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Sample records for adper single bond

  1. The Effect of Temperature on Shear Bond Strength of Clearfil SE Bond and Adper Single Bond Adhesive Systems to Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Sharafeddin, Farahnaz; Nouri, Hossein; Koohpeima, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Monomer viscosity and solvent evaporation can be affected by the adhesive system temperature. Higher temperature can elevate the vapor pressure in solution and penetration of adhesive in smear layer. Bonding mechanism may be influenced by the adhesive temperature. Purpose This study aimed to evaluate the effect of pre-heating on shear bond strength of etch-and-rinse and self-etching adhesives to ground bovine dentin surfaces, at temperatures of 4˚C, 25˚C and 40˚C. Materials and Method In this experimental study, 60 maxillary bovine incisors were randomly divided into 6 groups (n=10). The central part of labial dentin surfaces was exposed with a diamond bur and standardized smear layer was created by using silicon carbide paper (600 grit) under water-coolant while the specimens were mounted in acrylic resin. Two adhesive systems, an etch-and-rinse (Adper single bond) and a self-etch (Clearfil SE Bond) were stored at temperatures of 4˚C, 25˚C and 40˚C for 30 minutes and were then applied on the prepared labial surface according to the manufacturer’s instructions. The composite resin (Z350) was packed in Teflon mold (5 mm in diameter) on this surface and was cured. The shear bond strength (MPa) was evaluated by universal testing machine (Zwick/Roell Z020, Germany) at cross head speed of 1mm/min. The results were statistically analyzed by using ANOVA and Tukey tests (p< 0.05). Results No significant difference was found between the shear bond strength of Clearfil SE Bond adhesive in different temperature and single Bond adhesive system at 25 ˚C and 40 ˚C. However, there were significant differences between 4 ˚C of Adper single bond in comparison with 25˚C and 40˚C (p= 0.0001). Conclusion Pre-heating did not affect the shear bond strength of SE Bond, but could promote the shear bond strength of Adper Single Bond. PMID:25759852

  2. Micro-tensile bond strength of different adhesive systems on sound dentin and resin-based composite: An in-vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Mallick, Rashmirekha; Sarangi, Priyanka; Mohanty, Sandhyarani; Behera, Subasish; Nanda, Soumyaranjan; Satapathy, Sukanta Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To analyze the difference in the micro-tensile bond strength of specimens made with two different adhesive systems and compare them with two homogenous substrates. Materials and Methods: Sixty permanent mandibular molars were mounted in acrylic blocks and sectioned with exposed dentin surfaces. Samples were then divided into four groups. To Group-I Adper Single Bond 2 and to Group-II Adper Self-Etch plus bonding agents were applied. For Group-I and Group-II beams consisted of resin composite in the upper half and dentin in the lower half. In Group-III beams were made of only dentin. In Group-IV beams were made of only composite. Fifteen specimens of each group were taken for the micro-tensile bond strength test. Statistical Analysis: The results are analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and Critical Difference test. Results: The interface bonded with the two adhesive systems had lower micro-tensile bond strength than those of dentin and resin composite and the self-etching adhesive Adper Self-Etch plus had comparable bond strength with total-etch adhesive Adper Single Bond 2. Conclusion: The bond strength values for current adhesive systems cannot be compared to the micro-tensile bond strength of dentin and resin composite, and self-etching adhesives have comparable bond strength with total-etch adhesives. PMID:26430301

  3. Degree of conversion of two dentin bonding agents with and without a desensitizing agent using fourier transform infrared spectroscopy: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Jose, Poornima; Sakhamuri, Srinivasulu; Sampath, Vidhya; Sanjeev, Kavitha; Sekar, Mahalaxmi

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This in vitro study investigated the effect of a desensitizer on the degree of conversion of two bonding resins using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Materials and Methods: An etch-and-rise bonding resin and a self-etching adhesive resin were selected for the study. Vivasens (Ivoclar Vivadent) was used as a desensitizing agent. Grouping was done as follows: Group I: Adper Single Bond (n=10), Group II: Adper Single Bond + Vivasens (n=10), Group III: AdheSE One (n=10), Group IV: AdheSE One + Vivasens (n=10). The bonding resin alone was light cured for 20 seconds in groups I and III. For groups II and IV, 1 ml each of the bonding resin and the desensitizer was mixed in a vial and light cured for 20 seconds. The specimens were analysed using FTIR spectroscopy. Results: Group II (Adper Single Bond + Vivasens) showed a significantly higher degree of conversion compared to Group I (Adper Single Bond). Comparing Groups III and IV, Group IV (AdheSE One + Vivasens) showed a significantly higher degree of conversion compared to Group III (AdheSE One). Conclusions: The degree of conversion is increased when a dentin bonding agent is used along with a desensitizer. Hence, this combination can be recommended to effectively control postoperative sensitivity. PMID:22025838

  4. Probing the Hydrogen Bond Strength at Single Bond Limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jing; Lü, Jing-Tao; Chen, Ji; Peng, Jinbo; Meng, Xiangzhi; Wang, Zhichang; Li, Xin-Zheng; Wang, Enge; Jiang, Ying

    2015-03-01

    Many extraordinary physical, chemical and biological properties of water are determined by hydrogen-bonding interaction between the water molecules. So far, the routine way to determine the hydrogen-bonding strength of water is probing the frequency shift of O-H stretching mode using various spectroscopic techniques, which all suffer from the difficulty of spectral assignment and the broadening of vibrational signals due to the lack of spatial resolution. In this talk, we show the ability to probe the hydrogen-bonding strength of interfacial water at single bond limit using resonantly enhanced inelastic electron tunneling spectroscopy (IETS) with a scanning tunneling microscope (STM). The conventional IET signals of water molecules are extremely weak and far beyond the experimental detection limit due to the negligible molecular density of states (DOS) around the Fermi level. This difficulty can be surmounted by turning on the tip-water coupling, which shifts and broadens the frontier molecular orbitals of water to the proximity of Fermi level, resulting in a resonantly enhanced IET process. International Center for Quantum Materials, School of Physics, Peking University.

  5. INFLUENCE OF DIFFERENT ADHESIVE SYSTEMS ON THE PULL-OUT BOND STRENGTH OF GLASS FIBER POSTS

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Luciana Mendonça; de Andrade, Andréa Mello; Machuca, Melissa Fernanda Garcia; da Silva, Paulo Maurício Batista; da Silva, Ricardo Virgolino C.; Veronezi, Maria Cecília

    2008-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the tensile bond strength of glass fiber posts (Reforpost – Angelus-Brazil) cemented to root dentin with a resin cement (RelyX ARC – 3M/ESPE) associated with two different adhesive systems (Adper Single Bond - 3M/ESPE and Adper Scotchbond Multi Purpose (MP) Plus – 3M/ESPE), using the pull-out test. Twenty single-rooted human teeth with standardized root canals were randomly assigned to 2 groups (n=10): G1- etching with 37% phosphoric acid gel (3M/ESPE) + Adper Single Bond + #1 post (Reforpost – Angelus) + four #1 accessory posts (Reforpin – Angelus) + resin cement; G2- etching with 37% phosphoric acid gel + Adper Scotchbond MP Plus + #1 post + four #1 accessory posts + resin cement. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 7 days and submitted to the pull-out test in a universal testing machine (EMIC) at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The mean values of bond strength (kgf) and standard deviation were: G1- 29.163 ± 7.123; G2- 37.752 ±13.054. Statistical analysis (Student's t-test; α=0.05 showed no statistically significant difference (p<0.05) between the groups. Adhesive bonding failures between resin cement and root canal dentin surface were observed in both groups, with non-polymerized resin cement in the apical portion of the post space when Single Bond was used (G1). The type of adhesive system employed on the fiber post cementation did not influence the pull-out bond strength. PMID:19089224

  6. Multiple-Bond Kinetics from Single-Molecule Pulling Experiments: Evidence for Multiple NCAM Bonds

    PubMed Central

    Hukkanen, E. J.; Wieland, J. A.; Gewirth, A.; Leckband, D. E.; Braatz, R. D.

    2005-01-01

    The kinetic parameters of single bonds between neural cell adhesion molecules were determined from atomic force microscope measurements of the forced dissociation of the homophilic protein-protein bonds. The analytical approach described provides a systematic procedure for obtaining rupture kinetics for single protein bonds from bond breakage frequency distributions obtained from single-molecule pulling experiments. For these studies, we used the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM), which was recently shown to form two independent protein bonds. The analysis of the bond rupture data at different loading rates, using the single-bond full microscopic model, indicates that the breakage frequency distribution is most sensitive to the distance to the transition state and least sensitive to the molecular spring constant. The analysis of bond failure data, however, motivates the use of a double-bond microscopic model that requires an additional kinetic parameter. This double-bond microscopic model assumes two independent NCAM-NCAM bonds, and more accurately describes the breakage frequency distribution, particularly at high loading rates. This finding agrees with recent surface-force measurements, which showed that NCAM forms two spatially distinct bonds between opposed proteins. PMID:16100278

  7. Single-electron aerogen bonds: Do they exist?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esrafili, Mehdi D.; Mohammadian-Sabet, Fariba; Solimannejad, Mohammad

    2016-08-01

    A novel type of σ-hole interaction is characterized between some noble gas containing molecules (KrOF2, KrO3, XeOF2 and XeO3) and methyl (CH3) or ethyl (C2H5) radical by means of ab initio calculations. This interaction is named as single-electron aerogen bond (SEAB), in view of the concepts of aerogen bond and single-electron bond interactions. The properties of SEABs are studied by molecular electrostatic potential, quantum theory of atom in molecules, natural bonding orbital and noncovalent interaction index analyses. The formation of an O⋯H interaction tends to increase the strength of the SEAB, when they coexist in a ternary complex.

  8. Microwave Induced Direct Bonding of Single Crystal Silicon Wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budraa, N. K.; Jackson, H. W.; Barmatz, M.

    1999-01-01

    We have heated polished doped single-crystal silicon wafers in a single mode microwave cavity to temperatures where surface to surface bonding occurred. The absorption of microwaves and heating of the wafers is attributed to the inclusion of n-type or p-type impurities into these substrates. A cylindrical cavity TM (sub 010) standing wave mode was used to irradiate samples of various geometry's at positions of high magnetic field. This process was conducted in vacuum to exclude plasma effects. This initial study suggests that the inclusion of impurities in single crystal silicon significantly improved its microwave absorption (loss factor) to a point where heating silicon wafers directly can be accomplished in minimal time. Bonding of these substrates, however, occurs only at points of intimate surface to surface contact. The inclusion of a thin metallic layer on the surfaces enhances the bonding process.

  9. Effect of silorane-based adhesive system on bond strength between composite and dentin substrate

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Jefferson Ricardo; Júnior, Lindomar Corrêa; de Souza Almeida, Mauro; do Valle, Accácio Lins; Honório, Heitor Marques; Vidotti, Hugo Alberto; De Souza, Grace Mendonca

    2015-01-01

    Context: The complexities of the oral environment, the dentin substrate, and the different bond and composite resin systems represent a challenge to the maintenance of reasonable bond between the composite resin and the tooth structure. Aims: To evaluate the effect of the adhesive system on bond strength between silorane-based composite resin and dentin. Materials and Methods: Fourteen human molars extracted were selected and vertically cut into 3 dentin fragments, randomly divided among the experimental groups and restored with Z250 and P90 composite resin using different adhesive protocols (Adper Single Bond 2, Silorano primer, Adper SE Plus, and Scotchbond Multiuse). Two composite resin cylinders were built up on each dentin surface (n = 10) and subjected to a micro-shear bond strength test. Statistical Analysis Used: Kruskal–Wallis one-way analysis of variance and Tukey test (P = 0.05). Results: According to the results, Kruskal–Wallis test evidenced at least one statistical significant difference (P = 0.001). The Tukey test showed statistically significant differences among the group (P < 0.05). Group PSM8 (P90 + SM) showed statically significant higher results when compared with groups PSP4 (P90 + SP), PSB2 (P90 + SB), and ZSE5 (Z250 + SE). Conclusion: The results evidenced that the monomer of the adhesive system has an effect on bond strength between the composite resin and dentin. PMID:26752846

  10. Ge-Au eutectic bonding of Ge {100} single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knowlton, W. B.; Itoh, K. M.; Beeman, J. W.; Emes, J. H.; Loretto, D.; Haller, E. E.

    1993-11-01

    We present preliminary results on the eutectic bonding between two {100} Ge single crystal surfaces using thin films of Au ranging from 900Å/surface to 300Å/surface and Pd (10% the thickness of Au). Following bonding, plan view optical microscopy (OM) of the cleaved interface of samples with Au thicknesses ≤ 500Å/surface show a eutectic morphology more conducive to phonon transmission through the bond interface. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) cross sectional interface studies of a 300Å/surface Au sample show <100> epitaxial growth of Ge. In sections of the bond, lattice continuity of the Ge is apparent through the interface. TEM studies also reveal <110> heteroepitaxial growth of Au with a Au-Ge lattice mismatch of less than 2%. Eutectic bonds with 200Å/surface Au have been attained with characterization pending. An optical polishing technique for Ge has been optimized to insure intimate contact between the Ge surfaces prior to bonding. Interferometry analysis of the optically polished Ge surface shows that surface height fluctuations lie within ±150Å across an interval of 1mm. Characterization of phonon transmission through the interface is discussed with respect to low temperature detection of ballistic phonons.

  11. Effect of enamel etching time on roughness and bond strength.

    PubMed

    Barkmeier, Wayne W; Erickson, Robert L; Kimmes, Nicole S; Latta, Mark A; Wilwerding, Terry M

    2009-01-01

    The current study examined the effect of different enamel conditioning times on surface roughness and bond strength using an etch-and-rinse system and four self-etch adhesives. Surface roughness (Ra) and composite to enamel shear bond strengths (SBS) were determined following the treatment of flat ground human enamel (4000 grit) with five adhesive systems: (1) Adper Single Bond Plus (SBP), (2) Adper Prompt L-Pop (PLP), (3) Clearfil SE Bond (CSE), (4) Clearfil S3 Bond (CS3) and (5) Xeno IV (X4), using recommended treatment times and an extended treatment time of 60 seconds (n = 10/group). Control groups were also included for Ra (4000 grit surface) and SBS (no enamel treatment and Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Adhesive). For surface roughness measurements, the phosphoric acid conditioner of the SBP etch-and-rinse system was rinsed from the surface with an air-water spray, and the other four self-etch adhesive agents were removed with alternating rinses of water and acetone. A Proscan 2000 non-contact profilometer was used to determine Ra values. Composite (Z100) to enamel bond strengths (24 hours) were determined using Ultradent fixtures and they were debonded with a crosshead speed of 1 mm/minute. The data were analyzed with ANOVA and Fisher's LSD post-hoc test. The etch-and- rinse system (SBP) produced the highest Ra (microm) and SBS (MPa) using both the recommended treatment time (0.352 +/- 0.028 microm and 40.5 +/- 6.1 MPa) and the extended treatment time (0.733 +/- 0.122 microm and 44.2 +/- 8.2 MPa). The Ra and SBS of the etch-and-rinse system were significantly greater (p < 0.05) than all the self-etch systems and controls. Increasing the treatment time with phosphoric acid (SBP) and PLP produced greater surface roughness (p < 0.05) but did not result in significantly higher bond strengths (p > 0.05). PMID:19363978

  12. Towards force spectroscopy of single tip-link bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koussa, Mounir A.; Sotomayor, Marcos; Wong, Wesley P.; Corey, David P.

    2015-12-01

    Inner-ear mechanotransduction relies on tip links, fine protein filaments made of cadherin-23 and protocadherin-15 that convey tension to mechanosensitive channels at the tips of hair-cell stereocilia. The tip-link cadherins are thought to form a heterotetrameric complex, with two cadherin-23 molecules forming the upper part of the filament and two protocadherin-15 molecules forming the lower end. The interaction between cadherin-23 and protocadherin-15 is mediated by their N-terminal tips. Missense mutations that modify the interaction interface impair binding and lead to deafness. Molecular dynamics simulations predict that the tip-link bond is mechanically strong enough to withstand forces in hair cells, but its experimentally determined strength is unknown. We have developed molecular tools to facilitate single-molecule force spectroscopy on the tip link bond. Self-assembling DNA nanoswitches are functionalized with the interacting tips of cadherin-23 and protocadherin-15 using the enzyme sortase under conditions that preserve protein function. These tip link nanoswitches are designed to provide a signature force-extension profile. This molecular signature should allow us to identify single-molecule rupture events in pulling experiments.

  13. Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Methacrylate- and Silorane-based Composite Resin Bonded to Resin-Modified Glass-ionomer Containing Micro- and Nano-hydroxyapatite

    PubMed Central

    Sharafeddin, Farahnaz; Moradian, Marzie; Motamedi, Mehran

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem The adhesion of resin-modified glass-ionomer (RMGI) to composite resin has a very important role in the durability of sandwich restorations. Hydroxyapatite is an excellent candidate as a filler material for improving the mechanical properties of glass ionomer cement. Purpose The aim of this study was to assess the effect of adding micro- and nano-hydroxyapatite (HA) powder to RMGI on the shear bond strength (SBS) of nanofilled and silorane-based composite resins bonded to RMGI containing micro- and nano-HA. Materials and Method Sixty cylindrical acrylic blocks containing a hole of 5.5×2.5 mm (diameter × height) were prepared and randomly divided into 6 groups as Group 1 with RMGI (Fuji II LC) plus Adper Single Bond/Z350 composite resin (5.5×3.5 mm diameter × height); Group 2 with RMGI containing 25 wt% of micro-HA plus Adper Single Bond/Z350 composite resin; Group3 with RMGI containing 25 wt% of nano-HA plus Adper Single Bond/Z350 composite resin; Group 4 with RMGI plus P90 System Adhesive/P90 Filtek composite resin (5.5×3.5 mm diameter × height); Group 5 with RMGI containing 25 wt% of micro-HA plus P90 System Adhesive/P90Filtek composite resin; and Group 6 with RMGI containing 25 wt% of nano-HA plus P90 System Adhesive/P90 Filtek composite resin. The specimens were stored in water (37° C, 1 week) and subjected to 1000 thermal cycles (5°C/55°C). SBS test was performed by using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey test (p< 0.05). Results There were significant differences between groups 1 and 4 (RMGI groups, p= 0.025), and groups 3 and 6 (RMGI+ nano-HA groups, p= 0.012). However, among Z350 and P90 specimens, no statistically significant difference was detected in the SBS values (p= 0.19, p= 0.083, respectively). Conclusion RMGI containing HA can improve the bond strength to methacrylate-based in comparison to silorane-based composite resins. Meanwhile, RMGI

  14. Fatigue strength of a single lap joint SPR-bonded

    SciTech Connect

    Di Franco, G.; Fratini, L.; Pasta, A.

    2011-05-04

    In the last years, hybrid joints, meaning with this the joints which consist in combining a traditional mechanical joint to a layer of adhesive, are gradually attracting the attention of various sectors of the construction of vehicles and transportation industries, for their better performance compared to just mechanical joints (self-piercing riveting SPR, riveting, and so on) or just to bonded joints.The paper investigates the fatigue behavior of a single lap joint self-piercing riveted (SPR) and bonded throughout fatigue tests. The considered geometric configuration allowed the use of two rivets placed longitudinally; an epoxy resin was used as adhesive. In the first part of the work static characterization of the joints was carried out through tensile tests. Then fatigue tests were made with the application of different levels of load. The fatigue curves were also obtained at the varying the distance between the two rivets in order to better assess the joint strength for a given length of overlap.

  15. Hybridization quality and bond strength of adhesive systems according to interaction with dentin

    PubMed Central

    Salvio, Luciana Andrea; Hipólito, Vinicius Di; Martins, Adriano Luis; de Goes, Mario Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the hybridization quality and bond strength of adhesives to dentin. Materials and Methods: Ten human molars were ground to expose the dentin and then sectioned in four tooth-quarters. They were randomly divided into 5 groups according to the adhesive used: Two single-step self-etch adhesives – Adper Prompt (ADP) and Xeno III (XE), two two-step self-etching primer systems – Clearfil SE Bond (SE) and Adhe SE (ADSE), and one one-step etch-and-rinse system – Adper Single Bond (SB). Resin composite (Filtek Z250) crown buildups were made on the bonded surfaces and incrementally light-cured for 20 s. The restored tooth-quarters were stored in water at 37°C for 24 h and then sectioned into beams (0.8 mm2 in cross-section). Maximal microtensile bond strength (μ-TBS) was recorded (0.5 mm/min in crosshead speed). The results were submitted to one-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α = 0.05). Thirty additional teeth were used to investigate the hybridization quality by SEM using silver methenamine or ammoniacal silver nitrate dyes. Results: SE reached significantly higher μ-TBS (P < 0.05); no significance was found between ADSE and XE (P > 0.05), and between SB and ADP (P > 0.05); ADSE and XE were significantly higher than SB and ADP (P < 0.05). The bonding interface of SB showed the most intense silver uptake. SE and ADSE showed more favorable hybridization quality than that observed for ADP and XE. Conclusions: The bond strength and hybridization quality were affected by the interaction form of the adhesives with dentin. The hybridization quality was essential to improve the immediate μ-TBS to dentin. PMID:24926212

  16. Nonlinear Analysis of Bonded Composite Single-LAP Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oterkus, E.; Barut, A.; Madenci, E.; Smeltzer, S. S.; Ambur, D. R.

    2004-01-01

    This study presents a semi-analytical solution method to analyze the geometrically nonlinear response of bonded composite single-lap joints with tapered adherend edges under uniaxial tension. The solution method provides the transverse shear and normal stresses in the adhesive and in-plane stress resultants and bending moments in the adherends. The method utilizes the principle of virtual work in conjunction with von Karman s nonlinear plate theory to model the adherends and the shear lag model to represent the kinematics of the thin adhesive layer between the adherends. Furthermore, the method accounts for the bilinear elastic material behavior of the adhesive while maintaining a linear stress-strain relationship in the adherends. In order to account for the stiffness changes due to thickness variation of the adherends along the tapered edges, their in-plane and bending stiffness matrices are varied as a function of thickness along the tapered region. The combination of these complexities results in a system of nonlinear governing equilibrium equations. This approach represents a computationally efficient alternative to finite element method. Comparisons are made with corresponding results obtained from finite-element analysis. The results confirm the validity of the solution method. The numerical results present the effects of taper angle, adherend overlap length, and the bilinear adhesive material on the stress fields in the adherends, as well as the adhesive, of a single-lap joint

  17. Failure strength prediction for adhesively bonded single lap joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Niat Mahmud

    For adhesively bonded joint, failure strength depends on many factors such as material properties (both adhesive and adherend), specimen geometries, test environments, surface preparation procedures, etc. Failure occurs inside constitutive materials or along joint interfaces. Based on location, adhesively bonded failure mode can be classified as adhesive failure mode, cohesive failure mode and adherend failure mode. Failure mode directly affects the failure strength of joint. For last eight decades, researchers have developed analytical, empirical or semi-empirical methods capable of predicting failure strength for adhesively bonded joints generating either cohesive failure or adherend failure. Applicability of most of the methods is limited to particular cases. In this research, different failure modes for single lap joints (SLJs) were generated experimentally using epoxy based paste adhesive. Based on experimental data and analytical study, simplified failure prediction methods were developed for each failure mode. For adhesive failure mode, it is observed that peel stress distributions concur along interface near crack initiation points. All SLJs for this test endured consistent surface treatments. Geometric parameters of the joints were varied to study their effect on failure strength. Peel stress distributions were calculated using finite analysis (FEA). Based on peel stress distribution near crack initiation point, a failure model is proposed. Numerous analytical, empirical and semi-empirical models are available for predicting failure strengths of SLJs generating cohesive failures. However, most of the methods in the literature failed to capture failure behavior of SLJs having thickness of adhesive layer as variable. Cohesive failure mode was generated experimentally using aluminum as adherend and epoxy adhesive considering thickness of adhesive layers as variable within SLJs. Comparative study was performed among various methods. It was observed that

  18. Interaction morphology and bond strength of nanofilled simplified-step adhesives to acid etched dentin

    PubMed Central

    Di Hipólito, Vinicius; Reis, André Figueiredo; Mitra, Sumita B.; de Goes, Mario Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of nanofillers incorporated into adhesives on the microtensile bond strength (μ-TBS) and interfacial micromorphology to dentin. Methods: The occlusal enamel of 5 human molars was removed and each tooth sectioned into four quarters. The exposed dentin was treated with one of the following adhesives: Adper Single Bond (SB-unfilled), OptiBond Solo Plus (OS-barium aluminoborosilicate, 400nm Ø), Prime & Bond NT (NT-colloidal silica, 7–40 nm Ø) and Adper Single Bond 2 (SB2-colloidal silica, 5nm Ø). Cylinders of resin-based composite were constructed on the adhesive layers. After 24-hour storage, the restored tooth-quadrants were sectioned to obtain stick-shaped specimens (0.8 mm2, cross-sectional area) and submitted to μ-TBS at a cross-speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test (alpha = .05). Twenty-eight additional teeth were used for interfacial micro-morphologic analysis by SEM (16-teeth) and TEM (12-teeth). The dentin surfaces of 32 discs were treated with the adhesives (8 discs for adhesive) and laminated to form disc-pairs using a flowable resin composite for SEM/EDS analysis. For TEM, 90nm-thick nondemineralized unstained sections were processed. Results: SB2 showed significant higher bond strength than SB, OS and NT. The SEM/EDS and TEM analysis revealed nanofillers infiltrated within the interfibrillar spaces of the SB2-hybrid layer. Fillers were concentrated around patent tubular orifices and in the adhesive layer for OS and NT. Conclusion: The presence of nanofillers within the interfibrillar spaces of the SB2-hybrid layer suggests its importance in the improvement of the μ-TBS. PMID:23077413

  19. Effect of Bleaching and Thermocycling on Resin-Enamel Bond Strength

    PubMed Central

    Moosavi, Horieh; Mohammadipour, Hamideh Sadat; Ghavamnasiri, Marjaneh; Alizadeh, Sanaz

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of bleaching and thermocycling on microshear bond strength of bonded resin composites to enamel. Enamel slices were prepared from ninety-six intact human premolars and resin composite cylinders were bonded by using Adper Single Bond 2 + Filtek Z350 or Filtek silorane adhesive and resin composite. Each essential group was randomly subdivided to two subgroups: control and bleaching. In bleaching group, 35% hydrogen peroxide was applied on samples. Thermocycling procedure was conducted between 5°C and 55°C, for 3.000 cycles on the half of each subgroup specimen. Then microshear bond strength was tested. Methacrylate-based resin composite had higher bond strength than silorane-based one. The meyhacrylate-based group without bleaching along with thermocycling showed the most bond strength, while bleaching with 35% carbamide peroxide on silorane-based group without thermocycling showed the least microshear bond strength. Bleaching caused a significant degradation on shear bond strength of silorane-based resin composites that bonded using self-etch adhesive resin systems. PMID:26839550

  20. Rupture of single receptor-ligand bonds: A new insight into probability distribution functions

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, V.K.

    2012-01-01

    Single molecule force spectroscopy is widely used to determine kinetic parameters of dissociation by analyzing bond rupture data obtained via applying mechanical force to cells, capsules, and beads that are attached to an intermolecular bond. The current analysis assumes that the intermolecular bond force is equal to the externally applied mechanical force. We confirm that viscous drag alone or in combination with cellular deformation resulting in viscoelasticity modulates bond force so that the instantaneous intermolecular bond force is not equivalent to the applied force. The bond force modulation leads to bond rupture time and force histograms that differ from those predicted by probability distribution functions (PDFs) using the current approach. A new methodology that accounts for bond force modulation in obtaining PDFs is presented. The predicted histograms from the new methodology are in excellent agreement with the respective histograms obtained from Monte Carlo simulation. PMID:23010061

  1. Effect of Thermocycling, Degree of Conversion, and Cavity Configuration on the Bonding Effectiveness of All-in-One Adhesives.

    PubMed

    El-Damanhoury, H M; Gaintantzopoulou, M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare five all-in-one bonding agents with respect to microleakage, microtensile bond strength (μTBS), degree of conversion (DC) and the impact of cavity configuration. The materials tested were Adper Easy Bond, Clearfil S3 Bond, iBond, Optibond All-in-One, Xeno IV, and Adper Single Bond Plus as a control. The DC of each adhesive was measured on the surfaces of dentin discs (n=5) by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. One hundred and forty-four extracted human molars were randomly divided and assigned to one of the five tested adhesives and the control group. The μTBS to dentin was measured on flat occlusal dentin with and without thermocycling and to the gingival floor dentin of class II cavities (n=8). All specimens were restored with Filtek Z250 resin composite. Class II samples were immersed in a 5% methylene blue dye solution for 24 hours, and microleakage was examined under a stereomicroscope. Micromorphological analysis of demineralized/deproteinized specimens was done using scanning electron microscopy. The DC and microleakage data were statistically analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and μTBS data by two-way ANOVA followed by a Bonferroni multiple comparison post hoc test (α=0.05) and Weibull-distribution survival analysis. The relation between different variables and μTBS and microleakage was tested by the Pearson correlation coefficient and regression statistics. A moderate direct relation between DC and μTBS durability was found for all the adhesives tested. Significant wide variations exist among the results obtained for single-bottle adhesives tested regarding their μTBS and microleakage. Some of the all-in-one materials tested have shown significantly inferior results under a high C-factor or after aging. The use of these materials should be carefully considered. PMID:25748210

  2. Effect of additional etching and ethanol-wet bonding on the dentin bond strength of one-step self-etch adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Joonghee; Jung, Kyoung-Hwa; Son, Sung-Ae; Hur, Bock; Kwon, Yong-Hoon

    2015-01-01

    Objectives This study examined the effects of additional acid etching on the dentin bond strength of one-step self-etch adhesives with different compositions and pH. The effect of ethanol wetting on etched dentin bond strength of self-etch adhesives was also evaluated. Materials and Methods Forty-two human permanent molars were classified into 21 groups according to the adhesive types (Clearfil SE Bond [SE, control]; G-aenial Bond [GB]; Xeno V [XV]; Beauti Bond [BB]; Adper Easy Bond [AE]; Single Bond Universal [SU]; All Bond Universal [AU]), and the dentin conditioning methods. Composite resins were placed on the dentin surfaces, and the teeth were sectioned. The microtensile bond strength was measured, and the failure mode of the fractured specimens was examined. The data were analyzed statistically using two-way ANOVA and Duncan's post hoc test. Results In GB, XV and SE (pH ≤ 2), the bond strength was decreased significantly when the dentin was etched (p < 0.05). In BB, AE and SU (pH 2.4 - 2.7), additional etching did not affect the bond strength (p > 0.05). In AU (pH = 3.2), additional etching increased the bond strength significantly (p < 0.05). When adhesives were applied to the acid etched dentin with ethanol-wet bonding, the bond strength was significantly higher than that of the no ethanol-wet bonding groups, and the incidence of cohesive failure was increased. Conclusions The effect of additional acid etching on the dentin bond strength was influenced by the pH of one-step self-etch adhesives. Ethanol wetting on etched dentin could create a stronger bonding performance of one-step self-etch adhesives for acid etched dentin. PMID:25671215

  3. Effects of Thermal and Mechanical Load Cycling on the Dentin Microtensile Bond Strength of Single Bond-2

    PubMed Central

    Daneshkazemi, Alireza; Davari, Abdolrahim; Akbari, Mohammad Javad; Davoudi, Amin; Badrian, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Different studies have shown the uncertain effects of thermal cycling (TC) and mechanical load cycling (MC) on the dentin microtensile bond strength (µTBS) of composites. This study designed to investigate the effects of TC and MC on the dentin µTBS of single bond-2. Materials and Methods: Flat dentinal surface was prepared on 48 sound extracted human third molar teeth, and were bonded by single bond-2 adhesive and Z250 resin composite. The teeth were randomly divided into eight equal groups, according to the thermal/mechanical protocol. TC and MC were proceeded at 5-55°C and 90 N with 0.5 Hz. Then restorations were sectioned to shape the hour-glass form and subjected to µTBS testing at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. To evaluate the bonding failure, the specimens were observed under the scanning electron microscope. The results were statistically analyzed with analysis of variance, t-test, Tukey HSD and post-hoc by using SPSS software version 17 at a significant level of 0.05. Results: µTBS of all groups were significantly lower than the control group (P < 0.001). Adhesive failure was predominant in all groups and increased with TC and MC. Conclusions: TC and MC had an adverse effect on µTBS of the tested adhesive resin to dentin. PMID:26464532

  4. The computation of C-C and N-N bond dissociation energies for singly, doubly, and triply bonded systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langhoff, Stephen R.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1989-01-01

    The bond dissociation energies (D sub e) of C2H2, C2H4, C2H6, N2, N2H2, and N2H4 are studied at various levels of correlation treatment. The convergence of D sub e with respect to the one particle basis is studied at the single reference modified coupled-pair functional (MCPF) level. At all levels of correlation treatment, the errors in the bond dissociation energies increase with the degree of multiple bond character. The multireference configuration interaction (MRCI) D sub e values, corrected for an estimate of higher excitations, are in excellent agreement with those determined using the size extensive averaged coupled pair functional (ACPF) method. It was found that the full valence complete active space self consistent field (CASSCF)/MRCI calculations are reproduced very well by MRCI calculations based on a CASSCF calculation that includes in the active space only those electrons involved in the C-C or N-N bonds. To achieve chemical accuracy (1 kcal/mole) for the D sub e values of the doubly bonded species C2H4 and N2H2 requires one particle basis sets including up through h angular momentum functions (l = 5) and a multireference treatment of electron correlation: still higher levels of calculation are required to achieve chemical accuracy for the triply bonded species C2H2 and N2.

  5. Effect of Self-etching Adhesives on the Bond Strength of Glass-Ionomer Cements

    PubMed Central

    Jaberi Ansari, Zahra; Panahandeh, Narges; Tabatabaei Shafiei, Zahra Sadat; Akbarzadeh Baghban, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Statement of Problem: Adequate bond strength between glass ionomer cements and composite resin is necessary for the success of the sandwich technique. Purpose of Study: This study assessed the micro-shear bond strength of composite resin to glass-ionomer cements (GIC) using self-etch adhesives with different pH values. Materials and Methods: One hundred specimens (6×4×2 mm) were made using Fuji II and Fuji II LC GICs and treated with different adhesives as follows: Group 1:Fuji II+ Adper Prompt L-Pop, Group-2: Fuji II+SE bond, Group-3: Fuji II + AdheSE, Group-4:Fuji II+ Protect bond, Group-5: Fuji II + Single bond, Group-6:Fuji II LC+ Adper Prompt LPop, Group-7: Fuji II LC+SE bond, Group-8:Fuji II LC+ AdheSE, Group-9: Fuji II LC+ Protect bond, and Group-10: Fuji II LC+ Single bond. Each group consisted of 10 specimens. A cylinder of Z100 composite resin was placed on each sample and light cured. After 24 hours of water storage (37°C), the specimens were subjected to micro-shear bond strength tests (0.5 mm/min). Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test. Results: The mean micro-shear bond strength of groups 1–10 was 11.66±1.79, 16.50±1.85, 18.47±1.77, 13.95±1.77, 15.27±1.49, 15.14±0.90, 20.03±1.19, 17.48±3.00, 16.24±1.98 and 16.03±1.49 MPa, respectively. There were significant differences between groups 1 and 7 (P<0.05). No significant difference was observed between other groups (P>0.05). Fuji II LC showed higher bond strength than Fuji II (P<0.05). Conclusion: Type of self-etch adhesive had no significant effect on micro-shear bond strength of glass-ionomer to composite resin. Resin modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) exhibited higher bond strength than the conventional GIC. PMID:25628698

  6. Effects of cellular viscoelasticity in lifetime extraction of single receptor-ligand bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, V. K.

    2015-06-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy is widely used to determine kinetic parameters of dissociation by analyzing bond rupture data obtained via applying mechanical force to cells, capsules, and beads that are attached to an intermolecular bond. The bond rupture data are obtained in experiments either at a constant force or at a constant loading rate. We explore the effect of cellular viscoelasticity in constant-force experiments. Specifically, we perform Monte Carlo simulations of bond rupture at a given constant force to obtain the bond lifetime as a function of force in the absence and in the presence of bond force modulation due to cellular viscoelasticity, to explore its effect on the bond lifetime.

  7. Effects of cellular viscoelasticity in lifetime extraction of single receptor-ligand bonds.

    PubMed

    Gupta, V K

    2015-06-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy is widely used to determine kinetic parameters of dissociation by analyzing bond rupture data obtained via applying mechanical force to cells, capsules, and beads that are attached to an intermolecular bond. The bond rupture data are obtained in experiments either at a constant force or at a constant loading rate. We explore the effect of cellular viscoelasticity in constant-force experiments. Specifically, we perform Monte Carlo simulations of bond rupture at a given constant force to obtain the bond lifetime as a function of force in the absence and in the presence of bond force modulation due to cellular viscoelasticity, to explore its effect on the bond lifetime. PMID:26172730

  8. Adhesive bond strengths to enamel and dentin using recommended and extended treatment times.

    PubMed

    Kimmes, Nicole S; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Erickson, Robert L; Latta, Mark A

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the effect of different enamel and dentin conditioning times on the shear bond strength of a resin composite using etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesive systems. Shear bond strengths were determined following treatment of flat ground human enamel and dentin surfaces (4000 grit) with 11 adhesive systems: 1) AdheSE One Viva Pen-(ASE), 2) Adper Prompt L-Pop-(PLP), 3) Adper Single Bond Plus-(SBP), 4) Clearfil SE Bond-(CSE), 5) Clearfil S3 Bond-(CS3), 6) OptiBond All-In-One-(OBA), 7) OptiBond Solo Plus-(OBS), 8) Peak SE-(PSE), 9) Xeno IV-(X4), 10) Xeno V-(X5) and 11) XP Bond-(XPB) using recommended treatment times and an extended treatment time of 60 seconds (n = 10/group). Composite (Z100) to enamel and dentin bond strengths (24 hours) were determined using Ultradent fixtures and debonded with a crosshead speed of 1 mm/minute. The data were analyzed with a three-way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and Fisher's LSD post hoc test. The highest shear bond strengths (MPa) to enamel were achieved by the three etch-and-rinse systems at both the recommended treatment time (SBP-40.5 +/- 6.1; XPB-38.7 +/- 3.7; OBS- 35.2 +/- 6.2) and the extended treatment time (SBP-44.5 +/- 8.1; XPB-40.9 +/- 5.7; OBS-35.0 +/- 4.5). Extending the enamel treatment time did not produce a significant change (p > 0.05) in bond strength for the 11 adhesive systems tested. OBS generated the highest (46.2 +/- 7.9) bond strengths to dentin at the recommended treatment time. At the extended treatment time X4 (42.2 +/- 11.7), PSE (42.1 +/- 9.7) and OBS (41.4 +/- 8.0) produced the highest bond strengths to dentin. The bond strength change between recommend and extended treatment times was significant (p < 0.05) for PSE, but the other 10 systems did not exhibit any significant change. PMID:20166418

  9. Single C-F Bond Cleavage of Trifluoromethylarenes with an ortho-Silyl Group.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Suguru; Shimomori, Ken; Kim, Youngchan; Hosoya, Takamitsu

    2016-08-22

    The transformation of a single C-F bond of trifluoromethylarenes bearing a hydrosilyl group at the ortho position was achieved. The activation of the hydrosilyl group with a trityl cation in the presence of nucleophiles allowed for selective C-F bond functionalization, for example, by allylation, carboxylation, or chlorination. Further derivatization of the resulting fluorosilylarenes afforded various aromatic difluoromethylene compounds. PMID:27312982

  10. Method of bonding single crystal quartz by field-assisted bonding

    DOEpatents

    Curlee, R.M.; Tuthill, C.D.; Watkins, R.D.

    1991-04-23

    The method of producing a hermetic stable structural bond between quartz crystals includes providing first and second quartz crystals and depositing thin films of borosilicate glass and silicon on portions of the first and second crystals, respectively. The portions of the first and second crystals are then juxtaposed in a surface contact relationship and heated to a temperature for a period sufficient to cause the glass and silicon films to become electrically conductive. An electrical potential is then applied across the first and second crystals for creating an electrostatic field between the adjoining surfaces and causing the juxtaposed portions to be attracted into an intimate contact and form a bond for joining the adjoining surfaces of the crystals. 2 figures.

  11. Method of bonding single crystal quartz by field-assisted bonding

    DOEpatents

    Curlee, Richard M.; Tuthill, Clinton D.; Watkins, Randall D.

    1991-01-01

    The method of producing a hermetic stable structural bond between quartz crystals includes providing first and second quartz crystals and depositing thin films of borosilicate glass and silicon on portions of the first and second crystals, respectively. The portions of the first and second crystals are then juxtaposed in a surface contact relationship and heated to a temperature for a period sufficient to cause the glass and silicon films to become electrically conductive. An electrical potential is then applied across the first and second crystals for creating an electrostatic field between the adjoining surfaces and causing the juxtaposed portions to be attracted into an intimate contact and form a bond for joining the adjoining surfaces of the crystals.

  12. Predicted Rupture Force of a Single Molecular Bond Becomes Rate Independent at Ultralow Loading Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dechang; Ji, Baohua

    2014-02-01

    We present for the first time a theoretical model of studying the saturation of the rupture force of a single molecular bond that causes the rupture force to be rate independent under an ultralow loading rate. This saturation will obviously bring challenges to understanding the rupture behavior of the molecular bond using conventional methods. This intriguing feature implies that the molecular bond has a nonzero strength at a vanishing loading rate. We find that the saturation behavior is caused by bond rebinding when the loading rate is lower than a limiting value depending on the loading stiffness.

  13. Effect of two microshear test devices on bond strength and fracture pattern in primary teeth.

    PubMed

    Tedesco, Tamara Kerber; Garcia, Eugenio Jose; Soares, Fabio Zovico Maxnuck; Rocha, Rachel de Oliveira; Grande, Rosa Helena Miranda

    2013-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the influence of two devices for application of shear load in microshear tests on bond strength and fracture pattern of primary enamel and dentin. Eighty primary molars were selected and flat enamel (40 teeth sectioned mesio-distally) and dentin (40 teeth sectioned transversally) surfaces were obtained. Both surfaces were polished to standardize the smear layer. Two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive systems (Adper Single Bond and XP Bond) were used. Polyethylene tubes was placed over the bonded surfaces and filled with composite resin. The microshear testing was performed after storage in water (24 h/37 °C) using two devices for application of microshear loads: a notched rod (Bisco Shear Bond Tester) or a knife edge (Kratos Industrial Equipment). Failure modes were evaluated using a stereomicroscope. Bond strength data were subjected to ANOVA and chi-square test to compare the failure mode distributions (α=0.05). No significant differences were observed between the groups for dentin and enamel bond strength or fracture patterns (p>0.05). The predominant failure mode was adhesive/mixed. In conclusion, the devices for application of shear loads did not influence the bond strength values, regardless of adhesive system and substrate. PMID:24474357

  14. Correlation among electronegativity, cation polarizability, optical basicity and single bond strength of simple oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Dimitrov, Vesselin; Komatsu, Takayuki

    2012-12-15

    A suitable relationship between free-cation polarizability and electronegativity of elements in different valence states and with the most common coordination numbers has been searched on the basis of the similarity in physical nature of both quantities. In general, the cation polarizability increases with decreasing element electronegativity. A systematic periodic change in the polarizability against the electronegativity has been observed in the isoelectronic series. It has been found that generally the optical basicity increases and the single bond strength of simple oxides decreases with decreasing the electronegativity. The observed trends have been discussed on the basis of electron donation ability of the oxide ions and type of chemical bonding in simple oxides. - Graphical abstract: This figure shows the single bond strength of simple oxides as a function of element electronegativity. A remarkable correlation exists between these independently obtained quantities. High values of electronegativity correspond to high values of single bond strength and vice versa. It is obvious that the observed trend in this figure is closely related to the type of chemical bonding in corresponding oxide. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A suitable relationship between free-cation polarizability and electronegativity of elements was searched. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The cation polarizability increases with decreasing element electronegativity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The single bond strength of simple oxides decreases with decreasing the electronegativity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The observed trends were discussed on the basis of type of chemical bonding in simple oxides.

  15. Interactions Between Oxygen and Nitrogen: O[Single Bond]N, O[Single Bond]N (sub 2), and O (sub 2)[Single Bond]N (sub 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderslice, Joseph T.; Mason, Edward A.; Maisch, William G.

    1959-01-01

    Potential energy curves for 0-N interactions corresponding to the X (sup 2) II (sub t/2), X (sup 2) II (sub 3/2), A (sup 2) Eta (sup plus), B (sup 2) II, C (sup 2) II, D (sup 2) Eta (sup plus), E (sup 2) Eta (sup plus), and B prime (sup 2 delta) states of nitric oxide have been calculated from spectroscopic data by the Rydberg- Klein-Rees method. Curves for the (sup 4) II, (sup 2) Eta, (sup 4) Eta, (sup 6) Eta, and (sup 6) II states have been obtained from limited spectroscopic results and from relations derived from approximate quantum-mechanical calculations. Two semi-independent calculations have been made, and are in good agreement with each other. The quantum-mechanical relations also lead to approximate curves for the O[Single Bond]N, and O[Single Bond]N (sub 2) interactions over a limited range. The O (sub 2)[Single Bond]N (sub 2) interaction is consistent with one valid at larger separation distances which has been derived from high-temperature gas viscosity data.

  16. Effect of 10% Sodium Ascorbate on Shear Bond Strength of Bleached Teeth - An in-vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Ponnappa, K C; Nitin, Mirdha; Ramesh, Sachhi; Sharanappa, Kambale; Nishant, Ajgaonkar

    2015-01-01

    Background Patient often requires some additional interventions such as replacement of old restorations, laminates and veneers after bleaching, for aesthetic purposes. The residual oxygen inhibits polymerization of resin based materials which results in reduced bond strength of the restorations. Some techniques are available to solve the clinical problems related to the post bleach compromised bond strength. Objectives The purpose of this study is to evaluate, the role of 10% sodium ascorbate on reversing the compromised bond strength and compare enamel shear bond strength of 5th and 6th generation dentine bonding agents on bleached and unbleached teeth. Materials and Methods Eighty freshly extracted human anterior teeth were assigned in to Group A and Group B of 40 teeth each. Samples in both groups were subdivided in to 4 subgroups of 10 teeth each. In Group A composite resins was bonded using 5th generation dentine bonding agent (3M Single Bond) and Group B was bonded using 6th generation (3M ESPE Adper SE Plus). Subgroups were subjected to the procedure as, A1;B1 etching and bonding (control), A2; B2 bleaching, etching and immediate bonding, A3; B3 bleaching,10% ascorbic acid treatment for 10 minutes after that etching and bonding immediately, A4; B4 bleaching, storage in artificial saliva for 4 days and then etching and bonding. Pola office, in office bleach (SDI (082216) was used for bleaching. The specimens were subjected to shear load in a Universal testing machine to evaluate bond strength. Results A decrease in bond strength was seen with 6th generation adhesive system compared to 5th generation bonding system, which is statistically significant, p<0.001. Conclusion Treating the bleached enamel surfaces when treated with 10% sodium ascorbate, which reverses the compromised bond strength and is a good alternative to delayed bonding. PMID:26393201

  17. In Vivo and In Vitro Effects of Chlorhexidine Pretreatment on Immediate and Aged Dentin Bond Strengths.

    PubMed

    Gunaydin, Z; Yazici, A R; Cehreli, Z C

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of 2% chlorhexidine (CHX) pretreatment of dentin on the immediate and aged microtensile bond strength (μTBS) of different adhesives to dentin in vivo and in vitro. Class I cavities were prepared in 80 caries-free human third molars of 40 patients in a split-mouth fashion. In each tooth pair, one tooth received 2% CHX pretreatment after which both teeth were randomly assigned to one of the following groups with respect to the type of adhesive system applied: Adper Single Bond 2 (etch-and-rinse), Clearfil SE Bond (two-step self-etch), Clearfil S(3) Bond (one-step self-etch), and Adper Prompt-L-Pop (all-in-one self-etch). The teeth were restored with resin composite and extracted for μTBS testing either immediately or after six months in function. In vitro specimen pairs were prepared as with the clinical protocol in intact, freshly extracted human molars, and thereafter, subjected to testing immediately or after 5000× thermocycling. Data were analyzed with four-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). Bonferroni test was utilized for pair-wise comparisons. The immediate bond strength values were significantly higher than "aged" ones for all tested adhesives (p=0.00). The in vitro immediate bond strength values were statistically higher than in vivo bond strength values (p<0.05). While the bond strength of in vitro aged, CHX-treated samples were higher than their in vivo counterparts (p<0.05), no difference was observed in non-CHX treated groups (p>0.05). In the absence of CHX pretreatment, all adhesives showed significantly higher immediate bond strength values than CHX-treated groups, while all "aged", non-pretreated adhesives exhibited significantly lower bond strength values (both p<0.05). By contrast, chlorhexidine pretreatment resulted in significantly higher aged bond strengths, regardless of the adhesive system and testing condition. Aging-associated decline in dentin bond strength of etch-and rinse and self-etch adhesives can be

  18. The computation of C-C and N-N bond dissociation energies for singly, doubly, and triply bonded systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langhoff, Stephen R.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1991-01-01

    The bond dissociation energies (De) of C2H2, C2H4, C2H6, N2, N2H2, and N2H4 are studied at various levels of correlation treatment. The convergence of De with respect to the one-particle basis is studied at the single-reference modified coupled-pair-functional (MCPF)level. At all levels of correlation treatment, the errors in the bond dissociation energies increase with the degree of multiple bond character. The multireference configuration-interaction (MRCI) De values, corrected for an estimate of higher excitations, are in excellent agreement with those determined using the size-extensive averaged-coupled-pair-functional (ACPF) method. The full-valence complete-active-space self-consistent-field (CASSCF)/MRCI calculations are reproduced very well by MRCI calculations based on a CASSCF calculation that includes in the active space only those electrons involved in the C-C or N-N bonds.

  19. Evaluating resin-enamel bonds by microshear and microtensile bond strength tests: effects of composite resin

    PubMed Central

    de ANDRADE, Andrea Mello; MOURA, Sandra Kiss; REIS, Alessandra; LOGUERCIO, Alessandro Dourado; GARCIA, Eugenio Jose; GRANDE, Rosa Helena Miranda

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The aims of this study were to evaluate the effect of resin composite (Filtek Z250 and Filtek Flow Z350) and adhesive system [(Solobond Plus, Futurabond NR (VOCO) and Adper Single Bond (3M ESPE)] on the microtensile (µTBS) and microshear bond strength (µSBS) tests on enamel, and to correlate the bond strength means between them. Material and methods Thirty-six extracted human molars were sectioned to obtain two tooth halves: one for µTBS and the other one for µSBS. Adhesive systems and resin composites were applied to the enamel ground surfaces and light-cured. After storage (37ºC/24 h) specimens were stressed (0.5 mm/ min). Fracture modes were analyzed under scanning electron microscopy. The data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=0.05). Results The correlation between tests was estimated with Pearson's product-moment correlation statistics (α =0.05). For both tests only the main factor resin composite was statistically significant (p<0.05). The correlation test detected a positive (r=0.91) and significant (p=0.01) correlation between the tests. Conclusions The results were more influenced by the resin type than by the adhesives. Both microbond tests seem to be positive and linearly correlated and can therefore lead to similar conclusions. PMID:21308290

  20. High-resolution imaging and spectroscopy of interfacial water at single bond limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ying

    Hydrogen bond is one of the most important weak interactions in nature and plays an essential role in a broad spectrum of physics, chemistry, biology, energy and material sciences. The conventional methods for studying hydrogen-bonding interaction are all based on spectroscopic or diffraction techniques. However, those techniques have poor spatial resolution and only measure the average properties of many hydrogen bonds, which are susceptible to the structural inhomogeneity and local environments, especially when interfacial systems are concerned. The spatial variation and inter-bond coupling of the hydrogen bonds leads to significant spectral broadening, which prohibits the accurate understanding of the experimental data. In this talk, I will present our recent progress on the development of new-generation scanning probe microscopy/spectroscopy (SPM/S) with unprecedentedly high sensitivity and resolution, for addressing weak inter- and intra-molecular interactions, such as hydrogen bonds and van der Waals force. Based on a qPlus sensor, we have succeeded to push the real-space study of a prototypical hydrogen-bonded system, i.e. water, down to single bond limit. Combined with state-of-the-arts quantum simulations, we have discovered exotic nuclear quantum effects (NQEs) in interfacial water and revealed the quantum nature of the hydrogen bond from a completely new perspective

  1. Effect of Fluoride and Simplified Adhesive Systems on the Bond Strength of Primary Molars and Incisors.

    PubMed

    Firoozmand, Leily Macedo; Noleto, Lawanne Ellen Carvalho; Gomes, Isabella Azevedo; Bauer, José Roberto de Oliveira; Ferreira, Meire Coelho

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was evaluate in vitro the influence of simplified adhesive systems (etch-and-rinse and self-etching) and 1.23% acidulated phosphate fluoride (APF) on the microshear bond strength (μ-SBS) of composite resins on primary molars and incisors. Forty primary molars and forty incisors vestibular enamel was treated with either the self-etching Clearfil SE Bond (CSE, Kuraray) or etch-and-rinse Adper Single Bond 2 (SB2, 3M/ESPE) adhesive system. Each group was subdivided based on the prior treatment of the enamel with or without the topical application of 1.23% APF. Thereafter, matrices were positioned and filled with composite resin and light cured. After storage in distilled water at 37 ± 1°C for 24 h, the specimens were submitted to μ-SBS in a universal testing machine. Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney tests (p < 0.05) showed that the prior application of 1.23% APF led to a significant reduction in bond strength. The type of adhesive exerted no significant influence bond strength. In the inter-group analysis, however, significantly bond strength reduction was found for the incisors when CSE was employed with APF. Adhesive failure was the most common type of fracture. The bond strength was affected by the prior application of 1.23% APF and type of tooth. PMID:26312974

  2. The use of collagen cross-linking agents to enhance dentin bond strength

    PubMed Central

    Al-Ammar, Aiman; Drummond, James L; Bedran-Russo, Ana Karina B.

    2009-01-01

    Type I collagen is a major component of the hybrid layer, and improvement of its mechanical properties may be advantageous during bonding procedures. Objective To investigate the effect of three different cross-linking agents (Glutaraldehyde [GD], Grape seed extract [GSE], and Genipin [GE]) on the tensile bond strength (TBS) of resin-dentin bonds. Materials and Methods Sixty-four sound human molars were collected and their occlusal surfaces were ground flat to expose dentin. Dentin surfaces were etched using a phosphoric acid and then teeth were randomly divided according to the dentin treatment: Control group (no treatment), 5% GD, 6.5% GSE or 0.5% GE. Teeth were restored either with One Step Plus or Adper Single Bond Plus adhesive systems and resin composite. After 24 hours, teeth were sectioned to produce a cross-sectional surface area of 1.0 mm2 and tested for tensile bond strength. Data were statistically analyzed using ANOVA and Fisher's PLSD tests (p< 0.05). There was a statistically significant interaction between factors (treatment and adhesive p<0.001). Treatment affected TBS (p< 0.0001), while no differences were observed between the adhesive systems (p = 0.6961). Conclusion Chemical modification to the dentin matrix promoted by GD and GSE, but not GE, resulted in increased bond strength. The application of selective collagen cross-linkers during adhesive restorative procedures may be a new approach to improve dentin bond strength properties. PMID:19507140

  3. A revised set of values of single-bond radii derived from the observed interatomic distances in metals by correction for bond number and resonance energy

    PubMed Central

    Pauling, Linus; Kamb, Barclay

    1986-01-01

    An earlier discussion [Pauling, L. (1947) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 69, 542] of observed bond lengths in elemental metals with correction for bond number and resonance energy led to a set of single-bond metallic radii with values usually somewhat less than the corresponding values obtained from molecules and complex ions. A theory of resonating covalent bonds has now been developed that permits calculation of the number of resonance structures per atom and of the effective resonance energy per bond. With this refined method of correcting the observed bond lengths for the effect of resonance energy, a new set of single-bond covalent radii, in better agreement with values from molecules and complex ions, has been constructed. PMID:16593698

  4. First structural characterization of a protactinium(V) single oxo bond in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Le Naour, Claire; Trubert, Didier; Di Giandomenico, Maria V; Fillaux, Clara; Den Auwer, Christophe; Moisy, Philippe; Hennig, Christoph

    2005-12-12

    The present work describes the first structural studies of protactinium(V) in sulfuric and hydrofluoric acid media using X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The results show unambiguously the absence of the trans-dioxo bond that characterizes the other early actinide elements such as U and Np. In concentrated sulfuric acid (13 M), Pa(V) is proved to exhibit a single oxo bond as postulated in the literature for species in more dilute media. In a 0.5 M HF medium, XANES and EXAFS spectra indicate the absence of any oxo bond: Pa(V) exists in the form of a pure fluoro complex. PMID:16323942

  5. Assessment of the Shear Bond Strength between Nanofilled Composite Bonded to Glass-ionomer Cement Using Self-etch Adhesive with Different pHs and Total-Etch Adhesive

    PubMed Central

    Sharafeddin, Farahnaz; Choobineh, Mohammad Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem In the sandwich technique, the undesirable bond between the composite resin and glass-ionomer cement (GIc) is one of the most important factors which lead to the failure of restoration. Total-etch and self-etch adhesives may improve the bond strength based on their pH. Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength between the nanofilled composite resin and GIc using different adhesives. Materials and Method In this experimental study, 40 specimens (6×6mm) in 4 groups (n=10) were prepared in acrylic mold. Each specimen contained conventional GI ChemFil Superior with a height of 3mm, bonded to Z350 composite resin with a height measured 3mm. In order to bond the composite to the GI, the following adhesives were used, respectively: A: mild Clearfil SE Bond self-etch (pH=2), B: intermediate OptiBond self-etch (pH=1.4), C: strong Adper Prompt L-Pop (pH=1), and D: Adper Single Bond 2 total-etch (pH=7.2). The shear bond strength was measured by using universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 1mm/min. One-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test were used to analyze the data (p< 0.05). Results The shear bond strength in group A was significantly higher than group B (p= 0.002), C (p< 0.001), and D (p< 0.001). Moreover, the shear bond strength of groups A and B (self-etch) was significantly different from group D (total-etch) (p< 0.001); and C (self-etch) with D (p= 0.024). Conclusion The results of this study showed that applying the mild self-etch adhesive between the composite and the GIc results in stronger shear bond strength compared to intermediate and strong self-etch adhesives. Moreover, the self-etch adhesive increased the shear bond strength between composite resin and GIc more significantly than total-etch adhesive. PMID:26966701

  6. Transient Liquid Phase Bonding Single-Crystal Superalloys with Orientation Deviations: Creep Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Naicheng; Liu, Jide; Jin, Tao; Sun, Xiaofeng; Hu, Zhuangqi

    2015-12-01

    Superalloys single crystals with various orientation deviations were bonded using transient liquid phase bonding method, then the creep properties of the bonded specimens were tested at 1033 K (760 °C)/780 MPa. It is found that the creep life of the bonded specimens decreases with the increase of the relative orientation deviations. Despite the fracture of the specimens appears on the bonding region, the deformation mechanism changes from specimens with low angle boundary to high angle boundary. In low angle boundary specimens, cleavage originated from the defects grows perpendicularly to the tensile stress and connects through the different slip planes around the cleavage planes. In this case, the deformation proceeds by the dislocations and stacking faults on multi-planes. With increasing orientation deviation, dislocation and stacking faults moved on single plane. As a result, the dislocations interact with the grain boundary and lead to fracture. Based on the present investigation, the orientation of the bonded superalloys single crystal should be controlled so that the introduced grain boundaries are relatively small and exhibit higher creep strength.

  7. Marginal microleakage of class V resin-based composite restorations bonded with six one-step self-etch systems.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Ayala, Alfonso; Farias-Neto, Arcelino; Vilanova, Larissa Soares Reis; Gomes, João Carlos; Gomes, Osnara Maria Mongruel

    2013-01-01

    This study compared the microleakage of class V restorations bonded with various one-step self-etching adhesives. Seventy class V resin-based composite restorations were prepared on the buccal and lingual surfaces of 35 premolars, by using: Clearfil S3 Bond, G-Bond, iBond, One Coat 7.0, OptiBond All-In-One, or Xeno IV. The Adper Single Bond etch-and-rinse two-step adhesive was employed as a control. Specimens were thermocycled for 500 cycles in separate water baths at 5°C and 55°C and loaded under 40 to 70 N for 50,000 cycles. Marginal microleakage was measured based on the penetration of a tracer agent. Although the control showed no microleakage at the enamel margins, there were no differences between groups (p = 0.06). None of the adhesives avoided microleakage at the dentin margins, and they displayed similar performances (p = 0.76). When both margins were compared, iBond® presented higher microleakage (p < 0.05) at the enamel margins (median, 1.00; Q3-Q1, 1.25-0.00) compared to the dentin margins (median, 0.00; Q3-Q1, 0.25-0.00). The study adhesives showed similar abilities to seal the margins of class V restorations, except for iBond®, which presented lower performance at the enamel margin. PMID:23739787

  8. Bonding efficacy of etch-and-rinse adhesives after dentin biomodification using ethanol saturation and collagen cross-linker pretreatment

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Pallavi; Nagpal, Rajni; Tyagi, Shashi Prabha; Manuja, Naveen

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate whether the application of two simplified etch-and-rinse adhesives to biomodified dentin using ethanol-wet bonding (EWB) and collagen cross-linker (CCL) pretreatment improves their sealing ability. Materials and Methods: In 176 extracted human molars, the pulp-chambers were deroofed, and teeth were sectioned horizontally. Samples were randomly divided into eight groups according to four bonding techniques using two simplified etch-and-rinse adhesives; Adper Single Bond 2 (ASB) and XP Bond (XPB). The bonding protocols included: (a) Water-wet bonding (WWB); (b) EWB; (c) WWB and CCL application; (d) EWB and CCL application. After composite resin restorations, dye leakage evaluation and scanning electron microscope analysis were done. Leakage scores were statistically analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests at a significance level of P < 0.05. Result: For both ASB and XPB adhesives, least dye leakage was observed in EWB groups (b and d) (P = 0.918 and P = 0.399 respectively) which showed no significant difference, while maximum leakage scores were seen in WWB groups (a and c). Regardless of CCL application and adhesives used, EWB technique depicted (P = 0.003 and P = 0.004) significantly greater sealing ability than WWB. Conclusion: Bonding of ASB and XPB using EWB significantly improved their sealing ability. Biomodification using CCL pretreatment had no significant effect on the sealing ability of adhesives bonded with either WWB or EWB. PMID:26180421

  9. “Evaluation of shear bond strength of a composite resin to white mineral trioxide aggregate with three different bonding systems”-An in vitro analysis

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Anand C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is a biomaterial that has been investigated for endodontic applications. With the increased use of MTA in pulp capping, pulpotomy, perforation repair, apexification and obturation, the material that would be placed over MTA as a final restoration is an important matter. As composite resins are one of the most widely used final restorative materials, this study was conducted to evaluate the shear bond strength of a composite resin to white mineral trioxide aggregate (WMTA) using three different bonding systems namely the two-step etch and rinse adhesive, the self-etching primer and the All-in-one system. Material and Methods Forty five specimens of white MTA (Angelus) were prepared and randomly divided into three groups of 15 specimens each depending on the bonding systems used respectively. In Group A, a Two-step etch and rinse adhesive or ‘total-etch adhesive’, Adper Single Bond 2 (3M/ESPE) and Filtek Z350 (3M ESPE, St Paul, MN) were placed over WMTA. In group B, a Two-step self-etching primer system, Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray, Medical Inc) and Filtek Z350 were used. In Group C, an All-in-one system, G Bond (GC corporation, Tokyo, Japan) and Filtek Z350 were used. The shear bond strength was measured for all the specimens. The data obtained was subjected to One way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and Scheffe’s post hoc test. Results The results suggested that the Two-step etch and rinse adhesive when used to bond a composite resin to white MTA gave better bond strength values and the All-in-one exhibited the least bond strength values. Conclusions The placement of composite used with a Two-step etch and rinse adhesive over WMTA as a final restoration may be appropriate. Key words:Composite resins, dentin bonding agents, mineral trioxide aggregate, shear bond strength. PMID:27398177

  10. Bonding to dentin as a function of air-stream temperatures for solvent evaporation.

    PubMed

    Marsiglio, Andréia Aquino; Almeida, Júlio César Franco; Hilgert, Leandro Augusto; D'Alpino, Paulo Henrique Perlatti; Garcia, Fernanda Cristina Pimentel

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of solvent evaporation conditions of acid-etching adhesives. The medium dentin of thirty extracted human third molars was exposed and bonded to different types of etch-and-rinse adhesives: 1) Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (SBMP) ; water-based; 2) Adper Single Bond 2 (SB) ; ethanol/water-based, and 3) Prime & Bond 2.1 (PB) ; acetone-based. Solvents were evaporated at air-drying temperatures of 21ºC or 38ºC. Composite buildups were incrementally constructed. After storage in water for 24 h at 37ºC, the specimens were prepared for bond strength testing. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (5%). SBMP performed better when the solvents were evaporated at a higher temperature (p < 0.05). Higher temperatures did not affect the performance of SB or PB. Bond strength at room temperature was material-dependent, and air-drying temperatures affected bonding of the water-based, acid-etching adhesive. PMID:22641449

  11. Solvent Retention of Contemporary Commercial Dentin Bonding Agents in a Demineralized Dentin Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Georges; Fernandes, Karen Barros Parron; Garcia, Fernanda Cristina Pimentel; D’Alpino, Paulo Henrique Perlatti; da Rocha Svizero, Nádia; Wang, Linda

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Solvents are ingredients in dentin-bonding agents (DBAs) that are essential to obtain efficient adhesion to dentin under wet-technique bonding protocol. However, an excess of solvents can compromise bonding durability. This study aimed to assess the retention of solvents present in different DBAs after their application to a demineralized dentin matrix. Methods: Thirty-six specimens of bovine dentin were demineralized for 7 days in 0.5M EDTA and divided into six groups n=6 (Scotchbond primer, Adper Single Bond 2, Excite, AdheSE primer, Prime & Bond NT and Xeno III). These specimens were individually saturated by the systems for 5 min and then kept in vials protected against light exposure. Each specimen was measured using a digital balance and then measured at the following intervals 10, 20, 30 sec, 1, 2 and 5 min thereafter. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey tests (alfa=.05). Results: There were significant differences evident in Excite, Prime & Bond NT at 2 and 5 min, respectively. There was no significant interaction between materials and time in all experimented time evaluated. The amount of solvent spontaneously evaporated was limited even in acetone-based specimens. Conclusions: After DBAs are applied, professionals may facilitate their evaporation, since spontaneous evaporation is limited. PMID:20613918

  12. Single-Molecule Conductance through Hydrogen Bonds: The Role of Resonances.

    PubMed

    Wimmer, Micah; Palma, Julio L; Tarakeshwar, Pilarisetty; Mujica, Vladimiro

    2016-08-01

    The single-molecule conductance of hydrogen-bonded and alkane systems are compared in this theoretical investigation. The results indicate that for short chains, the H-bonded molecules exhibit larger conductance than the alkanes. Although earlier experimental investigations attributed this observation to a large density of states (DOS) corresponding to an occupied molecular orbital below the Fermi energy, the current work indicates the presence of a Fano resonance in the transmission function in the vicinity of the Fermi energy. The inclusion of this observation is essential in understanding the behavior of these systems. We also address the characteristics of the H-bond for transport and provide an explanation for the presence of a turnover regime wherein the conductance of the alkanes becomes larger than the H-bonded systems. Incidentally, this feature cannot be explained using a simple DOS argument. PMID:27424944

  13. Comparing the shear bond strength of direct and indirect composite inlays in relation to different surface conditioning and curing techniques

    PubMed Central

    Zorba, Yahya Orcun; Ilday, Nurcan Ozakar; Bayındır, Yusuf Ziya; Demirbuga, Sezer

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to test the null hypothesis that different surface conditioning (etch and rinse and self-etch) and curing techniques (light cure/dual cure) had no effect on the shear bond strength of direct and indirect composite inlays. Materials and Methods: A total of 112 extracted human molar teeth were horizontally sectioned and randomly divided into two groups according to restoration technique (direct and indirect restorations). Each group was further subdivided into seven subgroups (n = 8) according to bonding agent (etch and rinse adhesives Scotchbond multi-purpose plus, All-Bond 3, Adper Single Bond and Prime Bond NT; and self-etch adhesives Clearfil Liner Bond, Futurabond DC and G bond). Indirect composites were cemented to dentin surfaces using dual-curing luting cement. Shear bond strength of specimens was tested using a Universal Testing Machine. Two samples from each subgroup were evaluated under Scanning electron microscopy to see the failing modes. Data was analyzed using independent sample t-tests and Tukey's tests. Results: Surface conditioning and curing of bonding agents were all found to have significant effects on shear bond strength (P < 0.05) of both direct and indirect composite inlays. With direct restoration, etch and rinse systems and dual-cured bonding agents yielded higher bond strengths than indirect restoration, self-etch systems and light-cured bonding agents. Conclusions: The results of the present study indicated that direct restoration to be a more reliable method than indirect restoration. Although etch and rinse bonding systems showed higher shear bond strength to dentin than self-etch systems, both systems can be safely used for the adhesion of direct as well as indirect restorations. PMID:24932118

  14. Effects of single bond-ion and single bond-diradical form on the stretching vibration of C=N bridging bond in 4,4'-disubstituted benzylidene anilines.

    PubMed

    Cao, Chao-Tun; Bi, Yakun; Cao, Chenzhong

    2016-06-15

    Fifty-seven samples of model compounds, 4,4'-disubstituted benzylidene anilines, p-X-ArCH=NAr-p-Y were synthesized. Their infrared absorption spectra were recorded, and the stretching vibration frequencies νC=N of the C=N bridging bond were determined. New stretching vibration mode was proposed by means of the analysis of the factors affecting νC=N, that is there are mainly three modes in the stretching vibration of C=N bond: (I) polar double bond form C=N, (II) single bond-ion form C(+)-N(-) and (III) single bond-diradical form C-N. The contributions of the forms (I) and (II) to the change of νC=N can be quantified by using Hammett substituent constant (including substituent cross-interaction effects between X and Y groups), whereas the contribution of the form (III) can be quantified by employing the excited-state substituent constant. The most contribution of these three forms is the form (III), the next is the form (II), whose contribution difference was discussed with the viewpoint of energy requirements in vibration with the form (III) and form (II). PMID:27043872

  15. Effects of single bond-ion and single bond-diradical form on the stretching vibration of Cdbnd N bridging bond in 4,4‧-disubstituted benzylidene anilines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Chao-Tun; Bi, Yakun; Cao, Chenzhong

    2016-06-01

    Fifty-seven samples of model compounds, 4,4‧-disubstituted benzylidene anilines, p-X-ArCH = NAr-p-Y were synthesized. Their infrared absorption spectra were recorded, and the stretching vibration frequencies νCdbnd N of the Cdbnd N bridging bond were determined. New stretching vibration mode was proposed by means of the analysis of the factors affecting νCdbnd N, that is there are mainly three modes in the stretching vibration of Cdbnd N bond: (I) polar double bond form Cdbnd N, (II) single bond-ion form C+-N- and (III) single bond-diradical form Crad -Nrad . The contributions of the forms (I) and (II) to the change of νCdbnd N can be quantified by using Hammett substituent constant (including substituent cross-interaction effects between X and Y groups), whereas the contribution of the form (III) can be quantified by employing the excited-state substituent constant. The most contribution of these three forms is the form (III), the next is the form (II), whose contribution difference was discussed with the viewpoint of energy requirements in vibration with the form (III) and form (II).

  16. Microtensile and tensile bond strength of single-bottle adhesives: a new test method.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, A I

    2004-04-01

    To evaluate the tensile and microtensile bond strength of five single-bottle adhesives to dentine, extracted human molar teeth were used. For each tooth dentine was exposed on the occlusal surface by cutting with an isomet saw and the remaining part was mounted in a plastic ring using dental stone. The tested adhesive materials were: Scotchbond 1, Syntac SC, One-Step, Prime & Bond 2.1 and Clearfil SE Bond. The adhesive was applied to either 1 mm(2) of dentine or a circular area with a diameter of 3.9 mm. Composite resin Clearfil AP-X was placed to the adhesives using a Teflon split mould 3.9 mm in diameter and 2.5 mm in height. Tensile and microtensile bond strengths were measured using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm min(-1). Under tensile mode, the bond strengths were 16.7 +/- 3.5, 15.2 +/- 2.5, 11.5 +/- 3.2, 13.7 +/- 2.6, 20.9 +/- 4.2 MPa for each material. Under microtensile mode, the bond strengths were 52.5 +/- 9.5, 55.3 +/- 8.3, 40.5 +/- 5.2, 37.5 +/- 8.7, 60 +/- 6.21 MPa. Fracture pattern of bonded specimens showed 66% cohesive dentine failure in samples tested for tensile bond strength. For the microtensile test, failures were mainly adhesive at the interface between adhesive and dentine (94%). PMID:15089946

  17. Single polymer chains in poor solvent: Using the bond fluctuation method with explicit solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jentzsch, Christoph; Werner, Marco; Sommer, Jens-Uwe

    2013-03-01

    We use the bond fluctuation model with explicit solvent to study single polymer chains under poor solvent conditions. Static and dynamic properties of the bond fluctuation model with explicit solvent are compared with the implicit solvent model, and the Θ-temperatures are determined for both solvent models. We show that even in the very poor solvent regime, dynamics is not frozen for the explicit solvent model. We investigate some aspects of the structure of a single collapsed globule and show that rather large chain lengths are necessary to reach the scaling regime of a dense sphere. The force-extension curve of a single polymer chain under poor solvent conditions in the fixed end-to-end distance ensemble is analyzed. We find that the transition of the tadpole conformation to the stretched chain conformation is rather smooth because of fluctuation effects, which is in agreement with recent experimental results.

  18. Single polymer chains in poor solvent: using the bond fluctuation method with explicit solvent.

    PubMed

    Jentzsch, Christoph; Werner, Marco; Sommer, Jens-Uwe

    2013-03-01

    We use the bond fluctuation model with explicit solvent to study single polymer chains under poor solvent conditions. Static and dynamic properties of the bond fluctuation model with explicit solvent are compared with the implicit solvent model, and the Θ-temperatures are determined for both solvent models. We show that even in the very poor solvent regime, dynamics is not frozen for the explicit solvent model. We investigate some aspects of the structure of a single collapsed globule and show that rather large chain lengths are necessary to reach the scaling regime of a dense sphere. The force-extension curve of a single polymer chain under poor solvent conditions in the fixed end-to-end distance ensemble is analyzed. We find that the transition of the tadpole conformation to the stretched chain conformation is rather smooth because of fluctuation effects, which is in agreement with recent experimental results. PMID:23485321

  19. Generating giant and tunable nonlinearity in a macroscopic mechanical resonator from a single chemical bond

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Pu; Zhou, Jingwei; Zhang, Liang; Hou, Dong; Lin, Shaochun; Deng, Wen; Meng, Chao; Duan, Changkui; Ju, Chenyong; Zheng, Xiao; Xue, Fei; Du, Jiangfeng

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinearity in macroscopic mechanical systems may lead to abundant phenomena for fundamental studies and potential applications. However, it is difficult to generate nonlinearity due to the fact that macroscopic mechanical systems follow Hooke's law and respond linearly to external force, unless strong drive is used. Here we propose and experimentally realize high cubic nonlinear response in a macroscopic mechanical system by exploring the anharmonicity in chemical bonding interactions. We demonstrate the high tunability of nonlinear response by precisely controlling the chemical bonding interaction, and realize, at the single-bond limit, a cubic elastic constant of 1 × 1020 N m−3. This enables us to observe the resonator's vibrational bi-states transitions driven by the weak Brownian thermal noise at 6 K. This method can be flexibly applied to a variety of mechanical systems to improve nonlinear responses, and can be used, with further improvements, to explore macroscopic quantum mechanics. PMID:27225287

  20. Generating giant and tunable nonlinearity in a macroscopic mechanical resonator from a single chemical bond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Pu; Zhou, Jingwei; Zhang, Liang; Hou, Dong; Lin, Shaochun; Deng, Wen; Meng, Chao; Duan, Changkui; Ju, Chenyong; Zheng, Xiao; Xue, Fei; Du, Jiangfeng

    2016-05-01

    Nonlinearity in macroscopic mechanical systems may lead to abundant phenomena for fundamental studies and potential applications. However, it is difficult to generate nonlinearity due to the fact that macroscopic mechanical systems follow Hooke's law and respond linearly to external force, unless strong drive is used. Here we propose and experimentally realize high cubic nonlinear response in a macroscopic mechanical system by exploring the anharmonicity in chemical bonding interactions. We demonstrate the high tunability of nonlinear response by precisely controlling the chemical bonding interaction, and realize, at the single-bond limit, a cubic elastic constant of 1 × 1020 N m-3. This enables us to observe the resonator's vibrational bi-states transitions driven by the weak Brownian thermal noise at 6 K. This method can be flexibly applied to a variety of mechanical systems to improve nonlinear responses, and can be used, with further improvements, to explore macroscopic quantum mechanics.

  1. Generating giant and tunable nonlinearity in a macroscopic mechanical resonator from a single chemical bond.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pu; Zhou, Jingwei; Zhang, Liang; Hou, Dong; Lin, Shaochun; Deng, Wen; Meng, Chao; Duan, Changkui; Ju, Chenyong; Zheng, Xiao; Xue, Fei; Du, Jiangfeng

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinearity in macroscopic mechanical systems may lead to abundant phenomena for fundamental studies and potential applications. However, it is difficult to generate nonlinearity due to the fact that macroscopic mechanical systems follow Hooke's law and respond linearly to external force, unless strong drive is used. Here we propose and experimentally realize high cubic nonlinear response in a macroscopic mechanical system by exploring the anharmonicity in chemical bonding interactions. We demonstrate the high tunability of nonlinear response by precisely controlling the chemical bonding interaction, and realize, at the single-bond limit, a cubic elastic constant of 1 × 10(20) N m(-3). This enables us to observe the resonator's vibrational bi-states transitions driven by the weak Brownian thermal noise at 6 K. This method can be flexibly applied to a variety of mechanical systems to improve nonlinear responses, and can be used, with further improvements, to explore macroscopic quantum mechanics. PMID:27225287

  2. Studying Chemical Reactions, One Bond at a Time, with Single Molecule AFM Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Julio M.

    2008-03-01

    The mechanisms by which mechanical forces regulate the kinetics of a chemical reaction are unknown. In my lecture I will demonstrate how we use single molecule force-clamp spectroscopy and protein engineering to study the effect of force on the kinetics of thiol/disulfide exchange. Reduction of disulfide bond via the thiol/disulfide exchange chemical reaction is crucial in regulating protein function and is of common occurrence in mechanically stressed proteins. While reduction is thought to proceed through a substitution nucleophilic bimolecular (SN2) reaction, the role of a mechanical force in modulating this chemical reaction is unknown. We apply a constant stretching force to single engineered disulfide bonds and measure their rate of reduction by dithiothreitol (DTT). We find that while the reduction rate is linearly dependent on the concentration of DTT, it is exponentially dependent on the applied force, increasing 10-fold over a 300 pN range. This result predicts that the disulfide bond lengthens by 0.34 å at the transition state of the thiol/disulfide exchange reaction. In addition to DTT, we also study the reduction of the engineered disulfide bond by the E. coli enzyme thioredoxin (Trx). Thioredoxins are enzymes that catalyze disulfide bond reduction in all organisms. As before, we apply a mechanical force in the range of 25-450 pN to the engineered disulfide bond substrate and monitor the reduction of these bonds by individual enzymes. In sharp contrast with the data obtained with DTT, we now observe two alternative forms of the catalytic reaction, the first requiring a reorientation of the substrate disulfide bond, causing a shortening of the substrate polypeptide by 0.76±0.07 å, and the second elongating the substrate disulfide bond by 0.21±0.01 å. These results support the view that the Trx active site regulates the geometry of the participating sulfur atoms, with sub-ångström precision, in order to achieve efficient catalysis. Single molecule

  3. Bent Bonds and Multiple Bonds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Edward A.; Gillespie, Ronald J.

    1980-01-01

    Considers carbon-carbon multiple bonds in terms of Pauling's bent bond model, which allows direct calculation of double and triple bonds from the length of a CC single bond. Lengths of these multiple bonds are estimated from direct measurements on "bent-bond" models constructed of plastic tubing and standard kits. (CS)

  4. Single Molecule Junctions: A Laboratory for Chemistry, Mechanics and Bond Rupture

    SciTech Connect

    Hybertsen M. S.

    2013-07-08

    Simultaneous measurement [1] of junction conductance and sustained force in single molecule junctions bridging metal electrodes provides a powerful tool in the quantitative study of the character of molecule-metal bonds. In this talk I will discuss three topics. First, I will describe chemical trends in link bond strength based on experiments and Density Functional Theory based calculations. Second, I will focus on the specific case of pyridine-linked junctions. Bond rupture from the high conductance junction structure shows a requires a force that exceeds the rupture force of gold point contacts and clearly indicates the role of additional forces, beyond the specific N-Au donor acceptor bond. DFT-D2 calculations with empirical addition of dispersion interactions illustrates the interplay between the donor-acceptor bonding and the non-specific van der Waals interactions between the pyridine rings and Au asperities. Third, I will describe recent efforts to characterize the diversity of junction structures realized in break-junction experiments with suitable models for the potential surfaces that are observed. [1] Venkataraman Group, Columbia University.

  5. Directionality of Double-Bond Photoisomerization Dynamics Induced by a Single Stereogenic Center.

    PubMed

    Marchand, Gabriel; Eng, Julien; Schapiro, Igor; Valentini, Alessio; Frutos, Luis Manuel; Pieri, Elisa; Olivucci, Massimo; Léonard, Jérémie; Gindensperger, Etienne

    2015-02-19

    In light-driven single-molecule rotary motors, the photoisomerization of a double bond converts light energy into the rotation of a moiety (the rotor) with respect to another (the stator). However, at the level of a molecular population, an effective rotary motion can only be achieved if a large majority of the rotors rotate in the same, specific direction. Here we present a quantitative investigation of the directionality (clockwise vs counterclockwise) induced by a single stereogenic center placed in allylic position with respect to the reactive double bond of a model of the biomimetic indanylidene-pyrrolinium framework. By computing ensembles of nonadiabatic trajectories at 300 K, we predict that the photoisomerization is >70% unidirectional for the Z → E and E → Z conversions. Most importantly, we show that such directionality, resulting from the asymmetry of the excited state force field, can still be observed in the presence of a small (ca. 2°) pretwist or helicity of the reactive double bond. This questions the validity of the conjecture that a significant double-bond pretwist (e.g., >10°) in the ground state equilibrium structure of synthetic or natural rotary motors would be required for unidirectional motion. PMID:26262473

  6. Legionella pneumophila utilizes a Single Player Disulfide-Bond Oxidoreductase System to Manage Disulfide Bond Formation and Isomerization

    PubMed Central

    Kpadeh, Zegbeh Z.; Day, Shandra R.; Mills, Brandy W.; Hoffman, Paul S.

    2015-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila uses a single homodimeric disulfide bond (DSB) oxidoreductase DsbA2 to catalyze extracytoplasmic protein folding and to correct DSB errors through protein-disulfide isomerase (PDI) activity. In Escherichia coli, these functions are separated to avoid futile cycling. In L. pneumophila, DsbA2 is maintained as a mixture of disulfides (S-S) and free thiols (SH), but when expressed in E. coli, only the SH form is observed. We provide evidence to suggest that structural differences in DsbB oxidases (LpDsbB1 and LpDsbB2) and DsbD reductases (LpDsbD1 and LpDsbD2) (compared to E. coli) permit bifunctional activities without creating a futile cycle. LpdsbB1 and LpdsbB2 partially complemented an EcdsbB mutant while neither LpdsbD1 nor LpdsbD2 complemented an EcdsbD mutant unless DsbA2 was also expressed. When the dsb genes of E. coli were replaced with those of L. pneumophila, motility was restored and DsbA2 was present as a mixture of redox forms. A dominant-negative approach to interfere with DsbA2 function in L. pneumophila determined that DSB oxidase activity was necessary for intracellular multiplication and assembly/function of the Dot/Icm Type IVb secretion system. Our studies show that a single-player system may escape the futile cycle trap by limiting transfer of reducing equivalents from LpDsbDs to DsbA2. PMID:25534767

  7. On the Involvement of Single-Bond Rotation in the Primary Photochemistry of Photoactive Yellow Protein

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, Andreas D.; Hospes, Marijke; Singhal, Kushagra; van Stokkum, Ivo; van Grondelle, Rienk; Groot, Marie Louise; Hellingwerf, Klaas J.

    2011-01-01

    Prior experimental observations, as well as theoretical considerations, have led to the proposal that C4-C7 single-bond rotation may play an important role in the primary photochemistry of photoactive yellow protein (PYP). We therefore synthesized an analog of this protein's 4-hydroxy-cinnamic acid chromophore, (5-hydroxy indan-(1E)-ylidene)acetic acid, in which rotation across the C4-C7 single bond has been locked with an ethane bridge, and we reconstituted the apo form of the wild-type protein and its R52A derivative with this chromophore analog. In PYP reconstituted with the rotation-locked chromophore, 1), absorption spectra of ground and intermediate states are slightly blue-shifted; 2), the quantum yield of photochemistry is ∼60% reduced; 3), the excited-state dynamics of the chromophore are accelerated; and 4), dynamics of the thermal recovery reaction of the protein are accelerated. A significant finding was that the yield of the transient ground-state intermediate in the early phase of the photocycle was considerably higher in the rotation-locked samples than in the corresponding samples reconstituted with p-coumaric acid. In contrast to theoretical predictions, the initial photocycle dynamics of PYP were observed to be not affected by the charge of the amino acid residue at position 52, which was varied by 1), varying the pH of the sample between 5 and 10; and 2), site-directed mutagenesis to construct R52A. These results imply that C4-C7 single-bond rotation in PYP is not an alternative to C7=C8 double-bond rotation, in case the nearby positive charge of R52 is absent, but rather facilitates, presumably with a compensatory movement, the physiological Z/E isomerization of the blue-light-absorbing chromophore. PMID:21889456

  8. Single-crystal neutron diffraction studies of hydrogen-bonded systems: Two recent examples from IPNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koetzle, Thomas F.; Piccoli, Paula M. B.; Schultz, Arthur J.

    2009-02-01

    Beginning with work in the 1950s at the first generation of research reactors, studies of hydrogen-bonded systems have been a prime application for single-crystal neutron diffraction. The range of systems studied was extended in the 1960s and 1970s, with the advent of high flux reactor sources, and beginning around 1980 studies at pulsed neutron sources have made increasingly important contributions. Recently at the Argonne Intense Pulsed Neutron Source (IPNS), working with collaborators, we completed two studies of hydrogen-bonded systems that will serve to illustrate topics of current interest. In the first study, on andrographolide, an active diterpenoid natural product, our neutron diffraction results definitively characterize the hydrogen-bonding interactions. The second IPNS study is on tetraacetylethane (TAE), a β-diketone enol system with a very short, strong intramolecular O-H⋯O hydrogen bond. At IPNS, we have determined the neutron crystal structure of TAE at five temperatures between 20 and 298 K to investigate changes in the structure with temperature and to probe for disorder. Despite the successes illustrated by the two examples presented here and by many other studies, at present applications of single-crystal neutron diffraction continue to be extremely flux limited and constrained by the requirement for mm-size crystals for many problems. These limitations are being addressed through the realization of powerful instruments at a new generation of pulsed neutron sources, including in the USA the TOPAZ and MaNDi single-crystal diffractometers that are under development at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS).

  9. Deproteinized dentin: a favorable substrate to self-bonding resin cements?

    PubMed

    Barbosa De Souza, Fábio; Sinclér Delfino, Carina; Lacalle Turbino, Míriam; Braz, Rodivan

    2011-08-01

    The adhesive performance on deproteinized dentin of different self-adhesive resin cements was evaluated through microtensile bond strength (μTBS) analysis and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Occlusal dentin of human molars were distributed into different groups, according to the categories: adhesive cementation with two-step bonding systems-control Groups (Adper Single Bond 2 + RelyX ARC/3M ESPE; One Step Plus + Duolink/Bisco; Excite + Variolink I/Ivoclar Vivadent) and self-adhesive cementation-experimental groups (Rely X Unicem/3M ESPE; Biscem/Bisco; MultiLink Sprint/Ivoclar Vivadent). Each group was subdivided according to the dentin approach to: α, maintenance of collagen fibers and β, deproteinization. The mean values were obtained, and submitted to ANOVA and Tukey test. Statistical differences were obtained to the RelyX Unicem groups (α = 13.59 MPa; β = 30.19 MPa). All the BIS Group specimens failed before the mechanical tests. Dentinal deproteinization provided an improved bond performance for the self-adhesive cement Rely X Unicem, and had no negative effect on the other cementing systems studied. PMID:21648064

  10. Push-Out Bond Strength of Restorations with Bulk-Fill, Flow, and Conventional Resin Composites

    PubMed Central

    Caixeta, Rodrigo Vieira; Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil; Kaneshima, Edmilson Nobumitu; Barbosa, Aline Silvestre; Picolotto, Cassiana Pedrotti; Lima, Ana Eliza de Souza; Gonini Júnior, Alcides; Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strengths of composite restorations made with different filler amounts and resin composites that were photoactivated using a light-emitting diode (LED). Thirty bovine incisors were selected, and a conical cavity was prepared in the facial surface of each tooth. All preparations were etched with Scotchbond Etching Gel, the Adper Scotchbond Multipurpose Plus adhesive system was applied followed by photoactivation, and the cavities were filled with a single increment of Filtek Z350 XT, Filtek Z350 XT Flow, or bulk-fill X-tra fil resin composite (n = 10) followed by photoactivation. A push-out test to determine bond strength was conducted using a universal testing machine. Data (MPa) were submitted to Student's t-test at a 5% significance level. After the test, the fractured specimens were examined using an optical microscope under magnification (10x). Although all three composites demonstrated a high prevalence of adhesive failures, the bond strength values of the different resin composites photoactivated by LED showed that the X-tra fil resin composite had a lower bond strength than the Filtek Z350 XT and Filtek Z350 XT Flow resin composites. PMID:26457322

  11. Effect of Intermediate Agents and Preheated Composites on Repair Bond Strength of Silorane-Based Composites

    PubMed Central

    Shafiei, Fereshteh; Daryadar, Marzieh

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Repairing composite restorations is a challenging procedure especially when two different types of composites are used. This study aimed to compare the repair strength of silorane-based composite (SC) (Filtek P90) with that of preheated SC, methacrylate composite (MC)(Z250), flowable MC (Filtek Supreme Plus) and different adhesive/composite combinations. Materials and Methods: Eighty-four SC specimens were fabricated and randomly divided into seven groups (G). In the control group (G7), SC was bonded immediately to SC. The other specimens were water-aged for two months and were then roughened, etched and repaired with the following materials: G1) Silorane Adhesive Bond (SAB)/SC; G2) Preheated SC; G3) SAB/MC; G4) Adper Single Bond (SB)/MC; G5) Flowable MC/MC; G6) Preheated MC. After water storage and thermocycling, the repaired specimens were subjected to shear bond strength testing. The data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey’s test. Results: Preheated SC and MC, flowable MC and SAB/SC resulted in bond strength comparable to that of the control group. Preheated SC showed significantly higher bond strength when compared to SAB/MC (P=0.04) and SB/MC (P<0.001). Bond strength of SB/MC was significantly lower than that of the other groups (P<0.05), except for SAB/SC and SAB/MC. Conclusion: All repairing materials except for SB/MC resulted in bond strength values comparable to that of the control group. Repair with preheated SC yielded the highest bond strength. PMID:27148378

  12. A single theoretical descriptor for the bond-dissociation energy of substituted phenols.

    PubMed

    Aliaga, Carolina; Almodovar, Iriux; Rezende, Marcos Caroli

    2015-01-01

    Relative to the corresponding value of phenol, the bond-dissociation energies (BDE) of substituted phenols correlate well with a single descriptor: the Mulliken charge on the oxygen atom of the phenoxyl radical. However, the correlation fails for phenols ortho-substituted with polar groups. Internal reaction coordinates (IRC) for the model reaction of hydrogen abstraction by the hydroperoxyl radical from various 2- and 4-substituted phenols were calculated in order to investigate the role of intra-molecular hydrogen bonds and steric effects on the process. Calculations yielded theoretical values in good agreement with experimental ΔBDE values. The hydrogen-abstraction process was further analyzed in terms of density functional theory (DFT)-based reactivity indices such as local electrophilicity, the Fukui function for nucleophilic attack, and dual descriptor values of the phenolic hydroxyl oxygen along the IRC. PMID:25617211

  13. A permanently porous single molecule H-bonded organic framework for selective CO2 capture.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Shyamapada; Chakraborty, Debanjan; Vaidhyanathan, Ramanathan

    2016-05-26

    Permanent porosity has been realized in a hydrogen bonded framework formed by a single tripodal tricarboxylic acid molecule. The presence of three phenyl rings linked to a flexible sp(3) nitrogen centre renders a near-propeller shape to the molecule generating an unusual 'non-planar' 3-D framework formed by highly directional planar -COOHHOOC- hydrogen bonds, propagating in all three directions. The material shows exceptional hydrolytic, acidic and thermal stability and has a surface area of 1025 m(2) g(-1). Importantly, it shows preferential adsorption of CO2 over N2 with very high selectivities (350 : 1@1 bar, 303 K). DFT modeling shows the presence of stable T-shaped CO2CO2 dimers within the channels suggesting favorable co-operativity between them. PMID:27174692

  14. Aniline hydrogenolysis on the Pt(111) single crystal surface: Mechanisms for C-N bond activation

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, S.X.; Gland, J.L.; Fischer, D.A. |

    1993-12-31

    Hydrogenolysis of C-N bond on transition metals is a crucial step in hydrodenitrogenation (HDN) reactions. Despite the overall complexity of HDN processes, the details of important surface reactions can be characterized using model reactions of organonitrogen compounds on single crystal model catalysts. The structure and reactivity of well characterized aniline monolayers on the Pt(111) surface both in vacuum and in the presence of hydrogen is discussed here. Adsorption and reactions of aniline were studied by Gland and Somorjai on the Pt(111) and Pt(100) surfaces, and more recently by Benziger`s group on the Ni(111) and Ni(100) surfaces. On both Pt and Ni surfaces, aniline {pi} bonds through the aromatic ring with its ring parallel to the substrate surface.

  15. A single prolonged stress paradigm produces enduring impairments in social bonding in monogamous prairie voles.

    PubMed

    Arai, Aki; Hirota, Yu; Miyase, Naoki; Miyata, Shiori; Young, Larry J; Osako, Yoji; Yuri, Kazunari; Mitsui, Shinichi

    2016-12-15

    Traumatic events such as natural disasters, violent crimes, tragic accidents, and war, can have devastating impacts on social relationships, including marital partnerships. We developed a single prolonged stress (SPS) paradigm, which consisted of restraint, forced swimming, and ether anesthesia, to establish an animal model relevant to post-traumatic stress disorder. We applied a SPS paradigm to a monogamous rodent, the prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster) in order to determine whether a traumatic event affects the establishment of pair bonds. We did not detect effects of the SPS treatment on anhedonic or anxiety-like behavior. Sham-treated male voles huddled with their partner females, following a 6day cohabitation, for a longer duration than with a novel female, indicative of a pair bond. In contrast, SPS-treated voles indiscriminately huddled with the novel and partner females. Interestingly, the impairment of pair bonding was rescued by oral administration of paroxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), after the SPS treatment. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that oxytocin immunoreactivity (IR) was significantly decreased in the supraoptic nucleus (SON), but not in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN), 7days after SPS treatment, and recovered 14days after SPS treatment. After the presentation of a partner female, oxytocin neurons labeled with Fos IR was significantly increased in SPS-treated voles compared with sham-treated voles regardless of paroxetine administration. Our results suggest that traumatic events disturb the formation of pair bond possibly through an interaction with the serotonergic system, and that SSRIs are candidates for the treatment of social problems caused by traumatic events. Further, a vole SPS model may be useful for understanding mechanisms underlying the impairment of social bonding by traumatic events. PMID:27522019

  16. In vitro evaluation of influence of salivary contamination on the dentin bond strength of one-bottle adhesive systems

    PubMed Central

    Suryakumari, Nujella B. P.; Reddy, P. Satyanarayana; Surender, L. R.; Kiran, Ram

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the effect of salivary contamination on the bond strength of one-bottle adhesive systems — (the V generation) at various stages during the bonding procedure and to investigate the effect of the contaminant removing treatments on the recovery of bond strengths. Materials and Methods: In this study the V generation one-bottle system — (Adper Single Bond) was tested. Fifty caries-free human molars with flat dentin surfaces were randomly divided into five groups of ten teeth each: Group I had 15 second etching with 35% Ortho Phosphoric acid, 15 second rinse and blot dried (Uncontaminated); Group II contaminated and blot dried; Group III contaminated and completely dried; Group IV contaminated, washed, blot dried; Group V contaminated, retched washed, and blot dried. The bonding agent was applied and resin composite (Z-100 3M ESPE) was bonded to the treated surfaces using the Teflon mold. The specimens in each group were then subjected to shear bond strength testing in an Instron Universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm / minute and the data were subjected to one way ANOVA for comparison among the groups (P<0.05). Results: There was a significant difference between the group that was dried with strong oil-free air after contamination (Group III) and the other groups. When the etched surface was contaminated by saliva, there was no statistical difference between the just blot dry, wash, or the re-etching groups (Groups II, IV, V) if the dentin surface was kept wet before priming. When the etched dentin surface was dried (Group III) the shear bond strength decreased considerably. Conclusion: The bond strengths to the tooth structure of the recent dentin bonding agents are less sensitive to common forms of contamination than assumed. Re-etching without additional mechanical preparation is sufficient to provide or achieve the expected bond strength. PMID:22090757

  17. Effect of desensitizing agents on the microtensile bond strength of two-step etch-and-rinse adhesives to dentin.

    PubMed

    Cortiano, Fernanda M; Rached, Rodrigo N; Mazur, Rui F; Vieira, Sergio; Freire, Andrea; de Souza, Evelise M

    2016-06-01

    Desensitizers can be used to control postoperative sensitivity in adhesive restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of desensitizing agents on the bond strength of two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive systems to dentin. Forty-two human molars were sectioned to obtain 3-mm-thick dentin discs. The discs were divided into three groups (n = 14 in each) - no-treatment control group (CT), and oxalic acid [BisBlock (BB)] and calcium phosphate [Desensibilize Nano-P (NP)] desensitizers - before the application of two adhesive systems [Adper Single Bond Plus (SB) and One-Step Plus (OSP)]. A nanoparticle composite resin was used to create a 3-mm-thick build-up. The specimens were stored in distilled water for 24 h before a microtensile bond-strength test was performed. The failure modes were determined using a stereomicroscope at 100 × magnification. Specimens were sectioned perpendicular to the interface for scanning electron microscopy analyses. The CT-SB group exhibited the highest bond strength, differing significantly from BB-SB and BB-OSP groups. Mixed failures were prevalent for all groups. Scanning electron microscopy revealed a continuous hybrid layer and resin tags in all groups. Dentin bond strength of etch-and-rinse adhesive systems was reduced by an oxalic acid desensitizer but was not affected by a calcium phosphate-containing desensitizer. PMID:27038226

  18. Microtensile bond strength of indirect resin composite to resin-coated dentin: interaction between diamond bur roughness and coating material.

    PubMed

    Kameyama, Atsushi; Oishi, Takumi; Sugawara, Toyotarou; Hirai, Yoshito

    2009-02-01

    This aim of this study was to determine the effect of type of bur and resin-coating material on microtensile bond strength (microTBS) of indirect composite to dentin. Dentin surfaces were first ground with two types of diamond bur and resin-coated using UniFil Bond (UB) or Adper Single Bond (SB), and then bonded to a resin composite disc for indirect restoration with adhesive resin cement. After storage for 24 hr in distilled water at 37 degrees C, microTBS was measured (crosshead speed 1 mm/min). When UB was applied to dentin prepared using the regular-grit diamond bur, microTBS was significantly lower than that in dentin prepared using the superfine-grit bur. In contrast, no significant difference was found between regular-grit and superfine-grit bur with SB. However, more than half of the superfine-grit specimens failed before microTBS testing. These results indicate that selection of bur type is important in improving the bond strength of adhesive resin cement between indirect resin composite and resin-coated dentin. PMID:19622875

  19. Linker Dependent Bond Rupture Force Measurements in Single-Molecule Junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Frei M.; Hybertsen M.; Aradhya S.V.; Venkataraman L.

    2012-02-16

    We use a modified conducting atomic force microscope to simultaneously probe the conductance of a single-molecule junction and the force required to rupture the junction formed by alkanes terminated with four different chemical link groups which vary in binding strength and mechanism to the gold electrodes. Molecular junctions with amine, methylsulfide, and diphenylphosphine terminated molecules show clear conductance signatures and rupture at a force that is significantly smaller than the measured 1.4 nN force required to rupture the single-atomic gold contact. In contrast, measurements with a thiol terminated alkane which can bind covalently to the gold electrode show conductance and force features unlike those of the other molecules studied. Specifically, the strong Au-S bond can cause structural rearrangements in the electrodes, which are accompanied by substantial conductance changes. Despite the strong Au-S bond and the evidence for disruption of the Au structure, the experiments show that on average these junctions also rupture at a smaller force than that measured for pristine single-atom gold contacts.

  20. Single-step in situ synthesis of double bond-grafted yttrium-hydroxide nanotube core-shell structures.

    PubMed

    Li, Weijia; Wang, Xun; Li, Yadong

    2004-01-21

    Novel MMA-Y(OH)(3) nanotube core-shell structures have been successfully prepared with double bonds successfully grafted on the surface through a single-step in-situ hydrothermal method. PMID:14737530

  1. A Single-Lap Joint Adhesive Bonding Optimization Method Using Gradient and Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smeltzer, Stanley S., III; Finckenor, Jeffrey L.

    1999-01-01

    A natural process for any engineer, scientist, educator, etc. is to seek the most efficient method for accomplishing a given task. In the case of structural design, an area that has a significant impact on the structural efficiency is joint design. Unless the structure is machined from a solid block of material, the individual components which compose the overall structure must be joined together. The method for joining a structure varies depending on the applied loads, material, assembly and disassembly requirements, service life, environment, etc. Using both metallic and fiber reinforced plastic materials limits the user to two methods or a combination of these methods for joining the components into one structure. The first is mechanical fastening and the second is adhesive bonding. Mechanical fastening is by far the most popular joining technique; however, in terms of structural efficiency, adhesive bonding provides a superior joint since the load is distributed uniformly across the joint. The purpose of this paper is to develop a method for optimizing single-lap joint adhesive bonded structures using both gradient and genetic algorithms and comparing the solution process for each method. The goal of the single-lap joint optimization is to find the most efficient structure that meets the imposed requirements while still remaining as lightweight, economical, and reliable as possible. For the single-lap joint, an optimum joint is determined by minimizing the weight of the overall joint based on constraints from adhesive strengths as well as empirically derived rules. The analytical solution of the sin-le-lap joint is determined using the classical Goland-Reissner technique for case 2 type adhesive joints. Joint weight minimization is achieved using a commercially available routine, Design Optimization Tool (DOT), for the gradient solution while an author developed method is used for the genetic algorithm solution. Results illustrate the critical design variables

  2. Tuning the Formation and Rupture of Single Ligand-Receptor Bonds by Hyaluronan-Induced Repulsion

    PubMed Central

    Robert, Philippe; Sengupta, Kheya; Puech, Pierre-Henri; Bongrand, Pierre; Limozin, Laurent

    2008-01-01

    We used a combination of laminar flow chamber and reflection interference microscopy to study the formation and rupture of single bonds formed between Fc-ICAM-1 attached to a substrate and anti-ICAM-1 carried by micrometric beads in the presence of a repulsive hyaluronan (HA) layer adsorbed onto the substrate. The absolute distance between the colloids and the surface was measured under flow with an accuracy of a few nanometers. We could verify the long-term prediction of classical lubrication theory for the movement of a sphere near a wall in a shear flow. The HA polymer layer exerted long-range repulsive steric force on the beads and the hydrodynamics at the boundary remained more or less unchanged. By incubating HA at various concentrations, the thickness of the layer, as estimated by beads most probable height, was tuned in the range 20–200 nm. Frequency of bond formation was decreased by more than one order of magnitude by increasing the thickness of the repulsive layer, while the lifetime of individual bonds was not affected. This study opens the way for further quantitative studies of the effect of molecular environment and separation distance on ligand-receptor association and dissociation. PMID:18599637

  3. Theoretical and experimental studies of the molecular orbital bonding coefficients for Cu2+ ion in cesium hydrogen oxalate single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalfaoǧlu, Emel; Karabulut, Bünyamin

    2016-03-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and optical absorption spectra of Cu2+ ions in cesium hydrogen oxalate single crystals have been investigated at room temperature. The spin-Hamiltonian parameters (g and A), have been determined. Crystalline field around the Cu2+ ion is almost axially symmetric. The results show a single paramagnetic site which confirms the triclinic crystal symmetry. Molecular orbital bonding coefficients are studied from the EPR and optical data. Theoretical octahedral field parameter and the tetragonal field parameters have been evaluated from the superposition model. Using these parameters, various bonding parameters are analyzed and the nature of bonding in the complex is discussed. The theoretical results are supported by experimental results.

  4. Shear bond strength of resin cement to an acid etched and a laser irradiated ceramic surface

    PubMed Central

    Motro, Pelin Fatma Karagoz; Yurdaguven, Haktan

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the effects of hydrofluoric acid etching and Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation on the shear bond strength of resin cement to lithium disilicate ceramic. MATERIALS AND METHODS Fifty-five ceramic blocks (5 mm × 5 mm × 2 mm) were fabricated and embedded in acrylic resin. Their surfaces were finished with 1000-grit silicon carbide paper. The blocks were assigned to five groups: 1) 9.5% hydrofluoric-acid etching for 60 s; 2-4), 1.5-, 2.5-, and 6-W Er,Cr:YSGG laser applications for 60 seconds, respectively; and 5) no treatment (control). One specimen from each group was examined using scanning electron microscopy. Ceramic primer (Rely X ceramic primer) and adhesive (Adper Single Bond) were applied to the ceramic surfaces, followed by resin cement to bond the composite cylinders, and light curing. Bonded specimens were stored in distilled water at 37℃ for 24 hours. Shear bond strengths were determined by a universal testing machine at 1 mm/min crosshead speed. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests (α=0.05). RESULTS Adhesion was significantly stronger in Group 2 (3.88 ± 1.94 MPa) and Group 3 (3.65 ± 1.87 MPa) than in Control group (1.95 ± 1.06 MPa), in which bonding values were lowest (P<.01). No significant difference was observed between Group 4 (3.59 ± 1.19 MPa) and Control group. Shear bond strength was highest in Group 1 (8.42 ± 1.86 MPa; P<.01). CONCLUSION Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation at 1.5 and 2.5 W increased shear bond strengths between ceramic and resin cement compared with untreated ceramic surfaces. Irradiation at 6 W may not be an efficient ceramic surface treatment technique. PMID:23755333

  5. Relationships among the structural topology, bond strength, and mechanical properties of single-walled aluminosilicate nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou, Kai-Hsin; Tsou, Nien-Ti; Kang, Dun-Yen

    2015-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are regarded as small but strong due to their nanoscale microstructure and high mechanical strength (Young's modulus exceeds 1000 GPa). A longstanding question has been whether there exist other nanotube materials with mechanical properties as good as those of CNTs. In this study, we investigated the mechanical properties of single-walled aluminosilicate nanotubes (AlSiNTs) using a multiscale computational method and then conducted a comparison with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). By comparing the potential energy estimated from molecular and macroscopic material mechanics, we were able to model the chemical bonds as beam elements for the nanoscale continuum modeling. This method allowed for simulated mechanical tests (tensile, bending, and torsion) with minimum computational resources for deducing their Young's modulus and shear modulus. The proposed approach also enabled the creation of hypothetical nanotubes to elucidate the relative contributions of bond strength and nanotube structural topology to overall nanotube mechanical strength. Our results indicated that it is the structural topology rather than bond strength that dominates the mechanical properties of the nanotubes. Finally, we investigated the relationship between the structural topology and the mechanical properties by analyzing the von Mises stress distribution in the nanotubes. The proposed methodology proved effective in rationalizing differences in the mechanical properties of AlSiNTs and SWCNTs. Furthermore, this approach could be applied to the exploration of new high-strength nanotube materials.Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are regarded as small but strong due to their nanoscale microstructure and high mechanical strength (Young's modulus exceeds 1000 GPa). A longstanding question has been whether there exist other nanotube materials with mechanical properties as good as those of CNTs. In this study, we investigated the mechanical properties of single

  6. Fabrication and testing on monolithic single bin bed by low temperature epoxy bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, E.; Barclay, J. A.; Reedeker, P. G.; Wysokinski, T. W.

    2002-05-01

    The Cryofuel System Group at University of Victoria, Canada, has been developing an active magnetic liquefier for natural gas, so-called AMRL-1. Several subsystems are included in the liquefier. One of them is the magnetic refrigeration subsystem. For the magnetic refrigeration subsystem in the AMRL-1, an efficient magnetic regenerator is crucial to achieve high performance of the AMRL-1. To understand the working process of the magnetic regenerator, a single bin model characterizing each compartment of the rotary magnetic regenerator designed for the AMRL-1 has been designed, fabricated, and tested. The main objective of this task is to verify the feasibility of fabrication process of monolithic magnetic bed for AMRL-1 wheel rotary regenerator by low temperature epoxy bonding. Because of the unique structure of the single bin with several different magnetic materials, we have tried numerous supporting and sealing methods to avoid the leaking, escaping and mixing of very tiny particles. Then we have tested the flow performance of the monolithic yet porous beds before and after bonding. The experimental results are compared with the modified Ergun correlation for predicting the flow impedance of beds filled with particles. We will introduce some testing results in the paper.

  7. The use of warm air stream for solvent evaporation: effects on the durability of resin-dentin bonds.

    PubMed

    Reis, Alessandra; Klein-Júnior, Celso A; de Souza, Fabio H Coelho; Stanislawczuk, Rodrigo; Loguercio, Alessandro D

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of a warm (W) or cold (C) air-dry stream for solvent evaporation on the immediate (IM) and six-month (6M) resin-dentin bond strength (microTBS) and silver nitrate uptake pattern (SNU) of two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Adper Single Bond [SB] and Prime & Bond 2.1 [PB]). The adhesives were applied on demineralized dentin surfaces and a warm or cold air-dry stream (10 seconds) was applied followed by light-activation (10 seconds). After 24-hours of water storage, the specimens were serially sectioned in the "x" and "y" directions to obtain bonded sticks around 0.8 mm2 to be tested immediately or after six months of water storage. The specimens at each period were immersed in a 50% solution of silver nitrate, photodeveloped and analyzed by SEM for SNU. Higher IM microTBS values were observed for SB under W conditions. Both adhesives showed reductions in microTBS after 6M in both air temperatures. Regarding SEM, a low silver nitrate uptake was observed in the W groups either in IM or 6M for both adhesives. PMID:20166408

  8. Interaction of a conjugated polyaromatic molecule with a single dangling bond quantum dot on a hydrogenated semiconductor.

    PubMed

    Godlewski, Szymon; Kolmer, Marek; Engelund, Mads; Kawai, Hiroyo; Zuzak, Rafal; Garcia-Lekue, Aran; Saeys, Mark; Echavarren, Antonio M; Joachim, Christian; Sanchez-Portal, Daniel; Szymonski, Marek

    2016-02-01

    Controlling the strength of the coupling between organic molecules and single atoms provides a powerful tool for tuning electronic properties of single-molecule devices. Here, using scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy (STM/STS) supported by theoretical modeling, we study the interaction of a planar organic molecule (trinaphthylene) with a hydrogen-passivated Ge(001):H substrate and a single dangling bond quantum dot on that surface. The electronic structure of the molecule adsorbed on the hydrogen-passivated surface is similar to the gas phase structure and the measurements show that HOMO and LUMO states contribute to the STM filled and empty state images, respectively. Furthermore, we show that the electronic properties are not significantly affected when the molecule is attached to the single dangling bond, which is in contrast with the strong interaction of the molecule with a dangling bond dimer. Our results show that the dangling bond quantum dots could stabilize organic molecules on a hydrogenated semiconductor without affecting their originally designed gas phase electronic properties. Together with the ability to laterally manipulate the molecules on the surface, this will be advantageous in the construction of single-molecule devices, where the coupling and positioning of the molecules on the substrate could be tuned by a proper design of the surface quantum dot arrays, comprising both single and dimerized dangling bonds. PMID:26766161

  9. 24% Indigenously Prepared Ethylene Diamine Tetra Acetic Acid Compared to Self-Etching Adhesives and their Effect on Shear Bond Strength of Composites in Primary Teeth: An In-vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Nagar, Priya; Tandil, Yogesh L.; T.P., Chandru; Gupta, Anamika; Kalaria, Devendra; Kumar, Prafful

    2015-01-01

    Background: Over the years, it has been known that 34% phosphoric acid is the benchmark in etchants with the best shear bond strength shown with composites in primary teeth. However, with latest technological advancements and innovations, in order to reduce the number of steps and less damage to the tooth structure, non-rinse conditioner (NRC) & Single-Etch and various other etchants have been tried and tested. These etchants have been found to have shear bond strength comparable to phosphoric acid. In this study, indigenously prepared 24% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) has been compared with established etchants, as to prove if their shear bond strength was closely related. As it is a well-known fact that EDTA could be less damaging to the enamel during etching and hence can be an alternative for etching of primary teeth. Materials and Methods: For the study 60 caries-free primary molars were used, they were sectioned in the middle, after making area for bonding; the marked area was then etched using different etchants for 30 s. Each of the teeth was then rinsed and bonded with composite resin and thermocycling was done. Shear bond strength testing was done on the composite using Universal Testing Machine. Results: Results of the study showed that phosphoric acid showed the highest bond strength, closely followed by Single Etch (Adper Prompt) and NRC, then by EDTA. Conclusions: About 24% EDTA can be another comparable replacement for phosphoric acid if used with a Single Etch Primer, like Prime and Bond NT on primary teeth. 34% phosphoric acid has the highest bond strength values with composite resin. Single etch followed by NRC has the second and third highest bond strength values, which are comparable to phosphoric acid. PMID:26464540

  10. Shear Bond Strengths of Methacrylate- and Silorane-based Composite Resins to Feldspathic Porcelain using Different Adhesive Systems.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Narmin; Shakur Shahabi, Maryam; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Pournagi Azar, Fatemeh; Ebrahimi Chaharom, Mohammad Esmaeel

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Use of porcelain as inlays, laminates and metal-ceramic and all-ceramic crowns is common in modern dentistry. The high cost of ceramic restorations, time limitations and difficulty of removing these restorations result in delays in replacing fractured restorations; therefore, their repair is indicated. The aim of the present study was to compare the shear bond strengths of two types of composite resins (methacrylate-based and silorane-based) to porcelain, using three adhesive types. Materials and methods. A total of 156 samples of feldspathic porcelain surfaces were prepared with air-abrasion and randomly divided into 6 groups (n=26). In groups 1-3, Z250 composite resin was used to repair porcelain samples with Ad-per Single Bond 2 (ASB), Clearfil SE Bond (CSB) and Silorane Adhesive (SA) as the bonding systems, afterapplication of silane, respectively. In groups 4-6, the same adhesives were used in the same manner with Filtek Silorane composite resin. Finally, the shear bond strengths of the samples were measured. Two-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests were used to compare bond strengths between the groups with different adhesives at P<0.05. Results. There were significant differences in the mean bond strength values in terms of the adhesive type (P<0.001). In addition, the interactive effect of the adhesive type and composite resin type had no significant effect on bond strength (P=0.602). Conclusion. The results of the present study showed the highest repair bond strength values to porcelain with both composite resin types with the application of SA and ASB. PMID:26697151

  11. Shear Bond Strengths of Methacrylate- and Silorane-based Composite Resins to Feldspathic Porcelain using Different Adhesive Systems

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Narmin; Shakur Shahabi, Maryam; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Pournagi Azar, Fatemeh; Ebrahimi Chaharom, Mohammad Esmaeel

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Use of porcelain as inlays, laminates and metal-ceramic and all-ceramic crowns is common in modern dentistry. The high cost of ceramic restorations, time limitations and difficulty of removing these restorations result in delays in replacing fractured restorations; therefore, their repair is indicated. The aim of the present study was to compare the shear bond strengths of two types of composite resins (methacrylate-based and silorane-based) to porcelain, using three adhesive types. Materials and methods. A total of 156 samples of feldspathic porcelain surfaces were prepared with air-abrasion and randomly divided into 6 groups (n=26). In groups 1-3, Z250 composite resin was used to repair porcelain samples with Ad-per Single Bond 2 (ASB), Clearfil SE Bond (CSB) and Silorane Adhesive (SA) as the bonding systems, afterapplication of silane, respectively. In groups 4-6, the same adhesives were used in the same manner with Filtek Silorane composite resin. Finally, the shear bond strengths of the samples were measured. Two-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests were used to compare bond strengths between the groups with different adhesives at P<0.05. Results. There were significant differences in the mean bond strength values in terms of the adhesive type (P<0.001). In addition, the interactive effect of the adhesive type and composite resin type had no significant effect on bond strength (P=0.602). Conclusion. The results of the present study showed the highest repair bond strength values to porcelain with both composite resin types with the application of SA and ASB. PMID:26697151

  12. 31 CFR 363.165 - What happens when I convert a savings bond that is registered in my name as a single owner...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... unmatured savings bond that is registered in the name of the TreasuryDirect ® account owner as a single... bond that is registered in my name as a single owner, either coowner, an owner with a beneficiary, or... GOVERNING SECURITIES HELD IN TREASURYDIRECT Conversion of a Definitive Savings Bond § 363.165 What...

  13. 31 CFR 363.165 - What happens when I convert a savings bond that is registered in my name as a single owner...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... unmatured savings bond that is registered in the name of the TreasuryDirect® account owner as a single owner... bond that is registered in my name as a single owner, either coowner, an owner with a beneficiary, or... GOVERNING SECURITIES HELD IN TREASURYDIRECT Conversion of a Definitive Savings Bond § 363.165 What...

  14. 31 CFR 363.165 - What happens when I convert a savings bond that is registered in my name as a single owner...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... unmatured savings bond that is registered in the name of the TreasuryDirect ® account owner as a single... bond that is registered in my name as a single owner, either coowner, an owner with a beneficiary, or... GOVERNING SECURITIES HELD IN TREASURYDIRECT Conversion of a Definitive Savings Bond § 363.165 What...

  15. 31 CFR 363.165 - What happens when I convert a savings bond that is registered in my name as a single owner...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... unmatured savings bond that is registered in the name of the TreasuryDirect® account owner as a single owner... bond that is registered in my name as a single owner, either coowner, an owner with a beneficiary, or... GOVERNING SECURITIES HELD IN TREASURYDIRECT Conversion of a Definitive Savings Bond § 363.165 What...

  16. 31 CFR 363.165 - What happens when I convert a savings bond that is registered in my name as a single owner...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... unmatured savings bond that is registered in the name of the TreasuryDirect® account owner as a single owner... bond that is registered in my name as a single owner, either coowner, an owner with a beneficiary, or... GOVERNING SECURITIES HELD IN TREASURYDIRECT Conversion of a Definitive Savings Bond § 363.165 What...

  17. Studying Molecular Interactions at the Single Bond Level with a Laminar Flow Chamber.

    PubMed

    Pierres, Anne; Benoliel, Anne-Marie; Bongrand, Pierre

    2008-12-01

    During the last decade, many investigators developed new methodologies allowing to study ligand-receptor interactions with unprecedented accuracy, up to the single bond level. Reported results include information on bond mechanical properties, association behaviour of surface-attached molecules, and dissection of energy landscapes and reaction pathways. The purpose of the present review is to discuss the potential and limitations of laminar flow chambers operated at low shear rates. This includes a brief review of basic principles, practical tips and problems associated with data interpretation. It is concluded that flow chambers are ideally suited to analyze weak interactions between a number of biomolecules, including the main families of adhesion receptors such as selectins, integrins, cadherins and members of the immunoglobulin superfamily. The sensitivity of the method is limited by the quality of surfaces and efficiency of the studied ligand-receptor couple rather than the hardware. Analyzing interactions with a resolution of a piconewton and a few milliseconds shows that ligand-receptor complexes may experience a number of intermediate binding states, making it necessary to examine the definition of association and dissociation rates. Finally, it is emphasized that association rates measured on surface-bound molecules are highly dependent on parameters unrelated to binding surfaces. PMID:21151952

  18. Root filling bond strength using reciprocating file-matched single-cones with different sealers.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Carla Cristina Camilo; Brito-Júnior, Manoel; Faria-E-Silva, André Luís; Pereira, Rodrigo Dantas; Silva-Sousa, Yara Terezinha; Cruz-Filho, Antônio Miranda; Sousa-Neto, Manoel Damião

    2016-05-20

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the bond strength (BS) of root canal fillings to root dentin using the reciprocating file-matched single-cone or lateral compaction techniques with resin-based and calcium-silicate-based sealers. Maxillary canine roots were prepared and filled using one of the following approaches: Reciproc R40 file and R40 single cone, WaveOne Large file and Large single cone, or ProTaper up to F4 file with lateral compaction. The root filling was performed using AH Plus, Epiphany SE or MTA Fillapex (n = 10). Three 1-mm-thick slices were obtained from each third of each root. Two slices were subjected to a push-out test, and the other slices were prepared for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to examine the dentin-sealer interface. Data (in MPa) from the push-out tests were analyzed using a two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p < 0.05). Failure modes (adhesive, cohesive or mixed) were evaluated at ×25 magnification. The single-cone techniques resulted in lower BS values than the lateral compaction technique. For lateral compaction, AH Plus and Epiphany SE showed the highest and lowest BS values, respectively. Slight differences were observed between sealers when the single-cone techniques were used. A tendency to reduce the BS toward the apical third was observed. Adhesive failures were predominant for all experimental conditions. A closer adaption of the filling material on the root dentin was observed for the AH Plus and lateral compaction techniques. The Reciproc and WaveOne techniques were associated with lower BS values than the lateral compaction technique. However, the effect of the root canal filling technique appears to be sealer-dependent. PMID:27223126

  19. Formation of a dinuclear copper(II) complex through the cleavage of CN bond of 1-benzoyl-3-(pyridin-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole

    SciTech Connect

    Shardin, Rosidah; Pui, Law Kung; Yamin, Bohari M.; Kassim, Mohammad B.

    2014-09-03

    A simple mononuclear octahedral copper(II) complex was attempted from the reaction of three moles of 1-benzoyl-3-(pyridin-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole and one mole of copper(II) perchlorate hexahydrate in methanol. However, the product of the reaction was confirmed to be a dinuclear copper(II) complex with μ-(3-(pyridin-2-yl)-pyrazolato) and 3-(pyridin-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole ligands attached to each of the Cu(II) centre atom. The copper(II) ion assisted the cleavage of the C{sub benzoyl}N bond afforded a 3-(pyridin-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole molecule. Deprotonation of the 3-(pyridin-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole gave a 3-(pyridin-2-yl)-pyrazolato, which subsequently reacted with the Cu(II) ion to give the (3-(pyridin-2-yl)-pyrazolato)(3-(pyridin-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole)Cu(II) product moiety. The structure of the dinuclear complex was confirmed by x-ray crystallography. The complex crystallized in a monoclinic crystal system with P2(1)/n space group and cell dimensions of a = 12.2029(8) Å, b = 11.4010(7) Å, c = 14.4052(9) Å and β = 102.414(2)°. The compound was further characterized by mass spectrometry, CHN elemental analysis, infrared and UV-visible spectroscopy and the results concurred with the x-ray structure. The presence of d-d transition at 671 nm (ε = 116 dm{sup 3} mol{sup −1} cm{sup −1}) supports the presence of Cu(II) centres.

  20. Kinetics of pulpal temperature rise during light curing of 6 bonding agents from different generations, using light emitting diode and quartz-tungsten-halogen units: An in-vitro simulation

    PubMed Central

    Khaksaran, Najmeh Khatoon; Kashi, Tahereh Jafarzadeh; Rakhshan, Vahid; Zeynolabedin, Zahra Sadat; Bagheri, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Background: Application of bonding agents (BA) into deep cavities and light curing them might increase pulpal temperature and threaten its health. The purpose of this study was to evaluate temperature rise of pulp by light curing six BA using two different light curing units (LCU), through a dent in wall of 0.5 mm. Materials and Methods: This in vitro experiment was carried out on 96 slices of the same number of human third molars (6 BAs × 2 LCUs × 8 specimens in each group). There were 6 groups of BAs: N Bond, G-Bond, OptiBond XTR, Clearfil SE, Adper Single Bond 2 and V Bond. Each group of BA (n = 16) had two subgroups of light emitting diode (LED) and quartz-tungsten-halogen light cure units (n = 8). Each of these 16 specimens were subjected to light emitting for 20 s, once without any BAs (control) and later when a BA was applied to surface of disk. Temperature rises in 140 s were evaluated. Their mean temperature change in first 20 s were calculated and analyzed using two-way repeated-measures and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey (α = 0.05). Furthermore rate of temperature increase was calculated for each material and LCU. Results: Minimum and maximum temperature rises in all subgroups were 1.7 and 2.8°C, respectively. Repeated measures ANOVA showed that both of adhesive and LCU types had significant effect on temperature rise after application of adhesives. Tukey post-hoc analysis showed Clearfil SE showed significantly higher temperature rise in comparison with Adper Single bond 2 (P = 0.047) and N Bond (P = 0.038). Temperature rose in a linear fashion during first 30-40 s and after that it was non-linear. Conclusion: 20 s of light curing seems safe for pulpal health (with critical threshold of 5.5°C). However, in longer durations and especially when using LED units, the process should be broken to two sessions. PMID:25878684

  1. Modeling Progressive Failure of Bonded Joints Using a Single Joint Finite Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stapleton, Scott E.; Waas, Anthony M.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.

    2010-01-01

    Enhanced finite elements are elements with an embedded analytical solution which can capture detailed local fields, enabling more efficient, mesh-independent finite element analysis. In the present study, an enhanced finite element is applied to generate a general framework capable of modeling an array of joint types. The joint field equations are derived using the principle of minimum potential energy, and the resulting solutions for the displacement fields are used to generate shape functions and a stiffness matrix for a single joint finite element. This single finite element thus captures the detailed stress and strain fields within the bonded joint, but it can function within a broader structural finite element model. The costs associated with a fine mesh of the joint can thus be avoided while still obtaining a detailed solution for the joint. Additionally, the capability to model non-linear adhesive constitutive behavior has been included within the method, and progressive failure of the adhesive can be modeled by using a strain-based failure criteria and re-sizing the joint as the adhesive fails. Results of the model compare favorably with experimental and finite element results.

  2. Effects of bonding type and interface geometry on coherent transport through the single-molecule magnet Mn12

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Kyungwha; Barraza-Lopez, Salvador; García-Suárez, Víctor M.; Ferrer, Jaime

    2010-03-01

    We examine theoretically coherent electron transport through the single-molecule magnet Mn12 , bridged between Au(111) electrodes, using the nonequilibrium Green’s function method and the density-functional theory. We analyze the effects of bonding type, molecular orientation, and geometry relaxation on the electronic properties and charge and spin transport across the single-molecule junction. We consider nine interface geometries leading to five bonding mechanisms and two molecular orientations: (i) Au-C bonding, (ii) Au-Au bonding, (iii) Au-S bonding, (iv) Au-H bonding, and (v) physisorption via van der Waals forces. The two molecular orientations of Mn12 correspond to the magnetic easy axis of the molecule aligned perpendicular [hereafter denoted as orientation (1)] or parallel [orientation (2)] to the direction of electron transport. We find that the electron transport is carried by the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital (LUMO) level in all the cases that we have simulated. Relaxation of the junction geometries mainly shifts the relevant occupied molecular levels toward the Fermi energy as well as slightly reduces the broadening of the LUMO level. As a result, the current slightly decreases at low bias voltage. Our calculations also show that placing the molecule in the orientation (1) broadens the LUMO level much more than in the orientation (2) due to the internal structure of the Mn12 . Consequently, junctions with the former orientation yield a higher current than those with the latter. Among all of the bonding types considered, the Au-C bonding gives rise to the highest current (about one order of magnitude higher than the Au-S bonding), for a given distance between the electrodes. The current through the junction with other bonding types decreases in the order of Au-Au, Au-S, and Au-H. Importantly, the spin-filtering effect in all the nine geometries stays robust and their ratios of the majority-spin to the minority-spin transmission coefficients are

  3. Creating a single twin boundary between two CdTe (111) wafers with controlled rotation angle by wafer bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Ce; Lu, Ning; Wang, Jinguo; Lee, Jihyung; Peng, Xin; Kim, Moon J.; Klie, Robert F.

    2013-12-16

    The single twin boundary with crystallographic orientation relationship (1{sup ¯}1{sup ¯}1{sup ¯})//(111) [01{sup ¯}1]//[011{sup ¯}] was created by wafer bonding. Electron diffraction patterns and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy images demonstrated the well control of the rotation angle between the bonded pair. At the twin boundary, one unit of wurtzite structure was found between two zinc-blende matrices. High-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy images showed Cd- and Te-terminated for the two bonded portions, respectively. The I-V curve across the twin boundary showed increasingly nonlinear behavior, indicating a potential barrier at the bonded twin boundary.

  4. Visual Identification of Light-Driven Breakage of the Silver-Dithiocarbamate Bond by Single Plasmonic Nanoprobes

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Peng Fei; Yuan, Bin Fang; Gao, Ming Xuan; Li, Rong Sheng; Ma, Jun; Zou, Hong Yan; Li, Yuan Fang; Li, Ming; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Insight into the nature of metal-sulfur bond, a meaningful one in life science, interface chemistry and organometallic chemistry, is interesting but challenging. By utilizing the localized surface plasmon resonance properties of silver nanoparticles, herein we visually identified the photosensitivity of silver-dithiocarbamate (Ag-DTC) bond by using dark field microscopic imaging (iDFM) technique at single nanoparticle level. It was found that the breakage of Ag-DTC bond could be accelerated effectively by light irradiation, followed by a pH-dependent horizontal or vertical degradation of the DTC molecules, in which an indispensable preoxidation process of the silver was at first disclosed. These findings suggest a visualization strategy at single plasmonic nanoparticle level which can be excellently applied to explore new stimulus-triggered reactions, and might also open a new way to understand traditional organic reaction mechanisms. PMID:26493773

  5. Visual Identification of Light-Driven Breakage of the Silver-Dithiocarbamate Bond by Single Plasmonic Nanoprobes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Peng Fei; Yuan, Bin Fang; Gao, Ming Xuan; Li, Rong Sheng; Ma, Jun; Zou, Hong Yan; Li, Yuan Fang; Li, Ming; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2015-10-01

    Insight into the nature of metal-sulfur bond, a meaningful one in life science, interface chemistry and organometallic chemistry, is interesting but challenging. By utilizing the localized surface plasmon resonance properties of silver nanoparticles, herein we visually identified the photosensitivity of silver-dithiocarbamate (Ag-DTC) bond by using dark field microscopic imaging (iDFM) technique at single nanoparticle level. It was found that the breakage of Ag-DTC bond could be accelerated effectively by light irradiation, followed by a pH-dependent horizontal or vertical degradation of the DTC molecules, in which an indispensable preoxidation process of the silver was at first disclosed. These findings suggest a visualization strategy at single plasmonic nanoparticle level which can be excellently applied to explore new stimulus-triggered reactions, and might also open a new way to understand traditional organic reaction mechanisms.

  6. Visual Identification of Light-Driven Breakage of the Silver-Dithiocarbamate Bond by Single Plasmonic Nanoprobes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Peng Fei; Yuan, Bin Fang; Gao, Ming Xuan; Li, Rong Sheng; Ma, Jun; Zou, Hong Yan; Li, Yuan Fang; Li, Ming; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Insight into the nature of metal-sulfur bond, a meaningful one in life science, interface chemistry and organometallic chemistry, is interesting but challenging. By utilizing the localized surface plasmon resonance properties of silver nanoparticles, herein we visually identified the photosensitivity of silver-dithiocarbamate (Ag-DTC) bond by using dark field microscopic imaging (iDFM) technique at single nanoparticle level. It was found that the breakage of Ag-DTC bond could be accelerated effectively by light irradiation, followed by a pH-dependent horizontal or vertical degradation of the DTC molecules, in which an indispensable preoxidation process of the silver was at first disclosed. These findings suggest a visualization strategy at single plasmonic nanoparticle level which can be excellently applied to explore new stimulus-triggered reactions, and might also open a new way to understand traditional organic reaction mechanisms. PMID:26493773

  7. Acceptorless dehydrogenation of C-C single bonds adjacent to functional groups by metal-ligand cooperation.

    PubMed

    Kusumoto, Shuhei; Akiyama, Midori; Nozaki, Kyoko

    2013-12-18

    Unprecedented direct acceptorless dehydrogenation of C-C single bonds adjacent to functional groups to form α,β-unsaturated compounds has been accomplished by using a new class of group 9 metal complexes. Metal-ligand cooperation operated by the hydroxycyclopentadienyl ligand was proposed to play a major role in the catalytic transformation. PMID:24299029

  8. Influence of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate application, smear layer removal, and storage time on resin-dentin bonding.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jun; Zheng, Wei-ying; Liu, Peng-ruo-feng; Zhang, Ning; Lin, Hui-ping; Fan, Yi-jing; Gu, Xin-hua; Vollrath, Oliver; Mehl, Christian

    2014-07-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the influence of Tooth Mousse (TM) application, smear layer removal, and storage time on resin-dentin microtensile bond strength (µTBS). Dentin specimens were divided into two groups: (1) smear layer covered; (2) smear layer removed using 15% EDTA for 90 s. In each group, half the specimens were treated once with TM for 60 min. After bonding procedures using a two-step self-etching adhesive (Clearfil SE Bond (CSE); Kuraray Medical, Tokyo, Japan), an all-in-one adhesive (G-Bond (GB); GC Corp, Tokyo, Japan), and a total-etch adhesive (Adper Single Bond 2 (SB); 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA), the specimens were stored for 3 d or 6 months in deionized water at 37 °C, and µTBS was tested and analyzed. With the exception of SB (no TM application) and GB, the μTBS was significantly increased for CSE and SB using EDTA pre-conditioning and 3 d of storage (P≤0.001). Bond strength of GB decreased significantly when using EDTA (3 d storage, P<0.05). TM application only increased the μTBS of GB (no EDTA) and SB (with EDTA) after 3 d (P≤0.02). Comparing the adhesives after 3 d of storage, CSE exhibited the greatest μTBS values followed by GB and SB (P≤0.02). The factors of adhesive, EDTA, and TM did not show any significant impact on μTBS when specimens were stored for 6 months (P>0.05). The additional application of TM and EDTA for cavity preparation seems only to have a short-term effect, and no influence on µTBS of dentin bonds after a period of 6 months. PMID:25001224

  9. Influence of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate application, smear layer removal, and storage time on resin-dentin bonding*

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jun; Zheng, Wei-ying; Liu, Peng-ruo-feng; Zhang, Ning; Lin, Hui-ping; Fan, Yi-jing; Gu, Xin-hua; Vollrath, Oliver; Mehl, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the influence of Tooth Mousse (TM) application, smear layer removal, and storage time on resin-dentin microtensile bond strength (μTBS). Dentin specimens were divided into two groups: (1) smear layer covered; (2) smear layer removed using 15% EDTA for 90 s. In each group, half the specimens were treated once with TM for 60 min. After bonding procedures using a two-step self-etching adhesive (Clearfil SE Bond (CSE); Kuraray Medical, Tokyo, Japan), an all-in-one adhesive (G-Bond (GB); GC Corp, Tokyo, Japan), and a total-etch adhesive (Adper Single Bond 2 (SB); 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA), the specimens were stored for 3 d or 6 months in deionized water at 37 °C, and μTBS was tested and analyzed. With the exception of SB (no TM application) and GB, the μTBS was significantly increased for CSE and SB using EDTA pre-conditioning and 3 d of storage (P≤0.001). Bond strength of GB decreased significantly when using EDTA (3 d storage, P<0.05). TM application only increased the μTBS of GB (no EDTA) and SB (with EDTA) after 3 d (P≤0.02). Comparing the adhesives after 3 d of storage, CSE exhibited the greatest μTBS values followed by GB and SB (P≤0.02). The factors of adhesive, EDTA, and TM did not show any significant impact on μTBS when specimens were stored for 6 months (P>0.05). The additional application of TM and EDTA for cavity preparation seems only to have a short-term effect, and no influence on μTBS of dentin bonds after a period of 6 months. PMID:25001224

  10. Synthesis and photophysical properties of a single bond linked tetracene dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Tingting; Shen, Li; Liu, Heyuan; Sun, Xuan; Li, Xiyou

    2016-07-01

    A tetracene dimer linked directly by a single bond has been successfully prepared by using electron withdrawing groups to improve the stability. The molecular structure of this dimer is characterized by 1H NMR, MALDI-TOF mass spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. The minimized molecular structure and X-ray crystallography reveal that the tetracene subunits of this dimer adopt an orthogonal configuration. Its absorption spectrum differs significantly from that of its monomeric counterpart, suggesting the presence of strong interactions between the two tetracene subunits. The excited state of this dimer is delocalized on both two tetracene subunits, which is significantly different from that of orthogonal anthracene dimers, but similar with that observed for orthogonal pentacene dimer. Most of the excited states of this dimer decay by radioactive channels, which is different from the localized twisted charge transfer state (LTCT) channel of anthracene dimers and the singlet fission (SF) channel of pentacene dimers. The results of this research suggest that similar orthogonal configurations caused different propertied for acene dimers with different conjugation length.

  11. Direct Measurements of the Mechanical Stability of Zinc-Thiolate Bonds in Rubredoxin by Single-Molecule Atomic Force Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Peng; Li, Hongbin

    2011-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) is one of the most abundant metals and is essential for life. Through ligand interactions, often with thiolate from cysteine residues in proteins, Zn can play important structural roles in organizing protein structure and augmenting protein folding and stability. However, it is difficult to separate the contributions of Zn-ligand interactions from those originating from intrinsic protein folding in experimental studies of Zn-containing metalloproteins, which makes the study of Zn-ligand interactions in proteins challenging. Here, we used single-molecule force spectroscopy to directly measure the mechanical rupture force of the Zn-thiolate bond in Zn-rubredoxin. Our results show that considerable force is needed to rupture Zn-thiolate bonds (∼170 pN, which is significantly higher than the force necessary to rupture the coordination bond between Zn and histidines). To our knowledge, our study not only provides new information about Zn-thiolate bonds in rubredoxin, it also opens a new avenue for studying metal-ligand bonds in proteins using single-molecule force spectroscopy. PMID:21943428

  12. Can green tea be used to reverse compromised bond strength after bleaching?

    PubMed

    Berger, Sandrine B; De Souza Carreira, Renata P; Guiraldo, Ricardo D; Lopes, Murilo B; Pavan, Sabrina; Giannini, Marcelo; Bedran-Russo, Ana K

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the antioxidant effect of green tea on microtensile bond strength (μTBS) to bleached enamel. Forty-two human third molars were randomly divided into six experimental groups (n = 7 each group): group 1, no treatment; group 2, bleaching (10% carbamide peroxide); group 3, bleaching + 10% sodium ascorbate gel (SA); group 4, bleaching + 10% green tea gel (GT); group 5, SA; and group 6, GT. In groups 2, 3, and 4, bleach was applied onto the enamel surface for 6 h, every day for 14 d. In groups 3 and 5, SA was applied for 1 h; and in groups 4 and 6, GT was applied for 1 h. Immediately after treatment, the specimens were bonded with Adper Single Bond 2 and Filtek Z350 XT. The μTBS of the specimens was tested using a universal testing machine. Fracture mode analysis of the bonded enamel surface was performed using scanning electron microscopy. The mean μTBS values for each group were: group 1, 33.2 ± 5.8 MPa; group 2, 22.6 ± 5.5 MPa; group 3, 30.0 ± 5.2 MPa; group 4, 31.6 ± 3.8 MPa; group 5, 29.1 ± 4.2 MPa; and group 6, 32.2 ± 4.5 MPa. All groups had a higher percentage of mixed failures. In conclusion, green tea can be used as an alternative antioxidant on bleached enamel before bonding procedures. PMID:23841791

  13. Effect of Adhesive Cementation Strategies on the Bonding of Y-TZP to Human Dentin.

    PubMed

    Alves, Mll; Campos, F; Bergoli, C D; Bottino, M A; Özcan, M; Souza, Roa

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of different adhesive strategies on the adhesion of zirconia to dentin using conventional and self-adhesive cements and their corresponding adhesive resins. The occlusal parts of human molars (N=80) were sectioned, exposing the dentin. The teeth and zirconia cylinders (N=80) (diameter=3.4 mm; height=4 mm) were randomly divided into eight groups according to the factors "surface conditioning" and "cement type" (n=10 per group). One conventional cement (CC: RelyX ARC, 3M ESPE) and one self-adhesive cement (SA: RelyX U200, 3M ESPE) and their corresponding adhesive resin (for CC, Adper Single Bond Plus; for SA, Scotchbond Universal Adhesive-SU) were applied on dentin. Zirconia specimens were conditioned either using chairside (CJ: CoJet, 30 μm, 2.5 bar, four seconds), laboratory silica coating (RC: Rocatec, 110 μm, 2.5 bar, four seconds), or universal primer (Single Bond Universal-UP). Nonconditioned groups for both cements acted as the control (C). Specimens were stored in water (37°C, 30 days) and subjected to shear bond strength (SBS) testing (1 mm/min). Data (MPa) were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance and a Tukey test (α=0.05). While surface conditioning significantly affected the SBS values (p=0.0001) (Cbond strength of zirconia to dentin compared to the control group, regardless of the type of resin cement used. PMID:26509232

  14. Global-Local Finite Element Analysis of Bonded Single-Lap Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilic, Bahattin; Madenci, Erdogan; Ambur, Damodar R.

    2004-01-01

    Adhesively bonded lap joints involve dissimilar material junctions and sharp changes in geometry, possibly leading to premature failure. Although the finite element method is well suited to model the bonded lap joints, traditional finite elements are incapable of correctly resolving the stress state at junctions of dissimilar materials because of the unbounded nature of the stresses. In order to facilitate the use of bonded lap joints in future structures, this study presents a finite element technique utilizing a global (special) element coupled with traditional elements. The global element includes the singular behavior at the junction of dissimilar materials with or without traction-free surfaces.

  15. Singly Bonded Monoadduct rather than Methanofullerene: Manipulating the Addition Pattern of Trimetallic Nitride Clusterfullerene through One Endohedral Metal Atom Substitution.

    PubMed

    Wang, Song; Huang, Jing; Gao, Congli; Jin, Fei; Li, Qunxiang; Xie, Suyuan; Yang, Shangfeng

    2016-06-01

    Bingel-Hirsch reactions of trimetallic nitride clusterfullerenes (NCFs) generally yield methanofullerene (cyclopropane) adducts instead of singly bonded derivatives, which have been reported for monometallofullerenes. Herein, we report the synthesis and characterization of the Bingel-Hirsch derivative of a mixed metal nitride clusterfullerene (MMNCF) TiY2 N@Ih -C80 . Surprisingly, in contrast to the reported Bingel-Hirsch cyclopropane adducts of the analogous NCF Y3 N@Ih -C80 , the Bingel-Hirsch derivative of TiY2 N@Ih -C80 is the first singly bonded monoadduct (labeled as TiY2 N@C80 -Mono) to be reported, which was determined unambiguously by single-crystal X-ray crystallography. Besides, the reactivity of TiY2 N@Ih -C80 was found to be significantly improved relative to that of Y3 N@Ih -C80 . Upon substituting one endohedral yttrium (Y) atom of Y3 N@Ih -C80 with titanium (Ti), the Bingel-Hirsch derivative changes from the cyclopropane to the singly bonded monoadduct, revealing that not only the reactivity but also the addition pattern of NCFs can be manipulated simultaneously through one endohedral metal atom substitution. PMID:27115985

  16. Effect of a functional monomer (MDP) on the enamel bond durability of single-step self-etch adhesives.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Kenji; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Barkmeier, Wayne W; Tsubota, Keishi; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Berry, Thomas P; Erickson, Robert L; Latta, Mark A; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2016-02-01

    The present study aimed to determine the effect of the functional monomer, 10-methacryloxydecyl dihydrogen phosphate (MDP), on the enamel bond durability of single-step self-etch adhesives through integrating fatigue testing and long-term water storage. An MDP-containing self-etch adhesive, Clearfil Bond SE ONE (SE), and an experimental adhesive, MDP-free (MF), which comprised the same ingredients as SE apart from MDP, were used. Shear bond strength (SBS) and shear fatigue strength (SFS) were measured with or without phosphoric acid pre-etching. The specimens were stored in distilled water for 24 h, 6 months, or 1 yr. Although similar SBS and SFS values were obtained for SE with pre-etching and for MF after 24 h of storage in distilled water, SE with pre-etching showed higher SBS and SFS values than MF after storage in water for 6 months or 1 yr. Regardless of the pre-etching procedure, SE showed higher SBS and SFS values after 6 months of storage in distilled water than after 24 h or 1 yr. To conclude, MDP might play an important role in enhancing not only bond strength but also bond durability with respect to repeated subcritical loading after long-term water storage. PMID:26620762

  17. The effect of hydrogen bonds on diffusion mechanism of water inside single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qu; Wang, Qi; Liu, Ying-Chun; Wu, Tao

    2014-06-01

    Nanopores can serve as a molecule channel for transport of fluid, where water diffusion differs remarkably from that of simple particles. Hydrogen bonds play an essential role in the diffusion anomaly. Detailed investigations are carried out on the systems of rigid (6, 6), (7, 7), (8, 8), (9, 9), and (10, 10) armchair carbon nanotubes, solvated with Lennard-Jones water fluids. The role of hydrogen bonds is examined by diffusivity statistics and animation snapshots. It is found that in small (6,6) CNT, hydrogen bonds tend to aggregate water into a wire and lead to rapid collective drift. Confinement can stabilize the hydrogen bond of water molecules and enhance its lifetime. In relatively smaller CNTs, the diffusion mechanism could be altered by the temperature. Moreover, in larger nanotubes hydrogen bonding network allows the water to form regional concentrated clusters. This allows water fluid in extremely low density exhibit rather slow self-diffusion motion. This fundamental study attempts to provide insights in understanding nanoscale delivery system in aqueous solution.

  18. Casein Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate and Shear Bond Strength of Adhesives to Primary Teeth Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Farokh Gisovar, Elham; Hedayati, Nassim; Shadman, Niloofar; Shafiee, Leila

    2015-01-01

    Background: CPP-ACP (Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate) has an important role in caries prevention in pediatric patients. This study was done, because of the great use of CPP-ACP and the need for restoration for teeth treated with CPP-ACP as well as the importance of shear bond strength of adhesives in the success of restorations. Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the effect of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) on shear bond strength of dental adhesives to enamel of primary teeth molars. Materials and Methods: This in vitro study was conducted on 180 extracted primary molars. They were randomly divided into 6 groups and each group was divided into 2 subgroups (treated with CPP-ACP and untreated). In subgroups with CPP-ACP, enamel was treated with CPP-ACP paste 1 h/d for 5 days. Types of adhesives that were evaluated in this study were Tetric N-Bond, AdheSE, AdheSE One F, single Bond 2, SE Bond, and Adper Prompt L-Pop. Shear bond strength was tested with a universal testing machine and mode of failure was evaluated under stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed by T test, 2-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), Tukey and Fisher exact test using SPSS18. P < 0.05 was considered as significance level. Results: Shear bond strengths of different adhesive systems to enamel of primary teeth treated and untreated with CPP-ACP showed no significant difference (P > 0.05). Mode of failure in all groups regardless of CPP-ACP administration was mainly adhesive type. Our results indicated that CPP-ACP did not affect shear bond strength of studied adhesives to primary teeth enamel. Conclusions: To have a successful and durable composite restoration, having a high strength bonding is essential. Considering the wide use of CPP-ACP in preventing tooth decay and the role of adhesive shear bond strength (SBS) in success of composite restoration, we conducted the present study to evaluate the effect of CPP-ACP on the SBS of adhesives to primary teeth

  19. Accurate Bond Energies of Hydrocarbons from Complete Basis Set Extrapolated Multi-Reference Singles and Doubles Configuration Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Oyeyemi, Victor B.; Pavone, Michele; Carter, Emily A.

    2011-11-03

    Quantum chemistry has become one of the most reliable tools for characterizing the thermochemical underpinnings of reactions, such as bond dissociation energies (BDEs). The accurate prediction of these particular properties (BDEs) are challenging for ab initio methods based on perturbative corrections or coupled cluster expansions of the single-determinant Hartree-Fock wave function: the processes of bond breaking and forming are inherently multi-configurational and require an accurate description of non-dynamical electron correlation. To this end, we present a systematic ab initio approach for computing BDEs that is based on three components: (1) multi-reference single and double excitation configuration interaction (MRSDCI) for the electronic energies; (2) a two-parameter scheme for extrapolating MRSDCI energies to the complete basis set limit; and (3) DFT-B3LYP calculations of minimumenergy structures and vibrational frequencies to account for zero point energy and thermal corrections. We validated our methodology against a set of reliable experimental BDE values of C*C and C*H bonds of hydrocarbons. The goal of chemical accuracy is achieved, on average, without applying any empirical corrections to the MRSDCI electronic energies. We then use this composite scheme to make predictions of BDEs in a large number of hydrocarbon molecules for which there are no experimental data, so as to provide needed thermochemical estimates for fuel molecules.

  20. Effect of Pre-heating on Microtensile Bond Strength of Composite Resin to Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Davari, Abdolrahim; Daneshkazemi, Alireza; Behniafar, Behnaz; Sheshmani, Mahsan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Direct composite resin restorations are widely used and the impact of different storage temperatures on composites is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the microtensile bond strength of composite to dentin after different pre-curing temperatures. Materials and Methods: Occlusal surfaces of 44 human molars were ground with diamond burs under water coolant and polished with 600 grit silicon carbide papers to obtain flat dentin surfaces. The dentin was etched with 37% phosphoric acid and bonded with Adper Single Bond 2 according to the manufacturer's instructions. The specimens were randomly divided into two groups (n=22) according to the composite resin applied: FiltekP60 and Filtek Z250. Each group included three subgroups of composite resin pre-curing temperatures (4°C, 23°C and 37°C). Composite resins were applied to the dentin surfaces in a plastic mold (8mm in diameter and 4mm in length) incrementally and cured. Twenty-two composite-to-dentin hour-glass sticks with one mm2 cross-sectional area per group were prepared. Microtensile bond strength measurements were made using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of one mm/min. For statistical analysis, t-test, one-way and two-way ANOVA were used. The level of significance was set at P<0.05. Results: Filtek P60 pre-heated at 37ºC had significantly higher microtensile bond strength than Filtek Z250 under the same condition. The microtensile bond strengths were not significantly different at 4ºC, 23ºC and 37ºC subgroups of each composite resin group. Conclusion: Filtek P60 and Filtek Z250 did not have significantly different microtensile bond strengths at 4ºC and 23ºC but Filtek P60 had significantly higher microtensile bond strength at 37 ºC. Composite and temperature interactions had significant effects on the bond strength. PMID:25628684

  1. Investigation of displacement, strain and stress in single step transversely isotropic elastic bonded joint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apu, Md. Jakaria; Islam, Md. Shahidul

    2016-07-01

    Bi-material joint is often used in many advanced materials and structures. Determination of the bonding strength at the interface is very difficult because of the presence of the stress singularity. In this paper, the displacement and stress fields of a transversely isotropic bi-material joint around an interface edge are determined. Autodesk Simulation Mechanical 2015 is used to carry out the numerical computations. Stress and displacement fields demonstrate that the values near the edge of joint where the stress singularity occurs are larger than that at the inner portion. From the numerical results, it is suggested that de-bonding of the interface may occur at the interface edge of the joint due to the higher stress concentration at the free edge.

  2. A single disulfide bond differentiates aggregation pathways of beta2-microglobulin.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yiwen; Dokholyan, Nikolay V

    2005-11-25

    Deposition of wild-type beta2-microglobulin (beta2m) into amyloid fibrils is a complication in patients undergoing long-term hemodialysis. The native beta-sandwich fold of beta2m has a highly conserved disulfide bond linking Cys25 and Cys80. Oxidized beta2m forms needle-like amyloid fibrils at pH 2.5 in vitro, whereas reduced beta2m, at acid pH, in which the intra-chain disulfide bond is disrupted, cannot form typical fibrils. Instead, reduced beta2m forms thinner and more flexible filaments. To uncover the difference in molecular mechanisms underlying the aggregation of the oxidized and reduced beta2m, we performed molecular dynamics simulations of beta2m oligomerization under oxidized and reduced conditions. We show that, consistent with experimental observations, the oxidized beta2m forms domain-swapped dimer, in which the two proteins exchange their N-terminal segments complementing each other. In contrast, both dimers and trimers, formed by reduced beta2m, are comprised of parallel beta-sheets between monomers and stabilized by the hydrogen bond network along the backbone. The oligomerized monomers are in extended conformations, capable of further aggregation. We find that both reduced and oxidized dimers are thermodynamically less stable than their corresponding monomers, indicating that beta2m oligomerization is not accompanied by the formation of a thermodynamically stable dimer. Our studies suggest that the different aggregation pathways of oxidized and reduced beta2m are dictated by the formation of distinct precursor oligomeric species that are modulated by Cys25-Cys80 disulfide-bonds. We propose that the propagation of domain swapping is the aggregation mechanism for the oxidized beta2m, while "parallel stacking" of partially unfolded beta2m is the aggregation mechanism for the reduced beta2m. PMID:16242719

  3. Lanthanide-Catalyzed Reversible Alkynyl Exchange by Carbon-Carbon Single-Bond Cleavage Assisted by a Secondary Amino Group.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yinlin; Zhang, Fangjun; Zhang, Jie; Zhou, Xigeng

    2016-09-12

    Lanthanide-catalyzed alkynyl exchange through C-C single-bond cleavage assisted by a secondary amino group is reported. A lanthanide amido complex is proposed as a key intermediate, which undergoes unprecedented reversible β-alkynyl elimination followed by alkynyl exchange and imine reinsertion. The in situ homo- and cross-dimerization of the liberated alkyne can serve as an additional driving force to shift the metathesis equilibrium to completion. This reaction is formally complementary to conventional alkyne metathesis and allows the selective transformation of internal propargylamines into those bearing different substituents on the alkyne terminus in moderate to excellent yields under operationally simple reaction conditions. PMID:27510403

  4. A singly bonded derivative of endohedral metallofullerene: La@C82CBr(COOC2H5).

    PubMed

    Feng, Lai; Nakahodo, Tsukasa; Wakahara, Takatsugu; Tsuchiya, Takahiro; Maeda, Yutaka; Akasaka, Takeshi; Kato, Tatsuhisa; Horn, Ernst; Yoza, Kenji; Mizorogi, Naomi; Nagase, Shigeru

    2005-12-14

    A novel Bingel monoadduct of La@C82 (mono-A) has been synthesized by the reaction with diethyl bromomalonate in the presence of DBU (Bingel-Hirsch reaction). Its structure has been fully determined by NMR spectroscopic and X-ray crystallographic analyses. The most distinct feature of mono-A is the single bond moiety between the functional group and fullerene cage, which is very different from the cyclopropane moiety in a conventional Bingel adduct of empty fullerenes. Further spectroscopic characterizations and calculations revealed the closed-shell structure of mono-A. Its formation mechanism was discussed according to calculation results. PMID:16332032

  5. Chemical Bonds II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanderson, R. T.

    1972-01-01

    The continuation of a paper discussing chemical bonding from a bond energy viewpoint, with a number of examples of single and multiple bonds. (Part I appeared in volume 1 number 3, pages 16-23, February 1972.) (AL)

  6. Paddlewheel 1,2,4-diazaphospholide distibines with the shortest antimony-antimony single bonds.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Minggang; Wang, Lixia; Zhang, Xiang; Zheng, Wenjun

    2016-07-14

    One-electron reduction of SbCl3 with the non-innocent 1,2,4-diazaphospholide anion [3,5-R2dp](-) produced straightforwardly three unprecedented paddlewheel distibines [L2(Sb-Sb)L2] (L = η(1),η(1)-3,5-R2dp, R = tBu (4), iPr (5α, 5β), or Cy (6)) with very short Sb-Sb bond lengths (2.6691(8)-2.7451(8) Å). The novel structures were rationalized by DFT calculations. PMID:27295111

  7. A Tale of Copper Coordination Frameworks: Controlled Single-Crystal-to-Single-Crystal Transformations and Their Catalytic C-H Bond Activation Properties.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yifa; Feng, Xiao; Huang, Xianqiang; Lin, Zhengguo; Pei, Xiaokun; Li, Siqing; Li, Jikun; Wang, Shan; Li, Rui; Wang, Bo

    2015-09-28

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), as a class of microporous materials with well-defined channels and rich functionalities, hold great promise for various applications. Yet the formation and crystallization processes of various MOFs with distinct topology, connectivity, and properties remain largely unclear, and the control of such processes is rather challenging. Starting from a 0D Cu coordination polyhedron, MOP-1, we successfully unfolded it to give a new 1D-MOF by a single-crystal-to-single-crystal (SCSC) transformation process at room temperature as confirmed by SXRD. We also monitored the continuous transformation states by FTIR and PXRD. Cu MOFs with 2D and 3D networks were also obtained from this 1D-MOF by SCSC transformations. Furthermore, Cu MOFs with 0D, 1D, and 3D networks, MOP-1, 1D-MOF, and HKUST-1, show unique performances in the kinetics of the C-H bond catalytic oxidation reaction. PMID:26296038

  8. Covalently bonded single-molecule junctions with stable and reversible photoswitched conductivity.

    PubMed

    Jia, Chuancheng; Migliore, Agostino; Xin, Na; Huang, Shaoyun; Wang, Jinying; Yang, Qi; Wang, Shuopei; Chen, Hongliang; Wang, Duoming; Feng, Boyong; Liu, Zhirong; Zhang, Guangyu; Qu, Da-Hui; Tian, He; Ratner, Mark A; Xu, H Q; Nitzan, Abraham; Guo, Xuefeng

    2016-06-17

    Through molecular engineering, single diarylethenes were covalently sandwiched between graphene electrodes to form stable molecular conduction junctions. Our experimental and theoretical studies of these junctions consistently show and interpret reversible conductance photoswitching at room temperature and stochastic switching between different conductive states at low temperature at a single-molecule level. We demonstrate a fully reversible, two-mode, single-molecule electrical switch with unprecedented levels of accuracy (on/off ratio of ~100), stability (over a year), and reproducibility (46 devices with more than 100 cycles for photoswitching and ~10(5) to 10(6) cycles for stochastic switching). PMID:27313042

  9. Electronic Structure and Bonding in Co-Based Single and Mixed Valence Oxides: A Quantum Chemical Perspective.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vijay; Major, Dan Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The mixed valence cobalt oxide, Co3O4, is a potential candidate as a photovoltaic (PV) material, which also exhibits intriguing chemical and catalytic properties. Here, we present a comparative study of the electronic, magnetic, and chemical bonding properties of mixed valence Co3O4 (i.e., Co(2+/3+)) with the related single valence CoO (i.e., Co(2+)) and Co2O3 (i.e., Co(3+)) oxides using density functional theory (DFT). We have employed a range of theoretical methods, including pure DFT, DFT+U, and a range-separated exchange-correlation functional (HSE06). We compare the electronic structure and band gap of the oxide materials, with available photoemission spectroscopy and optical band gaps. Our calculations suggest that the bonding between Co(3+) and O(2-) ions in Co2O3 and Co3O4 and Co(2+) and O(2-) ions in CoO and Co3O4 are rather different. We find that Co2O3 and Co3O4 are weakly correlated materials, whereas CoO is a strongly correlated material. Furthermore, our computed one-electron energy level diagrams reveal that strong Co-O antibonding states are present at the top of the valence band for all the cobalt oxides, hinting at a defect tolerant capacity in these materials. These results, which give a detailed picture of the chemical bonding in related single and mixed valence cobalt oxides, may serve as a guide to enhance the PV or photoelectrochemical activity of Co3O4, by reducing its internal defect states or changing its electronic structure by doping or alloying with suitable elements. PMID:27010797

  10. Influence of salivary contamination on the dentin bond strength of two different seventh generation adhesive systems: In vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Taranjeet Kaur; Asrani, Hemant; Banga, Harpreet; Jain, Aditi; Rawlani, Sudhir S.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effect of salivary contamination on the bond strength of two different seventh generation adhesive systems. Materials and Methods: Sixty caries-free human premolars with flat dentin surfaces were randomly divided into six groups of 10 teeth each and bonding was done using seventh-generation bonding agents Adper Easy One (3M ESPE) and Xeno V (Dentsply). Following the bonding procedure, resin composite was bonded to the surfaces using a plastic mould. The prepared specimen with composite cylinders attached were placed in 37°C distilled water for 24 h and then subjected to shear bond strength (SBS) with 0 h universal testing machine and the data were subjected to one-way analysis of variance and unpaired t-test. Results: Statistical significant difference between the Groups I, II and III in which Adper Easy One was used and similarly for Groups IV, V, and VI in which Xeno V was used. When an intergroup comparison was made using unpaired t-test Group II and Group V showed the nonsignificant difference. Conclusion: Salivary contamination significantly affects the SBS of both the seventh generation dentin bonding agents. However, 2-hydroxyethyl methacryate based adhesive has higher bond strength. PMID:26752841

  11. Solid-State (17)O NMR of Oxygen-Nitrogen Singly Bonded Compounds: Hydroxylammonium Chloride and Sodium Trioxodinitrate (Angeli's Salt).

    PubMed

    Lu, Jiasheng; Kong, Xianqi; Terskikh, Victor; Wu, Gang

    2015-07-23

    We report a solid-state NMR study of (17)O-labeled hydroxylammonium chloride ([H(17)O-NH3]Cl) and sodium trioxodinitrate monohydrate (Na2[(17)ONNO2]·H2O, Angeli's salt). The common feature in these two compounds is that they both contain oxygen atoms that are singly bonded to nitrogen. For this class of oxygen-containing functional groups, there is very limited solid-state (17)O NMR data in the literature. In this work, we experimentally measured the (17)O chemical shift and quadrupolar coupling tensors. With the aid of plane-wave DFT computation, the (17)O NMR tensor orientations were determined in the molecular frame of reference. We found that the characteristic feature of an O-N single bond is that the (17)O nucleus exhibits a large quadrupolar coupling constant (13-15 MHz) but a rather small chemical shift anisotropy (100-250 ppm), in sharp contrast with the nitroso (O═N) functional group for which both quantities are very large (e.g., 16 MHz and 3000 ppm, respectively). PMID:26107984

  12. Shear bond strength of seventh generation bonding agents on dentin of primary teeth--an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Geoffrey; Rich, Alfred P; Finkelman, Matthew D; Defuria, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    This controlled, randomized, in vitro study evaluated the shear bond strength of several seventh generation bonding agents on the dentin of primary teeth. Six different adhesives were used: Xeno IV, Clearfil S3 Bond, Adper Prompt-L-Pop, AdheSE One, Bond Force, and Optibond (control). Ninety primary teeth were prepared by wet grinding with a 320-grit silicon carbide paper on a polishing wheel running at 110 RPM. After 24 hours of storage in water, shear bond strengths of each group were determined. The mean shear bond strength of the tested adhesive systems to primary dentin was 12.27 MPa. One-way ANOVA testing showed a statistically significant difference between adhesive products (P < 0.001). Tukey HSD post hoc tests were used to assess which means were significantly different from one another. There was no statistically significant difference between the fifth generation adhesive system (Optibond) and the two seventh generation systems (Xeno IV and Bond Force), with Optibond exhibiting a lower mean shear bond strength compared to Bond Force. Within the limitations of this study, there is a significant difference between seventh generation bonding materials. Bond Force and Optibond appear to exhibit higher shear bond strengths than the other products. PMID:22313979

  13. Comparative evaluation of bond strength of three contemporary self-etch adhesives: An ex vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Nikhil, Vineeta; Singh, Vijay; Chaudhry, Suruchi

    2011-01-01

    Aim: This study evaluated the effect of 2-hydroxymethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and the type of solvent on the tensile bond strength of the following three self-etch adhesives: Adper easy one (HEMA-rich adhesive) which contained ethanol, G-Bond (HEMA-free adhesive) which contained acetone, and Xeno V (HEMA-free adhesive) which contained butanol as a solvent. Material and Methods: Intact mandibular molars were mounted in self-cured resin and the occlusal surfaces were ground with # 600 SiC paper. Adhesives were applied on the prepared dentinal surfaces and the resin composite was condensed in the split brass mold (5 × 3 mm) placed over the adhesive surface. The specimens were stored in normal saline and placed in incubator at 37°C. After 24 hours, the specimens were tested in tensile mode at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Statistical analysis was done using One way ANOVA and Tukey's HSD test. Results: The mean bond strengths of Adper easy one, G-Bond, and Xeno V were 12.41 MPa, 10.09 MPa, and 8.67 MPa, respectively. Conclusions: Comparison of contemporary adhesives in this ex vivo study revealed that the ethanol-based HEMA-rich self-etch adhesive is better than HEMA-free self-etch adhesive that contained acetone and butanol as the solvents, when compared in terms of bond strength. PMID:21957383

  14. The effects of three different desensitizing agents on the shear bond strength of composite resin bonding agents.

    PubMed

    Zorba, Yahya Orcun; Erdemir, Ali; Ercan, Ertugrul; Eldeniz, Ayce Unverdi; Kalaycioglu, Baris; Ulker, Mustafa

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of three desensitizing agents on the shear bond strengths of four different bonding agents used to bond composite resin to dentin. A total of 160 extracted human molars were sectioned parallel to the occlusal plane under water cooling, polished and randomly divided into 4 groups of 40. Each group was treated with a different desensitizing agent (Tooth Mousse, Ultra-EZ, Cervitec Plus), except for an untreated control group. Each group was then randomly subdivided into 4 groups of 10, and a different dentin bonding agent (XP Bond, AdheSE, Adper Prompt L-pop, GBond) was applied to each group in order to bond the specimens to a resin composite (Gradia Direct) built up using a plastic apparatus. A Universal Testing Machine was used to measure the shear bond strength of each specimen. Statistical analysis was performed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey's tests. With the exception of the Control/AdheSE and Ultra-EZ/XP Bond groups, no statistically significant differences were found in the shear bond strength values of the groups tested. These findings suggest that the use of different desensitizing agents does not affect the shear bond strength of various adhesive systems used to bond resin composite to dentin. PMID:20416554

  15. Covalent lanthanide(III) macrocyclic complexes: the bonding nature and optical properties of a promising single antenna molecule.

    PubMed

    Rabanal-León, Walter A; Páez-Hernández, Dayán; Arratia-Pérez, Ramiro

    2014-12-21

    The present work is focused on the elucidation of the electronic structure, bonding nature and optical properties of a series of low symmetry (C2) coordination compounds of type [Ln(III)HAM](3+), where "Ln(III)" are the trivalent lanthanide ions: La(3+), Ce(3+), Eu(3+) and Lu(3+), while "HAM" is the neutral six-nitrogen donor macrocyclic ligand [C22N6H26]. This systematic study has been performed in the framework of the Relativistic Density Functional Theory (R-DFT) and also using a multi-reference approach via the Complete Active Space (CAS) wavefunction treatment with the aim of analyzing their ground state and excited state electronic structures as well as electronic correlation. Furthermore, the use of the energy decomposition scheme proposed by Morokuma-Ziegler and the electron localization function (ELF) allows us to characterize the bonding between the lanthanide ions and the macrocyclic ligand, obtaining as a result a dative-covalent interaction. Due to a great deal of lanthanide optical properties and their technological applications, the absorption spectra of this set of coordination compounds were calculated using the time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT), where the presence of the intense Ligand to Metal Charge Transfer (LMCT) bands in the ultraviolet and visible region and the inherent f-f electronic transitions in the Near-Infra Red (NIR) region for some lanthanide ions allow us to propose these systems as "single antenna molecules" with potential applications in NIR technologies. PMID:25357209

  16. Influence of light intensity on surface-free energy and dentin bond strength of single-step self-etch adhesives.

    PubMed

    Nojiri, Kie; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Suzuki, Takayuki; Shibasaki, Syo; Matsuyoshi, Saki; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the influence of light intensity on the surface-free energy and dentin bond strength of single-step selfetch adhesives. The adhesives were applied to the dentin surfaces of bovine mandibular incisors and cured with light intensities of 0 (no irradiation), 200, 400, and 600 mW/cm(2). Surface-free energies were determined by measuring the contact angles of three test liquids placed on the cured adhesives. Dentin bond strengths of the specimens were also measured. Polymerization with a higher light intensity resulted in a lower surface-free energy of the cured adhesives. The greatest bond strength was achieved when a light intensity of 400 mW/cm(2) or greater was used. Our data suggest that the surface-free energy and dentin bond strength of single-step self-etch adhesives are affected by light intensity of the curing unit. PMID:26438984

  17. Bond Dissociation Energies of the Tungsten Fluorides and Their Singly-Charged Ions: A Density Functional Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyall, Kenneth G.; Arnold, James (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The dissociation of WF6 and the related singly-charged cations and anions into the lower fluorides and fluorine atoms has been investigated theoretically using density functional theory (B3LYP) and relativistic effective core potentials, with estimates of spin-orbit effects included using a simple model. The inclusion of spin-orbit is essential for a correct description of the thermochemistry. The total atomization energy of the neutral and anionic WF6 is reproduced to within 25 kcal/mol, but comparison of individual bond dissociation energies with available experimental data shows discrepancies of up to 10 kcal/mol. The results are nevertheless useful to help resolve discrepancies in experimental data and provide estimates of missing data.

  18. Analysis of the Vibration Damping of Bonded Beams with a Single-Lap-Joint and Partial Dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Nak-Sam; Park, Jeong-Il

    A theoretical analysis model for the lateral vibration of beams with a bonded single-lap-joint and partial layered dampers has been proposed in this paper. Both shear and normal forces acting along the interface between the elastic and viscoelastic layers were considered in the vibration analysis. The analytical results were comparable to those obtained by the modal strain energy method and the harmonic response analysis, which were based on a finite element model. The effects of the location and thickness of the partial dampers on the system loss factor ηs were studied. The characteristic variations of ηs, with changes of the modulus and loss factor of the viscoelastic layer in the lap joint part and partial dampers were also studied. Consequently, the geometrical and material conditions at maximizing ηs were suggested.

  19. Effect of Dentin Biomodification Using Naturally Derived Collagen Cross-Linkers: One-Year Bond Strength Study

    PubMed Central

    Castellan, Carina S.; Bedran-Russo, Ana K.; Antunes, Alberto; Pereira, Patricia N. R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. This study investigated the long-term resin-dentin bond strength of dentin biomodified by proanthocyanidin-rich (PA) agents. Materials and Methods. Forty molars had their coronal dentin exposed, etched, and treated for 10 minutes with 6.5% grape seed extract (GSE), 6.5% cocoa seed extract ethanol-water (CSE-ET), 6.5% cocoa seed extract acetone-water (CSE-AC), and distilled water (CO). Samples were restored either with One-Step Plus (OS) or Adper Single-Bond Plus (SB). Bond strength test was performed immediately or after 3, 6, and 12 months. Results. Higher μTBS were observed for GSE immediately (SB- 62.9 MPa; OS- 51.9 MPa) when compared to CSE-ET (SB- 56.95 MPa; OS- 60.28 MPa), CSE-AC (SB- 49.97 MPa; OS- 54.44 MPa), and CO (SB- 52.0 MPa; OS- 44.0 MPa) (P < 0.05). CSE outcomes were adhesive system and solvent dependant. After 12 months storage SB results showed no difference among treatment types (GSE- 57.15 MPa; CSE/ET- 54.04 MPa; CSE/AC- 48.22 MPa; CO- 51.68 MPa; P = 0.347),while OS results where treatment dependent (GSE- 42.62 MPa; CSE/ET- 44.06 MPa; CSE/AC- 41.30 MPa; CO- 36.85 MPa; P = 0.036). Conclusions. GSE and CSE-ET agents provided enhanced immediate adhesion and stabilization to demineralized dentin after long-term storage, depending on adhesive system. PMID:24069032

  20. Single-cell Characterization of Autotransporter-mediated Escherichia coli Surface Display of Disulfide Bond-containing Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Balakrishnan; Sendra, Victor G; Cirino, Patrick C; Varadarajan, Navin

    2012-01-01

    Autotransporters (ATs) are a family of bacterial proteins containing a C-terminal β-barrel-forming domain that facilitates the translocation of N-terminal passenger domain whose functions range from adhesion to proteolysis. Genetic replacement of the native passenger domain with heterologous proteins is an attractive strategy not only for applications such as biocatalysis, live-cell vaccines, and protein engineering but also for gaining mechanistic insights toward understanding AT translocation. The ability of ATs to efficiently display functional recombinant proteins containing multiple disulfides has remained largely controversial. By employing high-throughput single-cell flow cytometry, we have systematically investigated the ability of the Escherichia coli AT Antigen 43 (Ag43) to display two different recombinant reporter proteins, a single-chain antibody (M18 scFv) that contains two disulfides and chymotrypsin that contains four disulfides, by varying the signal peptide and deleting the different domains of the native protein. Our results indicate that only the C-terminal β-barrel and the threaded α-helix are essential for efficient surface display of functional recombinant proteins containing multiple disulfides. These results imply that there are no inherent constraints for functional translocation and display of disulfide bond-containing proteins mediated by the AT system and should open new avenues for protein display and engineering. PMID:23019324

  1. Single-cell characterization of autotransporter-mediated Escherichia coli surface display of disulfide bond-containing proteins.

    PubMed

    Ramesh, Balakrishnan; Sendra, Victor G; Cirino, Patrick C; Varadarajan, Navin

    2012-11-01

    Autotransporters (ATs) are a family of bacterial proteins containing a C-terminal β-barrel-forming domain that facilitates the translocation of N-terminal passenger domain whose functions range from adhesion to proteolysis. Genetic replacement of the native passenger domain with heterologous proteins is an attractive strategy not only for applications such as biocatalysis, live-cell vaccines, and protein engineering but also for gaining mechanistic insights toward understanding AT translocation. The ability of ATs to efficiently display functional recombinant proteins containing multiple disulfides has remained largely controversial. By employing high-throughput single-cell flow cytometry, we have systematically investigated the ability of the Escherichia coli AT Antigen 43 (Ag43) to display two different recombinant reporter proteins, a single-chain antibody (M18 scFv) that contains two disulfides and chymotrypsin that contains four disulfides, by varying the signal peptide and deleting the different domains of the native protein. Our results indicate that only the C-terminal β-barrel and the threaded α-helix are essential for efficient surface display of functional recombinant proteins containing multiple disulfides. These results imply that there are no inherent constraints for functional translocation and display of disulfide bond-containing proteins mediated by the AT system and should open new avenues for protein display and engineering. PMID:23019324

  2. Phase diagram and magnetization structures of spin-3/2 bond-alternating Ising chains with single-ion anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guang-Hua; Dou, Jun-Ya; Tian, Guang-Shan

    2016-02-01

    By the infinite time-evolving block decimation (iTEBD) algorithm, the magnetization process of the spin-3/2 bond-alternating Ising chain with single-ion anisotropy (D) is investigated. Magnetization plateaus including detailed magnetization structures of three different cases are uncovered, and three rich ground-state phase diagrams are explicitly determined. Especially, for the uniform antiferromagnetic case, a phase transition line at D=J, which divides the Mz=0 (Mz =1/2) plateau into two phases, are detected by the magnetization structure and the ground-state energy, and a updated phase diagram is proposed. Such a transition line was not recognized by the average magnetization previously. A same transition line (D=J) is also detected in the phase diagram of the antiferromagnetic-ferromagnetic alternating case. Magnetization plateaus are found to be easily induced for the classical Ising systems without quantum fluctuations, and the single-ion anisotropy plays a key role in the formation of Mz = 1/2 and 1 plateaus in the present model.

  3. Evaluation of microshear bond strength of resin composites to enamel of dental adhesive systems associated with Er,Cr:YSGG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassimiro-Silva, Patricia F.; Zezell, Denise M.; Monteiro, Gabriela Q. d. M.; Benetti, Carolina; de Paula Eduardo, Carlos; Gomes, Anderson S. L.

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the microshear bond strength (μSBS) of resin composite to enamel etching by Er,Cr:YSGG laser with the use of two differents adhesives systems. Fifty freshly extracted human molars halves were embedded in acrylic resin before preparation for the study, making a total of up to 100 available samples. The specimens were randomly assigned into six groups (η=10) according to substrate pre-treatment and adhesive system on the enamel. A two-step self-etching primer system (Clearfil SE Bond) and a universal adhesive used as an etch-andrinse adhesive (Adper Single Bond Universal) were applied to the nonirradiated enamel surface according to manufacturer's instructions, as control groups (Control CF and Control SB, respectively). For the other groups, enamel surfaces were previously irradiated with the Er,Cr:YSGG laser with 0.5 W, 75 mJ and 66 J/cm2 (CF 5 Hz and SB 5 Hz) and 1.25 W, 50 mJ and 44 J/cm2 (CF 15 Hz and SB 15 Hz). Irradiation was performed under air (50%) and water (50%) cooling. An independent t-test was performed to compare the adhesive systems. Mean μSBS ± sd (MPa) for each group was 16.857 +/- 2.61, 17.87 +/- 5.83, 12.23 +/- 2.02, 9.88 +/- 2.26, 15.94 +/- 1.98, 17.62 +/- 2.10, respectively. The control groups and the 50 mJ laser groups showed no statistically significant differences, regardless of the adhesive system used. The results obtained lead us to affirm that the bonding interaction of adhesives to enamel depends not only on the morphological aspects of the dental surface, but also on the characteristics of the adhesive employed and the parameters of the laser.

  4. Self-etching bonding systems: in-vitro shear bond strength evaluation.

    PubMed

    Brandt, P D; de Wet, F A; du Preez, I C

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the dentine shear bond strength of five self-etching bonding agents with that of a total-etch dentine bonding agent (used as control). Sixty recently extracted third molar teeth were mounted in acrylic resin and the occlusal surfaces ground to expose superficial dentine. A standardised smear layer was created by polishing with wet 600-grit SiC paper. Products evaluated were Xeno III (XIII), Clearfil SE Bond (SE), ABF (ABF), Optibond Solo Self-etch (OS), Adper Prompt-L-Pop (PLP) and the control, Scotchbond Multipurpose Plus (SBMP). Resin stubs were bonded to the dentine using the bonding agents according to manufacturer's instructions. Composite stubs were manufactured using an Ultradent jig and two increments of Z100, A1 shade composite. The bonds were subsequently stressed to failure with an Instron testing machine, operating at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The data was statistically analysed using ANOVA (alpha < or = 0.05). The mean SBS (MPa) were: SBMP (Control) = 24.1 +/- 7.6; XIII = 17.3 +/- 4.1; SE = 26.2 +/- 7.8; ABF = 25.9 +/- 4.3; OS = 21.9 +/- 3.9 and PLP = 15.4 +/- 3.1. The shear bond strengths of both XIII and PLP to dentine were significantly lower than the control SBMP (p < 0.05). The remaining three products (SE, ABF and OS) displayed bond strengths comparable to the control (p > 0.05). Further research into cut (ground) and un-cut (un-ground) enamel shear bond strength and micro-leakage using these bonding agents are needed. PMID:16562613

  5. Microtensile bond strength of silorane-based composite specific adhesive system using different bonding strategies

    PubMed Central

    Bastos, Laura Alves; Sousa, Ana Beatriz Silva; Drubi-Filho, Brahim; Panzeri Pires-de-Souza, Fernanda de Carvalho

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of pre-etching on the bond strength of silorane-based composite specific adhesive system to dentin. Materials and Methods Thirty human molars were randomly divided into 5 groups according to the different bonding strategies. For teeth restored with silorane-based composite (Filtek Silorane, 3M ESPE), the specific self-etching adhesive system (Adhesive System P90, 3M ESPE) was used with and without pre-etching (Pre-etching/Silorane and Silorane groups). Teeth restored with methacrylate based-composite (Filtek Z250, 3M ESPE) were hybridized with the two-step self-etching system (Clearfil SE Bond, Kuraray), with and without pre-etching (Pre-etching/Methacrylate and Methacrylate groups), or three-step adhesive system (Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose, 3M ESPE) (Three-step/Methacrylate group) (n = 6). The restored teeth were sectioned into stick-shaped test specimens (1.0 × 1.0 mm), and coupled to a universal test machine (0.5 mm/min) to perform microtensile testing. Results Pre-etching/Methacrylate group presented the highest bond strength values, with significant difference from Silorane and Three-step/Methacrylate groups (p < 0.05). However, it was not significantly different from Preetching/Silorane and Methacrylate groups. Conclusions Pre-etching increased bond strength of silorane-based composite specific adhesive system to dentin. PMID:25671209

  6. 18,18'-Dihexyl[9,9']biphenanthro[9,10-b]triphenylene: construction and consequences of a profoundly hindered aryl-aryl single bond.

    PubMed

    Hilton, Cameron L; Crowfoot, Jeremy M; Rempala, Pawel; King, Benjamin T

    2008-10-01

    The title compound, 1-Hex, was synthesized by the Zr-mediated biphenylation of 4,4'-dihexyloctabromobiphenyl using (Li(THF)4)2 x Zr(biphe)3, where biphe is the 2,2'-biphenyldiyl ligand, in 5% isolated yield. Two independent X-ray diffraction analyses revealed that arene 1-Hex possesses a highly strained and hindered aryl-aryl single bond. This bond causes the phenanthro[9,10-b]triphenylene (PTP) moieties to twist (anthracene subunit dihedral, 69 degrees); the interlocked, helical, homochiral PTP moieties give rise to effective D2 symmetry. The calculated adiabatic homolytic bond dissociation energy of this strained bond is only 67 kcal/mol, but nonetheless the bond exhibits a surprisingly normal length (1.49 A); the reason is elongation only slowly releases strain. Variable temperature NMR revealed two dynamic processes: hexyl rotation (12.0 +/- 0.4 kcal/mol) and inversion of chirality (15.2 +/- 0.6 kcal/mol). DFT calculations provide rate-determining transitions states, whose energies agree with measured values, and provide insight to the mechanism of these processes. Rotation about the central bond is not involved in either observed process. Calculations demonstrate that rotation does not involve a simple torsion of the equilibrium structure, but rather a complex movement with a barrier of 49 kcal/mol from a slipped-parallel, C(2h) intermediate. PMID:18781754

  7. Reversible conversion of valence-tautomeric copper metal-organic frameworks dependent single-crystal-to-single-crystal oxidation/reduction: a redox-switchable catalyst for C-H bonds activation reaction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chao; Wu, Jie; Song, Chuanjun; Ding, Ran; Qiao, Yan; Hou, Hongwei; Chang, Junbiao; Fan, Yaoting

    2015-06-28

    Upon single-crystal-to-single-crystal (SCSC) oxidation/reduction, reversible structural transformations take place between the anionic porous zeolite-like Cu(I) framework and a topologically equivalent neutral Cu(I)Cu(II) mixed-valent framework. The unique conversion behavior of the Cu(I) framework endowed it as a redox-switchable catalyst for the direct arylation of heterocycle C-H bonds. PMID:25994106

  8. Effect of Er,Cr:YSGG Laser at Different Output Powers on the Micromorphology and the Bond Property of Non-Carious Sclerotic Dentin to Resin Composites

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weiguo; Jiao, Yang; Wang, Wanshan; Yang, Yanwei; Wei, Jingjing; Shen, Lijuan; Chen, Jihua

    2015-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiated at different powers on the micromorphology and the bonding property of non-carious sclerotic dentin to resin composites. Methods Two hundred bovine incisors characterized by non-carious sclerotic dentin were selected, and the seventy-two teeth of which for surface morphological analysis were divided into nine groups according to various treatments (A: the control group, B: only treated with the adhesive Adper Easy One, C: diamond bur polishing followed by Adper Easy One, D-I: Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiating at 1W, 2W, 3W, 4W, 5W, 6W output power, respectively, followed by Adper Easy One). The surface roughness values were measured by the non-contact three-dimensional morphology scanner, then the surface micromorphologies of surfaces in all groups were assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM); meanwhile, Image Pro-Plus 6.0 software was used to measure the relative percentage of open tubules on SEM images. The rest, one hundred twenty-eight teeth for bond strength test, were divided into eight groups according to the different treatments (A: only treated with the adhesive Adper Easy One, B: diamond bur polishing followed by the above adhesive, C-H: Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiating at 1 W, 2 W, 3 W, 4 W, 5 W, 6 W output power, respectively, followed by the above adhesive), and each group was subsequently divided into two subgroups according to whether aging is performed (immediately tested and after thermocycling). Micro-shear bond strength test was used to evaluate the bond strength. Results The 4W laser group showed the highest roughness value (30.84±1.93μm), which was statistically higher than the control group and the diamond bur groups (p<0.05). The mean percentages ((27.8±1.8)%, (28.0±2.2)%, (30.0±1.9)%) of open tubules area in the 4W, 5W, 6W group were higher than other groups (p<0.05). The 4W laser group showed the highest micro-shear bond strength not

  9. Comparison of tensile bond strengths of four one-bottle self-etching adhesive systems with Er:YAG laser-irradiated dentin.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qianzhou; Chen, Minle; Ding, Jiangfeng

    2013-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the interaction of current one-bottle self-etching adhesives and Er:YAG laser with dentin using a tensile bond strength (TBS) test and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in vitro. Two hundred and thirteen dentin discs were randomly distributed to the Control Group using bur cutting and to the Laser Group using an Er:YAG laser (200 mJ, VSP, 20 Hz). The following adhesives were investigated: one two-step total-etch adhesive [Prime & Bond NT (Dentsply)] and four one-step self-etch adhesives [G-Bond plus (GC), XENO V (Dentsply), iBond Self Etch (Heraeus) and Adper Easy One (3 M ESPE)]. Samples were restored with composite resin, and after 24-hour storage in distilled water, subjected to the TBS test. For morphological analysis, 12 dentin specimens were prepared for SEM. No significant differences were found between the control group and laser group (p = 0.899); dentin subjected to Prime & Bond NT, XENOV and Adper Easy One produced higher TBS. In conclusion, this study indicates that Er:YAG laser-prepared dentin can perform as well as bur on TBS, and some of the one-step one-bottle adhesives are comparable to the total-etch adhesives in TBS on dentin. PMID:24190486

  10. Effect of thermocycling on the durability of etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesives on dentin.

    PubMed

    Sangwichit, Ketkamon; Kingkaew, Ruksaphon; Pongprueksa, Pong; Senawongse, Pisol

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to compare bond strengths of adhesives with/without thermocycling and to analyze the micromorphology of resindentin interfaces. Flat dentin surfaces were prepared and divided into eight groups to bond with four etch-and-rinse adhesives (Optibond FL, Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose, Optibond Solo Plus, and Single Bond 2) and four self-etch adhesives (Clearfil SE Bond, Adper SE Plus, Clearfil S(3) Bond and Adper Easy Bond). Specimens were further divided into two subgroups subjected for with/without thermocycling and then subjected to both micro-tensile test and resin-dentin interface evaluation. The results revealed that there were significant differences in bond strength between the groups with and without thermocycling for all etch-and-rinse groups and for the Adper Easy Bond self-etch group (p<0.01). Clearfil SE Bond demonstrated highly durable bond strengths. Furthermore, more silver ion uptake was observed at the resin-dentin interfaces for all etch-and-rinse adhesives and Adper SE Plus and Adper Easy Bond after thermocycling. PMID:27251990

  11. Negative effects of a disulfide bond mismatch in anti-rabies G protein single-chain antibody variable fragment FV57.

    PubMed

    Duan, Ye; Gu, Tiejun; Zhang, Xizhen; Jiang, Chunlai; Yuan, Ruosen; Li, Zhuang; Wang, Dandan; Chen, Xiaoxu; Wu, Chunlai; Chen, Yan; Wu, Yongge; Kong, Wei

    2014-06-01

    Rabies virus (RV) causes a fatal infectious disease requiring efficient post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP), which includes a rabies vaccine and rabies immunoglobulin (RIG). The single-chain antibody variable fragment (scFv), a small engineered antibody fragment derived from an antibody variable heavy chain and light chain, has the potential to replace the current application of RIG. In previous studies, we constructed and evaluated an anti-rabies virus G protein scFv (FV57) based on the monoclonal antibody CR57. Of the five cysteines in FV57, four are linked in intra-chain disulfide bonds (Cys-VH28/Cys-VH98 and Cys-VL16/Cys-VL84), and one is free (Cys-VL85). However, the thiol in Cys-VL85 neighboring Cys-VL84 in the CDR3 of the light chain is likely to mismatch with the thiol in Cys-VL16 during the renaturing process. In order to study effects of the mismatched disulfide bond, Cys-VL85 and Cys-VL84 of FV57 were mutated to serine to construct mutants FV57(VL85S) and FV57(VL84S). Furthermore, the disulfide bonds in the light chain of FV57, FV57(VL85S) and FV57(VL84S) were deleted by mutating Cys-VL16 to serine. All mutants were prepared and evaluated along with the original FV57. The results indicated that the mismatched disulfide bond of FV57 linking the light chain FR1 and CDR3 would confer deleterious negative effects on its activity against RV, likely due to spatial hindrance in the light chain CDR3. Moreover, avoidance of the disulfide bond mismatch provided an additional 30% protective efficacy against RV infection in the mouse RV challenge model. Thus, modifications of FV57 to eliminate the disulfide bond mismatch may provide a candidate therapeutic agent for effective PEP against rabies. PMID:24598312

  12. Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Total- and Self-etching Adhesive Systems after Application of Chlorhexidine to Dentin Contaminated with a Hemostatic Agent

    PubMed Central

    Sharafeddin, Farahnaz; Farhadpour, Hajar

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Hemostatic agents may influence the bond strength of different bonding agents. Also, chlorhexidine has shown positive effects on bond strength values and their combination effect has not been reported yet. Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of contamination with a hemostatic agent on shear bond strength (SBS) of total- and self-etching adhesive systems and the effect of chlorhexidine application after removal of the hemostatic agent. Materials and Method In this experimental study, the occlusal enamel of each sixty caries-free mandibular molars was removed and their midcoronal dentin was exposed. The specimens were then mounted in auto-polymerizing resin 1mm apical to CEJ. Then, the specimens were divided into 6 groups (n=10) based on contamination with a hemostatic agent (H), application of chlorhexidine (CHX) and the adhesive system used; and then were classified as Group 1: Adper Single Bond (ASB); Group 2: H+ASB; Group 3: H+0.2% CHX+ASB; Group 4: Clearfil SE Bond (CSB); Group 5: H+CSB; Group 6: H+0.2% CHX+CSB. Then, composite resin rods (4×2 mm) were built up on the dentin surfaces and after thermocycling, the SBS (MPa) was evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed using two-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests (p< 0.05). Results There were statistically significant differences between bond strength values of group 1 (ASB) and group 2 (H+ASB) (p< 0.001) and group 1 (ASB) and group 3 (H+CHX+ASB) (p< 0.001). Similarly, significant differences were seen between group 4 (CSB) and group 5 (H+CSB) (p< 0.001) and between group 4 (CSB) and group 6 (H+CHX+CSB) (p< 0.001). Conclusion Contamination with hemostatic agent reduced the SBS of both total- and self-etching adhesive systems. In addition, application of chlorhexidine after the removal of hemostatic agent had a negative effect on SBS of total- and self-etching adhesive systems. PMID:26331146

  13. Measurement of longitudinal strain and estimation of peel stress in adhesive-bonded single-lap joint of CFRP adherend using embedded FBG sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, X.; Murayama, H.; Kageyama, K.; Uzawa, K.; Wada, D.

    2012-04-01

    In this research, longitudinal strain and peel stress in adhesive-bonded single-lap joint of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) were measured and estimated by embedded fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor. Two unidirectional CFRP substrates were bonded by epoxy to form a single-lap configuration. The distributed strain measurement system is used. It is based on optical frequency domain reflectometry (OFDR), which can provide measurement at an arbitrary position along FBG sensors with the high spatial resolution. The longitudinal strain was measured based on Bragg grating effect and the peel stress was estimated based on birefringence effect. Special manufacturing procedure was developed to ensure the embedded location of FBG sensor. A portion of the FBG sensor was embedded into one of CFRP adherends along fiber direction and another portion was kept free for temperature compensation. Photomicrograph of cross-section of specimen was taken to verify the sensor was embedded into proper location after adherend curing. The residual strain was monitored during specimen curing and adhesive joint bonding process. Tensile tests were carried out and longitudinal strain and peel stress of the bondline are measured and estimated by the embedded FBG sensor. A two-dimensional geometrically nonlinear finite element analysis was performed by ANSYS to evaluate the measurement precision.

  14. Evaluation of shear bond strength between self-etching adhesive systems and dentin and analysis of the resin-dentin interface.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Cleonice Silveira; Chain, Marcelo Carvalho

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the shear bond strength between dentin and four self-etching adhesive systems: Clearfil SE Bond (Group 1), Optibond Solo Plus SE (Group 2), Adper Prompt SE (Group 3), and Tyrian SPE (Group 4). A single-bottle adhesive system (Optibond Solo Plus) was used as the control (Group 5). The resin-dentin interface was analyzed by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The facial and lingual surfaces of 40 human molars were wet-ground flat; the teeth then were assigned randomly to one of five groups. Each adhesive system was applied to the dentin and the respective resin was applied using a Teflon mold. After 24 hours, the specimens were sheared at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/minute. Five additional teeth were prepared for SEM. Mean scores (+/-SD) in MP a were highest for Group 1 (33.23 +/- 12.67), followed by Group 2 (32.41 +/- 9.90), Group 5 (30.68 +/- 4.08), Group 4 (21.37 +/- 5.87), and Group 3 (17.50 +/- 4.24). The statistical analysis by Kruskal-Wallis and Wilcoxon Rank-Sum tests revealed no significant difference (p > 0.05) between Groups 1, 2, and 5. Groups 3 and 4 were different from the others and from each other (p < 0.05). The fracture modes were mostly interfacial/adhesive and cohesive in the resin. SEM analysis of the resin-dentin interface showed a homogeneous gap-free hybrid layer for all groups. PMID:20236904

  15. H-bonded supramolecular polymer for the selective dispersion and subsequent release of large-diameter semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Pochorovski, Igor; Wang, Huiliang; Feldblyum, Jeremy I; Zhang, Xiaodong; Antaris, Alexander L; Bao, Zhenan

    2015-04-01

    Semiconducting, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are promising candidates for applications in thin-film transistors, solar cells, and biological imaging. To harness their full potential, however, it is necessary to separate the semiconducting from the metallic SWNTs present in the as-synthesized SWNT mixture. While various polymers are able to selectively disperse semiconducting SWNTs, the subsequent removal of the polymer is challenging. However, many applications require semiconducting SWNTs in their pure form. Toward this goal, we have designed a 2-ureido-6[1H]-pyrimidinone (UPy)-based H-bonded supramolecular polymer that can selectively disperse semiconducting SWNTs. The dispersion purity is inversely related to the dispersion yield. In contrast to conventional polymers, the polymer described herein was shown to disassemble into monomeric units upon addition of an H-bond-disrupting agent, enabling isolation of dispersant-free, semiconducting SWNTs. PMID:25815604

  16. Dynamic strain distribution measurement and crack detection of an adhesive-bonded single-lap joint under cyclic loading using embedded FBG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ning, Xiaoguang; Murayama, Hideaki; Kageyama, Kazuro; Wada, Daichi; Kanai, Makoto; Ohsawa, Isamu; Igawa, Hirotaka

    2014-10-01

    In this study, the dynamic strain distribution measurement of an adhesive-bonded single-lap joint was carried out in a cyclic load test using a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor embedded into the adhesive/adherend interface along the overlap length direction. Unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) substrates were bonded by epoxy resin to form the joint, and the FBG sensor was embedded into the surface of one substrate during its curing. The measurement was carried out with a sampling rate of 5 Hz by the sensing system, based on the optical frequency domain reflectometry (OFDR) throughout the test. A finite element analysis (FEA) was performed for the measurement evaluation using a three-dimensional model, which included the embedded FBG sensor. The crack detection method, based on the longitudinal strain distribution measurement, was introduced and performed to estimate the cracks that occurred at the adhesive/adherend interface in the test.

  17. EPR study of radical reactions of C 60 dimer connected by a silicon bridge and single bond (C 60SiPh 2C 60)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumanskii, B. L.; Kalina, O. G.; Sokolov, V. I.; Chistyakov, A. L.; Stankevich, I. V.; Han, A.; Murata, Y.; Komatsu, K.

    2004-09-01

    Radical reactions of C 60 dimer connected by a silicon bridge and single bond (C 60SiPh 2C 60) were studied by EPR-spectroscopy. Attack of phosphoryl radicals or 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine- N-oxyl on the silicon atom leads to radical substitution of the fullerene and formation of a new fullerenyl radical, the structure of the former being confirmed by quantum-chemical calculations (DFT). The formation of only one type of spin-adduct on addition of phosphoryl radicals to the fullerene core is associated with small distortion of the fullerene cage in C 60SiPh 2C 60. Geometry of fullerene core in dimer differs only slightly from C 60 owing probably to flexibility of Si-C and C-C bonds which share a five-membered ring.

  18. Tunable crossover between one- and three-dimensional magnetic dynamics in C oII single-chain magnets organized by halogen bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amjad, A.; Clemente-Juan, J. M.; Coronado, E.; Luis, F.; Evangelisti, M.; Espallargas, G. Mínguez; del Barco, E.

    2016-06-01

    Low-temperature magnetometry, ac susceptibility, and calorimetry have been employed to study Co-based single-chain magnets (SCMs) organized through halogen bonding. Magnetic hysteresis and maxima in the dc and ac susceptibilities, respectively, confirm the SCM behavior of the system. Several characteristic magnetic relaxation regimes are observed at different temperatures, which can be associated with both intra- and interchain exchange interactions. Remarkably, tweaking the rate at which an external magnetic field is swept along the axis of the chains enables a controlled transition between the one- and three-dimensional dynamics. Experiments on an isostructural Co-based SCM system crystallized with different halogens do not show three-dimensional dynamics, illustrating the importance of halogen bonding on the control of interchain interactions.

  19. 4-Oxocyclo-hexa-neacetic acid: catemeric hydrogen bonding and spontaneous resolution of a single conformational enanti-omer in an achiral ∊-keto acid.

    PubMed

    Barcon, Alan; Brunskill, Andrew P J; Lalancette, Roger A; Thompson, Hugh W

    2010-01-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title compound, C(8)H(12)O(3), consists of a single conformational enanti-omer, which aggregates in the catemeric acid-to-ketone hydrogen-bonding mode [O⋯O = 2.682 (4) Å and O-H⋯O = 172 (6)°]. Four hydrogen-bonding chains of translationally related mol-ecules pass through the cell orthogonal to the 4(3) screw axis along c, alternating in the 110 and the 10 direction, with alignment with respect to this axis of + + - -. Successive chains are rotated by 90° around the c axis. One C-H⋯O=C close contact, involving the carboxyl group, exists. PMID:21587559

  20. 19 CFR 113.12 - Bond application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bond application. 113.12 Section 113.12 Customs... CUSTOMS BONDS Bond Application and Approval of Bond § 113.12 Bond application. (a) Single entry bond application. In order to insure that the revenue is adequately protected the port director may require...

  1. 19 CFR 113.12 - Bond application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bond application. 113.12 Section 113.12 Customs... CUSTOMS BONDS Bond Application and Approval of Bond § 113.12 Bond application. (a) Single entry bond application. In order to insure that the revenue is adequately protected the port director may require...

  2. 19 CFR 113.12 - Bond application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bond application. 113.12 Section 113.12 Customs... CUSTOMS BONDS Bond Application and Approval of Bond § 113.12 Bond application. (a) Single entry bond application. In order to insure that the revenue is adequately protected the port director may require...

  3. 19 CFR 113.12 - Bond application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bond application. 113.12 Section 113.12 Customs... CUSTOMS BONDS Bond Application and Approval of Bond § 113.12 Bond application. (a) Single entry bond application. In order to insure that the revenue is adequately protected the port director may require...

  4. 19 CFR 113.12 - Bond application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Bond application. 113.12 Section 113.12 Customs... CUSTOMS BONDS Bond Application and Approval of Bond § 113.12 Bond application. (a) Single entry bond application. In order to insure that the revenue is adequately protected the port director may require...

  5. Catalysis via homolytic substitutions with C-O and Ti-O bonds: oxidative additions and reductive eliminations in single electron steps.

    PubMed

    Gansäuer, Andreas; Fleckhaus, André; Lafont, Manuel Alejandre; Okkel, Andreas; Kotsis, Konstantinos; Anoop, Anakuthil; Neese, Frank

    2009-11-25

    In a combined theoretical and experimental study, an efficient catalytic reaction featuring epoxide opening and tetrahydrofuran formation through homolytic substitution reactions at C-O and Ti-O bonds was devised. The performance of these two key steps of the catalytic cycle was studied and could be adjusted by modifying the electronic properties of the catalysts through introduction of electron-donating or -withdrawing substituents to the titanocene catalysts. By regarding both steps as single electron versions of oxidative addition and reductive elimination, a mechanism-based platform for the design of catalysts and reagents for electron transfer reactions evolved that opens broad perspectives for further investigations. PMID:19919150

  6. A crystalline anionic complex of scandium nitride endometallofullerene: experimental observation of single-bonded (Sc3N@Ih-C80(-))2 dimers.

    PubMed

    Konarev, Dmitri V; Zorina, Leokadiya V; Khasanov, Salavat S; Popov, Alexey A; Otsuka, Akihiro; Yamochi, Hideki; Saito, Gunzi; Lyubovskaya, Rimma N

    2016-09-14

    Reduction of scandium nitride clusterfullerene, Sc3N@Ih-C80, by sodium fluorenone ketyl in the presence of cryptand[2,2,2] allows the crystallization of the {cryptand[2,2,2](Na(+))}2(Sc3N@Ih-C80(-))2·2.5C6H4Cl2 (1) salt. The Sc3N@Ih-C80˙(-) radical anions are dimerized to form single-bonded (Sc3N@Ih-C80(-))2 dimers. PMID:27511304

  7. An Electron-Poor C64 Nanographene by Palladium-Catalyzed Cascade C-C Bond Formation: One-Pot Synthesis and Single-Crystal Structure Analysis.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Sabine; Shoyama, Kazutaka; Schmidt, David; Würthner, Frank

    2016-05-23

    Herein, we report the one-pot synthesis of an electron-poor nanographene containing dicarboximide groups at the corners. We efficiently combined palladium-catalyzed Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling and dehydrohalogenation to synthesize an extended two-dimensional π-scaffold of defined size in a single chemical operation starting from N-(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)-4,5-dibromo-1,8-naphthalimide and a tetrasubstituted pyrene boronic acid ester as readily accessible starting materials. The reaction of these precursors under the conditions commonly used for Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling afforded a C64 nanographene through the formation of ten C-C bonds in a one-pot process. Single-crystal X-ray analysis unequivocally confirmed the structure of this unique extended aromatic molecule with a planar geometry. The optical and electrochemical properties of this largest ever synthesized planar electron-poor nanographene skeleton were also analyzed. PMID:27058998

  8. First principle investigation of electronic structure, chemical bonding and optical properties of tetrabarium gallium trinitride oxide single crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Saleem Ayaz Azam, Sikander

    2015-10-15

    The electronic band structure, valence electron charge density and optical susceptibilities of tetrabarium gallium trinitride (TGT) were calculated via first principle study. The electronic band structure calculation describes TGT as semiconductor having direct band gap of 1.38 eV. The valence electronic charge density contour verified the non-polar covalent nature of the bond. The absorption edge and first peak of dielectric tensor components showed electrons transition from N-p state to Ba-d state. The calculated uniaxial anisotropy (0.4842) and birefringence (−0.0061) of present paper is prearranged as follow the spectral components of the dielectric tensor. The first peak in energy loss function (ELOS) shows the energy loss of fast traveling electrons in the material. The first sharp peak produced in ELOS around 10.5 eV show plasmon loss having plasma frequencies 0.1536, 0.004 and 0.066 of dielectric tensor components. This plasmon loss also cause decrease in reflectivity spectra.

  9. Simple Bond Cleavage

    SciTech Connect

    Gary S. Groenewold

    2005-08-01

    Simple bond cleavage is a class of fragmentation reactions in which a single bond is broken, without formation of new bonds between previously unconnected atoms. Because no bond making is involved, simple bond cleavages are endothermic, and activation energies are generally higher than for rearrangement eliminations. The rate of simple bond cleavage reactions is a strong function of the internal energy of the molecular ion, which reflects a loose transition state that resembles reaction products, and has a high density of accessible states. For this reason, simple bond cleavages tend to dominate fragmentation reactions for highly energized molecular ions. Simple bond cleavages have negligible reverse activation energy, and hence they are used as valuable probes of ion thermochemistry, since the energy dependence of the reactions can be related to the bond energy. In organic mass spectrometry, simple bond cleavages of odd electron ions can be either homolytic or heterolytic, depending on whether the fragmentation is driven by the radical site or the charge site. Simple bond cleavages of even electron ions tend to be heterolytic, producing even electron product ions and neutrals.

  10. 200 mm wafer-scale epitaxial transfer of single crystal Si on glass by anodic bonding of silicon-on-insulator wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teh, W. H.; Trigg, Alastair; Tung, C. H.; Kumar, R.; Balasubramanian, N.; Kwong, D. L.

    2005-08-01

    We report a low-temperature (350 °C) anodic bonding followed by grind/etch-back method for a 200 mm wafer-scale epitaxial transfer of ultrathin (1.9 kÅ) single crystalline Si on Pyrex glass. Standard back-end-of-line 3 kÅ SiN/3 kÅ undoped silicon glass passivating films were used as the buffer layers between the silicon-on-insulator wafer and the glass wafer. The quality and strain-free state of the transferred transparent Si film to glass was characterized by cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction (XRD), and high-resolution XRD. Complete removal of the bulk Si after bonding was ascertained by Auger electron spectroscopy spectra and depth profiling. Strong adhesion between the transferred film and the glass wafer was verified by standard tape adhesion tests. This process will pave the way for future generations of Si-based microelectronics including bioelectronics.

  11. Identification and cleavage of breakable single bonds by selective oxidation, reduction, and hydrolysis. Annual report, October 1, 1980-September 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschon, A.S.; Zevely, J.; Mayo, F.R.

    1981-11-12

    The objective of this project is to determine the structure of bituminous coal by determining the proportions of the various kinds of connecting bonds and how they can best be broken. Results obtained during the past quarter are presented for the following tasks: (1) extractions and fractionations of coal products which covers pyridine extraction, fractionation of TIPS fractions, EDA extraction of Illinois No. 6 coal and swelling ratios of coal samples; (2) experiments on breakable single bonds which cover reactions of ethylenediamine and model ethers, reaction of pyridine-extracted coal with Me/sub 3/SiI, Baeyer-Villiger oxidations, reaction to diphenylmethane with 15% HNO/sub 3/, cleavage of TIPS with ZnI/sub 2/, and cleavage of black acids; and (3) oxygen oxidation No. 18. Some of the highlights of these studies are: (1) some model ethers are not cleaved by EDA under extraction conditions; (2) oxidation of diaryl ketones with m-chloroperbenzoic acid and saponification of the resulting esters in promising for identifying ketones, (3) treatment of a black acid with pyridine hydroiodide reduced the acid's molecular weight and increased its solubility in pyridine, but treatment with ZnI/sub 2/ was ineffective; (4) in comparison with 0.1 M K/sub 2/S/sub 2/O/sub 8/, 0.01 M persulfate is relatively ineffective in accelerating oxidation of BnNH/sub 2/-extracted coal in water suspension. 2 figures, 3 tables.

  12. Shear Bond Strength of Superficial, Intermediate and Deep Dentin In Vitro with Recent Generation Self-etching Primers and Single Nano Composite Resin

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Kulshrest; Naik, Rajaram; Hegde, Srinidhi; Damda, Aftab

    2015-01-01

    Background: This in vitro study is intended to compare the shear bond strength of recent self-etching primers to superficial, intermediate, and deep dentin levels. Materials and Methods: All teeth were sectioned at various levels and grouped randomly into two experimental groups and two control groups having three subgroups. The experimental groups consisted of two different dentin bonding system. The positive control group consisted of All Bond 2 and the negative control group was without the bonding agent. Finally, the specimens were subjected to shear bond strength study under Instron machine. The maximum shear bond strengths were noted at the time of fracture. The results were statistically analyzed. Results: Comparing the shear bond strength values, All Bond 2 (Group III) demonstrated fairly higher bond strength values at different levels of dentin. Generally comparing All Bond 2 with the other two experimental groups revealed highly significant statistical results. Conclusion: In the present investigation with the fourth generation, higher mean shear bond strength values were recorded compared with the self-etching primers. When intermediate dentin shear bond strength was compared with deep dentin shear bond strength statistically significant results were found with Clearfil Liner Bond 2V, All Bond 2 and the negative control. There was a statistically significant difference in shear bond strength values both with self-etching primers and control groups (fourth generation bonding system and without bonding system) at superficial, intermediate, and deep dentin. There was a significant fall in bond strength values as one reaches deeper levels of dentin from superficial to intermediate to deep. PMID:26225101

  13. Approach to thermal properties and electronic polarizability from average single bond strength in ZnO---Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}---B{sub 2}O{sub 3} glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Taisuke; Honma, Tsuyoshi; Dimitrov, Vesselin; Komatsu, Takayuki

    2010-12-15

    The glass transition temperature (T{sub g}), density, refractive index, Raman scattering spectra, and X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) for xZnO-yBi{sub 2}O{sub 3}-zB{sub 2}O{sub 3} glasses (x=10-65, y=10-50, z=25-60 mol%) are measured to clarify the bonding and structure features of the glasses with large amounts of ZnO. The average electronic polarizability of oxide ions ({alpha}{sub O2-}) and optical basicity ({Lambda}) of the glasses estimated using Lorentz-Lorenz equation increase with increasing ZnO or Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} content, giving the values of {alpha}{sub O2-}=1.963 A{sup 3} and {Lambda}=0.819 for 60ZnO-10Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}-30B{sub 2}O{sub 3} glass. The formation of B---O---Bi and B---O---Zn bridging bonds in the glass structure is suggested from Raman and XPS spectra. The average single bond strength (B{sub M---O}) proposed by Dimitrov and Komatsu is applied to the glasses and is calculated using single bond strengths of 150.6 kJ/mol for Zn---O bonds in ZnO{sub 4} groups, 102.5 kJ/mol for Bi---O bonds in BiO{sub 6} groups, 498 kJ/mol for B---O bonds in BO{sub 3} groups, and 373 kJ/mol for B---O bonds in BO{sub 4} groups. Good correlations are observed between T{sub g} and B{sub M---O}, {Lambda} and B{sub M---O}, and T{sub g} and {Lambda}, proposing that the average single bond strength is a good parameter for understanding thermal and optical properties of ZnO---Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}---B{sub 2}O{sub 3} glasses. -- Graphical abstract: This figure shows the correlation between optical basicity {Lambda} and average single bond strength B{sub M---O} in ZnO---Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}---B{sub 2}O{sub 3} glasses. A good correlation is observed, proposing that the average single bond strength is a good parameter for understanding optical properties of ZnO---Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}---B{sub 2}O{sub 3} glasses. Display Omitted

  14. Bonded semiconductor substrate

    DOEpatents

    Atwater, Jr.; Harry A. , Zahler; James M.

    2010-07-13

    Ge/Si and other nonsilicon film heterostructures are formed by hydrogen-induced exfoliation of the Ge film which is wafer bonded to a cheaper substrate, such as Si. A thin, single-crystal layer of Ge is transferred to Si substrate. The bond at the interface of the Ge/Si heterostructures is covalent to ensure good thermal contact, mechanical strength, and to enable the formation of an ohmic contact between the Si substrate and Ge layers. To accomplish this type of bond, hydrophobic wafer bonding is used, because as the invention demonstrates the hydrogen-surface-terminating species that facilitate van der Waals bonding evolves at temperatures above 600.degree. C. into covalent bonding in hydrophobically bound Ge/Si layer transferred systems.

  15. Comparison of Shear Bond Strength of Three Self-etching Adhesives: An In-Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Yadala, Chandrashekhar; Gaddam, Rajkumar; Arya, Siddarth; Baburamreddy, K V; Raju, V Ramakrishnam; Varma, Praveen Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background: The aim of the study was to determine and compare the shear bond strength of brackets bonded with Adper Promt self-etching adhesive (3M ESPE), Xeno III self-etching adhesive (DENSPLY), Transbond plus self-etching adhesive (3M) with that of conversional bonding procedure, and to calculate the adhesive remnant index (ARI). Materials and Methods: Totally, 60 maxillary premolar teeth were collected, and divided into Group I (Blue): Transbond™ XT primer, Group II (Purple): Adper™ Prompt™ self-etching adhesive, Group III (Orange): Xeno III® self-etching adhesive, Group IV (Pink): Tranbond™ Plus self-etching adhesive. Results: The results of the study showed there was no statistical significance in the shear bond strength according to an analysis of variance (P = 0.207) of the four groups. The mean shear bond strength of Groups I, II, III, IV were 14.56 ± 2.97 Megapascals (MPa), 12.62 ± 2.48 MPa, 13.27 ± 3.16, and 12.64 ± 2.56, respectively. Chi-square comparison for the ARI indicated that there was a significant difference (P = 0.003) between the groups. Conclusion: All the four self-etching adhesives showed clinically acceptable mean shear bond strength. The ARI score showed a self-etching adhesive the debonding occurred more within the adhesive interface leaving less composite adhesive on the tooth surface making it easy to clean up. PMID:26229371

  16. The mobility of single-file water molecules is governed by the number of H-bonds they may form with channel-lining residues

    PubMed Central

    Horner, Andreas; Zocher, Florian; Preiner, Johannes; Ollinger, Nicole; Siligan, Christine; Akimov, Sergey A.; Pohl, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Channel geometry governs the unitary osmotic water channel permeability, pf, according to classical hydrodynamics. Yet, pf varies by several orders of magnitude for membrane channels with a constriction zone that is one water molecule in width and four to eight molecules in length. We show that both the pf of those channels and the diffusion coefficient of the single-file waters within them are determined by the number NH of residues in the channel wall that may form a hydrogen bond with the single-file waters. The logarithmic dependence of water diffusivity on NH is in line with the multiplicity of binding options at higher NH densities. We obtained high-precision pf values by (i) having measured the abundance of the reconstituted aquaporins in the vesicular membrane via fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and via high-speed atomic force microscopy, and (ii) having acquired the vesicular water efflux from scattered light intensities via our new adaptation of the Rayleigh-Gans-Debye equation. PMID:26167541

  17. Instability in Chemical Bonds from Broken-Symmetry Single-Reference to Symmetry-Adapted Multireference Approaches to Strongly Correlated Electron Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, K.; Yamanaka, S.; Isobe, H.; Kawakami, K.; Kitagawa, Y.; Takeda, R.; Saito, T.; Nishihara, M.; Okumura, M.

    2009-03-01

    Theoretical descriptions of strongly correlated electron systems have been investigated from the view point of generalization of molecular orbital (MO) concepts; namely from broken-symmetry (BS) single reference (SR) MO theories to symmetry-adapted (SA) multi-reference (MR) MO theories. Generalized Hartree-Fock (GHF) MO and generalized Kohn-Sham (GKS) DFT methods are first introduced as the BS SR approach, whereas the MR-X (X = configuration interaction (CI), perturbation (PT), coupled-cluster (CC) and density functional theory (DFT)) are discussed as the SA MR approach. The quantum resonance (R) of the degenerated BS MO solutions is also examined as a powerful procedure for recovery of the broken spin and spatial symmetries in finite systems. The RBS MO CI has been applied to elucidate electronic structures of triangular and tetrahedral systems with strong spin frustrations. The RBS MO method also gives rise to an approximate spin projection (AP) scheme of the spin-contaminated BS solutions. The natural orbitals (NO) analysis of BS and RBS solutions provides symmetry-adapted (SA) NOs and their occupation numbers, which are useful for construction of complete active space (CAS) for successive MR-X computations. The occupation numbers of NOs are also used to define several chemical indices such as effective bond order (b and B) and unpaired electron density (U), which are common conceptual bridges between BS SR and SA MR methods. Applications of these theoretical methods have been performed for elucidation of chameleonic reactivity of molecular oxygen and transition-metal oxo species, and the nature of chemical bonds in ion-radicals and mixed-valence (MV) iron-sulfur clusters as typical examples with strongly correlated electron systems.

  18. Experimental investigation of the EPR parameters and molecular orbital bonding coefficients for VO2+ ion in NaH2PO4·2H2O single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalfaoğlu, Emel; Karabulut, Bünyamin

    2016-09-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of VO2+ ions in NaH2PO4·2H2O single crystal have been studied. The spin-Hamiltonian parameters and molecular orbital bonding coefficients were calculated. The angular variation of the EPR spectra shows two different VO2+ complexes. These are located in different chemical environment and each environment contains four magnetically inequivalent VO2+ sites. The crystal field around VO2+ ion is approximately axially symmetric since a strong V=O bond distorts the crystal lattice. Spin Hamiltonian parameters and molecular orbital bonding coefficients were calculated from the EPR data and the nature of bonding in the complex was discussed together.

  19. Bond Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollack, Rachel H.

    2000-01-01

    Notes trends toward increased borrowing by colleges and universities and offers guidelines for institutions that are considering issuing bonds to raise money for capital projects. Discussion covers advantages of using bond financing, how use of bonds impacts on traditional fund raising, other cautions and concerns, and some troubling aspects of…

  20. Facile Isolation of Adsorbent-Free Long and Highly-Pure Chirality-Selected Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Using A Hydrogen-bonding Supramolecular Polymer

    PubMed Central

    Toshimitsu, Fumiyuki; Nakashima, Naotoshi

    2015-01-01

    The ideal form of semiconducting-single-walled carbon nanotubes (sem-SWNTs) for science and technology is long, defect-free, chirality pure and chemically pure isolated narrow diameter tubes. While various techniques to solubilize and purify sem-SWNTs have been developed, many of them targeted only the chiral- or chemically-purity while sacrificing the sem-SWNT intrinsic structural identities by applying strong ultra-sonication and/or chemical modifications. Toward the ultimate purification of the sem-SWNTs, here we report a mild-conditioned extraction of the sem-SWNTs using removable supramolecular hydrogen-bonding polymers (HBPs) that are composed of dicarboxylic- or diaminopyridyl-fluorenes with ~70%-(8,6)SWNT selective extraction. Replacing conventional strong sonication techniques by a simple shaking using HPBs was found to provide long sem-SWNTs (>2.0 μm) with a very high D/G ratio, which was determined by atomic force microscopy observations. The HBPs were readily removed from the nanotube surfaces by an outer stimulus, such as a change in the solvent polarities, to provide chemically pure (8,6)-enriched sem-SWNTs. We also describe molecular mechanics calculations to propose possible structures for the HBP-wrapped sem-SWNTs, furthermore, the mechanism of the chiral selectivity for the sorted sem-SWNTs is well explained by the relationship between the molecular surface area and mass of the HBP/SWNT composites. PMID:26658356

  1. Facile Isolation of Adsorbent-Free Long and Highly-Pure Chirality-Selected Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Using A Hydrogen-bonding Supramolecular Polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toshimitsu, Fumiyuki; Nakashima, Naotoshi

    2015-12-01

    The ideal form of semiconducting-single-walled carbon nanotubes (sem-SWNTs) for science and technology is long, defect-free, chirality pure and chemically pure isolated narrow diameter tubes. While various techniques to solubilize and purify sem-SWNTs have been developed, many of them targeted only the chiral- or chemically-purity while sacrificing the sem-SWNT intrinsic structural identities by applying strong ultra-sonication and/or chemical modifications. Toward the ultimate purification of the sem-SWNTs, here we report a mild-conditioned extraction of the sem-SWNTs using removable supramolecular hydrogen-bonding polymers (HBPs) that are composed of dicarboxylic- or diaminopyridyl-fluorenes with ~70%-(8,6)SWNT selective extraction. Replacing conventional strong sonication techniques by a simple shaking using HPBs was found to provide long sem-SWNTs (>2.0 μm) with a very high D/G ratio, which was determined by atomic force microscopy observations. The HBPs were readily removed from the nanotube surfaces by an outer stimulus, such as a change in the solvent polarities, to provide chemically pure (8,6)-enriched sem-SWNTs. We also describe molecular mechanics calculations to propose possible structures for the HBP-wrapped sem-SWNTs, furthermore, the mechanism of the chiral selectivity for the sorted sem-SWNTs is well explained by the relationship between the molecular surface area and mass of the HBP/SWNT composites.

  2. Facile Isolation of Adsorbent-Free Long and Highly-Pure Chirality-Selected Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Using A Hydrogen-bonding Supramolecular Polymer.

    PubMed

    Toshimitsu, Fumiyuki; Nakashima, Naotoshi

    2015-01-01

    The ideal form of semiconducting-single-walled carbon nanotubes (sem-SWNTs) for science and technology is long, defect-free, chirality pure and chemically pure isolated narrow diameter tubes. While various techniques to solubilize and purify sem-SWNTs have been developed, many of them targeted only the chiral- or chemically-purity while sacrificing the sem-SWNT intrinsic structural identities by applying strong ultra-sonication and/or chemical modifications. Toward the ultimate purification of the sem-SWNTs, here we report a mild-conditioned extraction of the sem-SWNTs using removable supramolecular hydrogen-bonding polymers (HBPs) that are composed of dicarboxylic- or diaminopyridyl-fluorenes with ~70%-(8,6)SWNT selective extraction. Replacing conventional strong sonication techniques by a simple shaking using HPBs was found to provide long sem-SWNTs (>2.0 μm) with a very high D/G ratio, which was determined by atomic force microscopy observations. The HBPs were readily removed from the nanotube surfaces by an outer stimulus, such as a change in the solvent polarities, to provide chemically pure (8,6)-enriched sem-SWNTs. We also describe molecular mechanics calculations to propose possible structures for the HBP-wrapped sem-SWNTs, furthermore, the mechanism of the chiral selectivity for the sorted sem-SWNTs is well explained by the relationship between the molecular surface area and mass of the HBP/SWNT composites. PMID:26658356

  3. A Semi-Analytical Method for Determining the Energy Release Rate of Cracks in Adhesively-Bonded Single-Lap Composite Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Charles; Sun, Wenjun; Tomblin, John S.; Smeltzer, Stanley S., III

    2007-01-01

    A semi-analytical method for determining the strain energy release rate due to a prescribed interface crack in an adhesively-bonded, single-lap composite joint subjected to axial tension is presented. The field equations in terms of displacements within the joint are formulated by using first-order shear deformable, laminated plate theory together with kinematic relations and force equilibrium conditions. The stress distributions for the adherends and adhesive are determined after the appropriate boundary and loading conditions are applied and the equations for the field displacements are solved. Based on the adhesive stress distributions, the forces at the crack tip are obtained and the strain energy release rate of the crack is determined by using the virtual crack closure technique (VCCT). Additionally, the test specimen geometry from both the ASTM D3165 and D1002 test standards are utilized during the derivation of the field equations in order to correlate analytical models with future test results. The system of second-order differential field equations is solved to provide the adherend and adhesive stress response using the symbolic computation tool, Maple 9. Finite element analyses using J-integral as well as VCCT were performed to verify the developed analytical model. The finite element analyses were conducted using the commercial finite element analysis software ABAQUS. The results determined using the analytical method correlated well with the results from the finite element analyses.

  4. H-bonding scheme and cation partitioning in axinite: a single-crystal neutron diffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatta, G. Diego; Redhammer, Günther J.; Guastoni, Alessandro; Guastella, Giorgio; Meven, Martin; Pavese, Alessandro

    2016-05-01

    The crystal chemistry of a ferroaxinite from Colebrook Hill, Rosebery district, Tasmania, Australia, was investigated by electron microprobe analysis in wavelength-dispersive mode, inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy and single-crystal neutron diffraction at 293 K. The chemical formula obtained on the basis of the ICP-AES data is the following: ^{X1,X2} {{Ca}}_{4.03} Y ( {{{Mn}}_{0.42} {{Mg}}_{0.23} {{Fe}}^{2 + }_{1.39} } )_{Σ 2.04} ^{Z1,Z2} ( {{{Fe}}^{3 + }_{0.15} {{Al}}_{3.55} {{Ti}}_{0.12} } )_{Σ 3.82} ^{T1,T2,T3,T4} ( {{{Ti}}_{0.03} {{Si}}_{7.97} } )_{Σ 8} ^{T5} {{B}}_{1.96} {{O}}_{30} ( {{OH}} )_{2.18} . The 57Fe Mössbauer spectrum shows unambiguously the occurrence of Fe2+ and Fe3+ in octahedral coordination only, with Fe2+/Fe3+ = 9:1. The neutron structure refinement provides a structure model in general agreement with the previous experimental findings: the tetrahedral T1, T2, T3 and T4 sites are fully occupied by Si, whereas the T5 site is fully occupied by B, with no evidence of Si at the T5, or Al or Fe3+ at the T1- T5 sites. The structural and chemical data of this study suggest that the amount of B in ferroaxinite is that expected from the ideal stoichiometry: 2 a.p.f.u. (for 32 O). The atomic distribution among the X1, X2, Y, Z1 and Z2 sites obtained by neutron structure refinement is in good agreement with that based on the ICP-AES data. For the first time, an unambiguous localization of the H site is obtained, which forms a hydroxyl group with the oxygen atom at the O16 site as donor. The H-bonding scheme in axinite structure is now fully described: the O16- H distance (corrected for riding motion effect) is 0.991(1) Å and an asymmetric bifurcated bonding configuration occurs, with O5 and O13 as acceptors [i.e. with O16··· O5 = 3.096(1) Å, H··· O5 = 2.450(1) Å and O16- H··· O5 = 123.9(1)°; O16··· O13 = 2.777(1) Å, H··· O13 = 1.914(1) Å and O16- H··· O13 = 146

  5. Which Ab Initio Wave Function Methods Are Adequate for Quantitative Calculations of the Energies of Biradicals? The Performance of Coupled-Cluster and Multi-Reference Methods Along a Single-Bond Dissociation Coordinate

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ke; Jalan, Amrit; Green, William H.; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2013-01-08

    We examine the accuracy of single-reference and multireference correlated wave function methods for predicting accurate energies and potential energy curves of biradicals. The biradicals considered are intermediate species along the bond dissociation coordinates for breaking the F-F bond in F2, the O-O bond in H2O2, and the C-C bond in CH3CH3. We apply a host of single-reference and multireference approximations in a consistent way to the same cases to provide a better assessment of their relative accuracies than was previously possible. The most accurate method studied is coupled cluster theory with all connected excitations through quadruples, CCSDTQ. Without explicit quadruple excitations, the most accurate potential energy curves are obtained by the single-reference RCCSDt method, followed, in order of decreasing accuracy, by UCCSDT, RCCSDT, UCCSDt, seven multireference methods, including perturbation theory, configuration interaction, and coupled-cluster methods (with MRCI+Q being the best and Mk-MR-CCSD the least accurate), four CCSD(T) methods, and then CCSD.

  6. Overexpression of the rhodanese PspE, a single cysteine-containing protein, restores disulfide bond formation to an Escherichia coli strain lacking DsbA

    PubMed Central

    Chng, Shu-Sin; Dutton, Rachel J.; Denoncin, Katleen; Vertommen, Didier; Collet, Jean-Francois; Kadokura, Hiroshi; Beckwith, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    Summary Escherichia coli uses the DsbA/DsbB system for introducing disulfide bonds into proteins in the cell envelope. Deleting either dsbA or dsbB or both reduces disulfide bond formation but does not entirely eliminate it. Whether such background disulfide bond forming activity is enzyme-catalyzed is not known. To identify possible cellular factors that might contribute to the background activity, we studied the effects of overexpressing endogenous proteins on disulfide bond formation in the periplasm. We find that overexpressing PspE, a periplasmic rhodanese, partially restores substantial disulfide bond formation to a dsbA strain. This activity depends on DsbC, the bacterial disulfide bond isomerase, but not on DsbB. We show that overexpressed PspE is oxidized to the sulfenic acid form and reacts with substrate proteins to form mixed disulfide adducts. DsbC either prevents the formation of these mixed disulfides or resolves these adducts subsequently. In the process, DsbC itself gets oxidized and proceeds to catalyze disulfide bond formation. Although this PspE/DsbC system is not responsible for the background disulfide bond forming activity, we suggest that it might be utilized in other organisms lacking the DsbA/DsbB system. PMID:22809289

  7. Online, efficient and precision laser profiling of bronze-bonded diamond grinding wheels based on a single-layer deep-cutting intermittent feeding method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Hui; Chen, Genyu; He, Jie; Zhou, Cong; Du, Han; Wang, Yanyi

    2016-06-01

    In this study, an online, efficient and precision laser profiling approach that is based on a single-layer deep-cutting intermittent feeding method is described. The effects of the laser cutting depth and the track-overlap ratio of the laser cutting on the efficiency, precision and quality of laser profiling were investigated. Experiments on the online profiling of bronze-bonded diamond grinding wheels were performed using a pulsed fiber laser. The results demonstrate that an increase in the laser cutting depth caused an increase in the material removal efficiency during the laser profiling process. However, the maximum laser profiling efficiency was only achieved when the laser cutting depth was equivalent to the initial surface contour error of the grinding wheel. In addition, the selection of relatively high track-overlap ratios of laser cutting for the profiling of grinding wheels was beneficial with respect to the increase in the precision of laser profiling, whereas the efficiency and quality of the laser profiling were not affected by the change in the track-overlap ratio. After optimized process parameters were employed for online laser profiling, the circular run-out error and the parallelism error of the grinding wheel surface decreased from 83.1 μm and 324.6 μm to 11.3 μm and 3.5 μm, respectively. The surface contour precision of the grinding wheel significantly improved. The highest surface contour precision for grinding wheels of the same type that can be theoretically achieved after laser profiling is completely dependent on the peak power density of the laser. The higher the laser peak power density is, the higher the surface contour precision of the grinding wheel after profiling.

  8. The influence of air temperature for solvent evaporation on bonding of self-etch adhesives to dentin

    PubMed Central

    Moura, Sandra Kiss; Murad, Cintia Gaio; Reis, Alessandra; Klein-Júnior, Celso Afonso; Grande, Rosa Helena Miranda; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study evaluated the effect of air temperature (warm or cold) for solvent evaporation on bonding and nanoleakage of self-etching adhesives to dentin. Materials and Methods: The adhesives Clearfil 3S Bond [S3], OptiBond All-In-One [OB], Adper SE Plus [AD], and Silorane adhesive [SI] were applied on dentin surfaces, and a warm (60 ± 2°C) or cold air (20 ± 1°C) was applied and light-cured. After water storage (24 h), the teeth were sectioned into sticks (0.8 mm2) and tested in tensile. Then, they were immersed in a 50% solution of silver nitrate, photo-developed and the nanoleakage observed in a scanning electron microscope. The bond strength and nanoleakage pattern were analyzed by two-way analysis of variance and post hoc Tukey's test (α =0.05). Results: Higher bond strength and lower silver nitrate uptake were observed for the adhesives under warm condition (P < 0.05). AD and SI showed better adhesive results than S3 and OB (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The use of a warm air was useful to improve the bonding and diminish the nanoleakage of adhesive systems to dentin. PMID:24966771

  9. Phosphoric acid esters cannot replace polyvinylphosphonic acid as phosphoprotein analogs in biomimetic remineralization of resin-bonded dentin.

    PubMed

    Mai, Sui; Kim, Young Kyung; Toledano, Manuel; Breschi, Lorenzo; Ling, Jun Qi; Pashley, David H; Tay, Franklin R

    2009-10-01

    Polyvinylphosphonic acid (PVPA), a biomimetic analog of phosphoproteins, is crucial for recruiting polyacrylic acid (PAA)-stabilized amorphous calcium phosphate nanoprecursors during biomimetic remineralization of dentin collagen matrices. This study tested the null hypothesis that phosphoric acid esters of methacrylates in dentin adhesives cannot replace PVPA during bimimetic remineralization of resin-dentin interfaces. Human dentin specimens were bonded with: (I) XP Bond, an etch-and-rinse adhesive using moist bonding; (II) XP Bond using dry bonding; (III) Adper Prompt L-Pop, a self-etching adhesive. The control medium contained only set Portland cement and a simulated body fluid (SBF) without any biomimetic analog. Two experimental Portland cement/SBF remineralization media were evaluated: the first contained PAA as the sole biomimetic analog, the second contained PAA and PVPA as dual biomimetic analogs. No remineralization of the resin-dentin interfaces could be identified from specimens immersed in the control medium. After 2-4 months in the first experimental medium, specimens exhibited either no remineralization or large crystal formation within hybrid layers. Only specimens immersed in the second remineralization medium produced nanocrystals that accounted for intrafibrillar remineralization within hybrid layers. The null hypothesis could not be rejected; phosphoric acid esters in dentin adhesives cannot replace PVPA during biomimetic remineralization of adhesive-bonded dentin. PMID:19481792

  10. Institutional Bonding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allard, M. June

    Institutional bonding was examined at a public, urban commuter college with exceptionally high attrition and visibly low morale. Changes in bonding and attrition were measured 6 years after a 2-year effort to develop school identity and student feelings of membership. It was found that a simple index of campus morale is provided by level of…

  11. Bond selectivity in the dissociative adsorption of c-CH 2N 2 on single crystals: a comparative DFT-LSD investigation for Pd(110) and Cu(110)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rochefort, Alain; McBreen, Peter H.; Salahub, Dennis R.

    1996-02-01

    A comparison between the reactivity of palladium and copper cluster models toward diazirine ( c-CH 2N 2) was made using the LCGTO-MCP-LSD method. Adsorption with the nitrogen pair directly over surface atoms (the μ-top site) is clearly more stable than when the NN pair is perpendicular to the rows of the (110) surface (the μ-bridge site). The NN bond is strongly affected by adsorption, a significant decrease of its bond order is observed for both palladium and copper. One main difference between palladium and copper with regards to the adsorption of c-CH 2N 2 is the magnitude of the MN bond order; palladium tends to form a stronger chemisorption bond than copper. A second difference is that partial occupation of the LUMO of diazirine only occurs for the copper cluster model systems. The concerted dissociation of CN bonds is energetically demanding but appears to be easier on Pd than on Cu by around 28 kcal mol -1. The study of electronically perturbed diazirine (excited, ionized or isomerized) provides insight on how chemisorption induces variations in bond lengths and vibrational frequencies as a result of charge transfer. The results of the calculations show that the μ-top adsorbed state is more similar to the n_ →π∗ first excited state of the free molecule than to the ionized state. A more striking result is obtained when the first excited states of the chemisorbed complexes are studied. A 0.4 eV electron excitation in the {c- CH2N2}/{Cu4} complex (μ-top) leads to a significant decrease of the bond order of the NN bond but does not induce even a small change for the {c- CH2N2}/{Pd4} complex. The calculations provide some insights on the markedly different bond scission selectivity observed in experimental studies of the thermal decomposition of diazirine on Pd and Cu surfaces. Experiments show that NN bond scission occurs with essentially 100% selectivity on copper, whereas NN bond retention as well as NN bond scission occurs on Pd(110).

  12. Effect of blood contamination with 1-step self-etching adhesives on microtensile bond strength to dentin.

    PubMed

    Yoo, H M; Pereira, P N R

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of blood contamination and decontamination methods on the microtensile bond strength of 1-step self-etching adhesive systems to dentin contaminated after adhesive application and light curing. Three commercially available "all-in-one" adhesives (One Up Bond F, Xeno III and Adper Prompt L-Pop) and 1 resin composite (Clearfil AP-X) were used. Third molars that had been stored in distilled water with 0.5% thymol at 4 degrees C were ground with #600 SiC paper under running water to produce a standardized smear layer. The specimens were randomly divided into groups according to the 3 adhesive systems. The adhesive systems were used under 3 conditions: no contamination, which was the control (C); contamination of the light-cured adhesive surface with blood and reapplication of adhesive (Contamination 1) and contamination of the light-cured adhesive surface with blood, then washing, drying and reapplication of the adhesive (Contamination 2). Following light curing of the adhesive, the resin composite was placed in 3 increments up to a 5-mm-thick layer on the bonded surface. All specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours. The microtensile bond strength was measured using a universal testing machine (EZ test), and data were analyzed by 1-way ANOVA followed by the Duncan test to make comparisons among the groups (p=0.05). After debonding, 5 specimens were selected from each group and examined in a scanning electron microscope to evaluate the modes of fracture. For all adhesives, contamination groups showed lower bond strength than the control (p<0.05). There was no statistically significant difference among the control groups (p>0.05). For Xeno III and Adper Prompt L-Pop, contamination group #2 showed the lowest bond strength among the groups (p<0.05). For One Up Bond F, contamination group #2 showed higher bond strength than contamination group #1 but showed no statistical significance between them (p>0.05). PMID

  13. Kinetic stabilization and reactivity of π single-bonded species: effect of the alkoxy group on the lifetime of singlet 2,2-dialkoxy-1,3-diphenyloctahydropentalene-1,3-diyls.

    PubMed

    Nakagaki, Tomoyuki; Sakai, Tomoko; Mizuta, Tsutomu; Fujiwara, Yoshihisa; Abe, Manabu

    2013-07-29

    Kinetic stabilization and reactivity of π single-bonded species have been investigated in detail by generating a series of singlet 2,2-dialkoxy-1,3-diphenyloctahydropentalene-1,3-diyls (DRs). The lifetime at 293 K in benzene was found to increase when the carbon chain length of the alkoxy groups was increased; 292 ns (DRb; OR = OR' = OCH3) <880 ns (DRc; OR = OR' = OC2H5) <1899 ns (DRd; OR = OR' = OC3H7) ≈2292 ns (DRe; OR = OR' = OC6H13) ≈2146 ns (DRf; OR = OR' = OC10H21). DRh (OR = OC3H7, OR' = OCH3; 935 ns) with the mixed-acetal moiety is a longer-lived species than another diastereomer DRg (OR = OCH3, OR' = OC3H7; 516 ns). Activation parameters determined for the first-order decay process reveal that the enthalpy factor plays a crucial role in determining the energy barrier of the ring-closing reaction, that is, from the π-bonding to the σ-bonding compounds. Computational studies using density functional theory provided more insight into the structures of the singlet species with π single-bonded character and the transition states for the ring-closing reaction, thereby clarifying the role of the alkoxy group on the lifetime and the stereoselectivity of the ring-closing reaction. PMID:23787808

  14. Better Bonded Ethernet Load Balancing

    SciTech Connect

    Gabler, Jason

    2006-09-29

    When a High Performance Storage System's mover shuttles large amounts of data to storage over a single Ethernet device that single channel can rapidly become saturated. Using Linux Ethernet channel bonding to address this and similar situations was not, until now, a viable solution. The various modes in which channel bonding could be configured always offered some benefit but only under strict conditions or at a system resource cost that was greater than the benefit gained by using channel bonding. Newer bonding modes designed by various networking hardware companies, helpful in such networking scenarios, were already present in their own switches. However, Linux-based systems were unable to take advantage of those new modes as they had not yet been implemented in the Linux kernel bonding driver. So, except for basic fault tolerance, Linux channel bonding could not positively combine separate Ethernet devices to provide the necessary bandwidth.

  15. Influence of Er,Cr:YSGG laser treatment on microtensile bond strength of adhesives to enamel.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Marcio Vivan; De Munck, Jan; Coutinho, Eduardo; Ermis, R Banu; Van Landuyt, Kirsten; de Carvalho, Rubens Corte Real; Van Meerbeek, Bart

    2008-01-01

    The current trend towards minimum-intervention dentistry has introduced laser technology as an alternative technique for cavity preparation. This study assessed the null hypothesis that enamel prepared either by Er,Cr:YSGG laser or conventional diamond bur is equally receptive to adhesive procedures. The buccal and lingual surfaces of 35 sound human molars were prepared with Er,Cr:YSGG laser or a medium-grit diamond bur. One etch&rinse (OptiBond FL) and three self-etch adhesives (Adper Prompt L-Pop, Clearfil SE Bond and Clearfil S3 Bond) were applied on laser-irradiated and bur-cut enamel, followed by the application of a 5-6 mm build-up of Z100. The micro-tensile bond strength (microTBS) was determined after 24 hours of storage in water at 37 degrees C. Prepared enamel surfaces and failure patterns were evaluated using a stereomicroscope and a field-emission-gun scanning electron microscope (Feg-SEM). The pTBS to laser-irradiated enamel was significantly lower than to bur-cut enamel (p<0.05), with the exception of Clearfil S3 Bond, which bonded equally effectively to both substrates. The latter presented the highest microTBS on laser-irradiated enamel, though it was not statistically different from the microTBS of OptiBond FL. SEM analysis revealed significant morphological alterations of the laser-irradiated enamel surface, such as areas of melted and recrystalized hydroxyapatite and deep extensive micro-cracks. In conclusion, the bonding effectiveness of adhesives to laser-irradiated enamel depends not only on the structural substrate alterations induced by the laser, but also on the characteristics of the adhesive employed. PMID:18666504

  16. Effect of saliva contamination on the microshear bond strength of one-step self-etching adhesive systems to dentin.

    PubMed

    Yoo, H M; Oh, T S; Pereira, P N R

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of saliva contamination and decontamination methods on the dentin bond strength of one-step self-etching adhesive systems. Three commercially available "all-in-one" adhesives (One Up Bond F, Xeno III and Adper Prompt) and one resin composite (Filtek Z-250) were used. Third molars stored in distilled water with 0.5% thymol at 4 degrees C were ground with #600 SiC paper under running water to produce a standardized smear layer. The specimens were randomly divided into groups according to contamination methods: no contamination, which was the control (C); contamination of the adhesive surface with fresh saliva before light curing (A) and contamination of the adhesive surface with fresh saliva after light curing (B). Each contamination group was further subdivided into three subgroups according to the decontamination method: A1-Saliva was removed by a gentle air blast and the adhesive was light-cured; A2-Saliva was rinsed for 10 seconds, gently air-dried and the was adhesive light-cured; A3-Saliva was rinsed and dried as in A2, then the adhesive was re-applied to the dentin surface and light-cured; B1-Saliva was removed with a gentle air blast; B2-Saliva was rinsed and dried; B3-Saliva was rinsed, dried and the adhesive was re-applied and light cured. Tygon tubes filled with resin composite were placed on each surface and light cured. All specimens were stored in distilled water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours. Microshear bond strength was measured using a universal testing machine (EZ test), and data were analyzed by one-way ANOVA followed by the Duncan test to make comparisons among the groups (p<0.05). After debonding, five specimens were selected and examined in a scanning electron microscope to evaluate the modes of fracture. The A2 subgroup resulted in the lowest bond strength. For One Up Bond F and Adper Prompt, there was no significant difference between subgroup A1 and the control, and subgroup A3 and the control (p>0.05). Bond

  17. The Chemical Bond in C2.

    PubMed

    Hermann, Markus; Frenking, Gernot

    2016-03-14

    Quantum chemical calculations using the complete active space of the valence orbitals have been carried out for Hn CCHn (n=0-3) and N2 . The quadratic force constants and the stretching potentials of Hn CCHn have been calculated at the CASSCF/cc-pVTZ level. The bond dissociation energies of the C-C bonds of C2 and HC≡CH were computed using explicitly correlated CASPT2-F12/cc-pVTZ-F12 wave functions. The bond dissociation energies and the force constants suggest that C2 has a weaker C-C bond than acetylene. The analysis of the CASSCF wavefunctions in conjunction with the effective bond orders of the multiple bonds shows that there are four bonding components in C2 , while there are only three in acetylene and in N2 . The bonding components in C2 consist of two weakly bonding σ bonds and two electron-sharing π bonds. The bonding situation in C2 can be described with the σ bonds in Be2 that are enforced by two π bonds. There is no single Lewis structure that adequately depicts the bonding situation in C2 . The assignment of quadruple bonding in C2 is misleading, because the bond is weaker than the triple bond in HC≡CH. PMID:26756311

  18. Comparison of Push-out Bond Strength of Gutta-percha to Root Canal Dentin in Single-cone and Cold Lateral Compaction Techniques with AH Plus Sealer in Mandibular Premolars.

    PubMed

    Mokhtari, Hadi; Rahimi, Saeed; Forough Reyhani, Mohammad; Galledar, Saeedeh; Mokhtari Zonouzi, Hamid Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. The single-cone technique has gained some popularity in some European countries. The aim of the present study was to compare the push-out bond strength of gutta-percha to root canal dentin with the single-cone and cold lateral compaction canal obturation techniques. Materials and methods . The root canals of 58 human mandibular premolars were prepared using modified crown-down technique with ProTaper rotary files up to #F3as a master apical file (MAF) and divided randomly into groups A and B based on canal obturation technique. In group A (n = 29) the root canals were obturated with single-cone technique with #F3(30/.09) ProTaper gutta-percha, which was matched with MAF in relation to diameter, taper and manufacturer; in group B (n = 29) the canals were obturated with gutta-percha using cold lateral compaction technique. In both groups AH plus sealer were used. After two weeks of incubation, three 2-mm slices were prepared at a distance of 2 mm from the coronal surface and push-out test was carried out. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics using independent samples t-test. Results. There were statistically significant differences between two groups. The mean push-out bond strength was higher in group B (lateral compaction technique) compared to group A (single-cone technique; P < 0.05). Conclusion . Use of single-cone technique for obturation of root canals resulted in a lower bond strength compared to cold lateral compaction technique. PMID:26889358

  19. Comparison of Push-out Bond Strength of Gutta-percha to Root Canal Dentin in Single-cone and Cold Lateral Compaction Techniques with AH Plus Sealer in Mandibular Premolars

    PubMed Central

    Mokhtari, Hadi; Rahimi, Saeed; Forough Reyhani, Mohammad; Galledar, Saeedeh; Mokhtari Zonouzi, Hamid Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. The single-cone technique has gained some popularity in some European countries. The aim of the present study was to compare the push-out bond strength of gutta-percha to root canal dentin with the single-cone and cold lateral compaction canal obturation techniques. Materials and methods. The root canals of 58 human mandibular premolars were prepared using modified crown-down technique with ProTaper rotary files up to #F3as a master apical file (MAF) and divided randomly into groups A and B based on canal obturation technique. In group A (n = 29) the root canals were obturated with single-cone technique with #F3(30/.09) ProTaper gutta-percha, which was matched with MAF in relation to diameter, taper and manufacturer; in group B (n = 29) the canals were obturated with gutta-percha using cold lateral compaction technique. In both groups AH plus sealer were used. After two weeks of incubation, three 2-mm slices were prepared at a distance of 2 mm from the coronal surface and push-out test was carried out. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics using independent samples t-test. Results. There were statistically significant differences between two groups. The mean push-out bond strength was higher in group B (lateral compaction technique) compared to group A (single-cone technique; P < 0.05). Conclusion. Use of single-cone technique for obturation of root canals resulted in a lower bond strength compared to cold lateral compaction technique. PMID:26889358

  20. Bond strength of adhesives to dentin contaminated with smoker’s saliva

    PubMed Central

    Oguri, Makoto; O’Keefe, Kathy; Dusevish, Vladimir; Spencer, Paulette; Powers, John M.; Marshall, Grayson W.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of contamination with smoker’s and non-smoker’s saliva on the bond strength of resin composite to superficial dentin using different adhesive systems. The interfacial structure between the resin and dentin was evaluated for each treatment using environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). Freshly extracted human molars were ground with 600-grit SiC paper to expose the superficial dentin. Adhesives [One-Up-Bond-F-Plus (OUFP) and Adper-Prompt-L-Pop (APLP)] and resin composite (TPH-Spectrum) were bonded to the dentin (n = 8/group, 180 total specimens) under five surface conditions: control (adhesive applied following manufacturers’ instructions); saliva, then 5-s air dry, then adhesive; adhesive, saliva, 5-s air dry; adhesive, saliva, 5-s water rinse, 5-s air dry (ASW group); and adhesive, saliva, 5-s water rinse, 5-s air dry, reapply adhesive (ASWA group). After storage in water at 37°C for 24 h, the specimens were debonded under tension at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. ESEM photomicrographs of the dentin/adhesive interfaces were taken. Mean bond strength ranged from 8.1 to 24.1 MPa. Fisher’s protected least significant difference (P = 0.05) intervals for critical adhesive, saliva, and surface condition differences were 1.3, 1.3, and 2.1 MPa, respectively. There were no significant differences in bond strength to dentin between contamination by smoker’s and non-smoker’s saliva, but bond strengths were significantly different between adhesive systems, with OUFP twice as strong as APLP under almost all conditions. After adhesive application and contamination with either smoker’s or nonsmoker’s saliva followed by washing and reapplication of the adhesive (ASWA group), the bond strength of both adhesive systems was the same as that of the control group. PMID:20155506

  1. Distinguishing Bonds.

    PubMed

    Rahm, Martin; Hoffmann, Roald

    2016-03-23

    The energy change per electron in a chemical or physical transformation, ΔE/n, may be expressed as Δχ̅ + Δ(VNN + ω)/n, where Δχ̅ is the average electron binding energy, a generalized electronegativity, ΔVNN is the change in nuclear repulsions, and Δω is the change in multielectron interactions in the process considered. The last term can be obtained by the difference from experimental or theoretical estimates of the first terms. Previously obtained consequences of this energy partitioning are extended here to a different analysis of bonding in a great variety of diatomics, including more or less polar ones. Arguments are presented for associating the average change in electron binding energy with covalence, and the change in multielectron interactions with electron transfer, either to, out, or within a molecule. A new descriptor Q, essentially the scaled difference between the Δχ̅ and Δ(VNN + ω)/n terms, when plotted versus the bond energy, separates nicely a wide variety of bonding types, covalent, covalent but more correlated, polar and increasingly ionic, metallogenic, electrostatic, charge-shift bonds, and dispersion interactions. Also, Q itself shows a set of interesting relations with the correlation energy of a bond. PMID:26910496

  2. Single crystal electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of Cu(II) ions in Cu(tyrosine)(2): a study of weak exchange interactions mediated by resonance assisted hydrogen bonds (RAHB).

    PubMed

    Paredes-García, Verónica; Santana, Ricardo C; Madrid, Rosa; Baldo, Bianca; Vega, Andrés; Spodine, Evgenia

    2012-09-01

    EPR measurements have been performed on single crystals of [Cu(L-tyrosine)(2)](∞) at 33.8 GHz and at room temperature. The EPR spectra display partially resolved EPR lines for most orientations of the magnetic field in the ab plane, and only one resonance for orientations close to the crystal axes, while only a single line is observed along any direction in the ca and cb crystal planes. This behavior is a result of the selective collapse of the resonances corresponding to the four copper sites in the unit cell produced by the exchange interactions between the copper ions. The magnitudes of the exchange interactions between the copper ions were evaluated from the angular variation of the line width and the collapse of the EPR lines. The value |J(AD)/k(B)|=0.8 K between neighboring copper atoms at 4.942 Å is assigned to a syn-anti equatorial-apical carboxylate bridge with a total bond length of 6.822 Å, while the small value |J(AB)/k(B)|=0.004 K is assigned to a long bridge of 11 atoms with a total bond length of 19.186 Å, that includes one resonance assisted hydrogen bond (RAHB). This finding is discussed in terms of values obtained for similar paths in other model compounds and in proteins. PMID:22717721

  3. Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Newer Bonding Systems on Superficial and Deep Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, R Veena; Siddaraju, Kishore; Nagaraj, Hema; Poluri, Ramya Krishna

    2015-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of nanocomposite resin to superficial dentin and deep dentin using two different dentin bonding systems. Materials and Methods: All teeth were sectioned at various levels (superficial dentin: Dentin within 0.5-1 mm of dentinoenamel junction; deep dentin: Dentin within 0.5 mm of the highest pulp horn) using a Carborundum Disc and embedded in acrylic block of specific size. Selected specimens (60 premolar teeth) were grouped randomly into three groups, the groups were differentiated into superficial dentin, deep dentin, and control group which were further divided into sub Group A and Subgroup B containing 10 teeth each, depending on the bonding agents used. In Subgroup A, Tetric N Bond, and in Subgroup B Single Bond Universal were used. In the control group no bonding agent was used. The specimens were thermocycled for 500 cycles between 5°C and 55°C water bath for 40 s. Finally, the specimens were subjected to shear bond strength study under INSTRON machine (Universal Testing Machine). The maximum shear bond strengths were noted at the time of fracture (de-bonding) of the restorative material. Results were analyzed using ANOVA test, Bonferroni test, and paired t-test. Results: Bond strength values of fifth generation bonding system (Tetric N Bond) showed higher mean shear bond strength compared to seventh generation bonding system (Single Bond Universal). There was a significant fall in bond strength values as one reaches deeper levels of dentin from superficial to deep dentin. Conclusion: There was a significant difference between the bond strength of fifth generation bonding system (Tetric N Bond) and seventh generation bonding system (Single Bond Universal). Decrease in the bond strength values is seen for the deeper level of dentin as compared to superficial dentin. PMID:26435613

  4. 4-Oxocyclo­hexa­neacetic acid: catemeric hydrogen bonding and spontaneous resolution of a single conformational enanti­omer in an achiral ∊-keto acid

    PubMed Central

    Barcon, Alan; Brunskill, Andrew P. J.; Lalancette, Roger A.; Thompson, Hugh W.

    2010-01-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title compound, C8H12O3, consists of a single conformational enanti­omer, which aggregates in the catemeric acid-to-ketone hydrogen-bonding mode [O⋯O = 2.682 (4) Å and O—H⋯O = 172 (6)°]. Four hydrogen-bonding chains of translationally related mol­ecules pass through the cell orthogonal to the 43 screw axis along c, alternating in the 110 and the 10 direction, with alignment with respect to this axis of + + − −. Successive chains are rotated by 90° around the c axis. One C—H⋯O=C close contact, involving the carboxyl group, exists. PMID:21587559

  5. Yankee bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Delaney, P. )

    1993-10-01

    Yankee and Euromarket bonds may soon find their way into the financing of power projects in Latin America. For developers seeking long-term commitments under build, own, operate, and transfer (BOOT) power projects in Latin America, the benefits are substantial.

  6. Conformers and hydrogen bonds in cytidine 5‧-diphosphocholine sodium single crystals grown from a mixture of ethanol and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Zhenxing; Hu, Yanan; Wang, Pei; Zhou, Jingwei; Xiong, Jian; Ying, Hanjie; Bai, Jianxin

    2011-01-01

    The molecular structure of cytidine 5'-diphosphocholine sodium (CDPC) grown from a mixture of ethanol and water was determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD). CDPC was found to have an orthorhombic structure with confirmed lattice parameters of a = 6.978 Å, b = 12.406 Å and c = 29.326 Å. This nucleotide coenzyme was highly folded and net-like. Each crystallographic unit consisted of one sodium atom, one pyrophosphate group, one cytosine group, one coordinated water molecule, one pentose molecule, and three lattice water molecules. The interspaces of neighboring CDPC molecules were filled with water molecules and methyl groups. Although the coordinated water was connected to sodium atoms, the lattice water molecules formed chair-shaped water hexamers. The hydrogen bonds which played an important role in maintaining the structure included O sbnd H···O, N sbnd H···O and C sbnd H···O and ranged in length from 2.682 (17) to 3.349 (17) Å. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) showed a broad absorption in the 400-2000 cm -1 region characteristic of short hydrogen bonds. So for industrial crystallization, methods which could eliminate the influence of hydrogen bonds should be taken, and it would be beneficial for the process of crystallization.

  7. Diffusion bonding

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Robert C.

    1976-06-22

    1. A method for joining beryllium to beryllium by diffusion bonding, comprising the steps of coating at least one surface portion of at least two beryllium pieces with nickel, positioning a coated surface portion in a contiguous relationship with an other surface portion, subjecting the contiguously disposed surface portions to an environment having an atmosphere at a pressure lower than ambient pressure, applying a force upon the beryllium pieces for causing the contiguous surface portions to abut against each other, heating the contiguous surface portions to a maximum temperature less than the melting temperature of the beryllium, substantially uniformly decreasing the applied force while increasing the temperature after attaining a temperature substantially above room temperature, and maintaining a portion of the applied force at a temperature corresponding to about maximum temperature for a duration sufficient to effect the diffusion bond between the contiguous surface portions.

  8. Ultrasonic Imaging Of Bond Layers Through Bond Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chern, E. James

    1992-01-01

    Combination of hardware and software helps ultrasonic C-scan inspection system create images of bond layer in laminated composite material, even when obscured by another bond layer. Produces image of both layers in single scan. Includes ultrasonic transducer, pulser/receiver, mechanical scanner, personal computer as controller, and electronic circuitry that gates first and second peak signals, detects peaks, and feeds resulting amplitude data to computer.

  9. Pi Bond Orders and Bond Lengths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herndon, William C.; Parkanyi, Cyril

    1976-01-01

    Discusses three methods of correlating bond orders and bond lengths in unsaturated hydrocarbons: the Pauling theory, the Huckel molecular orbital technique, and self-consistent-field techniques. (MLH)

  10. 2-Benzoylpyridine thiosemicarbazone as a novel reagent for the single pot synthesis of dinuclear Cu(I)-Cu(II) complexes: formation of stable copper(II)-iodide bonds.

    PubMed

    Lobana, Tarlok S; Khanna, Sonia; Butcher, Ray J

    2012-04-28

    2-Benzoylpyridine thiosemicarbazone {R(1)R(2)C(2)=N(2)·N(3)H-C(1)(=S)-N(4)H(2), R(1) = py-N(1), R(2) = Ph; Hbpytsc} with copper(I) iodide in acetonitrile-dichloromethane mixture has formed stable Cu(II)-I bonds in a dark green Cu(II) iodo-bridged dimer, [Cu(2)(II)(μ-I)(2)(η(3)-N(1),N(2),S-bpytsc)(2)] 1. Copper(I) bromide also formed similar Cu(II)-Br bonds in a dark green Cu(II) bromo-bridged dimer, [Cu(2)(II)(μ-Br)(2)(η(3)-N(1),N(2),S-bpytsc)(2)] 3. The formation of dimers 1 and 3 appears to be due to a proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) process wherein copper(I) loses an electron to form copper(II), and this is accompanied by a loss of -N(3)H proton of Hbpytsc ligand resulting in the formation of anionic bpytsc(-). When copper(I) iodide was reacted with triphenylphosphine (PPh(3)) in acetonitrile followed by the addition of 2-benzoylpyridine thiosemicarbazone in dichloromethane (Cu : PPh(3) : Hbpytsc in the molar ratio 1:1:1), both Cu(II) dimer 1 and an orange Cu(I) sulfur-bridged dimer, [Cu(2)(I)I(2)(μ-S-Hbpytsc)(2)(PPh(3))(2)] 2 were formed. Copper(I) bromide with PPh(3) and Hbpytsc also formed Cu(II) dimer 3 and an orange Cu(I) sulfur-bridged dimer, [Cu(2)(I)Br(2)(μ-S-Hbpytsc)(2)(PPh(3))(2)] 4. While complexes 2 and 4 exist as sulfur-bridged Cu(I) dimers, 1 and 3 are halogen-bridged. The central Cu(2)S(2) cores of 2 and 4 as well as Cu(2)X(2) of 1 (X = I) and 3 (X = Br) are parallelograms. One set of Cu(II)-I and Cu(II)-Br bonds are short, while the second set is very long {1, Cu-I, 2.565(1), 3.313(1) Å; 3, Cu-Br, 2.391(1), 3.111(1) Å}. The Cu···Cu separations are long in all four complexes {1, 4.126(1); 2, 3.857(1); 3, 3.227(1); 4, 3.285(1) Å}, more than twice the van der Waals radius of a Cu atom, 2.80 Å. The pyridyl group appears to be necessary for stabilizing the Cu(II)-I bond, as this group can accept π-electrons from the metal. PMID:22395858

  11. Effect of indirect composite treatment microtensile bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements

    PubMed Central

    Escribano, Nuria; Baracco, Bruno; Romero, Martin; Ceballos, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Background No specific indications about the pre-treatment of indirect composite restorations is provided by the manufacturers of most self-adhesive resin cements. The potential effect of silane treatment to the bond strength of the complete tooth/indirect restoration complex is not available.The aim of this study was to determine the contribution of different surface treatments on microtensile bond strength of composite overlays to dentin using several self-adhesive resin cements and a total-etch one. Material and Methods Composite overlays were fabricated and bonding surfaces were airborne-particle abraded and randomly assigned to two different surface treatments: no treatment or silane application (RelyX Ceramic Primer) followed by an adhesive (Adper Scotchbond 1 XT). Composite overlays were luted to flat dentin surfaces using the following self-adhesive resin cements: RelyX Unicem, G-Cem, Speedcem, Maxcem Elite or Smartcem2, and the total-etch resin cement RelyX ARC. After 24 h, bonded specimens were cut into sticks 1 mm thick and stressed in tension until failure. Two-way ANOVA and SNK tests were applied at α=0.05. Results Bond strength values were significantly influenced by the resin cement used (p<0.001). However, composite surface treatment and the interaction between the resin cement applied and surface treatment did not significantly affect dentin bond strength (p>0.05). All self-adhesive resin cements showed lower bond strength values than the total-etch RelyX ARC. Among self-adhesive resin cements, RelyX Unicem and G-Cem attained statistically higher bond strength values. Smartcem2 and Maxcem Elite exhibited 80-90% of pre-test failures. Conclusions The silane and adhesive application after indirect resin composite sandblasting did not improve the bond strength of dentin-composite overlay complex. Selection of the resin cement seems to be a more relevant factor when bonding indirect composites to dentin than its surface treatment. Key words:Bond

  12. Bonded Lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Another spinoff to the food processing industry involves a dry lubricant developed by General Magnaplate Corp. of Linden, N.J. Used in such spacecraft as Apollo, Skylab and Viking, the lubricant is a coating bonded to metal surfaces providing permanent lubrication and corrosion resistance. The coating lengthens equipment life and permits machinery to be operated at greater speed, thus increasing productivity and reducing costs. Bonded lubricants are used in scores of commercia1 applications. They have proved particularly valuable to food processing firms because, while increasing production efficiency, they also help meet the stringent USDA sanitation codes for food-handling equipment. For example, a cookie manufacturer plagued production interruptions because sticky batter was clogging the cookie molds had the brass molds coated to solve the problem. Similarly, a pasta producer faced USDA action on a sanitation violation because dough was clinging to an automatic ravioli-forming machine; use of the anti-stick coating on the steel forming plates solved the dual problem of sanitation deficiency and production line downtime.

  13. Basics of Fidelity Bonding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn, Steven P.

    Fidelity bonds are important for an agency to hold to protect itself against any financial loss that can result from dishonest acts by its employees. Three types of fidelity bonds are available to an agency: (1) public official bonds; (2) dishonesty bonds; and (3) faithful performance bonds. Public official bonds are required by state law to be…

  14. 19 CFR 113.26 - Effective dates of bonds and riders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY CUSTOMS BONDS Bond Requirements § 113.26 Effective dates of bonds and riders. (a... before the effective date in order to provide adequate time for Customs administrative review and processing. (b) Single transaction bond. A single transaction bond is effective on the date of...

  15. 19 CFR 113.26 - Effective dates of bonds and riders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY CUSTOMS BONDS Bond Requirements § 113.26 Effective dates of bonds and riders. (a... before the effective date in order to provide adequate time for Customs administrative review and processing. (b) Single transaction bond. A single transaction bond is effective on the date of...

  16. 19 CFR 113.26 - Effective dates of bonds and riders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY CUSTOMS BONDS Bond Requirements § 113.26 Effective dates of bonds and riders. (a... before the effective date in order to provide adequate time for Customs administrative review and processing. (b) Single transaction bond. A single transaction bond is effective on the date of...

  17. 19 CFR 113.26 - Effective dates of bonds and riders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY CUSTOMS BONDS Bond Requirements § 113.26 Effective dates of bonds and riders. (a... before the effective date in order to provide adequate time for Customs administrative review and processing. (b) Single transaction bond. A single transaction bond is effective on the date of...

  18. 19 CFR 113.26 - Effective dates of bonds and riders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY CUSTOMS BONDS Bond Requirements § 113.26 Effective dates of bonds and riders. (a... before the effective date in order to provide adequate time for Customs administrative review and processing. (b) Single transaction bond. A single transaction bond is effective on the date of...

  19. Shear bond strength of bulk-fill and nano-restorative materials to dentin

    PubMed Central

    Colak, Hakan; Ercan, Ertugrul; Hamidi, Mehmet Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Bulk-fill composite materials are being developed for preparation depths of up to 4 mm in an effort to simplify and improve the placement of direct composite posterior restorations. The aim of our study was to compare shear-bond strength of bulk-fill and conventional posterior composite resins. Materials and Methods: In this study, 60 caries free extracted human molars were used and sectioned parallel to occlusal surface to expose midcoronal dentin. The specimens were randomly divided into four groups. Total-etch dentine bonding system (Adper Scotchbond 1XT, 3M ESPE) was applied to dentin surface in all the groups to reduce variability in results. Then, dentine surfaces covered by following materials. Group I: SonicFill Bulk-Fill, Group II: Tetric EvoCeram (TBF), Group III: Herculite XRV Ultra, and Group IV: TBF Bulk-Fill, 2 mm × 3 mm cylindrical restorations were prepared by using application apparatus. Shear bond testing was measured by using a universal testing machine. Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney U-tests were performed to evaluate the data. Results: The highest value was observed in Group III (14.42 ± 4.34) and the lowest value was observed in Group IV (11.16 ± 2.76) and there is a statistically significant difference between these groups (P = 0.046). However, there is no statistically significant difference between the values of other groups. In this study, Group III was showed higher strength values. Conclusion: There is a need for future studies about long-term bond strength and clinical success of these adhesive and bulk-fill systems. PMID:27011738

  20. Metal-metal bond lengths in complexes of transition metals*

    PubMed Central

    Pauling, Linus

    1976-01-01

    In complexes of the transition metals containing clusters of metal atoms the cobalt-cobalt bond lengths are almost always within 1 pm of the single-bond value 246 pm given by the enneacovalent radius of cobalt, whereas most of the observed iron-iron bond lengths are significantly larger than the single-bond value 248 pm, the mean being 264 pm, which corresponds to a half-bond. A simple discussion of the structures of these complexes based on spd hybrid orbitals, the electroneutrality principle, and the partial ionic character of bonds between unlike atoms leads to the conclusion that resonance between single bonds and no-bonds would occur for iron and its congeners but not for cobalt and its congeners, explaining the difference in the bond lengths. PMID:16592368

  1. What Determines Bond Costs. Municipal Bonds Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Douglas; And Others

    Public officials in small towns who participate infrequently in the bond market need information about bond financing. This publication, one in a series of booklets published by the Western Rural Development Center using research gathered between 1967-77, discusses factors influencing the marketability and cost of bond financing for towns and…

  2. Specific collapse followed by slow hydrogen-bond formation of beta-sheet in the folding of single-chain monellin.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Tetsunari; Uzawa, Takanori; Ishimori, Koichiro; Morishima, Isao; Takahashi, Satoshi; Konno, Takashi; Akiyama, Shuji; Fujisawa, Tetsuro

    2005-02-22

    Characterization of the conformational landscapes for proteins with different secondary structures is important in elucidating the mechanism of protein folding. The folding trajectory of single-chain monellin composed of a five-stranded beta-sheet and a helix was investigated by using a pH-jump from the alkaline unfolded to native state. The kinetic changes in the secondary structures and in the overall size and shape were measured by circular dichroism spectroscopy and small-angle x-ray scattering, respectively. The formation of the tertiary structure was monitored by intrinsic and extrinsic fluorescence. A significant collapse was observed within 300 micros after the pH-jump, leading to the intermediate with a small amount of secondary and tertiary structures but with an overall oblate shape. Subsequently, the stepwise formation of secondary and tertiary structures was detected. The current observation was consistent with the theoretical prediction that a more significant collapse precedes the formation of secondary structures in the folding of beta-sheet proteins than that of helical proteins [Shea, J. E., Onuchic, J. N. & Brooks, C. L., III (2002) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 99, 16064-16068]. Furthermore, it was implied that the initial collapse was promoted by the formation of some specific structural elements, such as tight turns, to form the oblate shape. PMID:15710881

  3. Specific collapse followed by slow hydrogen-bond formation of β-sheet in the folding of single-chain monellin

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Tetsunari; Uzawa, Takanori; Ishimori, Koichiro; Morishima, Isao; Takahashi, Satoshi; Konno, Takashi; Akiyama, Shuji; Fujisawa, Tetsuro

    2005-01-01

    Characterization of the conformational landscapes for proteins with different secondary structures is important in elucidating the mechanism of protein folding. The folding trajectory of single-chain monellin composed of a five-stranded β-sheet and a helix was investigated by using a pH-jump from the alkaline unfolded to native state. The kinetic changes in the secondary structures and in the overall size and shape were measured by circular dichroism spectroscopy and small-angle x-ray scattering, respectively. The formation of the tertiary structure was monitored by intrinsic and extrinsic fluorescence. A significant collapse was observed within 300 μs after the pH-jump, leading to the intermediate with a small amount of secondary and tertiary structures but with an overall oblate shape. Subsequently, the stepwise formation of secondary and tertiary structures was detected. The current observation was consistent with the theoretical prediction that a more significant collapse precedes the formation of secondary structures in the folding of β-sheet proteins than that of helical proteins [Shea, J. E., Onuchic, J. N. & Brooks, C. L., III (2002) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 99, 16064–16068]. Furthermore, it was implied that the initial collapse was promoted by the formation of some specific structural elements, such as tight turns, to form the oblate shape. PMID:15710881

  4. Effect of postoperative peroxide bleaching on the marginal seal of composite restorations bonded with self-etch adhesives.

    PubMed

    Roubickova, A; Dudek, M; Comba, L; Housova, D; Bradna, P

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the effect of peroxide bleaching on the marginal seal of composite restorations bonded with several adhesive systems. Combined cylindrical Class V cavities located half in enamel and half in dentin were prepared on the buccal and lingual surfaces of human molars. The cavities were bonded with the self-etch adhesives Clearfil SE-Bond (CLF), Adper Prompt (ADP), and iBond (IBO) and an etch-and-rinse adhesive Gluma Comfort Bond (GLU) and restored with a microhybrid composite Charisma. Experimental groups were treated 25 times for eight hours per day with a peroxide bleaching gel Opalescence PF 20, while the control groups were stored in distilled water for two months and then subjected to a microleakage test using a dye penetration method. Scanning electron microscopy was used to investigate the etching and penetration abilities of the adhesives and morphology of debonded restoration-enamel interfaces after the microleakage tests. Statistical analyses were performed using nonparametric Kruskal-Wallis, Mann-Whitney, and Wilcoxon tests at p=0.05. The microleakage of all GLU groups was low and not significantly affected by peroxide bleaching. Low microleakage was recorded for CLF control groups, but after bleaching, a small but significant increase in microleakage at the enamel margin indicated its sensitivity to peroxide bleaching. For ADP and IBO control groups, the microleakage at the enamel margins was significantly higher than for GLU and CLF and exceeded that at the dentin margins. Bleaching did not induce any significant changes in the microleakage. Electron microscopy analysis indicated that in our experimental setup, decreased adhesion and mechanical resistance of the ADP- and IBO-enamel interfaces could be more important than the chemical degradation effects induced by the peroxide bleaching gel. PMID:23570299

  5. Transient liquid phase ceramic bonding

    DOEpatents

    Glaeser, Andreas M.

    1994-01-01

    Ceramics are joined to themselves or to metals using a transient liquid phase method employing three layers, one of which is a refractory metal, ceramic or alloy. The refractory layer is placed between two metal layers, each of which has a lower melting point than the refractory layer. The three layers are pressed between the two articles to be bonded to form an assembly. The assembly is heated to a bonding temperature at which the refractory layer remains solid, but the two metal layers melt to form a liquid. The refractory layer reacts with the surrounding liquid and a single solid bonding layer is eventually formed. The layers may be designed to react completely with each other and form refractory intermetallic bonding layers. Impurities incorporated into the refractory metal may react with the metal layers to form refractory compounds. Another method for joining ceramic articles employs a ceramic interlayer sandwiched between two metal layers. In alternative embodiments, the metal layers may include sublayers. A method is also provided for joining two ceramic articles using a single interlayer. An alternate bonding method provides a refractory-metal oxide interlayer placed adjacent to a strong oxide former. Aluminum or aluminum alloys are joined together using metal interlayers.

  6. Non destructive evaluation of adhesively bonded carbon fiber reinforced composite lap joints with varied bond quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayakumar, R. L.; Bhat, M. R.; Murthy, C. R. L.

    2012-05-01

    Structural adhesive bonding is widely used to execute assemblies in automobile and aerospace structures. The quality and reliability of these bonded joints must be ensured during service. In this context non destructive evaluation of these bonded structures play an important role. Evaluation of adhesively bonded composite single lap shear joints has been attempted through experimental approach. Series of tests, non-destructive as well as destructive were performed on different sets of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite lap joint specimens with varied bond quality. Details of the experimental investigations carried out and the outcome are presented in this paper.

  7. Explosion bonding: aluminum-magnesium alloys bonded to austenitic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, R.A.

    1982-01-01

    The explosion bonding of 5000 series aluminum alloys to 300 series stainless steel alloys is summarized. The process technique involves a parallel gap arrangement with copper or aluminum bonding aids. Successful bonds have been achieved using either a single shot process for joining the trilayer clad or a sequential shot technique for each metal component. Bond success is monitored through a combined metallographic and tensile strength evaluation. Tensile properties are shown to be strongly dependent upon process parameters and the amount of intermetallic formation at the aluminum bond interface. Empirical data has been compared with experimental and destructive test results to determine the optimum procedures.

  8. Hydrogen bonded structures in organic amine oxalates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaidhyanathan, R.; Natarajan, S.; Rao, C. N. R.

    2002-05-01

    Oxalates of n-propylamine, n-butylamine, ethylenediamine, 1,4-butanediamine, piperazine, guanidine and 1,4-diazabicyclo[2,2,2]octane (DABCO) have been synthesized and characterized by single crystal X-ray diffraction and other techniques. The amine oxalates show different types of hydrogen bonded networks, linear hydrogen bonded chains characterizing the oxalates of the first five amines. Guanidinium oxalate has a sheet like structure while DABCO oxalate has dimeric hydrogen bonded rings. Hydrogen bonded structures of these oxalates are discussed in detail, besides relating their thermal stability to the strengths of the networks.

  9. Fundamental aspects of recoupled pair bonds. I. Recoupled pair bonds in carbon and sulfur monofluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Dunning, Thom H. Xu, Lu T.; Takeshita, Tyler Y.

    2015-01-21

    The number of singly occupied orbitals in the ground-state atomic configuration of an element defines its nominal valence. For carbon and sulfur, with two singly occupied orbitals in their {sup 3}P ground states, the nominal valence is two. However, in both cases, it is possible to form more bonds than indicated by the nominal valence—up to four bonds for carbon and six bonds for sulfur. In carbon, the electrons in the 2s lone pair can participate in bonding, and in sulfur the electrons in both the 3p and 3s lone pairs can participate. Carbon 2s and sulfur 3p recoupled pair bonds are the basis for the tetravalence of carbon and sulfur, and 3s recoupled pair bonds enable sulfur to be hexavalent. In this paper, we report generalized valence bond as well as more accurate calculations on the a{sup 4}Σ{sup −} states of CF and SF, which are archetypal examples of molecules that possess recoupled pair bonds. These calculations provide insights into the fundamental nature of recoupled pair bonds and illustrate the key differences between recoupled pair bonds formed with the 2s lone pair of carbon, as a representative of the early p-block elements, and recoupled pair bonds formed with the 3p lone pair of sulfur, as a representative of the late p-block elements.

  10. Using Multiple Bonding Strategies.

    PubMed

    Larson, Thomas D

    2015-01-01

    There are many ways to bond to tooth structure, some micro-mechanical some chemical, some a combination. Different dentin bonding materials have different bonding strengths to differently prepared surfaces, and because of differences in their nature, different areas of tooth structure present peculiar bonding challenges. This paper will review a variety of material types, elucidating their particular bonding strengths and commenting on improved bonding strategies to increase durability, strength, and favorable pulpal response. In this discussion, resin dentin bonding systems, glass ionomers, Gluma, resin cements, and newer combined products will br reviewed. PMID:26485903

  11. Bond Strength of 5th, 6th and 7th Generation Bonding Agents to Intracanal Dentin of Primary Teeth

    PubMed Central

    Afshar, Hossein; Baradaran Nakhjavani, Yahya; Rahro Taban, Sedighe; Baniameri, Zahra; Nahvi, Azam

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This in-vitro study sought to assess the push-out bond strength of a total etch and 2 self-etch bonding systems to intracanal dentin of primary anterior teeth (PAT). Materials and Methods: Thirty-six primary anterior teeth were randomly divided into 3 groups of 5th generation (Single Bond 2), 6th generation (Clearfil SE) and 7th generation (Single Bond Universal) bonding agents. The canal orifice was restored with composite resin and the push-out test was carried out to assess the bond strength. After applying the push-out load, specimens were evaluated under a light microscope at 40X magnification. One-way ANOVA and log-rank test on Kaplan-Meier curves were applied for the comparison of bond strength among the 3 groups. Results: The mean± standard deviation (SD) bond strength was 13.6±5.33 MPa for Single Bond 2, 13.85±5.86 MPa for Clearfil SE and 12.28±5.24 MPa for Single Bond Universal. The differences in bond strength among the 3 groups were not statistically significant (P>0.05). Conclusion: All three bonding agents are recommended for use with composite posts in PAT. However, due to high technical sensitivity of the Total Etch system, single or two-step self etch systems may be preferred for uncooperative children. PMID:26056518

  12. Bond and charge-density waves in (DI-DCNQI)2Ag (DI-DCNQI=2,5-diiodo-N,N'-dicyanoquinediimine) studied by single-crystal infrared and Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Kaoru; Yamamoto, Takashi; Yakushi, Kyuya; Pecile, Cesare; Meneghetti, Moreno

    2005-01-01

    The charge distribution and molecular arrangement of a quarter-filled quasi-one-dimensional system (DI-DCNQI)2Ag (DI-DCNQI=2,5-diiodo-dicyanoquinediimine) has been studied by IR and Raman spectroscopy. The charge localization of this material was believed to be a one-dimensional generalization of a Wigner crystal driven by intersite Coulomb repulsion. While charge disproportionation is confirmed via the splitting of bu modes in the infrared spectrum, the appearance of intense IR vibronic bands of ag modes strongly suggests the presence of the dimerization that is not expected by the proposed 1010 charge ordering model. In addition, the selection rules for the IR and Raman signals cannot be explained without a further symmetry reduction of the unit cell. To explain the vibrational behavior observed for a single crystal, we show that a more appropriate model for the charge ordering is 0110 ( 2kF charge-density wave and 4kF bond-order wave).

  13. Immediate bonding to bleached enamel.

    PubMed

    Nour El-din, Amal K; Miller, Barbara H; Griggs, Jason A; Wakefield, Charles

    2006-01-01

    This research sought to determine the shear bond strength, degree of resin infiltration and failure mode when organic solvent-based adhesives (acetone or ethanol) were used in immediate bonding to enamel bleached with 10% carbamide peroxide or 38% hydrogen peroxide systems. Seventy-two non-carious bovine incisors were randomly assigned to three groups of 24 specimens each-control group (deionized water), 38% hydrogen peroxide bleach group and 10% carbamide peroxide bleach group. Each group was further subdivided into two subgroups of 12 specimens each according to the adhesive system used to bond the resin composite to enamel surfaces. The two adhesive systems used were Single Bond, an ethanol-based adhesive, and One Step, an acetone-based adhesive. The shear bond strengths of 38% hydrogen peroxide and 10% carbamide peroxide were significantly lower compared to the non-bleached controls. Fractography revealed an adhesive failure mode in all specimens. Qualitative comparisons of resin tags present in the bleached and unbleached specimens using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed few, thin and fragmented resin tags when 38% hydrogen peroxide and 10% carbamide peroxide were used. PMID:16536201

  14. 29 CFR 2580.412-20 - Use of existing bonds, separate bonds and additional bonding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Use of existing bonds, separate bonds and additional..., separate bonds and additional bonding. (a) Additional bonding. Section 13 neither prevents additional... or separate bond. (b) Use of existing bonds. Insofar as a bond currently in use is adequate to...

  15. Hydroxide-catalyzed bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gwo, Dz-Hung (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method of bonding substrates by hydroxide-catalyzed hydration/dehydration involves applying a bonding material to at least one surface to be bonded, and placing the at least one surface sufficiently close to another surface such that a bonding interface is formed between them. A bonding material of the invention comprises a source of hydroxide ions, and may optionally include a silicate component, a particulate filling material, and a property-modifying component. Bonding methods of the invention reliably and reproducibly provide bonds which are strong and precise, and which may be tailored according to a wide range of possible applications. Possible applications for bonding materials of the invention include: forming composite materials, coating substrates, forming laminate structures, assembly of precision optical components, and preparing objects of defined geometry and composition. Bonding materials and methods of preparing the same are also disclosed.

  16. Towards an understanding of the bonding in polyoxometalates through bond order and bond energy analysis.

    PubMed

    Bridgeman, Adam J; Cavigliasso, Germán

    2003-01-01

    The molecular and electronic structures of transition metal complexes, [MOCl5]n- (n = 2 for M = V,Nb,Ta and n = 1 for Mo,W) and mixed-metal polyoxometalates, [M'M5O19]3-V,Nb,Ta, M = Mo,W) containing a single terminal oxo group on each metal, and of complexes of the uranyl ion [UO2]2+, [UO2(H2O)5]2+ and [UO2Cl4]2-, have been calculated using density functional methods. The calculated structures of the complexes are in good agreement with available experimental parameters. For the mixed-metal hexametalates, for which no crystallographic data is available, the calculations predict a small tetragonal compression of the clusters with only minor structural changes compared to the parent molybdate and tungstate. The metal oxygen bonding in these anions has been probed using Mayer-Mulliken, bond energy and atoms in molecule analyses (AIM). These methods provide a consistent description of the bonding in polyoxometalates. The terminal bonds between transition metal or uranium and oxygen atoms have large sigma and pi components with the pi contributions exceeding the sigma bonding. The transition metals utilize their d orbitals almost exclusively to bond to oxygen whilst uranium uses both its 5f and 6d orbitals. Oxygen atom charges increase and covalency indexes decrease with coordination number, with a marked separation of these terms according to the oxygen atom type. The total valency and AIM energies of the oxygen atoms are predicted to be almost constant for all types of oxygen site. The constancy of the bonding power of the oxygen atoms appears to be an important factor in determining the gross structures and details of the bonding in polyoxometalates. The Mayer Mulliken approach provides direct characterization of the bonding power of atoms and the extent of the interaction between pairs of atoms that is consistent with the results of the considerably more computationally demanding bond energy and AIM approaches. PMID:14527219

  17. Bonding Durability of Four Adhesive Systems

    PubMed Central

    Seyed Tabai, Elaheh; Mohammadi Basir, Mahshid

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to compare the durability of four adhesive systems by assessing their microtensile bond strength (MTBS) and microleakage during six months of water storage. Materials and Methods: A total of 128 human third molars were used. The adhesives tested were Scotch Bond Multipurpose (SBMP), Single Bond (SB), Clearfil-SE bond (CSEB), and All-Bond SE (ABSE). After sample preparation for MTBS testing, the microspecimens were subjected to microtensile tester after one day and six months of water storage. For microleakage evaluation, facial and lingual class V cavities were prepared and restored with composite. After thermocycling, microleakage was evaluated. Bond strength values were subjected to one-way ANOVA and Tamhane’s test, and the microleakage data were analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis, Dunn, Mann Whitney and Wilcoxon tests (P<0.05). Results: Single Bond yielded the highest and ABSE yielded the lowest bond strength at one day and six months. Short-term bond strength of SBMP and CSEB was similar. After six months, a significant decrease in bond strength was observed in ABSE and SBMP groups. At one day, ABSE showed the highest microleakage at the occlusal margin; however, at the gingival margin, there was no significant difference among groups. Long-term microleakage of all groups at the occlusal margins was similar, whilst gingival margins of SBMP and SB showed significantly higher microleakage. Conclusion: The highest MTBS and favorable sealability were obtained by Clearfil SE bond. Water storage had no effect on microleakage of self-etch adhesives at the gingival margin or MTBS of CSEB and SB. PMID:27123015

  18. The effect of oxalate desensitizers on the microleakage of resin composite restorations bonded by etch and rinse adhesive systems.

    PubMed

    Shafiei, Fereshteh; Motamedi, Mehran; Alavi, Ali Asghar; Namvar, Babak

    2010-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the effect of an oxalate desensitizer (OX) on the marginal microleakage of resin composite restorations bonded by two three-step and two two-step etch and rinse adhesives. Class V cavities were prepared on the buccal surfaces of 126 extracted premolars at the cementoenamel junction and randomly divided into nine groups of 14 each. In the control groups (1-4), four adhesives were applied, respectively, including Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (SBMP), Optibond FL (OBFL), One-Step Plus (OS) and Excite (EX). In the experimental groups (5-8), the same adhesives, in combination with OX (BisBlock), were applied. And, in one group, OX was applied without any adhesive, as the negative control group (9). All the groups were restored with a resin composite. After 24 hours of storage in distilled water and thermocycling, the samples were placed in 1% methylene blue dye solution. The dye penetration was evaluated using a stereomicroscope. The data were analyzed using non-parametric tests. The OX application, in combination with OBFL and EX, resulted in significantly increasing microleakage at the gingival margins (p < 0.05), while it had no effect on OS and SBMP (p > 0.05). At the occlusal margins, no significant difference in microleakage was observed after OX application for each of four adhesives (p > 0.05). PMID:21180008

  19. Diffusion bonding aeroengine components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, G. A.; Broughton, T.

    1988-10-01

    The use of diffusion bonding processes at Rolls-Royce for the manufacture of titanium-alloy aircraft engine components and structures is described. A liquid-phase diffusion bonding process called activated diffusion bonding has been developed for the manufacture of the hollow titanium wide chord fan blade. In addition, solid-state diffusion bonding is being used in the manufacture of hollow vane/blade airfoil constructions mainly in conjunction with superplastic forming and hot forming techniques.

  20. Sharing in covalent and hydrogen bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perhacs, Pablo

    1998-11-01

    The sharing of a single electron between two spatial and spin coordinates ζ and ζsp/prime in a many electron system is discussed in terms of the single particle sharing amplitude, single particle sharing index, I(/zeta;/zeta/sp/prime) /equiv /langle/zeta;/zeta/sp/prime/rangle/ /langle/zeta/sp/prime;/zeta/rangle. The sharing amplitude serves as a single electron wave function within the context of the wave function for the entire system. The sharing index is a measure of the extent to which an electron is shared between ζ and ζsp/prime. The sharing of an electron between atoms in molecules is quantitatively interpreted through the sharing indices and graphically displayed in the fixed point sharing amplitude, bonding is distinguished from non-bonding and anti- bonding. Molecules studied are the diatomics of seven of the first nine elements and the hydrides of the first row of eight elements. Analysis is extended to the complex of methane and hydrogen fluoride and to pairs of hydrogen fluoride, water, and ammonia. The behavior of bonded complexes, is shown to have all the characteristics of covalent bonding. The ammonia dimer is shown not to be hydrogen bonded.

  1. Rapid adhesive bonding concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, B. A.; Tyeryar, J. R.; Hodges, W. T.

    1984-01-01

    Adhesive bonding in the aerospace industry typically utilizes autoclaves or presses which have considerable thermal mass. As a consequence, the rates of heatup and cooldown of the bonded parts are limited and the total time and cost of the bonding process is often relatively high. Many of the adhesives themselves do not inherently require long processing times. Bonding could be performed rapidly if the heat was concentrated in the bond lines or at least in the adherends. Rapid adhesive bonding concepts were developed to utilize induction heating techniques to provide heat directly to the bond line and/or adherends without heating the entire structure, supports, and fixtures of a bonding assembly. Bonding times for specimens are cut by a factor of 10 to 100 compared to standard press bonding. The development of rapid adhesive bonding for lap shear specimens (per ASTM D1003 and D3163), for aerospace panel bonding, and for field repair needs of metallic and advanced fiber reinforced polymeric matrix composite structures are reviewed.

  2. Bonding thermoplastic polymers

    DOEpatents

    Wallow, Thomas I.; Hunter, Marion C.; Krafcik, Karen Lee; Morales, Alfredo M.; Simmons, Blake A.; Domeier, Linda A.

    2008-06-24

    We demonstrate a new method for joining patterned thermoplastic parts into layered structures. The method takes advantage of case-II permeant diffusion to generate dimensionally controlled, activated bonding layers at the surfaces being joined. It is capable of producing bonds characterized by cohesive failure while preserving the fidelity of patterned features in the bonding surfaces. This approach is uniquely suited to production of microfluidic multilayer structures, as it allows the bond-forming interface between plastic parts to be precisely manipulated at micrometer length scales. The bond enhancing procedure is easily integrated in standard process flows and requires no specialized equipment.

  3. Prospective bonding applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ancenay, H.; Benazet, D.

    1981-07-01

    Adhesive bonding in industry and in the laboratory is surveyed and prospects for its wider utilization are assessed. The economic impact of bonding technology on industry is discussed. Research is reviewed, centering on the development of nondestructive testing and inspection techniques. Traditional (wood) as well as new materials susceptible to bonding are considered. Applications in construction and civil engineering, in aeronautics, and in the automobile industry are covered. The use of glues in mechanical constructions, in assembling cylindrical parts, and in metal-metal bonding are examined. Hybrid assembling and bonding of composite materials are included.

  4. Observation of an amalgam-bonded tooth through a scanning electron microscope.

    PubMed

    Orosa, Jose Luis B

    2003-01-01

    Bonding dental amalgam to tooth reduces the occurrence of marginal leakage, fracture and sensitivity. However, most studies of amalgam bonding have made use of resin cements and the conventional three-bottle bonding agents. In this study, a newer, single-bottle bonding agent was used to bond amalgam both to dentin and enamel. Interfaces of bonded amalgam and unbonded amalgam were observed under the scanning electron microscope. PMID:13677864

  5. Influence of adhesive system and bevel preparation on fracture strength of teeth restored with composite resin.

    PubMed

    Coelho-de-Souza, Fábio Herrmann; Rocha, Analice da Cunha; Rubini, Alessandro; Klein-Júnior, Celso Afonso; Demarco, Flávio Fernando

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the fracture strength of teeth with different cavosurface margin cavity preparations and restored with composite resin and different adhesive systems. Eighty premolars were randomly divided in 8 groups, as follow: G1- sound teeth; G2- MOD preparation (no restoration); G3- Adper Single Bond without bevel preparation (butt joint); G4- Adper Single Bond with bevel preparation; G5- Adper Single Bond with chamfer preparation; G6- Clearfil SE Bond without bevel (butt joint); G7- Clearfil SE Bond with bevel preparation; G8- Clearfil SE Bond with chamfer preparation. The adhesive systems were applied according to manufacturers' instructions. Composite resin (Filtek Z250) was incrementally placed in all cavities. After 24 h, the specimens were tested in a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed statistically by ANOVA and Tukey's test (fracture strength) and Fisher's exact test (fracture pattern). The confidence level was set at 95% for all tests. Prepared and non-restored teeth showed the worst performance and G4 exhibited the highest fracture strength among all groups (p<0.05). In conclusion, all restorative treatments were able to recover the fracture strength of non-restored teeth to levels similar to those of sound teeth. Using a total-etch adhesive system with bevel preparation significantly improved the resistance to fracture. PMID:20976383

  6. One-year water sorption and solubility of "all-in-one" adhesives.

    PubMed

    Walter, Ricardo; Feiring, Andrew E; Boushell, Lee W; Braswell, Krista; Bartholomew, Whitley; Chung, Yunro; Phillips, Ceib; Pereira, Patricia N R; Swift, Edward J

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the water sorption and solubility of different adhesives. Adper Easy Bond, Adper Single Bond Plus, Bond Force, Clearfil SE Bond (bonding resin only), and Xeno IV were the materials evaluated. Ten disks of each adhesive were made in Teflon molds and evaporation of any volatile components was allowed. The disks were weighed daily in an analytical balance until a constant mass was obtained (m1). Disks were then immersed in water for 12 months when their wet weight was recorded (m2). The disks were again weighed daily until a constant mass was obtained and the final weight recorded (m3). Water sorption and solubility (percentages) were calculated using the recorded mass values. Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to compare the average water sorption and solubility among the different adhesives. Mann-Whitney tests with a Bonferroni correction were used to determine the pairwise differences between adhesives in water sorption and solubility. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Water sorption and solubility were significantly different among the groups (p<0.05). Pairwise comparisons showed no significant differences (p>0.05) between Adper Single Bond Plus and Bond Force, or between Clearfil SE Bond and Xeno IV in either water sorption or solubility. Xeno IV did not differ from Adper Easy Bond in water sorption (p>0.05). Water sorption and solubility of all-in-one adhesives increased with time, and the rates of increase were composition-dependent. The results suggest that monomers other than HEMA contribute to water sorption and solubility of adhesive systems from different categories. PMID:24173253

  7. Functional systems with orthogonal dynamic covalent bonds.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Adam; Gasparini, Giulio; Matile, Stefan

    2014-03-21

    This review summarizes the use of orthogonal dynamic covalent bonds to build functional systems. Dynamic covalent bonds are unique because of their dual nature. They can be as labile as non-covalent interactions or as permanent as covalent bonds, depending on conditions. Examples from nature, reaching from the role of disulfides in protein folding to thioester exchange in polyketide biosynthesis, indicate how dynamic covalent bonds are best used in functional systems. Several synthetic functional systems that employ a single type of dynamic covalent bonds have been reported. Considering that most functional systems make simultaneous use of several types of non-covalent interactions together, one would expect the literature to contain many examples in which different types of dynamic covalent bonds are similarly used in tandem. However, the incorporation of orthogonal dynamic covalent bonds into functional systems is a surprisingly rare and recent development. This review summarizes the available material comprehensively, covering a remarkably diverse collection of functions. However, probably more revealing than the specific functions addressed is that the questions asked are consistently quite unusual, very demanding and highly original, focusing on molecular systems that can self-sort, self-heal, adapt, exchange, replicate, transcribe, or even walk and "think" (logic gates). This focus on adventurous chemistry off the beaten track supports the promise that with orthogonal dynamic covalent bonds we can ask questions that otherwise cannot be asked. The broad range of functions and concepts covered should appeal to the supramolecular organic chemist but also to the broader community. PMID:24287608

  8. Weak bond screening system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, S. Y.; Chang, F. H.; Bell, J. R.

    Consideration is given to the development of a weak bond screening system which is based on the utilization of a high power ultrasonic (HPU) technique. The instrumentation of the prototype bond strength screening system is described, and the adhesively bonded specimens used in the system developmental effort are detailed. Test results obtained from these specimens are presented in terms of bond strength and level of high power ultrasound irradiation. The following observations were made: (1) for Al/Al specimens, 2.6 sec of HPU irradiation will screen weak bond conditions due to improper preparation of bonding surfaces; (2) for composite/composite specimens, 2.0 sec of HPU irradiation will disrupt weak bonds due to under-cured conditions; (3) for Al honeycomb core with composite skin structure, 3.5 sec of HPU irradiation will disrupt weak bonds due to bad adhesive or oils contamination of bonding surfaces; and (4) for Nomex honeycomb with Al skin structure, 1.3 sec of HPU irradiation will disrupt weak bonds due to bad adhesive.

  9. Energy pulse bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, G. C.

    1972-01-01

    To eliminate many of the present termination problems a technique called energy pulse bonding (EPB) was developed. The process demonstrated the capability of: (1) joining conductors without prior removal of insulations, (2) joining conductors without danger of brittle intermetallics, (3) increased joint temperature capability, (4) simultaneous formation of several bonds, (5) capability of higher joint density, and (6) a production oriented process. The following metals were successfully bonded in the solid state: copper, beryllium copper, phosphor bronze, aluminum, brass, and Kovar.

  10. BONDING ALUMINUM METALS

    DOEpatents

    Noland, R.A.; Walker, D.E.

    1961-06-13

    A process is given for bonding aluminum to aluminum. Silicon powder is applied to at least one of the two surfaces of the two elements to be bonded, the two elements are assembled and rubbed against each other at room temperature whereby any oxide film is ruptured by the silicon crystals in the interface; thereafter heat and pressure are applied whereby an aluminum-silicon alloy is formed, squeezed out from the interface together with any oxide film, and the elements are bonded.

  11. Chemical bonding technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plueddemann, E.

    1986-01-01

    Primers employed in bonding together the various material interfaces in a photovoltaic module are being developed. The approach develops interfacial adhesion by generating actual chemical bonds between the various materials bonded together. The current status of the program is described along with the progress toward developing two general purpose primers for ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA), one for glass and metals, and another for plastic films.

  12. Valence bond entanglement entropy.

    PubMed

    Alet, Fabien; Capponi, Sylvain; Laflorencie, Nicolas; Mambrini, Matthieu

    2007-09-14

    We introduce for SU(2) quantum spin systems the valence bond entanglement entropy as a counting of valence bond spin singlets shared by two subsystems. For a large class of antiferromagnetic systems, it can be calculated in all dimensions with quantum Monte Carlo simulations in the valence bond basis. We show numerically that this quantity displays all features of the von Neumann entanglement entropy for several one-dimensional systems. For two-dimensional Heisenberg models, we find a strict area law for a valence bond solid state and multiplicative logarithmic corrections for the Néel phase. PMID:17930468

  13. Bonding Agents in Pit and Fissure Sealants: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Das, Usha Mohan; G, Suma

    2009-01-01

    Dental adhesive systems used for bonding dental resins to enamel and dentin have evolved through several "generations," with changes in chemistry, mechanism, number of bottles, application technique, and clinical effectiveness. The trend in the latest generation of dental bonding systems is to reduce the number of components and clinical placement steps. The introduction of i bond, a single-bottle dental adhesive system, is the latest of the new generation materials, and combines etchant, adhesive, and desensitizer in one component. This paper describes different dentin bonding agents, its evolution, mechanism of action and different commercially available dentin bonding agents and their role in the retention of pit and fissure sealant. PMID:25206115

  14. Theoretical study of the bond dissociation energies of methanol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Walch, Stephen P.

    1992-01-01

    A theoretical study of the bond dissociation energies for H2O and CH3OH is presented. The C-H and O-H bond energies are computed accurately with the modified coupled-pair functional method using a large basis set. For these bonds, an accuracy of +/- 2 kcal/mol is achieved, which is consistent with the C-H and C-C single bond energies of other molecules. The C-O bond is much more difficult to compute accurately because it requires higher levels of correlation treatment and more extensive one-particle basis sets.

  15. Mechanochemistry: One Bond at a Time

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jian; Fernández, Julio M.

    2009-01-01

    Single-molecule force clamp spectroscopy offers a novel platform for mechanically denaturing proteins by applying a constant force to a polyprotein. A powerful emerging application of the technique is that, by introducing a disulfide bond in each protein module, the chemical kinetics of disulfide bond cleavage under different stretching forces can be probed at the single-bond level. Even at forces much lower than that can rupture the chemical bond, the breaking of the S-S bond at the presence of various chemical reducing agents is significantly accelerated. Our previous work demonstrated that the rate of thiol/disulfide exchange reaction is force-dependent, and well described by an Arrhenius term of the form: r = A(exp((FΔxr-Ea)/kBT)[nucleophile]). From Arrhenius fits to the force dependency of the reduction rate we measured the bond elongation parameter, Δxr, along the reaction coordinate to the transition state of the SN2 reaction cleaved by different nucleophiles and enzymes, never before observed by any other technique. For S-S cleavage by various reducing agents, obtaining the Δxr value can help depicting the energy landscapes and elucidating the mechanisms of the reactions at the single-molecule level. Small nucleophiles, such as 1, 4-DL-dithiothreitol (DTT), tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine (TCEP) and L-cysteine, react with the S-S bond with monotonically increasing rates under the applied force; while thioredoxin enzymes exhibit both stretching-favored and —resistant reaction-rate regimes. These measurements demonstrate the power of single-molecule force clamp spectroscopy approach in providing unprecedented access to chemical reactions. PMID:19572737

  16. Water interaction and bond strength to dentin of dye-labelled adhesive as a function of the addition of rhodamine B

    PubMed Central

    WANG, Linda; BIM, Odair; LOPES, Adolfo Coelho de Oliveira; FRANCISCONI-DOS-RIOS, Luciana Fávaro; MAENOSONO, Rafael Massunari; D’ALPINO, Paulo Henrique Perlatti; HONÓRIO, Heitor Marques; ATTA, Maria Teresa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective This study investigated the effect of the fluorescent dye rhodamine B (RB) for interfacial micromorphology analysis of dental composite restorations on water sorption/solubility (WS/WSL) and microtensile bond strength to dentin (µTBS) of a 3-step total etch and a 2-step self-etch adhesive system. Material and Methods The adhesives Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (MP) and Clearfil SE Bond (SE) were mixed with 0.1 mg/mL of RB. For the WS/WSL tests, cured resin disks (5.0 mm in diameter x 0.8 mm thick) were prepared and assigned into four groups (n=10): MP, MP-RB, SE, and SE-RB. For µTBS assessment, extracted human third molars (n=40) had the flat occlusal dentin prepared and assigned into the same experimental groups (n=10). After the bonding and restoration procedures, specimens were sectioned in rectangular beams, stored in water and tested after seven days or after 12 months. The failure mode of fractured specimens was qualitatively evaluated under optical microscope (x40). Data from WS/WSL and µTBS were assessed by one-way and three-way ANOVA, respectively, and Tukey’s test (α=5%). Results RB increased the WSL of MP and SE. On the other hand, WS of both MP and SE was not affected by the addition of RB. No significance in µTBS between MP and MP-RB for seven days or one year was observed, whereas for SE a decrease in the µTBS means occurred in both storage times. Conclusions RB should be incorporated into non-simplified DBSs with caution, as it can interfere with their physical-mechanical properties, leading to a possible misinterpretation of bonded interface. PMID:27556201

  17. Ultrasonic NDE of titanium diffusion bonds using signal phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar-Ruiz, E.; Cawley, P.; Nagy, P. B.; Collison, I.; Wright, D.

    2013-01-01

    Diffusion bonding is a highly advantageous solid-state welding method. However, its full exploitation in titanium components is currently limited by a lack of robust NDE techniques capable of detecting anything but gross bond-line defects. A novel ultrasonic technique has been developed to address this lack of capability. This technique, based on the ultrasonic signal phase, has been demonstrated in a `single-sided' scenario where only one side of the diffusion bond was accessible. Samples with differing degrees of bond quality were evaluated, and excellent agreement was found between the single-sided and double-sided experiments.

  18. How molecular is the chemisorptive bond?

    PubMed

    van Santen, R A; Tranca, I

    2016-08-01

    Trends in adsorption energies as a function of transition metal differ for adsorbates that are attached atop a surface atom or are adsorbed onto a high coordination site. When adsorption onto early and late transition metals is compared variation in relative bond energies of adsorbates attached to different sites is large. A theoretical understanding is provided based on the analysis of the electronic structure of the respective chemical bonds. The electronic structure analysis is based on partial density of states (PDOS) and bond order overlap population densities from crystal orbital Hamiltonian population (COHP) calculations available from DFT electronic structure computations. This is complemented by calculations of Bader charge densities and electron density topology properties. Variation of the respective bond energies depends on the symmetry of the molecular orbitals that form the chemical bond. The key electronic structure parameters are the position of the Fermi level in the bonding or antibonding molecular orbital partial density of states region of the chemical bond and chemical bond polarity. These are very different for adsorbates adsorbed onto the same transition metal surface, but which have different coordination with surface metal atoms. The adsorption energies and the respective electronic structures of adatoms H, C and O and molecular fragments CHx (x = 1-3) are compared with those of the analogous molecules that contain a single transition metal atom. When adsorbed atop, trends in bond energies are remarkably similar to those of the corresponding molecules. The difference in bond energies of adsorbates and transition metal molecules, i.e. the embedding energy, is shown to consist of three contributions: quenching of the sometimes high molecular spin states, weakening of the adsorbate-surface interaction energy and weakening of the metal-metal atom bond energies next to the adsorbate. Conventional scaling rules of the interaction energies of

  19. Interfacial bonding stability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boerio, J.

    1984-01-01

    Interfacial bonding stability by in situ ellipsometry was investigated. It is found that: (1) gamma MPS is an effective primer for bonding ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) to aluminum; (2) ellipsometry is an effective in situ technique for monitoring the stability of polymer/metal interfaces; (3) the aluminized back surface of silicon wafers contain significant amounts of silicon and may have glass like properties.

  20. The dissociative bond.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Nirit

    2013-01-01

    Dissociation leaves a psychic void and a lingering sense of psychic absence. How do 2 people bond while they are both suffering from dissociation? The author explores the notion of a dissociative bond that occurs in the aftermath of trauma--a bond that holds at its core an understanding and shared detachment from the self. Such a bond is confined to unspoken terms that are established in the relational unconscious. The author proposes understanding the dissociative bond as a transitional space that may not lead to full integration of dissociated knowledge yet offers some healing. This is exemplified by R. Prince's (2009) clinical case study. A relational perspective is adopted, focusing on the intersubjective aspects of a dyadic relationship. In the dissociative bond, recognition of the need to experience mutual dissociation can accommodate a psychic state that yearns for relationship when the psyche cannot fully confront past wounds. Such a bond speaks to the need to reestablish a sense of human relatedness and connection when both parties in the relationship suffer from disconnection. This bond is bound to a silence that becomes both a means of protection against the horror of traumatic memory and a way to convey unspoken gestures toward the other. PMID:23282044

  1. Chemical Bonds I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanderson, R. T.

    1972-01-01

    Chemical bonding is discussed from a bond energy, rather than a wave mechanics, viewpoint. This approach is considered to be more suitable for the average student. (The second part of the article will appear in a later issue of the journal.) (AL)

  2. Earth-Bonding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norgaard, Jim

    1988-01-01

    Defines "earth bonding" as dynamic interaction between individual and physical environment. Examines methods and goals of traditional environmental education. Describes development of five-day camping workshop for 11 outdoor education teachers. Describes how workshop facilitated earth bonding for teachers. Calls for further research in "bonding…

  3. Interpreting the widespread nonlinear force spectra of intermolecular bonds

    PubMed Central

    Friddle, Raymond W.; Noy, Aleksandr; De Yoreo, James J.

    2012-01-01

    Single molecule force spectroscopy probes the strength, lifetime, and energetic details of intermolecular interactions in a simple experiment. A growing number of these studies have reported distinctly nonlinear trends in rupture force with loading rate that are typically explained in conventional models by invoking complex escape pathways. Recent analyses suggested that these trends should be expected even for simple barriers based on the basic assumptions of bond rupture dynamics and thus may represent the norm rather than the exception. Here we explore how these nonlinear trends reflect the two fundamental regimes of bond rupture: (i) a near-equilibrium regime, produced either by bond reforming in the case of a single bond or by asynchronized rupture of multiple individual bonds, and (ii) a kinetic regime produced by fast, non-equilibrium bond rupture. We analyze both single- and multi-bonded cases, describe the full evolution of the system as it transitions between near- and far-from-equilibrium loading regimes, and show that both interpretations produce essentially identical force spectra. Data from 10 different molecular systems show that this model provides a comprehensive description of force spectra for a diverse suite of bonds over experimentally relevant loading rates, removes the inconsistencies of previous interpretations of transition state distances, and gives ready access to both kinetic and thermodynamic information about the interaction. These results imply that single-molecule binding free energies for a vast number of bonds have already been measured. PMID:22869712

  4. Shape Bonding method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pontius, James T. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a method of bonding at least two surfaces together. The methods step of the present invention include applying a strip of adhesive to a first surface along a predefined outer boundary of a bond area and thereby defining a remaining open area there within. A second surface, or gusset plate, is affixed onto the adhesive before the adhesive cures. The strip of adhesive is allowed to cure and then a second amount of adhesive is applied to cover the remaining open area and substantially fill a void between said first and second surfaces about said bond area. A stencil may be used to precisely apply the strip of adhesive. When the strip cures, it acts as a dam to prevent overflow of the subsequent application of adhesive to undesired areas. The method results in a precise bond area free of undesired shapes and of a preferred profile which eliminate the drawbacks of the prior art bonds.

  5. Halogen bonding anion recognition.

    PubMed

    Brown, Asha; Beer, Paul D

    2016-07-01

    A halogen bond is an attractive non-covalent interaction between an electrophilic region in a covalently bonded halogen atom and a Lewis base. While these interactions have long been exploited as a tool in crystal engineering their powerful ability to direct supramolecular self-assembly and molecular recognition processes in solution has, until recently, been overlooked. During the last decade however an ever-increasing number of studies on solution-phase halogen-bond-mediated anion recognition processes has emerged. This Feature Article summarises advancements which have been made thus far in this rapidly developing research area. We survey the use of iodoperfluoroarene, haloimidazolium and halotriazole/triazolium halogen-bond-donor motifs in anion receptor design, before providing an account of our research into the application of mechanically interlocked rotaxane and catenane frameworks as halogen bonding anion host systems. PMID:27273600

  6. Ultrasonically bonded value assembly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salvinski, R. J. (Inventor)

    1975-01-01

    A valve apparatus capable of maintaining a fluid-tight seal over a relatively long period of time by releasably bonding a valve member to its seat is described. The valve member is bonded or welded to the seat and then released by the application of the same energy to the bond joint. The valve member is held in place during the bonding by a clamping device. An appropriate force device can activate the opening and closing of the valve member. Various combinations of material for the valve member and valve seat can be utilized to provide an adequate sealing bond. Aluminum oxide, stainless steel, inconel, tungsten carbide as hard materials and copper, aluminum, titanium, silver, and gold as soft materials are suggested.

  7. Wood Bond Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    A joint development program between Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection Technologies and The Weyerhaeuser Company resulted in an internal bond analyzer (IBA), a device which combines ultrasonics with acoustic emission testing techniques. It is actually a spinoff from a spinoff, stemming from a NASA Lewis invented acousto-ultrasonic technique that became a system for testing bond strength of composite materials. Hartford's parent company, Acoustic Emission Technology Corporation (AET) refined and commercialized the technology. The IBA builds on the original system and incorporates on-line process control systems. The IBA determines bond strength by measuring changes in pulsar ultrasonic waves injected into a board. Analysis of the wave determines the average internal bond strength for the panel. Results are displayed immediately. Using the system, a mill operator can adjust resin/wood proportion, reduce setup time and waste, produce internal bonds of a consistent quality and automatically mark deficient products.

  8. Effects of a newly designed HEMA-free, multi-purpose, single-bottle, self-etching adhesive on bonding to dental hard tissues, zirconia-based ceramics, and gold alloy.

    PubMed

    Ikemura, Kunio; Jogetsu, Yoshiyuki; Shinno, Kazuya; Nakatsuka, Toshiyuki; Endo, Takeshi; Kadoma, Yoshinori

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the bonding effectiveness of newly designed self-etching adhesives to four types of adherends--enamel, dentin, zirconia, and gold (Au) alloy. Five experimental adhesives were prepared, which contained 3.0-5.0 wt% 6-methacryloyloxyhexyl phosphonoacetate (6-MHPA) or 6-methacryloyloxyhexyl 3-phosphonopropionate (6-MHPP), 3.0 wt% 4-acryloyloxyethoxycarbonylphthalic acid (4-AET) or 17.0 wt% 4-methacryloyloxyethoxycarbonylphthalic acid (4-MET), 0-0.5 wt% 6-methacryloyloxyhexyl 6,8-dithiooctanoate (6-MHDT) or 10-methacryloyloxydecyl 6,8-dithiooctanoate (10-MDDT), and varying contents of Bis-GMA, dimethacrylate monomers, water, acetone, and a photoinitiator system. After 2,000 times of thermal cycling, shear bond strengths (SBSs) between a resin composite (Beautifil II, Shofu Inc., Japan) and the four adherends, bonded using the experimental adhesives, were measured at 1.0 mm/min. No statistically significant differences in SBS for bonding to ground enamel, dentin, sandblasted zirconia and Au alloy (p>0.05) were found between experimental adhesives which contained 6-MHPA and/or 6-MHPP, 4-MET or 4-AET, 6-MHDT and/or 10-MDDT, Bis-GMA, and dimethacrylates. An adhesive layer of less than 5.0 µm thickness, by scanning electron microscopy observation, revealed strong adhesion to the four adherends. Therefore, the newly designed multi-purpose, self-etching adhesive strongly adhered to all the four adherend materials tested. PMID:21946481

  9. The Halogen Bond

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The halogen bond occurs when there is evidence of a net attractive interaction between an electrophilic region associated with a halogen atom in a molecular entity and a nucleophilic region in another, or the same, molecular entity. In this fairly extensive review, after a brief history of the interaction, we will provide the reader with a snapshot of where the research on the halogen bond is now, and, perhaps, where it is going. The specific advantages brought up by a design based on the use of the halogen bond will be demonstrated in quite different fields spanning from material sciences to biomolecular recognition and drug design. PMID:26812185

  10. The Halogen Bond.

    PubMed

    Cavallo, Gabriella; Metrangolo, Pierangelo; Milani, Roberto; Pilati, Tullio; Priimagi, Arri; Resnati, Giuseppe; Terraneo, Giancarlo

    2016-02-24

    The halogen bond occurs when there is evidence of a net attractive interaction between an electrophilic region associated with a halogen atom in a molecular entity and a nucleophilic region in another, or the same, molecular entity. In this fairly extensive review, after a brief history of the interaction, we will provide the reader with a snapshot of where the research on the halogen bond is now, and, perhaps, where it is going. The specific advantages brought up by a design based on the use of the halogen bond will be demonstrated in quite different fields spanning from material sciences to biomolecular recognition and drug design. PMID:26812185

  11. 26 CFR 1.148-4A - Yield on an issue of bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Yield on an issue of bonds. 1.148-4A Section 1....148-4A Yield on an issue of bonds. (a) through (b)(4) . For guidance see § 1.148-4. (b)(5) Special aggregation rule treating certain bonds as a single fixed yield bond. Two variable yield bonds of an issue...

  12. Strain measurement in a concrete beam by use of the Brillouin-scattering-based distributed fiber sensor with single-mode fibers embedded in glass fiber reinforced polymer rods and bonded to steel reinforcing bars.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiaodong; Bao, Xiaoyi; Chhoa, Chia Yee; Bremner, Theodore W; Brown, Anthony W; DeMerchant, Michael D; Ferrier, Graham; Kalamkarov, Alexander L; Georgiades, Anastasis V

    2002-08-20

    The strain measurement of a 1.65-m reinforced concrete beam by use of a distributed fiber strain sensor with a 50-cm spatial resolution and 5-cm readout resolution is reported. The strain-measurement accuracy is +/-15 microepsilon (microm/m) according to the system calibration in the laboratory environment with non-uniform-distributed strain and +/-5 microepsilon with uniform strain distribution. The strain distribution has been measured for one-point and two-point loading patterns for optical fibers embedded in pultruded glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) rods and those bonded to steel reinforcing bars. In the one-point loading case, the strain deviations are +/-7 and +/-15 microepsilon for fibers embedded in the GFRP rods and fibers bonded to steel reinforcing bars, respectively, whereas the strain deviation is +/-20 microepsilon for the two-point loading case. PMID:12206221

  13. Bonding aerogels with polyurethanes

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, F.M.; Hoffman, D.M.

    1989-11-01

    Aerogels, porous silica glasses with ultra-fine cell size (30nm), are made by a solution gelation (sol-gel) process. The resulting gel is critical point dried to densities from 0.15--0.60 g/cc. This material is machinable, homogeneous, transparent, coatable and bondable. To bond aerogel an adhesive should have long cure time, no attack on the aerogel structure, and high strength. Several epoxies and urethanes were examined to determine if they satisfied these conditions. Bond strengths above 13 psi were found with double bubble and DP-110 epoxies and XI-208/ODA-1000 and Castall U-2630 urethanes. Hardman Kalex Tough Stuff'' A-85 hardness urethane gave 18 psi bond strength. Hardman A-85, Tuff-Stuff'' was selected for further evaluation because it produced bond strengths comparable to the adherend cohesive strength. 5 refs., 2 figs.

  14. Junk-Bond Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Der Werf, Martin

    2003-01-01

    Describes how a long-predicted decline in the fortunes of small private colleges is beginning to show up in the bond market, as the number of colleges now rated in the junk category has nearly doubled. (EV)

  15. Detecting Defective Solder Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulson, R.; Barney, J.; Decker, H. J.

    1984-01-01

    Method is noncontact and nondestructive. Technique detects solder bonds in solar array of other large circuit board, using thermal-imaging camera. Board placed between heat lamp and camera. Poor joints indiated by "cold" spots on the infrared image.

  16. Comparative evaluation of the enamel bond strength of ‘etch-and-rinse’ and ‘all-in-one’ bonding agents on cut and uncut enamel surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Deepu; Singbal, Kiran Prabhakar; Kamat, Sharad

    2011-01-01

    Aims and Objectives: To compare tensile bond strength of an ‘etch-and-rinse’ bonding agent (Single bond,3M ESPE, MN, USA) with an ‘all-in-one’ bonding agent (iBond, Heraeus Kulzer, NY, USA) on cut and uncut enamel surfaces. The null hypothesis tested is that the ‘all-in-one’ bonding agent matches the ‘etch-and-rinse’ bonding agent in terms of tensile bond strength to enamel. Materials and Methods: Forty extracted human mandibular teeth were used for the study. Twenty teeth with intact enamel surfaces were divided into two groups of 10 teeth each. The enamel surfaces of the 20 teeth were prepared and assigned to two more groups of 10 teeth each. One group each of intact and prepared enamel surfaces were used to bond with the ‘etch-and-rinse’ bonding agent [Single bond (SB), 3M ESPE, MN, USA] and the other two groups one each of intact and prepared enamel surfaces were used to bond with the ‘all-in-one’ bonding agent [ iBond (IB), Heraeus Kulzer, NY, USA]. The tensile bond strength was measured on the universal testing machine (Unitek, 9450 PC, FIE, INDIA) at a cross head speed of 1 mm / minute. Results: The results were statistically analyzed using a one-way ANOVA and student ‘t’ test. The values for the ‘etch-and-rinse’ bonding agent SB were significantly higher for both the cut and uncut surfaces, compared to the ‘all-in-one’ bonding agent IB (P < 0.05). The all-in-one bonding agent resulted in a higher bond strength on the cut enamel surfaces. Conclusions: Based on the results, it is advisable to use the ‘etch-and-rinse system’ in a clinical situation requiring bonding on enamel alone. PMID:21814355

  17. Methoxylation of Singly Bonded 1,4-1',4'-BnC60-C60Bn Dimer: Preferential Formation of 1,4-C60 Adduct with Sterically Less Demanding Addends and Stability Difference between 1,2- and 1,4-OMe(Bn)C60.

    PubMed

    He, Fa-Gui; Li, Zong-Jun; Gao, Xiang

    2016-08-01

    Methoxylation of the singly bonded 1,4-1',4'-BnC60-C60Bn dimer afforded 1,4-OMe(Bn)C60, a 1,4-C60 adduct with sterically less demanding addends, as the major adduct. The situation was different from that of direct functionalization of C60, where 1,2-OMe(Bn)C60 was obtained as the major product. The reaction was studied with in situ vis-NIR spectroscopy and computational calculations to obtain a better understanding of this unusual regioselectivity. The stability difference between 1,2- and 1,4-OMe(Bn)C60 was studied. PMID:27387300

  18. 27 CFR 24.147 - Operations bond or unit bond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Operations bond or unit bond. 24.147 Section 24.147 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Establishment and Operations Bonds and Consents of Surety § 24.147 Operations bond or unit...

  19. Changes in Water Sorption and Solubility of Dental Adhesive Systems after Cigarette Smoke

    PubMed Central

    Vitória, Lívia Andrade; Aguiar, Thaiane Rodrigues; Santos, Poliana Ramos Braga; Cavalcanti, Andrea Nóbrega

    2013-01-01

    Aim. To evaluate the effect of cigarette smoke on water sorption and solubility of four adhesive systems. Materials and Methods. Sixteen disks of each adhesive system were prepared (Adper Scotchbond Multipurpose Adhesive (SA); Adper Scotchbond Multipurpose Adhesive System (Adhesive + Primer) (SAP); Adper Single Bond Plus (SB); Adper Easy One (EO)). Specimens were desiccated until a constant mass was obtained and divided into two groups (n = 8). One-half of the specimens were immersed in deionized water, while the other half were also immersed, but with daily exposure to tobacco smoke. After 21 days, disks were measured again and stored in desiccators until constant mass was achieved. Data were calculated according to ISO specifications and statistically analyzed. Results. The tobacco smoke only significantly affected the water sorption and solubility of EO. There were significant differences in both analyses among materials tested. The SB exhibited the highest water sorption, followed by EO, which demonstrated significantly higher solubility values than SB. The SA and SAP showed low water sorption and solubility, and there were no significant differences between the two. Conclusion. Regardless of smoke exposure, both simplified adhesive systems presented an inferior performance that could be related to the complex mixture of components in such versions. PMID:23984078

  20. Strength of Chemical Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christian, Jerry D.

    1973-01-01

    Students are not generally made aware of the extraordinary magnitude of the strengths of chemical bonds in terms of the forces required to pull them apart. Molecular bonds are usually considered in terms of the energies required to break them, and we are not astonished at the values encountered. For example, the Cl2 bond energy, 57.00 kcal/mole, amounts to only 9.46 x 10(sup -20) cal/molecule, a very small amount of energy, indeed, and impossible to measure directly. However, the forces involved in realizing the energy when breaking the bond operate over a very small distance, only 2.94 A, and, thus, f(sub ave) approx. equals De/(r - r(sub e)) must be very large. The forces involved in dissociating the molecule are discussed in the following. In consideration of average forces, the molecule shall be assumed arbitrarily to be dissociated when the atoms are far enough separated so that the potential, relative to that of the infinitely separated atoms, is reduced by 99.5% from the potential of the molecule at the equilibrium bond length (r(sub e)) for Cl2 of 1.988 A this occurs at 4.928 A.

  1. Asymmetric bifurcated halogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Novák, Martin; Foroutan-Nejad, Cina; Marek, Radek

    2015-03-01

    Halogen bonding (XB) is being extensively explored for its potential use in advanced materials and drug design. Despite significant progress in describing this interaction by theoretical and experimental methods, the chemical nature remains somewhat elusive, and it seems to vary with the selected system. In this work we present a detailed DFT analysis of three-center asymmetric halogen bond (XB) formed between dihalogen molecules and variously 4-substituted 1,2-dimethoxybenzene. The energy decomposition, orbital, and electron density analyses suggest that the contribution of electrostatic stabilization is comparable with that of non-electrostatic factors. Both terms increase parallel with increasing negative charge of the electron donor molecule in our model systems. Depending on the orientation of the dihalogen molecules, this bifurcated interaction may be classified as 'σ-hole - lone pair' or 'σ-hole - π' halogen bonds. Arrangement of the XB investigated here deviates significantly from a recent IUPAC definition of XB and, in analogy to the hydrogen bonding, the term bifurcated halogen bond (BXB) seems to be appropriate for this type of interaction. PMID:25656525

  2. Predicting Promoter-Induced Bond Activation on Solid Catalysts Using Elementary Bond Orders.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Charlie; Latimer, Allegra A; Yoo, Jong Suk; Studt, Felix; Abild-Pedersen, Frank

    2015-09-17

    In this Letter, we examine bond activation induced by nonmetal surface promoters in the context of dehydrogenation reactions. We use C-H bond activation in methane dehydrogenation on transition metals as an example to understand the origin of the promoting or poisoning effect of nonmetals. The electronic structure of the surface and the bond order of the promoter are found to establish all trends in bond activation. On the basis of these results, we develop a predictive model that successfully describes the energetics of C-H, O-H, and N-H bond activation across a range of reactions. For a given reaction step, a single data point determines whether a nonmetal will promote bond activation or poison the surface and by how much. We show how our model leads to general insights that can be directly used to predict bond activation energetics on transition metal sulfides and oxides, which can be perceived as promoted surfaces. These results can then be directly used in studies on full catalytic pathways. PMID:26722740

  3. Surface analysis in composite bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messick, D. L.; Wightman, J. P.

    1982-01-01

    The role of the interfacial region in determining the bond strength and durability of composite bonds is discussed. The characterization of a variety of carbon fibers including Celion 6000 using both scanning electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy is discussed. The emphasis is on composite bonding, that is, the adhesive bonding between composites in contrast to fiber-matrix interaction. The primary objective of the research is the characterization of composite surfaces before adhesive bonding and after fracture of bonded specimens. Work done on the analysis of composite samples pretreated in a number of ways prior to bonding is detailed.

  4. Insulation bonding test system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beggs, J. M.; Johnston, G. D.; Coleman, A. D.; Portwood, J. N.; Saunders, J. M.; Redmon, J. W.; Porter, A. C. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A method and a system for testing the bonding of foam insulation attached to metal is described. The system involves the use of an impacter which has a calibrated load cell mounted on a plunger and a hammer head mounted on the end of the plunger. When the impacter strikes the insulation at a point to be tested, the load cell measures the force of the impact and the precise time interval during which the hammer head is in contact with the insulation. This information is transmitted as an electrical signal to a load cell amplifier where the signal is conditioned and then transmitted to a fast Fourier transform (FFT) analyzer. The FFT analyzer produces energy spectral density curves which are displayed on a video screen. The termination frequency of the energy spectral density curve may be compared with a predetermined empirical scale to determine whether a igh quality bond, good bond, or debond is present at the point of impact.

  5. Electrochemical activation of a tetrathiafulvalene halogen bond donor in solution.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, R; Groni, S; Fave, C; Branca, M; Mavré, F; Lorcy, D; Fourmigué, M; Schöllhorn, B

    2016-06-21

    The halogen bond donor properties of iodo-tetrathiafulvalene (I-TTF) can be electrochemically switched and controlled via reversible oxidation in the solution phase. Interestingly the activation of only one single halogen bond yielded already a strong and selective interaction, quantified by cyclic voltammetry. The standard potentials of the redox couples I-TTF(0/1+) and I-TTF(1+/2+) were observed to shift upon the addition of halides. These anions selectively stabilize the cationic I-TTF species through halogen bonding in polar liquid electrolytes. The thermodynamic affinity constants for chloride and bromide binding to the oxidized species have been determined. Competition in halide binding between I-TTF(1+) and other halogen bond donors allowed for comparing the relative donor strength of the respective electrophilic species. Furthermore it has been shown that halogen bonding can prevail over hydrogen bonding in the investigated system. PMID:27231819

  6. Metallic Adhesion and Bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferrante, J.; Smith, J. R.; Rose, J. H.

    1984-01-01

    Although metallic adhesion has played a central part in much tribological speculation, few quantitative theoretical calculations are available. This is in part because of the difficulties involved in such calculations and in part because the theoretical physics community is not particularly involved with tribology. The calculations currently involved in metallic adhesion are summarized and shown that these can be generalized into a scaled universal relationship. Relationships exist to other types of covalent bonding, such as cohesive, chemisorptive, and molecular bonding. A simple relationship between surface energy and cohesive energy is offered.

  7. 29 CFR 2580.412-20 - Use of existing bonds, separate bonds and additional bonding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... bonding. 2580.412-20 Section 2580.412-20 Labor Regulations Relating to Labor (Continued) EMPLOYEE BENEFITS SECURITY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR TEMPORARY BONDING RULES UNDER THE EMPLOYEE RETIREMENT INCOME SECURITY ACT OF 1974 TEMPORARY BONDING RULES General Bond Rules § 2580.412-20 Use of existing...

  8. The varying nature of fluorine oxygen bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julia, Timothy J. Lee; Rice Christopher, E.; Dateo, E.

    The singles and doubles coupled cluster method that includes a per turbational estimate of the effects of connected triple excitations CCSD T together with a triple zeta double polarized TZ2P one particle basis set is used to determine the geometries harmonic frequencies infrared intensities and dipole moments of HOF F O HOOF FOOF ClOOF Agreement with experiment is very good with the exception that the currently accepted experimental assignment of the symmetric and antisymmetric O F stretches in FOOF is shown to be reversed and to be consistent with an earlier experimental study Very accurate heats of formation of HOOF FOOF and ClOOF are also computed using the CCSD T method in conjunction with large atomic natural orbital basis sets The F O bond distances quadratic force constants bond energies and fluorine and oxygen atomic charges from the above five molecules and six previously studied molecules FONO trans FONO cis FONO FOCl FOBr and FON are compared and used to deduce a simple model of F O bonding The unusual relationship between the F O bond distance and quadratic force constant shows that F O bonding is a function of at least three effects which are degree of covalent character degree of ionic character and extent of lone electron pair repulsions All of the data are qualitatively consistent with this simple model The bonding in cis FONO is even more complicated involving also dispersion interactions between fluorine and the terminal oxygen It is suggested that the general importance of lone pair repulsions in F O bonding and the additional importance of intra molecular dispersion interactions explains why many density functionals have difficulty in describing the geometry of cis FONO

  9. Bonding without Tears.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akeroyd, F. Michael

    1982-01-01

    Discusses merits of using sigma-pi model of ethylene as a teaching aid in introductory organic chemistry. The nonmathematical treatment of sigma-pi bonding is then extended to such phenomena as conjugation, hyperconjugation, Markovnikoff addition, aromaticity, and aromatic substitution. (SK)

  10. GRAPHITE BONDING METHOD

    DOEpatents

    King, L.D.P.

    1964-02-25

    A process for bonding or joining graphite members together in which a thin platinum foil is placed between the members, heated in an inert atmosphere to a temperature of 1800 deg C, and then cooled to room temperature is described. (AEC)

  11. Flax Fiber - Interfacial Bonding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Measured flax fiber physical and chemical properties potentially impact bonding and thus stress transfer between the matrix and fiber within composites. These first attempts at correlating flax fiber quality and biofiber composites contain the initial steps towards identifying key flax fiber charac...

  12. Bonds Between Atoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, Alan

    The field of inquiry into how atoms are bonded together to form molecules and solids crosses the borderlines between physics and chemistry encompassing methods characteristic of both sciences. At one extreme, the inquiry is pursued with care and rigor into the simplest cases; at the other extreme, suggestions derived from the more careful inquiry…

  13. Photochemical tissue bonding

    DOEpatents

    Redmond, Robert W.; Kochevar, Irene E.

    2012-01-10

    Photochemical tissue bonding methods include the application of a photosensitizer to a tissue and/or tissue graft, followed by irradiation with electromagnetic energy to produce a tissue seal. The methods are useful for tissue adhesion, such as in wound closure, tissue grafting, skin grafting, musculoskeletal tissue repair, ligament or tendon repair and corneal repair.

  14. Athermal fracture of covalent bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, J.J.

    1999-08-01

    Most fracture is athermal. Either because it occurs at low temperatures or because it occurs too fast for thermal activation to be effective. Thus it must be directly activated by applied stresses. This can occur via quantum tunneling when the chemical bonding of a solid resides in localized (covalent) bonds. Then applied stresses can cause the bonding electrons to become delocalized (anti-bonded) through quantum tunneling. That is, the bonds become broken. The process is related to the Zener tunneling process that is thought to be responsible for dielectric breakdown in semiconductors. Under a driving force, bonding electrons tunnel at constant energy from their bonding states into anti-bonding states through the forbidden gap in the bonding energy spectrum.

  15. Evaluation of micro-shear bond strength of resin modified glass-ionomer to composite resins using various bonding systems

    PubMed Central

    Kasraie, Shahin; Shokripour, Mohadese; Safari, Mahin

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to compare the micro-shear bond strength between composite and resin-modified glass-ionomer (RMGI) by different adhesive systems. Materials and Methods: A total of 16 discs of RMGI with a diameter of 15 mm and a thickness of 2 mm were randomly divided into four groups (n = 4). Four cylinders of composite resin (z250) were bonded to the RMGI discs with Single Bond, Clearfil SE Bond and Clearfil S3 Bond in Groups 1-3, respectively. The fourth group was the control. Samples were tested by a mechanical testing machine with a strain rate of 0.5 mm/min. Failure mode was assessed under a stereo-microscope. Results: The means of micro-shear bond strength values for Groups 1-4 were 14.45, 23.49, 16.23 and 5.46 MPa, respectively. Using a bonding agent significantly increased micro-shear bond strength (P = 0.0001). Conclusion: Micro-shear bond strength of RMGI to composite increased significantly with the use of adhesive resin. The bond strength of RMGI to composite resin could vary depending upon the type of adhesive system used. PMID:24347892

  16. Construct Polyoxometalate Frameworks through Covalent Bonds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Zhao, Huishuang; Yu, Zheng-Bao; Wang, Lei; Sun, Licheng; Sun, Junliang

    2015-09-01

    An emerging strategy for exploring the application of polyoxometalates (POMs) is to assemble POM clusters into open-framework materials, especially inorganic-organic hybrid three-dimensional (3D) open-framework materials, via the introduction of different organic linkers between the POM clusters. This strategy has yielded a few 3D crystalline POMs of which a typical class is the group of polyoxometalate metal-organic frameworks (POMMOFs). However, for reported POMMOFs, only coordination bonds are involved between the linkers and POM clusters, and it has not yet produced any covalently bonded polyoxometalate frameworks. Here, the concept of "covalently bonded POMs (CPOMs)" is developed. By using vanadoborates as an example, we showed that the 3D CPOMs can be obtained by a condensation reaction through the oxolation mechanism of polymer chemistry. In particular, suitable single crystals were harvested and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. This work forges a link among polymer science, POM chemistry, and open-framework materials by demonstrating that it is possible to use covalent bonds according to polymer chemistry principles to construct crystalline 3D open-framework POM materials. PMID:26286321

  17. The effect of delayed placement of composite and double application of single-bottle adhesives on microleakage of composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Shafiei, Fereshteh; Kiomarsi, Nazanin; Alavi, Ali Asghar

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of delayed placement of composite and double application of adhesive on microleakage of two-step, total-etch (single-bottle) adhesives. Standard Class V cavities were prepared in 140 sound premolars and randomly assigned into 10 groups (n = 14). Excite, Optibond Solo Plus, and Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (as a control) were used. After the first layer of single-bottle adhesive was photocured, the adhesive was reapplied and photocured in four of the groups. A microhybrid composite was applied in five of the groups immediately after the adhesive was photocured; in the other five groups, the composite was placed after a three-minute delay. After 24 hours of storage in distilled water and thermocycling, the samples were placed in 1% methylene blue. All samples then were sectioned longitudinally and evaluated for microleakage at the occlusal and gingival margins under a stereomicroscope at 20x magnification. Data were analyzed using nonparametric tests. Delayed placement of composite significantly increased leakage at the gingival margins when single-bottle adhesives were used (p < 0.05). Double application of the single-bottle adhesives significantly reduced leakage at the gingival margin when placement of the composite was delayed. There was no significant difference between single and double application when the composite was placed immediately (p < 0.05). PMID:21613038

  18. Effect of sodium ascorbate on the bond strength of all-in-one adhesive systems to NaOCl-treated dentin

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi-Chaharom, Mohammad-Esmaeel; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Mohammadi, Narmin; Oskoee, Parnian-Alizadeh; Daneshpuy, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Background Ascorbic acid and its salts are low-toxicity products, which are routinely used in food industries as antioxidants. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of 10% sodium ascorbate on the bond strength of two all-in-one adhesive systems to NaOCl-treated dentin. Material and Methods After exposing the dentin on the facial surface of 90 sound human premolars and mounting in an acrylic resin mold, the exposed dentin surfaces were polished with 600-grit SiC paper under running water. Then the samples were randomly divided into 6 groups of 15. Groups 1 and 4 were the controls, in which no surface preparation was carried out. In groups 2 and 5 the dentin surfaces were treated with 5.25% NaOCl alone for 10 minutes and in groups 3 and 6 with 5.25% NaOCl for 10 minutes followed by 10% sodium ascorbate for 10 minutes. Then composite resin cylinders, measuring 2 mm in diameter and 2 mm in height, were bonded on the dentin surfaces in groups 1, 2 and 3 with Clearfil S3 Bond and in groups 4, 5 and 6 with Adper Easy One adhesive systems according to manufacturers’ instructions. The samples were stored in distilled water for 24 hours at 37°C and then thermocycled. Finally, the samples underwent shear bond strength test in a universal testing machine at a strain rate of 1 mm/min. Data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests at α=0.05. Results The differences between groups 1 and 2 (P=0.01), 1 and 5 (P=0.003). 1 and 6 (P=0.03) and 4 and 5 (P=0.03) were statistically significant. Two-by-two comparisons did not reveal any significant difference between other groups (P>0.05). Conclusions Use of 10% sodium ascorbate for 10 minutes restored the decreased bond strength of the adhesive systems to that of the control groups. Key words:Sodium ascorbate, adhesive systems, all-in-one, bond strength, sodium hypochlorite. PMID:26644835

  19. Effect of loading conditions on the dissociation behaviour of catch bond clusters

    PubMed Central

    Sun, L.; Cheng, Q. H.; Gao, H. J.; Zhang, Y. W.

    2012-01-01

    Under increasing tensile load, the lifetime of a single catch bond counterintuitively increases up to a maximum and then decreases exponentially like a slip bond. So far, the characteristics of single catch bond dissociation have been extensively studied. However, it remains unclear how a cluster of catch bonds behaves under tensile load. We perform computational analysis on the following models to examine the characteristics of clustered catch bonds: (i) clusters of catch bonds with equal load sharing, (ii) clusters of catch bonds with linear load sharing, and (iii) clusters of catch bonds in micropipette-manipulated cell detachment. We focus on the differences between the slip and catch bond clusters, identifying the critical factors for exhibiting the characteristics of catch bond mechanism for the multiple-bond system. Our computation reveals that for a multiple-bond cluster, the catch bond behaviour could only manifest itself under relatively uniform loading conditions and at certain stages of decohesion, explaining the difficulties in observing the catch bond mechanism under real biological conditions. PMID:21937488

  20. Effect of loading conditions on the dissociation behaviour of catch bond clusters.

    PubMed

    Sun, L; Cheng, Q H; Gao, H J; Zhang, Y W

    2012-05-01

    Under increasing tensile load, the lifetime of a single catch bond counterintuitively increases up to a maximum and then decreases exponentially like a slip bond. So far, the characteristics of single catch bond dissociation have been extensively studied. However, it remains unclear how a cluster of catch bonds behaves under tensile load. We perform computational analysis on the following models to examine the characteristics of clustered catch bonds: (i) clusters of catch bonds with equal load sharing, (ii) clusters of catch bonds with linear load sharing, and (iii) clusters of catch bonds in micropipette-manipulated cell detachment. We focus on the differences between the slip and catch bond clusters, identifying the critical factors for exhibiting the characteristics of catch bond mechanism for the multiple-bond system. Our computation reveals that for a multiple-bond cluster, the catch bond behaviour could only manifest itself under relatively uniform loading conditions and at certain stages of decohesion, explaining the difficulties in observing the catch bond mechanism under real biological conditions. PMID:21937488

  1. 27 CFR 24.147 - Operations bond or unit bond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... amended, give an operations bond or unit bond in accordance with the applicable provisions of 27 CFR part... or contiguous distilled spirits plant qualified under 27 CFR part 19 for the production of distilled... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Operations bond or...

  2. 30 CFR 281.33 - Bonds and bonding requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 281.33 Mineral Resources BUREAU OF OCEAN ENERGY MANAGEMENT, REGULATION, AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF... a surety or personal bond to guarantee payment of a deferred portion of the bid. Upon the payment of the full amount of the cash bonus bid, the lessee's bond will be released. (b) All bonds to...

  3. 27 CFR 24.147 - Operations bond or unit bond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... or contiguous distilled spirits plant qualified under 27 CFR part 19 for the production of distilled... amended, give an operations bond or unit bond in accordance with the applicable provisions of 27 CFR part... BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Establishment and Operations Bonds and Consents of...

  4. New NMR spectroscopic probe of the absolute stereoselectivity for metal-hydride and metal-alkyl additions to the carbon-carbon double bond. Demonstration with a single-component, isospecific Ziegler-Natta {alpha}-olefin polymerization catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Gilchrist, J.H.; Bercaw, J.E.

    1996-12-04

    Optically active (98% ee) (R)-1,1,3,4,4,5,5,5-octadeutero-1-pentene (1) was prepared and used to evaluate the stereoselectivity of Y-H and Y-n-pentyl additions for the optically pure C{sub 2}-symmetric (R,S)-(BnBp)Y-R/(S,R)-(BnBp)Y-R and racemic ({+-})-(BnBp)Y-R isospecific polypropylene catalysts (BnBp = [(OC{sub 10}H{sub 6}C{sub 10}H{sub 6}O)Si(C{sub 5}H{sub 2}-2-SiMe{sub 3}-4-CMe{sub 3}){sub 2}]). Deuteration and deuterodimerization of 1 mediated by (R,S)-, (S,R)-, and ({+-})-(BnBp)Y-D provide alkanes whose {sup 1}H NMR spectra indicate the sense and magnitude of olefin facial selectivity for insertions into metal-hydride and metal-n-pentyl bonds. It is shown that useful information concerning the stereochemistry of olefin insertion can be deduced from the {sup 2}H NMR spectra of 1-pentene deuterodimers without the requirement of a stereochemically labeled pentene or a resolved catalyst. 26 refs., 4 figs.

  5. Probing voltage induced bond rupture in a molecular junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Haixing; Su, Timothy; Kim, Nathaniel; Darancet, Pierre; Leighton, James; Steigerwald, Michael; Nuckolls, Colin; Venkataraman, Latha

    We use scanning tunneling microscope break junction to study electric field breakdown at the single molecule level. We investigate breakdown phenomena in atomic chains composed of Si--Si, Si--O, Si--C, Ge--Ge and C--C bonds that are commonly found in the low- κ dielectric material. We see different bond rupture behaviors in a range of molecular backbones, and use the results from a statistically large number of measurements to determine which bond breaks. We find that Si--Si and Ge--Ge bonds rupture above a 1V bias. We also find that the Si--C bond is more robust than Si--O or Si--Si bond at above 1V. Finally, we illustrate how an additional conductance pathway in parallel to the Si--Si bond changes bond rupture behavior under an electric field. We carry out ab initio calculations on these systems and demonstrate that the mechanism for bond rupture under electric field involves ``heating'' of the molecule through electron-vibrational mode coupling. Haixing Li is supported by Semiconductor Research Corporation and New York CAIST program. We thank the NSF for the support of these studies under Grant No. CHE-1404922.

  6. IMPROVED BONDING METHOD

    DOEpatents

    Padgett, E.V. Jr.; Warf, D.H.

    1964-04-28

    An improved process of bonding aluminum to aluminum without fusion by ultrasonic vibrations plus pressure is described. The surfaces to be bonded are coated with an aqueous solution of alkali metal stearate prior to assembling for bonding. (AEC) O H19504 Present information is reviewed on steady state proliferation, differentiation, and maturation of blood cells in mammals. Data are cited from metabolic tracer studies, autoradiographic studies, cytologic studies, studies of hematopoietic response to radiation injuries, and computer analyses of blood cell production. A 3-step model for erythropoiesis and a model for granulocyte kinetics are presented. New approaches to the study of lymphocytopoiesis described include extracorporeal blood irradiation to deplete lymphocytic tissue without direct injury to the formative tissues as a means to study the stressed system, function control, and rates of proliferation. It is pointed out that present knowledge indicates that lymphocytes comprise a mixed family, with diverse life spans, functions, and migration patterns with apparent aimless recycling from modes to lymph to blood to nodes that has not yet been quantitated. Areas of future research are postulated. (70 references.) (C.H.)

  7. Cooperativity in Tetrel Bonds.

    PubMed

    Marín-Luna, Marta; Alkorta, Ibon; Elguero, José

    2016-02-01

    A theoretical study of the cooperativity in linear chains of (H3SiCN)n and (H3SiNC)n complexes connected by tetrel bonds has been carried out by means of MP2 and CCSD(T) computational methods. In all cases, a favorable cooperativity is observed, especially in some of the largest linear chains of (H3SiNC)n, where the effect is so large that the SiH3 group is almost equidistant to the two surrounding CN groups and it becomes planar. In addition, the combination of tetrel bonds with other weak interactions (halogen, chalcogen, pnicogen, triel, beryllium, lithium, and hydrogen bond) has been explored using ternary complexes, (H3SiCN)2:XY and (H3SiNC)2:XY. In all cases, positive cooperativity is obtained, especially in the (H3SiNC)2:ClF and (H3SiNC)2:SHF ternary complexes, where, respectively, halogen and chalcogen shared complexes are formed. PMID:26756083

  8. The role of bond tangency and bond gap in hard sphere crystallization of chains.

    PubMed

    Karayiannis, Nikos Ch; Foteinopoulou, Katerina; Laso, Manuel

    2015-03-01

    We report results from Monte Carlo simulations on dense packings of linear, freely-jointed chains of hard spheres of uniform size. In contrast to our past studies where bonded spheres along the chain backbone were tangent, in the present work a finite tolerance in the bond is allowed. Bond lengths are allowed to fluctuate in the interval [σ, σ + dl], where σ is the sphere diameter. We find that bond tolerance affects the phase behaviour of hard-sphere chains, especially in the close vicinity of the melting transition. First, a critical dl(crit) exists marking the threshold for crystallization, whose value decreases with increasing volume fraction. Second, bond gaps enhance the onset of phase transition by accelerating crystal nucleation and growth. Finally, bond tolerance has an effect on crystal morphologies: in the tangent limit the majority of structures correspond to stack-faulted random hexagonal close packing (rhcp). However, as bond tolerance increases a wealth of diverse structures can be observed: from single fcc (or hcp) crystallites to random hcp/fcc stackings with multiple directions. By extending the simulations over trillions of MC steps (10(12)) we are able to observe crystal-crystal transitions and perfection even for entangled polymer chains in accordance to the Ostwald's rule of stages in crystal polymorphism. Through simple geometric arguments we explain how the presence of rigid or flexible constraints affects crystallization in general atomic and particulate systems. Based on the present results, it can be concluded that proper tuning of bond gaps and of the connectivity network can be a controlling factor for the phase behaviour of model, polymer-based colloidal and granular systems. PMID:25594158

  9. Coulombic Models in Chemical Bonding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sacks, Lawrence J.

    1986-01-01

    Compares the coulumbic point charge model for hydrogen chloride with the valence bond model. It is not possible to assign either a nonpolar or ionic canonical form of the valence bond model, while the covalent-ionic bond distribution does conform to the point charge model. (JM)

  10. 46 CFR Sec. 10 - Bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... REPAIRS UNDER NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 10 Bonds. (a... awarded work and the furnishing of the performance and payment bonds required by Article 14 of the NSA... of the NSA-LUMPSUMREP Contract, the standard form of individual performance bond (Standard Form...

  11. 46 CFR Sec. 10 - Bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... REPAIRS UNDER NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 10 Bonds. (a... awarded work and the furnishing of the performance and payment bonds required by Article 14 of the NSA... of the NSA-LUMPSUMREP Contract, the standard form of individual performance bond (Standard Form...

  12. 46 CFR Sec. 10 - Bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... REPAIRS UNDER NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 10 Bonds. (a... awarded work and the furnishing of the performance and payment bonds required by Article 14 of the NSA... of the NSA-LUMPSUMREP Contract, the standard form of individual performance bond (Standard Form...

  13. 46 CFR Sec. 10 - Bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... REPAIRS UNDER NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 10 Bonds. (a... awarded work and the furnishing of the performance and payment bonds required by Article 14 of the NSA... of the NSA-LUMPSUMREP Contract, the standard form of individual performance bond (Standard Form...

  14. 46 CFR Sec. 10 - Bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... REPAIRS UNDER NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 10 Bonds. (a... awarded work and the furnishing of the performance and payment bonds required by Article 14 of the NSA... of the NSA-LUMPSUMREP Contract, the standard form of individual performance bond (Standard Form...

  15. Annual Bond Referenda Survey: 1998.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Jersey School Boards Association, Trenton.

    An annual school bond survey for New Jersey reveals that while the state's voters had approved 60 percent of the school bond issues in 1998, the communities clearly could not meet the state's multi- billion dollar construction needs on their own. Further, communities with high property taxes had fewer bond elections and approved less of them than…

  16. The effect of dentine location and tubule orientation on the bond strengths between resin and dentine.

    PubMed

    Phrukkanon, S; Burrow, M F; Tyas, M J

    1999-05-01

    This study determined the influence of dentine structure on the micro-tensile bond strengths between resin and dentine of two different dentine adhesive systems (Single Bond, 3M Dental Products, St Paul, MN; MF-102 (experimental self-etching primer), GC Corporation, Tokyo, Japan). The study was separated into two main parts: bond strength measurement and investigation of the bonding interface. Twenty-two human premolars were used for the bond strength measurement. Each tooth was cut vertically, separating the tooth into mesio-distal halves. One half of the tooth was used to bond to a surface perpendicular to the dentinal tubules and other half to bond to a surface parallel to the tubules. For each half, six locations of dentine were bonded. Each material was used in accordance to the manufacturer's directions. Cylindrical hourglass-shaped specimens of 1.2 mm diameter at the bonded interface were manufactured. The bonds were stressed in tension at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Mean bond strengths were compared using LSD, one-way ANOVA, and Student's t-test. The fractured surfaces were examined under a scanning electron microscope, and the frequency of fracture modes was compared using the Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests. For the investigation of the bonded interface, four teeth were prepared by the same procedure used for the bond test specimens. The bonded interfaces were observed after an acid-base treatment or fracturing across the bonded interface, prior to investigation with a field-emission scanning electron microscope. For Single Bond, the bond strengths for mid-root dentine were significantly lower than for other locations (p < 0.05). For MF-102, there was no significant difference for all locations (p > 0.05). MF-102 bonded well to all locations of dentine while Single Bond showed a porous zone at the base of the hybrid layer. The bonds were not influenced by tubule orientation. The results indicate that the bond for Single Bond may be affected by

  17. Protein folding guides disulfide bond formation

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Meng; Wang, Wei; Thirumalai, D.

    2015-01-01

    The Anfinsen principle that the protein sequence uniquely determines its structure is based on experiments on oxidative refolding of a protein with disulfide bonds. The problem of how protein folding drives disulfide bond formation is poorly understood. Here, we have solved this long-standing problem by creating a general method for implementing the chemistry of disulfide bond formation and rupture in coarse-grained molecular simulations. As a case study, we investigate the oxidative folding of bovine pancreatic trypsin inhibitor (BPTI). After confirming the experimental findings that the multiple routes to the folded state contain a network of states dominated by native disulfides, we show that the entropically unfavorable native single disulfide [14–38] between Cys14 and Cys38 forms only after polypeptide chain collapse and complete structuring of the central core of the protein containing an antiparallel β-sheet. Subsequent assembly, resulting in native two-disulfide bonds and the folded state, involves substantial unfolding of the protein and transient population of nonnative structures. The rate of [14–38] formation increases as the β-sheet stability increases. The flux to the native state, through a network of kinetically connected native-like intermediates, changes dramatically by altering the redox conditions. Disulfide bond formation between Cys residues not present in the native state are relevant only on the time scale of collapse of BPTI. The finding that formation of specific collapsed native-like structures guides efficient folding is applicable to a broad class of single-domain proteins, including enzyme-catalyzed disulfide proteins. PMID:26297249

  18. Urethane/Silicone Adhesives for Bonding Flexing Metal Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Paul D.

    2004-01-01

    Adhesives that are blends of commercially available urethane and silicone adhesives have been found to be useful for bonding metal parts that flex somewhat during use. These urethane/silicone adhesives are formulated for the specific metal parts to be bonded. The bonds formed by these adhesives have peel and shear strengths greater than those of bonds formed by double-sided tapes and by other adhesives, including epoxies and neat silicones. In addition, unlike the bonds formed by epoxies, the bonds formed by these adhesives retain flexibility. In the initial application for which the urethane/silicone adhesives were devised, there was a need to bond spring rings, which provide longitudinal rigidity for inflatable satellite booms, with the blades that provide the booms axial strength. The problem was to make the bonds withstand the stresses, associated with differences in curvature between the bonded parts, that arose when the booms were deflated and the springs were compressed. In experiments using single adhesives (that is, not the urethane/ silicone blends), the bonds were broken and, in each experiment, it was found that the adhesive bonded well with either the ring or with the blade, but not both. After numerous experiments, the adhesive that bonded best with the rings and the adhesive that bonded best with the blades were identified. These adhesives were then blended and, as expected, the blend bonded well with both the rings and the blades. The two adhesives are Kalex (or equivalent) high-shear-strength urethane and Dow Corning 732 (or equivalent) silicone. The nominal mixture ratio is 5 volume parts of the urethane per 1 volume part of the silicone. Increasing the proportion of silicone makes the bond weaker but more flexible, and decreasing the proportion of silicone makes the bond stronger but more brittle. The urethane/silicone blend must be prepared and used quickly because of the limited working time of the urethane: The precursor of the urethane

  19. Intramolecular amide bonds stabilize pili on the surface of bacilli

    SciTech Connect

    Budzik, Jonathan M.; Poor, Catherine B.; Faull, Kym F.; Whitelegge, Julian P.; He, Chuan; Schneewind, Olaf

    2010-01-12

    Gram-positive bacteria elaborate pili and do so without the participation of folding chaperones or disulfide bond catalysts. Sortases, enzymes that cut pilin precursors, form covalent bonds that link pilin subunits and assemble pili on the bacterial surface. We determined the x-ray structure of BcpA, the major pilin subunit of Bacillus cereus. The BcpA precursor encompasses 2 Ig folds (CNA{sub 2} and CNA{sub 3}) and one jelly-roll domain (XNA) each of which synthesizes a single intramolecular amide bond. A fourth amide bond, derived from the Ig fold of CNA{sub 1}, is formed only after pilin subunits have been incorporated into pili. We report that the domains of pilin precursors have evolved to synthesize a discrete sequence of intramolecular amide bonds, thereby conferring structural stability and protease resistance to pili.

  20. Resolving the molecular mechanism of cadherin catch bond formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manibog, Kristine; Li, Hui; Rakshit, Sabyasachi; Sivasankar, Sanjeevi

    2014-06-01

    Classical cadherin Ca2+-dependent cell-cell adhesion proteins play key roles in embryogenesis and in maintaining tissue integrity. Cadherins mediate robust adhesion by binding in multiple conformations. One of these adhesive states, called an X-dimer, forms catch bonds that strengthen and become longer lived in the presence of mechanical force. Here we use single-molecule force-clamp spectroscopy with an atomic force microscope along with molecular dynamics and steered molecular dynamics simulations to resolve the molecular mechanisms underlying catch bond formation and the role of Ca2+ ions in this process. Our data suggest that tensile force bends the cadherin extracellular region such that they form long-lived, force-induced hydrogen bonds that lock X-dimers into tighter contact. When Ca2+ concentration is decreased, fewer de novo hydrogen bonds are formed and catch bond formation is eliminated.

  1. Universal prediction of intramolecular hydrogen bonds in organic crystals.

    PubMed

    Galek, Peter T A; Fábián, László; Allen, Frank H

    2010-04-01

    A complete exploration of intramolecular hydrogen bonds (IHBs) has been undertaken using a combination of statistical analyses of the Cambridge Structural Database and computation of ab initio interaction energies for prototypical hydrogen-bonded fragments. Notable correlations have been revealed between computed energies, hydrogen-bond geometries, donor and acceptor chemistry, and frequencies of occurrence. Significantly, we find that 95% of all observed IHBs correspond to the five-, six- or seven-membered rings. Our method to predict a propensity for hydrogen-bond occurrence in a crystal has been adapted for such IHBs, applying topological and chemical descriptors derived from our findings. In contrast to intermolecular hydrogen bonding, it is found that IHBs can be predicted across the complete chemical landscape from a single optimized probability model, which is presented. Predictivity of 85% has been obtained for generic organic structures, which can exceed 90% for discrete classes of IHB. PMID:20305358

  2. Bond strength and SEM observation of CO2 laser irradiated dentin, bonded with simplified-step adhesives.

    PubMed

    Koshiro, K; Inoue, S; Niimi, K; Koase, K; Sano, H

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated, mechanically and morphologically, whether the dentin surface irradiated by CO2 laser could be a possible adherent when bonded with simplified-step adhesives. Buccal enamel and cementum of extracted human premolars were removed to expose a flat dentin surface. The dentin surfaces were irradiated continuously with CO2 laser at 1.0 W. Before bonding with either a single-bottle adhesive (Single Bond) or a self-etching priming system (Mega Bond), the irradiated dentin surface was treated as follows: no treatment, NaHCO3 powder abrasion and wet-grinding with 600-grit SiC paper. The treated dentin surfaces were bonded to resin composite with either of the two adhesives. Non-irradiated dentin surfaces were also used as control. Resin bonded specimens were stored in water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours and subjected to microtensile bond test. Additionally, to observe the resin/irradiated dentin interface, resin-bonded specimens were similarly prepared, sectioned into slabs, embedded in epoxy resin, polished with diamond pastes, sputter coated Au-Pd and examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). After SEM observation, the specimens were further polished with diamond paste to remove the Au-Pd sputter-coat, immersed in HCL and NaOCl and finally observed by SEM again. In the presence of carbonized dentin, microtensile bond strength drastically decreased but recovered to the control value by removing the carbonized dentin layer visually with SiC paper for both adhesive systems. However, the laser-affected dentin that remained on the bonded interface was easily dissolved with NaOCl and HCl. PMID:15853101

  3. Electrostatic model for hydrogen bonds in alcohols

    SciTech Connect

    Giguere, P.A.; Pigeon-Gosselin, M.

    1988-11-01

    The authors have measured the Raman spectra of liquid methanol at temperatures between 50/sup 0/ and -77/sup 0/C. The weak O-H stretching bands appear, under amplification, more and more asymmetric as the temperature is lowered. They can be decomposed into three Gaussian components centered at about 3220, 3310, and 3400 cm/sup -1/. The former, predominant at low temperature, corresponds to single, linear hydrogen bonds (LHB) between two molecules. The other two are assigned to branched hydrogen bonds, respectively bifurcated (BHB), between three molecules, and trifurcated (THB), between four molecules. They conclude that the molecular structure of liquid alcohols is not chain-like, as presumed so far, but a three-dimensional network featuring a mixture of single (LBH), and multiple hydrogen bonds (BHB, and THB). They are mainly electrostatic in nature, their relative proportions and geometry governed by the packing conditions for minimum energy. They form distinct trimers and tetramers in dilute solutions of alcohols in inert solvents and frozen matrices, and the latter even in the vapor.

  4. On homogeneous L-bonds and heterogeneous L-bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konecny, Jan; Ojeda-Aciego, Manuel

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we deal with suitable generalizations of the notion of bond between contexts, as part of the research area of Formal Concept Analysis. We study different generalizations of the notion of bond within the ? -fuzzy setting. Specifically, given a formal context, there are three prototypical pairs of concept-forming operators, and this immediately leads to three possible versions of the notion of bond (so-called homogeneous bond wrt certain pair of concept-forming operators). The first results show a close correspondence between a homogeneous bond between two contexts and certain special types of mappings between the sets of extents (or intents) of the corresponding concept lattices. Later, we introduce the so-called heterogeneous bonds (considering simultaneously two types of concept-forming operators) and generalize the previous relationship to mappings between the sets of extents (or intents) of the corresponding concept lattices.

  5. Silicon carbide wafer bonding by modified surface activated bonding method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suga, Tadatomo; Mu, Fengwen; Fujino, Masahisa; Takahashi, Yoshikazu; Nakazawa, Haruo; Iguchi, Kenichi

    2015-03-01

    4H-SiC wafer bonding has been achieved by the modified surface activated bonding (SAB) method without any chemical-clean treatment and high temperature annealing. Strong bonding between the SiC wafers with tensile strength greater than 32 MPa was demonstrated at room temperature under 5 kN force for 300 s. Almost the entire wafer has been bonded very well except a small peripheral region and few voids. The interface structure was analyzed to verify the bonding mechanism. It was found an amorphous layer existed as an intermediate layer at the interface. After annealing at 1273 K in vacuum for 1 h, the bonding tensile strength was still higher than 32 MPa. The interface changes after annealing were also studied. The results show that the thickness of the amorphous layer was reduced to half after annealing.

  6. NXY halogen bonds. Comparison with NHY H-bonds and CXY halogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Nepal, Binod; Scheiner, Steve

    2016-07-21

    Quantum calculations examine how the NHY H-bond compares to the equivalent NXY halogen bond, as well as to comparable CH/CX donors. Succinimide and saccharin, and their corresponding halogen-substituted derivatives, are chosen as the prototype NH/NX donors, paired with a wide range of electron donor molecules. The NHY H-bond is weakened if the bridging H is replaced by Cl, and strengthened by I; a Br halogen bond is roughly comparable to a H-bond. The lone pairs of the partner molecule are stronger electron donors than are π-systems. Whereas Coulombic forces represent the largest fraction of the attractive force in the H-bonds, induction energy is magnified in the halogen bonds, surpassing electrostatics in several cases. Mutation of NH/NX to CH/CX weakens the binding energy to roughly half its original value, while also lengthening the intermolecular distances by 0.3-0.8 Å. PMID:27327538

  7. Comparison of Bond in Roll-bonded and Adhesively Bonded Aluminums

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwensfeir, R. J., Jr.; Trenkler, G.; Delagi, R. G.; Forster, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Lap-shear and peel test measurements of bond strength have been carried out as part of an investigation of roll bonding of 2024 and 7075 aluminum alloys. Shear strengths of the bonded material in the F temper are in the range of 14 to 16 ksi. Corresponding peel strengths are 120 to 130 lb/inch. These values, which are three to five times those reported in the literature for adhesively bonded 2024 and 7075, are a result of the true metallurgical bond achieved. The effects of heat-treating the bonded material are described and the improvements in bond strength discussed relative to the shear strength of the parent material. The significance of the findings for aerospace applications is discussed.

  8. The coevolution of long-term pair bonds and cooperation.

    PubMed

    Song, Z; Feldman, M W

    2013-05-01

    The evolution of social traits may not only depend on but also change the social structure of the population. In particular, the evolution of pairwise cooperation, such as biparental care, depends on the pair-matching distribution of the population, and the latter often emerges as a collective outcome of individual pair-bonding traits, which are also under selection. Here, we develop an analytical model and individual-based simulations to study the coevolution of long-term pair bonds and cooperation in parental care, where partners play a Snowdrift game in each breeding season. We illustrate that long-term pair bonds may coevolve with cooperation when bonding cost is below a threshold. As long-term pair bonds lead to assortative interactions through pair-matching dynamics, they may promote the prevalence of cooperation. In addition to the pay-off matrix of a single game, the evolutionarily stable equilibrium also depends on bonding cost and accidental divorce rate, and it is determined by a form of balancing selection because the benefit from pair-bond maintenance diminishes as the frequency of cooperators increases. Our findings highlight the importance of ecological factors affecting social bonding cost and stability in understanding the coevolution of social behaviour and social structures, which may lead to the diversity of biological social systems. PMID:23496797

  9. Hydrogen bonds in PC{sub 61}BM solids

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, Chun-Qi; Li, Wen-Jie; Du, Ying-Ying; Chen, Guang-Hua; Chen, Zheng; Li, Hai-Yang; Li, Hong-Nian

    2015-09-15

    We have studied the hydrogen bonds in PC{sub 61}BM solids. Inter-molecular interaction is analyzed theoretically for the well-defined monoclinic (P2{sub 1}/n) structure. The results indicate that PC{sub 61}BM combines into C–H⋯O{sub d} bonded molecular chains, where O{sub d} denotes the doubly-bonded O atom of PC{sub 61}BM. The molecular chains are linked together by C–H⋯O{sub s} bonds, where O{sub s} denotes the singly-bonded O atom of PC{sub 61}BM. To reveal the consequences of hydrogen bond formation on the structural properties of PC{sub 61}BM solids (not limited to the monoclinic structure), we design and perform some experiments for annealed samples with the monoclinic (P2{sub 1}/n) PC{sub 61}BM as starting material. The experiments include differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction and infrared absorption measurements. Structural phase transitions are observed below the melting point. The C–H⋯O{sub d} bonds seem persisting in the altered structures. The inter-molecular hydrogen bonds can help to understand the phase separation in polymer/PC{sub 61}BM blends and may be responsible for the existence of liquid PC{sub 61}BM.

  10. Modulating the strength of tetrel bonding through beryllium bonding.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingxiu; Yang, Li; Li, Qingzhong; Li, Wenzuo; Cheng, Jianbo; Xiao, Bo; Yu, Xuefang

    2016-08-01

    Quantum chemical calculations were performed to investigate the stability of the ternary complexes BeH2···XMH3···NH3 (X = F, Cl, and Br; M = C, Si, and Ge) and the corresponding binary complexes at the atomic level. Our results reveal that the stability of the XMH3···BeH2 complexes is mainly due to both a strong beryllium bond and a weak tetrel-hydride interaction, while the XMH3···NH3 complexes are stabilized by a tetrel bond. The beryllium bond with a halogen atom as the electron donor has many features in common with a beryllium bond with an O or N atom as the electron donor, although they do exhibit some different characteristics. The stability of the XMH3···NH3 complex is dominated by the electrostatic interaction, while the orbital interaction also makes an important contribution. Interestingly, as the identities of the X and M atoms are varied, the strength of the tetrel bond fluctuates in an irregular manner, which can explained by changes in electrostatic potentials and orbital interactions. In the ternary systems, both the beryllium bond and the tetrel bond are enhanced, which is mainly ascribed to increased electrostatic potentials on the corresponding atoms and charge transfer. In particular, when compared to the strengths of the tetrel and beryllium bonds in the binary systems, in the ternary systems the tetrel bond is enhanced to a greater degree than the beryllium bond. Graphical Abstract A tetrel bond can be strengthened greatly by a beryllium bond. PMID:27464738

  11. A systematic structural study of halogen bonding versus hydrogen bonding within competitive supramolecular systems

    PubMed Central

    Aakeröy, Christer B.; Spartz, Christine L.; Dembowski, Sean; Dwyre, Savannah; Desper, John

    2015-01-01

    As halogen bonds gain prevalence in supramolecular synthesis and materials chemistry, it has become necessary to examine more closely how such interactions compete with or complement hydrogen bonds whenever both are present within the same system. As hydrogen and halogen bonds have several fundamental features in common, it is often difficult to predict which will be the primary interaction in a supramolecular system, especially as they have comparable strength and geometric requirements. To address this challenge, a series of molecules containing both hydrogen- and halogen-bond donors were co-crystallized with various monotopic, ditopic symmetric and ditopic asymmetric acceptor molecules. The outcome of each reaction was examined using IR spectroscopy and, whenever possible, single-crystal X-ray diffraction. 24 crystal structures were obtained and subsequently analyzed, and the synthon preferences of the competing hydrogen- and halogen-bond donors were rationalized against a background of calculated molecular electrostatic potential values. It has been shown that readily accessible electrostatic potentials can offer useful practical guidelines for predicting the most likely primary synthons in these co-crystals as long as the potential differences are weighted appropriately. PMID:26306192

  12. Solder extrusion pressure bonding process and bonded products produced thereby

    DOEpatents

    Beavis, L.C.; Karnowsky, M.M.; Yost, F.G.

    1992-06-16

    Disclosed is a process for production of soldered joints which are highly reliable and capable of surviving 10,000 thermal cycles between about [minus]40 C and 110 C. Process involves interposing a thin layer of a metal solder composition between the metal surfaces of members to be bonded and applying heat and up to about 1000 psi compression pressure to the superposed members, in the presence of a reducing atmosphere, to extrude the major amount of the solder composition, contaminants including fluxing gases and air, from between the members being bonded, to form a very thin, strong intermetallic bonding layer having a thermal expansion tolerant with that of the bonded members.

  13. Solder extrusion pressure bonding process and bonded products produced thereby

    SciTech Connect

    Beavis, L.C.; Karnowsky, M.M.; Yost, F.G.

    1990-12-31

    Production of soldiered joints which are highly reliable and capable of surviving 10,000 thermal cycles between about {minus}40{degrees}C and 110{degrees}C. Process involves interposing a thin layer of a metal solder composition between the metal surfaces of members to be bonded and applying heat and up to about 1000 psi compression pressure to the superposed members, in the presence of a reducing atmosphere, to extrude the major amount of the solder composition, contaminants including fluxing gases and air, from between the members being bonded, to form a very thin, strong intermetallic bonding layer having a thermal expansion tolerant with that of the bonded members.

  14. Solder extrusion pressure bonding process and bonded products produced thereby

    DOEpatents

    Beavis, Leonard C.; Karnowsky, Maurice M.; Yost, Frederick G.

    1992-01-01

    Production of soldered joints which are highly reliable and capable of surviving 10,000 thermal cycles between about -40.degree. C. and 110.degree. C. Process involves interposing a thin layer of a metal solder composition between the metal surfaces of members to be bonded and applying heat and up to about 1000 psi compression pressure to the superposed members, in the presence of a reducing atmosphere, to extrude the major amount of the solder composition, contaminants including fluxing gases and air, from between the members being bonded, to form a very thin, strong intermetallic bonding layer having a thermal expansion tolerant with that of the bonded members.

  15. Bonding and nondestructive evaluation of graphite/PEEK composite and titanium adherends with thermoplastic adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, W. T.; Tyeryar, J. R.; Berry, M.

    1985-01-01

    Bonded single overlap shear specimens were fabricated from Graphite/PEEK (Polyetheretherketone) composite adherends and titanium adherends. Six advanced thermoplastic adhesives were used for the bonding. The specimens were bonded by an electromagnetic induction technique producing high heating rates and high-strength bonds in a few minutes. This contrasts with conventionally heated presses or autoclaves that take hours to process comparable quality bonds. The Graphite/PEEK composites were highly resistant to delamination during the testing. This allowed the specimen to fail exclusively through the bondline, even at very high shear loads. Nondestructive evaluation of bonded specimens was performed ultrasonically by energizing the entire thickness of the material through the bondline and measuring acoustic impedance parameters. Destructive testing confirmed the unique ultrasonic profiles of strong and weak bonds, establishing a standard for predicting relative bond strength in subsequent specimens.

  16. Bond Sensitivity to Silicone Contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, G. A.; Hudson, W. D.; Hudson, W. D.; Cash, Stephen F. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Currently during fabrication of the Space Shuttle booster rocket motors, the use of silicone and silicone-containing products is prohibited in most applications. Many shop aids and other materials containing silicone have the potential, if they make contact with a bond surface, to transfer some of the silicone to the substrates being bonded. Such transfer could result in a reduction of the bond strength or even failure of the subsequent bonds. This concern is driving the need to understand the effect of silicones and the concentration needed to affect a given bond-line strength. Additionally, as silicone detection methods used for materials acceptance improve what may have gone unnoticed earlier is now being detected. Thus, realistic silicone limits for process materials (below which bond performance is satisfactory) are needed rather than having an absolute no silicone permitted policy.

  17. Interlayer bonding in IIb chlorite

    SciTech Connect

    Bish, D.L.; Giese, R.F. Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The interlayer bond energy of a IIb-4 chlorite has been calculated as a function of layer charge, the site of the charge and the selective replacement of hydroxyl groups by fluoride ions. Long hydrogen bonds between the hydroxide sheet and the adjacent oxygens are strong and by themselves sufficient to create a stable structure. Coupled substitutions giving the 2:1 layer a negative charge and the hydroxide sheet a positive charge increase substantially the interlayer bond energy. 3 figures.

  18. Photoinduced hydrogen-bonding dynamics.

    PubMed

    Chu, Tian-Shu; Xu, Jinmei

    2016-09-01

    Hydrogen bonding dynamics has received extensive research attention in recent years due to the significant advances in femtolaser spectroscopy experiments and quantum chemistry calculations. Usually, photoexcitation would cause changes in the hydrogen bonding formed through the interaction between hydrogen donor and acceptor molecules on their ground electronic states, and such transient strengthening or weakening of hydrogen bonding could be crucial for the photophysical transformations and the subsequent photochemical reactions that occurred on a time scale from tens of femtosecond to a few nanoseconds. In this article, we review the combined experimental and theoretical studies focusing on the ultrafast electronic and vibrational hydrogen bonding dynamics. Through these studies, new mechanisms and proposals and common rules have been put forward to advance our understanding of the hydrogen bondings dynamics in a variety of important photoinduced phenomena like photosynthesis, dual fluorescence emission, rotational reorientation, excited-state proton transfer and charge transfer processes, chemosensor fluorescence sensing, rearrangements of the hydrogen-bond network including forming and breaking hydrogen bond in water. Graphical Abstract We review the recent advances on exploring the photoinduced hydrogen bonding dynamics in solutions through a joint approach of laser spectroscopy and theoretical calculation. The reviewed studies have put forward a new mechanism, new proposal, and new rule for a variety of photoinduced phenomena such as photosynthesis, dual fluorescence emission, rotational reorientation, excited-state proton transfer and charge transfer, chemosensor fluorescence sensing, and rearrangements of the hydrogen-bond network in water. PMID:27491849

  19. 30 CFR 281.33 - Bonds and bonding requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bonds and bonding requirements. 281.33 Section 281.33 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE LEASING OF MINERALS OTHER THAN OIL, GAS, AND SULPHUR IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Financial Considerations §...

  20. Direct and Auger Electron-Induced, Single- and Double-Strand Breaks on Plasmid DNA Caused by 99mTc-Labeled Pyrene Derivatives and the Effect of Bonding Distance.

    PubMed

    Reissig, Falco; Mamat, Constantin; Steinbach, Joerg; Pietzsch, Hans-Juergen; Freudenberg, Robert; Navarro-Retamal, Carlos; Caballero, Julio; Kotzerke, Joerg; Wunderlich, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    It is evident that 99mTc causes radical-mediated DNA damage due to Auger electrons, which were emitted simultaneously with the known γ-emission of 99mTc. We have synthesized a series of new 99mTc-labeled pyrene derivatives with varied distances between the pyrene moiety and the radionuclide. The pyrene motif is a common DNA intercalator and allowed us to test the influence of the radionuclide distance on damages of the DNA helix. In general, pUC 19 plasmid DNA enables the investigation of the unprotected interactions between the radiotracers and DNA that results in single-strand breaks (SSB) or double-strand breaks (DSB). The resulting DNA fragments were separated by gel electrophoresis and quantified by fluorescent staining. Direct DNA damage and radical-induced indirect DNA damage by radiolysis products of water were evaluated in the presence or absence of the radical scavenger DMSO. We demonstrated that Auger electrons directly induced both SSB and DSB in high efficiency when 99mTc was tightly bound to the plasmid DNA and this damage could not be completely prevented by DMSO, a free radical scavenger. For the first time, we were able to minimize this effect by increasing the carbon chain lengths between the pyrene moiety and the 99mTc nuclide. However, a critical distance between the 99mTc atom and the DNA helix could not be determined due to the significantly lowered DSB generation resulting from the interaction which is dependent on the type of the 99mTc binding motif. The effect of variable DNA damage caused by the different chain length between the pyrene residue and the Tc-core as well as the possible conformations of the applied Tc-complexes was supplemented with molecular dynamics (MD) calculations. The effectiveness of the DNA-binding 99mTc-labeled pyrene derivatives was demonstrated by comparison to non-DNA-binding 99mTcO4-, since nearly all DNA damage caused by 99mTcO4- was prevented by incubating with DMSO. PMID:27583677

  1. Inspection of bonded composites using selectively excited ultrasonic modes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krauss, Gordon Gustav

    Improved methods of nondestructive testing (NDT) of multi-layered composites are vital for fundamental research in composites fabrication and performance. Fast, accurate NDT methods can also be used to predict catastrophic in-use failure and to reduce costly rejects during the manufacture of composite parts. Commercial normal incidence inspection techniques have generally yielded reliable detection of large areas of delamination and damage. They fail, however, to detect defects within thin bonded regions, such as disbonds, debonds, kissing bonds, and porosity. We have developed and studied a nondestructive testing technique designed to be sensitive to flaws in the bond area of adhesively bonded anisotropic materials. The technique utilizes specific ultrasonic modes which are selected through a priori modeling of the composite as a single anisotropic elastic layer. The displacement and stress profiles of the modes within the fluid loaded layer are evaluated. A propagating mode that is predicted to be highly sensitive to the bond area is then utilized in the inspection. The inspection is carried out with an apparatus designed and constructed to excite and detect the selected ultrasonic mode. The apparatus uses transducers oriented at the theoretically optimal incident angle to excite the desired mode, using a tone burst between 0.5 and 10.0 MHz. We monitor with a second transducer changes in the amplitude of the leaky component of the mode propagating in the plate. By using this apparatus we have experimentally distinguished changes in the bond areas of adhesively bonded aluminum plates and carbon-epoxy composite plates of unidirectional and quasi-isotropic lay-up, The radiated leaky wave amplitudes from poorly bonded plates were less than 50% of those from corresponding well bonded plates. We observed no significant changes in the amplitudes of normal incidence pulse-echo signals for these specimens. These results demonstrate that selective mode excitation can

  2. 29 CFR 2580.412-19 - Term of the bond, discovery period, other bond clauses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Term of the bond, discovery period, other bond clauses... SECURITY ACT OF 1974 TEMPORARY BONDING RULES General Bond Rules § 2580.412-19 Term of the bond, discovery... new bond must be obtained each year. There is nothing in the Act that prohibits a bond for a...

  3. σ-Hole Bond vs π-Hole Bond: A Comparison Based on Halogen Bond.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui; Wang, Weizhou; Jin, Wei Jun

    2016-05-11

    The σ-hole and π-hole are the regions with positive surface electrostatic potential on the molecule entity; the former specifically refers to the positive region of a molecular entity along extension of the Y-Ge/P/Se/X covalent σ-bond (Y = electron-rich group; Ge/P/Se/X = Groups IV-VII), while the latter refers to the positive region in the direction perpendicular to the σ-framework of the molecular entity. The directional noncovalent interactions between the σ-hole or π-hole and the negative or electron-rich sites are named σ-hole bond or π-hole bond, respectively. The contributions from electrostatic, charge transfer, and other terms or Coulombic interaction to the σ-hole bond and π-hole bond were reviewed first followed by a brief discussion on the interplay between the σ-hole bond and the π-hole bond as well as application of the two types of noncovalent interactions in the field of anion recognition. It is expected that this review could stimulate further development of the σ-hole bond and π-hole bond in theoretical exploration and practical application in the future. PMID:26886515

  4. LAMMPS framework for dynamic bonding and an application modeling DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svaneborg, Carsten

    2012-08-01

    We have extended the Large-scale Atomic/Molecular Massively Parallel Simulator (LAMMPS) to support directional bonds and dynamic bonding. The framework supports stochastic formation of new bonds, breakage of existing bonds, and conversion between bond types. Bond formation can be controlled to limit the maximal functionality of a bead with respect to various bond types. Concomitant with the bond dynamics, angular and dihedral interactions are dynamically introduced between newly connected triplets and quartets of beads, where the interaction type is determined from the local pattern of bead and bond types. When breaking bonds, all angular and dihedral interactions involving broken bonds are removed. The framework allows chemical reactions to be modeled, and use it to simulate a simplistic, coarse-grained DNA model. The resulting DNA dynamics illustrates the power of the present framework. Catalogue identifier: AEME_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEME_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public Licence No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2 243 491 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 771 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++ Computer: Single and multiple core servers Operating system: Linux/Unix/Windows Has the code been vectorized or parallelized?: Yes. The code has been parallelized by the use of MPI directives. RAM: 1 Gb Classification: 16.11, 16.12 Nature of problem: Simulating coarse-grain models capable of chemistry e.g. DNA hybridization dynamics. Solution method: Extending LAMMPS to handle dynamic bonding and directional bonds. Unusual features: Allows bonds to be created and broken while angular and dihedral interactions are kept consistent. Additional comments: The distribution file for this program is approximately 36 Mbytes and therefore is not delivered directly

  5. Pauling bond strength, bond length and electron density distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, Gerald V.; Ross, Nancy L.; Cox, David F.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Iversen, Bo B.; Spackman, M. A.

    2014-01-18

    A power law regression equation, = 1.46(<ρ(rc)>/r)-0.19, connecting the average experimental bond lengths, , with the average accumulation of the electron density at the bond critical point, <ρ(rc)>, between bonded metal M and oxygen atoms, determined at ambient conditions for oxide crystals, where r is the row number of the M atom, is similar to the regression equation R(M-O) = 1.39(ρ(rc)/r)-0.21 determined for three perovskite crystals for pressures as high as 80 GPa. The two equations are also comparable with those, = 1.43(/r)-0.21, determined for a large number of oxide crystals at ambient conditions and = 1.39(/r)-0.22, determined for geometry optimized hydroxyacid molecules, that connect the bond lengths to the average Pauling electrostatic bond strength, , for the M-O bonded interactions. On the basis of the correspondence between the two sets of equations connecting ρ(rc) and the Pauling bond strength s with bond length, it appears that Pauling’s simple definition of bond strength closely mimics the accumulation of the electron density between bonded pairs of atoms. The similarity of the expressions for the crystals and molecules is compelling evidence that the M-O bonded interactions for the crystals and molecules 2 containing the same bonded interactions are comparable. Similar expressions, connecting bond lengths and bond strength, have also been found to hold for fluoride, nitride and sulfide molecules and crystals. The Brown-Shannon bond valence, σ, power law expression σ = [R1/(R(M-O)]N that has found wide use in crystal chemistry, is shown to be connected to a more universal expression determined for oxides and the perovskites, <ρ(rc)> = r[(1.41)/]4.76, demonstrating that the bond valence for a bonded interaction is likewise closely connected to the accumulation of the electron density between the bonded atoms. Unlike the Brown-Shannon expression, it is universal in that it holds for the M

  6. Bonding and Geometry of OCF(3)(-), ONF(3), and Related Molecules in Terms of the Ligand Close Packing Model.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Ronald J.; Robinson, Edward A.; Heard, George L.

    1998-12-28

    The nature of the bonding in OCF(3)(-) and the isoelectronic molecule ONF(3) has been the subject of much discussion for many years, because these species appear to have unusual bond lengths and angles. We have reinvestigated the nature of the bonding in these and some related molecules by analyzing their calculated electron density distributions. The results show that the bonding in the series OBF(3)(2)(-), OCF(3)(-), ONF(3) ranges from predominately ionic in OBF(3)(2)(-) to predominately covalent in ONF(3) and that the interligand distances are consistent with the close packing of the ligands around the central atom. The AO bonds (A = B, C, N) are double bonds ranging in nature from a very ionic B=O bond to a predominately covalent N=O double bond, but all three are strong and short so that, in accordance with the ligand close packing (LCP) model, the AF bonds are correspondingly long. Also consistent with this model the bonds in a three-coordinated AOF(2) molecule are shorter than those in the corresponding AOF(3) molecule. Protonation of the doubly bonded oxygen, which converts the A=O bond to a single A-OH bond in each case, considerably lengthens the A-O bond, and the bond angles accordingly adopt values much closer to the tetrahedral angle. The difficulties of trying to describe the bonding in these molecules in terms of Lewis structures are discussed. PMID:11670825

  7. On the Relative Merits of Non-Orthogonal and Orthogonal Valence Bond Methods Illustrated on the Hydrogen Molecule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angeli, Celestino; Cimiraglia, Renzo; Malrieu, Jean-Paul

    2008-01-01

    Valence bond (VB) is one of the cornerstone theories of quantum chemistry. Even if in practical applications the molecular orbital (MO) approach has obtained more attention, some basic chemical concepts (such as the nature of the chemical bond and the failure of the single determinant-based MO methods in describing the bond cleavage) are normally…

  8. Ultrasonic Bonding to Metalized Plastic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conroy, B. L.; Cruzan, C. T.

    1986-01-01

    New technique makes it possible to bond wires ultrasonically to conductor patterns on such soft substrates as plain or ceramic-filled polytetrafluoroethylene. With ultrasonic bonding, unpackaged chips attached to soft circuit boards. Preferred because chips require substrate area and better matched electrically to circuit board at high frequencies.

  9. Microwave bonding of MEMS component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, Martin B. (Inventor); Mai, John D. (Inventor); Jackson, Henry W. (Inventor); Budraa, Nasser K. (Inventor); Pike, William T. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Bonding of MEMs materials is carried out using microwave. High microwave absorbing films are placed within a microwave cavity, and excited to cause selective heating in the skin of the material. This causes heating in one place more than another. Thereby minimizing the effects of the bonding microwave energy.

  10. Weld-bonded titanium structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, R. W.; Creedon, J. F. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    Structurally stronger titanium articles are produced by a weld-bonding technique comprising fastening at least two plates of titanium together using spotwelding and curing an adhesive interspersed between the spot-weld nuggets. This weld-bonding may be employed to form lap joints or to stiffen titanium metal plates.

  11. Computational Chemistry of Adhesive Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Donald H.

    1999-01-01

    This investigation is intended to determine the electrical mechanical, and chemical properties of adhesive bonds at the molecular level. The initial determinations will be followed by investigations of the effects of environmental effects on the chemistry and properties of the bond layer.

  12. Coulombic Models in Chemical Bonding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sacks, Lawrence J.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a bonding theory which provides a framework for the description of a wide range of substances and provides quantitative information of remarkable accuracy with far less computational effort than that required of other approaches. Includes applications, such as calculation of bond energies of two binary hydrides (methane and diborane).…

  13. Does Electron Capture Dissociation Cleave Protein Disulfide Bonds?

    PubMed Central

    Ganisl, Barbara; Breuker, Kathrin

    2012-01-01

    Peptide and protein characterization by mass spectrometry (MS) relies on their dissociation in the gas phase into specific fragments whose mass values can be aligned as ‘mass ladders’ to provide sequence information and to localize possible posttranslational modifications. The most common dissociation method involves slow heating of even-electron (M+n H)n+ ions from electrospray ionization by energetic collisions with inert gas, and cleavage of amide backbone bonds. More recently, dissociation methods based on electron capture or transfer were found to provide far more extensive sequence coverage through unselective cleavage of backbone N–Cα bonds. As another important feature of electron capture dissociation (ECD) and electron transfer dissociation (ETD), their unique unimolecular radical ion chemistry generally preserves labile posttranslational modifications such as glycosylation and phosphorylation. Moreover, it was postulated that disulfide bond cleavage is preferred over backbone cleavage, and that capture of a single electron can break both a backbone and a disulfide bond, or even two disulfide bonds between two peptide chains. However, the proposal of preferential disulfide bond cleavage in ECD or ETD has recently been debated. The experimental data presented here reveal that the mechanism of protein disulfide bond cleavage is much more intricate than previously anticipated. PMID:24363980

  14. The role of hydrogen bonding in tethered polymer layers

    PubMed Central

    Ren, C.; Nap, R. J.; Szleifer, I.

    2009-01-01

    A molecular theory to study the properties of end tethered polymer layers, in which the polymers have the ability to form hydrogen bonds with water is presented. The approach combines the ideas of the single-chain mean-field theory to treat tethered layers with the approach of Dormidontova (Macromolecules, 2002 35,987) to include hydrogen bonds. The generalization includes the consideration of position dependent polymer-water and water-water hydrogen bonds. The theory is applied to model poly ethylene oxide (PEO) and the predictions are compared with equivalent polymer layers that do not form hydrogen bonds. It is found that increasing the temperature lowers the solubility of the PEO and results in a collapse of the layer at high enough temperatures. The properties of the layer and their temperature dependence are shown to be the result of the coupling between the conformational entropy of the chains, the ability of the polymer to form hydrogen bonds, and the intermolecular interactions. The structural and thermodynamic properties of the PEO layers, such as the lateral pressure-area isotherms and polymer chemical potentials, are studied as a function of temperature and type of tethering surface. The possibility of phase separation of the PEO layer at high enough temperature is predicted, due to the reduced solubility induced by breaking of polymer-water hydrogen bonds. A discussion of the advantages and limitations of the theory, together with how to apply the approach to different hydrogen bonding polymers is presented. PMID:19367906

  15. Social bonding: regulation by neuropeptides

    PubMed Central

    Lieberwirth, Claudia; Wang, Zuoxin

    2014-01-01

    Affiliative social relationships (e.g., among spouses, family members, and friends) play an essential role in human society. These relationships affect psychological, physiological, and behavioral functions. As positive and enduring bonds are critical for the overall well-being of humans, it is not surprising that considerable effort has been made to study the neurobiological mechanisms that underlie social bonding behaviors. The present review details the involvement of the nonapeptides, oxytocin (OT), and arginine vasopressin (AVP), in the regulation of social bonding in mammals including humans. In particular, we will discuss the role of OT and AVP in the formation of social bonds between partners of a mating pair as well as between parents and their offspring. Furthermore, the role of OT and AVP in the formation of interpersonal bonding involving trust is also discussed. PMID:25009457

  16. Dual resin bonded joints in polyetheretherketone (PEEK) matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenak, Steve; Radford, Donald W.; Dean, Michael W.

    1993-04-01

    The paper describes applications of the dual resin (miscible polymer) bonding technique (Smiley, 1989) developed as an alternative to traditional bonding approaches to joining thermoplastic matrix composite subassemblies into structures. In the experiments, the performance of joint geometries, such as those that could be used to assemble large truss structures in space, are investigated using truss joint models consisting of woven carbon fiber/PEEK tubes of about 1 mm wall thickness. Specific process conditions and hand-held hardware used to apply heat and pressure were chosen to simulate a field asembly technique. Results are presented on tube/cruciform double lap shear tests, pinned-pinned tube compression tests, and single lap shear bond tests of joints obtained using the dual resin bonding technique.

  17. Direct microwave joining of reaction bonded silicon carbide

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, I.; Black, W.M.; Silberglitt, R.

    1992-08-01

    A single-mode rectangular resonant cavity operating at 2.45 GHz was used to join, without any interlayer or applied pressure, specimens of reaction bonded silicon carbide. Specimens of 0.95 cm diameter and 0.5 cm height were joined at temperatures 1400-1450 C in 10 to 15 minutes. Specimens of arbitrary shapes and practical sizes were joined in a commercially available 900 watt multi-mode oven with hybrid heating. The joined specimens were sectioned and examined. The joint was not detectable even by scanning electron microscope observation. On heating silicon bleeds out of reaction bonded silicon carbide. The apparent density of the heated reaction bonded silicon carbide was 3.01 gm/cc as compared to 3.05 gm/cc for the as received material. However, the only difference in microstructure was some grain growth of the microwave heated reaction bonded silicon carbide, compared to the as received material. 10 refs.

  18. The Halogen Bond in the Design of Functional Supramolecular Materials: Recent Advances

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Halogen bonding is an emerging noncovalent interaction for constructing supramolecular assemblies. Though similar to the more familiar hydrogen bonding, four primary differences between these two interactions make halogen bonding a unique tool for molecular recognition and the design of functional materials. First, halogen bonds tend to be much more directional than (single) hydrogen bonds. Second, the interaction strength scales with the polarizability of the bond-donor atom, a feature that researchers can tune through single-atom mutation. In addition, halogen bonds are hydrophobic whereas hydrogen bonds are hydrophilic. Lastly, the size of the bond-donor atom (halogen) is significantly larger than hydrogen. As a result, halogen bonding provides supramolecular chemists with design tools that cannot be easily met with other types of noncovalent interactions and opens up unprecedented possibilities in the design of smart functional materials. This Account highlights the recent advances in the design of halogen-bond-based functional materials. Each of the unique features of halogen bonding, directionality, tunable interaction strength, hydrophobicity, and large donor atom size, makes a difference. Taking advantage of the hydrophobicity, researchers have designed small-size ion transporters. The large halogen atom size provided a platform for constructing all-organic light-emitting crystals that efficiently generate triplet electrons and have a high phosphorescence quantum yield. The tunable interaction strengths provide tools for understanding light-induced macroscopic motions in photoresponsive azobenzene-containing polymers, and the directionality renders halogen bonding useful in the design on functional supramolecular liquid crystals and gel-phase materials. Although halogen bond based functional materials design is still in its infancy, we foresee a bright future for this field. We expect that materials designed based on halogen bonding could lead to

  19. Evolution of displays within the pair bond

    PubMed Central

    Servedio, Maria R.; Price, Trevor D.; Lande, Russell

    2013-01-01

    Although sexual selection is an important cause of display evolution, in socially monogamous species (e.g. many birds), displays continue after formation of the pair bond. Here, we consider that these displays evolve because they stimulate the partner to increase investment in offspring. Our study is motivated by elaborate mutual displays in species that are largely monomorphic and have long-term pair bonds (e.g. the great crested grebe, Podiceps cristatus) and by many empirical results evidencing that display manipulation affects parental investment. Using population genetic models, we show that a necessary condition for the permanent establishment of mutual displays in the pair bond is that the benefit of investment by the pair is more than twice that resulting from investment by a single individual. Pre-existing biases to respond to displays by increased investment are a necessary component of display evolution. We also consider examples where one sex (e.g. males) stimulates increased investment in offspring by the other sex. Here, display and additional investment cannot evolve permanently, but can increase and linger at high frequency for a long time before loss. We discuss how such transient effects may lead to the evolution of permanent displays as a result of evolution at additional loci. PMID:23427172

  20. 27 CFR 24.153 - Strengthening bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Strengthening bonds. In any instance where the penal sum of the bond on file becomes insufficient, the principal shall either give a strengthening bond with the same surety to attain a sufficient penal sum or give a new bond covering the entire liability. Strengthening bonds will not be approved where any notation...

  1. 8 CFR 103.6 - Surety bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... a public charge. A bond may also be cancelled in order to allow substitution of another bond. A... surety bonds posted in immigration cases shall be executed on Form I-352, Immigration Bond, a copy of... to approve a bond, a formal agreement to extension of liability of surety, a request for delivery...

  2. 48 CFR 252.217-7008 - Bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... corporate surety bond. (d) If any surety upon any bond furnished in connection with a job order under this...) If the solicitation requires an offeror to submit a bid bond, the Offeror may furnish, instead, an annual bid bond (or evidence thereof) or an annual performance and payment bond (or evidence thereof)....

  3. 48 CFR 252.217-7008 - Bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... corporate surety bond. (d) If any surety upon any bond furnished in connection with a job order under this...) If the solicitation requires an offeror to submit a bid bond, the Offeror may furnish, instead, an annual bid bond (or evidence thereof) or an annual performance and payment bond (or evidence thereof)....

  4. 8 CFR 103.6 - Surety bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... a public charge. A bond may also be cancelled in order to allow substitution of another bond. A... surety bonds posted in immigration cases shall be executed on Form I-352, Immigration Bond, a copy of... to approve a bond, a formal agreement to extension of liability of surety, a request for delivery...

  5. 48 CFR 252.217-7008 - Bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... corporate surety bond. (d) If any surety upon any bond furnished in connection with a job order under this...) If the solicitation requires an offeror to submit a bid bond, the Offeror may furnish, instead, an annual bid bond (or evidence thereof) or an annual performance and payment bond (or evidence thereof)....

  6. 8 CFR 103.6 - Surety bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... a public charge. A bond may also be cancelled in order to allow substitution of another bond. A... surety bonds posted in immigration cases shall be executed on Form I-352, Immigration Bond, a copy of... to approve a bond, a formal agreement to extension of liability of surety, a request for delivery...

  7. Shear bond strength of resin composite bonded with two adhesives: Influence of Er: YAG laser irradiation distance

    PubMed Central

    Shirani, Farzaneh; Birang, Reza; Malekipour, Mohammad Reza; Hourmehr, Zahra; Kazemi, Shantia

    2014-01-01

    Background: Dental surfaces prepared with different Er:YAG laser distance may have different characteristics compared with those prepared with conventional instruments. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Er:YAG laser irradiation distance from enamel and dentin surfaces on the shear bond strength of composite with self-etch and etch and rinse bonding systems compared with conventional preparation method. Materials and Methods: Two hundred caries-free human third molars were randomly divided into twenty groups (n = 10). Ten groups were designated for enamel surface (E1-E10) and ten for dentin surface (D1-D10). Er: YAG laser (2940 nm) was used on the E1-E8 (240 mJ, 25 Hz) and D1-D8 (140 mJ, 30 Hz) groups at four different distances of 0.5 (standard), 2, 4 and 11 mm. Control groups (E9, E10, D9 and D10) were ground with medium grit diamond bur. The enamel and dentin specimens were divided into two subgroups that were bonded with either Single Bond or Clearfil SE Bond. Resin composite (Z100) was dispensed on prepared dentin and enamel. The shear bond strengths were tested using a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed by SPSS12 statistical software using three way analysis of variance, Tukey and independent t-test. P < 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: There was a significant difference between enamel and dentin substrates (P < 0.001) and between lased and un-lased groups; the un-lased group had significantly higher bond strength (P < 0.001). Shear bond strength increased significantly with an increase in the laser irradiation distance (P < 0.05) on enamel surfaces (in both bonding agent subgroups) and on dentin surfaces (in the Single Bond subgroup). Conclusion: Laser irradiation decreases shear bond strength. Irradiation distance affects shear bond strength and increasing the distance would decrease the negative effects of laser irradiation. PMID:25540665

  8. Bonding or nonbonding? Description or explanation? "Confinement bonding" of He@adamantane.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shu-Guang; Qiu, Yi-Xiang; Schwarz, W H Eugen

    2009-06-01

    Different insights into chemical phenomena are obtained by analyzing the whole process (comparing three or more points, thereby explaining the atomistic mechanism) or only the final product (yielding an interesting fingerprint of the result). The viewpoint depends also on whether one analyzes the wavefunctions according to notions grounded in chemical experience or along physically well-defined formal concepts. Bond energies can only be understood upon comparing both ends of the formation process from fragments to molecule. We examine the formation of the inclusion complex He@adamantane. The large antibonding energy expense is partitioned into four physical contributions according to chemical concepts. Introduction of the He atom into an undeformed adamantane cage leads to a large increase of Pauli repulsion; this is partly moderated by electrostatic overlap attraction and by electronic and nuclear relaxations. The IUPAC definition of bonding comprises this antibonding interaction, since a (meta)stable complex is formed. We call it "confinement bonding". Single-point analyses of the bond-formation product can only yield one-sided characterizations. Any analysis depends on its prescription, which should always be specified in order to avoid controversies based on a mix up of unlike concepts. PMID:19418519

  9. Metal-Metal Bonding in Uranium-Group 10 Complexes.

    PubMed

    Hlina, Johann A; Pankhurst, James R; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Arnold, Polly L

    2016-03-16

    Heterobimetallic complexes containing short uranium-group 10 metal bonds have been prepared from monometallic IU(IV)(OAr(P)-κ(2)O,P)3 (2) {[Ar(P)O](-) = 2-tert-butyl-4-methyl-6-(diphenylphosphino)phenolate}. The U-M bond in IU(IV)(μ-OAr(P)-1κ(1)O,2κ(1)P)3M(0), M = Ni (3-Ni), Pd (3-Pd), and Pt (3-Pt), has been investigated by experimental and DFT computational methods. Comparisons of 3-Ni with two further U-Ni complexes XU(IV)(μ-OAr(P)-1κ(1)O,2κ(1)P)3Ni(0), X = Me3SiO (4) and F (5), was also possible via iodide substitution. All complexes were characterized by variable-temperature NMR spectroscopy, electrochemistry, and single crystal X-ray diffraction. The U-M bonds are significantly shorter than any other crystallographically characterized d-f-block bimetallic, even though the ligand flexes to allow a variable U-M separation. Excellent agreement is found between the experimental and computed structures for 3-Ni and 3-Pd. Natural population analysis and natural localized molecular orbital (NLMO) compositions indicate that U employs both 5f and 6d orbitals in covalent bonding to a significant extent. Quantum theory of atoms-in-molecules analysis reveals U-M bond critical point properties typical of metallic bonding and a larger delocalization index (bond order) for the less polar U-Ni bond than U-Pd. Electrochemical studies agree with the computational analyses and the X-ray structural data for the U-X adducts 3-Ni, 4, and 5. The data show a trend in uranium-metal bond strength that decreases from 3-Ni down to 3-Pt and suggest that exchanging the iodide for a fluoride strengthens the metal-metal bond. Despite short U-TM (transition metal) distances, four other computational approaches also suggest low U-TM bond orders, reflecting highly transition metal localized valence NLMOs. These are more so for 3-Pd than 3-Ni, consistent with slightly larger U-TM bond orders in the latter. Computational studies of the model systems (PH3)3MU(OH)3I (M = Ni, Pd) reveal

  10. Metal–Metal Bonding in Uranium–Group 10 Complexes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Heterobimetallic complexes containing short uranium–group 10 metal bonds have been prepared from monometallic IUIV(OArP-κ2O,P)3 (2) {[ArPO]− = 2-tert-butyl-4-methyl-6-(diphenylphosphino)phenolate}. The U–M bond in IUIV(μ-OArP-1κ1O,2κ1P)3M0, M = Ni (3–Ni), Pd (3–Pd), and Pt (3–Pt), has been investigated by experimental and DFT computational methods. Comparisons of 3–Ni with two further U–Ni complexes XUIV(μ-OArP-1κ1O,2κ1P)3Ni0, X = Me3SiO (4) and F (5), was also possible via iodide substitution. All complexes were characterized by variable-temperature NMR spectroscopy, electrochemistry, and single crystal X-ray diffraction. The U–M bonds are significantly shorter than any other crystallographically characterized d–f-block bimetallic, even though the ligand flexes to allow a variable U–M separation. Excellent agreement is found between the experimental and computed structures for 3–Ni and 3–Pd. Natural population analysis and natural localized molecular orbital (NLMO) compositions indicate that U employs both 5f and 6d orbitals in covalent bonding to a significant extent. Quantum theory of atoms-in-molecules analysis reveals U–M bond critical point properties typical of metallic bonding and a larger delocalization index (bond order) for the less polar U–Ni bond than U–Pd. Electrochemical studies agree with the computational analyses and the X-ray structural data for the U–X adducts 3–Ni, 4, and 5. The data show a trend in uranium–metal bond strength that decreases from 3–Ni down to 3–Pt and suggest that exchanging the iodide for a fluoride strengthens the metal–metal bond. Despite short U–TM (transition metal) distances, four other computational approaches also suggest low U–TM bond orders, reflecting highly transition metal localized valence NLMOs. These are more so for 3–Pd than 3–Ni, consistent with slightly larger U–TM bond orders in the latter. Computational studies of the model systems (PH3)3MU(OH)3I

  11. Smart interfacial bonding alloys

    SciTech Connect

    R. Q. Hwang; J. C. Hamilton; J. E. Houston

    1999-04-01

    The goal of this LDRD was to explore the use of the newly discovered strain-stabilized 2-D interfacial alloys as smart interface bonding alloys (SIBA). These materials will be used as templates for the heteroepitaxial growth of metallic thin films. SIBA are formed by two metallic components which mix at an interface to relieve strain and prevent dislocations from forming in subsequent thin film growth. The composition of the SIBA is determined locally by the amount of strain, and therefore can react smartly to areas of the highest strain to relieve dislocations. In this way, SIBA can be used to tailor the dislocation structure of thin films. This project included growth, characterization and modeling of films grown using SIBA templates. Characterization will include atomic imaging of the dislocations structure, measurement of the mechanical properties of the film using interface force microscopy (IFM) and the nanoindenter, and measurement of the electronic structure of the SIBA with synchrotron photoemission. Resistance of films to sulfidation and oxidation will also be examined. The Paragon parallel processing computer will be used to calculate the structure of the SIBA and thin films in order to develop ability to predict and tailor SIBA and thin film behavior. This work will lead to the possible development of a new class of thin film materials with properties tailored by varying the composition of the SIBA, serving as a buffer layer to relieve the strain between the substrate and the thin film. Such films will have improved mechanical and corrosion resistance allowing application as protective barriers for weapons applications. They will also exhibit enhanced electrical conductivity and reduced electromigration making them particularly suitable for application as interconnects and other electronic needs.

  12. Tensile Bond Strength of Latex-Modified Bonded Concrete Overlays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Cameron; Ramseyer, Chris

    2010-10-01

    The tensile bond strength of bonded concrete overlays was tested using the in-situ pull-off method described in ASTM C 1583 with the goal of determining whether adding latex to the mix design increases bond strength. One slab of ductile concrete (f'c > 12,000 psi) was cast with one half tined, i.e. roughened, and one half steel-troweled, i.e. smooth. The slab surface was sectioned off and overlay mixtures containing different latex contents cast in each section. Partial cores were drilled perpendicular to the surface through the overlay into the substrate. A tensile loading device applied a direct tensile load to each specimen and the load was increased until failure occurred. The tensile bond strength was then calculated for comparison between the specimens.

  13. Effect of phenyl and benzyl group in heterocyclic dithiocarbamates on the ZnS 4N chromophore: Synthesis, spectral, valence-bond parameters and single crystal X-ray structural studies on (pyridine)bis(1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinolinedithiocarbamato)zinc(II) and (pyridine)bis(1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinolinedithiocarbamato)zinc(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, N.; Thirumaran, S.; Ciattini, Samuele

    2009-03-01

    Two Zn(II)dithiocarbamates with ZnS 4N chromophores have been synthesized ([Zn(thqdtc) 2(py)] ( 1) and [Zn(thiqdtc) 2(py)] ( 2) (where thqdtc = 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinolinedithiocarbamate, thiqtc = 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinolinedithiocarbamate and py = pyridine)) from [Zn(thqdtc) 2] ( 3) and [Zn(thiqdtc) 2] ( 4), respectively. Their structures and properties have been characterized by IR and NMR spectra. The structures of both the complexes were determined by single crystal X-ray crystallography. The observed deshielding of the H-2 protons for 1 and 3 and H-1 and H-3 protons for 2 and 4 in the 1H NMR spectra is attributed to the drift of electrons from the nitrogen of the NR 2 group, forcing a high electron density towards sulfur via the thioureide π-system. In the 13C NMR spectra, the most important thioureide (N 13CS 2) carbon signals are observed in the region 204-207 ppm. The upfield shift of NCS 2 carbon signal for 1 (204.2 ppm) from the chemical shift value of 2 (206.9 ppm) is due to electron withdrawing resonance effect of phenyl ring thereby decreasing the double bond character in tetrahydroquinolinedithiocarbamate, whereas benzyl group in tetrahydroisoquinolinedithiocarbamate cannot participate in resonance delocalization in the same way. Single crystal X-ray structural analysis of 1 and 2 showed that the zinc atom is pentacoordinated with four sulfur atoms from the dithiocarbamate ligands and one nitrogen atom from the pyridine. VBS values support the correctness of the determined structure. The lower VBS value of 2 is due to the steric effect exerted by the thiqdtc. The phenyl and benzyl group in the heterocyclic dithiocarbamates influences the electronic properties of 1 and 2. The shift of ν C- N(thioureide) and thioureide N 13CS 2 carbon signals are correlated with the electronic effects of the dithiocarbamate ligands.

  14. C2 in a Box: Determining Its Intrinsic Bond Strength for the X(1) Σg (+) Ground State.

    PubMed

    Zou, Wenli; Cremer, Dieter

    2016-03-14

    The intrinsic bond strength of C2 in its (1) Σg (+) ground state is determined from its stretching force constant utilizing MR-CISD+Q(8,8), MR-AQCC(8,8), and single-determinant coupled cluster calculations with triple and quadruple excitations. By referencing the CC stretching force constant to its local counterparts of ethane, ethylene, and acetylene, an intrinsic bond strength half way between that of a double bond and a triple bond is obtained. Diabatic MR-CISD+Q results do not change this. Confinement of C2 and suitable reference molecules in a noble gas cage leads to compression, polarization, and charge transfer effects, which are quantified by the local CC stretching force constants and differences of correlated electron densities. These results are in line with two π bonds and a partial σ bond. Bond orders and bond dissociation energies of small hydrocarbons do not support quadruple bonding in C2 . PMID:26742466

  15. Fusion bonding and alignment fixture

    DOEpatents

    Ackler, Harold D.; Swierkowski, Stefan P.; Tarte, Lisa A.; Hicks, Randall K.

    2000-01-01

    An improved vacuum fusion bonding structure and process for aligned bonding of large area glass plates, patterned with microchannels and access holes and slots, for elevated glass fusion temperatures. Vacuum pumpout of all the components is through the bottom platform which yields an untouched, defect free top surface which greatly improves optical access through this smooth surface. Also, a completely non-adherent interlayer, such as graphite, with alignment and location features is located between the main steel platform and the glass plate pair, which makes large improvements in quality, yield, and ease of use, and enables aligned bonding of very large glass structures.

  16. Method for vacuum fusion bonding

    DOEpatents

    Ackler, Harold D.; Swierkowski, Stefan P.; Tarte, Lisa A.; Hicks, Randall K.

    2001-01-01

    An improved vacuum fusion bonding structure and process for aligned bonding of large area glass plates, patterned with microchannels and access holes and slots, for elevated glass fusion temperatures. Vacuum pumpout of all components is through the bottom platform which yields an untouched, defect free top surface which greatly improves optical access through this smooth surface. Also, a completely non-adherent interlayer, such as graphite, with alignment and location features is located between the main steel platform and the glass plate pair, which makes large improvements in quality, yield, and ease of use, and enables aligned bonding of very large glass structures.

  17. 75 FR 266 - Customs and Border Protection's Bond Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-05

    .... Customs and Border Protection on March 31, 2007 (see 72 FR 20131, dated April 23, 2007). As a consequence... Treasury Department Order No. 165 Revised, as amended (T.D. 53654, 19 FR 7241, November 6, 1954), may by... previously performed at the port level. The authority to approve single transaction bonds will remain...

  18. Bond selective chemistry beyond the adiabatic approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, L.J.

    1993-12-01

    One of the most important challenges in chemistry is to develop predictive ability for the branching between energetically allowed chemical reaction pathways. Such predictive capability, coupled with a fundamental understanding of the important molecular interactions, is essential to the development and utilization of new fuels and the design of efficient combustion processes. Existing transition state and exact quantum theories successfully predict the branching between available product channels for systems in which each reaction coordinate can be adequately described by different paths along a single adiabatic potential energy surface. In particular, unimolecular dissociation following thermal, infrared multiphoton, or overtone excitation in the ground state yields a branching between energetically allowed product channels which can be successfully predicted by the application of statistical theories, i.e. the weakest bond breaks. (The predictions are particularly good for competing reactions in which when there is no saddle point along the reaction coordinates, as in simple bond fission reactions.) The predicted lack of bond selectivity results from the assumption of rapid internal vibrational energy redistribution and the implicit use of a single adiabatic Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface for the reaction. However, the adiabatic approximation is not valid for the reaction of a wide variety of energetic materials and organic fuels; coupling between the electronic states of the reacting species play a a key role in determining the selectivity of the chemical reactions induced. The work described below investigated the central role played by coupling between electronic states in polyatomic molecules in determining the selective branching between energetically allowed fragmentation pathways in two key systems.

  19. Electron density, exchange-correlation density, and bond characterization from the perspective of the valence-bond theory. II. Numerical results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rincón, Luis; Alvarellos, J. E.; Almeida, Rafael

    2005-06-01

    In this work we have analyzed the bond character of a series of representative diatomic molecules, using valence bond and the atoms in molecules points of view. This is done using generalized valence-bond calculations. We have also employed more exigent levels, as configuration interaction with single and double excitations and complete active space self-consistent field calculations, in order to validate the generalized valence-bond results. We have explored the possibility that the known delocalization index, and a parameter that measures the excess or defect population within a given atomic basin, can be considered as indicators of the character of bond interaction. We conclude that for a proper description of the bond character, the global behavior of both the charge and two-electron densities should be considered.

  20. Generalized Valence Bond Description of Chalcogen-Nitrogen Compounds. III. Why the NO-OH and NS-OH Bonds Are So Different.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, Tyler Y; Dunning, Thom H

    2016-09-01

    Crabtree et al. recently reported the microwave spectrum of nitrosyl-O-hydroxide (trans-NOOH), an isomer of nitrous acid, and found that this molecule has the longest O-O bond ever observed: 1.9149 Å ± 0.0005 Å. This is in marked contrast to the structure of the valence isoelectronic trans-NSOH molecule, which has a normal NS-OH bond length and strength. Generalized valence bond calculations show that the long bond in trans-NOOH is the result of a weak through-pair interaction that singlet couples the spins of the electrons in singly occupied orbitals on the hydroxyl radical and nitrogen atom, an interaction that is enhanced by the intervening lone pair of the oxygen atom in NO. The NS-OH bond is the result of the formation of a stable recoupled pair bond dyad, which accounts for both its length and strength. PMID:27501366

  1. Explosive bonding of metal-matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reece, O. Y.

    1969-01-01

    Explosive bonding process produces sheet composites of aluminum alloy reinforced by high-strength stainless steel wires. The bonds are excellent metallurgically, no external heat is required, various metals can be bonded, and the process is inexpensive.

  2. 27 CFR 25.96 - Superseding bond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... approving the superseding bond, will issue a notice of termination for the superseded bond under the provisions of this subpart. Superseding bonds will show the current date of execution and their...

  3. 27 CFR 25.96 - Superseding bond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... approving the superseding bond, will issue a notice of termination for the superseded bond under the provisions of this subpart. Superseding bonds will show the current date of execution and their...

  4. 27 CFR 25.96 - Superseding bond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... approving the superseding bond, will issue a notice of termination for the superseded bond under the provisions of this subpart. Superseding bonds will show the current date of execution and their...

  5. 27 CFR 25.96 - Superseding bond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... approving the superseding bond, will issue a notice of termination for the superseded bond under the provisions of this subpart. Superseding bonds will show the current date of execution and their...

  6. Double pancake bonds: pushing the limits of strong π-π stacking interactions.

    PubMed

    Cui, Zhong-hua; Lischka, Hans; Beneberu, Habtamu Z; Kertesz, Miklos

    2014-09-17

    The concept of a double-bonded pancake bonding mechanism is introduced to explain the extremely short π-π stacking contacts in dimers of dithiatriazines. While ordinary single pancake bonds occur between radicals and already display significantly shorter interatomic distances in comparison to van der Waals (vdW) contacts, the double-bonded pancake dimer is based on diradicaloid or antiaromatic molecules and exhibits even shorter and stronger intermolecular bonds that breach into the range of extremely stretched single bonds in terms of bond distances and binding energies. These properties give rise to promising possibilities in the design of new materials with high electrical conductivity and for the field of spintronics. The analysis of the double pancake bond is based on cutting edge electron correlation theory combining multireference (nondynamical) effects and dispersion (dynamical) contributions in a balanced way providing accurate interaction energies and distributions of unpaired spins. It is also shown that the present examples do not stand isolated but that similar mechanisms operate in several analogous nonradical molecular systems to form double-bonded π-stacking pancake dimers. We report on the amazing properties of a new type of stacking interaction mechanism between π conjugated molecules in the form of a "double pancake bond" which breaks the record for short intermolecular distances and provides formidable strength for some π-π stacking interactions. PMID:25203200

  7. Low temperature GRISM direct bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalkowski, Gerhard; Harnisch, Gerd; Grabowski, Kevin; Benkenstein, Tino; Ehrhardt, Sascha; Zeitner, Uwe; Risse, Stefan

    2015-09-01

    For spectroscopy in space, GRISM elements -obtained by patterning gratings on a prism surface - are gaining increasing interest. Originally developed as dispersive elements for insertion into an imaging light path without deflecting the beam, they are progressively found in sophisticated multi stage dispersion optics. We report on GRISM manufacturing by joining the individual functional elements -prisms and gratings - to suitable components. Fused silica was used as glass material and the gratings were realized by e-beam lithography und dry etching. Alignment of the grating dispersion direction to the prism angle was realized by passive adjustment. Materials adapted bonds of high transmission, stiffness and strength were obtained at temperatures of about 200°C in vacuum by hydrophilic direct bonding. Examples for bonding uncoated as well as coated fused silica surfaces are given. The results illustrate the great potential of hydrophilic glass direct bonding for manufacturing transmission optics to be used under highly demanding environmental conditions, as typical in space.

  8. A conceptual framework of bonding.

    PubMed

    Gay, J

    1981-01-01

    Nurses involved in maternal-infant child care should objectively analyze any tools that purport to measure attachment and/or bonding. Has the author adequately defined the terms? Are directions given for making concepts operational for the practicing nurse? What are the foundations for placing values on parental behaviors? Do deviant parental behaviors reflect poor attachment or bonding, or are such behaviors merely indicative of limited parental opportunities for acquaintance? The presentation of of any conceptual framework should not be considered complete without empirical testing. Such testing and peer critique of a framework are essential fro any theory of bonding to evolve. With further research into the parental-child relationship, nurses can learn to provide adequate care for facilitating the bonding process in families. PMID:6913616

  9. Criteria for Establishing Bond Ratings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ackerman, Freda Stern

    1984-01-01

    An executive of Moody's Investors Service explains what past experience has taught the company about municipal analysis, how a bond issue is assigned a credit rating, and what issuers can do to obtain the best rating. (MLF)

  10. Surface analysis in composite bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messick, D. L.; Wightman, J. P.

    1983-01-01

    X ray photoelectron spectroscopy and contact angle measurements on graphite fiber composites pretreated in a number of different ways including mechanical, chemical, and light irradiation were analyzed. Data acquired on surface contamination as a result of fabrication techniques provides answers to the strength and durability of adhesively bonded composites. These techniques were shown to provide valuable information on surface analysis of pretreated composites prior to adhesive bonding and following lap shear fracture.

  11. Method to improve commercial bonded SOI material

    DOEpatents

    Maris, Humphrey John; Sadana, Devendra Kumar

    2000-07-11

    A method of improving the bonding characteristics of a previously bonded silicon on insulator (SOI) structure is provided. The improvement in the bonding characteristics is achieved in the present invention by, optionally, forming an oxide cap layer on the silicon surface of the bonded SOI structure and then annealing either the uncapped or oxide capped structure in a slightly oxidizing ambient at temperatures greater than 1200.degree. C. Also provided herein is a method for detecting the bonding characteristics of previously bonded SOI structures. According to this aspect of the present invention, a pico-second laser pulse technique is employed to determine the bonding imperfections of previously bonded SOI structures.

  12. Multi-responsive coordination polymers utilising metal-stabilised, dynamic covalent imine bonds.

    PubMed

    García, Fátima; Pelss, Janis; Zuilhof, Han; Smulders, Maarten M J

    2016-07-12

    We report how the combination of dynamic covalent imine bonds and coordination bonds in a single polymer material not only imparts enhanced stability to the final polymer, but also allows the material to be sensitive to a range of stimuli, offering more fine-grained control over its properties. PMID:26879208

  13. Hidden multiple bond effects in dynamic force spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Getfert, Sebastian; Reimann, Peter

    2012-03-01

    In dynamic force spectroscopy, a (bio-)molecular complex is subjected to a steadily increasing force until the chemical bond breaks. Repeating the same experiment many times results in a broad distribution of rupture forces, whose quantitative interpretation represents a formidable theoretical challenge. In this study we address the situation that more than a single molecular bond is involved in one experimental run, giving rise to multiple rupture events that are even more difficult to analyze and thus are usually eliminated as far as possible from the further evaluation of the experimental data. We develop and numerically solve a detailed model of a complete dynamic force spectroscopy experiment including a possible clustering of molecules on the substrate surface, the formation of bonds, their dissociation under load, and the postprocessing of the force extension curves. We show that the data, remaining after elimination of obvious multiple rupture events, may still contain a considerable number of hidden multiple bonds, which are experimentally indistinguishable from true single bonds, but which have considerable effects on the resulting rupture force statistics and its consistent theoretical interpretation. PMID:22404941

  14. Hidden Multiple Bond Effects in Dynamic Force Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Getfert, Sebastian; Reimann, Peter

    2012-01-01

    In dynamic force spectroscopy, a (bio-)molecular complex is subjected to a steadily increasing force until the chemical bond breaks. Repeating the same experiment many times results in a broad distribution of rupture forces, whose quantitative interpretation represents a formidable theoretical challenge. In this study we address the situation that more than a single molecular bond is involved in one experimental run, giving rise to multiple rupture events that are even more difficult to analyze and thus are usually eliminated as far as possible from the further evaluation of the experimental data. We develop and numerically solve a detailed model of a complete dynamic force spectroscopy experiment including a possible clustering of molecules on the substrate surface, the formation of bonds, their dissociation under load, and the postprocessing of the force extension curves. We show that the data, remaining after elimination of obvious multiple rupture events, may still contain a considerable number of hidden multiple bonds, which are experimentally indistinguishable from true single bonds, but which have considerable effects on the resulting rupture force statistics and its consistent theoretical interpretation. PMID:22404941

  15. Water's dual nature and its continuously changing hydrogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Henchman, Richard H

    2016-09-28

    A model is proposed for liquid water that is a continuum between the ordered state with predominantly tetrahedral coordination, linear hydrogen bonds and activated dynamics and a disordered state with a continuous distribution of multiple coordinations, multiple types of hydrogen bond, and diffusive dynamics, similar to that of normal liquids. Central to water's heterogeneous structure is the ability of hydrogen to donate to either one acceptor in a conventional linear hydrogen bond or to multiple acceptors as a furcated hydrogen. Linear hydrogen bonds are marked by slow, activated kinetics for hydrogen-bond switching to more crowded acceptors and sharp first peaks in the hydrogen-oxygen radial distribution function. Furcated hydrogens, equivalent to free, broken, dangling or distorted hydrogens, have barrierless, rapid kinetics and poorly defined first peaks in their hydrogen-oxygen radial distribution function. They involve the weakest donor in a local excess of donors, such that barrierless whole-molecule vibration rapidly swaps them between the linear and furcated forms. Despite the low number of furcated hydrogens and their transient existence, they are readily created in a single hydrogen-bond switch and free up the dynamics of numerous surrounding molecules, bringing about the disordered state. Hydrogens in the ordered state switch with activated dynamics to make the non-tetrahedral coordinations of the disordered state, which can also combine to make the ordered state. Consequently, the ordered and disordered states are both connected by diffusive dynamics and differentiated by activated dynamics, bringing about water's continuous heterogeneity. PMID:27447299

  16. Plasticity of hydrogen bond networks regulates mechanochemistry of cell adhesion complexes.

    PubMed

    Chakrabarti, Shaon; Hinczewski, Michael; Thirumalai, D

    2014-06-24

    Mechanical forces acting on cell adhesion receptor proteins regulate a range of cellular functions by formation and rupture of noncovalent interactions with ligands. Typically, force decreases the lifetimes of intact complexes ("slip bonds"), making the discovery that these lifetimes can also be prolonged ("catch bonds") a surprise. We created a microscopic analytic theory by incorporating the structures of selectin and integrin receptors into a conceptual framework based on the theory of stochastic equations, which quantitatively explains a wide range of experimental data (including catch bonds at low forces and slip bonds at high forces). Catch bonds arise due to force-induced remodeling of hydrogen bond networks, a finding that also accounts for unbinding in structurally unrelated integrin-fibronectin and actomyosin complexes. For the selectin family, remodeling of hydrogen bond networks drives an allosteric transition resulting in the formation of the maximum number of hydrogen bonds determined only by the structure of the receptor and independent of the ligand. A similar transition allows us to predict the increase in the number of hydrogen bonds in a particular allosteric state of α5β1 integrin-fibronectin complex, a conformation which is yet to be crystallized. We also make a testable prediction that a single point mutation (Tyr51Phe) in the ligand associated with selectin should dramatically alter the nature of the catch bond compared with the wild type. Our work suggests that nature uses a ductile network of hydrogen bonds to engineer function over a broad range of forces. PMID:24927549

  17. Fast and accurate predictions of covalent bonds in chemical space.

    PubMed

    Chang, K Y Samuel; Fias, Stijn; Ramakrishnan, Raghunathan; von Lilienfeld, O Anatole

    2016-05-01

    We assess the predictive accuracy of perturbation theory based estimates of changes in covalent bonding due to linear alchemical interpolations among molecules. We have investigated σ bonding to hydrogen, as well as σ and π bonding between main-group elements, occurring in small sets of iso-valence-electronic molecules with elements drawn from second to fourth rows in the p-block of the periodic table. Numerical evidence suggests that first order Taylor expansions of covalent bonding potentials can achieve high accuracy if (i) the alchemical interpolation is vertical (fixed geometry), (ii) it involves elements from the third and fourth rows of the periodic table, and (iii) an optimal reference geometry is used. This leads to near linear changes in the bonding potential, resulting in analytical predictions with chemical accuracy (∼1 kcal/mol). Second order estimates deteriorate the prediction. If initial and final molecules differ not only in composition but also in geometry, all estimates become substantially worse, with second order being slightly more accurate than first order. The independent particle approximation based second order perturbation theory performs poorly when compared to the coupled perturbed or finite difference approach. Taylor series expansions up to fourth order of the potential energy curve of highly symmetric systems indicate a finite radius of convergence, as illustrated for the alchemical stretching of H2 (+). Results are presented for (i) covalent bonds to hydrogen in 12 molecules with 8 valence electrons (CH4, NH3, H2O, HF, SiH4, PH3, H2S, HCl, GeH4, AsH3, H2Se, HBr); (ii) main-group single bonds in 9 molecules with 14 valence electrons (CH3F, CH3Cl, CH3Br, SiH3F, SiH3Cl, SiH3Br, GeH3F, GeH3Cl, GeH3Br); (iii) main-group double bonds in 9 molecules with 12 valence electrons (CH2O, CH2S, CH2Se, SiH2O, SiH2S, SiH2Se, GeH2O, GeH2S, GeH2Se); (iv) main-group triple bonds in 9 molecules with 10 valence electrons (HCN, HCP, HCAs, HSiN, HSi

  18. Fast and accurate predictions of covalent bonds in chemical space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, K. Y. Samuel; Fias, Stijn; Ramakrishnan, Raghunathan; von Lilienfeld, O. Anatole

    2016-05-01

    We assess the predictive accuracy of perturbation theory based estimates of changes in covalent bonding due to linear alchemical interpolations among molecules. We have investigated σ bonding to hydrogen, as well as σ and π bonding between main-group elements, occurring in small sets of iso-valence-electronic molecules with elements drawn from second to fourth rows in the p-block of the periodic table. Numerical evidence suggests that first order Taylor expansions of covalent bonding potentials can achieve high accuracy if (i) the alchemical interpolation is vertical (fixed geometry), (ii) it involves elements from the third and fourth rows of the periodic table, and (iii) an optimal reference geometry is used. This leads to near linear changes in the bonding potential, resulting in analytical predictions with chemical accuracy (˜1 kcal/mol). Second order estimates deteriorate the prediction. If initial and final molecules differ not only in composition but also in geometry, all estimates become substantially worse, with second order being slightly more accurate than first order. The independent particle approximation based second order perturbation theory performs poorly when compared to the coupled perturbed or finite difference approach. Taylor series expansions up to fourth order of the potential energy curve of highly symmetric systems indicate a finite radius of convergence, as illustrated for the alchemical stretching of H 2+ . Results are presented for (i) covalent bonds to hydrogen in 12 molecules with 8 valence electrons (CH4, NH3, H2O, HF, SiH4, PH3, H2S, HCl, GeH4, AsH3, H2Se, HBr); (ii) main-group single bonds in 9 molecules with 14 valence electrons (CH3F, CH3Cl, CH3Br, SiH3F, SiH3Cl, SiH3Br, GeH3F, GeH3Cl, GeH3Br); (iii) main-group double bonds in 9 molecules with 12 valence electrons (CH2O, CH2S, CH2Se, SiH2O, SiH2S, SiH2Se, GeH2O, GeH2S, GeH2Se); (iv) main-group triple bonds in 9 molecules with 10 valence electrons (HCN, HCP, HCAs, HSiN, HSi

  19. "Vibrational bonding": a new type of chemical bond is discovered.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Christopher J; Macrae, Roderick M

    2015-01-01

    A long-sought but elusive new type of chemical bond, occurring on a minimum-free, purely repulsive potential energy surface, has recently been convincingly shown to be possible on the basis of high-level quantum-chemical calculations. This type of bond, termed a vibrational bond, forms because the total energy, including the dynamical energy of the nuclei, is lower than the total energy of the dissociated products, including their vibrational zero-point energy. For this to be the case, the ZPE of the product molecule must be very high, which is ensured by replacing a conventional hydrogen atom with its light isotope muonium (Mu, mass = 1/9 u) in the system Br-H-Br, a natural transition state in the reaction between Br and HBr. A paramagnetic species observed in the reaction Mu +Br2 has been proposed as a first experimental sighting of this species, but definitive identification remains challenging. PMID:25942773

  20. Self-assembly of Epitaxial Monolayers for Vacuum Wafer Bonding.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altfeder, Igor; Huang, Biqin; Appelbaum, Ian; Walker, Barry

    2007-03-01

    Self-assembled epitaxial metal monolayers can be used for hetero-integration of mismatched semiconductors, leading to simultaneously low interfacial resistance and high optical transparency. Lattice-mismatched wafers of Si(100) and Si(111) were bonded at room temperature in situ after vacuum deposition of a single atomic layer of Ag on them. The interfacial resistance was measured to be 3.9x 10-4 ohm. cm^ 2 and the optical transmission of the interface at 2500 nm is approximately 98%. We discuss the important role of electron confinement in ultrathin Ag layers as a possible contributor to the bonding energy.

  1. Self-assembly of epitaxial monolayers for vacuum wafer bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altfeder, Igor; Huang, Biqin; Appelbaum, Ian; Walker, B. C.

    2006-11-01

    Self-assembled epitaxial metal monolayers can be used for heterointegration of mismatched semiconductors, leading to simultaneously low interfacial resistance and high optical transparency. Lattice-mismatched wafers of Si(100) and Si(111) were bonded at room temperature in situ after vacuum deposition of a single atomic layer of Ag. The interfacial resistance was measured to be 3.9×10-4Ωcm2 and the optical transmission of the interface at 2500nm is approximately 98%. Electron confinement in ultrathin Ag layers as a possible contributor to the bonding energy.

  2. Molecular Mechanics (MM4) Studies on Unusually Long Carbon-Carbon Bond Distances in Hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Allinger, Norman L; Lii, Jenn-Huei; Schaefer, Henry F

    2016-06-14

    The carbon-carbon single bond is of central importance in organic chemistry. When the molecular mechanics MM4 force field was developed beginning in the early 1990s, C-C bond lengths were not known very reliably for many important molecules, and bond lengths greater than 1.6 Å were quite poorly known experimentally. Quantum-mechanically computed values could not yet be obtained with useful accuracy in a general way. This paper examines structures now available from experiment and quantum-mechanical computations and extends the fit of the MM4 methodology to include new bond distances as long as 1.71 Å. PMID:27164310

  3. Highly polar bonds and the meaning of covalency and ionicity--structure and bonding of alkali metal hydride oligomers.

    PubMed

    Bickelhaupt, F Matthias; Solà, Miquel; Guerra, Célia Fonseca

    2007-01-01

    The hydrogen-alkali metal bond is simple and archetypal, and thus an ideal model for studying the nature of highly polar element-metal bonds. Thus, we have theoretically explored the alkali metal hydride monomers, HM, and (distorted) cubic tetramers, (HM)4, with M = Li, Na, K, and Rb, using density functional theory (DFT) at the BP86/TZ2P level. Our objective is to determine how the structure and thermochemistry (e.g., H-M bond lengths and strengths, oligomerization energies, etc.) of alkali metal hydrides depend on the metal atom, and to understand the emerging trends in terms of quantitative Kohn-Sham molecular orbital (KS-MO) theory. The H-M bond becomes longer and weaker, both in the monomers and tetramers, if one descends the periodic table from Li to Rb. Quantitative bonding analyses show that this trend is not determined by decreasing electrostatic attraction but, primarily, by the weakening in orbital interactions. The latter become less stabilizing along Li-Rb because the bond overlap between the singly occupied molecular orbitals (SOMOs) of H* and M* radicals decreases as the metal ns atomic orbital (AO) becomes larger and more diffuse. Thus, the H-M bond behaves as a text-book electron-pair bond and, in that respect, it is covalent, despite a high polarity. For the lithium and sodium hydride tetramers, the H4 tetrahedron is larger than and surrounds the M4 cluster (i.e., H-H > M-M). Interestingly, this is no longer the case in the potassium and rubidium hydride tetramers, in which the H4 tetrahedron is smaller than and inside the M4 cluster (i.e., H-H < M-M). PMID:17328442

  4. Dentine and enamel bonding agents.

    PubMed

    Bowen, R L; Tung, M S; Blosser, R L; Asmussen, E

    1987-09-01

    Previous studies have shown that sequential use of aqueous FO (ferric oxalate containing a small concentration of HNO3), acetone solutions of NPG (N-phenylglycine), and PMDM (the reaction product of pyromellitic dianhydride and 2-hydroxyethylmethacrylate) yields strong adhesive bonding of composite resins to both dentine and enamel. The purpose of this study was to determine if aluminum ions could be substituted for ferric ions and if the procedure could be simplified. Aqueous solutions containing aluminum oxalate and aluminum nitrate, followed in sequence by acetone solutions of NPG and PMDM, gave strong tensile adhesive bond strengths between a composite and extracted human teeth. Comparable values have been obtained with FO, NPG and PMDM. Aluminum oxalate solutions containing no nitrate gave lower bond strengths, as was the case with FO. Aqueous solutions of acidified aluminum oxalate can dissolve NPG, thereby allowing a simplification of the procedure. Tested for comparison, commercially available dentine bonding agents gave lower average bond strengths on dentine than did some of the experimental materials. PMID:3316044

  5. Welding, Bonding and Fastening, 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, J. D. (Editor); Stein, B. A. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    A compilation of papers presented in a joint NASA, American Society for Metals, The George Washington University, American Welding Soceity, and Society of Manufacturing Engineers conference on Welding, Bonding, and Fastening at Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA, on October 23 to 25, 1984 is given. Papers were presented on technology developed in current research programs relevant to welding, bonding, and fastening of structural materials required in fabricating structures and mechanical systems used in the aerospace, hydrospace, and automotive industries. Topics covered in the conference included equipment, hardware and materials used when welding, brazing, and soldering, mechanical fastening, explosive welding, use of unique selected joining techniques, adhesives bonding, and nondestructive evaluation. A concept of the factory of the future was presented, followed by advanced welding techniques, automated equipment for welding, welding in a cryogenic atmosphere, blind fastening, stress corrosion resistant fasteners, fastening equipment, explosive welding of different configurations and materials, solid-state bonding, electron beam welding, new adhesives, effects of cryogenics on adhesives, and new techniques and equipment for adhesive bonding.

  6. 21 CFR 1005.23 - Bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Bonds. 1005.23 Section 1005.23 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH IMPORTATION OF ELECTRONIC PRODUCTS Bonding and Compliance Procedures § 1005.23 Bonds. The bond required...

  7. 21 CFR 1005.23 - Bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bonds. 1005.23 Section 1005.23 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH IMPORTATION OF ELECTRONIC PRODUCTS Bonding and Compliance Procedures § 1005.23 Bonds. The bond required under section 360(b) of the Act shall...

  8. 21 CFR 1005.23 - Bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bonds. 1005.23 Section 1005.23 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH IMPORTATION OF ELECTRONIC PRODUCTS Bonding and Compliance Procedures § 1005.23 Bonds. The bond required...

  9. 21 CFR 1005.23 - Bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bonds. 1005.23 Section 1005.23 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH IMPORTATION OF ELECTRONIC PRODUCTS Bonding and Compliance Procedures § 1005.23 Bonds. The bond required...

  10. 21 CFR 1005.23 - Bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bonds. 1005.23 Section 1005.23 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH IMPORTATION OF ELECTRONIC PRODUCTS Bonding and Compliance Procedures § 1005.23 Bonds. The bond required...

  11. 27 CFR 19.516 - Bond account.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... maximum penal sum, he shall maintain an account of his bond and he shall charge the bond with the amount... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bond account. 19.516... Determination and Payment of Tax § 19.516 Bond account. Where the proprietor has furnished a withdrawal or...

  12. Oregon School Bond Manual. Sixth Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Education, Salem. Office of School District Services.

    Given that purchasers of Oregon school bonds rely on recommendations of accredited bond attorneys, this document is designed to assist school districts in complying with state statutes regulating the issuance of school bond issues in order that attorney opinions may be favorable. Six initial steps toward a bond sale and Oregon laws regarding bonds…

  13. 46 CFR Sec. 2 - Amount of bond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Amount of bond. Sec. 2 Section 2 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION A-NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY BONDING OF SHIP'S PERSONNEL Sec. 2 Amount of bond. The amount of the bond must be governed by the amount of monies advanced or value of...

  14. 46 CFR Sec. 2 - Amount of bond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Amount of bond. Sec. 2 Section 2 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION A-NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY BONDING OF SHIP'S PERSONNEL Sec. 2 Amount of bond. The amount of the bond must be governed by the amount of monies advanced or value of...

  15. 46 CFR Sec. 4 - Posting of bond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Posting of bond. Sec. 4 Section 4 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION A-NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY BONDING OF SHIP'S PERSONNEL Sec. 4 Posting of bond. The General Agent shall retain an executed copy of each such bond in its principal...

  16. 46 CFR Sec. 4 - Posting of bond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Posting of bond. Sec. 4 Section 4 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION A-NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY BONDING OF SHIP'S PERSONNEL Sec. 4 Posting of bond. The General Agent shall retain an executed copy of each such bond in its principal...

  17. 43 CFR 3474.1 - Bonding requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Bonding requirements. 3474.1 Section 3474....1 Bonding requirements. (a) Before a lease may be issued, one of the following forms of lease bond... a form approved by the Director. (c) The bonding obligation for a new lease may be met by...

  18. 27 CFR 24.146 - Bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... (c) Wine vinegar plant bond. The proprietor of a wine vinegar plant who withdraws wine from a bonded wine premises without payment of tax for use in the manufacture of vinegar shall file a bond on TTB F 5510.2, Bond Covering Removal to and Use of Wine at Vinegar Plant, to ensure the payment of the tax...

  19. 27 CFR 24.146 - Bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... (c) Wine vinegar plant bond. The proprietor of a wine vinegar plant who withdraws wine from a bonded wine premises without payment of tax for use in the manufacture of vinegar shall file a bond on TTB F 5510.2, Bond Covering Removal to and Use of Wine at Vinegar Plant, to ensure the payment of the tax...

  20. 27 CFR 24.146 - Bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... (c) Wine vinegar plant bond. The proprietor of a wine vinegar plant who withdraws wine from a bonded wine premises without payment of tax for use in the manufacture of vinegar shall file a bond on TTB F 5510.2, Bond Covering Removal to and Use of Wine at Vinegar Plant, to ensure the payment of the tax...

  1. 27 CFR 24.146 - Bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... (c) Wine vinegar plant bond. The proprietor of a wine vinegar plant who withdraws wine from a bonded wine premises without payment of tax for use in the manufacture of vinegar shall file a bond on TTB F 5510.2, Bond Covering Removal to and Use of Wine at Vinegar Plant, to ensure the payment of the tax...

  2. 27 CFR 24.146 - Bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... (c) Wine vinegar plant bond. The proprietor of a wine vinegar plant who withdraws wine from a bonded wine premises without payment of tax for use in the manufacture of vinegar shall file a bond on TTB F 5510.2, Bond Covering Removal to and Use of Wine at Vinegar Plant, to ensure the payment of the tax...

  3. 36 CFR 228.51 - Bonding.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Bonding. 228.51 Section 228.51 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MINERALS Disposal of Mineral Materials General Provisions § 228.51 Bonding. (a) Bond requirements. Before operations may begin under any contract or permit, a bond...

  4. Pet Bonding and Pet Bereavement among Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Brenda H.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Studied adolescent-pet bonding and bereavement following pet loss (n=55). Hypothesized that highly-bonded adolescents experience more intense grief when a pet dies than do those less bonded; degree of bonding is greater for girls than for boys; and intensity of bereavement is greater for girls than for boys. Results supported the hypotheses. (RB)

  5. How School District Bonds Are Rated.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hitchcock, David

    1992-01-01

    Bond ratings are an assessment by an independent rating agency of the credit worthiness of a bond issuer, such as a school district, on repayment of a particular bond issue. Describes the rating procedures Standard and Poor's Municipal Finance Department uses to assign bond ratings. (MLF)

  6. 43 CFR 3104.1 - Bond obligations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Bond obligations. 3104.1 Section 3104.1..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) OIL AND GAS LEASING Bonds § 3104.1 Bond obligations. (a..., operating rights owner (sublessee), or operator shall submit a surety or a personal bond, conditioned...

  7. 43 CFR 3104.1 - Bond obligations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Bond obligations. 3104.1 Section 3104.1..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) OIL AND GAS LEASING Bonds § 3104.1 Bond obligations. (a..., operating rights owner (sublessee), or operator shall submit a surety or a personal bond, conditioned...

  8. 27 CFR 25.96 - Superseding bond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Superseding bond. 25.96 Section 25.96 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... principal submits a new bond to supersede a bond or bonds in effect, the appropriate TTB officer,...

  9. To Compare the Microleakage Among Experimental Adhesives Containing Nanoclay Fillers after the Storages of 24 Hours and 6 Months

    PubMed Central

    Mousavinasab, Seyed Mostafa; Atai, Mohammad; Alavi, Bagher

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the microleakage among experimental adhesives containing nanoclay fillers after the storages of 24 hours and 6 months. Materials and Methods: Class V cavities were prepared on extracted human molars with the occlusal margins located in enamel and the cervical margins in cementum. Phosphoric acid was applied to the enamel and dentin margins.Subsequently, the cavities were treated using four groups of experimental adhesive systems and restored with a resin composite. Adper Single Bond® was used as control group. After 24- hour and 6- month storages, the samples were subjected to thermocycling shocks and then immersed in silver nitrate as well as developer solution and finally evaluated for leakage. The data were analyzed using SPSS software. Results: Based on Kruskal –Wallis test, significant differences were found between groups regarding microleakage. The Mann- Whitney test showed that Leakage was significantly lower in Adper Single Bond® compared to the other groups in dentinal margins after 24 hours and 6 months and in enamel margins after 6 months. The Wilcoxon Signed Ranks test showed that the enamel leakage in experimental adhesives was significantly lower than dentinal leakage after 24 hours as well as enamel leakage in Adper Single Bond and adhesive with 0.5% PMAA-g-nanoclay was significantly lower than dentinal margins after storage period of 6 months. Conclusion: All the experimental adhesives were effective in reducing enamel leakage after 24 hours, but were not effective in reducing dentinal leakage after 24 hours as well as in enamel and dentinal leakage after a 6-month storage. No improvement was observed in the microleakage in dentin in both short (24 hrs) and long times (6 months). The high microleakage in the adhesives is probably attributed to the high concentration of HEMA in the recipe of the bonding agent. PMID:21566692

  10. Three methods to measure RH bond energies

    SciTech Connect

    Berkowitz, J.; Ellison, G.B.; Gutman, D.

    1993-03-21

    In this paper the authors compare and contrast three powerful methods for experimentally measuring bond energies in polyatomic molecules. The methods are: radical kinetics; gas phase acidity cycles; and photoionization mass spectroscopy. The knowledge of the values of bond energies are a basic piece of information to a chemist. Chemical reactions involve the making and breaking of chemical bonds. It has been shown that comparable bonds in polyatomic molecules, compared to the same bonds in radicals, can be significantly different. These bond energies can be measured in terms of bond dissociation energies.

  11. Catch bonds: physical models and biological functions.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Cheng; McEver, Rodger P

    2005-09-01

    Force can shorten the lifetimes of receptor-ligand bonds by accelerating their dissociation. Perhaps paradoxical at first glance, bond lifetimes can also be prolonged by force. This counterintuitive behavior was named catch bonds, which is in contrast to the ordinary slip bonds that describe the intuitive behavior of lifetimes being shortened by force. Fifteen years after their theoretical proposal, catch bonds have finally been observed. In this article we review recently published data that have demonstrated catch bonds in the selectin system and suggested catch bonds in other systems, the theoretical models for their explanations, and their function as a mechanism for flow-enhanced adhesion. PMID:16708472

  12. Competition between hydrogen and halogen bonding in halogenated 1-methyluracil: Water systems.

    PubMed

    Hogan, Simon W L; van Mourik, Tanja

    2016-03-30

    The competition between hydrogen- and halogen-bonding interactions in complexes of 5-halogenated 1-methyluracil (XmU; X = F, Cl, Br, I, or At) with one or two water molecules in the binding region between C5-X and C4O4 is investigated with M06-2X/6-31+G(d). In the singly-hydrated systems, the water molecule forms a hydrogen bond with C4O4 for all halogens, whereas structures with a halogen bond between the water oxygen and C5-X exist only for X = Br, I, and At. Structures with two waters forming a bridge between C4O and C5-X (through hydrogen- and halogen-bonding interactions) exist for all halogens except F. The absence of a halogen-bonded structure in singly-hydrated ClmU is therefore attributed to the competing hydrogen-bonding interaction with C4O4. The halogen-bond angle in the doubly-hydrated structures (150-160°) is far from the expected linearity of halogen bonds, indicating that significantly non-linear halogen bonds may exist in complex environments with competing interactions. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26773851

  13. Anion Transport with Chalcogen Bonds.

    PubMed

    Benz, Sebastian; Macchione, Mariano; Verolet, Quentin; Mareda, Jiri; Sakai, Naomi; Matile, Stefan

    2016-07-27

    In this report, we introduce synthetic anion transporters that operate with chalcogen bonds. Electron-deficient dithieno[3,2-b;2',3'-d]thiophenes (DTTs) are identified as ideal to bind anions in the focal point of the σ holes on the cofacial endocyclic sulfur atoms. Anion binding in solution and anion transport across lipid bilayers are found to increase with the depth of the σ holes of the DTT anionophores. These results introduce DTTs and related architectures as a privileged motif to engineer chalcogen bonds into functional systems, complementary in scope to classics such as 2,2'-bipyrroles or 2,2'-bipyridines that operate with hydrogen bonds and lone pairs, respectively. PMID:27433964

  14. Quantitative bond energetics in atomic-scale junctions with significant van der Waals character

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkataraman, Latha; Aradhya, Sriharsha; Hybertsen, Mark

    2015-03-01

    A direct measurement of the potential energy surface that characterizes individual chemical bonds in complex materials has fundamental significance for many disciplines. Here, we demonstrate that the energy profile for metallic single-atom contacts and single-molecule junctions can be mapped by fitting ambient atomic force microscope measurements carried out in the near-equilibrium regime to a physical, but simple, functional form. In particular we are able to extract bond energies for metal-molecule link bonds in cases where the interaction has significant contribution from nonspecific interactions attributed to van der Waals (vdW) interactions at short length scale in addition to specific donor-acceptor bonds. Our approach significantly expands the quantitative information extracted from these measurements, allowing direct comparisons to density functional theory (DFT) calculations instead of relying on trends in bond rupture forces alone. Currently at Cornell University.

  15. Ultrasonic Bonding of Solar-Cell Leads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frasch, W.

    1984-01-01

    Rolling ultrasonic spot-bonding method successfully joins aluminum interconnect fingers to silicon solar cells with copper metalization. Technique combines best features of ultrasonic rotary seam welding and ultrasonic spot bonding: allows fast bond cycles and high indexing speeds without use of solder or flux. Achieves reliable bonds at production rates without damage to solar cells. Bonding system of interest for all solar-cell assemblies and other assemblies using flat leads (rather than round wires).

  16. To Bond or Not to Bond? That Is the Question

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balzer, Wayne E.

    2015-01-01

    This case, inspired by a real school district scenario, was developed for use in a graduate-level course in school finance. James Spencer had just been selected as the new superintendent of a low-income, 400-student, rural school district in need of many capital improvements. The previous superintendent had refused to hold a bond election because…

  17. Catch-bond behavior of bacteria binding by slip bonds.

    PubMed

    Björnham, Oscar; Axner, Ove

    2010-09-01

    It is shown that multipili-adhering bacteria expressing helix-like pili binding by slip bonds can show catch-bond behavior. When exposed to an external force, such bacteria can mediate adhesion to their hosts by either of two limiting means: sequential or simultaneous pili force exposure (referring to when the pili mediate force in a sequential or simultaneous manner, respectively). As the force is increased, the pili can transition from sequential to simultaneous pili force exposure. Since the latter mode of adhesion gives rise to a significantly longer bacterial adhesion lifetime than the former, this results in a prolongation of the lifetime, which shows up as a catch-bond behavior. The properties and conditions of this effect were theoretically investigated and assessed in some detail for dual-pili-adhering bacteria, by both analytical means and simulations. The results indicate that the adhesion lifetime of such bacteria can be prolonged by more than an order of magnitude. This implies that the adhesion properties of multibinding systems cannot be directly conveyed to the individual adhesion-receptor bonds. PMID:20816044

  18. What holds paper together: Nanometre scale exploration of bonding between paper fibres

    PubMed Central

    Schmied, Franz J.; Teichert, Christian; Kappel, Lisbeth; Hirn, Ulrich; Bauer, Wolfgang; Schennach, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Paper, a man-made material that has been used for hundreds of years, is a network of natural cellulosic fibres. To a large extent, it is the strength of bonding between these individual fibres that controls the strength of paper. Using atomic force microscopy, we explore here the mechanical properties of individual fibre-fibre bonds on the nanometre scale. A single fibre-fibre bond is loaded with a calibrated cantilever statically and dynamically until the bond breaks. Besides the calculation of the total energy input, time dependent processes such as creep and relaxation are studied. Through the nanometre scale investigation of the formerly bonded area, we show that fibrils or fibril bundles play a crucial role in fibre-fibre bonding because they act as bridging elements. With this knowledge, new fabrication routes can be deduced to increase the strength of an ancient product that is in fact an overlooked high-tech material. PMID:23969946

  19. Carbon–carbon bond activation of cyclobutenones enabled by the addition of chiral organocatalyst to ketone

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bao-Sheng; Wang, Yuhuang; Jin, Zhichao; Zheng, Pengcheng; Ganguly, Rakesh; Chi, Yonggui Robin

    2015-01-01

    The activation of carbon–carbon (C–C) bonds is an effective strategy in building functional molecules. The C–C bond activation is typically accomplished via metal catalysis, with which high levels of enantioselectivity are difficult to achieve due to high reactivity of metal catalysts and the metal-bound intermediates. It remains largely unexplored to use organocatalysis for C–C bond activation. Here we describe an organocatalytic activation of C–C bonds through the addition of an NHC to a ketone moiety that initiates a C–C single bond cleavage as a key step to generate an NHC-bound intermediate for chemo- and stereo-selective reactions. This reaction constitutes an asymmetric functionalization of cyclobutenones using organocatalysts via a C–C bond activation process. Structurally diverse and multicyclic compounds could be obtained with high optical purities via an atom and redox economic process. PMID:25652912

  20. Effect of the Hydrogen Bond in Photoinduced Water Dissociation: A Double-Edged Sword.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wenshao; Wei, Dong; Jin, Xianchi; Xu, Chenbiao; Geng, Zhenhua; Guo, Qing; Ma, Zhibo; Dai, Dongxu; Fan, Hongjun; Yang, Xueming

    2016-02-18

    Photoinduced water dissociation on rutile-TiO2 was investigated using various methods. Experimental results reveal that the water dissociation occurs via transferring an H atom to a bridge bonded oxygen site and ejecting an OH radical to the gas phase during irradiation. The reaction is strongly suppressed as the water coverage increases. Further scanning tunneling microscopy study demonstrates that hydrogen bonds between water molecules have a dramatic effect on the reaction. Interestingly, a single hydrogen bond in water dimer enhances the water dissociation reaction, while one-dimensional hydrogen bonds in water chains inhibit the reaction. Density functional theory calculations indicate that the effect of hydrogen bonds on the OH dissociation energy is likely the origin of this remarkable behavior. The results suggest that avoiding a strong hydrogen bond network between water molecules is crucial for water splitting. PMID:26810945

  1. Intermetallic Compound Formation Mechanisms for Cu-Sn Solid-Liquid Interdiffusion Bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H.; Wang, K.; Aasmundtveit, K. E.; Hoivik, N.

    2012-09-01

    Cu-Sn solid-liquid interdiffusion (SLID) bonding is an evolving technique for wafer-level packaging which features robust, fine pitch and high temperature tolerance. The mechanisms of Cu-Sn SLID bonding for wafer-level bonding and three-dimensional (3-D) packaging applications have been studied by analyzing the microstructure evolution of Cu-Sn intermetallic compounds (IMCs) at elevated temperature up to 400°C. The bonding time required to achieve a single IMC phase (Cu3Sn) in the final interconnects was estimated according to the parabolic growth law with consideration of defect-induced deviation. The effect of predominantly Cu metal grain size on the Cu-Sn interdiffusion rate is discussed. The temperature versus time profile (ramp rate) is critical to control the morphology of scallops in the IMC. A low temperature ramp rate before reaching the bonding temperature is believed to be favorable in a SLID wafer-level bonding process.

  2. Hydrogen Bonds in Polymer Folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borg, Jesper; Jensen, Mogens H.; Sneppen, Kim; Tiana, Guido

    2001-02-01

    We studied the thermodynamics of a homopolymeric chain with both van der Waals and directed hydrogen bond interaction. The effect of hydrogen bonds is to reduce dramatically the entropy of low-lying states and to give rise to long-range order and to conformations displaying secondary structures. For compact polymers a transition is found between helix-rich states and low-entropy sheet-dominated states. The consequences of this transition for protein folding and, in particular, for the problem of prions are discussed.

  3. Anodic bonding using a hybrid electrode with a two-step bonding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Luo; Jing, Xie; Yang, Zhang; Chaobo, Li; Yang, Xia

    2012-06-01

    A two-step bonding process using a novel hybrid electrode is presented. The effects of different electrodes on bonding time, bond strength and the bonded interface are analyzed. The anodic bonding is studied using a domestic bonding system, which carries out a detailed analysis of the integrity of the bonded interface and the bond strength measurement. With the aid of the hybrid electrode, a bubble-free anodic bonding process could be accomplished within 15-20 min, with a shear strength in excess of 10 MPa. These results show that the proposed method has a high degree of application value, including in most wafer-level MEMS packaging.

  4. Dynamical Crossover in Hot Dense Water: The Hydrogen Bond Role.

    PubMed

    Ranieri, Umbertoluca; Giura, Paola; Gorelli, Federico A; Santoro, Mario; Klotz, Stefan; Gillet, Philippe; Paolasini, Luigi; Koza, Michael Marek; Bove, Livia E

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the terahertz dynamics of liquid H2O as a function of pressure along the 450 K isotherm, by coupled quasielastic neutron scattering and inelastic X-ray scattering experiments. The pressure dependence of the single-molecule dynamics is anomalous in terms of both microscopic translation and rotation. In particular, the Stokes-Einstein-Debye equations are shown to be violated in hot water compressed to the GPa regime. The dynamics of the hydrogen bond network is only weakly affected by the pressure variation. The time scale of the structural relaxation driving the collective dynamics increases by a mere factor of 2 along the investigated isotherm, and the structural relaxation strength turns out to be almost pressure independent. Our results point at the persistence of the hydrogen bond network in hot dense water up to ice VII crystallization, thus questioning the long-standing perception that hydrogen bonds are broken in liquid water under the effect of compression. PMID:27479235

  5. Alkali metal mediated C-C bond coupling reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachikawa, Hiroto

    2015-02-01

    Metal catalyzed carbon-carbon (C-C) bond formation is one of the important reactions in pharmacy and in organic chemistry. In the present study, the electron and hole capture dynamics of a lithium-benzene sandwich complex, expressed by Li(Bz)2, have been investigated by means of direct ab-initio molecular dynamics method. Following the electron capture of Li(Bz)2, the structure of [Li(Bz)2]- was drastically changed: Bz-Bz parallel form was rapidly fluctuated as a function of time, and a new C-C single bond was formed in the C1-C1' position of Bz-Bz interaction system. In the hole capture, the intermolecular vibration between Bz-Bz rings was only enhanced. The mechanism of C-C bond formation in the electron capture was discussed on the basis of theoretical results.

  6. Interface Phenomena and Bonding Mechanism in Magnetic Pulse Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stern, A.; Shribman, V.; Ben-Artzy, A.; Aizenshtein, M.

    2014-10-01

    Magnetic pulse welding (MPW) is a solid-state impact welding technology that provides metallurgical joints while exhibiting a negligible heat-affected zone. The MPW process is a high speed single shot welding technique used mainly for joining tubular components in a lap configuration and characteristic length scales of few millimeters to centimeters. It is similar in operation to explosive welding and shares the same physical principles. The nature of bonding in MPW is not sufficiently understood yet and some controversial explanations are reported in the literature. The two major ideas are based on either solid state bonding or local melting and solidification. The present work summarizes our current understanding of the bonding mechanism and the structure in various similar and dissimilar metal pairs joined by MPW.

  7. Alkali metal mediated C–C bond coupling reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Tachikawa, Hiroto

    2015-02-14

    Metal catalyzed carbon-carbon (C–C) bond formation is one of the important reactions in pharmacy and in organic chemistry. In the present study, the electron and hole capture dynamics of a lithium-benzene sandwich complex, expressed by Li(Bz){sub 2}, have been investigated by means of direct ab-initio molecular dynamics method. Following the electron capture of Li(Bz){sub 2}, the structure of [Li(Bz){sub 2}]{sup −} was drastically changed: Bz–Bz parallel form was rapidly fluctuated as a function of time, and a new C–C single bond was formed in the C{sub 1}–C{sub 1}′ position of Bz–Bz interaction system. In the hole capture, the intermolecular vibration between Bz–Bz rings was only enhanced. The mechanism of C–C bond formation in the electron capture was discussed on the basis of theoretical results.

  8. Fluxless flip chip bonding processes and aerial fluxless bonding technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dongwook

    New fluxless flip chip processes of Sn-rich non-eutectic Au-Sn solder bumps were developed using vacuum deposition and electroplating technique. It is believed that this is the first report that non-eutectic Au-Sn flip chip solder bonding is achieved without the use of flux. In order to make 200mum diameter and 10mum thick Au-Sn solder bump 0.03mum of Cr, 10mum of Sn and 0.3mum of Au were vacuum deposited on the Si wafer through the high carbon steal stencil mask. Nearly void-free solder bumps with small grains of AuSn4 intermetallic compound were achieved. The re-melting temperature of solder bumps was measured to be 220°C. In the second part, first, the fluxless bonding process was performed in hydrogen environment with electroplated 4 mm x 4mm Au-Sn multi-layer chips if electroplating technique is compatible with our process. High quality and nearly void free solder joint was successfully achieved with this new process. After proving compatibility of the process, tall electroplated Sn/Au bumps (50 mum) were produced by photolithography method using Su-8 photoresist. The bumps in the chip were flip chip bonded to the borosilicate glass wafer coated with Cr (0.03 mum) and Au (0.05 mum) pads without using any flux. Fluxless and lead-free bonding technology in air ambient based on non eutectic 5 at. % Au-95 at. % Sn and eutectic 57 at. %Sn-43 at. % Bi with Au capping layer have been developed and studied. To understand the fluxless bonding principles in air ambient, phase formation mechanism of Au-Sn intermetallics embedded in Bi matrix has been postulated. The Au-Sn intermetallic-capping layer covers most outer surface of the samples and inhibits formation of oxide layer due to the minimizing exposure of (beta-Sn) phase to the air. In conclusion, new-lead free and fluxless bonding processes for flip chip packages were developed. In this work, Sn-rich Au-Sn flip chip solder bumps using vacuum deposition and electroplating process were successfully produced. It is

  9. 27 CFR 19.162 - Operations bond for distilled spirits plant and adjacent bonded wine cellar.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... distilled spirits plant and adjacent bonded wine cellar. 19.162 Section 19.162 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and... bond for distilled spirits plant and adjacent bonded wine cellar. (a) One bond satisfying two requirements. A proprietor who operates a bonded wine cellar that is adjacent to the proprietor's...

  10. Flip-chip bonding of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers using laser-induced forward transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, K. S. Missinne, J.; Van Steenberge, G.

    2014-02-10

    This letter reports the use of the Laser-Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT) technique for the fabrication of indium micro-bumps for the flip-chip (FC) bonding of single vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser chips. The FC bonded chips were electrically and optically characterized, and the successful functioning of the devices post-bonding is demonstrated. The die shear and life-time tests carried out on the bonded chips confirmed the mechanical reliability of the LIFT-assisted FC bonded assemblies.

  11. Flip-chip bonding of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers using laser-induced forward transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, K. S.; Missinne, J.; Van Steenberge, G.

    2014-02-01

    This letter reports the use of the Laser-Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT) technique for the fabrication of indium micro-bumps for the flip-chip (FC) bonding of single vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser chips. The FC bonded chips were electrically and optically characterized, and the successful functioning of the devices post-bonding is demonstrated. The die shear and life-time tests carried out on the bonded chips confirmed the mechanical reliability of the LIFT-assisted FC bonded assemblies.

  12. Vector-based model of elastic bonds for simulation of granular solids.

    PubMed

    Kuzkin, Vitaly A; Asonov, Igor E

    2012-11-01

    A model (further referred to as the V model) for the simulation of granular solids, such as rocks, ceramics, concrete, nanocomposites, and agglomerates, composed of bonded particles (rigid bodies), is proposed. It is assumed that the bonds, usually representing some additional gluelike material connecting particles, cause both forces and torques acting on the particles. Vectors rigidly connected with the particles are used to describe the deformation of a single bond. The expression for potential energy of the bond and corresponding expressions for forces and torques are derived. Formulas connecting parameters of the model with longitudinal, shear, bending, and torsional stiffnesses of the bond are obtained. It is shown that the model makes it possible to describe any values of the bond stiffnesses exactly; that is, the model is applicable for the bonds with arbitrary length/thickness ratio. Two different calibration procedures depending on bond length/thickness ratio are proposed. It is shown that parameters of the model can be chosen so that under small deformations the bond is equivalent to either a Bernoulli-Euler beam or a Timoshenko beam or short cylinder connecting particles. Simple analytical expressions, relating parameters of the V model with geometrical and mechanical characteristics of the bond, are derived. Two simple examples of computer simulation of thin granular structures using the V model are given. PMID:23214773

  13. Vector-based model of elastic bonds for simulation of granular solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzkin, Vitaly A.; Asonov, Igor E.

    2012-11-01

    A model (further referred to as the V model) for the simulation of granular solids, such as rocks, ceramics, concrete, nanocomposites, and agglomerates, composed of bonded particles (rigid bodies), is proposed. It is assumed that the bonds, usually representing some additional gluelike material connecting particles, cause both forces and torques acting on the particles. Vectors rigidly connected with the particles are used to describe the deformation of a single bond. The expression for potential energy of the bond and corresponding expressions for forces and torques are derived. Formulas connecting parameters of the model with longitudinal, shear, bending, and torsional stiffnesses of the bond are obtained. It is shown that the model makes it possible to describe any values of the bond stiffnesses exactly; that is, the model is applicable for the bonds with arbitrary length/thickness ratio. Two different calibration procedures depending on bond length/thickness ratio are proposed. It is shown that parameters of the model can be chosen so that under small deformations the bond is equivalent to either a Bernoulli-Euler beam or a Timoshenko beam or short cylinder connecting particles. Simple analytical expressions, relating parameters of the V model with geometrical and mechanical characteristics of the bond, are derived. Two simple examples of computer simulation of thin granular structures using the V model are given.

  14. Wafer bonded epitaxial templates for silicon heterostructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwater, Harry A., Jr. (Inventor); Zahler, James M. (Inventor); Morral, Anna Fontcubera I (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A heterostructure device layer is epitaxially grown on a virtual substrate, such as an InP/InGaAs/InP double heterostructure. A device substrate and a handle substrate form the virtual substrate. The device substrate is bonded to the handle substrate and is composed of a material suitable for fabrication of optoelectronic devices. The handle substrate is composed of a material suitable for providing mechanical support. The mechanical strength of the device and handle substrates is improved and the device substrate is thinned to leave a single-crystal film on the virtual substrate such as by exfoliation of a device film from the device substrate. An upper portion of the device film exfoliated from the device substrate is removed to provide a smoother and less defect prone surface for an optoelectronic device. A heterostructure is epitaxially grown on the smoothed surface in which an optoelectronic device may be fabricated.

  15. Surface patterning of bonded microfluidic channels

    PubMed Central

    Priest, Craig

    2010-01-01

    Microfluidic channels in which multiple chemical and biological processes can be integrated into a single chip have provided a suitable platform for high throughput screening, chemical synthesis, detection, and alike. These microchips generally exhibit a homogeneous surface chemistry, which limits their functionality. Localized surface modification of microchannels can be challenging due to the nonplanar geometries involved. However, chip bonding remains the main hurdle, with many methods involving thermal or plasma treatment that, in most cases, neutralizes the desired chemical functionality. Postbonding modification of microchannels is subject to many limitations, some of which have been recently overcome. Novel techniques include solution-based modification using laminar or capillary flow, while conventional techniques such as photolithography remain popular. Nonetheless, new methods, including localized microplasma treatment, are emerging as effective postbonding alternatives. This Review focuses on postbonding methods for surface patterning of microchannels. PMID:21045927

  16. Effect of Chlorhexidine on Dentin Bond Strength of Two Adhesive Systems after Storage in Different Media.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, Enio Marcos; Glir, Daniel Hatschbach; Gill, Allana Walesca Martins Castanho; Giovanini, Allan Fernando; Furuse, Adilson Yoshio; Gonzaga, Carla Castiglia

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of 2% chlorhexidine (CHX) application during the bonding protocol on microshear bond strength of two adhesive systems, after storage in different media. Seventy-two human molars had their crowns cut in half and embedded in PVC cylinders with acrylic resin. The specimens were randomly divided into experimental groups (n=12) according to the adhesive system (Ambar and Single Bond 2), use of CHX in the bonding protocol, and time interval (24 h and 15 days) in the storage media (distilled water, mineral oil and 1% sodium hypochlorite - NaOCl). Adhesive systems were applied in accordance to manufacturers' recommendations, with or without the use of CHX, and resin composite (Z350 XT) cylinders were placed on the hybridized dentin. After photoactivation, the specimens were stored in distilled water, mineral oil and 1% NaOCl for 24 h and 15 days. Microshear bond strength was determined at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min until fracture. The bond strength data were analyzed statistically by 4-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (α=5%). Use of CHX in the bonding protocol did not cause loss of bond strength in any of the evaluated situations, irrespective of time and storage medium. The storage medium had no influence on bond strength values after 15 days when the bond protocol without CHX application was used. However, the use of CHX in the protocol influenced negatively the bond strength values for Single Bond 2 after 15 days storage in distilled water and 1% NaOCl. PMID:26963210

  17. Ligand "Brackets" for Ga-Ga Bond.

    PubMed

    Fedushkin, Igor L; Skatova, Alexandra A; Dodonov, Vladimir A; Yang, Xiao-Juan; Chudakova, Valentina A; Piskunov, Alexander V; Demeshko, Serhiy; Baranov, Evgeny V

    2016-09-01

    The reactivity of digallane (dpp-Bian)Ga-Ga(dpp-Bian) (1) (dpp-Bian = 1,2-bis[(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)imino]acenaphthene) toward acenaphthenequinone (AcQ), sulfur dioxide, and azobenzene was investigated. The reaction of 1 with AcQ in 1:1 molar ratio proceeds via two-electron reduction of AcQ to give (dpp-Bian)Ga(μ2-AcQ)Ga(dpp-Bian) (2), in which diolate [AcQ](2-) acts as "bracket" for the Ga-Ga bond. The interaction of 1 with AcQ in 1:2 molar ratio proceeds with an oxidation of the both dpp-Bian ligands as well as of the Ga-Ga bond to give (dpp-Bian)Ga(μ2-AcQ)2Ga(dpp-Bian) (3). At 330 K in toluene complex 2 decomposes to give compounds 3 and 1. The reaction of complex 2 with atmospheric oxygen results in oxidation of a Ga-Ga bond and affords (dpp-Bian)Ga(μ2-AcQ)(μ2-O)Ga(dpp-Bian) (4). The reaction of digallane 1 with SO2 produces, depending on the ratio (1:2 or 1:4), dithionites (dpp-Bian)Ga(μ2-O2S-SO2)Ga(dpp-Bian) (5) and (dpp-Bian)Ga(μ2-O2S-SO2)2Ga(dpp-Bian) (6). In compound 5 the Ga-Ga bond is preserved and supported by dithionite dianionic bracket. In compound 6 the gallium centers are bridged by two dithionite ligands. Both 5 and 6 consist of dpp-Bian radical anionic ligands. Four-electron reduction of azobenzene with 1 mol equiv of digallane 1 leads to complex (dpp-Bian)Ga(μ2-NPh)2Ga(dpp-Bian) (7). Paramagnetic compounds 2-7 were characterized by electron spin resonance spectroscopy, and their molecular structures were established by single-crystal X-ray analysis. Magnetic behavior of compounds 2, 5, and 6 was investigated by superconducting quantum interference device technique in the range of 2-295 K. PMID:27548713

  18. Combining symmetry-separated and bent-bond spin-coupled models of cylindrically symmetric multiple bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penotti, Fabio E.; Cooper, David L.

    2015-07-01

    We examine the symmetry properties of spin-coupled (or full generalised valence bond) wavefunctions for C2H2 and N2. The symmetry-separated (σ,π) and bent-bond (ω) solutions are totally symmetric only in the D4h and D3h subgroups of D∞h, respectively. Two fairly different strategies are explored for imposing full cylindrical symmetry, with one of them (small nonorthogonal configuration interaction calculations involving rotated versions of the wavefunction) turning out to be somewhat preferable on energetic grounds to the other one (application of additional spin constraints to a single spatial configuration). It is also shown that mixing together the cylindrically symmetric symmetry-separated and bent-bond spin-coupled models leads to relatively small energy improvements unless the valence orbitals in each type of configuration are reoptimised.

  19. Substituent Effects on the [N-I-N](+) Halogen Bond.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, Anna-Carin C; Mehmeti, Krenare; Uhrbom, Martin; Karim, Alavi; Bedin, Michele; Puttreddy, Rakesh; Kleinmaier, Roland; Neverov, Alexei A; Nekoueishahraki, Bijan; Gräfenstein, Jürgen; Rissanen, Kari; Erdélyi, Máté

    2016-08-10

    We have investigated the influence of electron density on the three-center [N-I-N](+) halogen bond. A series of [bis(pyridine)iodine](+) and [1,2-bis((pyridine-2-ylethynyl)benzene)iodine](+) BF4(-) complexes substituted with electron withdrawing and donating functionalities in the para-position of their pyridine nitrogen were synthesized and studied by spectroscopic and computational methods. The systematic change of electron density of the pyridine nitrogens upon alteration of the para-substituent (NO2, CF3, H, F, Me, OMe, NMe2) was confirmed by (15)N NMR and by computation of the natural atomic population and the π electron population of the nitrogen atoms. Formation of the [N-I-N](+) halogen bond resulted in >100 ppm (15)N NMR coordination shifts. Substituent effects on the (15)N NMR chemical shift are governed by the π population rather than the total electron population at the nitrogens. Isotopic perturbation of equilibrium NMR studies along with computation on the DFT level indicate that all studied systems possess static, symmetric [N-I-N](+) halogen bonds, independent of their electron density. This was further confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction data of 4-substituted [bis(pyridine)iodine](+) complexes. An increased electron density of the halogen bond acceptor stabilizes the [N···I···N](+) bond, whereas electron deficiency reduces the stability of the complexes, as demonstrated by UV-kinetics and computation. In contrast, the N-I bond length is virtually unaffected by changes of the electron density. The understanding of electronic effects on the [N-X-N](+) halogen bond is expected to provide a useful handle for the modulation of the reactivity of [bis(pyridine)halogen](+)-type synthetic reagents. PMID:27265247

  20. Substituent Effects on the [N–I–N]+ Halogen Bond

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated the influence of electron density on the three-center [N–I–N]+ halogen bond. A series of [bis(pyridine)iodine]+ and [1,2-bis((pyridine-2-ylethynyl)benzene)iodine]+ BF4– complexes substituted with electron withdrawing and donating functionalities in the para-position of their pyridine nitrogen were synthesized and studied by spectroscopic and computational methods. The systematic change of electron density of the pyridine nitrogens upon alteration of the para-substituent (NO2, CF3, H, F, Me, OMe, NMe2) was confirmed by 15N NMR and by computation of the natural atomic population and the π electron population of the nitrogen atoms. Formation of the [N–I–N]+ halogen bond resulted in >100 ppm 15N NMR coordination shifts. Substituent effects on the 15N NMR chemical shift are governed by the π population rather than the total electron population at the nitrogens. Isotopic perturbation of equilibrium NMR studies along with computation on the DFT level indicate that all studied systems possess static, symmetric [N–I–N]+ halogen bonds, independent of their electron density. This was further confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction data of 4-substituted [bis(pyridine)iodine]+ complexes. An increased electron density of the halogen bond acceptor stabilizes the [N···I···N]+ bond, whereas electron deficiency reduces the stability of the complexes, as demonstrated by UV-kinetics and computation. In contrast, the N–I bond length is virtually unaffected by changes of the electron density. The understanding of electronic effects on the [N–X–N]+ halogen bond is expected to provide a useful handle for the modulation of the reactivity of [bis(pyridine)halogen]+-type synthetic reagents. PMID:27265247

  1. Regulation of catch bonds by rate of force application.

    PubMed

    Sarangapani, Krishna K; Qian, Jin; Chen, Wei; Zarnitsyna, Veronika I; Mehta, Padmaja; Yago, Tadayuki; McEver, Rodger P; Zhu, Cheng

    2011-09-16

    The current paradigm for receptor-ligand dissociation kinetics assumes off-rates as functions of instantaneous force without impact from its prior history. This a priori assumption is the foundation for predicting dissociation from a given initial state using kinetic equations. Here we have invalidated this assumption by demonstrating the impact of force history with single-bond kinetic experiments involving selectins and their ligands that mediate leukocyte tethering and rolling on vascular surfaces during inflammation. Dissociation of bonds between L-selectin and P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) loaded at a constant ramp rate to a constant hold force behaved as catch-slip bonds at low ramp rates that transformed to slip-only bonds at high ramp rates. Strikingly, bonds between L-selectin and 6-sulfo-sialyl Lewis X were impervious to ramp rate changes. This ligand-specific force history effect resembled the effect of a point mutation at the L-selectin surface (L-selectinA108H) predicted to contact the former but not the latter ligand, suggesting that the high ramp rate induced similar structural changes as the mutation. Although the A108H substitution in L-selectin eliminated the ramp rate responsiveness of its dissociation from PSGL-1, the inverse mutation H108A in P-selectin acquired the ramp rate responsiveness. Our data are well explained by the sliding-rebinding model for catch-slip bonds extended to incorporate the additional force history dependence, with Ala-108 playing a pivotal role in this structural mechanism. These results call for a paradigm shift in modeling the mechanical regulation of receptor-ligand bond dissociation, which includes conformational coupling between binding pocket and remote regions of the interacting molecules. PMID:21775439

  2. Regulation of Catch Bonds by Rate of Force Application*

    PubMed Central

    Sarangapani, Krishna K.; Qian, Jin; Chen, Wei; Zarnitsyna, Veronika I.; Mehta, Padmaja; Yago, Tadayuki; McEver, Rodger P.; Zhu, Cheng

    2011-01-01

    The current paradigm for receptor-ligand dissociation kinetics assumes off-rates as functions of instantaneous force without impact from its prior history. This a priori assumption is the foundation for predicting dissociation from a given initial state using kinetic equations. Here we have invalidated this assumption by demonstrating the impact of force history with single-bond kinetic experiments involving selectins and their ligands that mediate leukocyte tethering and rolling on vascular surfaces during inflammation. Dissociation of bonds between L-selectin and P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1) loaded at a constant ramp rate to a constant hold force behaved as catch-slip bonds at low ramp rates that transformed to slip-only bonds at high ramp rates. Strikingly, bonds between L-selectin and 6-sulfo-sialyl Lewis X were impervious to ramp rate changes. This ligand-specific force history effect resembled the effect of a point mutation at the L-selectin surface (L-selectinA108H) predicted to contact the former but not the latter ligand, suggesting that the high ramp rate induced similar structural changes as the mutation. Although the A108H substitution in L-selectin eliminated the ramp rate responsiveness of its dissociation from PSGL-1, the inverse mutation H108A in P-selectin acquired the ramp rate responsiveness. Our data are well explained by the sliding-rebinding model for catch-slip bonds extended to incorporate the additional force history dependence, with Ala-108 playing a pivotal role in this structural mechanism. These results call for a paradigm shift in modeling the mechanical regulation of receptor-ligand bond dissociation, which includes conformational coupling between binding pocket and remote regions of the interacting molecules. PMID:21775439

  3. Viscoelastic analysis of bonded connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, William C.

    1991-05-01

    Analysis of bonded configurations is made difficult because of the thin adhesive layer and the stress singularities which exist at the edges of bonded configurations at the bimaterial interfaces. This paper is concerned with the use of lap joint theories with regard to viscoelastic analysis of adhesively bonded configurations. Viscoelastic analyses of adhesively bonded joints were performed using the Laplace transform technique. The inverse transforms were obtained numerically. The results have become the benchmark against which other numerical results are compared. In this analysis, control parameters are set to exactly duplicate the assumptions of the earlier work. The analysis is advanced with time using the Runge-Kutta integration formula in a direct integration procedure. The direct integration procedure has the advantage that it is computationally simple, has minimal storage requirements, and requires very little programming effort to transform an elastic analysis algorithm into a viscoelastic analysis algorithm. The results obtained with the finite element analysis algorithm described are effectively identical to those of the earlier work.

  4. Bonded polyimide fuel cell package

    DOEpatents

    Morse, Jeffrey D.; Jankowski, Alan; Graff, Robert T.; Bettencourt, Kerry

    2010-06-08

    Described herein are processes for fabricating microfluidic fuel cell systems with embedded components in which micron-scale features are formed by bonding layers of DuPont Kapton.TM. polyimide laminate. A microfluidic fuel cell system fabricated using this process is also described.

  5. Enhanced rigid-bond restraints

    SciTech Connect

    Thorn, Andrea; Dittrich, Birger; Sheldrick, George M.

    2012-07-01

    An extension is proposed to the rigid-bond description of atomic thermal motion in crystals. The rigid-bond model [Hirshfeld (1976 ▶). Acta Cryst. A32, 239–244] states that the mean-square displacements of two atoms are equal in the direction of the bond joining them. This criterion is widely used for verification (as intended by Hirshfeld) and also as a restraint in structure refinement as suggested by Rollett [Crystallographic Computing (1970 ▶), edited by F. R. Ahmed et al., pp. 167–181. Copenhagen: Munksgaard]. By reformulating this condition, so that the relative motion of the two atoms is required to be perpendicular to the bond, the number of restraints that can be applied per anisotropic atom is increased from about one to about three. Application of this condition to 1,3-distances in addition to the 1,2-distances means that on average just over six restraints can be applied to the six anisotropic displacement parameters of each atom. This concept is tested against very high resolution data of a small peptide and employed as a restraint for protein refinement at more modest resolution (e.g. 1.7 Å)

  6. Electronegativity and the Bond Triangle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meek, Terry L.; Garner, Leah D.

    2005-01-01

    The usefulness of the bond triangle for categorizing compounds of the main-group elements may be extended by the use of weighted average electronegativities to allow distinction between compounds of the same elements with different stoichiometries. In such cases a higher valency for the central atom leads to greater covalent character and the…

  7. Visualizing Bent Bonds in Cyclopropane

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertolini, Thomas M.

    2004-01-01

    A two-minute overhead demonstration using a molecular model kit is employed for illustrating the unique binding of cyclopropane. It is reported that most model kits, much like an sp (super 3) hybridized carbon atom, resist forming 60-degree bond angles.

  8. Non-bonded ultrasonic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Eoff, J.M.

    1984-07-06

    A mechanically assembled non-bonded ultrasonic transducer includes a substrate, a piezoelectric film, a wetting agent, a thin metal electrode, and a lens held in intimate contact by a mechanical clamp. No epoxy or glue is used in the assembly of this device.

  9. Bonding Elastomers To Metal Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickerson, George E.; Kelley, Henry L.

    1990-01-01

    Improved, economical method for bonding elastomers to metals prevents failures caused by debonding. In new technique, vulcanization and curing occur simultaneously in specially designed mold that acts as form for desired shape of elastomer and as container that positions and supports metal parts. Increases interface adhesion between metal, adhesive, and elastomer.

  10. Mother-To-Infant 'Bonding'.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herbert, M.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Critically reviews the concept of "bonding," exploring its empirical basis and the implications that follow from its application in practice. Among the conclusions reached are that there is a tendency to oversimplify attachment phenomena and that the notion of a sensitive period for attachment has no direct empirical support. (RH)

  11. IMMEDIATE HUMAN PULP RESPONSE TO ETHANOL-WET BONDING TECHNIQUE

    PubMed Central

    Scheffel, Débora Lopes Salles; Sacono, Nancy Tomoko; Ribeiro, Ana Paula Dias; Soares, Diana Gabriela; Basso, Fernanda Gonçalves; Pashley, David Henry; Costa, Carlos Alberto de Souza; Hebling, Josimeri

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the short-term response of human pulps to ethanol-wet bonding technique associated with an etch-and-rinse adhesive system. Methods Deep class V cavities were prepared on the buccal surface of 17 sound premolars scheduled for extraction for orthodontics. The teeth were assigned into three groups: Ethanol-wet bonding (G1), water-wet bonding (G2) and calcium hydroxide (G3, control). Two teeth were used as intact control. After acid-etching, the cavities from G1 were filled with 100% ethanol for 60s and blot-dried before the application of Single Bond 2. In G2, the cavities were filled with distilled water for 60s previously to adhesive application and in G3, the cavity floor was lined with calcium hydroxide before etching and bonding. All cavities were restored with resin composite. The teeth were extracted 48h after the clinical procedures. From each tooth 6 μm-thick serial sections were obtained and stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H/E) and Masson's trichrome. Bacteria microleakage was assessed using Brown & Brenn. All sections were blindly evaluated and scored for five histological features. Results Mean remaining dentin thickness was 463±65μm (G1); 425±184μm (G2); and 348±194μm (G3). Similar pulp reactions followed ethanol- or water-wet bonding techniques. Slight inflammatory responses and disruption of the odontoblast layer related to the cavity floor were seen in all groups. Stained bacteria were not detected in any cavities. Normal pulp tissue was observed in G3 except for one case. Conclusions After 48 h, ethanol-wet bonding technique applied on deep cavities prepared in vital teeth does not increase pulpal damage compared to water-wet bonding technique. Clinical significance Ethanol-wet bonding has been considered an experimental technique that may increase resin-dentin bond durability. This study reported the in vivo response of human pulp tissue when 100% ethanol was applied previously to an etch-and-rinse simplified adhesive

  12. Nondestructive Determination of Bond Strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Although many nondestructive techniques have been applied to detect disbonds in adhesive joints, no absolutely reliable nondestructive method has been developed to detect poor adhesion and evaluate the strength of bonded joints prior to the present work which used nonlinear ultrasonic methods to investigate adhesive bond cure conditions. Previously, a variety of linear and nonlinear ultrasonic methods with water coupling had been used to study aluminum-adhesive-aluminum laminates, prepared under different adhesive curing conditions, for possible bond strength determination. Therefore, in the course of this research effort, a variety of finite-amplitude experimental methods which could possibly differentiate various cure conditions were investigated, including normal and oblique incidence approaches based on nonlinear harmonic generation as well as several non-collinear two-wave interaction approaches. Test samples were mechanically scanned in various ways with respect to the focus of a transmitting transducer operated at several variable excitation frequencies and excitation levels. Even when powerful sample-related resonances were exploited by means of a frequency scanning approach, it was very difficult to isolate the nonlinear characteristics of adhesive bonds. However, a multi-frequency multi-power approach was quite successful and reliable. Ultrasonic tone burst signals at increasing power levels, over a wide frequency range, were transmitted through each bond specimen to determine its excitation dependent nonlinear harmonic resonance behavior. Relative amplitude changes were observed particularly in the higher harmonic spectral data and analyzed using a local displacement and strain analysis in the linear approximation. Two analysis approaches of the excitation-dependent data at specific resonances were found to be quite promising. One of these approaches may represent a very robust algorithm for classifying an adhesive bond as being properly cured or not

  13. Adhesive wafer bonding for MEMS applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dragoi, Viorel; Glinsner, Thomas; Mittendorfer, Gerald; Wieder, Bernhard; Lindner, Paul

    2003-04-01

    Low temperature wafer bonding is a powerful technique for MEMS/MOEMS devices fabrication and packaging. Among the low temperature processes adhesive bonding focuses a high technological interest. Adhesive wafer bonding is a bonding approach using an intermediate layer for bonding (e.g. glass, polymers, resists, polyimides). The main advantages of this method are: surface planarization, encapsulation of structures on the wafer surface, particle compensation and decrease of annealing temperature after bonding. This paper presents results on adhesive bonding using spin-on glass and Benzocyclobutene (BCB) from Dow Chemicals. The advantages of using adhesive bonding for MEMS applications will be illustrated be presenting a technology of fabricating GaAs-on-Si substrates (up to 150 mm diameter) and results on BCB bonding of Si wafers (200 mm diameter).

  14. Halogen bonds in biological molecules

    PubMed Central

    Auffinger, Pascal; Hays, Franklin A.; Westhof, Eric; Ho, P. Shing

    2004-01-01

    Short oxygen–halogen interactions have been known in organic chemistry since the 1950s and recently have been exploited in the design of supramolecular assemblies. The present survey of protein and nucleic acid structures reveals similar halogen bonds as potentially stabilizing inter- and intramolecular interactions that can affect ligand binding and molecular folding. A halogen bond in biomolecules can be defined as a short CX···OY interaction (CX is a carbon-bonded chlorine, bromine, or iodine, and OY is a carbonyl, hydroxyl, charged carboxylate, or phosphate group), where the X···O distance is less than or equal to the sums of the respective van der Waals radii (3.27 Å for Cl···O, 3.37Å for Br···O, and 3.50 Å for I···O) and can conform to the geometry seen in small molecules, with the CX···O angle ≈165° (consistent with a strong directional polarization of the halogen) and the X···OY angle ≈120°. Alternative geometries can be imposed by the more complex environment found in biomolecules, depending on which of the two types of donor systems are involved in the interaction: (i) the lone pair electrons of oxygen (and, to a lesser extent, nitrogen and sulfur) atoms or (ii) the delocalized π -electrons of peptide bonds or carboxylate or amide groups. Thus, the specific geometry and diversity of the interacting partners of halogen bonds offer new and versatile tools for the design of ligands as drugs and materials in nanotechnology. PMID:15557000

  15. Halogen bonds in biological molecules.

    PubMed

    Auffinger, Pascal; Hays, Franklin A; Westhof, Eric; Ho, P Shing

    2004-11-30

    Short oxygen-halogen interactions have been known in organic chemistry since the 1950s and recently have been exploited in the design of supramolecular assemblies. The present survey of protein and nucleic acid structures reveals similar halogen bonds as potentially stabilizing inter- and intramolecular interactions that can affect ligand binding and molecular folding. A halogen bond in biomolecules can be defined as a short C-X...O-Y interaction (C-X is a carbon-bonded chlorine, bromine, or iodine, and O-Y is a carbonyl, hydroxyl, charged carboxylate, or phosphate group), where the X...O distance is less than or equal to the sums of the respective van der Waals radii (3.27 A for Cl...O, 3.37 A for Br...O, and 3.50 A for I...O) and can conform to the geometry seen in small molecules, with the C-X...O angle approximately 165 degrees (consistent with a strong directional polarization of the halogen) and the X...O-Y angle approximately 120 degrees . Alternative geometries can be imposed by the more complex environment found in biomolecules, depending on which of the two types of donor systems are involved in the interaction: (i) the lone pair electrons of oxygen (and, to a lesser extent, nitrogen and sulfur) atoms or (ii) the delocalized pi -electrons of peptide bonds or carboxylate or amide groups. Thus, the specific geometry and diversity of the interacting partners of halogen bonds offer new and versatile tools for the design of ligands as drugs and materials in nanotechnology. PMID:15557000

  16. Adsorption-induced scission of carbon carbon bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheiko, Sergei S.; Sun, Frank C.; Randall, Adrian; Shirvanyants, David; Rubinstein, Michael; Lee, Hyung-Il; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof

    2006-03-01

    Covalent carbon-carbon bonds are hard to break. Their strength is evident in the hardness of diamonds and tensile strength of polymeric fibres; on the single-molecule level, it manifests itself in the need for forces of several nanonewtons to extend and mechanically rupture one bond. Such forces have been generated using extensional flow, ultrasonic irradiation, receding meniscus and by directly stretching a single molecule with nanoprobes. Here we show that simple adsorption of brush-like macromolecules with long side chains on a substrate can induce not only conformational deformations, but also spontaneous rupture of covalent bonds in the macromolecular backbone. We attribute this behaviour to the fact that the attractive interaction between the side chains and the substrate is maximized by the spreading of the side chains, which in turn induces tension along the polymer backbone. Provided the side-chain densities and substrate interaction are sufficiently high, the tension generated will be strong enough to rupture covalent carbon-carbon bonds. We expect similar adsorption-induced backbone scission to occur for all macromolecules with highly branched architectures, such as brushes and dendrimers. This behaviour needs to be considered when designing surface-targeted macromolecules of this type-either to avoid undesired degradation, or to ensure rupture at predetermined macromolecular sites.

  17. Chemical Bonding Technology: Direct Investigation of Interfacial Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, J. L.; Boerio, F. J.; Plueddemann, E. P.; Miller, J.; Willis, P. B.; Cuddihy, E. F.

    1986-01-01

    This is the third Flat-Plate Solar Array (FSA) Project document reporting on chemical bonding technology for terrestrial photovoltaic (PV) modules. The impetus for this work originated in the late 1970s when PV modules employing silicone encapsulation materials were undergoing delamination during outdoor exposure. At that time, manufacturers were not employing adhesion promoters and, hence, module interfaces in common with the silicone materials were only in physical contact and therefore easily prone to separation if, for example, water were to penetrate to the interfaces. Delamination with silicone materials virtually vanished when adhesion promoters, recommended by silicone manufacturers, were used. The activities related to the direct investigation of chemically bonded interfaces are described.

  18. The effect of different adhesive system applications on push-out bond strengths of glass fiber posts

    PubMed Central

    Deniz Arısu, Hacer; Üçtaşlı, Mine Betül; Okay, Tufan Can

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE Over the past years, the adhesion of fiber posts luted with simplified adhesive systems has been a matter of great interest. The aim of this study was to assess the post retentive potential of a self-adhesive resin cement using different adhesive systems to compare the push-out bond strengths of fiber posts. MATERIALS AND METHODS The post spaces of 56 mandibular premolar roots were prepared and divided into 4 experimental groups and further divided into 2 subgroups according to testing time (n=7). The fiber posts (Rely X Fiber Post) were luted with a self-adhesive resin cement (RelyX Unicem) and one of the following adhesive systems: no adhesive, a total-etch adhesive resin (Single Bond), a two-step self-etch adhesive resin (Clearfil SE Bond) and a one-step self-etch adhesive resin (Clearfil S3 Bond). Each root was cut horizontally, and 1.5 mm thick six root segments were prepared. Push-out tests were performed after one week or three months (0.5 mm/min). Statistical analysis were performed with three-way ANOVA (α=.05). RESULTS Cervical root segments showed higher bond strength values than middle segments. Adhesive application increased the bond strength. For one week group, the total-etch adhesive resin Single Bond showed higher bond strength than the self-adhesive resin cement RelyX Unicem applied without adhesive resin at middle region. For 3 months group, the two-step self-etch adhesive resin Clearfil SE Bond showed the highest bond strength for both regions. Regarding the time considered, Clearfil SE Bond 3 months group showed higher bond strength values than one week group. CONCLUSION Using the adhesive resins in combination with the self-adhesive resin cement improves the bond strengths. The bond strength values of two-step self-etch adhesive resin Clearfil SE Bond improved as time passes. PMID:24049572

  19. Single Molecule Mechanochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shaowei; Zhang, Yanxing; Ho, Wilson; Wu, Ruqian; Ruqian Wu, Yanxing Zhang Team; Wilson Ho, Shaowei Li Team

    Mechanical forces can be used to trigger chemical reactions through bending and stretching of chemical bonds. Using the reciprocating movement of the tip of a scanning tunneling microscope (STM), mechanical energy can be provided to a single molecule sandwiched between the tip and substrate. When the mechanical pulse center was moved to the outer ring feature of a CO molecule, the reaction rate was significantly increased compared with bare Cu surface and over Au atoms. First, DFT calculations show that the presence of CO makes the Cu cavity more attractive toward H2 Second, H2 prefers the horizontal adsorption geometry in the Cu-Cu and Au-Cu cavities and no hybridization occurs between the antibonding states of H2 and states of Cu atoms. While H2 loses electrons from its bonding state in all three cavities, the filling of its anti-bonding state only occurs in the CO-Cu cavity. Both make the CO-Cu cavity much more effectively to chop the H2 molecule. Work was supported by the National Science Foundation Center for Chemical Innovation on Chemistry at the Space-Time Limit (CaSTL) under Grant No. CHE-1414466.

  20. Complexes between hypohalous acids and phosphine derivatives. Pnicogen bond versus halogen bond versus hydrogen bond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Qingzhong; Zhu, Hongjie; Zhuo, Hongying; Yang, Xin; Li, Wenzuo; Cheng, Jianbo

    2014-11-01

    The complexes of HOBr:PH2Y (Y = H, F, Cl, Br, CH3, NH2, OH, and NO2), HOCl:PH2F, and HOI:PH2F have been investigated with ab initio calculations at the MP2/aug-cc-pVTZ level. Four types of structures (1, 2, 3a, and 3b) were observed for these complexes. 1 is stabilized by an O⋯P pnicogen bond, 2 by a P⋯X halogen bond, 3a by a H⋯P hydrogen bond and a P⋯X pnicogen bond, and 3b by H⋯P and H⋯Br hydrogen bonds. Their relative stability is related to the halogen X of HOX and the substituent Y of PH2Y. These structures can compete with interaction energy of -10.22 ∼ -29.40 kJ/mol. The Hsbnd O stretch vibration shows a small red shift in 1, a small irregular shift in 2, but a prominent red shift in 3a and 3b. The Xsbnd O stretch vibration exhibits a smaller red shift in 1, a larger red shift in 2, but an insignificant blue shift in 3a and 3b. The Psbnd Y stretch vibration displays a red shift in 1 but a blue shift in 2, 3a, and 3b. The formation mechanism, stability, and properties of these structures have been analyzed with molecular electrostatic potentials, orbital interactions, and non-covalent interaction index.

  1. Study of bump bonding technology

    SciTech Connect

    Selcuk Cihangir et al.

    2003-10-17

    Pixel detectors proposed for the new generation of hadron collider experiments will use bump-bonding technology based on either indium or Pb/Sn solder to connect the front-end readout chips to the silicon pixel sensors. We have previously reported large-scale tests of the yield using both indium and Pb/Sn solder bump [1]. The conclusion is that both seem to be viable for pixel detectors. We have also carried out studies of various effects (e.g. storage over long period, effect of heating and cooling, and radiation) on both types of bump bonds using daisy-chained parts on a small scale [2], [3]. Overall, these tests showed little changes in the integrity of the bump connections. Nevertheless, questions still remain on the long-term reliability of the bumps due to thermal cycle effects, attachment to a substrate with a different coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), and radiation.

  2. Quality control of microelectronic wire bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thiel, R. A.; Schmidt, G. D.

    1975-01-01

    Report evaluates ultrasonic bonding of small-diameter aluminum wire joined to ceramic substrates metalized with thin-film and thick-film gold. Quick testing technique for nondestructive location of poor wire bonds is also presented.

  3. 7 CFR 1788.12 - Contractors' bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) RUS FIDELITY AND INSURANCE REQUIREMENTS FOR ELECTRIC AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS BORROWERS Insurance for Contractors, Engineers, and Architects, Electric Borrowers § 1788.12 Contractors' bonds. Electric borrowers shall require contractors to obtain contractors' bonds when required by part...

  4. 7 CFR 1788.12 - Contractors' bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) RUS FIDELITY AND INSURANCE REQUIREMENTS FOR ELECTRIC AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS BORROWERS Insurance for Contractors, Engineers, and Architects, Electric Borrowers § 1788.12 Contractors' bonds. Electric borrowers shall require contractors to obtain contractors' bonds when required by part...

  5. 7 CFR 1788.12 - Contractors' bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) RUS FIDELITY AND INSURANCE REQUIREMENTS FOR ELECTRIC AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS BORROWERS Insurance for Contractors, Engineers, and Architects, Electric Borrowers § 1788.12 Contractors' bonds. Electric borrowers shall require contractors to obtain contractors' bonds when required by part...

  6. 7 CFR 1788.12 - Contractors' bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) RUS FIDELITY AND INSURANCE REQUIREMENTS FOR ELECTRIC AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS BORROWERS Insurance for Contractors, Engineers, and Architects, Electric Borrowers § 1788.12 Contractors' bonds. Electric borrowers shall require contractors to obtain contractors' bonds when required by part...

  7. 7 CFR 1788.12 - Contractors' bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) RUS FIDELITY AND INSURANCE REQUIREMENTS FOR ELECTRIC AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS BORROWERS Insurance for Contractors, Engineers, and Architects, Electric Borrowers § 1788.12 Contractors' bonds. Electric borrowers shall require contractors to obtain contractors' bonds when required by part...

  8. Diffusion bonding of mismatch dental alloys.

    PubMed

    Liu, Honghua; Ni, Jiahua; Wu, Luhai; He, Guo

    2010-04-01

    The diffusion bonding of Ti-6Al-4V and Co-Cr-Mo dental alloys has been investigated in terms of the atoms diffusion, the microstructure evolution, and the bonding strength. The bonding performance reveals asymmetry diffusion profiles for both the Co and Cr in Ti-6Al-4V and the Ti in Co-Cr-Mo alloy. Their diffusion coefficients (Arrhenius relations) have been established based on the experiments. Co and Cr diffusion into Ti-6Al-4V leads to alpha --> beta transformation and the intermetallics-formation. Maximum bonding strength occurs at about 840 degrees C. The bonding joint fails under the shear stress in the Ti-6Al-4V side near the bonding interface in brittle manner. The intermetallics in the diffusion layer together with the unbonded areas and other flaws in the bonding interface are responsible for the shear brittle fracture, which also weaken the bonding strength. PMID:19957358

  9. Ultra precision and reliable bonding method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gwo, Dz-Hung (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The bonding of two materials through hydroxide-catalyzed hydration/dehydration is achieved at room temperature by applying hydroxide ions to at least one of the two bonding surfaces and by placing the surfaces sufficiently close to each other to form a chemical bond between them. The surfaces may be placed sufficiently close to each other by simply placing one surface on top of the other. A silicate material may also be used as a filling material to help fill gaps between the surfaces caused by surface figure mismatches. A powder of a silica-based or silica-containing material may also be used as an additional filling material. The hydroxide-catalyzed bonding method forms bonds which are not only as precise and transparent as optical contact bonds, but also as strong and reliable as high-temperature frit bonds. The hydroxide-catalyzed bonding method is also simple and inexpensive.

  10. G. N. Lewis and the Chemical Bond.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pauling, Linus

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the contributions of G. N. Lewis to chemistry, focusing on his formulation of the basic principle of the chemical bond--the idea that the chemical bond consists of a pair of electrons held jointly by two atoms. (JN)

  11. Clarifying Chemical Bonding. Overcoming Our Misconceptions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hapkiewicz, Annis

    1991-01-01

    Demonstrations to help students change their misconceptions about chemical bond breaking are presented. Students' misconceptions about chemical bonds in both biological and chemical systems are discussed. A calculation for the release of energy from respiration is presented. (KR)

  12. 30 CFR 282.40 - Bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... three areas: (1) The Gulf of Mexico and the area offshore the Atlantic Ocean; (2) The area offshore the... Alaska. (g) A separate bond shall be required for each area. An operator's bond may be submitted for...

  13. Analysis of "Kiss" Bonds Between Composite Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poveromo, Scott L.; Earthman, James C.

    2014-06-01

    One of the leading challenges to designing lightweight, cost-effective bonded structures is to detect low shear strength "kiss" bonds where no other defects such as voids and cracks exist. To develop a nondestructive testing method that is sensitive to kiss bonds, standards need to be fabricated with known strength values. In the current work, we attempt to create kiss bonds in between carbon fiber composite laminates that have been bonded with epoxy film adhesive and epoxy paste adhesive. Based on ultrasonic testing, when creating true kiss bonds using film adhesives, a complete disbond could not be avoided because of thermally induced stresses during the high-temperature cure. However, further work demonstrated that kiss bonds can be formed using room-temperature curable epoxy paste adhesives by creating an amine blush on the epoxy surface or applying a release agent on the bonding surfaces.

  14. Eutectic bonding of sapphire to sapphire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deluca, J. J.

    1973-01-01

    Eutectic mixture of aluminum oxide and zirconium oxide provides new bonding technique for sapphires and rubies. Technique effectively reduces possibility of contamination. Bonding material is aluminum oxide and zirconium oxide mixture that matches coefficient of thermal expansion of sapphire.

  15. Approaching improved adhesive bonding repeatability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlette, Christian; Müller, Tobias; Roβmann, Jürgen; Brecher, Christian

    2016-03-01

    Today, the precision of micro-optics assembly is mostly limited by the accuracy of the bonding process ― and in the case of adhesive bonding by the prediction and compensation of adhesive shrinkage during curing. In this contribution, we present a novel approach to address adhesive bonding based on hybrid control system theory. In hybrid control, dynamic systems are described as "plants" which produce discrete and/or continuous outputs from given discrete and/or continuous inputs, thus yielding a hybrid state space description of the system. The task of hybrid controllers is to observe the plant and to generate a discrete and/or continuous input sequence that guides or holds the plant in a desired target state region while avoiding invalid or unwanted intermediate states. Our approach is based on a series of experiments carried out in order to analyze, define and decouple the dependencies of adhesive shrinkage on multiple parameters, such as application geometries, fixture forces and UV intensities. As some of the dependencies describe continuous effects (e.g. shrinkage from UV intensity) and other dependencies describe discrete state transitions (e.g. fixture removal during curing), the resulting model of the overall bonding process is a hybrid dynamic system in the general case. For this plant model, we then propose a concept of sampling-based parameter search as a basis to design suitable hybrid controllers, which have the potential to optimize process control for a selection of assembly steps, thus improving the repeatability of related production steps like beam-shaping optics or mounting of turning mirrors for fiber coupling.

  16. Aqueous hydrogen bonding probed with polarization and matrix isolation spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shultz, Mary Jane; Bisson, Patrick; Buch, Victoria; Groenzin, Henning; Li, Irene

    2010-05-01

    A major challenge in hydrogen-bond research is interpreting the vibrational spectrum of water, arguably the most fundamental hydrogen bonding system. This challenge remains despite over a half century of progress in vibrational spectroscopy, largely due to a combination of the huge oscillator strength and the enormous width of the hydrogen-bond region. Lack of assignment of the resonances in the hydrogen-bond region hinders investigation of interactions between water and solutes. This lack-of-interpretation issue is an even more significant problem for studies of the aqueous interface. Numerous solutes are known to have an effect, some very dramatic, on the shape of the surface spectrum. These effects, however, are but tantalizing teasers because lack of interpretation means that the changes cannot be used to diagnose the effect of solutes or impinging gas-phase molecules on the surface. In the reported work two techniques are used to probe the origin of vibrational resonances in the H-bonded region: the surface sensitive technique sum frequency generation (SFG) and room-temperature matrix isolation spectroscopy (RT-MIS). A polarization technique called polarization angle null (PAN) has been developed that extends SFG and enables identification of resonances. The result of applying PAN-SFG to single crystal, I h ice is identification of at least nine underlying resonances and assignment of two of these. One resonance is correlated with the crystal temperature and is a sensitive probe for interactions that disrupt long range order on the surface - it is a morphology reporter. The second is associated with weakly bonded, double-donor water molecules. This resonance is sensitive to interaction of hydrogen bond donors, i.e. acids, with the surface. Both modes are more correctly pictured as collective modes. These two assignments are the first definitive assignments in the hydrogen-bond region for the aqueous surface. The effect of salts on the vibrational spectrum of

  17. 26 CFR 1.142-1 - Exempt facility bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... bonds. (a) Overview. Interest on a private activity bond is not excludable from gross income under section 103(a) unless the bond is a qualified bond. Under section 141(e)(1)(A), an exempt facility bond issued under section 142 may be a qualified bond. Under section 142(a), an exempt facility bond is...

  18. 26 CFR 1.142-1 - Exempt facility bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... bonds. (a) Overview. Interest on a private activity bond is not excludable from gross income under section 103(a) unless the bond is a qualified bond. Under section 141(e)(1)(A), an exempt facility bond issued under section 142 may be a qualified bond. Under section 142(a), an exempt facility bond is...

  19. Accumulation of dynamic catch bonds between TCR and agonist peptide-MHC triggers T cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Baoyu; Chen, Wei; Evavold, Brian D; Zhu, Cheng

    2014-04-10

    TCR-pMHC interactions initiate adaptive immune responses, but the mechanism of how such interactions under force induce T cell signaling is unclear. We show that force prolongs lifetimes of single TCR-pMHC bonds for agonists (catch bonds) but shortens those for antagonists (slip bonds). Both magnitude and duration of force are important, as the highest Ca(2+) responses were induced by 10 pN via both pMHC catch bonds whose lifetime peaks at this force and anti-TCR slip bonds whose maximum lifetime occurs at 0 pN. High Ca(2+) levels require early and rapid accumulation of bond lifetimes, whereas short-lived bonds that slow early accumulation of lifetimes correspond to low Ca(2+) responses. Our data support a model in which force on the TCR induces signaling events depending on its magnitude, duration, frequency, and timing, such that agonists form catch bonds that trigger the T cell digitally, whereas antagonists form slip bonds that fail to activate. PMID:24725404

  20. Evaluation of Microleakage of Dental Composites Using Bonding Agents with Different Placement Techniques: An Invitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Jasvir; Garg, Deepanshu; Sunil, MK; Sawhney, Anshul; Malaviya, Neha; Tripathi, Shashank; Arora, Saloni

    2015-01-01

    Background The rapid progress of adhesive dentistry over the past decade has been attributed to the significant advances in dentin bonding technology. Requirements of an ideal bonding agent are quite similar to those indicated by Buonocore despite of many improvements. As we enter the new millennium, it is important for us to examine the past. Objective To evaluate the microleakage of three bonding agents namely Single Bond, Prime & Bond NT and Excite using different composite materials namely Z100, Spectrum TPH, Tetric with three different placement techniques. Materials and Methods Fifty four extracted human premolars were taken & divided into 9 groups depending upon application of bonding agents followed by composite restorations. Specimens were subjected to thermal cycling at 60C, 370C, 540C and again at 370C & then placed in 10 ml each of freshly prepared 50% silver nitrate solution for 2 hour in darkness, washed & placed under sun light for 24 hours. The sectioned specimens were then observed under stereomicroscope to detect microleakage. Results On comparing the mean microleakage scores among the three groups, maximum microleakage scores have been obtained when no bonding agent was used, while least microleakage scores were obtained with double coat of bonding agent. Conclusion The present study suggests that the placement of bonding agent technique before composite restoration can be effective to limit the microleakage at the tooth restoration interface. PMID:26501015