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Sample records for adp-ribosylation factor-binding proteins

  1. Chromosomal protein poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation in pancreatic nucleosomes.

    PubMed

    Aubin, R J; Dam, V T; Miclette, J; Brousseau, Y; Poirier, G G

    1982-03-01

    When pancreatic chromatin fragments were prepared and resolved in the presence of 80 mM NaCl, endogenous poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activity was found to be maximal in nucleosome periodicities of four to five units and did not respond to any further increases in nucleosomal architecture. Furthermore, in nucleosome complexities spanning 1 through 14 and over unit lengths, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis on acid-urea and acid-urea-Triton gels has shown pancreatic histone H1 to be the only actively ADP-ribosylated histone species. The extent of ADP-ribosylation of histone H1 was also demonstrated to retard the protein's mobility in acid-urea, acid-urea-Triton, and lithium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gels and to consist of at least 12 distinct ADP-ribosylated species extractable in all nucleosome complexities studied. Finally, extraction and subsequent electrophoresis of total chromosomal proteins in the presence of lithium dodecyl sulfate also evidenced heavy ADP-ribosylation at the level of nonhistone chromosomal proteins of the high mobility group comigrating in the core histone region, as well as in the topmost region of the gels where poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase was found to form a poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated aggregate.

  2. ADP-ribosylation of proteins: Enzymology and biological significance

    SciTech Connect

    Althaus, F.R.; Richter, C.

    1987-01-01

    This book presents an overview of the molecular and biological consequences of the posttranslational modification of proteins with ADP-ribose monomers and polymers. Part one focuses on chromatin-associated poly ADP-ribosylation reactions which have evolved in higher eukaryotes as modulators of chromatin functions. The significance of poly ADP-ribosylation in DNA repair, carcinogenesis, and gene expression during terminal differentiation is discussed. Part two reviews mono ADP-ribosylation reactions which are catalyzed by prokaryotic and eukaryotic enzymes. Consideration is given to the action of bacterial toxins, such as cholera toxin, pertussis toxin, and diphtheria toxin. These toxins have emerged as tools for the molecular probing of proteins involved in signal transduction and protein biosynthesis.

  3. Regulation of Bone Morphogenetic Protein Signaling by ADP-ribosylation*

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Yukihide; Papoutsoglou, Panagiotis; Maturi, Varun; Tsubakihara, Yutaro; Hottiger, Michael O.; Heldin, Carl-Henrik; Moustakas, Aristidis

    2016-01-01

    We previously established a mechanism of negative regulation of transforming growth factor β signaling mediated by the nuclear ADP-ribosylating enzyme poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) and the deribosylating enzyme poly-(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG), which dynamically regulate ADP-ribosylation of Smad3 and Smad4, two central signaling proteins of the pathway. Here we demonstrate that the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathway can also be regulated by the opposing actions of PARP1 and PARG. PARG positively contributes to BMP signaling and forms physical complexes with Smad5 and Smad4. The positive role PARG plays during BMP signaling can be neutralized by PARP1, as demonstrated by experiments where PARG and PARP1 are simultaneously silenced. In contrast to PARG, ectopic expression of PARP1 suppresses BMP signaling, whereas silencing of endogenous PARP1 enhances signaling and BMP-induced differentiation. The two major Smad proteins of the BMP pathway, Smad1 and Smad5, interact with PARP1 and can be ADP-ribosylated in vitro, whereas PARG causes deribosylation. The overall outcome of this mode of regulation of BMP signal transduction provides a fine-tuning mechanism based on the two major enzymes that control cellular ADP-ribosylation. PMID:27129221

  4. Viral Macro Domains Reverse Protein ADP-Ribosylation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Changqing; Debing, Yannick; Jankevicius, Gytis; Neyts, Johan; Ahel, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT ADP-ribosylation is a posttranslational protein modification in which ADP-ribose is transferred from NAD+ to specific acceptors to regulate a wide variety of cellular processes. The macro domain is an ancient and highly evolutionarily conserved protein domain widely distributed throughout all kingdoms of life, including viruses. The human TARG1/C6orf130, MacroD1, and MacroD2 proteins can reverse ADP-ribosylation by acting on ADP-ribosylated substrates through the hydrolytic activity of their macro domains. Here, we report that the macro domain from hepatitis E virus (HEV) serves as an ADP-ribose-protein hydrolase for mono-ADP-ribose (MAR) and poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) chain removal (de-MARylation and de-PARylation, respectively) from mono- and poly(ADP)-ribosylated proteins, respectively. The presence of the HEV helicase in cis dramatically increases the binding of the macro domain to poly(ADP-ribose) and stimulates the de-PARylation activity. Abrogation of the latter dramatically decreases replication of an HEV subgenomic replicon. The de-MARylation activity is present in all three pathogenic positive-sense, single-stranded RNA [(+)ssRNA] virus families which carry a macro domain: Coronaviridae (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus and human coronavirus 229E), Togaviridae (Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus), and Hepeviridae (HEV), indicating that it might be a significant tropism and/or pathogenic determinant. IMPORTANCE Protein ADP-ribosylation is a covalent posttranslational modification regulating cellular protein activities in a dynamic fashion to modulate and coordinate a variety of cellular processes. Three viral families, Coronaviridae, Togaviridae, and Hepeviridae, possess macro domains embedded in their polyproteins. Here, we show that viral macro domains reverse cellular ADP-ribosylation, potentially cutting the signal of a viral infection in the cell. Various poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases which are notorious guardians of cellular

  5. Cholera toxin can catalyze ADP-ribosylation of cytoskeletal proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Kaslow, H.R.; Groppi, V.E.; Abood, M.E.; Bourne, H.R.

    1981-11-01

    Cholera toxin catalyzes transfer of radiolabel from (/sup 32/P)NAD/sup +/ to several peptides in particulate preparations of human foreskin fibroblasts. Resolution of these peptides by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis allowed identification of two peptides of M/sub r/ = 42,000 and 52,000 as peptide subunits of a regulatory component of adenylate cyclase. The radiolabeling of another group of peptides (M/sub r/ = 50,000 to 65,000) suggested that cholera toxin could catalyze ADP-ribosylation of cytoskeletal proteins. This suggestion was confirmed by showing that incubation with cholera toxin and (/sup 32/P)NAD/sup +/ caused radiolabeling of purified microtubule and intermediate filament proteins.

  6. Identification of a Class of Protein ADP-Ribosylating Sirtuins in Microbial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Rack, Johannes Gregor Matthias; Morra, Rosa; Barkauskaite, Eva; Kraehenbuehl, Rolf; Ariza, Antonio; Qu, Yue; Ortmayer, Mary; Leidecker, Orsolya; Cameron, David R.; Matic, Ivan; Peleg, Anton Y.; Leys, David; Traven, Ana; Ahel, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Summary Sirtuins are an ancient family of NAD+-dependent deacylases connected with the regulation of fundamental cellular processes including metabolic homeostasis and genome integrity. We show the existence of a hitherto unrecognized class of sirtuins, found predominantly in microbial pathogens. In contrast to earlier described classes, these sirtuins exhibit robust protein ADP-ribosylation activity. In our model organisms, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes, the activity is dependent on prior lipoylation of the target protein and can be reversed by a sirtuin-associated macrodomain protein. Together, our data describe a sirtuin-dependent reversible protein ADP-ribosylation system and establish a crosstalk between lipoylation and mono-ADP-ribosylation. We propose that these posttranslational modifications modulate microbial virulence by regulating the response to host-derived reactive oxygen species. PMID:26166706

  7. Microtubule protein ADP-ribosylation in vitro leads to assembly inhibition and rapid depolymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Scaife, R.M. ); Wilson, L. ); Purich, D.L. )

    1992-01-14

    Bovine brain microtubule protein, containing both tubulin and microtubule-associated proteins, undergoes ADP-ribosylation in the presence of ({sup 14}C)NAD{sup +} and a turkey erythrocyte mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase in vitro. The modification reaction could be demonstrated in crude brain tissue extracts where selective ADP-ribosylation of both the {alpha} and {beta} chains of tubulin and of the high molecular weight microtubule-associated protein MAP-2 occurred. In experiments with purified microtubule protein, tubulin dimer, the high molecular weight microtubule-associated protein MAP-2, and another high molecular weight microtubule-associated protein which may be a MAP-1 species were heavily labeled. Tubulin and MAP-2 incorporated ({sup 14}C)ADP-ribose to an average extent of approximately 2.4 and 30 mol of ADP-ribose/mol of protein, respectively. Assembly of microtubule protein into microtubules in vitro was inhibited by ADP-ribosylation, and incubation of assembled steady-state microtubules with ADP-ribosyltransferase and NAD{sup +} resulted in rapid depolymerization of the microtubules. Thus, the eukaryotic enzyme can ADP-ribosylate tubulin and microtubule-associated proteins to much greater extents than previously observed with cholera and pertussis toxins, and the modification can significantly modulate microtubule assembly and disassembly.

  8. NADP/sup +/ enhances cholera and pertussis toxin-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation of membrane proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Kawai, Y.; Whitsel, C.; Arinze, I.J.

    1986-05-01

    Cholera or pertussis toxin-catalyzed (/sup 32/P)ADP-ribosylation is frequently used to estimate the concentration of the stimulatory (Ns) or inhibitory (Ni) guanine nucleotide regulatory proteins which modulate the activity of adenylate cyclase. With this assay, however, the degradation of the substrate, NAD/sup +/, by endogenous enzymes such as NAD/sup +/-glycohydrolase (NADase) present in the test membranes can influence the results. In this study the authors show that both cholera and pertussis toxin-catalyzed (/sup 32/P)ADP-ribosylation of liver membrane proteins is markedly enhanced by NADP/sup +/. The effect is concentration dependent; with 20 ..mu..M (/sup 32/P)NAD/sup +/ as substrate maximal enhancement is obtained at 0.5-1.0 mM NADP/sup +/. The enhancement of (/sup 32/P)ADP-ribosylation by NADP/sup +/ was much greater than that by other known effectors such as Mg/sup 2 +/, phosphate or isoniazid. The effect of NADP/sup +/ on ADP-ribosylation may occur by inhibition of the degradation of NAD/sup +/ probably by acting as an alternate substrate for NADase. Among inhibitors tested (NADP/sup +/, isoniazid, imidazole, nicotinamide, L-Arg-methyl-ester and HgCl/sub 2/) to suppress NADase activity, NADP/sup +/ was the most effective and, 10 mM, inhibited activity of the enzyme by about 90%. In membranes which contain substantial activities of NADase the inclusion of NADP/sup +/ in the assay is necessary to obtain maximal ADP-ribosylation.

  9. Ezrin/radixin/moesin proteins are high affinity targets for ADP-ribosylation by Pseudomonas aeruginosa ExoS.

    PubMed

    Maresso, Anthony W; Baldwin, Michael R; Barbieri, Joseph T

    2004-09-10

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa ExoS is a bifunctional type III-secreted cytotoxin. The N terminus (amino acids 96-233) encodes a GTPase-activating protein activity, whereas the C terminus (amino acids 234-453) encodes a factor-activating ExoS-dependent ADP-ribosyltransferase activity. The GTPase-activating protein activity inactivates the Rho GTPases Rho, Rac, and Cdc42 in cultured cells and in vitro, whereas the ADP-ribosylation by ExoS is poly-substrate-specific and includes Ras as an early target for ADP-ribosylation. Infection of HeLa cells with P. aeruginosa producing a GTPase-activating protein-deficient form of ExoS rounded cells, indicating the ADP-ribosyltransferase domain alone is sufficient to elicit cytoskeletal changes. Examination of substrates modified by type III-delivered ExoS identified a 70-kDa protein as an early and predominant target for ADP-ribosylation. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectroscopy identified this protein as moesin, a member of the ezrin/radixin/moesin (ERM) family of proteins. ExoS ADP-ribosylated recombinant moesin at a linear velocity that was 5-fold faster and with a K(m) that was 2 orders of magnitude lower than Ras. Moesin homologs ezrin and radixin were also ADP-ribosylated, indicating the ERMs collectively represent high affinity targets of ExoS. Type III delivered ExoS ADP-ribosylated moesin and ezrin (and/or radixin) in cultured HeLa cells. The ERM proteins contribute to cytoskeleton dynamics, and the ability of ExoS to ADP-ribosylate the ERM proteins links ADP-ribosylation with the cytoskeletal changes associated with ExoS intoxication.

  10. Distribution of protein poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation systems across all domains of life

    PubMed Central

    Perina, Dragutin; Mikoč, Andreja; Ahel, Josip; Ćetković, Helena; Žaja, Roko; Ahel, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is a post-translational modification of proteins involved in regulation of many cellular pathways. Poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) consists of chains of repeating ADP-ribose nucleotide units and is synthesized by the family of enzymes called poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs). This modification can be removed by the hydrolytic action of poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) and ADP-ribosylhydrolase 3 (ARH3). Hydrolytic activity of macrodomain proteins (MacroD1, MacroD2 and TARG1) is responsible for the removal of terminal ADP-ribose unit and for complete reversion of protein ADP-ribosylation. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is widely utilized in eukaryotes and PARPs are present in representatives from all six major eukaryotic supergroups, with only a small number of eukaryotic species that do not possess PARP genes. The last common ancestor of all eukaryotes possessed at least five types of PARP proteins that include both mono and poly(ADP-ribosyl) transferases. Distribution of PARGs strictly follows the distribution of PARP proteins in eukaryotic species. At least one of the macrodomain proteins that hydrolyse terminal ADP-ribose is also always present. Therefore, we can presume that the last common ancestor of all eukaryotes possessed a fully functional and reversible PAR metabolism and that PAR signalling provided the conditions essential for survival of the ancestral eukaryote in its ancient environment. PARP proteins are far less prevalent in bacteria and were probably gained through horizontal gene transfer. Only eleven bacterial species possess all proteins essential for a functional PAR metabolism, although it is not known whether PAR metabolism is truly functional in bacteria. Several dsDNA viruses also possess PARP homologues, while no PARP proteins have been identified in any archaeal genome. Our analysis of the distribution of enzymes involved in PAR metabolism provides insight into the evolution of these important signalling systems, as well as

  11. HPF1/C4orf27 Is a PARP-1-Interacting Protein that Regulates PARP-1 ADP-Ribosylation Activity

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs-Seymour, Ian; Fontana, Pietro; Rack, Johannes Gregor Matthias; Ahel, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Summary We report the identification of histone PARylation factor 1 (HPF1; also known as C4orf27) as a regulator of ADP-ribosylation signaling in the DNA damage response. HPF1/C4orf27 forms a robust protein complex with PARP-1 in cells and is recruited to DNA lesions in a PARP-1-dependent manner, but independently of PARP-1 catalytic ADP-ribosylation activity. Functionally, HPF1 promotes PARP-1-dependent in trans ADP-ribosylation of histones and limits DNA damage-induced hyper-automodification of PARP-1. Human cells lacking HPF1 exhibit sensitivity to DNA damaging agents and PARP inhibition, thereby suggesting an important role for HPF1 in genome maintenance and regulating the efficacy of PARP inhibitors. Collectively, our results demonstrate how a fundamental step in PARP-1-dependent ADP-ribosylation signaling is regulated and suggest that HPF1 functions at the crossroads of histone ADP-ribosylation and PARP-1 automodification. PMID:27067600

  12. ADP-ribosylation factor-like protein 4C (ARL4C) interacts with galectin-3 during oocyte development and embryogenesis in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ADP-ribosylation factor-like protein 4 (ARL4) is a GTP-binding protein which belongs to the ADP-ribosylation factor protein (ARF) superfamily of small GTPases. ARL4 has been shown to be mainly related to the development of male germ cells and embryogenesis in mouse. To investigate the role of ARL4 i...

  13. ADP ribosylation adapts an ER chaperone response to short-term fluctuations in unfolded protein load

    PubMed Central

    Petrova, Kseniya; Tomba, Giulia; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2012-01-01

    Gene expression programs that regulate the abundance of the chaperone BiP adapt the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to unfolded protein load. However, such programs are slow compared with physiological fluctuations in secreted protein synthesis. While searching for mechanisms that fill this temporal gap in coping with ER stress, we found elevated levels of adenosine diphosphate (ADP)–ribosylated BiP in the inactive pancreas of fasted mice and a rapid decline in this modification in the active fed state. ADP ribosylation mapped to Arg470 and Arg492 in the substrate-binding domain of hamster BiP. Mutations that mimic the negative charge of ADP-ribose destabilized substrate binding and interfered with interdomain allosteric coupling, marking ADP ribosylation as a rapid posttranslational mechanism for reversible inactivation of BiP. A kinetic model showed that buffering fluctuations in unfolded protein load with a recruitable pool of inactive chaperone is an efficient strategy to minimize both aggregation and costly degradation of unfolded proteins. PMID:22869598

  14. Regulation of growth factor receptor degradation by ADP-ribosylation factor domain protein (ARD) 1.

    PubMed

    Meza-Carmen, Victor; Pacheco-Rodriguez, Gustavo; Kang, Gi Soo; Kato, Jiro; Donati, Chiara; Zhang, Chun-Yi; Vichi, Alessandro; Payne, D Michael; El-Chemaly, Souheil; Stylianou, Mario; Moss, Joel; Vaughan, Martha

    2011-06-28

    ADP-ribosylation factor domain protein 1 (ARD1) is a 64-kDa protein containing a functional ADP-ribosylation factor (GTP hydrolase, GTPase), GTPase-activating protein, and E3 ubiquitin ligase domains. ARD1 activation by the guanine nucleotide-exchange factor cytohesin-1 was known. GTPase and E3 ligase activities of ARD1 suggest roles in protein transport and turnover. To explore this hypothesis, we used mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) from ARD1-/- mice stably transfected with plasmids for inducible expression of wild-type ARD1 protein (KO-WT), or ARD1 protein with inactivating mutations in E3 ligase domain (KO-E3), or containing persistently active GTP-bound (KO-GTP), or inactive GDP-bound (KO-GDP) GTPase domains. Inhibition of proteasomal proteases in mifepristone-induced KO-WT, KO-GDP, or KO-GTP MEFs resulted in accumulation of these ARD1 proteins, whereas KO-E3 accumulated without inhibitors. All data were consistent with the conclusion that ARD1 regulates its own steady-state levels in cells by autoubiquitination. Based on reported growth factor receptor-cytohesin interactions, EGF receptor (EGFR) was investigated in induced MEFs. Amounts of cell-surface and total EGFR were higher in KO-GDP and lower in KO-GTP than in KO-WT MEFs, with levels in both mutants greater (p = 0.001) after proteasomal inhibition. Significant differences among MEF lines in content of TGF-β receptor III were similar to those in EGFR, albeit not as large. Differences in amounts of insulin receptor mirrored those in EGFR, but did not reach statistical significance. Overall, the capacity of ARD1 GTPase to cycle between active and inactive forms and its autoubiquitination both appear to be necessary for the appropriate turnover of EGFR and perhaps additional growth factor receptors.

  15. Synthesis of adenosine-imprinted microspheres for the recognition of ADP-ribosylated proteins.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xia; Tang, Biao; Liu, Jing Jing; You, Xiang Yu; Gu, Jing; Deng, Jiao Yu; Xie, Wei-Hong

    2017-01-15

    Core-shell structural adenosine-imprinted microspheres were prepared via a two-step procedure. Polystyrene core particles (CP) were firstly prepared via a reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) polymerization leaving the iniferter on the surface of the cores, then a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) shell was synthesized on the surface of the cores by using acrylamide (AAm) as the functional monomer and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) as the cross-linker. The formation and growth of the MIP layer were seen dependent on the initiator (AIBN), AAm and the polymerization time used within the polymerization. SEM/TEM images showed that the dimensions of the cores and shells were 2μM and 44nm, respectively. The MIP microspheres exhibited a fast rebinding rate within 2h and a maximum adsorption capacity of 177μg per gram for adenosine. The adsorption fitted a Langmuir-Freundlich (LF) isotherm model with a KLF value of 41mL/μg and a qm value of 177μg/g for the MIP microspheres. The values were larger than those for a non-molecularly imprinted polymer (NIP) particles (5mL/μg and 88μg/g) indicating a better adsorption ability towards adenosine. The MIP microspheres showed a good selectivity for adenosine with a higher adsorption (683nmol/g) for adenosine than that (91nmol/g, 24nmol/g and 54nmol/g) for guanosine, cytidine and uridine respectively. Further experiment proved that the adenosine-imprinted polymer microspheres also had a good selectivity for ADP-ribosylated proteins that the MIP could extract the ADP-ribosylated proteins from the cell extract samples.

  16. Changes in patterns of ADP-ribosylated proteins during differentiation of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) and its development mutants.

    PubMed Central

    Shima, J; Penyige, A; Ochi, K

    1996-01-01

    Mutants resistant to 3-aminobenzamide, a known inhibitor of ADP-ribosyltransferase, were obtained from Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2). One (strain 27) was analyzed in detail. Mutant 27 had a reduced ADP-ribosyl-transferase activity, exhibited substantial changes from the wild type in ADP-ribosylated protein profile during cell aging, and was defective in producing aerial mycelium and antibiotics. A 92-kDa ADP-ribosylated protein disappeared at the onset of differentiation in the parent strain but was present in mutant 27. Four ADP-ribosylated proteins (39, 41, 43, and 46 kDa) appeared at the onset of differentiation in the parent strain but were missing in mutant 27. Failure to ADP-ribosylate these four proteins was detected when the parent strain was grown in the presence of subinhibitory amounts of 3-aminobenzamide. Genetic analysis showed that the mutation, named brgA, conferring resistance to 3-aminobenzamide, cosegregated with the altered phenotypes (i.e., defects in ADP-ribosylation and aerial mycelium formation) and was mapped to a new locus near uraA. The brgA mutants were nonconditionally deficient in producing aerial mycelium and antibiotics, as determined by using various media, and had a morphological and physiological phenotype quite different from that of a bldG mutant carrying a mutation which was previously mapped near uraA. Among the known bld mutants, bldA, bldD, and bldG mutants exhibited a ADP-ribosylated protein profile similar to that of the wild type, while like mutant 27, bldB, bldC, and bldH mutants failed to ADP-ribosylate certain proteins. PMID:8682781

  17. Changes in patterns of ADP-ribosylated proteins during differentiation of Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) and its development mutants.

    PubMed

    Shima, J; Penyige, A; Ochi, K

    1996-07-01

    Mutants resistant to 3-aminobenzamide, a known inhibitor of ADP-ribosyltransferase, were obtained from Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2). One (strain 27) was analyzed in detail. Mutant 27 had a reduced ADP-ribosyl-transferase activity, exhibited substantial changes from the wild type in ADP-ribosylated protein profile during cell aging, and was defective in producing aerial mycelium and antibiotics. A 92-kDa ADP-ribosylated protein disappeared at the onset of differentiation in the parent strain but was present in mutant 27. Four ADP-ribosylated proteins (39, 41, 43, and 46 kDa) appeared at the onset of differentiation in the parent strain but were missing in mutant 27. Failure to ADP-ribosylate these four proteins was detected when the parent strain was grown in the presence of subinhibitory amounts of 3-aminobenzamide. Genetic analysis showed that the mutation, named brgA, conferring resistance to 3-aminobenzamide, cosegregated with the altered phenotypes (i.e., defects in ADP-ribosylation and aerial mycelium formation) and was mapped to a new locus near uraA. The brgA mutants were nonconditionally deficient in producing aerial mycelium and antibiotics, as determined by using various media, and had a morphological and physiological phenotype quite different from that of a bldG mutant carrying a mutation which was previously mapped near uraA. Among the known bld mutants, bldA, bldD, and bldG mutants exhibited a ADP-ribosylated protein profile similar to that of the wild type, while like mutant 27, bldB, bldC, and bldH mutants failed to ADP-ribosylate certain proteins.

  18. Protein Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation Regulates Arabidopsis Immune Gene Expression and Defense Responses

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Baomin; Liu, Chenglong; de Oliveira, Marcos V. V.; Intorne, Aline C.; Li, Bo; Babilonia, Kevin; de Souza Filho, Gonçalo A.; Shan, Libo; He, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Perception of microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) elicits transcriptional reprogramming in hosts and activates defense to pathogen attacks. The molecular mechanisms underlying plant pattern-triggered immunity remain elusive. A genetic screen identified Arabidopsis poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase 1 (atparg1) mutant with elevated immune gene expression upon multiple MAMP and pathogen treatments. Poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) is predicted to remove poly(ADP-ribose) polymers on acceptor proteins modified by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) with three PARPs and two PARGs in Arabidopsis genome. AtPARP1 and AtPARP2 possess poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activity, and the activity of AtPARP2 was enhanced by MAMP treatment. AtPARG1, but not AtPARG2, carries glycohydrolase activity in vivo and in vitro. Importantly, mutation (G450R) in atparg1 blocks its activity and the corresponding residue is highly conserved and essential for human HsPARG activity. Consistently, mutant atparp1atparp2 plants exhibited compromised immune gene activation and enhanced susceptibility to pathogen infections. Our study indicates that protein poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation plays critical roles in plant immune gene expression and defense to pathogen attacks. PMID:25569773

  19. Protein poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation regulates arabidopsis immune gene expression and defense responses.

    PubMed

    Feng, Baomin; Liu, Chenglong; de Oliveira, Marcos V V; Intorne, Aline C; Li, Bo; Babilonia, Kevin; de Souza Filho, Gonçalo A; Shan, Libo; He, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Perception of microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) elicits transcriptional reprogramming in hosts and activates defense to pathogen attacks. The molecular mechanisms underlying plant pattern-triggered immunity remain elusive. A genetic screen identified Arabidopsis poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase 1 (atparg1) mutant with elevated immune gene expression upon multiple MAMP and pathogen treatments. Poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) is predicted to remove poly(ADP-ribose) polymers on acceptor proteins modified by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) with three PARPs and two PARGs in Arabidopsis genome. AtPARP1 and AtPARP2 possess poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activity, and the activity of AtPARP2 was enhanced by MAMP treatment. AtPARG1, but not AtPARG2, carries glycohydrolase activity in vivo and in vitro. Importantly, mutation (G450R) in atparg1 blocks its activity and the corresponding residue is highly conserved and essential for human HsPARG activity. Consistently, mutant atparp1atparp2 plants exhibited compromised immune gene activation and enhanced susceptibility to pathogen infections. Our study indicates that protein poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation plays critical roles in plant immune gene expression and defense to pathogen attacks.

  20. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of Methyl CpG Binding Domain Protein 2 Regulates Chromatin Structure*

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Annette; Zhang, Peng; Allmann, Lena; Meilinger, Daniela; Bertulat, Bianca; Eck, Daniel; Hofstaetter, Maria; Bartolomei, Giody; Hottiger, Michael O.; Schreiber, Valérie; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Cardoso, M. Cristina

    2016-01-01

    The epigenetic information encoded in the genomic DNA methylation pattern is translated by methylcytosine binding proteins like MeCP2 into chromatin topology and structure and gene activity states. We have shown previously that the MeCP2 level increases during differentiation and that it causes large-scale chromatin reorganization, which is disturbed by MeCP2 Rett syndrome mutations. Phosphorylation and other posttranslational modifications of MeCP2 have been described recently to modulate its function. Here we show poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of endogenous MeCP2 in mouse brain tissue. Consequently, we found that MeCP2 induced aggregation of pericentric heterochromatin and that its chromatin accumulation was enhanced in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) 1−/− compared with wild-type cells. We mapped the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation domains and engineered MeCP2 mutation constructs to further analyze potential effects on DNA binding affinity and large-scale chromatin remodeling. Single or double deletion of the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated regions and PARP inhibition increased the heterochromatin clustering ability of MeCP2. Increased chromatin clustering may reflect increased binding affinity. In agreement with this hypothesis, we found that PARP-1 deficiency significantly increased the chromatin binding affinity of MeCP2 in vivo. These data provide novel mechanistic insights into the regulation of MeCP2-mediated, higher-order chromatin architecture and suggest therapeutic opportunities to manipulate MeCP2 function. PMID:26772194

  1. The mammalian G protein rhoC is ADP-ribosylated by Clostridium botulinum exoenzyme C3 and affects actin microfilaments in Vero cells.

    PubMed

    Chardin, P; Boquet, P; Madaule, P; Popoff, M R; Rubin, E J; Gill, D M

    1989-04-01

    Clostridium botulinum C3 is a recently discovered exoenzyme that ADP-ribosylates a eukaryotic GTP-binding protein of the ras superfamily. We show now that the bacterially-expressed product of the human rhoC gene is ADP-ribosylated by C3 and corresponds in size, charge and behavior to the dominant C3 substrate of eukaryotic cells. C3 treatment of Vero cells results in the disappearance of microfilaments and in actinomorphic shape changes without any apparent direct effect upon actin. Thus the ADP-ribosylation of a rho protein seems to be responsible for microfilament disassembly and we infer that the unmodified form of a rho protein may be involved in cytoskeletal control.

  2. Mono(ADP-ribosyl)ation of 2′-deoxyguanosine residue in DNA by an apoptosis-inducing protein, pierisin-1, from cabbage butterfly

    PubMed Central

    Takamura-Enya, Takeji; Watanabe, Masahiko; Totsuka, Yukari; Kanazawa, Takashi; Matsushima-Hibiya, Yuko; Koyama, Kotaro; Sugimura, Takashi; Wakabayashi, Keiji

    2001-01-01

    Pierisin-1 is a potent apoptosis-inducing protein derived from the cabbage butterfly, Pieris rapae. It has been shown that pierisin-1 has an A⋅B structure–function organization like cholera or diphtheria toxin, where the “A” domain (N-terminal) exhibits ADP-ribosyltransferase activity. The present studies were designed to identify the target molecule for ADP-ribosylation by pierisin-1 in the presence of β-[adenylate-32P]NAD, and we found DNA as the acceptor, but not protein as is the case with other bacteria-derived ADP-ribosylating toxins. ADP-ribosylation of tRNAs from yeast was also catalyzed by pierisin-1, but the efficiency was around \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}\\frac{1}{10}\\end{equation*}\\end{document} of that for calf thymus DNA. Pierisin-1 efficiently catalyzed the ADP-ribosylation of double-stranded DNA containing dG⋅dC, but not dA⋅dT pairs. The ADP-ribose moiety of NAD was transferred to the amino group at N2 of 2′-deoxyguanosine to yield N2-(α-ADP-ribos-1-yl)-2′-deoxyguanosine and its β form, which were determined by several spectral analyses including 1H- and 13C-NMR and mass spectrometry. The chemical structures were also ascertained by the independent synthesis of N2-(D-ribos-1-yl)-2′-deoxyguanosine, which is the characteristic moiety of ADP-ribosylated dG. Using the 32P-postlabeling method, ADP-ribosylated dG could be detected in DNA from pierisin-1-treated HeLa cells, in which apoptosis was easily induced. Thus, the targets for ADP-ribosylation by pierisin-1 were concluded to be 2′-deoxyguanosine residues in DNA. This finding may open a new field regarding the biological significance of ADP-ribosylation. PMID:11592983

  3. Progress in the function and regulation of ADP-Ribosylation.

    PubMed

    Hottiger, Michael O; Boothby, Mark; Koch-Nolte, Friedrich; Lüscher, Bernhard; Martin, Niall M B; Plummer, Ruth; Wang, Zhao-Qi; Ziegler, Mathias

    2011-05-24

    Adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP)-ribosylation is a protein posttranslational modification that is catalyzed by ADP-ribosyltransferases (ARTs), using nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) as a substrate. Mono-ribosylation can be extended into polymers of ADP-ribose (PAR). Poly(ADP-ribosyl)polymerase (PARP) 1, the best-characterized cellular enzyme catalyzing this process, is the prototypical member of a family of mono- and poly(ADP-ribosyl)transferases. The physiological consequences of ADP-ribosylation are inadequately understood. PARP2010, the 18th International Conference on ADP-Ribosylation, attracted scientists from all over the world to Zurich, Switzerland. Highlights from this meeting include promising clinical trials with PARP inhibitors and new insights into cell, structural, and developmental biology of ARTs and the (glyco)hydrolase proteins that catalyze de-ADP-ribosylation of mono- or poly-ADP-ribosylated proteins. Moreover, potential links to the NAD-dependent sirtuin family were explored on the basis of a shared dependence on cellular NAD(+) concentrations and the relationship of ADP-ribosylation with intermediary metabolism and cellular energetics.

  4. Detection and quantification of poly-ADP-ribosylated cellular proteins of spleen and liver tissues of mice in vivo by slot and Western blot immunoprobing using polyclonal antibody against mouse ADP-ribose polymer.

    PubMed

    Sharan, R N; Devi, B Jaylata; Humtsoe, J O; Saikia, Jyoti R; Kma, L

    2005-10-01

    Poly-ADP-ribosylation (PAR) of cellular proteins has been shown to have decisive roles in diverse cellular functions including carcinogenesis. There are indications that metabolic level of poly-ADP-ribosylated cellular proteins might indicate carcinogenesis and, therefore, could be potentially used in cancer screening program. Keeping in mind the limitations of currently available assays of cellular PAR, a new assay is being reported that measures the metabolic level of poly-ADP-ribosylated cellular proteins. The ELISA based slot and Western blot immunoassay used polyclonal antibody against natural, heterogeneous ADP-ribose polymers. It could be successfully employed to qualitatively and quantitatively assay metabolic levels of poly-ADP-ribosylated proteins of spleen and liver tissues of normal mice or mice exposed to dimethylnitrosamine for up to 8 weeks; potentially PAR of cellular proteins could be assayed in any tissue or biopsy. Implications of the results in cancer screening program have been discussed.

  5. Pertussis toxin-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation of a G protein in mouse oocytes, eggs, and preimplantation embryos: Developmental changes and possible functional roles

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, J.; Schultz, R.M. )

    1990-06-01

    G proteins, which in many somatic cells serve as mediators of signal transduction, were identified in preimplantation mouse embryos by their capacity to undergo pertussis toxin-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation. Two pertussis toxin (PT) substrates with Mr = 38,000 and 39,000 (alpha 38 and alpha 39) are present in approximately equal amounts. Relative to the amount in freshly isolated germinal vesicle (GV)-intact oocytes, the amount of PT-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation of alpha 38-39 falls during oocyte maturation, rises between the one- and two-cell stages, falls by the eight-cell and morula stages, and increases again by the blastocyst stage. The decrease in PT-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation of alpha 38-39 that occurs during oocyte maturation, however, does not require germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD), since inhibiting GVBD with 3-isobutyl-1-methyl xanthine (IBMX) does not prevent the decrease in the extent of PT-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation. A biologically active phorbol diester (12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol 13-acetate), but not an inactive one (4 alpha-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate, 4 alpha-PDD), totally inhibits the increase in PT-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation of alpha 38-39 that occurs between the one- and two-cell stage; TPA inhibits cleavage, but not transcriptional activation, which occurs in the two-cell embryo. In contrast, cytochalasin D, genistein, or aphidicolin, each of which inhibits cleavage of one-cell embryos, or alpha-amanitin or H8, each of which inhibits transcriptional activation but not cleavage of one-cell embryos, have little or inhibitory effects on the increase in PT-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation of alpha 38-39. Results of immunoblotting experiments using an antibody that is highly specific for alpha il-3 reveal the presence of a cross-reactive species of Mr = 38,000 (alpha 38) in the GV-intact oocyte, metaphase II-arrested egg, and one-, two-cell embryos.

  6. The uptake machinery of clostridial actin ADP-ribosylating toxins--a cell delivery system for fusion proteins and polypeptide drugs.

    PubMed

    Barth, Holger; Blöcker, Dagmar; Aktories, Klaus

    2002-12-01

    Several bacterial protein toxins, including Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin, Clostridum perfringens iota toxin, Clostridium difficile ADP-ribosyltransferase, and the Bacillus-produced vegetative insecticidal proteins, target the cytoskeleton by ADP-ribosylation of actin. All these toxins are binary in structure and consist of an enzyme component, possessing ADP-ribosyltransferase activity and a separated binding and translocation component, which is involved in the delivery of the enzyme component into the cell. The toxins are not only important virulence factors but also cell biological tools to study the function of the actin cytoskeleton. Moreover, the binary toxins turned out to be effective transporter systems for the delivery of specific fusion toxins (e.g., Rho-ADP-ribosylating C3 exoenzyme) into cells. The present review describes the biological functions of the toxins, focuses on recent studies on the uptake and delivery mechanism and discusses the usage as a drug delivery system.

  7. Molecular cloning of an apoptosis-inducing protein, pierisin, from cabbage butterfly: Possible involvement of ADP-ribosylation in its activity

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Masahiko; Kono, Takuo; Matsushima-Hibiya, Yuko; Kanazawa, Takashi; Nishisaka, Nobuyasu; Kishimoto, Taketoshi; Koyama, Kotaro; Sugimura, Takashi; Wakabayashi, Keiji

    1999-01-01

    We have previously reported that the cabbage butterfly, Pieris rapae, contains a 98-kDa protein, named pierisin, that induces apoptosis in a variety of human cancer cell lines. In the present study, sequencing and cloning of a cDNA encoding pierisin was accomplished. PCR-direct sequencing showed that the gene encodes an 850-amino acid protein with a calculated molecular weight of 98,081. An intact clone at the amino acid level encompassing the entire coding region was obtained by recombination of two independent clones, and the molecular mass of its in vitro expressed protein was about 100 kDa on SDS/PAGE, the same as that of purified native pierisin. The expressed protein induced apoptosis in human gastric carcinoma TMK-1 and cervical carcinoma HeLa cells, like the native protein, indicating functional activity. The deduced amino acid sequence of pierisin showed 32% homology with a 100-kDa mosquitocidal toxin from Bacillus sphaericus SSII-1. In addition, pierisin showed regional sequence similarities with ADP-ribosylating toxins, such as the A subunit of cholera toxin. A glutamic acid residue at the putative NAD-binding site, conserved in all ADP-ribosylating toxins, was also found in pierisin. Substitution of another amino acid for glutamic acid 165 resulted in a great decrease in cytotoxicity and induction of apoptosis. Moreover, inhibitors of ADP-ribosylating enzymes reduced pierisin-induced apoptosis. These results suggest that the apoptosis-inducing protein pierisin might possess ADP-ribosylation activity that leads to apoptosis of the cells. PMID:10485873

  8. The NarE protein of Neisseria gonorrhoeae catalyzes ADP-ribosylation of several ADP-ribose acceptors despite an N-terminal deletion.

    PubMed

    Rodas, Paula I; Álamos-Musre, A Said; Álvarez, Francisca P; Escobar, Alejandro; Tapia, Cecilia V; Osorio, Eduardo; Otero, Carolina; Calderón, Iván L; Fuentes, Juan A; Gil, Fernando; Paredes-Sabja, Daniel; Christodoulides, Myron

    2016-09-01

    The ADP-ribosylating enzymes are encoded in many pathogenic bacteria in order to affect essential functions of the host. In this study, we show that Neisseria gonorrhoeae possess a locus that corresponds to the ADP-ribosyltransferase NarE, a previously characterized enzyme in N. meningitidis The 291 bp coding sequence of gonococcal narE shares 100% identity with part of the coding sequence of the meningococcal narE gene due to a frameshift previously described, thus leading to a 49-amino-acid deletion at the N-terminus of gonococcal NarE protein. However, we found a promoter region and a GTG start codon, which allowed expression of the protein as demonstrated by RT-PCR and western blot analyses. Using a gonococcal NarE-6xHis fusion protein, we demonstrated that the gonococcal enzyme underwent auto-ADP-ribosylation but to a lower extent than meningococcal NarE. We also observed that gonoccocal NarE exhibited ADP-ribosyltransferase activity using agmatine and cell-free host proteins as ADP-ribose acceptors, but its activity was inhibited by human β-defensins. Taken together, our results showed that NarE of Neisseria gonorrhoeae is a functional enzyme that possesses key features of bacterial ADP-ribosylating enzymes.

  9. Cholera toxin-induced ADP-ribosylation of a 46 kDa protein is decreased in brains of ethanol-fed mice

    SciTech Connect

    Nhamburo, P.T.; Hoffman, P.L.; Tabakoff, B.

    1988-01-01

    The acute in vitro effects of ethanol on cerebral cortical adenylate cyclase activity and beta-adrenergic receptor characteristics suggested a site of action of ethanol at Gs, the stimulatory guanine nucleotide binding protein. After chronic ethanol ingestion, the beta-adrenergic receptor appeared to be uncoupled (i.e., the form of the receptor with high affinity for agonist was undetectable), and stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity by isoproterenol or guanine nucleotides was reduced, suggesting an alteration in the properties of Gs. To further characterize this change, cholera and pertussis toxin-mediated /sup 32/P-ADP-ribosylation of mouse cortical membranes was assessed in mice that had chronically ingested ethanol in a liquid diet. /sup 32/P-labeled proteins were separated by SDS-PAGE and quantitated by autoradiography. There was a selective 30-50% decrease in cholera toxin-induced labeling of 46 kDa protein band in membranes of ethanol-fed mice, with no apparent change in pertussis toxin-induced labeling. The 46 kDa protein has a molecular weight similar to that of the alpha subunit of Gs, suggesting a reduced amount of this protein or a change in its characteristics as a substrate for cholera toxin-induced ADP-ribosylation in cortical membranes of ethanol-fed mice.

  10. Platelet cytosolic 44-kDa protein is a substrate of cholera toxin-induced ADP-ribosylation and is not recognized by antisera against the. alpha. subunit of the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein

    SciTech Connect

    Molina Y Vedia, L.M.; Reep, B.R.; Lapetina, E.G. )

    1988-08-01

    ADP-ribosylation induced by cholera toxin and pertussis toxin was studied in particulate and cytosolic fractions of human platelets. Platelets were disrupted by a cycle of freezing and thawing in the presence of a hyposmotic buffer containing protease inhibitors. In both fractions, the A subunit of cholera toxin ADP-ribosylates two proteins with molecular masses of 42 and 44 kDa, whereas pertussis toxin ADP-ribosylates a 41-kDa polypeptide. Two antisera against the {alpha} subunit of the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein recognize only the 42-kDa polypeptide. Cholera toxin-induced ADP-ribosylation of the 42- and 44-kDa proteins is reduced by pretreatment of platelets with iloprost, a prostacyclin analog. The 44-kDa protein, which is substrate of cholera toxin, could be extracted completely from the membrane and recovered in the cytosolic fraction when the cells were disrupted by Dounce homogenization and the pellet was extensively washed. A 44-kDa protein can also be labeled with 8-azidoguanosine 5{prime}-({alpha}-{sup 32}P)triphosphate in the cytosol and membranes. These finding indicate that cholera and pertussis toxins produced covalent modifications of proteins present in particulate and cytosolic platelet fractions. Moreover, the 44-kDa protein might be an {alpha} subunit of a guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein that is not recognized by available antisera.

  11. Cell cycle-dependent intervention by benzamide of carcinogen-induced neoplastic transformation and in vitro poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of nuclear proteins in human fibroblasts.

    PubMed Central

    Kun, E; Kirsten, E; Milo, G E; Kurian, P; Kumari, H L

    1983-01-01

    Human fibroblasts were subjected to nutritionally induced G1 block, followed by release and subsequent entry into S phase, and exposed to nontoxic concentrations of carcinogens in early S phase. Cell transformation occurred as determined by early morphologic cell alterations, anchorage-independent colony formation, cell invasiveness, and augmentation of Ab 376 human malignancy-specific cell-surface antigenic determinant. Methylazoxymethanol acetate was the most potent transforming agent at doses that were negative in toxicity tests. Benzamide (10 microM intracellular concentration), a specific inhibitor of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase, prevented transformation in a cell cycle-specific manner, maximal prevention coinciding with early S phase, also characteristic of maximal susceptibility to transformation. Neither an interference of carcinogen deoxyguanosine nucleoside adduct formation nor a chemical reaction between benzamide and carcinogens was detected. Methylazoxymethanol acetate at transforming but nontoxic dose partially inhibited poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation to about the same extent as benzamide. However, simultaneous exposure of cells to both agents in early S phase, resulting in the prevention of transformation, augmented poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation above the controls. Enzymatic activities ran parallel with the formation of DNA-associating polymer-nonhistone protein adducts that are assumed to regulate the physiological function of chromatin at the structural level. Images PMID:6196785

  12. ADP-ribosylation of histones by ARTD1: an additional module of the histone code?

    PubMed

    Hottiger, Michael O

    2011-06-06

    ADP-ribosylation is a covalent post-translational protein modification catalyzed by ADP-ribosyltransferases and is involved in important processes such as cell cycle regulation, DNA damage response, replication or transcription. Histones are ADP-ribosylated by ADP-ribosyltransferase diphtheria toxin-like 1 at specific amino acid residues, in particular lysines, of the histones tails. Specific ADP-ribosyl hydrolases and poly-ADP-ribose glucohydrolases degrade the ADP-ribose polymers. The ADP-ribose modification is read by zinc finger motifs or macrodomains, which then regulate chromatin structure and transcription. Thus, histone ADP-ribosylation may be considered an additional component of the histone code.

  13. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation enhances H-RAS protein stability and causes abnormal cell cycle progression in human TK6 lymphoblastoid cells treated with hydroquinone.

    PubMed

    Liu, Linhua; Ling, Xiaoxuan; Tang, Huanwen; Chen, Jialong; Wen, Qiaosheng; Zou, Fei

    2015-08-05

    Hydroquinone (HQ), one of the most important benzene-derived metabolites, can induce aberrant cell cycle progression; however, the mechanism of this induction remains unclear. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation), which is catalysed primarily by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1), participates in various biological processes, including cell cycle control. The results of the present study show an accumulation in G1 phase versus S phase of TK6 human lymphoblast cells treated with HQ for 48h compared with PBS-treated cells; after 72h of HQ treatment, the cells transitioned from G1 arrest to S phase arrest. We examined the expression of six genes related to the cell cycle or leukaemia to further explore the reason for this phenomenon. Among these genes, H-RAS was found to be associated with this phenomenon because its mRNA and protein expression decreased at 48h and increased at 72h. Experiments for PARP activity induction and inhibition revealed that the observed PARylation was positively associated with H-RAS expression. Moreover, in cells treated with HQ in conjunction with PARP-1 knockdown, expression of the H-RAS protein decreased and the number of cells in G1 phase increased. The degree of poly(ADP-ribosyl) modification of the H-RAS protein increased in cells treated with HQ for 72h, further supporting that changes in PARylation contributed to the rapid alteration of H-RAS protein expression, followed by abnormal progression of the cell cycle. Co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) assays were employed to determine whether protein complexes were formed by PARP-1 and H-RAS proteins, and the direct interaction between these proteins indicated that PARylation regulated H-RAS expression. As detected by confocal microscopy, the H-RAS protein was found in the nucleus and cytoplasm. To our knowledge, this study is the first to reveal that H-RAS protein can be modified by PARylation.

  14. Arginine-Specific Mono ADP-Ribosylation In Vitro of Antimicrobial Peptides by ADP-Ribosylating Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Castagnini, Marta; Picchianti, Monica; Talluri, Eleonora; Biagini, Massimiliano; Del Vecchio, Mariangela; Di Procolo, Paolo; Norais, Nathalie; Nardi-Dei, Vincenzo; Balducci, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    Among the several toxins used by pathogenic bacteria to target eukaryotic host cells, proteins that exert ADP-ribosylation activity represent a large and studied family of dangerous and potentially lethal toxins. These proteins alter cell physiology catalyzing the transfer of the ADP-ribose unit from NAD to cellular proteins involved in key metabolic pathways. In the present study, we tested the capability of four of these toxins, to ADP-ribosylate α- and β- defensins. Cholera toxin (CT) from Vibrio cholerae and heat labile enterotoxin (LT) from Escherichia coli both modified the human α-defensin (HNP-1) and β- defensin-1 (HBD1), as efficiently as the mammalian mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase-1. Pseudomonas aeruginosa exoenzyme S was inactive on both HNP-1 and HBD1. Neisseria meningitidis NarE poorly recognized HNP-1 as a substrate but it was completely inactive on HBD1. On the other hand, HNP-1 strongly influenced NarE inhibiting its transferase activity while enhancing auto-ADP-ribosylation. We conclude that only some arginine-specific ADP-ribosylating toxins recognize defensins as substrates in vitro. Modifications that alter the biological activities of antimicrobial peptides may be relevant for the innate immune response. In particular, ADP-ribosylation of antimicrobial peptides may represent a novel escape mechanism adopted by pathogens to facilitate colonization of host tissues. PMID:22879887

  15. Arginine-specific mono ADP-ribosylation in vitro of antimicrobial peptides by ADP-ribosylating toxins.

    PubMed

    Castagnini, Marta; Picchianti, Monica; Talluri, Eleonora; Biagini, Massimiliano; Del Vecchio, Mariangela; Di Procolo, Paolo; Norais, Nathalie; Nardi-Dei, Vincenzo; Balducci, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    Among the several toxins used by pathogenic bacteria to target eukaryotic host cells, proteins that exert ADP-ribosylation activity represent a large and studied family of dangerous and potentially lethal toxins. These proteins alter cell physiology catalyzing the transfer of the ADP-ribose unit from NAD to cellular proteins involved in key metabolic pathways. In the present study, we tested the capability of four of these toxins, to ADP-ribosylate α- and β- defensins. Cholera toxin (CT) from Vibrio cholerae and heat labile enterotoxin (LT) from Escherichia coli both modified the human α-defensin (HNP-1) and β- defensin-1 (HBD1), as efficiently as the mammalian mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase-1. Pseudomonas aeruginosa exoenzyme S was inactive on both HNP-1 and HBD1. Neisseria meningitidis NarE poorly recognized HNP-1 as a substrate but it was completely inactive on HBD1. On the other hand, HNP-1 strongly influenced NarE inhibiting its transferase activity while enhancing auto-ADP-ribosylation. We conclude that only some arginine-specific ADP-ribosylating toxins recognize defensins as substrates in vitro. Modifications that alter the biological activities of antimicrobial peptides may be relevant for the innate immune response. In particular, ADP-ribosylation of antimicrobial peptides may represent a novel escape mechanism adopted by pathogens to facilitate colonization of host tissues.

  16. Intracellular Mono-ADP-Ribosylation in Signaling and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bütepage, Mareike; Eckei, Laura; Verheugd, Patricia; Lüscher, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    A key process in the regulation of protein activities and thus cellular signaling pathways is the modification of proteins by post-translational mechanisms. Knowledge about the enzymes (writers and erasers) that attach and remove post-translational modifications, the targets that are modified and the functional consequences elicited by specific modifications, is crucial for understanding cell biological processes. Moreover detailed knowledge about these mechanisms and pathways helps to elucidate the molecular causes of various diseases and in defining potential targets for therapeutic approaches. Intracellular adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-ribosylation refers to the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+)-dependent modification of proteins with ADP-ribose and is catalyzed by enzymes of the ARTD (ADP-ribosyltransferase diphtheria toxin like, also known as PARP) family as well as some members of the Sirtuin family. Poly-ADP-ribosylation is relatively well understood with inhibitors being used as anti-cancer agents. However, the majority of ARTD enzymes and the ADP-ribosylating Sirtuins are restricted to catalyzing mono-ADP-ribosylation. Although writers, readers and erasers of intracellular mono-ADP-ribosylation have been identified only recently, it is becoming more and more evident that this reversible post-translational modification is capable of modulating key intracellular processes and signaling pathways. These include signal transduction mechanisms, stress pathways associated with the endoplasmic reticulum and stress granules, and chromatin-associated processes such as transcription and DNA repair. We hypothesize that mono-ADP-ribosylation controls, through these different pathways, the development of cancer and infectious diseases. PMID:26426055

  17. ADP-ribosylation factor, a small GTP-binding protein, is required for binding of the coatomer protein beta-COP to Golgi membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, J G; Cassel, D; Kahn, R A; Klausner, R D

    1992-01-01

    The coatomer is a cytosolic protein complex that reversibly associates with Golgi membranes and is implicated in modulating Golgi membrane transport. The association of beta-COP, a component of coatomer, with Golgi membranes is enhanced by guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate (GTP[gamma S]), a nonhydrolyzable analogue of GTP, and by a mixture of aluminum and fluoride ions (Al/F). Here we show that the ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) is required for the binding of beta-COP. Thus, beta-COP contained in a coatomer fraction that has been resolved from ARF does not bind to Golgi membranes, whereas binding can be reconstituted by the addition of recombinant ARF. Furthermore, an N-terminal peptide of ARF, which blocks ARF binding to Golgi membranes, inhibits GTP[gamma S]- as well as the Al/F-enhanced binding of beta-COP. We show that Golgi coat protein binding involves a sequential reaction where an initial interaction of ARF and GTP[gamma S] with the membrane allows subsequent binding of beta-COP to take place in the absence of free ARF and GTP[gamma S]. The fungal metabolite brefeldin A, which is known to prevent the association of coat proteins with Golgi membrane, is shown to exert this effect by interfering with the initial ARF-membrane interaction step. Images PMID:1631136

  18. Identification of a GTP-binding protein. cap alpha. subunit that lacks an apparent ADP-ribosylation site for pertussis toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Fong, H.K.W.; Yoshimoto, K.K.; Eversole-Cire, P.; Simon, M.I.

    1988-05-01

    Recent molecular cloning of cDNA for the ..cap alpha.. subunit of bovine transducin (a guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein, or G protein) has revealed the presence of two retinal-specific transducins, called T/sub r/ and T/sub c/, which are expressed in rod or cone photoreceptor cells. In a further study of G-protein diversity and signal transduction in the retina, the authors have identified a G-protein ..cap alpha.. subunit, which they refer to as G/sub z/..cap alpha.., by isolating a human retinal cDNA clone that cross-hybridizes at reduced stringency with bovine T/sub r/ ..cap alpha..-subunit cDNA. The deduced amino acid sequence of G/sub z/..cap alpha.. is 41-67% identical with those of other known G-protein ..cap alpha.. subunits. However, the 355-residue G/sub z/..cap alpha.. lacks a consensus site for ADP-ribosylation by pertussis toxin, and its amino acid sequence varies within a number of regions that are strongly conserved among all of the other G-protein ..cap alpha.. subunits. They suggest that G/sub z/..cap alpha.., which appears to be highly expressed in neural tissues, represents a member of a subfamily of G proteins that mediate signal transduction in pertussis toxin-insensitive systems.

  19. Influence of DPH1 and DPH5 Protein Variants on the Synthesis of Diphthamide, the Target of ADP-Ribosylating Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Mayer, Klaus; Schröder, Anna; Schnitger, Jerome; Stahl, Sebastian; Brinkmann, Ulrich

    2017-01-01

    The diphthamide on eukaryotic translation elongation factor 2 (eEF2) is the target of ADP-ribosylating toxins and -derivatives that serve as payloads in targeted tumor therapy. Diphthamide is generated by seven DPH proteins; cells deficient in these (DPHko) lack diphthamide and are toxin-resistant. We have established assays to address the functionality of DPH1 (OVCA1) and DPH5 variants listed in dbSNP and cosmic databases: plasmids encoding wildtype and mutant DPHs were transfected into DPHko cells. Supplementation of DPH1 and DPH5 restores diphthamide synthesis and toxin sensitivity in DPH1ko and DPH5ko cells, respectively. Consequently, the determination of the diphthamide status of cells expressing DPH variants differentiates active and compromised proteins. The DPH1 frameshift variant L96fs* (with N-terminal 96 amino acids, truncated thereafter) and two splice isoforms lacking 80 or 140 amino acids at their N-termini failed to restore DPH1ko deficiency. The DPH1 frameshift variant R312fs* retained some residual activity even though it lacks a large C-terminal portion. DPH1 missense variants R27W and S56F retained activity while S221P had reduced activity, indicated by a decreased capability to restore diphthamide synthesis. The DPH5 nonsense or frameshift variants E60*, W136fs* and R207* (containing intact N-termini with truncations after 60, 136 or 207 amino acids, respectively) were inactive: none compensated the deficiency of DPH5ko cells. In contrast, missense variants D57G, G87R, S123C and Q170H as well as the frequently occurring DPH5 isoform delA212 retained activity. Sensitivity to ADP-ribosylating toxins and tumor-targeted immunotoxins depends on diphthamide which, in turn, requires DPH functionality. Because of that, DPH variants (in particular those that are functionally compromised) may serve as a biomarker and correlate with the efficacy of immunotoxin-based therapies. PMID:28245596

  20. In vivo exposure of swiss albino mice to chronic low dose of dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) lowers poly-ADP-ribosylation (PAR) of bone marrow cell and blood lymphocyte proteins.

    PubMed

    Kma, L; Sharan, R N

    2006-08-01

    Efforts to identify an easy and convenient biomarker of carcinogenesis with potentials of application in mass screening program continue. In a series of investigations on mice exposed to different carcinogens, poly-ADP-ribosylation (PAR) of cellular proteins of different tissues has been shown to be a potential biomarker of carcinogenesis. Because blood based biomarker of carcinogenesis offers significant advantage in its use in a cancer screening program, this investigation was undertaken to find correlations between initiation of carcinogenesis and PAR of bone marrow cell (BMC) and blood lymphocyte (BL) proteins in mice chronically exposed to low dose of dimethylnitrosamine (DMN) for up to four weeks in vivo. The exposure was either alone or in combination with 3-aminobenzamide (3-AB), an inhibitor of PAR. Total PAR of cellular proteins and of histone H1 protein were monitored by slot and Western blot immunoprobe assays, respectively. The PAR of total cellular proteins as well as of histone H1 was down-regulated in duration of exposure dependent manners. The results suggest that BMC and BL mirrored status of PAR in other tissues. This finding opens up the possibility of using PAR as a biomarker of carcinogenesis in a blood based test utilizing immunoprobe assay of cellular PAR.

  1. Nuclear ADP-Ribosylation Reactions in Mammalian Cells: Where Are We Today and Where Are We Going?

    PubMed Central

    Hassa, Paul O.; Haenni, Sandra S.; Elser, Michael; Hottiger, Michael O.

    2006-01-01

    Since poly-ADP ribose was discovered over 40 years ago, there has been significant progress in research into the biology of mono- and poly-ADP-ribosylation reactions. During the last decade, it became clear that ADP-ribosylation reactions play important roles in a wide range of physiological and pathophysiological processes, including inter- and intracellular signaling, transcriptional regulation, DNA repair pathways and maintenance of genomic stability, telomere dynamics, cell differentiation and proliferation, and necrosis and apoptosis. ADP-ribosylation reactions are phylogenetically ancient and can be classified into four major groups: mono-ADP-ribosylation, poly-ADP-ribosylation, ADP-ribose cyclization, and formation of O-acetyl-ADP-ribose. In the human genome, more than 30 different genes coding for enzymes associated with distinct ADP-ribosylation activities have been identified. This review highlights the recent advances in the rapidly growing field of nuclear mono-ADP-ribosylation and poly-ADP-ribosylation reactions and the distinct ADP-ribosylating enzyme families involved in these processes, including the proposed family of novel poly-ADP-ribose polymerase-like mono-ADP-ribose transferases and the potential mono-ADP-ribosylation activities of the sirtuin family of NAD+-dependent histone deacetylases. A special focus is placed on the known roles of distinct mono- and poly-ADP-ribosylation reactions in physiological processes, such as mitosis, cellular differentiation and proliferation, telomere dynamics, and aging, as well as “programmed necrosis” (i.e., high-mobility-group protein B1 release) and apoptosis (i.e., apoptosis-inducing factor shuttling). The proposed molecular mechanisms involved in these processes, such as signaling, chromatin modification (i.e., “histone code”), and remodeling of chromatin structure (i.e., DNA damage response, transcriptional regulation, and insulator function), are described. A potential cross talk between nuclear

  2. Iron starvation causes release from the group A streptococcus of the ADP-ribosylating protein called plasmin receptor or surface glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase.

    PubMed Central

    Eichenbaum, Z; Green, B D; Scott, J R

    1996-01-01

    In many pathogenic bacteria, iron starvation serves as an environmental signal that triggers the expression of virulence factors, many of which are found on the cell surface or secreted into the culture supernatant. Using the chelating agent nitrilotriacetic acid, we have established conditions for iron starvation of the important human pathogen Streptococcus pyogenes (the group A streptococcus) and determined that iron limitation results in the specific appearance of several new proteins in the culture supernatant. One of these supernatant proteins is the ADP-ribosylating protein known as streptococcal plasmin receptor (Plr) or as the streptococcal surface glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate-dehydrogenase because of its other activities. Upon iron starvation, Plr is specifically released into the culture supernatant in a time-dependent manner, and its appearance in the supernatant is not accompanied by induction of plr mRNA synthesis. Release of Plr from the bacteria may be important for the virulence of group A streptococci and the manifestation of diseases. PMID:8675293

  3. Discolored1 (DSC1) is an ADP-Ribosylation Factor-GTPase Activating Protein Required to Maintain Differentiation of Maize Kernel Structures

    PubMed Central

    Takacs, Elizabeth M.; Suzuki, Masaharu; Scanlon, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    The embryo and endosperm are the products of double fertilization and comprise the clonally distinct products of angiosperm seed development. Recessive mutations in the maize gene discolored1 (dsc1) condition inviable seed that are defective in both embryo and endosperm development. Here, detailed phenotypic analyses illustrate that discolored mutant kernels are able to establish, but fail to maintain, differentiated embryo, and endosperm structures. Development of the discolored mutant embryo and endosperm is normal albeit delayed, prior to the abortion and subsequent degeneration of all differentiated kernel structures. Using a genomic fragment that was previously isolated by transposon tagging, the full length dsc1 transcript is identified and shown to encode an ADP-ribosylation factor-GTPase activating protein (ARF-GAP) that co-localizes with the trans-Golgi network/early endosomes and the plasma membrane during transient expression assays in N. benthamiana leaves. DSC1 function during endomembrane trafficking and the maintenance of maize kernel differentiation is discussed. PMID:22666226

  4. Inhibition of ADP-ribosylation factor-like 6 interacting protein 1 suppresses proliferation and reduces tumor cell invasion in CaSki human cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Fengjie; Liu, Yan; Li, Yalin; Li, Guancheng

    2010-12-01

    ADP-ribosylation factor-like 6 interacting protein 1 (ARL6IP1) is an apoptotic regulator. To investigate the role of ARL6IP1 in human cervical cancer progression, we designed and used short hairpin RNA (shRNA) to inhibit ARL6IP1 expression in CaSki cells and validated its effect on cell proliferation and invasion. Changes in gene expression were analyzed by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) or western blot. Down-regulation of ARL6IP1 expression by infection with ARL6IP1-specific RNAi-expressing vector inhibited CaSki cell proliferation and colony formation. In addition, down-regulation of ARL6IP1 expression arrested CaSki cell cycling at the G0/G1 phase and mitigated CaSki cell migration, determined by wound healing assays. ARL6IP1 was involved in cervical cancer cell growth, cell cycle progression, and invasion through regulation of gene expression, such as Caspase-3, Caspase-9, p53, TAp63, NF-κB, MAPK, Bcl-2, and Bcl-xL, suggesting that ARL6IP1 could have important implications in cervical cancer biology. Our findings illustrate the biological significance of ARL6IP1 in cervical cancer progression, and provide novel evidence that ARL6IP1 may serve as a therapeutic target in the prevention of human cervical cancer.

  5. Immunoaffinity fractionation of the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated domains of chromatin.

    PubMed Central

    Malik, N; Miwa, M; Sugimura, T; Thraves, P; Smulson, M

    1983-01-01

    Antibody to poly(ADP-ribose) has been covalently coupled to Sepharose and utilized to isolate selectively oligonucleosomes undergoing the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation reaction from the bulk of chromatin. Approximately 12% of the unfractionated oligonucleosomes were bound to the immunoaffinity column and these represented essentially 100% of the original poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated nucleosomal species in the unfractionated chromatin. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated chromatin was not bound by preimmune IgG columns. KSCN eluted the modified nucleosomes in the form of nucleoprotein complexes. The eluted chromatin components were shown to contain poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated histones as well as automodified poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. By using [3H]lysine- and [3H]arginine-labeled chromatin, it was shown that the poly-(ADP-ribosyl)ated histones, attached to stretches of oligonucleosomes bound to the column, had a 6-fold enrichment of the modification compared to histones of the unfractionated chromatin. This indicated that non-poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated nucleosomes, connected and proximal to the modified regions, were copurified by this procedure. This allowed characterization of the oligonucleosomal DNA around poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated chromatin domains to be compared with the unbound bulk chromatin. The data indicated that immunofractionated poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated oligonucleosomal DNA contained significant amounts of internal single-strand breaks compared with bulk chromatin. The bound nucleo-protein complexes were found to be enzymatically active for poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase after elution from the antibody column. In contrast, the unbound nucleosomes, representing 90% of the unfractionated chromatin, were totally inactive in the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation reaction. Images PMID:6573670

  6. The family of bacterial ADP-ribosylating exotoxins.

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, K M; Barbieri, J T

    1995-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria utilize a variety of virulence factors that contribute to the clinical manifestation of their pathogenesis. Bacterial ADP-ribosylating exotoxins (bAREs) represent one family of virulence factors that exert their toxic effects by transferring the ADP-ribose moiety of NAD onto specific eucaryotic target proteins. The observations that some bAREs ADP-ribosylate eucaryotic proteins that regulate signal transduction, like the heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins and the low-molecular-weight GTP-binding proteins, has extended interest in bAREs beyond the bacteriology laboratory. Molecular studies have shown that bAREs possess little primary amino acid homology and have diverse quaternary structure-function organization. Underlying this apparent diversity, biochemical and crystallographic studies have shown that several bAREs have conserved active-site structures and possess a conserved glutamic acid within their active sites. PMID:7704894

  7. Selective amplification of an mRNA and related pseudogene for a human ADP-ribosylation factor, a guanine nucleotide-dependent protein activator of cholera toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Monaco, L.; Murtagh, J.J.; Newman, K.B.; Tsai, Su-Chen; Moss, J.; Vaughan, M. )

    1990-03-01

    ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs) are {approx}20-kDa proteins that act as GTP-dependent allosteric activators of cholera toxin. With deoxyinosine-containing degenerate oligonucleotide primers corresponding to conserved GTP-binding domains in ARFs, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was used to amplify simultaneously from human DNA portions of three ARF genes that include codons for 102 amino acids, with intervening sequences. Amplification products that differed in size because of differences in intron sizes were separated by agarose gel electrophoresis. One amplified DNA contained no introns and had a sequence different from those of known AFRs. Based on this sequence, selective oligonucleotide probes were prepared and used to isolate clone {Psi}ARF 4, a putative ARF pseudogene, from a human genomic library in {lambda} phage EMBL3. Reverse transcription-PCR was then used to clone from human poly(A){sup +} RNA the cDNA corresponding to the expressed homolog of {Psi}ARF 4, referred to as human ARF 4. It appears that {Psi}ARF 4 arose during human evolution by integration of processed ARF 4 mRNA into the genome. Human ARF 4 differs from previously identified mammalian ARFs 1, 2, and 3. Hybridization of ARF 4-specific oligonucleotide probes with human, bovine, and rat RNA revealed a single 1.8-kilobase mRNA, which was clearly distinguished from the 1.9-kilobase mRNA for ARF 1 in these tissues. The PCR provides a powerful tool for investigating diversity in this and other multigene families, especially with primers targeted at domains believed to have functional significance.

  8. Structure and function of the ARH family of ADP-ribosyl-acceptor hydrolases.

    PubMed

    Mashimo, Masato; Kato, Jiro; Moss, Joel

    2014-11-01

    ADP-ribosylation is a post-translational protein modification, in which ADP-ribose is transferred from nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) to specific acceptors, thereby altering their activities. The ADP-ribose transfer reactions are divided into mono- and poly-(ADP-ribosyl)ation. Cellular ADP-ribosylation levels are tightly regulated by enzymes that transfer ADP-ribose to acceptor proteins (e.g., ADP-ribosyltransferases, poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARP)) and those that cleave the linkage between ADP-ribose and acceptor (e.g., ADP-ribosyl-acceptor hydrolases (ARH), poly-(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolases (PARG)), thereby constituting an ADP-ribosylation cycle. This review summarizes current findings related to the ARH family of proteins. This family comprises three members (ARH1-3) with similar size (39kDa) and amino acid sequence. ARH1 catalyzes the hydrolysis of the N-glycosidic bond of mono-(ADP-ribosyl)ated arginine. ARH3 hydrolyzes poly-(ADP-ribose) (PAR) and O-acetyl-ADP-ribose. The different substrate specificities of ARH1 and ARH3 contribute to their unique roles in the cell. Based on a phenotype analysis of ARH1(-/-) and ARH3(-/-) mice, ARH1 is involved in the action by bacterial toxins as well as in tumorigenesis. ARH3 participates in the degradation of PAR that is synthesized by PARP1 in response to oxidative stress-induced DNA damage; this hydrolytic reaction suppresses PAR-mediated cell death, a pathway termed parthanatos.

  9. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation in carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Masutani, Mitsuko; Fujimori, Hiroaki

    2013-12-01

    Cancer develops through diverse genetic, epigenetic and other changes, so-called 'multi-step carcinogenesis', and each cancer harbors different alterations and properties. Here in this article we review how poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is involved in multi-step and diverse pathways of carcinogenesis. Involvement of poly- and mono-ADP-ribosylation in carcinogenesis has been studied at molecular and cellular levels, and further by animal models and human genetic approaches. PolyADP-ribosylation acts in DNA damage repair response and maintenance mechanisms of genomic stability. Several DNA repair pathways, including base-excision repair and double strand break repair pathways, involve PARP and PARG functions. These care-taker functions of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation suggest that polyADP-ribosyation may mainly act in a tumor suppressive manner because genomic instability caused by defective DNA repair response could serve as a driving force for tumor progression, leading to invasion, metastasis and relapse of cancer. On the other hand, the new concept of 'synthetic lethality by PARP inhibition' suggests the significance of PARP activities for survival of cancer cells that harbor defects in DNA repair. Accumulating evidence has revealed that some PARP family molecules are involved in various signaling cascades other than DNA repair, including epigenetic and transcriptional regulations, inflammation/immune response and epithelial-mesenchymal transition, suggesting that poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation both promotes and suppresses carcinogenic processes depending on the conditions. Expanding understanding of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation suggests that strategies to achieve cancer prevention targeting poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation for genome protection against life-long exposure to environmental carcinogens and endogenous carcinogenic stimuli.

  10. Ca2+, Mg2+-dependent endonuclease and ADP-ribosylation.

    PubMed

    Yoshihara, K; Tanaka, Y; Kamiya, T

    1983-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of the inhibition of Ca2+, Mg2+-dependent endonuclease by ADP-ribosylation was studied by using purified bull seminal plasma Ca2+, Mg2+-dependent endonuclease, endonuclease-stimulating proteins, and poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase. The activity of an essentially homogeneous preparation of the endonuclease was markedly suppressed by its preincubation with NAD+, poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase, DNA, and Mg2+. These four components of the incubation mixture were all essential for the suppression of the activity. Analyses of the initial and the chased reaction product by Sephadex G-100 column chromatography and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed that Ca2+, Mg2+-dependent endonuclease was ADP-ribosylated during the incubation and its activity was markedly inhibited by the elongation of the ADP-ribose polymer covalently attached to the endonuclease. When the suppressed enzymes were mildly treated with an alkaline pH of 10.0, the activity was restored almost to the level of the unmodified control sample. These facts indicate that the linkage between the enzyme and poly(ADP-ribose) is hydrolyzed at this pH, and that the liberated polymer itself does not appreciably affect the endonuclease activity. These results also suggest that an electric repulsion between negative charges on DNA and poly(ADP-ribose) attached to Ca2+, Mg2+-dependent endonuclease is the basis for the observed suppression of the enzyme by ADP-ribosylation. Though histone H2B and H1 are shown to be as good endonuclease-stimulators (1) as they are good acceptors of ADP-ribose in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase reaction (2), ADP-ribosylation of these two proteins did not affect their endonuclease-stimulating ability appreciably, at least under the conditions used.

  11. 2-Azido-( sup 32 P)NAD+, a photoactivatable probe for G-protein structure: Evidence for holotransducin oligomers in which the ADP-ribosylated carboxyl terminus of alpha interacts with both alpha and gamma subunits

    SciTech Connect

    Vaillancourt, R.R.; Dhanasekaran, N.; Johnson, G.L.; Ruoho, A.E. )

    1990-05-01

    A radioactive and photoactivatable derivative of NAD+, 2-azido-(adenylate-32P)NAD+, has been synthesized and used with pertussis toxin to ADP-ribosylate Cys347 of the alpha subunit (alpha T) of GT, the retinal guanine nucleotide-binding protein. ADP-ribosylation of alpha T followed by light activation of the azide moiety of 2-azido-(adenylate-32P)ADP-ribose produced four crosslinked species involving the alpha and gamma subunits of the GT heterotrimer: an alpha trimer (alpha-alpha-alpha), and alpha-alpha-gamma crosslink, an alpha dimer (alpha-alpha), and an alpha-gamma crosslink. The alpha trimer, alpha-alpha-gamma complex, alpha dimer, and alpha-gamma complexes were immunoreactive with alpha T antibodies. The alpha-alpha-gamma and the alpha-gamma complexes were immunoreactive with antisera recognizing gamma subunits. No evidence was found for crosslinking of alpha T to beta T subunits. Hydrolysis of the thioglycosidic bond between Cys347 and 2-azido-(adenylate-32P)ADP-ribose using mercuric acetate resulted in the transfer of radiolabel from Cys347 of alpha T in the crosslinked oligomers to alpha monomers, indicative of intermolecular photocrosslinking, and to gamma monomers, indicative of either intermolecular crosslinked complexes (between heterotrimers) or intramolecular crosslinked complexes (within the heterotrimer). These results demonstrate that GT exists as an oligomer and that ADP-ribosylated Cys347, which is four residues from the alpha T-carboxyl terminus, is oriented toward and in close proximity to the gamma subunit.

  12. ADP-ribosylation of transducin by pertussis toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, P.A.; Burns, D.L.; Kanaho, Y.; Liu, T.Y.; Hewlett, E.L.; Moss, J.

    1985-11-05

    Transducin, the guanyl nucleotide-binding regulatory protein of retinal rod outer segments that couples the photon receptor, rhodopsin, with the light-activated cGMP phosphodiesterase, can be resolved into two functional components, T alpha and T beta gamma. T alpha (39 kDa), which is (TSP)ADP-ribosylated by pertussis toxin and (TSP)NAD in rod outer segments and in purified transducin, was also labeled by the toxin after separation from T beta gamma (36 kDa and approximately 10 kDa); neither component of T beta gamma was a pertussis toxin substrate. Labeling of T alpha was enhanced by T beta gamma and was maximal at approximately 1:1 molar ratio of T alpha : T beta gamma. Limited proteolysis by trypsin of T alpha in the presence of guanyl-5'-yl imidodiphosphate (Gpp(NH)p) resulted in the sequential appearance of proteins of 38 and TS kDa. The amino terminus of both 38- and TS-kDa proteins was leucine, whereas that of T alpha could not be identified and was assumed to be blocked. The TS-kDa peptide was not a pertussis toxin substrate. Labeling of the 38-kDa protein was poor and was not enhanced by T beta gamma. Trypsin treatment of (TSP)ADP-ribosyl-T alpha produced a labeled 37-38-kDa doublet followed by appearance of radioactivity at the dye front. It appears, therefore, that, although the 38-kDa protein was poor toxin substrate, it contained the ADP-ribosylation site. Without rhodopsin, labeling of T alpha (in the presence of T beta gamma) was unaffected by Gpp(NH)p, guanosine 5'-O-(thiotriphosphate) (GTP gamma S), GTP, GDP, and guanosine 5'-O-(thiodiphosphate) (GDP beta S) but was increased by ATP. When photolyzed rhodopsin and T beta gamma were present, Gpp(NH)p and GTP gamma S decreased (TSP)ADP-ribosylation by pertussis toxin. Thus, pertussis toxin-catalyzed (TSP)ADP-ribosylation of T alpha was affected by nucleotides, rhodopsin and light in addition to T beta gamma.

  13. Mutations in ARL2BP, Encoding ADP-Ribosylation-Factor-Like 2 Binding Protein, Cause Autosomal-Recessive Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Davidson, Alice E.; Schwarz, Nele; Zelinger, Lina; Stern-Schneider, Gabriele; Shoemark, Amelia; Spitzbarth, Benjamin; Gross, Menachem; Laxer, Uri; Sosna, Jacob; Sergouniotis, Panagiotis I.; Waseem, Naushin H.; Wilson, Robert; Kahn, Richard A.; Plagnol, Vincent; Wolfrum, Uwe; Banin, Eyal; Hardcastle, Alison J.; Cheetham, Michael E.; Sharon, Dror; Webster, Andrew R.

    2013-01-01

    Retinitis pigmentosa (RP) is a genetically heterogeneous retinal degeneration characterized by photoreceptor death, which results in visual failure. Here, we used a combination of homozygosity mapping and exome sequencing to identify mutations in ARL2BP, which encodes an effector protein of the small GTPases ARL2 and ARL3, as causative for autosomal-recessive RP (RP66). In a family affected by RP and situs inversus, a homozygous, splice-acceptor mutation, c.101−1G>C, which alters pre-mRNA splicing of ARLBP2 in blood RNA, was identified. In another family, a homozygous c.134T>G (p.Met45Arg) mutation was identified. In the mouse retina, ARL2BP localized to the basal body and cilium-associated centriole of photoreceptors and the periciliary extension of the inner segment. Depletion of ARL2BP caused cilia shortening. Moreover, depletion of ARL2, but not ARL3, caused displacement of ARL2BP from the basal body, suggesting that ARL2 is vital for recruiting or anchoring ARL2BP at the base of the cilium. This hypothesis is supported by the finding that the p.Met45Arg amino acid substitution reduced binding to ARL2 and caused the loss of ARL2BP localization at the basal body in ciliated nasal epithelial cells. These data demonstrate a role for ARL2BP and ARL2 in primary cilia function and that this role is essential for normal photoreceptor maintenance and function. PMID:23849777

  14. Site-specific ADP-ribosylation of histone H2B in response to DNA double strand breaks

    PubMed Central

    Rakhimova, Alina; Ura, Seiji; Hsu, Duen-Wei; Wang, Hong-Yu; Pears, Catherine J.; Lakin, Nicholas D.

    2017-01-01

    ADP-ribosyltransferases (ARTs) modify proteins with single units or polymers of ADP-ribose to regulate DNA repair. However, the substrates for these enzymes are ill-defined. For example, although histones are modified by ARTs, the sites on these proteins ADP-ribosylated following DNA damage and the ARTs that catalyse these events are unknown. This, in part, is due to the lack of a eukaryotic model that contains ARTs, in addition to histone genes that can be manipulated to assess ADP-ribosylation events in vivo. Here we exploit the model Dictyostelium to identify site-specific histone ADP-ribosylation events in vivo and define the ARTs that mediate these modifications. Dictyostelium histones are modified in response to DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in vivo by the ARTs Adprt1a and Adprt2. Adprt1a is a mono-ART that modifies H2BE18 in vitro, although disruption of this site allows ADP-ribosylation at H2BE19. Although redundancy between H2BE18 and H2BE19 ADP-ribosylation is also apparent following DSBs in vivo, by generating a strain with mutations at E18/E19 in the h2b locus we demonstrate these are the principal sites modified by Adprt1a/Adprt2. This identifies DNA damage induced histone mono-ADP-ribosylation sites by specific ARTs in vivo, providing a unique platform to assess how histone ADP-ribosylation regulates DNA repair. PMID:28252050

  15. The role of ADP-ribosylation in regulating DNA interstrand crosslink repair

    PubMed Central

    Gunn, Alasdair R.; Banos-Pinero, Benito; Paschke, Peggy; Sanchez-Pulido, Luis; Ariza, Antonio; Day, Joseph; Emrich, Mehera; Leys, David; Ponting, Chris P.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT ADP-ribosylation by ADP-ribosyltransferases (ARTs) has a well-established role in DNA strand break repair by promoting enrichment of repair factors at damage sites through ADP-ribose interaction domains. Here, we exploit the simple eukaryote Dictyostelium to uncover a role for ADP-ribosylation in regulating DNA interstrand crosslink repair and redundancy of this pathway with non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). In silico searches were used to identify a protein that contains a permutated macrodomain (which we call aprataxin/APLF-and-PNKP-like protein; APL). Structural analysis reveals that this permutated macrodomain retains features associated with ADP-ribose interactions and that APL is capable of binding poly(ADP-ribose) through this macrodomain. APL is enriched in chromatin in response to cisplatin treatment, an agent that induces DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs). This is dependent on the macrodomain of APL and the ART Adprt2, indicating a role for ADP-ribosylation in the cellular response to cisplatin. Although adprt2− cells are sensitive to cisplatin, ADP-ribosylation is evident in these cells owing to redundant signalling by the double-strand break (DSB)-responsive ART Adprt1a, promoting NHEJ-mediated repair. These data implicate ADP-ribosylation in DNA ICL repair and identify that NHEJ can function to resolve this form of DNA damage in the absence of Adprt2. PMID:27587838

  16. Negative correlation between poly-ADP-ribosylation of spleen cell histone proteins and initial duration of dimethylnitrosamine exposure to mice in vivo measured by Western blot immunoprobe assay: a possible biomarker for cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Devi, Brahmacharimayum J; Schneeweiss, Frank H A; Sharan, Rajeshwar N

    2005-01-01

    Improved cancer detection involving suitable biomarkers with easy applicability is a challenge to our fight against cancer. Poly-ADP-ribosylation (PAR) of proteins is a likely candidate biomarker for this purpose because it meets the criterion well. This report is a step towards testing suitability of PAR as a biomarker for cancer detection. Swiss albino mice were exposed to hepatocarcinogen, dimethylnitrosamine (DMN), at a chronic dose, which is known to induce carcinogenesis in liver. PAR was monitored by a Western blot immunoprobe assay in spleen, a lymphoid organ, to find a correlation between PAR of spleen histone proteins and duration of DMN exposure. A negative, non-linear correlation was found for most histone proteins. The inhibition of PAR of histones was significant from 4 weeks onwards until the end of the observation. The inhibition was potentiated when 3-aminobenzamide was simultaneously administered. The results open up the possibility of PAR of cellular proteins being used as biomarker for cancer detection.

  17. ADP-ribosylation factor 1 protein regulates trypsinogen activation via organellar trafficking of procathepsin B protein and autophagic maturation in acute pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Orlichenko, Lidiya; Stolz, Donna B; Noel, Pawan; Behari, Jaideep; Liu, Shiguang; Singh, Vijay P

    2012-07-13

    Several studies have suggested that autophagy might play a deleterious role in acute pancreatitis via intra-acinar activation of digestive enzymes. The prototype for this phenomenon is cathepsin B-mediated trypsin generation. To determine the organellar basis of this process, we investigated the subcellular distribution of the cathepsin B precursor, procathepsin B. We found that procathepsin B is enriched in Golgi-containing microsomes, suggesting a role for the ADP-ribosylation (ARF)-dependent trafficking of cathepsin B. Indeed, caerulein treatment increased processing of procathepsin B, whereas a known ARF inhibitor brefeldin A (BFA) prevented this. Similar treatment did not affect processing of procathepsin L. BFA-mediated ARF1 inhibition resulted in reduced cathepsin B activity and consequently reduced trypsinogen activation. However, formation of light chain 3 (LC3-II) was not affected, suggesting that BFA did not prevent autophagy induction. Instead, sucrose density gradient centrifugation and electron microscopy showed that BFA arrested caerulein-induced autophagosomal maturation. Therefore, ARF1-dependent trafficking of procathepsin B and the maturation of autophagosomes results in cathepsin B-mediated trypsinogen activation induced by caerulein.

  18. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation reactions in the regulation of nuclear functions.

    PubMed Central

    D'Amours, D; Desnoyers, S; D'Silva, I; Poirier, G G

    1999-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is a post-translational modification of proteins. During this process, molecules of ADP-ribose are added successively on to acceptor proteins to form branched polymers. This modification is transient but very extensive in vivo, as polymer chains can reach more than 200 units on protein acceptors. The existence of the poly(ADP-ribose) polymer was first reported nearly 40 years ago. Since then, the importance of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis has been established in many cellular processes. However, a clear and unified picture of the physiological role of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation still remains to be established. The total dependence of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis on DNA strand breaks strongly suggests that this post-translational modification is involved in the metabolism of nucleic acids. This view is also supported by the identification of direct protein-protein interactions involving poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (113 kDa PARP), an enzyme catalysing the formation of poly(ADP-ribose), and key effectors of DNA repair, replication and transcription reactions. The presence of PARP in these multiprotein complexes, in addition to the actual poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of some components of these complexes, clearly supports an important role for poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation reactions in DNA transactions. Accordingly, inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis by any of several approaches and the analysis of PARP-deficient cells has revealed that the absence of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation strongly affects DNA metabolism, most notably DNA repair. The recent identification of new poly(ADP-ribosyl)ating enzymes with distinct (non-standard) structures in eukaryotes and archaea has revealed a novel level of complexity in the regulation of poly(ADP-ribose) metabolism. PMID:10455009

  19. Arginine-specific mono(ADP-ribosyl)transferase activity on the surface of human polymorphonuclear neutrophil leucocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Donnelly, L E; Rendell, N B; Murray, S; Allport, J R; Lo, G; Kefalas, P; Taylor, G W; MacDermot, J

    1996-01-01

    An Arg-specific mono(ADP-ribosyl)transferase activity on the surface of human polymorphonuclear neutrophil leucocytes (PMNs) was confirmed by the use of diethylamino-(benzylidineamino)guanidine (DEA-BAG) as an ADP-ribose acceptor. Two separate HPLC systems were used to separate ADP-ribosyl-DEA-BAG from reaction mixtures, and its presence was confirmed by electrospray mass spectrometry. ADP-ribosyl-DEA-BAG was produced in the presence of PMNs, but not in their absence. Incubation of DEA-BAG with ADP-ribose (0.1-10 mM) did not yield ADP-ribosyl-DEA-BAG, which indicates that ADP-ribosyl-DEA-BAG formed in the presence of PMNs was not simply a product of a reaction between DEA-BAG and free ADP-ribose, due possibly to the hydrolysis of NAD+ by an NAD+ glycohydrolase. The assay of mono(ADP-ribosyl)transferase with agmatine as a substrate was modified for intact PMNs, and the activity was found to be approx. 50-fold lower than that in rabbit cardiac membranes. The Km of the enzyme for NAD+ was 100.1 30.4 microM and the Vmax 1.4 0.2 pmol of ADP-ribosylagmatine/h per 10(6) cells. The enzyme is likely to be linked to the cell surface via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor, since incubation of intact PMNs with phosphoinositol-specific phospholipase C (PI-PLC) led to a 98% decrease in mono(ADP-ribosyl)transferase activity in the cells. Cell surface proteins were labelled after exposure of intact PMNs to [32P]NAD+. Their molecular masses were 79, 67, 46, 36 and 26 kDa. The time course for labelling was non-linear under these conditions over a period of 4 h. The labelled products were identified as mono(ADP-ribosyl)ated proteins by hydrolysis with snake venom phosphodiesterase to yield 5'-AMP. PMID:8615841

  20. Production of an antiserum specific to the ADP-ribosylated form of elongation factor 2 from archaebacteria and eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Siegmund, K D; Klink, F

    1992-11-09

    An antiserum to ADP-ribosylated elongation factor 2 (ADPR-EF-2) from S. acidocaldarius was raised in rabbits using stained, homogenized, ADPR-EF-2-containing slices from SDS-gels as a source of antigen. Elongation factor 2 (EF-2) from S. acidocaldarius was cloned in E. coli and the expressed gene product was used in order to adsorb all anti-EF-2 antibodies which do not contain the ADP-ribosyl group within their epitopes, as E. coli is unable to synthesize the ADP-ribosyl acceptor diphthamide. The remaining antibodies were specific to ADP-ribosylated EF-2 from Thermoplasma acidophilum, S. acidocaldarius and Desulfurococcus mucosus. ADP-ribosylated EF-2 from eukaryotic sources also reacted with the adsorbed antiserum as shown for EF-2 isolated from the killi-fish Cynolebias whitei, the mouse species BALB/c and Han/Wistar rats. The adsorbed antiserum did not cross-react with ADP-ribosylated actin or rho protein or with FAD-containing D-amino acid oxidase.

  1. Evidence that mono-ADP-ribosylation of CtBP1/BARS regulates lipid storage.

    PubMed

    Bartz, René; Seemann, Joachim; Zehmer, John K; Serrero, Ginette; Chapman, Kent D; Anderson, Richard G W; Liu, Pingsheng

    2007-08-01

    Mono-ADP-ribosylation is emerging as an important posttranslational modification that modulates a variety of cell signaling pathways. Here, we present evidence that mono-ADP-ribosylation of the transcriptional corepressor C terminal binding protein, brefeldin A (BFA)-induced ADP-ribosylated substrate (CtBP1/BARS) regulates neutral lipid storage in droplets that are surrounded by a monolayer of phospholipid and associated proteins. CtBP1/BARS is an NAD-binding protein that becomes ribosylated when cells are exposed to BFA. Both endogenous lipid droplets and droplets enlarged by oleate treatment are lost after 12-h exposure to BFA. Lipid loss requires new protein synthesis, and it is blocked by multiple ribosylation inhibitors, but it is not stimulated by disruption of the Golgi apparatus or the endoplasmic reticulum unfolded protein response. Small interfering RNA knockdown of CtBP1/BARS mimics the effect of BFA, and mouse embryonic fibroblasts derived from embryos that are deficient in CtBP1/BARS seem to be defective in lipid accumulation. We conclude that mono-ADP-ribosylation of CtBP1/BARS inactivates its repressor function, which leads to the activation of genes that regulate neutral lipid storage.

  2. Distribution of cytotoxic and DNA ADP-ribosylating activity in crude extracts from butterflies among the family Pieridae

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Yasuko; Nakano, Tsuyoshi; Yamamoto, Masafumi; Matsushima-Hibiya, Yuko; Odagiri, Ken-Ichi; Yata, Osamu; Koyama, Kotaro; Sugimura, Takashi; Wakabayashi, Keiji

    2008-01-01

    Cabbage butterflies, Pieris rapae and Pieris brassicae, contain strong cytotoxic proteins, designated as pierisin-1 and -2, against cancer cell lines. These proteins exhibit DNA ADP-ribosylating activity. To determine the distribution of substances with cytotoxicity and DNA ADP-ribosylating activity among other species, crude extracts from 20 species of the family Pieridae were examined for cytotoxicity in HeLa cells and DNA ADP-ribosylating activity. Both activities were detected in extracts from 13 species: subtribes Pierina (Pieris rapae, Pieris canidia, Pieris napi, Pieris melete, Pieris brassicae, Pontia daplidice, and Talbotia naganum), Aporiina (Aporia gigantea, Aporia crataegi, Aporia hippia, and Delias pasithoe), and Appiadina (Appias nero and Appias paulina). All of these extracts contained substances recognized by anti-pierisin-1 antibodies, with a molecular mass of ≈100 kDa established earlier for pierisin-1. Moreover, sequences containing NAD-binding sites, conserved in ADP-ribosyltransferases, were amplified from genomic DNA from 13 species of butterflies with cytotoxicity and DNA ADP-ribosylating activity by PCR. Extracts from seven species, Appias lyncida, Leptosia nina, Anthocharis scolymus, Eurema hecabe, Catopsilia pomona, Catopsilia scylla, and Colias erate, showed neither cytotoxicity nor DNA ADP-ribosylating activity, and did not contain substances recognized by anti-pierisin-1 antibodies. Sequences containing NAD-binding sites were not amplified from genomic DNA from these seven species. Thus, pierisin-like proteins, showing cytotoxicity and DNA ADP-ribosylating activity, are suggested to be present in the extracts from butterflies not only among the subtribe Pierina, but also among the subtribes Aporiina and Appiadina. These findings offer insight to understanding the nature of DNA ADP-ribosylating activity in the butterfly. PMID:18256183

  3. Endogenous ADP-ribosylation of elongation factor 2 in polyoma virus-transformed baby hamster kidney cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fendrick, J.L.; Iglewski, W.J. )

    1989-01-01

    Polyoma virus-transformed baby hamster kidney (pyBHK) cells were cultured in medium containing ({sup 32}P)orthophosphate and 105 (vol/vol) fetal bovine serum. A {sup 32}P-labeled protein with an apparent molecular mass of 97 kDa was immunoprecipitated from cell lysates with antiserum to ADP-ribosylated elongation factor 2 (EF-2). The {sup 32}P labeling of the protein was enhanced by culturing cells in medium containing 2% serum instead of 10% serum. The {sup 32}P label was completely removed from the protein by treatment with snake venom phosphodiesterase and the digestion product was identified as ({sup 32}P)AMP, indicating the protein was mono-ADP-ribosylated. HPLC analysis of tryptic peptides of the {sup 32}P-labeled 97-kDa protein and purified EF-2, which was ADP-ribosylated in vitro with diphtheria toxin fragment A and ({sup 32}P)NAD, demonstrated an identical labeled peptide in the two proteins. The data strongly suggest that EF-2 was endogenously ADP-ribosylated in pyBHK cells. Maximum incorporation of radioactivity in EF-2 occurred by 12 hr and remained constant over the subsequent 12 hr. It was estimated that 30-35% of the EF-2 was ADP-ribosylated in cells cultured in medium containing 2% serum. When {sup 32}P-labeled cultures were incubated in medium containing unlabeled phosphate, the {sup 32}P label was lost from the EF-2 within 30 min.

  4. Molecular mechanism and functional role of brefeldin A-mediated ADP-ribosylation of CtBP1/BARS.

    PubMed

    Colanzi, Antonino; Grimaldi, Giovanna; Catara, Giuliana; Valente, Carmen; Cericola, Claudia; Liberali, Prisca; Ronci, Maurizio; Lalioti, Vasiliki S; Bruno, Agostino; Beccari, Andrea R; Urbani, Andrea; De Flora, Antonio; Nardini, Marco; Bolognesi, Martino; Luini, Alberto; Corda, Daniela

    2013-06-11

    ADP-ribosylation is a posttranslational modification that modulates the functions of many target proteins. We previously showed that the fungal toxin brefeldin A (BFA) induces the ADP-ribosylation of C-terminal-binding protein-1 short-form/BFA-ADP-ribosylation substrate (CtBP1-S/BARS), a bifunctional protein with roles in the nucleus as a transcription factor and in the cytosol as a regulator of membrane fission during intracellular trafficking and mitotic partitioning of the Golgi complex. Here, we report that ADP-ribosylation of CtBP1-S/BARS by BFA occurs via a nonconventional mechanism that comprises two steps: (i) synthesis of a BFA-ADP-ribose conjugate by the ADP-ribosyl cyclase CD38 and (ii) covalent binding of the BFA-ADP-ribose conjugate into the CtBP1-S/BARS NAD(+)-binding pocket. This results in the locking of CtBP1-S/BARS in a dimeric conformation, which prevents its binding to interactors known to be involved in membrane fission and, hence, in the inhibition of the fission machinery involved in mitotic Golgi partitioning. As this inhibition may lead to arrest of the cell cycle in G2, these findings provide a strategy for the design of pharmacological blockers of cell cycle in tumor cells that express high levels of CD38.

  5. Dimethylnitrosamine-induced reduction in the level of poly-ADP-ribosylation of histone proteins of blood lymphocytes--a sensitive and reliable biomarker for early detection of cancer.

    PubMed

    Kma, Lakhan; Sharan, Rajeshwar Nath

    2014-01-01

    Poly-ADP-ribosylation (PAR) is a post-translational modification of mainly chromosomal proteins. It is known to be strongly involved in several molecular events, including nucleosome-remodelling and carcinogenesis. In this investigation, it was attempted to evaluate PAR level as a reliable biomarker for early detection of cancer in blood lymphocyte histones. PAR of isolated histone proteins was monitored in normal and dimethylnitrosamine (DMN)-exposed mice tissues using a novel ELISA-based immuno-probe assay developed in our laboratory. An inverse relationship was found between the level of PAR and period of DMN exposure in various histone proteins of blood lymphocytes and spleen cells. With the increase in the DMN exposure period, there was reduction in the PAR level of individual histones in both cases. It was also observed that the decrease in the level of PAR of histones resulted in progressive relaxation of genomic DNA, perhaps triggering activation of genes that are involved in initiation of transformation. The observed effect of carcinogen on the PAR of blood lymphocyte histones provided us with a handy tool for monitoring biochemical or physiological status of individuals exposed to carcinogens without obtaining biopsies of cancerous tissues, which involves several medical and ethical issues. Obtaining blood from any patient and separating blood lymphocytes are routine medical practices involving virtually no medical intervention, post-procedure medical care or trauma to a patient. Moreover, the immuno-probe assay is very simple, sensitive, reliable and cost-effective. Therefore, combined with the ease of preparation of blood lymphocytes and the simplicity of the technique, immuno-probe assay of PAR has the potential to be applied for mass screening of cancer. It appears to be a promising step in the ultimate goal of making cancer detection simple, sensitive and reliable in the near future.

  6. Effect of growth factors on nuclear and mitochondrial ADP-ribosylation processes during astroglial cell development and aging in culture.

    PubMed

    Spina Purrello, Vittoria; Cormaci, Gianfrancesco; Denaro, Luca; Reale, Salvatore; Costa, Antonino; Lalicata, Calogera; Sabbatini, Maurizio; Marchetti, Bianca; Avola, Roberto

    2002-03-15

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF), basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and insulin (INS) are powerful mitogens and may regulate gene expression in cultured astrocytes by ADP-ribosylation process. Nuclear poly-ADP ribose polymerase (PARP) and mitochondrial monoADP-ribosyltransferase (ADPRT) are the key enzymes involved in poly-ADP-ribosylation and mono ADP-ribosylation, respectively. In this investigation the effect of EGF, bFGF, IGF-I or INS on nuclear PARP and mitochondrial ADPRT activities were assessed in nuclei and mitochondria purified from developing (30 DIV) or aging (90 and 190 DIV) primary rat astrocyte cultures. A marked increase of PARP activity in bFGF or IGF-I treated astroglial cell cultures at 30 DIV was found. Nuclear PARP and mitochondrial ADPRT activities were greatly stimulated by treatment with EGF or INS alone or together in astrocyte cultures at 30 DIV. Nuclear PARP and mitochondrial ADPRT activities showed a more remarkable increase in control untreated astrocyte cultures at 190 DIV than at 90 DIV. These findings suggest that ADP-ribosylation process is involved in DNA damage and repair during cell differentiation and aging in culture. Twelve hours treatment with EGF, INS or bFGF significantly stimulated nuclear PARP and mitochondrial ADPRT activities in 190 DIV aging astrocyte cultures. The above results indicate that EGF, INS and bFGF may play a crucial role in the post-translational modification of chromosomal proteins including ADP-ribosylation process in in vitro models. This suggests that growth factors regulate genomic stability in glial cells during development and maturation, stimulating nuclear and mitochondrial ADP-ribosylation processes in developing or aging astrocyte cultures.

  7. Serine is a new target residue for endogenous ADP-ribosylation on histones

    PubMed Central

    Colby, Thomas; Zhang, Qi; Atanassov, Ilian; Zaja, Roko; Palazzo, Luca; Stockum, Anna; Ahel, Ivan; Matic, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation (ADPr) is a biologically and clinically important post-translational modification, but little is known about the amino acids it targets on cellular proteins. Here we present a proteomic approach for direct in vivo identification and quantification of ADPr sites on histones. We have identified 12 unique ADPr sites in human osteosarcoma cells and report serine ADPr as a new type of histone mark that responds to DNA damage. PMID:27723750

  8. Serine is a new target residue for endogenous ADP-ribosylation on histones.

    PubMed

    Leidecker, Orsolya; Bonfiglio, Juan José; Colby, Thomas; Zhang, Qi; Atanassov, Ilian; Zaja, Roko; Palazzo, Luca; Stockum, Anna; Ahel, Ivan; Matic, Ivan

    2016-12-01

    ADP-ribosylation (ADPr) is a biologically and clinically important post-translational modification, but little is known about the amino acids it targets on cellular proteins. Here we present a proteomic approach for direct in vivo identification and quantification of ADPr sites on histones. We have identified 12 unique ADPr sites in human osteosarcoma cells and report serine ADPr as a new type of histone mark that responds to DNA damage.

  9. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation as a new posttranslational modification of YB-1.

    PubMed

    Alemasova, Elizaveta E; Pestryakov, Pavel E; Sukhanova, Maria V; Kretov, Dmitry A; Moor, Nina A; Curmi, Patrick A; Ovchinnikov, Lev P; Lavrik, Olga I

    2015-12-01

    Multifunctional Y-box binding protein 1 (YB-1) is actively studied as one of the components of cellular response to genotoxic stress. However, the precise role of YB-1 in the process of DNA repair is still obscure. In the present work we report for the first time new posttranslational modification of YB-1 - poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation, catalyzed by one of the main regulatory enzymes of DNA repair - poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase 1 (PARP1) in the presence of model DNA substrate carrying multiple DNA lesions. Therefore, poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of YB-1 catalyzed with PARP1, can be stimulated by damaged DNA. The observed property of YB-1 underlines its ability to participate in the DNA repair by its involvement in the regulatory cascades of DNA repair.

  10. Structure-based Mechanism of ADP-ribosylation by Sirtuins

    SciTech Connect

    Hawse, William F.; Wolberger, Cynthia

    2009-12-01

    Sirtuins comprise a family of enzymes found in all organisms, where they play a role in diverse processes including transcriptional silencing, aging, regulation of transcription, and metabolism. The predominant reaction catalyzed by these enzymes is NAD{sup +}-dependent lysine deacetylation, although some sirtuins exhibit a weaker ADP-ribosyltransferase activity. Although the Sir2 deacetylation mechanism is well established, much less is known about the Sir2 ADP-ribosylation reaction. We have studied the ADP-ribosylation activity of a bacterial sirtuin, Sir2Tm, and show that acetylated peptides containing arginine or lysine 2 residues C-terminal to the acetyl lysine, the +2 position, are preferentially ADP-ribosylated at the +2 residue. A structure of Sir2Tm bound to the acetylated +2 arginine peptide shows how this arginine could enter the active site and react with a deacetylation reaction intermediate to yield an ADP-ribosylated peptide. The new biochemical and structural studies presented here provide mechanistic insights into the Sir2 ADP-ribosylation reaction and will aid in identifying substrates of this reaction.

  11. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of a herpes simplex virus immediate early polypeptide

    SciTech Connect

    Preston, C.M.; Notarianni, E.L.

    1983-12-01

    In vitro poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of the herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) immediate early polypeptide Vmw175 is reported. The phenomenon was most clearly observed by use of the temperature-sensitive mutant tsK, which overproduces Vmw175 at the nonpermissive temperature (NPT) and has a mutation in the coding sequences for this polypeptide. Nuclei prepared from cells which were infected with tsK at NPT and subsequently downshifted to the permissive temperature incorporated (/sup 32/P)NAD into Vmw175. This reaction did not occur when nuclei were prepared from cells constantly maintained at NPT, showing that only functional Vmw175 can be radiolabeled with (/sup 32/P)NAD. The identity of the acceptor protein was confirmed by demonstrating the expected electrophoretic mobility differences between the HSV-1 and HSV-2 counterparts of Vmw175. The use of suitable inhibitors demonstrated that the reaction represented mono- or poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation, and further analysis showed the presence of long poly(ADP-ribose) chains attached to Vmw175. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation may be important as a cause or result of the regulation of viral transcription by Vmw175. Radiolabeling of another virus-specified polypeptide (approximate molecular weight 38,000), thought to be a structural component of the input virus, is also reported.

  12. Serine ADP-Ribosylation Depends on HPF1.

    PubMed

    Bonfiglio, Juan José; Fontana, Pietro; Zhang, Qi; Colby, Thomas; Gibbs-Seymour, Ian; Atanassov, Ilian; Bartlett, Edward; Zaja, Roko; Ahel, Ivan; Matic, Ivan

    2017-03-02

    ADP-ribosylation (ADPr) regulates important patho-physiological processes through its attachment to different amino acids in proteins. Recently, by precision mapping on all possible amino acid residues, we identified histone serine ADPr marks in the DNA damage response. However, the biochemical basis underlying this serine modification remained unknown. Here we report that serine ADPr is strictly dependent on histone PARylation factor 1 (HPF1), a recently identified regulator of PARP-1. Quantitative proteomics revealed that serine ADPr does not occur in cells lacking HPF1. Moreover, adding HPF1 to in vitro PARP-1/PARP-2 reactions is necessary and sufficient for serine-specific ADPr of histones and PARP-1 itself. Three endogenous serine ADPr sites are located on the PARP-1 automodification domain. Further identification of serine ADPr on HMG proteins and hundreds of other targets indicates that serine ADPr is a widespread modification. We propose that O-linked protein ADPr is the key signal in PARP-1/PARP-2-dependent processes that govern genome stability.

  13. ADP-ribosylation of dinitrogenase reductase in Rhodobacter capsulatus

    SciTech Connect

    Jouanneau, Y.; Roby, C.; Meyer, C.M.; Vignais, P.M. )

    1989-07-25

    In the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus, nitrogenase is regulated by a reversible covalent modification of Fe protein or dinitrogenase reductase (Rc2). The linkage of the modifying group to inactive Rc2 was found to be sensitive to alkali and to neutral hydroxylamine. Complete release of the modifying group was achieved by incubation of inactive Rc2 in 0.4 or 1 M hydroxylamine. After hydroxylamine treatment of the Rc2 preparation, the modifying group could be isolated and purified by affinity chromatography and ion-exchange HPLC. The modifying group comigrated with ADP-ribose on both ion-exchange HPLC and thin-layer chromatography. Analyses by {sup 31}P NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry provided further evidence that the modifying group was ADP-ribose. The NMR spectrum of inactive Rc2 exhibited signals characteristic of ADP-ribose; integration of these signals allowed calculation of a molar ration ADP-ribose/Rc2 of 0.63. A hexapeptide carrying the ADP-ribose moiety was purified from a subtilisin digest of inactive Rc2. The structure of this peptide, determined by amino acid analysis and sequencing, is Gly-Arg(ADP-ribose)-Gly-Val-Ile-Thr. This structure allows identification of the binding site for ADP-ribose as Arg 101 of the polypeptide chain of Rc2. It is concluded that nitrogenase activity in R. capsulatus is regulated by reversible ADP-ribosylation of a specific arginyl residue of dinitrogenase reductase.

  14. ADP-ribosylating bacterial enzymes for the targeted control of mucosal tolerance and immunity.

    PubMed

    Lycke, Nils

    2004-12-01

    The questions of whether mucosal tolerance and IgA immunity are mutually exclusive or can coexist and whether they represent priming of the local immune system through the same or different activation pathways are addressed. Two strategies were attempted: the first using cholera toxin (CT) or the enzymatically inactive receptor-binding B subunit of CT (CTB), and the second using CTA1-DD or an enzymatically inactive mutant thereof, CTA1R7K-DD. The CTA1-DD adjuvant is a fusion protein composed of the ADP-ribosylating part of CT, CTA1, and DD, which is derived from Staphylococcus areus protein A and targets the molecule to B cells. Here, we provide compelling evidence that delivery of antigen in the absence of ADP ribosylation can promote tolerance, whereas ADP-ribosyltransferase activity induces IgA immunity and prevents tolerance. By linking antigen to the ADP-ribosylating enzymes we could show that CT, although potentially binding to all nucleated cells, in fact, bound preferentially to dendritic cells (DCs) in vivo. On the other hand, DD-bound antigen was distinctly targeted to B cells and probably also to follicular dendritic cells (FDCs) in vivo. Interestingly, the CT and CTA1-DD adjuvants gave equally enhancing effects on mucosal and systemic responses, but appeared to target different APCs in vivo. CT- or CTB-conjugated antigen accumulated in mucosal and systemic DCs. Whereas only CT promoted an active IgA response, CTB induced tolerance to the conjugated antigen. Following intravenous injection of CT-conjugated antigen, DCs in the marginal zone (MZ) of the spleen were selectively targeted. Interestingly, CTB delivered antigen to the same MZ DCs, but failed to induce maturation and upregulation of costimulatory molecules in these cells. Thus, ADP-ribosylation was necessary for a strong enhancing effect of immune responses following CT/CTB-dependent delivery of antigen to the MZ DCs. Moreover, using CTA1-DD, antigen was targeted to the B cell follicle and FDC

  15. Structure of Plasmodium falciparum ADP-ribosylation factor 1

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, William J.; Smith, Craig D.; Senkovich, Olga; Holder, Anthony A.; Chattopadhyay, Debasish

    2011-09-26

    Vesicular trafficking may play a crucial role in the pathogenesis and survival of the malaria parasite. ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs) are among the major components of vesicular trafficking pathways in eukaryotes. The crystal structure of ARF1 GTPase from Plasmodium falciparum has been determined in the GDP-bound conformation at 2.5 {angstrom} resolution and is compared with the structures of mammalian ARF1s.

  16. Rapid Evolution of PARP Genes Suggests a Broad Role for ADP-Ribosylation in Host-Virus Conflicts

    PubMed Central

    Daugherty, Matthew D.; Young, Janet M.; Kerns, Julie A.; Malik, Harmit S.

    2014-01-01

    Post-translational protein modifications such as phosphorylation and ubiquitinylation are common molecular targets of conflict between viruses and their hosts. However, the role of other post-translational modifications, such as ADP-ribosylation, in host-virus interactions is less well characterized. ADP-ribosylation is carried out by proteins encoded by the PARP (also called ARTD) gene family. The majority of the 17 human PARP genes are poorly characterized. However, one PARP protein, PARP13/ZAP, has broad antiviral activity and has evolved under positive (diversifying) selection in primates. Such evolution is typical of domains that are locked in antagonistic ‘arms races’ with viral factors. To identify additional PARP genes that may be involved in host-virus interactions, we performed evolutionary analyses on all primate PARP genes to search for signatures of rapid evolution. Contrary to expectations that most PARP genes are involved in ‘housekeeping’ functions, we found that nearly one-third of PARP genes are evolving under strong recurrent positive selection. We identified a >300 amino acid disordered region of PARP4, a component of cytoplasmic vault structures, to be rapidly evolving in several mammalian lineages, suggesting this region serves as an important host-pathogen specificity interface. We also found positive selection of PARP9, 14 and 15, the only three human genes that contain both PARP domains and macrodomains. Macrodomains uniquely recognize, and in some cases can reverse, protein mono-ADP-ribosylation, and we observed strong signatures of recurrent positive selection throughout the macro-PARP macrodomains. Furthermore, PARP14 and PARP15 have undergone repeated rounds of gene birth and loss during vertebrate evolution, consistent with recurrent gene innovation. Together with previous studies that implicated several PARPs in immunity, as well as those that demonstrated a role for virally encoded macrodomains in host immune evasion, our

  17. Further evidence for poly-ADP-ribosylated histones as DNA suppressors

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, F.L.; Geronimo, I.H.; Bender, W.; Meginniss, K.E.

    1986-05-01

    For many years histones have been considered to be the gene suppressors in eukaryotic cells. Recently, the authors have found strong evidence indicating that poly-ADP-ribosylated histones, rather than histones, are the potent inhibitors of DNA-dependent RNA synthesis. They now report additional evidence for this concept: 1) using histone inhibitor isolated directly from nuclei, the authors are able to confirm their earlier findings that the inhibitor substances are sensitive to pronase, snake venom phosphodiesterase digestion and 0.1N KOH hydrolysis, and are resistant to DNase I and RNase A digestion, 2) the O.D. 260/O.D.280 ratio of the histone inhibitor is between pure protein and nuclei acid, suggesting the inhibitor substance is a nucleoprotein hybrid. This result directly supports the fact that the isolated histone inhibitor is radioactive poly (ADP-ribose) labeled, 3) commercial histones show big differences in inhibitor activity. The authors believe this reflects the variation in poly-ADP-ribosylation among commercial histones, and 4) 0.1N KOH hydrolysis eliminates the poly (ADP-ribose) radioactivity from the acceptor proteins as well as histone inhibitor activity. Yet, on gel, the inhibitor shows identical histone bands and stain intensity before and after hydrolysis, indicating the histones per se are qualitatively and quantitatively unaffected by alkaline treatment. This result strongly suggests that histones themselves are not capable of inhibiting DNA-dependent RNA synthesis.

  18. Pierisins and CARP-1: ADP-ribosylation of DNA by ARTCs in butterflies and shellfish.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi-Nakaguchi, Azusa; Yamamoto, Masafumi; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    The cabbage butterfly, Pieris rapae, and related species possess a previously unknown ADP-ribosylating toxin, guanine specific ADP-ribosyltransferase. This enzyme toxin, known as pierisin, consists of enzymatic N-terminal domain and receptor-binding C-terminal domain, or typical AB-toxin structure. Pierisin efficiently transfers an ADP-ribosyl moiety to the N(2) position of the guanine base of dsDNA. Receptors for pierisin are suggested to be the neutral glycosphingolipids, globotriaosylceramide (Gb3), and globotetraosylceramide (Gb4). This DNA-modifying toxin exhibits strong cytotoxicity and induces apoptosis in various human cell lines, which can be blocked by Bcl-2. Pierisin also produces detrimental effects on the eggs and larvae of the non-habitual parasitoids. In contrast, a natural parasitoid of the cabbage butterfly, Cotesia glomerata, was resistant to this toxin. The physiological role of pierisin in the butterfly is suggested to be a defense factor against parasitization by wasps. Other type of DNA ADP-ribosyltransferase is present in certain kinds of edible clams. For example, the CARP-1 protein found in Meretrix lamarckii consists of an enzymatic domain without a possible receptor-binding domain. Pierisin and CARP-1 are almost fully non-homologous at the amino acid sequence level, but other ADP-ribosyltransferases homologous to pierisin are present in different biological species such as eubacterium Streptomyces. Possible diverse physiological roles of the DNA ADP-ribosyltransferases are discussed.

  19. Crystal structure of the ADP-ribosylating component of BEC, the binary enterotoxin of Clostridium perfringens.

    PubMed

    Kawahara, Kazuki; Yonogi, Shinya; Munetomo, Ryota; Oki, Hiroya; Yoshida, Takuya; Kumeda, Yuko; Matsuda, Shigeaki; Kodama, Toshio; Ohkubo, Tadayasu; Iida, Tetsuya; Nakamura, Shota

    2016-11-11

    Binary enterotoxin of Clostridium perfringens (BEC), consisting of the components BECa and BECb, was recently identified as a novel enterotoxin produced by C. perfringens that causes acute gastroenteritis in humans. Although the detailed mechanism of cell intoxication by BEC remains to be defined, BECa shows both NAD(+)-glycohydrolase and actin ADP-ribosyltransferase activities in the presence of NAD(+). In this study, we determined the first crystal structure of BECa in its apo-state and in complex with NADH. The structure of BECa shows striking resemblance with other binary actin ADP-ribosylating toxins (ADPRTs), especially in terms of its overall protein fold and mechanisms of substrate recognition. We present a detailed picture of interactions between BECa and NADH, including bound water molecules located near the C1'-N glycosidic bond of NADH and the catalytically important ADP-ribosylating turn-turn (ARTT) loop. We observed that the conformational rearrangement of the ARTT loop, possibly triggered by a conformational change involving a conserved tyrosine residue coupled with substrate binding, plays a crucial role in catalysis by properly positioning a catalytic glutamate residue in the E-X-E motif of the ARTT loop in contact with the nucleophile. Our results for BECa provide insight into the common catalytic mechanism of the family of binary actin ADPRTs.

  20. The actin-ADP-ribosylating Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin.

    PubMed

    Aktories, Klaus; Barth, Holger

    2004-04-01

    Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin is the prototype of actin-ADP-ribosylating toxins. The toxin consists of the enzyme component C2I and the separated binding/translocation component C2II. C2II is proteolytically activated to form heptamers, which bind the enzyme component. After endocytosis of the receptor-toxin complex, the enzyme component enters the cytosol from an acidic endosomal compartment to modify G-actin at arginine177. Recent data indicate that chaperons are involved in the translocation process of the toxin.

  1. Dicumarol, an inhibitor of ADP-ribosylation of CtBP3/BARS, fragments golgi non-compact tubular zones and inhibits intra-golgi transport.

    PubMed

    Mironov, Alexander A; Colanzi, Antonino; Polishchuk, Roman S; Beznoussenko, Galina V; Mironov, Alexander A; Fusella, Aurora; Di Tullio, Giuseppe; Silletta, Maria Giuseppina; Corda, Daniela; De Matteis, Maria Antonietta; Luini, Alberto

    2004-07-01

    Dicumarol (3,3'-methylenebis[4-hydroxycoumarin]) is an inhibitor of brefeldin-A-dependent ADP-ribosylation that antagonises brefeldin-A-dependent Golgi tubulation and redistribution to the endoplasmic reticulum. We have investigated whether dicumarol can directly affect the morphology of the Golgi apparatus. Here we show that dicumarol induces the breakdown of the tubular reticular networks that interconnect adjacent Golgi stacks and that contain either soluble or membrane-associated cargo proteins. This results in the formation of 65-120-nm vesicles that are sometimes invaginated. In contrast, smaller vesicles (45-65 nm in diameter, a size consistent with that of coat-protein-I-dependent vesicles) that excluded cargo proteins from their lumen are not affected by dicumarol. All other endomembranes are largely unaffected by dicumarol, including Golgi stacks, the ER, multivesicular bodies and the trans-Golgi network. In permeabilized cells, dicumarol activity depends on the function of CtBP3/BARS protein and pre-ADP-ribosylation of cytosol inhibits the breakdown of Golgi tubules by dicumarol. In functional experiments, dicumarol markedly slows down intra-Golgi traffic of VSV-G transport from the endoplasmic reticulum to the medial Golgi, and inhibits the diffusional mobility of both galactosyl transferase and VSV-G tagged with green fluorescent protein. However, it does not affect: transport from the trans-Golgi network to the cell surface; Golgi-to-endoplasmic reticulum traffic of ERGIC58; coat-protein-I-dependent Golgi vesiculation by AlF4 or ADP-ribosylation factor; or ADP-ribosylation factor and beta-coat protein binding to Golgi membranes. Thus the ADP-ribosylation inhibitor dicumarol induces the selective breakdown of the tubular components of the Golgi complex and inhibition of intra-Golgi transport. This suggests that lateral diffusion between adjacent stacks has a role in protein transport through the Golgi complex.

  2. Synaptic functions of the IQSEC family of ADP-ribosylation factor guanine nucleotide exchange factors.

    PubMed

    Um, Ji Won

    2016-06-28

    Postsynaptic scaffolding proteins interact with numerous synaptic proteins to ensure the organization and specialization of functional excitatory and inhibitory synapses. IQSECs (IQ motif and SEC7 domain-containing proteins) are a class of ADP ribosylation factor-guanine nucleotide exchange factors (ARF-GEFs), whose functions are beginning to be understood as both scaffolding and signaling proteins. Specifically, IQSEC1 binds to PSD-95, and IQSEC2 functions as a regulator of AMPA receptor trafficking at excitatory synapses, whereas IQSEC3 interacts with gephyrin to promote inhibitory synapse development. Here, I review the currently known findings on IQSECs and discuss the possible relations between dysfunctions of IQSECs and the pathophysiology of brain disorders.

  3. Localization and characterization of the human ADP-ribosylation factor 5 (ARF5) gene

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, R.E. |; Daiger, S.P.; Green, E.D.

    1997-05-01

    ADP-ribosylation factor 5 (ARF5) is a member of the ARF gene family. The ARF proteins stimulate the in vitro ADP-ribosyltransferase activity of cholera toxin and appear to play a role in vesicular trafficking in vivo. We have mapped ARF5, one of the six known mammalian ARF genes, to a well-defined yeast artificial chromosome contig on human chromosome 7q31.3. In addition, we have isolated and sequenced an {approximately}3.2-kb genomic segment that contains the entire ARF5 coding region, revealing the complete intron-exon structure of the gene. With six coding exons and five introns, the genomic structure of ARF5 is unique among the mammalian ARF genes and provides insight about the evolutionary history of this ancient gene family. 20 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of brefeldin A-ADP ribosylated substrate (BARS).

    PubMed

    Nardini, Marco; Spanò, Stefania; Cericola, Claudia; Pesce, Alessandra; Damonte, Gianluca; Luini, Alberto; Corda, Daniela; Bolognesi, Martino

    2002-06-01

    Brefeldin A-ADP ribosylated substrate (BARS) is a newly discovered enzyme involved in membrane fission, catalyzing the formation of phosphatidic acid by transfer of an acyl group from acyl-CoA to lysophosphatidic acid. A truncated form of BARS, lacking the C-terminal segment expected to interact with the Golgi membrane, has been expressed in soluble form in Escherichia coli, purified and crystallized. BARS crystals diffract up to 2.5 A resolution using synchrotron radiation and belong to space group P6(2)22/P6(4)22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 89.2, c = 162.6 A, alpha = beta = 90, gamma = 120 degrees and one molecule (39.5 kDa) per asymmetric unit. SeMet-substituted BARS has been crystallized under growth conditions very similar to those of the native protein.

  5. Poly ADP ribosylation as a possible mechanism of microwave--biointeraction.

    PubMed

    Singh, N; Rudra, N; Bansal, P; Mathur, R; Behari, J; Nayar, U

    1994-07-01

    Electromagnetic fields (EMFs) affect the metabolism of the body including the nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, hematological as well as the reproductive system. EMFs are environmental pollutants, thus posing a health hazard which can cause steric changes in the molecule located at the cell surface. Microwaves are known to cause chromosomal abberations and act as tumor promoters. The process involves a stream of signals from cell membrane to nucleus and other organelles. The present investigations aim to understand the mechanism of biological effects of microwaves (2.45 GHz). The effect was studied on poly ADP-ribosylation, which is a post translational modification of chromatin protein catalysed by the enzyme poly ADPR polymerase using NAD+ as the substrate. Poly ADP-ribosylation has been shown to be involved in several aspects of chromatin structure and function. Twenty-three days old rats weighing 42-48 gms were exposed at a microwave dose level of 1.0 mW/cm2. After exposure for sixty days the animals were sacrificed and an estimation of poly ADPR polymerase activity was undertaken in different organs of these animals. There was an increase of 20% in its activity in liver, 35% in testis, whereas brain showed a 53% decrease in diencephalon and 20% decrease in the cortex in the exposed animals as compared to their respective controls. There was no change in enzyme activity in spleen and kidney. This was accompanied by concomitant changes in NAD+ levels. The above results may be cited as important events in carcinogenesis and tumor promotion related to microwave exposure and the signal transduction mechanism involved. The goal is to shed light on complex ecogenetic interactions leading to cancer modulation of gene expression by epigenetic mechanism.

  6. Crystal structure and novel recognition motif of rho ADP-ribosylating C3 exoenzyme from Clostridium botulinum: structural insights for recognition specificity and catalysis.

    PubMed

    Han, S; Arvai, A S; Clancy, S B; Tainer, J A

    2001-01-05

    Clostridium botulinum C3 exoenzyme inactivates the small GTP-binding protein family Rho by ADP-ribosylating asparagine 41, which depolymerizes the actin cytoskeleton. C3 thus represents a major family of the bacterial toxins that transfer the ADP-ribose moiety of NAD to specific amino acids in acceptor proteins to modify key biological activities in eukaryotic cells, including protein synthesis, differentiation, transformation, and intracellular signaling. The 1.7 A resolution C3 exoenzyme structure establishes the conserved features of the core NAD-binding beta-sandwich fold with other ADP-ribosylating toxins despite little sequence conservation. Importantly, the central core of the C3 exoenzyme structure is distinguished by the absence of an active site loop observed in many other ADP-ribosylating toxins. Unlike the ADP-ribosylating toxins that possess the active site loop near the central core, the C3 exoenzyme replaces the active site loop with an alpha-helix, alpha3. Moreover, structural and sequence similarities with the catalytic domain of vegetative insecticidal protein 2 (VIP2), an actin ADP-ribosyltransferase, unexpectedly implicates two adjacent, protruding turns, which join beta5 and beta6 of the toxin core fold, as a novel recognition specificity motif for this newly defined toxin family. Turn 1 evidently positions the solvent-exposed, aromatic side-chain of Phe209 to interact with the hydrophobic region of Rho adjacent to its GTP-binding site. Turn 2 evidently both places the Gln212 side-chain for hydrogen bonding to recognize Rho Asn41 for nucleophilic attack on the anomeric carbon of NAD ribose and holds the key Glu214 catalytic side-chain in the adjacent catalytic pocket. This proposed bipartite ADP-ribosylating toxin turn-turn (ARTT) motif places the VIP2 and C3 toxin classes into a single ARTT family characterized by analogous target protein recognition via turn 1 aromatic and turn 2 hydrogen-bonding side-chain moieties. Turn 2 centrally anchors

  7. Poly(ADP-ribosylation) and neoplastic transformation: effect of PARP inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Donà, Francesca; Chiodi, Ilaria; Belgiovine, Cristina; Raineri, Tatiana; Ricotti, Roberta; Mondello, Chiara; Scovassi, Anna Ivana

    2013-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) and poly(ADP-ribosylation) play essential roles in several biological processes, among which neoplastic transformation and telomere maintenance. In this paper, we review the poly(ADP-ribosylation) process together with the highly appealing use of PARP inhibitors for the treatment of cancer. In addition, we report our results concerning poly(ADP-ribosylation) in a cellular model system for neoplastic transformation developed in our laboratory. Here we show that PARP-1 and PARP-2 expression increases during neoplastic transformation, together with the basal levels of poly(ADP-ribosylation). Furthermore, we demonstrate a greater effect of the PARP inhibitor 3-aminobenzamide (3AB) on cellular viability in neoplastically transformed cells compared to normal fibroblasts and we show that prolonged 3AB administration to tumorigenic cells causes a decrease in telomere length. Taken together, our data support an active involvement of poly(ADP-ribosylation) in neoplastic transformation and telomere length maintenance and confirm the relevant role of poly(ADP-ribosylation) inhibition for the treatment of cancer.

  8. Characterization of the active site of ADP-ribosyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Munshi, C; Thiel, D J; Mathews, I I; Aarhus, R; Walseth, T F; Lee, H C

    1999-10-22

    ADP-ribosyl cyclase synthesizes two Ca(2+) messengers by cyclizing NAD to produce cyclic ADP-ribose and exchanging nicotinic acid with the nicotinamide group of NADP to produce nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide phosphate. Recombinant Aplysia cyclase was expressed in yeast and co-crystallized with a substrate, nicotinamide. x-ray crystallography showed that the nicotinamide was bound in a pocket formed in part by a conserved segment and was near the central cleft of the cyclase. Glu(98), Asn(107) and Trp(140) were within 3.5 A of the bound nicotinamide and appeared to coordinate it. Substituting Glu(98) with either Gln, Gly, Leu, or Asn reduced the cyclase activity by 16-222-fold, depending on the substitution. The mutant N107G exhibited only a 2-fold decrease in activity, while the activity of W140G was essentially eliminated. The base exchange activity of all mutants followed a similar pattern of reduction, suggesting that both reactions occur at the same active site. In addition to NAD, the wild-type cyclase also cyclizes nicotinamide guanine dinucleotide to cyclic GDP-ribose. All mutant enzymes had at least half of the GDP-ribosyl cyclase activity of the wild type, some even 2-3-fold higher, indicating that the three coordinating amino acids are responsible for positioning of the substrate but not absolutely critical for catalysis. To search for the catalytic residues, other amino acids in the binding pocket were mutagenized. E179G was totally devoid of GDP-ribosyl cyclase activity, and both its ADP-ribosyl cyclase and the base exchange activities were reduced by 10,000- and 18,000-fold, respectively. Substituting Glu(179) with either Asn, Leu, Asp, or Gln produced similar inactive enzymes, and so was the conversion of Trp(77) to Gly. However, both E179G and the double mutant E179G/W77G retained NAD-binding ability as shown by photoaffinity labeling with [(32)P]8-azido-NAD. These results indicate that both Glu(179) and Trp(77) are crucial for catalysis and

  9. The ARTT motif and a unified structural understanding of substraterecognition in ADP ribosylating bacterial toxins and eukaryotic ADPribosyltransferases

    SciTech Connect

    Han, S.; Tainer, J.A.

    2001-08-01

    ADP-ribosylation is a widely occurring and biologically critical covalent chemical modification process in pathogenic mechanisms, intracellular signaling systems, DNA repair, and cell division. The reaction is catalyzed by ADP-ribosyltransferases, which transfer the ADP-ribose moiety of NAD to a target protein with nicotinamide release. A family of bacterial toxins and eukaryotic enzymes has been termed the mono-ADP-ribosyltransferases, in distinction to the poly-ADP-ribosyltransferases, which catalyze the addition of multiple ADP-ribose groups to the carboxyl terminus of eukaryotic nucleoproteins. Despite the limited primary sequence homology among the different ADP-ribosyltransferases, a central cleft bearing NAD-binding pocket formed by the two perpendicular b-sheet core has been remarkably conserved between bacterial toxins and eukaryotic mono- and poly-ADP-ribosyltransferases. The majority of bacterial toxins and eukaryotic mono-ADP-ribosyltransferases are characterized by conserved His and catalytic Glu residues. In contrast, Diphtheria toxin, Pseudomonas exotoxin A, and eukaryotic poly-ADP-ribosyltransferases are characterized by conserved Arg and catalytic Glu residues. The NAD-binding core of a binary toxin and a C3-like toxin family identified an ARTT motif (ADP-ribosylating turn-turn motif) that is implicated in substrate specificity and recognition by structural and mutagenic studies. Here we apply structure-based sequence alignment and comparative structural analyses of all known structures of ADP-ribosyltransfeases to suggest that this ARTT motif is functionally important in many ADP-ribosylating enzymes that bear a NAD binding cleft as characterized by conserved Arg and catalytic Glu residues. Overall, structure-based sequence analysis reveals common core structures and conserved active sites of ADP-ribosyltransferases to support similar NAD binding mechanisms but differing mechanisms of target protein binding via sequence variations within the ARTT

  10. S100B impairs glycolysis via enhanced poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase in rodent muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Hosokawa, Kaori; Hamada, Yoji; Fujiya, Atsushi; Murase, Masatoshi; Maekawa, Ryuya; Niwa, Yasuhiro; Izumoto, Takako; Seino, Yusuke; Tsunekawa, Shin; Arima, Hiroshi

    2017-02-07

    S100 calcium-binding protein B (S100B), a multifunctional macromolecule mainly expressed in nerve tissues and adipocytes, has been suggested to contribute to the pathogenesis of obesity. To clarify the role of S100B in insulin action and glucose metabolism in peripheral tissues, we investigated the effect of S100B on glycolysis in myoblast and myotube cells. Rat myoblast L6 cells were treated with recombinant mouse S100B to examine glucose consumption, lactate production, glycogen accumulation, glycolytic metabolites and enzyme activity, insulin signaling, and poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). Glycolytic metabolites were investigated by enzyme assays or metabolome analysis, and insulin signaling was assessed by western blot analysis. Enzyme activity and poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of GAPDH was evaluated by an enzyme assay and immunoprecipitation followed by dot blot with an anti-poly(ADP-ribose) antibody, respectively. S100B significantly decreased glucose consumption, glucose analog uptake, and lactate production in L6 cells, in either the presence or absence of insulin. In contrast, S100B had no effect on glycogen accumulation and insulin signaling. Metabolome analysis revealed that S100B increased the concentration of glycolytic intermediates upstream of GAPDH. S100B impaired GAPDH activity and increased poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated GAPDH proteins. The effects of S100B on glucose metabolism were mostly canceled by a poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibitor. Similar results were obtained in C2C12 myotube cells. We conclude that S100B as a humoral factor may impair glycolysis in muscle cells independently of insulin action, and the effect may be attributed to the inhibition of GAPDH activity from enhanced poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of the enzyme.

  11. ADP-ribosylation of membrane components by pertussis and cholera toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Ribeiro-Neto, F.A.P.; Mattera, F.; Hildebrandt, J.D.; Codina, J.; Field, J.B.; Birnbaumer, L.; Sekura, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    Pertussis and cholera toxins are important tools to investigate functional and structural aspects of the stimulatory (N/sub s/) and inhibitory (N/sub i/) regulatory components of adenylyl cyclase. Cholera toxin acts on N/sub s/ by ADP-ribosylating its ..cap alpha../sub s/ subunit; pertussis toxin acts on N/sub i/ by ADP-ribosylating its ..cap alpha..; subunit. By using (/sup 32/P)NAD/sup +/ and determining the transfer of its (/sup 32/P)ADP-ribose moiety to membrane components, it is possible to obtain information on N/sub s/ and N/sub i/. A set of protocols is presented that can be used to study simultaneously and comparatively the susceptibility of N/sub s/ and N/sub i/ to be ADP-ribosylated by cholera and pertussis toxin.

  12. Diversity and distribution of cholix toxin, a novel ADP-ribosylating factor from Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Purdy, Alexandra E; Balch, Deborah; Lizárraga-Partida, Marcial Leonardo; Islam, Mohammad Sirajul; Martinez-Urtaza, Jaime; Huq, Anwar; Colwell, Rita R; Bartlett, Douglas H

    2010-02-01

    Non-toxigenic non-O1, non-O139 Vibrio cholerae strains isolated from both environmental and clinical settings carry a suite of virulence factors aside from cholera toxin. Among V. cholerae strains isolated from coastal waters of southern California, this includes cholix toxin, an ADP-ribosylating factor that is capable of halting protein synthesis in eukaryotic cells. The prevalence of the gene encoding cholix toxin, chxA, was assessed among a collection of 155 diverse V. cholerae strains originating from both clinical and environmental settings in Bangladesh and Mexico and other countries around the globe. The chxA gene was present in 47% of 83 non-O1, non-O139 strains and 16% of 72 O1/O139 strains screened as part of this study. A total of 86 chxA gene sequences were obtained, and phylogenetic analysis revealed that they fall into two distinct clades. These two clades were also observed in the phylogenies of several housekeeping genes, suggesting that the divergence observed in chxA extends to other regions of the V. cholerae genome, and most likely has arisen from vertical descent rather than horizontal transfer. Our results clearly indicate that ChxA is a major toxin of V. cholerae with a worldwide distribution that is preferentially associated with non-pandemic strains.

  13. Autophagy requires poly(adp-ribosyl)ation-dependent AMPK nuclear export

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Vargas, José M; Rodríguez, María I; Majuelos-Melguizo, Jara; García-Diaz, Ángel; González-Flores, Ariannys; López-Rivas, Abelardo; Virág, László; Illuzzi, Giuditta; Schreiber, Valerie; Dantzer, Françoise; Oliver, F Javier

    2016-01-01

    AMPK is a central energy sensor linking extracellular milieu fluctuations with the autophagic machinery. In the current study we uncover that Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation), a post-translational modification (PTM) of proteins, accounts for the spatial and temporal regulation of autophagy by modulating AMPK subcellular localisation and activation. More particularly, we show that the minority AMPK pool needs to be exported to the cytosol in a PARylation-dependent manner for optimal induction of autophagy, including ULK1 phosphorylation and mTORC1 inactivation. PARP-1 forms a molecular complex with AMPK in the nucleus in non-starved cells. In response to nutrient deprivation, PARP-1 catalysed PARylation, induced the dissociation of the PARP-1/AMPK complex and the export of free PARylated nuclear AMPK to the cytoplasm to activate autophagy. PARP inhibition, its silencing or the expression of PARylation-deficient AMPK mutants prevented not only the AMPK nuclear-cytosolic export but also affected the activation of the cytosolic AMPK pool and autophagosome formation. These results demonstrate that PARylation of AMPK is a key early signal to efficiently convey extracellular nutrient perturbations with downstream events needed for the cell to optimize autophagic commitment before autophagosome formation. PMID:27689873

  14. Evidence that phospholipase D mediates ADP ribosylation factor- dependent formation of Golgi coated vesicles

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Formation of coatomer-coated vesicles from Golgi-enriched membranes requires the activation of a small GTP-binding protein, ADP ribosylation factor (ARF). ARF is also an efficacious activator of phospholipase D (PLD), an activity that is relatively abundant on Golgi- enriched membranes. It has been proposed that ARF, which is recruited onto membranes from cytosolic pools, acts directly to promote coatomer binding and is in a 3:1 stoichiometry with coatomer on coated vesicles. We present evidence that cytosolic ARF is not necessary for initiating coat assembly on Golgi membranes from cell lines with high constitutive PLD activity. Conditions are also described under which ARF is at most a minor component relative to coatomer in coated vesicles from all cell lines tested, including Chinese hamster ovary cells. Formation of coated vesicles was sensitive to ethanol at concentrations that inhibit the production of phosphatidic acid (PA) by PLD. When PA was produced in Golgi membranes by an exogenous bacterial PLD, rather than with ARF and endogenous PLD, coatomer bound to Golgi membranes. Purified coatomer also bound selectively to artificial lipid vesicles that contained PA and phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate (PIP2). We propose that activation of PLD and the subsequent production of PA are key early events for the formation of coatomer-coated vesicles. PMID:8707816

  15. Rifamycin Antibiotic Resistance by ADP-Ribosylation: Structure and Diversity of Arr

    SciTech Connect

    Baysarowich, J.; Koteva, K; Hughes, D; Ejim, L; Griffiths, E; Zhang, K; Junop, M; Wright, G

    2008-01-01

    The rifamycin antibiotic rifampin is important for the treatment of tuberculosis and infections caused by multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Recent iterations of the rifampin core structure have resulted in new drugs and drug candidates for the treatment of a much broader range of infectious diseases. This expanded use of rifamycin antibiotics has the potential to select for increased resistance. One poorly characterized mechanism of resistance is through Arr enzymes that catalyze ADP-ribosylation of rifamycins. We find that genes encoding predicted Arr enzymes are widely distributed in the genomes of pathogenic and nonpathogenic bacteria. Biochemical analysis of three representative Arr enzymes from environmental and pathogenic bacterial sources shows that these have equally efficient drug resistance capacity in vitro and in vivo. The 3D structure of one of these orthologues from Mycobacterium smegmatis was determined and reveals structural homology with ADP-ribosyltransferases important in eukaryotic biology, including poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) and bacterial toxins, despite no significant amino acid sequence homology with these proteins. This work highlights the extent of the rifamycin resistome in microbial genera with the potential to negatively impact the expanded use of this class of antibiotic.

  16. Autophagy requires poly(adp-ribosyl)ation-dependent AMPK nuclear export.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Vargas, José M; Rodríguez, María I; Majuelos-Melguizo, Jara; García-Diaz, Ángel; González-Flores, Ariannys; López-Rivas, Abelardo; Virág, László; Illuzzi, Giuditta; Schreiber, Valerie; Dantzer, Françoise; Oliver, F Javier

    2016-12-01

    AMPK is a central energy sensor linking extracellular milieu fluctuations with the autophagic machinery. In the current study we uncover that Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation), a post-translational modification (PTM) of proteins, accounts for the spatial and temporal regulation of autophagy by modulating AMPK subcellular localisation and activation. More particularly, we show that the minority AMPK pool needs to be exported to the cytosol in a PARylation-dependent manner for optimal induction of autophagy, including ULK1 phosphorylation and mTORC1 inactivation. PARP-1 forms a molecular complex with AMPK in the nucleus in non-starved cells. In response to nutrient deprivation, PARP-1 catalysed PARylation, induced the dissociation of the PARP-1/AMPK complex and the export of free PARylated nuclear AMPK to the cytoplasm to activate autophagy. PARP inhibition, its silencing or the expression of PARylation-deficient AMPK mutants prevented not only the AMPK nuclear-cytosolic export but also affected the activation of the cytosolic AMPK pool and autophagosome formation. These results demonstrate that PARylation of AMPK is a key early signal to efficiently convey extracellular nutrient perturbations with downstream events needed for the cell to optimize autophagic commitment before autophagosome formation.

  17. Poly-ADP ribosylation of PTEN by tankyrases promotes PTEN degradation and tumor growth

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nan; Zhang, Yajie; Han, Xin; Liang, Ke; Wang, Jiadong; Feng, Lin; Wang, Wenqi; Songyang, Zhou; Lin, Chunru; Yang, Liuqing; Yu, Yonghao

    2015-01-01

    PTEN [phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted from chromosome 10], a phosphatase and critical tumor suppressor, is regulated by numerous post-translational modifications, including phosphorylation, ubiquitination, acetylation, and SUMOylation, which affect PTEN localization and protein stability. Here we report ADP-ribosylation as a new post-translational modification of PTEN. We identified PTEN as a novel substrate of tankyrases, which are members of the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs). We showed that tankyrases interact with and ribosylate PTEN, which promotes the recognition of PTEN by a PAR-binding E3 ubiquitin ligase, RNF146, leading to PTEN ubiquitination and degradation. Double knockdown of tankyrase1/2 stabilized PTEN, resulting in the subsequent down-regulation of AKT phosphorylation and thus suppressed cell proliferation and glycolysis in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. Furthermore, tankyrases were up-regulated and negatively correlated with PTEN expression in human colon carcinomas. Together, our study revealed a new regulation of PTEN and highlighted a role for tankyrases in the PTEN–AKT pathway that can be explored further for cancer treatment. PMID:25547115

  18. Structure of CARDS toxin, a unique ADP-ribosylating and vacuolating cytotoxin from Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    DOE PAGES

    Becker, Argentina; Kannan, T. R.; Taylor, Alexander B.; ...

    2015-04-06

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae (Mp) infections cause tracheobronchitis and “walking” pneumonia, and are linked to asthma and other reactive airway diseases. As part of the infectious process, the bacterium expresses a 591-aa virulence factor with both mono-ADP ribosyltransferase (mART) and vacuolating activities known as Community-Acquired Respiratory Distress Syndrome Toxin (CARDS TX). CARDS TX binds to human surfactant protein A and annexin A2 on airway epithelial cells and is internalized, leading to a range of pathogenetic events. In this paper, we present the structure of CARDS TX, a triangular molecule in which N-terminal mART and C-terminal tandem β-trefoil domains associate to form anmore » overall architecture distinct from other well-recognized ADP-ribosylating bacterial toxins. We demonstrate that CARDS TX binds phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin specifically over other membrane lipids, and that cell surface binding and internalization activities are housed within the C-terminal β-trefoil domain. Finally, the results enhance our understanding of Mp pathogenicity and suggest a novel avenue for the development of therapies to treat Mp-associated asthma and other acute and chronic airway diseases.« less

  19. Dissection of Arabidopsis ADP-RIBOSYLATION FACTOR 1 Function in Epidermal Cell PolarityW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jian; Scheres, Ben

    2005-01-01

    Vesicle trafficking is essential for the generation of asymmetries, which are central to multicellular development. Core components of the vesicle transport machinery, such as ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) GTPases, have been studied primarily at the single-cell level. Here, we analyze developmental functions of the ARF1 subclass of the Arabidopsis thaliana multigene ARF family. Six virtually identical ARF1 genes are ubiquitously expressed, and single loss-of-function mutants in these genes reveal no obvious developmental phenotypes. Fluorescence colocalization studies reveal that ARF1 is localized to the Golgi apparatus and endocytic organelles in both onion (Allium cepa) and Arabidopsis cells. Apical-basal polarity of epidermal cells, reflected by the position of root hair outgrowth, is affected when ARF1 mutants are expressed at early stages of cell differentiation but after they exit mitosis. Genetic interactions during root hair tip growth and localization suggest that the ROP2 protein is a target of ARF1 action, but its localization is slowly affected upon ARF1 manipulation when compared with that of Golgi and endocytic markers. Localization of a second potential target of ARF1 action, PIN2, is also affected with slow kinetics. Although extreme redundancy precludes conventional genetic dissection of ARF1 functions, our approach separates different ARF1 downstream networks involved in local and specific aspects of cell polarity. PMID:15659621

  20. In silico characterization of the family of PARP-like poly(ADP-ribosyl)transferases (pARTs)

    PubMed Central

    Otto, Helge; Reche, Pedro A; Bazan, Fernando; Dittmar, Katharina; Haag, Friedrich; Koch-Nolte, Friedrich

    2005-01-01

    Background ADP-ribosylation is an enzyme-catalyzed posttranslational protein modification in which mono(ADP-ribosyl)transferases (mARTs) and poly(ADP-ribosyl)transferases (pARTs) transfer the ADP-ribose moiety from NAD onto specific amino acid side chains and/or ADP-ribose units on target proteins. Results Using a combination of database search tools we identified the genes encoding recognizable pART domains in the public genome databases. In humans, the pART family encompasses 17 members. For 16 of these genes, an orthologue exists also in the mouse, rat, and pufferfish. Based on the degree of amino acid sequence similarity in the catalytic domain, conserved intron positions, and fused protein domains, pARTs can be divided into five major subgroups. All six members of groups 1 and 2 contain the H-Y-E trias of amino acid residues found also in the active sites of Diphtheria toxin and Pseudomonas exotoxin A, while the eleven members of groups 3 – 5 carry variations of this motif. The pART catalytic domain is found associated in Lego-like fashion with a variety of domains, including nucleic acid-binding, protein-protein interaction, and ubiquitylation domains. Some of these domain associations appear to be very ancient since they are observed also in insects, fungi, amoebae, and plants. The recently completed genome of the pufferfish T. nigroviridis contains recognizable orthologues for all pARTs except for pART7. The nearly completed albeit still fragmentary chicken genome contains recognizable orthologues for twelve pARTs. Simpler eucaryotes generally contain fewer pARTs: two in the fly D. melanogaster, three each in the mosquito A. gambiae, the nematode C. elegans, and the ascomycete microfungus G. zeae, six in the amoeba E. histolytica, nine in the slime mold D. discoideum, and ten in the cress plant A. thaliana. GenBank contains two pART homologues from the large double stranded DNA viruses Chilo iridescent virus and Bacteriophage Aeh1 and only a single entry

  1. Structure of an ADP-ribosylation factor, ARF1, from Entamoeba histolytica bound to Mg(2+)-GDP.

    PubMed

    Serbzhinskiy, Dmitry A; Clifton, Matthew C; Sankaran, Banumathi; Staker, Bart L; Edwards, Thomas E; Myler, Peter J

    2015-05-01

    Entamoeba histolytica is the etiological agent of amebiasis, a diarrheal disease which causes amoebic liver abscesses and amoebic colitis. Approximately 50 million people are infected worldwide with E. histolytica. With only 10% of infected people developing symptomatic amebiasis, there are still an estimated 100,000 deaths each year. Because of the emergence of resistant strains of the parasite, it is necessary to find a treatment which would be a proper response to this challenge. ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) is a member of the ARF family of GTP-binding proteins. These proteins are ubiquitous in eukaryotic cells; they generally associate with cell membranes and regulate vesicular traffic and intracellular signalling. The crystal structure of ARF1 from E. histolytica has been determined bound to magnesium and GDP at 1.8 Å resolution. Comparison with other structures of eukaryotic ARF proteins shows a highly conserved structure and supports the interswitch toggle mechanism of communicating the conformational state to partner proteins.

  2. Histone ADP-Ribosylation Facilitates Gene Transcription by Directly Remodeling Nucleosomes

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Zamudio, Ricardo

    2012-01-01

    The packaging of DNA into nucleosomes imposes obstacles on gene transcription, and histone-modifying and nucleosome-remodeling complexes work in concert to alleviate these obstacles so as to facilitate transcription. Emerging evidence shows that chromatin-associated poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) and its enzymatic activity facilitate inflammatory gene transcription and modulate the inflammatory response in animal models. However, the molecular mechanisms by which PARP-1 enzymatic activity facilitates transcription are not well understood. Here we show that through an intracellular signaling pathway, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) stimulation induces PARP-1 enzymatic activity and the ADP-ribosylation of histones at transcriptionally active and accessible chromatin regions in macrophages. In vitro DNase I footprinting and restriction endonuclease accessibility assays reveal that histone ADP-ribosylation directly destabilizes histone-DNA interactions in the nucleosome and increases the site accessibility of the nucleosomal DNA to nucleases. Consistent with this, LPS stimulation-induced ADP-ribosylation at the nucleosome-occupied promoters of il-1β, mip-2, and csf2 facilitates NF-κB recruitment and the transcription of these genes in macrophages. Therefore, our data suggest that PARP-1 enzymatic activity facilitates gene transcription through increasing promoter accessibility by histone ADP-ribosylation. PMID:22547677

  3. Quantitative site-specific ADP-ribosylation profiling of DNA-dependent PARPs.

    PubMed

    Gagné, Jean-Philippe; Ethier, Chantal; Defoy, Daniel; Bourassa, Sylvie; Langelier, Marie-France; Riccio, Amanda A; Pascal, John M; Moon, Kyung-Mee; Foster, Leonard J; Ning, Zhibin; Figeys, Daniel; Droit, Arnaud; Poirier, Guy G

    2015-06-01

    An important feature of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) is their ability to readily undergo automodification upon activation. Although a growing number of substrates were found to be poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated, including histones and several DNA damage response factors, PARPs themselves are still considered as the main acceptors of poly(ADP-ribose). By monitoring spectral counts of specific hydroxamic acid signatures generated after the conversion of the ADP-ribose modification onto peptides by hydroxylamine hydrolysis, we undertook a thorough mass spectrometry mapping of the glutamate and aspartate ADP-ribosylation sites onto automodified PARP-1, PARP-2 and PARP-3. Thousands of hydroxamic acid-conjugated peptides were identified with high confidence and ranked based on their spectral count. This semi-quantitative approach allowed us to locate the preferentially targeted residues in DNA-dependent PARPs. In contrast to what has been reported in the literature, automodification of PARP-1 is not predominantly targeted towards its BRCT domain. Our results show that interdomain linker regions that connect the BRCT to the WGR module and the WGR to the PRD domain undergo prominent ADP-ribosylation during PARP-1 automodification. We also found that PARP-1 efficiently automodifies the D-loop structure within its own catalytic fold. Interestingly, additional major ADP-ribosylation sites were identified in functional domains of PARP-1, including all three zinc fingers. Similar to PARP-1, specific residues located within the catalytic sites of PARP-2 and PARP-3 are major targets of automodification following their DNA-dependent activation. Together our results suggest that poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation hot spots make a dominant contribution to the overall automodification process.

  4. Characterization of transducin from bovine retinal rod outer segments: mechanism and effects of cholera toxin-catalyzed adp-ribosylation

    SciTech Connect

    Navon, S.E.; Fung, B.K.K.

    1984-05-25

    Transducin, a guanine nucleotide-binding protein consisting of two subunits (T/sub ..cap alpha../ and T/sub ..beta gamma../), mediates the signal coupling between rhodopsin and a membrane-bound cyclic GMP phosphodiesterase in retinal rod outer segments. The T/sub ..cap alpha../ subunit is an activator of the phosphodiesterase, and the function of the T/sub ..beta gamma../ subunit is to physically link T/sub ..cap alpha../ with photolyzed rhodopsin. In this study, the mechanism of cholera toxin-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation of T/sub ..cap alpha../ has been examined in a reconstituted system consisting of purified transducin and stripped rod outer segment membranes. Limited proteolysis of the labeled T/sub ..cap alpha../ with trypsin indicated that the inserted ADP-ribose is located exclusively on a single proteolytic fragment with an apparent molecular weight of 23,000. Maximal incorporation of ADP-ribose was achieved when guanosine 5'-(..beta..,..gamma..-im ido)triphosphate (Gpp(NH)p) and T/sub ..beta gamma../ were present at concentrations equal to that of T/sub ..cap alpha../ and when rhodopsin was continuously irradiated with visible light in the 400-500 nm region. The stimulating effect of illumination was related to the direct interaction of the retinal chromophore with opsin. These findings strongly suggest that a transient protein complex consisting of T/sub ..cap alpha../xGpp(NH)p, T/sub ..beta gamma../, and a photointermediate of rhodopsin is the required substrate for cholera toxin. Single turnover kinetic measurements demonstrated that the ADP-ribosylation of T/sub ..cap alpha../ coincided with the appearance of a population of transducin molecules having a very slow rate of GTP hydrolysis. The hydrolysis rate of the bound GTP for this population was 1.1 x 10/sup -3//s, which was 22-fold slower than the rate for the unmodified transducin. 30 references, 9 figures, 1 table.

  5. ADP ribosylation factor 1 is required for synaptic vesicle budding in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Faúndez, V; Horng, J T; Kelly, R B

    1997-08-11

    Carrier vesicle generation from donor membranes typically progresses through a GTP-dependent recruitment of coats to membranes. Here we explore the role of ADP ribosylation factor (ARF) 1, one of the GTP-binding proteins that recruit coats, in the production of neuroendocrine synaptic vesicles (SVs) from PC12 cell membranes. Brefeldin A (BFA) strongly and reversibly inhibited SV formation in vivo in three different PC12 cell lines expressing vesicle-associated membrane protein-T Antigen derivatives. Other membrane traffic events remained unaffected by the drug, and the BFA effects were not mimicked by drugs known to interfere with formation of other classes of vesicles. The involvement of ARF proteins in the budding of SVs was addressed in a cell-free reconstitution system (Desnos, C., L. Clift-O'Grady, and R.B. Kelly. 1995. J. Cell Biol. 130:1041-1049). A peptide spanning the effector domain of human ARF1 (2-17) and recombinant ARF1 mutated in its GTPase activity, both inhibited the formation of SVs of the correct size. During in vitro incubation in the presence of the mutant ARFs, the labeled precursor membranes acquired different densities, suggesting that the two ARF mutations block at different biosynthetic steps. Cell-free SV formation in the presence of a high molecular weight, ARF-depleted fraction from brain cytosol was significantly enhanced by the addition of recombinant myristoylated native ARF1. Thus, the generation of SVs from PC12 cell membranes requires ARF and uses its GTPase activity, probably to regulate coating phenomena.

  6. Detection and Quantification of ADP-Ribosylated RhoA/B by Monoclonal Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Rohrbeck, Astrid; Fühner, Viola; Schröder, Anke; Hagemann, Sandra; Vu, Xuan-Khang; Berndt, Sarah; Hust, Michael; Pich, Andreas; Just, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum exoenzyme C3 is the prototype of C3-like ADP-ribosyltransferases that modify the GTPases RhoA, B, and C. C3 catalyzes the transfer of an ADP-ribose moiety from the co-substrate nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) to asparagine-41 of Rho-GTPases. Although C3 does not possess cell-binding/-translocation domains, C3 is able to efficiently enter intact cells, including neuronal and macrophage-like cells. Conventionally, the detection of C3 uptake into cells is carried out via the gel-shift assay of modified RhoA. Since this gel-shift assay does not always provide clear, evaluable results an additional method to confirm the ADP-ribosylation of RhoA is necessary. Therefore, a new monoclonal antibody has been generated that specifically detects ADP-ribosylated RhoA/B, but not RhoC, in Western blot and immunohistochemical assay. The scFv antibody fragment was selected by phage display using the human naive antibody gene libraries HAL9/10. Subsequently, the antibody was produced as scFv-Fc and was found to be as sensitive as a commercially available RhoA antibody providing reproducible and specific results. We demonstrate that this specific antibody can be successfully applied for the analysis of ADP-ribosylated RhoA/B in C3-treated Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and HT22 cells. Moreover, ADP-ribosylation of RhoA was detected within 10 min in C3-treated CHO wild-type cells, indicative of C3 cell entry. PMID:27043630

  7. Detection and Quantification of ADP-Ribosylated RhoA/B by Monoclonal Antibody.

    PubMed

    Rohrbeck, Astrid; Fühner, Viola; Schröder, Anke; Hagemann, Sandra; Vu, Xuan-Khang; Berndt, Sarah; Hust, Michael; Pich, Andreas; Just, Ingo

    2016-04-01

    Clostridium botulinum exoenzyme C3 is the prototype of C3-like ADP-ribosyltransferases that modify the GTPases RhoA, B, and C. C3 catalyzes the transfer of an ADP-ribose moiety from the co-substrate nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) to asparagine-41 of Rho-GTPases. Although C3 does not possess cell-binding/-translocation domains, C3 is able to efficiently enter intact cells, including neuronal and macrophage-like cells. Conventionally, the detection of C3 uptake into cells is carried out via the gel-shift assay of modified RhoA. Since this gel-shift assay does not always provide clear, evaluable results an additional method to confirm the ADP-ribosylation of RhoA is necessary. Therefore, a new monoclonal antibody has been generated that specifically detects ADP-ribosylated RhoA/B, but not RhoC, in Western blot and immunohistochemical assay. The scFv antibody fragment was selected by phage display using the human naive antibody gene libraries HAL9/10. Subsequently, the antibody was produced as scFv-Fc and was found to be as sensitive as a commercially available RhoA antibody providing reproducible and specific results. We demonstrate that this specific antibody can be successfully applied for the analysis of ADP-ribosylated RhoA/B in C3-treated Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and HT22 cells. Moreover, ADP-ribosylation of RhoA was detected within 10 min in C3-treated CHO wild-type cells, indicative of C3 cell entry.

  8. The ARTT motif and a unified structural understanding of substrate recognition in ADP-ribosylating bacterial toxins and eukaryotic ADP-ribosyltransferases.

    PubMed

    Han, Seungil; Tainer, John A

    2002-02-01

    ADP-ribosylation is a widely occurring and biologically critical covalent chemical modification process in pathogenic mechanisms, intracellular signaling systems, DNA repair, and cell division. The reaction is catalyzed by ADP-ribosyltransferases, which transfer the ADP-ribose moiety of NAD to a target protein with nicotinamide release. A family of bacterial toxins and eukaryotic enzymes has been termed the mono-ADP-ribosyltransferases, in distinction to the poly-ADP-ribosyltransferases, which catalyze the addition of multiple ADP-ribose groups to the carboxyl terminus of eukaryotic nucleoproteins. Despite the limited primary sequence homology among the different ADP-ribosyltransferases, a central cleft bearing the NAD-binding pocket formed by the two perpendicular beta-sheet cores has been remarkably conserved between bacterial toxins and eukaryotic mono- and poly-ADP-ribosyltransferases. The majority of bacterial toxins and eukaryotic mono-ADP-ribosyltransferases are characterized by conserved His and catalytic Glu residues. In contrast, diphtheria toxin, Pseudomonas exotoxin A, and eukaryotic poly-ADP-ribosytransferases are characterized by conserved Arg and catalytic Glu residues. Structural and mutagenic studies of the NAD-binding core of a binary toxin and a C3-like toxin identified an ARTT motif (ADP-ribosylating turn-turn motif) that is implicated in substrate specificity and recognition. Here we apply structure-based sequence alignment and comparative structural analyses of all known structures of ADP-ribosyltransfeases to suggest that this ARTT motif is functionally important in many ADP-ribosylating enzymes that bear a NAD-binding cleft as characterized by conserved Arg and catalytic Glu residues. Overall, structure-based sequence analysis reveals common core structures and conserved active sites of ADP-ribosyltransferases to support similar NAD-binding mechanisms but differing mechanisms of target protein binding via sequence variations within the ARTT

  9. In vivo vizualisation of mono-ADP-ribosylation by dPARP16 upon amino-acid starvation

    PubMed Central

    Aguilera-Gomez, Angelica; van Oorschot, Marinke M; Veenendaal, Tineke; Rabouille, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    PARP catalysed ADP-ribosylation is a post-translational modification involved in several physiological and pathological processes, including cellular stress. In order to visualise both Poly-, and Mono-, ADP-ribosylation in vivo, we engineered specific fluorescent probes. Using them, we show that amino-acid starvation triggers an unprecedented display of mono-ADP-ribosylation that governs the formation of Sec body, a recently identified stress assembly that forms in Drosophila cells. We show that dPARP16 catalytic activity is necessary and sufficient for both amino-acid starvation induced mono-ADP-ribosylation and subsequent Sec body formation and cell survival. Importantly, dPARP16 catalyses the modification of Sec16, a key Sec body component, and we show that it is a critical event for the formation of this stress assembly. Taken together our findings establish a novel example for the role of mono-ADP-ribosylation in the formation of stress assemblies, and link this modification to a metabolic stress. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21475.001 PMID:27874829

  10. Roles of Asp179 and Glu270 in ADP-Ribosylation of Actin by Clostridium perfringens Iota Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Belyy, Alexander; Tabakova, Irina; Lang, Alexander E.; Jank, Thomas; Belyi, Yury; Aktories, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens iota toxin is a binary toxin composed of the enzymatically active component Ia and receptor binding component Ib. Ia is an ADP-ribosyltransferase, which modifies Arg177 of actin. The previously determined crystal structure of the actin-Ia complex suggested involvement of Asp179 of actin in the ADP-ribosylation reaction. To gain more insights into the structural requirements of actin to serve as a substrate for toxin-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation, we engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, in which wild type actin was replaced by actin variants with substitutions in residues located on the Ia-actin interface. Expression of the actin mutant Arg177Lys resulted in complete resistance towards Ia. Actin mutation of Asp179 did not change Ia-induced ADP-ribosylation and growth inhibition of S. cerevisiae. By contrast, substitution of Glu270 of actin inhibited the toxic action of Ia and the ADP-ribosylation of actin. In vitro transcribed/translated human β-actin confirmed the crucial role of Glu270 in ADP-ribosylation of actin by Ia. PMID:26713879

  11. Molecular cloning, characterization, and expression of human ADP-ribosylation factors: Two guanine nucleotide-dependent activators of cholera toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Bobak, D.A.; Nightingale, M.S.; Murtagh, J.J.; Price, S.R.; Moss, J.; Vaughan, M. )

    1989-08-01

    ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs) are small guanine nucleotide-binding proteins that enhance the enzymatic activities of cholera toxin. Two ARF cDNAs, ARF1 and ARF3, were cloned from a human cerebellum library. Based on deduced amino acid sequences and patterns of hybridization of cDNA and oligonucleotide probes with mammalian brain poly(A){sup +} RNA, human ARF1 is the homologue of bovine ARF1. Human ARF3, which differs from bovine ARF1 and bovine ARF2, appears to represent a newly identified third type of ARF. Hybridization patterns of human ARF cDNA and clone-specific oligonucleotides with poly(A){sup +} RNA are consistent with the presence of at least two, and perhaps four, separate ARF messages in human brain. In vitro translation of ARF1, ARF2, and ARF3 produced proteins that behaved, by SDS/PAGE, similar to a purified soluble brain ARF. Deduced amino acid sequences of human ARF1 and ARF3 contain regions, similar to those in other G proteins, that are believed to be involved in GTP binding and hydrolysis. ARFS also exhibit a modest degree of homology with a bovine phospholipase C. The observations reported here support the conclusion that the ARFs are members of a multigene family of small guanine nucleotide-binding proteins. Definition of the regulation of ARF mRNAs and of function(s) of recombinant ARF proteins will aid in the elucidation of the physiologic role(s) of ARFs.

  12. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is recognized by ECT2 during mitosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Mo; Bian, Chunjing; Yu, Xiaochun

    2014-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is an unique posttranslational modification and required for spindle assembly and function during mitosis. However, the molecular mechanism of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) in mitosis remains elusive. Here, we show the evidence that PAR is recognized by ECT2, a key guanine nucleotide exchange factor in mitosis. The BRCT domain of ECT2 directly binds to PAR both in vitro and in vivo. We further found that α-tubulin is PARylated during mitosis. PARylation of α-tubulin is recognized by ECT2 and recruits ECT2 to mitotic spindle for completing mitosis. Taken together, our study reveals a novel mechanism by which PAR regulates mitosis.

  13. ADP-ribosylation of translation elongation factor 2 by diphtheria toxin in yeast inhibits translation and cell separation.

    PubMed

    Mateyak, Maria K; Kinzy, Terri Goss

    2013-08-23

    Eukaryotic translation elongation factor 2 (eEF2) facilitates the movement of the peptidyl tRNA-mRNA complex from the A site of the ribosome to the P site during protein synthesis. ADP-ribosylation (ADP(R)) of eEF2 by bacterial toxins on a unique diphthamide residue inhibits its translocation activity, but the mechanism is unclear. We have employed a hormone-inducible diphtheria toxin (DT) expression system in Saccharomyces cerevisiae which allows for the rapid induction of ADP(R)-eEF2 to examine the effects of DT in vivo. ADP(R) of eEF2 resulted in a decrease in total protein synthesis consistent with a defect in translation elongation. Association of eEF2 with polyribosomes, however, was unchanged upon expression of DT. Upon prolonged exposure to DT, cells with an abnormal morphology and increased DNA content accumulated. This observation was specific to DT expression and was not observed when translation elongation was inhibited by other methods. Examination of these cells by electron microscopy indicated a defect in cell separation following mitosis. These results suggest that expression of proteins late in the cell cycle is particularly sensitive to inhibition by ADP(R)-eEF2.

  14. Role of CTCF poly(ADP-Ribosyl)ation in the regulation of apoptosis in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Venkatraman, Bhooma; Klenova, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: CTCF is a candidate tumor suppressor gene encoding a multifunctional transcription factor. CTCF function is controlled by posttranslational modification and interaction with other proteins. Research findings suggested that CTCF function can be regulated by poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARlation) and has specific anti-apoptotic function in breast cancer cells. The aim of this study is to assess the effect of CTCF-wild type (WT) and CTCF complete mutant, which is deficient of PARlation in regulating apoptosis in breast cancer cells. Materials and Methods: The effect of CTCF-WT and CTCF complete mutant was expressed in breast cancer cell-lines by DNA-mediated transfection technique monitored by enhanced green fluorescent protein fluorescence. Evaluation of apoptotic cell death was carried out with immunohistochemical staining using 4’-6’-diamino-2 phenylindole and scoring by fluorescent microscopy. Results: CTCF-WT supports survival of breast cancer cells and was observed that CTCF complete mutant interferes with the functions of the CTCF-WT and there was a considerable apoptotic cell death in the breast cancer cell lines such as MDA-MB-435, CAMA-1 and MCF-7. Conclusion: The study enlighten CTCF as a Biological Marker for breast cancer and the role of CTCF PARlation may be involved in breast carcinogenesis. PMID:25810575

  15. PARP9 and PARP14 cross-regulate macrophage activation via STAT1 ADP-ribosylation

    PubMed Central

    Iwata, Hiroshi; Goettsch, Claudia; Sharma, Amitabh; Ricchiuto, Piero; Goh, Wilson Wen Bin; Halu, Arda; Yamada, Iwao; Yoshida, Hideo; Hara, Takuya; Wei, Mei; Inoue, Noriyuki; Fukuda, Daiju; Mojcher, Alexander; Mattson, Peter C.; Barabási, Albert-László; Boothby, Mark; Aikawa, Elena; Singh, Sasha A.; Aikawa, Masanori

    2016-01-01

    Despite the global impact of macrophage activation in vascular disease, the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. Here we show, with global proteomic analysis of macrophage cell lines treated with either IFNγ or IL-4, that PARP9 and PARP14 regulate macrophage activation. In primary macrophages, PARP9 and PARP14 have opposing roles in macrophage activation. PARP14 silencing induces pro-inflammatory genes and STAT1 phosphorylation in M(IFNγ) cells, whereas it suppresses anti-inflammatory gene expression and STAT6 phosphorylation in M(IL-4) cells. PARP9 silencing suppresses pro-inflammatory genes and STAT1 phosphorylation in M(IFNγ) cells. PARP14 induces ADP-ribosylation of STAT1, which is suppressed by PARP9. Mutations at these ADP-ribosylation sites lead to increased phosphorylation. Network analysis links PARP9–PARP14 with human coronary artery disease. PARP14 deficiency in haematopoietic cells accelerates the development and inflammatory burden of acute and chronic arterial lesions in mice. These findings suggest that PARP9 and PARP14 cross-regulate macrophage activation. PMID:27796300

  16. PARP-2 regulates cell cycle-related genes through histone deacetylation and methylation independently of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Ya-Chen; Hsu, Chiao-Yu; Yao, Ya-Li; Yang, Wen-Ming

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: ► PARP-2 acts as a transcription co-repressor independently of PARylation activity. ► PARP-2 recruits HDAC5, 7, and G9a and generates repressive chromatin. ► PARP-2 is recruited to the c-MYC promoter by DNA-binding factor YY1. ► PARP-2 represses cell cycle-related genes and alters cell cycle progression. -- Abstract: Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-2 (PARP-2) catalyzes poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) and regulates numerous nuclear processes, including transcription. Depletion of PARP-2 alters the activity of transcription factors and global gene expression. However, the molecular action of how PARP-2 controls the transcription of target promoters remains unclear. Here we report that PARP-2 possesses transcriptional repression activity independently of its enzymatic activity. PARP-2 interacts and recruits histone deacetylases HDAC5 and HDAC7, and histone methyltransferase G9a to the promoters of cell cycle-related genes, generating repressive chromatin signatures. Our findings propose a novel mechanism of PARP-2 in transcriptional regulation involving specific protein–protein interactions and highlight the importance of PARP-2 in the regulation of cell cycle progression.

  17. Cloning of an ADP-ribosylation factor gene from banana (Musa acuminata) and its expression patterns in postharvest ripening fruit.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan; Wu, Jing; Xu, Bi-Yu; Liu, Ju-Hua; Zhang, Jian-Bin; Jia, Cai-Hong; Jin, Zhi-Qiang

    2010-08-15

    A full-length cDNA encoding an ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) from banana (Musa acuminata) fruit was cloned and named MaArf. It contains an open reading frame encoding a 181-amino-acid polypeptide. Sequence analysis showed that MaArf shared high similarity with ARF of other plant species. The genomic sequence of MaArf was also obtained using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Sequence analysis showed that MaArf was a split gene containing five exons and four introns in genomic DNA. Reverse-transcriptase PCR was used to analyze the spatial expression of MaArf. The results showed that MaArf was expressed in all the organs examined: root, rhizome, leaf, flower and fruit. Real-time quantitative PCR was used to explore expression patterns of MaArf in postharvest banana. There was differential expression of MaArf associated with ethylene biosynthesis. In naturally ripened banana, expression of MaArf was in accordance with ethylene biosynthesis. However, in 1-methylcyclopropene-treated banana, the expression of MaArf was inhibited and changed little. When treated with ethylene, MaArf expression in banana fruit significantly increased in accordance with ethylene biosynthesis; the peak of MaArf was 3 d after harvest, 11 d earlier than for naturally ripened banana fruits. These results suggest that MaArf is induced by ethylene in regulating postharvest banana ripening. Finally, subcellular localization assays showed the MaArf protein in the cytoplasm.

  18. Structure of CARDS toxin, a unique ADP-ribosylating and vacuolating cytotoxin from Mycoplasma pneumoniae

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, Argentina; Kannan, T. R.; Taylor, Alexander B.; Pakhomova, Olga N.; Zhang, Yanfeng; Somarajan, Sudha R.; Galaleldeen, Ahmad; Holloway, Stephen P.; Baseman, Joel B.; Hart, P. John

    2015-04-06

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae (Mp) infections cause tracheobronchitis and “walking” pneumonia, and are linked to asthma and other reactive airway diseases. As part of the infectious process, the bacterium expresses a 591-aa virulence factor with both mono-ADP ribosyltransferase (mART) and vacuolating activities known as Community-Acquired Respiratory Distress Syndrome Toxin (CARDS TX). CARDS TX binds to human surfactant protein A and annexin A2 on airway epithelial cells and is internalized, leading to a range of pathogenetic events. In this paper, we present the structure of CARDS TX, a triangular molecule in which N-terminal mART and C-terminal tandem β-trefoil domains associate to form an overall architecture distinct from other well-recognized ADP-ribosylating bacterial toxins. We demonstrate that CARDS TX binds phosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin specifically over other membrane lipids, and that cell surface binding and internalization activities are housed within the C-terminal β-trefoil domain. Finally, the results enhance our understanding of Mp pathogenicity and suggest a novel avenue for the development of therapies to treat Mp-associated asthma and other acute and chronic airway diseases.

  19. ADP-ribosylation by cholera toxin: functional analysis of a cellular system that stimulates the enzymic activity of cholera toxin fragment A/sub 1/

    SciTech Connect

    Gill, D.M.; Coburn, J.

    1987-10-06

    The authors have clarified relationships between cholera toxin, cholera toxin substrates, a membrane protein S that is required for toxin activity, and a soluble protein CF that is needed for the function of S. The toxin has little intrinsic ability to catalyze ADP-ribosylations unless it encounters the active form of the S protein, which is S liganded to GTP or to a GTP analogue. In the presence of CF, S x GTP forms readily, though reversibly, but a more permanent active species, S-guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (S x GTP..gamma..S), forms over a period of 10-15 min at 37/sup 0/C. Both guanosine 5'-O-(2-thiodiphosphate) and GTP block this quasi-permanent activation. Some S x GTP..gamma..S forms in membranes that are exposed to CF alone and then to GTP..gamma..S, with a wash in between, and it is possible that CF facilitates a G nucleotide exchange. S x GTP..gamma..S dissolved by nonionic detergents persists in solution and can be used to support the ADP-ribosylation of nucleotide-free substrates. In this circumstance, added guanyl nucleotides have no further effect. This active form of S is unstable, especially when heated, but the thermal inactivation above 45/sup 0/C is decreased by GTP..gamma..S. Active S is required equally for the ADP-ribosylation of all of cholera toxin's protein substrates, regardless of whether they bind GTP or not. They suggest that active S interacts directly with the enzymic A/sub 1/ fragments of cholera toxin and not with any toxin substrate. The activation and activity of S are independent of the state, or even the presence, of adenylate cyclase and seem to be involved with the cyclase system only via cholera toxin. S is apparently not related by function to certain other GTP binding proteins, including p21/sup ras/, and appears to be a new GTP binding protein whose physiologic role remains to be identified.

  20. Poly(ADP-ribosylation) regulates chromatin organization through histone H3 modification and DNA methylation of the first cell cycle of mouse embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Osada, Tomoharu; Rydén, Anna-Margareta; Masutani, Mitsuko

    2013-04-26

    Highlights: •Histone modification of the mouse pronuclei is regulated by poly(ADP-ribosylation). •Hypermethylation of the mouse female pronuclei is maintained by poly(ADP-ribosylation). •Parp1 is physically interacted with Suz12, which may function in the pronuclei. •Poly(ADP-ribosylation) affects ultrastructure of chromatin of the mouse pronucleus. -- Abstract: We examined the roles of poly(ADP-ribosylation) in chromatin remodeling during the first cell cycle of mouse embryos. Drug-based inhibition of poly(ADP-ribosylation) by a PARP inhibitor, PJ-34, revealed up-regulation of dimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 4 in male pronuclei and down-regulation of dimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 9 (H3K9) and lysine 27 (H3K27). Association of poly(ADP-ribosylation) with histone modification was suggested to be supported by the interaction of Suz12, a histone methyltransferase in the polycomb complex, with Parp1. PARP activity was suggested to be required for a proper localization and maintenance of Suz12 on chromosomes. Notably, DNA methylation level of female pronuclei in one-cell embryos was robustly decreased by PJ-34. Electron microscopic analysis showed a frequent appearance of unusual electron-dense areas within the female pronuclei, implying the disorganized and hypercondensed chromatin ultrastructure. These results show that poly(ADP-ribosylation) is important for the integrity of non-equivalent epigenetic dynamics of pronuclei during the first cell cycle of mouse embryos.

  1. CTCF participates in DNA damage response via poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation

    PubMed Central

    Han, Deqiang; Chen, Qian; Shi, Jiazhong; Zhang, Feng; Yu, Xiaochun

    2017-01-01

    CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) plays an essential role in regulating the structure of chromatin by binding DNA strands for defining the boundary between active and heterochromatic DNA. However, the role of CTCF in DNA damage response remains elusive. Here, we show that CTCF is quickly recruited to the sites of DNA damage. The fast recruitment is mediated by the zinc finger domain and poly (ADP-ribose) (PAR). Further analyses show that only three zinc finger motifs are essential for PAR recognition. Moreover, CTCF-deficient cells are hypersensitive to genotoxic stress such as ionizing radiation (IR). Taken together, these results suggest that CTCF participate in DNA damage response via poly(ADP-ribosylation). PMID:28262757

  2. The myristoylated amino terminus of ADP-ribosylation factor 1 is a phospholipid- and GTP-sensitive switch.

    PubMed

    Randazzo, P A; Terui, T; Sturch, S; Fales, H M; Ferrige, A G; Kahn, R A

    1995-06-16

    ADP-ribosylation factor 1 (Arf1) is an essential N-myristoylated 21-kDa GTP-binding protein with activities that include the regulation of membrane traffic and phospholipase D activity. Both the N terminus of the protein and the N-myristate bound to glycine 2 have previously been shown to be essential to the function of Arf in cells. We show that the bound nucleotide affects the conformation of either the N terminus or residues of Arf1 that are in direct contact with the N terminus. This was demonstrated by examining the effects of mutations in this N-terminal domain on guanosine 5'-O-(3-thio)triphosphate (GTP gamma S) and GDP binding and dissociation kinetics. Arf1 mutants, lacking 13 or 17 residues from the N terminus or mutated at residues 3-7, had a greater affinity for GTP gamma S and a lower affinity for GDP than did the wild-type protein. As the N terminus is required for interactions with target proteins, we conclude that the N terminus of Arf1 is a GTP-sensitive effector domain. When Arf1 was acylated, the GTP-dependent conformational changes were codependent on added phospholipids. In the absence of phospholipids, myristoylated Arf1 has a lower affinity for GTP gamma S than for GDP, and in the presence of phospholipids, the myristoylated protein has a greater affinity for GTP gamma S than for GDP. Thus, N-myristoylation is a critical component in the construction of this phospholipid- and GTP-dependent switch.

  3. The Type III Secretion System Effector SeoC of Salmonella enterica subsp. salamae and S. enterica subsp. arizonae ADP-Ribosylates Src and Inhibits Opsonophagocytosis.

    PubMed

    Pollard, Dominic J; Young, Joanna C; Covarelli, Valentina; Herrera-León, Silvia; Connor, Thomas R; Fookes, Maria; Walker, Danielle; Echeita, Aurora; Thomson, Nicholas R; Berger, Cedric N; Frankel, Gad

    2016-12-01

    Salmonella species utilize type III secretion systems (T3SSs) to translocate effectors into the cytosol of mammalian host cells, subverting cell signaling and facilitating the onset of gastroenteritis. In this study, we compared a draft genome assembly of Salmonella enterica subsp. salamae strain 3588/07 against the genomes of S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium strain LT2 and Salmonella bongori strain 12419. S. enterica subsp. salamae encodes the Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1), SPI-2, and the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) T3SSs. Though several key S Typhimurium effector genes are missing (e.g., avrA, sopB, and sseL), S. enterica subsp. salamae invades HeLa cells and contains homologues of S. bongori sboK and sboC, which we named seoC SboC and SeoC are homologues of EspJ from enteropathogenic and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EPEC and EHEC, respectively), which inhibit Src kinase-dependent phagocytosis by ADP-ribosylation. By screening 73 clinical and environmental Salmonella isolates, we identified EspJ homologues in S. bongori, S. enterica subsp. salamae, and Salmonella enterica subsp. arizonae The β-lactamase TEM-1 reporter system showed that SeoC is translocated by the SPI-1 T3SS. All the Salmonella SeoC/SboC homologues ADP-ribosylate Src E310 in vitro Ectopic expression of SeoC/SboC inhibited phagocytosis of IgG-opsonized beads into Cos-7 cells stably expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP)-FcγRIIa. Concurrently, S. enterica subsp. salamae infection of J774.A1 macrophages inhibited phagocytosis of beads, in a seoC-dependent manner. These results show that S. bongori, S. enterica subsp. salamae, and S. enterica subsp. arizonae share features of the infection strategy of extracellular pathogens EPEC and EHEC and shed light on the complexities of the T3SS effector repertoires of Enterobacteriaceae.

  4. Oxytocin-induced elevation of ADP-ribosyl cyclase activity, cyclic ADP-ribose or Ca(2+) concentrations is involved in autoregulation of oxytocin secretion in the hypothalamus and posterior pituitary in male mice.

    PubMed

    Lopatina, Olga; Liu, Hong-Xiang; Amina, Sarwat; Hashii, Minako; Higashida, Haruhiro

    2010-01-01

    Locally released oxytocin (OT) activates OT receptors (2.1:OXY:1:OT:) in neighboring neurons in the hypothalamus and their terminals in the posterior pituitary, resulting in further OT release, best known in autoregulation occurring during labor or milk ejection in reproductive females. OT also plays a critical role in social behavior of non-reproductive females and even in males in mammals from rodents to humans. Social behavior is disrupted when elevation of free intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) and OT secretion are reduced in male and female CD38 knockout mice. Therefore, it is interesting to investigate whether ADP-ribosyl cyclase-dependent signaling is involved in OT-induced OT release for social recognition in males, independent from female reproduction, and to determine its molecular mechanism. Here, we report that ADP-ribosyl cyclase activity was increased by OT in crude membrane preparations of the hypothalamus and posterior pituitary in male mice, and that OT elicited an increase in [Ca(2+)](i) in the isolated terminals over a period of 5 min. The increases in cyclase and [Ca(2+)](i) were partially inhibited by nonspecific protein kinase inhibitors and a protein kinase C specific inhibitor, calphostin C. Subsequently, OT-induced OT release was also inhibited by calphostin C to levels inhibited by vasotocin, an OT receptor antagonist, and 8-bromo-cADP-ribose. These results demonstrate that OT receptors are functionally coupled to membrane-bound ADP-ribosyl cyclase and/or CD38 and suggest that cADPR-mediated intracellular calcium signaling is involved in autoregulation of OT release, which is sensitive to protein kinase C, in the hypothalamus and neurohypophysis in male mice.

  5. Molecular recognition of an ADP-ribosylating Clostridium botulinum C3 exoenzyme by RalA GTPase

    PubMed Central

    Holbourn, Kenneth P.; Sutton, J. Mark; Evans, Hazel R.; Shone, Clifford C.; Acharya, K. Ravi

    2005-01-01

    C3 exoenzymes (members of the ADP-ribosyltranferase family) are produced by Clostridium botulinum (C3bot1 and -2), Clostridium limosum (C3lim), Bacillus cereus (C3cer), and Staphylococcus aureus (C3stau1–3). These exoenzymes lack a translocation domain but are known to specifically inactivate Rho GTPases in host target cells. Here, we report the crystal structure of C3bot1 in complex with RalA (a GTPase of the Ras subfamily) and GDP at a resolution of 2.66 Å. RalA is not ADP-ribosylated by C3 exoenzymes but inhibits ADP-ribosylation of RhoA by C3bot1, C3lim, and C3cer to different extents. The structure provides an insight into the molecular interactions between C3bot1 and RalA involving the catalytic ADP-ribosylating turn–turn (ARTT) loop from C3bot1 and helix α4 and strand β6 (which are not part of the GDP-binding pocket) from RalA. The structure also suggests a molecular explanation for the different levels of C3-exoenzyme inhibition by RalA and why RhoA does not bind C3bot1 in this manner. PMID:15809419

  6. Molecular recognition of an ADP-ribosylating Clostridium botulinum C3 exoenzyme by RalA GTPase.

    PubMed

    Holbourn, Kenneth P; Sutton, J Mark; Evans, Hazel R; Shone, Clifford C; Acharya, K Ravi

    2005-04-12

    C3 exoenzymes (members of the ADP-ribosyltranferase family) are produced by Clostridium botulinum (C3bot1 and -2), Clostridium limosum (C3lim), Bacillus cereus (C3cer), and Staphylococcus aureus (C3stau1-3). These exoenzymes lack a translocation domain but are known to specifically inactivate Rho GTPases in host target cells. Here, we report the crystal structure of C3bot1 in complex with RalA (a GTPase of the Ras subfamily) and GDP at a resolution of 2.66 A. RalA is not ADP-ribosylated by C3 exoenzymes but inhibits ADP-ribosylation of RhoA by C3bot1, C3lim, and C3cer to different extents. The structure provides an insight into the molecular interactions between C3bot1 and RalA involving the catalytic ADP-ribosylating turn-turn (ARTT) loop from C3bot1 and helix alpha4 and strand beta6 (which are not part of the GDP-binding pocket) from RalA. The structure also suggests a molecular explanation for the different levels of C3-exoenzyme inhibition by RalA and why RhoA does not bind C3bot1 in this manner.

  7. Structural studies of intermediates along the cyclization pathway of Aplysia ADP-ribosyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Kotaka, Masayo; Graeff, Richard; Chen, Zhe; Zhang, Li He; Lee, Hon Cheung; Hao, Quan

    2012-01-20

    Cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) is a calcium messenger that can mobilize intracellular Ca²⁺ stores and activate Ca²⁺ influx to regulate a wide range of physiological processes. Aplysia cyclase is the first member of the ADP-ribosyl cyclases identified to catalyze the cyclization of NAD⁺ into cADPR. The catalysis involves a two-step reaction, the elimination of the nicotinamide ring and the cyclization of the intermediate resulting in the covalent attachment of the purine ring to the terminal ribose. Aplysia cyclase exhibits a high degree of leniency towards the purine base of its substrate, and the cyclization reaction takes place at either the N1- or the N7-position of the purine ring. To decipher the mechanism of cyclization in Aplysia cyclase, we used a crystallization setup with multiple Aplysia cyclase molecules present in the asymmetric unit. With the use of natural substrates and analogs, not only were we able to capture multiple snapshots during enzyme catalysis resulting in either N1 or N7 linkage of the purine ring to the terminal ribose, we were also able to observe, for the first time, the cyclized products of both N1 and N7 cyclization bound in the active site of Aplysia cyclase.

  8. Suppression of breast cancer metastasis through the inactivation of ADP-ribosylation factor 1

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xiayang; Tang, Shou-Ching; Cai, Yafei; Pi, Wenhu; Deng, Libin; Wu, Guangyu; Chavanieu, Alain; Teng, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis is the major cause of cancer-related death in breast cancer patients, which is controlled by specific sets of genes. Targeting these genes may provide a means to delay cancer progression and allow local treatment to be more effective. We report for the first time that ADP-ribosylation factor 1 (ARF1) is the most amplified gene in ARF gene family in breast cancer, and high-level amplification of ARF1 is associated with increased mRNA expression and poor outcomes of patients with breast cancer. Knockdown of ARF1 leads to significant suppression of migration and invasion in breast cancer cells. Using the orthotopic xenograft model in NSG mice, we demonstrate that loss of ARF1 expression in breast cancer cells inhibits pulmonary metastasis. The zebrafish-metastasis model confirms that the ARF1 gene depletion suppresses breast cancer cells to metastatic disseminate throughout fish body, indicating that ARF1 is a very compelling target to limit metastasis. ARF1 function largely dependents on its activation and LM11, a cell-active inhibitor that specifically inhibits ARF1 activation through targeting the ARF1-GDP/ARNO complex at the Golgi, significantly impairs metastatic capability of breast cancer cell in zebrafish. These findings underline the importance of ARF1 in promoting metastasis and suggest that LM11 that inhibits ARF1 activation may represent a potential therapeutic approach to prevent or treat breast cancer metastasis. PMID:27517156

  9. A quantitative analysis for the ADP-ribosylation activity of pertussis toxin: an enzymatic-HPLC coupled assay applicable to formulated whole cell and acellular pertussis vaccine products.

    PubMed

    Cyr, T; Menzies, A J; Calver, J; Whitehouse, L W

    2001-06-01

    The majority of the biological effects of pertussis toxin (PT) are the result of a toxin-catalyzed transfer of an adenosine diphosphate-ribose (ADP-ribose) moiety from NAD(+)to the alpha-subunits of a subset of signal-transducing guanine-nucleotide-binding proteins (G-proteins). This generally leads to an uncoupling of the modified G-protein from the corresponding receptor and the loss of effector regulation. This assay is based on the PT S1 subunit enzymatic transfer of ADP-ribose from NAD to the cysteine moiety of a fluorescent tagged synthetic peptide homologous to the 20 amino acid residue carboxyl-terminal sequence of the alpha-subunit of the G(i3)protein. The tagged peptide and the ADP-ribosylated product were characterized by HPLC/MS and MS/MS for structure confirmation. Quantitation of this characterized ADP-ribosylated fluorescently tagged peptide was by HPLC fluorescence using Standard Addition methodology. The assay was linear over a five hr incubation period at 20 degrees C at PT concentrations between 0.0625 and 4.0 microg/ml and the sensitivity of the assay could be increased several fold by increasing the incubation time to 24 h. Purified S1 subunit of PT exhibited 68.1+/-10.1% of the activity of the intact toxin on a molar basis, whereas the pertussis toxin B oligomer, the genetically engineered toxoid, (PT-9K/129G), and several of the other components of the Bordetella pertussis organism possessed little (<0.6%) or no detectable ribosylation activity. Commonly used pertussis vaccine reference materials, US PV Lot #11, BRP PV 66/303, and BRP PV 88/522, were assayed by this method against Bordetella pertussis Toxin Standard 90/518 and demonstrated to contain, respectively, 0.323+/-0.007, 0.682+/-0.045, and 0.757+/-0.006 microg PT/ml (Mean+/-SEM) or in terms of microg/vial: 3.63, 4.09 and 4.54, respectively. A survey of several multivalent pertussis vaccine products formulated with both whole cell as well as acellular components indicated that

  10. Mutations in the draT and draG genes of Rhodospirillum rubrum result in loss of regulation of nitrogenase by reversible ADP-ribosylation.

    PubMed Central

    Liang, J H; Nielsen, G M; Lies, D P; Burris, R H; Roberts, G P; Ludden, P W

    1991-01-01

    Reversible ADP-ribosylation of dinitrogenase reductase forms the basis of posttranslational regulation of nitrogenase activity in Rhodospirillum rubrum. This report describes the physiological effects of mutations in the genes encoding the enzymes that add and remove the ADP-ribosyl moiety. Mutants lacking a functional draT gene had no dinitrogenase reductase ADP-ribosyltransferase (DRAT, the draT gene product) activity in vitro and were incapable of modifying dinitrogenase reductase with ADP-ribose in vivo. Mutants lacking a functional draG gene had no dinitrogenase reductase-activating glycohydrolase (DRAG, the draG gene product) activity in vitro and were unable to remove ADP-ribose from the modified dinitrogenase reductase in vivo. Strains containing polar mutations in draT had no detectable DRAG activity in vitro, suggesting likely cotranscription of draT and draG. In strains containing draT and lacking a functional draG, dinitrogenase reductase accumulated in the active form under derepressing conditions but was rapidly ADP-ribosylated in response to conditions that cause inactivation. Detection of DRAT in these cells in vitro demonstrated that DRAT is itself subject to posttranslational regulation in vivo. Mutants affected in an open reading frame immediately downstream of draTG showed regulation of dinitrogenase reductase by ADP-ribosylation, although differences in the rates of ADP-ribosylation were apparent. Images FIG. 5 FIG. 6 PMID:1938894

  11. The Type III Secretion System Effector SeoC of Salmonella enterica subsp. salamae and S. enterica subsp. arizonae ADP-Ribosylates Src and Inhibits Opsonophagocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Pollard, Dominic J.; Young, Joanna C.; Covarelli, Valentina; Herrera-León, Silvia; Connor, Thomas R.; Fookes, Maria; Walker, Danielle; Echeita, Aurora; Thomson, Nicholas R.; Berger, Cedric N.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella species utilize type III secretion systems (T3SSs) to translocate effectors into the cytosol of mammalian host cells, subverting cell signaling and facilitating the onset of gastroenteritis. In this study, we compared a draft genome assembly of Salmonella enterica subsp. salamae strain 3588/07 against the genomes of S. enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium strain LT2 and Salmonella bongori strain 12419. S. enterica subsp. salamae encodes the Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1), SPI-2, and the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) T3SSs. Though several key S. Typhimurium effector genes are missing (e.g., avrA, sopB, and sseL), S. enterica subsp. salamae invades HeLa cells and contains homologues of S. bongori sboK and sboC, which we named seoC. SboC and SeoC are homologues of EspJ from enteropathogenic and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EPEC and EHEC, respectively), which inhibit Src kinase-dependent phagocytosis by ADP-ribosylation. By screening 73 clinical and environmental Salmonella isolates, we identified EspJ homologues in S. bongori, S. enterica subsp. salamae, and Salmonella enterica subsp. arizonae. The β-lactamase TEM-1 reporter system showed that SeoC is translocated by the SPI-1 T3SS. All the Salmonella SeoC/SboC homologues ADP-ribosylate Src E310 in vitro. Ectopic expression of SeoC/SboC inhibited phagocytosis of IgG-opsonized beads into Cos-7 cells stably expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP)-FcγRIIa. Concurrently, S. enterica subsp. salamae infection of J774.A1 macrophages inhibited phagocytosis of beads, in a seoC-dependent manner. These results show that S. bongori, S. enterica subsp. salamae, and S. enterica subsp. arizonae share features of the infection strategy of extracellular pathogens EPEC and EHEC and shed light on the complexities of the T3SS effector repertoires of Enterobacteriaceae. PMID:27736780

  12. ADP ribosylation factor 6 binding to phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate-containing vesicles creates defects in the bilayer structure: an electron spin resonance study.

    PubMed Central

    Ge, M; Cohen, J S; Brown, H A; Freed, J H

    2001-01-01

    The effects of binding of myristoylated ADP ribosylation factor 6 (myr-ARF6), an activator of phospholipase D (PLD), to a model membrane were investigated using an electron spin resonance (ESR) labeling technique. Initial studies were conducted in vesicles composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine, dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylinositol 4,5-biphosphate (PIP(2)), and cholesterol. Recombinant ARF6 binding significantly enhances defects in both the headgroup and acyl-chain regions of the membrane, which are revealed by the emergence of sharp components in the spectra from a headgroup label, 1,2-dipalmitoylphosphatidyl-2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-1-piperidinyloxy-choline (DPPTC), and a chain label, 10PC, after myr-ARF6 binding. Binding of non-myristoylated ARF6 (non-ARF6) shows markedly reduced effects. Interestingly, no change in spectra from DPPTC was observed upon myr-ARF6 binding when PIP(2) in the vesicles was replaced by other negatively charged lipids, including phosphatidylinositol, phosphatidylserine, and phosphatidylglycerol, even when normalized for charge. The production of the sharp peak appears to be a specific event, because another GTP binding protein, CDC42, which binds PIP(2) and activates PLD, fails to induce changes in vesicle structure. These results suggest a previously unappreciated role for ARF in mediating a protein/lipid interaction that produces defects in lipid bilayers. This function may serve as an initial event in destabilizing membrane structure for subsequent membrane fusion or biogenesis of vesicles. PMID:11463641

  13. ADP Ribosylation Factor 6 Regulates Neuronal Migration in the Developing Cerebral Cortex through FIP3/Arfophilin-1-dependent Endosomal Trafficking of N-cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Yoshinobu; Fukaya, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Abstract During neural development, endosomal trafficking controls cell shape and motility through the polarized transport of membrane proteins related to cell–cell and cell–extracellular matrix interactions. ADP ribosylation factor 6 (Arf6) is a critical small GTPase that regulates membrane trafficking between the plasma membrane and endosomes. We herein demonstrated that the knockdown of endogenous Arf6 in mouse cerebral cortices led to impaired neuronal migration in the intermediate zone and cytoplasmic retention of N-cadherin and syntaxin12 in migrating neurons. Rescue experiments with separation-of-function Arf6 mutants identified Rab11 family-interacting protein 3 (FIP3)/Arfophilin-1, a dual effector for Arf6 and Rab11, as a downstream effector of Arf6 in migrating neurons. The knockdown of FIP3 led to impaired neuronal migration in the intermediate zone and cytoplasmic retention of N-cadherin in migrating neurons, similar to that of Arf6, which could be rescued by the coexpression of wild-type FIP3 but not FIP3 mutants lacking the binding site for Arf6 or Rab11. These results suggest that Arf6 regulates cortical neuronal migration in the intermediate zone through the FIP3-dependent endosomal trafficking. PMID:27622210

  14. Arabidopsis PARG1 is the key factor promoting cell survival among the enzymes regulating post-translational poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hailei; Gu, Zongying; Wu, Qiao; Yang, Lifeng; Liu, Caifeng; Ma, Hong; Xia, Yiji; Ge, Xiaochun

    2015-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is a reversible post-translational modification of proteins, characterized by the addition of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) to proteins by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), and removal of PAR by poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG). Three PARPs and two PARGs have been found in Arabidopsis, but their respective roles are not fully understood. In this study, the functions of each PARP and PARG in DNA repair were analyzed based on their mutant phenotypes under genotoxic stresses. Double or triple mutant analysis revealed that PARP1 and PARP2, but not PARP3, play a similar but not critical role in DNA repair in Arabidopsis seedlings. PARG1 and PARG2 play an essential and a minor role, respectively under the same conditions. Mutation of PARG1 results in increased DNA damage level and enhanced cell death in plants after bleomycin treatment. PARG1 expression is induced primarily in root and shoot meristems by bleomycin and induction of PARG1 is dependent on ATM and ATR kinases. PARG1 also antagonistically modulates the DNA repair process by preventing the over-induction of DNA repair genes. Our study determined the contribution of each PARP and PARG member in DNA repair and indicated that PARG1 plays a critical role in this process. PMID:26516022

  15. Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin--new insights into the cellular up-take of the actin-ADP-ribosylating toxin.

    PubMed

    Aktories, Klaus; Barth, Holger

    2004-04-01

    Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin is a member of the family of binary actin-ADP-ribosylating toxins. It consists of the enzyme component C2I, and the separated binding/translocation component C2II. Proteolytically activated C2II forms heptamers and binds to a carbohydrate cell surface receptor. After attachment of C2I, the toxin complex is endocytosed to reach early endosomes. At low pH of endosomes, C2II-heptamers insert into the membrane, form pores and deliver C2I into the cytosol. Here, C2I ADP-ribosylates actin at Arg177 to block actin polymerization and to induce depolymerization of actin filaments. The mini-review describes main properties of C2 toxin and discusses new findings on the involvement of chaperones in the up-take process of the toxin.

  16. Oscillation of ADP-ribosyl cyclase activity during the cell cycle and function of cyclic ADP-ribose in a unicellular organism, Euglena gracilis.

    PubMed

    Masuda, W; Takenaka, S; Inageda, K; Nishina, H; Takahashi, K; Katada, T; Tsuyama, S; Inui, H; Miyatake, K; Nakano, Y

    1997-03-17

    In Euglena gracilis, the activity of ADP-ribosyl cyclase, which produces cyclic ADP-ribose, oscillated during the cell cycle in a synchronous culture induced by a light-dark cycle, and a marked increase in the activity was observed in the G2 phase. Similarly, the ADP-ribosyl cyclase activity rose extremely immediately before cell division started, when synchronous cell division was induced by adding cobalamin (which is an essential growth factor and participates in DNA synthesis in this organism) to its deficient culture. Further, cADPR in these cells showed a maximum level immediately before cell division started. A dose-dependent Ca2+ release was observed when microsomes were incubated with cADPR.

  17. Bradykinin activates ADP-ribosyl cyclase in neuroblastoma cells: intracellular concentration decrease in NAD and increase in cyclic ADP-ribose.

    PubMed

    Higashida, Haruhiro; Salmina, Alla; Hashii, Minako; Yokoyama, Shigeru; Zhang, Jia-Sheng; Noda, Mami; Zhong, Zen-Guo; Jin, Duo

    2006-09-04

    ADP-ribosyl cyclase activity in the crude membrane fraction of neuroblastomaxglioma NGPM1-27 hybrid cells was measured by monitoring [(3)H] cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) formation from [(3)H] NAD(+). Bradykinin (BK) at 100nM increased ADP-ribosyl cyclase activity by about 2.5-fold. Application of 300nM BK to living NGPM1-27 cells decreased NAD(+) to 78% of the prestimulation level at 30s. In contrast, intracellular cADPR concentrations were increased by 2-3-fold during the period from 30 to 120s after the same treatment. Our results suggest that cADPR is one of the second messengers downstream of B(2) BK receptors.

  18. NAD-dependent ADP-ribosylation of the human antimicrobial and immune-modulatory peptide LL-37 by ADP-ribosyltransferase-1.

    PubMed

    Picchianti, Monica; Russo, Carla; Castagnini, Marta; Biagini, Massimiliano; Soldaini, Elisabetta; Balducci, Enrico

    2015-04-01

    LL-37 is a cationic peptide belonging to the cathelicidin family that has antimicrobial and immune-modulatory properties. Here we show that the mammalian mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase-1 (ART1), which selectively transfers the ADP-ribose moiety from NAD to arginine residues, ADP-ribosylates LL-37 in vitro. The incorporation of ADP-ribose was first observed by Western blot analysis and then confirmed by MALDI-TOF. Mass-spectrometry showed that up to four of the five arginine residues present in LL-37 could be ADP-ribosylated on the same peptide when incubated at a high NAD concentration in the presence of ART1. The attachment of negatively charged ADP-ribose moieties considerably alters the positive charge of the arginine residues thus reducing the cationicity of LL-37. The cationic nature of LL-37 is key for its ability to interact with cell membranes or negatively charged biomolecules, such as DNA, RNA, F-actin and glycosaminoglycans. Thus, the ADP-ribosylation of LL-37 is expected to have the potential to modulate LL-37 biological activities in several physiological and pathological settings.

  19. Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins 4-6.

    PubMed

    Bach, Leon A

    2015-10-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) 4-6 have important roles as modulators of IGF actions. IGFBP-4 and IGFBP-6 predominantly inhibit IGF actions, whereas IGFBP-5 may enhance these actions under some circumstances. IGFBP-6 is unique among the IGFBPs for its marked IGF-II binding preference. IGFBPs 4-6 are found in the circulation as binary complexes with IGFs that can enter tissues. Additionally, about half of the circulating IGFBP-5 is found in ternary complexes with IGFs and an acid labile subunit; this high molecular complex cannot leave the circulation and acts as an IGF reservoir. IGFBPs 4-6 also have IGF-independent actions. These IGFBPs are regulated in a cell-specific manner and their dysregulation may play a role in a range of diseases including cancer. However, there is no clear clinical indication for measuring serum levels of these IGFBPs at present.

  20. [The structural characteristics, alternative splicing and genetic experession analysis of ADP-ribosylation-factor 1 (arf1) in cotton].

    PubMed

    Ren, Mao-Zhi; Chen, Quan-Jia; Zhang, Rui; Guo, San-Dui

    2004-08-01

    The full-length cDNA,DNA and promoter of ADP-ribosylation-factor 1 (arf1) was isolated from Gossypium hirsutum Y18 by means of isocaudarner inverse PCR (II-PCR) and rapid isolating cDNA 5' unknown sequence and promoter (RICUP) established in our lab. Results indicated that the gene is 4 360 bp in size, including seven exons and six introns. Interestingly, alterative splicing occurs at intron I. Differential processing of intron 1 yields three different transcripts with 1 026 bp, 1103 bp and 1 544 bp in sizes, respectively. Arf1 encodes 181 amino acids. Sequence analysis indicated that sequence upstream transcription initiation site of arf1 includes typical initiator, TATA box, CCAAT box, GC box and several forward and reverse repeat sequences. And typical promoter structures, such as AT-rich sequence and palindrome structure have been detected in the sequence downstream transcription initiation site. Southern blot analysis indicated that the gene has two copies in the genome of cotton. Northern blot confirmed the predominate expression of arf1 in reproductive organs of cotton, including bud, flower, fiber and boll. Also, the feature and character of arf1 and its promoter have been studied. This study will lay foundation for the other research on function of arf1 in the development of reproductive organs in cotton.

  1. Inhibition of Poly-ADP-Ribosylation Fails to Increase Axonal Regeneration or Improve Functional Recovery after Adult Mammalian CNS Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xingxing; Byrne, Alexandra B.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract After traumatic damage of the brain or spinal cord, many surviving neurons are disconnected, and recovery of function is limited by poor axon regeneration. Recent data have suggested that poly ADP-ribosylation plays a role in limiting axonal regrowth such that inhibition of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) may have therapeutic efficacy for neurological recovery after trauma. Here, we tested systemic administration of the PARP inhibitor, veliparib, and showed effective suppression of PARylation in the mouse CNS. After optic nerve crush injury or dorsal hemisection of the thoracic spinal cord in mice, treatment with veliparib at doses with pharmacodynamic action had no benefit for axonal regeneration or functional recovery. We considered whether PARP gene family specificity might play a role. In vitro mouse cerebral cortex axon regeneration experiments revealed that short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated suppression of PARP1 promoted axonal regeneration, whereas suppression of other PARP isoforms either had no effect or decreased regeneration. Therefore, we examined recovery from neurological trauma in mice lacking PARP1. No increase of axonal regeneration was observed in Parp1–/– mice after optic nerve crush injury or dorsal hemisection of the thoracic spinal cord, and there was no improvement in motor function recovery. Thus, comprehensive in vivo analysis reveals no indication that clinical PARP inhibitors will on their own provide benefit for recovery from CNS trauma. PMID:28032120

  2. Interaction of the GTP-binding and GTPase-activating domains of ARD1 involves the effector region of the ADP-ribosylation factor domain.

    PubMed

    Vitale, N; Moss, J; Vaughan, M

    1997-02-14

    ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs) are a family of approximately 20-kDa guanine nucleotide-binding proteins and members of the Ras superfamily, originally identified and purified by their ability to enhance the ADP-ribosyltransferase activity of cholera toxin and more recently recognized as critical participants in vesicular trafficking pathways and phospholipase D activation. ARD1 is a 64-kDa protein with an 18-kDa carboxyl-terminal ARF domain (p3) and a 46-kDa amino-terminal extension (p5) that is widely expressed in mammalian tissues. Using recombinant proteins, we showed that p5, the amino-terminal domain of ARD1, stimulates the GTPase activity of p3, the ARF domain, and appears to be the GTPase-activating protein (GAP) component of this bifunctional protein, whereas in other members of the Ras superfamily a separate GAP molecule interacts with the effector region of the GTP-binding protein. p5 stimulated the GTPase activity of p3 but not of ARF1, which differs from p3 in several amino acids in the effector domain. After substitution of 7 amino acids from p3 in the appropriate position in ARF1, the chimeric protein ARF1(39-45p3) bound to p5, which increased its GTPase activity. Specifically, after Gly40 and Thr45 in the putative effector domain of ARF1 were replaced with the equivalent Asp and Pro, respectively, from p3, functional interaction of the chimeric ARF1 with p5 was increased. Thus, Asp25 and Pro30 of the ARF domain (p3) of ARD1 are involved in its functional and physical interaction with the GTPase-activating (p5) domain of ARD1. After deletion of the amino-terminal 15 amino acids from ARF1(39-45p3), its interaction with p5 was essentially equivalent to that of p3, suggesting that the amino terminus of ARF1(39-45p3) may interfere with binding to p5. These results are consistent with the conclusion that the GAP domain of ARD1 interacts with the effector region of the ARF domain and thereby stimulates GTP hydrolysis.

  3. Characterization of ADP ribosylation factor 1 gene from Exopalaemon carinicauda and its immune response to pathogens challenge and ammonia-N stress.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yafei; Li, Jian; Zhang, Zhe; Li, Jitao; Liu, Ping

    2016-08-01

    ADP ribosylation factors (Arf), as highly conserved small guanosine triphosphate (GTP)-binding proteins, participates in intracellular trafficking and organelle structure. In this study, a full-length cDNA of Arf1 (designated EcArf1) was cloned from Exopalaemon carinicauda by using rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) approaches. The full-length cDNA of EcArf1 was 1428 bp, which contains an open reading frame (ORF) of 549 bp, encoding a 182 amino-acid polypeptide with the predicted molecular weight of 20.69 kDa and estimated isoelectric point was 7.24. Sequence analysis revealed that the conserved Arf protein family signatures were identified in EcArf1. The deduced amino acid sequence of EcArf1 shared high identity (95%-98%) with that of other species and clustered together with Arf1 of other shrimp in the NJ phylogenetic tree, indicating that EcArf1 should be a member of the Arf1 family. Quantitative real-time RT-qPCR analysis indicated that EcArf1 was expressed in hemocytes, hepatopancreas, gills, muscle, ovary, intestine, stomach and heart, and the most abundant level was in hemocytes and gills, which were also the two main target tissues of pathogen infection and environmental stress. After Vibrio parahaemolyticus challenge, EcArf1 transcripts level significantly increased in hemocytes and hepatopancreas at 3 h and 6 h, respectively. The expression of EcArf1 in hemocytes and hepatopancreas significantly up-regulated at 12 h and 6 h respectively, and down-regulated at 72 h and 48 h, respectively. EcArf1 expression in hepatopancreas and gills both significantly increased at 6 h and decreased at 24 h under ammonia-N stress. The results suggested that EcArf1 might be involved in immune responses to pathogens (V. parahaemolyticus and WSSV) challenge and ammonia-N stress in E. carinicauda.

  4. Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Proteins: A Structural Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Forbes, Briony E.; McCarthy, Peter; Norton, Raymond S.

    2012-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBP-1 to -6) bind insulin-like growth factors-I and -II (IGF-I and IGF-II) with high affinity. These binding proteins maintain IGFs in the circulation and direct them to target tissues, where they promote cell growth, proliferation, differentiation, and survival via the type 1 IGF receptor. IGFBPs also interact with many other molecules, which not only influence their modulation of IGF action but also mediate IGF-independent activities that regulate processes such as cell migration and apoptosis by modulating gene transcription. IGFBPs-1 to -6 are structurally similar proteins consisting of three distinct domains, N-terminal, linker, and C-terminal. There have been major advances in our understanding of IGFBP structure in the last decade and a half. While there is still no structure of an intact IGFBP, several structures of individual N- and C-domains have been solved. The structure of a complex of N-BP-4:IGF-I:C-BP-4 has also been solved, providing a detailed picture of the structural features of the IGF binding site and the mechanism of binding. Structural studies have also identified features important for interaction with extracellular matrix components and integrins. This review summarizes structural studies reported so far and highlights features important for binding not only IGF but also other partners. We also highlight future directions in which structural studies will add to our knowledge of the role played by the IGFBP family in normal growth and development, as well as in disease. PMID:22654863

  5. Early life stage trimethyltin exposure induces ADP-ribosylation factor expression and perturbs the vascular system in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiangfei; Huang, Changjiang; Truong, Lisa; La Du, Jane; Tilton, Susan C.; Waters, Katrina M.; Lin, Kuanfei; Tanguay, Robert L; Dong, Qiaoxiang

    2012-01-01

    Trimethyltin chloride (TMT) is an organotin contaminant, widely detected in aqueous environments, posing potential human and environmental risks. In this study, we utilized the zebrafish model to investigate the impact of transient TMT exposure on developmental progression, angiogenesis, and cardiovascular development. Embryos were waterborne exposed to a wide TMT concentration range from 8 to 96 hours post fertilization (hpf). The TMT concentration that led to mortality in 50% of the embryos (LC50) at 96 hpf was 8.2 μM; malformations in 50% of the embryos (EC50) was 2.8 μM. The predominant response observed in surviving embryos was pericardial edema. Additionally, using the Tg (fli1a: EGFP) y1 transgenic zebrafish line to non-invasively monitor vascular development, TMT exposure led to distinct disarrangements in the vascular system. The most susceptible developmental stage to TMT exposure was between 48–72 hpf. High density whole genome microarrays were used to identify the early transcriptional changes following TMT exposure from 48 to 60 hpf or 72 hpf. In total, 459 transcripts were differentially expressed at least 2-fold (P < 0.05) by TMT compared to control. Using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) tools, it was revealed that the transcripts misregulated by TMT exposure were clustered in numerous categories including metabolic and cardiovascular disease, cellular function, cell death, molecular transport, and physiological development. In situ localization of highly elevated transcripts revealed intense staining of ADP-ribosylation factors arf3 and arf5 in the head, trunk, and tail regions. When arf5 expression was blocked by morpholinos, the zebrafish did not display the prototypical TMT-induced vascular deficits, indicating that the induction of arf5 was necessary for TMT-induced vascular toxicity. PMID:23000284

  6. ADP Ribosylation Factor 6 (ARF6) Promotes Acrosomal Exocytosis by Modulating Lipid Turnover and Rab3A Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Pelletán, Leonardo E.; Suhaiman, Laila; Vaquer, Cintia C.; Bustos, Matías A.; De Blas, Gerardo A.; Vitale, Nicolas; Mayorga, Luis S.; Belmonte, Silvia A.

    2015-01-01

    Regulated secretion is a central issue for the specific function of many cells; for instance, mammalian sperm acrosomal exocytosis is essential for egg fertilization. ARF6 (ADP-ribosylation factor 6) is a small GTPase implicated in exocytosis, but its downstream effectors remain elusive in this process. We combined biochemical, functional, and microscopy-based methods to show that ARF6 is present in human sperm, localizes to the acrosomal region, and is required for calcium and diacylglycerol-induced exocytosis. Results from pulldown assays show that ARF6 exchanges GDP for GTP in sperm challenged with different exocytic stimuli. Myristoylated and guanosine 5′-3-O-(thio)triphosphate (GTPγS)-loaded ARF6 (active form) added to permeabilized sperm induces acrosome exocytosis even in the absence of extracellular calcium. We explore the ARF6 signaling cascade that promotes secretion. We demonstrate that ARF6 stimulates a sperm phospholipase D activity to produce phosphatidic acid and boosts the synthesis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate. We present direct evidence showing that active ARF6 increases phospholipase C activity, causing phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate hydrolysis and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-dependent intra-acrosomal calcium release. We show that active ARF6 increases the exchange of GDP for GTP on Rab3A, a prerequisite for secretion. We propose that exocytic stimuli activate ARF6, which is required for acrosomal calcium efflux and the assembly of the membrane fusion machinery. This report highlights the physiological importance of ARF6 as a key factor for human sperm exocytosis and fertilization. PMID:25713146

  7. Crystal structure and structure-based mutagenesis of actin-specific ADP-ribosylating toxin CPILE-a as novel enterotoxin

    PubMed Central

    Toniti, Waraphan; Yoshida, Toru; Tsurumura, Toshiharu; Irikura, Daisuke; Monma, Chie; Kamata, Yoichi

    2017-01-01

    Unusual outbreaks of food poisoning in Japan were reported in which Clostridium perfringens was strongly suspected to be the cause based on epidemiological information and fingerprinting of isolates. The isolated strains lack the typical C. perfringens enterotoxin (CPE) but secrete a new enterotoxin consisting of two components: C. perfringens iota-like enterotoxin-a (CPILE-a), which acts as an enzymatic ADP-ribosyltransferase, and CPILE-b, a membrane binding component. Here we present the crystal structures of apo-CPILE-a, NAD+-CPILE-a and NADH-CPILE-a. Though CPILE-a structure has high similarity with known iota toxin-a (Ia) with NAD+, it possesses two extra-long protruding loops from G262-S269 and E402-K408 that are distinct from Ia. Based on the Ia–actin complex structure, we focused on actin-binding interface regions (I-V) including two protruding loops (PT) and examined how mutations in these regions affect the ADP-ribosylation activity of CPILE-a. Though some site-directed mutagenesis studies have already been conducted on the actin binding site of Ia, in the present study, mutagenesis studies were conducted against both α- and β/γ-actin in CPILE-a and Ia. Interestingly, CPILE-a ADP-ribosylates both α- and β/γ-actin, but its sensitivity towards β/γ-actin is 36% compared with α-actin. Our results contrast to that only C2-I ADP-ribosylates β/γ-actin. We also showed that PT-I and two convex-concave interactions in CPILE-a are important for actin binding. The current study is the first detailed analysis of site-directed mutagenesis in the actin binding region of Ia and CPILE-a against both α- and β/γ-actin. PMID:28199340

  8. The Key Involvement of Poly(ADP-Ribosylation) in Defense Against Toxic Agents: Molecular Biology Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-04-29

    Jacobson, M.K., Janzon, L., SeidegArd, J., Smulson, M.E., and Troll, W. The Malmt5 Diet and Cancer Study: The Biomarker Program. Submitted for publication in...ribosylate proteins which bind to the regulatory regions of glucocorticoid responsive genes. (2). TCDD, dioxin , a potent environmental contaminant...like glucocorticoid is mediated by an aromatic hydrocarbon rereptor which a!’c binds to specific DNA sequences (i.e. dioxin -responsive elements

  9. Diadenosine Homodinucleotide Products of ADP-ribosyl Cyclases Behave as Modulators of the Purinergic Receptor P2X7*

    PubMed Central

    Bruzzone, Santina; Basile, Giovanna; Chothi, Madhu Parakkottil; Nobbio, Lucilla; Usai, Cesare; Jacchetti, Emanuela; Schenone, Angelo; Guse, Andreas H.; Di Virgilio, Francesco; De Flora, Antonio; Zocchi, Elena

    2010-01-01

    ADP-ribosyl cyclases from both vertebrates and invertebrates were previously shown to produce two isomers of P1,P2 diadenosine 5′,5′"-P1, P2-diphosphate, P18 and P24, from cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) and adenine. P18 and P24 are characterized by an unusual N-glycosidic linkage in one of the adenylic mononucleotides (Basile, G., Taglialatela-Scafati, O., Damonte, G., Armirotti, A., Bruzzone, S., Guida, L., Franco, L., Usai, C., Fattorusso, E., De Flora, A., and Zocchi, E. (2005) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 102, 14509–14514). P24, but not P18, proved to increase the intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) in HeLa cells and to negatively affect mitochondrial function. Here we show that micromolar P24, but not P18, triggers a slow and sustained influx of extracellular Ca2+ through the opening of the purinergic receptor/channel P2X7. On the other hand, P18 inhibits the Ca2+ influx induced by 0.6 mm ATP in HEK293 cells stably transfected with P2X7, with an IC50 of ∼1 μm. Thus, P18 is devoid of intrinsic P2X7 stimulatory activity and behaves as an ATP antagonist. A P2X7-mediated increase of the basal [Ca2+]i has been demonstrated to negatively affect Schwann cell (SC) function in rats with the inherited, peripheral neuropathy Charcot-Marie-Tooth 1A (CMT1A) (Nobbio, L., Sturla, L., Fiorese, F., Usai, C., Basile, G., Moreschi, I., Benvenuto, F., Zocchi, E., De Flora, A., Schenone, A., and Bruzzone S. (2009) J. Biol. Chem. 284, 23146–23158). Preincubation of CMT1A SC with 200 nm P18 restored the basal [Ca2+]i to values similar to those recorded in wild-type SC. These results identify P18 as a new P2X7 antagonist, potentially useful in the treatment of CMT1A. PMID:20439466

  10. Phylogenetic approach for inferring the origin and functional evolution of bacterial ADP-ribosylation superfamily.

    PubMed

    Chellapandi, P; Sakthishree, S; Bharathi, M

    2013-09-01

    Bacterial ADP-ribosyltransferases (BADPRTs) are extensively contributed to determine the strain-specific virulence state and pathogenesis in human hosts. Understanding molecular evolution and functional diversity of the BADPRTs is an important standpoint to describe the fundamental behind in the vaccine designing for bacterial infections. In the present study, we have evaluated the origin and functional evolution of conserved domains within the BADPRTs by analyzing their sequence-function relationship. To represent the evolution history of BADPRTs, phylogenetic trees were constructed based on their protein sequence, structure and conserved domains using different evolutionary programs. Sequence divergence and genetic diversity were studied herein to deduce the functional evolution of conserved domains across the family and superfamily. The results of sequence similarity search have shown that three hypothetical proteins (above 90%) were identical to the members of BADPRTs and their functions were annotated by phylogenetic approach. Phylogenetic analysis of this study has revealed the family members of BADPRTs were phylogenetically related to one another, functionally diverged within the same family, and dispersed into closely related bacteria. The presence of core substitution pattern in the conserved domains would determine the family-specific function of BADPRTs. Functional diversity of the BADPRTs was exclusively distinguished by Darwinian positive selection (diphtheria toxin C and pertussis toxin S) and neutral selection (arginine ADP-ribosyltransferase, enterotoxin A and binary toxin A) acting on the existing domains. Many of the family members were sharing their sequence-specific features from members in the arginine ADP-ribosyltransferase family. Conservative functions of members in the BADPRTs have shown to be expanded only within closely related families, and retained as such in pathogenic bacteria by evolutionary process (domain duplication or

  11. Expanding functions of ADP-ribosylation in the maintenance of genome integrity.

    PubMed

    Martin-Hernandez, K; Rodriguez-Vargas, J-M; Schreiber, V; Dantzer, F

    2017-03-01

    Cell response to genotoxic stress requires a complex network of sensors and effectors from numerous signaling and repair pathways, among them the nuclear poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) plays a central role. PARP1 is catalytically activated in the setting of DNA breaks. It uses NAD(+) as a donor and catalyses the synthesis and subsequent covalent attachment of branched ADP-ribose polymers onto itself and various acceptor proteins to promote repair. Its inhibition is now considered as an efficient therapeutic strategy to potentiate the cytotoxic effect of chemotherapy and radiation or to exploit synthetic lethality in tumours with defective homologous recombination mediated repair. Still, efforts made on understanding the role of PARylation in DNA repair continues to yield novel discoveries. Over the last years, our knowledge in this field has been particularly advanced by the discovery of novel biochemical and functional properties featuring PARP1, by the characterization of the other PARP family members and by the identification of a panel of enzymes capable of erasing poly(ADP-ribose). The aim of this review is to provide an overview of these newest findings and their relevance in genome surveillance.

  12. Targeted delivery of an ADP-ribosylating bacterial toxin into cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zahaf , N.-I.; Lang, A. E.; Kaiser, L.; Fichter, C. D.; Lassmann, S.; McCluskey, A.; Augspach, A.; Aktories, K.; Schmidt, G.

    2017-01-01

    The actin cytoskeleton is an attractive target for bacterial toxins. The ADP-ribosyltransferase TccC3 from the insect bacterial pathogen Photorhabdus luminescence modifies actin to force its aggregation. We intended to transport the catalytic part of this toxin preferentially into cancer cells using a toxin transporter (Protective antigen, PA) which was redirected to Epidermal Growth Factor Receptors (EGFR) or to human EGF receptors 2 (HER2), which are overexpressed in several cancer cells. Protective antigen of anthrax toxin forms a pore through which the two catalytic parts (lethal factor and edema factor) or other proteins can be transported into mammalian cells. Here, we used PA as a double mutant (N682A, D683A; mPA) which cannot bind to the two natural anthrax receptors. Each mutated monomer is fused either to EGF or to an affibody directed against the human EGF receptor 2 (HER2). We established a cellular model system composed of two cell lines representing HER2 overexpressing esophageal adenocarcinomas (EACs) and EGFR overexpressing esophageal squamous cell carcinomas (ESCCs). We studied the specificity and efficiency of the re-directed anthrax pore for transport of TccC3 toxin and established Photorhabdus luminescence TccC3 as a toxin suitable for the development of a targeted toxin selectively killing cancer cells. PMID:28128281

  13. Cholix Toxin, a Novel ADP-ribosylating Factor from Vibrio cholerae

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, Rene; Purdy, Alexandra E.; Fieldhouse, Robert J.; Kimber, Matthew S.; Bartlett, Douglas H.; Merrill, A. Rod

    2008-07-15

    The ADP-ribosyltransferases are a class of enzymes that display activity in a variety of bacterial pathogens responsible for causing diseases in plants and animals, including those affecting mankind, such as diphtheria, cholera, and whooping cough. We report the characterization of a novel toxin from Vibrio cholerae, which we call cholix toxin. The toxin is active against mammalian cells (IC50 = 4.6 {+-} 0.4 ng/ml) and crustaceans (Artemia nauplii LD50 = 10 {+-} 2 {mu}g/ml). Here we show that this toxin is the third member of the diphthamide-specific class of ADP-ribose transferases and that it possesses specific ADP-ribose transferase activity against ribosomal eukaryotic elongation factor 2. We also describe the high resolution crystal structures of the multidomain toxin and its catalytic domain at 2.1- and 1.25-{angstrom} resolution, respectively. The new structural data show that cholix toxin possesses the necessary molecular features required for infection of eukaryotes by receptor-mediated endocytosis, translocation to the host cytoplasm, and inhibition of protein synthesis by specific modification of elongation factor 2. The crystal structures also provide important insight into the structural basis for activation of toxin ADP-ribosyltransferase activity. These results indicate that cholix toxin may be an important virulence factor of Vibrio cholerae that likely plays a significant role in the survival of the organism in an aquatic environment.

  14. Purification and properties of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase from Crithidia fasciculata. Automodification and poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of DNA topoisomerase I.

    PubMed

    Podestá, Dolores; García-Herreros, María I; Cannata, Joaquín J B; Stoppani, Andrés O M; Fernández Villamil, Silvia H

    2004-06-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase has been purified more than 160000-fold from Crithidia fasciculata. This is the first PARP isolated to apparent homogeneity from trypanosomatids. The purified enzyme absolutely required DNA for catalytic activity and histones enhanced it 2.5-fold, when the DNA:histone ratio was 1:1.3. The enzyme required no magnesium or any other metal ion cofactor. The apparent molecular mass of 111 kDa, determined by gel filtration would correspond to a dimer of two identical 55-kDa subunits. Activity was inhibited by nicotinamide, 3-aminobenzamide, theophylline, thymidine, xanthine and hypoxanthine but not by adenosine. The enzyme was localized to the cell nucleus. Our findings suggest that covalent poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of PARP itself or DNA topoisomerase I resulted in the inhibition of their activities and provide an initial biochemical characterization of this covalent post-translational modification in trypanosomatids.

  15. Exploring the role of host cell chaperones/PPIases during cellular up-take of bacterial ADP-ribosylating toxins as basis for novel pharmacological strategies to protect mammalian cells against these virulence factors.

    PubMed

    Barth, Holger

    2011-03-01

    Bacterial exotoxins exploit protein transport pathways of their mammalian target cells to deliver their enzymatic active moieties into the cytosol. There, they modify their specific substrate molecules resulting in cell damage and the clinical symptoms characteristic for each individual toxin. We have investigated the cellular uptake of the binary actin ADP-ribosylating C2 toxin from Clostridium botulinum and the binary lethal toxin from Bacillus anthracis, a metalloprotease. Both toxins are composed of a binding/translocation component and a separate enzyme component. During cellular uptake, the binding/translocation components form pores in membranes of acidified endosomes, and the enzyme components translocate as unfolded proteins through the pores into the cytosol. We found by using specific pharmacological inhibitors that the host cell chaperone Hsp90 and the peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase cyclophilin A are crucial for membrane translocation of the enzyme component of the C2 toxin but not of the lethal toxin, although the structures of the binding/translocation components and the overall uptake mechanisms of both toxins are widely comparable. In conclusion, the new findings imply that Hsp90 and cyclophilin function selectively in promoting translocation of certain bacterial toxins depending on the enzyme domains of the individual toxins. The targeted pharmacological inhibition of individual host cell chaperones/PPIases prevents uptake of certain bacterial exotoxins into the cytosol of mammalian cells and thus protects cells from intoxication. Such substances could represent attractive lead substances for development of novel therapeutics to prevent toxic effects during infection with toxin-producing bacteria.

  16. Cell-permeable ceramides preferentially inhibit coated vesicle formation and exocytosis in Chinese hamster ovary compared with Madin-Darby canine kidney cells by preventing the membrane association of ADP-ribosylation factor.

    PubMed Central

    Abousalham, Abdelkarim; Hobman, Tom C; Dewald, Jay; Garbutt, Michael; Brindley, David N

    2002-01-01

    Differential effects of acetyl(C2-) ceramide (N-acetylsphingosine) were studied on coated vesicle formation from Golgi-enriched membranes of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cells. C2-ceramide blocked the translocation of ADP-ribosylation factor-1 (ARF-1) and protein kinase C-alpha (PKC-alpha) to the membranes from CHO cells, but not those of MDCK cells. Consequently, C2-ceramide blocked the stimulation of phospholipase D1 (PLD1) by the cytosol and guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate (GTP[S]) in membranes from CHO cells. Basal specific activity of PLD1 and the concentration of ARF-1 were 3-4 times higher in Golgi-enriched membranes from MDCK cells compared with CHO cells. Moreover, PLD1 activity in MDCK cells was stimulated less by cytosol and GTP[S]. PLD2 was not detectable in the Golgi-enriched membranes. Incubation of intact CHO cells or their Golgi-enriched membranes with C2-ceramide also inhibited COP1 vesicle formation by membranes from CHO, but not MDCK, cells. Specificity was demonstrated, since dihydro-C2-ceramide had no significant effect on ARF-1 translocation, PLD1 activation or vesicle formation in membranes from both cell types. C2-ceramide also decreased the secretion of virus-like particles to a greater extent in CHO compared with MDCK cells, whereas dihydro-C2-ceramide had no significant effect. The results demonstrate a biological effect of C2-ceramide in CHO cells by decreasing ARF-1 and PKC-alpha binding to Golgi-enriched membranes, thereby preventing COP1 vesicle formation. PMID:11802796

  17. Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Proteins--an Update.

    PubMed

    Bach, Leon A

    2015-12-01

    The insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system is essential for normal growth and development, and its perturbation is implicated in a number of diseases. IGF activity is finely regulated by a family of six high-affinity IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs). 1GFBPs usually inhibit IGF actions but may enhance them under certain conditions. Additionally, IGFBPs bind non-IGF ligands in the extracellular space, cell membrane, cytoplasm and nucleus, thereby modulating cell proliferation, survival and migration in an IGF-independent manner. IGFBP activity is regulated by transcriptional mechanisms as well as by post-translational modifications and proteolysis. Understanding the balance between the various actions of IGFBPs in vivo may lead to novel insights into disease processes and possible IGFBP-based therapeutics.

  18. Assignment of functional domains involved in ADP-ribosylation and B-oligomer binding within the carboxyl terminus of the S1 subunit of pertussis toxin.

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, K M; Barbieri, J T

    1994-01-01

    The roles of the carboxyl terminus of the S1 subunit (composed of 235 amino acids) of pertussis toxin in the ADP-ribosylation of transducin (Gt) and in B-oligomer binding were defined by analysis of two carboxyl-terminal deletion mutants of the recombinant S1 (rS1) subunit: C204, which is composed of amino acids 1 through 204 of S1, and C219, which is composed of amino acids 1 through 219 of S1. C204 was expressed in Escherichia coli as a stable, soluble peptide that had an apparent molecular mass of 23.4 kDa. In a linear velocity assay, the specific activity of C180 was 2% and that of C204 was 80% of the activity displayed by rS1 in catalyzing the ADP-ribosylation of Gt. In addition, C204 possessed catalytic efficiencies (kcat/Km) that were 110% at variable Gt concentrations and 40% at variable NAD concentrations of those reported for rS1. These data showed that the catalytic activity of C204 approached the activity of S1. C204 and C219 were unable to associate with the B oligomer under conditions which promoted association of rS1 with the B oligomer. Consistent with these results, mixtures of C204 or C219 with the B oligomer did not elicit a clustering phenotype in CHO cells, whereas rS1 which had associated with the B oligomer was as cytotoxic as native pertussis toxin. These data indicate that residues between 219 and 235 are important in the association of the S1 subunit with the B oligomer. These data allow the assignment of functional regions to the carboxyl terminus of S1. Residues 195 to 204 are required for optimal ADP-ribosyltransferase activity, residues 205 to 219 link the catalytic region of S1 and a B-oligomer-binding region of S1, and residues 220 to 235 are required for association of S1 with the B oligomer. Images PMID:8168972

  19. ADP-ribosylation factor 1 expression regulates epithelial-mesenchymal transition and predicts poor clinical outcome in triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schlienger, Sabrina; Campbell, Shirley; Pasquin, Sarah; Gaboury, Louis; Claing, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic capacities are fundamental features of tumor malignancy. ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) 1 has emerged as a key regulator of invasion in breast cancer cells. However, the importance of this GTPase, in vivo, remains to be demonstrated. We report that ARF1 is highly expressed in breast tumors of the most aggressive and advanced subtypes. Furthermore, we show that lowered expression of ARF1 impairs growth of primary tumors and inhibits lung metastasis in a murine xenograft model. To understand how ARF1 contributes to invasiveness, we used a poorly invasive breast cancer cell line, MCF7 (ER+), and examined the effects of overexpressing ARF1 to levels similar to that found in invasive cell lines. We demonstrate that ARF1 overexpression leads to the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Mechanistically, ARF1 controls cell–cell adhesion through ß-catenin and E-cadherin, oncogenic Ras activation and expression of EMT inducers. We further show that ARF1 overexpression enhances invasion, proliferation and resistance to a chemotherapeutic agent. In vivo, ARF1 overexpressing MCF7 cells are able to form more metastases to the lung. Overall, our findings demonstrate that ARF1 is a molecular switch for cancer progression and thus suggest that limiting the expression/activation of this GTPase could help improve outcome for breast cancer patients. PMID:26908458

  20. ADP-Ribosylation Factor 6 Regulates Mammalian Myoblast Fusion through Phospholipase D1 and Phosphatidylinositol 4,5-Bisphosphate Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Bach, Anne-Sophie; Enjalbert, Sandrine; Comunale, Franck; Bodin, Stéphane; Vitale, Nicolas; Charrasse, Sophie

    2010-01-01

    Myoblast fusion is an essential step during myoblast differentiation that remains poorly understood. M-cadherin–dependent pathways that signal through Rac1 GTPase activation via the Rho-guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) Trio are important for myoblast fusion. The ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF)6 GTPase has been shown to bind to Trio and to regulate Rac1 activity. Moreover, Loner/GEP100/BRAG2, a GEF of ARF6, has been involved in mammalian and Drosophila myoblast fusion, but the specific role of ARF6 has been not fully analyzed. Here, we show that ARF6 activity is increased at the time of myoblast fusion and is required for its implementation in mouse C2C12 myoblasts. Specifically, at the onset of myoblast fusion, ARF6 is associated with the multiproteic complex that contains M-cadherin, Trio, and Rac1 and accumulates at sites of myoblast fusion. ARF6 silencing inhibits the association of Trio and Rac1 with M-cadherin. Moreover, we demonstrate that ARF6 regulates myoblast fusion through phospholipase D (PLD) activation and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bis-phosphate production. Together, these data indicate that ARF6 is a critical regulator of C2C12 myoblast fusion and participates in the regulation of PLD activities that trigger both phospholipids production and actin cytoskeleton reorganization at fusion sites. PMID:20505075

  1. ADP-Ribosylation Factor 6 Acts as an Allosteric Activator for the Folded but not Disordered Cholera Toxin A1 Polypeptide

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Tuhina; Taylor, Michael; Jobling, Michael G.; Burress, Helen; Yang, ZhiJie; Serrano, Albert; Holmes, Randall K.; Tatulian, Suren A.; Teter, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Summary The catalytic A1 subunit of cholera toxin (CTA1) has a disordered structure at 37°C. An interaction with host factors must therefore place CTA1 in a folded conformation for the modification of its Gsα target which resides in a lipid raft environment. Host ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs) act as in vitro allosteric activators of CTA1, but the molecular events of this process are not fully characterized. Isotope-edited Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy monitored ARF6-induced structural changes to CTA1, which were correlated to changes in CTA1 activity. We found ARF6 prevents the thermal disordering of structured CTA1 and stimulates the activity of stabilized CTA1 over a range of temperatures. Yet ARF6 alone did not promote the refolding of disordered CTA1 to an active state. Instead, lipid rafts shifted disordered CTA1 to a folded conformation with a basal level of activity that could be further stimulated by ARF6. Thus, ARF alone is unable to activate disordered CTA1 at physiological temperature: additional host factors such as lipid rafts place CTA1 in the folded conformation required for its ARF-mediated activation. Interaction with ARF is required for in vivo toxin activity, as enzymatically active CTA1 mutants that cannot be further stimulated by ARF6 fail to intoxicate cultured cells. PMID:25257027

  2. ADP-ribosylation factor arf6p may function as a molecular switch of new end take off in fission yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Atsushi

    2008-02-01

    Small GTPases act as molecular switches in a wide variety of cellular processes. In fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the directions of cell growth change from a monopolar manner to a bipolar manner, which is known as 'New End Take Off' (NETO). Here I report the identification of a gene, arf6{sup +}, encoding an ADP-ribosylation factor small GTPase, that may be essential for NETO. arf6{delta} cells completely fail to undergo NETO. arf6p localizes at both cell ends and presumptive septa in a cell-cycle dependent manner. And its polarized localization is not dependent on microtubules, actin cytoskeletons and some NETO factors (bud6p, for3p, tea1p, tea3p, and tea4p). Notably, overexpression of a fast GDP/GTP-cycling mutant of arf6p can advance the timing of NETO. These findings suggest that arf6p functions as a molecular switch for the activation of NETO in fission yeast.

  3. The effect of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation inhibition on the porcine cumulus-oocyte complex during in vitro maturation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Duk Hyoun; Lee, Hye Ran; Kim, Min Gyeong; Lee, Jun Sung; Jin, Su Jin; Lee, Hoon Taek

    2017-01-29

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) plays important roles in DNA repair, apoptosis, transcriptional regulation, and cell death, and occurs via the activity of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs). Previous studies have shown that PARylation affects mouse and porcine pre-implantation development and participates in mechanisms of autophagy. However, there have not yet been reported the role of PARylation during in vitro maturation (IVM) of porcine oocytes. Thus, we investigated the effect of PARylation inhibition on this process; cumulus-oocyte complexes (COCs) were cultured with 3-aminobenzamide (3-ABA, PARP inhibitor) during porcine IVM. Full cumulus expansion was significantly reduced (10.34 ± 1.23 [3-ABA] vs. 48.17 ± 2.03% [control]), but nuclear maturation rates were not changed in the 3-ABA treatment group. Especially, we observed that cumulus cells were little expanded after 22 h in 3-ABA treated COCs. The mRNA expression levels of oocyte maturation- and cumulus expansion-related genes were evaluated at 22 and 44 h. GDF9, BMP15, COX-2, and PTX3 expression were upregulated at 44 h, whereas the levels of HAS2 and TNFAIP6 were downregulated in the 3-ABA treated group. Furthermore, 3-ABA treatment significantly decreased the developmental rate (28.24 ± 1.06 vs. 40.24 ± 3.03%) and total cell number (41.12 ± 2.10 vs. 50.38 ± 2.27), but increased the total apoptotic index (6.44 ± 0.81 vs. 3.08 ± 0.51) in parthenogenetically activated embryos. In conclusion, these results showed that PARylation regulates cumulus expansion through the regulation of gene expression and affects developmental competence and quality in parthenogenetic embryos.

  4. Recent Insights into Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 2 Transcriptional Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jae-Hyung; Bae, Jae-Hoon; Song, Dae-Kyu

    2017-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) are major regulators of insulin-like growth factor bioavailability and activity in metabolic signaling. Seven IGFBP family isoforms have been identified. Recent studies have shown that IGFBPs play a pivotal role in metabolic signaling and disease, including the pathogenesis of obesity, diabetes, and cancer. Although many studies have documented the various roles played by IGFBPs, transcriptional regulation of IGFBPs is not well understood. In this review, we focus on the regulatory mechanisms of IGFBP gene expression, and we summarize the findings of transcription factor activity in the IGFBP promoter region. PMID:28116872

  5. Multifunctional roles of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 5 in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Akkiprik, Mustafa; Feng, Yumei; Wang, Huamin; Chen, Kexin; Hu, Limei; Sahin, Aysegul; Krishnamurthy, Savitri; Ozer, Ayse; Hao, Xishan; Zhang, Wei

    2008-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factor axis, which has been shown to protect cells from apoptosis, plays an essential role in normal cell physiology and in cancer development. The family of insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) has been shown to have a diverse spectrum of functions in cell growth, death, motility, and tissue remodeling. Among the six IGFBP family members, IGFBP-5 has recently been shown to play an important role in the biology of breast cancer, especially in breast cancer metastasis; however, the exact mechanisms of action remain obscure and sometimes paradoxical. An in-depth understanding of IGFBP-5 would shed light on its potential role as a target for breast cancer therapeutics. PMID:18710598

  6. Characterization of the insulin-like growth factor binding protein family in Xenopus tropicalis.

    PubMed

    Haramoto, Yoshikazu; Oshima, Tomomi; Takahashi, Shuji; Ito, Yuzuru

    2014-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factor binding protein (Igfbp) family consists of six members designated Igfbp1-6. Igfbps are involved in many vital biological functions. They physically interact with IGFs (IGF1 and IGF2) and act as carriers, thereby protecting IGFs from proteolytic degradation. Thus, they function as modulators of IGF activity. Furthermore, Igfbps have been reported to have IGF-independent activities. They interact with other proteins, including cell surface proteins, extra-cellular matrix proteins, and potentially intracellular molecules. In Xenopus tropicalis (X. tropicalis), only four igfbp genes (igfbp1, igfbp2, igfbp4, and igfbp5) have been identified, and their expression is not well characterized. We report that X. tropicalis genome lacks the igfbp3 and igfbp6 genes based on synteny analyses. We also examined the spatio-temporal expression patterns of igfbp genes in early X. tropicalis development. Expression analyses indicated that they are differentially expressed during early development. Each igfbp gene showed a characteristic spatial expression pattern. Except for igfbp5, they demonstrated overlapping expression in the pronephros. The Xenopus pronephros is composed of four domains (i.e., the proximal tubule, intermediate tubule, distal tubule, and connecting tubule). Our results showed that at least two igfbp genes are co-expressed in all pronephric domains, suggesting that redundant functions of igfbp genes are required in early pronephric kidney development.

  7. Sulfur and nitrogen mustards induce characteristic poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation responses in HaCaT keratinocytes with distinctive cellular consequences.

    PubMed

    Mangerich, Aswin; Debiak, Malgorzata; Birtel, Matthias; Ponath, Viviane; Balszuweit, Frank; Lex, Kirsten; Martello, Rita; Burckhardt-Boer, Waltraud; Strobelt, Romano; Siegert, Markus; Thiermann, Horst; Steinritz, Dirk; Schmidt, Annette; Bürkle, Alexander

    2016-02-26

    Mustard agents are potent DNA alkylating agents with mutagenic, cytotoxic and vesicant properties. They include bi-functional agents, such as sulfur mustard (SM) or nitrogen mustard (mustine, HN2), as well as mono-functional agents, such as "half mustard" (CEES). Whereas SM has been used as a chemical warfare agent, several nitrogen mustard derivatives, such as chlorambucil and cyclophosphamide, are being used as established chemotherapeutics. Upon induction of specific forms of genotoxic stimuli, several poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) synthesize the nucleic acid-like biopolymer poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) by using NAD(+) as a substrate. Previously, it was shown that SM triggers cellular poly(ADP-ribosyl) ation (PARylation), but so far this phenomenon is poorly characterized. In view of the protective effects of PARP inhibitors, the latter have been proposed as a treatment option of SM-exposed victims. In an accompanying article (Debiak et al., 2016), we have provided an optimized protocol for the analysis of the CEES-induced PARylation response in HaCaT keratinocytes, which forms an experimental basis to further analyze mustard-induced PARylation and its functional consequences, in general. Thus, in the present study, we performed a comprehensive characterization of the PARylation response in HaCaT cells after treatment with four different mustard agents, i.e., SM, CEES, HN2, and chlorambucil, on a qualitative, quantitative and functional level. In particular, we recorded substance-specific as well as dose- and time-dependent PARylation responses using independent bioanalytical methods based on single-cell immuno-fluorescence microscopy and quantitative isotope dilution mass spectrometry. Furthermore, we analyzed if and how PARylation contributes to mustard-induced toxicity by treating HaCaT cells with CEES, SM, and HN2 in combination with the clinically relevant PARP inhibitor ABT888. As evaluated by a novel immunofluorescence-based protocol for the detection of

  8. Maternal insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1, body mass index, and fetal growth

    PubMed Central

    Holmes, R.; Holly, J; Soothill, P.

    2000-01-01

    AIM—To examine the hypothesis that the maternal insulin-like growth factor system may constrain fetal growth.
METHODS—A prospective observational study of maternal serum insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) and fetal growth was undertaken in neonates with birthweights below the 5th centile. They had been classified either as having fetal growth restriction (FGR) due to placental dysfunction (increased umbilical artery Doppler pulsatility index (PI); n = 25) or as being small for gestational age (SGA; normal umbilical artery PI, growth velocity and amniotic fluid; n = 27). Eighty nine controls had normal birthweights (5th-95th centile), umbilical artery PI, growth velocity, and amniotic fluid. IGFBP-1 was measured by radioimmunoassay.
RESULTS—Among the controls, there was no significant correlation between IGFBP-1 and birthweight after allowing for body mass index (BMI). Maternal BMI was high in FGR and after adjusting for this, IGFBP-1 was increased (109 ng/ml) compared with SGA babies (69ng/ml) and controls (57 ng/ml) and correlated with the umbilical artery PI.
CONCLUSIONS—Maternal IGFBP-1 is probably not part of normal placental function. Its increase in FGR could be the cause or consequence of impaired placental perfusion, but high IGFBP-1 concentrations might further reduce the availability of maternal IGF-I to the placenta. This could worsen placental function and so adversely affect fetal growth.
 PMID:10685983

  9. Markers of collagen metabolism and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 in term infants

    PubMed Central

    Hytinantti, T; Rutanen, E; Turpeinen, M; Sorva, R; Andersson, S

    2000-01-01

    AIM—To study the relation between fetal growth and markers of collagen metabolism and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) in term infants.
METHODS—Cord vein plasma was obtained from 67 term infants of gestational age 37.1-41.7 weeks (39 appropriate for gestational age (AGA), 11 large for gestational age (LGA; relative birth weight ⩾ 2.0 SD), and 17 small for gestational age (SGA; relative birth weight ⩽ −2.0 SD)) for analysis of markers of metabolism of collagen type I (PICP and ICTP) and III (PIIINP) and of IGFBP-1.
RESULTS—Negative correlations existed between gestational age and PICP (r = −0.294, p = 0.0158), ICTP (r = −0.338, p = 0.0052), and PIIINP (r = −0.432, p = 0.0003). These correlations were also found in SGA infants (all p < 0.05). IGFBP-1 showed negative correlations with birth weight and relative birth weight (r = −0.644, p = 0.0001, and r = −0.693, p = 0.0001 respectively) but not with gestational age (p>0.05).
CONCLUSIONS—In the term fetus, collagen metabolism is primarily dependent on maturity and not on intrauterine growth status, whereas IGFBP-1 reflects intrauterine growth independently of maturity.

 PMID:10873165

  10. N-Acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 14, a novel insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 binding partner

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Chen; Yao, Guangyin; Zou, Minji; Chen, Guangyu; Wang, Min; Liu, Jingqian; Wang, Jiaxi; Xu, Donggang . E-mail: xudg@nic.bmi.ac.cn

    2007-06-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) is known to inhibit cell proliferation and induce apoptosis in IGF-dependent and IGF-independent manners, but the mechanism underlying IGF-independent effects is not yet clear. In a yeast two-hybrid assay, IGFBP-3 was used as the bait to screen a human fetal liver cDNA library for it interactors that may potentially mediate IGFBP-3-regulated functions. N-Acetylgalactosaminyltransferase 14 (GalNAc-T14), a member of the GalNAc-Tases family, was identified as a novel IGFBP-3 binding partner. This interaction involved the ricin-type beta-trefoil domain of GalNAc-T14. The interaction between IGFBP-3 and GalNAc-T14 was reconfirmed in vitro and in vivo, using GST pull-down, co-immunoprecipitation and mammalian two-hybrid assays. Our findings may provide new clues for further study on the mechanism behind the IGF-independent effects of IGFBP-3 promoting apoptosis. The role of GalNAc-T14 as an intracellular mediator of the effects of IGFBP-3 need to be verified in future studies.

  11. Disruption of Macrodomain Protein SCO6735 Increases Antibiotic Production in Streptomyces coelicolor*

    PubMed Central

    Lalić, Jasna; Posavec Marjanović, Melanija; Palazzo, Luca; Perina, Dragutin; Sabljić, Igor; Žaja, Roko; Colby, Thomas; Pleše, Bruna; Halasz, Mirna; Jankevicius, Gytis; Bucca, Giselda; Ahel, Marijan; Matić, Ivan; Ćetković, Helena; Luić, Marija; Mikoč, Andreja; Ahel, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation is a post-translational modification that can alter the physical and chemical properties of target proteins and that controls many important cellular processes. Macrodomains are evolutionarily conserved structural domains that bind ADP-ribose derivatives and are found in proteins with diverse cellular functions. Some proteins from the macrodomain family can hydrolyze ADP-ribosylated substrates and therefore reverse this post-translational modification. Bacteria and Streptomyces, in particular, are known to utilize protein ADP-ribosylation, yet very little is known about their enzymes that synthesize and remove this modification. We have determined the crystal structure and characterized, both biochemically and functionally, the macrodomain protein SCO6735 from Streptomyces coelicolor. This protein is a member of an uncharacterized subfamily of macrodomain proteins. Its crystal structure revealed a highly conserved macrodomain fold. We showed that SCO6735 possesses the ability to hydrolyze PARP-dependent protein ADP-ribosylation. Furthermore, we showed that expression of this protein is induced upon DNA damage and that deletion of this protein in S. coelicolor increases antibiotic production. Our results provide the first insights into the molecular basis of its action and impact on Streptomyces metabolism. PMID:27634042

  12. Deficiency of terminal ADP-ribose protein glycohydrolase TARG1/C6orf130 in neurodegenerative disease

    PubMed Central

    Sharifi, Reza; Morra, Rosa; Denise Appel, C; Tallis, Michael; Chioza, Barry; Jankevicius, Gytis; Simpson, Michael A; Matic, Ivan; Ozkan, Ege; Golia, Barbara; Schellenberg, Matthew J; Weston, Ria; Williams, Jason G; Rossi, Marianna N; Galehdari, Hamid; Krahn, Juno; Wan, Alexander; Trembath, Richard C; Crosby, Andrew H; Ahel, Dragana; Hay, Ron; Ladurner, Andreas G; Timinszky, Gyula; Williams, R Scott; Ahel, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-ribosylation is a post-translational protein modification implicated in the regulation of a range of cellular processes. A family of proteins that catalyse ADP-ribosylation reactions are the poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymerases (PARPs). PARPs covalently attach an ADP-ribose nucleotide to target proteins and some PARP family members can subsequently add additional ADP-ribose units to generate a PAR chain. The hydrolysis of PAR chains is catalysed by PAR glycohydrolase (PARG). PARG is unable to cleave the mono(ADP-ribose) unit directly linked to the protein and although the enzymatic activity that catalyses this reaction has been detected in mammalian cell extracts, the protein(s) responsible remain unknown. Here, we report the homozygous mutation of the c6orf130 gene in patients with severe neurodegeneration, and identify C6orf130 as a PARP-interacting protein that removes mono(ADP-ribosyl)ation on glutamate amino acid residues in PARP-modified proteins. X-ray structures and biochemical analysis of C6orf130 suggest a mechanism of catalytic reversal involving a transient C6orf130 lysyl-(ADP-ribose) intermediate. Furthermore, depletion of C6orf130 protein in cells leads to proliferation and DNA repair defects. Collectively, our data suggest that C6orf130 enzymatic activity has a role in the turnover and recycling of protein ADP-ribosylation, and we have implicated the importance of this protein in supporting normal cellular function in humans. PMID:23481255

  13. Mxi1 regulates cell proliferation through insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Je Yeong; Yoo, Kyung Hyun; Lee, Han-Woong; Park, Jong Hoon

    2011-11-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mxi1 regulates cell proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Expression of IGFBP-3 is regulated by Mxi1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Inactivation of Mxi1 reduces IGFBP-3 expression in vitro and in vivo. -- Abstract: Mxi1, a member of the Myc-Max-Mad network, is an antagonist of the c-Myc oncogene and is associated with excessive cell proliferation. Abnormal cell proliferation and tumorigenesis are observed in organs of Mxi1-/- mice. However, the Mxi1-reltaed mechanism of proliferation is unclear. The present study utilized microarray analysis using Mxi1 mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) to identify genes associated with cell proliferation. Among these genes, insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) was selected as a candidate gene for real-time PCR to ascertain whether IGFBP-3 expression is regulated by Mxi1. Expression of IGFBP-3 was decreased in Mxi1-/- MEFs and Mxi1-/- mice, and the gene was regulated by Mxi1 in Mxi1 MEFs. Furthermore, proliferation pathways related to IGFBP-3 were regulated in Mxi1-/- mice compared to Mxi1+/+ mice. To determine the effect of Mxi1 inactivation on the induction of cell proliferation, a proliferation assay is performed in both Mxi1 MEFs and Mxi1 mice. Cell viability was regulated by Mxi1 in Mxi1 MEFs and number of PCNA-positive cells was increased in Mxi1-/- mice compared to Mxi1+/+ mice. Moreover, the IGFBP-3 level was decreased in proliferation defect regions in Mxi1-/- mice. The results support the suggestion that inactivation of Mxi1 has a positive effect on cell proliferation by down-regulating IGFBP-3.

  14. Hydrolysis of bound GTP by ARF protein triggers uncoating of Golgi- derived COP-coated vesicles

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    The cycle of nucleotide exchange and hydrolysis by a small GTP-binding protein, ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF), helps to provide vectoriality to vesicle transport. Coat assembly is triggered when ARF binds GTP, initiating transport vesicle budding, and coat disassembly is triggered when ARF hydrolyzes GTP, allowing the uncoated vesicle to fuse. PMID:8253837

  15. Intracellular protein delivery activity of peptides derived from insulin-like growth factor binding proteins 3 and 5

    SciTech Connect

    Goda, Natsuko; Tenno, Takeshi; Inomata, Kosuke; Shirakawa, Masahiro; Tanaka, Toshiki; Hiroaki, Hidekazu

    2008-08-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) have various IGF-independent cellular activities, including receptor-independent cellular uptake followed by transcriptional regulation, although mechanisms of cellular entry remain unclear. Herein, we focused on their receptor-independent cellular entry mechanism in terms of protein transduction domain (PTD) activity, which is an emerging technique useful for clinical applications. The peptides of 18 amino acid residues derived from IGFBP-3 and IGFBP-5, which involve heparin-binding regions, mediated cellular delivery of an exogenous protein into NIH3T3 and HeLa cells. Relative protein delivery activities of IGFBP-3/5-derived peptides were approximately 20-150% compared to that of the HIV-Tat peptide, a potent PTD. Heparin inhibited the uptake of the fusion proteins with IGFBP-3 and IGFBP-5, indicating that the delivery pathway is heparin-dependent endocytosis, similar to that of HIV-Tat. The delivery of GST fused to HIV-Tat was competed by either IGFBP-3 or IGFBP-5-derived synthetic peptides. Therefore, the entry pathways of the three PTDs are shared. Our data has shown a new approach for designing protein delivery systems using IGFBP-3/5 derived peptides based on the molecular mechanisms of IGF-independent activities of IGFBPs.

  16. Production of functional human insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) using recombinant expression in HEK293 cells.

    PubMed

    Wanscher, Anne Sofie Molsted; Williamson, Michael; Ebersole, Tasja Wainani; Streicher, Werner; Wikström, Mats; Cazzamali, Giuseppe

    2015-04-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) display many functions in humans including regulation of the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling pathway. The various roles of human IGFBPs make them attractive protein candidates in drug discovery. Structural and functional knowledge on human proteins with therapeutic relevance is needed to design and process the next generation of protein therapeutics. In order to conduct structural and functional investigations large quantities of recombinant proteins are needed. However, finding a suitable recombinant production system for proteins such as full-length human IGFBPs, still remains a challenge. Here we present a mammalian HEK293 expression method suitable for over-expression of secretory full-length human IGFBP-1 to -7. Protein purification of full-length human IGFBP-1, -2, -3 and -5 was conducted using a two-step chromatography procedure and the final protein yields were between 1 and 12mg protein per liter culture media. The recombinant IGFBPs contained PTMs and exhibited high-affinity interactions with their natural ligands IGF-1 and IGF-2.

  17. Activation of Telomerase by Ionizing Radiation: Differential Response to the Inhibition of DNA Double-Strand Break Repair by Abrogation of Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation, by LY294002, or by Wortmannin

    SciTech Connect

    Neuhof, Dirk Zwicker, Felix; Kuepper, Jan-Heiner; Debus, Juergen; Weber, Klaus-Josef

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: Telomerase activity represents a radiation-inducible function, which may be targeted by a double-strand break (DSB)-activated signal transduction pathway. Therefore, the effects of DNA-PK inhibitors (Wortmannin and LY294002) on telomerase upregulation after irradiation were studied. In addition, the role of trans-dominant inhibition of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation, which strongly reduces DSB rejoining, was assessed in comparison with 3-aminobenzamide. Methods and Materials: COM3 rodent cells carry a construct for the dexamethasone-inducible overexpression of the DNA-binding domain of PARP1 and exhibit greatly impaired DSB rejoining after irradiation. Telomerase activity was measured using polymerase chain reaction ELISA 1 h after irradiation with doses up to 10 Gy. Phosphorylation status of PKB/Akt and of PKC{alpha}/{beta}{sub II} was assessed by western blotting. Results: No telomerase upregulation was detectable for irradiated cells with undisturbed DSB rejoining. In contrast, incubation with LY294002 or dexamethasone yielded pronounced radiation induction of telomerase activity that could be suppressed by Wortmannin. 3-Aminobenzamide not only was unable to induce telomerase activity but also suppressed telomerase upregulation upon incubation with LY294002 or dexamethasone. Phospho-PKB was detectable independent of irradiation or dexamethasone pretreatment, but was undetectable upon incubations with LY294002 or Wortmannin, whereas phospho-PKC rested detectable. Conclusions: Telomerase activation postirradiation was triggered by different treatments that interfere with DNA DSB processing. This telomerase upregulation, however, was not reflected by the phosporylation status of the putative mediators of TERT activation, PKB and PKC. Although an involvement of PKB in TERT activation is not supported by the present findings, a respective role of PKC isoforms other than {alpha}/{beta}{sub II} cannot be ruled out.

  18. Differential expression of serum glycodelin and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1 in early pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Douglas, Nataki C; Thornton, Melvin H; Nurudeen, Sahadat K; Bucur, Maria; Lobo, Rogerio A; Sauer, Mark V

    2013-11-01

    This prospective study evaluated whether serum glycodelin and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1 (IGFBP-1) predict the likelihood of embryo implantation in recipients undergoing donor egg in vitro fertilization. We measured glycodelin and IGFBP-1 at 6 points from lining check to lutenizing hormone (LH) + 31. β-Human chorionic gonadotropin levels were first measured at LH + 17. The recipients were divided into those without embryo implantation (group 1, n = 6) and those with successful implantation (group 2, n = 30). Although this is a negative study in that neither glycodelin nor IGFBP-1 alone reflected endometrial (EM) receptivity, the glycodelin/IGFBP-1 ratio on the day of blastocyst transfer was higher in recipients who achieved pregnancy (P = .05). At LH + 17, glycodelin was higher (P = .04), and IGFBP-1 was lower (P = .004) in recipients who achieved pregnancy when compared to those who did not. These observations are likely due to EM changes induced by successful embryo implantation.

  19. The insulin-like growth factor-binding protein (IGFBP) superfamily.

    PubMed

    Hwa, V; Oh, Y; Rosenfeld, R G

    1999-12-01

    Over the last decade, the concept of an IGFBP family has been well accepted, based on structural similarities and on functional abilities to bind IGFs with high affinities. The existence of other potential IGFBPs was left open. The discovery of proteins with N-terminal domains bearing striking structural similarities to the N terminus of the IGFBPs, and with reduced, but demonstrable, affinity for IGFs, raised the question of whether these proteins were "new" IGFBPs (22, 23, 217). The N-terminal domain had been uniquely associated with the IGFBPs and has long been considered to be critical for IGF binding. No other function has been confirmed for this domain to date. Thus, the presence of this important IGFBP domain in the N terminus of other proteins must be considered significant. Although these other proteins appear capable of binding IGF, their relatively low affinity and the fact that their major biological actions are likely to not directly involve the IGF peptides suggest that they probably should not be classified within the IGFBP family as provisionally proposed (22, 23). The conservation of this single domain, so critical to high-affinity binding of IGF by the six IGFBPs, in all of the IGFBP-rPs, as well, speaks to its biological importance. Historically, and perhaps, functionally, this has led to the designation of an "IGFBP superfamily". The classification and nomenclature for the IGFBP superfamily, are, of course, arbitrary; what is ultimately relevant is the underlying biology, much of which still remains to be deciphered. The nomenclature for the IGFBP related proteins was derived from a consensus of researchers working in the IGFBP field (52). Obviously, a more general consensus on nomenclature, involving all groups working on each IGFBP-rP, has yet to be reached. Further understanding of the biological functions of each protein should help resolve the nomenclature dilemma. For the present, redesignating these proteins IGFBP-rPs simplifies the

  20. Role of insulin-like growth factor binding proteins in mammary gland development.

    PubMed

    Flint, D J; Tonner, E; Beattie, J; Allan, G J

    2008-12-01

    Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) play an important role in mammary gland development and their effects are, in turn, influenced by a family of 6 IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs). The IGFBPs are expressed in time- and tissue-specific fashion during the periods of rapid growth and involution of the mammary gland. The precise roles of these proteins in vivo have, however, been difficult to determine. This review examines the indirect evidence (evolution, chromosomal location and roles in lower life-forms) the evidence from in vitro studies and the attempts to examine their roles in vivo, using IGFBP-deficient and over-expression models. Evidence exists for a role of the IGFBPs in inhibition of the survival effects of IGFs as well as in IGF-enhancing effects from in vitro studies. The location of the IGFBPs, often associated with the extracellular matrix, suggests roles as a reservoir of IGFs or as a potential barrier, restricting access of IGFs to distinct cellular compartments. We also discuss the relative importance of IGF-dependent versus IGF-independent effects. IGF-independent effects include nuclear localization, activation of proteases and interaction with a variety of extracellular matrix and cell surface proteins. Finally, we examine the increasing evidence for the IGFBPs to be considered as part of a larger family of extracellular matrix proteins involved in morphogenesis and tissue re-modeling.

  1. Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins and mammary gland development.

    PubMed

    Sureshbabu, Angara; Tonner, Elizabeth; Flint, David J

    2011-01-01

    Mammary gland development is dependent upon insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) as survival factors. The actions of the IGFs are modulated by a family of IGF-binding proteins (IGFBP1-6). Expression of the IGFBPs is both time-dependent and cell-specific during both the developmental phases and the involution of the mammary gland. Although studied extensively in vitro, understanding the roles of IGFBPs in vivo has been difficult, largely due to the fact that IGFBP knock-out mice have no dramatic phenotypes. This review examines the evidence from in vitro studies and the attempts to examine in vivo actions utilising models with IGFBP deficiency or over-expression. In vitro studies demonstrate that IGFBPs can act by inhibition of the survival effects of IGFs, as well as by enhancing the effects of IGFs. Because the IGFBPs are found associated with the extracellular matrix, a role for IGFBPs as a reservoir of IGFs or, alternatively as a potential barrier to IGFs, thereby restricting their entry into particular tissues or cellular compartments was postulated. We also provide evidence with respect to the IGF-independent actions of the IGFBPs which include receptors, nuclear localization, and interaction with the extracellular matrix and cell surface proteins including integrins. We believe that recent findings place some of the IGFBPs in a larger family of extracellular proteins, the secreted cysteine-rich protein (CCN) family, which have similar structural domains (involved in binding to IGFs, extracellular matrix and integrins) and are heavily implicated in tissue re-modeling and morphogenesis.

  2. Allosteric properties of PH domains in Arf regulatory proteins.

    PubMed

    Roy, Neeladri Sekhar; Yohe, Marielle E; Randazzo, Paul A; Gruschus, James M

    2016-01-01

    Pleckstrin Homology (PH) domains bind phospholipids and proteins. They are critical regulatory elements of a number enzymes including guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) for Ras-superfamily guanine nucleotide binding proteins such as ADP-ribosylation factors (Arfs). Recent studies have indicated that many PH domains may bind more than one ligand cooperatively. Here we discuss the molecular basis of PH domain-dependent allosteric behavior of 2 ADP-ribosylation factor exchange factors, Grp1 and Brag2, cooperative binding of ligands to the PH domains of Grp1 and the Arf GTPase-activating protein, ASAP1, and the consequences for activity of the associated catalytic domains.

  3. Arabidopsis Sigma Factor Binding Proteins Are Activators of the WRKY33 Transcription Factor in Plant Defense[W

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Zhibing; Li, Ying; Wang, Fei; Cheng, Yuan; Fan, Baofang; Yu, Jing-Quan; Chen, Zhixiang

    2011-01-01

    Necrotrophic pathogens are important plant pathogens that cause many devastating plant diseases. Despite their impact, our understanding of the plant defense response to necrotrophic pathogens is limited. The WRKY33 transcription factor is important for plant resistance to necrotrophic pathogens; therefore, elucidation of its functions will enhance our understanding of plant immunity to necrotrophic pathogens. Here, we report the identification of two WRKY33-interacting proteins, nuclear-encoded SIGMA FACTOR BINDING PROTEIN1 (SIB1) and SIB2, which also interact with plastid-encoded plastid RNA polymerase SIGMA FACTOR1. Both SIB1 and SIB2 contain an N-terminal chloroplast targeting signal and a putative nuclear localization signal, suggesting that they are dual targeted. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation indicates that WRKY33 interacts with SIBs in the nucleus of plant cells. Both SIB1 and SIB2 contain a short VQ motif that is important for interaction with WRKY33. The two VQ motif–containing proteins recognize the C-terminal WRKY domain and stimulate the DNA binding activity of WRKY33. Like WRKY33, both SIB1 and SIB2 are rapidly and strongly induced by the necrotrophic pathogen Botrytis cinerea. Resistance to B. cinerea is compromised in the sib1 and sib2 mutants but enhanced in SIB1-overexpressing transgenic plants. These results suggest that dual-targeted SIB1 and SIB2 function as activators of WRKY33 in plant defense against necrotrophic pathogens. PMID:21990940

  4. Defining the role of corticotropin releasing factor binding protein in alcohol consumption.

    PubMed

    Haass-Koffler, C L; Henry, A T; Melkus, G; Simms, J A; Naemmuddin, M; Nielsen, C K; Lasek, A W; Magill, M; Schwandt, M L; Momenan, R; Hodgkinson, C A; Bartlett, S E; Swift, R M; Bonci, A; Leggio, L

    2016-11-15

    The corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) exerts its effects by acting on its receptors and on the binding protein (CRFBP), and has been implicated in alcohol use disorder (AUD). Therefore, identification of the exact contribution of each protein that mediates CRF effects is necessary to design effective therapeutic strategies for AUD. A series of in vitro/in vivo experiments across different species were performed to define the biological discrete role of CRFBP in AUD. First, to establish the CRFBP role in receptor signaling, we developed a novel chimeric cell-based assay and showed that CFRBP full length can stably be expressed on the plasma membrane. We discovered that only CRFBP(10 kD) fragment is able to potentiate CRF-intracellular Ca(2+) release. We provide evidence that CRHBP gene loss increased ethanol consumption in mice. Then, we demonstrate that selective reduction of CRHBP expression in the center nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) decreases ethanol consumption in ethanol-dependent rats. CRFBP amygdalar downregulation, however, does not attenuate yohimbine-induced ethanol self-administration. This effect was associated with decreased hemodynamic brain activity in the CRFBP-downregulated CeA and increased hemodynamic activity in the caudate putamen during yohimbine administration. Finally, in alcohol-dependent patients, genetic variants related to the CRFBP(10 kD) fragment were associated with greater risk for alcoholism and anxiety, while other genetic variants were associated with reduced risk for anxiety. Taken together, our data provide evidence that CRFBP may possess both inhibitory and excitatory roles and may represent a novel pharmacological target for the treatment of AUD.

  5. Defining the role of corticotropin releasing factor binding protein in alcohol consumption

    PubMed Central

    Haass-Koffler, C L; Henry, A T; Melkus, G; Simms, J A; Naemmuddin, M; Nielsen, C K; Lasek, A W; Magill, M; Schwandt, M L; Momenan, R; Hodgkinson, C A; Bartlett, S E; Swift, R M; Bonci, A; Leggio, L

    2016-01-01

    The corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) exerts its effects by acting on its receptors and on the binding protein (CRFBP), and has been implicated in alcohol use disorder (AUD). Therefore, identification of the exact contribution of each protein that mediates CRF effects is necessary to design effective therapeutic strategies for AUD. A series of in vitro/in vivo experiments across different species were performed to define the biological discrete role of CRFBP in AUD. First, to establish the CRFBP role in receptor signaling, we developed a novel chimeric cell-based assay and showed that CFRBP full length can stably be expressed on the plasma membrane. We discovered that only CRFBP(10 kD) fragment is able to potentiate CRF-intracellular Ca2+ release. We provide evidence that CRHBP gene loss increased ethanol consumption in mice. Then, we demonstrate that selective reduction of CRHBP expression in the center nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) decreases ethanol consumption in ethanol-dependent rats. CRFBP amygdalar downregulation, however, does not attenuate yohimbine-induced ethanol self-administration. This effect was associated with decreased hemodynamic brain activity in the CRFBP-downregulated CeA and increased hemodynamic activity in the caudate putamen during yohimbine administration. Finally, in alcohol-dependent patients, genetic variants related to the CRFBP(10 kD) fragment were associated with greater risk for alcoholism and anxiety, while other genetic variants were associated with reduced risk for anxiety. Taken together, our data provide evidence that CRFBP may possess both inhibitory and excitatory roles and may represent a novel pharmacological target for the treatment of AUD. PMID:27845775

  6. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 links obesity and breast cancer progression

    PubMed Central

    Scully, Tiffany; Firth, Sue M.; Scott, Carolyn D.; de Silva, Hasanthi C.; Pintar, John E.; Chan-Ling, Tailoi; Twigg, Stephen M.; Baxter, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is associated epidemiologically with poor breast cancer prognosis, but the mechanisms remain unclear. Since IGF binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) influences both breast cancer growth and adipocyte maturation, it may impact on how obesity promotes breast oncogenesis. This study investigated the role of endogenous IGFBP-3 on the development of obesity and subsequently on breast tumor growth. Wild-type (WT) C57BL/6 or IGFBP-3-null (BP3KO) mice were fed a high-fat diet (HFD) or control chow-diet for 15 weeks before orthotopic injection with syngeneic EO771 murine breast cancer cells. When the largest tumor reached 1000 mm3, tissues and tumors were excised for analysis. Compared to WT, BP3KO mice showed significantly reduced weight gain and mammary fat pad mass (contralateral to tumor) in response to HFD, despite similar food intake. EO771 tumor weight and volume were increased by HFD and decreased by BP3KO. Despite differences in tumor size, tumors in BP3KO mice showed no differences from WT in the number of mitotically active (Ki67+) and apoptotic (cleaved caspase-3+) cells, but had greater infiltration of CD3+ T-cells. These data suggest that endogenous (circulating and/or stromal) IGFBP-3 is stimulatory to adipose tissue expansion and enhances mammary tumor growth in immune-competent mice, potentially by suppressing T-cell infiltration into tumors. PMID:27448965

  7. Evolution of the insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP) family.

    PubMed

    Daza, Daniel Ocampo; Sundström, Görel; Bergqvist, Christina A; Duan, Cunming; Larhammar, Dan

    2011-06-01

    The evolution of the IGF binding protein (IGFBP) gene family has been difficult to resolve. Both chromosomal and serial duplications have been suggested as mechanisms for the expansion of this gene family. We have identified and annotated IGFBP sequences from a wide selection of vertebrate species as well as Branchiostoma floridae and Ciona intestinalis. By combining detailed sequence analysis with sequence-based phylogenies and chromosome information, we arrive at the following scenario: the ancestral chordate IGFBP gene underwent a local gene duplication, resulting in a gene pair adjacent to a HOX cluster. Subsequently, the gene family expanded in the two basal vertebrate tetraploidization (2R) resulting in the six IGFBP types that are presently found in placental mammals. The teleost fish ancestor underwent a third tetraploidization (3R) that further expanded the IGFBP repertoire. The five sequenced teleost fish genomes retain 9-11 of IGFBP genes. This scenario is supported by the phylogenies of three adjacent gene families in the HOX gene regions, namely the epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR) and the Ikaros and distal-less (DLX) transcription factors. Our sequence comparisons show that several important structural components in the IGFBPs are ancestral vertebrate features that have been maintained in all orthologs, for instance the integrin interaction motif Arg-Gly-Asp in IGFBP-2. In contrast, the Arg-Gly-Asp motif in IGFBP-1 has arisen independently in mammals. The large degree of retention of IGFBP genes after the ancient expansion of the gene family strongly suggests that each gene evolved distinct and important functions early in vertebrate evolution.

  8. Inactivation of fibroblast growth factor binding protein 3 causes anxiety-related behaviors.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Yasunari; Kitano, Ayumi; Takao, Keizo; Prasansuklab, Anchalee; Mushiroda, Taisei; Yamazaki, Keiko; Kumada, Tomohiro; Shibata, Minoru; Takaoka, Yuki; Awaya, Tomonari; Kato, Takeo; Abe, Takaya; Iwata, Nakao; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi; Nakamura, Yusuke; Nakahata, Tatsutoshi; Heike, Toshio

    2011-01-01

    The neurobiological mechanisms of emotional modulation and the molecular pathophysiology of anxiety disorders are largely unknown. The fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family has been implicated in the regulation of many physiological and pathological processes, which include the control of emotional behaviors. The present study examined mice with a targeted deletion of the fgf-bp3 gene, which encodes a novel FGF-binding protein, in animal models relevant to anxiety. To define the behavioral consequences of FGF-BP3 deficiency, we evaluated fgf-bp3-deficient mice using anxiety-related behavioral paradigms that provide a conflict between the desire to explore an unknown area or objects and the aversion to a brightly lit open space. The fgf-bp3-deficient mice exhibited alterations in time spent in the central area of the open-field arena, were less active in the lit areas of a light/dark transition test, and had a prolonged latency to feed during a novelty-induced hypophagia test. These changes were associated with alterations in light-induced orbitofrontal cortex (OFC) activation in an extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway-dependent manner. These results demonstrate that FGF-BP3 is a potent mediator of anxiety-related behaviors in mice and suggest that distinct pathways regulate emotional behaviors. Therefore, FGF-BP3 plays a critical role in the regulation of emotional states and in the development of anxiety disorders and should be investigated as a therapeutic target for anxiety disease in humans.

  9. Immunochemical analysis of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation in HaCaT keratinocytes induced by the mono-alkylating agent 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES): Impact of experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    Debiak, Malgorzata; Lex, Kirsten; Ponath, Viviane; Burckhardt-Boer, Waltraud; Thiermann, Horst; Steinritz, Dirk; Schmidt, Annette; Mangerich, Aswin; Bürkle, Alexander

    2016-02-26

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a bifunctional alkylating agent with a long history of use as a chemical weapon. Although its last military use is dated for the eighties of the last century, a potential use in terroristic attacks against civilians remains a significant threat. Thus, improving medical therapy of mustard exposed individuals is still of particular interest. PARP inhibitors were recently brought into the focus as a potential countermeasure for mustard-induced pathologies, supported by the availability of efficient compounds successfully tested in cancer therapy. PARP activation after SM treatment was reported in several cell types and tissues under various conditions; however, a detailed characterization of this phenomenon is still missing. This study provides the basis for such studies by developing and optimizing experimental conditions to investigate poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) in HaCaT keratinocytes upon treatment with the monofunctional alkylating agent 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide ("half mustard", CEES). By using an immunofluorescence-based approach, we show that optimization of experimental conditions with regards to the type of solvent, dilution factors and treatment procedure is essential to obtain a homogenous PAR staining in HaCaT cell cultures. Furthermore, we demonstrate that different CEES treatment protocols significantly influence the cytotoxicity profiles of treated cells. Using an optimized treatment protocol, our data reveals that CEES induces a dose- and time-dependent dynamic PARylation response in HaCaT cells that could be completely blocked by treating cells with the clinically relevant pharmacological PARP inhibitor ABT888 (also known as veliparib). Finally, siRNA experiments show that CEES-induced PAR formation is predominantly due to the activation of PARP1. In conclusion, this study provides a detailed analysis of the CEES-induced PARylation response in HaCaT keratinocytes, which forms an experimental basis to study the

  10. Corticotropin-releasing factor binding protein enters the regulated secretory pathway in neuroendocrine cells and cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Elías H; Zúñiga, Juan Pablo; Andrés, María Estela; Alvarez, Alejandra R; Gysling, Katia

    2011-08-01

    Corticotropin releasing factor binding protein (CRF-BP) is a 37kDa glycoprotein that binds CRF with high affinity. CRF-BP controls CRF levels within plasma during human pregnancy. It has also been shown that CRF-BP is expressed in various brain nuclei. Main actions that have been proposed for brain CRF-BP are either decreasing available CRF or facilitating CRF ligand-induced activation of CRF-R2 receptors. For both actions, it is necessary the release of CRF-BP from CRF-BP expressing neurons. However, the secretion mode of CRF-BP is currently unknown. We used heterologous expression of CRF-BP-Flag in PC12 cells and in primary culture of rat cortical neurons to study CRF-BP secretion mode. We observed that CRF-BP-Flag immunoreactivity presents the typical cytoplasmatic punctuate pattern that has been described for neuropeptides and proteins that enter the regulated secretory pathway in PC12 cells. Quantitative analysis of double immunofluorescence confocal images showed that CRF-BP-Flag colocalizes with secretogranin II, marker of secretory granules, both in PC12 and in primary-cultured rat neurons. Furthermore, CRF-BP-Flag is released from PC12 cells upon high K(+)-depolarization. Thus, our results show that CRF-BP is efficiently sorted to the regulated secretory pathway in two cellular contexts, suggesting that the extracellular levels of CRF-BP in the central nervous system depends on neuronal activity.

  11. Distinct roles for the N- and C-terminal regions in the cytotoxicity of pierisin-1, a putative ADP-ribosylating toxin from cabbage butterfly, against mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    Kanazawa, Takashi; Watanabe, Masahiko; Matsushima-Hibiya, Yuko; Kono, Takuo; Tanaka, Noriaki; Koyama, Kotaro; Sugimura, Takashi; Wakabayashi, Keiji

    2001-01-01

    Pierisin-1 is an 850-aa cytotoxic protein found in the cabbage butterfly, Pieris rapae, and has been suggested to consist of an N-terminal region with ADP-ribosyltransferase domain and of a C-terminal region that might have a receptor-binding domain. To elucidate the role of each region, we investigated the functions of various fragments of pierisin-1. In vitro expressed polypeptide consisting of amino acid residues 1–233 or 234–850 of pierisin-1 alone did not show cytotoxicity against human cervical carcinoma HeLa cells. However, the presence of both polypeptides in the culture medium showed some of the original cytotoxic activity. Introduction of the N-terminal polypeptide alone by electroporation also induced cell death in HeLa cells, and even in the mouse melanoma MEB4 cells insensitive to pierisin-1. Thus, the N-terminal region has a principal role in the cytotoxicity of pierisin-1 inside mammalian cells. Analyses of incorporated pierisin-1 indicated that the entire protein, regardless of whether it consisted of a single polypeptide or two separate N- and C-terminal polypeptides, was incorporated into HeLa cells. However, neither of the terminal polypeptides was incorporated when each polypeptide was present separately. These findings indicate that the C-terminal region is important for the incorporation of pierisin-1. Moreover, presence of receptor for pierisin-1 in the lipid fraction of cell membrane was suggested. The cytotoxic effects of pierisin-1 were enhanced by previous treatment with trypsin, producing “nicked” pierisin-1. Generation of the N-terminal fragment in HeLa cells was detected after application of intact entire molecule of pierisin-1. From the above observations, it is suggested that after incorporation of pierisin-1 into the cell by interaction of its C-terminal region with the receptor in the cell membrane, the entire protein is cleaved into the N- and C-terminal fragments with intracellular protease, and the N-terminal fragment

  12. Single molecule detection of PARP1 and PARP2 interaction with DNA strand breaks and their poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation using high-resolution AFM imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sukhanova, Maria V.; Abrakhi, Sanae; Joshi, Vandana; Pastre, David; Kutuzov, Mikhail M.; Anarbaev, Rashid O.; Curmi, Patrick A.; Hamon, Loic; Lavrik, Olga I.

    2016-01-01

    PARP1 and PARP2 are implicated in the synthesis of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) after detection of DNA damage. The specificity of PARP1 and PARP2 interaction with long DNA fragments containing single- and/or double-strand breaks (SSBs and DSBs) have been studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging in combination with biochemical approaches. Our data show that PARP1 localizes mainly on DNA breaks and exhibits a slight preference for nicks over DSBs, although the protein has a moderately high affinity for undamaged DNA. In contrast to PARP1, PARP2 is mainly detected at a single DNA nick site, exhibiting a low level of binding to undamaged DNA and DSBs. The enhancement of binding affinity of PARP2 for DNA containing a single nick was also observed using fluorescence titration. AFM studies reveal that activation of both PARPs leads to the synthesis of highly branched PAR whose size depends strongly on the presence of SSBs and DSBs for PARP1 and of SSBs for PARP2. The initial affinity between the PARP1, PARP2 and the DNA damaged site appears to influence both the size of the PAR synthesized and the time of residence of PARylated PARP1 and PARP2 on DNA damages. PMID:26673720

  13. Multiple Ligands of von Willebrand Factor-binding Protein (vWbp) Promote Staphylococcus aureus Clot Formation in Human Plasma*

    PubMed Central

    Thomer, Lena; Schneewind, Olaf; Missiakas, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus secretes coagulase (Coa) and von Willebrand factor-binding protein (vWbp) to activate host prothrombin and form fibrin cables, thereby promoting the establishment of infectious lesions. The D1-D2 domains of Coa and vWbp associate with, and non-proteolytically activate prothrombin. Moreover, Coa encompasses C-terminal tandem repeats for binding to fibrinogen, whereas vWbp has been reported to associate with von Willebrand factor and fibrinogen. Here we used affinity chromatography with non-catalytic Coa and vWbp to identify the ligands for these virulence factors in human plasma. vWbp bound to prothrombin, fibrinogen, fibronectin, and factor XIII, whereas Coa co-purified with prothrombin and fibrinogen. vWbp association with fibrinogen and factor XIII, but not fibronectin, required prothrombin and triggered the non-proteolytic activation of FXIII in vitro. Staphylococcus aureus coagulation of human plasma was associated with the recruitment of prothrombin, FXIII, and fibronectin as well as the formation of cross-linked fibrin. FXIII activity in staphylococcal clots could be attributed to thrombin-dependent proteolytic activation as well as vWbp-mediated non-proteolytic activation of FXIII zymogen. PMID:23960083

  14. Differential Expression of Serum Glycodelin and Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein 1 in Early Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, Melvin H.; Nurudeen, Sahadat K.; Bucur, Maria; Lobo, Rogerio A.; Sauer, Mark V.

    2013-01-01

    This prospective study evaluated whether serum glycodelin and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1 (IGFBP-1) predict the likelihood of embryo implantation in recipients undergoing donor egg in vitro fertilization. We measured glycodelin and IGFBP-1 at 6 points from lining check to lutenizing hormone (LH) + 31. β-Human chorionic gonadotropin levels were first measured at LH + 17. The recipients were divided into those without embryo implantation (group 1, n = 6) and those with successful implantation (group 2, n = 30). Although this is a negative study in that neither glycodelin nor IGFBP-1 alone reflected endometrial (EM) receptivity, the glycodelin/IGFBP-1 ratio on the day of blastocyst transfer was higher in recipients who achieved pregnancy (P = .05). At LH + 17, glycodelin was higher (P = .04), and IGFBP-1 was lower (P = .004) in recipients who achieved pregnancy when compared to those who did not. These observations are likely due to EM changes induced by successful embryo implantation. PMID:23585335

  15. Poly(ADP-ribose): Structure, Physicochemical Properties and Quantification In Vivo, with Special Reference to Poly(ADP-ribose) Binding Protein Modules.

    PubMed

    Miwa, Masanao; Ida, Chieri; Yamashita, Sachiko; Tanaka, Masakazu; Fujisawa, Junichi

    2016-01-01

    PolyADP-ribosylation is a unique posttranslational modification of proteins, involved in various cellular functions including stability of chromatin. PolyADP-ribosylation modifies acceptor proteins with a large negatively charged poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) to greatly change the structure and function of the acceptor proteins. In addition various specific motifs of proteins were recently found to interact non-covalently with PAR thereby changing the spaciotemporal activity of protein-protein interaction in cells. However, the structure of PAR to which specific protein motifs should bind is not fully characterized. The present work will review the structure, physicochemical properties and quantification of PAR in vivo, with special reference to PAR binding protein modules.

  16. Extracellular matrix contains insulin-like growth factor binding protein-5: potentiation of the effects of IGF-I

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) have been shown to serve as carrier proteins for the insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and to modulate their biologic effects. Since extracellular matrix (ECM) has been shown to be a reservoir for IGF-I and IGF-II, we examined the ECM of cultured human fetal fibroblasts and found that IGFBP-5 was incorporated intact into ECM, while mostly inert proteolytic fragments were found in the medium. In contrast, two other forms of IGFBP that are secreted by these cells were either present in ECM in minimal amounts (IGFBP-3) or not detected (IGFBP-4). Likewise, when purified IGFBPs were incubated with ECM, IGFBP-5 bound preferentially. IGFBP-5 was found to bind to types III and IV collagen, laminin, and fibronectin. Increasing salt concentrations inhibited the binding of IGFBP-5 to ECM and accelerated the release of IGFBP-5 from ECM, suggesting an ionic basis for this interaction. ECM-associated IGFBP-5 had a sevenfold decrease in affinity for IGF-I compared to IGFBP-5 in solution. Furthermore, when IGFBP-5 was present in cell culture substrata, it potentiated the growth stimulatory effects of IGF- I on fibroblasts. When IGFBP-5 was present only in the medium, it was degraded to a 22-kD fragment and had no effect on IGF-I-stimulated growth. We conclude that IGFBP-5 is present in fibroblast ECM, where it is protected from degradation and can potentiate the biologic actions of IGF-I. These findings provide a molecular explanation for the association of the IGF's with the extracellular matrix, and suggest that the binding of the IGF's to matrix, via IGFBP-5, may be important in mediating the cellular growth response to these growth factors. PMID:7683690

  17. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 5 (IGFBP5) mediates methamphetamine-induced dopaminergic neuron apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Dongfang; Xu, Jingtao; Le, Cuiyun; Huang, Enping; Liu, Chao; Qiu, Pingming; Lin, Zhoumeng; Xie, Wei-Bing; Wang, Huijun

    2014-11-04

    Overexposure to methamphetamine (METH), a psychoactive drug, induces a variety of adverse effects to the nervous system, including apoptosis of dopaminergic neurons. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 5 (IGFBP5), a member of insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system, is a pro-apoptotic factor that plays important roles in neuronal apoptosis. To test the hypothesis that IGFBP5 can mediate METH-induced neuronal apoptosis, we examined IGFBP5 mRNA and protein expression changes in PC12 cells exposed to METH (3.0mM) for 24h and in the striatum of rats following 15 mg/kg × 8 intraperitoneal injections of METH at 12h interval. We also checked the effect on neuronal apoptosis after silencing IGFBP5 expression with TUNEL staining and flow cytometry; Western blot was used for detecting the expression of apoptotic markers active-caspase3 and PARP. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying IGFBP5-mediated neuronal apoptosis, we determined the release of cytochrome c (cyto c), an apoptogenic factor, from the mitochondria after METH treatment with or without IGFBP5 knockdown. Our results showed that IGFBP5 expression was increased significantly after METH exposure in PC12 cells and in the METH-treated rats' striatum. Further, METH-exposed PC12 cells exhibited higher apoptosis-positive cell number and activity of caspase3 and PARP compared with control cells, while these changes can be blocked by silencing IGFBP5 expression. In addition, a significant increase of cyto c release from mitochondria after METH exposure was observed and it was inhibited after silencing IGFBP5 expression in PC12 cells. These results indicate that IGFBP5 plays key roles in METH-induced neuronal apoptosis and may be a potential gene target for therapeutics in METH-caused neurotoxicity.

  18. PTEN-induction in U251 glioma cells decreases the expression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-2

    SciTech Connect

    Levitt, Randy J.; Georgescu, Maria-Magdalena; Pollak, Michael . E-mail: michael.pollak@mcgill.ca

    2005-11-04

    PTEN is a tumor suppressor gene whose loss of function is observed in {approx}40-50% of human cancers. Although insulin-like growth factor binding protein-2 (IGFBP-2) was classically described as a growth inhibitor, multiple recent reports have shown an association of overexpression and/or high serum levels of IGFBP-2 with poor prognosis of several malignancies, including gliomas. Using an inducible PTEN expression system in the PTEN-null glioma cell line U251, we demonstrate that PTEN-induction is associated with reduced proliferation, increased apoptosis, and a substantial reduction of the high levels of IGFBP-2 expression. The PTEN-induced decrease in IGFBP-2 expression could be mimicked with the PI3-kinase inhibitor LY294002, indicating that the lipid phosphatase activity of PTEN is responsible for the observed effect. However, the rapamycin analog CCI-779 did not affect IGFBP-2 expression, suggesting that the PTEN-induced decrease in IGFBP-2 expression is not attributable to decreased mTOR signalling. Recombinant human IGFBP-2 was unable to rescue U251-PTEN cells from the antiproliferative effects of PTEN, and IGFBP-2 siRNA did not affect the IGF-dependent or -independent growth of this cell line. These results suggest that the clinical data linking IGFBP-2 expression to poor prognosis may arise, at least in part, because high levels of IGFBP-2 expression correlate with loss of function of PTEN, which is well known to lead to aggressive behavior of gliomas. Our results motivate translational research regarding the relationship between IGFBP-2 expression and loss of function of PTEN.

  19. Urinary Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-2 and Insulin-Like Growth Factor-Binding Protein 7 for Risk Stratification of Acute Kidney Injury in Patients With Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Honore, Patrick M.; Nguyen, H. Bryant; Gong, Michelle; Chawla, Lakhmir S.; Bagshaw, Sean M.; Artigas, Antonio; Shi, Jing; Joannes-Boyau, Olivier; Vincent, Jean-Louis

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To examine the performance of the urinary biomarker panel tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 7 in patients with sepsis at ICU admission. To investigate the effect of nonrenal organ dysfunction on tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 7 in this population. Method: In this ancillary analysis, we included patients with sepsis who were enrolled in either of two trials including 39 ICUs across Europe and North America. The primary endpoint was moderate-severe acute kidney injury (equivalent to Kidney Disease Improving Global Outcome stage 2–3) within 12 hours of enrollment. We assessed biomarker performance by calculating the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, sensitivity, specificity, and negative and positive predictive values at three cutoffs: 0.3, 1.0, and 2.0 (ng/mL)2/1,000. We also calculated nonrenal Sequential Organ Failure Assessment scores for each patient on enrollment and compared tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 7 results in patients with and without acute kidney injury and across nonrenal Sequential Organ Failure Assessment scores. Finally, we constructed a clinical model for acute kidney injury in this population and compared the performance of the model with and without tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 7. Results: We included 232 patients in the analysis and 40 (17%) developed acute kidney injury. We observed significantly higher urine tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 7 in patients with acute kidney injury than without acute kidney injury in both patients with low and high nonrenal Sequential Organ Failure Assessment scores (p < 0.001). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (95% CI) of tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 and insulin

  20. Protein Modifications as Manifestations of Hyperglycemic Glucotoxicity in Diabetes and Its Complications

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hong; Wu, Jinzi; Jin, Zhen; Yan, Liang-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes and its complications are hyperglycemic toxicity diseases. Many metabolic pathways in this array of diseases become aberrant, which is accompanied with a variety of posttranslational protein modifications that in turn reflect diabetic glucotoxicity. In this review, we summarize some of the most widely studied protein modifications in diabetes and its complications. These modifications include glycation, carbonylation, nitration, cysteine S-nitrosylation, acetylation, sumoylation, ADP-ribosylation, O-GlcNAcylation, and succination. All these posttranslational modifications can be significantly attributed to oxidative stress and/or carbon stress induced by diabetic redox imbalance that is driven by activation of pathways, such as the polyol pathway and the ADP-ribosylation pathway. Exploring the nature of these modifications should facilitate our understanding of the pathological mechanisms of diabetes and its associated complications. PMID:27042090

  1. Cloning of the functional promoter for human insulin-like growth factor binding protein-4 gene: endogenous regulation.

    PubMed

    Dai, B; Widen, S G; Mifflin, R; Singh, P

    1997-01-01

    The majority of the colon cancers analyzed to-date express insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP)-4, and antisense inhibition of IGFBP-4 messenger RNA (mRNA) confers a growth advantage to the cells in response to endogenous and exogenous IGFs. We recently reported a significant up-regulation of IGFBP-4 expression in a human colon cancer cell line (CaCo2) on spontaneous differentiation of the cells in culture. This suggests that the expression of IGFBP-4 may be related to growth and differentiation of colon cancer cells. To study the endogenous factors involved in the transcriptional regulation of IGFBP-4, we have isolated and sequenced the human (h) IGFBP-4 promoter. The approximately 1.3 kilobase pair (kb) 5' flanking region of the IGFBP-4 gene is GC rich and possesses several potential regulatory elements. These elements include a typical TATA box with sequence TATAA, located -299 nt from the initiation ATG codon. The cap site is located 14 nt downstream of the TATA box as determined by primer extension analysis. A 1.4-kb DNA fragment including the 1.254 kb 5' flanking region of the hIGFBP-4 gene was subcloned into a luciferase reporter vector (pGL-2 basic) either in the sense (BP-4-S-pGL) (S) or antisense (BP-4-AS-pGL) (AS) (negative control) orientation, relative to the luciferase coding sequence in the vector. CaCo2 cells were transfected with either the S or the AS vectors on days 2-10 of culture; cotransfection with the SV40-beta-Galactidose (Gal) vector was used to correct for transfection efficiency. The ratio of luciferase/beta-Gal expression by CaCo2 cells transfected with the S vectors increased significantly from days 3 and 4 to days 5 and 6 of culture, followed by a sharp decline on days 7-9, resembling the pattern of endogenous expression of IGFBP-4 by the cells; the expression of luciferase by the AS vectors remained low and insignificant. These results thus suggest that the approximately 1.4 kb 5' flanking region of the IGFBP-4 gene

  2. Variations in concentrations of the major endometrial secretory proteins (placental protein 14 and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1) in assisted conception regimes.

    PubMed

    Arthur, I D; Anthony, F W; Chard, T; Masson, G M; Thomas, E J

    1995-03-01

    We have previously shown that placental protein 14 (PP14) concentrations were depressed in two pregnancies that followed down-regulation of the anterior pituitary and exogenous hormone support prior to a frozen-thawed embryo transfer. We now report on a more comprehensive series of pregnancies following this form of treatment, in-vitro fertilization (IVF) and natural cycle frozen-thawed embryo transfer. Serum specimens were analysed for PP14 and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 12 days after embryo transfer and at 7 weeks gestation. At 12 days after embryo transfer, the mean serum PP14 concentrations in the IVF and natural cycle were significantly higher in those who conceived than those who did not (82 versus 23 and 107 versus 39 micrograms/l respectively, P < 0.001). Although the mean PP14 concentration in the hormone-supported pregnant patients was higher than in the non-pregnant patients, this had not reached statistical significance 12 days after embryo transfer (49 versus 31 micrograms/l). By 7 weeks gestation the PP14 concentrations in the hormone-supported pregnant patients were significantly higher than in the non-pregnant patients (152 versus 31 micrograms/l, P < 0.001). However, the PP14 concentrations for hormone-supported pregnant patients were significantly lower (P < 0.001) than those for pregnant IVF or natural cycle patients at 7 weeks gestation (152, 777 and 660 micrograms/l respectively). The PP14 concentrations in the pregnant patients, although lower than those in IVF and natural cycle pregnancies, were higher than those previously reported in ovarian failure and Turner's syndrome ovum donation cycles.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. The GTP-binding protein RhoA localizes to the cortical granules of Strongylocentrotus purpuratas sea urchin egg and is secreted during fertilization.

    PubMed

    Cuéllar-Mata, P; Martínez-Cadena, G; López-Godínez, J; Obregón, A; García-Soto, J

    2000-02-01

    The sea urchin egg has thousands of secretory vesicles known as cortical granules. Upon fertilization, these vesicles undergo a Ca2+-dependent exocytosis. G-protein-linked mechanisms may take place during the egg activation. In somatic cells from mammals, GTP-binding proteins of the Rho family regulate a number of cellular processes, including organization of the actin cytoskeleton. We report here that a crude membrane fraction from homogenates of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus sea urchin eggs, incubated with C3 (which ADP-ribosylates specifically Rho proteins) and [32P]NAD, displayed an [32P]ADP-ribosylated protein of 25 kDa that had the following characteristics: i) identical electrophoretic mobility in SDS-PAGE gels as the [32P]ADP-ribosylated Rho from sea urchin sperm; ii) identical mobility in isoelectro focusing gels as human RhoA; iii) positive cross-reactivity by immunoblotting with an antibody against mammalian RhoA. Thus, unfertilized S. purpuratus eggs contain a mammalian RhoA-like protein. Immunocytochemical analyses indicated that RhoA was localized preferentially to the cortical granules; this was confirmed by experiments of [32P]ADP-ribosylation with C3 in isolated cortical granules. Rho was secreted and retained in the fertilization membrane after insemination or activation with A23187. It was observed that the Rho protein present in the sea urchin sperm acrosome was also secreted during the exocytotic acrosome reaction. Thus, Rho could participate in those processes related to the cortical granules, i.e., in the Ca2+-regulated exocytosis or actin reorganization that accompany the egg activation.

  4. Amblyomma americanum tick saliva insulin-like growth factor binding protein-related protein 1 binds insulin but not insulin-like growth factors.

    PubMed

    Radulović, Ž M; Porter, L M; Kim, T K; Bakshi, M; Mulenga, A

    2015-10-01

    Silencing Amblyomma americanum insulin-like growth factor binding protein-related protein 1 (AamIGFBP-rP1) mRNA prevented ticks from feeding to repletion. In this study, we used recombinant (r)AamIGFBP-rP1 in a series of assays to obtain further insight into the role(s) of this protein in tick feeding regulation. Our results suggest that AamIGFBP-1 is an antigenic protein that is apparently exclusively expressed in salivary glands. We found that both males and females secrete AamIGFBP-rP1 into the host during feeding and confirmed that female ticks secrete this protein from within 24-48 h after attachment. Our data suggest that native AamIGFBP-rP1 is a functional insulin binding protein in that both yeast- and insect cell-expressed rAamIGFBP-rP1 bound insulin, but not insulin-like growth factors. When subjected to anti-blood clotting and platelet aggregation assays, rAamIGFBP-rP1 did not have any effect. Unlike human IGFBP-rP1, which is controlled by trypsinization, rAamIGFBP-rP1 is resistant to digestion, suggesting that the tick protein may not be under mammalian host control at the tick feeding site. The majority of tick-borne pathogens are transmitted 48 h after the tick has attached. Thus, the demonstrated antigenicity and secretion into the host within 24-48 h of the tick starting to feed makes AamIGFBP-rP1 an attractive target for antitick vaccine development.

  5. A mutational analysis of residues in cholera toxin A1 necessary for interaction with its substrate, the stimulatory G protein Gsα.

    PubMed

    Jobling, Michael G; Gotow, Lisa F; Yang, Zhijie; Holmes, Randall K

    2015-03-18

    Pathogenesis of cholera diarrhea requires cholera toxin (CT)-mediated adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-ribosylation of stimulatory G protein (Gsα) in enterocytes. CT is an AB5 toxin with an inactive CTA1 domain linked via CTA2 to a pentameric receptor-binding B subunit. Allosterically activated CTA1 fragment in complex with NAD+ and GTP-bound ADP-ribosylation factor 6 (ARF6-GTP) differs conformationally from the CTA1 domain in holotoxin. A surface-exposed knob and a short α-helix (formed, respectively, by rearranging "active-site" and "activation" loops in inactive CTA1) and an ADP ribosylating turn-turn (ARTT) motif, all located near the CTA1 catalytic site, were evaluated for possible roles in recognizing Gsα. CT variants with one, two or three alanine substitutions at surface-exposed residues within these CTA1 motifs were tested for assembly into holotoxin and ADP-ribosylating activity against Gsα and diethylamino-(benzylidineamino)-guanidine (DEABAG), a small substrate predicted to fit into the CTA1 active site). Variants with single alanine substitutions at H55, R67, L71, S78, or D109 had nearly wild-type activity with DEABAG but significantly decreased activity with Gsα, suggesting that the corresponding residues in native CTA1 participate in recognizing Gsα. As several variants with multiple substitutions at these positions retained partial activity against Gsα, other residues in CTA1 likely also participate in recognizing Gsα.

  6. The conserved macrodomains of the non-structural proteins of Chikungunya virus and other pathogenic positive strand RNA viruses function as mono-ADP-ribosylhydrolases.

    PubMed

    Eckei, Laura; Krieg, Sarah; Bütepage, Mareike; Lehmann, Anne; Gross, Annika; Lippok, Barbara; Grimm, Alexander R; Kümmerer, Beate M; Rossetti, Giulia; Lüscher, Bernhard; Verheugd, Patricia

    2017-02-02

    Human pathogenic positive single strand RNA ((+)ssRNA) viruses, including Chikungunya virus, pose severe health problems as for many neither efficient vaccines nor therapeutic strategies exist. To interfere with propagation, viral enzymatic activities are considered potential targets. Here we addressed the function of the viral macrodomains, conserved folds of non-structural proteins of many (+)ssRNA viruses. Macrodomains are closely associated with ADP-ribose function and metabolism. ADP-ribosylation is a post-translational modification controlling various cellular processes, including DNA repair, transcription and stress response. We found that the viral macrodomains possess broad hydrolase activity towards mono-ADP-ribosylated substrates of the mono-ADP-ribosyltransferases ARTD7, ARTD8 and ARTD10 (aka PARP15, PARP14 and PARP10, respectively), reverting this post-translational modification both in vitro and in cells. In contrast, the viral macrodomains possess only weak activity towards poly-ADP-ribose chains synthesized by ARTD1 (aka PARP1). Unlike poly-ADP-ribosylglycohydrolase, which hydrolyzes poly-ADP-ribose chains to individual ADP-ribose units but cannot cleave the amino acid side chain - ADP-ribose bond, the different viral macrodomains release poly-ADP-ribose chains with distinct efficiency. Mutational and structural analyses identified key amino acids for hydrolase activity of the Chikungunya viral macrodomain. Moreover, ARTD8 and ARTD10 are induced by innate immune mechanisms, suggesting that the control of mono-ADP-ribosylation is part of a host-pathogen conflict.

  7. The conserved macrodomains of the non-structural proteins of Chikungunya virus and other pathogenic positive strand RNA viruses function as mono-ADP-ribosylhydrolases

    PubMed Central

    Eckei, Laura; Krieg, Sarah; Bütepage, Mareike; Lehmann, Anne; Gross, Annika; Lippok, Barbara; Grimm, Alexander R.; Kümmerer, Beate M.; Rossetti, Giulia; Lüscher, Bernhard; Verheugd, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    Human pathogenic positive single strand RNA ((+)ssRNA) viruses, including Chikungunya virus, pose severe health problems as for many neither efficient vaccines nor therapeutic strategies exist. To interfere with propagation, viral enzymatic activities are considered potential targets. Here we addressed the function of the viral macrodomains, conserved folds of non-structural proteins of many (+)ssRNA viruses. Macrodomains are closely associated with ADP-ribose function and metabolism. ADP-ribosylation is a post-translational modification controlling various cellular processes, including DNA repair, transcription and stress response. We found that the viral macrodomains possess broad hydrolase activity towards mono-ADP-ribosylated substrates of the mono-ADP-ribosyltransferases ARTD7, ARTD8 and ARTD10 (aka PARP15, PARP14 and PARP10, respectively), reverting this post-translational modification both in vitro and in cells. In contrast, the viral macrodomains possess only weak activity towards poly-ADP-ribose chains synthesized by ARTD1 (aka PARP1). Unlike poly-ADP-ribosylglycohydrolase, which hydrolyzes poly-ADP-ribose chains to individual ADP-ribose units but cannot cleave the amino acid side chain - ADP-ribose bond, the different viral macrodomains release poly-ADP-ribose chains with distinct efficiency. Mutational and structural analyses identified key amino acids for hydrolase activity of the Chikungunya viral macrodomain. Moreover, ARTD8 and ARTD10 are induced by innate immune mechanisms, suggesting that the control of mono-ADP-ribosylation is part of a host-pathogen conflict. PMID:28150709

  8. Flotillins bind to the dileucine sorting motif of β-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1 and influence its endosomal sorting.

    PubMed

    John, Bincy A; Meister, Melanie; Banning, Antje; Tikkanen, Ritva

    2014-04-01

    The β-site amyloid precursor protein-cleaving enzyme 1 (BACE1) is a protease that participates in the amyloidogenic cleavage of the Alzheimer amyloid precursor protein. Trafficking of BACE1 has been shown to be largely mediated by an acidic cluster dileucine motif in its cytoplasmic tail. This sorting signal functions both in endocytosis and endosomal sorting/recycling of BACE1 by providing a binding site for various sorting factors, such as the Golgi-localizing γ-ear containing ADP ribosylation factor binding (GGA) proteins that mediate BACE1 sorting within endosomes. Because flotillin-1 has been suggested to bind to BACE1 cytoplasmic tail, we analyzed the role of flotillins in BACE1 sorting. We show that flotillin-1 directly binds to the dileucine motif in the cytoplasmic tail of BACE1, whereas flotillin-2 binding is mainly mediated by its interaction with flotillin-1. Depletion of flotillins results in altered subcellular localization of BACE1 in endosomes and stabilization of BACE1 protein. Furthermore, amyloidogenic processing of Alzheimer amyloid precursor protein is increased. Flotillins compete with GGA proteins for binding to the dileucine motif in the BACE1 tail, suggesting that they play an important role in endosomal sorting of BACE1. The present study shows for the first time that flotillins are involved in endosomal sorting of BACE1. Because the endosomal localization of BACE1 affects its function as the β-secretase by increasing amyloidogenic processing of the amyloid precursor protein, flotillins may play a novel role in Alzheimer's disease. The present study is the first to show that flotillins bind to a canonical sorting signal and influence the binding of endosomal sorting factors onto cargo tails.

  9. Clumping factor A, von Willebrand factor-binding protein and von Willebrand factor anchor Staphylococcus aureus to the vessel wall.

    PubMed

    Claes, J; Liesenborghs, L; Peetermans, M; Veloso, T R; Missiakas, D; Schneewind, O; Mancini, S; Entenza, J M; Hoylaerts, M F; Heying, R; Verhamme, P; Vanassche, T

    2017-02-09

    Essentials Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) binds to endothelium via von Willebrand factor (VWF). Secreted VWF-binding protein (vWbp) mediates S. aureus adhesion to VWF under shear stress. vWbp interacts with VWF and the Sortase A-dependent surface protein Clumping factor A (ClfA). VWF-vWbp-ClfA anchor S. aureus to vascular endothelium under shear stress.

  10. Acute handling disturbance modulates plasma insulin-like growth factor binding proteins in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of acute stressor exposure on proximal (growth hormone; GH) and distal (insulin-like growth factor-I; IGF-I and IGF-binding proteins) components of the somatotropic axis are poorly understood in finfish. We exposed rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) to a 5-minute handling disturbance to...

  11. Role of protein kinase C in diacylglycerol-mediated induction of ornithine decarboxylase and reduction of epidermal growth factor binding.

    PubMed Central

    Jetten, A M; Ganong, B R; Vandenbark, G R; Shirley, J E; Bell, R M

    1985-01-01

    Tumor-promoting phorbol esters induce ornithine decarboxylase (ODCase) activity and reduce epidermal growth factor (EGF) binding in rat tracheal epithelial 2C5 cells. Phorbol esters activate protein kinase C by interacting at the same site as sn-1,2-diacylglycerols, the presumed physiological regulators. The effects of added sn-1,2-diacylglycerols and those generated by phospholipase C treatment of 2C5 cells on ODCase induction and EGF binding were investigated to establish a role for protein kinase C in these cellular responses. Treatment of 2C5 cells with phospholipase C induced ODCase activity and reduced EGF binding, whereas phospholipases A2 and D were inactive. When sn-1,2-diacylglycerols containing fatty acids 3-10 carbons in length were added to 2C5 cells, those diacylglycerols containing fatty acids 5-10 carbons in length caused ODCase induction and reduction in EGF binding. sn-1,2-Dioctanoylglycerol was one of the most active compounds tested. It induced ODCase in a dose- (50-500 microM) and time-dependent manner. The reduction of binding of 125I-labeled EGF by sn-1,2-dioctanoylglycerol was also time and dose dependent and appeared to result from a change in EGF affinity and not the number of receptor sites. This series of sn-1,2-diacylglycerols showed similar structure-function relationships in their ability to induce ODCase activity, to decrease EGF binding, to stimulate protein kinase C, and to inhibit [3H]phorbol dibutyrate binding to the phorbol ester receptor. These data demonstrate biological activities for a number of diacylglycerols and indicate that protein kinase C activation is implicated in ODCase induction and decreased EGF binding. PMID:3157191

  12. Progesterone inhibits insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) production by explants of the Fallopian tube.

    PubMed

    Davies, S; Richardson, M C; Anthony, F W; Mukhtar, D; Cameron, I T

    2004-12-01

    The Fallopian tube provides the environment for early embryo growth, a process which is influenced by insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) in the tubal fluid. Whether the bioavailability of tubal IGFs is modulated by locally produced IGF-binding protein (IGFBP-1) is not clear. An explant culture system from human Fallopian tube mucosa was, therefore, developed enabling the potential for IGFBP-1 production by this tissue to be examined directly. Initial characterization of the system established that the explants maintained responsiveness to steroids. Thus, oviduct-specific glycoprotein production, a major product of the oviduct in vivo, continued to be made via an estrogen-sensitive pathway in the culture. The presence of mRNA for IGFBP-1 was established within the explants by the use of quantitative RT-PCR and IGFBP-1 protein was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Although insulin and estradiol had no consistent effect on IGFBP-1, addition of progesterone had a significant inhibitory effect on IGFBP-1 production, both at the mRNA and protein levels. A dose-range of progesterone revealed an incremental inhibitory effect of progesterone on IGFBP-1 output (maximal effect, 25-50 nmol/l), consistent with physiological inhibition of this process during the luteal phase. We suggest that progesterone might, therefore, play a role in controlling the bioavailability of IGFs to the embryo during early development within the Fallopian tube.

  13. Interaction between Fibrinogen and Insulin-Like Growth Factor-Binding Protein-1 in Human Plasma under Physiological Conditions.

    PubMed

    Gligorijević, N; Nedić, O

    2016-02-01

    Fibrinogen is a plasma glycoprotein and one of the principle participants in blood coagulation. It interacts with many proteins during formation of a blood clot, including insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and their binding proteins (IGFBP). Fibrinogen complexes were found as minor fractions in fibrinogen preparations independently of the coagulation process, and their presence influences the kinetics of polymerization. The idea of this work was to investigate whether fibrinogen in human plasma interacts with IGFBPs independently of the tissue injury or coagulation process. The results have shown that fibrinogen forms complexes with IGFBP-1 under physiological conditions. Several experimental approaches have confirmed that complexes are co-isolated with fibrinogen from plasma, they are relatively stable, and they appear as a general feature of human plasma. Several other experiments excluded the possibility that alpha-2 macroglobulin/IGFBP-1 complexes or IGFBP-1 oligomers contributed to IGFBP-1 immunoreactivity. The role of fibrinogen/IGFBP-1 complexes is still unknown. Further investigation in individuals expressing both impaired glucose control and coagulopathy could contribute to identification and understanding of their possible physiological role.

  14. Clonal mosaic analysis of EMPTY PERICARP2 reveals nonredundant functions of the duplicated HEAT SHOCK FACTOR BINDING PROTEINs during maize shoot development.

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Suneng; Scanlon, Michael J

    2004-01-01

    The paralogous maize proteins EMPTY PERICARP2 (EMP2) and HEAT SHOCK FACTOR BINDING PROTEIN2 (HSBP2) each contain a single recognizable motif: the coiled-coil domain. EMP2 and HSBP2 accumulate differentially during maize development and heat stress. Previous analyses revealed that EMP2 is required for regulation of heat shock protein (hsp) gene expression and also for embryo morphogenesis. Developmentally abnormal emp2 mutant embryos are aborted during early embryogenesis. To analyze EMP2 function during postembryonic stages, plants mosaic for sectors of emp2 mutant tissue were constructed. Clonal sectors of emp2 mutant tissue revealed multiple defects during maize vegetative shoot development, but these sector phenotypes are not correlated with aberrant hsp gene regulation. Furthermore, equivalent phenotypes are observed in emp2 sectored plants grown under heat stress and nonstress conditions. Thus, the function of EMP2 during regulation of the heat stress response can be separated from its role in plant development. The discovery of emp2 mutant phenotypes in postembryonic shoots reveals that the duplicate genes emp2 and hsbp2 encode nonredundant functions throughout maize development. Distinct developmental phenotypes correlated with the developmental timing, position, and tissue layer of emp2 mutant sectors, suggesting that EMP2 has evolved diverse developmental functions in the maize shoot. PMID:15280250

  15. Effect of soluble P55 tumour-necrosis factor binding fusion protein on the local Shwartzman and Arthus reactions.

    PubMed Central

    Norman, K. E.; Williams, T. J.; Feldmann, M.; Rossi, A. G.

    1996-01-01

    1. In this study, the effects of a protein synthesis inhibitor, cycloheximide, and a soluble tumour necrosis factor (TNF) binding/IgG fusion protein, p55-sf2, on the priming and challenge stages of the local Shwartzman reaction (LSR) were assessed and compared with their effects on the acute inflammatory response induced by recombinant human tumour necrosis factor-alpha (rhTNF), lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and a reversed passive Arthus (RPA) reaction in rabbit skin. 2. The LSR was induced in skin by giving an intradermal (i.d.) priming injection of LPS followed by two i.v. challenge injections 20 h and 22 h later. Accumulation of 51-Cr-labelled red blood cells and [125I]-albumin were measured at 24 h as markers of haemorrhage and oedema formation, respectively. 3. The RPA reaction was induced in the rabbit by giving i.d. injections of Arthus anti-serum (anti-bovine-gamma-globulin, BGG) followed 5 min later by an i.v. injection of the antigen (BGG). Oedema formation and the accumulation of 111In-labelled neutrophils produced in the RPA reaction and in response to i.d. injection of rhTNF and LPS were measured over the 4 h period after inducing the responses. 4. A single local injection of cycloheximide (10 micrograms/site) did not inhibit neutrophil accumulation or oedema formation produced by 100% Arthus anti-sera. Although LPS injected i.d. induced a marked dose-dependent neutrophil accumulation, there was little associated plasma leakage. Cycloheximide (10 micrograms/site) did not significantly inhibit the neutrophil accumulation induced by LPS (0.1 microgram/site). In the LSR, priming i.d. injections of LPS caused a dose-dependent increase in haemorrhage and plasma leakage at skin sites after challenge with LPS (two injections of 100 micrograms, i.v.). Co-injection of a single dose of cycloheximide (10 micrograms/site) with LPS (30 micrograms/site) caused a marked reduction in the amount of haemorrhage. Local cycloheximide (10 micrograms/site) administered

  16. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-6 transgenic mice: postnatal growth, brain development, and reproduction abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Bienvenu, Géraldine; Seurin, Danielle; Grellier, Pascale; Froment, Pascal; Baudrimont, Marielle; Monget, Philippe; Le Bouc, Yves; Babajko, Sylvie

    2004-05-01

    In biological fluids, IGFs bind to six distinct binding proteins (IGFBP-1 to -6). IGFBP-6 is of particular interest because it has been shown to inhibit proliferation in many cell types and to be synthesized in the central nervous system (CNS). It also has the strongest affinity for IGF-II among the IGFBPs. To study IGFBP-6 function in vivo, we established IGFBP-6 transgenic mice in which human IGFBP-6 (hIGFBP-6) cDNA is expressed under the control of the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) promoter. Northern and Western blot analysis revealed strong transgene expression in the CNS. With histological examination of the CNS, cerebellum size and weight proved to be reduced by about 25% and 35%, respectively, and there were smaller numbers of differentiated, GFAP-expressing astrocytes than in wild-type mice. Between birth and 1 month of age, transgenic mice had high levels of circulating hIGFBP-6 and reduced plasma IGF-I, and, as a result, body weight was significantly reduced. Reproductive physiology was also affected. Litter size was reduced by 27% when wild-type males were mated with 3-month-old transgenic females and by 66% when mated with 6-month-old transgenic females. Histological examination of ovaries of transgenic mice revealed a marked decrease in weight and in the number of corpora lutea, suggesting altered ovulation, and circulating LH levels were reduced by 50%. Our results indicate that this new model of transgenic mouse may prove to be a useful tool in elucidating the in vivo role of IGFBP-6 in the brain, especially in regard to hypothalamic control, and in reproductive physiology.

  17. Lifestyle and dietary correlates of plasma insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1), leptin, and C-peptide: the Multiethnic Cohort.

    PubMed

    DeLellis Henderson, Katherine; Rinaldi, Sabina; Kaaks, Rudolf; Kolonel, Laurence; Henderson, Brian; Le Marchand, Loic

    2007-01-01

    Circulating insulin-like growth factor binding protein 1 (IGFBP-1), leptin, and insulin are 3 proteins modified by obesity and have been associated with cancer at several sites in past studies. We conducted a cross-sectional study to describe the correlation of these proteins with gender, race/ethnicity, anthropometric indexes, and dietary and lifestyle factors. We measured fasting plasma levels of IGFBP-1, leptin, and C-peptide, used here as a stable measure of insulin secretion, in a random sample of 450 male and 352 postmenopausal female Hawaii and Los Angeles Multiethnic Cohort Study (MEC) participants (age range 47-82 yr at blood draw). Through a series of multiple linear regressions, we found that the most parsimonious model for plasma IGFBP-1 included inverse associations with age, body mass index (BMI), and regular soda intake. A term for interaction between age and BMI was positively associated with plasma IGFBP-1. Adjusted mean plasma leptins were highest among Whites and African Americans and lowest among Hawaiians and Japanese Leptin was also inversely associated with age and positively associated with the interaction between age and race/ethnicity, female gender, and BMI. A model with only race/ethnicity and BMI (positive association) was best for plasma C-peptide. Adjusted means for C-peptide were highest for Japanese and Whites and lowest for African Americans. The overall percent of variance in protein levels explained by these models was low for IGFBP-1(R2=0.17) and C-peptide (R(3)=0.11) and higher for leptin (R(2)=0.57). We saw no clear correlation between racial/ethnic trends in protein levels with those of colorectal, breast, or prostate cancer incidence rates in the MEC. Research to clarify factors associated with determination of these proteins and their relationship with cancer etiology is warranted.

  18. Hepatic insulin-like growth-factor binding protein (igfbp) responses tofood restriction in Atlantic salmon smolts

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breves, Jason P.; Phipps-Costin, Silas K.; Fujimoto, Chelsea K.; Einarsdottir, Ingibjörg E.; Regish, Amy M.; Björnsson, Björn Thrandur; McCormick, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The growth hormone (Gh)/insulin-like growth-factor (Igf) system plays a central role in the regulation of growth in fishes. However, the roles of Igf binding proteins (Igfbps) in coordinating responses to food availability are unresolved, especially in anadromous fishes preparing for seaward migration. We assayed plasma Gh, Igf1, thyroid hormones and cortisol along with igfbp mRNA levels in fasted and fed Atlantic salmon ( Salmo salar ). Fish were fasted for 3 or 10 days near the peak of smoltification (late April to early May). Fasting reduced plasma glucose by 3 days and condition factor by 10 days. Plasma Gh, cortisol, and thyroxine (T 4 ) were not altered in response to fasting, whereas Igf1 and 3,5,3′-triiodo- l -thyronine (T 3 ) were slightly higher and lower than controls, respectively. Hepatic igfbp1b1 , - 1b2 , - 2a , - 2b1 and - 2b2 mRNA levels were not responsive to fasting, but there were marked increases in igfbp1a1 following 3 and 10 days of fasting. Fasting did not alter hepatic igf1or igf2 ; however, muscle igf1 was diminished by 10 days of fasting. There were no signs that fasting compromised branchial ionoregulatory functions, as indicated by unchanged Na + /K + -ATPase activity and ion pump/transporter mRNA levels. We conclude that dynamic hepatic igfbp1a1 and muscle igf1 expression participate in the modulation of Gh/Igf signaling in smolts undergoing catabolism.

  19. Nutritional status and growth hormone regulate insulin-like growth factor binding protein (igfbp) transcripts in Mozambique tilapia.

    PubMed

    Breves, Jason P; Tipsmark, Christian K; Stough, Beth A; Seale, Andre P; Flack, Brenda R; Moorman, Benjamin P; Lerner, Darren T; Grau, E Gordon

    2014-10-01

    Growth in teleosts is controlled in large part by the activities of the growth hormone (Gh)/insulin-like growth factor (Igf) system. In this study, we initially identified igf-binding protein (bp)1b, -2b, -4, -5a and -6b transcripts in a tilapia EST library. In Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus), tissue expression profiling of igfbps revealed that igfbp1b and -2b had the highest levels of expression in liver while igfbp4, -5a and -6b were expressed at comparable levels in most other tissues. We compared changes in hepatic igfbp1b, -2b and -5a expression during catabolic conditions (28days of fasting) along with key components of the Gh/Igf system, including plasma Gh and Igf1 and hepatic gh receptor (ghr2), igf1 and igf2 expression. In parallel with elevated plasma Gh and decreased Igf1 levels, we found that hepatic igfbp1b increased substantially in fasted animals. We then tested whether systemic Gh could direct the expression of igfbps in liver. A single intraperitoneal injection of ovine Gh into hypophysectomized tilapia specifically stimulated liver igfbp2b expression along with plasma Igf1 and hepatic ghr2 levels. Our collective data suggest that hepatic endocrine signaling during fasting may involve post-translational regulation of plasma Igf1 via a shift towards the expression of igfbp1b. Thus, Igfbp1b may operate as a molecular switch to restrict Igf1 signaling in tilapia; furthermore, we provide new details regarding isoform-specific regulation of igfbp expression by Gh.

  20. Nutritional status and growth hormone regulate insulin-like growth factor binding protein (igfbp) transcripts in Mozambique tilapia

    PubMed Central

    Breves, Jason P.; Tipsmark, Christian K.; Stough, Beth A.; Seale, Andre P.; Flack, Brenda R.; Moorman, Benjamin P.; Lerner, Darren T.; Grau, E. Gordon

    2014-01-01

    Growth in teleosts is controlled in large part by the activities of the growth hormone (Gh)/insulin-like growth factor (Igf) system. In this study, we initially identified igf-binding protein (bp)1b, -2b, -4, -5a and -6b transcripts in a tilapia EST library. In Mozambique tilapia (Oreochromis mossambicus), tissue expression profiling of igfbps revealed that igfbp1b and -2b had the highest levels of expression in liver while igfbp4, -5a and -6b were expressed at comparable levels in most other tissues. We compared changes in hepatic igfbp1b, -2b and -5a expression during catabolic conditions (28 days of fasting) along with key components of the Gh/Igf system, including plasma Gh and Igf1 and hepatic gh receptor (ghr2), igf1 and igf2 expression. In parallel with elevated plasma Gh and decreased Igf1 levels, we found that hepatic igfbp1b increased substantially in fasted animals. We then tested whether systemic Gh could direct the expression of igfbps in liver. A single intraperitoneal injection of ovine Gh into hypophysectomized tilapia specifically stimulated liver igfbp2b expression along with plasma Igf1 and hepatic ghr2 levels. Our collective data suggest that hepatic endocrine signaling during fasting may involve post-translational regulation of plasma Igf1 via a shift towards the expression of igfbp1b. Thus, Igfbp1b may operate as a molecular switch to restrict Igf1 signaling in tilapia; furthermore, we provide new details regarding isoform-specific regulation of igfbp expression by Gh. PMID:24818968

  1. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 levels are increased in patients with IgA nephropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Tokunaga, Koki; Uto, Hirofumi; Takami, Yoichiro; Mera, Kumiko; Nishida, Chika; Yoshimine, Yozo; Fukumoto, Mayumi; Oku, Manei; Sogabe, Atsushi; Nosaki, Tsuyoshi; Moriuchi, Akihiro; Oketani, Makoto; Ido, Akio; Tsubouchi, Hirohito

    2010-08-20

    Research highlights: {yields} IGFBP-1 mRNA over express in kidneys obtained from mice model of IgA nephropathy. {yields} Serum IGFBP-1 levels are high in patients with IgA nephropathy. {yields} Serum IGFBP-1 levels correlate with renal function and the severity of renal injury. -- Abstract: The mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of immunoglobulin A (IgA) nephropathy (IgAN) are not well understood. In this study, we examined gene expression profiles in kidneys obtained from mice with high serum IgA levels (HIGA mice), which exhibit features of human IgAN. Female inbred HIGA, established from the ddY line, were used in these experiments. Serum IgA levels, renal IgA deposition, mesangial proliferation, and glomerulosclerosis were increased in 32-week-old HIGA mice in comparison to ddY animals. By microarray analysis, five genes were observed to be increased by more than 2.5-fold in 32-week-old HIGA in comparison to 16-week-old HIGA; these same five genes were decreased more than 2.5-fold in 32-week-old ddY in comparison to 16-week-old ddY mice. Of these five genes, insulin-like growth factor (IGF) binding protein (IGFBP)-1 exhibited differential expression between these mouse lines, as confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR. In addition, serum IGFBP-1 levels were significantly higher in patients with IgAN than in healthy controls. In patients with IgAN, these levels correlated with measures of renal function, such as estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), but not with sex, age, serum IgA, C3 levels, or IGF-1 levels. Pathologically, serum IGFBP-1 levels were significantly associated with the severity of renal injury, as assessed by mesangial cell proliferation and interstitial fibrosis. These results suggest that increased IGFBP-1 levels are associated with the severity of renal pathology in patients with IgAN.

  2. Defining the disulfide bonds of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-5 by tandem mass spectrometry with electron transfer dissociation and collision-induced dissociation.

    PubMed

    Nili, Mahta; Mukherjee, Aditi; Shinde, Ujwal; David, Larry; Rotwein, Peter

    2012-01-06

    The six high-affinity insulin-like growth factor-binding proteins (IGFBPs) comprise a conserved family of secreted molecules that modulate IGF actions by regulating their half-life and access to signaling receptors, and also exert biological effects that are independent of IGF binding. IGFBPs are composed of cysteine-rich amino- (N-) and carboxyl- (C-) terminal domains, along with a cysteine-poor central linker segment. IGFBP-5 is the most conserved IGFBP, and contains 18 cysteines, but only 2 of 9 putative disulfide bonds have been mapped to date. Using a mass spectrometry (MS)-based strategy combining sequential electron transfer dissociation (ETD) and collision-induced dissociation (CID) steps, in which ETD fragmentation preferentially induces cleavage of disulfide bonds, and CID provides exact disulfide linkage assignments between liberated peptides, we now have definitively mapped 5 disulfide bonds in IGFBP-5. In addition, in conjunction with ab initio molecular modeling we are able to assign the other 4 disulfide linkages to within a GCGCCXXC motif that is conserved in five IGFBPs. Because of the nature of ETD fragmentation MS experiments were performed without chemical reduction of IGFBP-5. Our results not only establish a disulfide bond map of IGFBP-5 but also define a general approach that takes advantage of the specificity of ETD and the scalability of tandem MS, and the predictive power of ab initio molecular modeling to characterize unknown disulfide linkages in proteins.

  3. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein 7 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-2: differential expression and secretion in human kidney tubule cells.

    PubMed

    Emlet, David R; Pastor-Soler, Nuria; Marciszyn, Allison; Wen, Xiaoyan; Gomez, Hernando; Humphries, William H; Morrisroe, Seth; Volpe, Jacob K; Kellum, John A

    2017-02-01

    We have characterized the expression and secretion of the acute kidney injury (AKI) biomarkers insulin-like growth factor binding protein 7 (IGFBP7) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-2 (TIMP-2) in human kidney epithelial cells in primary cell culture and tissue. We established cell culture model systems of primary kidney cells of proximal and distal tubule origin and observed that both proteins are indeed expressed and secreted in both tubule cell types in vitro. However, TIMP-2 is both expressed and secreted preferentially by cells of distal tubule origin, while IGFBP7 is equally expressed across tubule cell types yet preferentially secreted by cells of proximal tubule origin. In human kidney tissue, strong staining of IGFBP7 was seen in the luminal brush-border region of a subset of proximal tubule cells, and TIMP-2 stained intracellularly in distal tubules. Additionally, while some tubular colocalization of both biomarkers was identified with the injury markers kidney injury molecule-1 and neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, both biomarkers could also be seen alone, suggesting the possibility for differential mechanistic and/or temporal profiles of regulation of these early AKI biomarkers from known markers of injury. Last, an in vitro model of ischemia-reperfusion demonstrated enhancement of secretion of both markers early after reperfusion. This work provides a rationale for further investigation of these markers for their potential role in the pathogenesis of acute kidney injury.

  4. Elevation of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-2 level in Pallister-Killian syndrome: implications for the postnatal growth retardation phenotype.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Kosuke; Kellogg, Emily; Fujiki, Katsunori; Kaur, Maninder; Tilton, Richard K; Noon, Sarah; Wilkens, Alisha; Shirahige, Katsuhiko; Krantz, Ian D

    2015-06-01

    Pallister-Killian syndrome (PKS) is a multi-system developmental disorder caused by tetrasomy 12p that exhibits tissue-limited mosaicism. Probands with PKS often demonstrate a unique growth profile consisting of macrosomia at birth with deceleration of growth postnatally. We have previously demonstrated that cultured skin fibroblasts from PKS probands have significantly elevated expression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-2 (IGFBP2). To further evaluate the role of IGFBP2 in PKS, the amount of IGFBP2 secreted from cultured skin fibroblast cell lines and serum IGFBP2 levels were measured in probands with PKS. Approximately 60% of PKS fibroblast cell lines secreted higher levels of IGFBP2 compared to control fibroblasts, although the remaining 40% of PKS samples produced comparable level of IGFBP2 to that of control fibroblasts. Serum IGFBP2 levels were also measured in PKS probands and were elevated in 40% of PKS probands. PKS probands with elevated IGFBP2 manifested with severe postnatal growth retardation. IGFBPs are the family of related proteins that bind IGFs with high affinity and are typically thought to attenuate IGF action. We suggest that elevated IGFBP2 levels might play a role in the growth retardation phenotype of PKS.

  5. Influence of glyco-oxidation on complexes between fibrin(ogen) and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-1 in patients with diabetes mellitus type 2.

    PubMed

    Gligorijević, Nikola; Penezić, Ana; Nedić, Olgica

    2017-01-01

    Fibrinogen and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) are tightly connected to metabolic changes and complications in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM), and since they mutually interact to form complexes in plasma, we investigated whether and to what extent IGFBP-1/fibrinogen complexes change due to glyco-oxidative processes in DM and whether they participate in fibrin clot formation. These complexes were determined by immunoblotting in plasma samples from healthy adults and patients with DM type 2 (DM2). The influence of glyco-oxidation in vitro on the complexes was also investigated. Amounts of IGFBP-1/fibrinogen complexes in plasma from patients with DM2 were slightly but not significantly lower than in healthy persons. Such complexes in patients' samples participated in fibrin clot formation to a significantly decreased extent. In vitro experiments with glucose or methylglyoxal (MGO) as reactive agents demonstrated that the complexes underwent glyco-oxidative modification leading to reduced formation and/or stability. Extensively oxidized fibrinogen almost completely lost its ability to bind IGFBP-1. The reduced affinity of fibrinogen for IGFBP-1 accompanying diabetes may potentially shift the equilibrium to liberate more IGFBP-1 (and possibly insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I) able to activate platelets during coagulation, so contributing to the hypercoagulation state together with other factors. This hypothesis, however, needs further examination.

  6. Diagnostic Value of Urine Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-2 and Insulin-Like Growth Factor-Binding Protein 7 for Acute Kidney Injury: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Su, Yuanyuan; Gong, Zhiyan; Wu, Yan; Tian, Yuan; Liao, Xiaohui

    2017-01-01

    Background Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2) and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-7 (IGFBP7) are both involved in renal tubular epithelial cell cycle arrest in acute kidney injury (AKI). Several recent studies showed that urine TIMP-2 times IGFBP7 ([TIMP-2]*[IGFBP7]) is a promising biomarker to predict AKI. Methods The aim of this meta-analysis was to assess the diagnostic value of urine [TIMP-2]*[IGFBP7] for early diagnosis of AKI. Relevant studies were retrieved from the PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases. The sensitivity and specificity were determined, and summary receiver operating characteristic (SROC) curves were constructed. Results Ten full-text prospective studies were included in this meta-analysis. The estimated sensitivity of urine [TIMP-2]*[IGFBP7] for the early diagnosis of AKI was 0.84 (95% CI = 0.80–0.88) and the specificity was 0.57 (95%CI = 0.55–0.60). The SROC analysis showed an area under the curve of 0.8813. Limitation The limited number of included studies, small sample size, unpublished negative results and language limitation might have affected the evaluation. Conclusion Urine [TIMP-2]*[IGFBP7] is a promising candidate for early detection of AKI, especially in ruling-out AKI. However, the potential of this biomarker should be validated in larger studies with a broader spectrum of clinical settings. PMID:28107490

  7. Serum insulin-like growth factors I and II, insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 and risk of breast cancer in the Japan Collaborative Cohort study.

    PubMed

    Sakauchi, Fumio; Nojima, Masanori; Mori, Mitsuru; Wakai, Kenji; Suzuki, Sadao; Tamakoshi, Akiko; Ito, Yoshinori; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Inaba, Yutaka; Tajima, Kazuo; Nakachi, Kei

    2009-12-01

    The Japan Collaborative Cohort Study for Evaluation of Cancer Risk (JACC Study) was planned in the late 1980s as a large-scale cohort study of persons in various areas of Japan. In the present study, we conducted a nested case-control study and examined associations of breast cancer risk with serum levels of insulin-like growth factors I and II (IGF-I, IGF-II), as well as insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3), among women who participated in the JACC Study and donated blood at the baseline. Sixty-three women who died or suffered from breast cancer were examined. Two or three controls were selected to match each case for age at recruitment and the study area. Controls were alive and not diagnosed as having breast cancer at the diagnosis date of the cases. Associations between the serum IGF-I, IGF-II, IGFBP-3 and breast cancer risk were evaluated using a conditional logistic regression model. In premenopausal Japanese women, IGF-I showed a marginal negative dose-dependent association with the breast cancer risk (trend P= 0.08), but any link disappeared on taking into account IGFBP-3 (trend P= 0.47), which was likely to be inversely associated with the risk. In postmenopausal women, IGFBP-3 showed a marginal dose-dependent association with the risk (trend P= 0.06). Further studies are needed to confirm these findings.

  8. Association of the insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3) polymorphism with longevity in Chinese nonagenarians and centenarians.

    PubMed

    He, Yong-Han; Lu, Xiang; Yang, Li-Qin; Xu, Liang-You; Kong, Qing-Peng

    2014-11-01

    Human lifespan is determined greatly by genetic factors and some investigations have identified putative genes implicated in human longevity. Although some genetic loci have been associated with longevity, most of them are difficult to replicate due to ethnic differences. In this study, we analyzed the association of 18 reported gene single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) with longevity in 1075 samples consisting of 567 nonagenarians/centenarians and 508 younger controls using the GenomeLab SNPstream Genotyping System. Our results confirm the association of the forkhead box O3 (FOXO3) variant (rs13217795) and the ATM serine/threonine kinase (ATM) variant (rs189037) genotypes with longevity (p=0.0075 and p=0.026, using the codominant model and recessive model, respectively). Of note is that we first revealed the association of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3) gene polymorphism rs11977526 with longevity in Chinese nonagenarians/centenarians (p=0.033 using the dominant model and p=0.035 using the overdominant model). The FOXO3 and IGFBP-3 form important parts of the insulin/insulin-like growth factor-1 signaling pathway (IGF-1) implicated in human longevity, and the ATM gene is involved in sensing DNA damage and reducing oxidative stress, therefore our results highlight the important roles of insulin pathway and oxidative stress in the longevity in the Chinese population.

  9. G proteins in carotid body chemoreception.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, N R; Kou, Y R; Kumar, G K

    1995-01-01

    G proteins are signal coupling molecules that play major roles in mediating the effects of transmitters as well as certain sensory signals. In the present study we examined whether oxygen chemoreception in the carotid body is coupled to G proteins. Experiments were performed on carotid bodies isolated from anesthetized cats. Presence of G proteins was examined with ADP-ribosylation of the carotid body membranes. Pertussis toxin (PTX), which inactivates G proteins in neuronal tissues, ADP-ribosylated a single band of carotid body protein with a molecular mass of 41 kDa. With cholera toxin (CTX) only a faint band of protein corresponding to approximately 45 kDa was evident. Perfusing the isolated carotid bodies with PTX (2.5 micrograms/min; 60 min) attenuated the sensory response to hypoxia by 52% of the controls. Perfusion with CTX (50 micrograms/min; for 60 min), on the other hand, increased baseline activity and potentiated the hypoxic response by 125% of controls. Heat-inactivated toxins, however, had no influence on the carotid body sensory response to hypoxia. These results suggest that G proteins are present in the chemoreceptor tissue and they seem to be coupled to the transduction and/or to the transmission of the hypoxic stimulus.

  10. Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-7 (IGFBP7) transcript: A-to-I editing events in normal and cancerous human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Hochberg, Malka; Gilead, Leon; Markel, Gal; Nemlich, Yael; Feiler, Yulia; Enk, Claes David; Denichenko, Polina; Karni, Rotem; Ingber, Arieh

    2013-08-01

    Non-melanoma skin cancers (NMSC) are the most common malignancies in caucasians worldwide. Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-7 (IGFBP7) was suggested to function as a tumor suppressor gene in several cancers, and to play a role in the proliferation of keratinocytes. A-to-I RNA editing is a post-transcriptional mechanism frequently used to expand and diversify transcriptome and proteome repertoire in eukaryotic cells. A-to-I RNA editing can alter codons, substitute amino acids and affect protein sequence, structure, and function. Two editing sites were identified within the IGFBP7 transcript. To evaluate the expression and editing of IGFBP7 mRNA in NMSC compared to normal epidermis. We examined the expression and mRNA editing level of IGFBP7 in 22 basal cell carcinoma (BCC), 15 squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and 18 normal epidermis samples that were surgically removed from patients by the Mohs Micrographic Surgery procedure. We studied the effect of IGFBP7 editing on an immortalized HaCaT keratinocyte cell model. IGFBP7 mRNA is over expressed in BCC and SCC compared to normal epidermis. Moreover, the IGFBP7 transcript is highly edited in normal epidermis, but its editing is significantly reduced in BCC and SCC. The edited form of IGFBP7 can inhibit proliferation and induce senescence in cultured keratinocytes. This study describes for the first time A-to-I editing in the coding sequence of a tumor suppressor gene in humans, and suggests that IGFBP7 editing serves as a fine-tuning mechanism to maintain the equilibrium between proliferation and senescence in normal skin.

  11. Identification and localization of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein (IGFBP) messenger RNAs in human hair follicle dermal papilla.

    PubMed

    Batch, J A; Mercuri, F A; Werther, G A

    1996-03-01

    The role of the insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) in hair follicle biology has recently been recognized, although their actions, sites of production, and modulation by the insulin-like growth factor-binding proteins (IGFBPs) have not to date been defined. IGF-I is essential for normal hair growth and development, and may be important in regulation of the hair growth cycle. In many culture systems, IGF-I actions are modulated by the IGFBPs. Thus, if IGFBPs are produced in the human hair follicle, they may play a role in targeting IGF-I to its receptor or may modulate IGF-I action by interaction with matrix proteins. We have used in situ hybridization to localize messenger RNA for the six IGFBPs in anagen hair follicles. Anti-sense and sense RNA probes for the IGFBPs (IGFBP-1 to -6) were produced, and 5-micrometer sections of adult facial skin were probed. Messenger RNA for IGFBP-3, -4, and -5 were identified, with predominantly IGFBP-3 and -5 mRNA found in the dermal papilla, and to a lesser extent IGFBP-4 mRNA. IGFBP-4 mRNA was also found at the dermal papilla/epithelial matrix border. Messenger RNAs for both IGFBP-4 and -5 were also demonstrated in the dermal sheath surrounding the hair follicle. Messenger RNAs for IGFBP-1, -2, and -6 were not identified. These studies demonstrate specific localization of IGFBP mRNAs in hair follicles, suggesting that they each play specific roles in the local modulation of IGF action during the hair growth cycle.

  12. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein-5 modulates muscle differentiation through an insulin-like growth factor-dependent mechanism.

    PubMed

    James, P L; Stewart, C E; Rotwein, P

    1996-05-01

    The insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) are a family of six secreted proteins which bind to and modulate the actions of insulin-like growth factors-I and -II (IGF-I and -II). IGFBP-5 is more conserved than other IGFBPs characterized to date, and is expressed in adult rodent muscle and in the developing myotome. We have shown previously that C2 myoblasts secrete IGFBP-5 as their sole IGFBP. Here we use these cells to study the function of IGFBP-5 during myogenesis, a process stimulated by IGFs. We stably transfected C2 cells with IGFBP-5 cDNAs under control of a constitutively active promoter. Compared with vector-transfected control cells, C2 myoblasts expressing the IGFBP-5 transgene in the sense orientation exhibit increased IGFBP-5 levels in the extracellular matrix during proliferation, and subsequently fail to differentiate normally, as assessed by both morphological and biochemical criteria. Compared to controls, IGFBP-5 sense myoblasts show enhanced survival in low serum medium, remaining viable for at least four weeks in culture. By contrast, myoblasts expressing the IGFBP-5 antisense transcript differentiate prematurely and more extensively than control cells. The inhibition of myogenic differentiation by high level expression of IGFBP-5 could be overcome by exogenous IGFs, with des (1-3) IGF-I, an analogue with decreased affinity for IGFBP-5 but normal affinity for the IGF-I receptor, showing the highest potency. These results are consistent with a model in which IGFBP-5 blocks IGF-stimulated myogenesis, and indicate that sequestration of IGFs in the extracellular matrix could be a possible mechanism of action. Our observations also suggest that IGFBP-5 normally inhibits muscle differentiation, and imply a role for IGFBP-5 in regulating IGF action during myogenic development in vivo.

  13. INFLUENCE OF INSULIN-LIKE GROWTH FACTOR BINDING PROTEINS (IGFBP)-1 AND IGFBP-3 ON BONE HEALTH: RESULTS FROM THE EUROPEAN MALE AGEING STUDY (EMAS)

    PubMed Central

    Pye, Stephen R; Almusalam, Bader; Boonen, Steven; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Borghs, Herman; Gielen, Evelien; Adams, Judith E; Ward, Kate A; Bartfai, Gyorgy; Casanueva, Felipe F; Finn, Joseph D; Forti, Gianni; Giwercman, Aleksander; Han, Thang S; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo T; Kula, Krzysztof; Labrie, Fernand; Lean, Michael EJ; Pendleton, Neil; Punab, Margus; Silman, Alan J; Wu, Frederick CW; O’Neill, Terence W

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBP)-1 and IGFBP-3, and IGF-1 on calcaneal ultrasound parameters in middle-aged and elderly European men. Men aged 40 to 79 years were recruited from population registers for participation in the European Male Ageing Study (EMAS). Subjects were invited by letter to complete a postal questionnaire and to attend for an interviewer-assisted questionnaire, quantitative ultrasound (QUS) of the calcaneus and a fasting blood sample from which serum levels of IGFBP-1, IGFBP-3, IGF-1, oestradiol (E2) and SHBG were assayed. The questionnaires included the Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly (PASE) and questions about smoking and alcohol consumption. Estimated bone mineral density (eBMD) was derived as a function of the QUS parameters, speed of sound and broadband ultrasound attenuation. Height and weight were measured in all subjects. 3057 men, mean age 59.7 years (standard deviation [SD]=11.0) were included in the analysis. After adjusting for age, centre and BMI, higher levels of IGFBP-1 were associated with lower eBMD. Higher levels of both IGFBP-3 and IGF-1 were associated with higher eBMD. After further adjustment for PASE score, current smoking, alcohol consumption, free E2 and SHBG, IGFBP-3 and IGF-1, though not IGFBP-1, remained significantly associated with eBMD. IGFBP-1 was associated with bone health though the effect could be explained by other factors. IGFBP-3 and IGF-1 were independent determinants of bone health in middle aged and elderly European men. PMID:21503646

  14. The joint effects of arsenic and risk diplotypes of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 in renal cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chao-Yuan; Huang, Ya-Li; Pu, Yeong-Shiau; Shiue, Horng-Sheng; Chen, Wei-Jen; Chen, Shih-Shan; Lin, Ying-Chin; Su, Chien-Tien; Hsueh, Yu-Mei

    2016-07-01

    The association between renal cell carcinoma (RCC) and diabetes mellitus (DM), alcohol consumption, insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) gene, and arsenic exposure, has been the subject of independent studies. However, few studies have examined the combined effect of these factors on RCC risk. The aim of this study was to examine the association between these risk factors and the odds ratio (OR) of RCC. A hospital-based case-control study was conducted in 398 RCC patients and 756 age- and gender-matched non-cancer controls. Genomic DNA was used to examine the genotype of IRS-1 (Gly972Arg), PI3-K (Met362Ile), IGFBP-3 (A[-202]C), and IGFBP-3 (C[-1590]A) by PCR-RFLP. Profiles of urinary arsenic were measured by high performance liquid chromatography linked with hydride generator and atomic absorption spectrometry. Participants who had never consumed alcohol and who had high total levels of urinary arsenic and DM had a high OR of RCC. IGFBP-3 (A[-202]C) and IGFBP-3 (C[-1590]A) were in linkage disequilibrium. Participants carrying high-risk IGFBP-3 diplotypes A-C/C-C, A-A/A-C, and C-A/C-A had a significantly higher odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (2.80, 1.91-4.12) of RCC compared to those carrying other IGFBP-3 diplotypes. This is the first study to show that borderline significant interaction of high total levels of urinary arsenic and IGFBP-3 high-risk diplotypes significantly enhanced the OR of RCC. Our data also provide evidence that subjects with more risk factors (e.g., high total levels of urinary arsenic, never consumed alcohol, IGFBP-3 high-risk diplotypes) may experience a higher OR of RCC.

  15. Oncogenic function of the homeobox A13-long noncoding RNA HOTTIP-insulin growth factor-binding protein 3 axis in human gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Sophie S.W.; Wuputra, Kenly; Liu, Chung-Jung; Lin, Yin-Chu; Chen, Yi-Ting; Chai, Chee-Yin; Lin, Chen-Lung Steve; Kuo, Kung-Kai; Tsai, Ming-Ho; Wang, Shin-Wei; Chen, Ker-Kong; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Nakamura, Yukio; Saito, Shigeo; Hanafusa, Tadashi; Wu, Deng-Chyang; Lin, Chang-Shen; Yokoyama, Kazunari K.

    2016-01-01

    To study the mechanisms of gastric tumorigenesis, we have established CSN cell line from human normal gastric mucosa, and CS12, a tumorigenic and invasive gastric cancer cell line from CSN passages. Many stem cell markers were expressed in both CSN and CS12 cells, but LGR5 and NANOG were expressed only in CS12 cells. Increased expression of homeobox A13 (HoxA13) and its downstream cascades was significant for the tumorigenic activity of CS12 cells, and was associated with recruitment of E2F-1 to HoxA13 promoter accompanied with increased trimethylation of histone H3 lysine 4 (H3K4me3) at the hypomethylated E2F motifs. Knockdown of HoxA13 caused the downregulation of long non-coding RNA HOTTIP and insulin growth factor-binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3) genes, indicating that both were targets of HoxA13. Concurrent regulation of HoxA13-HOTTIP was mediated by the mixed lineage leukemia-WD repeat domain 5 complex, which caused the trimethylation of H3K4 and then stimulated cell proliferation. HoxA13 transactivated the IGFBP-3 promoter through the HOX-binding site. Activation of IGFBP-3 stimulated the oncogenic potential and invasion activity. Increased expression of HoxA13 (63.2%) and IGFBP-3 (28.6%) was detected in human gastric cancer tissues and was found in the gastric cancer data of The Cancer Genome Atlas. Taken together, the HoxA13–HOTTIP–IGFBP-3 cascade is critical for the carcinogenic characteristics of CS12 cells. PMID:27144338

  16. Influence of insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP)-1 and IGFBP-3 on bone health: results from the European Male Ageing Study.

    PubMed

    Pye, Stephen R; Almusalam, Bader; Boonen, Steven; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Borghs, Herman; Gielen, Evelien; Adams, Judith E; Ward, Kate A; Bartfai, Gyorgy; Casanueva, Felipe F; Finn, Joseph D; Forti, Gianni; Giwercman, Aleksander; Han, Thang S; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo T; Kula, Krzysztof; Labrie, Fernand; Lean, Michael E J; Pendleton, Neil; Punab, Margus; Silman, Alan J; Wu, Frederick C W; O'Neill, Terence W

    2011-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP)-1, IGFBP-3, and IGF-I on calcaneal ultrasound parameters in middle-aged and elderly European men. Men aged 40-79 years were recruited from population registers for participation in the European Male Ageing Study (EMAS). Subjects were invited by letter to complete a postal questionnaire and to attend for an interviewer-assisted questionnaire, quantitative ultrasound (QUS) of the calcaneus, and a fasting blood sample from which serum levels of IGFBP-1, IGFBP-3, IGF-I, estradiol (E(2)), and SHBG were assayed. The questionnaires included the Physical Activity Scale for the Elderly (PASE) and questions about smoking and alcohol consumption. Estimated bone mineral density (eBMD) was derived as a function of the QUS parameters speed of sound and broadband ultrasound attenuation. Height and weight were measured in all subjects. 3057 men, mean age 59.7 years (standard deviation 11.0) were included in the analysis. After adjusting for age, center, and BMI, higher levels of IGFBP-1 were associated with lower eBMD. Higher levels of both IGFBP-3 and IGF-I were associated with higher eBMD. After further adjustment for PASE score, current smoking, alcohol consumption, free E(2), and SHBG, IGFBP-3 and IGF-I, though not IGFBP-1, remained significantly associated with eBMD. IGFBP-1 was associated with bone health, though the effect could be explained by other factors. IGFBP-3 and IGF-I were independent determinants of bone health in middle-aged and elderly European men.

  17. The microRNA-302b-inhibited insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 2 signaling pathway induces glioma cell apoptosis by targeting nuclear factor IA

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chin-Cheng; Chen, Peng-Hsu; Ho, Kuo-Hao; Shih, Chwen-Ming; Cheng, Chia-Hsiung; Lin, Cheng-Wei; Cheng, Kur-Ta; Liu, Ann-Jeng

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNAs are small noncoding RNAs that post-transcriptionally control the expression of genes involved in glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) development. Although miR-302b functions as a tumor suppressor, its role in GBM is still unclear. Therefore, this study comprehensively explored the roles of miR-302b-mediated gene networks in GBM cell death. We found that miR-302b levels were significantly higher in primary astrocytes than in GBM cell lines. miR-302b overexpression dose dependently reduced U87-MG cell viability and induced apoptosis through caspase-3 activation and poly(ADP ribose) polymerase degradation. A transcriptome microarray revealed 150 downregulated genes and 380 upregulated genes in miR-302b-overexpressing cells. Nuclear factor IA (NFIA), higher levels of which were significantly related to poor survival, was identified as a direct target gene of miR-302b and was involved in miR-302b-induced glioma cell death. Higher NFIA levels were observed in GBM cell lines and human tumor sections compared with astrocytes and non-tumor tissues, respectively. NFIA knockdown significantly enhanced apoptosis. We found high levels of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 2 (IGFBP2), another miR-302b-downregulated gene, in patients with poor survival. We verified that NFIA binds to the IGFBP2 promoter and transcriptionally enhances IGFBP2 expression levels. We identified that NFIA-mediated IGFBP2 signaling pathways are involved in miR-302b-induced glioma cell death. The identification of a regulatory loop whereby miR-302b inhibits NFIA, leading to a decrease in expression of IGFBP-2, may provide novel directions for developing therapies to target glioblastoma tumorigenesis. PMID:28323865

  18. Neuroendocrine Cancer-Specific Up-Regulating Mechanism of Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein-2 in Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yazawa, Takuya; Sato, Hanako; Shimoyamada, Hiroaki; Okudela, Koji; Woo, Tetsukan; Tajiri, Michihiko; Ogura, Takashi; Ogawa, Nobuo; Suzuki, Takehisa; Mitsui, Hideaki; Ishii, Jun; Miyata, Chie; Sakaeda, Masashi; Goto, Kazuya; Kashiwagi, Korehito; Masuda, Munetaka; Takahashi, Takashi; Kitamura, Hitoshi

    2009-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) exhibits insulin-like growth factor-dependent growth. SCLC is the most aggressive among known in vivo lung cancers, whereas in vitro growth of SCLC is paradoxically slow as compared with that of non-SCLC (NSCLC). In this study, we demonstrate that SCLC cells overexpress insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP)-2 via NeuroD, a neuroendocrine cell-specific transcription factor. Chromatin immunoprecipitation, electrophoretic mobility shift, and IGFBP-2 promoter assays all revealed that NeuroD binds to the E-box in the 5′-untranslated region of IGFBP-2. A NeuroD transgene in both airway epithelial and NSCLC cells up-regulated the transcription of IGFBP-2 and retarded cell growth. Recombinant IGFBP-2 repressed the growth of both airway epithelial and NSCLC cells in a dose-dependent manner. A NeuroD-specific small interfering RNA repressed IGFBP-2 expression in SCLC, and neutralization of IGFBP-2 and an IGFBP-2-specific small interfering RNA increased SCLC cell growth. Pathological samples of SCLC also expressed IGFBP-2 abundantly, as compared with NSCLC, and showed only rare (8%) IGFBP-2 promoter methylation, whereas the IGFBP-2 promoter was methylated in 71% of adenocarcinomas and 29% of squamous cell carcinomas. These findings suggest that 1) SCLC has an IGFBP-2 overexpression mechanism distinct from NSCLC, 2) secreted IGFBP-2 contributes to the slow growth of SCLC in vitro, and 3) the epigenetic alterations in the IGFBP-2 promoter contribute to the striking differences in IGFBP-2 expression between SCLC and NSCLC in vivo. PMID:19679880

  19. Prognostic usefulness of insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 7 in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction: a novel biomarker of myocardial diastolic function?

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Parul U; Gaggin, Hanna K; Sheftel, Alex D; Belcher, Arianna M; Weiner, Rory B; Baggish, Aaron L; Motiwala, Shweta R; Liu, Peter P; Januzzi, James L

    2014-11-15

    Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 7 (IGFBP7) is a biomarker that has recently been associated with heart failure and cardiac hypertrophy. The aim of this study was to examine IGFBP7 relative to echocardiographic abnormalities reflecting diastolic dysfunction. One hundred twenty-four patients with ambulatory heart failure with reduced ejection fraction and baseline detailed 2-dimensional echocardiograms were followed for a mean of 10 months. IGFBP7 was measured serially at each office visit; 108 patients underwent follow-up echocardiography. Echocardiographic parameters of diastolic function were compared at baseline and over time. IGFBP7 concentrations were not linked to left ventricular size or systolic function. In contrast, those with elevated baseline IGFBP7 concentrations were more likely to have abnormalities of parameters describing diastolic function, such as higher left atrial volume index, transmitral E/A ratio, E/E' ratio, and right ventricular systolic pressure. IGFBP7 was correlated with left atrial volume index (ρ = 0.237, p = 0.008), transmitral E/A ratio (ρ = 0.304, p = 0.001), E/E' ratio (ρ = 0.257, p = 0.005), and right ventricular systolic pressure (ρ = 0.316, p = 0.001). Furthermore, each was found to be independently predictive of IGFBP7 in adjusted analysis. In subjects with baseline and final echocardiograms, more time spent with elevated IGFBP7 concentrations in serial measurement was associated with worsening diastolic function and increasing left atrial volume index or right ventricular systolic pressure. IGFBP7 concentrations were predictive of an increased risk for cardiovascular events independent of echocardiographic measures of diastolic function (p = 0.006). In conclusion, IGFBP7 is a novel prognostic biomarker for heart failure with reduced ejection fraction and shows significant links to the presence and severity of echocardiographic parameters of abnormal diastolic function.

  20. Two grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella) insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 5 genes exhibit different yet conserved functions in development and growth.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Guo-Dong; Zhou, Chun-Xue; Lin, Si-Tong; Chen, Jie; Jiang, Xia-Yun; Zou, Shu-Ming

    2017-02-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding-protein 5 (igfbp5), the most conserved member of the IGFBP family in vertebrates, plays a critical role in controlling cell survival, growth, differentiation, and apoptosis. Here, we characterized the expression patterns of igfbp5a and igfbp5b in grass carp (Ctenopharyngodon idella), which are retained in many fish species, likely from the teleost-specific whole-genome duplication. Both igfbp5a and igfbp5b encode 268- and 263-aa peptides, respectively, which share a sequence identity of 71%. Their mRNAs are not detected in zygotes. At 14hpf, grass carp igfbp5b mRNA was detected in the somites, while igfbp5a mRNA has some possible signal around the eye and head region. At 24hpf, both igfbp5a and igfbp5b mRNA appear to be limited to the presomitic mesoderm. At 36hpf, igfbp5a mRNA was only detected in the midbrain, while igfbp5b mRNA was detected in both the midbrain and notochord. Overall, both mRNAs were expressed in most adult tissues. igfbp5a and igfbp5b were significantly upregulated in the muscle and liver after injection of 10μg per kilogram body weight of zebrafish growth hormone (zGH), while their hepatic expression was downregulated by 50μg zGH. During fasting, both igfbp5a and igfbp5b mRNAs were significantly downregulated in the muscle but upregulated in the liver. Collectively, the results suggest that the two igfbp5 genes play important but different roles in the regulation of growth and development in grass carp.

  1. Construction of hormonally responsive intact cell hybrids by cell fusion: transfer of. beta. -adrenergic receptor and nucleotide regulatory protein(s) in normal and desensitized cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schulster, D.; Salmon, D.M.

    1985-01-01

    Fusion of normal, untreated human erythrocytes with desensitized turkey erythrocytes increases isoproterenol stimulation of cyclic (/sup 3/H)AMP accumulation over basal rates. Moreover, pretreatment of the human erythrocytes with cholera toxin before they are fused with desensitized turkey erthythrocytes leads to a large stimulation with isoproterenol. This is even greater and far more rapid than the response obtained if turkey erythrocytes are treated directly with cholera toxin. It is concluded that the stimulation in the fused system is due to the transfer of an ADP-ribosylated subunit of nucleotide regulatory protein.

  2. Protein kinase C and tyrosine kinase pathways regulate lipopolysaccharide-induced nitric oxide synthase activity in RAW 264.7 murine macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Paul, A; Pendreigh, R H; Plevin, R

    1995-01-01

    1. In RAW 264.7 macrophages, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and gamma-interferon (IFN gamma) alone or in combination stimulated the induction of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) activity and increased the expression of the 130 kDa isoform of NOS. 2. LPS-induced NOS activity was reduced by incubation with CD14 neutralising antibodies and abolished in macrophages deprived of serum. 3. LPS stimulated a small increase in protein kinase C (PKC) activity in RAW 264.7 macrophages which was dependent on the presence of serum. However, IFN gamma did not potentiate LPS-stimulated PKC activity. 4. The protein kinase C inhibitor, Ro-318220, abolished both LPS- and IFN gamma-stimulated protein kinase C activity and the induction of NOS activity. 5. LPS- and IFN gamma-induced NOS activity was reduced by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genestein. Genestein also reduced LPS-stimulated protein kinase C activity but did not affect the response to the protein kinase C activator, tetradecanoylphorbol acetate (TPA). 6. Nicotinamide, an inhibitor of poly-ADP ribosylation, abolished LPS- and IFN gamma-induced NOS activity. 7. Brefeldin A, an inhibitor of a factor which stimulates nucleotide exchange activity on the 21 kDa ADP-ribosylation factor, ARF, reduced LPS- and IFN gamma-induced NOS activity by approximately 80%. 8. These results suggest the involvement of protein kinase C, tyrosine kinase and poly-ADP ribosylation pathways in the regulation of the induction of nitric oxide synthase in RAW 264.7 macrophages by LPS and IFN gamma. Images Figure 2 PMID:7533621

  3. CERVICAL PHOSPHORYLATED INSULIN-LIKE GROWTH FACTOR BINDING PROTEIN-1 TEST FOR THE PREDICTION OF PRETERM BIRTH: A SYSTEMATIC REVIEW AND META-ANALYSIS

    PubMed Central

    CONDE-AGUDELO, AGUSTIN; ROMERO, ROBERTO

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To assess the accuracy of the cervical phosphorylated insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 (phIGFBP-1) test to predict preterm birth in women with and without symptoms of preterm labor through use of formal methods for systematic reviews and meta-analytic techniques. DATA SOURCES PubMed, Embase, Cinahl, Lilacs, and Medion (all from inception to June 20, 2015), reference lists, conference proceedings, and Google scholar. STUDY ELIGIBILITY CRITERIA Cohort or cross-sectional studies that reported on the predictive accuracy of cervical phIGFBP-1 test for preterm birth. STUDY APPRAISAL AND SYNTHESIS METHODS Two reviewers independently selected studies, assessed risk of bias, and extracted data. Summary receiver operating characteristic curves, pooled sensitivities and specificities, and summary likelihood ratios were generated. RESULTS Forty-three studies met the inclusion criteria of which 15 provided data on asymptomatic women (n=6583) and 34 on women with an episode of preterm labor (N=3620). Among asymptomatic women, the predictive accuracy of cervical phIGFBP-1 test for preterm birth at <37, <34 and <32 weeks of gestation was minimal with pooled sensitivities and specificities, and summary positive and negative likelihood ratios ranging from 14-47%, 76-93%, 1.5-4.4, and 0.6-1.0, respectively. Among women with an episode of preterm labor, the test had a low predictive performance for delivery within 7 and 14 days of testing, and preterm birth at <34 and <37 weeks of gestation with pooled sensitivities and specificities, and summary positive and negative likelihood ratios that varied between 60 and 68%, 77 and 81%, 2.7 and 3.5, and 0.4 and 0.5, respectively. A negative test result in women with an episode of preterm labor had a low to moderate accuracy to identify women who are not at risk for delivering within the next 48 hours (summary negative likelihood ratio of 0.28 in all women and 0.23 in women with singleton gestations). CONCLUSION Cervical

  4. Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 and Selected Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein Concentrations during an Ultramarathon Sled Dog Race

    PubMed Central

    Brunke, Matthew W.; Frye, Christopher W.; Levine, Corri B.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of running a 1000-mile (1600 km) endurance sled dog race on serum insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and insulin-like growth factor binding proteins 1 and 3 (IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-3). Serum was examined from 12 sled dogs prior to the race, at midrace (approximately 690 km), and again at the finish. IGF-1, IGFBP-1, and IGFBP-3 were assessed using radioimmunoassay or enzyme linked immune-absorbance assays. Mean prerace concentrations were significantly higher than midrace and end-race concentrations at 215.93 ± 80.51 ng/mL, 54.29 ± 25.45 ng/mL, and 55.53 ± 28.25 ng/mL, respectively (P < 0.001). Mean IGFBP-1 concentrations were not different across these time periods at 24.1 ± 15.8 ng/mL, 25.7 ± 14.0 ng/mL, and 26.6 ± 17.6 ng/mL, respectively. IGFBP-3 concentrations showed a modest significant decrease across time periods at 3,067 ± 2,792 ng/mL, 2,626 ± 2,310 ng/mL, and 2,331 ± 2,301 ng/mL, respectively (P < 0.01). Endurance sled dogs show a precipitous drop in serum IGF-1 concentrations. These differences may be related to fuel utilization and excessive negative energy balance associated with the loss of body condition during racing. The relative stability of IGFBP-1 and IGFBP-3 suggests that IGF-1 anabolic signaling is diminished during ultramarathon racing. Further studies comparing the influence of time and duration of exercise versus negative energy balance on serum IGF-1 status are warranted to better understand exercise versus negative energy balance differences. PMID:27689132

  5. Reprogramming cellular events by poly(ADP-ribose)-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pic, Émilie; Ethier, Chantal; Dawson, Ted M.; Dawson, Valina L.; Masson, Jean-Yves; Poirier, Guy G.; Gagné, Jean-Philippe

    2013-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is a posttranslational modification catalyzed by the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs). These enzymes covalently modify glutamic, aspartic and lysine amino acid side chains of acceptor proteins by the sequential addition of ADP-ribose (ADPr) units. The poly(ADP-ribose) (pADPr) polymers formed alter the physico-chemical characteristics of the substrate with functional consequences on its biological activities. Recently, non-covalent binding to pADPr has emerged as a key mechanism to modulate and coordinate several intracellular pathways including the DNA damage response, protein stability and cell death. In this review, we describe the basis of non-covalent binding to pADPr that has led to the emerging concept of pADPr-responsive signaling pathways. This review emphasizes the structural elements and the modular strategies developed by pADPr-binding proteins to exert a fine-tuned control of a variety of pathways. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation reactions are highly regulated processes, both spatially and temporally, for which at least four specialized pADPr-binding modules accommodate different pADPr structures and reprogram protein functions. In this review, we highlight the role of well-characterized and newly discovered pADPr-binding modules in a diverse set of physiological functions. PMID:23268355

  6. Rapamycin inhibits poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation in intact cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fahrer, Joerg; Wagner, Silvia; Buerkle, Alexander; Koenigsrainer, Alfred

    2009-08-14

    Rapamycin is an immunosuppressive drug, which inhibits the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase activity inducing changes in cell proliferation. Synthesis of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) is an immediate cellular response to genotoxic stress catalyzed mostly by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1), which is also controlled by signaling pathways. Therefore, we investigated whether rapamycin affects PAR production. Strikingly, rapamycin inhibited PAR synthesis in living fibroblasts in a dose-dependent manner as monitored by immunofluorescence. PARP-1 activity was then assayed in vitro, revealing that down-regulation of cellular PAR production by rapamycin was apparently not due to competitive PARP-1 inhibition. Further studies showed that rapamycin did not influence the cellular NAD pool and the activation of PARP-1 in extracts of pretreated fibroblasts. Collectively, our data suggest that inhibition of cellular PAR synthesis by rapamycin is mediated by formation of a detergent-sensitive complex in living cells, and that rapamycin may have a potential as therapeutic PARP inhibitor.

  7. Insulin-like growth factors and their binding proteins in human colonocytes: preferential degradation of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 2 in colonic cancers.

    PubMed Central

    Michell, N. P.; Langman, M. J.; Eggo, M. C.

    1997-01-01

    We have compared the expression of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs) in ten paired samples of normal and tumour colonic tissue with regard to both mRNA and protein. We have compared sensitivity of these tissues to IGF-I using primary cultures of epithelial cells of colonic mucosa, and we have examined the production of IGFs and IGFBPs by these cells. In the tissues, IGFBP-2 mRNA was expressed in all normal and cancer samples but other IGFBPs showed variable expression. mRNAs for IGF-I were expressed in all normal and cancer tissues but IGF-II mRNA was only detected in cancer tissue (3 out of 10). Immunostaining of sections of normal and cancer tissue was negative for IGF-I and IGF-II; IGFBP-2 was positive in 2 out of 10 cancer tissues and 7 out of 10 normal tissues; IGFBP-3 was positive in 7 out of 10 cancer tissues and 7 out of 10 normal tissues; and IGFBP-4 was positive in 5 out of 10 cancer tissues and 6 out of 10 normal tissues. In the cells in culture, cancer cells showed increased incorporation of [35S]methionine into protein and [3H]thymidine into DNA (P < 0.02) when treated with IGF-I. Western blotting of serum-free conditioned media from cells in culture showed that 8 out of 10 normal and 3 out of 10 cancer cultures produced a 32-kDa immunoreactive IGFBP-2. No IGFBP-3 was secreted by any culture but 24-kDa IGFBP-4 was found in 3 out of 10 normal and 5 out of 10 cancer tissues. Because of the discrepancy between mRNA and protein expression for IGFBP-2, degradation of native IGFBPs was assessed using tissue extracts. Colon cancer extracts were able to degrade exogenous IGFBP-2, IGFBP-3 and IGFBP-4, whereas normal tissue extracts were without effect on IGFBP-2. We conclude that IGFBPs are synthesized and secreted by cells of the colonic mucosa but that proteolysis of secreted IGFBP-2 occurs in colon cancer tissue. This selective degradation may confer a growth advantage. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5

  8. Associations of serum insulin-like growth factor-I and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 3 levels with biomarker-calibrated protein, dairy product and milk intake in the Women's Health Initiative.

    PubMed

    Beasley, Jeannette M; Gunter, Marc J; LaCroix, Andrea Z; Prentice, Ross L; Neuhouser, Marian L; Tinker, Lesley F; Vitolins, Mara Z; Strickler, Howard D

    2014-03-14

    It is well established that protein-energy malnutrition decreases serum insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I levels, and supplementation of 30 g of whey protein daily has been shown to increase serum IGF-I levels by 8 % after 2 years in a clinical trial. Cohort studies provide the opportunity to assess associations between dietary protein intake and IGF axis protein levels under more typical eating conditions. In the present study, we assessed the associations of circulating IGF axis protein levels (ELISA, Diagnostic Systems Laboratories) with total biomarker-calibrated protein intake, as well as with dairy product and milk intake, among postmenopausal women enrolled in the Women's Health Initiative (n 747). Analyses were carried out using multivariate linear regression models that adjusted for age, BMI, race/ethnicity, education, biomarker-calibrated energy intake, alcohol intake, smoking, physical activity and hormone therapy use. There was a positive association between milk intake and free IGF-I levels. A three-serving increase in milk intake per d (approximately 30 g of protein) was associated with an estimated average 18·6 % higher increase in free IGF-I levels (95 % CI 0·9, 39·3 %). However, total IGF-I and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 3 (IGFBP-3) levels were not associated with milk consumption and nor were there associations between biomarker-calibrated protein intake, biomarker-calibrated energy intake, and free IGF-I, total IGF-I or IGFBP-3 levels. The findings of the present study carried out in postmenopausal women are consistent with clinical trial data suggesting a specific relationship between milk consumption and serum IGF-I levels, although in the present study this association was only statistically significant for free, but not total, IGF-I or IGFBP-3 levels.

  9. The immunosuppressives FK 506 and cyclosporin A inhibit the generation of protein factors binding to the two purine boxes of the interleukin 2 enhancer.

    PubMed Central

    Brabletz, T; Pietrowski, I; Serfling, E

    1991-01-01

    Like Cyclosporin A (CsA), the macrolide FK 506 is a potent immunosuppressive that inhibits early steps of T cell activation, including the synthesis of Interleukin 2 (II-2) and numerous other lymphokines. The block of II-2 synthesis occurs at the transcriptional level. At concentrations that block T cell activation, FK 506 and CsA inhibit the proto-enhancer activity of Purine boxes of the II-2 promoter and the generation of lymphocyte-specific factors binding to the Purine boxes. Under the same conditions, the DNA binding of other II-2 enhancer factors remains unaffected by both compounds. These results support the view that FK 506 and CsA, which both inhibit the activity of peptidylprolyl cis/trans isomerases, suppress T cell activation by a similar, if not identical mechanism. Images PMID:1707162

  10. Mecasermin rinfabate: insulin-like growth factor-I/insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3, mecaserimin rinfibate, rhIGF-I/rhIGFBP-3.

    PubMed

    2005-01-01

    Insmed is developing mecasermin rinfabate, a recombinant complex of insulin-like growth factor-I (rhIGF-I) and binding protein-3 (rhIGFBP-3) [insulin-like growth factor-I/insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3, rhIGF-I/rhIGFBP-3, SomatoKine], for a number of metabolic and endocrine indications. In the human body, IGF-I circulates in the blood bound to a binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3), which regulates the delivery of IGF-I to target tissues, and particular proteases clip them apart in response to stresses and release IGF-I as needed. IGF-I, a naturally occurring hormone, is necessary for normal growth and metabolism. For the treatment of IGF-I deficiency, it is desirable to administer IGF-I bound to IGFBP-3 to maintain the normal equilibrium of these proteins in the blood. Mecasermin rinfabate (rhIGF-I/rhIGFBP-3) mimics the effects of the natural protein complex in the bloodstream and would augment the natural supply of these linked compounds. The most advanced indication in development of mecasermin rinfabate is the treatment of severe growth disorders due to growth hormone insensitivity syndrome (GHIS), also called Laron syndrome. GHIS is a genetic condition in which patients do not produce adequate quantities of IGF because of a failure to respond to the growth hormone signal. This results in a slower growth rate and short stature. Mecasermin rinfabate also has potential as replacement therapy for IGF-I, which may become depleted in indications such as major surgery, organ damage/failure, traumatic injury, cachexia and severe burn trauma. It also has potential for the treatment of osteoporosis. Mecasermin rinfabate was developed by Celtrix using its proprietary recombinant protein production technology. Subsequently, Celtrix was acquired by Insmed Pharmaceuticals on 1 June 2000. Insmed and Avecia of the UK have signed an agreement for manufacturing mecasermin rinfabate and its components, rhIGF-1 and rhIGFBP-3. CGMP clinical production of mecasermin rinfabate

  11. Arf proteins in cancer cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Casalou, Cristina; Faustino, Alexandra; Barral, Duarte C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Members of the ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf) family of small GTP-binding (G) proteins regulate several aspects of membrane trafficking, such as vesicle budding, tethering and cytoskeleton organization. Arf family members, including Arf-like (Arl) proteins have been implicated in several essential cellular functions, like cell spreading and migration. These functions are used by cancer cells to disseminate and invade the tissues surrounding the primary tumor, leading to the formation of metastases. Indeed, Arf and Arl proteins, as well as their guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) and GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) have been found to be abnormally expressed in different cancer cell types and human cancers. Here, we review the current evidence supporting the involvement of Arf family proteins and their GEFs and GAPs in cancer progression, focusing on 3 different mechanisms: cell-cell adhesion, integrin internalization and recycling, and actin cytoskeleton remodeling. PMID:27589148

  12. G/sub o/ protein of fat cells: role in hormonal regulation of agonist-stimulated phosphatidyl inositol breakdown

    SciTech Connect

    Rapiejko, P.J.; Northup, J.K.; Malbon, C.C.

    1986-05-01

    Incubating rat fat cell membranes in the presence of (/sup 32/P)NAD/sup +/ and pertussis toxin (PT) results in the ADP-ribosylation of two peptides (M/sub r/ = 41,000 and 40,000). The 41,000-M/sub r/ peptide is the inhibitory G-protein of adenylate cyclase (G/sub i/). The 40,000-M/sub r/ peptide radiolabeled in the presence of (/sup 32/P)NAD/sup +/ and PT has been purified from rabbit heart and bovine brain, but has not been identified uniformly in membranes of fat cells. Two rabbit polyclonal antisera raised against the alpha-subunit of bovine brain G/sub o/ were used to probe the nature of the 40,000-M/sub r/ peptide in rat fat cell membranes that had been separated by gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate and transferred electrophoretically to nitrocellulose. Both antisera specific for the alpha-subunit of G/sub o/ recognized the M/sub r/ = 40,000 peptide of fat cells that is ADP-ribosylated in the presence of PT. PT treatment of rat fat cells blocks epinephrine-stimulated inositol 1,4,5 trisphosphate (IP/sub 3/) generation. The inhibition of IP/sub 3/ generation by PT suggests a role for either G/sub i/ or G/sub o/ in receptor-mediated phosphatidyl inositol breakdown in the rat fat cell.

  13. A decay-accelerating factor-binding strain of coxsackievirus B3 requires the coxsackievirus-adenovirus receptor protein to mediate lytic infection of rhabdomyosarcoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Shafren, D R; Williams, D T; Barry, R D

    1997-01-01

    The composition of the cellular receptor complex for coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) has been an area of much contention for the last 30 years. Recently, two individual components of a putative CVB3 cellular receptor complex have been identified as (i) decay-accelerating factor (DAF) and (ii) the coxsackievirus-adenovirus receptor protein (CAR). The present study elucidates the individual roles of DAF and CAR in cell entry of CVB3 Nancy. First, we confirm that the DAF-binding phenotype of CVB3 correlates to the presence of key amino acids located in the viral capsid protein, VP2. Second, using antibody blockade, we show that complete protection of permissive cells from infection by high input multiplicities of CVB3 requires a combination of both anti-DAF and anti-CAR antibodies. Finally, it is shown that expression of the CAR protein on the surface of nonpermissive DAF-expressing RD cells renders them highly susceptible to CVB3-mediated lytic infection. Therefore, although the majority of CVB3 Nancy attaches to the cell via DAF, only virus directly interacting with the CAR protein mediates lytic infection. The role of DAF in CVB3 cell infection may be analogous to that recently described for coxsackievirus A21 (D. R. Shafren, D. J. Dorahy, R. A. Ingham, G. F. Burns, and R. D. Barry, J. Virol. 71:4736-4743, 1997), in that DAF may act as a CVB3 sequestration site, enhancing viral presentation to the functional CAR protein. PMID:9371658

  14. Electrostatic Forces as Dominant Interactions Between Proteins and Polyanions: an ESI MS Study of Fibroblast Growth Factor Binding to Heparin Oligomers.

    PubMed

    Minsky, Burcu Baykal; Dubin, Paul L; Kaltashov, Igor A

    2017-04-01

    The interactions between fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) and their receptors (FGFRs) are facilitated by heparan sulfate (HS) and heparin (Hp), highly sulfated biological polyelectrolytes. The molecular basis of FGF interactions with these polyelectrolytes is highly complex due to the structural heterogeneity of HS/Hp, and many details still remain elusive, especially the significance of charge density and minimal chain length of HS/Hp in growth factor recognition and multimerization. In this work, we use electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI MS) to investigate the association of relatively homogeneous oligoheparins (octamer, dp8, and decamer, dp10) with acidic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-1). This growth factor forms 1:1, 2:1, and 3:1 protein/heparinoid complexes with both dp8 and dp10, and the fraction of bound protein is highly dependent on protein/heparinoid molar ratio. Multimeric complexes are preferentially formed on the highly sulfated Hp oligomers. Although a variety of oligomers appear to be binding-competent, there is a strong correlation between the affinity and the overall level of sulfation (the highest charge density polyanions binding FGF most strongly via multivalent interactions). These results show that the interactions between FGF-1 and Hp oligomers are primarily directed by electrostatics, and also demonstrate the power of ESI MS as a tool to study multiple binding equilibria between proteins and structurally heterogeneous polyanions. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  15. Electrostatic Forces as Dominant Interactions Between Proteins and Polyanions: an ESI MS Study of Fibroblast Growth Factor Binding to Heparin Oligomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minsky, Burcu Baykal; Dubin, Paul L.; Kaltashov, Igor A.

    2017-02-01

    The interactions between fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) and their receptors (FGFRs) are facilitated by heparan sulfate (HS) and heparin (Hp), highly sulfated biological polyelectrolytes. The molecular basis of FGF interactions with these polyelectrolytes is highly complex due to the structural heterogeneity of HS/Hp, and many details still remain elusive, especially the significance of charge density and minimal chain length of HS/Hp in growth factor recognition and multimerization. In this work, we use electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI MS) to investigate the association of relatively homogeneous oligoheparins (octamer, dp8, and decamer, dp10) with acidic fibroblast growth factor (FGF-1). This growth factor forms 1:1, 2:1, and 3:1 protein/heparinoid complexes with both dp8 and dp10, and the fraction of bound protein is highly dependent on protein/heparinoid molar ratio. Multimeric complexes are preferentially formed on the highly sulfated Hp oligomers. Although a variety of oligomers appear to be binding-competent, there is a strong correlation between the affinity and the overall level of sulfation (the highest charge density polyanions binding FGF most strongly via multivalent interactions). These results show that the interactions between FGF-1 and Hp oligomers are primarily directed by electrostatics, and also demonstrate the power of ESI MS as a tool to study multiple binding equilibria between proteins and structurally heterogeneous polyanions.

  16. Partial characterization of GTP-binding proteins in Neurospora

    SciTech Connect

    Hasunuma, K.; Miyamoto-Shinohara, Y.; Furukawa, K.

    1987-08-14

    Six fractions of GTP-binding proteins separated by gel filtration of a mycelial extract containing membrane components of Neurospora crassa were partially characterized. (/sup 35/S)GTP gamma S bound to GTP-binding protein was assayed by repeated treatments with a Norit solution and centrifugation. The binding of (/sup 35/S)GTP gamma S to GTP-binding proteins was competitively prevented in the presence of 0.1 to 1 mM GTP but not in the presence of ATP. These GTP-binding proteins fractionated by the gel column had Km values of 20, 7, 4, 4, 80 and 2 nM. All six fractions of these GTP-binding proteins showed the capacity to be ADP-ribosylated by pertussis toxin.

  17. Collagen and Stretch Modulate Autocrine Secretion of Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 and Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Proteins from Differentiated Skeletal Muscle Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perrone, Carmen E.; Fenwick-Smith, Daniela; Vandenburgh, Herman H.

    1995-01-01

    Stretch-induced skeletal muscle growth may involve increased autocrine secretion of insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) since IGF-1 is a potent growth factor for skeletal muscle hypertrophy, and stretch elevates IGF-1 mRNA levels in vivo. In tissue cultures of differentiated avian pectoralis skeletal muscle cells, nanomolar concentrations of exogenous IGF-1 stimulated growth in mechanically stretched but not static cultures. These cultures released up to 100 pg of endogenously produced IGF-1/micro-g of protein/day, as well as three major IGF binding proteins of 31, 36, and 43 kilodaltons (kDa). IGF-1 was secreted from both myofibers and fibroblasts coexisting in the muscle cultures. Repetitive stretch/relaxation of the differentiated skeletal muscle cells stimulated the acute release of IGF-1 during the first 4 h after initiating mechanical activity, but caused no increase in the long-term secretion over 24-72 h of IGF-1, or its binding proteins. Varying the intensity and frequency of stretch had no effect on the long-term efflux of IGF-1. In contrast to stretch, embedding the differentiated muscle cells in a three-dimensional collagen (Type I) matrix resulted in a 2-5-fold increase in long-term IGF-1 efflux over 24-72 h. Collagen also caused a 2-5-fold increase in the release of the IGF binding proteins. Thus, both the extracellular matrix protein type I collagen and stretch stimulate the autocrine secretion of IGF-1, but with different time kinetics. This endogenously produced growth factor may be important for the growth response of skeletal myofibers to both types of external stimuli.

  18. Dose-dependent insulin regulation of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 in human endometrial stromal cells is mediated by distinct signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Lathi, R B; Hess, A P; Tulac, S; Nayak, N R; Conti, M; Giudice, L C

    2005-03-01

    IGF binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) is a major product of decidualized human endometrial stromal cells and decidua, and as a modulator of IGF action and/or by independent mechanisms, it regulates cell growth and differentiation and embryonic implantation in these tissues. IGFBP-1 secretion is primarily stimulated by progesterone and cAMP and is inhibited by insulin and IGFs. The signaling pathways mediating the latter are not well defined, and the current study was conducted to determine which pathways mediate the effects of insulin on IGFBP-1 mRNA and protein expression by human endometrial stromal cells decidualized in vitro by progesterone. Cells were cultured and treated with different combinations of insulin; wortmannin, an inhibitor of the phosphatidylinositide-3-kinase (PI3-kinase) pathway; and PD98059, an inhibitor of the MAPK pathway. IGFBP-1 mRNA was determined by real-time PCR, and protein secretion in the conditioned medium was measured by ELISA. Activation of the PI3-kinase and the MAPK pathways was assessed by the detection of phosphorylated AKT and ERK in Western blots, respectively. Insulin inhibited IGFBP-1 mRNA and protein secretion in a dose-dependent fashion, with an ED(50) for the latter 0.127 ng/ml (21.6 pm). Inhibitor studies revealed that at low doses, insulin acts through the PI3-kinase pathway, whereas at higher levels it also activates the MAPK pathway in the inhibition of IGFBP-1. The data demonstrate that human endometrium is a target for insulin action in the regulation of IGFBP-1. At physiological levels insulin likely plays a homeostatic role for energy metabolism in the endometrium, and in hyperinsulinemic states, insulin action on the endometrium may activate cellular mitosis via the MAPK pathway and perhaps predispose this tissue to hyperplasia and/or cancer.

  19. Transcription factor binding energy vs. biological function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djordjevic, M.; Grotewold, E.

    2007-03-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) are proteins that bind to DNA and regulate expression of genes. Identification of transcription factor binding sites within the regulatory segments of genomic DNA is an important step towards understanding of gene regulatory networks. Recent theoretical advances that we developed [1,2], allow us to infer TF-DNA interaction parameters from in-vitro selection experiments [3]. We use more than 6000 binding sequences [3], assembled under controlled conditions, to obtain protein-DNA interaction parameters for a mammalian TF with up to now unprecedented accuracy. Can one accurately identify biologically functional TF binding sites (i.e. the binding sites that regulate gene expression), even with the best possible protein-DNA interaction parameters? To address this issue we i) compare our prediction of protein binding with gene expression data, ii) use evolutionary comparison between related mammalian genomes. Our results strongly suggest that in a genome there exists a large number of randomly occurring high energy binding sites that are not biologically functional. [1] M Djordjevic, submitted to Biomol. Eng. [2] M. Djordjevic and A. M. Sengupta, Phys. Biol. 3: 13, 2006. [3] E. Roulet et al., Nature Biotech. 20: 831, 2002.

  20. Fox-2 Splicing Factor Binds to a Conserved Intron Motif to PromoteInclusion of Protein 4.1R Alternative Exon 16

    SciTech Connect

    Ponthier, Julie L.; Schluepen, Christina; Chen, Weiguo; Lersch,Robert A.; Gee, Sherry L.; Hou, Victor C.; Lo, Annie J.; Short, Sarah A.; Chasis, Joel A.; Winkelmann, John C.; Conboy, John G.

    2006-03-01

    Activation of protein 4.1R exon 16 (E16) inclusion during erythropoiesis represents a physiologically important splicing switch that increases 4.1R affinity for spectrin and actin. Previous studies showed that negative regulation of E16 splicing is mediated by the binding of hnRNP A/B proteins to silencer elements in the exon and that downregulation of hnRNP A/B proteins in erythroblasts leads to activation of E16 inclusion. This paper demonstrates that positive regulation of E16 splicing can be mediated by Fox-2 or Fox-1, two closely related splicing factors that possess identical RNA recognition motifs. SELEX experiments with human Fox-1 revealed highly selective binding to the hexamer UGCAUG. Both Fox-1 and Fox-2 were able to bind the conserved UGCAUG elements in the proximal intron downstream of E16, and both could activate E16 splicing in HeLa cell co-transfection assays in a UGCAUG-dependent manner. Conversely, knockdown of Fox-2 expression, achieved with two different siRNA sequences resulted in decreased E16 splicing. Moreover, immunoblot experiments demonstrate mouse erythroblasts express Fox-2, but not Fox-1. These findings suggest that Fox-2 is a physiological activator of E16 splicing in differentiating erythroid cells in vivo. Recent experiments show that UGCAUG is present in the proximal intron sequence of many tissue-specific alternative exons, and we propose that the Fox family of splicing enhancers plays an important role in alternative splicing switches during differentiation in metazoan organisms.

  1. Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-2 levels in pediatric patients with growth hormone deficiency, eating disorders and acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Barrios, V; Buño, M; Pozo, J; Muñoz, M T; Argente, J

    2000-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-binding protein-2 (IGFBP-2) is altered in different diseases and might be used as an indication of its severity. The aims of our study were to investigate: (1) the developmental pattern of the serum IGFBP-2 concentration at birth and during childhood and adolescence; (2) whether the serum IGFBP-2 level could be a marker for the diagnosis and evolution of diseases where the growth hormone (GH)-IGF axis is altered, and (3) whether this binding protein shows a relationship with IGF-I, its free fraction, IGFBP-1 and -3. We report reference values for 55 normal full-term newborns and 221 normal children who were divided into 5 groups according to their Tanner stage. Serum levels were higher in newborns when compared with Tanner stages I-V (p < 0.001, ANOVA), with no further changes throughout development. Furthermore, we studied IGFBP-2 levels in 24 children with congenital GH deficiency (GHD), 26 with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), 75 obese children, and 60 girls with anorexia nervosa (AN) at diagnosis and during a follow-up period. IGFBP-2 at diagnosis was increased in GHD, ALL and AN, and decreased in obesity (p < 0.05, ANOVA). During the follow-up, IGFBP-2 concentrations tended to normalize. IGFBP-2 correlated positively with IGFBP-1 and negatively with IGF-I and IGFBP-3 in normal subjects and at diagnosis of the pathologies studied. Although IGFBP-2 functions are not well understood, these results suggest a possible role for this protein in diseases where the GH-IGF axis is altered.

  2. Transcriptional activation of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 6 by 17beta-estradiol in SaOS-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yu-yan; Guo, Lei; Zhao, Xiao-juan; Liu, Hong; Lei, Tian; Ma, Dong-jie; Gao, Xiao-yu

    2009-07-31

    Osteoblasts can synthesize the insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and the IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs), which may either enhance or attenuate IGF-stimulated bone cell proliferation. Since estrogen induced osteoblastic differentiation and proliferation through an estrogen-responsive gene in target cells, we investigated the effects of estrogen on IGFBP-6 expression in the human osteoblastic-like cell line SaOS-2. Expressions of IGFBP-6 protein and mRNA increased 2.8 and 2-fold, respectively, in the presence of 17-beta-estradiol (E2) (0.01 to 1 micronM) and estrogen receptor (ER) in SaOS-2 cells. On the other hand, E2 induced a 2-fold increase in SaOS-2 cell proliferation. To identify genomic sequences associated with estrogen responsiveness, the 5'-promoter region (-44 to +118) of the IGFBP-6 gene was cloned into a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) reporter vector. E2 induced a 3-fold increase in CAT activity in SaOS-2 cells transiently transfected with this construct. Identification of the estrogen-responsive element (ERE) [5-CCTTCA CCTG-3] (-9 to +1) in this IGFBP-6 gene promoter region was confirmed using electromobility shift assays and deletion analysis. This functional ERE was important for E2-induced trans-activation of the IGFBP-6 gene. These results demonstrate that E2 exhibits a positive effect on IGFBP-6 gene transcription through estrogen-liganded ER binding to the functional ERE in the IGFBP-6 gene promoter in SaOS-2 cells.

  3. Growth Regulation via Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein-4 and -2 in Association with Mutant K-ras in Lung Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Hanako; Yazawa, Takuya; Suzuki, Takehisa; Shimoyamada, Hiroaki; Okudela, Koji; Ikeda, Masaichi; Hamada, Kenji; Yamada-Okabe, Hisafumi; Yao, Masayuki; Kubota, Yoshinobu; Takahashi, Takashi; Kamma, Hiroshi; Kitamura, Hitoshi

    2006-01-01

    Gain-of-function point mutations in K-ras affect early events in pulmonary bronchioloalveolar carcinoma. We investigated altered mRNA expression on K-Ras activation in human peripheral lung epithelial cells (HPL1A) using oligonucleotide microarrays. Mutated K-Ras stably expressed in HPL1A accelerated cell growth and induced the expression of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-binding protein (IGFBP)-4 and IGFBP-2, which modulate cell growth via IGF. Other lung epithelial cell lines (NHBE and HPL1D) revealed the same phenomena as HPL1A by mutated K-ras transgene. Lung cancer cell growth was also accelerated by mutated K-ras gene transduction, whereas IGFBP-4/2 induction was weaker compared with mutated K-Ras-expressing lung epithelial cells. To understand the differences in IGFBP-4/2 inducibility via K-Ras-activated signaling between nonneoplastic lung epithelia and lung carcinoma, we addressed the mechanisms of IGFBP-4/2 transcriptional activation. Our results revealed that Egr-1, which is induced on activation of Ras-mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling, is crucial for transactivation of IGFBP-4/2. Furthermore, IGFBP-4 and IGFBP-2 promoters were often hypermethylated in lung carcinoma, yielding low basal expression/weak induction of IGFBP-4/2. These findings suggest that continuous K-Ras activation accelerates cell growth and evokes a feedback system through IGFBP-4/2 to prevent excessive growth. Moreover, this growth regulation is disrupted in lung cancers because of promoter hypermethylation of IGFBP-4/2 genes. PMID:17071580

  4. Promoter-dependent and -independent activation of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-5 gene expression by prostaglandin E2 in primary rat osteoblasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCarthy, T. L.; Casinghino, S.; Mittanck, D. W.; Ji, C. H.; Centrella, M.; Rotwein, P.

    1996-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF) action is mediated by high affinity cell surface IGF receptors and modulated by a family of secreted IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs). IGFBP-5, the most conserved of six IGFBPs characterized to date, uniquely potentiates the anabolic actions of IGF-I for skeletal cells. In osteoblasts, IGFBP-5 production is stimulated by prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), a local factor that mediates certain effects induced by parathyroid hormone, cytokines such as interleukin-1 and transforming growth factor-beta, and mechanical strain. In this study, we show that transcriptional and post-transcriptional events initiated by PGE2 collaborate to enhance IGFBP-5 gene expression in primary fetal rat osteoblast cultures. PGE2 treatment stimulated up to a 7-fold rise in steady-state levels of IGFBP-5 mRNA throughout 32 h of incubation. Analysis of nascent IGFBP-5 mRNA suggested that PGE2 had only a modest stimulatory effect on IGFBP-5 gene transcription, and transient transfection studies with IGFBP-5 promoter-reporter genes confirmed that PGE2 enhanced promoter activity by approximately 2-fold. Similar stimulatory effects were seen with forskolin. A DNA fragment with only 51 base pairs of the 5'-flanking sequence retained hormonal responsiveness, which may be mediated by a binding site for transcription factor AP-2 located at positions -44 to -36 in the proximal IGFBP-5 promoter. Incubation of osteoblasts with the mRNA transcriptional inhibitor 5,6-dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole demonstrated that PGE2 enhanced IGFBP-5 mRNA stability by 2-fold, increasing the t1/2 from 9 to 18 h. The effects of PGE2 on steady-state IGFBP-5 transcripts were abrogated by preincubating cells with cycloheximide, indicating that the effects of PGE2 on both gene transcription and mRNA stability required ongoing protein synthesis. Therefore, both promoter-dependent and -independent pathways converge to enhance IGFBP-5 gene expression in response to PGE2 in osteoblasts.

  5. Relationship between leptin, insulin resistance, insulin-like growth factor-1 and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 in patients with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Atamer, A; Alisir Ecder, S; Akkus, Z; Kocyigit, Y; Atamer, Y; Ilhan, N; Ecder, T

    2008-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between leptin, insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1), IGF binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) and insulin resistance in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). Levels of leptin, insulin, IGF-1, IGFBP-3 and common routine parameters were measured in 45 patients (23 males and 22 females) with CKD and 45 healthy controls matched for age, gender and body mass index. IGF-1 and IGFBP-3 levels were measured using a two-site immunoradiometric assay. Leptin levels were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. A homeostasis model assessment computer-solved model was used to assess insulin resistance (HOMA-IR). Levels of serum leptin, insulin, IGF-1, IGFBP-3 and HOMA-IR were significantly increased in patients with CKD compared with healthy subjects, whereas fasting blood glucose was not significantly different between the two groups. In patients with CKD, the serum leptin level was significantly correlated with IGF-1, IGFBP-3 and HOMA-IR. In conclusion, this study suggests that there is an interaction between leptin, IGF-1, IGFBP-3 and insulin resistance in patients with CKD.

  6. Structure of the IGF-binding domain of the insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-5 (IGFBP-5): implications for IGF and IGF-I receptor interactions.

    PubMed Central

    Kalus, W; Zweckstetter, M; Renner, C; Sanchez, Y; Georgescu, J; Grol, M; Demuth, D; Schumacher, R; Dony, C; Lang, K; Holak, T A

    1998-01-01

    Binding proteins for insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) IGF-I and IGF-II, known as IGFBPs, control the distribution, function and activity of IGFs in various cell tissues and body fluids. Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-5 (IGFBP-5) is known to modulate the stimulatory effects of IGFs and is the major IGF-binding protein in bone tissue. We have expressed two N-terminal fragments of IGFBP-5 in Escherichia coli; the first encodes the N-terminal domain of the protein (residues 1-104) and the second, mini-IGFBP-5, comprises residues Ala40 to Ile92. We show that the entire IGFBP-5 protein contains only one high-affinity binding site for IGFs, located in mini-IGFBP-5. The solution structure of mini-IGFBP-5, determined by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, discloses a rigid, globular structure that consists of a centrally located three-stranded anti-parallel beta-sheet. Its scaffold is stabilized further by two inside packed disulfide bridges. The binding to IGFs, which is in the nanomolar range, involves conserved Leu and Val residues localized in a hydrophobic patch on the surface of the IGFBP-5 protein. Remarkably, the IGF-I receptor binding assays of IGFBP-5 showed that IGFBP-5 inhibits the binding of IGFs to the IGF-I receptor, resulting in reduction of receptor stimulation and autophosphorylation. Compared with the full-length IGFBP-5, the smaller N-terminal fragments were less efficient inhibitors of the IGF-I receptor binding of IGFs. PMID:9822601

  7. Variation in branchial expression among insulin-like growth-factor binding proteins (igfbps) during Atlantic salmon smoltification and seawater exposure

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Breves, Jason P.; Fujimoto, Chelsea K.; Phipps-Costin, Silas K.; Einarsdottir, Ingibjörg E.; Björnsson, Björn Thrandur; McCormick, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    BackgroundIn preparation for migration from freshwater to marine habitats, Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) undergo smoltification, a transformation that includes the acquisition of hyposmoregulatory capacity. The growth hormone (Gh)/insulin-like growth-factor (Igf) axis promotes the development of branchial ionoregulatory functions that underlie ion secretion. Igfs interact with a suite of Igf binding proteins (Igfbps) that modulate hormone activity. In Atlantic salmon smolts, igfbp4,−5a,−5b1,−5b2,−6b1 and−6b2 transcripts are highly expressed in gill. We measured mRNA levels of branchial and hepatic igfbps during smoltification (March, April, and May), desmoltification (July) and following seawater (SW) exposure in March and May. We also characterized parallel changes in a broad suite of osmoregulatory (branchial Na+/K+-ATPase (Nka) activity, Na+ /K + /2Cl − cotransporter 1 (nkcc1) and cystic fibrosis transmembrane regulator 1 (cftr1) transcription) and endocrine (plasma Gh and Igf1) parameters.ResultsIndicative of smoltification, we observed increased branchial Nka activity, nkcc1 and cftr1 transcription in May. Branchial igfbp6b1 and -6b2 expression increased coincidentally with smoltification. Following a SW challenge in March, igfbp6b1 showed increased expression while igfbp6b2 exhibited diminished expression. igfbp5a,−5b1 and−5b2 mRNA levels did not change during smolting, but each had lower levels following a SW exposure in March.ConclusionsSalmonids express an especially large suite of igfbps. Our data suggest that dynamic expression of particular igfbps accompanies smoltification and SW challenges; thus, transcriptional control of igfbps may provide a mechanism for the local modulation of Igf activity in salmon gill.

  8. Insulin response sequence-dependent and -independent mechanisms mediate effects of insulin on glucocorticoid-stimulated insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 promoter activity.

    PubMed

    Gan, Lixia; Pan, Haiyun; Unterman, Terry G

    2005-10-01

    IGF binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) gene expression is stimulated by glucocorticoids and suppressed by insulin in the liver. Insulin response sequences (IRSs) mediate effects of insulin on basal promoter function, whereas glucocorticoids stimulate promoter activity through a contiguous glucocorticoid response element. Here we examined the role of IRS-dependent and -independent mechanisms in mediating insulin and glucocorticoids effects on IGFBP-1 promoter activity. Dexamethasone (Dex) stimulates IGFBP-1 promoter activity in HepG2 cells, and mutation of IRSs reduces this effect, indicating that IRS-associated factors enhance glucocorticoid effects on promoter function. Conversely, insulin inhibits basal promoter activity by 40% and Dex-stimulated promoter activity by 65%, indicating that glucocorticoids enhance the ability of insulin to suppress promoter activity. Mutation of IRSs completely disrupts the insulin effect on basal promoter activity and reduces but does not abolish inhibition of Dex-stimulated promoter activity, indicating that insulin suppresses glucocorticoid-stimulated promoter activity through both IRS-dependent and -independent mechanisms. IRS-independent effects of insulin are context dependent because insulin does not suppress glucocorticoid-stimulated activity of a promoter containing multiple glucocorticoid response elements. Cotransfection studies indicate that suppression of peroxisomal proliferator-activated receptor-gamma coactivator-1alpha, an insulin-regulated coactivator of the glucocorticoid receptor, is not required for this effect of insulin. Studies with pharmacological inhibitors indicate that both phosphatidylinositol-3' kinase and mitogen-activated kinase kinase pathways contribute to IRS-independent effects. These studies indicate that glucocorticoids and IRS-associated factors function together to mediate effects of insulin and glucocorticoids on promoter activity and that glucocorticoid treatment creates a complex environment in

  9. Insulin-like growth factor-1, insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3, growth hormone, and mammographic density in the Nurses' Health Studies.

    PubMed

    Rice, Megan S; Tworoger, Shelley S; Rosner, Bernard A; Pollak, Michael N; Hankinson, Susan E; Tamimi, Rulla M

    2012-12-01

    Higher circulating insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-1) levels have been associated with higher mammographic density among women in some, but not all studies. Also, few studies have examined the association between mammographic density and circulating growth hormone (GH) in premenopausal women. We conducted a cross-sectional study among 783 premenopausal women and 436 postmenopausal women who were controls in breast cancer case-control studies nested in the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) and NHSII. Participants provided blood samples in 1989-1990 (NHS) or in 1996-1999 (NHSII), and mammograms were obtained near the time of blood draw. Generalized linear models were used to assess the associations of IGF-1, IGF-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3), IGF-1:IGFBP-3 ratio, and GH with percent mammographic density, total dense area, and total non-dense area. Models were adjusted for potential confounders including age and body mass index (BMI), among others. We also assessed whether the associations varied by age or BMI. In both pre- and postmenopausal women, percent mammographic density was not associated with plasma levels of IGF-1, IGFBP-3, or the IGF-1:IGFBP-3 ratio. In addition, GH was not associated with percent density among premenopausal women in the NHSII. Similarly, total dense area and non-dense area were not significantly associated with any of these analytes. In postmenopausal women, IGF-1 was associated with higher percent mammographic density among women with BMI <25 kg/m(2), but not among overweight/obese women. Overall, plasma IGF-1, IGFBP-3, and GH levels were not associated with mammographic density in a sample of premenopausal and postmenopausal women.

  10. Antepartal insulin-like growth factor 1 and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 2 concentrations are indicative of ketosis in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Piechotta, M; Mysegades, W; Ligges, U; Lilienthal, J; Hoeflich, A; Miyamoto, A; Bollwein, H

    2015-05-01

    A study involving a small number of cows found that the concentrations of insulin-like growth hormone 1 (IGF1) may be a useful predictor of metabolic disease. Further, IGF1 may provide also a pathophysiological link to metabolic diseases such as ketosis. The objective of the current study was to test whether the low antepartal total IGF1 or IGF1 binding protein (IGFBP) concentrations might predict ketosis under field conditions. Clinical examinations and blood sampling were performed antepartum (262-270 d after artificial insemination) on 377 pluriparous pregnant Holstein Friesian cows. The presence of postpartum diseases were recorded (ketosis, fatty liver, displacement of the abomasum, hypocalcemia, mastitis, retention of fetal membranes, and clinical metritis or endometritis), and the concentrations of IGF1, IGFBP2, IGFBP3, and nonesterified fatty acids were measured. Cows with postpartum clinical ketosis had lower IGF1 concentrations antepartum than healthy cows. The sensitivity of antepartal IGF1 as a marker for postpartum ketosis was 0.87, and the specificity was 0.43; a positive predictive value of 0.91 and a negative predictive value of 0.35 were calculated. The cows with ketosis and retained fetal membranes had lower IGFBP2 concentrations compared with the healthy cows. It can be speculated that lower IGF1 production in the liver during late pregnancy may increase growth hormone secretions and lipolysis, thereby increasing the risk of ketosis. Lower IGFBP2 concentrations may reflect the suppression of IGFBP2 levels through higher growth hormone secretion. In conclusion, compared with nonesterified fatty acids as a predictive parameter, IGF1 and IGFBP2 may represent earlier biomarkers of inadequate metabolic adaptation to the high energy demand required postpartum.

  11. Sex Differences in Age-Related Decline of Urinary Insulin-Like Growth Factor-Binding Protein-3 Levels in Adult Bonobos and Chimpanzees

    PubMed Central

    Behringer, Verena; Wudy, Stefan A.; Blum, Werner F.; Stevens, Jeroen M. G.; Remer, Thomas; Boesch, Christophe; Hohmann, Gottfried

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the characterization of normative senescence in humans. To assess to what extent aging patterns in humans are unique, comparative data from closely related species, such as non-human primates, can be very useful. Here, we use data from bonobos and chimpanzees, two closely related species that share a common ancestor with humans, to explore physiological markers that are indicative of aging processes. Many studies on aging in humans focus on the somatotropic axis, consisting of growth hormone (GH), insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), and IGF binding proteins (IGFBPs). In humans, IGFBP-3 levels decline steadily with increasing age. We used urinary IGFBP-3 levels as an alternative endocrine marker for IGF-I to identify the temporal pattern known to be related with age-related changes in cell proliferation, growth, and apoptosis. We measured urinary IGFBP-3 levels in samples from 71 bonobos and 102 chimpanzees. Focusing on samples from individuals aged 10 years or older, we found that urinary IGFBP-3 levels decline in both ape species with increasing age. However, in both species, females start with higher urinary IGFBP-3 levels than males, experience a steeper decline with increasing age, and converge with male levels around the age of 30–35 years. Our measurements of urinary IGFBP-3 levels indicate that bonobos and chimpanzees mirror human patterns of age-related decline in IGFBP-3 in older individuals (<10 years) of both sexes. Moreover, such as humans, both ape species show sex-specific differences in IGFBP-3 levels with females having higher levels than males, a result that correlates with sex differences in life expectancy. Using changes in urinary IGFBP-3 levels as a proxy for changes in GH and IGF-I levels that mark age-related changes in cell proliferation, this approach provides an opportunity to investigate trade-offs in life-history strategies in cross-sectional and in longitudinal studies, both in captivity and in

  12. Genetic polymorphisms of insulin-like growth factor 1 and insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3, xenoestrogen, phytoestrogen, and premenopausal breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, H.; Zhao, M.; Wang, Q.; Liu, L.; Qi, Y.N.; Li, J.Y.

    2016-01-01

    Background Previous studies suggest a combined effect of insulin-like growth factor 1 (igf-1) and igf binding protein 3 (igfbp-3) gene polymorphisms, xenoestrogen, and phytoestrogen on the igf-1 signalling pathway and serum concentrations in the igf system, which are associated with premenopausal breast cancer (bca) risk. Methods Between 2010 and 2012, our study recruited 140 premenopausal bca patients and 160 community-based premenopausal control subjects. Participants were surveyed about oral contraceptive (oc) use, dietary habits, and other bca risk factors. TaqMan assays were used to determine igf-1 rs1520220 and igfbp-3 rs2854744 genotypes. Daily intakes of energy-adjusted soy isoflavones (easis) were calculated by the residual method. Multivariate logistic regression was applied to estimate the adjusted odds ratios (ors) and 95% confidence intervals (cis) of the igf-1 rs1520220 and igfbp-3 rs2854744 genotypes, oc use, and intake of easis. Stratified analyses were performed to detect the gene–environment combined effect, and multivariate logistic regression was used to estimate interaction coefficients (iors) by the multiplicative model, with 95% cis. The delta method was used to calculate interaction coefficients by the additive model [relative excess risk of interaction (reri), attributable proportions of interaction (apis)] and 95% cis. Results The igf-1 and igfbp-3 genotypes, oc use, and easis were not found to be associated with bca risk (p > 0.05). Stratified analysis showed that the risk of bca was markedly increased in women carrying the igfbp-3C allele and using ocs compared with women either carrying the igfbp-3C allele or using ocs (or: 3.02; 95% ci: 1.04 to 8.79). The interaction coefficients ior, reri, and api were 4.89 (95% ci: 1.09 to 21.90), 2.42 (95% ci: −0.76 to 5.61), and 0.80 (95% ci: 0.46 to 1.67) respectively. Conclusions The igfbp-3 rs2854744 polymorphism and oc use might synergistically increase premenopausal bca risk. PMID:26966408

  13. Suppressed expression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 mRNA in the endometrium: a molecular mechanism associating endometrial cancer with its risk factors.

    PubMed

    Rutanen, E M; Nyman, T; Lehtovirta, P; Ammälä, M; Pekonen, F

    1994-11-01

    The insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system is thought to function as a mediator of steroid hormone actions in the endometrium. IGFs (IGF-I and IGF-II) are also potent mitogens in endometrial cancer. The biological actions of IGFs are modulated by specific binding proteins (IGFBP)--6 cloned and sequenced so far--which may either inhibit or enhance the effects of IGF at the cellular level. In the endometrium, IGFBP-1 gene expression is stimulated by progesterone and inhibited by insulin, while IGFBP-1 inhibits the mitogenic action of IGF-I. In this study, we used a quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to investigate IGFBP-1, IGFBP-2, IGFBP-4, IGFBP-5 and IGFBP-6 gene expression in endometrial cancer tissues. Endometrial cancer tissue samples were collected from 20 women (aged 54-79 yrs) with stage I to II well-differentiated endometrial adenocarcinoma. Samples of normal endometrium (n = 14) obtained from women undergoing tubal ligation in various phases of the menstrual cycle, and normal early-pregnancy endometrium (decidua) were studied for comparison. In endometrial cancer tissues, the IGFBP-1 mRNA was undetectable or minimally expressed when studied by RT-PCR. The mean (+ SD) levels of IGFBP-2 and IGFBP-4 and IGFBP-5 mRNAs in endometrial cancer tissues did not differ from those in normal endometrium, in which no cyclic variation was observed, suggesting that the genes encoding IGFBP-2, IGFBP-4 and IGFBP-5 are not hormonally regulated in the endometrium. The IGFBP-6 mRNA expression showed a significant cyclic variation in normal endometrium, with low levels in late-proliferative and early- to mid-secretory phases and high expression in late-secretory and early-proliferative phases. In endometrial cancer tissues, the mean IGFBP-6 mRNA level was similar to that in cycling endometrium during the peri-ovulatory period. In summary, a continuous stimulation of the endometrial epithelial cells by IGFs with suppressed IGFBP-1 expression

  14. Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 inhibits IGF-1-induced proliferation of human hepatocellular carcinoma cells by controlling bFGF and PDGF autocrine/paracrine loops.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yang; Han, Chen-Chen; Li, Yifan; Wang, Yang; Wei, Wei

    2016-09-16

    Basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) produced by hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells are responsible for the growth of HCC cells. Accumulating evidence shows that insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3) suppresses HCC cell proliferation in both IGF-dependent and independent manners. It's unknown, however, whether treatment with exogenous IGFBP-3 inhibits bFGF and PDGF production in HCC cells. The present study demonstrates that IGFBP-3 suppressed IGF-1-induced bFGF and PDGF expression while it does not affect their expression in the absence of IGF-1. To delineate the underlying mechanism, western-blot and RT-PCR assays confirmed that the transcription factor early growth response protein 1 (EGR1) is involved in IGFBP-3 regulation of bFGF and PDGF. IGFBP-3 inhibition of type 1 insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF1R), ERK and AKT activation is IGF-1-dependent. Furthermore, transient transfection with constitutively activated AKT or MEK partially blocks the IGFBP-3 inhibition of EGR1, bFGF and PDGF expression. In conclusion, these findings suggest that IGFBP-3 suppresses transcription of EGR1 and its target genes bFGF and PDGF through inhibiting IGF-1-dependent ERK and AKT activation. It demonstrates the importance of IGFBP-3 in the regulation of HCC cell proliferation, suggesting that IGFBP-3 could be a target for the treatment of HCC.

  15. Evaluation of Insulin-like Growth Factor-1 and Insulin-like Growth Factor Binding Protein-3 Expression Levels in Patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Ayer, Mesut; Sakin, Abdullah; Ay, Selim; Ayer, Aylin; Sazak, Elif Gökçen; Aktan, Melih

    2016-12-01

    Amaç: Kronik lenfositik lösemi (KLL) olgun görünümlü B lenfositlerin hastalığıdır. İnsülin-benzeri büyüme faktörü-1 (IGF-1), mitojenik ve antiapoptotik etkili küçük peptid hormondur ve insülin-benzeri büyüme faktörü bağlayıcı protein-3 (IGFBP-3) ise hücre üzerinde antiproliferative etki gösterir. Çalışmamızda, KLL hasta grubu ve kontrol grubunda plazma IGF-1 ve IGFBP-3 düzeylerini ve prognostik faktörlerle ilişkisini karşılaştırdık. Gereç ve Yöntemler: Haseki Eğitim ve Araştırma Hastanesi, Hematoloji Bölümü’nde takip edilen yeni tanı almış KLL hastaları ile kontrol grubu çalışmaya dahil edilmiştir. Hastalar Rai sistemine göre evrelendirilmiştir. İstatistiksel analiz SPSS for Windows version 17.0 kullanılarak yapılmıştır. Bulgular: Kırk üç hasta [16 kadın (%37) ve 27 erkek (%63)] çalışmaya alınmıştır. Kontrol grubu 21 kişiden (11 kadın, 10 erkek) oluşmuştur. Hasta grubunda ortanca yaş 65±9 (18-63), kontrol grubunda 68±8’dir (18-63). Kontrol grubu ile karşılaştırıldığında; çalışma grubunda plazma IGF-1 düzeyi yüksek; IGFBP-3 düzeyi düşük, IGF-I/IGFBP-3 oranı ise yüksek olarak bulunmasına rağmen istatistiksel yönden anlamlı değildi (p>0,05). Çalışma grubunda plazma IGF-1 düzeyi yüksekliği ile Rai ileri evresi paralellik gösteriyordu. Diğer gruplarla istatistiksel yönden anlamlı farklılık yoktu (p=0,105). Sonuç: Çalışma grubunda, plazma IGF-1 düzeyi kontrol grubundan daha yüksek, IGFBP-3 düzeyi ise düşük bulundu, bununla beraber istatistiksel yönden anlamlı farklılık yoktu. Plazma IGF-1 düzeyi yüksekliği ile Rai ileri evresi uyumlu idi. Bu sonuçlar bize, IGF-1 düzeyinin KLL hastalarında tümor yükü ve Rai evresi ile ilişkili olduğunu ve prognostik faktör olarak değerli olabileceğini düşündürmüştür. Bu sonuçları destekleyebilmek için daha geniş kapsamlı çalışmalara ihtiyaç vardır.

  16. The coordinate cellular response to insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) and insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-2 (IGFBP-2) is regulated through vimentin binding to receptor tyrosine phosphatase β (RPTPβ).

    PubMed

    Shen, Xinchun; Xi, Gang; Wai, Christine; Clemmons, David R

    2015-05-01

    Insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-2 (IGFBP-2) functions coordinately with IGF-I to stimulate cellular proliferation and differentiation. IGFBP-2 binds to receptor tyrosine phosphatase β (RPTPβ), and this binding in conjunction with IGF-I receptor stimulation induces RPTPβ polymerization leading to phosphatase and tensin homolog inactivation, AKT stimulation, and enhanced cell proliferation. To determine the mechanism by which RPTPβ polymerization is regulated, we analyzed the protein(s) that associated with RPTPβ in response to IGF-I and IGFBP-2 in vascular smooth muscle cells. Proteomic experiments revealed that IGF-I stimulated the intermediate filament protein vimentin to bind to RPTPβ, and knockdown of vimentin resulted in failure of IGFBP-2 and IGF-I to stimulate RPTPβ polymerization. Knockdown of IGFBP-2 or inhibition of IGF-IR tyrosine kinase disrupted vimentin/RPTPβ association. Vimentin binding to RPTPβ was mediated through vimentin serine phosphorylation. The serine threonine kinase PKCζ was recruited to vimentin in response to IGF-I and inhibition of PKCζ activation blocked these signaling events. A cell-permeable peptide that contained the vimentin phosphorylation site disrupted vimentin/RPTPβ association, and IGF-I stimulated RPTPβ polymerization and AKT activation. Integrin-linked kinase recruited PKCζ to SHPS-1-associated vimentin in response to IGF-I and inhibition of integrin-linked kinase/PKCζ association reduced vimentin serine phosphorylation. PKCζ stimulation of vimentin phosphorylation required high glucose and vimentin/RPTPβ-association occurred only during hyperglycemia. Disruption of vimetin/RPTPβ in diabetic mice inhibited RPTPβ polymerization, vimentin serine phosphorylation, and AKT activation in response to IGF-I, whereas nondiabetic mice showed no difference. The induction of vimentin phosphorylation is important for IGFBP-2-mediated enhancement of IGF-I-stimulated proliferation during hyperglycemia, and it

  17. Purification and functional properties of the membrane fissioning protein CtBP3/BARS.

    PubMed

    Valente, Carmen; Spanò, Stefania; Luini, Alberto; Corda, Daniela

    2005-01-01

    The fissioning protein CtBP3/BARS is a member of the CtBP transcription corepressor family of proteins. The characterization of this fissioning activity of CtBP3/BARS in both isolated Golgi membranes and in intact cells has indicated that the CtBP family includes multifunctional proteins that can act both in the nucleus and in the cytoplasm. The fissiogenic activity of CtBP3/BARS has a role in the fragmentation of the Golgi complex during mitosis and during intracellular membrane transport. This was demonstrated using a number of approaches and reagents, which are discussed in the following text, and which include recombinant proteins and mutants, antibodies, protein overexpression, RNA interference, antisense oligonucleotides, cell permeabilization, and electron miscroscopy, together with biochemical assays such as that for ADP-ribosylation.

  18. EWS/FLI-1 silencing and gene profiling of Ewing cells reveal downstream oncogenic pathways and a crucial role for repression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3.

    PubMed

    Prieur, Alexandre; Tirode, Franck; Cohen, Pinchas; Delattre, Olivier

    2004-08-01

    Ewing tumors are characterized by abnormal transcription factors resulting from the oncogenic fusion of EWS with members of the ETS family, most commonly FLI-1. RNA interference targeted to the junction between EWS and FLI-1 sequences was used to inactivate the EWS/FLI-1 fusion gene in Ewing cells and to explore the resulting phenotype and alteration of the gene expression profile. Loss of expression of EWS/FLI-1 resulted in the complete arrest of growth and was associated with a dramatic increase in the number of apoptotic cells. Gene profiling of Ewing cells in which the EWS/FLI-1 fusion gene had been inactivated identified downstream targets which could be grouped in two major functional clusters related to extracellular matrix structure or remodeling and regulation of signal transduction pathways. Among these targets, the insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 gene (IGFBP-3), a major regulator of insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) proliferation and survival signaling, was strongly induced upon treating Ewing cells with EWS/FLI-1-specific small interfering RNAs. We show that EWS/FLI-1 can bind the IGFBP-3 promoter in vitro and in vivo and can repress its activity. Moreover, IGFBP-3 silencing can partially rescue the apoptotic phenotype caused by EWS/FLI-1 inactivation. Finally, IGFBP-3-induced Ewing cell apoptosis relies on both IGF-1-dependent and -independent pathways. These findings therefore identify the repression of IGFBP-3 as a key event in the development of Ewing's sarcoma.

  19. Cellular proliferation rate and insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP)-2 and IGFBP-3 and estradiol receptor alpha expression in the mammary gland of dairy heifers naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes during development.

    PubMed

    Perri, A F; Dallard, B E; Baravalle, C; Licoff, N; Formía, N; Ortega, H H; Becú-Villalobos, D; Mejia, M E; Lacau-Mengido, I M

    2014-01-01

    Mammary ductal morphogenesis during prepuberty occurs mainly in response to insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and estradiol stimulation. Dairy heifers infected with gastrointestinal nematodes have reduced IGF-1 levels, accompanied by reduced growth rate, delayed puberty onset, and lower parenchyma-stroma relationship in their mammary glands. Immunohistochemical studies were undertaken to determine variations in cell division rate, IGF-1 system components, and estradiol receptors (ESR) during peripubertal development in the mammary glands of antiparasitic-treated and untreated Holstein heifers naturally infected with gastrointestinal nematodes. Mammary biopsies were taken at 20, 30, 40, and 70 wk of age. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen immunolabeling, evident in nuclei, tended to be higher in the parenchyma of the glands from treated heifers than in those from untreated. Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBP) type 2 and type 3 immunolabeling was cytoplasmic and was evident in stroma and parenchyma. The IGFBP2-labeled area was lower in treated than in untreated heifers. In the treated group, a maximal expression of this protein was seen at 40 wk of age, whereas in the untreated group the labeling remained constant. No differences were observed for IGFBP3 between treatment groups or during development. Immunolabeling for α ESR (ESR1) was evident in parenchymal nuclei and was higher in treated than in untreated heifers. In the treated group, ESR1 peaked at 30 wk of age and then decreased. These results demonstrate that the parasite burden in young heifers negatively influence mammary gland development, affecting cell division rate and parameters related to estradiol and IGF-1 signaling in the gland.

  20. Insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP)-3 and IGFBP-5 mediate TGF-{beta}- and myostatin-induced suppression of proliferation in porcine embryonic myogenic cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Kamanga-Sollo, E.; Pampusch, M.S.; White, M.E.; Hathaway, M.R.; Dayton, W.R. . E-mail: wdayton@umn.edu

    2005-11-15

    We have previously shown that cultured porcine embryonic myogenic cells (PEMC) produce both insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP)-3 and IGFBP-5 and secrete these proteins into their media. Exogenously added recombinant porcine (rp) IGFBP-3 and rpIGFBP-5 act via IGF-dependent and IGF-independent mechanisms to suppress proliferation of PEMC cultures. Furthermore, immunoneutralization of endogenous IGFBP-3 and IGFBP-5 in the PEMC culture medium results in increased DNA synthesis rate suggesting that endogenous IGFBP-3 and IGFBP-5 suppress PEMC proliferation. TGF-{beta} superfamily members myostatin and TGF-{beta}{sub 1} have also been shown to suppress proliferation of myogenic cells, and treatment of cultured PEMC with either TGF-{beta}{sub 1} or myostatin significantly (P < 0.01) increases levels of IGFBP-3 and -5 mRNA. We have previously shown that immunoneutralization of IGFBP-3 decreases the proliferation-suppressing activity of TGF-{beta}{sub 1} and myostatin. Here, we show that immunoneutralization of IGFBP-5 also significantly (P < 0.05) decreases the DNA synthesis-suppressing activity of these molecules. Simultaneous immunoneutralization of both IGFBP-3 and IGFBP-5 in TGF-{beta}{sub 1} or myostatin-treated PEMC cultures restores Long-R3-IGF-I-stimulated DNA synthesis rates to 90% of the levels observed in control cultures receiving no TGF-{beta}{sub 1} or myostatin treatment (P < 0.05). Even though immunoneutralization of IGFBP-3 and -5 increased DNA synthesis rates in TGF-{beta}{sub 1} or myostatin-treated PEMC cultures, phosphosmad2 levels in these cultures were not affected. These findings strongly suggest that IGFBP-3 and IGFBP-5 affect processes downstream from receptor-mediated Smad phosphorylation that facilitate the ability of TGF-{beta} and myostatin to suppress proliferation of PEMC.

  1. Insulin-like growth factor-independent insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 promotes cell migration and lymph node metastasis of oral squamous cell carcinoma cells by requirement of integrin β1.

    PubMed

    Yen, Yi-Chen; Hsiao, Jenn-Ren; Jiang, Shih Sheng; Chang, Jeffrey S; Wang, Ssu-Han; Shen, Ying-Ying; Chen, Chung-Hsing; Chang, I-Shou; Chang, Jang-Yang; Chen, Ya-Wen

    2015-12-08

    Frequent metastasis to the cervical lymph nodes leads to poor survival of patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). To understand the underlying mechanisms of lymph node metastasis, two sublines were successfully isolated from cervical lymph nodes of nude mice through in vivo selection, and identified as originating from poorly metastatic parental cells. These two sublines specifically metastasized to cervical lymph nodes in 83% of mice, whereas OEC-M1 cells did not metastasize after injection into the oral cavity. After gene expression analysis, we identified insulin-like growth factor binding protein 3 (IGFBP3) as one of the significantly up-regulated genes in the sublines in comparison with their parental cells. Consistently, meta-analysis of the public microarray datasets and IGFBP3 immunohistochemical analysis revealed increased both levels of IGFBP3 mRNA and protein in human OSCC tissues when compared to normal oral or adjacent nontumorous tissues. Interestingly, the up-regulated IGFBP3 mRNA expression was significantly associated with OSCC patients with lymph node metastasis. IGFBP3 knockdown in the sublines impaired and ectopic IGFBP3 expression in the parental cells promoted migration, transendothelial migration and lymph node metastasis of orthotopic transplantation. Additionally, ectopic expression of IGFBP3 with an IGF-binding defect sustained the IGFBP3-enhanced biological functions. Results indicated that IGFBP3 regulates metastasis-related functions of OSCC cells through an IGF-independent mechanism. Furthermore, exogenous IGFBP3 was sufficient to induce cell motility and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation. The silencing of integrin β1 was able to impair exogenous IGFBP3-mediated migration and ERK phosphorylation, suggesting a critical role of integrin β1 in IGFBP3-enchanced functions.

  2. Inhibition of epithelial Na sup + transport by atriopeptin, protein kinase c, and pertussis toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Mohrmann, M.; Cantiello, H.F.; Ausiello, D.A. )

    1987-08-01

    The authors have recently shown the selective inhibition of an amiloride-sensitive, conductive pathway for Na{sup +} by atrial natriuretic peptide and 8-bromoguanosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate (8-BrcGMP) in the renal epithelial cell line, LLC-PK{sub i}. Using {sup 22}Na{sup +} fluxes, they further investigated the modulation of Na{sup +} transport by atrial natriuretic peptide and by agents that increase cGMP production, activate protein kinase c, or modulate guanine nucleotide regulatory protein function. Sodium nitroprusside increases intracellular cGMP concentrations without affecting cAMP concentrations and completely inhibits amiloride-sensitive Na{sup +} uptake in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Oleoyl 2-acetylglycerol and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, activators of protein kinase c, inhibit Na{sup +} uptake by 93 {plus minus} 13 and 51 {plus minus} 10%, respectively. Prolonged incubation with phorbol ester results in the downregulation of protein kinase c activity and reduces the inhibitory effect of atrial natriuretic peptide, suggesting that the action of this peptide involves stimulation of protein kinase c. Pertussis toxin, which induces the ADP-ribosylation of a 41-kDa guanine nucleotide regulatory protein in LLC-PK{sub i} cells, inhibits {sup 22}Na{sup +} influx to the same extent as amiloride. Thus, increasing cGMP, activating protein kinase c, and ADP-ribosylating a guanine nucleotide regulatory protein all inhibit Na{sup +} uptake. These events may be sequentially involved in the action of atrial natriuretic peptide.

  3. Heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) overexpression in transgenic mice downregulates insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP)-3 and -4 mRNA.

    PubMed

    Provenzano, Aaron P; Besner, Gail E; James, Paul F; Harding, Paul A

    2005-03-01

    An in vivo approach was taken to assess the biological significance of heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor (HB-EGF) using transgenic mice. Transgenic mice were generated using the pIRES-EGFP vector expressing a bicistronic mRNA containing both human HB-EGF (hHB-EGF) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) coding sequences under the regulation of the cytomegalovirus immediate-early (CMV-IE) promoter. As a marker for transgene expression, EGFP fluorescence in 5 microm tissue sections was evaluated. To confirm HB-EGF expression in EGFP-containing tissues, HB-EGF mRNA was analyzed by RT-PCR and Northern blot analysis. Protein levels of HB-EGF and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 (IGFBP-3), a molecule that stabilizes IGFs, which in turn helps to promote growth, were analyzed by Western blot. Also, the weights of transgenic mice were compared with the weights of wild type non-transgenic littermates over a 10-week period. EGFP fluorescence, RT-PCR and Northern analysis of a variety of tissues from hHB-EGF transgenic mice indicate recombinant EGFP/hHB-EGF mRNA expression in kidney, liver, lung and stomach. Western blot analysis confirmed that HB-EGF protein levels were greater in these tissues from hHB-EGF transgenic mice compared to wild type non-transgenic littermates. IGFBP-3 protein was absent in serum of transgenic mice prior to the onset of puberty, but indistinguishable from wild type non-transgenic mice after puberty. Furthermore, IGFBP-3 and IGFBP-4 mRNA were downregulated in the kidney, but not liver or lung of the transgenic mice. In accordance with reduced IGFBP-3 and -4 levels, hHB-EGF transgenic mice exhibited a 20% decrease in weight prior to 6 weeks of age compared to wild type non-transgenic littermates. Our laboratory has generated a biologically functional transgenic mouse model exhibiting increased expression of hHB-EGF in kidney, liver, lung and stomach. Overexpression of hHB-EGF affected the growth rate of these transgenic mice

  4. Characterization, localization and function of pertussis toxin-sensitive G proteins in the nervous systems of Aplysia and Loligo

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, S.S.

    1989-01-01

    The author has characterized pertussis toxin-sensitive G proteins in the nervous systems of the gastropod mollusc Aplysia and the cephalopod Loligo using ({sup 32}P)ADP-ribosylation and immunoblotting with G protein specific antisera. As in vertebrates, this class of G protein is associated with membranes and enriched in nervous tissue in Aplysia. Analysis of dissected Aplysia ganglia reveal that it is enriched in neuropil, a region containing most of the central nervous system synapses. Because both Aplysia and Loligo synaptosomes are enriched in pertussis toxin-sensitive G proteins, it is likely that they are found in synaptic terminals. Fractionation of Aplysia synaptosomes into membrane and vesicle fractions reveals that, although the majority of G protein is recovered in the plasma membrane fraction, a small proportion is recovered in the vesicle fraction. He shows that G proteins are on intracellular membranes by ADP-ribosylating extruded axoplasm with pertussis toxin. A plausible explanation for vesicular localization of G protein in axoplasm is that G proteins are transported to terminals on vesicles. He has shown, using ligature experiments with Aplysia connectives and temperature block experiments in the giant axon of Loligo, that G proteins move by anterograde fast axonal transport. Injection of pertussis toxin into the identified Aplysia neuron L10 blocks histamine-induced presynaptic inhibition of transmitter release. This suggests that pertussis toxin sensitive G proteins play a role in modulating transmitter release at synaptic terminals. In the giant synapse of Loligo, he presents preliminary data that demonstrates that the activation of G proteins in the presynaptic terminal results in decreased transmitter release.

  5. The cell morphogenesis gene ANGUSTIFOLIA encodes a CtBP/BARS-like protein and is involved in the control of the microtubule cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Folkers, U; Kirik, V; Schöbinger, U; Falk, S; Krishnakumar, S; Pollock, M A; Oppenheimer, D G; Day, I; Reddy, A S M; Jürgens, G; Hülskamp, M; Reddy, A R

    2002-03-15

    The ANGUSTIFOLIA (AN) gene is required for leaf hair (trichome) branching and is also involved in polarized expansion underlying organ shape. Here we show that the AN gene encodes a C-terminal binding proteins/brefeldin A ADP-ribosylated substrates (CtBP/BARS) related protein. AN is expressed at low levels in all organs and the AN protein is localized in the cytoplasm. In an mutant trichomes, the organization of the actin cytoskeleton is normal but the distribution of microtubules is aberrant. A role of AN in the control of the microtubule cytoskeleton is further supported by the finding that AN genetically and physically interacts with ZWICHEL, a kinesin motor molecule involved in trichome branching. Our data suggest that CtBP/BARS-like protein function in plants is directly associated with the microtubule cytoskeleton.

  6. Chemical Screens Identify Drugs that Enhance or Mitigate Cellular Responses to Antibody-Toxin Fusion Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Guha, Rajarshi; Simon, Nathan; Pasetto, Matteo; Keller, Jonathan; Huang, Manjie; Angelus, Evan; Pastan, Ira; Ferrer, Marc; FitzGerald, David J.; Thomas, Craig J.

    2016-01-01

    The intersection of small molecular weight drugs and antibody-based therapeutics is rarely studied in large scale. Both types of agents are currently part of the cancer armamentarium. However, very little is known about how to combine them in optimal ways. Immunotoxins are antibody-toxin gene fusion proteins engineered to target cancer cells via antibody binding to surface antigens. For fusion proteins derived from Pseudomonas exotoxin (PE), potency relies on the enzymatic domain of the toxin which catalyzes the ADP-ribosylation of EF2 causing inhibition of protein synthesis leading to cell death. Candidate immunotoxins have demonstrated clear value in clinical trials but generally have not been curative as single agents. Therefore we undertook three screens to discover effective combinations that could act synergistically. From the MIPE-3 library of compounds we identified various enhancers of immunotoxin action and at least one major class of inhibitor. Follow-up experiments confirmed the screening data and suggested that immunotoxins when administered with everolimus or nilotinib exhibit favorable combinatory activity and would be candidates for preclinical development. Mechanistic studies revealed that everolimus-immunotoxin combinations acted synergistically on elements of the protein synthetic machinery, including S61 kinase and 4E-BP1 of the mTORC1 pathway. Conversely, PARP inhibitors antagonized immunotoxins and also blocked the toxicity due to native ADP-ribosylating toxins. Thus, our goal of investigating a chemical library was justified based on the identification of several approved compounds that could be developed preclinically as ‘enhancers’ and at least one class of mitigator to be avoided. PMID:27556570

  7. The RST and PARP-like domain containing SRO protein family: analysis of protein structure, function and conservation in land plants

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The SROs (SIMILAR TO RCD-ONE) are a group of plant-specific proteins which have important functions in stress adaptation and development. They contain the catalytic core of the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) domain and a C-terminal RST (RCD-SRO-TAF4) domain. In addition to these domains, several, but not all, SROs contain an N-terminal WWE domain. Results SROs are present in all analyzed land plants and sequence analysis differentiates between two structurally distinct groups; cryptogams and monocots possess only group I SROs whereas eudicots also contain group II. Group I SROs possess an N-terminal WWE domain (PS50918) but the WWE domain is lacking in group II SROs. Group I domain structure is widely represented in organisms as distant as humans (for example, HsPARP11). We propose a unified nomenclature for the SRO family. The SROs are able to interact with transcription factors through the C-terminal RST domain but themselves are generally not regulated at the transcriptional level. The most conserved feature of the SROs is the catalytic core of the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PS51059) domain. However, bioinformatic analysis of the SRO PARP domain fold-structure and biochemical assays of AtRCD1 suggested that SROs do not possess ADP-ribosyl transferase activity. Conclusions The SROs are a highly conserved family of plant specific proteins. Sequence analysis of the RST domain implicates a highly preserved protein structure in that region. This might have implications for functional conservation. We suggest that, despite the presence of the catalytic core of the PARP domain, the SROs do not possess ADP-ribosyl transferase activity. Nevertheless, the function of SROs is critical for plants and might be related to transcription factor regulation and complex formation. PMID:20226034

  8. A Steric Antagonism of Actin Polymerization by a Salmonella Virulence Protein

    SciTech Connect

    Margarit,S.; Davidson, W.; Frego, L.; Stebbins, F.

    2006-01-01

    Salmonella spp. require the ADP-ribosyltransferase activity of the SpvB protein for intracellular growth and systemic virulence. SpvB covalently modifies actin, causing cytoskeletal disruption and apoptosis. We report here the crystal structure of the catalytic domain of SpvB, and we show by mass spectrometric analysis that SpvB modifies actin at Arg177, inhibiting its ATPase activity. We also describe two crystal structures of SpvB-modified, polymerization-deficient actin. These structures reveal that ADP-ribosylation does not lead to dramatic conformational changes in actin, suggesting a model in which this large family of toxins inhibits actin polymerization primarily through steric disruption of intrafilament contacts.

  9. Pertussis toxin-sensitive G-protein mediates the alpha 2-adrenergic receptor inhibition of melatonin release in photoreceptive chick pineal cell cultures

    SciTech Connect

    Pratt, B.L.; Takahashi, J.S.

    1988-07-01

    The avian pineal gland is a photoreceptive organ that has been shown to contain postjunctional alpha 2-adrenoceptors that inhibit melatonin synthesis and/or release upon receptor activation. Physiological response and (32P)ADP ribosylation experiments were performed to investigate whether pertussis toxin-sensitive guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G-proteins) were involved in the transduction of the alpha 2-adrenergic signal. For physiological response studies, the effects of pertussis toxin on melatonin release in dissociated cell cultures exposed to norepinephrine were assessed. Pertussis toxin blocked alpha 2-adrenergic receptor-mediated inhibition in a dose-dependent manner. Pertussis toxin-induced blockade appeared to be noncompetitive. One and 10 ng/ml doses of pertussis toxin partially blocked and a 100 ng/ml dose completely blocked norepinephrine-induced inhibition. Pertussis toxin-catalyzed (32P)ADP ribosylation of G-proteins in chick pineal cell membranes was assessed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and autoradiography. Membranes were prepared from cells that had been pretreated with 0, 1, 10, or 100 ng/ml pertussis toxin. In the absence of pertussis toxin pretreatment, two major proteins of 40K and 41K mol wt (Mr) were labeled by (32P)NAD. Pertussis toxin pretreatment of pineal cells abolished (32P) radiolabeling of the 40K Mr G-protein in a dose-dependent manner. The norepinephrine-induced inhibition of both cAMP efflux and melatonin release, as assessed by RIA of medium samples collected before membrane preparation, was also blocked in a dose-dependent manner by pertussis toxin. Collectively, these results suggest that a pertussis toxin-sensitive 40K Mr G-protein labeled by (32P)NAD may be functionally associated with alpha 2-adrenergic signal transduction in chick pineal cells.

  10. Regulation of cytoplasmic division of Xenopus embryo by rho p21 and its inhibitory GDP/GTP exchange protein (rho GDI)

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Evidence is accumulating that the rho family, a member of the ras p21- related small GTP-binding protein superfamily, regulates cell morphology, cell motility, and smooth muscle contraction through the actomyosin system. The actomyosin system is also known to be essential for cytoplasmic division of cells (cytokinesis). In this study, we examined the action of rho p21, its inhibitory GDP/GTP exchange protein, named rho GDI, its stimulatory GDP/GTP exchange protein, named smg GDS, and botulinum ADP-ribosyltransferase C3, known to selectively ADP-ribosylate rho p21 and to impair its function, in the cytoplasmic division using Xenopus embryos. The sperm-induced cytoplasmic division of Xenopus embryos was not affected by microinjection into the embryos of either smg GDS or the guanosine-5'-(3-O-thio)triphosphate (GTP gamma S)-bound form of rhoA p21, one member of the rho family, but completely inhibited by microinjection of rho GDI or C3. Under these conditions, nuclear division occurred normally but the furrow formation, which was induced by the contractile ring consisting of actomyosin just beneath the plasma membrane, was impaired. Comicroinjection of rho GDI with the GTP gamma S-bound form of rhoA p21 prevented the rho GDI action. Moreover, the sperm-induced cytoplasmic division of Xenopus embryos was inhibited by microinjection into the embryos of the rhoA p21 pre-ADP- ribosylated by C3 which might serve as a dominant negative inhibitor of endogenous rho p21. These results indicate that rho p21 together with its regulatory proteins regulates the cytoplasmic division through the actomyosin system. PMID:8436590

  11. Inhibition by islet-activating protein, pertussis toxin, of P2-purinergic receptor-mediated iodide efflux and phosphoinositide turnover in FRTL-5 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Okajima, F.; Sho, K.; Kondo, Y.

    1988-08-01

    Exposure of FRTL-5 thyroid cells to ATP (1 microM to 1 mM) resulted in the stimulation of I- efflux in association with the induction of inositol trisphosphate production and intracellular Ca2+ mobilization. Nonhydrolyzable ATP derivatives, ADP and GTP, were also as effective in magnitude as ATP, whereas neither AMP nor adenosine exerted significant effect on I- efflux, suggesting a P2-purinergic receptor-mediated activation of I- efflux. Treatment of the cells with the islet-activating protein (IAP) pertussis toxin, which ADP-ribosylated a 41,000 mol wt membrane protein, effectively suppressed the phosphoinositide response to ATP in addition to ATP-dependent I- efflux at agonist concentrations below 10 microM. In contrast, the I- efflux stimulated by TSH, A23187, or phorbol myristate acetate was insusceptible to IAP. The IAP substrate, probably GTP-binding protein, is hence proposed to mediate the activation of P2-purinergic receptor-linked phospholipase-C in FRTL-5 cells. However, the responses to ATP, its nonhydrolyzable derivatives, or ADP at the higher agonist concentrations, especially above 100 microM, were only partially inhibited by IAP, even though the IAP substrate was totally ADP ribosylated by the toxin. The responses to GTP in the whole concentration range tested were not influenced by IAP treatment. Thus, signals arising from the P2-receptor might be transduced to phospholipase-C by two different pathways, i.e. IAP-sensitive and insensitive ones, and result in the stimulation of I- efflux.

  12. Guanosine 5'-triphosphate binding protein (G/sub i/) and two additional pertussis toxin substrates associated with muscarinic receptors in rat heart myocytes: characterization and age dependency

    SciTech Connect

    Moscona-Amir, E.; Henis, Y.I.; Sokolovsky, M.

    1988-07-12

    The coupling of muscarinic receptors with G-proteins was investigated in cultured myocytes prepared from the hearts of newborn rats. The coupling was investigated in both young (5 days after plating) and aged (14 days after plating) cultures, in view of the completely different effects of 5'-guanylyl imidodiphosphate (Gpp(NH)p) on muscarinic agonist binding to homogenates from young vs aged cultures. Pretreatment of cultures from both ages by Bordetella pertussis toxin (IAP) was found to eliminate any Gpp(NH)p effect on carbamylcholine binding. IAP by itself induced a rightward shift in the carbamylcholine competition curve in homogenates from aged cultures, but no such effect was observed in homogenates from young cultures. IAP-catalyzed (/sup 32/P)ADP-ribosylation of membrane preparations from young and aged cultures revealed major differences between them. Young cultures exhibited a major IAP substrate at 40 kDa, which was also recognized by anti-..cap alpha../sub i/ antibodies, and two novel IAP substrates at 28 and 42 kDa, which were weakly ADP-ribosylated by the toxin and were not recognized with either anti-..cap alpha../sub i/ or anti-..cap alpha../sub 0/ antibodies. In aged cultures, only the 40-kDa band (ribosylated to a lower degree) was detected. The parallel age-dependent changes in the three IAP substrates (28, 40, and 42 kDa) and in the interactions of the G-protein(s) with the muscarinic receptors strongly suggest close association between the two phenomena. All of these age-dependent changes in the G-protein related parameters were prevented by phosphatidylcholine-liposome treatment of the aged cultures. The role of the membrane lipid composition in these phenomena is discussed.

  13. Identifying differential transcription factor binding in ChIP-seq

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dai-Ying; Bittencourt, Danielle; Stallcup, Michael R.; Siegmund, Kimberly D.

    2015-01-01

    ChIP seq is a widely used assay to measure genome-wide protein binding. The decrease in costs associated with sequencing has led to a rise in the number of studies that investigate protein binding across treatment conditions or cell lines. In addition to the identification of binding sites, new studies evaluate the variation in protein binding between conditions. A number of approaches to study differential transcription factor binding have recently been developed. Several of these methods build upon established methods from RNA-seq to quantify differences in read counts. We compare how these new approaches perform on different data sets from the ENCODE project to illustrate the impact of data processing pipelines under different study designs. The performance of normalization methods for differential ChIP-seq depends strongly on the variation in total amount of protein bound between conditions, with total read count outperforming effective library size, or variants thereof, when a large variation in binding was studied. Use of input subtraction to correct for non-specific binding showed a relatively modest impact on the number of differential peaks found and the fold change accuracy to biological validation, however a larger impact might be expected for samples with more extreme copy number variations between them. Still, it did identify a small subset of novel differential regions while excluding some differential peaks in regions with high background signal. These results highlight proper scaling for between-sample data normalization as critical for differential transcription factor binding analysis and suggest bioinformaticians need to know about the variation in level of total protein binding between conditions to select the best analysis method. At the same time, validation using fold-change estimates from qRT-PCR suggests there is still room for further method improvement. PMID:25972895

  14. Excessive stimulation of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation contributes to endothelial dysfunction in pre-eclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Crocker, Ian P; Kenny, Louise C; Thornton, Wayne A; Szabo, Csaba; Baker, Philip N

    2004-01-01

    Pre-eclampsia is a serious pregnancy disorder associated with widespread activation of the maternal vascular endothelium. Recent evidence implicates a role for oxidative stress in the aetiology of this condition. Reactive oxygen species, particularly superoxide anions, invokes endothelial cell activation through many pathways. Oxidant-induced cell injury triggers the activation of nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) leading to endothelial dysfunction in various pathophysiological conditions (reperfusion, shock, diabetes). We have studied whether the loss of endothelial function in pre-eclampsia is dependent on PARP activity. Endothelium-dependent responses of myometrial arteries were tested following exposure to either plasma from women with pre-eclampsia or normal pregnant women in the presence and absence of a novel potent inhibitor of PARP, PJ34. Additional effects of plasma and PJ34 inhibition were identified in microvascular endothelial cell cultures. In myometrial arteries, PARP inhibition blocked the attenuation of endothelium-dependent responses following exposure to plasma from women with pre-eclampsia. In endothelial cell cultures, plasma from pre-eclamptics induced measurable oxidative stress and a concomitant increase in PARP activity and reduction in cellular ATP. Again, these biochemical changes were reversed by PJ34. These results suggest that PARP activity plays a pathogenic role in the development of endothelial dysfunction in pre-eclampsia and promotes PARP inhibition as a potential therapy in this condition. PMID:15778700

  15. Sam68 Is Required for DNA Damage Responses via Regulating Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, Andrea; Wier, Eric M.; Wen, Matthew G.; Kamenyeva, Olena; Xia, Xue; Koo, Lily Y.

    2016-01-01

    The rapid and robust synthesis of polymers of adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-ribose (PAR) chains, primarily catalyzed by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1), is crucial for cellular responses to DNA damage. However, the precise mechanisms through which PARP1 is activated and PAR is robustly synthesized are not fully understood. Here, we identified Src-associated substrate during mitosis of 68 kDa (Sam68) as a novel signaling molecule in DNA damage responses (DDRs). In the absence of Sam68, DNA damage-triggered PAR production and PAR-dependent DNA repair signaling were dramatically diminished. With serial cellular and biochemical assays, we demonstrated that Sam68 is recruited to and significantly overlaps with PARP1 at DNA lesions and that the interaction between Sam68 and PARP1 is crucial for DNA damage-initiated and PARP1-conferred PAR production. Utilizing cell lines and knockout mice, we illustrated that Sam68-deleted cells and animals are hypersensitive to genotoxicity caused by DNA-damaging agents. Together, our findings suggest that Sam68 plays a crucial role in DDR via regulating DNA damage-initiated PAR production. PMID:27635653

  16. ADP ribosyl-cyclases (CD38/CD157), social skills and friendship.

    PubMed

    Chong, Anne; Malavasi, Fabio; Israel, Salomon; Khor, Chiea Chuen; Yap, Von Bing; Monakhov, Mikhail; Chew, Soo Hong; Lai, Poh San; Ebstein, Richard P

    2017-04-01

    Why some individuals seek social engagement while others shy away has profound implications for normal and pathological human behavior. Evidence suggests that oxytocin (OT), the paramount human social hormone, and CD38 that governs OT release, contribute to individual differences in social skills from intense social involvement to extreme avoidance that characterize autism. To explore the neurochemical underpinnings of sociality, CD38 expression of peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) was measured in Han Chinese undergraduates. First, CD38 mRNA levels were correlated with lower Autism Quotient (AQ), indicating enhanced social skills. AQ assesses the extent of autistic-like traits including the propensity and dexterity needed for successful social engagement in the general population. Second, three CD157 eQTL SNPs in the CD38/CD157 gene region were associated with CD38 expression. CD157 is a paralogue of CD38 and is contiguous with it on chromosome 4p15. Third, association was also observed between the CD157 eQTL SNPs, CD38 expression and AQ. In the full model, CD38 expression and CD157 eQTL SNPs altogether account for a substantial 14% of the variance in sociality. Fourth, functionality of CD157 eQTL SNPs was suggested by a significant association with plasma oxytocin immunoreactivity products. Fifth, the ecological validity of these findings was demonstrated with subjects with higher PBL CD38 expression having more friends, especially for males. Furthermore, CD157 sequence variation predicts scores on the Friendship questionnaire. To summarize, this study by uniquely leveraging various measures reveals salient elements contributing to nonkin sociality and friendship, revealing a likely pathway underpinning the transition from normality to psychopathology.

  17. Identification of nuclear proteins in soybean under flooding stress using proteomic technique.

    PubMed

    Oh, Myeong Won; Nanjo, Yohei; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2014-05-01

    Flooding stress restricts soybean growth, it results in decrease the production. In this report, to understand how nuclear proteins in soybean affected by flooding, abundance changes of those proteins was analyzed. Nuclear proteins were extracted from the root tips of soybean treated with or without flooding stress. The extracted proteins were analyzed using a label-free quantitative proteomic technique. Of a total of 94 nuclear proteins that were found to be responsive to flooding, the 19 and 75 proteins were increased and decreased, respectively. The identified flooding-responsive proteins were functionally classified, revealing that 8 increased proteins changed in protein synthesis, posttranslational modification, and protein degradation, while 34 decreased proteins were involved in transcription, RNA processing, DNA synthesis, and chromatin structure maintenance. Among these proteins, those whose levels changed more than 10 fold included two poly ADP-ribose polymerases and a novel G-domain-containing protein that might be involved in RNA binding. The mRNA expression levels of these three proteins indicated a similar tendency to their protein abundance changes. These results suggest that acceleration of protein poly-ADP-ribosylation and suppression of RNA metabolism may be involved in root tip of soybean under flooding stress.

  18. Noncovalent protein interaction with poly(ADP-ribose).

    PubMed

    Malanga, Maria; Althaus, Felix R

    2011-01-01

    Compared to most common posttranslational modifications of proteins, a peculiarity of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is the molecular heterogeneity and complexity of the reaction product, poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR). In fact, protein-bound PAR consists of variously sized (2-200 ADP-ribose residues) linear or branched molecules, negatively charged at physiological pH. It is now clear that PAR not only affects the function of the polypeptide to which it is covalently bound, but it can also influence the activity of other proteins by engaging specific noncovalent interactions. In the last 10 years, the family of PAR-binding proteins has been rapidly growing and functional studies have expanded the regulatory potential of noncovalent -protein targeting by PAR far beyond initial assumptions.In this chapter, methods are described for: (1) PAR synthesis and analysis; (2) detecting PAR-binding proteins in protein mixtures; (3) defining affinity and specificity of PAR binding to individual proteins or protein fragments; and (4) identifying PAR molecules selectively involved in the interaction.

  19. Arf-like Protein 3 (ARL3) Regulates Protein Trafficking and Ciliogenesis in Mouse Photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Hanke-Gogokhia, Christin; Wu, Zhijian; Gerstner, Cecilia D; Frederick, Jeanne M; Zhang, Houbin; Baehr, Wolfgang

    2016-03-25

    Arf-like protein 3 (ARL3) is a ubiquitous small GTPase expressed in ciliated cells of plants and animals. Germline deletion ofArl3in mice causes multiorgan ciliopathy reminiscent of Bardet-Biedl or Joubert syndromes. As photoreceptors are elegantly compartmentalized and have cilia, we probed the function of ARL3 (ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf)-like 3 protein) by generating rod photoreceptor-specific (prefix(rod)) and retina-specific (prefix(ret))Arl3deletions. In predegenerate(rod)Arl3(-/-)mice, lipidated phototransduction proteins showed trafficking deficiencies, consistent with the role of ARL3 as a cargo displacement factor for lipid-binding proteins. By contrast,(ret)Arl3(-/-)rods and cones expressing Cre recombinase during embryonic development formed neither connecting cilia nor outer segments and degenerated rapidly. Absence of cilia infers participation of ARL3 in ciliogenesis and axoneme formation. Ciliogenesis was rescued, and degeneration was reversed in part by subretinal injection of adeno-associated virus particles expressing ARL3-EGFP. The conditional knock-out phenotypes permitted identification of two ARL3 functions, both in the GTP-bound form as follows: one as a regulator of intraflagellar transport participating in photoreceptor ciliogenesis and the other as a cargo displacement factor transporting lipidated protein to the outer segment. Surprisingly, a farnesylated inositol polyphosphate phosphatase only trafficked from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi, thereby excluding it from a role in photoreceptor cilia physiology.

  20. Uncoupling of gamma-aminobutyric acid B receptors from GTP-binding proteins by N-ethylmaleimide: effect of N-ethylmaleimide on purified GTP-binding proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Asano, T.; Ogasawara, N.

    1986-03-01

    Treatment of membranes from bovine cerebral cortex with N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) resulted in inhibition of gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) binding to GABAB receptors. The binding curve for increasing concentrations of agonist was shifted to the right by NEM treatment. Guanine nucleotide had little effect on the binding of GABA to NEM-treated membranes. The addition of purified GTP-binding proteins, which were the substrates of islet-activating protein (IAP), pertussis toxin, to the NEM-treated membranes caused a shift of the binding curve to the left, suggesting modification of GTP-binding proteins rather than receptors by NEM. The effect of NEM on two purified GTP-binding proteins, Gi (composed of three subunits with molecular weight of alpha, 41,000; beta, 35,000; gamma, 10,000) and Go (alpha, 39,000; beta, 35,000; gamma, 10,000) was studied. NEM did not significantly change guanosine 5'-(3-O-thio)triphosphate (GTP gamma S) binding and GTPase activity of these two proteins. NEM-treated Gi and Go were not ADP-ribosylated by IAP and did not increase GABA binding to NEM-treated membranes. When alpha and beta gamma subunits were treated with NEM and then mixed with nontreated alpha and beta gamma to form Gi or Go, respectively, both oligomers with NEM-treated alpha-subunits lost their abilities to be IAP substrates and to couple to receptors. Results indicate that NEM uncoupled GTP-binding proteins from receptors by modifying alpha-subunits of GTP-binding proteins, and the site seemed to be on or near the site of ADP-ribosylation by IAP. When alpha and beta gamma subunits were treated with NEM and then mixed to form Gi or Go, GTP gamma S binding in the absence of Mg2+ and GTPase activity were changed, although they were not affected when oligomers were treated with NEM. Results suggest the existence of another sulfhydryl group which is protected from NEM by the association of subunits.

  1. Nucleotides of transcription factor binding sites exert interdependent effects on the binding affinities of transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Bulyk, Martha L.; Johnson, Philip L. F.; Church, George M.

    2002-01-01

    We can determine the effects of many possible sequence variations in transcription factor binding sites using microarray binding experiments. Analysis of wild-type and mutant Zif268 (Egr1) zinc fingers bound to microarrays containing all possible central 3 bp triplet binding sites indicates that the nucleotides of transcription factor binding sites cannot be treated independently. This indicates that the current practice of characterizing transcription factor binding sites by mutating individual positions of binding sites one base pair at a time does not provide a true picture of the sequence specificity. Similarly, current bioinformatic practices using either just a consensus sequence, or even mononucleotide frequency weight matrices to provide more complete descriptions of transcription factor binding sites, are not accurate in depicting the true binding site specificities, since these methods rely upon the assumption that the nucleotides of binding sites exert independent effects on binding affinity. Our results stress the importance of complete reference tables of all possible binding sites for comparing protein binding preferences for various DNA sequences. We also show results suggesting that microarray binding data using particular subsets of all possible binding sites can be used to extrapolate the relative binding affinities of all possible full-length binding sites, given a known binding site for use as a starting sequence for site preference refinement. PMID:11861919

  2. Association of serum retinol and carotenoids with insulin-like growth factors and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 among control subjects of a nested case-control study in the Japan Collaborative Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Koji; Ito, Yoshinori; Hashimoto, Shuji; Kawado, Miyuki; Inoue, Takashi; Ando, Masahiko; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Inaba, Yutaka; Tajima, Kazuo; Nakachi, Kei; Tamakoshi, Akiko

    2009-12-01

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I and its main binding protein, IGFBP-3, modulate cell growth and survival, and thus are thought to be important for tumor development. Carotenoids and retinol have been linked to the prevention of several cancers. We here evaluated associations of serum levels of carotenoids and retinol with IGF-I, IGF-II, and IGFBP-3 within the context of the JACC Study. The study subjects were 924 controls (578 men and 346 women) of a nested case-control study of lung and colorectal cancer risk. Using frozen-stored sera, serum levels of a-carotene, b-carotene, lycopene, b-cryptoxanthin, zeaxanthin/lutein, and retinol were separately determined using high-performance liquid chromatography. Serum levels of IGF-I, IGF-II, and IGFBP-3 were measured by immuno-radiometric assay. Confounding factors-adjusted least squares mean levels of serum IGF-I, IGF-II, and IGFBP-3 for each quartile of serum levels of carotenoids and retinol were estimated. Serum IGF-I, IGF-II, and IGFBP-3 levels increased with increasing serum retinol levels. Moreover, serum IGF-I levels were significantly higher in highest quartile of serum provitamin A, such as a-carotene, b-carotene, and b-cryptoxanthin, among women. Serum IGFBP-3 levels decreased with increasing serum lycopene levels in women and with increasing serum zeaxanthin/lutein levels in men. The current study indicates that positive associations exist for serum retinol levels with serum levels of IGF-I, IGF-II, and IGFBP-3 independent of age, BMI, smoking habits, drinking habits, and intake of energy and protein among Japanese healthy men and women.

  3. Predicting tissue specific transcription factor binding sites

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Studies of gene regulation often utilize genome-wide predictions of transcription factor (TF) binding sites. Most existing prediction methods are based on sequence information alone, ignoring biological contexts such as developmental stages and tissue types. Experimental methods to study in vivo binding, including ChIP-chip and ChIP-seq, can only study one transcription factor in a single cell type and under a specific condition in each experiment, and therefore cannot scale to determine the full set of regulatory interactions in mammalian transcriptional regulatory networks. Results We developed a new computational approach, PIPES, for predicting tissue-specific TF binding. PIPES integrates in vitro protein binding microarrays (PBMs), sequence conservation and tissue-specific epigenetic (DNase I hypersensitivity) information. We demonstrate that PIPES improves over existing methods on distinguishing between in vivo bound and unbound sequences using ChIP-seq data for 11 mouse TFs. In addition, our predictions are in good agreement with current knowledge of tissue-specific TF regulation. Conclusions We provide a systematic map of computationally predicted tissue-specific binding targets for 284 mouse TFs across 55 tissue/cell types. Such comprehensive resource is useful for researchers studying gene regulation. PMID:24238150

  4. Molecular Toxicology of Chromatin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    Role of Poly ADP-ribose. Poly ADP-ribosylated proteins were quantitatively isolated from livers of normal and dimethylnitrosamine treated Syrian hamsters...histone proteins (r180-200 kd) were poly ADP-ribosylated at least 6-9 fold over controls, in livers of dimethylnitrosamine treated Syrian hamsters (ref...34Quantitative Isolation of Oligo- and Polyadenosine-diphosphorylated Proteins by Affinity Chromatography from Livers of Normal and Dimethylnitrosamine - treated

  5. PROTEOMIC ANALYSIS OF UBIQUITINATED PROTEINS FROM DELTAMETHRIN-RESISTANT AND SUSCEPTIBLE STRAINS OF THE DIAMONDBACK MOTH, Plutella Xylostella L.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Luogen; Du, Yaqiong; Hu, Junli; Jiao, Dongxu; Li, Jin; Zhou, Zhou; Xu, Qin; Li, Fengliang

    2015-10-01

    Ubiquitin, a small protein consisting of 76 amino acids, acts in protein degradation, DNA repair, signal transduction, transcriptional regulation, and receptor control through endocytosis. Using proteomics, we compared the differentially ubiquitinated proteins between a deltamethrin-resistant (DR) strain and a deltamethrin-sensitive (DS) strain in third-instar larvae of the diamondback moth. We used polyubiquitin affinity beads to enrich ubiquitinated proteins and then performed one-dimensional SDS-PAGE separation and mass spectrometric identification. In the DR strain, We found 17 proteins that were upregulated (relative to the DS strain), including carbonic anhydrase family members, ADP ribosylation factor 102F CG11027-PA, protein kinase 61C, phospholipase A2 , dihydrolipoamide dehydrogenase, tyrosine hydroxylase, and heat shock proteins, and five proteins that were downregulated in the DS strain, including carboxylesterase and DNA cytosine-5 methyltransferase. These results were also verified by qPCR. The differentially ubiquitinated proteins/enzymes were mainly responsible for protein binding, catalytic activity, and molecular transducer activity. These results improve our understanding of the relationship between protein ubiquitination and the deltamethrin stress response.

  6. TEMPLE: analysing population genetic variation at transcription factor binding sites.

    PubMed

    Litovchenko, Maria; Laurent, Stefan

    2016-11-01

    Genetic variation occurring at the level of regulatory sequences can affect phenotypes and fitness in natural populations. This variation can be analysed in a population genetic framework to study how genetic drift and selection affect the evolution of these functional elements. However, doing this requires a good understanding of the location and nature of regulatory regions and has long been a major hurdle. The current proliferation of genomewide profiling experiments of transcription factor occupancies greatly improves our ability to identify genomic regions involved in specific DNA-protein interactions. Although software exists for predicting transcription factor binding sites (TFBS), and the effects of genetic variants on TFBS specificity, there are no tools currently available for inferring this information jointly with the genetic variation at TFBS in natural populations. We developed the software Transcription Elements Mapping at the Population LEvel (TEMPLE), which predicts TFBS, evaluates the effects of genetic variants on TFBS specificity and summarizes the genetic variation occurring at TFBS in intraspecific sequence alignments. We demonstrate that TEMPLE's TFBS prediction algorithms gives identical results to PATSER, a software distribution commonly used in the field. We also illustrate the unique features of TEMPLE by analysing TFBS diversity for the TF Senseless (SENS) in one ancestral and one cosmopolitan population of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. TEMPLE can be used to localize TFBS that are characterized by strong genetic differentiation across natural populations. This will be particularly useful for studies aiming to identify adaptive mutations. TEMPLE is a java-based cross-platform software that easily maps the genetic diversity at predicted TFBSs using a graphical interface, or from the Unix command line.

  7. Proteomic Analysis of the Excretory and Secretory Proteins of Haemonchus contortus (HcESP) Binding to Goat PBMCs In Vivo Revealed Stage-Specific Binding Profiles

    PubMed Central

    Gadahi, Javaid Ali; Wang, Shuai; Bo, Gao; Ehsan, Muhammad; Yan, RuoFeng; Song, XiaoKai; Xu, LiXin; Li, XiangRui

    2016-01-01

    Haemonchus contortus is a parasitic gastrointestinal nematode, and its excretory and secretory products (HcESPs) interact extensively with the host cells. In this study, we report the interaction of proteins from HcESPs at different developmental stages to goat peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in vivo using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. A total of 407 HcESPs that interacted with goat PBMCs at different time points were identified from a H. contortus protein database using SEQUEST searches. The L4 and L5 stages of H. contortus represented a higher proportion of the identified proteins compared with the early and late adult stages. Both stage-specific interacting proteins and proteins that were common to multiple stages were identified. Forty-seven interacting proteins were shared among all stages. The gene ontology (GO) distributions of the identified goat PBMC-interacting proteins were nearly identical among all developmental stages, with high representation of binding and catalytic activity. Cellular, metabolic and single-organism processes were also annotated as major biological processes, but interestingly, more proteins were annotated as localization processes at the L5 stage than at the L4 and adult stages. Based on the clustering of homologous proteins, we improved the functional annotations of un-annotated proteins identified at different developmental stages. Some unnamed H. contortus ATP-binding cassette proteins, including ADP-ribosylation factor and P-glycoprotein-9, were identified by STRING protein clustering analysis. PMID:27467391

  8. Genome-wide conserved consensus transcription factor binding motifs are hyper-methylated

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background DNA methylation can regulate gene expression by modulating the interaction between DNA and proteins or protein complexes. Conserved consensus motifs exist across the human genome ("predicted transcription factor binding sites": "predicted TFBS") but the large majority of these are proven by chromatin immunoprecipitation and high throughput sequencing (ChIP-seq) not to be biological transcription factor binding sites ("empirical TFBS"). We hypothesize that DNA methylation at conserved consensus motifs prevents promiscuous or disorderly transcription factor binding. Results Using genome-wide methylation maps of the human heart and sperm, we found that all conserved consensus motifs as well as the subset of those that reside outside CpG islands have an aggregate profile of hyper-methylation. In contrast, empirical TFBS with conserved consensus motifs have a profile of hypo-methylation. 40% of empirical TFBS with conserved consensus motifs resided in CpG islands whereas only 7% of all conserved consensus motifs were in CpG islands. Finally we further identified a minority subset of TF whose profiles are either hypo-methylated or neutral at their respective conserved consensus motifs implicating that these TF may be responsible for establishing or maintaining an un-methylated DNA state, or whose binding is not regulated by DNA methylation. Conclusions Our analysis supports the hypothesis that at least for a subset of TF, empirical binding to conserved consensus motifs genome-wide may be controlled by DNA methylation. PMID:20875111

  9. Position specific variation in the rate of evolution intranscription factor binding sites

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, Alan M.; Chiang, Derek Y.; Kellis, Manolis; Lander, EricS.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2003-08-28

    The binding sites of sequence specific transcription factors are an important and relatively well-understood class of functional non-coding DNAs. Although a wide variety of experimental and computational methods have been developed to characterize transcription factor binding sites, they remain difficult to identify. Comparison of non-coding DNA from related species has shown considerable promise in identifying these functional non-coding sequences, even though relatively little is known about their evolution. Here we analyze the genome sequences of the budding yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae, S. bayanus, S. paradoxus and S. mikataeto study the evolution of transcription factor binding sites. As expected, we find that both experimentally characterized and computationally predicted binding sites evolve slower than surrounding sequence, consistent with the hypothesis that they are under purifying selection. We also observe position-specific variation in the rate of evolution within binding sites. We find that the position-specific rate of evolution is positively correlated with degeneracy among binding sites within S. cerevisiae. We test theoretical predictions for the rate of evolution at positions where the base frequencies deviate from background due to purifying selection and find reasonable agreement with the observed rates of evolution. Finally, we show how the evolutionary characteristics of real binding motifs can be used to distinguish them from artifacts of computational motif finding algorithms. As has been observed for protein sequences, the rate of evolution in transcription factor binding sites varies with position, suggesting that some regions are under stronger functional constraint than others. This variation likely reflects the varying importance of different positions in the formation of the protein-DNA complex. The characterization of the pattern of evolution in known binding sites will likely contribute to the effective use of comparative

  10. Inhibition of Rho protein stimulates iNOS expression in rat vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Muniyappa, R; Xu, R; Ram, J L; Sowers, J R

    2000-06-01

    Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) is upregulated in arterial injury and plays a role in regulating VSMC proliferation and restenosis. Inflammatory cytokines [e.g., interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta)] released during vascular injury induce iNOS. Small GTP-binding proteins of the Ras superfamily play a major role in IL-1beta-dependent signaling pathways. In this study, we examined the role of Rho GTPases in regulating iNOS expression in VSMCs. Treatment of VSMCs with mevastatin, which inhibits isoprenylation of Rho and other small GTP-binding proteins, produced significantly higher amounts of IL-1beta-evoked NO and iNOS protein compared with control. Similarly, bacterial toxins [Toxin B from Clostridium difficile and C3 ADP-ribosyl transferase (C3) toxin from Clostridium botulinium] that specifically inactivate Rho proteins increased NOS products (NO and citrulline) and iNOS expression. Toxin B increased the activity of iNOS promoter-reporter construct in VSMCs. Both toxins enhanced IL-1beta-stimulated iNOS expression and NO production. These data demonstrate for the first time that inhibition of Rho induces iNOS and suggest a role for Rho protein in IL-1beta-stimulated NO production in VSMCs.

  11. Pasteurella multocida toxin as a transporter of non-cell-permeating proteins.

    PubMed

    Bergmann, Stefan; Jehle, Doris; Schwan, Carsten; Orth, Joachim H C; Aktories, Klaus

    2013-07-01

    The protein toxin Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT) is the causative agent of atrophic rhinitis in pigs, leading to atrophy of the nasal turbinate bones by affecting osteoblasts and osteoclasts. The mechanism of PMT-induced intoxication is a deamidation of α-subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins, including Gαq, Gα13, and Gαi, thereby causing persistent activation of the G proteins. Here we utilized PMT as a transporter of the non-cell-permeating A domain of diphtheria toxin (DTa). Fusion proteins of PMT and DTa ADP-ribosylated elongation factor 2, the natural target of diphtheria toxin, leading to cell toxicity. PMT-DTa effects were competed by PMT, indicating binding to the same cell surface receptor. Fluorescently labeled PMT-DTa and PMT colocalized with specific markers of early and late endosomes. Bafilomycin A, which inhibits vacuolar H(+)-ATPase, blocked PMT-DTa-induced intoxication of HEK-293 cells. By constructing various PMT-DTa chimeras, we identified a minimal region of PMT necessary for uptake of DTa. The data suggest that PMT is able to transport cargo proteins into eukaryotic cells by utilizing the PMT-specific uptake route.

  12. In-Frame cDNA Library Combined with Protein Complementation Assay Identifies ARL11-Binding Partners

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sangkyou; Lee, Ilkyun; Jung, Yoonsuh; McConkey, David; Czerniak, Bogdan

    2012-01-01

    The cDNA expression libraries that produce correct proteins are essential in facilitating the identification of protein-protein interactions. The 5′-untranslated regions (UTRs) that are present in the majority of mammalian and non-mammalian genes are predicted to alter the expression of correct proteins from cDNA libraries. We developed a novel cDNA expression library from which 5′-UTRs were removed using a mixture of polymerase chain reaction primers that complement the Kozak sequences we refer to as an “in-frame cDNA library.” We used this library with the protein complementation assay to identify two novel binding partners for ras-related ADP-ribosylation factor-like 11 (ARL11), cellular retinoic acid binding protein 2 (CRABP2), and phosphoglycerate mutase 1 (PGAM1). Thus, the in-frame cDNA library without 5′-UTRs we describe here increases the chance of correctly identifying protein interactions and will have wide applications in both mammalian and non-mammalian detection systems. PMID:23272234

  13. In-frame cDNA library combined with protein complementation assay identifies ARL11-binding partners.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sangkyou; Lee, Ilkyun; Jung, Yoonsuh; McConkey, David; Czerniak, Bogdan

    2012-01-01

    The cDNA expression libraries that produce correct proteins are essential in facilitating the identification of protein-protein interactions. The 5'-untranslated regions (UTRs) that are present in the majority of mammalian and non-mammalian genes are predicted to alter the expression of correct proteins from cDNA libraries. We developed a novel cDNA expression library from which 5'-UTRs were removed using a mixture of polymerase chain reaction primers that complement the Kozak sequences we refer to as an "in-frame cDNA library." We used this library with the protein complementation assay to identify two novel binding partners for ras-related ADP-ribosylation factor-like 11 (ARL11), cellular retinoic acid binding protein 2 (CRABP2), and phosphoglycerate mutase 1 (PGAM1). Thus, the in-frame cDNA library without 5'-UTRs we describe here increases the chance of correctly identifying protein interactions and will have wide applications in both mammalian and non-mammalian detection systems.

  14. Neuronal death induced by misfolded prion protein is due to NAD+ depletion and can be relieved in vitro and in vivo by NAD+ replenishment

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Minghai; Ottenberg, Gregory; Sferrazza, Gian Franco; Hubbs, Christopher; Fallahi, Mohammad; Rumbaugh, Gavin; Brantley, Alicia F.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms of neuronal death in protein misfolding neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and prion diseases are poorly understood. We used a highly toxic misfolded prion protein (TPrP) model to understand neurotoxicity induced by prion protein misfolding. We show that abnormal autophagy activation and neuronal demise is due to severe, neuron-specific, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) depletion. Toxic prion protein-exposed neuronal cells exhibit dramatic reductions of intracellular NAD+ followed by decreased ATP production, and are completely rescued by treatment with NAD+ or its precursor nicotinamide because of restoration of physiological NAD+ levels. Toxic prion protein-induced NAD+ depletion results from PARP1-independent excessive protein ADP-ribosylations. In vivo, toxic prion protein-induced degeneration of hippocampal neurons is prevented dose-dependently by intracerebral injection of NAD+. Intranasal NAD+ treatment of prion-infected sick mice significantly improves activity and delays motor impairment. Our study reveals NAD+ starvation as a novel mechanism of autophagy activation and neurodegeneration induced by a misfolded amyloidogenic protein. We propose the development of NAD+ replenishment strategies for neuroprotection in prion diseases and possibly other protein misfolding neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25678560

  15. Neuronal death induced by misfolded prion protein is due to NAD+ depletion and can be relieved in vitro and in vivo by NAD+ replenishment.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Minghai; Ottenberg, Gregory; Sferrazza, Gian Franco; Hubbs, Christopher; Fallahi, Mohammad; Rumbaugh, Gavin; Brantley, Alicia F; Lasmézas, Corinne I

    2015-04-01

    The mechanisms of neuronal death in protein misfolding neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and prion diseases are poorly understood. We used a highly toxic misfolded prion protein (TPrP) model to understand neurotoxicity induced by prion protein misfolding. We show that abnormal autophagy activation and neuronal demise is due to severe, neuron-specific, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) depletion. Toxic prion protein-exposed neuronal cells exhibit dramatic reductions of intracellular NAD(+) followed by decreased ATP production, and are completely rescued by treatment with NAD(+) or its precursor nicotinamide because of restoration of physiological NAD(+) levels. Toxic prion protein-induced NAD(+) depletion results from PARP1-independent excessive protein ADP-ribosylations. In vivo, toxic prion protein-induced degeneration of hippocampal neurons is prevented dose-dependently by intracerebral injection of NAD(+). Intranasal NAD(+) treatment of prion-infected sick mice significantly improves activity and delays motor impairment. Our study reveals NAD(+) starvation as a novel mechanism of autophagy activation and neurodegeneration induced by a misfolded amyloidogenic protein. We propose the development of NAD(+) replenishment strategies for neuroprotection in prion diseases and possibly other protein misfolding neurodegenerative diseases.

  16. PARylation of the forkhead-associated domain protein DAWDLE regulates plant immunity.

    PubMed

    Feng, Baomin; Ma, Shisong; Chen, Sixue; Zhu, Ning; Zhang, Shuxin; Yu, Bin; Yu, Yu; Le, Brandon; Chen, Xuemei; Dinesh-Kumar, Savithramma P; Shan, Libo; He, Ping

    2016-12-01

    Protein poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) primarily catalyzed by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) plays a crucial role in controlling various cellular responses. However, PARylation targets and their functions remain largely elusive. Here, we deployed an Arabidopsis protein microarray coupled with in vitro PARylation assays to globally identify PARylation targets in plants. Consistent with the essential role of PARylation in plant immunity, the forkhead-associated (FHA) domain protein DAWDLE (DDL), one of PARP2 targets, positively regulates plant defense to both adapted and non-adapted pathogens. Arabidopsis PARP2 interacts with and PARylates DDL, which was enhanced upon treatment of bacterial flagellin. Mass spectrometry and mutagenesis analysis identified multiple PARylation sites of DDL by PARP2. Genetic complementation assays indicate that DDL PARylation is required for its function in plant immunity. In contrast, DDL PARylation appears to be dispensable for its previously reported function in plant development partially mediated by the regulation of microRNA biogenesis. Our study uncovers many previously unknown PARylation targets and points to the distinct functions of DDL in plant immunity and development mediated by protein PARylation and small RNA biogenesis, respectively.

  17. Extracting transcription factor binding sites from unaligned gene sequences with statistical models

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Chung-Chin; Yuan, Wei-Hao; Chen, Te-Ming

    2008-01-01

    Background Transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) are crucial in the regulation of gene transcription. Recently, chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by cDNA microarray hybridization (ChIP-chip array) has been used to identify potential regulatory sequences, but the procedure can only map the probable protein-DNA interaction loci within 1–2 kb resolution. To find out the exact binding motifs, it is necessary to build a computational method to examine the ChIP-chip array binding sequences and search for possible motifs representing the transcription factor binding sites. Results We developed a program to find out accurate motif sites from a set of unaligned DNA sequences in the yeast genome. Compared with MDscan, the prediction results suggest that, overall, our algorithm outperforms MDscan since the predicted motifs are more consistent with previously known specificities reported in the literature and have better prediction ranks. Our program also outperforms the constraint-less Cosmo program, especially in the elimination of false positives. Conclusion In this study, an improved sampling algorithm is proposed to incorporate the binomial probability model to build significant initial candidate motif sets. By investigating the statistical dependence between base positions in TFBSs, the method of dependency graphs and their expanded Bayesian networks is combined. The results show that our program satisfactorily extract transcription factor binding sites from unaligned gene sequences. PMID:19091030

  18. Discovery and information-theoretic characterization of transcription factor binding sites that act cooperatively

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clifford, Jacob; Adami, Christoph

    2015-10-01

    Transcription factor binding to the surface of DNA regulatory regions is one of the primary causes of regulating gene expression levels. A probabilistic approach to model protein-DNA interactions at the sequence level is through position weight matrices (PWMs) that estimate the joint probability of a DNA binding site sequence by assuming positional independence within the DNA sequence. Here we construct conditional PWMs that depend on the motif signatures in the flanking DNA sequence, by conditioning known binding site loci on the presence or absence of additional binding sites in the flanking sequence of each site's locus. Pooling known sites with similar flanking sequence patterns allows for the estimation of the conditional distribution function over the binding site sequences. We apply our model to the Dorsal transcription factor binding sites active in patterning the Dorsal-Ventral axis of Drosophila development. We find that those binding sites that cooperate with nearby Twist sites on average contain about 0.5 bits of information about the presence of Twist transcription factor binding sites in the flanking sequence. We also find that Dorsal binding site detectors conditioned on flanking sequence information make better predictions about what is a Dorsal site relative to background DNA than detection without information about flanking sequence features.

  19. Involvement of Ras-related Rho proteins in the mechanisms of action of Clostridium difficile toxin A and toxin B.

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, S T; Rubin, E J; Yakubovich, M; Pothoulakis, C; LaMont, J T; Feig, L A; Gilbert, R J

    1995-01-01

    Toxins A and B of Clostridium difficile are responsible for pseudomembranous colitis, a disease that afflicts a substantial number of hospitalized patients treated with antibiotics. A major effect of these proteins is the disruption of the actin cytoskeleton. Recently, I. Just, G. Fritz, K. Aktories, M. Giry, M. R. Popoff, P. Boquet, S. Hegenbarth, and C. von Eichel-Streiber (J. Biol. Chem. 269:10706-10712, 1994) implicated Rho proteins as cellular targets of C. difficile toxin B, since pretreatment of cells or purified Rho with toxin prevented subsequent ADP-ribosylation of Rho by exoenzyme C3. Moreover, they showed that overexpression of Rho proteins in cells suppressed cell rounding normally associated with exposure of cells to C. difficile toxin B. Here we expand these findings by showing directly that Rho proteins are covalently modified by both C. difficile toxins A and B. In addition, we demonstrate that the stability of toxin-modified Rho in NIH 3T3 cells is dramatically reduced. Finally, we show that C. difficile toxins A and B do not have similar effects on the closely related Rac and CDC42 GTP-binding proteins. PMID:7890404

  20. Glucagon induces disaggregation of polymer-like structures of the. alpha. subunit of the stimulatory G protein in liver membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Shunichi; Rodbell, M. )

    1991-08-15

    The hydrodynamic behavior of G{alpha}{sub s}, the {alpha} subunit of the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein (G protein), in octyl glucoside extracts of rat liver membranes was investigated. As was previously shown for G proteins similarly extracted from brain synaptoneurosomes, G{alpha}{sub s} behaved as polydisperse structures with S values higher than that of heterotrimeric G proteins. When G{alpha}{sub s} in its membrane-bound form was ({sup 32}P)ADP-ribosylated by cholera toxin and the treated membranes were extracted with octyl glucoside, > 35% of the labeled G{alpha}{sub s} was found in material that sedimented through sucrose gradients and contained relatively low levels of immunoreactive G{alpha}{sub s}. These finding suggest that the glucagon receptor selectivity interacts with polymer-like structures of G{alpha}{sub 2} and that activation by GTP({gamma}S) results in disaggregation. The role of the {beta} and {gamma} subunits of G proteins in the hormone-induced process is not clear since the polymer-like structures extracted with octyl glucoside are devoid of {beta} and {gamma} subunits.

  1. A 23-kDa protein as a substrate for protein kinase C in bovine neutrophils. Purification and partial characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Stasia, M.J.; Dianoux, A.C.; Vignais, P.V. )

    1989-12-12

    In {sup 32}P{sub i}-loaded bovine neutrophils stimulated with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA), radioactivity was preferentially incorporated into a protein of low molecular mass, suggesting a PKC-dependent phosphorylation. This protein, termed 23-kDa protein, was predominantly localized in the cytosol. The apparent molecular mass of the purified protein range between 20 and 23 kDa. In the absence of mercaptoethanol, a dimer accumulated. Homogeneity of the 23-kDa protein was verified by 2D-PAGE analysis. Gel isoelectric focusing (IEF) of the purified 23-kDa protein followed by Coomassie blue staining allowed the visualization of our discrete protein bands with isoelectric points ranging between pH 6.3 and 6.7. Phosphorylation of the 23-kDa protein by ({gamma}-{sup 32}P)ATP in the presence of bovine neutrophil PKC supplemented with Ca{sup 2+}, phosphatidylserine, and diacylglycerol or with PMA occurred on serine and required the presence of mercaptoethanol. IEF of the {sup 32}P-labeled 23-kDa protein followed by autoradiography revealed for discrete bands with distinct isoelectric points similar to those of the bands stained by Coomassie blue after IEF on nonlabeled 23-kDa protein. The bands of the 23-kDa protein resolved by IEF and transfered to nitrocellulose showed ability to bind ({sup 35}S)GTP-{gamma}-S. The immunoreactivity of antibodies raised in rabbits against the bovine neutrophil 23-kDa protein was demonstrated on immunoblots after SDS-PAGE. The 23-kDa protein differed also from several other proteins of similar molecular mass that have been identified in neutrophils, namely, calmodulin, the small subunit of the low-potential cytochrome b, and a low molecular weight protein which is ADP-ribosylated by the botulinum toxin.

  2. Membrane trafficking in protozoa SNARE proteins, H+-ATPase, actin, and other key players in ciliates.

    PubMed

    Plattner, Helmut

    2010-01-01

    Due to their well-defined pathways of vesicle trafficking and manyfold mutants ciliates have served as good model systems. Further studies required the development of databases, now available for Paramecium and Tetrahymena. A variety of key players have been identified and characterized based on BLAST search, domain analysis, localization, and gene-silencing studies. They include NSF (N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor), SNAREs (soluble NSF attachment protein [SNAP] receptors), the H(+)-ATPase (V-ATPase) and actin, while Arf (ADP-ribosylation factor) and Rab-type small GTPases, COPs (coatamer proteins) and many others remain to be elucidated. The number of SNAREs, H(+)-ATPase subunits, and actins ever found within one cell type are unexpectedly high and most of the manifold vesicle types seem to be endowed with specific molecular components pertinent to trafficking. As in higher eukaryotes, multifactorial targeting likely occurs. It appears that, in parallel to higher organisms, ciliates have evolved a similar structural and molecular complexity of vesicle trafficking.

  3. G alpha 12 and G alpha 13 subunits define a fourth class of G protein alpha subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Strathmann, M P; Simon, M I

    1991-01-01

    Heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (G proteins) are central to the signaling processes of multicellular organisms. We have explored the diversity of the G protein subunits in mammals and found evidence for a large family of genes that encode the alpha subunits. Amino acid sequence comparisons show that the different alpha subunits fall into at least three classes. These classes have been conserved in animals separated by considerable evolutionary distances; they are present in mammals, Drosophila, and nematodes. We have now obtained cDNA clones encoding two murine alpha subunits, G alpha 12 and G alpha 13, that define a fourth class. The translation products are predicted to have molecular masses of 44 kDa and to be insensitive to ADP-ribosylation by pertussis toxin. They share 67% amino acid sequence identity with each other and less than 45% identity with other alpha subunits. Their transcripts can be detected in every tissue examined, although the relative levels of the G alpha 13 message appear somewhat variable. Images PMID:1905812

  4. CtBP/BARS: a dual-function protein involved in transcription co-repression and Golgi membrane fission.

    PubMed

    Nardini, Marco; Spanò, Stefania; Cericola, Claudia; Pesce, Alessandra; Massaro, Anna; Millo, Enrico; Luini, Alberto; Corda, Daniela; Bolognesi, Martino

    2003-06-16

    C-terminal-binding protein/brefeldin A-ADP ribosylated substrate (CtBP/BARS) plays key roles in development and oncogenesis as a transcription co-repressor, and in intracellular traffic as a promoter of Golgi membrane fission. Co-repressor activity is regulated by NAD(H) binding to CtBP/BARS, while membrane fission is associated with its acyl-CoA-dependent acyltransferase activity. Here, we report the crystal structures of rat CtBP/BARS in a binary complex with NAD(H), and in a ternary complex with a PIDLSKK peptide mimicking the consensus motif (PXDLS) recognized in CtBP/BARS cellular partners. The structural data show CtBP/BARS in a NAD(H)-bound dimeric form; the peptide binding maps the recognition site for DNA-binding proteins and histone deacetylases to an N-terminal region of the protein. The crystal structure together with the site-directed mutagenesis data and binding experiments suggest a rationale for the molecular mechanisms underlying the two fundamental co-existing, but diverse, activities supported by CtBP/BARS in the nucleus and in Golgi membranes.

  5. Characterization and cytotoxic activity of apoptosis-inducing pierisin-5 protein from white cabbage butterfly.

    PubMed

    Subbarayan, Sarathbabu; Marimuthu, Satheesh Kumar; Nachimuthu, Senthil Kumar; Zhang, Wenqing; Subramanian, Selvi

    2016-06-01

    In this study, caspase-dependent apoptosis-inducing pierisin-5 gene was identified and characterized from cabbage white butterfly, Pieris canidia. A thousand-fold increase in expression of pierisin-5 gene was observed from second to third instar larvae, gradually decreasing before pupation. Pierisin-5 was purified from the fifth-instar larvae and was found to exhibit cytotoxicity against HeLa and HepG2 human cancer cell lines. Pierisin-5 showed growth inhibition and several morphological changes such as cell shrinkage, chromatin condensation and apoptotic body formation with programmed cell death in HeLa and HepG2 cells. Moreover, DNA fragmentation was observed after gel electrophoresis analysis. Caspase substrate assay showed further cleavage of Ac-DEVD-pNA, suggesting the activation of Caspase-3. Flow cytometry analysis revealed the cell cycle arrest at G1 phase and increased the percentage of apoptotic cells in cancer cell lines treated with pierisin-5. These findings suggest that pierisin-5 could significantly induce apoptosis in cancer cell lines and is mediated by activation of caspase-3 in the mitochondrial pathway. Phylogenetic analysis using pierisin proteins from Pierid butterflies, ADP-ribosylating toxins from bacteria, human, rat, and mouse indicated the possibility of horizontal transfer of pierisin genes from bacteria to butterflies. The single copy of pierisin gene unlike other insect toxin genes also supports lateral transfer.

  6. The small G-protein Arf6GTP recruits the AP-2 adaptor complex to membranes.

    PubMed

    Paleotti, Olivia; Macia, Eric; Luton, Frederic; Klein, Stephanie; Partisani, Mariagrazia; Chardin, Pierre; Kirchhausen, Tom; Franco, Michel

    2005-06-03

    The small GTP-binding protein ADP-ribosylation factor 6 (Arf6) is involved in plasma membrane/endosomes trafficking. However, precisely how the activation of Arf6 regulates vesicular transport is still unclear. Here, we show that, in vitro, recombinant Arf6GTP recruits purified clathrin-adaptor complex AP-2 (but not AP-1) onto phospholipid liposomes in the absence of phosphoinositides. We also show that phosphoinositides and Arf6 tightly cooperate to translocate AP-2 to the membrane. In vivo, Arf6GTP (but not Arf6GDP) was found associated to AP-2. The expression of the GTP-locked mutant of Arf6 leads to the plasma membrane redistribution of AP-2 in Arf6GTP-enriched areas. Finally, we demonstrated that the expression of the GTP-locked mutant of Arf6 inhibits transferrin receptor internalization without affecting its recycling. Altogether, our results demonstrated that Arf6GTP interacts specifically with AP-2 and promotes its membrane recruitment. These findings strongly suggest that Arf6 plays a major role in clathrin-mediated endocytosis by directly controlling the assembly of the AP-2/clathrin coat.

  7. Myristoylation of an inhibitory GTP-binding protein. alpha. subunit is essential for its membrane attachment

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, T.L.Z.; Simonds, W.F.; Merendino, J.J. Jr.; Brann, M.R.; Spiegel, A.M. )

    1990-01-01

    The authors transfected COS cells with cDNAs for the {alpha} subunits of stimulatory and inhibitory GTP-binding proteins, {alpha}{sub s} and {alpha}{sub i1}, respectively, and immunoprecipitated the metabolically labeled products with specific peptide antibodies. Cells were separated into particulate and soluble fractions before immunoprecipitation; ({sup 35}S)methionine-labeled {alpha}{sub s} and {alpha}{sub i} were both found primarily in the particulate fraction. ({sup 3}H)Myristate was incorporated into endogenous and transfected {alpha}{sub i} but could not be detected in {alpha}{sub s} even when it was overexpressed. They converted the second residue, glycine, of {alpha}{sub i1} into alanine by site-directed mutagenesis. Upon transfection of the mutant {alpha}{sub i1} into COS cells, the ({sup 35}S)methionine-labeled product was localized primarily to the soluble fraction, and, also unlike normal {alpha}{sub i1}, the mutant failed to incorporate ({sup 3}H)myristate. The unmyristoylated mutant {alpha}{sub i1} could still interact with the {beta}-{gamma} complex, since purified {beta}{gamma} subunits promoted pertussis toxin-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation of both the normal and mutant {alpha}{sub i1} subunits. These results indicate that myristoylation is critical for membrane attachment of {alpha}{sub i} but not {alpha}{sub s} subunits.

  8. Characterization of G-protein alpha subunits in the Gq class: expression in murine tissues and in stromal and hematopoietic cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Wilkie, T M; Scherle, P A; Strathmann, M P; Slepak, V Z; Simon, M I

    1991-01-01

    Murine G alpha 14 and G alpha 15 cDNAs encode distinct alpha subunits of heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins). These alpha subunits are related to members of the Gq class and share certain sequence characteristics with G alpha q, G alpha 11, and G alpha 16, such as the absence of a pertussis toxin ADP-ribosylation site. G alpha 11 and G alpha q are ubiquitously expressed among murine tissues but G alpha 14 is predominantly expressed in spleen, lung, kidney, and testis whereas G alpha 15 is primarily restricted to hematopoietic lineages. Among hematopoietic cell lines, G alpha 11 mRNA is found in all cell lines tested, G alpha q is expressed widely but is not found in most T-cell lines, G alpha 15 is predominantly expressed in myeloid and B-cell lineages, and G alpha 14 is expressed in bone marrow adherent (stromal) cells, certain early myeloid cells, and progenitor B cells. Polyclonal antisera produced from synthetic peptides that correspond to two regions of G alpha 15 react with a protein of 42 kDa expressed in B-cell membranes and in Escherichia coli transformed with G alpha 15 cDNA. The expression patterns that were observed in mouse tissues and cell lines indicate that each of the alpha subunits in the Gq class may be involved in pertussis toxin-insensitive signal-transduction pathways that are fundamental to hematopoietic cell differentiation and function. Images PMID:1946421

  9. Regulation of kinase cascade activation and heat shock protein expression by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibition in doxorubicin-induced heart failure.

    PubMed

    Bartha, Eva; Solti, Izabella; Szabo, Aliz; Olah, Gabor; Magyar, Klara; Szabados, Eszter; Kalai, Tamas; Hideg, Kalman; Toth, Kalman; Gero, Domokos; Szabo, Csaba; Sumegi, Balazs; Halmosi, Robert

    2011-10-01

    Cardiomyopathy is one of the most severe side effects of the chemotherapeutic agent doxorubicin (DOX). The formation of reactive oxygen species plays a critical role in the development of cardiomyopathies, and the pathophysiological cascade activates nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), and kinase pathways. We characterized the effects of the PARP-inhibitor and kinase-modulator compound L-2286 in DOX-induced cardiac injury models. We studied the effect of the established superoxide dismutase-mimic Tempol and compared the effects of this agent with those of the PARP inhibitor. In the rat H9C2 cardiomyocytes, in which DOX-induced poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation, L-2286 protected them from the DOX-induced injury in a concentration-dependent manner. In the in vivo studies, mice were pretreated (for 1 week) with L-2286 or Tempol before the DOX treatment. Both the agents improved the activation of cytoprotective kinases, Akt, phospho-specific protein kinase C ϵ, ζ/λ and suppressed the activity of cell death promoting kinases glycogen synthase kinase-3β, JNK, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase, but the effect of PARP inhibitor was more pronounced and improved the survival as well. L-2286 activated the phosphorylation of proapoptotic transcription factor FKHR1 and promoted the expression of Hsp72 and Hsp90. These data suggest that the mode of the cytoprotective action of the PARP inhibitor may include the modulation of kinase pathways and heat shock protein expression.

  10. Analysis of Genomic Sequence Motifs for Deciphering Transcription Factor Binding and Transcriptional Regulation in Eukaryotic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Boeva, Valentina

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic genomes contain a variety of structured patterns: repetitive elements, binding sites of DNA and RNA associated proteins, splice sites, and so on. Often, these structured patterns can be formalized as motifs and described using a proper mathematical model such as position weight matrix and IUPAC consensus. Two key tasks are typically carried out for motifs in the context of the analysis of genomic sequences. These are: identification in a set of DNA regions of over-represented motifs from a particular motif database, and de novo discovery of over-represented motifs. Here we describe existing methodology to perform these two tasks for motifs characterizing transcription factor binding. When applied to the output of ChIP-seq and ChIP-exo experiments, or to promoter regions of co-modulated genes, motif analysis techniques allow for the prediction of transcription factor binding events and enable identification of transcriptional regulators and co-regulators. The usefulness of motif analysis is further exemplified in this review by how motif discovery improves peak calling in ChIP-seq and ChIP-exo experiments and, when coupled with information on gene expression, allows insights into physical mechanisms of transcriptional modulation. PMID:26941778

  11. Epidermal growth factor-stimulated protein phosphorylation in rat hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Connelly, P.A.; Sisk, R.B.; Johnson, R.M.; Garrison, J.C.

    1987-05-01

    Epidermal growth factor (EGF) causes a 6-fold increase in the phosphorylation state of a cytosolic protein (pp36, M/sub r/ = 36,000, pI = 5.5) in hepatocytes isolated from fasted, male, Wistar rats. Stimulation of /sup 32/P incorporation is observed as early as 1 min following treatment of hepatocytes with EGF and is still present at 30 min after exposure to the growth factor. The phosphate incorporated into pp36 in response to EGF is located predominantly in serine but not tyrosine residues. Phosphorylation of pp36 does not occur in response to insulin or to agents which specifically activate the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (S/sub p/ -cAMPS), protein kinase C (PMA) or Ca/sup 2 +//calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (A23187) in these cells. Prior treatment of hepatocytes with the cAMP analog, S/sub p/-cAMPS, or ADP-ribosylation of N/sub i/, the inhibitory GTP-binding protein of the adenylate cyclase complex, does not prevent EGF-stimulated phosphorylation of pp36. However, as seen in other cell types, pretreatment of hepatocytes with PMA abolishes all EGF-mediated responses including phosphorylation of pp36. These results suggest that EGP specifically activates an uncharacterized, serine protein kinase in hepatocytes that is distal to the intrinsic EGF receptor tyrosine protein kinase. The rapid activation of this kinase suggests that it may play an important role in the early response of the cell to EGF.

  12. The GTPase-activating protein GIT2 protects against colitis by negatively regulating Toll-like receptor signaling

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Juncheng; Wei, Chao; Wang, Min; Qiu, Xiao; Li, Yang; Yuan, Yanzhi; Jin, Chaozhi; Leng, Ling; Wang, Jian; Yang, Xiaoming; He, Fuchu

    2014-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptor kinase-interactor 2 (GIT2) regulates thymocyte positive selection, neutrophil-direction sensing, and cell motility during immune responses by regulating the activity of the small GTPases ADP ribosylation factors (Arfs) and Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (Rac1). Here, we show that Git2-deficient mice were more susceptible to dextran sodium sulfate (DSS)-induced colitis, Escherichia coli, or endotoxin-shock challenge, and a dramatic increase in proinflammatory cytokines was observed in Git2 knockout mice and macrophages. GIT2 is a previously unidentified negative regulator of Toll-like receptor (TLR)-induced NF-κB signaling. The ubiquitination of TNF receptor associated factor 6 (TRAF6) is critical for the activation of NF-κB. GIT2 terminates TLR-induced NF-κB and MAPK signaling by recruiting the deubiquitinating enzyme Cylindromatosis to inhibit the ubiquitination of TRAF6. Finally, we show that the susceptibility of Git2-deficient mice to DSS-induced colitis depends on TLR signaling. Thus, we show that GIT2 is an essential terminator of TLR signaling and that loss of GIT2 leads to uncontrolled inflammation and severe organ damage. PMID:24879442

  13. The Key Involvement of Poly (ADP-Ribosylation) in Defense against Toxic Agents in Molecular Biology Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-15

    polymerase increased very early and remained high for up to 48 after which it decreased to pre-induced levels. Polymerase transcript levels did not change...the Ub- PADPRP junction. HUMAN POLY(ADP-RIBOSE) POLYMERASE IS FUNCTIONAL IN SCHr2OSACCHAROMYCES POMBE (MS IN PREP.) The full length cDNA for human...PADPRP has been introduced into the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe under the transcriptional control of the SV40 early promoter. A number of haploid

  14. The Key Involvement of Poly(ADP-Ribosylation) in Defense Against Toxic Agents in Molecular Biology Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-17

    for the polymerase increased very early and remained high for up to 48 after which it decreased to pre-induced levels. Polymerase transcript levels...cleave the Ub-PADPRP Junction. HUMAN POLY(ADP-RIBOSE) POLYMERASE IS FUNCTIONAL IN SC.=OSACCHAROMYCES POMBE (MS IN PREP.) The full length cDNA for human...PADPRP has been introduced into the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe under the transcriptional control of the SV40 early promoter. A number of haploid

  15. Development of an electrochemical biosensor for the detection of an ADP-ribosylating toxin, exo A from Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enríquez, Y.; Negrón, Y.; Navarreto, M.; Guadalupe, A. R.

    2013-03-01

    A free radical copolymerization of Styrene (Sty) and acrylic acid N-hydroxysuccinimide ester (NAS) has been done in a range of 10:90 to 90:10 (Sty:NAS) molar ratios. The FT-IR spectra for all seven copolymers showed the absorption peaks for the carbonyl signals of the ester and the amide in NAS (1773 cm-1 and 1727 cm-1 respectively), the styrene aromatic signal (1494 cm-1) and the disappearance of the absorption peak for the vinyl group in both monomers (1629 cm-1). HPLC-UV results showed an increment in the average molecular weight with an increase in the molar ratio of the styrene monomer, from 1528.51 g/mol for 10:90 Sty:NAS to 7141.67 g/mol for 90:10 Sty:NAS. These copolymers will be used to generate films on carbon surfaces to anchor a β-NAD+ electroactive analog. Also, a Ferrocene-labeled NAAD (Fc-NAAD) was prepared by attaching Ferrocene Succinimide (Fc-NHS) to the primary amine in the adenine moiety of the cofactor. Osteryoung Squatre Wave Voltammetry (OSWV) of the new Fc-NAAD showed an anodic peak in 320 mV and the cyclic voltammetry (CV) showed chemical reversibility and electrochemical quasi-reversibility.

  16. The Key Involvement of Poly(ADP-Ribosyl)ation in Defense Against Toxic Agents: Molecular Biology Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-19

    in all species of phloem sap-feeding insects , was reported to contain only 182 open reading frames (Nakabachi, el al, 2006). Even though this gene...including treatment with ethidium bromide (EtBr) (King, and Attardi, 1989) and silencing of the mt-DNA polymerase by RNAi (Khan, and Bennett, 2004

  17. CD38 Knockout Mice Show Significant Protection Against Ischemic Brain Damage Despite High Level Poly-ADP-Ribosylation.

    PubMed

    Long, Aaron; Park, Ji H; Klimova, Nina; Fowler, Carol; Loane, David J; Kristian, Tibor

    2017-01-01

    Several enzymes in cellular bioenergetics metabolism require NAD(+) as an essential cofactor for their activity. NAD(+) depletion following ischemic insult can result in cell death and has been associated with over-activation of poly-ADP-ribose polymerase PARP1 as well as an increase in NAD(+) consuming enzyme CD38. CD38 is an NAD(+) glycohydrolase that plays an important role in inflammatory responses. To determine the contribution of CD38 activity to the mechanisms of post-ischemic brain damage we subjected CD38 knockout (CD38KO) mice and wild-type (WT) mice to transient forebrain ischemia. The CD38KO mice showed a significant amelioration in both histological and neurologic outcome following ischemic insult. Decrease of hippocampal NAD(+) levels detected during reperfusion in WT mice was only transient in CD38KO animals, suggesting that CD38 contributes to post-ischemic NAD(+) catabolism. Surprisingly, pre-ischemic poly-ADP-ribose (PAR) levels were dramatically higher in CD38KO animals compared to WT animals and exhibited reduction post-ischemia in contrast to the increased levels in WT animals. The high PAR levels in CD38 mice were due to reduced expression levels of poly-ADP-ribose glycohydrolase (PARG). Thus, the absence of CD38 activity can not only directly affect inflammatory response, but also result in unpredicted alterations in the expression levels of enzymes participating in NAD(+) metabolism. Although the CD38KO mice showed significant protection against ischemic brain injury, the changes in enzyme activity related to NAD(+) metabolism makes the determination of the role of CD38 in mechanisms of ischemic brain damage more complex.

  18. The pioneering spirit of Takashi Sugimura: his studies of the biochemistry of poly(ADP-ribosylation) and of cancer.

    PubMed

    Masutani, Mitsuko

    2012-03-01

    Takashi Sugimura has accomplished many scientific achievements in the field of biochemistry and in cancer research. Sugimura's group identified the novel polymer poly(ADP-ribose) in parallel to P. Mandel's and O. Hayaishi's groups and demonstrated the presence of the enzyme poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). He also discovered the cognate catabolic enzyme, poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) and further elucidated the biology of poly(ADP-ribose). The astonishing discovery of pierisin, an apoptogenic peptide that ADP-ribosyaltes DNA, profoundly illuminates his scientific character and curiosity as well. Sugimura's work in cancer research shows an extraordinarily wide range, which includes the establishment of new methods in chemical carcinogenesis, the identification of various environmental mutagens/carcinogens and new tumour promoters. He also established the concept that cancer is a disease of DNA and contributed to the development of the concept of the multi-step model of carcinogenesis.

  19. Rab2A is a pivotal switch protein that promotes either secretion or ER-associated degradation of (pro)insulin in insulin-secreting cells

    PubMed Central

    Sugawara, Taichi; Kano, Fumi; Murata, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    Rab2A, a small GTPase localizing to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-Golgi intermediate compartment (ERGIC), regulates COPI-dependent vesicular transport from the ERGIC. Rab2A knockdown inhibited glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and concomitantly enlarged the ERGIC in insulin-secreting cells. Large aggregates of polyubiquitinated proinsulin accumulated in the cytoplasmic vicinity of a unique large spheroidal ERGIC, designated the LUb-ERGIC. Well-known components of ER-associated degradation (ERAD) also accumulated at the LUb-ERGIC, creating a suitable site for ERAD-mediated protein quality control. Moreover, chronically high glucose levels, which induced the enlargement of the LUb-ERGIC and ubiquitinated protein aggregates, impaired Rab2A activity by promoting dissociation from its effector, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), in response to poly (ADP-ribosyl)ation of GAPDH. The inactivation of Rab2A relieved glucose-induced ER stress and inhibited ER stress-induced apoptosis. Collectively, these results suggest that Rab2A is a pivotal switch that controls whether insulin should be secreted or degraded at the LUb-ERGIC and Rab2A inactivation ensures alleviation of ER stress and cell survival under chronic glucotoxicity. PMID:25377857

  20. Unfolded protein response regulates yeast small GTPase Arl1p activation at late Golgi via phosphorylation of Arf GEF Syt1p

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Jia-Wei; Tang, Pei-Hua; Wang, I-Hao; Liu, Chia-Lun; Chen, Wen-Hui; Tsai, Pei-Chin; Chen, Kuan-Yu; Chen, Kuan-Jung; Yu, Chia-Jung

    2016-01-01

    ADP ribosylation factor (Arf) GTPases are key regulators of membrane traffic at the Golgi complex. In yeast, Arf guanine nucleotide-exchange factor (GEF) Syt1p activates Arf-like protein Arl1p, which was accompanied by accumulation of golgin Imh1p at late Golgi, but whether and how this function of Syt1p is regulated remains unclear. Here, we report that the inositol-requiring kinase 1 (Ire1p)-mediated unfolded protein response (UPR) modulated Arl1p activation at late Golgi. Arl1p activation was dependent on both kinase and endo-RNase activities of Ire1p. Moreover, constitutively active transcription factor Hac1p restored the Golgi localization of Arl1p and Imh1p in IRE1-deleted cells. Elucidating the mechanism of Ire1p–Hac1p axis actions, we found that it regulated phosphorylation of Syt1p, which enhances Arl1p activation, recruitment of Imh1p to the Golgi, and Syt1p interaction with Arl1p. Consistent with these findings, the induction of UPR by tunicamycin treatment increases phosphorylation of Syt1p, resulting in Arl1p activation. Thus, these findings clarify how the UPR influences the roles of Syt1p, Arl1p, and Imh1p in Golgi transport. PMID:26966233

  1. Activation of Aplysia ARF6 induces neurite outgrowth and is sequestered by the overexpression of the PH domain of Aplysia Sec7 proteins.

    PubMed

    Jang, Deok-Jin; Jun, Yong-Woo; Shim, Jaehoon; Sim, Su-Eon; Lee, Jin-A; Lim, Chae-Seok; Kaang, Bong-Kiun

    2017-02-01

    ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs) are small guanosine triphosphatases of the Ras superfamily involved in membrane trafficking and regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. Aplysia Sec7 protein (ApSec7), a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for ARF1 and ARF6, induces neurite outgrowth and plays a key role in 5-hydroxyltryptamine-induced neurite growth and synaptic facilitation in Aplysia sensory-motor synapses. However, the specific role of ARF6 signaling on neurite outgrowth in Aplysia neurons has not been examined. In the present study, we cloned Aplysia ARF6 (ApARF6) and revealed that an overexpression of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-fused constitutively active ApARF6 (ApARF6-Q67L-EGFP) could induce neurite outgrowth in Aplysia sensory neurons. Further, we observed that ApARF6-induced neurite outgrowth was inhibited by the co-expression of a Sec7 activity-deficient mutant of ApSec7 (ApSec7-E159K). The pleckstrin homology domain of ApSec7 may bind to active ApARF6 at the plasma membrane and prevent active ApARF6-induced functions, including intracellular vacuole formation in HEK293T cells. The results of the present study suggest that activation of ARF6 signaling could induce neurite outgrowth in Aplysia neurons and may be involved in downstream signaling of ApSec7-induced neurite outgrowth in Aplysia neurons.

  2. Dynamin-like protein 1 at the Golgi complex: A novel component of the sorting/targeting machinery en route to the plasma membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Bonekamp, Nina A.; Vormund, Kerstin; Jacob, Ralf; Schrader, Michael

    2010-12-10

    The final step in the liberation of secretory vesicles from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) involves the mechanical action of the large GTPase dynamin as well as conserved dynamin-independent fission mechanisms, e.g. mediated by Brefeldin A-dependent ADP-ribosylated substrate (BARS). Another member of the dynamin family is the mammalian dynamin-like protein 1 (DLP1/Drp1) that is known to constrict and tubulate membranes, and to divide mitochondria and peroxisomes. Here, we examined a potential role for DLP1 at the Golgi complex. DLP1 localized to the Golgi complex in some but not all cell lines tested, thus explaining controversial reports on its cellular distribution. After silencing of DLP1, an accumulation of the apical reporter protein YFP-GL-GPI, but not the basolateral reporter VSVG-SP-GFP at the Golgi complex was observed. A reduction in the transport of YFP-GL-GPI to the plasma membrane was confirmed by surface immunoprecipitation and TGN-exit assays. In contrast, YFP-GL-GPI trafficking was not disturbed in cells silenced for BARS, which is involved in basolateral sorting and trafficking of VSVG-SP-GFP in COS-7 cells. Our data indicate a new role for DLP1 at the Golgi complex and thus a role for DLP1 as a novel component of the apical sorting machinery at the TGN is discussed.

  3. Dynamin-like protein 1 at the Golgi complex: a novel component of the sorting/targeting machinery en route to the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Bonekamp, Nina A; Vormund, Kerstin; Jacob, Ralf; Schrader, Michael

    2010-12-10

    The final step in the liberation of secretory vesicles from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) involves the mechanical action of the large GTPase dynamin as well as conserved dynamin-independent fission mechanisms, e.g. mediated by Brefeldin A-dependent ADP-ribosylated substrate (BARS). Another member of the dynamin family is the mammalian dynamin-like protein 1 (DLP1/Drp1) that is known to constrict and tubulate membranes, and to divide mitochondria and peroxisomes. Here, we examined a potential role for DLP1 at the Golgi complex. DLP1 localized to the Golgi complex in some but not all cell lines tested, thus explaining controversial reports on its cellular distribution. After silencing of DLP1, an accumulation of the apical reporter protein YFP-GL-GPI, but not the basolateral reporter VSVG-SP-GFP at the Golgi complex was observed. A reduction in the transport of YFP-GL-GPI to the plasma membrane was confirmed by surface immunoprecipitation and TGN-exit assays. In contrast, YFP-GL-GPI trafficking was not disturbed in cells silenced for BARS, which is involved in basolateral sorting and trafficking of VSVG-SP-GFP in COS-7 cells. Our data indicate a new role for DLP1 at the Golgi complex and thus a role for DLP1 as a novel component of the apical sorting machinery at the TGN is discussed.

  4. Signalling functions and biochemical properties of pertussis toxin-resistant G-proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Fields, T A; Casey, P J

    1997-01-01

    Pertussis toxin (PTX) has been widely used as a reagent to characterize the involvement of heterotrimeric G-proteins in signalling. This toxin catalyses the ADP-ribosylation of specific G-protein alpha subunits of the Gi family, and this modification prevents the occurrence of the receptor-G-protein interaction. This review focuses on the biochemical properties and signalling of those G-proteins historically classified as 'PTX-resistant' due to the inability of the toxin to influence signalling through them. These G-proteins include members of the Gq and G12 families and one Gi family member, i.e. Gz. Signalling pathways controlled by these G-proteins are well characterized only for Gq family members, which activate specific isoforms of phospholipase C, resulting in increases in intracellular calcium and activation of protein kinase C (PKC), among other responses. While members of the G12 family have been implicated in processes that regulate cell growth, and Gz has been shown to inhibit adenylate cyclase, the specific downstream targets to these G-proteins in vivo have not been clearly established. Since two of these proteins, G12 alpha and Gz alpha, are excellent substrates for PKC, there is the potential for cross-talk between their signalling and Gq-dependent processes leading to activation of PKC. In tissues that express these G-proteins, a number of guanine-nucleotide-dependent, PTX-resistant, signalling pathways have been defined for which the G-protein involved has not been identified. This review summarizes these pathways and discusses the evidence both for the participation of specific PTX-resistant G-proteins in them and for the regulation of these processes by PKC. PMID:9032437

  5. Gibbs Recursive Sampler: finding transcription factor binding sites.

    PubMed

    Thompson, William; Rouchka, Eric C; Lawrence, Charles E

    2003-07-01

    The Gibbs Motif Sampler is a software package for locating common elements in collections of biopolymer sequences. In this paper we describe a new variation of the Gibbs Motif Sampler, the Gibbs Recursive Sampler, which has been developed specifically for locating multiple transcription factor binding sites for multiple transcription factors simultaneously in unaligned DNA sequences that may be heterogeneous in DNA composition. Here we describe the basic operation of the web-based version of this sampler. The sampler may be acces-sed at http://bayesweb.wadsworth.org/gibbs/gibbs.html and at http://www.bioinfo.rpi.edu/applications/bayesian/gibbs/gibbs.html. An online user guide is available at http://bayesweb.wadsworth.org/gibbs/bernoulli.html and at http://www.bioinfo.rpi.edu/applications/bayesian/gibbs/manual/bernoulli.html. Solaris, Solaris.x86 and Linux versions of the sampler are available as stand-alone programs for academic and not-for-profit users. Commercial licenses are also available. The Gibbs Recursive Sampler is distributed in accordance with the ISCB level 0 guidelines and a requirement for citation of use in scientific publications.

  6. Retroactivity effects dependency on the transcription factors binding mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Pantoja-Hernández, Libertad; Álvarez-Buylla, Elena; Aguilar-Ibáñez, Carlos F; Garay-Arroyo, Adriana; Soria-López, Alberto; Martínez-García, Juan Carlos

    2016-12-07

    Downstream connection effects on transcription are caused by retroactivity. When biomolecular dynamical systems interconnect retroactivity is a property that becomes important. The biological functional meaning of these effects is increasingly becoming an area of interest. Downstream targets, which are operator binding sites in transcriptional networks, may induce behaviors such as ultrasensitive responses or even represent an undesired issue in regulation. To the best of our knowledge, the role of the binding mechanisms of transcription factors in relation to minimizing - or enhancing - retroactivity effects has not been previously addressed. Our aim is to evaluate retroactivity effects considering how the binding mechanism impacts the number of free functional transcription factor (FFTF) molecules using a simple model via deterministic and stochastic simulations. We study four transcription factor binding mechanisms (BM): simple monomer binding (SMB), dimer binding (DB), cooperative sequential binding (CSB) and cooperative sequential binding with dimerization (CSB_D). We consider weak and strong binding regimes for each mechanism, where we contrast the cases when the FFTF is bound or unbound to the downstream loads. Upon interconnection, the number of FFTF molecules changed less for the SMB mechanism while for DB they changed the most. Our results show that for the chosen mechanisms (in terms of the corresponding described dynamics), retroactivity effects depend on transcription binding mechanisms. This contributes to the understanding of how the transcription factor regulatory function-such as decision making-and its dynamic needs for the response, may determine the nature of the selected binding mechanism.

  7. PARP1 promotes gene expression at the post-transcriptional level by modulating the RNA-binding protein HuR

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Yueshuang; Han, Yanlong; Guo, Xiaolan; Wen, Jitao; Wang, Ke; Jiang, Xue; Tian, Xue; Ba, Xueqing; Boldogh, Istvan; Zeng, Xianlu

    2017-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) is mainly catalysed by poly-ADP-ribose polymerase 1 (PARP1), whose role in gene transcription modulation has been well established. Here we show that, in response to LPS exposure, PARP1 interacts with the adenylateuridylate-rich element-binding protein embryonic lethal abnormal vision-like 1 (Elavl1)/human antigen R (HuR), resulting in its PARylation, primarily at site D226. PARP inhibition and the D226 mutation impair HuR's PARylation, nucleocytoplasmic shuttling and mRNA binding. Increases in mRNA level or stability of pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines are abolished by PARP1 ablation or inhibition, or blocked in D226A HuR-expressing cells. The present study demonstrates a mechanism to regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level, and suggests that blocking the interaction of PARP1 with HuR could be a strategy to treat inflammation-related diseases that involve increased mRNA stability. PMID:28272405

  8. HLB1 Is a Tetratricopeptide Repeat Domain-Containing Protein That Operates at the Intersection of the Exocytic and Endocytic Pathways at the TGN/EE in Arabidopsis[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Sparks, J. Alan; Renna, Luciana; Liao, Fuqi; Brandizzi, Federica

    2016-01-01

    The endomembrane system plays essential roles in plant development, but the proteome responsible for its function and organization remains largely uncharacterized in plants. Here, we identified and characterized the HYPERSENSITIVE TO LATRUNCULIN B1 (HLB1) protein isolated through a forward-genetic screen in Arabidopsis thaliana for mutants with heightened sensitivity to actin-disrupting drugs. HLB1 is a plant-specific tetratricopeptide repeat domain-containing protein of unknown function encoded by a single Arabidopsis gene. HLB1 associated with the trans-Golgi network (TGN)/early endosome (EE) and tracked along filamentous actin, indicating that it could link post-Golgi traffic with the actin cytoskeleton in plants. HLB1 was found to interact with the ADP-ribosylation-factor guanine nucleotide exchange factor, MIN7/BEN1 (HOPM INTERACTOR7/BREFELDIN A-VISUALIZED ENDOCYTIC TRAFFICKING DEFECTIVE1) by coimmunoprecipitation. The min7/ben1 mutant phenocopied the mild root developmental defects and latrunculin B hypersensitivity of hlb1, and analyses of a hlb1/ min7/ben1 double mutant showed that hlb1 and min7/ben1 operate in common genetic pathways. Based on these data, we propose that HLB1 together with MIN7/BEN1 form a complex with actin to modulate the function of the TGN/EE at the intersection of the exocytic and endocytic pathways in plants. PMID:26941089

  9. Role of a guanine nucleotide-binding protein in. cap alpha. /sub 1/-adrenergic receptor-mediated Ca/sup 2 +/ mobilization in DDT/sub 1/ MF-2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cornett, L.E.; Norris, J.S.

    1987-11-01

    In this study the mechanisms involved in ..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenergic receptor-mediated Ca/sup 2 +/ mobilization at the level of the plasma membrane were investigated. Stimulation of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux from saponin-permeabilized DDT/sub 1/ MF-2 cells was observed with the addition of either the ..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenergic agonist phenylephrine and guanosine-5'-triphosphate or the nonhydrolyzable guanine nucleotide guanylyl-imidodiphosphate. In the presence of (/sup 32/P) NAD, pertussis toxin was found to catalyze ADP-ribosylation of a M/sub r/ = 40,500 (n = 8) peptide in membranes prepared from DDT/sub 1/, MF-2 cells, possibly the ..cap alpha..-subunit of N/sub i/. However, stimulation of unidirectional /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ efflux by phenylephrine was not affected by previous treatment of cells with 100 ng/ml pertussis toxin. These data suggest that the putative guanine nucleotide-binding protein which couples the ..cap alpha../sub 1/-adrenergic receptor to Ca/sup 2 +/ mobilization in DDT/sub 1/ MF-2 cells is not a pertussis toxin substrate and may possibly be an additional member of guanine nucleotide binding protein family.

  10. Pertussis toxin-insensitive effects of mastoparan, a wasp venom peptide, in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Murayama, T; Oda, H; Nomura, Y

    1996-12-01

    Recent studies have shown that mastoparan, an amphiphilic peptide derived from wasp venom, modifies the secretion of neurotransmitters and hormones from a variety of cell types. Mastoparan interacts with heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) such as Gi and G(o), which are ADP-ribosylated by pertussis toxin (PTX) and thereby uncoupled from receptors. Previously, some of the effects of mastoparan including secretion were reported to be modified selectively by PTX but not by cholera toxin (CTX). In the present study, we examined the influence of bacterial toxins on the effects of mastoparan in PC12 cells. Mastoparan stimulated [3H]noradrenaline (NA) release from prelabeled PC12 cells in the absence of CaCl2, although high K+ or ATP-stimulated the release in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner. Pretreatment with CTX, not PTX, for 24 h inhibited mastoparan-stimulated [3H]NA release. Mastoparan inhibited forskolin-stimulated cyclic AMP accumulation in a dose-dependent manner, although mastoparan had no effect by itself. Pretreatment with PTX completely abolished the inhibitory effect of carbachol via Gi on cyclic AMP accumulation and partially reduced the effect of mastoparan. However, the inhibitory effect of 20 microM mastoparan was not modified by pretreatment with PTX. Thus, we investigated the effect of mastoparan on CTX-catalyzed [32P]ADP-ribosylation of proteins in PC12 cells. A subunit of CTX (CTX-A) catalyzed [32P]ADP-ribosylation of many proteins in the cytosolic fraction of PC12 cells. One of these was a 20 kDa protein, named ADP-ribosylating factor (ARF). The addition of mastoparan to assay mixtures inhibited ADP-ribosylation of many proteins including ARF and CTX-A in the presence of the cytosolic fraction. In the absence of the cytosolic fraction, however, mastoparan slightly enhanced ADP-ribosylation of bovine serum albumin and auto-ADP-ribosylation by CTX-A. Mastoparan did not inhibit ADP-ribosylation of the alpha subunit of Gs in the

  11. G alpha 16, a G protein alpha subunit specifically expressed in hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Amatruda, T T; Steele, D A; Slepak, V Z; Simon, M I

    1991-01-01

    Signal-transduction pathways mediated by guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (G proteins) determine many of the responses of hematopoietic cells. A recently identified gene encoding a G protein alpha subunit, G alpha 16, is specifically expressed in human cells of the hematopoietic lineage. The G alpha 16 cDNA encodes a protein with predicted Mr of 43,500, which resembles the G q class of alpha subunits and does not include a pertussis toxin ADP-ribosylation site. In comparison with other G protein alpha subunits, the G alpha 16 predicted protein has distinctive amino acid sequences in the amino terminus, the region A guanine nucleotide-binding domain, and in the carboxyl-terminal third of the protein. Cell lines of myelomonocytic and T-cell phenotype express the G alpha 16 gene, but no expression is detectable in two B-cell lines or in nonhematopoietic cell lines. G alpha 16 gene expression is down-regulated in HL-60 cells induced to differentiate to neutrophils with dimethyl sulfoxide. Antisera generated from synthetic peptides that correspond to two regions of G alpha 16 specifically react with a protein of 42- to 43-kDa in bacterial strains that overexpress G alpha 16 and in HL-60 membranes. This protein is decreased in membranes from dimethyl sulfoxide-differentiated HL-60 cells and is not detectable in COS cell membranes. The restricted expression of this gene suggests that G alpha 16 regulates cell-type-specific signal-transduction pathways, which are not inhibited by pertussis toxin. Images PMID:1905813

  12. TPA-inducible proteins may account for sensitivity to promotion of transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Hirano, K.; Smith, B.; Colburn, N.H.

    1986-05-01

    The preneoplastic JB6 mouse epidermal cell system includes cell lines sensitive (P/sup +/) or resistant (P/sup -/) to tumor promoter induced neoplastic transformation. The authors investigated whether a difference in TPA-inducible proteins may explain this differential sensitivity. The synthesis of a 39 Kd cytoplasmic protein (Major Excreted Protein) was TPA-inducible, but to a similar extent in both P/sup +/ and P/sup -/ cells. TPA stimulated phosphorylation but not synthesis of the previously described stress protein pp80 in both P/sup +/ and P/sup -/ cells from 1 to 5 hr after treatment. Pulse labelling of P/sup +/ and P/sup -/ cells with /sup 35/S-methionine revealed a TPA dependent P/sup +/ specific transient increase in the synthesis of 58Kd protein. Induction was observed at 1 hr, and returned to basal levels by 4 hr and 20 hr, in nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions, respectively. This protein is not phosphorylated in response to TPA treatment. P/sup +/ cells differ from P/sup -/ cells in one or more genes that specify sensitivity to promotion of transformation, designated pro genes. Antibodies to three peptides representing the pro-1 open reading frame were used in immunoprecipitation and Western blotting to isolate the pro-1 gene product. A 43 Kd protein was immunologically responsive to the pro-1 peptide antibodies, and showed an increased signal 40 min after TPA treatment. Since the predicted molecular weight of a pro-1 gene product is only 7 Kd, the possibility of a modification of the protein by poly(ADP-ribosylation) or glycosylation is being investigated.

  13. Guanine nucleotide regulatory protein co-purifies with the D/sub 2/-dopamine receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Senogles, S.E.; Caron, M.G.

    1986-05-01

    The D/sub 2/-dopamine receptor from bovine anterior pituitary was purified approx.1000 fold by affinity chromatography on CMOS-Sepharose. Reconstitution of the affinity-purified receptor into phospholipid vesicles revealed the presence of high and low affinity agonist sites as detected by N-n-propylnorapomorphine (NPA) competition experiments with /sup 3/H-spiperone. High affinity agonist binding could be converted to the low affinity form by guanine nucleotides, indicating the presence of an endogenous guanine nucleotide binding protein (N protein) in the affinity-purified D/sub 2/ receptor preparations. Furthermore, this preparation contained an agonist-sensitive GTPase activity which was stimulated 2-3 fold over basal by 10 ..mu..M NPA. /sup 35/S-GTP..gamma..S binding to these preparations revealed a stoichiometry of 0.4-0.7 mole N protein/mole receptor, suggesting the N protein may be specifically coupled with the purified D/sub 2/-dopamine receptor and not present as a contaminant. Pertussis toxin treatment of the affinity purified receptor preparations prevented high affinity agonist binding, as well as agonist stimulation of the GTPase activity, presumably by inactivating the associated N protein. Pertussis toxin lead to the ADP-ribosylation of a protein of 39-40K on SDS-PAGE. These findings indicate that an endogenous N protein, N/sub i/ or N/sub o/, co-purifies with the D/sub 2/-dopamine receptor which may reflect a precoupling of this receptor with an N protein within the membranes.

  14. Growth factor-binding proteases in the murine submaxillary gland: isolation of a cDNA clone.

    PubMed Central

    Ronne, H; Lundgren, S; Severinsson, L; Rask, L; Peterson, P A

    1983-01-01

    The submaxillary gland of the adult male mouse contains a number of serine proteases, several of which are involved in the proteolytic processing of precursors to growth factors and other biologically active polypeptides. Here we report the isolation and identification of a cDNA clone corresponding to one of the proteases, the type B of the epidermal growth factor-binding protein. A pronounced sequence homology was found between the predicted activation peptide of this protease and the NH2-terminal extension of the nerve growth factor alpha subunit, suggesting that the latter protein has an uncleaved activation peptide attached to its NH2 terminus. Images Fig. 1. PMID:11892812

  15. Age-associated changes in basal c-fos transcription factor binding activity in rat hearts.

    PubMed

    Tsou, H; Azhar, G; Lu, X G; Kovacs, S; Peacocke, M; Wei, J Y

    1996-12-15

    The early response proto-oncogene c-fos is expressed at very low levels in the mammalian heart at baseline. To further investigate the mechanism of altered c-fos expression with age, we studied in the basal state the binding of five transcription proteins to their cognate sites in the c-fos promoter/enhancer region, in adult and old F344 rats. Our results show a reduced binding of E2F and AP1 proteins to the c-fos promoter in aging hearts. The major calcium/cyclic AMP response element (CRE) and SP1 binding was unchanged. The only increase seen with age was in the serum response element (SRE) binding proteins. SRE is the point of convergence of different signal transduction pathways (via MAP kinases and the Rho family of GTPases) at the c-fos promoter. Increased SRE binding may reflect a compensation for a decreased binding of other transcription proteins to the c-fos promoter, alteration in the phosphorylation status of SRF, or a change in the ternary complex factors Elk 1 or SAP 1. Other possibilities include defects in the signal transduction pathways with aging, which combine to produce an overall negative balance in the function of the c-fos promoter despite the increased SRE binding activity. Both in vitro and in vivo experiments have shown decreased c-fos expression with age. This may be due partly to alterations in the basal levels of transcription factor binding.

  16. Proteome-wide identification of the endogenous ADP-ribosylome of mammalian cells and tissue

    PubMed Central

    Martello, Rita; Leutert, Mario; Jungmichel, Stephanie; Bilan, Vera; Larsen, Sara C.; Young, Clifford; Hottiger, Michael O.; Nielsen, Michael L.

    2016-01-01

    Although protein ADP-ribosylation is involved in diverse biological processes, it has remained a challenge to identify ADP-ribose acceptor sites. Here, we present an experimental workflow for sensitive and unbiased analysis of endogenous ADP-ribosylation sites, capable of detecting more than 900 modification sites in mammalian cells and mouse liver. In cells, we demonstrate that Lys residues, besides Glu, Asp and Arg residues, are the dominant in vivo targets of ADP-ribosylation during oxidative stress. In normal liver tissue, we find Arg residues to be the predominant modification site. The cellular distribution and biological processes that involve ADP-ribosylated proteins are different in cultured cells and liver tissue, in the latter of which the majority of sites were found to be in cytosolic and mitochondrial protein networks primarily associated with metabolism. Collectively, we describe a robust methodology for the assessment of the role of ADP-ribosylation and ADP-ribosyltransferases in physiological and pathological states. PMID:27686526

  17. Functional analysis of TbARL1, an N-myristoylated Golgi protein essential for viability in bloodstream trypanosomes

    PubMed Central

    Price, Helen P.; Panethymitaki, Chrysoula; Goulding, David; Smith, Deborah F.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Myristoyl-CoA:protein N-myristoyltransferase (NMT), an essential protein in Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania major, catalyses the covalent attachment of the fatty acid myristate to the N-terminus of a range of target proteins. In order to define the essential targets contributing to lethality in the absence of NMT activity, we have focused on the ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf) family of GTP-binding proteins, as growth arrest in Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants with reduced NMT activity correlates with a decrease in N-myristoylated Arf proteins. We have identified nine Arf/Arls in the T. brucei and T. cruzi genomes and ten in L. major. Characterization of the T. brucei ARL1 homologue has revealed that the protein is localized in the Golgi apparatus and is expressed only in the mammalian bloodstream form of the parasite and not in the insect procyclic stage. This is the only reported example to date of a differentially expressed ARL1 homologue in any species. We have used RNA interference to demonstrate that ARL1 is essential for viability in T. brucei bloodstream parasites. Prior to cell death, depletion of ARL1 protein in bloodstream parasites results in abnormal morphology, including disintegration of the Golgi structure, multiple flagella and nuclei, and the presence of large numbers of vesicles. The cells have only a minor apparent defect in endocytosis but exocytosis of variant surface glycoprotein to the parasite surface is significantly delayed. RNA interference of ARL1 in procyclic cells has no effect on parasite growth or morphology. Our results suggest that there may be different pathways regulating Golgi structure and function in the two major life cycle stages of T. brucei. PMID:15687105

  18. Functional Analyses of Transcription Factor Binding Sites that Differ between Present-Day and Archaic Humans

    PubMed Central

    Weyer, Sven; Pääbo, Svante

    2016-01-01

    We analyze 25 previously identified transcription factor binding sites that carry DNA sequence changes that are present in all or nearly all present-day humans, yet occur in the ancestral state in Neandertals and Denisovans, the closest evolutionary relatives of humans. When the ancestral and derived forms of the transcription factor binding sites are tested using reporter constructs in 3 neuronal cell lines, the activity of 12 of the derived versions of transcription factor binding sites differ from the respective ancestral variants. This suggests that the majority of this class of evolutionary differences between modern humans and Neandertals may affect gene expression in at least some tissue or cell type. PMID:26454764

  19. Distribution of G/sub o. cap alpha. / mRNA and protein in bovine tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Price, S.R.; Tsai, S.C.; Adamik, R.; Angus, C.W.; Van Meurs, K.P.; Czarnecki, S.; Bruckwick, E.C.; Moss, J.; Vaughan, M.

    1987-05-01

    G/sub o..cap alpha../ is a 39 kDa guanyl nucleotide-binding protein similar in structure and function to G/sub s..cap alpha../ and G/sub i..cap alpha../ in the adenylate cyclase complex and transducin (G/sub t..cap alpha../) in the retinal photon receptor system. A bovine retinal cDNA clone, lambdaG09, that encodes the complete amino acid sequence of G/sub o..cap alpha../ has been isolated. Nick-translated lambdaG09 cDNA and a 5' end-labeled oligonucleotide probe complementary to a 24 base sequence unique to G/sub o..cap alpha../ were used as probes for Northern analysis of poly(A)/sup +/ RNA from bovine tissues. A major 4.0 kb mRNA was detected in brain and retina and in lesser amounts in heart. Several smaller mRNAs also hybridized with both probes in these tissues and in liver and lung. G/sub o..cap alpha../ protein was identified using rabbit polyclonal antibodies directed against purified bovine G/sub o..cap alpha../ and pertussis toxin-catalyzed (/sup 32/P)ADP-ribosylation. Soluble and membrane proteins were incubated with toxin and (/sup 32/P)NAD and then separated by gel electrophoresis before transfer to nitrocellulose for immunoreaction and subsequent autoradiography. A radiolabeled and immunoreactive 39 kDa membrane protein was found principally in retina and brain, and to a lesser extent, in heart. Thus, in the tissues examined, distribution of the 4.0 kb mRNA parallels that of the immunoreactive G/sub o..cap alpha../ with relatively small amounts in heart and larger amounts in brain and retina.

  20. Regulatory Control of Breast Tumor Cell Poly (ADP-Ribose) Polymerase

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-08-01

    The proteins were transferred to a nitrocellulose membrane and PARP was detected using anti-human PARP monoclonal antibody. Since PARP is a basic...to check if this modification is due to poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of the protein , the membrane was stripped off and re-probed with anti-PAR polyclonal...detect any poly(ADP- ribosyl)ated proteins corresponding to the molecular weight of PARP (116 kDa) (Figure 18 ), we initiated experiment to test possible

  1. INTERACTION AND LOCALIZATION OF THE RETINITIS PIGMENTOSA PROTEIN RP2 AND NSF IN RETINAL PHOTORECEPTOR CELLS†

    PubMed Central

    Holopainen, Juha M.; Cheng, Christiana L.; Molday, Laurie L.; Johal, Gurp; Coleman, Jonathan; Dyka, Frank; Hii, Theresa; Ahn, Jinhi; Molday, Robert S.

    2010-01-01

    RP2 is a ubiquitously expressed protein encoded by a gene associated with X-linked retinitis pigmentosa (XLRP), a retinal degenerative disease that causes severe vision loss. Previous in vitro studies have shown that RP2 binds to ADP ribosylation factor-like 3 (Arl3) and activates its intrinsic GTPase activity, but the function of RP2 in the retina, and in particular photoreceptor cells, remains unclear. To begin to define the role of RP2 in the retina and XLRP, we have carried out biochemical studies to identify proteins in retinal cell extracts that interact with RP2. Here, we show that RP2 interacts with N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor (NSF) in retinal cells as well as cultured embryonic kidney (HEK293) cells by mass spectrometry-based proteomics and biochemical analysis. This interaction is mediated by the N-terminal domain of NSF. The E138G and ΔI137 mutations of RP2 known to cause XLRP abolished the interaction of RP2 with the N-terminal domain of NSF. Immunofluorescence labeling studies further showed that RP2 co-localized with NSF in photoreceptors and other cells of the retina. Intense punctate staining of RP2 was observed close to the junction between the inner and outer segments beneath the connecting cilium, as well as within the synaptic region of rod and cone photoreceptors. Our studies indicate that RP2, in addition to serving as a regulator of Arl3, interacts with NSF and this complex may play an important role in membrane protein trafficking in photoreceptors and other cells of the retina. PMID:20669900

  2. ACAPs are arf6 GTPase-activating proteins that function in the cell periphery.

    PubMed

    Jackson, T R; Brown, F D; Nie, Z; Miura, K; Foroni, L; Sun, J; Hsu, V W; Donaldson, J G; Randazzo, P A

    2000-10-30

    The GTP-binding protein ADP-ribosylation factor 6 (Arf6) regulates endosomal membrane trafficking and the actin cytoskeleton in the cell periphery. GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) are critical regulators of Arf function, controlling the return of Arf to the inactive GDP-bound state. Here, we report the identification and characterization of two Arf6 GAPs, ACAP1 and ACAP2. Together with two previously described Arf GAPs, ASAP1 and PAP, they can be grouped into a protein family defined by several common structural motifs including coiled coil, pleckstrin homology, Arf GAP, and three complete ankyrin-repeat domains. All contain phosphoinositide-dependent GAP activity. ACAP1 and ACAP2 are widely expressed and occur together in the various cultured cell lines we examined. Similar to ASAP1, ACAP1 and ACAP2 were recruited to and, when overexpressed, inhibited the formation of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced dorsal membrane ruffles in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts. However, in contrast with ASAP1, ACAP1 and ACAP2 functioned as Arf6 GAPs. In vitro, ACAP1 and ACAP2 preferred Arf6 as a substrate, rather than Arf1 and Arf5, more so than did ASAP1. In HeLa cells, overexpression of either ACAP blocked the formation of Arf6-dependent protrusions. In addition, ACAP1 and ACAP2 were recruited to peripheral, tubular membranes, where activation of Arf6 occurs to allow membrane recycling back to the plasma membrane. ASAP1 did not inhibit Arf6-dependent protrusions and was not recruited by Arf6 to tubular membranes. The additional effects of ASAP1 on PDGF-induced ruffling in fibroblasts suggest that multiple Arf GAPs function coordinately in the cell periphery.

  3. PARP12, an interferon-stimulated gene involved in the control of protein translation and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Welsby, Iain; Hutin, David; Gueydan, Cyril; Kruys, Veronique; Rongvaux, Anthony; Leo, Oberdan

    2014-09-19

    Transcriptome analyses have recently identified PARP12, a member of a large family of ADP-ribosyl transferases, as an interferon-induced gene (ISG), whose function remains incompletely characterized. We demonstrate herein that PARP12 is a genuine ISG, whose expressed protein displays at least two distinct subcellular locations and related functions. Upon ectopic expression or exposure to oxidative stress, PARP12 is recruited to stress-granules (SGs), known sites of mRNA translational arrest. Accordingly, PARP12 was found to block mRNA translation, possibly upon association to the translational machinery. Both the N-terminal domain (containing an RNA-binding domain characterized by the presence of five CCCH-type Zn-fingers) and integrity of the catalytic domain are required for this suppressive function. In contrast, stimulation with LPS leads to the localization of PARP12 to p62/SQSTM1 (an adaptor protein involved in innate signaling and autophagy) containing structures, unrelated to SGs. Deletion of the N-terminal domain promotes the association of the protein to p62/SQSTM1, suggesting that the RNA-binding domain is responsible for the subcellular localization of PARP12. Association to p62/SQSTM1 was found to correlate with increased NF-κB signaling, suggesting a role for PARP12 in inflammation. Collectively, these observations suggest that PARP12 can alternate between two distinct subcellular compartments associated to two distinct cellular functions. The present work therefore identifies PARP12 as an ISG with a potential role in cellular defenses against viral infections.

  4. Ancient Complexity, Opisthokont Plasticity, and Discovery of the 11th Subfamily of Arf GAP Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Schlacht, Alexander; Mowbrey, Kevin; Elias, Marek; Kahn, Richard A.; Dacks, Joel B.

    2013-01-01

    The organelle paralogy hypothesis is one model for the acquisition of non-endosymbiotic organelles, generated from molecular evolutionary analyses of proteins encoding specificity in the membrane traffic system. GTPase Activating Proteins (GAPs) for the ADP-ribosylation factor (Arfs) GTPases are additional regulators of the kinetics and fidelity of membrane traffic. Here we describe molecular evolutionary analyses of Arf GAP protein family. Of the ten subfamilies previously defined in humans, we find that five were likely present in the Last Eukaryotic Common Ancestor (LECA). Of the three more recently derived subfamilies, one was likely present in the ancestor of opisthokonts (animals and fungi) and apusomonads (flagellates classified as the sister lineage to opisthokonts), while two arose in the holozoan lineage. We also propose to have identified a novel ancient subfamily (ArfGAPC2), present in diverse eukaryotes but which is lost frequently, including in the opisthokonts. Surprisingly few ancient domains accompanying the ArfGAP domain were identified, in marked contrast to the extensively decorated human Arf GAPs. Phylogenetic analyses of the subfamilies reveal patterns of single and multiple gene duplications specific to the Holozoa, to some degree mirroring evolution of Arf GAP targets, the Arfs. Conservation, and lack thereof, of various residues in the ArfGAP structure provide contextualization of previously identified functional amino acids and their application to Arf GAP biology in general. Overall, our results yield insights into current Arf GAP biology, reveal complexity in the ancient eukaryotic ancestor, and integrate the Arf GAP family into a proposed mechanism for the evolution of non-endosymbiotic organelles. PMID:23433073

  5. The ankyrin repeat-containing protein Akr1p is required for the endocytosis of yeast pheromone receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Givan, S A; Sprague, G F

    1997-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae a-factor receptor (Ste3p) requires its C-terminal cytoplasmic tail for endocytosis. Wild-type receptor is delivered to the cell surface via the secretory pathway but remains there only briefly before being internalized and delivered to the vacuole for degradation. Receptors lacking all or part of the cytoplasmic tail are not subject to this constitutive endocytosis. We used the cytoplasmic tail of Ste3p as bait in the two-hybrid system in an effort to identify other proteins involved in endocytosis. One protein identified was Akr1p, an ankyrin repeat-containing protein. We applied three criteria to demonstrate that Akr1p is involved in the constitutive endocytosis of Ste3p. First, when receptor synthesis is shut off, akr1 delta cells retain the ability to mate longer than do AKR1 cells. Second, Ste3p half-life is increased by greater than 5-fold in akr1 delta cells compared with AKR1 cells. Third, after a pulse of synthesis, newly synthesized receptor remains at the cell surface in akr1 delta mutants, whereas it is rapidly internalized in AKR1 cells. Specifically, in akr1 delta mutants, newly synthesized receptor is accessible to exogenous protease, and by indirect immunofluorescence, the receptor is located at the cell surface. akr1 delta cells are also defective for endocytosis of the alpha-factor receptor (Ste2p). Despite the block to constitutive endocytosis exhibited by akr1 delta cells, they are competent to carry out ligand-mediated endocytosis of Ste3p. In contrast, akr1 delta cells cannot carry out ligand-mediated endocytosis of Ste2p. We discuss the implications for Akr1p function in endocytosis and suggest a link to the regulation of ADP-ribosylation proteins (Arf proteins). Images PMID:9243510

  6. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 regulates both the exonuclease and helicase activities of the Werner syndrome protein.

    PubMed

    von Kobbe, Cayetano; Harrigan, Jeanine A; Schreiber, Valérie; Stiegler, Patrick; Piotrowski, Jason; Dawut, Lale; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2004-01-01

    Werner syndrome (WS) is a genetic premature aging disorder in which patients appear much older than their chronological age. The gene mutated in WS encodes a nuclear protein (WRN) which possesses 3'-5' exonuclease and ATPase-dependent 3'-5' helicase activities. The genomic instability associated with WS cells and the biochemical characteristics of WRN suggest that WRN plays a role in DNA metabolic pathways such as transcription, replication, recombination and repair. Recently we have identified poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) as a new WRN interacting protein. In this paper, we further mapped the interacting domains. We found that PARP-1 bound to the N-terminus of WRN and to the C-terminus containing the RecQ-conserved (RQC) domain. WRN bound to the N-terminus of PARP-1 containing DNA binding and BRCA1 C-terminal (BRCT) domains. We show that unmodified PARP-1 inhibited both WRN exonuclease and helicase activities, and to our knowledge is the only known WRN protein partner that inactivates both of the WRN's catalytic activities suggesting a biologically significant regulation. Moreover, this dual inhibition seems to be specific for PARP-1, as PARP-2 did not affect WRN helicase activity and only slightly inhibited WRN exonuclease activity. The differential effect of PARP-1 and PARP-2 on WRN catalytic activity was not due to differences in affinity for WRN or the DNA substrate. Finally, we demonstrate that the inhibition of WRN by PARP-1 was influenced by the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation state of PARP-1. The biological relevance of the specific modulation of WRN catalytic activities by PARP-1 are discussed in the context of pathways in which these proteins may function together, namely in the repair of DNA strand breaks.

  7. Distribution of adenylate cyclase and GTP-binding proteins in hepatic plasma membranes.

    PubMed

    Dixon, B S; Sutherland, E; Alexander, A; Nibel, D; Simon, F R

    1993-10-01

    Hepatic membrane subfractions prepared from control rats demonstrated forskolin (FSK)-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in the basolateral (sinusoidal) but not apical (canalicular) plasma membrane. After bile duct ligation (BDL) for 12 or 24 h, there was an increase in FSK-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in the apical membrane (54.2 +/- 3.9 pmol.mg-1 x min-1). The mechanism for this increase was explored further. ATP hydrolysis was found to be much higher in the apical than the basolateral membrane. Increasing the ATP levels in the assay enhanced apical membrane adenylate cyclase activity (10.5 +/- 0.2 pmol.mg-l.min-1); however, total adenosinetriphosphatase (ATPase) activity was not altered after BDL. Extraction of the apical membrane with bile acids or other detergents resulted in a two- to threefold increase in adenylate cyclase activity (30.6 +/- 3.6 pmol.mg-1 x min-1; detergent C12E8) This suggested that bile duct ligation was acting via the detergent-like action of bile acids to uncover latent adenylate cyclase activity on apical membranes. Further studies demonstrated that both BDL and detergent extraction also enhanced toxin-directed ADP-ribosylation of Gs alpha (cholera toxin) and Gi alpha (pertussis toxin) in the apical but not the basolateral membrane. After BDL, Gi alpha was found to be twofold greater in the apical membrane than the basolateral membrane. Immunoblotting using specific G protein antibodies further confirmed that apical membranes from control rats had a higher concentration of Gi1, 2 alpha and beta and slightly elevated levels of Gi3 alpha and Gs alpha compared with the basolateral membrane. The results demonstrate that adenylate cyclase and heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins are present on the apical membrane, but measurement of their functional activity requires detergent permeabilization of apical membrane vesicles and is limited by the presence of high ATPase activity.

  8. Ca2+ signalling in K562 human erythroleukaemia cells: effect of dimethyl sulphoxide and role of G-proteins in thrombin- and thromboxane A2-activated pathways.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, C P; Dunn, M J; Mattera, R

    1995-01-01

    The human leukaemic cell line K562 is a pluripotent stem cell with the potential to mature along a megakaryocytic or erythroid line. In these cells, thrombin and U46619 (9,11-dideoxy-9 alpha, 11 alpha-methanoepoxy prostaglandin F2 alpha), a thromboxane A2 analogue, increased intracellular Ca2+ in a rapid and concentration-dependent manner. The peak transient observed with both thrombin and U46619 was preserved upon stimulation in the absence of extracellular calcium and blunted with phorbol myristate acetate, suggestive of activation of phospholipase C. Short-term treatment with leupeptin abolished the calcium response to thrombin, but did not alter that to U46619. Both pertussis toxin (PT) and DMSO pretreatment inhibited thrombin- but not U46619-stimulated intracellular calcium elevation, indicating that these agonists signal through different G-proteins. Western blot analysis of crude membranes from K562 cells revealed the presence of G12 alpha and G13 alpha; the other known PT-substrates, Gi1 alpha and G0 alpha, were not detected. Consistent with this observation, ADP-ribosylation experiments revealed the presence of two PT substrates which co-migrated with human erythrocyte G12 alpha and G13 alpha. An antibody raised against Gq/11 alpha, a subfamily of G-protein alpha subunits unmodified by PT, specifically recognized 42 kDa protein(s) in K562 cells. PCR amplification of reverse-transcribed K562 RNA followed by DNA sequencing showed that these cells express messages for both Gq alpha and G11 alpha. Treatment of K562 cells with DMSO reduced the levels of thrombin receptor mRNA, without simultaneous changes in the expression of G12 alpha and G13 alpha. We have thus identified Ca(2+)-mobilizing agonists and related G-proteins in K562 cells, together with changes induced by DMSO in this signalling pathway. Images Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 9 PMID:7492305

  9. Inhibition of ADP-ribosyltransferase activity of cholera toxin by MDL 12330A and chlorpromazine.

    PubMed

    Bitonti, A J

    1984-04-30

    ADP-ribosylation by cholera toxin of the guanine nucleotide binding regulatory protein (Gs) of rat liver membrane adenylate cyclase was inhibited by 0.1-1 mM MDL 12330A or 0.1-1 mM chlorpromazine. Basal as well as cholera toxin activated adenylate cyclase activity in liver membranes was also inhibited by the two drugs. NAD glycohydrolase activity and self-ADP-ribosylation of cholera toxin were also inhibited by MDL 12330A and chlorpromazine. These effects of MDL 12330A and chlorpromazine may be related to their effects on cholera toxin-induced fluid secretion in vivo.

  10. Zelda is differentially required for chromatin accessibility, transcription factor binding, and gene expression in the early Drosophila embryo

    PubMed Central

    Schulz, Katharine N.; Bondra, Eliana R.; Moshe, Arbel; Villalta, Jacqueline E.; Lieb, Jason D.; Kaplan, Tommy; McKay, Daniel J.; Harrison, Melissa M.

    2015-01-01

    The transition from a specified germ cell to a population of pluripotent cells occurs rapidly following fertilization. During this developmental transition, the zygotic genome is largely transcriptionally quiescent and undergoes significant chromatin remodeling. In Drosophila, the DNA-binding protein Zelda (also known as Vielfaltig) is required for this transition and for transcriptional activation of the zygotic genome. Open chromatin is associated with Zelda-bound loci, as well as more generally with regions of active transcription. Nonetheless, the extent to which Zelda influences chromatin accessibility across the genome is largely unknown. Here we used formaldehyde-assisted isolation of regulatory elements to determine the role of Zelda in regulating regions of open chromatin in the early embryo. We demonstrate that Zelda is essential for hundreds of regions of open chromatin. This Zelda-mediated chromatin accessibility facilitates transcription-factor recruitment and early gene expression. Thus, Zelda possesses some key characteristics of a pioneer factor. Unexpectedly, chromatin at a large subset of Zelda-bound regions remains open even in the absence of Zelda. The GAGA factor-binding motif and embryonic GAGA factor binding are specifically enriched in these regions. We propose that both Zelda and GAGA factor function to specify sites of open chromatin and together facilitate the remodeling of the early embryonic genome. PMID:26335634

  11. Molecular and cellular roles of PI31 (PSMF1) protein in regulation of proteasome function.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaohua; Thompson, David; Kumar, Brajesh; DeMartino, George N

    2014-06-20

    We investigated molecular features and cellular roles of PI31 (PSMF1) on regulation of proteasome function. PI31 has a C-terminal HbYX (where Hb is a hydrophobic amino acid, Y is tyrosine, and X is any amino acid) motif characteristic of several proteasome activators. Peptides corresponding to the PI31 C terminus also bind to and activate the 20 S proteasome in an HbYX-dependent manner, but intact PI31protein inhibits in vitro 20 S activity. Binding to and inhibition of the proteasome by PI31 are conferred by the HbYX-containing proline-rich C-terminal domain but do not require HbYX residues. Thus, multiple regions of PI31 bind independently to the proteasome and collectively determine effects on activity. PI31 blocks the ATP-dependent in vitro assembly of 26 S proteasome from 20 S proteasome and PA700 subcomplexes but has no effect on in vitro activity of the intact 26 S proteasome. To determine the physiologic significance of these in vitro effects, we assessed multiple aspects of cellular proteasome content and function after altering PI31 levels. We detected no change in overall cellular proteasome content or function when PI31 levels were either increased by moderate ectopic overexpression or decreased by RNA interference (RNAi). We also failed to identify a role of PI31 ADP-ribosylation as a mechanism for regulation of overall 26 S proteasome content and function, as recently proposed. Thus, despite its in vitro effects on various proteasome activities and its structural relationship to established proteasome regulators, cellular roles and mechanisms of PI31 in regulation of proteasome function remain unclear and require future definition.

  12. Receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase and stimulation of arachidonic acid release in 3T3 fibroblasts. Selective susceptibility to islet-activating protein, pertussis toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Murayama, T.; Ui, M.

    1985-06-25

    Thrombin exhibited diverse effects on mouse 3T3 fibroblasts. It (a) decreased cAMP in the cell suspension, (b) inhibited adenylate cyclase in the Lubrol-permeabilized cell suspension in a GTP-dependent manner, increased releases of (c) arachidonic acid and (d) inositol from the cell monolayer prelabeled with these labeled compounds, (e) increased /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake into the cell monolayer, and (f) increased /sup 86/Rb/sup +/ uptake into the cell monolayer in a ouabain-sensitive manner. Most of the effects were reproduced by bradykinin, platelet-activating factor, and angiotensin II. The receptors for these agonists are thus likely to be linked to three separate effector systems: the adenylate cyclase inhibition, the phosphoinositide breakdown leading to Ca/sup 2 +/ mobilization and phospholipase A2 activation, and the Na,K-ATPase activation. Among the effects of these agonists, (a), (b), (c), and (e) were abolished, but (d) and (f) were not, by prior treatment of the cells with islet-activating protein (IAP), pertussis toxin, which ADP-ribosylates the Mr = 41,000 protein, the alpha-subunit of the inhibitory guanine nucleotide regulatory protein (Ni), thereby abolishing receptor-mediated inhibition of adenylate cyclase. The effects (a), (c), (d), and (e) of thrombin, but not (b), were mimicked by A23187, a calcium ionophore. The effects of A23187, in contrast to those of receptor agonists, were not affected by the treatment of cells with IAP. Thus, the IAP substrate, the alpha-subunit of Ni, or the protein alike, may play an additional role in signal transduction arising from the Ca/sup 2 +/-mobilizing receptors, probably mediating process(es) distal to phosphoinositide breakdown and proximal to Ca/sup 2 +/ gating.

  13. Transcription Factor Binding Site Positioning in Yeast: Proximal Promoter Motifs Characterize TATA-Less Promoters

    PubMed Central

    Erb, Ionas; van Nimwegen, Erik

    2011-01-01

    The availability of sequence specificities for a substantial fraction of yeast's transcription factors and comparative genomic algorithms for binding site prediction has made it possible to comprehensively annotate transcription factor binding sites genome-wide. Here we use such a genome-wide annotation for comprehensively studying promoter architecture in yeast, focusing on the distribution of transcription factor binding sites relative to transcription start sites, and the architecture of TATA and TATA-less promoters. For most transcription factors, binding sites are positioned further upstream and vary over a wider range in TATA promoters than in TATA-less promoters. In contrast, a group of ‘proximal promoter motifs’ (GAT1/GLN3/DAL80, FKH1/2, PBF1/2, RPN4, NDT80, and ROX1) occur preferentially in TATA-less promoters and show a strong preference for binding close to the transcription start site in these promoters. We provide evidence that suggests that pre-initiation complexes are recruited at TATA sites in TATA promoters and at the sites of the other proximal promoter motifs in TATA-less promoters. TATA-less promoters can generally be classified by the proximal promoter motif they contain, with different classes of TATA-less promoters showing different patterns of transcription factor binding site positioning and nucleosome coverage. These observations suggest that different modes of regulation of transcription initiation may be operating in the different promoter classes. In addition we show that, across all promoter classes, there is a close match between nucleosome free regions and regions of highest transcription factor binding site density. This close agreement between transcription factor binding site density and nucleosome depletion suggests a direct and general competition between transcription factors and nucleosomes for binding to promoters. PMID:21931670

  14. Transcription factor binding site positioning in yeast: proximal promoter motifs characterize TATA-less promoters.

    PubMed

    Erb, Ionas; van Nimwegen, Erik

    2011-01-01

    The availability of sequence specificities for a substantial fraction of yeast's transcription factors and comparative genomic algorithms for binding site prediction has made it possible to comprehensively annotate transcription factor binding sites genome-wide. Here we use such a genome-wide annotation for comprehensively studying promoter architecture in yeast, focusing on the distribution of transcription factor binding sites relative to transcription start sites, and the architecture of TATA and TATA-less promoters. For most transcription factors, binding sites are positioned further upstream and vary over a wider range in TATA promoters than in TATA-less promoters. In contrast, a group of 6 'proximal promoter motifs' (GAT1/GLN3/DAL80, FKH1/2, PBF1/2, RPN4, NDT80, and ROX1) occur preferentially in TATA-less promoters and show a strong preference for binding close to the transcription start site in these promoters. We provide evidence that suggests that pre-initiation complexes are recruited at TATA sites in TATA promoters and at the sites of the other proximal promoter motifs in TATA-less promoters. TATA-less promoters can generally be classified by the proximal promoter motif they contain, with different classes of TATA-less promoters showing different patterns of transcription factor binding site positioning and nucleosome coverage. These observations suggest that different modes of regulation of transcription initiation may be operating in the different promoter classes. In addition we show that, across all promoter classes, there is a close match between nucleosome free regions and regions of highest transcription factor binding site density. This close agreement between transcription factor binding site density and nucleosome depletion suggests a direct and general competition between transcription factors and nucleosomes for binding to promoters.

  15. Integrated genome analysis suggests that most conserved non-coding sequences are regulatory factor binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Hemberg, Martin; Gray, Jesse M.; Cloonan, Nicole; Kuersten, Scott; Grimmond, Sean; Greenberg, Michael E.; Kreiman, Gabriel

    2012-01-01

    More than 98% of a typical vertebrate genome does not code for proteins. Although non-coding regions are sprinkled with short (<200 bp) islands of evolutionarily conserved sequences, the function of most of these unannotated conserved islands remains unknown. One possibility is that unannotated conserved islands could encode non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs); alternatively, unannotated conserved islands could serve as promoter-distal regulatory factor binding sites (RFBSs) like enhancers. Here we assess these possibilities by comparing unannotated conserved islands in the human and mouse genomes to transcribed regions and to RFBSs, relying on a detailed case study of one human and one mouse cell type. We define transcribed regions by applying a novel transcript-calling algorithm to RNA-Seq data obtained from total cellular RNA, and we define RFBSs using ChIP-Seq and DNAse-hypersensitivity assays. We find that unannotated conserved islands are four times more likely to coincide with RFBSs than with unannotated ncRNAs. Thousands of conserved RFBSs can be categorized as insulators based on the presence of CTCF or as enhancers based on the presence of p300/CBP and H3K4me1. While many unannotated conserved RFBSs are transcriptionally active to some extent, the transcripts produced tend to be unspliced, non-polyadenylated and expressed at levels 10 to 100-fold lower than annotated coding or ncRNAs. Extending these findings across multiple cell types and tissues, we propose that most conserved non-coding genomic DNA in vertebrate genomes corresponds to promoter-distal regulatory elements. PMID:22684627

  16. Quantitative Models of the Mechanisms That Control Genome-Wide Patterns of Transcription Factor Binding during Early Drosophila Development

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Tommy; Li, Xiao-Yong; Sabo, Peter J.; Thomas, Sean; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A.; Biggin, Mark D.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2011-01-01

    Transcription factors that drive complex patterns of gene expression during animal development bind to thousands of genomic regions, with quantitative differences in binding across bound regions mediating their activity. While we now have tools to characterize the DNA affinities of these proteins and to precisely measure their genome-wide distribution in vivo, our understanding of the forces that determine where, when, and to what extent they bind remains primitive. Here we use a thermodynamic model of transcription factor binding to evaluate the contribution of different biophysical forces to the binding of five regulators of early embryonic anterior-posterior patterning in Drosophila melanogaster. Predictions based on DNA sequence and in vitro protein-DNA affinities alone achieve a correlation of ∼0.4 with experimental measurements of in vivo binding. Incorporating cooperativity and competition among the five factors, and accounting for spatial patterning by modeling binding in every nucleus independently, had little effect on prediction accuracy. A major source of error was the prediction of binding events that do not occur in vivo, which we hypothesized reflected reduced accessibility of chromatin. To test this, we incorporated experimental measurements of genome-wide DNA accessibility into our model, effectively restricting predicted binding to regions of open chromatin. This dramatically improved our predictions to a correlation of 0.6–0.9 for various factors across known target genes. Finally, we used our model to quantify the roles of DNA sequence, accessibility, and binding competition and cooperativity. Our results show that, in regions of open chromatin, binding can be predicted almost exclusively by the sequence specificity of individual factors, with a minimal role for protein interactions. We suggest that a combination of experimentally determined chromatin accessibility data and simple computational models of transcription factor binding may be

  17. Identification of cDNA encoding an additional. alpha. subunit of a human GTP-binding protein: Expression of three. alpha. sub i subtypes in human tissues and cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, S.; Ang, S.L.; Bloch, D.B.; Bloch, K.D.; Kawahara, Y.; Tolman, C.; Lee, R.; Seidman, J.G.; Neer, E.J. )

    1988-06-01

    The guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins), which mediate hormonal regulation of many membrane functions, are composed of {alpha}, {beta}, and {gamma} subunits. The authors have cloned and characterized cDNA from a human T-cell library encoding a form of {alpha}{sub i} that is different from the human {alpha}{sub i} subtypes previously reported. {alpha}{sub i} is the {alpha} subunit of a class of G proteins that inhibits adenylate cyclase and regulates other enzymes and ion channels. This cDNA encodes a polypeptide of 354 amino acids and is assigned to encode the {alpha}{sub i-3} subtype of G proteins on the basis of its similarity to other {alpha}{sub i}-like cDNAs and the presence of a predicted site for ADP ribosylation by pertussis toxin. They have determined the expression of mRNA for this and two other subtypes of human {alpha}{sub i} ({alpha}{sub i-1} and {alpha}{sub i-2}) in a variety of human fetal tissues and in human cell lines. All three {alpha}{sub i} subtypes were present in the tissues tested. However, analysis of individual cell types reveals specificity of {alpha}{sub i-1} expression. mRNA for {alpha}{i-1} is absent in T cells, B cells, and monocytes but is present in other cell lines. The finding of differential expression of {alpha}{sub i-1} genes may permit characterization of distinct physiological roles for this {alpha}{sub i} subunit. mRNA for {alpha}{sub i-2} and {alpha}{sub i-3} was found in all the primary and transformed cell lines tested. Thus, some cells contain all three {alpha}{sub i} subtypes. This observation raises the question of how cells prevent cross talk among receptors that are coupled to effectors through such similar {alpha} proteins.

  18. An information transmission model for transcription factor binding at regulatory DNA sites

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Computational identification of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) is a rapid, cost-efficient way to locate unknown regulatory elements. With increased potential for high-throughput genome sequencing, the availability of accurate computational methods for TFBS prediction has never been as important as it currently is. To date, identifying TFBSs with high sensitivity and specificity is still an open challenge, necessitating the development of novel models for predicting transcription factor-binding regulatory DNA elements. Results Based on the information theory, we propose a model for transcription factor binding of regulatory DNA sites. Our model incorporates position interdependencies in effective ways. The model computes the information transferred (TI) between the transcription factor and the TFBS during the binding process and uses TI as the criterion to determine whether the sequence motif is a possible TFBS. Based on this model, we developed a computational method to identify TFBSs. By theoretically proving and testing our model using both real and artificial data, we found that our model provides highly accurate predictive results. Conclusions In this study, we present a novel model for transcription factor binding regulatory DNA sites. The model can provide an increased ability to detect TFBSs. PMID:22672438

  19. Identification of candidate transcription factor binding sites in the cattle genome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A resource that provides candidate transcription factor binding sites does not currently exist for cattle. Such data is necessary, as predicted sites may serve as excellent starting locations for future 'omics studies to develop transcriptional regulation hypotheses. In order to generate this resour...

  20. Bacterial Cytotoxins Target Rho GTPases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Gudula; Aktories, Klaus

    1998-06-01

    Low molecular mass GTPases of the Rho family, which are involved in the regulation of the actin cytoskeleton and in various signal transduction processes, are the eukaryotic targets of bacterial protein toxins. The toxins covalently modify Rho proteins by ADP ribosylation, glucosylation, and deamidation, thereby inactivating and activating the GTPases.

  1. Myristoylation-facilitated binding of the G protein ARF1GDP to membrane phospholipids is required for its activation by a soluble nucleotide exchange factor.

    PubMed

    Franco, M; Chardin, P; Chabre, M; Paris, S

    1996-01-19

    We have investigated the role of N-myristoylation in the activation of bovine ADP-ribosylation factor 1 (ARF1). We previously showed that myristoylation allows some spontaneous GDP-to-GTP exchange to occur on ARF1 at physiological Mg2+ levels in the presence of phospholipid vesicles (Franco, M., Chardin, P., Chabre, M., and Paris, S. (1995) J. Biol. Chem. 270, 1337-1341). Here, we report that this basal nucleotide exchange can be accelerated (by up to 5-fold) by addition of a soluble fraction obtained from bovine retinas. This acceleration is totally abolished by brefeldin A (IC50 = 2 microM) and by trypsin treatment of the retinal extract, as expected for an ARF-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factor. To accelerate GDP release from ARF1, this soluble exchange factor absolutely requires myristoylation of ARF1 and the presence of phospholipid vesicles. The retinal extract also stimulates guanosine 5'-3-O-(thio)-triphosphate (GTP gamma S) release from ARF1 in the presence of phospholipids, but in this case myristoylation of ARF is not required. These observations, together with our previous findings that both myristoylated and non-myristoylated forms of ARF GTP-gamma S but only the myristoylated form of ARFGDP bind to membrane phospholipids, suggest that (i) the retinal exchange factor acts only on membrane-bound ARF, (ii) the myristate is not involved in the protein-protein interaction between ARF1 and the exchange factor, and (iii) N-myristoylation facilitates both spontaneous and catalyzed GDP-to-GTP exchange on ARF1 simply by facilitating the binding of ARFGDP to membrane phospholipids.

  2. The Prediction of the Expected Current Selection Coefficient of Single Nucleotide Polymorphism Associated with Holstein Milk Yield, Fat and Protein Contents.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Sup; Shin, Donghyun; Lee, Wonseok; Taye, Mengistie; Cho, Kwanghyun; Park, Kyoung-Do; Kim, Heebal

    2016-01-01

    Milk-related traits (milk yield, fat and protein) have been crucial to selection of Holstein. It is essential to find the current selection trends of Holstein. Despite this, uncovering the current trends of selection have been ignored in previous studies. We suggest a new formula to detect the current selection trends based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP). This suggestion is based on the best linear unbiased prediction (BLUP) and the Fisher's fundamental theorem of natural selection both of which are trait-dependent. Fisher's theorem links the additive genetic variance to the selection coefficient. For Holstein milk production traits, we estimated the additive genetic variance using SNP effect from BLUP and selection coefficients based on genetic variance to search highly selective SNPs. Through these processes, we identified significantly selective SNPs. The number of genes containing highly selective SNPs with p-value <0.01 (nearly top 1% SNPs) in all traits and p-value <0.001 (nearly top 0.1%) in any traits was 14. They are phosphodiesterase 4B (PDE4B), serine/threonine kinase 40 (STK40), collagen, type XI, alpha 1 (COL11A1), ephrin-A1 (EFNA1), netrin 4 (NTN4), neuron specific gene family member 1 (NSG1), estrogen receptor 1 (ESR1), neurexin 3 (NRXN3), spectrin, beta, non-erythrocytic 1 (SPTBN1), ADP-ribosylation factor interacting protein 1 (ARFIP1), mutL homolog 1 (MLH1), transmembrane channel-like 7 (TMC7), carboxypeptidase X, member 2 (CPXM2) and ADAM metallopeptidase domain 12 (ADAM12). These genes may be important for future artificial selection trends. Also, we found that the SNP effect predicted from BLUP was the key factor to determine the expected current selection coefficient of SNP. Under Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium of SNP markers in current generation, the selection coefficient is equivalent to 2*SNP effect.

  3. Pertussis toxin modifies the characteristics of both the inhibitory GTP binding proteins and the somatostatin receptor in anterior pituitary tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Mahy, N.; Woolkalis, M.; Thermos, K.; Carlson, K.; Manning, D.; Reisine, T.

    1988-08-01

    The effects of pertussis toxin treatment on the characteristics of somatostatin receptors in the anterior pituitary tumor cell line AtT-20 were examined. Pertussis toxin selectively catalyzed the ADP ribosylation of the alpha subunits of the inhibitory GTP binding proteins in AtT-20 cells. Toxin treatment abolished somatostatin inhibition of forskolin-stimulated adenylyl cyclase activity and somatostatin stimulation of GTPase activity. To examine the effects of pertussis toxin treatment on the characteristics of the somatostatin receptor, the receptor was labeled by the somatostatin analog (125I)CGP 23996. (125I)CGP 23996 binding to AtT-20 cell membranes was saturable and within a limited concentration range was to a single high affinity site. Pertussis toxin treatment reduced the apparent density of the high affinity (125I)CGP 23996 binding sites in AtT-20 cell membranes. Inhibition of (125I)CGP 23996 binding by a wide concentration range of CGP 23996 revealed the presence of two binding sites. GTP predominantly reduced the level of high affinity sites in control membranes. Pertussis toxin treatment also diminished the amount of high affinity sites. GTP did not affect (125I)CGP 23996 binding in the pertussis toxin-treated membranes. The high affinity somatostatin receptors were covalently labeled with (125I) CGP 23996 and the photoactivated crosslinking agent n-hydroxysuccinimidyl-4-azidobenzoate. No high affinity somatostatin receptors, covalently bound to (125I)CGP 23996, were detected in the pertussis toxin-treated membranes. These results are most consistent with pertussis toxin uncoupling the inhibitory G proteins from the somatostatin receptor thereby converting the receptor from a mixed population of high and low affinity sites to only low affinity receptors.

  4. rVISTA for Comparative Sequence-Based Discovery of Functional Transcription Factor Binding Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Loots, Gabriela G.; Ovcharenko, Ivan; Pachter, Lior; Dubchak, Inna; Rubin, Edward M.

    2002-03-08

    Identifying transcriptional regulatory elements represents a significant challenge in annotating the genomes of higher vertebrates. We have developed a computational tool, rVISTA, for high-throughput discovery of cis-regulatory elements that combines transcription factor binding site prediction and the analysis of inter-species sequence conservation. Here, we illustrate the ability of rVISTA to identify true transcription factor binding sites through the analysis of AP-1 and NFAT binding sites in the 1 Mb well-annotated cytokine gene cluster1 (Hs5q31; Mm11). The exploitation of orthologous human-mouse data set resulted in the elimination of 95 percent of the 38,000 binding sites predicted upon analysis of the human sequence alone, while it identified 87 percent of the experimentally verified binding sites in this region.

  5. Inhibition of protein kinase C α/βII and activation of c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase mediate glycyrrhetinic acid induced apoptosis in non-small cell lung cancer NCI-H460 cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Junho; Ko, Hyun-suk; Sohn, Eun Jung; Kim, Bonglee; Kim, Jung Hyo; Kim, Hee Jeong; Kim, Chulwoo; Kim, Jai-eun; Kim, Sung-Hoon

    2014-02-15

    Though glycyrrhetinic acid (GA) from Glycyrrhiza glabra was known to exert antioxidant, antifilarial, hepatoprotective, anti-inflammatory and anti-tumor effects, the antitumor mechanism of GA was not clearly elucidated in non-small cell lung cancer cells (NSCLCCs). Thus, in the present study, the underlying apoptotic mechanism of GA was examined in NCI-H460 NSCLCCs. GA significantly suppressed the viability of NCI-H460 and A549 non-small lung cancer cells. Also, GA significantly increased the sub G1 population by cell cycle analysis and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) positive cells in a concentration dependent manner in NCI-H460 non-small lung cancer cells. Consistently, GA cleaved poly (ADP-ribosyl) polymerase (PARP), caspase 9/3, attenuated the expression of Bcl-XL, Bcl-2, Cyclin D1 and Cyclin E in NCI-H460 cells. Interestingly, GA attenuated the phosphorylation of protein kinase C (PKC) α/βII and extracellular activated protein kinase (ERK) as well as activated the phosphorylation of PKC δ and c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase in NCI-H460 cells. Conversely, PKC promoter phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and JNK inhibitor SP600125 reversed the cleavages of caspase 3 and PARP induced by GA in NCI-H460 cells. Overall, our findings suggest that GA induces apoptosis via inhibition of PKC α/βII and activation of JNK in NCI-H460 non-small lung cancer cells as a potent anticancer candidate for lung cancer treatment.

  6. Plasma insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 proteolysis is increased in primary breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Helle, S I; Geisler, S; Aas, T; Paulsen, T; Holly, J M P; Lønning, P E

    2001-01-01

    Fasting blood samples were obtained before definitive surgery or biopsy in 128 patients referred to the department of surgery with suspected or manifest breast cancer. Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I, IGF-II and free IGF-I were measured by radioimmunoassay/immunoradiometric assay, while IGFBP-3 proteolysis was evaluated by Western immunoblot. 12 patients had ductal carcinoma in situ benign conditions, while staging revealed metastatic disease in 15 of 16 patients with invasive cancers. IGFBP-3 proteolysis above the normal range was recorded in 19 patients with invasive cancers, but in none of the patients suffering from DCIS/benign conditions. Increased IGFBP-3 proteolysis was most frequently recorded in patients harbouring large tumours and metastatic disease (Stage I: 0/19, 0%; Stage II: 3/45, 7%, Stage III: 9/37, 24%, and Stage IV: 7/15, 47%). IGFBP-3 proteolysis was significantly higher in Stage III (P =0.01) and IV (P< 0.001) patients compared to the other stage groups (P = 0.001). IGF-I and IGF-II correlated negatively to IGFBP-3 proteolysis and age. Plasma levels of IGF-I and -II were significantly lower in patients with elevated IGFBP-3 proteolysis compared to those within the normal range. Our findings reveal alterations in the IGF-system among a substantial number of patients with large primary breast cancers. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11437405

  7. Role of Fibroblast Growth Factor Binding Protein-1 in Mammary Development and Tumorigenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    present FGFs to high affinity tyrosine kinase receptors ( FGFR ) on the cell surface. As the only branched organ that undergoes the majority of its...Recent Prog Horm Res 51: 159-186; discussion 186-158. Koziczak, M., Holbro, T., and Hynes, N.E. 2004. Blocking of FGFR signaling inhibits breast cancer

  8. Role of Fibroblast Growth Factor Binding Protein-1 in Mammary Development and Tumorigenesis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    Hens and Wysolmerski 2005). At the future site of each nipple , five disk-like placodes line up and invade into the underlying mesenchyme. Referred...mouse mammary gland forms a single ductal tree leading to each nipple . The nascent mammary gland remains quiescent until puberty where the...harvested as described in this original proposal. 12 Apoptosis at regular intervals is a normal part of mammary physiology . In murine models

  9. A Novel Member of the Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein Superfamily in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-02-01

    Beckwith- Wiedemann (BWS), and in various cancers we sought to examine their expression in familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP), are associated with an...G, Romans KE, Montgomery E, 37. Umeda F, Ono Y, Sekiguchi N, Hashimoto T, Masakado M, Nakamura K, Lal A, Riggins GJ , Lengauer C, Vogelstein B

  10. Definition and prediction of the full range of transcription factor binding sites—the hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 dimeric site

    PubMed Central

    Locker, Joseph; Ghosh, David; Luc, Phuong-Van; Zheng, Jianhua

    2002-01-01

    In animals, transcription factor binding sites are hard to recognize because of their extensive variation. We therefore characterized the general relationship between a specific protein-binding site and its DNA sequence and used this relationship to generate a predictive algorithm for searching other DNA sequences. The experimental process was defined by studying hepatocyte nuclear factor 1 (HNF1), which binds DNA as a dimer on two inverted-repeat 7-bp half sites separated by one base. The binding model was based on the equivalence of the two half sites, which was confirmed in examples where specific modified sites were compared. Binding competition analysis was used to determine the effects of substitution of all four bases at each position in the half site. From these data, a weighted half-site matrix was generated and the full site was evaluated as the sum of two half-site scores. This process accurately predicted even weak binding sites that were significantly different from the consensus sequence. The predictions also showed a direct correlation with measured protein binding. PMID:12202766

  11. Renal vasoconstriction by vasopressin V1a receptors is modulated by nitric oxide, prostanoids, and superoxide but not the ADP ribosyl cyclase CD38

    PubMed Central

    Kopple, Tayler E.; Arendshorst, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Renal blood flow (RBF) responses to arginine vasopressin (AVP) were tested in anesthetized wild-type (WT) and CD38−/− mice that lack the major calcium-mobilizing second messenger cyclic ADP ribose. AVP (3–25 ng) injected intravenously produced dose-dependent decreases in RBF, reaching a maximum of 25 ± 2% below basal RBF in WT and 27 ± 2% in CD38−/− mice with 25 ng of AVP. Renal vascular resistance (RVR) increased 75 ± 6% and 78 ± 6% in WT and CD38−/− mice. Inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) synthase with nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) increased the maximum RVR response to AVP to 308 ± 76% in WT and 388 ± 81% in CD38−/− (P < 0.001 for both). Cyclooxygenase inhibition with indomethacin increased the maximum RVR response to 125 ± 15% in WT and 120 ± 14% in CD38−/− mice (P < 0.001, <0.05). Superoxide suppression with tempol inhibited the maximum RVR response to AVP by 38% in both strains (P < 0.005) but was ineffective when administered after l-NAME. The rate of RBF recovery (relaxation) after AVP was slowed by l-NAME and indomethacin (P < 0.001, <0.005) but was unchanged by tempol. All vascular responses to AVP were abolished by an AVP V1a receptor antagonist. A V2 receptor agonist or antagonist had no effect on AVP-induced renal vasoconstriction. Taken together, the results indicate that renal vasoconstriction by AVP in the mouse is strongly buffered by vasodilatory actions of NO and prostanoids. The vasoconstriction depends on V1a receptor activation without involvement of CD38 or concomitant vasodilatation by V2 receptors. The role of superoxide is to enhance the contractile response to AVP, most likely by reducing the availability of NO rather than directly stimulating intracellular contraction signaling pathways. PMID:24623148

  12. Overexpression of human CD38/ADP-ribosyl cyclase enhances acetylcholine-induced Ca2+ signalling in rodent NG108-15 neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Higashida, Haruhiro; Bowden, Sarah E H; Yokoyama, Shigeru; Salmina, Alla; Hashii, Minako; Hoshi, Naoto; Zhang, Jia-Sheng; Knijnik, Rimma; Noda, Mami; Zhong, Zen-Guo; Jin, Duo; Higashida, Kazuhiro; Takeda, Hisashi; Akita, Tenpei; Kuba, Kenji; Yamagishi, Sayaka; Shimizu, Noriaki; Takasawa, Shin; Okamoto, Hiroshi; Robbins, Jon

    2007-03-01

    The role of cyclic ADP-ribose (cADPR) and its synthetic enzyme, CD38, as a downstream signal of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) was examined in neuroblastoma cells expressing M1 mAChRs (NGM1). NGM1 cells were further transformed with both wild-type and mutant (C119K/C201E) human CD38. The dual transformed cells exhibited higher cADPR formation than ADPR production and elevated intracellular free Ca(2+) concentrations ([Ca(2+)](i)) in response to ACh. These phenotypes were analyzed in detail in a representative CD38 clone. The intracellular cADPR concentration by ACh application was significantly increased by CD38 overexpression. Digital image analysis by a confocal microscopy revealed that topographical distribution of the sites of Ca(2+) release was unchanged between control and overexpressed cells. These results indicate that cADPR is an intracellular messenger of Ca(2+) signalling, suggesting that CD38 can contribute to mAChR-cADPR signalling.

  13. Regulation of NFAT by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activity in T cells.

    PubMed

    Valdor, Rut; Schreiber, Valérie; Saenz, Luis; Martínez, Teresa; Muñoz-Suano, Alba; Dominguez-Villar, Margarita; Ramírez, Pablo; Parrilla, Pascual; Aguado, Enrique; García-Cózar, Francisco; Yélamos, José

    2008-04-01

    The nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) family of transcription factors is pivotal for T lymphocyte functionality. All relevant NFAT activation events upon T cells stimulation such as nuclear translocation, DNA binding, and transcriptional activity have been shown to be dictated by its phosphorylation state. Here, we provide evidence for a novel post-translational modification that regulates NFAT. Indeed, NFATc1 and NFATc2 are poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated by poly-ADP-ribose polymerase-1 (PARP-1). Moreover, we have also found a physical interaction between PARP-1 and both NFATc1 and NFATc2. Interestingly, PARP is activated during T cell stimulation in the absence of DNA damage, leading to ADP-ribose polymers formation and transfer to nuclear acceptor proteins. Our data suggest that poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation modulates the activation of NFAT in T cells, as PARP inhibition causes an increase in NFAT-dependent transactivation and a delay in NFAT nuclear export. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation will expedited NFAT export from the nucleus directly or by priming/facilitating NFAT phosphorylation. Altogether, these data point to PARP-1 and poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation as a novel regulatory mechanism of NFAT at nuclear level, suggesting a potential use of PARP as a new therapeutic target in the modulation of NFAT.

  14. ECRbase: Database of Evolutionary Conserved Regions, Promoters, and Transcription Factor Binding Sites in Vertebrate Genomes

    DOE Data Explorer

    Loots, Gabriela G. [LLNL; Ovcharenko, I. [LLNL

    Evolutionary conservation of DNA sequences provides a tool for the identification of functional elements in genomes. This database of evolutionary conserved regions (ECRs) in vertebrate genomes features a database of syntenic blocks that recapitulate the evolution of rearrangements in vertebrates and a comprehensive collection of promoters in all vertebrate genomes generated using multiple sources of gene annotation. The database also contains a collection of annotated transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) in evolutionary conserved and promoter elements. ECRbase currently includes human, rhesus macaque, dog, opossum, rat, mouse, chicken, frog, zebrafish, and fugu genomes. (taken from paper in Journal: Bioinformatics, November 7, 2006, pp. 122-124

  15. PolyaPeak: detecting transcription factor binding sites from ChIP-seq using peak shape information.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hao; Ji, Hongkai

    2014-01-01

    ChIP-seq is a powerful technology for detecting genomic regions where a protein of interest interacts with DNA. ChIP-seq data for mapping transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) have a characteristic pattern: around each binding site, sequence reads aligned to the forward and reverse strands of the reference genome form two separate peaks shifted away from each other, and the true binding site is located in between these two peaks. While it has been shown previously that the accuracy and resolution of binding site detection can be improved by modeling the pattern, efficient methods are unavailable to fully utilize that information in TFBS detection procedure. We present PolyaPeak, a new method to improve TFBS detection by incorporating the peak shape information. PolyaPeak describes peak shapes using a flexible Pólya model. The shapes are automatically learnt from the data using Minorization-Maximization (MM) algorithm, then integrated with the read count information via a hierarchical model to distinguish true binding sites from background noises. Extensive real data analyses show that PolyaPeak is capable of robustly improving TFBS detection compared with existing methods. An R package is freely available.

  16. JASPAR 2016: a major expansion and update of the open-access database of transcription factor binding profiles

    PubMed Central

    Mathelier, Anthony; Fornes, Oriol; Arenillas, David J.; Chen, Chih-yu; Denay, Grégoire; Lee, Jessica; Shi, Wenqiang; Shyr, Casper; Tan, Ge; Worsley-Hunt, Rebecca; Zhang, Allen W.; Parcy, François; Lenhard, Boris; Sandelin, Albin; Wasserman, Wyeth W.

    2016-01-01

    JASPAR (http://jaspar.genereg.net) is an open-access database storing curated, non-redundant transcription factor (TF) binding profiles representing transcription factor binding preferences as position frequency matrices for multiple species in six taxonomic groups. For this 2016 release, we expanded the JASPAR CORE collection with 494 new TF binding profiles (315 in vertebrates, 11 in nematodes, 3 in insects, 1 in fungi and 164 in plants) and updated 59 profiles (58 in vertebrates and 1 in fungi). The introduced profiles represent an 83% expansion and 10% update when compared to the previous release. We updated the structural annotation of the TF DNA binding domains (DBDs) following a published hierarchical structural classification. In addition, we introduced 130 transcription factor flexible models trained on ChIP-seq data for vertebrates, which capture dinucleotide dependencies within TF binding sites. This new JASPAR release is accompanied by a new web tool to infer JASPAR TF binding profiles recognized by a given TF protein sequence. Moreover, we provide the users with a Ruby module complementing the JASPAR API to ease programmatic access and use of the JASPAR collection of profiles. Finally, we provide the JASPAR2016 R/Bioconductor data package with the data of this release. PMID:26531826

  17. The Motif Tool Assessment Platform (MTAP) for sequence-based transcription factor binding site prediction tools.

    PubMed

    Quest, Daniel; Ali, Hesham

    2010-01-01

    Predicting transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) from sequence is one of the most challenging problems in computational biology. The development of (semi-)automated computer-assisted prediction methods is needed to find TFBS over an entire genome, which is a first step in reconstructing mechanisms that control gene activity. Bioinformatics journals continue to publish diverse methods for predicting TFBS on a monthly basis. To help practitioners in deciding which method to use to predict for a particular TFBS, we provide a platform to assess the quality and applicability of the available methods. Assessment tools allow researchers to determine how methods can be expected to perform on specific organisms or on specific transcription factor families. This chapter introduces the TFBS detection problem and reviews current strategies for evaluating algorithm effectiveness. In this chapter, a novel and robust assessment tool, the Motif Tool Assessment Platform (MTAP), is introduced and discussed.

  18. BaalChIP: Bayesian analysis of allele-specific transcription factor binding in cancer genomes.

    PubMed

    de Santiago, Ines; Liu, Wei; Yuan, Ke; O'Reilly, Martin; Chilamakuri, Chandra Sekhar Reddy; Ponder, Bruce A J; Meyer, Kerstin B; Markowetz, Florian

    2017-02-24

    Allele-specific measurements of transcription factor binding from ChIP-seq data are key to dissecting the allelic effects of non-coding variants and their contribution to phenotypic diversity. However, most methods of detecting an allelic imbalance assume diploid genomes. This assumption severely limits their applicability to cancer samples with frequent DNA copy-number changes. Here we present a Bayesian statistical approach called BaalChIP to correct for the effect of background allele frequency on the observed ChIP-seq read counts. BaalChIP allows the joint analysis of multiple ChIP-seq samples across a single variant and outperforms competing approaches in simulations. Using 548 ENCODE ChIP-seq and six targeted FAIRE-seq samples, we show that BaalChIP effectively corrects allele-specific analysis for copy-number variation and increases the power to detect putative cis-acting regulatory variants in cancer genomes.

  19. The MAPPER2 Database: a multi-genome catalog of putative transcription factor binding sites

    PubMed Central

    Riva, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    The mapper2 Database (http://genome.ufl.edu/mapperdb) is a component of mapper2, a web-based system for the analysis of transcription factor binding sites in multiple genomes. The database contains predicted binding sites identified in the promoters of all human, mouse and Drosophila genes using 1017 probabilistic models representing over 600 different transcription factors. In this article we outline the current contents of the database and we describe its web-based user interface in detail. We then discuss ongoing work to extend the database contents to experimental data and to add analysis capabilities. Finally, we provide information about recent improvements to the hardware and software platform that mapper2 is based on. PMID:22121218

  20. ECRbase: Database of Evolutionary Conserved Regions, Promoters, and Transcription Factor Binding Sites in Vertebrate Genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Loots, G; Ovcharenko, I

    2006-08-08

    Evolutionary conservation of DNA sequences provides a tool for the identification of functional elements in genomes. We have created a database of evolutionary conserved regions (ECRs) in vertebrate genomes entitled ECRbase that is constructed from a collection of pairwise vertebrate genome alignments produced by the ECR Browser database. ECRbase features a database of syntenic blocks that recapitulate the evolution of rearrangements in vertebrates and a collection of promoters in all vertebrate genomes presented in the database. The database also contains a collection of annotated transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) in all ECRs and promoter elements. ECRbase currently includes human, rhesus macaque, dog, opossum, rat, mouse, chicken, frog, zebrafish, and two pufferfish genomes. It is freely accessible at http://ECRbase.dcode.org.

  1. Direct visualization of the elt-2 gut-specific GATA factor binding to a target promoter inside the living Caenorhabditis elegans embryo.

    PubMed

    Fukushige, T; Hendzel, M J; Bazett-Jones, D P; McGhee, J D

    1999-10-12

    In analyzing the transcriptional networks that regulate development, one ideally would like to determine whether a particular transcription factor binds directly to a candidate target promoter inside the living embryo. Properties of the Caenorhabditis elegans elt-2 gene, which encodes a gut-specific GATA factor, have allowed us to develop such a method. We previously have shown, by means of ectopic expression studies, that elt-2 regulates its own promoter. To test whether this autoregulation is direct, we fused green fluorescent protein (GFP) close to the C terminus of elt-2 in a construct that contains the full elt-2 promoter and the full elt-2 zinc finger DNA binding domain; the construct is expressed correctly (i.e., only in the gut lineage) and is able to rescue the lethality of an elt-2 null mutant. Multicopy transgenic arrays of this rescuing elt-2::GFP construct were integrated into the genome and transgenic embryos were examined when the developing gut has 4-8 cells; the majority of these embryonic gut nuclei show two discrete intense foci of fluorescence. We interpret these fluorescent foci as the result of ELT-2::GFP binding directly to its own promoter within nuclei of the developing gut lineage. Numerous control experiments, both genetic and biochemical, all support this conclusion and support the specificity of the binding. The approach should be applicable to studying other transcription factors binding target promoters, all within the living C. elegans embryo.

  2. Arabidopsis Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 binding sites contain putative GAGA factor binding motifs within coding regions of genes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) is an essential regulator of gene expression that maintains genes in a repressed state by marking chromatin with trimethylated Histone H3 lysine 27 (H3K27me3). In Arabidopsis, loss of PRC2 function leads to pleiotropic effects on growth and development thought to be due to ectopic expression of seed and embryo-specific genes. While there is some understanding of the mechanisms by which specific genes are targeted by PRC2 in animal systems, it is still not clear how PRC2 is recruited to specific regions of plant genomes. Results We used ChIP-seq to determine the genome-wide distribution of hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged FERTLIZATION INDEPENDENT ENDOSPERM (FIE-HA), the Extra Sex Combs homolog protein present in all Arabidopsis PRC2 complexes. We found that the FIE-HA binding sites co-locate with a subset of the H3K27me3 sites in the genome and that the associated genes were more likely to be de-repressed in mutants of PRC2 components. The FIE-HA binding sites are enriched for three sequence motifs including a putative GAGA factor binding site that is also found in Drosophila Polycomb Response Elements (PREs). Conclusions Our results suggest that PRC2 binding sites in plant genomes share some sequence features with Drosophila PREs. However, unlike Drosophila PREs which are located in promoters and devoid of H3K27me3, Arabidopsis FIE binding sites tend to be in gene coding regions and co-localize with H3K27me3. PMID:24001316

  3. Next-generation SELEX identifies sequence and structural determinants of splicing factor binding in human pre-mRNA sequence

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Daniel C.; Chang, Brian L.; Gunderson, Samuel I.; Alpert, Lauren; Thompson, William A.; Fairbrother, William G.

    2009-01-01

    Many splicing factors interact with both mRNA and pre-mRNA. The identification of these interactions has been greatly improved by the development of in vivo cross-linking immunoprecipitation. However, the output carries a strong sampling bias in favor of RNPs that form on more abundant RNA species like mRNA. We have developed a novel in vitro approach for surveying binding on pre-mRNA, without cross-linking or sampling bias. Briefly, this approach entails specifically designed oligonucleotide pools that tile through a pre-mRNA sequence. The pool is then partitioned into bound and unbound fractions, which are quantified by a two-color microarray. We applied this approach to locating splicing factor binding sites in and around ∼4000 exons. We also quantified the effect of secondary structure on binding. The method is validated by the finding that U1snRNP binds at the 5′ splice site (5′ss) with a specificity that is nearly identical to the splice donor motif. In agreement with prior reports, we also show that U1snRNP appears to have some affinity for intronic G triplets that are proximal to the 5′ss. Both U1snRNP and the polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTB) avoid exonic binding, and the PTB binding map shows increased enrichment at the polypyrimidine tract. For PTB, we confirm polypyrimidine specificity and are also able to identify structural determinants of PTB binding. We detect multiple binding motifs enriched in the PTB bound fraction of oligonucleotides. These motif combinations augment binding in vitro and are also enriched in the vicinity of exons that have been determined to be in vivo targets of PTB. PMID:19861426

  4. Regulation of α2B-Adrenergic Receptor Cell Surface Transport by GGA1 and GGA2

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Maoxiang; Huang, Wei; Gao, Jie; Terry, Alvin V.; Wu, Guangyu

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms that control the targeting of newly synthesized G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) to the functional destinations remain poorly elucidated. Here, we have determined the role of Golgi-localized, γ-adaptin ear domain homology, ADP ribosylation factor-binding proteins 1 and 2 (GGA1 and GGA2) in the cell surface transport of α2B-adrenergic receptor (α2B-AR), a prototypic GPCR, and studied the underlying mechanisms. We demonstrated that knockdown of GGA1 and GGA2 by shRNA and siRNA significantly reduced the cell surface expression of inducibly expressed α2B-AR and arrested the receptor in the perinuclear region. Knockdown of each GGA markedly inhibited the dendritic expression of α2B-AR in primary cortical neurons. Consistently, depleting GGA1 and GGA2 attenuated receptor-mediated signal transduction measured as ERK1/2 activation and cAMP inhibition. Although full length α2B-AR associated with GGA2 but not GGA1, its third intracellular loop was found to directly interact with both GGA1 and GGA2. More interestingly, further mapping of interaction domains showed that the GGA1 hinge region and the GGA2 GAE domain bound to multiple subdomains of the loop. These studies have identified an important function and revealed novel mechanisms of the GGA family proteins in the forward trafficking of a cell surface GPCR. PMID:27901063

  5. H3K4me2 reliably defines transcription factor binding regions in different cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Li, Xiaoman; Hu, Haiyan

    2014-01-01

    Histone modification (HM) patterns are widely applied to identify transcription factor binding regions (TFBRs). However, how frequently the TFBRs overlap with genomic regions enriched with certain types of HMs and which HM marker is more effective to pinpoint the TFBRs have not been systematically investigated. To address these problems, we studied 149 transcription factor (TF) ChIP-seq datasets and 33 HM ChIP-seq datasets in three cell lines. We found that on average about 90% of the TFBRs overlap with the H3K4me2-enriched regions. Moreover, the H3K4me2-enriched regions with stronger signals of H3K4me2 enrichment more likely overlap with the TFBRs than those with weaker signals. In addition, we showed that the H3K4me2-enriched regions together with the H3K27ac-enriched regions can greatly reduce false positive predictions of the TFBRs. Our study sheds light on the comprehensive discovery of the TFBRs using the HeK4me-enriched regions, especially when no good antibody to a TF exists.

  6. Fibronectin Growth Factor-Binding Domains Are Required for Fibroblast Survival

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Fubao; Ren, Xiang-Dong; Pan, Zhi; Macri, Lauren; Zong, Wei-Xing; Tonnesen, Marcia G.; Rafailovich, Miriam; Bar-Sagi, Dafna; Clark, Richard A.F.

    2011-01-01

    Fibronectin (FN) is required for embryogenesis, morphogenesis, and wound repair, and its Arg–Gly–Asp-containing central cell-binding domain (CCBD) is essential for mesenchymal cell survival and growth. Here, we demonstrate that FN contains three growth factor-binding domains (FN-GFBDs) that bind platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB), a potent fibroblast survival and mitogenic factor. These sites bind PDGF-BB with dissociation constants of 10–100 nm. FN-null cells cultured on recombinant CCBD (FNIII8–11) without a FN-GFBD demonstrated minimal metabolism and underwent autophagy at 24 hours, followed by apoptosis at 72 hours, even in the presence of PDGF-BB. In contrast, FN-null cells plated on FNIII8–11 contiguous with FN-GFBD survived without, and proliferated with, PDGF-BB. FN-null cell survival on FNIII8–11 and noncontiguous arrays of FN-GFBDs required these domains to be adsorbed on the same surface, suggesting the existence of a mesenchymal cell-extracellular matrix synapse. Thus, fibroblast survival required GF stimulation in the presence of a FN-GFBD, as well as adhesion to FN through the CCBD. The findings that fibroblast survival is dependent on FN-GFBD underscore the critical importance of pericellular matrix for cell survival and have significant implications for cutaneous wound healing and regeneration. PMID:20811396

  7. rVISTA 2.0: evolutionary analysis of transcription factor binding sites.

    PubMed

    Loots, Gabriela G; Ovcharenko, Ivan

    2004-07-01

    Identifying and characterizing the transcription factor binding site (TFBS) patterns of cis-regulatory elements represents a challenge, but holds promise to reveal the regulatory language the genome uses to dictate transcriptional dynamics. Several studies have demonstrated that regulatory modules are under positive selection and, therefore, are often conserved between related species. Using this evolutionary principle, we have created a comparative tool, rVISTA, for analyzing the regulatory potential of noncoding sequences. Our ability to experimentally identify functional noncoding sequences is extremely limited, therefore, rVISTA attempts to fill this great gap in genomic analysis by offering a powerful approach for eliminating TFBSs least likely to be biologically relevant. The rVISTA tool combines TFBS predictions, sequence comparisons and cluster analysis to identify noncoding DNA regions that are evolutionarily conserved and present in a specific configuration within genomic sequences. Here, we present the newly developed version 2.0 of the rVISTA tool, which can process alignments generated by both the zPicture and blastz alignment programs or use pre-computed pairwise alignments of several vertebrate genomes available from the ECR Browser and GALA database. The rVISTA web server is closely interconnected with the TRANSFAC database, allowing users to either search for matrices present in the TRANSFAC library collection or search for user-defined consensus sequences. The rVISTA tool is publicly available at http://rvista.dcode.org/.

  8. Analysis of transcription-factor binding-site evolution by using the Hamilton-Jacobi equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancliff, Mark; Park, Jeong-Man

    2016-12-01

    We investigate a quasi-species mutation-selection model of transcription-factor binding-site evolution. By considering the mesa and the crater fitness landscapes designed to describe these binding sites and point mutations, we derive an evolution equation for the population distribution of binding sequences. In the long-length limit, the evolution equation is replaced by a Hamilton-Jacobi equation which we solve for the stationary state solution. From the stationary solution, we derive the population distributions and find that an error threshold, separating populations in which the binding site does or does not evolve, only exists for certain values of the fitness parameters. A phase diagram in this parameter space is derived and shows a critical line below which no error threshold exists. We also investigate the evolution of multiple binding sites for the same transcription factor. For two binding sites, we perform an analysis similar to that for a single site and determine a phase diagram showing different phases with both, one, or no binding sites selected. In the phase diagram, the phase boundary between the one-or-two selected site phases is qualitatively different for the mesa and the crater fitness landscapes. As fitness benefits for a second bound transcription factor tend to zero, the minimum mutation rate at which the two-site phase occurs diverges in the mesa landscape whereas the mutation rate at the phase boundary tends to a finite value for the crater landscape.

  9. GTRD: a database of transcription factor binding sites identified by ChIP-seq experiments

    PubMed Central

    Yevshin, Ivan; Sharipov, Ruslan; Valeev, Tagir; Kel, Alexander; Kolpakov, Fedor

    2017-01-01

    GTRD—Gene Transcription Regulation Database (http://gtrd.biouml.org)—is a database of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) identified by ChIP-seq experiments for human and mouse. Raw ChIP-seq data were obtained from ENCODE and SRA and uniformly processed: (i) reads were aligned using Bowtie2; (ii) ChIP-seq peaks were called using peak callers MACS, SISSRs, GEM and PICS; (iii) peaks for the same factor and peak callers, but different experiment conditions (cell line, treatment, etc.), were merged into clusters; (iv) such clusters for different peak callers were merged into metaclusters that were considered as non-redundant sets of TFBSs. In addition to information on location in genome, the sets contain structured information about cell lines and experimental conditions extracted from descriptions of corresponding ChIP-seq experiments. A web interface to access GTRD was developed using the BioUML platform. It provides: (i) browsing and displaying information; (ii) advanced search possibilities, e.g. search of TFBSs near the specified gene or search of all genes potentially regulated by a specified transcription factor; (iii) integrated genome browser that provides visualization of the GTRD data: read alignments, peaks, clusters, metaclusters and information about gene structures from the Ensembl database and binding sites predicted using position weight matrices from the HOCOMOCO database. PMID:27924024

  10. rVISTA 2.0: Evolutionary Analysis of Transcription Factor Binding Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Loots, G G; Ovcharenko, I

    2004-01-28

    Identifying and characterizing the patterns of DNA cis-regulatory modules represents a challenge that has the potential to reveal the regulatory language the genome uses to dictate transcriptional dynamics. Several studies have demonstrated that regulatory modules are under positive selection and therefore are often conserved between related species. Using this evolutionary principle we have created a comparative tool, rVISTA, for analyzing the regulatory potential of noncoding sequences. The rVISTA tool combines transcription factor binding site (TFBS) predictions, sequence comparisons and cluster analysis to identify noncoding DNA regions that are highly conserved and present in a specific configuration within an alignment. Here we present the newly developed version 2.0 of the rVISTA tool that can process alignments generated by both zPicture and PipMaker alignment programs or use pre-computed pairwise alignments of seven vertebrate genomes available from the ECR Browser. The rVISTA web server is closely interconnected with the TRANSFAC database, allowing users to either search for matrices present in the TRANSFAC library collection or search for user-defined consensus sequences. rVISTA tool is publicly available at http://rvista.dcode.org/.

  11. MORPHEUS, a Webtool for Transcription Factor Binding Analysis Using Position Weight Matrices with Dependency.

    PubMed

    Minguet, Eugenio Gómez; Segard, Stéphane; Charavay, Céline; Parcy, François

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional networks are central to any biological process and changes affecting transcription factors or their binding sites in the genome are a key factor driving evolution. As more organisms are being sequenced, tools are needed to easily predict transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) presence and affinity from mere inspection of genomic sequences. Although many TFBS discovery algorithms exist, tools for using the DNA binding models they generate are relatively scarce and their use is limited among the biologist community by the lack of flexible and user-friendly tools. We have developed a suite of web tools (called Morpheus) based on the proven Position Weight Matrices (PWM) formalism that can be used without any programing skills and incorporates some unique features such as the presence of dependencies between nucleotides positions or the possibility to compute the predicted occupancy of a large regulatory region using a biophysical model. To illustrate the possibilities and simplicity of Morpheus tools in functional and evolutionary analysis, we have analysed the regulatory link between LEAFY, a key plant transcription factor involved in flower development, and its direct target gene APETALA1 during the divergence of Brassicales clade.

  12. Interaction of HCMV UL84 with C/EBPalpha transcription factor binding sites within oriLyt is essential for lytic DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Kagele, Dominique; Gao, Yang; Smallenburg, Kate; Pari, Gregory S

    2009-09-15

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) lytic DNA replication is initiated at the cis-acting oriLyt region and requires six core replication proteins along with UL84 and IE2. Although UL84 is thought to be the replication initiator protein, little is known about its interaction with oriLyt. We have now performed chromatin immunoprecipitation assays (ChIP) using antibodies specific to UL84, IE2, UL44, CCAAT/enhancer binding protein (C/EBPalpha) and PCR primers that span the entire oriLyt region to reveal an evaluation of specific protein binding across oriLyt. UL84 interacted with several regions of oriLyt that contain C/EBPalpha transcription factor binding sites. Mutation of either of one of C/EBPalpha (92,526 or 92,535) sites inactivated oriLyt and resulted in the loss of binding of UL84. These data reveal the regions of interaction within oriLyt for several key replication proteins and show that the interaction between UL84 and C/EBPalpha sites within oriLyt is essential for lytic DNA replication.

  13. Role of protein-phospholipid interactions in the activation of ARF1 by the guanine nucleotide exchange factor Arno.

    PubMed

    Paris, S; Béraud-Dufour, S; Robineau, S; Bigay, J; Antonny, B; Chabre, M; Chardin, P

    1997-08-29

    Arno is a 47-kDa human protein recently identified as a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for ADP ribosylation factor 1 (ARF1) with a central Sec7 domain responsible for the exchange activity and a carboxyl-terminal pleckstrin homology (PH) domain (Chardin, P., Paris, S., Antonny, B., Robineau, S., Béraud-Dufour, S., Jackson, C. L., and Chabre, M. (1996) Nature 384, 481-484). Binding of the PH domain to phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) greatly enhances Arno-mediated activation of myristoylated ARF1. We show here that in the absence of phospholipids, Arno promotes nucleotide exchange on [Delta17]ARF1, a soluble mutant of ARF1 lacking the first 17 amino acids. This reaction is unaffected by PIP2, which suggests that the PIP2-PH domain interaction does not directly regulate the catalytic activity of Arno but rather serves to recruit Arno to membranes. Arno catalyzes the release of GDP more efficiently than that of GTP from [Delta17]ARF1, and a stable complex between Arno Sec7 domain and nucleotide-free [Delta17]ARF1 can be isolated. In contrast to [Delta17]ARF1, full-length unmyristoylated ARF1 is not readily activated by Arno in solution. Its activation requires the presence of phospholipids and a reduction of ionic strength and Mg2+ concentration. PIP2 is strongly stimulatory, indicating that binding of Arno to phospholipids is involved, but in addition, electrostatic interactions between phospholipids and the amino-terminal portion of unmyristoylated ARF1GDP seem to be important. We conclude that efficient activation of full-length ARF1 by Arno requires a membrane surface and two distinct protein-phospholipid interactions: one between the PH domain of Arno and PIP2, and the other between amino-terminal cationic residues of ARF1 and anionic phospholipids. The latter interaction is normally induced by insertion of the amino-terminal myristate into the bilayer but can also be artificially facilitated by decreasing Mg2+ and salt concentrations.

  14. Exploiting ancestral mammalian genomes for the prediction of human transcription factor binding sites

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The computational prediction of Transcription Factor Binding Sites (TFBS) remains a challenge due to their short length and low information content. Comparative genomics approaches that simultaneously consider several related species and favor sites that have been conserved throughout evolution improve the accuracy (specificity) of the predictions but are limited due to a phenomenon called binding site turnover, where sequence evolution causes one TFBS to replace another in the same region. In parallel to this development, an increasing number of mammalian genomes are now sequenced and it is becoming possible to infer, to a surprisingly high degree of accuracy, ancestral mammalian sequences. Results We propose a TFBS prediction approach that makes use of the availability of inferred ancestral mammalian genomes to improve its accuracy. This method aims to identify binding loci, which are regions of a few hundred base pairs that have preserved their potential to bind a given transcription factor over evolutionary time. After proposing a neutral evolutionary model of predicted TFBS counts in a DNA region of a given length, we use it to identify regions that have preserved the number of predicted TFBS they contain to an unexpected degree given their divergence. The approach is applied to human chromosome 1 and shows significant gains in accuracy as compared to both existing single-species and multi-species TFBS prediction approaches, in particular for transcription factors that are subject to high turnover rates. Availability The source code and predictions made by the program are available at http://www.cs.mcgill.ca/~blanchem/bindingLoci. PMID:23281809

  15. A General Pairwise Interaction Model Provides an Accurate Description of In Vivo Transcription Factor Binding Sites

    PubMed Central

    Santolini, Marc; Mora, Thierry; Hakim, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    The identification of transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) on genomic DNA is of crucial importance for understanding and predicting regulatory elements in gene networks. TFBS motifs are commonly described by Position Weight Matrices (PWMs), in which each DNA base pair contributes independently to the transcription factor (TF) binding. However, this description ignores correlations between nucleotides at different positions, and is generally inaccurate: analysing fly and mouse in vivo ChIPseq data, we show that in most cases the PWM model fails to reproduce the observed statistics of TFBSs. To overcome this issue, we introduce the pairwise interaction model (PIM), a generalization of the PWM model. The model is based on the principle of maximum entropy and explicitly describes pairwise correlations between nucleotides at different positions, while being otherwise as unconstrained as possible. It is mathematically equivalent to considering a TF-DNA binding energy that depends additively on each nucleotide identity at all positions in the TFBS, like the PWM model, but also additively on pairs of nucleotides. We find that the PIM significantly improves over the PWM model, and even provides an optimal description of TFBS statistics within statistical noise. The PIM generalizes previous approaches to interdependent positions: it accounts for co-variation of two or more base pairs, and predicts secondary motifs, while outperforming multiple-motif models consisting of mixtures of PWMs. We analyse the structure of pairwise interactions between nucleotides, and find that they are sparse and dominantly located between consecutive base pairs in the flanking region of TFBS. Nonetheless, interactions between pairs of non-consecutive nucleotides are found to play a significant role in the obtained accurate description of TFBS statistics. The PIM is computationally tractable, and provides a general framework that should be useful for describing and predicting TFBSs beyond

  16. Expression profile and transcription factor binding site exploration of imprinted genes in human and mouse

    PubMed Central

    Steinhoff, Christine; Paulsen, Martina; Kielbasa, Szymon; Walter, Jörn; Vingron, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Background In mammals, imprinted genes are regulated by an epigenetic mechanism that results in parental origin-specific expression. Though allele-specific regulation of imprinted genes has been studied for several individual genes in detail, little is known about their overall tissue-specific expression patterns and interspecies conservation of expression. Results We performed a computational analysis of microarray expression data of imprinted genes in human and mouse placentae and in a variety of adult tissues. For mouse, early embryonic stages were also included. The analysis reveals that imprinted genes are expressed in a broad spectrum of tissues for both species. Overall, the relative tissue-specific expression levels of orthologous imprinted genes in human and mouse are not highly correlated. However, in both species distinctive expression profiles are found in tissues of the endocrine pathways such as adrenal gland, pituitary, pancreas as well as placenta. In mouse, the placental and embryonic expression patterns of imprinted genes are highly similar. Transcription factor binding site (TFBS) prediction reveals correlation of tissue-specific expression patterns and the presence of distinct TFBS signatures in the upstream region of human imprinted genes. Conclusion Imprinted genes are broadly expressed pre- and postnatally and do not exhibit a distinct overall expression pattern when compared to non-imprinted genes. The relative expression of most orthologous gene pairs varies significantly between human and mouse suggesting rapid species-specific changes in gene regulation. Distinct expression profiles of imprinted genes are confined to certain human and mouse hormone producing tissues, and placentae. In contrast to the overall variability, distinct expression profiles and enriched TFBS signatures are found in human and mouse endocrine tissues and placentae. This points towards an important role played by imprinted gene regulation in these tissues. PMID

  17. Distinct roles of P(II)-like signal transmitter proteins and amtB in regulation of nif gene expression, nitrogenase activity, and posttranslational modification of NifH in Azoarcus sp. strain BH72.

    PubMed

    Martin, Dietmar E; Reinhold-Hurek, Barbara

    2002-04-01

    P(II)-like signal transmitter proteins, found in Bacteria, Archaea, and plants, are known to mediate control of carbon and nitrogen assimilation. They indirectly regulate the activity of key metabolic enzymes and transcription factors by protein-protein interactions with signal transduction proteins. Many Proteobacteria harbor two paralogous P(II)-like proteins, GlnB and GlnK, whereas a novel third P(II) paralogue (GlnY) was recently identified in Azoarcus sp. strain BH72, a diazotrophic endophyte of grasses. In the present study, evidence was obtained that the P(II)-like proteins have distinct roles in mediating nitrogen and oxygen control of nif gene transcription and nitrogenase activity. Full repression of nif gene transcription in the presence of a combined nitrogen source or high oxygen concentrations was observed in wild-type and glnB and glnK knockout mutants, revealing that GlnB and GlnK can complement each other in mediating the repression. In contrast, in a glnBK double mutant strain in the presence of only GlnY, nif gene transcription was still detectable, albeit at a lower level, on nitrate or 20% oxygen. As another level of control, nitrogenase activity was regulated by at least three types of mechanisms in strain BH72: covalent modification of dinitrogenase reductase (NifH), probably by ADP-ribosylation, and two other, unknown means. Functional inactivation upon ammonium addition (switch-off) required the putative high-affinity ammonium transporter AmtB and GlnK, but not GlnB or GlnY. Functional inactivation in response to anaerobiosis did not depend on AmtB, GlnK, or GlnB. In contrast, covalent modification of NifH required both GlnB and GlnK and AmtB as response to ammonium addition, whereas it required either GlnB or GlnK and not AmtB when cells were shifted to anaerobiosis. In a glnBK double mutant expressing only GlnY, NifH modification was completely abolished, further revealing functional differences between the three P(II) paralogues.

  18. GGA3 mediates TrkA endocytic recycling to promote sustained Akt phosphorylation and cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuezhi; Lavigne, Pierre; Lavoie, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Although TrkA postendocytic sorting significantly influences neuronal cell survival and differentiation, the molecular mechanism underlying TrkA receptor sorting in the recycling or degradation pathways remains poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that Golgi-localized, γ adaptin-ear–containing ADP ribosylation factor-binding protein 3 (GGA3) interacts directly with the TrkA cytoplasmic tail through an internal DXXLL motif and mediates the functional recycling of TrkA to the plasma membrane. We find that GGA3 depletion by siRNA delays TrkA recycling, accelerates TrkA degradation, attenuates sustained NGF-induced Akt activation, and reduces cell survival. We also show that GGA3’s effect on TrkA recycling is dependent on the activation of Arf6. This work identifies GGA3 as a key player in a novel DXXLL-mediated endosomal sorting machinery that targets TrkA to the plasma membrane, where it prolongs the activation of Akt signaling and survival responses. PMID:26446845

  19. Regulation of follitropin-sensitive adenylate cyclase by stimulatory and inhibitory forms of the guanine nucleotide regulatory protein in immature rat Sertoli cells

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, G.P.

    1987-01-01

    Studies have been designed to examine the role of guanine nucleotides in mediating FSH-sensitive adenylate cyclase activity in Sertoli cell plasma membranes. Analysis of ({sup 3}H)GDP binding to plasma membranes suggested a single high affinity site with a K{sub d} = 0.24 uM. Competition studies indicated that GTP{sub {gamma}}S was 7-fold more potent than GDP{sub {beta}}S. Bound GDP could be released by FSH in the presence of GTP{sub {gamma}}S, but not by FSH alone. Adenylate cyclase activity was enhanced 5-fold by FSH in the presence of GTP. Addition of GDP{sub {beta}}S to the activated enzyme (FSH plus GTP) resulted in a time-dependent decay to basal activity within 20 sec. GDP{sub {beta}}S competitively inhibited GTP{sub {gamma}}S-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity with a K{sub i} = 0.18 uM. Adenylate cyclase activity was also demonstrated to be sensitive to the nucleotide bound state. In the presence of FSH, only the GTP{sub {gamma}}S-bound form persisted even if GDP{sub {beta}}S previously occupied all available binding sites. Two membrane proteins, M{sub r} = 43,000 and 48,000, were ADP{centered dot}ribosylated using cholera toxin and labeling was enhanced 2 to 4-fold by GTP{sub {gamma}}S but not by GDP{sub {beta}}S. The M{sub r} = 43,000 and 48,000 proteins represented variant forms of G{sub S}. A single protein of M{sub r} = 40,000 (G{sub i}) was ADP-ribosylated by pertussis toxin in vitro. GTP inhibited forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity with an IC{sub 50} = 0.1 uM. The adenosine analog, N{sup 6}{centered dot}phenylisopropyl adenosine enhanced GTP inhibition of forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity by an additional 15%. GTP-dependent inhibition of forskolin-sensitive adenylate cyclase activity was abolished in membranes prepared from Sertoli cells treated in culture with pertussis toxin.

  20. MONKEY: Identifying conserved transcription-factor binding sitesin multiple alignments using a binding site-specific evolutionarymodel

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, Alan M.; Chiang, Derek Y.; Pollard, Daniel A.; Iyer, VenkyN.; Eisen, Michael B.

    2004-10-28

    We introduce a method (MONKEY) to identify conserved transcription-factor binding sites in multispecies alignments. MONKEY employs probabilistic models of factor specificity and binding site evolution, on which basis we compute the likelihood that putative sites are conserved and assign statistical significance to each hit. Using genomes from the genus Saccharomyces, we illustrate how the significance of real sites increases with evolutionary distance and explore the relationship between conservation and function.

  1. Clostridium and Bacillus Binary Enterotoxins: Bad for the Bowels, and Eukaryotic Being

    PubMed Central

    Stiles, Bradley G.; Pradhan, Kisha; Fleming, Jodie M.; Samy, Ramar Perumal; Barth, Holger; Popoff, Michel R.

    2014-01-01

    Some pathogenic spore-forming bacilli employ a binary protein mechanism for intoxicating the intestinal tracts of insects, animals, and humans. These Gram-positive bacteria and their toxins include Clostridium botulinum (C2 toxin), Clostridium difficile (C. difficile toxin or CDT), Clostridium perfringens (ι-toxin and binary enterotoxin, or BEC), Clostridium spiroforme (C. spiroforme toxin or CST), as well as Bacillus cereus (vegetative insecticidal protein or VIP). These gut-acting proteins form an AB complex composed of ADP-ribosyl transferase (A) and cell-binding (B) components that intoxicate cells via receptor-mediated endocytosis and endosomal trafficking. Once inside the cytosol, the A components inhibit normal cell functions by mono-ADP-ribosylation of globular actin, which induces cytoskeletal disarray and death. Important aspects of each bacterium and binary enterotoxin will be highlighted in this review, with particular focus upon the disease process involving the biochemistry and modes of action for each toxin. PMID:25198129

  2. Identification of two nuclear factor-binding domains on the chicken cardiac actin promoter: implications for regulation of the gene.

    PubMed Central

    Quitschke, W W; DePonti-Zilli, L; Lin, Z Y; Paterson, B M

    1989-01-01

    The cis-acting regions that appear to be involved in negative regulation of the chicken alpha-cardiac actin promoter both in vivo and in vitro have been identified. A nuclear factor(s) binding to the proximal region mapped over the TATA element between nucleotides -50 and -25. In the distal region, binding spanned nucleotides -136 to -112, a region that included a second CArG box (CArG2) 5' to the more familiar CCAAT-box (CArG1) consensus sequence. Nuclear factors binding to these different domains were found in both muscle and nonmuscle preparations but were detectable at considerably lower levels in tissues expressing the alpha-cardiac actin gene. In contrast, concentrations of the beta-actin CCAAT-box binding activity were similar in all extracts tested. The role of these factor-binding domains on the activity of the cardiac actin promoter in vivo and in vitro and the prevalence of the binding factors in nonmuscle extracts are consistent with the idea that these binding domains and their associated factors are involved in the tissue-restricted expression of cardiac actin through both positive and negative regulatory mechanisms. In the absence of negative regulatory factors, these same binding domains act synergistically, via other factors, to activate the cardiac actin promoter during myogenesis. Images PMID:2552286

  3. Overexpression, purification, and partial characterization of ADP-ribosyltransferases modA and modB of bacteriophage T4.

    PubMed

    Tiemann, B; Depping, R; Rüger, W

    1999-01-01

    There is increasing experimental evidence that ADP-ribosylation of host proteins is an important means to regulate gene expression of bacteriophage T4. Surprisingly, this phage codes for three different ADP-ribosyltransferases, gene products Alt, ModA, and ModB, modifying partially overlapping sets of host proteins. While gene product Alt already has been isolated as a recombinant protein and its action on host RNA polymerases and transcription regulation have been studied, the nucleotide sequences of the two mod genes was published only recently. Their mode of action in the course of the infection cycle and the consequences of the ADP-ribosylations catalyzed by these enzymes remain to be investigated. Here we describe the cloning of the genes, the overexpression, purification, and partial characterization of ADP-ribosyltransferases ModA and ModB. Both proteins seem to act independently, and the ADP-ribosyl moieties are transferred to different sets of host proteins. While gene product ModA, similarly to the Alt protein, acts also on the alpha-subunit of host RNA polymerase, the ModB activity serves another set of proteins, one of which was identified as the S1 protein associated with the 30S subunit of the E. coli ribosomes.

  4. Role of ARF6 in internalization of metal-binding proteins, metallothionein and transferrin, and cadmium-metallothionein toxicity in kidney proximal tubule cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, Natascha A.; Lee, Wing-Kee; Abouhamed, Marouan

    2008-07-01

    Filtered metal-protein complexes, such as cadmium-metallothionein-1 (CdMT-1) or transferrin (Tf) are apically endocytosed partly via megalin/cubilin by kidney proximal tubule (PT) cells where CdMT-1 internalization causes apoptosis. Small GTPase ARF (ADP-ribosylation factor) proteins regulate endocytosis and vesicular trafficking. We investigated roles of ARF6, which has been shown to be involved in internalization of ligands and endocytic trafficking in PT cells, following MT-1/CdMT-1 and Tf uptake by PT cells. WKPT-0293 Cl.2 cells derived from rat PT S1 segment were transfected with hemagglutinin-tagged wild-type (ARF6-WT) or dominant negative (ARF6-T27N) forms of ARF6. Using immunofluorescence, endogenous ARF6 was associated with the plasma membrane (PM) as well as juxtanuclear and co-localized with Rab5a and Rab11 involved in early and recycling endosomal trafficking. Immunofluorescence staining of megalin showed reduced surface labelling in ARF6 dominant negative (ARF6-DN) cells. Intracellular Alexa Fluor 546-conjugated MT-1 uptake was reduced in ARF6-DN cells and CdMT-1 (14.8 {mu}M for 24 h) toxicity was significantly attenuated from 27.3 {+-} 3.9% in ARF6-WT to 11.1 {+-} 4.0% in ARF6-DN cells (n = 6, P < 0.02). Moreover, reduced Alexa Fluor 546-conjugated Tf uptake was observed in ARF-DN cells (75.0 {+-} 4.6% versus 3.9 {+-} 3.9% of ARF6-WT cells, n = 3, P < 0.01) and/or remained near the PM (89.3 {+-} 5. 6% versus 45.2 {+-} 14.3% of ARF6-WT cells, n = 3, P < 0.05). In conclusion, the data support roles for ARF6 in receptor-mediated endocytosis and trafficking of MT-1/Tf to endosomes/lysosomes and CdMT-1 toxicity of PT cells.

  5. Toward an atomistic model for predicting transcription-factor binding sites.

    PubMed

    Endres, Robert G; Schulthess, Thomas C; Wingreen, Ned S

    2004-11-01

    Identifying the specific DNA-binding sites of transcription-factor proteins is essential to understanding the regulation of gene expression in the cell. Bioinformatics approaches are fast compared to experiments, but require prior knowledge of multiple binding sites for each protein. Here, we present an atomistic force-field method to predict binding sites based only on the X-ray structure of a related bound complex. Specific flexible contacts between the protein and DNA are modeled by a library of amino acid side-chain rotamers. Using the example of the mouse transcription factor, Zif268, a well-studied zinc-finger protein, we show that the protein sequence alone, without the detailed experimental structure, gives a strong bias toward the consensus binding site.

  6. Structure of the sirtuin-linked macrodomain SAV0325 from Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Appel, C Denise; Feld, Geoffrey K; Wallace, Bret D; Williams, R Scott

    2016-09-01

    Cells use the post-translational modification ADP-ribosylation to control a host of biological activities. In some pathogenic bacteria, an operon-encoded mono-ADP-ribosylation cycle mediates response to host-induced oxidative stress. In this system, reversible mono ADP-ribosylation of a lipoylated target protein represses oxidative stress response. An NAD(+) -dependent sirtuin catalyzes the single ADP-ribose (ADPr) addition, while a linked macrodomain-containing protein removes the ADPr. Here we report the crystal structure of the sitruin-linked macrodomain protein from Staphylococcus aureus, SauMacro (also known as SAV0325) to 1.75-Å resolution. The monomeric SauMacro bears a previously unidentified Zn(2+) -binding site that putatively aids in substrate recognition and catalysis. An amino-terminal three-helix bundle motif unique to this class of macrodomain proteins provides a structural scaffold for the Zn(2+) site. Structural features of the enzyme further indicate a cleft proximal to the Zn(2+) binding site appears well suited for ADPr binding, while a deep hydrophobic channel in the protein core is suitable for binding the lipoate of the lipoylated protein target.

  7. CORE_TF: a user-friendly interface to identify evolutionary conserved transcription factor binding sites in sets of co-regulated genes

    PubMed Central

    Hestand, Matthew S; van Galen, Michiel; Villerius, Michel P; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B; den Dunnen, Johan T; 't Hoen, Peter AC

    2008-01-01

    Background The identification of transcription factor binding sites is difficult since they are only a small number of nucleotides in size, resulting in large numbers of false positives and false negatives in current approaches. Computational methods to reduce false positives are to look for over-representation of transcription factor binding sites in a set of similarly regulated promoters or to look for conservation in orthologous promoter alignments. Results We have developed a novel tool, "CORE_TF" (Conserved and Over-REpresented Transcription Factor binding sites) that identifies common transcription factor binding sites in promoters of co-regulated genes. To improve upon existing binding site predictions, the tool searches for position weight matrices from the TRANSFACR database that are over-represented in an experimental set compared to a random set of promoters and identifies cross-species conservation of the predicted transcription factor binding sites. The algorithm has been evaluated with expression and chromatin-immunoprecipitation on microarray data. We also implement and demonstrate the importance of matching the random set of promoters to the experimental promoters by GC content, which is a unique feature of our tool. Conclusion The program CORE_TF is accessible in a user friendly web interface at . It provides a table of over-represented transcription factor binding sites in the users input genes' promoters and a graphical view of evolutionary conserved transcription factor binding sites. In our test data sets it successfully predicts target transcription factors and their binding sites. PMID:19036135

  8. Role of ChIP-seq in the discovery of transcription factor binding sites, differential gene regulation mechanism, epigenetic marks and beyond.

    PubMed

    Mundade, Rasika; Ozer, Hatice Gulcin; Wei, Han; Prabhu, Lakshmi; Lu, Tao

    2014-01-01

    Many biologically significant processes, such as cell differentiation and cell cycle progression, gene transcription and DNA replication, chromosome stability and epigenetic silencing etc. depend on the crucial interactions between cellular proteins and DNA. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) is an important experimental technique for studying interactions between specific proteins and DNA in the cell and determining their localization on a specific genomic locus. In recent years, the combination of ChIP with second generation DNA-sequencing technology (ChIP-seq) allows precise genomic functional assay. This review addresses the important applications of ChIP-seq with an emphasis on its role in genome-wide mapping of transcription factor binding sites, the revelation of underlying molecular mechanisms of differential gene regulation that are governed by specific transcription factors, and the identification of epigenetic marks. Furthermore, we also describe the ChIP-seq data analysis workflow and a perspective for the exciting potential advancement of ChIP-seq technology in the future.

  9. Parp2 is required for the differentiation of post-meiotic germ cells: Identification of a spermatid-specific complex containing Parp1, Parp2, TP2 and HSPA2

    SciTech Connect

    Quenet, Delphine; Mark, Manuel; Govin, Jerome; Dorsselear, A. van; Schreiber, Valerie; Khochbin, Saadi; Dantzer, Francoise

    2009-10-01

    Spermiogenesis is a complex male germ cell post-meiotic differentiation process characterized by dramatic changes in chromatin structure and function, including chromatin condensation, transcriptional inhibition and the sequential replacement of histones by transition proteins and protamines. Recent advances, in mammalian cells, suggest a possible role of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation catalyzed by Parp1 and/or Parp2 in this process. We have recently reported severely compromised spermiogenesis in Parp2-deficient mice characterized by a marked delay in nuclear elongation whose molecular mechanisms remain however unknown. Here, using in vitro protein-protein interaction assays, we show that Parp2 interacts significantly with both the transition protein TP2 and the transition chaperone HSPA2, whereas Parp1 binds weakly to HSPA2. Parp2-TP2 interaction is partly mediated by poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation. Only Parp1 poly(ADP-ribosyl)ates HSPA2. In addition, a detailed analysis of spermatid maturation in Parp2-deficient mice, combining immunohistochemistry and electron microscopic approaches, reveals a loss of spermatids expressing TP2, a defect in chromatin condensation and abnormal formation of the manchette microtubules that, together, contribute to spermatid-specific cell death. In conclusion, we propose both Parps as new participants of a spermatid-specific protein complex involved in genome reorganization throughout spermiogenesis.

  10. Advances in enzymology and related areas of molecular biology, Vol. 61

    SciTech Connect

    Meister, A.

    1988-01-01

    The contents of this book are: A Unifying Model of the Thermodynamics of Formation of Dehydrogenase-Ligand Complexes; Sorbitol Dehydrogenase; Molecular Size Determination of Enzymes by Radiation Inactivation; Calcineurin; The Behavior and Significance of Slow-Binding Enzyme Inhibitors; ADP-Ribosylation of Guanyl Nucleotide-Binding Regulatory Proteins by Bacterial Toxins; Kinetics of Substrate Reaction During Irreversible Modification of Enzyme Activity; The Dynamics of DNA Polymerace-Catalyzed Reactions; and Author Index.

  11. Guanine nucleotides stimulate hydrolysis of phosphatidyl inositol bis phosphate in human myelin membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Boulias, C.; Moscarello, M.A. )

    1989-07-14

    Phosphodiesterase activity was stimulated in myelin membranes in the presence of guanine nucleotide analogues. This activity was reduced in myelin membranes which had been adenosine diphosphate ribosylated in the presence of cholera toxin which ADP-ribosylated three proteins of Mr 46,000, 43,000 and 18,500. Aluminum fluoride treatment of myelin had the same stimulatory effects on phosphodiesterase activity as did the guanine nucleotides.

  12. Investigation of the action of poly(ADP-ribose)-synthesising enzymes on NAD+ analogues

    PubMed Central

    Wallrodt, Sarah; Simpson, Edward L

    2017-01-01

    ADP-ribosyl transferases with diphtheria toxin homology (ARTDs) catalyse the covalent addition of ADP-ribose onto different acceptors forming mono- or poly(ADP-ribos)ylated proteins. Out of the 18 members identified, only four are known to synthesise the complex poly(ADP-ribose) biopolymer. The investigation of this posttranslational modification is important due to its involvement in cancer and other diseases. Lately, metabolic labelling approaches comprising different reporter-modified NAD+ building blocks have stimulated and enriched proteomic studies and imaging applications of ADP-ribosylation processes. Herein, we compare the substrate scope and applicability of different NAD+ analogues for the investigation of the polymer-synthesising enzymes ARTD1, ARTD2, ARTD5 and ARTD6. By varying the site and size of the NAD+ modification, suitable probes were identified for each enzyme. This report provides guidelines for choosing analogues for studying poly(ADP-ribose)-synthesising enzymes. PMID:28382184

  13. The human NAD metabolome: Functions, metabolism and compartmentalization

    PubMed Central

    Nikiforov, Andrey; Kulikova, Veronika; Ziegler, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The metabolism of NAD has emerged as a key regulator of cellular and organismal homeostasis. Being a major component of both bioenergetic and signaling pathways, the molecule is ideally suited to regulate metabolism and major cellular events. In humans, NAD is synthesized from vitamin B3 precursors, most prominently from nicotinamide, which is the degradation product of all NAD-dependent signaling reactions. The scope of NAD-mediated regulatory processes is wide including enzyme regulation, control of gene expression and health span, DNA repair, cell cycle regulation and calcium signaling. In these processes, nicotinamide is cleaved from NAD+ and the remaining ADP-ribosyl moiety used to modify proteins (deacetylation by sirtuins or ADP-ribosylation) or to generate calcium-mobilizing agents such as cyclic ADP-ribose. This review will also emphasize the role of the intermediates in the NAD metabolome, their intra- and extra-cellular conversions and potential contributions to subcellular compartmentalization of NAD pools. PMID:25837229

  14. The human NAD metabolome: Functions, metabolism and compartmentalization.

    PubMed

    Nikiforov, Andrey; Kulikova, Veronika; Ziegler, Mathias

    2015-01-01

    The metabolism of NAD has emerged as a key regulator of cellular and organismal homeostasis. Being a major component of both bioenergetic and signaling pathways, the molecule is ideally suited to regulate metabolism and major cellular events. In humans, NAD is synthesized from vitamin B3 precursors, most prominently from nicotinamide, which is the degradation product of all NAD-dependent signaling reactions. The scope of NAD-mediated regulatory processes is wide including enzyme regulation, control of gene expression and health span, DNA repair, cell cycle regulation and calcium signaling. In these processes, nicotinamide is cleaved from NAD(+) and the remaining ADP-ribosyl moiety used to modify proteins (deacetylation by sirtuins or ADP-ribosylation) or to generate calcium-mobilizing agents such as cyclic ADP-ribose. This review will also emphasize the role of the intermediates in the NAD metabolome, their intra- and extra-cellular conversions and potential contributions to subcellular compartmentalization of NAD pools.

  15. Integrated microfluidic approach for quantitative high-throughput measurements of transcription factor binding affinities.

    PubMed

    Glick, Yair; Orenstein, Yaron; Chen, Dana; Avrahami, Dorit; Zor, Tsaffrir; Shamir, Ron; Gerber, Doron

    2016-04-07

    Protein binding to DNA is a fundamental process in gene regulation. Methodologies such as ChIP-Seq and mapping of DNase I hypersensitive sites provide global information on this regulation in vivo In vitro methodologies provide valuable complementary information on protein-DNA specificities. However, current methods still do not measure absolute binding affinities. There is a real need for large-scale quantitative protein-DNA affinity measurements. We developed QPID, a microfluidic application for measuring protein-DNA affinities. A single run is equivalent to 4096 gel-shift experiments. Using QPID, we characterized the different affinities of ATF1, c-Jun, c-Fos and AP-1 to the CRE consensus motif and CRE half-site in two different genomic sequences on a single device. We discovered that binding of ATF1, but not of AP-1, to the CRE half-site is highly affected by its genomic context. This effect was highly correlated with ATF1 ChIP-seq and PBM experiments. Next, we characterized the affinities of ATF1 and ATF3 to 128 genomic CRE and CRE half-site sequences. Our affinity measurements explained that in vivo binding differences between ATF1 and ATF3 to CRE and CRE half-sites are partially mediated by differences in the minor groove width. We believe that QPID would become a central tool for quantitative characterization of biophysical aspects affecting protein-DNA binding.

  16. Influence of bacterial toxins on the GTPase activity of transducin from bovine retinal rod outer segments

    SciTech Connect

    Rybin, V.O.; Gureeva, A.A.

    1986-05-10

    The action of cholera toxin, capable of ADP-ribosylation of the activator N/sub s/ protein, and pertussis toxin, capable of ADP-ribosylation of the inhibitor N/sub i/ protein of the adenylate cyclase complex, on transducin, the GTP-binding protein of the rod outer segments of the retina, was investigated. It was shown that under the action of pertussis and cholera toxins, the GTPase activity of transducin is inhibited. Pertussin toxin inhibits the GTPase of native retinal rod outer segments by 30-40%, while GTPase of homogeneous transducin produces a 70-80% inhibition. The action of toxins on transducin depends on the presence and nature of the guanylic nucleotide with which incubation is performed. On the basis of the data obtained it is suggested that pertussis toxin interacts with pretransducin and with the transducin-GDP complex, while cholera toxin ADP-ribosylates the transducin-GTP complex and does not act on transducin lacking GTP.

  17. In Vivo Activity of Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein-3 in Prevention of Prostate Cancer Progression

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-10-01

    Egler, V., Reiter, R., Miard, S, Lefebvre , A-M., Auwerx, J. (2003) Oncogene 22: 4186-93. 21. Segawa, Y., Yoshimura, R., Hase, T., Nakatani, T...administering acquisition office. L.J.M. is a recipient of the Henry G. Friesen Chair in Endocrine and Metabolic Research. Present address for Y.G.: Center

  18. Growth hormone suppression of apoptosis in preovulatory rat follicles and partial neutralization by insulin-like growth factor binding protein.

    PubMed

    Eisenhauer, K M; Chun, S Y; Billig, H; Hsueh, A J

    1995-07-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that growth hormone (GH) plays a role in regulating ovarian function by augmenting gonadotropin stimulation of granulosa cell differentiation and folliculogenesis. The majority of follicles in the mammalian ovary do not ovulate, but instead undergo a degenerative process (atresia) involving apoptotic cell death. The objective of the present study was to investigate the role of GH in regulating follicle apoptosis and to determine whether or not insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) mediates GH action in this process. Preovulatory follicles obtained from eCG-primed rats were cultured for 24 h in serum-free conditions with or without hormone treatments. After culture, follicular apoptotic DNA fragmentation was analyzed by autoradiography of size-fractionated DNA labeled at 3' ends with [32P]dideoxy-ATP. Culture of preovulatory follicles resulted in a spontaneous onset of apoptotic DNA fragmentation that was suppressed by ovine GH (oGH) in a dose-dependent manner, reaching a maximum of 65% suppression. To rule out the effect of residual gonadotropin in the oGH preparation, follicles were also cultured with recombinant bovine growth hormone (rbGH). Like oGH, rbGH suppressed apoptotic DNA fragmentation. Our earlier study indicated that hCG and FSH treatment also suppress apoptosis in the present model system, but no additive effect of GH and either hCG or FSH on the suppression of apoptosis was observed. To determine whether the observed effect of GH action on follicle apoptosis is mediated by IGF-I, three types of studies were carried out.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  19. Vitamin D regulates steroidogenesis and insulin-like growth factor binding protein-1 (IGFBP-1) production in human ovarian cells.

    PubMed

    Parikh, G; Varadinova, M; Suwandhi, P; Araki, T; Rosenwaks, Z; Poretsky, L; Seto-Young, D

    2010-09-01

    Vitamin D Receptor (VDR) is expressed in both animal and human ovarian tissue, however, the role of vitamin D in human ovarian steroidogenesis is unknown. Cultured human ovarian cells were incubated in tissue culture medium supplemented with appropriate substrates, with or without 50 pM-150 pM or 50 nM-150 nM of 1,25-(OH)2D3, and in the presence or absence of insulin. Progesterone, testosterone, estrone, estradiol, and IGFBP-1 concentrations in conditioned tissue culture medium were measured. Vitamin D receptor was present in human ovarian cells. 1,25-(OH)2D3 stimulated progesterone production by 13% (p<0.001), estradiol production by 9% (p<0.02), and estrone production by 21% (p<0.002). Insulin and 1,25-(OH)2D3 acted synergistically to increase estradiol production by 60% (p<0.005). 1,25-(OH)2D3 alone stimulated IGFBP-1 production by 24% (p<0.001), however, in the presence of insulin, 1,25-(OH)2D3 enhanced insulin-induced inhibition of IGFBP-1 production by 13% (p<0.009). Vitamin D stimulates ovarian steroidogenesis and IGFBP-1 production in human ovarian cells likely acting via vitamin D receptor. Insulin and vitamin D synergistically stimulate estradiol production. Vitamin D also enhances inhibitory effect of insulin on IGFBP-1 production.

  20. A New Insulin-Like Growth Factor Binding Protein and Its Role in Breast Cancer and Cell Growth

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-09-01

    cells (Figure 7). Aim 2: Experiments for promoter studies: library screening and clone analysis. Previous Work/Background (August 1996-August 1998) A...Experiments for promoter studies: library screening and clone analysis. * Two clones isolated from genomic library screen enriched for chromosome 4 contain 42

  1. Single Molecule Imaging of Transcription Factor Binding to DNA in Live Mammalian Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gebhardt, J Christof M; Suter, David M; Roy, Rahul; Zhao, Ziqing W; Chapman, Alec R; Basu, Srinjan; Maniatis, Tom; Xie, X Sunney

    2013-01-01

    Imaging single fluorescent proteins in living mammalian cells is challenging due to out-of-focus fluorescence excitation by common microscopy schemes. We report the development of a novel fluorescence microscopy method, reflected light sheet microscopy (RLSM), which allows selective plane illumination throughout the nucleus of living mammalian cells, for reducing out-of-focus fluorescence signal. Generation of a thin light sheet parallel to the imaging plane and close to the sample surface is achieved by reflecting an elliptical laser beam incident from the top by 45° with a small mirror. The thin light sheet allows for an increased signal-to-background ratio superior to previous illumination schemes and enables imaging of single fluorescent proteins with up to 100 Hz time resolution. We demonstrate the sensitivity of RLSM by measuring the DNA-bound fraction of glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and determine the residence times on DNA of various oligomerization states and mutants of GR and estrogen receptor (ER), enabling us to resolve different modes of DNA binding of GR. Finally, we demonstrate two-color single molecule imaging by observing the spatio-temporal co-localization of two different protein pairs. The combination of our single molecule measurements and statistical analysis reveals dynamic properties of transcription factors in live mammalian cells. PMID:23524394

  2. ChIP-Chip Designs to Interrogate the Genome of Xenopus Embryos for Transcription Factor Binding and Epigenetic Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Manak, J. Robert; Green, Roland D.; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G.; Veenstra, Gert Jan C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Chromatin immunoprecipitation combined with genome tile path microarrays or deep sequencing can be used to study genome-wide epigenetic profiles and the transcription factor binding repertoire. Although well studied in a variety of cell lines, these genome-wide profiles have so far been little explored in vertebrate embryos. Principal Findings Here we report on two genome tile path ChIP-chip designs for interrogating the Xenopus tropicalis genome. In particular, a whole-genome microarray design was used to identify active promoters by close proximity to histone H3 lysine 4 trimethylation. A second microarray design features these experimentally derived promoter regions in addition to currently annotated 5′ ends of genes. These regions truly represent promoters as shown by binding of TBP, a key transcription initiation factor. Conclusions A whole-genome and a promoter tile path microarray design was developed. Both designs can be used to study epigenetic phenomena and transcription factor binding in developing Xenopus embryos. PMID:20098671

  3. Clustered somatic mutations are frequent in transcription factor binding motifs within proximal promoter regions in melanoma and other cutaneous malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Colebatch, Andrew J.; Di Stefano, Leon; Wong, Stephen Q.; Hannan, Ross D.; Waring, Paul M.; Dobrovic, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Most cancer DNA sequencing studies have prioritized recurrent non-synonymous coding mutations in order to identify novel cancer-related mutations. Although attention is increasingly being paid to mutations in non-coding regions, standard approaches to identifying significant mutations may not be appropriate and there has been limited analysis of mutational clusters in functionally annotated non-coding regions. We sought to identify clustered somatic mutations (hotspot regions across samples) in functionally annotated regions in melanoma and other cutaneous malignancies (cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma and Merkel cell carcinoma). Sliding window analyses revealed numerous recurrent clustered hotspot mutations in proximal promoters, with some specific clusters present in up to 25% of cases. Mutations in melanoma were clustered within ETS and Sp1 transcription factor binding motifs, had a UV signature and were identified in other cutaneous malignancies. Clinicopathologic correlation and mutation analysis support a causal role for chronic UV irradiation generating somatic mutations in transcription factor binding motifs of proximal promoters. PMID:27611953

  4. Diadenosine 5', 5'''-P(1),P(4)-tetraphosphate (Ap4A) is synthesized in response to DNA damage and inhibits the initiation of DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Marriott, Andrew S; Copeland, Nikki A; Cunningham, Ryan; Wilkinson, Mark C; McLennan, Alexander G; Jones, Nigel J

    2015-09-01

    The level of intracellular diadenosine 5', 5'''-P(1),P(4)-tetraphosphate (Ap4A) increases several fold in mammalian cells treated with non-cytotoxic doses of interstrand DNA-crosslinking agents such as mitomycin C. It is also increased in cells lacking DNA repair proteins including XRCC1, PARP1, APTX and FANCG, while >50-fold increases (up to around 25 μM) are achieved in repair mutants exposed to mitomycin C. Part of this induced Ap4A is converted into novel derivatives, identified as mono- and di-ADP-ribosylated Ap4A. Gene knockout experiments suggest that DNA ligase III is primarily responsible for the synthesis of damage-induced Ap4A and that PARP1 and PARP2 can both catalyze its ADP-ribosylation. Degradative proteins such as aprataxin may also contribute to the increase. Using a cell-free replication system, Ap4A was found to cause a marked inhibition of the initiation of DNA replicons, while elongation was unaffected. Maximum inhibition of 70-80% was achieved with 20 μM Ap4A. Ap3A, Ap5A, Gp4G and AD