Science.gov

Sample records for adp-glucose pyrophosphorylase agpase

  1. Molecular cloning of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase from cyanobacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Kakefuda, G.; Yeeyung Charng; Iglesias, A.; McIntosh, L. )

    1991-05-01

    Bacterial and higher plant ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase differ in structure (homotetramer vs heterotetramer respectively) and allosteric activator and inhibitor. However, highly conserved regions can be identified when sequence comparisons are made between ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylases from diverse species. The fructose 1,6 bisphosphate binding site (activator site) in E. coli is highly conserved in all species for which ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase has been sequenced. A second conserved region, which is labeled by 8-azido-ATP, is also highly conserved in bacteria and higher plants. In previously cloned ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylases the two conserved regions are separated by approximately 80 amino acids. The authors have used these conserved amino acid sequences to design degenerate oligonucleotide primers for polymerase chain reaction amplification (PCR) of part of the ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase geae. A predicted 240 bp fragment is amplified in PCR reactions using Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 and Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 genomic DNA as template. The deduced amino acid sequence from the 240 bp Anabaena fragment shares 75 and 76% identity to that of the rice endosperm and spinach leaf ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylases respectively. The Anabaena amino acid sequence shares 42% identity in amino acid sequence to the E. coli enzyme. At the nucleotide level there is 66% identity of the Anabaena sequence to rice endosperm ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and 54% to the E. coli gene. The PCR amplified fragments are being used to screen respective Anabaena and Synechocystis genomic gene libraries.

  2. Crystal structure of potato tuber ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xiangshu; Ballicora, Miguel A; Preiss, Jack; Geiger, James H

    2005-01-01

    ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase catalyzes the first committed and rate-limiting step in starch biosynthesis in plants and glycogen biosynthesis in bacteria. It is the enzymatic site for regulation of storage polysaccharide accumulation in plants and bacteria, being allosterically activated or inhibited by metabolites of energy flux. We report the first atomic resolution structure of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase. Crystals of potato tuber ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase α subunit were grown in high concentrations of sulfate, resulting in the sulfate-bound, allosterically inhibited form of the enzyme. The N-terminal catalytic domain resembles a dinucleotide-binding Rossmann fold and the C-terminal domain adopts a left-handed parallel β helix that is involved in cooperative allosteric regulation and a unique oligomerization. We also report structures of the enzyme in complex with ATP and ADP-glucose. Communication between the regulator-binding sites and the active site is both subtle and complex and involves several distinct regions of the enzyme including the N-terminus, the glucose-1-phosphate-binding site, and the ATP-binding site. These structures provide insights into the mechanism for catalysis and allosteric regulation of the enzyme. PMID:15692569

  3. Crystal structure of potato tuber ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Jin, Xiangshu; Ballicora, Miguel A; Preiss, Jack; Geiger, James H

    2005-02-23

    ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase catalyzes the first committed and rate-limiting step in starch biosynthesis in plants and glycogen biosynthesis in bacteria. It is the enzymatic site for regulation of storage polysaccharide accumulation in plants and bacteria, being allosterically activated or inhibited by metabolites of energy flux. We report the first atomic resolution structure of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase. Crystals of potato tuber ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase alpha subunit were grown in high concentrations of sulfate, resulting in the sulfate-bound, allosterically inhibited form of the enzyme. The N-terminal catalytic domain resembles a dinucleotide-binding Rossmann fold and the C-terminal domain adopts a left-handed parallel beta helix that is involved in cooperative allosteric regulation and a unique oligomerization. We also report structures of the enzyme in complex with ATP and ADP-glucose. Communication between the regulator-binding sites and the active site is both subtle and complex and involves several distinct regions of the enzyme including the N-terminus, the glucose-1-phosphate-binding site, and the ATP-binding site. These structures provide insights into the mechanism for catalysis and allosteric regulation of the enzyme.

  4. Enhanced heterotetrameric assembly of potato ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase using reverse genetics.

    PubMed

    Seferoglu, A Bengisu; Koper, Kaan; Can, F Betul; Cevahir, Gul; Kavakli, I Halil

    2014-08-01

    ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) is a key allosteric enzyme in plant starch biosynthesis. Plant AGPase is a heterotetrameric enzyme that consists of large (LS) and small subunits (SS), which are encoded by two different genes. Computational and experimental studies have revealed that the heterotetrameric assembly of AGPase is thermodynamically weak. Modeling studies followed by the mutagenesis of the LS of the potato AGPase identified a heterotetramer-deficient mutant, LS(R88A). To enhance heterotetrameric assembly, LS(R88A) cDNA was subjected to error-prone PCR, and second-site revertants were identified according to their ability to restore glycogen accumulation, as assessed with iodine staining. Selected mutations were introduced into the wild-type (WT) LS and co-expressed with the WT SS in Escherichia coli glgC(-). The biochemical characterization of revertants revealed that LS(I90V)SS(WT), LS(Y378C)SS(WT) and LS(D410G)SS(WT) mutants displayed enhanced heterotetrameric assembly with the WT SS. Among these mutants, LS(Y378C)SS(WT) AGPase displayed increased heat stability compared with the WT enzyme. Kinetic characterization of the mutants indicated that the LS(I90V)SS(WT) and LS(Y378C)SS(WT) AGPases have comparable allosteric and kinetic properties. However, the LS(D410G)SS(WT) mutant exhibited altered allosteric properties of being less responsive and more sensitive to 3-phosphoglyceric acid activation and inorganic phosphate inhibition. This study not only enhances our understanding of the interaction between the SS and the LS of AGPase but also enables protein engineering to obtain enhanced assembled heat-stable variants of AGPase, which can be used for the improvement of plant yields.

  5. Enhanced heterotetrameric assembly of potato ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase using reverse genetics.

    PubMed

    Seferoglu, A Bengisu; Koper, Kaan; Can, F Betul; Cevahir, Gul; Kavakli, I Halil

    2014-08-01

    ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) is a key allosteric enzyme in plant starch biosynthesis. Plant AGPase is a heterotetrameric enzyme that consists of large (LS) and small subunits (SS), which are encoded by two different genes. Computational and experimental studies have revealed that the heterotetrameric assembly of AGPase is thermodynamically weak. Modeling studies followed by the mutagenesis of the LS of the potato AGPase identified a heterotetramer-deficient mutant, LS(R88A). To enhance heterotetrameric assembly, LS(R88A) cDNA was subjected to error-prone PCR, and second-site revertants were identified according to their ability to restore glycogen accumulation, as assessed with iodine staining. Selected mutations were introduced into the wild-type (WT) LS and co-expressed with the WT SS in Escherichia coli glgC(-). The biochemical characterization of revertants revealed that LS(I90V)SS(WT), LS(Y378C)SS(WT) and LS(D410G)SS(WT) mutants displayed enhanced heterotetrameric assembly with the WT SS. Among these mutants, LS(Y378C)SS(WT) AGPase displayed increased heat stability compared with the WT enzyme. Kinetic characterization of the mutants indicated that the LS(I90V)SS(WT) and LS(Y378C)SS(WT) AGPases have comparable allosteric and kinetic properties. However, the LS(D410G)SS(WT) mutant exhibited altered allosteric properties of being less responsive and more sensitive to 3-phosphoglyceric acid activation and inorganic phosphate inhibition. This study not only enhances our understanding of the interaction between the SS and the LS of AGPase but also enables protein engineering to obtain enhanced assembled heat-stable variants of AGPase, which can be used for the improvement of plant yields. PMID:24891561

  6. Trehalose 6-phosphate regulates starch synthesis via posttranslational redox activation of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Kolbe, Anna; Tiessen, Axel; Schluepmann, Henriette; Paul, Matthew; Ulrich, Silke; Geigenberger, Peter

    2005-08-01

    Trehalose is the most widespread disaccharide in nature, occurring in bacteria, fungi, insects, and plants. Its precursor, trehalose 6-phosphate (T6P), is also indispensable for the regulation of sugar utilization and growth, but the sites of action are largely unresolved. Here we use genetic and biochemical approaches to investigate whether T6P acts to regulate starch synthesis in plastids of higher plants. Feeding of trehalose to Arabidopsis leaves led to stimulation of starch synthesis within 30 min, accompanied by activation of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) via posttranslational redox modification. The response resembled sucrose but not glucose feeding and depended on the expression of SNF1-related kinase. We also analyzed transgenic Arabidopsis plants with T6P levels increased by expression of T6P synthase or decreased by expression of T6P phosphatase (TPP) in the cytosol. Compared with wild type, leaves of T6P synthase-expressing plants had increased redox activation of AGPase and increased starch, whereas TPP-expressing plants showed the opposite. Moreover, TPP expression prevented the increase in AGPase activation in response to sucrose or trehalose feeding. Incubation of intact isolated chloroplasts with 100 muM T6P significantly and specifically increased reductive activation of AGPase within 15 min. Results provide evidence that T6P is synthesized in the cytosol and acts on plastidial metabolism by promoting thioredoxin-mediated redox transfer to AGPase in response to cytosolic sugar levels, thereby allowing starch synthesis to be regulated independently of light. The discovery informs about the evolution of plant metabolism and how chloroplasts of prokaryotic origin use an intermediate of the ancient trehalose pathway to report the metabolic status of the cytosol.

  7. Preliminary crystallographic analysis of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase from Agrobacterium tumefaciens

    SciTech Connect

    Cupp-Vickery, Jill R. Igarashi, Robert Y.; Meyer, Christopher R.

    2005-03-01

    Crystallization and X-ray diffraction methods for native A. tumefaciens ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and its selenomethionyl derivative are described. Two crystal forms are identified, both of which diffract to 2 Å.

  8. Enhanced activity of ADP glucose pyrophosphorylase and formation of starch induced by Azospirillum brasilense in Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Choix, Francisco J; Bashan, Yoav; Mendoza, Alberto; de-Bashan, Luz E

    2014-05-10

    ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) regulates starch biosynthesis in higher plants and microalgae. This study measured the effect of the bacterium Azospirillum brasilense on AGPase activity in the freshwater microalga Chlorella vulgaris and formation of starch. This was done by immobilizing both microorganisms in alginate beads, either replete with or deprived of nitrogen or phosphorus and all under heterotrophic conditions, using d-glucose or Na-acetate as the carbon source. AGPase activity during the first 72h of incubation was higher in C. vulgaris when immobilized with A. brasilense. This happened simultaneously with higher starch accumulation and higher carbon uptake by the microalgae. Either carbon source had similar effects on enzyme activity and starch accumulation. Starvation either by N or P had the same pattern on AGPase activity and starch accumulation. Under replete conditions, the population of C. vulgaris immobilized alone was higher than when immobilized together, but under starvation conditions A. brasilense induced a larger population of C. vulgaris. In summary, adding A. brasilense enhanced AGPase activity, starch formation, and mitigation of stress in C. vulgaris.

  9. ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase large subunit 2 is essential for storage substance accumulation and subunit interactions in rice endosperm.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiao-Jie; Peng, Cheng; Zhang, Jie; Cai, Yue; You, Xiao-Man; Kong, Fei; Yan, Hai-Gang; Wang, Guo-Xiang; Wang, Liang; Jin, Jie; Chen, Wei-Wei; Chen, Xin-Gang; Ma, Jing; Wang, Peng; Jiang, Ling; Zhang, Wen-Wei; Wan, Jian-Min

    2016-08-01

    ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) controls a rate-limiting step in the starch biosynthetic pathway in higher plants. Here we isolated a shrunken rice mutant w24. Map-based cloning identified OsAGPL2, a large subunit of the cytosolic AGPase in rice endosperm, as the gene responsible for the w24 mutation. In addition to severe inhibition of starch synthesis and significant accumulation of sugar, the w24 endosperm showed obvious defects in compound granule formation and storage protein synthesis. The defect in OsAGPL2 enhanced the expression levels of the AGPase family. Meanwhile, the elevated activities of starch phosphorylase 1 and sucrose synthase in the w24 endosperm might possibly partly account for the residual starch content in the mutant seeds. Moreover, the expression of OsAGPL2 and its counterpart, OsAGPS2b, was highly coordinated in rice endosperm. Yeast two-hybrid and BiFC assays verified direct interactions between OsAGPL2 and OsAGPS2b as well as OsAGPL1 and OsAGPS1, supporting the model for spatiotemporal complex formation of AGPase isoforms in rice endosperm. Besides, our data provided no evidence for the self-binding of OsAGPS2b, implying that OsAGPS2b might not interact to form higher molecular mass aggregates in the absence of OsAGPL2. Therefore, the molecular mechanism of rice AGPase assembly might differ from that of Arabidopsis. PMID:27297991

  10. Multiple forms of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase from tomato fruit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, B. Y.; Janes, H. W.

    1997-01-01

    ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGP) was purified from tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill.) fruit to apparent homogeneity. By sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis the enzyme migrated as two close bands with molecular weights of 50,000 and 51,000. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of the purified enzyme, however, revealed at least five major protein spots that could be distinguished by their slight differences in net charge and molecular weight. Whereas all of the spots were recognized by the antiserum raised against tomato fruit AGP holoenzyme, only three of them reacted strongly with antiserum raised against the potato tuber AGP large subunit, and the other two spots (with lower molecular weights) reacted specifically with antisera raised against spinach leaf AGP holoenzyme and the potato tuber AGP small subunit. The results suggest the existence of at least three isoforms of the AGP large subunit and two isoforms of the small subunit in tomato fruit in vivo. The native molecular mass of the enzyme determined by gel filtration was 220 +/- 10 kD, indicating a tetrameric structure for AGP from tomato fruit. The purified enzyme is very sensitive to 3-phosphoglycerate/inorganic phosphate regulation.

  11. Sucrose regulation of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase subunit genes transcript levels in leaves and fruits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Xiangyang; Xing, Jinpeng; Gianfagna, Thomas J.; Janes, Harry W.

    2002-01-01

    ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase, EC2.7.7.27) is a key regulatory enzyme in starch biosynthesis. The enzyme is a heterotetramer with two S and two B subunits. In tomato, there are three multiple forms of the S subunit gene. Agp S1, S2 and B are highly expressed in fruit from 10 to 25 days after anthesis. Agp S3 is only weakly expressed in fruit. Sucrose significantly elevates expression of Agp S1, S2 and B in both leaves and fruits. Agp S1 exhibits the highest degree of regulation by sucrose. In fact, sucrose may be required for Agp S1 expression. For excised leaves incubated in water, no transcripts for Agp S1 could be detected in the absence of sucrose, whereas it took up to 16 h in water before transcripts were no longer detectable for Agp S2 and B. Neither Agp S3 nor the tubulin gene is affected by sucrose, demonstrating that this response is specifically regulated by a carbohydrate metabolic signal, and is not due to a general increase in metabolism caused by sucrose treatment. Truncated versions of the promoter for Agp S1 indicate that a specific region 1.3-3.0 kb upstream from the transcription site is responsible for sucrose sensitivity. This region of the S1 promoter contains several cis-acting elements present in the promoters of other genes that are also regulated by sucrose. c2002 Elsevier Science Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A Cytosolic ADP-Glucose Pyrophosphorylase Is a Feature of Graminaceous Endosperms, But Not of Other Starch-Storing Organs1

    PubMed Central

    Beckles, Diane M.; Smith, Alison M.; ap Rees, Tom

    2001-01-01

    The occurrence of an extra-plastidial isoform of ADP-glucose (Glc) pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) among starch-storing organs was investigated in two ways. First, the possibility that an extra-plastidial isoform arose during the domestication of cereals was studied by comparing the intracellular distribution of enzyme activity and protein in developing endosperm of noncultivated Hordeum species with that previously reported for cultivated barley (Hordeum vulgare). As in cultivated barley, the AGPase of H. vulgare subsp. spontaneum and Hordeum murinum endosperm is accounted for by a major extra-plastidial and a minor plastidial isoform. Second, the ratio of ADP-Glc to UDP-Glc was used as an indication of the intracellular location of the AGPase activity in a wide range of starch-synthesizing organs. The ratio is expected to be high in organs in which UDP-Glc and ADP-Glc are synthesized primarily in the cytosol, because the reactions catalyzed by AGPase and UDP-Glc pyrophosphorylase will be coupled and close to equilibrium. This study revealed that ADP-Glc contents and the ratio of ADP-Glc to UDP-Glc were higher in developing graminaceous endosperms than in any other starch-storing organs. Taken as a whole the results indicate that an extra-plastidial AGPase is important in ADP-Glc synthesis in graminaceous endosperms, but not in other starch-storing organs. PMID:11161039

  13. Transcriptional regulation of the ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase isoforms in the leaf and the stem under long and short photoperiod in lentil.

    PubMed

    Seferoglu, Ayse Bengisu; Baris, Ibrahim; Morgil, Hande; Tulum, Isil; Ozdas, Sule; Cevahir, Gul; Kavakli, Ibrahim Halil

    2013-05-01

    ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) is a key enzyme in plant starch biosynthesis. It contains large (LS) and small (SS) subunits encoded by two different genes. In this study, we explored the transcriptional regulation of both the LS and SS subunits of AGPase in stem and leaf under different photoperiods length in lentil. To this end, we first isolated and characterized different isoforms of the LS and SS of lentil AGPase and then we performed quantitative real time PCR (qPCR) to see the effect of photoperiod length on the transcription of the AGPase isforms under the different photoperiod regimes in lentil. Analysis of the qPCR results revealed that the transcription of different isoforms of the LSs and the SSs of lentil AGPase are differentially regulated when photoperiod shifted from long-day to short-day in stem and leaves. While transcript levels of LS1 and SS2 in leaf significantly decreased, overall transcript levels of SS1 increased in short-day regime. Our results indicated that day length affects the transcription of lentil AGPase isoforms differentially in stems and leaves most likely to supply carbon from the stem to other tissues to regulate carbon metabolism under short-day conditions.

  14. Isolation and characterization of cDNAs and genomic DNAs encoding ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase large and small subunits from sweet potato.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu-Xi; Chen, Yu-Xiang; Tao, Xiang; Cheng, Xiao-Jie; Wang, Hai-Yan

    2016-04-01

    Sweet potato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.], the world's seventh most important food crop, is also a major industrial raw material for starch and ethanol production. In the plant starch biosynthesis pathway, ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) catalyzes the first, rate-limiting step and plays a pivotal role in regulating this process. In spite of the importance of sweet potato as a starch source, only a few studies have focused on the molecular aspects of starch biosynthesis in sweet potato and almost no intensive research has been carried out on the AGPase gene family in this species. In this study, cDNAs encoding two small subunits (SSs) and four large subunits (LSs) of AGPase isoforms were cloned from sweet potato and the genomic organizations of the corresponding AGPase genes were elucidated. Expression pattern analysis revealed that the two SSs were constitutively expressed, whereas the four LSs displayed differential expression patterns in various tissues and at different developmental stages. Co-expression of SSs with different LSs in Escherichia coli yielded eight heterotetramers showing different catalytic activities. Interactions between different SSs and LSs were confirmed by a yeast two-hybrid experiment. Our findings provide comprehensive information about AGPase gene sequences, structures, expression profiles, and subunit interactions in sweet potato. The results can serve as a foundation for elucidation of molecular mechanisms of starch synthesis in tuberous roots, and should contribute to future regulation of starch biosynthesis to improve sweet potato starch yield.

  15. Isolation and characterization of cDNAs and genomic DNAs encoding ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase large and small subunits from sweet potato.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yu-Xi; Chen, Yu-Xiang; Tao, Xiang; Cheng, Xiao-Jie; Wang, Hai-Yan

    2016-04-01

    Sweet potato [Ipomoea batatas (L.) Lam.], the world's seventh most important food crop, is also a major industrial raw material for starch and ethanol production. In the plant starch biosynthesis pathway, ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) catalyzes the first, rate-limiting step and plays a pivotal role in regulating this process. In spite of the importance of sweet potato as a starch source, only a few studies have focused on the molecular aspects of starch biosynthesis in sweet potato and almost no intensive research has been carried out on the AGPase gene family in this species. In this study, cDNAs encoding two small subunits (SSs) and four large subunits (LSs) of AGPase isoforms were cloned from sweet potato and the genomic organizations of the corresponding AGPase genes were elucidated. Expression pattern analysis revealed that the two SSs were constitutively expressed, whereas the four LSs displayed differential expression patterns in various tissues and at different developmental stages. Co-expression of SSs with different LSs in Escherichia coli yielded eight heterotetramers showing different catalytic activities. Interactions between different SSs and LSs were confirmed by a yeast two-hybrid experiment. Our findings provide comprehensive information about AGPase gene sequences, structures, expression profiles, and subunit interactions in sweet potato. The results can serve as a foundation for elucidation of molecular mechanisms of starch synthesis in tuberous roots, and should contribute to future regulation of starch biosynthesis to improve sweet potato starch yield. PMID:26499957

  16. Mutagenesis of cysteine 81 prevents dimerization of the APS1 subunit of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and alters diurnal starch turnover in Arabidopsis thaliana leaves.

    PubMed

    Hädrich, Nadja; Hendriks, Janneke H M; Kötting, Oliver; Arrivault, Stéphanie; Feil, Regina; Zeeman, Samuel C; Gibon, Yves; Schulze, Waltraud X; Stitt, Mark; Lunn, John E

    2012-04-01

    Many plants, including Arabidopsis thaliana, retain a substantial portion of their photosynthate in leaves in the form of starch, which is remobilized to support metabolism and growth at night. ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) catalyses the first committed step in the pathway of starch synthesis, the production of ADP-glucose. The enzyme is redox-activated in the light and in response to sucrose accumulation, via reversible breakage of an intermolecular cysteine bridge between the two small (APS1) subunits. The biological function of this regulatory mechanism was investigated by complementing an aps1 null mutant (adg1) with a series of constructs containing a full-length APS1 gene encoding either the wild-type APS1 protein or mutated forms in which one of the five cysteine residues was replaced by serine. Substitution of Cys81 by serine prevented APS1 dimerization, whereas mutation of the other cysteines had no effect. Thus, Cys81 is both necessary and sufficient for dimerization of APS1. Compared to control plants, the adg1/APS1(C81S) lines had higher levels of ADP-glucose and maltose, and either increased rates of starch synthesis or a starch-excess phenotype, depending on the daylength. APS1 protein levels were five- to tenfold lower in adg1/APS1(C81S) lines than in control plants. These results show that redox modulation of AGPase contributes to the diurnal regulation of starch turnover, with inappropriate regulation of the enzyme having an unexpected impact on starch breakdown, and that Cys81 may play an important role in the regulation of AGPase turnover.

  17. Inactivation of thioredoxin f1 leads to decreased light activation of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and altered diurnal starch turnover in leaves of Arabidopsis plants.

    PubMed

    Thormählen, Ina; Ruber, Joachim; von Roepenack-Lahaye, Edda; Ehrlich, Sven-Matthias; Massot, Vincent; Hümmer, Christine; Tezycka, Justyna; Issakidis-Bourguet, Emmanuelle; Geigenberger, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Chloroplast thioredoxin f (Trx f) is an important regulator of primary metabolic enzymes. However, genetic evidence for its physiological importance is largely lacking. To test the functional significance of Trx f in vivo, Arabidopsis mutants with insertions in the trx f1 gene were studied, showing a drastic decrease in Trx f leaf content. Knockout of Trx f1 led to strong attenuation in reductive light activation of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase), the key enzyme of starch synthesis, in leaves during the day and in isolated chloroplasts, while sucrose-dependent redox activation of AGPase in darkened leaves was not affected. The decrease in light-activation of AGPase in leaves was accompanied by a decrease in starch accumulation, an increase in sucrose levels and a decrease in starch-to-sucrose ratio. Analysis of metabolite levels at the end of day shows that inhibition of starch synthesis was unlikely due to shortage of substrates or changes in allosteric effectors. Metabolite profiling by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry pinpoints only a small number of metabolites affected, including sugars, organic acids and ethanolamine. Interestingly, metabolite data indicate carbon shortage in trx f1 mutant leaves at the end of night. Overall, results provide in planta evidence for the role played by Trx f in the light activation of AGPase and photosynthetic carbon partitioning in plants.

  18. Cloning and characterization of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase small subunit gene in Cyperus esculentus (yellow nutsedge).

    PubMed

    Cheng, C; Hu, J; Zhi, Y; Su, J J; Zhang, X K; Huang, B Q

    2015-01-01

    ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (ADPGlcPPase) controls the first committed step of starch synthesis by catalyzing the biosynthesis of ADP-glucose from glucose-phosphate and ATP. It is a tetrameric protein consisting of two small and two large subunits. The small subunits have a catalytic function, while the large subunits regulate the enzyme activity. Cyperus esculentus (yellow nutsedge) is a perennial C4 plant grown from rhizomes and tubers. Previous studies on yellow nutsedge have mostly focused on the morphology and cultivation of tubers, their application in food, and biochemical analyses of the tubers. In this study, the gene encoding the ADPGlcPPase small subunit (CeAGPS) in yellow nutsedge was cloned and characterized. The full-length CeAGPS cDNA sequence contained an 81-bp 5'-untranslated region (UTR), a 188-bp 3'-UTR, and a 1539-bp open reading frame encoding 512-amino acid residues. The genomic sequence of CeAGPS comprises a nine exon-eight intron structure similar to the previously reported cotton and Arabidopsis thaliana AGPS genes. The deduced translation product of the CeAGPS gene contained a well-conserved catalytic domain and regulatory elements typical of plant AGPS. Reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction amplification of the target gene in various plant parts using gene-specific primers indicated that the expression of CeAGPS was most abundant in the tuber, and relatively lower in nutsedge roots. PMID:26782478

  19. Deciphering the kinetic mechanisms controlling selected plant ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylases.

    PubMed

    Boehlein, Susan K; Shaw, Janine R; Hwang, Seon K; Stewart, Jon D; Curtis Hannah, L

    2013-07-15

    ADP-Glc pyrophosphorylase (AGPase), a rate-limiting enzyme in starch biosynthesis, is controlled by thermostability and allosteric regulation. Previous studies suggested that redox affects turnover number and heat stability of AGPases. Here, we investigated how allostery and redox state affect kinetic mechanisms of the reduced, heat labile and the oxidized, heat stable potato tuber enzymes; the heat labile maize endosperm enzyme and a chimeric maize/potato heat stable enzyme that lacks the cysteine responsible for redox changes. With 3-PGA, all AGPases followed a Theorell-Chance Bi Bi mechanism with ATP binding first and ADP-Glc releasing last. 3-PGA increases the binding affinity for both substrates with little effect on velocity for the maize and MP isoforms. By contrast, 3-PGA increases the velocity and the affinity for G-1-P for the potato enzymes. Redox state does not affect kcat of the two potato isoforms. Without 3-PGA the oxidized potato enzyme exhibits a rapid equilibrium random Bi Bi mechanism with a dead end ternary complex. This fundamental change from rapid, ordered binding with little buildup of intermediates to a mechanism featuring relatively slow, random binding is unique to the oxidized potato tuber enzyme. Finally, ADP-Glc the physiologically relevant product of this enzyme has complex, isoform-specific effects on catalysis. PMID:23603314

  20. Substrate binding properties of potato tuber ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase as determined by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Cakir, Bilal; Tuncel, Aytug; Green, Abigail R; Koper, Kaan; Hwang, Seon-Kap; Okita, Thomas W; Kang, ChulHee

    2015-06-01

    Substrate binding properties of the large (LS) and small (SS) subunits of potato tuber ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase were investigated by using isothermal titration calorimetry. Our results clearly show that the wild type heterotetramer (S(WT)L(WT)) possesses two distinct types of ATP binding sites, whereas the homotetrameric LS and SS variant forms only exhibited properties of one of the two binding sites. The wild type enzyme also exhibited significantly increased affinity to this substrate compared to the homotetrameric enzyme forms. No stable binding was evident for the second substrate, glucose-1-phosphate, in the presence or absence of ATPγS suggesting that interaction of glucose-1-phosphate is dependent on hydrolysis of ATP and supports the Theorell-Chance bi bi reaction mechanism.

  1. Substrate binding properties of potato tuber ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase as determined by isothermal titration calorimetry.

    PubMed

    Cakir, Bilal; Tuncel, Aytug; Green, Abigail R; Koper, Kaan; Hwang, Seon-Kap; Okita, Thomas W; Kang, ChulHee

    2015-06-01

    Substrate binding properties of the large (LS) and small (SS) subunits of potato tuber ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase were investigated by using isothermal titration calorimetry. Our results clearly show that the wild type heterotetramer (S(WT)L(WT)) possesses two distinct types of ATP binding sites, whereas the homotetrameric LS and SS variant forms only exhibited properties of one of the two binding sites. The wild type enzyme also exhibited significantly increased affinity to this substrate compared to the homotetrameric enzyme forms. No stable binding was evident for the second substrate, glucose-1-phosphate, in the presence or absence of ATPγS suggesting that interaction of glucose-1-phosphate is dependent on hydrolysis of ATP and supports the Theorell-Chance bi bi reaction mechanism. PMID:25953126

  2. PCR cloning and characterization of multiple ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase cDNAs from tomato

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, B. Y.; Janes, H. W.; Gianfagna, T.

    1998-01-01

    Four ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGP) cDNAs were cloned from tomato fruit and leaves by the PCR techniques. Three of them (agp S1, agp S2, and agp S3) encode the large subunit of AGP, the fourth one (agp B) encodes the small subunit. The deduced amino acid sequences of the cDNAs show very high identities (96-98%) to the corresponding potato AGP isoforms, although there are major differences in tissue expression profiles. All four tomato AGP transcripts were detected in fruit and leaves; the predominant ones in fruit are agp B and agp S1, whereas in leaves they are agp B and agp S3. Genomic southern analysis suggests that the four AGP transcripts are encoded by distinct genes.

  3. Molecular characterization and sequence diversity of genes encoding the large subunit of the ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Rose, Meghan K; Huang, Xiu-Qiang; Brûlé-Babel, Anita

    2016-02-01

    The large subunit of ADP glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase), the rate limiting enzyme in starch biosynthesis in Triticum aestivum L., is encoded by the ADP glucose pyrophosphorylase large subunit (AGP-L) gene. This was the first report on the development of three genome-specific primer sets for isolating the complete genomic sequence of all three homoeologous AGP-L genes on group 1 chromosomes. All three AGP-L genes consisted of 15 introns and 15 exons. The lengths of the structural genes from start to stop codon were 3334 bp for AGP-L-A1, 3351 bp for AGP-L-B1, and 3340 bp for AGP-L-D1. The coding region was 1569 bases long in all three genomes. All three AGP-L genes encoded 522 amino acid residues including the transit peptide sequences with 62 amino acid residues and the mature protein with 460 amino acid residues. The mature protein of three AGP-L genes was highly conserved. Three AGP-L genes were sequenced in 47 diverse spring and winter wheat genotypes. One and two haplotypes were found for AGP-L-D1 and AGP-L-A1, respectively. In total, 67 SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms) and 13 indels (insertions or deletions) forming five haplotypes were identified for AGP-L-B1. All 13 indels and 58 of the 67 SNPs among the 47 genotypes were located in the non-coding regions, while the remaining nine SNPs were synonymous substitutions in the coding region. Significant LD was found among the 45 SNPs and ten indels located from intron 2 to intron 3. Association analysis indicated that four SNPs were strongly associated with seed number per spike and thousand kernel weight.

  4. Structural Analysis of ADP-Glucose Pyrophosphorylase From the Bacterium Agrobacterium Tumefaciens

    SciTech Connect

    Cupp-Vickery, J.R.; Igarashi, R.Y.; Perez, M.; Poland, M.; Meyer, C.R.

    2009-05-14

    ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (ADPGlc PPase) catalyzes the conversion of glucose 1-phosphate and ATP to ADP-glucose and pyrophosphate. As a key step in glucan synthesis, the ADPGlc PPases are highly regulated by allosteric activators and inhibitors in accord with the carbon metabolism pathways of the organism. Crystals of Agrobacterium tumefaciens ADPGlc PPase were obtained using lithium sulfate as a precipitant. A complete anomalous selenomethionyl derivative X-ray diffraction data set was collected with unit cell dimensions a = 85.38 {angstrom}, b = 93.79 {angstrom}, and c = 140.29 {angstrom} ({alpha} = {beta} = {gamma} = 90{sup o}) and space group I{sub 222}. The A. tumefaciens ADPGlc PPase model was refined to 2.1 {angstrom} with an R{sub factor} = 22% and R{sub free} = 26.6%. The model consists of two domains: an N-terminal {alpha}{beta}{alpha} sandwich and a C-terminal parallel {beta}-helix. ATP and glucose 1-phosphate were successfully modeled in the proposed active site, and site-directed mutagenesis of conserved glycines in this region (G20, G21, and G23) resulted in substantial loss of activity. The interface between the N- and the C-terminal domains harbors a strong sulfate-binding site, and kinetic studies revealed that sulfate is a competitive inhibitor for the allosteric activator fructose 6-phosphate. These results suggest that the interface between the N- and C-terminal domains binds the allosteric regulator, and fructose 6-phosphate was modeled into this region. The A. tumefaciens ADPGlc PPase/fructose 6-phosphate structural model along with sequence alignment analysis was used to design mutagenesis experiments to expand the activator specificity to include fructose 1,6-bisphosphate. The H379R and H379K enzymes were found to be activated by fructose 1,6-bisphosphate.

  5. Aspartic acid 413 is important for the normal allosteric functioning of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, T.W.; Woodbury, R.L.; Okita, T.W.

    1996-11-01

    As part of a structure-function analysis of the higher-plant ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGP), we used a random mutagenesis approach in combination with a novel bacterial complementation system to isolate over 100 mutants that were defective in glycogen production. One mutant of the large subunit M27 was identified by its capacity to only partially complement a mutation in the structural gene for the bacterial AGP (glg C), as determined by its light-staining phenotype when cells were exposed to I{sub 2} vapors. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and enzymatic pyrophosphorylysis assays of M27 cell extracts showed that the level of expression and AGP activity was comparable to those of cells that expressed the wildtype recombinant enzyme. Kinetic analysis indicated that the M27 AGP displays normal Michaelis constant values for the substrates glucose-1-phosphate and ATP but requires 6- to 10-fold greater levels of 3-phosphoglycerate (3-PGA) than the wild-type recombinant enzyme for maximum activation. DNA sequence analysis showed that M27 contains a single point mutation that resulted in the replacement of aspartic acid 413 to alanine. Substitution of a lysine residue at this site almost completely abolished activation by 3-PGA. Aspartic acid 413 is adjacent to a lysine residue that was previously identified by chemical modification studies to be important in the binding of 3-PGA. The kinetic properties of M27 corroborate the importance of this region in the allosteric regulation of a higher-plant AGP. 28 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Regulatory properties of ADP glucose pyrophosphorylase are required for adjustment of leaf starch synthesis in different photoperiods.

    PubMed

    Mugford, Sam T; Fernandez, Olivier; Brinton, Jemima; Flis, Anna; Krohn, Nicole; Encke, Beatrice; Feil, Regina; Sulpice, Ronan; Lunn, John E; Stitt, Mark; Smith, Alison M

    2014-12-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaves synthesize starch faster in short days than in long days, but the mechanism that adjusts the rate of starch synthesis to daylength is unknown. To understand this mechanism, we first investigated whether adjustment occurs in mutants lacking components of the circadian clock or clock output pathways. Most mutants adjusted starch synthesis to daylength, but adjustment was compromised in plants lacking the GIGANTEA or FLAVIN-BINDING, KELCH REPEAT, F BOX1 components of the photoperiod-signaling pathway involved in flowering. We then examined whether the properties of the starch synthesis enzyme adenosine 5'-diphosphate-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) are important for adjustment of starch synthesis to daylength. Modulation of AGPase activity is known to bring about short-term adjustments of photosynthate partitioning between starch and sucrose (Suc) synthesis. We found that adjustment of starch synthesis to daylength was compromised in plants expressing a deregulated bacterial AGPase in place of the endogenous AGPase and in plants containing mutant forms of the endogenous AGPase with altered allosteric regulatory properties. We suggest that the rate of starch synthesis is in part determined by growth rate at the end of the preceding night. If growth at night is low, as in short days, there is a delay before growth recovers during the next day, leading to accumulation of Suc and stimulation of starch synthesis via activation of AGPase. If growth at night is fast, photosynthate is used for growth at the start of the day, Suc does not accumulate, and starch synthesis is not up-regulated.

  7. Decreased expression of plastidial adenylate kinase in potato tubers results in an enhanced rate of respiration and a stimulation of starch synthesis that is attributable to post-translational redox-activation of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Sandra N; Tiessen, Axel; Fernie, Alisdair R; Geigenberger, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Adenine nucleotides are of general importance for many aspects of cell function, but their role in the regulation of biosynthetic processes is still unclear. It was previously reported that decreased expression of plastidial adenylate kinase, catalysing the interconversion of ATP and AMP to ADP, leads to increased adenylate pools and starch content in transgenic potato tubers. However, the underlying mechanisms were not elucidated. Here, it is shown that decreased expression of plastidial adenylate kinase in growing tubers leads to increased rates of respiratory oxygen consumption and increased carbon fluxes into starch. Increased rates of starch synthesis were accompanied by post-translational redox-activation of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase), catalysing the key regulatory step of starch synthesis in the plastid, while there were no substantial changes in metabolic intermediates or sugar levels. A similar increase in post-translational redox-activation of AGPase was found after supplying adenine to wild-type potato tuber discs to increase adenine nucleotide levels. Results provide first evidence for a link between redox-activation of AGPase and adenine nucleotide levels in plants.

  8. Conserved residues of the Pro103-Arg115 loop are involved in triggering the allosteric response of the Escherichia coli ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Hill, Benjamin L; Wong, Jennifer; May, Brian M; Huerta, Fidel B; Manley, Tara E; Sullivan, Peter R F; Olsen, Kenneth W; Ballicora, Miguel A

    2015-05-01

    The synthesis of glycogen in bacteria and starch in plants is allosterically controlled by the production of ADP-glucose by ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase. Using computational studies, site-directed mutagenesis, and kinetic characterization, we found a critical region for transmitting the allosteric signal in the Escherichia coli ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase. Molecular dynamics simulations and structural comparisons with other ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylases provided information to hypothesize that a Pro103-Arg115 loop is part of an activation path. It had strongly correlated movements with regions of the enzyme associated with regulation and ATP binding, and a network analysis showed that the optimal network pathways linking ATP and the activator binding Lys39 mainly involved residues of this loop. This hypothesis was biochemically tested by mutagenesis. We found that several alanine mutants of the Pro103-Arg115 loop had altered activation profiles for fructose-1,6-bisphosphate. Mutants P103A, Q106A, R107A, W113A, Y114A, and R115A had the most altered kinetic profiles, primarily characterized by a lack of response to fructose-1,6-bisphosphate. This loop is a distinct insertional element present only in allosterically regulated sugar nucleotide pyrophosphorylases that could have been acquired to build a triggering mechanism to link proto-allosteric and catalytic sites.

  9. ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase is localized to both the cytoplasm and plastids in developing pericarp of tomato fruit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, B. Y.; Wang, Y.; Janes, H. W.

    1998-01-01

    The intracellular location of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGP) in developing pericarp of tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum Mill) has been investigated by immunolocalization. With the use of a highly specific anti-tomato fruit AGP antibody, the enzyme was localized in cytoplasm as well as plastids at both the light and electron microscope levels. The immunogold particles in plastids were localized in the stroma and at the surface of the starch granule, whereas those in the cytoplasm occurred in cluster-like patterns. Contrary to the fruit, the labeling in tomato leaf cells occurred exclusively in the chloroplasts. These data demonstrate that AGP is localized to both the cytoplasm and plastids in developing pericarp cells of tomato.

  10. Molecular cloning and characterization of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase cDNA clones isolated from pea cotyledons.

    PubMed

    Burgess, D; Penton, A; Dunsmuir, P; Dooner, H

    1997-02-01

    Three ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (ADPG-PPase) cDNA clones have been isolated and characterized from a pea cotyledon cDNA library. Two of these clones (Psagps1 and Psagps2) encode the small subunit of ADPG-PPase. The deduced amino acid sequences for these two clones are 95% identical. Expression of these two genes differs in that the Psagps2 gene shows comparatively higher expression in seeds relative to its expression in other tissues. Psagps2 expression also peaks midway through seed development at a time in which Psagps1 transcripts are still accumulating. The third cDNA isolated (Psagp11) encodes the large subunit of ADPG-PPase. It shows greater selectivity in expression than either of the small subunit clones. It is highly expressed in sink organs (seed, pod, and seed coat) and undetectable in leaves.

  11. On the Kinetic and Allosteric Regulatory Properties of the ADP-Glucose Pyrophosphorylase from Rhodococcus jostii: An Approach to Evaluate Glycogen Metabolism in Oleaginous Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Cereijo, Antonela E.; Asencion Diez, Matías D.; Dávila Costa, José S.; Alvarez, Héctor M.; Iglesias, Alberto A.

    2016-01-01

    Rhodococcus spp. are oleaginous bacteria that accumulate glycogen during exponential growth. Despite the importance of these microorganisms in biotechnology, little is known about the regulation of carbon and energy storage, mainly the relationship between glycogen and triacylglycerols metabolisms. Herein, we report the molecular cloning and heterologous expression of the gene coding for ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (EC 2.7.7.27) of Rhodococcus jostii, strain RHA1. The recombinant enzyme was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity to accurately characterize its oligomeric, kinetic, and regulatory properties. The R. jostii ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase is a homotetramer of 190 kDa exhibiting low basal activity to catalyze synthesis of ADP-glucose, which is markedly influenced by different allosteric effectors. Glucose-6P, mannose-6P, fructose-6P, ribose-5P, and phosphoenolpyruvate were major activators; whereas, NADPH and 6P-gluconate behaved as main inhibitors of the enzyme. The combination of glucose-6P and other effectors (activators or inhibitors) showed a cross-talk effect suggesting that the different metabolites could orchestrate a fine regulation of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase in R. jostii. The enzyme exhibited some degree of affinity toward ATP, GTP, CTP, and other sugar-1P substrates. Remarkably, the use of glucosamine-1P was sensitive to allosteric activation. The relevance of the fine regulation of R. jostii ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase is further analyzed in the framework of proteomic studies already determined for the bacterium. Results support a critical role for glycogen as a temporal reserve that provides a pool of carbon able of be re-routed to produce long-term storage of lipids under certain conditions. PMID:27313571

  12. [Enhancement of photoassimilate utilization by manipulation of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase gene]. Final progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Okita, T.W.

    1999-04-01

    Part 1 of this research focuses on patterns of gene expression of ADPG-pyrophosphorylase in native and transgenic potato plants. To elucidate the mechanism controlling AGP expression during plant development, the expression of the potato tuber AGP small subunit (sAGP) gene was analyzed in transgenic potato plants using a promoter-{beta}-glucuronidase expression system. Part II evaluated the structure-function relationships of AGP.

  13. Mutagenesis of the Glucose-1-Phosphate-Binding Site of Potato Tuber ADP-Glucose Pyrophosphorylase1

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Yingbin; Ballicora, Miguel A.; Preiss, Jack

    1998-01-01

    Lysine (Lys)-195 in the homotetrameric ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (ADPGlc PPase) from Escherichia coli was shown previously to be involved in the binding of the substrate glucose-1-phosphate (Glc-1-P). This residue is highly conserved in the ADPGlc PPase family. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to investigate the function of this conserved Lys residue in the large and small subunits of the heterotetrameric potato (Solanum tuberosum) tuber enzyme. The apparent affinity for Glc-1-P of the wild-type enzyme decreased 135- to 550-fold by changing Lys-198 of the small subunit to arginine, alanine, or glutamic acid, suggesting that both the charge and the size of this residue influence Glc-1-P binding. These mutations had little effect on the kinetic constants for the other substrates (ATP and Mg2+ or ADP-Glc and inorganic phosphate), activator (3-phosphoglycerate), inhibitor (inorganic phosphate), or on the thermal stability. Mutagenesis of the corresponding Lys (Lys-213) in the large subunit had no effect on the apparent affinity for Glc-1-P by substitution with arginine, alanine, or glutamic acid. A double mutant, SK198RLK213R, was also obtained that had a 100-fold reduction of the apparent affinity for Glc-1-P. The data indicate that Lys-198 in the small subunit is directly involved in the binding of Glc-1-P, whereas they appear to exclude a direct role of Lys-213 in the large subunit in the interaction with this substrate. PMID:9662541

  14. Plastidic phosphoglucomutase and ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase mutants impair starch synthesis in rice pollen grains and cause male sterility

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Kyu; Eom, Joon-Seob; Hwang, Seon-Kap; Shin, Dongjin; An, Gynheung; Okita, Thomas W.; Jeon, Jong-Seong

    2016-01-01

    To elucidate the starch synthesis pathway and the role of this reserve in rice pollen, we characterized mutations in the plastidic phosphoglucomutase, OspPGM, and the plastidic large subunit of ADP-glucose (ADP-Glc) pyrophosphorylase, OsAGPL4. Both genes were up-regulated in maturing pollen, a stage when starch begins to accumulate. Progeny analysis of self-pollinated heterozygous lines carrying the OspPGM mutant alleles, osppgm-1 and osppgm-2, or the OsAGPL4 mutant allele, osagpl4-1, as well as reciprocal crosses between the wild type (WT) and heterozygotes revealed that loss of OspPGM or OsAGPL4 caused male sterility, with the former condition rescued by the introduction of the WT OspPGM gene. While iodine staining and transmission electron microscopy analyses of pollen grains from homozygous osppgm-1 lines produced by anther culture confirmed the starch null phenotype, pollen from homozygous osagpl4 mutant lines, osagpl4-2 and osagpl4-3, generated by the CRISPR/Cas system, accumulated small amounts of starch which were sufficient to produce viable seed. Such osagpl4 mutant pollen, however, was unable to compete against WT pollen successfully, validating the important role of this reserve in fertilization. Our results demonstrate that starch is mainly polymerized from ADP-Glc synthesized from plastidic hexose phosphates in rice pollen and that starch is an essential requirement for successful fertilization in rice. PMID:27588462

  15. Analysis of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase expression during turion formation induced by abscisic acid in Spirodela polyrhiza (greater duckweed)

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Aquatic plants differ in their development from terrestrial plants in their morphology and physiology, but little is known about the molecular basis of the major phases of their life cycle. Interestingly, in place of seeds of terrestrial plants their dormant phase is represented by turions, which circumvents sexual reproduction. However, like seeds turions provide energy storage for starting the next growing season. Results To begin a characterization of the transition from the growth to the dormant phase we used abscisic acid (ABA), a plant hormone, to induce controlled turion formation in Spirodela polyrhiza and investigated their differentiation from fronds, representing their growth phase, into turions with respect to morphological, ultra-structural characteristics, and starch content. Turions were rich in anthocyanin pigmentation and had a density that submerged them to the bottom of liquid medium. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) of turions showed in comparison to fronds shrunken vacuoles, smaller intercellular space, and abundant starch granules surrounded by thylakoid membranes. Turions accumulated more than 60% starch in dry mass after two weeks of ABA treatment. To further understand the mechanism of the developmental switch from fronds to turions, we cloned and sequenced the genes of three large-subunit ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylases (APLs). All three putative protein and exon sequences were conserved, but the corresponding genomic sequences were extremely variable mainly due to the invasion of miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs) into introns. A molecular three-dimensional model of the SpAPLs was consistent with their regulatory mechanism in the interaction with the substrate (ATP) and allosteric activator (3-PGA) to permit conformational changes of its structure. Gene expression analysis revealed that each gene was associated with distinct temporal expression during turion formation. APL2 and APL3 were highly

  16. Regulatory Properties of ADP Glucose Pyrophosphorylase Are Required for Adjustment of Leaf Starch Synthesis in Different Photoperiods1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Mugford, Sam T.; Fernandez, Olivier; Brinton, Jemima; Flis, Anna; Krohn, Nicole; Encke, Beatrice; Feil, Regina; Sulpice, Ronan; Lunn, John E.; Stitt, Mark; Smith, Alison M.

    2014-01-01

    Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaves synthesize starch faster in short days than in long days, but the mechanism that adjusts the rate of starch synthesis to daylength is unknown. To understand this mechanism, we first investigated whether adjustment occurs in mutants lacking components of the circadian clock or clock output pathways. Most mutants adjusted starch synthesis to daylength, but adjustment was compromised in plants lacking the GIGANTEA or FLAVIN-BINDING, KELCH REPEAT, F BOX1 components of the photoperiod-signaling pathway involved in flowering. We then examined whether the properties of the starch synthesis enzyme adenosine 5′-diphosphate-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) are important for adjustment of starch synthesis to daylength. Modulation of AGPase activity is known to bring about short-term adjustments of photosynthate partitioning between starch and sucrose (Suc) synthesis. We found that adjustment of starch synthesis to daylength was compromised in plants expressing a deregulated bacterial AGPase in place of the endogenous AGPase and in plants containing mutant forms of the endogenous AGPase with altered allosteric regulatory properties. We suggest that the rate of starch synthesis is in part determined by growth rate at the end of the preceding night. If growth at night is low, as in short days, there is a delay before growth recovers during the next day, leading to accumulation of Suc and stimulation of starch synthesis via activation of AGPase. If growth at night is fast, photosynthate is used for growth at the start of the day, Suc does not accumulate, and starch synthesis is not up-regulated. PMID:25293961

  17. Brittle-1, an Adenylate Translocator, Facilitates Transfer of Extraplastidial Synthesized ADP-Glucose into Amyloplasts of Maize Endosperms1

    PubMed Central

    Shannon, Jack C.; Pien, Fang-Mei; Cao, Heping; Liu, Kang-Chien

    1998-01-01

    Amyloplasts of starchy tissues such as those of maize (Zea mays L.) function in the synthesis and accumulation of starch during kernel development. ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) is known to be located in chloroplasts, and for many years it was generally accepted that AGPase was also localized in amyloplasts of starchy tissues. Recent aqueous fractionation of young maize endosperm led to the conclusion that 95% of the cellular AGPase was extraplastidial, but immunolocalization studies at the electron- and light-microscopic levels supported the conclusion that maize endosperm AGPase was localized in the amyloplasts. We report the results of two nonaqueous procedures that provide evidence that in maize endosperms in the linear phase of starch accumulation, 90% or more of the cellular AGPase is extraplastidial. We also provide evidence that the brittle-1 protein (BT1), an adenylate translocator with a KTGGL motif common to the ADP-glucose-binding site of starch synthases and bacterial glycogen synthases, functions in the transfer of ADP-glucose into the amyloplast stroma. The importance of the BT1 translocator in starch accumulation in maize endosperms is demonstrated by the severely reduced starch content in bt1 mutant kernels. PMID:9701580

  18. Adjustment of diurnal starch turnover to short days: depletion of sugar during the night leads to a temporary inhibition of carbohydrate utilization, accumulation of sugars and post-translational activation of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase in the following light period.

    PubMed

    Gibon, Yves; Bläsing, Oliver E; Palacios-Rojas, Natalia; Pankovic, Dejana; Hendriks, Janneke H M; Fisahn, Joachim; Höhne, Melanie; Günther, Manuela; Stitt, Mark

    2004-09-01

    A larger proportion of the fixed carbon is retained as starch in the leaf in short days, providing a larger store to support metabolism and carbon export during the long night. The mechanisms that facilitate this adjustment of the sink-source balance are unknown. Starchless pgm mutants were analysed to discover responses that are triggered when diurnal starch turnover is disturbed. Sugars accumulated to high levels during the day, and fell to very low levels by the middle of the night. Sugars rose rapidly in the roots and rosette after illumination, and decreased later in the light period. Global transcript profiling revealed only small differences between pgm and Col0 at the end of the day but large differences at the end of the night, when pgm resembled Col0 after a 4-6 h prolongation of the night and many genes required for biosynthesis and growth were repressed [Plant J. 37 (2004) 914]. It is concluded that transient sugar depletion at the end of the night inhibits carbon utilization at the start of the ensuing light period. A second set of experiments investigated the stimulation of starch synthesis in response to short days in wild-type Col0. In short days, sugars were very low in the roots and rosette at the end of the dark period, and after illumination accumulated rapidly in both organs to levels that were higher than in long days. The response resembles pgm, except that carbohydrate accumulated in the leaf as starch instead of sugars. A similar response was found after transfer from long to short days. Inclusion of sugar in the rooting medium attenuated the stimulation of starch synthesis. Post-translational activation of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) was increased in pgm, and in Col0 in short days. It is concluded that starch synthesis is stimulated in short day conditions because sugar depletion at the end of the night triggers a temporary inhibition of growth and carbohydrate utilization in the first part of the light period, leading to

  19. The rice endosperm ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase large subunit is essential for optimal catalysis and allosteric regulation of the heterotetrameric enzyme.

    PubMed

    Tuncel, Aytug; Kawaguchi, Joe; Ihara, Yasuharu; Matsusaka, Hiroaki; Nishi, Aiko; Nakamura, Tetsuhiro; Kuhara, Satoru; Hirakawa, Hideki; Nakamura, Yasunori; Cakir, Bilal; Nagamine, Ai; Okita, Thomas W; Hwang, Seon-Kap; Satoh, Hikaru

    2014-06-01

    Although an alternative pathway has been suggested, the prevailing view is that starch synthesis in cereal endosperm is controlled by the activity of the cytosolic isoform of ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase). In rice, the cytosolic AGPase isoform is encoded by the OsAGPS2b and OsAGPL2 genes, which code for the small (S2b) and large (L2) subunits of the heterotetrameric enzyme, respectively. In this study, we isolated several allelic missense and nonsense OsAGPL2 mutants by N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) treatment of fertilized egg cells and by TILLING (Targeting Induced Local Lesions in Genomes). Interestingly, seeds from three of the missense mutants (two containing T139I and A171V) were severely shriveled and had seed weight and starch content comparable with the shriveled seeds from OsAGPL2 null mutants. Results from kinetic analysis of the purified recombinant enzymes revealed that the catalytic and allosteric regulatory properties of these mutant enzymes were significantly impaired. The missense heterotetramer enzymes and the S2b homotetramer had lower specific (catalytic) activities and affinities for the activator 3-phosphoglycerate (3-PGA). The missense heterotetramer enzymes showed more sensitivity to inhibition by the inhibitor inorganic phosphate (Pi) than the wild-type AGPase, while the S2b homotetramer was profoundly tolerant to Pi inhibition. Thus, our results provide definitive evidence that starch biosynthesis during rice endosperm development is controlled predominantly by the catalytic activity of the cytoplasmic AGPase and its allosteric regulation by the effectors. Moreover, our results show that the L2 subunit is essential for both catalysis and allosteric regulatory properties of the heterotetramer enzyme.

  20. Starch synthesis in potato tubers is regulated by post-translational redox modification of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase: a novel regulatory mechanism linking starch synthesis to the sucrose supply.

    PubMed

    Tiessen, Axel; Hendriks, Janneke H M; Stitt, Mark; Branscheid, Anja; Gibon, Yves; Farré, Eva M; Geigenberger, Peter

    2002-09-01

    Transcriptional and allosteric regulation of ADP-Glc pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) plays a major role in the regulation of starch synthesis. Analysis of the response after detachment of growing potato tubers from the mother plant revealed that this concept requires extension. Starch synthesis was inhibited within 24 h of tuber detachment, even though the catalytic subunit of AGPase (AGPB) and overall AGPase activity remained high, the substrates ATP and Glc-1-P increased, and the glycerate-3-phosphate/inorganic orthophosphate (the allosteric activator and inhibitor, respectively) ratio increased. This inhibition was abolished in transformants in which a bacterial AGPase replaced the potato AGPase. Measurements of the subcellular levels of each metabolite between Suc and starch established AGPase as the only step whose substrates increase and mass action ratio decreases after detachment of wild-type tubers. Separation of extracts on nonreducing SDS gels revealed that AGPB is present as a mixture of monomers and dimers in growing tubers and becomes dimerized completely in detached tubers. Dimerization led to inactivation of the enzyme as a result of a marked decrease of the substrate affinity and sensitivity to allosteric effectors. Dimerization could be reversed and AGPase reactivated in vitro by incubating extracts with DTT. Incubation of tuber slices with DTT or high Suc levels reduced dimerization, increased AGPase activation, and stimulated starch synthesis in vivo. In intact tubers, the Suc content correlated strongly with AGPase activation across a range of treatments, including tuber detachment, aging of the mother plant, heterologous overexpression of Suc phosphorylase, and antisense inhibition of endogenous AGPase activity. Furthermore, activation of AGPase resulted in a stimulation of starch synthesis and decreased levels of glycolytic intermediates.

  1. Carbon dynamics, development and stress responses in Arabidopsis: involvement of the APL4 subunit of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (starch synthesis).

    PubMed

    Sulmon, Cécile; Gouesbet, Gwenola; Ramel, Fanny; Cabello-Hurtado, Francisco; Penno, Christophe; Bechtold, Nicole; Couée, Ivan; El Amrani, Abdelhak

    2011-01-01

    An Arabidopsis thaliana T-DNA insertional mutant was identified and characterized for enhanced tolerance to the singlet-oxygen-generating herbicide atrazine in comparison to wild-type. This enhanced atrazine tolerance mutant was shown to be affected in the promoter structure and in the regulation of expression of the APL4 isoform of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, a key enzyme of the starch biosynthesis pathway, thus resulting in decrease of APL4 mRNA levels. The impact of this regulatory mutation was confirmed by the analysis of an independent T-DNA insertional mutant also affected in the promoter of the APL4 gene. The resulting tissue-specific modifications of carbon partitioning in plantlets and the effects on plantlet growth and stress tolerance point out to specific and non-redundant roles of APL4 in root carbon dynamics, shoot-root relationships and sink regulations of photosynthesis. Given the effects of exogenous sugar treatments and of endogenous sugar levels on atrazine tolerance in wild-type Arabidopsis plantlets, atrazine tolerance of this apl4 mutant is discussed in terms of perception of carbon status and of investment of sugar allocation in xenobiotic and oxidative stress responses.

  2. Carbon Dynamics, Development and Stress Responses in Arabidopsis: Involvement of the APL4 Subunit of ADP-Glucose Pyrophosphorylase (Starch Synthesis)

    PubMed Central

    Sulmon, Cécile; Gouesbet, Gwenola; Ramel, Fanny; Cabello-Hurtado, Francisco; Penno, Christophe; Bechtold, Nicole; Couée, Ivan; Amrani, Abdelhak El

    2011-01-01

    An Arabidopsis thaliana T-DNA insertional mutant was identified and characterized for enhanced tolerance to the singlet-oxygen-generating herbicide atrazine in comparison to wild-type. This enhanced atrazine tolerance mutant was shown to be affected in the promoter structure and in the regulation of expression of the APL4 isoform of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, a key enzyme of the starch biosynthesis pathway, thus resulting in decrease of APL4 mRNA levels. The impact of this regulatory mutation was confirmed by the analysis of an independent T-DNA insertional mutant also affected in the promoter of the APL4 gene. The resulting tissue-specific modifications of carbon partitioning in plantlets and the effects on plantlet growth and stress tolerance point out to specific and non-redundant roles of APL4 in root carbon dynamics, shoot-root relationships and sink regulations of photosynthesis. Given the effects of exogenous sugar treatments and of endogenous sugar levels on atrazine tolerance in wild-type Arabidopsis plantlets, atrazine tolerance of this apl4 mutant is discussed in terms of perception of carbon status and of investment of sugar allocation in xenobiotic and oxidative stress responses. PMID:22073207

  3. ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase-deficient pea embryos reveal specific transcriptional and metabolic changes of carbon-nitrogen metabolism and stress responses.

    PubMed

    Weigelt, Kathleen; Küster, Helge; Rutten, Twan; Fait, Aaron; Fernie, Alisdair R; Miersch, Otto; Wasternack, Claus; Emery, R J Neil; Desel, Christine; Hosein, Felicia; Müller, Martin; Saalbach, Isolde; Weber, Hans

    2009-01-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGP)-repressed pea (Pisum sativum) seeds using transcript and metabolite profiling to monitor the effects that reduced carbon flow into starch has on carbon-nitrogen metabolism and related pathways. Changed patterns of transcripts and metabolites suggest that AGP repression causes sugar accumulation and stimulates carbohydrate oxidation via glycolysis, tricarboxylic acid cycle, and mitochondrial respiration. Enhanced provision of precursors such as acetyl-coenzyme A and organic acids apparently support other pathways and activate amino acid and storage protein biosynthesis as well as pathways fed by cytosolic acetyl-coenzyme A, such as cysteine biosynthesis and fatty acid elongation/metabolism. As a consequence, the resulting higher nitrogen (N) demand depletes transient N storage pools, specifically asparagine and arginine, and leads to N limitation. Moreover, increased sugar accumulation appears to stimulate cytokinin-mediated cell proliferation pathways. In addition, the deregulation of starch biosynthesis resulted in indirect changes, such as increased mitochondrial metabolism and osmotic stress. The combined effect of these changes is an enhanced generation of reactive oxygen species coupled with an up-regulation of energy-dissipating, reactive oxygen species protection, and defense genes. Transcriptional activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways and oxylipin synthesis indicates an additional activation of stress signaling pathways. AGP-repressed embryos contain higher levels of jasmonate derivatives; however, this increase is preferentially in nonactive forms. The results suggest that, although metabolic/osmotic alterations in iAGP pea seeds result in multiple stress responses, pea seeds have effective mechanisms to circumvent stress signaling under conditions in which excessive stress responses and/or cellular damage could prematurely initiate senescence or apoptosis.

  4. Site-directed mutagenesis of Lysine{sup 382}, the activator-binding site, of ADP-Glucose pyrophosphorylase from Anabaena PCC 6120

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, Jun; Charng, Yee-yung; Preiss, J.

    1996-03-05

    Previous studies have shown that a highly conserved lysyl residue (Lys{sup 419}) near the C-terminus of Anabaena ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase is involved in the binding of 3-P-glycerate, the allosteric activator. Phosphopyridoxylation of the K419R mutant enzyme modified another conserved lysyl residue (Lys{sup 382}), suggesting that this residue might be also located within the activator-binding site. Site-directed mutagenesis of Lys{sup 382} of the Anabaena enzyme was performed to determine the role of this residue. Replacing Lys{sup 382} with either arginine, alanine, or glutamine produced mutant enzymes with apparent affinities for 3-P-glycerate 10-160-fold lower than that of the wild-type enzyme. The glutamic acid mutant enzyme was inhibited by 3-P-glycerate. These mutations had lesser impact on the kinetic constants for the substrates and inhibitor, P{sub i}, and on the thermal stability. These results indicate that both the charge and size of the residue at position 382 influence the binding of 3-P-glycerate. Site-directed mutagenesis was also performed to obtain a K382R-K419R double mutant. The apparent affinity for 3-P-glycerate of this double-mutant enzyme was 104-fold lower than that of the wild-type enzyme, and the specificity for activator of this mutant enzyme was altered. The K382R-K419R enzyme could not be phosphopyridoxylated, suggesting that other lysine residues are not involved in the binding of 3-P-glycerate. 32 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Structure Function Relationships of ADP-Glucose Pyrophosphorylase and Branching Enzyme: Manipulation of Their Genes for Alteration of Starch Quanlity and Quantity

    SciTech Connect

    Jack Preiss

    2006-02-16

    Conversion of the Potato tuber ADP-glucose Pyrophopshorylase Regulatory Subunit into a Catalytic Subunit. ADP-glucose synthesis, a rate-limiting reaction in starch synthesis, is catalyzed by ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (ADPGlc PPase). The enzyme in plants is allosterically activated by 3-phosphoglycerate (3PGA) and inhibited by inorganic phosphate (Pi) and is composed of two subunits as a heterotetramer, a2b2. Subunit a is the catalytic subunit and subunit b is designated as the regulatory subunit.The b subunit increases the affinty of the activator for the catalytic subunit. Recent results have shown that the subunits are derived from the same ancestor subunit as the regulatory subunit can be converted to a catalytically subunit via mutation of just two amino acids. Lys44 and Thr54 in the large subunit from potato tuber were converted to the homologous catalytic subunit residues, Arg33 and Lys43. The activity of the large subunit mutants cannot be readily tested with a co-expressed wild-type small (catalytic) subunit because of the intrinsic activity of the latter. We co-expressed the regulatory-subunit mutants with SmallD145N, an inactive S subunit in which the catalytic Asp145 was mutated. The activity of the small (catalytic) subunit was reduced more than three orders of magnitude. Coexpression of the L subunit double mutant LargeK44R/T54K with SmallD145N generated an enzyme with considerable activity, 10% and 18% of the wildtype enzyme, in the ADP-glucose synthetic and pyrophosphorolytic direction, respectively. Replacement of those two residues in the small subunit by the homologous amino acids in the L subunits (mutations R33K and K43T) decreased the activity one and two orders of magnitude. The wild-type enzyme and SmallD145NLargeK44R/T54K had very similar kinetic properties indicating that the substrate site has been conserved. The fact that only two mutations in the L subunit restored enzyme activity is very strong evidence that the large subunit is

  6. The sweet potato ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase gene (ibAGP1) promoter confers high-level expression of the GUS reporter gene in the potato tuber.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Won; Goo, Young-Min; Lee, Cheol-Ho; Lee, Byung-Hyun; Bae, Jung-Myung; Lee, Shin-Woo

    2009-10-01

    Molecular farming refers to the process of creating bioengineered plants with the capability of producing potentially valuable products, such as drugs, vaccines, and chemicals. We have investigated the potential of the sweet potato ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase gene (ibAGP1) promoter and its transit peptide (TP) as an expression system for the mass production of foreign proteins in potato. The ibAGP1 promoter and its TP sequence were transformed into potato along with beta-glucuronidase (GUS) as a reporter gene, and GUS activity was subsequently analyzed in the transgenic potato plants. In tuber tissues, GUS activity in transgenic plants carrying only the ibAGP1 promoter (ibAGP1::GUS) increased up to 15.6-fold compared with that of transgenic plants carrying only the CaMV35S promoter (CaMV35S::GUS). GUS activity in transgenic plants was further enhanced by the addition of the sweetpotato TP to the recombinant vector (ibAGP1::TP::GUS), with tuber tissues showing a 26-fold increase in activity compared with that in the CaMV35S::GUS-transgenic lines. In leaf tissues, the levels of GUS activity found in ibAGP1::GUS-transgenic lines were similar to those in CaMV35S::GUS-lines, but they were significantly enhanced in ibAGP1::TP::GUS-lines. GUS activity gradually increased with increasing tuber diameter in ibAGP1::GUS-transgenic plants, reaching a maximum level when the tuber was 35 mm in diameter. In contrast, extremely elevated levels of GUS activity - up to about 10-fold higher than that found in CaMV35S::GUS-lines - were found in ibAGP1::TP::GUS-transgenic lines at a much earlier stage of tuber development (diameter 4 mm), and these higher levels were maintained throughout the entire tuber developmental stage. These results suggest that the sweetpotato ibAGP1 promoter and its TP are a potentially strong foreign gene expression system that can be used for molecular farming in potato plants.

  7. The sweet potato ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase gene (ibAGP1) promoter confers high-level expression of the GUS reporter gene in the potato tuber.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae-Won; Goo, Young-Min; Lee, Cheol-Ho; Lee, Byung-Hyun; Bae, Jung-Myung; Lee, Shin-Woo

    2009-10-01

    Molecular farming refers to the process of creating bioengineered plants with the capability of producing potentially valuable products, such as drugs, vaccines, and chemicals. We have investigated the potential of the sweet potato ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase gene (ibAGP1) promoter and its transit peptide (TP) as an expression system for the mass production of foreign proteins in potato. The ibAGP1 promoter and its TP sequence were transformed into potato along with beta-glucuronidase (GUS) as a reporter gene, and GUS activity was subsequently analyzed in the transgenic potato plants. In tuber tissues, GUS activity in transgenic plants carrying only the ibAGP1 promoter (ibAGP1::GUS) increased up to 15.6-fold compared with that of transgenic plants carrying only the CaMV35S promoter (CaMV35S::GUS). GUS activity in transgenic plants was further enhanced by the addition of the sweetpotato TP to the recombinant vector (ibAGP1::TP::GUS), with tuber tissues showing a 26-fold increase in activity compared with that in the CaMV35S::GUS-transgenic lines. In leaf tissues, the levels of GUS activity found in ibAGP1::GUS-transgenic lines were similar to those in CaMV35S::GUS-lines, but they were significantly enhanced in ibAGP1::TP::GUS-lines. GUS activity gradually increased with increasing tuber diameter in ibAGP1::GUS-transgenic plants, reaching a maximum level when the tuber was 35 mm in diameter. In contrast, extremely elevated levels of GUS activity - up to about 10-fold higher than that found in CaMV35S::GUS-lines - were found in ibAGP1::TP::GUS-transgenic lines at a much earlier stage of tuber development (diameter 4 mm), and these higher levels were maintained throughout the entire tuber developmental stage. These results suggest that the sweetpotato ibAGP1 promoter and its TP are a potentially strong foreign gene expression system that can be used for molecular farming in potato plants. PMID:19819408

  8. Cumulative effect of heterologous AtWRI1 gene expression and endogenous BjAGPase gene silencing increases seed lipid content in Indian mustard Brassica juncea.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Surajit; Das, Natasha; Maiti, Mrinal K

    2016-10-01

    The production of vegetable oil in many countries of the world, including India has not been able to keep pace with the increasing requirement, leading to a very large gap in the demand-supply chain. Thus, there is an urgent need to increase the yield potential of the oilseed crops so as to enhance the storage lipid productivity. The present study describes a novel metabolic engineering ploy involving the constitutive down-regulation of endogenous ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (BjAGPase) enzyme and the seed-specific expression of WRINKLED1 transcription factor (AtWRI1) from Arabidopsis thaliana in Indian mustard (Brassica juncea) with an aim to divert the photosynthetically fixed carbon pool from starch to lipid synthesis in the seeds for the enhanced production of storage lipids in the seeds of transgenic mustard plants. The starch content, in both the vegetative leaf and developing seed tissues of the transgenic B. juncea lines exhibited a reduction by about 45-53% compared to the untransformed control, whereas the soluble sugar content was increased by 2.4 and 1.3-fold in the leaf and developing seed tissues, respectively. Consequently, the transgenic lines showed a significant enhancement in total seed lipid content ranging between 7.5 and 16.9%. The results indicate that the adopted metabolic engineering strategy was successful in significantly increasing the seed oil content. Therefore, findings of our research suggest that the metabolic engineering strategy adopted in this study for shifting the anabolic carbon flux from starch synthesis to lipid biosynthesis can be employed for increasing the storage lipid content of seeds in other plant species. PMID:27314514

  9. Loss of Starch Granule Initiation Has a Deleterious Effect on the Growth of Arabidopsis Plants Due to an Accumulation of ADP-Glucose1[W

    PubMed Central

    Ragel, Paula; Streb, Sebastian; Feil, Regina; Sahrawy, Mariam; Annunziata, Maria Grazia; Lunn, John E.; Zeeman, Samuel; Mérida, Ángel

    2013-01-01

    STARCH SYNTHASE4 (SS4) is required for proper starch granule initiation in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), although SS3 can partially replace its function. Unlike other starch-deficient mutants, ss4 and ss3/ss4 mutants grow poorly even under long-day conditions. They have less chlorophyll and carotenoids than the wild type and lower maximal rates of photosynthesis. There is evidence of photooxidative damage of the photosynthetic apparatus in the mutants from chlorophyll a fluorescence parameters and their high levels of malondialdehyde. Metabolite profiling revealed that ss3/ss4 accumulates over 170 times more ADP-glucose (Glc) than wild-type plants. Restricting ADP-Glc synthesis, by introducing mutations in the plastidial phosphoglucomutase (pgm1) or the small subunit of ADP-Glc pyrophosphorylase (aps1), largely restored photosynthetic capacity and growth in pgm1/ss3/ss4 and aps1/ss3/ss4 triple mutants. It is proposed that the accumulation of ADP-Glc in the ss3/ss4 mutant sequesters a large part of the plastidial pools of adenine nucleotides, which limits photophosphorylation, leading to photooxidative stress, causing the chlorotic and stunted growth phenotypes of the plants. PMID:23872660

  10. Loss of starch granule initiation has a deleterious effect on the growth of arabidopsis plants due to an accumulation of ADP-glucose.

    PubMed

    Ragel, Paula; Streb, Sebastian; Feil, Regina; Sahrawy, Mariam; Annunziata, Maria Grazia; Lunn, John E; Zeeman, Samuel; Mérida, Ángel

    2013-09-01

    STARCH SYNTHASE4 (SS4) is required for proper starch granule initiation in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), although SS3 can partially replace its function. Unlike other starch-deficient mutants, ss4 and ss3/ss4 mutants grow poorly even under long-day conditions. They have less chlorophyll and carotenoids than the wild type and lower maximal rates of photosynthesis. There is evidence of photooxidative damage of the photosynthetic apparatus in the mutants from chlorophyll a fluorescence parameters and their high levels of malondialdehyde. Metabolite profiling revealed that ss3/ss4 accumulates over 170 times more ADP-glucose (Glc) than wild-type plants. Restricting ADP-Glc synthesis, by introducing mutations in the plastidial phosphoglucomutase (pgm1) or the small subunit of ADP-Glc pyrophosphorylase (aps1), largely restored photosynthetic capacity and growth in pgm1/ss3/ss4 and aps1/ss3/ss4 triple mutants. It is proposed that the accumulation of ADP-Glc in the ss3/ss4 mutant sequesters a large part of the plastidial pools of adenine nucleotides, which limits photophosphorylation, leading to photooxidative stress, causing the chlorotic and stunted growth phenotypes of the plants.

  11. Isolation and characterization of a starchless mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana (L. ) Heynh lacking ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Tsanpiao; Caspar, T.; Somerville, C.; Preiss, J. )

    1988-04-01

    A mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana lacking ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase activity (EC 2.7.7.27) was isolated (from a mutagenized population of plants) by screening for the absence of leaf starch. The mutant grows as vigorously as the wild type in continuous light but more slowly than the wild type in a 12 hours light/12 hours dark photoperiod. Genetic analysis showed that the deficiency of both starch and ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase activity were attributable to a single, nuclear, recessive mutation at a locus designated adg1. The absence of starch in the mutant demonstrates that starch synthesis in the chloroplast is entirely dependent on a pathway involving ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase. Analysis of leaf extracts by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis followed by Western blotting experiments using antibodies specific for spinach ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase showed that two proteins, present in the wild type, were absent from the mutant. The heterozygous F{sub 1} progeny of a cross between the mutant and wild type had a specific activity of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase indistinguishable from the wild type. These observations suggest that the mutation in the adg1 gene in TL25 might affect a regulatory locus.

  12. Distinct isoforms of ADPglucose pyrophosphatase and ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase occur in the suspension-cultured cells of sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.).

    PubMed

    Baroja-Fernández, E; Zandueta-Criado, A; Rodríguez-López, M; Akazawa, T; Pozueta-Romero, J

    2000-09-01

    The intracellular localizations of ADPglucose pyrophosphatase (AGPPase) and ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) have been studied using protoplasts prepared from suspension-cultured cells of sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.). Subcellular fractionation studies revealed that all the AGPPase present in the protoplasts is associated with amyloplasts, whereas more than 60% of AGPase is in the extraplastidial compartment. Immunoblots of amyloplast- and extraplastid-enriched extracts further confirmed that AGPase is located mainly outside the amyloplast. Experiments carried out to identify possible different isoforms of AGPPase in the amyloplast revealed the presence of soluble and starch granule-bound isoforms. We thus propose that ADPglucose levels linked to starch biosynthesis in sycamore cells are controlled by enzymatic reactions catalyzing the synthesis and breakdown of ADPglucose, which take place both inside and outside the amyloplast.

  13. Structure and Mechanism of an ADP-Glucose Phosphorylase from Arabidopsis thaliana†,‡

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Jason G.; Arabshahi, Abolfazl; Bitto, Eduard; Bingman, Craig A.; Ruzicka, Frank J.; Frey, Perry A.; Phillips, George N.

    2008-01-01

    The X-ray crystal structure of the At5g18200.1 protein has been solved to a nominal resolution of 2.30 Å. The structure has a histidine triad (HIT)-like fold containing two distinct HIT-like motifs. The sequence of At5g18200.1 indicates a distant family relationship to the Escherichia coli galactose-1-P uridylyltransferase (GalT): the determined structure of the At5g18200.1 protein confirms this relationship. The At5g18200.1 protein does not demonstrate GalT activity but instead catalyzes adenylyltransfer in the reaction of ADP-glucose with various phosphates. The best acceptor among those evaluated is phosphate itself, thus the At5g18200.1 enzyme appears to be an ADP-glucose phosphorylase. The enzyme catalyzes the exchange of 14C between ADP-[14C]glucose and glucose-1-P in the absence of phosphate. The steady state kinetics of exchange follows the ping pong bi bi kinetic mechanism, with kcat = 4.1 s−1 and Km-values of 1.4 µM and 83 µM for ADP-[14C]glucose and glucose-1-P, respectively, at pH 8.5 and 25 °C. The overall reaction of ADP-glucose with phosphate to produce ADP and glucose-1-P follows ping pong bi bi steady state kinetics, with kcat = 2.7 s−1 and Km-values of 6.9 µM and 90 µM for ADP-glucose and phosphate, respectively, at pH 8.5 and 25 °C. The kinetics are consistent with a double displacement mechanism that involves a covalent adenylyl-enzyme intermediate. The X-ray crystal structure of this intermediate was solved to 1.83 Å resolution, and shows the AMP-group bonded to His186. The value of Keq in the direction of ADP and glucose-1-P formation is 5.0 at pH 7.0 and 25 °C in the absence of a divalent metal ion, and it is 40 in the presence of 1 mM MgCl2. PMID:16519510

  14. Modification of carbon partitioning, photosynthetic capacity, and O{sub 2} sensitivity in Arabidopsis plants with low ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, J.; Okita, T.W.; Edwards, G.E.

    1999-01-01

    Wild-type Arabidopsis plants, the starch-deficient mutant TL46, and the near-starchless mutant TL25 were evaluated by noninvasive in situ methods for their capacity for net CO{sub 2} assimilation, true rates of photosynthetic O{sub 2} evolution (determined from chlorophyll fluorescence measurements of photosystem II), partitioning of photosynthate into sucrose and starch, and plant growth. Compared with wild-type plants, the starch mutants showed reduced photosynthetic capacity, with the largest reduction occurring in mutant TL25 subjected to high light and increased CO{sub 2} partial pressure. The extent of stimulation of CO{sub 2} assimilation by increasing CO{sub 2} or by reducing O{sub 2} partial pressure was significantly less for the starch mutants than for wild-type plants. Under high light and moderate to high levels of CO{sub 2}, the rates of CO{sub 2} assimilation and O{sub 2} evolution and the percentage inhibition of photosynthesis by low O{sub 2} were higher for the wild type than for the mutants. The relative rates of {sup 14}CO{sub 2} incorporation into starch under high light and high CO{sub 2} followed the patterns of photosynthetic capacity, with TL46 showing 31% to 40% of the starch-labeling rates of the wild type and TL25 showing less than 14% incorporation. Overall, there were significant correlations between the rates of starch synthesis and CO{sub 2} assimilation and between the rates of starch synthesis and cumulative leaf area. These results indicate that leaf starch plays an important role as a transient reserve, the synthesis of which can ameliorate any potential reduction in photosynthesis caused by feedback regulation.

  15. Identification and characterization of UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase in cyanobacteria Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Yusuke; Sekine, Midori; Ihara, Masaki

    2014-05-01

    Exopolysaccharides produced by photosynthetic cyanobacteria have received considerable attention in recent years for their potential applications in the production of renewable biofuels. Particularly, cyanobacterial cellulose is one of the most promising products because it is extracellularly secreted as a non-crystalline form, which can be easily harvested from the media and converted into glucose units. In cyanobacteria, the production of UDP-glucose, the cellulose precursor, is a key step in the cellulose synthesis pathway. UDP-glucose is synthesized from UTP and glucose-1-phosphate (Glc-1P) by UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (UGPase), but this pathway in cyanobacteria has not been well characterized. Therefore, to elucidate the overall cellulose biosynthesis pathway in cyanobacteria, we studied the putative UGPase All3274 and seven other putative NDP-sugar pyrophosphorylases (NSPases), All4645, Alr2825, Alr4491, Alr0188, Alr3400, Alr2361, and Alr3921 of Anabaena sp. PCC 7120. Assays using the purified recombinant proteins revealed that All3274 exhibited UGPase activity, All4645, Alr2825, Alr4491, Alr0188, and Alr3921 exhibited pyrophosphorylase activities on ADP-glucose, CDP-glucose, dTDP-glucose, GDP-mannose, and UDP-N-acetylglucosamine, respectively. Further characterization of All3274 revealed that the kcat for UDP-glucose formation was one or two orders lower than those of other known UGPases. The activity and dimerization tendency of All3274 increased at higher enzyme concentrations, implying catalytic activation by dimerization. However, most interestingly, All3274 dimerization was inhibited by UTP and Glc-1P, but not by UDP-glucose. This study presents the first in vitro characterization of a cyanobacterial UGPase, and provides insights into biotechnological attempts to utilize the photosynthetic production of cellulose from cyanobacteria.

  16. Analysis of the Rice ADP-Glucose Transporter (OsBT1) Indicates the Presence of Regulatory Processes in the Amyloplast Stroma That Control ADP-Glucose Flux into Starch1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Shiraishi, Shota; Matsusaka, Hiroaki; Singh, Salvinder; Hosaka, Yuko; Satoh, Hikaru

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies showed that efforts to further elevate starch synthesis in rice (Oryza sativa) seeds overproducing ADP-glucose (ADPglc) were prevented by processes downstream of ADPglc synthesis. Here, we identified the major ADPglc transporter by studying the shrunken3 locus of the EM1093 rice line, which harbors a mutation in the BRITTLE1 (BT1) adenylate transporter (OsBt1) gene. Despite containing elevated ADPglc levels (approximately 10-fold) compared with the wild-type, EM1093 grains are small and shriveled due to the reduction in the amounts and size of starch granules. Increases in ADPglc levels in EM1093 were due to their poor uptake of ADP-[14C]glc by amyloplasts. To assess the potential role of BT1 as a rate-determining step in starch biosynthesis, the maize ZmBt1 gene was overexpressed in the wild-type and the GlgC (CS8) transgenic line expressing a bacterial glgC-TM gene. ADPglc transport assays indicated that transgenic lines expressing ZmBT1 alone or combined with GlgC exhibited higher rates of transport (approximately 2-fold), with the GlgC (CS8) and GlgC/ZmBT1 (CS8/AT5) lines showing elevated ADPglc levels in amyloplasts. These increases, however, did not lead to further enhancement in seed weights even when these plant lines were grown under elevated CO2. Overall, our results indicate that rice lines with enhanced ADPglc synthesis and import into amyloplasts reveal additional barriers within the stroma that restrict maximum carbon flow into starch. PMID:26754668

  17. Decreasing the mitochondrial synthesis of malate in potato tubers does not affect plastidial starch synthesis, suggesting that the physiological regulation of ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase is context dependent.

    PubMed

    Szecowka, Marek; Osorio, Sonia; Obata, Toshihiro; Araújo, Wagner L; Rohrmann, Johannes; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Fernie, Alisdair R

    2012-12-01

    Modulation of the malate content of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) fruit by altering the expression of mitochondrially localized enzymes of the tricarboxylic acid cycle resulted in enhanced transitory starch accumulation and subsequent effects on postharvest fruit physiology. In this study, we assessed whether such a manipulation would similarly affect starch biosynthesis in an organ that displays a linear, as opposed to a transient, kinetic of starch accumulation. For this purpose, we used RNA interference to down-regulate the expression of fumarase in potato (Solanum tuberosum) under the control of the tuber-specific B33 promoter. Despite displaying similar reductions in both fumarase activity and malate content as observed in tomato fruit expressing the same construct, the resultant transformants were neither characterized by an increased flux to, or accumulation of, starch, nor by alteration in yield parameters. Since the effect in tomato was mechanistically linked to derepression of the reaction catalyzed by ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, we evaluated whether the lack of effect on starch biosynthesis was due to differences in enzymatic properties of the enzyme from potato and tomato or rather due to differential subcellular compartmentation of reductant in the different organs. The results are discussed in the context both of current models of metabolic compartmentation and engineering.

  18. Enhancing sucrose synthase activity results in increased levels of starch and ADP-glucose in maize (Zea mays L.) seed endosperms.

    PubMed

    Li, Jun; Baroja-Fernández, Edurne; Bahaji, Abdellatif; Muñoz, Francisco José; Ovecka, Miroslav; Montero, Manuel; Sesma, María Teresa; Alonso-Casajús, Nora; Almagro, Goizeder; Sánchez-López, Angela María; Hidalgo, Maite; Zamarbide, Marta; Pozueta-Romero, Javier

    2013-02-01

    Sucrose synthase (SuSy) is a highly regulated cytosolic enzyme that catalyzes the conversion of sucrose and a nucleoside diphosphate into the corresponding nucleoside diphosphate glucose and fructose. In cereal endosperms, it is widely assumed that the stepwise reactions of SuSy, UDPglucose pyrophosphorylase and ADPglucose (ADPG) pyrophosphorylase (AGP) take place in the cytosol to convert sucrose into ADPG necessary for starch biosynthesis, although it has also been suggested that SuSy may participate in the direct conversion of sucrose into ADPG. In this study, the levels of the major primary carbon metabolites, and the activities of starch metabolism-related enzymes were assessed in endosperms of transgenic maize plants ectopically expressing StSUS4, which encodes a potato SuSy isoform. A total of 29 fertile lines transformed with StSUS4 were obtained, five of them containing a single copy of the transgene that was still functional after five generations. The number of seeds per ear of the five transgenic lines containing a single StSUS4 copy was comparable with that of wild-type (WT) control seeds. However, transgenic seeds accumulated 10-15% more starch at the mature stage, and contained a higher amylose/amylopectin balance than WT seeds. Endosperms of developing StSUS4-expressing seeds exhibited a significant increase in SuSy activity, and in starch and ADPG contents when compared with WT endosperms. No significant changes could be detected in the transgenic seeds in the content of soluble sugars, and in activities of starch metabolism-related enzymes when compared with WT seeds. A suggested metabolic model is presented wherein both AGP and SuSy are involved in the production of ADPG linked to starch biosynthesis in maize endosperm cells.

  19. Sugar-induced increases in trehalose 6-phosphate are correlated with redox activation of ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase and higher rates of starch synthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Lunn, John E; Feil, Regina; Hendriks, Janneke H M; Gibon, Yves; Morcuende, Rosa; Osuna, Daniel; Scheible, Wolf-Rüdiger; Carillo, Petronia; Hajirezaei, Mohammad-Reza; Stitt, Mark

    2006-07-01

    Tre6P (trehalose 6-phosphate) is implicated in sugar-signalling pathways in plants, but its exact functions in vivo are uncertain. One of the main obstacles to discovering these functions is the difficulty of measuring the amount of Tre6P in plant tissues. We have developed a highly specific assay, using liquid chromatography coupled to MS-Q3 (triple quadrupole MS), to measure Tre6P in the femto-picomole range. The Tre6P content of sucrose-starved Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings in axenic culture increased from 18 to 482 pmol x g(-1) FW (fresh weight) after adding sucrose. Leaves from soil-grown plants contained 67 pmol x g(-1) FW at the end of the night, which rose to 108 pmol x g(-1)FW after 4 h of illumination. Even greater changes in Tre6P content were seen after a 6 h extension of the dark period, and in the starchless mutant, pgm. The intracellular concentration of Tre6P in wild-type leaves was estimated to range from 1 to 15 microM. It has recently been reported that the addition of Tre6P to isolated chloroplasts leads to redox activation of AGPase (ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase) [Kolbe, Tiessen, Schluepmann, Paul, Ulrich and Geigenberger (2005) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 102, 11118-11123]. Using the new assay for Tre6P, we found that rising sugar levels in plants are accompanied by increases in the level of Tre6P, redox activation of AGPase and the stimulation of starch synthesis in vivo. These results indicate that Tre6P acts as a signalling metabolite of sugar status in plants, and support the proposal that Tre6P mediates sucrose-induced changes in the rate of starch synthesis.

  20. Sugar-induced increases in trehalose 6-phosphate are correlated with redox activation of ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase and higher rates of starch synthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Lunn, John E.; Feil, Regina; Hendriks, Janneke H. M.; Gibon, Yves; Morcuende, Rosa; Osuna, Daniel; Scheible, Wolf-Rüdiger; Carillo, Petronia; Hajirezaei, Mohammad-Reza; Stitt, Mark

    2006-01-01

    Tre6P (trehalose 6-phosphate) is implicated in sugar-signalling pathways in plants, but its exact functions in vivo are uncertain. One of the main obstacles to discovering these functions is the difficulty of measuring the amount of Tre6P in plant tissues. We have developed a highly specific assay, using liquid chromatography coupled to MS-Q3 (triple quadrupole MS), to measure Tre6P in the femto-picomole range. The Tre6P content of sucrose-starved Arabidopsis thaliana seedlings in axenic culture increased from 18 to 482 pmol·g−1FW (fresh weight) after adding sucrose. Leaves from soil-grown plants contained 67 pmol·g−1FW at the end of the night, which rose to 108 pmol·g−1FW after 4 h of illumination. Even greater changes in Tre6P content were seen after a 6 h extension of the dark period, and in the starchless mutant, pgm. The intracellular concentration of Tre6P in wild-type leaves was estimated to range from 1 to 15 μM. It has recently been reported that the addition of Tre6P to isolated chloroplasts leads to redox activation of AGPase (ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase) [Kolbe, Tiessen, Schluepmann, Paul, Ulrich and Geigenberger (2005) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 102, 11118–11123]. Using the new assay for Tre6P, we found that rising sugar levels in plants are accompanied by increases in the level of Tre6P, redox activation of AGPase and the stimulation of starch synthesis in vivo. These results indicate that Tre6P acts as a signalling metabolite of sugar status in plants, and support the proposal that Tre6P mediates sucrose-induced changes in the rate of starch synthesis. PMID:16551270

  1. Immunocytochemical localization of ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase in developing potato tuber cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Woo Taek; Franceschi, V.R.; Okita, T.W. ); Robinson, N.L.; Morell, M.; Preiss, J. )

    1989-09-01

    The subcellular localization of ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase, a key regulatory enzyme in starch biosynthesis, was determined in developing potato tuber cells by immunocytochemical localization techniques at the light microscopy level. Specific labeling of ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase by either immunofluorescence or immunogold followed by silver enhancement was detected only in the amyloplasts and indicates that this enzyme is located exclusively in the amyloplasts in developing potato tuber cells. Labeling occurred on the starch grains and, in some instances, specific labeling patterns were evident which may be related to sites active in starch deposition.

  2. Structural Basis of Glycogen Biosynthesis Regulation in Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Cifuente, Javier O; Comino, Natalia; Madariaga-Marcos, Julene; López-Fernández, Sonia; García-Alija, Mikel; Agirre, Jon; Albesa-Jové, David; Guerin, Marcelo E

    2016-09-01

    ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) catalyzes the rate-limiting step of bacterial glycogen and plant starch biosynthesis, the most common carbon storage polysaccharides in nature. A major challenge is to understand how AGPase activity is regulated by metabolites in the energetic flux within the cell. Here we report crystal structures of the homotetrameric AGPase from Escherichia coli in complex with its physiological positive and negative allosteric regulators, fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP) and AMP, and sucrose in the active site. FBP and AMP bind to partially overlapping sites located in a deep cleft between glycosyltransferase A-like and left-handed β helix domains of neighboring protomers, accounting for the fact that sensitivity to inhibition by AMP is modulated by the concentration of the activator FBP. We propose a model in which the energy reporters regulate EcAGPase catalytic activity by intra-protomer interactions and inter-protomer crosstalk, with a sensory motif and two regulatory loops playing a prominent role.

  3. Structural Basis of Glycogen Biosynthesis Regulation in Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Cifuente, Javier O; Comino, Natalia; Madariaga-Marcos, Julene; López-Fernández, Sonia; García-Alija, Mikel; Agirre, Jon; Albesa-Jové, David; Guerin, Marcelo E

    2016-09-01

    ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) catalyzes the rate-limiting step of bacterial glycogen and plant starch biosynthesis, the most common carbon storage polysaccharides in nature. A major challenge is to understand how AGPase activity is regulated by metabolites in the energetic flux within the cell. Here we report crystal structures of the homotetrameric AGPase from Escherichia coli in complex with its physiological positive and negative allosteric regulators, fructose-1,6-bisphosphate (FBP) and AMP, and sucrose in the active site. FBP and AMP bind to partially overlapping sites located in a deep cleft between glycosyltransferase A-like and left-handed β helix domains of neighboring protomers, accounting for the fact that sensitivity to inhibition by AMP is modulated by the concentration of the activator FBP. We propose a model in which the energy reporters regulate EcAGPase catalytic activity by intra-protomer interactions and inter-protomer crosstalk, with a sensory motif and two regulatory loops playing a prominent role. PMID:27545622

  4. NTRC links built-in thioredoxin to light and sucrose in regulating starch synthesis in chloroplasts and amyloplasts.

    PubMed

    Michalska, Justyna; Zauber, Henrik; Buchanan, Bob B; Cejudo, Francisco J; Geigenberger, Peter

    2009-06-16

    Plants have an unusual plastid-localized NADP-thioredoxin reductase C (NTRC) containing both an NADP-thioredoxin reductase (NTR) and a thioredoxin (Trx) domain in a single polypeptide. Although NTRC is known to supply reductant for detoxifying hydrogen peroxide in the dark, its other functions are unknown. We now report that NTRC plays a previously unrecognized role in the redox regulation of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase), a central enzyme of starch synthesis. When supplied NADPH, NTRC activated AGPase in vitro in a redox reaction that required the active site cysteines of both domains of the enzyme. In leaves, AGPase was activated in planta either by light or external feeding of sucrose in the dark. Leaves of an Arabidopsis NTRC KO mutant showed a decrease both in the extent of redox activation of AGPase and in the enhancement of starch synthesis either in the light (by 40-60%) or in the dark after treatment with external sucrose (by almost 100%). The light-dependent activation of AGPase in isolated chloroplasts, by contrast, was unaffected. In nonphotosynthetic tissue (roots), KO of NTRC decreased redox activation of AGPase and starch synthesis in response to light or external sucrose by almost 90%. The results provide biochemical and genetic evidence for a role of NTRC in regulating starch synthesis in response to either light or sucrose. The data also suggest that the Trx domain of NTRC and, to a lesser extent, free Trxs linked to ferredoxin enable amyloplasts of distant sink tissues to sense light used in photosynthesis by leaf chloroplasts and adjust heterotrophic starch synthesis accordingly.

  5. Lung contains an inhibitor for nicotinatemononucleotide pyrophosphorylase (carboxylating) of NAD biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Seither, R L; Brown, O R; Babu, B V

    1991-01-01

    Rat, cow and foal lung extracts contained an inhibitor for the liver NAD biosynthetic-pathway enzyme, nicotinatemononucleotide pyrophosphorylase (carboxylating) [EC 2.4.2.19]. The inhibitor was not dialyzable, was labile at 100 degrees C, was retained by a 30,000 dalton pore size Amicon membrane and, when partially purified by precipitation at 40-100% ammonium sulfate, inhibited the enzyme stoichiometrically. Lung reportedly does not contain nicotinate-mononucleotide pyrophosphorylase or make NAD de novo. However, the inhibitor would mask detection of the enzyme in lung extracts. We detected a low nicotinatemononucleotide pyrophosphorylase-like activity (0.003 +/- 0.001 nanomoles CO2 produced from quinolinic acid per mg of extract protein) in rat lung but none in foal or cow lung.

  6. ACHT4-driven oxidation of APS1 attenuates starch synthesis under low light intensity in Arabidopsis plants

    PubMed Central

    Eliyahu, Erez; Rog, Ido; Inbal, Dangoor; Danon, Avihai

    2015-01-01

    The regulatory mechanisms that use signals of low levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) could be obscured by ROS produced under stress and thus are better investigated under homeostatic conditions. Previous studies showed that the chloroplastic atypical thioredoxin ACHT1 is oxidized by 2-Cys peroxiredoxin (2-Cys Prx) in Arabidopsis plants illuminated with growth light and in turn transmits a disulfide-based signal via yet unknown target proteins in a feedback regulation of photosynthesis. Here, we studied the role of a second chloroplastic paralog, ACHT4, in plants subjected to low light conditions. Likewise, ACHT4 reacted in planta with 2-Cys Prx, indicating that it is oxidized by a similar disulfide exchange reaction. ACHT4 further reacted uniquely with the small subunit (APS1) of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase), the first committed enzyme of the starch synthesis pathway, suggesting that it transfers the disulfides it receives from 2-Cys Prx to APS1 and turns off AGPase. In accordance, ACHT4 participated in an oxidative signal that quenched AGPase activity during the diurnal transition from day to night, and also in an attenuating oxidative signal of AGPase in a dynamic response to small fluctuations in light intensity during the day. Increasing the level of expressed ACHT4 or of ACHT4ΔC, a C terminus-deleted form that does not react with APS1, correspondingly decreased or increased the level of reduced APS1 and decreased or increased transitory starch content. These findings imply that oxidative control mechanisms act in concert with reductive signals to fine tune starch synthesis during daily homeostatic conditions. PMID:26424450

  7. CugP Is a Novel Ubiquitous Non-GalU-Type Bacterial UDP-Glucose Pyrophosphorylase Found in Cyanobacteria

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Kaisei; Narikawa, Rei

    2014-01-01

    UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase synthesizes UDP-glucose from UTP and glucose 1-phosphate and exists in almost all species. Most bacteria possess a GalU-type UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, whereas many cyanobacteria species do not. In certain cyanobacteria, UDP-glucose is used as a substrate for synthesis of exopolysaccharide cellulose in spite of the absence of GalU-type UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase. Therefore, there should be an uncharacterized UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase in cyanobacteria. Here, we show that all cyanobacteria possess a non-GalU-type bacterial UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, i.e., CugP, a novel family in the nucleotide triphosphate transferase superfamily. The expressed recombinant Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 CugP had pyrophosphorylase activity that was highly specific for UTP and glucose 1-phosphate. The fact that the CugP gene cannot be deleted completely in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 suggests its central role as the substrate supplier for galactolipid synthesis. Galactolipids are major constituents of the photosynthetic thylakoid membrane and important for photosynthetic activity. Based on phylogenetic analysis, this CugP-type UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase may have recently been horizontally transferred to certain noncyanobacteria. PMID:24727225

  8. Both UDP N-acetylglucosamine pyrophosphorylases of Tribolium castaneum are critical for molting, survival, and fecundity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A bioinformatics search of the genome of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, resulted in the identification of two genes encoding proteins closely related to UDP-N-acetylglucosamine pyrophosphorylases (UAP), which provide the activated precursor, UDP-N-acetylglucosamine, for the synthesis of ...

  9. Isolated gene encoding an enzyme with UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and phosphoglucomutase activities from Cyclotella cryptica

    DOEpatents

    Jarvis, E.E.; Roessler, P.G.

    1999-07-27

    The present invention relates to a cloned gene which encodes an enzyme, the purified enzyme, and the applications and products resulting from the use of the gene and enzyme. The gene, isolated from Cyclotella cryptica, encodes a multifunctional enzyme that has both UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and phosphoglucomutase activities. 8 figs.

  10. Isolated gene encoding an enzyme with UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and phosphoglucomutase activities from Cyclotella cryptica

    DOEpatents

    Jarvis, Eric E.; Roessler, Paul G.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention relates to a cloned gene which encodes an enzyme, the purified enzyme, and the applications and products resulting from the use of the gene and enzyme. The gene, isolated from Cyclotella cryptica, encodes a multifunctional enzyme that has both UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and phosphoglucomutase activities.

  11. Effects of the activities of key enzymes involved in starch biosynthesis on the fine structure of amylopectin in developing rice (Oryza sativa L.) endosperms.

    PubMed

    Lü, Bing; Guo, ZhiGang; Liang, JianSheng

    2008-10-01

    The dynamic changes of the activities of enzymes involving in starch biosynthesis, including ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase), soluble starch synthases (SSS), starch branching enzyme (SBE) and starch debranching enzymes (DBE) were studied, and changes of fine structure of amylopectin were characterized by isoamylase treatment during rice grain development, using trans anti-waxy gene rice plants. The relationships between the activities of those key enzymes were also analyzed. The amylose synthesis was significantly inhibited in transgenic Wanjing 9522, but the total starch content and final grain weight were less affected as compared with those of non-transgenic Wanjing 9522 rice cultivar. Analyses on the changes of activities of enzymes involving in starch biosynthesis showed that different enzyme activities were expressed differently during rice endosperm development. Soluble starch synthase is relatively highly expressed in earlier stage of endosperm development, whilst maximal expression of granule-bound starch synthase (GBSS) occurred in mid-stage of endosperm development. No obvious differences in changes of the activities of AGPase and SBE between two rice cultivars investigated, except the DBEs. Distribution patterns of branches of amylopectin changed continually during the development of rice grains and varied between two rice cultivars. It was suggested that amylopectin synthesis be prior to the synthesis of amylose and different enzymes have different roles in controlling syntheses of branches of amylopectin.

  12. Regulation of starch biosynthesis in plant leaves: activation and inhibition of ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Sanwal, G G; Greenberg, E; Hardie, J; Cameron, E C; Preiss, J

    1968-03-01

    The ADPglucose pyrophosphorylases of 7 plant-leaf tissues were partially purified and characterized. In all cases the enzymes showed stability to heat treatment at 65 degrees for 5 minutes in the presence of 0.02 m phosphate buffer, pH 7.0. The leaf ADPglucose pyrophosphorylases were activated 5 to 15-fold by 3-phosphoglycerate. Fructose-6-phosphate and fructose 1, 6-diphosphate stimulated ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase to lesser extents. The A(0.5) (conc of activator required to give 50% of the observed maximal activation) of 3-phosphoglycerate for the barley enzyme was 7 x 10(-6)m while for the sorghum enzyme it was 3.7 x 10(-4)m. Inorganic phosphate proved to be an effective inhibitor of ADPglucose synthesis. The I(0.5) (conc of inhibitor that gave 50% inhibition of activity for the various leaf enzymes varied from 2 x 10(-5)m (barley) to 1.9 x 10(-4)m (sorghum). This inhibition was reversed or antagonized by the activator 3-phosphoglycerate. These results form the basis for an hypothesis of the regulation of leaf starch biosynthesis.

  13. The subunit structure of potato tuber ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase. [Solanum tuberosum L

    SciTech Connect

    Okita, T.W.; Nakata, P.A.; Anderson, J.M. ); Sowokinos, J. ); Morell, M.; Preiss, J. )

    1990-06-01

    ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase has been extensively purified from potato (Solanum tuberosum L.) tuber tissue to study its structure. By employing a modified published procedure together with Mono Q chromatography, a near homogeneous enzyme preparation was obtained with substantial improvement in enzyme yield and specific activity. In single dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gels, the enzyme migrated as a single polypeptide band with a mobility of about 50,000 daltons. Analysis by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, however, revealed the presence of two types of subunits which could be distinguished by their slight differences in net charge and molecular weight. The smaller potato tuber subunit was recognized by antiserum prepared against the smaller spinach leaf 51 kilodalton ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase subunit. In contrast, the anti-54 kilodalton raised against the spinach leaf subunit did not significantly react to the tuber enzyme subunits. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that the potato tuber ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase is not composed of a simple homotetramer as previously suggested, but is a product of two separate and distinct subunits as observed for the spinach leaf and maize enzymes.

  14. [Enhancement of photoassimilate utilization by manipulation of the ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase gene]. Progress report, [March 15, 1989--April 14, 1990

    SciTech Connect

    Okita, T.W.

    1990-12-31

    The long term aim of this project is to assess the feasibility of increasing the conversion of photosynthate into starch via manipulation of the gene that encodes for ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase, a key regulatory enzyme of starch biosynthesis. In developing storage tissues such as cereal seeds and tubers, starch biosynthesis is regulated by the gene activation and expression of ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase, starch synthase, branching enzyme and other ancillary starch modifying enzymes, as well as the allosteric-controlled behavior of ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase activity. During the last two years we have obtained information on the structure of this enzyme from both potato tuber and rice endosperm, using a combination of biochemical and molecular biological approaches. Moreover, we present evidence that this enzyme may be localized at discrete regions of the starch grain within the amyloplast, and plays a role in controlling overall starch biosynthesis in potato tubers.

  15. On the Ancestral UDP-Glucose Pyrophosphorylase Activity of GalF from Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Ebrecht, Ana C.; Orlof, Agnieszka M.; Sasoni, Natalia; Figueroa, Carlos M.; Iglesias, Alberto A.; Ballicora, Miguel A.

    2015-01-01

    In bacteria, UDP-glucose is a central intermediate in carbohydrate metabolism. The enzyme responsible for its synthesis is encoded by the galU gene and its deletion generates cells unable to ferment galactose. In some bacteria, there is a second gene, galF, encoding for a protein with high sequence identity to GalU. However, the role of GalF has been contradictory regarding its catalytic capability and not well understood. In this work we show that GalF derives from a catalytic (UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase) ancestor, but its activity is very low compared to GalU. We demonstrated that GalF has some residual UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase activity by in vitro and in vivo experiments in which the phenotype of a galU- strain was reverted by the over-expression of GalF and its mutant. To demonstrate its evolutionary path of “enzyme inactivation” we enhanced the catalysis by mutagenesis and showed the importance of the quaternary structure. This study provides important information to understand the structural and functional evolutionary origin of the protein GalF in enteric bacteria. PMID:26617591

  16. [Enhancement of photoassimilate utilization by manipulation of the ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase gene]. Summary of progress, [April 15, 1991--April 14, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Okita, T.W.

    1992-12-31

    The long term aim of this project is to assess the feasibility of increasing the conversion of photosynthate into starch via manipulation of genes encoding enzymes that may be rate-limiting in starch biosynthesis. In developing storage tissues such as tubers, starch biosynthesis is regulated by the gene activation and expression of ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase, starch synthase, branching enzyme and other ancillary starch modifying enzymes, as well as the allosteric-controlled behavior of ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase activity. In view of the regulatory role of ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase in starch biosynthesis at both the genetic and biochemical level, we have focused our attention on the genes that encode for this enzyme in potato tubers. The proposed objectives of the grant were to (1) analyze the structure of the tuber enzyme, (2) isolate and characterize the structure of its genes, and (3) identify the regulatory elements controlling ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase during plant development. During the last two and 1/2 years we have met or have made considerable progress in achieving these objectives as discussed in more detail below.

  17. Purification and Properties of Adenosine Diphosphoglucose Pyrophosphorylase from Sweet Corn 1

    PubMed Central

    Amir, Jacob; Cherry, Joe H.

    1972-01-01

    A 40-fold purification of adenosine diphosphoglucose pyrophosphorylase from sweet corn (Zea mays var. Golden Beauty) revealed the enzyme to be specific for adenosine triphosphate. The enzyme has an absolute requirement for Mg2+ and is activated by 3-phosphoglycerate and to a lesser extent by ribose-5-phosphate and fructose-6-phosphate. The apparent Km values of the enzyme for glucose-1-phosphate, adenosine triphosphate, pyrophosphate, and adenosine diphosphoglucose are 1.9 × 10−4, 3.2 × 10−5, 3.3 × 10−5, and 6.2 × 10−4m, respectively. Pyrophosphate inhibits adenosine diphosphoglucose synthesis competitively (Ki = 3.8 × 10−7m), while orthophosphate and sulfate appear to inhibit the reacion noncompetitively. These results show that the production of this sugar nucleotide can be controlled by the concentration of pyrophosphate. PMID:16658078

  18. Structure of uridine diphosphate N-acetylglucosamine pyrophosphorylase from Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Thomas E; Gardberg, Anna S; Phan, Isabelle Q H; Zhang, Yang; Staker, Bart L; Myler, Peter J; Lorimer, Donald D

    2015-05-01

    Uridine diphosphate N-acetylglucosamine pyrophosphorylase (UAP) catalyzes the final step in the synthesis of UDP-GlcNAc, which is involved in cell-wall biogenesis in plants and fungi and in protein glycosylation. Small-molecule inhibitors have been developed against UAP from Trypanosoma brucei that target an allosteric pocket to provide selectivity over the human enzyme. A 1.8 Å resolution crystal structure was determined of UAP from Entamoeba histolytica, an anaerobic parasitic protozoan that causes amoebic dysentery. Although E. histolytica UAP exhibits the same three-domain global architecture as other UAPs, it appears to lack three α-helices at the N-terminus and contains two amino acids in the allosteric pocket that make it appear more like the enzyme from the human host than that from the other parasite T. brucei. Thus, allosteric inhibitors of T. brucei UAP are unlikely to target Entamoeba UAPs.

  19. Comparative study of structural models of Leishmania donovani and human GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylases.

    PubMed

    Daligaux, Pierre; Bernadat, Guillaume; Tran, Linh; Cavé, Christian; Loiseau, Philippe M; Pomel, Sébastien; Ha-Duong, Tâp

    2016-01-01

    Leishmania is the parasite responsible for the neglected disease leishmaniasis. Its virulence and survival require biosynthesis of glycoconjugates, whose guanosine diphospho-d-mannose pyrophosphorylase (GDP-MP) is a key player. However, experimentally resolved structures of this enzyme are still lacking. We herein propose structural models of the GDP-MP from human and Leishmania donovani. Based on a multiple sequences alignment, the models were built with MODELLER and then carefully refined with all atom molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent. Their quality was evaluated against several standard criteria, including their ability to bind GDP-mannose assessed by redocking calculations. Special attention was given in this study to interactions of the catalytic site residues with the enzyme substrate and competitive inhibitors, opening the perspective of medicinal chemistry developments.

  20. Comparative study of structural models of Leishmania donovani and human GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylases.

    PubMed

    Daligaux, Pierre; Bernadat, Guillaume; Tran, Linh; Cavé, Christian; Loiseau, Philippe M; Pomel, Sébastien; Ha-Duong, Tâp

    2016-01-01

    Leishmania is the parasite responsible for the neglected disease leishmaniasis. Its virulence and survival require biosynthesis of glycoconjugates, whose guanosine diphospho-d-mannose pyrophosphorylase (GDP-MP) is a key player. However, experimentally resolved structures of this enzyme are still lacking. We herein propose structural models of the GDP-MP from human and Leishmania donovani. Based on a multiple sequences alignment, the models were built with MODELLER and then carefully refined with all atom molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent. Their quality was evaluated against several standard criteria, including their ability to bind GDP-mannose assessed by redocking calculations. Special attention was given in this study to interactions of the catalytic site residues with the enzyme substrate and competitive inhibitors, opening the perspective of medicinal chemistry developments. PMID:26562546

  1. Enhancement of photoassimilate utilization by manipulation of the ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase gene. Progress report, [April 15, 1988--April 14, 1989

    SciTech Connect

    Okita, T.W.

    1989-12-31

    During this period researchers have been successful in determining the structure of the rice pyrophosphorylase gene. Potato tuber ADPglucose pyrophosphorylse purification and structure studies were carried out as well as recombinant DNA studies. Evidence suggests that the tuber form is made up of subunits with similar molecular weights and immunological relatedness. In contrast, the spinach leaf enzyme and presumably the maize endosperm species is composed of two dissimilar sununits encoded by different genes.

  2. Distinct metabolic changes between wheat embryo and endosperm during grain development revealed by 2D-DIGE-based integrative proteome analysis.

    PubMed

    Cao, Hui; He, Miao; Zhu, Chong; Yuan, Linlin; Dong, Liwei; Bian, Yanwei; Zhang, Wenying; Yan, Yueming

    2016-05-01

    Two Chinese bread wheat cultivars, Jinghua 9 and Zhongmai 175, distinct in grain weight and dough quality, were used to study proteome changes in the embryo and endosperm during grain development using a two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE)-based proteomics approach. In total, 138 and 127 differentially expressed protein (DEP) spots representing 116 and 113 unique DEPs were identified in the embryo and endosperm, respectively. Among them, 54 (31%) DEPs were commonly present in both organs while 62 (35%) and 59 (34%) DEPs occurred only in the embryo and endosperm, respectively. Embryonic DEPs are primarily stress-related proteins and involved in carbohydrate and lipid metabolism, while those from the endosperm are related primarily to carbohydrate metabolism and storage. Principal component analysis (PCA) indicated that the proteome differences in the endosperm caused by different cultivars were greater than those by development stages, while the differences in the embryo showed the opposite pattern. Protein-protein interaction (PPI) analysis revealed a complex network centered primarily on enzymes involved in carbohydrate and protein metabolism. The transcriptional levels of fourteen important DEPs encoding genes showed high similarity between organs and cultivars. In particular, some key DEPs of the endosperm, such as phosphoglucomutase, ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase), and sucrose synthase (SUS), showed significantly upregulated expression, indicating their key roles in starch biosynthesis and grain yield. Moreover, upregulated expression of some storage proteins in the endosperm could improve wheat bread-making quality.

  3. The Metabolic Signature of Biomass Formation in Barley.

    PubMed

    Ghaffari, Mohammad R; Shahinnia, Fahimeh; Usadel, Björn; Junker, Björn; Schreiber, Falk; Sreenivasulu, Nese; Hajirezaei, Mohammad R

    2016-09-01

    The network analysis of genome-wide transcriptome responses, metabolic signatures and enzymes' relationship to biomass formation has been studied in a diverse panel of 12 barley accessions during vegetative and reproductive stages. The primary metabolites and enzymes involved in central metabolism that determine the accumulation of shoot biomass at the vegetative stage of barley development are primarily being linked to sucrose accumulation and sucrose synthase activity. Interestingly, the metabolic and enzyme links which are strongly associated with biomass accumulation during reproductive stages are related to starch accumulation and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates citrate, malate, trans-aconitate and isocitrate. Additional significant associations were also found for UDP glucose, ATP and the amino acids isoleucine, valine, glutamate and histidine during the reproductive stage. A network analysis resulted in a combined identification of metabolite and enzyme signatures indicative for grain weight accumulation that was correlated with the activity of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase), a rate-limiting enzyme involved in starch biosynthesis, and with that of alanine amino transferase involved in the synthesis of storage proteins. We propose that the mechanism related to vegetative and reproductive biomass formation vs. seed biomass formation is being linked to distinct fluxes regulating sucrose, starch, sugars and amino acids as central resources. These distinct biomarkers can be used to engineer biomass production and grain weight in barley. PMID:27388338

  4. Influence of tryptophan and indole-3-acetic acid on starch accumulation in the synthetic mutualistic Chlorella sorokiniana-Azospirillum brasilense system under heterotrophic conditions.

    PubMed

    Palacios, Oskar A; Choix, Francisco J; Bashan, Yoav; de-Bashan, Luz E

    2016-06-01

    This study measured the relations between tryptophan production, the phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and the metabolism and accumulation of starch during synthetic mutualism between the microalgae Chlorella sorokiniana and the microalgae growth-promoting bacteria Azospirillum brasilense, created by co-immobilization in alginate beads. Experiments used two wild-type A. brasilense strains (Cd and Sp6) and an IAA-attenuated mutant (SpM7918) grown under nitrogen-replete and nitrogen-starved conditions tested under dark, heterotrophic and aerobic growth conditions. Under all incubating conditions, C. sorokiniana, but not A. brasilense, produced tryptophan. A significant correlation between IAA-production by A. brasilense and starch accumulation in C. sorokiniana was found, since the IAA-attenuated mutant was not producing increased starch levels. The highest ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) activity, starch content and glucose uptake were found during the interaction of A. brasilense wild type strains with the microalgae. When the microalgae were grown alone, they produced only small amounts of starch. Supplementation with synthetic IAA to C. sorokiniana grown alone enhanced the above parameters, but only transiently. Activity of α-amylase decreased under nitrogen-replete conditions, but increased under nitrogen-starved conditions. In summary, this study demonstrated that, during synthetic mutualism, the exchange of tryptophan and IAA between the partners is a mechanism that governs several changes in starch metabolism of C. sorokiniana, yielding an increase in starch content.

  5. Can fast-growing plantation trees escape biochemical down-regulation of photosynthesis when grown throughout their complete production cycle in the open air under elevated carbon dioxide?

    PubMed

    Davey, P A; Olcer, H; Zakhleniuk, O; Bernacchi, C J; Calfapietra, C; Long, S P; Raines, C A

    2006-07-01

    Poplar trees sustain close to the predicted increase in leaf photosynthesis when grown under long-term elevated CO2 concentration ([CO2]). To investigate the mechanisms underlying this response, carbohydrate accumulation and protein expression were determined over four seasons of growth. No increase in the levels of soluble carbohydrates was observed in the young expanding or mature sun leaves of the three poplar genotypes during this period. However, substantial increases in starch levels were observed in the mature leaves of all three poplar genotypes grown in elevated [CO2]. Despite the very high starch levels, no changes in the expression of photosynthetic Calvin cycle proteins, or in the starch biosynthetic enzyme ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase), were observed. This suggested that no long-term photosynthetic acclimation to CO2 occurred in these plants. Our data indicate that poplar trees are able to 'escape' from long-term, acclimatory down-regulation of photosynthesis through a high capacity for starch synthesis and carbon export. These findings show that these poplar genotypes are well suited to the elevated [CO2] conditions forecast for the middle of this century and may be particularly suited for planting for the long-term carbon sequestration into wood.

  6. Proteomic Analysis Reveals Key Proteins and Phosphoproteins upon Seed Germination of Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Kun; Zhen, Shoumin; Cheng, Zhiwei; Cao, Hui; Ge, Pei; Yan, Yueming

    2015-01-01

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is one of the oldest cultivated crops and the second most important food crop in the world. Seed germination is the key developmental process in plant growth and development, and poor germination directly affects plant growth and subsequent grain yield. In this study, we performed the first dynamic proteome analysis of wheat seed germination using a two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE)-based proteomic approach. A total of 166 differentially expressed protein (DEP) spots representing 73 unique proteins were identified, which are mainly involved in storage, stress/defense/detoxification, carbohydrate metabolism, photosynthesis, cell metabolism, and transcription/translation/transposition. The identified DEPs and their dynamic expression profiles generally correspond to three distinct seed germination phases after imbibition: storage degradation, physiological processes/morphogenesis, and photosynthesis. Some key DEPs involved in storage substance degradation and plant defense mechanisms, such as globulin 3, sucrose synthase type I, serpin, beta-amylase, and plastid ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) small subunit, were found to be phosphorylated during seed germination. Particularly, the phosphorylation site Ser355 was found to be located in the enzyme active region of beta-amylase, which promotes substrate binding. Phosphorylated modification of several proteins could promote storage substance degradation and environmental stress defense during seed germination. The central metabolic pathways involved in wheat seed germination are proposed herein, providing new insights into the molecular mechanisms of cereal seed germination. PMID:26635843

  7. Proteomic Analysis Reveals Key Proteins and Phosphoproteins upon Seed Germination of Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Dong, Kun; Zhen, Shoumin; Cheng, Zhiwei; Cao, Hui; Ge, Pei; Yan, Yueming

    2015-01-01

    Wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) is one of the oldest cultivated crops and the second most important food crop in the world. Seed germination is the key developmental process in plant growth and development, and poor germination directly affects plant growth and subsequent grain yield. In this study, we performed the first dynamic proteome analysis of wheat seed germination using a two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE)-based proteomic approach. A total of 166 differentially expressed protein (DEP) spots representing 73 unique proteins were identified, which are mainly involved in storage, stress/defense/detoxification, carbohydrate metabolism, photosynthesis, cell metabolism, and transcription/translation/transposition. The identified DEPs and their dynamic expression profiles generally correspond to three distinct seed germination phases after imbibition: storage degradation, physiological processes/morphogenesis, and photosynthesis. Some key DEPs involved in storage substance degradation and plant defense mechanisms, such as globulin 3, sucrose synthase type I, serpin, beta-amylase, and plastid ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) small subunit, were found to be phosphorylated during seed germination. Particularly, the phosphorylation site Ser(355) was found to be located in the enzyme active region of beta-amylase, which promotes substrate binding. Phosphorylated modification of several proteins could promote storage substance degradation and environmental stress defense during seed germination. The central metabolic pathways involved in wheat seed germination are proposed herein, providing new insights into the molecular mechanisms of cereal seed germination. PMID:26635843

  8. Lauric Acid Production in a Glycogen-Less Strain of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002

    PubMed Central

    Work, Victoria H.; Melnicki, Matthew R.; Hill, Eric A.; Davies, Fiona K.; Kucek, Leo A.; Beliaev, Alexander S.; Posewitz, Matthew C.

    2015-01-01

    The cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. Pasteur culture collection 7002 was genetically engineered to synthesize biofuel-compatible medium-chain fatty acids (FAs) during photoautotrophic growth. Expression of a heterologous lauroyl-acyl carrier protein (C12:0-ACP) thioesterase with concurrent deletion of the endogenous putative acyl-ACP synthetase led to secretion of transesterifiable C12:0 FA in CO2-supplemented batch cultures. When grown at steady state over a range of light intensities in a light-emitting diode turbidostat photobioreactor, the C12-secreting mutant exhibited a modest reduction in growth rate and increased O2 evolution relative to the wild-type (WT). Inhibition of (i) glycogen synthesis by deletion of the glgC-encoded ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) and (ii) protein synthesis by nitrogen deprivation were investigated as potential mechanisms for metabolite redistribution to increase FA synthesis. Deletion of AGPase led to a 10-fold decrease in reducing carbohydrates and secretion of organic acids during nitrogen deprivation consistent with an energy spilling phenotype. When the carbohydrate-deficient background (ΔglgC) was modified for C12 secretion, no increase in C12 was achieved during nutrient replete growth, and no C12 was recovered from any strain upon nitrogen deprivation under the conditions used. At steady state, the growth rate of the ΔglgC strain saturated at a lower light intensity than the WT, but O2 evolution was not compromised and became increasingly decoupled from growth rate with rising irradiance. Photophysiological properties of the ΔglgC strain suggest energy dissipation from photosystem II and reconfiguration of electron flow at the level of the plastoquinone pool. PMID:25964950

  9. MUMMY, A UDP-N-ACETYLGLUCOSAMINE PYROPHOSPHORYLASE, MODULATES DPP SIGNALING IN THE EMBRYONIC EPIDERMIS OF DROSOPHILA

    PubMed Central

    HUMPHREYS, GREGORY B.; JUD, MOLLY C.; MONROE, KATHRYN M.; KIMBALL, SUZANNE S.; HIGLEY, MATTHEW; SHIPLEY, DANIELLE; VRABLIK, MARIE CLOUGHERTY; BATES, KATHERINE L.; LETSOU, ANTHEA

    2013-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved JNK/AP-1 (Jun N-terminal kinase/activator protein 1) and BMP (Bone Morphogenetic Protein) signaling cascades are deployed hierarchically to regulate dorsal closure in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. In this developmental context, the JNK/AP-1 signaling cascade transcriptionally activates BMP signaling in leading edge epidermal cells. Here we show that the mummy (mmy) gene product, which is required for dorsal closure, functions as a BMP signaling antagonist. Genetic and biochemical tests of Mmy’s role as a BMP-antagonist indicate that its function is independent of AP-1, the transcriptional trigger of BMP signal transduction in leading edge cells. pMAD (phosphorylated Mothers Against Dpp) activity data show the mmy gene product to be a new type of epidermal BMP regulator – one which transforms a BMP ligand from a long- to a short-range signal. mmy codes for the single UDP-N-acetylglucosamine pyrophosphorylase in Drosophila, and its requirement for attenuating epidermal BMP signaling during dorsal closure points to a new role for glycosylation in defining a highly restricted BMP activity field in the fly. These findings add a new dimension to our understanding of mechanisms modulating the BMP signaling gradient. PMID:23796903

  10. Overexpression of UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase gene could increase cellulose content in Jute (Corchorus capsularis L.).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gaoyang; Qi, Jianmin; Xu, Jiantang; Niu, Xiaoping; Zhang, Yujia; Tao, Aifen; Zhang, Liwu; Fang, Pingping; Lin, Lihui

    2013-12-13

    In this study, the full-length cDNA of the UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase gene was isolated from jute by homologous cloning (primers were designed according to the sequence of UGPase gene of other plants) and modified RACE techniques; the cloned gene was designated CcUGPase. Using bioinformatic analysis, the gene was identified as a member of the UGPase gene family. Real-time PCR analysis revealed differential spatial and temporal expression of the CcUGPase gene, with the highest expression levels at 40 and 120d. PCR and Southern hybridization results indicate that the gene was integrated into the jute genome. Overexpression of CcUGPase gene in jute revealed increased height and cellulose content compared with control lines, although the lignin content remained unchanged. The results indicate that the jute UGPase gene participates in cellulose biosynthesis. These data provide an important basis for the application of the CcUGPase gene in the improvement of jute fiber quality.

  11. Overexpression of UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase gene could increase cellulose content in Jute (Corchorus capsularis L.).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gaoyang; Qi, Jianmin; Xu, Jiantang; Niu, Xiaoping; Zhang, Yujia; Tao, Aifen; Zhang, Liwu; Fang, Pingping; Lin, Lihui

    2013-12-13

    In this study, the full-length cDNA of the UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase gene was isolated from jute by homologous cloning (primers were designed according to the sequence of UGPase gene of other plants) and modified RACE techniques; the cloned gene was designated CcUGPase. Using bioinformatic analysis, the gene was identified as a member of the UGPase gene family. Real-time PCR analysis revealed differential spatial and temporal expression of the CcUGPase gene, with the highest expression levels at 40 and 120d. PCR and Southern hybridization results indicate that the gene was integrated into the jute genome. Overexpression of CcUGPase gene in jute revealed increased height and cellulose content compared with control lines, although the lignin content remained unchanged. The results indicate that the jute UGPase gene participates in cellulose biosynthesis. These data provide an important basis for the application of the CcUGPase gene in the improvement of jute fiber quality. PMID:24269810

  12. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray characterization of the human GTP fucose pyrophosphorylase

    SciTech Connect

    Quirk, Stephen; Seley-Radtke, Katherine L.

    2006-04-01

    The human GTP fucose pyrophosphohydrolase protein has been crystallized via the hanging-drop technique over a reservoir of polyethylene glycol (MW 8000) and ethylene glycol. The orthorhombic crystals diffract to 2.8 Å resolution. The human nucleotide-sugar metabolizing enzyme GTP fucose pyrophosphorylase (GFPP) has been purified to homogeneity by an affinity chromatographic procedure that utilizes a novel nucleoside analog. This new purification regime results in a protein preparation that produces significantly better crystals than traditional purification methods. The purified 66.6 kDa monomeric protein has been crystallized via hanging-drop vapor diffusion at 293 K. Crystals of the native enzyme diffract to 2.8 Å and belong to the orthorhombic space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}. There is a single GFPP monomer in the asymmetric unit, giving a Matthews coefficient of 2.38 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and a solvent content of 48.2%. A complete native data set has been collected as a first step in determining the three-dimensional structure of this enzyme.

  13. GDP-D-mannose pyrophosphorylase from Pogonatherum paniceum enhances salinity and drought tolerance of transgenic tobacco.

    PubMed

    Ai, Taobo; Liao, Xuehong; Li, Rui; Fan, Linhong; Luo, Fengxue; Xu, Ying; Wang, Shenghua

    2016-01-01

    Pogonatherum paniceum is a highly drought- and salt-tolerant plant species that is typically used for ecological restoration and the conservation of soil and water in many countries. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying plant abiotic stress responses, especially to salinity and drought stresses, in species such as P. paniceum could be important to broader crop improvement efforts. GDP-D-mannose pyrophosphorylase (GMPase) is the limiting enzyme in the synthesis of L-ascorbic acid (AsA), which plays a crucial role in the detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS). We have cloned and characterized the cDNA of the PpGMP gene of P. paniceum encoding a GMPase. The full-length cDNA sequence contains 1411 nucleotides encoding a putative protein with 361 amino acid residues and an approximate molecular mass of 39.68 kDa. The GMPase transcript was up-regulated in P. paniceum plants subjected to salinity and drought stress, respectively. Transgenic tobacco expressing PpGMPase exhibited enhanced salinity and drought resistance, a higher seed germination rate, better growth performance, a higher AsA content, a more stable redox state, higher superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and lower levels of malonaldehyde (MDA) and H2O2 under drought and salinity stress. Taken together, expression of PpGMPase in tobacco conferred salinity and drought stress tolerance by increasing the content of AsA, thereby enhancing ROS-detoxifying functions. Thus, PpGMP is a potential candidate gene for crop improvement.

  14. Genetic and structural validation of Aspergillus fumigatus UDP-N-acetylglucosamine pyrophosphorylase as an antifungal target.

    PubMed

    Fang, Wenxia; Du, Ting; Raimi, Olawale G; Hurtado-Guerrero, Ramon; Urbaniak, Michael D; Ibrahim, Adel F M; Ferguson, Michael A J; Jin, Cheng; van Aalten, Daan M F

    2013-08-01

    The sugar nucleotide UDP-N-acetylglucosamine (UDP-GlcNAc) is an essential metabolite in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes. In fungi, it is the precursor for the synthesis of chitin, an essential component of the fungal cell wall. UDP-N-acetylglucosamine pyrophosphorylase (UAP) is the final enzyme in eukaryotic UDP-GlcNAc biosynthesis, converting UTP and N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate (GlcNAc-1P) to UDP-GlcNAc. As such, this enzyme may provide an attractive target against pathogenic fungi. Here, we demonstrate that the fungal pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus possesses an active UAP (AfUAP1) that shows selectivity for GlcNAc-1P as the phosphosugar substrate. A conditional mutant, constructed by replacing the native promoter of the A. fumigatus uap1 gene with the Aspergillus nidulans alcA promoter, revealed that uap1 is essential for cell survival and important for cell wall synthesis and morphogenesis. The crystal structure of AfUAP1 was determined and revealed exploitable differences in the active site compared with the human enzyme. Thus AfUAP1 could represent a novel antifungal target and this work will assist the future discovery of small molecule inhibitors against this enzyme.

  15. GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylase is essential for cell wall integrity, morphogenesis and viability of Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hechun; Ouyang, Haomiao; Zhou, Hui; Jin, Cheng

    2008-09-01

    GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylase (GMPP) catalyses the synthesis of GDP-mannose, which is the precursor for the mannose residues in glycoconjugates, using mannose 1-phosphate and GTP as substrates. Repression of GMPP in yeast leads to phenotypes including cell lysis, defective cell wall, and failure of polarized growth and cell separation. Although several GMPPs have been isolated and characterized in filamentous fungi, the physiological consequences of their actions are not clear. In this study, Afsrb1, which is a homologue of yeast SRB1/PSA1/VIG9, was identified in the Aspergillus fumigatus genome. The Afsrb1 gene was expressed in Escherichia coli, and recombinant AfSrb1 was functionally confirmed as a GMPP. By the replacement of the native Afsrb1 promoter with an inducible Aspergillus nidulans alcA promoter, the conditional inactivation mutant strain YJ-gmpp was constructed. The presence of 3 % glucose completely blocked transcription of P(alcA)-Afsrb1, and was lethal to strain YJ-gmpp. Repression of Afsrb1 expression in strain YJ-gmpp led to phenotypes including hyphal lysis, defective cell wall, impaired polarity maintenance, and branching site selection. Also, rapid germination and reduced conidiation were documented. However, in contrast to yeast, strain YJ-gmpp retained the ability to direct polarity establishment and septation. Our results showed that the Afsrb1 gene is essential for cell wall integrity, morphogenesis and viability of Aspergillus fumigatus.

  16. GDP-D-mannose pyrophosphorylase from Pogonatherum paniceum enhances salinity and drought tolerance of transgenic tobacco.

    PubMed

    Ai, Taobo; Liao, Xuehong; Li, Rui; Fan, Linhong; Luo, Fengxue; Xu, Ying; Wang, Shenghua

    2016-01-01

    Pogonatherum paniceum is a highly drought- and salt-tolerant plant species that is typically used for ecological restoration and the conservation of soil and water in many countries. Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying plant abiotic stress responses, especially to salinity and drought stresses, in species such as P. paniceum could be important to broader crop improvement efforts. GDP-D-mannose pyrophosphorylase (GMPase) is the limiting enzyme in the synthesis of L-ascorbic acid (AsA), which plays a crucial role in the detoxification of reactive oxygen species (ROS). We have cloned and characterized the cDNA of the PpGMP gene of P. paniceum encoding a GMPase. The full-length cDNA sequence contains 1411 nucleotides encoding a putative protein with 361 amino acid residues and an approximate molecular mass of 39.68 kDa. The GMPase transcript was up-regulated in P. paniceum plants subjected to salinity and drought stress, respectively. Transgenic tobacco expressing PpGMPase exhibited enhanced salinity and drought resistance, a higher seed germination rate, better growth performance, a higher AsA content, a more stable redox state, higher superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity, and lower levels of malonaldehyde (MDA) and H2O2 under drought and salinity stress. Taken together, expression of PpGMPase in tobacco conferred salinity and drought stress tolerance by increasing the content of AsA, thereby enhancing ROS-detoxifying functions. Thus, PpGMP is a potential candidate gene for crop improvement. PMID:27442366

  17. Oligomerization, Membrane Association, and in Vivo Phosphorylation of Sugarcane UDP-glucose Pyrophosphorylase*

    PubMed Central

    Soares, Jose Sergio M.; Gentile, Agustina; Scorsato, Valeria; Lima, Aline da C.; Kiyota, Eduardo; dos Santos, Marcelo Leite; Piattoni, Claudia V.; Huber, Steven C.; Aparicio, Ricardo; Menossi, Marcelo

    2014-01-01

    Sugarcane is a monocot plant that accumulates sucrose to levels of up to 50% of dry weight in the stalk. The mechanisms that are involved in sucrose accumulation in sugarcane are not well understood, and little is known with regard to factors that control the extent of sucrose storage in the stalks. UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (UGPase; EC 2.7.7.9) is an enzyme that produces UDP-glucose, a key precursor for sucrose metabolism and cell wall biosynthesis. The objective of this work was to gain insights into the ScUGPase-1 expression pattern and regulatory mechanisms that control protein activity. ScUGPase-1 expression was negatively correlated with the sucrose content in the internodes during development, and only slight differences in the expression patterns were observed between two cultivars that differ in sucrose content. The intracellular localization of ScUGPase-1 indicated partial membrane association of this soluble protein in both the leaves and internodes. Using a phospho-specific antibody, we observed that ScUGPase-1 was phosphorylated in vivo at the Ser-419 site in the soluble and membrane fractions from the leaves but not from the internodes. The purified recombinant enzyme was kinetically characterized in the direction of UDP-glucose formation, and the enzyme activity was affected by redox modification. Preincubation with H2O2 strongly inhibited this activity, which could be reversed by DTT. Small angle x-ray scattering analysis indicated that the dimer interface is located at the C terminus and provided the first structural model of the dimer of sugarcane UGPase in solution. PMID:25320091

  18. Octamerization is essential for enzymatic function of human UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase.

    PubMed

    Führing, Jana; Damerow, Sebastian; Fedorov, Roman; Schneider, Julia; Münster-Kühnel, Anja-Katharina; Gerardy-Schahn, Rita

    2013-04-01

    Uridine diphosphate-glucose pyrophosphorylase (UGP) occupies a central position in carbohydrate metabolism in all kingdoms of life, since its product uridine diphosphate-glucose (UDP-glucose) is essential in a number of anabolic and catabolic pathways and is a precursor for other sugar nucleotides. Its significance as a virulence factor in protists and bacteria has given momentum to the search for species-specific inhibitors. These attempts are, however, hampered by high structural conservation of the active site architecture. A feature that discriminates UGPs of different species is the quaternary organization. While UGPs in protists are monomers, di- and tetrameric forms exist in bacteria, and crystal structures obtained for the enzyme from yeast and human identified octameric UGPs. These octamers are formed by contacts between highly conserved amino acids in the C-terminal β-helix. Still under debate is the question whether octamerization is required for the functionality of the human enzyme. Here, we used single amino acid replacements in the C-terminal β-helix to interrogate the impact of highly conserved residues on octamer formation and functional activity of human UGP (hUGP). Replacements were guided by the sequence of Arabidopsis thaliana UGP, known to be active as a monomer. Correlating the data obtained in blue native PAGE, size exclusion chromatography and enzymatic activity testing, we prove that the octamer is the active enzyme form. This new insight into structure-function relationships in hUGP does not only improve the understanding of the catalysis of this important enzyme, but in addition broadens the basis for studies aimed at designing drugs that selectively inhibit UGPs from pathogens.

  19. Structure and Dynamics of UDP-Glucose Pyrophosphorylase from Arabidopsis thaliana with Bound UDP-Glucose and UTP

    PubMed Central

    McCoy, Jason G.; Bitto, Eduard; Bingman, Craig A.; Wesenberg, Gary E.; Bannen, Ryan M.; Kondrashov, Dmitry A.; Phillips, George N.

    2007-01-01

    The structure of the UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase encoded by Arabidopsis thaliana gene At3g03250 has been solved to a nominal resolution of 1.86 Å. In addition, the structure has been solved in the presence of the substrates/products UTP and UDP-glucose to nominal resolutions of 1.64 Å and 1.85 Å. The three structures revealed a catalytic domain similar to that of other nucleotidyl-glucose pyrophosphorylases with a carboxy-terminal β-helix domain in a unique orientation. Conformational changes are observed between the native and substrate-bound complexes. The nucleotide binding loop and the carboxy-terminal domain, including the suspected catalytically important Lys360, move in and out of the active site in a concerted fashion. TLS refinement was employed to initially model conformational heterogeneity in the UDP-glucose complex followed by the use of multiconformer refinement for the entire molecule. Normal mode analysis generated atomic displacement predictions in good agreement in magnitude and direction with the observed conformational changes and anisotropic displacement parameters generated by TLS refinement. The structures and the observed dynamic changes provide insight into the ordered mechanism of this enzyme and previously described oligomerization effects on catalytic activity. PMID:17178129

  20. A starch deficient mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana with low ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase activity lacks one of the two subunits of the enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Tsanpiao; Caspar, T.; Somerville, C.R.; Preiss, J. )

    1988-12-01

    A starch deficient mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. has been isolated in which leaf extracts contain only about 5% as much activity of ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase (EC 2.7.7.27) as the wild type. A single, nuclear mutation at a previously undescribed locus designated adg2 is responsible for the mutant phenotype. Although the mutant contained only 5% as much ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase activity as the wild type, it accumulated 40% as much starch when grown in a 12 hour photoperiod. The mutant also contained about 40% as much starch as the wild type when grown in continuous light, suggesting that the rate of synthesis regulates its steady state accumulation. Immunological analysis of leaf extracts using antibodies against the spinach 54 and 51 kilodalton (kD) ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase subunits indicated that the mutant is deficient in a cross-reactive 54 kD polypeptide and has only about 4% as much as the wild type of a cross-reactive 51 kD polypeptide. This result and genetic studies suggested that adg2 is a structural gene which codes for the 54 kD polypeptide, and provides the first functional evidence that the 54 kD polypeptide is a required component of the native ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase enzyme.

  1. Molecular and functional analysis of UDP-N-acetylglucosamine Pyrophosphorylases from the Migratory Locust, Locusta migratoria.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaojian; Li, Feng; Li, Daqi; Ma, Enbo; Zhang, Wenqing; Zhu, Kun Yan; Zhang, Jianzhen

    2013-01-01

    UDP-N-acetylglucosamine pyrophosphorylases (UAP) function in the formation of extracellular matrix by producing N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) residues needed for chitin biosynthesis and protein glycosylation. Herein, we report two UAP cDNA's derived from two different genes (LmUAP1 and LmUAP2) in the migratory locust Locusta migratoria. Both the cDNA and their deduced amino acid sequences showed about 70% identities between the two genes. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that LmUAP1 and LmUAP2 derive from a relatively recent gene duplication event. Both LmUAP1 and LmUAP2 were widely expressed in all the major tissues besides chitin-containing tissues. However, the two genes exhibited different developmental expression patterns. High expression of LmUAP1 was detected during early embryogenesis, then decreased greatly, and slowly increased before egg hatch. During nymphal development, the highest expression of LmUAP1 appeared just after molting but declined in each inter-molting period and then increased before molting to the next stage, whereas LmUAP2 was more consistently expressed throughout all these stages. When the early second- and fifth-instar nymphs (1-day-old) were injected with LmUAP1 double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), 100% mortality was observed 2 days after the injection. When the middle second- and fifth-instar nymphs (3- to 4-day-old) were injected with LmUAP1 dsRNA, 100% mortality was observed during their next molting process. In contrast, when the insects at the same stages were injected with LmUAP2 dsRNA, these insects were able to develop normally and molt to the next stage successfully. It is presumed that the lethality caused by RNAi of LmUAP1 is due to reduced chitin biosynthesis of the integument and midgut, whereas LmUAP2 is not essential for locust development at least in nymph stage. This study is expected to help better understand different functions of UAP1 and UAP2 in the locust and other insect species. PMID:23977188

  2. Molecular and Functional Analysis of UDP-N-Acetylglucosamine Pyrophosphorylases from the Migratory Locust, Locusta migratoria

    PubMed Central

    Li, Daqi; Ma, Enbo; Zhang, Wenqing; Zhu, Kun Yan; Zhang, Jianzhen

    2013-01-01

    UDP-N-acetylglucosamine pyrophosphorylases (UAP) function in the formation of extracellular matrix by producing N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) residues needed for chitin biosynthesis and protein glycosylation. Herein, we report two UAP cDNA’s derived from two different genes (LmUAP1 and LmUAP2) in the migratory locust Locusta migratoria. Both the cDNA and their deduced amino acid sequences showed about 70% identities between the two genes. Phylogenetic analysis suggests that LmUAP1 and LmUAP2 derive from a relatively recent gene duplication event. Both LmUAP1 and LmUAP2 were widely expressed in all the major tissues besides chitin-containing tissues. However, the two genes exhibited different developmental expression patterns. High expression of LmUAP1 was detected during early embryogenesis, then decreased greatly, and slowly increased before egg hatch. During nymphal development, the highest expression of LmUAP1 appeared just after molting but declined in each inter-molting period and then increased before molting to the next stage, whereas LmUAP2 was more consistently expressed throughout all these stages. When the early second- and fifth-instar nymphs (1-day-old) were injected with LmUAP1 double-stranded RNA (dsRNA), 100% mortality was observed 2 days after the injection. When the middle second- and fifth-instar nymphs (3- to 4-day-old) were injected with LmUAP1 dsRNA, 100% mortality was observed during their next molting process. In contrast, when the insects at the same stages were injected with LmUAP2 dsRNA, these insects were able to develop normally and molt to the next stage successfully. It is presumed that the lethality caused by RNAi of LmUAP1 is due to reduced chitin biosynthesis of the integument and midgut, whereas LmUAP2 is not essential for locust development at least in nymph stage. This study is expected to help better understand different functions of UAP1 and UAP2 in the locust and other insect species. PMID:23977188

  3. Effect of nitrogen and phosphorus deficiency on transcriptional regulation of genes encoding key enzymes of starch metabolism in duckweed (Landoltia punctata).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Zhao; Shi, Hui-juan; Wang, Mao-lin; Cui, Long; Zhao, Hai; Zhao, Yun

    2015-01-01

    The production of starch by plants influences their use as biofuels. Nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P) regulate starch gene expression during plant growth and development, yet the role of key enzymes such as ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (E.C. 2.7.7.27 AGPase) in starch metabolism during N- and P-deficiency remains unknown. We investigated the effect of N- and P-deficiency on the expression of large (LeAPL1, LeAPL2, and LeAPL3) and small (LeAPS) subunits of AGPase in duckweed (Landoltia punctata) and their correlation with starch content. We first isolated the full-length cDNA encoding LeAPL1 (GenBank Accession No. KJ603244) and LeAPS (GenBank Accession No. KJ603243); they contained open reading frames of 1554 bp (57.7-kDa polypeptide of 517 amino acids) and 1578 bp (57.0 kDa polypeptide of 525 amino acids), respectively. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that LeAPL1 and LeAPL3 were highly expressed during early stages of N-deficiency, while LeAPL2 was only expressed during late stage. However, in response to P-deficiency, LeAPL1 and LeAPL2 were upregulated during early stages and LeAPL3 was primarily expressed in the late stage. Interestingly, LeAPS was highly expressed following N-deficiency during both stages, but was only upregulated in the early stage after P-deficiency. The activities of AGPase and soluble starch synthesis enzyme (SSS EC 2.4.1.21) were positively correlated with changes in starch content. Furthermore, LeAPL3 and LeSSS (SSS gene) were positively correlated with changes in starch content during N-deficiency, while LeAPS and LeSSS were correlated with starch content in response to P-deficiency. These results elevate current knowledge of the molecular mechanisms underlying starch synthesis.

  4. Enhancement of photoassimilate utilization by manipulation of the ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase gene. Progress report, [April 15, 1987--April 14, 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Okita, T.W.

    1988-12-31

    Many agronomically important crops are viewed as significant resources of renewable energy. Overall crop productivity could be increased if the efficiency of photoassimilate conversion into dry matter such as starch were improved in storage tissues. Starch production is controlled by the catalytic activity of ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase in the first step of starch biosynthesis. This research focuses on the genetic structure and molecular mechanisms by which it is controlled during plant development and how it is affected by environmental and hormonal conditions. The current goal is to isolate the genes for this enzyme present in both cereal endosperm and potato tuber tissues, and to elucidate its structure and the controlling sequences responsible for gene expression. The long term goal is the improvement of starch production in storage organs by manipulating this gene so that it encodes an enzyme refractive to inorganic phosphate inhibition.

  5. Enhancement of photoassimilate utilization by manipulation of the ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase genes. Progress report, [April 15, 1990--April 14, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Okita, T.W.

    1990-12-31

    The long term goal of this project is to assess the feasibility of increasing the conversion of photosynthate a key regulatory enzyme in starch biosynthesis. In developing storage tissues such as cereal seeds and tubers, starch biosynthesis is primarily regulated by the gene activation, expression, and allosteric regulation of ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase, as well as starch synthase, and branching enzyme. During the last year we have elucidated the structure of both subunits which compose this tetrameric enzyme and determined the temporal and spatial expression of the genes encoding each subunit as well as their correlation to starch biosynthesis. Genomic clones to both subunits have also been isolated and the gene structure of the small subunit determined. Transgenic potato plants have been produced containing deletions of the small subunit promoter. Currently, cis acting elements and their involvement in spatial and temporal expression are under investigation.

  6. Characterization of the ugpG gene encoding a UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase from the gellan gum producer Sphingomonas paucimobilis ATCC 31461.

    PubMed

    Marques, A R; Ferreira, P B; Sá-Correia, I; Fialho, A M

    2003-03-01

    The ugpGgene, which codes for a UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (UGP) (or glucose-1-phosphate uridylyltransferase; EC 2.7.7.9) in Sphingomonas paucimobilis ATCC 31461, was cloned and sequenced. This industrial strain produces the exopolysaccharide gellan, a new commercial gelling agent, and the ugpG gene may convert glucose-1-phosphate into UDP-glucose in the gellan biosynthetic pathway. The ugpG gene is capable of restoring the capacity of an Escherichia coli galU mutant to grow on galactose by functional complementation of its deficiency for UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase activity. As expected, the predicted gene product shows strong homology to UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylases from several bacterial species. The N-terminal region of UgpG exhibits the motif GXGTRXLPXTK, which is highly conserved among bacterial XDP-sugar pyrophosphorylases, and a lysine residue (K(192)) is located within a VEKP motif predicted to be essential for substrate binding or catalysis. UgpG was purified to homogeneity as a heterologous fusion protein from crude cell extracts prepared from IPTG-induced cells of E. coli, using affinity chromatography. Under denaturing conditions, the fusion protein S-UgpG-His(6) migrated with an estimated molecular mass of 36 kDa [corresponding to the predicted molecular mass of native UgpG (31.2 kDa) plus 5 kDa for the S and histidine tags). Kinetic analysis of UgpG in the reverse reaction (pyrophosphorolysis) showed a typical Michaelis-Menten substrate saturation pattern. The apparent K(m) and V(max) values estimated for UDP-glucose were 7.5 microM and 1275 micromol/min/g.

  7. Functional inactivation of UDP-N-acetylglucosamine pyrophosphorylase 1 (UAP1) induces early leaf senescence and defence responses in rice.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaohai; Wang, Ya; Hong, Xiao; Hu, Daoheng; Liu, Caixiang; Yang, Jing; Li, Yang; Huang, Yunqing; Feng, Yuqi; Gong, Hanyu; Li, Yang; Fang, Gen; Tang, Huiru; Li, Yangsheng

    2015-02-01

    Plant leaf senescence and defence responses are important biological processes, but the molecular mechanisms involved are not well understood. This study identified a new rice mutant, spotted leaf 29 (spl29). The SPL29 gene was identified by map-based cloning, and SPL29 was confirmed as UDP-N-acetylglucosamine pyrophosphorylase 1 (UAP1) by enzymatic analysis. The mutant spl29 lacks UAP activity. The biological phenotypes for which UAP is responsible have not previously been reported in plants. The spl29 mutant displayed early leaf senescence, confirmed by chlorophyll loss and photosystem II decline as physiological indicators, chloroplast degradation as a cellular characteristic, and both upregulation of senescence transcription factors and senescence-associated genes, and downregulation of photosynthesis-related genes, as molecular evidence. Defence responses were induced in the spl29 mutant, shown by enhanced resistance to bacterial blight inoculation and upregulation of defence response genes. Reactive oxygen species, including O2 (-) and H2O2, accumulated in spl29 plants; there was also increased malondialdehyde content. Enhanced superoxide dismutase activity combined with normal catalase activity in spl29 could be responsible for H2O2 accumulation. The plant hormones jasmonic acid and abscisic acid also accumulated in spl29 plants. ROS and plant hormones probably play important roles in early leaf senescence and defence responses in the spl29 mutant. Based on these findings, it is suggested that UAP1 is involved in regulating leaf senescence and defence responses in rice. PMID:25399020

  8. Enhanced UDP-glucose and UDP-galactose by homologous overexpression of UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase in Lactobacillus casei.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Díaz, Jesús; Yebra, María J

    2011-07-20

    UDP-sugars are widely used as substrates in the synthesis of oligosaccharides catalyzed by glycosyltransferases. In the present work a metabolic engineering strategy aimed to direct the carbon flux towards UDP-glucose and UDP-galactose biosynthesis was successfully applied in Lactobacillus casei. The galU gene coding for UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (GalU) enzyme in L. casei BL23 was cloned under control of the inducible nisA promoter and it was shown to be functional by homologous overexpression. Notably, about an 80-fold increase in GalU activity resulted in approximately a 9-fold increase of UDP-glucose and a 4-fold increase of UDP-galactose. This suggested that the endogenous UDP-galactose 4-epimerase (GalE) activity, which inter-converts both UDP-sugars, is not sufficient to maintain the UDP-glucose/UDP-galactose ratio. The L. casei galE gene coding for GalE was cloned downstream of galU and the resulting plasmid was transformed in L. casei. The new recombinant strain showed about a 4-fold increase of GalE activity, however this increment did not affect that ratio, suggesting that GalE has higher affinity for UDP-galactose than for UDP-glucose. The L. casei strains constructed here that accumulate high intracellular levels of UDP-sugars would be adequate hosts for the production of oligosaccharides.

  9. Enhanced UDP-glucose and UDP-galactose by homologous overexpression of UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase in Lactobacillus casei.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Díaz, Jesús; Yebra, María J

    2011-07-20

    UDP-sugars are widely used as substrates in the synthesis of oligosaccharides catalyzed by glycosyltransferases. In the present work a metabolic engineering strategy aimed to direct the carbon flux towards UDP-glucose and UDP-galactose biosynthesis was successfully applied in Lactobacillus casei. The galU gene coding for UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (GalU) enzyme in L. casei BL23 was cloned under control of the inducible nisA promoter and it was shown to be functional by homologous overexpression. Notably, about an 80-fold increase in GalU activity resulted in approximately a 9-fold increase of UDP-glucose and a 4-fold increase of UDP-galactose. This suggested that the endogenous UDP-galactose 4-epimerase (GalE) activity, which inter-converts both UDP-sugars, is not sufficient to maintain the UDP-glucose/UDP-galactose ratio. The L. casei galE gene coding for GalE was cloned downstream of galU and the resulting plasmid was transformed in L. casei. The new recombinant strain showed about a 4-fold increase of GalE activity, however this increment did not affect that ratio, suggesting that GalE has higher affinity for UDP-galactose than for UDP-glucose. The L. casei strains constructed here that accumulate high intracellular levels of UDP-sugars would be adequate hosts for the production of oligosaccharides. PMID:21663774

  10. Mutagenesis of the potato ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase and characterization of an allosteric mutant defective in 3-phosphoglycerate activation

    SciTech Connect

    Greene, T.W.; Chantler, S.E.; Kahn, M.L.

    1996-02-20

    ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase (glucose-1-phosphate adenylytransferase; AD P:{alpha}-D-glucose-1-phosphate adenylyltransferase, EC 2.7.7.27) catalyzes a key regulatory step in {alpha}-glucan synthesis in bacteria and higher plants. We have previously shown that the expression of the cDNA sequences of the potato tuber large (LS) and small (SS) subunits yielded a functional heterotetrameric enzyme capable of complementing a mutation in the single AGP (glgC) structural gene of Escherichia coli. This heterologous complementation provides a powerful genetic approach to obtain biochemical information on the specific roles of LS and SS in enzyme function. By mutagenizing the LS cDNA with hydroxylamine and then coexpressing with wild-type SS in an E. coli glgC{sup {minus}} strain, >350 mutant colonies were identified that were impaired in glycogen production. One mutant exhibited enzymatic and antigen levels comparable to the wild-type recombinant enzyme but required 45-fold greater levels of the activator 3-phosphoglycerate for maximum activity. Sequence analysis identified a single nucleotide change that resulted in the change of Pro-52 to Leu. This heterologous genetic system provides and efficient means to identify residues important for catalysis and allosteric functioning and should lead to novel approaches to increase plant productivity. 31 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  11. The essential role of sugar metabolism in the acclimation response of Arabidopsis thaliana to high light intensities

    PubMed Central

    Schmitz, Jessica; Häusler, Rainer E.

    2014-01-01

    Retrograde signals from chloroplasts are thought to control the expression of nuclear genes associated with plastidial processes such as acclimation to varying light conditions. Arabidopsis mutants altered in the day and night path of photoassimilate export from the chloroplasts served as tools to study the involvement of carbohydrates in high light (HL) acclimation. A double mutant impaired in the triose phosphate/phosphate translocator (TPT) and ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) (adg1-1/tpt-2) exhibits a HL-dependent depletion in endogenous carbohydrates combined with a severe growth and photosynthesis phenotype. The acclimation response of mutant and wild-type plants has been assessed in time series after transfer from low light (LL) to HL by analysing photosynthetic performance, carbohydrates, MgProtoIX (a chlorophyll precursor), and the ascorbate/glutathione redox system, combined with microarray-based transcriptomic and GC-MS-based metabolomic approaches. The data indicate that the accumulation of soluble carbohydrates (predominantly glucose) acts as a short-term response to HL exposure in both mutant and wild-type plants. Only if carbohydrates are depleted in the long term (e.g. after 2 d) is the acclimation response impaired, as observed in the adg1-1/tpt-2 double mutant. Furthermore, meta-analyses conducted with in-house and publicly available microarray data suggest that, in the long term, reactive oxygen species such as H2O2 can replace carbohydrates as signals. Moreover, a cross-talk exists between genes associated with the regulation of starch and lipid metabolism. The involvement of genes responding to phytohormones in HL acclimation appears to be less likely. Various candidate genes involved in retrograde control of nuclear gene expression emerged from the analyses of global gene expression. PMID:24523502

  12. The essential role of sugar metabolism in the acclimation response of Arabidopsis thaliana to high light intensities.

    PubMed

    Schmitz, Jessica; Heinrichs, Luisa; Scossa, Federico; Fernie, Alisdair R; Oelze, Marie-Luise; Dietz, Karl-Josef; Rothbart, Maxi; Grimm, Bernhard; Flügge, Ulf-Ingo; Häusler, Rainer E

    2014-04-01

    Retrograde signals from chloroplasts are thought to control the expression of nuclear genes associated with plastidial processes such as acclimation to varying light conditions. Arabidopsis mutants altered in the day and night path of photoassimilate export from the chloroplasts served as tools to study the involvement of carbohydrates in high light (HL) acclimation. A double mutant impaired in the triose phosphate/phosphate translocator (TPT) and ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) (adg1-1/tpt-2) exhibits a HL-dependent depletion in endogenous carbohydrates combined with a severe growth and photosynthesis phenotype. The acclimation response of mutant and wild-type plants has been assessed in time series after transfer from low light (LL) to HL by analysing photosynthetic performance, carbohydrates, MgProtoIX (a chlorophyll precursor), and the ascorbate/glutathione redox system, combined with microarray-based transcriptomic and GC-MS-based metabolomic approaches. The data indicate that the accumulation of soluble carbohydrates (predominantly glucose) acts as a short-term response to HL exposure in both mutant and wild-type plants. Only if carbohydrates are depleted in the long term (e.g. after 2 d) is the acclimation response impaired, as observed in the adg1-1/tpt-2 double mutant. Furthermore, meta-analyses conducted with in-house and publicly available microarray data suggest that, in the long term, reactive oxygen species such as H₂O₂ can replace carbohydrates as signals. Moreover, a cross-talk exists between genes associated with the regulation of starch and lipid metabolism. The involvement of genes responding to phytohormones in HL acclimation appears to be less likely. Various candidate genes involved in retrograde control of nuclear gene expression emerged from the analyses of global gene expression.

  13. Deficiencies in both starch synthase IIIa and branching enzyme IIb lead to a significant increase in amylose in SSIIa-inactive japonica rice seeds

    PubMed Central

    Asai, Hiroki; Abe, Natsuko; Matsushima, Ryo; Crofts, Naoko; Oitome, Naoko F.; Nakamura, Yasunori; Fujita, Naoko

    2014-01-01

    Starch synthase (SS) IIIa has the second highest activity of the total soluble SS activity in developing rice endosperm. Branching enzyme (BE) IIb is the major BE isozyme, and is strongly expressed in developing rice endosperm. A mutant (ss3a/be2b) was generated from wild-type japonica rice which lacks SSIIa activity. The seed weight of ss3a/be2b was 74–94% of that of the wild type, whereas the be2b seed weight was 59–73% of that of the wild type. There were significantly fewer amylopectin short chains [degree of polymerization (DP) ≤13] in ss3a/be2b compared with the wild type. In contrast, the amount of long chains (DP ≥25) connecting clusters of amylopectin in ss3a/be2b was higher than in the wild type and lower than in be2b. The apparent amylose content of ss3a/be2b was 45%, which was >1.5 times greater than that of either ss3a or be2b. Both SSIIIa and BEIIb deficiencies led to higher activity of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) and granule-bound starch synthase I (GBSSI), which partly explains the high amylose content in the ss3a/be2b endosperm. The percentage apparent amylose content of ss3a and ss3a/be2b at 10 days after flowering (DAF) was higher than that of the wild type and be2b. At 20 DAF, amylopectin biosynthesis in be2b and ss3a/be2b was not observed, whereas amylose biosynthesis in these lines was accelerated at 30 DAF. These data suggest that the high amylose content in the ss3a/be2b mutant results from higher amylose biosynthesis at two stages, up to 20 DAF and from 30 DAF to maturity. PMID:25071222

  14. Starch biosynthesis in rice endosperm requires the presence of either starch synthase I or IIIa

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Naoko; Satoh, Rui; Hayashi, Aki; Kodama, Momoko; Itoh, Rumiko; Aihara, Satomi; Nakamura, Yasunori

    2011-01-01

    Starch synthase (SS) I and IIIa are the first and second largest components of total soluble SS activity, respectively, in developing japonica rice (Oryza sativa L.) endosperm. To elucidate the distinct and overlapping functions of these enzymes, double mutants were created by crossing the ss1 null mutant with the ss3a null mutant. In the F2 generation, two opaque seed types were found to have either the ss1ss1/SS3ass3a or the SS1ss1/ss3ass3a genotype. Phenotypic analyses revealed lower SS activity in the endosperm of these lines than in those of the parent mutant lines since these seeds had different copies of SSI and SSIIIa genes in a heterozygous state. The endosperm of the two types of opaque seeds contained the unique starch with modified fine structure, round-shaped starch granules, high amylose content, and specific physicochemical properties. The seed weight was ∼90% of that of the wild type. The amount of granule-bound starch synthase I (GBSSI) and the activity of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) were higher than in the wild type and parent mutant lines. The double-recessive homozygous mutant prepared from both ss1 and ss3a null mutants was considered sterile, while the mutant produced by the leaky ss1 mutant×ss3a null mutant cross was fertile. This present study strongly suggests that at least SSI or SSIIIa is required for starch biosynthesis in rice endosperm. PMID:21730357

  15. Aluminum-induced decrease in CO2 assimilation in citrus seedlings is unaccompanied by decreased activities of key enzymes involved in CO2 assimilation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Li-Song; Qi, Yi-Ping; Smith, Brandon Rhett; Liu, Xing-Hui

    2005-03-01

    'Cleopatra' tangerine (Citrus reshni Hort. ex Tanaka) seedlings were irrigated daily for 8 weeks with 1/4 strength Hoagland's nutrient solution containing 0 (control) or 2 mM aluminum (Al). Leaves from Al-treated plants had decreased CO2 assimilation and stomatal conductance, but increased intercellular CO2 concentrations compared with control leaves. On a leaf area basis, 2 mM Al increased activities of key enzymes in the Calvin cycle, including ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco), NADP-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), phosphoribulokinase (PRK), stromal fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase (FBPase), and a key enzyme in starch synthesis, ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase), compared with control leaves. Aluminum had no effect on cytosolic FBPase activity, but it decreased sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) activity. Aluminum had no effect on area-based concentrations of carbohydrates, glucose-6-phosphate (G6P) and fructose 6-phosphate (F6P) or the G6P:F6P ratio, but it decreased the area-based concentration of 3-phosphoglycerate (PGA). Photochemical quenching coefficient (qP) and electron transport rate through PSII were greatly reduced by Al. Non-photochemical quenching coefficient (NPQ) was less affected by Al than qP and electron transport rate through PSII. We conclude that the reduced rate of CO2 assimilation in Al-treated leaves was probably caused by a combination of factors such as reduced electron transport rate through PSII, increased closure of PSII reaction centers and increased photorespiration.

  16. Localization of the human UGP2 gene encoding the muscle isoform of UDPglucose pyrophosphorylase to 2p13-p14 by fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Sou-De; Peng, Hwei-Ling; Chang, Hwan-You

    1997-02-01

    UDPglucose pyrophosphorylase (UGP, EC 2.7.7.9) catalyzes the transfer of a glucose moiety from Glc1P to MgUTP, forming UDPglc and MgPPi. This reaction is necessary in several tissues. In liver and muscle, UDPglc is the direct precursor of glycogen, while in lactating mammary gland it is converted to UDPgalactose and thence lactose. Liver also requires UDPglc for the formation of UDPglucuronate, which then acts as a source for the formation of soluble glucuronides of xenobiotic and endobiotic metabolites destined for excretion. 6 refs., 1 fig.

  17. Genetic and biochemical characterization of the UGP1 gene encoding the UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Daran, J M; Dallies, N; Thines-Sempoux, D; Paquet, V; François, J

    1995-10-15

    We report here that the open reading frame YKL248, previously identified during the systematic sequencing of yeast chromosome XI [Purnelle B., Skala, J., Van Dijck, L. & Goffeau, A. (1992) Yeast 8, 977-986] encodes UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (UGPase), the enzyme which catalyses the reversible formation of UDP-Glc from glucose 1-phosphate and UTP. Proof for this function come from sequence alignment of the YKL248 product with UGPase of other species, from complementation studies of an Escherichia coli galU mutant deficient in UGPase activity, and from overexpression studies. In particular, the amino acid sequence motifs involved in the binding of glucose 1-phosphate and UDP-Glc are entirely conserved between the yeast, bovine, human and potato tuber UGPases, and multi-copy expression of YKL248 resulted in a 40-fold increase in UGPase activity. This gene was, therefore, renamed UGP1. Gene disruption at the UGP1 locus in a diploid strain, followed by tetrad analysis, showed that UGPase is essential for cell viability. Functional analysis of UGP1 was, therefore, carried out by generating strains in which UGPase could be either overexpressed or depleted. This was done by generating haploid strains carrying either UGP1 on a multicopy vector or the chromosomal deletion of UGP1, and rescued by a vector bearing the wild-type gene under the control of the glucose-repressible galactose-inducible promoter. The effects of overproducing UGPase on the cell metabolism and morphology were carbon-source dependent. On glucose medium, the 40-fold increase of UGPase activity was restricted to a twofold increase in the concentration of glycogen and UDP-Glc, with no significant effect on growth. In contrast, on galactose, the 40-fold increase in UGPase activity was accompanied by several effects, including a threefold reduction of the growth rate, a 3-5-fold increase in the concentrations of UDP-Glc, UDP-Gal and galactose 1-phosphate, a higher sensitivity to calcofluor white and an

  18. Soybean cotyledon starch metabolism is sensitive to altered gravity conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, C. S.; Piastuch, W. C.; Knott, W. M.

    1994-01-01

    We have demonstrated that etiolated soybean seedlings grown under the altered gravity conditions of clinorotation (1 rpm) and centrifugation (5xg) exhibit changes in starch metabolism. Cotyledon starch concentration was lower (-28%) in clinorotated plants and higher (+24%) in centrifuged plants than in vertical control plants. The activity of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase in the cotyledons was affected in a similar way, i.e. lower (-37%) in the clinorotated plants and higher (+22%) in the centrifuged plants. Other starch metabolic enzyme activities, starch synthase, starch phosphorylase and total hydrolase were not affected by the altered gravity treatments. We conclude that the observed changes in starch concentrations were primarily due to gravity-mediated differences in ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase activity.

  19. Rice UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase1 is essential for pollen callose deposition and its cosuppression results in a new type of thermosensitive genic male sterility.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rongzhi; Zhao, Xiao; Shao, Zhe; Wei, Zhe; Wang, Yuanyuan; Zhu, Lili; Zhao, Jie; Sun, Mengxiang; He, Ruifeng; He, Guangcun

    2007-03-01

    UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (UGPase) catalyzes the reversible production of glucose-1-phosphate and UTP to UDP-glucose and pyrophosphate. The rice (Oryza sativa) genome contains two homologous UGPase genes, Ugp1 and Ugp2. We report a functional characterization of rice Ugp1, which is expressed throughout the plant, with highest expression in florets, especially in pollen during anther development. Ugp1 silencing by RNA interference or cosuppression results in male sterility. Expressing a double-stranded RNA interference construct in Ugp1-RI plants resulted in complete suppression of both Ugp1 and Ugp2, together with various pleiotropic developmental abnormalities, suggesting that UGPase plays critical roles in plant growth and development. More importantly, Ugp1-cosuppressing plants contained unprocessed intron-containing primary transcripts derived from transcription of the overexpression construct. These aberrant transcripts undergo temperature-sensitive splicing in florets, leading to a novel thermosensitive genic male sterility. Pollen mother cells (PMCs) of Ugp1-silenced plants appeared normal before meiosis, but during meiosis, normal callose deposition was disrupted. Consequently, the PMCs began to degenerate at the early meiosis stage, eventually resulting in complete pollen collapse. In addition, the degeneration of the tapetum and middle layer was inhibited. These results demonstrate that rice Ugp1 is required for callose deposition during PMC meiosis and bridges the apoplastic unloading pathway and pollen development. PMID:17400897

  20. Analysis of GDP-D-mannose pyrophosphorylase gene promoter from acerola (Malpighia glabra) and increase in ascorbate content of transgenic tobacco expressing the acerola gene.

    PubMed

    Badejo, Adebanjo A; Tanaka, Nobukazu; Esaka, Muneharu

    2008-01-01

    GDP-D-mannose pyrophosphorylase (GMP) is an important enzyme in the Smirnoff-Wheeler's pathway for the biosynthesis of ascorbic acid (AsA) in plants. We have reported recently that the expression of the acerola (Malpighia glabra) GMP gene, designated MgGMP, correlates with the AsA content of the plant. The acerola plant has very high levels of AsA relative to better studied model plants such as Arabidopsis. Here we found that the GMP mRNA levels in acerola are higher than those from Arabidopsis and tomato. Also, the transient expression of the uidA reporter gene in the protoplasts of Nicotiana tabacum cultures showed the MgGMP gene promoter to have higher activity than the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S and Arabidopsis GMP promoters. The AsA content of transgenic tobacco plants expressing the MgGMP gene including its promoter was about 2-fold higher than that of the wild type.

  1. UDP-sugar pyrophosphorylase is essential for arabinose and xylose recycling, and is required during vegetative and reproductive growth in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Geserick, Claudia; Tenhaken, Raimund

    2013-04-01

    Numerous nucleotide sugars are needed in plants to synthesize cell wall polymers and glycoproteins. The de novo synthesis of nucleotide sugars is of major importance. During growth, however, some polymers are broken down to monosaccharides. Reactivation of these sugars into nucleotide sugars occurs in two steps: first, by a substrate-specific sugar-1-kinase and, second, by UDP-sugar-pyrophosphorylase (USP), which has broad substrate specificity. A knock-out of the USP gene results in non-fertile pollen. By using various genetic complementation approaches we obtained a strong (>95%) knock-down line in USP that allowed us to investigate the physiological role of the enzyme during the life cycle. Mutant plants show an arabinose reduction in the cell wall, and accumulate mainly two sugars, arabinose and xylose, in the cytoplasm. The arabinogalactanproteins in usp mutants show no significant reduction in size. USP is also part of the myo-inositol oxygenation pathway to UDP-glucuronic acid; however, free glucuronic acid does not accumulate in cells, suggesting alternative conversion pathways of this monosaccharide. The knock-down plants are mostly sterile because of the improper formation of anthers and pollen sacks.

  2. Alginate biosynthetic enzymes in mucoid and nonmucoid Pseudomonas aeruginosa: overproduction of phosphomannose isomerase, phosphomannomutase, and GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylase by overexpression of the phosphomannose isomerase (pmi) gene.

    PubMed Central

    Sá-Correia, I; Darzins, A; Wang, S K; Berry, A; Chakrabarty, A M

    1987-01-01

    The specific activities of phosphomannose isomerase (PMI), phosphomannomutase (PMM), GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylase (GMP), and GDP-mannose dehydrogenase (GMD) were compared in a mucoid cystic fibrosis isolate of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and in two spontaneous nonmucoid revertants. In both revertants some or all of the alginate biosynthetic enzymes we examined appeared to be repressed, indicating that the loss of the mucoid phenotype may be a result of decreased formation of sugar-nucleotide precursors. The introduction and overexpression of the cloned P. aeruginosa phosphomannose isomerase (pmi) gene in both mucoid and nonmucoid strains led not only to the appearance of PMI levels in cell extracts several times higher than those present in the wild-type mucoid strain, but also in higher PMM and GMP specific activities. In extracts of both strains, however, the specific activity of GMD did not change as a result of pmi overexpression. In contrast, the introduction of the cloned Escherichia coli manA (pmi) gene in P. aeruginosa caused an increase in only PMI and PMM activities, having no effect on the level of GMP. This suggests that an increase in PMI activity alone does not induce high GMP activity in P. aeruginosa. The heterologous overexpression of the P. aeruginosa pmi gene in the E. coli manA mutant CD1 led to the appearance in cell extracts of not only PMI activity but also GMP activity, both of which are normally undetectable in extracts of CD1. We discuss the implications of these results and propose a mechanism by which overexpression of the P. aeruginosa pmi gene can cause an elevation in both PMM and GMP activities. PMID:3036776

  3. Cloning and expression of GDP-D-mannose pyrophosphorylase gene and ascorbic acid content of acerola (Malpighia glabra L.) fruit at ripening stages.

    PubMed

    Badejo, Adebanjo A; Jeong, Seok T; Goto-Yamamoto, Nami; Esaka, Muneharu

    2007-09-01

    Acerola (Malpighia glabra L.) is one of the richest natural sources of L-ascorbic acid (AsA; vitamin C). GDP-D-mannose pyrophosphorylase (GMP; EC 2.7.7.13) was found to play a major role in the proposed AsA biosynthetic pathway in plants, considering that Arabidopsis vtc1-1 mutant with point mutation in this gene has a highly reduced AsA content. GMP cDNA was isolated from acerola fruits, designated MgGMP, using rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE), and its expression was monitored during fruit ripening. The full-length cDNA was found to have an ORF of 1083bp encoding a polypeptide of 361 amino acids. In silico analysis of the predicted amino acid sequence showed a pI of 6.45 and molecular mass of 39.7kD. MgGMP showed over 80% amino acid sequence identity with other plant GMP homologues. The phylogenetic tree shows the close relation of MgGMP to the GMP of other plants as against those from parasite, yeasts and mammals. Southern analysis indicated that M. glabra contains not less than two copies of GMP genes. Northern blot analysis showed the transcript abundance of MgGMP in all the organs of acerola examined, with the fruit having the highest expression. The relative transcript abundance of MgGMP mRNA levels in the fruits changes as the ripening process progresses, with the unripe green fruits having the highest relative mRNA level, and the lowest was found in the fruits at advanced ripening stage. A strong correlation was also observed between the relative MgGMP mRNA levels and the AsA contents of acerola during fruit ripening.

  4. Two Leptinotarsa uridine diphosphate N-acetylglucosamine pyrophosphorylases are specialized for chitin synthesis in larval epidermal cuticle and midgut peritrophic matrix.

    PubMed

    Shi, Ji-Feng; Fu, Jia; Mu, Li-Li; Guo, Wen-Chao; Li, Guo-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Uridine diphosphate-N-acetylglucosamine-pyrophosphorylase (UAP) is involved in the biosynthesis of chitin, an essential component of the epidermal cuticle and midgut peritrophic matrix (PM) in insects. In the present paper, two putative LdUAP genes were cloned in Leptinotarsa decemlineata. In vivo bioassay revealed that 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) and an ecdysteroid agonist halofenozide activated the expression of the two LdUAPs, whereas a decrease in 20E by RNA interference (RNAi) of an ecdysteroidogenesis gene LdSHD and a 20E signaling gene LdFTZ-F1 repressed the expression. Juvenile hormone (JH), a JH analog pyriproxyfen and an increase in JH by RNAi of an allatostatin gene LdAS-C downregulated LdUAP1 but upregulated LdUAP2, whereas a decrease in JH by silencing of a JH biosynthesis gene LdJHAMT had converse effects. Thus, expression of LdUAPs responded to both 20E and JH. Moreover, knockdown of LdUAP1 reduced chitin contents in whole larvae and integument samples, thinned tracheal taenidia, impaired larval-larval molt, larval-pupal ecdysis and adult emergence. In contrast, silencing of LdUAP2 significantly reduced foliage consumption, decreased chitin content in midgut samples, damaged PM, and retarded larval growth. The resulting larvae had lighter fresh weights, smaller body sizes and depleted fat body. As a result, the development was arrested. Combined knockdown of LdUAP1 and LdUAP2 caused an additive negative effect. Our data suggest that LdUAP1 and LdUAP2 have specialized functions in biosynthesizing chitin in the epidermal cuticle and PM respectively in L. decemlineata. PMID:26592348

  5. Rice GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylase OsVTC1-1 and OsVTC1-3 play different roles in ascorbic acid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Qin, Hua; Deng, Zaian; Zhang, Chuanyu; Wang, Yayun; Wang, Juan; Liu, Hai; Zhang, Zhili; Huang, Rongfeng; Zhang, Zhijin

    2016-02-01

    GDP-D-mannose pyrophosphorylase (GMPase) catalyzes the synthesis of GDP-D-mannose, which is a precursor for ascorbic acid (AsA) synthesis in plants. The rice genome encodes three GMPase homologs OsVTC1-1, OsVTC1-3 and OsVTC1-8, but their roles in AsA synthesis are unclear. The overexpression of OsVTC1-1 or OsVTC1-3 restored the AsA synthesis of vtc1-1 in Arabidopsis, while that of OsVTC1-8 did not, indicating that only OsVTC1-1 and OsVTC1-3 are involved in AsA synthesis in rice. Similar to Arabidopsis VTC1, the expression of OsVTC1-1 was high in leaves, induced by light, and inhibited by dark. Unlike OsVTC1-1, the expression level of OsVTC1-3 was high in roots and quickly induced by the dark, while the transcription level of OsVTC1-8 did not show obvious changes under constant light or dark treatments. In OsVTC1-1 RNAi plants, the AsA content of rice leaves decreased, and the AsA production induced by light was limited. In contrast, OsVTC1-3 RNAi lines altered AsA synthesis levels in rice roots, but not in the leaves or under the light/dark treatment. The enzyme activity showed that OsVTC1-1 and OsVTC1-3 had higher GMPase activities than OsVTC1-8 in vitro. Our data showed that, unlike in Arabidopsis, the rice GPMase homologous proteins illustrated a new model in AsA synthesis: OsVTC1-1 may be involved in the AsA synthesis, which takes place in leaves, while OsVTC1-3 may be responsible for AsA synthesis in roots. The different roles of rice GMPase homologous proteins in AsA synthesis may be due to their differences in transcript levels and enzyme activities.

  6. Rice GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylase OsVTC1-1 and OsVTC1-3 play different roles in ascorbic acid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Qin, Hua; Deng, Zaian; Zhang, Chuanyu; Wang, Yayun; Wang, Juan; Liu, Hai; Zhang, Zhili; Huang, Rongfeng; Zhang, Zhijin

    2016-02-01

    GDP-D-mannose pyrophosphorylase (GMPase) catalyzes the synthesis of GDP-D-mannose, which is a precursor for ascorbic acid (AsA) synthesis in plants. The rice genome encodes three GMPase homologs OsVTC1-1, OsVTC1-3 and OsVTC1-8, but their roles in AsA synthesis are unclear. The overexpression of OsVTC1-1 or OsVTC1-3 restored the AsA synthesis of vtc1-1 in Arabidopsis, while that of OsVTC1-8 did not, indicating that only OsVTC1-1 and OsVTC1-3 are involved in AsA synthesis in rice. Similar to Arabidopsis VTC1, the expression of OsVTC1-1 was high in leaves, induced by light, and inhibited by dark. Unlike OsVTC1-1, the expression level of OsVTC1-3 was high in roots and quickly induced by the dark, while the transcription level of OsVTC1-8 did not show obvious changes under constant light or dark treatments. In OsVTC1-1 RNAi plants, the AsA content of rice leaves decreased, and the AsA production induced by light was limited. In contrast, OsVTC1-3 RNAi lines altered AsA synthesis levels in rice roots, but not in the leaves or under the light/dark treatment. The enzyme activity showed that OsVTC1-1 and OsVTC1-3 had higher GMPase activities than OsVTC1-8 in vitro. Our data showed that, unlike in Arabidopsis, the rice GPMase homologous proteins illustrated a new model in AsA synthesis: OsVTC1-1 may be involved in the AsA synthesis, which takes place in leaves, while OsVTC1-3 may be responsible for AsA synthesis in roots. The different roles of rice GMPase homologous proteins in AsA synthesis may be due to their differences in transcript levels and enzyme activities. PMID:26715595

  7. Transcriptional coordination and abscisic acid mediated regulation of sucrose transport and sucrose-to-starch metabolism related genes during grain filling in wheat (Triticum aestivum L.).

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Shalini; Liu, Aihua; Deol, Kirandeep K; Kulichikhin, Konstanin; Stasolla, Claudio; Brûlé-Babel, Anita; Ayele, Belay T

    2015-11-01

    Combining physiological, molecular and biochemical approaches, this study investigated the transcriptional coordination and abscisic acid (ABA) mediated regulation of genes involved in sucrose import and its conversion to starch during grain filling in wheat. Sucrose import appears to be mediated by seed localized TaSUT1, mainly TaSUT1D, while sucrose cleavage by TaSuSy2. Temporal overlapping of the transcriptional activation of AGPL1 and AGPS1a that encode AGPase with that of the above genes suggests their significance in the synthesis of ADP-glucose; TaAGPL1A and TaAGPL1D contributing the majority of AGPL1 transcripts. ABA induced repressions of TaSUT1, TaSuSy2, TaAGPL1 and TaAGPS1a imply that ABA negatively regulates sucrose import into the endosperm and its subsequent metabolism to ADP-glucose, the substrate for starch synthesis. The formations of amyloses and amylopectin from ADP-glucose appear to be mediated by specific members of GBSS, and SS, SBE and DBE gene families, and the ABA-induced transcriptional change in most of these genes implies that ABA regulates amylose and amylopectin synthesis. The findings provide insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the coordination and ABA mediated regulation of sucrose transport into the developing endosperm and its subsequent metabolism to starch during grain filling in wheat.

  8. Carbohydrate and Enzymic Characterization of a High Sucrose Sugary Inbred Line of Sweet Corn 1

    PubMed Central

    Gonzales, Jorge W.; Rhodes, Ashby M.; Dickinson, David B.

    1976-01-01

    Reserve carbohydrates were determined on developing endosperm of a new line of sugary maize (Zea mays L.). Other entries, included for comparative purposes, were Midway (sugary), Funks G4646 (starchy), and Illini X-tra Sweet (shrunken-2). Sucrose in the new line, Illinois 677a, was more than twice that of Midway at most stages of development, and reached a maximum of 40% of dry weight at 18 days after pollination. Appreciable phytoglycogen accumulated in Illinois 677a, reaching 30% or more of dry weight as endosperm tissue matured. Thus, Illinois 677a is a typical sugary maize concerning phytoglycogen content, but it resembles shrunken-2 concerning the extent of sucrose accumulation. Enhanced sucrose accumulation by Illinois 677a was not accounted for by altered in vitro activities of invertase, sucrose synthase, UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, or ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase. Its normal level of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase set Illinois 677a apart from shrunken-2 in which the enzyme was drastically reduced. PMID:16659614

  9. UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase influences polysaccharide synthesis, cell wall components, and hyphal branching in Ganoderma lucidum via regulation of the balance between glucose-1-phosphate and UDP-glucose.

    PubMed

    Li, Mengjiao; Chen, Tianxi; Gao, Tan; Miao, Zhigang; Jiang, Ailiang; Shi, Liang; Ren, Ang; Zhao, Mingwen

    2015-09-01

    UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (UGP) is a key enzyme involved in carbohydrate metabolism, but there are few studies on the functions of this enzyme in fungi. The ugp gene of Ganoderma lucidum was cloned, and enzyme kinetic parameters of the UGP recombinant protein were determined in vitro, revealing that this protein was functional and catalyzed the reversible conversion between Glc-1-P and UDP-Glc. ugp silencing by RNA interference resulted in changes in the levels of the intermediate metabolites Glc-1-P and UDP-Glc. The compounds and structure of the cell wall in the silenced strains were also altered compared with those in the wild-type strains. Moreover, the number of hyphal branches was also changed in the silenced strains. To verify the role of UGP in hyphal branching, a ugp-overexpressing strain was constructed. The results showed that the number of hyphal branches was influenced by UGP. The mechanism underlying hyphal branching was further investigated by adding exogenous Glc-1-P. Our results showed that hyphal branching was regulated by a change in the cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration, which was affected by the level of the intermediate metabolite Glc-1-P, in G. lucidum. Our findings indicate the existence of an interaction between carbon metabolism and Ca(2+) signaling in this fungus.

  10. Reducing AsA leads to leaf lesion and defence response in knock-down of the AsA biosynthetic enzyme GDP-D-mannose pyrophosphorylase gene in tomato plant.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chanjuan; Ouyang, Bo; Yang, Changxian; Zhang, Xiaohui; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Yuyang; Zhang, Junhong; Li, Hanxia; Ye, Zhibiao

    2013-01-01

    As a vital antioxidant, L-ascorbic acid (AsA) affects diverse biological processes in higher plants. Lack of AsA in cell impairs plant development. In the present study, we manipulated a gene of GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylase which catalyzes the conversion of D-mannose-1-P to GDP-D-mannose in AsA biosynthetic pathway and found out the phenotype alteration of tomato. In the tomato genome, there are four members of GMP gene family and they constitutively expressed in various tissues in distinct expression patterns. As expected, over-expression of SlGMP3 increased total AsA contents and enhanced the tolerance to oxidative stress in tomato. On the contrary, knock-down of SlGMP3 significantly decreased AsA contents below the threshold level and altered the phenotype of tomato plants with lesions and further senescence. Further analysis indicated the causes for this symptom could result from failing to instantly deplete the reactive oxygen species (ROS) as decline of free radical scavenging activity. More ROS accumulated in the leaves and then triggered expressions of defence-related genes and mimic symptom occurred on the leaves similar to hypersensitive responses against pathogens. Consequently, the photosynthesis of leaves was dramatically fallen. These results suggested the vital roles of AsA as an antioxidant in leaf function and defence response of tomato.

  11. Cloning and expression analysis of a UDP-galactose/glucose pyrophosphorylase from melon fruit provides evidence for the major metabolic pathway of galactose metabolism in raffinose oligosaccharide metabolizing plants.

    PubMed

    Dai, Nir; Petreikov, Marina; Portnoy, Vitaly; Katzir, Nurit; Pharr, David M; Schaffer, Arthur A

    2006-09-01

    The Cucurbitaceae translocate a significant portion of their photosynthate as raffinose and stachyose, which are galactosyl derivatives of sucrose. These are initially hydrolyzed by alpha-galactosidase to yield free galactose (Gal) and, accordingly, Gal metabolism is an important pathway in Cucurbitaceae sink tissue. We report here on a novel plant-specific enzyme responsible for the nucleotide activation of phosphorylated Gal and the subsequent entry of Gal into sink metabolism. The enzyme was antibody purified, sequenced, and the gene cloned and functionally expressed in Escherichia coli. The heterologous protein showed the characteristics of a dual substrate UDP-hexose pyrophosphorylase (PPase) with activity toward both Gal-1-P and glucose (Glc)-1-P in the uridinylation direction and their respective UDP-sugars in the reverse direction. The two other enzymes involved in Glc-P and Gal-P uridinylation are UDP-Glc PPase and uridyltransferase, and these were also cloned, heterologously expressed, and characterized. The gene expression and enzyme activities of all three enzymes in melon (Cucumis melo) fruit were measured. The UDP-Glc PPase was expressed in melon fruit to a similar extent as the novel enzyme, but the expressed protein was specific for Glc-1-P in the UDP-Glc synthesis direction and did not catalyze the nucleotide activation of Gal-1-P. The uridyltransferase gene was only weakly expressed in melon fruit, and activity was not observed in crude extracts. The results indicate that this novel enzyme carries out both the synthesis of UDP-Gal from Gal-1-P as well as the subsequent synthesis of Glc-1-P from the epimerase product, UDP-Glc, and thus plays a key role in melon fruit sink metabolism.

  12. Nitrate Acts as a Signal to Induce Organic Acid Metabolism and Repress Starch Metabolism in Tobacco.

    PubMed Central

    Scheible, W. R.; Gonzalez-Fontes, A.; Lauerer, M.; Muller-Rober, B.; Caboche, M.; Stitt, M.

    1997-01-01

    Nia30(145) transformants with very low nitrate reductase activity provide an in vivo screen to identify processes that are regulated by nitrate. Nia30(145) resembles nitrate-limited wild-type plants with respect to growth rate and protein and amino acid content but accumulates large amounts of nitrate when it is grown on high nitrate. The transcripts for nitrate reductase (NR), nitrite reductase, cytosolic glutamine synthetase, and glutamate synthase increased; NR and nitrite reductase activity increased in leaves and roots; and glutamine synthetase activity increased in roots. The transcripts for phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, cytosolic pyruvate kinase, citrate synthase, and NADP-isocitrate dehydrogenase increased; phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activity increased; and malate, citrate, isocitrate, and [alpha]-oxoglutarate accumulated in leaves and roots. There was a decrease of the ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase transcript and activity, and starch decreased in the leaves and roots. After adding 12 mM nitrate to nitrate-limited Nia30(145), the transcripts for NR and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase increased, and the transcripts for ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase decreased within 2 and 4 hr, respectively. Starch was remobilized at almost the same rate as in wild-type plants, even though growth was not stimulated in Nia30(145). It is proposed that nitrate acts as a signal to initiate coordinated changes in carbon and nitrogen metabolism. PMID:12237366

  13. The influence of altered gravity on carbohydrate metabolism in excised wheat leaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Obenland, D. M.; Brown, C. S.

    1994-01-01

    We developed a system to study the influence of altered gravity on carbohydrate metabolism in excised wheat leaves by means of clinorotation. The use of excised leaves in our clinostat studies offered a number of advantages over the use of whole plants, most important of which were minimization of exogenous mechanical stress and a greater amount of carbohydrate accumulation during the time of treatment. We found that horizontal clinorotation of excised wheat leaves resulted in significant reductions in the accumulation of fructose, sucrose, starch and fructan relative to control, vertically clinorotated leaves. Photosynthesis, dark respiration and the extractable activities of ADP glucose pyrophosphorylase (EC 2.7.7.27), sucrose phosphate synthase (EC 2.4.4.14), sucrose sucrose fructosyltransferase (EC 2.4.1.99), and fructan hydrolase (EC 3.2.1.80) were unchanged due to altered gravity treatment.

  14. Effects of grain development on formation of resistant starch in rice.

    PubMed

    Shu, Xiaoli; Sun, Jian; Wu, Dianxing

    2014-12-01

    Three rice mutants with different contents of resistant starch (RS) were selected to investigate the effects of grain filling process on the formation of resistant starch. During grain development, the content of RS was increased with grain maturation and showed negative correlations with the grain weight and the starch molecular weight (Mn, Mw) and a positive correlation with the distribution of molecular mass (polydispersity, Pd). The morphologies of starch granules in high-RS rice were almost uniform in single starch granules and exhibited different proliferation modes from common rice. The lower activities of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and starch branching enzyme and the higher activity of starch synthase and starch de-branching enzyme observed in high-RS rice might be responsible for the formation of small irregular starch granules with large spaces between them. In addition, the lower molecular weight and the broad distribution of molecular weights lead to differences in the physiochemical properties of starch.

  15. Post-anthesis alternate wetting and moderate soil drying enhances activities of key enzymes in sucrose-to-starch conversion in inferior spikelets of rice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hao; Li, Hongwei; Yuan, Liming; Wang, Zhiqin; Yang, Jianchang; Zhang, Jianhua

    2012-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that a post-anthesis moderate soil drying can improve grain filling through regulating the key enzymes in the sucrose-to-starch pathway in the grains of rice (Oryza sativa L.). Two rice cultivars were field grown and two irrigation regimes, alternate wetting and moderate soil drying (WMD) and conventional irrigation (CI, continuously flooded), were imposed during the grain-filling period. The grain-filling rate and activities of four key enzymes in sucrose-to-starch conversion, sucrose synthase (SuSase), adenosine diphosphate-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase), starch synthase (StSase), and starch branching enzyme (SBE), showed no significant difference between WMD and CI regimes for the earlier flowering superior spikelets. However, they were significantly enhanced by the WMD for the later flowering inferior spikelets. The activities of both soluble and insoluble acid invertase in the grains were little affected by the WMD. The two cultivars showed the same tendencies. The activities of SuSase, AGPase, StSase, and SBE in grains were very significantly correlated with the grain-filling rate. The abscisic acid (ABA) concentration in inferior spikelets was remarkably increased in the WMD and very significantly correlated with activities of SuSase, AGPase, StSase, and SBE. Application of ABA on plants under CI produced similar results to those seen in plants receiving WMD. Applying fluridone, an indirect inhibitor of ABA synthesis, produced the opposite effect. The results suggest that post-anthesis WMD could enhance sink strength by regulating the key enzymes involved, and consequently, increase the grain-filling rate and grain weight of inferior spikelets. ABA plays an important role in this process.

  16. Metabolic analysis of kiwifruit (Actinidia deliciosa) berries from extreme genotypes reveals hallmarks for fruit starch metabolism.

    PubMed

    Nardozza, Simona; Boldingh, Helen L; Osorio, Sonia; Höhne, Melanie; Wohlers, Mark; Gleave, Andrew P; MacRae, Elspeth A; Richardson, Annette C; Atkinson, Ross G; Sulpice, Ronan; Fernie, Alisdair R; Clearwater, Michael J

    2013-11-01

    Tomato, melon, grape, peach, and strawberry primarily accumulate soluble sugars during fruit development. In contrast, kiwifruit (Actinidia Lindl. spp.) and banana store a large amount of starch that is released as soluble sugars only after the fruit has reached maturity. By integrating metabolites measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, enzyme activities measured by a robot-based platform, and transcript data sets during fruit development of Actinidia deliciosa genotypes contrasting in starch concentration and size, this study identified the metabolic changes occurring during kiwifruit development, including the metabolic hallmarks of starch accumulation and turnover. At cell division, a rise in glucose (Glc) concentration was associated with neutral invertase (NI) activity, and the decline of both Glc and NI activity defined the transition to the cell expansion and starch accumulation phase. The high transcript levels of β-amylase 9 (BAM9) during cell division, prior to net starch accumulation, and the correlation between sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS) activity and sucrose suggest the occurrence of sucrose cycling and starch turnover. ADP-Glc pyrophosphorylase (AGPase) is identified as a key enzyme for starch accumulation in kiwifruit berries, as high-starch genotypes had 2- to 5-fold higher AGPase activity, which was maintained over a longer period of time and was also associated with enhanced and extended transcription of the AGPase large subunit 4 (APL4). The data also revealed that SPS and galactinol might affect kiwifruit starch accumulation, and suggest that phloem unloading into kiwifruit is symplastic. These results are relevant to the genetic improvement of quality traits such as sweetness and sugar/acid balance in a range of fruit species.

  17. Influence of crop load on the expression patterns of starch metabolism genes in alternate-bearing citrus trees.

    PubMed

    Nebauer, Sergio G; Renau-Morata, Begoña; Lluch, Yolanda; Baroja-Fernández, Edurne; Pozueta-Romero, Javier; Molina, Rosa-Victoria

    2014-07-01

    The fruit is the main sink organ in Citrus and captures almost all available photoassimilates during its development. Consequently, carbohydrate partitioning and starch content depend on the crop load of Citrus trees. Nevertheless, little is known about the mechanisms controlling the starch metabolism at the tree level in relation to presence of fruit. The aim of this study was to find the relation between the seasonal variation of expression and activity of the genes involved in carbon metabolism and the partition and allocation of carbohydrates in 'Salustiana' sweet orange trees with different crop loads. Metabolisable carbohydrates, and the expression and activity of the enzymes involved in sucrose and starch metabolism, including sucrose transport, were determined during the year in the roots and leaves of 40-year-old trees bearing heavy crop loads ('on' trees) and trees with almost no fruits ('off' trees). Fruit altered photoassimilate partitioning in trees. Sucrose content tended to be constant in roots and leaves, and surplus fixed carbon is channeled to starch production. Differences between 'on' and 'off' trees in starch content can be explained by differences in ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPP) expression/activity and α-amylase activity which varies depending on crop load. The observed relation of AGPP and UGPP (UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase) is noteworthy and indicates a direct link between sucrose and starch synthesis. Furthermore, different roles for sucrose transporter SUT1 and SUT2 have been proposed. Variation in soluble sugars content cannot explain the differences in gene expression between the 'on' and 'off' trees. A still unknown signal from fruit should be responsible for this control.

  18. Influence of crop load on the expression patterns of starch metabolism genes in alternate-bearing citrus trees.

    PubMed

    Nebauer, Sergio G; Renau-Morata, Begoña; Lluch, Yolanda; Baroja-Fernández, Edurne; Pozueta-Romero, Javier; Molina, Rosa-Victoria

    2014-07-01

    The fruit is the main sink organ in Citrus and captures almost all available photoassimilates during its development. Consequently, carbohydrate partitioning and starch content depend on the crop load of Citrus trees. Nevertheless, little is known about the mechanisms controlling the starch metabolism at the tree level in relation to presence of fruit. The aim of this study was to find the relation between the seasonal variation of expression and activity of the genes involved in carbon metabolism and the partition and allocation of carbohydrates in 'Salustiana' sweet orange trees with different crop loads. Metabolisable carbohydrates, and the expression and activity of the enzymes involved in sucrose and starch metabolism, including sucrose transport, were determined during the year in the roots and leaves of 40-year-old trees bearing heavy crop loads ('on' trees) and trees with almost no fruits ('off' trees). Fruit altered photoassimilate partitioning in trees. Sucrose content tended to be constant in roots and leaves, and surplus fixed carbon is channeled to starch production. Differences between 'on' and 'off' trees in starch content can be explained by differences in ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPP) expression/activity and α-amylase activity which varies depending on crop load. The observed relation of AGPP and UGPP (UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase) is noteworthy and indicates a direct link between sucrose and starch synthesis. Furthermore, different roles for sucrose transporter SUT1 and SUT2 have been proposed. Variation in soluble sugars content cannot explain the differences in gene expression between the 'on' and 'off' trees. A still unknown signal from fruit should be responsible for this control. PMID:24747724

  19. Structure, function and regulation of the enzymes in the starch biosynthetic pathway.

    SciTech Connect

    Geiger, Jim

    2013-11-30

    structure of ADP- Glucose pyrophosphorylase from potato in its inhibited conformation, and bound to both ATP and ADP-glucose. In addition, we have determined the first structure of glycogen synthase in its "closed", catalytically active conformation bound to ADP-glucose. We also determined the structure of glycogen synthase bound to malto-oligosaccharides, showing for the first time that an enzyme in the starch biosynthetic pathway recognizes glucans not just in its active site but on binding sites on the surface of the enzyme ten’s of Angstroms from the active site. In addition our structure of a glycogen branching enzyme bound to malto-oligosaccharides identified seven distinct binding sites distributed about the surface of the enzyme. We will now determine the function of these sites to get a molecular-level picture of exactly how these enzymes interact with their polymeric substrates and confer specificity leading to the complex structure of the starch granule. We will extend our studies to other isoforms of the enzymes, to understand how their structures give rise to their distinct function. Our goal is to understand what accounts for the various functional differences between SS and SBE isoforms at a molecular level.

  20. Malate plays a crucial role in starch metabolism, ripening, and soluble solid content of tomato fruit and affects postharvest softening.

    PubMed

    Centeno, Danilo C; Osorio, Sonia; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Bertolo, Ana L F; Carneiro, Raphael T; Araújo, Wagner L; Steinhauser, Marie-Caroline; Michalska, Justyna; Rohrmann, Johannes; Geigenberger, Peter; Oliver, Sandra N; Stitt, Mark; Carrari, Fernando; Rose, Jocelyn K C; Fernie, Alisdair R

    2011-01-01

    Despite the fact that the organic acid content of a fruit is regarded as one of its most commercially important quality traits when assessed by the consumer, relatively little is known concerning the physiological importance of organic acid metabolism for the fruit itself. Here, we evaluate the effect of modifying malate metabolism in a fruit-specific manner, by reduction of the activities of either mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase or fumarase, via targeted antisense approaches in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). While these genetic perturbations had relatively little effect on the total fruit yield, they had dramatic consequences for fruit metabolism, as well as unanticipated changes in postharvest shelf life and susceptibility to bacterial infection. Detailed characterization suggested that the rate of ripening was essentially unaltered but that lines containing higher malate were characterized by lower levels of transitory starch and a lower soluble sugars content at harvest, whereas those with lower malate contained higher levels of these carbohydrates. Analysis of the activation state of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase revealed that it correlated with the accumulation of transitory starch. Taken together with the altered activation state of the plastidial malate dehydrogenase and the modified pigment biosynthesis of the transgenic lines, these results suggest that the phenotypes are due to an altered cellular redox status. The combined data reveal the importance of malate metabolism in tomato fruit metabolism and development and confirm the importance of transitory starch in the determination of agronomic yield in this species.

  1. Deletion of chloroplast NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase results in inability to regulate starch synthesis and causes stunted growth under short-day photoperiods.

    PubMed

    Lepistö, Anna; Pakula, Eveliina; Toivola, Jouni; Krieger-Liszkay, Anja; Vignols, Florence; Rintamäki, Eevi

    2013-09-01

    Plastid-localized NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase C (NTRC) is a unique NTR enzyme containing both reductase and thioredoxin domains in a single polypeptide. Arabidopsis thaliana NTRC knockout lines (ntrc) show retarded growth, especially under short-day (SD) photoperiods. This study identified chloroplast processes that accounted for growth reduction in SD-acclimated ntrc. The strongest reduction in ntrc growth occurred under photoperiods with nights longer than 14 h, whereas knockout of the NTRC gene did not alter the circadian-clock-controlled growth of Arabidopsis. Lack of NTRC modulated chloroplast reactive oxygen species (ROS) metabolism, but oxidative stress was not the primary cause of retarded growth of SD-acclimated ntrc. Scarcity of starch accumulation made ntrc leaves particularly vulnerable to photoperiods with long nights. Direct interaction of NTRC and ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, a key enzyme in starch synthesis, was confirmed by yeast two-hybrid analysis. The ntrc line was not able to maximize starch synthesis during the light period, which was particularly detrimental under SD conditions. Acclimation of Arabidopsis to SD conditions also involved an inductive rise of ROS production in illuminated chloroplasts that was not counterbalanced by the activation of plastidial anti-oxidative systems. It is proposed that knockout of NTRC challenges redox regulation of starch synthesis, resulting in stunted growth of the mutant lines acclimated to the SD photoperiod.

  2. Surrogate biochemistry: use of Escherichia coli to identify plant cDNAs that impact metabolic engineering of carotenoid accumulation.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, C E; Cervantes-Cervantes, M; Wurtzel, E T

    2003-02-01

    Carotenoids synthesized in plants but not animals are essential for human nutrition. Therefore, ongoing efforts to metabolically engineer plants for improved carotenoid content benefit from the identification of genes that affect carotenoid accumulation, possibly highlighting potential challenges when pyramiding traits represented by multiple biosynthetic pathways. We employed a heterologous bacterial system to screen for maize cDNAs encoding products that alter carotenoid accumulation either positively or negatively. Genes encoding carotenoid biosynthetic enzymes from the bacterium Erwinia uredovora were introduced into Escherichia coli cells that were subsequently transfected with a maize endosperm cDNA expression library; and these doubly transformed cells were then screened for altered carotenoid accumulation. DNA sequencing and characterization of one cDNA class conferring increased carotenoid content led to the identification of maize cDNAs encoding isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase. A cDNA that caused a reduced carotenoid content in E. coli was also identified. Based on DNA sequence analysis, DNA hybridization, and further functional testing, this latter cDNA was found to encode the small subunit of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, a rate-controlling enzyme in starch biosynthesis that has been of interest for enhancing plant starch content.

  3. Space Experiment on Tuber Development and Starch Accumulation for CELSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tibbitts,Theodore W.; Croxdale, Judith C.; Brown, Christopher S.

    1997-01-01

    Potato explants (leaf, small stem section, and axillary bud), flown on STS-73, developed tubers of 1.5 cm diameter and 1.7 g mass during the 16 day period of spaceflight. The experiment was undertaken in the ASTROCULTURE(Trademark) experiment package under controlled temperature, humidity, lighting, and carbon dioxide concentrations. The tubers formed in the explant system under microgravity had the same gross morphology, the same anatomical configuration of cells and tissues, and the same sizes, shapes, and surface character of starch granules as tubers formed in a 1 g environment. The total accumulation of starch and other energy containing compounds was singular in space flight and ground control tubers. Enzyme activity of starch synthase, starch phosphorylase, and total hydrolase was similar in spaceflight and ground controls but activity of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase was reduced in the spaceflight tuber tissue. This experiment documented that potatoes will metabolize and accumulate starch as effectively in spaceflight as on the ground and thus this data provides the potential for effective utilization of potatoes in life support systems of space bases.

  4. Enzymes of glycolytic and pentose phosphate pathways in cytosolic and leucoplastic fractions of developing seeds of Brassica campestris.

    PubMed

    Gupta, R; Singh, R

    1997-06-01

    Distribution of the enzymes of glycolytic and pentose phosphate pathways were studied in cytosolic and leucoplastic fractions of the developing seeds of Brassica. Leucoplasts were isolated using a discontinuous percoll gradient. Intactness of leucoplasts was checked by ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase assay in presence and absence of triton X-100. No contamination by microbodies, mitochondria and cytosol was observed as assessed by measuring the activities of marker enzymes. The recovery, latency and specific activity of each enzyme in different fractions were compared. The leucoplastic fraction contained complete set of the enzymes of glycolytic and pentose phosphate pathways, indicating that the two subcellular compartments metabolize carbon independently by these pathways. However, the enzymes showed higher activities in cytosolic fraction as compared to those in the leucoplasts, suggesting the need for exchange of metabolites in the two compartments through various translocators, for acting in cooperation to produce energy, reducing power and carbon skeletons for different biosynthetic activities in the non-photosynthetic plastids. Based on these compartmentation studies, a model for carbon flow for fatty acid synthesis in leucoplasts of developing Brassica seeds has been proposed. PMID:9425748

  5. Thioredoxin f1 and NADPH-Dependent Thioredoxin Reductase C Have Overlapping Functions in Regulating Photosynthetic Metabolism and Plant Growth in Response to Varying Light Conditions.

    PubMed

    Thormählen, Ina; Meitzel, Tobias; Groysman, Julia; Öchsner, Alexandra Bianca; von Roepenack-Lahaye, Edda; Naranjo, Belén; Cejudo, Francisco J; Geigenberger, Peter

    2015-11-01

    Two different thiol redox systems exist in plant chloroplasts, the ferredoxin-thioredoxin (Trx) system, which depends on ferredoxin reduced by the photosynthetic electron transport chain and, thus, on light, and the NADPH-dependent Trx reductase C (NTRC) system, which relies on NADPH and thus may be linked to sugar metabolism in the dark. Previous studies suggested, therefore, that the two different systems may have different functions in plants. We now report that there is a previously unrecognized functional redundancy of Trx f1 and NTRC in regulating photosynthetic metabolism and growth. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants, combined, but not single, deficiencies of Trx f1 and NTRC led to severe growth inhibition and perturbed light acclimation, accompanied by strong impairments of Calvin-Benson cycle activity and starch accumulation. Light activation of key enzymes of these pathways, fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, was almost completely abolished. The subsequent increase in NADPH-NADP(+) and ATP-ADP ratios led to increased nitrogen assimilation, NADP-malate dehydrogenase activation, and light vulnerability of photosystem I core proteins. In an additional approach, reporter studies show that Trx f1 and NTRC proteins are both colocalized in the same chloroplast substructure. Results provide genetic evidence that light- and NADPH-dependent thiol redox systems interact at the level of Trx f1 and NTRC to coordinately participate in the regulation of the Calvin-Benson cycle, starch metabolism, and growth in response to varying light conditions.

  6. Thioredoxin f1 and NADPH-Dependent Thioredoxin Reductase C Have Overlapping Functions in Regulating Photosynthetic Metabolism and Plant Growth in Response to Varying Light Conditions1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Thormählen, Ina; Meitzel, Tobias; Groysman, Julia; Öchsner, Alexandra Bianca; von Roepenack-Lahaye, Edda; Naranjo, Belén; Cejudo, Francisco J.; Geigenberger, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Two different thiol redox systems exist in plant chloroplasts, the ferredoxin-thioredoxin (Trx) system, which depends on ferredoxin reduced by the photosynthetic electron transport chain and, thus, on light, and the NADPH-dependent Trx reductase C (NTRC) system, which relies on NADPH and thus may be linked to sugar metabolism in the dark. Previous studies suggested, therefore, that the two different systems may have different functions in plants. We now report that there is a previously unrecognized functional redundancy of Trx f1 and NTRC in regulating photosynthetic metabolism and growth. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants, combined, but not single, deficiencies of Trx f1 and NTRC led to severe growth inhibition and perturbed light acclimation, accompanied by strong impairments of Calvin-Benson cycle activity and starch accumulation. Light activation of key enzymes of these pathways, fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, was almost completely abolished. The subsequent increase in NADPH-NADP+ and ATP-ADP ratios led to increased nitrogen assimilation, NADP-malate dehydrogenase activation, and light vulnerability of photosystem I core proteins. In an additional approach, reporter studies show that Trx f1 and NTRC proteins are both colocalized in the same chloroplast substructure. Results provide genetic evidence that light- and NADPH-dependent thiol redox systems interact at the level of Trx f1 and NTRC to coordinately participate in the regulation of the Calvin-Benson cycle, starch metabolism, and growth in response to varying light conditions. PMID:26338951

  7. SALT-RESPONSIVE ERF1 is a negative regulator of grain filling and gibberellin-mediated seedling establishment in rice.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Romy; Schippers, Jos H M; Mieulet, Delphine; Watanabe, Mutsumi; Hoefgen, Rainer; Guiderdoni, Emmanuel; Mueller-Roeber, Bernd

    2014-02-01

    Grain quality is an important agricultural trait that is mainly determined by grain size and composition. Here, we characterize the role of the rice transcription factor (TF) SALT-RESPONSIVE ERF1 (SERF1) during grain development. Through genome-wide expression profiling and chromatin immunoprecipitation, we found that SERF1 directly regulates RICE PROLAMIN-BOX BINDING FACTOR (RPBF), a TF that functions as a positive regulator of grain filling. Loss of SERF1 enhances RPBF expression resulting in larger grains with increased starch content, while SERF1 overexpression represses RPBF resulting in smaller grains. Consistently, during grain filling, starch biosynthesis genes such as GRANULE-BOUND STARCH SYNTHASEI (GBSSI), STARCH SYNTHASEI (SSI), SSIIIa, and ADP-GLUCOSE PYROPHOSPHORYLASE LARGE SUBUNIT2 (AGPL2) are up-regulated in SERF1 knockout grains. Moreover, SERF1 is a direct upstream regulator of GBSSI. In addition, SERF1 negatively regulates germination by controlling RPBF expression, which mediates the gibberellic acid (GA)-induced expression of RICE AMYLASE1A (RAmy1A). Loss of SERF1 results in more rapid seedling establishment, while SERF1 overexpression has the opposite effect. Our study reveals that SERF1 represents a negative regulator of grain filling and seedling establishment by timing the expression of RPBF. PMID:24046061

  8. Glucose and ethylene signalling pathways converge to regulate trans-differentiation of epidermal transfer cells in Vicia narbonensis cotyledons.

    PubMed

    Andriunas, Felicity A; Zhang, Hui-Ming; Weber, Hans; McCurdy, David W; Offler, Christina E; Patrick, John W

    2011-12-01

    Transfer cells are specialized transport cells containing invaginated wall ingrowths that provide an amplified plasma membrane surface area with high densities of transporter proteins. They trans-differentiate from differentiated cells at sites where enhanced rates of nutrient transport occur across apo/symplasmic boundaries. Despite their physiological importance, the signal(s) and signalling cascades responsible for initiating their trans-differentiation are poorly understood. In culture, adaxial epidermal cells of Vicia narbonensis cotyledons were induced to trans-differentiate to a transfer cell morphology. Manipulating their intracellular glucose concentrations by transgenic knock-down of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase expression and/or culture on a high-glucose medium demonstrated that glucose functioned as a negative regulator of wall ingrowth induction. In contrast, glucose had no detectable effect on wall ingrowth morphology. The effect on wall ingrowth induction of culture on media containing glucose analogues suggested that glucose acts through a hexokinase-dependent signalling pathway. Elevation of an epidermal cell-specific ethylene signal alone, or in combination with glucose analogues, countered the negative effect of glucose on wall ingrowth induction. Glucose modulated the amplitude of ethylene-stimulated wall ingrowth induction by down-regulating the expression of ethylene biosynthetic genes and an ethylene insensitive 3 (EIN3)-like gene (EIL) encoding a key transcription factor in the ethylene signalling cascade. A model is presented describing the interaction between glucose and ethylene signalling pathways regulating the induction of wall ingrowth formation in adaxial epidermal cells.

  9. Effects of microgravity and clinorotation on stress ethylene production in two starchless mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gallegos, Gregory L.; Hilaire, Emmanuel M.; Peterson, Barbara V.; Brown, Christopher S.; Guikema, James A.

    1995-01-01

    Starch filled plastids termed amyloplasts, contained within columella cells of the root caps of higher plant roots, are believed to play a statolith-like role in the gravitropic response of roots. Plants having amyloplasts containing less starch exhibit a corresponding reduction in gravitropic response. We have observed enhanced ethylene production by sweet clover (Melilotus alba L.) seedlings grown in the altered gravity condition of a slow rotating clinostat, and have suggested that this is a stress response resulting from continuous gravistimulation rather than as a result of the simulation of a microgravity condition. If so, we expect that plants deficient in starch accumulation in amyloplasts may produce less stress ethylene when grown on a clinostat. Therefore, we have grown Arabidopsis thaliana in the small, closed environment of the Fluid Processing Apparatus (FPA). In this preliminary report we compare stationary plants with clinorotated and those grown in microgravity aboard Discovery during the STS-63 flight in February 1995. In addition to wildtype, two mutants deficient in starch biosynthesis, mutants TC7 and TL25, which are, respectively, deficient in the activity of amyloplast phosphoglucomutase and ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, were grown for three days before being fixed within the FPA. Gas samples were aspirated from the growth chambers and carbon dioxide and ethylene concentations were measured using a gas chromatograph. The fixed tissue is currently undergoing further morphologic and microscopic characterization.

  10. Malate Plays a Crucial Role in Starch Metabolism, Ripening, and Soluble Solid Content of Tomato Fruit and Affects Postharvest Softening[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Centeno, Danilo C.; Osorio, Sonia; Nunes-Nesi, Adriano; Bertolo, Ana L.F.; Carneiro, Raphael T.; Araújo, Wagner L.; Steinhauser, Marie-Caroline; Michalska, Justyna; Rohrmann, Johannes; Geigenberger, Peter; Oliver, Sandra N.; Stitt, Mark; Carrari, Fernando; Rose, Jocelyn K.C.; Fernie, Alisdair R.

    2011-01-01

    Despite the fact that the organic acid content of a fruit is regarded as one of its most commercially important quality traits when assessed by the consumer, relatively little is known concerning the physiological importance of organic acid metabolism for the fruit itself. Here, we evaluate the effect of modifying malate metabolism in a fruit-specific manner, by reduction of the activities of either mitochondrial malate dehydrogenase or fumarase, via targeted antisense approaches in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). While these genetic perturbations had relatively little effect on the total fruit yield, they had dramatic consequences for fruit metabolism, as well as unanticipated changes in postharvest shelf life and susceptibility to bacterial infection. Detailed characterization suggested that the rate of ripening was essentially unaltered but that lines containing higher malate were characterized by lower levels of transitory starch and a lower soluble sugars content at harvest, whereas those with lower malate contained higher levels of these carbohydrates. Analysis of the activation state of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase revealed that it correlated with the accumulation of transitory starch. Taken together with the altered activation state of the plastidial malate dehydrogenase and the modified pigment biosynthesis of the transgenic lines, these results suggest that the phenotypes are due to an altered cellular redox status. The combined data reveal the importance of malate metabolism in tomato fruit metabolism and development and confirm the importance of transitory starch in the determination of agronomic yield in this species. PMID:21239646

  11. Two negative cis-regulatory regions involved in fruit-specific promoter activity from watermelon (Citrullus vulgaris S.).

    PubMed

    Yin, Tao; Wu, Hanying; Zhang, Shanglong; Lu, Hongyu; Zhang, Lingxiao; Xu, Yong; Chen, Daming; Liu, Jingmei

    2009-01-01

    A 1.8 kb 5'-flanking region of the large subunit of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, isolated from watermelon (Citrullus vulgaris S.), has fruit-specific promoter activity in transgenic tomato plants. Two negative regulatory regions, from -986 to -959 and from -472 to -424, were identified in this promoter region by fine deletion analyses. Removal of both regions led to constitutive expression in epidermal cells. Gain-of-function experiments showed that these two regions were sufficient to inhibit RFP (red fluorescent protein) expression in transformed epidermal cells when fused to the cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S minimal promoter. Gel mobility shift experiments demonstrated the presence of leaf nuclear factors that interact with these two elements. A TCCAAAA motif was identified in these two regions, as well as one in the reverse orientation, which was confirmed to be a novel specific cis-element. A quantitative beta-glucuronidase (GUS) activity assay of stable transgenic tomato plants showed that the activities of chimeric promoters harbouring only one of the two cis-elements, or both, were approximately 10-fold higher in fruits than in leaves. These data confirm that the TCCAAAA motif functions as a fruit-specific element by inhibiting gene expression in leaves.

  12. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Two Barley Cultivars (Hordeum vulgare L.) with Contrasting Grain Protein Content

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Baojian; Luan, Haiye; Lin, Shen; Lv, Chao; Zhang, Xinzhong; Xu, Rugen

    2016-01-01

    Grain protein contents (GPCs) of barley seeds are significantly different between feed and malting barley cultivars. However, there is still no insight into the proteomic analysis of seed proteins between feed and malting barley cultivars. Also, the genetic control of barley GPC is still unclear. GPCs were measured between mature grains of Yangsimai 3 and Naso Nijo. A proteome profiling of differentially expressed protein was established by using a combination of 2-DE and tandem mass spectrometry. In total, 502 reproducible protein spots in barley seed proteome were detected with a pH range of 4–7 and 6–11, among these 41 protein spots (8.17%) were detected differentially expressed between Yangsimai 3 and Naso Nijo. Thirty-four protein spots corresponding to 23 different proteins were identified, which were grouped into eight categories, including stress, protein degradation and post-translational modification, development, cell, signaling, glycolysis, starch metabolism, and other functions. Among the identified proteins, enolase (spot 274) and small subunit of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (spot 271) are exclusively expressed in barley Yangsimai 3, which may be involved in regulating seed protein expression. In addition, malting quality is characterized by an accumulation of serpin protein, Alpha-amylase/trypsin inhibitor CMb and Alpha-amylase inhibitor BDAI-1. Most noticeably, globulin, an important storage protein in barley seed, undergoes post-translational processing in both cultivars, and also displays different expression patterns. PMID:27200019

  13. Simultaneous boosting of source and sink capacities doubles tuber starch yield of potato plants.

    PubMed

    Jonik, Claudia; Sonnewald, Uwe; Hajirezaei, Mohammad-Reza; Flügge, Ulf-Ingo; Ludewig, Frank

    2012-12-01

    An important goal in biotechnological research is to improve the yield of crop plants. Here, we genetically modified simultaneously source and sink capacities in potato (Solanum tuberosum cv. Desirée) plants to improve starch yield. Source capacity was increased by mesophyll-specific overexpression of a pyrophosphatase or, alternatively, by antisense expression of the ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase in leaves. Both approaches make use of re-routing photoassimilates to sink organs at the expense of leaf starch accumulation. Simultaneous increase in sink capacity was accomplished by overexpression of two plastidic metabolite translocators, that is, a glucose 6-phosphate/phosphate translocator and an adenylate translocator in tubers. Employing such a 'pull' approach, we have previously shown that potato starch content and yield can be increased when sink strength is elevated. In the current biotechnological approach, we successfully enhanced source and sink capacities by a combination of 'pull' and 'push' approaches using two different attempts. A doubling in tuber starch yield was achieved. This successful approach might be transferable to other crop plants in the future.

  14. Redox regulation of glycogen biosynthesis in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803: analysis of the AGP and glycogen synthases.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Troya, Sandra; López-Maury, Luis; Sánchez-Riego, Ana María; Roldán, Miguel; Florencio, Francisco J

    2014-01-01

    Glycogen constitutes the major carbon storage source in cyanobacteria, as starch in algae and higher plants. Glycogen and starch synthesis is linked to active photosynthesis and both of them are degraded to glucose in the dark to maintain cell metabolism. Control of glycogen biosynthesis in cyanobacteria could be mediated by the regulation of the enzymes involved in this process, ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGP) and glycogen synthase, which were identified as putative thioredoxin targets. We have analyzed whether both enzymes were subjected to redox modification using purified recombinant enzymes or cell extracts in the model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Our results indicate that both AGP and glycogen synthases are sensitive to copper oxidation. However, only AGP exhibits a decrease in its enzymatic activity, which is recovered after reduction by DTT or reduced thioredoxin (TrxA), suggesting a redox control of AGP. In order to elucidate the role in redox control of the cysteine residues present on the AGP sequence (C45, C185, C320, and C337), they were replaced with serine. All AGP mutant proteins remained active when expressed in Synechocystis, although they showed different electrophoretic mobility profiles after copper oxidation, reflecting a complex pattern of cysteines interaction.

  15. Comparative Proteomic Analysis of Two Barley Cultivars (Hordeum vulgare L.) with Contrasting Grain Protein Content.

    PubMed

    Guo, Baojian; Luan, Haiye; Lin, Shen; Lv, Chao; Zhang, Xinzhong; Xu, Rugen

    2016-01-01

    Grain protein contents (GPCs) of barley seeds are significantly different between feed and malting barley cultivars. However, there is still no insight into the proteomic analysis of seed proteins between feed and malting barley cultivars. Also, the genetic control of barley GPC is still unclear. GPCs were measured between mature grains of Yangsimai 3 and Naso Nijo. A proteome profiling of differentially expressed protein was established by using a combination of 2-DE and tandem mass spectrometry. In total, 502 reproducible protein spots in barley seed proteome were detected with a pH range of 4-7 and 6-11, among these 41 protein spots (8.17%) were detected differentially expressed between Yangsimai 3 and Naso Nijo. Thirty-four protein spots corresponding to 23 different proteins were identified, which were grouped into eight categories, including stress, protein degradation and post-translational modification, development, cell, signaling, glycolysis, starch metabolism, and other functions. Among the identified proteins, enolase (spot 274) and small subunit of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (spot 271) are exclusively expressed in barley Yangsimai 3, which may be involved in regulating seed protein expression. In addition, malting quality is characterized by an accumulation of serpin protein, Alpha-amylase/trypsin inhibitor CMb and Alpha-amylase inhibitor BDAI-1. Most noticeably, globulin, an important storage protein in barley seed, undergoes post-translational processing in both cultivars, and also displays different expression patterns.

  16. Alteration of the interconversion of pyruvate and malate in the plastid or cytosol of ripening tomato fruit invokes diverse consequences on sugar but similar effects on cellular organic acid, metabolism, and transitory starch accumulation.

    PubMed

    Osorio, Sonia; Vallarino, José G; Szecowka, Marek; Ufaz, Shai; Tzin, Vered; Angelovici, Ruthie; Galili, Gad; Fernie, Alisdair R

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the effect of decreased cytosolic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and plastidic NADP-dependent malic enzyme (ME) on tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) ripening. Transgenic tomato plants with strongly reduced levels of PEPCK and plastidic NADP-ME were generated by RNA interference gene silencing under the control of a ripening-specific E8 promoter. While these genetic modifications had relatively little effect on the total fruit yield and size, they had strong effects on fruit metabolism. Both transformants were characterized by lower levels of starch at breaker stage. Analysis of the activation state of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase correlated with the decrease of starch in both transformants, which suggests that it is due to an altered cellular redox status. Moreover, metabolic profiling and feeding experiments involving positionally labeled glucoses of fruits lacking in plastidic NADP-ME and cytosolic PEPCK activities revealed differential changes in overall respiration rates and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle flux. Inactivation of cytosolic PEPCK affected the respiration rate, which suggests that an excess of oxaloacetate is converted to aspartate and reintroduced in the TCA cycle via 2-oxoglutarate/glutamate. On the other hand, the plastidic NADP-ME antisense lines were characterized by no changes in respiration rates and TCA cycle flux, which together with increases of pyruvate kinase and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase activities indicate that pyruvate is supplied through these enzymes to the TCA cycle. These results are discussed in the context of current models of the importance of malate during tomato fruit ripening.

  17. Metabolic Consequences of Infection of Grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) cv. "Modra frankinja" with Flavescence Dorée Phytoplasma.

    PubMed

    Prezelj, Nina; Covington, Elizabeth; Roitsch, Thomas; Gruden, Kristina; Fragner, Lena; Weckwerth, Wolfram; Chersicola, Marko; Vodopivec, Maja; Dermastia, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Flavescence dorée, caused by the quarantine phytoplasma FDp, represents the most devastating of the grapevine yellows diseases in Europe. In an integrated study we have explored the FDp-grapevine interaction in infected grapevines of cv. "Modra frankinja" under natural conditions in the vineyard. In FDp-infected leaf vein-enriched tissues, the seasonal transcriptional profiles of 14 genes selected from various metabolic pathways showed an FDp-specific plant response compared to other grapevine yellows and uncovered a new association of the SWEET17a vacuolar transporter of fructose with pathogens. Non-targeted metabolome analysis from leaf vein-enriched tissues identified 22 significantly changed compounds with increased levels during infection. Several metabolites corroborated the gene expression study. Detailed investigation of the dynamics of carbohydrate metabolism revealed significant accumulation of sucrose and starch in the mesophyll of FDp-infected leaves, as well as significant up-regulation of genes involved in their biosynthesis. In addition, infected leaves had high activities of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and, more significantly, sucrose synthase. The data support the conclusion that FDp infection inhibits phloem transport, resulting in accumulation of carbohydrates and secondary metabolites that provoke a source-sink transition and defense response status. PMID:27242887

  18. Experiment 9: ASTROCULTURE: Growth and Starch Accumulation of Potato Tuber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tibbitts, Theodore W.; Brown, Christopher S.; Croxdale, Judith G.; Wheeler, Raymond M.

    1998-01-01

    Potato explants (leaf, small stem section, and axillary bud) flown on STS-73 developed tubers of 1.5 cm diameter and 1.7 g mass during the 16-day period of space flight. The experiment was undertaken in the ASTROCULTURE(TM) experiment package under controlled temperature, humidity, lighting, and carbon dioxide concentrations. The tubers that formed in the explant system under microgravity had the same gross morphology, the same anatomical configuration of cells and tissues, and the same sizes, shapes, and surface character of starch granules as tubers formed in a 1 g environment. The total accumulation of starch and other energy containing compounds was similar in space flight and ground control tubers. Enzyme activity of starch synthase, starch phosphorylase, and total hydrolase was similar in space flight and ground controls, but activity of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase was reduced in the space flight tuber tissue. This experiment documented that potatoes will metabolize and accumulate starch as effectively in space flight as on the ground. Thus, this data provides the potential for effective utilization of potatoes in life support systems of space bases.

  19. Simultaneous boosting of source and sink capacities doubles tuber starch yield of potato plants.

    PubMed

    Jonik, Claudia; Sonnewald, Uwe; Hajirezaei, Mohammad-Reza; Flügge, Ulf-Ingo; Ludewig, Frank

    2012-12-01

    An important goal in biotechnological research is to improve the yield of crop plants. Here, we genetically modified simultaneously source and sink capacities in potato (Solanum tuberosum cv. Desirée) plants to improve starch yield. Source capacity was increased by mesophyll-specific overexpression of a pyrophosphatase or, alternatively, by antisense expression of the ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase in leaves. Both approaches make use of re-routing photoassimilates to sink organs at the expense of leaf starch accumulation. Simultaneous increase in sink capacity was accomplished by overexpression of two plastidic metabolite translocators, that is, a glucose 6-phosphate/phosphate translocator and an adenylate translocator in tubers. Employing such a 'pull' approach, we have previously shown that potato starch content and yield can be increased when sink strength is elevated. In the current biotechnological approach, we successfully enhanced source and sink capacities by a combination of 'pull' and 'push' approaches using two different attempts. A doubling in tuber starch yield was achieved. This successful approach might be transferable to other crop plants in the future. PMID:22931170

  20. Use of an osmotically sensitive mutant of Propionibacterium freudenreichii subspp. shermanii for the simultaneous productions of organic acids and trehalose from biodiesel waste based crude glycerol.

    PubMed

    Ruhal, Rohit; Choudhury, Bijan

    2012-04-01

    Recently suitability of crude glycerol for trehalose and propionic acid productions was reported using Propionibacterium freudenreichii subspp. shermanii and it was concluded that presence of KCl in crude glycerol was the probable reason for higher trehalose accumulation with crude glycerol medium. To further improve trehalose production, an osmotic sensitive mutant of this strain (non-viable in medium with 3% NaCl) with higher trehalose yield was isolated. In mutant, trehalose yields achieved with respect to biomass and substrate consumed (391 mg/g of biomass, 90 mg/g of substrate consumed) were three and four times higher, respectively as compared to parent strain when crude glycerol was used as a carbon source. Other major fermentation products obtained were propionic acid (0.42 g/g of substrate consumed) and lactic acid (0.3g/g of substrate consumed). It was also observed that in mutant higher activity of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase was probably responsible for higher trehalose accumulation. PMID:22306074

  1. Metabolic Consequences of Infection of Grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) cv. “Modra frankinja” with Flavescence Dorée Phytoplasma

    PubMed Central

    Prezelj, Nina; Covington, Elizabeth; Roitsch, Thomas; Gruden, Kristina; Fragner, Lena; Weckwerth, Wolfram; Chersicola, Marko; Vodopivec, Maja; Dermastia, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Flavescence dorée, caused by the quarantine phytoplasma FDp, represents the most devastating of the grapevine yellows diseases in Europe. In an integrated study we have explored the FDp–grapevine interaction in infected grapevines of cv. “Modra frankinja” under natural conditions in the vineyard. In FDp-infected leaf vein-enriched tissues, the seasonal transcriptional profiles of 14 genes selected from various metabolic pathways showed an FDp-specific plant response compared to other grapevine yellows and uncovered a new association of the SWEET17a vacuolar transporter of fructose with pathogens. Non-targeted metabolome analysis from leaf vein-enriched tissues identified 22 significantly changed compounds with increased levels during infection. Several metabolites corroborated the gene expression study. Detailed investigation of the dynamics of carbohydrate metabolism revealed significant accumulation of sucrose and starch in the mesophyll of FDp-infected leaves, as well as significant up-regulation of genes involved in their biosynthesis. In addition, infected leaves had high activities of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and, more significantly, sucrose synthase. The data support the conclusion that FDp infection inhibits phloem transport, resulting in accumulation of carbohydrates and secondary metabolites that provoke a source-sink transition and defense response status. PMID:27242887

  2. Thioredoxin f1 and NADPH-Dependent Thioredoxin Reductase C Have Overlapping Functions in Regulating Photosynthetic Metabolism and Plant Growth in Response to Varying Light Conditions.

    PubMed

    Thormählen, Ina; Meitzel, Tobias; Groysman, Julia; Öchsner, Alexandra Bianca; von Roepenack-Lahaye, Edda; Naranjo, Belén; Cejudo, Francisco J; Geigenberger, Peter

    2015-11-01

    Two different thiol redox systems exist in plant chloroplasts, the ferredoxin-thioredoxin (Trx) system, which depends on ferredoxin reduced by the photosynthetic electron transport chain and, thus, on light, and the NADPH-dependent Trx reductase C (NTRC) system, which relies on NADPH and thus may be linked to sugar metabolism in the dark. Previous studies suggested, therefore, that the two different systems may have different functions in plants. We now report that there is a previously unrecognized functional redundancy of Trx f1 and NTRC in regulating photosynthetic metabolism and growth. In Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants, combined, but not single, deficiencies of Trx f1 and NTRC led to severe growth inhibition and perturbed light acclimation, accompanied by strong impairments of Calvin-Benson cycle activity and starch accumulation. Light activation of key enzymes of these pathways, fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase and ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, was almost completely abolished. The subsequent increase in NADPH-NADP(+) and ATP-ADP ratios led to increased nitrogen assimilation, NADP-malate dehydrogenase activation, and light vulnerability of photosystem I core proteins. In an additional approach, reporter studies show that Trx f1 and NTRC proteins are both colocalized in the same chloroplast substructure. Results provide genetic evidence that light- and NADPH-dependent thiol redox systems interact at the level of Trx f1 and NTRC to coordinately participate in the regulation of the Calvin-Benson cycle, starch metabolism, and growth in response to varying light conditions. PMID:26338951

  3. Oligomerization, membrane association and in vivo phosphorylation of sugarcane UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Sugarcane is a C4 plant that accumulates sucrose to levels of up to 50% of dry weight in the stalk. The mechanisms involved in sucrose accumulation in sugarcane are not well understood and little is known with regard to factors that control the extent of sucrose storage in stalks. UDP-glucose pyroph...

  4. Feedback inhibition of starch degradation in Arabidopsis leaves mediated by trehalose 6-phosphate.

    PubMed

    Martins, Marina Camara Mattos; Hejazi, Mahdi; Fettke, Joerg; Steup, Martin; Feil, Regina; Krause, Ursula; Arrivault, Stéphanie; Vosloh, Daniel; Figueroa, Carlos María; Ivakov, Alexander; Yadav, Umesh Prasad; Piques, Maria; Metzner, Daniela; Stitt, Mark; Lunn, John Edward

    2013-11-01

    Many plants accumulate substantial starch reserves in their leaves during the day and remobilize them at night to provide carbon and energy for maintenance and growth. In this paper, we explore the role of a sugar-signaling metabolite, trehalose-6-phosphate (Tre6P), in regulating the accumulation and turnover of transitory starch in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaves. Ethanol-induced overexpression of trehalose-phosphate synthase during the day increased Tre6P levels up to 11-fold. There was a transient increase in the rate of starch accumulation in the middle of the day, but this was not linked to reductive activation of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase. A 2- to 3-fold increase in Tre6P during the night led to significant inhibition of starch degradation. Maltose and maltotriose did not accumulate, suggesting that Tre6P affects an early step in the pathway of starch degradation in the chloroplasts. Starch granules isolated from induced plants had a higher orthophosphate content than granules from noninduced control plants, consistent either with disruption of the phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle that is essential for efficient starch breakdown or with inhibition of starch hydrolysis by β-amylase. Nonaqueous fractionation of leaves showed that Tre6P is predominantly located in the cytosol, with estimated in vivo Tre6P concentrations of 4 to 7 µm in the cytosol, 0.2 to 0.5 µm in the chloroplasts, and 0.05 µm in the vacuole. It is proposed that Tre6P is a component in a signaling pathway that mediates the feedback regulation of starch breakdown by sucrose, potentially linking starch turnover to demand for sucrose by growing sink organs at night.

  5. Comparative transcriptome analysis to investigate the high starch accumulation of duckweed (Landoltia punctata) under nutrient starvation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Duckweed can thrive on anthropogenic wastewater and produce tremendous biomass production. Due to its relatively high starch and low lignin percentage, duckweed is a good candidate for bioethanol fermentation. Previous studies have observed that water devoid of nutrients is good for starch accumulation, but its molecular mechanism remains unrevealed. Results This study globally analyzed the response to nutrient starvation in order to investigate the starch accumulation in duckweed (Landoltia punctata). L. punctata was transferred from nutrient-rich solution to distilled water and sampled at different time points. Physiological measurements demonstrated that the activity of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, the key enzyme of starch synthesis, as well as the starch percentage in duckweed, increased continuously under nutrient starvation. Samples collected at 0 h, 2 h and 24 h time points respectively were used for comparative gene expression analysis using RNA-Seq. A comprehensive transcriptome, comprising of 74,797 contigs, was constructed by a de novo assembly of the RNA-Seq reads. Gene expression profiling results showed that the expression of some transcripts encoding key enzymes involved in starch biosynthesis was up-regulated, while the expression of transcripts encoding enzymes involved in starch consumption were down-regulated, the expression of some photosynthesis-related transcripts were down-regulated during the first 24 h, and the expression of some transporter transcripts were up-regulated within the first 2 h. Very interestingly, most transcripts encoding key enzymes involved in flavonoid biosynthesis were highly expressed regardless of starvation, while transcripts encoding laccase, the last rate-limiting enzyme of lignifications, exhibited very low expression abundance in all three samples. Conclusion Our study provides a comprehensive expression profiling of L. punctata under nutrient starvation, which indicates that nutrient starvation down

  6. Metabolic and enzymatic changes associated with carbon mobilization, utilization and replenishment triggered in grain amaranth (Amaranthus cruentus) in response to partial defoliation by mechanical injury or insect herbivory

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Amaranthus cruentus and A. hypochondriacus are crop plants grown for grain production in subtropical countries. Recently, the generation of large-scale transcriptomic data opened the possibility to study representative genes of primary metabolism to gain a better understanding of the biochemical mechanisms underlying tolerance to defoliation in these species. A multi-level approach was followed involving gene expression analysis, enzyme activity and metabolite measurements. Results Defoliation by insect herbivory (HD) or mechanical damage (MD) led to a rapid and transient reduction of non-structural carbohydrates (NSC) in all tissues examined. This correlated with a short-term induction of foliar sucrolytic activity, differential gene expression of a vacuolar invertase and its inhibitor, and induction of a sucrose transporter gene. Leaf starch in defoliated plants correlated negatively with amylolytic activity and expression of a β-amylase-1 gene and positively with a soluble starch synthase gene. Fatty-acid accumulation in roots coincided with a high expression of a phosphoenolpyruvate/phosphate transporter gene. In all tissues there was a long-term replenishment of most metabolite pools, which allowed damaged plants to maintain unaltered growth and grain yield. Promoter analysis of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and vacuolar invertase genes indicated the presence of cis-regulatory elements that supported their responsiveness to defoliation. HD and MD had differential effects on transcripts, enzyme activities and metabolites. However, the correlation between transcript abundance and enzymatic activities was very limited. A better correlation was found between enzymes, metabolite levels and growth and reproductive parameters. Conclusions It is concluded that a rapid reduction of NSC reserves in leaves, stems and roots followed by their long-term recovery underlies tolerance to defoliation in grain amaranth. This requires the coordinate action of genes

  7. Quantitative Multilevel Analysis of Central Metabolism in Developing Oilseeds of Oilseed Rape during in Vitro Culture.

    PubMed

    Schwender, Jörg; Hebbelmann, Inga; Heinzel, Nicolas; Hildebrandt, Tatjana; Rogers, Alistair; Naik, Dhiraj; Klapperstück, Matthias; Braun, Hans-Peter; Schreiber, Falk; Denolf, Peter; Borisjuk, Ljudmilla; Rolletschek, Hardy

    2015-07-01

    Seeds provide the basis for many food, feed, and fuel products. Continued increases in seed yield, composition, and quality require an improved understanding of how the developing seed converts carbon and nitrogen supplies into storage. Current knowledge of this process is often based on the premise that transcriptional regulation directly translates via enzyme concentration into flux. In an attempt to highlight metabolic control, we explore genotypic differences in carbon partitioning for in vitro cultured developing embryos of oilseed rape (Brassica napus). We determined biomass composition as well as 79 net fluxes, the levels of 77 metabolites, and 26 enzyme activities with specific focus on central metabolism in nine selected germplasm accessions. Overall, we observed a tradeoff between the biomass component fractions of lipid and starch. With increasing lipid content over the spectrum of genotypes, plastidic fatty acid synthesis and glycolytic flux increased concomitantly, while glycolytic intermediates decreased. The lipid/starch tradeoff was not reflected at the proteome level, pointing to the significance of (posttranslational) metabolic control. Enzyme activity/flux and metabolite/flux correlations suggest that plastidic pyruvate kinase exerts flux control and that the lipid/starch tradeoff is most likely mediated by allosteric feedback regulation of phosphofructokinase and ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase. Quantitative data were also used to calculate in vivo mass action ratios, reaction equilibria, and metabolite turnover times. Compounds like cyclic 3',5'-AMP and sucrose-6-phosphate were identified to potentially be involved in so far unknown mechanisms of metabolic control. This study provides a rich source of quantitative data for those studying central metabolism. PMID:25944824

  8. Increasing the energy density of vegetative tissues by diverting carbon from starch to oil biosynthesis in transgenic Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sanjaya; Durrett, Timothy P; Weise, Sean E; Benning, Christoph

    2011-10-01

    Increasing the energy density of biomass by engineering the accumulation of triacylglycerols (TAGs) in vegetative tissues is synergistic with efforts to produce biofuels by conversion of lignocellulosic biomass. Typically, TAG accumulates in developing seeds, and little is known about the regulatory mechanisms and control factors preventing oil biosynthesis in vegetative tissues in most plants. Here, we engineered Arabidopsis thaliana to ectopically overproduce the transcription factor WRINKLED1 (WRI1) involved in the regulation of seed oil biosynthesis. Furthermore, we reduced the expression of APS1 encoding a major catalytic isoform of the small subunit of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase involved in starch biosynthesis using an RNAi approach. The resulting AGPRNAi-WRI1 lines accumulated less starch and more hexoses. In addition, these lines produced 5.8-fold more oil in vegetative tissues than plants with WRI1 or AGPRNAi alone. Abundant oil droplets were visible in vegetative tissues. TAG molecular species contained long-chain fatty acids, similar to those found in seed oils. In AGPRNAi-WRI1 lines, the relative expression level of sucrose synthase 2 was considerably elevated and correlated with the level of sugars. The relative expression of the genes encoding plastidic proteins involved in de novo fatty acid synthesis, biotin carboxyl carrier protein isoform 2 and acyl carrier protein 1, was also elevated. The relative contribution of TAG compared to starch to the overall energy density increased 9.5-fold in one AGPRNAi-WRI1 transgenic line consistent with altered carbon partitioning from starch to oil. PMID:22003502

  9. Photosynthesis Activates Plasma Membrane H+-ATPase via Sugar Accumulation.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Masaki; Inoue, Shin-Ichiro; Kuwata, Keiko; Kinoshita, Toshinori

    2016-05-01

    Plant plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase acts as a primary transporter via proton pumping and regulates diverse physiological responses by controlling secondary solute transport, pH homeostasis, and membrane potential. Phosphorylation of the penultimate threonine and the subsequent binding of 14-3-3 proteins in the carboxyl terminus of the enzyme are required for H(+)-ATPase activation. We showed previously that photosynthesis induces phosphorylation of the penultimate threonine in the nonvascular bryophyte Marchantia polymorpha However, (1) whether this response is conserved in vascular plants and (2) the process by which photosynthesis regulates H(+)-ATPase phosphorylation at the plasma membrane remain unresolved issues. Here, we report that photosynthesis induced the phosphorylation and activation of H(+)-ATPase in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaves via sugar accumulation. Light reversibly phosphorylated leaf H(+)-ATPase, and this process was inhibited by pharmacological and genetic suppression of photosynthesis. Immunohistochemical and biochemical analyses indicated that light-induced phosphorylation of H(+)-ATPase occurred autonomously in mesophyll cells. We also show that the phosphorylation status of H(+)-ATPase and photosynthetic sugar accumulation in leaves were positively correlated and that sugar treatment promoted phosphorylation. Furthermore, light-induced phosphorylation of H(+)-ATPase was strongly suppressed in a double mutant defective in ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and triose phosphate/phosphate translocator (adg1-1 tpt-2); these mutations strongly inhibited endogenous sugar accumulation. Overall, we show that photosynthesis activated H(+)-ATPase via sugar production in the mesophyll cells of vascular plants. Our work provides new insight into signaling from chloroplasts to the plasma membrane ion transport mechanism. PMID:27016447

  10. A Suite of Lotus japonicus Starch Mutants Reveals Both Conserved and Novel Features of Starch Metabolism1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Vriet, Cécile; Welham, Tracey; Brachmann, Andreas; Pike, Marilyn; Pike, Jodie; Perry, Jillian; Parniske, Martin; Sato, Shusei; Tabata, Satoshi; Smith, Alison M.; Wang, Trevor L.

    2010-01-01

    The metabolism of starch is of central importance for many aspects of plant growth and development. Information on leaf starch metabolism other than in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) is scarce. Furthermore, its importance in several agronomically important traits exemplified by legumes remains to be investigated. To address this issue, we have provided detailed information on the genes involved in starch metabolism in Lotus japonicus and have characterized a comprehensive collection of forward and TILLING (for Targeting Induced Local Lesions IN Genomes) reverse genetics mutants affecting five enzymes of starch synthesis and two enzymes of starch degradation. The mutants provide new insights into the structure-function relationships of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and glucan, water dikinase1 in particular. Analyses of the mutant phenotypes indicate that the pathways of leaf starch metabolism in L. japonicus and Arabidopsis are largely conserved. However, the importance of these pathways for plant growth and development differs substantially between the two species. Whereas essentially starchless Arabidopsis plants lacking plastidial phosphoglucomutase grow slowly relative to wild-type plants, the equivalent mutant of L. japonicus grows normally even in a 12-h photoperiod. In contrast, the loss of GLUCAN, WATER DIKINASE1, required for starch degradation, has a far greater effect on plant growth and fertility in L. japonicus than in Arabidopsis. Moreover, we have also identified several mutants likely to be affected in new components or regulators of the pathways of starch metabolism. This suite of mutants provides a substantial new resource for further investigations of the partitioning of carbon and its importance for symbiotic nitrogen fixation, legume seed development, and perenniality and vegetative regrowth. PMID:20699404

  11. Low-temperature effect on enzyme activities involved in sucrose-starch partitioning in salt-stressed and salt-acclimated cotyledons of quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Mariana; Hilal, Mirna; González, Juan A; Prado, Fernando E

    2009-04-01

    The effect of low temperature on growth, sucrose-starch partitioning and related enzymes in salt-stressed and salt-acclimated cotyledons of quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa Willd.) was studied. The growth of cotyledons and growing axes in seedlings grown at 25/20 degrees C (light/dark) and shifted to 5/5 degrees C was lower than in those only growing at 25/20 degrees C (unstressed). However, there were no significant differences between low-temperature control and salt-treated seedlings. The higher activities of sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS, EC 2.4.1.14) and soluble acid invertase (acid INV, EC 3.2.1.25) were observed in salt-stressed cotyledons; however, the highest acid INV activity was observed in unstressed cotyledons. ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (ADP-GPPase, EC 2.7.7.27) was higher in unstressed cotyledons than in stressed ones. However, between 0 and 4days the highest value was observed in salt-stressed cotyledons. The lowest value of ADP-GPPase was observed in salt-acclimated cotyledons. Low temperature also affected sucrose synthase (SuSy, EC 2.4.1.13) activity in salt-treated cotyledons. Sucrose and glucose were higher in salt-stressed cotyledons, but fructose was essentially higher in low-temperature control. Starch was higher in low-temperature control; however, the highest content was observed at 0day in salt-acclimated cotyledons. Results demonstrated that low temperature induces different responses on sucrose-starch partitioning in salt-stressed and salt-acclimated cotyledons. Data also suggest that in salt-treated cotyledons source-sink relations (SSR) are changed in order to supply soluble sugars and proline for the osmotic adjustment. Relationships between starch formation and SuSy activity are also discussed.

  12. Quantitative Multilevel Analysis of Central Metabolism in Developing Oilseeds of Oilseed Rape during in Vitro Culture.

    PubMed

    Schwender, Jörg; Hebbelmann, Inga; Heinzel, Nicolas; Hildebrandt, Tatjana; Rogers, Alistair; Naik, Dhiraj; Klapperstück, Matthias; Braun, Hans-Peter; Schreiber, Falk; Denolf, Peter; Borisjuk, Ljudmilla; Rolletschek, Hardy

    2015-07-01

    Seeds provide the basis for many food, feed, and fuel products. Continued increases in seed yield, composition, and quality require an improved understanding of how the developing seed converts carbon and nitrogen supplies into storage. Current knowledge of this process is often based on the premise that transcriptional regulation directly translates via enzyme concentration into flux. In an attempt to highlight metabolic control, we explore genotypic differences in carbon partitioning for in vitro cultured developing embryos of oilseed rape (Brassica napus). We determined biomass composition as well as 79 net fluxes, the levels of 77 metabolites, and 26 enzyme activities with specific focus on central metabolism in nine selected germplasm accessions. Overall, we observed a tradeoff between the biomass component fractions of lipid and starch. With increasing lipid content over the spectrum of genotypes, plastidic fatty acid synthesis and glycolytic flux increased concomitantly, while glycolytic intermediates decreased. The lipid/starch tradeoff was not reflected at the proteome level, pointing to the significance of (posttranslational) metabolic control. Enzyme activity/flux and metabolite/flux correlations suggest that plastidic pyruvate kinase exerts flux control and that the lipid/starch tradeoff is most likely mediated by allosteric feedback regulation of phosphofructokinase and ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase. Quantitative data were also used to calculate in vivo mass action ratios, reaction equilibria, and metabolite turnover times. Compounds like cyclic 3',5'-AMP and sucrose-6-phosphate were identified to potentially be involved in so far unknown mechanisms of metabolic control. This study provides a rich source of quantitative data for those studying central metabolism.

  13. Starch biosynthetic genes and enzymes are expressed and active in the absence of starch accumulation in sugar beet tap-root

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Starch is the predominant storage compound in underground plant tissues like roots and tubers. An exception is sugar beet tap-root (Beta vulgaris ssp altissima) which exclusively stores sucrose. The underlying mechanism behind this divergent storage accumulation in sugar beet is currently not fully known. From the general presence of starch in roots and tubers it could be speculated that the lack in sugar beet tap-roots would originate from deficiency in pathways leading to starch. Therefore with emphasis on starch accumulation, we studied tap-roots of sugar beet using parsnip (Pastinaca sativa) as a comparator. Results Metabolic and structural analyses of sugar beet tap-root confirmed sucrose as the exclusive storage component. No starch granules could be detected in tap-roots of sugar beet or the wild ancestor sea beet (Beta vulgaris ssp. maritima). Analyses of parsnip showed that the main storage component was starch but tap-root tissue was also found to contain significant levels of sugars. Surprisingly, activities of four main starch biosynthetic enzymes, phosphoglucomutase, ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, starch synthase and starch branching enzyme, were similar in sugar beet and parsnip tap-roots. Transcriptional analysis confirmed expression of corresponding genes. Additionally, expression of genes involved in starch accumulation such as for plastidial hexose transportation and starch tuning functions could be determined in tap-roots of both plant species. Conclusion Considering underground storage organs, sugar beet tap-root upholds a unique property in exclusively storing sucrose. Lack of starch also in the ancestor sea beet indicates an evolved trait of biological importance. Our findings in this study show that gene expression and enzymatic activity of main starch biosynthetic functions are present in sugar beet tap-root during storage accumulation. In view of this, the complete lack of starch in sugar beet tap-roots is enigmatic. PMID

  14. Factors Altering Pyruvate Excretion in a Glycogen Storage Mutant of the Cyanobacterium, Synechococcus PCC7942

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Phoebe J.; Purcell-Meyerink, Diane; Hocart, Charles H.; Truong, Thy T.; James, Gabriel O.; Rourke, Loraine; Djordjevic, Michael A.; Blackburn, Susan I.; Price, G. D.

    2016-01-01

    Interest in the production of carbon commodities from photosynthetically fixed CO2 has focused attention on cyanobacteria as a target for metabolic engineering and pathway investigation. We investigated the redirection of carbon flux in the model cyanobacterial species, Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942, under nitrogen deprivation, for optimized production of the industrially desirable compound, pyruvate. Under nitrogen limited conditions, excess carbon is naturally stored as the multi-branched polysaccharide, glycogen, but a block in glycogen synthesis, via knockout mutation in the gene encoding ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (glgC), results in the accumulation of the organic acids, pyruvate and 2-oxoglutarate, as overflow excretions into the extracellular media. The ΔglgC strain, under 48 h of N-deprivation was shown to excrete pyruvate for the first time in this strain. Additionally, by increasing culture pH, to pH 10, it was possible to substantially elevate excretion of pyruvate, suggesting the involvement of an unknown substrate/proton symporter for export. The ΔglgC mutant was also engineered to express foreign transporters for glucose and sucrose, and then grown photomixotrophically with exogenous organic carbon supply, as added 5 mM glucose or sucrose during N- deprivation. Under these conditions we observed a fourfold increase in extracellular pyruvate excretion when glucose was added, and a smaller increase with added sucrose. Although the magnitude of pyruvate excretion did not correlate with the capacity of the ΔglgC strain for bicarbonate-dependent photosynthetic O2 evolution, or with light intensity, there was, however, a positive correlation observed between the density of the starter culture prior to N-deprivation and the final extracellular pyruvate concentration. The factors that contribute to enhancement of pyruvate excretion are discussed, as well as consideration of whether the source of carbon for pyruvate excretion might be derived from

  15. The intrinsically disordered protein LEA7 from Arabidopsis thaliana protects the isolated enzyme lactate dehydrogenase and enzymes in a soluble leaf proteome during freezing and drying.

    PubMed

    Popova, Antoaneta V; Rausch, Saskia; Hundertmark, Michaela; Gibon, Yves; Hincha, Dirk K

    2015-10-01

    The accumulation of Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins in plants is associated with tolerance against stresses such as freezing and desiccation. Two main functions have been attributed to LEA proteins: membrane stabilization and enzyme protection. We have hypothesized previously that LEA7 from Arabidopsis thaliana may stabilize membranes because it interacts with liposomes in the dry state. Here we show that LEA7, contrary to this expectation, did not stabilize liposomes during drying and rehydration. Instead, it partially preserved the activity of the enzyme lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) during drying and freezing. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy showed no evidence of aggregation of LDH in the dry or rehydrated state under conditions that lead to complete loss of activity. To approximate the complex influence of intracellular conditions on the protective effects of a LEA protein in a convenient in-vitro assay, we measured the activity of two Arabidopsis enzymes (glucose-6-P dehydrogenase and ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase) in total soluble leaf protein extract (Arabidopsis soluble proteome, ASP) after drying and rehydration or freezing and thawing. LEA7 partially preserved the activity of both enzymes under these conditions, suggesting its role as an enzyme protectant in vivo. Further FTIR analyses indicated the partial reversibility of protein aggregation in the dry ASP during rehydration. Similarly, aggregation in the dry ASP was strongly reduced by LEA7. In addition, mixtures of LEA7 with sucrose or verbascose reduced aggregation more than the single additives, presumably through the effects of the protein on the H-bonding network of the sugar glasses. PMID:25988244

  16. Quantitative Multilevel Analysis of Central Metabolism in Developing Oilseeds of Oilseed Rape During In Vitro Culture

    SciTech Connect

    Schwender, Jorg; Hebbelmann, Inga; Heinzel, Nicholas; Hildebrandt, Tatjana; Rogers, Alistair; Naik, Dhiraj; Klapperstuck, Matthias; Braun, Hans -Peter; Schreiber, Falk; Denolf, Peter; Borisjuk, Ljudmilla; Rolletschek, Hardy

    2015-07-01

    Seeds provide the basis for many food, feed, and fuel products. Continued increases in seed yield, composition, and quality require an improved understanding of how the developing seed converts carbon and nitrogen supplies into storage. Current knowledge of this process is often based on the premise that transcriptional regulation directly translates via enzyme concentration into flux. In an attempt to highlight metabolic control, we explore genotypic differences in carbon partitioning for in vitro cultured developing embryos of oilseed rape (Brassica napus). We determined biomass composition as well as 79 net fluxes, the levels of 77 metabolites, and 26 enzyme activities with specific focus on central metabolism in nine selected germplasm accessions. We observed a tradeoff between the biomass component fractions of lipid and starch. With increasing lipid content over the spectrum of genotypes, plastidic fatty acid synthesis and glycolytic flux increased concomitantly, while glycolytic intermediates decreased. The lipid/starch tradeoff was not reflected at the proteome level, pointing to the significance of (posttranslational) metabolic control. Enzyme activity/flux and metabolite/flux correlations suggest that plastidic pyruvate kinase exerts flux control and that the lipid/starch tradeoff is most likely mediated by allosteric feedback regulation of phosphofructokinase and ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase. Also, quantitative data were used to calculate in vivo mass action ratios, reaction equilibria, and metabolite turnover times. Compounds like cyclic 3',5'-AMP and sucrose-6-phosphate were identified to potentially be involved in so far unknown mechanisms of metabolic control. This study provides a rich source of quantitative data for those studying central metabolism..

  17. Feedback Inhibition of Starch Degradation in Arabidopsis Leaves Mediated by Trehalose 6-Phosphate1[W][OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Marina Camara Mattos; Hejazi, Mahdi; Fettke, Joerg; Steup, Martin; Feil, Regina; Krause, Ursula; Arrivault, Stéphanie; Vosloh, Daniel; Figueroa, Carlos María; Ivakov, Alexander; Yadav, Umesh Prasad; Piques, Maria; Metzner, Daniela; Stitt, Mark; Lunn, John Edward

    2013-01-01

    Many plants accumulate substantial starch reserves in their leaves during the day and remobilize them at night to provide carbon and energy for maintenance and growth. In this paper, we explore the role of a sugar-signaling metabolite, trehalose-6-phosphate (Tre6P), in regulating the accumulation and turnover of transitory starch in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaves. Ethanol-induced overexpression of trehalose-phosphate synthase during the day increased Tre6P levels up to 11-fold. There was a transient increase in the rate of starch accumulation in the middle of the day, but this was not linked to reductive activation of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase. A 2- to 3-fold increase in Tre6P during the night led to significant inhibition of starch degradation. Maltose and maltotriose did not accumulate, suggesting that Tre6P affects an early step in the pathway of starch degradation in the chloroplasts. Starch granules isolated from induced plants had a higher orthophosphate content than granules from noninduced control plants, consistent either with disruption of the phosphorylation-dephosphorylation cycle that is essential for efficient starch breakdown or with inhibition of starch hydrolysis by β-amylase. Nonaqueous fractionation of leaves showed that Tre6P is predominantly located in the cytosol, with estimated in vivo Tre6P concentrations of 4 to 7 µm in the cytosol, 0.2 to 0.5 µm in the chloroplasts, and 0.05 µm in the vacuole. It is proposed that Tre6P is a component in a signaling pathway that mediates the feedback regulation of starch breakdown by sucrose, potentially linking starch turnover to demand for sucrose by growing sink organs at night. PMID:24043444

  18. Comparative genomic and phylogenetic analyses of Gammaproteobacterial glg genes traced the origin of the Escherichia coli glycogen glgBXCAP operon to the last common ancestor of the sister orders Enterobacteriales and Pasteurellales.

    PubMed

    Almagro, Goizeder; Viale, Alejandro M; Montero, Manuel; Rahimpour, Mehdi; Muñoz, Francisco José; Baroja-Fernández, Edurne; Bahaji, Abdellatif; Zúñiga, Manuel; González-Candelas, Fernando; Pozueta-Romero, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Production of branched α-glucan, glycogen-like polymers is widely spread in the Bacteria domain. The glycogen pathway of synthesis and degradation has been fairly well characterized in the model enterobacterial species Escherichia coli (order Enterobacteriales, class Gammaproteobacteria), in which the cognate genes (branching enzyme glgB, debranching enzyme glgX, ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase glgC, glycogen synthase glgA, and glycogen phosphorylase glgP) are clustered in a glgBXCAP operon arrangement. However, the evolutionary origin of this particular arrangement and of its constituent genes is unknown. Here, by using 265 complete gammaproteobacterial genomes we have carried out a comparative analysis of the presence, copy number and arrangement of glg genes in all lineages of the Gammaproteobacteria. These analyses revealed large variations in glg gene presence, copy number and arrangements among different gammaproteobacterial lineages. However, the glgBXCAP arrangement was remarkably conserved in all glg-possessing species of the orders Enterobacteriales and Pasteurellales (the E/P group). Subsequent phylogenetic analyses of glg genes present in the Gammaproteobacteria and in other main bacterial groups indicated that glg genes have undergone a complex evolutionary history in which horizontal gene transfer may have played an important role. These analyses also revealed that the E/P glgBXCAP genes (a) share a common evolutionary origin, (b) were vertically transmitted within the E/P group, and (c) are closely related to glg genes of some phylogenetically distant betaproteobacterial species. The overall data allowed tracing the origin of the E. coli glgBXCAP operon to the last common ancestor of the E/P group, and also to uncover a likely glgBXCAP transfer event from the E/P group to particular lineages of the Betaproteobacteria.

  19. Comparative Genomic and Phylogenetic Analyses of Gammaproteobacterial glg Genes Traced the Origin of the Escherichia coli Glycogen glgBXCAP Operon to the Last Common Ancestor of the Sister Orders Enterobacteriales and Pasteurellales

    PubMed Central

    Almagro, Goizeder; Viale, Alejandro M.; Montero, Manuel; Rahimpour, Mehdi; Muñoz, Francisco José; Baroja-Fernández, Edurne; Bahaji, Abdellatif; Zúñiga, Manuel; González-Candelas, Fernando; Pozueta-Romero, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Production of branched α-glucan, glycogen-like polymers is widely spread in the Bacteria domain. The glycogen pathway of synthesis and degradation has been fairly well characterized in the model enterobacterial species Escherichia coli (order Enterobacteriales, class Gammaproteobacteria), in which the cognate genes (branching enzyme glgB, debranching enzyme glgX, ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase glgC, glycogen synthase glgA, and glycogen phosphorylase glgP) are clustered in a glgBXCAP operon arrangement. However, the evolutionary origin of this particular arrangement and of its constituent genes is unknown. Here, by using 265 complete gammaproteobacterial genomes we have carried out a comparative analysis of the presence, copy number and arrangement of glg genes in all lineages of the Gammaproteobacteria. These analyses revealed large variations in glg gene presence, copy number and arrangements among different gammaproteobacterial lineages. However, the glgBXCAP arrangement was remarkably conserved in all glg-possessing species of the orders Enterobacteriales and Pasteurellales (the E/P group). Subsequent phylogenetic analyses of glg genes present in the Gammaproteobacteria and in other main bacterial groups indicated that glg genes have undergone a complex evolutionary history in which horizontal gene transfer may have played an important role. These analyses also revealed that the E/P glgBXCAP genes (a) share a common evolutionary origin, (b) were vertically transmitted within the E/P group, and (c) are closely related to glg genes of some phylogenetically distant betaproteobacterial species. The overall data allowed tracing the origin of the E. coli glgBXCAP operon to the last common ancestor of the E/P group, and also to uncover a likely glgBXCAP transfer event from the E/P group to particular lineages of the Betaproteobacteria. PMID:25607991

  20. Increasing Phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-Bisphosphate Biosynthesis Affects Basal Signaling and Chloroplast Metabolism in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Im, Yang Ju; Smith, Caroline M.; Phillippy, Brian Q.; Strand, Deserah; Kramer, David M.; Grunden, Amy M.; Boss, Wendy F.

    2014-01-01

    One challenge in studying the second messenger inositol(1,4,5)-trisphosphate (InsP3) is that it is present in very low amounts and increases only transiently in response to stimuli. To identify events downstream of InsP3, we generated transgenic plants constitutively expressing the high specific activity, human phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate 5-kinase Iα (HsPIPKIα). PIP5K is the enzyme that synthesizes phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate (PtdIns(4,5)P2); this reaction is flux limiting in InsP3 biosynthesis in plants. Plasma membranes from transgenic Arabidopsis expressing HsPIPKIα had 2–3 fold higher PIP5K specific activity, and basal InsP3 levels in seedlings and leaves were >2-fold higher than wild type. Although there was no significant difference in photosynthetic electron transport, HsPIPKIα plants had significantly higher starch (2–4 fold) and 20% higher anthocyanin compared to controls. Starch content was higher both during the day and at the end of dark period. In addition, transcripts of genes involved in starch metabolism such as SEX1 (glucan water dikinase) and SEX4 (phosphoglucan phosphatase), DBE (debranching enzyme), MEX1 (maltose transporter), APL3 (ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase) and glucose-6-phosphate transporter (Glc6PT) were up-regulated in the HsPIPKIα plants. Our results reveal that increasing the phosphoinositide (PI) pathway affects chloroplast carbon metabolism and suggest that InsP3 is one component of an inter-organelle signaling network regulating chloroplast metabolism. PMID:27135490

  1. The evolution of contact-dependent inhibition in non-growing populations of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Lemonnier, Marc; Levin, Bruce R; Romeo, Tony; Garner, Kim; Baquero, María-Rosario; Mercante, Jeff; Lemichez, Emmanuel; Baquero, Fernando; Blázquez, Jesús

    2008-01-01

    In the course of liquid culture, serial passage experiments with Escherichia coli K-12 bearing a mutator gene deletion (DeltamutS) we observed the evolution of strains that appeared to kill or inhibit the growth of the bacteria from where they were derived, their ancestors. We demonstrate that this inhibition occurs after the cells stop growing and requires physical contact between the evolved and ancestral bacteria. Thereby, it is referred to as stationary phase contact-dependent inhibition (SCDI). The evolution of this antagonistic relationship is not anticipated from existing theory and experiments of competition in mass (liquid) culture. Nevertheless, it occurred in the same way (parallel evolution) in the eight independent serial transfer cultures, through different single base substitutions in a gene in the glycogen synthesis pathway, glgC. We demonstrate that the observed mutations in glgC, which codes for ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, are responsible for both the ability of the evolved bacteria to inhibit or kill their ancestors and their immunity to that inhibition or killing. We present evidence that without additional evolution, mutator genes, or known mutations in glgC, other strains of E. coli K-12 are also capable of SCDI or sensitive to this inhibition. We interpret this, in part, as support for the generality of SCDI and also as suggesting that the glgC mutations responsible for the SCDI, which evolved in our experiments, may suppress the action of one or more genes responsible for the sensitivity of E. coli to SCDI. Using numerical solutions to a mathematical model and in vitro experiments, we explore the population dynamics of SCDI and postulate the conditions responsible for its evolution in mass culture. We conclude with a brief discussion of the potential ecological significance of SCDI and its possible utility for the development of antimicrobial agents, which unlike existing antibiotics, can kill or inhibit the growth of bacteria that are

  2. A suite of Lotus japonicus starch mutants reveals both conserved and novel features of starch metabolism.

    PubMed

    Vriet, Cécile; Welham, Tracey; Brachmann, Andreas; Pike, Marilyn; Pike, Jodie; Perry, Jillian; Parniske, Martin; Sato, Shusei; Tabata, Satoshi; Smith, Alison M; Wang, Trevor L

    2010-10-01

    The metabolism of starch is of central importance for many aspects of plant growth and development. Information on leaf starch metabolism other than in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) is scarce. Furthermore, its importance in several agronomically important traits exemplified by legumes remains to be investigated. To address this issue, we have provided detailed information on the genes involved in starch metabolism in Lotus japonicus and have characterized a comprehensive collection of forward and TILLING (for Targeting Induced Local Lesions IN Genomes) reverse genetics mutants affecting five enzymes of starch synthesis and two enzymes of starch degradation. The mutants provide new insights into the structure-function relationships of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and glucan, water dikinase1 in particular. Analyses of the mutant phenotypes indicate that the pathways of leaf starch metabolism in L. japonicus and Arabidopsis are largely conserved. However, the importance of these pathways for plant growth and development differs substantially between the two species. Whereas essentially starchless Arabidopsis plants lacking plastidial phosphoglucomutase grow slowly relative to wild-type plants, the equivalent mutant of L. japonicus grows normally even in a 12-h photoperiod. In contrast, the loss of GLUCAN, WATER DIKINASE1, required for starch degradation, has a far greater effect on plant growth and fertility in L. japonicus than in Arabidopsis. Moreover, we have also identified several mutants likely to be affected in new components or regulators of the pathways of starch metabolism. This suite of mutants provides a substantial new resource for further investigations of the partitioning of carbon and its importance for symbiotic nitrogen fixation, legume seed development, and perenniality and vegetative regrowth.

  3. Sucrose induces expression of the sorbitol-6-phosphate dehydrogenase gene in source leaves of loquat.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yasuo; Dandekar, Abhaya M

    2014-03-01

    Rosaceae fruit trees use sorbitol and sucrose as translocating sugars and the sorbitol-to-sucrose ratio in source leaves determines apple fruit quality. Here, we investigate the effects of sugars on the expression of genes encoding key photosynthetic enzymes, including sorbitol-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (S6PDH, EC 1.1.1.200), sucrose phosphate synthase (SPS, EC 2.4.1.14), and ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (ADPGPPase, EC 2.7.7.27) to understand the sugar-signaling mechanism in Rosaceae fruit trees. Mature leaf-petiole cuttings of loquat (Eriobotrya japonica Lindl. cv. Mogi) were supplied with a water, sorbitol or sucrose solution for 2 days at 20°C. The relative levels of the transcripts were analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). S6PDH transcription was decreased by sorbitol but drastically increased by sucrose. SPS and ADPGPPase large subunit transcription were decreased by sucrose and sorbitol. The simultaneous application of sorbitol and sucrose revealed that S6PDH transcription increased in a dose-dependent manner with sucrose. These results show that both sorbitol and sucrose work as signaling molecules in source organs of Rosaceae fruit trees. These trees have mechanisms to positively keep sorbitol as the dominant translocating sugar, suggesting that sorbitol plays an important role in their survival strategy. Effects of various sugars on S6PDH expression were investigated. Palatinose, a sucrose analog, increased S6PDH transcription much more drastically than sucrose. Mannose and 3-O-methylglucose, glucose analogs, also increased S6PDH transcription; however, glucose did not. Models of sugar signaling in source organs of Rosaceae fruit trees are discussed.

  4. Photosynthesis Activates Plasma Membrane H+-ATPase via Sugar Accumulation1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Okumura, Masaki; Inoue, Shin-ichiro; Kuwata, Keiko

    2016-01-01

    Plant plasma membrane H+-ATPase acts as a primary transporter via proton pumping and regulates diverse physiological responses by controlling secondary solute transport, pH homeostasis, and membrane potential. Phosphorylation of the penultimate threonine and the subsequent binding of 14-3-3 proteins in the carboxyl terminus of the enzyme are required for H+-ATPase activation. We showed previously that photosynthesis induces phosphorylation of the penultimate threonine in the nonvascular bryophyte Marchantia polymorpha. However, (1) whether this response is conserved in vascular plants and (2) the process by which photosynthesis regulates H+-ATPase phosphorylation at the plasma membrane remain unresolved issues. Here, we report that photosynthesis induced the phosphorylation and activation of H+-ATPase in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) leaves via sugar accumulation. Light reversibly phosphorylated leaf H+-ATPase, and this process was inhibited by pharmacological and genetic suppression of photosynthesis. Immunohistochemical and biochemical analyses indicated that light-induced phosphorylation of H+-ATPase occurred autonomously in mesophyll cells. We also show that the phosphorylation status of H+-ATPase and photosynthetic sugar accumulation in leaves were positively correlated and that sugar treatment promoted phosphorylation. Furthermore, light-induced phosphorylation of H+-ATPase was strongly suppressed in a double mutant defective in ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and triose phosphate/phosphate translocator (adg1-1 tpt-2); these mutations strongly inhibited endogenous sugar accumulation. Overall, we show that photosynthesis activated H+-ATPase via sugar production in the mesophyll cells of vascular plants. Our work provides new insight into signaling from chloroplasts to the plasma membrane ion transport mechanism. PMID:27016447

  5. The intrinsically disordered protein LEA7 from Arabidopsis thaliana protects the isolated enzyme lactate dehydrogenase and enzymes in a soluble leaf proteome during freezing and drying.

    PubMed

    Popova, Antoaneta V; Rausch, Saskia; Hundertmark, Michaela; Gibon, Yves; Hincha, Dirk K

    2015-10-01

    The accumulation of Late Embryogenesis Abundant (LEA) proteins in plants is associated with tolerance against stresses such as freezing and desiccation. Two main functions have been attributed to LEA proteins: membrane stabilization and enzyme protection. We have hypothesized previously that LEA7 from Arabidopsis thaliana may stabilize membranes because it interacts with liposomes in the dry state. Here we show that LEA7, contrary to this expectation, did not stabilize liposomes during drying and rehydration. Instead, it partially preserved the activity of the enzyme lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) during drying and freezing. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy showed no evidence of aggregation of LDH in the dry or rehydrated state under conditions that lead to complete loss of activity. To approximate the complex influence of intracellular conditions on the protective effects of a LEA protein in a convenient in-vitro assay, we measured the activity of two Arabidopsis enzymes (glucose-6-P dehydrogenase and ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase) in total soluble leaf protein extract (Arabidopsis soluble proteome, ASP) after drying and rehydration or freezing and thawing. LEA7 partially preserved the activity of both enzymes under these conditions, suggesting its role as an enzyme protectant in vivo. Further FTIR analyses indicated the partial reversibility of protein aggregation in the dry ASP during rehydration. Similarly, aggregation in the dry ASP was strongly reduced by LEA7. In addition, mixtures of LEA7 with sucrose or verbascose reduced aggregation more than the single additives, presumably through the effects of the protein on the H-bonding network of the sugar glasses.

  6. Photosynthesis down-regulation precedes carbohydrate accumulation under sink limitation in Citrus.

    PubMed

    Nebauer, Sergio G; Renau-Morata, Begoña; Guardiola, José Luis; Molina, Rosa-Victoria

    2011-02-01

    Photosynthesis down-regulation due to an imbalance between sources and sinks in Citrus leaves could be mediated by excessive accumulation of carbohydrates. However, there is limited understanding of the physiological role of soluble and insoluble carbohydrates in photosynthesis regulation and the elements triggering the down-regulation process. In this work, the role of non-structural carbohydrates in the regulation of photosynthesis under a broad spectrum of source-sink relationships has been investigated in the Salustiana sweet orange. Soluble sugar and starch accumulation in leaves, induced by girdling experiments, did not induce down-regulation of the photosynthetic rate in the presence of sinks (fruits). The leaf-to-fruit ratio did not modulate photosynthesis but allocation of photoassimilates to the fruits. The lack of strong sink activity led to a decrease in the photosynthetic rate and starch accumulation in leaves. However, photosynthesis down-regulation due to an excess of total soluble sugars or starch was discarded because photosynthesis and stomatal conductance reduction occurred prior to any significant accumulation of these carbohydrates. Gas exchange and fluorescence parameters suggested biochemical limitations to photosynthesis. In addition, the expression of carbon metabolism-related genes was altered within 24 h when strong sinks were removed. Sucrose synthesis and export genes were inhibited, whereas the expression of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase was increased to cope with the excess of assimilates. In conclusion, changes in starch and soluble sugar turnover, but not sugar content per se, could provide the signal for photosynthesis regulation. In these conditions, non-stomatal limitations strongly inhibited the photosynthetic rate prior to any significant increase in carbohydrate levels. PMID:21367744

  7. Quantitative Multilevel Analysis of Central Metabolism in Developing Oilseeds of Oilseed Rape during in Vitro Culture1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Schwender, Jörg; Hebbelmann, Inga; Heinzel, Nicolas; Hildebrandt, Tatjana; Rogers, Alistair; Klapperstück, Matthias; Schreiber, Falk; Borisjuk, Ljudmilla; Rolletschek, Hardy

    2015-01-01

    Seeds provide the basis for many food, feed, and fuel products. Continued increases in seed yield, composition, and quality require an improved understanding of how the developing seed converts carbon and nitrogen supplies into storage. Current knowledge of this process is often based on the premise that transcriptional regulation directly translates via enzyme concentration into flux. In an attempt to highlight metabolic control, we explore genotypic differences in carbon partitioning for in vitro cultured developing embryos of oilseed rape (Brassica napus). We determined biomass composition as well as 79 net fluxes, the levels of 77 metabolites, and 26 enzyme activities with specific focus on central metabolism in nine selected germplasm accessions. Overall, we observed a tradeoff between the biomass component fractions of lipid and starch. With increasing lipid content over the spectrum of genotypes, plastidic fatty acid synthesis and glycolytic flux increased concomitantly, while glycolytic intermediates decreased. The lipid/starch tradeoff was not reflected at the proteome level, pointing to the significance of (posttranslational) metabolic control. Enzyme activity/flux and metabolite/flux correlations suggest that plastidic pyruvate kinase exerts flux control and that the lipid/starch tradeoff is most likely mediated by allosteric feedback regulation of phosphofructokinase and ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase. Quantitative data were also used to calculate in vivo mass action ratios, reaction equilibria, and metabolite turnover times. Compounds like cyclic 3′,5′-AMP and sucrose-6-phosphate were identified to potentially be involved in so far unknown mechanisms of metabolic control. This study provides a rich source of quantitative data for those studying central metabolism. PMID:25944824

  8. Potato guard cells respond to drying soil by a complex change in the expression of genes related to carbon metabolism and turgor regulation.

    PubMed

    Kopka, J; Provart, N J; Müller-Röber, B

    1997-04-01

    Altering stomatal function by a guard cell-targeted transgenic approach with the aim of increased stress tolerance and crop yield requires knowledge of the natural fluctuations of stomatal gene expression under stress conditions. We developed a fast method for the isolation of RNA from epidermal fragments of potato leaves (Solanum tuberosum L. cv. Désirée), demonstrated that this RNA preparation is highly enriched in guard cell transcripts and used this method to investigate the response of gene expression in guard cells to mild drought stress. Drought was applied in planta by withholding water over a period of 2-4 days. In the following work responses observed under these conditions are called 'long-term' in contrast to immediate (short-term) stomatal opening and closing responses to environmental stress. We observed both gene-specific increases and decreases of steady-state transcript levels. In particular, the mRNA levels of sucrose synthase and sucrose-phosphate synthase were elevated 5.5-fold and 1.4-fold, respectively. In contrast, expression of an inwardly rectifying K+ channel from guard cells (kst1) and of a plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase (pha2) was reduced to 26% and 36%, respectively, of the expression in watered controls. In addition, expression of vacuolar invertase, UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (large subunit), cytosolic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, a sucrose/H+ cotransporter, and a novel isoform of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase were also reduced. Other genes exhibited unaltered expression. Compared with the response in whole leaves, the transcript levels of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase, vacuolar invertase, and cytosolic glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase were regulated guard cell specifically. Most importantly, changes in steady-state transcript levels were complete before the onset of a decrease in leaf water potential, when drought-induced stomatal closure was already obvious. These data

  9. [Enhancement of photoassimilate utilization by manipulation of the ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase gene]. Progress report, April 1993--January 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Okita, T.W.

    1994-04-01

    Part I of this research concerns patterns of gene expression of ADPG-PP in native and transgenic potato plants. The expression of both potato ADPG-PP subunits were analyzed on the transcript and antigen levels. The small and large subunits were coordinately expressed during tuber development suggesting a role for the temporal regulation of ADPG-PP expression as well as providing further support for earlier work in the heterotetrameric subunit structure of the tuber enzyme. Part II involves studies on the structure-function relationships of ADPG-PP, more specifically the mutagenesis of the large and small subunit DNAs of ADPG-PP.

  10. [Studies on the initiation of glycogen metabolism in Escherichia coli (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Barengo, R; Krisman, C R

    1976-01-01

    Glycogen biosynthesis was studied in Escherichia coli. An enzyme complex composed of UDP-glucose; protein glucosyltransferase, ADP-glucose: protein glucosyltransferase and ADP-glucose: alpha-1,4 glucan alpha-4-glucosyltransferase was found. Further results revealed that while glycogen concentration remained unchanged, the specific activity of the glucosyltransferase complex increased during the growth phase of the culture. The detergents Lubrol and Brij provoked a decrease of 80% and 20% in the glucose transfer to protein from ADP-glucose and UDP-glucose, respectively. These detergents did not inhibit the glucose incorporation into glycogen by ADP-glucose: alpha-1,4-glucosyltransferase. We postulated that the biosynthesis of glycogen in Escherichia coli could be initiated by two different enzymes which catalyze the transfer of glucose from UDP-glucose or ADP-glucose to an acceptor protien. In a second step, the glucan protein formed is used as primer by the ADP-glucose: alpha-1,4 glucan alpha-1-glucosyltransferase for glycogen formation.

  11. Transcriptomic identification and expression of starch and sucrose metabolism genes in the seeds of Chinese chestnut (Castanea mollissima).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lin; Lin, Qing; Feng, Yanzhi; Fan, Xiaoming; Zou, Feng; Yuan, De-Yi; Zeng, Xiaochun; Cao, Heping

    2015-01-28

    The Chinese chestnut (Castanea mollissima) seed provides a rich source of carbohydrates as food and feed. However, little is known about starch biosynthesis in the seeds. The objectives of this study were to determine seed composition profiles and identify genes involved in starch and sucrose metabolism. Metabolite analysis showed that starch was the major component and rapidly accumulated during seed endosperm development. Amylopectin was approximately 3-fold of amylose content in chestnut starch. Illumina platform-based transcriptome sequencing generated 56671 unigenes in two cDNA libraries from seed endosperms collected at 45 and 75 days after flowering (DAF). A total of 1537 unigenes showed expression differences ≥2-fold in the two stages of seeds including 570 up-regulated and 967 down-regulated unigenes. One hundred and fifty-two unigenes were identified as involved in starch and sucrose metabolism, including 1 for glycogenin glucosyltransferase, 4 for adenylate transporter (brittle1-type), 3 for ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGP, not brittle2- or shrunken2-type), 3 for starch synthase (SS), 2 for starch branching enzyme, 5 for starch debranching enzyme, 11 for sucrose synthase, and 3 for sucrose-phosphate synthase. Among them, 58 unigenes showed a ≥2-fold expression difference between the 45 and 75 DAF seeds including 11 up- and 47 down-regulated unigenes. The expression of 21 unigenes putatively coding for major enzymes in starch and sucrose metabolism was validated by qPCR using RNA from five seed stages. Expression profiles and correlation analysis indicated that the mRNA levels of AGP (large and small subunits), granule-bound SS2, and soluble SS1 and SS4 were well-correlated with starch accumulation in the seeds. This study suggests that the starch biosynthesis pathway in Chinese chestnut is similar to that of potato tuber/Arabidopsis leaf and differs from that of maize endosperm. The information provides valuable metabolite and genetic resources

  12. Validation of candidate gene markers for marker-assisted selection of potato cultivars with improved tuber quality.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Tacke, Eckhard; Hofferbert, Hans-Reinhardt; Lübeck, Jens; Strahwald, Josef; Draffehn, Astrid M; Walkemeier, Birgit; Gebhardt, Christiane

    2013-04-01

    Tuber yield, starch content, starch yield and chip color are complex traits that are important for industrial uses and food processing of potato. Chip color depends on the quantity of reducing sugars glucose and fructose in the tubers, which are generated by starch degradation. Reducing sugars accumulate when tubers are stored at low temperatures. Early and efficient selection of cultivars with superior yield, starch yield and chip color is hampered by the fact that reliable phenotypic selection requires multiple year and location trials. Application of DNA-based markers early in the breeding cycle, which are diagnostic for superior alleles of genes that control natural variation of tuber quality, will reduce the number of clones to be evaluated in field trials. Association mapping using genes functional in carbohydrate metabolism as markers has discovered alleles of invertases and starch phosphorylases that are associated with tuber quality traits. Here, we report on new DNA variants at loci encoding ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and the invertase Pain-1, which are associated with positive or negative effect with chip color, tuber starch content and starch yield. Marker-assisted selection (MAS) and marker validation were performed in tetraploid breeding populations, using various combinations of 11 allele-specific markers associated with tuber quality traits. To facilitate MAS, user-friendly PCR assays were developed for specific candidate gene alleles. In a multi-parental population of advanced breeding clones, genotypes were selected for having different combinations of five positive and the corresponding negative marker alleles. Genotypes combining five positive marker alleles performed on average better than genotypes with four negative alleles and one positive allele. When tested individually, seven of eight markers showed an effect on at least one quality trait. The direction of effect was as expected. Combinations of two to three marker alleles were

  13. GlgS, described previously as a glycogen synthesis control protein, negatively regulates motility and biofilm formation in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Rahimpour, Mehdi; Montero, Manuel; Almagro, Goizeder; Viale, Alejandro M; Sevilla, Ángel; Cánovas, Manuel; Muñoz, Francisco J; Baroja-Fernández, Edurne; Bahaji, Abdellatif; Eydallin, Gustavo; Dose, Hitomi; Takeuchi, Rikiya; Mori, Hirotada; Pozueta-Romero, Javier

    2013-06-15

    Escherichia coli glycogen metabolism involves the regulation of glgBXCAP operon expression and allosteric control of the GlgC [ADPG (ADP-glucose) pyrophosphorylase]-mediated catalysis of ATP and G1P (glucose-1-phosphate) to ADPG linked to glycogen biosynthesis. E. coli glycogen metabolism is also affected by glgS. Though the precise function of the protein it encodes is unknown, its deficiency causes both reduced glycogen content and enhanced levels of the GlgC-negative allosteric regulator AMP. The transcriptomic analyses carried out in the present study revealed that, compared with their isogenic BW25113 wild-type strain, glgS-null (ΔglgS) mutants have increased expression of the operons involved in the synthesis of type 1 fimbriae adhesins, flagella and nucleotides. In agreement, ΔglgS cells were hyperflagellated and hyperfimbriated, and displayed elevated swarming motility; these phenotypes all reverted to the wild-type by ectopic glgS expression. Also, ΔglgS cells accumulated high colanic acid content and displayed increased ability to form biofilms on polystyrene surfaces. F-driven conjugation based on large-scale interaction studies of glgS with all the non-essential genes of E. coli showed that deletion of purine biosynthesis genes complement the glycogen-deficient, high motility and high biofilm content phenotypes of ΔglgS cells. Overall the results of the present study indicate that glycogen deficiency in ΔglgS cells can be ascribed to high flagellar propulsion and high exopolysaccharide and purine nucleotides biosynthetic activities competing with GlgC for the same ATP and G1P pools. Supporting this proposal, glycogen-less ΔglgC cells displayed an elevated swarming motility, and accumulated high levels of colanic acid and biofilm. Furthermore, glgC overexpression reverted the glycogen-deficient, high swarming motility, high colanic acid and high biofilm content phenotypes of ΔglgS cells to the wild-type. As on the basis of the present study Glg

  14. Changes in gravity affect gene expression, protein modulation and metabolite pools of arabidopsis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampp, R.; Martzivanou, M.; Maier, R. M.; Magel, E.

    Callus cultures of Arabidopsis thaliana (cv. Columbia) in Petri dishes / suspension cultures were exposed to altered g-forces by centrifugation (1 to 10 g), klinorotation, and μ g (sounding rocket flights). Using semi-quantitative RT-PCR, transcripts of genes coding for metabolic key enzymes (ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, ADPG-PP; ß-amylase, fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase, FBPase; glyceraldehyde-P dehydrogenase, GAPDH; hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase, HMG; phenylalanine-ammonium-lyase, PAL; PEP carboxylase, PEPC) were used to monitor threshold conditions for g-number (all) and time of exposure (ß-amylase) which led to altered amounts of the gene product. Exposure to approx. 5 g and higher for 1h resulted in altered transcript levels: transcripts of ß-amylase, PAL, and PEPC were increased, those of ADPG-PP decreased, while those of FBPase, GAPDH, and HMG were not affected. This probably indicates a shift from starch synthesis to starch degradation and increased rates of anaplerosis (PEPC: supply of ketoacids for amino acid synthesis). In order to get more information about g-related effects on gene expression, we used a 1h-exposure to 7 g for a microarray analysis. Transcripts of more than 200 genes were significantly increased in amount (ratio 7g / 1g control; 21.6 and larger). They fall into several categories. Transcripts coding for enzymes of major pathways form the largest group (25%), followed by gene products involved in cellular organisation and cell wall formation / rearrangement (17%), signalling, phosphorylation/dephosphorylation (12%), proteolysis and transport (10% each), hormone synthesis plus related events (8%), defense (4%), stress-response (2%), and gravisensing (2%). Many of the alterations are part of a general stress response, but some changes related to the synthesis / rearrangement of cell wall components could be more hyper-g-specific. Using macroarrays with selected genes according to our hypergravity study (metabolism / signalling

  15. Metabolic and developmental adaptations of growing potato tubers in response to specific manipulations of the adenylate energy status.

    PubMed

    Riewe, David; Grosman, Lukasz; Zauber, Henrik; Wucke, Cornelia; Fernie, Alisdair R; Geigenberger, Peter

    2008-04-01

    Heterotrophic carbon metabolism has been demonstrated to be limited by oxygen availability in a variety of plant tissues, which in turn inevitably affects the adenylate status. To study the effect of altering adenylate energy metabolism, without changing the oxygen supply, we expressed a plastidially targeted ATP/ADP hydrolyzing phosphatase (apyrase) in tubers of growing potato (Solanum tuberosum) plants under the control of either inducible or constitutive promoters. Inducible apyrase expression in potato tubers, for a period of 24 h, resulted in a decrease in the ATP-content and the ATP-ADP ratio in the tubers. As revealed by metabolic profiling, this was accompanied by a decrease in the intermediates of sucrose to starch conversion and several plastidially synthesized amino acids, indicating a general depression of tuber metabolism. Constitutive tuber-specific apyrase expression did not lead to a reduction of ATP, but rather a decrease in ADP and an increase in AMP levels. Starch accumulation was strongly inhibited and shifted to the production of amylopectin instead of amylose in these tubers. Furthermore, the levels of almost all amino acids were decreased, although soluble sugars and hexose-Ps were highly abundant. Respiration was elevated in the constitutively expressing lines indicating a compensation for the dramatic increase in ATP hydrolysis. The increase in respiration did not affect the internal oxygen tensions in the tubers. However, the tubers developed a ginger-like phenotype having an elevated surface-volume ratio and a reduced mass per tuber. Decreased posttranslational redox activation of ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and a shift in the ratio of soluble starch synthase activity to granule-bound starch synthase activity were found to be partially responsible for the alterations in starch structure and abundance. The activity of alcohol dehydrogenase was decreased and pyruvate decarboxylase was induced, but this was neither reflected by an increase

  16. [Enzymes of starch metabolism in the chloroplasts of the bundle sheath and palisade cells of Zea mays].

    PubMed

    Huber, W; de Fekete, M A; Ziegler, H

    1969-12-01

    Isolated chloroplasts from the bundle sheath cells show considerable activity of the ADPG- and UDPG-pyrophosphorylase (EC 2.7.7.9), ADPG- and UDPG-transglucosylase (EC 2.4.1.21), and the starch phosphorylase (EC 2.4.1.1). In chloroplasts of the palisade cells, on the other hand, only the UDPG-pyrophosphorylase is remarkably active.

  17. Free Sugars in Relation to Starch Accumulation in Developing Rice Grain

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rangil; Juliano, Bienvenido O.

    1977-01-01

    The changes in sugars (water-soluble carbohydrates) were studied in the developing grain of rice (Oryza sativa L., variety IR28 and IR29) in relation to the role of these sugars as precursors of ADP glucose in starch accumulation. The levels of total sugars, total reducing sugars and free glucose, sucrose and other nonreducing sugars, maltooligosaccharides, and total and nonsucrosyl fructose followed closely the changes in the rate of starch accumulation, in both IR28 and 29; the peak value occurred 9 days after flowering. The level of soluble carbohydrates remained high in the caryopsis and also in milled rice after starch accumulation, suggesting that the supply of sugar precursors does not limit starch accumulation in the rice grain. Because of a higher level of reducing sugars, the level of free sugars in the grain of waxy rice IR29 was higher than that of nonwaxy IR28. PMID:16659864

  18. Screening of advanced potato breeding clones for resistance to cold-induced-sweetening (CIS)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The advantages of processing potatoes from low temperature storage are well known. It had previously been reported that clones with A-II isozymes of UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (UGPase) and low vacuolar acid invertase (VAcInv) activity demonstrate increased resistance to CIS. This study reports o...

  19. Metabolic Network for the Biosynthesis of Intra- and Extracellular α-Glucans Required for Virulence of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    van de Weerd, Robert; Chandra, Govind; Appelmelk, Ben; Alber, Marina; Ioerger, Thomas R.; Jacobs, William R.; Geurtsen, Jeroen; Bornemann, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis synthesizes intra- and extracellular α-glucans that were believed to originate from separate pathways. The extracellular glucose polymer is the main constituent of the mycobacterial capsule that is thought to be involved in immune evasion and virulence. However, the role of the α-glucan capsule in pathogenesis has remained enigmatic due to an incomplete understanding of α-glucan biosynthetic pathways preventing the generation of capsule-deficient mutants. Three separate and potentially redundant pathways had been implicated in α-glucan biosynthesis in mycobacteria: the GlgC-GlgA, the Rv3032 and the TreS-Pep2-GlgE pathways. We now show that α-glucan in mycobacteria is exclusively assembled intracellularly utilizing the building block α-maltose-1-phosphate as the substrate for the maltosyltransferase GlgE, with subsequent branching of the polymer by the branching enzyme GlgB. Some α-glucan is exported to form the α-glucan capsule. There is an unexpected convergence of the TreS-Pep2 and GlgC-GlgA pathways that both generate α-maltose-1-phosphate. While the TreS-Pep2 route from trehalose was already known, we have now established that GlgA forms this phosphosugar from ADP-glucose and glucose 1-phosphate 1000-fold more efficiently than its hitherto described glycogen synthase activity. The two routes are connected by the common precursor ADP-glucose, allowing compensatory flux from one route to the other. Having elucidated this unexpected configuration of the metabolic pathways underlying α-glucan biosynthesis in mycobacteria, an M. tuberculosis double mutant devoid of α-glucan could be constructed, showing a direct link between the GlgE pathway, α-glucan biosynthesis and virulence in a mouse infection model. PMID:27513637

  20. Physicochemical properties of starches and expression and activity of starch biosynthesis-related genes in sweet potatoes.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yung C; Wang, Shu Y; Gao, Huan Y; Nguyen, Khiem M; Nguyen, Chinh H; Shih, Ming C; Lin, Kuan H

    2016-05-15

    The functional properties of starches from six sweet potato varieties containing various starch components and structures were studied in an attempt to identify starch sources for industrial uses. Tainan 18 (TNN18) with high-amylose (AM) starch exhibited high setback and breakdown viscosities, high water solubility at 85°C but low swelling volume at 65°C, and high hardness and adhesiveness; in contrast, the low-AM starch of Tainung 31 (TNG31) had opposite characteristics. Seven genes related to starch biosynthesis were tested, and GBSS, SS, SBEII, ISA, and AGPase were highly expressed in TNN18 and TNG31; however, transcript levels in DBE and SBE were extremely low. GBSS and SS activity reflected the abundance of GBSS and SS mRNA in TNG31 and TNN18, and expression of AGPase, GBSS, SS, and SBE in TNN18 substantially increased content of AM. The expression and activity of DBE had a significant effect on TNG31 with increased AP content.

  1. Physicochemical properties of starches and expression and activity of starch biosynthesis-related genes in sweet potatoes.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yung C; Wang, Shu Y; Gao, Huan Y; Nguyen, Khiem M; Nguyen, Chinh H; Shih, Ming C; Lin, Kuan H

    2016-05-15

    The functional properties of starches from six sweet potato varieties containing various starch components and structures were studied in an attempt to identify starch sources for industrial uses. Tainan 18 (TNN18) with high-amylose (AM) starch exhibited high setback and breakdown viscosities, high water solubility at 85°C but low swelling volume at 65°C, and high hardness and adhesiveness; in contrast, the low-AM starch of Tainung 31 (TNG31) had opposite characteristics. Seven genes related to starch biosynthesis were tested, and GBSS, SS, SBEII, ISA, and AGPase were highly expressed in TNN18 and TNG31; however, transcript levels in DBE and SBE were extremely low. GBSS and SS activity reflected the abundance of GBSS and SS mRNA in TNG31 and TNN18, and expression of AGPase, GBSS, SS, and SBE in TNN18 substantially increased content of AM. The expression and activity of DBE had a significant effect on TNG31 with increased AP content. PMID:26776008

  2. Molecular Characterization of Organelle-Type Nudix Hydrolases in Arabidopsis1[W

    PubMed Central

    Ogawa, Takahisa; Yoshimura, Kazuya; Miyake, Hiroe; Ishikawa, Kazuya; Ito, Daisuke; Tanabe, Noriaki; Shigeoka, Shigeru

    2008-01-01

    Nudix (for nucleoside diphosphates linked to some moiety X) hydrolases act to hydrolyze ribonucleoside and deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates, nucleotide sugars, coenzymes, or dinucleoside polyphosphates. Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) contains 27 genes encoding Nudix hydrolase homologues (AtNUDX1 to -27) with a predicted distribution in the cytosol, mitochondria, and chloroplasts. Previously, cytosolic Nudix hydrolases (AtNUDX1 to -11 and -25) were characterized. Here, we conducted a characterization of organelle-type AtNUDX proteins (AtNUDX12 to -24, -26, and -27). AtNUDX14 showed pyrophosphohydrolase activity toward both ADP-ribose and ADP-glucose, although its Km value was approximately 100-fold lower for ADP-ribose (13.0 ± 0.7 μm) than for ADP-glucose (1,235 ± 65 μm). AtNUDX15 hydrolyzed not only reduced coenzyme A (118.7 ± 3.4 μm) but also a wide range of its derivatives. AtNUDX19 showed pyrophosphohydrolase activity toward both NADH (335.3 ± 5.4 μm) and NADPH (36.9 ± 3.5 μm). AtNUDX23 had flavin adenine dinucleotide pyrophosphohydrolase activity (9.1 ± 0.9 μm). Both AtNUDX26 and AtNUDX27 hydrolyzed diadenosine polyphosphates (n = 4–5). A confocal microscopic analysis using a green fluorescent protein fusion protein showed that AtNUDX15 is distributed in mitochondria and AtNUDX14 -19, -23, -26, and -27 are distributed in chloroplasts. These AtNUDX mRNAs were detected ubiquitously in various Arabidopsis tissues. The T-DNA insertion mutants of AtNUDX13, -14, -15, -19, -20, -21, -25, -26, and -27 did not exhibit any phenotypical differences under normal growth conditions. These results suggest that Nudix hydrolases in Arabidopsis control a variety of metabolites and are pertinent to a wide range of physiological processes. PMID:18815383

  3. Enzymatic and regulatory properties of the trehalose-6-phosphate synthase from the thermoacidophilic archaeon Thermoplasma acidophilum.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yanyan; Jiang, Ying; Liu, Qiulei; Wang, Ruiming; Liu, Xinli; Liu, Bo

    2014-06-01

    Trehalose-6-phosphate synthase plays an important role in trehalose metabolism. It catalyzes the transfer of glucose from UDP-glucose (UDPG) to glucose 6-phosphate to produce trehalose-6-phosphate. Herein we describe the characterization of a trehalose-6-phosphate synthase from the thermoacidophilic archaeon Thermoplasma acidophilum. The dimeric enzyme could utilize UDPG, ADP-Glucose (ADPG) and GDP-Glucose (GDPG) as glycosyl donors and various phosphorylated monosaccharides as glycosyl acceptors. The optimal temperature and pH were found to be 60 °C and pH 6, and the enzyme exhibited notable pH and thermal stability. The enzymatic activity could be stimulated by divalent metal ions and polyanions heparin and chondroitin sulfate. Moreover, the protein was considerably resistant to additives ethanol, EDTA, urea, DTT, SDS, β-mercaptoethanol, methanol, isopropanol and n-butanol. Molecular modeling and mutagenesis analysis revealed that the N-loop region was important for the catalytic efficiency of the enzyme, indicating different roles of N-loop sequences in different trehalose-6-phosphate synthases. PMID:24508535

  4. CO2-Responsive CONSTANS, CONSTANS-Like, and Time of Chlorophyll a/b Binding Protein Expression1 Protein Is a Positive Regulator of Starch Synthesis in Vegetative Organs of Rice1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Sugino, Miho; Hatanaka, Tomoko; Misoo, Shuji

    2015-01-01

    A unique CO2-Responsive CONSTANS, CONSTANS-like, and Time of Chlorophyll a/b Binding Protein1 (CCT) Protein (CRCT) containing a CCT domain but not a zinc finger motif is described, which is up-regulated under elevated CO2 in rice (Oryza sativa). The expression of CRCT showed diurnal oscillation peaked at the end of the light period and was also increased by sugars such as glucose and sucrose. Promoter β-glucuronidase analysis showed that CRCT was highly expressed in the phloem of various tissues such as leaf blade and leaf sheath. Overexpression or RNA interference knockdown of CRCT had no appreciable effect on plant growth and photosynthesis except that tiller angle was significantly increased by the overexpression. More importantly, starch content in leaf sheath, which serves as a temporary storage organ for photoassimilates, was markedly increased in overexpression lines and decreased in knockdown lines. The expressions of several genes related to starch synthesis, such as ADP-glucose pyrophospholylase and α-glucan phospholylase, were significantly changed in transgenic lines and positively correlated with the expression levels of CRCT. Given these observations, we suggest that CRCT is a positive regulator of starch accumulation in vegetative tissues, regulating coordinated expression of starch synthesis genes in response to the levels of photoassimilates. PMID:25717036

  5. Rice Plastidial N-Glycosylated Nucleotide Pyrophosphatase/Phosphodiesterase Is Transported from the ER-Golgi to the Chloroplast through the Secretory Pathway[W

    PubMed Central

    Nanjo, Yohei; Oka, Hiromasa; Ikarashi, Noriko; Kaneko, Kentaro; Kitajima, Aya; Mitsui, Toshiaki; Muñoz, Francisco José; Rodríguez-López, Milagros; Baroja-Fernández, Edurne; Pozueta-Romero, Javier

    2006-01-01

    A nucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase (NPP) activity that catalyzes the hydrolytic breakdown of ADP-glucose (ADPG) has been shown to occur in the plastidial compartment of both mono- and dicotyledonous plants. To learn more about this enzyme, we purified two NPPs from rice (Oryza sativa) and barley (Hordeum vulgare) seedlings. Both enzymes are glycosylated, since they bind to concanavalin A, stain with periodic acid–Schiff reagent, and are digested by Endo-H. A complete rice NPP cDNA, designated as NPP1, was isolated, characterized, and overexpressed in transgenic plants displaying high ADPG hydrolytic activity. Databank searches revealed that NPP1 belongs to a functionally divergent group of plant nucleotide hydrolases. NPP1 contains numerous N-glycosylation sites and a cleavable hydrophobic signal sequence that does not match with the N-terminal part of the mature protein. Both immunocytochemical analyses and confocal fluorescence microscopy of rice cells expressing NPP1 fused with green fluorescent protein (GFP) revealed that NPP1-GFP occurs in the plastidial compartment. Brefeldin A treatment of NPP1-GFP–expressing cells prevented NPP1-GFP accumulation in the chloroplasts. Endo-H digestibility studies revealed that both NPP1 and NPP1-GFP in the chloroplast are glycosylated. Collectively, these data demonstrate the trafficking of glycosylated proteins from the endoplasmic reticulum–Golgi system to the chloroplast in higher plants. PMID:17028208

  6. Enhancing the expression of starch synthase class IV results in increased levels of both transitory and long-term storage starch.

    PubMed

    Gámez-Arjona, Francisco M; Li, Jun; Raynaud, Sandy; Baroja-Fernández, Edurne; Muñoz, Francisco J; Ovecka, Miroslav; Ragel, Paula; Bahaji, Abdellatif; Pozueta-Romero, Javier; Mérida, Ángel

    2011-12-01

    Starch is an important renewable raw material with an increasing number of applications. Several attempts have been made to obtain plants that produce modified versions of starch or higher starch yield. Most of the approaches designed to increase the levels of starch have focused on the increment of the amount of ADP-glucose or ATP available for starch biosynthesis. In this work, we show that the overexpression of starch synthase class IV (SSIV) increases the levels of starch accumulated in the leaves of Arabidopsis by 30%-40%. In addition, SSIV-overexpressing lines display a higher rate of growth. The increase in starch content as a consequence of enhanced SSIV expression is also observed in long-term storage starch organs such as potato tubers. Overexpression of SSIV in potato leads to increased tuber starch content on a dry weight basis and to increased yield of starch production in terms of tons of starch/hectare. These results identify SSIV as one of the regulatory steps involved in the control of the amount of starch accumulated in plastids.

  7. Identification and characterization of a novel plastidic adenine nucleotide uniporter from Solanum tuberosum.

    PubMed

    Leroch, Michaela; Kirchberger, Simon; Haferkamp, Ilka; Wahl, Markus; Neuhaus, H Ekkehard; Tjaden, Joachim

    2005-05-01

    Homologs of BT1 (the Brittle1 protein) are found to be phylogenetically related to the mitochondrial carrier family and appear to occur in both mono- and dicotyledonous plants. Whereas BT1 from cereals is probably involved in the transport of ADP-glucose, which is essential for starch metabolism in endosperm plastids, BT1 from a noncereal plant, Solanum tuberosum (StBT1), catalyzes an adenine nucleotide uniport when functionally integrated into the bacterial cytoplasmic membrane. Import studies into intact Escherichia coli cells harboring StBT1 revealed a narrow substrate spectrum with similar affinities for AMP, ADP, and ATP of about 300-400 mum. Transiently expressed StBT1-green fluorescent protein fusion protein in tobacco leaf protoplasts showed a plastidic localization of the StBT1. In vitro synthesized radioactively labeled StBT1 was targeted to the envelope membranes of isolated spinach chloroplasts. Furthermore, we showed by real time reverse transcription-PCR a ubiquitous expression pattern of the StBT1 in autotrophic and heterotrophic potato tissues. We therefore propose that StBT1 is a plastidic adenine nucleotide uniporter used to provide the cytosol and other compartments with adenine nucleotides exclusively synthesized inside plastids.

  8. Genetic dissection of floridean starch synthesis in the cytosol of the model dinoflagellate Crypthecodinium cohnii.

    PubMed

    Dauvillée, David; Deschamps, Philippe; Ral, Jean-Philippe; Plancke, Charlotte; Putaux, Jean-Luc; Devassine, Jimi; Durand-Terrasson, Amandine; Devin, Aline; Ball, Steven G

    2009-12-15

    Starch defines an insoluble semicrystalline form of storage polysaccharides restricted to Archaeplastida (red and green algae, land plants, and glaucophytes) and some secondary endosymbiosis derivatives of the latter. While green algae and land-plants store starch in plastids by using an ADP-glucose-based pathway related to that of cyanobacteria, red algae, glaucophytes, cryptophytes, dinoflagellates, and apicomplexa parasites store a similar type of polysaccharide named floridean starch in their cytosol or periplast. These organisms are suspected to store their floridean starch from UDP-glucose in a fashion similar to heterotrophic eukaryotes. However, experimental proof of this suspicion has never been produced. Dinoflagellates define an important group of both photoautotrophic and heterotrophic protists. We now report the selection and characterization of a low starch mutant of the heterotrophic dinoflagellate Crypthecodinium cohnii. We show that the sta1-1 mutation of C. cohnii leads to a modification of the UDP-glucose-specific soluble starch synthase activity that correlates with a decrease in starch content and an alteration of amylopectin structure. These experimental results validate the UDP-glucose-based pathway proposed for floridean starch synthesis.

  9. Versatility of germin-like proteins in their sequences, expressions, and functions.

    PubMed

    Barman, Ashis Roy; Banerjee, Joydeep

    2015-09-01

    Germin-like proteins (GLPs) are evolutionary conserved ubiquitous plant glycoproteins belonging to the cupin superfamily. A large number of GLP family members have been identified from different higher and lower plant species, and those have been classified into different subfamilies. Although three histidine residues (H) and one glutamate residue (E) in germin box B and C were conserved among all the GLP subfamily members, how the sequences of one subfamily member differ from the other is unclear. Progress in the field of genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics has made it possible to understand the variation at gene level among different GLP members from diverse genera and also their biological significances. GLPs from different plant species were found to have various enzymatic properties including oxalate oxidase (OxO), superoxide dismutase (SOD), ADP glucose pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase (AGPPase), and polyphenol oxidase (PPO) activities. 'Omics' study demonstrated the expression as well as involvement of GLP family members in almost every part of higher plants as well as in lower plants. Additionally, GLPs from different species were reported to be involved in biotic as well as abiotic stresses and also in the growth and development. This review describes the present research status of GLPs from different plant species, their expressions, and functional significances. Sequence variation was detected among GLP subfamily members at the amino acid level, and based on the sequence variation and phylogenetic analyses, two new GLP subfamilies have been proposed in this review.

  10. Plastid uridine salvage activity is required for photoassimilate allocation and partitioning in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mingjie; Thelen, Jay J

    2011-08-01

    Nucleotides are synthesized from de novo and salvage pathways. To characterize the uridine salvage pathway, two genes, UKL1 and UKL2, that tentatively encode uridine kinase (UK) and uracil phosphoribosyltransferase (UPRT) bifunctional enzymes were studied in Arabidopsis thaliana. T-DNA insertions in UKL1 and UKL2 reduced transcript expression and increased plant tolerance to toxic analogs 5-fluorouridine and 5-fluorouracil. Enzyme activity assays using purified recombinant proteins indicated that UKL1 and UKL2 have UK but not UPRT activity. Subcellular localization using a C-terminal enhanced yellow fluorescent protein fusion indicated that UKL1 and UKL2 localize to plastids. The ukl2 mutant shows reduced transient leaf starch during the day. External application of orotate rescued this phenotype in ukl2, indicating pyrimidine pools are limiting for starch synthesis in ukl2. Intermediates for lignin synthesis were upregulated, and there was increased lignin and reduced cellulose content in the ukl2 mutant. Levels of ATP, ADP, ADP-glucose, UTP, UDP, and UDP-glucose were altered in a light-dependent manner. Seed composition of the ukl1 and ukl2 mutants included lower oil and higher protein compared with the wild type. Unlike single gene mutants, the ukl1 ukl2 double mutant has severe developmental defects and reduced biomass accumulation, indicating these enzymes catalyze redundant reactions. These findings point to crucial roles played by uridine salvage for photoassimilate allocation and partitioning. PMID:21828290

  11. Metabolic symbiosis and the birth of the plant kingdom.

    PubMed

    Deschamps, Philippe; Colleoni, Christophe; Nakamura, Yasunori; Suzuki, Eiji; Putaux, Jean-Luc; Buléon, Alain; Haebel, Sophie; Ritte, Gerhard; Steup, Martin; Falcón, Luisa I; Moreira, David; Löffelhardt, Wolfgang; Raj, Jenifer Nirmal; Plancke, Charlotte; d'Hulst, Christophe; Dauvillée, David; Ball, Steven

    2008-03-01

    Eukaryotic cells are composed of a variety of membrane-bound organelles that are thought to derive from symbiotic associations involving bacteria, archaea, or other eukaryotes. In addition to acquiring the plastid, all Archaeplastida and some of their endosymbiotic derivatives can be distinguished from other organisms by the fact that they accumulate starch, a semicrystalline-storage polysaccharide distantly related to glycogen and never found elsewhere. We now provide the first evidence for the existence of starch in a particular species of single-cell diazotrophic cyanobacterium. We provide evidence for the existence in the eukaryotic host cell at the time of primary endosymbiosis of an uridine diphosphoglucose (UDP-glucose)-based pathway similar to that characterized in amoebas. Because of the monophyletic origin of plants, we can define the genetic makeup of the Archaeplastida ancestor with respect to storage polysaccharide metabolism. The most likely enzyme-partitioning scenario between the plastid's ancestor and its eukaryotic host immediately suggests the precise nature of the ancient metabolic symbiotic relationship. The latter consisted in the export of adenosine diphosphoglucose (ADP-glucose) from the cyanobiont in exchange for the import of reduced nitrogen from the host. We further speculate that the monophyletic origin of plastids may lie in an organism with close relatedness to present-day group V cyanobacteria. PMID:18093994

  12. Nicotinamide nucleotide synthesis in regenerating rat liver

    PubMed Central

    Ferris, G. M.; Clark, J. B.

    1971-01-01

    1. The concentrations and total content of the nicotinamide nucleotides were measured in the livers of rats at various times after partial hepatectomy and laparotomy (sham hepatectomy) and correlated with other events in the regeneration process. 2. The NAD content and concentration in rat liver were relatively unaffected by laparotomy, but fell to a minimum, 25 and 33% below control values respectively, 24h after partial hepatectomy. NADP content and concentration were affected similarly by both laparotomy and partial hepatectomy, falling rapidly and remaining depressed for up to 48h. 3. The effect of injecting various doses of nicotinamide on the liver DNA and NAD 18h after partial hepatectomy was studied and revealed an inverse correlation between NAD content and DNA content. 4. Injections of nicotinamide at various times after partial hepatectomy revealed that the ability to synthesize NAD from nicotinamide was impaired during the first 12h, rose to a peak at 26h and fell again by 48h after partial hepatectomy. 5. The total liver activity of NAD pyrophosphorylase (EC 2.7.7.1) remained at or slightly above the initial value for 12h after partial hepatectomy and then rose continuously until 48h after operation. The activity of NMN pyrophosphorylase (EC 2.4.2.12) showed a similar pattern of change after partial hepatectomy, but was at no time greater than 5% of the activity of NAD pyrophosphorylase. 6. The results are discussed with reference to the control of NAD synthesis in rapidly dividing tissue. It is suggested that the availability of cofactors and substrates for NAD synthesis is more important as a controlling factor than the maximum enzyme activities. It is concluded that the low concentrations of nicotinamide nucleotides in rapidly dividing tissues are the result of competition between NAD synthesis and nucleic acid synthesis for common precursor and cofactors. PMID:4398891

  13. Starch mutants of Chlamydomonas

    SciTech Connect

    Berry-Lowe, S.L.; Schmidt, G.W. )

    1990-05-01

    Wild type Chlamydomonas accumulates starch and triglycerides when grown under nitrogen limiting conditions. Toward elucidation of the mechanisms for control of starch biosynthesis, we isolated mutants impaired int he accumulation of storage carbohydrates. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (strain ya-12) was mutagenized by UV irradiation and colonies were screened by iodine staining after growth in darkness. Mutants, denoted ais for altered in iodine staining, have been characterized by electron microscopy and assays for starch synthease, ADPG-pyrophosphorylase, phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI), phosphoglucomutase and fructose 1,6-bisphosphatase, and amylase activities. Transcript analysis of wild type and mutant RNAs with PGI, ADPG-pyrophosphorylase, and waxy probes have also been carried out. No deficiencies of any of these components have been detected. Furthermore, long-term cultures of ya-12 and ais-1d in nitrogen-limited chemostats have been studied; starch also does not accumulate in ais-1d under these conditions. Thus, the lesion affects an essential factor of unknown identity that is required for starch synthesis.

  14. Regulation of starch synthesis in potato tubers

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, H.; Oparka, K.; Viola, R.; Wright, K.; Ross, H. )

    1990-05-01

    Following tuber excision from the mother plant sucrose synthase activity fell from 3,120 to 960 nmol/g.f. wt./h within 7 days and starch synthesis ({sup 14}C sucrose incorporated into isolated discs) from 23 to 7 nmol/g.f. wt./h. While the maximum catalytic activity of sucrose synthase was more than sufficient to account for the observed rate of starch synthesis a maximum of 27% of sucrose incorporated by discs was converted into starch within 3 h. This compared with 80% conversion of {sup 14}C glucose incorporated. Tuber excision also reduced the rate of starch biosynthesis with glucose as a substrate (from 206 to 64 nmol/g.f. wt./h). The activities of UDPG-pyrophosphorylase, PPi-PFK, ATP-PFK, starch synthase and hexokinase (glucose or fructose substrates) were unaffected by tuber removal. ADPG pyrophosphorylase activity was reduced from 8,000 to 4,500 nmol/g.f. wt./h. Preliminary experiments indicate that the decline in sucrose synthease activity is prevented by maintaining sucrose flux into tubers through the cut stolon.

  15. KONJAC1 and 2 Are Key Factors for GDP-Mannose Generation and Affect l-Ascorbic Acid and Glucomannan Biosynthesis in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Sawake, Shota; Tajima, Noriaki; Mortimer, Jenny C; Lao, Jeemeng; Ishikawa, Toshiki; Yu, Xiaolan; Yamanashi, Yukiko; Yoshimi, Yoshihisa; Kawai-Yamada, Maki; Dupree, Paul; Tsumuraya, Yoichi; Kotake, Toshihisa

    2015-12-01

    Humans are unable to synthesize l-ascorbic acid (AsA), yet it is required as a cofactor in many critical biochemical reactions. The majority of human dietary AsA is obtained from plants. In Arabidopsis thaliana, a GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylase (GMPP), VITAMIN C DEFECTIVE1 (VTC1), catalyzes a rate-limiting step in AsA synthesis: the formation of GDP-Man. In this study, we identified two nucleotide sugar pyrophosphorylase-like proteins, KONJAC1 (KJC1) and KJC2, which stimulate the activity of VTC1. The kjc1kjc2 double mutant exhibited severe dwarfism, indicating that KJC proteins are important for growth and development. The kjc1 mutation reduced GMPP activity to 10% of wild-type levels, leading to a 60% reduction in AsA levels. On the contrary, overexpression of KJC1 significantly increased GMPP activity. The kjc1 and kjc1kjc2 mutants also exhibited significantly reduced levels of glucomannan, which is also synthesized from GDP-Man. Recombinant KJC1 and KJC2 enhanced the GMPP activity of recombinant VTC1 in vitro, while KJCs did not show GMPP activity. Yeast two-hybrid assays suggested that the stimulation of GMPP activity occurs via interaction of KJCs with VTC1. These results suggest that KJCs are key factors for the generation of GDP-Man and affect AsA level and glucomannan accumulation through the stimulation of VTC1 GMPP activity.

  16. Heterologous Production of Hyaluronic Acid in an ε-Poly-l-Lysine Producer, Streptomyces albulus

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimura, Tomohiro; Shibata, Nobuyuki; Hamano, Yoshimitsu

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is used in a wide range of medical applications, where its performance and therapeutic efficacy are highly dependent on its molecular weight. In the microbial production of HA, it has been suggested that a high level of intracellular ATP enhances the productivity and molecular weight of HA. Here, we report on heterologous HA production in an ε-poly-l-lysine producer, Streptomyces albulus, which has the potential to generate ATP at high level. The hasA gene from Streptococcus zooepidemicus, which encodes HA synthase, was refactored and expressed under the control of a late-log growth phase-operating promoter. The expression of the refactored hasA gene, along with genes coding for UDP-glucose dehydrogenase, UDP-N-acetylglucosamine pyrophosphorylase, and UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, which are involved in HA precursor sugar biosynthesis, resulted in efficient production of HA in the 2.0 MDa range, which is greater than typical bacterial HA, demonstrating that a sufficient amount of ATP was provided to support the biosynthesis of the precursor sugars, which in turn promoted HA production. In addition, unlike in the case of streptococcal HA, S. albulus-derived HA was not cell associated. Based on these findings, our heterologous production system appears to have several advantages for practical HA production. We propose that the present system could be applicable to the heterologous production of a wide variety of molecules other than HA in the case their biosynthesis pathways require ATP in vivo. PMID:25795665

  17. Growth, /sup 14/C-sucrose uptake, and metabolites of starch synthesis in apical and basal kernels of corn (Zea mays L. )

    SciTech Connect

    Greenberg, J.M.

    1985-01-01

    Developing field-grown kernels of corn (Zea mays L. cv. Cornell 175) from the base and apex of the ear were sampled from seven to 70 days after pollination (DAP) an compared with respect to dry weight, ability to take up /sup 14/C-sucrose from solution in vitro, and content of sucrose, glucose, starch, glucose-1-P (G1P), glucose-6-P (G6P), fructose-6-P (F6P), ADP-glucose (ADPG), and UDP-glucose (UDPG). ADPG and UDPG were analyzed by HPLC. All other metabolites were analyzed enzymatically. Simultaneous hand-pollination of all ovaries in an ear did not reduce the difference between apical and basal kernels in dry weight, indicating that the latter fertilization of apical kernels was not responsible for their lesser mature dry weight. Detached kernels took up /sup 14/C-sucrose (0.3-400 mM) and glucose (5-100 mM) at rates linearly proportional to the sugar concentration. Glucose, fructose, and sorbitol did not inhibit uptake of /sup 14/C-sucrose. Uptake was not stimulated by 5 mM CaCl/sup 2/ or the addition of buffers (pH 4.5-6.7) to the medium. Sulfhydryl reagents (PCMBS, NEM) and metabolic inhibitors (TNBS, DNP, NaF) did not reduce uptake. These observations suggest that sucrose is taken up by a non-saturable, non-energy-requiring mechanism. Sucrose uptake increased throughout development, especially at the stage when basal kernels began to accumulate more dry weight than apical kernels (10-20 DAP in freely pollinated ears; 25 DAP in synchronously pollinated ears). Hydrolysis of incorporated sucrose increased from 87% at 14 DAP to 99% by 57 DAP.

  18. Differential messenger RNA gradients in the unicellular alga Acetabularia acetabulum. Role of the cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Vogel, Heiko; Grieninger, Gerd E; Zetsche, Klaus H

    2002-07-01

    The unicellular green alga Acetabularia acetabulum has proven itself to be a superior model for studies of morphogenesis because of its large size and distinctive polar morphology. The giant cell forms an elongated tube (a stalk of up to 60 mm in length), which at its apical pole makes whorls of hairs, followed by one whorl of gametophores in the shape of a cap. At its basal pole, the cell extends into a rhizoid wherein the single nucleus is positioned. In this study, we have determined the level of specific messenger RNAs in the apical, middle, and basal regions using reverse transcriptase-PCR methodology. Four mRNA classes were distinguished: those that were uniformly distributed (small subunit of Rubisco, actin-1, ADP-glucose, centrin, and alpha- and beta-tubulin), those that expressed apical/basal (calmodulin-4) or basal/apical gradients (calmodulin-2 and a Ran-G protein), and those with development-specific patterns of distribution (mitogen-activated protein kinase, actin-2, and UDP-glucose-epimerase). Restoration of the apical/basal calmodulin-4 mRNA gradient after amputation of the apical region of the cell requires the nucleus and was abolished by cytochalasin D. Accumulation of actin-1 mRNA in the vicinity of the wound set by the amputation needs, likewise, the presence of the nucleus and was also inhibited by cytochalasin. This suggests that actin microfilaments of the cytoskeleton are involved in directed transport and/or anchoring of these mRNAs.

  19. Alanine aminotransferase 1 (OsAlaAT1) plays an essential role in the regulation of starch storage in rice endosperm.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jungil; Kim, Sung-Ryul; Lee, Sang-Kyu; Choi, Heebak; Jeon, Jong-Seong; An, Gynheung

    2015-11-01

    Alteration of storage substances, in particular the major storage form starch, leads to floury endosperm. Because floury mutants have physical attributes for milling processes, identification and characterization of those mutants are valuable. In this study we identified a floury endosperm mutant caused by a T-DNA insertion in Oryza sativa alanine-aminotransferase1 (OsAlaAT1). OsAlaAT1 is localized in the cytosol and has aminotransferase enzyme activity. The osalaat1 mutant has less amylose and its amylopectin is structurally altered. OsAlaAT1 is predominantly expressed in developing seeds during active starch synthesis. AlaAT catalyzes the interconversion of pyruvate to alanine, and this pathway is activated under low-oxygen conditions. Consistently, OsAlaAT1 is induced by such conditions. Expression of the starch synthesis genes AGPases, OsSSI, OsSSIIa, and OsPPDKB is decreased in the mutant. Thus, our observations suggest that OsAlaAT1 plays an essential role in starch synthesis in developing seeds that are exposed to low concentrations of oxygen. PMID:26475189

  20. Cold-night responses in grapevine inflorescences.

    PubMed

    Sawicki, Mélodie; Ait Barka, Essaid; Clément, Christophe; Gilard, Françoise; Tcherkez, Guillaume; Baillieul, Fabienne; Vaillant-Gaveau, Nathalie; Jacquard, Cédric

    2015-10-01

    Cold nights impact grapevine flower development and fruit set. Regulation at the female meiosis stepmay be of considerable importance for further understanding on how flower reacts to cold stress. In this study, the impact of chilling temperature (0 °C overnight) on carbon metabolism was investigated in the inflorescencesof two cultivars, Pinot noir (Pinot) and Gewurztraminer (Gewurtz.). Fluctuations in photosynthetic activity and carbohydrate metabolism were monitored by analyzing gas exchanges, simultaneous photosystem I and II activities, andcarbohydrate content. Further, the expression of PEPc, PC, FNR, ISO, OXO, AGPase, amylases and invertase genes, activities of various enzymes, as well as metabolomic analysis were attained. Results showed that the chilling night has different impacts depending on cultivars. Thus, in Gewurtz., net photosynthesis (Pn) was transiently increased whereas, in Pinot, the Pn increase was persistent and concomitant with an inhibition of respiration. However, during the days following the cold night, photosynthetic activity was decreased, and the cyclic electron flow was inhibited in Gewurtz., suggesting lower efficient energy dissipation. Likewise, metabolomic analysis revealed that several metabolites contents (namely alanine, GABA, lysine and succinate)were distinctly modulated in the two cultivars. Taking together, these results reflect a photosynthetic metabolism alteration or internal CO2 conductance in Gewurtz. explaining partly why Pinot is less susceptible to cold stress. PMID:26398796

  1. Inhibition of raffinose oligosaccharide breakdown delays germination of pea seeds.

    PubMed

    Blöchl, Andreas; Peterbauer, Thomas; Richter, Andreas

    2007-08-01

    Raffinose family oligosaccharides (RFOs) are almost ubiquitous in seeds and have been hypothesized to constitute an important energy source during germination. To test this hypothesis we applied a specific alpha-galactosidase inhibitor (1-deoxygalactonojirimycin, DGJ) to germinating pea seeds, resulting in a complete blocking of RFO breakdown. The germination rates of DGJ-treated seeds dropped drastically to about 25% of controls two days after imbibition. Similarly, the activities of the key enzymes in the galactose salvage pathway galactokinase, UDP-galactose pyrophosphorylase and UDP-galactose 4'-epimerase, were also significantly lower in seeds treated with the inhibitor. The inhibitory effect on germination could be relieved by galactose but only partially by sucrose, indicating that galactose, in addition to providing easily available energy for growth, may also be an important component of the sugar signaling pathway during germination. Taken together our study, for the first time, provides clear evidence that RFOs play an important role for early germination.

  2. Enhanced gellan gum production by hydrogen peroxide (H2O 2) induced oxidative stresses in Sphingomonas paucimobilis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guilan; Sheng, Long; Tong, Qunyi

    2014-04-01

    In this study, the effect of H2O2-induced oxidative stress on gellan gum production and cell growth were investigated. Gellan gum production was improved and cell growth was inhibited by H2O2. A multiple H2O2 stresses with different concentrations were developed to optimize gellan gum production. A maximal gellan gum yield (22.52 g/L), which was 35.58 % higher than the control, was observed with 2, 2, 3, 4 mmol/L H2O2 added at 6, 12, 18, 24 h, respectively. Moreover, UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase activity and glucosyltransferase activity were increased with H2O2 stresses. This new strategy of multiple H2O2-induced oxidative stresses would be further applied to gellan gum production in future study.

  3. A novel sucrose synthase pathway for sucrose degradation in cultured sycamore cells.

    PubMed

    Huber, S C; Akazawa, T

    1986-08-01

    Enzymes of sucrose degradation and glycolysis in cultured sycamore (Acer pseudoplatanus L.) cells were assayed and characterized in crude extracts and after partial purification, in an attempt to identify pathways for sucrose catabolism. Desalted cell extracts contained similar activities (20-40 nanomoles per milligram protein per minute) of sucrose synthase, neutral invertase, glucokinase, fructokinase, phosphofructokinase, and UDPglucose pyrophosphorylase (assayed with 2 micromolar pyrophosphate (PPi). PPi-linked phosphofructokinase activity was virtually dependent upon fructose 2,6-bisphosphate, and the maximum activity exceeded that of ATP-linked phosphofructokinase. Hexokinase activity, with glucose as substrate, was highly specific for ATP, whereas fructokinase activity was relatively nonspecific. At 1 millimolar nucleoside triphosphate, fructokinase activity decreased in the order: UTP > ATP > CTP > GTP. We propose two pathways for sucrose degradation. One involves invertase action, followed by classical glycolysis of hexose sugars, and the other is a novel pathway initiated by sucrose synthase. The K(m) for sucrose of sucrose synthase was severalfold lower than that of neutral invertase (15 versus 65 millimolar), which may determine carbon partitioning between the two pathways. The sucrose synthase pathway proposed involves cycling of uridylates and PPi. UDPglucose pyrophosphorylase, which is shown to be an effective ;PPi-scavenger,' would consume PPi and form UTP. The UTP could be then utilized in the UTP-linked fructokinase reaction, thereby forming UDP for sucrose synthase. The source of PPi is postulated to arise from the back reaction of PPi-linked phosphofructokinase. Sycamore cells contained a substantial endogenous pool of PPi (about 3 nanomoles per gram fresh weight, roughly 1/10 the amount of ATP in these cells), and sufficient fructose 2,6-bisphosphate (0.09 nanomole per gram fresh weight) to activate the PPi-linked phosphofructokinase. Possible

  4. A mannosyl transferase required for lipopolysaccharide inner core assembly in Rhizobium leguminosarum. Purification, substrate specificity, and expression in Salmonella waaC mutants.

    PubMed

    Kanipes, Margaret I; Ribeiro, Anthony A; Lin, Shanhua; Cotter, Robert J; Raetz, Christian R H

    2003-05-01

    The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) core domain of Gram-negative bacteria plays an important role in outer membrane stability and host interactions. Little is known about the biochemical properties of the glycosyltransferases that assemble the LPS core. We now report the purification and characterization of the Rhizobium leguminosarum mannosyl transferase LpcC, which adds a mannose unit to the inner 3-deoxy-d-manno-octulosonic acid (Kdo) moiety of the LPS precursor, Kdo(2)-lipid IV(A). LpcC containing an N-terminal His(6) tag was assayed using GDP-mannose as the donor and Kdo(2)-[4'-(32)P]lipid IV(A) as the acceptor and was purified to near homogeneity. Sequencing of the N terminus confirmed that the purified enzyme is the lpcC gene product. Mild acid hydrolysis of the glycolipid generated in vitro by pure LpcC showed that the mannosylation occurs on the inner Kdo residue of Kdo(2)-[4'-(32)P]lipid IV(A). A lipid acceptor substrate containing two Kdo moieties is required by LpcC, since no activity is seen with lipid IV(A) or Kdo-lipid IV(A). The purified enzyme can use GDP-mannose or, to a lesser extent, ADP-mannose (both of which have the alpha-anomeric configuration) for the glycosylation of Kdo(2)-[4'-(32)P]lipid IV(A). Little or no activity is seen with ADP-glucose, UDP-glucose, UDP-GlcNAc, or UDP-galactose. A Salmonella typhimurium waaC mutant, which lacks the enzyme for incorporating the inner l-glycero-d-manno-heptose moiety of LPS, regains LPS with O-antigen when complemented with lpcC. An Escherichia coli heptose-less waaC-waaF deletion mutant expressing the R. leguminosarum lpcC gene likewise generates a hybrid LPS species consisting of Kdo(2)-lipid A plus a single mannose residue. Our results demonstrate that heterologous lpcC expression can be used to modify the structure of the Salmonella and E. coli LPS cores in living cells.

  5. Enzymatic synthesis of lipopolysaccharide in Escherichia coli. Purification and properties of heptosyltransferase i.

    PubMed

    Kadrmas, J L; Raetz, C R

    1998-01-30

    Heptosyltransferase I, encoded by the rfaC(waaC) gene of Escherichia coli, is thought to add L-glycero-D-manno-heptose to the inner 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonic acid (Kdo) residue of the lipopolysaccharide core. Lipopolysaccharide isolated from mutants defective in rfaC lack heptose and all other sugars distal to heptose. The putative donor, ADP-L-glycero-D-manno-heptose, has never been fully characterized and is not readily available. In cell extracts, the analog ADP-mannose can serve as an alternative donor for RfaC-catalyzed glycosylation of the acceptor, Kdo2-lipid IVA. Using a T7 promoter construct that overexpresses RfaC approximately 15,000-fold, the enzyme has been purified to near homogeneity. NH2-terminal sequencing confirms that the purified enzyme is the rfaC gene product. The subunit molecular mass is 36 kDa. Enzymatic activity is dependent upon the presence of Triton X-100 and is maximal at pH 7.5. The apparent Km (determined at near saturating concentrations of the second substrate) is 1.5 mM for ADP-mannose and 4.5 microM for Kdo2-lipid IVA. Chemical hydrolysis of the RfaC reaction product at 100 degrees C in the presence of sodium acetate and 1% sodium dodecyl sulfate generates fragments consistent with the inner Kdo residue of Kdo2-lipid IVA as the site of mannosylation. The analog, Kdo-lipid IVA, functions as an acceptor, but is mannosylated at less than 1% the rate of Kdo2-lipid IVA. The purified enzyme displays no activity with ADP-glucose, GDP-mannose, UDP-glucose, or UDP-galactose. Mannosylation of Kdo2-lipid IVA catalyzed by RfaC proceeds in high yield and may be useful for the synthesis of lipopolysaccharide analogs. Pure RfaC can also be used together with Kdo2-[4'-32P]lipid IVA to assay for the physiological donor (presumably ADP-L-glycero-D-manno-heptose) in a crude, low molecular weight fraction isolated from wild type cells.

  6. The transfer of mannose from guanosine diphosphate mannose to dolichol phosphate and protein by pig liver endoplasmic reticulum

    PubMed Central

    Richards, J. B.; Hemming, F. W.

    1972-01-01

    incubation was transferred to protein. A scheme is proposed to explain the variations with time in the production of radioactive mannolipid, mannoprotein, mannose 1-phosphate and mannose from GDP-[14C]mannose that takes account of the above observations. ATP, ADP, UTP, GDP, ADP-glucose and UDP-glucose markedly inhibited the transfer of mannose to the mannolipid. PMID:4655455

  7. Molecular Aspect of Good Eating Quality Formation in Japonica Rice

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Ming-Mao; Abdula, Sailila E.; Lee, Hye-Jung; Cho, Young-Chan; Han, Long-Zhi; Koh, Hee-Jong; Cho, Yong-Gu

    2011-01-01

    The composition of amylopectin is the determinant of rice eating quality under certain threshold of protein content and the ratio of amylose and amylopectin. In molecular biology level, the fine structure of amylopectin is determined by relative activities of starch branching enzyme (SBE), granule-bound starch synthase (GBSS), and soluble starch synthase (SSS) in rice grain under the same ADP-Glucose level. But the underlying mechanism of eating quality in molecular biology level remains unclear. This paper reports the differences on major parameters such as SNP and insertion-deletion sites, RNA expressions, and enzyme activities associated with eating quality of japonica varieties. Eight japonica rice varieties with significant differences in various eating quality parameters such as palatability and protein content were used in this experiment. Association analysis between nucleotide polymorphism and eating quality showed that S12 and S13 loci in SBE1, S55 in SSS1, S58 in SSS2A were significantly associated with apparent amylose content, alkali digestion value, setback viscosity, consistency viscosity, pasting temperature, which explained most of the variation in apparent amylose content, setback viscosity, and consistency viscosity; and explained almost all variations in alkali digestion value and pasting temperature. Thirty-five SNPs and insertion-deletions from SBE1, SBE3, GBSS1, SSS1, and SSS2A differentiated high or intermediate palatability rice varieties from low palatability rice varieties. Correlation analysis between enzyme activities and eating quality properties revealed that SBE25 and SSS15/W15 were positively correlated with palatability, whereas GBSS10 and GBSS15 were negatively correlated. Gene expressions showed that SBE1 and SBE3 expressions in high palatability varieties tended to be higher than middle and low palatability varieties. Collectively, SBE1, SBE3, SSS1, and SSS2A, especially SBE1 and SBE3 could improve eating quality, but GBSS1

  8. A Mannosyl Transferase Required for Lipopolysaccharide Inner Core Assembly in Rhizobium leguminosarum

    PubMed Central

    Kanipes, Margaret I.; Ribeiro, Anthony A.; Lin, Shanhua; Cotter, Robert J.; Raetz, Christian R. H.

    2008-01-01

    The lipopolysaccharide (LPS) core domain of Gram-negative bacteria plays an important role in outer membrane stability and host interactions. Little is known about the biochemical properties of the glycosyltransferases that assemble the LPS core. We now report the purification and characterization of the Rhizobium leguminosarum mannosyl transferase LpcC, which adds a mannose unit to the inner 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonic acid (Kdo) moiety of the LPS precursor, Kdo2-lipid IVA. LpcC containing an N-terminal His6 tag was assayed using GDP-mannose as the donor and Kdo2-[4′-32P]lipid IVA as the acceptor and was purified to near homogeneity. Sequencing of the N terminus confirmed that the purified enzyme is the lpcC gene product. Mild acid hydrolysis of the glycolipid generated in vitro by pure LpcC showed that the mannosylation occurs on the inner Kdo residue of Kdo2-[4′-32P]lipid IVA. A lipid acceptor substrate containing two Kdo moieties is required by LpcC, since no activity is seen with lipid IVA or Kdo-lipid IVA. The purified enzyme can use GDP-mannose or, to a lesser extent, ADP-mannose (both of which have the α-anomeric configuration) for the glycosylation of Kdo2-[4′-32P]lipid IVA. Little or no activity is seen with ADP-glucose, UDP-glucose, UDP-GlcNAc, or UDP-galactose. A Salmonella typhimurium waaC mutant, which lacks the enzyme for incorporating the inner L-glycero-D-manno-heptose moiety of LPS, regains LPS with O-antigen when complemented with lpcC. An Escherichia coli heptose-less waaC-waaF deletion mutant expressing the R. leguminosarum lpcC gene likewise generates a hybrid LPS species consisting of Kdo2-lipid A plus a single mannose residue. Our results demonstrate that heterologous lpcC expression can be used to modify the structure of the Salmonella and E. coli LPS cores in living cells. PMID:12591937

  9. Relaxed Sugar Donor Selectivity of a Sinorhizobium meliloti Ortholog of the Rhizobium leguminosarum Mannosyl Transferase LpcC. Role of the Lipopolysaccharide Core in Symbiosis of Rhizobiaceae with Plants*

    PubMed Central

    Kanipes, Margaret I.; Kalb, Suzanne R.; Cotter, Robert J.; Hozbor, Daniela F.; Lagares, Antonio; Raetz, Christian R. H.

    2008-01-01

    The lpcC gene of Rhizobium leguminosarum and the lpsB gene of Sinorhizobium meliloti encode protein orthologs that are 58% identical over their entire lengths of about 350 amino acid residues. LpcC and LpsB are required for symbiosis with pea and Medicago plants, respectively. S. meliloti lpsB complements a mutant of R. leguminosarum defective in lpcC, but the converse does not occur. LpcC encodes a highly selective mannosyl transferase that utilizes GDP-mannose to glycosylate the inner 3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonic acid (Kdo) residue of the lipopolysaccharide precursor Kdo2-lipid IVA. We now demonstrate that LpsB can also efficiently mannosylate the same acceptor substrate as does LpcC. Unexpectedly, however, the sugar nucleotide selectivity of LpsB is greatly relaxed compared with that of LpcC. Membranes of the wild-type S. meliloti strain 2011 catalyze the glycosylation of Kdo2-[4′-32P]lipid IVA at comparable rates using a diverse set of sugar nucleotides, including GDP-mannose, ADP-mannose, UDP-glucose, and ADP-glucose. This complex pattern of glycosylation is due entirely to LpsB, since membranes of the S. meliloti lpsB mutant 6963 do not glycosylate Kdo2-[4′-32P]lipid IVA in the presence of any of these sugar nucleotides. Expression of lpsB in E. coli using a T7lac promoter-driven construct results in the appearance of similar multiple glycosyl transferase activities seen in S. meliloti 2011 membranes. Constructs expressing lpcC display only mannosyl transferase activity. We conclude that LpsB, despite its high degree of similarity to LpcC, is a much more versatile glycosyltransferase, probably accounting for the inability of lpcC to complement S. meliloti lpsB mutants. Our findings have important implications for the regulation of core glycosylation in S. meliloti and other bacteria containing LpcC orthologs. PMID:12591936

  10. The Role of Cysteine Residues in Redox Regulation and Protein Stability of Arabidopsis thaliana Starch Synthase 1

    PubMed Central

    Skryhan, Katsiaryna; Cuesta-Seijo, Jose A.; Nielsen, Morten M.; Marri, Lucia; Mellor, Silas B.; Glaring, Mikkel A.; Jensen, Poul E.; Palcic, Monica M.; Blennow, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Starch biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana is strictly regulated. In leaf extracts, starch synthase 1 (AtSS1) responds to the redox potential within a physiologically relevant range. This study presents data testing two main hypotheses: 1) that specific thiol-disulfide exchange in AtSS1 influences its catalytic function 2) that each conserved Cys residue has an impact on AtSS1 catalysis. Recombinant AtSS1 versions carrying combinations of cysteine-to-serine substitutions were generated and characterized in vitro. The results demonstrate that AtSS1 is activated and deactivated by the physiological redox transmitters thioredoxin f1 (Trxf1), thioredoxin m4 (Trxm4) and the bifunctional NADPH-dependent thioredoxin reductase C (NTRC). AtSS1 displayed an activity change within the physiologically relevant redox range, with a midpoint potential equal to -306 mV, suggesting that AtSS1 is in the reduced and active form during the day with active photosynthesis. Cys164 and Cys545 were the key cysteine residues involved in regulatory disulfide formation upon oxidation. A C164S_C545S double mutant had considerably decreased redox sensitivity as compared to wild type AtSS1 (30% vs 77%). Michaelis-Menten kinetics and molecular modeling suggest that both cysteines play important roles in enzyme catalysis, namely, Cys545 is involved in ADP-glucose binding and Cys164 is involved in acceptor binding. All the other single mutants had essentially complete redox sensitivity (98–99%). In addition of being part of a redox directed activity “light switch”, reactivation tests and low heterologous expression levels indicate that specific cysteine residues might play additional roles. Specifically, Cys265 in combination with Cys164 can be involved in proper protein folding or/and stabilization of translated protein prior to its transport into the plastid. Cys442 can play an important role in enzyme stability upon oxidation. The physiological and phylogenetic relevance of these findings

  11. Changes in the activities of starch metabolism enzymes in rice grains in response to elevated CO2 concentration.

    PubMed

    Xie, Li-Yong; Lin, Er-Da; Zhao, Hong-Liang; Feng, Yong-Xiang

    2016-05-01

    The global atmospheric CO(2) concentration is currently (2012) 393.1 μmol mol(-1), an increase of approximately 42 % over pre-industrial levels. In order to understand the responses of metabolic enzymes to elevated CO(2) concentrations, an experiment was conducted using the Free Air CO(2) Enrichment (FACE )system. Two conventional japonica rice varieties (Oryza sativa L. ssp. japonica) grown in North China, Songjing 9 and Daohuaxiang 2, were used in this study. The activities of ADPG pyrophosphorylase, soluble and granule-bound starch synthases, and soluble and granule-bound starch branching enzymes were measured in rice grains, and the effects of elevated CO(2) on the amylose and protein contents of the grains were analyzed. The results showed that elevated CO(2) levels significantly increased the activity of ADPG pyrophosphorylase at day 8, 24, and 40 after flower, with maximum increases of 56.67 % for Songjing 9 and 21.31 % for Daohuaxiang 2. Similarly, the activities of starch synthesis enzymes increased significantly from the day 24 after flower to the day 40 after flower, with maximum increases of 36.81 % for Songjing 9 and 66.67 % for Daohuaxiang 2 in soluble starch synthase (SSS), and 25.00 % for Songjing 9 and 36.44 % for Daohuaxiang 2 in granule-bound starch synthase (GBSS), respectively. The elevated CO(2) concentration significantly increased the activity of soluble starch branching enzyme (SSBE) at day 16, 32, and 40 after flower, and also significantly increased the activity of granule-bound starch branching enzyme (GBSBE) at day 8, 32, and 40 after flower. The elevated CO(2) concentration increased the peak values of enzyme activity, and the timing of the activity peaks for SSS and GBSBE were earlier in Songjing 9 than in Daohuaxiang 2. There were obvious differences in developmental stages between the two varieties of rice, which indicated that the elevated CO(2) concentration increased enzyme activity expression and starch synthesis, affecting the

  12. Changes in the activities of starch metabolism enzymes in rice grains in response to elevated CO2 concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Li-Yong; Lin, Er-Da; Zhao, Hong-Liang; Feng, Yong-Xiang

    2016-05-01

    The global atmospheric CO2 concentration is currently (2012) 393.1 μmol mol-1, an increase of approximately 42 % over pre-industrial levels. In order to understand the responses of metabolic enzymes to elevated CO2 concentrations, an experiment was conducted using the Free Air CO2 Enrichment (FACE )system. Two conventional japonica rice varieties ( Oryza sativa L. ssp. japonica) grown in North China, Songjing 9 and Daohuaxiang 2, were used in this study. The activities of ADPG pyrophosphorylase, soluble and granule-bound starch synthases, and soluble and granule-bound starch branching enzymes were measured in rice grains, and the effects of elevated CO2 on the amylose and protein contents of the grains were analyzed. The results showed that elevated CO2 levels significantly increased the activity of ADPG pyrophosphorylase at day 8, 24, and 40 after flower, with maximum increases of 56.67 % for Songjing 9 and 21.31 % for Daohuaxiang 2. Similarly, the activities of starch synthesis enzymes increased significantly from the day 24 after flower to the day 40 after flower, with maximum increases of 36.81 % for Songjing 9 and 66.67 % for Daohuaxiang 2 in soluble starch synthase (SSS), and 25.00 % for Songjing 9 and 36.44 % for Daohuaxiang 2 in granule-bound starch synthase (GBSS), respectively. The elevated CO2 concentration significantly increased the activity of soluble starch branching enzyme (SSBE) at day 16, 32, and 40 after flower, and also significantly increased the activity of granule-bound starch branching enzyme (GBSBE) at day 8, 32, and 40 after flower. The elevated CO2 concentration increased the peak values of enzyme activity, and the timing of the activity peaks for SSS and GBSBE were earlier in Songjing 9 than in Daohuaxiang 2. There were obvious differences in developmental stages between the two varieties of rice, which indicated that the elevated CO2 concentration increased enzyme activity expression and starch synthesis, affecting the final contents

  13. Starch synthesis in Arabidopsis is achieved by spatial cotranscription of core starch metabolism genes.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Huang-Lung; Lue, Wei-Ling; Lu, Kuan-Jen; Hsieh, Ming-Hsiun; Wang, Shue-Mei; Chen, Jychian

    2009-11-01

    Starch synthesis and degradation require the participation of many enzymes, occur in both photosynthetic and nonphotosynthetic tissues, and are subject to environmental and developmental regulation. We examine the distribution of starch in vegetative tissues of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and the expression of genes encoding core enzymes for starch synthesis. Starch is accumulated in plastids of epidermal, mesophyll, vascular, and root cap cells but not in root proper cells. We also identify cells that can synthesize starch heterotrophically in albino mutants. Starch synthesis in leaves is regulated by developmental stage and light. Expression of gene promoter-beta-glucuronidase fusion constructs in transgenic seedlings shows that starch synthesis genes are transcriptionally active in cells with starch synthesis and are inactive in root proper cells except the plastidial phosphoglucose isomerase. In addition, ADG2 (for ADPG PYROPHOSPHORYLASE2) is not required for starch synthesis in root cap cells. Expression profile analysis reveals that starch metabolism genes can be clustered into two sets based on their tissue-specific expression patterns. Starch distribution and expression pattern of core starch synthesis genes are common in Arabidopsis and rice (Oryza sativa), suggesting that the regulatory mechanism for starch metabolism genes may be conserved evolutionarily. We conclude that starch synthesis in Arabidopsis is achieved by spatial coexpression of core starch metabolism genes regulated by their promoter activities and is fine-tuned by cell-specific endogenous and environmental controls.

  14. Development of Pyrimidine-metabolizing Enzymes in Cotyledons of Germinating Peas 1

    PubMed Central

    Ross, Cleon; Murray, Michael G.

    1971-01-01

    Mechanisms controlling conversion of orotic acid-6-14C to uridine-5′-phosphate in cotyledons of germinating Alaska peas (Pisum sativum L.) were investigated. The content of 5-phosphoribosyl-1-pyrophosphate was very low in dry seeds, increased to a maximum after about 12 hours of imbibition, and then rapidly declined. Orotidine-5′-phosphate pyrophosphorylase and orotidine-5′-phosphate decarboxylase activities more than doubled during the first 24 hours of germination and then also decreased. These results do not account for the continuous increases of orotate anabolism in such cotyledons as we observed previously. The initial increases in activities of these two enzymes were unaffected by cycloheximide, while the subsequent decreases were less rapid in the presence of this inhibitor. Activities of cotyledonary cytidine deaminase and uridine hydrolase also increased during imbibition, but the activity of only the latter showed a decrease after imbibition was completed. Cycloheximide inhibited the initial rapid increase in uridine hydrolase activity but had little effect on its subsequent decline. Cycloheximide had only slight inhibitory effects on the development of cytidine deaminase activity during the first 62 hours. The evidence suggests that uridine hydrolase might be synthesized de novo during the first few days of germination, but that the other three enzymes might not be. PMID:16657849

  15. Effect of Vanadium on Growth, Chemical Composition, and Metabolic Processes of Mature Sugar Beet (Beta vulgaris L.) Plants 1

    PubMed Central

    Singh, B.; Wort, D. J.

    1969-01-01

    As measured 7, 14, and 21 days after the application of 10−2 M vanadyl sulfate solution to the foliage of 4.5-month-old sugar beet plants, significantly less growth of the leaves and an increase in the sucrose content of the storage root resulted. Accompanying these alterations were a higher rate of carbon dioxide fixation, a lower rate of respiration, and a decreased rate of nitrate reductase, glutamic-pyruvic transaminase, phosphatase, and invertase activity. The enzymes of sucrose synthesis, sucrose synthetase, sucrose phosphate synthetase and uridine diphosphate glucose-pyrophosphorylase were stimulated. The content of reducing sugar, nitrite N, amino acids and protein was less, and that of nitrate N was greater in the vanadium-treated plants. In the majority of cases the greatest magnitude of change occurred during the first 7 days following treatment. The changes in growth and chemical composition are believed to be closely related to the stimulation or inhibition of the various enzymes by vanadyl sulfate. PMID:16657205

  16. The functional O-mannose glycan on α-dystroglycan contains a phospho-ribitol primed for matriglycan addition.

    PubMed

    Praissman, Jeremy L; Willer, Tobias; Sheikh, M Osman; Toi, Ants; Chitayat, David; Lin, Yung-Yao; Lee, Hane; Stalnaker, Stephanie H; Wang, Shuo; Prabhakar, Pradeep Kumar; Nelson, Stanley F; Stemple, Derek L; Moore, Steven A; Moremen, Kelley W; Campbell, Kevin P; Wells, Lance

    2016-01-01

    Multiple glycosyltransferases are essential for the proper modification of alpha-dystroglycan, as mutations in the encoding genes cause congenital/limb-girdle muscular dystrophies. Here we elucidate further the structure of an O-mannose-initiated glycan on alpha-dystroglycan that is required to generate its extracellular matrix-binding polysaccharide. This functional glycan contains a novel ribitol structure that links a phosphotrisaccharide to xylose. ISPD is a CDP-ribitol (ribose) pyrophosphorylase that generates the reduced sugar nucleotide for the insertion of ribitol in a phosphodiester linkage to the glycoprotein. TMEM5 is a UDP-xylosyl transferase that elaborates the structure. We demonstrate in a zebrafish model as well as in a human patient that defects in TMEM5 result in muscular dystrophy in combination with abnormal brain development. Thus, we propose a novel structure-a ribitol in a phosphodiester linkage-for the moiety on which TMEM5, B4GAT1, and LARGE act to generate the functional receptor for ECM proteins having LG domains. PMID:27130732

  17. Ethylene Response Factor TERF1, Regulated by ETHYLENE-INSENSITIVE3-like Factors, Functions in Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) Scavenging in Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongbo; Li, Ang; Zhang, Zhijin; Huang, Zejun; Lu, Pingli; Zhang, Dingyu; Liu, Xinmin; Zhang, Zhong-Feng; Huang, Rongfeng

    2016-01-01

    The phytohormone ethylene plays a crucial role in the production and accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plants under stress conditions. Ethylene response factors (ERFs) are important ethylene-signaling regulators functioning in plant defense responses against biotic and abiotic stresses. However, the roles of ERFs during plant adapting to ROS stress have not yet been well documented. Our studies previously reported that a tomato ERF transcription factor TERF1 functions in the regulation of plant ethylene responses and stress tolerance. Here, we report our findings regarding the roles of TERF1 in ROS scavenging. In this study, we revealed that the transcription of TERF1 is regulated by upstream EIN3-like (EIN3, ethylene-insensitive 3) regulators LeEIL3 and LeEIL4 in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), and is also inducible by exogenous applied ROS-generating reagents. Ectopic expression of TERF1 in tobacco promoted the expression of genes involved in oxidative stress responses, including carbonic anhydrase functioning in hypersensitive defense, catalase and glutathione peroxidase catalyzing oxidative reactions, and GDP-D-mannose pyrophosphorylase functioning in ascorbic acid biosynthesis, reduced the ROS content induced by ethylene treatment, and enhanced stress tolerance of tobacco seedlings to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Cumulatively, these findings suggest that TERF1 is an ethylene inducible factor regulating ROS scavenging during stress responses. PMID:27435661

  18. Examination of the mechanism of sucrose synthetase by positional isotope exchange.

    PubMed

    Singh, A N; Hester, L S; Raushel, F M

    1987-02-25

    The mechanism of the sucrose synthetase reaction has been probed by the technique of positional isotope exchange. [beta-18O2, alpha beta-18O]UDP-Glc has been synthesized starting from oxygen-18-labeled phosphate and the combined activities of carbamate kinase, hexokinase, phosphoglucomutase, and uridine diphosphoglucose pyrophosphorylase. The oxygen-18 at the alpha beta-bridge position of the labeled UDP-Glc has been shown to cause a 0.014 ppm upfield chemical shift in the 31P NMR spectrum of both the alpha- and beta-phosphorus atoms in UDP-Glc relative to the unlabeled compound. The chemical shift induced by each of the beta-nonbridge oxygen-18 atoms was 0.030 ppm. Incubation of [beta-18O2, alpha beta-18O]UDP-Glc with sucrose synthetase in the presence and absence of 2,5-anhydromannitol did not result in any significant exchange of an oxygen-18 from the beta-nonbridge position to the anomeric oxygen of the glucose moiety. It can thus be concluded that either sucrose synthetase does not catalyze the cleavage of the scissile carbon-oxygen bond of UDP-Glc in the absence of fructose or, alternatively, the beta-phosphoryl group of the newly formed UDP is rotationally immobilized. PMID:2950088

  19. Examination of the mechanism of sucrose synthetase by positional isotope exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, A.N.; Hester, L.S.; Raushel, F.M.

    1987-02-25

    The mechanism of the sucrose synthetase reaction has been probed by the technique of positional isotope exchange. (beta-/sup 18/O/sub 2/, alpha beta-/sup 18/O)UDP-Glc has been synthesized starting from oxygen-18-labeled phosphate and the combined activities of carbamate kinase, hexokinase, phosphoglucomutase, and uridine diphosphoglucose pyrophosphorylase. The oxygen-18 at the alpha beta-bridge position of the labeled UDP-Glc has been shown to cause a 0.014 ppm upfield chemical shift in the 31P NMR spectrum of both the alpha- and beta-phosphorus atoms in UDP-Glc relative to the unlabeled compound. The chemical shift induced by each of the beta-nonbridge oxygen-18 atoms was 0.030 ppm. Incubation of (beta-/sup 18/O/sub 2/, alpha beta-/sup 18/O)UDP-Glc with sucrose synthetase in the presence and absence of 2,5-anhydromannitol did not result in any significant exchange of an oxygen-18 from the beta-nonbridge position to the anomeric oxygen of the glucose moiety. It can thus be concluded that either sucrose synthetase does not catalyze the cleavage of the scissile carbon-oxygen bond of UDP-Glc in the absence of fructose or, alternatively, the beta-phosphoryl group of the newly formed UDP is rotationally immobilized.

  20. Evidences for Chlorogenic Acid--A Major Endogenous Polyphenol Involved in Regulation of Ripening and Senescence of Apple Fruit.

    PubMed

    Xi, Yu; Cheng, Dai; Zeng, Xiangquan; Cao, Jiankang; Jiang, Weibo

    2016-01-01

    To learn how the endogenous polyphenols may play a role in fruit ripening and senescence, apple pulp discs were used as a model to study the influences of chlorogenic acid (CHA, a major polyphenol in apple pulp) on fruit ripening and senescence. Apple ('Golden Delicious') pulp discs prepared from pre-climacteric fruit were treated with 50 mg L(-1) CHA and incubated in flasks with 10 mM MES buffer (pH 6.0, 11% sorbitol). Compared to the control samples, treatment with CHA significantly reduced ethylene production and respiration rate, and enhanced levels of firmness and soluble solids content of the pulp discs during incubation at 25°C. These results suggested that CHA could retard senescence of the apple pulp discs. Proteomics analysis with sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF) revealed that the expressions of several key proteins correlated to fruit ripening and senescence were affected by the treatment with CHA. Further study showed that treating the pulp discs with CHA remarkably reduced levels of lipoxygenase, β-galactosidase, NADP-malic enzyme, and enzymatic activities of lipoxygenase and UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, all of which are known as promoters of fruit ripening and senescence. These results could provide new insights into the functions of endogenous phenolic compounds in fruit ripening and senescence.

  1. Sucrose metabolism gene families and their biological functions.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Shu-Ye; Chi, Yun-Hua; Wang, Ji-Zhou; Zhou, Jun-Xia; Cheng, Yan-Song; Zhang, Bao-Lan; Ma, Ali; Vanitha, Jeevanandam; Ramachandran, Srinivasan

    2015-11-30

    Sucrose, as the main product of photosynthesis, plays crucial roles in plant development. Although studies on general metabolism pathway were well documented, less information is available on the genome-wide identification of these genes, their expansion and evolutionary history as well as their biological functions. We focused on four sucrose metabolism related gene families including sucrose synthase, sucrose phosphate synthase, sucrose phosphate phosphatase and UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase. These gene families exhibited different expansion and evolutionary history as their host genomes experienced differentiated rates of the whole genome duplication, tandem and segmental duplication, or mobile element mediated gene gain and loss. They were evolutionarily conserved under purifying selection among species and expression divergence played important roles for gene survival after expansion. However, we have detected recent positive selection during intra-species divergence. Overexpression of 15 sorghum genes in Arabidopsis revealed their roles in biomass accumulation, flowering time control, seed germination and response to high salinity and sugar stresses. Our studies uncovered the molecular mechanisms of gene expansion and evolution and also provided new insight into the role of positive selection in intra-species divergence. Overexpression data revealed novel biological functions of these genes in flowering time control and seed germination under normal and stress conditions.

  2. The Synthesis of UDP-N-acetylglucosamine Is Essential for Bloodstream Form Trypanosoma brucei in Vitro and in Vivo and UDP-N-acetylglucosamine Starvation Reveals a Hierarchy in Parasite Protein Glycosylation*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Stokes, Matthew J.; Güther, M. Lucia S.; Turnock, Daniel C.; Prescott, Alan R.; Martin, Kirstee L.; Alphey, Magnus S.; Ferguson, Michael A. J.

    2008-01-01

    A gene encoding Trypanosoma brucei UDP-N-acetylglucosamine pyrophosphorylase was identified, and the recombinant protein was shown to have enzymatic activity. The parasite enzyme is unusual in having a strict substrate specificity for N-acetylglucosamine 1-phosphate and in being located inside a peroxisome-like microbody, the glycosome. A bloodstream form T. brucei conditional null mutant was constructed and shown to be unable to sustain growth in vitro or in vivo under nonpermissive conditions, demonstrating that there are no alternative metabolic or nutritional routes to UDP-N-acetylglucosamine and providing a genetic validation for the enzyme as a potential drug target. The conditional null mutant was also used to investigate the effects of N-acetylglucosamine starvation in the parasite. After 48 h under nonpermissive conditions, about 24 h before cell lysis, the status of parasite glycoprotein glycosylation was assessed. Under these conditions, UDP-N-acetylglucosamine levels were less than 5% of wild type. Lectin blotting and fluorescence microscopy with tomato lectin revealed that poly-N-acetyllactosamine structures were greatly reduced in the parasite. The principal parasite surface coat component, the variant surface glycoprotein, was also analyzed. Endoglycosidase digestions and mass spectrometry showed that, under UDP-N-acetylglucosamine starvation, the variant surface glycoprotein was specifically underglycosylated at its C-terminal Asn-428 N-glycosylation site. The significance of this finding, with respect to the hierarchy of site-specific N-glycosylation in T. brucei, is discussed. PMID:18381290

  3. Influence of gamma radiation on the activities of some carbohydrate metabolic enzymes in the cotyledons and the leaves of fenugreek (Trigonella foenum-graecum L. ) bean seedlings

    SciTech Connect

    Ahanotu, P.A.

    1985-01-01

    Studies indicated that 21-day old cotyledons from gamma irradiated seeds of fenugreek beans were heavier and had more starch and sugar than their non-irradiated controls. To test whether these effects occurred in the leaves and to seek a possible biochemical explanation for these results, the activities of five enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism were studied. Three groups of fenugreek bean seeds were irradiated (100-300 Gy) and then allowed to grow for 21 days. On harvest, wet and dry weights of both cotyledons and leaves were determined. Starch and sugar contents in cotyledons and leaves were measured. The five enzymes ..cap alpha..-amylase, ..beta..-amylase, starch phosphorylase, ADPG-pyrophosphorylase and ribulose-1,5-diphosphate carboxylase were extracted from cotyledons and leaves, respectively. The protein contents and activities of the enzyme extracts were determined. The results suggest an increase in carbohydrate metabolism in cotyldeons and a decrease in leaves due to the radiation treatment of the seeds before germination. Thus, increased amounts of starch and sugars are observed in the cotyledons, and decreased amounts in the leaves. Radiation damage to the translocatory system of the plant may retard the movement of sugars from the cotyledons to the other parts of the plant. This may cause accumulation of sugars and starch in the cotyledons, leading to an increase in their size and weight.

  4. Improved polysaccharide production in a submerged culture of Ganoderma lucidum by the heterologous expression of Vitreoscilla hemoglobin gene.

    PubMed

    Li, Huan-Jun; Zhang, De-Huai; Yue, Tong-Hui; Jiang, Lu-Xi; Yu, Xuya; Zhao, Peng; Li, Tao; Xu, Jun-Wei

    2016-01-10

    Expression of Vitreoscilla hemoglobin (VHb) gene was used to improve polysaccharide production in Ganoderma lucidum. The VHb gene, vgb, under the control of the constitutive glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene promoter was introduced into G. lucidum. The activity of expressed VHb was confirmed by the observation of VHb specific CO-difference spectrum with a maximal absorption at 419 nm for the transformant. The effects of VHb expression on intracellular polysaccharide (IPS) content, extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) production and transcription levels of three genes encoding the enzymes involved in polysaccharide biosynthesis, including phosphoglucomutase (PGM), uridine diphosphate glucose pyrophosphorylase (UGP), and β-1,3-glucan synthase (GLS), were investigated. The maximum IPS content and EPS production in the vgb-bearing G. lucidum were 26.4 mg/100mg dry weight and 0.83 g/L, respectively, which were higher by 30.5% and 88.2% than those of the wild-type strain. The transcription levels of PGM, UGP and GLS were up-regulated by 1.51-, 1.55- and 3.83-fold, respectively, in the vgb-bearing G. lucidum. This work highlights the potential of VHb to enhance G. lucidum polysaccharide production by large scale fermentation. PMID:26603122

  5. Influence of fermentation conditions on polysaccharide production and the activities of enzymes involved in the polysaccharide synthesis of Cordyceps militaris.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Zhen-Yuan; Liu, Xiao-Cui; Dong, Feng-Ying; Guo, Ming-Zhu; Wang, Xiao-Ting; Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Yong-Min

    2016-05-01

    The influence of different fermentation conditions on intracellular polysaccharide (IPS) production and activities of the phosphoglucomutase (PGM), UDPG-pyrophosphorylase (UGP), phosphoglucose isomerase (PGI), UDPG-dehydrogenase (UGD), and glucokinase (GK) implicated in metabolite synthesis in Cordyceps militaris was evaluated. The highest IPS production (327.57 ± 6.27 mg/100 mL) was obtained when the strain was grown in the optimal medium containing glucose (40 g · L(-1)), beef extract (10 g · L(-1)), and CaCO3 (0.5 g · L(-1)), and the initial pH and temperature were 7 and 25 °C, respectively. The activities of PGM, UGP, and PGI were proved to be influenced by the fermentation conditions. A strong correlation between the activities of these enzymes and the production of IPS was found. The transcription level of the pgm gene (encoding PGM) was 1.049 times and 1.467 times compared to the ugp gene and pgi gene (encoding UGP and PGI), respectively, in the optimal culture medium. This result indicated that PGM might be the highly key enzyme to regulate the biosynthesis of IPS of C. militaris in a liquid-submerged culture. Our study might be helpful for further research on the pathway of polysaccharide biosynthesis aimed to improve the IPS production of C. militaris. PMID:26685672

  6. Genetics of xanthan production in Xanthomonas campestris: the xanA and xanB genes are involved in UDP-glucose and GDP-mannose biosynthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Köplin, R; Arnold, W; Hötte, B; Simon, R; Wang, G; Pühler, A

    1992-01-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a 3.4-kb EcoRI-PstI DNA fragment of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris revealed two open reading frames, which were designated xanA and xanB. The genes xanA and xanB encode proteins of 448 amino acids (molecular weight of 48,919) and 466 amino acids (molecular weight of 50,873), respectively. These genes were identified by analyzing insertion mutants which were known to be involved in xanthan production. Specific tests for the activities of enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of UDP-glucose and GDP-mannose indicated that the xanA gene product was involved in the biosynthesis of both glucose 1-phosphate and mannose 1-phosphate. The deduced amino acid sequence of xanB showed a significant degree of homology (59%) to the phosphomannose isomerase of Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of alginate. Moreover, biochemical analysis and complementation experiments with the Escherichia coli manA fragment revealed that xanB encoded a bifunctional enzyme, phosphomannose isomerase-GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylase. Images PMID:1370280

  7. Evidences for Chlorogenic Acid — A Major Endogenous Polyphenol Involved in Regulation of Ripening and Senescence of Apple Fruit

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Yu; Cheng, Dai; Zeng, Xiangquan; Cao, Jiankang; Jiang, Weibo

    2016-01-01

    To learn how the endogenous polyphenols may play a role in fruit ripening and senescence, apple pulp discs were used as a model to study the influences of chlorogenic acid (CHA, a major polyphenol in apple pulp) on fruit ripening and senescence. Apple (‘Golden Delicious’) pulp discs prepared from pre-climacteric fruit were treated with 50 mg L-1 CHA and incubated in flasks with 10 mM MES buffer (pH 6.0, 11% sorbitol). Compared to the control samples, treatment with CHA significantly reduced ethylene production and respiration rate, and enhanced levels of firmness and soluble solids content of the pulp discs during incubation at 25°C. These results suggested that CHA could retard senescence of the apple pulp discs. Proteomics analysis with sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF) revealed that the expressions of several key proteins correlated to fruit ripening and senescence were affected by the treatment with CHA. Further study showed that treating the pulp discs with CHA remarkably reduced levels of lipoxygenase, β-galactosidase, NADP-malic enzyme, and enzymatic activities of lipoxygenase and UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, all of which are known as promoters of fruit ripening and senescence. These results could provide new insights into the functions of endogenous phenolic compounds in fruit ripening and senescence. PMID:26756813

  8. Molecular and biochemical mechanisms of drug resistance in fungi.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, H

    1999-01-01

    This paper reviews the current status of our understanding of resistance mechanisms of three major classes of antifungal drugs for systemic use, amphotericin B (AMPH), flucytosine (5-FC) and several azole antifungals, in particular fluconazole (FLCZ), at the molecular and cellular levels. Although the number of reports of AMPH- or 5-FC-resistant fungal species and strains is limited, several mechanisms of resistance have been described. AMPH-resistant Candida have a marked decrease in ergosterol content compared with AMPH-susceptible control isolates. A lesion in the UMP-pyrophosphorylase is the most frequent determinant of 5-FC resistance in C. albicans. Recently resistance of C. albicans to azoles has become an increasing problem. Extensive biochemical studies have highlighted a significant diversity in mechanisms conferring resistance to FLCZ and other azoles, which include alterations in sterol biosynthesis, target site, uptake and efflux. Among them, the most important mechanism clinically is reduced access of the drug to the intracellular P450 14 DM target, probably because of the action of a multidrug resistance efflux pump, and overproduction of that target. However, other possible resistance mechanisms for azoles remain to be identified.

  9. Structure-based drug design studies of UDP-N-acetylglucosamine pyrophosphosrylase, a key enzyme for the control of witches’ broom disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The witches’ broom disease is a plague caused by Moniliophthora perniciosa in the Theobroma cacao, which has been reducing the cocoa production since 1989. This issue motivated a genome project that has showing several new molecular targets, which can be developed inhibitors in order to control the plague. Among the molecular targets obtained, the UDP-N-acetylglucosamine pyrophosphorylase (UNAcP) is a key enzyme to construct the fungal cell wall. The inhibition of this enzyme results in the fungal cell death. Results The results show that the molecular recognition of the enzyme with the substrates occurs mainly by hydrogen bonds between ligands and Arg116, Arg383, Gly381, and Lys408 amino acids; and few hydrophobic interactions with Tyr382 and Lys123 residues. Conclusions Among the compounds analyzed, the NAG5 showed the best binding energy (−95.2 kcal/mol). The next steps for the control of witches’ broom plague involve the synthesis and biological evaluation of these compounds, which are in progress. PMID:23497581

  10. GMPPB-Associated Dystroglycanopathy: Emerging Common Variants with Phenotype Correlation.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Braden S; Willer, Tobias; Saade, Dimah N; Cox, Mary O; Mozaffar, Tahseen; Scavina, Mena; Stefans, Vikki A; Winder, Thomas L; Campbell, Kevin P; Moore, Steven A; Mathews, Katherine D

    2015-12-01

    Mutations in GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylase B (GMPPB), a catalyst for the formation of the sugar donor GDP-mannose, were recently identified as a cause of muscular dystrophy resulting from abnormal glycosylation of α-dystroglycan. In this series, we report nine unrelated individuals with GMPPB-associated dystroglycanopathy. The most mildly affected subject has normal strength at 25 years, whereas three severely affected children presented in infancy with intellectual disability and epilepsy. Muscle biopsies of all subjects are dystrophic with abnormal immunostaining for glycosylated α-dystroglycan. This cohort, together with previously published cases, allows preliminary genotype-phenotype correlations to be made for the emerging GMPPB common variants c.79G>C (p.D27H) and c.860G>A (p.R287Q). We observe that c.79G>C (p.D27H) is associated with a mild limb-girdle muscular dystrophy phenotype, whereas c.860G>A (p.R287Q) is associated with a relatively severe congenital muscular dystrophy typically involving brain development. Sixty-six percent of GMPPB families to date have one of these common variants.

  11. Sucrose metabolism gene families and their biological functions

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Shu-Ye; Chi, Yun-Hua; Wang, Ji-Zhou; Zhou, Jun-Xia; Cheng, Yan-Song; Zhang, Bao-Lan; Ma, Ali; Vanitha, Jeevanandam; Ramachandran, Srinivasan

    2015-01-01

    Sucrose, as the main product of photosynthesis, plays crucial roles in plant development. Although studies on general metabolism pathway were well documented, less information is available on the genome-wide identification of these genes, their expansion and evolutionary history as well as their biological functions. We focused on four sucrose metabolism related gene families including sucrose synthase, sucrose phosphate synthase, sucrose phosphate phosphatase and UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase. These gene families exhibited different expansion and evolutionary history as their host genomes experienced differentiated rates of the whole genome duplication, tandem and segmental duplication, or mobile element mediated gene gain and loss. They were evolutionarily conserved under purifying selection among species and expression divergence played important roles for gene survival after expansion. However, we have detected recent positive selection during intra-species divergence. Overexpression of 15 sorghum genes in Arabidopsis revealed their roles in biomass accumulation, flowering time control, seed germination and response to high salinity and sugar stresses. Our studies uncovered the molecular mechanisms of gene expansion and evolution and also provided new insight into the role of positive selection in intra-species divergence. Overexpression data revealed novel biological functions of these genes in flowering time control and seed germination under normal and stress conditions. PMID:26616172

  12. Metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli to produce 2'-fucosyllactose via salvage pathway of guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP)-l-fucose.

    PubMed

    Chin, Young-Wook; Seo, Nari; Kim, Jae-Han; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2016-11-01

    2'-Fucosyllactose (2-FL) is one of the key oligosaccharides in human milk. In the present study, the salvage guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP)-l-fucose biosynthetic pathway from fucose was employed in engineered Escherichia coli BL21star(DE3) for efficient production of 2-FL. Introduction of the fkp gene coding for fucokinase/GDP-l-fucose pyrophosphorylase (Fkp) from Bacteroides fragilis and the fucT2 gene encoding α-1,2-fucosyltransferase from Helicobacter pylori allows the engineered E. coli to produce 2-FL from fucose, lactose and glycerol. To enhance the lactose flux to 2-FL production, the attenuated, and deleted mutants of β-galactosidase were employed. Moreover, the 2-FL yield and productivity were further improved by deletion of the fucI-fucK gene cluster coding for fucose isomerase (FucI) and fuculose kinase (FucK). Finally, fed-batch fermentation of engineered E. coli BL21star(DE3) deleting lacZ and fucI-fucK, and expressing fkp and fucT2 resulted in 23.1 g/L of extracellular concentration of 2-FL and 0.39 g/L/h productivity. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2443-2452. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27217241

  13. Overexpression of an alfalfa GDP-mannose 3, 5-epimerase gene enhances acid, drought and salt tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis by increasing ascorbate accumulation.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lichao; Wang, Yanrong; Liu, Wenxian; Liu, Zhipeng

    2014-11-01

    GDP-mannose 3', 5'-epimerase (GME) catalyses the conversion of GDP-D-mannose to GDP-L-galactose, an important step in the ascorbic acid (ascorbic acid) biosynthetic pathway in higher plants. In this study, a novel cDNA fragment (MsGME) encoding a GME protein was isolated and characterised from alfalfa (Medicago sativa). An expression analysis confirmed that MsGME expression was induced by salinity, PEG and acidity stresses. MsGME overexpression in Arabidopsis enhanced tolerance of the transgenic plants to salt, drought and acid. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that the transcript levels of GDP-D-mannose pyrophosphorylase (GMP), L-galactose-phosphate 1-P phosphatase (GP) and GDP-L-galactose phosphorylase (GGP) were increased in transgenic Arabidopsis (T3 generation). Moreover, the ascorbate content was increased in transgenic Arabidopsis. Our results suggest that MsGME can effectively enhance tolerance of transgenic Arabidopsis to acid, drought and salt by increasing ascorbate accumulation.

  14. Efficient use of energy in anoxia-tolerant plants with focus on germinating rice seedlings.

    PubMed

    Atwell, Brian J; Greenway, Hank; Colmer, Timothy D

    2015-04-01

    Anoxia tolerance in plants is distinguished by direction of the sparse supply of energy to processes crucial to cell maintenance and sometimes to growth, as in rice seedlings. In anoxic rice coleoptiles energy is used to synthesise proteins, take up K(+) , synthesise cell walls and lipids, and in cell maintenance. Maintenance of electrochemical H(+) gradients across the tonoplast and plasma membrane is crucial for solute compartmentation and thus survival. These gradients sustain some H(+) -solute cotransport and regulate cytoplasmic pH. Pyrophosphate (PPi ), the alternative energy donor to ATP, allows direction of energy to the vacuolar H(+) -PPi ase, sustaining H(+) gradients across the tonoplast. When energy production is critically low, operation of a biochemical pHstat allows H(+) -solute cotransport across plasma membranes to continue for at least for 18 h. In active (e.g. growing) cells, PPi produced during substantial polymer synthesis allows conversion of PPi to ATP by PPi -phosphofructokinase (PFK). In quiescent cells with little polymer synthesis and associated PPi formation, the PPi required by the vacuolar H(+) -PPi ase and UDPG pyrophosphorylase involved in sucrose mobilisation via sucrose synthase might be produced by conversion of ATP to PPi through reversible glycolytic enzymes, presumably pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase. These hypotheses need testing with species characterised by contrasting anoxia tolerance. PMID:25472708

  15. Regulation of Glucose Metabolism and Cell Wall Synthesis in Avena Stem Segments by Gibberellic Acid 1

    PubMed Central

    Montague, Michael J.; Ikuma, Hiroshi

    1978-01-01

    Gibberellic acid (GA) stimulated both the elongation of Avena sativa stem segments and increased synthesis of cell wall material. The effects of GA on glucose metabolism, as related to cell wall synthesis, have been investigated in order to find specific events regulated by GA. GA caused a decline in the levels of glucose, glucose 6-phosphate, and fructose 6-phosphate if exogenous sugar was not supplied to the segments, whereas the hormone caused no change in the levels of glucose 6-phosphate, fructose 6-phosphate, UDP-glucose, or the adenylate energy charge if the segments were incubated in 0.1 m glucose. No GA-induced change could be demonstrated in the activities of hexokinase, phosphoglucomutase, UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, or polysaccharide synthetases using UDP-glucose, UDP-galactose, UDP-xylose, and UDP-arabinose as substrates. GA stimulated the activity of GDP-glucose-dependent β-glucan synthetase by 2- to 4-fold over the control. When glucan synthetase was assayed using UDP-glucose as substrate, only β-1,3-linked glucan was synthesized in vitro, whereas with GDP-glucose, only β-1,4-linked glucan was synthesized. These results suggest that one part of the mechanism by which GA stimulates cell wall synthesis concurrently with elongation in Avena stem segments may be through a stimulation of cell wall polysaccharide synthetase activity. PMID:16660524

  16. Evidences for Chlorogenic Acid--A Major Endogenous Polyphenol Involved in Regulation of Ripening and Senescence of Apple Fruit.

    PubMed

    Xi, Yu; Cheng, Dai; Zeng, Xiangquan; Cao, Jiankang; Jiang, Weibo

    2016-01-01

    To learn how the endogenous polyphenols may play a role in fruit ripening and senescence, apple pulp discs were used as a model to study the influences of chlorogenic acid (CHA, a major polyphenol in apple pulp) on fruit ripening and senescence. Apple ('Golden Delicious') pulp discs prepared from pre-climacteric fruit were treated with 50 mg L(-1) CHA and incubated in flasks with 10 mM MES buffer (pH 6.0, 11% sorbitol). Compared to the control samples, treatment with CHA significantly reduced ethylene production and respiration rate, and enhanced levels of firmness and soluble solids content of the pulp discs during incubation at 25°C. These results suggested that CHA could retard senescence of the apple pulp discs. Proteomics analysis with sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF) revealed that the expressions of several key proteins correlated to fruit ripening and senescence were affected by the treatment with CHA. Further study showed that treating the pulp discs with CHA remarkably reduced levels of lipoxygenase, β-galactosidase, NADP-malic enzyme, and enzymatic activities of lipoxygenase and UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, all of which are known as promoters of fruit ripening and senescence. These results could provide new insights into the functions of endogenous phenolic compounds in fruit ripening and senescence. PMID:26756813

  17. Combined biosynthetic pathway for de novo production of UDP-galactose: catalysis with multiple enzymes immobilized on agarose beads.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ziye; Zhang, Jianbo; Chen, Xi; Wang, Peng G

    2002-04-01

    Regeneration of sugar nucleotides is a critical step in the biosynthetic pathway for the formation of oligosaccharides. To alleviate the difficulties in the production of sugar nucleotides, we have developed a method to produce uridine diphosphate galactose (UDP-galactose). The combined biosynthetic pathway, which involves seven enzymes, is composed of three parts: i) the main pathway to form UDP-galactose from galactose, with the enzymes galactokinase, galactose-1-phosphate uridyltransferase, UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase, and inorganic pyrophosphatase, ii) the uridine triphosphate supply pathway catalyzed by uridine monophosphate (UMP) kinase and nucleotide diphosphate kinase, and iii) the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) regeneration pathway catalyzed by polyphosphate kinase with polyphosphate added as an energy resource. All of the enzymes were expressed individually and immobilized through their hexahistidine tags onto nickel agarose beads ("super beads"). The reaction requires a stoichiometric amount of UMP and galactose, and catalytic amounts of ATP and glucose 1-phosphate, all inexpensive starting materials. After continuous circulation of the reaction mixture through the super-bead column for 48 h, 50 % of the UMP was converted into UDP-galactose. The results show that de novo production of UDP-galactose on the super-bead column is more efficient than in solution because of the stability of the immobilized enzymes.

  18. Starch Biosynthesis in Guard Cells But Not in Mesophyll Cells Is Involved in CO2-Induced Stomatal Closing.

    PubMed

    Azoulay-Shemer, Tamar; Bagheri, Andisheh; Wang, Cun; Palomares, Axxell; Stephan, Aaron B; Kunz, Hans-Henning; Schroeder, Julian I

    2016-06-01

    Starch metabolism is involved in stomatal movement regulation. However, it remains unknown whether starch-deficient mutants affect CO2-induced stomatal closing and whether starch biosynthesis in guard cells and/or mesophyll cells is rate limiting for high CO2-induced stomatal closing. Stomatal responses to [CO2] shifts and CO2 assimilation rates were compared in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants that were either starch deficient in all plant tissues (ADP-Glc-pyrophosphorylase [ADGase]) or retain starch accumulation in guard cells but are starch deficient in mesophyll cells (plastidial phosphoglucose isomerase [pPGI]). ADGase mutants exhibited impaired CO2-induced stomatal closure, but pPGI mutants did not, showing that starch biosynthesis in guard cells but not mesophyll functions in CO2-induced stomatal closing. Nevertheless, starch-deficient ADGase mutant alleles exhibited partial CO2 responses, pointing toward a starch biosynthesis-independent component of the response that is likely mediated by anion channels. Furthermore, whole-leaf CO2 assimilation rates of both ADGase and pPGI mutants were lower upon shifts to high [CO2], but only ADGase mutants caused impairments in CO2-induced stomatal closing. These genetic analyses determine the roles of starch biosynthesis for high CO2-induced stomatal closing.

  19. The functional O-mannose glycan on α-dystroglycan contains a phospho-ribitol primed for matriglycan addition

    PubMed Central

    Praissman, Jeremy L; Willer, Tobias; Sheikh, M Osman; Toi, Ants; Chitayat, David; Lin, Yung-Yao; Lee, Hane; Stalnaker, Stephanie H; Wang, Shuo; Prabhakar, Pradeep Kumar; Nelson, Stanley F; Stemple, Derek L; Moore, Steven A; Moremen, Kelley W; Campbell, Kevin P; Wells, Lance

    2016-01-01

    Multiple glycosyltransferases are essential for the proper modification of alpha-dystroglycan, as mutations in the encoding genes cause congenital/limb-girdle muscular dystrophies. Here we elucidate further the structure of an O-mannose-initiated glycan on alpha-dystroglycan that is required to generate its extracellular matrix-binding polysaccharide. This functional glycan contains a novel ribitol structure that links a phosphotrisaccharide to xylose. ISPD is a CDP-ribitol (ribose) pyrophosphorylase that generates the reduced sugar nucleotide for the insertion of ribitol in a phosphodiester linkage to the glycoprotein. TMEM5 is a UDP-xylosyl transferase that elaborates the structure. We demonstrate in a zebrafish model as well as in a human patient that defects in TMEM5 result in muscular dystrophy in combination with abnormal brain development. Thus, we propose a novel structure—a ribitol in a phosphodiester linkage—for the moiety on which TMEM5, B4GAT1, and LARGE act to generate the functional receptor for ECM proteins having LG domains. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14473.001 PMID:27130732

  20. Isolation and characterization of a transposon mutant of Pseudomonas fluorescens BM07 enhancing the production of polyhydroxyalkanoic acid but deficient in cold-induced exobiopolymer production.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ju; Zhao, Xu Ping; Choi, Mun Hwan; Yoon, Sung Chul

    2010-04-01

    Pseudomonas fluorescens BM07 is known to produce cold-induced exobiopolymer, which is mainly composed of water-insoluble hydrophobic polypeptides (up to 85%) and saccharides (8%), by decreasing the culture temperature down to as low as 10 degrees C. We screened for transposon insertion mutants of P. fluorescens BM07 that were unable to produce the exobiopolymer. Among the eight mutants that showed the deficiency of exobiopolymer and O-lipopolysaccharide, one mutant BM07-59 that had the highest polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) production was selected. The transposon inserted gene in BM07-59 was identified as galU. The disruption of the gene galU coded for the putative product, UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (GalU), resulted in 1.5-fold more accumulation of PHA compared with the wild-type strain from 70 mM fructose or galactose at 30 degrees C. Electrophoretic analysis of lipopolysaccharide showed that the mutant lacked the O-antigen lipopolysaccharide bands. The glycosyl composition of the lipopolysaccharide produced by the mutant strain was significantly different from that of the wild-type strain. We suggest that the deletion of galU could be a way to shift carbon flux efficiently from exobiopolymer toward PHA in P. fluorescens BM07.

  1. Metabolic engineering of Escherichia coli to produce 2'-fucosyllactose via salvage pathway of guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP)-l-fucose.

    PubMed

    Chin, Young-Wook; Seo, Nari; Kim, Jae-Han; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2016-11-01

    2'-Fucosyllactose (2-FL) is one of the key oligosaccharides in human milk. In the present study, the salvage guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP)-l-fucose biosynthetic pathway from fucose was employed in engineered Escherichia coli BL21star(DE3) for efficient production of 2-FL. Introduction of the fkp gene coding for fucokinase/GDP-l-fucose pyrophosphorylase (Fkp) from Bacteroides fragilis and the fucT2 gene encoding α-1,2-fucosyltransferase from Helicobacter pylori allows the engineered E. coli to produce 2-FL from fucose, lactose and glycerol. To enhance the lactose flux to 2-FL production, the attenuated, and deleted mutants of β-galactosidase were employed. Moreover, the 2-FL yield and productivity were further improved by deletion of the fucI-fucK gene cluster coding for fucose isomerase (FucI) and fuculose kinase (FucK). Finally, fed-batch fermentation of engineered E. coli BL21star(DE3) deleting lacZ and fucI-fucK, and expressing fkp and fucT2 resulted in 23.1 g/L of extracellular concentration of 2-FL and 0.39 g/L/h productivity. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2443-2452. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Starch Biosynthesis in Guard Cells But Not in Mesophyll Cells Is Involved in CO2-Induced Stomatal Closing1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Stephan, Aaron B.; Schroeder, Julian I.

    2016-01-01

    Starch metabolism is involved in stomatal movement regulation. However, it remains unknown whether starch-deficient mutants affect CO2-induced stomatal closing and whether starch biosynthesis in guard cells and/or mesophyll cells is rate limiting for high CO2-induced stomatal closing. Stomatal responses to [CO2] shifts and CO2 assimilation rates were compared in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants that were either starch deficient in all plant tissues (ADP-Glc-pyrophosphorylase [ADGase]) or retain starch accumulation in guard cells but are starch deficient in mesophyll cells (plastidial phosphoglucose isomerase [pPGI]). ADGase mutants exhibited impaired CO2-induced stomatal closure, but pPGI mutants did not, showing that starch biosynthesis in guard cells but not mesophyll functions in CO2-induced stomatal closing. Nevertheless, starch-deficient ADGase mutant alleles exhibited partial CO2 responses, pointing toward a starch biosynthesis-independent component of the response that is likely mediated by anion channels. Furthermore, whole-leaf CO2 assimilation rates of both ADGase and pPGI mutants were lower upon shifts to high [CO2], but only ADGase mutants caused impairments in CO2-induced stomatal closing. These genetic analyses determine the roles of starch biosynthesis for high CO2-induced stomatal closing. PMID:27208296

  3. Ethylene Response Factor TERF1, Regulated by ETHYLENE-INSENSITIVE3-like Factors, Functions in Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) Scavenging in Tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongbo; Li, Ang; Zhang, Zhijin; Huang, Zejun; Lu, Pingli; Zhang, Dingyu; Liu, Xinmin; Zhang, Zhong-Feng; Huang, Rongfeng

    2016-01-01

    The phytohormone ethylene plays a crucial role in the production and accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plants under stress conditions. Ethylene response factors (ERFs) are important ethylene-signaling regulators functioning in plant defense responses against biotic and abiotic stresses. However, the roles of ERFs during plant adapting to ROS stress have not yet been well documented. Our studies previously reported that a tomato ERF transcription factor TERF1 functions in the regulation of plant ethylene responses and stress tolerance. Here, we report our findings regarding the roles of TERF1 in ROS scavenging. In this study, we revealed that the transcription of TERF1 is regulated by upstream EIN3-like (EIN3, ethylene-insensitive 3) regulators LeEIL3 and LeEIL4 in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), and is also inducible by exogenous applied ROS-generating reagents. Ectopic expression of TERF1 in tobacco promoted the expression of genes involved in oxidative stress responses, including carbonic anhydrase functioning in hypersensitive defense, catalase and glutathione peroxidase catalyzing oxidative reactions, and GDP-D-mannose pyrophosphorylase functioning in ascorbic acid biosynthesis, reduced the ROS content induced by ethylene treatment, and enhanced stress tolerance of tobacco seedlings to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Cumulatively, these findings suggest that TERF1 is an ethylene inducible factor regulating ROS scavenging during stress responses. PMID:27435661

  4. A new strategy to enhance gellan production by two-stage culture in Sphingomonas paucimobilis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guilan; Sheng, Long; Tong, Qunyi

    2013-10-15

    The effects of different initial sucrose concentrations and temperatures on gellan biosynthesis by Sphingomonas paucimobilis ATCC 31461 were investigated. Lower sucrose concentrations and higher temperatures were favorable for cell growth. Higher sucrose concentrations and lower temperatures promoted gellan production but retarded cell growth. Based on these results, a two-stage culture strategy was developed to improve gellan production. During the first 24 h, S. paucimobilis was cultured in a pulse fed-batch mode with an initial sucrose concentration 10 g/L. Ten grams per liter of sucrose were added at 12 h and 24 h, and the temperature was controlled at 33 °C. Batch culture was performed, and the temperature was reduced to 28 °C to achieve a high gellan accumulation. The two-stage culture strategy achieved the highest gellan production (22.61 g/L) at 60 h that was 35.71% higher than the result of the best conventional batch operation (16.66 g/L). Meanwhile, high gellan yield was related to high UDPG-pyrophosphorylase activity and glucosyltransferase activity.

  5. New qualitative detection methods of genetically modified potatoes.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Takahiro; Kuribara, Hideo; Mishima, Takashi; Kikuchi, Hiroyuki; Kodama, Takashi; Futo, Satoshi; Kasama, Kikuko; Toyota, Akie; Nouno, Masanori; Saita, Ayako; Takahashi, Kunihiko; Hino, Akihiro; Akiyama, Hiroshi; Maitani, Tamio; Kubo, Misao

    2004-09-01

    In Japan, 8 lines of genetically modified (GM) potato (2 lines of NewLeaf potato; NL, 3 lines of NewLeaf Plus potato; NLP, and 3 lines of NewLeaf Y potato; NLY) have already been authorized as safe for use in foods and feeds. We have developed polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods for the qualitative detection of the GM potatoes for the screening and the identification of NL, NLP and NLY. The gene encoding uridine diphosphate (UDP)-glucose pyrophosphorylase (UGPase) was used as a taxon specific gene. We designed the primer pair to detect the cryIIIA genes as a screening method for GM potatoes because the gene should be inserted in all 8 lines of the GM potatoes. For identification of NL, NLP and NLY, we further designed three specific primer pairs for the different recombinant DNAs (r-DNA) specifically introduced into NL, NLP, or NLY. In addition, to identify the 3 lines of NLY that have been introduced with the same r-DNA, the three line-specific primer pairs for the border sequence between the r-DNA and genomic DNA of NLY 3 lines were designed. Six lines of GM potato used as the test material were specifically identified using the each primer pair under the same PCR condition. The detection limits of all the GM potatoes should be approximately 0.1%. Furthermore, the specificity and reproducibility of the methods were confirmed in a six-laboratory collaborative study. PMID:15340215

  6. Improved polysaccharide production in a submerged culture of Ganoderma lucidum by the heterologous expression of Vitreoscilla hemoglobin gene.

    PubMed

    Li, Huan-Jun; Zhang, De-Huai; Yue, Tong-Hui; Jiang, Lu-Xi; Yu, Xuya; Zhao, Peng; Li, Tao; Xu, Jun-Wei

    2016-01-10

    Expression of Vitreoscilla hemoglobin (VHb) gene was used to improve polysaccharide production in Ganoderma lucidum. The VHb gene, vgb, under the control of the constitutive glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene promoter was introduced into G. lucidum. The activity of expressed VHb was confirmed by the observation of VHb specific CO-difference spectrum with a maximal absorption at 419 nm for the transformant. The effects of VHb expression on intracellular polysaccharide (IPS) content, extracellular polysaccharide (EPS) production and transcription levels of three genes encoding the enzymes involved in polysaccharide biosynthesis, including phosphoglucomutase (PGM), uridine diphosphate glucose pyrophosphorylase (UGP), and β-1,3-glucan synthase (GLS), were investigated. The maximum IPS content and EPS production in the vgb-bearing G. lucidum were 26.4 mg/100mg dry weight and 0.83 g/L, respectively, which were higher by 30.5% and 88.2% than those of the wild-type strain. The transcription levels of PGM, UGP and GLS were up-regulated by 1.51-, 1.55- and 3.83-fold, respectively, in the vgb-bearing G. lucidum. This work highlights the potential of VHb to enhance G. lucidum polysaccharide production by large scale fermentation.

  7. D-galactose catabolism in Penicillium chrysogenum: Expression analysis of the structural genes of the Leloir pathway.

    PubMed

    Jónás, Ágota; Fekete, Erzsébet; Németh, Zoltán; Flipphi, Michel; Karaffa, Levente

    2016-09-01

    In this study, we analyzed the expression of the structural genes encoding the five enzymes comprising the Leloir pathway of D-galactose catabolism in the industrial cell factory Penicillium chrysogenum on various carbon sources. The genome of P. chrysogenum contains a putative galactokinase gene at the annotated locus Pc13g10140, the product of which shows strong structural similarity to yeast galactokinase that was expressed on lactose and D-galactose only. The expression profile of the galactose-1-phosphate uridylyl transferase gene at annotated locus Pc15g00140 was essentially similar to that of galactokinase. This is in contrast to the results from other fungi such as Aspergillus nidulans, Trichoderma reesei and A. niger, where the ortholog galactokinase and galactose-1-phosphate uridylyl transferase genes were constitutively expressed. As for the UDP-galactose-4-epimerase encoding gene, five candidates were identified. We could not detect Pc16g12790, Pc21g12170 and Pc20g06140 expression on any of the carbon sources tested, while for the other two loci (Pc21g10370 and Pc18g01080) transcripts were clearly observed under all tested conditions. Like the 4-epimerase specified at locus Pc21g10370, the other two structural Leloir pathway genes - UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (Pc21g12790) and phosphoglucomutase (Pc18g01390) - were expressed constitutively at high levels as can be expected from their indispensable function in fungal cell wall formation. PMID:27630054

  8. Starch Biosynthesis in Guard Cells But Not in Mesophyll Cells Is Involved in CO2-Induced Stomatal Closing.

    PubMed

    Azoulay-Shemer, Tamar; Bagheri, Andisheh; Wang, Cun; Palomares, Axxell; Stephan, Aaron B; Kunz, Hans-Henning; Schroeder, Julian I

    2016-06-01

    Starch metabolism is involved in stomatal movement regulation. However, it remains unknown whether starch-deficient mutants affect CO2-induced stomatal closing and whether starch biosynthesis in guard cells and/or mesophyll cells is rate limiting for high CO2-induced stomatal closing. Stomatal responses to [CO2] shifts and CO2 assimilation rates were compared in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants that were either starch deficient in all plant tissues (ADP-Glc-pyrophosphorylase [ADGase]) or retain starch accumulation in guard cells but are starch deficient in mesophyll cells (plastidial phosphoglucose isomerase [pPGI]). ADGase mutants exhibited impaired CO2-induced stomatal closure, but pPGI mutants did not, showing that starch biosynthesis in guard cells but not mesophyll functions in CO2-induced stomatal closing. Nevertheless, starch-deficient ADGase mutant alleles exhibited partial CO2 responses, pointing toward a starch biosynthesis-independent component of the response that is likely mediated by anion channels. Furthermore, whole-leaf CO2 assimilation rates of both ADGase and pPGI mutants were lower upon shifts to high [CO2], but only ADGase mutants caused impairments in CO2-induced stomatal closing. These genetic analyses determine the roles of starch biosynthesis for high CO2-induced stomatal closing. PMID:27208296

  9. Efficient use of energy in anoxia-tolerant plants with focus on germinating rice seedlings.

    PubMed

    Atwell, Brian J; Greenway, Hank; Colmer, Timothy D

    2015-04-01

    Anoxia tolerance in plants is distinguished by direction of the sparse supply of energy to processes crucial to cell maintenance and sometimes to growth, as in rice seedlings. In anoxic rice coleoptiles energy is used to synthesise proteins, take up K(+) , synthesise cell walls and lipids, and in cell maintenance. Maintenance of electrochemical H(+) gradients across the tonoplast and plasma membrane is crucial for solute compartmentation and thus survival. These gradients sustain some H(+) -solute cotransport and regulate cytoplasmic pH. Pyrophosphate (PPi ), the alternative energy donor to ATP, allows direction of energy to the vacuolar H(+) -PPi ase, sustaining H(+) gradients across the tonoplast. When energy production is critically low, operation of a biochemical pHstat allows H(+) -solute cotransport across plasma membranes to continue for at least for 18 h. In active (e.g. growing) cells, PPi produced during substantial polymer synthesis allows conversion of PPi to ATP by PPi -phosphofructokinase (PFK). In quiescent cells with little polymer synthesis and associated PPi formation, the PPi required by the vacuolar H(+) -PPi ase and UDPG pyrophosphorylase involved in sucrose mobilisation via sucrose synthase might be produced by conversion of ATP to PPi through reversible glycolytic enzymes, presumably pyruvate orthophosphate dikinase. These hypotheses need testing with species characterised by contrasting anoxia tolerance.

  10. Review: Mechanisms of ammonium toxicity and the quest for tolerance.

    PubMed

    Esteban, Raquel; Ariz, Idoia; Cruz, Cristina; Moran, Jose Fernando

    2016-07-01

    Ammonium sensitivity of plants is a worldwide problem, constraining crop production. Prolonged application of ammonium as the sole nitrogen source may result in physiological and morphological disorders that lead to decreased plant growth and toxicity. The main causes of ammonium toxicity/tolerance described until now include high ammonium assimilation by plants and/or low sensitivity to external pH acidification. The various ammonium transport-related components, especially the non-electrogenic influx of NH3 (related to the depletion of (15)N) and the electrogenic influx of NH4(+), may contribute to ammonium accumulation, and therefore to NH3 toxicity. However, this accumulation may be influenced by increasing K(+) concentration in the root medium. Recently, new insights have been provided by "omics" studies, leading to a suggested involvement of GDP mannose-pyrophosphorylase in the response pathways of NH4(+) stress. In this review, we highlight the cross-talk signaling between nitrate, auxins and NO, and the importance of the connection of the plants' urea cycle to metabolism of polyamines. Overall, the tolerance and amelioration of ammonium toxicity are outlined to improve the yield of ammonium-grown plants. This review identifies future directions of research, focusing on the putative importance of aquaporins in ammonium influx, and on genes involved in ammonium sensitivity and tolerance. PMID:27181951

  11. The Timing of Senescence and Response to Pathogens Is Altered in the Ascorbate-Deficient Arabidopsis Mutant vitamin c-11

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Carina; Moeder, Wolfgang; Klessig, Daniel F.; Conklin, Patricia L.

    2004-01-01

    The ozone-sensitive Arabidopsis mutant vitamin c-1 (vtc1) is deficient in l-ascorbic acid (AsA) due to a mutation in GDP-Man pyrophosphorylase (Conklin et al., 1999), an enzyme involved in the AsA biosynthetic pathway (Smirnoff et al., 2001). In this study, the physiology of this AsA deficiency was initially investigated in response to biotic (virulent pathogens) stress and subsequently with regards to the onset of senescence. Infection with either virulent Pseudomonas syringae or Peronospora parasitica resulted in largely reduced bacterial and hyphal growth in the vtc1 mutant in comparison to the wild type. When vitamin c-2 (vtc2), another AsA-deficient mutant, was challenged with P. parasitica, growth of the fungus was also reduced, indicating that the two AsA-deficient mutants are more resistant to these pathogens. Induction of pathogenesis-related proteins PR-1 and PR-5 is significantly higher in vtc1 than in the wild type when challenged with virulent P. syringae. In addition, the vtc1 mutant exhibits elevated levels of some senescence-associated gene (SAG) transcripts as well as heightened salicylic acid levels. Presumably, therefore, low AsA is causing vtc1 to enter at least some stage(s) of senescence prematurely with an accompanying increase in salicylic acid levels that results in a faster induction of defense responses. PMID:15064386

  12. Molecular insights into how a deficiency of amylose affects carbon allocation – carbohydrate and oil analyses and gene expression profiling in the seeds of a rice waxy mutant

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    rice waxy mutant GM077 revealed several candidate genes implicated in the carbon reallocation response to an amylose deficiency, including genes encoding AGPase and SUSIBA2-like. We believe that AGP and SUSIBA2 are two promising targets for classical breeding and/or transgenic plant improvement to control the carbon flux between starch and other components in cereal seeds. PMID:23217057

  13. [Primary targeting of functional regions involved in transcriptional regulation on watermelon fruit-specific promoter WSP].

    PubMed

    Wu, Han-Ying; Liu, Jing-Mei; Yang, Xin-Ting; Zhu, Zhu-Jun; Shou, Sen-Yan

    2003-03-01

    Fruit ripening is associated with a number of physiological and biochemical changes. They include degradation of chlorophyll, synthesis of flavor compounds, carotenoid biosynthesis, conversion of starch to sugars, cell wall solublisation and fruit softening. These changes are brought about by the expression of specific genes. People are interested in the molecular mechanism involved in the regulation of gene transcription during fruit ripening. Many fruit-specific promoters such as PG, E4, E8, and 2A11 have been characterized and shown to direct ripening-specific expression of reporter genes. AGPase plays the key role in catalyzing the biosynthesis of starch in plants. It is a heterotetrameric enzyme with two small subunits and two large subunits, which are encoded by different genes. In higher plants, small subunits are highly conserved among plant species and expressed in all tissues. And the large subunits are present at multiple isoforms and expressed in a tissue-specific pattern. In fruits, the expression pattern of the large subunits varies with plant species. That made it important to study the transcriptional regulation of the large subunits of AGPase in different plant species. Northern-blot analysis indicates in watermelon, an isoform of the large subunits Wml1 expressed specifically in fruits, not in leaves. The 5' flanking region of Wml1, which covers 1573bp, has been isolated through the method of uneven PCR. And transient expression assay has shown that the 1573bp (named WSP) can direct fruit-specific expression of GUS gene. Our goal in this study was to scan the promoter region for main regulatory regions involved in fruit-specific expression. A chimaeric gene was constructed containing the WSP promoter, the beta-glucuronidase (GUS) structural sequence as a reporter gene and the nopaline synthase polyadenylation site (NOS-ter). The plasmid pSPA was digested with Hind III + Hinc II and promoter fragment of 1573bp (from 180bp to 1752bp) was cut out and

  14. 2-Fluoro-L-Fucose Is a Metabolically Incorporated Inhibitor of Plant Cell Wall Polysaccharide Fucosylation.

    PubMed

    Villalobos, Jose A; Yi, Bo R; Wallace, Ian S

    2015-01-01

    The monosaccharide L-fucose (L-Fuc) is a common component of plant cell wall polysaccharides and other plant glycans, including the hemicellulose xyloglucan, pectic rhamnogalacturonan-I (RG-I) and rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II), arabinogalactan proteins, and N-linked glycans. Mutations compromising the biosynthesis of many plant cell wall polysaccharides are lethal, and as a result, small molecule inhibitors of plant cell wall polysaccharide biosynthesis have been developed because these molecules can be applied at defined concentrations and developmental stages. In this study, we characterize novel small molecule inhibitors of plant fucosylation. 2-fluoro-L-fucose (2F-Fuc) analogs caused severe growth phenotypes when applied to Arabidopsis seedlings, including reduced root growth and altered root morphology. These phenotypic defects were dependent upon the L-Fuc salvage pathway enzyme L-Fucose Kinase/ GDP-L-Fucose Pyrophosphorylase (FKGP), suggesting that 2F-Fuc is metabolically converted to the sugar nucleotide GDP-2F-Fuc, which serves as the active inhibitory molecule. The L-Fuc content of cell wall matrix polysaccharides was reduced in plants treated with 2F-Fuc, suggesting that this molecule inhibits the incorporation of L-Fuc into these polysaccharides. Additionally, phenotypic defects induced by 2F-Fuc treatment could be partially relieved by the exogenous application of boric acid, suggesting that 2F-Fuc inhibits RG-II biosynthesis. Overall, the results presented here suggest that 2F-Fuc is a metabolically incorporated inhibitor of plant cellular fucosylation events, and potentially suggest that other 2-fluorinated monosaccharides could serve as useful chemical probes for the inhibition of cell wall polysaccharide biosynthesis. PMID:26414071

  15. Gene networks and toxicity pathways induced by acute cadmium exposure in adult largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides).

    PubMed

    Mehinto, Alvine C; Prucha, Melinda S; Colli-Dula, Reyna C; Kroll, Kevin J; Lavelle, Candice M; Barber, David S; Vulpe, Christopher D; Denslow, Nancy D

    2014-07-01

    Cadmium is a heavy metal that can accumulate to toxic levels in the environment leading to detrimental effects in animals and humans including kidney, liver and lung injuries. Using a transcriptomics approach, genes and cellular pathways affected by a low dose of cadmium were investigated. Adult largemouth bass were intraperitoneally injected with 20μg/kg of cadmium chloride (mean exposure level - 2.6μg of cadmium per fish) and microarray analyses were conducted in the liver and testis 48h after injection. Transcriptomic profiles identified in response to cadmium exposure were tissue-specific with the most differential expression changes found in the liver tissues, which also contained much higher levels of cadmium than the testis. Acute exposure to a low dose of cadmium induced oxidative stress response and oxidative damage pathways in the liver. The mRNA levels of antioxidants such as catalase increased and numerous transcripts related to DNA damage and DNA repair were significantly altered. Hepatic mRNA levels of metallothionein, a molecular marker of metal exposure, did not increase significantly after 48h exposure. Carbohydrate metabolic pathways were also disrupted with hepatic transcripts such as UDP-glucose, pyrophosphorylase 2, and sorbitol dehydrogenase highly induced. Both tissues exhibited a disruption of steroid signaling pathways. In the testis, estrogen receptor beta and transcripts linked to cholesterol metabolism were suppressed. On the contrary, genes involved in cholesterol metabolism were highly increased in the liver including genes encoding for the rate limiting steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and the catalytic enzyme 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase. Integration of the transcriptomic data using functional enrichment analyses revealed a number of enriched gene networks associated with previously reported adverse outcomes of cadmium exposure such as liver toxicity and impaired reproduction. PMID:24794047

  16. Differential transcriptional regulation of L-ascorbic acid content in peel and pulp of citrus fruits during development and maturation.

    PubMed

    Alós, Enriqueta; Rodrigo, María J; Zacarías, Lorenzo

    2014-05-01

    Citrus fruits are an important source of ascorbic acid (AsA) for human nutrition, but the main pathways involved in its biosynthesis and their regulation are still not fully characterized. To study the transcriptional regulation of AsA accumulation, expression levels of 13 genes involved in AsA biosynthesis, 5 in recycling and 5 in degradation were analyzed in peel and pulp of fruit of two varieties with different AsA concentration: Navel orange (Citrus sinensis) and Satsuma mandarin (Citrus unshiu). AsA accumulation in peel and pulp correlated with the transcriptional profiling of the L-galactose pathway genes, and the myo-inositol pathway appeared to be also relevant in the peel of immature-green orange. Differences in AsA content between varieties were associated with differential gene expression of GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylase (GMP), GDP-L-galactose phosphorylase (GGP) and L-galactose-1-phosphate phosphatase (GPP), myo-inositol oxygenase in peel, and GGP and GPP in pulp. Relative expressions of monodehydroascorbate reductase 3 (MDHAR3) and dehydroascorbate reductase1 (DHAR1) correlated with AsA accumulation during development and ripening in peel and pulp, respectively, and were more highly expressed in the variety with higher AsA contents. Collectively, results indicated a differential regulation of AsA concentration in peel and pulp of citrus fruits that may change during the different stages of fruit development. The L-galactose pathway appears to be predominant in both tissues, but AsA concentration is regulated by complex mechanisms in which degradation and recycling also play important roles.

  17. Inhibitory Role of Greatwall-Like Protein Kinase Rim15p in Alcoholic Fermentation via Upregulating the UDP-Glucose Synthesis Pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Daisuke; Zhou, Yan; Hirata, Aiko; Sugimoto, Yukiko; Takagi, Kenichi; Akao, Takeshi; Ohya, Yoshikazu; Takagi, Hiroshi; Shimoi, Hitoshi

    2015-10-23

    The high fermentation rate of Saccharomyces cerevisiae sake yeast strains is attributable to a loss-of-function mutation in the RIM15 gene, which encodes a Greatwall-family protein kinase that is conserved among eukaryotes. In the present study, we performed intracellular metabolic profiling analysis and revealed that deletion of the RIM15 gene in a laboratory strain impaired glucose-anabolic pathways through the synthesis of UDP-glucose (UDPG). Although Rim15p is required for the synthesis of trehalose and glycogen from UDPG upon entry of cells into the quiescent state, we found that Rim15p is also essential for the accumulation of cell wall β-glucans, which are also anabolic products of UDPG. Furthermore, the impairment of UDPG or 1,3-β-glucan synthesis contributed to an increase in the fermentation rate. Transcriptional induction of PGM2 (phosphoglucomutase) and UGP1 (UDPG pyrophosphorylase) was impaired in Rim15p-deficient cells in the early stage of fermentation. These findings demonstrate that the decreased anabolism of glucose into UDPG and 1,3-β-glucan triggered by a defect in the Rim15p-mediated upregulation of PGM2 and UGP1 redirects the glucose flux into glycolysis. Consistent with this, sake yeast strains with defective Rim15p exhibited impaired expression of PGM2 and UGP1 and decreased levels of β-glucans, trehalose, and glycogen during sake fermentation. We also identified a sake yeast-specific mutation in the glycogen synthesis-associated glycogenin gene GLG2, supporting the conclusion that the glucose-anabolic pathway is impaired in sake yeast. These findings demonstrate that downregulation of the UDPG synthesis pathway is a key mechanism accelerating alcoholic fermentation in industrially utilized S. cerevisiae sake strains.

  18. Manipulation of the rice L-galactose pathway: evaluation of the effects of transgene overexpression on ascorbate accumulation and abiotic stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Gui-Yun; Liu, Ru-Ru; Zhang, Chang-Quan; Tang, Ke-Xuan; Sun, Ming-Fa; Yan, Guo-Hong; Liu, Qiao-Quan

    2015-01-01

    Ascorbic acid (AsA) is the most abundant water-soluble antioxidant in plants, and it plays a crucial role in plant growth, development and abiotic stress tolerance. In the present study, six key Arabidopsis or rapeseed genes involved in AsA biosynthesis were constitutively overexpressed in an elite Japonica rice cultivar. These genes encoded the GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylase (GMP), GDP-mannose-3',5'-epimerase (GME), GDP-L-galactose phosphorylase (GGP), L-galactose-1-phosphate phosphatase (GPP), L-galactose dehydrogenase (GDH), and L-galactono-1,4-lactone dehydrogenase (GalLDH). The effects of transgene expression on rice leaf AsA accumulation were carefully evaluated. In homozygous transgenic seedlings, AtGGP transgenic lines had the highest AsA contents (2.55-fold greater than the empty vector transgenic control), followed by the AtGME and AtGDH transgenic lines. Moreover, with the exception of the AtGPP lines, the increased AsA content also provoked an increase in the redox state (AsA/DHA ratio). To evaluate salt tolerance, AtGGP and AtGME transgenic seedlings were exposed to salt stress for one week. The relative plant height, root length and fresh weight growth rates were significantly higher for the transgenic lines compared with the control plants. Altogether, our results suggest that GGP may be a key rate-limiting step in rice AsA biosynthesis, and the plants with elevated AsA contents demonstrated enhanced tolerance for salt stress.

  19. Gene networks and toxicity pathways induced by acute cadmium exposure in adult largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides).

    PubMed

    Mehinto, Alvine C; Prucha, Melinda S; Colli-Dula, Reyna C; Kroll, Kevin J; Lavelle, Candice M; Barber, David S; Vulpe, Christopher D; Denslow, Nancy D

    2014-07-01

    Cadmium is a heavy metal that can accumulate to toxic levels in the environment leading to detrimental effects in animals and humans including kidney, liver and lung injuries. Using a transcriptomics approach, genes and cellular pathways affected by a low dose of cadmium were investigated. Adult largemouth bass were intraperitoneally injected with 20μg/kg of cadmium chloride (mean exposure level - 2.6μg of cadmium per fish) and microarray analyses were conducted in the liver and testis 48h after injection. Transcriptomic profiles identified in response to cadmium exposure were tissue-specific with the most differential expression changes found in the liver tissues, which also contained much higher levels of cadmium than the testis. Acute exposure to a low dose of cadmium induced oxidative stress response and oxidative damage pathways in the liver. The mRNA levels of antioxidants such as catalase increased and numerous transcripts related to DNA damage and DNA repair were significantly altered. Hepatic mRNA levels of metallothionein, a molecular marker of metal exposure, did not increase significantly after 48h exposure. Carbohydrate metabolic pathways were also disrupted with hepatic transcripts such as UDP-glucose, pyrophosphorylase 2, and sorbitol dehydrogenase highly induced. Both tissues exhibited a disruption of steroid signaling pathways. In the testis, estrogen receptor beta and transcripts linked to cholesterol metabolism were suppressed. On the contrary, genes involved in cholesterol metabolism were highly increased in the liver including genes encoding for the rate limiting steroidogenic acute regulatory protein and the catalytic enzyme 7-dehydrocholesterol reductase. Integration of the transcriptomic data using functional enrichment analyses revealed a number of enriched gene networks associated with previously reported adverse outcomes of cadmium exposure such as liver toxicity and impaired reproduction.

  20. Identification of differentially accumulating pistil proteins associated with self-incompatibility of non-heading Chinese cabbage.

    PubMed

    Wang, L; Peng, H; Ge, T; Liu, T; Hou, X; Li, Y

    2014-01-01

    Non-heading Chinese cabbage (Brassica campestris L. ssp. chinensis Makino), an important vegetable crop in China, exhibits a typical sporophytic self-incompatibility (SI) system. To better understand the mechanism of SI response and identify potential candidate proteins involved in the SI system of this vegetable crop, the proteomic approach was taken to identify differential accumulating pistil proteins. Pistils were collected at 0 h and 2 h after self-pollination at anthesis in self-incompatible and compatible lines of non-heading Chinese cabbage, and total proteins were extracted and separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). A total of 25 protein spots that displayed differential abundance were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS) and peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF). Among them, 22 protein spots were confidently established. The mRNA levels of the corresponding genes were detected by quantitative RT-PCR. The 22 identified protein spots are involved in energy metabolism (four), protein biosynthesis (three), photosynthesis (six), stress response and defence (five), and protein degradation (four). Among these potential candidate proteins, UDP-sugar pyrophosphorylase could be involved in sucrose degradation to influence pollen germination and growth. Glutathione S-transferases could be involved in pollen maturation, and affect pollen fertility. Senescence-associated cysteine protease, which is related to programmed cell death, could be mainly related to self pollen recognition of non-heading Chinese cabbage. The study will contribute to further investigations of molecular mechanism of sporophytic SI in Brassicaceae. PMID:23581423

  1. A single gene mutation that increases maize seed weight

    SciTech Connect

    Giroux, M.J.; Shaw, J.; Hannah, L.C. |

    1996-06-11

    The maize endosperm-specific gene shrunken2 (Sh2) encodes the large subunit of the heterotetrameric starch synthetic enzyme adenosine diphosphoglucose pyrophosphorylase (AGP; EC 2.7.7.27). Here we exploit an in vivo, site-specific mutagenesis system to create short insertion mutations in a region of the gene known to be involved in the allosteric regulation of AGP. The site-specific mutagen is the transposable element dissociation (Ds). Approximately one-third (8 of 23) of the germinal revertants sequenced restored the wild-type sequence, whereas the remaining revertants contained insertions of 3 or 6 bp. All revertants retained the original reading frame 3 feet to the insertion site and involved the addition of tyrosine and/or serine. Each insertion revertant reduced total AGP activity and the amount of the SH2 protein. The revertant containing additional tyrosine and serine residues increased seed weight 11-18% without increasing or decreasing the percentage of starch. Other insertion revertants lacking an additional serine reduced seed weight. Reduced sensitivity to phosphate, a long-known inhibitor of AGP, was found in the high seed-weight revertant. This alteration is likely universally important since insertion of tyrosine and serine in the potato large subunit of AGP at the comparable position and expression in Escherichia coli also led to a phosphate-insensitive enzyme. These results show that single gene mutations giving rise to increased seed weight, and therefore perhaps yield, are clearly possible in a plant with a long history of intensive and successful breeding efforts. 20 refs., 5 figs., 5 tabs.

  2. Climate Extreme Effects on the Chemical Composition of Temperate Grassland Species under Ambient and Elevated CO2: A Comparison of Fructan and Non-Fructan Accumulators

    PubMed Central

    Zinta, Gaurav; Van den Ende, Wim; Janssens, Ivan A.; Asard, Han

    2014-01-01

    Elevated CO2 concentrations and extreme climate events, are two increasing components of the ongoing global climatic change factors, may alter plant chemical composition and thereby their economic and ecological characteristics, e.g. nutritional quality and decomposition rates. To investigate the impact of climate extremes on tissue quality, four temperate grassland species: the fructan accumulating grasses Lolium perenne, Poa pratensis, and the nitrogen (N) fixing legumes Medicago lupulina and Lotus corniculatus were subjected to water deficit at elevated temperature (+3°C), under ambient CO2 (392 ppm) and elevated CO2 (620 ppm). As a general observation, the effects of the climate extreme were larger and more ubiquitous in combination with elevated CO2. The imposed climate extreme increased non-structural carbohydrate and phenolics in all species, whereas it increased lignin in legumes and decreased tannins in grasses. However, there was no significant effect of climate extreme on structural carbohydrates, proteins, lipids and mineral contents and stoichiometric ratios. In combination with elevated CO2, climate extreme elicited larger increases in fructan and sucrose content in the grasses without affecting the total carbohydrate content, while it significantly increased total carbohydrates in legumes. The accumulation of carbohydrates in legumes was accompanied by higher activity of sucrose phosphate synthase, sucrose synthase and ADP-Glc pyrophosphorylase. In the legumes, elevated CO2 in combination with climate extreme reduced protein, phosphorus (P) and magnesium (Mg) contents and the total element:N ratio and it increased phenol, lignin, tannin, carbon (C), nitrogen (N) contents and C:N, C:P and N:P ratios. On the other hand, the tissue composition of the fructan accumulating grasses was not affected at this level, in line with recent views that fructans contribute to cellular homeostasis under stress. It is speculated that quality losses will be less

  3. The Autophagic Degradation of Chloroplasts via Rubisco-Containing Bodies Is Specifically Linked to Leaf Carbon Status But Not Nitrogen Status in Arabidopsis1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Izumi, Masanori; Wada, Shinya; Makino, Amane; Ishida, Hiroyuki

    2010-01-01

    Autophagy is an intracellular process facilitating the vacuolar degradation of cytoplasmic components and is important for nutrient recycling during starvation. We previously demonstrated that chloroplasts can be partially mobilized to the vacuole by autophagy via spherical bodies named Rubisco-containing bodies (RCBs). Although chloroplasts contain approximately 80% of total leaf nitrogen and represent a major carbon and nitrogen source for new growth, the relationship between leaf nutrient status and RCB production remains unclear. We examined the effects of nutrient factors on the appearance of RCBs in leaves of transgenic Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) expressing stroma-targeted fluorescent proteins. In excised leaves, the appearance of RCBs was suppressed by the presence of metabolic sugars, which were added externally or were produced during photosynthesis in the light. The light-mediated suppression was relieved by the inhibition of photosynthesis. During a diurnal cycle, RCB production was suppressed in leaves excised at the end of the day with high starch content. Starchless mutants phosphoglucomutase and ADP-Glc pyrophosphorylase1 produced a large number of RCBs, while starch-excess mutants starch-excess1 and maltose-excess1 produced fewer RCBs. In nitrogen-limited plants, as leaf carbohydrates were accumulated, RCB production was suppressed. We propose that there exists a close relationship between the degradation of chloroplast proteins via RCBs and leaf carbon but not nitrogen status in autophagy. We also found that the appearance of non-RCB-type autophagic bodies was not suppressed in the light and somewhat responded to nitrogen in excised leaves, unlike RCBs. These results imply that the degradation of chloroplast proteins via RCBs is specifically controlled in autophagy. PMID:20807997

  4. The tomato HD-Zip I transcription factor SlHZ24 modulates ascorbate accumulation through positive regulation of the D-mannose/L-galactose pathway.

    PubMed

    Hu, Tixu; Ye, Jie; Tao, Peiwen; Li, Hanxia; Zhang, Junhong; Zhang, Yuyang; Ye, Zhibiao

    2016-01-01

    Ascorbate (AsA) is an antioxidant that can scavenge the reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced when plants encounter stressful conditions. Here, it was revealed by a yeast one-hybrid assay that a tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) HD-Zip I family transcription factor, SlHZ24, binds to the promoter of an AsA biosynthetic gene encoding GDP-D-mannose pyrophosphorylase 3 (SlGMP3). Both the transient expression system and electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) showed that SlHZ24 binds to a regulatory cis-element in the SlGMP3 promoter, and further overexpression of SlHZ24 in transgenic tomato lines resulted in increased AsA levels. In contrast, suppressing expression of the gene using RNA interference (RNAi) had the opposite effect. These data suggest that SlHZ24 can positively regulate the accumulation of AsA, and in support of this it was shown that SlGMP3 expression increased in the SlHZ24-overexpressing lines and declined in SlHZ24-RNAi lines. SlHZ24 also affected the expression of other genes in the D-mannose/L-galactose pathway, such as genes encoding GDP-mannose-3',5'-epimerase 2 (SlGME2), GDP-L-galactose phosphorylase (SlGGP) and SlGMP4. The EMSA indicated that SlHZ24 bound to the promoters of SlGME2 and SlGGP, suggesting multi-targeted regulation of AsA biosynthesis. Finally, SlHZ24-overexpressing plants showed less sensitivity to oxidative stress; we therefore conclude that SlHZ24 promotes AsA biosynthesis, which in turn enhances oxidative stress tolerance. PMID:26610866

  5. High-throughput screen for inhibitors of transglycosylase and/or transpeptidase activities of Escherichia coli penicillin binding protein 1b.

    PubMed

    Chandrakala, B; Shandil, Radha K; Mehra, Upasana; Ravishankar, Sudha; Kaur, Parvinder; Usha, Veeraraghavan; Joe, Bina; deSousa, Sunita M

    2004-01-01

    Penicillin binding protein (PBP) 1b of Escherichia coli has both transglycosylase and transpeptidase activities, which are attractive targets for the discovery of new antibacterial agents. A high-throughput assay that detects inhibitors of the PBPs was described previously, but it cannot distinguish them from inhibitors of the MraY, MurG, and lipid pyrophosphorylase. We report on a method that distinguishes inhibitors of both activities of the PBPs from those of the other three enzymes. Radioactive peptidoglycan was synthesized by using E. coli membranes. Following termination of the reaction the products were analyzed in three ways. Wheat germ agglutinin (WGA)-coated scintillation proximity assay (SPA) beads were added to one set, and the same beads together with a detergent were added to a second set. Type A polyethylenimine-coated WGA-coated SPA beads were added to a third set. By comparison of the results of assays run in parallel under the first two conditions, inhibitors of the transpeptidase and transglycosylase could be distinguished from inhibitors of the other enzymes, as the inhibitors of the other enzymes showed similar inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)s) under both conditions but the inhibitors of the PBPs showed insignificant inhibition in the absence of detergent. Furthermore, comparison of the results of assays run under conditions two and three enabled the distinction of transpeptidase inhibitors. Penicillin and other beta-lactams showed insignificant inhibition with type A beads compared with that shown with WGA-coated SPA beads plus detergent. However, inhibitors of the other four enzymes (tunicamycin, nisin, bacitracin, and moenomycin) showed similar IC(50)s under both conditions. We show that the main PBP being measured under these conditions is PBP 1b. This screen can be used to find novel transglycosylase or transpeptidase inhibitors. PMID:14693515

  6. Climate extreme effects on the chemical composition of temperate grassland species under ambient and elevated CO2: a comparison of fructan and non-fructan accumulators.

    PubMed

    AbdElgawad, Hamada; Peshev, Darin; Zinta, Gaurav; Van den Ende, Wim; Janssens, Ivan A; Asard, Han

    2014-01-01

    Elevated CO2 concentrations and extreme climate events, are two increasing components of the ongoing global climatic change factors, may alter plant chemical composition and thereby their economic and ecological characteristics, e.g. nutritional quality and decomposition rates. To investigate the impact of climate extremes on tissue quality, four temperate grassland species: the fructan accumulating grasses Lolium perenne, Poa pratensis, and the nitrogen (N) fixing legumes Medicago lupulina and Lotus corniculatus were subjected to water deficit at elevated temperature (+3°C), under ambient CO2 (392 ppm) and elevated CO2 (620 ppm). As a general observation, the effects of the climate extreme were larger and more ubiquitous in combination with elevated CO2. The imposed climate extreme increased non-structural carbohydrate and phenolics in all species, whereas it increased lignin in legumes and decreased tannins in grasses. However, there was no significant effect of climate extreme on structural carbohydrates, proteins, lipids and mineral contents and stoichiometric ratios. In combination with elevated CO2, climate extreme elicited larger increases in fructan and sucrose content in the grasses without affecting the total carbohydrate content, while it significantly increased total carbohydrates in legumes. The accumulation of carbohydrates in legumes was accompanied by higher activity of sucrose phosphate synthase, sucrose synthase and ADP-Glc pyrophosphorylase. In the legumes, elevated CO2 in combination with climate extreme reduced protein, phosphorus (P) and magnesium (Mg) contents and the total element:N ratio and it increased phenol, lignin, tannin, carbon (C), nitrogen (N) contents and C:N, C:P and N:P ratios. On the other hand, the tissue composition of the fructan accumulating grasses was not affected at this level, in line with recent views that fructans contribute to cellular homeostasis under stress. It is speculated that quality losses will be less

  7. A novel GDP-D-glucose phosphorylase involved in quality control of the nucleoside diphosphate sugar pool in Caenorhabditis elegans and mammals.

    PubMed

    Adler, Lital N; Gomez, Tara A; Clarke, Steven G; Linster, Carole L

    2011-06-17

    The plant VTC2 gene encodes GDP-L-galactose phosphorylase, a rate-limiting enzyme in plant vitamin C biosynthesis. Genes encoding apparent orthologs of VTC2 exist in both mammals, which produce vitamin C by a distinct metabolic pathway, and in the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans where vitamin C biosynthesis has not been demonstrated. We have now expressed cDNAs of the human and worm VTC2 homolog genes (C15orf58 and C10F3.4, respectively) and found that the purified proteins also display GDP-hexose phosphorylase activity. However, as opposed to the plant enzyme, the major reaction catalyzed by these enzymes is the phosphorolysis of GDP-D-glucose to GDP and D-glucose 1-phosphate. We detected activities with similar substrate specificity in worm and mouse tissue extracts. The highest expression of GDP-D-glucose phosphorylase was found in the nervous and male reproductive systems. A C. elegans C10F3.4 deletion strain was found to totally lack GDP-D-glucose phosphorylase activity; this activity was also found to be decreased in human HEK293T cells transfected with siRNAs against the human C15orf58 gene. These observations confirm the identification of the worm C10F3.4 and the human C15orf58 gene expression products as the GDP-D-glucose phosphorylases of these organisms. Significantly, we found an accumulation of GDP-D-glucose in the C10F3.4 mutant worms, suggesting that the GDP-D-glucose phosphorylase may function to remove GDP-D-glucose formed by GDP-D-mannose pyrophosphorylase, an enzyme that has previously been shown to lack specificity for its physiological D-mannose 1-phosphate substrate. We propose that such removal may prevent the misincorporation of glucosyl residues for mannosyl residues into the glycoconjugates of worms and mammals.

  8. Manipulation of the Rice L-Galactose Pathway: Evaluation of the Effects of Transgene Overexpression on Ascorbate Accumulation and Abiotic Stress Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Gui-Yun; Liu, Ru-Ru; Zhang, Chang-Quan; Tang, Ke-Xuan; Sun, Ming-Fa; Yan, Guo-Hong; Liu, Qiao-Quan

    2015-01-01

    Ascorbic acid (AsA) is the most abundant water-soluble antioxidant in plants, and it plays a crucial role in plant growth, development and abiotic stress tolerance. In the present study, six key Arabidopsis or rapeseed genes involved in AsA biosynthesis were constitutively overexpressed in an elite Japonica rice cultivar. These genes encoded the GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylase (GMP), GDP-mannose-3',5'-epimerase (GME), GDP-L-galactose phosphorylase (GGP), L-galactose-1-phosphate phosphatase (GPP), L-galactose dehydrogenase (GDH), and L-galactono-1,4-lactone dehydrogenase (GalLDH). The effects of transgene expression on rice leaf AsA accumulation were carefully evaluated. In homozygous transgenic seedlings, AtGGP transgenic lines had the highest AsA contents (2.55-fold greater than the empty vector transgenic control), followed by the AtGME and AtGDH transgenic lines. Moreover, with the exception of the AtGPP lines, the increased AsA content also provoked an increase in the redox state (AsA/DHA ratio). To evaluate salt tolerance, AtGGP and AtGME transgenic seedlings were exposed to salt stress for one week. The relative plant height, root length and fresh weight growth rates were significantly higher for the transgenic lines compared with the control plants. Altogether, our results suggest that GGP may be a key rate-limiting step in rice AsA biosynthesis, and the plants with elevated AsA contents demonstrated enhanced tolerance for salt stress. PMID:25938231

  9. Gene expression of ascorbic acid biosynthesis related enzymes of the Smirnoff-Wheeler pathway in acerola (Malpighia glabra).

    PubMed

    Badejo, Adebanjo A; Fujikawa, Yukichi; Esaka, Muneharu

    2009-04-01

    The Smirnoff-Wheeler (SW) pathway has been proven to be the only significant source of l-ascorbic acid (AsA; vitamin C) in the seedlings of the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana. It is yet uncertain whether the same pathway holds for all other plants and their various organs as AsA may also be synthesized through alternative pathways. In this study, we have cloned some of the genes involved in the SW-pathway from acerola (Malpighia glabra), a plant containing enormous amount of AsA, and examined the expression patterns of these genes in the plant. The AsA contents of acerola leaves were about 8-fold more than that of Arabidopsis with 5-700-fold higher mRNA abundance in AsA-biosynthesizing genes. The unripe fruits have the highest AsA content but the accumulation was substantially repressed as the fruit transitions to maturation. The mRNAs encoding these genes showed correlation in their expression with the AsA contents of the fruits. Although very little AsA was recorded in the seeds the mRNAs encoding all the genes, with the exception of the mitochondrially located L-galactono-1,4-lactone dehydrogenase, were clearly detected in the seeds of the unripe fruits. In young leaves of acerola, the expression of most genes were repressed by the dark and induced by light. However, the expression of GDP-D-mannose pyrophosphorylase similar to that encoded by A. thaliana VTC1 was induced in the dark. The expressions of all the genes surged after 24h following wounding stress on the young leaves. These findings will advance the investigation into the molecular factors regulating the biosynthesis of abundant AsA in acerola.

  10. Tuber physiology and properties of starch from tubers of transgenic potato plants with altered plastidic adenylate transporter activity.

    PubMed

    Geigenberger, P; Stamme, C; Tjaden, J; Schulz, A; Quick, P W; Betsche, T; Kersting, H J; Neuhaus, H E

    2001-04-01

    We showed recently that antisense plants with decreased activity of the plastidic ATP/ADP-transporter protein exhibit drastically reduced levels of starch and a decreased amylose/amylopectin ratio, whereas sense plants with increased activity of the transporter possessed more starch than wild-type plants and an increased amylose/amylopectin ratio. In this paper we investigate the effect of altered plastidic ATP/ADP-transporter protein expression on primary metabolism and granule morphology in more detail. Tuber tissues from antisense and sense plants exhibited substantially increased respiratory activity compared with the wild type. Tubers from antisense plants contained markedly increased levels of free sugars, UDP-Glc, and hexose phosphates, whereas phosphoenolpyruvate, isocitrate, ATP, ADP, AMP, UTP, UDP, and inorganic pyrophosphate levels were slightly decreased. In contrast, tubers from sense plants revealed a slight increase in adenine and uridine nucleotides and in the levels of inorganic pyrophosphate, whereas no significant changes in the levels of soluble sugars and metabolites were observed. Antisense tubers contained 50% reduced levels of ADP-Glc, whereas sense tubers contained up to 2-fold increased levels of this sole precursor for starch biosynthesis. Microscopic examination of starch grain morphology revealed that the size of starch grains from antisense tubers was substantially smaller (50%) compared with the wild type. The large starch grains from sense tubers appeared of a more angular morphology, which differed to the more ellipsoid shape of wild type grains. The results suggest a close interaction between plastidial adenylate transport and starch biosynthesis, indicating that ADP-Glc pyrophosphorylase is ATP-limited in vivo and that changes in ADP-Glc concentration determine starch yield, as well as granule morphology. Possible factors linking starch synthesis and respiration are discussed.

  11. Transcriptional Profiles of Hybrid Eucalyptus Genotypes with Contrasting Lignin Content Reveal That Monolignol Biosynthesis-related Genes Regulate Wood Composition.

    PubMed

    Shinya, Tomotaka; Iwata, Eiji; Nakahama, Katsuhiko; Fukuda, Yujiroh; Hayashi, Kazunori; Nanto, Kazuya; Rosa, Antonio C; Kawaoka, Akiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Eucalyptus species constitutes the most widely planted hardwood trees in temperate and subtropical regions. In this study, we compared the transcript levels of genes involved in lignocellulose formation such as cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin biosynthesis in two selected 3-year old hybrid Eucalyptus (Eucalyptus urophylla × Eucalyptus grandis) genotypes (AM063 and AM380) that have different lignin content. AM063 and AM380 had 20.2 and 35.5% of Klason lignin content and 59.0 and 48.2%, α-cellulose contents, respectively. We investigated the correlation between wood properties and transcript levels of wood formation-related genes using RNA-seq with total RNAs extracted from developing xylem tissues at a breast height. Transcript levels of cell wall construction genes such as cellulose synthase (CesA) and sucrose synthase (SUSY) were almost the same in both genotypes. However, AM063 exhibited higher transcript levels of UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and xyloglucan endotransglucoxylase than those in AM380. Most monolignol biosynthesis-related isozyme genes showed higher transcript levels in AM380. These results indicate monolignol biosynthesis-related genes may regulate wood composition in Eucalyptus. Flavonoids contents were also observed at much higher levels in AM380 as a result of the elevated transcript levels of common phenylpropanoid pathway genes, phenylalanine ammonium lyase, cinnamate-4-hydroxylase (C4H) and 4-coumarate-CoA ligase (4CL). Secondary plant cell wall formation is regulated by many transcription factors. We analyzed genes encoding NAC, WRKY, AP2/ERF, and KNOX transcription factors and found higher transcript levels of these genes in AM380. We also observed increased transcription of some MYB and LIM domain transcription factors in AM380 compared to AM063. All these results show that genes related to monolignol biosynthesis may regulate the wood composition and help maintain the ratio of cellulose and lignin contents in Eucalyptus plants. PMID

  12. Transcriptional Profiles of Hybrid Eucalyptus Genotypes with Contrasting Lignin Content Reveal That Monolignol Biosynthesis-related Genes Regulate Wood Composition

    PubMed Central

    Shinya, Tomotaka; Iwata, Eiji; Nakahama, Katsuhiko; Fukuda, Yujiroh; Hayashi, Kazunori; Nanto, Kazuya; Rosa, Antonio C.; Kawaoka, Akiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Eucalyptus species constitutes the most widely planted hardwood trees in temperate and subtropical regions. In this study, we compared the transcript levels of genes involved in lignocellulose formation such as cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin biosynthesis in two selected 3-year old hybrid Eucalyptus (Eucalyptus urophylla × Eucalyptus grandis) genotypes (AM063 and AM380) that have different lignin content. AM063 and AM380 had 20.2 and 35.5% of Klason lignin content and 59.0 and 48.2%, α-cellulose contents, respectively. We investigated the correlation between wood properties and transcript levels of wood formation-related genes using RNA-seq with total RNAs extracted from developing xylem tissues at a breast height. Transcript levels of cell wall construction genes such as cellulose synthase (CesA) and sucrose synthase (SUSY) were almost the same in both genotypes. However, AM063 exhibited higher transcript levels of UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and xyloglucan endotransglucoxylase than those in AM380. Most monolignol biosynthesis-related isozyme genes showed higher transcript levels in AM380. These results indicate monolignol biosynthesis-related genes may regulate wood composition in Eucalyptus. Flavonoids contents were also observed at much higher levels in AM380 as a result of the elevated transcript levels of common phenylpropanoid pathway genes, phenylalanine ammonium lyase, cinnamate-4-hydroxylase (C4H) and 4-coumarate-CoA ligase (4CL). Secondary plant cell wall formation is regulated by many transcription factors. We analyzed genes encoding NAC, WRKY, AP2/ERF, and KNOX transcription factors and found higher transcript levels of these genes in AM380. We also observed increased transcription of some MYB and LIM domain transcription factors in AM380 compared to AM063. All these results show that genes related to monolignol biosynthesis may regulate the wood composition and help maintain the ratio of cellulose and lignin contents in Eucalyptus plants. PMID

  13. An alpha-glucose-1-phosphate phosphodiesterase is present in rat liver cytosol

    SciTech Connect

    Srisomsap, C.; Richardson, K.L.; Jay, J.C.; Marchase, R.B. )

    1989-12-05

    UDP-glucose:glycoprotein glucose-1-phosphotransferase (Glc-phosphotransferase) catalyzes the transfer of alpha-Glc-1-P from UDP-Glc to mannose residues on acceptor glycoproteins. The predominant acceptor for this transfer in both mammalian cells and Paramecium is a cytoplasmic glycoprotein of 62-63 kDa. When cytoplasmic proteins from rat liver were fractionated by preparative isoelectric focusing following incubation of a liver homogenate with the 35S-labeled phosphorothioate analogue of UDP-Glc ((beta-35S)UDP-Glc), the acceptor was found to have a pI of about 6.0. This fraction, when not labeled prior to the focusing, became very heavily labeled when mixed with (beta-35S). UDP-Glc and intact liver microsomes, a rich source of the Glc-phosphotransferase. In addition, it was observed that the isoelectric fractions of the cytosol having pI values of 2-3.2 contained a degradative activity, alpha-Glc-1-P phosphodiesterase, that was capable of removing alpha-Glc-1-P, monitored through radioactive labeling both in the sugar and the phosphate, as an intact unit from the 62-kDa acceptor. Identification of the product of this cleavage was substantiated by its partial transformation to UDP-Glc in the presence of UTP and UDP-Glc pyrophosphorylase. The alpha-Glc-1-P phosphodiesterase had a pH optimum of 7.5 and was not effectively inhibited by any of the potential biochemical inhibitors that were tested. Specificity for the Glc-alpha-1-P-6-Man diester was suggested by the diesterase's inability to degrade UDP-Glc or glucosylphosphoryldolichol. This enzyme may be important in the regulation of secretion since the alpha-Glc-1-P present on the 62-kDa phosphoglycoprotein appears to be removed and then rapidly replaced in response to secretagogue.

  14. Antisense-mediated depletion of GMPase gene expression in tobacco decreases plant tolerance to temperature stresses and alters plant development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua-Sen; Zhu, Zhu-Jun; Feng, Zhen; Zhang, Shi-Gang; Yu, Chao

    2012-12-01

    In our previous work [1] we investigated the role of tomato GDP-mannose pyrophosphorylase (EC 2.7.7.22) in plants by overexpressing its gene in tobacco leaves and showed its function in AsA metabolism and detoxification of reactive oxygen species under temperature stresses. In this study, we use the antisense technique to block the endogenous GMPase gene expression in tobacco in order to further investigate its function. Northern and western blot analysis confirmed that the expression of endogenous tobacco GMPase mRNA and protein was inhibited by this antisense expression. Consequently, the activity of GMPase and the content of AsA in the leaves of antisense transgenic plants were markedly decreased. This was also the case for the activities of both chloroplastic SOD (superoxide dismutase EC 1.15.1.1), APX (ascorbate peroxidase EC 1.11.1.7) and the content of AsA in leaves of the transgenic plants. On the contrary, the contents of H(2)O(2) and O(2) (-•) were increased. Meanwhile, the net photosynthetic rate (Pn) and the maximal photochemical efficiency of PSII (Fv/Fm) also declined in the leaves of antisense plants. Under high or low temperature stresses, the seed germination rate of the antisense transgenic plants was significantly decreased in comparison with that of the wild-type tobacco. Interestingly, the antisense plants had smaller leaves and an earlier onset of flowering. In conclusion, the depletion of GMPase decreased the content of AsA, resulting in the plants susceptible to the oxidative damage caused by temperature stresses and subjected to developmental alternations.

  15. Climate extreme effects on the chemical composition of temperate grassland species under ambient and elevated CO2: a comparison of fructan and non-fructan accumulators.

    PubMed

    AbdElgawad, Hamada; Peshev, Darin; Zinta, Gaurav; Van den Ende, Wim; Janssens, Ivan A; Asard, Han

    2014-01-01

    Elevated CO2 concentrations and extreme climate events, are two increasing components of the ongoing global climatic change factors, may alter plant chemical composition and thereby their economic and ecological characteristics, e.g. nutritional quality and decomposition rates. To investigate the impact of climate extremes on tissue quality, four temperate grassland species: the fructan accumulating grasses Lolium perenne, Poa pratensis, and the nitrogen (N) fixing legumes Medicago lupulina and Lotus corniculatus were subjected to water deficit at elevated temperature (+3°C), under ambient CO2 (392 ppm) and elevated CO2 (620 ppm). As a general observation, the effects of the climate extreme were larger and more ubiquitous in combination with elevated CO2. The imposed climate extreme increased non-structural carbohydrate and phenolics in all species, whereas it increased lignin in legumes and decreased tannins in grasses. However, there was no significant effect of climate extreme on structural carbohydrates, proteins, lipids and mineral contents and stoichiometric ratios. In combination with elevated CO2, climate extreme elicited larger increases in fructan and sucrose content in the grasses without affecting the total carbohydrate content, while it significantly increased total carbohydrates in legumes. The accumulation of carbohydrates in legumes was accompanied by higher activity of sucrose phosphate synthase, sucrose synthase and ADP-Glc pyrophosphorylase. In the legumes, elevated CO2 in combination with climate extreme reduced protein, phosphorus (P) and magnesium (Mg) contents and the total element:N ratio and it increased phenol, lignin, tannin, carbon (C), nitrogen (N) contents and C:N, C:P and N:P ratios. On the other hand, the tissue composition of the fructan accumulating grasses was not affected at this level, in line with recent views that fructans contribute to cellular homeostasis under stress. It is speculated that quality losses will be less

  16. Glucose-1-phosphate transport into protoplasts and chloroplasts from leaves of Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Fettke, Joerg; Malinova, Irina; Albrecht, Tanja; Hejazi, Mahdi; Steup, Martin

    2011-04-01

    Almost all glucosyl transfer reactions rely on glucose-1-phosphate (Glc-1-P) that either immediately acts as glucosyl donor or as substrate for the synthesis of the more widely used Glc dinucleotides, ADPglucose or UDPglucose. In this communication, we have analyzed two Glc-1-P-related processes: the carbon flux from externally supplied Glc-1-P to starch by either mesophyll protoplasts or intact chloroplasts from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). When intact protoplasts or chloroplasts are incubated with [U-(14)C]Glc-1-P, starch is rapidly labeled. Incorporation into starch is unaffected by the addition of unlabeled Glc-6-P or Glc, indicating a selective flux from Glc-1-P to starch. However, illuminated protoplasts incorporate less (14)C into starch when unlabeled bicarbonate is supplied in addition to the (14)C-labeled Glc-1-P. Mesophyll protoplasts incubated with [U-(14)C]Glc-1-P incorporate (14)C into the plastidial pool of adenosine diphosphoglucose. Protoplasts prepared from leaves of mutants of Arabidopsis that lack either the plastidial phosphorylase or the phosphoglucomutase isozyme incorporate (14)C derived from external Glc-1-P into starch, but incorporation into starch is insignificant when protoplasts from a mutant possessing a highly reduced ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase activity are studied. Thus, the path of assimilatory starch biosynthesis initiated by extraplastidial Glc-1-P leads to the plastidial pool of adenosine diphosphoglucose, and at this intermediate it is fused with the Calvin cycle-driven route. Mutants lacking the plastidial phosphoglucomutase contain a small yet significant amount of transitory starch.

  17. 2-Fluoro-L-Fucose Is a Metabolically Incorporated Inhibitor of Plant Cell Wall Polysaccharide Fucosylation

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Ian S.

    2015-01-01

    The monosaccharide L-fucose (L-Fuc) is a common component of plant cell wall polysaccharides and other plant glycans, including the hemicellulose xyloglucan, pectic rhamnogalacturonan-I (RG-I) and rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II), arabinogalactan proteins, and N-linked glycans. Mutations compromising the biosynthesis of many plant cell wall polysaccharides are lethal, and as a result, small molecule inhibitors of plant cell wall polysaccharide biosynthesis have been developed because these molecules can be applied at defined concentrations and developmental stages. In this study, we characterize novel small molecule inhibitors of plant fucosylation. 2-fluoro-L-fucose (2F-Fuc) analogs caused severe growth phenotypes when applied to Arabidopsis seedlings, including reduced root growth and altered root morphology. These phenotypic defects were dependent upon the L-Fuc salvage pathway enzyme L-Fucose Kinase/ GDP-L-Fucose Pyrophosphorylase (FKGP), suggesting that 2F-Fuc is metabolically converted to the sugar nucleotide GDP-2F-Fuc, which serves as the active inhibitory molecule. The L-Fuc content of cell wall matrix polysaccharides was reduced in plants treated with 2F-Fuc, suggesting that this molecule inhibits the incorporation of L-Fuc into these polysaccharides. Additionally, phenotypic defects induced by 2F-Fuc treatment could be partially relieved by the exogenous application of boric acid, suggesting that 2F-Fuc inhibits RG-II biosynthesis. Overall, the results presented here suggest that 2F-Fuc is a metabolically incorporated inhibitor of plant cellular fucosylation events, and potentially suggest that other 2-fluorinated monosaccharides could serve as useful chemical probes for the inhibition of cell wall polysaccharide biosynthesis. PMID:26414071

  18. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis of Cultivated and Wild Watermelon during Fruit Development

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Shaogui; Sun, Honghe; Zhang, Haiying; Liu, Jingan; Ren, Yi; Gong, Guoyi; Jiao, Chen; Zheng, Yi; Yang, Wencai; Fei, Zhangjun; Xu, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Watermelon [Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. & Nakai] is an important vegetable crop world-wide. Watermelon fruit quality is a complex trait determined by various factors such as sugar content, flesh color and flesh texture. Fruit quality and developmental process of cultivated and wild watermelon are highly different. To systematically understand the molecular basis of these differences, we compared transcriptome profiles of fruit tissues of cultivated watermelon 97103 and wild watermelon PI296341-FR. We identified 2,452, 826 and 322 differentially expressed genes in cultivated flesh, cultivated mesocarp and wild flesh, respectively, during fruit development. Gene ontology enrichment analysis of these genes indicated that biological processes and metabolic pathways related to fruit quality such as sweetness and flavor were significantly changed only in the flesh of 97103 during fruit development, while those related to abiotic stress response were changed mainly in the flesh of PI296341-FR. Our comparative transcriptome profiling analysis identified critical genes potentially involved in controlling fruit quality traits including α-galactosidase, invertase, UDP-galactose/glucose pyrophosphorylase and sugar transporter genes involved in the determination of fruit sugar content, phytoene synthase, β-carotene hydroxylase, 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase and carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase genes involved in carotenoid metabolism, and 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase, cellulose synthase, pectinesterase, pectinesterase inhibitor, polygalacturonase inhibitor and α-mannosidase genes involved in the regulation of flesh texture. In addition, we found that genes in the ethylene biosynthesis and signaling pathway including ACC oxidase, ethylene receptor and ethylene responsive factor showed highly ripening-associated expression patterns, indicating a possible role of ethylene in fruit development and ripening of watermelon, a non-climacteric fruit. Our analysis provides

  19. Glucose-1-Phosphate Transport into Protoplasts and Chloroplasts from Leaves of Arabidopsis1

    PubMed Central

    Fettke, Joerg; Malinova, Irina; Albrecht, Tanja; Hejazi, Mahdi; Steup, Martin

    2011-01-01

    Almost all glucosyl transfer reactions rely on glucose-1-phosphate (Glc-1-P) that either immediately acts as glucosyl donor or as substrate for the synthesis of the more widely used Glc dinucleotides, ADPglucose or UDPglucose. In this communication, we have analyzed two Glc-1-P-related processes: the carbon flux from externally supplied Glc-1-P to starch by either mesophyll protoplasts or intact chloroplasts from Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). When intact protoplasts or chloroplasts are incubated with [U-14C]Glc-1-P, starch is rapidly labeled. Incorporation into starch is unaffected by the addition of unlabeled Glc-6-P or Glc, indicating a selective flux from Glc-1-P to starch. However, illuminated protoplasts incorporate less 14C into starch when unlabeled bicarbonate is supplied in addition to the 14C-labeled Glc-1-P. Mesophyll protoplasts incubated with [U-14C]Glc-1-P incorporate 14C into the plastidial pool of adenosine diphosphoglucose. Protoplasts prepared from leaves of mutants of Arabidopsis that lack either the plastidial phosphorylase or the phosphoglucomutase isozyme incorporate 14C derived from external Glc-1-P into starch, but incorporation into starch is insignificant when protoplasts from a mutant possessing a highly reduced ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase activity are studied. Thus, the path of assimilatory starch biosynthesis initiated by extraplastidial Glc-1-P leads to the plastidial pool of adenosine diphosphoglucose, and at this intermediate it is fused with the Calvin cycle-driven route. Mutants lacking the plastidial phosphoglucomutase contain a small yet significant amount of transitory starch. PMID:21115809

  20. Rare Homologous Gene Targeting in Histoplasma capsulatum: Disruption of the URA5Hc Gene by Allelic Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Woods, Jon P.; Retallack, Diane M.; Heinecke, Elizabeth L.; Goldman, William E.

    1998-01-01

    URA5 genes encode orotidine-5′-monophosphate pyrophosphorylase (OMPpase), an enzyme involved in pyrimidine biosynthesis. We cloned the Histoplasma capsulatum URA5 gene (URA5Hc) by using a probe generated by PCR with inosine-rich primers based on relatively conserved sequences in OMPpases from other organisms. Transformation with this gene restored uracil prototrophy and OMPpase activity to UV-mutagenized ura5 strains of H. capsulatum. We attempted to target the genomic URA5 locus in this haploid organism to demonstrate homologous allelic replacement with transforming DNA, which has not been previously done in H. capsulatum and has been challenging in some other pathogenic fungi. Several strategies commonly used in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and other eukaryotes were unsuccessful, due to the frequent occurrence of ectopic integration, linear plasmid formation, and spontaneous resistance to 5-fluoroorotic acid, which is a selective agent for URA5 gene inactivation. Recent development of an efficient electrotransformation system and of a second selectable marker (hph, conferring hygromycin B resistance) for this fungus enabled us to achieve allelic replacement by using transformation with an insertionally inactivated Δura5Hc::hph plasmid, followed by dual selection with hygromycin B and 5-fluoroorotic acid, or by screening hygromycin B-resistant transformants for uracil auxotrophy. The relative frequency of homologous gene targeting was approximately one allelic replacement event per thousand transformants. This work demonstrates the feasibility but also the potential challenge of gene disruption in this organism. To our knowledge, it represents the first example of experimentally directed allelic replacement in H. capsulatum, or in any dimorphic systemic fungal pathogen of humans. PMID:9748447

  1. Inhibitory Role of Greatwall-Like Protein Kinase Rim15p in Alcoholic Fermentation via Upregulating the UDP-Glucose Synthesis Pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Daisuke; Zhou, Yan; Hirata, Aiko; Sugimoto, Yukiko; Takagi, Kenichi; Akao, Takeshi; Ohya, Yoshikazu; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    The high fermentation rate of Saccharomyces cerevisiae sake yeast strains is attributable to a loss-of-function mutation in the RIM15 gene, which encodes a Greatwall-family protein kinase that is conserved among eukaryotes. In the present study, we performed intracellular metabolic profiling analysis and revealed that deletion of the RIM15 gene in a laboratory strain impaired glucose-anabolic pathways through the synthesis of UDP-glucose (UDPG). Although Rim15p is required for the synthesis of trehalose and glycogen from UDPG upon entry of cells into the quiescent state, we found that Rim15p is also essential for the accumulation of cell wall β-glucans, which are also anabolic products of UDPG. Furthermore, the impairment of UDPG or 1,3-β-glucan synthesis contributed to an increase in the fermentation rate. Transcriptional induction of PGM2 (phosphoglucomutase) and UGP1 (UDPG pyrophosphorylase) was impaired in Rim15p-deficient cells in the early stage of fermentation. These findings demonstrate that the decreased anabolism of glucose into UDPG and 1,3-β-glucan triggered by a defect in the Rim15p-mediated upregulation of PGM2 and UGP1 redirects the glucose flux into glycolysis. Consistent with this, sake yeast strains with defective Rim15p exhibited impaired expression of PGM2 and UGP1 and decreased levels of β-glucans, trehalose, and glycogen during sake fermentation. We also identified a sake yeast-specific mutation in the glycogen synthesis-associated glycogenin gene GLG2, supporting the conclusion that the glucose-anabolic pathway is impaired in sake yeast. These findings demonstrate that downregulation of the UDPG synthesis pathway is a key mechanism accelerating alcoholic fermentation in industrially utilized S. cerevisiae sake strains. PMID:26497456

  2. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis of Cultivated and Wild Watermelon during Fruit Development.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shaogui; Sun, Honghe; Zhang, Haiying; Liu, Jingan; Ren, Yi; Gong, Guoyi; Jiao, Chen; Zheng, Yi; Yang, Wencai; Fei, Zhangjun; Xu, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Watermelon [Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. & Nakai] is an important vegetable crop world-wide. Watermelon fruit quality is a complex trait determined by various factors such as sugar content, flesh color and flesh texture. Fruit quality and developmental process of cultivated and wild watermelon are highly different. To systematically understand the molecular basis of these differences, we compared transcriptome profiles of fruit tissues of cultivated watermelon 97103 and wild watermelon PI296341-FR. We identified 2,452, 826 and 322 differentially expressed genes in cultivated flesh, cultivated mesocarp and wild flesh, respectively, during fruit development. Gene ontology enrichment analysis of these genes indicated that biological processes and metabolic pathways related to fruit quality such as sweetness and flavor were significantly changed only in the flesh of 97103 during fruit development, while those related to abiotic stress response were changed mainly in the flesh of PI296341-FR. Our comparative transcriptome profiling analysis identified critical genes potentially involved in controlling fruit quality traits including α-galactosidase, invertase, UDP-galactose/glucose pyrophosphorylase and sugar transporter genes involved in the determination of fruit sugar content, phytoene synthase, β-carotene hydroxylase, 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase and carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase genes involved in carotenoid metabolism, and 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase, cellulose synthase, pectinesterase, pectinesterase inhibitor, polygalacturonase inhibitor and α-mannosidase genes involved in the regulation of flesh texture. In addition, we found that genes in the ethylene biosynthesis and signaling pathway including ACC oxidase, ethylene receptor and ethylene responsive factor showed highly ripening-associated expression patterns, indicating a possible role of ethylene in fruit development and ripening of watermelon, a non-climacteric fruit. Our analysis provides

  3. 2-Fluoro-L-Fucose Is a Metabolically Incorporated Inhibitor of Plant Cell Wall Polysaccharide Fucosylation.

    PubMed

    Villalobos, Jose A; Yi, Bo R; Wallace, Ian S

    2015-01-01

    The monosaccharide L-fucose (L-Fuc) is a common component of plant cell wall polysaccharides and other plant glycans, including the hemicellulose xyloglucan, pectic rhamnogalacturonan-I (RG-I) and rhamnogalacturonan-II (RG-II), arabinogalactan proteins, and N-linked glycans. Mutations compromising the biosynthesis of many plant cell wall polysaccharides are lethal, and as a result, small molecule inhibitors of plant cell wall polysaccharide biosynthesis have been developed because these molecules can be applied at defined concentrations and developmental stages. In this study, we characterize novel small molecule inhibitors of plant fucosylation. 2-fluoro-L-fucose (2F-Fuc) analogs caused severe growth phenotypes when applied to Arabidopsis seedlings, including reduced root growth and altered root morphology. These phenotypic defects were dependent upon the L-Fuc salvage pathway enzyme L-Fucose Kinase/ GDP-L-Fucose Pyrophosphorylase (FKGP), suggesting that 2F-Fuc is metabolically converted to the sugar nucleotide GDP-2F-Fuc, which serves as the active inhibitory molecule. The L-Fuc content of cell wall matrix polysaccharides was reduced in plants treated with 2F-Fuc, suggesting that this molecule inhibits the incorporation of L-Fuc into these polysaccharides. Additionally, phenotypic defects induced by 2F-Fuc treatment could be partially relieved by the exogenous application of boric acid, suggesting that 2F-Fuc inhibits RG-II biosynthesis. Overall, the results presented here suggest that 2F-Fuc is a metabolically incorporated inhibitor of plant cellular fucosylation events, and potentially suggest that other 2-fluorinated monosaccharides could serve as useful chemical probes for the inhibition of cell wall polysaccharide biosynthesis.

  4. Activities of key enzymes in sucrose-to-starch conversion in wheat grains subjected to water deficit during grain filling.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianchang; Zhang, Jianhua; Wang, Zhiqing; Xu, Guowei; Zhu, Qingsen

    2004-07-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that a controlled water deficit during grain filling of wheat (Triticum aestivum) could accelerate grain-filling rate through regulating the key enzymes involved in Suc-to-starch pathway in the grains. Two high lodging-resistant wheat cultivars were field grown. Well-watered and water-deficit (WD) treatments were imposed from 9 DPA until maturity. The WD promoted the reallocation of prefixed 14C from the stems to grains, shortened the grain-filling period, and increased grain-filling rate or starch accumulation rate (SAR) in the grains. Activities of Suc synthase (SuSase), soluble starch synthase (SSS), and starch branching enzyme (SBE) in the grains were substantially enhanced by WD and positively correlated with the SAR. ADP Glc pyrophosphorylase activity was also enhanced in WD grains initially and correlated with SAR with a smaller coefficient. Activities of granule-bound starch synthase and soluble and insoluble acid invertase in the grains were less affected by WD. Abscisic acid (ABA) content in the grains was remarkably enhanced by WD and very significantly correlated with activities of SuSase, SSS, and SBE. Application of ABA on well-watered plants showed similar results as those by WD. Spraying with fluridone, an ABA synthesis inhibitor, had the opposite effect. The results suggest that increased grain-filling rate is mainly attributed to the enhanced sink activity by regulating key enzymes involved in Suc-to-starch conversion, especially SuSase, SSS, and SBE, in wheat grains when subjected to a mild water deficit during grain filling, and ABA plays a vital role in the regulation of this process.

  5. Comparative Transcriptome Analysis of Cultivated and Wild Watermelon during Fruit Development.

    PubMed

    Guo, Shaogui; Sun, Honghe; Zhang, Haiying; Liu, Jingan; Ren, Yi; Gong, Guoyi; Jiao, Chen; Zheng, Yi; Yang, Wencai; Fei, Zhangjun; Xu, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Watermelon [Citrullus lanatus (Thunb.) Matsum. & Nakai] is an important vegetable crop world-wide. Watermelon fruit quality is a complex trait determined by various factors such as sugar content, flesh color and flesh texture. Fruit quality and developmental process of cultivated and wild watermelon are highly different. To systematically understand the molecular basis of these differences, we compared transcriptome profiles of fruit tissues of cultivated watermelon 97103 and wild watermelon PI296341-FR. We identified 2,452, 826 and 322 differentially expressed genes in cultivated flesh, cultivated mesocarp and wild flesh, respectively, during fruit development. Gene ontology enrichment analysis of these genes indicated that biological processes and metabolic pathways related to fruit quality such as sweetness and flavor were significantly changed only in the flesh of 97103 during fruit development, while those related to abiotic stress response were changed mainly in the flesh of PI296341-FR. Our comparative transcriptome profiling analysis identified critical genes potentially involved in controlling fruit quality traits including α-galactosidase, invertase, UDP-galactose/glucose pyrophosphorylase and sugar transporter genes involved in the determination of fruit sugar content, phytoene synthase, β-carotene hydroxylase, 9-cis-epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase and carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase genes involved in carotenoid metabolism, and 4-coumarate:coenzyme A ligase, cellulose synthase, pectinesterase, pectinesterase inhibitor, polygalacturonase inhibitor and α-mannosidase genes involved in the regulation of flesh texture. In addition, we found that genes in the ethylene biosynthesis and signaling pathway including ACC oxidase, ethylene receptor and ethylene responsive factor showed highly ripening-associated expression patterns, indicating a possible role of ethylene in fruit development and ripening of watermelon, a non-climacteric fruit. Our analysis provides

  6. HPLC-MS/MS Analyses Show That the Near-Starchless aps1 and pgm Leaves Accumulate Wild Type Levels of ADPglucose: Further Evidence for the Occurrence of Important ADPglucose Biosynthetic Pathway(s) Alternative to the pPGI-pPGM-AGP Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Francisco José; Li, Jun; Almagro, Goizeder; Montero, Manuel; Pujol, Pablo; Galarza, Regina; Kaneko, Kentaro; Oikawa, Kazusato; Wada, Kaede; Mitsui, Toshiaki; Pozueta-Romero, Javier

    2014-01-01

    In leaves, it is widely assumed that starch is the end-product of a metabolic pathway exclusively taking place in the chloroplast that (a) involves plastidic phosphoglucomutase (pPGM), ADPglucose (ADPG) pyrophosphorylase (AGP) and starch synthase (SS), and (b) is linked to the Calvin-Benson cycle by means of the plastidic phosphoglucose isomerase (pPGI). This view also implies that AGP is the sole enzyme producing the starch precursor molecule, ADPG. However, mounting evidence has been compiled pointing to the occurrence of important sources, other than the pPGI-pPGM-AGP pathway, of ADPG. To further explore this possibility, in this work two independent laboratories have carried out HPLC-MS/MS analyses of ADPG content in leaves of the near-starchless pgm and aps1 mutants impaired in pPGM and AGP, respectively, and in leaves of double aps1/pgm mutants grown under two different culture conditions. We also measured the ADPG content in wild type (WT) and aps1 leaves expressing in the plastid two different ADPG cleaving enzymes, and in aps1 leaves expressing in the plastid GlgC, a bacterial AGP. Furthermore, we measured the ADPG content in ss3/ss4/aps1 mutants impaired in starch granule initiation and chloroplastic ADPG synthesis. We found that, irrespective of their starch contents, pgm and aps1 leaves, WT and aps1 leaves expressing in the plastid ADPG cleaving enzymes, and aps1 leaves expressing in the plastid GlgC accumulate WT ADPG content. In clear contrast, ss3/ss4/aps1 leaves accumulated ca. 300 fold-more ADPG than WT leaves. The overall data showed that, in Arabidopsis leaves, (a) there are important ADPG biosynthetic pathways, other than the pPGI-pPGM-AGP pathway, (b) pPGM and AGP are not major determinants of intracellular ADPG content, and (c) the contribution of the chloroplastic ADPG pool to the total ADPG pool is low. PMID:25133777

  7. The Regulation of Sugar Uptake and Accumulation in Bean Pod Tissue 1

    PubMed Central

    Sacher, J. A.

    1966-01-01

    The identity, localization and physiological significance of enzymes involved in sugar uptake and accumulation were determined for endocarp tissue of pods of Kentucky Wonder pole beans (Phaseolus vulgaris). An intracellular, alkaline invertase (pH optimum, 8) was assayed in extracted protein, as well as enzymes involved in sucrose synthesis, namely, uridinediphosphate (UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase and UDP-glucose-fructose transglucosylase). Indirect evidence indicated the presence also of hexokinase, phosphohexoseisomerase and phosphoglucomutase. The data suggested that sucrose synthesis occurred in the cytoplasm, and that both sugar storage and an alkaline invertase occurred in the vacuole. The latter functions to hydrolyze accumulated sucrose. An outer space invertase (pH optimum, 4.0) was detected, but was variable in occurrence. Although its activity at the cell surface enhanced sucrose uptake, sucrose may be taken up unaltered. Over a wide range of concentrations of exogenous glucose the sucrose/reducing sugar ratio of accumulated sugars remained unchanged at about 20. Synthesis of sucrose appears to be requisite to initial accumulation from glucose or fructose, as free hexoses do not increase at the apparent saturating concentration for uptake. Sucrose accumulation from exogenous hexose represents a steady-state value, in which sucrose is transported across the tonoplast into the vacuole at a rate equivalent to its rate of synthesis. Evidence indicates that this component of the accumulation process involves active transport of sucrose against a concentration gradient. The ratio of sucrose/reducing sugars in the accumulated sugars immediately after a period of uptake was inversely related to the level of inner space invertase. Within 16 hours after a period of accumulation, practically all of the sugar occurs as glucose and fructose. The absence of competition among hexoses and sucrose indicated that a common carrier was not involved in their uptake. From a

  8. Gain of function AMP-activated protein kinase γ3 mutation (AMPKγ3R200Q) in pig muscle increases glycogen storage regardless of AMPK activation.

    PubMed

    Scheffler, Tracy L; Park, Sungkwon; Roach, Peter J; Gerrard, David E

    2016-06-01

    Chronic activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) increases glycogen content in skeletal muscle. Previously, we demonstrated that a mutation in the ryanodine receptor (RyR1(R615C)) blunts AMPK phosphorylation in longissimus muscle of pigs with a gain of function mutation in the AMPKγ3 subunit (AMPKγ3(R200Q)); this may decrease the glycogen storage capacity of AMPKγ3(R200Q) + RyR1(R615C) muscle. Therefore, our aim in this study was to utilize our pig model to understand how AMPKγ3(R200Q) and AMPK activation contribute to glycogen storage and metabolism in muscle. We selected and bred pigs in order to generate offspring with naturally occurring AMPKγ3(R200Q), RyR1(R615C), and AMPKγ3(R200Q) + RyR1(R615C) mutations, and also retained wild-type littermates (control). We assessed glycogen content and parameters of glycogen metabolism in longissimus muscle. Regardless of RyR1(R615C), AMPKγ3(R200Q) increased the glycogen content by approximately 70%. Activity of glycogen synthase (GS) without the allosteric activator glucose 6-phosphate (G6P) was decreased in AMPKγ3(R200Q) relative to all other genotypes, whereas both AMPKγ3(R200Q) and AMPKγ3(R200Q) + RyR1(R615C) muscle exhibited increased GS activity with G6P. Increased activity of GS with G6P was not associated with increased abundance of GS or hexokinase 2. However, AMPKγ3(R200Q) enhanced UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase 2 (UGP2) expression approximately threefold. Although UGP2 is not generally considered a rate-limiting enzyme for glycogen synthesis, our model suggests that UGP2 plays an important role in increasing flux to glycogen synthase. Moreover, we have shown that the capacity for glycogen storage is more closely related to the AMPKγ3(R200Q) mutation than activity.