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Sample records for adp-ribosylation factors arfs

  1. Localization and characterization of the human ADP-ribosylation factor 5 (ARF5) gene

    SciTech Connect

    McGuire, R.E. |; Daiger, S.P.; Green, E.D.

    1997-05-01

    ADP-ribosylation factor 5 (ARF5) is a member of the ARF gene family. The ARF proteins stimulate the in vitro ADP-ribosyltransferase activity of cholera toxin and appear to play a role in vesicular trafficking in vivo. We have mapped ARF5, one of the six known mammalian ARF genes, to a well-defined yeast artificial chromosome contig on human chromosome 7q31.3. In addition, we have isolated and sequenced an {approximately}3.2-kb genomic segment that contains the entire ARF5 coding region, revealing the complete intron-exon structure of the gene. With six coding exons and five introns, the genomic structure of ARF5 is unique among the mammalian ARF genes and provides insight about the evolutionary history of this ancient gene family. 20 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Molecular cloning and characterization of an ADP-ribosylation factor 6 gene (ptARF6) from Pisolithus tinctorius.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liling; Li, Haibo; Zhou, Yifeng; Qin, Yuchuan; Wang, Yanbin; Liu, Bentong; Qian, Hua

    2016-05-01

    ADP-ribosylation factor 6 (ARF6) is an evolutionarily conserved molecule that has an essential function in intracellular trafficking and organelle structure. To better understand its role during presymbiosis between plant roots and compatible filamentous fungi, the full-length cDNA sequence of ARF6 from Pisolithus tinctorius was cloned and a variety of bioinformatics analyses performed. The full-length sequence was 849 bp long and contained a 549 bp open reading frame encoding a protein of 182 amino acids. A phylogenetic analysis showed that ptARF6 was the ortholog of the ADP ribosylation factor 6/GTPase SAR1 gene from the white-rot basidiomycete Trametes versicolor. A domain architecture analysis of the ARF6 protein revealed a repeat region, which is a common feature of ARF6 in other species. Recombinant ARF6 protein was expressed with an N-terminal 6×His tag and purified using Ni(2+)-NTA affinity chromatography. The molecular mass of the recombinant protein was estimated by SDS-PAGE to be 25 kDa. The recombinant ARF6 protein bound strongly to 18:1 and 18:2 phosphatidic acids. Thus, ARF6 may participate in the signaling pathways involved in membrane phospholipid composition. The intracellular distribution of ptADP6 in HEK239T cells also indicates that ptADP6 may function not only in plasma membrane events but also in endosomal membranes events. Real-time quantitative PCR revealed that the differential expression of ptARF6 was associated with the presymbiotic stage. ptARF6 may be induced by presymbiosis during the regulation of mycorrhizal formation. PMID:26928195

  3. A presynaptic role for the ADP ribosylation factor (ARF)-specific GDP/GTP exchange factor msec7-1

    PubMed Central

    Ashery, Uri; Koch, Henriette; Scheuss, Volker; Brose, Nils; Rettig, Jens

    1999-01-01

    ADP ribosylation factors (ARFs) represent a family of small monomeric G proteins that switch from an inactive, GDP-bound state to an active, GTP-bound state. One member of this family, ARF6, translocates on activation from intracellular compartments to the plasma membrane and has been implicated in regulated exocytosis in neuroendocrine cells. Because GDP release in vivo is rather slow, ARF activation is facilitated by specific guanine nucleotide exchange factors like cytohesin-1 or ARNO. Here we show that msec7-1, a rat homologue of cytohesin-1, translocates ARF6 to the plasma membrane in living cells. Overexpression of msec7-1 leads to an increase in basal synaptic transmission at the Xenopus neuromuscular junction. msec7-1-containing synapses have a 5-fold higher frequency of spontaneous synaptic currents than control synapses. On stimulation, the amplitudes of the resulting evoked postsynaptic currents of msec7-1-overexpressing neurons are increased as well. However, further stimulation leads to a decline in amplitudes approaching the values of control synapses. This transient effect on amplitude is strongly reduced on overexpression of msec7-1E157K, a mutant incapable of translocating ARFs. Our results provide evidence that small G proteins of the ARF family and activating factors like msec7-1 play an important role in synaptic transmission, most likely by making more vesicles available for fusion at the plasma membrane. PMID:9927699

  4. Mechanism of activation of cholera toxin by ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF): both low- and high-affinity interactions of ARF with guanine nucleotides promote toxin activation.

    PubMed

    Bobak, D A; Bliziotes, M M; Noda, M; Tsai, S C; Adamik, R; Moss, J

    1990-01-30

    Activation of adenylyl cyclase by cholera toxin A subunit (CT-A) results from the ADP-ribosylation of the stimulatory guanine nucleotide binding protein (GS alpha). This process requires GTP and an endogenous guanine nucleotide binding protein known as ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF). One membrane (mARF) and two soluble forms (sARF I and sARF II) of ARF have been purified from bovine brain. Because the conditions reported to enhance the binding of guanine nucleotides by ARF differ from those observed to promote optimal activity, we sought to characterize the determinants influencing the functional interaction of guanine nucleotides with ARF. High-affinity GTP binding by sARF II (apparent KD of approximately 70 nM) required Mg2+, DMPC, and sodium cholate. sARF II, in DMPC/cholate, also enhanced CT-A ADP-ribosyltransferase activity (apparent EC50 for GTP of approximately 50 nM), although there was a delay before achievement of a maximal rate of sARF II stimulated toxin activity. The delay was abolished by incubation of sARF II with GTP at 30 degrees C before initiation of the assay. In contrast, a maximal rate of activation of toxin by sARF II, in 0.003% SDS, occurred without delay (apparent EC50 for GTP of approximately 5 microM). High-affinity GTP binding by sARF II was not detectable in SDS. Enhancement of CT-A ADP-ribosyltransferase activity by sARF II, therefore, can occur under conditions in which sARF II exhibits either a relatively low affinity or a relatively high affinity for GTP. The interaction of GTP with ARF under these conditions may reflect ways in which intracellular membrane and cytosolic environments modulate GTP-mediated activation of ARF. PMID:2111167

  5. ADP Ribosylation Factor 6 (ARF6) Promotes Acrosomal Exocytosis by Modulating Lipid Turnover and Rab3A Activation*

    PubMed Central

    Pelletán, Leonardo E.; Suhaiman, Laila; Vaquer, Cintia C.; Bustos, Matías A.; De Blas, Gerardo A.; Vitale, Nicolas; Mayorga, Luis S.; Belmonte, Silvia A.

    2015-01-01

    Regulated secretion is a central issue for the specific function of many cells; for instance, mammalian sperm acrosomal exocytosis is essential for egg fertilization. ARF6 (ADP-ribosylation factor 6) is a small GTPase implicated in exocytosis, but its downstream effectors remain elusive in this process. We combined biochemical, functional, and microscopy-based methods to show that ARF6 is present in human sperm, localizes to the acrosomal region, and is required for calcium and diacylglycerol-induced exocytosis. Results from pulldown assays show that ARF6 exchanges GDP for GTP in sperm challenged with different exocytic stimuli. Myristoylated and guanosine 5′-3-O-(thio)triphosphate (GTPγS)-loaded ARF6 (active form) added to permeabilized sperm induces acrosome exocytosis even in the absence of extracellular calcium. We explore the ARF6 signaling cascade that promotes secretion. We demonstrate that ARF6 stimulates a sperm phospholipase D activity to produce phosphatidic acid and boosts the synthesis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate. We present direct evidence showing that active ARF6 increases phospholipase C activity, causing phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate hydrolysis and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate-dependent intra-acrosomal calcium release. We show that active ARF6 increases the exchange of GDP for GTP on Rab3A, a prerequisite for secretion. We propose that exocytic stimuli activate ARF6, which is required for acrosomal calcium efflux and the assembly of the membrane fusion machinery. This report highlights the physiological importance of ARF6 as a key factor for human sperm exocytosis and fertilization. PMID:25713146

  6. Structure of Plasmodium falciparum ADP-ribosylation factor 1

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, William J.; Smith, Craig D.; Senkovich, Olga; Holder, Anthony A.; Chattopadhyay, Debasish

    2011-09-26

    Vesicular trafficking may play a crucial role in the pathogenesis and survival of the malaria parasite. ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs) are among the major components of vesicular trafficking pathways in eukaryotes. The crystal structure of ARF1 GTPase from Plasmodium falciparum has been determined in the GDP-bound conformation at 2.5 {angstrom} resolution and is compared with the structures of mammalian ARF1s.

  7. ADP-ribosylation factor arf6p may function as a molecular switch of new end take off in fission yeast

    SciTech Connect

    Fujita, Atsushi

    2008-02-01

    Small GTPases act as molecular switches in a wide variety of cellular processes. In fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, the directions of cell growth change from a monopolar manner to a bipolar manner, which is known as 'New End Take Off' (NETO). Here I report the identification of a gene, arf6{sup +}, encoding an ADP-ribosylation factor small GTPase, that may be essential for NETO. arf6{delta} cells completely fail to undergo NETO. arf6p localizes at both cell ends and presumptive septa in a cell-cycle dependent manner. And its polarized localization is not dependent on microtubules, actin cytoskeletons and some NETO factors (bud6p, for3p, tea1p, tea3p, and tea4p). Notably, overexpression of a fast GDP/GTP-cycling mutant of arf6p can advance the timing of NETO. These findings suggest that arf6p functions as a molecular switch for the activation of NETO in fission yeast.

  8. ADP-ribosylation factor-like protein 4C (ARL4C) interacts with galectin-3 during oocyte development and embryogenesis in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    ADP-ribosylation factor-like protein 4 (ARL4) is a GTP-binding protein which belongs to the ADP-ribosylation factor protein (ARF) superfamily of small GTPases. ARL4 has been shown to be mainly related to the development of male germ cells and embryogenesis in mouse. To investigate the role of ARL4 i...

  9. Differential interaction of ADP-ribosylation factors 1, 3, and 5 with rat brain Golgi membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, S C; Adamik, R; Haun, R S; Moss, J; Vaughan, M

    1992-01-01

    Six mammalian ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs) identified by cDNA cloning were expressed as recombinant proteins (rARFs) that stimulated cholera toxin ADP-ribosyltransferase activity. Microsequencing of soluble ARFs I and II (sARFs I and II), purified from bovine brain, established that they are ARFs 1 and 3, respectively. Rabbit antibodies (IgG) against sARF II reacted similarly with ARFs 1, 2, and 3 (class I) on Western blots. ARFs 1 and 3 were distinguished by their electrophoretic mobilities. Antiserum against rARF 5 cross-reacted partially with rARF 4 but not detectably with rARF 6 and minimally with class I ARFs. Guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTP[gamma S]) increased recovery of ARF activity and immunoreactivity in organelle fractions separated by density gradient centrifugation, after incubation of rat brain homogenate with ATP and a regenerating system. ARF 1 accumulated in microsomes plus Golgi and Golgi fractions, whereas ARF 5 seemed to localize more specifically in Golgi; the smaller increment in ARF 3 was distributed more evenly among fractions. On incubation of Golgi with a crude ARF fraction, GTP[gamma S], and an ATP-regenerating system, association of ARF activity with Golgi increased with increasing ATP concentration paralleled by increases in immunoreactive ARFs 1 and 5 and, to a lesser degree, ARF 3. Golgi incubated with GTP[gamma S] and purified ARF 1 or 3 bound more ARF 1 than ARF 3. Based on immunoreactivity and assay of ARF activity, individual ARFs 1, 3, and 5 appeared to behave independently and selectively in their GTP-dependent association with Golgi in vitro. Images PMID:1409634

  10. Differential interaction of ADP-ribosylation factors 1, 3, and 5 with rat brain Golgi membranes.

    PubMed

    Tsai, S C; Adamik, R; Haun, R S; Moss, J; Vaughan, M

    1992-10-01

    Six mammalian ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs) identified by cDNA cloning were expressed as recombinant proteins (rARFs) that stimulated cholera toxin ADP-ribosyltransferase activity. Microsequencing of soluble ARFs I and II (sARFs I and II), purified from bovine brain, established that they are ARFs 1 and 3, respectively. Rabbit antibodies (IgG) against sARF II reacted similarly with ARFs 1, 2, and 3 (class I) on Western blots. ARFs 1 and 3 were distinguished by their electrophoretic mobilities. Antiserum against rARF 5 cross-reacted partially with rARF 4 but not detectably with rARF 6 and minimally with class I ARFs. Guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate) (GTP[gamma S]) increased recovery of ARF activity and immunoreactivity in organelle fractions separated by density gradient centrifugation, after incubation of rat brain homogenate with ATP and a regenerating system. ARF 1 accumulated in microsomes plus Golgi and Golgi fractions, whereas ARF 5 seemed to localize more specifically in Golgi; the smaller increment in ARF 3 was distributed more evenly among fractions. On incubation of Golgi with a crude ARF fraction, GTP[gamma S], and an ATP-regenerating system, association of ARF activity with Golgi increased with increasing ATP concentration paralleled by increases in immunoreactive ARFs 1 and 5 and, to a lesser degree, ARF 3. Golgi incubated with GTP[gamma S] and purified ARF 1 or 3 bound more ARF 1 than ARF 3. Based on immunoreactivity and assay of ARF activity, individual ARFs 1, 3, and 5 appeared to behave independently and selectively in their GTP-dependent association with Golgi in vitro. PMID:1409634

  11. Poliovirus Proteins Induce Membrane Association of GTPase ADP-Ribosylation Factor

    PubMed Central

    Belov, George A.; Fogg, Mark H.; Ehrenfeld, Ellie

    2005-01-01

    Poliovirus infection results in the disintegration of intracellular membrane structures and formation of specific vesicles that serve as sites for replication of viral RNA. The mechanism of membrane rearrangement has not been clearly defined. Replication of poliovirus is sensitive to brefeldin A (BFA), a fungal metabolite known to prevent normal function of the ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) family of small GTPases. During normal membrane trafficking in uninfected cells, ARFs are involved in vesicle formation from different intracellular sites through interaction with numerous regulatory and coat proteins as well as in regulation of phospholipase D activity and cytoskeleton modifications. We demonstrate here that ARFs 3 and 5, but not ARF6, are translocated to membranes in HeLa cell extracts that are engaged in translation of poliovirus RNA. The accumulation of ARFs on membranes correlates with active replication of poliovirus RNA in vitro, whereas ARF translocation to membranes does not occur in the presence of BFA. ARF translocation can be induced independently by synthesis of poliovirus 3A or 3CD proteins, and we describe mutations that abolished this activity. In infected HeLa cells, an ARF1-enhanced green fluorescent protein fusion redistributes from Golgi stacks to the perinuclear region, where poliovirus RNA replication occurs. Taken together, the data suggest an involvement of ARF in poliovirus RNA replication. PMID:15890959

  12. Small G proteins in peroxisome biogenesis: the potential involvement of ADP-ribosylation factor 6

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Peroxisomes execute diverse and vital functions in virtually every eukaryote. New peroxisomes form by budding from pre-existing organelles or de novo by vesiculation of the ER. It has been suggested that ADP-ribosylation factors and COPI coatomer complexes are involved in these processes. Results Here we show that all viable Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains deficient in one of the small GTPases which have an important role in the regulation of vesicular transport contain functional peroxisomes, and that the number of these organelles in oleate-grown cells is significantly upregulated in the arf1 and arf3 null strains compared to the wild-type strain. In addition, we provide evidence that a portion of endogenous Arf6, the mammalian orthologue of yeast Arf3, is associated with the cytoplasmic face of rat liver peroxisomes. Despite this, ablation of Arf6 did neither influence the regulation of peroxisome abundance nor affect the localization of peroxisomal proteins in cultured fetal hepatocytes. However, co-overexpression of wild-type, GTP hydrolysis-defective or (dominant-negative) GTP binding-defective forms of Arf1 and Arf6 caused mislocalization of newly-synthesized peroxisomal proteins and resulted in an alteration of peroxisome morphology. Conclusion These observations suggest that Arf6 is a key player in mammalian peroxisome biogenesis. In addition, they also lend strong support to and extend the concept that specific Arf isoform pairs may act in tandem to regulate exclusive trafficking pathways. PMID:19686593

  13. Differential expression during development of ADP-ribosylation factors, 20-kDa guanine nucleotide-binding protein activators of cholera toxin.

    PubMed

    Tsai, S C; Adamik, R; Tsuchiya, M; Chang, P P; Moss, J; Vaughan, M

    1991-05-01

    Cholera toxin exerts its effects on cells in large part through the ADP-ribosylation of guanine nucleotide-binding proteins. Toxin-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation is enhanced by approximately 20-kDa guanine nucleotide-binding proteins termed ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs), which are allosteric activators of the toxin catalytic unit. Rabbit antiserum against a purified bovine brain ARF (sARF II) reacted on immunoblots with two approximately 20-kDa ARF-like proteins (sARF I and II) in tissue extracts from bovine, rat, frog, and chicken. Levels of ARF were higher in brain than in non-neural tissues. In rat brain, on the second postnatal day, amounts of sARF I and II were similar. By the 10th postnatal day and thereafter, sARF II predominated. Relative levels of ARF determined by immunoreactivity were in agreement with levels assessed in functional assays of cholera toxin-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation. Based on nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences of human and bovine cDNAs, there appear to be at least six different ARF-like genes. Northern blots of rat brain poly(A)+ RNA were hybridized with cDNA and oligonucleotide probes specific for each of the human and bovine ARF genes. From the second to the 27th postnatal day, ARF 3 mRNA increased, whereas mRNAs for ARFs 2 and 4 decreased; and those for ARFs 1, 5, and 6 were apparently unchanged. Partial amino acid sequence of sARF II is consistent with it being either the ARF 1 or 3 gene product. The developmental changes in rat brain ARF parallel neuronal maturation and synapse formation. PMID:1902473

  14. Effects of Site-Directed Mutagenesis of Escherichia coli Heat-Labile Enterotoxin on ADP-Ribosyltransferase Activity and Interaction with ADP-Ribosylation Factors

    PubMed Central

    A. Stevens, Linda; Moss, Joel; Vaughan, Martha; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Rappuoli, Rino

    1999-01-01

    Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin (LT), an oligomeric protein with one A subunit (LTA) and five B subunits, exerts its effects via the ADP-ribosylation of Gsα, a guanine nucleotide-binding (G) protein that activates adenylyl cyclase. LTA also ADP-ribosylates simple guanidino compounds (e.g., arginine) and catalyzes its own auto-ADP-ribosylation. All LTA-catalyzed reactions are enhanced by ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs), 20-kDa guanine nucleotide-binding proteins. Replacement of arginine-7 (R7K), valine-53 (V53D), serine-63 (S63K), valine 97 (V97K), or tyrosine-104 (Y104K) in LTA resulted in fully assembled but nontoxic proteins. S63K, V53D, and R7K are catalytic-site mutations, whereas V97K and Y104K are amino acid replacements adjacent to and outside of the catalytic site, respectively. The effects of mutagenesis were quantified by measuring ADP-ribosyltransferase activity (i.e., auto-ADP-ribosylation and ADP-ribosylagmatine synthesis) and interaction with ARF (i.e., inhibition of ARF-stimulated cholera toxin ADP-ribosyltransferase activity and effects of ARF on mutant auto-ADP-ribosylation). All mutants were inactive in the ADP-ribosyltransferase assay; however, auto-ADP-ribosylation in the presence of recombinant human ARF6 was detected, albeit much less than that of native LT (Y104K > V53D > V97K > R7K, S63K). Based on the lack of inhibition by free ADP-ribose, the observed auto-ADP-ribosylation activity was enzymatic and not due to the nonenzymatic addition of free ADP-ribose. V53D, S63K, and R7K were more effective than Y104K or V97K in blocking ARF stimulation of cholera toxin ADP-ribosyltransferase. Based on these data, it appears that ARF-binding and catalytic sites are not identical and that a region outside the NAD cleft may participate in the LTA-ARF interaction. PMID:9864224

  15. Effects of site-directed mutagenesis of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin on ADP-ribosyltransferase activity and interaction with ADP-ribosylation factors.

    PubMed

    Stevens, L A; Moss, J; Vaughan, M; Pizza, M; Rappuoli, R

    1999-01-01

    Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxin (LT), an oligomeric protein with one A subunit (LTA) and five B subunits, exerts its effects via the ADP-ribosylation of Gsalpha, a guanine nucleotide-binding (G) protein that activates adenylyl cyclase. LTA also ADP-ribosylates simple guanidino compounds (e.g., arginine) and catalyzes its own auto-ADP-ribosylation. All LTA-catalyzed reactions are enhanced by ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs), 20-kDa guanine nucleotide-binding proteins. Replacement of arginine-7 (R7K), valine-53 (V53D), serine-63 (S63K), valine 97 (V97K), or tyrosine-104 (Y104K) in LTA resulted in fully assembled but nontoxic proteins. S63K, V53D, and R7K are catalytic-site mutations, whereas V97K and Y104K are amino acid replacements adjacent to and outside of the catalytic site, respectively. The effects of mutagenesis were quantified by measuring ADP-ribosyltransferase activity (i.e., auto-ADP-ribosylation and ADP-ribosylagmatine synthesis) and interaction with ARF (i.e., inhibition of ARF-stimulated cholera toxin ADP-ribosyltransferase activity and effects of ARF on mutant auto-ADP-ribosylation). All mutants were inactive in the ADP-ribosyltransferase assay; however, auto-ADP-ribosylation in the presence of recombinant human ARF6 was detected, albeit much less than that of native LT (Y104K > V53D > V97K > R7K, S63K). Based on the lack of inhibition by free ADP-ribose, the observed auto-ADP-ribosylation activity was enzymatic and not due to the nonenzymatic addition of free ADP-ribose. V53D, S63K, and R7K were more effective than Y104K or V97K in blocking ARF stimulation of cholera toxin ADP-ribosyltransferase. Based on these data, it appears that ARF-binding and catalytic sites are not identical and that a region outside the NAD cleft may participate in the LTA-ARF interaction. PMID:9864224

  16. MARTX effector cross kingdom activation by Golgi-associated ADP-ribosylation factors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byoung Sik; Satchell, Karla J F

    2016-08-01

    Vibrio vulnificus infects humans and causes lethal septicemia. The primary virulence factor is a multifunctional-autoprocessing repeats-in-toxin (MARTX) toxin consisting of conserved repeats-containing regions and various effector domains. Recent genomic analyses for the newly emerged V. vulnificus biotype 3 strain revealed that its MARTX toxin has two previously unknown effector domains. Herein, we characterized one of these domains, Domain X (DmXVv ). A structure-based homology search revealed that DmXVv belongs to the C58B cysteine peptidase subfamily. When ectopically expressed in cells, DmXVv was autoprocessed and induced cytopathicity including Golgi dispersion. When the catalytic cysteine or the region flanking the scissile bond was mutated, both autoprocessing and cytopathicity were significantly reduced indicating that DmXVv cytopathicity is activated by amino-terminal autoprocessing. Consistent with this, host cell protein export was affected by Vibrio cells producing a toxin with wild-type, but not catalytically inactive, DmXVv . DmXVv was found to localize to Golgi and to directly interact with Golgi-associated ADP-ribosylation factors ARF1, ARF3 and ARF4, although ARF binding was not necessary for the subcellular localization. Rather, this interaction was found to induce autoprocessing of DmXVv . These data demonstrate that the V. vulnificus hijacks the host ARF proteins to activate the cytopathic DmXVv effector domain of MARTX toxin. PMID:26780191

  17. Molecular cloning, characterization, and expression of human ADP-ribosylation factors: two guanine nucleotide-dependent activators of cholera toxin.

    PubMed Central

    Bobak, D A; Nightingale, M S; Murtagh, J J; Price, S R; Moss, J; Vaughan, M

    1989-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs) are small guanine nucleotide-binding proteins that enhance the enzymatic activities of cholera toxin. Two ARF cDNAs, ARF1 and ARF3, were cloned from a human cerebellum library. Based on deduced amino acid sequences and patterns of hybridization of cDNA and oligonucleotide probes with mammalian brain poly(A)+ RNA, human ARF1 is the homologue of bovine ARF1. Human ARF3, which differs from bovine ARF1 and bovine ARF2, appears to represent a newly identified third type of ARF. Hybridization patterns of human ARF cDNA and clone-specific oligonucleotides with poly(A)+ RNA are consistent with the presence of at least two, and perhaps four, separate ARF messages in human brain. In vitro translation of ARF1, ARF2, and ARF3 produced proteins that behaved, by SDS/PAGE, similar to a purified soluble brain ARF. Deduced amino acid sequences of human ARF1 and ARF3 contain regions, similar to those in other G proteins, that are believed to be involved in GTP binding and hydrolysis. ARFs also exhibit a modest degree of homology with a bovine phospholipase C. The observations reported here support the conclusion that the ARFs are members of a multigene family of small guanine nucleotide-binding proteins. Definition of the regulation of ARF mRNAs and of function(s) of recombinant ARF proteins will aid in the elucidation of the physiologic role(s) of ARFs. Images PMID:2474826

  18. Arfaptin 1, a putative cytosolic target protein of ADP-ribosylation factor, is recruited to Golgi membranes.

    PubMed

    Kanoh, H; Williger, B T; Exton, J H

    1997-02-28

    ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs) have been implicated in vesicle transport in the Golgi complex. Employing yeast two-hybrid screening of an HL60 cDNA library using a constitutively active mutant of ARF3 (ARF3.Q71L), as a probe, we have identified a cDNA encoding a novel protein with a calculated molecular mass of 38.6 kDa, which we have named arfaptin 1. The mRNA of arfaptin 1 was ubiquitously expressed, and recombinant arfaptin 1 bound preferentially to class I ARFs, especially ARF1, but only in the GTP-bound form. The interactions were independent of myristoylation of ARF. Arfaptin 1 in cytosol was recruited to Golgi membranes by ARF in a guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate)-dependent and brefeldin A-sensitive manner. When expressed in COS cells, arfaptin 1 was localized to the Golgi complex. The yeast two-hybrid system yielded another clone, which encoded a putative protein, which we have named arfaptin 2. This consisted of the same number of amino acids as arfaptin 1 and was 60% identical to it. Arfaptin 2 was also ubiquitously expressed and bound to the GTP-, but not GDP-liganded form of class I ARFs, especially ARF1. These results suggest that arfaptins 1 and 2 may be direct target proteins of class 1 ARFs. Arfaptin 1 may be involved in Golgi function along with ARF1. PMID:9038142

  19. GTP but not GDP analogues promote association of ADP-ribosylation factors, 20-kDa protein activators of cholera toxin, with phospholipids and PC-12 cell membranes.

    PubMed

    Walker, M W; Bobak, D A; Tsai, S C; Moss, J; Vaughan, M

    1992-02-15

    ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs) are a family of approximately 20-kDa guanine nucleotide-binding proteins initially identified by their ability to enhance cholera toxin ADP-ribosyltransferase activity in the presence of GTP. ARFs have been purified from both membrane and cytosolic fractions. ARF purified from bovine brain cytosol requires phospholipid plus detergent for high affinity guanine nucleotide binding and for optimal enhancement of cholera toxin ADP-ribosyltransferase activity. The phospholipid requirements, combined with a putative role for ARF in vesicular transport, suggested that the soluble protein might interact reversibly with membranes. A polyclonal antibody against purified bovine ARF (sARF II) was used to detect ARF by immunoblot in membrane and soluble fractions from rat pheochromocytoma (PC-12) cell homogenates. ARF was predominantly cytosolic but increased in membranes during incubation of homogenates with nonhydrolyzable GTP analogues guanosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate), guanylyl-(beta gamma-imido)-diphosphate, and guanylyl-(beta gamma-methylene)-diphosphate, and to a lesser extent, adenosine 5'-O-(3-thiotriphosphate). GTP, GDP, GMP, and ATP were inactive. Cytosolic ARF similarly associated with added phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, or cardiolipin in GTP gamma S-dependent fashion. ARF binding to phosphatidylserine was reversible and coincident with stimulation of cholera toxin-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation. These observations may reflect a mechanism by which ARF could cycle between soluble and membrane compartments in vivo. PMID:1737779

  20. Cloning of an ADP-ribosylation factor gene from banana (Musa acuminata) and its expression patterns in postharvest ripening fruit.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuan; Wu, Jing; Xu, Bi-Yu; Liu, Ju-Hua; Zhang, Jian-Bin; Jia, Cai-Hong; Jin, Zhi-Qiang

    2010-08-15

    A full-length cDNA encoding an ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) from banana (Musa acuminata) fruit was cloned and named MaArf. It contains an open reading frame encoding a 181-amino-acid polypeptide. Sequence analysis showed that MaArf shared high similarity with ARF of other plant species. The genomic sequence of MaArf was also obtained using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Sequence analysis showed that MaArf was a split gene containing five exons and four introns in genomic DNA. Reverse-transcriptase PCR was used to analyze the spatial expression of MaArf. The results showed that MaArf was expressed in all the organs examined: root, rhizome, leaf, flower and fruit. Real-time quantitative PCR was used to explore expression patterns of MaArf in postharvest banana. There was differential expression of MaArf associated with ethylene biosynthesis. In naturally ripened banana, expression of MaArf was in accordance with ethylene biosynthesis. However, in 1-methylcyclopropene-treated banana, the expression of MaArf was inhibited and changed little. When treated with ethylene, MaArf expression in banana fruit significantly increased in accordance with ethylene biosynthesis; the peak of MaArf was 3 d after harvest, 11 d earlier than for naturally ripened banana fruits. These results suggest that MaArf is induced by ethylene in regulating postharvest banana ripening. Finally, subcellular localization assays showed the MaArf protein in the cytoplasm. PMID:20435371

  1. Guanine nucleotide-binding proteins that enhance choleragen ADP-ribosyltransferase activity: nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequence of an ADP-ribosylation factor cDNA.

    PubMed Central

    Price, S R; Nightingale, M; Tsai, S C; Williamson, K C; Adamik, R; Chen, H C; Moss, J; Vaughan, M

    1988-01-01

    Three (two soluble and one membrane) guanine nucleotide-binding proteins (G proteins) that enhance ADP-ribosylation of the Gs alpha stimulatory subunit of the adenylyl cyclase (EC 4.6.1.1) complex by choleragen have recently been purified from bovine brain. To further define the structure and function of these ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs), we isolated a cDNA clone (lambda ARF2B) from a bovine retinal library by screening with a mixed heptadecanucleotide probe whose sequence was based on the partial amino acid sequence of one of the soluble ARFs from bovine brain. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence of lambda ARF2B with sequences of peptides from the ARF protein (total of 60 amino acids) revealed only two differences. Whether these are cloning artifacts or reflect the existence of more than one ARF protein remains to be determined. Deduced amino acid sequences of ARF, Go alpha (the alpha subunit of a G protein that may be involved in regulation of ion fluxes), and c-Ha-ras gene product p21 show similarities in regions believed to be involved in guanine nucleotide binding and GTP hydrolysis. ARF apparently lacks a site analogous to that ADP-ribosylated by choleragen in G-protein alpha subunits. Although both the ARF proteins and the alpha subunits bind guanine nucleotides and serve as choleragen substrates, they must interact with the toxin A1 peptide in different ways. In addition to serving as an ADP-ribose acceptor, ARF interacts with the toxin in a manner that modifies its catalytic properties. PMID:3135549

  2. Structure, organization and evolution of ADP-ribosylation factors in rice and foxtail millet, and their expression in rice

    PubMed Central

    Muthamilarasan, Mehanathan; Mangu, Venkata R.; Zandkarimi, Hana; Prasad, Manoj; Baisakh, Niranjan

    2016-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs) have been reported to function in diverse physiological and molecular activities. Recent evidences also demonstrate the involvement of ARFs in conferring tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses in plant species. In the present study, 23 and 25 ARF proteins were identified in C3 model- rice and C4 model- foxtail millet, respectively. These proteins are classified into four classes (I–IV) based on phylogenetic analysis, with ARFs in classes I–III and ARF-like proteins (ARLs) in class IV. Sequence alignment and domain analysis revealed the presence of conserved and additional motifs, which may contribute to neo- and sub-functionalization of these proteins. Promoter analysis showed the presence of several cis-regulatory elements related to stress and hormone response, indicating their role in stress regulatory network. Expression analysis of rice ARFs and ARLs in different tissues, stresses and abscisic acid treatment highlighted temporal and spatial diversification of gene expression. Five rice cultivars screened for allelic variations in OsARF genes showed the presence of allelic polymorphisms in few gene loci. Altogether, the study provides insights on characteristics of ARF/ARL genes in rice and foxtail millet, which could be deployed for further functional analysis to extrapolate their precise roles in abiotic stress responses. PMID:27097755

  3. Structure, organization and evolution of ADP-ribosylation factors in rice and foxtail millet, and their expression in rice.

    PubMed

    Muthamilarasan, Mehanathan; Mangu, Venkata R; Zandkarimi, Hana; Prasad, Manoj; Baisakh, Niranjan

    2016-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs) have been reported to function in diverse physiological and molecular activities. Recent evidences also demonstrate the involvement of ARFs in conferring tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses in plant species. In the present study, 23 and 25 ARF proteins were identified in C3 model- rice and C4 model- foxtail millet, respectively. These proteins are classified into four classes (I-IV) based on phylogenetic analysis, with ARFs in classes I-III and ARF-like proteins (ARLs) in class IV. Sequence alignment and domain analysis revealed the presence of conserved and additional motifs, which may contribute to neo- and sub-functionalization of these proteins. Promoter analysis showed the presence of several cis-regulatory elements related to stress and hormone response, indicating their role in stress regulatory network. Expression analysis of rice ARFs and ARLs in different tissues, stresses and abscisic acid treatment highlighted temporal and spatial diversification of gene expression. Five rice cultivars screened for allelic variations in OsARF genes showed the presence of allelic polymorphisms in few gene loci. Altogether, the study provides insights on characteristics of ARF/ARL genes in rice and foxtail millet, which could be deployed for further functional analysis to extrapolate their precise roles in abiotic stress responses. PMID:27097755

  4. Identification of a brefeldin A-insensitive guanine nucleotide-exchange protein for ADP-ribosylation factor in bovine brain.

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, S C; Adamik, R; Moss, J; Vaughan, M

    1994-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs) are approximately 20-kDa guanine nucleotide-binding proteins that participate in vesicular transport in the Golgi and other intracellular compartments and stimulate cholera toxin ADP-ribosyltransferase activity. ARFs are active in the GTP-bound form; hydrolysis of bound GTP to GDP, possibly with the assistance of a GTP hydrolysis (GTPase)-activating protein results in inactivation. Exchange of GDP for GTP and reactivation were shown by other workers to be enhanced by Golgi membranes in a brefeldin A-sensitive reaction, leading to the proposal that the guanine nucleotide-exchange protein (GEP) was a target of brefeldin A. In the studies reported here, a soluble GEP was partially purified from bovine brain. Exchange of nucleotide on ARFs 1 and 3, based on increased ARF activity in a toxin assay and stimulation of binding of guanosine 5'-[gamma-[35S]thio]triphosphate, was dependent on phospholipids, with phosphatidylserine being more effective than cardiolipin. GEP appeared to increase the rate of nucleotide exchange but did not affect the affinity of ARF for GTP. Whereas the crude GEP had a size of approximately 700 kDa, the partially purified GEP behaved on Ultrogel AcA 54 as a protein of 60 kDa. With purification, the GEP activity became insensitive to brefeldin A, consistent with the conclusion that, in contrast to earlier inferences, the exchange protein is not itself the target of brefeldin A. PMID:8159707

  5. An Entamoeba histolytica ADP-ribosyl transferase from the diphtheria toxin family modifies the bacterial elongation factor Tu.

    PubMed

    Avila, Eva E; Rodriguez, Orlando I; Marquez, Jaqueline A; Berghuis, Albert M

    2016-06-01

    ADP-ribosyl transferases are enzymes involved in the post-translational modification of proteins; they participate in multiple physiological processes, pathogenesis and host-pathogen interactions. Several reports have characterized the functions of these enzymes in viruses, prokaryotes and higher eukaryotes, but few studies have reported ADP-ribosyl transferases in lower eukaryotes, such as parasites. The locus EHI_155600 from Entamoeba histolytica encodes a hypothetical protein that possesses a domain from the ADP-ribosylation superfamily; this protein belongs to the diphtheria toxin family according to a homology model using poly-ADP-ribosyl polymerase 12 (PARP12 or ARTD12) as a template. The recombinant protein expressed in Escherichia coli exhibited in vitro ADP-ribosylation activity that was dependent on the time and temperature. Unlabeled βNAD(+), but not ADP-ribose, competed in the enzymatic reaction using biotin-βNAD(+) as the ADP-ribose donor. The recombinant enzyme, denominated EhToxin-like, auto-ADP-ribosylated and modified an acceptor from E. coli that was identified by MS/MS as the elongation factor Tu (EF-Tu). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to identify an ADP-ribosyl transferase from the diphtheria toxin family in a protozoan parasite. The known toxins from this family (i.e., the diphtheria toxin, the Pseudomonas aeruginosa toxin Exo-A, and Cholix from Vibrio cholerae) modify eukaryotic elongation factor two (eEF-2), whereas the amoeba EhToxin-like modified EF-Tu, which is another elongation factor involved in protein synthesis in bacteria and mitochondria. PMID:27234208

  6. Centaurin-alpha 1, an ADP-ribosylation factor 6 GTPase activating protein, inhibits beta 2-adrenoceptor internalization.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, Joanna; Mundell, Stuart J; Yun, Hongruo; Kelly, Eamonn; Venkateswarlu, Kanamarlapudi

    2005-06-01

    The small GTP-binding protein ADP ribosylation factor 6 (ARF6) has recently been implicated in the internalization of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), although its precise molecular mechanism in this process remains unclear. We have recently identified centaurin alpha(1) as a GTPase activating protein (GAP) for ARF6. In the current study, we characterized the effects of centaurin alpha(1) on the agonist-induced internalization of the beta(2)-adrenoceptor transiently expressed in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay as well as confocal imaging of cells, we found that expression of centaurin alpha(1) strongly inhibited the isoproterenol-induced internalization of beta(2)-adrenoceptor. On the other hand, expression of functionally inactive versions of centaurin alpha(1), including an R49C mutant, which has no catalytic activity, and a double pleckstrin homology (PH) mutant (DM; R148C/R273C), which has mutations in both the PH domains of centaurin alpha(1), rendering it unable to translocate to the cell membrane, were unable to inhibit beta(2)-adrenoceptor internalization. In addition, a constitutively active version of ARF6, ARF6Q67L, reversed the ability of centaurin alpha(1) to inhibit beta(2)-adrenoceptor internalization. Finally, expression of centaurin alpha(1) also inhibited the agonist-induced internalization of beta(2)-adrenoceptor endogenously expressed in HEK 293 cells, whereas the R49C and DM mutant versions of centaurin alpha(1) had no effect. Together, these data indicate that by acting as an ARF6 GAP, centaurin alpha(1) is able to switch off ARF6 and so inhibit its ability to mediate beta(2)-adrenoceptor internalization. Thus, ARF6 GAPs, such as centaurin alpha(1), are likely to play a crucial role in GPCR trafficking by modulating the activity of ARF6. PMID:15778454

  7. Endogenous ADP-ribosylation of elongation factor 2 in polyoma virus-transformed baby hamster kidney cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fendrick, J.L.; Iglewski, W.J. )

    1989-01-01

    Polyoma virus-transformed baby hamster kidney (pyBHK) cells were cultured in medium containing ({sup 32}P)orthophosphate and 105 (vol/vol) fetal bovine serum. A {sup 32}P-labeled protein with an apparent molecular mass of 97 kDa was immunoprecipitated from cell lysates with antiserum to ADP-ribosylated elongation factor 2 (EF-2). The {sup 32}P labeling of the protein was enhanced by culturing cells in medium containing 2% serum instead of 10% serum. The {sup 32}P label was completely removed from the protein by treatment with snake venom phosphodiesterase and the digestion product was identified as ({sup 32}P)AMP, indicating the protein was mono-ADP-ribosylated. HPLC analysis of tryptic peptides of the {sup 32}P-labeled 97-kDa protein and purified EF-2, which was ADP-ribosylated in vitro with diphtheria toxin fragment A and ({sup 32}P)NAD, demonstrated an identical labeled peptide in the two proteins. The data strongly suggest that EF-2 was endogenously ADP-ribosylated in pyBHK cells. Maximum incorporation of radioactivity in EF-2 occurred by 12 hr and remained constant over the subsequent 12 hr. It was estimated that 30-35% of the EF-2 was ADP-ribosylated in cells cultured in medium containing 2% serum. When {sup 32}P-labeled cultures were incubated in medium containing unlabeled phosphate, the {sup 32}P label was lost from the EF-2 within 30 min.

  8. TFIIF, a basal eukaryotic transcription factor, is a substrate for poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation.

    PubMed Central

    Rawling, J M; Alvarez-Gonzalez, R

    1997-01-01

    We have examined the susceptibility of some of the basal eukaryotic transcription factors as covalent targets for poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation. Human recombinant TATA-binding protein, transcription factor (TF)IIB and TFIIF (made up of the 30 and 74 kDa RNA polymerase II-associated proteins RAP30 and RAP74) were incubated with calf thymus poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase and [32P]NAD+ at 37 degrees C. On lithium dodecyl sulphate/PAGE and autoradiography, two bands of radioactivity, coincident with RAP30 and RAP74, were observed. No radioactivity co-migrated with TATA-binding protein or TFIIB. The phenomenon was dependent on the presence of nicked DNA, which is essential for poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activity. Covalent modification of TFIIF increased with time of incubation, with increasing TFIIF concentration and with increasing NAD+ concentration. High-resolution PAGE confirmed that the radioactive species associated with RAP30 and RAP74 were ADP-ribose polymers. From these observations, we conclude that both TFIIF subunits are highly specific substrates for covalent poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation. PMID:9164864

  9. ADP-ribosylation factor 1 expression regulates epithelial-mesenchymal transition and predicts poor clinical outcome in triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schlienger, Sabrina; Campbell, Shirley; Pasquin, Sarah; Gaboury, Louis; Claing, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic capacities are fundamental features of tumor malignancy. ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) 1 has emerged as a key regulator of invasion in breast cancer cells. However, the importance of this GTPase, in vivo, remains to be demonstrated. We report that ARF1 is highly expressed in breast tumors of the most aggressive and advanced subtypes. Furthermore, we show that lowered expression of ARF1 impairs growth of primary tumors and inhibits lung metastasis in a murine xenograft model. To understand how ARF1 contributes to invasiveness, we used a poorly invasive breast cancer cell line, MCF7 (ER+), and examined the effects of overexpressing ARF1 to levels similar to that found in invasive cell lines. We demonstrate that ARF1 overexpression leads to the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Mechanistically, ARF1 controls cell–cell adhesion through ß-catenin and E-cadherin, oncogenic Ras activation and expression of EMT inducers. We further show that ARF1 overexpression enhances invasion, proliferation and resistance to a chemotherapeutic agent. In vivo, ARF1 overexpressing MCF7 cells are able to form more metastases to the lung. Overall, our findings demonstrate that ARF1 is a molecular switch for cancer progression and thus suggest that limiting the expression/activation of this GTPase could help improve outcome for breast cancer patients. PMID:26908458

  10. ADP-ribosylation factor 1 expression regulates epithelial-mesenchymal transition and predicts poor clinical outcome in triple-negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Schlienger, Sabrina; Campbell, Shirley; Pasquin, Sarah; Gaboury, Louis; Claing, Audrey

    2016-03-29

    Metastatic capacities are fundamental features of tumor malignancy. ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) 1 has emerged as a key regulator of invasion in breast cancer cells. However, the importance of this GTPase, in vivo, remains to be demonstrated. We report that ARF1 is highly expressed in breast tumors of the most aggressive and advanced subtypes. Furthermore, we show that lowered expression of ARF1 impairs growth of primary tumors and inhibits lung metastasis in a murine xenograft model. To understand how ARF1 contributes to invasiveness, we used a poorly invasive breast cancer cell line, MCF7 (ER+), and examined the effects of overexpressing ARF1 to levels similar to that found in invasive cell lines. We demonstrate that ARF1 overexpression leads to the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Mechanistically, ARF1 controls cell-cell adhesion through ß-catenin and E-cadherin, oncogenic Ras activation and expression of EMT inducers. We further show that ARF1 overexpression enhances invasion, proliferation and resistance to a chemotherapeutic agent. In vivo, ARF1 overexpressing MCF7 cells are able to form more metastases to the lung. Overall, our findings demonstrate that ARF1 is a molecular switch for cancer progression and thus suggest that limiting the expression/activation of this GTPase could help improve outcome for breast cancer patients. PMID:26908458

  11. ADP-Ribosylation Factor 6 Acts as an Allosteric Activator for the Folded but not Disordered Cholera Toxin A1 Polypeptide

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Tuhina; Taylor, Michael; Jobling, Michael G.; Burress, Helen; Yang, ZhiJie; Serrano, Albert; Holmes, Randall K.; Tatulian, Suren A.; Teter, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Summary The catalytic A1 subunit of cholera toxin (CTA1) has a disordered structure at 37°C. An interaction with host factors must therefore place CTA1 in a folded conformation for the modification of its Gsα target which resides in a lipid raft environment. Host ADP-ribosylation factors (ARFs) act as in vitro allosteric activators of CTA1, but the molecular events of this process are not fully characterized. Isotope-edited Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy monitored ARF6-induced structural changes to CTA1, which were correlated to changes in CTA1 activity. We found ARF6 prevents the thermal disordering of structured CTA1 and stimulates the activity of stabilized CTA1 over a range of temperatures. Yet ARF6 alone did not promote the refolding of disordered CTA1 to an active state. Instead, lipid rafts shifted disordered CTA1 to a folded conformation with a basal level of activity that could be further stimulated by ARF6. Thus, ARF alone is unable to activate disordered CTA1 at physiological temperature: additional host factors such as lipid rafts place CTA1 in the folded conformation required for its ARF-mediated activation. Interaction with ARF is required for in vivo toxin activity, as enzymatically active CTA1 mutants that cannot be further stimulated by ARF6 fail to intoxicate cultured cells. PMID:25257027

  12. ADP Ribosylation Factor 6 Regulates Neuronal Migration in the Developing Cerebral Cortex through FIP3/Arfophilin-1-dependent Endosomal Trafficking of N-cadherin.

    PubMed

    Hara, Yoshinobu; Fukaya, Masahiro; Hayashi, Kanehiro; Kawauchi, Takeshi; Nakajima, Kazunori; Sakagami, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    During neural development, endosomal trafficking controls cell shape and motility through the polarized transport of membrane proteins related to cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions. ADP ribosylation factor 6 (Arf6) is a critical small GTPase that regulates membrane trafficking between the plasma membrane and endosomes. We herein demonstrated that the knockdown of endogenous Arf6 in mouse cerebral cortices led to impaired neuronal migration in the intermediate zone and cytoplasmic retention of N-cadherin and syntaxin12 in migrating neurons. Rescue experiments with separation-of-function Arf6 mutants identified Rab11 family-interacting protein 3 (FIP3)/Arfophilin-1, a dual effector for Arf6 and Rab11, as a downstream effector of Arf6 in migrating neurons. The knockdown of FIP3 led to impaired neuronal migration in the intermediate zone and cytoplasmic retention of N-cadherin in migrating neurons, similar to that of Arf6, which could be rescued by the coexpression of wild-type FIP3 but not FIP3 mutants lacking the binding site for Arf6 or Rab11. These results suggest that Arf6 regulates cortical neuronal migration in the intermediate zone through the FIP3-dependent endosomal trafficking. PMID:27622210

  13. ADP Ribosylation Factor 6 Regulates Neuronal Migration in the Developing Cerebral Cortex through FIP3/Arfophilin-1-dependent Endosomal Trafficking of N-cadherin

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Yoshinobu; Fukaya, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Abstract During neural development, endosomal trafficking controls cell shape and motility through the polarized transport of membrane proteins related to cell–cell and cell–extracellular matrix interactions. ADP ribosylation factor 6 (Arf6) is a critical small GTPase that regulates membrane trafficking between the plasma membrane and endosomes. We herein demonstrated that the knockdown of endogenous Arf6 in mouse cerebral cortices led to impaired neuronal migration in the intermediate zone and cytoplasmic retention of N-cadherin and syntaxin12 in migrating neurons. Rescue experiments with separation-of-function Arf6 mutants identified Rab11 family-interacting protein 3 (FIP3)/Arfophilin-1, a dual effector for Arf6 and Rab11, as a downstream effector of Arf6 in migrating neurons. The knockdown of FIP3 led to impaired neuronal migration in the intermediate zone and cytoplasmic retention of N-cadherin in migrating neurons, similar to that of Arf6, which could be rescued by the coexpression of wild-type FIP3 but not FIP3 mutants lacking the binding site for Arf6 or Rab11. These results suggest that Arf6 regulates cortical neuronal migration in the intermediate zone through the FIP3-dependent endosomal trafficking. PMID:27622210

  14. ARNO3, a Sec7-domain guanine nucleotide exchange factor for ADP ribosylation factor 1, is involved in the control of Golgi structure and function

    PubMed Central

    Franco, Michel; Boretto, Joëlle; Robineau, Sylviane; Monier, Solange; Goud, Bruno; Chardin, Pierre; Chavrier, Philippe

    1998-01-01

    Budding of transport vesicles in the Golgi apparatus requires the recruitment of coat proteins and is regulated by ADP ribosylation factor (ARF) 1. ARF1 activation is promoted by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), which catalyze the transition to GTP-bound ARF1. We recently have identified a human protein, ARNO (ARF nucleotide-binding-site opener), as an ARF1-GEF that shares a conserved domain with the yeast Sec7 protein. We now describe a human Sec7 domain-containing GEF referred to as ARNO3. ARNO and ARNO3, as well as a third GEF called cytohesin-1, form a family of highly related proteins with identical structural organization that consists of a central Sec7 domain and a carboxy-terminal pleckstrin homology domain. We show that all three proteins act as ARF1 GEF in vitro, whereas they have no effect on ARF6, an ARF protein implicated in the early endocytic pathway. Substrate specificity of ARNO-like GEFs for ARF1 depends solely on the Sec7 domain. Overexpression of ARNO3 in mammalian cells results in (i) fragmentation of the Golgi apparatus, (ii) redistribution of Golgi resident proteins as well as the coat component β-COP, and (iii) inhibition of SEAP transport (secreted form of alkaline phosphatase). In contrast, the distribution of endocytic markers is not affected. This study indicates that Sec7 domain-containing GEFs control intracellular membrane compartment structure and function through the regulation of specific ARF proteins in mammalian cells. PMID:9707577

  15. Modes of Action of ADP-Ribosylated Elongation Factor 2 in Inhibiting the Polypeptide Elongation Cycle: A Modeling Study

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Kevin C.; Xie, Honglin; Cai, Yujie

    2013-01-01

    Despite the fact that ADP-ribosylation of eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (EF2) leads to inhibition of protein synthesis, the mechanism by which ADP-ribosylated EF2 (ADPR•EF2) causes this inhibition remains controversial. Here, we applied modeling approaches to investigate the consequences of various modes of ADPR•EF2 inhibitory actions on the two coupled processes, the polypeptide chain elongation and ADP-ribosylation of EF2. Modeling of experimental data indicates that ADPR•EF2 fully blocks the late-phase translocation of tRNAs; but the impairment in the translocation upstream process, mainly the GTP-dependent factor binding with the pretranslocation ribosome and/or the guanine nucleotide exchange in EF2, is responsible for the overall inhibition kinetics. The reduced ADPR•EF2-ribosome association spares the ribosome to bind and shield native EF2 against toxin attack, thereby deferring the inhibition of protein synthesis inhibition and inactivation of EF2. Minimum association with the ribosome also keeps ADPR•EF2 in an accessible state for toxins to catalyze the reverse reaction when nicotinamide becomes available. Our work underscores the importance of unveiling the interactions between ADPR•EF2 and the ribosome, and argues against that toxins inhibit protein synthesis through converting native EF2 to a competitive inhibitor to actively disable the ribosome. PMID:23861744

  16. ADP ribosylation factor like 2 (Arl2) protein influences microtubule dynamics in breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Beghin, Anne . E-mail: anne.beghin@recherche.univ-lyon1.fr; Honore, Stephane; Messana, Celine; Matera, Eva-Laure; Aim, Jennifer; Burlinchon, Sandrine; Braguer, Diane; Dumontet, Charles

    2007-02-01

    ADP ribosylation factor like 2 (Arl2) protein is involved in the folding of tubulin peptides. Variants of the human adenocarcinoma line MCF7 cells with increased or reduced content of Arl2 protein were produced and characterized. Western blot analysis performed after separation of the different fractions of tubulins showed that the content in polymerizable soluble heterodimers was significantly increased in cells with the highest Arl2 expression level (MA+) and reduced in cells with the lowest Arl2 expression level (MA-) in comparison to control cells (MP). Microtubule dynamic instability, measured after microinjection of rhodamine-labelled tubulin in living cells, was significantly enhanced in MA+ cells and reduced in MA- cells. These alterations involved modifications of the microtubule growth and shortening rates, duration of attenuation phases, percentage of time spent in each phase (growth, shortening and attenuation) and catastrophe frequency. We also observed modifications in the expression level of the tumor suppressor protein phosphatase 2Ac, which has been shown to form a complex with Arl2. Finally, cell cycle progression was modified in these cells, particularly in regard to duration of telophase. In summary, alterations in Arl2 protein content were found to be associated with modifications in tubulin pools, microtubule dynamics as well as cell cycle progression.

  17. The Structure of RalF, an ADP-Ribosylation Factor Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor from Legionella pneumophila, Reveals the Presence of a Cap over the Active Site

    SciTech Connect

    Amor,J.; Swails, J.; Zhu, X.; Roy, C.; Nagai, H.; Ingmundson, A.; Cheng, X.; Kahn, R.

    2005-01-01

    The Legionella pneumophila protein RalF is secreted into host cytosol via the Dot/Icm type IV transporter where it acts to recruit ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf) to pathogen-containing phagosomes in the establishment of a replicative organelle. The presence in RalF of the Sec7 domain, present in all Arf guanine nucleotide exchange factors, has suggested that recruitment of Arf is an early step in pathogenesis. We have determined the crystal structure of RalF and of the isolated Sec7 domain and found that RalF is made up of two domains. The Sec7 domain is homologous to mammalian Sec7 domains. The C-terminal domain forms a cap over the active site in the Sec7 domain and contains a conserved folding motif, previously observed in adaptor subunits of vesicle coat complexes. The importance of the capping domain and of the glutamate in the 'glutamic finger,' conserved in all Sec7 domains, to RalF functions was examined using three different assays. These data highlight the functional importance of domains other than Sec7 in Arf guanine nucleotide exchange factors to biological activities and suggest novel mechanisms of regulation of those activities.

  18. GB virus type C E2 protein inhibits human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Gag assembly by downregulating human ADP-ribosylation factor 1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chenliang; Timmons, Christine L.; Shao, Qiujia; Kinlock, Ballington L.; Turner, Tiffany M.; Iwamoto, Aikichi; Zhang, Hui; Liu, Huanliang; Liu, Bindong

    2015-01-01

    GB virus type C (GBV-C) glycoprotein E2 protein disrupts HIV-1 assembly and release by inhibiting Gag plasma membrane targeting, however the mechanism by which the GBV-C E2 inhibits Gag trafficking remains unclear. In the present study, we identified ADP-ribosylation factor 1 (ARF1) contributed to the inhibitory effect of GBV-C E2 on HIV-1 Gag membrane targeting. Expression of GBV-C E2 decreased ARF1 expression in a proteasomal degradation-dependent manner. The restoration of ARF1 expression rescued the HIV-1 Gag processing and membrane targeting defect imposed by GBV-C E2. In addition, GBV-C E2 expression also altered Golgi morphology and suppressed protein traffic through the secretory pathway, which are all consistent with a phenotype of disrupting the function of ARF1 protein. Thus, our results indicate that GBV-C E2 inhibits HIV-1 assembly and release by decreasing ARF1, and may provide insights regarding GBV-C E2's potential for a new therapeutic approach for treating HIV-1. PMID:26675377

  19. Nuclear localization and molecular partners of BIG1, a brefeldin A-inhibited guanine nucleotide-exchange protein for ADP-ribosylation factors.

    PubMed

    Padilla, Philip Ian; Pacheco-Rodriguez, Gustavo; Moss, Joel; Vaughan, Martha

    2004-03-01

    Brefeldin A-inhibited guanine nucleotide-exchange protein 1 (BIG1) is an approximately 200-kDa brefeldin A-inhibited guanine nucleotide-exchange protein that preferentially activates ADP-ribosylation factor 1 (ARF1) and ARF3. BIG1 was found in cytosol in a multiprotein complex with a similar ARF-activating protein, BIG2, which is also an A kinase-anchoring protein. In HepG2 cells growing with serum, BIG1 was primarily cytosolic and Golgi-associated. After incubation overnight without serum, a large fraction of endogenous BIG1 was in the nuclei. By confocal immunofluorescence microscopy, BIG1 was localized with nucleoporin p62 at the nuclear envelope (probably during nucleocytoplasmic transport) and also in nucleoli, clearly visible against the less concentrated overall matrix staining. BIG1 was also identified by Western blot analyses in purified subnuclear fractions (e.g., nucleoli and nuclear matrix). Antibodies against BIG1, nucleoporin, or nucleolin coimmunoprecipitated the other two proteins from purified nuclei. In contrast, BIG2 was not associated with nuclear BIG1. Also of note, ARF was never detected among proteins precipitated from purified nuclei by anti-BIG1 antibodies, although microscopically the two proteins do appear sometimes to be colocalized in the nucleus. These data are consistent with independent intracellular movements and actions of BIG1 and BIG2, and they are also evidence of the participation of BIG1 in both Golgi and nuclear functions. PMID:14973189

  20. Characterization of ADP ribosylation factor 1 gene from Exopalaemon carinicauda and its immune response to pathogens challenge and ammonia-N stress.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yafei; Li, Jian; Zhang, Zhe; Li, Jitao; Liu, Ping

    2016-08-01

    ADP ribosylation factors (Arf), as highly conserved small guanosine triphosphate (GTP)-binding proteins, participates in intracellular trafficking and organelle structure. In this study, a full-length cDNA of Arf1 (designated EcArf1) was cloned from Exopalaemon carinicauda by using rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) approaches. The full-length cDNA of EcArf1 was 1428 bp, which contains an open reading frame (ORF) of 549 bp, encoding a 182 amino-acid polypeptide with the predicted molecular weight of 20.69 kDa and estimated isoelectric point was 7.24. Sequence analysis revealed that the conserved Arf protein family signatures were identified in EcArf1. The deduced amino acid sequence of EcArf1 shared high identity (95%-98%) with that of other species and clustered together with Arf1 of other shrimp in the NJ phylogenetic tree, indicating that EcArf1 should be a member of the Arf1 family. Quantitative real-time RT-qPCR analysis indicated that EcArf1 was expressed in hemocytes, hepatopancreas, gills, muscle, ovary, intestine, stomach and heart, and the most abundant level was in hemocytes and gills, which were also the two main target tissues of pathogen infection and environmental stress. After Vibrio parahaemolyticus challenge, EcArf1 transcripts level significantly increased in hemocytes and hepatopancreas at 3 h and 6 h, respectively. The expression of EcArf1 in hemocytes and hepatopancreas significantly up-regulated at 12 h and 6 h respectively, and down-regulated at 72 h and 48 h, respectively. EcArf1 expression in hepatopancreas and gills both significantly increased at 6 h and decreased at 24 h under ammonia-N stress. The results suggested that EcArf1 might be involved in immune responses to pathogens (V. parahaemolyticus and WSSV) challenge and ammonia-N stress in E. carinicauda. PMID:27231192

  1. Site of ADP-ribosylation and the RNA-binding site are situated in different domains of the elongation factor EF-2

    SciTech Connect

    Davydova, E.K.

    1987-01-01

    One of the proteins participating in the process of elongation of polypeptide chains - elongation factor 2 (EF-2) - can be ADP-ribosylated at a unique amino acid residue - diphthamide. Since the ADP-ribosylation of EF-2 at dipthamide leads to a loss of affinity of the factor for RNA while the presence of RNA inhibits the ADP-ribosylation reaction, it seemed probable to the authors that diphthamide participated directly in the binding of EF-2 to DNA. The experiments presented in this article showed that this was not the case: diphthamide and the RNA-binding site are situated on different domains of EF-2. Thus, ADP-ribosylation of factor EF-2 in one domain leads to a loss of the ability to bind to RNA in the other. The authors investigated the mutual arrangement of diphthamide and the RNA-binding site on the EF-2 molecule by preparing a factor from rabbit reticulocytes and subjecting it to proteolytic digestion with elastase. The factor was incubated with elastase for 15 min at 37/sup 0/C at an enzyme:substrate ratio of 1:100 in buffer solution containing 20 mM Tris-HCl, pH 7.6, 10 mM KCl, 1 mM MgCl/sub 2/, and 2 mM dithiothreitol. The reaction was stopped by adding para-methylsulfonyl fluoride to 50 micro-M. The authors obtained a preparation as a result of proteolysis and applied it on a column with RNA-Sepharose and separated into two fractions: RNA-binding and without affinity for RNA. The initial preparation and its fractions were subjected to exhaustive ADP-ribosylation in the presence of diphtheria toxin and (U-/sup 14/C) nicotinaide adenine dinucleotide ((/sup 14/C)NAD) (296 mCi/mmole). The samples were analyzed electrophoretically in a polyacrylamide gel gradient in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate. For the detection of (/sup 14/C) ADP-ribosylated components, the gels were dried and exposed with RM-V x-ray film.

  2. ADP-ribosylation Factor-related Protein 1 Interacts with NS5A and Regulates Hepatitis C Virus Propagation.

    PubMed

    Lim, Yun-Sook; Ngo, Huong T T; Lee, Jihye; Son, Kidong; Park, Eun-Mee; Hwang, Soon B

    2016-01-01

    The life cycle of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is tightly coupled to the lipid metabolism of host cells. In order to identify host factors involved in HCV propagation, we have previously screened a small interfering RNA (siRNA) library targeting host genes that control lipid metabolism and lipid droplet (LD) formation using cell culture-grown HCV (HCVcc)-infected cells. In this study, we selected and characterized the gene encoding ADP-ribosylation factor-related protein 1 (ARFRP1). ARFRP1 is essential for LD growth and is involved in the regulation of lipolysis. siRNA-mediated knockdown of ARFRP1 significantly inhibited HCV replication in both subgenomic replicon cells and HCVcc-infected cells. ARFRP1 interacted with NS5A and NS5A partially colocalized with LD. Silencing of ARFRP1 abrogated HCV-induced LD growth and viral protein expressions. Moreover, ARFRP1 recruited synaptosomal-associated protein 23 (SNAP23) to sites in close proximity to LDs in HCV-infected cells. Silencing of ARFRP1 ablated relocalization of SNAP23 to LD. These data indicate that HCV regulates ARFRP1 for LD growth to facilitate viral propagation and thus ARFRP1 may be a potential target for antiviral therapy. PMID:27550144

  3. ADP-ribosylation Factor-related Protein 1 Interacts with NS5A and Regulates Hepatitis C Virus Propagation

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Yun-Sook; Ngo, Huong T. T.; Lee, Jihye; Son, Kidong; Park, Eun-Mee; Hwang, Soon B.

    2016-01-01

    The life cycle of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is tightly coupled to the lipid metabolism of host cells. In order to identify host factors involved in HCV propagation, we have previously screened a small interfering RNA (siRNA) library targeting host genes that control lipid metabolism and lipid droplet (LD) formation using cell culture-grown HCV (HCVcc)-infected cells. In this study, we selected and characterized the gene encoding ADP-ribosylation factor-related protein 1 (ARFRP1). ARFRP1 is essential for LD growth and is involved in the regulation of lipolysis. siRNA-mediated knockdown of ARFRP1 significantly inhibited HCV replication in both subgenomic replicon cells and HCVcc-infected cells. ARFRP1 interacted with NS5A and NS5A partially colocalized with LD. Silencing of ARFRP1 abrogated HCV-induced LD growth and viral protein expressions. Moreover, ARFRP1 recruited synaptosomal-associated protein 23 (SNAP23) to sites in close proximity to LDs in HCV-infected cells. Silencing of ARFRP1 ablated relocalization of SNAP23 to LD. These data indicate that HCV regulates ARFRP1 for LD growth to facilitate viral propagation and thus ARFRP1 may be a potential target for antiviral therapy. PMID:27550144

  4. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of Apoptosis Antagonizing Transcription Factor Involved in Hydroquinone-Induced DNA Damage Response.

    PubMed

    Ling, Xiao Xuan; Liu, Jia Xian; Yun, Lin; DU, Yu Jun; Chen, Shao Qian; Chen, Jia Long; Tang, Huan Wen; Liu, Lin Hua

    2016-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of DNA damage induced by hydroquinone (HQ) remains unclear. Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) usually works as a DNA damage sensor, and hence, it is possible that PARP-1 is involved in the DNA damage response induced by HQ. In TK6 cells treated with HQ, PARP activity as well as the expression of apoptosis antagonizing transcription factor (AATF), PARP-1, and phosphorylated H2AX (γ-H2AX) were maximum at 0.5 h, 6 h, 3 h, and 3 h, respectively. To explore the detailed mechanisms underlying the prompt DNA repair reaction, the above indicators were investigated in PARP-1-silenced cells. PARP activity and expression of AATF and PARP-1 decreased to 36%, 32%, and 33%, respectively, in the cells; however, γ-H2AX expression increased to 265%. Co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) assays were employed to determine whether PARP-1 and AATF formed protein complexes. The interaction between these proteins together with the results from IP assays and confocal microscopy indicated that poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) regulated AATF expression. In conclusion, PARP-1 was involved in the DNA damage repair induced by HQ via increasing the accumulation of AATF through PARylation. PMID:26822515

  5. ADP ribosylation factor 1 mutants identify a phospholipase D effector region and reveal that phospholipase D participates in lysosomal secretion but is not sufficient for recruitment of coatomer I.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, D H; Bax, B; Fensome, A; Cockcroft, S

    1999-01-01

    The small GTP-binding protein, ADP-ribosylation factor 1 (ARF1) is essential for the formation of coatomer-coated vesicles from the Golgi and is also an activator of phospholipase D (PLD). Moreover, ARF1-regulated PLD is part of the signal-transduction pathway that can lead to secretion. In this study, substitution and deletion mutants of ARF1 were tested for their ability to activate PLD. These map the PLD effector region of ARF1 to the alpha2 helix, part of the beta2-strand and the N-terminal helix and its ensuing loop. ARF mutants with an increased or decreased ability to activate PLD showed similar characteristics when tested for their ability to stimulate secretion from HL60 cells. ARF1, deleted of the N-terminal 17 amino acid residues (Ndel17), did not support PLD activity or secretion, and neither did it inhibit the activity of wild-type myristoylated ARF1 (myrARF1). In contrast, Ndel17 effectively competed with wild-type myrARF1 to prevent coatomer binding to membranes. This appears to define a structural role for Ndel17, as it can bind a high-molecular mass complex in cytosol. In addition, ethanol has no effect on recruitment of coatomer to membrane. We conclude that the function of ARF-regulated PLD is in the signal-transduction pathway leading to secretion of lysosomal granules, and not as an essential component of ARF1-mediated coatomer binding. PMID:10377261

  6. Cholix Toxin, a Novel ADP-ribosylating Factor from Vibrio cholerae

    SciTech Connect

    Jorgensen, Rene; Purdy, Alexandra E.; Fieldhouse, Robert J.; Kimber, Matthew S.; Bartlett, Douglas H.; Merrill, A. Rod

    2008-07-15

    The ADP-ribosyltransferases are a class of enzymes that display activity in a variety of bacterial pathogens responsible for causing diseases in plants and animals, including those affecting mankind, such as diphtheria, cholera, and whooping cough. We report the characterization of a novel toxin from Vibrio cholerae, which we call cholix toxin. The toxin is active against mammalian cells (IC50 = 4.6 {+-} 0.4 ng/ml) and crustaceans (Artemia nauplii LD50 = 10 {+-} 2 {mu}g/ml). Here we show that this toxin is the third member of the diphthamide-specific class of ADP-ribose transferases and that it possesses specific ADP-ribose transferase activity against ribosomal eukaryotic elongation factor 2. We also describe the high resolution crystal structures of the multidomain toxin and its catalytic domain at 2.1- and 1.25-{angstrom} resolution, respectively. The new structural data show that cholix toxin possesses the necessary molecular features required for infection of eukaryotes by receptor-mediated endocytosis, translocation to the host cytoplasm, and inhibition of protein synthesis by specific modification of elongation factor 2. The crystal structures also provide important insight into the structural basis for activation of toxin ADP-ribosyltransferase activity. These results indicate that cholix toxin may be an important virulence factor of Vibrio cholerae that likely plays a significant role in the survival of the organism in an aquatic environment.

  7. Regulation of Bone Morphogenetic Protein Signaling by ADP-ribosylation.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Yukihide; Papoutsoglou, Panagiotis; Maturi, Varun; Tsubakihara, Yutaro; Hottiger, Michael O; Heldin, Carl-Henrik; Moustakas, Aristidis

    2016-06-10

    We previously established a mechanism of negative regulation of transforming growth factor β signaling mediated by the nuclear ADP-ribosylating enzyme poly-(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) and the deribosylating enzyme poly-(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG), which dynamically regulate ADP-ribosylation of Smad3 and Smad4, two central signaling proteins of the pathway. Here we demonstrate that the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) pathway can also be regulated by the opposing actions of PARP1 and PARG. PARG positively contributes to BMP signaling and forms physical complexes with Smad5 and Smad4. The positive role PARG plays during BMP signaling can be neutralized by PARP1, as demonstrated by experiments where PARG and PARP1 are simultaneously silenced. In contrast to PARG, ectopic expression of PARP1 suppresses BMP signaling, whereas silencing of endogenous PARP1 enhances signaling and BMP-induced differentiation. The two major Smad proteins of the BMP pathway, Smad1 and Smad5, interact with PARP1 and can be ADP-ribosylated in vitro, whereas PARG causes deribosylation. The overall outcome of this mode of regulation of BMP signal transduction provides a fine-tuning mechanism based on the two major enzymes that control cellular ADP-ribosylation. PMID:27129221

  8. Nuclear ADP-Ribosylation Reactions in Mammalian Cells: Where Are We Today and Where Are We Going?

    PubMed Central

    Hassa, Paul O.; Haenni, Sandra S.; Elser, Michael; Hottiger, Michael O.

    2006-01-01

    Since poly-ADP ribose was discovered over 40 years ago, there has been significant progress in research into the biology of mono- and poly-ADP-ribosylation reactions. During the last decade, it became clear that ADP-ribosylation reactions play important roles in a wide range of physiological and pathophysiological processes, including inter- and intracellular signaling, transcriptional regulation, DNA repair pathways and maintenance of genomic stability, telomere dynamics, cell differentiation and proliferation, and necrosis and apoptosis. ADP-ribosylation reactions are phylogenetically ancient and can be classified into four major groups: mono-ADP-ribosylation, poly-ADP-ribosylation, ADP-ribose cyclization, and formation of O-acetyl-ADP-ribose. In the human genome, more than 30 different genes coding for enzymes associated with distinct ADP-ribosylation activities have been identified. This review highlights the recent advances in the rapidly growing field of nuclear mono-ADP-ribosylation and poly-ADP-ribosylation reactions and the distinct ADP-ribosylating enzyme families involved in these processes, including the proposed family of novel poly-ADP-ribose polymerase-like mono-ADP-ribose transferases and the potential mono-ADP-ribosylation activities of the sirtuin family of NAD+-dependent histone deacetylases. A special focus is placed on the known roles of distinct mono- and poly-ADP-ribosylation reactions in physiological processes, such as mitosis, cellular differentiation and proliferation, telomere dynamics, and aging, as well as “programmed necrosis” (i.e., high-mobility-group protein B1 release) and apoptosis (i.e., apoptosis-inducing factor shuttling). The proposed molecular mechanisms involved in these processes, such as signaling, chromatin modification (i.e., “histone code”), and remodeling of chromatin structure (i.e., DNA damage response, transcriptional regulation, and insulator function), are described. A potential cross talk between nuclear

  9. Activation of exocytosis by cross-linking of the IgE receptor is dependent on ADP-ribosylation factor 1-regulated phospholipase D in RBL-2H3 mast cells: evidence that the mechanism of activation is via regulation of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Way, G; O'luanaigh, N; Cockcroft, S

    2000-01-01

    The physiological stimulus to exocytosis in mast cells is the cross-linking of the high-affinity IgE receptor, FcepsilonR1, with antigen. We demonstrate a novel function for ADP-ribosylation factor 1 (ARF1) in the regulation of antigen-stimulated secretion using cytosol-depleted RBL-2H3 mast cells for reconstitution of secretory responses. When antigen is used as the stimulus, ARF1 also reconstitutes phospholipase D activation. Using ethanol to divert the phosphatidic acid (the product of phospholipase D activity) to phosphatidylethanol causes inhibition of ARF1-reconstituted secretion. In addition. ARF1 causes an increase in phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP(2)) levels at the expense of phosphatidylinositol 4-monophosphate. The requirement for PIP(2) in exocytosis was confirmed by using phosphatidylinositol transfer protein (PITPalpha) to increase PIP(2) levels. Exocytosis, restored by either ARF1 or PITPalpha, was inhibited when PIP(2) levels were depleted by phospholipase Cdelta1. We conclude that the function of ARF1 and PITPalpha is to increase the local synthesis of PIP(2), the function of which in exocytosis is likely to be linked to lipid-protein interactions, whereby recruitment of key components of the exocytotic machinery are targeted to the appropriate membrane compartment. PMID:10657240

  10. ADP-Ribosylation: Activation, Recognition, and Removal

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nan; Chen, Junjie

    2014-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation is a type of posttranslational modification catalyzed by members of the poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) polymerase superfamily. ADP-ribosylation is initiated by PARPs, recognized by PAR binding proteins, and removed by PARG and other ADP-ribose hydrolases. These three groups of proteins work together to regulate the cellular and molecular response of PAR signaling, which is critical for a wide range of cellular and physiological functions. PMID:24552704

  11. The family of bacterial ADP-ribosylating exotoxins.

    PubMed Central

    Krueger, K M; Barbieri, J T

    1995-01-01

    Pathogenic bacteria utilize a variety of virulence factors that contribute to the clinical manifestation of their pathogenesis. Bacterial ADP-ribosylating exotoxins (bAREs) represent one family of virulence factors that exert their toxic effects by transferring the ADP-ribose moiety of NAD onto specific eucaryotic target proteins. The observations that some bAREs ADP-ribosylate eucaryotic proteins that regulate signal transduction, like the heterotrimeric GTP-binding proteins and the low-molecular-weight GTP-binding proteins, has extended interest in bAREs beyond the bacteriology laboratory. Molecular studies have shown that bAREs possess little primary amino acid homology and have diverse quaternary structure-function organization. Underlying this apparent diversity, biochemical and crystallographic studies have shown that several bAREs have conserved active-site structures and possess a conserved glutamic acid within their active sites. PMID:7704894

  12. ADP-Ribosyltransferases and Poly ADP-Ribosylation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chao; Yu, Xiaochun

    2016-01-01

    Protein ADP-ribosylation is an important posttranslational modification that plays versatile roles in multiple biological processes. ADP-ribosylation is catalyzed by a group of enzymes known as ADP-ribosyltransferases (ARTs). Using nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+) as the donor, ARTs covalently link single or multiple ADP-ribose moieties from NAD+ to the substrates, forming mono ADP-ribosylation or poly ADP-ribosylation (PARylation). Novel functions of ARTs and ADP-ribosylation have been revealed over the past few years. Here we summarize the current knowledge on ARTs and PARylation. PMID:25938242

  13. Wnt pathway activation by ADP-ribosylation

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Eungi; Tacchelly-Benites, Ofelia; Wang, Zhenghan; Randall, Michael P.; Tian, Ai; Benchabane, Hassina; Freemantle, Sarah; Pikielny, Claudio; Tolwinski, Nicholas S.; Lee, Ethan; Ahmed, Yashi

    2016-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signalling directs fundamental processes during metazoan development and can be aberrantly activated in cancer. Wnt stimulation induces the recruitment of the scaffold protein Axin from an inhibitory destruction complex to a stimulatory signalosome. Here we analyse the early effects of Wnt on Axin and find that the ADP-ribose polymerase Tankyrase (Tnks)—known to target Axin for proteolysis—regulates Axin's rapid transition following Wnt stimulation. We demonstrate that the pool of ADP-ribosylated Axin, which is degraded under basal conditions, increases immediately following Wnt stimulation in both Drosophila and human cells. ADP-ribosylation of Axin enhances its interaction with the Wnt co-receptor LRP6, an essential step in signalosome assembly. We suggest that in addition to controlling Axin levels, Tnks-dependent ADP-ribosylation promotes the reprogramming of Axin following Wnt stimulation; and propose that Tnks inhibition blocks Wnt signalling not only by increasing destruction complex activity, but also by impeding signalosome assembly. PMID:27138857

  14. Wnt pathway activation by ADP-ribosylation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Eungi; Tacchelly-Benites, Ofelia; Wang, Zhenghan; Randall, Michael P; Tian, Ai; Benchabane, Hassina; Freemantle, Sarah; Pikielny, Claudio; Tolwinski, Nicholas S; Lee, Ethan; Ahmed, Yashi

    2016-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signalling directs fundamental processes during metazoan development and can be aberrantly activated in cancer. Wnt stimulation induces the recruitment of the scaffold protein Axin from an inhibitory destruction complex to a stimulatory signalosome. Here we analyse the early effects of Wnt on Axin and find that the ADP-ribose polymerase Tankyrase (Tnks)--known to target Axin for proteolysis-regulates Axin's rapid transition following Wnt stimulation. We demonstrate that the pool of ADP-ribosylated Axin, which is degraded under basal conditions, increases immediately following Wnt stimulation in both Drosophila and human cells. ADP-ribosylation of Axin enhances its interaction with the Wnt co-receptor LRP6, an essential step in signalosome assembly. We suggest that in addition to controlling Axin levels, Tnks-dependent ADP-ribosylation promotes the reprogramming of Axin following Wnt stimulation; and propose that Tnks inhibition blocks Wnt signalling not only by increasing destruction complex activity, but also by impeding signalosome assembly. PMID:27138857

  15. Analysis of Chromatin ADP-Ribosylation at the Genome-wide Level and at Specific Loci by ADPr-ChAP.

    PubMed

    Bartolomei, Giody; Leutert, Mario; Manzo, Massimiliano; Baubec, Tuncay; Hottiger, Michael O

    2016-02-01

    Chromatin ADP-ribosylation regulates important cellular processes. However, the exact location and magnitude of chromatin ADP-ribosylation are largely unknown. A robust and versatile method for assessing chromatin ADP-ribosylation is therefore crucial for further understanding its function. Here, we present a chromatin affinity precipitation method based on the high specificity and avidity of two well-characterized ADP-ribose binding domains to map chromatin ADP-ribosylation at the genome-wide scale and at specific loci. Our ADPr-ChAP method revealed that in cells exposed to oxidative stress, ADP-ribosylation of chromatin scales with histone density, with highest levels at heterochromatic sites and depletion at active promoters. Furthermore, in growth factor-induced adipocyte differentiation, increased chromatin ADP-ribosylation was observed at PPARγ target genes, whose expression is ADP-ribosylation dependent. In combination with deep-sequencing and conventional chromatin immunoprecipitation, the established ADPr-ChAP provides a valuable resource for the bioinformatic comparison of ADP-ribosylation with other chromatin modifications and for addressing its role in other biologically important processes. PMID:26833088

  16. Proteomics Approaches to Identify Mono(ADP-ribosyl)ated and Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated proteins

    PubMed Central

    Vivelo, Christina A.; Leung, Anthony K. L.

    2015-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation refers to the addition of one or more ADP-ribose units onto protein substrates and this protein modification has been implicated in various cellular processes including DNA damage repair, RNA metabolism, transcription and cell cycle regulation. This review focuses on a compilation of large-scale proteomics studies that identify ADP-ribosylated proteins and their associated proteins by mass spectrometry using a variety of enrichment strategies. Some methods, such as the use of a poly(ADP-ribose)-specific antibody and boronate affinity chromatography and NAD+ analogues, have been employed for decades while others, such as the use of protein microarrays and recombinant proteins that bind ADP-ribose moieties (such as macrodomains), have only recently been developed. The advantages and disadvantages of each method and whether these methods are specific for identifying mono(ADP-ribosyl)ated and poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated proteins will be discussed. Lastly, since poly(ADP-ribose) is heterogeneous in length, it has been difficult to attain a mass signature associated with the modification sites. Several strategies on how to reduce polymer chain length heterogeneity for site identification will be reviewed. PMID:25263235

  17. Proteomics approaches to identify mono-(ADP-ribosyl)ated and poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated proteins.

    PubMed

    Vivelo, Christina A; Leung, Anthony K L

    2015-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation refers to the addition of one or more ADP-ribose units onto protein substrates and this protein modification has been implicated in various cellular processes including DNA damage repair, RNA metabolism, transcription, and cell cycle regulation. This review focuses on a compilation of large-scale proteomics studies that identify ADP-ribosylated proteins and their associated proteins by MS using a variety of enrichment strategies. Some methods, such as the use of a poly(ADP-ribose)-specific antibody and boronate affinity chromatography and NAD(+) analogues, have been employed for decades while others, such as the use of protein microarrays and recombinant proteins that bind ADP-ribose moieties (such as macrodomains), have only recently been developed. The advantages and disadvantages of each method and whether these methods are specific for identifying mono(ADP-ribosyl)ated and poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated proteins will be discussed. Lastly, since poly(ADP-ribose) is heterogeneous in length, it has been difficult to attain a mass signature associated with the modification sites. Several strategies on how to reduce polymer chain length heterogeneity for site identification will be reviewed. PMID:25263235

  18. Quantitative site-specific ADP-ribosylation profiling of DNA-dependent PARPs.

    PubMed

    Gagné, Jean-Philippe; Ethier, Chantal; Defoy, Daniel; Bourassa, Sylvie; Langelier, Marie-France; Riccio, Amanda A; Pascal, John M; Moon, Kyung-Mee; Foster, Leonard J; Ning, Zhibin; Figeys, Daniel; Droit, Arnaud; Poirier, Guy G

    2015-06-01

    An important feature of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) is their ability to readily undergo automodification upon activation. Although a growing number of substrates were found to be poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated, including histones and several DNA damage response factors, PARPs themselves are still considered as the main acceptors of poly(ADP-ribose). By monitoring spectral counts of specific hydroxamic acid signatures generated after the conversion of the ADP-ribose modification onto peptides by hydroxylamine hydrolysis, we undertook a thorough mass spectrometry mapping of the glutamate and aspartate ADP-ribosylation sites onto automodified PARP-1, PARP-2 and PARP-3. Thousands of hydroxamic acid-conjugated peptides were identified with high confidence and ranked based on their spectral count. This semi-quantitative approach allowed us to locate the preferentially targeted residues in DNA-dependent PARPs. In contrast to what has been reported in the literature, automodification of PARP-1 is not predominantly targeted towards its BRCT domain. Our results show that interdomain linker regions that connect the BRCT to the WGR module and the WGR to the PRD domain undergo prominent ADP-ribosylation during PARP-1 automodification. We also found that PARP-1 efficiently automodifies the D-loop structure within its own catalytic fold. Interestingly, additional major ADP-ribosylation sites were identified in functional domains of PARP-1, including all three zinc fingers. Similar to PARP-1, specific residues located within the catalytic sites of PARP-2 and PARP-3 are major targets of automodification following their DNA-dependent activation. Together our results suggest that poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation hot spots make a dominant contribution to the overall automodification process. PMID:25800440

  19. Brefeldin A-induced ADP-ribosylation in the structure and function of the Golgi complex.

    PubMed

    Colanzi, A; Mironov, A; Weigert, R; Limina, C; Flati, S; Cericola, C; Di Tullio, G; Di Girolamo, M; Corda, D; De Matteis, M A; Luini, A

    1997-01-01

    Brefeldin A (BFA) is a fungal metabolite that exerts generally inhibitory actions on membrane transport and induces the disappearance of the Golgi complex. Previously we have shown that BFA stimulates the ADP-ribosylation of two cytosolic proteins of 38 and 50 KD. The BFA-binding components mediating the BFA-sensitive ADP-ribosylation (BAR) and the effect of BFA on ARF binding to Golgi membranes have similar specificities and affinities for BFA and its analogues, suggesting that BAR may have a role in the cellular effects of BFA. To investigate this we used the approach to impair BAR activity by the use of BAR inhibitors. A series of BAR inhibitors was developed and their effects were studied in RBL cells treated with BFA. In addition to the common ADP-ribosylation inhibitors (nicotinamide and aminobenzamide), compounds belonging to the cumarin (novobiocin, cumermycin, dicumarol) class were active BAR inhibitors. All BAR inhibitors were able to prevent the BFA-induced redistribution of a Golgi marker (Helix pomatia lectin) into the endoplasmic reticulum, as assessed in immunofluorescence experiments. At the ultrastructural level, BAR inhibitors prevented the tubular-vesicular transformation of the Golgi complex caused by BFA. The potencies of these compounds in preventing the BFA effects on the Golgi complex were similar to those at which they inhibited BAR. Altogether these data support the hypothesis that BAR mediates at least some of the effects of BFA on the Golgi structure and function. PMID:9193673

  20. HPF1/C4orf27 Is a PARP-1-Interacting Protein that Regulates PARP-1 ADP-Ribosylation Activity.

    PubMed

    Gibbs-Seymour, Ian; Fontana, Pietro; Rack, Johannes Gregor Matthias; Ahel, Ivan

    2016-05-01

    We report the identification of histone PARylation factor 1 (HPF1; also known as C4orf27) as a regulator of ADP-ribosylation signaling in the DNA damage response. HPF1/C4orf27 forms a robust protein complex with PARP-1 in cells and is recruited to DNA lesions in a PARP-1-dependent manner, but independently of PARP-1 catalytic ADP-ribosylation activity. Functionally, HPF1 promotes PARP-1-dependent in trans ADP-ribosylation of histones and limits DNA damage-induced hyper-automodification of PARP-1. Human cells lacking HPF1 exhibit sensitivity to DNA damaging agents and PARP inhibition, thereby suggesting an important role for HPF1 in genome maintenance and regulating the efficacy of PARP inhibitors. Collectively, our results demonstrate how a fundamental step in PARP-1-dependent ADP-ribosylation signaling is regulated and suggest that HPF1 functions at the crossroads of histone ADP-ribosylation and PARP-1 automodification. PMID:27067600

  1. HPF1/C4orf27 Is a PARP-1-Interacting Protein that Regulates PARP-1 ADP-Ribosylation Activity

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs-Seymour, Ian; Fontana, Pietro; Rack, Johannes Gregor Matthias; Ahel, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Summary We report the identification of histone PARylation factor 1 (HPF1; also known as C4orf27) as a regulator of ADP-ribosylation signaling in the DNA damage response. HPF1/C4orf27 forms a robust protein complex with PARP-1 in cells and is recruited to DNA lesions in a PARP-1-dependent manner, but independently of PARP-1 catalytic ADP-ribosylation activity. Functionally, HPF1 promotes PARP-1-dependent in trans ADP-ribosylation of histones and limits DNA damage-induced hyper-automodification of PARP-1. Human cells lacking HPF1 exhibit sensitivity to DNA damaging agents and PARP inhibition, thereby suggesting an important role for HPF1 in genome maintenance and regulating the efficacy of PARP inhibitors. Collectively, our results demonstrate how a fundamental step in PARP-1-dependent ADP-ribosylation signaling is regulated and suggest that HPF1 functions at the crossroads of histone ADP-ribosylation and PARP-1 automodification. PMID:27067600

  2. A Clickable Aminooxy Probe for Monitoring Cellular ADP-Ribosylation

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Rory K.; Cohen, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation is essential for cell function, yet there is a dearth of methods for detecting this post-translational modification in cells. Here, we describe a clickable aminooxy alkyne (AO-alkyne) probe that can detect cellular ADP-ribosylation on acidic amino acids following Cu-catalyzed conjugation to an azide-containing reporter. Using AO-alkyne, we show that PARP10 and PARP11 are auto-ADP-ribosylated in cells. We also demonstrate that AO-alkyne can be used to monitor stimulus-induced ADP-ribosylation in cells. Functional studies using AO-alkyne support a previously unknown mechanism for ADP-ribosylation on acidic amino acids, wherein a glutamate or aspartate at the initial C1′-position of ADP-ribose transfers to the C2′ position. This new mechanism for ADP-ribosylation has important implications for how glutamyl/aspartyl-ADP-ribose is recognized by proteins in cells. PMID:25978521

  3. Structure-based Mechanism of ADP-ribosylation by Sirtuins

    SciTech Connect

    Hawse, William F.; Wolberger, Cynthia

    2009-12-01

    Sirtuins comprise a family of enzymes found in all organisms, where they play a role in diverse processes including transcriptional silencing, aging, regulation of transcription, and metabolism. The predominant reaction catalyzed by these enzymes is NAD{sup +}-dependent lysine deacetylation, although some sirtuins exhibit a weaker ADP-ribosyltransferase activity. Although the Sir2 deacetylation mechanism is well established, much less is known about the Sir2 ADP-ribosylation reaction. We have studied the ADP-ribosylation activity of a bacterial sirtuin, Sir2Tm, and show that acetylated peptides containing arginine or lysine 2 residues C-terminal to the acetyl lysine, the +2 position, are preferentially ADP-ribosylated at the +2 residue. A structure of Sir2Tm bound to the acetylated +2 arginine peptide shows how this arginine could enter the active site and react with a deacetylation reaction intermediate to yield an ADP-ribosylated peptide. The new biochemical and structural studies presented here provide mechanistic insights into the Sir2 ADP-ribosylation reaction and will aid in identifying substrates of this reaction.

  4. Arginine-Specific Mono ADP-Ribosylation In Vitro of Antimicrobial Peptides by ADP-Ribosylating Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Castagnini, Marta; Picchianti, Monica; Talluri, Eleonora; Biagini, Massimiliano; Del Vecchio, Mariangela; Di Procolo, Paolo; Norais, Nathalie; Nardi-Dei, Vincenzo; Balducci, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    Among the several toxins used by pathogenic bacteria to target eukaryotic host cells, proteins that exert ADP-ribosylation activity represent a large and studied family of dangerous and potentially lethal toxins. These proteins alter cell physiology catalyzing the transfer of the ADP-ribose unit from NAD to cellular proteins involved in key metabolic pathways. In the present study, we tested the capability of four of these toxins, to ADP-ribosylate α- and β- defensins. Cholera toxin (CT) from Vibrio cholerae and heat labile enterotoxin (LT) from Escherichia coli both modified the human α-defensin (HNP-1) and β- defensin-1 (HBD1), as efficiently as the mammalian mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase-1. Pseudomonas aeruginosa exoenzyme S was inactive on both HNP-1 and HBD1. Neisseria meningitidis NarE poorly recognized HNP-1 as a substrate but it was completely inactive on HBD1. On the other hand, HNP-1 strongly influenced NarE inhibiting its transferase activity while enhancing auto-ADP-ribosylation. We conclude that only some arginine-specific ADP-ribosylating toxins recognize defensins as substrates in vitro. Modifications that alter the biological activities of antimicrobial peptides may be relevant for the innate immune response. In particular, ADP-ribosylation of antimicrobial peptides may represent a novel escape mechanism adopted by pathogens to facilitate colonization of host tissues. PMID:22879887

  5. ADP-ribosylation of proteins: Enzymology and biological significance

    SciTech Connect

    Althaus, F.R.; Richter, C.

    1987-01-01

    This book presents an overview of the molecular and biological consequences of the posttranslational modification of proteins with ADP-ribose monomers and polymers. Part one focuses on chromatin-associated poly ADP-ribosylation reactions which have evolved in higher eukaryotes as modulators of chromatin functions. The significance of poly ADP-ribosylation in DNA repair, carcinogenesis, and gene expression during terminal differentiation is discussed. Part two reviews mono ADP-ribosylation reactions which are catalyzed by prokaryotic and eukaryotic enzymes. Consideration is given to the action of bacterial toxins, such as cholera toxin, pertussis toxin, and diphtheria toxin. These toxins have emerged as tools for the molecular probing of proteins involved in signal transduction and protein biosynthesis.

  6. PARPs and ADP-Ribosylation: Fifty Years… and Counting

    PubMed Central

    Kraus, W. Lee

    2015-01-01

    Summary Over 50 years ago, the discovery of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) set a new field of science in motion - the field of poly(ADP-ribosyl) transferases (PARPs) and ADP-ribosylation. The field is still flourishing today. The diversity of biological processes now known to require PARPs and ADP-ribosylation was practically unimaginable even two decades ago. From an initial focus on DNA damage detection and repair in response to genotoxic stresses, the field has expanded to include the regulation of chromatin structure, gene expression, and RNA processing in a wide range of biological systems, including reproduction, development, aging, stem cells, inflammation, metabolism, and cancer. This special focus issue of Molecular Cell includes a collection of three Reviews, three Perspectives, and a SnapShot, which together summarize the current state of the field and suggest where it may be headed. PMID:26091339

  7. Intracellular Mono-ADP-Ribosylation in Signaling and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Bütepage, Mareike; Eckei, Laura; Verheugd, Patricia; Lüscher, Bernhard

    2015-01-01

    A key process in the regulation of protein activities and thus cellular signaling pathways is the modification of proteins by post-translational mechanisms. Knowledge about the enzymes (writers and erasers) that attach and remove post-translational modifications, the targets that are modified and the functional consequences elicited by specific modifications, is crucial for understanding cell biological processes. Moreover detailed knowledge about these mechanisms and pathways helps to elucidate the molecular causes of various diseases and in defining potential targets for therapeutic approaches. Intracellular adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-ribosylation refers to the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD+)-dependent modification of proteins with ADP-ribose and is catalyzed by enzymes of the ARTD (ADP-ribosyltransferase diphtheria toxin like, also known as PARP) family as well as some members of the Sirtuin family. Poly-ADP-ribosylation is relatively well understood with inhibitors being used as anti-cancer agents. However, the majority of ARTD enzymes and the ADP-ribosylating Sirtuins are restricted to catalyzing mono-ADP-ribosylation. Although writers, readers and erasers of intracellular mono-ADP-ribosylation have been identified only recently, it is becoming more and more evident that this reversible post-translational modification is capable of modulating key intracellular processes and signaling pathways. These include signal transduction mechanisms, stress pathways associated with the endoplasmic reticulum and stress granules, and chromatin-associated processes such as transcription and DNA repair. We hypothesize that mono-ADP-ribosylation controls, through these different pathways, the development of cancer and infectious diseases. PMID:26426055

  8. ADP-ribosylation of transducin by pertussis toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, P.A.; Burns, D.L.; Kanaho, Y.; Liu, T.Y.; Hewlett, E.L.; Moss, J.

    1985-11-05

    Transducin, the guanyl nucleotide-binding regulatory protein of retinal rod outer segments that couples the photon receptor, rhodopsin, with the light-activated cGMP phosphodiesterase, can be resolved into two functional components, T alpha and T beta gamma. T alpha (39 kDa), which is (TSP)ADP-ribosylated by pertussis toxin and (TSP)NAD in rod outer segments and in purified transducin, was also labeled by the toxin after separation from T beta gamma (36 kDa and approximately 10 kDa); neither component of T beta gamma was a pertussis toxin substrate. Labeling of T alpha was enhanced by T beta gamma and was maximal at approximately 1:1 molar ratio of T alpha : T beta gamma. Limited proteolysis by trypsin of T alpha in the presence of guanyl-5'-yl imidodiphosphate (Gpp(NH)p) resulted in the sequential appearance of proteins of 38 and TS kDa. The amino terminus of both 38- and TS-kDa proteins was leucine, whereas that of T alpha could not be identified and was assumed to be blocked. The TS-kDa peptide was not a pertussis toxin substrate. Labeling of the 38-kDa protein was poor and was not enhanced by T beta gamma. Trypsin treatment of (TSP)ADP-ribosyl-T alpha produced a labeled 37-38-kDa doublet followed by appearance of radioactivity at the dye front. It appears, therefore, that, although the 38-kDa protein was poor toxin substrate, it contained the ADP-ribosylation site. Without rhodopsin, labeling of T alpha (in the presence of T beta gamma) was unaffected by Gpp(NH)p, guanosine 5'-O-(thiotriphosphate) (GTP gamma S), GTP, GDP, and guanosine 5'-O-(thiodiphosphate) (GDP beta S) but was increased by ATP. When photolyzed rhodopsin and T beta gamma were present, Gpp(NH)p and GTP gamma S decreased (TSP)ADP-ribosylation by pertussis toxin. Thus, pertussis toxin-catalyzed (TSP)ADP-ribosylation of T alpha was affected by nucleotides, rhodopsin and light in addition to T beta gamma.

  9. Pierisins and CARP-1: ADP-ribosylation of DNA by ARTCs in butterflies and shellfish.

    PubMed

    Nakano, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi-Nakaguchi, Azusa; Yamamoto, Masafumi; Watanabe, Masahiko

    2015-01-01

    The cabbage butterfly, Pieris rapae, and related species possess a previously unknown ADP-ribosylating toxin, guanine specific ADP-ribosyltransferase. This enzyme toxin, known as pierisin, consists of enzymatic N-terminal domain and receptor-binding C-terminal domain, or typical AB-toxin structure. Pierisin efficiently transfers an ADP-ribosyl moiety to the N(2) position of the guanine base of dsDNA. Receptors for pierisin are suggested to be the neutral glycosphingolipids, globotriaosylceramide (Gb3), and globotetraosylceramide (Gb4). This DNA-modifying toxin exhibits strong cytotoxicity and induces apoptosis in various human cell lines, which can be blocked by Bcl-2. Pierisin also produces detrimental effects on the eggs and larvae of the non-habitual parasitoids. In contrast, a natural parasitoid of the cabbage butterfly, Cotesia glomerata, was resistant to this toxin. The physiological role of pierisin in the butterfly is suggested to be a defense factor against parasitization by wasps. Other type of DNA ADP-ribosyltransferase is present in certain kinds of edible clams. For example, the CARP-1 protein found in Meretrix lamarckii consists of an enzymatic domain without a possible receptor-binding domain. Pierisin and CARP-1 are almost fully non-homologous at the amino acid sequence level, but other ADP-ribosyltransferases homologous to pierisin are present in different biological species such as eubacterium Streptomyces. Possible diverse physiological roles of the DNA ADP-ribosyltransferases are discussed. PMID:25033755

  10. Transcutaneous Immunization with Bacterial ADP-Ribosylating Exotoxins, Subunits, and Unrelated Adjuvants

    PubMed Central

    Scharton-Kersten, Tanya; Yu, Jian-mei; Vassell, Russell; O'Hagan, Derek; Alving, Carl R.; Glenn, Gregory M.

    2000-01-01

    We have recently described a needle-free method of vaccination, transcutaneous immunization, consisting of the topical application of vaccine antigens to intact skin. While most proteins themselves are poor immunogens on the skin, we have shown that the addition of cholera toxin (CT), a mucosal adjuvant, results in cellular and humoral immune responses to the adjuvant and coadministered antigens. The present study explores the breadth of adjuvants that have activity on the skin, using diphtheria toxoid (DTx) and tetanus toxoid as model antigens. Heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) displayed adjuvant properties similar to those of CT when used on the skin and induced protective immune responses against tetanus toxin challenge when applied topically at doses as low as 1 μg. Interestingly, enterotoxin derivatives LTR192G, LTK63, and LTR72 and the recombinant CT B subunit also exhibited adjuvant properties on the skin. Consistent with the latter finding, non-ADP-ribosylating exotoxins, including an oligonucleotide DNA sequence, as well as several cytokines (interleukin-1β [IL-1β] fragment, IL-2, IL-12, and tumor necrosis factor alpha) and lipopolysaccharide also elicited detectable anti-DTx immunoglobulin G titers in the immunized mice. These results indicate that enhancement of the immune response to topical immunization is not restricted to CT or the ADP-ribosylating exotoxins as adjuvants. This study also reinforces earlier findings that addition of an adjuvant is important for the induction of robust immune responses to vaccine antigens delivered by topical application. PMID:10948159

  11. Rapid Evolution of PARP Genes Suggests a Broad Role for ADP-Ribosylation in Host-Virus Conflicts

    PubMed Central

    Daugherty, Matthew D.; Young, Janet M.; Kerns, Julie A.; Malik, Harmit S.

    2014-01-01

    Post-translational protein modifications such as phosphorylation and ubiquitinylation are common molecular targets of conflict between viruses and their hosts. However, the role of other post-translational modifications, such as ADP-ribosylation, in host-virus interactions is less well characterized. ADP-ribosylation is carried out by proteins encoded by the PARP (also called ARTD) gene family. The majority of the 17 human PARP genes are poorly characterized. However, one PARP protein, PARP13/ZAP, has broad antiviral activity and has evolved under positive (diversifying) selection in primates. Such evolution is typical of domains that are locked in antagonistic ‘arms races’ with viral factors. To identify additional PARP genes that may be involved in host-virus interactions, we performed evolutionary analyses on all primate PARP genes to search for signatures of rapid evolution. Contrary to expectations that most PARP genes are involved in ‘housekeeping’ functions, we found that nearly one-third of PARP genes are evolving under strong recurrent positive selection. We identified a >300 amino acid disordered region of PARP4, a component of cytoplasmic vault structures, to be rapidly evolving in several mammalian lineages, suggesting this region serves as an important host-pathogen specificity interface. We also found positive selection of PARP9, 14 and 15, the only three human genes that contain both PARP domains and macrodomains. Macrodomains uniquely recognize, and in some cases can reverse, protein mono-ADP-ribosylation, and we observed strong signatures of recurrent positive selection throughout the macro-PARP macrodomains. Furthermore, PARP14 and PARP15 have undergone repeated rounds of gene birth and loss during vertebrate evolution, consistent with recurrent gene innovation. Together with previous studies that implicated several PARPs in immunity, as well as those that demonstrated a role for virally encoded macrodomains in host immune evasion, our

  12. Arsenite induced poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of tumor suppressor P53 in human skin keratinocytes as a possible mechanism for carcinogenesis associated with arsenic exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Komissarova, Elena V.; Rossman, Toby G.

    2010-03-15

    Arsenite is an environmental pollutant. Exposure to inorganic arsenic in drinking water is associated with elevated cancer risk, especially in skin. Arsenite alone does not cause skin cancer in animals, but arsenite can enhance the carcinogenicity of solar UV. Arsenite is not a significant mutagen at non-toxic concentrations, but it enhances the mutagenicity of other carcinogens. The tumor suppressor protein P53 and nuclear enzyme PARP-1 are both key players in DNA damage response. This laboratory demonstrated earlier that in cells treated with arsenite, the P53-dependent increase in p21{sup WAF1/CIP1} expression, normally a block to cell cycle progression after DNA damage, is deficient. Here we show that although long-term exposure of human keratinocytes (HaCaT) to a nontoxic concentration (0.1 muM) of arsenite decreases the level of global protein poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation, it increases poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of P53 protein and PARP-1 protein abundance. We also demonstrate that exposure to 0.1 muM arsenite depresses the constitutive expression of p21 mRNA and P21 protein in HaCaT cells. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of P53 is reported to block its activation, DNA binding and its functioning as a transcription factor. Our results suggest that arsenite's interference with activation of P53 via poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation may play a role in the comutagenic and cocarcinogenic effects of arsenite.

  13. Ultrastructural Localization of Endogenous Exchange Factor for ARF6 in Adrenocortical Cells In Situ of Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chomphoo, Surang; Mothong, Wilaiwan; Sawatpanich, Tarinee; Kanla, Pipatphong; Sakagami, Hiroyuki; Kondo, Hisatake; Hipkaeo, Wiphawi

    2016-01-01

    EFA6 (exchange factor for ARF6) activates Arf6 (ADP ribosylation factor 6) by exchanging ADP to ATP, and the resulting activated form of Arf6 is involved in the membrane dynamics and actin re-organization of cells. The present study was attempted to localize EFA6 type D (EFA6D) in mouse adrenocortical cells in situ whose steroid hormone secretion is generally considered not to depend on the vesicle-involved regulatory mechanism. In immunoblotting, an immunoreactive band with the same size as brain EFA6D was detected in homogenates of adrenal cortical tissues almost free of adrenal capsules and medulla. In immuno-light microscopy, EFA6D-immunoreactivity was positive in adrenocortical cells and it was often distinct along the plasmalemma, especially along portions of the cell columns facing the interstitium. In immuno-electron microscopy, the gold-labeling was more dense in the peripheral intracellular domains than the central domain of the immunopositive cells. The labeling was deposited on the plasma membranes in a discontinuous pattern and in cytoplasmic domains rich in filaments. It was also associated with some, but not all, of pleiomorphic vesicles and coated pits/vesicles. No labeling was seen in association with lipid droplets or smooth endoplasmic reticulum. The present finding is in support of the importance of EFA6D for activation of Arf6 in adrenocortical cells. PMID:27462133

  14. Ultrastructural Localization of Endogenous Exchange Factor for ARF6 in Adrenocortical Cells In Situ of Mice.

    PubMed

    Chomphoo, Surang; Mothong, Wilaiwan; Sawatpanich, Tarinee; Kanla, Pipatphong; Sakagami, Hiroyuki; Kondo, Hisatake; Hipkaeo, Wiphawi

    2016-06-28

    EFA6 (exchange factor for ARF6) activates Arf6 (ADP ribosylation factor 6) by exchanging ADP to ATP, and the resulting activated form of Arf6 is involved in the membrane dynamics and actin re-organization of cells. The present study was attempted to localize EFA6 type D (EFA6D) in mouse adrenocortical cells in situ whose steroid hormone secretion is generally considered not to depend on the vesicle-involved regulatory mechanism. In immunoblotting, an immunoreactive band with the same size as brain EFA6D was detected in homogenates of adrenal cortical tissues almost free of adrenal capsules and medulla. In immuno-light microscopy, EFA6D-immunoreactivity was positive in adrenocortical cells and it was often distinct along the plasmalemma, especially along portions of the cell columns facing the interstitium. In immuno-electron microscopy, the gold-labeling was more dense in the peripheral intracellular domains than the central domain of the immunopositive cells. The labeling was deposited on the plasma membranes in a discontinuous pattern and in cytoplasmic domains rich in filaments. It was also associated with some, but not all, of pleiomorphic vesicles and coated pits/vesicles. No labeling was seen in association with lipid droplets or smooth endoplasmic reticulum. The present finding is in support of the importance of EFA6D for activation of Arf6 in adrenocortical cells. PMID:27462133

  15. Chemical reporters for exploring ADP-ribosylation and AMPylation at the host-pathogen interface

    PubMed Central

    Westcott, Nathan P.; Hang, Howard C.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial pathogens secrete protein toxins and effectors that hijack metabolites to covalently modify key host proteins and interfere with their function during infection. Adenosine metabolites, such as nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) and adenosine triphosphate (ATP), have in particular been co-opted by these secreted virulence factors to reprogram host pathways. While some host targets for secreted virulence factors have been identified, other toxin and effector substrates have been elusive, which require new methods for their characterization. In this review, we focus on chemical reporters based on NAD and ATP that should facilitate the discovery and characterization of adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-ribosylation and adenylylation/AMPylation in bacterial pathogenesis and cell biology. PMID:25461386

  16. 50Years of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation.

    PubMed

    Virág, László

    2013-12-01

    The seminal paper published in 1963 by Chambon, Weil and Mandel reporting a new NAD-dependent protein modification now known as poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) marked the launch of a new era in both protein research and cell biology. In the coming decades, the identity, biochemical characteristics and regulation of enzymes responsible for the synthesis and degradation of protein-bound poly(ADP-ribose) have been discovered and the surprisingly multifarious biological roles of PARylation have not ceased to amaze cell and molecular biologists ever since. The review series on PARylation following this preface is comprised of ten papers written by great experts of the field and aims to provide practicing physicians and basic scientists with the state-of-the-art on the "writers, readers and erasers" of poly(ADP-ribose), some recent paradigm shifts of the field and its translational potential. PMID:23727362

  17. Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Activation by Dioxin Targets Phosphoenolpyruvate Carboxykinase (PEPCK) for ADP-ribosylation via 2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-inducible Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase (TiPARP)*

    PubMed Central

    Diani-Moore, Silvia; Zhang, Sheng; Ram, Payal; Rifkind, Arleen B.

    2013-01-01

    Effects of the environmental toxin and carcinogen 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD, dioxin) include a wasting syndrome associated with decreased gluconeogenesis. TCDD is a potent activator of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR), a ligand activated transcription factor. The relationship between gene activation by the AHR and TCDD toxicities is not well understood. We recently identified a pathway by which the AHR target gene TiPARP (TCDD-inducible poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase) contributes to TCDD suppression of transcription of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), a key regulator of gluconeogenesis, by consuming NAD+ and decreasing Sirtuin 1 activation of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC1α), a transcriptional activator of PEPCK. We report here that TCDD-induced TiPARP also targets PEPCK for ADP-ribosylation. Both cytosolic and mitochondrial forms of PEPCK were found to undergo ADP-ribosylation. Unexpectedly, AHR suppression also enhanced ADP-ribosylation and did so by a poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-independent mechanism. This report 1) identifies ADP-ribosylation as a new posttranslational modification for PEPCK, 2) describes a pathway by which transcriptional induction of TiPARP by the AHR can lead to a downstream posttranslational change in a TCDD target protein (PEPCK), and 3) reveals that the AHR exerts complex, previously unidentified modulatory effects on ADP-ribosylation. PMID:23770670

  18. The Promise of Proteomics for the Study of ADP-ribosylation

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Casey M.; Ong, Shao-En; Leung, Anthony K. L.

    2015-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation is a post-translational modification where single units (mono-ADP-ribosylation) or polymeric chains (poly-ADP-ribosylation) of ADP-ribose are conjugated to proteins by ADP-ribosyltransferases. This post-translational modification and the ADP-ribosyltransferases (also known as PARPs) responsible for its synthesis have been found to play a role in nearly all major cellular processes, including DNA repair, transcription, translation, cell signaling and cell death. Furthermore, dysregulation of ADP-ribosylation has been linked to diseases including cancers, diabetes, neurodegenerative disorders and heart failure, leading to the development of therapeutic PARP inhibitors, many of which are currently in clinical trials. The study of this therapeutically important modification has recently been bolstered by the application of mass spectrometry-based proteomics, arguably the most powerful tool for the unbiased analysis of protein modifications. Unfortunately, progress has been hampered by the inherent challenges that stem from the physicochemical properties of ADP-ribose which as a post-translational modification is highly charged, heterogeneous (linear or branched polymers, as well as monomers), labile, and found on a wide range of amino acid acceptors. In this perspective, we discuss the progress that has been made in addressing these challenges, including the recent breakthroughs in proteomics techniques to identify ADP-ribosylation sites, and future developments to provide a proteome-wide view of the many cellular processes regulated by ADP-ribosylation. PMID:26091340

  19. Poly(ADP-Ribosyl)ation Affects Histone Acetylation and Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Verdone, Loredana; La Fortezza, Marco; Ciccarone, Fabio; Caiafa, Paola; Zampieri, Michele; Caserta, Micaela

    2015-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) is a posttranslational protein modification catalyzed by members of the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) enzyme family. PARylation regulates a wide variety of biological processes in most eukaryotic cells including energy metabolism and cell death, maintenance of genomic stability, chromatin structure and transcription. Inside the nucleus, cross-talk between PARylation and other epigenetic modifications, such as DNA and histone methylation, was already described. In the present work, using PJ34 or ABT888 to inhibit PARP activity or over-expressing poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG), we show decrease of global histone H3 and H4 acetylation. This effect is accompanied by a reduction of the steady state mRNA level of p300, Pcaf, and Tnfα, but not of Dnmt1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analyses, performed at the level of the Transcription Start Site (TSS) of these four genes, reveal that changes in histone acetylation are specific for each promoter. Finally, we demonstrate an increase of global deacetylase activity in nuclear extracts from cells treated with PJ34, whereas global acetyltransferase activity is not affected, suggesting a role for PARP in the inhibition of histone deacetylases. Taken together, these results show an important link between PARylation and histone acetylation regulated transcription. PMID:26636673

  20. Role of NAD+ and ADP-Ribosylation in the Maintenance of the Golgi Structure

    PubMed Central

    Mironov, Alexander; Colanzi, Antonino; Silletta, Maria Giuseppina; Fiucci, Giusy; Flati, Silvio; Fusella, Aurora; Polishchuk, Roman; Mironov, Alexander; Tullio, Giuseppe Di; Weigert, Roberto; Malhotra, Vivek; Corda, Daniela; Matteis, Maria Antonietta De; Luini, Alberto

    1997-01-01

    We have investigated the role of the ADP- ribosylation induced by brefeldin A (BFA) in the mechanisms controlling the architecture of the Golgi complex. BFA causes the rapid disassembly of this organelle into a network of tubules, prevents the association of coatomer and other proteins to Golgi membranes, and stimulates the ADP-ribosylation of two cytosolic proteins of 38 and 50 kD (GAPDH and BARS-50; De Matteis, M.A., M. DiGirolamo, A. Colanzi, M. Pallas, G. Di Tullio, L.J. McDonald, J. Moss, G. Santini, S. Bannykh, D. Corda, and A. Luini. 1994. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 91:1114–1118; Di Girolamo, M., M.G. Silletta, M.A. De Matteis, A. Braca, A. Colanzi, D. Pawlak, M.M. Rasenick, A. Luini, and D. Corda. 1995. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA. 92:7065–7069). To study the role of ADP-ribosylation, this reaction was inhibited by depletion of NAD+ (the ADP-ribose donor) or by using selective pharmacological blockers in permeabilized cells. In NAD+-depleted cells and in the presence of dialized cytosol, BFA detached coat proteins from Golgi membranes with normal potency but failed to alter the organelle's structure. Readdition of NAD+ triggered Golgi disassembly by BFA. This effect of NAD+ was mimicked by the use of pre–ADP- ribosylated cytosol. The further addition of extracts enriched in native BARS-50 abolished the ability of ADP-ribosylated cytosol to support the effect of BFA. Pharmacological blockers of the BFA-dependent ADP-ribosylation (Weigert, R., A. Colanzi, A. Mironov, R. Buccione, C. Cericola, M.G. Sciulli, G. Santini, S. Flati, A. Fusella, J. Donaldson, M. DiGirolamo, D. Corda, M.A. De Matteis, and A. Luini. 1997. J. Biol. Chem. 272:14200–14207) prevented Golgi disassembly by BFA in permeabilized cells. These inhibitors became inactive in the presence of pre–ADP-ribosylated cytosol, and their activity was rescued by supplementing the cytosol with a native BARS-50–enriched fraction. These results indicate that ADP-ribosylation plays a role in the

  1. State of the art of protein mono-ADP-ribosylation: biological role and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Fabrizio, Gaia; Scarpa, Emanuele Salvatore; Di Girolamo, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Mono-ADP-ribosylation is a post-translational modification that was discovered more than five decades ago, and it consists of the enzymatic transfer of ADP-ribose from NAD⁺ to acceptor proteins. In viruses and prokaryotes, mono-ADP-ribosylation is mainly, but not exclusively, a mechanism used to take control of the host cell. In mammals, mono-ADP-ribosylation serves to regulate protein functions, and it is catalysed by two families of toxin-related cellular ADP-ribosyltransferases: ecto-enzymes that modify various cell-surface proteins, like integrins and receptors, and intracellular enzymes that act on a variety of nuclear and cytosolic proteins. These two families have been recently renamed the ARTCs (clostridia toxin like) and ARTDs (diphtheria toxin like), depending on their conserved structural features, and in terms of their relationships to the bacterial toxins. In addition, two members of the structurally non-related sirtuin family can also modify cellular proteins by mono-ADP-ribosylation. Recently, new examples of ADP-ribosylation of proteins involved in signal transduction and intracellular trafficking have been discovered, thus opening the route to the better molecular understanding of this reaction and of its role in human cell physiology and pathology. PMID:25553458

  2. ADP-ribosylation of membrane components by pertussis and cholera toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Ribeiro-Neto, F.A.P.; Mattera, F.; Hildebrandt, J.D.; Codina, J.; Field, J.B.; Birnbaumer, L.; Sekura, R.D.

    1985-01-01

    Pertussis and cholera toxins are important tools to investigate functional and structural aspects of the stimulatory (N/sub s/) and inhibitory (N/sub i/) regulatory components of adenylyl cyclase. Cholera toxin acts on N/sub s/ by ADP-ribosylating its ..cap alpha../sub s/ subunit; pertussis toxin acts on N/sub i/ by ADP-ribosylating its ..cap alpha..; subunit. By using (/sup 32/P)NAD/sup +/ and determining the transfer of its (/sup 32/P)ADP-ribose moiety to membrane components, it is possible to obtain information on N/sub s/ and N/sub i/. A set of protocols is presented that can be used to study simultaneously and comparatively the susceptibility of N/sub s/ and N/sub i/ to be ADP-ribosylated by cholera and pertussis toxin.

  3. Identification of a Class of Protein ADP-Ribosylating Sirtuins in Microbial Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Rack, Johannes Gregor Matthias; Morra, Rosa; Barkauskaite, Eva; Kraehenbuehl, Rolf; Ariza, Antonio; Qu, Yue; Ortmayer, Mary; Leidecker, Orsolya; Cameron, David R; Matic, Ivan; Peleg, Anton Y; Leys, David; Traven, Ana; Ahel, Ivan

    2015-07-16

    Sirtuins are an ancient family of NAD(+)-dependent deacylases connected with the regulation of fundamental cellular processes including metabolic homeostasis and genome integrity. We show the existence of a hitherto unrecognized class of sirtuins, found predominantly in microbial pathogens. In contrast to earlier described classes, these sirtuins exhibit robust protein ADP-ribosylation activity. In our model organisms, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes, the activity is dependent on prior lipoylation of the target protein and can be reversed by a sirtuin-associated macrodomain protein. Together, our data describe a sirtuin-dependent reversible protein ADP-ribosylation system and establish a crosstalk between lipoylation and mono-ADP-ribosylation. We propose that these posttranslational modifications modulate microbial virulence by regulating the response to host-derived reactive oxygen species. PMID:26166706

  4. Identification of a Class of Protein ADP-Ribosylating Sirtuins in Microbial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Rack, Johannes Gregor Matthias; Morra, Rosa; Barkauskaite, Eva; Kraehenbuehl, Rolf; Ariza, Antonio; Qu, Yue; Ortmayer, Mary; Leidecker, Orsolya; Cameron, David R.; Matic, Ivan; Peleg, Anton Y.; Leys, David; Traven, Ana; Ahel, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Summary Sirtuins are an ancient family of NAD+-dependent deacylases connected with the regulation of fundamental cellular processes including metabolic homeostasis and genome integrity. We show the existence of a hitherto unrecognized class of sirtuins, found predominantly in microbial pathogens. In contrast to earlier described classes, these sirtuins exhibit robust protein ADP-ribosylation activity. In our model organisms, Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes, the activity is dependent on prior lipoylation of the target protein and can be reversed by a sirtuin-associated macrodomain protein. Together, our data describe a sirtuin-dependent reversible protein ADP-ribosylation system and establish a crosstalk between lipoylation and mono-ADP-ribosylation. We propose that these posttranslational modifications modulate microbial virulence by regulating the response to host-derived reactive oxygen species. PMID:26166706

  5. Yeast Golgi-localized, gamma-Ear-containing, ADP-ribosylation factor-binding proteins are but adaptor protein-1 is not required for cell-free transport of membrane proteins from the trans-Golgi network to the prevacuolar compartment.

    PubMed

    Abazeed, Mohamed E; Fuller, Robert S

    2008-11-01

    Golgi-localized, gamma-Ear-containing, ADP-ribosylation factor-binding proteins (GGAs) and adaptor protein-1 (AP-1) mediate clathrin-dependent trafficking of transmembrane proteins between the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and endosomes. In yeast, the vacuolar sorting receptor Vps10p follows a direct pathway from the TGN to the late endosome/prevacuolar compartment (PVC), whereas, the processing protease Kex2p partitions between the direct pathway and an indirect pathway through the early endosome. To examine the roles of the Ggas and AP-1 in TGN-PVC transport, we used a cell-free assay that measures delivery to the PVC of either Kex2p or a chimeric protein (K-V), in which the Vps10p cytosolic tail replaces the Kex2p tail. Either antibody inhibition or dominant-negative Gga2p completely blocked K-V transport but only partially blocked Kex2p transport. Deletion of APL2, encoding the beta subunit of AP-1, did not affect K-V transport but partially blocked Kex2p transport. Residual Kex2p transport seen with apl2Delta membranes was insensitive to dominant-negative Gga2p, suggesting that the apl2Delta mutation causes Kex2p to localize to a compartment that precludes Gga-dependent trafficking. These results suggest that yeast Ggas facilitate the specific and direct delivery of Vps10p and Kex2p from the TGN to the PVC and that AP-1 modulates Kex2p trafficking through a distinct pathway, presumably involving the early endosome. PMID:18784256

  6. Yeast Golgi-localized, γ-Ear–containing, ADP-Ribosylation Factor-binding Proteins Are but Adaptor Protein-1 Is Not Required for Cell-free Transport of Membrane Proteins from the Trans-Golgi Network to the Prevacuolar Compartment

    PubMed Central

    Abazeed, Mohamed E.

    2008-01-01

    Golgi-localized, γ-Ear–containing, ADP-ribosylation factor-binding proteins (GGAs) and adaptor protein-1 (AP-1) mediate clathrin-dependent trafficking of transmembrane proteins between the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and endosomes. In yeast, the vacuolar sorting receptor Vps10p follows a direct pathway from the TGN to the late endosome/prevacuolar compartment (PVC), whereas, the processing protease Kex2p partitions between the direct pathway and an indirect pathway through the early endosome. To examine the roles of the Ggas and AP-1 in TGN–PVC transport, we used a cell-free assay that measures delivery to the PVC of either Kex2p or a chimeric protein (K-V), in which the Vps10p cytosolic tail replaces the Kex2p tail. Either antibody inhibition or dominant-negative Gga2p completely blocked K-V transport but only partially blocked Kex2p transport. Deletion of APL2, encoding the β subunit of AP-1, did not affect K-V transport but partially blocked Kex2p transport. Residual Kex2p transport seen with apl2Δ membranes was insensitive to dominant-negative Gga2p, suggesting that the apl2Δ mutation causes Kex2p to localize to a compartment that precludes Gga-dependent trafficking. These results suggest that yeast Ggas facilitate the specific and direct delivery of Vps10p and Kex2p from the TGN to the PVC and that AP-1 modulates Kex2p trafficking through a distinct pathway, presumably involving the early endosome. PMID:18784256

  7. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation reactions in the regulation of nuclear functions.

    PubMed Central

    D'Amours, D; Desnoyers, S; D'Silva, I; Poirier, G G

    1999-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is a post-translational modification of proteins. During this process, molecules of ADP-ribose are added successively on to acceptor proteins to form branched polymers. This modification is transient but very extensive in vivo, as polymer chains can reach more than 200 units on protein acceptors. The existence of the poly(ADP-ribose) polymer was first reported nearly 40 years ago. Since then, the importance of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis has been established in many cellular processes. However, a clear and unified picture of the physiological role of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation still remains to be established. The total dependence of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis on DNA strand breaks strongly suggests that this post-translational modification is involved in the metabolism of nucleic acids. This view is also supported by the identification of direct protein-protein interactions involving poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (113 kDa PARP), an enzyme catalysing the formation of poly(ADP-ribose), and key effectors of DNA repair, replication and transcription reactions. The presence of PARP in these multiprotein complexes, in addition to the actual poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of some components of these complexes, clearly supports an important role for poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation reactions in DNA transactions. Accordingly, inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesis by any of several approaches and the analysis of PARP-deficient cells has revealed that the absence of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation strongly affects DNA metabolism, most notably DNA repair. The recent identification of new poly(ADP-ribosyl)ating enzymes with distinct (non-standard) structures in eukaryotes and archaea has revealed a novel level of complexity in the regulation of poly(ADP-ribose) metabolism. PMID:10455009

  8. Interaction of serologically defined colon cancer antigen-3 with Arf6 and its predominant expression in the mouse testis.

    PubMed

    Sakagami, Hiroyuki; Hara, Yoshinobu; Fukaya, Masahiro

    2016-09-01

    ADP ribosylation factor 6 (Arf6) is a small GTPase that regulates endosomal trafficking and actin cytoskeleton remodeling. Here, we identified the serologically defined colon antigen-3 (SDCCAG3) as an Arf6-interacting protein by yeast two-hybrid screening with a constitutively active Arf6 mutant. SDCCAG3 interacts specifically with Arf6 among the Arf family members through its 101  C-terminal amino acids. SDCCAG3 is expressed most intensely in the testis at the mRNA and protein levels. In the testis, SDCCAG3 is expressed in spermatocytes and spermatids. We also show that full-length SDCCAG3, but not a mutant lacking the ability to interact with Arf6, is recruited to the midbody during cytokinesis when expressed exogenously in HeLa cells. These findings suggest that SDCCAG3 might function in endosomal trafficking downstream of Arf6. PMID:27373827

  9. The inhibitory G protein G(i) identified as pertussis toxin-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation.

    PubMed

    Katada, Toshiaki

    2012-01-01

    Pertussis toxin (PTX) produced by Bordetella pertussis was first introduced by Ui and his colleagues in research on signal transduction under the name islet-activating protein in 1979, when the mechanism of toxin-induced stimulation of insulin release from pancreatic islets was reported in the rat. The stimulatory effect of PTX in vivo results from the blockage of α(2)-adrenergic receptor-mediated inhibition of insulin release. The receptor-induced inhibition of cAMP formation was also abolished in pancreatic islets isolated from PTX-treated rats, suggesting that the toxin caused uncoupling of adenylyl cyclase inhibition from receptor stimulation. The action of PTX on isolated membranes required a cytosolic factor, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), and the uncoupling induced by PTX was shown to be due to the toxin-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation of a 41-kDa protein with NAD as another substrate. The 41-kDa PTX substrate was soon identified and purified as the α-subunit of the inhibitory G protein that transmits an inhibitory signal from membrane receptors to adenylyl cyclase. After demonstration of the molecular mechanism of PTX, the toxin was widely utilized as a probe for identifying and analyzing major αβγ-trimeric G proteins. Thus, PTX-sensitive G proteins appeared to carry positive and negative signals from many membrane receptors to a variety of effectors other than adenylyl cyclase. PMID:23207763

  10. Poly-ADP-ribosylation of HMGB1 regulates TNFSF10/TRAIL resistance through autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Minghua; Liu, Liying; Xie, Min; Sun, Xiaofang; Yu, Yan; Kang, Rui; Yang, Liangchun; Zhu, Shan; Cao, Lizhi; Tang, Daolin

    2015-01-01

    Both apoptosis ("self-killing") and autophagy ("self-eating") are evolutionarily conserved processes, and their crosstalk influences anticancer drug sensitivity and cell death. However, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. Here, we demonstrated that HMGB1 (high mobility group box 1), normally a nuclear protein, is a crucial regulator of TNFSF10/TRAIL (tumor necrosis factor [ligand] superfamily, member 10)-induced cancer cell death. Activation of PARP1 (poly [ADP-ribose] polymerase 1) was required for TNFSF10-induced ADP-ribosylation of HMGB1 in cancer cells. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of PARP1 activity or knockdown of PARP1 gene expression significantly inhibited TNFSF10-induced HMGB1 cytoplasmic translocation and subsequent HMGB1-BECN1 complex formation. Furthermore, suppression of the PARP1-HMGB1 pathway diminished autophagy, increased apoptosis, and enhanced the anticancer activity of TNFSF10 in vitro and in a subcutaneous tumor model. These results indicate that PARP1 acts as a prominent upstream regulator of HMGB1-mediated autophagy and maintains a homeostatic balance between apoptosis and autophagy, which provides new insight into the mechanism of TNFSF10 resistance. PMID:25607248

  11. Microtubule protein ADP-ribosylation in vitro leads to assembly inhibition and rapid depolymerization

    SciTech Connect

    Scaife, R.M. ); Wilson, L. ); Purich, D.L. )

    1992-01-14

    Bovine brain microtubule protein, containing both tubulin and microtubule-associated proteins, undergoes ADP-ribosylation in the presence of ({sup 14}C)NAD{sup +} and a turkey erythrocyte mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase in vitro. The modification reaction could be demonstrated in crude brain tissue extracts where selective ADP-ribosylation of both the {alpha} and {beta} chains of tubulin and of the high molecular weight microtubule-associated protein MAP-2 occurred. In experiments with purified microtubule protein, tubulin dimer, the high molecular weight microtubule-associated protein MAP-2, and another high molecular weight microtubule-associated protein which may be a MAP-1 species were heavily labeled. Tubulin and MAP-2 incorporated ({sup 14}C)ADP-ribose to an average extent of approximately 2.4 and 30 mol of ADP-ribose/mol of protein, respectively. Assembly of microtubule protein into microtubules in vitro was inhibited by ADP-ribosylation, and incubation of assembled steady-state microtubules with ADP-ribosyltransferase and NAD{sup +} resulted in rapid depolymerization of the microtubules. Thus, the eukaryotic enzyme can ADP-ribosylate tubulin and microtubule-associated proteins to much greater extents than previously observed with cholera and pertussis toxins, and the modification can significantly modulate microtubule assembly and disassembly.

  12. The natural history of ADP-ribosyltransferases and the ADP-ribosylation system.

    PubMed

    Aravind, L; Zhang, Dapeng; de Souza, Robson F; Anand, Swadha; Iyer, Lakshminarayan M

    2015-01-01

    Catalysis of NAD(+)-dependent ADP-ribosylation of proteins, nucleic acids, or small molecules has evolved in at least three structurally unrelated superfamilies of enzymes, namely ADP-ribosyltransferase (ART), the Sirtuins, and probably TM1506. Of these, the ART superfamily is the most diverse in terms of structure, active site residues, and targets that they modify. The primary diversification of the ART superfamily occurred in the context of diverse bacterial conflict systems, wherein ARTs play both offensive and defensive roles. These include toxin-antitoxin systems, virus-host interactions, intraspecific antagonism (polymorphic toxins), symbiont/parasite effectors/toxins, resistance to antibiotics, and repair of RNAs cleaved in conflicts. ARTs evolving in these systems have been repeatedly acquired by lateral transfer throughout eukaryotic evolution, starting from the PARP family, which was acquired prior to the last eukaryotic common ancestor. They were incorporated into eukaryotic regulatory/epigenetic control systems (e.g., PARP family and NEURL4), and also used as defensive (e.g., pierisin and CARP-1 families) or immunity-related proteins (e.g., Gig2-like ARTs). The ADP-ribosylation system also includes other domains, such as the Macro, ADP-ribosyl glycohydrolase, NADAR, and ADP-ribosyl cyclase, which appear to have initially diversified in bacterial conflict-related systems. Unlike ARTs, sirtuins appear to have a much smaller presence in conflict-related systems. PMID:25027823

  13. Agonist-induced ADP-ribosylation of a cytosolic protein in human platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Bruene, B.; Molina Y Vedia, L.; Lapetina, E.G. )

    1990-05-01

    {alpha}-Thrombin and phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate stimulated the mono(ADP-ribosyl)ation of a 42-kDa cytosolic protein of human platelets. This effect was mediated by protein kinase C activation and was inhibited by protein kinase C inhibitor staurosporine. It also was prevented by prostacyclin, which is known to inhibit the phospholipase C-induced formation of 1,2-diacylglycerol, which is one of the endogenous activators of protein kinase C. On sodium dodecyl sulfate/polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, the 42-kDa protein that is ADP-ribosylated by {alpha}-thrombin was clearly distinct from the {alpha} subunits of membrane-bound inhibitory and stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins, respectively G{sub i{alpha}} and G{sub s{alpha}}; the 47-kDa protein that is phosphorylated by protein kinase C in platelets; and the 39-kDa protein that has been shown to be endogenously ADP-ribosylated by agents that release nitric oxide. This information shows that agonist-induced activation of protein kinase leads to the ADP-ribosylation of a specific protein. This covalent modification might have a functional role in platelet activation.

  14. ADP ribosylation of human neutrophil peptide-1 regulates its biological properties.

    PubMed

    Paone, Gregorino; Wada, Akihiro; Stevens, Linda A; Matin, Abul; Hirayama, Toshiya; Levine, Rodney L; Moss, Joel

    2002-06-11

    In human airways, epithelial cells lining the lumen and intraluminal cells (e.g., polymorphonuclear cells) participate in the innate immune response. These cells secrete or express on their surfaces arginine-specific ADP ribosyltransferases. Defensins, antimicrobial proteins secreted by immune cells, are arginine-rich, leading us to hypothesize that ADP ribosylation could modify their biological activities. We found that an arginine-specific ADP ribosyltransferase-1 present on airway epithelial cells modifies Arg-14 of alpha defensin-1. ADP-ribosylated defensin-1 had decreased antimicrobial and cytotoxic activities but still stimulated T cell chemotaxis and IL-8 release from A549 cells. Further, ADP-ribosylated defensin-1 inhibited cytotoxic and antimicrobial activities of unmodified defensin-1. We identified ADP-ribosylated defensin-1 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from smokers but not from nonsmokers, confirming its existence in vivo. Thus, airway mono-ADP-ribosyltransferases could have an important regulatory role in the innate immune response through modification of alpha defensin-1 and perhaps other basic molecules, with alteration of their biological properties. PMID:12060767

  15. Radiolabelling of bovine myristoylated alanine-rich protein kinase C substrate (MARCKS) in an ADP-ribosylation reaction.

    PubMed

    Chao, D; Severson, D L; Zwiers, H; Hollenberg, M D

    1994-01-01

    In an ADP-ribosylation reaction, we have observed the radiolabelling of a protein in a crude bovine brain homogenate, which upon two-dimensional gel electrophoresis migrated with an acidic pI (< 4.5) and an apparent molecular mass (80-90 kDa) consistent with the properties of the myristoylated, alanine-rich, protein kinase C substrate protein termed MARCKS. To establish the identity of this radiolabelled constituent in brain homogenates, we first purified bovine brain MARCKS using calmodulin-Sepharose affinity chromatography and we then supplemented the crude ADP-ribosylation reaction mixture with this purified MARCKS fraction. Concordant increases in radiolabelling and silver staining of the same protein component from the MARCKS-supplemented ADP-ribosylation reaction, as compared with the ADP-ribosylated crude homogenate, established the identity of this constituent as MARCKS. The radiolabelling of MARCKS was lower in comparison with the ADP-ribosylation of the related neuronal protein B-50/GAP-43 under identical reaction conditions. The potential functional consequences of the ADP-ribosylation of MARCKS are discussed and the possibility is raised that other members of the MARCKS family, such as the F52/MacMARCKS/MRP protein, may also be subject to ADP-ribosylation. PMID:7605610

  16. NADP/sup +/ enhances cholera and pertussis toxin-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation of membrane proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Kawai, Y.; Whitsel, C.; Arinze, I.J.

    1986-05-01

    Cholera or pertussis toxin-catalyzed (/sup 32/P)ADP-ribosylation is frequently used to estimate the concentration of the stimulatory (Ns) or inhibitory (Ni) guanine nucleotide regulatory proteins which modulate the activity of adenylate cyclase. With this assay, however, the degradation of the substrate, NAD/sup +/, by endogenous enzymes such as NAD/sup +/-glycohydrolase (NADase) present in the test membranes can influence the results. In this study the authors show that both cholera and pertussis toxin-catalyzed (/sup 32/P)ADP-ribosylation of liver membrane proteins is markedly enhanced by NADP/sup +/. The effect is concentration dependent; with 20 ..mu..M (/sup 32/P)NAD/sup +/ as substrate maximal enhancement is obtained at 0.5-1.0 mM NADP/sup +/. The enhancement of (/sup 32/P)ADP-ribosylation by NADP/sup +/ was much greater than that by other known effectors such as Mg/sup 2 +/, phosphate or isoniazid. The effect of NADP/sup +/ on ADP-ribosylation may occur by inhibition of the degradation of NAD/sup +/ probably by acting as an alternate substrate for NADase. Among inhibitors tested (NADP/sup +/, isoniazid, imidazole, nicotinamide, L-Arg-methyl-ester and HgCl/sub 2/) to suppress NADase activity, NADP/sup +/ was the most effective and, 10 mM, inhibited activity of the enzyme by about 90%. In membranes which contain substantial activities of NADase the inclusion of NADP/sup +/ in the assay is necessary to obtain maximal ADP-ribosylation.

  17. Structural basis of actin recognition and arginine ADP-ribosylation by Clostridium perfringens ι-toxin

    PubMed Central

    Tsuge, Hideaki; Nagahama, Masahiro; Oda, Masataka; Iwamoto, Shinobu; Utsunomiya, Hiroko; Marquez, Victor E.; Katunuma, Nobuhiko; Nishizawa, Mugio; Sakurai, Jun

    2008-01-01

    The ADP-ribosylating toxins (ADPRTs) produced by pathogenic bacteria modify intracellular protein and affect eukaryotic cell function. Actin-specific ADPRTs (including Clostridium perfringens ι-toxin and Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin) ADP-ribosylate G-actin at Arg-177, leading to disorganization of the cytoskeleton and cell death. Although the structures of many actin-specific ADPRTs are available, the mechanisms underlying actin recognition and selective ADP-ribosylation of Arg-177 remain unknown. Here we report the crystal structure of actin-Ia in complex with the nonhydrolyzable NAD analog βTAD at 2.8 Å resolution. The structure indicates that Ia recognizes actin via five loops around NAD: loop I (Tyr-60–Tyr-62 in the N domain), loop II (active-site loop), loop III, loop IV (PN loop), and loop V (ADP-ribosylating turn–turn loop). We used site-directed mutagenesis to confirm that loop I on the N domain and loop II are essential for the ADP-ribosyltransferase activity. Furthermore, we revealed that Glu-378 on the EXE loop is in close proximity to Arg-177 in actin, and we proposed that the ADP-ribosylation of Arg-177 proceeds by an SN1 reaction via first an oxocarbenium ion intermediate and second a cationic intermediate by alleviating the strained conformation of the first oxocarbenium ion. Our results suggest a common reaction mechanism for ADPRTs. Moreover, the structure might be of use in rational drug design to block toxin-substrate recognition. PMID:18490658

  18. Phosphoproteomic Approach to Characterize Protein Mono- and Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation Sites from Cells

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose), or PAR, is a cellular polymer implicated in DNA/RNA metabolism, cell death, and cellular stress response via its role as a post-translational modification, signaling molecule, and scaffolding element. PAR is synthesized by a family of proteins known as poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases, or PARPs, which attach PAR polymers to various amino acids of substrate proteins. The nature of these polymers (large, charged, heterogeneous, base-labile) has made these attachment sites difficult to study by mass spectrometry. Here we propose a new pipeline that allows for the identification of mono(ADP-ribosyl)ation and poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation sites via the enzymatic product of phosphodiesterase-treated ADP-ribose, or phospho(ribose). The power of this method lies in the enrichment potential of phospho(ribose), which we show to be enriched by phosphoproteomic techniques when a neutral buffer, which allows for retention of the base-labile attachment site, is used for elution. Through the identification of PARP-1 in vitro automodification sites as well as endogenous ADP-ribosylation sites from whole cells, we have shown that ADP-ribose can exist on adjacent amino acid residues as well as both lysine and arginine in addition to known acidic modification sites. The universality of this technique has allowed us to show that enrichment of ADP-ribosylated proteins by macrodomain leads to a bias against ADP-ribose modifications conjugated to glutamic acids, suggesting that the macrodomain is either removing or selecting against these distinct protein attachments. Ultimately, the enrichment pipeline presented here offers a universal approach for characterizing the mono- and poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated proteome. PMID:24920161

  19. A novel Hsp70 inhibitor prevents cell intoxication with the actin ADP-ribosylating Clostridium perfringens iota toxin

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, Katharina; Liebscher, Markus; Mathea, Sebastian; Granzhan, Anton; Schmid, Johannes; Popoff, Michel R.; Ihmels, Heiko; Barth, Holger; Schiene-Fischer, Cordelia

    2016-01-01

    Hsp70 family proteins are folding helper proteins involved in a wide variety of cellular pathways. Members of this family interact with key factors in signal transduction, transcription, cell-cycle control, and stress response. Here, we developed the first Hsp70 low molecular weight inhibitor specifically targeting the peptide binding site of human Hsp70. After demonstrating that the inhibitor modulates the Hsp70 function in the cell, we used the inhibitor to show for the first time that the stress-inducible chaperone Hsp70 functions as molecular component for entry of a bacterial protein toxin into mammalian cells. Pharmacological inhibition of Hsp70 protected cells from intoxication with the binary actin ADP-ribosylating iota toxin from Clostridium perfringens, the prototype of a family of enterotoxins from pathogenic Clostridia and inhibited translocation of its enzyme component across cell membranes into the cytosol. This finding offers a starting point for novel therapeutic strategies against certain bacterial toxins. PMID:26839186

  20. Fanconi anemia protein FANCD2 inhibits TRF1 polyADP-ribosylation through tankyrase1-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare autosomal recessive syndrome characterized by developmental abnormalities, progressive bone marrow failure, and predisposition to cancer. The key FA protein FANCD2 crosstalks with members of DNA damage and repair pathways that also play a role at telomeres. Therefore, we investigated whether FANCD2 has a similar involvement at telomeres. Results We reveal that FANCD2 may perform a novel function separate to the FANCD2/BRCA pathway. This function includes FANCD2 interaction with one of the telomere components, the PARP family member tankyrase-1. Moreover, FANCD2 inhibits tankyrase-1 activity in vitro. In turn, FANCD2 deficiency increases the polyADP-ribosylation of telomere binding factor TRF1. Conclusions FANCD2 binding and inhibiting tankyrase-1PARsylation at telomeres may provide an additional step within the FA pathway for the regulation of genomic integrity. PMID:21314979

  1. Activation of Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxins by native and recombinant adenosine diphosphate-ribosylation factors, 20-kD guanine nucleotide-binding proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Lee, C M; Chang, P P; Tsai, S C; Adamik, R; Price, S R; Kunz, B C; Moss, J; Twiddy, E M; Holmes, R K

    1991-01-01

    Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxins (LT) are responsible in part for "traveler's diarrhea" and related diarrheal illnesses. The family of LTs comprises two serogroups termed LT-I and LT-II; each serogroup includes two or more antigenic variants. The effects of LTs result from ADP ribosylation of Gs alpha, a stimulatory component of adenylyl cyclase; the mechanism of action is identical to that of cholera toxin (CT). The ADP-ribosyltransferase activity of CT is enhanced by 20-kD guanine nucleotide-binding proteins, known as ADP-ribosylation factors or ARFs. These proteins directly activate the CTA1 catalytic unit and stimulate its ADP ribosylation of Gs alpha, other proteins, and simple guanidino compounds (e.g., agmatine). Because of the similarities between CT and LTs, we investigated the effects of purified bovine brain ARF and a recombinant form of bovine ARF synthesized in Escherichia coli on LT activity. ARF enhanced the LT-I-, LT-IIa-, and LT-IIb-catalyzed ADP ribosylation of agmatine, as well as the auto-ADP ribosylation of the toxin catalytic unit. Stimulation of ADP-ribosylagmatine formation by LTs and CT in the presence of ARF was GTP dependent and enhanced by sodium dodecyl sulfate. With agmatine as substrate, LT-IIa and LT-IIb exhibited less than 1% the activity of CT and LT-Ih. CT and LTs catalyzed ADP-ribosyl-Gs alpha formation in a reaction dependent on ARF, GTP, and dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine/cholate. With Gs alpha as substrate, the ADP-ribosyltransferase activities of the toxins were similar, although CT and LT-Ih appeared to be slightly more active than LT-IIa and LT-IIb. Thus, LT-IIa and LT-IIb appear to differ somewhat from CT and LT-Ih in substrate specificity. Responsiveness to stimulation by ARF, GTP, and phospholipid/detergent as well as the specificity of ADP-ribosyltransferase activity are functions of LTs from serogroups LT-I and LT-II that are shared with CT. Images PMID:1902492

  2. Filamin A regulates neuronal migration through brefeldin A-inhibited guanine exchange factor 2-dependent Arf1 activation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingping; Neal, Jason; Lian, Gewei; Hu, Jianjun; Lu, Jie; Sheen, Volney

    2013-10-01

    Periventricular heterotopias is a malformation of cortical development, characterized by ectopic neuronal nodules around ventricle lining and caused by an initial migration defect during early brain development. Human mutations in the Filamin A (FLNA) and ADP-ribosylation factor guanine exchange factor 2 [ARFGEF2; encoding brefeldin-A-inhibited guanine exchange factor-2 (BIG2)] genes give rise to this disorder. Previously, we have reported that Big2 inhibition impairs neuronal migration and binds to FlnA, and its loss promotes FlnA phosphorylation. FlnA phosphorylation dictates FlnA-actin binding affinity and consequently alters focal adhesion size and number to effect neuronal migration. Here we show that FlnA loss similarly impairs migration, reciprocally enhances Big2 expression, but also alters Big2 subcellular localization in both null and conditional FlnA mice. FlnA phosphorylation promotes relocalization of Big2 from the Golgi toward the lipid ruffles, thereby activating Big2-dependent Arf1 at the cell membrane. Loss of FlnA phosphorylation or Big2 function impairs Arf1-dependent vesicle trafficking at the periphery, and Arf1 is required for maintenance of cell-cell junction connectivity and focal adhesion assembly. Loss of Arf1 activity disrupts neuronal migration and cell adhesion. Collectively, these studies demonstrate a potential mechanism whereby coordinated interactions between actin (through FlnA) and vesicle trafficking (through Big2-Arf) direct the assembly and disassembly of membrane protein complexes required for neuronal migration and neuroependymal integrity. PMID:24089482

  3. Arf guanine nucleotide-exchange factors BIG1 and BIG2 regulate nonmuscle myosin IIA activity by anchoring myosin phosphatase complex

    PubMed Central

    Le, Kang; Li, Chun-Chun; Ye, Guan; Moss, Joel; Vaughan, Martha

    2013-01-01

    Brefeldin A-inhibited guanine nucleotide-exchange factors BIG1 and BIG2 activate, through their Sec7 domains, ADP ribosylation factors (Arfs) by accelerating the replacement of Arf-bound GDP with GTP for initiation of vesicular transport or activation of specific enzymes that modify important phospholipids. They are also implicated in regulation of cell polarization and actin dynamics for directed migration. Reciprocal coimmunoprecipitation of endogenous HeLa cell BIG1 and BIG2 with myosin IIA was demonstrably independent of Arf guanine nucleotide-exchange factor activity, because effects of BIG1 and BIG2 depletion were reversed by overexpression of the cognate BIG molecule C-terminal sequence that follows the Arf activation site. Selective depletion of BIG1 or BIG2 enhanced specific phosphorylation of myosin regulatory light chain (T18/S19) and F-actin content, which impaired cell migration in Transwell assays. Our data are clear evidence of these newly recognized functions for BIG1 and BIG2 in transduction or integration of mechanical signals from integrin adhesions and myosin IIA-dependent actin dynamics. Thus, by anchoring or scaffolding the assembly, organization, and efficient operation of multimolecular myosin phosphatase complexes that include myosin IIA, protein phosphatase 1δ, and myosin phosphatase-targeting subunit 1, BIG1 and BIG2 serve to integrate diverse biophysical and biochemical events in cells. PMID:23918382

  4. Calcium-dependent ADP-ribosylation of high-mobility-group I (HMGI) proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Giancotti, V; Bandiera, A; Sindici, C; Perissin, L; Crane-Robinson, C

    1996-01-01

    Micrococcal nuclease digestion of nuclei from mouse Lewis lung carcinoma cells releases a protein mixture into the supernatant that lacks histone H1 and contains a full complement of high-mobility-group I (HMGI) proteins (i.e. I, Y and I-C). This implies that all three HMGI proteins are localized at the nuclease-sensitive regions of active chromatin. It is also shown that if Ca2+ ions are present in the nuclear incubation buffer (with or without exogenous nuclease), all three HMGI proteins become ADP-ribosylated. We propose that this modification of HMGI family proteins is part of the general poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation that accompanies DNA damage in apoptosis and other processes. PMID:8760375

  5. Auto ADP-ribosylation of NarE, a Neisseria meningitidis ADP-ribosyltransferase, regulates its catalytic activities.

    PubMed

    Picchianti, Monica; Del Vecchio, Mariangela; Di Marcello, Federica; Biagini, Massimiliano; Veggi, Daniele; Norais, Nathalie; Rappuoli, Rino; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Balducci, Enrico

    2013-12-01

    NarE is an arginine-specific mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase identified in Neisseria meningitidis that requires the presence of iron in a structured cluster for its enzymatic activities. In this study, we show that NarE can perform auto-ADP-ribosylation. This automodification occurred in a time- and NAD-concentration-dependent manner; was inhibited by novobiocin, an ADP-ribosyltransferase inhibitor; and did not occur when NarE was heat inactivated. No reduction in incorporation was evidenced in the presence of high concentrations of ATP, GTP, ADP-ribose, or nicotinamide, which inhibits NAD-glycohydrolase, impeding the formation of free ADP-ribose. Based on the electrophoretic profile of NarE on auto-ADP-ribosylation and on the results of mutagenesis and mass spectrometry analysis, the auto-ADP-ribosylation appeared to be restricted to the addition of a single ADP-ribose. Chemical stability experiments showed that the ADP-ribosyl linkage was sensitive to hydroxylamine, which breaks ADP-ribose-arginine bonds. Site-directed mutagenesis suggested that the auto-ADP-ribosylation site occurred preferentially on the R(7) residue, which is located in the region I of the ADP-ribosyltransferase family. After auto-ADP-ribosylation, NarE showed a reduction in ADP-ribosyltransferase activity, while NAD-glycohydrolase activity was increased. Overall, our findings provide evidence for a novel intramolecular mechanism used by NarE to regulate its enzymatic activities. PMID:23964075

  6. Expanding functions of GIT Arf GTPase-activating proteins, PIX Rho guanine nucleotide exchange factors and GIT-PIX complexes.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wu; Li, Xiaobo; Premont, Richard T

    2016-05-15

    The GIT proteins, GIT1 and GIT2, are GTPase-activating proteins (inactivators) for the ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf) small GTP-binding proteins, and function to limit the activity of Arf proteins. The PIX proteins, α-PIX and β-PIX (also known as ARHGEF6 and ARHGEF7, respectively), are guanine nucleotide exchange factors (activators) for the Rho family small GTP-binding protein family members Rac1 and Cdc42. Through their multi-domain structures, GIT and PIX proteins can also function as signaling scaffolds by binding to numerous protein partners. Importantly, the constitutive association of GIT and PIX proteins into oligomeric GIT-PIX complexes allows these two proteins to function together as subunits of a larger structure that coordinates two distinct small GTP-binding protein pathways and serves as multivalent scaffold for the partners of both constituent subunits. Studies have revealed the involvement of GIT and PIX proteins, and of the GIT-PIX complex, in numerous fundamental cellular processes through a wide variety of mechanisms, pathways and signaling partners. In this Commentary, we discuss recent findings in key physiological systems that exemplify current understanding of the function of this important regulatory complex. Further, we draw attention to gaps in crucial information that remain to be filled to allow a better understanding of the many roles of the GIT-PIX complex in health and disease. PMID:27182061

  7. Detection and Quantification of ADP-Ribosylated RhoA/B by Monoclonal Antibody

    PubMed Central

    Rohrbeck, Astrid; Fühner, Viola; Schröder, Anke; Hagemann, Sandra; Vu, Xuan-Khang; Berndt, Sarah; Hust, Michael; Pich, Andreas; Just, Ingo

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum exoenzyme C3 is the prototype of C3-like ADP-ribosyltransferases that modify the GTPases RhoA, B, and C. C3 catalyzes the transfer of an ADP-ribose moiety from the co-substrate nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) to asparagine-41 of Rho-GTPases. Although C3 does not possess cell-binding/-translocation domains, C3 is able to efficiently enter intact cells, including neuronal and macrophage-like cells. Conventionally, the detection of C3 uptake into cells is carried out via the gel-shift assay of modified RhoA. Since this gel-shift assay does not always provide clear, evaluable results an additional method to confirm the ADP-ribosylation of RhoA is necessary. Therefore, a new monoclonal antibody has been generated that specifically detects ADP-ribosylated RhoA/B, but not RhoC, in Western blot and immunohistochemical assay. The scFv antibody fragment was selected by phage display using the human naive antibody gene libraries HAL9/10. Subsequently, the antibody was produced as scFv-Fc and was found to be as sensitive as a commercially available RhoA antibody providing reproducible and specific results. We demonstrate that this specific antibody can be successfully applied for the analysis of ADP-ribosylated RhoA/B in C3-treated Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and HT22 cells. Moreover, ADP-ribosylation of RhoA was detected within 10 min in C3-treated CHO wild-type cells, indicative of C3 cell entry. PMID:27043630

  8. Detection and Quantification of ADP-Ribosylated RhoA/B by Monoclonal Antibody.

    PubMed

    Rohrbeck, Astrid; Fühner, Viola; Schröder, Anke; Hagemann, Sandra; Vu, Xuan-Khang; Berndt, Sarah; Hust, Michael; Pich, Andreas; Just, Ingo

    2016-04-01

    Clostridium botulinum exoenzyme C3 is the prototype of C3-like ADP-ribosyltransferases that modify the GTPases RhoA, B, and C. C3 catalyzes the transfer of an ADP-ribose moiety from the co-substrate nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) to asparagine-41 of Rho-GTPases. Although C3 does not possess cell-binding/-translocation domains, C3 is able to efficiently enter intact cells, including neuronal and macrophage-like cells. Conventionally, the detection of C3 uptake into cells is carried out via the gel-shift assay of modified RhoA. Since this gel-shift assay does not always provide clear, evaluable results an additional method to confirm the ADP-ribosylation of RhoA is necessary. Therefore, a new monoclonal antibody has been generated that specifically detects ADP-ribosylated RhoA/B, but not RhoC, in Western blot and immunohistochemical assay. The scFv antibody fragment was selected by phage display using the human naive antibody gene libraries HAL9/10. Subsequently, the antibody was produced as scFv-Fc and was found to be as sensitive as a commercially available RhoA antibody providing reproducible and specific results. We demonstrate that this specific antibody can be successfully applied for the analysis of ADP-ribosylated RhoA/B in C3-treated Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and HT22 cells. Moreover, ADP-ribosylation of RhoA was detected within 10 min in C3-treated CHO wild-type cells, indicative of C3 cell entry. PMID:27043630

  9. Structure of the catalytic domain of Plasmodium falciparum ARF GTPase-activating protein (ARFGAP)

    SciTech Connect

    Cook, William J.; Senkovich, Olga; Chattopadhyay, Debasish

    2012-03-26

    The crystal structure of the catalytic domain of the ADP ribosylation factor GTPase-activating protein (ARFGAP) from Plasmodium falciparum has been determined and refined to 2.4 {angstrom} resolution. Multiwavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD) data were collected utilizing the Zn{sup 2+} ion bound at the zinc-finger domain and were used to solve the structure. The overall structure of the domain is similar to those of mammalian ARFGAPs. However, several amino-acid residues in the area where GAP interacts with ARF1 differ in P. falciparum ARFGAP. Moreover, a number of residues that form the dimer interface in the crystal structure are unique in P. falciparum ARFGAP.

  10. ARF6, PI3-kinase and host cell actin cytoskeleton in Toxoplasma gondii cell invasion

    SciTech Connect

    Vieira da Silva, Claudio; Alves da Silva, Erika; Costa Cruz, Mario; Chavrier, Philippe; Arruda Mortara, Renato

    2009-01-16

    Toxoplasma gondii infects a variety of different cell types in a range of different hosts. Host cell invasion by T. gondii occurs by active penetration of the host cell, a process previously described as independent of host actin polymerization. Also, the parasitophorous vacuole has been shown to resist fusion with endocytic and exocytic pathways of the host cell. ADP-ribosylation factor-6 (ARF6) belongs to the ARF family of small GTP-binding proteins. ARF6 regulates membrane trafficking and actin cytoskeleton rearrangements at the plasma membrane. Here, we have observed that ARF6 is recruited to the parasitophorous vacuole of tachyzoites of T. gondii RH strain and it also plays an important role in the parasite cell invasion with activation of PI3-kinase and recruitment of PIP{sub 2} and PIP{sub 3} to the parasitophorous vacuole of invading parasites. Moreover, it was verified that maintenance of host cell actin cytoskeleton integrity is important to parasite invasion.

  11. Roles of Asp179 and Glu270 in ADP-Ribosylation of Actin by Clostridium perfringens Iota Toxin

    PubMed Central

    Belyy, Alexander; Tabakova, Irina; Lang, Alexander E.; Jank, Thomas; Belyi, Yury; Aktories, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens iota toxin is a binary toxin composed of the enzymatically active component Ia and receptor binding component Ib. Ia is an ADP-ribosyltransferase, which modifies Arg177 of actin. The previously determined crystal structure of the actin-Ia complex suggested involvement of Asp179 of actin in the ADP-ribosylation reaction. To gain more insights into the structural requirements of actin to serve as a substrate for toxin-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation, we engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, in which wild type actin was replaced by actin variants with substitutions in residues located on the Ia-actin interface. Expression of the actin mutant Arg177Lys resulted in complete resistance towards Ia. Actin mutation of Asp179 did not change Ia-induced ADP-ribosylation and growth inhibition of S. cerevisiae. By contrast, substitution of Glu270 of actin inhibited the toxic action of Ia and the ADP-ribosylation of actin. In vitro transcribed/translated human β-actin confirmed the crucial role of Glu270 in ADP-ribosylation of actin by Ia. PMID:26713879

  12. Distribution of protein poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation systems across all domains of life

    PubMed Central

    Perina, Dragutin; Mikoč, Andreja; Ahel, Josip; Ćetković, Helena; Žaja, Roko; Ahel, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is a post-translational modification of proteins involved in regulation of many cellular pathways. Poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) consists of chains of repeating ADP-ribose nucleotide units and is synthesized by the family of enzymes called poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs). This modification can be removed by the hydrolytic action of poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) and ADP-ribosylhydrolase 3 (ARH3). Hydrolytic activity of macrodomain proteins (MacroD1, MacroD2 and TARG1) is responsible for the removal of terminal ADP-ribose unit and for complete reversion of protein ADP-ribosylation. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is widely utilized in eukaryotes and PARPs are present in representatives from all six major eukaryotic supergroups, with only a small number of eukaryotic species that do not possess PARP genes. The last common ancestor of all eukaryotes possessed at least five types of PARP proteins that include both mono and poly(ADP-ribosyl) transferases. Distribution of PARGs strictly follows the distribution of PARP proteins in eukaryotic species. At least one of the macrodomain proteins that hydrolyse terminal ADP-ribose is also always present. Therefore, we can presume that the last common ancestor of all eukaryotes possessed a fully functional and reversible PAR metabolism and that PAR signalling provided the conditions essential for survival of the ancestral eukaryote in its ancient environment. PARP proteins are far less prevalent in bacteria and were probably gained through horizontal gene transfer. Only eleven bacterial species possess all proteins essential for a functional PAR metabolism, although it is not known whether PAR metabolism is truly functional in bacteria. Several dsDNA viruses also possess PARP homologues, while no PARP proteins have been identified in any archaeal genome. Our analysis of the distribution of enzymes involved in PAR metabolism provides insight into the evolution of these important signalling systems, as well as

  13. Regulation of chromatin structure by poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation

    PubMed Central

    Beneke, Sascha

    2012-01-01

    The interaction of DNA with proteins in the context of chromatin has to be tightly regulated to achieve so different tasks as packaging, transcription, replication and repair. The very rapid and transient post-translational modification of proteins by poly(ADP-ribose) has been shown to take part in all four. Originally identified as immediate cellular answer to a variety of genotoxic stresses, already early data indicated the ability of this highly charged nucleic acid-like polymer to modulate nucleosome structure, the basic unit of chromatin. At the same time the enzyme responsible for synthesizing poly(ADP-ribose), the zinc-finger protein poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-1 (PARP1), was shown to control transcription initiation as basic factor TFIIC within the RNA-polymerase II machinery. Later research focused more on PARP-mediated regulation of DNA repair and cell death, but in the last few years, transcription as well as chromatin modulation has re-appeared on the scene. This review will discuss the impact of PARP1 on transcription and transcription factors, its implication in chromatin remodeling for DNA repair and probably also replication, and its role in controlling epigenetic events such as DNA methylation and the functionality of the insulator protein CCCTC-binding factor. PMID:22969794

  14. IGF-1 drives chromogranin A secretion via activation of Arf1 in human neuroendocrine tumour cells

    PubMed Central

    Münzberg, Christin; Höhn, Katharina; Krndija, Denis; Maaß, Ulrike; Bartsch, Detlef K; Slater, Emily P; Oswald, Franz; Walther, Paul; Seufferlein, Thomas; von Wichert, Götz

    2015-01-01

    Hypersecretion is the major symptom of functional neuroendocrine tumours. The mechanisms that contribute to this excessive secretion of hormones are still elusive. A key event in secretion is the exit of secretory products from the Golgi apparatus. ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf) GTPases are known to control vesicle budding and trafficking, and have a leading function in the regulation of formation of secretory granula at the Golgi. Here, we show that Arf1 is the predominant Arf protein family member expressed in the neuroendocrine pancreatic tumour cell lines BON and QGP-1. In BON cells Arf1 colocalizes with Golgi markers as well as chromogranin A, and shows significant basal activity. The inhibition of Arf1 activity or expression significantly impaired secretion of chromogranin A. Furthermore, we show that the insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1), a major regulator of growth and secretion in BON cells, induces Arf1 activity. We found that activation of Arf1 upon IGF-1 receptor stimulation is mediated by MEK/ERK signalling pathway in BON and QGP-1 cells. Moreover, the activity of Arf1 in BON cells is mediated by autocrinely secreted IGF-1, and concomitantly, autocrine IGF1 secretion is maintained by Arf1 activity. In summary, our data indicate an important regulatory role for Arf1 at the Golgi in hypersecretion in neuroendocrine cancer cells. PMID:25754106

  15. The ADP-ribosyl cyclases--the current evolutionary state of the ARCs.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, Enza; Lo Buono, Nicola; Horenstein, Alberto L; Funaro, Ada; Malavasi, Fabio

    2014-01-01

    The major ADP-ribosylating enzyme families are the focus of this special issue of Frontiers in Bioscience . However, there is room for another family of enzymes with the capacity to utilize nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD): the ADP-ribosyl cyclases (ARCs). These unique enzymes catalyse the cyclization of NAD to cyclic ADP ribose (cADPR), a widely distributed second messenger. However, the ARCs are versatile enzymes that can manipulate NAD, NAD phosphate (NADP) and other substrates to generate various bioactive molecules including nicotinic acid adenine dinucleotide diphosphate (NAADP) and ADP ribose (ADPR). This review will focus on the group of well-characterized invertebrate and vertebrate ARCs whose common gene structure allows us to trace their origin to the ancestor of bilaterian animals. Behind a facade of gene and protein homology lies a family with a disparate functional repertoire dictated by the animal model and the physical trait under investigation. Here we present a phylogenetic view of the ARCs to better understand the evolution of function in this family. PMID:24896331

  16. Common features of the NAD-binding and catalytic site of ADP-ribosylating toxins.

    PubMed

    Domenighini, M; Magagnoli, C; Pizza, M; Rappuoli, R

    1994-10-01

    Computer analysis of the three-dimensional structure of ADP-ribosylating toxins showed that in all toxins the NAD-binding site is located in a cavity. This cavity consists of 18 contiguous amino acids that form an alpha-helix bent over a beta-strand. The tertiary folding of this structure is strictly conserved despite the differences in the amino acid sequence. Catalysis is supported by two spatially conserved amino acids, each flanking the NAD-binding site. These are: a glutamic acid that is conserved in all toxins, and a nucleophilic residue, which is a histidine in the diphtheria toxin and Pseudomonas exotoxin A, and an arginine in the cholera toxin, the Escherichia coli heat-labile enterotoxins, the pertussis toxin and the mosquitocidal toxin of Bacillus sphaericus. The latter group of toxins presents an additional histidine that appears important for catalysis. This structure suggests a general mechanism of ADP-ribosylation evolved to work on different target proteins. PMID:7830559

  17. Poly-ADP-ribosylation-mediated degradation of ARTD1 by the NLRP3 inflammasome is a prerequisite for osteoclast maturation.

    PubMed

    Wang, C; Qu, C; Alippe, Y; Bonar, S L; Civitelli, R; Abu-Amer, Y; Hottiger, M O; Mbalaviele, G

    2016-01-01

    Evidence implicates ARTD1 in cell differentiation, but its role in skeletal metabolism remains unknown. Osteoclasts (OC), the bone-resorbing cells, differentiate from macrophages under the influence of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor-activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL). We found that M-CSF induced ADP-ribosyltransferase diphtheria toxin-like 1 (ARTD1) auto-ADP-ribosylation in macrophages, a modification that marked ARTD1 for cleavage, and subsequently, for degradation upon RANKL exposure. We established that ARTD1 proteolysis was NLRP3 inflammasome-dependent, and occurred via the proteasome pathway. Since ARTD1 is cleaved at aspartate(214), we studied the impact of ARTD1 rendered uncleavable by D214N substitution (ARTD1(D214N)) on skeletal homeostasis. ARTD1(D214N), unlike wild-type ARTD1, was resistant to cleavage and degradation during osteoclastogenesis. As a result, ARTD1(D214N) altered histone modification and promoted the abundance of the repressors of osteoclastogenesis by interfering with the expression of B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein 1 (Blimp1), the master regulator of anti-osteoclastogenic transcription factors. Importantly, ARTD1(D214N)-expressing mice exhibited higher bone mass compared with controls, owing to decreased osteoclastogenesis while bone formation was unaffected. Thus, unless it is degraded, ARTD1 represses OC development through transcriptional regulation. PMID:27010854

  18. Poly-ADP-ribosylation-mediated degradation of ARTD1 by the NLRP3 inflammasome is a prerequisite for osteoclast maturation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, C; Qu, C; Alippe, Y; Bonar, S L; Civitelli, R; Abu-Amer, Y; Hottiger, M O; Mbalaviele, G

    2016-01-01

    Evidence implicates ARTD1 in cell differentiation, but its role in skeletal metabolism remains unknown. Osteoclasts (OC), the bone-resorbing cells, differentiate from macrophages under the influence of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and receptor-activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL). We found that M-CSF induced ADP-ribosyltransferase diphtheria toxin-like 1 (ARTD1) auto-ADP-ribosylation in macrophages, a modification that marked ARTD1 for cleavage, and subsequently, for degradation upon RANKL exposure. We established that ARTD1 proteolysis was NLRP3 inflammasome-dependent, and occurred via the proteasome pathway. Since ARTD1 is cleaved at aspartate214, we studied the impact of ARTD1 rendered uncleavable by D214N substitution (ARTD1D214N) on skeletal homeostasis. ARTD1D214N, unlike wild-type ARTD1, was resistant to cleavage and degradation during osteoclastogenesis. As a result, ARTD1D214N altered histone modification and promoted the abundance of the repressors of osteoclastogenesis by interfering with the expression of B lymphocyte-induced maturation protein 1 (Blimp1), the master regulator of anti-osteoclastogenic transcription factors. Importantly, ARTD1D214N-expressing mice exhibited higher bone mass compared with controls, owing to decreased osteoclastogenesis while bone formation was unaffected. Thus, unless it is degraded, ARTD1 represses OC development through transcriptional regulation. PMID:27010854

  19. PARP-2 regulates cell cycle-related genes through histone deacetylation and methylation independently of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Ya-Chen; Hsu, Chiao-Yu; Yao, Ya-Li; Yang, Wen-Ming

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: ► PARP-2 acts as a transcription co-repressor independently of PARylation activity. ► PARP-2 recruits HDAC5, 7, and G9a and generates repressive chromatin. ► PARP-2 is recruited to the c-MYC promoter by DNA-binding factor YY1. ► PARP-2 represses cell cycle-related genes and alters cell cycle progression. -- Abstract: Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase-2 (PARP-2) catalyzes poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) and regulates numerous nuclear processes, including transcription. Depletion of PARP-2 alters the activity of transcription factors and global gene expression. However, the molecular action of how PARP-2 controls the transcription of target promoters remains unclear. Here we report that PARP-2 possesses transcriptional repression activity independently of its enzymatic activity. PARP-2 interacts and recruits histone deacetylases HDAC5 and HDAC7, and histone methyltransferase G9a to the promoters of cell cycle-related genes, generating repressive chromatin signatures. Our findings propose a novel mechanism of PARP-2 in transcriptional regulation involving specific protein–protein interactions and highlight the importance of PARP-2 in the regulation of cell cycle progression.

  20. Subunit-selective N-Methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) Receptor Signaling through Brefeldin A-resistant Arf Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors BRAG1 and BRAG2 during Synapse Maturation.

    PubMed

    Elagabani, Mohammad Nael; Briševac, Dušica; Kintscher, Michael; Pohle, Jörg; Köhr, Georg; Schmitz, Dietmar; Kornau, Hans-Christian

    2016-04-22

    The maturation of glutamatergic synapses in the CNS is regulated by NMDA receptors (NMDARs) that gradually change from a GluN2B- to a GluN2A-dominated subunit composition during postnatal development. Here we show that NMDARs control the activity of the small GTPase ADP-ribosylation factor 6 (Arf6) by consecutively recruiting two related brefeldin A-resistant Arf guanine nucleotide exchange factors, BRAG1 and BRAG2, in a GluN2 subunit-dependent manner. In young cortical cultures, GluN2B and BRAG1 tonically activated Arf6. In mature cultures, Arf6 was activated through GluN2A and BRAG2 upon NMDA treatment, whereas the tonic Arf6 activation was not detectable any longer. This shift in Arf6 regulation and the associated drop in Arf6 activity were reversed by a knockdown of BRAG2. Given their sequential recruitment during development, we examined whether BRAG1 and BRAG2 influence synaptic currents in hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons using patch clamp recordings in acute slices from mice at different ages. The number of AMPA receptor (AMPAR) miniature events was reduced by depletion of BRAG1 but not by depletion of BRAG2 during the first 2 weeks after birth. In contrast, depletion of BRAG2 during postnatal weeks 4 and 5 reduced the number of AMPAR miniature events and compromised the quantal sizes of both AMPAR and NMDAR currents evoked at Schaffer collateral synapses. We conclude that both Arf6 activation through GluN2B-BRAG1 during early development and the transition from BRAG1- to BRAG2-dependent Arf6 signaling induced by the GluN2 subunit switch are critical for the development of mature glutamatergic synapses. PMID:26884337

  1. Arf1-GTP-induced Tubule Formation Suggests a Function of Arf Family Proteins in Curvature Acquisition at Sites of Vesicle Budding*

    PubMed Central

    Krauss, Michael; Jia, Jun-Yong; Roux, Aurélien; Beck, Rainer; Wieland, Felix T.; De Camilli, Pietro; Haucke, Volker

    2008-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf) and related small GTPases play crucial roles in membrane traffic within the exo- and endocytic pathways. Arf proteins in their GTP-bound state are associated with curved membrane buds and tubules, frequently together with effector coat proteins to which they bind. Here we report that Arf1 is found on membrane tubules originating from the Golgi complex where it colocalizes with COPI and GGA1 vesicle coat proteins. Arf1 also induces tubulation of liposomes in vitro. Mutations within the amino-terminal amphipathic helix (NTH) of Arf1 affect the number of Arf1-positive tubules in vivo and its property to tubulate liposomes. Moreover, hydrophilic substitutions within the hydrophobic part of its NTH impair Arf1-catalyzed budding of COPI vesicles in vitro. Our data indicate that GTP-controlled local induction of high curvature membranes is an important property of Arf1 that might be shared by a subgroup of Arf/Arl family GTPases. PMID:18693248

  2. Poly(ADP-ribosylation) regulates chromatin organization through histone H3 modification and DNA methylation of the first cell cycle of mouse embryos

    SciTech Connect

    Osada, Tomoharu; Rydén, Anna-Margareta; Masutani, Mitsuko

    2013-04-26

    Highlights: •Histone modification of the mouse pronuclei is regulated by poly(ADP-ribosylation). •Hypermethylation of the mouse female pronuclei is maintained by poly(ADP-ribosylation). •Parp1 is physically interacted with Suz12, which may function in the pronuclei. •Poly(ADP-ribosylation) affects ultrastructure of chromatin of the mouse pronucleus. -- Abstract: We examined the roles of poly(ADP-ribosylation) in chromatin remodeling during the first cell cycle of mouse embryos. Drug-based inhibition of poly(ADP-ribosylation) by a PARP inhibitor, PJ-34, revealed up-regulation of dimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 4 in male pronuclei and down-regulation of dimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 9 (H3K9) and lysine 27 (H3K27). Association of poly(ADP-ribosylation) with histone modification was suggested to be supported by the interaction of Suz12, a histone methyltransferase in the polycomb complex, with Parp1. PARP activity was suggested to be required for a proper localization and maintenance of Suz12 on chromosomes. Notably, DNA methylation level of female pronuclei in one-cell embryos was robustly decreased by PJ-34. Electron microscopic analysis showed a frequent appearance of unusual electron-dense areas within the female pronuclei, implying the disorganized and hypercondensed chromatin ultrastructure. These results show that poly(ADP-ribosylation) is important for the integrity of non-equivalent epigenetic dynamics of pronuclei during the first cell cycle of mouse embryos.

  3. Aspergillus nidulans ArfB Plays a Role in Endocytosis and Polarized Growth ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Soo Chan; Schmidtke, Sabrina N.; Dangott, Lawrence J.; Shaw, Brian D.

    2008-01-01

    Filamentous fungi undergo polarized growth throughout most of their life cycles. The Spitzenkörper is an apical organelle composed primarily of vesicles that is unique to filamentous fungi and is likely to act as a vesicle supply center for tip growth. Vesicle assembly and trafficking are therefore important for hyphal growth. ADP ribosylation factors (Arfs), a group of small GTPase proteins, play an important role in nucleating vesicle assembly. Little is known about the role of Arfs in filamentous hyphal growth. We found that Aspergillus nidulans is predicted to encode six Arf family proteins. Analysis of protein sequence alignments suggests that A. nidulans ArfB shares similarity with ARF6 of Homo sapiens and Arf3p of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. An arfB null allele (arfB disrupted by a transposon [arfB::Tn]) was characterized by extended isotropic growth of germinating conidia followed by cell lysis or multiple, random germ tube emergence, consistent with a failure to establish polarity. The mutant germ tubes and hyphae that do form initially meander abnormally off of the axis of polarity and frequently exhibit dichotomous branching at cell apices, consistent with a defect in polarity maintenance. FM4-64 staining of the arfB::Tn strain revealed that another phenotypic characteristic seen for arfB::Tn is a reduction and delay in endocytosis. ArfB is myristoylated at its N terminus. Green fluorescent protein-tagged ArfB (ArfB::GFP) localizes to the plasma membrane and endomembranes and mutation (ArfBG2A::GFP) of the N-terminal myristoylation motif disperses the protein to the cytoplasm rather than to the membranes. These results demonstrate that ArfB functions in endocytosis to play important roles in polarity establishment during isotropic growth and polarity maintenance during hyphal extension. PMID:18539885

  4. Centaurin-alpha1 and KIF13B kinesin motor protein interaction in ARF6 signalling.

    PubMed

    Kanamarlapudi, V

    2005-12-01

    The ARF (ADP-ribosylation factor) family of small GTPases regulate intracellular membrane trafficking by cycling between an inactive GDP- and an active GTP-bound form. Among the six known mammalian ARFs (ARF1-ARF6), ARF6 is the least conserved and plays critical roles in membrane trafficking and cytoskeletal dynamics near the cell surface. Since ARFs have undetectable levels of intrinsic GTP binding and hydrolysis, they are totally dependent on extrinsic GEFs (guanine nucleotide-exchange factors) for GTP binding and GAPs (GTPase-activating proteins) for GTP hydrolysis. We have recently isolated a novel KIF (kinesin) motor protein (KIF13B) that binds to centaurin-alpha1, an ARF6GAP that binds to the second messenger PIP3 [PtdIns(3,4,5)P3]. KIFs transport intracellular vesicles and recognize their cargo by binding to proteins (receptors) localized on the surface of the cargo vesicles. Identification of centaurin-alpha1 as a KIF13B interactor suggests that KIF13B may transport ARF6 and/or PIP3 using centaurin-alpha1 as its receptor. This paper reviews the studies carried out to assess the interaction and regulation of centaurin-alpha1 by KIF13B. PMID:16246098

  5. Pathological functions of the small GTPase Arf6 in cancer progression: Tumor angiogenesis and metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Hongu, Tsunaki; Yamauchi, Yohei; Funakoshi, Yuji; Katagiri, Naohiro; Ohbayashi, Norihiko; Kanaho, Yasunori

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although several lines of evidence have shown that the small GTPase ADP-ribosylation factor 6 (Arf6) plays pivotal roles in cancer progression of several types of cancers, little is known about the functions of Arf6 in tumor microenvironment. We demonstrated that Arf6 in vascular endothelial cells (VECs) plays a crucial role in tumor angiogenesis and growth using endothelial cell-specific Arf6 conditional knockout mice into which B16 melanoma and Lewis lung carcinoma cells were implanted. It was also found that Arf6 in VECs positively regulates hepatocyte growth factor (HGF)-induced β1 integrin recycling, which is a critical event for tumor angiogenesis by promoting cell migration. Importantly, pharmacological inhibition of HGF-induced Arf6 activation significantly suppresses tumor angiogenesis and growth in mice, suggesting that Arf6 signaling would be a potential target for anti-angiogenic therapy. In this manuscript, we summarize the multiple roles of Arf6 in cancer progression, particularly in cancer cell invasion/metastasis and our recent findings on tumor angiogenesis, and discuss a possible approach to develop innovative anti-cancer drugs. PMID:26909552

  6. Arf6 plays an early role in platelet activation by collagen and convulxin.

    PubMed

    Choi, Wangsun; Karim, Zubair A; Whiteheart, Sidney W

    2006-04-15

    Small GTPases play critical roles in hemostasis, though the roster of such molecules in platelets is not complete. In this study, we report the presence of Ras-related GTPases of the ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf) family. Platelets contain Arf1 or 3 and Arf6, with the latter being predominantly membrane associated. Using effector domain pull-down assays, we show, counter to other GTPases, that Arf6-GTP is present in resting platelets and decreases rapidly upon activation with collagen or convulxin. This decrease does not completely rely on secondary agonists (ADP and thromboxane A2) or require integrin signaling. The decrease in free Arf6-GTP temporally precedes activation of Rho family GTPases (RhoA, Cdc42, and Rac1). Using a membrane-permeant, myristoylated peptide, which mimics the N-terminus of Arf6, we show that the Arf6-GTP decrease is essential for collagen- and convulxin-induced aggregation, platelet adherence, and spreading on collagen-coated glass. Treatment with this peptide also affects the activation of Rho family GTPases, but has little effect on RalA and Rap1 or on agonist-induced calcium mobilization. These data show that Arf6 is a key element in activation through GPVI, and is required for activation of the Rho family GTPases and the subsequent cytoskeletal rearrangements needed for full platelet function. PMID:16352809

  7. ArfGAP3 regulates the Transport of Cation-Independent Mannose 6-phosphate Receptor in the post-Golgi compartment

    PubMed Central

    Shiba, Yoko; Kametaka, Satoshi; Waguri, Satoshi; Presley, John F.; Randazzo, Paul Agostino

    2013-01-01

    Summary ArfGAPs are known to be involved in cargo sorting in COPI transport. However, the role of ArfGAPs in post-Golgi membrane traffic has not been defined. To determine the function of ArfGAPs in post-Golgi traffic, we used siRNA to examine each of 25 ArfGAPs for effects on cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor (CIMPR) localization. We found that down-regulation of ArfGAP3 resulted in the peripheral localization of CIMPR. The effect was specific for ArfGAP3 and dependent on its GAP activity, because the phenotype was rescued by ArfGAP3 but not by ArfGAP1, ArfGAP2 or the GAP domain mutants of ArfGAP3. ArfGAP3 localized to the trans-Golgi network and early endosomes. In cells with reduced expression of ArfGAP3, Cathepsin D maturation was slowed and its secretion was accelerated. Also retrograde transport from the endosomes to the trans-Golgi network of endogenous CIMPR, but not truncated CIMPR lacking the luminal domain, was perturbed in cells with reduced expression of ArfGAP3. Furthermore the exit of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) from the early endosomes and degradation of EGFR after EGF stimulation was slowed in cells with reduced expression of ArfGAP3. ArfGAP3 associates with Golgi-localized, γ-ear-containing, ADP-ribosylation factor binding proteins (GGAs), and ArfGAP3 knockdown reduces membrane association of GGAs. A possible mechanism explaining our results is that ArfGAP3 regulates transport from early endosomes to late endosomes. We suggest a model in which ArfGAP3 regulates Golgi association of GGA clathrin adaptors. PMID:24076238

  8. Two novel human members of an emerging mammalian gene family related to mono-ADP-ribosylating bacterial toxins

    SciTech Connect

    Koch-Nolte, F.; Haag, F.; Braren, R.

    1997-02-01

    Mono-ADP-ribosylation is one of the posttranslational protein modifications regulating cellular metabolism, e.g., nitrogen fixation, in prokaryotes. Several bacterial toxins mono-ADP-ribosylate and inactivate specific proteins in their animal hosts. Recently, two mammalian GPI-anchored cell surface enzymes with similar activities were cloned (designated ART1 and ART2). We have now identified six related expressed sequence tags (ESTs) in the public database and cloned the two novel human genes from which these are derived (designated ART3 and ART4). The deduced amino acid sequences of the predicted gene products show 28% sequence identity to one another and 32-41% identity vs the muscle and T cell enzymes. They contain signal peptide sequences characteristic of GPI anchorage. Southern Zoo blot analyses suggest the presence of related genes in other mammalian species. By PCR screening of somatic cell hybrids and by in situ hybridization, we have mapped the two genes to human chromosomes 4p14-p15.l and 12q13.2- q13.3. Northern blot analyses show that these genes are specifically expressed in testis and spleen, respectively. Comparison of genomic and cDNA sequences reveals a conserved exon/intron structure, with an unusually large exon encoding the predicted mature membrane proteins. Secondary structure prediction analyses indicate conserved motifs and amino acid residues consistent with a common ancestry of this emerging mammalian enzyme family and bacterial mono(ADP-ribosyl)transferases. It is possible that the four human gene family members identified so far represent the {open_quotes}tip of an iceberg,{close_quote} i.e., a larger family of enzymes that influences the function of target proteins via mono-ADP-ribosylation. 35 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of Methyl CpG Binding Domain Protein 2 Regulates Chromatin Structure.

    PubMed

    Becker, Annette; Zhang, Peng; Allmann, Lena; Meilinger, Daniela; Bertulat, Bianca; Eck, Daniel; Hofstaetter, Maria; Bartolomei, Giody; Hottiger, Michael O; Schreiber, Valérie; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Cardoso, M Cristina

    2016-03-01

    The epigenetic information encoded in the genomic DNA methylation pattern is translated by methylcytosine binding proteins like MeCP2 into chromatin topology and structure and gene activity states. We have shown previously that the MeCP2 level increases during differentiation and that it causes large-scale chromatin reorganization, which is disturbed by MeCP2 Rett syndrome mutations. Phosphorylation and other posttranslational modifications of MeCP2 have been described recently to modulate its function. Here we show poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of endogenous MeCP2 in mouse brain tissue. Consequently, we found that MeCP2 induced aggregation of pericentric heterochromatin and that its chromatin accumulation was enhanced in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) 1(-/-) compared with wild-type cells. We mapped the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation domains and engineered MeCP2 mutation constructs to further analyze potential effects on DNA binding affinity and large-scale chromatin remodeling. Single or double deletion of the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated regions and PARP inhibition increased the heterochromatin clustering ability of MeCP2. Increased chromatin clustering may reflect increased binding affinity. In agreement with this hypothesis, we found that PARP-1 deficiency significantly increased the chromatin binding affinity of MeCP2 in vivo. These data provide novel mechanistic insights into the regulation of MeCP2-mediated, higher-order chromatin architecture and suggest therapeutic opportunities to manipulate MeCP2 function. PMID:26772194

  10. How to kill tumor cells with inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation.

    PubMed

    Mangerich, Aswin; Bürkle, Alexander

    2011-01-15

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is a post-translational modification catalyzed by the enzyme family of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs). PARPs exhibit pleiotropic cellular functions ranging from maintenance of genomic stability and chromatin remodeling to regulation of cell death, thereby rendering PARP homologues promising targets in cancer therapy. Depending on the molecular status of a cancer cell, low-molecular weight PARP inhibitors can (i) either be used as monotherapeutic agents following the concept of synthetic lethality or (ii) to support classical chemotherapy or radiotherapy. The rationales are the following: (i) in cancers with selective defects in homologous recombination repair, inactivation of PARPs directly causes cell death. In cancer treatment, this phenomenon can be employed to specifically target tumor cells while sparing nonmalignant tissue. (ii) PARP inhibitors can also be used to sensitize cells to cytotoxic DNA-damaging treatments, as some PARPs actively participate in genomic maintenance. Apart from that, PARP inhibitors possess antiangiogenic functions, thus opening up a further option to inhibit tumor growth. In view of the above, a number of high-potency PARP inhibitors have been developed during the last decade and are currently evaluated as cancer therapeutics in clinical trials by several leading pharmaceutical companies. PMID:20853319

  11. Rifamycin Antibiotic Resistance by ADP-Ribosylation: Structure and Diversity of Arr

    SciTech Connect

    Baysarowich, J.; Koteva, K; Hughes, D; Ejim, L; Griffiths, E; Zhang, K; Junop, M; Wright, G

    2008-01-01

    The rifamycin antibiotic rifampin is important for the treatment of tuberculosis and infections caused by multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus. Recent iterations of the rifampin core structure have resulted in new drugs and drug candidates for the treatment of a much broader range of infectious diseases. This expanded use of rifamycin antibiotics has the potential to select for increased resistance. One poorly characterized mechanism of resistance is through Arr enzymes that catalyze ADP-ribosylation of rifamycins. We find that genes encoding predicted Arr enzymes are widely distributed in the genomes of pathogenic and nonpathogenic bacteria. Biochemical analysis of three representative Arr enzymes from environmental and pathogenic bacterial sources shows that these have equally efficient drug resistance capacity in vitro and in vivo. The 3D structure of one of these orthologues from Mycobacterium smegmatis was determined and reveals structural homology with ADP-ribosyltransferases important in eukaryotic biology, including poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) and bacterial toxins, despite no significant amino acid sequence homology with these proteins. This work highlights the extent of the rifamycin resistome in microbial genera with the potential to negatively impact the expanded use of this class of antibiotic.

  12. Protein Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation Regulates Arabidopsis Immune Gene Expression and Defense Responses

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Baomin; Liu, Chenglong; de Oliveira, Marcos V. V.; Intorne, Aline C.; Li, Bo; Babilonia, Kevin; de Souza Filho, Gonçalo A.; Shan, Libo; He, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Perception of microbe-associated molecular patterns (MAMPs) elicits transcriptional reprogramming in hosts and activates defense to pathogen attacks. The molecular mechanisms underlying plant pattern-triggered immunity remain elusive. A genetic screen identified Arabidopsis poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase 1 (atparg1) mutant with elevated immune gene expression upon multiple MAMP and pathogen treatments. Poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase (PARG) is predicted to remove poly(ADP-ribose) polymers on acceptor proteins modified by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) with three PARPs and two PARGs in Arabidopsis genome. AtPARP1 and AtPARP2 possess poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase activity, and the activity of AtPARP2 was enhanced by MAMP treatment. AtPARG1, but not AtPARG2, carries glycohydrolase activity in vivo and in vitro. Importantly, mutation (G450R) in atparg1 blocks its activity and the corresponding residue is highly conserved and essential for human HsPARG activity. Consistently, mutant atparp1atparp2 plants exhibited compromised immune gene activation and enhanced susceptibility to pathogen infections. Our study indicates that protein poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation plays critical roles in plant immune gene expression and defense to pathogen attacks. PMID:25569773

  13. Allosteric Activation of the RNF146 Ubiquitin Ligase by a Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation Signal

    PubMed Central

    DaRosa, Paul A.; Wang, Zhizhi; Jiang, Xiaomo; Pruneda, Jonathan N.; Cong, Feng; Klevit, Rachel E.; Xu, Wenqing

    2014-01-01

    Protein poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) plays a role in diverse cellular processes such as DNA repair, transcription, Wnt signaling, and cell death1–6. Recent studies have shown that PARylation can serve as a signal for the polyubiquitination and degradation of several critical regulatory proteins, including Axin and 3BP2 (refs 7–9). The RING-type E3 ubiquitin ligase RNF146 (a.k.a. Iduna) is responsible for PARylation-dependent ubiquitination (PARdU)10–12. Here we provide a structural basis for RNF146 catalyzed PARdU and how PARdU specificity is achieved. First, we show that iso-ADPr, the smallest internal poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) structural unit, binds between the WWE and RING domains of RNF146 and functions as an allosteric signal that switches the RING domain from a catalytically inactive state to an active one. In the absence of PAR, the RING domain is unable to efficiently bind and activate an E2. Binding of PAR/iso-ADPr induces a major conformational change that creates a functional RING structure. Thus RNF146 represents a new mechanistic class of RING E3 ligases whose activities are regulated by non-covalent ligand binding, which may provide a template for designing inducible protein-degradation systems. Second, we found that RNF146 directly interacts with the PAR polymerase tankyrase (TNKS). Disruption of the RNF146/TNKS interaction inhibits turnover of the substrate Axin in cells. Thus, both substrate PARylation and PARdU are catalyzed by enzymes within the same protein complex, and PARdU substrate specificity may be primarily determined by the substrate-TNKS interaction. We propose that maintenance of unliganded RNF146 in an inactive state may serve to maintain the stability of the RNF146-TNKS complex, which in turn regulates the homeostasis of PARdU activity in the cell. PMID:25327252

  14. ARF6-dependent regulation of P2Y receptor traffic and function in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Kanamarlapudi, Venkateswarlu; Owens, Sian E; Saha, Keya; Pope, Robert J; Mundell, Stuart J

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine diphosphate (ADP) is a critical regulator of platelet activation, mediating its actions through two G protein-coupled receptors, the P2Y(1) and P2Y(12) purinoceptors. Recently, we demonstrated that P2Y(1) and P2Y(12) purinoceptor activities are rapidly and reversibly modulated in human platelets, revealing that the underlying mechanism requires receptor internalization and subsequent trafficking as an essential part of this process. In this study we investigated the role of the small GTP-binding protein ADP ribosylation factor 6 (ARF6) in the internalization and function of P2Y(1) and P2Y(12) purinoceptors in human platelets. ARF6 has been implicated in the internalization of a number of GPCRs, although its precise molecular mechanism in this process remains unclear. In this study we show that activation of either P2Y(1) or P2Y(12) purinoceptors can stimulate ARF6 activity. Further blockade of ARF6 function either in cell lines or human platelets blocks P2Y purinoceptor internalization. This blockade of receptor internalization attenuates receptor resensitization. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Nm23-H1, a nucleoside diphosphate (NDP) kinase regulated by ARF6 which facilitates dynamin-dependent fission of coated vesicles during endocytosis, is also required for P2Y purinoceptor internalization. These data describe a novel function of ARF6 in the internalization of P2Y purinoceptors and demonstrate the integral importance of this small GTPase upon platelet ADP receptor function. PMID:22916275

  15. ARF6-Dependent Regulation of P2Y Receptor Traffic and Function in Human Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Kanamarlapudi, Venkateswarlu; Owens, Sian E.; Saha, Keya; Pope, Robert J.; Mundell, Stuart J.

    2012-01-01

    Adenosine diphosphate (ADP) is a critical regulator of platelet activation, mediating its actions through two G protein-coupled receptors, the P2Y1 and P2Y12 purinoceptors. Recently, we demonstrated that P2Y1 and P2Y12 purinoceptor activities are rapidly and reversibly modulated in human platelets, revealing that the underlying mechanism requires receptor internalization and subsequent trafficking as an essential part of this process. In this study we investigated the role of the small GTP-binding protein ADP ribosylation factor 6 (ARF6) in the internalization and function of P2Y1 and P2Y12 purinoceptors in human platelets. ARF6 has been implicated in the internalization of a number of GPCRs, although its precise molecular mechanism in this process remains unclear. In this study we show that activation of either P2Y1 or P2Y12 purinoceptors can stimulate ARF6 activity. Further blockade of ARF6 function either in cell lines or human platelets blocks P2Y purinoceptor internalization. This blockade of receptor internalization attenuates receptor resensitization. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Nm23-H1, a nucleoside diphosphate (NDP) kinase regulated by ARF6 which facilitates dynamin-dependent fission of coated vesicles during endocytosis, is also required for P2Y purinoceptor internalization. These data describe a novel function of ARF6 in the internalization of P2Y purinoceptors and demonstrate the integral importance of this small GTPase upon platelet ADP receptor function. PMID:22916275

  16. Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of Methyl CpG Binding Domain Protein 2 Regulates Chromatin Structure*

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Annette; Zhang, Peng; Allmann, Lena; Meilinger, Daniela; Bertulat, Bianca; Eck, Daniel; Hofstaetter, Maria; Bartolomei, Giody; Hottiger, Michael O.; Schreiber, Valérie; Leonhardt, Heinrich; Cardoso, M. Cristina

    2016-01-01

    The epigenetic information encoded in the genomic DNA methylation pattern is translated by methylcytosine binding proteins like MeCP2 into chromatin topology and structure and gene activity states. We have shown previously that the MeCP2 level increases during differentiation and that it causes large-scale chromatin reorganization, which is disturbed by MeCP2 Rett syndrome mutations. Phosphorylation and other posttranslational modifications of MeCP2 have been described recently to modulate its function. Here we show poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation of endogenous MeCP2 in mouse brain tissue. Consequently, we found that MeCP2 induced aggregation of pericentric heterochromatin and that its chromatin accumulation was enhanced in poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) 1−/− compared with wild-type cells. We mapped the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation domains and engineered MeCP2 mutation constructs to further analyze potential effects on DNA binding affinity and large-scale chromatin remodeling. Single or double deletion of the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated regions and PARP inhibition increased the heterochromatin clustering ability of MeCP2. Increased chromatin clustering may reflect increased binding affinity. In agreement with this hypothesis, we found that PARP-1 deficiency significantly increased the chromatin binding affinity of MeCP2 in vivo. These data provide novel mechanistic insights into the regulation of MeCP2-mediated, higher-order chromatin architecture and suggest therapeutic opportunities to manipulate MeCP2 function. PMID:26772194

  17. The ARTT motif and a unified structural understanding of substraterecognition in ADP ribosylating bacterial toxins and eukaryotic ADPribosyltransferases

    SciTech Connect

    Han, S.; Tainer, J.A.

    2001-08-01

    ADP-ribosylation is a widely occurring and biologically critical covalent chemical modification process in pathogenic mechanisms, intracellular signaling systems, DNA repair, and cell division. The reaction is catalyzed by ADP-ribosyltransferases, which transfer the ADP-ribose moiety of NAD to a target protein with nicotinamide release. A family of bacterial toxins and eukaryotic enzymes has been termed the mono-ADP-ribosyltransferases, in distinction to the poly-ADP-ribosyltransferases, which catalyze the addition of multiple ADP-ribose groups to the carboxyl terminus of eukaryotic nucleoproteins. Despite the limited primary sequence homology among the different ADP-ribosyltransferases, a central cleft bearing NAD-binding pocket formed by the two perpendicular b-sheet core has been remarkably conserved between bacterial toxins and eukaryotic mono- and poly-ADP-ribosyltransferases. The majority of bacterial toxins and eukaryotic mono-ADP-ribosyltransferases are characterized by conserved His and catalytic Glu residues. In contrast, Diphtheria toxin, Pseudomonas exotoxin A, and eukaryotic poly-ADP-ribosyltransferases are characterized by conserved Arg and catalytic Glu residues. The NAD-binding core of a binary toxin and a C3-like toxin family identified an ARTT motif (ADP-ribosylating turn-turn motif) that is implicated in substrate specificity and recognition by structural and mutagenic studies. Here we apply structure-based sequence alignment and comparative structural analyses of all known structures of ADP-ribosyltransfeases to suggest that this ARTT motif is functionally important in many ADP-ribosylating enzymes that bear a NAD binding cleft as characterized by conserved Arg and catalytic Glu residues. Overall, structure-based sequence analysis reveals common core structures and conserved active sites of ADP-ribosyltransferases to support similar NAD binding mechanisms but differing mechanisms of target protein binding via sequence variations within the ARTT

  18. ACAP3 regulates neurite outgrowth through its GAP activity specific to Arf6 in mouse hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Miura, Yuki; Hongu, Tsunaki; Yamauchi, Yohei; Funakoshi, Yuji; Katagiri, Naohiro; Ohbayashi, Norihiko; Kanaho, Yasunori

    2016-09-01

    ACAP3 (ArfGAP with coiled-coil, ankyrin repeat and pleckstrin homology domains 3) belongs to the ACAP family of GAPs (GTPase-activating proteins) for the small GTPase Arf (ADP-ribosylation factor). However, its specificity to Arf isoforms and physiological functions remain unclear. In the present study, we demonstrate that ACAP3 plays an important role in neurite outgrowth of mouse hippocampal neurons through its GAP activity specific to Arf6. In primary cultured mouse hippocampal neurons, knockdown of ACAP3 abrogated neurite outgrowth, which was rescued by ectopically expressed wild-type ACAP3, but not by its GAP activity-deficient mutant. Ectopically expressed ACAP3 in HEK (human embryonic kidney)-293T cells showed the GAP activity specific to Arf6. In support of this observation, the level of GTP-bound Arf6 was significantly increased by knockdown of ACAP3 in hippocampal neurons. In addition, knockdown and knockout of Arf6 in mouse hippocampal neurons suppressed neurite outgrowth. These results demonstrate that ACAP3 positively regulates neurite outgrowth through its GAP activity specific to Arf6. Furthermore, neurite outgrowth suppressed by ACAP3 knockdown was rescued by expression of a fast cycle mutant of Arf6 that spontaneously exchanges guanine nucleotides on Arf6, but not by that of wild-type, GTP- or GDP-locked mutant Arf6. Thus cycling between active and inactive forms of Arf6, which is precisely regulated by ACAP3 in concert with a guanine-nucleotide-exchange factor(s), seems to be required for neurite outgrowth of hippocampal neurons. PMID:27330119

  19. Cellular regulation of ADP-ribosylation of proteins: 3. Selective augmentation of in vitro ADP-ribosylation of histone H3 in murine thymic cells after in vivo emetine treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Sooki-Toth, A.; Banfalvi, G.; Staub, M.; Antoni, F. ); Szoelloesi, J. ); Kirsten, E. ); Kun, E. )

    1989-09-01

    Thymic cells were isolated at intervals of between 0 and 144 h from mice that received one intraperitoneal injection of emetine, and thymus weight, incorporation of ({sup 14}C)leucine into proteins and ({sup 3}H)thymidine into DNA in intact thymic cells, as well as initial rates of protein ADP-ribosylation in permeabilized cells were simultaneously monitored. The effect of emetine as an inhibitor of protein synthesis corresponds to the induction of sequential cellular events, such as cell exit and remigration, by other antimitotic agents and produces an activation of proliferation of cells reentering into this organ. Proliferation, as demonstrated by a large increase in DNA synthesis and entrance into S phase, was kinetically related to an apparent increase in poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase activity in thymic cells and a highly significant in vitro ADP-ribosylation of histone H3. since no DNA fragmentation occurred in thymic cells, as tested by a fluorometric technique it is probable that a selective activation of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase may have been induced in cells that undergo differentiation and proliferation while repopulating thymus.

  20. AmtB Is Necessary for NH4+-Induced Nitrogenase Switch-Off and ADP-Ribosylation in Rhodobacter capsulatus‡

    PubMed Central

    Yakunin, Alexander F.; Hallenbeck, Patrick C.

    2002-01-01

    Rhodobacter capsulatus possesses two genes potentially coding for ammonia transporters, amtB and amtY. In order to better understand their role in the physiology of this bacterium and their possible significance in nitrogen fixation, we created single-knockout mutants. Strains mutated in either amtB or amtY did not show a growth defect under any condition tested and were still capable of taking up ammonia at nearly wild-type rates, but an amtB mutant was no longer capable of transporting methylamine. The amtB strain but not the amtY strain was also totally defective in carrying out ADP-ribosylation of Fe-protein or the switch-off of in vivo nitrogenase activity in response to NH4+ addition. ADP-ribosylation in response to darkness was unaffected in amtB and amtBY strains, and glutamine synthetase activity was normally regulated in these strains in response to ammonium addition, suggesting that one role of AmtB is to function as an ammonia sensor for the processes that regulate nitrogenase activity. PMID:12107124

  1. Kinetic analysis of GTP hydrolysis catalysed by the Arf1-GTP–ASAP1 complex

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Ruibai; Ahvazi, Bijan; Amariei, Diana; Shroder, Deborah; Burrola, Beatriz; Losert, Wolfgang; Randazzo, Paul A.

    2006-01-01

    Arf (ADP-ribosylation factor) GAPs (GTPase-activating proteins) are enzymes that catalyse the hydrolysis of GTP bound to the small GTP-binding protein Arf. They have also been proposed to function as Arf effectors and oncogenes. We have set out to characterize the kinetics of the GAP-induced GTP hydrolysis using a truncated form of ASAP1 [Arf GAP with SH3 (Src homology 3) domain, ankyrin repeats and PH (pleckstrin homology) domains 1] as a model. We found that ASAP1 used Arf1-GTP as a substrate with a kcat of 57±5 s−1 and a Km of 2.2±0.5 μM determined by steady-state kinetics and a kcat of 56±7 s−1 determined by single-turnover kinetics. Tetrafluoroaluminate (AlF4−), which stabilizes complexes of other Ras family members with their cognate GAPs, also stabilized a complex of Arf1-GDP with ASAP1. As anticipated, mutation of Arg-497 to a lysine residue affected kcat to a much greater extent than Km. Changing Trp-479, Iso-490, Arg-505, Leu-511 or Asp-512 was predicted, based on previous studies, to affect affinity for Arf1-GTP. Instead, these mutations primarily affected the kcat. Mutants that lacked activity in vitro similarly lacked activity in an in vivo assay of ASAP1 function, the inhibition of dorsal ruffle formation. Our results support the conclusion that the Arf GAP ASAP1 functions in binary complex with Arf1-GTP to induce a transition state towards GTP hydrolysis. The results have led us to speculate that Arf1-GTP–ASAP1 undergoes a significant conformational change when transitioning from the ground to catalytically active state. The ramifications for the putative effector function of ASAP1 are discussed. PMID:17112341

  2. An arf1Delta synthetic lethal screen identifies a new clathrin heavy chain conditional allele that perturbs vacuolar protein transport in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, C Y; Graham, T R

    1998-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) is a small GTP-binding protein that is thought to regulate the assembly of coat proteins on transport vesicles. To identify factors that functionally interact with ARF, we have performed a genetic screen in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for mutations that exhibit synthetic lethality with an arf1Delta allele and defined seven genes by complementation tests (SWA1-7 for synthetically lethal with arf1Delta). Most of the swa mutants exhibit phenotypes comparable to arf1Delta mutants such as temperature-conditional growth, hypersensitivity to fluoride ions, and partial protein transport and glycosylation defects. Here, we report that swa5-1 is a new temperature-sensitive allele of the clathrin heavy chain gene (chc1-5), which carries a frameshift mutation near the 3' end of the CHC1 open reading frame. This genetic interaction between arf1 and chc1 provides in vivo evidence for a role for ARF in clathrin coat assembly. Surprisingly, strains harboring chc1-5 exhibited a significant defect in transport of carboxypeptidase Y or carboxypeptidase S to the vacuole that was not observed in other chc1 ts mutants. The kinetics of invertase secretion or transport of alkaline phosphatase to the vacuole were not significantly affected in the chc1-5 mutant, further implicating clathrin specifically in the Golgi to vacuole transport pathway for carboxypeptidase Y. PMID:9755191

  3. Human ARF4 expression rescues sec7 mutant yeast cells.

    PubMed Central

    Deitz, S B; Wu, C; Silve, S; Howell, K E; Melançon, P; Kahn, R A; Franzusoff, A

    1996-01-01

    Vesicle-mediated traffic between compartments of the yeast secretory pathway involves recruitment of multiple cytosolic proteins for budding, targeting, and membrane fusion events. The SEC7 gene product (Sec7p) is a constituent of coat structures on transport vesicles en route to the Golgi complex in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To identify mammalian homologs of Sec7p and its interacting proteins, we used a genetic selection strategy in which a human HepG2 cDNA library was transformed into conditional-lethal yeast sec7 mutants. We isolated several clones capable of rescuing sec7 mutant growth at the restrictive temperature. The cDNA encoding the most effective suppressor was identified as human ADP ribosylation factor 4 (hARF4), a member of the GTPase family proposed to regulate recruitment of vesicle coat proteins in mammalian cells. Having identified a Sec7p-interacting protein rather than the mammalian Sec7p homolog, we provide evidence that hARF4 suppressed the sec7 mutation by restoring secretory pathway function. Shifting sec7 strains to the restrictive temperature results in the disappearance of the mutant Sec7p cytosolic pool without apparent changes in the membrane-associated fraction. The introduction of hARF4 to the cells maintained the balance between cytosolic and membrane-associated Sec7p pools. These results suggest a requirement for Sec7p cycling on and off of the membranes for cell growth and vesicular traffic. In addition, overexpression of the yeast GTPase-encoding genes ARF1 and ARF2, but not that of YPT1, suppressed the sec7 mutant growth phenotype in an allele-specific manner. This allele specificity indicates that individual ARFs are recruited to perform two different Sec7p-related functions in vesicle coat dynamics. PMID:8668142

  4. Arf GTPase-activating Protein ASAP1 Interacts with Rab11 Effector FIP3 and Regulates Pericentrosomal Localization of Transferrin Receptor–positive Recycling Endosome

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Hiroki; Ha, Vi Luan; Prekeris, Rytis

    2008-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation factors (Arfs) and Arf GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs) are key regulators of membrane trafficking and the actin cytoskeleton. The Arf GAP ASAP1 contains an N-terminal BAR domain, which can induce membrane tubulation. Here, we report that the BAR domain of ASAP1 can also function as a protein binding site. Two-hybrid screening identified FIP3, which is a putative Arf6- and Rab11-effector, as a candidate ASAP1 BAR domain-binding protein. Both coimmunoprecipitation and in vitro pulldown assays confirmed that ASAP1 directly binds to FIP3 through its BAR domain. ASAP1 formed a ternary complex with Rab11 through FIP3. FIP3 binding to the BAR domain stimulated ASAP1 GAP activity against Arf1, but not Arf6. ASAP1 colocalized with FIP3 in the pericentrosomal endocytic recycling compartment. Depletion of ASAP1 or FIP3 by small interfering RNA changed the localization of transferrin receptor, which is a marker of the recycling endosome, in HeLa cells. The depletion also altered the trafficking of endocytosed transferrin. These results support the conclusion that ASAP1, like FIP3, functions as a component of the endocytic recycling compartment. PMID:18685082

  5. Pertussis toxin-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation of a G protein in mouse oocytes, eggs, and preimplantation embryos: Developmental changes and possible functional roles

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, J.; Schultz, R.M. )

    1990-06-01

    G proteins, which in many somatic cells serve as mediators of signal transduction, were identified in preimplantation mouse embryos by their capacity to undergo pertussis toxin-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation. Two pertussis toxin (PT) substrates with Mr = 38,000 and 39,000 (alpha 38 and alpha 39) are present in approximately equal amounts. Relative to the amount in freshly isolated germinal vesicle (GV)-intact oocytes, the amount of PT-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation of alpha 38-39 falls during oocyte maturation, rises between the one- and two-cell stages, falls by the eight-cell and morula stages, and increases again by the blastocyst stage. The decrease in PT-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation of alpha 38-39 that occurs during oocyte maturation, however, does not require germinal vesicle breakdown (GVBD), since inhibiting GVBD with 3-isobutyl-1-methyl xanthine (IBMX) does not prevent the decrease in the extent of PT-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation. A biologically active phorbol diester (12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol 13-acetate), but not an inactive one (4 alpha-phorbol 12,13-didecanoate, 4 alpha-PDD), totally inhibits the increase in PT-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation of alpha 38-39 that occurs between the one- and two-cell stage; TPA inhibits cleavage, but not transcriptional activation, which occurs in the two-cell embryo. In contrast, cytochalasin D, genistein, or aphidicolin, each of which inhibits cleavage of one-cell embryos, or alpha-amanitin or H8, each of which inhibits transcriptional activation but not cleavage of one-cell embryos, have little or inhibitory effects on the increase in PT-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation of alpha 38-39. Results of immunoblotting experiments using an antibody that is highly specific for alpha il-3 reveal the presence of a cross-reactive species of Mr = 38,000 (alpha 38) in the GV-intact oocyte, metaphase II-arrested egg, and one-, two-cell embryos.

  6. A Review of Auxin Response Factors (ARFs) in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Li, Si-Bei; Xie, Zong-Zhou; Hu, Chun-Gen; Zhang, Jin-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    Auxin is a key regulator of virtually every aspect of plant growth and development from embryogenesis to senescence. Previous studies have indicated that auxin regulates these processes by controlling gene expression via a family of functionally distinct DNA-binding auxin response factors (ARFs). ARFs are likely components that confer specificity to auxin response through selection of target genes as transcription factors. They bind to auxin response DNA elements (AuxRE) in the promoters of auxin-regulated genes and either activate or repress transcription of these genes depending on a specific domain in the middle of the protein. Genetic studies have implicated various ARFs in distinct developmental processes through loss-of-function mutant analysis. Recent advances have provided information on the regulation of ARF gene expression, the role of ARFs in growth and developmental processes, protein–protein interactions of ARFs and target genes regulated by ARFs in plants. In particular, protein interaction and structural studies of ARF proteins have yielded novel insights into the molecular basis of auxin-regulated transcription. These results provide the foundation for predicting the contributions of ARF genes to the biology of other plants. PMID:26870066

  7. TCDD-inducible poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (TIPARP/PARP7) mono-ADP-ribosylates and co-activates liver X receptors.

    PubMed

    Bindesbøll, Christian; Tan, Susanna; Bott, Debbie; Cho, Tiffany; Tamblyn, Laura; MacPherson, Laura; Grønning-Wang, Line; Nebb, Hilde Irene; Matthews, Jason

    2016-04-01

    Members of the poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (PARP) family catalyse the ADP-ribosylation of target proteins and are known to play important roles in many cellular processes, including DNA repair, differentiation and transcription. The majority of PARPs exhibit mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase activity rather than PARP activity; however, little is known about their biological activity. In the present study, we report that 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD)-inducible poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (TIPARP), mono-ADP-ribosylates and positively regulates liver X receptor α (LXRα) and LXRβ activity. Overexpression of TIPARP enhanced LXR-reporter gene activity. TIPARP knockdown or deletion reduced LXR regulated target gene expression levels in HepG2 cells and inTiparp(-/-)mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) respectively. Deletion and mutagenesis studies showed that TIPARP's zinc-finger and catalytic domains were required to enhance LXR activity. Protein interaction studies using TIPARP and LXRα/β peptide arrays revealed that LXRs interacted with an N-terminal sequence (a.a. 209-236) of TIPARP, which also overlapped with a putative co-activator domain of TIPARP (a.a. 200-225). Immunofluorescence studies showed that TIPARP and LXRα or LXRβ co-localized in the nucleus.In vitroribosylation assays provided evidence that TIPARP mono-ADP-ribosylated both LXRα and LXRβ. Co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) studies revealed that ADP-ribosylase macrodomain 1 (MACROD1), but not MACROD2, interacted with LXRs in a TIPARP-dependent manner. This was complemented by reporter gene studies showing that MACROD1, but not MACROD2, prevented the TIPARP-dependent increase in LXR activity. GW3965-dependent increases in hepatic Srebp1 mRNA and protein expression levels were reduced inTiparp(-/-)mice compared withTiparp(+/+)mice. Taken together, these data identify a new mechanism of LXR regulation that involves TIPARP, ADP-ribosylation and MACROD1. PMID:26814197

  8. The NarE protein of Neisseria gonorrhoeae catalyzes ADP-ribosylation of several ADP-ribose acceptors despite an N-terminal deletion.

    PubMed

    Rodas, Paula I; Álamos-Musre, A Said; Álvarez, Francisca P; Escobar, Alejandro; Tapia, Cecilia V; Osorio, Eduardo; Otero, Carolina; Calderón, Iván L; Fuentes, Juan A; Gil, Fernando; Paredes-Sabja, Daniel; Christodoulides, Myron

    2016-09-01

    The ADP-ribosylating enzymes are encoded in many pathogenic bacteria in order to affect essential functions of the host. In this study, we show that Neisseria gonorrhoeae possess a locus that corresponds to the ADP-ribosyltransferase NarE, a previously characterized enzyme in N. meningitidis The 291 bp coding sequence of gonococcal narE shares 100% identity with part of the coding sequence of the meningococcal narE gene due to a frameshift previously described, thus leading to a 49-amino-acid deletion at the N-terminus of gonococcal NarE protein. However, we found a promoter region and a GTG start codon, which allowed expression of the protein as demonstrated by RT-PCR and western blot analyses. Using a gonococcal NarE-6xHis fusion protein, we demonstrated that the gonococcal enzyme underwent auto-ADP-ribosylation but to a lower extent than meningococcal NarE. We also observed that gonoccocal NarE exhibited ADP-ribosyltransferase activity using agmatine and cell-free host proteins as ADP-ribose acceptors, but its activity was inhibited by human β-defensins. Taken together, our results showed that NarE of Neisseria gonorrhoeae is a functional enzyme that possesses key features of bacterial ADP-ribosylating enzymes. PMID:27465490

  9. NO-Mediated [Ca2+]cyt Increases Depend on ADP-Ribosyl Cyclase Activity in Arabidopsis1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Hotta, Carlos T.; Davey, Matthew P.; Dodd, Antony N.

    2016-01-01

    Cyclic ADP ribose (cADPR) is a Ca2+-mobilizing intracellular second messenger synthesized from NAD by ADP-ribosyl cyclases (ADPR cyclases). In animals, cADPR targets the ryanodine receptor present in the sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum to promote Ca2+ release from intracellular stores to increase the concentration of cytosolic free Ca2+ in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), and cADPR has been proposed to play a central role in signal transduction pathways evoked by the drought and stress hormone, abscisic acid, and the circadian clock. Despite evidence for the action of cADPR in Arabidopsis, no predicted proteins with significant similarity to the known ADPR cyclases have been reported in any plant genome database, suggesting either that there is a unique route for cADPR synthesis or that a homolog of ADPR cyclase with low similarity might exist in plants. We sought to determine whether the low levels of ADPR cyclase activity reported in Arabidopsis are indicative of a bona fide activity that can be associated with the regulation of Ca2+ signaling. We adapted two different fluorescence-based assays to measure ADPR cyclase activity in Arabidopsis and found that this activity has the characteristics of a nucleotide cyclase that is activated by nitric oxide to increase cADPR and mobilize Ca2+. PMID:26932235

  10. Poly(ADP-Ribosyl)ation Is Required to Modulate Chromatin Changes at c-MYC Promoter during Emergence from Quiescence

    PubMed Central

    Battistelli, Cecilia; Ciotti, Agnese; Amati, Paolo; Maione, Rossella

    2014-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation is a post-translational modification of various proteins and participates in the regulation of chromatin structure and transcription through complex mechanisms not completely understood. We have previously shown that PARP-1, the major family member of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerases, plays an important role in the cell cycle reactivation of resting cells by regulating the expression of Immediate Early Response Genes, such as c-MYC, c-FOS, JUNB and EGR-1. In the present work we have investigated the molecular mechanisms by which the enzyme induces c-MYC transcription upon serum stimulation of quiescent cells. We show that PARP-1 is constitutively associated in vivo to a c-MYC promoter region recognized as biologically relevant for the transcriptional regulation of the gene. Moreover, we report that serum stimulation causes the prompt accumulation of ADP-ribose polymers on the same region and that this modification is required for chromatin decondensation and for the exchange of negative for positive transcriptional regulators. Finally we provide evidence that the inhibition of PARP activity along with serum stimulation impairs c-MYC induction by preventing the proper accumulation of histone H3 phosphoacetylation, a specific chromatin mark for the activation of Immediate Early Response Genes. These findings not only suggest a novel strategy by which PARP-1 regulates the transcriptional activity of promoters but also provide new information about the complex regulation of c-MYC expression, a critical determinant of the transition from quiescence to proliferation. PMID:25047032

  11. Distinct subcellular localization of alternative splicing variants of EFA6D, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Arf6, in the mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Fukaya, Masahiro; Ohta, Shingo; Hara, Yoshinobu; Tamaki, Hideaki; Sakagami, Hiroyuki

    2016-09-01

    EFA6D (guanine nucleotide exchange factor for ADP-ribosylation factor 6 [Arf6]D) is also known as EFA6R, Psd3, and HCA67. It is the fourth member of the EFA6 family with guanine nucleotide exchange activity for Arf6, a small guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase) that regulates endosomal trafficking and actin cytoskeleton remodeling. We propose a classification and nomenclature of 10 EFA6D variants deposited in the GenBank database as EFA6D1a, 1b, 1c, 1d, 1s, 2a, 2b, 2c, 2d, and 2s based on the combination of N-terminal and C-terminal insertions. Polymerase chain reaction analysis showed the expression of all EFA6D variants except for variants a and d in the adult mouse brain. Immunoblotting analysis with novel variant-specific antibodies showed the endogenous expression of EFA6D1b, EFA6D1c, and EFA6D1s at the protein level, with the highest expression being EFA6D1s, in the brain. Immunoblotting analysis of forebrain subcellular fractions showed the distinct subcellular distribution of EFA6D1b/c and EFA6D1s. The immunohistochemical analysis revealed distinct but overlapping immunoreactive patterns between EFA6D1b/c and EFA6D1s in the mouse brain. In immunoelectron microscopic analyses of the hippocampal CA3 region, EFA6D1b/c was present predominantly in the mossy fiber axons of dentate granule cells, whereas EFA6D1s was present abundantly in the cell bodies, dendritic shafts, and spines of hippocampal pyramidal cells. These results provide the first anatomical evidence suggesting the functional diversity of EFA6D variants, particularly EFA6D1b/c and EFA6D1s, in neurons. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2531-2552, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27241101

  12. Molecular mechanisms of Sar/Arf GTPases in vesicular trafficking in yeast and plants

    PubMed Central

    Yorimitsu, Tomohiro; Sato, Ken; Takeuchi, Masaki

    2014-01-01

    Small GTPase proteins play essential roles in the regulation of vesicular trafficking systems in eukaryotic cells. Two types of small GTPases, secretion-associated Ras-related protein (Sar) and ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf), act in the biogenesis of transport vesicles. Sar/Arf GTPases function as molecular switches by cycling between active, GTP-bound and inactive, GDP-bound forms, catalyzed by guanine nucleotide exchange factors and GTPase-activating proteins, respectively. Activated Sar/Arf GTPases undergo a conformational change, exposing the N-terminal amphipathic α-helix for insertion into membranes. The process triggers the recruitment and assembly of coat proteins to the membranes, followed by coated vesicle formation and scission. In higher plants, Sar/Arf GTPases also play pivotal roles in maintaining the dynamic identity of organelles in the secretory pathway. Sar1 protein strictly controls anterograde transport from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) through the recruitment of plant COPII coat components onto membranes. COPII vesicle transport is responsible for the organization of highly conserved polygonal ER networks. In contrast, Arf proteins contribute to the regulation of multiple trafficking routes, including transport through the Golgi complex and endocytic transport. These transport systems have diversified in the plant kingdom independently and exhibit several plant-specific features with respect to Golgi organization, endocytic cycling, cell polarity and cytokinesis. The functional diversification of vesicular trafficking systems ensures the multicellular development of higher plants. This review focuses on the current knowledge of Sar/Arf GTPases, highlighting the molecular details of GTPase regulation in vesicle formation in yeast and advances in knowledge of the characteristics of vesicle trafficking in plants. PMID:25191334

  13. The Role of ARF6 in Biliary Atresia

    PubMed Central

    Glessner, Joseph; Ashokkumar, Chethan; Ranganathan, Sarangarajan; Min, Jun; Higgs, Brandon W.; Sun, Qing; Haberman, Kimberly; Schmitt, Lori; Vilarinho, Silvia; Mistry, Pramod K.; Vockley, Gerard; Dhawan, Anil; Gittes, George K.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Jaffe, Ronald; Subramaniam, Shankar; Shin, Donghun; Sindhi, Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Altered extrahepatic bile ducts, gut, and cardiovascular anomalies constitute the variable phenotype of biliary atresia (BA). Methods To identify potential susceptibility loci, Caucasian children, normal (controls) and with BA (cases) at two US centers were compared at >550000 SNP loci. Systems biology analysis was carried out on the data. In order to validate a key gene identified in the analysis, biliary morphogenesis was evaluated in 2-5-day post-fertilization zebrafish embryos after morpholino-antisense oligonucleotide knockdown of the candidate gene ADP ribosylation factor-6 (ARF6, Mo-arf6). Results Among 39 and 24 cases at centers 1 and 2, respectively, and 1907 controls, which clustered together on principal component analysis, the SNPs rs3126184 and rs10140366 in a 3’ flanking enhancer region for ARF6 demonstrated higher minor allele frequencies (MAF) in each cohort, and 63 combined cases, compared with controls (0.286 vs. 0.131, P = 5.94x10-7, OR 2.66; 0.286 vs. 0.13, P = 5.57x10-7, OR 2.66). Significance was enhanced in 77 total cases, which included 14 additional BA genotyped at rs3126184 only (p = 1.58x10-2, OR = 2.66). Pathway analysis of the 1000 top-ranked SNPs in CHP cases revealed enrichment of genes for EGF regulators (p<1 x10-7), ERK/MAPK and CREB canonical pathways (p<1 x10-34), and functional networks for cellular development and proliferation (p<1 x10-45), further supporting the role of EGFR-ARF6 signaling in BA. In zebrafish embryos, Mo-arf6 injection resulted in a sparse intrahepatic biliary network, several biliary epithelial cell defects, and poor bile excretion to the gall bladder compared with uninjected embryos. Biliary defects were reproduced with the EGFR-blocker AG1478 alone or with Mo-arf6 at lower doses of each agent and rescued with arf6 mRNA. Conclusions The BA-associated SNPs identify a chromosome 14q21.3 susceptibility locus encompassing the ARF6 gene. arf6 knockdown in zebrafish implicates early biliary

  14. Insights into the Localization and Function of the Membrane Trafficking Regulator GNOM ARF-GEF at the Golgi Apparatus in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Naramoto, Satoshi; Otegui, Marisa S.; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; de Rycke, Riet; Dainobu, Tomoko; Karampelias, Michael; Fujimoto, Masaru; Feraru, Elena; Miki, Daisuke; Fukuda, Hiroo; Nakano, Akihiko; Friml, Jiří

    2014-01-01

    GNOM is one of the most characterized membrane trafficking regulators in plants, with crucial roles in development. GNOM encodes an ARF-guanine nucleotide exchange factor (ARF-GEF) that activates small GTPases of the ARF (ADP ribosylation factor) class to mediate vesicle budding at endomembranes. The crucial role of GNOM in recycling of PIN auxin transporters and other proteins to the plasma membrane was identified in studies using the ARF-GEF inhibitor brefeldin A (BFA). GNOM, the most prominent regulator of recycling in plants, has been proposed to act and localize at so far elusive recycling endosomes. Here, we report the GNOM localization in context of its cellular function in Arabidopsis thaliana. State-of-the-art imaging, pharmacological interference, and ultrastructure analysis show that GNOM predominantly localizes to Golgi apparatus. Super-resolution confocal live imaging microscopy identified GNOM and its closest homolog GNOM-like 1 at distinct subdomains on Golgi cisternae. Short-term BFA treatment stabilizes GNOM at the Golgi apparatus, whereas prolonged exposures results in GNOM translocation to trans-Golgi network (TGN)/early endosomes (EEs). Malformed TGN/EE in gnom mutants suggests a role for GNOM in maintaining TGN/EE function. Our results redefine the subcellular action of GNOM and reevaluate the identity and function of recycling endosomes in plants. PMID:25012191

  15. Insights into the localization and function of the membrane trafficking regulator GNOM ARF-GEF at the Golgi apparatus in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Naramoto, Satoshi; Otegui, Marisa S; Kutsuna, Natsumaro; de Rycke, Riet; Dainobu, Tomoko; Karampelias, Michael; Fujimoto, Masaru; Feraru, Elena; Miki, Daisuke; Fukuda, Hiroo; Nakano, Akihiko; Friml, Jiří

    2014-07-01

    GNOM is one of the most characterized membrane trafficking regulators in plants, with crucial roles in development. GNOM encodes an ARF-guanine nucleotide exchange factor (ARF-GEF) that activates small GTPases of the ARF (ADP ribosylation factor) class to mediate vesicle budding at endomembranes. The crucial role of GNOM in recycling of PIN auxin transporters and other proteins to the plasma membrane was identified in studies using the ARF-GEF inhibitor brefeldin A (BFA). GNOM, the most prominent regulator of recycling in plants, has been proposed to act and localize at so far elusive recycling endosomes. Here, we report the GNOM localization in context of its cellular function in Arabidopsis thaliana. State-of-the-art imaging, pharmacological interference, and ultrastructure analysis show that GNOM predominantly localizes to Golgi apparatus. Super-resolution confocal live imaging microscopy identified GNOM and its closest homolog GNOM-like 1 at distinct subdomains on Golgi cisternae. Short-term BFA treatment stabilizes GNOM at the Golgi apparatus, whereas prolonged exposures results in GNOM translocation to trans-Golgi network (TGN)/early endosomes (EEs). Malformed TGN/EE in gnom mutants suggests a role for GNOM in maintaining TGN/EE function. Our results redefine the subcellular action of GNOM and reevaluate the identity and function of recycling endosomes in plants. PMID:25012191

  16. Thromboxane-induced renal vasoconstriction is mediated by the ADP-ribosyl cyclase CD38 and superoxide anion

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, Paul A.; Kopple, Tayler E.; Arendshorst, William J.

    2013-01-01

    The present renal hemodynamic study tested the hypothesis that CD38 and superoxide anion (O2·−) participate in the vasoconstriction produced by activation of thromboxane prostanoid (TP) receptors in the mouse kidney. CD38 is the major mammalian ADP-ribosyl cyclase contributing to vasomotor tone through the generation of cADP-ribose, a second messenger that activates ryanodine receptors to release Ca2+ from the sarcoplasmic reticulum in vascular smooth muscle cells. We evaluated whether the stable thromboxane mimetic U-46619 causes less pronounced renal vasoconstriction in CD38-deficient mice and the involvement of O2·− in U-46619-induced renal vasoconstriction. Our results indicate that U-46619 activation of TP receptors causes renal vasoconstriction in part by activating cADP-ribose signaling in renal resistance arterioles. Based on maximal renal blood flow and renal vascular resistance responses to bolus injections of U-46619, CD38 contributes 30–40% of the TP receptor-induced vasoconstriction. We also found that the antioxidant SOD mimetic tempol attenuated the magnitude of vasoconstriction by U-46619 in both groups of mice, suggesting mediation by O2·−. The degree of tempol blockage of U-46619-induced renal vasoconstriction was greater in wild-type mice, attenuating renal vasoconstriction by 40% compared with 30% in CD38-null mice. In other experiments, U-46619 rapidly stimulated O2·− production (dihydroethidium fluorescence) in isolated mouse afferent arterioles, an effect abolished by tempol. These observations provide the first in vivo demonstration of CD38 and O2·− involvement in the vasoconstrictor effects of TP receptor activation in the kidney and in vitro evidence for TP receptor stimulation of O2·− production by the afferent arteriole. PMID:23884143

  17. Arf-like Protein 3 (ARL3) Regulates Protein Trafficking and Ciliogenesis in Mouse Photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Hanke-Gogokhia, Christin; Wu, Zhijian; Gerstner, Cecilia D; Frederick, Jeanne M; Zhang, Houbin; Baehr, Wolfgang

    2016-03-25

    Arf-like protein 3 (ARL3) is a ubiquitous small GTPase expressed in ciliated cells of plants and animals. Germline deletion ofArl3in mice causes multiorgan ciliopathy reminiscent of Bardet-Biedl or Joubert syndromes. As photoreceptors are elegantly compartmentalized and have cilia, we probed the function of ARL3 (ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf)-like 3 protein) by generating rod photoreceptor-specific (prefix(rod)) and retina-specific (prefix(ret))Arl3deletions. In predegenerate(rod)Arl3(-/-)mice, lipidated phototransduction proteins showed trafficking deficiencies, consistent with the role of ARL3 as a cargo displacement factor for lipid-binding proteins. By contrast,(ret)Arl3(-/-)rods and cones expressing Cre recombinase during embryonic development formed neither connecting cilia nor outer segments and degenerated rapidly. Absence of cilia infers participation of ARL3 in ciliogenesis and axoneme formation. Ciliogenesis was rescued, and degeneration was reversed in part by subretinal injection of adeno-associated virus particles expressing ARL3-EGFP. The conditional knock-out phenotypes permitted identification of two ARL3 functions, both in the GTP-bound form as follows: one as a regulator of intraflagellar transport participating in photoreceptor ciliogenesis and the other as a cargo displacement factor transporting lipidated protein to the outer segment. Surprisingly, a farnesylated inositol polyphosphate phosphatase only trafficked from the endoplasmic reticulum to the Golgi, thereby excluding it from a role in photoreceptor cilia physiology. PMID:26814127

  18. Role of ARF6 in internalization of metal-binding proteins, metallothionein and transferrin, and cadmium-metallothionein toxicity in kidney proximal tubule cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wolff, Natascha A.; Lee, Wing-Kee; Abouhamed, Marouan

    2008-07-01

    Filtered metal-protein complexes, such as cadmium-metallothionein-1 (CdMT-1) or transferrin (Tf) are apically endocytosed partly via megalin/cubilin by kidney proximal tubule (PT) cells where CdMT-1 internalization causes apoptosis. Small GTPase ARF (ADP-ribosylation factor) proteins regulate endocytosis and vesicular trafficking. We investigated roles of ARF6, which has been shown to be involved in internalization of ligands and endocytic trafficking in PT cells, following MT-1/CdMT-1 and Tf uptake by PT cells. WKPT-0293 Cl.2 cells derived from rat PT S1 segment were transfected with hemagglutinin-tagged wild-type (ARF6-WT) or dominant negative (ARF6-T27N) forms of ARF6. Using immunofluorescence, endogenous ARF6 was associated with the plasma membrane (PM) as well as juxtanuclear and co-localized with Rab5a and Rab11 involved in early and recycling endosomal trafficking. Immunofluorescence staining of megalin showed reduced surface labelling in ARF6 dominant negative (ARF6-DN) cells. Intracellular Alexa Fluor 546-conjugated MT-1 uptake was reduced in ARF6-DN cells and CdMT-1 (14.8 {mu}M for 24 h) toxicity was significantly attenuated from 27.3 {+-} 3.9% in ARF6-WT to 11.1 {+-} 4.0% in ARF6-DN cells (n = 6, P < 0.02). Moreover, reduced Alexa Fluor 546-conjugated Tf uptake was observed in ARF-DN cells (75.0 {+-} 4.6% versus 3.9 {+-} 3.9% of ARF6-WT cells, n = 3, P < 0.01) and/or remained near the PM (89.3 {+-} 5. 6% versus 45.2 {+-} 14.3% of ARF6-WT cells, n = 3, P < 0.05). In conclusion, the data support roles for ARF6 in receptor-mediated endocytosis and trafficking of MT-1/Tf to endosomes/lysosomes and CdMT-1 toxicity of PT cells.

  19. The GTPase ARF6 Controls ROS Production to Mediate Angiotensin II-Induced Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Bourmoum, Mohamed; Charles, Ricardo; Claing, Audrey

    2016-01-01

    High reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and enhanced vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) proliferation are observed in numerous cardiovascular diseases. The mechanisms by which hormones such as angiotensin II (Ang II) acts to promote these cellular responses remain poorly understood. We have previously shown that the ADP-ribosylation factor 6 (ARF6), a molecular switch that coordinates intracellular signaling events can be activated by the Ang II receptor (AT1R). Whether this small GTP-binding protein controls the signaling events leading to ROS production and therefore Ang II-dependent VSMC proliferation, remains however unknown. Here, we demonstrate that in rat aortic VSMC, Ang II stimulation led to the subsequent activation of ARF6 and Rac1, a key regulator of NADPH oxidase activity. Using RNA interference, we showed that ARF6 is essential for ROS generation since in conditions where this GTPase was knocked down, Ang II could no longer promote superoxide anion production. In addition to regulating Rac1 activity, ARF6 also controlled expression of the NADPH oxidase 1 (Nox 1) as well as the ability of the EGFR to become transactivated. Finally, ARF6 also controlled MAPK (Erk1/2, p38 and Jnk) activation, a key pathway of VSMC proliferation. Altogether, our findings demonstrate that Ang II promotes activation of ARF6 to controls ROS production by regulating Rac1 activation and Nox1 expression. In turn, increased ROS acts to activate the MAPK pathway. These signaling events represent a new molecular mechanism by which Ang II can promote proliferation of VSMC. PMID:26824355

  20. Cholera toxin-induced ADP-ribosylation of a 46 kDa protein is decreased in brains of ethanol-fed mice

    SciTech Connect

    Nhamburo, P.T.; Hoffman, P.L.; Tabakoff, B.

    1988-01-01

    The acute in vitro effects of ethanol on cerebral cortical adenylate cyclase activity and beta-adrenergic receptor characteristics suggested a site of action of ethanol at Gs, the stimulatory guanine nucleotide binding protein. After chronic ethanol ingestion, the beta-adrenergic receptor appeared to be uncoupled (i.e., the form of the receptor with high affinity for agonist was undetectable), and stimulation of adenylate cyclase activity by isoproterenol or guanine nucleotides was reduced, suggesting an alteration in the properties of Gs. To further characterize this change, cholera and pertussis toxin-mediated /sup 32/P-ADP-ribosylation of mouse cortical membranes was assessed in mice that had chronically ingested ethanol in a liquid diet. /sup 32/P-labeled proteins were separated by SDS-PAGE and quantitated by autoradiography. There was a selective 30-50% decrease in cholera toxin-induced labeling of 46 kDa protein band in membranes of ethanol-fed mice, with no apparent change in pertussis toxin-induced labeling. The 46 kDa protein has a molecular weight similar to that of the alpha subunit of Gs, suggesting a reduced amount of this protein or a change in its characteristics as a substrate for cholera toxin-induced ADP-ribosylation in cortical membranes of ethanol-fed mice.

  1. Differences in the poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation patterns of ICP4, the herpes simplex virus major regulatory protein, in infected cells and in isolated nuclei.

    PubMed Central

    Blaho, J A; Michael, N; Kang, V; Aboul-Ela, N; Smulson, M E; Jacobson, M K; Roizman, B

    1992-01-01

    Infected-cell protein 4 (ICP4), the major regulatory protein in herpes simplex viruses 1 and 2, was previously reported to accept 32P from [32P]NAD in isolated nuclei. This modification was attributed to poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (C. M. Preston and E. L. Notarianni, Virology 131:492-501, 1983). We determined that an antibody specific for poly(ADP-ribose) reacts with ICP4 extracted from infected cells, electrophoretically separated in denaturing gels, and electrically transferred to nitrocellulose. Our results indicate that all forms of ICP4 observed in one-dimensional gel electrophoresis are poly(ADP-ribosyl)ated. Poly(ADP-ribose) on ICP4 extracted from infected cells was resistant to cleavage by purified poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase unless ICP4 was in a denatured state. Poly(ADP-ribose) added to ICP4 in isolated nuclei was sensitive to this enzyme. This result indicates that the two processes are distinct and may involve different sites on the ICP4 molecule. Images PMID:1328673

  2. Platelet cytosolic 44-kDa protein is a substrate of cholera toxin-induced ADP-ribosylation and is not recognized by antisera against the. alpha. subunit of the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein

    SciTech Connect

    Molina Y Vedia, L.M.; Reep, B.R.; Lapetina, E.G. )

    1988-08-01

    ADP-ribosylation induced by cholera toxin and pertussis toxin was studied in particulate and cytosolic fractions of human platelets. Platelets were disrupted by a cycle of freezing and thawing in the presence of a hyposmotic buffer containing protease inhibitors. In both fractions, the A subunit of cholera toxin ADP-ribosylates two proteins with molecular masses of 42 and 44 kDa, whereas pertussis toxin ADP-ribosylates a 41-kDa polypeptide. Two antisera against the {alpha} subunit of the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein recognize only the 42-kDa polypeptide. Cholera toxin-induced ADP-ribosylation of the 42- and 44-kDa proteins is reduced by pretreatment of platelets with iloprost, a prostacyclin analog. The 44-kDa protein, which is substrate of cholera toxin, could be extracted completely from the membrane and recovered in the cytosolic fraction when the cells were disrupted by Dounce homogenization and the pellet was extensively washed. A 44-kDa protein can also be labeled with 8-azidoguanosine 5{prime}-({alpha}-{sup 32}P)triphosphate in the cytosol and membranes. These finding indicate that cholera and pertussis toxins produced covalent modifications of proteins present in particulate and cytosolic platelet fractions. Moreover, the 44-kDa protein might be an {alpha} subunit of a guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein that is not recognized by available antisera.

  3. Molecular Basis of Phosphatidylinositol 4-Phosphate and ARF1 GTPase Recognition by the FAPP1 Pleckstrin Homology (PH) Domain

    SciTech Connect

    He, J.; Heroux, A.; Scott, J. L.; Roy, S.; Lenoir, M.; Overduin, M.; Stahelin, R. V.; Kutateladze, T. G.

    2011-05-27

    Four-phosphate-adaptor protein 1 (FAPP1) regulates secretory transport from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) to the plasma membrane. FAPP1 is recruited to the Golgi through binding of its pleckstrin homology (PH) domain to phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PtdIns(4)P) and a small GTPase ADP-ribosylation factor 1 (ARF1). Despite the critical role of FAPP1 in membrane trafficking, the molecular basis of its dual function remains unclear. Here, we report a 1.9 {angstrom} resolution crystal structure of the FAPP1 PH domain and detail the molecular mechanisms of the PtdIns(4)P and ARF1 recognition. The FAPP1 PH domain folds into a seven-stranded {beta}-barrel capped by an {alpha}-helix at one edge, whereas the opposite edge is flanked by three loops and the {beta}4 and {beta}7 strands that form a lipid-binding pocket within the {beta}-barrel. The ARF1-binding site is located on the outer side of the {beta}-barrel as determined by NMR resonance perturbation analysis, mutagenesis, and measurements of binding affinities. The two binding sites have little overlap, allowing FAPP1 PH to associate with both ligands simultaneously and independently. Binding to PtdIns(4)P is enhanced in an acidic environment and is required for membrane penetration and tubulation activity of FAPP1, whereas the GTP-bound conformation of the GTPase is necessary for the interaction with ARF1. Together, these findings provide structural and biochemical insight into the multivalent membrane anchoring by the PH domain that may augment affinity and selectivity of FAPP1 toward the TGN membranes enriched in both PtdIns(4)P and GTP-bound ARF1.

  4. Molecular Basis of Phosphatidylinositol 4-Phosphate and ARF1 GTPase Recognition by the FAPP1 Pleckstrin Homology (PH) Domain*

    PubMed Central

    He, Ju; Scott, Jordan L.; Heroux, Annie; Roy, Siddhartha; Lenoir, Marc; Overduin, Michael; Stahelin, Robert V.; Kutateladze, Tatiana G.

    2011-01-01

    Four-phosphate-adaptor protein 1 (FAPP1) regulates secretory transport from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) to the plasma membrane. FAPP1 is recruited to the Golgi through binding of its pleckstrin homology (PH) domain to phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PtdIns(4)P) and a small GTPase ADP-ribosylation factor 1 (ARF1). Despite the critical role of FAPP1 in membrane trafficking, the molecular basis of its dual function remains unclear. Here, we report a 1.9 Å resolution crystal structure of the FAPP1 PH domain and detail the molecular mechanisms of the PtdIns(4)P and ARF1 recognition. The FAPP1 PH domain folds into a seven-stranded β-barrel capped by an α-helix at one edge, whereas the opposite edge is flanked by three loops and the β4 and β7 strands that form a lipid-binding pocket within the β-barrel. The ARF1-binding site is located on the outer side of the β-barrel as determined by NMR resonance perturbation analysis, mutagenesis, and measurements of binding affinities. The two binding sites have little overlap, allowing FAPP1 PH to associate with both ligands simultaneously and independently. Binding to PtdIns(4)P is enhanced in an acidic environment and is required for membrane penetration and tubulation activity of FAPP1, whereas the GTP-bound conformation of the GTPase is necessary for the interaction with ARF1. Together, these findings provide structural and biochemical insight into the multivalent membrane anchoring by the PH domain that may augment affinity and selectivity of FAPP1 toward the TGN membranes enriched in both PtdIns(4)P and GTP-bound ARF1. PMID:21454700

  5. Molecular basis of phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate and ARF1 GTPase recognition by the FAPP1 pleckstrin homology (PH) domain.

    PubMed

    He, Ju; Scott, Jordan L; Heroux, Annie; Roy, Siddhartha; Lenoir, Marc; Overduin, Michael; Stahelin, Robert V; Kutateladze, Tatiana G

    2011-05-27

    Four-phosphate-adaptor protein 1 (FAPP1) regulates secretory transport from the trans-Golgi network (TGN) to the plasma membrane. FAPP1 is recruited to the Golgi through binding of its pleckstrin homology (PH) domain to phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate (PtdIns(4)P) and a small GTPase ADP-ribosylation factor 1 (ARF1). Despite the critical role of FAPP1 in membrane trafficking, the molecular basis of its dual function remains unclear. Here, we report a 1.9 Å resolution crystal structure of the FAPP1 PH domain and detail the molecular mechanisms of the PtdIns(4)P and ARF1 recognition. The FAPP1 PH domain folds into a seven-stranded β-barrel capped by an α-helix at one edge, whereas the opposite edge is flanked by three loops and the β4 and β7 strands that form a lipid-binding pocket within the β-barrel. The ARF1-binding site is located on the outer side of the β-barrel as determined by NMR resonance perturbation analysis, mutagenesis, and measurements of binding affinities. The two binding sites have little overlap, allowing FAPP1 PH to associate with both ligands simultaneously and independently. Binding to PtdIns(4)P is enhanced in an acidic environment and is required for membrane penetration and tubulation activity of FAPP1, whereas the GTP-bound conformation of the GTPase is necessary for the interaction with ARF1. Together, these findings provide structural and biochemical insight into the multivalent membrane anchoring by the PH domain that may augment affinity and selectivity of FAPP1 toward the TGN membranes enriched in both PtdIns(4)P and GTP-bound ARF1. PMID:21454700

  6. Exogenous nitric oxide (NO) generation or IL-1[beta]-induced intracellular NO production stimulates inhibitory auto-ADP-ribosylation of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase in RINm5F cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dimmeler, S.; Bruene, B. ); Ankarcrona, M.; Nicotera, P. )

    1993-04-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) stimulates the auto-ADP-ribosylation of the glycolytic enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) which results in the inhibition of enzyme activity. In the present work the authors show that addition of exogenous NO or IL-1[beta]-induced intracellular NO generation cause GAPDH ADP-ribosylation and inhibition of enzyme activity. Incubation of RINm5F cells with sodium nitroprusside (SNP) for 18 h caused a time- and dose-dependent inhibition of GAPDH activity. Half-maximal inhibition of GAPDH activity was observed with 80 [mu]M of the NO donor, with maximal inhibition after roughly 6 h of incubation. In parallel, SNP induced endogenous ADP-ribosylation of GAPDH measured by a decreased incorporation of [[sup 32]P]ADP-ribose from [[sup 32]P]NAD[sup +] in the cytosol of the SNP-treated cells. Stimulation of endogenous NO production by inducing the NO synthase by exposure to the cytokine IL-1[beta] results in decreased GAPDH activity. IL-1[beta] (10[sup [minus]9] M) inhibited GAPDH activity about 55%, compared with control values. Production of nitrite and inhibition of GAPDH was reversed by the NAD[sup +] synthease inhibitor N[sub G]-monomethyl-L-arginine, indicating the endogenous generated NO was the effective molecule. Again, GAPDH inhibition was associated with NO-stimulated endogenous ADP-ribosylation of the enzyme Western blot analysis of GAPDH excluded degradation of GAPDH by NO. NO-stimulated auto-ADP-ribosylation resulted in inhibition of the glycolytic enzyme GAPDH and may be relevant as a cytotoxic effect of NO. In concert with its inhibitory actions on iron-sulfur enzymes like aconitase and electron transport proteins of the respiratory chain, NO may mediate autocytotoxic effect in [beta]-cells. 40 refs., 7 figs.

  7. SmARF8, a transcription factor involved in parthenocarpy in eggplant.

    PubMed

    Du, Liming; Bao, Chonglai; Hu, Tianhua; Zhu, Qinmei; Hu, Haijiao; He, Qunyan; Mao, Weihai

    2016-02-01

    Parthenocarpic fruit is a very attractive trait for consumers and especially in eggplants where seeds can lead to browning of the flesh and bitterness. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying parthenocarpy in eggplant still remain unknown. Some auxin response factors have been previously shown in model species, such as Arabidopsis and tomato, to play an important role in such a process. Here, we have identified a natural parthenocarpic mutant and showed that ARF8 from eggplant (SmARF8), is down-regulated in buds compared to wild-type plants. Further characterization of SmARF8 showed that it is a nuclear protein and an active transcriptional regulator. We determined that amino acids 629-773 of SmARF8 act as the transcriptional activation domain, the C terminus of SmARF8 is the protein-binding domain, and that SmARF8 might form homodimers. Expression analysis in eggplant showed that SmARF8 is expressed ubiquitously in all tissues and organs and is responsive to auxin. Eggplant transgenic lines harboring RNA interference of SmARF8 exhibited parthenocarpy in unfertilized flowers, suggesting that SmARF8 negatively regulates fruit initiation. Interestingly, SmARF8-overexpressing Arabidopsis lines also induced parthenocarpy. These results indicate that SmARF8 could affect the dimerization of auxin/indole acetic acid repressors with SmARF8 via domains III and IV and thus induce fruit development. Furthermore, the introduction of SmARF8 full-length cDNA could partially complement the parthenocarpic phenotypes in Arabidopsis arf8-1 and arf8-4 mutants. Collectively, our results demonstrate that SmARF8 may act as a key negative regulator involved in parthenocarpic fruit development of eggplant. These findings give more insights into the conserved mechanisms leading to parthenocarpy in which auxin signaling plays a pivotal role, and provide potential target for eggplant breeding. PMID:26174736

  8. Which Way In? The RalF Arf-GEF Orchestrates Rickettsia Host Cell Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Rennoll-Bankert, Kristen E.; Rahman, M. Sayeedur; Gillespie, Joseph J.; Guillotte, Mark L.; Kaur, Simran J.; Lehman, Stephanie S.; Beier-Sexton, Magda; Azad, Abdu F.

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial Sec7-domain-containing proteins (RalF) are known only from species of Legionella and Rickettsia, which have facultative and obligate intracellular lifestyles, respectively. L. pneumophila RalF, a type IV secretion system (T4SS) effector, is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) of ADP-ribosylation factors (Arfs), activating and recruiting host Arf1 to the Legionella-containing vacuole. In contrast, previous in vitro studies showed R. prowazekii (Typhus Group) RalF is a functional Arf-GEF that localizes to the host plasma membrane and interacts with the actin cytoskeleton via a unique C-terminal domain. As RalF is differentially encoded across Rickettsia species (e.g., pseudogenized in all Spotted Fever Group species), it may function in lineage-specific biology and pathogenicity. Herein, we demonstrate RalF of R. typhi (Typhus Group) interacts with the Rickettsia T4SS coupling protein (RvhD4) via its proximal C-terminal sequence. RalF is expressed early during infection, with its inactivation via antibody blocking significantly reducing R. typhi host cell invasion. For R. typhi and R. felis (Transitional Group), RalF ectopic expression revealed subcellular localization with the host plasma membrane and actin cytoskeleton. Remarkably, R. bellii (Ancestral Group) RalF showed perinuclear localization reminiscent of ectopically expressed Legionella RalF, for which it shares several structural features. For R. typhi, RalF co-localization with Arf6 and PI(4,5)P2 at entry foci on the host plasma membrane was determined to be critical for invasion. Thus, we propose recruitment of PI(4,5)P2 at entry foci, mediated by RalF activation of Arf6, initiates actin remodeling and ultimately facilitates bacterial invasion. Collectively, our characterization of RalF as an invasin suggests that, despite carrying a similar Arf-GEF unknown from other bacteria, different intracellular lifestyles across Rickettsia and Legionella species have driven divergent roles for Ral

  9. Membrane metabolism mediated by Sec14 family members influences Arf GTPase activating protein activity for transport from the trans-Golgi.

    PubMed

    Wong, Tania A; Fairn, Gregory D; Poon, Pak P; Shmulevitz, Maya; McMaster, Christopher R; Singer, Richard A; Johnston, Gerald C

    2005-09-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains a family of Arf (ADP-ribosylation factor) GTPase activating protein (GAP) proteins with the Gcs1 + Age2 ArfGAP pair providing essential overlapping function for the movement of transport vesicles from the trans-Golgi network. We have generated a temperature-sensitive but stable version of the Gcs1 protein that is impaired only for trans-Golgi transport and find that deleterious effects of this enfeebled Gcs1-4 mutant protein are relieved by increased gene dosage of the gcs1-4 mutant gene itself or by the SFH2 gene (also called CSR1), encoding a phosphatidylinositol transfer protein (PITP). This effect was not seen for the SEC14 gene, encoding the founding member of the yeast PITP protein family, even though the Gcs1 and Age2 ArfGAPs are known to be downstream effectors of Sec14-mediated activity for trans-Golgi transport. Sfh2-mediated suppression of inadequate Gcs1-4 function depended on phospholipase D, whereas inadequate Gcs1-4 activity was relieved by increasing levels of diacylglycerol (DAG). Recombinant Gcs1 protein was found to bind certain phospholipids but not DAG. Our findings favor a model of Gcs1 localization through binding to specific phospholipids and activation of ArfGAP activity by DAG-mediated membrane curvature as the transport vesicle is formed. Thus, ArfGAPs are subject to both temporal and spatial regulation that is facilitated by Sfh2-mediated modulation of the lipid environment. PMID:16126894

  10. Endothelial Cells Can Regulate Smooth Muscle Cells in Contractile Phenotype through the miR-206/ARF6&NCX1/Exosome Axis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiao; He, Yu; Hou, Xue; Zhang, Zhenming; Wang, Rui; Wu, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    Active interactions between endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) are critical to maintaining the SMC phenotype. Exosomes play an important role in intercellular communication. However, little is known about the mechanisms that regulate endothelial cells and SMCs crosstalk. We aimed to determine the mechanisms underlying the regulation of the SMC phenotype by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) through exosomes. We found that HUVECs overexpressing miR-206 upregulated contractile marker (α-SMA, Smoothelin and Calponin) mRNA expression in SMCs. We also found that the expression of miR-206 by HUVECs reduced exosome production by regulating ADP-Ribosylation Factor 6 (ARF6) and sodium/calcium exchanger 1 (NCX1). Using real-time PCR and western blot analysis, we showed that HUVEC-derived exosomes decreased the expression of contractile phenotype marker genes (α-SMA, Smoothelin and Calponin) in SMCs. Furthermore, a reduction of the miR-26a-containing exosomes secreted from HUVECs affects the SMC phenotype. We propose a novel mechanism in which miR-206 expression in HUVECs maintains the contractile phenotype of SMCs by suppressing exosome secretion from HUVECs, particularly miR-26a in exosomes, through targeting ARF6 and NCX1. PMID:27031991

  11. Endothelial Cells Can Regulate Smooth Muscle Cells in Contractile Phenotype through the miR-206/ARF6&NCX1/Exosome Axis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xiao; He, Yu; Hou, Xue; Zhang, Zhenming; Wang, Rui; Wu, Qiong

    2016-01-01

    Active interactions between endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) are critical to maintaining the SMC phenotype. Exosomes play an important role in intercellular communication. However, little is known about the mechanisms that regulate endothelial cells and SMCs crosstalk. We aimed to determine the mechanisms underlying the regulation of the SMC phenotype by human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) through exosomes. We found that HUVECs overexpressing miR-206 upregulated contractile marker (α-SMA, Smoothelin and Calponin) mRNA expression in SMCs. We also found that the expression of miR-206 by HUVECs reduced exosome production by regulating ADP-Ribosylation Factor 6 (ARF6) and sodium/calcium exchanger 1 (NCX1). Using real-time PCR and western blot analysis, we showed that HUVEC-derived exosomes decreased the expression of contractile phenotype marker genes (α-SMA, Smoothelin and Calponin) in SMCs. Furthermore, a reduction of the miR-26a-containing exosomes secreted from HUVECs affects the SMC phenotype. We propose a novel mechanism in which miR-206 expression in HUVECs maintains the contractile phenotype of SMCs by suppressing exosome secretion from HUVECs, particularly miR-26a in exosomes, through targeting ARF6 and NCX1. PMID:27031991

  12. Enhancement of β-catenin activity by BIG1 plus BIG2 via Arf activation and cAMP signals.

    PubMed

    Li, Chun-Chun; Le, Kang; Kato, Jiro; Moss, Joel; Vaughan, Martha

    2016-05-24

    Multifunctional β-catenin, with critical roles in both cell-cell adhesion and Wnt-signaling pathways, was among HeLa cell proteins coimmunoprecipitated by antibodies against brefeldin A-inhibited guanine nucleotide-exchange factors 1 and 2 (BIG1 or BIG2) that activate ADP-ribosylation factors (Arfs) by accelerating the replacement of bound GDP with GTP. BIG proteins also contain A-kinase anchoring protein (AKAP) sequences that can act as scaffolds for multimolecular assemblies that facilitate and limit cAMP signaling temporally and spatially. Direct interaction of BIG1 N-terminal sequence with β-catenin was confirmed using yeast two-hybrid assays and in vitro synthesized proteins. Depletion of BIG1 and/or BIG2 or overexpression of guanine nucleotide-exchange factor inactive mutant, but not wild-type, proteins interfered with β-catenin trafficking, leading to accumulation at perinuclear Golgi structures. Both phospholipase D activity and vesicular trafficking were required for effects of BIG1 and BIG2 on β-catenin activation. Levels of PKA-phosphorylated β-catenin S675 and β-catenin association with PKA, BIG1, and BIG2 were also diminished after BIG1/BIG2 depletion. Inferring a requirement for BIG1 and/or BIG2 AKAP sequence in PKA modification of β-catenin and its effect on transcription activation, we confirmed dependence of S675 phosphorylation and transcription coactivator function on BIG2 AKAP-C sequence. PMID:27162341

  13. Identification of a GTP-binding protein. cap alpha. subunit that lacks an apparent ADP-ribosylation site for pertussis toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Fong, H.K.W.; Yoshimoto, K.K.; Eversole-Cire, P.; Simon, M.I.

    1988-05-01

    Recent molecular cloning of cDNA for the ..cap alpha.. subunit of bovine transducin (a guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory protein, or G protein) has revealed the presence of two retinal-specific transducins, called T/sub r/ and T/sub c/, which are expressed in rod or cone photoreceptor cells. In a further study of G-protein diversity and signal transduction in the retina, the authors have identified a G-protein ..cap alpha.. subunit, which they refer to as G/sub z/..cap alpha.., by isolating a human retinal cDNA clone that cross-hybridizes at reduced stringency with bovine T/sub r/ ..cap alpha..-subunit cDNA. The deduced amino acid sequence of G/sub z/..cap alpha.. is 41-67% identical with those of other known G-protein ..cap alpha.. subunits. However, the 355-residue G/sub z/..cap alpha.. lacks a consensus site for ADP-ribosylation by pertussis toxin, and its amino acid sequence varies within a number of regions that are strongly conserved among all of the other G-protein ..cap alpha.. subunits. They suggest that G/sub z/..cap alpha.., which appears to be highly expressed in neural tissues, represents a member of a subfamily of G proteins that mediate signal transduction in pertussis toxin-insensitive systems.

  14. Functional Characterization of an Extended Binding Component of the Actin-ADP-Ribosylating C2 Toxin Detected in Clostridium botulinum Strain (C) 2300 ▿

    PubMed Central

    Sterthoff, Charlott; Lang, Alexander E.; Schwan, Carsten; Tauch, Andreas; Aktories, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    Clostridium botulinum C2 toxin consists of the binding component C2II and the enzyme component C2I, which ADP-ribosylates G-actin of eukaryotic cells. Trypsin-activated C2II (C2IIa) forms heptamers that mediate cell binding and translocation of C2I from acidic endosomes into the cytosol of target cells. By genome sequencing of C. botulinum strain (C) 2300, we found that C2II from this strain carries a C-terminal extension of 129 amino acids, unlike its homologous counterparts from strains (C) 203U28, (C) 468, and (D) 1873. This extension shows a high similarity to the C-terminal receptor-binding domain of C2II and is presumably the result of a duplication of this domain. The C2II extension facilitates the binding to cell surface receptors, which leads to an increased intoxication efficiency compared to that of C2II proteins from other C. botulinum strains. PMID:20145093

  15. The calcium-sensing receptor changes cell shape via a beta-arrestin-1 ARNO ARF6 ELMO protein network.

    PubMed

    Bouschet, Tristan; Martin, Stéphane; Kanamarlapudi, Venkateswarlu; Mundell, Stuart; Henley, Jeremy M

    2007-08-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) transduce the binding of extracellular stimuli into intracellular signalling cascades that can lead to morphological changes. Here, we demonstrate that stimulation of the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR), a GPCR that promotes chemotaxis by detecting increases in extracellular calcium, triggers plasma membrane (PM) ruffling via a pathway that involves beta-arrestin 1, Arf nucleotide binding site opener (ARNO), ADP-ribosylating factor 6 (ARF6) and engulfment and cell motility protein (ELMO). Expression of dominant negative beta-arrestin 1 or its knockdown with siRNA impaired the CaSR-induced PM ruffling response. Expression of a catalytically inactive ARNO also reduced CaSR-induced PM ruffling. Furthermore, beta-arrestin 1 co-immunoprecipitated with the CaSR and ARNO under resting conditions. Agonist treatment did not markedly alter beta-arrestin 1 binding to the CaSR or to ARNO but it did elicit the translocation and colocalisation of the CaSR, beta-arrestin 1 and ARNO to membrane protrusions. Furthermore, ARF6 and ELMO, two proteins known to couple ARNO to the cytoskeleton, were required for CaSR-dependent morphological changes and translocated to the PM ruffles. These data suggest that cells ruffle upon CaSR stimulation via a mechanism that involves translocation of beta-arrestin 1 pre-assembled with the CaSR or ARNO, and that ELMO plays an essential role in this CaSR-signalling-induced cytoskeletal reorganisation. PMID:17623778

  16. Immunochemical analysis of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation in HaCaT keratinocytes induced by the mono-alkylating agent 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES): Impact of experimental conditions.

    PubMed

    Debiak, Malgorzata; Lex, Kirsten; Ponath, Viviane; Burckhardt-Boer, Waltraud; Thiermann, Horst; Steinritz, Dirk; Schmidt, Annette; Mangerich, Aswin; Bürkle, Alexander

    2016-02-26

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a bifunctional alkylating agent with a long history of use as a chemical weapon. Although its last military use is dated for the eighties of the last century, a potential use in terroristic attacks against civilians remains a significant threat. Thus, improving medical therapy of mustard exposed individuals is still of particular interest. PARP inhibitors were recently brought into the focus as a potential countermeasure for mustard-induced pathologies, supported by the availability of efficient compounds successfully tested in cancer therapy. PARP activation after SM treatment was reported in several cell types and tissues under various conditions; however, a detailed characterization of this phenomenon is still missing. This study provides the basis for such studies by developing and optimizing experimental conditions to investigate poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation) in HaCaT keratinocytes upon treatment with the monofunctional alkylating agent 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide ("half mustard", CEES). By using an immunofluorescence-based approach, we show that optimization of experimental conditions with regards to the type of solvent, dilution factors and treatment procedure is essential to obtain a homogenous PAR staining in HaCaT cell cultures. Furthermore, we demonstrate that different CEES treatment protocols significantly influence the cytotoxicity profiles of treated cells. Using an optimized treatment protocol, our data reveals that CEES induces a dose- and time-dependent dynamic PARylation response in HaCaT cells that could be completely blocked by treating cells with the clinically relevant pharmacological PARP inhibitor ABT888 (also known as veliparib). Finally, siRNA experiments show that CEES-induced PAR formation is predominantly due to the activation of PARP1. In conclusion, this study provides a detailed analysis of the CEES-induced PARylation response in HaCaT keratinocytes, which forms an experimental basis to study the

  17. 2-Azido-( sup 32 P)NAD+, a photoactivatable probe for G-protein structure: Evidence for holotransducin oligomers in which the ADP-ribosylated carboxyl terminus of alpha interacts with both alpha and gamma subunits

    SciTech Connect

    Vaillancourt, R.R.; Dhanasekaran, N.; Johnson, G.L.; Ruoho, A.E. )

    1990-05-01

    A radioactive and photoactivatable derivative of NAD+, 2-azido-(adenylate-32P)NAD+, has been synthesized and used with pertussis toxin to ADP-ribosylate Cys347 of the alpha subunit (alpha T) of GT, the retinal guanine nucleotide-binding protein. ADP-ribosylation of alpha T followed by light activation of the azide moiety of 2-azido-(adenylate-32P)ADP-ribose produced four crosslinked species involving the alpha and gamma subunits of the GT heterotrimer: an alpha trimer (alpha-alpha-alpha), and alpha-alpha-gamma crosslink, an alpha dimer (alpha-alpha), and an alpha-gamma crosslink. The alpha trimer, alpha-alpha-gamma complex, alpha dimer, and alpha-gamma complexes were immunoreactive with alpha T antibodies. The alpha-alpha-gamma and the alpha-gamma complexes were immunoreactive with antisera recognizing gamma subunits. No evidence was found for crosslinking of alpha T to beta T subunits. Hydrolysis of the thioglycosidic bond between Cys347 and 2-azido-(adenylate-32P)ADP-ribose using mercuric acetate resulted in the transfer of radiolabel from Cys347 of alpha T in the crosslinked oligomers to alpha monomers, indicative of intermolecular photocrosslinking, and to gamma monomers, indicative of either intermolecular crosslinked complexes (between heterotrimers) or intramolecular crosslinked complexes (within the heterotrimer). These results demonstrate that GT exists as an oligomer and that ADP-ribosylated Cys347, which is four residues from the alpha T-carboxyl terminus, is oriented toward and in close proximity to the gamma subunit.

  18. The calcium-sensing receptor changes cell shape via a β-arrestin-1–ARNO–ARF6–ELMO protein network

    PubMed Central

    Bouschet, Tristan; Martin, Stéphane; Kanamarlapudi, Venkateswarlu; Mundell, Stuart; Henley, Jeremy M.

    2012-01-01

    Summary G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) transduce the binding of extracellular stimuli into intracellular signalling cascades that can lead to morphological changes. Here, we demonstrate that stimulation of the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR), a GPCR that promotes chemotaxis by detecting increases in extracellular calcium, triggers plasma membrane (PM) ruffling via a pathway that involves β-arrestin 1, Arf nucleotide binding site opener (ARNO), ADP-ribosylating factor 6 (ARF6) and engulfment and cell motility protein (ELMO). Expression of dominant negative β-arrestin 1 or its knockdown with siRNA impaired the CaSR-induced PM ruffling response. Expression of a catalytically inactive ARNO also reduced CaSR-induced PM ruffling. Furthermore, β-arrestin 1 co-immunoprecipitated with the CaSR and ARNO under resting conditions. Agonist treatment did not markedly alter β-arrestin 1 binding to the CaSR or to ARNO but it did elicit the translocation and colocalisation of the CaSR, β-arrestin 1 and ARNO to membrane protrusions. Furthermore, ARF6 and ELMO, two proteins known to couple ARNO to the cytoskeleton, were required for CaSR-dependent morphological changes and translocated to the PM ruffles. These data suggest that cells ruffle upon CaSR stimulation via a mechanism that involves translocation of β-arrestin 1 pre-assembled with the CaSR or ARNO, and that ELMO plays an essential role in this CaSR-signalling-induced cytoskeletal reorganisation. PMID:17623778

  19. The ARF-Like GTPase ARFRP1 Is Essential for Lipid Droplet Growth and Is Involved in the Regulation of Lipolysis▿

    PubMed Central

    Hommel, Angela; Hesse, Deike; Völker, Wolfgang; Jaschke, Alexander; Moser, Markus; Engel, Thomas; Blüher, Matthias; Zahn, Claudia; Chadt, Alexandra; Ruschke, Karen; Vogel, Heike; Kluge, Reinhart; Robenek, Horst; Joost, Hans-Georg; Schürmann, Annette

    2010-01-01

    ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF)-related protein 1 (ARFRP1) is a GTPase regulating protein trafficking between intracellular organelles. Here we show that mice lacking Arfrp1 in adipocytes (Arfrp1ad−/−) are lipodystrophic due to a defective lipid droplet formation in adipose cells. Ratios of mono-, di-, and triacylglycerol, as well as the fatty acid composition of triglycerides, were unaltered. Lipid droplets of brown adipocytes of Arfrp1ad−/− mice were considerably smaller and exhibited ultrastructural alterations, such as a disturbed interaction of small lipid-loaded particles with the larger droplets, suggesting that ARFRP1 mediates the transfer of newly formed small lipid particles to the large storage droplets. SNAP23 (synaptosomal-associated protein of 23 kDa) associated with small lipid droplets of control adipocytes but was located predominantly in the cytosol of Arfrp1ad−/− adipocytes, suggesting that lipid droplet growth is defective in Arfrp1ad−/− mice. In addition, levels of phosphorylated hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) were elevated, and association of adipocyte triglyceride lipase (ATGL) with lipid droplets was enhanced in brown adipose tissue from Arfrp1ad−/− mice. Accordingly, basal lipolysis was increased after knockdown of Arfrp1 in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. The data indicate that disruption of ARFRP1 prevents the normal enlargement of lipid droplets and produces an activation of lipolysis. PMID:20038528

  20. Activation of immobilized, biotinylated choleragen AI protein by a 19-kilodalton guanine nucleotide-binding protein.

    PubMed

    Noda, M; Tsai, S C; Adamik, R; Bobak, D A; Moss, J; Vaughan, M

    1989-09-19

    Cholera toxin catalyzes the ADP-ribosylation that results in activation of the stimulatory guanine nucleotide-binding protein of the adenylyl cyclase system, known as Gs. The toxin also ADP-ribosylates other proteins and simple guanidino compounds and auto-ADP-ribosylates its AI protein (CTA1). All of the ADP-ribosyltransferase activities of CTAI are enhanced by 19-21-kDa guanine nucleotide-binding proteins known as ADP-ribosylation factors, or ARFs. CTAI contains a single cysteine located near the carboxy terminus. CTAI was immobilized through this cysteine by reaction with iodoacetyl-N-biotinyl-hexylenediamine and binding of the resulting biotinylated protein to avidin-agarose. Immobilized CTAI catalyzed the ARF-stimulated ADP-ribosylation of agmatine. The reaction was enhanced by detergents and phospholipid, but the fold stimulation by purified sARF-II from bovine brain was considerably less than that observed with free CTA. ADP-ribosylation of Gsa by immobilized CTAI, which was somewhat enhanced by sARF-II, was much less than predicted on the basis of the NAD:agmatine ADP-ribosyltransferase activity. Immobilized CTAI catalyzed its own auto-ADP-ribosylation as well as the ADP-ribosylation of the immobilized avidin and CTA2, with relatively little stimulation by sARF-II. ADP-ribosylation of CTA2 by free CTAI is minimal. These observations are consistent with the conclusion that the cysteine near the carboxy terminus of the toxin is not critical for ADP-ribosyltransferase activity or for its regulation by sARF-II. Biotinylation and immobilization of the toxin through this cysteine may, however, limit accessibility to Gsa or SARF-II, or perhaps otherwise reduce interaction with these proteins whether as substrates or activator. PMID:2514798

  1. Genome-wide identification, isolation and expression analysis of auxin response factor (ARF) gene family in sweet orange (Citrus sinensis)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Si-Bei; OuYang, Wei-Zhi; Hou, Xiao-Jin; Xie, Liang-Liang; Hu, Chun-Gen; Zhang, Jin-Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Auxin response factors (ARFs) are an important family of proteins in auxin-mediated response, with key roles in various physiological and biochemical processes. To date, a genome-wide overview of the ARF gene family in citrus was not available. A systematic analysis of this gene family in citrus was begun by carrying out a genome-wide search for the homologs of ARFs. A total of 19 nonredundant ARF genes (CiARF) were found and validated from the sweet orange. A comprehensive overview of the CiARFs was undertaken, including the gene structures, phylogenetic analysis, chromosome locations, conserved motifs of proteins, and cis-elements in promoters of CiARF. Furthermore, expression profiling using real-time PCR revealed many CiARF genes, albeit with different patterns depending on types of tissues and/or developmental stages. Comprehensive expression analysis of these genes was also performed under two hormone treatments using real-time PCR. Indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) and N-1-napthylphthalamic acid (NPA) treatment experiments revealed differential up-regulation and down-regulation, respectively, of the 19 citrus ARF genes in the callus of sweet orange. Our comprehensive analysis of ARF genes further elucidates the roles of CiARF family members during citrus growth and development process. PMID:25870601

  2. Proteolytic elimination of N-myristoyl modifications by the Shigella virulence factor IpaJ

    PubMed Central

    Burnaevskiy, Nikolay; Fox, Thomas G.; Plymire, Daniel A.; Ertelt, James M.; Weigele, Bethany A.; Selyunin, Andrey S.; Way, Sing Sing; Patrie, Steven M.; Alto, Neal M.

    2013-01-01

    Protein N-myristoylation is a 14-carbon fatty-acid modification that is conserved across eukaryotic species and occurs on nearly 1% of the cellular proteome1,2. The ability of the myristoyl group to facilitate dynamic protein–protein and protein–membrane interactions (known as the myristoyl switch) makes it an essential feature of many signal transduction systems3. Thus pathogenic strategies that facilitate protein demyristoylation would markedly alter the signalling landscape of infected host cells. Here we describe an irreversible mechanism of protein demyristoylation catalysed by invasion plasmid antigen J (IpaJ), a previously uncharacterized Shigella flexneri type III effector protein with cysteine protease activity. A yeast genetic screen for IpaJ substrates identified ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF)1p and ARF2p, small molecular mass GTPases that regulate cargo transport through the Golgi apparatus4. Mass spectrometry showed that IpaJ cleaved the peptide bond between N-myristoylated glycine-2 and asparagine-3 of human ARF1, thereby providing a new mechanism for host secretory inhibition by a bacterial pathogen5,6. We further demonstrate that IpaJ cleaves an array of N-myristoylated proteins involved in cellular growth, signal transduction, autophagasome maturation and organelle function. Taken together, these findings show a previously unrecognized pathogenic mechanism for the site-specific elimination of N-myristoyl protein modification. PMID:23535599

  3. Sulfur and nitrogen mustards induce characteristic poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation responses in HaCaT keratinocytes with distinctive cellular consequences.

    PubMed

    Mangerich, Aswin; Debiak, Malgorzata; Birtel, Matthias; Ponath, Viviane; Balszuweit, Frank; Lex, Kirsten; Martello, Rita; Burckhardt-Boer, Waltraud; Strobelt, Romano; Siegert, Markus; Thiermann, Horst; Steinritz, Dirk; Schmidt, Annette; Bürkle, Alexander

    2016-02-26

    Mustard agents are potent DNA alkylating agents with mutagenic, cytotoxic and vesicant properties. They include bi-functional agents, such as sulfur mustard (SM) or nitrogen mustard (mustine, HN2), as well as mono-functional agents, such as "half mustard" (CEES). Whereas SM has been used as a chemical warfare agent, several nitrogen mustard derivatives, such as chlorambucil and cyclophosphamide, are being used as established chemotherapeutics. Upon induction of specific forms of genotoxic stimuli, several poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) synthesize the nucleic acid-like biopolymer poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) by using NAD(+) as a substrate. Previously, it was shown that SM triggers cellular poly(ADP-ribosyl) ation (PARylation), but so far this phenomenon is poorly characterized. In view of the protective effects of PARP inhibitors, the latter have been proposed as a treatment option of SM-exposed victims. In an accompanying article (Debiak et al., 2016), we have provided an optimized protocol for the analysis of the CEES-induced PARylation response in HaCaT keratinocytes, which forms an experimental basis to further analyze mustard-induced PARylation and its functional consequences, in general. Thus, in the present study, we performed a comprehensive characterization of the PARylation response in HaCaT cells after treatment with four different mustard agents, i.e., SM, CEES, HN2, and chlorambucil, on a qualitative, quantitative and functional level. In particular, we recorded substance-specific as well as dose- and time-dependent PARylation responses using independent bioanalytical methods based on single-cell immuno-fluorescence microscopy and quantitative isotope dilution mass spectrometry. Furthermore, we analyzed if and how PARylation contributes to mustard-induced toxicity by treating HaCaT cells with CEES, SM, and HN2 in combination with the clinically relevant PARP inhibitor ABT888. As evaluated by a novel immunofluorescence-based protocol for the detection of

  4. 20 CFR 228.16 - Adjustments in the age reduction factor (ARF).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... RETIREMENT ACT COMPUTATION OF SURVIVOR ANNUITIES The Tier I Annuity Component § 228.16 Adjustments in the age reduction factor (ARF). Upon the attainment of retirement age, the previously-computed age reduction factor... 20 Employees' Benefits 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Adjustments in the age reduction factor...

  5. Auxin Response Factor SlARF2 Is an Essential Component of the Regulatory Mechanism Controlling Fruit Ripening in Tomato.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yanwei; Hu, Guojian; Breitel, Dario; Liu, Mingchun; Mila, Isabelle; Frasse, Pierre; Fu, Yongyao; Aharoni, Asaph; Bouzayen, Mondher; Zouine, Mohamed

    2015-12-01

    Ethylene is the main regulator of climacteric fruit ripening, by contrast the putative role of other phytohormones in this process remains poorly understood. The present study brings auxin signaling components into the mechanism regulating tomato fruit ripening through the functional characterization of Auxin Response Factor2 (SlARF2) which encodes a downstream component of auxin signaling. Two paralogs, SlARF2A and SlARF2B, are found in the tomato genome, both displaying a marked ripening-associated expression but distinct responsiveness to ethylene and auxin. Down-regulation of either SlARF2A or SlARF2B resulted in ripening defects while simultaneous silencing of both genes led to severe ripening inhibition suggesting a functional redundancy among the two ARFs. Tomato fruits under-expressing SlARF2 produced less climacteric ethylene and exhibited a dramatic down-regulation of the key ripening regulators RIN, CNR, NOR and TAGL1. Ethylene treatment failed to reverse the non-ripening phenotype and the expression of ethylene signaling and biosynthesis genes was strongly altered in SlARF2 down-regulated fruits. Although both SlARF proteins are transcriptional repressors the data indicate they work as positive regulators of tomato fruit ripening. Altogether, the study defines SlARF2 as a new component of the regulatory network controlling the ripening process in tomato. PMID:26716451

  6. Auxin Response Factor SlARF2 Is an Essential Component of the Regulatory Mechanism Controlling Fruit Ripening in Tomato

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Yanwei; Hu, Guojian; Breitel, Dario; Liu, Mingchun; Mila, Isabelle; Frasse, Pierre; Fu, Yongyao; Aharoni, Asaph; Bouzayen, Mondher; Zouine, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Ethylene is the main regulator of climacteric fruit ripening, by contrast the putative role of other phytohormones in this process remains poorly understood. The present study brings auxin signaling components into the mechanism regulating tomato fruit ripening through the functional characterization of Auxin Response Factor2 (SlARF2) which encodes a downstream component of auxin signaling. Two paralogs, SlARF2A and SlARF2B, are found in the tomato genome, both displaying a marked ripening-associated expression but distinct responsiveness to ethylene and auxin. Down-regulation of either SlARF2A or SlARF2B resulted in ripening defects while simultaneous silencing of both genes led to severe ripening inhibition suggesting a functional redundancy among the two ARFs. Tomato fruits under-expressing SlARF2 produced less climacteric ethylene and exhibited a dramatic down-regulation of the key ripening regulators RIN, CNR, NOR and TAGL1. Ethylene treatment failed to reverse the non-ripening phenotype and the expression of ethylene signaling and biosynthesis genes was strongly altered in SlARF2 down-regulated fruits. Although both SlARF proteins are transcriptional repressors the data indicate they work as positive regulators of tomato fruit ripening. Altogether, the study defines SlARF2 as a new component of the regulatory network controlling the ripening process in tomato. PMID:26716451

  7. The Solanum lycopersicum auxin response factor 7 (SlARF7) regulates auxin signaling during tomato fruit set and development.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Maaike; Wolters-Arts, Mieke; Feron, Richard; Mariani, Celestina; Vriezen, Wim H

    2009-01-01

    Auxin response factors (ARFs) are encoded by a gene family of transcription factors that specifically control auxin-dependent developmental processes. A tomato ARF gene, homologous to Arabidopsis NPH4/ARF7 and therefore designated as Solanum lycopersicum ARF7 (SlARF7), was found to be expressed at a high level in unpollinated mature ovaries. More detailed analysis of tomato ovaries showed that the level of SlARF7 transcript increases during flower development, remains at a constant high level in mature flowers, and is down-regulated within 48 h after pollination. Transgenic plants with decreased SlARF7 mRNA levels formed seedless (parthenocarpic) fruits. These fruits were heart-shaped and had a rather thick pericarp due to increased cell expansion, compared with the pericarp of wild-type fruits. The expression analysis, together with the parthenocarpic fruit phenotype of the transgenic lines, suggests that, in tomato, SlARF7 acts as a negative regulator of fruit set until pollination and fertilization have taken place, and moderates the auxin response during fruit growth. PMID:18778404

  8. Arf6 guanine-nucleotide exchange factor cytohesin-2 regulates myelination in nerves.

    PubMed

    Torii, Tomohiro; Ohno, Nobuhiko; Miyamoto, Yuki; Kawahara, Kazuko; Saitoh, Yurika; Nakamura, Kazuaki; Takashima, Shou; Sakagami, Hiroyuki; Tanoue, Akito; Yamauchi, Junji

    2015-05-01

    In postnatal development of the peripheral nervous system (PNS), Schwann cells differentiate to insulate neuronal axons with myelin sheaths, increasing the nerve conduction velocity. To produce the mature myelin sheath with its multiple layers, Schwann cells undergo dynamic morphological changes. While extracellular molecules such as growth factors and cell adhesion ligands are known to regulate the myelination process, the intracellular molecular mechanism underlying myelination remains unclear. In this study, we have produced Schwann cell-specific conditional knockout mice for cytohesin-2, a guanine-nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) specifically activating Arf6. Arf6, a member of the Ras-like protein family, participates in various cellular functions including cell morphological changes. Cytohesin-2 knockout mice exhibit decreased Arf6 activity and reduced myelin thickness in the sciatic nerves, with decreased expression levels of myelin protein zero (MPZ), the major myelin marker protein. These results are consistent with those of experiments in which Schwann cell-neuronal cultures were treated with pan-cytohesin inhibitor SecinH3. On the other hand, the numbers of Ki67-positive cells in knockout mice and controls are comparable, indicating that cytohesin-2 does not have a positive effect on cell numbers. Thus, signaling through cytohesin-2 is required for myelination by Schwann cells, and cytohesin-2 is added to the list of molecules known to underlie PNS myelination. PMID:25824033

  9. Cellular regulation of poly ADP-ribosylation of proteins: II. Augmentation of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase in SV40 3T3 cells following methotrexate-induced G1/S inhibition of cell cycle progression

    SciTech Connect

    Sooki-Toth, A.; Asghari, F.; Kirsten, E.; Kun, E. )

    1987-05-01

    SV40-3T3 cells were exposed in monolayer cultures to 5{times}10{sup {minus}7} M methotrexate (MTX), that inhibited thymidylate synthetase, arrested cell growth without cell killing in 24 h and did not induce single- (ss) or double-strand (ds) breaks in DNA. Following 24, up to 72 h, the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase content of attached cells was induced by 5{times}10{sup {minus}7} MTX and the augmentation of the enzyme increased with the time of exposure to the drug. Inhibition of protein or RNA synthesis abolished augmentation of enzymatic activity; so too did the initiation of maximal cell growth by thymidine + hypoxanthine, by-passing the inhibitory site of MTX. Isolation of the ADP-ribosylated enzyme protein by gel electrophoresis identified poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase protein as the molecule that was induced by 5{times}10{sup {minus}7} M MTX. Under identical conditions, the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase induction in 3T3 cells could not be demonstrated. A possible cell-cycle dependent biosynthesis of the enzyme protein is proposed in SV40 3T3 cells.

  10. Enhancement of choleragen ADP-ribosyltransferase activities by guanyl nucleotides and a 19-kDa membrane protein.

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, S C; Noda, M; Adamik, R; Moss, J; Vaughan, M

    1987-01-01

    Choleragen activates adenylate cyclase by catalyzing, in the presence of NAD, the ADP-ribosylation of Gs alpha, the stimulatory guanyl nucleotide-binding protein of the cyclase system. Kahn and Gilman [Kahn, R. A. & Gilman, A. G. (1986) J. Biol. Chem. 261, 7906-7911] identified another guanyl nucleotide-binding protein termed ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) that stimulated this reaction. It was proposed that the toxin substrate is an ARF-Gs alpha complex and that ARF may have a physiological role in regulation of Gs alpha activity. We have found that purified ARF from bovine brain enhances not only the ADP-ribosylation of Gs alpha but also Gs alpha-independent choleragen-catalyzed reactions. These are (i) ADP-ribosylation of agmatine, a low molecular weight guanidino compound; (ii) ADP-ribosylation of several proteins unrelated to Gs alpha; and (iii) auto-ADP-ribosylation of the toxin A1 peptide. These reactions, as well as the ADP-ribosylation of ARF itself, were stimulated by GTP or stable GTP analogues such as guanyl-5'-yl imido-beta gamma-diphosphate and guanosine 5'-O-[gamma-thio]triphosphate; GDP and guanosine 5'-O-[beta-thio]diphosphate were inactive. These observations are consistent with the conclusion that ARF interacts directly with the A subunit of choleragen in a GTP-dependent fashion thereby enhancing catalytic activity manifest as transfer of ADP-ribose to Gs alpha and other proteins, to the toxin A1 peptide, or to agmatine. It is tempting to speculate that ARF may be involved in regulating one or another of the ADP-ribosyltransferases found in animal cells. Images PMID:3110784

  11. LdARL-3A, a Leishmania promastigote-specific ADP-ribosylation factor-like protein, is essential for flagellum integrity.

    PubMed

    Cuvillier, A; Redon, F; Antoine, J C; Chardin, P; DeVos, T; Merlin, G

    2000-06-01

    The small G protein-encoding LdARL-3A gene, a homologue of the human ARL-3 gene, was isolated from Leishmania donovani, and its protein product characterised. It is unique in the Leishmania genome and expressed only in the extracellular promastigote insect form, but not in the intracellular amastigote mammalian form, as shown by northern blots and western blots developed with a specific anti-C terminus immune serum. Indirect immunofluorescence microscopy revealed distinct labelled spots regularly distributed on the plasma membrane, including the part lining the flagellum and the flagellar pocket. By transfection experiments, it was found that wild-type LdARL-3A-overexpressing promastigotes reached higher densities in culture, but released significantly less secreted acid phosphatase in the extracellular medium than the parental strain. When LdARL-3A blocked under the GDP-bound 'inactive' form or with an inactivated potential myristoylation site was overexpressed, the cells displayed an apparent wild-type phenotype, but died earlier in the stationary phase; in contrast to parental cells, they showed a diffuse pattern of fluorescence labelling in the cytoplasm and on the cell membrane. Strikingly, when a constitutively 'active' form of LdARL-3A (blocked under the GTP-bound form) was overexpressed, the promastigotes were immobile with a very short flagellum, a slow growth rate and a low level of acid phosphatase secretion; the length of the flagellum was inversely proportional to mutant protein expression. We concluded that LdARL-3A could be an essential gene involved in flagellum biogenesis; it may provide new approaches for control of the parasite at the insect stage. PMID:10806117

  12. ADP-ribosylation factor-like 4C (ARL4C), a novel ovarian cancer metastasis suppressor, identified by integrated genomics

    PubMed Central

    Su, Dan; Katsaros, Dionyssios; Xu, Shenhua; Xu, Haiyan; Gao, Yun; Biglia, Nicoletta; Feng, Jianguo; Ying, Lisha; Zhang, Ping; Benedetto, Chiara; Yu, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms involving the initiation, progression, and metastasis of ovarian cancer is important for the prevention, detection, and treatment of ovarian cancer. In this study, two ovarian cancer cell lines, HO-8910 and its derivative HO-8910PM with highly metastatic potential, were applied to comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) analysis. We found 14 chromosome fragments with different copy numbers between the two cell lines, one (2q36.1-37.3) of which was confirmed to be one-copy loss in HO-8910PM by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Using the microarray data on gene expression profiles from these cell lines, 6 significantly expression-decreased genes located on 2q36.1-37.3 in HO-8910PM were identified. Of the 6 genes, ARL4C was identified as a novel ovarian cancer-related gene using integrated molecular and genomic analyses. ARL4C mRNA expression was validated by quantitative PCR to be markedly decreased in HO-8910PM cells, compared to that in HO-8910. Both overexpression and knockdown of ARL4C demonstrated that low ARL4C expression promotes the migration but not influences proliferation capability of ovarian cancer cells in vitro, indicating its specific role in ovarian cancer progression. Furthermore, ovarian cancer patients with medium and high expression of ARL4C mRNA had a favorable prognosis compared to those with low expression, suggesting the ARL4C could be a potential predictor for ovarian cancer prognosis. PMID:25901194

  13. The cytohesin guanosine exchange factors (GEFs) are required to promote HGF-mediated renal recovery after acute kidney injury (AKI) in mice

    PubMed Central

    Reviriego-Mendoza, Marta M; Santy, Lorraine C

    2015-01-01

    The lack of current treatment and preventable measures for acute kidney injury (AKI) in hospitalized patients results in an increased mortality rate of up to 80% and elevated health costs. Additionally, if not properly repaired, those who survive AKI may develop fibrosis and long-term kidney damage. The molecular aspects of kidney injury and repair are still uncertain. Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) promotes recovery of the injured kidney by inducing survival and migration of tubular epithelial cells to repopulate bare tubule areas. HGF-stimulated kidney epithelial cell migration requires the activation of ADP-ribosylation factor 6 (Arf6) and Rac1 via the cytohesin family of Arf-guanine-nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), in vitro. We used an ischemia and reperfusion injury (IRI) mouse model to analyze the effects of modulating this signaling pathway on kidney recovery. We treated IRI mice with either HGF, the cytohesin inhibitor SecinH3, or a combination of both. As previously reported, HGF treatment promoted rapid improvement of kidney function as evidenced by creatinine (Cre) and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels. In contrast, simultaneous treatment with SecinH3 and HGF blocks the ability of HGF to promote kidney recovery. Immunohistochemistry showed that HGF treatment promoted recovery of tubule structure, and had enhanced levels of active, GTP-bound Arf6 and GTP-Rac1. SecinH3 treatment, however, caused a dramatic decrease in GTP-Arf6 and GTP-Rac1 levels when compared to kidney sections from HGF-treated IRI mice. Additionally, SecinH3 counteracted the renal reparative effects of HGF. Our results support the conclusion that cytohesin function is required for HGF-stimulated renal IRI repair. PMID:26116550

  14. Regulating the large Sec7 ARF guanine nucleotide exchange factors: the when, where and how of activation

    PubMed Central

    Wright, John; Kahn, Richard A.; Sztul, Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells require selective sorting and transport of cargo between intracellular compartments. This is accomplished at least in part by vesicles that bud from a donor compartment, sequestering a subset of resident protein “cargos” destined for transport to an acceptor compartment. A key step in vesicle formation and targeting is the recruitment of specific proteins that form a coat on the outside of the vesicle in a process requiring the activation of regulatory GTPases of the ARF family. Like all such GTPases, ARFs cycle between inactive, GDP-bound, and membrane-associated active, GTP-bound, conformations. And like most regulatory GTPases the activating step is slow and thought to be rate limiting in cells, requiring the use of ARF guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEFs). ARF GEFs are characterized by the presence of a conserved, catalytic Sec7 domain, though they also contain motifs or additional domains that confer specificity to localization and regulation of activity. These domains have been used to define and classify five different sub-families of ARF GEFs. One of these, the BIG/GBF1 family, includes three proteins that are each key regulators of the secretory pathway. GEF activity initiates the coating of nascent vesicles via the localized generation of activated ARFs and thus these GEFs are the upstream regulators that define the site and timing of vesicle production. Paradoxically, while we have detailed molecular knowledge of how GEFs activate ARFs, we know very little about how GEFs are recruited and/or activated at the right time and place to initiate transport. This review summarizes the current knowledge of GEF regulation and explores the still uncertain mechanisms that position GEFs at “budding ready” membrane sites to generate highly localized activated ARFs. PMID:24728583

  15. Activation of the Small G Protein Arf6 by Dynamin2 through Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factors in Endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Okada, Risa; Yamauchi, Yohei; Hongu, Tsunaki; Funakoshi, Yuji; Ohbayashi, Norihiko; Hasegawa, Hiroshi; Kanaho, Yasunori

    2015-01-01

    The small G protein Arf6 and the GTPase dynamin2 (Dyn2) play key roles in clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME). However, their functional relationship remains obscure. Here, we show that Arf6 functions as a downstream molecule of Dyn2 in CME. Wild type of Dyn2 overexpressed in HeLa cells markedly activates Arf6, while a GTPase-lacking Dyn2 mutant does not. Of the Arf6-specific guanine nucleotide exchange factors, EFA6A, EFA6B, and EFA6D specifically interact with Dyn2. Furthermore, overexpression of dominant negative mutants or knockdown of EFA6B and EFA6D significantly inhibit Dyn2-induced Arf6 activation. Finally, overexpression of the binding region peptide of EFA6B for Dyn2 or knockdown of EFA6B and EFA6D significantly suppresses clathrin-mediated transferrin uptake. These results provide evidence for a novel Arf6 activation mechanism by Dyn2 through EFA6B and EFA6D in CME in a manner dependent upon the GTPase activity of Dyn2. PMID:26503427

  16. SynArfGEF is a guanine nucleotide exchange factor for Arf6 and localizes preferentially at post-synaptic specializations of inhibitory synapses.

    PubMed

    Fukaya, Masahiro; Kamata, Akifumi; Hara, Yoshinobu; Tamaki, Hideaki; Katsumata, Osamu; Ito, Naoki; Takeda, Shin'ichi; Hata, Yutaka; Suzuki, Tatsuo; Watanabe, Masahiko; Harvey, Robert J; Sakagami, Hiroyuki

    2011-03-01

    SynArfGEF, also known as BRAG3 or IQSEC3, is a member of the brefeldin A-resistant Arf-GEF/IQSEC family and was originally identified by screening for mRNA species associated with the post-synaptic density fraction. In this study, we demonstrate that synArfGEF activates Arf6, using Arf pull down and transferrin incorporation assays. Immunohistochemical analysis reveals that synArfGEF is present in somata and dendrites as puncta in close association with inhibitory synapses, whereas immunoelectron microscopic analysis reveals that synArfGEF localizes preferentially at post-synaptic specializations of symmetric synapses. Using yeast two-hybrid and pull down assays, we show that synArfGEF is able to bind utrophin/dystrophin and S-SCAM/MAGI-2 scaffolding proteins that localize at inhibitory synapses. Double immunostaining reveals that synArfGEF co-localizes with dystrophin and S-SCAM in cultured hippocampal neurons and cerebellar cortex, respectively. Both β-dystroglycan and S-SCAM were immunoprecipitated from brain lysates using anti-synArfGEF IgG. Taken together, these findings suggest that synArfGEF functions as a novel regulator of Arf6 at inhibitory synapses and associates with the dystrophin-associated glycoprotein complex and S-SCAM. PMID:21198641

  17. Activation of Telomerase by Ionizing Radiation: Differential Response to the Inhibition of DNA Double-Strand Break Repair by Abrogation of Poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation, by LY294002, or by Wortmannin

    SciTech Connect

    Neuhof, Dirk Zwicker, Felix; Kuepper, Jan-Heiner; Debus, Juergen; Weber, Klaus-Josef

    2007-11-01

    Purpose: Telomerase activity represents a radiation-inducible function, which may be targeted by a double-strand break (DSB)-activated signal transduction pathway. Therefore, the effects of DNA-PK inhibitors (Wortmannin and LY294002) on telomerase upregulation after irradiation were studied. In addition, the role of trans-dominant inhibition of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation, which strongly reduces DSB rejoining, was assessed in comparison with 3-aminobenzamide. Methods and Materials: COM3 rodent cells carry a construct for the dexamethasone-inducible overexpression of the DNA-binding domain of PARP1 and exhibit greatly impaired DSB rejoining after irradiation. Telomerase activity was measured using polymerase chain reaction ELISA 1 h after irradiation with doses up to 10 Gy. Phosphorylation status of PKB/Akt and of PKC{alpha}/{beta}{sub II} was assessed by western blotting. Results: No telomerase upregulation was detectable for irradiated cells with undisturbed DSB rejoining. In contrast, incubation with LY294002 or dexamethasone yielded pronounced radiation induction of telomerase activity that could be suppressed by Wortmannin. 3-Aminobenzamide not only was unable to induce telomerase activity but also suppressed telomerase upregulation upon incubation with LY294002 or dexamethasone. Phospho-PKB was detectable independent of irradiation or dexamethasone pretreatment, but was undetectable upon incubations with LY294002 or Wortmannin, whereas phospho-PKC rested detectable. Conclusions: Telomerase activation postirradiation was triggered by different treatments that interfere with DNA DSB processing. This telomerase upregulation, however, was not reflected by the phosporylation status of the putative mediators of TERT activation, PKB and PKC. Although an involvement of PKB in TERT activation is not supported by the present findings, a respective role of PKC isoforms other than {alpha}/{beta}{sub II} cannot be ruled out.

  18. Mechanism of cholera toxin activation by a guanine nucleotide-dependent 19 kDa protein.

    PubMed

    Noda, M; Tsai, S C; Adamik, R; Moss, J; Vaughan, M

    1990-05-16

    Cholera toxin causes the devastating diarrheal syndrome characteristic of cholera by catalyzing the ADP-ribosylation of Gs alpha, a GTP-binding regulatory protein, resulting in activation of adenylyl cyclase. ADP-ribosylation of Gs alpha is enhanced by 19 kDa guanine nucleotide-binding proteins known as ADP-ribosylation factors or ARFs. We investigated the effects of agents known to alter toxin-catalyzed activation of adenylyl cyclase on the stimulation of toxin- and toxin subunit-catalyzed ADP-ribosylation of Gs alpha and other substrates by an ADP-ribosylation factor purified from a soluble fraction of bovine brain (sARF II). In the presence of GTP, sARF II enhanced activity of both the toxin catalytic unit and a reduced and alkylated fragment ('A1'), as a result of an increase in substrate affinity with no significant effects on Vmax. Activation of toxin was independent of Gs alpha and was stimulated 4-fold by sodium dodecyl sulfate, but abolished by Triton X-100. sARF II therefore serves as a direct allosteric activator of the A1 protein and may thus amplify the pathological effects of cholera toxin. PMID:2112955

  19. Regulation of a senescence checkpoint response by the E2F1 transcription factor and p14ARF tumor suppressor

    SciTech Connect

    Dimri, Goberdhan P.; Itahana, Koji; Acosta, Meileen; Campisi, Judith

    1999-11-05

    Normal cells do not divide indefinitely due to a process known as replicative senescence. Human cells arrest growth with a senescent phenotype when they acquire one or more critically short telomere as a consequence of cell division. Recent evidence suggests that certain types of DNA damage, chromatin remodeling, or oncogenic forms of Rasor Raf can also elicit a senescence response. We show here that E2F1, a multifunctional transcription factor that binds the retinoblastoma (pRb) tumor suppressor and can either promote or suppress tumorigenesis, induces a senescent phenotype when overexpressed in normal human fibroblasts. Normal human cells stably arrested proliferation and expressed several markers of replicative senescence in response to E2F1. This activity of E2F1 was independent of its pRb binding activity, but dependent on its ability to stimulate gene expression. The E2F1 target gene critical for the senescence response appeared to be the p14ARF tumor suppressor. Replicatively senescent human fibroblasts overexpressed p14ARF, and ectopic expression of p14ARF in presenescent cells induced a phenotype similar to that induced by E2F1. Consistent with a critical role for p14ARF, cells with compromised p53 function were immune to senescence induction by E2F1, as were cells deficient in p14ARF. Our findings support the idea that the senescence response is a critical tumor suppressive mechanism, provide an explanation for the apparently paradoxical roles of E2F1 in oncogenesis, and identify p14ARF as a potentially important mediator of the senescent phenotype.

  20. Crystal structure of the catalytic domain of Pseudomonas exotoxin A complexed with a nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide analog: implications for the activation process and for ADP ribosylation.

    PubMed Central

    Li, M; Dyda, F; Benhar, I; Pastan, I; Davies, D R

    1996-01-01

    The catalytic, or third domain of Pseudomonas exotoxin A (PEIII) catalyzes the transfer of ADP ribose from nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD) to elongation factor-2 in eukaryotic cells, inhibiting protein synthesis. We have determined the structure of PEIII crystallized in the presence of NAD to define the site of binding and mechanism of activation. However, NAD undergoes a slow hydrolysis and the crystal structure revealed only the hydrolysis products, AMP and nicotinamide, bound to the enzyme. To better define the site of NAD binding, we have now crystallized PEIII in the presence of a less hydrolyzable NAD analog, beta-methylene-thiazole-4-carboxamide adenine dinucleotide (beta-TAD), and refined the complex structure at 2.3 angstroms resolution. There are two independent molecules of PEIII in the crystal, and the conformations of beta-TAD show some differences in the two binding sites. The beta-TAD attached to molecule 2 appears to have been hydrolyzed between the pyrophosphate and the nicotinamide ribose. However molecule 1 binds to an intact beta-TAD and has no crystal packing contacts in the vicinity of the binding site, so that the observed conformation and interaction with the PEIII most likely resembles that of NAD bound to PEIII in solution. We have compared this complex with the catalytic domains of diphtheria toxin, heat labile enterotoxin, and pertussis toxin, all three of which it closely resembles. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 PMID:8692916

  1. Secretion of soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (sVEGFR1/sFlt1) requires Arf1, Arf6, and Rab11 GTPases.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jae-Joon; Tiwari, Ajit; Inamdar, Shivangi M; Thomas, Christie P; Goel, Apollina; Choudhury, Amit

    2012-01-01

    The soluble form of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 1 (sVEGFR-1/sFlt1) is generated by alternative splicing of the FLT1 gene. Secretion of sFlt1 from endothelial cells plays an important role in blood vessel sprouting and morphogenesis. However, excess sFlt1 secretion is associated with diseases such as preeclampsia and chronic kidney disease. To date, the secretory transport process involved in the secretion of sFlt1 is poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the itinerary of sFlt1 trafficking along the secretory pathway. To understand the timecourse of sFlt1 secretion, endothelial cells stably expressing sFlt1 were metabolically radiolabeled with [(35)S]-methionine and cysteine. Our results indicate that after initial synthesis the levels of secreted [(35)S]-sFlt1 in the extracellular medium peaks at 8 hours. Treatment with brefeldin A (BFA), a drug which blocks trafficking between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the Golgi complex, inhibited extracellular release of sFlt1 suggesting that ER to Golgi and intra-Golgi trafficking of sFlt1 are essential for its secretion. Furthermore, we show that ectopic expression of dominant-negative mutant forms of Arf1, Arf6, and Rab11 as well as siRNA-mediated knockdown of these GTPases block secretion of sFlt1 during normoxic and hypoxic conditions suggesting role for these small GTPases. This work is the first to report role of regulatory proteins involved in sFlt1 trafficking along the secretory pathway and may provide insights and new molecular targets for the modulation of sFlt-1 release during physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:22962618

  2. Failure of the Tomato Trans-Acting Short Interfering RNA Program to Regulate AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR3 and ARF4 Underlies the Wiry Leaf Syndrome[C][W

    PubMed Central

    Yifhar, Tamar; Pekker, Irena; Peled, Dror; Friedlander, Gilgi; Pistunov, Anna; Sabban, Moti; Wachsman, Guy; Alvarez, John Paul; Amsellem, Ziva; Eshed, Yuval

    2012-01-01

    Interfering with small RNA production is a common strategy of plant viruses. A unique class of small RNAs that require microRNA and short interfering (siRNA) biogenesis for their production is termed trans-acting short interfering RNAs (ta-siRNAs). Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) wiry mutants represent a class of phenotype that mimics viral infection symptoms, including shoestring leaves that lack leaf blade expansion. Here, we show that four WIRY genes are involved in siRNA biogenesis, and in their corresponding mutants, levels of ta-siRNAs that regulate AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR3 (ARF3) and ARF4 are reduced, while levels of their target ARFs are elevated. Reducing activity of both ARF3 and ARF4 can rescue the wiry leaf lamina, and increased activity of either can phenocopy wiry leaves. Thus, a failure to negatively regulate these ARFs underlies tomato shoestring leaves. Overexpression of these ARFs in Arabidopsis thaliana, tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum), and potato (Solanum tuberosum) failed to produce wiry leaves, suggesting that the dramatic response in tomato is exceptional. As negative regulation of orthologs of these ARFs by ta-siRNA is common to land plants, we propose that ta-siRNA levels serve as universal sensors for interference with small RNA biogenesis, and changes in their levels direct species-specific responses. PMID:23001036

  3. MicroRNA167-Directed Regulation of the Auxin Response Factors GmARF8a and GmARF8b Is Required for Soybean Nodulation and Lateral Root Development.

    PubMed

    Wang, Youning; Li, Kexue; Chen, Liang; Zou, Yanmin; Liu, Haipei; Tian, Yinping; Li, Dongxiao; Wang, Rui; Zhao, Fang; Ferguson, Brett J; Gresshoff, Peter M; Li, Xia

    2015-07-01

    Legume root nodules convert atmospheric nitrogen gas into ammonium through symbiosis with a prokaryotic microsymbiont broadly called rhizobia. Auxin signaling is required for determinant nodule development; however, the molecular mechanism of auxin-mediated nodule formation remains largely unknown. Here, we show in soybean (Glycine max) that the microRNA miR167 acts as a positive regulator of lateral root organs, namely nodules and lateral roots. miR167c expression was up-regulated in the vasculature, pericycle, and cortex of soybean roots following inoculation with Bradyrhizobium japonicum strain USDA110 (the microsymbiont). It was found to positively regulate nodule numbers directly by repressing the target genes GmARF8a and GmARF8b (homologous genes of Arabidopsis [Arabidopsis thaliana] AtARF8 that encode auxin response factors). Moreover, the expression of miR167 and its targets was up- and down-regulated by auxin, respectively. The miR167-GmARF8 module also positively regulated nodulation efficiency under low microsymbiont density, a condition often associated with environmental stress. The regulatory role of miR167 on nodule initiation was dependent on the Nod factor receptor GmNFR1α, and it acts upstream of the nodulation-associated genes nodule inception, nodulation signaling pathway1, early nodulin40-1, NF-YA1 (previously known as HAEM activator protein2-1), and NF-YA2. miR167 also promoted lateral root numbers. Collectively, our findings establish a key role for the miR167-GmARF8 module in auxin-mediated nodule and lateral root formation in soybean. PMID:25941314

  4. The Drosophila Arf1 homologue Arf79F is essential for lamellipodium formation.

    PubMed

    Humphreys, Daniel; Liu, Tao; Davidson, Anthony C; Hume, Peter J; Koronakis, Vassilis

    2012-12-01

    The WAVE regulatory complex (WRC) drives the polymerisation of actin filaments located beneath the plasma membrane to generate lamellipodia that are pivotal to cell architecture and movement. By reconstituting WRC-dependent actin assembly at the membrane, we recently discovered that several classes of Arf family GTPases directly recruit and activate WRC in cell extracts, and that Arf cooperates with Rac1 to trigger actin polymerisation. Here, we demonstrate that the Class 1 Arf1 homologue Arf79F colocalises with the WRC at dynamic lamellipodia. We report that Arf79F is required for lamellipodium formation in Drosophila S2R+ cells, which only express one Arf isoform for each class. Impeding Arf function either by dominant-negative Arf expression or by Arf double-stranded RNA interference (dsRNAi)-mediated knockdown uncovered that Arf-dependent lamellipodium formation was specific to Arf79F, establishing that Class 1 Arfs, but not Class 2 or Class 3 Arfs, are crucial for lamellipodia. Lamellipodium formation in Arf79F-silenced cells was restored by expressing mammalian Arf1, but not by constitutively active Rac1, showing that Arf79F does not act via Rac1. Abolition of lamellipodium formation in Arf79F-silenced cells was not due to Golgi disruption. Blocking Arf79F activation with guanine nucleotide exchange factor inhibitors impaired WRC localisation to the plasma membrane and concomitant generation of lamellipodia. Our data indicate that the Class I Arf GTPase is a central component in WRC-driven lamellipodium formation. PMID:22992458

  5. Molecular insights into plant cell proliferation disturbance by Agrobacterium protein 6b

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meimei; Soyano, Takashi; Machida, Satoru; Yang, Jun-Yi; Jung, Choonkyun; Chua, Nam-Hai; Yuan, Y. Adam

    2011-01-01

    The Agrobacterium Ti plasmid (T-DNA) 6b proteins interact with many different host proteins implicated in plant cell proliferation. Here, we show that Arabidopsis plants overexpressing 6b display microRNA (miRNA) deficiency by directly targeting SERRATE and AGO1 via a specific loop fragment (residues 40–55). In addition, we report the crystal structures of Agrobacterium tumefaciens AK6b at 2.1 Å, Agrobacterium vitis AB6b at 1.65 Å, and Arabidopsis ADP ribosylation factor (ARF) at 1.8 Å. The 6b structure adopts an ADP-ribosylating toxin fold closely related to cholera toxin. In vitro ADP ribosylation analysis demonstrates that 6b represents a new toxin family, with Tyr 66, Thr 93, and Tyr 153 as the ADP ribosylation catalytic residues in the presence of Arabidopsis ARF and GTP. Our work provides molecular insights, suggesting that 6b regulates plant cell growth by the disturbance of the miRNA pathway through its ADP ribosylation activity. PMID:21156810

  6. GBF1, a Guanine Nucleotide Exchange Factor for Arf, Is Crucial for Coxsackievirus B3 RNA Replication▿

    PubMed Central

    Lanke, Kjerstin H. W.; van der Schaar, Hilde M.; Belov, George A.; Feng, Qian; Duijsings, Daniël; Jackson, Catherine L.; Ehrenfeld, Ellie; van Kuppeveld, Frank J. M.

    2009-01-01

    The replication of enteroviruses is sensitive to brefeldin A (BFA), an inhibitor of endoplasmic reticulum-to-Golgi network transport that blocks activation of guanine exchange factors (GEFs) of the Arf GTPases. Mammalian cells contain three BFA-sensitive Arf GEFs: GBF1, BIG1, and BIG2. Here, we show that coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) RNA replication is insensitive to BFA in MDCK cells, which contain a BFA-resistant GBF1 due to mutation M832L. Further evidence for a critical role of GBF1 stems from the observations that viral RNA replication is inhibited upon knockdown of GBF1 by RNA interference and that replication in the presence of BFA is rescued upon overexpression of active, but not inactive, GBF1. Overexpression of Arf proteins or Rab1B, a GTPase that induces GBF1 recruitment to membranes, failed to rescue RNA replication in the presence of BFA. Additionally, the importance of the interaction between enterovirus protein 3A and GBF1 for viral RNA replication was investigated. For this, the rescue from BFA inhibition of wild-type (wt) replicons and that of mutant replicons of both CVB3 and poliovirus (PV) carrying a 3A protein that is impaired in binding GBF1 were compared. The BFA-resistant GBF1-M832L protein efficiently rescued RNA replication of both wt and mutant CVB3 and PV replicons in the presence of BFA. However, another BFA-resistant GBF1 protein, GBF1-A795E, also efficiently rescued RNA replication of the wt replicons, but not that of mutant replicons, in the presence of BFA. In conclusion, this study identifies a critical role for GBF1 in CVB3 RNA replication, but the importance of the 3A-GBF1 interaction requires further study. PMID:19740986

  7. ARF6 promotes the formation of Rac1 and WAVE-dependent ventral F-actin rosettes in breast cancer cells in response to epidermal growth factor.

    PubMed

    Marchesin, Valentina; Montagnac, Guillaume; Chavrier, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Coordination between actin cytoskeleton assembly and localized polarization of intracellular trafficking routes is crucial for cancer cell migration. ARF6 has been implicated in the endocytic recycling of surface receptors and membrane components and in actin cytoskeleton remodeling. Here we show that overexpression of an ARF6 fast-cycling mutant in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer-derived cells to mimick ARF6 hyperactivation observed in invasive breast tumors induced a striking rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton at the ventral cell surface. This phenotype consisted in the formation of dynamic actin-based podosome rosette-like structures expanding outward as wave positive for F-actin and actin cytoskeleton regulatory components including cortactin, Arp2/3 and SCAR/WAVE complexes and upstream Rac1 regulator. Ventral rosette-like structures were similarly induced in MDA-MB-231 cells in response to epidermal growth factor (EGF) stimulation and to Rac1 hyperactivation. In addition, interference with ARF6 expression attenuated activation and plasma membrane targeting of Rac1 in response to EGF treatment. Our data suggest a role for ARF6 in linking EGF-receptor signaling to Rac1 recruitment and activation at the plasma membrane to promote breast cancer cell directed migration. PMID:25799492

  8. Critical roles of DMP1 in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2/neu-Arf-p53 signaling and breast cancer development.

    PubMed

    Taneja, Pankaj; Maglic, Dejan; Kai, Fumitake; Sugiyama, Takayuki; Kendig, Robert D; Frazier, Donna P; Willingham, Mark C; Inoue, Kazushi

    2010-11-15

    Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) overexpression stimulates cell growth in p53-mutated cells while it inhibits cell proliferation in those with wild-type p53, but the molecular mechanism is unknown. The Dmp1 promoter was activated by HER2/neu through the phosphatidylinositol-3'-kinase-Akt-NF-κB pathway, which in turn stimulated Arf transcription. Binding of p65 and p52 subunits of NF-κB was shown to the Dmp1 promoter and that of Dmp1 to the Arf promoter on HER2/neu overexpression. Both Dmp1 and p53 were induced in premalignant lesions from mouse mammary tumor virus-neu mice, and mammary tumorigenesis was significantly accelerated in both Dmp1+/- and Dmp1-/- mice. Selective deletion of Dmp1 and/or overexpression of Tbx2/Pokemon was found in >50% of wild-type HER2/neu carcinomas, although the involvement of Arf, Mdm2, or p53 was rare. Tumors from Dmp1+/-, Dmp1-/-, and wild-type neu mice with hemizygous Dmp1 deletion showed significant downregulation of Arf and p21Cip1/WAF1, showing p53 inactivity and more aggressive phenotypes than tumors without Dmp1 deletion. Notably, endogenous hDMP1 mRNA decreased when HER2 was depleted in human breast cancer cells. Our study shows the pivotal roles of Dmp1 in HER2/neu-p53 signaling and breast carcinogenesis. PMID:21062982

  9. Tumor suppressor ARF

    PubMed Central

    Través, Paqui G.; Luque, Alfonso; Hortelano, Sonsoles

    2012-01-01

    ARF (alternative reading frame) is one of the most important tumor regulator playing critical roles in controlling tumor initiation and progression. Recently, we have demonstrated a novel and unexpected role for ARF as modulator of inflammatory responses. PMID:23162766

  10. Arf1 and Arf6 Promote Ventral Actin Structures formed by acute Activation of Protein Kinase C and Src

    PubMed Central

    Caviston, Juliane P.; Cohen, Lee Ann; Donaldson, Julie G.

    2016-01-01

    Arf proteins regulate membrane traffic and organelle structure. Although Arf6 is known to initiate actin-based changes in cell surface architecture, Arf1 may also function at the plasma membrane. Here we show that acute activation of protein kinase C (PKC) induced by the phorbol ester PMA led to the formation of motile actin structures on the ventral surface of Beas-2b cells, a lung bronchial epithelial cell line. Ventral actin structures also formed in PMA-treated HeLa cells that had elevated levels of Arf activation. For both cell types, formation of the ventral actin structures was enhanced by expression of active forms of either Arf1 or Arf6, and by the expression of guanine nucleotide exchange factors that activate these Arfs. By contrast, formation of these structures was blocked by inhibitors of PKC and Src, and required phosphatidylinositol 4, 5-bisphosphate, Rac, Arf6 and Arf1. Furthermore, expression of ASAP1, an Arf1 GTPase activating protein (GAP) was more effective at inhibiting the ventral actin structures than was ACAP1, an Arf6 GAP. This study adds to the expanding role for Arf1 in the periphery and identifies a requirement for Arf1, a “Golgi Arf”, in the reorganization of the cortical actin cytoskeleton on ventral surfaces, against the substratum. PMID:24916416

  11. In vivo expression of the Arf6 Guanine-nucleotide exchange factor cytohesin-1 in mice exhibits enhanced myelin thickness in nerves.

    PubMed

    Torii, Tomohiro; Miyamoto, Yuki; Onami, Naoko; Tsumura, Hideki; Nemoto, Noriko; Kawahara, Katsumasa; Kato, Minoru; Kotera, Jun; Nakamura, Kazuaki; Tanoue, Akito; Yamauchi, Junji

    2013-10-01

    The myelin sheath consists of a unique multiple layer structure that acts as an insulator between neuronal axons to enhance the propagation of the action potential. In neuropathies such as demyelinating or dismyelinating diseases, chronic demyelination and defective remyelination occur repeatedly, leading to more severe neuropathy. As yet, little is known about the possibility of drug target-specific medicine for such diseases. In the developing peripheral nervous system (PNS), myelin sheaths form as Schwann cells wrap individual axons. It is thought that the development of a drug promoting myelination by Schwann cells would provide effective therapy against peripheral nerve disorders: to test such treatment, genetically modified mice overexpressing the drug target molecules are needed. We previously identified an Arf6 activator, the guanine-nucleotide exchange factor cytohesin-1, as the signaling molecule controlling myelination of peripheral axons by Schwann cells; yet, the important issue of whether cytohesin-1 itself promotes myelin thickness in vivo has remained unclear. Herein, we show that, in mouse PNS nerves, Schwann cell-specific expression of wild-type cytohesin-1 exhibits enhanced myelin thickness. Downstream activation of Arf6 is also seen in these transgenic mice, revealing the involvement of the cytohesin-1 and Arf6 signaling unit in promoting myelination. These results suggest that cytohesin-1 may be a candidate for the basis of a therapy for peripheral neuropathies through its enhancement of myelin thickness. PMID:23636892

  12. ArF Photoresist Parameter Optimization for Mask Error Enhancement Factor Reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chang Ho; Oh, Hye-Keun

    2005-10-01

    The mask error enhancement factor (MEEF) is the best representative index for critical dimension (CD) variation in a wafer which is amplified by real specific mask CD variation. As already clarified in previous reports, MEEF is increased by reducing k1 (process ability index) or pattern pitch. The illumination system, just like lens aberration or stage defocus effects directly the MEEF value, but the leveling or species of a substrate and the resist performance are also strongly related to the MEEF value. In practice, when engineers set up the photoprocess for fabricating the miniaturized structures of current devices, they established minimum shot uniformity target such as the MEEF value within wafer uniformity and wafer-to-wafer uniformity, in addition to the usable depth of focus (UDOF) or exposure latitude (EL) margin. We examined MEEF reduction by checking the differences in resist parameters and attempted to correlate the results between experiment and simulation. Solid-C was used as the simulation tool. The target node is dense line/space pattern (L/S) of sub-80 nm and we used the same illumination conditions. We calculated MEEF values by comparing with the original mask uniformity using the optical parameters of each resist type. The normalized image log slope (NILS) showed us some points of the saturation value with pupil mesh points and the aberration is not considered. We used four different types of resist and changed resist optical properties (i.e., n, k refractive index; A, B, and C Dill exposure parameters). It is very difficult to measure the kinetic phenomenon, thus we chose the Fickian model in post exposure bake (PEB) and the Weiss model for development. In this paper, we suggest another direction of photoresist improvement by comparing the resist parameters with the MEEF values at different pitches.

  13. ArF photoresist parameter optimization for mask error enhancement factor reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chang Ho; Han, Seok; Park, Kyung Sil; Kang, Hye Young; Oh, Hyun Wook; Lee, Ji Eun; Kim, Kyung Me; Kim, Young Ho; Kim, Tae Sung; Oh, Hye-Keun

    2005-05-01

    MEEF (Mask Error Enhancement Factor) is the most representative index which CD (Critical Dimension) variation in wafer is amplified by real specific mask CD variation. Already, as it was announced through other papers, MEEF is increased by small k1 or pattern pitch. Illumination system, just like lens aberration or stage defocus affects directly MEEF value, but the leveling or species of substrate and the resist performance are also deeply related to MEEF value. Actually, when the engineers set up the photo process of shrink structure in current device makers, they established minimum shot uniformity target such as MEEF value within wafer uniformity and wafer to wafer uniformity, besides UDOF (Usable Depth of Focus) or EL (Exposure Latitude) margin. We examined MEEF reduction by checking the difference in resist parameters and tried to correlate the results between experiment and simulation. Solid-C was used for simulation tool. The target node was dense L/S (Line/Space) of sub-80 nm and we fix the same illumination conditions. We calculated MEEF values by comparing to original mask uniformity through the optical parameters of each resist type. NILS (Normalized Image Log Slope) shows us some points of the saturation value with pupil mesh points and the aberration was not considered. We used four different type resists and changed resist optical properties (i.e. n, k refractive index; A, B, and C Dill exposure parameters). It was very difficult to measure the kinetic phenomenon, so we choose Fickian model in PEB (Post Exposure Bake) and Weiss model in development. In this paper, we tried to suggest another direction of photoresist improvement by comparing the resist parameters to MEEF value of different pitches.

  14. ArF photoresist parameter optimization for mask error enhancement factor reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chang H.; Han, Seok; Park, Kyoung S.; Yoon, Sangwoong; Kang, Hye Y.; Oh, Hyun W.; Lee, Ji E.; Kim, Young H.; Kim, Tae S.; Oh, Hye-Keun

    2005-06-01

    MEEF (Mask Error Enhancement Factor) is the most representative index which CD (Critical Dimension) variation in wafer is amplified by real specific mask CD variation. Already, as it was announced through other papers, MEEF is increased by small k1 or pattern pitch. Illumination system, just like lens aberration or stage defocus affects directly MEEF value, but the leveling or species of substrate and the resist performance are also deeply related to MEEF value. Actually, when the engineers set up the photo process of shrink structure in current device makers, they established minimum shot uniformity target such as MEEF value within wafer uniformity and wafer to wafer uniformity, besides UDOF (Usable Depth of Focus) or EL (Exposure Latitude) margin. We examined MEEF reduction by checking the difference in resist parameters and tried to correlate the results between experiment and simulation. Solid-C was used for simulation tool. The target node was dense L/S (Line/Space) of sub-80 nm and we fix the same illumination conditions. We calculated MEEF values by comparing to original mask uniformity through the optical parameters of each resist type. NILS (Normalized Image Log Slope) shows us some points of the saturation value with pupil mesh points and the aberration was not considered. We used four different type resists and changed resist optical properties (i.e. n, k refractive index; A, B, and C Dill exposure parameters). It was very difficult to measure the kinetic phenomenon, so we choose Fickian model in PEB (Post Exposure Bake) and Weiss model in development. In this paper, we tried to suggest another direction of photoresist improvement by comparing the resist parameters to MEEF value of different pitches.

  15. Rapamycin inhibits poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation in intact cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fahrer, Joerg; Wagner, Silvia; Buerkle, Alexander; Koenigsrainer, Alfred

    2009-08-14

    Rapamycin is an immunosuppressive drug, which inhibits the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase activity inducing changes in cell proliferation. Synthesis of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) is an immediate cellular response to genotoxic stress catalyzed mostly by poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1), which is also controlled by signaling pathways. Therefore, we investigated whether rapamycin affects PAR production. Strikingly, rapamycin inhibited PAR synthesis in living fibroblasts in a dose-dependent manner as monitored by immunofluorescence. PARP-1 activity was then assayed in vitro, revealing that down-regulation of cellular PAR production by rapamycin was apparently not due to competitive PARP-1 inhibition. Further studies showed that rapamycin did not influence the cellular NAD pool and the activation of PARP-1 in extracts of pretreated fibroblasts. Collectively, our data suggest that inhibition of cellular PAR synthesis by rapamycin is mediated by formation of a detergent-sensitive complex in living cells, and that rapamycin may have a potential as therapeutic PARP inhibitor.

  16. Role of the tumor suppressor ARF in macrophage polarization: Enhancement of the M2 phenotype in ARF-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Herranz, Sandra; Través, Paqui G; Luque, Alfonso; Hortelano, Sonsoles

    2012-11-01

    The ARF locus is frequently inactivated in human cancer. The oncosuppressor ARF has indeed been described as a general sensor for different situation of cellular stress. We have previously demonstrated that ARF deficiency severely impairs inflammatory responses in vitro and in vivo, establishing a role for ARF in the regulation of innate immunity. The aim of the present work was to get further insights into the immune functions of ARF and to evaluate its possible contribution to the polarization of macrophages toward the M1 or M2 phenotype. Our results demonstrate that resting Arf(-/-) macrophages express high levels of Ym1 and Fizz-1, two typical markers of alternatively-activated macrophages (M2). Additionally, Arf(-/-) peritoneal macrophages showed an impaired response to lipopolysaccharide (a classical inducer of M1 polaryzation) and a reduced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines. Moreover, upon stimulation with interleukin-4 (IL-4), an inducer of the M2 phenotype, well established M2 markers such as Fizz-1, Ym1 and arginase-1 were upregulated in Arf(-/-) as compared with wild type macrophages. Accordingly, the cytokine and chemokine profile associated with the M2 phenotype was significantly overexpressed in Arf(-/-) macrophages responding to IL-4. In addition, multiple pro-angiogenic factors such as VEGF and MMP-9 were also increased. In summary, these results indicate that ARF contributes to the polarization and functional plasticity of macrophages. PMID:23243586

  17. Characterization of ARF-BP1/HUWE1 Interactions with CTCF, MYC, ARF and p53 in MYC-Driven B Cell Neoplasms

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Chen-Feng; Kim, Yong-Soo; Xiang, Shao; Abdullaev, Ziedulla; Torrey, Ted A.; Janz, Siegfried; Kovalchuk, Alexander L.; Sun, Jiafang; Chen, Delin; Cho, William C.; Gu, Wei; Morse, Herbert C.

    2012-01-01

    Transcriptional activation of MYC is a hallmark of many B cell lineage neoplasms. MYC provides a constitutive proliferative signal but can also initiate ARF-dependent activation of p53 and apoptosis. The E3 ubiquitin ligase, ARF-BP1, encoded by HUWE1, modulates the activity of both the MYC and the ARF-p53 signaling pathways, prompting us to determine if it is involved in the pathogenesis of MYC-driven B cell lymphomas. ARF-BP1 was expressed at high levels in cell lines from lymphomas with either wild type or mutated p53 but not in ARF-deficient cells. Downregulation of ARF-BP1 resulted in elevated steady state levels of p53, growth arrest and apoptosis. Co-immunoprecipitation studies identified a multiprotein complex comprised of ARF-BP1, ARF, p53, MYC and the multifunctional DNA-binding factor, CTCF, which is involved in the transcriptional regulation of MYC, p53 and ARF. ARF-BP1 bound and ubiquitylated CTCF leading to its proteasomal degradation. ARF-BP1 and CTCF thus appear to be key cofactors linking the MYC proliferative and p53-ARF apoptotic pathways. In addition, ARF-BP1 could be a therapeutic target for MYC-driven B lineage neoplasms, even if p53 is inactive, with inhibition reducing the transcriptional activity of MYC for its target genes and stabilizing the apoptosis-promoting activities of p53. PMID:22754359

  18. Auxin-dependent compositional change in Mediator in ARF7- and ARF19-mediated transcription

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Jun; Fukaki, Hidehiro; Onoda, Makoto; Li, Lin; Li, Chuanyou; Tasaka, Masao; Furutani, Masahiko

    2016-01-01

    Mediator is a multiprotein complex that integrates the signals from transcription factors binding to the promoter and transmits them to achieve gene transcription. The subunits of Mediator complex reside in four modules: the head, middle, tail, and dissociable CDK8 kinase module (CKM). The head, middle, and tail modules form the core Mediator complex, and the association of CKM can modify the function of Mediator in transcription. Here, we show genetic and biochemical evidence that CKM-associated Mediator transmits auxin-dependent transcriptional repression in lateral root (LR) formation. The AUXIN/INDOLE 3-ACETIC ACID 14 (Aux/IAA14) transcriptional repressor inhibits the transcriptional activity of its binding partners AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 7 (ARF7) and ARF19 by making a complex with the CKM-associated Mediator. In addition, TOPLESS (TPL), a transcriptional corepressor, forms a bridge between IAA14 and the CKM component MED13 through the physical interaction. ChIP assays show that auxin induces the dissociation of MED13 but not the tail module component MED25 from the ARF7 binding region upstream of its target gene. These findings indicate that auxin-induced degradation of IAA14 changes the module composition of Mediator interacting with ARF7 and ARF19 in the upstream region of their target genes involved in LR formation. We suggest that this regulation leads to a quick switch of signal transmission from ARFs to target gene expression in response to auxin. PMID:27217573

  19. Auxin-dependent compositional change in Mediator in ARF7- and ARF19-mediated transcription.

    PubMed

    Ito, Jun; Fukaki, Hidehiro; Onoda, Makoto; Li, Lin; Li, Chuanyou; Tasaka, Masao; Furutani, Masahiko

    2016-06-01

    Mediator is a multiprotein complex that integrates the signals from transcription factors binding to the promoter and transmits them to achieve gene transcription. The subunits of Mediator complex reside in four modules: the head, middle, tail, and dissociable CDK8 kinase module (CKM). The head, middle, and tail modules form the core Mediator complex, and the association of CKM can modify the function of Mediator in transcription. Here, we show genetic and biochemical evidence that CKM-associated Mediator transmits auxin-dependent transcriptional repression in lateral root (LR) formation. The AUXIN/INDOLE 3-ACETIC ACID 14 (Aux/IAA14) transcriptional repressor inhibits the transcriptional activity of its binding partners AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 7 (ARF7) and ARF19 by making a complex with the CKM-associated Mediator. In addition, TOPLESS (TPL), a transcriptional corepressor, forms a bridge between IAA14 and the CKM component MED13 through the physical interaction. ChIP assays show that auxin induces the dissociation of MED13 but not the tail module component MED25 from the ARF7 binding region upstream of its target gene. These findings indicate that auxin-induced degradation of IAA14 changes the module composition of Mediator interacting with ARF7 and ARF19 in the upstream region of their target genes involved in LR formation. We suggest that this regulation leads to a quick switch of signal transmission from ARFs to target gene expression in response to auxin. PMID:27217573

  20. Oligomerization of the Sec7 domain Arf guanine nucleotide exchange factor GBF1 is dispensable for Golgi localization and function but regulates degradation.

    PubMed

    Bhatt, Jay M; Viktorova, Ekaterina G; Busby, Theodore; Wyrozumska, Paulina; Newman, Laura E; Lin, Helen; Lee, Eunjoo; Wright, John; Belov, George A; Kahn, Richard A; Sztul, Elizabeth

    2016-03-15

    Members of the large Sec7 domain-containing Arf guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) family have been shown to dimerize through their NH2-terminal dimerization and cyclophilin binding (DCB) and homology upstream of Sec7 (HUS) domains. However, the importance of dimerization in GEF localization and function has not been assessed. We generated a GBF1 mutant (91/130) in which two residues required for oligomerization (K91 and E130 within the DCB domain) were replaced with A and assessed the effects of these mutations on GBF1 localization and cellular functions. We show that 91/130 is compromised in oligomerization but that it targets to the Golgi in a manner indistinguishable from wild-type GBF1 and that it rapidly exchanges between the cytosolic and membrane-bound pools. The 91/130 mutant appears active as it integrates within the functional network at the Golgi, supports Arf activation and COPI recruitment, and sustains Golgi homeostasis and cargo secretion when provided as a sole copy of functional GBF1 in cells. In addition, like wild-type GBF1, the 91/130 mutant supports poliovirus RNA replication, a process requiring GBF1 but believed to be independent of GBF1 catalytic activity. However, oligomerization appears to stabilize GBF1 in cells, and the 91/130 mutant is degraded faster than the wild-type GBF1. Our data support a model in which oligomerization is not a key regulator of GBF1 activity but impacts its function by regulating the cellular levels of GBF1. PMID:26718629

  1. Expression of the Arf tumor suppressor gene is controlled by Tgfβ2 during development

    PubMed Central

    Freeman-Anderson, Natalie E.; Zheng, Yanbin; McCalla-Martin, Amy C.; Treanor, Louise M.; Zhao, Yi D.; Garfin, Phillip M.; He, Tong-Chuan; Mary, Michelle N.; Thornton, J. Derek; Anderson, Colleen; Gibbons, Melissa; Saab, Raya; Baumer, Shannon H.; Cunningham, John M.; Skapek, Stephen X.

    2009-01-01

    Summary The Arf tumor suppressor (also known as Cdkn2a) acts as an oncogene sensor induced by `abnormal' mitogenic signals in incipient cancer cells. It also plays a crucial role in embryonic development: newborn mice lacking Arf are blind due to a pathological process resembling severe persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous (PHPV), a human eye disease. The cell-intrinsic mechanism implied in the oncogene sensor model seems unlikely to explain Arf regulation during embryo development. Instead, transforming growth factor β2 (Tgfβ2) might control Arf expression, as we show that mice lacking Tgfβ2 have primary vitreous hyperplasia similar to Arf-/- mice. Consistent with a potential linear pathway, Tgfβ2 induces Arf transcription and p19Arf expression in cultured mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs); and Tgfβ2-dependent cell cycle arrest in MEFs is maintained in an Arf-dependent manner. Using a new model in which Arf expression can be tracked by β-galactosidase activity in ArflacZ/+ mice, we show that Tgfβ2 is required for Arf transcription in the developing vitreous as well as in the cornea and the umbilical arteries, two previously unrecognized sites of Arf expression. Chemical and genetic strategies show that Arf promoter induction depends on Tgfβ receptor activation of Smad proteins; the induction correlates with Smad2 phosphorylation in MEFs and Arf-expressing cells in vivo. Chromatin immunoprecipitation shows that Smads bind to genomic DNA proximal to Arf exon 1β. In summary, Tgfβ2 and p19Arf act in a linear pathway during embryonic development. We present the first evidence that p19Arf expression can be coupled to extracellular cues in normal cells and suggest a new mechanism for Arf control in tumor cells. PMID:19465598

  2. The processed isoform of the translation termination factor eRF3 localizes to the nucleus to interact with the ARF tumor suppressor

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Yoshifumi; Kumagai, Naomichi; Hosoda, Nao; Hoshino, Shin-ichi

    2014-03-14

    Highlights: • So far, eRF3 has been thought to function exclusively in the cytoplasm. • eRF3 is a nucleo-cutoplasmic shuttling protein. • eRF3 has a leptomycin-sensitive nuclear export signal (NES). • Removal of NES by proteolytic cleavage allows eRF3 to translocate to the nucleus. • The processed eRF3 (p-eRF3) interacts with a nuclear tumor suppressor ARF. - Abstract: The eukaryotic releasing factor eRF3 is a multifunctional protein that plays pivotal roles in translation termination as well as the initiation of mRNA decay. eRF3 also functions in the regulation of apoptosis; eRF3 is cleaved at Ala73 by an as yet unidentified protease into processed isoform of eRF3 (p-eRF3), which interacts with the inhibitors of apoptosis proteins (IAPs). The binding of p-eRF3 with IAPs leads to the release of active caspases from IAPs, which promotes apoptosis. Although full-length eRF3 is localized exclusively in the cytoplasm, p-eRF3 localizes in the nucleus as well as the cytoplasm. We here focused on the role of p-eRF3 in the nucleus. We identified leptomycin-sensitive nuclear export signal (NES) at amino acid residues 61–71 immediately upstream of the cleavage site Ala73. Thus, the proteolytic cleavage of eRF3 into p-eRF3 leads to release an amino-terminal fragment containing NES to allow the relocalization of eRF3 into the nucleus. Consistent with this, p-eRF3 more strongly interacted with the nuclear ARF tumor suppressor than full-length eRF3. These results suggest that while p-eRF3 interacts with IAPs to promote apoptosis in the cytoplasm, p-eRF3 also has some roles in regulating cell death in the nucleus.

  3. Hypergrowth mTORC1 Signals Translationally Activate the ARF Tumor Suppressor Checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Miceli, Alexander P.; Saporita, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    The ARF tumor suppressor is a potent sensor of hyperproliferative cues emanating from oncogenic signaling. ARF responds to these cues by eliciting a cell cycle arrest, effectively abating the tumorigenic potential of these stimuli. Prior reports have demonstrated that oncogenic RasV12 signaling induces ARF through a mechanism mediated by the Dmp1 transcription factor. However, we now show that ARF protein is still induced in response to RasV12 in the absence of Dmp1 through the enhanced translation of existing Arf mRNAs. Here, we report that the progrowth Ras/tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC)/mTORC1 signaling pathway regulates ARF protein expression and triggers ARF-mediated tumor suppression through a novel translational mechanism. Hyperactivation of mTORC1 through Tsc1 loss resulted in a significant increase in ARF expression, activation of the p53 pathway, and a dramatic cell cycle arrest, which were completely reversed upon Arf deletion. ARF protein induced from RasV12 in the absence of Dmp1 repressed anchorage-independent colony formation in soft agar and tumor burden in an allograft model. Taken together, our data demonstrate the ability of the ARF tumor suppressor to respond to hypergrowth stimuli to prevent unwarranted tumor formation. PMID:22064482

  4. OsARF16, a transcription factor regulating auxin redistribution, is required for iron deficiency response in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Shen, Chenjia; Yue, Runqing; Sun, Tao; Zhang, Lei; Yang, Yanjun; Wang, Huizhong

    2015-02-01

    Plant response to iron deficiency is the most important feature for survival in Fe-limited soils. Several phytohormones, including auxin, are involved in iron uptake and homeostasis. However, the mechanisms behind how auxin participates in the iron deficiency response in rice are largely unknown. We found that OsARF16 was involved in the iron deficiency response and the induction of iron deficiency response genes. Most Fe-deficient symptoms could be partially restored in the osarf16 mutant, including dwarfism, photosynthesis decline, a reduction in iron content and root system architecture (RSA) regulation. OsARF16 expression was induced in the roots and shoots by Fe deprivation. Restoration of the phenotype could also be mimicked by 1-NOA, an auxin influx inhibitor. Furthermore, the qRT-PCR data indicated that the induction of Fe-deficiency response genes by iron deficiency was more compromised in the osarf16 mutant than in Nipponbare. In conclusion, osarf16, an auxin insensitive mutant, was involved in iron deficiency response in rice. Our results reveal a new biological function for OsARF16 and provide important information on how ARF-medicated auxin signaling affects iron signaling and the iron deficiency response. This work may help us to improve production or increased Fe nutrition of rice to iron deficiency by regulating auxin signaling. PMID:25576000

  5. Evolution of the ARF gene family in land plants: old domains, new tricks.

    PubMed

    Finet, Cédric; Berne-Dedieu, Annick; Scutt, Charles P; Marlétaz, Ferdinand

    2013-01-01

    Auxin response factors (ARF) are key players in plant development. They mediate the cellular response to the plant hormone auxin by activating or repressing the expression of downstream developmental genes. The pivotal activation function of ARF proteins is enabled by their four-domain architecture, which includes both DNA-binding and protein dimerization motifs. To determine the evolutionary origin of this characteristic architecture, we built a comprehensive data set of 224 ARF-related protein sequences that represents all major living divisions of land plants, except hornworts. We found that ARFs are split into three subfamilies that could be traced back to the origin of the land plants. We also show that repeated events of extensive gene duplication contributed to the expansion of those three original subfamilies. Further examination of our data set uncovered a broad diversity in the structure of ARF transcripts and allowed us to identify an additional conserved motif in ARF proteins. We found that additional structural diversity in ARF proteins is mainly generated by two mechanisms: genomic truncation and alternative splicing. We propose that the loss of domains from the canonical, four-domain ARF structure has promoted functional shifts within the ARF family by disrupting either dimerization or DNA-binding capabilities. For instance, the loss of dimerization domains in some ARFs from moss and spikemoss genomes leads to proteins that are reminiscent of Aux/IAA proteins, possibly providing a clue on the evolution of these modulators of ARF function. We also assessed the functional impact of alternative splicing in the case of ARF4, for which we have identified a novel isoform in Arabidopsis thaliana. Genetic analysis showed that these two transcripts exhibit markedly different developmental roles in A. thaliana. Gene duplications, domain rearrangement, and post-transcriptional regulation have thus enabled a subtle control of auxin signaling through ARF proteins

  6. Ink4-Arf locus in cancer and aging.

    PubMed

    Sherr, Charles J

    2012-01-01

    Three tumor suppressor genes at the small (<50 kb) INK4-ARF (CDKN2A/B) locus on human chromosome 9p21 coordinate a signaling network that depends on the activities of the retinoblastoma (RB) protein and the p53 transcription factor. Disruption of this circuitry, frequently by codeletion of INK4-ARF, is a hallmark of cancer, begging the question of why the intimate genetic linkage of these tumor suppressor genes has been maintained in mammals despite the risk of their coinactivation. The INK4-ARF locus is not highly expressed under normal physiologic conditions in young mammals, but its induction becomes more pronounced as animals age. Notably, INK4-ARF is actively silenced en bloc in embryonic, fetal, and adult stem cells but becomes poised to respond to oncogenic stress signals as stem cells lose their self-renewal capacity and differentiate, thereby providing a potent barrier to tumor formation. Epigenetic remodeling of the locus as a whole provides a mechanism for coordinating the activities of RB and p53. A hypothesis is that the INK4-ARF locus may have evolved to physiologically restrict the self-renewal capacities and numbers of stem and progenitor cells with the attendant consequence of limiting tissue regenerative capacity, particularly as animals age. Deletion of INK4-ARF contributes to the aberrant self-renewal capacity of tumor cells and occurs frequently in many forms of human cancer. PMID:22960768

  7. Role of the tumor suppressor ARF in macrophage polarization

    PubMed Central

    Herranz, Sandra; Través, Paqui G.; Luque, Alfonso; Hortelano, Sonsoles

    2012-01-01

    The ARF locus is frequently inactivated in human cancer. The oncosuppressor ARF has indeed been described as a general sensor for different situation of cellular stress. We have previously demonstrated that ARF deficiency severely impairs inflammatory responses in vitro and in vivo, establishing a role for ARF in the regulation of innate immunity. The aim of the present work was to get further insights into the immune functions of ARF and to evaluate its possible contribution to the polarization of macrophages toward the M1 or M2 phenotype. Our results demonstrate that resting Arf−/− macrophages express high levels of Ym1 and Fizz-1, two typical markers of alternatively-activated macrophages (M2). Additionally, Arf−/− peritoneal macrophages showed an impaired response to lipopolysaccharide (a classical inducer of M1 polaryzation) and a reduced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines. Moreover, upon stimulation with interleukin-4 (IL-4), an inducer of the M2 phenotype, well established M2 markers such as Fizz-1, Ym1 and arginase-1 were upregulated in Arf−/− as compared with wild type macrophages. Accordingly, the cytokine and chemokine profile associated with the M2 phenotype was significantly overexpressed in Arf−/− macrophages responding to IL-4. In addition, multiple pro-angiogenic factors such as VEGF and MMP-9 were also increased. In summary, these results indicate that ARF contributes to the polarization and functional plasticity of macrophages. PMID:23243586

  8. A Mutational Analysis of Residues in Cholera Toxin A1 Necessary for Interaction with Its Substrate, the Stimulatory G Protein Gsα

    PubMed Central

    Jobling, Michael G.; Gotow, Lisa F.; Yang, Zhijie; Holmes, Randall K.

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenesis of cholera diarrhea requires cholera toxin (CT)-mediated adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-ribosylation of stimulatory G protein (Gsα) in enterocytes. CT is an AB5 toxin with an inactive CTA1 domain linked via CTA2 to a pentameric receptor-binding B subunit. Allosterically activated CTA1 fragment in complex with NAD+ and GTP-bound ADP-ribosylation factor 6 (ARF6-GTP) differs conformationally from the CTA1 domain in holotoxin. A surface-exposed knob and a short α-helix (formed, respectively, by rearranging “active-site” and “activation” loops in inactive CTA1) and an ADP ribosylating turn-turn (ARTT) motif, all located near the CTA1 catalytic site, were evaluated for possible roles in recognizing Gsα. CT variants with one, two or three alanine substitutions at surface-exposed residues within these CTA1 motifs were tested for assembly into holotoxin and ADP-ribosylating activity against Gsα and diethylamino-(benzylidineamino)-guanidine (DEABAG), a small substrate predicted to fit into the CTA1 active site). Variants with single alanine substitutions at H55, R67, L71, S78, or D109 had nearly wild-type activity with DEABAG but significantly decreased activity with Gsα, suggesting that the corresponding residues in native CTA1 participate in recognizing Gsα. As several variants with multiple substitutions at these positions retained partial activity against Gsα, other residues in CTA1 likely also participate in recognizing Gsα. PMID:25793724

  9. Ral-Arf6 crosstalk regulates Ral dependent exocyst trafficking and anchorage independent growth signalling.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Archana; Meier, Jeremy A; Dasgupta, Anwesha; Diwanji, Neha; Deshpande, Neha; Saxena, Kritika; Buwa, Natasha; Inchanalkar, Siddhi; Schwartz, Martin Alexander; Balasubramanian, Nagaraj

    2016-09-01

    Integrin dependent regulation of growth factor signalling confers anchorage dependence that is deregulated in cancers. Downstream of integrins and oncogenic Ras the small GTPase Ral is a vital mediator of adhesion dependent trafficking and signalling. This study identifies a novel regulatory crosstalk between Ral and Arf6 that controls Ral function in cells. In re-adherent mouse fibroblasts (MEFs) integrin dependent activation of RalA drives Arf6 activation. Independent of adhesion constitutively active RalA and RalB could both however activate Arf6. This is further conserved in oncogenic H-Ras containing bladder cancer T24 cells, which express anchorage independent active Ral that supports Arf6 activation. Arf6 mediates active Ral-exocyst dependent delivery of raft microdomains to the plasma membrane that supports anchorage independent growth signalling. Accordingly in T24 cells the RalB-Arf6 crosstalk is seen to preferentially regulate anchorage independent Erk signalling. Active Ral we further find uses a Ral-RalBP1-ARNO-Arf6 pathway to mediate Arf6 activation. This study hence identifies Arf6, through this regulatory crosstalk, to be a key downstream mediator of Ral isoform function along adhesion dependent pathways in normal and cancer cells. PMID:27269287

  10. Arf Induction by Tgfβ Is Influenced by Sp1 and C/ebpβ in Opposing Directions

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yanbin; Devitt, Caitlin; Liu, Jing; Iqbal, Nida; Skapek, Stephen X.

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies show that Arf, a bona fide tumor suppressor, also plays an essential role during mouse eye development. Tgfβ is required for Arf promoter activation in developing mouse eyes, and its capacity to induce Arf depends on Smads 2/3 as well as p38 Mapk. Substantial delay between activation of these pathways and increased Arf transcription imply that changes in the binding of additional transcription factors help orchestrate changes in Arf expression. Focusing on proteins with putative DNA binding elements near the mouse Arf transcription start, we now show that Tgfβ induction of this gene correlated with decreased expression and DNA binding of C/ebpβ to the proximal Arf promoter. Ectopic expression of C/ebpβ in mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) blocked Arf induction by Tgfβ. Although basal levels of Arf mRNA were increased by C/ebpβ loss in MEFs and in the developing eye, Tgfβ was still able to increase Arf, indicating that derepression was not the sole factor. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay showed increased Sp1 binding to the Arf promotor at 24 and 48 hours after Tgfβ treatment, at which time points Arf expression was significantly induced by Tgfβ. Chemical inhibition of Sp1 and its knockdown by RNA interference blocked Arf induction by Tgfβ in MEFs. In summary, our results indicate that C/ebpβ and Sp1 are negative and positive Arf regulators that are influenced by Tgfβ. PMID:23940569

  11. Genome-wide analysis of Aux/IAA and ARF gene families in Populus trichocarpa

    SciTech Connect

    Kalluri, Udaya C; DiFazio, Stephen P; Brunner, A.; Tuskan, Gerald A

    2007-01-01

    Auxin/Indole-3-Acetic Acid (Aux/IAA) and Auxin Response Factor (ARF) transcription factors are key regulators of auxin responses in plants. A total of 35 Aux/IAA and 39 ARF genes were identified in the Populus genome. Comparative phylogenetic analysis revealed that the subgroups PoptrARF2, 6, 9 and 16 and PoptrIAA3, 16, 27 and 29 have differentially expanded in Populus relative to Arabidopsis. Activator ARFs were found to be two fold-overrepresented in the Populus genome. PoptrIAA and PoptrARF gene families appear to have expanded due to high segmental and low tandem duplication events. Furthermore, expression studies showed that genes in the expanded PoptrIAA3 subgroup display differential expression. The gene-family analysis reported here will be useful in conducting future functional genomics studies to understand how the molecular roles of these large gene families translate into a diversity of biologically meaningful auxin effects.

  12. Abnormalities of the ARF-p53 pathway in primary angiosarcomas of the liver.

    PubMed

    Weihrauch, Markus; Markwarth, Anett; Lehnert, Gerhard; Wittekind, Christian; Wrbitzky, Renate; Tannapfel, Andrea

    2002-09-01

    The INK4a-ARF locus, located on chromosome 9p21, encodes 2 cell cycle-regulatory proteins, p16(INKa) and p14(ARF), acting through the Rb-CDK4 and p53 pathways. This study was done to investigate the contribution of the INK4a-ARF locus in tumorigenesis of angiosarcoma of the liver. Alterations of p14(ARF), p16(INKa), and p53 in primary liver angiosarcoma from 19 patients were analyzed by methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction (MSP), restriction enzyme-related polymerase chain reaction (RE-PCR), microsatellite analysis, and DNA sequencing. As a control group, 12 angiosarcomas from other organs were analyzed. Promoter methylation of p14(ARF) was found in 5 of 19 cases (26%), and p16(INKa) showed aberrant promoter methylation in 12 of 19 cases (63%). One tumor (5%) had homozygous deletion of the INK4a-ARF locus. Methylation and deletion correlated with loss of mRNA transcription. Methylated p14(ARF) appeared in the context of a methylated p16(INKa) promoter in 3 cases of the 5 angiosarcomas methylated at p14(ARF). p14(ARF) aberrant methylation was not related to the presence of p53 mutations, which was detected in 6 of 19 (32%) cases. Alterations of the INK4a-ARF locus or p53 as were not established independent prognostic factors in these tumors. In conclusion, our data indicate that the INK4a-ARF locus is frequently inactivated in angiosarcoma of the liver and occurs independently of p53 mutations. PMID:12378512

  13. Nuclear trafficking of EGFR by Vps34 represses Arf expression to promote lung tumor cell survival.

    PubMed

    Dayde, D; Guerard, M; Perron, P; Hatat, A-S; Barrial, C; Eymin, B; Gazzeri, S

    2016-07-28

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a cell surface receptor that has an essential role in cell proliferation and survival, and overexpression of EGFR is a common feature of human cancers. In Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), activating mutations of EGFR have also been described. We recently showed that mutant EGFR-L858R inhibits the expression of the p14ARF tumor-suppressor protein to promote cell survival. In this study, we defined the molecular bases by which EGFR controls Arf expression. Using various lung tumor models, we showed that EGF stimulation inhibits Arf transcription by a mechanism involving the nuclear transport and recruitment of EGFR to the Arf promoter. We unraveled the vesicular trafficking protein Vps34 as a mediator of EGFR nuclear trafficking and showed that its neutralization prevents the accumulation of EGFR to the Arf promoter in response to ligand activation. Finally, in lung tumor cells that carry mutant EGFR-L858R, we demonstrated that inhibition of Vps34 using small interfering RNA restrains nuclear EGFR location and restores Arf expression leading to apoptosis. These findings identify the Arf tumor suppressor as a new transcriptional target of nuclear EGFR and highlight Vps34 as an important regulator of the nuclear EGFR/Arf survival pathway. As a whole, they provide a mechanistic explanation to the inverse correlation between nuclear expression of EGFR and overall survival in NSCLC patients. PMID:26686095

  14. The yeast Arf GTPase-activating protein Age1 is regulated by phospholipase D for post-Golgi vesicular transport.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Jeremy J R; Poon, Pak P; Lewis, Stephen M; Auger, Andréanne; Wong, Tania A; Singer, Richard A; Johnston, Gerald C

    2011-02-18

    Vesicular transport shuttles cargo among intracellular compartments. Several stages of vesicular transport are mediated by the small GTPase Arf, which is controlled in a cycle of GTP binding and hydrolysis by Arf guanine-nucleotide exchange factors and Arf GTPase-activating proteins (ArfGAPs), respectively. In budding yeast the Age2 + Gcs1 ArfGAP pair facilitates post-Golgi transport. We have found the AGE1 gene, encoding another ArfGAP, can in high gene-copy number alleviate the temperature sensitivity of cells carrying mutations affecting the Age2 + Gcs1 ArfGAP pair. Moreover, increased AGE1 gene dosage compensates for the complete absence of the otherwise essential Age2 + Gcs1 ArfGAP pair. Increased dosage of SFH2, encoding a phosphatidylinositol transfer protein, also allows cell growth in the absence of the Age2 + Gcs1 pair, but good growth in this situation requires Age1. The ability of Age1 to overcome the need for Age2 + Gcs1 depends on phospholipase D activity that regulates lipid composition. We show by direct assessment of Age1 ArfGAP activity that Age1 is regulated by lipid composition and can provide ArfGAP function for post-Golgi transport. PMID:21135091

  15. The Yeast Arf GTPase-activating Protein Age1 Is Regulated by Phospholipase D for Post-Golgi Vesicular Transport*

    PubMed Central

    Benjamin, Jeremy J. R.; Poon, Pak P.; Lewis, Stephen M.; Auger, Andréanne; Wong, Tania A.; Singer, Richard A.; Johnston, Gerald C.

    2011-01-01

    Vesicular transport shuttles cargo among intracellular compartments. Several stages of vesicular transport are mediated by the small GTPase Arf, which is controlled in a cycle of GTP binding and hydrolysis by Arf guanine-nucleotide exchange factors and Arf GTPase-activating proteins (ArfGAPs), respectively. In budding yeast the Age2 + Gcs1 ArfGAP pair facilitates post-Golgi transport. We have found the AGE1 gene, encoding another ArfGAP, can in high gene-copy number alleviate the temperature sensitivity of cells carrying mutations affecting the Age2 + Gcs1 ArfGAP pair. Moreover, increased AGE1 gene dosage compensates for the complete absence of the otherwise essential Age2 + Gcs1 ArfGAP pair. Increased dosage of SFH2, encoding a phosphatidylinositol transfer protein, also allows cell growth in the absence of the Age2 + Gcs1 pair, but good growth in this situation requires Age1. The ability of Age1 to overcome the need for Age2 + Gcs1 depends on phospholipase D activity that regulates lipid composition. We show by direct assessment of Age1 ArfGAP activity that Age1 is regulated by lipid composition and can provide ArfGAP function for post-Golgi transport. PMID:21135091

  16. The Ink4a/Arf Locus Is a Barrier to Direct Neuronal Transdifferentiation

    PubMed Central

    Price, James D.; Park, Ki-Youb; Chen, Jiadong; Salinas, Ryan D.; Cho, Mathew J.; Kriegstein, Arnold R.

    2014-01-01

    Non-neurogenic cell types, such as cortical astroglia and fibroblasts, can be directly converted into neurons by the overexpression of defined transcription factors. Normally, the cellular phenotype of such differentiated cells is remarkably stable and resists direct cell transdifferentiation. Here we show that the Ink4a/Arf (also known as Cdkn2a) locus is a developmental barrier to direct neuronal transdifferentiation induced by transcription factor overexpression. With serial passage in vitro, wild-type postnatal cortical astroglia become progressively resistant to Dlx2-induced neuronal transdifferentiation. In contrast, the neurogenic competence of Ink4a/Arf-deficient astroglia is both greatly increased and does not diminish through serial cell culture passage. Electrophysiological analysis further demonstrates the neuronal identity of cells induced from Ink4a/Arf-null astroglia, and short hairpin RNA-mediated acute knockdown of p16Ink4a and p19Arf p16Ink4a and p19Arf indicates that these gene products function postnatally as a barrier to cellular transdifferentiation. Finally, we found that mouse fibroblasts deficient for Ink4a/Arf also exhibit greatly enhanced transcription factor-induced neuronal induction. These data indicate that Ink4a/Arf is a potent barrier to direct neuronal transdifferentiation and further suggest that this locus functions normally in the progressive developmental restriction of postnatal astrocytes. PMID:25209293

  17. Inhibition of poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation in cancer: old and new paradigms revisited.

    PubMed

    Lupo, Barbara; Trusolino, Livio

    2014-08-01

    Inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases actualized the biological concept of synthetic lethality in the clinical practice, yielding a paradigmatic example of translational medicine. The profound sensitivity of tumors with germline BRCA mutations to PARP1/2 blockade owes to inherent defects of the BRCA-dependent homologous recombination machinery, which are unleashed by interruption of PARP DNA repair activity and lead to DNA damage overload and cell death. Conversely, aspirant BRCA-like tumors harboring somatic DNA repair dysfunctions (a vast entity of genetic and epigenetic defects known as "BRCAness") not always align with the familial counterpart and appear not to be equally sensitive to PARP inhibition. The acquisition of secondary resistance in initially responsive patients and the lack of standardized biomarkers to identify "BRCAness" pose serious threats to the clinical advance of PARP inhibitors; a feeling is also emerging that a BRCA-centered perspective might have missed the influence of additional, not negligible and DNA repair-independent PARP contributions onto therapy outcome. While regulatory approval for PARP1/2 inhibitors is still pending, novel therapeutic opportunities are sprouting from different branches of the PARP family, although they remain immature for clinical extrapolation. This review is an endeavor to provide a comprehensive appraisal of the multifaceted biology of PARPs and their evolving impact on cancer therapeutics. PMID:25026313

  18. Kinase-mediated changes in nucleosome conformation trigger chromatin decondensation via poly-ADP-ribosylation

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Colin J.; Kotova, Elena; Andrake, Mark; Adolf-Bryfogle, Jared; Glaser, Robert; Regnard, Catherine; Tulin, Alexei V.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Dynamically controlled post-translational modifications of nucleosomal histones alter chromatin condensation to regulate transcriptional activation. We report that a nuclear tandem kinase, JIL-1, controls gene expression by activating Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase 1 (PARP-1). JIL-1 phosphorylates the C-terminus of the H2Av histone variant, which stimulates PARP-1 enzymatic activity in the surrounding chromatin, leading to further modification of histones and chromatin loosening. The H2Av nucleosome has a higher surface representation of PARP-1 binding patch consisting of H3 and H4 epitopes. Phosphorylation of H2Av by JIL-1 restructures this surface patch leading to activation of PARP-1. Exposure of Val61 and Leu23 of the H4 histone is critical for PARP-1 binding on nucleosome and PARP-1 activation following H2Av phosphorylation. We propose that chromatin loosening and associated initiation of gene expression is activated by phosphorylation of H2Av in a nucleosome positioned in promoter regions of PARP-1 dependent genes. PMID:24508391

  19. Studies on protein poly(ADP-ribosylation) using high resolution gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Boulikas, T

    1990-08-25

    Analysis of poly(ADP-ribose) synthesized in cellular lysates or in isolated nuclei on 100-cm-long thin gels of 20% polyacrylamide, 2.5 M urea permits determination of the exact size of poly(ADP-ribose) molecules using labeled oligonucleotides as molecular weight markers. The size and concentration of poly(ADP-ribose) molecules increase at time intervals during its synthesis. Differences in the concentration of poly(ADP-ribose) size classes among cell lines are also shown. Inhibition of poly(ADP-ribose) degradation by ethacridine that directly interacts with the polymer and inhibits its hydrolysis by poly(ADP-ribose) glycohydrolase shows a dramatic increase in both polymer size and concentration. Use of alkaline conditions for the hydrolysis of poly(ADP-ribose)-protein linkages reveals a specific shortening of all size classes of poly(ADP-ribose) compared with its size in preparations obtained by extensive digestion of nuclei with nucleases, RNases, and proteases. PMID:2167322

  20. Arf6 controls platelet spreading and clot retraction via integrin αIIbβ3 trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yunjie; Joshi, Smita; Xiang, Binggang; Kanaho, Yasunori; Li, Zhenyu; Bouchard, Beth A.; Moncman, Carole L.

    2016-01-01

    Platelet and megakaryocyte endocytosis is important for loading certain granule cargo (ie, fibrinogen [Fg] and vascular endothelial growth factor); however, the mechanisms of platelet endocytosis and its functional acute effects are understudied. Adenosine 5'-diphosphate–ribosylation factor 6 (Arf6) is a small guanosine triphosphate–binding protein that regulates endocytic trafficking, especially of integrins. To study platelet endocytosis, we generated platelet-specific Arf6 knockout (KO) mice. Arf6 KO platelets had less associated Fg suggesting that Arf6 affects αIIbβ3-mediated Fg uptake and/or storage. Other cargo was unaffected. To measure Fg uptake, mice were injected with biotinylated- or fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)–labeled Fg. Platelets from the injected Arf6 KO mice showed lower accumulation of tagged Fg, suggesting an uptake defect. Ex vivo, Arf6 KO platelets were also defective in FITC-Fg uptake and storage. Immunofluorescence analysis showed initial trafficking of FITC-Fg to a Rab4-positive compartment followed by colocalization with Rab11-positive structures, suggesting that platelets contain and use both early and recycling endosomes. Resting and activated αIIbβ3 levels, as measured by flow cytometry, were unchanged; yet, Arf6 KO platelets exhibited enhanced spreading on Fg and faster clot retraction. This was not the result of alterations in αIIbβ3 signaling, because myosin light-chain phosphorylation and Rac1/RhoA activation were unaffected. Consistent with the enhanced clot retraction and spreading, Arf6 KO mice showed no deficits in tail bleeding or FeCl3-induced carotid injury assays. Our studies present the first mouse model for defining the functions of platelet endocytosis and suggest that altered integrin trafficking may affect the efficacy of platelet function. PMID:26738539

  1. Liver Sinusoidal Endothelial Cells Escape Senescence by Loss of p19ARF

    PubMed Central

    Koudelkova, Petra; Weber, Gerhard; Mikulits, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Liver sinusoidal endothelial cells (LSECs) represent a highly differentiated cell type that lines hepatic sinusoids. LSECs form a discontinuous endothelium due to fenestrations under physiological conditions, which are reduced upon chronic liver injury. Cultivation of rodent LSECs associates with a rapid onset of stress-induced senescence a few days post isolation, which limits genetic and biochemical studies ex vivo. Here we show the establishment of LSECs isolated from p19ARF-/- mice which undergo more than 50 cell doublings in the absence of senescence. Isolated p19ARF-/- LSECs display a cobblestone-like morphology and show the ability of tube formation. Analysis of DNA content revealed a stable diploid phenotype after long-term passaging without a gain of aneuploidy. Notably, p19ARF-/- LSECs express the endothelial markers CD31, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-2, VE-cadherin, von Willebrand factor, stabilin-2 and CD146 suggesting that these cells harbor and maintain an endothelial phenotype. In line, treatment with small molecule inhibitors against VEGFR-2 caused cell death, demonstrating the sustained ability of p19ARF-/- LSECs to respond to anti-angiogenic therapeutics. From these data we conclude that loss of p19ARF overcomes senescence of LSECs, allowing immortalization of cells without losing endothelial characteristics. Thus, p19ARF-/- LSECs provide a novel cellular model to study endothelial cell biology. PMID:26528722

  2. ELMOD2 is an Arl2 GTPase-activating protein that also acts on Arfs.

    PubMed

    Bowzard, J Bradford; Cheng, Dongmei; Peng, Junmin; Kahn, Richard A

    2007-06-15

    Regulatory GTPases in the Ras superfamily employ a cycle of alternating GTP binding and hydrolysis, controlled by guanine nucleotide exchange factors and GTPase-activating proteins (GAPs), as essential features of their actions in cells. Studies of these GAPs and guanine nucleotide exchange factors have provided important insights into our understanding of GTPase signaling and biology. Within the Ras superfamily, the Arf family is composed of 30 members in mammals, including 22 Arf-like (Arl) proteins. Much less is known about the mechanisms of cell regulation by Arls than by Arfs. We report the purification from bovine testis of an Arl2 GAP and its identity as ELMOD2, a protein with no previously described function. ELMOD2 is one of six human proteins that contain an ELMO domain, and a second member, ELMOD1, was also found to have Arl2 GAP activity. Surprisingly, ELMOD2 also exhibited GAP activity against Arf proteins even though it does not contain the canonical Arf GAP sequence signature. The broader specificity of ELMOD2, as well as the previously described role for ELMO1 and ELMO2 in linking Arf6 and Rac1 signaling, suggests that ELMO family members may play a more general role in integrating signaling pathways controlled by Arls and other GTPases. PMID:17452337

  3. Arf nucleotide binding site opener [ARNO] promotes sequential activation of Arf6, Cdc42 and Rac1 and insulin secretion in INS 832/13 β-cells and rat islets

    PubMed Central

    Jayaram, Bhavaani; Syed, Ismail; Kyathanahalli, Chandrashekara N.; Rhodes, Christopher J.; Kowluru, Anjaneyulu

    2011-01-01

    Glucose-stimulated insulin secretion [GSIS] involves interplay between small G-proteins and their regulatory factors. Herein, we tested the hypothesis that Arf nucleotide binding site opener [ARNO], a guanine nucleotide exchange factor [GEF] for the small G-protein Arf6, mediates the functional activation of Arf6, and that ARNO/Arf6 signaling axis, in turn, controls the activation of Cdc42 and Rac1, which have been implicated in GSIS. Molecular biological [i.e., expression of inactive mutants or siRNA] and pharmacological approaches were employed to assess the roles for ARNO/Arf6 signaling pathway in insulin secretion in normal rat islets and INS 832/13 cells. Degrees of activation of Arf6 and Cdc42/Rac1 were quantitated by GST-GGA3 and PAK-1 kinase pull-down assays, respectively. ARNO is expressed in INS 832/13 cells, rat islets and human islets. Expression of inactive mutants of Arf6 [Arf6-T27N] or ARNO [ARNO-E156K] or siRNA-ARNO markedly reduced GSIS in isolated β-cells. secinH3, a selective inhibitor of ARNO/Arf6 signaling axis, also inhibited GSIS in INS 832/13 cells and rat islets. Stimulatory concentrations of glucose promoted Arf6 activation, which was inhibited by secinH3 or siRNA-ARNO, suggesting that ARNO/Arf6 signaling cascade is necessary for GSIS. secinH3 or siRNA-ARNO also inhibited glucose-induced activation of Cdc42 and Rac1 suggesting that ARNO/Arf6 might be upstream to Cdc42 and Rac1 activation steps, which are necessary for GSIS. Lastly, co-immunoprecipitation and confocal microscopic studies suggested increased association between Arf6 and ARNO in glucose-stimulated β-cells. These findings provide the first evidence to implicate ARNO in the sequential activation of Arf6, Cdc42 and Rac1 culminating in GSIS. PMID:21276423

  4. The Sec7 N-terminal regulatory domains facilitate membrane-proximal activation of the Arf1 GTPase

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Brian C; Halaby, Steve L; Gustafson, Margaret A; Fromme, J Christopher

    2016-01-01

    The Golgi complex is the central sorting compartment of eukaryotic cells. Arf guanine nucleotide exchange factors (Arf-GEFs) regulate virtually all traffic through the Golgi by activating Arf GTPase trafficking pathways. The Golgi Arf-GEFs contain multiple autoregulatory domains, but the precise mechanisms underlying their function remain largely undefined. We report a crystal structure revealing that the N-terminal DCB and HUS regulatory domains of the Arf-GEF Sec7 form a single structural unit. We demonstrate that the established role of the N-terminal region in dimerization is not conserved; instead, a C-terminal autoinhibitory domain is responsible for dimerization of Sec7. We find that the DCB/HUS domain amplifies the ability of Sec7 to activate Arf1 on the membrane surface by facilitating membrane insertion of the Arf1 amphipathic helix. This enhancing function of the Sec7 N-terminal domains is consistent with the high rate of Arf1-dependent trafficking to the plasma membrane necessary for maximal cell growth. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.12411.001 PMID:26765562

  5. Protein-protein interaction and gene co-expression maps of ARFs and Aux/IAAs in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Piya, Sarbottam; Shrestha, Sandesh K.; Binder, Brad; Stewart, C. Neal; Hewezi, Tarek

    2014-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin regulates nearly all aspects of plant growth and development. Based on the current model in Arabidopsis thaliana, Auxin/indole-3-acetic acid (Aux/IAA) proteins repress auxin-inducible genes by inhibiting auxin response transcription factors (ARFs). Experimental evidence suggests that heterodimerization between Aux/IAA and ARF proteins are related to their unique biological functions. The objective of this study was to generate the Aux/IAA-ARF protein-protein interaction map using full length sequences and locate the interacting protein pairs to specific gene co-expression networks in order to define tissue-specific responses of the Aux/IAA-ARF interactome. Pairwise interactions between 19 ARFs and 29 Aux/IAAs resulted in the identification of 213 specific interactions of which 79 interactions were previously unknown. The incorporation of co-expression profiles with protein-protein interaction data revealed a strong correlation of gene co-expression for 70% of the ARF-Aux/IAA interacting pairs in at least one tissue/organ, indicative of the biological significance of these interactions. Importantly, ARF4-8 and 19, which were found to interact with almost all Aux-Aux/IAA showed broad co-expression relationships with Aux/IAA genes, thus, formed the central hubs of the co-expression network. Our analyses provide new insights into the biological significance of ARF-Aux/IAA associations in the morphogenesis and development of various plant tissues and organs. PMID:25566309

  6. Constitutive auxin response in Physcomitrella reveals complex interactions between Aux/IAA and ARF proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lavy, Meirav; Prigge, Michael J; Tao, Sibo; Shain, Stephanie; Kuo, April; Kirchsteiger, Kerstin; Estelle, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The coordinated action of the auxin-sensitive Aux/IAA transcriptional repressors and ARF transcription factors produces complex gene-regulatory networks in plants. Despite their importance, our knowledge of these two protein families is largely based on analysis of stabilized forms of the Aux/IAAs, and studies of a subgroup of ARFs that function as transcriptional activators. To understand how auxin regulates gene expression we generated a Physcomitrella patens line that completely lacks Aux/IAAs. Loss of the repressors causes massive changes in transcription with misregulation of over a third of the annotated genes. Further, we find that the aux/iaa mutant is blind to auxin indicating that auxin regulation of transcription occurs exclusively through Aux/IAA function. We used the aux/iaa mutant as a simplified platform for studies of ARF function and demonstrate that repressing ARFs regulate auxin-induced genes and fine-tune their expression. Further the repressing ARFs coordinate gene induction jointly with activating ARFs and the Aux/IAAs. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.13325.001 PMID:27247276

  7. Constitutive auxin response in Physcomitrella reveals complex interactions between Aux/IAA and ARF proteins.

    PubMed

    Lavy, Meirav; Prigge, Michael J; Tao, Sibo; Shain, Stephanie; Kuo, April; Kirchsteiger, Kerstin; Estelle, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The coordinated action of the auxin-sensitive Aux/IAA transcriptional repressors and ARF transcription factors produces complex gene-regulatory networks in plants. Despite their importance, our knowledge of these two protein families is largely based on analysis of stabilized forms of the Aux/IAAs, and studies of a subgroup of ARFs that function as transcriptional activators. To understand how auxin regulates gene expression we generated a Physcomitrella patens line that completely lacks Aux/IAAs. Loss of the repressors causes massive changes in transcription with misregulation of over a third of the annotated genes. Further, we find that the aux/iaa mutant is blind to auxin indicating that auxin regulation of transcription occurs exclusively through Aux/IAA function. We used the aux/iaa mutant as a simplified platform for studies of ARF function and demonstrate that repressing ARFs regulate auxin-induced genes and fine-tune their expression. Further the repressing ARFs coordinate gene induction jointly with activating ARFs and the Aux/IAAs. PMID:27247276

  8. Chemical genetic discovery of PARP targets reveals a role for PARP-1 in transcription elongation.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Bryan A; Zhang, Yajie; Jiang, Hong; Hussey, Kristine M; Shrimp, Jonathan H; Lin, Hening; Schwede, Frank; Yu, Yonghao; Kraus, W Lee

    2016-07-01

    Poly[adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-ribose] polymerases (PARPs) are a family of enzymes that modulate diverse biological processes through covalent transfer of ADP-ribose from the oxidized form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) onto substrate proteins. Here we report a robust NAD(+) analog-sensitive approach for PARPs, which allows PARP-specific ADP-ribosylation of substrates that is suitable for subsequent copper-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reactions. Using this approach, we mapped hundreds of sites of ADP-ribosylation for PARPs 1, 2, and 3 across the proteome, as well as thousands of PARP-1-mediated ADP-ribosylation sites across the genome. We found that PARP-1 ADP-ribosylates and inhibits negative elongation factor (NELF), a protein complex that regulates promoter-proximal pausing by RNA polymerase II (Pol II). Depletion or inhibition of PARP-1 or mutation of the ADP-ribosylation sites on NELF-E promotes Pol II pausing, providing a clear functional link between PARP-1, ADP-ribosylation, and NELF. This analog-sensitive approach should be broadly applicable across the PARP family and has the potential to illuminate the ADP-ribosylated proteome and the molecular mechanisms used by individual PARPs to mediate their responses to cellular signals. PMID:27256882

  9. A secreted peptide acts on BIN2-mediated phosphorylation of ARFs to potentiate auxin response during lateral root development.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyunwoo; Ryu, Hojin; Rho, Sangchul; Hill, Kristine; Smith, Stephanie; Audenaert, Dominique; Park, Joonghyuk; Han, Soeun; Beeckman, Tom; Bennett, Malcolm J; Hwang, Daehee; De Smet, Ive; Hwang, Ildoo

    2014-01-01

    The phytohormone auxin is a key developmental signal in plants. So far, only auxin perception has been described to trigger the release of transcription factors termed Auxin Response Factors (ARFs) from their auxin/indole-3-acetic acid (AUX/IAA) repressor proteins. Here, we show that phosphorylation of ARF7 and ARF19 by BRASSINOSTEROID-insensitive2 (BIN2) can also potentiate auxin signalling output during lateral root organogenesis. BIN2-mediated phosphorylation of ARF7 and ARF19 suppresses their interaction with AUX/IAAs, and subsequently enhances the transcriptional activity to their target genes lateral organ boundaries-domain16 (LBD16) and LBD29. In this context, BIN2 is under the control of the Tracheary element differentiation inhibitory factor (TDIF)-TDIF receptor (TDR) module. TDIF-initiated TDR signalling directly acts on BIN2-mediated ARF phosphorylation, leading to the regulation of auxin signalling during lateral root development. In summary, this study delineates a TDIF-TDR-BIN2 signalling cascade that controls regulation of ARF and AUX/IAA interaction independent of auxin perception during lateral root development. PMID:24362628

  10. Protein kinase C and tyrosine kinase pathways regulate lipopolysaccharide-induced nitric oxide synthase activity in RAW 264.7 murine macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Paul, A; Pendreigh, R H; Plevin, R

    1995-01-01

    1. In RAW 264.7 macrophages, lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and gamma-interferon (IFN gamma) alone or in combination stimulated the induction of nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) activity and increased the expression of the 130 kDa isoform of NOS. 2. LPS-induced NOS activity was reduced by incubation with CD14 neutralising antibodies and abolished in macrophages deprived of serum. 3. LPS stimulated a small increase in protein kinase C (PKC) activity in RAW 264.7 macrophages which was dependent on the presence of serum. However, IFN gamma did not potentiate LPS-stimulated PKC activity. 4. The protein kinase C inhibitor, Ro-318220, abolished both LPS- and IFN gamma-stimulated protein kinase C activity and the induction of NOS activity. 5. LPS- and IFN gamma-induced NOS activity was reduced by the tyrosine kinase inhibitor genestein. Genestein also reduced LPS-stimulated protein kinase C activity but did not affect the response to the protein kinase C activator, tetradecanoylphorbol acetate (TPA). 6. Nicotinamide, an inhibitor of poly-ADP ribosylation, abolished LPS- and IFN gamma-induced NOS activity. 7. Brefeldin A, an inhibitor of a factor which stimulates nucleotide exchange activity on the 21 kDa ADP-ribosylation factor, ARF, reduced LPS- and IFN gamma-induced NOS activity by approximately 80%. 8. These results suggest the involvement of protein kinase C, tyrosine kinase and poly-ADP ribosylation pathways in the regulation of the induction of nitric oxide synthase in RAW 264.7 macrophages by LPS and IFN gamma. Images Figure 2 PMID:7533621

  11. Natural variation in ARF18 gene simultaneously affects seed weight and silique length in polyploid rapeseed.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Hua, Wei; Hu, Zhiyong; Yang, Hongli; Zhang, Liang; Li, Rongjun; Deng, Linbin; Sun, Xingchao; Wang, Xinfa; Wang, Hanzhong

    2015-09-15

    Seed weight (SW), which is one of the three major factors influencing grain yield, has been widely accepted as a complex trait that is controlled by polygenes, particularly in polyploid crops. Brassica napus L., which is the second leading crop source for vegetable oil around the world, is a tetraploid (4×) species. In the present study, we identified a major quantitative trait locus (QTL) on chromosome A9 of rapeseed in which the genes for SW and silique length (SL) were colocated. By fine mapping and association analysis, we uncovered a 165-bp deletion in the auxin-response factor 18 (ARF18) gene associated with increased SW and SL. ARF18 encodes an auxin-response factor and shows inhibitory activity on downstream auxin genes. This 55-aa deletion prevents ARF18 from forming homodimers, in turn resulting in the loss of binding activity. Furthermore, reciprocal crossing has shown that this QTL affects SW by maternal effects. Transcription analysis has shown that ARF18 regulates cell growth in the silique wall by acting via an auxin-response pathway. Together, our results suggest that ARF18 regulates silique wall development and determines SW via maternal regulation. In addition, our study reveals the first (to our knowledge) QTL in rapeseed and may provide insights into gene cloning involving polyploid crops. PMID:26324896

  12. Natural variation in ARF18 gene simultaneously affects seed weight and silique length in polyploid rapeseed

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Hua, Wei; Hu, Zhiyong; Yang, Hongli; Zhang, Liang; Li, Rongjun; Deng, Linbin; Sun, Xingchao; Wang, Xinfa; Wang, Hanzhong

    2015-01-01

    Seed weight (SW), which is one of the three major factors influencing grain yield, has been widely accepted as a complex trait that is controlled by polygenes, particularly in polyploid crops. Brassica napus L., which is the second leading crop source for vegetable oil around the world, is a tetraploid (4×) species. In the present study, we identified a major quantitative trait locus (QTL) on chromosome A9 of rapeseed in which the genes for SW and silique length (SL) were colocated. By fine mapping and association analysis, we uncovered a 165-bp deletion in the auxin-response factor 18 (ARF18) gene associated with increased SW and SL. ARF18 encodes an auxin-response factor and shows inhibitory activity on downstream auxin genes. This 55-aa deletion prevents ARF18 from forming homodimers, in turn resulting in the loss of binding activity. Furthermore, reciprocal crossing has shown that this QTL affects SW by maternal effects. Transcription analysis has shown that ARF18 regulates cell growth in the silique wall by acting via an auxin-response pathway. Together, our results suggest that ARF18 regulates silique wall development and determines SW via maternal regulation. In addition, our study reveals the first (to our knowledge) QTL in rapeseed and may provide insights into gene cloning involving polyploid crops. PMID:26324896

  13. Genetic interactions in yeast between Ypt GTPases and Arf guanine nucleotide exchangers.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, S; Jedd, G; Kahn, R A; Franzusoff, A; Bartolini, F; Segev, N

    1999-01-01

    Two families of GTPases, Arfs and Ypt/rabs, are key regulators of vesicular transport. While Arf proteins are implicated in vesicle budding from the donor compartment, Ypt/rab proteins are involved in the targeting of vesicles to the acceptor compartment. Recently, we have shown a role for Ypt31/32p in exit from the yeast trans-Golgi, suggesting a possible function for Ypt/rab proteins in vesicle budding as well. Here we report the identification of a new member of the Sec7-domain family, SYT1, as a high-copy suppressor of a ypt31/32 mutation. Several proteins that belong to the Sec7-domain family, including the yeast Gea1p, have recently been shown to stimulate nucleotide exchange by Arf GTPases. Nucleotide exchange by Arf GTPases, the switch from the GDP- to the GTP-bound form, is thought to be crucial for their function. Sec7p itself has an important role in the yeast secretory pathway. However, its mechanism of action is not yet understood. We show that all members of the Sec7-domain family exhibit distinct genetic interactions with the YPT genes. Biochemical assays demonstrate that, although the homology between the members of the Sec7-domain family is relatively low (20-35%) and limited to a small domain, they all can act as guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) for Arf proteins, but not for Ypt GTPases. The Sec7-domain of Sec7p is sufficient for this activity. Interestingly, the Sec7 domain activity is inhibited by brefeldin A (BFA), a fungal metabolite that inhibits some of the Arf-GEFs, indicating that this domain is a target for BFA. These results demonstrate that the ability to act as Arf-GEFs is a general property of all Sec7-domain proteins in yeast. The genetic interactions observed between Arf GEFs and Ypt GTPases suggest the existence of a Ypt-Arf GTPase cascade in the secretory pathway. PMID:10430582

  14. Transcriptional Coactivator Cited2 Induces Bmi1 and Mel18 and Controls Fibroblast Proliferation via Ink4a/ARF

    PubMed Central

    Kranc, Kamil R.; Bamforth, Simon D.; Bragança, José; Norbury, Chris; van Lohuizen, Maarten; Bhattacharya, Shoumo

    2003-01-01

    Cited2 (CBP/p300 interacting transactivator with ED-rich tail 2) is required for embryonic development, coactivation of transcription factor AP-2, and inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 transactivation. Cited2 is induced by multiple growth factors and cytokines and oncogenically transforms cells. Here, we show that the proliferation of Cited2−/− mouse embryonic fibroblasts ceases prematurely. This is associated with a reduction in growth fraction, senescent cellular morphology, and increased expression of the cell proliferation inhibitors p16INK4a, p19ARF, and p15INK4b. Deletion of INK4a/ARF (encoding p16INK4a and p19ARF) completely rescued the defective proliferation of Cited2−/− fibroblasts. However, the deletion of INK4a/ARF did not rescue the embryonic malformations observed in Cited2−/− mice, indicating that INK4a/ARF-independent pathways are likely to be involved here. We found that Cited2−/− fibroblasts had reduced expression of the polycomb-group genes Bmi1 and Mel18, which function as INK4a/ARF and Hox repressors. Complementation with CITED2-expressing retrovirus enhanced proliferation, induced Bmi1/Mel18 expression, and decreased INK4a/ARF expression. Bmi1- and Mel18-expressing retroviruses enhanced the proliferation of Cited2−/− fibroblasts, indicating that they function downstream of Cited2. Our results provide genetic evidence that Cited2 controls the expression of INK4a/ARF and fibroblast proliferation, at least in part via the polycomb-group genes Bmi1 and Mel18. PMID:14560011

  15. Novel ArF photoresist polymer to suppress the roughness formation in plasma etching processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Keisuke; Yasuda, Atsushi; Maeda, Shin-ichi; Uesugi, Takuji; Okada, Takeru; Wada, Akira; Samukawa, Seiji

    2013-03-01

    The serious problem associated with 193-nm lithography using an ArF photoresist is roughness formation of photoresist polymer during plasma processes. We have previously investigated the mechanism of roughness formation caused by plasma. The main deciding factor for roughness formation is a chemical reaction between photoresist polymer and reactive species from plasma. The lactone group in photoresist polymer is highly chemically reactive, and shrinking the lactone structure enhances the roughness formation. In this paper, on the basis of the mechanism of roughness formation, we propose a novel ArF photoresist polymer. The roughness formation was much more suppressed in the novel photoresist polymer during plasma etching process than in the previous type. In the novel photoresist polymer, chemical reactions were spread evenly on the photoresist film surface by adding the polar structure. As a result, decreases in the lactone group were inhibited, leading to suppressing ArF photoresist roughness.

  16. The effects of polymer side-chain structure on roughness formation of ArF photoresist in plasma etching processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uesugi, Takuji; Okada, Takeru; Wada, Akira; Kato, Keisuke; Yasuda, Atsushi; Maeda, Shinichi; Samukawa, Seiji

    2012-02-01

    Low etching resistance and roughness formation of ArF photoresist during plasma etching are serious problems. We have previously found that decisive factors affecting the plasma resistance and roughness formation in an ArF photoresist are determined by ultraviolet/vacuum ultraviolet radiation and roughness formation is dominated by chemical reactions. In this paper, on the basis of our previous findings on the interaction between radiation species from plasma and ArF photoresist polymers, we investigated the polymer structural dependence for the degradation mechanism of ArF photoresist in the plasma etching processes. The etching resistance of ArF photoresist was improved by controlling the elemental ratio of oxygen atoms and ring structures in photoresist polymer. Furthermore, lactone C=O bond is found to be a key factor for roughness formation during the etching process. We have revealed the importance of the molecular structure of ArF photoresist for improving the surface roughness and etching resistance during the plasma etching process.

  17. The structural basis of Arf effector specificity: the crystal structure of ARF6 in a complex with JIP4

    PubMed Central

    Isabet, Tatiana; Montagnac, Guillaume; Regazzoni, Karine; Raynal, Bertrand; Khadali, Fatima El; England, Patrick; Franco, Michel; Chavrier, Philippe; Houdusse, Anne; Ménétrey, Julie

    2009-01-01

    The JNK-interacting proteins, JIP3 and JIP4, are specific effectors of the small GTP-binding protein ARF6. The interaction of ARF6–GTP with the second leucine zipper (LZII) domains of JIP3/JIP4 regulates the binding of JIPs to kinesin-1 and dynactin. Here, we report the crystal structure of ARF6–GTP bound to the JIP4-LZII at 1.9 Å resolution. The complex is a heterotetramer with dyad symmetry arranged in an ARF6–(JIP4)2–ARF6 configuration. Comparison of the ARF6–JIP4 interface with the equivalent region of ARF1 shows the structural basis of JIP4's specificity for ARF6. Using site-directed mutagenesis and surface plasmon resonance, we further show that non-conserved residues at the switch region borders are the key structural determinants of JIP4 specificity. A structure-derived model of the association of the ARF6–JIP3/JIP4 complex with membranes shows that the JIP4-LZII coiled-coil should lie along the membrane to prevent steric hindrances, resulting in only one ARF6 molecule bound. Such a heterotrimeric complex gives insights to better understand the ARF6-mediated motor switch regulatory function. PMID:19644450

  18. MDM2-Mediated Degradation of p14ARF: A Novel Mechanism to Control ARF Levels in Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vivo, Maria; Matarese, Maria; Sepe, Maria; Di Martino, Rosaria; Festa, Luisa; Calabrò, Viola; Mantia, Girolama La; Pollice, Alessandra

    2015-01-01

    We here show a new relationship between the human p14ARF oncosuppressor and the MDM2 oncoprotein. MDM2 overexpression in various cancer cell lines causes p14ARF reduction inducing its degradation through the proteasome. The effect does not require the ubiquitin ligase activity of MDM2 and preferentially occurs in the cytoplasm. Interestingly, treatment with inhibitors of the PKC (Protein Kinase C) pathway and use of p14ARF phosphorylation mutants indicate that ARF phosphorylation could play a role in MDM2 mediated ARF degradation reinforcing our previous observations that ARF phosphorylation influences its stability and biological activity. Our study uncovers a new potentially important mechanism through which ARF and MDM2 can counterbalance each other during the tumorigenic process. PMID:25723571

  19. Snf1/AMP-activated protein kinase activates Arf3p to promote invasive yeast growth via a non-canonical GEF domain

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Jia-Wei; Chen, Kuan-Jung; Lee, Fang-Jen S.

    2015-01-01

    Active GTP-bound Arf GTPases promote eukaryotic cell membrane trafficking and cytoskeletal remodelling. Arf activation is accelerated by guanine nucleotide-exchange factors (GEFs) using the critical catalytic glutamate in all known Sec7 domain sequences. Yeast Arf3p, a homologue of mammalian Arf6, is required for yeast invasive responses to glucose depletion. Here we identify Snf1p as a GEF that activates Arf3p when energy is limited. SNF1 is the yeast homologue of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), which is a key regulator of cellular energy homeostasis. As activation of Arf3p does not depend on the Snf1p kinase domain, assay of regulatory domain fragments yield evidence that the C-terminal hydrophobic α-helix core of Snf1p is a non-canonical GEF for Arf3p activation. Thus, our study reveals a novel mechanism for regulating cellular responses to energy deprivation, in particular invasive cell growth, through direct Arf activation by Snf1/AMPK. PMID:26198097

  20. Regulators and Effectors of Arf GTPases in Neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    Gamara, Jouda; Chouinard, François; Davis, Lynn; Aoudjit, Fawzi; Bourgoin, Sylvain G.

    2015-01-01

    Polymorphonuclear neutrophils (PMNs) are key innate immune cells that represent the first line of defence against infection. They are the first leukocytes to migrate from the blood to injured or infected sites. This process involves molecular mechanisms that coordinate cell polarization, delivery of receptors, and activation of integrins at the leading edge of migrating PMNs. These phagocytes actively engulf microorganisms or form neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) to trap and kill pathogens with bactericidal compounds. Association of the NADPH oxidase complex at the phagosomal membrane for production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and delivery of proteolytic enzymes into the phagosome initiate pathogen killing and removal. G protein-dependent signalling pathways tightly control PMN functions. In this review, we will focus on the small monomeric GTPases of the Arf family and their guanine exchange factors (GEFs) and GTPase activating proteins (GAPs) as components of signalling cascades regulating PMN responses. GEFs and GAPs are multidomain proteins that control cellular events in time and space through interaction with other proteins and lipids inside the cells. The number of Arf GAPs identified in PMNs is expanding, and dissecting their functions will provide important insights into the role of these proteins in PMN physiology. PMID:26609537

  1. Deregulation of the OsmiR160 Target Gene OsARF18 Causes Growth and Developmental Defects with an Alteration of Auxin Signaling in Rice.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jian; Li, Zhiyong; Zhao, Dazhong

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) control gene expression as key negative regulators at the post-transcriptional level. MiR160 plays a pivotal role in Arabidopsis growth and development through repressing expression of its target AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR (ARF) genes; however, the function of miR160 in monocots remains elusive. In this study, we found that the mature rice miR160 (OsmiR160) was mainly derived from OsMIR160a and OsMIR160b genes. Among four potential OsmiR160 target OsARF genes, the OsARF18 transcript was cleaved at the OsmiR160 target site. Rice transgenic plants (named mOsARF18) expressing an OsmiR160-resistant version of OsARF18 exhibited pleiotropic defects in growth and development, including dwarf stature, rolled leaves, and small seeds. mOsARF18 leaves were abnormal in bulliform cell differentiation and epidermal cell division. Starch accumulation in mOsARF18 seeds was also reduced. Moreover, auxin induced expression of OsMIR160a, OsMIR160b, and OsARF18, whereas expression of OsMIR160a and OsMIR160b as well as genes involved in auxin signaling was altered in mOsARF18 plants. Our results show that negative regulation of OsARF18 expression by OsmiR160 is critical for rice growth and development via affecting auxin signaling, which will advance future studies on the molecular mechanism by which miR160 fine-tunes auxin signaling in plants. PMID:27444058

  2. Deregulation of the OsmiR160 Target Gene OsARF18 Causes Growth and Developmental Defects with an Alteration of Auxin Signaling in Rice

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jian; Li, Zhiyong; Zhao, Dazhong

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) control gene expression as key negative regulators at the post-transcriptional level. MiR160 plays a pivotal role in Arabidopsis growth and development through repressing expression of its target AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR (ARF) genes; however, the function of miR160 in monocots remains elusive. In this study, we found that the mature rice miR160 (OsmiR160) was mainly derived from OsMIR160a and OsMIR160b genes. Among four potential OsmiR160 target OsARF genes, the OsARF18 transcript was cleaved at the OsmiR160 target site. Rice transgenic plants (named mOsARF18) expressing an OsmiR160-resistant version of OsARF18 exhibited pleiotropic defects in growth and development, including dwarf stature, rolled leaves, and small seeds. mOsARF18 leaves were abnormal in bulliform cell differentiation and epidermal cell division. Starch accumulation in mOsARF18 seeds was also reduced. Moreover, auxin induced expression of OsMIR160a, OsMIR160b, and OsARF18, whereas expression of OsMIR160a and OsMIR160b as well as genes involved in auxin signaling was altered in mOsARF18 plants. Our results show that negative regulation of OsARF18 expression by OsmiR160 is critical for rice growth and development via affecting auxin signaling, which will advance future studies on the molecular mechanism by which miR160 fine-tunes auxin signaling in plants. PMID:27444058

  3. Rab11-FIP3 is a Rab11-binding protein that regulates breast cancer cell motility by modulating the actin cytoskeleton

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Jian; Tarbutton, Elizabeth; Wilson, Gayle; Prekeris, Rytis

    2009-01-01

    Cell adhesion and motility are very dynamic processes that require the temporal and spatial coordination of many cellular structures. ADP-ribosylation factor 6 (Arf6) has emerged as master regulator of endocytic membrane traffic and cytoskeletal dynamics during cell movement. Recently, a novel Arf6-binding protein known as FIP3/arfophilin/eferin has been identified. In addition to Arf6, FIP3 also interacts with Rab11, a small monomeric GTPase that regulates endocytic membrane transport. Both Arf6 and Rab11 GTPases have been implicated in regulation of cell motility. Here we test the role of FIP3 in breast carcinoma cell motility. First, we demonstrate that FIP3 is associated with recycling endosomes that are present at the leading edge of motile cells. Second, we show that FIP3 is required for the motility of MDA-MB-231 breast carcinoma cells. Third, we demonstrate that FIP3 regulates Rac1-dependent actin cytoskeleton dynamics and modulates the formation and ruffling of lamellipodia. Finally, we demonstrate that FIP3 regulates the localization of Arf6 at the plasma membrane of MDA-MB-231 cells. Based on our data we propose that FIP3 affects cell motility by regulating Arf6 localization to the plasma membrane of the leading edge, thus regulating polarized Rac1 activation and actin dynamics. PMID:19327867

  4. The Arf family G protein Arl1 is required for secretory granule biogenesis in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Isabel L.; Rosa-Ferreira, Cláudia; Munro, Sean

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The small G protein Arf like 1 (Arl1) is found at the Golgi complex, and its GTP-bound form recruits several effectors to the Golgi including GRIP-domain-containing coiled-coil proteins, and the Arf1 exchange factors Big1 and Big2. To investigate the role of Arl1, we have characterised a loss-of-function mutant of the Drosophila Arl1 orthologue. The gene is essential, and examination of clones of cells lacking Arl1 shows that it is required for recruitment of three of the four GRIP domain golgins to the Golgi, with Drosophila GCC185 being less dependent on Arl1. At a functional level, Arl1 is essential for formation of secretory granules in the larval salivary gland. When Arl1 is missing, Golgi are still present but there is a dispersal of adaptor protein 1 (AP-1), a clathrin adaptor that requires Arf1 for its membrane recruitment and which is known to be required for secretory granule biogenesis. Arl1 does not appear to be required for AP-1 recruitment in all tissues, suggesting that it is crucially required to enhance Arf1 activation at the trans-Golgi in particular tissues. PMID:24610947

  5. Rab, Arf, and Arl-Regulated Membrane Traffic in Cortical Neuron Migration.

    PubMed

    Tang, Bor Luen

    2016-07-01

    The migration of projection neurons from its birthplace in the subventricular zone to their final destination in the cortical plate is a complex process that requires a series of highly coordinated cellular events. Amongst the key factors involved in the processes are modulators of cytoskeletal dynamics, as well as cellular membrane traffic. Members of the small GTPases family responsible for the latter process, the Rabs and Arfs, have been recently implicated in cortical neuron migration. Rab5 and Rab11, which are key modulators of endocytosis and endocytic recycling respectively, ensure proper surface expression and distribution of N-cadherin, a key adhesion protein that tethers migrating neurons to the radial glia fiber tracts during pia-directed migration. Rab7, which is associated with lysosomal biogenesis and function, is important for the final step of terminal translocation when N-cadherin is downregulated by lysosomal degradation. Arf6 activity, which is known to be important in neuronal processes outgrowth, may negatively impact the multipolar-bipolar transition of cortical neurons undergoing radial migration, but the downstream effector of Arf6 in this regard is not yet known. In addition to the above, members of the Arl family which have been recently shown to be important in radial glia scaffold formation, would also be important for cortical neuron migration. In this short review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of the importance of membrane traffic regulated by the Rab, Arf, and Arl family members in cortical neuron migration. PMID:26587959

  6. Brefeldin A-inhibited guanine exchange factor 2 regulates filamin A phosphorylation and neuronal migration.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingping; Neal, Jason; Lian, Gewei; Shi, Bingxing; Ferland, Russell J; Sheen, Volney

    2012-09-01

    Periventricular heterotopia (PH) is a human malformation of cortical development associated with gene mutations in ADP-ribosylation factor guanine exchange factor 2 (ARFGEF2 encodes for Big2 protein) and Filamin A (FLNA). PH is thought to derive from neuroependymal disruption, but the extent to which neuronal migration contributes to this phenotype is unknown. Here, we show that Arfgef2 null mice develop PH and exhibit impaired neural migration with increased protein expression for both FlnA and phosphoFlnA at Ser2152. Big2 physically interacts with FlnA and overexpression of phosphomimetic Ser2512 FLNA impairs neuronal migration. FlnA phosphorylation directs FlnA localization toward the cell cytoplasm, diminishes its binding affinity to actin skeleton, and alters the number and size of paxillin focal adhesions. Collectively, our results demonstrate a molecular mechanism whereby Big2 inhibition promotes phosphoFlnA (Ser2152) expression, and increased phosphoFlnA impairs its actin binding affinity and the distribution of focal adhesions, thereby disrupting cell intrinsic neuronal migration. PMID:22956851

  7. M-COPA, a novel Golgi system disruptor, suppresses apoptosis induced by Shiga toxin.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Takayuki; Watanabe-Takahashi, Miho; Shiina, Isamu; Ohashi, Yoshimi; Dan, Shingo; Nishikawa, Kiyotaka; Yamori, Takao; Naito, Mikihiko

    2016-08-01

    Shiga toxin (Stx) is a main virulence factor of Stx-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) that contributes to diarrhea and hemorrhagic colitis and occasionally to fatal systemic complications. Therefore, the development of an antidote to neutralize Stx toxicity is urgently needed. After internalization into cells, Stx is transferred to the Golgi apparatus via a retrograde vesicular transport system. We report here that 2-methylcoprophilinamide (M-COPA), a compound that induces disassembly of the Golgi apparatus by inactivating ADP-ribosylation factor 1 (Arf1), suppresses Stx-induced apoptosis. M-COPA inhibited transport of Stx from the plasma membrane to the Golgi apparatus and suppressed degradation of anti-apoptotic proteins and the activation of caspases. These findings suggest that inhibition of Stx retrograde transport by M-COPA could be a novel approach to suppress Stx toxicity. PMID:27302278

  8. Analysis of a 26,756 bp segment from the left arm of yeast chromosome IV.

    PubMed

    Wölfl, S; Hanemann, V; Saluz, H P

    1996-12-01

    The nucleotide sequence of a 26.7 kb DNA segment from the left arm of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosome IV is presented. An analysis of this segment revealed 11 open reading frames (ORFs) longer than 300 bp and one split gene. These ORFs include the genes encoding the large subunit of RNA polymerase II, the biotin apo-protein ligase, an ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF 2), the 'L35'-ribosomal protein, a rho GDP dissociation factor, and the sequence encoding the protein phosphatase 2A. Further sequence analysis revealed a short ORF encoding the ribosomal protein YL41B, an intron in a 5' untranslated region and an extended homology with another cosmid (X83276) located on the same chromosome. The potential biological relevance of these findings is discussed. PMID:8972577

  9. Comparison study for sub-0.13-μm lithography between ArF and KrF lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seok-Kyun; Kim, YoungSik; Kim, Jin-Soo; Bok, Cheol-Kyu; Ham, Young-Mog; Baik, Ki-Ho

    2000-07-01

    In this paper we investigated the feasibility of printing sub-0.13 micrometers device patterns with ArF and KrF lithography by using experiment and simulation. To do this we evaluated various cell structures with different sizes from 0.26 micrometers to 0.20 micrometers pitch. In experiment 0.60NA ArF and 0.70NA KrF exposure tools, commercial and in house resists and bottom anti-reflective coating (BARC) materials are used. To predict and compare with experimental data we also used our developed simulation tool HOST base don diffused aerial iamge model. We found that ArF lithography performance is a little bit better than KrF and therefore 0.70NA KrF lithography can be used up to 0.12 micrometers design rule device and 0.60NA ArF lithography can be used up to 0.11 micrometers . But to get more than 10 percent expose latitude, 0.13 micrometers with KrF and 0.12 micrometers with ArF are the minimum design rule size. However to obtain process margin we had to use extreme off-axis illumination (OAI) which results in large isolated- dense bias and poor linearity including isolated pattern. Using higher NA can reduce ID bias and mask error factor. For contact hole it is more effective to use KrF lithography because resist thermal flow process can be used to shrink C/H size. Our developed ArF resist and BARC shows good performance and we can reduce k1 value up to 0.34. Through this study we verified again that ArF lithography can be applied for sub-0.13 micrometers device through sub-0.10 micrometers with high contrast resist and 0.75NA exposure tool.

  10. The small GTPase Arf1 modulates mitochondrial morphology and function

    PubMed Central

    Ackema, Karin B; Hench, Jürgen; Böckler, Stefan; Wang, Shyi Chyi; Sauder, Ursula; Mergentaler, Heidi; Westermann, Benedikt; Bard, Frédéric; Frank, Stephan; Spang, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The small GTPase Arf1 plays critical roles in membrane traffic by initiating the recruitment of coat proteins and by modulating the activity of lipid-modifying enzymes. Here, we report an unexpected but evolutionarily conserved role for Arf1 and the ArfGEF GBF1 at mitochondria. Loss of function of ARF-1 or GBF-1 impaired mitochondrial morphology and activity in Caenorhabditis elegans. Similarly, mitochondrial defects were observed in mammalian and yeast cells. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, aberrant clusters of the mitofusin Fzo1 accumulated in arf1-11 mutants and were resolved by overexpression of Cdc48, an AAA-ATPase involved in ER and mitochondria-associated degradation processes. Yeast Arf1 co-fractionated with ER and mitochondrial membranes and interacted genetically with the contact site component Gem1. Furthermore, similar mitochondrial abnormalities resulted from knockdown of either GBF-1 or contact site components in worms, suggesting that the role of Arf1 in mitochondrial functioning is linked to ER–mitochondrial contacts. Thus, Arf1 is involved in mitochondrial homeostasis and dynamics, independent of its role in vesicular traffic. PMID:25190516

  11. Quantitative assessment of higher-order chromatin structure of the INK4/ARF locus in human senescent cells.

    PubMed

    Hirosue, Akiyuki; Ishihara, Ko; Tokunaga, Kazuaki; Watanabe, Takehisa; Saitoh, Noriko; Nakamoto, Masafumi; Chandra, Tamir; Narita, Masashi; Shinohara, Masanori; Nakao, Mitsuyoshi

    2012-06-01

    Somatic cells can be reset to oncogene-induced senescent (OIS) cells or induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells by expressing specified factors. The INK4/ARF locus encodes p15(INK4b) , ARF, and p16(INK4a) genes in human chromosome 9p21, the products of which are known as common key reprogramming regulators. Compared with growing fibroblasts, the CCCTC-binding factor CTCF is remarkably up-regulated in iPS cells with silencing of the three genes in the locus and is reversely down-regulated in OIS cells with high expression of p15(INK4b) and p16(INK4a) genes. There are at least three CTCF-enriched sites in the INK4/ARF locus, which possess chromatin loop-forming activities. These CTCF-enriched sites and the p16(INK4a) promoter associate to form compact chromatin loops in growing fibroblasts, while CTCF depletion disrupts the loop structure. Interestingly, the loose chromatin structure is found in OIS cells. In addition, the INK4/ARF locus has an intermediate type of chromatin compaction in iPS cells. These results suggest that senescent cells have distinct higher-order chromatin signature in the INK4/ARF locus. PMID:22340434

  12. Disruption of the ARF transcriptional activator DMP1 facilitates cell immortalization, Ras transformation, and tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Kazushi; Wen, Renren; Rehg, Jerold E.; Adachi, Masashi; Cleveland, John L.; Roussel, Martine F.; Sherr, Charles J.

    2000-01-01

    The DMP1 transcription factor induces the ARF tumor suppressor gene in mouse fibroblasts, leading to cell cycle arrest in a p53-dependent manner. We disrupted sequences encoding the DNA-binding domain of DMP1 in mouse embryonic stem cells and derived animals lacking the functional protein. DMP1-null animals are small at birth, and males develop more slowly than their wild-type littermates. Some adult animals exhibit seizures and/or obstuctive uropathy, each of unknown cause. The growth of explanted DMP1-null mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) is progressively retarded as cells are passaged in culture on defined transfer protocols; but, unlike the behavior of normal cells, p19ARF, Mdm2, and p53 levels remain relatively low and DMP1-null MEFs do not senesce. Whereas the establishment of cell lines from MEFs is usually always accompanied by either p53 or ARF loss of function, continuously passaged DMP1-null cells readily give rise to established 3T3 and 3T9 cell lines that retain wild-type ARF and functional p53 genes. Early-passage DMP1-null cells, like MEFs from either ARF-null or p53-null mice, can be morphologically transformed by oncogenic Ha-Ras (Val-12) alone. Splenic lymphocytes harvested from both DMP1-null and ARF-null mice exhibit enhanced proliferative responses in long-term cultures when stimulated to divide with antibody to CD3 and interleukin-2. Although only 1 of 40 DMP1-null animals spontaneously developed a tumor in the first year of life, neonatal treatment with dimethylbenzanthracene or ionizing radiation induced tumors of various histologic types that were not observed in similarly treated DMP1+/+ animals. Karyotypic analyses of MEFs and lymphomas from DMP1-null animals revealed pseudodiploid chromosome numbers, consistent with the retention of wild-type p53. Together, these data suggest that ARF function is compromised, but not eliminated, in animals lacking functional DMP1. PMID:10898794

  13. Immersion and dry ArF scanners enabling 22nm HP production and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uehara, Yusaku; Ishikawa, Jun; Kohno, Hirotaka; Tanaka, Eiichiro; Ohba, Masanori; Shibazaki, Yuichi

    2012-03-01

    Pattern shrinks using multiple patterning techniques will continue to the 22nm half pitch (HP) node and beyond. The cutting-edge Nikon NSR-S621D immersion lithography tool, which builds upon the technology advancements of the NSR-S620D [1], was developed to satisfy the aggressive requirements for the 22 nm HP node and subsequent generations. The key design challenge for the S621D was to deliver further improvements to product overlay performance and CD uniformity, while also providing increased productivity. Since many different products are made within an IC manufacturing facility, various wafer process-related issues, including the flatness or grid distortion of the processed wafers and exposure-induced heating had to be addressed. Upgrades and enhancements were made to the S620D hardware and software systems to enable the S621D to minimize these process-related effects and deliver the necessary scanner performance. To enable continued process technology advancements, in addition to pattern shrinks at the most critical layers, resolution for less critical layers must also be improved proportionally. As a result, increased demand for dry ArF instead of KrF scanners is expected for less critical layers, and dry ArF tools are already being employed for some of these applications. Further, multiple patterning techniques, such as sidewall double patterning, actually enable use of dry ArF instead of immersion scanners for some critical layers having relaxed pattern resolution requirements. However, in order for this to be successful, the ArF dry tool must deliver overlay performance that is comparable to the latest generation immersion systems. Understanding these factors, an ArF dry scanner that has excellent overlay performance could be used effectively for critical layers and markedly improve cost of ownership (CoO). Therefore, Nikon has developed the NSR-S320F, a new dry ArF scanner also built upon the proven S620D Streamlign platform. By incorporating the

  14. Modulation of transmembrane signalling in HL-60 granulocytes by tumour necrosis factor-alpha.

    PubMed Central

    McLeish, K R; Klein, J B; Schepers, T; Sonnenfeld, G

    1991-01-01

    Differentiated HL-60 granulocytes were used to study the mechanism by which tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) enhances responses to N-formyl-methionyl-leucylphenylalanine (FMLP). Cultivation of differentiated HL-60 cells with 100 units of TNF/ml for 24 h resulted in a 3-fold increase in superoxide release and 4-fold increase in prostaglandin E2 production on stimulation with 1 microM-FMLP. On the other hand, cultivation with TNF failed to increase phorbol diester stimulation of superoxide release. Formyl-peptide-receptor expression determined on isolated membranes from cells cultivated with TNF (TNF-M) was increased by 50% compared with membranes from control cells (NM). Similarly, FMLP binding to intact HL-60 cells was increased by cultivation with TNF. Guanine-nucleotide-binding proteins (G-protein) levels were not different between TNF-M and NM, as determined by pertussis-toxin-catalysed ADP-ribosylation and by immunoblotting with antisera recognizing alpha i2 subunit. Binding of guanosine 5'-[gamma-thio]triphosphate and GTP hydrolysis stimulated by FMLP were enhanced by about 50% in TNF-M. The efficiency of G-protein activation by formyl-peptide receptors did not differ between TNF-M and NM. TNF regulates expression of formyl-peptide receptors independently of G-protein levels. The regulation of receptor expression is one mechanism by which TNF enhances cell responses to formylated peptides. Images Fig. 4. PMID:1659380

  15. Wnt Signaling in Cell Motility and Invasion: Drawing Parallels between Development and Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sedgwick, Alanna E; D'Souza-Schorey, Crislyn

    2016-01-01

    The importance of canonical and non-canonical Wnt signal transduction cascades in embryonic development and tissue homeostasis is well recognized. The aberrant activation of these pathways in the adult leads to abnormal cellular behaviors, and tumor progression is frequently a consequence. Here we discuss recent findings and analogies between Wnt signaling in developmental processes and tumor progression, with a particular focus on cell motility and matrix invasion and highlight the roles of the ARF (ADP-Ribosylation Factor) and Rho-family small GTP-binding proteins. Wnt-regulated signal transduction from cell surface receptors, signaling endosomes and/or extracellular vesicles has the potential to profoundly influence cell movement, matrix degradation and paracrine signaling in both development and disease. PMID:27589803

  16. Structural Insights into Arl1-Mediated Targeting of the Arf-GEF BIG1 to the trans-Golgi.

    PubMed

    Galindo, Antonio; Soler, Nicolas; McLaughlin, Stephen H; Yu, Minmin; Williams, Roger L; Munro, Sean

    2016-07-19

    The GTPase Arf1 is the major regulator of vesicle traffic at both the cis- and trans-Golgi. Arf1 is activated at the cis-Golgi by the guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) GBF1 and at the trans-Golgi by the related GEF BIG1 or its paralog, BIG2. The trans-Golgi-specific targeting of BIG1 and BIG2 depends on the Arf-like GTPase Arl1. We find that Arl1 binds to the dimerization and cyclophilin binding (DCB) domain in BIG1 and report a crystal structure of human Arl1 bound to this domain. Residues in the DCB domain that bind Arl1 are required for BIG1 to locate to the Golgi in vivo. DCB domain-binding residues in Arl1 have a distinct conformation from those in known Arl1-effector complexes, and this plasticity allows Arl1 to interact with different effectors of unrelated structure. The findings provide structural insight into how Arf1 GEFs, and hence active Arf1, achieve their correct subcellular distribution. PMID:27373159

  17. Genome-wide CRISPR screen reveals novel host factors required for Staphylococcus aureus α-hemolysin-mediated toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Virreira Winter, Sebastian; Zychlinsky, Arturo; Bardoel, Bart W.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus causes a wide variety of infections and antibiotic resistant strains are a major problem in hospitals. One of the best studied virulence factors of S. aureus is the pore-forming toxin alpha hemolysin (αHL) whose mechanism of action is incompletely understood. We performed a genome-wide loss-of-function screen using CRISPR/Cas9 technology to identify host targets required for αHL susceptibility in human myeloid cells. We found gRNAs for ten genes enriched after intoxication with αHL and focused on the top five hits. Besides a disintegrin and metalloproteinase domain-containing protein 10 (ADAM10), the host receptor for αHL, we identified three proteins, Sys1 golgi trafficking protein (SYS1), ADP-ribosylation factor 1 (ARFRP1), and tetraspanin-14 (TSPAN14) which regulate the presentation of ADAM10 on the plasma membrane post-translationally. Interestingly, we also showed that cells lacking sphingomyelin synthase 1 (SGMS1) resist αHL intoxication, but have only a slightly reduced ADAM10 surface expression. SGMS1 regulates lipid raft formation, suggesting that αHL requires these membrane microdomains for attachment and cytotoxicity. PMID:27066838

  18. Auxin response factors.

    PubMed

    Chandler, John William

    2016-05-01

    Auxin signalling involves the activation or repression of gene expression by a class of auxin response factor (ARF) proteins that bind to auxin response elements in auxin-responsive gene promoters. The release of ARF repression in the presence of auxin by the degradation of their cognate auxin/indole-3-acetic acid repressors forms a paradigm of transcriptional response to auxin. However, this mechanism only applies to activating ARFs, and further layers of complexity of ARF function and regulation are being revealed, which partly reflect their highly modular domain structure. This review summarizes our knowledge concerning ARF binding site specificity, homodimer and heterodimer multimeric ARF association and cooperative function and how activator ARFs activate target genes via chromatin remodelling and evolutionary information derived from phylogenetic comparisons from ARFs from diverse species. ARFs are regulated in diverse ways, and their importance in non-auxin-regulated pathways is becoming evident. They are also embedded within higher-order transcription factor complexes that integrate signalling pathways from other hormones and in response to the environment. The ways in which new information concerning ARFs on many levels is causing a revision of existing paradigms of auxin response are discussed. PMID:26487015

  19. Nucleostemin stabilizes ARF by inhibiting the ubiquitin ligase ULF.

    PubMed

    Lo, D; Zhang, Y; Dai, M-S; Sun, X-X; Zeng, S X; Lu, H

    2015-03-26

    Upregulated expression of nucleolar GTPase nucleostemin (NS) has been associated with increased cellular proliferation potential and tumor malignancy during cancer development. Recent reports attribute the growth regulatory effects of NS protein to its role in facilitating ribosome production. However, the oncogenic potential of NS remains unclear, as imbalanced levels of NS have been reported to exert growth inhibitory effect by modulating p53 tumor-suppressor activity. It also remains in questions if aberrant NS levels might have a p53-independent role in regulation of cell proliferation and growth. In this study, we performed affinity purification and mass spectrometry analysis to explore protein-protein interactions influencing NS growth regulatory properties independently of p53 tumor suppressor. We identified the alternative reading frame (ARF) protein as a key protein associating with NS and further verified the interaction through in vitro and in vivo assays. We demonstrated that NS is able to regulate cell cycle progression by regulating the stability of the ARF tumor suppressor. Furthermore, overexpression of NS suppressed ARF polyubiquitination by its E3 ligase Ubiquitin Ligase for ARF and elongated its half-life, whereas knockdown of NS led to the decrease of ARF levels. Also, we found that NS can enhance NPM stabilization of ARF. Thus, we propose that in the absence of p53, ARF can be stabilized by NS and nucleophosmin to serve as an alternative tumor-suppressor surveillance, preventing potential cellular transformation resulting from the growth-inducing effects of NS overexpression. PMID:24769896

  20. Arf6 mediates Schwann cell differentiation and myelination.

    PubMed

    Torii, Tomohiro; Miyamoto, Yuki; Yamamoto, Masahiro; Ohbuchi, Katsuya; Tsumura, Hideki; Kawahara, Kazuko; Tanoue, Akito; Sakagami, Hiroyuki; Yamauchi, Junji

    2015-09-25

    During development of the peripheral nervous system (PNS), Schwann cells wrap neuronal axons, becoming the myelin sheaths that help axonal functions. While the intercellular signals controlling the myelination process between Schwann cells and peripheral neurons are well studied, the transduction of these signals in Schwann cells still remains elusive. Here, we show that Arf6, an Arf protein of the small GTPase family, is involved in promoting the myelination process. Knockdown of Arf6 with the small-interfering (si)RNA in primary Schwann cells markedly decreases dibutyl-cyclic AMP-induced myelin marker protein expression, indicating that Arf6 plays a role in differentiation-like phenotypic changes. To obtain in vivo evidence, we generated small-hairpin (sh)RNA transgenic mice targeting Arf6 for Schwann cells. Transgenic mice exhibited reduced myelin thickness compared to littermate controls, consistent with the defective myelin formation observed in the transgenic mouse-derived Schwann cell and neuronal culture system. Transgenic mice also exhibited decreased phosphorylation of myelination-related signaling molecules such as Akt kinase cascade proteins as well as downregulation of myelin marker proteins. These results suggest that signaling through Arf6 is required for Schwann cell myelination, adding Arf6 to the list of intracellular signaling molecules involved in the myelination process. PMID:26277388

  1. Regulation of the p14ARF-Mdm2-p53 pathway: an overview in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Anshu; Yang, Jianhui; Murphy, Richard F; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2006-10-01

    Knowledge of the roles of proteins that are abnormally suppressed or activated due to mutation in the DNA sequences of the common tumor suppressor genes, p14ARF and p53, is critical to the understanding the pathogenesis of breast cancer. Mdm2 is a mediator for the function of both p14ARF and p53. In this review article factors including Pokemon, Geminin, Twist, and Apigenin, which control the action of individual proteins in the p14ARF-Mdm2-p53 pathway in breast cancer as well the consequences of mutation 7 of p53 are discussed. The complexity of interaction of components of the pathway and the underlying development of cancer is emphasized. Opportunities for future therapeutic innovations are indicated. PMID:16919268

  2. Pertussis toxin treatment does not block inhibition by atrial natriuretic factor of aldosterone secretion in cultured bovine zona glomerulosa cells

    SciTech Connect

    De Lean, A.; Cantin, M.

    1986-03-05

    The authors have previously reported that atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) potently inhibits PGE or forskolin-stimulation aldosterone secretion in bovine zona glomerulosa (ZG) by acting through specific high affinity receptors. In order to evaluate the functional role of the regulatory protein N/sub i/ and the inhibition of adenylate cyclase activity (AC) in ZG, the authors have studied the effect of treatment with PT on inhibition by ANF of aldosterone production. Primary cultures of ZG were treated for 18 hours in serum-free F12 medium with (0-100 ng/ml PT). No effect of PT pretreatment was observed either on basal, PGE-stimulated or ANF-inhibited levels of steroidogenesis. When membranes prepared from control ZG were ADP-ribosylated with (/sup 32/P) NAD in the presence of PT, two toxin-specific bands with 39 Kd and 41 Kd were documented on SDS gel. Cell pretreatment with as low as 1 ng/ml drastically reduced further labelling of these two bands while higher doses completely abolished them. Since PT treatment covalently modifies completely the toxin substrate without altering ANF inhibition of adrenal steroidogenesis, the authors conclude that N/sub i/ is not involved in the mode of action of ANF on aldosterone production.

  3. Cancer cell specific cytotoxic gene expression mediated by ARF tumor suppressor promoter constructs

    SciTech Connect

    Kurayoshi, Kenta; Ozono, Eiko; Iwanaga, Ritsuko; Bradford, Andrew P.; Komori, Hideyuki; Ohtani, Kiyoshi

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • ARF promoter showed higher responsiveness to deregulated E2F activity than the E2F1 promoter. • ARF promoter showed higher cancer cell-specificity than E2F1 promoter to drive gene expression. • HSV-TK driven by ARF promoter showed higher cancer cell-specific cytotoxicity than that driven by E2F1 promoter. - Abstract: In current cancer treatment protocols, such as radiation and chemotherapy, side effects on normal cells are major obstacles to radical therapy. To avoid these side effects, a cancer cell-specific approach is needed. One way to specifically target cancer cells is to utilize a cancer specific promoter to express a cytotoxic gene (suicide gene therapy) or a viral gene required for viral replication (oncolytic virotherapy). For this purpose, the selected promoter should have minimal activity in normal cells to avoid side effects, and high activity in a wide variety of cancers to obtain optimal therapeutic efficacy. In contrast to the AFP, CEA and PSA promoters, which have high activity only in a limited spectrum of tumors, the E2F1 promoter exhibits high activity in wide variety of cancers. This is based on the mechanism of carcinogenesis. Defects in the RB pathway and activation of the transcription factor E2F, the main target of the RB pathway, are observed in almost all cancers. Consequently, the E2F1 promoter, which is mainly regulated by E2F, has high activity in wide variety of cancers. However, E2F is also activated by growth stimulation in normal growing cells, suggesting that the E2F1 promoter may also be highly active in normal growing cells. In contrast, we found that the tumor suppressor ARF promoter is activated by deregulated E2F activity, induced by forced inactivation of pRB, but does not respond to physiological E2F activity induced by growth stimulation. We also found that the deregulated E2F activity, which activates the ARF promoter, is detected only in cancer cell lines. These observations suggest that ARF promoter

  4. Cancer cell specific cytotoxic gene expression mediated by ARF tumor suppressor promoter constructs.

    PubMed

    Kurayoshi, Kenta; Ozono, Eiko; Iwanaga, Ritsuko; Bradford, Andrew P; Komori, Hideyuki; Ohtani, Kiyoshi

    2014-07-18

    In current cancer treatment protocols, such as radiation and chemotherapy, side effects on normal cells are major obstacles to radical therapy. To avoid these side effects, a cancer cell-specific approach is needed. One way to specifically target cancer cells is to utilize a cancer specific promoter to express a cytotoxic gene (suicide gene therapy) or a viral gene required for viral replication (oncolytic virotherapy). For this purpose, the selected promoter should have minimal activity in normal cells to avoid side effects, and high activity in a wide variety of cancers to obtain optimal therapeutic efficacy. In contrast to the AFP, CEA and PSA promoters, which have high activity only in a limited spectrum of tumors, the E2F1 promoter exhibits high activity in wide variety of cancers. This is based on the mechanism of carcinogenesis. Defects in the RB pathway and activation of the transcription factor E2F, the main target of the RB pathway, are observed in almost all cancers. Consequently, the E2F1 promoter, which is mainly regulated by E2F, has high activity in wide variety of cancers. However, E2F is also activated by growth stimulation in normal growing cells, suggesting that the E2F1 promoter may also be highly active in normal growing cells. In contrast, we found that the tumor suppressor ARF promoter is activated by deregulated E2F activity, induced by forced inactivation of pRB, but does not respond to physiological E2F activity induced by growth stimulation. We also found that the deregulated E2F activity, which activates the ARF promoter, is detected only in cancer cell lines. These observations suggest that ARF promoter is activated by E2F only in cancer cells and therefore may be more cancer cell-specific than E2F1 promoter to drive gene expression. We show here that the ARF promoter has lower activity in normal growing fibroblasts and shows higher cancer cell-specificity compared to the E2F1 promoter. We also demonstrate that adenovirus expressing HSV

  5. MOZ (MYST3, KAT6A) inhibits senescence via the INK4A-ARF pathway.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, B N; Phipson, B; El-Saafin, F; Vanyai, H K; Downer, N L; Bird, M J; Kueh, A J; May, R E; Smyth, G K; Voss, A K; Thomas, T

    2015-11-19

    Cellular senescence is an important mechanism that restricts tumour growth. The Ink4a-Arf locus (also known as Cdkn2a), which encodes p16(INK4A) and p19(ARF), has a central role in inducing and maintaining senescence. Given the importance of cellular senescence in restraining tumour growth, great emphasis is being placed on the identification of novel factors that can modulate senescence. The MYST-family histone acetyltransferase MOZ (MYST3, KAT6A), first identified in recurrent translocations in acute myeloid leukaemia, has been implicated in both the promotion and inhibition of senescence. In this study, we investigate the role of MOZ in cellular senescence and show that MOZ is a potent inhibitor of senescence via the INK4A-ARF pathway. Primary mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) isolated from Moz-deficient embryos exhibit premature senescence, which was rescued on the Ink4a-Arf(-/-) background. Importantly, senescence resulting from the absence of MOZ was not accompanied by DNA damage, suggesting that MOZ acts independently of the DNA damage response. Consistent with the importance of senescence in cancer, expression profiling revealed that genes overexpressed in aggressive and highly proliferative cancers are expressed at low levels in Moz-deficient MEFs. We show that MOZ is required to maintain normal levels of histone 3 lysine 9 (H3K9) and H3K27 acetylation at the transcriptional start sites of at least four genes, Cdc6, Ezh2, E2f2 and Melk, and normal mRNA levels of these genes. CDC6, EZH2 and E2F2 are known inhibitors of the INK4A-ARF pathway. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation, we show that MOZ occupies the Cdc6, Ezh2 and Melk loci, thereby providing a direct link between MOZ, H3K9 and H3K27 acetylation, and normal transcriptional levels at these loci. This work establishes that MOZ is an upstream inhibitor of the INK4A-ARF pathway, and suggests that inhibiting MOZ may be one way to induce senescence in proliferative tumour cells. PMID:25772242

  6. Hydrogen sulfide is a novel potential virulence factor of Mycoplasma pneumoniae: characterization of the unusual cysteine desulfurase/desulfhydrase HapE.

    PubMed

    Großhennig, Stephanie; Ischebeck, Till; Gibhardt, Johannes; Busse, Julia; Feussner, Ivo; Stülke, Jörg

    2016-04-01

    Mycoplasma pneumoniae is a human pathogen causing atypical pneumonia with a minimalized and highly streamlined genome. So far, hydrogen peroxide production, cytadherence, and the ADP-ribosylating CARDS toxin have been identified as pathogenicity determinants. We have studied haemolysis caused by M. pneumoniae, and discovered that hydrogen peroxide is responsible for the oxidation of heme, but not for lysis of erythrocytes. This feature could be attributed to hydrogen sulfide, a compound that has previously not been identified as virulence factor in lung pathogens. Indeed, we observed hydrogen sulfide production by M. pneumoniae. The search for a hydrogen sulfide-producing enzyme identified HapE, a protein with similarity to cysteine desulfurases. In contrast to typical cysteine desulfurases, HapE is a bifunctional enzyme: it has both the cysteine desulfurase activity to produce alanine and the cysteine desulfhydrase activity to produce pyruvate and hydrogen sulfide. Experiments with purified HapE showed that the enzymatic activity of the protein is responsible for haemolysis, demonstrating that HapE is a novel potential virulence factor of M. pneumoniae. PMID:26711628

  7. β-Arrestin-mediated Angiotensin II Signaling Controls the Activation of ARF6 Protein and Endocytosis in Migration of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Charles, Ricardo; Namkung, Yoon; Cotton, Mathieu; Laporte, Stéphane A; Claing, Audrey

    2016-02-19

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) is a vasopressive hormone but is also a potent activator of cellular migration. We have previously shown that it can promote the activation of the GTPase ARF6 in a heterologous overexpressing system. The molecular mechanisms by which receptors control the activation of this small G protein remain, however, largely unknown. Furthermore, how ARF6 coordinates the activation of complex cellular responses needs to be further elucidated. In this study, we demonstrate that Ang II receptors engage β-arrestin, but not Gq, to mediate ARF6 activation in HEK 293 cells. To further confirm the key role of β-arrestin proteins, we overexpressed β-arrestin2-(1-320), a dominant negative mutant known to block receptor endocytosis. We show that expression of this truncated construct does not support the activation of the GTPase nor cell migration. Interestingly, β-arrestin2 can interact with the ARF guanine nucleotide exchange factor ARNO, although the C-terminally lacking mutant does not. We finally examined whether receptor endocytosis controlled ARF6 activation and cell migration. Although the clathrin inhibitor PitStop2 did not impact the ability of Ang II to activate ARF6, cell migration was markedly impaired. To further show that ARF activation regulates key signaling events leading to migration, we also examined MAPK activation. We demonstrate that this signaling axis is relevant in smooth muscle cells of the vasculature. Altogether, our findings show for the first time that Ang II receptor signaling to β-arrestin regulates ARF6 activation. These proteins together control receptor endocytosis and ultimately cell migration. PMID:26703465

  8. RLIP76 regulates Arf6-dependent cell spreading and migration by linking ARNO with activated R-Ras at recycling endosomes.

    PubMed

    Wurtzel, Jeremy G T; Lee, Seunghyung; Singhal, Sharad S; Awasthi, Sanjay; Ginsberg, Mark H; Goldfinger, Lawrence E

    2015-11-27

    R-Ras small GTPase enhances cell spreading and motility via RalBP1/RLIP76, an R-Ras effector that links GTP-R-Ras to activation of Arf6 and Rac1 GTPases. Here, we report that RLIP76 performs these functions by binding cytohesin-2/ARNO, an Arf GTPase guanine exchange factor, and connecting it to R-Ras at recycling endosomes. RLIP76 formed a complex with R-Ras and ARNO by binding ARNO via its N-terminus (residues 1-180) and R-Ras via residues 180-192. This complex was present in Rab11-positive recycling endosomes and the presence of ARNO in recycling endosomes required RLIP76, and was not supported by RLIP76(Δ1-180) or RLIP76(Δ180-192). Spreading and migration required RLIP76(1-180), and RLIP76(Δ1-180) blocked ARNO recruitment to recycling endosomes, and spreading. Arf6 activation with an ArfGAP inhibitor overcame the spreading defects in RLIP76-depleted cells or cells expressing RLIP76(Δ1-180). Similarly, RLIP76(Δ1-180) or RLIP76(Δ180-192) suppressed Arf6 activation. Together these results demonstrate that RLIP76 acts as a scaffold at recycling endosomes by binding activated R-Ras, recruiting ARNO to activate Arf6, thereby contributing to cell spreading and migration. PMID:26498519

  9. Molecular cloning of the black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon) elongation factor 2 (EF-2): sequence analysis and its expression on the ovarian maturation stage.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Lihua; Jiang, Shigui; Zhou, Falin; Zhang, Dianchang; Huang, Jianhua; Guo, Yihui

    2008-09-01

    The techniques of homology cloning and anchored PCR were used to clone the elongation factor 2 (EF-2) gene from black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon). The full length cDNA of black tiger shrimp EF-2 (btsEF-2) contained a 5' untranslated region (UTR) of 73 bp, an ORF of 2541 bp encoding a polypeptide of 846 amino acids with an estimated molecular mass of 95 kDa, and a 3( UTR of 112 bp. The searches for protein sequence similarities with BLAST analysis indicated that the deduced amino acid sequence of btsEF-2 was homological to the EF-2 of other species and even the mammalians. The conserved signature sequence of EF-2 gene family, GTPase effector domain and ADP-ribosylation domain were found in the btsEF-2 deduced amino acid sequence. The temporal expressions of gene in the different ovarian stages were measured by real time PCR. The mRNA expressions of the gene were constitutively expressed in ovary and different during the maturation stages. The result indicated that EF-2 gene was constitutively expressed and could play a critical role in the ovarian maturation stage. PMID:17629788

  10. Antitumor impact of p14ARF on gefitinib-resistant non-small cell lung cancers.

    PubMed

    Saito, Ken; Takigawa, Nagio; Ohtani, Naoko; Iioka, Hidekazu; Tomita, Yuki; Ueda, Ryuzo; Fukuoka, Junya; Kuwahara, Kazuhiko; Ichihara, Eiki; Kiura, Katsuyuki; Kondo, Eisaku

    2013-08-01

    Activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) has been observed in many malignant tumors and its constitutive signal transduction facilitates the proliferation of tumors. EGFR-tyrosine kinase inhibitors, such as gefitinib, are widely used as a molecular-targeting agent for the inactivation of EGFR signaling and show considerable therapeutic effect in non-small cell lung cancers harboring activating EGFR mutations. However, prolonged treatment inevitably produces tumors with additional gefitinib-resistant mutations in EGFR, which is a critical issue for current therapeutics. We aimed to characterize the distinct molecular response to gefitinib between the drug-resistant and drug-sensitive lung adenocarcinoma cells in order to learn about therapeutics based on the molecular information. From the quantitative PCR analysis, we found a specific increase in p14(ARF) expression in gefitinib-sensitive lung adenocarcinoma clones, which was absent in gefitinib-resistant clones. Moreover, mitochondria-targeted p14(ARF) triggered the most augmented apoptosis in both clones. We identified the amino acid residues spanning from 38 to 65 as a functional core of mitochondrial p14(ARF) (p14 38-65 a.a.), which reduced the mitochondrial membrane potential and caused caspase-9 activation. The synthesized peptide covering the p14 38-65 a.a. induced growth suppression of the gefitinib-resistant clones without affecting nonneoplastic cells. Notably, transduction of the minimized dose of the p14 38-65 peptide restored the response to gefitinib like that in the sensitive clones. These findings suggest that the region of p14(ARF) 38-65 a.a. is critical in the pharmacologic action of gefitinib against EGFR-mutated lung adenocarcinoma cells and has potential utility in the therapeutics of gefitinib-resistant cancers. PMID:23761220

  11. AMPA receptor signaling through BRAG2 and Arf6 critical for long-term synaptic depression.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Ralf; Berberich, Sven; Rathgeber, Louisa; Kolleker, Alexander; Köhr, Georg; Kornau, Hans-Christian

    2010-06-10

    Central nervous system synapses undergo activity-dependent alterations to support learning and memory. Long-term depression (LTD) reflects a sustained reduction of the synaptic AMPA receptor content based on targeted clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Here we report a current-independent form of AMPA receptor signaling, fundamental for LTD. We found that AMPA receptors directly interact via the GluA2 subunit with the synaptic protein BRAG2, which functions as a guanine-nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for the coat-recruitment GTPase Arf6. BRAG2-mediated catalysis, controlled by ligand-binding and tyrosine phosphorylation of GluA2, activates Arf6 to internalize synaptic AMPA receptors upon LTD induction. Furthermore, acute blockade of the GluA2-BRAG2 interaction and targeted deletion of BRAG2 in mature hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons prevents LTD in CA3-to-CA1 cell synapses, irrespective of the induction pathway. We conclude that BRAG2-mediated Arf6 activation triggered by AMPA receptors is the convergent step of different forms of LTD, thus providing an essential mechanism for the control of vesicle formation by endocytic cargo. PMID:20547133

  12. Mouse Hepatitis Coronavirus RNA Replication Depends on GBF1-Mediated ARF1 Activation

    PubMed Central

    Verheije, Monique H.; Raaben, Matthijs; Mari, Muriel; te Lintelo, Eddie G.; Reggiori, Fulvio; van Kuppeveld, Frank J. M.; Rottier, Peter J. M.; de Haan, Cornelis A. M.

    2008-01-01

    Coronaviruses induce in infected cells the formation of double membrane vesicles, which are the sites of RNA replication. Not much is known about the formation of these vesicles, although recent observations indicate an important role for the endoplasmic reticulum in the formation of the mouse hepatitis coronavirus (MHV) replication complexes (RCs). We now show that MHV replication is sensitive to brefeldin A (BFA). Consistently, expression of a dominant-negative mutant of ARF1, known to mimic the action of the drug, inhibited MHV infection profoundly. Immunofluorescence analysis and quantitative electron microscopy demonstrated that BFA did not block the formation of RCs per se, but rather reduced their number. MHV RNA replication was not sensitive to BFA in MDCK cells, which are known to express the BFA-resistant guanine nucleotide exchange factor GBF1. Accordingly, individual knockdown of the Golgi-resident targets of BFA by transfection of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) showed that GBF1, but not BIG1 or BIG2, was critically involved in MHV RNA replication. ARF1, the cellular effector of GBF1, also appeared to be involved in MHV replication, as siRNAs targeting this small GTPase inhibited MHV infection significantly. Collectively, our results demonstrate that GBF1-mediated ARF1 activation is required for efficient MHV RNA replication and reveal that the early secretory pathway and MHV replication complex formation are closely connected. PMID:18551169

  13. Biochemical methods for studying kinetic regulation of Arf1 activation by Sec7

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Brian C.; Fromme, J. Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The Arf family of small GTPases regulates vesicular transport at several locations within the cell, and is in turn regulated by guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) via a conserved catalytic domain, termed the Sec7 domain. The catalytic activity of the Sec7 domain is well characterized in the context of a few GEFs acting at the periphery of the cell. This chapter describes techniques used to extend biochemical analysis of activity to the much larger GEFs acting on the Arf family in the core secretory pathway, using the activity of S. cerevisiae Sec7 on Arf1, regulating export from the trans-Golgi network (TGN), as a model. Complete methods for purification to near-homogeneity of all proteins required, including several Sec7 constructs and multiple relevant small GTPases, are detailed. These are followed by methods for quantification of the nucleotide exchange activity of Sec7 in a physiologically relevant context, including modifications required to dissect the signal integration functions of Sec7 as an effector of several other small GTPases, and methods for identifying stable Sec7-small GTPase interactions in the presence of membranes. These techniques may be extended to analysis of similar members of the Sec7 GEF subfamily in other species and acting elsewhere in the secretory pathway. PMID:26360031

  14. Integrated Conformational and Lipid-Sensing Regulation of Endosomal ArfGEF BRAG2

    PubMed Central

    Aizel, Kaheina; Biou, Valérie; Navaza, Jorge; Duarte, Lionel V.; Campanacci, Valérie; Cherfils, Jacqueline; Zeghouf, Mahel

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms whereby guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs) coordinate their subcellular targeting to their activation of small GTPases remain poorly understood. Here we analyzed how membranes control the efficiency of human BRAG2, an ArfGEF involved in receptor endocytosis, Wnt signaling, and tumor invasion. The crystal structure of an Arf1–BRAG2 complex that mimics a membrane-bound intermediate revealed an atypical PH domain that is constitutively anchored to the catalytic Sec7 domain and interacts with Arf. Combined with the quantitative analysis of BRAG2 exchange activity reconstituted on membranes, we find that this PH domain potentiates nucleotide exchange by about 2,000-fold by cumulative conformational and membrane-targeting contributions. Furthermore, it restricts BRAG2 activity to negatively charged membranes without phosphoinositide specificity, using a positively charged surface peripheral to but excluding the canonical lipid-binding pocket. This suggests a model of BRAG2 regulation along the early endosomal pathway that expands the repertoire of GEF regulatory mechanisms. Notably, it departs from the auto-inhibitory and feedback loop paradigm emerging from studies of SOS and cytohesins. It also uncovers a novel mechanism of unspecific lipid-sensing by PH domains that may allow sustained binding to maturating membranes. PMID:24058294

  15. Phosphorylation of the Bin, Amphiphysin, and RSV161/167 (BAR) domain of ACAP4 regulates membrane tubulation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xuannv; Wang, Dongmei; Liu, Xing; Liu, Lifang; Song, Zhenwei; Zhu, Tongge; Adams, Gregory; Gao, Xinjiao; Tian, Ruijun; Huang, Yuejia; Chen, Runhua; Wang, Fengsong; Liu, Dong; Yu, Xue; Chen, Yong; Chen, Zhengjun; Teng, Maikun; Ding, Xia; Yao, Xuebiao

    2013-07-01

    ArfGAP With Coiled-Coil, Ankyrin Repeat And PH Domains 4 (ACAP4) is an ADP-ribosylation factor 6 (ARF6) GTPase-activating protein essential for EGF-elicited cell migration. However, how ACAP4 regulates membrane dynamics and curvature in response to EGF stimulation is unknown. Here, we show that phosphorylation of the N-terminal region of ACAP4, named the Bin, Amphiphysin, and RSV161/167 (BAR) domain, at Tyr34 is necessary for EGF-elicited membrane remodeling. Domain structure analysis demonstrates that the BAR domain regulates membrane curvature. EGF stimulation of cells causes phosphorylation of ACAP4 at Tyr34, which subsequently promotes ACAP4 homodimer curvature. The phospho-mimicking mutant of ACAP4 demonstrates lipid-binding activity and tubulation in vitro, and ARF6 enrichment at the membrane is associated with ruffles of EGF-stimulated cells. Expression of the phospho-mimicking ACAP4 mutant promotes ARF6-dependent cell migration. Thus, the results present a previously undefined mechanism by which EGF-elicited phosphorylation of the BAR domain controls ACAP4 molecular plasticity and plasma membrane dynamics during cell migration. PMID:23776207

  16. Cooperation of phosphoinositides and BAR domain proteins in endosomal tubulation.

    PubMed

    Shinozaki-Narikawa, Naeko; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Shibasaki, Yoshikazu

    2006-11-01

    Phosphorylated derivatives of phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns) regulate many intracellular events, including vesicular trafficking and actin remodeling, by recruiting proteins to their sites of function. PtdIns(4,5)-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] and related phosphoinositides are mainly synthesized by type I PtdIns-4-phosphate 5-kinases (PIP5Ks). We found that PIP5K induces endosomal tubules in COS-7 cells. ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) 6 has been shown to act upstream of PIP5K and regulate endocytic transport and tubulation. ARF GAP with coiled-coil, ankyrin repeat, and pleckstrin homology domains 1 (ACAP1) has guanosine triphosphatase-activating protein (GAP) activity for ARF6. While there were few tubules induced by the expression of ACAP1 alone, numerous endosomal tubules were induced by coexpression of PIP5K and ACAP1. ACAP1 has a pleckstrin homology (PH) domain known to bind phosphoinositide and a Bin/amphiphysin/Rvs (BAR) domain that has been reported to detect membrane curvature. Truncated and point mutations in the ACAP1 BAR and PH domains revealed that both BAR and PH domains are required for tubulation. These results suggest that two ARF6 downstream molecules, PIP5K and ACAP1, function together in endosomal tubulation and that phosphoinositide levels may regulate endosomal dynamics. PMID:17010122

  17. Human Kruppel-related 3 (HKR3) is a novel transcription activator of alternate reading frame (ARF) gene.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jae-Hyeon; Choi, Won-Il; Jeon, Bu-Nam; Koh, Dong-In; Kim, Min-Kyeong; Kim, Myung-Hwa; Kim, Jungho; Hur, Sujin Susanne; Kim, Kyung-Sup; Hur, Man-Wook

    2014-02-14

    HKR3 (Human Krüppel-related 3) is a novel POK (POZ-domain Krüppel-like zinc-finger) family transcription factor. Recently, some of the POK (POZ-domain Krüppel-like zinc finger) family proteins have been shown to play roles in cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, cell proliferation, and oncogenesis. We investigated whether HKR3, an inhibitor of cell proliferation and an uncharacterized POK family protein, could regulate the cell cycle by controlling expression of genes within the p53 pathway (ARF-MDM2-TP53-p21WAF/CDKN1A). HKR3 potently activated the transcription of the tumor suppressor gene ARF by acting on the proximal promoter region (bp, -149∼+53), which contains Sp1 and FBI-1 binding elements (FREs). HKR3 interacted with the co-activator p300 to activate ARF transcription, which increased the acetylation of histones H3 and H4 within the proximal promoter. Oligonucleotide pull-down assays and ChIP assays revealed that HKR3 interferes with the binding of the proto-oncogenic transcription repressor FBI-1 to proximal FREs, thus derepressing ARF transcription. PMID:24382891

  18. Human Krüppel-related 3 (HKR3) Is a Novel Transcription Activator of Alternate Reading Frame (ARF) Gene*

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Jae-Hyeon; Choi, Won-Il; Jeon, Bu-Nam; Koh, Dong-In; Kim, Min-Kyeong; Kim, Myung-Hwa; Kim, Jungho; Hur, Sujin Susanne; Kim, Kyung-Sup; Hur, Man-Wook

    2014-01-01

    HKR3 (Human Krüppel-related 3) is a novel POK (POZ-domain Krüppel-like zinc-finger) family transcription factor. Recently, some of the POK (POZ-domain Krüppel-like zinc finger) family proteins have been shown to play roles in cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, cell proliferation, and oncogenesis. We investigated whether HKR3, an inhibitor of cell proliferation and an uncharacterized POK family protein, could regulate the cell cycle by controlling expression of genes within the p53 pathway (ARF-MDM2-TP53-p21WAF/CDKN1A). HKR3 potently activated the transcription of the tumor suppressor gene ARF by acting on the proximal promoter region (bp, −149∼+53), which contains Sp1 and FBI-1 binding elements (FREs). HKR3 interacted with the co-activator p300 to activate ARF transcription, which increased the acetylation of histones H3 and H4 within the proximal promoter. Oligonucleotide pull-down assays and ChIP assays revealed that HKR3 interferes with the binding of the proto-oncogenic transcription repressor FBI-1 to proximal FREs, thus derepressing ARF transcription. PMID:24382891

  19. p53 and ARF: Unexpected players in autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Balaburski, Gregor M.; Hontz, Robert D.; Murphy, Maureen E.

    2010-01-01

    p53 and ARF are well-established tumor suppressor proteins that function together in the negative regulation of cancer. Recently, both of these proteins were found to play surprising roles in autophagy. Autophagy (“self-eating”) is a critical response of eukaryotic cells to metabolic and other stress. During this process, portions of the cytosol are sequestered into characteristic double membrane vesicles that are delivered to the lysosome for degradation, leading to the release of free amino acids and subsequent survival. The mechanisms whereby p53 and ARF control autophagy are only now becoming elucidated. An emerging question is whether we can develop metabolic poisons that preferentially destroy tumor cells depending on their reliance on autophagy for survival, and on their p53 and ARF status. PMID:20303758

  20. Isolation of cucumber CsARF cDNAs and expression of the corresponding mRNAs during gravity-regulated morphogenesis of cucumber seedlings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Y.; Yamasaki, S.; Fujii, N.; Hagen, G.; Guilfoyle, T.; Takahashi, H.

    Cucumber seedlings grown in a horizontal position develop a protuberance called peg on the lower side of the transition zone between the hypocotyl and the root. We have suggested that peg formation on the upper side of the gravistimulated transition zone is suppressed because cucumber seedlings grown in a vertical position or microgravity symmetrically develop two pegs on the transition zone. Plant hormone, auxin, is considered to play a crucial role in the gravity-regulated formation of peg. We have shown that the mRNAs of auxin-inducible genes (CsIAAs) isolated from cucumber accumulate more abundantly in the lower side of the transition zone than in the upper side when peg formation initiates. To reveal the mechanism of transcriptional regulation by auxin for peg formation, we isolated five cDNAs of Auxin Response Factors (ARFs) from cucumber and compared their mRNA accumulation with those of CsIAA1 and CsIAA2. The tissue specificity of mRNA accumulation of CsARF2 was similar to those of CsIAA1 and CsIAA2. The structural character of CsARF2 predicts it is transcriptional activator. These results suggest that CsARF2 may be involved in activation of the transcription of auxin-inducible genes including CsIAA1 for peg formation. Because mRNA accumulation of five CsARFs, including CsARF2, were affected by neither gravity nor auxin, transcriptional activity of CsARF2 may be regulated at post-transcriptional level to induce asymmetric mRNA accumulation of auxin-inducible genes in the transition zone.

  1. OsARF12, a transcription activator on auxin response gene, regulates root elongation and affects iron accumulation in rice (Oryza sativa).

    PubMed

    Qi, YanHua; Wang, SuiKang; Shen, ChenJia; Zhang, SaiNa; Chen, Yue; Xu, YanXia; Liu, Yu; Wu, YunRong; Jiang, DeAn

    2012-01-01

    • Auxin has an important role in maintaining optimal root system architecture (RSA) that can cope with growth reductions of crops caused by water or nutrient shortages. However, the mechanism of controlling RSA remains largely unclear. Here, we found a limiting factor of RSA--OsARF12--an auxin response factor whose knockout led to decreased primary root length in rice (Oryza sativa). • OsARF12 as a transcription activator can facilitate the expression of the auxin response element DR5::GFP, and OsARF12 was inhibited by osa-miRNA167d by transient expression in tobacco and rice callus. • The root elongation zones of osarf12 and osarf12/25, which had lower auxin concentrations, were distinctly shorter than for the wild-type, possibly as a result of decreased expression of auxin synthesis genes OsYUCCAs and auxin efflux carriers OsPINs and OsPGPs. The knockout of OsARF12 also altered the abundance of mitochondrial iron-regulated (OsMIR), iron (Fe)-regulated transporter1 (OsIRT1) and short postembryonic root1 (OsSPR1) in roots of rice, and resulted in lower Fe content. • The data provide evidence for the biological function of OsARF12, which is implicated in regulating root elongation. Our investigation contributes a novel insight for uncovering regulation of RSA and the relationship between auxin response and Fe acquisition. PMID:21973088

  2. The Arf GAP ASAP1 provides a platform to regulate Arf4- and Rab11–Rab8-mediated ciliary receptor targeting

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Morita, Yoshiko; Mazelova, Jana; Deretic, Dusanka

    2012-01-01

    Dysfunctional trafficking to primary cilia is a frequent cause of human diseases known as ciliopathies, yet molecular mechanisms for specific targeting of sensory receptors to cilia are largely unknown. Here, we show that the targeting of ciliary cargo, represented by rhodopsin, is mediated by a specialized system, the principal component of which is the Arf GAP ASAP1. Ablation of ASAP1 abolishes ciliary targeting and causes formation of actin-rich periciliary membrane projections that accumulate mislocalized rhodopsin. We find that ASAP1 serves as a scaffold that brings together the proteins necessary for transport to the cilia including the GTP-binding protein Arf4 and the two G proteins of the Rab family—Rab11 and Rab8—linked by the Rab8 guanine nucleotide exchange factor Rabin8. ASAP1 recognizes the FR ciliary targeting signal of rhodopsin. Rhodopsin FR-AA mutant, defective in ASAP1 binding, fails to interact with Rab8 and translocate across the periciliary diffusion barrier. Our study implies that other rhodopsin-like sensory receptors may interact with this conserved system and reach the cilia using the same platform. PMID:22983554

  3. Protein Networks Supporting AP-3 Function in Targeting Lysosomal Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Baust, Thorsten; Anitei, Mihaela; Czupalla, Cornelia; Parshyna, Iryna; Bourel, Line; Thiele, Christoph; Krause, Eberhard

    2008-01-01

    The AP-3 adaptor complex targets selected transmembrane proteins to lysosomes and lysosome-related organelles. We reconstituted its preferred interaction with liposomes containing the ADP ribosylation factor (ARF)-1 guanosine triphosphatase (GTPase), specific cargo tails, and phosphatidylinositol-3 phosphate, and then we performed a proteomic screen to identify new proteins supporting its sorting function. We identified ≈30 proteins belonging to three networks regulating either AP-3 coat assembly or septin polymerization or Rab7-dependent lysosomal transport. RNA interference shows that, among these proteins, the ARF-1 exchange factor brefeldin A-inhibited exchange factor 1, the ARF-1 GTPase-activating protein 1, the Cdc42-interacting Cdc42 effector protein 4, an effector of septin-polymerizing GTPases, and the phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase IIIC3 are key components regulating the targeting of lysosomal membrane proteins to lysosomes in vivo. This analysis reveals that these proteins, together with AP-3, play an essential role in protein sorting at early endosomes, thereby regulating the integrity of these organelles. PMID:18287518

  4. Short Mitochondrial ARF Triggers Parkin/PINK1-dependent Mitophagy*

    PubMed Central

    Grenier, Karl; Kontogiannea, Maria; Fon, Edward A.

    2014-01-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is a complex neurodegenerative disease characterized by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Multiple genes have been associated with PD, including Parkin and PINK1. Recent studies have established that the Parkin and PINK1 proteins function in a common mitochondrial quality control pathway, whereby disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential leads to PINK1 stabilization at the mitochondrial outer surface. PINK1 accumulation leads to Parkin recruitment from the cytosol, which in turn promotes the degradation of the damaged mitochondria by autophagy (mitophagy). Most studies characterizing PINK1/Parkin mitophagy have relied on high concentrations of chemical uncouplers to trigger mitochondrial depolarization, a stimulus that has been difficult to adapt to neuronal systems and one unlikely to faithfully model the mitochondrial damage that occurs in PD. Here, we report that the short mitochondrial isoform of ARF (smARF), previously identified as an alternate translation product of the tumor suppressor p19ARF, depolarizes mitochondria and promotes mitophagy in a Parkin/PINK1-dependent manner, both in cell lines and in neurons. The work positions smARF upstream of PINK1 and Parkin and demonstrates that mitophagy can be triggered by intrinsic signaling cascades. PMID:25217637

  5. Inhibition of Cytohesins Protects against Genetic Models of Motor Neuron Disease.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Jinbin; Zhang, Lei; Mojsilovic-Petrovic, Jelena; Jian, Xiaoying; Thomas, Jeffrey; Homma, Kengo; Schmitz, Anton; Famulok, Michael; Ichijo, Hidenori; Argon, Yair; Randazzo, Paul A; Kalb, Robert G

    2015-06-17

    Mutant genes that underlie Mendelian forms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and biochemical investigations of genetic disease models point to potential driver pathophysiological events involving endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and autophagy. Several steps in these cell biological processes are known to be controlled physiologically by small ADP-ribosylation factor (ARF) signaling. Here, we investigated the role of ARF guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), cytohesins, in models of ALS. Genetic or pharmacological inhibition of cytohesins protects motor neurons in vitro from proteotoxic insults and rescues locomotor defects in a Caenorhabditis elegans model of disease. Cytohesins form a complex with mutant superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1), a known cause of familial ALS, but this is not associated with a change in GEF activity or ARF activation. ER stress evoked by mutant SOD1 expression is alleviated by antagonism of cytohesin activity. In the setting of mutant SOD1 toxicity, inhibition of cytohesin activity enhances autophagic flux and reduces the burden of misfolded SOD1. These observations suggest that targeting cytohesins may have potential benefits for the treatment of ALS. PMID:26085633

  6. Therapeutic Targets in the ARF Tumor Suppressor Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Saporita, Anthony J.; Maggi, Leonard B.; Apicelli, Anthony J.; Weber, Jason D.

    2008-01-01

    One of the outstanding fundamental questions in cancer cell biology concerns how cells coordinate cellular growth (or macromolecular synthesis) with cell cycle progression and mitosis. Intuitively, rapidly dividing cells must have some control over these processes; otherwise cells would continue to shrink in volume with every passing cycle, similar to the cytoreductive divisions seen in the very early stages of embryogenesis. The problem is easily solved in unicellular organisms, such as yeast, as their growth rates are entirely dependent on nutrient availability. Multicellular organisms such as mammals, however, must have acquired additional levels of control, as nutrient availability is seldom an issue and the organism has a prodigious capacity to store necessary metabolites in the form of glycogen, lipids, and protein. Furthermore, the specific needs and specialized architecture of tissues must constrain growth for growth’s sake; if not, the necessary function of the organ could be lost. While certainly a myriad of mechanisms for preventing this exist via initiating cell death (e.g. apoptosis, autophagy, necrosis), these all depend on some external cue, such as death signals, hypoxia, lack of nutrients or survival signals. However there must also be some cell autonomous method for surveying against inappropriate growth signals (such as oncogenic stress) that occur in a stochastic fashion, possibly as a result of random mutations. The ARF tumor suppressor seems to fulfill that role, as its expression is near undetectable in normal tissues, yet is potently induced by oncogenic stress (such as overexpression of oncogenic Ras or myc). As a result of induced expression of ARF, the tumor suppressor protein p53 is stabilized and promotes cell cycle arrest. Mutations or epigenetic alterations of the INK4a/Arf locus are second only to p53 mutations in cancer cells, and in some cancers, alterations in both Arf and p53 observed, suggesting that these two tumor

  7. HuR Maintains a Replicative Life Span by Repressing the ARF Tumor Suppressor

    PubMed Central

    Kawagishi, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Michihiro; Nakamura, Hideaki; Tsugawa, Takayuki; Watanabe, Atsushi; Kontoyiannis, Dimitris L.

    2013-01-01

    p19ARF plays an essential role in the senescence of mouse cells, and its expression is lost by methylation or deletion of the ARF locus; otherwise, p53 is inactivated to bypass senescence. ARF expression is tightly regulated, but little is known about its posttranscriptional regulation. Here, we show that an RNA-binding protein, HuR (human antigen R), represses ARF mRNA translation, thereby maintaining the replicative life span of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). Loss of HuR results in premature senescence, with concomitant increases in p19ARF but not p16Ink4a levels, and this senescence is not observed in ARF-null MEFs that retain an intact Ink4a locus. HuR depletion does not alter ARF transcription or stability but enhances ribosome association with ARF mRNA. Under these conditions, ARF mRNA accumulates in nucleoli, where it associates with nucleolin. Furthermore, adipose-specific deletion of the HuR gene results in increased p19ARF expression in aged animals, which is accompanied by decreased insulin sensitivity. Together, our findings demonstrate that p19ARF is also regulated at the translational level, and this translational regulation restrains the cellular life span and tissue functions in vivo. PMID:23508105

  8. HuR maintains a replicative life span by repressing the ARF tumor suppressor.

    PubMed

    Kawagishi, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Michihiro; Nakamura, Hideaki; Tsugawa, Takayuki; Watanabe, Atsushi; Kontoyiannis, Dimitris L; Sugimoto, Masataka

    2013-05-01

    p19(ARF) plays an essential role in the senescence of mouse cells, and its expression is lost by methylation or deletion of the ARF locus; otherwise, p53 is inactivated to bypass senescence. ARF expression is tightly regulated, but little is known about its posttranscriptional regulation. Here, we show that an RNA-binding protein, HuR (human antigen R), represses ARF mRNA translation, thereby maintaining the replicative life span of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). Loss of HuR results in premature senescence, with concomitant increases in p19(ARF) but not p16(Ink4a) levels, and this senescence is not observed in ARF-null MEFs that retain an intact Ink4a locus. HuR depletion does not alter ARF transcription or stability but enhances ribosome association with ARF mRNA. Under these conditions, ARF mRNA accumulates in nucleoli, where it associates with nucleolin. Furthermore, adipose-specific deletion of the HuR gene results in increased p19(ARF) expression in aged animals, which is accompanied by decreased insulin sensitivity. Together, our findings demonstrate that p19(ARF) is also regulated at the translational level, and this translational regulation restrains the cellular life span and tissue functions in vivo. PMID:23508105

  9. p53-independent functions of the p19ARF tumor suppressor

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Jason D.; Jeffers, John R.; Rehg, Jerold E.; Randle, David H.; Lozano, Guillermina; Roussel, Martine F.; Sherr, Charles J.; Zambetti, Gerard P.

    2000-01-01

    The p19ARF tumor suppressor antagonizes Mdm2 to induce p53-dependent cell cycle arrest. Individual TKO (triple knock out) mice nullizygous for ARF, p53, and Mdm2 develop multiple tumors at a frequency greater than those observed in animals lacking both p53 and Mdm2 or p53 alone, demonstrating that p19ARF can act independently of the Mdm2-p53 axis in tumor surveillance. Reintroduction of ARF into TKO mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs), but not into those lacking both p53 and ARF, arrested the cell division cycle in the G1 phase. Inhibition of the retinoblastoma protein had no effect on the ability of ARF to arrest TKO MEFs. Thus, in the absence of Mdm2, p19ARF interacts with other targets to inhibit cell proliferation. PMID:10995391

  10. Isolation and characterization of mammalian cells expressing the Arf promoter during eye development

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Nida S.; Xu, Lin; Devitt, Caitlin C.; Skapek, Stephen X.

    2015-01-01

    Although many researchers have successfully uncovered novel functions of the tumor suppressor p19Arf utilizing various types of cultured cancer cells and immortalized fibroblasts, these systems do not accurately reflect the endogenous environment in which Arf is developmentally expressed. We addressed this by isolating perivascular cells from the primary vitreous of the mouse eye. These cells represent a rare cell type that normally expresses the p19Arf tumor suppressor in a non-pathological, developmental context. We utilized fluorescence activated cell sorting to purify the cells by virtue of a GFP reporter driven by the native Arf promoter, and characterized their morphology and gene expression pattern. We further examined the effects of reintroduction of Arf in the PVCs to verify expected downstream effectors of p19Arf as well as uncover novel functions as a regulator of vasculogenesis. This methodology and cell culture model should serve as a useful tool to examine p19Arf biology. PMID:24806224

  11. The Cell Fate Determinant Numb Interacts with EHD/Rme-1 Family Proteins and Has a Role in Endocytic Recycling

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Christian A.; Dho, Sascha E.; Donaldson, Julie; Tepass, Ulrich; McGlade, C. Jane

    2004-01-01

    The adaptor protein Numb is necessary for the cell fate specification of progenitor cells in the Drosophila nervous system. Numb is evolutionarily conserved and previous studies have provided evidence for a similar functional role during mammalian development. The Numb protein has multiple protein-protein interaction regions including a phosphotyrosine binding (PTB) domain and a carboxy-terminal domain that contains conserved interaction motifs including an EH (Eps15 Homology) domain binding motif and α-adaptin binding site. In this study we identify the EHD/Rme-1/Pincher family of endocytic proteins as Numb interacting partners in mammals and Drosophila. The EHD/Rme-1 proteins function in recycling of plasma membrane receptors internalized by both clathrin-mediated endocytosis and a clathrin-independent pathway regulated by ADP ribosylation factor 6 (Arf6). Here we report that Numb colocalizes with endogenous EHD4/Pincher and Arf6 and that Arf6 mutants alter Numb subcellular localization. In addition, we present evidence that Numb has a novel function in endosomal recycling and intracellular trafficking of receptors. PMID:15155807

  12. Molecular Evolution and Association of Natural Variation in ZmARF31 with Low Phosphorus Tolerance in Maize.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fengkai; Liu, Zuoming; Xu, Jie; Gao, Shibin; Lin, Haijian; Liu, Ling; Liu, Yaxi; Lu, Yanli

    2016-01-01

    Low-phosphorus (P) stress is one of the major factors constraining plant growth and yield. Improving plant tolerance to P starvation through molecular breeding is an efficient alternative to increase grain production. In the study, 331 diverse maize inbreds were used to detect nucleotide diversity and favorable alleles of ZmARF31, which plays a key role in low P responses and root architecture regulation. Significant phenotypic variation was found in each of 11 tested traits under both P and no-P treatments, and 30 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 14 insertion-deletions (InDels) were detected in ZmARF31 among the 331 maize inbreds. The 5'-untranslated region (UTR) of ZmARF31 showed a small linkage disequilibrium (LD) block under significant purifying selection, whereas the 3'-UTR showed the most abundant diversity and a larger LD block. Thirty, fourteen, and nine natural variations were identified in ZmARF31 that were associated with P-deficiency-tolerance traits (P ≤ 0.01) by using the general linear model (GLM), GLM incorporated with population structure, and mixed linear model, respectively. Four SNPs were significantly associated with the total dry weight (TDW) in the three models, of which SNPs S410 and S462 were located in a complete LD block. A further verification conducted in a recombinant inbred line population revealed that favorable allele G/G of non-synonymous mutation S410 and favorable allele with a 38 bp insertion of InDel S1442 exhibited positive genetic effects on the TDW and total root tips, respectively. Expression analysis further confirmed that ZmARF31 was highly expressed in the roots of low-P-tolerant inbred 178. The protein encoded by ZmARF31 was located both in the nucleus and cytoplasm. Haplotypes carrying more favorable alleles showed a greater effect on phenotypic variation than single loci. Such haplotypes should be helpful to develop valuable genetic markers and perform maize molecular breeding. PMID:27493655

  13. Molecular Evolution and Association of Natural Variation in ZmARF31 with Low Phosphorus Tolerance in Maize

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fengkai; Liu, Zuoming; Xu, Jie; Gao, Shibin; Lin, Haijian; Liu, Ling; Liu, Yaxi; Lu, Yanli

    2016-01-01

    Low-phosphorus (P) stress is one of the major factors constraining plant growth and yield. Improving plant tolerance to P starvation through molecular breeding is an efficient alternative to increase grain production. In the study, 331 diverse maize inbreds were used to detect nucleotide diversity and favorable alleles of ZmARF31, which plays a key role in low P responses and root architecture regulation. Significant phenotypic variation was found in each of 11 tested traits under both P and no-P treatments, and 30 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 14 insertion–deletions (InDels) were detected in ZmARF31 among the 331 maize inbreds. The 5′-untranslated region (UTR) of ZmARF31 showed a small linkage disequilibrium (LD) block under significant purifying selection, whereas the 3′-UTR showed the most abundant diversity and a larger LD block. Thirty, fourteen, and nine natural variations were identified in ZmARF31 that were associated with P-deficiency-tolerance traits (P ≤ 0.01) by using the general linear model (GLM), GLM incorporated with population structure, and mixed linear model, respectively. Four SNPs were significantly associated with the total dry weight (TDW) in the three models, of which SNPs S410 and S462 were located in a complete LD block. A further verification conducted in a recombinant inbred line population revealed that favorable allele G/G of non-synonymous mutation S410 and favorable allele with a 38 bp insertion of InDel S1442 exhibited positive genetic effects on the TDW and total root tips, respectively. Expression analysis further confirmed that ZmARF31 was highly expressed in the roots of low-P-tolerant inbred 178. The protein encoded by ZmARF31 was located both in the nucleus and cytoplasm. Haplotypes carrying more favorable alleles showed a greater effect on phenotypic variation than single loci. Such haplotypes should be helpful to develop valuable genetic markers and perform maize molecular breeding. PMID:27493655

  14. Effects of botulinum toxin type D on secretion of tumor necrosis factor from human monocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Imamura, K.; Spriggs, D.; Ohno, T.; Kufe, D.

    1989-05-01

    Botulinum toxins are potent neurotoxins which block the release of neurotransmitters. The effects of these toxins on hematopoietic cells, however, are unknown. Monocytes secrete a variety of polypeptide growth factors, including tumor necrosis factor (TNF). In the study reported here, the effects of botulinum toxin type D on the secretion of TNF from human monocytes were examined. The results demonstrate that biotulinum toxin type D inhibits the release of TNF from monocytes activated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) but not by 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate. Botulinum toxin type D had no detectable effect on intracellular TNF levels in LPS-treated monocytes, indicating that the effects of this toxin involve the secretory process. This inhibitory effect of botulinum toxin type D on TNF secretion from LPS-treated monocytes was partially reversed by treatment with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate or introduction of guanosine 5'-(/gamma/-thio)t-riphosphate into these cells. The results demonstrate that TNF secretion is regulated by at least two distinct guanine nucleotide-binding proteins, one responsible for the activation of phospholiphase C and another which acts as a substrate for botulinum toxin type D. ADP-ribosylation of monocyte membranes by botulinum toxin type D demonstrated the presence of three substrates with M/sub r/s of 45,000, 21,000, and 17,000. While the role of these substrates in exocytosis is unknown, the results suggest that the M/sub r/ 21,000 substrate is involved in a process other than TNF secretion.

  15. Intercomparison of selected fixed-area areal reduction factor methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlovic, Sandra; Perica, Sanja; St Laurent, Michael; Mejía, Alfonso

    2016-06-01

    The areal reduction factor (ARF) is a concept used in many hydrologic designs to transform a point precipitation frequency estimate of a given duration and frequency to a corresponding areal estimate. Various methods have been proposed in the literature to calculate ARFs. Proposed ARFs could vary significantly, and it is unclear if discrepancies are primarily due to differences in methodologies, the dissimilar datasets used to calculate ARFs, or if they originate from regional uniqueness. Our goal in this study is to analyze differences among ARFs derived from different types of fixed-area ARF methods, which are suitable for use with precipitation frequency estimates. For this intercomparison, all the ARFs were computed using the same, high-quality rainfall-radar merged dataset for a common geographic region. The selected ARFs methods represent four commonly used approaches: empirical methods, methods that are based on the spatial correlation structure of rainfall, methods that rely on the scaling properties of rainfall in space and time, and methods that utilize extreme value theory. The state of Oklahoma was selected as the study area, as it has a good quality radar data and a dense network of rain gauges. Results indicate significant uncertainties in the ARF estimates, regardless of the method used. Even when calculated from the same dataset and for the same geographic area, the ARF estimates from the selected methods differ. The differences are more pronounced for the shorter durations and larger areas. Results also indicate some ARF dependence on the average recurrence intervals.

  16. Association of genetic polymorphisms in GADD45A, MDM2, and p14{sup ARF} with the risk of chronic benzene poisoning in a Chinese occupational population

    SciTech Connect

    Sun Pin; Zhang Zhongbin; Wan Junxiang; Zhao Naiqing; Jin Xipeng; Xia Zhaolin

    2009-10-01

    Benzene reactive metabolites can lead to DNA damage and trigger the p53-dependent defense responses to maintain genomic stability. We hypothesized that the p53-dependent genes may play a role in the development of chronic benzene poisoning (CBP). In a case-control study of 303 patients with benzene poisoning and 295 workers occupationally exposed to benzene in south China, we investigated associations between the risk of CBP and polymorphisms in three p53-dependent genes. Potential interactions of these polymorphisms with lifestyle factors were also explored. We found p14{sup ARF} rs3731245 polymorphism was associated with risk of CBP (P = 0.014). Compared with those carrying the GG genotype, individuals carrying p14{sup ARF} rs3731245 GA+AA genotypes had a reduced risk of CBP ([adjusted odds ratio (OR{sub adj}) = 0.57, 95%CI = 0.36-0.89]. Further analysis showed p14{sup ARF} TGA/TAG diplotype was associated with an increased risk of CBP (P = 0.0006), whereas p14{sup ARF} TGG/TAA diplotype was associated with a decreased risk of CBP (P = 0.0000001). In addition, we found individuals carrying both MDM2 Del1518 WW genotype and p14{sup ARF} rs3731245 GA+AA genotypes had a lower risk of CBP (OR{sub adj} = 0.25; 95%CI = 0.10-0.62; P = 0.003). Although these results require confirmation and extension, our findings suggest that genetic polymorphisms in p14{sup ARF} may have an impact on the risk of CBP in the study population.

  17. Differential effects on ARF stability by normal vs. oncogenic levels of c-Myc expression

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Delin; Kon, Ning; Zhong, Jiayun; Zhang, Pingzhao; Yu, Long; Gu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY ARF suppresses aberrant cell growth upon c-Myc overexpression through activating p53 responses. Nevertheless, the precise mechanism by which ARF specifically, restrains the oncogenic potential of c-Myc without affecting its normal physiological function is not well understood. Here, we show that low levels of c-Myc expression stimulate cell proliferation whereas high levels inhibit through activating the ARF-p53 response. Although the mRNA levels of ARF are induced under both scenarios, the accumulation of ARF protein occurs only when ULF-mediated degradation of ARF is inhibited by c-Myc overexpression. Moreover, the levels of ARF are reduced through ULF-mediated ubiquitination upon DNA damage. Blocking ARF degradation by c-Myc overexpression dramatically stimulates the apoptotic responses. Our study reveals that ARF stability control is crucial for differentiating normal (low) vs. oncogenic (high) levels of c-Myc expression and suggests that differential effects on ULF- mediated ARF ubiquitination by c-Myc levels act as a barrier in oncogene-induced stress responses. PMID:23747016

  18. An Effector Domain Mutant of Arf6 Implicates Phospholipase D in Endosomal Membrane RecyclingD⃞

    PubMed Central

    Jovanovic, Olivera A.; Brown, Fraser D.; Donaldson, Julie G.

    2006-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the role of phospholipase D (PLD) in mediating Arf6 function in cells. Expression of Arf6 mutants that are defective in activating PLD, Arf6N48R and Arf6N48I, inhibited membrane recycling to the plasma membrane (PM), resulting in an accumulation of tubular endosomal membranes. Additionally, unlike wild-type Arf6, neither Arf6 mutant could generate protrusions or recruit the Arf6 GTPase activating protein (GAP) ACAP1 onto the endosome in the presence of aluminum fluoride. Remarkably, all of these phenotypes, including accumulated tubular endosomes, blocked recycling, and failure to make protrusions and recruit ACAP effectively, could be recreated in either untransfected cells or cells expressing wild-type Arf6 by treatment with 1-butanol to inhibit the formation of phosphatidic acid (PA), the product of PLD. Moreover, most of the defects present in cells expressing Arf6N48R or N48I could be reversed by treatment with agents expected to elevate PA levels in cells. Together, these observations provide compelling evidence that Arf6 stimulation of PLD is required for endosomal membrane recycling and GAP recruitment. PMID:16280360

  19. The auxin response factor gene family in banana: genome-wide identification and expression analyses during development, ripening, and abiotic stress

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Wei; Zuo, Jiao; Hou, Xiaowan; Yan, Yan; Wei, Yunxie; Liu, Juhua; Li, Meiying; Xu, Biyu; Jin, Zhiqiang

    2015-01-01

    Auxin signaling regulates various auxin-responsive genes via two types of transcriptional regulators, Auxin Response Factors (ARF) and Aux/IAA. ARF transcription factors act as critical components of auxin signaling that play important roles in modulating various biological processes. However, limited information about this gene family in fruit crops is currently available. Herein, 47 ARF genes were identified in banana based on its genome sequence. Phylogenetic analysis of the ARFs from banana, rice, and Arabidopsis suggested that the ARFs could be divided into four subgroups, among which most ARFs from the banana showed a closer relationship with those from rice than those from Arabidopsis. Conserved motif analysis showed that all identified MaARFs had typical DNA-binding and ARF domains, but 12 members lacked the dimerization domain. Gene structure analysis showed that the number of exons in MaARF genes ranged from 5 to 21, suggesting large variation amongst banana ARF genes. The comprehensive expression profiles of MaARF genes yielded useful information about their involvement in diverse tissues, different stages of fruit development and ripening, and responses to abiotic stresses in different varieties. Interaction networks and co-expression assays indicated the strong transcriptional response of banana ARFs and ARF-mediated networks in early fruit development for different varieties. Our systematic analysis of MaARFs revealed robust tissue-specific, development-dependent, and abiotic stress-responsive candidate MaARF genes for further functional assays in planta. These findings could lead to potential applications in the genetic improvement of banana cultivars, and yield new insights into the complexity of the control of MaARF gene expression at the transcriptional level. Finally, they support the hypothesis that ARFs are a crucial component of the auxin signaling pathway, which regulates a wide range of physiological processes. PMID:26442055

  20. The auxin response factor gene family in banana: genome-wide identification and expression analyses during development, ripening, and abiotic stress.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei; Zuo, Jiao; Hou, Xiaowan; Yan, Yan; Wei, Yunxie; Liu, Juhua; Li, Meiying; Xu, Biyu; Jin, Zhiqiang

    2015-01-01

    Auxin signaling regulates various auxin-responsive genes via two types of transcriptional regulators, Auxin Response Factors (ARF) and Aux/IAA. ARF transcription factors act as critical components of auxin signaling that play important roles in modulating various biological processes. However, limited information about this gene family in fruit crops is currently available. Herein, 47 ARF genes were identified in banana based on its genome sequence. Phylogenetic analysis of the ARFs from banana, rice, and Arabidopsis suggested that the ARFs could be divided into four subgroups, among which most ARFs from the banana showed a closer relationship with those from rice than those from Arabidopsis. Conserved motif analysis showed that all identified MaARFs had typical DNA-binding and ARF domains, but 12 members lacked the dimerization domain. Gene structure analysis showed that the number of exons in MaARF genes ranged from 5 to 21, suggesting large variation amongst banana ARF genes. The comprehensive expression profiles of MaARF genes yielded useful information about their involvement in diverse tissues, different stages of fruit development and ripening, and responses to abiotic stresses in different varieties. Interaction networks and co-expression assays indicated the strong transcriptional response of banana ARFs and ARF-mediated networks in early fruit development for different varieties. Our systematic analysis of MaARFs revealed robust tissue-specific, development-dependent, and abiotic stress-responsive candidate MaARF genes for further functional assays in planta. These findings could lead to potential applications in the genetic improvement of banana cultivars, and yield new insights into the complexity of the control of MaARF gene expression at the transcriptional level. Finally, they support the hypothesis that ARFs are a crucial component of the auxin signaling pathway, which regulates a wide range of physiological processes. PMID:26442055

  1. ArF photoresist system using alicyclic polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Joo Hyeon; Kim, Seong-Ju; Park, Sun-Yi; Lee, Hosull; Jung, Jae Chang; Bok, Cheol-Kyu; Baik, Ki-Ho

    1997-07-01

    We have developed a chemically amplified photoresist for use in ArF lithography based on alicyclic polymer. 3- Bicyclo(2,2,1)hept-2-yl-3-(2-methyl allyoxy)-propionic acid tert-butyl ester (BHPE) was prepared as a new kind of protected acid-labile monomer. Terpolymer, poly(BHPE-NBO-MAL), was prepared with BHPE, 5-norbornen-2-ol (NBO), and maleic anhydride (MAL) monomers by radical polymerization. Photoresist of poly(BHPE-NBO-MAL) displayed good adhesion, dry-etch resistance, and development. As a result, we obtained 0.16 micrometer line-and-space positive patterns with 2.38 wt% TMAH aqueous solution using an ArF exposure system.

  2. A-RAF Kinase Functions in ARF6 Regulated Endocytic Membrane Traffic

    PubMed Central

    Nekhoroshkova, Elena; Albert, Stefan; Becker, Matthias; Rapp, Ulf R.

    2009-01-01

    Background RAF kinases direct ERK MAPK signaling to distinct subcellular compartments in response to growth factor stimulation. Methodology/Principal Findings Of the three mammalian isoforms A-RAF is special in that one of its two lipid binding domains mediates a unique pattern of membrane localization. Specific membrane binding is retained by an N-terminal fragment (AR149) that corresponds to a naturally occurring splice variant termed DA-RAF2. AR149 colocalizes with ARF6 on tubular endosomes and has a dominant negative effect on endocytic trafficking. Moreover actin polymerization of yeast and mammalian cells is abolished. AR149/DA-RAF2 does not affect the internalization step of endocytosis, but trafficking to the recycling compartment. Conclusions/Significance A-RAF induced ERK activation is required for this step by activating ARF6, as A-RAF depletion or inhibition of the A-RAF controlled MEK-ERK cascade blocks recycling. These data led to a new model for A-RAF function in endocytic trafficking. PMID:19247477

  3. STAT3 regulated ARF expression suppresses prostate cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Pencik, Jan; Schlederer, Michaela; Gruber, Wolfgang; Unger, Christine; Walker, Steven M.; Chalaris, Athena; Marié, Isabelle J.; Hassler, Melanie R.; Javaheri, Tahereh; Aksoy, Osman; Blayney, Jaine K.; Prutsch, Nicole; Skucha, Anna; Herac, Merima; Krämer, Oliver H.; Mazal, Peter; Grebien, Florian; Egger, Gerda; Poli, Valeria; Mikulits, Wolfgang; Eferl, Robert; Esterbauer, Harald; Kennedy, Richard; Fend, Falko; Scharpf, Marcus; Braun, Martin; Perner, Sven; Levy, David E.; Malcolm, Tim; Turner, Suzanne D.; Haitel, Andrea; Susani, Martin; Moazzami, Ali; Rose-John, Stefan; Aberger, Fritz; Merkel, Olaf; Moriggl, Richard; Culig, Zoran; Dolznig, Helmut; Kenner, Lukas

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) is the most prevalent cancer in men. Hyperactive STAT3 is thought to be oncogenic in PCa. However, targeting of the IL-6/STAT3 axis in PCa patients has failed to provide therapeutic benefit. Here we show that genetic inactivation of Stat3 or IL-6 signalling in a Pten-deficient PCa mouse model accelerates cancer progression leading to metastasis. Mechanistically, we identify p19ARF as a direct Stat3 target. Loss of Stat3 signalling disrupts the ARF–Mdm2–p53 tumour suppressor axis bypassing senescence. Strikingly, we also identify STAT3 and CDKN2A mutations in primary human PCa. STAT3 and CDKN2A deletions co-occurred with high frequency in PCa metastases. In accordance, loss of STAT3 and p14ARF expression in patient tumours correlates with increased risk of disease recurrence and metastatic PCa. Thus, STAT3 and ARF may be prognostic markers to stratify high from low risk PCa patients. Our findings challenge the current discussion on therapeutic benefit or risk of IL-6/STAT3 inhibition. PMID:26198641

  4. ArF pellicle degradation mechanism for resolving CD variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Hyungseok; Ahn, Yohan; Ryu, Jua; Lee, Yangkoo; An, Bumhyun; Lee, Seokryeol

    2007-03-01

    With the introduction of ArF laser, a binary mask is preferred because a PSM mask is still weak to the crystal defect called as photomask haze although extensive studies trying to resolve the haze impact to a photomask have been performed by various researchers in company and school. However, a new problem was happened after a binary mask introduction that CD variation in an exposure shot is appeared and is gradually increased. And finally, CD variation considerably causes defects in wafer level. It was proven that CD variation is closely related to the change of the reticle transmittance by a lot of researches. In this study, the mechanism of ArF pellicle degradation is focused on because the pellicle degradation affects a reticle transmittance in direct. The components outgassed from a pellicle by the high photon energy of ArF laser, for example carbon or fluorine, are absorbed on the surface of the reticle, so that the transmittance of the reticle is decreased. The phenomena of the pellicle degradation have been studied by the various viewpoints, theoretical background, experiment and results tested in mass production line in this study. Therefore, this study has the important meaning by providing the substantial clues to resolve CD variation problem in a near future.

  5. p19(Arf) is required for the cellular response to chronic DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Bieging-Rolett, K T; Johnson, T M; Brady, C A; Beaudry, V G; Pathak, N; Han, S; Attardi, L D

    2016-08-18

    The p53 tumor suppressor is a stress sensor, driving cell cycle arrest or apoptosis in response to DNA damage or oncogenic signals. p53 activation by oncogenic signals relies on the p19(Arf) tumor suppressor, while p53 activation downstream of acute DNA damage is reported to be p19(Arf)-independent. Accordingly, p19(Arf)-deficient mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) arrest in response to acute DNA damage. However, p19(Arf) is required for replicative senescence, a condition associated with an activated DNA damage response, as p19(Arf)-/- MEFs do not senesce after serial passage. A possible explanation for these seemingly disparate roles for p19(Arf) is that acute and chronic DNA damage responses are mechanistically distinct. Replicative senescence may result from chronic, low-dose DNA damage responses in which p19(Arf) has a specific role. We therefore examined the role of p19(Arf) in cellular responses to chronic, low-dose DNA-damaging agent treatment by maintaining MEFs in low oxygen and administering 0.5 G y γ-irradiation daily or 150 μM hydroxyurea, a replication stress inducer. In contrast to their response to acute DNA damage, p19(Arf)-/- MEFs exposed to chronic DNA damage do not senesce, revealing a selective role for p19(Arf) in senescence upon low-level, chronic DNA damage. We show further that p53 pathway activation in p19(Arf)-/- MEFs exposed to chronic DNA damage is attenuated relative to wild-type MEFs, suggesting a role for p19(Arf) in fine-tuning p53 activity. However, combined Nutlin3a and chronic DNA-damaging agent treatment is insufficient to promote senescence in p19(Arf)-/- MEFs, suggesting that the role of p19(Arf) in the chronic DNA damage response may be partially p53-independent. These data suggest the importance of p19(Arf) for the cellular response to the low-level DNA damage incurred in culture or upon oncogene expression, providing new insight into how p19(Arf) serves as a tumor suppressor. Moreover, our study helps reconcile reports

  6. Poliovirus Replication Requires the N-terminus but not the Catalytic Sec7 Domain of ArfGEF GBF1

    PubMed Central

    Belov, George A.; Kovtunovych, Gennadiy; Jackson, Catherine L.; Ehrenfeld, Ellie

    2010-01-01

    Viruses are intracellular parasites whose reproduction relies on factors provided by the host. The cellular protein GBF1 is critical for poliovirus replication. Here we show that the contribution of GBF1 to virus replication is different from its known activities in uninfected cells. Normally GBF1 activates the Arf GTPases necessary for formation of COPI transport vesicles. GBF1 function is modulated by p115 and Rab1b. However, in polio-infected cells, p115 is degraded and neither p115 nor Rab1b knock-down affects virus replication. Poliovirus infection is very sensitive to BFA, an inhibitor of Arf activation by GBF1. BFA targets the catalytic Sec7 domain of GBF1. Nevertheless the BFA block of polio replication is rescued by expression of only the N-terminal region of GBF1 lacking the Sec7 domain. Replication of BFA-resistant poliovirus in the presence of BFA is uncoupled from Arf activation but is dependent on GBF1. Thus the function(s) of this protein essential for viral replication can be separated from those required for cellular metabolism. PMID:20497182

  7. Membrane curvature induced by Arf1-GTP is essential for vesicle formation

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Rainer; Sun, Zhe; Adolf, Frank; Rutz, Chistoph; Bassler, Jochen; Wild, Klemens; Sinning, Irmgard; Hurt, Ed; Brügger, Britta; Béthune, Julien; Wieland, Felix

    2008-01-01

    The GTPase Arf1 is considered as a molecular switch that regulates binding and release of coat proteins that polymerize on membranes to form transport vesicles. Here, we show that Arf1-GTP induces positive membrane curvature and find that the small GTPase can dimerize dependent on GTP. Investigating a possible link between Arf dimerization and curvature formation, we isolated an Arf1 mutant that cannot dimerize. Although it was capable of exerting the classical role of Arf1 as a coat receptor, it could not mediate the formation of COPI vesicles from Golgi-membranes and was lethal when expressed in yeast. Strikingly, this mutant was not able to deform membranes, suggesting that GTP-induced dimerization of Arf1 is a critical step inducing membrane curvature during the formation of coated vesicles. PMID:18689681

  8. [Basic principles for setting acute reference dose, ARfD in Japan].

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Midori; Suzuki, Daisetsu; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Shirota, Mariko; Inoue, Kaoru; Takahashi, Miwa; Morita, Takeshi; Ono, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    Basic principles for simulation of acute reference dose (ARfD) setting were defined based on the work of Solecki et al. (2005). The principles are: (1) Appearance of acute toxicity within 24 h after oral administration. (2) Rationale for setting toxicity that appears or could appear after single oral administration. (3) ARfD setting is assumed to be necessary for all pesticides. (4) ARfD setting is not necessary when the value is at or above the cutoff level. (5) The setting basically applies to the general population. (6) ARfD is set based on the lowest NOAEL among all the available study data concerning endpoints for acute effects. (7) Effects of exposure during critical periods should be considered as endpoints for ARfD setting. (8) The approach for the safety coefficient is the same as that for acceptable daily intake. (9) If available, human data are acceptable as an endpoint for ARfD setting. PMID:24025213

  9. CD metrology for avoiding shrinkage of ArF resist patterns in 100 nm ArF lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    You, Tae-Jun; Bok, Cheol-Kyu; Shin, Ki-Soo

    2002-07-01

    ML 4689-80 CD Metrology for Avoiding Shrinkage of ArF Resist Patterns in 100nm ArF Lithography Tae-Jun You, Cheolkyu Bok, Ki-Soo Shin Hynix Semiconductor, San 136-1 Amiri, Bubal-eub, Ichon-si, Kyongki-do 467-701, Korea We have observed CD(Critical Dimension) shrinkage of acrylate type ArF resist patterns during SEM measurement. CD change was 30% shrinkage for line pattern and 10% expansion for contact hole patterns after 30 times measurement. CD shrinkage was proportion to line pattern size but no relation with LER(Line Edge Roughness). We confirm that CD shrinkage different from resist to resist and SEM measurement condition. CD shrinkage was bigger for acrylate type resist than COMA(Cyclo Olefin Maleic Anhydride) type resist and smaller at lower electron voltage and current conditions. In order to get the improvement of CD shrinkage, we performed electron-beam curing before SEM measurement. Above (see paper for formula) electron-beam dose condition, CD shrinkage improved from 10% to 3%. However, this method caused OPC(Optical Proximity Correction) issue as CD also changed after electron-beam curing. Therefore, we tried to develop a new measurement method instead of applying additional process technique. In this paper, we will describe our CD measurement method, Off-Site measurement technique, for 100nm DRAM lithography. The Off-Site CD measurement repeatability (formula available in paper) was controlled below (see paper).

  10. Genome-wide analysis of auxin response factor gene family members in medicinal model plant Salvia miltiorrhiza

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Zhichao; Ji, Aijia; Chen, Shilin

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Auxin response factors (ARFs) can function as transcriptional activators or repressors to regulate the expression of auxin response genes by specifically binding to auxin response elements (AuxREs) during plant development. Based on a genome-wide strategy using the medicinal model plant Salvia miltiorrhiza, 25 S. miltiorrhiza ARF (SmARF) gene family members in four classes (class Ia, IIa, IIb and III) were comprehensively analyzed to identify characteristics including gene structures, conserved domains, phylogenetic relationships and expression patterns. In a hybrid analysis of the phylogenetic tree, microRNA targets, and expression patterns of SmARFs in different organs, root tissues, and methyl jasmonate or indole-3-acetic acid treatment conditions, we screened for candidate SmARFs involved in various developmental processes of S. miltiorrhiza. Based on this analysis, we predicted that SmARF25, SmARF7, SmARF16 and SmARF20 are involved in flower, leaf, stem and root development, respectively. With the further insight into the targets of miR160 and miR167, specific SmARF genes in S. miltiorrhiza might encode products that participate in biological processes as described for ARF genes in Arabidopsis. Our results provide a foundation for understanding the molecular basis and regulatory mechanisms of SmARFs in S. miltiorrhiza. PMID:27230647

  11. Genome-wide analysis of auxin response factor gene family members in medicinal model plant Salvia miltiorrhiza.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhichao; Ji, Aijia; Song, Jingyuan; Chen, Shilin

    2016-01-01

    Auxin response factors (ARFs) can function as transcriptional activators or repressors to regulate the expression of auxin response genes by specifically binding to auxin response elements (AuxREs) during plant development. Based on a genome-wide strategy using the medicinal model plant Salvia miltiorrhiza, 25 S. miltiorrhiza ARF (SmARF) gene family members in four classes (class Ia, IIa, IIb and III) were comprehensively analyzed to identify characteristics including gene structures, conserved domains, phylogenetic relationships and expression patterns. In a hybrid analysis of the phylogenetic tree, microRNA targets, and expression patterns of SmARFs in different organs, root tissues, and methyl jasmonate or indole-3-acetic acid treatment conditions, we screened for candidate SmARFs involved in various developmental processes of S. miltiorrhiza Based on this analysis, we predicted that SmARF25, SmARF7, SmARF16 and SmARF20 are involved in flower, leaf, stem and root development, respectively. With the further insight into the targets of miR160 and miR167, specific SmARF genes in S. miltiorrhiza might encode products that participate in biological processes as described for ARF genes in Arabidopsis Our results provide a foundation for understanding the molecular basis and regulatory mechanisms of SmARFs in S. miltiorrhiza. PMID:27230647

  12. An early secretory pathway mediated by GNOM-LIKE 1 and GNOM is essential for basal polarity establishment in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Siamsa M.; Haeger, Ash; Vain, Thomas; Rigal, Adeline; Viotti, Corrado; Łangowska, Małgorzata; Ma, Qian; Friml, Jiří; Raikhel, Natasha V.; Hicks, Glenn R.; Robert, Stéphanie

    2015-01-01

    Spatial regulation of the plant hormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA, or auxin) is essential for plant development. Auxin gradient establishment is mediated by polarly localized auxin transporters, including PIN-FORMED (PIN) proteins. Their localization and abundance at the plasma membrane are tightly regulated by endomembrane machinery, especially the endocytic and recycling pathways mediated by the ADP ribosylation factor guanine nucleotide exchange factor (ARF-GEF) GNOM. We assessed the role of the early secretory pathway in establishing PIN1 polarity in Arabidopsis thaliana by pharmacological and genetic approaches. We identified the compound endosidin 8 (ES8), which selectively interferes with PIN1 basal polarity without altering the polarity of apical proteins. ES8 alters the auxin distribution pattern in the root and induces a strong developmental phenotype, including reduced root length. The ARF-GEF–defective mutants gnom-like 1 (gnl1-1) and gnom (van7) are significantly resistant to ES8. The compound does not affect recycling or vacuolar trafficking of PIN1 but leads to its intracellular accumulation, resulting in loss of PIN1 basal polarity at the plasma membrane. Our data confirm a role for GNOM in endoplasmic reticulum (ER)–Golgi trafficking and reveal that a GNL1/GNOM-mediated early secretory pathway selectively regulates PIN1 basal polarity establishment in a manner essential for normal plant development. PMID:25646449

  13. Role of protein kinase D2 phosphorylation on Tyr in modulation by ghrelin of Helicobacter pylori-induced up-regulation in gastric mucosal matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) secretion.

    PubMed

    Slomiany, B L; Slomiany, A

    2016-06-01

    Matrix metalloproteinas-9 (MMP-9) is a glycosylated endopeptidase associated with host reaction to microbial endotoxins and also characterizes gastric mucosal inflammatory response to H. pylori infection. Here, we report on the factors involved in gastric mucosal MMP-9 secretion in response to H. pylori LPS, and the effect of hormone, ghrelin. We show that both the LPS-elicited induction in MMP-9 secretion and also the modulatory influence of ghrelin occur at the level of MMP-9 processing between the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi. Further, we demonstrate that the LPS effect is associated with up-regulation in the activation of Arf1, a small GTPase of the ADP-ribosylation factor family, and the recruitment and phosphorylation of protein kinase D2 (PKD2), involved in the secretory cargo processing in the Golgi. Moreover, we reveal that the LPS-induced up-regulation in MMP-9 secretion is reflected in a marked increase in PKCδ-mediated PKD2 phosphorylation on Ser, while the modulatory effect of ghrelin is manifested by the SFK-PTKs-dependent phosphorylation of PKD2 on Tyr. Thus, our findings demonstrate the role of Arf1/PKD2 in mediation of H. pylori LPS-induced up-regulation in gastric mucosal MMP-9 secretion and suggest the modulatory mechanism of ghrelin action. PMID:27209313

  14. Laa1p, a Conserved AP-1 Accessory Protein Important for AP-1 Localization in Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, G. Esteban

    2006-01-01

    AP-1 and Gga adaptors participate in clathrin-mediated protein transport between the trans-Golgi network and endosomes. Both adaptors contain homologous domains that act to recruit accessory proteins involved in clathrin-coated vesicle formation, but the spectrum of known adaptor-binding partners is limited. This study describes an evolutionarily conserved protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Laa1p (Yjl207cp), that interacts and functions specifically with AP-1. Deletion of LAA1, when combined with a conditional mutation in clathrin heavy chain or deletion of GGA genes, accentuated growth defects and increased disruption of clathrin-dependent α-factor maturation and transport of carboxypeptidase Y to the vacuole. In contrast, such genetic interactions were not observed between deletions of LAA1 and AP-1 subunit genes. Laa1p preferentially interacted with AP-1 compared with Gga proteins by glutathione S-transferase-fusion affinity binding and coimmunoprecipitations. Localization of AP-1 and Laa1p, but not Gga proteins, was highly sensitive to brefeldin A, an inhibitor of ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf) activation. Importantly, deletion of LAA1 caused mislocalization of AP-1, especially in cells at high density (postdiauxic shift), but it did not affect Gga protein distribution. Our results identify Laa1p as a new determinant of AP-1 localization, suggesting a model in which Laa1p and Arf cooperate to direct stable association of AP-1 with appropriate intracellular membranes. PMID:16687571

  15. New 0.75 NA ArF scanning lithographic tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Lifeng; Cheng, Jianrui; Sun, Gang; Chen, Yonghui

    2011-04-01

    A new company in the lithography world, SMEE has developed and produced a prototype wafer exposure tool, with an ArF laser light source. This tool, SMEE SSA600/10, adopted step and scan technology to obtain a large exposure filed and to average optical aberrations for a scanned image to improve CD uniformity and reduce distortion. The maximum numerical aperture is 0.75 and the maximum coherence factor of illumination system is 0.88. The illuminator provides continuously variable conventional and off-axis illumination modes to improve resolution. In this paper, the configuration of the exposure tool is presented and design concepts of the scanner are introduced. We show actual test data such as synchronization accuracy, focus and leveling repeatability, dynamic imaging performance (resolution, depth of focus) and overlay.

  16. Role of the proto-oncogene Pokemon in cellular transformation and ARF repression.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Takahiro; Hobbs, Robin M; Merghoub, Taha; Guernah, Ilhem; Zelent, Arthur; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2005-01-20

    Aberrant transcriptional repression through chromatin remodelling and histone deacetylation has been postulated to represent a driving force underlying tumorigenesis because histone deacetylase inhibitors have been found to be effective in cancer treatment. However, the molecular mechanisms by which transcriptional derepression would be linked to tumour suppression are poorly understood. Here we identify the transcriptional repressor Pokemon (encoded by the Zbtb7 gene) as a critical factor in oncogenesis. Mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking Zbtb7 are completely refractory to oncogene-mediated cellular transformation. Conversely, Pokemon overexpression leads to overt oncogenic transformation both in vitro and in vivo in transgenic mice. Pokemon can specifically repress the transcription of the tumour suppressor gene ARF through direct binding. We find that Pokemon is aberrantly overexpressed in human cancers and that its expression levels predict biological behaviour and clinical outcome. Pokemon's critical role in cellular transformation makes it an attractive target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:15662416

  17. p14(ARF) Prevents Proliferation of Aneuploid Cells by Inducing p53-Dependent Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Veneziano, Lorena; Barra, Viviana; Lentini, Laura; Spatafora, Sergio; Di Leonardo, Aldo

    2016-02-01

    Weakening the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint by reduced expression of its components induces chromosome instability and aneuploidy that are hallmarks of cancer cells. The tumor suppressor p14(ARF) is overexpressed in response to oncogenic stimuli to stabilize p53 halting cell progression. Previously, we found that lack or reduced expression of p14(ARF) is involved in the maintenance of aneuploid cells in primary human cells, suggesting that it could be part of a pathway controlling their proliferation. To investigate this aspect further, p14(ARF) was ectopically expressed in HCT116 cells after depletion of the Spindle Assembly Checkpoint MAD2 protein that was used as a trigger for aneuploidy. p14(ARF) Re-expression reduced the number of aneuploid cells in MAD2 post-transcriptionally silenced cells. Also aberrant mitoses, frequently displayed in MAD2-depleted cells, were decreased when p14(ARF) was expressed at the same time. In addition, p14(ARF) ectopic expression in MAD2-depleted cells induced apoptosis associated with increased p53 protein levels. Conversely, p14(ARF) ectopic expression did not induce apoptosis in HCT116 p53KO cells. Collectively, our results suggest that the tumor suppressor p14(ARF) may have an important role in counteracting proliferation of aneuploid cells by activating p53-dependent apoptosis. PMID:25752701

  18. Simulation of acute reference dose (ARfD) settings for pesticides in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Midori; Suzuki, Daisetsu; Matsumoto, Kiyoshi; Shirota, Mariko; Inoue, Kaoru; Takahashi, Miwa; Morita, Takeshi; Ono, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    In order to develop guidelines for setting acute reference doses (ARfDs) for pesticides in Japan, we conducted simulations of ARfD settings based on evaluation reports for 201 pesticides assessed by the Food Safety Commission (FSC) in Japan over the last 8 years. Our conceptual principles were based on the concepts written by Solecki et al. (2005) and were adapted for toxicological data required in Japan. Through this process, we were able to set the ARfDs for over 90% of the 201 pesticides tested. The studies that provided the rationale for ARfD setting were primarily reproductive and developmental toxicity studies, acute neurotoxicity studies, and pharmacology studies. For approximately 30% of the pesticides simulated in the present study, it was not necessary to establish ARfDs. Some of the simulated ARfDs resulting from their endpoints may be conservative estimates, because the evaluation reports were written for acceptable daily intake settings. Thus, it was sometimes difficult to distinguish acute toxic alerts from repeated toxicities. We were unable to set an ARfD for 14 pesticides because of insufficient data on acute toxicities. This could be improved by more complete recordkeeping. Furthermore, we categorized the 201 pesticides by mechanism of action or chemical structure. Our simulation indicates that the conceptual framework presented here can be used as a basis for the development of guidelines on ARfD settings for pesticides in Japan. PMID:23535399

  19. Identification of Insulin-Like Growth Factor-I Receptor (IGF-IR) Gene Promoter-Binding Proteins in Estrogen Receptor (ER)-Positive and ER-Depleted Breast Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sarfstein, Rive; Belfiore, Antonino; Werner, Haim

    2010-01-01

    The insulin-like growth factor I receptor (IGF-IR) has been implicated in the etiology of breast cancer. Overexpression of the IGF-IR gene is a typical feature of most primary breast cancers, whereas low IGF-IR levels are seen at advanced stages. Hence, evaluation of IGF-IR levels might be important for assessing prognosis. In the present study, we employed a proteomic approach based on DNA affinity chromatography followed either by mass spectroscopy (MS) or Western blot analysis to identify transcription factors that may associate with the IGF-IR promoter in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive and ER-depleted breast cancer cells. A biotinylated IGF-IR promoter fragment was bound to streptavidin magnetic beads and incubated with nuclear extracts of breast cancer cells. IGF-IR promoter-binding proteins were eluted with high salt and analyzed by MS and Western blots. Among the proteins that were found to bind to the IGF-IR promoter we identified zinc finger transcription factors Sp1 and KLF6, ER-α, p53, c-jun, and poly (ADP-ribosylation) polymerase. Furthermore, chromatin immune-precipitation (ChIP) analysis confirmed the direct in vivo binding of some of these transcription factors to IGF-IR promoter DNA. The functional relevance of binding data was assessed by cotransfection experiments with specific expression vectors along with an IGF-IR promoter reporter. In summary, we identified nuclear proteins that are potentially responsible for the differential expression of the IGF-IR gene in ER-positive and ER-depleted breast cancer cells. PMID:24281069

  20. Identification and isoprenylation of plant GTP-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Biermann, B; Randall, S K; Crowell, D N

    1996-08-01

    To identify isoprenylated plant GTP-binding proteins, Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tabacum cDNA expression libraries were screened for cDNA-encoded proteins capable of binding [32P]GTP in vitro. ATGB2, an Arabidopsis homologue of the GTP-binding protein Rab2, was found to bind GTP in vitro and to be a substrate for a geranylgeranyl:protein transferase (GGTase) present in plant extracts. The carboxyl terminus of this protein contains a -GCCG sequence, which has not previously been shown to be recognized by any prenyl:protein transferase (PTase), but which most closely resembles that isoprenylated by the type II GGTase (-XXCC, -XCXC, or -CCXX). In vitro geranylgeranylation of an Arabidopsis Rab1 protein containing a carboxyl-terminal-CCGQ sequence confirmed the presence of a type II GGTase-like activity in plant extracts. Several other proteins were also identified by in vitro GTP binding, including Arabidopsis and tobacco homologues of Rab11, ARF (ADP-ribosylation factor) and Sar proteins, as well as a novel 22 kDa Arabidopsis protein (ATG81). This 22 kDa protein had consensus GTP-binding motifs and bound GTP with high specificity, but its structure was not closely related to that of any known GTP-binding protein (it most resembled proteins within the ARF/Sar and G protein alpha-subunit superfamilies). PMID:8843944

  1. Photomask cleaning process improvement to minimize ArF haze

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graham, Michael; McDonald, Andrew

    2008-04-01

    Growth of "haze" defects on photomasks exposed in ArF lithography is recognized as a serious problem. Haze defects that have grown to detectable sizes can be analysed in situ by techniques such as EDX or Raman, but to analyze at the photomask manufacturing stage requires extraction of residues by solution in DI water. The effect of extraction conditions, including surface area and material, water volume, time, and temperature, has been studied. A standard method to compare residual ion levels is proposed. Various methods for reducing residual ion levels from the photomask cleaning process have been published. These include SPM reduction, oxygen plasma, SC1 dilution, Megasonic agitation, hot rinse, UV exposure, thermal bake, ozone water, ozone gas, and hydrogenated water. Critical parameters for the cleaning process, besides residual ion levels and contamination removal efficiency, include CD shift, AR/chrome damage, scatter bar damage, and on phase shift masks, the change in phase and transmission. An optimized process combining conventional and novel techniques is described. Data is presented to show the importance of controlling all resist strip and clean processes, not just the final clean. It has achieved sulphate levels of 0.2ng/cm2 (well below the critical level for haze growth), as well as improved results for the other critical parameters. This process has been demonstrated to allow ArF exposure of large numbers of wafers without the appearance of haze defects.

  2. Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase 1 Interacts with Nuclear Respiratory Factor 1 (NRF-1) and Plays a Role in NRF-1 Transcriptional Regulation*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Hossain, Mohammad B.; Ji, Ping; Anish, Ramakrishnan; Jacobson, Raymond H.; Takada, Shinako

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear respiratory factor 1 (NRF-1) is one of the key transcriptional activators for nuclear-coded genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and function as well as for many housekeeping genes. A transcriptional co-activator PGC-1 and its related family member PRC have previously been shown to interact with NRF-1 and co-activate NRF-1. We show here that NRF-1 can also directly interact with poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP-1) and co-purify the PARP-1·DNA-PK·Ku80·Ku70·topoisomerase IIβ-containing protein complex. Our in vitro binding experiments show that DNA-binding/dimerization domain of NRF-1 and the N-terminal half of PARP-1, which contains two Zinc fingers and the auto-modification domain, are responsible for the interaction, and that this interaction occurs with or without PARP-1 poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation (PARylation). DNA-bound NRF-1 can form a complex with PARP-1, suggesting that NRF-1 can recruit the PARP-1·DNA-PK·Ku80·Ku70·topoisomerase IIβ-containing protein complex to the promoter. PARP-1 can also PARylate the DNA-binding domain of NRF-1 and negatively regulate NRF-1·PARP-1 interaction. Transient transfection and chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments suggest that PARP-1 plays a role during transcriptional activation by NRF-1. Our finding identifies a new aspect of transcriptional regulation used by NRF-1. PMID:19181665

  3. Molecular Control of the Amount, Subcellular Location and Activity State of Translation Elongation Factor 2 (eEF-2) in Neurons Experiencing Stress

    PubMed Central

    Argüelles-Castilla, Sandro; Camandola, Simonetta; Hutchison, Emmette R.; Cutler, Roy G.; Ayala, Antonio; Mattson, Mark P.

    2013-01-01

    Eukaryotic elongation factor 2 (eEF-2) is an important regulator of the protein translation machinery wherein it controls the movement of the ribosome along the mRNA. The activity of eEF-2 is regulated by changes in cellular energy status and nutrient availability, and posttranslational modifications such as phosphorylation and mono-ADP-ribosylation. However, the mechanisms regulating protein translation under conditions of cellular stress in neurons are unknown. Here we show that when rat hippocampal neurons experience oxidative stress (lipid peroxidation induced by exposure to cumene hydroperoxide; CH), eEF-2 is hyperphosphorylated and ribosylated resulting in reduced translational activity. The degradation of eEF-2 requires calpain proteolytic activity and is accompanied by accumulation of eEF-2 in the nuclear compartment. The subcellular localization of both native and phosphorylated forms of eEF-2 is influenced by CRM1 and 14.3.3, respectively. In hippocampal neurons p53 interacts with non-phosphorylated (active) eEF-2, but not with its phosphorylated form. The p53 – eEF-2 complexes are present in cytoplasm and nucleus, and their abundance increases when neurons experience oxidative stress. The nuclear localization of active eEF-2 depends upon its interaction with p53, as cells lacking p53 contain less active eEF-2 in the nuclear compartment. Overexpression of eEF-2 in hippocampal neurons results in increased nuclear levels of eEF-2, and decreased cell death following exposure to CH. Our results reveal novel molecular mechanisms controlling the differential subcellular localization and activity state of eEF-2 that may influence the survival status of neurons during periods of elevated oxidative stress. PMID:23542375

  4. The auxin response factor transcription factor family in soybean: genome-wide identification and expression analyses during development and water stress.

    PubMed

    Ha, Chien Van; Le, Dung Tien; Nishiyama, Rie; Watanabe, Yasuko; Sulieman, Saad; Tran, Uyen Thi; Mochida, Keiichi; Dong, Nguyen Van; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Tran, Lam-Son Phan

    2013-10-01

    In plants, the auxin response factor (ARF) transcription factors play important roles in regulating diverse biological processes, including development, growth, cell division and responses to environmental stimuli. An exhaustive search of soybean genome revealed 51 GmARFs, many of which were formed by genome duplications. The typical GmARFs (43 members) contain a DNA-binding domain, an ARF domain and an auxin/indole acetic acid (AUX/IAA) dimerization domain, whereas the remaining eight members lack the dimerization domain. Phylogenetic analysis of the ARFs from soybean and Arabidopsis revealed both similarity and divergence between the two ARF families, as well as enabled us to predict the functions of the GmARFs. Using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and available soybean Affymetrix array and Illumina transcriptome sequence data, a comprehensive expression atlas of GmARF genes was obtained in various organs and tissues, providing useful information about their involvement in defining the precise nature of individual tissues. Furthermore, expression profiling using qRT-PCR and microarray data revealed many water stress-responsive GmARFs in soybean, albeit with different patterns depending on types of tissues and/or developmental stages. Our systematic analysis has identified excellent tissue-specific and/or stress-responsive candidate GmARF genes for in-depth in planta functional analyses, which would lead to potential applications in the development of genetically modified soybean cultivars with enhanced drought tolerance. PMID:23810914

  5. The Auxin Response Factor Transcription Factor Family in Soybean: Genome-Wide Identification and Expression Analyses During Development and Water Stress

    PubMed Central

    Van Ha, Chien; Le, Dung Tien; Nishiyama, Rie; Watanabe, Yasuko; Sulieman, Saad; Tran, Uyen Thi; Mochida, Keiichi; Van Dong, Nguyen; Yamaguchi-Shinozaki, Kazuko; Shinozaki, Kazuo; Tran, Lam-Son Phan

    2013-01-01

    In plants, the auxin response factor (ARF) transcription factors play important roles in regulating diverse biological processes, including development, growth, cell division and responses to environmental stimuli. An exhaustive search of soybean genome revealed 51 GmARFs, many of which were formed by genome duplications. The typical GmARFs (43 members) contain a DNA-binding domain, an ARF domain and an auxin/indole acetic acid (AUX/IAA) dimerization domain, whereas the remaining eight members lack the dimerization domain. Phylogenetic analysis of the ARFs from soybean and Arabidopsis revealed both similarity and divergence between the two ARF families, as well as enabled us to predict the functions of the GmARFs. Using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and available soybean Affymetrix array and Illumina transcriptome sequence data, a comprehensive expression atlas of GmARF genes was obtained in various organs and tissues, providing useful information about their involvement in defining the precise nature of individual tissues. Furthermore, expression profiling using qRT-PCR and microarray data revealed many water stress-responsive GmARFs in soybean, albeit with different patterns depending on types of tissues and/or developmental stages. Our systematic analysis has identified excellent tissue-specific and/or stress-responsive candidate GmARF genes for in-depth in planta functional analyses, which would lead to potential applications in the development of genetically modified soybean cultivars with enhanced drought tolerance. PMID:23810914

  6. p19Arf is required for the cellular response to chronic DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Bieging-Rolett, Kathryn T.; Johnson, Thomas M.; Brady, Colleen A.; Beaudry, Veronica G.; Pathak, Navneeta; Han, Shuo; Attardi, Laura D.

    2015-01-01

    The p53 tumor suppressor is a stress sensor, driving cell-cycle arrest or apoptosis in response to DNA damage or oncogenic signals. p53 activation by oncogenic signals relies on the p19Arf tumor suppressor, while p53 activation downstream of acute DNA damage is reported to be p19Arf-independent. Accordingly, p19Arf-deficient mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs) arrest in response to acute DNA damage. However, p19Arf is required for replicative senescence, a condition associated with an activated DNA damage response, as p19Arf−/− MEFs do not senesce after serial passage. A possible explanation for these seemingly disparate roles for p19Arf is that acute and chronic DNA damage responses are mechanistically distinct. Replicative senescence may result from chronic, low-dose DNA damage responses in which p19Arf has a specific role. We therefore examined the role of p19Arf in cellular responses to chronic, low-dose DNA damaging agent treatment by maintaining MEFs in low oxygen and administering 0.5 Gy γ-irradiation daily or 150μM hydroxyurea, a replication stress-inducer. In contrast to their response to acute DNA damage, p19Arf−/− MEFs exposed to chronic DNA damage do not senesce, revealing a selective role for p19Arf in senescence upon low-level, chronic DNA damage. We show further that p53 pathway activation in p19Arf−/− MEFs exposed to chronic DNA damage is attenuated relative to wild-type MEFs, suggesting a role for p19Arf in fine-tuning p53 activity. However, combined Nutlin3a and chronic DNA damaging agent treatment is insufficient to promote senescence in p19Arf−/− MEFs, suggesting that the role of p19Arf in the chronic DNA damage response may be partially p53-independent. These data suggest the importance of p19Arf for the cellular response to the low-level DNA damage incurred in culture or upon oncogene expression, providing new insight into how p19Arf serves as a tumor suppressor. Moreover, our study helps reconcile reports suggesting crucial

  7. Renal vasoconstriction by vasopressin V1a receptors is modulated by nitric oxide, prostanoids, and superoxide but not the ADP ribosyl cyclase CD38

    PubMed Central

    Kopple, Tayler E.; Arendshorst, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Renal blood flow (RBF) responses to arginine vasopressin (AVP) were tested in anesthetized wild-type (WT) and CD38−/− mice that lack the major calcium-mobilizing second messenger cyclic ADP ribose. AVP (3–25 ng) injected intravenously produced dose-dependent decreases in RBF, reaching a maximum of 25 ± 2% below basal RBF in WT and 27 ± 2% in CD38−/− mice with 25 ng of AVP. Renal vascular resistance (RVR) increased 75 ± 6% and 78 ± 6% in WT and CD38−/− mice. Inhibition of nitric oxide (NO) synthase with nitro-l-arginine methyl ester (l-NAME) increased the maximum RVR response to AVP to 308 ± 76% in WT and 388 ± 81% in CD38−/− (P < 0.001 for both). Cyclooxygenase inhibition with indomethacin increased the maximum RVR response to 125 ± 15% in WT and 120 ± 14% in CD38−/− mice (P < 0.001, <0.05). Superoxide suppression with tempol inhibited the maximum RVR response to AVP by 38% in both strains (P < 0.005) but was ineffective when administered after l-NAME. The rate of RBF recovery (relaxation) after AVP was slowed by l-NAME and indomethacin (P < 0.001, <0.005) but was unchanged by tempol. All vascular responses to AVP were abolished by an AVP V1a receptor antagonist. A V2 receptor agonist or antagonist had no effect on AVP-induced renal vasoconstriction. Taken together, the results indicate that renal vasoconstriction by AVP in the mouse is strongly buffered by vasodilatory actions of NO and prostanoids. The vasoconstriction depends on V1a receptor activation without involvement of CD38 or concomitant vasodilatation by V2 receptors. The role of superoxide is to enhance the contractile response to AVP, most likely by reducing the availability of NO rather than directly stimulating intracellular contraction signaling pathways. PMID:24623148

  8. Single molecule detection of PARP1 and PARP2 interaction with DNA strand breaks and their poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation using high-resolution AFM imaging.

    PubMed

    Sukhanova, Maria V; Abrakhi, Sanae; Joshi, Vandana; Pastre, David; Kutuzov, Mikhail M; Anarbaev, Rashid O; Curmi, Patrick A; Hamon, Loic; Lavrik, Olga I

    2016-04-01

    PARP1 and PARP2 are implicated in the synthesis of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) after detection of DNA damage. The specificity of PARP1 and PARP2 interaction with long DNA fragments containing single- and/or double-strand breaks (SSBs and DSBs) have been studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging in combination with biochemical approaches. Our data show that PARP1 localizes mainly on DNA breaks and exhibits a slight preference for nicks over DSBs, although the protein has a moderately high affinity for undamaged DNA. In contrast to PARP1, PARP2 is mainly detected at a single DNA nick site, exhibiting a low level of binding to undamaged DNA and DSBs. The enhancement of binding affinity of PARP2 for DNA containing a single nick was also observed using fluorescence titration. AFM studies reveal that activation of both PARPs leads to the synthesis of highly branched PAR whose size depends strongly on the presence of SSBs and DSBs for PARP1 and of SSBs for PARP2. The initial affinity between the PARP1, PARP2 and the DNA damaged site appears to influence both the size of the PAR synthesized and the time of residence of PARylated PARP1 and PARP2 on DNA damages. PMID:26673720

  9. The Poly(ADP-ribose) Polymerase Enzyme Tankyrase Antagonizes Activity of the β-Catenin Destruction Complex through ADP-ribosylation of Axin and APC2.

    PubMed

    Croy, Heather E; Fuller, Caitlyn N; Giannotti, Jemma; Robinson, Paige; Foley, Andrew V A; Yamulla, Robert J; Cosgriff, Sean; Greaves, Bradford D; von Kleeck, Ryan A; An, Hyun Hyung; Powers, Catherine M; Tran, Julie K; Tocker, Aaron M; Jacob, Kimberly D; Davis, Beckley K; Roberts, David M

    2016-06-10

    Most colon cancer cases are initiated by truncating mutations in the tumor suppressor, adenomatous polyposis coli (APC). APC is a critical negative regulator of the Wnt signaling pathway that participates in a multi-protein "destruction complex" to target the key effector protein β-catenin for ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis. Prior work has established that the poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) enzyme Tankyrase (TNKS) antagonizes destruction complex activity by promoting degradation of the scaffold protein Axin, and recent work suggests that TNKS inhibition is a promising cancer therapy. We performed a yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) screen and uncovered TNKS as a putative binding partner of Drosophila APC2, suggesting that TNKS may play multiple roles in destruction complex regulation. We find that TNKS binds a C-terminal RPQPSG motif in Drosophila APC2, and that this motif is conserved in human APC2, but not human APC1. In addition, we find that APC2 can recruit TNKS into the β-catenin destruction complex, placing the APC2/TNKS interaction at the correct intracellular location to regulate β-catenin proteolysis. We further show that TNKS directly PARylates both Drosophila Axin and APC2, but that PARylation does not globally regulate APC2 protein levels as it does for Axin. Moreover, TNKS inhibition in colon cancer cells decreases β-catenin signaling, which we find cannot be explained solely through Axin stabilization. Instead, our findings suggest that TNKS regulates destruction complex activity at the level of both Axin and APC2, providing further mechanistic insight into TNKS inhibition as a potential Wnt pathway cancer therapy. PMID:27068743

  10. Single molecule detection of PARP1 and PARP2 interaction with DNA strand breaks and their poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation using high-resolution AFM imaging

    PubMed Central

    Sukhanova, Maria V.; Abrakhi, Sanae; Joshi, Vandana; Pastre, David; Kutuzov, Mikhail M.; Anarbaev, Rashid O.; Curmi, Patrick A.; Hamon, Loic; Lavrik, Olga I.

    2016-01-01

    PARP1 and PARP2 are implicated in the synthesis of poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) after detection of DNA damage. The specificity of PARP1 and PARP2 interaction with long DNA fragments containing single- and/or double-strand breaks (SSBs and DSBs) have been studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging in combination with biochemical approaches. Our data show that PARP1 localizes mainly on DNA breaks and exhibits a slight preference for nicks over DSBs, although the protein has a moderately high affinity for undamaged DNA. In contrast to PARP1, PARP2 is mainly detected at a single DNA nick site, exhibiting a low level of binding to undamaged DNA and DSBs. The enhancement of binding affinity of PARP2 for DNA containing a single nick was also observed using fluorescence titration. AFM studies reveal that activation of both PARPs leads to the synthesis of highly branched PAR whose size depends strongly on the presence of SSBs and DSBs for PARP1 and of SSBs for PARP2. The initial affinity between the PARP1, PARP2 and the DNA damaged site appears to influence both the size of the PAR synthesized and the time of residence of PARylated PARP1 and PARP2 on DNA damages. PMID:26673720

  11. Increased poly(ADP-ribosyl)ation in skeletal muscle tissue of pediatric patients with severe burn injury: prevention by propranolol treatment

    PubMed Central

    Oláh, Gábor; Finnerty, Celeste; Sbrana, Elena; Elijah, Itoro; Gerö, Domokos; Herndon, David; Szabó, Csaba

    2011-01-01

    Summary Activation of the nuclear enzyme poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) has been shown to promote cellular energetic collapse and cellular necrosis in various forms of critical illness. Most of the evidence implicating the PARP pathway in disease processes is derived from preclinical studies. With respect to PARP and burns, studies in rodent and large animal models of burn injury have demonstrated the activation of PARP in various tissues and the beneficial effect of its pharmacological inhibition. The aim of the current study was to measure the activation of PARP in human skeletal muscle biopsies at various stages of severe pediatric burn injury and to identify the cell types where this activation may occur. Another aim of the study was to test the effect of propranolol (an effective treatment of patients with burns), on the activation of PARP in skeletal muscle biopsies. PARP activation was measured by Western blotting for its product, poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR). The localization of PARP activation was determined by PAR immunohistochemistry. The results showed that PARP becomes activated in the skeletal muscle tissue after burns, with the peak of the activation occurring in the middle stage of the disease (13–18 days after burns). Even at the late stage of the disease (69–369 days post-burn) an elevated degree of PARP activation persisted in some of the patients. Immunohistochemical studies localized the staining of PAR primarily to vascular endothelial cells, and occasionally to resident mononuclear cells. There was a marked suppression of PARP activation in the skeletal muscle biopsies of patients who received propranolol treatment. We conclude that human burn injury is associated with the activation of PARP. We hypothesize that this response may contribute to the inflammatory responses and cell dysfunction in burns. Some of the clinical benefit of propranolol in burns may be related to its inhibitory effect on PARP activation. PMID:21368715

  12. Inhibition of potentially lethal radiation damage repair in normal and neoplastic human cells by 3-aminobenzamide: an inhibitor of poly(ADP-ribosylation)

    SciTech Connect

    Thraves, P.J.; Mossman, K.L.; Frazier, D.T.; Dritschilo, A.

    1986-08-01

    The effect of 3-aminobenzamide (3AB), an inhibitor of poly(ADP-ribose) synthetase, on potentially lethal damage repair (PLDR) was investigated in normal human fibroblasts and four human tumor cell lines from tumors with varying degrees of radiocurability. The tumor lines selected were: Ewing's sarcoma, a bone tumor considered radiocurable and, human lung adenocarcinoma, osteosarcoma, and melanoma, three tumors considered nonradiocurable. PLDR was measured by comparing cell survival when cells were irradiated in a density-inhibited state and replated at appropriate cell numbers at specified times following irradiation to cell survival when cells were replated immediately following irradiation. 3AB was added to cultures 2 hr prior to irradiation and removed at the time of replating. Different test radiation doses were used for the various cell lines to obtain equivalent levels of cell survival. In the absence of inhibitor, PLDR was similar in all cell lines tested. In the presence of 8 mM 3AB, differential inhibition of PLDR was observed. PLDR was almost completely inhibited in Ewing's sarcoma cells and partially inhibited in normal fibroblast cells and osteosarcoma cells. No inhibition of PLDR was observed in the lung adenocarcinoma or melanoma cells. Except for the osteosarcoma cells, inhibition of PLDR by 3AB correlated well with radiocurability.

  13. AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR7 Restores the Expression of Auxin-Responsive Genes in Mutant Arabidopsis Leaf Mesophyll ProtoplastsW⃞

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shucai; Tiwari, Shiv B.; Hagen, Gretchen; Guilfoyle, Tom J.

    2005-01-01

    AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR7 (ARF7) is one of five ARF transcriptional activators in Arabidopsis thaliana that is proposed to regulate auxin-responsive expression of genes containing TGTCTC auxin response elements in their promoters. An Arabidopsis mutant (nonphototropic hypocotyl4-1 [nph4-1]) that is a null for ARF7 showed strongly reduced expression of integrated auxin-responsive reporter genes and natural genes that were monitored in Arabidopsis leaf mesophyll protoplasts. Expression of the reporter and natural genes was restored in an auxin-dependent manner when protoplasts were transfected with a 35S:ARF7 effector gene, encoding a full-length ARF7 protein. Transfection of effector genes encoding other ARF activators restored auxin-responsive gene expression to varying degrees, but less than that observed with the ARF7 effector gene. Arabidopsis lines that were null for ARF6, ARF8, or ARF19 were not defective in expression of the reporter and natural auxin response genes assayed in mesophyll protoplasts, suggesting that ARF7 plays a major role in regulating expression of a subset of auxin response genes in leaf mesophyll cells. Auxin-responsive gene expression was induced in wild-type protoplasts and restored in nph4-1 protoplasts only with auxin and not with other hormones, including brassinolide. In the presence of auxin, however, brassinolide modestly enhanced auxin-responsive gene expression. PMID:15923351

  14. ArfGAP1 interacts with coat proteins through tryptophan-based motifs

    SciTech Connect

    Rawet, Moran; Levi-Tal, Sharon; Szafer-Glusman, Edith; Parnis, Anna; Cassel, Dan

    2010-04-09

    The Arf1 GTPase-activating protein ArfGAP1 regulates vesicular traffic through the COPI system. This protein consists of N-terminal catalytic domain, lipid packing sensors (the ALPS motifs) in the central region, and a carboxy part of unknown function. The carboxy part contains several diaromatic sequences that are reminiscent of motifs known to interact with clathrin adaptors. In pull-down experiments using GST-fused peptides from rat ArfGAP1, a peptide containing a {sup 329}WETF sequence interacted strongly with clathrin adaptors AP1 and AP2, whereas a major coatomer-binding determinant was identified within the extreme carboxy terminal peptide ({sup 405}AADEGWDNQNW). Mutagenesis and peptide competition experiments revealed that this determinant is required for coatomer binding to full-length ArfGAP1, and that interaction is mediated through the {delta}-subunit of the coatomer adaptor-like subcomplex. Evidence for a role of the carboxy motif in ArfGAP1-coatomer interaction in vivo is provided by means of a reporter fusion assay. Our findings point to mechanistic differences between ArfGAP1 and the other ArfGAPs known to function in the COPI system.

  15. The human ARF tumor suppressor senses blastema activity and suppresses epimorphic tissue regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Hesse, Robert G; Kouklis, Gayle K; Ahituv, Nadav; Pomerantz, Jason H

    2015-01-01

    The control of proliferation and differentiation by tumor suppressor genes suggests that evolution of divergent tumor suppressor repertoires could influence species’ regenerative capacity. To directly test that premise, we humanized the zebrafish p53 pathway by introducing regulatory and coding sequences of the human tumor suppressor ARF into the zebrafish genome. ARF was dormant during development, in uninjured adult fins, and during wound healing, but was highly expressed in the blastema during epimorphic fin regeneration after amputation. Regenerative, but not developmental signals resulted in binding of zebrafish E2f to the human ARF promoter and activated conserved ARF-dependent Tp53 functions. The context-dependent activation of ARF did not affect growth and development but inhibited regeneration, an unexpected distinct tumor suppressor response to regenerative versus developmental environments. The antagonistic pleiotropic characteristics of ARF as both tumor and regeneration suppressor imply that inducing epimorphic regeneration clinically would require modulation of ARF –p53 axis activation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07702.001 PMID:26575287

  16. An ARF6/Rab35 GTPase cascade for endocytic recycling and successful cytokinesis.

    PubMed

    Chesneau, Laurent; Dambournet, Daphné; Machicoane, Mickaël; Kouranti, Ilektra; Fukuda, Mitsunori; Goud, Bruno; Echard, Arnaud

    2012-01-24

    Cytokinesis bridge instability leads to binucleated cells that can promote tumorigenesis in vivo. Membrane trafficking is crucial for animal cell cytokinesis, and several endocytic pathways regulated by distinct GTPases (Rab11, Rab21, Rab35, ARF6, RalA/B) contribute to the postfurrowing steps of cytokinesis. However, little is known about how these pathways are coordinated for successful cytokinesis. The Rab35 GTPase controls a fast endocytic recycling pathway and must be activated for SEPTIN cytoskeleton localization at the intercellular bridge, and thus for completion of cytokinesis. Here, we report that the ARF6 GTPase negatively regulates Rab35 activation and hence the Rab35 pathway. Human cells expressing a constitutively activated, GTP-bound ARF6 mutant display identical endocytic recycling and cytokinesis defects as those observed upon overexpression of the inactivated, GDP-bound Rab35 mutant. As a molecular mechanism, we identified the Rab35 GAP EPI64B as an effector of ARF6 in negatively regulating Rab35 activation. Unexpectedly, this regulation takes place at clathrin-coated pits, and activated ARF6 reduces Rab35 loading into the endocytic pathway. Thus, an effector of an ARF protein is a GAP for a downstream Rab protein, and we propose that this hierarchical ARF/Rab GTPase cascade controls the proper activation of a common endocytic pathway essential for cytokinesis. PMID:22226746

  17. Proteobacterial ArfA peptides are synthesized from non-stop messenger RNAs.

    PubMed

    Schaub, Ryan E; Poole, Stephen J; Garza-Sánchez, Fernando; Benbow, Sarah; Hayes, Christopher S

    2012-08-24

    The translation of non-stop mRNA (which lack in-frame stop codons) represents a significant quality control problem for all organisms. In eubacteria, the transfer-messenger RNA (tmRNA) system facilitates recycling of stalled ribosomes from non-stop mRNA in a process termed trans-translation or ribosome rescue. During rescue, the nascent chain is tagged with the tmRNA-encoded ssrA peptide, which promotes polypeptide degradation after release from the stalled ribosome. Escherichia coli possesses an additional ribosome rescue pathway mediated by the ArfA peptide. The E. coli arfA message contains a hairpin structure that is cleaved by RNase III to produce a non-stop transcript. Therefore, ArfA levels are controlled by tmRNA through ssrA-peptide tagging and proteolysis. Here, we examine whether ArfA homologues from other bacteria are also regulated by RNase III and tmRNA. We searched 431 arfA coding sequences for mRNA secondary structures and found that 82.8% of the transcripts contain predicted hairpins in their 3'-coding regions. The arfA hairpins from Haemophilus influenzae, Proteus mirabilis, Vibrio fischeri, and Pasteurella multocida are all cleaved by RNase III as predicted, whereas the hairpin from Neisseria gonorrhoeae functions as an intrinsic transcription terminator to generate non-stop mRNA. Each ArfA homologue is ssrA-tagged and degraded when expressed in wild-type E. coli cells, but accumulates in mutants lacking tmRNA. Together, these findings show that ArfA synthesis from non-stop mRNA is a conserved mechanism to regulate the alternative ribosome rescue pathway. This strategy ensures that ArfA homologues are only deployed when the tmRNA system is incapacitated or overwhelmed by stalled ribosomes. PMID:22791716

  18. Recruitment of PI4KIIIβ to Coxsackievirus B3 Replication Organelles Is Independent of ACBD3, GBF1, and Arf1

    PubMed Central

    Dorobantu, Cristina M.; van der Schaar, Hilde M.; Ford, Lauren A.; Strating, Jeroen R. P. M.; Ulferts, Rachel; Fang, Ying; Belov, George

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Members of the Enterovirus (poliovirus [PV], coxsackieviruses, and human rhinoviruses) and Kobuvirus (Aichi virus) genera in the Picornaviridae family rely on PI4KIIIβ (phosphatidylinositol-4-kinase IIIβ) for efficient replication. The small membrane-anchored enteroviral protein 3A recruits PI4KIIIβ to replication organelles, yet the underlying mechanism has remained elusive. Recently, it was shown that kobuviruses recruit PI4KIIIβ through interaction with ACBD3 (acyl coenzyme A [acyl-CoA]-binding protein domain 3), a novel interaction partner of PI4KIIIβ. Therefore, we investigated a possible role for ACBD3 in recruiting PI4KIIIβ to enterovirus replication organelles. Although ACBD3 interacted directly with coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) 3A, its depletion from cells by RNA interference did not affect PI4KIIIβ recruitment to replication organelles and did not impair CVB3 RNA replication. Enterovirus 3A was previously also proposed to recruit PI4KIIIβ via GBF1/Arf1, based on the known interaction of 3A with GBF1, an important regulator of secretory pathway transport and a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) of Arf1. However, our results demonstrate that inhibition of GBF1 or Arf1 either by pharmacological inhibition or depletion with small interfering RNA (siRNA) treatment did not affect the ability of 3A to recruit PI4KIIIβ. Furthermore, we show that a 3A mutant that no longer binds GBF1 was capable of recruiting PI4KIIIβ, even in ACBD3-depleted cells. Together, our findings indicate that unlike originally envisaged, coxsackievirus recruits PI4KIIIβ to replication organelles independently of ACBD3 and GBF1/Arf1. IMPORTANCE A hallmark of enteroviral infection is the generation of new membranous structures to support viral RNA replication. The functionality of these “replication organelles” depends on the concerted actions of both viral nonstructural proteins and co-opted host factors. It is thus essential to understand how these structures are

  19. An AGEF-1/Arf GTPase/AP-1 Ensemble Antagonizes LET-23 EGFR Basolateral Localization and Signaling during C. elegans Vulva Induction

    PubMed Central

    Skorobogata, Olga; Escobar-Restrepo, Juan M.; Rocheleau, Christian E.

    2014-01-01

    LET-23 Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (EGFR) signaling specifies the vulval cell fates during C. elegans larval development. LET-23 EGFR localization on the basolateral membrane of the vulval precursor cells (VPCs) is required to engage the LIN-3 EGF-like inductive signal. The LIN-2 Cask/LIN-7 Veli/LIN-10 Mint (LIN-2/7/10) complex binds LET-23 EGFR, is required for its basolateral membrane localization, and therefore, vulva induction. Besides the LIN-2/7/10 complex, the trafficking pathways that regulate LET-23 EGFR localization have not been defined. Here we identify vh4, a hypomorphic allele of agef-1, as a strong suppressor of the lin-2 mutant Vulvaless (Vul) phenotype. AGEF-1 is homologous to the mammalian BIG1 and BIG2 Arf GTPase guanine nucleotide exchange factors (GEFs), which regulate secretory traffic between the Trans-Golgi network, endosomes and the plasma membrane via activation of Arf GTPases and recruitment of the AP-1 clathrin adaptor complex. Consistent with a role in trafficking we show that AGEF-1 is required for protein secretion and that AGEF-1 and the AP-1 complex regulate endosome size in coelomocytes. The AP-1 complex has previously been implicated in negative regulation of LET-23 EGFR, however the mechanism was not known. Our genetic data indicate that AGEF-1 is a strong negative regulator of LET-23 EGFR signaling that functions in the VPCs at the level of the receptor. In line with AGEF-1 being an Arf GEF, we identify the ARF-1.2 and ARF-3 GTPases as also negatively regulating signaling. We find that the agef-1(vh4) mutation results in increased LET-23 EGFR on the basolateral membrane in both wild-type and lin-2 mutant animals. Furthermore, unc-101(RNAi), a component of the AP-1 complex, increased LET-23 EGFR on the basolateral membrane in lin-2 and agef-1(vh4); lin-2 mutant animals. Thus, an AGEF-1/Arf GTPase/AP-1 ensemble functions opposite the LIN-2/7/10 complex to antagonize LET-23 EGFR basolateral membrane localization and signaling

  20. ELMO Domains, Evolutionary and Functional Characterization of a Novel GTPase-activating Protein (GAP) Domain for Arf Protein Family GTPases*

    PubMed Central

    East, Michael P.; Bowzard, J. Bradford; Dacks, Joel B.; Kahn, Richard A.

    2012-01-01

    The human family of ELMO domain-containing proteins (ELMODs) consists of six members and is defined by the presence of the ELMO domain. Within this family are two subclassifications of proteins, based on primary sequence conservation, protein size, and domain architecture, deemed ELMOD and ELMO. In this study, we used homology searching and phylogenetics to identify ELMOD family homologs in genomes from across eukaryotic diversity. This demonstrated not only that the protein family is ancient but also that ELMOs are potentially restricted to the supergroup Opisthokonta (Metazoa and Fungi), whereas proteins with the ELMOD organization are found in diverse eukaryotes and thus were likely the form present in the last eukaryotic common ancestor. The segregation of the ELMO clade from the larger ELMOD group is consistent with their contrasting functions as unconventional Rac1 guanine nucleotide exchange factors and the Arf family GTPase-activating proteins, respectively. We used unbiased, phylogenetic sorting and sequence alignments to identify the most highly conserved residues within the ELMO domain to identify a putative GAP domain within the ELMODs. Three independent but complementary assays were used to provide an initial characterization of this domain. We identified a highly conserved arginine residue critical for both the biochemical and cellular GAP activity of ELMODs. We also provide initial evidence of the function of human ELMOD1 as an Arf family GAP at the Golgi. These findings provide the basis for the future study of the ELMOD family of proteins and a new avenue for the study of Arf family GTPases. PMID:23014990

  1. MicroRNA390-Directed TAS3 Cleavage Leads to the Production of tasiRNA-ARF3/4 During Somatic Embryogenesis in Dimocarpus longan Lour

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yuling; Lin, Lixia; Lai, Ruilian; Liu, Weihua; Chen, Yukun; Zhang, Zihao; XuHan, Xu; Lai, Zhongxiong

    2015-01-01

    Trans-acting short-interfering RNAs (tasiRNAs) originate from TAS3 families through microRNA (miRNA) 390-guided cleavage of primary transcripts and target auxin response factors (ARF3/-4), which are involved in the normal development of lateral roots and flowers in plants. However, their roles in embryo development are still unclear. Here, the pathway miR390-TAS3-ARF3/-4 was identified systematically for the first time during somatic embryo development in Dimocarpus longan. We identified the miR390 primary transcript and promoter. The promoter contained cis-acting elements responsive to stimuli such as light, salicylic acid, anaerobic induction, fungal elicitor, circadian control, and heat stress. The longan TAS3 transcript, containing two miR390-binding sites, was isolated; the miR390- guided cleavage site located near the 3′ end of the TAS3 transcript was verified. Eight TAS3-tasiRNAs with the 21-nucleotides phase were found among longan small RNA data, further confirming that miR390-directed TAS3 cleavage leads to the production of tasiRNA in longan. Among them, TAS3_5′D5+ and 5′D6+ tasiRNAs were highly abundant, and verified to target ARF3 and -4, implying that miR390-guided TAS3 cleavage with 21-nucleotides phase leading to the production of tasiRNA-ARF is conserved in plants. Pri-miR390 was highly expressed in friable-embryogenic callus (EC), and less expressed in incomplete compact pro-embryogenic cultures, while miR390 showed its lowest expression in EC and highest expression in torpedo-shaped embryos (TEs). DlTAS3 and DlARF4 both exhibited their lowest expressions in EC, and reached their peaks in the globular embryos stage, which were mainly inversely proportional to the expression of miR390, especially at the globular embryos to cotyledonary embryos (CEs) stages. While DlARF3 showed little variation from the EC to TEs stages, and exhibited its lowest expression in the CEs stage. There was a general lack of correlation between the expressions of DlARF

  2. Arabidopsis ribosomal proteins control developmental programs through translational regulation of auxin response factors

    PubMed Central

    Rosado, Abel; Li, Ruixi; van de Ven, Wilhelmina; Hsu, Emily; Raikhel, Natasha V.

    2012-01-01

    Upstream ORFs are elements found in the 5′-leader sequences of specific mRNAs that modulate the translation of downstream ORFs encoding major gene products. In Arabidopsis, the translational control of auxin response factors (ARFs) by upstream ORFs has been proposed as a regulatory mechanism required to respond properly to complex auxin-signaling inputs. In this study, we identify and characterize the aberrant auxin responses in specific ribosomal protein mutants in which multiple ARF transcription factors are simultaneously repressed at the translational level. This characteristic lends itself to the use of these mutants as genetic tools to bypass the genetic redundancy among members of the ARF family in Arabidopsis. Using this approach, we were able to assign unique functions for ARF2, ARF3, and ARF6 in plant development. PMID:23144218

  3. Alternative Protein Secretion in the Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Thavayogarajah, Thuvaraka; Gangopadhyay, Preetish; Rahlfs, Stefan; Becker, Katja; Lingelbach, Klaus; Przyborski, Jude M; Holder, Anthony A

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum invades human red blood cells, residing in a parasitophorous vacuole (PV), with a parasitophorous vacuole membrane (PVM) separating the PV from the host cell cytoplasm. Here we have investigated the role of N-myristoylation and two other N-terminal motifs, a cysteine potential S-palmitoylation site and a stretch of basic residues, as the driving force for protein targeting to the parasite plasma membrane (PPM) and subsequent translocation across this membrane. Plasmodium falciparum adenylate kinase 2 (Pf AK2) contains these three motifs, and was previously proposed to be targeted beyond the parasite to the PVM, despite the absence of a signal peptide for entry into the classical secretory pathway. Biochemical and microscopy analyses of PfAK2 variants tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP) showed that these three motifs are involved in targeting the protein to the PPM and translocation across the PPM to the PV. It was shown that the N-terminal 37 amino acids of PfAK2 alone are sufficient to target and translocate GFP across the PPM. As a control we examined the N-myristoylated P. falciparum ADP-ribosylation factor 1 (PfARF1). PfARF1 was found to co-localise with a Golgi marker. To determine whether or not the putative palmitoylation and the cluster of lysine residues from the N-terminus of PfAK2 would modulate the subcellular localization of PfARF1, a chimeric fusion protein containing the N-terminus of PfARF1 and the two additional PfAK2 motifs was analysed. This chimeric protein was targeted to the PPM, but not translocated across the membrane into the PV, indicating that other features of the N-terminus of PfAK2 also play a role in the secretion process. PMID:25909331

  4. Alternative Protein Secretion in the Malaria Parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Thavayogarajah, Thuvaraka; Gangopadhyay, Preetish; Rahlfs, Stefan; Becker, Katja; Lingelbach, Klaus; Przyborski, Jude M.; Holder, Anthony A.

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum invades human red blood cells, residing in a parasitophorous vacuole (PV), with a parasitophorous vacuole membrane (PVM) separating the PV from the host cell cytoplasm. Here we have investigated the role of N-myristoylation and two other N-terminal motifs, a cysteine potential S-palmitoylation site and a stretch of basic residues, as the driving force for protein targeting to the parasite plasma membrane (PPM) and subsequent translocation across this membrane. Plasmodium falciparum adenylate kinase 2 (Pf AK2) contains these three motifs, and was previously proposed to be targeted beyond the parasite to the PVM, despite the absence of a signal peptide for entry into the classical secretory pathway. Biochemical and microscopy analyses of PfAK2 variants tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP) showed that these three motifs are involved in targeting the protein to the PPM and translocation across the PPM to the PV. It was shown that the N-terminal 37 amino acids of PfAK2 alone are sufficient to target and translocate GFP across the PPM. As a control we examined the N-myristoylated P. falciparum ADP-ribosylation factor 1 (PfARF1). PfARF1 was found to co-localise with a Golgi marker. To determine whether or not the putative palmitoylation and the cluster of lysine residues from the N-terminus of PfAK2 would modulate the subcellular localization of PfARF1, a chimeric fusion protein containing the N-terminus of PfARF1 and the two additional PfAK2 motifs was analysed. This chimeric protein was targeted to the PPM, but not translocated across the membrane into the PV, indicating that other features of the N-terminus of PfAK2 also play a role in the secretion process. PMID:25909331

  5. Radiative Processes In Air Excited By An ArF Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, Robert L.; Huo, Winifred; Laufer, Gabriel

    1990-01-01

    Report describes experimental and theoretical studies of emission spectrum of air excited by light from ArF laser. Purpose of studies to determine conditions under which fluorescence from O2 used to measure temperatures in aerodynamic flows.

  6. miR390, Arabidopsis TAS3 tasiRNAs, and Their AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR Targets Define an Autoregulatory Network Quantitatively Regulating Lateral Root Growth[W

    PubMed Central

    Marin, Elena; Jouannet, Virginie; Herz, Aurélie; Lokerse, Annemarie S.; Weijers, Dolf; Vaucheret, Herve; Nussaume, Laurent; Crespi, Martin D.; Maizel, Alexis

    2010-01-01

    Plants adapt to different environmental conditions by constantly forming new organs in response to morphogenetic signals. Lateral roots branch from the main root in response to local auxin maxima. How a local auxin maximum translates into a robust pattern of gene activation ensuring the proper growth of the newly formed lateral root is largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that miR390, TAS3-derived trans-acting short-interfering RNAs (tasiRNAs), and AUXIN RESPONSE FACTORS (ARFs) form an auxin-responsive regulatory network controlling lateral root growth. Spatial expression analysis using reporter gene fusions, tasi/miRNA sensors, and mutant analysis showed that miR390 is specifically expressed at the sites of lateral root initiation where it triggers the biogenesis of tasiRNAs. These tasiRNAs inhibit ARF2, ARF3, and ARF4, thus releasing repression of lateral root growth. In addition, ARF2, ARF3, and ARF4 affect auxin-induced miR390 accumulation. Positive and negative feedback regulation of miR390 by ARF2, ARF3, and ARF4 thus ensures the proper definition of the miR390 expression pattern. This regulatory network maintains ARF expression in a concentration range optimal for specifying the timing of lateral root growth, a function similar to its activity during leaf development. These results also show how small regulatory RNAs integrate with auxin signaling to quantitatively regulate organ growth during development. PMID:20363771

  7. Acceleration of Gastric Tumorigenesis Through MKRN1-Mediated Posttranslational Regulation of p14ARF

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background We investigated whether Makorin ring finger protein 1 (MKRN1), an E3 ligase, affects p14ARF-associated cellular senescence and tumorigenesis by posttranslational modification in gastric tumorigenesis. Methods A link between MKRN1 and ARF was examined in MKRN1 null mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) and in human fibroblasts and gastric cancer cells by silencing MKRN1 using small interfering RNA (siRNA) and short hairpin RNA (shRNA). Ubiquitination and proteasomal degradation assays were used to assess p14ARF degradation associated with MKRN1. MKRN1 and p14ARF expression levels were analyzed with immunohistochemistry in malignant and normal tissues from gastric cancer patients and with χ2 tests. The tumor growth of gastric cancer cells stably expressing MKRN1 shRNA, p14ARF shRNA, or both was examined in mouse xenograft models (n = 4–6) and analyzed with unpaired t tests. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results MKRN1 knockout MEFs exhibited premature senescence and growth retardation with increased p19ARF protein expression. Similar results were obtained for human fibroblasts or gastric cancer cell lines by MKRN1 knockdown. Biochemical analyses confirmed that MKRN1 targets p14ARF for ubiquitination and subsequent proteasome-dependent degradation. A statistically significant association was shown between MKRN1 overexpression and p14ARF underexpression (P = .016). Xenograft analyses using p53-functional AGS or -dysfunctional SNU601 cells displayed statistically significant tumor growth retardation by silencing MKRN1, which was reversed under depletion of p14ARF (AGS cells, MKRN1 knockdown tumors vs MKRN1 and p14ARF knockdown tumors: 164.6 vs 464.8mm3, difference = 300.2mm3, 95% CI = 189.1 to 411.3mm3, P < .001). Conclusions We demonstrated that MKRN1 functions as a novel E3 ligase of p14ARF and that it potentially regulates cellular senescence and tumorigenesis in gastric cancer. PMID:23104211

  8. Nucleolar p14ARF Overexpression in Reed-Sternberg Cells in Hodgkin’s Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    García, Juan F.; Villuendas, Raquel; Sánchez-Beato, Margarita; Sánchez-Aguilera, Abel; Sánchez, Lydia; Prieto, Ignacio; Piris, Miguel A.

    2002-01-01

    The development of human cancers is frequently associated with the silencing of the two major tumor suppressor pathways represented by retinoblastoma protein and p53. As the incidence of p53 mutations is significantly lower in Hodgkin’s lymphoma than in other neoplasias, we investigated whether the malfunction of other proteins in this pathway could be responsible for its inactivation. Because the existence of nucleolar complexes between p14ARF and Hdm2 has been described as having a critical effect on p53 function by inhibiting its degradation, we analyzed the expression and subcellular localization of these proteins in 52 cases and in Hodgkin’s cell lines. Two of four cell lines revealed loss of p14ARF expression secondary to gene promoter methylation, this being mutually exclusive with p53 mutations (1 of 4), illustrating the existence of selective pressure to inactivate the p53 pathway. The majority of Hodgkin’s samples showed a strong nucleolar expression of p14ARF that was not associated with Hdm2. They also showed the existence of Hdm2/p53 complexes, and the absence of complexes containing either p14ARF/Hdm2 or p14ARF/p53. The different localization of Hdm2 (nucleoplasm) and p14ARF (nucleoli) observed in Hodgkin’s tumors and cell lines is associated with the presence of short alternatively spliced transcripts of Hdm2 lacking the ARF-binding region and the nuclear export signal. The absence of these p14ARF/Hdm2 nucleolar complexes could be sufficient to inactivate the pathway and may explain the low frequency of p53 mutations in this tumor. PMID:11839577

  9. Evaluation of ArF lithography for 45-nm node implant layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, T. C.; Maynollo, J.; Perez, J. J.; Popova, I.; Zhang, B.

    2007-03-01

    Scaling of designs to the 45nm or future nodes presents challenges for KrF lithography. The purpose of this work was to explore several aspects of ArF lithography for implant layers. A comparison of dark loss seen in a KrF resist and TARC system to that seen in an ArF system showed significant differences. While the KrF resist yielded dark loss that varied with CD and pitch, the ArF resist showed very little dark loss and no significant variation through the design space. ArF resist were observed to have marginal adhesion to various substrates. Improvements in adhesion performance were shown by pre-treating the substrate with various processes, of which an ozone clean provided the best results. Optimization of the HMDS priming conditions also improved adhesion, and it was observed that the HMDS reaction proceeds at different rates on different subsatrates, which is particularly important for implant layers where the resist must adhere to both Si and SiO II. The effect of ArF resist profile with varying reflectivity swing position is shown, and some investigation into reflectivity optimization techniques was performed. Low-index ArF TARC was shown to reduce the CD variation over polysilicon topography, and wet developable BARC was demonstrated to provide consistent profiles on both Si and SiO II substrates. Finally, a comparison of ArF and KrF resists after As implant indicates that the ArF resist showed similar shrinkage performance to the KrF resist.

  10. Overexpression of AtTTP Affects ARF17 Expression and Leads to Male Sterility in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Zhi-Hao; Zhang, Cheng; Xu, Xiao-Feng; Zhu, Jun; Zhou, Que; Ma, Li-Juan; Niu, Jin; Yang, Zhong-Nan

    2015-01-01

    Callose synthesis is critical for the formation of the pollen wall pattern. CalS5 is thought to be the major synthethase for the callose wall. In the Arabidopsis anther, ARF17 regulates the expression of CalS5 and is the target of miR160. Plants expressing miR160-resistant ARF17 (35S:5mARF17 lines) with increased ARF17 mRNA levels display male sterility. Here we report a zinc finger family gene, AtTTP, which is involved in miR160 maturation and callose synthesis in Arabidopsis. AtTTP is expressed in microsporocytes, tetrads and tapetal cells in the anther. Over-expression lines of AtTTP (AtTTP-OE line) exhibited reduced male fertility. CalS5 expression was tremendously reduced and the tetrad callose wall became much thinner in the AtTTP-OE line. Northern blotting hybridization and quantitative RT-PCR analysis revealed that miR160 was decreased, while the expression of ARF17 was increased in the AtTTP-OE line. Based on these results, we propose that AtTTP associates with miR160 in order to regulate the ARF17 expression needed for callose synthesis and pollen wall formation. PMID:25822980

  11. P53- and mevalonate pathway-driven malignancies require Arf6 for metastasis and drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Ari; Oikawa, Tsukasa; Hashimoto, Shigeru; Sugino, Hirokazu; Yoshikawa, Ayumu; Otsuka, Yutaro; Handa, Haruka; Onodera, Yasuhito; Nam, Jin-Min; Oneyama, Chitose; Okada, Masato; Fukuda, Mitsunori; Sabe, Hisataka

    2016-04-11

    Drug resistance, metastasis, and a mesenchymal transcriptional program are central features of aggressive breast tumors. The GTPase Arf6, often overexpressed in tumors, is critical to promote epithelial-mesenchymal transition and invasiveness. The metabolic mevalonate pathway (MVP) is associated with tumor invasiveness and known to prenylate proteins, but which prenylated proteins are critical for MVP-driven cancers is unknown. We show here that MVP requires the Arf6-dependent mesenchymal program. The MVP enzyme geranylgeranyl transferase II (GGT-II) and its substrate Rab11b are critical for Arf6 trafficking to the plasma membrane, where it is activated by receptor tyrosine kinases. Consistently, mutant p53, which is known to support tumorigenesis via MVP, promotes Arf6 activation via GGT-II and Rab11b. Inhibition of MVP and GGT-II blocked invasion and metastasis and reduced cancer cell resistance against chemotherapy agents, but only in cells overexpressing Arf6 and components of the mesenchymal program. Overexpression of Arf6 and mesenchymal proteins as well as enhanced MVP activity correlated with poor patient survival. These results provide insights into the molecular basis of MVP-driven malignancy. PMID:27044891

  12. Absence of p16INK4a and truncation of ARF tumor suppressors in chickens

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo-Hyun; Mitchell, Michael; Fujii, Hideta; Llanos, Susana; Peters, Gordon

    2003-01-01

    The INK4b-ARF-INK4a locus on human chromosome 9p21 (Human Genome Organization designation CDKN2B-CDKN2A), and the corresponding locus on mouse chromosome 4, encodes three distinct products: two members of the INK4 cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor family and a completely unrelated protein, ARF, whose carboxyl-terminal half is specified by the second exon of INK4a but in an alternative reading frame. As INK4 proteins block the phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma gene product and ARF protects p53 from degradation, the locus plays a key role in tumor suppression and the control of cell proliferation. To gain further insights into the relative importance of INK4a and ARF in different settings, we have isolated and characterized the equivalent locus in chickens. Surprisingly, although we identified orthologues of INK4b and ARF, chickens do not encode an equivalent of INK4a. Moreover, the reading frame for chicken ARF does not extend into exon 2, because splicing occurs in a different register to that used in mammals. The resultant 60-aa product nevertheless shares functional attributes with its mammalian counterparts. As well as indicating that the locus has been subject to dynamic evolutionary pressures, these unexpected findings suggest that in chickens, the tumor-suppressor functions of INK4a have been compensated for by other genes. PMID:12506196

  13. Expression of p14ARF, MDM2, and MDM4 in human retinoblastoma.

    PubMed

    Guo, Ying; Pajovic, Sanja; Gallie, Brenda L

    2008-10-10

    It is still not clear whether the p53 pathway is altered in retinoblastoma development. We assessed the expression of the p53 pathway genes p14(ARF), mouse double minute 2 (MDM2), and mouse double minute 4 (MDM4) in human retinoblastoma compared to normal retina. Primary human retinoblastomas, retinoblastoma cell lines and normal retinas were assessed for p14(ARF) and MDM4 mRNA by quantitative RT-PCR. p14(ARF), MDM2, and MDM4 protein were measured by immunoblot and immunohistochemistry. Compared to retina, p14(ARF) mRNA expression was notably increased in retinoblastoma but p14(ARF) protein was undetectable. MDM2 and MDM4 proteins were expressed in 22/22 retinoblastomas. MDM2 was expressed in 3/10 retinas tested, and MDM4 in 10/10 retinas. The expression level of MDM2 protein in retinoblastomas and retina was comparable, while MDM4 protein was overexpressed in one retinoblastoma cell line Y79 and two primary retinoblastomas. We observe that overexpression of MDM2 and MDM4 is not a necessary step in retinoblastoma development. However, loss of detectable p14(ARF) protein and resultant lack of functional inactivation of these p53 inhibitors may contribute to retinoblastoma development by constitutive inhibition of p53. PMID:18644346

  14. PI3K regulates endocytosis after insulin secretion by mediating signaling crosstalk between Arf6 and Rab27a.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Mami; Ando, Tomomi; Terabayashi, Takeshi; Okamoto, Mitsuhiro; Takei, Masahiro; Nishioka, Tomoki; Kaibuchi, Kozo; Matsunaga, Kohichi; Ishizaki, Ray; Izumi, Tetsuro; Niki, Ichiro; Ishizaki, Toshimasa; Kimura, Toshihide

    2016-02-01

    In secretory cells, endocytosis is coupled to exocytosis to enable proper secretion. Although endocytosis is crucial to maintain cellular homeostasis before and after secretion, knowledge about secretagogue-induced endocytosis in secretory cells is still limited. Here, we searched for proteins that interacted with the Rab27a GTPase-activating protein (GAP) EPI64 (also known as TBC1D10A) and identified the Arf6 guanine-nucleotide-exchange factor (GEF) ARNO (also known as CYTH2) in pancreatic β-cells. We found that the insulin secretagogue glucose promotes phosphatidylinositol (3,4,5)-trisphosphate (PIP3) generation through phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K), thereby recruiting ARNO to the intracellular side of the plasma membrane. Peripheral ARNO promotes clathrin assembly through its GEF activity for Arf6 and regulates the early stage of endocytosis. We also found that peripheral ARNO recruits EPI64 to the same area and that the interaction requires glucose-induced endocytosis in pancreatic β-cells. Given that GTP- and GDP-bound Rab27a regulate exocytosis and the late stage of endocytosis, our results indicate that the glucose-induced activation of PI3K plays a pivotal role in exocytosis-endocytosis coupling, and that ARNO and EPI64 regulate endocytosis at distinct stages. PMID:26683831

  15. The Arf and Rab11 effector FIP3 acts synergistically with ASAP1 to direct Rabin8 in ciliary receptor targeting

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Deretic, Dusanka

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Primary cilia have gained considerable importance in biology and disease now that their involvement in a wide range of human ciliopathies has been abundantly documented. However, detailed molecular mechanisms for specific targeting of sensory receptors to primary cilia are still unknown. Here, we show that the Arf and Rab11 effector FIP3 (also known as RAB11FIP3) promotes the activity of Rab11a and the Arf GTPase-activating protein (GAP) ASAP1 in the Arf4-dependent ciliary transport of the sensory receptor rhodopsin. During its passage out of the photoreceptor Golgi and trans-Golgi network (TGN), rhodopsin indirectly interacts with FIP3 through Rab11a and ASAP1. FIP3 competes with rhodopsin for binding to ASAP1 and displaces it from the ternary complex with Arf4–GTP and ASAP1. Resembling the phenotype resulting from lack of ASAP1, ablation of FIP3 abolishes ciliary targeting and causes rhodopsin mislocalization. FIP3 coordinates the interactions of ASAP1 and Rab11a with the Rab8 guanine nucleotide exchange factor Rabin8 (also known as RAB3IP). Our study implies that FIP3 functions as a crucial targeting regulator, which impinges on rhodopsin–ASAP1 interactions and shapes the binding pocket for Rabin8 within the ASAP1–Rab11a–FIP3 targeting complex, thus facilitating the orderly assembly and activation of the Rab11–Rabin8–Rab8 cascade during ciliary receptor trafficking. PMID:25673879

  16. Double patterning combined with shrink technique to extend ArF lithography for contact holes to 22nm node and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Xiangqun; Huli, Lior; Chen, Hao; Xu, Xumou; Woo, Hyungje; Bencher, Chris; Shu, Jen; Ngai, Chris; Borst, Christopher

    2008-03-01

    Lithography becomes much more challenging when CD shrinks to 22nm nodes. Since EUV is not ready, double patterning combined with Resolution Enhancement Technology (RET) such as shrink techniques seems to be the most possible solution. Companies such as TSMC [1] and IBM [2] etc. are pushing out EUV to extend immersion ArF lithography to 32nm/22nm nodes. Last year, we presented our development work on 32nm node contact (50nm hole at 100nm pitch) using dry ArF lithography by double patterning with SAFIER shrink process[3]. To continue the work, we further extend our dry litho capability towards the 22nm node. We demonstrated double patterning capability of 40nm holes at 80nm pitch using ASML XT1400E scanner. It seems difficult to print pitches below 140nm on dry scanner in single exposure which is transferred into 70nm pitch with double patterning. To push the resolution to 22nm node and beyond, we developed ArF immersion process on ASML XT1700i-P system at the College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering (Albany, NY) combined with a SAFIER process. We achieved single exposure process capability of 25nm holes at 128nm pitch after shrink. It enables us to print ~25nm holes at pitch of 64nm with double patterning. Two types of hard mask (HM), i.e. TIN and a-Si were used in both dry and immersion ArF DP processes. The double patterning process consists of two HM litho-shrink-etch steps. The dense feature is designed into two complementary parts on two masks such that the density is reduced by half and minimum pitch is increased by at least a factor of 21/2 depending on design. The complete pattern is formed after the two HM litho-shrink-etch steps are finished.

  17. DNA double-strand breaks cooperate with loss of Ink4 and Arf tumor suppressors to generate glioblastomas with frequent Met amplification

    PubMed Central

    Camacho, Cristel V.; Todorova, Pavlina K.; Gillam, Molly C.; Tomimatsu, Nozomi; del Alcazar, Carlos R Gil; Ilcheva, Mariya; Mukherjee, Bipasha; McEllin, Brian; Vemireddy, Vamsidhara; Hatanpaa, Kimmo; Story, Michael D.; Habib, Amyn A.; Murty, Vundavalli V.; Bachoo, Robert; Burma, Sandeep

    2014-01-01

    Glioblastomas (GBM) are highly radioresistant and lethal brain tumors. Ionizing radiation (IR)-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are a risk factor for the development of GBM. In this study, we systematically examined the contribution of IR-induced DSBs to GBM development using transgenic mouse models harboring brain-targeted deletions of key tumor suppressors frequently lost in GBM, namely Ink4a, Ink4b, Arf, and/or PTEN. Using low linear energy transfer (LET) X-rays to generate simple breaks or high LET Fe ions to generate complex breaks, we found that DSBs induce high-grade gliomas in these mice which, otherwise, do not develop gliomas spontaneously. Loss of Ink4a and Arf was sufficient to trigger IR-induced glioma development but additional loss of Ink4b significantly increased tumor incidence. We analyzed IR-induced tumors for copy number alterations (CNAs) to identify oncogenic changes that were generated and selected for as a consequence of stochastic DSB events. We found Met amplification to be the most significant oncogenic event in these radiation-induced gliomas. Importantly, Met activation resulted in expression of Sox2, a GBM cancer stem cell (CSC) marker, and was obligatory for tumor formation. In sum, these results indicate that radiation-induced DSBs cooperate with loss of Ink4 and Arf tumor suppressors to generate high-grade gliomas that are commonly driven by Met amplification and activation. PMID:24632607

  18. ARF-GEF cytohesin-2/ARNO regulates R-Ras and α5-integrin recycling through an EHD1-positive compartment

    PubMed Central

    Salem, Joseph C.; Reviriego-Mendoza, Marta M.; Santy, Lorraine C.

    2015-01-01

    When expressed in epithelial cells, cytohesin-2/ARNO, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) for ARF small GTPases, causes a robust migration response. Recent evidence suggests that cytohesin-2/ARNO acts downstream of small the GTPase R-Ras to promote spreading and migration. We hypothesized that cytohesin-2/ARNO could transmit R-Ras signals by regulating the recycling of R-Ras through ARF activation. We found that Eps15-homology domain 1 (EHD1), a protein that associates with the endocytic recycling compartment (ERC), colocalizes with active R-Ras in transiently expressed HeLa cells. In addition, we show that EHD1-positive recycling endosomes are a novel compartment for cytohesin-2/ARNO. Knockdown or expression of GEF-inactive (E156K) cytohesin-2/ARNO causes R-Ras to accumulate on recycling endosomes containing EHD1 and inhibits cell spreading. E156K-ARNO also causes a reduction in focal adhesion size and number. Finally, we demonstrate that R-Ras/ARNO signaling is required for recycling of α5-integrin and R-Ras to the plasma membrane. These data establish a role for cytohesin-2/ARNO as a regulator of R-Ras and integrin recycling and suggest that ARF-regulated trafficking of R-Ras is required for R-Ras–dependent effects on spreading and adhesion formation. PMID:26378252

  19. The phytoplasmal virulence factor TENGU causes plant sterility by downregulating of the jasmonic acid and auxin pathways

    PubMed Central

    Minato, Nami; Himeno, Misako; Hoshi, Ayaka; Maejima, Kensaku; Komatsu, Ken; Takebayashi, Yumiko; Kasahara, Hiroyuki; Yusa, Akira; Yamaji, Yasuyuki; Oshima, Kenro; Kamiya, Yuji; Namba, Shigetou

    2014-01-01

    Despite plants infected by pathogens are often unable to produce offspring, it remains unclear how sterility is induced in host plants. In this study, we demonstrate that TENGU, a phytoplasmal virulence peptide known as a dwarfism inducer, acts as an inducer of sterility. Transgenic expression of TENGU induced both male and female sterility in Arabidopsis thaliana flowers similar to those observed in double knockout mutants of auxin response factor 6 (ARF6) and ARF8, which are known to regulate floral development in a jasmonic acid (JA)-dependent manner. Transcripts of ARF6 and ARF8 were significantly decreased in both tengu-transgenic and phytoplasma-infected plants. Furthermore, JA and auxin levels were actually decreased in tengu-transgenic buds, suggesting that TENGU reduces the endogenous levels of phytohormones by repressing ARF6 and ARF8, resulting in impaired flower maturation. TENGU is the first virulence factor with the effects on plant reproduction by perturbation of phytohormone signaling. PMID:25492247

  20. Investigation of cyclopolymerization for ArF positive photoresist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Youngjoon; Hashimoto, Kazuhiko; Fujishima, Hiroaki; Hanawa, Ryotaro; Uetani, Yasunori

    2003-06-01

    Cyclopolymerization methodology is unique because it uses a standard free radical polymerization that is free from the use of metal catalyzed chemistry while it still can provide the main chain cyclic structure. The feasibility and applicability have been examined previously, from which some of the potential opportunities have been revealed. Our initial research direction was aimed at developing robust etching resistant acrylic resins through cyclopolymerization. During the course of our investigation it came to our attention that there might be more than one benefit we could get from this approach and here in reported is our recent progress in the study. A series of diacrylic monomers and their cyclic polymers have been prepared and evaluated for ArF optical lithography applications. The reaction of acrylic esters that have essential functional groups for lithographic performances such as an acid-cleavable bulky adamantyl group and a polar lactone group with formaldehyde in the presence of diazabicyclo-(2,2,2)octane has been shown to provide access to an ether linked symmetric or asymmetric diacrylic monomer depending on the starting materials with a reasonable yield after an adequate purification procedure. While the main research focus of cyclopolymerization of diacrylic monomers has been an improvement of dry etching resistance, an equal interest was placed on enhancing homogeneity in the polymerization reaction medium.

  1. ArF solutions for low-k1 back-end imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiaux, Vincent; Montgomery, Patrick K.; Vandenberghe, Geert; Monnoyer, Philippe; Ronse, Kurt G.; Conley, Will; Litt, Lloyd C.; Lucas, Kevin; Finders, Jo; Socha, Robert; Van Den Broeke, Douglas J.

    2003-06-01

    The requirements stated in the ITRS roadmap for back-end-of-line imaging of current and future technology nodes are very aggressive. Therefore, it is likely that high NA in combination with enhancement techniques will be necessary for the imaging of contacts and trenches, pushing optical lithography into the low-k1 regime. In this paper, we focus more specifically on imaging solutions for contact holes beyond the 90 nm node using high NA ArF lithography, as this is currently seen as one of the major challenges in optical lithography. We investigate the performance of various existing enhancement techniques in order to provide contact holes imaging solutions in a k1 range from 0.35 to 0.45, using the ASML PAS5500/1100 0.75NA ArF scanner installed at IMEC. For various resolution enhancement techniques (RET), the proof of concept has been demonstrated in literature. In this paper, we propose an experimental one-to-one comparison of these RET"s with fixed CD target, exposure tool, lithographic process, and metrology. A single exposure through pitch (dense through isolated) printing solution is preferred and is the largest challenge. The common approach using a 6% attenuated phase-shifted mask (attPSM) with a conventional illumination fails. The advantages and drawbacks of other techniques are discussed. High transmission (17%) attenuated phase shift, potentially beneficial for part of the pitch range, requires conflicting trade-offs when looking for a single exposure through pitch solution. More promising results are obtained combining a BIM or a 6% attPSM with assist slots and off-axis illumination, yielding a depth of focus (DOF) at 8% exposure latitude (EL) greater than 0.31 μm from 200 nm pitch through isolated. Chromeless phase lithography (CPL) is also discussed with promising results obtained at the densest pitch. At a 0.4 k1, an experimental extrapolation to 0.85NA demonstrates that a pitch of 180 nm can be resolved with 0.4 μm DOF at 8% EL. For all of these

  2. Characterization of Shikonin Derivative Secretion in Lithospermum erythrorhizon Hairy Roots as a Model of Lipid-Soluble Metabolite Secretion from Plants

    PubMed Central

    Tatsumi, Kanade; Yano, Mariko; Kaminade, Kenta; Sugiyama, Akifumi; Sato, Mayuko; Toyooka, Kiminori; Aoyama, Takashi; Sato, Fumihiko; Yazaki, Kazufumi

    2016-01-01

    Shikonin derivatives are specialized lipophilic metabolites, secreted in abundant amounts from the root epidermal cells of Lithospermum erythrorhizon. Because they have anti-microbial activities, these compounds, which are derivatives of red naphthoquinone, are thought to serve as a chemical barrier for plant roots. The mechanism by which they are secreted from cells is, however, largely unknown. The shikonin production system in L. erythrorhizon is an excellent model for studying the mechanism by which lipophilic compounds are secreted from plant cells, because of the abundant amounts of these compounds produced by L. erythrorhizon, the 0 to 100% inducibility of their production, the light-specific inhibition of production, and the visibility of these products as red pigments. To date, many factors regulating shikonin biosynthesis have been identified, but no mechanism that regulates shikonin secretion without inhibiting biosynthesis has been detected. This study showed that inhibitors of membrane traffic strongly inhibit shikonin secretion without inhibiting shikonin production, suggesting that the secretion of shikonin derivatives into the apoplast utilizes pathways common to the ADP-ribosylation factor/guanine nucleotide exchange factor (ARF/GEF) system and actin filament polymerization, at least in part. These findings provide clues about the machinery involved in secreting lipid-soluble metabolites from cells. PMID:27507975

  3. Characterization of Shikonin Derivative Secretion in Lithospermum erythrorhizon Hairy Roots as a Model of Lipid-Soluble Metabolite Secretion from Plants.

    PubMed

    Tatsumi, Kanade; Yano, Mariko; Kaminade, Kenta; Sugiyama, Akifumi; Sato, Mayuko; Toyooka, Kiminori; Aoyama, Takashi; Sato, Fumihiko; Yazaki, Kazufumi

    2016-01-01

    Shikonin derivatives are specialized lipophilic metabolites, secreted in abundant amounts from the root epidermal cells of Lithospermum erythrorhizon. Because they have anti-microbial activities, these compounds, which are derivatives of red naphthoquinone, are thought to serve as a chemical barrier for plant roots. The mechanism by which they are secreted from cells is, however, largely unknown. The shikonin production system in L. erythrorhizon is an excellent model for studying the mechanism by which lipophilic compounds are secreted from plant cells, because of the abundant amounts of these compounds produced by L. erythrorhizon, the 0 to 100% inducibility of their production, the light-specific inhibition of production, and the visibility of these products as red pigments. To date, many factors regulating shikonin biosynthesis have been identified, but no mechanism that regulates shikonin secretion without inhibiting biosynthesis has been detected. This study showed that inhibitors of membrane traffic strongly inhibit shikonin secretion without inhibiting shikonin production, suggesting that the secretion of shikonin derivatives into the apoplast utilizes pathways common to the ADP-ribosylation factor/guanine nucleotide exchange factor (ARF/GEF) system and actin filament polymerization, at least in part. These findings provide clues about the machinery involved in secreting lipid-soluble metabolites from cells. PMID:27507975

  4. TRIM28 Is an E3 Ligase for ARF-Mediated NPM1/B23 SUMOylation That Represses Centrosome Amplification

    PubMed Central

    Neo, Shu Hui; Itahana, Yoko; Alagu, Jennifer; Kitagawa, Mayumi; Guo, Alvin Kunyao; Lee, Sang Hyun; Tang, Kai

    2015-01-01

    The tumor suppressor ARF enhances the SUMOylation of target proteins; however, the physiological function of ARF-mediated SUMOylation has been unclear due to the lack of a known, associated E3 SUMO ligase. Here we uncover TRIM28/KAP1 as a novel ARF-binding protein and SUMO E3 ligase for NPM1/B23. ARF and TRIM28 cooperate to SUMOylate NPM1, a nucleolar protein that regulates centrosome duplication and genomic stability. ARF-mediated SUMOylation of NPM1 was attenuated by TRIM28 depletion and enhanced by TRIM28 overexpression. Coexpression of ARF and TRIM28 promoted NPM1 centrosomal localization by enhancing its SUMOylation and suppressed centrosome amplification; these functions required the E3 ligase activity of TRIM28. Conversely, depletion of ARF or TRIM28 increased centrosome amplification. ARF also counteracted oncogenic Ras-induced centrosome amplification. Centrosome amplification is often induced by oncogenic insults, leading to genomic instability. However, the mechanisms employed by tumor suppressors to protect the genome are poorly understood. Our findings suggest a novel role for ARF in maintaining genome integrity by facilitating TRIM28-mediated SUMOylation of NPM1, thus preventing centrosome amplification. PMID:26055329

  5. Azidothymidine and cisplatin increase p14ARF expression in OVCAR-3 ovarian cancer cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Vaskivuo, Liisa; Rysae, Jaana; Koivuperae, Johanna; Myllynen, Paeivi; Vaskivuo, Tommi; Chvalova, Katerina; Serpi, Raisa; Savolainen, Eeva-Riitta; Puistola, Ulla; Vaehaekangas, Kirsi . E-mail: kirsi.vahakangas@uku.fi

    2006-10-01

    p14{sup ARF} tumor suppressor protein regulates p53 by interfering with mdm2-p53 interaction. p14{sup ARF} is activated in response to oncogenic stimuli but little is known of the responses of endogenous p14{sup ARF} to different types of cellular stress or DNA damage. Azidothymidine (AZT) is being tested in several clinical trials as an enhancer of anticancer chemotherapy. However, the knowledge of the relationship between AZT and cellular pathways, e.g. p53 pathway, is very limited. In this study, we show that AZT, cisplatin (CDDP) and docetaxel (DTX) all induce unique molecular responses in OVCAR-3 ovarian carcinoma cells carrying a mutated p53, while in A2780, ovarian carcinoma and MCF-7 breast carcinoma cells with wild type p53, all of these drugs cause similar p53 responses. We found that endogenous p14{sup ARF} protein in OVCAR-3 cells is down-regulated by DTX but induced by AZT and a short CDDP pulse treatment. In HT-29 colon carcinoma cells with a mutated p53, all treatments down-regulated p14{sup ARF} protein. Both CDDP and AZT increased the expression of p14ARF mRNA in OVCAR-3 cells. Differences in cell death induced by these drugs did not explain the differences in protein and mRNA expressions. No increase in the level of either c-Myc or H-ras oncoproteins was seen in OVCAR-3 cells after AZT or CDDP-treatment. These results suggest that p14{sup ARF} can respond to DNA damage without oncogene activation in cell lines without functional p53.

  6. Canalization of auxin flow by Aux/IAA-ARF-dependent feedback regulation of PIN polarity.

    PubMed

    Sauer, Michael; Balla, Jozef; Luschnig, Christian; Wisniewska, Justyna; Reinöhl, Vilém; Friml, Jirí; Benková, Eva

    2006-10-15

    Plant development is characterized by a profound ability to regenerate and form tissues with new axes of polarity. An unsolved question concerns how the position within a tissue and cues from neighboring cells are integrated to specify the polarity of individual cells. The canalization hypothesis proposes a feedback effect of the phytohormone auxin on the directionality of intercellular auxin flow as a means to polarize tissues. Here we identify a cellular and molecular mechanism for canalization. Local auxin application, wounding, or auxin accumulation during de novo organ formation lead to rearrangements in the subcellular polar localization of PIN auxin transport components. This auxin effect on PIN polarity is cell-specific, does not depend on PIN transcription, and involves the Aux/IAA-ARF (indole-3-acetic acid-auxin response factor) signaling pathway. Our data suggest that auxin acts as polarizing cue, which links individual cell polarity with tissue and organ polarity through control of PIN polar targeting. This feedback regulation provides a conceptual framework for polarization during multiple regenerative and patterning processes in plants. PMID:17043314

  7. A role for Arf1 in mitotic Golgi disassembly, chromosome segregation, and cytokinesis

    PubMed Central

    Altan-Bonnet, Nihal; Phair, Robert D.; Polishchuk, Roman S.; Weigert, Roberto; Lippincott-Schwartz, Jennifer

    2003-01-01

    In mitosis, chromosome, cytoskeleton, and organelle dynamics must be coordinated for successful cell division. Here, we present evidence for a role for Arf1, a small GTPase associated with the Golgi apparatus, in the orchestration of mitotic Golgi breakdown, chromosome segregation, and cytokinesis. We show that early in mitosis Arf1 becomes inactive and dissociates from Golgi membranes. This is followed by the dispersal of numerous Arf1-dependent peripheral Golgi proteins and subsequent Golgi disassembly. If Arf1 is kept in an active state by treatment with the small molecule H89 or expression of its GTP-locked form, intact Golgi membranes with bound peripheral proteins persist throughout mitosis. These cells enter mitosis but exhibit gross defects in chromosome segregation and cytokinetic furrow ingression. These findings suggest that mitotic Golgi disassembly depends on Arf1 inactivation and is used by the cell to disperse numerous peripheral Golgi proteins for coordinating the behavior of Golgi membranes, chromosomes, and cytoskeleton during mitosis. PMID:14585930

  8. Gibberellin application at pre-bloom in grapevines down-regulates the expressions of VvIAA9 and VvARF7, negative regulators of fruit set initiation, during parthenocarpic fruit development.

    PubMed

    Jung, Chan Jin; Hur, Youn Young; Yu, Hee-Ju; Noh, Jung-Ho; Park, Kyo-Sun; Lee, Hee Jae

    2014-01-01

    Fruit set is initiated only after fertilization and is tightly regulated primarily by gibberellins (GAs) and auxins. The application of either of these hormones induces parthenocarpy, fruit set without fertilization, but the molecular mechanism underlying this induction is poorly understood. In the present study, we have shown that the parthenocarpic fruits induced by GA application at pre-bloom result from the interaction of GA with auxin signaling. The transcriptional levels of the putative negative regulators of fruit set initiation, including Vitis auxin/indole-3-acetic acid transcription factor 9 (VvIAA9), Vitis auxin response factor 7 (VvARF7), and VvARF8 were monitored during inflorescence development in seeded diploid 'Tamnara' grapevines with or without GA application. Without GA application, VvIAA9, VvARF7, and VvARF8 were expressed at a relatively high level before full bloom, but decreased thereafter following pollination. After GA application at 14 days before full bloom (DBF); however, the expression levels of VvIAA9 and VvARF7 declined at 5 DBF prior to pollination. The effects of GA application on auxin levels or auxin signaling were also analyzed by monitoring the expression patterns of auxin biosynthesis genes and auxin-responsive genes with or without GA application. Transcription levels of the auxin biosynthesis genes Vitis anthranilate synthase β subunit (VvASB1-like), Vitis YUCCA2 (VvYUC2), and VvYUC6 were not significantly changed by GA application. However, the expressions of Vitis Gretchen Hagen3.2 (VvGH3.2) and VvGH3.3, auxin-responsive genes, were up-regulated from 2 DBF to full bloom with GA application. Furthermore, the Vitis GA signaling gene, VvDELLA was up-regulated by GA application during 12 DBF to 7 DBF, prior to down-regulation of VvIAA9 and VvARF7. These results suggest that VvIAA9 and VvARF7 are negative regulators of fruit set initiation in grapevines, and GA signaling is integrated with auxin signaling via VvDELLA during

  9. Gibberellin Application at Pre-Bloom in Grapevines Down-Regulates the Expressions of VvIAA9 and VvARF7, Negative Regulators of Fruit Set Initiation, during Parthenocarpic Fruit Development

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Chan Jin; Hur, Youn Young; Yu, Hee-Ju; Noh, Jung-Ho; Park, Kyo-Sun; Lee, Hee Jae

    2014-01-01

    Fruit set is initiated only after fertilization and is tightly regulated primarily by gibberellins (GAs) and auxins. The application of either of these hormones induces parthenocarpy, fruit set without fertilization, but the molecular mechanism underlying this induction is poorly understood. In the present study, we have shown that the parthenocarpic fruits induced by GA application at pre-bloom result from the interaction of GA with auxin signaling. The transcriptional levels of the putative negative regulators of fruit set initiation, including Vitis auxin/indole-3-acetic acid transcription factor 9 (VvIAA9), Vitis auxin response factor 7 (VvARF7), and VvARF8 were monitored during inflorescence development in seeded diploid ‘Tamnara’ grapevines with or without GA application. Without GA application, VvIAA9, VvARF7, and VvARF8 were expressed at a relatively high level before full bloom, but decreased thereafter following pollination. After GA application at 14 days before full bloom (DBF); however, the expression levels of VvIAA9 and VvARF7 declined at 5 DBF prior to pollination. The effects of GA application on auxin levels or auxin signaling were also analyzed by monitoring the expression patterns of auxin biosynthesis genes and auxin-responsive genes with or without GA application. Transcription levels of the auxin biosynthesis genes Vitis anthranilate synthase β subunit (VvASB1-like), Vitis YUCCA2 (VvYUC2), and VvYUC6 were not significantly changed by GA application. However, the expressions of Vitis Gretchen Hagen3.2 (VvGH3.2) and VvGH3.3, auxin-responsive genes, were up-regulated from 2 DBF to full bloom with GA application. Furthermore, the Vitis GA signaling gene, VvDELLA was up-regulated by GA application during 12 DBF to 7 DBF, prior to down-regulation of VvIAA9 and VvARF7. These results suggest that VvIAA9 and VvARF7 are negative regulators of fruit set initiation in grapevines, and GA signaling is integrated with auxin signaling via VvDELLA during

  10. AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 2 Intersects Hormonal Signals in the Regulation of Tomato Fruit Ripening.

    PubMed

    Breitel, Dario A; Chappell-Maor, Louise; Meir, Sagit; Panizel, Irina; Puig, Clara Pons; Hao, Yanwei; Yifhar, Tamar; Yasuor, Hagai; Zouine, Mohamed; Bouzayen, Mondher; Granell Richart, Antonio; Rogachev, Ilana; Aharoni, Asaph

    2016-03-01

    The involvement of ethylene in fruit ripening is well documented, though knowledge regarding the crosstalk between ethylene and other hormones in ripening is lacking. We discovered that AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 2A (ARF2A), a recognized auxin signaling component, functions in the control of ripening. ARF2A expression is ripening regulated and reduced in the rin, nor and nr ripening mutants. It is also responsive to exogenous application of ethylene, auxin and abscisic acid (ABA). Over-expressing ARF2A in tomato resulted in blotchy ripening in which certain fruit regions turn red and possess accelerated ripening. ARF2A over-expressing fruit displayed early ethylene emission and ethylene signaling inhibition delayed their ripening phenotype, suggesting ethylene dependency. Both green and red fruit regions showed the induction of ethylene signaling components and master regulators of ripening. Comprehensive hormone profiling revealed that altered ARF2A expression in fruit significantly modified abscisates, cytokinins and salicylic acid while gibberellic acid and auxin metabolites were unaffected. Silencing of ARF2A further validated these observations as reducing ARF2A expression let to retarded fruit ripening, parthenocarpy and a disturbed hormonal profile. Finally, we show that ARF2A both homodimerizes and interacts with the ABA STRESS RIPENING (ASR1) protein, suggesting that ASR1 might be linking ABA and ethylene-dependent ripening. These results revealed that ARF2A interconnects signals of ethylene and additional hormones to co-ordinate the capacity of fruit tissue to initiate the complex ripening process. PMID:26959229

  11. AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 2 Intersects Hormonal Signals in the Regulation of Tomato Fruit Ripening

    PubMed Central

    Meir, Sagit; Panizel, Irina; Puig, Clara Pons; Hao, Yanwei; Yifhar, Tamar; Yasuor, Hagai; Zouine, Mohamed; Bouzayen, Mondher; Granell Richart, Antonio; Rogachev, Ilana; Aharoni, Asaph

    2016-01-01

    The involvement of ethylene in fruit ripening is well documented, though knowledge regarding the crosstalk between ethylene and other hormones in ripening is lacking. We discovered that AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR 2A (ARF2A), a recognized auxin signaling component, functions in the control of ripening. ARF2A expression is ripening regulated and reduced in the rin, nor and nr ripening mutants. It is also responsive to exogenous application of ethylene, auxin and abscisic acid (ABA). Over-expressing ARF2A in tomato resulted in blotchy ripening in which certain fruit regions turn red and possess accelerated ripening. ARF2A over-expressing fruit displayed early ethylene emission and ethylene signaling inhibition delayed their ripening phenotype, suggesting ethylene dependency. Both green and red fruit regions showed the induction of ethylene signaling components and master regulators of ripening. Comprehensive hormone profiling revealed that altered ARF2A expression in fruit significantly modified abscisates, cytokinins and salicylic acid while gibberellic acid and auxin metabolites were unaffected. Silencing of ARF2A further validated these observations as reducing ARF2A expression let to retarded fruit ripening, parthenocarpy and a disturbed hormonal profile. Finally, we show that ARF2A both homodimerizes and interacts with the ABA STRESS RIPENING (ASR1) protein, suggesting that ASR1 might be linking ABA and ethylene-dependent ripening. These results revealed that ARF2A interconnects signals of ethylene and additional hormones to co-ordinate the capacity of fruit tissue to initiate the complex ripening process. PMID:26959229

  12. AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR8 is a negative regulator of fruit initiation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Goetz, Marc; Vivian-Smith, Adam; Johnson, Susan D; Koltunow, Anna M

    2006-08-01

    Fruit and seed formation in plants is normally initiated after pollination and fertilization, and, in the absence of fertilization, flowers senesce. In the Arabidopsis thaliana mutant fruit without fertilization, a mutation in AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR8 (ARF8) results in the uncoupling of fruit development from pollination and fertilization and gives rise to seedless (parthenocarpic) fruit. Parthenocarpy was confirmed in two additional recessive alleles and was caused by mutations within the coding region of ARF8. Genetic experiments indicate that ARF8 acts as an inhibitor to stop further carpel development in the absence of fertilization and the generation of signals required to initiate fruit and seed development. Expression of ARF8 was found to be regulated at multiple levels, and transcriptional autoregulation of ARF8 was observed. Analysis of plants transformed with a transcriptional P(ARF8):beta-glucuronidase (GUS) construct or a translational ARF8:GUS fusion construct displayed distinct developmental regulation of the reporter in floral tissues involved in pollination and fertilization and in the carpel wall. After fertilization, the level of GUS activity declined in the developing seed, while in unfertilized ovules that are destined to senesce, ARF8:GUS expression spread throughout the ovule. This is consistent with a proposed role for ARF8 in restricting signal transduction processes in ovules and growth in pistils until the fruit initiation cue. PMID:16829592

  13. Structural basis for the binding of tryptophan-based motifs by δ-COP

    PubMed Central

    Suckling, Richard J.; Poon, Pak Phi; Travis, Sophie M.; Majoul, Irina V.; Hughson, Frederick M.; Evans, Philip R.; Duden, Rainer; Owen, David J.

    2015-01-01

    Coatomer consists of two subcomplexes: the membrane-targeting, ADP ribosylation factor 1 (Arf1):GTP-binding βγδζ-COP F-subcomplex, which is related to the adaptor protein (AP) clathrin adaptors, and the cargo-binding αβ’ε-COP B-subcomplex. We present the structure of the C-terminal μ-homology domain of the yeast δ-COP subunit in complex with the WxW motif from its binding partner, the endoplasmic reticulum-localized Dsl1 tether. The motif binds at a site distinct from that used by the homologous AP μ subunits to bind YxxΦ cargo motifs with its two tryptophan residues sitting in compatible pockets. We also show that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Arf GTPase-activating protein (GAP) homolog Gcs1p uses a related WxxF motif at its extreme C terminus to bind to δ-COP at the same site in the same way. Mutations designed on the basis of the structure in conjunction with isothermal titration calorimetry confirm the mode of binding and show that mammalian δ-COP binds related tryptophan-based motifs such as that from ArfGAP1 in a similar manner. We conclude that δ-COP subunits bind Wxn(1–6)[WF] motifs within unstructured regions of proteins that influence the lifecycle of COPI-coated vesicles; this conclusion is supported by the observation that, in the context of a sensitizing domain deletion in Dsl1p, mutating the tryptophan-based motif-binding site in yeast causes defects in both growth and carboxypeptidase Y trafficking/processing. PMID:26578768

  14. Molecular Machines Determining the Fate of Endocytosed Synaptic Vesicles in Nerve Terminals

    PubMed Central

    Fassio, Anna; Fadda, Manuela; Benfenati, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    The cycle of a synaptic vesicle (SV) within the nerve terminal is a step-by-step journey with the final goal of ensuring the proper synaptic strength under changing environmental conditions. The SV cycle is a precisely regulated membrane traffic event in cells and, because of this, a plethora of membrane-bound and cytosolic proteins are devoted to assist SVs in each step of the journey. The cycling fate of endocytosed SVs determines both the availability for subsequent rounds of release and the lifetime of SVs in the terminal and is therefore crucial for synaptic function and plasticity. Molecular players that determine the destiny of SVs in nerve terminals after a round of exo-endocytosis are largely unknown. Here we review the functional role in SV fate of phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of SV proteins and of small GTPases acting on membrane trafficking at the synapse, as they are emerging as key molecules in determining the recycling route of SVs within the nerve terminal. In particular, we focus on: (i) the cyclin-dependent kinase-5 (cdk5) and calcineurin (CN) control of the recycling pool of SVs; (ii) the role of small GTPases of the Rab and ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf) families in defining the route followed by SV in their nerve terminal cycle. These regulatory proteins together with their synaptic regulators and effectors, are molecular nanomachines mediating homeostatic responses in synaptic plasticity and potential targets of drugs modulating the efficiency of synaptic transmission. PMID:27242505

  15. Partial 13C isotopic enrichment of nucleoside monophosphates: useful reporters for NMR structural studies

    PubMed Central

    Kishore, Anita I.; Mayer, Michael R.; Prestegard, James H.

    2005-01-01

    Analysis of the 13C isotopic labeling patterns of nucleoside monophosphates (NMPs) extracted from Escherichia coli grown in a mixture of C-1 and C-2 glucose is presented. By comparing our results to previous observations on amino acids grown in similar media, we have been able to rationalize the labeling pattern based on the well-known biochemistry of nucleotide biosynthesis. Except for a few notable absences of label (C4 in purines and C3′ in ribose) and one highly enriched site (C1′ in ribose), most carbons are randomly enriched at a low level (an average of 13%). These sparsely labeled NMPs give less complex NMR spectra than their fully isotopically labeled analogs due to the elimination of most 13C–13C scalar couplings. The spectral simplicity is particularly advantageous when working in ordered systems, as illustrated with guanosine diphosphate (GDP) bound to ADP ribosylation factor 1 (ARF1) aligned in a liquid crystalline medium. In this system, the absence of scalar couplings and additional long-range dipolar couplings significantly enhances signal to noise and resolution. PMID:16254075

  16. Energy metabolism regulates clathrin adaptors at the trans-Golgi network and endosomes

    PubMed Central

    Aoh, Quyen L.; Hung, Chao-wei; Duncan, Mara C.

    2013-01-01

    Glucose is a master regulator of cell behavior in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It acts as both a metabolic substrate and a potent regulator of intracellular signaling cascades. Glucose starvation induces the transient delocalization and then partial relocalization of clathrin adaptors at the trans-Golgi network and endosomes. Although these localization responses are known to depend on the protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway, the molecular mechanism of this regulation is unknown. Here we demonstrate that PKA and the AMP-regulated kinase regulate adaptor localization through changes in energy metabolism. We show that genetic and chemical manipulation of intracellular ATP levels cause corresponding changes in adaptor localization. In permeabilized cells, exogenous ATP is sufficient to induce adaptor localization. Furthermore, we reveal distinct energy-dependent steps in adaptor localization: a step that requires the ADP-ribosylation factor ARF, an ATP-dependent step that requires the phosphatidyl-inositol-4 kinase Pik1, and third ATP-dependent step for which we provide evidence but for which the mechanism is unknown. We propose that these energy-dependent mechanisms precisely synchronize membrane traffic with overall proliferation rates and contribute a crucial aspect of energy conservation during acute glucose starvation. PMID:23345590

  17. Multifaceted roles of beta-arrestins in the regulation of seven-membrane-spanning receptor trafficking and signalling.

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Sudha K; Lefkowitz, Robert J

    2003-01-01

    Beta-arrestins are cytosolic proteins that bind to activated and phosphorylated G-protein-coupled receptors [7MSRs (seven-membrane-spanning receptors)] and uncouple them from G-protein-mediated second messenger signalling pathways. The binding of beta-arrestins to 7MSRs also leads to new signals via activation of MAPKs (mitogen-activated protein kinases) such as JNK3 (c-Jun N-terminal kinase 3), ERK1/2 (extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2) and p38 MAPKs. By binding to endocytic proteins [clathrin, AP2 (adapter protein 2), NSF (N -ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein) and ARF6 (ADP-ribosylation factor 6)], beta-arrestins also serve as adapters to link the receptors to the cellular trafficking machinery. Agonist-promoted ubiquitination of beta-arrestins is a prerequisite for their role in receptor internalization, as well as a determinant of the differing trafficking patterns of distinct classes of receptors. Recently, beta-arrestins have also been implicated as playing novel roles in cellular chemotaxis and apoptosis. By virtue of their ability to bind, in a stimulus-dependent fashion, to 7MSRs as well as to different classes of cellular proteins, beta-arrestins serve as versatile adapter proteins that regulate the signalling and trafficking of the receptors. PMID:12959637

  18. Multi-dimensional NMR without coherence transfer: Minimizing losses in large systems

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yizhou; Prestegard, James H.

    2011-01-01

    Most multi-dimensional solution NMR experiments connect one dimension to another using coherence transfer steps that involve evolution under scalar couplings. While experiments of this type have been a boon to biomolecular NMR the need to work on ever larger systems pushes the limits of these procedures. Spin relaxation during transfer periods for even the most efficient 15N–1H HSQC experiments can result in more than an order of magnitude loss in sensitivity for molecules in the 100 kDa range. A relatively unexploited approach to preventing signal loss is to avoid coherence transfer steps entirely. Here we describe a scheme for multi-dimensional NMR spectroscopy that relies on direct frequency encoding of a second dimension by multi-frequency decoupling during acquisition, a technique that we call MD-DIRECT. A substantial improvement in sensitivity of 15N–1H correlation spectra is illustrated with application to the 21 kDa ADP ribosylation factor (ARF) labeled with 15N in all alanine residues. Operation at 4 °C mimics observation of a 50 kDa protein at 35 °C. PMID:21835658

  19. The GTPase ARFRP1 controls the lipidation of chylomicrons in the Golgi of the intestinal epithelium.

    PubMed

    Jaschke, Alexander; Chung, Bomee; Hesse, Deike; Kluge, Reinhart; Zahn, Claudia; Moser, Markus; Petzke, Klaus-Jürgen; Brigelius-Flohé, Regina; Puchkov, Dmytro; Koepsell, Hermann; Heeren, Joerg; Joost, Hans-Georg; Schürmann, Annette

    2012-07-15

    The uptake and processing of dietary lipids by the small intestine is a multistep process that involves several steps including vesicular and protein transport. The GTPase ADP-ribosylation factor-related protein 1 (ARFRP1) controls the ARF-like 1 (ARL1)-mediated Golgi recruitment of GRIP domain proteins which in turn bind several Rab-GTPases. Here, we describe the essential role of ARFRP1 and its interaction with Rab2 in the assembly and lipidation of chylomicrons in the intestinal epithelium. Mice lacking Arfrp1 specifically in the intestine (Arfrp1(vil-/-)) exhibit an early post-natal growth retardation with reduced plasma triacylglycerol and free fatty acid concentrations. Arfrp1(vil-/-) enterocytes as well as Arfrp1 mRNA depleted Caco-2 cells absorbed fatty acids normally but secreted chylomicrons with a markedly reduced triacylglycerol content. In addition, the release of apolipoprotein A-I (ApoA-I) was dramatically decreased, and ApoA-I accumulated in the Arfrp1(vil-/-) epithelium, where it predominantly co-localized with Rab2. The release of chylomicrons from Caco-2 was markedly reduced after the suppression of Rab2, ARL1 and Golgin-245. Thus, the GTPase ARFRP1 and its downstream proteins are required for the lipidation of chylo-microns and the assembly of ApoA-I to these particles in the Golgi of intestinal epithelial cells. PMID:22505585

  20. GGA3 mediates TrkA endocytic recycling to promote sustained Akt phosphorylation and cell survival

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuezhi; Lavigne, Pierre; Lavoie, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Although TrkA postendocytic sorting significantly influences neuronal cell survival and differentiation, the molecular mechanism underlying TrkA receptor sorting in the recycling or degradation pathways remains poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that Golgi-localized, γ adaptin-ear–containing ADP ribosylation factor-binding protein 3 (GGA3) interacts directly with the TrkA cytoplasmic tail through an internal DXXLL motif and mediates the functional recycling of TrkA to the plasma membrane. We find that GGA3 depletion by siRNA delays TrkA recycling, accelerates TrkA degradation, attenuates sustained NGF-induced Akt activation, and reduces cell survival. We also show that GGA3’s effect on TrkA recycling is dependent on the activation of Arf6. This work identifies GGA3 as a key player in a novel DXXLL-mediated endosomal sorting machinery that targets TrkA to the plasma membrane, where it prolongs the activation of Akt signaling and survival responses. PMID:26446845

  1. Multi-dimensional NMR without coherence transfer: minimizing losses in large systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yizhou; Prestegard, James H

    2011-10-01

    Most multi-dimensional solution NMR experiments connect one dimension to another using coherence transfer steps that involve evolution under scalar couplings. While experiments of this type have been a boon to biomolecular NMR the need to work on ever larger systems pushes the limits of these procedures. Spin relaxation during transfer periods for even the most efficient (15)N-(1)H HSQC experiments can result in more than an order of magnitude loss in sensitivity for molecules in the 100 kDa range. A relatively unexploited approach to preventing signal loss is to avoid coherence transfer steps entirely. Here we describe a scheme for multi-dimensional NMR spectroscopy that relies on direct frequency encoding of a second dimension by multi-frequency decoupling during acquisition, a technique that we call MD-DIRECT. A substantial improvement in sensitivity of (15)N-(1)H correlation spectra is illustrated with application to the 21 kDa ADP ribosylation factor (ARF) labeled with (15)N in all alanine residues. Operation at 4°C mimics observation of a 50 kDa protein at 35°C. PMID:21835658

  2. Molecular Machines Determining the Fate of Endocytosed Synaptic Vesicles in Nerve Terminals.

    PubMed

    Fassio, Anna; Fadda, Manuela; Benfenati, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    The cycle of a synaptic vesicle (SV) within the nerve terminal is a step-by-step journey with the final goal of ensuring the proper synaptic strength under changing environmental conditions. The SV cycle is a precisely regulated membrane traffic event in cells and, because of this, a plethora of membrane-bound and cytosolic proteins are devoted to assist SVs in each step of the journey. The cycling fate of endocytosed SVs determines both the availability for subsequent rounds of release and the lifetime of SVs in the terminal and is therefore crucial for synaptic function and plasticity. Molecular players that determine the destiny of SVs in nerve terminals after a round of exo-endocytosis are largely unknown. Here we review the functional role in SV fate of phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of SV proteins and of small GTPases acting on membrane trafficking at the synapse, as they are emerging as key molecules in determining the recycling route of SVs within the nerve terminal. In particular, we focus on: (i) the cyclin-dependent kinase-5 (cdk5) and calcineurin (CN) control of the recycling pool of SVs; (ii) the role of small GTPases of the Rab and ADP-ribosylation factor (Arf) families in defining the route followed by SV in their nerve terminal cycle. These regulatory proteins together with their synaptic regulators and effectors, are molecular nanomachines mediating homeostatic responses in synaptic plasticity and potential targets of drugs modulating the efficiency of synaptic transmission. PMID:27242505

  3. ARF1 activation dissociates ADRP from lipid droplets to promote HCV assembly.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Na; Yin, Peiqi; Zhou, Liya; Li, Hongyan; Zhang, Leiliang

    2016-06-17

    Lipid droplets are the place for HCV assembly and ADRP is an abundant lipid droplets-associated protein. However, little is known about the mechanisms how ADRP is involved in HCV life cycle. Here we demonstrate that activation of ARF1 dissociates ADRP from lipid droplets. A constitute active form of ARF1 (ARF1Q71I) promotes HCV assembly. We found that ADRP plays a positive role in HCV replication and a negative role in HCV assembly. Overexpression of ADRP increases the size of lipid droplets, while silencing ADRP reduces the size of lipid droplets. These findings provide new insight into the role of lipid droplets proteins in life cycle of HCV. PMID:27157138

  4. ARF6 Is an Actionable Node that Orchestrates Oncogenic GNAQ Signaling in Uveal Melanoma.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jae Hyuk; Shi, Dallas S; Grossmann, Allie H; Sorensen, Lise K; Tong, ZongZhong; Mleynek, Tara M; Rogers, Aaron; Zhu, Weiquan; Richards, Jackson R; Winter, Jacob M; Zhu, Jie; Dunn, Christine; Bajji, Ashok; Shenderovich, Mark; Mueller, Alan L; Woodman, Scott E; Harbour, J William; Thomas, Kirk R; Odelberg, Shannon J; Ostanin, Kirill; Li, Dean Y

    2016-06-13

    Activating mutations in Gαq proteins, which form the α subunit of certain heterotrimeric G proteins, drive uveal melanoma oncogenesis by triggering multiple downstream signaling pathways, including PLC/PKC, Rho/Rac, and YAP. Here we show that the small GTPase ARF6 acts as a proximal node of oncogenic Gαq signaling to induce all of these downstream pathways as well as β-catenin signaling. ARF6 activates these diverse pathways through a common mechanism: the trafficking of GNAQ and β-catenin from the plasma membrane to cytoplasmic vesicles and the nucleus, respectively. Blocking ARF6 with a small-molecule inhibitor reduces uveal melanoma cell proliferation and tumorigenesis in a mouse model, confirming the functional relevance of this pathway and suggesting a therapeutic strategy for Gα-mediated diseases. PMID:27265506

  5. ARF and ATM/ATR cooperate in p53-mediated apoptosis upon oncogenic stress

    SciTech Connect

    Pauklin, Siim . E-mail: spauklin@ut.ee; Kristjuhan, Arnold; Maimets, Toivo; Jaks, Viljar

    2005-08-26

    Induction of apoptosis is pivotal for eliminating cells with damaged DNA or deregulated proliferation. We show that tumor suppressor ARF and ATM/ATR kinase pathways cooperate in the induction of apoptosis in response to elevated expression of c-myc, {beta}-catenin or human papilloma virus E7 oncogenes. Overexpression of oncogenes leads to the formation of phosphorylated H2AX foci, induction of Rad51 protein levels and ATM/ATR-dependent phosphorylation of p53. Inhibition of ATM/ATR kinases abolishes both induction of Rad51 and phosphorylation of p53, and remarkably reduces the level of apoptosis induced by co-expression of oncogenes and ARF. However, the induction of apoptosis is downregulated in p53-/- cells and does not depend on activities of ATM/ATR kinases, indicating that efficient induction of apoptosis by oncogene activation depends on coordinated action of ARF and ATM/ATR pathways in the regulation of p53.

  6. PML IV/ARF interaction enhances p53 SUMO-1 conjugation, activation, and senescence

    PubMed Central

    Ivanschitz, Lisa; Takahashi, Yuki; Jollivet, Florence; Ayrault, Olivier; Le Bras, Morgane; de Thé, Hugues

    2015-01-01

    Promyelocytic leukemia protein (PML) nuclear bodies (NBs) recruit multiple partners, including p53 and many of its regulators. NBs are believed to facilitate several posttranslational modifications and are key regulators of senescence. PML, the organizer of NBs, is expressed as a number of splice variants that all efficiently recruit p53 partners. However, overexpression of only one of them, PML IV, triggers p53-driven senescence. Here, we show that PML IV specifically binds ARF, a key p53 regulator. Similar to ARF, PML IV enhances global SUMO-1 conjugation, particularly that of p53, resulting in p53 stabilization and activation. ARF interacts with and stabilizes the NB-associated UBC9 SUMO-conjugating enzyme, possibly explaining PML IV-enhanced SUMOylation. These results unexpectedly link two key tumor suppressors, highlighting their convergence for global control of SUMO conjugation, p53 activation, and senescence induction. PMID:26578773

  7. Expression of the Novel Hepatitis C Virus Core+1/ARF Protein in the Context of JFH1-Based Replicons

    PubMed Central

    Kotta-Loizou, Ioly; Karakasiliotis, Ioannis; Vassilaki, Niki; Sakellariou, Panagiotis; Bartenschlager, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus contains a second open reading frame within the core gene, designated core+1/ARF. Here we demonstrate for the first time expression of core+1/ARF protein in the context of a bicistronic JFH1-based replicon and report the production of two isoforms, core+1/L (long) and core+1/S (short), with different kinetics. PMID:25694591

  8. Molecular structure and peptidoglycan recognition of Mycobacterium tuberculosis ArfA (Rv0899)

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yong; Barghava, Neha; Kim, Johnny; Niederweis, Michael; Marassi, Francesca M.

    2012-01-01

    M. tuberculosis ArfA (Rv0899) is a membrane protein encoded by an operon that is required for supporting bacterial growth in acidic environments. Its C-terminal domain (C domain) shares significant sequence homology with the OmpA-like family of peptidoglycan-binding domains, suggesting that its physiological function in acid stress protection may be related to its interaction with the mycobacterial cell wall. Previously, we showed that ArfA forms three independently structured modules and we reported the structure of its central domain (B domain). Here we describe the high-resolution structure and dynamics of the C domain, we identify ArfA as a peptidoglycan-binding protein, and elucidate the molecular basis for its specific recognition of diaminopimelate (DAP) type peptidoglycan. The C domain of ArfA adopts the characteristic fold of the OmpA-like family. It exhibits pH-dependent conformational dynamics (with significant hereogeneity at neutral pH and a more ordered structure at acidic pH), which could be related to its acid-stress response. The C domain associates tightly with polymeric peptidoglycan isolated from M. tuberculosis and also associates with a soluble peptide intermediate of peptidoglycan biosynthesis. This enabled us to characterize the peptidoglycan binding site where five highly conserved ArfA residues, including two key arginines, establish the specificity for DAP- but not Lys-type peptidoglycan. ArfA is the first peptidoglycan-binding protein to be identified in M. tuberculosis. Its functions in acid stress protection and peptidoglycan binding suggest a link between the acid stress response and the physico-chemical properties of the mycobacterial cell wall. PMID:22206986

  9. Down-regulation of AUXIN RESPONSE FACTORS 6 and 8 by microRNA 167 leads to floral development defects and female sterility in tomato.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ning; Wu, Shan; Van Houten, Jason; Wang, Ying; Ding, Biao; Fei, Zhangjun; Clarke, Thomas H; Reed, Jason W; van der Knaap, Esther

    2014-06-01

    Auxin regulates the expression of diverse genes that affect plant growth and development. This regulation requires AUXIN RESPONSE FACTORS (ARFs) that bind to the promoter regions of these genes. ARF6 and ARF8 in Arabidopsis thaliana are required to promote inflorescence stem elongation and late stages of petal, stamen, and gynoecium development. All seed plants studied thus far have ARF6 and ARF8 orthologues as well as the microRNA miR167, which targets ARF6 and ARF8. Whether these genes have broadly conserved roles in flower development is not known. To address this question, the effects of down-regulation of ARF6 and ARF8 were investigated through transgenic expression of Arabidopsis MIR167a in tomato, which diverged from Arabidopsis before the radiation of dicotyledonous plants approximately 90-112 million years ago. The transgenic tomato plants overexpressing MIR167a exhibited reductions in leaf size and internode length as well as shortened petals, stamens, and styles. More significantly, the transgenic plants were female-sterile as a result of failure of wild-type pollen to germinate on the stigma surface and/or to grow through the style. RNA-Seq analysis identified many genes with significantly altered expression patterns, including those encoding products with functions in 'transcription regulation', 'cell wall' and 'lipid metabolism' categories. Putative orthologues of a subset of these genes were also differentially expressed in Arabidopsis arf6 arf8 mutant flowers. These results thus suggest that ARF6 and ARF8 have conserved roles in controlling growth and development of vegetative and flower organs in dicots. PMID:24723401

  10. Photoluminescence excited by ArF and KrF lasers and optical absorption of stishovite mono-crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trukhin, Anatoly N.; Dyuzheva, Tatyana I.; Lityagina, Ludmila M.; Bendeliani, Nikolai A.

    2008-04-01

    Two photoluminescence bands were found in a stishovite (silicon dioxide) mono-crystal sample under ArF (193 nm) and KrF (248 nm) excitation. The blue band is situated at 3.17 ± 0.02 eV in the case of ArF and at 3 ± 0.2 in the case of KrF. The UV band is at 4.55 ± 0.05 eV in the case of ArF and at 4.5 ± 0.05 eV in the case of KrF. The position of the UV emission band correlates with that excited by x rays. This position is 4.6 ± 0.05 eV with FWHM 0.8 ± 0.05 eV (Truhins et al 2003 Solid State Commun. 127 415). The blue band possesses slow decay kinetics with time constant 16 ± 2 µs and the UV band is fast on the level of 2 ± 0.5 ns, similarly for both lasers. Thermal quenching of both bands begins for T higher than 150 K. The activation energies are similar for intensity and time constant, and are equal to 0.23 ± 0.01 eV and 0.13 ± 0.01 eV for blue and UV bands, respectively, with equal values of frequency factor, 2 × 1011 s-1. Optical absorption contains bands at 4.5, 5.5, and 7 eV and a strong band starting from 7 eV adjacent to the intrinsic absorption threshold above 8.75 eV. Excitation at 7.86 eV (F2 laser) does not provide luminescence. The nature of the luminescence excited in the transparency range of stishovite is ascribed to a defect, presumably created by previous irradiation of the crystal. Similarity of the stishovite luminescence to that of oxygen-deficient silica glass and also to that induced by irradiation of α-quartz crystals allows us to conclude similar natures for the defect centers in these dissimilar materials.

  11. Annealing of induced absorption in quartz glasses by ArF laser radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sergeev, P B; Sergeev, A P

    2010-11-13

    Annealing of individual bands of electron-beam-induced absorption (IA) in the region of 150 - 400 nm in KS-4V, KU-1, and Corning 7980 (ArF Grade) quartz glasses by ArF laser radiation is studied. It is shown that the phototransformation of the IA spectra occurs mainly due to a significant decrease in the amplitudes of bands at {lambda} = 183.5, 213, and 260 nm. The role played by interstitial oxygen, hydrogen, and chlorine in the formation and relaxation of glass defects is considered. (effects of laser radiation on matter. laser plasma)

  12. ZEB1 induces EPB41L5 in the cancer mesenchymal program that drives ARF6-based invasion, metastasis and drug resistance.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, A; Hashimoto, S; Sugino, H; Yoshikawa, A; Onodera, Y; Handa, H; Oikawa, T; Sabe, H

    2016-01-01

    Onset of the cancer mesenchymal program is closely associated with cancer malignancy and drug resistance. Among the different epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-associated transcriptional factors, ZEB1 has a key role in inducing the mesenchymal phenotypes and stem cell-like properties of different breast cancer cells. ARF6 and its effector AMAP1 are frequently overexpressed in breast cancer cells, and promote invasion, metastasis and drug resistance. EPB41L5 is induced during EMT, and mediates the disruption of E-cadherin-based cell-cell adhesion and the promotion of focal adhesion dynamics. Here we show that EPB41L5 is an integral component of the ARF6-based pathway, which is induced by ZEB1. We found that EPB41L5 is expressed at high levels in malignant breast cancer cells and binds to AMAP1. ZEB1 induced EPB41L5 both in cancer cells and normal cells. This relationship was recaptured with The Cancer Genome Atlas RNASeq data set, and correlated with the poor outcome of the patients. In contrast, diversified events, such as tumor growth factor β1 stimulation, expression of SNAI1 and TP53 mutation, can each cause the induction of ZEB1 and EPB41L5, depending on the cellular context. Our results demonstrated that the ZEB1-EPB41L5 axis is at the core of the cancer mesenchymal program that drives ARF6-based invasion, metastasis and drug resistance of significant populations of primary breast cancers, and is tightly correlated with the poor outcomes of patients. PMID:27617643

  13. Lysophosphatidic acid activates Arf6 to promote the mesenchymal malignancy of renal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Shigeru; Mikami, Shuji; Sugino, Hirokazu; Yoshikawa, Ayumu; Hashimoto, Ari; Onodera, Yasuhito; Furukawa, Shotaro; Handa, Haruka; Oikawa, Tsukasa; Okada, Yasunori; Oya, Mototsugu; Sabe, Hisataka

    2016-01-01

    Acquisition of mesenchymal properties by cancer cells is critical for their malignant behaviour, but regulators of the mesenchymal molecular machinery and how it is activated remain elusive. Here we show that clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCCs) frequently utilize the Arf6-based mesenchymal pathway to promote invasion and metastasis, similar to breast cancers. In breast cancer cells, ligand-activated receptor tyrosine kinases employ GEP100 to activate Arf6, which then recruits AMAP1; and AMAP1 then binds to the mesenchymal-specific protein EPB41L5, which promotes epithelial–mesenchymal transition and focal adhesion dynamics. In renal cancer cells, lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) activates Arf6 via its G-protein-coupled receptors, in which GTP-Gα12 binds to EFA6. The Arf6-based pathway may also contribute to drug resistance. Our results identify a specific mesenchymal molecular machinery of primary ccRCCs, which is triggered by a product of autotaxin and it is associated with poor outcome of patients. PMID:26854204

  14. MUC1 oncoprotein suppresses activation of the ARF-MDM2-p53 pathway.

    PubMed

    Raina, Deepak; Ahmad, Rehan; Chen, Dongshu; Kumar, Shailendra; Kharbanda, Surender; Kufe, Donald

    2008-12-01

    The MUC1 oncoprotein interacts with the c-Abl tyrosine kinase and blocks nuclear targeting of c-Abl in the apoptotic response to DNA damage. Mutation of the MUC1 cytoplasmic domain at Tyr-60 disrupts the MUC1-c-Abl interaction. The present results demonstrate that the MUC1(Y60F) mutant is a potent inducer of the ARF tumor suppressor. MUC1(Y60F) induces transcription of the ARF locus by a c-Abl-dependent mechanism that promotes CUL-4A-mediated nuclear export of the replication protein Cdc6. The functional significance of these findings is that MUC1(Y60F)-induced ARF expression and thereby inhibition of MDM2 results in the upregulation of p53 and the homeodomain interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) serine/threonine kinase. HIPK2-mediated phosphorylation of p53 on Ser-46 was further associated with a shift from expression of the cell cycle arrest-related p21 gene to the apoptosis-related PUMA gene. We also show that the MUC1(Y60F) mutant functions as dominant negative inhibitor of tumorigenicity. These findings indicate that the oncogenic function of MUC1 is conferred by suppressing activation of the ARF-MDM2-p53 pathway. PMID:18981727

  15. The Area Resource File (ARF). A Health Professions Planning and Research Tool.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Applied Management Sciences, Inc., Silver Spring, MD.

    This report presents a description and sample products of the Area Resource File (ARF), a computer-based county-specific health resources information system which consolidates U.S. data on the health professions, hospital and nursing home facilities, hospital utilization levels, health professions training, hospital expenditures, Medicare…

  16. Lysophosphatidic acid activates Arf6 to promote the mesenchymal malignancy of renal cancer.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Shigeru; Mikami, Shuji; Sugino, Hirokazu; Yoshikawa, Ayumu; Hashimoto, Ari; Onodera, Yasuhito; Furukawa, Shotaro; Handa, Haruka; Oikawa, Tsukasa; Okada, Yasunori; Oya, Mototsugu; Sabe, Hisataka

    2016-01-01

    Acquisition of mesenchymal properties by cancer cells is critical for their malignant behaviour, but regulators of the mesenchymal molecular machinery and how it is activated remain elusive. Here we show that clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCCs) frequently utilize the Arf6-based mesenchymal pathway to promote invasion and metastasis, similar to breast cancers. In breast cancer cells, ligand-activated receptor tyrosine kinases employ GEP100 to activate Arf6, which then recruits AMAP1; and AMAP1 then binds to the mesenchymal-specific protein EPB41L5, which promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition and focal adhesion dynamics. In renal cancer cells, lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) activates Arf6 via its G-protein-coupled receptors, in which GTP-Gα12 binds to EFA6. The Arf6-based pathway may also contribute to drug resistance. Our results identify a specific mesenchymal molecular machinery of primary ccRCCs, which is triggered by a product of autotaxin and it is associated with poor outcome of patients. PMID:26854204

  17. Below 70-nm contact hole pattern with RELACS process on ArF resist

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terai, Mamoru; Toyoshima, Toshiyuki; Ishibashi, Takeo; Tarutani, Shinji; Takahashi, Kiyohisa; Takano, Yusuke; Tanaka, Hatsuyuki

    2003-06-01

    A chemical shrink technology, RELACS (Resolution Enhancement Lithography Assisted by Chemical Shrink), utilizes the cross linking reaction catalyzed by the acid component existing in a predefined resist pattern. This "RELACS" process is a hole shrinking procedure that includes simple coating, baking, and rinsing applied after conventional photolithography. Our target is realize of sub-70nm hole pattern formation by using new RELACS for ArF resist. At present, RELACS process is introduced to mass production of KrF lithography by using AZ R200 (Product name of Clariant) mainly. Then first of all we reported process performance of conventional RELACS material, AZ R200 with ArF resist. However AZ R200 does not show satisfactory shrinkage on ArF resist. Thereupon, we started on the development of new RELACS corresponding to ArF resist. As the result, we developed new RELACS material including Cross Linking Accelerator (CLA). It was found that CLA is able to improve reactivity of RELACS with ArF-resist. By using this new RELACS, It is Realized sub-70nm hole pattern formation with ArF-Ex lithography and It is able to Control of hole size by mixing bake (MB) temperature and additive ratio of CLA. Moreover this process was realized that thickness of shrunk hole is increased.

  18. ARF6 inhibition stabilizes the vasculature and enhances survival during endotoxic shock

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Chadwick T.; Zhu, Weiquan; Gibson, Christopher C.; Bowman-Kirigin, Jay; Sorensen, Lise; Ling, Jing; Sun, Huiming; Navankasattusas, Sutip; Li, Dean Y.

    2014-01-01

    The vascular endothelium responds to infection by destabilizing endothelial cell-cell junctions to allow fluid and cells to pass into peripheral tissues facilitating clearance of infection and tissue repair. During sepsis, endotoxin and other pro-inflammatory molecules induce excessive vascular leak, which can cause organ dysfunction, shock, and death. Current therapies for sepsis are limited to antibiotics and supportive care, which are often insufficient to reduce morbidity and prevent mortality. Previous attempts at blocking inflammatory cytokine responses in humans have proven ineffective at reducing the pathologies associated with sepsis, thus highlighting the need for a new therapeutic strategy. The small GTPase ARF6 is activated by a MYD88-ARNO interaction to induce vascular leak through disruption of endothelial adherens junctions. Here we show that the MYD88-ARNO-ARF6 signaling axis is responsible for lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced endothelial permeability and is a destabilizing convergence point utilized by multiple inflammatory cues. We also show that blocking ARF6 with a peptide construct of its N-terminus is sufficient to reduce vascular leak and enhance survival during endotoxic shock without inhibiting host cytokine response. Our data highlight the therapeutic potential of blocking ARF6 and reducing vascular leak for the treatment of inflammatory conditions such as endotoxemia. PMID:24835390

  19. The clathrin adaptor AP-1 complex and Arf1 regulate planar cell polarity in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza, Meg; Dussert, Aurore; Collu, Giovanna; Roman, Angel-Carlos; Weber, Ursula; Ciruna, Brian; Mlodzik, Marek

    2015-01-01

    A key step in generating planar cell polarity (PCP) is the formation of restricted junctional domains containing Frizzled/Dishevelled/Diego (Fz/Dsh/Dgo) or Van Gogh/Prickle (Vang/Pk) complexes within the same cell, stabilized via Flamingo (Fmi) across cell membranes. Although models have been proposed for how these complexes acquire and maintain their polarized localization, the machinery involved in moving core PCP proteins around cells remains unknown. We describe the AP-1 adaptor complex and Arf1 as major regulators of PCP protein trafficking in vivo. AP-1 and Arf1 disruption affects the accumulation of Fz/Fmi and Vang/Fmi complexes in the proximo–distal axis, producing severe PCP phenotypes. Using novel tools, we demonstrate a direct and specific Arf1 involvement in Fz trafficking in vivo. Moreover, we uncover a conserved Arf1 PCP function in vertebrates. Our data support a model whereby the trafficking machinery plays an important part during PCP establishment, promoting formation of polarized PCP-core complexes in vivo. PMID:25849195

  20. The ARF-like 2 (ARL2)-binding protein, BART. Purification, cloning, and initial characterization.

    PubMed

    Sharer, J D; Kahn, R A

    1999-09-24

    ARF-like proteins (ARLs) comprise a functionally distinct group of incompletely characterized members in the ARF family of RAS-related GTPases. We took advantage of the GTP binding characteristics of human ARL2 to develop a specific, high affinity binding assay that allowed the purification of a novel ARL2-binding protein. A 19-kDa protein (BART, Binder of Arl Two) was identified and purified from bovine brain homogenate. BART binding is specific to ARL2.GTP with high affinity but does not interact with ARL2.GDP or activated ARF or RHO proteins. Based on peptide sequences of purified bovine BART, the human cDNA sequence was determined. The 489-base pair BART open reading frame encodes a novel 163-amino acid protein with a predicted molecular mass of 18,822 Da. Recombinant BART was found to bind ARL2.GTP in a manner indistinguishable from native BART. Northern and Western analyses indicated BART is expressed in all tissues sampled. The lack of detectable membrane association of ARL2 or BART upon activation of ARL2 is suggestive of actions quite distinct from those of the ARFs. The lack of ARL2 GTPase-activating protein activity in BART led us to conclude that the specific interaction with ARL2.GTP is most consistent with BART being the first identified ARL2-specific effector. PMID:10488091

  1. ArF processing of 90-nm design rule lithography achieved through enhanced thermal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagerer, Markus; Miller, Daniel; Chang, Wayne; Williams, Daniel J.

    2006-03-01

    As the lithography community has moved to ArF processing on 300 mm wafers for 90 nm design rules the process characterization of the components of variance continues to highlight the thermal requirements for the post exposure bake (PEB) processing step. In particular as the thermal systems have become increasingly uniform, the transient behavior of the thermal processing system has received the focus of attention. This paper demonstrates how a newly designed and patented thermal processing system was optimized for delivering improved thermal uniformity during a typical 90 second PEB processing cycle, rather than being optimized for steady state performance. This was accomplished with the aid of a wireless temperature measurement wafer system for obtaining real time temperature data and by using a response surface model (RSM) experimental design for optimizing parameters of the temperature controller of the thermal processing system. The new units were field retrofitted seamlessly in <2 days at customer sites without disruption to process recipes or flows. After evaluating certain resist parameters such as PEB temperature sensitivity and post exposure delay (PED) - stability of the baseline process, the new units were benchmarked against the previous PEB plates by processing a split lot experiment. Additional hardware characterization included environmental factors such as air velocity in the vicinity of the PEB plates and transient time between PEB and chill plate. At the completion of the optimization process, the within wafer CD uniformity displayed a significant improvement when compared to the previous hardware. The demonstrated within wafer CD uniformity improved by 27% compared to the initial hardware and baseline process. ITRS requirements for the 90 nm node were exceeded.

  2. A novel proapoptotic gene PANO encodes a post-translational modulator of the tumor suppressor p14ARF

    SciTech Connect

    Watari, Akihiro; Li, Yang; Higashiyama, Shinji; Yutsudo, Masuo

    2012-02-01

    The protein p14ARF is a known tumor suppressor protein controlling cell proliferation and survival, which mainly localizes in nucleoli. However, the regulatory mechanisms that govern its activity or expression remain unclear. Here, we report that a novel proapoptotic nucleolar protein, PANO, modulates the expression and activity of p14ARF in HeLa cells. Overexpression of PANO enhances the stability of p14ARF protein by protecting it from degradation, resulting in an increase in p14ARF expression levels. Overexpression of PANO also induces apoptosis under low serum conditions. This effect is dependent on the nucleolar localization of PANO and inhibited by knocking-down p14ARF. Alternatively, PANO siRNA treated cells exhibit a reduction in p14ARF protein levels. In addition, ectopic expression of PANO suppresses the tumorigenicity of HeLa cells in nude mice. These results indicate that PANO is a new apoptosis-inducing gene by modulating the tumor suppressor protein, p14ARF, and may itself be a new candidate tumor suppressor gene.

  3. Mechanism for low-etching resistance and surface roughness of ArF photoresist during plasma irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Jinnai, Butsurin; Koyama, Koji; Kato, Keisuke; Yasuda, Atsushi; Momose, Hikaru; Samukawa, Seiji

    2009-03-01

    ArF excimer laser lithography was introduced to fabricate nanometer-scale devices and uses chemically amplified photoresist polymers including photoacid generators (PAGs). Because plasma-etching processes cause serious problems related to the use of ArF photoresists, such as line-edge roughness and low etching selectivity, we have to understand the interaction between plasma and ArF photoresist polymers. Investigating the effects of surface temperature and the irradiation species from plasma, we have found that ion irradiation by itself did not drastically increase the roughness or etching rate of ArF photoresist films unless it was combined with ultraviolet/vacuum ultraviolet (UV/VUV) photon irradiation. The structures of ArF photoresist polymers were largely unchanged by ion irradiation alone but were destroyed by combinations of ion and UV/VUV-photon irradiation. Our results suggested that PAG-mediated deprotection induced by UV/VUV-photon irradiation was amplified at surface temperatures above 100 deg. C. The etching rate and surface roughness of plasma-etched ArF photoresists are affected by the irradiation species and surface temperature during plasma etching. UV/VUV-photon irradiation plays a particularly important role in the interaction between plasma and ArF photoresist polymers.

  4. Activation-Inactivation Cycling of Rab35 and ARF6 Is Required for Phagocytosis of Zymosan in RAW264 Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Egami, Youhei; Fujii, Makoto; Kawai, Katsuhisa; Ishikawa, Yurie; Fukuda, Mitsunori; Araki, Nobukazu

    2015-01-01

    Phagocytosis of zymosan by phagocytes is a widely used model of microbial recognition by the innate immune system. Live-cell imaging showed that fluorescent protein-fused Rab35 accumulated in the membranes of phagocytic cups and then dissociated from the membranes of newly formed phagosomes. By our novel pull-down assay for Rab35 activity, we found that Rab35 is deactivated immediately after zymosan internalization into the cells. Phagosome formation was inhibited in cells expressing the GDP- or GTP-locked Rab35 mutant. Moreover, the simultaneous expression of ACAP2—a Rab35 effector protein—with GTP-locked Rab35 or the expression of plasma membrane-targeted ACAP2 showed a marked inhibitory effect on phagocytosis through ARF6 inactivation by the GAP activity of ACAP2. ARF6, a substrate for ACAP2, was also localized on the phagocytic cups and dissociated from the membranes of internalized phagosomes. In support of the microscopic observations, ARF6-GTP pull-down experiments showed that ARF6 is transiently activated during phagosome formation. Furthermore, the expression of GDP- or GTP-locked ARF6 mutants also suppresses the uptake of zymosan. These data suggest that the activation-inactivation cycles of Rab35 and ARF6 are required for the uptake of zymosan and that ACAP2 is an important component that links Rab35/ARF6 signaling during phagocytosis of zymosan. PMID:26229970

  5. High frequency of p53/MDM2/p14ARF pathway abnormalities in relapsed neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Carr-Wilkinson, Jane; O' Toole, Kieran; Wood, Katrina M.; Challen, Christine C.; Baker, Angela G.; Board, Julian R.; Evans, Laura; Cole, Michael; Cheung, Nai-Kong V.; Boos, Joachim; Köhler, Gabriele; Leuschner, Ivo; Pearson, Andrew D.J.; Lunec, John; Tweddle, Deborah A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Most neuroblastomas initially respond to therapy but many relapse with chemoresistant disease. p53 mutations are rare in diagnostic neuroblastomas, but we have previously reported inactivation of the p53/MDM2/p14ARF pathway in 9/17 (53%) neuroblastoma cell lines established at relapse. Hypothesis: Inactivation of the p53/MDM2/p14ARF pathway develops during treatment and contributes to neuroblastoma relapse. Methods: Eighty-four neuroblastomas were studied from 41 patients with relapsed neuroblastoma including 38 paired neuroblastomas at different stages of therapy. p53 mutations were detected by automated sequencing, p14ARF methylation and deletion by methylation-specific PCR and duplex PCR respectively, and MDM2 amplification by fluorescent in-situ hybridisation. Results: Abnormalities in the p53 pathway were identified in 20/41(49%) cases. Downstream defects due to inactivating missense p53 mutations were identified in 6/41 (15%) cases, 5 following chemotherapy and/or at relapse and 1 at diagnosis, post chemotherapy and relapse. The presence of a p53 mutation was independently prognostic for overall survival (hazard ratio 3.4, 95% confidence interval 1.2, 9.9; p = 0.02). Upstream defects were present in 35% cases: MDM2 amplification in 3 cases, all at diagnosis & relapse and p14ARF inactivation in 12/41 (29%) cases: 3 had p14ARF methylation, 2 after chemotherapy, and 9 had homozygous deletions, 8 at diagnosis and relapse. Conclusions: These results show that a high proportion of neuroblastomas which relapse have an abnormality in the p53 pathway. The majority have upstream defects suggesting that agents which reactivate wild-type p53 would be beneficial, in contrast to those with downstream defects where p53 independent therapies are indicated. PMID:20145180

  6. Intrinsically Unstructured Domains of Arf and Hdm2 Form Bi-molecular Oligomeric Structures In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sivakolundu, Sivashankar G.; Nourse, Amanda; Moshiach, Simon; Bothner, Brian; Ashley, Chimere; Satumba, John; Lahti, Jill; Kriwacki, Richard W.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Arf, Hdm2 and p53 regulate the tumor suppressor pathway that is most frequently disrupted in human cancer. In the absence of tumorigenic stress, Hdm2 actively attenuates p53-dependent cell cycle arrest and apoptosis by mediating ubiquitination-dependent degradation of p53. Mitogenic stress activates Arf, which indirectly activates p53 by binding to and nullifying the anti-p53 activities of Hdm2. Small, conserved domains within Arf and Hdm2 mediate their direct interaction. Individually, these domains are intrinsically unstructured and, when combined in vitro, they co-fold into bi-molecular oligomeric structures that, in some features, resemble amyloid fibrils. Detailed structural characterization of Arf/Hdm2 complexes has previously been hampered by their heterogeneity and large size. Here, we report that a 9-residue fragment of the N-terminus of mouse Arf (termed A1-mini) co-folds specifically with the Arf-binding domain of Hdm2 to form bi-molecular oligomers. We characterized these unprecedented structures using analytical ultracentrifugation and NMR spectroscopy, providing insights into their structural organization. The A1-mini peptide not only binds specifically to Hdm2 in vitro, but also recapitulates the nucleolar localization features of full-length Arf in cells. Further, larger fragments of Arf that contain the A1-mini segment have previously been shown to activate p53 in mouse and human cells. Our studies provide the first insights into the molecular basis through which Arf nullifies the p53-inhibiting activity of Hdm2, indirectly activating the tumor suppressor function of p53 in mammalian cells. PMID:18809412

  7. Irrepressible, truncated auxin response factors: natural roles and applications in dissecting auxin gene regulation pathways.

    PubMed

    Ckurshumova, Wenzislava; Krogan, Naden T; Marcos, Danielle; Caragea, Adriana E; Berleth, Thomas

    2012-08-01

    The molecularly well-characterized auxin signal transduction pathway involves two evolutionarily conserved families interacting through their C-terminal domains III and IV: the Auxin Response Factors (ARFs) and their repressors the Aux/IAAs, to control auxin-responsive genes, among them genes involved in auxin transport. ( 1) (,) ( 2) We have developed a new genetic tool to study ARF function. Using MONOPTEROS (MP)/ARF5, we have generated a truncated version of MP (MPΔ), ( 3) which has lost the target domains for repression by Aux/IAA proteins. Besides exploring genetic interactions between MP and Aux/IAAs, we used this construct to trace MP's role in vascular patterning, a previously characterized auxin dependent process. ( 4) (,) ( 5) Here we summarize examples of naturally occurring truncated ARFs and summarize potential applications of truncated ARFs as analytical tools. PMID:22827953

  8. Endogenous target mimics down-regulate miR160 mediation of ARF10, -16, and -17 cleavage during somatic embryogenesis in Dimocarpus longan Lour

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yuling; Lai, Zhongxiong; Tian, Qilin; Lin, Lixia; Lai, Ruilian; Yang, Manman; Zhang, Dongmin; Chen, Yukun; Zhang, Zihao

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA160 plays a critical role in plant development by negatively regulating the auxin response factors ARF10, -16, and -17. However, the ways in which miR160 expression is regulated at the transcriptional level, and how miR160 interacts with its targets during plant embryo development, remain unknown. Here, we studied the regulatory relationships among endogenous target mimics (eTMs), and miR160 and its targets, and their involvement in hormone signaling and somatic embryogenesis (SE) in Dimocarpus longan. We identified miR160 family members and isolated the miR160 precursor, primary transcript, and promoter. The promoter contained cis-acting elements responsive to stimuli such as light, abscisic acid, salicylic acid (SA) and heat stress. The pri-miR160 was down-regulated in response to SA but up-regulated by gibberellic acid, ethylene, and methyl jasmonate treatment, suggesting that pri-miR160 was associated with hormone transduction. Dlo-miR160a, -a∗ and -d∗ reached expression peaks in torpedo-shaped embryos, globular embryos and cotyledonary embryos, respectively, but were barely detectable in friable-embryogenic callus. This suggests that they have expression-related and functional diversity, especially during the middle and later developmental stages of SE. Four potential eTMs for miR160 were identified. Two of them, glucan endo-1,3-beta- glucosidase-like protein 2-like and calpain-type cysteine protease DEK1, were confirmed to control the corresponding dlo-miR160a∗ expression level. This suggests that they may function to abolish the binding between dlo-miR160a∗ and its targets. These two eTMs also participated in 2,4-D and ABA signal transduction. DlARF10, -16, and -17 targeting by dlo-miR160a was confirmed; their expression levels were higher in friable-embryogenic callus and incomplete compact pro-embryogenic cultures and responded to 2,4-D, suggesting they may play a major role in the early stages of longan SE dependent on 2,4-D. The eTMs, mi

  9. Angiotensin II-induced Akt activation through the epidermal growth factor receptor in vascular smooth muscle cells is mediated by phospholipid metabolites derived by activation of phospholipase D.

    PubMed

    Li, Fang; Malik, Kafait U

    2005-03-01

    Angiotensin II (Ang II) activates cytosolic Ca(2+)-dependent phospholipase A(2) (cPLA(2)), phospholipase D (PLD), p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and Akt in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). This study was conducted to investigate the relationship between Akt activation by Ang II and other signaling molecules in rat VSMC. Ang II-induced Akt phosphorylation was significantly reduced by the PLD inhibitor 1-butanol, but not by its inactive analog 2-butanol, and by brefeldin A, an inhibitor of the PLD cofactor ADP-ribosylation factor, and in cells infected with retrovirus containing PLD(2) siRNA or transfected with PLD(2) antisense but not control LacZ or sense oligonucleotide. Diacylglycerol kinase inhibitor II diminished Ang II-induced and diC8-phosphatidic acid (PA)-increased Akt phosphorylation, suggesting that PLD-dependent Akt activation is mediated by PA. Ang II-induced EGFR phosphorylation was inhibited by 1-butanol and PLD(2) siRNA and also by cPLA(2) siRNA. In addition, the inhibitor of arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid (ETYA) reduced both Ang II- and AA-induced EGFR transactivation. Furthermore, ETYA, cPLA(2) antisense, and cPLA(2) siRNA attenuated Ang II-elicited PLD activation. p38 MAPK inhibitor SB202190 [4-(4-flurophenyl)-2-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-5-(4-pyridyl)1H-imidazole] reduced PLD activity and EGFR and Akt phosphorylation elicited by Ang II. Pyrrolidine-1, a cPLA(2) inhibitor, and cPLA(2) siRNA decreased p38 MAPK activity. These data indicate that Ang II-stimulated Akt activity is mediated by cPLA(2)-dependent, p38 MAPK regulated PLD(2) activation and EGFR transactivation. We propose the following scheme of the sequence of events leading to activation of Akt in VSMC by Ang II: Ang II-->cPLA(2)-->AA-->p38 MAPK-->PLD(2)-->PA-->EGFR-->Akt. PMID:15525798

  10. A conserved domain in exon 2 coding for the human and murine ARF tumor suppressor protein is required for autophagy induction

    PubMed Central

    Budina-Kolomets, Anna; Hontz, Robert D; Pimkina, Julia; Murphy, Maureen E

    2013-01-01

    The ARF tumor suppressor, encoded by the CDKN2A gene, has a well-defined role regulating TP53 stability; this activity maps to exon 1β of CDKN2A. In contrast, little is known about the function(s) of exon 2 of ARF, which contains the majority of mutations in human cancer. In addition to controlling TP53 stability, ARF also has a role in the induction of autophagy. However, whether the principal molecule involved is full-length ARF, or a small molecular weight variant called smARF, has been controversial. Additionally, whether tumor-derived mutations in exon 2 of CDKN2A affect ARF’s autophagy function is unknown. Finally, whereas it is known that silencing or inhibiting TP53 induces autophagy, the contribution of ARF to this induction is unknown. In this report we used multiple autophagy assays to map a region located in the highly conserved 5′ end of exon 2 of CDKN2A that is necessary for autophagy induction by both human and murine ARF. We showed that mutations in exon 2 of CDKN2A that affect the coding potential of ARF, but not p16INK4a, all impair the ability of ARF to induce autophagy. We showed that whereas full-length ARF can induce autophagy, our combined data suggest that smARF instead induces mitophagy (selective autophagy of mitochondria), thus potentially resolving some confusion regarding the role of these variants. Finally, we showed that silencing Tp53 induces autophagy in an ARF-dependent manner. Our data indicated that a conserved domain in ARF mediates autophagy, and for the first time they implicate autophagy in ARF’s tumor suppressor function. PMID:23939042

  11. Design and performance of photoresist materials for ArF lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun-Woo; Jung, Dong-Won; Lee, Sook; Choi, Sang-Jun; Woo, Sang-Gyun; Kavanagh, Robert J.; Barclay, George G.; Blacksmith, Robert F.; Kang, Doris; Pohlers, Gerd; Cameron, James F.; Mattia, Joe; Caporale, Stefan; Penniman, Thomas; Joesten, Lori A.; Thackeray, James W.

    2001-08-01

    In this paper we review the design and performance of ArF resists developed from various polymer platforms. Inadequate etch performance of early ArF acrylate platforms necessitated the development of new etch resistant platforms, in terms of both etch rate and etch uniformity. Two resist platforms were developed to address etch resistance: 1) alternating copolymers of cyclic olefins and maleic anhydride (COMA); and 2) polycycloolefin polymers (CO). Improvements have been made in the imaging performance of these resists, such that they now approach the lithographic performance of acrylate based resists. Recently, a third platform based on polymerization of vinyl ethers with maleic anhydride (VEMA), which has excellent etch performance, was developed by Samsung. Here we will focus our discussion on acrylate, COMA and VEMA based resists.

  12. Comparison of KrF and ArF excimer laser treatment of biopolymer surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaljaničová, I.; Slepička, P.; Heitz, J.; Barb, R. A.; Sajdl, P.; Švorčík, V.

    2015-06-01

    The goal of this work was the investigation of the impact of two different excimer lasers on two biocompatible and biodegradable polymers (poly-L-lactide and poly hydroxybutyrate). Both polymers find usage in medical and pharmaceutical fields. The polymers were modified by KrF and ArF excimer lasers. Subsequently the impact on surface morphology, surface chemistry changes, and thermal properties was studied by means of confocal and AFM microscopy, FTIR and XPS spectroscopy and DSC calorimetry. Under the same conditions of laser treatment it was observed that ArF laser causes more significant changes on surface chemistry, surface morphology and pattern formation on the polymers under investigation. The data obtained in this work can be used for a wide range of possible applications, in tissue engineering or in combination with metallization in electronics, e.g. for biosensors.

  13. RNA helicase DDX5 is a p53-independent target of ARF that participates in ribosome biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Saporita, Anthony J.; Chang, Hsiang-Chun; Winkeler, Crystal L.; Apicelli, Anthony J.; Kladney, Raleigh D.; Wang, Jianbo; Townsend, R. Reid; Michel, Loren S.; Weber, Jason D.

    2011-01-01

    The p19ARF tumor suppressor limits ribosome biogenesis and responds to hyperproliferative signals to activate the p53 checkpoint response. While its activation of p53 has been well characterized, ARF’s role in restraining nucleolar ribosome production is poorly understood. Here we report the use of a mass spectroscopic analysis to identify protein changes within the nucleoli of Arf-deficient mouse cells. Through this approach, we discovered that ARF limited the nucleolar localization of the RNA helicase DDX5 which promotes the synthesis and maturation of rRNA, ultimately increasing ribosome output and proliferation. ARF inhibited the interaction between DDX5 and nucleophosmin (NPM), preventing association of DDX5 with the rDNA promoter and nuclear pre-ribosomes. In addition, Arf-deficient cells transformed by oncogenic RasV12 were addicted to DDX5, since reduction of DDX5 was sufficient to impair RasV12-driven colony formation in soft agar and tumor growth in mice. Taken together, our findings indicate that DDX5 is a key p53-independent target of the ARF tumor suppressor and is a novel non-oncogene participant in ribosome biogenesis. PMID:21937682

  14. Rayleigh rejection filters for 193-nm ArF laser Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckenzie, Robert L.

    1993-01-01

    Selected organic absorbers and their solvents are evaluated as spectral filters for the rejection of 193-nm Rayleigh light associated with the use of an ArF excimer laser for Raman spectroscopy. A simply constructed filter cell filled with 0.5 percent acetone in water and an optical path of 7 mm is shown effectively to eliminate stray Rayleigh light underlying the Raman spectrum from air while transmitting 60 percent of the Raman light scattered by O2.

  15. Breaking a paradigm: IL-6/STAT3 signaling suppresses metastatic prostate cancer upon ARF expression.

    PubMed

    Culig, Zoran; Pencik, Jan; Merkel, Olaf; Kenner, Lukas

    2016-03-01

    Interleukin 6 (IL-6)/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) signaling is considered to have important oncogenic functions in prostate cancer (PCa). However, a recent study highlighted the central role of IL-6/STAT3 signaling in regulation of the ARF-MDM2-p53 senescence axis. This reversal of the postulated oncogenic properties of IL-6/STAT3 signaling in PCa has important therapeutic implications. PMID:27308625

  16. Vault-poly-ADP-ribose polymerase in the Octopus vulgaris brain: a regulatory factor of actin polymerization dynamic.

    PubMed

    De Maio, Anna; Natale, Emiliana; Rotondo, Sergio; Di Cosmo, Anna; Faraone-Mennella, Maria Rosaria

    2013-09-01

    Our previous behavioural, biochemical and immunohistochemical analyses conducted in selected regions (supra/sub oesophageal masses) of the Octopus vulgaris brain detected a cytoplasmic poly-ADP-ribose polymerase (more than 90% of total enzyme activity). The protein was identified as the vault-free form of vault-poly-ADP-ribose polymerase. The present research extends and integrates the biochemical characterization of poly-ADP-ribosylation system, namely, reaction product, i.e., poly-ADP-ribose, and acceptor proteins, in the O. vulgaris brain. Immunochemical analyses evidenced that the sole poly-ADP-ribose acceptor was the octopus cytoskeleton 50-kDa actin. It was present in both free, endogenously poly-ADP-ribosylated form (70kDa) and in complex with V-poly-ADP-ribose polymerase and poly-ADP-ribose (260kDa). The components of this complex, alkali and high salt sensitive, were purified and characterized. The kind and the length of poly-ADP-ribose corresponded to linear chains of 30-35 ADP-ribose units, in accordance with the features of the polymer synthesized by the known vault-poly-ADP-ribose polymerase. In vitro experiments showed that V-poly-ADP-ribose polymerase activity of brain cytoplasmic fraction containing endogenous actin increased upon the addition of commercial actin and was highly reduced by ATP. Anti-actin immunoblot of the mixture in the presence and absence of ATP showed that the poly-ADP-ribosylation of octopus actin is a dynamic process balanced by the ATP-dependent polymerization of the cytoskeleton protein, a fundamental mechanism for synaptic plasticity. PMID:23831359

  17. Arf6 controls retromer traffic and intracellular cholesterol distribution via a phosphoinositide-based mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Marquer, Catherine; Tian, Huasong; Yi, Julie; Bastien, Jayson; Dall'Armi, Claudia; Yang-Klingler, YoungJoo; Zhou, Bowen; Chan, Robin Barry; Di Paolo, Gilbert

    2016-01-01

    Small GTPases play a critical role in membrane traffic. Among them, Arf6 mediates transport to and from the plasma membrane, as well as phosphoinositide signalling and cholesterol homeostasis. Here we delineate the molecular basis for the link between Arf6 and cholesterol homeostasis using an inducible knockout (KO) model of mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). We find that accumulation of free cholesterol in the late endosomes/lysosomes of Arf6 KO MEFs results from mistrafficking of Niemann–Pick type C protein NPC2, a cargo of the cation-independent mannose-6-phosphate receptor (CI-M6PR). This is caused by a selective increase in an endosomal pool of phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate (PI4P) and a perturbation of retromer, which controls the retrograde transport of CI-M6PR via sorting nexins, including the PI4P effector SNX6. Finally, reducing PI4P levels in KO MEFs through independent mechanisms rescues aberrant retromer tubulation and cholesterol mistrafficking. Our study highlights a phosphoinositide-based mechanism for control of cholesterol distribution via retromer. PMID:27336679

  18. The Arf GAP CNT-2 regulates the apoptotic fate in C. elegans asymmetric neuroblast divisions

    PubMed Central

    Singhvi, Aakanksha; Teuliere, Jerome; Talavera, Karla; Cordes, Shaun; Ou, Guangshuo; Vale, Ronald D.; Prasad, Brinda C.; Clark, Scott G.; Garriga, Gian

    2011-01-01

    Summary During development, all cells make the decision to live or die. While the molecular mechanisms that execute the apoptotic program are well defined, less is known about how cells decide whether to live or die. In C. elegans, this decision is linked to how cells divide asymmetrically [1, 2]. Several classes of molecules are known to regulate asymmetric cell divisions in metazoans, yet these molecules do not appear to control C. elegans divisions that produce apoptotic cells [3]. We identified CNT-2, an Arf GAP protein of the AGAP family, as a novel regulator of this type of neuroblast division. Loss of CNT-2 altered daughter cell size and caused the apoptotic cell to adopt the fate of its sister cell, resulting in extra neurons. CNT-2’s Arf GAP activity was essential for its function in these divisions. The N-terminus of CNT-2, which contains a GTPase-like domain that defines the AGAP class of Arf GAPs, negatively regulates CNT-2’s function. We provide evidence that CNT-2 regulates receptor-mediated endocytosis and consider the implications of its role in asymmetric cell divisions. PMID:21596567

  19. Guidance on setting of acute reference dose (ARfD) for pesticides.

    PubMed

    Solecki, Roland; Davies, Les; Dellarco, Vicki; Dewhurst, Ian; Raaij, Marcel van; Tritscher, Angelika

    2005-11-01

    This paper summarises and extends the work developed over the last decade by the Joint FAO/WHO Meeting on Pesticide Residues (JMPR) for acute health risk assessment of agricultural pesticides. The general considerations in setting of acute reference doses (ARfDs) in a step-wise process, as well as specific considerations and guidance regarding selected toxicological endpoints are described in detail. The endpoints selected are based on the practical experience with agricultural pesticides by the JMPR and are not a comprehensive listing of all possible relevant endpoints. Haematotoxicity, immunotoxicity, neurotoxicity, liver and kidney toxicity, endocrine effects as well as developmental effects are taken into account as acute toxic alerts, relevant for the consideration of ARfDs for pesticides. The general biological background and the data available through standard toxicological testing for regulatory purposes, interpretation of the data, conclusions and recommendations for future improvements are described for each relevant endpoint. The paper also considers a single dose study protocol. This type of study is not intended to be included in routine toxicological testing for regulatory purposes, but rather to guide further testing when the current database indicates the necessity for an ARfD but does not allow a reliable derivation of the value. PMID:16040182

  20. Selection of Nanobodies that Block the Enzymatic and Cytotoxic Activities of the Binary Clostridium Difficile Toxin CDT

    PubMed Central

    Unger, Mandy; Eichhoff, Anna Marei; Schumacher, Lucas; Strysio, Moritz; Menzel, Stephan; Schwan, Carsten; Alzogaray, Vanina; Zylberman, Vanesa; Seman, Michel; Brandner, Johanna; Rohde, Holger; Zhu, Kai; Haag, Friedrich; Mittrücker, Hans-Willi; Goldbaum, Fernando; Aktories, Klaus; Koch-Nolte, Friedrich

    2015-01-01

    The spore-forming gut bacterium Clostridium difficile is the leading cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea in hospitalized patients. The major virulence factors are two large glucosylating cytotoxins. Hypervirulent strains (e.g. ribotype 027) with higher morbidity and mortality additionally produce the binary CDT toxin (Clostridium difficile transferase) that ADP-ribosylates actin and induces microtubule-based cell protrusions. Nanobodies are robust single domain antibodies derived from camelid heavy chain antibodies. Here we report the generation of functional nanobodies against the enzymatic CDTa and the heptameric receptor binding subunit CDTb. The nanobodies were obtained from a variable-domain repertoire library isolated from llamas immunized with recombinant CDTa or CDTb. Five CDTa-specific nanobodies blocked CDTa-mediated ADP-ribosylation of actin. Three CDTa-specific and two CDTb-specific nanobodies neutralized the cytotoxicity of CDTa+b. These nanobodies hold promise as new tools for research, diagnosis and therapy of C. difficile associated disease. PMID:25597743

  1. AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR17 Is Essential for Pollen Wall Pattern Formation in Arabidopsis1[C][W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jun; Tian, Lei; Sun, Ming-Xi; Huang, Xue-Yong; Zhu, Jun; Guan, Yue-Feng; Jia, Qi-Shi; Yang, Zhong-Nan

    2013-01-01

    In angiosperms, pollen wall pattern formation is determined by primexine deposition on the microspores. Here, we show that AUXIN RESPONSE FACTOR17 (ARF17) is essential for primexine formation and pollen development in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). The arf17 mutant exhibited a male-sterile phenotype with normal vegetative growth. ARF17 was expressed in microsporocytes and microgametophytes from meiosis to the bicellular microspore stage. Transmission electron microscopy analysis showed that primexine was absent in the arf17 mutant, which leads to pollen wall-patterning defects and pollen degradation. Callose deposition was also significantly reduced in the arf17 mutant, and the expression of CALLOSE SYNTHASE5 (CalS5), the major gene for callose biosynthesis, was approximately 10% that of the wild type. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and electrophoretic mobility shift assays showed that ARF17 can directly bind to the CalS5 promoter. As indicated by the expression of DR5-driven green fluorescent protein, which is an synthetic auxin response reporter, auxin signaling appeared to be specifically impaired in arf17 anthers. Taken together, our results suggest that ARF17 is essential for pollen wall patterning in Arabidopsis by modulating primexine formation at least partially through direct regulation of CalS5 gene expression. PMID:23580594

  2. Tgfβ Signaling Directly Induces Arf Promoter Remodeling by a Mechanism Involving Smads 2/3 and p38 MAPK*

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yanbin; Zhao, Yi D.; Gibbons, Melissa; Abramova, Tatiana; Chu, Patricia Y.; Ash, John D.; Cunningham, John M.; Skapek, Stephen X.

    2010-01-01

    We have investigated how the Arf gene product, p19Arf, is activated by Tgfβ during mouse embryo development to better understand how this important tumor suppressor is controlled. Taking advantage of new mouse models, we provide genetic evidence that Arf lies downstream of Tgfβ signaling in cells arising from the Wnt1-expressing neural crest and that the anti-proliferative effects of Tgfβ depend on Arf in vivo. Tgfβ1, -2, and -3 (but not BMP-2, another member of the Tgfβ superfamily) induce p19Arf expression in wild type mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs), and they enhance Arf promoter activity in ArflacZ/lacZ MEFs. Application of chemical inhibitors of Smad-dependent and -independent pathways show that SB431542, a Tgfβ type I receptor (TβrI) inhibitor, and SB203580, a p38 MAPK inhibitor, impede Tgfβ2 induction of Arf. Genetic studies confirm the findings; transient knockdown of Smad2, Smad3, or p38 MAPK blunt Tgfβ2 effects, as does Cre recombinase treatment of Tgfbr2fl/fl MEFs to delete Tgfβ receptor II. Chromatin immunoprecipitation reveals that Tgfβ rapidly induces Smads 2/3 binding and histone H3 acetylation at genomic DNA proximal to Arf exon 1β. This is followed by increased RNA polymerase II binding and progressively increased Arf primary and mature transcripts from 24 through 72 h, indicating that increased transcription contributes to p19Arf increase. Last, Arf induction by oncogenic Ras depends on p38 MAPK but is independent of TβrI activation of Smad 2. These findings add to our understanding of how developmental and tumorigenic signals control Arf expression in vivo and in cultured MEFs. PMID:20826783

  3. Long noncoding RNA, polycomb, and the ghosts haunting INK4b-ARF-INK4a expression.

    PubMed

    Aguilo, Francesca; Zhou, Ming-Ming; Walsh, Martin J

    2011-08-15

    Polycomb group proteins (PcG) function as transcriptional repressors of gene expression. The important role of PcG in mediating repression of the INK4b-ARF-INK4a locus, by directly binding to the long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) transcript antisense noncoding RNA in the INK4 locus (ANRIL), was recently shown. INK4b-ARF-INK4a encodes 3 tumor-suppressor proteins, p15(INK4b), p14(ARF), and p16(INK4a), and its transcription is a key requirement for replicative or oncogene-induced senescence and constitutes an important barrier for tumor growth. ANRIL gene is transcribed in the antisense orientation of the INK4b-ARF-INK4a gene cluster, and different single-nucleotide polymorphisms are associated with increased susceptibility to several diseases. Although lncRNA-mediated regulation of INK4b-ARF-INK4a gene is not restricted to ANRIL, both polycomb repressive complex-1 (PRC1) and -2 (PRC2) interact with ANRIL to form heterochromatin surrounding the INK4b-ARF-INK4a locus, leading to its repression. This mechanism would provide an increased advantage for bypassing senescence, sustaining the requirements for the proliferation of stem and/or progenitor cell populations or inappropriately leading to oncogenesis through the aberrant saturation of the INK4b-ARF-INK4a locus by PcG complexes. In this review, we summarize recent findings on the underlying epigenetic mechanisms that link PcG function with ANRIL, which impose gene silencing to control cellular homeostasis as well as cancer development. PMID:21828241

  4. Long Noncoding RNA, Polycomb, and the Ghosts Haunting INK4b-ARF-INK4a Expression

    PubMed Central

    Aguilo, Francesca; Zhou, Ming-Ming; Walsh, Martin J.

    2012-01-01

    Polycomb group proteins (PcG) function as transcriptional repressors of gene expression. The important role of PcG in mediating repression of the INK4b-ARF-INK4a locus, by directly binding to the long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) transcript antisense noncoding RNA in the INK4 locus (ANRIL), was recently shown. INK4b-ARF-INK4a encodes 3 tumor-suppressor proteins, p15INK4b, p14ARF, and p16INK4a, and its transcription is a key requirement for replicative or oncogene-induced senescence and constitutes an important barrier for tumor growth. ANRIL gene is transcribed in the antisense orientation of the INK4b-ARF-INK4a gene cluster, and different single-nucleotide polymorphisms are associated with increased susceptibility to several diseases. Although lncRNA-mediated regulation of INK4b-ARF-INK4a gene is not restricted to ANRIL, both polycomb repressive complex-1 (PRC1) and -2 (PRC2) interact with ANRIL to form heterochromatin surrounding the INK4b-ARF-INK4a locus, leading to its repression. This mechanism would provide an increased advantage for bypassing senescence, sustaining the requirements for the proliferation of stem and/or progenitor cell populations or inappropriately leading to oncogenesis through the aberrant saturation of the INK4b-ARF-INK4a locus by PcG complexes. In this review, we summarize recent findings on the underlying epigenetic mechanisms that link PcG function with ANRIL, which impose gene silencing to control cellular homeostasis as well as cancer development. PMID:21828241

  5. Auxin response factors mediate Arabidopsis organ asymmetry via modulation of KANADI activity.

    PubMed

    Pekker, Irena; Alvarez, John Paul; Eshed, Yuval

    2005-11-01

    Members of the KANADI gene family in Arabidopsis thaliana regulate abaxial identity and laminar growth of lateral organs. Promoter APETALA3-mediated ectopic expression of KANADI restricts petal expansion and was used in a genetic screen for factors involved in KANADI-mediated signaling. Through this screen, mutations in ETTIN (ETT; also known as Auxin Response Factor3 [ARF3]) were isolated as second site suppressors and found to ameliorate ectopic KANADI activity throughout the plant as well. Mutant phenotypes of ett are restricted to flowers; however, double mutants with a closely related gene ARF4 exhibit transformation of abaxial tissues into adaxial ones in all aerial parts, resembling mutations in KANADI. Accordingly, the common RNA expression domain of both ARFs was found to be on the abaxial side of all lateral organs. Truncated, negatively acting gene products of strong ett alleles map to an ARF-specific, N-terminal domain of ETT. Such gene products strongly enhance abaxial tissue loss only when ARF activities are compromised. As KANADI is not required for either ETT or ARF4 transcription, and their overexpression cannot rescue kanadi mutants, cooperative activity is implied. ARF proteins are pivotal in mediating auxin responses; thus, we present a model linking transient local auxin gradients and gradual partitioning of lateral organs along the abaxial/adaxial axis. PMID:16199616

  6. Collaborator of ARF (CARF) Regulates Proliferative Fate of Human Cells by Dose-dependent Regulation of DNA Damage Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Caroline T.; Singh, Rumani; Kalra, Rajkumar S.; Kaul, Sunil C.; Wadhwa, Renu

    2014-01-01

    Collaborator of ARF (CARF) has been shown to directly bind to and regulate p53, a central protein that controls tumor suppression via cellular senescence and apoptosis. However, the cellular functions of CARF and the mechanisms governing its effect on senescence, apoptosis, or proliferation are still unknown. Our previous studies have shown that (i) CARF is up-regulated during replicative and stress-induced senescence, and its exogenous overexpression caused senescence-like growth arrest of cells, and (ii) suppression of CARF induces aneuploidy, DNA damage, and mitotic catastrophe, resulting in apoptosis via the ATR/CHK1 pathway. In the present study, we dissected the cellular role of CARF by investigating the molecular pathways triggered by its overexpression in vitro and in vivo. We found that the dosage of CARF is a critical factor in determining the proliferation potential of cancer cells. Most surprisingly, although a moderate level of CARF overexpression induced senescence, a very high level of CARF resulted in increased cell proliferation. We demonstrate that the level of CARF is crucial for DNA damage and checkpoint response of cells through ATM/CHK1/CHK2, p53, and ERK pathways that in turn determine the proliferative fate of cancer cells toward growth arrest or proproliferative and malignant phenotypes. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that demonstrates the capability of a fundamental protein, CARF, in controlling cell proliferation in two opposite directions and hence may play a key role in tumor biology and cancer therapeutics. PMID:24825908

  7. A novel role for the mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase PARP14/ARTD8 in promoting homologous recombination and protecting against replication stress.

    PubMed

    Nicolae, Claudia M; Aho, Erin R; Choe, Katherine N; Constantin, Daniel; Hu, He-Juan; Lee, Deokjae; Myung, Kyungjae; Moldovan, George-Lucian

    2015-03-31

    Genomic instability, a major hallmark of cancer cells, is caused by incorrect or ineffective DNA repair. Many DNA repair mechanisms cooperate in cells to fight DNA damage, and are generally regulated by post-translational modification of key factors. Poly-ADP-ribosylation, catalyzed by PARP1, is a post-translational modification playing a prominent role in DNA repair, but much less is known about mono-ADP-ribosylation. Here we report that mono-ADP-ribosylation plays an important role in homologous recombination DNA repair, a mechanism essential for replication fork stability and double strand break repair. We show that the mono-ADP-ribosyltransferase PARP14 interacts with the DNA replication machinery component PCNA and promotes replication of DNA lesions and common fragile sites. PARP14 depletion results in reduced homologous recombination, persistent RAD51 foci, hypersensitivity to DNA damaging agents and accumulation of DNA strand breaks. Our work uncovered PARP14 as a novel factor required for mitigating replication stress and promoting genomic stability. PMID:25753673

  8. ARF6–JIP3/4 regulate endosomal tubules for MT1-MMP exocytosis in cancer invasion

    PubMed Central

    Marchesin, Valentina; Castro-Castro, Antonio; Lodillinsky, Catalina; Castagnino, Alessia; Cyrta, Joanna; Bonsang-Kitzis, Hélène; Fuhrmann, Laetitia; Irondelle, Marie; Infante, Elvira; Montagnac, Guillaume; Reyal, Fabien; Vincent-Salomon, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Invasion of cancer cells into collagen-rich extracellular matrix requires membrane-tethered membrane type 1–matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) as the key protease for collagen breakdown. Understanding how MT1-MMP is delivered to the surface of tumor cells is essential for cancer cell biology. In this study, we identify ARF6 together with c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase–interacting protein 3 and 4 (JIP3 and JIP4) effectors as critical regulators of this process. Silencing ARF6 or JIP3/JIP4 in breast tumor cells results in MT1-MMP endosome mispositioning and reduces MT1-MMP exocytosis and tumor cell invasion. JIPs are recruited by Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein and scar homologue (WASH) on MT1-MMP endosomes on which they recruit dynein–dynactin and kinesin-1. The interaction of plasma membrane ARF6 with endosomal JIPs coordinates dynactin–dynein and kinesin-1 activity in a tug-of-war mechanism, leading to MT1-MMP endosome tubulation and exocytosis. In addition, we find that ARF6, MT1-MMP, and kinesin-1 are up-regulated in high-grade triple-negative breast cancers. These data identify a critical ARF6–JIP–MT1-MMP–dynein–dynactin–kinesin-1 axis promoting an invasive phenotype of breast cancer cells. PMID:26504170

  9. Loss of ARF sensitizes transgenic BRAFV600E mice to UV-induced melanoma via suppression of XPC

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Chi; Sheng, Jinghao; Hu, Miaofen G.; Haluska, Frank G.; Cui, Rutao; Xu, Zhengping; Tsichlis, Philip N.; Hu, Guo-fu; Hinds, Philip W.

    2013-01-01

    Both genetic mutations and ultraviolet (UV) irradiation can predispose individuals to melanoma. Although BRAFV600E is the most prevalent oncogene in melanoma, the BRAFV600E mutant is not sufficient to induce tumors in vivo. Mutation at the CDKN2A locus is another melanoma-predisposing event that can disrupt the function of both p16INK4a and ARF. Numerous studies have focused on the role of p16INK4a in melanoma, but the involvement of ARF, a well-known p53 activator, is still controversial. Using a transgenic BRAFV600E mouse model previously generated in our laboratory, we report that loss of ARF is able to enhance spontaneous melanoma formation and cause profound sensitivity to neonatal UVB exposure. Mechanistically, BRAFV600E and ARF deletion synergize to inhibit nucleotide excision repair by epigenetically repressing XPC and inhibiting the E2F4/DP1 complex. We suggest that the deletion of ARF promotes melanomagenesis not by abrogating p53 activation but by acting in concert with BRAFV600E to increase the load of DNA damage caused by UV irradiation. PMID:23650282

  10. ARF6-JIP3/4 regulate endosomal tubules for MT1-MMP exocytosis in cancer invasion.

    PubMed

    Marchesin, Valentina; Castro-Castro, Antonio; Lodillinsky, Catalina; Castagnino, Alessia; Cyrta, Joanna; Bonsang-Kitzis, Hélène; Fuhrmann, Laetitia; Irondelle, Marie; Infante, Elvira; Montagnac, Guillaume; Reyal, Fabien; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Chavrier, Philippe

    2015-10-26

    Invasion of cancer cells into collagen-rich extracellular matrix requires membrane-tethered membrane type 1-matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) as the key protease for collagen breakdown. Understanding how MT1-MMP is delivered to the surface of tumor cells is essential for cancer cell biology. In this study, we identify ARF6 together with c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase-interacting protein 3 and 4 (JIP3 and JIP4) effectors as critical regulators of this process. Silencing ARF6 or JIP3/JIP4 in breast tumor cells results in MT1-MMP endosome mispositioning and reduces MT1-MMP exocytosis and tumor cell invasion. JIPs are recruited by Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein and scar homologue (WASH) on MT1-MMP endosomes on which they recruit dynein-dynactin and kinesin-1. The interaction of plasma membrane ARF6 with endosomal JIPs coordinates dynactin-dynein and kinesin-1 activity in a tug-of-war mechanism, leading to MT1-MMP endosome tubulation and exocytosis. In addition, we find that ARF6, MT1-MMP, and kinesin-1 are up-regulated in high-grade triple-negative breast cancers. These data identify a critical ARF6-JIP-MT1-MMP-dynein-dynactin-kinesin-1 axis promoting an invasive phenotype of breast cancer cells. PMID:26504170

  11. Detection of specific antibodies to HCV-ARF/CORE+1 protein in patients treated with pegylated interferon plus ribavirin.

    PubMed

    Karamitros, T; Kakkanas, A; Katsoulidou, A; Sypsa, V; Dalagiorgou, G; Mavromara, P; Hatzakis, A

    2012-03-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause for chronic liver disease and hepatocellular carcinoma. The HCV-ARF/core+1 protein is an alternative product of HCV core-encoding sequence of unknown biological function. Highly purified HCV core and ARF/core+1 recombinant proteins from HCV genotype 1a and HCV-ARF/core+1 recombinant protein from HCV genotype 3a were expressed in Escherichia coli. Using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, we assessed the prevalence of anti-ARF/core+1 antibodies in 90 chronic hepatitis C patients infected with HCV genotypes 1a/1b or 3a, treated with pegylated interferon (Peg-IFN-a-2a) plus ribavirin. Samples derived from 92 healthy blood donors were used as negative controls. All HCV-RNA-positive serum samples reacted with core 1a antigen, while 15 (37.5%) of 40 and 14 (28%) of 50 patients infected with HCV-1a/1b and HCV-3a, respectively, were found to have anti-ARF/core+1 antibodies into their serum before treatment initiation. These antibodies were persistently present during treatment follow-up and linked to elevated levels of HCV-RNA at baseline. PMID:22329372

  12. Pesticide residue analysis and its relationship to hazard characterisation (ADI/ARfD) and intake estimations (NEDI/NESTI).

    PubMed

    Renwick, Andrew G

    2002-10-01

    Over 800 pesticides are currently approved for use in one or more EU countries. The maximum residue levels (MRL) for agricultural pesticides are derived from field trials conducted under good agricultural practice (GAP). The MRL is a legally enforceable limit related to GAP. The results from field trials would only be used to establish MRLs if the estimated intake of residues did not exceed the acceptable daily intake (ADI) or acute reference dose (ARfD). However, the MRL is not linked to the ADI or ARfD, and could result in intakes considerably below the ADI/ARfD. This disconnection between hazard characterisation (ADI/ARfD) and potential exposure assessment (MRL) means that risk characterisation of pesticide residues is less transparent than for other chemicals present in human food. Residue levels at or below the MRL would not give intakes that exceed the ADI/ARfD but, despite this, there is public concern over such residues. Residue levels above the MRL have to be analysed on a case-by-case basis to determine if the intake could exceed the health-based limits. Other causes of public concern, such as the presence of multiple residues, are currently under investigation. PMID:12400449

  13. ARTD1 regulates cyclin E expression and consequently cell-cycle re-entry and G1/S progression in T24 bladder carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Léger, Karolin; Hopp, Ann-Katrin; Fey, Monika; Hottiger, Michael O

    2016-08-01

    ADP-ribosylation is involved in a variety of biological processes, many of which are chromatin-dependent and linked to important functions during the cell cycle. However, any study on ADP-ribosylation and the cell cycle faces the problem that synchronization with chemical agents or by serum starvation and subsequent growth factor addition already activates ADP-ribosylation by itself. Here, we investigated the functional contribution of ARTD1 in cell cycle re-entry and G1/S cell cycle progression using T24 urinary bladder carcinoma cells, which synchronously re-enter the cell cycle after splitting without any additional stimuli. In synchronized cells, ARTD1 knockdown, but not inhibition of its enzymatic activity, caused specific down-regulation of cyclin E during cell cycle re-entry and G1/S progression through alterations of the chromatin composition and histone acetylation, but not of other E2F-1 target genes. Although Cdk2 formed a functional complex with the residual cyclin E, p27(Kip 1) protein levels increased in G1 upon ARTD1 knockdown most likely due to inappropriate cyclin E-Cdk2-induced phosphorylation-dependent degradation, leading to decelerated G1/S progression. These results provide evidence that ARTD1 regulates cell cycle re-entry and G1/S progression via cyclin E expression and p27(Kip 1) stability independently of its enzymatic activity, uncovering a novel cell cycle regulatory mechanism. PMID:27295004

  14. Exclusion of Integrins from CNS Axons Is Regulated by Arf6 Activation and the AIS

    PubMed Central

    Franssen, Elske H. P.; Zhao, Rong-Rong; Koseki, Hiroaki; Kanamarlapudi, Venkateswarlu; Hoogenraad, Casper C.

    2015-01-01

    Integrins are adhesion and survival molecules involved in axon growth during CNS development, as well as axon regeneration after injury in the peripheral nervous system (PNS). Adult CNS axons do not regenerate after injury, partly due to a low intrinsic growth capacity. We have previously studied the role of integrins in axon growth in PNS axons; in the present study, we investigate whether integrin mechanisms involved in PNS regeneration may be altered or lacking from mature CNS axons by studying maturing CNS neurons in vitro. In rat cortical neurons, we find that integrins are present in axons during initial growth but later become restricted to the somato-dendritic domain. We investigated ho