with different cellular localizations, pH and temperature optima. We suggest that in the sea urchin egg, cADPR and NAADP production may be differentially regulated by receptor-coupled second messengers, with cADPR production being regulated by cGMP and NAADP production modulated by cAMP. PMID:9560312

  2. Differential effect of pH upon cyclic-ADP-ribose and nicotinate-adenine dinucleotide phosphate-induced Ca2+ release systems.

    PubMed Central

    Chini, E N; Liang, M; Dousa, T P

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the pH dependence and the effects of thimerosal and dithiothreitol (DTT) upon the Ca2+ release induced by cADP-ribose (cADPR) and nicotinate-adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NAADP) in sea urchin egg homogenates. Both Ca2+ release triggered by cADPR and the binding of [3H]cADPR to sea urchin egg homogenates were decreased by alkalization of the assay media from pH 7.2 to 8.9. In contrast, NAADP-triggered Ca2+ release was not influenced by changes in pH. The Ca2+ release induced by cADPR was potentiated by thimerosal and inhibited by DTT, but neither thimerosal nor DTT had any effect upon the Ca2+ release induced by NAADP. We conclude that cADPR-sensitive Ca2+-release mechanisms are dependent on pH of the assay media and are sensitive to thiol group modification. On the other hand, these functional properties are not shared by NAADP-regulated Ca2+ channels. PMID:9794787

  3. Cyclic ADP-Ribose and Heat Regulate Oxytocin Release via CD38 and TRPM2 in the Hypothalamus during Social or Psychological Stress in Mice.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Jing; Amina, Sarwat; Liang, Mingkun; Akther, Shirin; Yuhi, Teruko; Nishimura, Tomoko; Tsuji, Chiharu; Tsuji, Takahiro; Liu, Hong-Xiang; Hashii, Minako; Furuhara, Kazumi; Yokoyama, Shigeru; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko; Okamoto, Hiroshi; Zhao, Yong Juan; Lee, Hon Cheung; Tominaga, Makoto; Lopatina, Olga; Higashida, Haruhiro

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic oxytocin (OT) is released into the brain by cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) with or without depolarizing stimulation. Previously, we showed that the intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) that seems to trigger OT release can be elevated by β-NAD(+), cADPR, and ADP in mouse oxytocinergic neurons. As these β-NAD(+) metabolites activate warm-sensitive TRPM2 cation channels, when the incubation temperature is increased, the [Ca(2+)]i in hypothalamic neurons is elevated. However, it has not been determined whether OT release is facilitated by heat in vitro or hyperthermia in vivo in combination with cADPR. Furthermore, it has not been examined whether CD38 and TRPM2 exert their functions on OT release during stress or stress-induced hyperthermia in relation to the anxiolytic roles and social behaviors of OT under stress conditions. Here, we report that OT release from the isolated hypothalami of male mice in culture was enhanced by extracellular application of cADPR or increasing the incubation temperature from 35°C to 38.5°C, and simultaneous stimulation showed a greater effect. This release was inhibited by a cADPR-dependent ryanodine receptor inhibitor and a nonspecific TRPM2 inhibitor. The facilitated release by heat and cADPR was suppressed in the hypothalamus isolated from CD38 knockout mice and CD38- or TRPM2-knockdown mice. In the course of these experiments, we noted that OT release differed markedly between individual mice under stress with group housing. That is, when male mice received cage-switch stress and eliminated due to their social subclass, significantly higher levels of OT release were found in subordinates compared with ordinates. In mice exposed to anxiety stress in an open field, the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) OT level increased transiently at 5 min after exposure, and the rectal temperature also increased from 36.6°C to 37.8°C. OT levels in the CSF of mice with lipopolysaccharide-induced fever (+0.8°C) were higher than

  4. Cyclic ADP-Ribose and Heat Regulate Oxytocin Release via CD38 and TRPM2 in the Hypothalamus during Social or Psychological Stress in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Jing; Amina, Sarwat; Liang, Mingkun; Akther, Shirin; Yuhi, Teruko; Nishimura, Tomoko; Tsuji, Chiharu; Tsuji, Takahiro; Liu, Hong-Xiang; Hashii, Minako; Furuhara, Kazumi; Yokoyama, Shigeru; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko; Okamoto, Hiroshi; Zhao, Yong Juan; Lee, Hon Cheung; Tominaga, Makoto; Lopatina, Olga; Higashida, Haruhiro

    2016-01-01

    Hypothalamic oxytocin (OT) is released into the brain by cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) with or without depolarizing stimulation. Previously, we showed that the intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) that seems to trigger OT release can be elevated by β-NAD+, cADPR, and ADP in mouse oxytocinergic neurons. As these β-NAD+ metabolites activate warm-sensitive TRPM2 cation channels, when the incubation temperature is increased, the [Ca2+]i in hypothalamic neurons is elevated. However, it has not been determined whether OT release is facilitated by heat in vitro or hyperthermia in vivo in combination with cADPR. Furthermore, it has not been examined whether CD38 and TRPM2 exert their functions on OT release during stress or stress-induced hyperthermia in relation to the anxiolytic roles and social behaviors of OT under stress conditions. Here, we report that OT release from the isolated hypothalami of male mice in culture was enhanced by extracellular application of cADPR or increasing the incubation temperature from 35°C to 38.5°C, and simultaneous stimulation showed a greater effect. This release was inhibited by a cADPR-dependent ryanodine receptor inhibitor and a nonspecific TRPM2 inhibitor. The facilitated release by heat and cADPR was suppressed in the hypothalamus isolated from CD38 knockout mice and CD38- or TRPM2-knockdown mice. In the course of these experiments, we noted that OT release differed markedly between individual mice under stress with group housing. That is, when male mice received cage-switch stress and eliminated due to their social subclass, significantly higher levels of OT release were found in subordinates compared with ordinates. In mice exposed to anxiety stress in an open field, the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) OT level increased transiently at 5 min after exposure, and the rectal temperature also increased from 36.6°C to 37.8°C. OT levels in the CSF of mice with lipopolysaccharide-induced fever (+0.8°C) were higher than those

  5. Effects of photoreleased cADP-ribose on calcium transients and calcium sparks in myocytes isolated from guinea-pig and rat ventricle.

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Y; Galione, A; Terrar, D A

    1999-01-01

    Actions of photoreleased cADP-ribose (cADPR), a novel regulator of calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) from ryanodine-sensitive stores, were investigated in cardiac myocytes. Photoreleased cADPR caused an increase in the magnitude of whole-cell calcium transients studied in mammalian cardiac ventricular myocytes (both guinea-pig and rat) using confocal microscopy). Approx. 15 s was required following photorelease of cADPR for the development of its maximal effect. Photoreleased cADPR also increased the frequency of calcium 'sparks', which are thought to be elementary events which make up the whole-cell calcium transient, and were studied in rat myocytes, but had little or no effect on spark characteristics (amplitude, rise time, decay time and distance to half amplitude). The potentiating effects of photoreleased cADPR on both whole-cell transients and the frequency of calcium sparks were prevented by cytosolic application of the antagonist 8-amino-cADPR (5 microM). These experiments, therefore, provide the first evidence in any cell type for an effect of cADPR on calcium sparks, and are the first to show the actions of photoreleased cADPR on whole-cell calcium transients in mammalian cells. The observations are consistent with the effects of cADPR in enhancing the calcium sensitivity of CICR from the sarcoplasmic reticulum in cardiac ventricular myocytes, leading to an increase in the probability of occurrence of calcium sparks and to an increase in whole-cell calcium transients. The slow time-course for development of the full effect on whole-cell calcium transients might be taken to indicate that the influence of cADPR on CICR may involve complex molecular interactions rather than a simple direct action of cADPR on the ryanodine-receptor channels. PMID:10455010

  6. Regulation of Bone Morphogenetic Protein Signaling by ADP-ribosylation*

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Yukihide; Papoutsoglou, Panagiotis; Maturi, Varun; Tsubakihara, Yutaro; Hottiger, Michael O.; Heldin, Carl-Henrik; Moustakas, Aristidis

    2016-01-01

    We previously established a mechanism of negative regulation of transforming growth factor β signaling mediated by the nuclear ADP-ribosylating enzyme poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) and the deribosylating enzyme poly-(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG), which dynamically regulate ADP-ribosylation of Smad3 and Smad4, two central signaling proteins of the pathway. Here we demonstrate that the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathway can also be regulated by the opposing actions of PARP1 and PARG. PARG positively contributes to BMP signaling and forms physical complexes with Smad5 and Smad4. The positive role PARG plays during BMP signaling can be neutralized by PARP1, as demonstrated by experiments where PARG and PARP1 are simultaneously silenced. In contrast to PARG, ectopic expression of PARP1 suppresses BMP signaling, whereas silencing of endogenous PARP1 enhances signaling and BMP-induced differentiation. The two major Smad proteins of the BMP pathway, Smad1 and Smad5, interact with PARP1 and can be ADP-ribosylated in vitro, whereas PARG causes deribosylation. The overall outcome of this mode of regulation of BMP signal transduction provides a fine-tuning mechanism based on the two major enzymes that control cellular ADP-ribosylation. PMID:27129221

  7. Inhibition of gamma-ray dose-rate effects by D/sup 2/O and inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase in cultured mammalian L5178Y cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ueno, A.M.; Tanaka, O.; Matsudaira, H.

    1984-06-01

    Effects of deuterium oxide (D/sub 2/O) and 3-aminobenzamide, an inhibitor of poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase, on cell proliferation and survival were studied in cultured mammalian L5178Y cells under growing conditions and after acute and low-dose-rate irradiation at about 0.1 to 0.4 Gy/hr of ..gamma.. rays. Growth of irradiated and unirradiated cells was inhibited by 45% D/sub 2/O but not by 3-aminobenzamide at 10mM, except for treatments longer than 30 hr. The presence of these agents either alone or in combination during irradiation at low dose rates suppressed almost totally the decrease in cell killing due to the decrease in dose rate. Among other inhibitors tested, theobromine and theophylline were found to be effective in eliminating the dose-rate effects of ..gamma.. rays. Possible mechanisms underlying the inhibition are discussed.

  8. The status of poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors in ovarian cancer, part 2: extending the scope beyond olaparib and BRCA1/2 mutations.

    PubMed

    Miller, Rowan E; Ledermann, Jonathan A

    2016-09-01

    Poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitors have shown clinical activity in epithelial ovarian cancer, leading both the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Medicines Agency to approve olaparib for tumors characterized by BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations. However, it is becoming increasingly evident that tumors that share molecular features with BRCA-mutant tumors-a concept known as BRCAness-also may exhibit defective homologous recombination DNA repair, and therefore will respond to PARP inhibition. A number of strategies have been proposed to identify BRCAness, including identifying defects in other genes that modulate homologous recombination and characterizing the mutational and transcriptional signatures of BRCAness. In addition to olaparib, a number of other PARP inhibitors are in clinical development. This article reviews the development of PARP inhibitors other than olaparib, and discusses the evidence for PARP inhibitors beyond BRCA1/2-mutant ovarian cancer. PMID:27673289

  9. Distribution of protein poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation systems across all domains of life

    PubMed Central

    Perina, Dragutin; Mikoč, Andreja; Ahel, Josip; Ćetković, Helena; Žaja, Roko; Ahel, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is a post-translational modification of proteins involved in regulation of many cellular pathways. Poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) consists of chains of repeating ADP-ribose nucleotide units and is synthesized by the family of enzymes called poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs). This modification can be removed by the hydrolytic action of poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) and ADP-ribosylhydrolase 3 (ARH3). Hydrolytic activity of macrodomain proteins (MacroD1, MacroD2 and TARG1) is responsible for the removal of terminal ADP-ribose unit and for complete reversion of protein ADP-ribosylation. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is widely utilized in eukaryotes and PARPs are present in representatives from all six major eukaryotic supergroups, with only a small number of eukaryotic species that do not possess PARP genes. The last common ancestor of all eukaryotes possessed at least five types of PARP proteins that include both mono and poly(ADP-ribosyl) transferases. Distribution of PARGs strictly follows the distribution of PARP proteins in eukaryotic species. At least one of the macrodomain proteins that hydrolyse terminal ADP-ribose is also always present. Therefore, we can presume that the last common ancestor of all eukaryotes possessed a fully functional and reversible PAR metabolism and that PAR signalling provided the conditions essential for survival of the ancestral eukaryote in its ancient environment. PARP proteins are far less prevalent in bacteria and were probably gained through horizontal gene transfer. Only eleven bacterial species possess all proteins essential for a functional PAR metabolism, although it is not known whether PAR metabolism is truly functional in bacteria. Several dsDNA viruses also possess PARP homologues, while no PARP proteins have been identified in any archaeal genome. Our analysis of the distribution of enzymes involved in PAR metabolism provides insight into the evolution of these important signalling systems, as well as

  10. ADP-ribosylation of histones by ARTD1: an additional module of the histone code?

    PubMed

    Hottiger, Michael O

    2011-06-01

    ADP-ribosylation is a covalent post-translational protein modification catalyzed by ADP-ribosyltransferases and is involved in important processes such as cell cycle regulation, DNA damage response, replication or transcription. Histones are ADP-ribosylated by ADP-ribosyltransferase diphtheria toxin-like 1 at specific amino acid residues, in particular lysines, of the histones tails. Specific ADP-ribosyl hydrolases and poly-ADP-ribose glucohydrolases degrade the ADP-ribose polymers. The ADP-ribose modification is read by zinc finger motifs or macrodomains, which then regulate chromatin structure and transcription. Thus, histone ADP-ribosylation may be considered an additional component of the histone code.

  11. Expression of Poly (Adenosine Diphosphate-Ribose) Polymerase and p53 in Epithelial Ovarian Cancer and Their Role in Prognosis and Disease Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Godoy, Heidi; Mhawech-Fauceglia, Paulette; Beck, Amy; Miller, Austin; Lele, Shashikant; Odunsi, Kunle

    2016-01-01

    Summary PARP, poly (adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase, is a damage-sensing protein, which is essential for the repair of DNA single-strand breaks. PARP and p53 function synergistically in repairing DNA damage and suppressing chromosomal rearrangements. The aim of this study was to determine the expression of PARP and p53 in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) and to correlate their expression with clinicopathologic characteristics. PARP and p53 were evaluated using immunohistochemistry applied on a tissue microarray of 189 EOC and their expressions were correlated to clinicopathologic variables, including the age of diagnosis, stage, grade, histologic type, optimal debulking, progression-free survival, and overall survival (OS). PARP and p53 expressions were shown in 61% and 54% of cases, respectively. PARP-positive tumors are more likely to have higher grade (P = 0.03) and complete response to initial first-line chemotherapy (P = 0.009). Patients with positive p53 staining are more likely to be at the advanced stage disease (P = 0.004). Finally, there were no significant associations between PARP and p53 expression and no differences in progression-free survival and OS for PARP or p53 expressions. The overexpression of PARP and p53 in high grade, and advanced stage tumors indicated that these 2 markers might serve as an indicator of aggressive disease behavior. Additional studies are warranted to evaluate the role of PARP and PARP inhibitors in the setting of adjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:21293287

  12. Wnt pathway activation by ADP-ribosylation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Eungi; Tacchelly-Benites, Ofelia; Wang, Zhenghan; Randall, Michael P; Tian, Ai; Benchabane, Hassina; Freemantle, Sarah; Pikielny, Claudio; Tolwinski, Nicholas S; Lee, Ethan; Ahmed, Yashi

    2016-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signalling directs fundamental processes during metazoan development and can be aberrantly activated in cancer. Wnt stimulation induces the recruitment of the scaffold protein Axin from an inhibitory destruction complex to a stimulatory signalosome. Here we analyse the early effects of Wnt on Axin and find that the ADP-ribose polymerase Tankyrase (Tnks)--known to target Axin for proteolysis-regulates Axin's rapid transition following Wnt stimulation. We demonstrate that the pool of ADP-ribosylated Axin, which is degraded under basal conditions, increases immediately following Wnt stimulation in both Drosophila and human cells. ADP-ribosylation of Axin enhances its interaction with the Wnt co-receptor LRP6, an essential step in signalosome assembly. We suggest that in addition to controlling Axin levels, Tnks-dependent ADP-ribosylation promotes the reprogramming of Axin following Wnt stimulation; and propose that Tnks inhibition blocks Wnt signalling not only by increasing destruction complex activity, but also by impeding signalosome assembly. PMID:27138857

  13. Wnt pathway activation by ADP-ribosylation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Eungi; Tacchelly-Benites, Ofelia; Wang, Zhenghan; Randall, Michael P.; Tian, Ai; Benchabane, Hassina; Freemantle, Sarah; Pikielny, Claudio; Tolwinski, Nicholas S.; Lee, Ethan; Ahmed, Yashi

    2016-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signalling directs fundamental processes during metazoan development and can be aberrantly activated in cancer. Wnt stimulation induces the recruitment of the scaffold protein Axin from an inhibitory destruction complex to a stimulatory signalosome. Here we analyse the early effects of Wnt on Axin and find that the ADP-ribose polymerase Tankyrase (Tnks)—known to target Axin for proteolysis—regulates Axin's rapid transition following Wnt stimulation. We demonstrate that the pool of ADP-ribosylated Axin, which is degraded under basal conditions, increases immediately following Wnt stimulation in both Drosophila and human cells. ADP-ribosylation of Axin enhances its interaction with the Wnt co-receptor LRP6, an essential step in signalosome assembly. We suggest that in addition to controlling Axin levels, Tnks-dependent ADP-ribosylation promotes the reprogramming of Axin following Wnt stimulation; and propose that Tnks inhibition blocks Wnt signalling not only by increasing destruction complex activity, but also by impeding signalosome assembly. PMID:27138857

  14. Co-targeting Deoxyribonucleic Acid–Dependent Protein Kinase and Poly(Adenosine Diphosphate-Ribose) Polymerase-1 Promotes Accelerated Senescence of Irradiated Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Azad, Arun; Bukczynska, Patricia; Jackson, Susan; Haput, Ygal; Cullinane, Carleen; McArthur, Grant A.; Solomon, Benjamin

    2014-02-01

    Purpose: To examine the effects of combined blockade of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) and poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) on accelerated senescence in irradiated H460 and A549 non-small cell lung cancer cells. Methods and Materials: The effects of KU5788 and AG014699 (inhibitors of DNA-PK and PARP-1, respectively) on clonogenic survival, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), apoptosis, mitotic catastrophe, and accelerated senescence in irradiated cells were examined in vitro. For in vivo experiments, H460 xenografts established in athymic nude mice were treated with BEZ235 (a DNA-PK, ATM, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor) and AG014699 to determine effects on proliferation, DNA DSBs, and accelerated senescence after radiation. Results: Compared with either inhibitor alone, combination treatment with KU57788 and AG014699 reduced postradiation clonogenic survival and significantly increased persistence of Gamma-H2AX (γH2AX) foci in irradiated H460 and A549 cells. Notably, these effects coincided with the induction of accelerated senescence in irradiated cells as reflected by positive β-galactosidase staining, G2-M cell-cycle arrest, enlarged and flattened cellular morphology, increased p21 expression, and senescence-associated cytokine secretion. In irradiated H460 xenografts, concurrent therapy with BEZ235 and AG014699 resulted in sustained Gamma-H2AX (γH2AX) staining and prominent β-galactosidase activity. Conclusion: Combined DNA-PK and PARP-1 blockade increased tumor cell radiosensitivity and enhanced the prosenescent properties of ionizing radiation in vitro and in vivo. These data provide a rationale for further preclinical and clinical testing of this therapeutic combination.

  15. Post-Transcriptional Regulation by Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of the RNA-Binding Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Yingbiao; Tulin, Alexei V.

    2013-01-01

    Gene expression is intricately regulated at the post-transcriptional level by RNA-binding proteins (RBPs) via their interactions with pre-messenger RNA (pre-mRNA) and mRNA during development. However, very little is known about the mechanism regulating RBP activities in RNA metabolism. During the past few years, a large body of evidence has suggested that many RBPs, such as heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNPs), undergo post-translational modification through poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation to modulate RNA processing, including splicing, polyadenylation, translation, miRNA biogenesis and rRNA processing. Accordingly, RBP poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation has been shown to be involved in stress responses, stem cell differentiation and retinal morphogenesis. Here, we summarize recent advances in understanding the biological roles of RBP poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation, as controlled by Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerases (PARPs) and Poly(ADP-ribose) Glycohydrolase (PARG). In addition, we discuss the potential of PARP and PARG inhibitors for the treatment of RBP-related human diseases, including cancer and neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:23921685

  16. Persistence of histone H2AX phosphorylation after meiotic chromosome synapsis and abnormal centromere cohesion in Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (Parp-1) null oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Feikun; Baumann, Claudia; De La Fuente, Rabindranath

    2009-01-01

    In spite of the impact of aneuploidy on human health little is known concerning the molecular mechanisms involved in the formation of structural or numerical chromosome abnormalities during meiosis. Here, we provide novel evidence indicating that lack of PARP-1 function during oogenesis predisposes the female gamete to genome instability. During prophase I of meiosis, a high proportion of Parp-1 (−/−) mouse oocytes exhibit a spectrum of meiotic defects including incomplete homologous chromosome synapsis or persistent histone H2AX phosphorylation in fully synapsed chromosomes at the late pachytene stage. Moreover, the X chromosome bivalent is also prone to exhibit persistent double strand DNA breaks (DSBs). In striking contrast, such defects were not detected in mutant pachytene spermatocytes. In fully-grown wild type oocytes at the germinal vesicle stage, PARP-1 protein associates with nuclear speckles and upon meiotic resumption, undergoes a striking re-localization towards spindle poles as well as pericentric heterochromatin domains at the metaphase II stage. Notably, a high proportion of in vivo matured Parp-1 (−/−) oocytes show lack of recruitment of the kinetochore-associated protein BUB3 to centromeric domains and fail to maintain metaphase II arrest. Defects in chromatin modifications in the form of persistent histone H2AX phosphorylation during prophase I of meiosis and deficient sister chromatid cohesion during metaphase II predispose mutant oocytes to premature anaphase II onset upon removal from the oviductal environment. Our results indicate that PARP-1 plays a critical role in the maintenance of chromosome stability at key stages of meiosis in the female germ line. Moreover, in the metaphase II stage oocyte PARP-1 is required for the regulation of centromere structure and function through a mechanism that involves the recruitment of BUB3 protein to centromeric domains. PMID:19463809

  17. Novel tricyclic poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase-1/2 inhibitors with potent anticancer chemopotentiating activity: Design, synthesis and biological evaluation.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Hu, Yan; Wang, Xueyan; He, Guangwei; Xu, Yungen; Zhu, Qihua

    2016-10-01

    8,9-Dihydro-2,4,7,9a-tetraazabenzo[cd]azulen-6(7H)-ones were designed and synthesized as a new class of PARP-1/2 inhibitors. The compounds displayed a variable pattern of PARP-1/2 enzymes inhibition profile that, in part, paralleled the antiproliferative activity in cell lines. Among them, compound 9e exhibited not only the significant IC50 value of 28nM in the PARP-1 and 7.7nM in PARP-2 enzyme assay, but also a profound synergic efficacy combined with temozolomide with PF50 values of 2.6, 2.5, and 6.5 against MDA-MB-468, SW-620 and A549 and cell line, respectively. PMID:27561983

  18. Phase I Study Of The Poly(ADP-Ribose) Polymerase Inhibitor, AG014699, In Combination With Temozolomide in Patients with Advanced Solid Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Plummer, Ruth; Jones, Christopher; Middleton, Mark; Wilson, Richard; Evans, Jeffrey; Olsen, Anna; Curtin, Nicola; Boddy, Alan; McHugh, Peter; Newell, David; Harris, Adrian; Johnson, Patrick; Steinfeldt, Heidi; Dewji, Raz; Wang, Diane; Robson, Lesley; Calvert, Hilary

    2009-01-01

    Purpose One mechanism of tumor resistance to cytotoxic therapy is repair of damaged DNA. PARP-1 is a nuclear enzyme involved in base excision repair, one of the 5 major repair pathways. PARP inhibitors are emerging as a new class of agents which can potentiate chemo and radiotherapy. The paper reports safety, efficacy, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic results of the First-in-Class trial of a PARP inhibitor, AG-014699, combined with temozolomide in adults with advanced malignancy. Experimental Design Initially patients with solid tumors received escalating doses of AG-014699 with 100 mg/m2 temozolomide daily x 5 q 28 to establish the PARP-inhibitory dose (PID). Subsequently AG-014699 dose was fixed at PID and temozolomide escalated to maximum tolerated dose or 200 mg/m2 in metastatic melanoma patients whose tumours were biopsied. AG014699 and temozolomide pharmacokinetics, PARP activity, DNA strand single strand breaks (SSB), response and toxicity were evaluated. Results 33 patients were enrolled. PARP inhibition was seen at all doses, PID was 12 mg/m2 based on 74 -97% inhibition of PBL PARP activity. Recommended doses were AG014699 12 mg/m2 and temozolomide 200 mg/m2. Mean tumor PARP inhibition at 5 hours was 92% (range 46 - 97%). No toxicity attributable to AG014699 alone was observed. AG014699 demonstrated linear pharmacokinetics with no interaction with temozolomide. All patients treated at PID showed increases in DNA SSB and encouraging evidence of activity was seen. Conclusions The combination of AG014699 and temozolomide is well tolerated, pharmacodynamic assessments demonstrating proof of principle of the mode of action of this new class of agents. PMID:19047122

  19. Long-lasting neuroprotection and neurological improvement in stroke models with new, potent and brain permeable inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Moroni, F; Cozzi, A; Chiarugi, A; Formentini, L; Camaioni, E; Pellegrini-Giampietro, DE; Chen, Y; Liang, S; Zaleska, MM; Gonzales, C; Wood, A; Pellicciari, R

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSES Thienyl-isoquinolone (TIQ-A) is a relatively potent PARP inhibitor able to reduce post-ischaemic neuronal death in vitro. Here we have studied, in different stroke models in vivo, the neuroprotective properties of DAMTIQ and HYDAMTIQ, two TIQ-A derivatives able to reach the brain and to inhibit PARP-1 and PARP-2. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH Studies were carried out in (i) transient (2 h) middle cerebral artery occlusion (tMCAO), (ii) permanent MCAO (pMCAO) and (iii) electrocoagulation of the distal portion of MCA in conjunction with transient (90 min) bilateral carotid occlusion (focal cortical ischaemia). KEY RESULTS In male rats with tMCAO, HYDAMTIQ (0.1–10 mg·kg−1) injected i.p. three times, starting 4 h after MCAO, reduced infarct volumes by up to 70%, reduced the loss of body weight by up to 60% and attenuated the neurological impairment by up to 40%. In age-matched female rats, HYDAMTIQ also reduced brain damage. Protection, however, was less pronounced than in the male rats. In animals with pMCAO, HYDAMTIQ administered 30 min after MCAO reduced infarct volumes by approximately 40%. In animals with focal cortical ischaemia, HYDAMTIQ treatment decreased post-ischaemic accumulation of PAR (the product of PARP activity) and the presence of OX42-positive inflammatory cells in the ischaemic cortex. It also reduced sensorimotor deficits for up to 90 days after MCAO. CONCLUSION AND IMPLICATIONS Our results show that HYDAMTIQ is a potent PARP inhibitor that conferred robust neuroprotection and long-lasting improvement of post-stroke neurological deficits. PMID:21913897

  20. Nitric Oxide (NO) Releasing Poly ADP-ribose Polymerase 1 (PARP-1) Inhibitors Targeted to Glutathione S-Transferase P1-Overexpressing Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    We report the antitumor effects of nitric oxide (NO) releasing derivatives of the PARP-1 inhibitor olaparib (1). Compound 5b was prepared by coupling the carboxyl group of 3b and the free amino group of arylated diazeniumdiolated piperazine 4. Analogue 5a has the same structure except that the F is replaced by H. Compound 13 is the same as 5b except that a Me2N–N(O)=NO– group was added para and ortho to the nitro groups of the dinitrophenyl ring. The resulting prodrugs are activated by glutathione in a reaction accelerated by glutathione S-transferase P1 (GSTP1), an enzyme frequently overexpressed in cancers. This metabolism generates NO plus a PARP-1 inhibitor simultaneously, consuming reducing equivalents, leading to DNA damage concomitant with inhibition of DNA repair, and in the case of 13 inducing cross-linking glutathionylation of proteins. Compounds 5b and 13 reduced the growth rates of A549 human lung adenocarcinoma xenografts with no evidence of systemic toxicity. PMID:24521039

  1. Poly-ADP-Ribose Polymerase as a Therapeutic Target in Pediatric Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma and Pediatric High-Grade Astrocytoma.

    PubMed

    Chornenkyy, Yevgen; Agnihotri, Sameer; Yu, Man; Buczkowicz, Pawel; Rakopoulos, Patricia; Golbourn, Brian; Garzia, Livia; Siddaway, Robert; Leung, Stephie; Rutka, James T; Taylor, Michael D; Dirks, Peter B; Hawkins, Cynthia

    2015-11-01

    Pediatric high-grade astrocytomas (pHGA) and diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas (DIPG) are devastating malignancies for which no effective therapies exist. We investigated the therapeutic potential of PARP1 inhibition in preclinical models of pHGA and DIPG. PARP1 levels were characterized in pHGA and DIPG patient samples and tumor-derived cell lines. The effects of PARP inhibitors veliparib, olaparib, and niraparib as monotherapy or as radiosensitizers on cell viability, DNA damage, and PARP1 activity were evaluated in a panel of pHGA and DIPG cell lines. Survival benefit of niraparib was examined in an orthotopic xenograft model of pHGA. About 85% of pHGAs and 76% of DIPG tissue microarray samples expressed PARP1. Six of 8 primary cell lines highly expressed PARP1. Interestingly, across multiple cell lines, some PARP1 protein expression was required for response to PARP inhibition; however, there was no correlation between protein level or PARP1 activity and sensitivity to PARP inhibitors. Niraparib was the most effective at reducing cell viability and proliferation (MTT and Ki67). Niraparib induced DNA damage (γH2AX foci) and induced growth arrest. Pretreatment of pHGA cells with a sublethal dose of niraparib (1 μmol/L) before 2 Gy of ionizing radiation (IR) decreased the rate of DNA damage repair, colony growth, and relative cell number. Niraparib (50 mg/kg) inhibited PARP1 activity in vivo and extended survival of mice with orthotopic pHGA xenografts, when administered before IR (20 Gy, fractionated), relative to control mice (40 vs. 25 days). Our data provide in vitro and in vivo evidence that niraparib may be an effective radiosensitizer for pHGA and DIPG. PMID:26351319

  2. DNA double strand break repair defect and sensitivity to poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) inhibition in human papillomavirus 16-positive head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Alice N.; Cooper, Tiffiny S.; Rodriguez, Marcela; Trummell, Hoa Q.; Bonner, James A.; Rosenthal, Eben L.; Yang, Eddy S.

    2015-01-01

    Patients with human papillomavirus-positive (HPV+) head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) have increased response to radio- and chemotherapy and improved overall survival, possibly due to an impaired DNA damage response. Here, we investigated the correlation between HPV status and repair of DNA damage in HNSCC cell lines. We also assessed in vitro and in vivo sensitivity to the PARP inhibitor veliparib (ABT-888) in HNSCC cell lines and an HPV+ patient xenograft. Repair of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) was significantly delayed in HPV+ compared to HPV− HNSCCs, resulting in persistence of γH2AX foci. Although DNA repair activators 53BP1 and BRCA1 were functional in all HNSCCs, HPV+ cells showed downstream defects in both non-homologous end joining and homologous recombination repair. Specifically, HPV+ cells were deficient in protein recruitment and protein expression of DNA-Pk and BRCA2, key factors for non-homologous end joining and homologous recombination respectively. Importantly, the apparent DNA repair defect in HPV+ HNSCCs was associated with increased sensitivity to the PARP inhibitor veliparib, resulting in decreased cell survival in vitro and a 10–14 day tumor growth delay in vivo. These results support the testing of PARP inhibition in combination with DNA damaging agents as a novel therapeutic strategy for HPV+ HNSCC. PMID:26336991

  3. The Effect of Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase-1 Gene 3′Untranslated Region Polymorphism in Colorectal Cancer Risk among Saudi Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Alhadheq, Abdullah M.; Purusottapatnam Shaik, Jilani; Alamri, Abdullah; Aljebreen, Abdulrahman M.; Alharbi, Othman; Almadi, Majid A.; Alhadeq, Faten; Azzam, Nahla A.; Alanazi, Mohammad; Bazzi, Mohammad D.

    2016-01-01

    Background. DNA repair systems are essential for each cell to repair and maintain the genome integrity. Base excision repair pathway is one of the crucial pathways to maintain genome integrity and PARP-1 plays a key role in BER pathway. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the association between polymorphisms in PARP-1 3′untranslated region (3′UTR) SNP rs8679 and its expression in colorectal cancer. Methods. Genotyping and gene expression were performed using TaqMan assays. The effects of age, gender, and tumor location were evaluated in cases and controls regarding the genotyping results. Resulting data was analyzed using SPSS software. Results and Conclusions. Genotyping analysis for SNP rs8679 showed decreased susceptibility to colorectal cancer at heterozygous TC allele and at minor allele C. Further this protective association was also observed in younger age patients (≤57), in female patients, and also in patients with tumors located at colon and rectum. PARP-1 expression levels are significantly different in colorectal cancer compared to matched normal tissue. Our findings proved that the upregulation of PARP-1 is associated with tumor progression and poor prognosis in Saudi patients with colorectal cancer, suggesting that PARP-1 can be novel and valuable signatures for predicting the clinical outcome of patients with colorectal cancer. PMID:27746584

  4. An Entamoeba histolytica ADP-ribosyl transferase from the diphtheria toxin family modifies the bacterial elongation factor Tu.

    PubMed

    Avila, Eva E; Rodriguez, Orlando I; Marquez, Jaqueline A; Berghuis, Albert M

    2016-06-01

    ADP-ribosyl transferases are enzymes involved in the post-translational modification of proteins; they participate in multiple physiological processes, pathogenesis and host-pathogen interactions. Several reports have characterized the functions of these enzymes in viruses, prokaryotes and higher eukaryotes, but few studies have reported ADP-ribosyl transferases in lower eukaryotes, such as parasites. The locus EHI_155600 from Entamoeba histolytica encodes a hypothetical protein that possesses a domain from the ADP-ribosylation superfamily; this protein belongs to the diphtheria toxin family according to a homology model using poly-ADP-ribosyl polymerase 12 (PARP12 or ARTD12) as a template. The recombinant protein expressed in Escherichia coli exhibited in vitro ADP-ribosylation activity that was dependent on the time and temperature. Unlabeled βNAD(+), but not ADP-ribose, competed in the enzymatic reaction using biotin-βNAD(+) as the ADP-ribose donor. The recombinant enzyme, denominated EhToxin-like, auto-ADP-ribosylated and modified an acceptor from E. coli that was identified by MS/MS as the elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to identify an ADP-ribosyl transferase from the diphtheria toxin family in a protozoan parasite. The known toxins from this family (i.e., the diphtheria toxin, the Pseudomonas aeruginosa toxin Exo-A, and Cholix from Vibrio cholerae) modify eukaryotic elongation factor two (eEF-2), whereas the amoeba EhToxin-like modified EF-Tu, which is another elongation factor involved in protein synthesis in bacteria and mitochondria. PMID:27234208

  5. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation-dependent Transient Chromatin Decondensation and Histone Displacement following Laser Microirradiation.

    PubMed

    Strickfaden, Hilmar; McDonald, Darin; Kruhlak, Michael J; Haince, Jean-Francois; Th'ng, John P H; Rouleau, Michele; Ishibashi, Toytaka; Corry, Gareth N; Ausio, Juan; Underhill, D Alan; Poirier, Guy G; Hendzel, Michael J

    2016-01-22

    Chromatin undergoes a rapid ATP-dependent, ATM and H2AX-independent decondensation when DNA damage is introduced by laser microirradiation. Although the detailed mechanism of this decondensation remains to be determined, the kinetics of decondensation are similar to the kinetics of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation. We used laser microirradiation to introduce DNA strand breaks into living cells expressing a photoactivatable GFP-tagged histone H2B. We find that poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation mediated primarily by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) is responsible for the rapid decondensation of chromatin at sites of DNA damage. This decondensation of chromatin correlates temporally with the displacement of histones, which is sensitive to PARP inhibition and is transient in nature. Contrary to the predictions of the histone shuttle hypothesis, we did not find that histone H1 accumulated on poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) in vivo. Rather, histone H1, and to a lessor extent, histones H2A and H2B were rapidly depleted from the sites of PAR accumulation. However, histone H1 returns to chromatin and the chromatin recondenses. Thus, the PARP-dependent relaxation of chromatin closely correlates with histone displacement.

  6. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation-dependent Transient Chromatin Decondensation and Histone Displacement following Laser Microirradiation.

    PubMed

    Strickfaden, Hilmar; McDonald, Darin; Kruhlak, Michael J; Haince, Jean-Francois; Th'ng, John P H; Rouleau, Michele; Ishibashi, Toytaka; Corry, Gareth N; Ausio, Juan; Underhill, D Alan; Poirier, Guy G; Hendzel, Michael J

    2016-01-22

    Chromatin undergoes a rapid ATP-dependent, ATM and H2AX-independent decondensation when DNA damage is introduced by laser microirradiation. Although the detailed mechanism of this decondensation remains to be determined, the kinetics of decondensation are similar to the kinetics of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation. We used laser microirradiation to introduce DNA strand breaks into living cells expressing a photoactivatable GFP-tagged histone H2B. We find that poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation mediated primarily by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) is responsible for the rapid decondensation of chromatin at sites of DNA damage. This decondensation of chromatin correlates temporally with the displacement of histones, which is sensitive to PARP inhibition and is transient in nature. Contrary to the predictions of the histone shuttle hypothesis, we did not find that histone H1 accumulated on poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) in vivo. Rather, histone H1, and to a lessor extent, histones H2A and H2B were rapidly depleted from the sites of PAR accumulation. However, histone H1 returns to chromatin and the chromatin recondenses. Thus, the PARP-dependent relaxation of chromatin closely correlates with histone displacement. PMID:26559976

  7. Proteomics Approaches to Identify Mono(ADP-ribosyl)ated and Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated proteins

    PubMed Central

    Vivelo, Christina A.; Leung, Anthony K. L.

    2015-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation refers to the addition of one or more ADP-ribose units onto protein substrates and this protein modification has been implicated in various cellular processes including DNA damage repair, RNA metabolism, transcription and cell cycle regulation. This review focuses on a compilation of large-scale proteomics studies that identify ADP-ribosylated proteins and their associated proteins by mass spectrometry using a variety of enrichment strategies. Some methods, such as the use of a poly(ADP-ribose)-specific antibody and boronate affinity chromatography and NAD+ analogues, have been employed for decades while others, such as the use of protein microarrays and recombinant proteins that bind ADP-ribose moieties (such as macrodomains), have only recently been developed. The advantages and disadvantages of each method and whether these methods are specific for identifying mono(ADP-ribosyl)ated and poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated proteins will be discussed. Lastly, since poly(ADP-ribose) is heterogeneous in length, it has been difficult to attain a mass signature associated with the modification sites. Several strategies on how to reduce polymer chain length heterogeneity for site identification will be reviewed. PMID:25263235

  8. Proteomics approaches to identify mono-(ADP-ribosyl)ated and poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated proteins.

    PubMed

    Vivelo, Christina A; Leung, Anthony K L

    2015-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation refers to the addition of one or more ADP-ribose units onto protein substrates and this protein modification has been implicated in various cellular processes including DNA damage repair, RNA metabolism, transcription, and cell cycle regulation. This review focuses on a compilation of large-scale proteomics studies that identify ADP-ribosylated proteins and their associated proteins by MS using a variety of enrichment strategies. Some methods, such as the use of a poly(ADP-ribose)-specific antibody and boronate affinity chromatography and NAD(+) analogues, have been employed for decades while others, such as the use of protein microarrays and recombinant proteins that bind ADP-ribose moieties (such as macrodomains), have only recently been developed. The advantages and disadvantages of each method and whether these methods are specific for identifying mono(ADP-ribosyl)ated and poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated proteins will be discussed. Lastly, since poly(ADP-ribose) is heterogeneous in length, it has been difficult to attain a mass signature associated with the modification sites. Several strategies on how to reduce polymer chain length heterogeneity for site identification will be reviewed. PMID:25263235

  9. Rapamycin inhibits poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation in intact cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fahrer, Joerg; Wagner, Silvia; Buerkle, Alexander; Koenigsrainer, Alfred

    2009-08-14

    Rapamycin is an immunosuppressive drug, which inhibits the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase activity inducing changes in cell proliferation. Synthesis of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) is an immediate cellular response to genotoxic stress catalyzed mostly by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1), which is also controlled by signaling pathways. Therefore, we investigated whether rapamycin affects PAR production. Strikingly, rapamycin inhibited PAR synthesis in living fibroblasts in a dose-dependent manner as monitored by immunofluorescence. PARP-1 activity was then assayed in vitro, revealing that down-regulation of cellular PAR production by rapamycin was apparently not due to competitive PARP-1 inhibition. Further studies showed that rapamycin did not influence the cellular NAD pool and the activation of PARP-1 in extracts of pretreated fibroblasts. Collectively, our data suggest that inhibition of cellular PAR synthesis by rapamycin is mediated by formation of a detergent-sensitive complex in living cells, and that rapamycin may have a potential as therapeutic PARP inhibitor.

  10. Sam68 Is Required for DNA Damage Responses via Regulating Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, Andrea; Wier, Eric M.; Wen, Matthew G.; Kamenyeva, Olena; Xia, Xue; Koo, Lily Y.

    2016-01-01

    The rapid and robust synthesis of polymers of adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-ribose (PAR) chains, primarily catalyzed by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1), is crucial for cellular responses to DNA damage. However, the precise mechanisms through which PARP1 is activated and PAR is robustly synthesized are not fully understood. Here, we identified Src-associated substrate during mitosis of 68 kDa (Sam68) as a novel signaling molecule in DNA damage responses (DDRs). In the absence of Sam68, DNA damage-triggered PAR production and PAR-dependent DNA repair signaling were dramatically diminished. With serial cellular and biochemical assays, we demonstrated that Sam68 is recruited to and significantly overlaps with PARP1 at DNA lesions and that the interaction between Sam68 and PARP1 is crucial for DNA damage-initiated and PARP1-conferred PAR production. Utilizing cell lines and knockout mice, we illustrated that Sam68-deleted cells and animals are hypersensitive to genotoxicity caused by DNA-damaging agents. Together, our findings suggest that Sam68 plays a crucial role in DDR via regulating DNA damage-initiated PAR production. PMID:27635653

  11. Sam68 Is Required for DNA Damage Responses via Regulating Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xin; Fu, Kai; Hodgson, Andrea; Wier, Eric M; Wen, Matthew G; Kamenyeva, Olena; Xia, Xue; Koo, Lily Y; Wan, Fengyi

    2016-09-01

    The rapid and robust synthesis of polymers of adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-ribose (PAR) chains, primarily catalyzed by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1), is crucial for cellular responses to DNA damage. However, the precise mechanisms through which PARP1 is activated and PAR is robustly synthesized are not fully understood. Here, we identified Src-associated substrate during mitosis of 68 kDa (Sam68) as a novel signaling molecule in DNA damage responses (DDRs). In the absence of Sam68, DNA damage-triggered PAR production and PAR-dependent DNA repair signaling were dramatically diminished. With serial cellular and biochemical assays, we demonstrated that Sam68 is recruited to and significantly overlaps with PARP1 at DNA lesions and that the interaction between Sam68 and PARP1 is crucial for DNA damage-initiated and PARP1-conferred PAR production. Utilizing cell lines and knockout mice, we illustrated that Sam68-deleted cells and animals are hypersensitive to genotoxicity caused by DNA-damaging agents. Together, our findings suggest that Sam68 plays a crucial role in DDR via regulating DNA damage-initiated PAR production. PMID:27635653

  12. Increased poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation in skeletal muscle tissue of pediatric patients with severe burn injury: prevention by propranolol treatment.

    PubMed

    Oláh, Gábor; Finnerty, Celeste C; Sbrana, Elena; Elijah, Itoro; Gerö, Domokos; Herndon, David N; Szabó, Csaba

    2011-07-01

    Activation of the nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) has been shown to promote cellular energetic collapse and cellular necrosis in various forms of critical illness. Most of the evidence implicating the PARP pathway in disease processes is derived from preclinical studies. With respect to PARP and burns, studies in rodent and large animal models of burn injury have demonstrated the activation of PARP in various tissues and the beneficial effect of its pharmacological inhibition. The aims of the current study were to measure the activation of PARP in human skeletal muscle biopsies at various stages of severe pediatric burn injury and to identify the cell types where this activation may occur. Another aim of the study was to test the effect of propranolol (an effective treatment of patients with burns) on the activation of PARP in skeletal muscle biopsies. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activation was measured by Western blotting for its product, poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR). The localization of PARP activation was determined by PAR immunohistochemistry. The results showed that PARP becomes activated in the skeletal muscle tissue after burns, with the peak of the activation occurring in the middle stage of the disease (13-18 days after burns). Even at the late stage of the disease (69-369 days after burn), an elevated degree of PARP activation persisted in some of the patients. Immunohistochemical studies localized the staining of PAR primarily to vascular endothelial cells and occasionally to resident mononuclear cells. There was a marked suppression of PARP activation in the skeletal muscle biopsies of patients who received propranolol treatment. We conclude that human burn injury is associated with the activation of PARP. We hypothesize that this response may contribute to the inflammatory responses and cell dysfunction in burns. Some of the clinical benefit of propranolol in burns may be related to its inhibitory effect on PARP activation.

  13. Spermatid Head Elongation with Normal Nuclear Shaping Requires ADP-Ribosyltransferase PARP11 (ARTD11) in Mice1

    PubMed Central

    Meyer-Ficca, Mirella L.; Ihara, Motomasa; Bader, Jessica J.; Leu, N. Adrian; Beneke, Sascha; Meyer, Ralph G.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Sperm are highly differentiated cells characterized by their species-specific nuclear shapes and extremely condensed chromatin. Abnormal head shapes represent a form of teratozoospermia that can impair fertilization capacity. This study shows that poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-11 (ARTD11/PARP11), a member of the ADP-ribosyltransferase (ARTD) family, is expressed preferentially in spermatids undergoing nuclear condensation and differentiation. Deletion of the Parp11 gene results in teratozoospermia and male infertility in mice due to the formation of abnormally shaped fertilization-incompetent sperm, despite normal testis weights and sperm counts. At the subcellular level, PARP11-deficient elongating spermatids reveal structural defects in the nuclear envelope and chromatin detachment associated with abnormal nuclear shaping, suggesting functional relevance of PARP11 for nuclear envelope stability and nuclear reorganization during spermiogenesis. In vitro, PARP11 exhibits mono(ADP-ribosyl)ation activity with the ability to ADP-ribosylate itself. In transfected somatic cells, PARP11 colocalizes with nuclear pore components, such as NUP153. Amino acids Y77, Q86, and R95 in the N-terminal WWE domain, as well as presence of the catalytic domain, are essential for colocalization of PARP11 with the nuclear envelope, but catalytic activity of the protein is not required for colocalization with NUP153. This study demonstrates that PARP11 is a novel enzyme important for proper sperm head shaping and identifies it as a potential factor involved in idiopathic mammalian teratozoospermia. PMID:25673562

  14. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of Methyl CpG Binding Domain Protein 2 Regulates Chromatin Structure.

    PubMed

    Becker, Annette; Zhang, Peng; Allmann, Lena; Meilinger, Daniela; Bertulat, Bianca; Eck, Daniel; Hofstaetter, Maria; Bartolomei, Giody; Hottiger, Michael O; Schreiber, Valérie; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Cardoso, M Cristina

    2016-03-01

    The epigenetic information encoded in the genomic DNA methylation pattern is translated by methylcytosine binding proteins like MeCP2 into chromatin topology and structure and gene activity states. We have shown previously that the MeCP2 level increases during differentiation and that it causes large-scale chromatin reorganization, which is disturbed by MeCP2 Rett syndrome mutations. Phosphorylation and other posttranslational modifications of MeCP2 have been described recently to modulate its function. Here we show poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of endogenous MeCP2 in mouse brain tissue. Consequently, we found that MeCP2 induced aggregation of pericentric heterochromatin and that its chromatin accumulation was enhanced in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) 1(-/-) compared with wild-type cells. We mapped the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation domains and engineered MeCP2 mutation constructs to further analyze potential effects on DNA binding affinity and large-scale chromatin remodeling. Single or double deletion of the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated regions and PARP inhibition increased the heterochromatin clustering ability of MeCP2. Increased chromatin clustering may reflect increased binding affinity. In agreement with this hypothesis, we found that PARP-1 deficiency significantly increased the chromatin binding affinity of MeCP2 in vivo. These data provide novel mechanistic insights into the regulation of MeCP2-mediated, higher-order chromatin architecture and suggest therapeutic opportunities to manipulate MeCP2 function.

  15. Rifamycin Antibiotic Resistance by ADP-Ribosylation: Structure and Diversity of Arr

    SciTech Connect

    Baysarowich, J.; Koteva, K; Hughes, D; Ejim, L; Griffiths, E; Zhang, K; Junop, M; Wright, G

    2008-01-01

    The rifamycin antibiotic rifampin is important for the treatment of tuberculosis and infections caused by multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Recent iterations of the rifampin core structure have resulted in new drugs and drug candidates for the treatment of a much broader range of infectious diseases. This expanded use of rifamycin antibiotics has the potential to select for increased resistance. One poorly characterized mechanism of resistance is through Arr enzymes that catalyze ADP-ribosylation of rifamycins. We find that genes encoding predicted Arr enzymes are widely distributed in the genomes of pathogenic and nonpathogenic bacteria. Biochemical analysis of three representative Arr enzymes from environmental and pathogenic bacterial sources shows that these have equally efficient drug resistance capacity in vitro and in vivo. The 3D structure of one of these orthologues from Mycobacterium smegmatis was determined and reveals structural homology with ADP-ribosyltransferases important in eukaryotic biology, including poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) and bacterial toxins, despite no significant amino acid sequence homology with these proteins. This work highlights the extent of the rifamycin resistome in microbial genera with the potential to negatively impact the expanded use of this class of antibiotic.

  16. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of p53 Contributes to TPEN-Induced Neuronal Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyun-Lim; Ra, Hana; Kim, Ki-Ryeong; Lee, Jeong-Min; Im, Hana; Kim, Yang-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Depletion of intracellular zinc by N,N,N′,N′-tetrakis(2-pyridylmethyl) ethylenediamine (TPEN) induces p53-mediated protein synthesis-dependent apoptosis of mouse cortical neurons. Here, we examined the requirement for poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP)-1 as an upstream regulator of p53 in zinc depletion-induced neuronal apoptosis. First, we found that chemical inhibition or genetic deletion of PARP-1 markedly attenuated TPEN-induced apoptosis of cultured mouse cortical neurons. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of p53 occurred starting 1 h after TPEN treatment. Suggesting the critical role of PARP-1, the TPEN-induced increase of stability and activity of p53 as well as poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of p53 was almost completely blocked by PARP inhibition. Consistent with this, the induction of downstream proapoptotic proteins PUMA and NOXA was noticeably reduced by chemical inhibitors or genetic deletion of PARP-1. TPEN-induced cytochrome C release into the cytosol and caspase-3 activation were also blocked by inhibition of PARP-1. Taken together, these findings indicate that PARP-1 is essential for TPEN-induced neuronal apoptosis. PMID:25813624

  17. A Clickable Aminooxy Probe for Monitoring Cellular ADP-Ribosylation

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Rory K.; Cohen, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation is essential for cell function, yet there is a dearth of methods for detecting this post-translational modification in cells. Here, we describe a clickable aminooxy alkyne (AO-alkyne) probe that can detect cellular ADP-ribosylation on acidic amino acids following Cu-catalyzed conjugation to an azide-containing reporter. Using AO-alkyne, we show that PARP10 and PARP11 are auto-ADP-ribosylated in cells. We also demonstrate that AO-alkyne can be used to monitor stimulus-induced ADP-ribosylation in cells. Functional studies using AO-alkyne support a previously unknown mechanism for ADP-ribosylation on acidic amino acids, wherein a glutamate or aspartate at the initial C1′-position of ADP-ribose transfers to the C2′ position. This new mechanism for ADP-ribosylation has important implications for how glutamyl/aspartyl-ADP-ribose is recognized by proteins in cells. PMID:25978521

  18. Transient inhibition by ribose 5-phosphate of photosynthetic O2 evolution in a reconstituted chloroplast system.

    PubMed

    Slabas, A R; Walker, D A

    1976-04-01

    Photosynthetic oxygen evolution by a reconstituted chloroplast system utilising sn-phospho-3-glycerol (3-phosphoglycerate) ceases upon the addition of ribose 5-phosphate even though the presence of this metabolite permits a rapid and immediate CO2 fixation. The period of cessation is appreciable at 0.1 mM ribose 5-phosphate. It is lengthened as the amount of added ribose 5-phosphate is increased and by the addition of dithiothreitol, a known activator of ribulose-5-phosphate kinase. Ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate is without effect. A similar interruption of O2 evolution may also be brought about by the addition of ADP or by ADP-generating systems such as glucose plus hexokinase. Spectrophotometric experiments indicate that the reoxidation of NADPH in the presence of sn-phospho-3-glycerol is similarly affected. The transient inhibition by ribose 5-phosphate is not observed in the presence of an active ATP-generating system or in the presence of sufficient DL-glyceraldehyde to inhibit ribulose-5-phosphate kinase activity. It is concluded that ribose 5-phosphate inhibits photosynthetic O2 evolution by adversely affecting the steady-state ATP/ADP ratio and consequently the reduction of sn-phospho-3-glycerol to glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate. The results are discussed in their relation to ADP regulation of photosynthetic carbon assimilation and metabolite transport.

  19. The role of ADP-ribosylation in regulating DNA interstrand crosslink repair

    PubMed Central

    Gunn, Alasdair R.; Banos-Pinero, Benito; Paschke, Peggy; Sanchez-Pulido, Luis; Ariza, Antonio; Day, Joseph; Emrich, Mehera; Leys, David; Ponting, Chris P.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT ADP-ribosylation by ADP-ribosyltransferases (ARTs) has a well-established role in DNA strand break repair by promoting enrichment of repair factors at damage sites through ADP-ribose interaction domains. Here, we exploit the simple eukaryote Dictyostelium to uncover a role for ADP-ribosylation in regulating DNA interstrand crosslink repair and redundancy of this pathway with non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). In silico searches were used to identify a protein that contains a permutated macrodomain (which we call aprataxin/APLF-and-PNKP-like protein; APL). Structural analysis reveals that this permutated macrodomain retains features associated with ADP-ribose interactions and that APL is capable of binding poly(ADP-ribose) through this macrodomain. APL is enriched in chromatin in response to cisplatin treatment, an agent that induces DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs). This is dependent on the macrodomain of APL and the ART Adprt2, indicating a role for ADP-ribosylation in the cellular response to cisplatin. Although adprt2− cells are sensitive to cisplatin, ADP-ribosylation is evident in these cells owing to redundant signalling by the double-strand break (DSB)-responsive ART Adprt1a, promoting NHEJ-mediated repair. These data implicate ADP-ribosylation in DNA ICL repair and identify that NHEJ can function to resolve this form of DNA damage in the absence of Adprt2. PMID:27587838

  20. Cyclic ADP-ribose and hydrogen peroxide synergize with ADP-ribose in the activation of TRPM2 channels.

    PubMed

    Kolisek, Martin; Beck, Andreas; Fleig, Andrea; Penner, Reinhold

    2005-04-01

    The melastatin-related transient receptor potential channel TRPM2 is a plasma membrane Ca2+-permeable cation channel that is activated by intracellular adenosine diphosphoribose (ADPR) binding to the channel's enzymatic Nudix domain. Channel activity is also seen with nicotinamide dinucleotide (NAD+) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), but their mechanisms of action remain unknown. Here, we identify cyclic adenosine diphosphoribose (cADPR) as an agonist of TRPM2 with dual activity: at concentrations above 100 microM, cADPR can gate the channel by itself, whereas lower concentrations of 10 microM have a potentiating effect that enables ADPR to gate the channel at nanomolar concentrations. ADPR's breakdown product adenosine monophosphate (AMP) specifically inhibits ADPR, but not cADPR-mediated gating of TRPM2, whereas the cADPR antagonist 8-Br-cADPR exhibits the reverse block specificity. Our results establish TRPM2 as a coincidence detector for ADPR and cADPR signaling and provide a functional context for cADPR as a second messenger for Ca2+ influx.

  1. The Promise of Proteomics for the Study of ADP-ribosylation

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Casey M.; Ong, Shao-En; Leung, Anthony K. L.

    2015-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation is a post-translational modification where single units (mono-ADP-ribosylation) or polymeric chains (poly-ADP-ribosylation) of ADP-ribose are conjugated to proteins by ADP-ribosyltransferases. This post-translational modification and the ADP-ribosyltransferases (also known as PARPs) responsible for its synthesis have been found to play a role in nearly all major cellular processes, including DNA repair, transcription, translation, cell signaling and cell death. Furthermore, dysregulation of ADP-ribosylation has been linked to diseases including cancers, diabetes, neurodegenerative disorders and heart failure, leading to the development of therapeutic PARP inhibitors, many of which are currently in clinical trials. The study of this therapeutically important modification has recently been bolstered by the application of mass spectrometry-based proteomics, arguably the most powerful tool for the unbiased analysis of protein modifications. Unfortunately, progress has been hampered by the inherent challenges that stem from the physicochemical properties of ADP-ribose which as a post-translational modification is highly charged, heterogeneous (linear or branched polymers, as well as monomers), labile, and found on a wide range of amino acid acceptors. In this perspective, we discuss the progress that has been made in addressing these challenges, including the recent breakthroughs in proteomics techniques to identify ADP-ribosylation sites, and future developments to provide a proteome-wide view of the many cellular processes regulated by ADP-ribosylation. PMID:26091340

  2. ARTC1-mediated ADP-ribosylation of GRP78/BiP: a new player in endoplasmic-reticulum stress responses.

    PubMed

    Fabrizio, Gaia; Di Paola, Simone; Stilla, Annalisa; Giannotta, Monica; Ruggiero, Carmen; Menzel, Stephan; Koch-Nolte, Friedrich; Sallese, Michele; Di Girolamo, Maria

    2015-03-01

    Protein mono-ADP-ribosylation is a reversible post-translational modification of cellular proteins. This scheme of amino-acid modification is used not only by bacterial toxins to attack host cells, but also by endogenous ADP-ribosyltransferases (ARTs) in mammalian cells. These latter ARTs include members of three different families of proteins: the well characterised arginine-specific ecto-enzymes (ARTCs), two sirtuins, and some members of the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP/ARTD) family. In the present study, we demonstrate that human ARTC1 is localised to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), in contrast to the previously characterised ARTC proteins, which are typical GPI-anchored ecto-enzymes. Moreover, using the "macro domain" cognitive binding module to identify ADP-ribosylated proteins, we show here that the ER luminal chaperone GRP78/BiP (glucose-regulated protein of 78 kDa/immunoglobulin heavy-chain-binding protein) is a cellular target of human ARTC1 and hamster ARTC2. We further developed a procedure to visualise ADP-ribosylated proteins using immunofluorescence. With this approach, in cells overexpressing ARTC1, we detected staining of the ER that co-localises with GRP78/BiP, thus confirming that this modification occurs in living cells. In line with the key role of GRP78/BiP in the ER stress response system, we provide evidence here that ARTC1 is activated during the ER stress response, which results in acute ADP-ribosylation of GRP78/BiP paralleling translational inhibition. Thus, this identification of ARTC1 as a regulator of GRP78/BiP defines a novel, previously unsuspected, player in GRP78-mediated ER stress responses.

  3. Poly-ADP-ribosylation of HMGB1 regulates TNFSF10/TRAIL resistance through autophagy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Minghua; Liu, Liying; Xie, Min; Sun, Xiaofang; Yu, Yan; Kang, Rui; Yang, Liangchun; Zhu, Shan; Cao, Lizhi; Tang, Daolin

    2015-01-01

    Both apoptosis ("self-killing") and autophagy ("self-eating") are evolutionarily conserved processes, and their crosstalk influences anticancer drug sensitivity and cell death. However, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here, we demonstrated that HMGB1 (high mobility group box 1), normally a nuclear protein, is a crucial regulator of TNFSF10/TRAIL (tumor necrosis factor [ligand] superfamily, member 10)-induced cancer cell death. Activation of PARP1 (poly [ADP-ribose] polymerase 1) was required for TNFSF10-induced ADP-ribosylation of HMGB1 in cancer cells. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of PARP1 activity or knockdown of PARP1 gene expression significantly inhibited TNFSF10-induced HMGB1 cytoplasmic translocation and subsequent HMGB1-BECN1 complex formation. Furthermore, suppression of the PARP1-HMGB1 pathway diminished autophagy, increased apoptosis, and enhanced the anticancer activity of TNFSF10 in vitro and in a subcutaneous tumor model. These results indicate that PARP1 acts as a prominent upstream regulator of HMGB1-mediated autophagy and maintains a homeostatic balance between apoptosis and autophagy, which provides new insight into the mechanism of TNFSF10 resistance.

  4. ADP-ribosylation of proteins: Enzymology and biological significance

    SciTech Connect

    Althaus, F.R.; Richter, C.

    1987-01-01

    This book presents an overview of the molecular and biological consequences of the posttranslational modification of proteins with ADP-ribose monomers and polymers. Part one focuses on chromatin-associated poly ADP-ribosylation reactions which have evolved in higher eukaryotes as modulators of chromatin functions. The significance of poly ADP-ribosylation in DNA repair, carcinogenesis, and gene expression during terminal differentiation is discussed. Part two reviews mono ADP-ribosylation reactions which are catalyzed by prokaryotic and eukaryotic enzymes. Consideration is given to the action of bacterial toxins, such as cholera toxin, pertussis toxin, and diphtheria toxin. These toxins have emerged as tools for the molecular probing of proteins involved in signal transduction and protein biosynthesis.

  5. PARPs and ADP-Ribosylation: Fifty Years… and Counting

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, W. Lee

    2015-01-01

    Summary Over 50 years ago, the discovery of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) set a new field of science in motion - the field of poly(ADP-ribosyl) transferases (PARPs) and ADP-ribosylation. The field is still flourishing today. The diversity of biological processes now known to require PARPs and ADP-ribosylation was practically unimaginable even two decades ago. From an initial focus on DNA damage detection and repair in response to genotoxic stresses, the field has expanded to include the regulation of chromatin structure, gene expression, and RNA processing in a wide range of biological systems, including reproduction, development, aging, stem cells, inflammation, metabolism, and cancer. This special focus issue of Molecular Cell includes a collection of three Reviews, three Perspectives, and a SnapShot, which together summarize the current state of the field and suggest where it may be headed. PMID:26091339

  6. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of Methyl CpG Binding Domain Protein 2 Regulates Chromatin Structure*

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Annette; Zhang, Peng; Allmann, Lena; Meilinger, Daniela; Bertulat, Bianca; Eck, Daniel; Hofstaetter, Maria; Bartolomei, Giody; Hottiger, Michael O.; Schreiber, Valérie; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Cardoso, M. Cristina

    2016-01-01

    The epigenetic information encoded in the genomic DNA methylation pattern is translated by methylcytosine binding proteins like MeCP2 into chromatin topology and structure and gene activity states. We have shown previously that the MeCP2 level increases during differentiation and that it causes large-scale chromatin reorganization, which is disturbed by MeCP2 Rett syndrome mutations. Phosphorylation and other posttranslational modifications of MeCP2 have been described recently to modulate its function. Here we show poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of endogenous MeCP2 in mouse brain tissue. Consequently, we found that MeCP2 induced aggregation of pericentric heterochromatin and that its chromatin accumulation was enhanced in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) 1−/− compared with wild-type cells. We mapped the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation domains and engineered MeCP2 mutation constructs to further analyze potential effects on DNA binding affinity and large-scale chromatin remodeling. Single or double deletion of the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated regions and PARP inhibition increased the heterochromatin clustering ability of MeCP2. Increased chromatin clustering may reflect increased binding affinity. In agreement with this hypothesis, we found that PARP-1 deficiency significantly increased the chromatin binding affinity of MeCP2 in vivo. These data provide novel mechanistic insights into the regulation of MeCP2-mediated, higher-order chromatin architecture and suggest therapeutic opportunities to manipulate MeCP2 function. PMID:26772194

  7. Microtubule protein ADP-ribosylation in vitro leads to assembly inhibition and rapid depolymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Scaife, R.M. ); Wilson, L. ); Purich, D.L. )

    1992-01-14

    Bovine brain microtubule protein, containing both tubulin and microtubule-associated proteins, undergoes ADP-ribosylation in the presence of ({sup 14}C)NAD{sup +} and a turkey erythrocyte mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase in vitro. The modification reaction could be demonstrated in crude brain tissue extracts where selective ADP-ribosylation of both the {alpha} and {beta} chains of tubulin and of the high molecular weight microtubule-associated protein MAP-2 occurred. In experiments with purified microtubule protein, tubulin dimer, the high molecular weight microtubule-associated protein MAP-2, and another high molecular weight microtubule-associated protein which may be a MAP-1 species were heavily labeled. Tubulin and MAP-2 incorporated ({sup 14}C)ADP-ribose to an average extent of approximately 2.4 and 30 mol of ADP-ribose/mol of protein, respectively. Assembly of microtubule protein into microtubules in vitro was inhibited by ADP-ribosylation, and incubation of assembled steady-state microtubules with ADP-ribosyltransferase and NAD{sup +} resulted in rapid depolymerization of the microtubules. Thus, the eukaryotic enzyme can ADP-ribosylate tubulin and microtubule-associated proteins to much greater extents than previously observed with cholera and pertussis toxins, and the modification can significantly modulate microtubule assembly and disassembly.

  8. PARP-2 regulates cell cycle-related genes through histone deacetylation and methylation independently of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Ya-Chen; Hsu, Chiao-Yu; Yao, Ya-Li; Yang, Wen-Ming

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: ► PARP-2 acts as a transcription co-repressor independently of PARylation activity. ► PARP-2 recruits HDAC5, 7, and G9a and generates repressive chromatin. ► PARP-2 is recruited to the c-MYC promoter by DNA-binding factor YY1. ► PARP-2 represses cell cycle-related genes and alters cell cycle progression. -- Abstract: Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-2 (PARP-2) catalyzes poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) and regulates numerous nuclear processes, including transcription. Depletion of PARP-2 alters the activity of transcription factors and global gene expression. However, the molecular action of how PARP-2 controls the transcription of target promoters remains unclear. Here we report that PARP-2 possesses transcriptional repression activity independently of its enzymatic activity. PARP-2 interacts and recruits histone deacetylases HDAC5 and HDAC7, and histone methyltransferase G9a to the promoters of cell cycle-related genes, generating repressive chromatin signatures. Our findings propose a novel mechanism of PARP-2 in transcriptional regulation involving specific protein–protein interactions and highlight the importance of PARP-2 in the regulation of cell cycle progression.

  9. Regulation of E2F1-induced apoptosis by poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, A; Iwasaki, T; Pyndiah, S; Cassimere, E K; Palani, C D; Sakamuro, D

    2015-01-01

    The transcription factor adenovirus E2 promoter-binding factor (E2F)-1 normally enhances cell-cycle progression, but it also induces apoptosis under certain conditions, including DNA damage and serum deprivation. Although DNA damage facilitates the phosphorylation and stabilization of E2F1 to trigger apoptosis, how serum starvation renders cells vulnerable to E2F1-induced apoptosis remains unclear. Because poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1), a nuclear enzyme essential for genomic stability and chromatin remodeling, interacts directly with E2F1, we investigated the effects of PARP1 on E2F1-mediated functions in the presence and absence of serum. PARP1 attenuation, which increased E2F1 transactivation, induced G2/M cell-cycle arrest under normal growth conditions, but enhanced E2F1-induced apoptosis in serum-starved cells. Interestingly, basal PARP1 activity was sufficient to modify E2F1 by poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation, which stabilized the interaction between E2F1 and the BIN1 tumor suppressor in the nucleus. Accordingly, BIN1 acted as an RB1-independent E2F1 corepressor. Because E2F1 directly activates the BIN1 gene promoter, BIN1 curbed E2F1 activity through a negative-feedback mechanism. Conversely, when the BIN1–E2F1 interaction was abolished by PARP1 suppression, E2F1 continuously increased BIN1 levels. This is functionally germane, as PARP1-depletion-associated G2/M arrest was reversed by the transfection of BIN1 siRNA. Moreover, PARP-inhibitor-associated anti-transformation activity was compromised by the coexpression of dominant-negative BIN1. Because serum starvation massively reduced the E2F1 poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation, we conclude that the release of BIN1 from hypo-poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated E2F1 is a mechanism by which serum starvation promotes E2F1-induced apoptosis. PMID:25257171

  10. Identification of Inhibitors of Pseudomonas aeruginosa Exotoxin-S ADP-Ribosyltransferase Activity.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Ana Filipa; Ebrahimi, Mahsa; Saleeb, Michael; Forsberg, Åke; Elofsson, Mikael; Schüler, Herwig

    2016-07-01

    The gram-negative bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunistic pathogen associated with drug resistance complications and, as such, an important object for drug discovery efforts. One attractive target for development of therapeutics is the ADP-ribosyltransferase Exotoxin-S (ExoS), an early effector of the type III secretion system that is delivered into host cells to affect their transcription pattern and cytoskeletal dynamics. The purpose of this study was to formulate a real-time assay of purified recombinant ExoS activity for high-throughput application. We characterized the turnover kinetics of the fluorescent dinucleotide 1,N(6)-etheno-NAD+ as co-substrate for ExoS. Further, we found that the toxin relied on any of five tested isoforms of human 14-3-3 to modify vH-Ras and the Rho-family GTPases Rac1, -2, and -3 and RhoC. We then used 14-3-3β-stimulated ExoS modification of vH-Ras to screen a collection of low-molecular-weight compounds selected to target the poly-ADP ribose polymerase family and identified 3-(4-oxo-3,5,6,7-tetrahydro-4H-cyclopenta[4,5]thieno[2,3-d]pyrimidin-2-yl)propanoic acid as an ExoS inhibitor with micromolar potency. Thus, we present an optimized method to screen for inhibitors of ExoS activity that is amenable to high-throughput format and an intermediate affinity inhibitor that can serve both as assay control and as a starting point for further development. PMID:26850638

  11. Selective Stabilization of Ribose by Borate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Yoshihiro; Horiuchi, Mana; Kakegawa, Takeshi

    2013-10-01

    In this study, borate was found to selectively increase the stability of ribose over other aldopentoses. Ribose is the only sugar present in both early RNA-based biochemistry and contemporary DNA-based life, and the stability of ribose is of fundamental concern for determining the origin of early RNA-based biochemistry. The formose reaction is a potential process in the prebiotic synthesis of ribose and its stereoisomers arabinose, xylose, and lyxose. Ribose is the least stable of these aldopentoses, raising the fundamental question of whether it was originally a component of primitive RNA or was selected through biotic processes. Borate is known to increase the stability of aldopentoses, but the specific differences in the stabilization achieved among different stereoisomers remain unclear. In this study, it was found that the stabilities of all of the tested pentoses increased with the concentration of added borate, but notably, the stability of ribose increased the most. The predominant formation of complexes between borate and ribose was verified, in agreement with previous studies. This borate complex formation might have sequestered ribose from the isomerization and decomposition reactions, resulting in its selective stabilization. These findings indicate that ribose could have accumulated in borate-rich environments on the early Earth and suggest that ribose-based nucleotides combined with phosphate and nucleobases formed abiotically.

  12. Ribose: more than a simple sugar?

    PubMed

    Dhanoa, Teginder S; Housner, Jeffrey A

    2007-07-01

    This article reviews the current literature regarding the use of ribose as an ergogenic aid. Ribose manufacturers claim that it provides ergogenic benefit, but this has not been substantiated through scientific investigations. Data have shown promise that ribose supplementation leads to enhanced restoration of ATP levels following exercise, but this has seldom translated into increased athletic performance. However, as with many ergogenic aids, additional research is needed to clarify its value as a supplement.

  13. Molecular cloning of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase from cyanobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Kakefuda, G.; Yeeyung Charng; Iglesias, A.; McIntosh, L. )

    1991-05-01

    Bacterial and higher plant ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase differ in structure (homotetramer vs heterotetramer respectively) and allosteric activator and inhibitor. However, highly conserved regions can be identified when sequence comparisons are made between ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylases from diverse species. The fructose 1,6 bisphosphate binding site (activator site) in E. coli is highly conserved in all species for which ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase has been sequenced. A second conserved region, which is labeled by 8-azido-ATP, is also highly conserved in bacteria and higher plants. In previously cloned ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylases the two conserved regions are separated by approximately 80 amino acids. The authors have used these conserved amino acid sequences to design degenerate oligonucleotide primers for polymerase chain reaction amplification (PCR) of part of the ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase geae. A predicted 240 bp fragment is amplified in PCR reactions using Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 and Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 genomic DNA as template. The deduced amino acid sequence from the 240 bp Anabaena fragment shares 75 and 76% identity to that of the rice endosperm and spinach leaf ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylases respectively. The Anabaena amino acid sequence shares 42% identity in amino acid sequence to the E. coli enzyme. At the nucleotide level there is 66% identity of the Anabaena sequence to rice endosperm ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and 54% to the E. coli gene. The PCR amplified fragments are being used to screen respective Anabaena and Synechocystis genomic gene libraries.

  14. ADP-ribosylation of membrane components by pertussis and cholera toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Ribeiro-Neto, F.A.P.; Mattera, F.; Hildebrandt, J.D.; Codina, J.; Field, J.B.; Birnbaumer, L.; Sekura, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    Pertussis and cholera toxins are important tools to investigate functional and structural aspects of the stimulatory (N/sub s/) and inhibitory (N/sub i/) regulatory components of adenylyl cyclase. Cholera toxin acts on N/sub s/ by ADP-ribosylating its ..cap alpha../sub s/ subunit; pertussis toxin acts on N/sub i/ by ADP-ribosylating its ..cap alpha..; subunit. By using (/sup 32/P)NAD/sup +/ and determining the transfer of its (/sup 32/P)ADP-ribose moiety to membrane components, it is possible to obtain information on N/sub s/ and N/sub i/. A set of protocols is presented that can be used to study simultaneously and comparatively the susceptibility of N/sub s/ and N/sub i/ to be ADP-ribosylated by cholera and pertussis toxin.

  15. ADP's ABCs of Training

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weinstein, Margery

    2010-01-01

    When a company's core competence is processing data, it is sometimes easy to lose sight of the obvious--the information right under its nose. In the case of Automatic Data Processing, Inc. (ADP), a business outsourcing company specializing in human resources, payroll, tax, and benefits administrations solutions, that is not a problem. Through…

  16. Complex coordinated extracellular metabolism: Acid phosphatases activate diluted human leukocyte proteins to generate energy flow as NADPH from purine nucleotide ribose

    PubMed Central

    Hibbs, John B.; Vavrin, Zdenek; Cox, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Complex metabolism is thought to occur exclusively in the crowded intracellular environment. Here we report that diluted enzymes from lysed human leukocytes produce extracellular energy. Our findings involve two pathways: the purine nucleotide catabolic pathway and the pentose phosphate pathway, which function together to generate energy as NADPH. Glucose6P fuel for NADPH production is generated from structural ribose of purine ribonucleoside monophosphates, ADP, and ADP-ribose. NADPH drives glutathione reductase to reduce an oxidized glutathione disulfide-glutathione redox couple. Acid phosphatases initiate ribose5P salvage from purine ribonucleoside monophosphates, and transaldolase controls the direction of carbon chain flow through the nonoxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway. These metabolic control points are regulated by pH. Biologically, this energy conserving metabolism could function in perturbed extracellular spaces. PMID:26895212

  17. Complex coordinated extracellular metabolism: Acid phosphatases activate diluted human leukocyte proteins to generate energy flow as NADPH from purine nucleotide ribose.

    PubMed

    Hibbs, John B; Vavrin, Zdenek; Cox, James E

    2016-08-01

    Complex metabolism is thought to occur exclusively in the crowded intracellular environment. Here we report that diluted enzymes from lysed human leukocytes produce extracellular energy. Our findings involve two pathways: the purine nucleotide catabolic pathway and the pentose phosphate pathway, which function together to generate energy as NADPH. Glucose6P fuel for NADPH production is generated from structural ribose of purine ribonucleoside monophosphates, ADP, and ADP-ribose. NADPH drives glutathione reductase to reduce an oxidized glutathione disulfide-glutathione redox couple. Acid phosphatases initiate ribose5P salvage from purine ribonucleoside monophosphates, and transaldolase controls the direction of carbon chain flow through the nonoxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway. These metabolic control points are regulated by pH. Biologically, this energy conserving metabolism could function in perturbed extracellular spaces.

  18. The synthesis of nicotinamide–adenine dinucleotide and poly(adenosine diphosphate ribose) in various classes of rat liver nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Haines, M. E.; Johnston, I. R.; Mathias, A. P.; Ridge, D.

    1969-01-01

    1. The activities of NMN adenylyltransferase and an enzyme that synthesizes poly (ADP-ribose) from NAD were investigated in the various classes of rat liver nuclei fractionated by zonal centrifugation. 2. The highest specific activities of these two nuclear enzymes occur in different classes of nuclei. In very young and in mature rats it was shown that a correlation exists between DNA synthesis and NMN adenylyltransferase activity, but in rats of intermediate age this correlation is less evident. The highest activities of the enzyme that catalyses formation of poly (ADP-ribose) are in the nuclei involved in the synthesis of RNA. 3. The significance of these results in relation to NAD metabolism is discussed. PMID:4311824

  19. Effects of ribose as an ergogenic aid.

    PubMed

    Peveler, Willard W; Bishop, Phillip A; Whitehorn, Ed J

    2006-08-01

    The amount of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) stored in the muscle available for immediate use is limited, and once used, must be resynthesized in the muscle. Ribose, a naturally occurring pentose sugar, helps resynthesize ATP for use in muscles. There have been claims that ribose supplements increase ATP levels and improve performance. Other studies have provided mixed results on the effectiveness of ribose as an ergogenic aid at high doses. None of these studies have compared the impact of the recommended dose of ribose on athletes and nonathletes under exercise conditions that are most conducive for effectiveness. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of ribose as an ergogenic aid at the dose recommended for supplements currently on the market during an exercise trial to maximize its efficacy. Male subjects (n = 11) performed 2 trials 1 week apart. Each trial consisted of three 30-second Wingate tests with a 2-minute recovery between each test. Trials were counterbalanced, with 1 trial being performed with 625 mg of ribose and the other with a placebo. Peak power, mean power, and percent decrease in power were recorded during each Wingate test. Repeated-measures analysis of variance (p > 0.05) found no significant differences between ribose and placebo. These results suggest that ribose had no effect on performance when taken orally, at the dose suggested by the distributor.

  20. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is recognized by ECT2 during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Mo; Bian, Chunjing; Yu, Xiaochun

    2014-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is an unique posttranslational modification and required for spindle assembly and function during mitosis. However, the molecular mechanism of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) in mitosis remains elusive. Here, we show the evidence that PAR is recognized by ECT2, a key guanine nucleotide exchange factor in mitosis. The BRCT domain of ECT2 directly binds to PAR both in vitro and in vivo. We further found that α-tubulin is PARylated during mitosis. PARylation of α-tubulin is recognized by ECT2 and recruits ECT2 to mitotic spindle for completing mitosis. Taken together, our study reveals a novel mechanism by which PAR regulates mitosis.

  1. The ARTT motif and a unified structural understanding of substraterecognition in ADP ribosylating bacterial toxins and eukaryotic ADPribosyltransferases

    SciTech Connect

    Han, S.; Tainer, J.A.

    2001-08-01

    ADP-ribosylation is a widely occurring and biologically critical covalent chemical modification process in pathogenic mechanisms, intracellular signaling systems, DNA repair, and cell division. The reaction is catalyzed by ADP-ribosyltransferases, which transfer the ADP-ribose moiety of NAD to a target protein with nicotinamide release. A family of bacterial toxins and eukaryotic enzymes has been termed the mono-ADP-ribosyltransferases, in distinction to the poly-ADP-ribosyltransferases, which catalyze the addition of multiple ADP-ribose groups to the carboxyl terminus of eukaryotic nucleoproteins. Despite the limited primary sequence homology among the different ADP-ribosyltransferases, a central cleft bearing NAD-binding pocket formed by the two perpendicular b-sheet core has been remarkably conserved between bacterial toxins and eukaryotic mono- and poly-ADP-ribosyltransferases. The majority of bacterial toxins and eukaryotic mono-ADP-ribosyltransferases are characterized by conserved His and catalytic Glu residues. In contrast, Diphtheria toxin, Pseudomonas exotoxin A, and eukaryotic poly-ADP-ribosyltransferases are characterized by conserved Arg and catalytic Glu residues. The NAD-binding core of a binary toxin and a C3-like toxin family identified an ARTT motif (ADP-ribosylating turn-turn motif) that is implicated in substrate specificity and recognition by structural and mutagenic studies. Here we apply structure-based sequence alignment and comparative structural analyses of all known structures of ADP-ribosyltransfeases to suggest that this ARTT motif is functionally important in many ADP-ribosylating enzymes that bear a NAD binding cleft as characterized by conserved Arg and catalytic Glu residues. Overall, structure-based sequence analysis reveals common core structures and conserved active sites of ADP-ribosyltransferases to support similar NAD binding mechanisms but differing mechanisms of target protein binding via sequence variations within the ARTT

  2. State of the art of protein mono-ADP-ribosylation: biological role and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Fabrizio, Gaia; Scarpa, Emanuele Salvatore; Di Girolamo, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Mono-ADP-ribosylation is a post-translational modification that was discovered more than five decades ago, and it consists of the enzymatic transfer of ADP-ribose from NAD⁺ to acceptor proteins. In viruses and prokaryotes, mono-ADP-ribosylation is mainly, but not exclusively, a mechanism used to take control of the host cell. In mammals, mono-ADP-ribosylation serves to regulate protein functions, and it is catalysed by two families of toxin-related cellular ADP-ribosyltransferases: ecto-enzymes that modify various cell-surface proteins, like integrins and receptors, and intracellular enzymes that act on a variety of nuclear and cytosolic proteins. These two families have been recently renamed the ARTCs (clostridia toxin like) and ARTDs (diphtheria toxin like), depending on their conserved structural features, and in terms of their relationships to the bacterial toxins. In addition, two members of the structurally non-related sirtuin family can also modify cellular proteins by mono-ADP-ribosylation. Recently, new examples of ADP-ribosylation of proteins involved in signal transduction and intracellular trafficking have been discovered, thus opening the route to the better molecular understanding of this reaction and of its role in human cell physiology and pathology.

  3. Proteome-wide identification of the endogenous ADP-ribosylome of mammalian cells and tissue

    PubMed Central

    Martello, Rita; Leutert, Mario; Jungmichel, Stephanie; Bilan, Vera; Larsen, Sara C.; Young, Clifford; Hottiger, Michael O.; Nielsen, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    Although protein ADP-ribosylation is involved in diverse biological processes, it has remained a challenge to identify ADP-ribose acceptor sites. Here, we present an experimental workflow for sensitive and unbiased analysis of endogenous ADP-ribosylation sites, capable of detecting more than 900 modification sites in mammalian cells and mouse liver. In cells, we demonstrate that Lys residues, besides Glu, Asp and Arg residues, are the dominant in vivo targets of ADP-ribosylation during oxidative stress. In normal liver tissue, we find Arg residues to be the predominant modification site. The cellular distribution and biological processes that involve ADP-ribosylated proteins are different in cultured cells and liver tissue, in the latter of which the majority of sites were found to be in cytosolic and mitochondrial protein networks primarily associated with metabolism. Collectively, we describe a robust methodology for the assessment of the role of ADP-ribosylation and ADP-ribosyltransferases in physiological and pathological states. PMID:27686526

  4. Cholix Toxin, a Novel ADP-ribosylating Factor from Vibrio cholerae

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, Rene; Purdy, Alexandra E.; Fieldhouse, Robert J.; Kimber, Matthew S.; Bartlett, Douglas H.; Merrill, A. Rod

    2008-07-15

    The ADP-ribosyltransferases are a class of enzymes that display activity in a variety of bacterial pathogens responsible for causing diseases in plants and animals, including those affecting mankind, such as diphtheria, cholera, and whooping cough. We report the characterization of a novel toxin from Vibrio cholerae, which we call cholix toxin. The toxin is active against mammalian cells (IC50 = 4.6 {+-} 0.4 ng/ml) and crustaceans (Artemia nauplii LD50 = 10 {+-} 2 {mu}g/ml). Here we show that this toxin is the third member of the diphthamide-specific class of ADP-ribose transferases and that it possesses specific ADP-ribose transferase activity against ribosomal eukaryotic elongation factor 2. We also describe the high resolution crystal structures of the multidomain toxin and its catalytic domain at 2.1- and 1.25-{angstrom} resolution, respectively. The new structural data show that cholix toxin possesses the necessary molecular features required for infection of eukaryotes by receptor-mediated endocytosis, translocation to the host cytoplasm, and inhibition of protein synthesis by specific modification of elongation factor 2. The crystal structures also provide important insight into the structural basis for activation of toxin ADP-ribosyltransferase activity. These results indicate that cholix toxin may be an important virulence factor of Vibrio cholerae that likely plays a significant role in the survival of the organism in an aquatic environment.

  5. Thiol reagents are substrates for the ADP-ribosyltransferase activity of pertussis toxin.

    PubMed

    Lobban, M D; van Heyningen, S

    1988-06-20

    Thiols such as cysteine and dithiothreitol are substrates for the ADP-ribosyltransferase activity of pertussis toxin. When cysteine was incubated with NAD+ and toxin at pH 7.5, a product containing ADP-ribose and cysteine (presumably ADP-ribosylcysteine) was isolated by high-performance liquid chromatography, and characterized by its composition and release of AMP with phosphodiesterase. Cysteine has a Km of 105 mM at saturating NAD+ concentration. The ability of thiols to act as a substrate is one explanation for the very high concentrations (250 mM or greater) that have been observed to enhance the apparent NAD glycohydrolase activity of the toxin. PMID:3133246

  6. The Neisseria meningitidis ADP-Ribosyltransferase NarE Enters Human Epithelial Cells and Disrupts Epithelial Monolayer Integrity.

    PubMed

    Valeri, Maria; Zurli, Vanessa; Ayala, Inmaculada; Colanzi, Antonino; Lapazio, Lucia; Corda, Daniela; Soriani, Marco; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Rossi Paccani, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Many pathogenic bacteria utilize ADP-ribosylating toxins to modify and impair essential functions of eukaryotic cells. It has been previously reported that Neisseria meningitidis possesses an ADP-ribosyltransferase enzyme, NarE, retaining the capacity to hydrolyse NAD and to transfer ADP-ribose moiety to arginine residues in target acceptor proteins. Here we show that upon internalization into human epithelial cells, NarE gains access to the cytoplasm and, through its ADP-ribosylating activity, targets host cell proteins. Notably, we observed that these events trigger the disruption of the epithelial monolayer integrity and the activation of the apoptotic pathway. Overall, our findings provide, for the first time, evidence for a biological activity of NarE on host cells, suggesting its possible involvement in Neisseria pathogenesis.

  7. ADP computer security classification program

    SciTech Connect

    Augustson, S.J.

    1984-01-01

    CG-ADP-1, the Automatic Data Processing Security Classification Guide, provides for classification guidance (for security information) concerning the protection of Department of Energy (DOE) and DOE contractor Automatic Data Processing (ADP) systems which handle classified information. Within the DOE, ADP facilities that process classified information provide potentially lucrative targets for compromise. In conjunction with the security measures required by DOE regulations, necessary precautions must be taken to protect details of those ADP security measures which could aid in their own subversion. Accordingly, the basic principle underlying ADP security classification policy is to protect information which could be of significant assistance in gaining unauthorized access to classified information being processed at an ADP facility. Given this policy, classification topics and guidelines are approved for implementation. The basic program guide, CG-ADP-1 is broad in scope and based upon it, more detailed local guides are sometimes developed and approved for specific sites. Classification topics are provided for system features, system and security management, and passwords. Site-specific topics can be addressed in local guides if needed.

  8. Analysis of Chromatin ADP-Ribosylation at the Genome-wide Level and at Specific Loci by ADPr-ChAP.

    PubMed

    Bartolomei, Giody; Leutert, Mario; Manzo, Massimiliano; Baubec, Tuncay; Hottiger, Michael O

    2016-02-01

    Chromatin ADP-ribosylation regulates important cellular processes. However, the exact location and magnitude of chromatin ADP-ribosylation are largely unknown. A robust and versatile method for assessing chromatin ADP-ribosylation is therefore crucial for further understanding its function. Here, we present a chromatin affinity precipitation method based on the high specificity and avidity of two well-characterized ADP-ribose binding domains to map chromatin ADP-ribosylation at the genome-wide scale and at specific loci. Our ADPr-ChAP method revealed that in cells exposed to oxidative stress, ADP-ribosylation of chromatin scales with histone density, with highest levels at heterochromatic sites and depletion at active promoters. Furthermore, in growth factor-induced adipocyte differentiation, increased chromatin ADP-ribosylation was observed at PPARγ target genes, whose expression is ADP-ribosylation dependent. In combination with deep-sequencing and conventional chromatin immunoprecipitation, the established ADPr-ChAP provides a valuable resource for the bioinformatic comparison of ADP-ribosylation with other chromatin modifications and for addressing its role in other biologically important processes. PMID:26833088

  9. A fluorometric assay for measurement of mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase activity.

    PubMed

    Klebl, B M; Pette, D

    1996-08-01

    Using 1,N6-etheno NAD, a fluorescent analog of NAD, we extended an existing assay for NAD glycohydrolase to the measurement of mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase (mADP-RT) activity using agmatine as acceptor for ADP-ribose. The reaction products were analyzed by reversed-phase chromatography. In the presence of agmatine two newly formed fluorescent products were tentatively identified as ADP-ribosylagmatine anomers. Fluorescence intensity increased upon splitting the N-glycoside bondage of 1,N6-etheno NAD. Therefore, 1, N6-etheno AMP could be used for calibration. The nonradioactive assay yielded values nearly identical to those obtained with the [carbonyl-14C]NAD method. It proved to be highly reproducible, rapid, and suitable for an improved purification protocol yielding a 76,000-fold enriched mADP-RT preparation from rabbit skeletal muscle. The identity and high purity of the enzyme were confirmed immunochemically. The assay served to determine the pH optimum of the enzyme (pH 9.0) and its KM for 1,N6-etheno NAD (287 microM). PMID:8811894

  10. (-)-Botryodiplodin, A Unique Ribose Analog Toxin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many toxins owe their mechanisms of action to being structural analogs of essential metabolites, messengers or structural components. Examples range from tubo-curare to penicillin. Ribose plays a unique role in the metabolism of living organisms, whether prokaryotes or eukaryotes. It and its deri...

  11. Cyclic aristeromycin diphosphate ribose: a potent and poorly hydrolysable Ca(2+)-mobilising mimic of cyclic adenosine diphosphate ribose.

    PubMed

    Bailey, V C; Fortt, S M; Summerhill, R J; Galione, A; Potter, B V

    1996-02-01

    Cyclic aristeromycin diphosphate ribose, a carbocyclic analogue of cyclic adenosine diphosphate ribose, was synthesised using a chemo-enzymatic route involving activation of aristeromycin 5'-phosphate by diphenyl phosphochloridate. The calcium-releasing properties of this novel analogue were investigated in sea urchin egg homogenates. While cyclic aristeromycin diphosphate ribose has a calcium release profile similar to that of cyclic adenosine diphosphate ribose (EC50 values are 80 nM and 30 nM, respectively), it is degraded significantly more slowly (t1/2 values are 170 min and 15 min, respectively) and may, therefore, be a useful tool to investigate the activities of cyclic adenosine diphosphate ribose. PMID:8603694

  12. Stimulation of mono-ADP ribosylation in rat liver plasma membranes after long-term alcohol intake.

    PubMed

    Nomura, F; Noda, M

    1993-10-01

    ADP ribosylation is considered one of the important covalent modifications of cellular proteins catalyzed by ADP ribosyltransferase, which transfers ADP ribose moiety of NAD to an acceptor protein. Because a growing body of evidence has suggested significant biological roles for mono-ADP ribosylations in transmembrane signal transduction and other cell metabolism, how alcohol intake alters them is of interest. Cholera toxin and pertussis toxin have been widely used as probes to investigate the roles of GTP-binding proteins (G-proteins) in the transduction of hormonal and sensory signals. We first tested effects of long-term alcohol intake on these toxin-catalyzed ADP ribosylations of G-proteins in rat liver plasma membranes. Treatment of rat liver plasma membrane with [32P]NAD and thiol-preactivated cholera toxin resulted in the labeling of a 44-kD band, most likely an alpha-subunit of the stimulatory GTP-binding protein, the extent of which was much greater in alcohol-fed rats than in pair-fed controls. Analogous experiments with pertussis toxin also demonstrated enhancement of toxin-catalyzed ADP ribosylation of the inhibitory GTP-binding protein after long-term alcohol intake. More interesting was that long-term alcohol intake remarkably stimulated endogenous mono-ADP ribosylation of a 58-kD protein in a GTP-dependent manner. In vitro, ethanol (50 mmol/L) or a single load of ethanol (3 gm/kg) did not stimulate the reaction. Thus long-term alcohol intake stimulated both toxin-catalyzed and endogenous mono-ADP ribosylations of proteins in rat liver plasma membranes. Pursuit of alcohol interaction with mono-ADP ribosylation may provide an interesting approach to the study of alcohol's effects on the liver.

  13. Blockade of PARP activity attenuates poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation but offers only partial neuroprotection against NMDA-induced cell death in the rat retina.

    PubMed

    Goebel, Dennis J; Winkler, Barry S

    2006-09-01

    Recent reports have linked neuronal cell death by necrosis to poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) hyperactivation. It is believed that under stress, the activity of this enzyme is up-regulated, resulting in extensive poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of nuclear proteins, using NAD(+) as its substrate, which, in turn, leads to the depletion of NAD(+). In efforts to restore the level of NAD(+), depletion of ATP occurs, resulting in the shutdown of ATP-dependent ionic pumps. This results in cell swelling and eventual loss of membrane selectivity, hallmarks of necrosis. Reports from in vitro and in vivo studies in the brain have shown that NMDA receptor activation stimulates PARP activity and that blockade of the enzyme provides substantial neuroprotection. The present study was undertaken to determine whether PARP activity is regulated by NMDA in the rat retina, and whether blockade of PARP activity provides protection against toxic effects of NMDA. Rat retinas exposed to intravitreal injections containing NMDA, with or without the PARP inhibitor N-(6-oxo-5, 6-dihydrophenanthridin-2-yl)-(N,-dimethylamino) acetamide hydrochloride (PJ-34), were assessed for changes in PARP-1 activity as evidenced by poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PAR), loss of membrane integrity, morphological indicators of apoptosis and necrosis, and ganglion cell loss. Results showed that: NMDA increased PAR formation in a concentration-dependent manner and caused a decline in retinal ATP levels; PJ-34 blockade attenuated the NMDA-induced formation of PAR and decline in ATP; NMDA induced the loss of membrane selectivity to ethidium bromide (EtBr) in inner retinal neurons, but loss of membrane selectivity was not prevented by blocking PARP activity; cells stained with EtBr, or reacted for TUNEL-labeling, displayed features characteristic of both apoptosis and necrosis. In the presence of PJ-34, greater numbers of cells exhibited apoptotic features; PJ-34 provided partial neuroprotection against NMDA-induced ganglion

  14. 45 CFR 95.621 - ADP reviews.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... CFR part 74 and the conditions of this subpart and to determine the efficiency, economy and... claim provisions of 45 CFR part 95, subpart A; and (iv) The service agreement was not previously... of Federal ADP systems and information processing. (2) ADP Security Program. State ADP...

  15. 45 CFR 95.621 - ADP reviews.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... all ADP systems used by State and local governments to administer programs covered under 45 CFR part... 45 Public Welfare 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false ADP reviews. 95.621 Section 95.621 Public Welfare....621 ADP reviews. The Department will conduct periodic onsite surveys and reviews of State and...

  16. ADP Signaling in Vascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Connie Ng; Kou, Ruqin; Johnson, Rosalyn P.; Li, Gordon K.; Michel, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    ADP responses underlie therapeutic approaches to many cardiovascular diseases, and ADP receptor antagonists are in widespread clinical use. The role of ADP in platelet biology has been extensively studied, yet ADP signaling pathways in endothelial cells remain incompletely understood. We found that ADP promoted phosphorylation of the endothelial isoform of nitric-oxide synthase (eNOS) at Ser1179 and Ser635 and dephosphorylation at Ser116 in cultured endothelial cells. Although eNOS activity was stimulated by both ADP and ATP, only ADP signaling was significantly inhibited by the P2Y1 receptor antagonist MRS 2179 or by knockdown of P2Y1 using small interfering RNA (siRNA). ADP activated the small GTPase Rac1 and promoted endothelial cell migration. siRNA-mediated knockdown of Rac1 blocked ADP-dependent eNOS Ser1179 and Ser635 phosphorylation, as well as eNOS activation. We analyzed pathways known to regulate eNOS, including phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt, ERK1/2, Src, and calcium/calmodulin-dependent kinase kinase-β (CaMKKβ) using the inhibitors wortmannin, PD98059, PP2, and STO-609, respectively. None of these inhibitors altered ADP-modulated eNOS phosphorylation. In contrast, siRNA-mediated knockdown of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) inhibited ADP-dependent eNOS Ser635 phosphorylation and eNOS activity but did not affect eNOS Ser1179 phosphorylation. Importantly, the AMPK enzyme inhibitor compound C had no effect on ADP-stimulated eNOS activity, despite completely blocking AMPK activity. CaMKKβ knockdown suppressed ADP-stimulated eNOS activity, yet inhibition of CaMKKβ kinase activity using STO-609 failed to affect eNOS activation by ADP. These data suggest that the expression, but not the kinase activity, of AMPK and CaMKKβ is necessary for ADP signaling to eNOS. PMID:19783664

  17. Detection and Quantification of ADP-Ribosylated RhoA/B by Monoclonal Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Rohrbeck, Astrid; Fühner, Viola; Schröder, Anke; Hagemann, Sandra; Vu, Xuan-Khang; Berndt, Sarah; Hust, Michael; Pich, Andreas; Just, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum exoenzyme C3 is the prototype of C3-like ADP-ribosyltransferases that modify the GTPases RhoA, B, and C. C3 catalyzes the transfer of an ADP-ribose moiety from the co-substrate nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) to asparagine-41 of Rho-GTPases. Although C3 does not possess cell-binding/-translocation domains, C3 is able to efficiently enter intact cells, including neuronal and macrophage-like cells. Conventionally, the detection of C3 uptake into cells is carried out via the gel-shift assay of modified RhoA. Since this gel-shift assay does not always provide clear, evaluable results an additional method to confirm the ADP-ribosylation of RhoA is necessary. Therefore, a new monoclonal antibody has been generated that specifically detects ADP-ribosylated RhoA/B, but not RhoC, in Western blot and immunohistochemical assay. The scFv antibody fragment was selected by phage display using the human naive antibody gene libraries HAL9/10. Subsequently, the antibody was produced as scFv-Fc and was found to be as sensitive as a commercially available RhoA antibody providing reproducible and specific results. We demonstrate that this specific antibody can be successfully applied for the analysis of ADP-ribosylated RhoA/B in C3-treated Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and HT22 cells. Moreover, ADP-ribosylation of RhoA was detected within 10 min in C3-treated CHO wild-type cells, indicative of C3 cell entry. PMID:27043630

  18. Detection and Quantification of ADP-Ribosylated RhoA/B by Monoclonal Antibody.

    PubMed

    Rohrbeck, Astrid; Fühner, Viola; Schröder, Anke; Hagemann, Sandra; Vu, Xuan-Khang; Berndt, Sarah; Hust, Michael; Pich, Andreas; Just, Ingo

    2016-04-01

    Clostridium botulinum exoenzyme C3 is the prototype of C3-like ADP-ribosyltransferases that modify the GTPases RhoA, B, and C. C3 catalyzes the transfer of an ADP-ribose moiety from the co-substrate nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) to asparagine-41 of Rho-GTPases. Although C3 does not possess cell-binding/-translocation domains, C3 is able to efficiently enter intact cells, including neuronal and macrophage-like cells. Conventionally, the detection of C3 uptake into cells is carried out via the gel-shift assay of modified RhoA. Since this gel-shift assay does not always provide clear, evaluable results an additional method to confirm the ADP-ribosylation of RhoA is necessary. Therefore, a new monoclonal antibody has been generated that specifically detects ADP-ribosylated RhoA/B, but not RhoC, in Western blot and immunohistochemical assay. The scFv antibody fragment was selected by phage display using the human naive antibody gene libraries HAL9/10. Subsequently, the antibody was produced as scFv-Fc and was found to be as sensitive as a commercially available RhoA antibody providing reproducible and specific results. We demonstrate that this specific antibody can be successfully applied for the analysis of ADP-ribosylated RhoA/B in C3-treated Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and HT22 cells. Moreover, ADP-ribosylation of RhoA was detected within 10 min in C3-treated CHO wild-type cells, indicative of C3 cell entry. PMID:27043630

  19. Synthesis of phosphonate and phostone analogues of ribose-1-phosphates

    PubMed Central

    Nasomjai, Pitak; Slawin, Alexandra M Z

    2009-01-01

    Summary The synthesis of phosphonate analogues of ribose-1-phosphate and 5-fluoro-5-deoxyribose-1-phosphate is described. Preparations of both the α- and β-phosphonate anomers are reported for the ribose and 5-fluoro-5-deoxyribose series and a synthesis of the corresponding cyclic phostones of each α-ribose is also reported. These compounds have been prepared as tools to probe the details of fluorometabolism in S. cattleya. PMID:19777136

  20. Comparison of the acid-base properties of ribose and 2'-deoxyribose nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Mucha, Ariel; Knobloch, Bernd; Jezowska-Bojczuk, Małgorzata; Kozłowski, Henryk; Sigel, Roland K O

    2008-01-01

    The extent to which the replacement of a ribose unit by a 2'-deoxyribose unit influences the acid-base properties of nucleotides has not hitherto been determined in detail. In this study, by potentiometric pH titrations in aqueous solution, we have measured the acidity constants of the 5'-di- and 5'-triphosphates of 2'-deoxyguanosine [i.e., of H(2)(dGDP)(-) and H(2)(dGTP)(2-)] as well as of the 5'-mono-, 5'-di-, and 5'-triphosphates of 2'-deoxyadenosine [i.e., of H(2)(dAMP)(+/-), H(2)(dADP)(-), and H(2)(dATP)(2-)]. These 12 acidity constants (of the 56 that are listed) are compared with those of the corresponding ribose derivatives (published data) measured under the same experimental conditions. The results show that all protonation sites in the 2'-deoxynucleotides are more basic than those in their ribose counterparts. The influence of the 2'-OH group is dependent on the number of 5'-phosphate groups as well as on the nature of the purine nucleobase. The basicity of N7 in guanine nucleotides is most significantly enhanced (by about 0.2 pK units), while the effect on the phosphate groups and the N1H or N1H(+) sites is less pronounced but clearly present. In addition, (1)H NMR chemical shift change studies in dependence on pD in D(2)O have been carried out for the dAMP, dADP, and dATP systems, which confirmed the results from the potentiometric pH titrations and showed the nucleotides to be in their anti conformations. Overall, our results are not only of relevance for metal ion binding to nucleotides or nucleic acids, but also constitute an exact basis for the calculation, determination, and understanding of perturbed pK(a) values in DNAzymes and ribozymes, as needed for the delineation of acid-base mechanisms in catalysis.

  1. In Vitro Reassembly of the Ribose ATP-binding Cassette Transporter Reveals a Distinct Set of Transport Complexes*

    PubMed Central

    Clifton, Matthew C.; Simon, Michael J.; Erramilli, Satchal K.; Zhang, Huide; Zaitseva, Jelena; Hermodson, Mark A.; Stauffacher, Cynthia V.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial ATP-binding cassette (ABC) importers are primary active transporters that are critical for nutrient uptake. Based on structural and functional studies, ABC importers can be divided into two distinct classes, type I and type II. Type I importers follow a strict alternating access mechanism that is driven by the presence of the substrate. Type II importers accept substrates in a nucleotide-free state, with hydrolysis driving an inward facing conformation. The ribose transporter in Escherichia coli is a tripartite complex consisting of a cytoplasmic ATP-binding cassette protein, RbsA, with fused nucleotide binding domains; a transmembrane domain homodimer, RbsC2; and a periplasmic substrate binding protein, RbsB. To investigate the transport mechanism of the complex RbsABC2, we probed intersubunit interactions by varying the presence of the substrate ribose and the hydrolysis cofactors, ATP/ADP and Mg2+. We were able to purify a full complex, RbsABC2, in the presence of stable, transition state mimics (ATP, Mg2+, and VO4); a RbsAC complex in the presence of ADP and Mg2+; and a heretofore unobserved RbsBC complex in the absence of cofactors. The presence of excess ribose also destabilized complex formation between RbsB and RbsC. These observations suggest that RbsABC2 shares functional traits with both type I and type II importers, as well as possessing unique features, and employs a distinct mechanism relative to other ABC transporters. PMID:25533465

  2. Guanine nucleotide-binding proteins that enhance choleragen ADP-ribosyltransferase activity: nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequence of an ADP-ribosylation factor cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Price, S R; Nightingale, M; Tsai, S C; Williamson, K C; Adamik, R; Chen, H C; Moss, J; Vaughan, M

    1988-01-01

    Three (two soluble and one membrane) guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) that enhance ADP-ribosylation of the Gs alpha stimulatory subunit of the adenylyl cyclase (EC 4.6.1.1) complex by choleragen have recently been purified from bovine brain. To further define the structure and function of these ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs), we isolated a cDNA clone (lambda ARF2B) from a bovine retinal library by screening with a mixed heptadecanucleotide probe whose sequence was based on the partial amino acid sequence of one of the soluble ARFs from bovine brain. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence of lambda ARF2B with sequences of peptides from the ARF protein (total of 60 amino acids) revealed only two differences. Whether these are cloning artifacts or reflect the existence of more than one ARF protein remains to be determined. Deduced amino acid sequences of ARF, Go alpha (the alpha subunit of a G protein that may be involved in regulation of ion fluxes), and c-Ha-ras gene product p21 show similarities in regions believed to be involved in guanine nucleotide binding and GTP hydrolysis. ARF apparently lacks a site analogous to that ADP-ribosylated by choleragen in G-protein alpha subunits. Although both the ARF proteins and the alpha subunits bind guanine nucleotides and serve as choleragen substrates, they must interact with the toxin A1 peptide in different ways. In addition to serving as an ADP-ribose acceptor, ARF interacts with the toxin in a manner that modifies its catalytic properties. PMID:3135549

  3. Ribose Accelerates Gut Motility and Suppresses Mouse Body Weight Gaining

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Li, Tong-Ruei R; Xu, Cong; Xu, Tian

    2016-01-01

    The increasing prevalence of obesity is closely related to excessive energy consumption. Clinical intervention of energy intake is an attractive strategy to fight obesity. However, the current FDA-approved weight-loss drugs all have significant side effects. Here we show that ribose upregulates gut motility and suppresses mice body weight gain. Ribokinase, which is encoded by Rbks gene, is the first enzyme for ribose metabolism in vivo. Rbks mutation resulted in ribose accumulation in the small intestine, which accelerated gut movement. Ribose oral treatment in wild type mice also enhanced bowel motility and rendered mice resistance to high fat diets. The suppressed weight gain was resulted from enhanced ingested food excretion. In addition, the effective dose of ribose didn't cause any known side effects (i.e. diarrhea and hypoglycemia). Overall, our results show that ribose can regulate gut motility and energy homeostasis in mice, and suggest that administration of ribose and its analogs could regulate gastrointestinal motility, providing a novel therapeutic approach for gastrointestinal dysfunction and weight control. PMID:27194947

  4. Biotechnological production of L-ribose from L-arabinose.

    PubMed

    Helanto, M; Kiviharju, K; Granström, T; Leisola, M; Nyyssölä, A

    2009-05-01

    L-Ribose is a rare and expensive sugar that can be used as a precursor for the production of L-nucleoside analogues, which are used as antiviral drugs. In this work, we describe a novel way of producing L-ribose from the readily available raw material L-arabinose. This was achieved by introducing L-ribose isomerase activity into L-ribulokinase-deficient Escherichia coli UP1110 and Lactobacillus plantarum BPT197 strains. The process for L-ribose production by resting cells was investigated. The initial L-ribose production rates at 39 degrees C and pH 8 were 0.46 +/- 0.01 g g(-1) h(-1) (1.84 +/- 0.03 g l(-1) h(-1)) and 0.27 +/- 0.01 g g(-1) h(-1) (1.91 +/- 0.1 g l(-1) h(-1)) for E. coli and for L. plantarum, respectively. Conversions were around 20% at their highest in the experiments. Also partially purified protein precipitates having both L-arabinose isomerase and L-ribose isomerase activity were successfully used for converting L-arabinose to L-ribose.

  5. The Escherichia coli effector EspJ blocks Src kinase activity via amidation and ADP ribosylation

    PubMed Central

    Young, Joanna C.; Clements, Abigail; Lang, Alexander E.; Garnett, James A.; Munera, Diana; Arbeloa, Ana; Pearson, Jaclyn; Hartland, Elizabeth L.; Matthews, Stephen J.; Mousnier, Aurelie; Barry, David J.; Way, Michael; Schlosser, Andreas; Aktories, Klaus; Frankel, Gad

    2014-01-01

    The hallmark of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) infection is the formation of actin-rich pedestal-like structures, which are generated following phosphorylation of the bacterial effector Tir by cellular Src and Abl family tyrosine kinases. This leads to recruitment of the Nck–WIP–N-WASP complex that triggers Arp2/3-dependent actin polymerization in the host cell. The same phosphorylation-mediated signalling network is also assembled downstream of the Vaccinia virus protein A36 and the phagocytic Fc-gamma receptor FcγRIIa. Here we report that the EPEC type-III secretion system effector EspJ inhibits autophosphorylation of Src and phosphorylation of the Src substrates Tir and FcγRIIa. Consistent with this, EspJ inhibits actin polymerization downstream of EPEC, Vaccinia virus and opsonized red blood cells. We identify EspJ as a unique adenosine diphosphate (ADP) ribosyltransferase that directly inhibits Src kinase by simultaneous amidation and ADP ribosylation of the conserved kinase-domain residue, Src E310, resulting in glutamine-ADP ribose. PMID:25523213

  6. The Escherichia coli effector EspJ blocks Src kinase activity via amidation and ADP ribosylation.

    PubMed

    Young, Joanna C; Clements, Abigail; Lang, Alexander E; Garnett, James A; Munera, Diana; Arbeloa, Ana; Pearson, Jaclyn; Hartland, Elizabeth L; Matthews, Stephen J; Mousnier, Aurelie; Barry, David J; Way, Michael; Schlosser, Andreas; Aktories, Klaus; Frankel, Gad

    2014-01-01

    The hallmark of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) infection is the formation of actin-rich pedestal-like structures, which are generated following phosphorylation of the bacterial effector Tir by cellular Src and Abl family tyrosine kinases. This leads to recruitment of the Nck-WIP-N-WASP complex that triggers Arp2/3-dependent actin polymerization in the host cell. The same phosphorylation-mediated signalling network is also assembled downstream of the Vaccinia virus protein A36 and the phagocytic Fc-gamma receptor FcγRIIa. Here we report that the EPEC type-III secretion system effector EspJ inhibits autophosphorylation of Src and phosphorylation of the Src substrates Tir and FcγRIIa. Consistent with this, EspJ inhibits actin polymerization downstream of EPEC, Vaccinia virus and opsonized red blood cells. We identify EspJ as a unique adenosine diphosphate (ADP) ribosyltransferase that directly inhibits Src kinase by simultaneous amidation and ADP ribosylation of the conserved kinase-domain residue, Src E310, resulting in glutamine-ADP ribose.

  7. Mediator of RNA polymerase II transcription subunit 19 promotes osteosarcoma growth and metastasis and associates with prognosis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wenxi; Zhang, Zhichang; Min, Daliu; Yang, Qingcheng; Du, Xuefei; Tang, Lina; Lin, Feng; Sun, Yuanjue; Zhao, Hui; Zheng, Shuier; He, Aina; Li, Hongtao; Yao, Yang; Shen, Zan

    2014-04-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common primary malignant tumour of bone. Nearly 30-40% of OS patients have a poor prognosis despite multimodal treatments. Because the carcinogenesis of OS remains unclear, the identification of new oncogenes that control the tumourigenesis and progression of OS is crucial for developing new therapies. Here, we found that the expression of Mediator of RNA polymerase II transcription subunit 19 (Med19) was increased in OS samples from patients compared to normal bone tissues. Cyclin D1 and cyclin B1 are upregulated in Med19 positive OS tissues. Importantly, among 97 OS patients of Enneking stage IIB or IIIB, Med19 expression was correlated with metastasis (P<0.05) and poor prognosis (P<0.01). Med19 knockdown significantly induced growth inhibition, reduced colony-forming ability and suppressed migration in the OS cell lines Saos-2 and U2OS, along with the downregulated expression of cyclin D1 and cyclin B1. Med19 knockdown also induced apoptosis in Saos-2 cells via induction of caspase-3 and poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP). In addition, Med19 knockdown significantly suppressed tumour growth in an OS xenograft nude mouse model via suppression of cyclin D1 and cyclin B1. Simultaneously, Med19 downregulation decreased the expression of Ki67 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in tumour samples from OS xenograft nude mice. Med19 depletion remarkably reduced tumour metastasis in a model of OS metastatic spreading. Taken together, our data suggest that Med19 acts as an oncogene in OS via a possible cyclin D1/cyclin B1 modulation pathway.

  8. Mediator of RNA polymerase II transcription subunit 19 promotes osteosarcoma growth and metastasis and associates with prognosis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Wenxi; Zhang, Zhichang; Min, Daliu; Yang, Qingcheng; Du, Xuefei; Tang, Lina; Lin, Feng; Sun, Yuanjue; Zhao, Hui; Zheng, Shuier; He, Aina; Li, Hongtao; Yao, Yang; Shen, Zan

    2014-04-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common primary malignant tumour of bone. Nearly 30-40% of OS patients have a poor prognosis despite multimodal treatments. Because the carcinogenesis of OS remains unclear, the identification of new oncogenes that control the tumourigenesis and progression of OS is crucial for developing new therapies. Here, we found that the expression of Mediator of RNA polymerase II transcription subunit 19 (Med19) was increased in OS samples from patients compared to normal bone tissues. Cyclin D1 and cyclin B1 are upregulated in Med19 positive OS tissues. Importantly, among 97 OS patients of Enneking stage IIB or IIIB, Med19 expression was correlated with metastasis (P<0.05) and poor prognosis (P<0.01). Med19 knockdown significantly induced growth inhibition, reduced colony-forming ability and suppressed migration in the OS cell lines Saos-2 and U2OS, along with the downregulated expression of cyclin D1 and cyclin B1. Med19 knockdown also induced apoptosis in Saos-2 cells via induction of caspase-3 and poly ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP). In addition, Med19 knockdown significantly suppressed tumour growth in an OS xenograft nude mouse model via suppression of cyclin D1 and cyclin B1. Simultaneously, Med19 downregulation decreased the expression of Ki67 and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in tumour samples from OS xenograft nude mice. Med19 depletion remarkably reduced tumour metastasis in a model of OS metastatic spreading. Taken together, our data suggest that Med19 acts as an oncogene in OS via a possible cyclin D1/cyclin B1 modulation pathway. PMID:24565852

  9. 45 CFR 95.621 - ADP reviews.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... the efficiency, economy and effectiveness of the equipment or service. (e) State Agency Maintenance of... appropriate ADP security requirements based on recognized industry standards or standards governing security... all ADP systems used by State and local governments to administer programs covered under 45 CFR...

  10. 45 CFR 95.621 - ADP reviews.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... the efficiency, economy and effectiveness of the equipment or service. (e) State Agency Maintenance of... appropriate ADP security requirements based on recognized industry standards or standards governing security... all ADP systems used by State and local governments to administer programs covered under 45 CFR...

  11. 45 CFR 95.621 - ADP reviews.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Department of Health and Human Services GENERAL ADMINISTRATION GENERAL ADMINISTRATION-GRANT PROGRAMS (PUBLIC...) Physical security of ADP resources; (B) Equipment security to protect equipment from theft and unauthorized...; (G) Emergency preparedness; and, (H) Designation of an Agency ADP Security Manager. (iii)...

  12. Characterization of transducin from bovine retinal rod outer segments: mechanism and effects of cholera toxin-catalyzed adp-ribosylation

    SciTech Connect

    Navon, S.E.; Fung, B.K.K.

    1984-05-25

    Transducin, a guanine nucleotide-binding protein consisting of two subunits (T/sub ..cap alpha../ and T/sub ..beta gamma../), mediates the signal coupling between rhodopsin and a membrane-bound cyclic GMP phosphodiesterase in retinal rod outer segments. The T/sub ..cap alpha../ subunit is an activator of the phosphodiesterase, and the function of the T/sub ..beta gamma../ subunit is to physically link T/sub ..cap alpha../ with photolyzed rhodopsin. In this study, the mechanism of cholera toxin-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation of T/sub ..cap alpha../ has been examined in a reconstituted system consisting of purified transducin and stripped rod outer segment membranes. Limited proteolysis of the labeled T/sub ..cap alpha../ with trypsin indicated that the inserted ADP-ribose is located exclusively on a single proteolytic fragment with an apparent molecular weight of 23,000. Maximal incorporation of ADP-ribose was achieved when guanosine 5'-(..beta..,..gamma..-im ido)triphosphate (Gpp(NH)p) and T/sub ..beta gamma../ were present at concentrations equal to that of T/sub ..cap alpha../ and when rhodopsin was continuously irradiated with visible light in the 400-500 nm region. The stimulating effect of illumination was related to the direct interaction of the retinal chromophore with opsin. These findings strongly suggest that a transient protein complex consisting of T/sub ..cap alpha../xGpp(NH)p, T/sub ..beta gamma../, and a photointermediate of rhodopsin is the required substrate for cholera toxin. Single turnover kinetic measurements demonstrated that the ADP-ribosylation of T/sub ..cap alpha../ coincided with the appearance of a population of transducin molecules having a very slow rate of GTP hydrolysis. The hydrolysis rate of the bound GTP for this population was 1.1 x 10/sup -3//s, which was 22-fold slower than the rate for the unmodified transducin. 30 references, 9 figures, 1 table.

  13. Synergistic inhibition of Streptococcal biofilm by ribose and xylitol.

    PubMed

    Lee, Heon-Jin; Kim, Se Chul; Kim, Jinkyung; Do, Aejin; Han, Se Yeong; Lee, Bhumgey David; Lee, Hyun Ho; Lee, Min Chan; Lee, So Hui; Oh, Taejun; Park, Sangbin; Hong, Su-Hyung

    2015-02-01

    Streptococcus mutans and Streptococcus sobrinus are the major causative agents of human dental caries. Therefore, the removal or inhibition of these streptococcal biofilms is essential for dental caries prevention. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of ribose treatment alone or in combination with xylitol on streptococcal biofilm formation for both species. Furthermore, we examined the expression of genes responsible for dextran-dependent aggregation (DDAG). In addition, we investigated whether ribose affects the biofilm formation of xylitol-insensitive streptococci, which results from long-term exposure to xylitol. The viability of streptococci biofilms formed in a 24-well polystyrene plate was quantified by fluorescent staining with the LIVE/DEAD bacterial viability and counting kit, which was followed by fluorescence activated cell sorting analysis. The effects of ribose and/or xylitol on the mRNA expression of DDAG-responsible genes, gbpC and dblB, was evaluated by RT-qPCR. Our data showed that ribose and other pentose molecules significantly inhibited streptococcal biofilm formation and the expression of DDAG-responsible genes. In addition, co-treatment with ribose and xylitol decreased streptococcal biofilm formation to a further extent than ribose or xylitol treatment alone in both streptococcal species. Furthermore, ribose attenuated the increase of xylitol-insensitive streptococcal biofilm, which results in the reduced difference of biofilm formation between S. mutans that are sensitive and insensitive to xylitol. These data suggest that pentose may be used as an additive for teeth-protective materials or in sweets. Furthermore, ribose co-treatment with xylitol might help to increase the anti-cariogenic efficacy of xylitol.

  14. Overexpression, purification, and partial characterization of ADP-ribosyltransferases modA and modB of bacteriophage T4.

    PubMed

    Tiemann, B; Depping, R; Rüger, W

    1999-01-01

    There is increasing experimental evidence that ADP-ribosylation of host proteins is an important means to regulate gene expression of bacteriophage T4. Surprisingly, this phage codes for three different ADP-ribosyltransferases, gene products Alt, ModA, and ModB, modifying partially overlapping sets of host proteins. While gene product Alt already has been isolated as a recombinant protein and its action on host RNA polymerases and transcription regulation have been studied, the nucleotide sequences of the two mod genes was published only recently. Their mode of action in the course of the infection cycle and the consequences of the ADP-ribosylations catalyzed by these enzymes remain to be investigated. Here we describe the cloning of the genes, the overexpression, purification, and partial characterization of ADP-ribosyltransferases ModA and ModB. Both proteins seem to act independently, and the ADP-ribosyl moieties are transferred to different sets of host proteins. While gene product ModA, similarly to the Alt protein, acts also on the alpha-subunit of host RNA polymerase, the ModB activity serves another set of proteins, one of which was identified as the S1 protein associated with the 30S subunit of the E. coli ribosomes.

  15. 2'-deoxy cyclic adenosine 5'-diphosphate ribose derivatives: importance of the 2'-hydroxyl motif for the antagonistic activity of 8-substituted cADPR derivatives.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bo; Wagner, Gerd K; Weber, Karin; Garnham, Clive; Morgan, Anthony J; Galione, Antony; Guse, Andreas H; Potter, Barry V L

    2008-03-27

    The structural features needed for antagonism at the cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) receptor are unclear. Chemoenzymatic syntheses of novel 8-substituted 2'-deoxy-cADPR analogues, including 8-bromo-2'-deoxy-cADPR 7, 8-amino-2'-deoxy-cADPR 8, 8- O-methyl-2'-deoxy-cADPR 9, 8-phenyl-2'-deoxy-cADPR 10 and its ribose counterpart 8-phenyl-cADPR 5 are reported, including improved syntheses of established antagonists 8-amino-cADPR 2 and 8-bromo-cADPR 3. Aplysia californica ADP-ribosyl cyclase tolerates even the bulky 8-phenyl-nicotinamide adenine 5'-dinucleotide as a substrate. Structure-activity relationships of 8-substituted cADPR analogues in both Jurkat T-lymphocytes and sea urchin egg homogenate (SUH) were investigated. 2'-OH Deletion decreased antagonistic activity (at least for the 8-amino series), showing it to be an important motif. Some 8-substituted 2'-deoxy analogues showed agonist activity at higher concentrations, among which 8-bromo-2'-deoxy-cADPR 7 was, unexpectedly, a weak but almost full agonist in SUH and was membrane-permeant in whole eggs. Classical antagonists 2 and 3 also showed previously unobserved agonist activity at higher concentrations in both systems. The 2'-OH group, without effect on the Ca (2+)-mobilizing ability of cADPR itself, is an important motif for the antagonistic activities of 8-substituted cADPR analogues. PMID:18303825

  16. Development of a selection system for the detection of L-ribose isomerase expressing mutants of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    De Muynck, Cassandra; Van der Borght, Jef; De Mey, Marjan; De Maeseneire, Sofie L; Van Bogaert, Inge N A; Beauprez, Joeri; Soetaert, Wim; Vandamme, Erick

    2007-10-01

    L-Arabinose isomerase (E.C. 5.3.1.14) catalyzes the reversible isomerization between L-arabinose and L-ribulose and is highly selective towards L-arabinose. By using a directed evolution approach, enzyme variants with altered substrate specificity were created and screened in this research. More specifically, the screening was directed towards the identification of isomerase mutants with L-ribose isomerizing activity. Random mutagenesis was performed on the Escherichia coli L-arabinose isomerase gene (araA) by error-prone polymerase chain reaction to construct a mutant library. To enable screening of this library, a selection host was first constructed in which the mutant genes were transformed. In this selection host, the genes encoding for L-ribulokinase and L-ribulose-5-phosphate-4-epimerase were brought to constitutive expression and the gene encoding for the native L-arabinose isomerase was knocked out. L-Ribulokinase and L-ribulose-5-phosphate-4-epimerase are necessary to ensure the channeling of the formed product, L-ribulose, to the pentose phosphate pathway. Hence, the mutant clones could be screened on a minimal medium with L-ribose as the sole carbon source. Through the screening, two first-generation mutants were isolated, which expressed a small amount of L-ribose isomerase activity.

  17. Kinesin ATPase: Rate-limiting ADP release

    SciTech Connect

    Hackney, D.D.

    1988-09-01

    The ATPase rate of kinesin isolated from bovine brain by the method of S.A. Kuznetsov and V.I. Gelfand is stimulated 1000-fold by interaction with tubulin. The tubulin-stimulated reaction exhibits no extra incorporation of water-derived oxygens over a wide range of ATP and tubulin concentrations, indicating that P/sub i/ release is faster than the reversal of hydrolysis. ADP release, however, is slow for the basal reaction and its release is rate limiting as indicated by the very tight ADP binding (K/sub i/ < 5 nM), the retention of a stoichiometric level of bound ADP through ion-exchange chromatography and dialysis, and the reversible labeling of a bound ADP by (/sup 14/C)ATP at the steady-state ATPase rate as shown by centrifuge gel filtration and inaccessibility to pyruvate kinase. Tubulin accelerates the release of the bound ADP consistent with its activation of the net ATPase reaction. The detailed kinetics of ADP release in the presence of tubulin are biphasic indicating apparent heterogeneity with a fraction of the kinesin active sites being unaffected by tubulin.

  18. Kinesin ATPase: Rate-Limiting ADP Release

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackney, David D.

    1988-09-01

    The ATPase rate of kinesin isolated from bovine brain by the method of S. A. Kuznetsov and V. I. Gelfand [(1986) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 83, 8530-8534)] is stimulated 1000-fold by interaction with tubulin (turnover rate per 120-kDa peptide increases from ≈ 0.009 sec-1 to 9 sec-1). The tubulin-stimulated reaction exhibits no extra incorporation of water-derived oxygens over a wide range of ATP and tubulin concentrations, indicating that Pi release is faster than the reversal of hydrolysis. ADP release, however, is slow for the basal reaction and its release is rate limiting as indicated by the very tight ADP binding (Ki < 5 nM), the retention of a stoichiometric level of bound ADP through ion-exchange chromatography and dialysis, and the reversible labeling of a bound ADP by [14C]ATP at the steady-state ATPase rate as shown by centrifuge gel filtration and inaccessibility to pyruvate kinase. Tubulin accelerates the release of the bound ADP consistent with its activation of the net ATPase reaction. The detailed kinetics of ADP release in the presence of tubulin are biphasic indicating apparent heterogeneity with a fraction of the kinesin active sites being unaffected by tubulin.

  19. On the Stabilization of Ribose by Silicate Minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vázquez-Mayagoitia, Álvaro; Horton, Scott R.; Sumpter, Bobby G.; Šponer, Jiří; Šponer, Judit E.; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel

    2011-03-01

    The RNA-world theory hypothesizes that early Earth life was based on the RNA molecule. However, the notion that ribose, the sugar in RNA, is unstable still casts a serious doubt over this theory. Recently, it has been found that the silicate-mediated formose reaction facilitates the stabilization of ribose. Using accurate quantum chemical calculations, we determined the relative stability of the silicate complexes of arabinose, lyxose, ribose, and xylose with the intent to determine which would form predominantly from a formose-like reaction. Five stereoisomers were investigated for each complex. The stereoisomers of 2:1 ribose-silicate are the more stable ones, to the extent that the least stable of these is even more stable than the most stable stereoisomer of the other 2:1 sugar-silicate complexes. Thus, thermodynamically, a formose-like reaction in the presence of silicate minerals should preferentially form the silicate complex of ribose over the silicate complex of arabinose, lyxose, and xylose.

  20. D-ribose inhibits DNA repair synthesis in human lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Zunica, G.; Marini, M.; Brunelli, M.A.; Chiricolo, M.; Franceschi, C.

    1986-07-31

    D-ribose is cytotoxic for quiescent human lymphocytes and severely inhibits their PHA-induced proliferation at concentrations (25-50 mM) at which other simple sugars are ineffective. In order to explain these effects, DNA repair synthesis was evaluated in PHA-stimulated human lymphocytes treated with hydroxyurea and irradiated. D-ribose, in contrast to other reducing sugars, did not induce repair synthesis and therefore did not apparently damage DNA in a direct way, although it markedly inhibited gamma ray-induced repair. Taking into account that lymphocytes must rejoin physiologically-formed DNA strand breaks in order to enter the cell cycle, we suggest that D-ribose exerts its cytotoxic activity by interfering with metabolic pathways critical for the repair of DNA breaks.

  1. Identification of Determinants Required for Agonistic and Inverse Agonistic Ligand Properties at the ADP Receptor P2Y12

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Philipp; Ritscher, Lars; Dong, Elizabeth N.; Hermsdorf, Thomas; Cöster, Maxi; Wittkopf, Doreen; Meiler, Jens

    2013-01-01

    The ADP receptor P2Y12 belongs to the superfamily of G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs), and its activation triggers platelet aggregation. Therefore, potent antagonists, such as clopidogrel, are of high clinical relevance in prophylaxis and treatment of thromboembolic events. P2Y12 displays an elevated basal activity in vitro, and as such, inverse agonists may be therapeutically beneficial compared with antagonists. Only a few inverse agonists of P2Y12 have been described. To expand this limited chemical space and improve understanding of structural determinants of inverse agonist-receptor interaction, this study screened a purine compound library for lead structures using wild-type (WT) human P2Y12 and 28 constitutively active mutants. Results showed that ATP and ATP derivatives are agonists at P2Y12. The potency at P2Y12 was 2-(methylthio)-ADP > 2-(methylthio)-ATP > ADP > ATP. Determinants required for agonistic ligand activity were identified. Molecular docking studies revealed a binding pocket for the ATP derivatives that is bordered by transmembrane helices 3, 5, 6, and 7 in human P2Y12, with Y105, E188, R256, Y259, and K280 playing a particularly important role in ligand interaction. N-Methyl-anthraniloyl modification at the 3′-OH of the 2′-deoxyribose leads to ligands (mant-deoxy-ATP [dATP], mant-deoxy-ADP) with inverse agonist activity. Inverse agonist activity of mant-dATP was found at the WT human P2Y12 and half of the constitutive active P2Y12 mutants. This study showed that, in addition to ADP and ATP, other ATP derivatives are not only ligands of P2Y12 but also agonists. Modification of the ribose within ATP can result in inverse activity of ATP-derived ligands. PMID:23093496

  2. Thromboxane-induced renal vasoconstriction is mediated by the ADP-ribosyl cyclase CD38 and superoxide anion

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Paul A.; Kopple, Tayler E.; Arendshorst, William J.

    2013-01-01

    The present renal hemodynamic study tested the hypothesis that CD38 and superoxide anion (O2·−) participate in the vasoconstriction produced by activation of thromboxane prostanoid (TP) receptors in the mouse kidney. CD38 is the major mammalian ADP-ribosyl cyclase contributing to vasomotor tone through the generation of cADP-ribose, a second messenger that activates ryanodine receptors to release Ca2+ from the sarcoplasmic reticulum in vascular smooth muscle cells. We evaluated whether the stable thromboxane mimetic U-46619 causes less pronounced renal vasoconstriction in CD38-deficient mice and the involvement of O2·− in U-46619-induced renal vasoconstriction. Our results indicate that U-46619 activation of TP receptors causes renal vasoconstriction in part by activating cADP-ribose signaling in renal resistance arterioles. Based on maximal renal blood flow and renal vascular resistance responses to bolus injections of U-46619, CD38 contributes 30–40% of the TP receptor-induced vasoconstriction. We also found that the antioxidant SOD mimetic tempol attenuated the magnitude of vasoconstriction by U-46619 in both groups of mice, suggesting mediation by O2·−. The degree of tempol blockage of U-46619-induced renal vasoconstriction was greater in wild-type mice, attenuating renal vasoconstriction by 40% compared with 30% in CD38-null mice. In other experiments, U-46619 rapidly stimulated O2·− production (dihydroethidium fluorescence) in isolated mouse afferent arterioles, an effect abolished by tempol. These observations provide the first in vivo demonstration of CD38 and O2·− involvement in the vasoconstrictor effects of TP receptor activation in the kidney and in vitro evidence for TP receptor stimulation of O2·− production by the afferent arteriole. PMID:23884143

  3. Raman gains of ADP and KDP crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hai-Liang; Zhang, Qing-Hua; Wang, Bo; Xu, Xin-Guang; Wang, Zheng-Ping; Sun, Xun; Zhang, Fang; Zhang, Li-Song; Liu, Bao-An; Chai, Xiang-Xu

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, the Raman gain coefficients of ammonium dihydrogen phosphate (ADP) and potassium dihydrogen phosphate (KDP) crystals are measured. By using a pump source of a 30-ps, 532-nm laser, the gain coefficients of ADP and KDP are 1.22 cm/GW, and 0.91 cm/GW, respectively. While for a 20-ps, 355-nm pump laser, the gain coefficients of these two crystals are similar, which are 1.95 cm/GW for ADP and 1.86 for KDP. The present results indicate that for ultra-violet frequency conversion, the problem of stimulated Raman scattering for ADP crystal will not be more serious than that for KDP crystal. Considering other advantages such the larger nonlinear optical coefficient, higher laser damage threshold, and lower noncritical phase-matching temperature, it can be anticipated that ADP will be a powerful competitor to KDP in large aperture, high energy third-harmonic generation or fourth-harmonic generation applications. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 51323002 and 51402173), the Independent Innovation Foundation of Shandong University, China (Grant Nos. IIFSDU and 2012JC016), the Program for New Century Excellent Talents in University, China (Grant No. NCET-10-0552), the Fund from the Key Laboratory of Neutron Physics, China Academy of Engineering Physics (Grant No. 2014BB07), and the Natural Science Foundation for Distinguished Young Scholar of Shandong Province, China (Grant No. JQ201218).

  4. Positron emission tomography probe demonstrates a striking concentration of ribose salvage in the liver.

    PubMed

    Clark, Peter M; Flores, Graciela; Evdokimov, Nikolai M; McCracken, Melissa N; Chai, Timothy; Nair-Gill, Evan; O'Mahony, Fiona; Beaven, Simon W; Faull, Kym F; Phelps, Michael E; Jung, Michael E; Witte, Owen N

    2014-07-15

    PET is a powerful technique for quantifying and visualizing biochemical pathways in vivo. Here, we develop and validate a novel PET probe, [(18)F]-2-deoxy-2-fluoroarabinose ([(18)F]DFA), for in vivo imaging of ribose salvage. DFA mimics ribose in vivo and accumulates in cells following phosphorylation by ribokinase and further metabolism by transketolase. We use [(18)F]DFA to show that ribose preferentially accumulates in the liver, suggesting a striking tissue specificity for ribose metabolism. We demonstrate that solute carrier family 2, member 2 (also known as GLUT2), a glucose transporter expressed in the liver, is one ribose transporter, but we do not know if others exist. [(18)F]DFA accumulation is attenuated in several mouse models of metabolic syndrome, suggesting an association between ribose salvage and glucose and lipid metabolism. These results describe a tool for studying ribose salvage and suggest that plasma ribose is preferentially metabolized in the liver.

  5. Ribose 5-Phosphate Isomerase Investigations for the Undergraduate Biochemistry Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jewett, Kathy; Sandwick, Roger K.

    2011-01-01

    The enzyme ribose 5-phosphate isomerase (RpiA) has many features that make it attractive as a focal point of a semester-long, advanced biochemistry laboratory for undergraduate students. The protein can easily and inexpensively be isolated from spinach using traditional purification techniques. Characterization of RpiA enzyme activity can be…

  6. Glycosidation of Methanol with Ribose: An Interdisciplinary Undergraduate Laboratory Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Erin; Cook, Katie; Pritchard, Meredith R.; Stripe, Wayne; Bruch, Martha; Bendinskas, Kestutis

    2010-01-01

    This exercise provides students hands-on experience with the topics of glycosidation, hemiacetal and acetal formation, proton nuclear magnetic resonance ([superscript 1]H NMR) spectroscopy, and kinetic and thermodynamic product formation. In this laboratory experiment, the methyl acetal of ribose is synthesized, and the kinetic and thermodynamic…

  7. Isolation and characterization of Escherichia coli mutants able to utilize the novel pentose L-ribose.

    PubMed

    Trimbur, D E; Mortlock, R P

    1991-04-01

    Wild-type strains of Escherichia coli were unable to utilize L-ribose for growth. However, L-ribose-positive mutants could be isolated from strains of E. coli K-12 which contained a ribitol operon. L-ribose-positive strains of E. coli, isolated after 15 to 20 days, had a growth rate of 0.22 generation per h on L-ribose. Growth on L-ribose was found to induce the enzymes of the L-arabinose and ribitol pathways, but only ribitol-negative mutants derived from strains originally L-ribose positive lost the ability to grow on L-ribose, showing that a functional ribitol pathway was required. One of the mutations permitting growth on L-ribose enabled the mutants to produce constitutively an NADPH-linked reductase which converted L-ribose to ribitol. L-ribose is not metabolized by an isomerization to L-ribulose, as would be predicted on the basis of other pentose pathways in enteric bacteria. Instead, L-ribose was metabolized by the reduction of L-ribose to ribitol, followed by the conversion to D-ribulose by enzymes of the ribitol pathway.

  8. 45 CFR 95.619 - Use of ADP systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... PROGRAMS (PUBLIC ASSISTANCE, MEDICAL ASSISTANCE AND STATE CHILDREN'S HEALTH INSURANCE PROGRAMS) Automatic... Conditions for Ffp § 95.619 Use of ADP systems. ADP systems designed, developed, or installed with FFP...

  9. Dielectric, thermal and mechanical properties of ADP doped PVA composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naik, Jagadish; Bhajantri, R. F.; Ravindrachary, V.; Rathod, Sunil G.; Sheela, T.; Naik, Ishwar

    2015-06-01

    Polymer composites of poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), doped with different concentrations of ammonium dihydrogen phosphate (ADP) has been prepared by solution casting. The formation of complexation between ADP and PVA was confirmed with the help of Fourier transforms infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) shows thermal stability of the prepared composites. Impedance analyzer study revealed the increase in dielectric constant and loss with increase the ADP concentration and the strain rate of the prepared composites decreases with ADP concentration.

  10. ADP--A Must in the Secondary School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Majernik, John A.

    1974-01-01

    The rationale for including automated data processing (ADP) in secondary schools is given. ADP instruction: prepares students for data processing employment and for advanced ADP study, aids all students preparing for business careers, aids students in choosing a career, provides consumer information, and adds realism to other classroom…

  11. Extinction and expression of the ribose-positive phenotype in hybrid Novikoff hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Silnutzer, J; Jargiello, P

    1981-03-01

    Expression of the ribose-positive phenotype was examined in hybrids obtained from the fusion of parental pentose-negative Novikoff hepatoma cells and ribose-positive variants. The two ribose-positive variants used differed phenotypically in their ability to use pentoses other than ribose for growth. One variant used D-ribose, D-xylose, and L-arabinose for growth, while the other variant used only D-ribose. Each variant was fused to pentose-negative parental hepatoma cells, and resultant hybrids were tested for the ability to use ribose. In both instances extinction of ribose utilization was the primary event, suggesting the existence of a trans-acting negative control element in the parental cells. In addition, hybrids from both fusion experiments eventually reexpressed the ribose phenotype. The rate of reexpression, however, was different for the two fusion experiments. Reexpression of ribose utilization in hybrids derived from the nonspecific variant occurred at approximately 10(-3) segregants/cell/day. Reexpressing segregants arose from the specific-derived hybrids at a rate of 0.5 segregants/cell/day. Possible reasons for this difference include a differential rate in chromosomal segregation or a difference in the regulation of ribose metabolism. PMID:6794162

  12. The Juxtaposition of Ribose Hydroxyl Groups: The Root of Biological Catalysis and the RNA World?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernhardt, Harold S.

    2015-06-01

    We normally think of enzymes as being proteins; however, the RNA world hypothesis suggests that the earliest biological catalysts may have been composed of RNA. One of the oldest surviving RNA enzymes we are aware of is the peptidyl transferase centre (PTC) of the large ribosomal RNA, which joins amino acids together to form proteins. Recent evidence indicates that the enzymatic activity of the PTC is principally due to ribose 2 '-OHs. Many other reactions catalyzed by RNA and/or in which RNA is a substrate similarly utilize ribose 2 '-OHs, including phosphoryl transfer reactions that involve the cleavage and/or ligation of the ribose-phosphate backbone. It has recently been proposed by Yakhnin (2013) that phosphoryl transfer reactions were important in the prebiotic chemical evolution of RNA, by enabling macromolecules composed of polyols joined by phosphodiester linkages to undergo recombination reactions, with the reaction energy supplied by the phosphodiester bond itself. The almost unique juxtaposition of the ribose 2'-hydroxyl and 3'-oxygen in ribose-containing polymers such as RNA, which gives ribose the ability to catalyze such reactions, may have been an important factor in the selection of ribose as a component of the first biopolymer. In addition, the juxtaposition of hydroxyl groups in free ribose: (i) allows coordination of borate ions, which could have provided significant and preferential stabilization of ribose in a prebiotic environment; and (ii) enhances the rate of permeation by ribose into a variety of lipid membrane systems, possibly favouring its incorporation into early metabolic pathways and an ancestral ribose-phosphate polymer. Somewhat more speculatively, hydrogen bonds formed by juxtaposed ribose hydroxyl groups may have stabilized an ancestral ribose-phosphate polymer against degradation (Bernhardt and Sandwick 2014). I propose that the almost unique juxtaposition of ribose hydroxyl groups constitutes the root of both biological

  13. D-ribose, a metabolic substrate for congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Susan; Herrick, James; Shecterle, Linda M; St Cyr, John A

    2009-06-01

    The incidence of congestive heart failure continues to escalate worldwide, taxing health care systems. Current therapies focus on clinical management. Current accepted regimens have provided some success; however, most patients show progression of their disease. Because of this failure, research continues to explore therapies directed at stabilization of their disease and hopefully to improve the downward spiral. Publications have asserted that the failing heart is energy starved. D-ribose, a naturally occurring pentose carbohydrate and a key component in the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) molecule, has demonstrated an ability to replenish ATP levels and improve diastolic dysfunction following myocardial ischemia, which has been shown to improve the clinical state of patients afflicted with congestive heart failure. D-ribose may provide the necessary metabolic substrate to benefit this energy-deficient state found in heart failure. PMID:19523159

  14. Phosphorylation of Ribose-Borate Complexes at Convergent Margins?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holm, N. G.

    2008-12-01

    The potential of pyrophosphate formation upon heating of hydrogenated orthophosphates like whitlockite ((Ca18Mg2H2(PO4)14) to a few hundred °C in geological environments with low water to rock ratio has probably been underestimated. Once pyrophosphate is available, phosphorylation of pentoses, ribose in particular, may occur. Experiments involving heating of sodium dihydrogen phosphate have even shown high yields of trimetaphosphate. This compound is an even better phosphorylating agent than pyrophosphate and has been identified in volcanic fumaroles. Ribose may be formed from formaldehyde and glycolaldehyde, because the ribose molecule is stabilized by borate that binds to the 2' and 3' positions. Mechanistically, aldehydes can be formed directly from elemental carbon present in mafic rocks in contact with water. The initial reaction of elemental carbon with water gives hydroxymethylene, which can rearrange to formaldehyde. A new hydroxymethylene molecule can then add onto the formaldehyde (and larger aldehyde molecules) and form glycolaldehyde. In this way, the known lag in the formation of glycolaldehyde from formaldehyde is avoided. This lag has previously been a drawback and a reason that the formose reaction was for a while outdated as a possible mechanism for abiotic synthesis of carbohydrates. The reason why pentoses are stabilized by borate is that borate forms trigonal and tetrahedral complexes with oxygen groups and, therefore, has a strong affinity for organic material. Boric acid and borate readily form complexes with a wide variety of sugars, particularly the furanose form of pentoses, and other compounds containing cis-hydroxyl groups like humic substances. Borate is continuously scavenged from seawater by secondary layer minerals of oceanic lithosphere and is released again at moderate heating of the subducting plate at convergent margins. The Mariana back-arc is a good example of this process. The fact that ribose is stabilized by borate may

  15. Thymidine phosphorylase, 2-deoxy-D-ribose and angiogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, N S; Bicknell, R

    1998-01-01

    Angiogenesis is the term used to describe the formation of new blood vessels from the existing vasculature. In order to attract new vessels, a tissue must release an endothelial-cell chemoattractant. 2-Deoxy-D-ribose is produced in vivo by the catalytic action of thymidine phosphorylase (TP) on thymidine and has recently been identified as an endothelial-cell chemoattractant and angiogenesis-inducing factor. TP, previously known only for its role in nucleotide salvage, is now known to be angiogenic. TP expression is elevated in many solid tumours and in chronically inflamed tissues, both known areas of active angiogenesis. There is evidence that TP is also involved in physiological angiogenesis such as endometrial angiogenesis during the menstrual cycle. The majority of known endothelial-cell chemoattractants are polypeptides that bind to endothelial-cell-surface receptors. In contrast, 2-deoxy-D-ribose appears to lack a cell-surface receptor. Glucose is another sugar that acts as an endothelial-cell chemoattractant. The migratory activity of glucose is blocked by ouabain. It is possible that 2-deoxy-D-ribose and glucose stimulate endothelial-cell migration via a similar mechanistic pathway. PMID:9693094

  16. Escherchia coli ribose binding protein based bioreporters revisited

    PubMed Central

    Reimer, Artur; Yagur-Kroll, Sharon; Belkin, Shimshon; Roy, Shantanu; van der Meer, Jan Roelof

    2014-01-01

    Bioreporter bacteria, i.e., strains engineered to respond to chemical exposure by production of reporter proteins, have attracted wide interest because of their potential to offer cheap and simple alternative analytics for specified compounds or conditions. Bioreporter construction has mostly exploited the natural variation of sensory proteins, but it has been proposed that computational design of new substrate binding properties could lead to completely novel detection specificities at very low affinities. Here we reconstruct a bioreporter system based on the native Escherichia coli ribose binding protein RbsB and one of its computationally designed variants, reported to be capable of binding 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT). Our results show in vivo reporter induction at 50 nM ribose, and a 125 nM affinity constant for in vitro ribose binding to RbsB. In contrast, the purified published TNT-binding variant did not bind TNT nor did TNT cause induction of the E. coli reporter system. PMID:25005019

  17. T7-RNA Polymerase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    T7-RNA Polymerase grown on STS-81. Structure-Function Relationships of RNA Polymerase: DNA-dependent RNA polymerase is the key enzyme responsible for the biosynthesis of RNA, a process known as transcription. Principal Investigator's include Dr. Dan Carter, Dr. B.C. Wang, and Dr. John Rose of New Century Pharmaceuticals.

  18. Global transcriptome response in Lactobacillus sakei during growth on ribose

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Lactobacillus sakei is valuable in the fermentation of meat products and exhibits properties that allow for better preservation of meat and fish. On these substrates, glucose and ribose are the main carbon sources available for growth. We used a whole-genome microarray based on the genome sequence of L. sakei strain 23K to investigate the global transcriptome response of three L. sakei strains when grown on ribose compared with glucose. Results The function of the common regulated genes was mostly related to carbohydrate metabolism and transport. Decreased transcription of genes encoding enzymes involved in glucose metabolism and the L-lactate dehydrogenase was observed, but most of the genes showing differential expression were up-regulated. Especially transcription of genes directly involved in ribose catabolism, the phosphoketolase pathway, and in alternative fates of pyruvate increased. Interestingly, the methylglyoxal synthase gene, which encodes an enzyme unique for L. sakei among lactobacilli, was up-regulated. Ribose catabolism seems closely linked with catabolism of nucleosides. The deoxyribonucleoside synthesis operon transcriptional regulator gene was strongly up-regulated, as well as two gene clusters involved in nucleoside catabolism. One of the clusters included a ribokinase gene. Moreover, hprK encoding the HPr kinase/phosphatase, which plays a major role in the regulation of carbon metabolism and sugar transport, was up-regulated, as were genes encoding the general PTS enzyme I and the mannose-specific enzyme II complex (EIIman). Putative catabolite-responsive element (cre) sites were found in proximity to the promoter of several genes and operons affected by the change of carbon source. This could indicate regulation by a catabolite control protein A (CcpA)-mediated carbon catabolite repression (CCR) mechanism, possibly with the EIIman being indirectly involved. Conclusions Our data shows that the ribose uptake and catabolic machinery in

  19. DNA polymerases and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Sabine S.; Takata, Kei-ichi; Wood, Richard D.

    2013-01-01

    There are fifteen different DNA polymerases encoded in mammalian genomes, which are specialized for replication, repair or the tolerance of DNA damage. New evidence is emerging for lesion-specific and tissue-specific functions of DNA polymerases. Many point mutations that occur in cancer cells arise from the error-generating activities of DNA polymerases. However, the ability of some of these enzymes to bypass DNA damage may actually defend against chromosome instability in cells and at least one DNA polymerase, POLζ, is a suppressor of spontaneous tumorigenesis. Because DNA polymerases can help cancer cells tolerate DNA damage, some of these enzymes may be viable targets for therapeutic strategies. PMID:21258395

  20. The natural history of ADP-ribosyltransferases and the ADP-ribosylation system.

    PubMed

    Aravind, L; Zhang, Dapeng; de Souza, Robson F; Anand, Swadha; Iyer, Lakshminarayan M

    2015-01-01

    Catalysis of NAD(+)-dependent ADP-ribosylation of proteins, nucleic acids, or small molecules has evolved in at least three structurally unrelated superfamilies of enzymes, namely ADP-ribosyltransferase (ART), the Sirtuins, and probably TM1506. Of these, the ART superfamily is the most diverse in terms of structure, active site residues, and targets that they modify. The primary diversification of the ART superfamily occurred in the context of diverse bacterial conflict systems, wherein ARTs play both offensive and defensive roles. These include toxin-antitoxin systems, virus-host interactions, intraspecific antagonism (polymorphic toxins), symbiont/parasite effectors/toxins, resistance to antibiotics, and repair of RNAs cleaved in conflicts. ARTs evolving in these systems have been repeatedly acquired by lateral transfer throughout eukaryotic evolution, starting from the PARP family, which was acquired prior to the last eukaryotic common ancestor. They were incorporated into eukaryotic regulatory/epigenetic control systems (e.g., PARP family and NEURL4), and also used as defensive (e.g., pierisin and CARP-1 families) or immunity-related proteins (e.g., Gig2-like ARTs). The ADP-ribosylation system also includes other domains, such as the Macro, ADP-ribosyl glycohydrolase, NADAR, and ADP-ribosyl cyclase, which appear to have initially diversified in bacterial conflict-related systems. Unlike ARTs, sirtuins appear to have a much smaller presence in conflict-related systems.

  1. The natural history of ADP-ribosyltransferases and the ADP-ribosylation system.

    PubMed

    Aravind, L; Zhang, Dapeng; de Souza, Robson F; Anand, Swadha; Iyer, Lakshminarayan M

    2015-01-01

    Catalysis of NAD(+)-dependent ADP-ribosylation of proteins, nucleic acids, or small molecules has evolved in at least three structurally unrelated superfamilies of enzymes, namely ADP-ribosyltransferase (ART), the Sirtuins, and probably TM1506. Of these, the ART superfamily is the most diverse in terms of structure, active site residues, and targets that they modify. The primary diversification of the ART superfamily occurred in the context of diverse bacterial conflict systems, wherein ARTs play both offensive and defensive roles. These include toxin-antitoxin systems, virus-host interactions, intraspecific antagonism (polymorphic toxins), symbiont/parasite effectors/toxins, resistance to antibiotics, and repair of RNAs cleaved in conflicts. ARTs evolving in these systems have been repeatedly acquired by lateral transfer throughout eukaryotic evolution, starting from the PARP family, which was acquired prior to the last eukaryotic common ancestor. They were incorporated into eukaryotic regulatory/epigenetic control systems (e.g., PARP family and NEURL4), and also used as defensive (e.g., pierisin and CARP-1 families) or immunity-related proteins (e.g., Gig2-like ARTs). The ADP-ribosylation system also includes other domains, such as the Macro, ADP-ribosyl glycohydrolase, NADAR, and ADP-ribosyl cyclase, which appear to have initially diversified in bacterial conflict-related systems. Unlike ARTs, sirtuins appear to have a much smaller presence in conflict-related systems. PMID:25027823

  2. Essentiality of tetramer formation of Cellulomonas parahominis L-ribose isomerase involved in novel L-ribose metabolic pathway.

    PubMed

    Terami, Yuji; Yoshida, Hiromi; Uechi, Keiko; Morimoto, Kenji; Takata, Goro; Kamitori, Shigehiro

    2015-08-01

    L-Ribose isomerase from Cellulomonas parahominis MB426 (CpL-RI) can catalyze the isomerization between L-ribose and L-ribulose, which are non-abundant in nature and called rare sugars. CpL-RI has a broad substrate specificity and can catalyze the isomerization between D-lyxose and D-xylulose, D-talose and D-tagatose, L-allose and L-psicose, L-gulose and L-sorbose, and D-mannose and D-fructose. To elucidate the molecular basis underlying the substrate recognition mechanism of CpL-RI, the crystal structures of CpL-RI alone and in complexes with L-ribose, L-allose, and L-psicose were determined. The structure of CpL-RI was very similar to that of L-ribose isomerase from Acinetobacter sp. strain DL-28, previously determined by us. CpL-RI had a cupin-type β-barrel structure, and the catalytic site was detected between two large β-sheets with a bound metal ion. The bound substrates coordinated to the metal ion, and Glu113 and Glu204 were shown to act as acid/base catalysts in the catalytic reaction via a cis-enediol intermediate. Glu211 and Arg243 were found to be responsible for the recognition of substrates with various configurations at 4- and 5-positions of sugar. CpL-RI formed a homo-tetramer in crystals, and the catalytic site independently consisted of residues within a subunit, suggesting that the catalytic site acted independently. Crystal structure and site-direct mutagenesis analyses showed that the tetramer structure is essential for the enzyme activity and that each subunit of CpL-RI could be structurally stabilized by intermolecular contacts with other subunits. The results of growth complementation assays suggest that CpL-RI is involved in a novel metabolic pathway using L-ribose as a carbon source.

  3. NIH study uncovers new mechanism of action for class of chemotherapy drugs

    Cancer.gov

    NIH researchers have discovered a significant new mechanism of action for a class of chemotherapy drugs known as poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitors, or PARP inhibitors. They have also identified differences in the toxic capabilities of three drugs in

  4. Rates of Decomposition of Ribose and other Sugars: Implications for Chemical Evolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larralde, Rosa; Robertson, Michael P.; Miller, Stanley L.

    1995-01-01

    The existence of the RNA world, in which RNA acted as a catalyst as well as an informational macromolecule, assumes a large prebiotic source of ribose or the existence of pre-RNA molecules with backbones different from ribose-phosphate. The generally accepted prebiotic synthesis of ribose, the formose reaction, yields numerous sugars without any selectivity. Even if there were a selective synthesis of ribose, there is still the problem of stability. Sugars are known to be unstable in strong acid or base, but there are few data for neutral solutions. Therefore, we have measured the rate of decomposition of ribose between pH 4 and pH 8 from 40 C to 120 C. The ribose half-lives are very short (73 min at pH 7.0 and 100 C and 44 years at pH 7.0 and 0 C). The other aldopentoses and aldohexoses have half-lives within an order of magnitude of these values, as do 2-deoxyribose, ribose 5-phosphate, and ribose 2,4bisphosphate. These results suggest that the backbone of the first genetic material could not have contained ribose or other sugars because of their instability.

  5. On the Kinetic and Allosteric Regulatory Properties of the ADP-Glucose Pyrophosphorylase from Rhodococcus jostii: An Approach to Evaluate Glycogen Metabolism in Oleaginous Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Cereijo, Antonela E.; Asencion Diez, Matías D.; Dávila Costa, José S.; Alvarez, Héctor M.; Iglesias, Alberto A.

    2016-01-01

    Rhodococcus spp. are oleaginous bacteria that accumulate glycogen during exponential growth. Despite the importance of these microorganisms in biotechnology, little is known about the regulation of carbon and energy storage, mainly the relationship between glycogen and triacylglycerols metabolisms. Herein, we report the molecular cloning and heterologous expression of the gene coding for ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (EC 2.7.7.27) of Rhodococcus jostii, strain RHA1. The recombinant enzyme was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity to accurately characterize its oligomeric, kinetic, and regulatory properties. The R. jostii ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase is a homotetramer of 190 kDa exhibiting low basal activity to catalyze synthesis of ADP-glucose, which is markedly influenced by different allosteric effectors. Glucose-6P, mannose-6P, fructose-6P, ribose-5P, and phosphoenolpyruvate were major activators; whereas, NADPH and 6P-gluconate behaved as main inhibitors of the enzyme. The combination of glucose-6P and other effectors (activators or inhibitors) showed a cross-talk effect suggesting that the different metabolites could orchestrate a fine regulation of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase in R. jostii. The enzyme exhibited some degree of affinity toward ATP, GTP, CTP, and other sugar-1P substrates. Remarkably, the use of glucosamine-1P was sensitive to allosteric activation. The relevance of the fine regulation of R. jostii ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase is further analyzed in the framework of proteomic studies already determined for the bacterium. Results support a critical role for glycogen as a temporal reserve that provides a pool of carbon able of be re-routed to produce long-term storage of lipids under certain conditions. PMID:27313571

  6. ADP Analysis project for the Human Resources Management Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tureman, Robert L., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    The ADP (Automated Data Processing) Analysis Project was conducted for the Human Resources Management Division (HRMD) of NASA's Langley Research Center. The three major areas of work in the project were computer support, automated inventory analysis, and an ADP study for the Division. The goal of the computer support work was to determine automation needs of Division personnel and help them solve computing problems. The goal of automated inventory analysis was to find a way to analyze installed software and usage on a Macintosh. Finally, the ADP functional systems study for the Division was designed to assess future HRMD needs concerning ADP organization and activities.

  7. DNA polymerase profiling.

    PubMed

    Summerer, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    We report a simple homogeneous fluorescence assay for quantification of DNA polymerase function in high throughput. The fluorescence signal is generated by the DNA polymerase triggering opening of a molecular beacon extension of the template strand. A resulting distance alteration is reported by fluorescence resonance energy transfer between two dyes introduced into the molecular beacon stem. We describe real-time reaction profiling of two model DNA polymerases. We demonstrate kinetic characterization, rapid optimization of reaction conditions, and inhibitor profiling using the presented assay. Furthermore, to supersede purification steps in screening procedures of DNA polymerase mutant libraries, detection of enzymatic activity in bacterial expression lysates is described.

  8. ModA and ModB, two ADP-ribosyltransferases encoded by bacteriophage T4: catalytic properties and mutation analysis.

    PubMed

    Tiemann, Bernd; Depping, Reinhard; Gineikiene, Egle; Kaliniene, Laura; Nivinskas, Rimas; Rüger, Wolfgang

    2004-11-01

    Bacteriophage T4 encodes three ADP-ribosyltransferases, Alt, ModA, and ModB. These enzymes participate in the regulation of the T4 replication cycle by ADP-ribosylating a defined set of host proteins. In order to obtain a better understanding of the phage-host interactions and their consequences for regulating the T4 replication cycle, we studied cloning, overexpression, and characterization of purified ModA and ModB enzymes. Site-directed mutagenesis confirmed that amino acids, as deduced from secondary structure alignments, are indeed decisive for the activity of the enzymes, implying that the transfer reaction follows the Sn1-type reaction scheme proposed for this class of enzymes. In vitro transcription assays performed with Alt- and ModA-modified RNA polymerases demonstrated that the Alt-ribosylated polymerase enhances transcription from T4 early promoters on a T4 DNA template, whereas the transcriptional activity of ModA-modified polymerase, without the participation of T4-encoded auxiliary proteins for middle mode or late transcription, is reduced. The results presented here support the conclusion that ADP-ribosylation of RNA polymerase and of other host proteins allows initial phage-directed mRNA synthesis reactions to escape from host control. In contrast, subsequent modification of the other cellular target proteins limits transcription from phage early genes and participates in redirecting transcription to phage middle and late genes.

  9. Profile of olaparib in the treatment of advanced ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chase, Dana M; Patel, Shreya; Shields, Kristin

    2016-01-01

    Olaparib is a poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor that received accelerated approval from the US Food and Drug Administration as monotherapy for patients with germline BRCA mutations and ovarian cancer treated with three or more prior lines of chemotherapy. This article summarizes the mechanism of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibition, therapeutic profile and uses of olaparib, and current and ongoing literature pertaining to olaparib in advanced ovarian cancer. PMID:27186080

  10. 42 CFR 457.230 - FFP for State ADP expenditures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) STATE CHILDREN'S HEALTH INSURANCE PROGRAMS (SCHIPs) ALLOTMENTS AND GRANTS TO STATES General... ADP expenditures for the design, development, or installation of mechanized claims processing and... procedures regarding the availability of FFP for ADP expenditures are in 45 CFR part 74, 45 CFR part...

  11. Ribose and related sugars from ultraviolet irradiation of interstellar ice analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinert, Cornelia; Myrgorodska, Iuliia; de Marcellus, Pierre; Buhse, Thomas; Nahon, Laurent; Hoffmann, Søren V.; d'Hendecourt, Louis Le Sergeant; Meierhenrich, Uwe J.

    2016-04-01

    Ribose is the central molecular subunit in RNA, but the prebiotic origin of ribose remains unknown. We observed the formation of substantial quantities of ribose and a diversity of structurally related sugar molecules such as arabinose, xylose, and lyxose in the room-temperature organic residues of photo-processed interstellar ice analogs initially composed of H2O, CH3OH, and NH3. Our results suggest that the generation of numerous sugar molecules, including the aldopentose ribose, may be possible from photochemical and thermal treatment of cosmic ices in the late stages of the solar nebula. Our detection of ribose provides plausible insights into the chemical processes that could lead to formation of biologically relevant molecules in suitable planetary environments.

  12. Ribose and related sugars from ultraviolet irradiation of interstellar ice analogs.

    PubMed

    Meinert, Cornelia; Myrgorodska, Iuliia; de Marcellus, Pierre; Buhse, Thomas; Nahon, Laurent; Hoffmann, Søren V; d'Hendecourt, Louis Le Sergeant; Meierhenrich, Uwe J

    2016-04-01

    Ribose is the central molecular subunit in RNA, but the prebiotic origin of ribose remains unknown. We observed the formation of substantial quantities of ribose and a diversity of structurally related sugar molecules such as arabinose, xylose, and lyxose in the room-temperature organic residues of photo-processed interstellar ice analogs initially composed of H2O, CH3OH, and NH3 Our results suggest that the generation of numerous sugar molecules, including the aldopentose ribose, may be possible from photochemical and thermal treatment of cosmic ices in the late stages of the solar nebula. Our detection of ribose provides plausible insights into the chemical processes that could lead to formation of biologically relevant molecules in suitable planetary environments.

  13. Ribose and related sugars from ultraviolet irradiation of interstellar ice analogs.

    PubMed

    Meinert, Cornelia; Myrgorodska, Iuliia; de Marcellus, Pierre; Buhse, Thomas; Nahon, Laurent; Hoffmann, Søren V; d'Hendecourt, Louis Le Sergeant; Meierhenrich, Uwe J

    2016-04-01

    Ribose is the central molecular subunit in RNA, but the prebiotic origin of ribose remains unknown. We observed the formation of substantial quantities of ribose and a diversity of structurally related sugar molecules such as arabinose, xylose, and lyxose in the room-temperature organic residues of photo-processed interstellar ice analogs initially composed of H2O, CH3OH, and NH3 Our results suggest that the generation of numerous sugar molecules, including the aldopentose ribose, may be possible from photochemical and thermal treatment of cosmic ices in the late stages of the solar nebula. Our detection of ribose provides plausible insights into the chemical processes that could lead to formation of biologically relevant molecules in suitable planetary environments. PMID:27124456

  14. RNA Polymerases of Maize: Nuclear RNA Polymerases*

    PubMed Central

    Strain, Gustave C.; Mullinix, Kathleen P.; Bogorad, Lawrence

    1971-01-01

    Two DNA-dependent RNA polymerases of nuclear origin have been purified from leaves of Zea mays. The two enzymes can be separated on DEAE-cellulose columns. Enzymes I and II are eluted with 0.08 and 0.20 M (NH4)2SO4, respectively. Both enzymes prefer maize nuclear DNA as a template; they are also more active in the presence of Mg++ than Mn++ and are inhibited by (NH4)2-SO4 or KCl. Neither enzyme is inhibited by rifamycin SV. Enzyme II is strongly inhibited by α-amanitin, whereas enzyme I is not significantly affected. Their ability to use native and denatured DNA as templates varies according to the extent and method of purification of the polymerase. Furthermore, enzyme II can be resolved by DEAE-chromatography or glycerol-gradient centrifugation into two components, one of which prefers native DNA, while the other prefers denatured DNA. PMID:5288239

  15. The expanding polymerase universe.

    PubMed

    Goodman, M F; Tippin, B

    2000-11-01

    Over the past year, the number of known prokaryotic and eukaryotic DNA polymerases has exploded. Many of these newly discovered enzymes copy aberrant bases in the DNA template over which 'respectable' polymerases fear to tread. The next step is to unravel their functions, which are thought to range from error-prone copying of DNA lesions, somatic hypermutation and avoidance of skin cancer, to restarting stalled replication forks and repairing double-stranded DNA breaks.

  16. Imaging changes in the cytosolic ATP-to-ADP ratio.

    PubMed

    Tantama, Mathew; Yellen, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is a central metabolite that plays fundamental roles as an energy transfer molecule, a phosphate donor, and a signaling molecule inside the cells. The phosphoryl group transfer potential of ATP provides a thermodynamic driving force for many metabolic reactions, and phosphorylation of both small metabolites and large proteins can serve as a regulatory modification. In the process of phosphoryl transfer from ATP, the diphosphate ADP is produced, and as a result, the ATP-to-ADP ratio is an important physiological control parameter. The ATP-to-ADP ratio is directly proportional to cellular energy charge and phosphorylation potential. Furthermore, several ATP-dependent enzymes and signaling proteins are regulated by ADP, and their activation profiles are a function of the ATP-to-ADP ratio. Finally, regeneration of ATP from ADP can serve as an important readout of energy metabolism and mitochondrial function. We, therefore, developed a genetically encoded fluorescent biosensor tuned to sense ATP-to-ADP ratios in the physiological range of healthy mammalian cells. Here, we present a protocol for using this biosensor to visualize energy status using live-cell fluorescence microscopy.

  17. Identification of a new ribose methylation in the 18S rRNA of S. cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun; Sharma, Sunny; Kötter, Peter; Entian, Karl-Dieter

    2015-02-27

    Methylation of ribose sugars at the 2'-OH group is one of the major chemical modifications in rRNA, and is catalyzed by snoRNA directed C/D box snoRNPs. Previous biochemical and computational analyses of the C/D box snoRNAs have identified and mapped a large number of 2'-OH ribose methylations in rRNAs. In the present study, we systematically analyzed ribose methylations of 18S rRNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, using mung bean nuclease protection assay and RP-HPLC. Unexpectedly, we identified a hitherto unknown ribose methylation at position G562 in the helix 18 of 5' central domain of yeast 18S rRNA. Furthermore, we identified snR40 as being responsible to guide snoRNP complex to catalyze G562 ribose methylation, which makes it only second snoRNA known so far to target three ribose methylation sites: Gm562, Gm1271 in 18S rRNA, and Um898 in 25S rRNA. Our sequence and mutational analysis of snR40 revealed that snR40 uses the same D' box and methylation guide sequence for both Gm562 and Gm1271 methylation. With the identification of Gm562 and its corresponding snoRNA, complete set of ribose methylations of 18S rRNA and their corresponding snoRNAs have finally been established opening great prospects to understand the physiological function of these modifications.

  18. Cloning and characterization of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase small subunit gene in Cyperus esculentus (yellow nutsedge).

    PubMed

    Cheng, C; Hu, J; Zhi, Y; Su, J J; Zhang, X K; Huang, B Q

    2015-01-01

    ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (ADPGlcPPase) controls the first committed step of starch synthesis by catalyzing the biosynthesis of ADP-glucose from glucose-phosphate and ATP. It is a tetrameric protein consisting of two small and two large subunits. The small subunits have a catalytic function, while the large subunits regulate the enzyme activity. Cyperus esculentus (yellow nutsedge) is a perennial C4 plant grown from rhizomes and tubers. Previous studies on yellow nutsedge have mostly focused on the morphology and cultivation of tubers, their application in food, and biochemical analyses of the tubers. In this study, the gene encoding the ADPGlcPPase small subunit (CeAGPS) in yellow nutsedge was cloned and characterized. The full-length CeAGPS cDNA sequence contained an 81-bp 5'-untranslated region (UTR), a 188-bp 3'-UTR, and a 1539-bp open reading frame encoding 512-amino acid residues. The genomic sequence of CeAGPS comprises a nine exon-eight intron structure similar to the previously reported cotton and Arabidopsis thaliana AGPS genes. The deduced translation product of the CeAGPS gene contained a well-conserved catalytic domain and regulatory elements typical of plant AGPS. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction amplification of the target gene in various plant parts using gene-specific primers indicated that the expression of CeAGPS was most abundant in the tuber, and relatively lower in nutsedge roots. PMID:26782478

  19. ADP study of the structure of the IUE halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Massa, Derck

    1992-01-01

    Results of a two year ADP study of gas in the Galactic halo are presented. This is partly a summary of 2 papers which were published in referred journals and partly a discussion of work currently underway.

  20. Automated Data Processing (ADP) research and development

    SciTech Connect

    Dowla, F.U.; Kohlhepp, V.N.; Leach, R.R. Jr.

    1995-07-01

    Monitoring a comprehensive test ban treaty (CTBT) will require screening tens of thousands of seismic events each year. Reliable automated data analysis will be essential in keeping up with the continuous stream of events that a global monitoring network will detect. We are developing automated event location and identification algorithms by looking at the gaps and weaknesses in conventional ADP systems and by taking advantage of modem computational paradigms. Our research focus is on three areas: developing robust algorithms for signal feature extraction, integrating the analysis of critical measurements, and exploiting joint estimation techniques such as using data from acoustic, hydroacoustic, and seismic sensors. We identify several important problems for research and development; e.g., event location with approximate velocity models and event identification in the presence of outliers. We are employing both linear and nonlinear methods and advanced signal transform techniques to solve these event monitoring problems. Our goal is to increase event-interpretation throughput by employing the power and efficiency of modem computational techniques, and to improve the reliability of automated analysis by reducing the rates of false alarms and missed detections.

  1. Partial Purification and Characterization of d-Ribose-5-phosphate Reductase from Adonis vernalis L. Leaves

    PubMed Central

    Negm, Fayek B.; Marlow, Gary C.

    1985-01-01

    This study presents evidence for a new enzyme, d-ribose-5-P reductase, which catalyzes the reaction: d-ribose-5-P + NADPH + H+ → d-ribitol-5-P + NADP+. The enzyme was isolated from Adonis vernalis L. leaves in 38% yield and was purified 71-fold. The reductase was NADPH specific and had a pH optimum in the range of 5.5 to 6.0. The Michaelis constant value for d-ribose-5-P reduction was 1.35 millimolar. The enzyme also reduced d-erythrose-4-P, d-erythrose, dl-glyceraldehyde, and the aromatic aldehyde 3-pyridinecarboxaldehyde. Hexoses, hexose phosphates, pentoses, and dihydroxyacetone did not serve as substrates. d-Ribose-5-P reductase is distinct from the other known ribitol synthesizing enzymes detected in bacteria and yeast, and may be responsible for ribitol synthesis in Adonis vernalis. PMID:16664320

  2. The road to survival goes through PARG.

    PubMed

    Koh, David W; Dawson, Valina L; Dawson, Ted M

    2005-03-01

    Unlike poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) has long been a difficult protein to study. However, the complete absence of PARG activity was recently characterized in mice via disruption of the murine PARG gene. As expected, PARG is critical for the maintenance of steady-state poly(ADP-ribose) levels. But surprisingly, the disruption of PARG led to embryonic lethality and increased susceptibility to mild cell stress. Therefore, the protective role of PARG and its involvement in development indicate that these roads to viability go through PARG.

  3. myo-inositol and D-ribose ligand discrimination in an ABC periplasmic binding protein.

    PubMed

    Herrou, Julien; Crosson, Sean

    2013-05-01

    The periplasmic binding protein (PBP) IbpA mediates the uptake of myo-inositol by the IatP-IatA ATP-binding cassette transmembrane transporter. We report a crystal structure of Caulobacter crescentus IbpA bound to myo-inositol at 1.45 Å resolution. This constitutes the first structure of a PBP bound to inositol. IbpA adopts a type I PBP fold consisting of two α-β lobes that surround a central hinge. A pocket positioned between the lobes contains the myo-inositol ligand, which binds with submicromolar affinity (0.76 ± 0.08 μM). IbpA is homologous to ribose-binding proteins and binds D-ribose with low affinity (50.8 ± 3.4 μM). On the basis of IbpA and ribose-binding protein structures, we have designed variants of IbpA with inverted binding specificity for myo-inositol and D-ribose. Five mutations in the ligand-binding pocket are sufficient to increase the affinity of IbpA for D-ribose by 10-fold while completely abolishing binding to myo-inositol. Replacement of ibpA with these mutant alleles unable to bind myo-inositol abolishes C. crescentus growth in medium containing myo-inositol as the sole carbon source. Neither deletion of ibpA nor replacement of ibpA with the high-affinity ribose binding allele affected C. crescentus growth on D-ribose as a carbon source, providing evidence that the IatP-IatA transporter is specific for myo-inositol. This study outlines the evolutionary relationship between ribose- and inositol-binding proteins and provides insight into the molecular basis upon which these two related, but functionally distinct, classes of periplasmic proteins specifically bind carbohydrate ligands.

  4. Ribose 5-Phosphate Isomerase B Knockdown Compromises Trypanosoma brucei Bloodstream Form Infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Loureiro, Inês; Faria, Joana; Clayton, Christine; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra; Santarém, Nuno; Roy, Nilanjan; Cordeiro-da-Siva, Anabela; Tavares, Joana

    2015-01-01

    Ribose 5-phosphate isomerase is an enzyme involved in the non-oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway, and catalyzes the inter-conversion of D-ribose 5-phosphate and D-ribulose 5-phosphate. Trypanosomatids, including the agent of African sleeping sickness namely Trypanosoma brucei, have a type B ribose-5-phosphate isomerase. This enzyme is absent from humans, which have a structurally unrelated ribose 5-phosphate isomerase type A, and therefore has been proposed as an attractive drug target waiting further characterization. In this study, Trypanosoma brucei ribose 5-phosphate isomerase B showed in vitro isomerase activity. RNAi against this enzyme reduced parasites' in vitro growth, and more importantly, bloodstream forms infectivity. Mice infected with induced RNAi clones exhibited lower parasitaemia and a prolonged survival compared to control mice. Phenotypic reversion was achieved by complementing induced RNAi clones with an ectopic copy of Trypanosoma cruzi gene. Our results present the first functional characterization of Trypanosoma brucei ribose 5-phosphate isomerase B, and show the relevance of an enzyme belonging to the non-oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway in the context of Trypanosoma brucei infection. PMID:25568941

  5. Ribose 5-phosphate isomerase B knockdown compromises Trypanosoma brucei bloodstream form infectivity.

    PubMed

    Loureiro, Inês; Faria, Joana; Clayton, Christine; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra; Santarém, Nuno; Roy, Nilanjan; Cordeiro-da-Siva, Anabela; Tavares, Joana

    2015-01-01

    Ribose 5-phosphate isomerase is an enzyme involved in the non-oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway, and catalyzes the inter-conversion of D-ribose 5-phosphate and D-ribulose 5-phosphate. Trypanosomatids, including the agent of African sleeping sickness namely Trypanosoma brucei, have a type B ribose-5-phosphate isomerase. This enzyme is absent from humans, which have a structurally unrelated ribose 5-phosphate isomerase type A, and therefore has been proposed as an attractive drug target waiting further characterization. In this study, Trypanosoma brucei ribose 5-phosphate isomerase B showed in vitro isomerase activity. RNAi against this enzyme reduced parasites' in vitro growth, and more importantly, bloodstream forms infectivity. Mice infected with induced RNAi clones exhibited lower parasitaemia and a prolonged survival compared to control mice. Phenotypic reversion was achieved by complementing induced RNAi clones with an ectopic copy of Trypanosoma cruzi gene. Our results present the first functional characterization of Trypanosoma brucei ribose 5-phosphate isomerase B, and show the relevance of an enzyme belonging to the non-oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway in the context of Trypanosoma brucei infection. PMID:25568941

  6. Ribose 5-phosphate isomerase B knockdown compromises Trypanosoma brucei bloodstream form infectivity.

    PubMed

    Loureiro, Inês; Faria, Joana; Clayton, Christine; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra; Santarém, Nuno; Roy, Nilanjan; Cordeiro-da-Siva, Anabela; Tavares, Joana

    2015-01-01

    Ribose 5-phosphate isomerase is an enzyme involved in the non-oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway, and catalyzes the inter-conversion of D-ribose 5-phosphate and D-ribulose 5-phosphate. Trypanosomatids, including the agent of African sleeping sickness namely Trypanosoma brucei, have a type B ribose-5-phosphate isomerase. This enzyme is absent from humans, which have a structurally unrelated ribose 5-phosphate isomerase type A, and therefore has been proposed as an attractive drug target waiting further characterization. In this study, Trypanosoma brucei ribose 5-phosphate isomerase B showed in vitro isomerase activity. RNAi against this enzyme reduced parasites' in vitro growth, and more importantly, bloodstream forms infectivity. Mice infected with induced RNAi clones exhibited lower parasitaemia and a prolonged survival compared to control mice. Phenotypic reversion was achieved by complementing induced RNAi clones with an ectopic copy of Trypanosoma cruzi gene. Our results present the first functional characterization of Trypanosoma brucei ribose 5-phosphate isomerase B, and show the relevance of an enzyme belonging to the non-oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway in the context of Trypanosoma brucei infection.

  7. Cloning and characterization of the l-ribose isomerase gene from Cellulomonas parahominis MB426.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Kenji; Terami, Yuji; Maeda, Yu-ichiro; Yoshihara, Akihide; Takata, Goro; Izumori, Ken

    2013-04-01

    A newly isolated bacterium, Cellulomonas parahominis MB426, produced l-ribose isomerase (CeLRI) on a medium containing l-ribose as a sole carbon source. A 32 kDa protein isomerizing l-ribose to l-ribulose was purified to homogeneity from this bacterium. A set of degenerated primers were synthesized based on amino acid sequences of the purified CeLRI, and a 747 bp gene encoding CeLRI was cloned, sequenced and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. This gene encoded a 249 amino acid protein with a calculated molecular mass of 27,435. The deduced amino acid sequence of this gene showed the highest identity with l-ribose isomerase from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus DL-28 (71%). The recombinant l-ribose isomerase (rCeLRI) was optimally active at pH 9.0 and 40°C, and was stable up to 40°C for 1 h and not dependent for metallic ions for its activity. The rCeLRI showed widely substrate specificity for the rare sugar which involved l-erythro form such as l-ribose, d-lyxose, d-talose, d-mannose, l-gulose, and l-allose.

  8. Biochemical preparation of L-ribose and L-arabinose from ribitol: a new approach.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Z; Shimonishi, T; Bhuiyan, S H; Utamura, M; Takada, G; Izumori, K

    1999-01-01

    L-ribose and L-arabinose were prepared biochemically from ribitol via a two-step reaction, by which the complete oxidation of ribitol to L-ribulose (approximately 98%) was achieved by the reaction of washed cells of Acetobacter aceti IFO 3281. The produced L-ribulose was then used as a substrate for the production of L-ribose and L-arabinose. The isomerization of L-ribulose to L-ribose and L-arabinose was carried out using L-ribose isomerase (L-RI) of Acinetobacter sp. strain DL-28 and L-arabinose isomerase (L-AI) of Mycobacterium smegmatis, respectively. At equilibrium, the ratio of L-ribose: L-ribulose was 70:30 and that of L-arabinose: L-ribulose was 90: 10. After a simple purification treatment, both pentoses could be crystallized without the use of column chromatography. The crystals were confirmed as L-ribose and L-arabinose by High-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), Infrared (IR), Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and optical rotation measurements.

  9. Polymerase chain reaction system

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Richards, James B.; Stratton, Paul L.; Hadley, Dean R.; Milanovich, Fred P.; Belgrader, Phil; Meyer, Peter L.

    2004-03-02

    A portable polymerase chain reaction DNA amplification and detection system includes one or more chamber modules. Each module supports a duplex assay of a biological sample. Each module has two parallel interrogation ports with a linear optical system. The system is capable of being handheld.

  10. Hyperthermal (1-100 eV) nitrogen ion scattering damage to D-ribose and 2-deoxy-D-ribose films.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zongwu; Bald, Ilko; Illenberger, Eugen; Huels, Michael A

    2007-10-14

    Highly charged heavy ion traversal of a biological medium can produce energetic secondary fragment ions. These fragment ions can in turn cause collisional and reactive scattering damage to DNA. Here we report hyperthermal (1-100 eV) scattering of one such fragment ion (N(+)) from biologically relevant sugar molecules D-ribose and 2-deoxy-D-ribose condensed on polycrystalline Pt substrate. The results indicate that N(+) ion scattering at kinetic energies down to 10 eV induces effective decomposition of both sugar molecules and leads to the desorption of abundant cation and anion fragments. Use of isotope-labeled molecules (5-(13)C D-ribose and 1-D D-ribose) partly reveals some site specificity of the fragment origin. Several scattering reactions are also observed. Both ionic and neutral nitrogen atoms abstract carbon from the molecules to form CN(-) anion at energies down to approximately 5 eV. N(+) ions also abstract hydrogen from hydroxyl groups of the molecules to form NH(-) and NH(2) (-) anions. A fraction of OO(-) fragments abstract hydrogen to form OH(-). The formation of H(3)O(+) ions also involves hydrogen abstraction as well as intramolecular proton transfer. These findings suggest a variety of severe damaging pathways to DNA molecules which occur on the picosecond time scale following heavy ion irradiation of a cell, and prior to the late diffusion-limited homogeneous chemical processes.

  11. Hyperthermal (1-100 eV) nitrogen ion scattering damage to D-ribose and 2-deoxy-D-ribose films.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zongwu; Bald, Ilko; Illenberger, Eugen; Huels, Michael A

    2007-10-14

    Highly charged heavy ion traversal of a biological medium can produce energetic secondary fragment ions. These fragment ions can in turn cause collisional and reactive scattering damage to DNA. Here we report hyperthermal (1-100 eV) scattering of one such fragment ion (N(+)) from biologically relevant sugar molecules D-ribose and 2-deoxy-D-ribose condensed on polycrystalline Pt substrate. The results indicate that N(+) ion scattering at kinetic energies down to 10 eV induces effective decomposition of both sugar molecules and leads to the desorption of abundant cation and anion fragments. Use of isotope-labeled molecules (5-(13)C D-ribose and 1-D D-ribose) partly reveals some site specificity of the fragment origin. Several scattering reactions are also observed. Both ionic and neutral nitrogen atoms abstract carbon from the molecules to form CN(-) anion at energies down to approximately 5 eV. N(+) ions also abstract hydrogen from hydroxyl groups of the molecules to form NH(-) and NH(2) (-) anions. A fraction of OO(-) fragments abstract hydrogen to form OH(-). The formation of H(3)O(+) ions also involves hydrogen abstraction as well as intramolecular proton transfer. These findings suggest a variety of severe damaging pathways to DNA molecules which occur on the picosecond time scale following heavy ion irradiation of a cell, and prior to the late diffusion-limited homogeneous chemical processes. PMID:17935431

  12. Identification of a new ribose methylation in the 18S rRNA of S. cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jun; Sharma, Sunny; Kötter, Peter; Entian, Karl-Dieter

    2015-01-01

    Methylation of ribose sugars at the 2′-OH group is one of the major chemical modifications in rRNA, and is catalyzed by snoRNA directed C/D box snoRNPs. Previous biochemical and computational analyses of the C/D box snoRNAs have identified and mapped a large number of 2′-OH ribose methylations in rRNAs. In the present study, we systematically analyzed ribose methylations of 18S rRNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, using mung bean nuclease protection assay and RP-HPLC. Unexpectedly, we identified a hitherto unknown ribose methylation at position G562 in the helix 18 of 5′ central domain of yeast 18S rRNA. Furthermore, we identified snR40 as being responsible to guide snoRNP complex to catalyze G562 ribose methylation, which makes it only second snoRNA known so far to target three ribose methylation sites: Gm562, Gm1271 in 18S rRNA, and Um898 in 25S rRNA. Our sequence and mutational analysis of snR40 revealed that snR40 uses the same D′ box and methylation guide sequence for both Gm562 and Gm1271 methylation. With the identification of Gm562 and its corresponding snoRNA, complete set of ribose methylations of 18S rRNA and their corresponding snoRNAs have finally been established opening great prospects to understand the physiological function of these modifications. PMID:25653162

  13. Role of D-ribose as a cometabolite in D-xylose metabolism by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    van Zyl, C; Prior, B A; Kilian, S G; Brandt, E V

    1993-01-01

    The influence of D-ribose as a cosubstrate on the uptake and metabolism of the non-growth substrate D-xylose by Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATCC 26602 was investigated. Xylose was taken up by means of low- and high-affinity glucose transport systems. In cells exposed for 2 days to a mixture of xylose and ribose, only the high-affinity system could be detected. Glucose strongly inhibited the transport of xylose by both systems. Starvation or exposure to either xylose or ribose resulted in inactivation of xylose transport, which did not occur in the presence of a mixture of ribose and xylose. A constitutive non-glucose-repressible NADPH2-dependent xylose reductase with a specific activity of ca. 5 mU/mg of protein that converted xylose to xylitol was present in a glucose-grown culture. No activity converting xylitol to xylulose or vice versa was found in crude extracts. Both xylose and ribose were converted to their corresponding polyols, xylitol and ribitol, as indicated by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. Furthermore, ethanol was detected, and this implied that pathways for the complete catabolism of xylose and ribose exist. However, the NADPH2 required for the conversion of xylose to xylitol is apparently not supplied by the pentose phosphate pathway since the ethanol produced from D-[1-13C]xylose was labelled only in the C-2 position. Acetic acid was produced from ribose and may assist in the conversion of xylose to xylitol by cycling NADPH2. PMID:8517743

  14. ADP1 affects plant architecture by regulating local auxin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Ruixi; Li, Jieru; Li, Shibai; Qin, Genji; Novák, Ondřej; Pěnčík, Aleš; Ljung, Karin; Aoyama, Takashi; Liu, Jingjing; Murphy, Angus; Gu, Hongya; Tsuge, Tomohiko; Qu, Li-Jia

    2014-01-01

    Plant architecture is one of the key factors that affect plant survival and productivity. Plant body structure is established through the iterative initiation and outgrowth of lateral organs, which are derived from the shoot apical meristem and root apical meristem, after embryogenesis. Here we report that ADP1, a putative MATE (multidrug and toxic compound extrusion) transporter, plays an essential role in regulating lateral organ outgrowth, and thus in maintaining normal architecture of Arabidopsis. Elevated expression levels of ADP1 resulted in accelerated plant growth rate, and increased the numbers of axillary branches and flowers. Our molecular and genetic evidence demonstrated that the phenotypes of plants over-expressing ADP1 were caused by reduction of local auxin levels in the meristematic regions. We further discovered that this reduction was probably due to decreased levels of auxin biosynthesis in the local meristematic regions based on the measured reduction in IAA levels and the gene expression data. Simultaneous inactivation of ADP1 and its three closest homologs led to growth retardation, relative reduction of lateral organ number and slightly elevated auxin level. Our results indicated that ADP1-mediated regulation of the local auxin level in meristematic regions is an essential determinant for plant architecture maintenance by restraining the outgrowth of lateral organs. PMID:24391508

  15. Force-producing ADP state of myosin bound to actin

    PubMed Central

    Wulf, Sarah F.; Ropars, Virginie; Fujita-Becker, Setsuko; Oster, Marco; Hofhaus, Goetz; Trabuco, Leonardo G.; Pylypenko, Olena; Sweeney, H. Lee; Houdusse, Anne M.; Schröder, Rasmus R.

    2016-01-01

    Molecular motors produce force when they interact with their cellular tracks. For myosin motors, the primary force-generating state has MgADP tightly bound, whereas myosin is strongly bound to actin. We have generated an 8-Å cryoEM reconstruction of this state for myosin V and used molecular dynamics flexed fitting for model building. We compare this state to the subsequent state on actin (Rigor). The ADP-bound structure reveals that the actin-binding cleft is closed, even though MgADP is tightly bound. This state is accomplished by a previously unseen conformation of the β-sheet underlying the nucleotide pocket. The transition from the force-generating ADP state to Rigor requires a 9.5° rotation of the myosin lever arm, coupled to a β-sheet rearrangement. Thus, the structure reveals the detailed rearrangements underlying myosin force generation as well as the basis of strain-dependent ADP release that is essential for processive myosins, such as myosin V. PMID:26976594

  16. Nicotinic Acid Adenine Dinucleotide Phosphate (NAADP) and Cyclic ADP-Ribose (cADPR) Mediate Ca2+ Signaling in Cardiac Hypertrophy Induced by β-Adrenergic Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Shawl, Asif Iqbal; Im, Soo-Yeul; Nam, Tae-Sik; Lee, Sun-Hwa; Ko, Jae-Ki; Jang, Kyu Yoon; Kim, Donghee; Kim, Uh-Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Ca2+ signaling plays a fundamental role in cardiac hypertrophic remodeling, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. We investigated the role of Ca2+-mobilizing second messengers, NAADP and cADPR, in the cardiac hypertrophy induced by β-adrenergic stimulation by isoproterenol. Isoproterenol induced an initial Ca2+ transients followed by sustained Ca2+ rises. Inhibition of the cADPR pathway with 8-Br-cADPR abolished only the sustained Ca2+ increase, whereas inhibition of the NAADP pathway with bafilomycin-A1 abolished both rapid and sustained phases of the isoproterenol-mediated signal, indicating that the Ca2+ signal is mediated by a sequential action of NAADP and cADPR. The sequential production of NAADP and cADPR was confirmed biochemically. The isoproterenol-mediated Ca2+ increase and cADPR production, but not NAADP production, were markedly reduced in cardiomyocytes obtained from CD38 knockout mice. CD38 knockout mice were rescued from chronic isoproterenol infusion-induced myocardial hypertrophy, interstitial fibrosis, and decrease in fractional shortening and ejection fraction. Thus, our findings indicate that β-adrenergic stimulation contributes to the development of maladaptive cardiac hypertrophy via Ca2+ signaling mediated by NAADP-synthesizing enzyme and CD38 that produce NAADP and cADPR, respectively. PMID:26959359

  17. Nucleotide sequence and chromosomal localization of the gene for pierisin-1, a DNA ADP-ribosylating protein, in the cabbage butterfly Pieris rapae.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Masafumi; Takahashi-Nakaguchi, Azusa; Matsushima-Hibiya, Yuko; Nakano, Tsuyoshi; Totsuka, Yukari; Imanishi, Shigeo; Mitsuhashi, Jun; Watanabe, Masahiko; Nakagama, Hitoshi; Sugimura, Takashi; Wakabayashi, Keiji

    2011-10-01

    Cabbage butterfly, Pieris rapae, contains a unique DNA ADP-ribosylating protein, pierisin-1, which transfers ADP-ribose moiety of NAD to guanine bases of DNA. Pierisin-like proteins are only distributed in subtribes Pierina, Aporiina and Appiadina of the family Pieridae. In this study, we obtained genomic clones carrying the pierisin-1 gene from adult samples of P. rapae by plaque hybridization. The pierisin-1 gene was found to consist of two exons, 0.1-kb exon 1 and 3.9-kb exon 2, and a 2.3-kb intron. In addition, we could demonstrate that the putative promoter in the about 3-kb upstream region from the transcription start site of the gene include a transcriptional activating motif involved in immune pathways and hormonal regulation. We also examined chromosomal localization of the pierisin-1 gene. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis using Cy3-labeled pierisin-1 genomic clone demonstrated the localization of the gene near the kinetochore in chromosome 9. Thus, we confirmed that the pierisin-1 gene is located in the genome of P. rapae.

  18. Novel substrates of a ribose-5-phosphate isomerase from Clostridium thermocellum.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Ran-Young; Yeom, Soo-Jin; Kim, Hye-Jung; Oh, Deok-Kun

    2009-01-01

    A substrate specificity study of the recombinant D-ribose-5-phosphate isomerase (RpiB) from Clostridium thermocellum was performed. Among all aldopentoses and aldohexoses, the RpiB enzyme displayed activity with L-talose, D-ribose, D-allose, L-allose, L-ribose, and D-talose in decreasing order. The products released were L-tagatose, D-ribulose, D-psicose, L-psicose, L-ribulose, and D-tagatose, respectively. The enzyme showed specificity for aldose substrates possessing hydroxyl groups oriented in the same direction at the C2, C3, and C4 positions. Molecular modeling of the enzyme suggests that the novel substrate specificity may be explained by substrate interactions with residues Tyr42, His98, and His9, which interact with the hydroxyl groups of C2, C3, and C4, respectively, oriented in the same direction. L-Talose and D-ribulose exhibited the highest activity among the aldoses and ketoses, respectively. Ribose 5-phosphate isomerase catalyzed the conversion of L-talose to L-tagatose with an 89% conversion yield after approximately 90 min, while D-ribulose was converted to D-ribose with a 38% conversion yield.

  19. The structure of an archaeal ribose-5-phosphate isomerase from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii (MJ1603).

    PubMed

    Strange, Richard W; Antonyuk, Svetlana V; Ellis, Mark J; Bessho, Yoshitaka; Kuramitsu, Seiki; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Hasnain, S Samar

    2009-12-01

    Ribose-5-phosphate isomerase is a ubiquitous intracellular enzyme of bacterial, plant and animal origin that is involved in the pentose phosphate cycle, an essential component of cellular carbohydrate metabolism. Specifically, the enzyme catalyses the reversible conversion of ribose 5-phosphate to ribulose 5-phosphate. The structure of ribose-5-phosphate isomerase from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii has been solved in space group P2(1) to 1.78 A resolution using molecular replacement with one homotetramer in the asymmetric unit and refined to an R factor of 14.8%. The active site in each subunit was occupied by two molecules of propylene glycol in different orientations, one of which corresponds to the location of the phosphate moiety and the other to the location of the furanose ring of the inhibitor.

  20. Temporal assessment of ribose treatment on self-assembled articular cartilage constructs

    PubMed Central

    Eleswarapu, Sriram V.; Chen, Justin A.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2011-01-01

    Articular cartilage cannot repair itself in response to degradation from injury or osteoarthritis. As such, there is a substantial clinical need for replacements of damaged cartilage. Tissue engineering aims to fulfill this need by developing replacement tissues in vitro. A major goal of cartilage tissue engineering is to produce tissues with robust biochemical and biomechanical properties. One technique that has been proposed to improve these properties in engineered tissue is the use of non-enzymatic glycation to induce collagen crosslinking, an attractive solution that may avoid the risks of cytotoxicity posed by conventional crosslinking agents such as glutaraldehyde. The objectives of this study were 1) to determine whether continuous application of ribose would enhance biochemical and biomechanical properties of self-assembled articular cartilage constructs, and 2) to identify an optimal time window for continuous ribose treatment. Self-assembled constructs were grown for 4 weeks using a previously established method and were subjected to continuous 7-day treatment with 30 mM ribose during culture weeks 1, 2, 3, or 4, or for the entire 4-week culture. Control constructs were grown in parallel, and all groups were evaluated for gross morphology, histology, cellularity, collagen and sulfated glycosaminoglycan (GAG) content, and compressive and tensile mechanical properties. Compared to control constructs, it was found that treatment with ribose during week 2 and for the entire duration of culture resulted in significant 62% and 40% increases in compressive stiffness, respectively; significant 66% and 44% increases in tensile stiffness; and significant 50% and 126% increases in tensile strength. Similar statistically significant trends were observed for collagen and GAG. In contrast, constructs treated with ribose during week 1 had poorer biochemical and biomechanical properties, although they were significantly larger and more cellular than all other groups. We

  1. Concerted Proton Transfer Mechanism of Clostridium thermocellum Ribose-5-phosphate Isomerase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Yang, Weitao

    2013-01-01

    Ribose-5-phosphate isomerase (Rpi) catalyzes the interconversion of D-ribose-5-phosphate and D-ribulose-5-phosphate and plays an essential role in the pentose phosphate pathway and the Calvin cycle of photosynthesis. RpiB, one of the two isoforms of Rpi, is also a potential drug target for some pathogenic bacteria. Clostridium thermocellum ribose-5-phosphate isomerase (CtRpi), belonging to RpiB family, has recently been employed to the industrial production of rare sugars because of it fast reactions kinetics and narrow substrate specificity. It is known this enzyme adopts proton transfer mechanism. It was suggested that the deprotonated Cys65 attracts the proton at C2 of substrate to initiate the isomerization reaction and this step is the rate-limiting step. However the elaborate catalytic mechanism is still unclear. We have performed quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical simulations of this rate-limiting step of the reaction catalyzed by CtRpi with the substrate D-ribose. Our results demonstrate that the deprotonated Cys65 is not a stable reactant. Instead, our calculations revealed a concerted proton-transfer mechanism: Asp8, a highly conserved residue in the RpiB family performs as the base to abstract the proton at Cys65 and Cys65 in turn abstracts the proton of the D-ribose simultaneously. Moreover, we found Thr67 cannot catalyze the proton transfer from O2 to O1 of the D-ribose alone. Water molecule(s) may assist this proton transfer with Thr67. Our findings lead to a clear understanding of the catalysis mechanism of RpiB family and should guide the experiments to increase the catalysis efficiency. This study also highlights the importance of initial protonation states of cysteines. PMID:23875675

  2. Concerted proton transfer mechanism of Clostridium thermocellum ribose-5-phosphate isomerase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jun; Yang, Weitao

    2013-08-15

    Ribose-5-phosphate isomerase (Rpi) catalyzes the interconversion of D-ribose-5-phosphate and D-ribulose-5-phosphate and plays an essential role in the pentose phosphate pathway and the Calvin cycle of photosynthesis. RpiB, one of the two isoforms of Rpi, is also a potential drug target for some pathogenic bacteria. Clostridium thermocellum ribose-5-phosphate isomerase (CtRpi), belonging to the RpiB family, has recently been employed in the industrial production of rare sugars because of its fast reaction kinetics and narrow substrate specificity. It is known that this enzyme adopts a proton transfer mechanism. It was suggested that the deprotonated Cys65 attracts the proton at C2 of the substrate to initiate the isomerization reaction, and this step is the rate-limiting step. However the elaborate catalytic mechanism is still unclear. We have performed quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical simulations of this rate-limiting step of the reaction catalyzed by CtRpi with the substrate D-ribose. Our results demonstrate that the deprotonated Cys65 is not a stable reactant. Instead, our calculations revealed a concerted proton-transfer mechanism: Asp8, a highly conserved residue in the RpiB family, performs as the base to abstract the proton at Cys65 and Cys65 in turn abstracting the proton of the D-ribose simultaneously. Moreover, we found Thr67 cannot catalyze the proton transfer from O2 to O1 of the D-ribose alone. Water molecule(s) may assist this proton transfer with Thr67. Our findings lead to a clear understanding of the catalysis mechanism of the RpiB family and should guide experiments to increase the catalysis efficiency. This study also highlights the importance of initial protonation states of cysteines.

  3. Impact of Dabigatran versus Phenprocoumon on ADP Induced Platelet Aggregation in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation with or without Concomitant Clopidogrel Therapy (the Dabi-ADP-1 and Dabi-ADP-2 Trials)

    PubMed Central

    Martischnig, Amadea M.; Mehilli, Julinda; Pollak, Janina; Petzold, Tobias; Fiedler, Anette K.; Mayer, Katharina; Schulz-Schüpke, Stefanie; Sibbing, Dirk; Massberg, Steffen; Kastrati, Adnan; Sarafoff, Nikolaus

    2015-01-01

    Background. A relevant number of patients receive triple therapy with clopidogrel, aspirin, and oral anticoagulation. Clopidogrel's efficacy on ADP induced platelet function may be influenced by concomitant antithrombotic therapies. Data regarding the effect of dabigatran on platelet function is limited to in vitro studies and healthy individuals. Methods. The “Dabi-ADP-1” and “Dabi-ADP-2” trials randomized patients with atrial fibrillation to either dabigatran or phenprocoumon for a 2-week period. In Dabi-ADP-1 (n = 70) patients with clopidogrel therapy were excluded and in Dabi-ADP-2 (n = 46) patients had to be treated concomitantly with clopidogrel. The primary endpoint was ADP-induced platelet aggregation between dabigatran and phenprocoumon at 14 days. Secondary endpoints were ADPtest HS-, TRAP-, and COL-induced platelet aggregation. Results. There was no significant difference regarding the primary endpoint between both groups in either trial (Dabi-ADP-1: Dabigatran: 846 [650–983] AU × min versus phenprocoumon: 839 [666–1039] AU × min, P = 0.90 and Dabi-ADP-2: 326 [268–462] versus 350 [214–535], P = 0.70) or regarding the secondary endpoints, ADPtest HS-, TRAP-, and COL-induced platelet aggregation. Conclusion. Dabigatran as compared to phenprocoumon has no impact on ADP-induced platelet aggregation in atrial fibrillation patients neither with nor without concomitant clopidogrel therapy. PMID:26229963

  4. Error Rate Comparison during Polymerase Chain Reaction by DNA Polymerase

    DOE PAGES

    McInerney, Peter; Adams, Paul; Hadi, Masood Z.

    2014-01-01

    As larger-scale cloning projects become more prevalent, there is an increasing need for comparisons among high fidelity DNA polymerases used for PCR amplification. All polymerases marketed for PCR applications are tested for fidelity properties (i.e., error rate determination) by vendors, and numerous literature reports have addressed PCR enzyme fidelity. Nonetheless, it is often difficult to make direct comparisons among different enzymes due to numerous methodological and analytical differences from study to study. We have measured the error rates for 6 DNA polymerases commonly used in PCR applications, including 3 polymerases typically used for cloning applications requiring high fidelity. Errormore » rate measurement values reported here were obtained by direct sequencing of cloned PCR products. The strategy employed here allows interrogation of error rate across a very large DNA sequence space, since 94 unique DNA targets were used as templates for PCR cloning. The six enzymes included in the study, Taq polymerase, AccuPrime-Taq High Fidelity, KOD Hot Start, cloned Pfu polymerase, Phusion Hot Start, and Pwo polymerase, we find the lowest error rates with Pfu , Phusion, and Pwo polymerases. Error rates are comparable for these 3 enzymes and are >10x lower than the error rate observed with Taq polymerase. Mutation spectra are reported, with the 3 high fidelity enzymes displaying broadly similar types of mutations. For these enzymes, transition mutations predominate, with little bias observed for type of transition.« less

  5. Error Rate Comparison during Polymerase Chain Reaction by DNA Polymerase.

    PubMed

    McInerney, Peter; Adams, Paul; Hadi, Masood Z

    2014-01-01

    As larger-scale cloning projects become more prevalent, there is an increasing need for comparisons among high fidelity DNA polymerases used for PCR amplification. All polymerases marketed for PCR applications are tested for fidelity properties (i.e., error rate determination) by vendors, and numerous literature reports have addressed PCR enzyme fidelity. Nonetheless, it is often difficult to make direct comparisons among different enzymes due to numerous methodological and analytical differences from study to study. We have measured the error rates for 6 DNA polymerases commonly used in PCR applications, including 3 polymerases typically used for cloning applications requiring high fidelity. Error rate measurement values reported here were obtained by direct sequencing of cloned PCR products. The strategy employed here allows interrogation of error rate across a very large DNA sequence space, since 94 unique DNA targets were used as templates for PCR cloning. The six enzymes included in the study, Taq polymerase, AccuPrime-Taq High Fidelity, KOD Hot Start, cloned Pfu polymerase, Phusion Hot Start, and Pwo polymerase, we find the lowest error rates with Pfu, Phusion, and Pwo polymerases. Error rates are comparable for these 3 enzymes and are >10x lower than the error rate observed with Taq polymerase. Mutation spectra are reported, with the 3 high fidelity enzymes displaying broadly similar types of mutations. For these enzymes, transition mutations predominate, with little bias observed for type of transition. PMID:25197572

  6. Hyperthermal (1-100 eV) nitrogen ion scattering damage to D-ribose and 2-deoxy-D-ribose films

    SciTech Connect

    Deng Zongwu; Bald, Ilko; Illenberger, Eugen; Huels, Michael A.

    2007-10-14

    Highly charged heavy ion traversal of a biological medium can produce energetic secondary fragment ions. These fragment ions can in turn cause collisional and reactive scattering damage to DNA. Here we report hyperthermal (1-100 eV) scattering of one such fragment ion (N{sup +}) from biologically relevant sugar molecules D-ribose and 2-deoxy-D-ribose condensed on polycrystalline Pt substrate. The results indicate that N{sup +} ion scattering at kinetic energies down to 10 eV induces effective decomposition of both sugar molecules and leads to the desorption of abundant cation and anion fragments. Use of isotope-labeled molecules (5-{sup 13}C D-ribose and 1-D D-ribose) partly reveals some site specificity of the fragment origin. Several scattering reactions are also observed. Both ionic and neutral nitrogen atoms abstract carbon from the molecules to form CN{sup -} anion at energies down to {approx}5 eV. N{sup +} ions also abstract hydrogen from hydroxyl groups of the molecules to form NH{sup -} and NH{sub 2}{sup -} anions. A fraction of O/O{sup -} fragments abstract hydrogen to form OH{sup -}. The formation of H{sub 3}O{sup +} ions also involves hydrogen abstraction as well as intramolecular proton transfer. These findings suggest a variety of severe damaging pathways to DNA molecules which occur on the picosecond time scale following heavy ion irradiation of a cell, and prior to the late diffusion-limited homogeneous chemical processes.

  7. Crystal structure of potato tuber ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xiangshu; Ballicora, Miguel A; Preiss, Jack; Geiger, James H

    2005-01-01

    ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase catalyzes the first committed and rate-limiting step in starch biosynthesis in plants and glycogen biosynthesis in bacteria. It is the enzymatic site for regulation of storage polysaccharide accumulation in plants and bacteria, being allosterically activated or inhibited by metabolites of energy flux. We report the first atomic resolution structure of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase. Crystals of potato tuber ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase α subunit were grown in high concentrations of sulfate, resulting in the sulfate-bound, allosterically inhibited form of the enzyme. The N-terminal catalytic domain resembles a dinucleotide-binding Rossmann fold and the C-terminal domain adopts a left-handed parallel β helix that is involved in cooperative allosteric regulation and a unique oligomerization. We also report structures of the enzyme in complex with ATP and ADP-glucose. Communication between the regulator-binding sites and the active site is both subtle and complex and involves several distinct regions of the enzyme including the N-terminus, the glucose-1-phosphate-binding site, and the ATP-binding site. These structures provide insights into the mechanism for catalysis and allosteric regulation of the enzyme. PMID:15692569

  8. 7 CFR 272.10 - ADP/CIS Model Plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false ADP/CIS Model Plan. 272.10 Section 272.10 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) FOOD AND NUTRITION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE... other State agencies that have similar characteristics such as whether they are urban or rural,...

  9. ADP correspondence system: Unsolicited proposal evaluation tracking application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, W. A.; Goodwin, D. J.

    1976-01-01

    A complete description of a correspondence control system, designed to be used by non-ADP clerical personnel is provided. In addition to operating instructions, sufficient design and conceptual information is provided to allow use or adaption of the system in related applications. The complete COBOL program and documentation are available.

  10. Crystal structure of potato tuber ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiangshu; Ballicora, Miguel A; Preiss, Jack; Geiger, James H

    2005-02-23

    ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase catalyzes the first committed and rate-limiting step in starch biosynthesis in plants and glycogen biosynthesis in bacteria. It is the enzymatic site for regulation of storage polysaccharide accumulation in plants and bacteria, being allosterically activated or inhibited by metabolites of energy flux. We report the first atomic resolution structure of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase. Crystals of potato tuber ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase alpha subunit were grown in high concentrations of sulfate, resulting in the sulfate-bound, allosterically inhibited form of the enzyme. The N-terminal catalytic domain resembles a dinucleotide-binding Rossmann fold and the C-terminal domain adopts a left-handed parallel beta helix that is involved in cooperative allosteric regulation and a unique oligomerization. We also report structures of the enzyme in complex with ATP and ADP-glucose. Communication between the regulator-binding sites and the active site is both subtle and complex and involves several distinct regions of the enzyme including the N-terminus, the glucose-1-phosphate-binding site, and the ATP-binding site. These structures provide insights into the mechanism for catalysis and allosteric regulation of the enzyme.

  11. Abiogenic Photophosphorylation of ADP to ATP Sensitized by Flavoproteinoid Microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolesnikov, Michael P.; Telegina, Taisiya A.; Lyudnikova, Tamara A.; Kritsky, Mikhail S.

    2008-06-01

    A model for abiogenic photophosphorylation of ADP by orthophosphate to yield ATP was studied. The model is based on the photochemical activity of flavoproteinoid microspheres that are formed by aggregation in an aqueous medium of products of thermal condensation of a glutamic acid, glycine and lysine mixture (8:3:1) and contain, along with amino acid polymers (proteinoids), abiogenic isoalloxazine (flavin) pigments. Irradiation of aqueous suspensions of microspheres with blue visible light or ultraviolet in the presence of ADP and orthophosphate resulted in ATP formation. The yield of ATP in aerated suspensions was 10 20% per one mol of starting ADP. Deaeration reduced the photophosphorylating activity of microspheres five to 10 times. Treatment of aerated microsphere suspensions with superoxide dismutase during irradiation partially suppressed ATP formation. Deaerated microspheres restored completely their photophosphorylating activity after addition of hydrogen peroxide to the suspension. The photophosphorylating activity of deaerated suspensions of flavoproteinoid microspheres was also recovered by introduction of Fe3+-cytochrome c, an electron acceptor alternative to oxygen. On the basis of the results obtained, a chemical mechanism of phosphorylation is proposed in which the free radical form of reduced flavin sensitizer left( {{text{FlH}}^ bullet } right) and ADP are involved.

  12. American Diploma Project (ADP) End-of-Course Exams: 2010 Annual Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Achieve, Inc., 2010

    2010-01-01

    To assess the raised expectations of college and career readiness for all students, a group of American Diploma Project (ADP) Network states formed the ADP Assessment Consortium in 2005. The Consortium created Algebra I and II end-of-course exams, based in large part on Achieve's ADP mathematics benchmarks, which would provide an honest assessment…

  13. Involvement of PARP1 in the regulation of alternative splicing

    PubMed Central

    Matveeva, Elena; Maiorano, John; Zhang, Qingyang; Eteleeb, Abdallah M; Convertini, Paolo; Chen, Jing; Infantino, Vittoria; Stamm, Stefan; Wang, Jiping; Rouchka, Eric C; Fondufe-Mittendorf, Yvonne N

    2016-01-01

    Specialized chromatin structures such as nucleosomes with specific histone modifications decorate exons in eukaryotic genomes, suggesting a functional connection between chromatin organization and the regulation of pre-mRNA splicing. Through profiling the functional location of Poly (ADP) ribose polymerase, we observed that it is associated with the nucleosomes at exon/intron boundaries of specific genes, suggestive of a role for this enzyme in alternative splicing. Poly (ADP) ribose polymerase has previously been implicated in the PARylation of splicing factors as well as regulation of the histone modification H3K4me3, a mark critical for co-transcriptional splicing. In light of these studies, we hypothesized that interaction of the chromatin-modifying factor, Poly (ADP) ribose polymerase with nucleosomal structures at exon–intron boundaries, might regulate pre-mRNA splicing. Using genome-wide approaches validated by gene-specific assays, we show that depletion of PARP1 or inhibition of its PARylation activity results in changes in alternative splicing of a specific subset of genes. Furthermore, we observed that PARP1 bound to RNA, splicing factors and chromatin, suggesting that Poly (ADP) ribose polymerase serves as a gene regulatory hub to facilitate co-transcriptional splicing. These studies add another function to the multi-functional protein, Poly (ADP) ribose polymerase, and provide a platform for further investigation of this protein’s function in organizing chromatin during gene regulatory processes. PMID:27462443

  14. Polymerase chain reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Arnhelm, N. ); Levenson, C.H. )

    1990-10-01

    This paper discusses the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) an in-vitro method of amplifying DNA sequences. Beginning with DNA of any origin- bacterial, viral, plant, or animal- PCR can increase the amount of a DNA sequence hundreds of millions to billions of times. The procedure can amplify a targeted sequence even when it makes up less than one part in a million of the total initial sample. PCR is an enzymatic process that is carried out in discrete cycles of amplification, each of which can double the amount of target DNA in the sample. Thus, n cycles can produce 2{sup n} times as much target as was present to begin with. This paper discusses how PCR has had an impact on molecular biology, human genetics, infectious and genetic disease diagnosis, forensic science, and evolutionary biology.

  15. Ribose facilitates thallium-201 redistribution in patients with coronary artery disease

    SciTech Connect

    Perlmutter, N.S.; Wilson, R.A.; Angello, D.A.; Palac, R.T.; Lin, J.; Brown, B.G. )

    1991-02-01

    To investigate whether i.v. infusion of ribose, an adenine nucleotide precursor, postischemia facilitates thallium-201 (201Tl) redistribution and improves identification of ischemic myocardium in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD), 17 patients underwent two exercise 201Tl stress tests, performed 1-2 wk apart. After immediate postexercise planar imaging, patients received either i.v. ribose (3.3 mg/kg/min x 30 min) or saline as a control. Additional imaging was performed 1 and 4 hr postexercise. Reversible defects were identified by count-profile analysis. Significantly more (nearly twice as many) reversible 201Tl defects were identified on the post-ribose images compared to the post-saline (control) images at both 1 and 4 hr postexercise (p less than 0.001). Quantitative analyses of the coronary arteriogram was available in 13 patients and confirmed that the additional reversible defects were in myocardial regions supplied by stenosed arteries. We conclude that ribose appears to facilitate 201Tl redistribution in patients with CAD and enhances identification of ischemic myocardium.

  16. Efficient production of L-ribose with a recombinant Escherichia coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new synthetic platform with potential for the production of several rare sugars, with L-ribose being the model target, is described. The gene encoding the unique NAD-dependent mannitol-1-dehydrogenase (MDH) from Apium graveolens (garden celery) was synthetically constructed for optimal expression...

  17. Purification, crystallization, and properties of D-ribose isomerase from Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Izumori, K; Rees, A W; Elbein, A D

    1975-10-25

    D-Ribose isomerase, which catalyzes the conversion of D-ribose to D-ribulose, was purified from extracts of Mycobacterium smegmatis grown on D-ribose. The purified enzyme crystalized as hexagonal plates from a 44% solution of ammonium sulfate. The enzyme was homogenous by disc gel electrophoresis and ultracentrifugal analysis. The molecular weight of the enzyme was between 145,000 and 174,000 by sedimentation equilibrium analysis. Its sedimentation constant of 8.7 S indicates it is globular. On the basis of sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis in the presence of Mn2+, the enzyme is probably composed of 4 identical subunits of molecular weight about 42,000 to 44,000. The enzyme was specific for sugars having the same configuration as D-ribose at carbon atoms 1 to 3. Thus, the enzyme could also utilize L-lyxose, D-allose, and L-rhamnose as substrates. The Km for D-ribose was 4 mM and for L-lyxose it was 5.3 mM. The enzyme required a divalent cation for activity with optimum activity being shown with Mn2+. the Km for the various cations was as follows: Mn2+, 1 times 10(-7) M, Co2+, 4 times 10(-7) M, and Mg2+, 1.8 times 10(-5) M. The pH optimum for the enzyme was 7.5 to 8.5. Polyols did not inhibit the enzyme to any great extent. The product of the reaction was identified as D-ribulose by thin layer chromatography and by preparation of the O-nitrophenylhydrazone derivative. PMID:240851

  18. Purification, crystallization, and properties of D-ribose isomerase from Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Izumori, K; Rees, A W; Elbein, A D

    1975-10-25

    D-Ribose isomerase, which catalyzes the conversion of D-ribose to D-ribulose, was purified from extracts of Mycobacterium smegmatis grown on D-ribose. The purified enzyme crystalized as hexagonal plates from a 44% solution of ammonium sulfate. The enzyme was homogenous by disc gel electrophoresis and ultracentrifugal analysis. The molecular weight of the enzyme was between 145,000 and 174,000 by sedimentation equilibrium analysis. Its sedimentation constant of 8.7 S indicates it is globular. On the basis of sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis in the presence of Mn2+, the enzyme is probably composed of 4 identical subunits of molecular weight about 42,000 to 44,000. The enzyme was specific for sugars having the same configuration as D-ribose at carbon atoms 1 to 3. Thus, the enzyme could also utilize L-lyxose, D-allose, and L-rhamnose as substrates. The Km for D-ribose was 4 mM and for L-lyxose it was 5.3 mM. The enzyme required a divalent cation for activity with optimum activity being shown with Mn2+. the Km for the various cations was as follows: Mn2+, 1 times 10(-7) M, Co2+, 4 times 10(-7) M, and Mg2+, 1.8 times 10(-5) M. The pH optimum for the enzyme was 7.5 to 8.5. Polyols did not inhibit the enzyme to any great extent. The product of the reaction was identified as D-ribulose by thin layer chromatography and by preparation of the O-nitrophenylhydrazone derivative.

  19. The 1994 NASA/USRA/ADP Design Projects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruse, Thomas; Richardson, Joseph; Tryon, Robert

    1994-01-01

    The NASA/USRA/ADP Design Projects from Vanderbilt University, Department of Mechanical Engineering (1994) are enclosed in this final report. Design projects include: (1) Protein Crystal Growth, both facilities and methodology; (2) ACES Deployable Space Boom; (3) Hybrid Launch System designs for both manned and unmanned systems; (4) LH2 Fuel Tank design (SSTO); (5) SSTO design; and (6) Pressure Tank Feed System design.

  20. Structure of Plasmodium falciparum ADP-ribosylation factor 1

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, William J.; Smith, Craig D.; Senkovich, Olga; Holder, Anthony A.; Chattopadhyay, Debasish

    2011-09-26

    Vesicular trafficking may play a crucial role in the pathogenesis and survival of the malaria parasite. ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs) are among the major components of vesicular trafficking pathways in eukaryotes. The crystal structure of ARF1 GTPase from Plasmodium falciparum has been determined in the GDP-bound conformation at 2.5 {angstrom} resolution and is compared with the structures of mammalian ARF1s.

  1. 26 CFR 1.401(k)-2 - ADP test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...)(2)(iv) (as it appeared in the April 1, 2007, edition of 26 CFR part 1). (v) Distribution. Within 12... determined under § 1.401(k)-2(b)(2)(vi) (as it appeared in the April 1, 2007, edition of 26 CFR Part 1). (C... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false ADP test. 1.401(k)-2 Section 1.401(k)-2...

  2. 26 CFR 1.401(k)-2 - ADP test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... determined under § 1.401(k)-2(b)(2)(vi) (as it appeared in the April 1, 2007, edition of 26 CFR Part 1). (C...)(2)(iv) (as it appeared in the April 1, 2007, edition of 26 CFR part 1). (v) Distribution. Within 12... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false ADP test. 1.401(k)-2 Section 1.401(k)-2...

  3. 26 CFR 1.401(k)-2 - ADP test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... determined under § 1.401(k)-2(b)(2)(vi) (as it appeared in the April 1, 2007, edition of 26 CFR Part 1). (C...)(2)(iv) (as it appeared in the April 1, 2007, edition of 26 CFR part 1). (v) Distribution. Within 12... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false ADP test. 1.401(k)-2 Section 1.401(k)-2...

  4. 26 CFR 1.401(k)-2 - ADP test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... determined under § 1.401(k)-2(b)(2)(vi) (as it appeared in the April 1, 2007, edition of 26 CFR Part 1). (C...)(2)(iv) (as it appeared in the April 1, 2007, edition of 26 CFR part 1). (v) Distribution. Within 12... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false ADP test. 1.401(k)-2 Section 1.401(k)-2...

  5. 26 CFR 1.401(k)-2 - ADP test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... determined under § 1.401(k)-2(b)(2)(vi) (as it appeared in the April 1, 2007, edition of 26 CFR Part 1). (C...)(2)(iv) (as it appeared in the April 1, 2007, edition of 26 CFR part 1). (v) Distribution. Within 12... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true ADP test. 1.401(k)-2 Section 1.401(k)-2...

  6. Protein ADP-ribosylation and the cellular response to DNA strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Caldecott, K W

    2014-07-01

    DNA strand breaks arise continuously in cells and can lead to chromosome rearrangements and genome instability or cell death. The commonest DNA breaks are DNA single-strand breaks, which arise at a frequency of tens-of-thousands per cell each day and which can block the progression of RNA/DNA polymerases and disrupt gene transcription and genome duplication. If not rapidly repaired, SSBs can be converted into DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) during genome duplication, eliciting a complex series of DNA damage responses that attempt to protect cells from irreversible replication fork collapse. DSBs are the most cytotoxic and clastogenic type of DNA breaks, and can also arise independently of DNA replication, albeit at a frequency several orders of magnitude lower than SSBs. Here, I discuss the evidence that DNA single- and double -strand break repair pathways, and cellular tolerance mechanisms for protecting replication forks during genome duplication, utilize signalling by protein ADP-ribosyltransferases to protect cells from the harmful impact of DNA strand breakage.

  7. Cytological and molecular studies of chromosomal radiosensitivity in Down Syndrome cells

    SciTech Connect

    MacLaren, R.A.

    1988-01-01

    Molecular, cellular and cytogenetic studies were conducted to determine if altered levels of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, a DNA repair-related enzyme, is responsible for the reported formation of excess X-ray induced chromosome aberrations in cells derived from Down Syndrome (DS) patients. Nonstimulated lymphocytes from normal and DS subjects were pretreated with 3-aminobenzamide, an inhibitor of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, for 30 minutes before exposure to X-rays and the levels of induced chromosome aberrations were determined in mitotic cells. DS lymphocytes exhibited significantly higher frequencies of chromosome aberrations in the presence of 3-aminobenzamide that normal lymphocytes. No difference was observed in the absence of 3-aminobenzamide. Additional studies were done using normal and DS lymphoblastoid cell lines which exhibited a similar response at the DNA level as the lymphocytes. Analysis of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activity based on incorporation of the substrate, NAD{sup +}, into acid insoluble materials, revealed that there was no significant difference in the ability to form poly (ADP-ribose) in the DS or normal cells. 3-aminobenzamide effectively inhibited poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase in both the normal and DS cells.

  8. Highly selective affinity labelling of RNA polymerase B (II) from wheat germ.

    PubMed

    Grachev, M A; Hartmann, G R; Maximova, T G; Mustaev, A A; Schäffner, A R; Sieber, H; Zaychikov, E F

    1986-05-12

    DNA-dependent RNA polymerase B (II) from wheat germ was modified by incubation with 4-[N-(beta-hydroxyethyl)-N-methyl]benzaldehyde esters of AMP, ADP or ATP, followed by reduction with NaBH4. Reaction of the modified enzyme with [alpha-32P]UTP in the presence of various DNA templates led to a highly selective affinity labelling of the subunit with Mr 140 000 by covalently linked ApU. Labelling was inhibited by 1 microgram/ml alpha-amanitin.

  9. Growth and gas production of a novel obligatory heterofermentative Cheddar cheese nonstarter lactobacilli species on ribose and galactose.

    PubMed

    Ortakci, Fatih; Broadbent, Jeffery R; Oberg, Craig J; McMahon, Donald J

    2015-06-01

    An obligatory heterofermentative lactic acid bacterium, Lactobacillus wasatchii sp. nov., isolated from gassy Cheddar cheese was studied for growth, gas formation, salt tolerance, and survival against pasteurization treatments at 63°C and 72°C. Initially, Lb. wasatchii was thought to use only ribose as a sugar source and we were interested in whether it could also utilize galactose. We conducted experiments to determine the rate and extent of growth and gas production in carbohydrate-restricted (CR) de Man, Rogosa, and Sharpe (MRS) medium under anaerobic conditions with various combinations of ribose and galactose at 12, 23, and 37°C, with 23°C being the optimum growth temperature of Lb. wasatchii among the 3 temperatures studied. When Lb. wasatchii was grown on ribose (0.1, 0.5, and 1%), maximum specific growth rates (µmax) within each temperature were similar. When galactose was the only sugar, compared with ribose, µmax was 2 to 4 times lower. At all temperatures, the highest final cell densities (optical density at 640 nm) of Lb. wasatchii were achieved in CR-MRS plus 1% ribose, 0.5% ribose and 0.5% galactose, or 1% ribose and 1% galactose. Similar µmax values and final cell densities were achieved when 50% of the ribose in CR-MRS was substituted with galactose. Such enhanced utilization of galactose in the presence of ribose to support bacterial growth has not previously been reported. It appears that Lb. wasatchii co-metabolizes ribose and galactose, utilizing ribose for energy and galactose for other functions such as cell wall biosynthesis. Co-utilization of both sugars could be an adaptation mechanism of Lb. wasatchii to the cheese environment to efficiently ferment available sugars for maximizing metabolism and growth. As expected, gas formation by the heterofermenter was observed only when galactose was present in the medium. Growth experiments with MRS plus 1.5% ribose at pH 5.2 or 6.5 with 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5% NaCl revealed that Lb. wasatchii is

  10. Growth and gas production of a novel obligatory heterofermentative Cheddar cheese nonstarter lactobacilli species on ribose and galactose.

    PubMed

    Ortakci, Fatih; Broadbent, Jeffery R; Oberg, Craig J; McMahon, Donald J

    2015-06-01

    An obligatory heterofermentative lactic acid bacterium, Lactobacillus wasatchii sp. nov., isolated from gassy Cheddar cheese was studied for growth, gas formation, salt tolerance, and survival against pasteurization treatments at 63°C and 72°C. Initially, Lb. wasatchii was thought to use only ribose as a sugar source and we were interested in whether it could also utilize galactose. We conducted experiments to determine the rate and extent of growth and gas production in carbohydrate-restricted (CR) de Man, Rogosa, and Sharpe (MRS) medium under anaerobic conditions with various combinations of ribose and galactose at 12, 23, and 37°C, with 23°C being the optimum growth temperature of Lb. wasatchii among the 3 temperatures studied. When Lb. wasatchii was grown on ribose (0.1, 0.5, and 1%), maximum specific growth rates (µmax) within each temperature were similar. When galactose was the only sugar, compared with ribose, µmax was 2 to 4 times lower. At all temperatures, the highest final cell densities (optical density at 640 nm) of Lb. wasatchii were achieved in CR-MRS plus 1% ribose, 0.5% ribose and 0.5% galactose, or 1% ribose and 1% galactose. Similar µmax values and final cell densities were achieved when 50% of the ribose in CR-MRS was substituted with galactose. Such enhanced utilization of galactose in the presence of ribose to support bacterial growth has not previously been reported. It appears that Lb. wasatchii co-metabolizes ribose and galactose, utilizing ribose for energy and galactose for other functions such as cell wall biosynthesis. Co-utilization of both sugars could be an adaptation mechanism of Lb. wasatchii to the cheese environment to efficiently ferment available sugars for maximizing metabolism and growth. As expected, gas formation by the heterofermenter was observed only when galactose was present in the medium. Growth experiments with MRS plus 1.5% ribose at pH 5.2 or 6.5 with 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, or 5% NaCl revealed that Lb. wasatchii is

  11. The Relative Reactivity of Deoxyribose and Ribose: Did DNA Come Before RNA?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dworkin, Jason P.; Miller, Stanley L.

    1995-01-01

    If it is assumed that there was a precursor to the ribose-phosphate backbone of RNA in the preRNA world (such as peptide nucleic acid), then the entry of various sugars into the genetic material may be related to the stability and non-enzymatic reactivity of the aldose. The rate of decomposition of 2-deoxyribose has been determined to be 1/3 that of ribose. In addition we have measured the amount of free aldehyde by H-1 and C-13 NMR and find that it has approximately 0.15% free aldehyde compared to 0.05% for ribose at 25 C. This suggests that deoxyribose would be significantly more reactive with early bases in the absence of enzymes. This is confirmed by urazole and deoxyribose reacting to form the deoxynucleoside 45 times faster as 25 C than urazole reacts with ribose to form the Ribonucleoside. Urazole is a potential precursor of uracil and is a plausible prebiotic compound which reacts with aldoses to form nucleosides. Thus the non-enzymatic reactivity of deoxyribose would favor its early use over ribose until enzymes could change the relative reactivities. Most of the reasons that RNA is presumed to have come before DNA are extrapolations back from contemporary metabolism (e.g. the abundance of ribose based coenzymes, the biosynthesis of histidine, deoxyribonucleotides are synthesized from ribonucleotides, etc.). It is very difficult to reconstruct biochemical pathways much before the last common ancestor, and it is even more difficult to do more than guess at the biochemistry of very early self-replicating systems. Thus we believe that these reasons are not compelling and that the non-enzymatic chemistry may be more important than enzymatic pathways for constructing the earliest of biochemical pathways. While the RNA world has been discussed at great length, there has not been an exploration of the transition out of the RNA world. We have constructed many possible schemes of genetic takeover events from preRNA to modern DNA, RNA, protein system which could

  12. Submaximal ADP-stimulated respiration is impaired in ZDF rats and recovered by resveratrol.

    PubMed

    Smith, Brennan K; Perry, Christopher G R; Herbst, Eric A F; Ritchie, Ian R; Beaudoin, Marie-Soleil; Smith, Jeffrey C; Neufer, P Darrell; Wright, David C; Holloway, Graham P

    2013-12-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and reactive oxygen species (ROS) have been implicated in the aetiology of skeletal muscle insulin resistance, although there is considerable controversy regarding these concepts. Mitochondrial function has been traditionally assessed in the presence of saturating ADP, but ATP turnover and the resultant ADP is thought to limit respiration in vivo. Therefore, we investigated the potential link between submaximal ADP-stimulated respiration rates, ROS generation and skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity in a model of type 2 diabetes mellitus, the ZDF rat. Utilizing permeabilized muscle fibres we observed that submaximal ADP-stimulated respiration rates (250-2000 μm ADP) were lower in ZDF rats than in lean controls, which coincided with decreased adenine nucleotide translocase 2 (ANT2) protein content. This decrease in submaximal ADP-stimulated respiration occurred in the absence of a decrease in electron transport chain function. Treating ZDF rats with resveratrol improved skeletal muscle insulin resistance and this was associated with elevated submaximal ADP-stimulated respiration rates as well as an increase in ANT2 protein content. These results coincided with a greater ability of ADP to attenuate mitochondrial ROS emission and an improvement in cellular redox balance. Together, these data suggest that mitochondrial dysfunction is present in skeletal muscle insulin resistance when assessed at submaximal ADP concentrations and that ADP dynamics may influence skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity through alterations in the propensity for mitochondrial ROS emission.

  13. Practical Experience of Discharge Measurement in Flood Conditions with ADP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidmar, A.; Brilly, M.; Rusjan, S.

    2009-04-01

    Accurate discharge estimation is important for an efficient river basin management and especially for flood forecasting. The traditional way of estimating the discharge in hydrological practice is to measure the water stage and to convert the recorded water stage values into discharge by using the single-valued rating curve .Relationship between the stage and discharge values of the rating curve for the extreme events are usually extrapolated by using different mathematical methods and are not directly measured. Our practice shows that by using the Accoustic Doppler Profiler (ADP) instrument we can record the actual relation between the water stage and the flow velocity at the occurrence of flood waves very successfully. Measurement in flood conditions it is not easy task, because of high water surface velocity and large amounts of sediments in the water and floating objects on the surface like branches, bushes, trees, piles and others which can also easily damage ADP instrument. We made several measurements in such extreme events on the Sava River down to the nuclear power plant Kr\\vsko where we have install fixed cable way. During the several measurement with traditional "moving-boat" measurement technique a mowing bed phenomenon was clearly seen. Measuring flow accurately using ADP that uses the "moving-boat" technique, the system needs a reference against which to relate water velocities to. This reference is river bed and must not move. During flood events we detected difficulty finding a static bed surface to which to relate water velocities. This is caused by motion of the surface layer of bed material or also sediments suspended in the water near bed very densely. So these traditional »moving-boat« measurement techniques that we normally use completely fail. Using stationary measurement method to making individual velocity profile measurements, using an Acoustic Doppler Profiler (ADP), at certain time at fixed locations across the width of a stream gave

  14. Ribose-5-phosphate isomerase and ribulose-5-phosphate kinase show apparent specificity for a specific ribulose 5-phosphate species.

    PubMed

    Anderson, L E

    1987-02-01

    Ribose-5-phosphate isomerase and ribulose-5-phosphate kinase appear to show specificity for a particular ribulose 5-phosphate species. The effect of this specificity will be channeling of ribulose 5-phosphate from the isomerase to the kinase during photosynthesis.

  15. Kinetics of a self-amplifying substrate cycle: ADP-ATP cycling assay.

    PubMed Central

    Valero, E; Varón, R; García-Carmona, F

    2000-01-01

    A kinetic study of an ATP-ADP amplification cyclic system involving the enzymes adenylate kinase, pyruvate kinase and L-lactate dehydrogenase has been made. The stoichiometry of the cycle is 2:1, because two molecules of ADP are synthesized from one each of ATP and AMP, and one molecule of ADP is converted back into one of ATP at each turn of the cycle. This results in a continuous exponential increase in the concentrations of ATP and ADP in the reaction medium, according to the equations obtained. This is therefore a substrate cycle that amplifies itself, the cycling rate increasing continuously with time. The background signal of the reagent was reduced by using apyrase to degrade ATP and ADP in the reagent, permitting detection limits as low as 16 pmol of ATP and/or ADP in a continuous spectrophotometric assay. PMID:10926849

  16. Seasonal cycles of mitochondrial ADP sensitivity and oxidative capacities in trout oxidative muscle.

    PubMed

    Guderley, H; St Pierre, J

    1999-10-01

    Mitochondria from red myotomal muscle of rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss, showed seasonal cycles of their maximal rates of substrate oxidation (nmol.min-1 mg-1 mitochondrial protein) and their apparent ADP affinity (Kmapp), as well as in the thermal sensitivity of these properties. Increases in the maximal capacity of pyruvate oxidation were sufficient to compensate for seasonal changes in temperature, except during the winter months when rates at habitat temperature were depressed relative to other periods. The ADP affinity of isolated mitochondria was highest during cold months. Thus, the Kmapp for ADP at habitat temperature showed less seasonal variation than the ADP Kmapp at a given temperature. A loss in ADP affinity with decreasing temperature occurred through much of the year, and only was definitively suppressed in December and July. Both the ADP affinity and the maximal oxidative capacities of muscle mitochondria seem to be regulated parameters. PMID:10595316

  17. Metal Oxide-Based Selective Enrichment Combined with Stable Isotope Labeling-Mass Spectrometry Analysis for Profiling of Ribose Conjugates.

    PubMed

    Chu, Jie-Mei; Qi, Chu-Bo; Huang, Yun-Qing; Jiang, Han-Peng; Hao, Yan-Hong; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2015-07-21

    Some modified ribonucleosides in biological fluids have been evaluated as cancer-related metabolites. Detection of endogenous modified ribonucleosides in biological fluids may serve as a noninvasive cancers diagnostic method. However, determination of modified ribonucleosides is still challenging because of their low abundance and serious matrix interferences in biological fluids. Here, we developed a novel strategy for comprehensive profiling of ribose conjugates from biological fluids using metal oxide-based dispersive solid-phase extraction (DSPE) followed with in vitro stable isotope labeling and double neutral loss scan-mass spectrometry analysis (DSPE-SIL-LC-DNLS-MS). Cerium dioxide (CeO2) was used to selectively recognize and capture ribose conjugates from complex biological samples under basic environment. The enriched ribose conjugates were subsequently labeled with a pair of isotope labeling reagents (acetone and acetone-d6). The glucosidic bond of acetone labeled ribose conjugates is readily ruptured, and the generated ribose that carries an isotope tag can be lost as a neutral fragment under collision induced dissociation (CID). Since the light (acetone) and heavy (acetone-d6) labeled compounds have the same chemical structures and can generate different neutral loss fragments (NL 172 and 178 Da), it is therefore highly convenient to profile ribose conjugates by double neutral loss scan mode in mass spectrometry analysis. In this respect, the light and heavy labeled compounds were ionized at the same condition but recorded separately on MS spectra, which can significantly improve the detection specificity and facilitate the identification of ribose conjugates. Using the developed DSPE-SIL-LC-DNLS-MS strategy, we profiled the ribose conjugates in human urine, and 49 ribose conjugates were readily identified, among which 7 ribose conjugates exhibited significant contents change between healthy controls and lymphoma patients. The DSPE

  18. FRET imaging of diatoms expressing a biosilica-localized ribose sensor.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Kathryn E; Robinson, Errol W; Hengel, Shawna M; Paša-Tolić, Ljiljana; Roesijadi, Guritno

    2012-01-01

    Future materials are envisioned to include bio-assembled, hybrid, three-dimensional nanosystems that incorporate functional proteins. Diatoms are amenable to genetic modification for localization of recombinant proteins in the biosilica cell wall. However, the full range of protein functionalities that can be accommodated by the modified porous biosilica has yet to be described. Our objective was to functionalize diatom biosilica with a reagent-less sensor dependent on ligand-binding and conformational change to drive FRET-based signaling capabilities. A fusion protein designed to confer such properties included a bacterial periplasmic ribose binding protein (R) flanked by CyPet (C) and YPet (Y), cyan and yellow fluorescent proteins that act as a FRET pair. The structure and function of the CRY recombinant chimeric protein was confirmed by expression in E. coli prior to transformation of the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana. Mass spectrometry of the recombinant CRY showed 97% identity with the deduced amino acid sequence. CRY with and without an N-terminal Sil3 tag for biosilica localization exhibited characteristic ribose-dependent changes in FRET, with similar dissociation constants of 123.3 µM and 142.8 µM, respectively. The addition of the Sil3 tag did not alter the affinity of CRY for the ribose substrate. Subsequent transformation of T. pseudonana with a vector encoding Sil3-CRY resulted in fluorescence localization in the biosilica and changes in FRET in both living cells and isolated frustules in response to ribose. This work demonstrated that the nano-architecture of the genetically modified biosilica cell wall was able to support the functionality of the relatively complex Sil3-CyPet-RBP-YPet fusion protein with its requirement for ligand-binding and conformational change for FRET-signal generation.

  19. FRET Imaging of Diatoms Expressing a Biosilica-Localized Ribose Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, Kathryn E.; Robinson, E. W.; Hengel, Shawna M.; Pasa-Tolic, Ljiljana; Roesijadi, Guritno

    2012-03-21

    Future materials are envisioned to include bio-assembled, hybrid, three-dimensional nanosystems that incorporate functional proteins. Diatoms are amenable to genetic modification that enables localization of recombinant proteins in the biosilica cell wall. Our objective was to functionalize diatom biosilica with a reagent-less biosensor with FRET-based imaging capabilities for signaling. The design of the fusion protein conferring these properties included a bacterial periplasmic ribose binding protein (R) flanked by CyPet (C) and YPet (Y), cyan and yellow fluorescent proteins that act as a FRET pair. The structure and function of the recombinant chimeric protein was first confirmed in E. coli-expressed proteins, prior to transformation of the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana. Mass spectrometry of CRY showed 95% identity with the deduced amino acid sequence. CRY with and without an N-terminal Sil3 tag for biosilica targeting exhibited characteristic ribose-dependent changes in FRET, with similar dissociation constants of 123.3 {mu}M and 142.8 {mu}M, respectively. The addition of the silaffin tag for biosilica localization did not influence the affinity of CRY for the ribose substrate. Subsequent transformation of T. pseudonana with a vector encoding Sil3-CRY resulted in fluorescence localization in the biosilica and changes in FRET in both living cells and isolated biosilica in response to ribose. This work demonstrated that the nano-architecture of the genetically modified biosilica cell wall was able to support the functionality of the relatively complex Sil3-CyPet-RBP-YPet fusion protein with its requirement for ligand binding and conformational change for FRET-signal generation.

  20. Molecular contacts of ribose-phosphate backbone of mRNA with human ribosome.

    PubMed

    Sharifulin, Dmitri E; Grosheva, Anastasia S; Bartuli, Yulia S; Malygin, Alexey A; Meschaninova, Maria I; Ven'yaminova, Aliya G; Stahl, Joachim; Graifer, Dmitri M; Karpova, Galina G

    2015-08-01

    In this work, intimate contacts of riboses of mRNA stretch from nucleotides in positions +3 to +12 with respect to the first nucleotide of the P site codon were studied using cross-linking of short mRNA analogs with oxidized 3'-terminal riboses bound to human ribosomes in the complexes stabilized by codon-anticodon interactions and in the binary complexes. It was shown that in all types of complexes cross-links of the mRNA analogs to ribosomal protein (rp) uS3 occur and the yield of these cross-links does not depend on the presence of tRNA and on sequences of the mRNA analogs. Site of the mRNA analogs cross-linking in rp uS3 was mapped to the peptide in positions 55-64 that is located away from the mRNA binding site. Additionally, in complexes with P site-bound tRNA, riboses of mRNA nucleotides in positions +4 to +7 cross-linked to the C-terminal tail of rp uS19 displaying a contact specific to the decoding site of the mammalian ribosome, and tRNA bound at the A site completely blocked this cross-linking. Remarkably, rps uS3 and uS19 were also able to cross-link to the fragment of HCV IRES containing unstructured 3'-terminal part restricted by the AUGC tetraplet with oxidized 3'-terminal ribose. However, no cross-linking to rp uS3 was observed in the 48S preinitiation complex assembled in reticulocyte lysate with this HCV IRES derivative. The results obtained show an ability of rp uS3 to interact with single-stranded RNAs. Possible roles of rp uS3 region 55-64 in the functioning of ribosomes are discussed.

  1. First prebiotic generation of a ribonucleotide from adenine, D-ribose and trimetaphosphate.

    PubMed

    Baccolini, Graziano; Boga, Carla; Micheletti, Gabriele

    2011-03-28

    Adenosine monophosphate isomers are obtained by self-assembling of adenine, D-ribose and trimetaphosphate in aqueous solution in good yields. This generation of a ribonucleotide from its three molecular components occurs in a one-pot reaction at room temperature for about 30-40 days and with high chemio-, regio-, and stereo-selectivity. Similar results are obtained with guanine. A mechanism is also proposed. PMID:21305098

  2. A Possible Path to the RNA World: Enantioselective and Diastereoselective Purification of Ribose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bielski, Roman; Tencer, Michal

    2007-04-01

    A theoretical mechanism resulting in the prebiotic appearance of enantiopure ribose, which would be needed for the origin of RNA and the “RNA world” is proposed. The mechanism simultaneously explains the emergence of biological homochirality and could answer the question of why nucleic acids are based on ribose rather than another sugar. Cleavage of certain non-chiral mineral crystals is known to lead to formation of chiral surfaces. In a chromatography-like process a mixture of racemic carbohydrates originating from the formose reaction is proposed to have been separated on such a chiral surface. Monosaccharides interact with surfaces through their hydroxyl groups, either by hydrogen bond formation or complex formation with metal ions. α-Ribopyranose, which has all hydroxyl groups on one side of the ring, is known to interact more strongly than other sugars with surfaces, as corroborated by certain chromatographic and electrophoresis data. A similar scenario leading to enantiopure ribose is separation on a flat, but not necessarily chiral surface in the presence of a strong electric field capable of orienting highly polar derivatives of sugars.

  3. Crystal structures and enzyme mechanisms of a dual fucose mutarotase/ribose pyranase.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kwang-Hoon; Ryu, Kyoung-Seok; Kim, Min-Sung; Suh, Hye-Young; Ku, Bonsu; Song, Young-Lan; Ko, Sunggeon; Lee, Weontae; Oh, Byung-Ha

    2009-08-01

    Escherichia coli FucU (Fucose Unknown) is a dual fucose mutarotase and ribose pyranase, which shares 44% sequence identity with its human counterpart. Herein, we report the structures of E. coli FucU and mouse FucU bound to L-fucose and delineate the catalytic mechanisms underlying the interconversion between stereoisomers of fucose and ribose. E. coli FucU forms a decameric toroid with each active site formed by two adjacent subunits. While one subunit provides most of the fucose-interacting residues including a catalytic tyrosine residue, the other subunit provides a catalytic His-Asp dyad. This active-site feature is critical not only for the mutarotase activity toward L-fucose but also for the pyranase activity toward D-ribose. Structural and biochemical analyses pointed that mouse FucU assembles into four different oligomeric forms, among which the smallest homodimeric form is most abundant and would be the predominant species under physiological conditions. This homodimer has two fucose-binding sites that are devoid of the His-Asp dyad and catalytically inactive, indicating that the mutarotase and the pyranase activities appear dispensable in vertebrates. The defective assembly of the mouse FucU homodimer into the decameric form is due to an insertion of two residues at the N-terminal extreme, which is a common aspect of all the known vertebrate FucU proteins. Therefore, vertebrate FucU appears to serve for as yet unknown function through the quaternary structural alteration.

  4. Pyridoxine biosynthesis in yeast: participation of ribose 5-phosphate ketol-isomerase.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Hiroki; Nakamura, Yoriko; Dong, Yi-Xin; Nikawa, Jun-ichi; Sueda, Shinji

    2004-04-01

    To identify the genes involved in pyridoxine synthesis in yeast, auxotrophic mutants were prepared. After transformation with a yeast genomic library, a transformant (A22t1) was obtained from one of the auxotrophs, A22, which lost the pyridoxine auxotrophy. From an analysis of the plasmid harboured in A22t1, the RKI1 gene coding for ribose 5-phosphate ketol-isomerase and residing on chromosome no. 15 was identified as the responsible gene. This notion was confirmed by gene disruption and tetrad analysis on a diploid prepared from the wild-type and the auxotroph. The site of mutation on the RKI1 gene was identified as position 566 with a transition from guanine to adenine, resulting in amino acid substitution of Arg-189 with lysine. The enzymic activity of the Arg189-->Lys (R189K) mutant of ribose 5-phosphate ketolisomerase was 0.6% when compared with the wild-type enzyme. Loss of the structural integrity of the protein seems to be responsible for the greatly diminished activity, which eventually leads to a shortage of either ribose 5-phosphate or ribulose 5-phosphate as the starting or intermediary material for pyridoxine synthesis.

  5. Production of RNA by a polymerase protein encapsulated within phospholipid vesicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chakrabarti, A. C.; Breaker, R. R.; Joyce, G. F.; Deamer, D. W.

    1994-01-01

    Catalyzed polymerization reactions represent a primary anabolic activity of all cells. It can be assumed that early cells carried out such reactions, in which macromolecular catalysts were encapsulated within some type of boundary membrane. In the experiments described here, we show that a template-independent RNA polymerase (polynucleotide phosphorylase) can be encapsulated in dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine vesicles without substrate. When the substrate adenosine diphosphate (ADP) was provided externally, long-chain RNA polymers were synthesized within the vesicles. Substrate flux was maximized by maintaining the vesicles at the phase transition temperature of the component lipid. A protease was introduced externally as an additional control. Free enzyme was inactivated under identical conditions. RNA products were visualized in situ by ethidium bromide fluorescence. The products were harvested from the liposomes, radiolabeled, and analyzed by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Encapsulated catalysts represent a model for primitive cellular systems in which an RNA polymerase was entrapped within a protected microenvironment.

  6. Bovine spermatozoa incorporate 32Pi into ADP by an unknown pathway.

    PubMed

    Cheetham, J A; Lardy, H A

    1992-03-15

    Intact ejaculated bovine sperm incorporate 32Pi into ADP to a specific activity two to three times higher than into ATP. This contrasts with other cell types where ATP specific activity is higher than that of ADP. Predominant labeling of ADP may be partially due to compartmentation of ATP, but removal of cytosolic ATP does not change the relative labeling of ADP and ATP. Dilution of extracellular 32Pi following labeling resulted in loss of 70% of label from ADP but only 50% loss from gamma-ATP at 26 min. ADP was labeled in the absence of detectable ATP in the presence of rotenone plus antimycin. Fractionation of ejaculated sperm yielded midpieces that are depleted of adenylate kinase and have coupled respiration. ATP was labeled with 32Pi, but ADP was not in midpieces. Evidence for mitochondrial substrate level phosphorylation-supported incorporation of 32Pi into nucleotides was observed for intact sperm incubated with pyruvate and inhibitors of oxidative phosphorylation, but this activity did not occur in midpieces and does not appear to explain disproportionate labeling of ADP. We conclude that labeling of ADP in intact and permeabilized cells occurs by two pathways; one involves adenylate kinase, and the other is an unknown pathway which may be independent of ATP. PMID:1544901

  7. The transport mechanism of the mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier.

    PubMed

    Kunji, Edmund R S; Aleksandrova, Antoniya; King, Martin S; Majd, Homa; Ashton, Valerie L; Cerson, Elizabeth; Springett, Roger; Kibalchenko, Mikhail; Tavoulari, Sotiria; Crichton, Paul G; Ruprecht, Jonathan J

    2016-10-01

    The mitochondrial ADP/ATP carrier imports ADP from the cytosol and exports ATP from the mitochondrial matrix, which are key transport steps for oxidative phosphorylation in eukaryotic organisms. The transport protein belongs to the mitochondrial carrier family, a large transporter family in the inner membrane of mitochondria. It is one of the best studied members of the family and serves as a paradigm for the molecular mechanism of mitochondrial carriers. Structurally, the carrier consists of three homologous domains, each composed of two transmembrane α-helices linked with a loop and short α-helix on the matrix side. The transporter cycles between a cytoplasmic and matrix state in which a central substrate binding site is alternately accessible to these compartments for binding of ADP or ATP. On both the cytoplasmic and matrix side of the carrier are networks consisting of three salt bridges each. In the cytoplasmic state, the matrix salt bridge network is formed and the cytoplasmic network is disrupted, opening the central substrate binding site to the intermembrane space and cytosol, whereas the converse occurs in the matrix state. In the transport cycle, tighter substrate binding in the intermediate states allows the interconversion of conformations by lowering the energy barrier for disruption and formation of these networks, opening and closing the carrier to either side of the membrane in an alternating way. Conversion between cytoplasmic and matrix states might require the simultaneous rotation of three domains around a central translocation pathway, constituting a unique mechanism among transport proteins. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Mitochondrial Channels edited by Pierre Sonveaux, Pierre Maechler and Jean-Claude Martinou.

  8. Frequency doubling of copper lasers using temperature-tuned ADP

    SciTech Connect

    Molander, W.A.

    1994-03-01

    The ability to generate high average power uv at 255 nm by frequency doubling the green line (510.6 nm) of copper lasers would greatly extend the utility of copper lasers. Material processing and microlithography are two areas of interest. The frequency-doubled copper laser could replace the KrF excimer laser, which has a similar wavelength (248 nm), in some applications. The frequency-doubled copper laser has a narrow linewidth and excellent beam quality at a competitive cost. Other attractive features are high reliability, low operating costs, and the absence of toxic gases. This paper will report recent progress in high-efficiency, high-average-power harmonic generation of the copper laser green line using noncritical phase matching in ADP. Frequency doubling of the yellow line (578.2 nm) and sum-frequency mixing of the two lines are also of interest. These processes, however, cannot be phase-matched in ADP and, therefore, will not be discussed here. The results reported and the issues identified here would be important in these other processes and also in many other frequency conversion schemes in the uv such as 4{omega} conversion of Nd{sup 3+}:YAG lasers.

  9. Nitrogen Control of Atrazine Utilization in Pseudomonas sp. Strain ADP

    PubMed Central

    García-González, Vicente; Govantes, Fernando; Shaw, Liz J.; Burns, Richard G.; Santero, Eduardo

    2003-01-01

    Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP uses the herbicide atrazine as the sole nitrogen source. We have devised a simple atrazine degradation assay to determine the effect of other nitrogen sources on the atrazine degradation pathway. The atrazine degradation rate was greatly decreased in cells grown on nitrogen sources that support rapid growth of Pseudomonas sp. strain ADP compared to cells cultivated on growth-limiting nitrogen sources. The presence of atrazine in addition to the nitrogen sources did not stimulate degradation. High degradation rates obtained in the presence of ammonium plus the glutamine synthetase inhibitor MSX and also with an Nas− mutant derivative grown on nitrate suggest that nitrogen regulation operates by sensing intracellular levels of some key nitrogen-containing metabolite. Nitrate amendment in soil microcosms resulted in decreased atrazine mineralization by the wild-type strain but not by the Nas− mutant. This suggests that, although nitrogen repression of the atrazine catabolic pathway may have a strong impact on atrazine biodegradation in nitrogen-fertilized soils, the use of selected mutant variants may contribute to overcoming this limitation. PMID:14660340

  10. Single molecule detection of PARP1 and PARP2 interaction with DNA strand breaks and their poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation using high-resolution AFM imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sukhanova, Maria V.; Abrakhi, Sanae; Joshi, Vandana; Pastre, David; Kutuzov, Mikhail M.; Anarbaev, Rashid O.; Curmi, Patrick A.; Hamon, Loic; Lavrik, Olga I.

    2016-01-01

    PARP1 and PARP2 are implicated in the synthesis of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) after detection of DNA damage. The specificity of PARP1 and PARP2 interaction with long DNA fragments containing single- and/or double-strand breaks (SSBs and DSBs) have been studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging in combination with biochemical approaches. Our data show that PARP1 localizes mainly on DNA breaks and exhibits a slight preference for nicks over DSBs, although the protein has a moderately high affinity for undamaged DNA. In contrast to PARP1, PARP2 is mainly detected at a single DNA nick site, exhibiting a low level of binding to undamaged DNA and DSBs. The enhancement of binding affinity of PARP2 for DNA containing a single nick was also observed using fluorescence titration. AFM studies reveal that activation of both PARPs leads to the synthesis of highly branched PAR whose size depends strongly on the presence of SSBs and DSBs for PARP1 and of SSBs for PARP2. The initial affinity between the PARP1, PARP2 and the DNA damaged site appears to influence both the size of the PAR synthesized and the time of residence of PARylated PARP1 and PARP2 on DNA damages. PMID:26673720

  11. Single molecule detection of PARP1 and PARP2 interaction with DNA strand breaks and their poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation using high-resolution AFM imaging.

    PubMed

    Sukhanova, Maria V; Abrakhi, Sanae; Joshi, Vandana; Pastre, David; Kutuzov, Mikhail M; Anarbaev, Rashid O; Curmi, Patrick A; Hamon, Loic; Lavrik, Olga I

    2016-04-01

    PARP1 and PARP2 are implicated in the synthesis of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) after detection of DNA damage. The specificity of PARP1 and PARP2 interaction with long DNA fragments containing single- and/or double-strand breaks (SSBs and DSBs) have been studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging in combination with biochemical approaches. Our data show that PARP1 localizes mainly on DNA breaks and exhibits a slight preference for nicks over DSBs, although the protein has a moderately high affinity for undamaged DNA. In contrast to PARP1, PARP2 is mainly detected at a single DNA nick site, exhibiting a low level of binding to undamaged DNA and DSBs. The enhancement of binding affinity of PARP2 for DNA containing a single nick was also observed using fluorescence titration. AFM studies reveal that activation of both PARPs leads to the synthesis of highly branched PAR whose size depends strongly on the presence of SSBs and DSBs for PARP1 and of SSBs for PARP2. The initial affinity between the PARP1, PARP2 and the DNA damaged site appears to influence both the size of the PAR synthesized and the time of residence of PARylated PARP1 and PARP2 on DNA damages.

  12. Inhibition of potentially lethal radiation damage repair in normal and neoplastic human cells by 3-aminobenzamide: an inhibitor of poly(ADP-ribosylation)

    SciTech Connect

    Thraves, P.J.; Mossman, K.L.; Frazier, D.T.; Dritschilo, A.

    1986-08-01

    The effect of 3-aminobenzamide (3AB), an inhibitor of poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase, on potentially lethal damage repair (PLDR) was investigated in normal human fibroblasts and four human tumor cell lines from tumors with varying degrees of radiocurability. The tumor lines selected were: Ewing's sarcoma, a bone tumor considered radiocurable and, human lung adenocarcinoma, osteosarcoma, and melanoma, three tumors considered nonradiocurable. PLDR was measured by comparing cell survival when cells were irradiated in a density-inhibited state and replated at appropriate cell numbers at specified times following irradiation to cell survival when cells were replated immediately following irradiation. 3AB was added to cultures 2 hr prior to irradiation and removed at the time of replating. Different test radiation doses were used for the various cell lines to obtain equivalent levels of cell survival. In the absence of inhibitor, PLDR was similar in all cell lines tested. In the presence of 8 mM 3AB, differential inhibition of PLDR was observed. PLDR was almost completely inhibited in Ewing's sarcoma cells and partially inhibited in normal fibroblast cells and osteosarcoma cells. No inhibition of PLDR was observed in the lung adenocarcinoma or melanoma cells. Except for the osteosarcoma cells, inhibition of PLDR by 3AB correlated well with radiocurability.

  13. Sugar-metal ion interactions: the complicated coordination structures of cesium ion with D-ribose and myo-inositol.

    PubMed

    Hu, Haijian; Xue, Junhui; Wen, Xiaodong; Li, Weihong; Zhang, Chao; Yang, Limin; Xu, Yizhuang; Zhao, Guozhong; Bu, Xiaoxia; Liu, Kexin; Chen, Jia'er; Wu, Jinguang

    2013-11-18

    The novel cesium chloride-D-ribose complex (CsCl·C5H10O5; Cs-R) and cesium chloride-myo-inositol complex (CsCl·C6H12O6; Cs-I) have been synthesized and characterized using X-ray diffraction and FTIR, FIR, THz, and Raman spectroscopy. Cs(+) is eight-coordinated to three chloride ions, O1 and O2 from one D-ribose molecule, O1 from another D-ribose molecule, and O4 and O5 from the third D-ribose molecule in Cs-R. For one D-ribose molecule, the oxygen atom O1 in the ring is coordinated to two cesium ions as an oxygen bridge, O2 is cocoordinated with O1 to one of the two cesium ions, and O4 and O5 are coordinated to the third cesium ion, respectively. O3 does not coordinate to metal ions and only takes part in forming hydrogen bonds. One chloride ion is connected to three cesium ions. Thus, a complicated structure of Cs-D-ribose forms. For Cs-I, Cs(+) is 10-coordinated to three chloride ions, O1 and O2 from one myo-inositol molecule, O3 and O4 from another myo-inositol molecule, O5 and O6 from the third myo-inositol molecule, and O6 from the fourth myo-inositol molecule. One metal ion is connected to four ligands, and one myo-inositol is coordinated to four Cs(+) ions, which is also a complicated coordination structure. Crystal structure results, FTIR, FIR, THz, and Raman spectra provide detailed information on the structure and coordination of hydroxyl groups to metal ions in the cesium chloride-D-ribose and cesium chloride-myo-inositol complexes.

  14. ADP1 affects abundance and endocytosis of PIN-FORMED proteins in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Li, Jieru; Li, Ruixi; Jiang, Zhaoyun; Gu, Hongya; Qu, Li-Jia

    2015-01-01

    Auxin, as a vital plant hormone, regulates almost every aspect of plant growth and development. We previously identified a dominant mutant, adp1-D, displaying loss of apical dominance. We also demonstrated that down-regulation of local auxin biosynthesis in adp1-D was responsible for the bushy phenotype of this mutant. Consistent with the reduction of local auxin biosynthesis, we recently discovered that protein abundance of PIN1, PIN3, and PIN7 was reduced in adp1-D without accompanying transcription level changes. Additionally, subcellular analysis revealed that over-expression of ADP1 inhibited endocytosis of PIN proteins. Taken together, we conclude that ADP1 regulates plant architecture through the fine-tuning of local auxin biosynthesis and through post-transcriptional regulation of auxin transporters. PMID:25482774

  15. The Mitochondrial Fission Receptor MiD51 Requires ADP as a Cofactor

    PubMed Central

    Losón, Oliver C.; Liu, Raymond; Rome, Michael E.; Meng, Shuxia; Kaiser, Jens T.; Shan, Shu-ou; Chan, David C.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Mitochondrial fission requires recruitment of dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) to the mitochondrial surface and activation of its GTP-dependent scission function. The Drp1 receptors MiD49 and MiD51 recruit Drp1 to facilitate mitochondrial fission, but their mechanism of action is poorly understood. Using X-ray crystallography, we demonstrate that MiD51 contains a nucleotidyl transferase domain that binds ADP with high affinity. MiD51 recruits Drp1 via a surface loop that functions independently of ADP binding. However, in the absence of nucleotide binding, the recruited Drp1 cannot be activated for fission. Purified MiD51 strongly inhibits Drp1 assembly and GTP hydrolysis in the absence of ADP. Addition of ADP relieves this inhibition and promotes Drp1 assembly into spirals with enhanced GTP hydrolysis. Our results reveal ADP as an essential cofactor for MiD51 during mitochondrial fission. PMID:24508339

  16. The mitochondrial fission receptor MiD51 requires ADP as a cofactor.

    PubMed

    Losón, Oliver C; Liu, Raymond; Rome, Michael E; Meng, Shuxia; Kaiser, Jens T; Shan, Shu-ou; Chan, David C

    2014-03-01

    Mitochondrial fission requires recruitment of dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) to the mitochondrial surface and activation of its GTP-dependent scission function. The Drp1 receptors MiD49 and MiD51 recruit Drp1 to facilitate mitochondrial fission, but their mechanism of action is poorly understood. Using X-ray crystallography, we demonstrate that MiD51 contains a nucleotidyl transferase domain that binds ADP with high affinity. MiD51 recruits Drp1 via a surface loop that functions independently of ADP binding. However, in the absence of nucleotide binding, the recruited Drp1 cannot be activated for fission. Purified MiD51 strongly inhibits Drp1 assembly and GTP hydrolysis in the absence of ADP. Addition of ADP relieves this inhibition and promotes Drp1 assembly into spirals with enhanced GTP hydrolysis. Our results reveal ADP as an essential cofactor for MiD51 during mitochondrial fission.

  17. An investigation of the equilibria between aqueous ribose, ribulose, and arabinose.

    PubMed

    Tewari, Y B; Goldberg, R N

    1985-08-01

    The thermodynamics of the equilibria between aqueous ribose, ribulose, and arabinose were investigated using high-pressure liquid chromatography and microcalorimetry. The reactions were carried out in aqueous phosphate buffer over the pH range 6.8-7.4 and over the temperature range 313.15-343.75 K using solubilized glucose isomerase with either Mg(NO3)2 or MgSO4 as cofactors. The equilibrium constants (K) and the standard state Gibbs energy (delta G degrees) and enthalpy (delta H degrees) changes at 298.15 K for the three equilibria investigated were found to be: ribose(aq) = ribulose(aq) K = 0.317, delta G degrees = 2.85 +/- 0.14 kJ mol-1, delta H degrees = 11.0 +/- 1.5 kJ mol-1; ribose(aq) = arabinose(aq) K = 4.00, delta G degrees = -3.44 +/- 0.30 kJ mol-1, delta H degrees = -9.8 +/- 3.0 kJ mol-1; ribulose(aq) = arabinose(aq) K = 12.6, delta G degrees = -6.29 +/- 0.34 kJ mol-1, delta H degrees = -20.75 +/- 3.4 kJ mol-1. Information on rates of the above reactions was also obtained. The temperature dependencies of the equilibrium constants are conveniently expressed as R in K = -delta G degrees 298.15/298.15 + delta H degrees 298.15[(1/298.15)-(1/T)] where R is the gas constant (8.31441 J mol-1 K-1) and T the thermodynamic temperature.

  18. Decaprenylphosphoryl-β-D-ribose 2'-epimerase from Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a magic drug target.

    PubMed

    Manina, G; Pasca, M R; Buroni, S; De Rossi, E; Riccardi, G

    2010-01-01

    Tuberculosis is still a leading cause of death in developing countries and a resurgent disease in developed countries. The selection and soaring spread of Mycobacterium tuberculosis multidrug-resistant (MDR-TB) and extensively drug-resistant strains (XDR-TB) is a severe public health problem. Currently, there is an urgent need of new drugs for tuberculosis treatment, with novel mechanisms of action and, moreover, the necessity to identify new drug targets. Several enzymes involved in various metabolic processes have been described as potential targets for the development of new drugs. Recently, two different classes of most promising drugs, the benzothiazinones (BTZ) and the dinitrobenzamide derivatives (DNB), have been found to be highly active against M. tuberculosis, including XDR-TB strains. Interestingly, both drugs have the same target: the heteromeric decaprenylphosphoryl-β-D-ribose 2'-epimerase encoded by dprE1 (Rv3790) and dprE2 (Rv3791) genes, respectively. DprE1 and DprE2 are involved in the biosynthesis of D-arabinose and, in particular, they are essential to perform the transformation of decaprenylphosphoryl-D-ribose to decaprenylphosphoryl-D-arabinose, which is a substrate for arabinosyltransferases in the synthesis of the cell-envelope arabinogalactan and liporabinomannan polysaccharides of mycobacteria. Arabinogalactan is a fundamental component of the mycobacterial cell wall, which covalently binds the outer layer of mycolic acids to peptidoglycan. The heteromeric decaprenylphosphoryl-β-D-ribose 2'-epimerase thus represents a valid vulnerable antimycobacterial drug target which could result in "magic" for tuberculosis treatment.

  19. Mw Spectroscopy Coupled with Ultrafast UV Laser Vaporization: {RIBOSE} Found in the Gas Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cocinero, Emilio J.; Ecija, Patricia; Basterretxea, Francisco J.; Fernandez, Jose A.; Castano, Fernando; Lesarri, Alberto; Grabow, Jens-Uwe

    2012-06-01

    Sugars are aldoses or ketoses with multiple hydroxy groups which have been elusive to spectroscopic studies. Here we report a rotational study of the aldopentose ribose. According to any standard textbook aldopentoses can exhibit either linear forms, cyclic five-membered (furanose) structures or six-membered (pyranose) rings, occurring either as α- or β- anomers depending on the orientation of the hydroxy group at C-1 (anomeric carbon). β-Furanose is predominant in ribonucleosides, RNA, ATP and other biochemically relevant derivatives, but is β-furanose the native form also of free ribose? Recent condensed-phase X-ray and older NMR studies delivered conflicting results. In order to solve this question we conducted a microwave study on D-ribose that, owing to ultrafast UV laser vaporization, has become the first C-5 sugar observed with rotational resolution. The spectrum revealed six conformations of free ribose, preferentially adopting β-pyranose chairs as well as higher-energy α-pyranose forms. The method also allowed for unambiguous distinction between different orientations of the hydroxy groups, which stabilize the structures by cooperative hydrogen-bond networks. No evidence was observed of the α-/β-furanoses or linear forms found in the biochemical derivatives. i) D. Šišak, L. B. McCusker, G. Zandomeneghi, B. H. Meier, D. Bläser, R. Boese, W. B. Schweizer, R. Gylmour and J. D. Dunitz Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 49, 4503, 2010. ii) W. Saenger Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 49, 6487, 2010. i) M. Rudrum, and D. F. Shaw, J. Chem. Soc. 52, 1965. ii) R. U. Lemieux and J. D. Stevens Can. J. Chem. 44, 249, 1966. iii) E. Breitmaier and U. Hollstein Org. Magn. Reson. 8, 573, 1976. E. J. Cocinero, A. Lesarri, P. Écija, F. J. Basterretxea, J. U. Grabow, J. A. Fernández and F. Castaño Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. in press: DOI: 10.1002/anie.201107973, 2012.

  20. An Ancient Fingerprint Indicates the Common Ancestry of Rossmann-Fold Enzymes Utilizing Different Ribose-Based Cofactors.

    PubMed

    Laurino, Paola; Tóth-Petróczy, Ágnes; Meana-Pañeda, Rubén; Lin, Wei; Truhlar, Donald G; Tawfik, Dan S

    2016-03-01

    Nucleoside-based cofactors are presumed to have preceded proteins. The Rossmann fold is one of the most ancient and functionally diverse protein folds, and most Rossmann enzymes utilize nucleoside-based cofactors. We analyzed an omnipresent Rossmann ribose-binding interaction: a carboxylate side chain at the tip of the second β-strand (β2-Asp/Glu). We identified a canonical motif, defined by the β2-topology and unique geometry. The latter relates to the interaction being bidentate (both ribose hydroxyls interacting with the carboxylate oxygens), to the angle between the carboxylate and the ribose, and to the ribose's ring configuration. We found that this canonical motif exhibits hallmarks of divergence rather than convergence. It is uniquely found in Rossmann enzymes that use different cofactors, primarily SAM (S-adenosyl methionine), NAD (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide), and FAD (flavin adenine dinucleotide). Ribose-carboxylate bidentate interactions in other folds are not only rare but also have a different topology and geometry. We further show that the canonical geometry is not dictated by a physical constraint--geometries found in noncanonical interactions have similar calculated bond energies. Overall, these data indicate the divergence of several major Rossmann-fold enzyme classes, with different cofactors and catalytic chemistries, from a common pre-LUCA (last universal common ancestor) ancestor that possessed the β2-Asp/Glu motif.

  1. Improvement of D-Ribose Production from Corn Starch Hydrolysate by a Transketolase-Deficient Strain Bacillus subtilis UJS0717.

    PubMed

    Wei, Zhuan; Zhou, Jue; Sun, WenJing; Cui, FengJie; Xu, QinHua; Liu, ChangFeng

    2015-01-01

    D-Ribose is a five-carbon sugar and generally used as an energy source to improve athletic performance and the ability. The culture conditions for maximum D-ribose production performance from cheap raw material corn starch hydrolysate were improved by using one-factor-at-a-time experiments and a three-level Box-Behnken factorial design. The optimal fermentation parameters were obtained as 36°C culture temperature, 10% inoculum volume, and 7.0 initial pH. The mathematical model was then developed to show the effect of each medium composition and their interactions on the production of D-ribose and estimated that the optimized D-ribose production performance with the concentration of 62.13 g/L, yield of 0.40 g/g, and volumetric productivity of 0.86 g/L·h could be obtained when the medium compositions were set as 157 g/L glucose, 21 g/L corn steep liquor, 3.2 g/L (NH4)2SO4, 1 g/L yeast extract, 0.05 g/L MnSO4·H2O, and 20 g/L CaCO3. These findings indicated the D-ribose production performance was significantly improved compared to that under original conditions. PMID:26759810

  2. Improvement of D-Ribose Production from Corn Starch Hydrolysate by a Transketolase-Deficient Strain Bacillus subtilis UJS0717

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Zhuan; Zhou, Jue; Sun, WenJing; Cui, FengJie; Xu, QinHua; Liu, ChangFeng

    2015-01-01

    D-Ribose is a five-carbon sugar and generally used as an energy source to improve athletic performance and the ability. The culture conditions for maximum D-ribose production performance from cheap raw material corn starch hydrolysate were improved by using one-factor-at-a-time experiments and a three-level Box-Behnken factorial design. The optimal fermentation parameters were obtained as 36°C culture temperature, 10% inoculum volume, and 7.0 initial pH. The mathematical model was then developed to show the effect of each medium composition and their interactions on the production of D-ribose and estimated that the optimized D-ribose production performance with the concentration of 62.13 g/L, yield of 0.40 g/g, and volumetric productivity of 0.86 g/L·h could be obtained when the medium compositions were set as 157 g/L glucose, 21 g/L corn steep liquor, 3.2 g/L (NH4)2SO4, 1 g/L yeast extract, 0.05 g/L MnSO4·H2O, and 20 g/L CaCO3. These findings indicated the D-ribose production performance was significantly improved compared to that under original conditions. PMID:26759810

  3. ADP-ribosylation of dinitrogenase reductase from Clostridium pasteurianum prevents its inhibition of nitrogenase from Azotobacter vinelandii.

    PubMed

    Murrell, S A; Lowery, R G; Ludden, P W

    1988-04-15

    The effect of ADP-ribosylation of dinitrogenase reductase on its binding to dinitrogenase was investigated. Dinitrogenase reductase from Clostridium pasteurianum (Cp2) was a substrate for the ADP-ribosyltransferase and the dinitrogenase-reductase-activating glycohydrolase from Rhodospirillum rubrum. ADP-ribosylation inactivated Cp2 and prevented its formation of a tight complex with dinitrogenase from Azotobacter vinelandii (Av1). The complex between Cp2 and Av1 could not be ADP-ribosylated once it formed.

  4. Cholera toxin can catalyze ADP-ribosylation of cytoskeletal proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Kaslow, H.R.; Groppi, V.E.; Abood, M.E.; Bourne, H.R.

    1981-11-01

    Cholera toxin catalyzes transfer of radiolabel from (/sup 32/P)NAD/sup +/ to several peptides in particulate preparations of human foreskin fibroblasts. Resolution of these peptides by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis allowed identification of two peptides of M/sub r/ = 42,000 and 52,000 as peptide subunits of a regulatory component of adenylate cyclase. The radiolabeling of another group of peptides (M/sub r/ = 50,000 to 65,000) suggested that cholera toxin could catalyze ADP-ribosylation of cytoskeletal proteins. This suggestion was confirmed by showing that incubation with cholera toxin and (/sup 32/P)NAD/sup +/ caused radiolabeling of purified microtubule and intermediate filament proteins.

  5. Norovirus Proteinase-Polymerase and Polymerase Are Both Active Forms of RNA-Dependent RNA Polymerase

    PubMed Central

    Belliot, Gaël; Sosnovtsev, Stanislav V.; Chang, Kyeong-Ok; Babu, Vijay; Uche, Uzo; Arnold, Jamie J.; Cameron, Craig E.; Green, Kim Y.

    2005-01-01

    In vitro mapping studies of the MD145 norovirus (Caliciviridae) ORF1 polyprotein identified two stable cleavage products containing the viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) domains: ProPol (a precursor comprised of both the proteinase and polymerase) and Pol (the mature polymerase). The goal of this study was to identify the active form (or forms) of the norovirus polymerase. The recombinant ProPol (expressed as Pro−Pol with an inactivated proteinase domain to prevent autocleavage) and recombinant Pol were purified after synthesis in bacteria and shown to be active RdRp enzymes. In addition, the mutant His-E1189A-ProPol protein (with active proteinase but with the natural ProPol cleavage site blocked) was active as an RdRp, confirming that the norovirus ProPol precursor could possess two enzymatic activities simultaneously. The effects of several UTP analogs on the RdRp activity of the norovirus and feline calicivirus Pro−Pol enzymes were compared and found to be similar. Our data suggest that the norovirus ProPol is a bifunctional enzyme during virus replication. The availability of this recombinant ProPol enzyme might prove useful in the development of antiviral drugs for control of the noroviruses associated with acute gastroenteritis. PMID:15681440

  6. FRET Response of a Modified Ribose Receptor Expressed in the Diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Hanna

    2011-08-26

    The ability to insert complex proteins into silica has many applications including biosensing. Previous research has demonstrated how to direct proteins to the biosilica of diatoms [1]. Here, we show that a complex fusion protein that includes an enzyme, a bacterial ribose periplasmic binding protein, flanked by fluorescent proteins constituting a FRET pair can remain functional in the frustules of living diatoms. A Sil3 tag is attached to the N-terminal end to localize the fusion protein to frustules of the diatom Thalassiosira pseudonana. When ribose was applied, a larger decrease in FRET response was seen in transformed cells than in untransformed cells. Multiple forms of the expression vector were tested to find the optimal system; specifically, a one-vector system was compared to a two-vector system and the gDNA version of the Sil3 localization tag was compared to the cDNA version. The optimal system was found to be a one-vector system with the genomic version of the Sil3 tag to direct the protein to the frustules. Localization of the enzyme to the frustules was further confirmed through cell fluorescence imaging.

  7. D-ribose competitively reverses inhibition by D-psicose of larval growth in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Sato, Masashi; Yokoi, Nobutoshi; Kurose, Hiroyuki; Yamasaki, Toru

    2009-05-01

    D-Psicose inhibits the growth of L1 stage Caenorhabditis elegans. Sugars, involved in the pentose phosphate pathway, were examined for their ability to reverse the inhibition. Among these sugars, D-ribose specifically exerted reversing activity in a competitive manner. The ingested sugars are probably phosphorylated, although it remains to be seen whether D-psicose is phosphorylated. The structural similarity of D-psicofuranose 6-phosphate (Pf6P) or D-psicofuranose (Pf) to D-ribofuranose 5-phosphate (Rf5P) suggests that Pf6P or Pf is reversibly docked in the active site(s) of ribose-5-phosphate isomerase(s) to act as an antimetabolite to Rf5P, leading to inhibition of the biosynthesis of nucleic acids. D-Psicose was much less potent against the L4 stage than against the L1 stage. This is probably because in the L4 stage the somatic cell lineages come to an end and the number of germ-line nuclei increases to about 1000.

  8. Disclosing the essentiality of ribose-5-phosphate isomerase B in Trypanosomatids.

    PubMed

    Faria, Joana; Loureiro, Inês; Santarém, Nuno; Cecílio, Pedro; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra; Tavares, Joana; Cordeiro-da-Silva, Anabela

    2016-05-27

    Ribose-5-phosphate isomerase (RPI) belongs to the non-oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway, catalysing the inter-conversion of D-ribose-5-phosphate and D-ribulose-5-phosphate. Trypanosomatids encode a type B RPI, whereas humans have a structurally unrelated type A, making RPIB worthy of exploration as a potential drug target. Null mutant generation in Leishmania infantum was only possible when an episomal copy of RPIB gene was provided, and the latter was retained both in vitro and in vivo in the absence of drug pressure. This suggests the gene is essential for parasite survival. Importantly, the inability to remove the second allele of RPIB gene in sKO mutants complemented with an episomal copy of RPIB carrying a mutation that abolishes isomerase activity suggests the essentiality is due to its metabolic function. In vitro, sKO promastigotes exhibited no defect in growth, metacyclogenesis or macrophage infection, however, an impairment in intracellular amastigotes' replication was observed. Additionally, mice infected with sKO mutants rescued by RPIB complementation had a reduced parasite burden in the liver. Likewise, Trypanosoma brucei is resistant to complete RPIB gene removal and mice infected with sKO mutants showed prolonged survival upon infection. Taken together our results genetically validate RPIB as a potential drug target in trypanosomatids.

  9. Disclosing the essentiality of ribose-5-phosphate isomerase B in Trypanosomatids

    PubMed Central

    Faria, Joana; Loureiro, Inês; Santarém, Nuno; Cecílio, Pedro; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra; Tavares, Joana; Cordeiro-da-Silva, Anabela

    2016-01-01

    Ribose-5-phosphate isomerase (RPI) belongs to the non-oxidative branch of the pentose phosphate pathway, catalysing the inter-conversion of D-ribose-5-phosphate and D-ribulose-5-phosphate. Trypanosomatids encode a type B RPI, whereas humans have a structurally unrelated type A, making RPIB worthy of exploration as a potential drug target. Null mutant generation in Leishmania infantum was only possible when an episomal copy of RPIB gene was provided, and the latter was retained both in vitro and in vivo in the absence of drug pressure. This suggests the gene is essential for parasite survival. Importantly, the inability to remove the second allele of RPIB gene in sKO mutants complemented with an episomal copy of RPIB carrying a mutation that abolishes isomerase activity suggests the essentiality is due to its metabolic function. In vitro, sKO promastigotes exhibited no defect in growth, metacyclogenesis or macrophage infection, however, an impairment in intracellular amastigotes’ replication was observed. Additionally, mice infected with sKO mutants rescued by RPIB complementation had a reduced parasite burden in the liver. Likewise, Trypanosoma brucei is resistant to complete RPIB gene removal and mice infected with sKO mutants showed prolonged survival upon infection. Taken together our results genetically validate RPIB as a potential drug target in trypanosomatids. PMID:27230471

  10. Preferential uptake of ribose by primitive cells might explain why RNA was favored over its analogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohorille, Andrew; Wei, Chenyu

    Permeation of molecules through membranes is a fundamental process in biological systems, which not only involves mass and signal transfers between the interior of a contemporary cell and its environment, but was also of crucial importance in the origin of life. In the absence of complex protein transporters, nutrients and building blocks of biopolymers must have been able to permeate membranes at sufficient rates to support primordial metabolism and cel-lular reproduction. From this perspective one class of solutes that is of special interest are monosaccharides, which serve not only as nutritional molecules but also as building blocks for information molecules. In particular, ribose is a part of the RNA backbone, but RNA analogs containing a number of other sugars have also been shown to form stable duplexes. Why, among these possibilities, ribose (and, subsequently, deoxyribose) was selected for the backbone of information polymers is still poorly understood. It was recently found that ribose permeates membranes an order of magnitude faster than its diastereomers, arabinose and xylose [1]. On this basis it was hypothesized that differences in membrane permeability to aldopentoses provide a mechanism for preferential delivery of ribose to primitive cells for subsequent, selective incorporation into nucleotides and their polymers. However, the origins of these unusually large differences had not been well understood. We addressed this issue in molecular dynamics simulations combined with free energy calculations. It was found that the free energy barrier for transferring ribose from water to the bilayer is lower by 1.5-2 kcal/mol than the barrier for transferring the other two aldopentoses. The calculated [2] and measured [1] permeability coefficients are in an excellent agreement. The sugar structures that permeate the membrane are -pyranoses, with a possible contribution of the -anomer for arabinose. The furanoid form of ribose is not substantially involved in

  11. Structure of the Escherichia coli heptosyltransferase WaaC: binary complexes with ADP and ADP-2-deoxy-2-fluoro heptose.

    PubMed

    Grizot, Sylvestre; Salem, Michèle; Vongsouthi, Vanida; Durand, Lionel; Moreau, François; Dohi, Hirofumi; Vincent, Stéphane; Escaich, Sonia; Ducruix, Arnaud

    2006-10-20

    Lipopolysaccharides constitute the outer leaflet of the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and are therefore essential for cell growth and viability. The heptosyltransferase WaaC is a glycosyltransferase (GT) involved in the synthesis of the inner core region of LPS. It catalyzes the addition of the first L-glycero-D-manno-heptose (heptose) molecule to one 3-deoxy-D-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid (Kdo) residue of the Kdo2-lipid A molecule. Heptose is an essential component of the LPS core domain; its absence results in a truncated lipopolysaccharide associated with the deep-rough phenotype causing a greater susceptibility to antibiotic and an attenuated virulence for pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria. Thus, WaaC represents a promising target in antibacterial drug design. Here, we report the structure of WaaC from the Escherichia coli pathogenic strain RS218 alone at 1.9 A resolution, and in complex with either ADP or the non-cleavable analog ADP-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-heptose of the sugar donor at 2.4 A resolution. WaaC adopts the GT-B fold in two domains, characteristic of one glycosyltransferase structural superfamily. The comparison of the three different structures shows that WaaC does not undergo a domain rotation, characteristic of the GT-B family, upon substrate binding, but allows the substrate analog and the reaction product to adopt remarkably distinct conformations inside the active site. In addition, both binary complexes offer a close view of the donor subsite and, together with results from site-directed mutagenesis studies, provide evidence for a model of the catalytic mechanism.

  12. Insights into the mechanism of ADP action on flagellar motility derived from studies on bull sperm.

    PubMed

    Lesich, Kathleen A; Pelle, Dominic W; Lindemann, Charles B

    2008-07-01

    Adenosine diphosphate (ADP) is known to have interesting effects on flagellar motility. Permeabilized and reactivated bull sperm exhibit a marked reduction in beating frequency and a greatly increased beat amplitude in the presence of 1-4 mM ADP. In this study we examined the force production of sperm reactivated with 0.1 mM ATP with and without 1 mM ADP and found that there is little or no resulting change in the stalling force produced by a bull sperm flagella in response to ADP. Because bull sperm bend to a higher curvature after ADP treatment we explored the possibility that ADP-treated sperm flagella are more flexible. We measured the stiffness of 50 muM sodium vanadate treated bull sperm in the presence of 4 mM ADP, but found no change in the passive flagellar stiffness. When we analyzed the torque that develops in ADP-treated sperm at the point of beat reversal we found that the torque developed by the flagellum is significantly increased. Our torque estimates also allow us to calculate the transverse force (t-force) acting on the flagellum at the point of beat direction reversal. We find that the t-force at the switch-point of the beat is increased significantly in the ADP treated condition, averaging 0.7 +/- 0.29 nN/microm in 0.1 mM ATP and increasing to 2.9 +/- 1.2 nN/microm in 0.1 mM ATP plus 4 mM ADP. This suggests that ADP is exerting its effect on the beat by increasing the tenacity of dynein attachment at the B-subtubule. This could be a direct result of a regulatory effect of ADP on the binding affinity of dynein for the B-subtubule of the outer doublets. This result could also help to explain a number of previous experimental observations, as discussed. PMID:18375503

  13. Insights into the Mechanism of ADP Action on Flagellar Motility Derived from Studies on Bull Sperm

    PubMed Central

    Lesich, Kathleen A.; Pelle, Dominic W.; Lindemann, Charles B.

    2008-01-01

    Adenosine diphosphate (ADP) is known to have interesting effects on flagellar motility. Permeabilized and reactivated bull sperm exhibit a marked reduction in beating frequency and a greatly increased beat amplitude in the presence of 1–4 mM ADP. In this study we examined the force production of sperm reactivated with 0.1 mM ATP with and without 1 mM ADP and found that there is little or no resulting change in the stalling force produced by a bull sperm flagella in response to ADP. Because bull sperm bend to a higher curvature after ADP treatment we explored the possibility that ADP-treated sperm flagella are more flexible. We measured the stiffness of 50 μM sodium vanadate treated bull sperm in the presence of 4 mM ADP, but found no change in the passive flagellar stiffness. When we analyzed the torque that develops in ADP-treated sperm at the point of beat reversal we found that the torque developed by the flagellum is significantly increased. Our torque estimates also allow us to calculate the transverse force (t-force) acting on the flagellum at the point of beat direction reversal. We find that the t-force at the switch-point of the beat is increased significantly in the ADP treated condition, averaging 0.7 ± 0.29 nN/μm in 0.1 mM ATP and increasing to 2.9 ± 1.2 nN/μm in 0.1 mM ATP plus 4 mM ADP. This suggests that ADP is exerting its effect on the beat by increasing the tenacity of dynein attachment at the B-subtubule. This could be a direct result of a regulatory effect of ADP on the binding affinity of dynein for the B-subtubule of the outer doublets. This result could also help to explain a number of previous experimental observations, as discussed. PMID:18375503

  14. Prechemistry Nucleotide Selection Checkpoints in the Reaction Pathway of DNA Polymerase I and Roles of Glu710 and Tyr766

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The accuracy of high-fidelity DNA polymerases such as DNA polymerase I (Klenow fragment) is governed by conformational changes early in the reaction pathway that serve as fidelity checkpoints, identifying inappropriate template–nucleotide pairings. The fingers-closing transition (detected by a fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based assay) is the unique outcome of binding a correct incoming nucleotide, both complementary to the templating base and with a deoxyribose (rather than ribose) sugar structure. Complexes with mispaired dNTPs or complementary rNTPs are arrested at an earlier stage, corresponding to a partially closed fingers conformation, in which weak binding of DNA and nucleotide promote dissociation and resampling of the substrate pool. A 2-aminopurine fluorescence probe on the DNA template provides further information about the steps preceding fingers closing. A characteristic 2-aminopurine signal is observed on binding a complementary nucleotide, regardless of whether the sugar is deoxyribose or ribose. However, mispaired dNTPs show entirely different behavior. Thus, a fidelity checkpoint ahead of fingers closing is responsible for distinguishing complementary from noncomplementary nucleotides and routing them toward different outcomes. The E710A mutator polymerase has a defect in the early fidelity checkpoint such that some complementary dNTPs are treated as if they were mispaired. In the Y766A mutant, the early checkpoint functions normally, but some correctly paired dNTPs do not efficiently undergo fingers closing. Thus, both mutator alleles cause a blurring of the distinction between correct and incorrect base pairs and result in a larger fraction of errors passing through the prechemistry fidelity checkpoints. PMID:23937394

  15. The Level of AdpA Directly Affects Expression of Developmental Genes in Streptomyces coelicolor ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Wolański, Marcin; Donczew, Rafał; Kois-Ostrowska, Agnieszka; Masiewicz, Paweł; Jakimowicz, Dagmara; Zakrzewska-Czerwińska, Jolanta

    2011-01-01

    AdpA is a key regulator of morphological differentiation in Streptomyces. In contrast to Streptomyces griseus, relatively little is known about AdpA protein functions in Streptomyces coelicolor. Here, we report for the first time the translation accumulation profile of the S. coelicolor adpA (adpASc) gene; the level of S. coelicolor AdpA (AdpASc) increased, reaching a maximum in the early stage of aerial mycelium formation (after 36 h), and remained relatively stable for the next several hours (48 to 60 h), and then the signal intensity decreased considerably. AdpASc specifically binds the adpASc promoter region in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that its expression is autoregulated; surprisingly, in contrast to S. griseus, the protein presumably acts as a transcriptional activator. We also demonstrate a direct influence of AdpASc on the expression of several genes whose products play key roles in the differentiation of S. coelicolor: STI, a protease inhibitor; RamR, an atypical response regulator that itself activates expression of the genes for a small modified peptide that is required for aerial growth; and ClpP1, an ATP-dependent protease. The diverse influence of AdpASc protein on the expression of the analyzed genes presumably results mainly from different affinities of AdpASc protein to individual promoters. PMID:21926228

  16. In-vitro digestibility and amino acid composition of soy protein isolate cross-linked with microbial transglutaminase followed by heating with ribose.

    PubMed

    Gan, Chee-Yuen; Cheng, Lai-Hoong; Azahari, Baharin; Easa, Azhar Mat

    2009-01-01

    Cross-linked soy protein isolate (SPI) gels were produced via single-treatment of SPI with microbial transglutaminase (MTG) for 5 h or 24 h, or with ribose for 2 h, or via combined-treatments of SPI with MTG followed by heating with ribose. Assessment of gel strength and solubility concluded that measures which increased protein cross-links resulted in improved gel strength; however, in most cases the digestibility and amino acid content of the gels were reduced. The combined treated gel of SPI/MTG for 24 h/ribose was more easily digested by digestive enzymes and retained higher amounts of amino acids compared with the control Maillard gels of SPI with ribose. MTG consumed lysine and glutamine and reduced the availability of amino acids for the Maillard reaction with ribose. MTG was able to preserve the nutritional value of SPI against the destructive effect of the Maillard reaction and cross-links.

  17. Inhibitory Effect of Bridged Nucleosides on Thermus aquaticus DNA Polymerase and Insight into the Binding Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sung-Kun; Castro, Aaron; Kim, Edward S.; Dinkel, Austin P.; Liu, Xiaoyun; Castro, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    Modified nucleosides have the potential to inhibit DNA polymerases for the treatment of viral infections and cancer. With the hope of developing potent drug candidates by the modification of the 2’,4’-position of the ribose with the inclusion of a bridge, efforts were focused on the inhibition of Taq DNA polymerase using quantitative real time PCR, and the results revealed the significant inhibitory effects of 2’,4’-bridged thymidine nucleoside on the polymerase. Study on the mode of inhibition revealed the competitive mechanism with which the 2’,4’-bridged thymidine operates. With a Ki value of 9.7 ± 1.1 μM, the 2’,4’-bridged thymidine proved to be a very promising inhibitor. Additionally, docking analysis showed that all the nucleosides including 2’,4’-bridged thymidine were able to dock in the active site, indicating that the substrate analogs reflect a structural complementarity to the enzyme active site. The analysis also provided evidence that Asp610 was a key binding site for 2’,4’-bridged thymidine. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations were performed to further understand the conformational variations of the binding. The root-mean-square deviation (RMSD) values for the peptide backbone of the enzyme and the nitrogenous base of the inhibitor stabilized within 0.8 and 0.2 ns, respectively. Furthermore, the MD analysis indicates substantial conformational change in the ligand (inhibitor) as the nitrogenous base rotated anticlockwise with respect to the sugar moiety, complemented by the formation of several new hydrogen bonds where Arg587 served as a pivot axis for binding formation. In conclusion, the active site inhibition of Taq DNA polymerase by 2’,4’-bridged thymidine suggests the potential of bridged nucleosides as drug candidates. PMID:26820310

  18. Box C/D RNA guides for the ribose methylation of archaeal tRNAs. The tRNATrp intron guides the formation of two ribose-methylated nucleosides in the mature tRNATrp

    PubMed Central

    d’Orval, Béatrice Clouet; Bortolin, Marie-Line; Gaspin, Christine; Bachellerie, Jean-Pierre

    2001-01-01

    Following a search of the Pyrococcus genomes for homologs of eukaryotic methylation guide small nucleolar RNAs, we have experimentally identified in Pyrococcus abyssi four novel box C/D small RNAs predicted to direct 2′-O-ribose methylations onto the first position of the anticodon in tRNALeu(CAA), tRNALeu(UAA), elongator tRNAMet and tRNATrp, respectively. Remarkably, one of them corresponds to the intron of its presumptive target, pre-tRNATrp. This intron is predicted to direct in cis two distinct ribose methylations within the unspliced tRNA precursor, not only onto the first position of the anticodon in the 5′ exon but also onto position 39 (universal tRNA numbering) in the 3′ exon. The two intramolecular RNA duplexes expected to direct methylation, which both span an exon–intron junction in pre-tRNATrp, are phylogenetically conserved in euryarchaeotes. We have experimentally confirmed the predicted guide function of the box C/D intron in halophile Haloferax volcanii by mutagenesis analysis, using an in vitro splicing/RNA modification assay in which the two cognate ribose methylations of pre-tRNATrp are faithfully reproduced. Euryarchaeal pre-tRNATrp should provide a unique system to further investigate the molecular mechanisms of RNA-guided ribose methylation and gain new insights into the origin and evolution of the complex family of archaeal and eukaryotic box C/D small RNAs. PMID:11713301

  19. Identification and characterization of a novel Ribose 5-phosphate isomerase B from Leishmania donovani.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Preet Kamal; Dinesh, Neeradi; Soumya, Neelagiri; Babu, Neerupudi Kishore; Singh, Sushma

    2012-04-27

    Leishmaniasis is a group of tropical diseases caused by protozoan parasites of the genus Leishmania. Due to the emergence of resistance to the available antileishmanial drugs there is an immediate need to identify molecular targets on which to base future treatment strategies. Ribose 5-phosphate isomerase (Rpi; EC 5.3.1.6) is a key enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) which catalyses the reversible aldose-ketose isomerization between Ribose 5-phosphate (R5P) and Ribulose 5-phosphate (Ru5P). It exists in two isoforms A and B. These two are completely unrelated enzymes catalyzing the same reaction. Analysis of the Leishmania infantum genome revealed that though the RpiB gene is present, RpiA homologs are completely absent. An absence of RpiBs in the genomes of higher animals makes this enzyme a possible target for the chemotherapy of Leishmaniasis. In this paper, we report for the first time the presence of B isoform of the Rpi enzyme in Leishmania donovani (LdRpiB) by cloning and molecular characterization of the enzyme. An amplified L. donovani RpiB gene is 519 bp and encodes for a putative 172 amino acid protein with a molecular mass of ∼19 kDa. An ∼19 kDa protein with poly-His tag at the C-terminal end was obtained by heterologous expression of LdRpiB in Escherichia coli. The recombinant form of RpiB was obtained in soluble and active form. The LdRpiB exists as a dimer of dimers i.e. the tetramer form. The polyclonal antibody against Trypanosoma cruzi RpiB could detect a band of ∼19 kDa with the purified recombinant RpiB as well as native RpiB from the L. donovani promastigotes. Recombinant RpiB obeys the classical Michaelis-Menten kinetics utilizing R5P as the substrate with a K(m) value of 2.4±0.6 mM and K(cat) value of 30±5.2 s(-1). Our study confirms the presence of Ribose 5-phosphate isomerase B in L. donovani and provides functional characterization of RpiB for further validating it as a potential drug target.

  20. The evolutionary conservation of DNA polymerase. alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.A.; Korn, D.; Wang, T.S.F. )

    1988-08-25

    The evolutionary conservation of DNA polymerase {alpha} was assessed by immunological and molecular genetic approaches. Four anti-human KB cell DNA polymerase {alpha} monoclonal antibodies were tested for their ability to recognize a phylogenetically broad array of eukaryotic DNA polymerases. While the single non-neutralizing antibody used in this study recognizes higher mammalian (human, simian, canine, and bovine) polymerases only, three neutralizing antibodies exhibit greater, but variable, extents of cross-reactivity among vertebrate species. Genomic Southern hybridization studies with the cDNA of the human DNA polymerase {alpha} catalytic polypeptide identify the existence of many consensus DNA sequences within the DNA polymerase genes of vertebrate, invertebrate, plant and unicellular organisms. These findings illustrate the differential evolutionary conservation of four unique epitopes on DNA sequences, presumably reflective of critical functional domains, in the DNA polymerase genes from a broad diversity of living forms.

  1. Botulinum ADP-ribosyltransferase activity as affected by detergents and phospholipids.

    PubMed

    Maehama, T; Ohoka, Y; Ohtsuka, T; Takahashi, K; Nagata, K; Nozawa, Y; Ueno, K; Ui, M; Katada, T

    1990-04-24

    GTP-binding proteins with Mr values of 22,000 and 25,000 in bovine brain cytosol were ADP-ribosylated by an exoenzyme (termed C3) purified from Clostridium botulinum type C. The rate of C3-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation of the partially purified substrates was extremely low by itself, but was increased enormously when a protein factor(s) obtained from the cytosol was simultaneously added. The rate of the C3-catalyzed reaction was also stimulated by the addition of certain types of detergents or phospholipids even in the absence of the protein factors. The ADP-ribosylation appeared to be enhanced to an extent more than the additive effect of either the protein factors or the detergents (and phospholipids). Thus, ADP-ribosylation catalyzed by botulinum C3 enzyme was affected not only by cytoplasmic protein factors but also by detergents or phospholipids in manners different from each other.

  2. Unidirectional growth of pure and L-lysine added ADP crystals from aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salarian, Samaneh; Dizaji, Hamid Rezagholipour

    2014-01-01

    Pure and L-lysine added ammonium dihydrogen phosphate (ADP) crystals were grown in the <001> direction by Sankaranarayanan-Ramasamy (S-R) method. The grown crystals were characterized by X-Ray diffractometry (XRD), UV-Vis spectroscopy, Fourier Transform Infrared (FT-IR) and Vicker's Microhardness analysis. XRD spectrum of each of the grown crystals proved its crystallinity. The crystals showed good transparency in the entire visible region. FT-IR spectra of the specimens revealed the presence of functional groups in them. The hardness of the pure and L-lysine added ADP crystals were measured and that of the added one was found higher. Meanwhile, it was found that the ADP crystals (pure and L-lysine added) grown by S-R method had higher hardness compared to ADP crystal grown by conventional method.

  3. Preliminary crystallographic analysis of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    SciTech Connect

    Cupp-Vickery, Jill R. Igarashi, Robert Y.; Meyer, Christopher R.

    2005-03-01

    Crystallization and X-ray diffraction methods for native A. tumefaciens ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and its selenomethionyl derivative are described. Two crystal forms are identified, both of which diffract to 2 Å.

  4. Use of genetically encoded sensors to monitor cytosolic ATP/ADP ratio in living cells.

    PubMed

    Tarasov, Andrei I; Rutter, Guy A

    2014-01-01

    ATP is not only recognized as the universal energy "currency" in most cells but also plays a less well-known role as an intracellular and extracellular messenger. Here, we review novel approaches for measuring free ATP (or ATP/ADP ratios) in living mammalian cells by using genetically encoded sensors. We also discuss the key technical aspects of routine real-time ATP/ADP monitoring using as a model one of the last-generation fluorescent probes, a fusion protein commonly known as "Perceval." Finally, we present detailed guidelines for the simultaneous measurement of cytosolic ATP/ADP ratios and Ca(2+) concentrations alongside electrical parameters in individual pancreatic β cells, in which energy metabolism is tightly linked to plasma membrane excitability to control the secretion of insulin. With appropriate variations, this approach can be adapted to the study of cytosolic ATP/ADP ratios and Ca(2+) concentrations in malignant cells, two important aspects of oncometabolism.

  5. An Ancient Fingerprint Indicates the Common Ancestry of Rossmann-Fold Enzymes Utilizing Different Ribose-Based Cofactors

    PubMed Central

    Laurino, Paola; Tóth-Petróczy, Ágnes; Meana-Pañeda, Rubén; Lin, Wei; Truhlar, Donald G.; Tawfik, Dan S.

    2016-01-01

    Nucleoside-based cofactors are presumed to have preceded proteins. The Rossmann fold is one of the most ancient and functionally diverse protein folds, and most Rossmann enzymes utilize nucleoside-based cofactors. We analyzed an omnipresent Rossmann ribose-binding interaction: a carboxylate side chain at the tip of the second β-strand (β2-Asp/Glu). We identified a canonical motif, defined by the β2-topology and unique geometry. The latter relates to the interaction being bidentate (both ribose hydroxyls interacting with the carboxylate oxygens), to the angle between the carboxylate and the ribose, and to the ribose’s ring configuration. We found that this canonical motif exhibits hallmarks of divergence rather than convergence. It is uniquely found in Rossmann enzymes that use different cofactors, primarily SAM (S-adenosyl methionine), NAD (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide), and FAD (flavin adenine dinucleotide). Ribose-carboxylate bidentate interactions in other folds are not only rare but also have a different topology and geometry. We further show that the canonical geometry is not dictated by a physical constraint—geometries found in noncanonical interactions have similar calculated bond energies. Overall, these data indicate the divergence of several major Rossmann-fold enzyme classes, with different cofactors and catalytic chemistries, from a common pre-LUCA (last universal common ancestor) ancestor that possessed the β2-Asp/Glu motif. PMID:26938925

  6. The energetics of allosteric regulation of ADP release from myosin heads.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Del R; Baker, Josh E

    2009-06-28

    Myosin molecules are involved in a wide range of transport and contractile activities in cells. A single myosin head functions through its ATPase reaction as a force generator and as a mechanosensor, and when two or more myosin heads work together in moving along an actin filament, the interplay between these mechanisms contributes to collective myosin behaviors. For example, the interplay between force-generating and force-sensing mechanisms coordinates the two heads of a myosin V molecule in its hand-over-hand processive stepping along an actin filament. In muscle, it contributes to the Fenn effect and smooth muscle latch. In both examples, a key force-sensing mechanism is the regulation of ADP release via interhead forces that are generated upon actin-myosin binding. Here we present a model describing the mechanism of allosteric regulation of ADP release from myosin heads as a change, DeltaDeltaG(-D), in the standard free energy for ADP release that results from the work, Deltamicro(mech), performed by that myosin head upon ADP release, or DeltaDeltaG(-D) = Deltamicro(mech). We show that this model is consistent with previous measurements for strain-dependent kinetics of ADP release in both myosin V and muscle myosin II. The model makes explicit the energetic cost of accelerating ADP release, showing that acceleration of ADP release during myosin V processivity requires approximately 4 kT of energy whereas the energetic cost for accelerating ADP release in a myosin II-based actin motility assay is only approximately 0.4 kT. The model also predicts that the acceleration of ADP release involves a dissipation of interhead forces. To test this prediction, we use an in vitro motility assay to show that the acceleration of ADP release from both smooth and skeletal muscle myosin II correlates with a decrease in interhead force. Our analyses provide clear energetic constraints for models of the allosteric regulation of ADP release and provide novel, testable insights

  7. The energetics of allosteric regulation of ADP release from myosin heads.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Del R; Baker, Josh E

    2009-06-28

    Myosin molecules are involved in a wide range of transport and contractile activities in cells. A single myosin head functions through its ATPase reaction as a force generator and as a mechanosensor, and when two or more myosin heads work together in moving along an actin filament, the interplay between these mechanisms contributes to collective myosin behaviors. For example, the interplay between force-generating and force-sensing mechanisms coordinates the two heads of a myosin V molecule in its hand-over-hand processive stepping along an actin filament. In muscle, it contributes to the Fenn effect and smooth muscle latch. In both examples, a key force-sensing mechanism is the regulation of ADP release via interhead forces that are generated upon actin-myosin binding. Here we present a model describing the mechanism of allosteric regulation of ADP release from myosin heads as a change, DeltaDeltaG(-D), in the standard free energy for ADP release that results from the work, Deltamicro(mech), performed by that myosin head upon ADP release, or DeltaDeltaG(-D) = Deltamicro(mech). We show that this model is consistent with previous measurements for strain-dependent kinetics of ADP release in both myosin V and muscle myosin II. The model makes explicit the energetic cost of accelerating ADP release, showing that acceleration of ADP release during myosin V processivity requires approximately 4 kT of energy whereas the energetic cost for accelerating ADP release in a myosin II-based actin motility assay is only approximately 0.4 kT. The model also predicts that the acceleration of ADP release involves a dissipation of interhead forces. To test this prediction, we use an in vitro motility assay to show that the acceleration of ADP release from both smooth and skeletal muscle myosin II correlates with a decrease in interhead force. Our analyses provide clear energetic constraints for models of the allosteric regulation of ADP release and provide novel, testable insights

  8. Multiple forms of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase from tomato fruit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, B. Y.; Janes, H. W.

    1997-01-01

    ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGP) was purified from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) fruit to apparent homogeneity. By sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis the enzyme migrated as two close bands with molecular weights of 50,000 and 51,000. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of the purified enzyme, however, revealed at least five major protein spots that could be distinguished by their slight differences in net charge and molecular weight. Whereas all of the spots were recognized by the antiserum raised against tomato fruit AGP holoenzyme, only three of them reacted strongly with antiserum raised against the potato tuber AGP large subunit, and the other two spots (with lower molecular weights) reacted specifically with antisera raised against spinach leaf AGP holoenzyme and the potato tuber AGP small subunit. The results suggest the existence of at least three isoforms of the AGP large subunit and two isoforms of the small subunit in tomato fruit in vivo. The native molecular mass of the enzyme determined by gel filtration was 220 +/- 10 kD, indicating a tetrameric structure for AGP from tomato fruit. The purified enzyme is very sensitive to 3-phosphoglycerate/inorganic phosphate regulation.

  9. ADP-stimulated contraction: A predictor of thin-filament activation in cardiac disease

    PubMed Central

    Sequeira, Vasco; Najafi, Aref; Wijnker, Paul J. M.; Michels, Michelle; Kuster, Diederik W. D.; van der Velden, Jolanda

    2015-01-01

    Diastolic dysfunction is general to all idiopathic dilated (IDCM) and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) patients. Relaxation deficits may result from increased actin–myosin formation during diastole due to altered tropomyosin position, which blocks myosin binding to actin in the absence of Ca2+. We investigated whether ADP-stimulated force development (without Ca2+) can be used to reveal changes in actin–myosin blockade in human cardiomyopathy cardiomyocytes. Cardiac samples from HCM patients, harboring thick-filament (MYH7mut, MYBPC3mut) and thin-filament (TNNT2mut, TNNI3mut) mutations, and IDCM were compared with sarcomere mutation-negative HCM (HCMsmn) and nonfailing donors. Myofilament ADP sensitivity was higher in IDCM and HCM compared with donors, whereas it was lower for MYBPC3. Increased ADP sensitivity in IDCM, HCMsmn, and MYH7mut was caused by low phosphorylation of myofilament proteins, as it was normalized to donors by protein kinase A (PKA) treatment. Troponin exchange experiments in a TNNT2mut sample corrected the abnormal actin–myosin blockade. In MYBPC3trunc samples, ADP sensitivity highly correlated with cardiac myosin-binding protein-C (cMyBP-C) protein level. Incubation of cardiomyocytes with cMyBP-C antibody against the actin-binding N-terminal region reduced ADP sensitivity, indicative of cMyBP-C’s role in actin–myosin regulation. In the presence of Ca2+, ADP increased myofilament force development and sarcomere stiffness. Enhanced sarcomere stiffness in sarcomere mutation-positive HCM samples was irrespective of the phosphorylation background. In conclusion, ADP-stimulated contraction can be used as a tool to study how protein phosphorylation and mutant proteins alter accessibility of myosin binding on actin. In the presence of Ca2+, pathologic [ADP] and low PKA-phosphorylation, high actin–myosin formation could contribute to the impaired myocardial relaxation observed in cardiomyopathies. PMID:26621701

  10. Analytical Design Package (ADP2): A computer aided engineering tool for aircraft transparency design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wuerer, J. E.; Gran, M.; Held, T. W.

    1994-01-01

    The Analytical Design Package (ADP2) is being developed as a part of the Air Force Frameless Transparency Program (FTP). ADP2 is an integrated design tool consisting of existing analysis codes and Computer Aided Engineering (CAE) software. The objective of the ADP2 is to develop and confirm an integrated design methodology for frameless transparencies, related aircraft interfaces, and their corresponding tooling. The application of this methodology will generate high confidence for achieving a qualified part prior to mold fabrication. ADP2 is a customized integration of analysis codes, CAE software, and material databases. The primary CAE integration tool for the ADP2 is P3/PATRAN, a commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) software tool. The open architecture of P3/PATRAN allows customized installations with different applications modules for specific site requirements. Integration of material databases allows the engineer to select a material, and those material properties are automatically called into the relevant analysis code. The ADP2 materials database will be composed of four independent schemas: CAE Design, Processing, Testing, and Logistics Support. The design of ADP2 places major emphasis on the seamless integration of CAE and analysis modules with a single intuitive graphical interface. This tool is being designed to serve and be used by an entire project team, i.e., analysts, designers, materials experts, and managers. The final version of the software will be delivered to the Air Force in Jan. 1994. The Analytical Design Package (ADP2) will then be ready for transfer to industry. The package will be capable of a wide range of design and manufacturing applications.

  11. Ligand-induced conformational changes in a thermophilic ribose-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Cuneo, Matthew J.; Beese, Lorena S.; Hellinga, Homme W.

    2009-05-21

    Members of the periplasmic binding protein (PBP) superfamily are involved in transport and signaling processes in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. Biological responses are typically mediated by ligand-induced conformational changes in which the binding event is coupled to a hinge-bending motion that brings together two domains in a closed form. In all PBP-mediated biological processes, downstream partners recognize the closed form of the protein. This motion has also been exploited in protein engineering experiments to construct biosensors that transduce ligand binding to a variety of physical signals. Understanding the mechanistic details of PBP conformational changes, both global (hinge bending, twisting, shear movements) and local (rotamer changes, backbone motion), therefore is not only important for understanding their biological function but also for protein engineering experiments. Here we present biochemical characterization and crystal structure determination of the periplasmic ribose-binding protein (RBP) from the hyperthermophile Thermotoga maritima in its ribose-bound and unliganded state. The T. maritima RBP (tmRBP) has 39% sequence identity and is considerably more resistant to thermal denaturation (appTm value is 108 C) than the mesophilic Escherichia coli homolog (ecRBP) (appTm value is 56 C). Polar ligand interactions and ligand-induced global conformational changes are conserved among ecRBP and tmRBP; however local structural rearrangements involving side-chain motions in the ligand-binding site are not conserved. Although the large-scale ligand-induced changes are mediated through similar regions, and are produced by similar backbone movements in tmRBP and ecRBP, the small-scale ligand-induced structural rearrangements differentiate the mesophile and thermophile. This suggests there are mechanistic differences in the manner by which these two proteins bind their ligands and are an example of how two structurally similar proteins utilize different

  12. Conformational influence of the ribose 2'-hydroxyl group: crystal structures of DNA-RNA chimeric duplexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egli, M.; Usman, N.; Rich, A.

    1993-01-01

    We have crystallized three double-helical DNA-RNA chimeric duplexes and determined their structures by X-ray crystallography at resolutions between 2 and 2.25 A. The two self-complementary duplexes [r(G)d(CGTATACGC)]2 and [d(GCGT)r(A)d(TACGC)]2, as well as the Okazaki fragment d(GGGTATACGC).r(GCG)d(TATACCC), were found to adopt A-type conformations. The crystal structures are non-isomorphous, and the crystallographic environments for the three chimeras are different. A number of intramolecular interactions of the ribose 2'-hydroxyl groups contribute to the stabilization of the A-conformation. Hydrogen bonds between 2'-hydroxyls and 5'-oxygens or phosphate oxygens, in addition to the previously observed hydrogen bonds to 1'-oxygens of adjacent riboses and deoxyriboses, are observed in the DNA-RNA chimeric duplexes. The crystalline chimeric duplexes do not show a transition between the DNA A- and B-conformations. CD spectra suggest that the Okazaki fragment assumes an A-conformation in solution as well. In this molecule the three RNA residues may therefore lock the complete decamer in the A-conformation. Crystals of an all-DNA strand with the same sequence as the self-complementary chimeras show a morphology which is different from those of the chimera crystals. Moreover, the oligonucleotide does not match any of the sequence characteristics of DNAs usually adopting the A-conformation in the crystalline state (e.g., octamers with short alternating stretches of purines and pyrimidines). In DNA-RNA chimeric duplexes, it is therefore possible that a single RNA residue can drive the conformational equilibrium toward the A-conformation.

  13. Biosynthesis Pathway of ADP-l-glycero-β-d-manno-Heptose in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Kneidinger, Bernd; Marolda, Cristina; Graninger, Michael; Zamyatina, Alla; McArthur, Fiona; Kosma, Paul; Valvano, Miguel A.; Messner, Paul

    2002-01-01

    The steps involved in the biosynthesis of the ADP-l-glycero-β-d-manno-heptose (ADP-l-β-d-heptose) precursor of the inner core lipopolysaccharide (LPS) have not been completely elucidated. In this work, we have purified the enzymes involved in catalyzing the intermediate steps leading to the synthesis of ADP-d-β-d-heptose and have biochemically characterized the reaction products by high-performance anion-exchange chromatography. We have also constructed a deletion in a novel gene, gmhB (formerly yaeD), which results in the formation of an altered LPS core. This mutation confirms that the GmhB protein is required for the formation of ADP-d-β-d-heptose. Our results demonstrate that the synthesis of ADP-d-β-d-heptose in Escherichia coli requires three proteins, GmhA (sedoheptulose 7-phosphate isomerase), HldE (bifunctional d-β-d-heptose 7-phosphate kinase/d-β-d-heptose 1-phosphate adenylyltransferase), and GmhB (d,d-heptose 1,7-bisphosphate phosphatase), as well as ATP and the ketose phosphate precursor sedoheptulose 7-phosphate. A previously characterized epimerase, formerly named WaaD (RfaD) and now renamed HldD, completes the pathway to form the ADP-l-β-d-heptose precursor utilized in the assembly of inner core LPS. PMID:11751812

  14. Pierisins and CARP-1: ADP-ribosylation of DNA by ARTCs in butterflies and shellfish.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi-Nakaguchi, Azusa; Yamamoto, Masafumi; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    The cabbage butterfly, Pieris rapae, and related species possess a previously unknown ADP-ribosylating toxin, guanine specific ADP-ribosyltransferase. This enzyme toxin, known as pierisin, consists of enzymatic N-terminal domain and receptor-binding C-terminal domain, or typical AB-toxin structure. Pierisin efficiently transfers an ADP-ribosyl moiety to the N(2) position of the guanine base of dsDNA. Receptors for pierisin are suggested to be the neutral glycosphingolipids, globotriaosylceramide (Gb3), and globotetraosylceramide (Gb4). This DNA-modifying toxin exhibits strong cytotoxicity and induces apoptosis in various human cell lines, which can be blocked by Bcl-2. Pierisin also produces detrimental effects on the eggs and larvae of the non-habitual parasitoids. In contrast, a natural parasitoid of the cabbage butterfly, Cotesia glomerata, was resistant to this toxin. The physiological role of pierisin in the butterfly is suggested to be a defense factor against parasitization by wasps. Other type of DNA ADP-ribosyltransferase is present in certain kinds of edible clams. For example, the CARP-1 protein found in Meretrix lamarckii consists of an enzymatic domain without a possible receptor-binding domain. Pierisin and CARP-1 are almost fully non-homologous at the amino acid sequence level, but other ADP-ribosyltransferases homologous to pierisin are present in different biological species such as eubacterium Streptomyces. Possible diverse physiological roles of the DNA ADP-ribosyltransferases are discussed.

  15. The role of PARP-1 and PARP-2 enzymes in metabolic regulation and disease.

    PubMed

    Bai, Péter; Cantó, Carles

    2012-09-01

    While originally described as DNA damage repair agents, recent data suggest a role for poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) enzymes in metabolic regulation by influencing mitochondrial function and oxidative metabolism. Here we review how PARP activity has a major metabolic impact and the role of PARP-1 and PARP-2 in diverse metabolic complications.

  16. A new family of polymerases related to superfamily A DNA polymerases and T7-like DNA-dependent RNA polymerases.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Lakshminarayan M; Abhiman, Saraswathi; Aravind, L

    2008-01-01

    Using sequence profile methods and structural comparisons we characterize a previously unknown family of nucleic acid polymerases in a group of mobile elements from genomes of diverse bacteria, an algal plastid and certain DNA viruses, including the recently reported Sputnik virus. Using contextual information from domain architectures and gene-neighborhoods we present evidence that they are likely to possess both primase and DNA polymerase activity, comparable to the previously reported prim-pol proteins. These newly identified polymerases help in defining the minimal functional core of superfamily A DNA polymerases and related RNA polymerases. Thus, they provide a framework to understand the emergence of both DNA and RNA polymerization activity in this class of enzymes. They also provide evidence that enigmatic DNA viruses, such as Sputnik, might have emerged from mobile elements coding these polymerases. PMID:18834537

  17. Theoretical Study on the Factors Controlling the Stability of the Borate Complexes of Ribose, Arabinose, Lyxose and Xylose

    SciTech Connect

    Sumpter, Bobby G; Fuentes-Cabrera, Miguel A; Leszczynski, Jerzy; Sponer, Judit; Sponer, Jiri

    2008-01-01

    Recent views on the origin of the "RNA world" suggest that complexation with borate minerals had an indispensable role at stabilizing the cyclic form of aldopentoses that are the potential building blocks of RNA. Experimental investigations by Li Q, Ricardo A, Benner SA, Winefordner JD, Powell DH (2005) Anal Chem 77:4503-4508 and Chapelle S, Verchere J-F (1988) Tetrahedron 44:4469-4482 have shown that stability of the 2:1 complexes formed between ribose and borate is superior to those of the analogous compounds of the other three aldopentoses (xylose, arabinose and lyxose). The distinct stability of the ribose-borate 2:1 complexes is thought to be one of the basic reasons why evolution selected ribose (out of the four aldopentoses) to build up RNA molecules. Here we disclose the factors governing the stability of the aldopentose-borate 2:1 complexes using Density Functional Theory electronic structure calculations with inclusion of solvation effects using a continuum solvent approach. Our results show that the strong electrostatic field of the borate anion leads to the reorientation of the hydroxyl groups of the aldopentoses relative to the geometry adopted in the non-complexed form. The reasons why complex formation between borate and ribose is clearly preferred over the other three aldopentoses is (i) the ribose 3-OH is involved in a H-bond with one of the borate-oxygens and (ii) its 5-CH2OH group is well separated in space from the negatively charged region of the complex and ensures favorable contact with the aqueous medium.

  18. ADP-dependent 6-Phosphofructokinase from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3: STRUCTURE DETERMINATION AND BIOCHEMICAL CHARACTERIZATION OF PH1645

    SciTech Connect

    Currie, Mark A.; Merino, Felipe; Skarina, Tatiana; Wong, Andrew H.Y.; Singer, Alexander; Brown, Greg; Savchenko, Alexei; Caniuguir, Andrés; Guixé, Victoria; Yakunin, Alexander F.; Jia, Zongchao

    2009-12-01

    Some hyperthermophilic archaea use a modified glycolytic pathway that employs an ADP-dependent glucokinase (ADP-GK) and an ADP-dependent phosphofructokinase (ADP-PFK) or, in the case of Methanococcus jannaschii, a bifunctional ADP-dependent glucophosphofructokinase (ADP-GK/PFK). The crystal structures of three ADP-GKs have been determined. However, there is no structural information available for ADP-PFKs or the ADP-GK/PFK. Here, we present the first crystal structure of an ADP-PFK from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3 (PhPFK) in both apo- and AMP-bound forms determined to 2.0-{angstrom} and 1.9-{angstrom} resolution, respectively, along with biochemical characterization of the enzyme. The overall structure of PhPFK maintains a similar large and small {alpha}/{beta} domain structure seen in the ADP-GK structures. A large conformational change accompanies binding of phosphoryl donor, acceptor, or both, in all members of the ribokinase superfamily characterized thus far, which is believed to be critical to enzyme function. Surprisingly, no such conformational change was observed in the AMP-bound PhPFK structure compared with the apo structure. Through comprehensive site-directed mutagenesis of the substrate binding pocket we identified residues that were critical for both substrate recognition and the phosphotransfer reaction. The catalytic residues and many of the substrate binding residues are conserved between PhPFK and ADP-GKs; however, four key residues differ in the sugar-binding pocket, which we have shown determine the sugar-binding specificity. Using these results we were able to engineer a mutant PhPFK that mimics the ADP-GK/PFK and is able to phosphorylate both fructose 6-phosphate and glucose.

  19. Disordered osteoclast formation and function in a CD38 (ADP-ribosyl cyclase)-deficient mouse establishes an essential role for CD38 in bone resorption.

    PubMed

    Sun, Li; Iqbal, Jameel; Dolgilevich, Svetlana; Yuen, Tony; Wu, Xue-Bin; Moonga, Baljit S; Adebanjo, Olugbenga A; Bevis, Peter J R; Lund, Frances; Huang, Christopher L-H; Blair, Harry C; Abe, Etsuko; Zaidi, Mone

    2003-03-01

    We have evaluated the role of the ADP-ribosyl cyclase, CD38, in bone remodeling, a process by which the skeleton is being renewed constantly through the coordinated activity of osteoclasts and osteoblasts. CD38 catalyzes the cyclization of its substrate, NAD+, to the Ca2+-releasing second messenger, cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPr). We have shown previously that CD38 is expressed both in osteoblasts and osteoclasts. Its activation in the osteoclast triggers Ca2+ release through ryanodine receptors (RyRs), stimulation of interleukin-6 (IL-6), and an inhibition of bone resorption. Here, we have examined the consequences of deleting the CD38 gene in mice on skeletal remodeling. We report that CD38-/- mice displayed a markedly reduced bone mineral density (BMD) at the femur, tibia, and lumbar spine at 3 months and at the lumbar spine at 4 months, with full normalization of the BMD at all sites at 5 months. The osteoporosis at 3 months was accompanied by a reduction in primary spongiosa and increased osteoclast surfaces on histomorphometric analysis. Hematopoetic stem cells isolated ex vivo from CD38-/- mice showed a dramatic approximately fourfold increase in osteoclast formation in response to incubation for 6 days with RANK-L and M-CSF. The osteoclasts so formed in these cultures showed a approximately 2.5-fold increase in resorptive activity compared with wild-type cells. However, when adherent bone marrow stromal cells were allowed to mature into alkaline phosphatase-positive colony-forming units (CFU-Fs), those derived from CD38-/- mice showed a significant reduction in differentiation compared with wild-type cells. Real-time RT-PCR on mRNA isolated from osteoclasts at day 6 showed a significant reduction in IL-6 and IL-6 receptor mRNA, together with significant decreases in the expression of all calcineurin A isoforms, alpha, beta, and gamma. These findings establish a critical role for CD38 in osteoclast formation and bone resorption. We speculate that CD38 functions

  20. Synthesis and RNA polymerase incorporation of the degenerate ribonucleotide analogue rPTP.

    PubMed Central

    Moriyama, K; Negishi, K; Briggs, M S; Smith, C L; Hill, F; Churcher, M J; Brown, D M; Loakes, D

    1998-01-01

    The synthesis and enzymatic incorporation into RNA of the hydrogen bond degenerate nucleoside analogue 6-(beta-d-ribofuranosyl)-3, 4-dihydro-8H-pyrimido[4,5-c]-[1,2]oxazin-7-one (P) is described. The 5'-triphosphate of this analogue is readily incorporated by T3, T7 and SP6 RNA polymerases into RNA transcripts, being best incorporated in place of UTP, but also in place of CTP. When all the uridine residues in an HIV-1 TAR RNA transcript are replaced by P the transcript has similar characteristics to the wild-type TAR RNA, as demonstrated by similar melting temperatures and CD spectra. The P-substituted TAR transcript binds to the Tat peptide ADP-1 with only 4-fold lowered efficiency compared with wild-type TAR. PMID:9547267

  1. Chemical genetic discovery of PARP targets reveals a role for PARP-1 in transcription elongation.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Bryan A; Zhang, Yajie; Jiang, Hong; Hussey, Kristine M; Shrimp, Jonathan H; Lin, Hening; Schwede, Frank; Yu, Yonghao; Kraus, W Lee

    2016-07-01

    Poly[adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-ribose] polymerases (PARPs) are a family of enzymes that modulate diverse biological processes through covalent transfer of ADP-ribose from the oxidized form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) onto substrate proteins. Here we report a robust NAD(+) analog-sensitive approach for PARPs, which allows PARP-specific ADP-ribosylation of substrates that is suitable for subsequent copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reactions. Using this approach, we mapped hundreds of sites of ADP-ribosylation for PARPs 1, 2, and 3 across the proteome, as well as thousands of PARP-1-mediated ADP-ribosylation sites across the genome. We found that PARP-1 ADP-ribosylates and inhibits negative elongation factor (NELF), a protein complex that regulates promoter-proximal pausing by RNA polymerase II (Pol II). Depletion or inhibition of PARP-1 or mutation of the ADP-ribosylation sites on NELF-E promotes Pol II pausing, providing a clear functional link between PARP-1, ADP-ribosylation, and NELF. This analog-sensitive approach should be broadly applicable across the PARP family and has the potential to illuminate the ADP-ribosylated proteome and the molecular mechanisms used by individual PARPs to mediate their responses to cellular signals.

  2. Chemical genetic discovery of PARP targets reveals a role for PARP-1 in transcription elongation.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Bryan A; Zhang, Yajie; Jiang, Hong; Hussey, Kristine M; Shrimp, Jonathan H; Lin, Hening; Schwede, Frank; Yu, Yonghao; Kraus, W Lee

    2016-07-01

    Poly[adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-ribose] polymerases (PARPs) are a family of enzymes that modulate diverse biological processes through covalent transfer of ADP-ribose from the oxidized form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) onto substrate proteins. Here we report a robust NAD(+) analog-sensitive approach for PARPs, which allows PARP-specific ADP-ribosylation of substrates that is suitable for subsequent copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reactions. Using this approach, we mapped hundreds of sites of ADP-ribosylation for PARPs 1, 2, and 3 across the proteome, as well as thousands of PARP-1-mediated ADP-ribosylation sites across the genome. We found that PARP-1 ADP-ribosylates and inhibits negative elongation factor (NELF), a protein complex that regulates promoter-proximal pausing by RNA polymerase II (Pol II). Depletion or inhibition of PARP-1 or mutation of the ADP-ribosylation sites on NELF-E promotes Pol II pausing, providing a clear functional link between PAR