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Sample records for adper single bond

  1. The Effect of Temperature on Shear Bond Strength of Clearfil SE Bond and Adper Single Bond Adhesive Systems to Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Sharafeddin, Farahnaz; Nouri, Hossein; Koohpeima, Fatemeh

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Monomer viscosity and solvent evaporation can be affected by the adhesive system temperature. Higher temperature can elevate the vapor pressure in solution and penetration of adhesive in smear layer. Bonding mechanism may be influenced by the adhesive temperature. Purpose This study aimed to evaluate the effect of pre-heating on shear bond strength of etch-and-rinse and self-etching adhesives to ground bovine dentin surfaces, at temperatures of 4˚C, 25˚C and 40˚C. Materials and Method In this experimental study, 60 maxillary bovine incisors were randomly divided into 6 groups (n=10). The central part of labial dentin surfaces was exposed with a diamond bur and standardized smear layer was created by using silicon carbide paper (600 grit) under water-coolant while the specimens were mounted in acrylic resin. Two adhesive systems, an etch-and-rinse (Adper single bond) and a self-etch (Clearfil SE Bond) were stored at temperatures of 4˚C, 25˚C and 40˚C for 30 minutes and were then applied on the prepared labial surface according to the manufacturer’s instructions. The composite resin (Z350) was packed in Teflon mold (5 mm in diameter) on this surface and was cured. The shear bond strength (MPa) was evaluated by universal testing machine (Zwick/Roell Z020, Germany) at cross head speed of 1mm/min. The results were statistically analyzed by using ANOVA and Tukey tests (p< 0.05). Results No significant difference was found between the shear bond strength of Clearfil SE Bond adhesive in different temperature and single Bond adhesive system at 25 ˚C and 40 ˚C. However, there were significant differences between 4 ˚C of Adper single bond in comparison with 25˚C and 40˚C (p= 0.0001). Conclusion Pre-heating did not affect the shear bond strength of SE Bond, but could promote the shear bond strength of Adper Single Bond. PMID:25759852

  2. Micro-tensile bond strength of different adhesive systems on sound dentin and resin-based composite: An in-vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Mallick, Rashmirekha; Sarangi, Priyanka; Mohanty, Sandhyarani; Behera, Subasish; Nanda, Soumyaranjan; Satapathy, Sukanta Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To analyze the difference in the micro-tensile bond strength of specimens made with two different adhesive systems and compare them with two homogenous substrates. Materials and Methods: Sixty permanent mandibular molars were mounted in acrylic blocks and sectioned with exposed dentin surfaces. Samples were then divided into four groups. To Group-I Adper Single Bond 2 and to Group-II Adper Self-Etch plus bonding agents were applied. For Group-I and Group-II beams consisted of resin composite in the upper half and dentin in the lower half. In Group-III beams were made of only dentin. In Group-IV beams were made of only composite. Fifteen specimens of each group were taken for the micro-tensile bond strength test. Statistical Analysis: The results are analyzed using one-way analysis of variance and Critical Difference test. Results: The interface bonded with the two adhesive systems had lower micro-tensile bond strength than those of dentin and resin composite and the self-etching adhesive Adper Self-Etch plus had comparable bond strength with total-etch adhesive Adper Single Bond 2. Conclusion: The bond strength values for current adhesive systems cannot be compared to the micro-tensile bond strength of dentin and resin composite, and self-etching adhesives have comparable bond strength with total-etch adhesives. PMID:26430301

  3. The effect of cavity disinfectants on the micro-shear bond strength of dentin adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Elkassas, Dina Wafik; Fawzi, Elham Mostafa; El Zohairy, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: This study was carried out to examine the effect of application of four different disinfecting agents on the micro-shear bond strength (μ-SBS) of an etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesive systems. Materials and Methods: One hundred flat dentin surfaces of human molars were produced by wet grinding the buccal surfaces. Specimens were randomly assigned to five groups according to the disinfectant used: Group I: Control (no disinfectant); Group II: 5.25% sodium hypochlorite based; Group III: 2% chlorhexidine based (Consepsis), Group IV: 0.1% benzalkoniumchloride based (Tubulicid red) and Group V: 3% doxycycline based (Biopure, MTAD). Specimens were bonded using either Adper Single Bond 2 or Clearfil S3 Bond, which were employed according to the manufacturer's instructions. Resin composite microcylinders were bonded using Tygon® tubes for μ-SBS testing. The modes of failure were noted after visual examination using a binocular stereomicroscope at ×25 magnification. Failures were classified as adhesive, or mixed. μ-SBS results were analyzed using two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's post-hoc test. Results: Dentin disinfectants tested significantly negated the bonding of Adper Single bond 2 and the groups were ranked; Group I > Group V = Group IV > Group II = Group III, meanwhile they enhanced significantly the μ-SBS values upon using Clearfil S3 Bond and were ranked; Group II > Group III = Group IV = Group V > Group I. Most failures were adhesive with the Adper single bond adhesive system. Mixed modes of failure were evident with Clearfil S3 bond. Conclusions: The disinfectants tested should not be used with Adper Single Bond 2 when applied before the etching step, However they could be used safely prior to bonding with Clearfil S3 Bond. PMID:24966768

  4. Effects of endodontic tri-antibiotic paste on bond strengths of dentin adhesives to coronal dentin

    PubMed Central

    Mirzakoucheki, Parvin; Walter, Ricardo; Jahromi, Maryam Zare; Mirsattari, Sanaz; Akbarzadeh, Navid

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of tri-antibiotic paste (TAP) on microtensile bond strengths (MTBS) of dental adhesives to dentin. Materials and Methods Sixty extracted molars had their occlusal surfaces flattened to expose dentin. They were divided into two groups, i.e., control group with no dentin treatment and experimental group with dentin treatment with TAP. After 10 days, specimens were bonded using self-etch (Filtek P90 adhesive) or etch-and-rinse (Adper Single Bond Plus) adhesives and restored with composite resin. Teeth were sectioned into beams, and the specimens were subjected to MTBS test. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests. Results There was a statistically significant interaction between dentin treatment and adhesive on MTBS to coronal dentin (p = 0.003). Despite a trend towards worse MTBS being noticed in the experimental groups, TAP application showed no significant effect on MTBS (p = 0.064). Conclusions The etch-and-rinse adhesive Adper Single Bond Plus presented higher mean bond strengths than the self-etch adhesive Filtek P90, irrespective of the group. The superior bond performance for Adper Single Bond when compared to Filtek P90 adhesive was confirmed by a fewer number of adhesive failures. The influence of TAP in bond strength is insignificant. PMID:25984475

  5. INFLUENCE OF DIFFERENT ADHESIVE SYSTEMS ON THE PULL-OUT BOND STRENGTH OF GLASS FIBER POSTS

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Luciana Mendonça; de Andrade, Andréa Mello; Machuca, Melissa Fernanda Garcia; da Silva, Paulo Maurício Batista; da Silva, Ricardo Virgolino C.; Veronezi, Maria Cecília

    2008-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the tensile bond strength of glass fiber posts (Reforpost – Angelus-Brazil) cemented to root dentin with a resin cement (RelyX ARC – 3M/ESPE) associated with two different adhesive systems (Adper Single Bond - 3M/ESPE and Adper Scotchbond Multi Purpose (MP) Plus – 3M/ESPE), using the pull-out test. Twenty single-rooted human teeth with standardized root canals were randomly assigned to 2 groups (n=10): G1- etching with 37% phosphoric acid gel (3M/ESPE) + Adper Single Bond + #1 post (Reforpost – Angelus) + four #1 accessory posts (Reforpin – Angelus) + resin cement; G2- etching with 37% phosphoric acid gel + Adper Scotchbond MP Plus + #1 post + four #1 accessory posts + resin cement. The specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 7 days and submitted to the pull-out test in a universal testing machine (EMIC) at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The mean values of bond strength (kgf) and standard deviation were: G1- 29.163 ± 7.123; G2- 37.752 ±13.054. Statistical analysis (Student's t-test; α=0.05 showed no statistically significant difference (p<0.05) between the groups. Adhesive bonding failures between resin cement and root canal dentin surface were observed in both groups, with non-polymerized resin cement in the apical portion of the post space when Single Bond was used (G1). The type of adhesive system employed on the fiber post cementation did not influence the pull-out bond strength. PMID:19089224

  6. 27 CFR 70.282 - Single bond in lieu of multiple bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Single bond in lieu of multiple bonds. 70.282 Section 70.282 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND... ADMINISTRATION Collection of Excise and Special (Occupational) Tax Bonds § 70.282 Single bond in lieu of...

  7. Does bonding to dentin reduce microleakage of composite restorations?

    PubMed

    Faria-e-silva, André L; Soares, Paulo V; Baroni, Daniela B; Menezes, Murilo S; Santos-Filho, Paulo C F; Soares, Carlos J; Aguiar, Flávio H B; Martins, Luís R M

    2012-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of adhesive application only to enamel on the marginal microleakage of composite resin restorations performed with different adhesive systems. Standardized cylinder-shaped cavities were prepared on the buccal surface of eighty bovine incisors. Two etch-and-rinse (Adper Scotchbond Multi-purpose [3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN USA] and Adper Single Bond 2 [3M ESPE]) and two self-etching (Clearfil SE Bond [Kuraray, Osaka, Japan] and Adper Prompt [3M ESPE]) adhesive systems were evaluated. The adhesives were applied only to enamel or to both dentin and enamel. After adhesive light-activation, the cavities were restored with composite resin. The samples were coated with two layers of nail polish, except an area of 1-mm wide around of the restoration, and immersed in a methylene blue solution. Afterwards, the specimens were ground in order to obtain powder which was immersed in absolute alcohol. The solutions were centrifuged and the supernatant was analyzed using an absorbance spectrophotometer. Linear regression was used to estimate the dye concentration. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's tests (alpha = 0.05). The etch-and-rinse adhesives showed lower microleakage means compared to those of the self-etching adhesives. Adper Prompt presented higher microleakage means. There was no difference between the modes of application of the adhesive on the cavity for all adhesive systems, except for Clearfil SE Bond. This showed lower microleakage when applied to the whole cavity. Bonding to dentin may not reduce microleakage of composite restorations. PMID:22928376

  8. 26 CFR 301.7102-1 - Single bond in lieu of multiple bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 18 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Single bond in lieu of multiple bonds. 301.7102-1 Section 301.7102-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY... of multiple bonds. (a) In general. Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, a person...

  9. Composite bonding to stainless steel crowns using a new universal bonding and single-bottle systems.

    PubMed

    Hattan, Mohammad Ali; Pani, Sharat Chandra; Alomari, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Aim. The aim of this study is to evaluate the shear bond strength of nanocomposite to stainless steel crowns using a new universal bonding system. Material and Methods. Eighty (80) stainless steel crowns (SSCs) were divided into four groups (20 each). Packable nanocomposite was bonded to the lingual surface of the crowns in the following methods: Group A without adhesive (control group), Group B using a new universal adhesive system (Scotchbond Universal Adhesive, 3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany), and Group C and Group D using two different brands of single-bottle adhesive systems. Shear bond strengths were calculated and the types of failure also were recorded. Results. The shear strength of Group B was significantly greater than that of other groups. No significant differences were found between the shear bond strengths of Groups C and D. The control group had significantly lower shear bond strength (P < 0.05) to composite than the groups that utilized bonding agents. Conclusion. Composites bonding to stainless steel crowns using the new universal bonding agent (Scotchbond Universal Adhesive, 3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany) show significantly greater shear bond strengths and fewer adhesive failures when compared to traditional single-bottle systems.

  10. Composite Bonding to Stainless Steel Crowns Using a New Universal Bonding and Single-Bottle Systems

    PubMed Central

    Hattan, Mohammad Ali; Pani, Sharat Chandra; AlOmari, Mohammad

    2013-01-01

    Aim. The aim of this study is to evaluate the shear bond strength of nanocomposite to stainless steel crowns using a new universal bonding system. Material and Methods. Eighty (80) stainless steel crowns (SSCs) were divided into four groups (20 each). Packable nanocomposite was bonded to the lingual surface of the crowns in the following methods: Group A without adhesive (control group), Group B using a new universal adhesive system (Scotchbond Universal Adhesive, 3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany), and Group C and Group D using two different brands of single-bottle adhesive systems. Shear bond strengths were calculated and the types of failure also were recorded. Results. The shear strength of Group B was significantly greater than that of other groups. No significant differences were found between the shear bond strengths of Groups C and D. The control group had significantly lower shear bond strength (P < 0.05) to composite than the groups that utilized bonding agents. Conclusion. Composites bonding to stainless steel crowns using the new universal bonding agent (Scotchbond Universal Adhesive, 3M ESPE, Seefeld, Germany) show significantly greater shear bond strengths and fewer adhesive failures when compared to traditional single-bottle systems. PMID:23606844

  11. Comparative study of the dentin bond strength of a new universal adhesive.

    PubMed

    Jang, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Myoung Geun; Woo, Sang Uk; Lee, Chung Ok; Yi, Jin-Kyu; Kim, Duck-Su

    2016-01-01

    This study compared the dentin bond strength of a new universal adhesive with that of contemporary multi-step dentin adhesives. Six experimental groups were prepared according to the adhesives used and their application modes: Optibond FL (OB), Adper Single Bond Plus (SB), One-Step Plus (OS), Clearfil SE Bond (CS), All-Bond Universal using etch-and-rinse mode (ABE), and AllBond Universal using self-etch mode (ABS). Micro-tensile bond strength (µTBS) and failure mode were evaluated for each group. The bonded interface was analyzed using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). As a result, µTBS of 6 experimental groups was followed as: OB=ABE=SE=ABS>SB>OS group. TEM micrographs of ABE and ABS groups revealed a homogenous adhesive layer formation. In conclusion, a new universal adhesive can make reliable bond to dentin, regardless of the application mode. PMID:27477226

  12. Effect of prolonged air drying on the bond strength of adhesive systems to dentin.

    PubMed

    Werle, Stefanie Bressan; Steglich, Ana; Soares, Fabio Zovico Maxnuck; Rocha, Rachel Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the effect of air-drying time on degree of solvent evaporation (DE), dentin microtensile bond strength (µTBS), and degree of conversion (DC) of 5 adhesive systems: Adper Single Bond 2, XP Bond, Prime & Bond 2.1, OptiBond Solo, and Adper Easy One. For DE testing, 20 µL of each material was submitted to measurements in a digital balance after an air stream of 3, 5, 10, 20, 30, or 60 seconds; the weight loss was computed and converted to a percentage (DE). For µTBS testing, 50 sound human molars were divided into groups (n = 5). The 5 adhesive systems were applied either in accordance with manufacturers' instructions for solvent drying time (control) or with a prolonged drying time (20-30 seconds). After composite resin was built up on the hybridized surfaces, the teeth were stored for 24 hours and then sectioned to obtain beams that were loaded until fracture. For DC testing, specimens of each adhesive and air-drying condition (n = 3) were evaluated by means of attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Data were submitted to 2-way analysis of variance, t test, and Spearman test for correlation analysis. Prolonged air drying resulted in significantly greater DE than did the time suggested by the manufacturers. The adhesives XP Bond and Adper Easy One showed significantly greater µTBS with prolonged air drying. The DC was not affected by air-drying time. No statistically significant correlation was found between DC and µTBS values. Depending on the material, bond strength can be improved by prolonged air-drying times.

  13. Effect of prolonged air drying on the bond strength of adhesive systems to dentin.

    PubMed

    Werle, Stefanie Bressan; Steglich, Ana; Soares, Fabio Zovico Maxnuck; Rocha, Rachel Oliveira

    2015-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the effect of air-drying time on degree of solvent evaporation (DE), dentin microtensile bond strength (µTBS), and degree of conversion (DC) of 5 adhesive systems: Adper Single Bond 2, XP Bond, Prime & Bond 2.1, OptiBond Solo, and Adper Easy One. For DE testing, 20 µL of each material was submitted to measurements in a digital balance after an air stream of 3, 5, 10, 20, 30, or 60 seconds; the weight loss was computed and converted to a percentage (DE). For µTBS testing, 50 sound human molars were divided into groups (n = 5). The 5 adhesive systems were applied either in accordance with manufacturers' instructions for solvent drying time (control) or with a prolonged drying time (20-30 seconds). After composite resin was built up on the hybridized surfaces, the teeth were stored for 24 hours and then sectioned to obtain beams that were loaded until fracture. For DC testing, specimens of each adhesive and air-drying condition (n = 3) were evaluated by means of attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Data were submitted to 2-way analysis of variance, t test, and Spearman test for correlation analysis. Prolonged air drying resulted in significantly greater DE than did the time suggested by the manufacturers. The adhesives XP Bond and Adper Easy One showed significantly greater µTBS with prolonged air drying. The DC was not affected by air-drying time. No statistically significant correlation was found between DC and µTBS values. Depending on the material, bond strength can be improved by prolonged air-drying times. PMID:26545278

  14. Single-electron aerogen bonds: Do they exist?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esrafili, Mehdi D.; Mohammadian-Sabet, Fariba; Solimannejad, Mohammad

    2016-08-01

    A novel type of σ-hole interaction is characterized between some noble gas containing molecules (KrOF2, KrO3, XeOF2 and XeO3) and methyl (CH3) or ethyl (C2H5) radical by means of ab initio calculations. This interaction is named as single-electron aerogen bond (SEAB), in view of the concepts of aerogen bond and single-electron bond interactions. The properties of SEABs are studied by molecular electrostatic potential, quantum theory of atom in molecules, natural bonding orbital and noncovalent interaction index analyses. The formation of an O⋯H interaction tends to increase the strength of the SEAB, when they coexist in a ternary complex.

  15. Microwave Induced Direct Bonding of Single Crystal Silicon Wafers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budraa, N. K.; Jackson, H. W.; Barmatz, M.

    1999-01-01

    We have heated polished doped single-crystal silicon wafers in a single mode microwave cavity to temperatures where surface to surface bonding occurred. The absorption of microwaves and heating of the wafers is attributed to the inclusion of n-type or p-type impurities into these substrates. A cylindrical cavity TM (sub 010) standing wave mode was used to irradiate samples of various geometry's at positions of high magnetic field. This process was conducted in vacuum to exclude plasma effects. This initial study suggests that the inclusion of impurities in single crystal silicon significantly improved its microwave absorption (loss factor) to a point where heating silicon wafers directly can be accomplished in minimal time. Bonding of these substrates, however, occurs only at points of intimate surface to surface contact. The inclusion of a thin metallic layer on the surfaces enhances the bonding process.

  16. Effect of silorane-based adhesive system on bond strength between composite and dentin substrate

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Jefferson Ricardo; Júnior, Lindomar Corrêa; de Souza Almeida, Mauro; do Valle, Accácio Lins; Honório, Heitor Marques; Vidotti, Hugo Alberto; De Souza, Grace Mendonca

    2015-01-01

    Context: The complexities of the oral environment, the dentin substrate, and the different bond and composite resin systems represent a challenge to the maintenance of reasonable bond between the composite resin and the tooth structure. Aims: To evaluate the effect of the adhesive system on bond strength between silorane-based composite resin and dentin. Materials and Methods: Fourteen human molars extracted were selected and vertically cut into 3 dentin fragments, randomly divided among the experimental groups and restored with Z250 and P90 composite resin using different adhesive protocols (Adper Single Bond 2, Silorano primer, Adper SE Plus, and Scotchbond Multiuse). Two composite resin cylinders were built up on each dentin surface (n = 10) and subjected to a micro-shear bond strength test. Statistical Analysis Used: Kruskal–Wallis one-way analysis of variance and Tukey test (P = 0.05). Results: According to the results, Kruskal–Wallis test evidenced at least one statistical significant difference (P = 0.001). The Tukey test showed statistically significant differences among the group (P < 0.05). Group PSM8 (P90 + SM) showed statically significant higher results when compared with groups PSP4 (P90 + SP), PSB2 (P90 + SB), and ZSE5 (Z250 + SE). Conclusion: The results evidenced that the monomer of the adhesive system has an effect on bond strength between the composite resin and dentin. PMID:26752846

  17. Ge-Au eutectic bonding of Ge {100} single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knowlton, W. B.; Itoh, K. M.; Beeman, J. W.; Emes, J. H.; Loretto, D.; Haller, E. E.

    1993-11-01

    We present preliminary results on the eutectic bonding between two {100} Ge single crystal surfaces using thin films of Au ranging from 900Å/surface to 300Å/surface and Pd (10% the thickness of Au). Following bonding, plan view optical microscopy (OM) of the cleaved interface of samples with Au thicknesses ≤ 500Å/surface show a eutectic morphology more conducive to phonon transmission through the bond interface. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) cross sectional interface studies of a 300Å/surface Au sample show <100> epitaxial growth of Ge. In sections of the bond, lattice continuity of the Ge is apparent through the interface. TEM studies also reveal <110> heteroepitaxial growth of Au with a Au-Ge lattice mismatch of less than 2%. Eutectic bonds with 200Å/surface Au have been attained with characterization pending. An optical polishing technique for Ge has been optimized to insure intimate contact between the Ge surfaces prior to bonding. Interferometry analysis of the optically polished Ge surface shows that surface height fluctuations lie within ±150Å across an interval of 1mm. Characterization of phonon transmission through the interface is discussed with respect to low temperature detection of ballistic phonons.

  18. A microtensile bond strength evaluation of a single-bottle adhesive to caries-affected dentin in conventional versus minimal invasive caries removal techniques: An in-vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Saraswathi V; Shashikiran, N D; Chaitra, N L; Syed, Ghousia

    2014-01-01

    Background and Objective: The current dental restorative concepts are characterized by an increased effort towards a less invasive treatment of carious lesions. Minimally invasive cavity preparation techniques are intended to preserve as much sound enamel and dentin as possible, during the treatment of carious lesions. The objective of this in vitro study is to evaluate the microtensile bond strength of single-etch adhesives (Adper Easy one) on caries-affected dentin, following three different caries removal techniques, namely, Carisolv, Conventional carbide bur at slow speed, and aqueous calcium hydroxide. Materials and Methods: A total of 30 teeth were divided into three groups and arranged with 10 samples in each group - round bur (Group A), Carisolv (Group B), Aqueous calcium hydroxide (Group C). Following caries excavation by using the three above -mentioned techniques, application of the bonding agent and composite buildup was done. Following sectioning of the samples with the help of a hard tissue microtome, Group A, B, and C were again trimmed into an hour-glass shape, maintaining a width of 1.2 mm in the center of an hour glass. These were debonded under a microtensile load at failure, using the Instron Universal Testing Machine. Results: There was a significantly lower microtensile bond strength in the group where the caries was removed by the round bur, as compared to the group where the caries was removed by using Carisolv and calcium hydroxide, which showed higher microtensile bond strength, that is, the significant pairing of Groups were Group A to Group B and Group A to Group C, exhibiting statistically significant difference with a P < 0.001. However, there was no statistically significant difference between Group B and Group C. Interpretation and Conclusion: Carisolv and aqueous calcium hydroxide have proven to be good methods of caries removal for achieving a higher microtensile bond strength of the single-bottle self-etch adhesive on dentin. PMID

  19. Effect of enamel etching time on roughness and bond strength.

    PubMed

    Barkmeier, Wayne W; Erickson, Robert L; Kimmes, Nicole S; Latta, Mark A; Wilwerding, Terry M

    2009-01-01

    The current study examined the effect of different enamel conditioning times on surface roughness and bond strength using an etch-and-rinse system and four self-etch adhesives. Surface roughness (Ra) and composite to enamel shear bond strengths (SBS) were determined following the treatment of flat ground human enamel (4000 grit) with five adhesive systems: (1) Adper Single Bond Plus (SBP), (2) Adper Prompt L-Pop (PLP), (3) Clearfil SE Bond (CSE), (4) Clearfil S3 Bond (CS3) and (5) Xeno IV (X4), using recommended treatment times and an extended treatment time of 60 seconds (n = 10/group). Control groups were also included for Ra (4000 grit surface) and SBS (no enamel treatment and Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Adhesive). For surface roughness measurements, the phosphoric acid conditioner of the SBP etch-and-rinse system was rinsed from the surface with an air-water spray, and the other four self-etch adhesive agents were removed with alternating rinses of water and acetone. A Proscan 2000 non-contact profilometer was used to determine Ra values. Composite (Z100) to enamel bond strengths (24 hours) were determined using Ultradent fixtures and they were debonded with a crosshead speed of 1 mm/minute. The data were analyzed with ANOVA and Fisher's LSD post-hoc test. The etch-and- rinse system (SBP) produced the highest Ra (microm) and SBS (MPa) using both the recommended treatment time (0.352 +/- 0.028 microm and 40.5 +/- 6.1 MPa) and the extended treatment time (0.733 +/- 0.122 microm and 44.2 +/- 8.2 MPa). The Ra and SBS of the etch-and-rinse system were significantly greater (p < 0.05) than all the self-etch systems and controls. Increasing the treatment time with phosphoric acid (SBP) and PLP produced greater surface roughness (p < 0.05) but did not result in significantly higher bond strengths (p > 0.05). PMID:19363978

  20. Towards force spectroscopy of single tip-link bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koussa, Mounir A.; Sotomayor, Marcos; Wong, Wesley P.; Corey, David P.

    2015-12-01

    Inner-ear mechanotransduction relies on tip links, fine protein filaments made of cadherin-23 and protocadherin-15 that convey tension to mechanosensitive channels at the tips of hair-cell stereocilia. The tip-link cadherins are thought to form a heterotetrameric complex, with two cadherin-23 molecules forming the upper part of the filament and two protocadherin-15 molecules forming the lower end. The interaction between cadherin-23 and protocadherin-15 is mediated by their N-terminal tips. Missense mutations that modify the interaction interface impair binding and lead to deafness. Molecular dynamics simulations predict that the tip-link bond is mechanically strong enough to withstand forces in hair cells, but its experimentally determined strength is unknown. We have developed molecular tools to facilitate single-molecule force spectroscopy on the tip link bond. Self-assembling DNA nanoswitches are functionalized with the interacting tips of cadherin-23 and protocadherin-15 using the enzyme sortase under conditions that preserve protein function. These tip link nanoswitches are designed to provide a signature force-extension profile. This molecular signature should allow us to identify single-molecule rupture events in pulling experiments.

  1. Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Methacrylate- and Silorane-based Composite Resin Bonded to Resin-Modified Glass-ionomer Containing Micro- and Nano-hydroxyapatite

    PubMed Central

    Sharafeddin, Farahnaz; Moradian, Marzie; Motamedi, Mehran

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem The adhesion of resin-modified glass-ionomer (RMGI) to composite resin has a very important role in the durability of sandwich restorations. Hydroxyapatite is an excellent candidate as a filler material for improving the mechanical properties of glass ionomer cement. Purpose The aim of this study was to assess the effect of adding micro- and nano-hydroxyapatite (HA) powder to RMGI on the shear bond strength (SBS) of nanofilled and silorane-based composite resins bonded to RMGI containing micro- and nano-HA. Materials and Method Sixty cylindrical acrylic blocks containing a hole of 5.5×2.5 mm (diameter × height) were prepared and randomly divided into 6 groups as Group 1 with RMGI (Fuji II LC) plus Adper Single Bond/Z350 composite resin (5.5×3.5 mm diameter × height); Group 2 with RMGI containing 25 wt% of micro-HA plus Adper Single Bond/Z350 composite resin; Group3 with RMGI containing 25 wt% of nano-HA plus Adper Single Bond/Z350 composite resin; Group 4 with RMGI plus P90 System Adhesive/P90 Filtek composite resin (5.5×3.5 mm diameter × height); Group 5 with RMGI containing 25 wt% of micro-HA plus P90 System Adhesive/P90Filtek composite resin; and Group 6 with RMGI containing 25 wt% of nano-HA plus P90 System Adhesive/P90 Filtek composite resin. The specimens were stored in water (37° C, 1 week) and subjected to 1000 thermal cycles (5°C/55°C). SBS test was performed by using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of 1 mm/min. Data were analyzed by two-way ANOVA and Tukey test (p< 0.05). Results There were significant differences between groups 1 and 4 (RMGI groups, p= 0.025), and groups 3 and 6 (RMGI+ nano-HA groups, p= 0.012). However, among Z350 and P90 specimens, no statistically significant difference was detected in the SBS values (p= 0.19, p= 0.083, respectively). Conclusion RMGI containing HA can improve the bond strength to methacrylate-based in comparison to silorane-based composite resins. Meanwhile, RMGI

  2. Regional bond strengths to root canal dentin of fiber posts luted with three cementation systems.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Giovana Mongruel; Gomes, Osnara Maria Mongruel; Reis, Alessandra; Gomes, João Carlos; Loguercio, Alessandro Dourado; Calixto, Abraham Lincoln

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of the cementation system on the regional push-out bond strength and failure pattern of fiber posts to radicular dentin. The roots of 48 extracted human incisors were prepared and divided into 3 groups (n = 16), according to the cementation system: AdperScotchbond Multi-Purpose + resin cement RelyX ARC (SBMP+ARC); Adper SingleBond 2 + RelyX ARC (SB+ARC) and; RelyX U100 self-adhesive resin cement (U100). The posts were cemented as per manufacturer's instructions for each cementation system. After 1 week, the roots were sectioned transversely into 6 discs. Two discs were obtained from the cervical, middle and apical thirds and the push-out test was carried out. The failure pattern was examined on all debonded specimens. The data were analyzed by two-way repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey's test. When U100 was used, no statistically significant difference (p>0.05) was observed among the different root regions. Statistically higher push-out bond strength values were detected in the cervical third for SBMP+ARC and SB+ARC (p<0.05). The U100 showed significantly more mixed failures than SBMP+ARC in the apical third (p<0.05). In conclusion, the self-adhesive cement RelyX U100 was the only cement not sensitive to the root canal region.

  3. ON THE DURABILITY OF RESIN-DENTIN BONDS: IDENTIFYING THE WEAKEST LINKS

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zihou; Beitzel, Dylan; Mutluay, Mustafa; Tay, Franklin R.; Pashley, David H.; Arola, Dwayne

    2015-01-01

    Fatigue of resin-dentin adhesive bonds is critical to the longevity of resin composite restorations. Objectives The objectives were to characterize the fatigue and fatigue crack growth resistance of resin-dentin bonds achieved using two different commercial adhesives and to identify apparent “weak-links”. Methods Bonded interface specimens were prepared using Adper Single Bond Plus (SB) or Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (SBMP) adhesives and 3M Z100 resin composite according to the manufacturers instructions. The stress-life fatigue behavior was evaluated using the twin bonded interface approach and the fatigue crack growth resistance was examined using bonded interface Compact Tension (CT) specimens. Fatigue properties of the interfaces were compared to those of the resin-adhesive, resin composite and coronal dentin. Results The fatigue strength of the SBMP interface was significantly greater than that achieved by SB (p≤0.01). Both bonded interfaces exhibited significantly lower fatigue strength than that of the Z100 and dentin. Regarding the fatigue crack growth resistance, the stress intensity threshold (ΔKth) of the SB interface was significantly greater (p≤0.01) than that of the SBMP, whereas the ΔKth of the interfaces was more than twice that of the parent adhesives. Significance Collagen fibril reinforcement of the resin adhesive is essential to the fatigue crack growth resistance of resin-dentin bonds. Resin tags that are not well hybridized into the surrounding intertubular dentin and/or poor collagen integrity are detrimental to the bonded interface durability. PMID:26169318

  4. Fatigue strength of a single lap joint SPR-bonded

    SciTech Connect

    Di Franco, G.; Fratini, L.; Pasta, A.

    2011-05-04

    In the last years, hybrid joints, meaning with this the joints which consist in combining a traditional mechanical joint to a layer of adhesive, are gradually attracting the attention of various sectors of the construction of vehicles and transportation industries, for their better performance compared to just mechanical joints (self-piercing riveting SPR, riveting, and so on) or just to bonded joints.The paper investigates the fatigue behavior of a single lap joint self-piercing riveted (SPR) and bonded throughout fatigue tests. The considered geometric configuration allowed the use of two rivets placed longitudinally; an epoxy resin was used as adhesive. In the first part of the work static characterization of the joints was carried out through tensile tests. Then fatigue tests were made with the application of different levels of load. The fatigue curves were also obtained at the varying the distance between the two rivets in order to better assess the joint strength for a given length of overlap.

  5. Effect of thermal aging on the tensile bond strength at reduced areas of seven current adhesives.

    PubMed

    Baracco, Bruno; Fuentes, M Victoria; Garrido, Miguel A; González-López, Santiago; Ceballos, Laura

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the micro-tensile bond strength (MTBS) to dentin of seven adhesive systems (total and self-etch adhesives) after 24 h and 5,000 thermocycles. Dentin surfaces of human third molars were exposed and bonded with two total-etch adhesives (Adper Scotchbond 1 XT and XP Bond), two two-step self-etch adhesives (Adper Scotchbond SE and Filtek Silorane Adhesive System) and three one-step self-etch adhesives (G-Bond, Xeno V and Bond Force). All adhesive systems were applied following manufacturers' instructions. Composite buildups were constructed and the bonded teeth were then stored in water (24 h, 37 °C) or thermocycled (5,000 cycles) before being sectioned and submitted to MTBS test. Two-way ANOVA and subsequent comparison tests were applied at α = 0.05. Characteristic de-bonded specimens were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). After 24 h water storage, MTBS values were highest with XP Bond, Adper Scotchbond 1 XT, Filtek Silorane Adhesive System and Adper Scotchbond SE and lowest with the one-step self-etch adhesives Bond Force, Xeno V and G-Bond. After thermocycling, MTBS values were highest with XP Bond, followed by Filtek Silorane Adhesive System, Adper Scotchbond SE and Adper Scotchbond 1 XT and lowest with the one-step self-etch adhesives Bond Force, Xeno V and G-Bond. Thermal aging induced a significant decrease in MTBS values with all adhesives tested. The resistance of resin-dentin bonds to thermal-aging degradation was material dependent. One-step self-etch adhesives obtained the lowest MTBS results after both aging treatments, and their adhesive capacity was significantly reduced after thermocycling.

  6. Effect of thermal aging on the tensile bond strength at reduced areas of seven current adhesives.

    PubMed

    Baracco, Bruno; Fuentes, M Victoria; Garrido, Miguel A; González-López, Santiago; Ceballos, Laura

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the micro-tensile bond strength (MTBS) to dentin of seven adhesive systems (total and self-etch adhesives) after 24 h and 5,000 thermocycles. Dentin surfaces of human third molars were exposed and bonded with two total-etch adhesives (Adper Scotchbond 1 XT and XP Bond), two two-step self-etch adhesives (Adper Scotchbond SE and Filtek Silorane Adhesive System) and three one-step self-etch adhesives (G-Bond, Xeno V and Bond Force). All adhesive systems were applied following manufacturers' instructions. Composite buildups were constructed and the bonded teeth were then stored in water (24 h, 37 °C) or thermocycled (5,000 cycles) before being sectioned and submitted to MTBS test. Two-way ANOVA and subsequent comparison tests were applied at α = 0.05. Characteristic de-bonded specimens were analyzed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). After 24 h water storage, MTBS values were highest with XP Bond, Adper Scotchbond 1 XT, Filtek Silorane Adhesive System and Adper Scotchbond SE and lowest with the one-step self-etch adhesives Bond Force, Xeno V and G-Bond. After thermocycling, MTBS values were highest with XP Bond, followed by Filtek Silorane Adhesive System, Adper Scotchbond SE and Adper Scotchbond 1 XT and lowest with the one-step self-etch adhesives Bond Force, Xeno V and G-Bond. Thermal aging induced a significant decrease in MTBS values with all adhesives tested. The resistance of resin-dentin bonds to thermal-aging degradation was material dependent. One-step self-etch adhesives obtained the lowest MTBS results after both aging treatments, and their adhesive capacity was significantly reduced after thermocycling. PMID:22790477

  7. Bonding stability of adhesive systems to eroded dentin.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Janaina Barros; Bonini, Gabriela; Lenzi, Tathiane Larissa; Imparato, José Carlos Pettorossi; Raggio, Daniela Prócida

    2015-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the immediate and 6 months microshear bond strength (µSBS) of different adhesive systems to sound and eroded dentin. Sixty bovine incisors were embedded in acrylic resin and ground to obtain flat buccal dentin surfaces. Specimens were randomly allocated into two groups: sound dentin (immersion in artificial saliva) and eroded dentin (erosive challenge following a pH cycling model comprising 4 ×/day Sprite Light® drink for 10 days). Then, specimens were reassigned according to the adhesive system: etch-and-rinse adhesive (Adper Single Bond), two-step self-etch system (Clearfil SE Bond), or one-step self-etch adhesive (Adper Easy One). Polyethylene tubes with an internal diameter of 0.76 mm were placed over pre-treated dentin and filled with resin composite (Z250). Half of the specimens were evaluated by the µSBS test after 24 h, and the other half 6 months later, after water storage at 37 °C. Failure mode was evaluated using a stereomicroscope (400 ×). Data were analyzed by three-way repeated measures analysis of variance and Tukey's post hoc tests (α = 0.05). After 6 months of water aging, marked reductions in µSBS values were observed, irrespective of the substrate. The µSBS values for eroded dentin were lower than those obtained for sound dentin. No difference in bonding effectiveness was observed among adhesive systems. For all groups, adhesive/mixed failure was observed. In conclusion, eroded dentin compromises the bonding quality of adhesive systems over time. PMID:26154377

  8. Nonlinear Analysis of Bonded Composite Single-LAP Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oterkus, E.; Barut, A.; Madenci, E.; Smeltzer, S. S.; Ambur, D. R.

    2004-01-01

    This study presents a semi-analytical solution method to analyze the geometrically nonlinear response of bonded composite single-lap joints with tapered adherend edges under uniaxial tension. The solution method provides the transverse shear and normal stresses in the adhesive and in-plane stress resultants and bending moments in the adherends. The method utilizes the principle of virtual work in conjunction with von Karman s nonlinear plate theory to model the adherends and the shear lag model to represent the kinematics of the thin adhesive layer between the adherends. Furthermore, the method accounts for the bilinear elastic material behavior of the adhesive while maintaining a linear stress-strain relationship in the adherends. In order to account for the stiffness changes due to thickness variation of the adherends along the tapered edges, their in-plane and bending stiffness matrices are varied as a function of thickness along the tapered region. The combination of these complexities results in a system of nonlinear governing equilibrium equations. This approach represents a computationally efficient alternative to finite element method. Comparisons are made with corresponding results obtained from finite-element analysis. The results confirm the validity of the solution method. The numerical results present the effects of taper angle, adherend overlap length, and the bilinear adhesive material on the stress fields in the adherends, as well as the adhesive, of a single-lap joint

  9. Failure strength prediction for adhesively bonded single lap joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Niat Mahmud

    For adhesively bonded joint, failure strength depends on many factors such as material properties (both adhesive and adherend), specimen geometries, test environments, surface preparation procedures, etc. Failure occurs inside constitutive materials or along joint interfaces. Based on location, adhesively bonded failure mode can be classified as adhesive failure mode, cohesive failure mode and adherend failure mode. Failure mode directly affects the failure strength of joint. For last eight decades, researchers have developed analytical, empirical or semi-empirical methods capable of predicting failure strength for adhesively bonded joints generating either cohesive failure or adherend failure. Applicability of most of the methods is limited to particular cases. In this research, different failure modes for single lap joints (SLJs) were generated experimentally using epoxy based paste adhesive. Based on experimental data and analytical study, simplified failure prediction methods were developed for each failure mode. For adhesive failure mode, it is observed that peel stress distributions concur along interface near crack initiation points. All SLJs for this test endured consistent surface treatments. Geometric parameters of the joints were varied to study their effect on failure strength. Peel stress distributions were calculated using finite analysis (FEA). Based on peel stress distribution near crack initiation point, a failure model is proposed. Numerous analytical, empirical and semi-empirical models are available for predicting failure strengths of SLJs generating cohesive failures. However, most of the methods in the literature failed to capture failure behavior of SLJs having thickness of adhesive layer as variable. Cohesive failure mode was generated experimentally using aluminum as adherend and epoxy adhesive considering thickness of adhesive layers as variable within SLJs. Comparative study was performed among various methods. It was observed that

  10. Interaction morphology and bond strength of nanofilled simplified-step adhesives to acid etched dentin

    PubMed Central

    Di Hipólito, Vinicius; Reis, André Figueiredo; Mitra, Sumita B.; de Goes, Mario Fernando

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the effect of nanofillers incorporated into adhesives on the microtensile bond strength (μ-TBS) and interfacial micromorphology to dentin. Methods: The occlusal enamel of 5 human molars was removed and each tooth sectioned into four quarters. The exposed dentin was treated with one of the following adhesives: Adper Single Bond (SB-unfilled), OptiBond Solo Plus (OS-barium aluminoborosilicate, 400nm Ø), Prime & Bond NT (NT-colloidal silica, 7–40 nm Ø) and Adper Single Bond 2 (SB2-colloidal silica, 5nm Ø). Cylinders of resin-based composite were constructed on the adhesive layers. After 24-hour storage, the restored tooth-quadrants were sectioned to obtain stick-shaped specimens (0.8 mm2, cross-sectional area) and submitted to μ-TBS at a cross-speed of 0.5 mm/min. Data were analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test (alpha = .05). Twenty-eight additional teeth were used for interfacial micro-morphologic analysis by SEM (16-teeth) and TEM (12-teeth). The dentin surfaces of 32 discs were treated with the adhesives (8 discs for adhesive) and laminated to form disc-pairs using a flowable resin composite for SEM/EDS analysis. For TEM, 90nm-thick nondemineralized unstained sections were processed. Results: SB2 showed significant higher bond strength than SB, OS and NT. The SEM/EDS and TEM analysis revealed nanofillers infiltrated within the interfibrillar spaces of the SB2-hybrid layer. Fillers were concentrated around patent tubular orifices and in the adhesive layer for OS and NT. Conclusion: The presence of nanofillers within the interfibrillar spaces of the SB2-hybrid layer suggests its importance in the improvement of the μ-TBS. PMID:23077413

  11. Influence of preliminary etching on the stability of bonds created by one-step self-etch bonding systems.

    PubMed

    Taschner, Michael; Nato, Fernando; Mazzoni, Annalisa; Frankenberger, Roland; Falconi, Mirella; Petschelt, Anselm; Breschi, Lorenzo

    2012-06-01

    We evaluated the effects of preliminary etching of dentine on the stability of the bond created by one-step self-etch adhesives under different storage conditions. Adper Easy Bond (3M ESPE) and iBond Self-Etch (iBond SE; Heraeus Kulzer) were applied with an etch-and-rinse (i.e. after preliminary phosphoric acid etching for 15 s) or a self-etch approach. Resin-dentine bonded specimens were sectioned perpendicularly to the adhesive interface according to the 'non-trimming technique'. Beams were stored in artificial saliva for 24 h, 6 months, or 1 yr at 37°C, or in 10% NaOCl for 5 h at room temperature, and then stressed until failure; the microtensile bond strengths were calculated. Interfacial nanoleakage of additional teeth was evaluated using light microscopy or transmission electron microscopy. Adper Easy Bond showed higher bond strength than iBond SE, regardless of the dentine treatment. Similar microtensile bond strength results were obtained for teeth subjected to artificial ageing in 10% NaOCl for 5 h at room temperature and for teeth stored in artificial saliva for 6 months at 37°C. The additional etching step increased the microtensile bond strength for Adper Easy Bond and iBond SE. This study supports the use of one-step adhesives on etched dentine because of the increased bond strength compared with their application onto smear-layer-covered dentine, regardless of storage conditions. PMID:22607341

  12. Rupture of single receptor-ligand bonds: a new insight into probability distribution function.

    PubMed

    Gupta, V K

    2013-01-01

    Single molecule force spectroscopy is widely used to determine kinetic parameters of dissociation by analyzing bond rupture data obtained via applying mechanical force to cells, capsules, and beads that are attached to an intermolecular bond. The current analysis assumes that the intermolecular bond force is equal to the externally applied mechanical force. We confirm that viscous drag alone or in combination with cellular deformation resulting in viscoelasticity modulates bond force so that the instantaneous intermolecular bond force is not equivalent to the applied force. The bond force modulation leads to bond rupture time and force histograms that differ from those predicted by probability distribution function (PDF) using the current approach. A new methodology that accounts for bond force modulation in obtaining PDF is presented. The predicted histograms from the new methodology are in excellent agreement with the respective histograms obtained from Monte Carlo simulation.

  13. Effect of Bleaching and Thermocycling on Resin-Enamel Bond Strength

    PubMed Central

    Moosavi, Horieh; Mohammadipour, Hamideh Sadat; Ghavamnasiri, Marjaneh; Alizadeh, Sanaz

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of bleaching and thermocycling on microshear bond strength of bonded resin composites to enamel. Enamel slices were prepared from ninety-six intact human premolars and resin composite cylinders were bonded by using Adper Single Bond 2 + Filtek Z350 or Filtek silorane adhesive and resin composite. Each essential group was randomly subdivided to two subgroups: control and bleaching. In bleaching group, 35% hydrogen peroxide was applied on samples. Thermocycling procedure was conducted between 5°C and 55°C, for 3.000 cycles on the half of each subgroup specimen. Then microshear bond strength was tested. Methacrylate-based resin composite had higher bond strength than silorane-based one. The meyhacrylate-based group without bleaching along with thermocycling showed the most bond strength, while bleaching with 35% carbamide peroxide on silorane-based group without thermocycling showed the least microshear bond strength. Bleaching caused a significant degradation on shear bond strength of silorane-based resin composites that bonded using self-etch adhesive resin systems. PMID:26839550

  14. Effect of Bleaching and Thermocycling on Resin-Enamel Bond Strength.

    PubMed

    Moosavi, Horieh; Mohammadipour, Hamideh Sadat; Ghavamnasiri, Marjaneh; Alizadeh, Sanaz

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of bleaching and thermocycling on microshear bond strength of bonded resin composites to enamel. Enamel slices were prepared from ninety-six intact human premolars and resin composite cylinders were bonded by using Adper Single Bond 2 + Filtek Z350 or Filtek silorane adhesive and resin composite. Each essential group was randomly subdivided to two subgroups: control and bleaching. In bleaching group, 35% hydrogen peroxide was applied on samples. Thermocycling procedure was conducted between 5°C and 55°C, for 3.000 cycles on the half of each subgroup specimen. Then microshear bond strength was tested. Methacrylate-based resin composite had higher bond strength than silorane-based one. The meyhacrylate-based group without bleaching along with thermocycling showed the most bond strength, while bleaching with 35% carbamide peroxide on silorane-based group without thermocycling showed the least microshear bond strength. Bleaching caused a significant degradation on shear bond strength of silorane-based resin composites that bonded using self-etch adhesive resin systems. PMID:26839550

  15. Effects of Thermal and Mechanical Load Cycling on the Dentin Microtensile Bond Strength of Single Bond-2

    PubMed Central

    Daneshkazemi, Alireza; Davari, Abdolrahim; Akbari, Mohammad Javad; Davoudi, Amin; Badrian, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    Background: Different studies have shown the uncertain effects of thermal cycling (TC) and mechanical load cycling (MC) on the dentin microtensile bond strength (µTBS) of composites. This study designed to investigate the effects of TC and MC on the dentin µTBS of single bond-2. Materials and Methods: Flat dentinal surface was prepared on 48 sound extracted human third molar teeth, and were bonded by single bond-2 adhesive and Z250 resin composite. The teeth were randomly divided into eight equal groups, according to the thermal/mechanical protocol. TC and MC were proceeded at 5-55°C and 90 N with 0.5 Hz. Then restorations were sectioned to shape the hour-glass form and subjected to µTBS testing at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. To evaluate the bonding failure, the specimens were observed under the scanning electron microscope. The results were statistically analyzed with analysis of variance, t-test, Tukey HSD and post-hoc by using SPSS software version 17 at a significant level of 0.05. Results: µTBS of all groups were significantly lower than the control group (P < 0.001). Adhesive failure was predominant in all groups and increased with TC and MC. Conclusions: TC and MC had an adverse effect on µTBS of the tested adhesive resin to dentin. PMID:26464532

  16. The computation of C-C and N-N bond dissociation energies for singly, doubly, and triply bonded systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langhoff, Stephen R.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1989-01-01

    The bond dissociation energies (D sub e) of C2H2, C2H4, C2H6, N2, N2H2, and N2H4 are studied at various levels of correlation treatment. The convergence of D sub e with respect to the one particle basis is studied at the single reference modified coupled-pair functional (MCPF) level. At all levels of correlation treatment, the errors in the bond dissociation energies increase with the degree of multiple bond character. The multireference configuration interaction (MRCI) D sub e values, corrected for an estimate of higher excitations, are in excellent agreement with those determined using the size extensive averaged coupled pair functional (ACPF) method. It was found that the full valence complete active space self consistent field (CASSCF)/MRCI calculations are reproduced very well by MRCI calculations based on a CASSCF calculation that includes in the active space only those electrons involved in the C-C or N-N bonds. To achieve chemical accuracy (1 kcal/mole) for the D sub e values of the doubly bonded species C2H4 and N2H2 requires one particle basis sets including up through h angular momentum functions (l = 5) and a multireference treatment of electron correlation: still higher levels of calculation are required to achieve chemical accuracy for the triply bonded species C2H2 and N2.

  17. Effect of Thermocycling, Degree of Conversion, and Cavity Configuration on the Bonding Effectiveness of All-in-One Adhesives.

    PubMed

    El-Damanhoury, H M; Gaintantzopoulou, M

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare five all-in-one bonding agents with respect to microleakage, microtensile bond strength (μTBS), degree of conversion (DC) and the impact of cavity configuration. The materials tested were Adper Easy Bond, Clearfil S3 Bond, iBond, Optibond All-in-One, Xeno IV, and Adper Single Bond Plus as a control. The DC of each adhesive was measured on the surfaces of dentin discs (n=5) by attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. One hundred and forty-four extracted human molars were randomly divided and assigned to one of the five tested adhesives and the control group. The μTBS to dentin was measured on flat occlusal dentin with and without thermocycling and to the gingival floor dentin of class II cavities (n=8). All specimens were restored with Filtek Z250 resin composite. Class II samples were immersed in a 5% methylene blue dye solution for 24 hours, and microleakage was examined under a stereomicroscope. Micromorphological analysis of demineralized/deproteinized specimens was done using scanning electron microscopy. The DC and microleakage data were statistically analyzed by one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and μTBS data by two-way ANOVA followed by a Bonferroni multiple comparison post hoc test (α=0.05) and Weibull-distribution survival analysis. The relation between different variables and μTBS and microleakage was tested by the Pearson correlation coefficient and regression statistics. A moderate direct relation between DC and μTBS durability was found for all the adhesives tested. Significant wide variations exist among the results obtained for single-bottle adhesives tested regarding their μTBS and microleakage. Some of the all-in-one materials tested have shown significantly inferior results under a high C-factor or after aging. The use of these materials should be carefully considered. PMID:25748210

  18. Effects of cellular viscoelasticity in lifetime extraction of single receptor-ligand bonds.

    PubMed

    Gupta, V K

    2015-06-01

    Single-molecule force spectroscopy is widely used to determine kinetic parameters of dissociation by analyzing bond rupture data obtained via applying mechanical force to cells, capsules, and beads that are attached to an intermolecular bond. The bond rupture data are obtained in experiments either at a constant force or at a constant loading rate. We explore the effect of cellular viscoelasticity in constant-force experiments. Specifically, we perform Monte Carlo simulations of bond rupture at a given constant force to obtain the bond lifetime as a function of force in the absence and in the presence of bond force modulation due to cellular viscoelasticity, to explore its effect on the bond lifetime.

  19. Effect of Self-etching Adhesives on the Bond Strength of Glass-Ionomer Cements

    PubMed Central

    Jaberi Ansari, Zahra; Panahandeh, Narges; Tabatabaei Shafiei, Zahra Sadat; Akbarzadeh Baghban, Alireza

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Statement of Problem: Adequate bond strength between glass ionomer cements and composite resin is necessary for the success of the sandwich technique. Purpose of Study: This study assessed the micro-shear bond strength of composite resin to glass-ionomer cements (GIC) using self-etch adhesives with different pH values. Materials and Methods: One hundred specimens (6×4×2 mm) were made using Fuji II and Fuji II LC GICs and treated with different adhesives as follows: Group 1:Fuji II+ Adper Prompt L-Pop, Group-2: Fuji II+SE bond, Group-3: Fuji II + AdheSE, Group-4:Fuji II+ Protect bond, Group-5: Fuji II + Single bond, Group-6:Fuji II LC+ Adper Prompt LPop, Group-7: Fuji II LC+SE bond, Group-8:Fuji II LC+ AdheSE, Group-9: Fuji II LC+ Protect bond, and Group-10: Fuji II LC+ Single bond. Each group consisted of 10 specimens. A cylinder of Z100 composite resin was placed on each sample and light cured. After 24 hours of water storage (37°C), the specimens were subjected to micro-shear bond strength tests (0.5 mm/min). Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test. Results: The mean micro-shear bond strength of groups 1–10 was 11.66±1.79, 16.50±1.85, 18.47±1.77, 13.95±1.77, 15.27±1.49, 15.14±0.90, 20.03±1.19, 17.48±3.00, 16.24±1.98 and 16.03±1.49 MPa, respectively. There were significant differences between groups 1 and 7 (P<0.05). No significant difference was observed between other groups (P>0.05). Fuji II LC showed higher bond strength than Fuji II (P<0.05). Conclusion: Type of self-etch adhesive had no significant effect on micro-shear bond strength of glass-ionomer to composite resin. Resin modified glass ionomer cement (RMGIC) exhibited higher bond strength than the conventional GIC. PMID:25628698

  20. Evaluating the bonding of two adhesive systems to enamel submitted to whitening dentifrices.

    PubMed

    Briso, André Luiz Fraga; Toseto, Roberta Mariano; de Arruda, Alex Mendes; Tolentino, Patricia Ramos; de Alexandre, Rodrigo Sversut; dos Santos, Paulo Henrique

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate by micro-shear bond strength test, the bond strength of composite resin restoration to enamel submitted to whitening dentifrices. Forty bovine teeth were embedded in polystyrene resin and polished. The specimens were randomly divided into eight groups (n=5), according to the dentifrice (carbamide peroxide, hydrogen peroxide and conventional dentifrice) and the adhesive system (Prime & Bond 2.1 and Adper Single Bond 2). Dentifrice was applied for 15 minutes a day, for 21 days. Thirty minutes after the last exposure to dentifrice, the samples were submitted to a bonding procedure with the respective adhesive system. After that, four buttons of resin were bonded in each sample using transparent cylindrical molds. After 24 hours, the teeth were submitted to the micro-shear bond strength test and subsequent analysis of the fracture mode. Data were submitted to analysis of variance and Fisher's PLSD test (alpha = 0.05). The micro-shear bond strength showed no difference between adhesives systems but a significant reduction was found between the control and carbamide groups (p = 0.0145) and the control and hydrogen groups (p = 0.0370). The evaluation of the failures modes showed that adhesive failures were predominant. Cohesive failures were predominant in group IV The use of dentifrice with peroxides can decrease bonding strength in enamel.

  1. Method of bonding single crystal quartz by field-assisted bonding

    DOEpatents

    Curlee, Richard M.; Tuthill, Clinton D.; Watkins, Randall D.

    1991-01-01

    The method of producing a hermetic stable structural bond between quartz crystals includes providing first and second quartz crystals and depositing thin films of borosilicate glass and silicon on portions of the first and second crystals, respectively. The portions of the first and second crystals are then juxtaposed in a surface contact relationship and heated to a temperature for a period sufficient to cause the glass and silicon films to become electrically conductive. An electrical potential is then applied across the first and second crystals for creating an electrostatic field between the adjoining surfaces and causing the juxtaposed portions to be attracted into an intimate contact and form a bond for joining the adjoining surfaces of the crystals.

  2. Method of bonding single crystal quartz by field-assisted bonding

    DOEpatents

    Curlee, R.M.; Tuthill, C.D.; Watkins, R.D.

    1991-04-23

    The method of producing a hermetic stable structural bond between quartz crystals includes providing first and second quartz crystals and depositing thin films of borosilicate glass and silicon on portions of the first and second crystals, respectively. The portions of the first and second crystals are then juxtaposed in a surface contact relationship and heated to a temperature for a period sufficient to cause the glass and silicon films to become electrically conductive. An electrical potential is then applied across the first and second crystals for creating an electrostatic field between the adjoining surfaces and causing the juxtaposed portions to be attracted into an intimate contact and form a bond for joining the adjoining surfaces of the crystals. 2 figures.

  3. Predicted Rupture Force of a Single Molecular Bond Becomes Rate Independent at Ultralow Loading Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dechang; Ji, Baohua

    2014-02-01

    We present for the first time a theoretical model of studying the saturation of the rupture force of a single molecular bond that causes the rupture force to be rate independent under an ultralow loading rate. This saturation will obviously bring challenges to understanding the rupture behavior of the molecular bond using conventional methods. This intriguing feature implies that the molecular bond has a nonzero strength at a vanishing loading rate. We find that the saturation behavior is caused by bond rebinding when the loading rate is lower than a limiting value depending on the loading stiffness.

  4. Correlation among electronegativity, cation polarizability, optical basicity and single bond strength of simple oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Dimitrov, Vesselin; Komatsu, Takayuki

    2012-12-15

    A suitable relationship between free-cation polarizability and electronegativity of elements in different valence states and with the most common coordination numbers has been searched on the basis of the similarity in physical nature of both quantities. In general, the cation polarizability increases with decreasing element electronegativity. A systematic periodic change in the polarizability against the electronegativity has been observed in the isoelectronic series. It has been found that generally the optical basicity increases and the single bond strength of simple oxides decreases with decreasing the electronegativity. The observed trends have been discussed on the basis of electron donation ability of the oxide ions and type of chemical bonding in simple oxides. - Graphical abstract: This figure shows the single bond strength of simple oxides as a function of element electronegativity. A remarkable correlation exists between these independently obtained quantities. High values of electronegativity correspond to high values of single bond strength and vice versa. It is obvious that the observed trend in this figure is closely related to the type of chemical bonding in corresponding oxide. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A suitable relationship between free-cation polarizability and electronegativity of elements was searched. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The cation polarizability increases with decreasing element electronegativity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The single bond strength of simple oxides decreases with decreasing the electronegativity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The observed trends were discussed on the basis of type of chemical bonding in simple oxides.

  5. Eroded dentin does not jeopardize the bond strength of adhesive restorative materials.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Janaina Barros; Lenzi, Tathiane Larissa; Tedesco, Tamara Kerber; Guglielmi, Camila de Almeida Brandão; Raggio, Daniela Prócida

    2012-01-01

    This in vitro study evaluated the bond strength of adhesive restorative materials to sound and eroded dentin. Thirty-six bovine incisors were embedded in acrylic resin and ground to obtain flat buccal dentin surfaces. Specimens were randomly allocated in 2 groups: sound dentin (immersion in artificial saliva) and eroded dentin (pH cycling model - 3× / cola drink for 7 days). Specimens were then reassigned according to restorative material: glass ionomer cement (KetacTM Molar Easy Mix), resin-modified glass ionomer cement (VitremerTM) or adhesive system with resin composite (Adper Single Bond 2 + Filtek Z250). Polyethylene tubes with an internal diameter of 0.76 mm were placed over the dentin and filled with the material. The microshear bond test was performed after 24 h of water storage at 37ºC. The failure mode was evaluated using a stereomicroscope (400×). Bond strength data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc tests (α = 0.05). Eroded dentin showed bond strength values similar to those for sound dentin for all materials. The adhesive system showed the highest bond strength values, regardless of the substrate (p < 0.0001). For all groups, the adhesive/mixed failure prevailed. In conclusion, adhesive materials may be used in eroded dentin without jeopardizing the bonding quality. It is preferable to use an etch-and-rinse adhesive system because it shows the highest bond strength values compared with the glass ionomer cements tested. PMID:22714927

  6. The computation of C-C and N-N bond dissociation energies for singly, doubly, and triply bonded systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langhoff, Stephen R.; Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Taylor, Peter R.

    1991-01-01

    The bond dissociation energies (De) of C2H2, C2H4, C2H6, N2, N2H2, and N2H4 are studied at various levels of correlation treatment. The convergence of De with respect to the one-particle basis is studied at the single-reference modified coupled-pair-functional (MCPF)level. At all levels of correlation treatment, the errors in the bond dissociation energies increase with the degree of multiple bond character. The multireference configuration-interaction (MRCI) De values, corrected for an estimate of higher excitations, are in excellent agreement with those determined using the size-extensive averaged-coupled-pair-functional (ACPF) method. The full-valence complete-active-space self-consistent-field (CASSCF)/MRCI calculations are reproduced very well by MRCI calculations based on a CASSCF calculation that includes in the active space only those electrons involved in the C-C or N-N bonds.

  7. Effect of 10% Sodium Ascorbate on Shear Bond Strength of Bleached Teeth - An in-vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Ponnappa, K C; Nitin, Mirdha; Ramesh, Sachhi; Sharanappa, Kambale; Nishant, Ajgaonkar

    2015-01-01

    Background Patient often requires some additional interventions such as replacement of old restorations, laminates and veneers after bleaching, for aesthetic purposes. The residual oxygen inhibits polymerization of resin based materials which results in reduced bond strength of the restorations. Some techniques are available to solve the clinical problems related to the post bleach compromised bond strength. Objectives The purpose of this study is to evaluate, the role of 10% sodium ascorbate on reversing the compromised bond strength and compare enamel shear bond strength of 5th and 6th generation dentine bonding agents on bleached and unbleached teeth. Materials and Methods Eighty freshly extracted human anterior teeth were assigned in to Group A and Group B of 40 teeth each. Samples in both groups were subdivided in to 4 subgroups of 10 teeth each. In Group A composite resins was bonded using 5th generation dentine bonding agent (3M Single Bond) and Group B was bonded using 6th generation (3M ESPE Adper SE Plus). Subgroups were subjected to the procedure as, A1;B1 etching and bonding (control), A2; B2 bleaching, etching and immediate bonding, A3; B3 bleaching,10% ascorbic acid treatment for 10 minutes after that etching and bonding immediately, A4; B4 bleaching, storage in artificial saliva for 4 days and then etching and bonding. Pola office, in office bleach (SDI (082216) was used for bleaching. The specimens were subjected to shear load in a Universal testing machine to evaluate bond strength. Results A decrease in bond strength was seen with 6th generation adhesive system compared to 5th generation bonding system, which is statistically significant, p<0.001. Conclusion Treating the bleached enamel surfaces when treated with 10% sodium ascorbate, which reverses the compromised bond strength and is a good alternative to delayed bonding. PMID:26393201

  8. High-resolution imaging and spectroscopy of interfacial water at single bond limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Ying

    Hydrogen bond is one of the most important weak interactions in nature and plays an essential role in a broad spectrum of physics, chemistry, biology, energy and material sciences. The conventional methods for studying hydrogen-bonding interaction are all based on spectroscopic or diffraction techniques. However, those techniques have poor spatial resolution and only measure the average properties of many hydrogen bonds, which are susceptible to the structural inhomogeneity and local environments, especially when interfacial systems are concerned. The spatial variation and inter-bond coupling of the hydrogen bonds leads to significant spectral broadening, which prohibits the accurate understanding of the experimental data. In this talk, I will present our recent progress on the development of new-generation scanning probe microscopy/spectroscopy (SPM/S) with unprecedentedly high sensitivity and resolution, for addressing weak inter- and intra-molecular interactions, such as hydrogen bonds and van der Waals force. Based on a qPlus sensor, we have succeeded to push the real-space study of a prototypical hydrogen-bonded system, i.e. water, down to single bond limit. Combined with state-of-the-arts quantum simulations, we have discovered exotic nuclear quantum effects (NQEs) in interfacial water and revealed the quantum nature of the hydrogen bond from a completely new perspective

  9. A revised set of values of single-bond radii derived from the observed interatomic distances in metals by correction for bond number and resonance energy

    PubMed Central

    Pauling, Linus; Kamb, Barclay

    1986-01-01

    An earlier discussion [Pauling, L. (1947) J. Am. Chem. Soc. 69, 542] of observed bond lengths in elemental metals with correction for bond number and resonance energy led to a set of single-bond metallic radii with values usually somewhat less than the corresponding values obtained from molecules and complex ions. A theory of resonating covalent bonds has now been developed that permits calculation of the number of resonance structures per atom and of the effective resonance energy per bond. With this refined method of correcting the observed bond lengths for the effect of resonance energy, a new set of single-bond covalent radii, in better agreement with values from molecules and complex ions, has been constructed. PMID:16593698

  10. Rigid Single Carbon-Carbon Bond That Does Not Rotate in Water.

    PubMed

    Gadogbe, Manuel; Zhou, Yadong; Zou, Shengli; Zhang, Dongmao

    2016-03-10

    Carbon-carbon bond is one of the most ubiquitous molecular building blocks for natural and man-made materials. Rotational isomerization is fundamentally important for understanding the structure and reactivity of chemical and biological molecules. Reported herein is the first demonstration that a single C-C bond does not rotate in water. The two distal C-S bonds in both 1,2-ethanedithiolate ((-)S-CH2-CH2-S(-), 1,2-EDT(2-)) and 2,3-butanedithiolate (2,3-BuDT(2-)) are exclusively in the trans conformer with reference to their respective center single C-C bond. In contrast, both trans and gauche conformers are observed in neutral 1,2-ethanedithiol (1,2-EDT) and 2, 3-butanedithiol (2,3-BuDT). The insight from this work should be important for understanding the charge effect on the molecular conformation in aqueous solutions.

  11. First structural characterization of a protactinium(V) single oxo bond in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Le Naour, Claire; Trubert, Didier; Di Giandomenico, Maria V; Fillaux, Clara; Den Auwer, Christophe; Moisy, Philippe; Hennig, Christoph

    2005-12-12

    The present work describes the first structural studies of protactinium(V) in sulfuric and hydrofluoric acid media using X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The results show unambiguously the absence of the trans-dioxo bond that characterizes the other early actinide elements such as U and Np. In concentrated sulfuric acid (13 M), Pa(V) is proved to exhibit a single oxo bond as postulated in the literature for species in more dilute media. In a 0.5 M HF medium, XANES and EXAFS spectra indicate the absence of any oxo bond: Pa(V) exists in the form of a pure fluoro complex.

  12. First structural characterization of a protactinium(V) single oxo bond in aqueous media.

    PubMed

    Le Naour, Claire; Trubert, Didier; Di Giandomenico, Maria V; Fillaux, Clara; Den Auwer, Christophe; Moisy, Philippe; Hennig, Christoph

    2005-12-12

    The present work describes the first structural studies of protactinium(V) in sulfuric and hydrofluoric acid media using X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The results show unambiguously the absence of the trans-dioxo bond that characterizes the other early actinide elements such as U and Np. In concentrated sulfuric acid (13 M), Pa(V) is proved to exhibit a single oxo bond as postulated in the literature for species in more dilute media. In a 0.5 M HF medium, XANES and EXAFS spectra indicate the absence of any oxo bond: Pa(V) exists in the form of a pure fluoro complex. PMID:16323942

  13. Assessment of the Shear Bond Strength between Nanofilled Composite Bonded to Glass-ionomer Cement Using Self-etch Adhesive with Different pHs and Total-Etch Adhesive

    PubMed Central

    Sharafeddin, Farahnaz; Choobineh, Mohammad Mehdi

    2016-01-01

    Statement of the Problem In the sandwich technique, the undesirable bond between the composite resin and glass-ionomer cement (GIc) is one of the most important factors which lead to the failure of restoration. Total-etch and self-etch adhesives may improve the bond strength based on their pH. Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength between the nanofilled composite resin and GIc using different adhesives. Materials and Method In this experimental study, 40 specimens (6×6mm) in 4 groups (n=10) were prepared in acrylic mold. Each specimen contained conventional GI ChemFil Superior with a height of 3mm, bonded to Z350 composite resin with a height measured 3mm. In order to bond the composite to the GI, the following adhesives were used, respectively: A: mild Clearfil SE Bond self-etch (pH=2), B: intermediate OptiBond self-etch (pH=1.4), C: strong Adper Prompt L-Pop (pH=1), and D: Adper Single Bond 2 total-etch (pH=7.2). The shear bond strength was measured by using universal testing machine with a crosshead speed of 1mm/min. One-way ANOVA and Tukey’s test were used to analyze the data (p< 0.05). Results The shear bond strength in group A was significantly higher than group B (p= 0.002), C (p< 0.001), and D (p< 0.001). Moreover, the shear bond strength of groups A and B (self-etch) was significantly different from group D (total-etch) (p< 0.001); and C (self-etch) with D (p= 0.024). Conclusion The results of this study showed that applying the mild self-etch adhesive between the composite and the GIc results in stronger shear bond strength compared to intermediate and strong self-etch adhesives. Moreover, the self-etch adhesive increased the shear bond strength between composite resin and GIc more significantly than total-etch adhesive. PMID:26966701

  14. Bonding efficacy of etch-and-rinse adhesives after dentin biomodification using ethanol saturation and collagen cross-linker pretreatment

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Pallavi; Nagpal, Rajni; Tyagi, Shashi Prabha; Manuja, Naveen

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate whether the application of two simplified etch-and-rinse adhesives to biomodified dentin using ethanol-wet bonding (EWB) and collagen cross-linker (CCL) pretreatment improves their sealing ability. Materials and Methods: In 176 extracted human molars, the pulp-chambers were deroofed, and teeth were sectioned horizontally. Samples were randomly divided into eight groups according to four bonding techniques using two simplified etch-and-rinse adhesives; Adper Single Bond 2 (ASB) and XP Bond (XPB). The bonding protocols included: (a) Water-wet bonding (WWB); (b) EWB; (c) WWB and CCL application; (d) EWB and CCL application. After composite resin restorations, dye leakage evaluation and scanning electron microscope analysis were done. Leakage scores were statistically analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U tests at a significance level of P < 0.05. Result: For both ASB and XPB adhesives, least dye leakage was observed in EWB groups (b and d) (P = 0.918 and P = 0.399 respectively) which showed no significant difference, while maximum leakage scores were seen in WWB groups (a and c). Regardless of CCL application and adhesives used, EWB technique depicted (P = 0.003 and P = 0.004) significantly greater sealing ability than WWB. Conclusion: Bonding of ASB and XPB using EWB significantly improved their sealing ability. Biomodification using CCL pretreatment had no significant effect on the sealing ability of adhesives bonded with either WWB or EWB. PMID:26180421

  15. “Evaluation of shear bond strength of a composite resin to white mineral trioxide aggregate with three different bonding systems”-An in vitro analysis

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Anand C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) is a biomaterial that has been investigated for endodontic applications. With the increased use of MTA in pulp capping, pulpotomy, perforation repair, apexification and obturation, the material that would be placed over MTA as a final restoration is an important matter. As composite resins are one of the most widely used final restorative materials, this study was conducted to evaluate the shear bond strength of a composite resin to white mineral trioxide aggregate (WMTA) using three different bonding systems namely the two-step etch and rinse adhesive, the self-etching primer and the All-in-one system. Material and Methods Forty five specimens of white MTA (Angelus) were prepared and randomly divided into three groups of 15 specimens each depending on the bonding systems used respectively. In Group A, a Two-step etch and rinse adhesive or ‘total-etch adhesive’, Adper Single Bond 2 (3M/ESPE) and Filtek Z350 (3M ESPE, St Paul, MN) were placed over WMTA. In group B, a Two-step self-etching primer system, Clearfil SE Bond (Kuraray, Medical Inc) and Filtek Z350 were used. In Group C, an All-in-one system, G Bond (GC corporation, Tokyo, Japan) and Filtek Z350 were used. The shear bond strength was measured for all the specimens. The data obtained was subjected to One way Analysis of Variance (ANOVA) and Scheffe’s post hoc test. Results The results suggested that the Two-step etch and rinse adhesive when used to bond a composite resin to white MTA gave better bond strength values and the All-in-one exhibited the least bond strength values. Conclusions The placement of composite used with a Two-step etch and rinse adhesive over WMTA as a final restoration may be appropriate. Key words:Composite resins, dentin bonding agents, mineral trioxide aggregate, shear bond strength. PMID:27398177

  16. Single-Molecule Conductance through Hydrogen Bonds: The Role of Resonances.

    PubMed

    Wimmer, Micah; Palma, Julio L; Tarakeshwar, Pilarisetty; Mujica, Vladimiro

    2016-08-01

    The single-molecule conductance of hydrogen-bonded and alkane systems are compared in this theoretical investigation. The results indicate that for short chains, the H-bonded molecules exhibit larger conductance than the alkanes. Although earlier experimental investigations attributed this observation to a large density of states (DOS) corresponding to an occupied molecular orbital below the Fermi energy, the current work indicates the presence of a Fano resonance in the transmission function in the vicinity of the Fermi energy. The inclusion of this observation is essential in understanding the behavior of these systems. We also address the characteristics of the H-bond for transport and provide an explanation for the presence of a turnover regime wherein the conductance of the alkanes becomes larger than the H-bonded systems. Incidentally, this feature cannot be explained using a simple DOS argument. PMID:27424944

  17. Single and double substrate insertion into the Ti=N(alpha) bonds of terminal titanium hydrazides.

    PubMed

    Tiong, Pei-Jen; Schofield, A Daniel; Selby, Jonathan D; Nova, Ainara; Clot, Eric; Mountford, Philip

    2010-01-01

    Nitriles, CO(2) and isocyanates undergo net single or double insertion reactions into the Ti=N(alpha) multiple bonds of terminal titanium hydrazides. These are the first such examples of this type of reactivity for any transition metal hydrazide complex.

  18. Effects of single bond-ion and single bond-diradical form on the stretching vibration of C=N bridging bond in 4,4'-disubstituted benzylidene anilines.

    PubMed

    Cao, Chao-Tun; Bi, Yakun; Cao, Chenzhong

    2016-06-15

    Fifty-seven samples of model compounds, 4,4'-disubstituted benzylidene anilines, p-X-ArCH=NAr-p-Y were synthesized. Their infrared absorption spectra were recorded, and the stretching vibration frequencies νC=N of the C=N bridging bond were determined. New stretching vibration mode was proposed by means of the analysis of the factors affecting νC=N, that is there are mainly three modes in the stretching vibration of C=N bond: (I) polar double bond form C=N, (II) single bond-ion form C(+)-N(-) and (III) single bond-diradical form C-N. The contributions of the forms (I) and (II) to the change of νC=N can be quantified by using Hammett substituent constant (including substituent cross-interaction effects between X and Y groups), whereas the contribution of the form (III) can be quantified by employing the excited-state substituent constant. The most contribution of these three forms is the form (III), the next is the form (II), whose contribution difference was discussed with the viewpoint of energy requirements in vibration with the form (III) and form (II).

  19. Effects of single bond-ion and single bond-diradical form on the stretching vibration of Cdbnd N bridging bond in 4,4‧-disubstituted benzylidene anilines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Chao-Tun; Bi, Yakun; Cao, Chenzhong

    2016-06-01

    Fifty-seven samples of model compounds, 4,4‧-disubstituted benzylidene anilines, p-X-ArCH = NAr-p-Y were synthesized. Their infrared absorption spectra were recorded, and the stretching vibration frequencies νCdbnd N of the Cdbnd N bridging bond were determined. New stretching vibration mode was proposed by means of the analysis of the factors affecting νCdbnd N, that is there are mainly three modes in the stretching vibration of Cdbnd N bond: (I) polar double bond form Cdbnd N, (II) single bond-ion form C+-N- and (III) single bond-diradical form Crad -Nrad . The contributions of the forms (I) and (II) to the change of νCdbnd N can be quantified by using Hammett substituent constant (including substituent cross-interaction effects between X and Y groups), whereas the contribution of the form (III) can be quantified by employing the excited-state substituent constant. The most contribution of these three forms is the form (III), the next is the form (II), whose contribution difference was discussed with the viewpoint of energy requirements in vibration with the form (III) and form (II).

  20. Local modifications of single-wall carbon nanotubes induced by bond formation with encapsulated fullerenes.

    PubMed

    Yumura, Takashi; Kertesz, Miklos; Iijima, Sumio

    2007-02-01

    Defected fullerenes in nanopeapods form bonds with the encapsulating single-walled carbon nanotubes when irradiated by an electron beam leading to changes in the guest (fullerene) and the host (nanotube). Intrinsic reaction coordinate (IRC) analysis based on B3LYP hybrid density functional theory shows that a C1-C59 defect with a single protruding C atom is initially formed from the C60(Ih) cage. The high activation energy for this step (8.37 eV (193.0 kcal/mol)), being assumed to be accessible during irradiation, is lower than that of the Stone-Wales rearrangement on the sp2 network. The binding of the defected fullerene to the nanotube is preferential, orthogonal bonds relative to the tube axis being slightly preferred. Because of the covalent bonds formed between the guest and host, the carbon network on the nanotube is locally perturbed in the vicinity of the binding site. As a result of the new bonds, bisnorcaradiene-like as well as quinonoid-like patterns appear near the binding site. These results are interpreted using orbital interaction and Clar diagram arguments. The changes in the bonding pattern on the nanotube should be significant in further functionalization of carbon nanotubes.

  1. Isothermal solidification stage during transient liquid-phase bonding single-crystal superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Naicheng; Liu, Jide; Jin, Tao; Sun, Xiaofeng; Hu, Zhuangqi

    2014-04-01

    In this work, the isothermal solidification stage during transient liquid-phase bonding (TLP) single-crystal superalloys has been investigated. Experiments were performed to ascertain the bonding microstructures and the kinetics during the isothermal solidification. The results have shown that the isothermal solidification stage deviates from the standard parabolic TLP models. Lots of the borides with fine, short bar and acicular morphologies formed in the diffusion affected zone (DAZ) in the thick wall and thin wall substrate specimens at the isothermal solidification stage. Electron probe microanalysis results have shown that there exists B composition peak in the DAZ. Examination of the bonding kinetics presented that there are three stages in the isothermal solidification stage: initial stage, transient stage and final stage with different growth velocity of the isothermal solidification zone (ISZ). And the relationship of the width of the ISZ with the square root of the bonding time didn't satisfy the parabolic relationship. Based on the microstructures and kinetics observed, a film ISZ mechanism is proposed, and a model is constructed to illustrate the isothermal solidification stage during bonding single-crystal superalloys.

  2. Single-Molecule Rotational Switch on a Dangling Bond Dimer Bearing.

    PubMed

    Godlewski, Szymon; Kawai, Hiroyo; Kolmer, Marek; Zuzak, Rafał; Echavarren, Antonio M; Joachim, Christian; Szymonski, Marek; Saeys, Mark

    2016-09-27

    One of the key challenges in the construction of atomic-scale circuits and molecular machines is to design molecular rotors and switches by controlling the linear or rotational movement of a molecule while preserving its intrinsic electronic properties. Here, we demonstrate both the continuous rotational switching and the controlled step-by-step single switching of a trinaphthylene molecule adsorbed on a dangling bond dimer created on a hydrogen-passivated Ge(001):H surface. The molecular switch is on-surface assembled when the covalent bonds between the molecule and the dangling bond dimer are controllably broken, and the molecule is attached to the dimer by long-range van der Waals interactions. In this configuration, the molecule retains its intrinsic electronic properties, as confirmed by combined scanning tunneling microscopy/spectroscopy (STM/STS) measurements, density functional theory calculations, and advanced STM image calculations. Continuous switching of the molecule is initiated by vibronic excitations when the electrons are tunneling through the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital state of the molecule. The switching path is a combination of a sliding and rotation motion over the dangling bond dimer pivot. By carefully selecting the STM conditions, control over discrete single switching events is also achieved. Combined with the ability to create dangling bond dimers with atomic precision, the controlled rotational molecular switch is expected to be a crucial building block for more complex surface atomic-scale devices. PMID:27504525

  3. Ge-Au eutectic bonding of Ge {l_brace}100{r_brace} single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Knowlton, W.B.; Beeman, J.W.; Emes, J.H.; Loretto, D.; Itoh, K.M.; Haller, E.E. |

    1993-08-01

    We present preliminary results on eutectic bonding between two (100) Ge single crystal surfaces using thin films of Au ranging from 900{Angstrom}/surface and Pd(10% the thickness of Au). Following bonding, plan view optical microscopy (OM) of the cleaved interface of samples with Au thicknesses {le} 500{Angstrom}/surface show a eutectic morphology more conducive to phonon transmission through the bond interface. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) cross sectional interface studies of a 300{Angstrom}/surface Au sample show <100> epitaxial growth of Ge. In sections of the bond, lattice continuity of the Ge is apparent through the interface. TEM studies also reveal <110> heteroepitaxial growth of Au with a Au-Ge lattice mismatch of less than 2%. Eutectic bonds with 200{Angstrom}/surface Au have been attained with characterization pending. An optical polishing technique for Ge has been optimized to insure intimate contact between the Ge surfaces prior to bonding. Interferometry analysis of the optically polished Ge surface shows that surface height fluctuations lie within {plus_minus}150{Angstrom} across an interval of 1mm. Characterization of phonon transmission through the interface is discussed with respect to low temperature detection of ballistic phonons.

  4. Single polymer chains in poor solvent: Using the bond fluctuation method with explicit solvent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jentzsch, Christoph; Werner, Marco; Sommer, Jens-Uwe

    2013-03-01

    We use the bond fluctuation model with explicit solvent to study single polymer chains under poor solvent conditions. Static and dynamic properties of the bond fluctuation model with explicit solvent are compared with the implicit solvent model, and the Θ-temperatures are determined for both solvent models. We show that even in the very poor solvent regime, dynamics is not frozen for the explicit solvent model. We investigate some aspects of the structure of a single collapsed globule and show that rather large chain lengths are necessary to reach the scaling regime of a dense sphere. The force-extension curve of a single polymer chain under poor solvent conditions in the fixed end-to-end distance ensemble is analyzed. We find that the transition of the tadpole conformation to the stretched chain conformation is rather smooth because of fluctuation effects, which is in agreement with recent experimental results.

  5. Intrinsic carrier mobility of a single-layer graphene covalently bonded with single-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Dian; Shao, Zhi-Gang; Hao, Qing; Zhao, Hongbo

    2014-06-21

    We report intrinsic carrier mobility calculations of a two-dimensional nanostructure that consists of porous single layer graphene covalently bonded with single-walled carbon nanotubes on both sides. We used first-principles calculation and found that the deformation potential of such system is about 25% of that of graphene, and the carrier mobility is about 5 × 10{sup 4} cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} for both electrons and holes, about one order of magnitude lower than that of graphene. This nanostructure and its three-dimensional stacking could serve as novel organic electronic materials.

  6. Generating giant and tunable nonlinearity in a macroscopic mechanical resonator from a single chemical bond.

    PubMed

    Huang, Pu; Zhou, Jingwei; Zhang, Liang; Hou, Dong; Lin, Shaochun; Deng, Wen; Meng, Chao; Duan, Changkui; Ju, Chenyong; Zheng, Xiao; Xue, Fei; Du, Jiangfeng

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinearity in macroscopic mechanical systems may lead to abundant phenomena for fundamental studies and potential applications. However, it is difficult to generate nonlinearity due to the fact that macroscopic mechanical systems follow Hooke's law and respond linearly to external force, unless strong drive is used. Here we propose and experimentally realize high cubic nonlinear response in a macroscopic mechanical system by exploring the anharmonicity in chemical bonding interactions. We demonstrate the high tunability of nonlinear response by precisely controlling the chemical bonding interaction, and realize, at the single-bond limit, a cubic elastic constant of 1 × 10(20) N m(-3). This enables us to observe the resonator's vibrational bi-states transitions driven by the weak Brownian thermal noise at 6 K. This method can be flexibly applied to a variety of mechanical systems to improve nonlinear responses, and can be used, with further improvements, to explore macroscopic quantum mechanics.

  7. Generating giant and tunable nonlinearity in a macroscopic mechanical resonator from a single chemical bond

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Pu; Zhou, Jingwei; Zhang, Liang; Hou, Dong; Lin, Shaochun; Deng, Wen; Meng, Chao; Duan, Changkui; Ju, Chenyong; Zheng, Xiao; Xue, Fei; Du, Jiangfeng

    2016-01-01

    Nonlinearity in macroscopic mechanical systems may lead to abundant phenomena for fundamental studies and potential applications. However, it is difficult to generate nonlinearity due to the fact that macroscopic mechanical systems follow Hooke's law and respond linearly to external force, unless strong drive is used. Here we propose and experimentally realize high cubic nonlinear response in a macroscopic mechanical system by exploring the anharmonicity in chemical bonding interactions. We demonstrate the high tunability of nonlinear response by precisely controlling the chemical bonding interaction, and realize, at the single-bond limit, a cubic elastic constant of 1 × 1020 N m−3. This enables us to observe the resonator's vibrational bi-states transitions driven by the weak Brownian thermal noise at 6 K. This method can be flexibly applied to a variety of mechanical systems to improve nonlinear responses, and can be used, with further improvements, to explore macroscopic quantum mechanics. PMID:27225287

  8. Studying Chemical Reactions, One Bond at a Time, with Single Molecule AFM Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez, Julio M.

    2008-03-01

    The mechanisms by which mechanical forces regulate the kinetics of a chemical reaction are unknown. In my lecture I will demonstrate how we use single molecule force-clamp spectroscopy and protein engineering to study the effect of force on the kinetics of thiol/disulfide exchange. Reduction of disulfide bond via the thiol/disulfide exchange chemical reaction is crucial in regulating protein function and is of common occurrence in mechanically stressed proteins. While reduction is thought to proceed through a substitution nucleophilic bimolecular (SN2) reaction, the role of a mechanical force in modulating this chemical reaction is unknown. We apply a constant stretching force to single engineered disulfide bonds and measure their rate of reduction by dithiothreitol (DTT). We find that while the reduction rate is linearly dependent on the concentration of DTT, it is exponentially dependent on the applied force, increasing 10-fold over a 300 pN range. This result predicts that the disulfide bond lengthens by 0.34 å at the transition state of the thiol/disulfide exchange reaction. In addition to DTT, we also study the reduction of the engineered disulfide bond by the E. coli enzyme thioredoxin (Trx). Thioredoxins are enzymes that catalyze disulfide bond reduction in all organisms. As before, we apply a mechanical force in the range of 25-450 pN to the engineered disulfide bond substrate and monitor the reduction of these bonds by individual enzymes. In sharp contrast with the data obtained with DTT, we now observe two alternative forms of the catalytic reaction, the first requiring a reorientation of the substrate disulfide bond, causing a shortening of the substrate polypeptide by 0.76±0.07 å, and the second elongating the substrate disulfide bond by 0.21±0.01 å. These results support the view that the Trx active site regulates the geometry of the participating sulfur atoms, with sub-ångström precision, in order to achieve efficient catalysis. Single molecule

  9. Bent Bonds and Multiple Bonds.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Edward A.; Gillespie, Ronald J.

    1980-01-01

    Considers carbon-carbon multiple bonds in terms of Pauling's bent bond model, which allows direct calculation of double and triple bonds from the length of a CC single bond. Lengths of these multiple bonds are estimated from direct measurements on "bent-bond" models constructed of plastic tubing and standard kits. (CS)

  10. Directionality of Double-Bond Photoisomerization Dynamics Induced by a Single Stereogenic Center.

    PubMed

    Marchand, Gabriel; Eng, Julien; Schapiro, Igor; Valentini, Alessio; Frutos, Luis Manuel; Pieri, Elisa; Olivucci, Massimo; Léonard, Jérémie; Gindensperger, Etienne

    2015-02-19

    In light-driven single-molecule rotary motors, the photoisomerization of a double bond converts light energy into the rotation of a moiety (the rotor) with respect to another (the stator). However, at the level of a molecular population, an effective rotary motion can only be achieved if a large majority of the rotors rotate in the same, specific direction. Here we present a quantitative investigation of the directionality (clockwise vs counterclockwise) induced by a single stereogenic center placed in allylic position with respect to the reactive double bond of a model of the biomimetic indanylidene-pyrrolinium framework. By computing ensembles of nonadiabatic trajectories at 300 K, we predict that the photoisomerization is >70% unidirectional for the Z → E and E → Z conversions. Most importantly, we show that such directionality, resulting from the asymmetry of the excited state force field, can still be observed in the presence of a small (ca. 2°) pretwist or helicity of the reactive double bond. This questions the validity of the conjecture that a significant double-bond pretwist (e.g., >10°) in the ground state equilibrium structure of synthetic or natural rotary motors would be required for unidirectional motion. PMID:26262473

  11. Single-molecule measurement of the strength of a siloxane bond.

    PubMed

    Schwaderer, Peter; Funk, Enno; Achenbach, Frank; Weis, Johann; Bräuchle, Christoph; Michaelis, Jens

    2008-02-19

    Increasing the mechanical stability of artificial polymer materials is an important task in materials science, and for this a profound knowledge of the critical mechanoelastic properties of its constituents is vital. Here, we use AFM-based single-molecule force spectroscopy measurements to characterize the rupture of a single silicon-oxygen bond in the backbone of polydimethylsiloxane as well as the force-extension behavior of this polymer. PDMS is not only a polymer used in a large variety of products but also an important model system for highly flexible polymers. In our experiments, we probe the entire relevant force range from low forces dominated by entropy up to the rupture of the covalent Si-O bonds in the polymer backbone at high forces. The resulting rupture-force histograms are investigated with microscopic models of bond rupture under load and are compared to density functional theory calculations to characterize the free-energy landscape of the Si-O bond in the polymer backbone.

  12. Dentin surface treatment using a non-thermal argon plasma brush for interfacial bonding improvement in composite restoration.

    PubMed

    Ritts, Andy C; Li, Hao; Yu, Qingsong; Xu, Changqi; Yao, Xiaomei; Hong, Liang; Wang, Yong

    2010-10-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the treatment effects of non-thermal atmospheric gas plasmas on dentin surfaces used for composite restoration. Extracted unerupted human third molars were prepared by removing the crowns and etching the exposed dentin surfaces with 35% phosphoric acid gel. The dentin surfaces were treated using a non-thermal atmospheric argon plasma brush for various periods of time. The molecular changes of the dentin surfaces were analyzed using Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry/attenuated total reflectance (FTIR/ATR), and an increase in the amount of carbonyl groups was detected on plasma-treated dentin surfaces. Adper Single Bond Plus adhesive and Filtek Z250 dental composite were applied as directed. To evaluate the dentin/composite interfacial bonding, the teeth thus prepared were sectioned into micro-bars and analyzed using tensile testing. Student-Newman-Keuls tests showed that the bonding strength of the composite restoration to peripheral dentin was significantly increased (by 64%) after 30 s of plasma treatment. However, the bonding strength to plasma-treated inner dentin did not show any improvement. It was found that plasma treatment of the peripheral dentin surface for up to 100 s resulted in an increase in the interfacial bonding strength, while prolonged plasma treatment of dentin surfaces (e.g. 5 min) resulted in a decrease in the interfacial bonding strength.

  13. Legionella pneumophila utilizes a Single Player Disulfide-Bond Oxidoreductase System to Manage Disulfide Bond Formation and Isomerization

    PubMed Central

    Kpadeh, Zegbeh Z.; Day, Shandra R.; Mills, Brandy W.; Hoffman, Paul S.

    2015-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila uses a single homodimeric disulfide bond (DSB) oxidoreductase DsbA2 to catalyze extracytoplasmic protein folding and to correct DSB errors through protein-disulfide isomerase (PDI) activity. In Escherichia coli, these functions are separated to avoid futile cycling. In L. pneumophila, DsbA2 is maintained as a mixture of disulfides (S-S) and free thiols (SH), but when expressed in E. coli, only the SH form is observed. We provide evidence to suggest that structural differences in DsbB oxidases (LpDsbB1 and LpDsbB2) and DsbD reductases (LpDsbD1 and LpDsbD2) (compared to E. coli) permit bifunctional activities without creating a futile cycle. LpdsbB1 and LpdsbB2 partially complemented an EcdsbB mutant while neither LpdsbD1 nor LpdsbD2 complemented an EcdsbD mutant unless DsbA2 was also expressed. When the dsb genes of E. coli were replaced with those of L. pneumophila, motility was restored and DsbA2 was present as a mixture of redox forms. A dominant-negative approach to interfere with DsbA2 function in L. pneumophila determined that DSB oxidase activity was necessary for intracellular multiplication and assembly/function of the Dot/Icm Type IVb secretion system. Our studies show that a single-player system may escape the futile cycle trap by limiting transfer of reducing equivalents from LpDsbDs to DsbA2. PMID:25534767

  14. On the Involvement of Single-Bond Rotation in the Primary Photochemistry of Photoactive Yellow Protein

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, Andreas D.; Hospes, Marijke; Singhal, Kushagra; van Stokkum, Ivo; van Grondelle, Rienk; Groot, Marie Louise; Hellingwerf, Klaas J.

    2011-01-01

    Prior experimental observations, as well as theoretical considerations, have led to the proposal that C4-C7 single-bond rotation may play an important role in the primary photochemistry of photoactive yellow protein (PYP). We therefore synthesized an analog of this protein's 4-hydroxy-cinnamic acid chromophore, (5-hydroxy indan-(1E)-ylidene)acetic acid, in which rotation across the C4-C7 single bond has been locked with an ethane bridge, and we reconstituted the apo form of the wild-type protein and its R52A derivative with this chromophore analog. In PYP reconstituted with the rotation-locked chromophore, 1), absorption spectra of ground and intermediate states are slightly blue-shifted; 2), the quantum yield of photochemistry is ∼60% reduced; 3), the excited-state dynamics of the chromophore are accelerated; and 4), dynamics of the thermal recovery reaction of the protein are accelerated. A significant finding was that the yield of the transient ground-state intermediate in the early phase of the photocycle was considerably higher in the rotation-locked samples than in the corresponding samples reconstituted with p-coumaric acid. In contrast to theoretical predictions, the initial photocycle dynamics of PYP were observed to be not affected by the charge of the amino acid residue at position 52, which was varied by 1), varying the pH of the sample between 5 and 10; and 2), site-directed mutagenesis to construct R52A. These results imply that C4-C7 single-bond rotation in PYP is not an alternative to C7=C8 double-bond rotation, in case the nearby positive charge of R52 is absent, but rather facilitates, presumably with a compensatory movement, the physiological Z/E isomerization of the blue-light-absorbing chromophore. PMID:21889456

  15. Bonding surgical incisions using a temperature-controlled laser system based on a single infrared fiber.

    PubMed

    Gabay, Ilan; Barequet, Irina; Varssano, David; Rosner, Mordechai; Katzir, Abraham

    2013-11-01

    ABSTRACT. Although there has been great interest in laser heating for bonding of surgical incisions in tissues, it has not gained wide acceptance by surgeons. We argue that the main obstacle has been the lack of temperature control, which may lead to a weak bonding. We previously developed a laser bonding system based on two infrared transmitting AgBrCl fibers, one for laser heating and one for temperature control. In view of the inherent limitations of such systems observed in many animal experiments, we developed an improved system based on a single infrared fiber. Besides the decreased dimensions, this system offers many advantages over the two-fiber system. It is less sensitive to accuracy of height and tilt of the fiber distal tip above the tissue, ensuring more accurate heating that can potentially lead to stronger bonding with minimal thermal damage. The system is successfully tested in the soldering of 15 corneal incisions, ex vivo. Histopathology shows little thermal damage and good wound apposition. The average burst pressure is 100±30  mm Hg. These findings indicate the usefulness of the system for ophthalmic surgery as well as other surgical procedures, including endoscopic and robotic surgery.

  16. Relationships among the structural topology, bond strength, and mechanical properties of single-walled aluminosilicate nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Liou, Kai-Hsin; Tsou, Nien-Ti; Kang, Dun-Yen

    2015-10-21

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are regarded as small but strong due to their nanoscale microstructure and high mechanical strength (Young's modulus exceeds 1000 GPa). A longstanding question has been whether there exist other nanotube materials with mechanical properties as good as those of CNTs. In this study, we investigated the mechanical properties of single-walled aluminosilicate nanotubes (AlSiNTs) using a multiscale computational method and then conducted a comparison with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). By comparing the potential energy estimated from molecular and macroscopic material mechanics, we were able to model the chemical bonds as beam elements for the nanoscale continuum modeling. This method allowed for simulated mechanical tests (tensile, bending, and torsion) with minimum computational resources for deducing their Young's modulus and shear modulus. The proposed approach also enabled the creation of hypothetical nanotubes to elucidate the relative contributions of bond strength and nanotube structural topology to overall nanotube mechanical strength. Our results indicated that it is the structural topology rather than bond strength that dominates the mechanical properties of the nanotubes. Finally, we investigated the relationship between the structural topology and the mechanical properties by analyzing the von Mises stress distribution in the nanotubes. The proposed methodology proved effective in rationalizing differences in the mechanical properties of AlSiNTs and SWCNTs. Furthermore, this approach could be applied to the exploration of new high-strength nanotube materials.

  17. Numerical simulation and experimental study of transient liquid phase bonding of single crystal superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoneim, Adam

    The primary goals of the research in this dissertation are to perform a systematic study to identify and understand the fundamental cause of prolonged processing time during transient liquid phase bonding of difficult-to-bond single crystal Ni-base materials, and use the acquired knowledge to develop an effective way to reduce the isothermal solidification time without sacrificing the single crystalline nature of the base materials. To achieve these objectives, a multi-scale numerical modeling approach, that involves the use of a 2-D fully implicit moving-mesh Finite Element method and a Cellular Automata method, was developed to theoretically investigate the cause of long isothermal solidification times and determine a viable way to minimize the problem. Subsequently, the predictions of the theoretical models are experimentally validated. Contrary to previous suggestions, numerical calculations and experimental verifications have shown that enhanced intergranular diffusivity has a negligible effect on solidification time in cast superalloys and that another important factor must be responsible. In addition, it was found that the concept of competition between solute diffusivity and solubility as predicted by standard analytical TLP bonding models and reported in the literature as a possible cause of long solidification times is not suitable to explain salient experimental observations. In contrast, however, this study shows that the problem of long solidification times, which anomalously increase with temperature is fundamentally caused by departure from diffusion controlled parabolic migration of the liquid-solid interface with holding time during bonding due to a significant reduction in the solute concentration gradient in the base material. Theoretical analyses showed it is possible to minimize the solidification time and prevent formation of stray-grains in joints between single crystal substrates by using a composite powder mixture of brazing alloy and base

  18. A single theoretical descriptor for the bond-dissociation energy of substituted phenols.

    PubMed

    Aliaga, Carolina; Almodovar, Iriux; Rezende, Marcos Caroli

    2015-01-01

    Relative to the corresponding value of phenol, the bond-dissociation energies (BDE) of substituted phenols correlate well with a single descriptor: the Mulliken charge on the oxygen atom of the phenoxyl radical. However, the correlation fails for phenols ortho-substituted with polar groups. Internal reaction coordinates (IRC) for the model reaction of hydrogen abstraction by the hydroperoxyl radical from various 2- and 4-substituted phenols were calculated in order to investigate the role of intra-molecular hydrogen bonds and steric effects on the process. Calculations yielded theoretical values in good agreement with experimental ΔBDE values. The hydrogen-abstraction process was further analyzed in terms of density functional theory (DFT)-based reactivity indices such as local electrophilicity, the Fukui function for nucleophilic attack, and dual descriptor values of the phenolic hydroxyl oxygen along the IRC. PMID:25617211

  19. A permanently porous single molecule H-bonded organic framework for selective CO2 capture.

    PubMed

    Nandi, Shyamapada; Chakraborty, Debanjan; Vaidhyanathan, Ramanathan

    2016-05-26

    Permanent porosity has been realized in a hydrogen bonded framework formed by a single tripodal tricarboxylic acid molecule. The presence of three phenyl rings linked to a flexible sp(3) nitrogen centre renders a near-propeller shape to the molecule generating an unusual 'non-planar' 3-D framework formed by highly directional planar -COOHHOOC- hydrogen bonds, propagating in all three directions. The material shows exceptional hydrolytic, acidic and thermal stability and has a surface area of 1025 m(2) g(-1). Importantly, it shows preferential adsorption of CO2 over N2 with very high selectivities (350 : 1@1 bar, 303 K). DFT modeling shows the presence of stable T-shaped CO2CO2 dimers within the channels suggesting favorable co-operativity between them.

  20. Push-Out Bond Strength of Restorations with Bulk-Fill, Flow, and Conventional Resin Composites

    PubMed Central

    Caixeta, Rodrigo Vieira; Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil; Kaneshima, Edmilson Nobumitu; Barbosa, Aline Silvestre; Picolotto, Cassiana Pedrotti; Lima, Ana Eliza de Souza; Gonini Júnior, Alcides; Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the bond strengths of composite restorations made with different filler amounts and resin composites that were photoactivated using a light-emitting diode (LED). Thirty bovine incisors were selected, and a conical cavity was prepared in the facial surface of each tooth. All preparations were etched with Scotchbond Etching Gel, the Adper Scotchbond Multipurpose Plus adhesive system was applied followed by photoactivation, and the cavities were filled with a single increment of Filtek Z350 XT, Filtek Z350 XT Flow, or bulk-fill X-tra fil resin composite (n = 10) followed by photoactivation. A push-out test to determine bond strength was conducted using a universal testing machine. Data (MPa) were submitted to Student's t-test at a 5% significance level. After the test, the fractured specimens were examined using an optical microscope under magnification (10x). Although all three composites demonstrated a high prevalence of adhesive failures, the bond strength values of the different resin composites photoactivated by LED showed that the X-tra fil resin composite had a lower bond strength than the Filtek Z350 XT and Filtek Z350 XT Flow resin composites. PMID:26457322

  1. Effect of surface treatments on the bond strength of a resin cement to commercially pure titanium.

    PubMed

    de Almeida-Júnior, Antonio Alves; Fonseca, Renata Garcia; Haneda, Isabella Gagliardi; Abi-Rached, Filipe de Oliveira; Adabo, Gelson Luis

    2010-01-01

    Investigation of the effectiveness of surface treatments that promote a strong bond strength of resin cements to metals can contribute significantly to the longevity of metal-ceramic restorations. This study evaluated the effect of surface treatments on the shear bond strength (SBS) of a resin cement to commercially pure titanium (CP Ti). Ninety cast CP Ti discs were divided into 3 groups (n=30), which received one of the following airborne-particle abrasion conditions: (1) 50 microm Al(2)O(3) particles; (2) 30 microm silica-modified Al(2)O(3) particles (Cojet Sand); (3) 110 microm silica-modified Al(2)O(3) particles (Rocatec). For each airborne-particle abrasion condition, the following post-airborne-particle abrasion treatments were used (n=10): (1) none; (2) adhesive Adper Single Bond 2; (3) silane RelyX Ceramic Primer. RelyX ARC resin cement was bonded to CP Ti surfaces. All specimens were thermally cycled before being tested in shear mode. Failure mode was determined. The best association was Rocatec plus silane. All groups showed 100% adhesive failure. There were combinations that promote higher SBS than the protocol recommended by the manufacturer of RelyX ARC. PMID:20640356

  2. A single prolonged stress paradigm produces enduring impairments in social bonding in monogamous prairie voles.

    PubMed

    Arai, Aki; Hirota, Yu; Miyase, Naoki; Miyata, Shiori; Young, Larry J; Osako, Yoji; Yuri, Kazunari; Mitsui, Shinichi

    2016-12-15

    Traumatic events such as natural disasters, violent crimes, tragic accidents, and war, can have devastating impacts on social relationships, including marital partnerships. We developed a single prolonged stress (SPS) paradigm, which consisted of restraint, forced swimming, and ether anesthesia, to establish an animal model relevant to post-traumatic stress disorder. We applied a SPS paradigm to a monogamous rodent, the prairie vole (Microtus ochrogaster) in order to determine whether a traumatic event affects the establishment of pair bonds. We did not detect effects of the SPS treatment on anhedonic or anxiety-like behavior. Sham-treated male voles huddled with their partner females, following a 6day cohabitation, for a longer duration than with a novel female, indicative of a pair bond. In contrast, SPS-treated voles indiscriminately huddled with the novel and partner females. Interestingly, the impairment of pair bonding was rescued by oral administration of paroxetine, a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI), after the SPS treatment. Immunohistochemical analyses revealed that oxytocin immunoreactivity (IR) was significantly decreased in the supraoptic nucleus (SON), but not in the paraventricular nucleus (PVN), 7days after SPS treatment, and recovered 14days after SPS treatment. After the presentation of a partner female, oxytocin neurons labeled with Fos IR was significantly increased in SPS-treated voles compared with sham-treated voles regardless of paroxetine administration. Our results suggest that traumatic events disturb the formation of pair bond possibly through an interaction with the serotonergic system, and that SSRIs are candidates for the treatment of social problems caused by traumatic events. Further, a vole SPS model may be useful for understanding mechanisms underlying the impairment of social bonding by traumatic events. PMID:27522019

  3. Effect of Intermediate Agents and Preheated Composites on Repair Bond Strength of Silorane-Based Composites

    PubMed Central

    Shafiei, Fereshteh; Daryadar, Marzieh

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Repairing composite restorations is a challenging procedure especially when two different types of composites are used. This study aimed to compare the repair strength of silorane-based composite (SC) (Filtek P90) with that of preheated SC, methacrylate composite (MC)(Z250), flowable MC (Filtek Supreme Plus) and different adhesive/composite combinations. Materials and Methods: Eighty-four SC specimens were fabricated and randomly divided into seven groups (G). In the control group (G7), SC was bonded immediately to SC. The other specimens were water-aged for two months and were then roughened, etched and repaired with the following materials: G1) Silorane Adhesive Bond (SAB)/SC; G2) Preheated SC; G3) SAB/MC; G4) Adper Single Bond (SB)/MC; G5) Flowable MC/MC; G6) Preheated MC. After water storage and thermocycling, the repaired specimens were subjected to shear bond strength testing. The data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey’s test. Results: Preheated SC and MC, flowable MC and SAB/SC resulted in bond strength comparable to that of the control group. Preheated SC showed significantly higher bond strength when compared to SAB/MC (P=0.04) and SB/MC (P<0.001). Bond strength of SB/MC was significantly lower than that of the other groups (P<0.05), except for SAB/SC and SAB/MC. Conclusion: All repairing materials except for SB/MC resulted in bond strength values comparable to that of the control group. Repair with preheated SC yielded the highest bond strength. PMID:27148378

  4. Effect of desensitizing agents on the microtensile bond strength of two-step etch-and-rinse adhesives to dentin.

    PubMed

    Cortiano, Fernanda M; Rached, Rodrigo N; Mazur, Rui F; Vieira, Sergio; Freire, Andrea; de Souza, Evelise M

    2016-06-01

    Desensitizers can be used to control postoperative sensitivity in adhesive restorations. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of desensitizing agents on the bond strength of two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive systems to dentin. Forty-two human molars were sectioned to obtain 3-mm-thick dentin discs. The discs were divided into three groups (n = 14 in each) - no-treatment control group (CT), and oxalic acid [BisBlock (BB)] and calcium phosphate [Desensibilize Nano-P (NP)] desensitizers - before the application of two adhesive systems [Adper Single Bond Plus (SB) and One-Step Plus (OSP)]. A nanoparticle composite resin was used to create a 3-mm-thick build-up. The specimens were stored in distilled water for 24 h before a microtensile bond-strength test was performed. The failure modes were determined using a stereomicroscope at 100 × magnification. Specimens were sectioned perpendicular to the interface for scanning electron microscopy analyses. The CT-SB group exhibited the highest bond strength, differing significantly from BB-SB and BB-OSP groups. Mixed failures were prevalent for all groups. Scanning electron microscopy revealed a continuous hybrid layer and resin tags in all groups. Dentin bond strength of etch-and-rinse adhesive systems was reduced by an oxalic acid desensitizer but was not affected by a calcium phosphate-containing desensitizer. PMID:27038226

  5. A Single-Lap Joint Adhesive Bonding Optimization Method Using Gradient and Genetic Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smeltzer, Stanley S., III; Finckenor, Jeffrey L.

    1999-01-01

    A natural process for any engineer, scientist, educator, etc. is to seek the most efficient method for accomplishing a given task. In the case of structural design, an area that has a significant impact on the structural efficiency is joint design. Unless the structure is machined from a solid block of material, the individual components which compose the overall structure must be joined together. The method for joining a structure varies depending on the applied loads, material, assembly and disassembly requirements, service life, environment, etc. Using both metallic and fiber reinforced plastic materials limits the user to two methods or a combination of these methods for joining the components into one structure. The first is mechanical fastening and the second is adhesive bonding. Mechanical fastening is by far the most popular joining technique; however, in terms of structural efficiency, adhesive bonding provides a superior joint since the load is distributed uniformly across the joint. The purpose of this paper is to develop a method for optimizing single-lap joint adhesive bonded structures using both gradient and genetic algorithms and comparing the solution process for each method. The goal of the single-lap joint optimization is to find the most efficient structure that meets the imposed requirements while still remaining as lightweight, economical, and reliable as possible. For the single-lap joint, an optimum joint is determined by minimizing the weight of the overall joint based on constraints from adhesive strengths as well as empirically derived rules. The analytical solution of the sin-le-lap joint is determined using the classical Goland-Reissner technique for case 2 type adhesive joints. Joint weight minimization is achieved using a commercially available routine, Design Optimization Tool (DOT), for the gradient solution while an author developed method is used for the genetic algorithm solution. Results illustrate the critical design variables

  6. The role of intra-domain disulfide bonds in heat-induced irreversible denaturation of camelid single domain VHH antibodies.

    PubMed

    Akazawa-Ogawa, Yoko; Uegaki, Koichi; Hagihara, Yoshihisa

    2016-01-01

    Camelid-derived single domain VHH antibodies are highly heat resistant, and the mechanism of heat-induced VHH denaturation predominantly relies on the chemical modification of amino acids. Although chemical modification of disulfide bonds has been recognized as a cause for heat-induced denaturation of many proteins, there have been no mutagenesis studies, in which the number of disulfide bonds was controlled. In this article, we examined a series of mutants of two different VHHs with single, double or no disulfide bonds, and scrutinized the effects of these disulfide bond modifications on VHH denaturation. With the exception of one mutant, the heat resistance of VHHs decreased when the number of disulfide bonds increased. The effect of disulfide bonds on heat denaturation was more striking if the VHH had a second disulfide bond, suggesting that the contribution of disulfide shuffling is significant in proteins with multiple disulfide bonds. Furthermore, our results directly indicate that removal of a disulfide bond can indeed increase the heat resistance of a protein, irrespective of the negative impact on equilibrium thermodynamic stability.

  7. Relationships among the structural topology, bond strength, and mechanical properties of single-walled aluminosilicate nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liou, Kai-Hsin; Tsou, Nien-Ti; Kang, Dun-Yen

    2015-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are regarded as small but strong due to their nanoscale microstructure and high mechanical strength (Young's modulus exceeds 1000 GPa). A longstanding question has been whether there exist other nanotube materials with mechanical properties as good as those of CNTs. In this study, we investigated the mechanical properties of single-walled aluminosilicate nanotubes (AlSiNTs) using a multiscale computational method and then conducted a comparison with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). By comparing the potential energy estimated from molecular and macroscopic material mechanics, we were able to model the chemical bonds as beam elements for the nanoscale continuum modeling. This method allowed for simulated mechanical tests (tensile, bending, and torsion) with minimum computational resources for deducing their Young's modulus and shear modulus. The proposed approach also enabled the creation of hypothetical nanotubes to elucidate the relative contributions of bond strength and nanotube structural topology to overall nanotube mechanical strength. Our results indicated that it is the structural topology rather than bond strength that dominates the mechanical properties of the nanotubes. Finally, we investigated the relationship between the structural topology and the mechanical properties by analyzing the von Mises stress distribution in the nanotubes. The proposed methodology proved effective in rationalizing differences in the mechanical properties of AlSiNTs and SWCNTs. Furthermore, this approach could be applied to the exploration of new high-strength nanotube materials.Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are regarded as small but strong due to their nanoscale microstructure and high mechanical strength (Young's modulus exceeds 1000 GPa). A longstanding question has been whether there exist other nanotube materials with mechanical properties as good as those of CNTs. In this study, we investigated the mechanical properties of single

  8. Identifying individual chemical bonds in single-molecule chemical reaction products using nc-AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wickenburg, Sebastian; de Oteyza, Dimas G.; Chen, Yen-Chia; Riss, Alexander; Tsai, Hsin-Zon; Pedramrazi, Zahra; Bradley, Aaron J.; Ugeda, Miguel M.; Gorman, Patrick; Etkin, Grisha; Mowbray, Duncan J.; Perez, Alejandro; Rubio, Angel; Crommie, Michael F.; Fischer, Felix R.

    2014-03-01

    Determining reaction pathways and products is an integral part of chemical synthesis. Ensemble measurements are commonly used, but identifying products of complex reactions at surfaces presents a significant challenge. Here we present a non-contact AFM (nc-AFM) study to directly address this issue. We followed the change of the chemical structures, from reactants to products of enediyne cyclization reactions on metal surfaces. Thermal annealing of enediynes induced a series of cyclization cascades leading to radical species and the formation of dimers. Atomically resolved nc-AFM images reveal the precise chemical structure and the formation of chemical bonds between single molecular units. With the support of DFT calculations, we identified the underlying chemical pathways and barriers, demonstrating the potential of this atomically resolved AFM technique to study unknown reaction products in surface chemistry at the single-molecule level.

  9. Shear bond strength of resin cement to an acid etched and a laser irradiated ceramic surface

    PubMed Central

    Motro, Pelin Fatma Karagoz; Yurdaguven, Haktan

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate the effects of hydrofluoric acid etching and Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation on the shear bond strength of resin cement to lithium disilicate ceramic. MATERIALS AND METHODS Fifty-five ceramic blocks (5 mm × 5 mm × 2 mm) were fabricated and embedded in acrylic resin. Their surfaces were finished with 1000-grit silicon carbide paper. The blocks were assigned to five groups: 1) 9.5% hydrofluoric-acid etching for 60 s; 2-4), 1.5-, 2.5-, and 6-W Er,Cr:YSGG laser applications for 60 seconds, respectively; and 5) no treatment (control). One specimen from each group was examined using scanning electron microscopy. Ceramic primer (Rely X ceramic primer) and adhesive (Adper Single Bond) were applied to the ceramic surfaces, followed by resin cement to bond the composite cylinders, and light curing. Bonded specimens were stored in distilled water at 37℃ for 24 hours. Shear bond strengths were determined by a universal testing machine at 1 mm/min crosshead speed. Data were analyzed using Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney U-tests (α=0.05). RESULTS Adhesion was significantly stronger in Group 2 (3.88 ± 1.94 MPa) and Group 3 (3.65 ± 1.87 MPa) than in Control group (1.95 ± 1.06 MPa), in which bonding values were lowest (P<.01). No significant difference was observed between Group 4 (3.59 ± 1.19 MPa) and Control group. Shear bond strength was highest in Group 1 (8.42 ± 1.86 MPa; P<.01). CONCLUSION Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiation at 1.5 and 2.5 W increased shear bond strengths between ceramic and resin cement compared with untreated ceramic surfaces. Irradiation at 6 W may not be an efficient ceramic surface treatment technique. PMID:23755333

  10. The use of warm air stream for solvent evaporation: effects on the durability of resin-dentin bonds.

    PubMed

    Reis, Alessandra; Klein-Júnior, Celso A; de Souza, Fabio H Coelho; Stanislawczuk, Rodrigo; Loguercio, Alessandro D

    2010-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of a warm (W) or cold (C) air-dry stream for solvent evaporation on the immediate (IM) and six-month (6M) resin-dentin bond strength (microTBS) and silver nitrate uptake pattern (SNU) of two-step etch-and-rinse adhesive system (Adper Single Bond [SB] and Prime & Bond 2.1 [PB]). The adhesives were applied on demineralized dentin surfaces and a warm or cold air-dry stream (10 seconds) was applied followed by light-activation (10 seconds). After 24-hours of water storage, the specimens were serially sectioned in the "x" and "y" directions to obtain bonded sticks around 0.8 mm2 to be tested immediately or after six months of water storage. The specimens at each period were immersed in a 50% solution of silver nitrate, photodeveloped and analyzed by SEM for SNU. Higher IM microTBS values were observed for SB under W conditions. Both adhesives showed reductions in microTBS after 6M in both air temperatures. Regarding SEM, a low silver nitrate uptake was observed in the W groups either in IM or 6M for both adhesives. PMID:20166408

  11. Shear bond strength and ultrastructural interface analysis of different adhesive systems to Er:YAG laser-prepared dentin.

    PubMed

    Guven, Yeliz; Aktoren, Oya

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the shear bond strength (SBS) of a microhybrid composite resin bonded with three different adhesive systems to Er:YAG laser- (EL) or bur-prepared dentin surfaces and to analyze the quality and ultrastructure of the adhesive-dentin interfaces by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The specimens prepared for SBS test and SEM analysis were randomly assigned to eight groups (G1-G8): G1, EL (Fidelis PlusIII, Fotona) + Clearfil S3 Bond (C3S); G2, EL + AdperSE Plus (SE); G3, EL + laser etch + Adper Single Bond2 (SB2); G4, EL + acid etch + SB2; G5, EL + SB2 (no etching); G6, bur + acid etch + SB2; G7, bur + S3; G8, bur + SE. Laser was used in very short pulse mode at a setting of 200 mJ/20 Hz for dentin preparation and at 80 mJ/10 Hz for dentin etching. Bond strength test: 3.5 × 2.0 mm cylindrical molds were placed onto adhesives and filled with the composites. After 24 h in distilled water, SBS was tested at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. SEM analysis: The dentin-adhesive interfaces were evaluated for the ultrastructure of hybrid layer. Data of SBS (MPa) were statistically analyzed by ANOVA and Tukey HSD. ER:YAG laser-prepared dentin has demonstrated significantly more SBS (p < 0.01) for SE when compared to bur-prepared dentin. No significancies (p > 0.05) in SBS have been determined between the total-etch adhesive applied groups with regard to etching types. SEM analysis revealed that hybrid layers obtained in Er:YAG laser-irradiated dentin exhibited more irregular and non-homogeneous pattern than the conventionally prepared dentin. In conclusion, SE Bond demonstrated superior results in Er:YAG laser-ablated dentin compared to bur-prepared dentin. PMID:23982720

  12. 24% Indigenously Prepared Ethylene Diamine Tetra Acetic Acid Compared to Self-Etching Adhesives and their Effect on Shear Bond Strength of Composites in Primary Teeth: An In-vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Nagar, Priya; Tandil, Yogesh L.; T.P., Chandru; Gupta, Anamika; Kalaria, Devendra; Kumar, Prafful

    2015-01-01

    Background: Over the years, it has been known that 34% phosphoric acid is the benchmark in etchants with the best shear bond strength shown with composites in primary teeth. However, with latest technological advancements and innovations, in order to reduce the number of steps and less damage to the tooth structure, non-rinse conditioner (NRC) & Single-Etch and various other etchants have been tried and tested. These etchants have been found to have shear bond strength comparable to phosphoric acid. In this study, indigenously prepared 24% ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) has been compared with established etchants, as to prove if their shear bond strength was closely related. As it is a well-known fact that EDTA could be less damaging to the enamel during etching and hence can be an alternative for etching of primary teeth. Materials and Methods: For the study 60 caries-free primary molars were used, they were sectioned in the middle, after making area for bonding; the marked area was then etched using different etchants for 30 s. Each of the teeth was then rinsed and bonded with composite resin and thermocycling was done. Shear bond strength testing was done on the composite using Universal Testing Machine. Results: Results of the study showed that phosphoric acid showed the highest bond strength, closely followed by Single Etch (Adper Prompt) and NRC, then by EDTA. Conclusions: About 24% EDTA can be another comparable replacement for phosphoric acid if used with a Single Etch Primer, like Prime and Bond NT on primary teeth. 34% phosphoric acid has the highest bond strength values with composite resin. Single etch followed by NRC has the second and third highest bond strength values, which are comparable to phosphoric acid. PMID:26464540

  13. Studying Molecular Interactions at the Single Bond Level with a Laminar Flow Chamber

    PubMed Central

    Pierres, Anne; Benoliel, Anne-Marie; Bongrand, Pierre

    2008-01-01

    During the last decade, many investigators developed new methodologies allowing to study ligand-receptor interactions with unprecedented accuracy, up to the single bond level. Reported results include information on bond mechanical properties, association behaviour of surface-attached molecules, and dissection of energy landscapes and reaction pathways. The purpose of the present review is to discuss the potential and limitations of laminar flow chambers operated at low shear rates. This includes a brief review of basic principles, practical tips and problems associated with data interpretation. It is concluded that flow chambers are ideally suited to analyze weak interactions between a number of biomolecules, including the main families of adhesion receptors such as selectins, integrins, cadherins and members of the immunoglobulin superfamily. The sensitivity of the method is limited by the quality of surfaces and efficiency of the studied ligand-receptor couple rather than the hardware. Analyzing interactions with a resolution of a piconewton and a few milliseconds shows that ligand-receptor complexes may experience a number of intermediate binding states, making it necessary to examine the definition of association and dissociation rates. Finally, it is emphasized that association rates measured on surface-bound molecules are highly dependent on parameters unrelated to binding surfaces. PMID:21151952

  14. Shear Bond Strengths of Methacrylate- and Silorane-based Composite Resins to Feldspathic Porcelain using Different Adhesive Systems.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Narmin; Shakur Shahabi, Maryam; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Pournagi Azar, Fatemeh; Ebrahimi Chaharom, Mohammad Esmaeel

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Use of porcelain as inlays, laminates and metal-ceramic and all-ceramic crowns is common in modern dentistry. The high cost of ceramic restorations, time limitations and difficulty of removing these restorations result in delays in replacing fractured restorations; therefore, their repair is indicated. The aim of the present study was to compare the shear bond strengths of two types of composite resins (methacrylate-based and silorane-based) to porcelain, using three adhesive types. Materials and methods. A total of 156 samples of feldspathic porcelain surfaces were prepared with air-abrasion and randomly divided into 6 groups (n=26). In groups 1-3, Z250 composite resin was used to repair porcelain samples with Ad-per Single Bond 2 (ASB), Clearfil SE Bond (CSB) and Silorane Adhesive (SA) as the bonding systems, afterapplication of silane, respectively. In groups 4-6, the same adhesives were used in the same manner with Filtek Silorane composite resin. Finally, the shear bond strengths of the samples were measured. Two-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests were used to compare bond strengths between the groups with different adhesives at P<0.05. Results. There were significant differences in the mean bond strength values in terms of the adhesive type (P<0.001). In addition, the interactive effect of the adhesive type and composite resin type had no significant effect on bond strength (P=0.602). Conclusion. The results of the present study showed the highest repair bond strength values to porcelain with both composite resin types with the application of SA and ASB. PMID:26697151

  15. Shear Bond Strengths of Methacrylate- and Silorane-based Composite Resins to Feldspathic Porcelain using Different Adhesive Systems

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Narmin; Shakur Shahabi, Maryam; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Pournagi Azar, Fatemeh; Ebrahimi Chaharom, Mohammad Esmaeel

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. Use of porcelain as inlays, laminates and metal-ceramic and all-ceramic crowns is common in modern dentistry. The high cost of ceramic restorations, time limitations and difficulty of removing these restorations result in delays in replacing fractured restorations; therefore, their repair is indicated. The aim of the present study was to compare the shear bond strengths of two types of composite resins (methacrylate-based and silorane-based) to porcelain, using three adhesive types. Materials and methods. A total of 156 samples of feldspathic porcelain surfaces were prepared with air-abrasion and randomly divided into 6 groups (n=26). In groups 1-3, Z250 composite resin was used to repair porcelain samples with Ad-per Single Bond 2 (ASB), Clearfil SE Bond (CSB) and Silorane Adhesive (SA) as the bonding systems, afterapplication of silane, respectively. In groups 4-6, the same adhesives were used in the same manner with Filtek Silorane composite resin. Finally, the shear bond strengths of the samples were measured. Two-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests were used to compare bond strengths between the groups with different adhesives at P<0.05. Results. There were significant differences in the mean bond strength values in terms of the adhesive type (P<0.001). In addition, the interactive effect of the adhesive type and composite resin type had no significant effect on bond strength (P=0.602). Conclusion. The results of the present study showed the highest repair bond strength values to porcelain with both composite resin types with the application of SA and ASB. PMID:26697151

  16. Root filling bond strength using reciprocating file-matched single-cones with different sealers.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Carla Cristina Camilo; Brito-Júnior, Manoel; Faria-E-Silva, André Luís; Pereira, Rodrigo Dantas; Silva-Sousa, Yara Terezinha; Cruz-Filho, Antônio Miranda; Sousa-Neto, Manoel Damião

    2016-05-20

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the bond strength (BS) of root canal fillings to root dentin using the reciprocating file-matched single-cone or lateral compaction techniques with resin-based and calcium-silicate-based sealers. Maxillary canine roots were prepared and filled using one of the following approaches: Reciproc R40 file and R40 single cone, WaveOne Large file and Large single cone, or ProTaper up to F4 file with lateral compaction. The root filling was performed using AH Plus, Epiphany SE or MTA Fillapex (n = 10). Three 1-mm-thick slices were obtained from each third of each root. Two slices were subjected to a push-out test, and the other slices were prepared for scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to examine the dentin-sealer interface. Data (in MPa) from the push-out tests were analyzed using a two-way ANOVA and Tukey's test (p < 0.05). Failure modes (adhesive, cohesive or mixed) were evaluated at ×25 magnification. The single-cone techniques resulted in lower BS values than the lateral compaction technique. For lateral compaction, AH Plus and Epiphany SE showed the highest and lowest BS values, respectively. Slight differences were observed between sealers when the single-cone techniques were used. A tendency to reduce the BS toward the apical third was observed. Adhesive failures were predominant for all experimental conditions. A closer adaption of the filling material on the root dentin was observed for the AH Plus and lateral compaction techniques. The Reciproc and WaveOne techniques were associated with lower BS values than the lateral compaction technique. However, the effect of the root canal filling technique appears to be sealer-dependent.

  17. Formation of a dinuclear copper(II) complex through the cleavage of CN bond of 1-benzoyl-3-(pyridin-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole

    SciTech Connect

    Shardin, Rosidah; Pui, Law Kung; Yamin, Bohari M.; Kassim, Mohammad B.

    2014-09-03

    A simple mononuclear octahedral copper(II) complex was attempted from the reaction of three moles of 1-benzoyl-3-(pyridin-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole and one mole of copper(II) perchlorate hexahydrate in methanol. However, the product of the reaction was confirmed to be a dinuclear copper(II) complex with μ-(3-(pyridin-2-yl)-pyrazolato) and 3-(pyridin-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole ligands attached to each of the Cu(II) centre atom. The copper(II) ion assisted the cleavage of the C{sub benzoyl}N bond afforded a 3-(pyridin-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole molecule. Deprotonation of the 3-(pyridin-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole gave a 3-(pyridin-2-yl)-pyrazolato, which subsequently reacted with the Cu(II) ion to give the (3-(pyridin-2-yl)-pyrazolato)(3-(pyridin-2-yl)-1H-pyrazole)Cu(II) product moiety. The structure of the dinuclear complex was confirmed by x-ray crystallography. The complex crystallized in a monoclinic crystal system with P2(1)/n space group and cell dimensions of a = 12.2029(8) Å, b = 11.4010(7) Å, c = 14.4052(9) Å and β = 102.414(2)°. The compound was further characterized by mass spectrometry, CHN elemental analysis, infrared and UV-visible spectroscopy and the results concurred with the x-ray structure. The presence of d-d transition at 671 nm (ε = 116 dm{sup 3} mol{sup −1} cm{sup −1}) supports the presence of Cu(II) centres.

  18. The NTA-His6 bond is strong enough for AFM single-molecular recognition studies.

    PubMed

    Verbelen, Claire; Gruber, Hermann J; Dufrêne, Yves F

    2007-01-01

    There is a need in current atomic force microscopy (AFM) molecular recognition studies for generic methods for the stable, functional attachment of proteins on tips and solid supports. In the last few years, the site-directed nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA)-polyhistidine (Hisn) system has been increasingly used towards this goal. Yet, a crucial question in this context is whether the NTA-Hisn bond is sufficiently strong for ensuring stable protein immobilization during force spectroscopy measurements. Here, we measured the forces between AFM tips modified with NTA-terminated alkanethiols and solid supports functionalized with His6-Gly-Cys peptides in the presence of Ni2+. The force histogram obtained at a loading rate of 6600 pN s(-1) showed three maxima at rupture forces of 153 +/- 57 pN, 316 +/- 50 pN and 468 +/- 44 pN, that we attribute primarily to monovalent and multivalent interactions between a single His6 moiety and one, two and three NTA groups, respectively. The measured forces are well above the 50-100 pN unbinding forces typically observed by AFM for receptor-ligand pairs. The plot of adhesion force versus log (loading rate) revealed a linear regime, from which we deduced a kinetic off-rate constant of dissociation, k(off) approximately 0.07 s(-1). This value is in the range of that estimated for the multivalent interaction involving two NTA, using fluorescence measurements, and may account for an increased binding stability of the NTA-His6 bond. We conclude that the NTA-His6 system is a powerful, well-suited platform for the stable, oriented immobilization of proteins in AFM single-molecule studies. PMID:17712775

  19. Kinetics of pulpal temperature rise during light curing of 6 bonding agents from different generations, using light emitting diode and quartz-tungsten-halogen units: An in-vitro simulation

    PubMed Central

    Khaksaran, Najmeh Khatoon; Kashi, Tahereh Jafarzadeh; Rakhshan, Vahid; Zeynolabedin, Zahra Sadat; Bagheri, Hossein

    2015-01-01

    Background: Application of bonding agents (BA) into deep cavities and light curing them might increase pulpal temperature and threaten its health. The purpose of this study was to evaluate temperature rise of pulp by light curing six BA using two different light curing units (LCU), through a dent in wall of 0.5 mm. Materials and Methods: This in vitro experiment was carried out on 96 slices of the same number of human third molars (6 BAs × 2 LCUs × 8 specimens in each group). There were 6 groups of BAs: N Bond, G-Bond, OptiBond XTR, Clearfil SE, Adper Single Bond 2 and V Bond. Each group of BA (n = 16) had two subgroups of light emitting diode (LED) and quartz-tungsten-halogen light cure units (n = 8). Each of these 16 specimens were subjected to light emitting for 20 s, once without any BAs (control) and later when a BA was applied to surface of disk. Temperature rises in 140 s were evaluated. Their mean temperature change in first 20 s were calculated and analyzed using two-way repeated-measures and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey (α = 0.05). Furthermore rate of temperature increase was calculated for each material and LCU. Results: Minimum and maximum temperature rises in all subgroups were 1.7 and 2.8°C, respectively. Repeated measures ANOVA showed that both of adhesive and LCU types had significant effect on temperature rise after application of adhesives. Tukey post-hoc analysis showed Clearfil SE showed significantly higher temperature rise in comparison with Adper Single bond 2 (P = 0.047) and N Bond (P = 0.038). Temperature rose in a linear fashion during first 30-40 s and after that it was non-linear. Conclusion: 20 s of light curing seems safe for pulpal health (with critical threshold of 5.5°C). However, in longer durations and especially when using LED units, the process should be broken to two sessions. PMID:25878684

  20. Modeling Progressive Failure of Bonded Joints Using a Single Joint Finite Element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stapleton, Scott E.; Waas, Anthony M.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.

    2010-01-01

    Enhanced finite elements are elements with an embedded analytical solution which can capture detailed local fields, enabling more efficient, mesh-independent finite element analysis. In the present study, an enhanced finite element is applied to generate a general framework capable of modeling an array of joint types. The joint field equations are derived using the principle of minimum potential energy, and the resulting solutions for the displacement fields are used to generate shape functions and a stiffness matrix for a single joint finite element. This single finite element thus captures the detailed stress and strain fields within the bonded joint, but it can function within a broader structural finite element model. The costs associated with a fine mesh of the joint can thus be avoided while still obtaining a detailed solution for the joint. Additionally, the capability to model non-linear adhesive constitutive behavior has been included within the method, and progressive failure of the adhesive can be modeled by using a strain-based failure criteria and re-sizing the joint as the adhesive fails. Results of the model compare favorably with experimental and finite element results.

  1. Real-space imaging of molecular structure and chemical bonding by single-molecule inelastic tunneling probe.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Chi-lun; Xu, Chen; Han, Zhumin; Ho, W

    2014-05-23

    The arrangement of atoms and bonds in a molecule influences its physical and chemical properties. The scanning tunneling microscope can provide electronic and vibrational signatures of single molecules. However, these signatures do not relate simply to the molecular structure and bonding. We constructed an inelastic tunneling probe based on the scanning tunneling microscope to sense the local potential energy landscape of an adsorbed molecule with a carbon monoxide (CO)-terminated tip. The skeletal structure and bonding of the molecule are revealed from imaging the spatial variations of a CO vibration as the CO-terminated tip probes the core of the interactions between adjacent atoms. An application of the inelastic tunneling probe reveals the sharing of hydrogen atoms among multiple centers in intramolecular and extramolecular bonding.

  2. Creating a single twin boundary between two CdTe (111) wafers with controlled rotation angle by wafer bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Ce; Lu, Ning; Wang, Jinguo; Lee, Jihyung; Peng, Xin; Kim, Moon J.; Klie, Robert F.

    2013-12-16

    The single twin boundary with crystallographic orientation relationship (1{sup ¯}1{sup ¯}1{sup ¯})//(111) [01{sup ¯}1]//[011{sup ¯}] was created by wafer bonding. Electron diffraction patterns and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy images demonstrated the well control of the rotation angle between the bonded pair. At the twin boundary, one unit of wurtzite structure was found between two zinc-blende matrices. High-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy images showed Cd- and Te-terminated for the two bonded portions, respectively. The I-V curve across the twin boundary showed increasingly nonlinear behavior, indicating a potential barrier at the bonded twin boundary.

  3. Visual Identification of Light-Driven Breakage of the Silver-Dithiocarbamate Bond by Single Plasmonic Nanoprobes

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Peng Fei; Yuan, Bin Fang; Gao, Ming Xuan; Li, Rong Sheng; Ma, Jun; Zou, Hong Yan; Li, Yuan Fang; Li, Ming; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2015-01-01

    Insight into the nature of metal-sulfur bond, a meaningful one in life science, interface chemistry and organometallic chemistry, is interesting but challenging. By utilizing the localized surface plasmon resonance properties of silver nanoparticles, herein we visually identified the photosensitivity of silver-dithiocarbamate (Ag-DTC) bond by using dark field microscopic imaging (iDFM) technique at single nanoparticle level. It was found that the breakage of Ag-DTC bond could be accelerated effectively by light irradiation, followed by a pH-dependent horizontal or vertical degradation of the DTC molecules, in which an indispensable preoxidation process of the silver was at first disclosed. These findings suggest a visualization strategy at single plasmonic nanoparticle level which can be excellently applied to explore new stimulus-triggered reactions, and might also open a new way to understand traditional organic reaction mechanisms. PMID:26493773

  4. Visual Identification of Light-Driven Breakage of the Silver-Dithiocarbamate Bond by Single Plasmonic Nanoprobes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Peng Fei; Yuan, Bin Fang; Gao, Ming Xuan; Li, Rong Sheng; Ma, Jun; Zou, Hong Yan; Li, Yuan Fang; Li, Ming; Huang, Cheng Zhi

    2015-10-01

    Insight into the nature of metal-sulfur bond, a meaningful one in life science, interface chemistry and organometallic chemistry, is interesting but challenging. By utilizing the localized surface plasmon resonance properties of silver nanoparticles, herein we visually identified the photosensitivity of silver-dithiocarbamate (Ag-DTC) bond by using dark field microscopic imaging (iDFM) technique at single nanoparticle level. It was found that the breakage of Ag-DTC bond could be accelerated effectively by light irradiation, followed by a pH-dependent horizontal or vertical degradation of the DTC molecules, in which an indispensable preoxidation process of the silver was at first disclosed. These findings suggest a visualization strategy at single plasmonic nanoparticle level which can be excellently applied to explore new stimulus-triggered reactions, and might also open a new way to understand traditional organic reaction mechanisms.

  5. Acceptorless dehydrogenation of C-C single bonds adjacent to functional groups by metal-ligand cooperation.

    PubMed

    Kusumoto, Shuhei; Akiyama, Midori; Nozaki, Kyoko

    2013-12-18

    Unprecedented direct acceptorless dehydrogenation of C-C single bonds adjacent to functional groups to form α,β-unsaturated compounds has been accomplished by using a new class of group 9 metal complexes. Metal-ligand cooperation operated by the hydroxycyclopentadienyl ligand was proposed to play a major role in the catalytic transformation. PMID:24299029

  6. New approach for designing single-chain magnets: organization of chains via hydrogen bonding between nucleobases.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei-Xiong; Shiga, Takuya; Miyasaka, Hitoshi; Yamashita, Masahiro

    2012-04-25

    Two one-dimensional (1D) manganese complexes, [Mn(2)(naphtmen)(2)(L)](ClO(4))·2Et(2)O·2MeOH·H(2)O (1) and [Mn(2)(naphtmen)(2)(HL)](ClO(4))(2)·MeOH (2), were synthesized by using a bridging ligand with a nucleobase moiety, 6-amino-9-β-carboxyethylpurine, and a salen-type manganese(III) dinuclear complex, [Mn(2)(naphtmen)(2)(H(2)O)(2)](ClO(4))(2) (naphtmen(2-) = N,N'-(1,1,2,2-tetramethylethylene)bis(naphthylideneiminato) dianion). In 1 and 2, the carboxylate-bridged Mn(III) dinuclear units are alternately linked by two kinds of weak Mn···O interactions into 1D chains. As a result, canted antiferromagnetic and ferromagnetic interactions are alternately present along the chains, leading to a 1D chain with non-cancellation of anisotropic spins. Since the chains connected via H-bonds between nucleobase moieties are magnetically isolated, both 1 and 2 act as single-chain magnets (SCMs). More importantly, this result shows the smaller canting angles hinder long-range ordering in favor of SCM dynamics.

  7. Single-step approach for fabrication of vancomycin-bonded silica monolith as chiral stationary phase.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Ming-Lung; Chau, Lai-Kwan; Hon, Yung-Son

    2014-09-01

    A vancomycin-bonded silica monolithic column for capillary electrochromatography (CEC) was prepared by a single-step in situ sol-gel approach. This sol-gel process incorporates a synthetic sol-gel precursor which contains a macrocyclic antibiotic, vancomycin, to form a porous silica network inside a fused-silica capillary. To avoid degradation of vancomycin during the column fabrication, a mild step was adopted into the sol-gel process. The performance of the vancomycin chiral stationary phase was investigated by CEC in both the reversed-phase mode and the normal-phase mode. The vancomycin chiral stationary phase was optimized with respect to vancomycin loading in the reversed-phase mode for chiral separation of thalidomide enantiomers. The best efficiency and resolution values of 94600plates/m and 5.79, respectively, were achieved. The optimized column was further applied to chiral separation of alprenolol enantiomers. A plate height of less than 7μm for the first eluted enantiomer of alprenolol was obtained in an aqueous mobile phase at a flow rate of 0.74mm/s. Using enantiomers of seven β-blockers and some other basic enantiomers as test analytes, separation efficiencies of up to 148100plates/m in the reversed-phase mode and up to 138100plates/m in the normal-phase mode were achieved.

  8. Synthesis and photophysical properties of a single bond linked tetracene dimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Tingting; Shen, Li; Liu, Heyuan; Sun, Xuan; Li, Xiyou

    2016-07-01

    A tetracene dimer linked directly by a single bond has been successfully prepared by using electron withdrawing groups to improve the stability. The molecular structure of this dimer is characterized by 1H NMR, MALDI-TOF mass spectroscopy, and elemental analysis. The minimized molecular structure and X-ray crystallography reveal that the tetracene subunits of this dimer adopt an orthogonal configuration. Its absorption spectrum differs significantly from that of its monomeric counterpart, suggesting the presence of strong interactions between the two tetracene subunits. The excited state of this dimer is delocalized on both two tetracene subunits, which is significantly different from that of orthogonal anthracene dimers, but similar with that observed for orthogonal pentacene dimer. Most of the excited states of this dimer decay by radioactive channels, which is different from the localized twisted charge transfer state (LTCT) channel of anthracene dimers and the singlet fission (SF) channel of pentacene dimers. The results of this research suggest that similar orthogonal configurations caused different propertied for acene dimers with different conjugation length.

  9. Bond-equilibrium theory of liquid Se-Te alloys. II. Effect of singly attached ring molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutler, Melvin; Bez, Wolfgang G.

    1981-06-01

    A statistical-mechanical theory for bond equilibrium of chain polymers containing threefold (3F) and onefold (1F) bond defects is extended to include the effects of free ring molecules and ring molecules attached to chains by a single 3F atom. Positively charged singly attached rings are shown to play a key role in bond equilibrium in liquid Sex Te1-x by permitting the formation of ion pairs in which both constituents are effectively chain terminators, thus decreasing the average polymer size. The theory is applied to explain the behavior of the paramagnetic susceptibility, χp, and electronic transport as affected by the Fermi energy EF. It is found that the increase in χp with the concentration of Te is primarily the result of the smaller energy for breaking Te bonds. In addition, attached rings play an important role in determining the effect of temperature on χp. At x<~0.5, the concentrations of both free and attached rings becomes small at high T because of the high concentration of bond defects.

  10. Influence of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate application, smear layer removal, and storage time on resin-dentin bonding*

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Jun; Zheng, Wei-ying; Liu, Peng-ruo-feng; Zhang, Ning; Lin, Hui-ping; Fan, Yi-jing; Gu, Xin-hua; Vollrath, Oliver; Mehl, Christian

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the influence of Tooth Mousse (TM) application, smear layer removal, and storage time on resin-dentin microtensile bond strength (μTBS). Dentin specimens were divided into two groups: (1) smear layer covered; (2) smear layer removed using 15% EDTA for 90 s. In each group, half the specimens were treated once with TM for 60 min. After bonding procedures using a two-step self-etching adhesive (Clearfil SE Bond (CSE); Kuraray Medical, Tokyo, Japan), an all-in-one adhesive (G-Bond (GB); GC Corp, Tokyo, Japan), and a total-etch adhesive (Adper Single Bond 2 (SB); 3M ESPE, St. Paul, MN, USA), the specimens were stored for 3 d or 6 months in deionized water at 37 °C, and μTBS was tested and analyzed. With the exception of SB (no TM application) and GB, the μTBS was significantly increased for CSE and SB using EDTA pre-conditioning and 3 d of storage (P≤0.001). Bond strength of GB decreased significantly when using EDTA (3 d storage, P<0.05). TM application only increased the μTBS of GB (no EDTA) and SB (with EDTA) after 3 d (P≤0.02). Comparing the adhesives after 3 d of storage, CSE exhibited the greatest μTBS values followed by GB and SB (P≤0.02). The factors of adhesive, EDTA, and TM did not show any significant impact on μTBS when specimens were stored for 6 months (P>0.05). The additional application of TM and EDTA for cavity preparation seems only to have a short-term effect, and no influence on μTBS of dentin bonds after a period of 6 months. PMID:25001224

  11. Erosive cola-based drinks affect the bonding to enamel surface: an in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    CASAS-APAYCO, Leslie Caroll; DREIBI, Vanessa Manzini; HIPÓLITO, Ana Carolina; GRAEFF, Márcia Sirlene Zardin; RIOS, Daniela; MAGALHÃES, Ana Carolina; BUZALAF, Marília Afonso Rabelo; WANG, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to assess the impact of in vitro erosion provoked by different cola-based drinks (Coke types), associated or not with toothbrushing, to bonding to enamel. Material and Methods Fifty-six bovine enamel specimens were prepared and randomly assigned into seven groups (N=8): C- Control (neither eroded nor abraded), ERO-RC: 3x/1-minute immersion in Regular Coke (RC), ERO-LC: 3x/1-minute immersion in Light Coke (LC), ERO-ZC: 3x/1-minute immersion in Zero Coke (ZC) and three other eroded groups, subsequently abraded for 1-minute toothbrushing (EROAB-RC, EROAB-LC and EROAB-ZC, respectively). After challenges, they were stored overnight in artificial saliva for a total of 24 hours and restored with Adper Single Bond 2/Filtek Z350. Buildup coronal surfaces were cut in 1 mm2 -specimens and subjected to a microtensile test. Data were statistically analyzed by two-way ANOVA/Bonferroni tests (α=0.05). Failure modes were assessed by optical microscopy (X40). The interface of the restorations were observed using Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM). Results All tested cola-based drinks significantly reduced the bond strength, which was also observed in the analyses of interfaces. Toothbrushing did not have any impact on the bond strength. CLSM showed that except for Zero Coke, all eroded specimens resulted in irregular hybrid layer formation. Conclusions All cola-based drinks reduced the bond strength. Different patterns of hybrid layers were obtained revealing their impact, except for ZC. PMID:24918663

  12. Can green tea be used to reverse compromised bond strength after bleaching?

    PubMed

    Berger, Sandrine B; De Souza Carreira, Renata P; Guiraldo, Ricardo D; Lopes, Murilo B; Pavan, Sabrina; Giannini, Marcelo; Bedran-Russo, Ana K

    2013-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the antioxidant effect of green tea on microtensile bond strength (μTBS) to bleached enamel. Forty-two human third molars were randomly divided into six experimental groups (n = 7 each group): group 1, no treatment; group 2, bleaching (10% carbamide peroxide); group 3, bleaching + 10% sodium ascorbate gel (SA); group 4, bleaching + 10% green tea gel (GT); group 5, SA; and group 6, GT. In groups 2, 3, and 4, bleach was applied onto the enamel surface for 6 h, every day for 14 d. In groups 3 and 5, SA was applied for 1 h; and in groups 4 and 6, GT was applied for 1 h. Immediately after treatment, the specimens were bonded with Adper Single Bond 2 and Filtek Z350 XT. The μTBS of the specimens was tested using a universal testing machine. Fracture mode analysis of the bonded enamel surface was performed using scanning electron microscopy. The mean μTBS values for each group were: group 1, 33.2 ± 5.8 MPa; group 2, 22.6 ± 5.5 MPa; group 3, 30.0 ± 5.2 MPa; group 4, 31.6 ± 3.8 MPa; group 5, 29.1 ± 4.2 MPa; and group 6, 32.2 ± 4.5 MPa. All groups had a higher percentage of mixed failures. In conclusion, green tea can be used as an alternative antioxidant on bleached enamel before bonding procedures. PMID:23841791

  13. Effect of Adhesive Cementation Strategies on the Bonding of Y-TZP to Human Dentin.

    PubMed

    Alves, Mll; Campos, F; Bergoli, C D; Bottino, M A; Özcan, M; Souza, Roa

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of different adhesive strategies on the adhesion of zirconia to dentin using conventional and self-adhesive cements and their corresponding adhesive resins. The occlusal parts of human molars (N=80) were sectioned, exposing the dentin. The teeth and zirconia cylinders (N=80) (diameter=3.4 mm; height=4 mm) were randomly divided into eight groups according to the factors "surface conditioning" and "cement type" (n=10 per group). One conventional cement (CC: RelyX ARC, 3M ESPE) and one self-adhesive cement (SA: RelyX U200, 3M ESPE) and their corresponding adhesive resin (for CC, Adper Single Bond Plus; for SA, Scotchbond Universal Adhesive-SU) were applied on dentin. Zirconia specimens were conditioned either using chairside (CJ: CoJet, 30 μm, 2.5 bar, four seconds), laboratory silica coating (RC: Rocatec, 110 μm, 2.5 bar, four seconds), or universal primer (Single Bond Universal-UP). Nonconditioned groups for both cements acted as the control (C). Specimens were stored in water (37°C, 30 days) and subjected to shear bond strength (SBS) testing (1 mm/min). Data (MPa) were analyzed using two-way analysis of variance and a Tukey test (α=0.05). While surface conditioning significantly affected the SBS values (p=0.0001) (Cbond strength of zirconia to dentin compared to the control group, regardless of the type of resin cement used.

  14. THE PROTOTYPE ALUMINUM - CARBON SINGLE, DOUBLE, AND TRIPLE BONDS: Al - CH3, Al = CH2, AND Al. = CH

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, Douglas J.; Ray, Douglas; Rubesin, Philip C.; Schaefer III, Henry F.

    1980-06-01

    Nonempirical quantum mechanical methods have been used to investigate the A{ell}CH{sub 3}, A{ell}CH{sub 2}, and A{ell}CH molecules, which may be considered to represent the simplest aluminum-carbon single, double, and triple bonds. Equilibrium geometries and vibrational frequencies were determined at the self-consistent-field level of theory using double zeta basis set: A{ell}(11s7p/6s4p), C(9s5p/4s2p), H(4s/2s). The {sup 1}A{sub 1} ground state of A{ell}CH{sub 3} has a reasonably conventional A{ell}-C single bond of length 2.013 {angstrom}, compared to 1.96 {angstrom} in the known molecule A{ell}(CH{sub 3}){sub 3}. The CH equilibrium distance is 1.093 {angstrom} and the A{ell}-C-H angle 111.9{sup o}. The structures of three electron states each of A{ell}CH{sub 2} and A{ell}CH were similarly predicted, The interesting result is that the ground state of A{ell}CH{sub 2} does not contain an A{ell}-C double bond, and the ground state of A{ell}CH is not characterized by an A{ell}{triple_bond}C bond. The multiply-bonded electronic states do exist but they lie 21 kcal (A{ell}CH{sub 2}) and 86 kcal (A{ell}CH) above the respective ground states. The dissociation energies of the three ground electronic states are predicted to be 68 kcal (A{ell}CH{sub 3}), 77 kcal (A{ell}CH{sub 2}), and 88 kcal (A{ell}CH), Vibrational frequencies are also predicted for the three molecules, and their electronic structures are discussed with reference to Mulliken populations and dipole moments.

  15. Global-Local Finite Element Analysis of Bonded Single-Lap Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kilic, Bahattin; Madenci, Erdogan; Ambur, Damodar R.

    2004-01-01

    Adhesively bonded lap joints involve dissimilar material junctions and sharp changes in geometry, possibly leading to premature failure. Although the finite element method is well suited to model the bonded lap joints, traditional finite elements are incapable of correctly resolving the stress state at junctions of dissimilar materials because of the unbounded nature of the stresses. In order to facilitate the use of bonded lap joints in future structures, this study presents a finite element technique utilizing a global (special) element coupled with traditional elements. The global element includes the singular behavior at the junction of dissimilar materials with or without traction-free surfaces.

  16. Thorium–phosphorus triamidoamine complexes containing Th–P single- and multiple-bond interactions

    PubMed Central

    Wildman, Elizabeth P.; Balázs, Gábor; Wooles, Ashley J.; Scheer, Manfred; Liddle, Stephen T.

    2016-01-01

    Despite the burgeoning field of uranium-ligand multiple bonds, analogous complexes involving other actinides remain scarce. For thorium, under ambient conditions only a few multiple bonds to carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, sulfur, selenium and tellurium are reported, and no multiple bonds to phosphorus are known, reflecting a general paucity of synthetic methodologies and also problems associated with stabilising these linkages at the large thorium ion. Here we report structurally authenticated examples of a parent thorium(IV)–phosphanide (Th–PH2), a terminal thorium(IV)–phosphinidene (Th=PH), a parent dithorium(IV)–phosphinidiide (Th–P(H)-Th) and a discrete actinide–phosphido complex under ambient conditions (Th=P=Th). Although thorium is traditionally considered to have dominant 6d-orbital contributions to its bonding, contrasting to majority 5f-orbital character for uranium, computational analyses suggests that the bonding of thorium can be more nuanced, in terms of 5f- versus 6d-orbital composition and also significant involvement of the 7s-orbital and how this affects the balance of 5f- versus 6d-orbital bonding character. PMID:27682617

  17. Thorium-phosphorus triamidoamine complexes containing Th-P single- and multiple-bond interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wildman, Elizabeth P.; Balázs, Gábor; Wooles, Ashley J.; Scheer, Manfred; Liddle, Stephen T.

    2016-09-01

    Despite the burgeoning field of uranium-ligand multiple bonds, analogous complexes involving other actinides remain scarce. For thorium, under ambient conditions only a few multiple bonds to carbon, nitrogen, oxygen, sulfur, selenium and tellurium are reported, and no multiple bonds to phosphorus are known, reflecting a general paucity of synthetic methodologies and also problems associated with stabilising these linkages at the large thorium ion. Here we report structurally authenticated examples of a parent thorium(IV)-phosphanide (Th-PH2), a terminal thorium(IV)-phosphinidene (Th=PH), a parent dithorium(IV)-phosphinidiide (Th-P(H)-Th) and a discrete actinide-phosphido complex under ambient conditions (Th=P=Th). Although thorium is traditionally considered to have dominant 6d-orbital contributions to its bonding, contrasting to majority 5f-orbital character for uranium, computational analyses suggests that the bonding of thorium can be more nuanced, in terms of 5f- versus 6d-orbital composition and also significant involvement of the 7s-orbital and how this affects the balance of 5f- versus 6d-orbital bonding character.

  18. Mechanochemical synthesis of a novel C(60) dimer connected by a silicon bridge and a single bond.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Koichi; Komatsu, Koichi

    2002-03-21

    [reaction: see text] A novel C(60) dimer connected by a silicon bridge and a single bond was synthesized by the mechanochemical solid-state reaction employing a high-speed vibration milling technique and fully characterized by the (1)H and (13)C NMR, APCI mass, and UV-vis spectroscopy. The presence of the electronic interaction between the two C(60) cages was demonstrated by the electrochemical method.

  19. The effect of hydrogen bonds on diffusion mechanism of water inside single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qu; Wang, Qi; Liu, Ying-Chun; Wu, Tao

    2014-06-01

    Nanopores can serve as a molecule channel for transport of fluid, where water diffusion differs remarkably from that of simple particles. Hydrogen bonds play an essential role in the diffusion anomaly. Detailed investigations are carried out on the systems of rigid (6, 6), (7, 7), (8, 8), (9, 9), and (10, 10) armchair carbon nanotubes, solvated with Lennard-Jones water fluids. The role of hydrogen bonds is examined by diffusivity statistics and animation snapshots. It is found that in small (6,6) CNT, hydrogen bonds tend to aggregate water into a wire and lead to rapid collective drift. Confinement can stabilize the hydrogen bond of water molecules and enhance its lifetime. In relatively smaller CNTs, the diffusion mechanism could be altered by the temperature. Moreover, in larger nanotubes hydrogen bonding network allows the water to form regional concentrated clusters. This allows water fluid in extremely low density exhibit rather slow self-diffusion motion. This fundamental study attempts to provide insights in understanding nanoscale delivery system in aqueous solution.

  20. Influence of Surface Treatments and Adhesive Systems on Lithium Disilicate Microshear Bond Strength.

    PubMed

    Garboza, Celso Sebastião; Berger, Sandrine Bittencourt; Guiraldo, Ricardo Danil; Fugolin, Ana Paula Piovezan; Gonini-Júnior, Alcides; Moura, Sandra Kiss; Lopes, Murilo Baena

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the microshear bond strength of ceramic prosthetic structures reinforced by lithium disilicate cemented with resin cement under conditions of different surface treatments and adhesive systems. Seventy-two rectangular blocks of lithium disilicate (6.5 mm long × 5 mm wide × 1 mm thick) were fabricated, air abraded with 50-μm Al2O3 particles and divided into six groups (n=12) depending on the surface pretreatments. The groups were as follows: 10HF/S/SBM: 10% hydrofluoric acid etched for 20 s (10HF) + silane (S) + Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (SBM); 10HF/S/SB: 10HF + S + Single Bond Universal (SB); 10HF/SBM; 10HF/SB; S/SBM and S/SB. Two 1-mm-long plastic tubes were placed on the specimens, filled with RelyX ARC resin cement and cured for 20 s per tube. The plastic tube was removed, and the microshear bond strength was tested. Data were submitted to analysis of variance and Tukey's tests (α=0.05). Fractured specimens were observed under optical microscopy. For both adhesives, the bond strengths (MPa) of groups treated with acid-etching and silane (10HF/S/SB: 24.82, 10HF/S/SBM: 24.90) were higher (p<0.001) than those of groups treated with acid-etching (10HF/SB: 16.47, 10HF/SBM: 19.94) only or only silane (S/SB: 18.42, S/SBM: 13.24). All groups showed a predominance of failure adhesive. The silanization should be a clinical step in cementing ceramic structures reinforced by lithium disilicate, even with the application of universal adhesive that contains silane in its formulation. PMID:27652711

  1. Effect of warm air-drying on dentin bond strength of single-step self-etch adhesives.

    PubMed

    Ogura, Yukari; Shimizu, Yusuke; Shiratsuchi, Koji; Tsujimoto, Akimasa; Takamizawa, Toshiki; Ando, Susumu; Miyazaki, Masashi

    2012-01-01

    The effect of warm air-drying on the dentin bond strengths of the single-step self-etch adhesives was determined. The adhesives were applied to bovine dentin followed by drying in a stream of warm air for 5, 10, and 15 s at 37°C. Resin composites were condensed into a mold and polymerized. Specimens were stored in distilled water at 37°C for 24 h, then shear tested. The surface free-energies were determined by measuring the contact angles of three test liquids placed on the cured adhesives. The dentin bond strengths varied according to the air-drying time. The value of the acid component increased slightly when drying was performed with a stream of warm air, whereas that of the base component decreased significantly. These data suggested that warm air-drying was essential to obtain adequate bond strengths, although increasing the drying time did not significantly influence the bond strength. PMID:22864201

  2. Casein Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate and Shear Bond Strength of Adhesives to Primary Teeth Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Farokh Gisovar, Elham; Hedayati, Nassim; Shadman, Niloofar; Shafiee, Leila

    2015-01-01

    Background: CPP-ACP (Phosphopeptide-Amorphous Calcium Phosphate) has an important role in caries prevention in pediatric patients. This study was done, because of the great use of CPP-ACP and the need for restoration for teeth treated with CPP-ACP as well as the importance of shear bond strength of adhesives in the success of restorations. Objectives: This study aimed to evaluate the effect of casein phosphopeptide-amorphous calcium phosphate (CPP-ACP) on shear bond strength of dental adhesives to enamel of primary teeth molars. Materials and Methods: This in vitro study was conducted on 180 extracted primary molars. They were randomly divided into 6 groups and each group was divided into 2 subgroups (treated with CPP-ACP and untreated). In subgroups with CPP-ACP, enamel was treated with CPP-ACP paste 1 h/d for 5 days. Types of adhesives that were evaluated in this study were Tetric N-Bond, AdheSE, AdheSE One F, single Bond 2, SE Bond, and Adper Prompt L-Pop. Shear bond strength was tested with a universal testing machine and mode of failure was evaluated under stereomicroscope. Data were analyzed by T test, 2-way analysis of variance (ANOVA), Tukey and Fisher exact test using SPSS18. P < 0.05 was considered as significance level. Results: Shear bond strengths of different adhesive systems to enamel of primary teeth treated and untreated with CPP-ACP showed no significant difference (P > 0.05). Mode of failure in all groups regardless of CPP-ACP administration was mainly adhesive type. Our results indicated that CPP-ACP did not affect shear bond strength of studied adhesives to primary teeth enamel. Conclusions: To have a successful and durable composite restoration, having a high strength bonding is essential. Considering the wide use of CPP-ACP in preventing tooth decay and the role of adhesive shear bond strength (SBS) in success of composite restoration, we conducted the present study to evaluate the effect of CPP-ACP on the SBS of adhesives to primary teeth

  3. Bond strength of an adhesive system irradiated with Nd:YAG laser in dentin treated with Er:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malta, D. A. M. P.; Costa, M. M.; Pelino, J. E. P.; de Andrade, M. F.; Lizarelli, R. F. Z.

    2008-02-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to verify through micro tensile bond test the bond strength of an adhesive system irradiated with Nd:YAG laser in dentine previously treated with Er:YAG laser. Twenty caries free extracted human third molars were used. The teeth were divided in four experimental groups (n = 5): (G1) control group; (G2) irradiation of the adhesive system with the Nd:YAG laser; (G3) dentin treatment with Er:YAG laser; (G4) dentin treatment with Er:YAG laser followed by the irradiation of the adhesive system with Nd:YAG laser. The Er:YAG laser fluency parameter for the dentin treatment was of 60 J/cm2. The adhesive system was irradiated with the Nd:YAG laser with fluency of 100 J/cm2. Dental restorations were performed with Adper Single Bond 2/Z250. One tooth from each group was prepared for the evaluation of the adhesive interface under SEM and bond failure tests were also performed and evaluated. The statistical analysis showed statistical significant difference between the groups G1 and G3, G1 and G4, G2 and G3, and G2 and G4; and similarity between the groups G1 and G2, and G3 and G4. The adhesive failures were predominant in all the experimental groups. The SEM analysis showed an adhesive interface with features confirming the results of the mechanical tests. The Nd:YAG laser on the adhesive system did not influence the bond strength in dentin treated or not with the Er:YAG laser.

  4. 31 CFR 363.165 - What happens when I convert a savings bond that is registered in my name as a single owner...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What happens when I convert a savings... when I convert a savings bond that is registered in my name as a single owner, either coowner, an owner... beneficiary, or an entity, will be converted to a book-entry savings bond and automatically redeemed....

  5. A single disulfide bond restores thermodynamic and proteolytic stability to an extensively mutated protein.

    PubMed Central

    Roesler, K. R.; Rao, A. G.

    2000-01-01

    The potential for engineering stable proteins with multiple amino acid substitutions was explored. Eleven lysine, five methionine, two tryptophan, one glycine, and three threonine substitutions were simultaneously made in barley chymotrypsin inhibitor-2 (CI-2) to substantially improve the essential amino acid content of the protein. These substitutions were chosen based on the three-dimensional structure of CI-2 and an alignment of homologous sequences. The initial engineered protein folded into a wild-type-like structure, but had a free energy of unfolding of only 2.2 kcal/mol, considerably less than the wild-type value of 7.5 kcal/mol. Restoration of the lysine mutation at position 67 to the wild-type arginine increased the free energy of unfolding to 3.1 kcal/mol. Subsequent cysteine substitutions at positions 22 and 82 resulted in disulfide bond formation and a protein with nearly wild-type thermodynamic stability (7.0 kcal/mol). None of the engineered proteins retained inhibitory activity against chymotrypsin or elastase, and all had substantially reduced inhibitory activity against subtilisin. The proteolytic stabilities of the proteins correlated with their thermodynamic stabilities. Reduction of the disulfide bond resulted in substantial loss of both thermodynamic and proteolytic stabilities, confirming that the disulfide bond, and not merely the cysteine substitutions, was responsible for the increased stability. We conclude that it is possible to replace over a third of the residues in CI-2 with minimal disruption of stability and structural integrity. PMID:11045611

  6. Effect of Pre-heating on Microtensile Bond Strength of Composite Resin to Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Davari, Abdolrahim; Daneshkazemi, Alireza; Behniafar, Behnaz; Sheshmani, Mahsan

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Direct composite resin restorations are widely used and the impact of different storage temperatures on composites is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the microtensile bond strength of composite to dentin after different pre-curing temperatures. Materials and Methods: Occlusal surfaces of 44 human molars were ground with diamond burs under water coolant and polished with 600 grit silicon carbide papers to obtain flat dentin surfaces. The dentin was etched with 37% phosphoric acid and bonded with Adper Single Bond 2 according to the manufacturer's instructions. The specimens were randomly divided into two groups (n=22) according to the composite resin applied: FiltekP60 and Filtek Z250. Each group included three subgroups of composite resin pre-curing temperatures (4°C, 23°C and 37°C). Composite resins were applied to the dentin surfaces in a plastic mold (8mm in diameter and 4mm in length) incrementally and cured. Twenty-two composite-to-dentin hour-glass sticks with one mm2 cross-sectional area per group were prepared. Microtensile bond strength measurements were made using a universal testing machine at a crosshead speed of one mm/min. For statistical analysis, t-test, one-way and two-way ANOVA were used. The level of significance was set at P<0.05. Results: Filtek P60 pre-heated at 37ºC had significantly higher microtensile bond strength than Filtek Z250 under the same condition. The microtensile bond strengths were not significantly different at 4ºC, 23ºC and 37ºC subgroups of each composite resin group. Conclusion: Filtek P60 and Filtek Z250 did not have significantly different microtensile bond strengths at 4ºC and 23ºC but Filtek P60 had significantly higher microtensile bond strength at 37 ºC. Composite and temperature interactions had significant effects on the bond strength. PMID:25628684

  7. Lanthanide-Catalyzed Reversible Alkynyl Exchange by Carbon-Carbon Single-Bond Cleavage Assisted by a Secondary Amino Group.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yinlin; Zhang, Fangjun; Zhang, Jie; Zhou, Xigeng

    2016-09-12

    Lanthanide-catalyzed alkynyl exchange through C-C single-bond cleavage assisted by a secondary amino group is reported. A lanthanide amido complex is proposed as a key intermediate, which undergoes unprecedented reversible β-alkynyl elimination followed by alkynyl exchange and imine reinsertion. The in situ homo- and cross-dimerization of the liberated alkyne can serve as an additional driving force to shift the metathesis equilibrium to completion. This reaction is formally complementary to conventional alkyne metathesis and allows the selective transformation of internal propargylamines into those bearing different substituents on the alkyne terminus in moderate to excellent yields under operationally simple reaction conditions. PMID:27510403

  8. Chemical Bonds II

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanderson, R. T.

    1972-01-01

    The continuation of a paper discussing chemical bonding from a bond energy viewpoint, with a number of examples of single and multiple bonds. (Part I appeared in volume 1 number 3, pages 16-23, February 1972.) (AL)

  9. Paddlewheel 1,2,4-diazaphospholide distibines with the shortest antimony-antimony single bonds.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Minggang; Wang, Lixia; Zhang, Xiang; Zheng, Wenjun

    2016-07-14

    One-electron reduction of SbCl3 with the non-innocent 1,2,4-diazaphospholide anion [3,5-R2dp](-) produced straightforwardly three unprecedented paddlewheel distibines [L2(Sb-Sb)L2] (L = η(1),η(1)-3,5-R2dp, R = tBu (4), iPr (5α, 5β), or Cy (6)) with very short Sb-Sb bond lengths (2.6691(8)-2.7451(8) Å). The novel structures were rationalized by DFT calculations. PMID:27295111

  10. Molecular single-bond covalent radii for elements 1-118.

    PubMed

    Pyykkö, Pekka; Atsumi, Michiko

    2009-01-01

    A self-consistent system of additive covalent radii, R(AB)=r(A) + r(B), is set up for the entire periodic table, Groups 1-18, Z=1-118. The primary bond lengths, R, are taken from experimental or theoretical data corresponding to chosen group valencies. All r(E) values are obtained from the same fit. Both E-E, E-H, and E-CH(3) data are incorporated for most elements, E. Many E-E' data inside the same group are included. For the late main groups, the system is close to that of Pauling. For other elements it is close to the methyl-based one of Suresh and Koga [J. Phys. Chem. A 2001, 105, 5940] and its predecessors. For the diatomic alkalis MM' and halides XX', separate fits give a very high accuracy. These primary data are then absorbed with the rest. The most notable exclusion are the transition-metal halides and chalcogenides which are regarded as partial multiple bonds. Other anomalies include H(2) and F(2). The standard deviation for the 410 included data points is 2.8 pm.

  11. A Tale of Copper Coordination Frameworks: Controlled Single-Crystal-to-Single-Crystal Transformations and Their Catalytic C-H Bond Activation Properties.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yifa; Feng, Xiao; Huang, Xianqiang; Lin, Zhengguo; Pei, Xiaokun; Li, Siqing; Li, Jikun; Wang, Shan; Li, Rui; Wang, Bo

    2015-09-28

    Metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), as a class of microporous materials with well-defined channels and rich functionalities, hold great promise for various applications. Yet the formation and crystallization processes of various MOFs with distinct topology, connectivity, and properties remain largely unclear, and the control of such processes is rather challenging. Starting from a 0D Cu coordination polyhedron, MOP-1, we successfully unfolded it to give a new 1D-MOF by a single-crystal-to-single-crystal (SCSC) transformation process at room temperature as confirmed by SXRD. We also monitored the continuous transformation states by FTIR and PXRD. Cu MOFs with 2D and 3D networks were also obtained from this 1D-MOF by SCSC transformations. Furthermore, Cu MOFs with 0D, 1D, and 3D networks, MOP-1, 1D-MOF, and HKUST-1, show unique performances in the kinetics of the C-H bond catalytic oxidation reaction.

  12. Electronic Structure and Bonding in Co-Based Single and Mixed Valence Oxides: A Quantum Chemical Perspective.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vijay; Major, Dan Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The mixed valence cobalt oxide, Co3O4, is a potential candidate as a photovoltaic (PV) material, which also exhibits intriguing chemical and catalytic properties. Here, we present a comparative study of the electronic, magnetic, and chemical bonding properties of mixed valence Co3O4 (i.e., Co(2+/3+)) with the related single valence CoO (i.e., Co(2+)) and Co2O3 (i.e., Co(3+)) oxides using density functional theory (DFT). We have employed a range of theoretical methods, including pure DFT, DFT+U, and a range-separated exchange-correlation functional (HSE06). We compare the electronic structure and band gap of the oxide materials, with available photoemission spectroscopy and optical band gaps. Our calculations suggest that the bonding between Co(3+) and O(2-) ions in Co2O3 and Co3O4 and Co(2+) and O(2-) ions in CoO and Co3O4 are rather different. We find that Co2O3 and Co3O4 are weakly correlated materials, whereas CoO is a strongly correlated material. Furthermore, our computed one-electron energy level diagrams reveal that strong Co-O antibonding states are present at the top of the valence band for all the cobalt oxides, hinting at a defect tolerant capacity in these materials. These results, which give a detailed picture of the chemical bonding in related single and mixed valence cobalt oxides, may serve as a guide to enhance the PV or photoelectrochemical activity of Co3O4, by reducing its internal defect states or changing its electronic structure by doping or alloying with suitable elements. PMID:27010797

  13. Electronic Structure and Bonding in Co-Based Single and Mixed Valence Oxides: A Quantum Chemical Perspective.

    PubMed

    Singh, Vijay; Major, Dan Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The mixed valence cobalt oxide, Co3O4, is a potential candidate as a photovoltaic (PV) material, which also exhibits intriguing chemical and catalytic properties. Here, we present a comparative study of the electronic, magnetic, and chemical bonding properties of mixed valence Co3O4 (i.e., Co(2+/3+)) with the related single valence CoO (i.e., Co(2+)) and Co2O3 (i.e., Co(3+)) oxides using density functional theory (DFT). We have employed a range of theoretical methods, including pure DFT, DFT+U, and a range-separated exchange-correlation functional (HSE06). We compare the electronic structure and band gap of the oxide materials, with available photoemission spectroscopy and optical band gaps. Our calculations suggest that the bonding between Co(3+) and O(2-) ions in Co2O3 and Co3O4 and Co(2+) and O(2-) ions in CoO and Co3O4 are rather different. We find that Co2O3 and Co3O4 are weakly correlated materials, whereas CoO is a strongly correlated material. Furthermore, our computed one-electron energy level diagrams reveal that strong Co-O antibonding states are present at the top of the valence band for all the cobalt oxides, hinting at a defect tolerant capacity in these materials. These results, which give a detailed picture of the chemical bonding in related single and mixed valence cobalt oxides, may serve as a guide to enhance the PV or photoelectrochemical activity of Co3O4, by reducing its internal defect states or changing its electronic structure by doping or alloying with suitable elements.

  14. Solid-State (17)O NMR of Oxygen-Nitrogen Singly Bonded Compounds: Hydroxylammonium Chloride and Sodium Trioxodinitrate (Angeli's Salt).

    PubMed

    Lu, Jiasheng; Kong, Xianqi; Terskikh, Victor; Wu, Gang

    2015-07-23

    We report a solid-state NMR study of (17)O-labeled hydroxylammonium chloride ([H(17)O-NH3]Cl) and sodium trioxodinitrate monohydrate (Na2[(17)ONNO2]·H2O, Angeli's salt). The common feature in these two compounds is that they both contain oxygen atoms that are singly bonded to nitrogen. For this class of oxygen-containing functional groups, there is very limited solid-state (17)O NMR data in the literature. In this work, we experimentally measured the (17)O chemical shift and quadrupolar coupling tensors. With the aid of plane-wave DFT computation, the (17)O NMR tensor orientations were determined in the molecular frame of reference. We found that the characteristic feature of an O-N single bond is that the (17)O nucleus exhibits a large quadrupolar coupling constant (13-15 MHz) but a rather small chemical shift anisotropy (100-250 ppm), in sharp contrast with the nitroso (O═N) functional group for which both quantities are very large (e.g., 16 MHz and 3000 ppm, respectively). PMID:26107984

  15. Solid-State (17)O NMR of Oxygen-Nitrogen Singly Bonded Compounds: Hydroxylammonium Chloride and Sodium Trioxodinitrate (Angeli's Salt).

    PubMed

    Lu, Jiasheng; Kong, Xianqi; Terskikh, Victor; Wu, Gang

    2015-07-23

    We report a solid-state NMR study of (17)O-labeled hydroxylammonium chloride ([H(17)O-NH3]Cl) and sodium trioxodinitrate monohydrate (Na2[(17)ONNO2]·H2O, Angeli's salt). The common feature in these two compounds is that they both contain oxygen atoms that are singly bonded to nitrogen. For this class of oxygen-containing functional groups, there is very limited solid-state (17)O NMR data in the literature. In this work, we experimentally measured the (17)O chemical shift and quadrupolar coupling tensors. With the aid of plane-wave DFT computation, the (17)O NMR tensor orientations were determined in the molecular frame of reference. We found that the characteristic feature of an O-N single bond is that the (17)O nucleus exhibits a large quadrupolar coupling constant (13-15 MHz) but a rather small chemical shift anisotropy (100-250 ppm), in sharp contrast with the nitroso (O═N) functional group for which both quantities are very large (e.g., 16 MHz and 3000 ppm, respectively).

  16. High-output-power, single-wavelength silicon hybrid laser using precise flip-chip bonding technology.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Shinsuke; Jeong, Seok-Hwan; Sekiguchi, Shigeaki; Kurahashi, Teruo; Tanaka, Yu; Morito, Ken

    2012-12-17

    An Si/III-V hybrid laser oscillating at a single wavelength was developed for use in a large-scale Si optical I/O chip. The laser had an InP-based reflective semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) chip integrated with an Si wavelength-selection-mirror chip in a flip-chip configuration. A low coupling loss of 1.55 dB at the Si-SOA interface was accomplished by both mode-field-matching between Si-SOA waveguides and accurately controlling the bonding position. The fabricated Si hybrid laser exhibited a very low threshold current of 9.4 mA, a high output power of 15.0 mW, and a high wall-plug efficiency of 7.6% at 20 °C. Moreover, the device maintained a high output power of >10 mW up to 60°C due to the high thermal conductance between the SOA chip and Si substrate. The short cavity length of the flip-chip bonded laser expanded the longitudinal mode spacing. This resulted in temperature-stable single longitudinal mode lasing and a low RIN level of <-130 dB/Hz.

  17. Single Tooth Replacement Using InCeram Resin Bonded Fixed Partial Denture: A Clinical Report

    PubMed Central

    Moslehifard, Elnaz; Farid, Farzaneh

    2014-01-01

    This clinical report describes a treatment option for replacement of a missing mandibular anterior tooth using InCeram resin bonded fixed partial denture (RBFPD). The conventional approach for replacing mandibular incisors dictates the placement of either a conventional porcelain-fused-to-metal (PFM) bridge, Maryland bridge, or fiber-reinforced composite veneer bridge and several appearance-related disadvantages have been reported in the use of a prosthesis that incorporates a metal substructure. The InCeram bridge is a minimally invasive restoration and eliminates undesirable incisal graying frequently observed in metal RBFPDs. This method was successfully clinically applied to overcome shortcomings of other approaches that may require a minimal invasive technique to preserve lasting sound tooth structure. PMID:24910683

  18. Influence of salivary contamination on the dentin bond strength of two different seventh generation adhesive systems: In vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Bhatia, Taranjeet Kaur; Asrani, Hemant; Banga, Harpreet; Jain, Aditi; Rawlani, Sudhir S.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the effect of salivary contamination on the bond strength of two different seventh generation adhesive systems. Materials and Methods: Sixty caries-free human premolars with flat dentin surfaces were randomly divided into six groups of 10 teeth each and bonding was done using seventh-generation bonding agents Adper Easy One (3M ESPE) and Xeno V (Dentsply). Following the bonding procedure, resin composite was bonded to the surfaces using a plastic mould. The prepared specimen with composite cylinders attached were placed in 37°C distilled water for 24 h and then subjected to shear bond strength (SBS) with 0 h universal testing machine and the data were subjected to one-way analysis of variance and unpaired t-test. Results: Statistical significant difference between the Groups I, II and III in which Adper Easy One was used and similarly for Groups IV, V, and VI in which Xeno V was used. When an intergroup comparison was made using unpaired t-test Group II and Group V showed the nonsignificant difference. Conclusion: Salivary contamination significantly affects the SBS of both the seventh generation dentin bonding agents. However, 2-hydroxyethyl methacryate based adhesive has higher bond strength. PMID:26752841

  19. Shear bond strength of seventh generation bonding agents on dentin of primary teeth--an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Geoffrey; Rich, Alfred P; Finkelman, Matthew D; Defuria, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    This controlled, randomized, in vitro study evaluated the shear bond strength of several seventh generation bonding agents on the dentin of primary teeth. Six different adhesives were used: Xeno IV, Clearfil S3 Bond, Adper Prompt-L-Pop, AdheSE One, Bond Force, and Optibond (control). Ninety primary teeth were prepared by wet grinding with a 320-grit silicon carbide paper on a polishing wheel running at 110 RPM. After 24 hours of storage in water, shear bond strengths of each group were determined. The mean shear bond strength of the tested adhesive systems to primary dentin was 12.27 MPa. One-way ANOVA testing showed a statistically significant difference between adhesive products (P < 0.001). Tukey HSD post hoc tests were used to assess which means were significantly different from one another. There was no statistically significant difference between the fifth generation adhesive system (Optibond) and the two seventh generation systems (Xeno IV and Bond Force), with Optibond exhibiting a lower mean shear bond strength compared to Bond Force. Within the limitations of this study, there is a significant difference between seventh generation bonding materials. Bond Force and Optibond appear to exhibit higher shear bond strengths than the other products.

  20. Shear bond strength of seventh generation bonding agents on dentin of primary teeth--an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Geoffrey; Rich, Alfred P; Finkelman, Matthew D; Defuria, Catherine

    2012-01-01

    This controlled, randomized, in vitro study evaluated the shear bond strength of several seventh generation bonding agents on the dentin of primary teeth. Six different adhesives were used: Xeno IV, Clearfil S3 Bond, Adper Prompt-L-Pop, AdheSE One, Bond Force, and Optibond (control). Ninety primary teeth were prepared by wet grinding with a 320-grit silicon carbide paper on a polishing wheel running at 110 RPM. After 24 hours of storage in water, shear bond strengths of each group were determined. The mean shear bond strength of the tested adhesive systems to primary dentin was 12.27 MPa. One-way ANOVA testing showed a statistically significant difference between adhesive products (P < 0.001). Tukey HSD post hoc tests were used to assess which means were significantly different from one another. There was no statistically significant difference between the fifth generation adhesive system (Optibond) and the two seventh generation systems (Xeno IV and Bond Force), with Optibond exhibiting a lower mean shear bond strength compared to Bond Force. Within the limitations of this study, there is a significant difference between seventh generation bonding materials. Bond Force and Optibond appear to exhibit higher shear bond strengths than the other products. PMID:22313979

  1. Stable RNA-DNA-RNA polymerase complexes can accompany formation of a single phosphodiester bond.

    PubMed

    Sylvester, J E; Cashel, M

    1980-03-18

    Incubation of RNA polymerase with poly[d(A-T)n] template results in a binary enzyme-DNA complex. Further addition of the dinucleotide UpA and [alpha-32P]UTP results in catalytic formation of the labeled trinucleotide UpApU until substrate exhaustion. In contrast, incubation of binary enzyme-DNA complexes with ApU and [alpha-32P]ATP results in labeled ApUpA formation to an extent that is stoichiometric with the amount of enzyme present despite an excess of substrates. The occurrence of ApUpA in a stable DNA-enzyme-RNA ternary complex is shown by gel exclusion chromatography, Millipore filtration, and the ability of ternary complexes to support subsequent RNA chain elongation. Radioactivity is not bound to Millipore filters when purified, labeled ApUpA is added to enzyme-DNA binary complexes. Hence, phosphodiester bond formation is required for stable ternary complex formation. The absence of the delta subunit of RNA polymerase or the addition of rifampicin to the reaction before ribonucleotide substrates results in catalytic ApUpA formation instead of stable ternary complexes.

  2. Single-cycle and fatigue strengths of adhesively bonded lap joints

    SciTech Connect

    Metzinger, K.E.; Guess, T.R.

    1998-12-31

    This study considers a composite-to-steel tubular lap joint in which failure typically occurs when the adhesive debonds from the steel adherend. The same basic joint was subjected to compressive and tensile axial loads (single-cycle) as well as bending loads (fatigue). The purpose of these tests was to determine whether failure is more dependent on the plastic strain or the peel stress that develops in the adhesive. For the same joint, compressive and tensile loads of the same magnitude will produce similar plastic strains but peel stresses of opposite signs in the adhesive. In the axial tests, the tensile strengths were much greater than the compressive strengths - indicating that the peel stress is key to predicting the single-cycle strengths. To determine the key parameter(s) for predicting high-cycle fatigue strengths, a test technique capable of subjecting a specimen to several million cycles per day was developed. In these bending tests, the initial adhesive debonding always occurred on the compressive side. This result is consistent with the single-cycle tests, although not as conclusive due to the limited number of tests. Nevertheless, a fatigue test method has been established and future tests are planned.

  3. Single crystal X-ray diffraction and Hirshfeld surface analyses of supramolecular assemblies in certain hydrogen bonded heterocyclic organic crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthuraja, P.; Sethuram, M.; Shanmugavadivu, T.; Dhandapani, M.

    2016-10-01

    A set of four nitrogen containing heterocyclic organic compounds was synthesised in which enormous non-covalent interactions along with intensive hydrogen bonding were present. The crystal structures of four crystals, namely, 1H-2-3H-triazolium picrate (TZ-PA), 1H-2,3-triazole-3,5-dinitrobenzoic acid (TZ-DNB), N-p-tolyl-5-oxo pyrrolidine-3-carboxylic acid (TOPC) and itaconic acid-2-amino-4,6-dimethyl pyrimidine (IA-ADP) have been determined by single crystal X-ray diffraction at 296 K. The nature of intermolecular interactions has been analysed through Hirshfeld surfaces and 2D fingerprint plots. It is explicit that in TZ-PA and TZ-DNB, presence of nitro groups diminishes H⋯H contacts whereas the absence of nitro groups and presence of methyl group in IA-ADP and TOPC enhances H⋯H contacts. The intimate O⋯H contacts in all the compounds reveal excessive hydrogen bonding.

  4. Covalent lanthanide(III) macrocyclic complexes: the bonding nature and optical properties of a promising single antenna molecule.

    PubMed

    Rabanal-León, Walter A; Páez-Hernández, Dayán; Arratia-Pérez, Ramiro

    2014-12-21

    The present work is focused on the elucidation of the electronic structure, bonding nature and optical properties of a series of low symmetry (C2) coordination compounds of type [Ln(III)HAM](3+), where "Ln(III)" are the trivalent lanthanide ions: La(3+), Ce(3+), Eu(3+) and Lu(3+), while "HAM" is the neutral six-nitrogen donor macrocyclic ligand [C22N6H26]. This systematic study has been performed in the framework of the Relativistic Density Functional Theory (R-DFT) and also using a multi-reference approach via the Complete Active Space (CAS) wavefunction treatment with the aim of analyzing their ground state and excited state electronic structures as well as electronic correlation. Furthermore, the use of the energy decomposition scheme proposed by Morokuma-Ziegler and the electron localization function (ELF) allows us to characterize the bonding between the lanthanide ions and the macrocyclic ligand, obtaining as a result a dative-covalent interaction. Due to a great deal of lanthanide optical properties and their technological applications, the absorption spectra of this set of coordination compounds were calculated using the time-dependent density functional theory (TD-DFT), where the presence of the intense Ligand to Metal Charge Transfer (LMCT) bands in the ultraviolet and visible region and the inherent f-f electronic transitions in the Near-Infra Red (NIR) region for some lanthanide ions allow us to propose these systems as "single antenna molecules" with potential applications in NIR technologies.

  5. Bond Dissociation Energies of the Tungsten Fluorides and Their Singly-Charged Ions: A Density Functional Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dyall, Kenneth G.; Arnold, James (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    The dissociation of WF6 and the related singly-charged cations and anions into the lower fluorides and fluorine atoms has been investigated theoretically using density functional theory (B3LYP) and relativistic effective core potentials, with estimates of spin-orbit effects included using a simple model. The inclusion of spin-orbit is essential for a correct description of the thermochemistry. The total atomization energy of the neutral and anionic WF6 is reproduced to within 25 kcal/mol, but comparison of individual bond dissociation energies with available experimental data shows discrepancies of up to 10 kcal/mol. The results are nevertheless useful to help resolve discrepancies in experimental data and provide estimates of missing data.

  6. Comparison of shear bond strengths of orthodontic brackets bonded with flowable composites.

    PubMed

    Turgut, Melek D; Attar, Nuray; Korkmaz, Yonca; Gokcelik, Aylin

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the shear bond strengths of orthodontic brackets bonded to human premolars using five different combinations of flowable composites and one-step self-etching adhesives (n=12): (1) Adper Easy Bond+Filtek Supreme XT Flow; (2) Futurabond NR+Grandio Flow; (3) Clearfil S3 Bond+Clearfil Majesty Flow; (4) AdheSE One+Tetric EvoFlow; and (5) Transbond Plus Self Etching Primer+Transbond XT Light Cure Adhesive. After shear bond strength testing, adhesive remnant index (ARI) scores were given according to the amount of adhesive and resin remaining on the brackets. On shear bond strength, there were no statistically significant differences between Groups 2 and 4 and between Groups 3 and 5 (p>0.05). On ARI scores, the predominant ARI scores in Groups 1, 2, 3, and 5 were 4, 2, 5, and 4 respectively; in Group 4, they were 0 and 4. Results showed that some combinations of flowable composites and self-etching adhesives might not be suitable for orthodontic use due to their low shear bond strengths and high ARI scores -with the latter signaling the risk of damaging the enamel surface during debonding. PMID:21282886

  7. Phase diagram and magnetization structures of spin-3/2 bond-alternating Ising chains with single-ion anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guang-Hua; Dou, Jun-Ya; Tian, Guang-Shan

    2016-02-01

    By the infinite time-evolving block decimation (iTEBD) algorithm, the magnetization process of the spin-3/2 bond-alternating Ising chain with single-ion anisotropy (D) is investigated. Magnetization plateaus including detailed magnetization structures of three different cases are uncovered, and three rich ground-state phase diagrams are explicitly determined. Especially, for the uniform antiferromagnetic case, a phase transition line at D=J, which divides the Mz=0 (Mz =1/2) plateau into two phases, are detected by the magnetization structure and the ground-state energy, and a updated phase diagram is proposed. Such a transition line was not recognized by the average magnetization previously. A same transition line (D=J) is also detected in the phase diagram of the antiferromagnetic-ferromagnetic alternating case. Magnetization plateaus are found to be easily induced for the classical Ising systems without quantum fluctuations, and the single-ion anisotropy plays a key role in the formation of Mz = 1/2 and 1 plateaus in the present model.

  8. Single-cell Characterization of Autotransporter-mediated Escherichia coli Surface Display of Disulfide Bond-containing Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Balakrishnan; Sendra, Victor G; Cirino, Patrick C; Varadarajan, Navin

    2012-01-01

    Autotransporters (ATs) are a family of bacterial proteins containing a C-terminal β-barrel-forming domain that facilitates the translocation of N-terminal passenger domain whose functions range from adhesion to proteolysis. Genetic replacement of the native passenger domain with heterologous proteins is an attractive strategy not only for applications such as biocatalysis, live-cell vaccines, and protein engineering but also for gaining mechanistic insights toward understanding AT translocation. The ability of ATs to efficiently display functional recombinant proteins containing multiple disulfides has remained largely controversial. By employing high-throughput single-cell flow cytometry, we have systematically investigated the ability of the Escherichia coli AT Antigen 43 (Ag43) to display two different recombinant reporter proteins, a single-chain antibody (M18 scFv) that contains two disulfides and chymotrypsin that contains four disulfides, by varying the signal peptide and deleting the different domains of the native protein. Our results indicate that only the C-terminal β-barrel and the threaded α-helix are essential for efficient surface display of functional recombinant proteins containing multiple disulfides. These results imply that there are no inherent constraints for functional translocation and display of disulfide bond-containing proteins mediated by the AT system and should open new avenues for protein display and engineering. PMID:23019324

  9. Chlorhexidine-containing acid conditioner preserves the longevity of resin-dentin bonds.

    PubMed

    Stanislawczuk, R; Amaral, R C; Zander-Grande, C; Gagler, D; Reis, A; Loguercio, A D

    2009-01-01

    The current study evaluated the effect of 2% chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX) on the immediate and six-month resin-dentin bond strength (BS) and nanoleakage pattern (NL) of etch-and-rinse adhesives when applied in aqueous or associated to the phosphoric acid conditioner. The occlusal enamel of 42 caries-free extracted molars was removed in order to expose a flat dentin surface. In groups 1 and 2 (control-C), the surfaces were acid etched with conventional phosphoric acid, and the adhesives Prime&Bond NT (PB) and Adper Single Bond 2 (SB) were applied after rinsing, drying and rewetting with water. In groups 3 and 4 (Ac/CHX), the adhesives were applied in a similar manner, however, a 2% CHX-containing acid was previously applied. In groups 5 and 6 (CHX), the adhesives were applied according to the control group; however, the rewetting procedure was performed with an aqueous solution of 2% CHX for 60 seconds. Composite buildups (Opallis, FGM) were constructed incrementally, and the specimens were longitudinally sectioned in the "x" and "y" directions to obtain bonded sticks (0.8 mm2) to be tested in tension at 0.5 mm/minute immediately or after six months of water storage. For NL, two bonded sticks from each tooth were coated with nail varnish, placed in silver nitrate and polished down with SiC paper. Resin-dentin interfaces were analyzed by EDX-SEM. The BS and NL data from each adhesive was submitted to two-way repeated measures ANOVA and Tukey's test (alpha=0.05). After six months of water storage, significant reductions in BS were observed for both adhesives in the control group (p<0.05). When Ac/CHX or CHX was used, no significant reductions in BS were observed for both systems. Nanoleakage was more evident in the control group than in the experimental groups (p<0.05), even after six months. The use of CHX in an aqueous solution or associated with the acid conditioner was effective for reducing degradation of resin-dentin bonds after six months of water storage

  10. Evaluation of microshear bond strength of resin composites to enamel of dental adhesive systems associated with Er,Cr:YSGG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cassimiro-Silva, Patricia F.; Zezell, Denise M.; Monteiro, Gabriela Q. d. M.; Benetti, Carolina; de Paula Eduardo, Carlos; Gomes, Anderson S. L.

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the microshear bond strength (μSBS) of resin composite to enamel etching by Er,Cr:YSGG laser with the use of two differents adhesives systems. Fifty freshly extracted human molars halves were embedded in acrylic resin before preparation for the study, making a total of up to 100 available samples. The specimens were randomly assigned into six groups (η=10) according to substrate pre-treatment and adhesive system on the enamel. A two-step self-etching primer system (Clearfil SE Bond) and a universal adhesive used as an etch-andrinse adhesive (Adper Single Bond Universal) were applied to the nonirradiated enamel surface according to manufacturer's instructions, as control groups (Control CF and Control SB, respectively). For the other groups, enamel surfaces were previously irradiated with the Er,Cr:YSGG laser with 0.5 W, 75 mJ and 66 J/cm2 (CF 5 Hz and SB 5 Hz) and 1.25 W, 50 mJ and 44 J/cm2 (CF 15 Hz and SB 15 Hz). Irradiation was performed under air (50%) and water (50%) cooling. An independent t-test was performed to compare the adhesive systems. Mean μSBS ± sd (MPa) for each group was 16.857 +/- 2.61, 17.87 +/- 5.83, 12.23 +/- 2.02, 9.88 +/- 2.26, 15.94 +/- 1.98, 17.62 +/- 2.10, respectively. The control groups and the 50 mJ laser groups showed no statistically significant differences, regardless of the adhesive system used. The results obtained lead us to affirm that the bonding interaction of adhesives to enamel depends not only on the morphological aspects of the dental surface, but also on the characteristics of the adhesive employed and the parameters of the laser.

  11. M3B2 and M5B3 Formation in Diffusion-Affected Zone During Transient Liquid Phase Bonding Single-Crystal Superalloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, Naicheng; Hu, Xiaobing; Liu, Jide; Jin, Tao; Sun, Xiaofeng; Hu, Zhuangqi

    2015-04-01

    Precipitates in the diffusion-affected zone (DAZ) during transient liquid phase bonding (TLP) single-crystal superalloys were observed and investigated. Small size and dendritic-shaped precipitates were identified to be M3B2 borides and intergrowth of M3B2/M5B3 borides. The orientation relationships among M3B2, M5B3, and matrix were determined using transmission electron microscope (TEM). Composition characteristics of these borides were also analyzed by TEM energy-dispersive spectrometer. Because this precipitating phenomenon deviates from the traditional parabolic transient liquid phase bonding model which assumed a precipitates free DAZ during TLP bonding, some correlations between the deviation of the isothermal solidification kinetics and these newly observed precipitating behaviors were discussed and rationalized when bonding the interlayer containing the high diffusivity melting point depressant elements and substrates of low solubility.

  12. Self-etching bonding systems: in-vitro shear bond strength evaluation.

    PubMed

    Brandt, P D; de Wet, F A; du Preez, I C

    2006-02-01

    The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the dentine shear bond strength of five self-etching bonding agents with that of a total-etch dentine bonding agent (used as control). Sixty recently extracted third molar teeth were mounted in acrylic resin and the occlusal surfaces ground to expose superficial dentine. A standardised smear layer was created by polishing with wet 600-grit SiC paper. Products evaluated were Xeno III (XIII), Clearfil SE Bond (SE), ABF (ABF), Optibond Solo Self-etch (OS), Adper Prompt-L-Pop (PLP) and the control, Scotchbond Multipurpose Plus (SBMP). Resin stubs were bonded to the dentine using the bonding agents according to manufacturer's instructions. Composite stubs were manufactured using an Ultradent jig and two increments of Z100, A1 shade composite. The bonds were subsequently stressed to failure with an Instron testing machine, operating at a crosshead speed of 0.5 mm/min. The data was statistically analysed using ANOVA (alpha < or = 0.05). The mean SBS (MPa) were: SBMP (Control) = 24.1 +/- 7.6; XIII = 17.3 +/- 4.1; SE = 26.2 +/- 7.8; ABF = 25.9 +/- 4.3; OS = 21.9 +/- 3.9 and PLP = 15.4 +/- 3.1. The shear bond strengths of both XIII and PLP to dentine were significantly lower than the control SBMP (p < 0.05). The remaining three products (SE, ABF and OS) displayed bond strengths comparable to the control (p > 0.05). Further research into cut (ground) and un-cut (un-ground) enamel shear bond strength and micro-leakage using these bonding agents are needed. PMID:16562613

  13. A single molecule assay to probe monovalent and multivalent bonds between hyaluronan and its key leukocyte receptor CD44 under force

    PubMed Central

    Bano, Fouzia; Banerji, Suneale; Howarth, Mark; Jackson, David G.; Richter, Ralf P.

    2016-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs), a category of linear, anionic polysaccharides, are ubiquitous in the extracellular space, and important extrinsic regulators of cell function. Despite the recognized significance of mechanical stimuli in cellular communication, however, only few single molecule methods are currently available to study how monovalent and multivalent GAG·protein bonds respond to directed mechanical forces. Here, we have devised such a method, by combining purpose-designed surfaces that afford immobilization of GAGs and receptors at controlled nanoscale organizations with single molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS). We apply the method to study the interaction of the GAG polymer hyaluronan (HA) with CD44, its receptor in vascular endothelium. Individual bonds between HA and CD44 are remarkably resistant to rupture under force in comparison to their low binding affinity. Multiple bonds along a single HA chain rupture sequentially and independently under load. We also demonstrate how strong non-covalent bonds, which are versatile for controlled protein and GAG immobilization, can be effectively used as molecular anchors in SMFS. We thus establish a versatile method for analyzing the nanomechanics of GAG·protein interactions at the level of single GAG chains, which provides new molecular-level insight into the role of mechanical forces in the assembly and function of GAG-rich extracellular matrices. PMID:27679982

  14. Cycloaddition of P-C Single Bonds: Stereoselective Formation of Benzo-1,3,6,2-trioxaphosphepine Complexes via a Ditopic van der Waals Complex.

    PubMed

    Malik, Payal; Espinosa Ferao, Arturo; Schnakenburg, Gregor; Streubel, Rainer

    2016-10-01

    While phosphaalkenes and phosphanes are known to participate in [4+n] cycloaddition reactions, P-C single bonds are inert in this respect. Herein, reactions of oxaphosphirane complexes with tetrachloro-ortho-benzoquinone are presented that reveal a stereoselective reaction of the endocyclic P-C bond to afford benzo-1,3,6,2-trioxaphosphepine complexes. High-level DFT calculations provide evidence that the final product is derived from a sequence of three consecutive steps involving a ditopic van der Waals complex.

  15. Cycloaddition of P-C Single Bonds: Stereoselective Formation of Benzo-1,3,6,2-trioxaphosphepine Complexes via a Ditopic van der Waals Complex.

    PubMed

    Malik, Payal; Espinosa Ferao, Arturo; Schnakenburg, Gregor; Streubel, Rainer

    2016-10-01

    While phosphaalkenes and phosphanes are known to participate in [4+n] cycloaddition reactions, P-C single bonds are inert in this respect. Herein, reactions of oxaphosphirane complexes with tetrachloro-ortho-benzoquinone are presented that reveal a stereoselective reaction of the endocyclic P-C bond to afford benzo-1,3,6,2-trioxaphosphepine complexes. High-level DFT calculations provide evidence that the final product is derived from a sequence of three consecutive steps involving a ditopic van der Waals complex. PMID:27629542

  16. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 591 - Section 591.5(f) Bond for the Entry of a Single Vehicle

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... bound unto the UNITED STATES OF AMERICA in the sum of (bond amount in words) dollars ($ (bond amount in..., pursuant to 49 CFR part 591, a regulation promulgated under the provisions of 49 U.S.C. Chapter 301, the... bumper standards; and WHEREAS, pursuant to 49 CFR part 592, a regulation promulgated under the...

  17. Relationship between force constants and bond lengths for CX (X = C, Si, Ge, N, P, As, O, S, Se, F, Cl and Br) single and multiple bonds: formulation of Badger's rule for universal use.

    PubMed

    Kurita, Eiichi; Matsuura, Hiroatsu; Ohno, Keiichi

    2004-11-01

    Geometries and harmonic vibrational wave numbers were calculated on a series of simple compounds that contain the atoms of elements in the groups 14-17 by density functional theory at the B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,2pd) level. The calculated wave numbers agree well with the observed harmonic wave numbers with substantially the same accuracy for the compounds of the different groups. The stretching force constants of the CX (X = C, Si, Ge, N, P, As, O, S, Se, F, Cl and Br) single and multiple bonds were obtained. The CX stretching force constants increase with a decrease of the bond lengths as the element X in the same period goes from left to right in the periodic table. The individual intrinsic properties of the CX bonds are lost gradually with increasing the period of the element X. The unified interpretation of Badger's rule has enabled the formulation of a common equation for universal use f = 2.8 R(-3) to relate the force constants f (10(2) N m(-1)) and the reduced bond lengths R (10(-10) m).

  18. Relationship between force constants and bond lengths for CX (X = C, Si, Ge, N, P, As, O, S, Se, F, Cl and Br) single and multiple bonds: formulation of Badger?s rule for universal use

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurita, Eiichi; Matsuura, Hiroatsu; Ohno, Keiichi

    2004-11-01

    Geometries and harmonic vibrational wave numbers were calculated on a series of simple compounds that contain the atoms of elements in the groups 14-17 by density functional theory at the B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,2pd) level. The calculated wave numbers agree well with the observed harmonic wave numbers with substantially the same accuracy for the compounds of the different groups. The stretching force constants of the CX (X = C, Si, Ge, N, P, As, O, S, Se, F, Cl and Br) single and multiple bonds were obtained. The CX stretching force constants increase with a decrease of the bond lengths as the element X in the same period goes from left to right in the periodic table. The individual intrinsic properties of the CX bonds are lost gradually with increasing the period of the element X. The unified interpretation of Badger's rule has enabled the formulation of a common equation for universal use f=2.8 R-3 to relate the force constants f (10 2 N m -1) and the reduced bond lengths R (10 -10 m).

  19. Reversible conversion of valence-tautomeric copper metal-organic frameworks dependent single-crystal-to-single-crystal oxidation/reduction: a redox-switchable catalyst for C-H bonds activation reaction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chao; Wu, Jie; Song, Chuanjun; Ding, Ran; Qiao, Yan; Hou, Hongwei; Chang, Junbiao; Fan, Yaoting

    2015-06-28

    Upon single-crystal-to-single-crystal (SCSC) oxidation/reduction, reversible structural transformations take place between the anionic porous zeolite-like Cu(I) framework and a topologically equivalent neutral Cu(I)Cu(II) mixed-valent framework. The unique conversion behavior of the Cu(I) framework endowed it as a redox-switchable catalyst for the direct arylation of heterocycle C-H bonds.

  20. Structure-dependent response of a chemiluminescence nitrogen detector for organic compounds with adjacent nitrogen atoms connected by a single bond.

    PubMed

    Yan, Bing; Zhao, Jiang; Leopold, Kyle; Zhang, Bin; Jiang, Guibin

    2007-01-15

    High-throughput screening (HTS) of chemical libraries is indispensable for drug discovery research. However, the HTS data quality for lead discovery, lead optimization, and quantitative structure activity relationship studies has been severely compromised due to the uncertain compound concentrations in screening plates. In order to address this issue, we compared various high-throughput technologies for quantification of compounds in microtiter plate format without the need for authentic compounds as standards and identified the chemiluminescence nitrogen detector (CLND) as the method of choice at the present time. However, the structure dependence of this detector has not been well studied. A proposed rule suggested that the only exception to equimolar response is for compounds that contain adjacent nitrogen atoms. The response should be zero when the adjacent nitrogen atoms are connected by a double bond and 0.5 when they are connected by a single bond. In this investigation, we studied a broad range of compounds with isolated and adjacent nitrogen atoms. We confirmed that compounds with isolated nitrogen atoms produce an equimolar response with a 15-20% variation depending on structures and compounds with adjacent nitrogen atoms connected by a double bond giving nearly zero response. We discovered that the CLND response for compounds containing adjacent nitrogen atoms that are connected with a single bond is highly structure dependent. Substitutions on the nitrogen atoms or nearby in the molecule can increase the CLND response to approach a value higher than the predicted value 0.5 (maximal value 0.82/nitrogen atom). Without substitution, much lower values than predicted (minimal value 0.0-0.08/nitrogen atom) are obtained. Therefore, the prediction of response of 0.5/nitrogen atom for compounds with adjacent nitrogen atoms connected by a single bond should be abandoned. Compounds with similar structures should be used to generate calibration curves for

  1. Effect of Er,Cr:YSGG Laser at Different Output Powers on the Micromorphology and the Bond Property of Non-Carious Sclerotic Dentin to Resin Composites

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Weiguo; Jiao, Yang; Wang, Wanshan; Yang, Yanwei; Wei, Jingjing; Shen, Lijuan; Chen, Jihua

    2015-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiated at different powers on the micromorphology and the bonding property of non-carious sclerotic dentin to resin composites. Methods Two hundred bovine incisors characterized by non-carious sclerotic dentin were selected, and the seventy-two teeth of which for surface morphological analysis were divided into nine groups according to various treatments (A: the control group, B: only treated with the adhesive Adper Easy One, C: diamond bur polishing followed by Adper Easy One, D-I: Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiating at 1W, 2W, 3W, 4W, 5W, 6W output power, respectively, followed by Adper Easy One). The surface roughness values were measured by the non-contact three-dimensional morphology scanner, then the surface micromorphologies of surfaces in all groups were assessed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM); meanwhile, Image Pro-Plus 6.0 software was used to measure the relative percentage of open tubules on SEM images. The rest, one hundred twenty-eight teeth for bond strength test, were divided into eight groups according to the different treatments (A: only treated with the adhesive Adper Easy One, B: diamond bur polishing followed by the above adhesive, C-H: Er,Cr:YSGG laser irradiating at 1 W, 2 W, 3 W, 4 W, 5 W, 6 W output power, respectively, followed by the above adhesive), and each group was subsequently divided into two subgroups according to whether aging is performed (immediately tested and after thermocycling). Micro-shear bond strength test was used to evaluate the bond strength. Results The 4W laser group showed the highest roughness value (30.84±1.93μm), which was statistically higher than the control group and the diamond bur groups (p<0.05). The mean percentages ((27.8±1.8)%, (28.0±2.2)%, (30.0±1.9)%) of open tubules area in the 4W, 5W, 6W group were higher than other groups (p<0.05). The 4W laser group showed the highest micro-shear bond strength not

  2. Comparison of tensile bond strengths of four one-bottle self-etching adhesive systems with Er:YAG laser-irradiated dentin.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qianzhou; Chen, Minle; Ding, Jiangfeng

    2013-12-01

    This study aimed to investigate the interaction of current one-bottle self-etching adhesives and Er:YAG laser with dentin using a tensile bond strength (TBS) test and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in vitro. Two hundred and thirteen dentin discs were randomly distributed to the Control Group using bur cutting and to the Laser Group using an Er:YAG laser (200 mJ, VSP, 20 Hz). The following adhesives were investigated: one two-step total-etch adhesive [Prime & Bond NT (Dentsply)] and four one-step self-etch adhesives [G-Bond plus (GC), XENO V (Dentsply), iBond Self Etch (Heraeus) and Adper Easy One (3 M ESPE)]. Samples were restored with composite resin, and after 24-hour storage in distilled water, subjected to the TBS test. For morphological analysis, 12 dentin specimens were prepared for SEM. No significant differences were found between the control group and laser group (p = 0.899); dentin subjected to Prime & Bond NT, XENOV and Adper Easy One produced higher TBS. In conclusion, this study indicates that Er:YAG laser-prepared dentin can perform as well as bur on TBS, and some of the one-step one-bottle adhesives are comparable to the total-etch adhesives in TBS on dentin.

  3. Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Total- and Self-etching Adhesive Systems after Application of Chlorhexidine to Dentin Contaminated with a Hemostatic Agent

    PubMed Central

    Sharafeddin, Farahnaz; Farhadpour, Hajar

    2015-01-01

    Statement of the Problem Hemostatic agents may influence the bond strength of different bonding agents. Also, chlorhexidine has shown positive effects on bond strength values and their combination effect has not been reported yet. Purpose The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of contamination with a hemostatic agent on shear bond strength (SBS) of total- and self-etching adhesive systems and the effect of chlorhexidine application after removal of the hemostatic agent. Materials and Method In this experimental study, the occlusal enamel of each sixty caries-free mandibular molars was removed and their midcoronal dentin was exposed. The specimens were then mounted in auto-polymerizing resin 1mm apical to CEJ. Then, the specimens were divided into 6 groups (n=10) based on contamination with a hemostatic agent (H), application of chlorhexidine (CHX) and the adhesive system used; and then were classified as Group 1: Adper Single Bond (ASB); Group 2: H+ASB; Group 3: H+0.2% CHX+ASB; Group 4: Clearfil SE Bond (CSB); Group 5: H+CSB; Group 6: H+0.2% CHX+CSB. Then, composite resin rods (4×2 mm) were built up on the dentin surfaces and after thermocycling, the SBS (MPa) was evaluated. Statistical analysis was performed using two-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests (p< 0.05). Results There were statistically significant differences between bond strength values of group 1 (ASB) and group 2 (H+ASB) (p< 0.001) and group 1 (ASB) and group 3 (H+CHX+ASB) (p< 0.001). Similarly, significant differences were seen between group 4 (CSB) and group 5 (H+CSB) (p< 0.001) and between group 4 (CSB) and group 6 (H+CHX+CSB) (p< 0.001). Conclusion Contamination with hemostatic agent reduced the SBS of both total- and self-etching adhesive systems. In addition, application of chlorhexidine after the removal of hemostatic agent had a negative effect on SBS of total- and self-etching adhesive systems. PMID:26331146

  4. Effect of thermocycling on the durability of etch-and-rinse and self-etch adhesives on dentin.

    PubMed

    Sangwichit, Ketkamon; Kingkaew, Ruksaphon; Pongprueksa, Pong; Senawongse, Pisol

    2016-01-01

    The objective was to compare bond strengths of adhesives with/without thermocycling and to analyze the micromorphology of resindentin interfaces. Flat dentin surfaces were prepared and divided into eight groups to bond with four etch-and-rinse adhesives (Optibond FL, Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose, Optibond Solo Plus, and Single Bond 2) and four self-etch adhesives (Clearfil SE Bond, Adper SE Plus, Clearfil S(3) Bond and Adper Easy Bond). Specimens were further divided into two subgroups subjected for with/without thermocycling and then subjected to both micro-tensile test and resin-dentin interface evaluation. The results revealed that there were significant differences in bond strength between the groups with and without thermocycling for all etch-and-rinse groups and for the Adper Easy Bond self-etch group (p<0.01). Clearfil SE Bond demonstrated highly durable bond strengths. Furthermore, more silver ion uptake was observed at the resin-dentin interfaces for all etch-and-rinse adhesives and Adper SE Plus and Adper Easy Bond after thermocycling. PMID:27251990

  5. Wide Gap TLP Bonding a Single-Crystal Superalloy: Evolution of the L/S Interface Morphology and Formation of the Isolated Grain Boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, N. C.; Liu, J. D.; Jin, T.; Sun, X. F.; Hu, Z. Q.

    2013-04-01

    The microstructural evolution and bonding behavior of transient liquid phase (TLP) bonded joints for single-crystal superalloy samples with a 300- μm-wide gap have been investigated. The results show that at the initial stage, the interface grows with a cellular structure. With the increase of time, the length and numbers of the cellular structures decrease. At the final stage, the interface evolves with a planar manner. The gradient of B ahead of the liquid/solid interface exists and becomes sharper from the initial to the final analyzed from the electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) results. Inevitably, isolated grain forms during the evolution of the interface and the growth rate of isothermal solidification zone (ISZ) changes through the whole bonding process, and these both deviate from the traditional TLP bonding models. The mechanisms of the formation of the isolated grain boundaries and the reasons for the deviation of the solidification rate are discussed. Also, some effective methods to avoid the formation of isolated grain boundaries in the ISZ are proposed.

  6. 4-Oxocyclo-hexa-neacetic acid: catemeric hydrogen bonding and spontaneous resolution of a single conformational enanti-omer in an achiral ∊-keto acid.

    PubMed

    Barcon, Alan; Brunskill, Andrew P J; Lalancette, Roger A; Thompson, Hugh W

    2010-01-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title compound, C(8)H(12)O(3), consists of a single conformational enanti-omer, which aggregates in the catemeric acid-to-ketone hydrogen-bonding mode [O⋯O = 2.682 (4) Å and O-H⋯O = 172 (6)°]. Four hydrogen-bonding chains of translationally related mol-ecules pass through the cell orthogonal to the 4(3) screw axis along c, alternating in the 110 and the 10 direction, with alignment with respect to this axis of + + - -. Successive chains are rotated by 90° around the c axis. One C-H⋯O=C close contact, involving the carboxyl group, exists. PMID:21587559

  7. Tunable crossover between one- and three-dimensional magnetic dynamics in C oII single-chain magnets organized by halogen bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amjad, A.; Clemente-Juan, J. M.; Coronado, E.; Luis, F.; Evangelisti, M.; Espallargas, G. Mínguez; del Barco, E.

    2016-06-01

    Low-temperature magnetometry, ac susceptibility, and calorimetry have been employed to study Co-based single-chain magnets (SCMs) organized through halogen bonding. Magnetic hysteresis and maxima in the dc and ac susceptibilities, respectively, confirm the SCM behavior of the system. Several characteristic magnetic relaxation regimes are observed at different temperatures, which can be associated with both intra- and interchain exchange interactions. Remarkably, tweaking the rate at which an external magnetic field is swept along the axis of the chains enables a controlled transition between the one- and three-dimensional dynamics. Experiments on an isostructural Co-based SCM system crystallized with different halogens do not show three-dimensional dynamics, illustrating the importance of halogen bonding on the control of interchain interactions.

  8. Linear free-energy relationships between a single gas-phase ab initio equilibrium bond length and experimental pKa values in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Alkorta, Ibon; Popelier, Paul L A

    2015-02-01

    Remarkably simple yet effective linear free energy relationships were discovered between a single ab initio computed bond length in the gas phase and experimental pKa values in aqueous solution. The formation of these relationships is driven by chemical features such as functional groups, meta/para substitution and tautomerism. The high structural content of the ab initio bond length makes a given data set essentially divide itself into high correlation subsets (HCSs). Surprisingly, all molecules in a given high correlation subset share the same conformation in the gas phase. Here we show that accurate pKa values can be predicted from such HCSs. This is achieved within an accuracy of 0.2 pKa units for 5 drug molecules.

  9. H-bonded supramolecular polymer for the selective dispersion and subsequent release of large-diameter semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Pochorovski, Igor; Wang, Huiliang; Feldblyum, Jeremy I; Zhang, Xiaodong; Antaris, Alexander L; Bao, Zhenan

    2015-04-01

    Semiconducting, single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are promising candidates for applications in thin-film transistors, solar cells, and biological imaging. To harness their full potential, however, it is necessary to separate the semiconducting from the metallic SWNTs present in the as-synthesized SWNT mixture. While various polymers are able to selectively disperse semiconducting SWNTs, the subsequent removal of the polymer is challenging. However, many applications require semiconducting SWNTs in their pure form. Toward this goal, we have designed a 2-ureido-6[1H]-pyrimidinone (UPy)-based H-bonded supramolecular polymer that can selectively disperse semiconducting SWNTs. The dispersion purity is inversely related to the dispersion yield. In contrast to conventional polymers, the polymer described herein was shown to disassemble into monomeric units upon addition of an H-bond-disrupting agent, enabling isolation of dispersant-free, semiconducting SWNTs. PMID:25815604

  10. Effect of transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding on the ductility of a Ni-base single crystal superalloy in a stress rupture test

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, J.D. Jin, T.; Zhao, N.R.; Wang, Z.H.; Sun, X.F.; Guan, H.R.; Hu, Z.Q.

    2008-01-15

    A Ni-base single crystal superalloy was transient liquid phase (TLP) bonded using a Ni-Cr-B amorphous foil at 1230 deg. C for 8 h. Stress rupture tests of the TLP joint and a matrix sample were carried out at 982 deg. C/248 MPa and 1010 deg. C/248 MPa. The microstructures and fracture surfaces were studied using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) investigations were performed after creep rupture testing to examine the deformation substructures. The results show that the stress rupture ductility of TLP joints is significantly decreased compared to the matrix sample. This reduction of the ductility of TLP joints can be attributed to solid solution strengthening by boron atoms, subgrain boundaries formed in the bonding zone and the concentration of creep cavities formed during the last stage of the stress rupture test.

  11. Spontaneous Reduction of a Hydroborane To Generate a B-B Single Bond by the Use of a Lewis Pair.

    PubMed

    Rochette, Étienne; Bouchard, Nicolas; Légaré Lavergne, Julien; Matta, Chérif F; Fontaine, Frédéric-Georges

    2016-10-01

    The ansa-aminohydroborane 1-NMe2 -2-(BH2 )C6 H4 crystallizes in an unprecedented type of dimer containing a B-H bond activated by one FLP moiety. Upon mild heating and without the use of any catalyst, this molecule liberates one equivalent of hydrogen to generate a diborane molecule. The synthesis and structural characterization of these new compounds, as well as the kinetic monitoring of the reaction and the DFT investigation of its mechanism, are reported. PMID:27625187

  12. Effects of simplified ethanol-wet bonding technique on immediate bond strength with normal versus caries-affected dentin

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Vivek; Singla, Mamta; Sharma, Ritu; Miglani, Sanjay; Bhasin, Saranjit Singh

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether the use of simplified ethanol-wet bonding (EWB) technique improved the immediate microtensile bond strength (μTBS) between resin composite and caries-affected dentin (CAD). Materials and Methods: Twenty-four extracted carious human permanent molars were sectioned to expose the carious lesion. The carious dentin was excavated until CAD was exposed. The samples were divided into two groups: water-wet bonding with Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose and a simplified EWB (three 100% ethanol applications for 30 s each), followed by application of an experimental hydrophobic primer and restoration. The samples were vertically sectioned to produce 1 mm × 1 mm thick slabs. The normal dentin (ND) slabs and CAD slabs were identified and were subjected to μTBS evaluation. Slabs from four teeth (two from each group) were evaluated under microscope. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and post hoc Holm–Sidak test at P < 0.05. Results: EWB improved the μTBS in ND but not in CAD group. The dentinal tubules in CAD group showed sclerotic activity with minimal or no hybrid layer. Conclusions: Simplified ethanol bonding does not improve the bond strength in CAD.

  13. Effects of simplified ethanol-wet bonding technique on immediate bond strength with normal versus caries-affected dentin

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Vivek; Singla, Mamta; Sharma, Ritu; Miglani, Sanjay; Bhasin, Saranjit Singh

    2016-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether the use of simplified ethanol-wet bonding (EWB) technique improved the immediate microtensile bond strength (μTBS) between resin composite and caries-affected dentin (CAD). Materials and Methods: Twenty-four extracted carious human permanent molars were sectioned to expose the carious lesion. The carious dentin was excavated until CAD was exposed. The samples were divided into two groups: water-wet bonding with Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose and a simplified EWB (three 100% ethanol applications for 30 s each), followed by application of an experimental hydrophobic primer and restoration. The samples were vertically sectioned to produce 1 mm × 1 mm thick slabs. The normal dentin (ND) slabs and CAD slabs were identified and were subjected to μTBS evaluation. Slabs from four teeth (two from each group) were evaluated under microscope. Data were analyzed using two-way ANOVA and post hoc Holm–Sidak test at P < 0.05. Results: EWB improved the μTBS in ND but not in CAD group. The dentinal tubules in CAD group showed sclerotic activity with minimal or no hybrid layer. Conclusions: Simplified ethanol bonding does not improve the bond strength in CAD. PMID:27656059

  14. Formation of intersubunit disulfide bonds and properties of the single histidine and cysteine residues in each subunit relative to the decameric structure of cyanase.

    PubMed

    Anderson, P M; Korte, J J; Holcomb, T A; Cho, Y G; Son, C M; Sung, Y C

    1994-05-27

    Reaction of the single cysteine residue in each subunit of cyanase with certain SH reagents gives an active decameric derivative that dissociates reversibly to an inactive dimer derivative (Anderson, P. M., Johnson, W. V., Korte, J. J., Xiong, X., Sung, Y.-c., and Fuchs, J. A. (1988) J. Biol. Chem. 263, 5674-5680). Reaction of mixed disulfide dimer derivatives of cyanase with dithiothreitol at 0 degree C results in formation of a disulfide bond between the subunits in the dimer. The disulfide dimer was inactive and did not associate to a decamer; the intersubunit disulfide bond could not be formed when the dimers were associated as a decamer. The two SH groups apparently are in close proximity to each other in the dissociated dimer but not when the dimer is associated to a decamer. Substitution of glycine for the cysteine residue or of tyrosine, asparagine, glycine, valine, or leucine for the single histidine residue in each subunit gave mutant enzymes that were active. However, H113N, H113Y, and C83G were unstable at low temperature and/or ionic strength, dissociating reversibly to an inactive dimer. Efficient reassociation required the presence of bicarbonate or cyanate analog. The results are consistent with a proposed single site per subunit model explaining apparent half-site binding of substrates and the requirement of decameric structure for activity.

  15. A crystalline anionic complex of scandium nitride endometallofullerene: experimental observation of single-bonded (Sc3N@Ih-C80(-))2 dimers.

    PubMed

    Konarev, Dmitri V; Zorina, Leokadiya V; Khasanov, Salavat S; Popov, Alexey A; Otsuka, Akihiro; Yamochi, Hideki; Saito, Gunzi; Lyubovskaya, Rimma N

    2016-09-14

    Reduction of scandium nitride clusterfullerene, Sc3N@Ih-C80, by sodium fluorenone ketyl in the presence of cryptand[2,2,2] allows the crystallization of the {cryptand[2,2,2](Na(+))}2(Sc3N@Ih-C80(-))2·2.5C6H4Cl2 (1) salt. The Sc3N@Ih-C80˙(-) radical anions are dimerized to form single-bonded (Sc3N@Ih-C80(-))2 dimers.

  16. A crystalline anionic complex of scandium nitride endometallofullerene: experimental observation of single-bonded (Sc3N@Ih-C80(-))2 dimers.

    PubMed

    Konarev, Dmitri V; Zorina, Leokadiya V; Khasanov, Salavat S; Popov, Alexey A; Otsuka, Akihiro; Yamochi, Hideki; Saito, Gunzi; Lyubovskaya, Rimma N

    2016-09-14

    Reduction of scandium nitride clusterfullerene, Sc3N@Ih-C80, by sodium fluorenone ketyl in the presence of cryptand[2,2,2] allows the crystallization of the {cryptand[2,2,2](Na(+))}2(Sc3N@Ih-C80(-))2·2.5C6H4Cl2 (1) salt. The Sc3N@Ih-C80˙(-) radical anions are dimerized to form single-bonded (Sc3N@Ih-C80(-))2 dimers. PMID:27511304

  17. Structure, bonding, and passivation of single carbon-related oxide hole traps near 4H-SiC/SiO2 interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ettisserry, D. P.; Goldsman, N.; Akturk, A.; Lelis, A. J.

    2014-11-01

    Single carbon interstitial in silicon dioxide, existing in carboxyl configuration, is shown to act as a border hole trap near 4H-SiC/SiO2 interface. Using density functional theory-based formation energy considerations, it is found to switch charge state between +2 and neutral as the 4H-SiC Fermi level sweeps its charge transition level located 1.4 eV above 4H-SiC valence band edge. Thus, carboxyl defect is predicted to be a potential candidate for threshold voltage instability in 4H-SiC MOSFETs. Post oxidation annealing of the interface with nitric oxide is shown to remove carboxyl defects. However, treating the defect in H2 creates a hole trap level at 1.1 eV above 4H-SiC valence band edge similar to the original carboxyl defect. The stability of carboxyl and H2 treated carboxyl defects in their doubly positive state is explained on the basis of their structural and bonding transformations during hole capture. These include puckering and back-bonding of silicon with lattice oxygen as in the well-known oxygen vacancy (E' center) hole traps and an increase in the bond order between carboxyl carbon and oxygen.

  18. Controlling mechano- and seeding-triggered single-crystal-to-single-crystal phase transition: molecular domino with a disconnection of aurophilic bonds.

    PubMed

    Seki, Tomohiro; Sakurada, Kenta; Ito, Hajime

    2013-12-01

    Green and blue polymorphs: A single-crystal-to-single-crystal (SCSC) phase transition of phenyl(3,5-dimethylphenyl isocyanide)gold(I) was triggered by mechanical picking or solid seeding and propagated spontaneously with a domino-like mechanism. As a result, one phase with intense green emission was transformed to another phase with weaker blue emission.

  19. ELECTRON DONOR ACCEPTOR DESCRIPTORS OF THE SINGLE AND DOUBLE BONDED SUBSTITUENT AND HETEROATOM INCORPORATION EFFECTS. A REVIEW.

    PubMed

    Mazurek, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    The properties of the series of Electron Donor-Acceptor (EDA) descriptors of classical substituent effect (sEDA(I), pEDA(I)), double bonded substituent effect (sEDA(=), pEDA(=)), heteroatom incorporation effect in monocyclic systems (sEDA(II), pEDA(II)), and in ring-junction position (sEDA(III), pEDA(III)), are reviewed. The descriptors show the amount of electrons donated to or withdrawn from the σ-(sEDA) or π(pEDA) valence orbitals by the substituent or incorporant. The new descriptors are expected to enrich the potency of QSAR analyses in drug design and materials chemistry.

  20. Development of a new single-bottle multi-purpose primer for bonding to dental porcelain, alumina, zirconia, and dental gold alloy.

    PubMed

    Ikemura, Kunio; Tanaka, Hisaki; Fujii, Toshihide; Deguchi, Mikito; Endo, Takeshi; Kadoma, Yoshinori

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the bonding efficacy of a combined primer application which comprised a silane coupling agent, an acidic adhesive monomer, and a dithiooctanoate monomer, as well as the influence of shelf life on bonding. Five experimental primers (coded as Si-P-SS-1 to Si-P-SS-4, and Si-SS as the control) were prepared using 20.0-40.0 wt% 3-methacryloyloxypropyltriethoxysilane (3-MPTES), 0-7.44 wt% 6-methacryloyloxyhexyl phosphonoacetate (6-MHPA), and 0.50 wt% 10-methacryloyloxydecyl 6,8-dithiooctanoate (10-MDDT). After 24-hour storage at 23°C (Initial) and 2-month storage at 50°C (Aged), tensile bond strengths (TBSs) of a resin cement (ResiCem, Shofu Inc., Kyoto, Japan) to primer-treated porcelain, alumina, zirconia, and Au alloy were measured. With the Initial and Aged primers of Si-P-SS-1 to Si-P-SS-3, there were no statistically significant differences in the mean TBSs (MPa) [porcelain: 21.7-29.2; alumina: 21.4-25.3; zirconia: 20.3-24.5; and Au alloy: 23.4-27.6] among these three primers (p>0.05), but they were significantly higher than that of the control primer (p<0.05). The experimental primers Si-P-SS-1 to Si-P-SS-3 demonstrated good potential as multi-purpose primers: they had good shelf lives as single-bottle primer systems and were thus able to exhibit good bond strength to all the adherends tested after 2-month storage under accelerated aging conditions.

  1. An Electron-Poor C64 Nanographene by Palladium-Catalyzed Cascade C-C Bond Formation: One-Pot Synthesis and Single-Crystal Structure Analysis.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Sabine; Shoyama, Kazutaka; Schmidt, David; Würthner, Frank

    2016-05-23

    Herein, we report the one-pot synthesis of an electron-poor nanographene containing dicarboximide groups at the corners. We efficiently combined palladium-catalyzed Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling and dehydrohalogenation to synthesize an extended two-dimensional π-scaffold of defined size in a single chemical operation starting from N-(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)-4,5-dibromo-1,8-naphthalimide and a tetrasubstituted pyrene boronic acid ester as readily accessible starting materials. The reaction of these precursors under the conditions commonly used for Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling afforded a C64 nanographene through the formation of ten C-C bonds in a one-pot process. Single-crystal X-ray analysis unequivocally confirmed the structure of this unique extended aromatic molecule with a planar geometry. The optical and electrochemical properties of this largest ever synthesized planar electron-poor nanographene skeleton were also analyzed.

  2. Bulk modulus and structural changes of carbon nitride C2N2(CH2) under pressure: The strength of C-N single bond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sougawa, Masaya; Takarabe, Kenichi; Mori, Yoshihisa; Okada, Taku; Yagi, Takehiko; Kariyazaki, Hiroaki; Sueoka, Koji

    2013-02-01

    The experimental bulk modulus, B0, of C2N2(CH2) is determined to be 258 ± 3.4 GPa from the analysis of high-pressure (up to 30 GPa) X-ray diffraction patterns obtained using synchrotron radiation. This bulk modulus is 40% lower than that of diamond. At the level of a combined analysis of lattice constants determined experimentally and atomic positions obtained theoretically for the compression behavior of C2N2(CH2), the strength of the C-N single bond is determined to be the same as the C-C single bond in diamond. In other words, the tetrahedral frame of C2N2(CH2) which consists of CN3Cb, where Cb is a bridging carbon, is as hard as diamond. To account for the differing bulk moduli, we infer that the lower bulk modulus in C2N2(CH2) is due to the rotational freedom in the crystal at high pressures.

  3. The effect of hydrogen bonding on the diffusion of water in n-alkanes and n-alcohols measured with a novel single microdroplet method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Jonathan T.; Duncan, P. Brent; Momaya, Amit; Jutila, Arimatti; Needham, David

    2010-01-01

    While the Stokes-Einstein (SE) equation predicts that the diffusion coefficient of a solute will be inversely proportional to the viscosity of the solvent, this relation is commonly known to fail for solutes, which are the same size or smaller than the solvent. Multiple researchers have reported that for small solutes, the diffusion coefficient is inversely proportional to the viscosity to a fractional power, and that solutes actually diffuse faster than SE predicts. For other solvent systems, attractive solute-solvent interactions, such as hydrogen bonding, are known to retard the diffusion of a solute. Some researchers have interpreted the slower diffusion due to hydrogen bonding as resulting from the effective diffusion of a larger complex of a solute and solvent molecules. We have developed and used a novel micropipette technique, which can form and hold a single microdroplet of water while it dissolves in a diffusion controlled environment into the solvent. This method has been used to examine the diffusion of water in both n-alkanes and n-alcohols. It was found that the polar solute water, diffusing in a solvent with which it cannot hydrogen bond, closely resembles small nonpolar solutes such as xenon and krypton diffusing in n-alkanes, with diffusion coefficients ranging from 12.5×10-5 cm2/s for water in n-pentane to 1.15×10-5 cm2/s for water in hexadecane. Diffusion coefficients were found to be inversely proportional to viscosity to a fractional power, and diffusion coefficients were faster than SE predicts. For water diffusing in a solvent (n-alcohols) with which it can hydrogen bond, diffusion coefficient values ranged from 1.75×10-5 cm2/s in n-methanol to 0.364×10-5 cm2/s in n-octanol, and diffusion was slower than an alkane of corresponding viscosity. We find no evidence for solute-solvent complex diffusion. Rather, it is possible that the small solute water may be retarded by relatively longer residence times (compared to non-H-bonding solvents

  4. First principle investigation of electronic structure, chemical bonding and optical properties of tetrabarium gallium trinitride oxide single crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Saleem Ayaz Azam, Sikander

    2015-10-15

    The electronic band structure, valence electron charge density and optical susceptibilities of tetrabarium gallium trinitride (TGT) were calculated via first principle study. The electronic band structure calculation describes TGT as semiconductor having direct band gap of 1.38 eV. The valence electronic charge density contour verified the non-polar covalent nature of the bond. The absorption edge and first peak of dielectric tensor components showed electrons transition from N-p state to Ba-d state. The calculated uniaxial anisotropy (0.4842) and birefringence (−0.0061) of present paper is prearranged as follow the spectral components of the dielectric tensor. The first peak in energy loss function (ELOS) shows the energy loss of fast traveling electrons in the material. The first sharp peak produced in ELOS around 10.5 eV show plasmon loss having plasma frequencies 0.1536, 0.004 and 0.066 of dielectric tensor components. This plasmon loss also cause decrease in reflectivity spectra.

  5. Simple Bond Cleavage

    SciTech Connect

    Gary S. Groenewold

    2005-08-01

    Simple bond cleavage is a class of fragmentation reactions in which a single bond is broken, without formation of new bonds between previously unconnected atoms. Because no bond making is involved, simple bond cleavages are endothermic, and activation energies are generally higher than for rearrangement eliminations. The rate of simple bond cleavage reactions is a strong function of the internal energy of the molecular ion, which reflects a loose transition state that resembles reaction products, and has a high density of accessible states. For this reason, simple bond cleavages tend to dominate fragmentation reactions for highly energized molecular ions. Simple bond cleavages have negligible reverse activation energy, and hence they are used as valuable probes of ion thermochemistry, since the energy dependence of the reactions can be related to the bond energy. In organic mass spectrometry, simple bond cleavages of odd electron ions can be either homolytic or heterolytic, depending on whether the fragmentation is driven by the radical site or the charge site. Simple bond cleavages of even electron ions tend to be heterolytic, producing even electron product ions and neutrals.

  6. Identification and cleavage of breakable single bonds by selective oxidation, reduction, and hydrolysis. Annual report, October 1, 1980-September 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschon, A.S.; Zevely, J.; Mayo, F.R.

    1981-11-12

    The objective of this project is to determine the structure of bituminous coal by determining the proportions of the various kinds of connecting bonds and how they can best be broken. Results obtained during the past quarter are presented for the following tasks: (1) extractions and fractionations of coal products which covers pyridine extraction, fractionation of TIPS fractions, EDA extraction of Illinois No. 6 coal and swelling ratios of coal samples; (2) experiments on breakable single bonds which cover reactions of ethylenediamine and model ethers, reaction of pyridine-extracted coal with Me/sub 3/SiI, Baeyer-Villiger oxidations, reaction to diphenylmethane with 15% HNO/sub 3/, cleavage of TIPS with ZnI/sub 2/, and cleavage of black acids; and (3) oxygen oxidation No. 18. Some of the highlights of these studies are: (1) some model ethers are not cleaved by EDA under extraction conditions; (2) oxidation of diaryl ketones with m-chloroperbenzoic acid and saponification of the resulting esters in promising for identifying ketones, (3) treatment of a black acid with pyridine hydroiodide reduced the acid's molecular weight and increased its solubility in pyridine, but treatment with ZnI/sub 2/ was ineffective; (4) in comparison with 0.1 M K/sub 2/S/sub 2/O/sub 8/, 0.01 M persulfate is relatively ineffective in accelerating oxidation of BnNH/sub 2/-extracted coal in water suspension. 2 figures, 3 tables.

  7. The Effect of Different Disinfecting Agents on Bond Strength of Resin Composites

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed Hassan, Ahmed; Ali Goda, Ahmed; Baroudi, Kusai

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different disinfectant agents on bond strength of two types of resin composite materials. Methods. A total of 80 sound posterior teeth were used. They were divided into four groups (n = 20) according to the dentin surface pretreatment (no treatment, chlorhexidine gluconate 2%, sodium hypochlorite 4%, and EDTA 19%). Each group was divided into two subgroups according to the type of adhesive (prime and bond 2.1 and Adper easy one). Each subgroup was further divided into two subgroups according to the type of resin composite (TPH spectrum and Tetric EvoCeram). Shear bond strength between dentin and resin composite was measured using Universal Testing Machine. Data collected were statistically analyzed by t-test and one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's post hoc test. Results. It was found that dentin treated with EDTA recorded the highest shear bond strength values followed by sodium hypochlorite and then chlorhexidine groups while the control group showed the lowest shear bond strength. Conclusions. The surface treatment of dentin before bonding application has a great effect on shear bond strength between resin composite and dentin surface. PMID:25477961

  8. The effect of different disinfecting agents on bond strength of resin composites.

    PubMed

    Mohammed Hassan, Ahmed; Ali Goda, Ahmed; Baroudi, Kusai

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of different disinfectant agents on bond strength of two types of resin composite materials. Methods. A total of 80 sound posterior teeth were used. They were divided into four groups (n = 20) according to the dentin surface pretreatment (no treatment, chlorhexidine gluconate 2%, sodium hypochlorite 4%, and EDTA 19%). Each group was divided into two subgroups according to the type of adhesive (prime and bond 2.1 and Adper easy one). Each subgroup was further divided into two subgroups according to the type of resin composite (TPH spectrum and Tetric EvoCeram). Shear bond strength between dentin and resin composite was measured using Universal Testing Machine. Data collected were statistically analyzed by t-test and one-way ANOVA followed by Tukey's post hoc test. Results. It was found that dentin treated with EDTA recorded the highest shear bond strength values followed by sodium hypochlorite and then chlorhexidine groups while the control group showed the lowest shear bond strength. Conclusions. The surface treatment of dentin before bonding application has a great effect on shear bond strength between resin composite and dentin surface. PMID:25477961

  9. Shear Bond Strength of Superficial, Intermediate and Deep Dentin In Vitro with Recent Generation Self-etching Primers and Single Nano Composite Resin

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Kulshrest; Naik, Rajaram; Hegde, Srinidhi; Damda, Aftab

    2015-01-01

    Background: This in vitro study is intended to compare the shear bond strength of recent self-etching primers to superficial, intermediate, and deep dentin levels. Materials and Methods: All teeth were sectioned at various levels and grouped randomly into two experimental groups and two control groups having three subgroups. The experimental groups consisted of two different dentin bonding system. The positive control group consisted of All Bond 2 and the negative control group was without the bonding agent. Finally, the specimens were subjected to shear bond strength study under Instron machine. The maximum shear bond strengths were noted at the time of fracture. The results were statistically analyzed. Results: Comparing the shear bond strength values, All Bond 2 (Group III) demonstrated fairly higher bond strength values at different levels of dentin. Generally comparing All Bond 2 with the other two experimental groups revealed highly significant statistical results. Conclusion: In the present investigation with the fourth generation, higher mean shear bond strength values were recorded compared with the self-etching primers. When intermediate dentin shear bond strength was compared with deep dentin shear bond strength statistically significant results were found with Clearfil Liner Bond 2V, All Bond 2 and the negative control. There was a statistically significant difference in shear bond strength values both with self-etching primers and control groups (fourth generation bonding system and without bonding system) at superficial, intermediate, and deep dentin. There was a significant fall in bond strength values as one reaches deeper levels of dentin from superficial to intermediate to deep. PMID:26225101

  10. Bond strength of adhesives to dentin contaminated with smoker's saliva.

    PubMed

    Pinzon, Lilliam M; Oguri, Makoto; O'Keefe, Kathy; Dusevish, Vladimir; Spencer, Paulette; Powers, John M; Marshall, Grayson W

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of contamination with smoker's and non-smoker's saliva on the bond strength of resin composite to superficial dentin using different adhesive systems. The interfacial structure between the resin and dentin was evaluated for each treatment using environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). Freshly extracted human molars were ground with 600-grit SiC paper to expose the superficial dentin. Adhesives [One-Up-Bond-F-Plus (OUFP) and Adper-Prompt-L-Pop (APLP)] and resin composite (TPHSpectrum) were bonded to the dentin (n = 8/group, 180 total specimens) under five surface conditions: control (adhesive applied following manufacturers' instructions); saliva, then 5-s air dry, then adhesive; adhesive, saliva, 5-s air dry; adhesive, saliva, 5-s water rinse, 5-s air dry (ASW group); and adhesive, saliva, 5-s water rinse, 5-s air dry, reapply adhesive (ASWA group). After storage in water at 37 degrees C for 24 h, the specimens were debonded under tension at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. ESEM photomicrographs of the dentin/adhesive interfaces were taken. Mean bond strength ranged from 8.1 to 24.1 MPa. Fisher's protected least significant difference (P = 0.05) intervals for critical adhesive, saliva, and surface condition differences were 1.3, 1.3, and 2.1 MPa, respectively. There were no significant differences in bond strength to dentin between contamination by smoker's and nonsmoker's saliva, but bond strengths were significantly different between adhesive systems, with OUFP twice as strong as APLP under almost all conditions. After adhesive application and contamination with either smoker's or nonsmoker's saliva followed by washing and reapplication of the adhesive (ASWA group), the bond strength of both adhesive systems was the same as that of the control group.

  11. Identification and cleavage of breakable single bonds by selective oxidation, reduction, and hydrolysis. Quarterly report No. 12, June 1-September 30, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschon, A.S.; Zevely, J.; Mayo, F.R.

    1981-11-12

    We assume that bituminous coal consists mostly of an aggregate of condensed aromatic and aliphatic rings, connected and made insoluble (but swellable) by crosslinks containing single bonds. The objective of this project is to determine the proportions of the various kinds of connecting links and how they can best be broken - in other words, to determine the structure of bituminous coal, with emphasis on the crosslinks and breakable single bonds. The program began with an investigation of the structure of the TIPS fraction of Illinois No. 6 coal, that is, the two-thirds of the 16% extracted by pyridine that is toluene-insoluble, pyridine-soluble, mostly through changes in molecular weight during cleavage reactions in pyridine solution. The most promising of these cleavage reactions are now being applied to the 84% of coal that is insoluble in pyridine and presents the main problem in coal liquefaction, following the progress of the reactions by formation of soluble material and swelling of the insoluble portion. We found that benzylamine (BnNH/sub 2/) would extract an additional 14% (of the original weight of coal) of material from pyridine-extracted coal, and later that an ethylenediamine/dimethyl sulfoxide (EDA/DMSO) mixture would dissolve another 21% of the original coal. The BnNH/sub 2/ extract is soluble in pyridine. Our best present guess is that the BnNH/sub 2/ extract cleaves most of the ester groups in coal and that EDA/DMSO cleaves the remaining ester and most of the ether groups.

  12. Identification and cleavage of breakable single bonds by selective oxidation, reduction, and hydrolysis. Quarterly report No. 13, October 1-December 31, 1981

    SciTech Connect

    Hirschon, A.S.; Zevely, J.; Mayo, F.R.

    1982-02-26

    Bituminous coal is assumed to consist mostly of aggregates of condensed aromatic and aliphatic rings which are connected and made soluble by crosslinks containing single bonds. The objective of this project is to determine the structure of bituminous coal with emphasis on the crosslinks and breakable single bonds. During this past quarter the following studies were conducted on Illinois No. 6 coal: extraction with benzylamine (BnH/sub 2/), ethanolamine, ethylenediamine (EDA), pyridine; saponification of some toluene-insoluble, pyridine-soluble (TIPS) fraction; cleavages by amines; oxidation with aqueous NaOCl of butylated and methylated pyridine-extracted coal; decarboxylation on black acids. The investigations dealt with two kinds of connecting links in coal, which are designated as ester and ether groups. The ester groups are cleaved by strongly basic amines (to give amides) at 25/sup 0/C and by alcoholic KOH at 100/sup 0/C (to give salts and alcohols or phenols). Both esters and ethers are cleaved by HI or ZnCL/sub 2/ in pyridine at or below 50/sup 0/C. The ethers are also cleaved by BnNH/sub 2/, EDA, and EDA/DMSO to nearly the same extent on several days heating at 100/sup 0/C. Although a cleavage of model ethers by amines were not established, the parallel easy reactions of HI and ZnCl/sub 2/ and the slow 100/sup 0/C reactions of amines on coal lead the authors to designate the non-ester cleavages as ether cleavages. (ATT)

  13. Single (C-C) and triple (CC) bond-length dependence of the static electric polarizability and hyperpolarizability of H-CC-CC-H

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karamanis, Panaghiotis; Maroulis, George

    2003-07-01

    We report an ab initio study of the static electric (hyper)polarizability of diacetylene and its dependence on the single (C-C) and triple (CC) bond length. At the CCSD(T) level of theory we find for the mean dipole polarizability and its derivatives ᾱ=49.10 e2a02Eh-1,( ∂ᾱ/ ∂R C- C) e=-4.41 and ( ∂ᾱ/ ∂R C C) e=34.57 e2a0Eh-1. For the anisotropy Δα=54.45 e2a02Eh-1, (∂Δ α/∂ RC-C) e=-20.42 and ( ∂Δα/ ∂R C C) e=64.56 e2a0Eh-1. The dependence of the mean hyperpolarizability on RC-C and RCC around the equilibrium is quite distinct. Varying the single bond by Δ R/ a0 around the equilibrium entails changes of [ γ¯(R C- C)- γ¯(R e)]/ e4a04Eh-3=-3643 ΔR-230 ΔR 2-184 ΔR 3+453 ΔR 4The mean second hyperpolarizability increases strongly with R C≡C around the equilibrium [ γ¯(R C C)- γ¯(R e)]/ e4a04Eh-3=22 259 ΔR+11 293 ΔR 2+2384 ΔR 3+6445 ΔR 4

  14. Approach to thermal properties and electronic polarizability from average single bond strength in ZnO---Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}---B{sub 2}O{sub 3} glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Inoue, Taisuke; Honma, Tsuyoshi; Dimitrov, Vesselin; Komatsu, Takayuki

    2010-12-15

    The glass transition temperature (T{sub g}), density, refractive index, Raman scattering spectra, and X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) for xZnO-yBi{sub 2}O{sub 3}-zB{sub 2}O{sub 3} glasses (x=10-65, y=10-50, z=25-60 mol%) are measured to clarify the bonding and structure features of the glasses with large amounts of ZnO. The average electronic polarizability of oxide ions ({alpha}{sub O2-}) and optical basicity ({Lambda}) of the glasses estimated using Lorentz-Lorenz equation increase with increasing ZnO or Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} content, giving the values of {alpha}{sub O2-}=1.963 A{sup 3} and {Lambda}=0.819 for 60ZnO-10Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}-30B{sub 2}O{sub 3} glass. The formation of B---O---Bi and B---O---Zn bridging bonds in the glass structure is suggested from Raman and XPS spectra. The average single bond strength (B{sub M---O}) proposed by Dimitrov and Komatsu is applied to the glasses and is calculated using single bond strengths of 150.6 kJ/mol for Zn---O bonds in ZnO{sub 4} groups, 102.5 kJ/mol for Bi---O bonds in BiO{sub 6} groups, 498 kJ/mol for B---O bonds in BO{sub 3} groups, and 373 kJ/mol for B---O bonds in BO{sub 4} groups. Good correlations are observed between T{sub g} and B{sub M---O}, {Lambda} and B{sub M---O}, and T{sub g} and {Lambda}, proposing that the average single bond strength is a good parameter for understanding thermal and optical properties of ZnO---Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}---B{sub 2}O{sub 3} glasses. -- Graphical abstract: This figure shows the correlation between optical basicity {Lambda} and average single bond strength B{sub M---O} in ZnO---Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}---B{sub 2}O{sub 3} glasses. A good correlation is observed, proposing that the average single bond strength is a good parameter for understanding optical properties of ZnO---Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3}---B{sub 2}O{sub 3} glasses. Display Omitted

  15. Bonded semiconductor substrate

    DOEpatents

    Atwater, Jr.; Harry A. , Zahler; James M.

    2010-07-13

    Ge/Si and other nonsilicon film heterostructures are formed by hydrogen-induced exfoliation of the Ge film which is wafer bonded to a cheaper substrate, such as Si. A thin, single-crystal layer of Ge is transferred to Si substrate. The bond at the interface of the Ge/Si heterostructures is covalent to ensure good thermal contact, mechanical strength, and to enable the formation of an ohmic contact between the Si substrate and Ge layers. To accomplish this type of bond, hydrophobic wafer bonding is used, because as the invention demonstrates the hydrogen-surface-terminating species that facilitate van der Waals bonding evolves at temperatures above 600.degree. C. into covalent bonding in hydrophobically bound Ge/Si layer transferred systems.

  16. Bond-length alternation and charge transfer in a linear carbon chain encapsulated within a single-walled carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rusznyák, Á.; Zólyomi, V.; Kürti, J.; Yang, S.; Kertesz, M.

    2005-10-01

    The physical properties of a linear carbon chain encapsulated within single-walled carbon nanotubes are investigated with density-functional theory using periodic boundary conditions. The dominant feature of an isolated carbon chain is the Peierls dimerization and the opening of a Peierls gap. The two weakly interacting subsystems (infinite carbon chain and nanotube) establish a common Fermi level, resulting in charge transfer (CT) which leads to a metallic combined system with a high density of states at the Fermi level. The rigid band model provides useful insights. Unusual physics arises from the effects of CT and chain-tube orbital hybridization which both tend to suppress the Peierls dimerization. Implications for the observed Raman spectrum of the chain-nanotube system are discussed.

  17. The mobility of single-file water molecules is governed by the number of H-bonds they may form with channel-lining residues

    PubMed Central

    Horner, Andreas; Zocher, Florian; Preiner, Johannes; Ollinger, Nicole; Siligan, Christine; Akimov, Sergey A.; Pohl, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Channel geometry governs the unitary osmotic water channel permeability, pf, according to classical hydrodynamics. Yet, pf varies by several orders of magnitude for membrane channels with a constriction zone that is one water molecule in width and four to eight molecules in length. We show that both the pf of those channels and the diffusion coefficient of the single-file waters within them are determined by the number NH of residues in the channel wall that may form a hydrogen bond with the single-file waters. The logarithmic dependence of water diffusivity on NH is in line with the multiplicity of binding options at higher NH densities. We obtained high-precision pf values by (i) having measured the abundance of the reconstituted aquaporins in the vesicular membrane via fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and via high-speed atomic force microscopy, and (ii) having acquired the vesicular water efflux from scattered light intensities via our new adaptation of the Rayleigh-Gans-Debye equation. PMID:26167541

  18. Contact mechanics modeling of pull-off measurements: effect of solvent, probe radius, and chemical binding probability on the detection of single-bond rupture forces by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Skulason, Hjalti; Frisbie, C Daniel

    2002-07-01

    Pull-off forces for chemically modified atomic force microscopy tips in contact with flat substrates coated with receptor molecules are calculated using a Johnson, Kendall, and Roberts contact mechanics model. The expression for the work of adhesion is modified to account for the formation of discrete numbers of chemical bonds (nBonds) between the tip and substrate. The model predicts that the pull-off force scales as nBonds(1/2), which differs from a common assumption that the pull-off force scales linearly with nBonds. Periodic peak progressions are observed in histograms generated from hundreds of computed pull-off forces. The histogram periodicity is the signature of discrete chemical interactions between the tip and substrate and allows estimation of single-bond rupture forces. The effects of solvent, probe tip radius, and chemical binding probability on the detection of single-bond forces are examined systematically. A dimensionless parameter, the effective force resolution, is introduced that serves as a quantitative predictor for determining when periodicity in force histograms can occur. The output of model is compared to recent experimental results involving tips and substrates modified with self-assembled monolayers. An advantage of this contact mechanics approach is that it allows straightforward estimation of solvent effects on pull-off forces.

  19. Experimental investigation of the EPR parameters and molecular orbital bonding coefficients for VO2+ ion in NaH2PO4·2H2O single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalfaoğlu, Emel; Karabulut, Bünyamin

    2016-09-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of VO2+ ions in NaH2PO4·2H2O single crystal have been studied. The spin-Hamiltonian parameters and molecular orbital bonding coefficients were calculated. The angular variation of the EPR spectra shows two different VO2+ complexes. These are located in different chemical environment and each environment contains four magnetically inequivalent VO2+ sites. The crystal field around VO2+ ion is approximately axially symmetric since a strong V=O bond distorts the crystal lattice. Spin Hamiltonian parameters and molecular orbital bonding coefficients were calculated from the EPR data and the nature of bonding in the complex was discussed together.

  20. Equilibrium CO bond lengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demaison, Jean; Császár, Attila G.

    2012-09-01

    Based on a sample of 38 molecules, 47 accurate equilibrium CO bond lengths have been collected and analyzed. These ultimate experimental (reEX), semiexperimental (reSE), and Born-Oppenheimer (reBO) equilibrium structures are compared to reBO estimates from two lower-level techniques of electronic structure theory, MP2(FC)/cc-pVQZ and B3LYP/6-311+G(3df,2pd). A linear relationship is found between the best equilibrium bond lengths and their MP2 or B3LYP estimates. These (and similar) linear relationships permit to estimate the CO bond length with an accuracy of 0.002 Å within the full range of 1.10-1.43 Å, corresponding to single, double, and triple CO bonds, for a large number of molecules. The variation of the CO bond length is qualitatively explained using the Atoms in Molecules method. In particular, a nice correlation is found between the CO bond length and the bond critical point density and it appears that the CO bond is at the same time covalent and ionic. Conditions which permit the computation of an accurate ab initio Born-Oppenheimer equilibrium structure are discussed. In particular, the core-core and core-valence correlation is investigated and it is shown to roughly increase with the bond length.

  1. Bond Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pollack, Rachel H.

    2000-01-01

    Notes trends toward increased borrowing by colleges and universities and offers guidelines for institutions that are considering issuing bonds to raise money for capital projects. Discussion covers advantages of using bond financing, how use of bonds impacts on traditional fund raising, other cautions and concerns, and some troubling aspects of…

  2. Sticker Bonding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frazier, Laura Corbin

    2000-01-01

    Introduces a science activity on the bonding of chemical compounds. Assigns students the role of either a cation or anion and asks them to write the ions they may bond with. Assesses students' understanding of charge, bonding, and other concepts. (YDS)

  3. Theoretical study of the bonding of Sc, Y, and La singly charged and dipositive ions to C2H2, C2H4, and C3H6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.

    1991-01-01

    The interaction of the Sc and Y singly-charged and dipositive ions with C2H2, C2H4, and C3H6 is studied using electronic structure calculations that include high levels of electron correlation. These results are compared with comparable calculations performed previously for La(+) and La(2+). For C2H2 and C2H4, all three metal ions insert into the C-C pi bond, making a three-membered ring. The optimal structures for the MC3H6(+) ions all involve rearrangement to make a four-membered ring. The strength of the metal-ligand bond for the singly charged ions follows the order La greater than Sc equal to about Y. In contrast, the bonds involving the dipositive ions are electrostatic, so that the binding energy increases as the size of the ion decreases, leading to the trend Sc greater than Y greater than La.

  4. Facile Isolation of Adsorbent-Free Long and Highly-Pure Chirality-Selected Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Using A Hydrogen-bonding Supramolecular Polymer

    PubMed Central

    Toshimitsu, Fumiyuki; Nakashima, Naotoshi

    2015-01-01

    The ideal form of semiconducting-single-walled carbon nanotubes (sem-SWNTs) for science and technology is long, defect-free, chirality pure and chemically pure isolated narrow diameter tubes. While various techniques to solubilize and purify sem-SWNTs have been developed, many of them targeted only the chiral- or chemically-purity while sacrificing the sem-SWNT intrinsic structural identities by applying strong ultra-sonication and/or chemical modifications. Toward the ultimate purification of the sem-SWNTs, here we report a mild-conditioned extraction of the sem-SWNTs using removable supramolecular hydrogen-bonding polymers (HBPs) that are composed of dicarboxylic- or diaminopyridyl-fluorenes with ~70%-(8,6)SWNT selective extraction. Replacing conventional strong sonication techniques by a simple shaking using HPBs was found to provide long sem-SWNTs (>2.0 μm) with a very high D/G ratio, which was determined by atomic force microscopy observations. The HBPs were readily removed from the nanotube surfaces by an outer stimulus, such as a change in the solvent polarities, to provide chemically pure (8,6)-enriched sem-SWNTs. We also describe molecular mechanics calculations to propose possible structures for the HBP-wrapped sem-SWNTs, furthermore, the mechanism of the chiral selectivity for the sorted sem-SWNTs is well explained by the relationship between the molecular surface area and mass of the HBP/SWNT composites. PMID:26658356

  5. Facile Isolation of Adsorbent-Free Long and Highly-Pure Chirality-Selected Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Using A Hydrogen-bonding Supramolecular Polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toshimitsu, Fumiyuki; Nakashima, Naotoshi

    2015-12-01

    The ideal form of semiconducting-single-walled carbon nanotubes (sem-SWNTs) for science and technology is long, defect-free, chirality pure and chemically pure isolated narrow diameter tubes. While various techniques to solubilize and purify sem-SWNTs have been developed, many of them targeted only the chiral- or chemically-purity while sacrificing the sem-SWNT intrinsic structural identities by applying strong ultra-sonication and/or chemical modifications. Toward the ultimate purification of the sem-SWNTs, here we report a mild-conditioned extraction of the sem-SWNTs using removable supramolecular hydrogen-bonding polymers (HBPs) that are composed of dicarboxylic- or diaminopyridyl-fluorenes with ~70%-(8,6)SWNT selective extraction. Replacing conventional strong sonication techniques by a simple shaking using HPBs was found to provide long sem-SWNTs (>2.0 μm) with a very high D/G ratio, which was determined by atomic force microscopy observations. The HBPs were readily removed from the nanotube surfaces by an outer stimulus, such as a change in the solvent polarities, to provide chemically pure (8,6)-enriched sem-SWNTs. We also describe molecular mechanics calculations to propose possible structures for the HBP-wrapped sem-SWNTs, furthermore, the mechanism of the chiral selectivity for the sorted sem-SWNTs is well explained by the relationship between the molecular surface area and mass of the HBP/SWNT composites.

  6. Facile Isolation of Adsorbent-Free Long and Highly-Pure Chirality-Selected Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Using A Hydrogen-bonding Supramolecular Polymer.

    PubMed

    Toshimitsu, Fumiyuki; Nakashima, Naotoshi

    2015-01-01

    The ideal form of semiconducting-single-walled carbon nanotubes (sem-SWNTs) for science and technology is long, defect-free, chirality pure and chemically pure isolated narrow diameter tubes. While various techniques to solubilize and purify sem-SWNTs have been developed, many of them targeted only the chiral- or chemically-purity while sacrificing the sem-SWNT intrinsic structural identities by applying strong ultra-sonication and/or chemical modifications. Toward the ultimate purification of the sem-SWNTs, here we report a mild-conditioned extraction of the sem-SWNTs using removable supramolecular hydrogen-bonding polymers (HBPs) that are composed of dicarboxylic- or diaminopyridyl-fluorenes with ~70%-(8,6)SWNT selective extraction. Replacing conventional strong sonication techniques by a simple shaking using HPBs was found to provide long sem-SWNTs (>2.0 μm) with a very high D/G ratio, which was determined by atomic force microscopy observations. The HBPs were readily removed from the nanotube surfaces by an outer stimulus, such as a change in the solvent polarities, to provide chemically pure (8,6)-enriched sem-SWNTs. We also describe molecular mechanics calculations to propose possible structures for the HBP-wrapped sem-SWNTs, furthermore, the mechanism of the chiral selectivity for the sorted sem-SWNTs is well explained by the relationship between the molecular surface area and mass of the HBP/SWNT composites.

  7. Facile Isolation of Adsorbent-Free Long and Highly-Pure Chirality-Selected Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Using A Hydrogen-bonding Supramolecular Polymer.

    PubMed

    Toshimitsu, Fumiyuki; Nakashima, Naotoshi

    2015-01-01

    The ideal form of semiconducting-single-walled carbon nanotubes (sem-SWNTs) for science and technology is long, defect-free, chirality pure and chemically pure isolated narrow diameter tubes. While various techniques to solubilize and purify sem-SWNTs have been developed, many of them targeted only the chiral- or chemically-purity while sacrificing the sem-SWNT intrinsic structural identities by applying strong ultra-sonication and/or chemical modifications. Toward the ultimate purification of the sem-SWNTs, here we report a mild-conditioned extraction of the sem-SWNTs using removable supramolecular hydrogen-bonding polymers (HBPs) that are composed of dicarboxylic- or diaminopyridyl-fluorenes with ~70%-(8,6)SWNT selective extraction. Replacing conventional strong sonication techniques by a simple shaking using HPBs was found to provide long sem-SWNTs (>2.0 μm) with a very high D/G ratio, which was determined by atomic force microscopy observations. The HBPs were readily removed from the nanotube surfaces by an outer stimulus, such as a change in the solvent polarities, to provide chemically pure (8,6)-enriched sem-SWNTs. We also describe molecular mechanics calculations to propose possible structures for the HBP-wrapped sem-SWNTs, furthermore, the mechanism of the chiral selectivity for the sorted sem-SWNTs is well explained by the relationship between the molecular surface area and mass of the HBP/SWNT composites. PMID:26658356

  8. A Semi-Analytical Method for Determining the Energy Release Rate of Cracks in Adhesively-Bonded Single-Lap Composite Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Charles; Sun, Wenjun; Tomblin, John S.; Smeltzer, Stanley S., III

    2007-01-01

    A semi-analytical method for determining the strain energy release rate due to a prescribed interface crack in an adhesively-bonded, single-lap composite joint subjected to axial tension is presented. The field equations in terms of displacements within the joint are formulated by using first-order shear deformable, laminated plate theory together with kinematic relations and force equilibrium conditions. The stress distributions for the adherends and adhesive are determined after the appropriate boundary and loading conditions are applied and the equations for the field displacements are solved. Based on the adhesive stress distributions, the forces at the crack tip are obtained and the strain energy release rate of the crack is determined by using the virtual crack closure technique (VCCT). Additionally, the test specimen geometry from both the ASTM D3165 and D1002 test standards are utilized during the derivation of the field equations in order to correlate analytical models with future test results. The system of second-order differential field equations is solved to provide the adherend and adhesive stress response using the symbolic computation tool, Maple 9. Finite element analyses using J-integral as well as VCCT were performed to verify the developed analytical model. The finite element analyses were conducted using the commercial finite element analysis software ABAQUS. The results determined using the analytical method correlated well with the results from the finite element analyses.

  9. Hydrogen bond and halogen bond inside the carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Weizhou; Wang, Donglai; Zhang, Yu; Ji, Baoming; Tian, Anmin

    2011-02-01

    The hydrogen bond and halogen bond inside the open-ended single-walled carbon nanotubes have been investigated theoretically employing the newly developed density functional M06 with the suitable basis set and the natural bond orbital analysis. Comparing with the hydrogen or halogen bond in the gas phase, we find that the strength of the hydrogen or halogen bond inside the carbon nanotube will become weaker if there is a larger intramolecular electron-density transfer from the electron-rich region of the hydrogen or halogen atom donor to the antibonding orbital of the X-H or X-Hal bond involved in the formation of the hydrogen or halogen bond and will become stronger if there is a larger intermolecular electron-density transfer from the electron-rich region of the hydrogen or halogen atom acceptor to the antibonding orbital of the X-H or X-Hal bond. According to the analysis of the molecular electrostatic potential of the carbon nanotube, the driving force for the electron-density transfer is found to be the negative electric field formed in the carbon nanotube inner phase. Our results also show that the X-H bond involved in the formation of the hydrogen bond and the X-Hal bond involved in the formation of the halogen bond are all elongated when encapsulating the hydrogen bond and halogen bond within the carbon nanotube, so the carbon nanotube confinement may change the blue-shifting hydrogen bond and the blue-shifting halogen bond into the red-shifting hydrogen bond and the red-shifting halogen bond. The possibility to replace the all electron nanotube-confined calculation by the simple polarizable continuum model is also evaluated.

  10. Influence of Organic Acids from the Oral Biofilm on the Bond Strength of Self-Etch Adhesives to Dentin.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Cristiane Mariote; Correa, Danielly de Sá; Miragaya, Luciana Meirelles; Silva, Eduardo Moreira da

    2015-10-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the microtensile bond strength of self-etch adhesive systems to dentin after storage in acids from oral biofilm. Three adhesive systems were used in the study: a two-step self-etch adhesive for use with a silorane-based resin composite (Filtek P90 adhesive system - P90), a two-step self-etch adhesive (Clearfil SE Bond - CSE) and a one-step self-etch adhesive (Adper Easy One - AEO). The bond strength of these products was evaluated by bonding resin composite (Filtek Z350 for CSE and AEO; and Filtek P90 for P90) to 90 bovine dentin tooth fragments, according to the manufacturer's instructions. After 24 h of water storage at 37 °C, the specimens were sectioned into beams (1 mm2) divided and stored in distilled water, lactic acid and propionic acid, for 7 and 30 days. After storage, the specimens were tested for microtensile bond strength. Data were analyzed by three-way ANOVA and Tukey´s test (α=0.05). CSE presented the highest microtensile bond strength after storage in distilled water for 7 and 30 days. The microtensile bond strength of all adhesive systems was lower after storage in lactic acid and propionic acid than after water storage. Significant difference was not found between storage times. PMID:26647935

  11. H-bonding scheme and cation partitioning in axinite: a single-crystal neutron diffraction and Mössbauer spectroscopic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatta, G. Diego; Redhammer, Günther J.; Guastoni, Alessandro; Guastella, Giorgio; Meven, Martin; Pavese, Alessandro

    2016-05-01

    The crystal chemistry of a ferroaxinite from Colebrook Hill, Rosebery district, Tasmania, Australia, was investigated by electron microprobe analysis in wavelength-dispersive mode, inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES), 57Fe Mössbauer spectroscopy and single-crystal neutron diffraction at 293 K. The chemical formula obtained on the basis of the ICP-AES data is the following: ^{X1,X2} {{Ca}}_{4.03} Y ( {{{Mn}}_{0.42} {{Mg}}_{0.23} {{Fe}}^{2 + }_{1.39} } )_{Σ 2.04} ^{Z1,Z2} ( {{{Fe}}^{3 + }_{0.15} {{Al}}_{3.55} {{Ti}}_{0.12} } )_{Σ 3.82} ^{T1,T2,T3,T4} ( {{{Ti}}_{0.03} {{Si}}_{7.97} } )_{Σ 8} ^{T5} {{B}}_{1.96} {{O}}_{30} ( {{OH}} )_{2.18} . The 57Fe Mössbauer spectrum shows unambiguously the occurrence of Fe2+ and Fe3+ in octahedral coordination only, with Fe2+/Fe3+ = 9:1. The neutron structure refinement provides a structure model in general agreement with the previous experimental findings: the tetrahedral T1, T2, T3 and T4 sites are fully occupied by Si, whereas the T5 site is fully occupied by B, with no evidence of Si at the T5, or Al or Fe3+ at the T1- T5 sites. The structural and chemical data of this study suggest that the amount of B in ferroaxinite is that expected from the ideal stoichiometry: 2 a.p.f.u. (for 32 O). The atomic distribution among the X1, X2, Y, Z1 and Z2 sites obtained by neutron structure refinement is in good agreement with that based on the ICP-AES data. For the first time, an unambiguous localization of the H site is obtained, which forms a hydroxyl group with the oxygen atom at the O16 site as donor. The H-bonding scheme in axinite structure is now fully described: the O16- H distance (corrected for riding motion effect) is 0.991(1) Å and an asymmetric bifurcated bonding configuration occurs, with O5 and O13 as acceptors [i.e. with O16··· O5 = 3.096(1) Å, H··· O5 = 2.450(1) Å and O16- H··· O5 = 123.9(1)°; O16··· O13 = 2.777(1) Å, H··· O13 = 1.914(1) Å and O16- H··· O13 = 146

  12. Which Ab Initio Wave Function Methods Are Adequate for Quantitative Calculations of the Energies of Biradicals? The Performance of Coupled-Cluster and Multi-Reference Methods Along a Single-Bond Dissociation Coordinate

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ke; Jalan, Amrit; Green, William H.; Truhlar, Donald G.

    2013-01-08

    We examine the accuracy of single-reference and multireference correlated wave function methods for predicting accurate energies and potential energy curves of biradicals. The biradicals considered are intermediate species along the bond dissociation coordinates for breaking the F-F bond in F2, the O-O bond in H2O2, and the C-C bond in CH3CH3. We apply a host of single-reference and multireference approximations in a consistent way to the same cases to provide a better assessment of their relative accuracies than was previously possible. The most accurate method studied is coupled cluster theory with all connected excitations through quadruples, CCSDTQ. Without explicit quadruple excitations, the most accurate potential energy curves are obtained by the single-reference RCCSDt method, followed, in order of decreasing accuracy, by UCCSDT, RCCSDT, UCCSDt, seven multireference methods, including perturbation theory, configuration interaction, and coupled-cluster methods (with MRCI+Q being the best and Mk-MR-CCSD the least accurate), four CCSD(T) methods, and then CCSD.

  13. Single-residue changes in the C-terminal disulfide-bonded loop of the Pseudomonas aeruginosa type IV pilin influence pilus assembly and twitching motility.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Hanjeong; Habash, Marc; Aidoo, Francisca; Burrows, Lori L

    2009-11-01

    PilA, the major pilin subunit of Pseudomonas aeruginosa type IV pili (T4P), is a principal structural component. PilA has a conserved C-terminal disulfide-bonded loop (DSL) that has been implicated as the pilus adhesinotope. Structural studies have suggested that DSL is involved in intersubunit interactions within the pilus fiber. PilA mutants with single-residue substitutions, insertions, or deletions in the DSL were tested for pilin stability, pilus assembly, and T4P function. Mutation of either Cys residue of the DSL resulted in pilins that were unable to assemble into fibers. Ala replacements of the intervening residues had a range of effects on assembly or function, as measured by changes in surface pilus expression and twitching motility. Modification of the C-terminal P-X-X-C type II beta-turn motif, which is one of the few highly conserved features in pilins across various species, caused profound defects in assembly and twitching motility. Expression of pilins with suspected assembly defects in a pilA pilT double mutant unable to retract T4P allowed us to verify which subunits were physically unable to assemble. Use of two different PilA antibodies showed that the DSL may be an immunodominant epitope in intact pili compared with pilin monomers. Sequence diversity of the type IVa pilins likely reflects an evolutionary compromise between retention of function and antigenic variation. The consequences of DSL sequence changes should be evaluated in the intact protein since it is technically feasible to generate DSL-mimetic peptides with mutations that will not appear in the natural repertoire due to their deleterious effects on assembly.

  14. Online, efficient and precision laser profiling of bronze-bonded diamond grinding wheels based on a single-layer deep-cutting intermittent feeding method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Hui; Chen, Genyu; He, Jie; Zhou, Cong; Du, Han; Wang, Yanyi

    2016-06-01

    In this study, an online, efficient and precision laser profiling approach that is based on a single-layer deep-cutting intermittent feeding method is described. The effects of the laser cutting depth and the track-overlap ratio of the laser cutting on the efficiency, precision and quality of laser profiling were investigated. Experiments on the online profiling of bronze-bonded diamond grinding wheels were performed using a pulsed fiber laser. The results demonstrate that an increase in the laser cutting depth caused an increase in the material removal efficiency during the laser profiling process. However, the maximum laser profiling efficiency was only achieved when the laser cutting depth was equivalent to the initial surface contour error of the grinding wheel. In addition, the selection of relatively high track-overlap ratios of laser cutting for the profiling of grinding wheels was beneficial with respect to the increase in the precision of laser profiling, whereas the efficiency and quality of the laser profiling were not affected by the change in the track-overlap ratio. After optimized process parameters were employed for online laser profiling, the circular run-out error and the parallelism error of the grinding wheel surface decreased from 83.1 μm and 324.6 μm to 11.3 μm and 3.5 μm, respectively. The surface contour precision of the grinding wheel significantly improved. The highest surface contour precision for grinding wheels of the same type that can be theoretically achieved after laser profiling is completely dependent on the peak power density of the laser. The higher the laser peak power density is, the higher the surface contour precision of the grinding wheel after profiling.

  15. Better Bonded Ethernet Load Balancing

    SciTech Connect

    Gabler, Jason

    2006-09-29

    When a High Performance Storage System's mover shuttles large amounts of data to storage over a single Ethernet device that single channel can rapidly become saturated. Using Linux Ethernet channel bonding to address this and similar situations was not, until now, a viable solution. The various modes in which channel bonding could be configured always offered some benefit but only under strict conditions or at a system resource cost that was greater than the benefit gained by using channel bonding. Newer bonding modes designed by various networking hardware companies, helpful in such networking scenarios, were already present in their own switches. However, Linux-based systems were unable to take advantage of those new modes as they had not yet been implemented in the Linux kernel bonding driver. So, except for basic fault tolerance, Linux channel bonding could not positively combine separate Ethernet devices to provide the necessary bandwidth.

  16. Evaluation of single liquid primers with organic sulfur compound for bonding between indirect composite material and silver-palladium-copper-gold alloy.

    PubMed

    Shimoe, Saiji; Tanoue, Naomi; Satoda, Takahiro; Murayama, Takeshi; Nikawa, Hiroki; Matsumura, Hideo

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of primers on bonding between a silver-palladium-copper-gold alloy and an indirect composite material. Cast disks were air-abraded with alumina, conditioned with one of five primers (Alloy Primer, Luna-Wing Primer, Metal Primer II, Metaltite, M.L. Primer), and bonded with a light-activated indirect composite. Shear bond strengths were determined after 20,000 times of thermocycling. The results showed that four of the primers, except the Luna-Wing Primer, were effective in enhancing the bond strength as compared with the unprimed control group. Of these four primers, Alloy Primer, Metal Primer II, and M.L. Primer exhibited significantly greater bond strengths. It can be concluded that the effectiveness of primers varies considerably according to the organic sulfur compounds added to the solvent, and that care must be taken in selecting priming agents for bonding the composite material and the silver-palladium-copper-gold alloy.

  17. Shear bond strength of two resin cements to human root dentin using three dentin bonding agents.

    PubMed

    Gogos, C; Stavrianos, C; Kolokouris, I; Economides, N; Papadoyannis, I

    2007-01-01

    This study compared the bond strength of two resin cements to human root dentin when used with three bonding agents. The materials used were Rely X ARC and Perma Cem, two one-bottle bonding agents (Single Bond, Bond-1) and one self-etching bonding agent (Clearfil SE Bond). The dentin was obtained from single rooted human teeth, and the specimens were treated with either 15% EDTA or 37% phosphoric acid to remove the smear layer, except in groups where the self-etching bonding agent was used. The resin cements were placed on dentin surfaces with the use of bonding agents. Shear bond strength (SBS) was tested using a single plane shear test assembly. The dentin specimens were divided into 10 groups. Eight groups were pre-treated with EDTA or phosphoric acid to remove the smear layer, followed by a bonding agent (Bond-1 or Single Bond) and resin cement (Rely X or Perma Cem). In the two remaining groups, the smear layer was left intact, and the two resins cements were used in combination with the self-etching bonding agent (Clearfil SE Bond). No statistically significant differences were observed among the eight groups treated with one-bottle bonding agents. The mean bond strengths of the two groups treated with the self-etching bonding agent did not differ significantly from each other but were both significantly greater than the bond strengths of all the other groups. The results of this study also showed that EDTA can be used as an alternative to phosphoric acid in bonding procedures for resin cements. However, the bond strengths of resin cements, in combination with a self-etching bonding agent, were significantly greater than those of the same cements when used with one-bottle bonding agents.

  18. Secondary deuterium kinetic isotope effects in irreversible additions of hydride and carbon nucleophiles to aldehydes: A spectrum of transition states from complete bond formation to single electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Gajewski, J.J.; Bocian, W.; Harris, N.J.; Olson, L.P.; Gajewski, J.P.

    1999-01-20

    The competitive kinetics of hydride and organometallic additions to benzaldehyde-H and -D were determined at {minus}78 C using LiAlH{sub 4}, LiBEt{sub 3}H, NaBH{sub 4}, LiBH{sub 4}, LiAl(O-tert-butoxy){sub 3}H, NaB(OMe){sub 3}H, NaB-(Ac){sub 3}H (at 20 C) methyl, phenyl, and allyl Grignard, and methyl-, phenyl-, n-butyl-, tert-butyl-, and allyllithium. The additions of hydride were found to have an inverse secondary deuterium kinetic isotope effects in all cases, but the magnitude of the effect varied inversely with the apparent reactivity of the hydride. In the additions of methyl Grignard reagent and of methyllithium and phenyllithium, inverse secondary deuterium isotope effects were observed; little if any isotope effect was observed with phenyl Grignard or n-butyl- and tert-butyllithium. With allyl Grignard and allyllithium, a normal secondary deuterium kinetic isotope effect was observed. The results indicate that rate-determining single-electron transfer occurs with allyl reagents, but direct nucleophilic reaction occurs with all of the other reagents, with the extent of bond formation dependent on the reactivity of the reagent. In the addition of methyllithium to cyclohexanecarboxyaldehyde, a less inverse secondary deuterium kinetic isotope effect was observed than that observed in the addition of methyllithium to benzaldehyde, and allyllithium addition to cyclohexanecarboxaldehyde had a kinetic isotope effect near unity. The data with organometallic additions, which are not incompatible with observations of carbonyl carbon isotope effects, suggest that electrochemically determined redox potentials which indicate endoergonic electron transfer with energies less than ca. 13 kcal/mol allow electron-transfer mechanisms to compete well with direct polar additions to aldehydes, provided that the reagent is highly stabilized, like allyl species. Methyllithium and phenyllithium and methyl and phenyl Grignard reagents are estimated to undergo electron transfer with

  19. Comparison of Push-out Bond Strength of Gutta-percha to Root Canal Dentin in Single-cone and Cold Lateral Compaction Techniques with AH Plus Sealer in Mandibular Premolars.

    PubMed

    Mokhtari, Hadi; Rahimi, Saeed; Forough Reyhani, Mohammad; Galledar, Saeedeh; Mokhtari Zonouzi, Hamid Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. The single-cone technique has gained some popularity in some European countries. The aim of the present study was to compare the push-out bond strength of gutta-percha to root canal dentin with the single-cone and cold lateral compaction canal obturation techniques. Materials and methods . The root canals of 58 human mandibular premolars were prepared using modified crown-down technique with ProTaper rotary files up to #F3as a master apical file (MAF) and divided randomly into groups A and B based on canal obturation technique. In group A (n = 29) the root canals were obturated with single-cone technique with #F3(30/.09) ProTaper gutta-percha, which was matched with MAF in relation to diameter, taper and manufacturer; in group B (n = 29) the canals were obturated with gutta-percha using cold lateral compaction technique. In both groups AH plus sealer were used. After two weeks of incubation, three 2-mm slices were prepared at a distance of 2 mm from the coronal surface and push-out test was carried out. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics using independent samples t-test. Results. There were statistically significant differences between two groups. The mean push-out bond strength was higher in group B (lateral compaction technique) compared to group A (single-cone technique; P < 0.05). Conclusion . Use of single-cone technique for obturation of root canals resulted in a lower bond strength compared to cold lateral compaction technique.

  20. Comparison of Push-out Bond Strength of Gutta-percha to Root Canal Dentin in Single-cone and Cold Lateral Compaction Techniques with AH Plus Sealer in Mandibular Premolars

    PubMed Central

    Mokhtari, Hadi; Rahimi, Saeed; Forough Reyhani, Mohammad; Galledar, Saeedeh; Mokhtari Zonouzi, Hamid Reza

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims. The single-cone technique has gained some popularity in some European countries. The aim of the present study was to compare the push-out bond strength of gutta-percha to root canal dentin with the single-cone and cold lateral compaction canal obturation techniques. Materials and methods. The root canals of 58 human mandibular premolars were prepared using modified crown-down technique with ProTaper rotary files up to #F3as a master apical file (MAF) and divided randomly into groups A and B based on canal obturation technique. In group A (n = 29) the root canals were obturated with single-cone technique with #F3(30/.09) ProTaper gutta-percha, which was matched with MAF in relation to diameter, taper and manufacturer; in group B (n = 29) the canals were obturated with gutta-percha using cold lateral compaction technique. In both groups AH plus sealer were used. After two weeks of incubation, three 2-mm slices were prepared at a distance of 2 mm from the coronal surface and push-out test was carried out. Data were analyzed with descriptive statistics using independent samples t-test. Results. There were statistically significant differences between two groups. The mean push-out bond strength was higher in group B (lateral compaction technique) compared to group A (single-cone technique; P < 0.05). Conclusion. Use of single-cone technique for obturation of root canals resulted in a lower bond strength compared to cold lateral compaction technique. PMID:26889358

  1. Distinguishing Bonds.

    PubMed

    Rahm, Martin; Hoffmann, Roald

    2016-03-23

    The energy change per electron in a chemical or physical transformation, ΔE/n, may be expressed as Δχ̅ + Δ(VNN + ω)/n, where Δχ̅ is the average electron binding energy, a generalized electronegativity, ΔVNN is the change in nuclear repulsions, and Δω is the change in multielectron interactions in the process considered. The last term can be obtained by the difference from experimental or theoretical estimates of the first terms. Previously obtained consequences of this energy partitioning are extended here to a different analysis of bonding in a great variety of diatomics, including more or less polar ones. Arguments are presented for associating the average change in electron binding energy with covalence, and the change in multielectron interactions with electron transfer, either to, out, or within a molecule. A new descriptor Q, essentially the scaled difference between the Δχ̅ and Δ(VNN + ω)/n terms, when plotted versus the bond energy, separates nicely a wide variety of bonding types, covalent, covalent but more correlated, polar and increasingly ionic, metallogenic, electrostatic, charge-shift bonds, and dispersion interactions. Also, Q itself shows a set of interesting relations with the correlation energy of a bond.

  2. Bond strength of adhesives to dentin contaminated with smoker’s saliva

    PubMed Central

    Oguri, Makoto; O’Keefe, Kathy; Dusevish, Vladimir; Spencer, Paulette; Powers, John M.; Marshall, Grayson W.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of contamination with smoker’s and non-smoker’s saliva on the bond strength of resin composite to superficial dentin using different adhesive systems. The interfacial structure between the resin and dentin was evaluated for each treatment using environmental scanning electron microscopy (ESEM). Freshly extracted human molars were ground with 600-grit SiC paper to expose the superficial dentin. Adhesives [One-Up-Bond-F-Plus (OUFP) and Adper-Prompt-L-Pop (APLP)] and resin composite (TPH-Spectrum) were bonded to the dentin (n = 8/group, 180 total specimens) under five surface conditions: control (adhesive applied following manufacturers’ instructions); saliva, then 5-s air dry, then adhesive; adhesive, saliva, 5-s air dry; adhesive, saliva, 5-s water rinse, 5-s air dry (ASW group); and adhesive, saliva, 5-s water rinse, 5-s air dry, reapply adhesive (ASWA group). After storage in water at 37°C for 24 h, the specimens were debonded under tension at a speed of 0.5 mm/min. ESEM photomicrographs of the dentin/adhesive interfaces were taken. Mean bond strength ranged from 8.1 to 24.1 MPa. Fisher’s protected least significant difference (P = 0.05) intervals for critical adhesive, saliva, and surface condition differences were 1.3, 1.3, and 2.1 MPa, respectively. There were no significant differences in bond strength to dentin between contamination by smoker’s and non-smoker’s saliva, but bond strengths were significantly different between adhesive systems, with OUFP twice as strong as APLP under almost all conditions. After adhesive application and contamination with either smoker’s or nonsmoker’s saliva followed by washing and reapplication of the adhesive (ASWA group), the bond strength of both adhesive systems was the same as that of the control group. PMID:20155506

  3. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 591 - Section 591.5(f) Bond for the Entry of More Than a Single Vehicle

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... held and firmly bound unto the UNITED STATES OF AMERICA in the sum of (bond amount in words) dollars... Form HS-7 “Declaration,” WHEREAS, pursuant to 49 CFR part 591, a regulation promulgated under the... Federal motor vehicle safety, or bumper, or theft prevention standards; and WHEREAS, pursuant to 49...

  4. Single crystal electron paramagnetic resonance spectra of Cu(II) ions in Cu(tyrosine)(2): a study of weak exchange interactions mediated by resonance assisted hydrogen bonds (RAHB).

    PubMed

    Paredes-García, Verónica; Santana, Ricardo C; Madrid, Rosa; Baldo, Bianca; Vega, Andrés; Spodine, Evgenia

    2012-09-01

    EPR measurements have been performed on single crystals of [Cu(L-tyrosine)(2)](∞) at 33.8 GHz and at room temperature. The EPR spectra display partially resolved EPR lines for most orientations of the magnetic field in the ab plane, and only one resonance for orientations close to the crystal axes, while only a single line is observed along any direction in the ca and cb crystal planes. This behavior is a result of the selective collapse of the resonances corresponding to the four copper sites in the unit cell produced by the exchange interactions between the copper ions. The magnitudes of the exchange interactions between the copper ions were evaluated from the angular variation of the line width and the collapse of the EPR lines. The value |J(AD)/k(B)|=0.8 K between neighboring copper atoms at 4.942 Å is assigned to a syn-anti equatorial-apical carboxylate bridge with a total bond length of 6.822 Å, while the small value |J(AB)/k(B)|=0.004 K is assigned to a long bridge of 11 atoms with a total bond length of 19.186 Å, that includes one resonance assisted hydrogen bond (RAHB). This finding is discussed in terms of values obtained for similar paths in other model compounds and in proteins.

  5. Evaluation of Shear Bond Strength of Newer Bonding Systems on Superficial and Deep Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, R Veena; Siddaraju, Kishore; Nagaraj, Hema; Poluri, Ramya Krishna

    2015-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to compare the shear bond strength of nanocomposite resin to superficial dentin and deep dentin using two different dentin bonding systems. Materials and Methods: All teeth were sectioned at various levels (superficial dentin: Dentin within 0.5-1 mm of dentinoenamel junction; deep dentin: Dentin within 0.5 mm of the highest pulp horn) using a Carborundum Disc and embedded in acrylic block of specific size. Selected specimens (60 premolar teeth) were grouped randomly into three groups, the groups were differentiated into superficial dentin, deep dentin, and control group which were further divided into sub Group A and Subgroup B containing 10 teeth each, depending on the bonding agents used. In Subgroup A, Tetric N Bond, and in Subgroup B Single Bond Universal were used. In the control group no bonding agent was used. The specimens were thermocycled for 500 cycles between 5°C and 55°C water bath for 40 s. Finally, the specimens were subjected to shear bond strength study under INSTRON machine (Universal Testing Machine). The maximum shear bond strengths were noted at the time of fracture (de-bonding) of the restorative material. Results were analyzed using ANOVA test, Bonferroni test, and paired t-test. Results: Bond strength values of fifth generation bonding system (Tetric N Bond) showed higher mean shear bond strength compared to seventh generation bonding system (Single Bond Universal). There was a significant fall in bond strength values as one reaches deeper levels of dentin from superficial to deep dentin. Conclusion: There was a significant difference between the bond strength of fifth generation bonding system (Tetric N Bond) and seventh generation bonding system (Single Bond Universal). Decrease in the bond strength values is seen for the deeper level of dentin as compared to superficial dentin. PMID:26435613

  6. 4-Oxocyclo­hexa­neacetic acid: catemeric hydrogen bonding and spontaneous resolution of a single conformational enanti­omer in an achiral ∊-keto acid

    PubMed Central

    Barcon, Alan; Brunskill, Andrew P. J.; Lalancette, Roger A.; Thompson, Hugh W.

    2010-01-01

    The asymmetric unit of the title compound, C8H12O3, consists of a single conformational enanti­omer, which aggregates in the catemeric acid-to-ketone hydrogen-bonding mode [O⋯O = 2.682 (4) Å and O—H⋯O = 172 (6)°]. Four hydrogen-bonding chains of translationally related mol­ecules pass through the cell orthogonal to the 43 screw axis along c, alternating in the 110 and the 10 direction, with alignment with respect to this axis of + + − −. Successive chains are rotated by 90° around the c axis. One C—H⋯O=C close contact, involving the carboxyl group, exists. PMID:21587559

  7. Bonds Boom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Cathryn

    1989-01-01

    The combined effect of the "Serrano" decision and Proposition 13 left California school districts with aging, overcrowded facilities. Chico schools won a $18.5 million general obligation bond election for facilities construction. With $11 billion needed for new school construction, California will need to tap local sources. A sidebar outlines…

  8. Yankee bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Delaney, P. )

    1993-10-01

    Yankee and Euromarket bonds may soon find their way into the financing of power projects in Latin America. For developers seeking long-term commitments under build, own, operate, and transfer (BOOT) power projects in Latin America, the benefits are substantial.

  9. Conformers and hydrogen bonds in cytidine 5‧-diphosphocholine sodium single crystals grown from a mixture of ethanol and water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Zhenxing; Hu, Yanan; Wang, Pei; Zhou, Jingwei; Xiong, Jian; Ying, Hanjie; Bai, Jianxin

    2011-01-01

    The molecular structure of cytidine 5'-diphosphocholine sodium (CDPC) grown from a mixture of ethanol and water was determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD). CDPC was found to have an orthorhombic structure with confirmed lattice parameters of a = 6.978 Å, b = 12.406 Å and c = 29.326 Å. This nucleotide coenzyme was highly folded and net-like. Each crystallographic unit consisted of one sodium atom, one pyrophosphate group, one cytosine group, one coordinated water molecule, one pentose molecule, and three lattice water molecules. The interspaces of neighboring CDPC molecules were filled with water molecules and methyl groups. Although the coordinated water was connected to sodium atoms, the lattice water molecules formed chair-shaped water hexamers. The hydrogen bonds which played an important role in maintaining the structure included O sbnd H···O, N sbnd H···O and C sbnd H···O and ranged in length from 2.682 (17) to 3.349 (17) Å. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) showed a broad absorption in the 400-2000 cm -1 region characteristic of short hydrogen bonds. So for industrial crystallization, methods which could eliminate the influence of hydrogen bonds should be taken, and it would be beneficial for the process of crystallization.

  10. Diffusion bonding

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Robert C.

    1976-06-22

    1. A method for joining beryllium to beryllium by diffusion bonding, comprising the steps of coating at least one surface portion of at least two beryllium pieces with nickel, positioning a coated surface portion in a contiguous relationship with an other surface portion, subjecting the contiguously disposed surface portions to an environment having an atmosphere at a pressure lower than ambient pressure, applying a force upon the beryllium pieces for causing the contiguous surface portions to abut against each other, heating the contiguous surface portions to a maximum temperature less than the melting temperature of the beryllium, substantially uniformly decreasing the applied force while increasing the temperature after attaining a temperature substantially above room temperature, and maintaining a portion of the applied force at a temperature corresponding to about maximum temperature for a duration sufficient to effect the diffusion bond between the contiguous surface portions.

  11. Bond failure patterns in vivo.

    PubMed

    Linklater, Rognvald A; Gordon, Peter H

    2003-05-01

    The aim of this study was to identify the presence and pattern of differences in bond failure between tooth types in vivo when bonding orthodontic brackets with the no-mix orthodontic composite adhesive Right-On. In vivo bond failure for a single operator was recorded for 108 consecutive patients undergoing fixed-appliance orthodontic treatment. The bond failure data were analyzed by survival analysis. Time to first failure or censorship was recorded for each bonded attachment. Overall failure in the sample matched previous clinical studies but conflicted with previous ex vivo bond strength data. Mandibular and posterior teeth had significantly higher rates of failure than did maxillary and anterior teeth. The type of attachment used had a significant effect on bond survival. The results of this study confirm that in vivo bond survival is not uniform for all teeth. Comparisons between the findings of this study and those of a previous ex vivo study by the same authors failed to validate ex vivo bond strength testing as clinically relevant.

  12. Analysis of micro-shear bond strength of self-etch adhesive systems with dentine: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Shakya, Vijay Kumar; Singh, Rajeev Kumar; Pathak, Anjani Kumar; Singh, Balendra Pratap; Chandra, Anil; Bharti, Ramesh; Yadav, Rakesh Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Background Success or failure of a composite restoration largely depends on its bonding to enamel/dentine. Several better adhesive systems have been developed during the last few years due to rapid advancement in the technology. Recent self-etched adhesives have fewer clinical steps and are less technique sensitive. Methods Ninety extracted human permanent molars were collected, grounded and finished to prepare flat dentine-bonding surfaces on their occlusal surface. All specimens were divided into three groups (n = 30) on the basis of three adhesive systems Adper Easy Bond (AE), Beautibond (BB) and Xeno IV (XE). These adhesive systems were applied on prepared mid-dentine-bonding surface. A restorative resin was added with the help of a transparent tube of 2 mm height and 1.7 mm internal diameter and cured. Fifteen specimens in each group were loaded to failure in an Instron Universal Testing Machine after storage for 24 h at 37 °C to check micro-shear bond strength. Another fifteen specimens from each group were thermocycled 500 times at 5 °C and 55 °C with dwell time of 1 min in each bath followed by loading to failure. The data obtained was analyzed with SPSS version 21 at significance level of <05. Results After 24 h, micro-shear bond strength of BB was higher (26.04 MPa) than XE (23.69 MPa) and AE (21.50 MPa). After thermocycling, micro-shear bond strength decreased significantly in BB (P = .001) and XE (P = .03). Conclusion The micro-shear bond strength of BB was highest among three groups, which decreased after thermocycling. PMID:26605144

  13. Chalcogen bond: a sister noncovalent bond to halogen bond.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weizhou; Ji, Baoming; Zhang, Yu

    2009-07-16

    A sister noncovalent bond to halogen bond, termed chalcogen bond, is defined in this article. By selecting the complexes H(2)CS...Cl(-), F(2)CS...Cl(-), OCS...Cl(-), and SCS...Cl(-) as models, the bond-length change, interaction energy, topological property of the electron charge density and its Laplacian, and the charge transfer of the chalcogen bond have been investigated in detail theoretically. It was found that the similar misshaped electron clouds of the chalcogen atom and the halogen atom result in the similar properties of the chalcogen bond and the halogen bond. Experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions.

  14. The effect of various primers on shear bond strength of zirconia ceramic and resin composite

    PubMed Central

    Sanohkan, Sasiwimol; Kukiattrakoon, Boonlert; Larpboonphol, Narongrit; Sae-Yib, Taewalit; Jampa, Thibet; Manoppan, Satawat

    2013-01-01

    Aims: To determine the in vitro shear bond strengths (SBS) of zirconia ceramic to resin composite after various primer treatments. Materials and Methods: Forty zirconia ceramic (Zeno, Wieland Dental) specimens (10 mm in diameter and 2 mm thick) were prepared, sandblasted with 50 μm alumina, and divided into four groups (n = 10). Three experimental groups were surface treated with three primers; CP (RelyX Ceramic Primer, 3M ESPE), AP (Alloy Primer, Kuraray Medical), and MP (Monobond Plus, Ivoclar Vivadent AG). One group was not treated and served as the control. All specimens were bonded to a resin composite (Filtek Supreme XT, 3M ESPE) cylinder with an adhesive system (Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose Plus Adhesive, 3M ESPE) and then stored in 100% humidity at 37°C for 24 h before SBS testing in a universal testing machine. Mean SBS (MPa) were analyzed with one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the Tukey's Honestly Significant Difference (HSD) test (α = 0.05). Results: Group AP yielded the highest mean and standard deviation (SD) value of SBS (16.8 ± 2.5 MPa) and Group C presented the lowest mean and SD value (15.4 ± 1.6 MPa). The SBS did not differ significantly among the groups (P = 0.079). Conclusions: Within the limitations of this study, the SBS values between zirconia ceramic to resin composite using various primers and untreated surface were not significantly different. PMID:24347881

  15. Pi Bond Orders and Bond Lengths

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herndon, William C.; Parkanyi, Cyril

    1976-01-01

    Discusses three methods of correlating bond orders and bond lengths in unsaturated hydrocarbons: the Pauling theory, the Huckel molecular orbital technique, and self-consistent-field techniques. (MLH)

  16. 2-Benzoylpyridine thiosemicarbazone as a novel reagent for the single pot synthesis of dinuclear Cu(I)-Cu(II) complexes: formation of stable copper(II)-iodide bonds.

    PubMed

    Lobana, Tarlok S; Khanna, Sonia; Butcher, Ray J

    2012-04-28

    2-Benzoylpyridine thiosemicarbazone {R(1)R(2)C(2)=N(2)·N(3)H-C(1)(=S)-N(4)H(2), R(1) = py-N(1), R(2) = Ph; Hbpytsc} with copper(I) iodide in acetonitrile-dichloromethane mixture has formed stable Cu(II)-I bonds in a dark green Cu(II) iodo-bridged dimer, [Cu(2)(II)(μ-I)(2)(η(3)-N(1),N(2),S-bpytsc)(2)] 1. Copper(I) bromide also formed similar Cu(II)-Br bonds in a dark green Cu(II) bromo-bridged dimer, [Cu(2)(II)(μ-Br)(2)(η(3)-N(1),N(2),S-bpytsc)(2)] 3. The formation of dimers 1 and 3 appears to be due to a proton coupled electron transfer (PCET) process wherein copper(I) loses an electron to form copper(II), and this is accompanied by a loss of -N(3)H proton of Hbpytsc ligand resulting in the formation of anionic bpytsc(-). When copper(I) iodide was reacted with triphenylphosphine (PPh(3)) in acetonitrile followed by the addition of 2-benzoylpyridine thiosemicarbazone in dichloromethane (Cu : PPh(3) : Hbpytsc in the molar ratio 1:1:1), both Cu(II) dimer 1 and an orange Cu(I) sulfur-bridged dimer, [Cu(2)(I)I(2)(μ-S-Hbpytsc)(2)(PPh(3))(2)] 2 were formed. Copper(I) bromide with PPh(3) and Hbpytsc also formed Cu(II) dimer 3 and an orange Cu(I) sulfur-bridged dimer, [Cu(2)(I)Br(2)(μ-S-Hbpytsc)(2)(PPh(3))(2)] 4. While complexes 2 and 4 exist as sulfur-bridged Cu(I) dimers, 1 and 3 are halogen-bridged. The central Cu(2)S(2) cores of 2 and 4 as well as Cu(2)X(2) of 1 (X = I) and 3 (X = Br) are parallelograms. One set of Cu(II)-I and Cu(II)-Br bonds are short, while the second set is very long {1, Cu-I, 2.565(1), 3.313(1) Å; 3, Cu-Br, 2.391(1), 3.111(1) Å}. The Cu···Cu separations are long in all four complexes {1, 4.126(1); 2, 3.857(1); 3, 3.227(1); 4, 3.285(1) Å}, more than twice the van der Waals radius of a Cu atom, 2.80 Å. The pyridyl group appears to be necessary for stabilizing the Cu(II)-I bond, as this group can accept π-electrons from the metal. PMID:22395858

  17. Bonded Lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Another spinoff to the food processing industry involves a dry lubricant developed by General Magnaplate Corp. of Linden, N.J. Used in such spacecraft as Apollo, Skylab and Viking, the lubricant is a coating bonded to metal surfaces providing permanent lubrication and corrosion resistance. The coating lengthens equipment life and permits machinery to be operated at greater speed, thus increasing productivity and reducing costs. Bonded lubricants are used in scores of commercia1 applications. They have proved particularly valuable to food processing firms because, while increasing production efficiency, they also help meet the stringent USDA sanitation codes for food-handling equipment. For example, a cookie manufacturer plagued production interruptions because sticky batter was clogging the cookie molds had the brass molds coated to solve the problem. Similarly, a pasta producer faced USDA action on a sanitation violation because dough was clinging to an automatic ravioli-forming machine; use of the anti-stick coating on the steel forming plates solved the dual problem of sanitation deficiency and production line downtime.

  18. Effect of indirect composite treatment microtensile bond strength of self-adhesive resin cements

    PubMed Central

    Escribano, Nuria; Baracco, Bruno; Romero, Martin; Ceballos, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Background No specific indications about the pre-treatment of indirect composite restorations is provided by the manufacturers of most self-adhesive resin cements. The potential effect of silane treatment to the bond strength of the complete tooth/indirect restoration complex is not available.The aim of this study was to determine the contribution of different surface treatments on microtensile bond strength of composite overlays to dentin using several self-adhesive resin cements and a total-etch one. Material and Methods Composite overlays were fabricated and bonding surfaces were airborne-particle abraded and randomly assigned to two different surface treatments: no treatment or silane application (RelyX Ceramic Primer) followed by an adhesive (Adper Scotchbond 1 XT). Composite overlays were luted to flat dentin surfaces using the following self-adhesive resin cements: RelyX Unicem, G-Cem, Speedcem, Maxcem Elite or Smartcem2, and the total-etch resin cement RelyX ARC. After 24 h, bonded specimens were cut into sticks 1 mm thick and stressed in tension until failure. Two-way ANOVA and SNK tests were applied at α=0.05. Results Bond strength values were significantly influenced by the resin cement used (p<0.001). However, composite surface treatment and the interaction between the resin cement applied and surface treatment did not significantly affect dentin bond strength (p>0.05). All self-adhesive resin cements showed lower bond strength values than the total-etch RelyX ARC. Among self-adhesive resin cements, RelyX Unicem and G-Cem attained statistically higher bond strength values. Smartcem2 and Maxcem Elite exhibited 80-90% of pre-test failures. Conclusions The silane and adhesive application after indirect resin composite sandblasting did not improve the bond strength of dentin-composite overlay complex. Selection of the resin cement seems to be a more relevant factor when bonding indirect composites to dentin than its surface treatment. Key words:Bond

  19. Effect of moisture, saliva, and blood contamination on the shear bond strength of brackets bonded with a conventional bonding system and self-etched bonding system

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, Mandava; Mohamed, Shamil; Nayak, Krishna; Shetty, Sharath Kumar; Talapaneni, Ashok Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Background: The success of bonding brackets to enamel with resin bonding systems is negatively affected by contamination with oral fluids such as blood and saliva. The new self-etch primer systems combine conditioning and priming agents into a single application, making the procedure more cost effective. Objective: The purpose of the study was to investigate the effect of moisture, saliva and blood contamination on shear bond strength of orthodontic brackets bonded with conventional bonding system and self-etch bonding system. Materials and Methods: Each system was examined under four enamel surface conditions (dry, water, saliva, and blood), and 80 human teeth were divided into two groups with four subgroups each of 10 according to enamel surface condition. Group 1 used conventional bonding system and Group 2 used self-etched bonding system. Subgroups 1a and 2a under dry enamel surface conditions; Subgroups 1b and 2b under moist enamel surface condition; Subgroups 3a and 3b under saliva enamel surface condition and Subgroup 4a and 4b under blood enamel surface condition. Brackets were bonded, and all the samples were then submitted to a shear bond test with a universal testing machine with a cross head speed of 1mm/sec. Results: The results showed that the contamination reduced the shear bond strength of all groups. In self-etch bonding system water and saliva had significantly higher bond strength when compared to other groups. Conclusion: It was concluded that the blood contamination showed lowest bond strength from both bonding systems. Self-etch bonding system resulted in higher bond strength than conventional bonding system under all conditions except the dry enamel surface. PMID:24678210

  20. Trimethylaluminum: Bonding by Charge and Current Topology.

    PubMed

    Stammler, Hans-Georg; Blomeyer, Sebastian; Berger, Raphael J F; Mitzel, Norbert W

    2015-11-01

    The charge density distribution of the trimethylaluminum dimer was determined by high-angle X-ray diffraction of a single crystal and quantum-chemical methods and analyzed using the quantum theory of atoms in molecules. The data can be interpreted as Al2Me6 being predominantly ionically bonded, with clear indications of topological asymmetry for the bridging Al-C bonds owing to delocalized multicenter bonding. This interpretation is supported by the calculated magnetic response currents. The data shed new light on the bonding situation in this basic organometallic molecule, which was previously described by contradicting interpretations of bonding.

  1. Hydrogen bonded arrays: the power of multiple hydrogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Shokri, Alireza; Schmidt, Jacob; Wang, Xue-Bin; Kass, Steven R

    2012-02-01

    Hydrogen bond interactions in small covalent model compounds (i.e., deprotonated polyhydroxy alcohols) were measured by negative ion photoelectron spectroscopy. The experimentally determined vertical and adiabatic electron detachment energies for (HOCH(2)CH(2))(2)CHO(-)(2a), (HOCH(2)CH(2))(3)CO(-) (3a), and (HOCH(2)CH(2)CH(OH)CH(2))(3)CO(-) (4a)reveal that hydrogen-bonded networks can provide enormous stabilizations and that a single charge center not only can be stabilized by up to three hydrogen bonds but also can increase the interaction energy between noncharged OH groups by 5.8 kcal mol(-1) or more per hydrogen bond. This can lead to pK(a) values that are very different from those in water and can provide some of the impetus for catalytic processes.

  2. Shear bond strength of bulk-fill and nano-restorative materials to dentin

    PubMed Central

    Colak, Hakan; Ercan, Ertugrul; Hamidi, Mehmet Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Bulk-fill composite materials are being developed for preparation depths of up to 4 mm in an effort to simplify and improve the placement of direct composite posterior restorations. The aim of our study was to compare shear-bond strength of bulk-fill and conventional posterior composite resins. Materials and Methods: In this study, 60 caries free extracted human molars were used and sectioned parallel to occlusal surface to expose midcoronal dentin. The specimens were randomly divided into four groups. Total-etch dentine bonding system (Adper Scotchbond 1XT, 3M ESPE) was applied to dentin surface in all the groups to reduce variability in results. Then, dentine surfaces covered by following materials. Group I: SonicFill Bulk-Fill, Group II: Tetric EvoCeram (TBF), Group III: Herculite XRV Ultra, and Group IV: TBF Bulk-Fill, 2 mm × 3 mm cylindrical restorations were prepared by using application apparatus. Shear bond testing was measured by using a universal testing machine. Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney U-tests were performed to evaluate the data. Results: The highest value was observed in Group III (14.42 ± 4.34) and the lowest value was observed in Group IV (11.16 ± 2.76) and there is a statistically significant difference between these groups (P = 0.046). However, there is no statistically significant difference between the values of other groups. In this study, Group III was showed higher strength values. Conclusion: There is a need for future studies about long-term bond strength and clinical success of these adhesive and bulk-fill systems. PMID:27011738

  3. Disulfide bonds of acetylcholinesterase

    SciTech Connect

    MacPhee-Quigley, K.; Vedvick, T.; Taylor, P.; Taylor, S.

    1986-05-01

    The positions of the inter- and intrasubunit disulfide bridges were established for the 11S form of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) isolated from Torpedo californica. A major form of AChE localized within the basal lamina of the synapse is a dimensionally asymmetric molecule which contains either two (13S) or three (17S) sets of catalytic subunits linked to collagenous and non-collagenous structural subunits. Limited proteolysis yields a tetramer of catalytic subunits which sediments at 11S. Each catalytic subunit contains 8 cysteine residues. Initially, these Cys residues were identified following trypsin digestion of the reduced protein alkylated with (/sup 14/C)-iodoacetate. Peptides were resolved by gel filtration followed by reverse phase HPLC. To determine the disulfide bonding profile, native non-reduced 11S AChE was treated with a fluorescent, sulfhydryl-specific reagent, monobromobimane, prior to proteolytic digestion. One fluorescent Cys peptide was identified indicating that a single sulfhydryl residue was present in its reduced form. Three pairs of disulfide bonded peptides were identified, sequenced, and localized in the polypeptide chain. The Cys residue that is located in the C-terminal tryptic peptide was disulfide bonded to an identical peptide and thus forms the intersubunit crosslink. Finally, the cysteine positions have been compared with the sequence of the homologous protein, thyroglobulin. Both likely share a common pattern of folding.

  4. Effect of EDTA and Phosphoric Acid Pretreatment on the Bonding Effectiveness of Self-Etch Adhesives to Ground Enamel

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Ihab M.; Elkassas, Dina W.; Yousry, Mai M.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: This in vitro study determined the effect of enamel pretreatment with phosphoric acid and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) on the bond strength of strong, intermediary strong, and mild self-etching adhesive systems. Methods: Ninety sound human premolars were used. Resin composite cylinders were bonded to flat ground enamel surfaces using three self-etching adhesive systems: strong Adper Prompt L-Pop (pH=0.9–1.0), intermediary strong AdheSE (pH=1.6–1.7), and mild Frog (pH=2). Adhesive systems were applied either according to manufacturer instructions (control) or after pretreatment with either phosphoric acid or EDTA (n=10). After 24 hours, shear bond strength was tested using a universal testing machine at a cross-head speed of 0.5 mm/minute. Ultra-morphological characterization of the surface topography and resin/enamel interfaces as well as representative fractured enamel specimens were examined using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Results: Neither surface pretreatment statistically increased the mean shear bond strength values of either the strong or the intermediary strong self-etching adhesive systems. However, phosphoric acid pretreatment significantly increased the mean shear bond strength values of the mild self-etching adhesive system. SEM examination of enamel surface topography showed that phosphoric acid pretreatment deepened the same etching pattern of the strong and intermediary strong adhesive systems but converted the irregular etching pattern of the mild self-etching adhesive system to a regular etching pattern. SEM examination of the resin/enamel interface revealed that deepening of the etching pattern was consistent with increase in the length of resin tags. EDTA pretreatment had a negligible effect on ultra-morphological features. Conclusions: Use of phosphoric acid pretreatment can be beneficial with mild self-etching adhesive systems for bonding to enamel. PMID:20922162

  5. Sealing and dentin bond strengths of adhesive systems.

    PubMed

    Del Nero, M O; de la Macorra, J C

    1999-01-01

    The objectives of this research were (1) to analyze the variations of the permeability of dentin after restoration with two polyacid-modified resin composites (Compoglass, Dyract) and four single-bottle adhesives (Prime & Bond 2.0, Syntac Single Component, OptiBond Solo, and Single Bond--Scotch Bond 1 in Europe--immediately (approximately 1 hour) after insertion. A perfusion system with distilled water was used at a pressure of 32.5 cm of water; (2) to study the bond strength of their interfaces; and (3) to find the correlation, if any, between both parameters. None of the materials used produced a complete cessation in fluid filtration. Tensile bond strengths were very low (maximum: P&B = 3.96 MPa) probably because of the very large bonding surfaces used (mean bonded surface area = 88.8 mm2). No significant correlation was found between tensile bond strength and the sealing ability for any material.

  6. What Determines Bond Costs. Municipal Bonds Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Douglas; And Others

    Public officials in small towns who participate infrequently in the bond market need information about bond financing. This publication, one in a series of booklets published by the Western Rural Development Center using research gathered between 1967-77, discusses factors influencing the marketability and cost of bond financing for towns and…

  7. Transient liquid phase ceramic bonding

    DOEpatents

    Glaeser, Andreas M.

    1994-01-01

    Ceramics are joined to themselves or to metals using a transient liquid phase method employing three layers, one of which is a refractory metal, ceramic or alloy. The refractory layer is placed between two metal layers, each of which has a lower melting point than the refractory layer. The three layers are pressed between the two articles to be bonded to form an assembly. The assembly is heated to a bonding temperature at which the refractory layer remains solid, but the two metal layers melt to form a liquid. The refractory layer reacts with the surrounding liquid and a single solid bonding layer is eventually formed. The layers may be designed to react completely with each other and form refractory intermetallic bonding layers. Impurities incorporated into the refractory metal may react with the metal layers to form refractory compounds. Another method for joining ceramic articles employs a ceramic interlayer sandwiched between two metal layers. In alternative embodiments, the metal layers may include sublayers. A method is also provided for joining two ceramic articles using a single interlayer. An alternate bonding method provides a refractory-metal oxide interlayer placed adjacent to a strong oxide former. Aluminum or aluminum alloys are joined together using metal interlayers.

  8. Non destructive evaluation of adhesively bonded carbon fiber reinforced composite lap joints with varied bond quality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayakumar, R. L.; Bhat, M. R.; Murthy, C. R. L.

    2012-05-01

    Structural adhesive bonding is widely used to execute assemblies in automobile and aerospace structures. The quality and reliability of these bonded joints must be ensured during service. In this context non destructive evaluation of these bonded structures play an important role. Evaluation of adhesively bonded composite single lap shear joints has been attempted through experimental approach. Series of tests, non-destructive as well as destructive were performed on different sets of carbon fiber reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite lap joint specimens with varied bond quality. Details of the experimental investigations carried out and the outcome are presented in this paper.

  9. Using Multiple Bonding Strategies.

    PubMed

    Larson, Thomas D

    2015-01-01

    There are many ways to bond to tooth structure, some micro-mechanical some chemical, some a combination. Different dentin bonding materials have different bonding strengths to differently prepared surfaces, and because of differences in their nature, different areas of tooth structure present peculiar bonding challenges. This paper will review a variety of material types, elucidating their particular bonding strengths and commenting on improved bonding strategies to increase durability, strength, and favorable pulpal response. In this discussion, resin dentin bonding systems, glass ionomers, Gluma, resin cements, and newer combined products will br reviewed. PMID:26485903

  10. Using Multiple Bonding Strategies.

    PubMed

    Larson, Thomas D

    2015-01-01

    There are many ways to bond to tooth structure, some micro-mechanical some chemical, some a combination. Different dentin bonding materials have different bonding strengths to differently prepared surfaces, and because of differences in their nature, different areas of tooth structure present peculiar bonding challenges. This paper will review a variety of material types, elucidating their particular bonding strengths and commenting on improved bonding strategies to increase durability, strength, and favorable pulpal response. In this discussion, resin dentin bonding systems, glass ionomers, Gluma, resin cements, and newer combined products will br reviewed.

  11. Fundamental aspects of recoupled pair bonds. I. Recoupled pair bonds in carbon and sulfur monofluoride

    SciTech Connect

    Dunning, Thom H. Xu, Lu T.; Takeshita, Tyler Y.

    2015-01-21

    The number of singly occupied orbitals in the ground-state atomic configuration of an element defines its nominal valence. For carbon and sulfur, with two singly occupied orbitals in their {sup 3}P ground states, the nominal valence is two. However, in both cases, it is possible to form more bonds than indicated by the nominal valence—up to four bonds for carbon and six bonds for sulfur. In carbon, the electrons in the 2s lone pair can participate in bonding, and in sulfur the electrons in both the 3p and 3s lone pairs can participate. Carbon 2s and sulfur 3p recoupled pair bonds are the basis for the tetravalence of carbon and sulfur, and 3s recoupled pair bonds enable sulfur to be hexavalent. In this paper, we report generalized valence bond as well as more accurate calculations on the a{sup 4}Σ{sup −} states of CF and SF, which are archetypal examples of molecules that possess recoupled pair bonds. These calculations provide insights into the fundamental nature of recoupled pair bonds and illustrate the key differences between recoupled pair bonds formed with the 2s lone pair of carbon, as a representative of the early p-block elements, and recoupled pair bonds formed with the 3p lone pair of sulfur, as a representative of the late p-block elements.

  12. Influence of N-H-O hydrogen bonds on the structure and properties of (K1-x(NH4)xH2PO4) proton glasses: a single crystal neutron diffraction study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan Choudhury, Rajul; Chitra, R.

    2013-02-01

    It has been known for quite some time now that proton dynamics plays a key role in the structural ferroelectric (FE)/antiferroelectric (AFE) phase transition in the crystals belonging to the potassium dihydrogen phosphate crystal family. Mixed crystals belonging to this family having the composition M1-x(NW4)xW2AO4, where M = K, Rb, Cs, W = H, D, and A = P, As, exhibit proton glass behavior due to frustration between FE and AFE ordering; these proton glasses do not undergo any structural phase change but retain their room temperature structure down to very low temperatures. Single crystal neutron diffraction investigations of four mixed crystals with composition (K1-x(NH4)xH2PO4), where x = 0.0, 0.29, 0.67 1.0, were undertaken with the intention to investigate the effect of the local structural deviations on the overall average structure of the crystals and correlate these structural changes to the presence or absence of a structural phase transition in these crystals. Hydrogen bonding is shown to play a key role in the changing nature of the mixed crystals as the composition varies from the potassium rich ferroelectric region to the proton glass region to the ammonium rich antiferroelectric region.

  13. Influence of chlorhexidine concentration on the durability of etch-and-rinse dentin bonds: a 12-month in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Breschi, Lorenzo; Cammelli, Federica; Visintini, Erika; Mazzoni, Annalisa; Vita, Francesca; Carrilho, Marcela; Cadenaro, Milena; Foulger, Stephen; Tay, Franklin R; Pashley, David; Di Lenarda, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of 0.2% and 2% chlorhexidine (CHX) used as a therapeutic primer on the long-term bond strengths of two etch-and-rinse adhesive systems. Methods Adper Scotchbond 1XT (SB1) and XP-Bond (XPB) were evaluated. Etched dentin substrates were assigned to six treatment groups: (1) 0.2% CHX + SB1; (2) 2% CHX + SB1; (3) SB1 (control); (4) 0.2% CHX + XPB; (5) 2% CHX + XPB; (6) XPB (control). Composite build-ups were made and beams prepared for microtensile bond strength test. Beams were divided in three subgroups and either immediately pulled to failure or stored in artificial saliva for 6 or 12 months prior to testing. Data were evaluated by three-way ANOVA. Additional adhesive interfaces were prepared to investigate nanoleakage expression by TEM. Results SB1 and XPB showed similar immediate bond strength values with or without CHX pre-treatment (p>0.05). After 12 months, bonds fell from 43.9 ± 9.5 MPa to 20.1 ± 5.4 MPa and from 39.6 ± 9.4 MPa to 14.2 ± 5.0 MPa in control specimens for SB1 and XPB respectively, while bond fell only from 41.9±9.6MPa to 33.2 ± 8.3 MPa and 38.3 ± 8.9 MPa to 26.5 ± 10.9 (for SB1 and XPB respectively) when 0.2% CHX was previously used. CHX concentration did not affect bond strength values (0.2% vs 2%, p>.05). Nanoleakage increased during aging in controls, but reduced silver deposits were found in CHX-treated specimens. Conclusions Chlorhexidine significantly reduced the loss of bond strength seen in control bonds. Since no bacterial growth was present in the aging conditions, the results of this study suggest that endogenous factors thought to degrade the adhesive interface can be inhibited by CHX. Further in vivo trials should confirm the role of CHX in bond durability. PMID:19603582

  14. Hydroxide-catalyzed bonding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gwo, Dz-Hung (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method of bonding substrates by hydroxide-catalyzed hydration/dehydration involves applying a bonding material to at least one surface to be bonded, and placing the at least one surface sufficiently close to another surface such that a bonding interface is formed between them. A bonding material of the invention comprises a source of hydroxide ions, and may optionally include a silicate component, a particulate filling material, and a property-modifying component. Bonding methods of the invention reliably and reproducibly provide bonds which are strong and precise, and which may be tailored according to a wide range of possible applications. Possible applications for bonding materials of the invention include: forming composite materials, coating substrates, forming laminate structures, assembly of precision optical components, and preparing objects of defined geometry and composition. Bonding materials and methods of preparing the same are also disclosed.

  15. Immediate bonding to bleached enamel.

    PubMed

    Nour El-din, Amal K; Miller, Barbara H; Griggs, Jason A; Wakefield, Charles

    2006-01-01

    This research sought to determine the shear bond strength, degree of resin infiltration and failure mode when organic solvent-based adhesives (acetone or ethanol) were used in immediate bonding to enamel bleached with 10% carbamide peroxide or 38% hydrogen peroxide systems. Seventy-two non-carious bovine incisors were randomly assigned to three groups of 24 specimens each-control group (deionized water), 38% hydrogen peroxide bleach group and 10% carbamide peroxide bleach group. Each group was further subdivided into two subgroups of 12 specimens each according to the adhesive system used to bond the resin composite to enamel surfaces. The two adhesive systems used were Single Bond, an ethanol-based adhesive, and One Step, an acetone-based adhesive. The shear bond strengths of 38% hydrogen peroxide and 10% carbamide peroxide were significantly lower compared to the non-bleached controls. Fractography revealed an adhesive failure mode in all specimens. Qualitative comparisons of resin tags present in the bleached and unbleached specimens using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed few, thin and fragmented resin tags when 38% hydrogen peroxide and 10% carbamide peroxide were used.

  16. Bonding Durability of Four Adhesive Systems

    PubMed Central

    Seyed Tabai, Elaheh; Mohammadi Basir, Mahshid

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to compare the durability of four adhesive systems by assessing their microtensile bond strength (MTBS) and microleakage during six months of water storage. Materials and Methods: A total of 128 human third molars were used. The adhesives tested were Scotch Bond Multipurpose (SBMP), Single Bond (SB), Clearfil-SE bond (CSEB), and All-Bond SE (ABSE). After sample preparation for MTBS testing, the microspecimens were subjected to microtensile tester after one day and six months of water storage. For microleakage evaluation, facial and lingual class V cavities were prepared and restored with composite. After thermocycling, microleakage was evaluated. Bond strength values were subjected to one-way ANOVA and Tamhane’s test, and the microleakage data were analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis, Dunn, Mann Whitney and Wilcoxon tests (P<0.05). Results: Single Bond yielded the highest and ABSE yielded the lowest bond strength at one day and six months. Short-term bond strength of SBMP and CSEB was similar. After six months, a significant decrease in bond strength was observed in ABSE and SBMP groups. At one day, ABSE showed the highest microleakage at the occlusal margin; however, at the gingival margin, there was no significant difference among groups. Long-term microleakage of all groups at the occlusal margins was similar, whilst gingival margins of SBMP and SB showed significantly higher microleakage. Conclusion: The highest MTBS and favorable sealability were obtained by Clearfil SE bond. Water storage had no effect on microleakage of self-etch adhesives at the gingival margin or MTBS of CSEB and SB. PMID:27123015

  17. Diffusion bonding aeroengine components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, G. A.; Broughton, T.

    1988-10-01

    The use of diffusion bonding processes at Rolls-Royce for the manufacture of titanium-alloy aircraft engine components and structures is described. A liquid-phase diffusion bonding process called activated diffusion bonding has been developed for the manufacture of the hollow titanium wide chord fan blade. In addition, solid-state diffusion bonding is being used in the manufacture of hollow vane/blade airfoil constructions mainly in conjunction with superplastic forming and hot forming techniques.

  18. Bond percolation in films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korneta, W.; Pytel, Z.

    1988-04-01

    Bond percolation in films with simple cubic structure is considered. It is assumed that the probability of a bond being present between nearest-neighbor sites depends on the distances to surfaces. Based on the relation between the Potts model and the bond percolation model, and using the mean-field approximation, the phase diagram and profiles of the percolation probability have been obtained.

  19. Rapid adhesive bonding concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, B. A.; Tyeryar, J. R.; Hodges, W. T.

    1984-01-01

    Adhesive bonding in the aerospace industry typically utilizes autoclaves or presses which have considerable thermal mass. As a consequence, the rates of heatup and cooldown of the bonded parts are limited and the total time and cost of the bonding process is often relatively high. Many of the adhesives themselves do not inherently require long processing times. Bonding could be performed rapidly if the heat was concentrated in the bond lines or at least in the adherends. Rapid adhesive bonding concepts were developed to utilize induction heating techniques to provide heat directly to the bond line and/or adherends without heating the entire structure, supports, and fixtures of a bonding assembly. Bonding times for specimens are cut by a factor of 10 to 100 compared to standard press bonding. The development of rapid adhesive bonding for lap shear specimens (per ASTM D1003 and D3163), for aerospace panel bonding, and for field repair needs of metallic and advanced fiber reinforced polymeric matrix composite structures are reviewed.

  20. Acrylic mechanical bond tests

    SciTech Connect

    Wouters, J.M.; Doe, P.J.

    1991-02-01

    The tensile strength of bonded acrylic is tested as a function of bond joint thickness. 0.125 in. thick bond joints were found to posses the maximum strength while the acceptable range of joints varied from 0.063 in. to almost 0.25 in. Such joints are used in the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory.

  1. Sharing in covalent and hydrogen bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perhacs, Pablo

    1998-11-01

    The sharing of a single electron between two spatial and spin coordinates ζ and ζsp/prime in a many electron system is discussed in terms of the single particle sharing amplitude, single particle sharing index, I(/zeta;/zeta/sp/prime) /equiv /langle/zeta;/zeta/sp/prime/rangle/ /langle/zeta/sp/prime;/zeta/rangle. The sharing amplitude serves as a single electron wave function within the context of the wave function for the entire system. The sharing index is a measure of the extent to which an electron is shared between ζ and ζsp/prime. The sharing of an electron between atoms in molecules is quantitatively interpreted through the sharing indices and graphically displayed in the fixed point sharing amplitude, bonding is distinguished from non-bonding and anti- bonding. Molecules studied are the diatomics of seven of the first nine elements and the hydrides of the first row of eight elements. Analysis is extended to the complex of methane and hydrogen fluoride and to pairs of hydrogen fluoride, water, and ammonia. The behavior of bonded complexes, is shown to have all the characteristics of covalent bonding. The ammonia dimer is shown not to be hydrogen bonded.

  2. The modified extended Hansen method to determine partial solubility parameters of drugs containing a single hydrogen bonding group and their sodium derivatives: benzoic acid/Na and ibuprofen/Na.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, P; Pena, M A; Barra, J

    2000-01-20

    Sodium salts are often used in drug formulation but their partial solubility parameters are not available. Sodium alters the physical properties of the drug and the knowledge of these parameters would help to predict adhesion properties that cannot be estimated using the solubility parameters of the parent acid. This work tests the applicability of the modified extended Hansen method to determine partial solubility parameters of sodium salts of acidic drugs containing a single hydrogen bonding group (ibuprofen, sodium ibuprofen, benzoic acid and sodium benzoate). The method uses a regression analysis of the logarithm of the experimental mole fraction solubility of the drug against the partial solubility parameters of the solvents, using models with three and four parameters. The solubility of the drugs was determined in a set of solvents representative of several chemical classes, ranging from low to high solubility parameter values. The best results were obtained with the four parameter model for the acidic drugs and with the three parameter model for the sodium derivatives. The four parameter model includes both a Lewis-acid and a Lewis-base term. Since the Lewis acid properties of the sodium derivatives are blocked by sodium, the three parameter model is recommended for these kind of compounds. Comparison of the parameters obtained shows that sodium greatly changes the polar parameters whereas the dispersion parameter is not much affected. Consequently the total solubility parameters of the salts are larger than for the parent acids in good agreement with the larger hydrophilicity expected from the introduction of sodium. The results indicate that the modified extended Hansen method can be applied to determine the partial solubility parameters of acidic drugs and their sodium salts.

  3. Hydrogen Bonds in Excited State Proton Transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horke, D. A.; Watts, H. M.; Smith, A. D.; Jager, E.; Springate, E.; Alexander, O.; Cacho, C.; Chapman, R. T.; Minns, R. S.

    2016-10-01

    Hydrogen bonding interactions between biological chromophores and their surrounding protein and solvent environment significantly affect the photochemical pathways of the chromophore and its biological function. A common first step in the dynamics of these systems is excited state proton transfer between the noncovalently bound molecules, which stabilizes the system against dissociation and principally alters relaxation pathways. Despite such fundamental importance, studying excited state proton transfer across a hydrogen bond has proven difficult, leaving uncertainties about the mechanism. Through time-resolved photoelectron imaging measurements, we demonstrate how the addition of a single hydrogen bond and the opening of an excited state proton transfer channel dramatically changes the outcome of a photochemical reaction, from rapid dissociation in the isolated chromophore to efficient stabilization and ground state recovery in the hydrogen bonded case, and uncover the mechanism of excited state proton transfer at a hydrogen bond, which follows sequential hydrogen and charge transfer processes.

  4. Bonding thermoplastic polymers

    DOEpatents

    Wallow, Thomas I.; Hunter, Marion C.; Krafcik, Karen Lee; Morales, Alfredo M.; Simmons, Blake A.; Domeier, Linda A.

    2008-06-24

    We demonstrate a new method for joining patterned thermoplastic parts into layered structures. The method takes advantage of case-II permeant diffusion to generate dimensionally controlled, activated bonding layers at the surfaces being joined. It is capable of producing bonds characterized by cohesive failure while preserving the fidelity of patterned features in the bonding surfaces. This approach is uniquely suited to production of microfluidic multilayer structures, as it allows the bond-forming interface between plastic parts to be precisely manipulated at micrometer length scales. The bond enhancing procedure is easily integrated in standard process flows and requires no specialized equipment.

  5. A novel C-C single bond formation by use of ketones, alkylmagnesium bromide, and low-valent vanadium in the presence of a catalytic amount of molecular oxygen

    SciTech Connect

    Kataoka, Yasutaka; Akiyama, Hiroaki; Makihira, Isamu; Tani, Kazuhide

    1996-09-06

    Reductive coupling of ketones mediated by MeMgBr, vanadium, and O{sub 2} is described. Multiple examples of this reaction are discussed. Both a C-C bond formation product and an alcohol product are formed.

  6. Direct bonding applied to space maintenance.

    PubMed

    Swaine, T J; Wright, G Z

    1976-01-01

    Based on the conditions of this study, the following conclusions were reached: A success rate of 70 percent seems to justify further investigation into direct bonded space maintainers. A space maintainer directly bonded to the buccal surfaces seems to be efficient in maintaining single tooth spaces. Primary-to-primary appliances were more successful than the primary-to-permanent appliances, which suggests that incomplete first permanent molar eruption and a posterior location affect appliance durability.

  7. Generalized resonating valence bond description of cyclobutadiene

    SciTech Connect

    Voter, A.F.; Goddard, W.A. III

    1986-05-28

    The low-lying electronic states of square and rectangular cyclobutadiene (CBD) are calculated by using the generalized resonating valence bond (GRVB) method and compared with the results from Hartree-Fock and configuration interaction wavefunctions. We find that simple valence bond concepts correctly predict the sequence of excited states (including ground-state singlet) and the distortion to a rectangular geometry for the ground state. Contrary to common expectation, we find that the singlet ground state of square CBD has 22 kcal of resonance energy (relative to a single valence bond structure). Thus, CBD is not antiresonant, though it is much less stable than normal conjugated systems.

  8. Weak bond screening system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, S. Y.; Chang, F. H.; Bell, J. R.

    Consideration is given to the development of a weak bond screening system which is based on the utilization of a high power ultrasonic (HPU) technique. The instrumentation of the prototype bond strength screening system is described, and the adhesively bonded specimens used in the system developmental effort are detailed. Test results obtained from these specimens are presented in terms of bond strength and level of high power ultrasound irradiation. The following observations were made: (1) for Al/Al specimens, 2.6 sec of HPU irradiation will screen weak bond conditions due to improper preparation of bonding surfaces; (2) for composite/composite specimens, 2.0 sec of HPU irradiation will disrupt weak bonds due to under-cured conditions; (3) for Al honeycomb core with composite skin structure, 3.5 sec of HPU irradiation will disrupt weak bonds due to bad adhesive or oils contamination of bonding surfaces; and (4) for Nomex honeycomb with Al skin structure, 1.3 sec of HPU irradiation will disrupt weak bonds due to bad adhesive.

  9. Functional systems with orthogonal dynamic covalent bonds.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Adam; Gasparini, Giulio; Matile, Stefan

    2014-03-21

    This review summarizes the use of orthogonal dynamic covalent bonds to build functional systems. Dynamic covalent bonds are unique because of their dual nature. They can be as labile as non-covalent interactions or as permanent as covalent bonds, depending on conditions. Examples from nature, reaching from the role of disulfides in protein folding to thioester exchange in polyketide biosynthesis, indicate how dynamic covalent bonds are best used in functional systems. Several synthetic functional systems that employ a single type of dynamic covalent bonds have been reported. Considering that most functional systems make simultaneous use of several types of non-covalent interactions together, one would expect the literature to contain many examples in which different types of dynamic covalent bonds are similarly used in tandem. However, the incorporation of orthogonal dynamic covalent bonds into functional systems is a surprisingly rare and recent development. This review summarizes the available material comprehensively, covering a remarkably diverse collection of functions. However, probably more revealing than the specific functions addressed is that the questions asked are consistently quite unusual, very demanding and highly original, focusing on molecular systems that can self-sort, self-heal, adapt, exchange, replicate, transcribe, or even walk and "think" (logic gates). This focus on adventurous chemistry off the beaten track supports the promise that with orthogonal dynamic covalent bonds we can ask questions that otherwise cannot be asked. The broad range of functions and concepts covered should appeal to the supramolecular organic chemist but also to the broader community. PMID:24287608

  10. Assessment of Tooth Preparation via Er:YAG Laser and Bur on Microleakage of Dentin Adhesives

    PubMed Central

    Bahrololoomi, Zahra; Heydari, Elham

    2014-01-01

    Objective Microleakage can be responsible for tooth hypersensitivity, secondary caries, and the possibility of pathological pulp alterations in restored teeth. Recently, alternative methods for tooth preparation such as laser irradiation have been studied; but there are limited studies on primary teeth. The aim of this in vitro study was to compare the degree of microleakage of composite restorations prepared by Er:YAG laser and conventional bur preparation with two adhesive systems in primary teeth. Materials and Methods: Eighty primary canine teeth were randomly divided into 4 groups. Class V cavities were prepared by Er:YAG laser or diamond bur on buccal surface. The groups were as follows: group1: High speed drill + self-etching adhesive Adper Prompt-L-Pop, group 2: Er:YAG laser + etch & rinse adhesive Adper Single Bond, group 3: High speed drill + Adper Single Bond, group 4: Er:YAG laser + Adper Prompt-L-Pop. Cavities were restored with Filtek Z250 composite resin. Then all of the specimens were polished, thermocycled, immersed in 2% methylene blue solution and sectioned longitudinally. Degree of microleakage was evaluated by two evaluators who assigned the micrleakage score (0 to 3). The original data were analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis and Dunn’s tests. Results: There were significant differences between bur-prepared cavities in the Adper Single Bond and other groups. There were no statistically significant differences between other groups. Conclusion: Laser-prepared cavities showed higher microleakage scores than cavities prepared with diamond bur with etch and rinse adhesive system. No significant difference was revealed between the laser and bur-prepared cavities using self-etch primers. PMID:24910693

  11. BONDING ALUMINUM METALS

    DOEpatents

    Noland, R.A.; Walker, D.E.

    1961-06-13

    A process is given for bonding aluminum to aluminum. Silicon powder is applied to at least one of the two surfaces of the two elements to be bonded, the two elements are assembled and rubbed against each other at room temperature whereby any oxide film is ruptured by the silicon crystals in the interface; thereafter heat and pressure are applied whereby an aluminum-silicon alloy is formed, squeezed out from the interface together with any oxide film, and the elements are bonded.

  12. Chemical bonding technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plueddemann, E.

    1986-01-01

    Primers employed in bonding together the various material interfaces in a photovoltaic module are being developed. The approach develops interfacial adhesion by generating actual chemical bonds between the various materials bonded together. The current status of the program is described along with the progress toward developing two general purpose primers for ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA), one for glass and metals, and another for plastic films.

  13. One-year water sorption and solubility of "all-in-one" adhesives.

    PubMed

    Walter, Ricardo; Feiring, Andrew E; Boushell, Lee W; Braswell, Krista; Bartholomew, Whitley; Chung, Yunro; Phillips, Ceib; Pereira, Patricia N R; Swift, Edward J

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the water sorption and solubility of different adhesives. Adper Easy Bond, Adper Single Bond Plus, Bond Force, Clearfil SE Bond (bonding resin only), and Xeno IV were the materials evaluated. Ten disks of each adhesive were made in Teflon molds and evaporation of any volatile components was allowed. The disks were weighed daily in an analytical balance until a constant mass was obtained (m1). Disks were then immersed in water for 12 months when their wet weight was recorded (m2). The disks were again weighed daily until a constant mass was obtained and the final weight recorded (m3). Water sorption and solubility (percentages) were calculated using the recorded mass values. Kruskal-Wallis tests were used to compare the average water sorption and solubility among the different adhesives. Mann-Whitney tests with a Bonferroni correction were used to determine the pairwise differences between adhesives in water sorption and solubility. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Water sorption and solubility were significantly different among the groups (p<0.05). Pairwise comparisons showed no significant differences (p>0.05) between Adper Single Bond Plus and Bond Force, or between Clearfil SE Bond and Xeno IV in either water sorption or solubility. Xeno IV did not differ from Adper Easy Bond in water sorption (p>0.05). Water sorption and solubility of all-in-one adhesives increased with time, and the rates of increase were composition-dependent. The results suggest that monomers other than HEMA contribute to water sorption and solubility of adhesive systems from different categories. PMID:24173253

  14. 31 CFR 363.168 - What rules regarding registration apply to a converted savings bond?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... apply to a converted savings bond? 363.168 Section 363.168 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations... § 363.168 What rules regarding registration apply to a converted savings bond? (a) Savings bond of any series registered in the single owner or entity form of registration. By converting a definitive bond...

  15. Theoretical study of the bond dissociation energies of methanol

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Langhoff, Stephen R.; Walch, Stephen P.

    1992-01-01

    A theoretical study of the bond dissociation energies for H2O and CH3OH is presented. The C-H and O-H bond energies are computed accurately with the modified coupled-pair functional method using a large basis set. For these bonds, an accuracy of +/- 2 kcal/mol is achieved, which is consistent with the C-H and C-C single bond energies of other molecules. The C-O bond is much more difficult to compute accurately because it requires higher levels of correlation treatment and more extensive one-particle basis sets.

  16. Mechanochemistry: One Bond at a Time

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jian; Fernández, Julio M.

    2009-01-01

    Single-molecule force clamp spectroscopy offers a novel platform for mechanically denaturing proteins by applying a constant force to a polyprotein. A powerful emerging application of the technique is that, by introducing a disulfide bond in each protein module, the chemical kinetics of disulfide bond cleavage under different stretching forces can be probed at the single-bond level. Even at forces much lower than that can rupture the chemical bond, the breaking of the S-S bond at the presence of various chemical reducing agents is significantly accelerated. Our previous work demonstrated that the rate of thiol/disulfide exchange reaction is force-dependent, and well described by an Arrhenius term of the form: r = A(exp((FΔxr-Ea)/kBT)[nucleophile]). From Arrhenius fits to the force dependency of the reduction rate we measured the bond elongation parameter, Δxr, along the reaction coordinate to the transition state of the SN2 reaction cleaved by different nucleophiles and enzymes, never before observed by any other technique. For S-S cleavage by various reducing agents, obtaining the Δxr value can help depicting the energy landscapes and elucidating the mechanisms of the reactions at the single-molecule level. Small nucleophiles, such as 1, 4-DL-dithiothreitol (DTT), tris(2-carboxyethyl)phosphine (TCEP) and L-cysteine, react with the S-S bond with monotonically increasing rates under the applied force; while thioredoxin enzymes exhibit both stretching-favored and —resistant reaction-rate regimes. These measurements demonstrate the power of single-molecule force clamp spectroscopy approach in providing unprecedented access to chemical reactions. PMID:19572737

  17. How molecular is the chemisorptive bond?

    PubMed

    van Santen, R A; Tranca, I

    2016-08-01

    Trends in adsorption energies as a function of transition metal differ for adsorbates that are attached atop a surface atom or are adsorbed onto a high coordination site. When adsorption onto early and late transition metals is compared variation in relative bond energies of adsorbates attached to different sites is large. A theoretical understanding is provided based on the analysis of the electronic structure of the respective chemical bonds. The electronic structure analysis is based on partial density of states (PDOS) and bond order overlap population densities from crystal orbital Hamiltonian population (COHP) calculations available from DFT electronic structure computations. This is complemented by calculations of Bader charge densities and electron density topology properties. Variation of the respective bond energies depends on the symmetry of the molecular orbitals that form the chemical bond. The key electronic structure parameters are the position of the Fermi level in the bonding or antibonding molecular orbital partial density of states region of the chemical bond and chemical bond polarity. These are very different for adsorbates adsorbed onto the same transition metal surface, but which have different coordination with surface metal atoms. The adsorption energies and the respective electronic structures of adatoms H, C and O and molecular fragments CHx (x = 1-3) are compared with those of the analogous molecules that contain a single transition metal atom. When adsorbed atop, trends in bond energies are remarkably similar to those of the corresponding molecules. The difference in bond energies of adsorbates and transition metal molecules, i.e. the embedding energy, is shown to consist of three contributions: quenching of the sometimes high molecular spin states, weakening of the adsorbate-surface interaction energy and weakening of the metal-metal atom bond energies next to the adsorbate. Conventional scaling rules of the interaction energies of

  18. Water interaction and bond strength to dentin of dye-labelled adhesive as a function of the addition of rhodamine B

    PubMed Central

    WANG, Linda; BIM, Odair; LOPES, Adolfo Coelho de Oliveira; FRANCISCONI-DOS-RIOS, Luciana Fávaro; MAENOSONO, Rafael Massunari; D’ALPINO, Paulo Henrique Perlatti; HONÓRIO, Heitor Marques; ATTA, Maria Teresa

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective This study investigated the effect of the fluorescent dye rhodamine B (RB) for interfacial micromorphology analysis of dental composite restorations on water sorption/solubility (WS/WSL) and microtensile bond strength to dentin (µTBS) of a 3-step total etch and a 2-step self-etch adhesive system. Material and Methods The adhesives Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (MP) and Clearfil SE Bond (SE) were mixed with 0.1 mg/mL of RB. For the WS/WSL tests, cured resin disks (5.0 mm in diameter x 0.8 mm thick) were prepared and assigned into four groups (n=10): MP, MP-RB, SE, and SE-RB. For µTBS assessment, extracted human third molars (n=40) had the flat occlusal dentin prepared and assigned into the same experimental groups (n=10). After the bonding and restoration procedures, specimens were sectioned in rectangular beams, stored in water and tested after seven days or after 12 months. The failure mode of fractured specimens was qualitatively evaluated under optical microscope (x40). Data from WS/WSL and µTBS were assessed by one-way and three-way ANOVA, respectively, and Tukey’s test (α=5%). Results RB increased the WSL of MP and SE. On the other hand, WS of both MP and SE was not affected by the addition of RB. No significance in µTBS between MP and MP-RB for seven days or one year was observed, whereas for SE a decrease in the µTBS means occurred in both storage times. Conclusions RB should be incorporated into non-simplified DBSs with caution, as it can interfere with their physical-mechanical properties, leading to a possible misinterpretation of bonded interface. PMID:27556201

  19. The Sibling Bond.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bank, Stephen P.; Kahn, Michael D.

    The relationships among brothers and sisters are infinitely varied, but whatever their characteristics, these bonds last throughout life. This book examines the sibling relationship as a distinctive emotional, passionate, painful, and solacing power. Chapter 1, "Unraveling the Sibling Bond," addresses research on siblings and development of the…

  20. Chemical Bonds I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanderson, R. T.

    1972-01-01

    Chemical bonding is discussed from a bond energy, rather than a wave mechanics, viewpoint. This approach is considered to be more suitable for the average student. (The second part of the article will appear in a later issue of the journal.) (AL)

  1. Universal nanopatternable interfacial bonding.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yuzhe; Garland, Shaun; Howland, Michael; Revzin, Alexander; Pan, Tingrui

    2011-12-01

    A nanopatternable polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) oligomer layer is demonstrated as an interfacial adhesive for its intrinsic transferability and universal adhesiveness. Utilizing the well-established surface modification and bonding techniques of PDMS surfaces, irreversible bonding is formed (up to 400 kPa) between a wide range of substrate pairs, representing ones within and across different materials categories, including metals, ceramics, thermoset, and thermoplastic polymers.

  2. The dissociative bond.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Nirit

    2013-01-01

    Dissociation leaves a psychic void and a lingering sense of psychic absence. How do 2 people bond while they are both suffering from dissociation? The author explores the notion of a dissociative bond that occurs in the aftermath of trauma--a bond that holds at its core an understanding and shared detachment from the self. Such a bond is confined to unspoken terms that are established in the relational unconscious. The author proposes understanding the dissociative bond as a transitional space that may not lead to full integration of dissociated knowledge yet offers some healing. This is exemplified by R. Prince's (2009) clinical case study. A relational perspective is adopted, focusing on the intersubjective aspects of a dyadic relationship. In the dissociative bond, recognition of the need to experience mutual dissociation can accommodate a psychic state that yearns for relationship when the psyche cannot fully confront past wounds. Such a bond speaks to the need to reestablish a sense of human relatedness and connection when both parties in the relationship suffer from disconnection. This bond is bound to a silence that becomes both a means of protection against the horror of traumatic memory and a way to convey unspoken gestures toward the other.

  3. Mother-Child Bonding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pearce, Joseph Chilton

    1994-01-01

    Examines the nature of mother-child bonding from the prenatal stage through early infancy, discussing how the mother's actions, even before birth, stimulate her child's senses. Explains the crucial role that physical contact, breastfeeding, and visual stimuli have on mother-child bonding in human and animal newborns. (MDM)

  4. The dissociative bond.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Nirit

    2013-01-01

    Dissociation leaves a psychic void and a lingering sense of psychic absence. How do 2 people bond while they are both suffering from dissociation? The author explores the notion of a dissociative bond that occurs in the aftermath of trauma--a bond that holds at its core an understanding and shared detachment from the self. Such a bond is confined to unspoken terms that are established in the relational unconscious. The author proposes understanding the dissociative bond as a transitional space that may not lead to full integration of dissociated knowledge yet offers some healing. This is exemplified by R. Prince's (2009) clinical case study. A relational perspective is adopted, focusing on the intersubjective aspects of a dyadic relationship. In the dissociative bond, recognition of the need to experience mutual dissociation can accommodate a psychic state that yearns for relationship when the psyche cannot fully confront past wounds. Such a bond speaks to the need to reestablish a sense of human relatedness and connection when both parties in the relationship suffer from disconnection. This bond is bound to a silence that becomes both a means of protection against the horror of traumatic memory and a way to convey unspoken gestures toward the other. PMID:23282044

  5. Effects of light curing modes and ethanol-wet bonding on dentin bonding properties*

    PubMed Central

    Li, Mu-zi; Wang, Jin-rui; Liu, Hong; Wang, Xia; Gan, Kang; Liu, Xiu-ju; Niu, De-li; Song, Xiao-qing

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study explored the effects of different light curing modes and ethanol-wet bonding on dentin bonding strength and durability. Methods: A total of 54 molars were randomly divided into three groups: Single Bond 2, Gluma Comfort Bond, and N-Bond. Based on the three light-curing modes and presence or absence of ethanol pretreatment, the samples were assigned to six subgroups: high-light mode, ethanol pretreatment+high-light mode, soft-start mode, ethanol pretreatment+soft-start mode, standard mode, and ethanol pretreatment+standard mode. All samples were bonded with resin based on the experimental groups. After 24 h and 6 months of water storage, a universal testing machine was used to measure microtensile bond strength. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was applied to observe mixed layer morphology. Results: The 24-h and 6-month microtensile bond strengths of the ethanol pretreatment groups were significantly higher than those of the non-ethanol pretreatment groups at the same light modes (P<0.05). With or without ethanol pretreatment, the microtensile bond strengths of the high-light modes were significantly lower than those of the soft-start modes and standard modes (P<0.05). The microtensile bond strengths of samples from the 6-month water storage group significantly decreased compared with those of samples from the 24-h water storage group (P<0.05). The soft-start groups and standard groups formed better mixed layers than the high-light mode groups, whereas the ethanol pretreatment groups formed more uniform mixed layers than those without ethanol pretreatment. Conclusions: Ethanol-wet bonding technique, soft-start, and standard modes could improve dentin bonding properties. PMID:27604862

  6. Shape Bonding method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pontius, James T. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a method of bonding at least two surfaces together. The methods step of the present invention include applying a strip of adhesive to a first surface along a predefined outer boundary of a bond area and thereby defining a remaining open area there within. A second surface, or gusset plate, is affixed onto the adhesive before the adhesive cures. The strip of adhesive is allowed to cure and then a second amount of adhesive is applied to cover the remaining open area and substantially fill a void between said first and second surfaces about said bond area. A stencil may be used to precisely apply the strip of adhesive. When the strip cures, it acts as a dam to prevent overflow of the subsequent application of adhesive to undesired areas. The method results in a precise bond area free of undesired shapes and of a preferred profile which eliminate the drawbacks of the prior art bonds.

  7. Wood Bond Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    A joint development program between Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection Technologies and The Weyerhaeuser Company resulted in an internal bond analyzer (IBA), a device which combines ultrasonics with acoustic emission testing techniques. It is actually a spinoff from a spinoff, stemming from a NASA Lewis invented acousto-ultrasonic technique that became a system for testing bond strength of composite materials. Hartford's parent company, Acoustic Emission Technology Corporation (AET) refined and commercialized the technology. The IBA builds on the original system and incorporates on-line process control systems. The IBA determines bond strength by measuring changes in pulsar ultrasonic waves injected into a board. Analysis of the wave determines the average internal bond strength for the panel. Results are displayed immediately. Using the system, a mill operator can adjust resin/wood proportion, reduce setup time and waste, produce internal bonds of a consistent quality and automatically mark deficient products.

  8. Strength of a bifurcated H bond

    PubMed Central

    Feldblum, Esther S.; Arkin, Isaiah T.

    2014-01-01

    Macromolecules are characterized by their particular arrangement of H bonds. Many of these interactions involve a single donor and acceptor pair, such as the regular H-bonding pattern between carbonyl oxygens and amide H+s four residues apart in α-helices. The H-bonding potential of some acceptors, however, leads to the phenomenon of overcoordination between two donors and one acceptor. Herein, using isotope-edited Fourier transform infrared measurements and density functional theory (DFT) calculations, we measured the strength of such bifurcated H bonds in a transmembrane α-helix. Frequency shifts of the 13C=18O amide I mode were used as a reporter of the strength of the bifurcated H bond from a thiol and hydroxyl H+ at residue i + 4. DFT calculations yielded very similar frequency shifts and an energy of −2.6 and −3.4 kcal/mol for the thiol and hydroxyl bifurcated H bonds, respectively. The strength of the intrahelical bifurcated H bond is consistent with its prevalence in hydrophobic environments and is shown to significantly impact side-chain rotamer distribution. PMID:24591597

  9. Anharmonic Vibrational Spectra of Hydrogen Bonded Clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xantheas, Sotiris S.

    2006-03-01

    We report anharmonic vibrational spectra for a variety of hydrogen bonded clusters such as (H2O)n and (HF)n, n=1-5. We investigate the convergence of the hydrogen bonded frequencies with basis set and level of electron correlation and compare with the available experimental data. For this purpose we employ the correlation-consistent basis sets up to quintuple zeta (5z) quality and compute the spectra at the second order Møller-Plesset (MP2) and Coupled Cluster plus Single and Double with perturbative estimate of Triple excitations [CCSD(T)]. The correlation between the calculated elongations in the hydrogen bonding stretches and the corresponding computed/observed vibrational frequencies suggest an extension of Badger's rule for these hydrogen bonded systems.

  10. Aminoboration: Addition of B–N σ Bonds across C–C π Bonds

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This communication demonstrates the first catalytic aminoboration of C–C π bonds by B–N σ bonds and its application to the synthesis of 3-borylated indoles. The regiochemistry and broad functional group compatibility of this addition reaction enable substitution patterns that are incompatible with major competing technologies. This aminoboration reaction effects the formation of C–B and C–N bonds in a single step from aminoboronic esters, which are simple starting materials available on the gram scale. This reaction generates synthetically valuable N-heterocyclic organoboron compounds as potential building blocks for drug discovery. The working mechanistic hypothesis involves a bifunctional Lewis acid/base catalysis strategy involving the combination of a carbophilic gold cation and a trifluoroacetate anion that activate the C–C π bond and the B–N σ bond simultaneously. PMID:26238962

  11. iBond: the seventh-generation, one-bottle dental bonding agent.

    PubMed

    Dunn, James R

    2003-02-01

    Dental adhesive systems used for bonding dental resins to enamel and dentin have evolved through several "generations," with changes in chemistries, mechanism, number of bottles, application technique, and clinical effectiveness. The trend in the latest generation of dental bonding systems is to reduce the number of components and clinical placement steps. The introduction of iBond, a single-bottle dental adhesive system, is the latest of the new generation materials, and combines etchant, adhesive, and desensitizer in one component. This article will show that laboratory test results comparing the bond strength and margin-gap sealing of iBond with other latest-generation dental adhesive systems have shown similar results.

  12. Effects of a newly designed HEMA-free, multi-purpose, single-bottle, self-etching adhesive on bonding to dental hard tissues, zirconia-based ceramics, and gold alloy.

    PubMed

    Ikemura, Kunio; Jogetsu, Yoshiyuki; Shinno, Kazuya; Nakatsuka, Toshiyuki; Endo, Takeshi; Kadoma, Yoshinori

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the bonding effectiveness of newly designed self-etching adhesives to four types of adherends--enamel, dentin, zirconia, and gold (Au) alloy. Five experimental adhesives were prepared, which contained 3.0-5.0 wt% 6-methacryloyloxyhexyl phosphonoacetate (6-MHPA) or 6-methacryloyloxyhexyl 3-phosphonopropionate (6-MHPP), 3.0 wt% 4-acryloyloxyethoxycarbonylphthalic acid (4-AET) or 17.0 wt% 4-methacryloyloxyethoxycarbonylphthalic acid (4-MET), 0-0.5 wt% 6-methacryloyloxyhexyl 6,8-dithiooctanoate (6-MHDT) or 10-methacryloyloxydecyl 6,8-dithiooctanoate (10-MDDT), and varying contents of Bis-GMA, dimethacrylate monomers, water, acetone, and a photoinitiator system. After 2,000 times of thermal cycling, shear bond strengths (SBSs) between a resin composite (Beautifil II, Shofu Inc., Japan) and the four adherends, bonded using the experimental adhesives, were measured at 1.0 mm/min. No statistically significant differences in SBS for bonding to ground enamel, dentin, sandblasted zirconia and Au alloy (p>0.05) were found between experimental adhesives which contained 6-MHPA and/or 6-MHPP, 4-MET or 4-AET, 6-MHDT and/or 10-MDDT, Bis-GMA, and dimethacrylates. An adhesive layer of less than 5.0 µm thickness, by scanning electron microscopy observation, revealed strong adhesion to the four adherends. Therefore, the newly designed multi-purpose, self-etching adhesive strongly adhered to all the four adherend materials tested.

  13. The Halogen Bond.

    PubMed

    Cavallo, Gabriella; Metrangolo, Pierangelo; Milani, Roberto; Pilati, Tullio; Priimagi, Arri; Resnati, Giuseppe; Terraneo, Giancarlo

    2016-02-24

    The halogen bond occurs when there is evidence of a net attractive interaction between an electrophilic region associated with a halogen atom in a molecular entity and a nucleophilic region in another, or the same, molecular entity. In this fairly extensive review, after a brief history of the interaction, we will provide the reader with a snapshot of where the research on the halogen bond is now, and, perhaps, where it is going. The specific advantages brought up by a design based on the use of the halogen bond will be demonstrated in quite different fields spanning from material sciences to biomolecular recognition and drug design. PMID:26812185

  14. The Halogen Bond

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The halogen bond occurs when there is evidence of a net attractive interaction between an electrophilic region associated with a halogen atom in a molecular entity and a nucleophilic region in another, or the same, molecular entity. In this fairly extensive review, after a brief history of the interaction, we will provide the reader with a snapshot of where the research on the halogen bond is now, and, perhaps, where it is going. The specific advantages brought up by a design based on the use of the halogen bond will be demonstrated in quite different fields spanning from material sciences to biomolecular recognition and drug design. PMID:26812185

  15. Silicon waveguides produced by wafer bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Poulsen, M.; Jensen, F.; Bunk, O.; Feidenhans'l, R.; Breiby, D.W.

    2005-12-26

    X-ray waveguides are successfully produced employing standard silicon technology of UV photolithography and wafer bonding. Contrary to theoretical expectations for similar systems even 100 {mu}m broad guides of less than 80 nm height do not collapse and can be used as one dimensional waveguides to excite single guided modes at typical x-ray energies.

  16. Junk-Bond Colleges.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Der Werf, Martin

    2003-01-01

    Describes how a long-predicted decline in the fortunes of small private colleges is beginning to show up in the bond market, as the number of colleges now rated in the junk category has nearly doubled. (EV)

  17. Bonding with your newborn

    MedlinePlus

    ... and your baby begin to feel a strong attachment with each other. You may feel great love ... L, Saison J, et al. Building a secure attachment bond with your baby. Helpguide.org. www.helpguide. ...

  18. Detecting Defective Solder Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paulson, R.; Barney, J.; Decker, H. J.

    1984-01-01

    Method is noncontact and nondestructive. Technique detects solder bonds in solar array of other large circuit board, using thermal-imaging camera. Board placed between heat lamp and camera. Poor joints indiated by "cold" spots on the infrared image.

  19. Bonding aerogels with polyurethanes

    SciTech Connect

    Matthews, F.M.; Hoffman, D.M.

    1989-11-01

    Aerogels, porous silica glasses with ultra-fine cell size (30nm), are made by a solution gelation (sol-gel) process. The resulting gel is critical point dried to densities from 0.15--0.60 g/cc. This material is machinable, homogeneous, transparent, coatable and bondable. To bond aerogel an adhesive should have long cure time, no attack on the aerogel structure, and high strength. Several epoxies and urethanes were examined to determine if they satisfied these conditions. Bond strengths above 13 psi were found with double bubble and DP-110 epoxies and XI-208/ODA-1000 and Castall U-2630 urethanes. Hardman Kalex Tough Stuff'' A-85 hardness urethane gave 18 psi bond strength. Hardman A-85, Tuff-Stuff'' was selected for further evaluation because it produced bond strengths comparable to the adherend cohesive strength. 5 refs., 2 figs.

  20. Hydrogen-bond reinforced vanadia nanofiber paper of high stiffness.

    PubMed

    Burghard, Zaklina; Leineweber, Andreas; van Aken, Peter A; Dufaux, Thomas; Burghard, Marko; Bill, Joachim

    2013-05-01

    Low-temperature, solution-based self-assembly of vanadia nanofibers yields a free-standing, ceramic paper with an outstanding combination of high strength, stiffness, and macroscopic flexibility. Its excellent mechanical performance results from a brick-and-mortar like architecture, which combines strong covalent bonding within the single-crystalline nanofibers with an intricate hydrogen bonding network between them. PMID:23468458

  1. Methoxylation of Singly Bonded 1,4-1',4'-BnC60-C60Bn Dimer: Preferential Formation of 1,4-C60 Adduct with Sterically Less Demanding Addends and Stability Difference between 1,2- and 1,4-OMe(Bn)C60.

    PubMed

    He, Fa-Gui; Li, Zong-Jun; Gao, Xiang

    2016-08-01

    Methoxylation of the singly bonded 1,4-1',4'-BnC60-C60Bn dimer afforded 1,4-OMe(Bn)C60, a 1,4-C60 adduct with sterically less demanding addends, as the major adduct. The situation was different from that of direct functionalization of C60, where 1,2-OMe(Bn)C60 was obtained as the major product. The reaction was studied with in situ vis-NIR spectroscopy and computational calculations to obtain a better understanding of this unusual regioselectivity. The stability difference between 1,2- and 1,4-OMe(Bn)C60 was studied. PMID:27387300

  2. Strength of Chemical Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christian, Jerry D.

    1973-01-01

    Students are not generally made aware of the extraordinary magnitude of the strengths of chemical bonds in terms of the forces required to pull them apart. Molecular bonds are usually considered in terms of the energies required to break them, and we are not astonished at the values encountered. For example, the Cl2 bond energy, 57.00 kcal/mole, amounts to only 9.46 x 10(sup -20) cal/molecule, a very small amount of energy, indeed, and impossible to measure directly. However, the forces involved in realizing the energy when breaking the bond operate over a very small distance, only 2.94 A, and, thus, f(sub ave) approx. equals De/(r - r(sub e)) must be very large. The forces involved in dissociating the molecule are discussed in the following. In consideration of average forces, the molecule shall be assumed arbitrarily to be dissociated when the atoms are far enough separated so that the potential, relative to that of the infinitely separated atoms, is reduced by 99.5% from the potential of the molecule at the equilibrium bond length (r(sub e)) for Cl2 of 1.988 A this occurs at 4.928 A.

  3. Predicting Promoter-Induced Bond Activation on Solid Catalysts Using Elementary Bond Orders.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Charlie; Latimer, Allegra A; Yoo, Jong Suk; Studt, Felix; Abild-Pedersen, Frank

    2015-09-17

    In this Letter, we examine bond activation induced by nonmetal surface promoters in the context of dehydrogenation reactions. We use C-H bond activation in methane dehydrogenation on transition metals as an example to understand the origin of the promoting or poisoning effect of nonmetals. The electronic structure of the surface and the bond order of the promoter are found to establish all trends in bond activation. On the basis of these results, we develop a predictive model that successfully describes the energetics of C-H, O-H, and N-H bond activation across a range of reactions. For a given reaction step, a single data point determines whether a nonmetal will promote bond activation or poison the surface and by how much. We show how our model leads to general insights that can be directly used to predict bond activation energetics on transition metal sulfides and oxides, which can be perceived as promoted surfaces. These results can then be directly used in studies on full catalytic pathways. PMID:26722740

  4. Biomolecular halogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Ho, P Shing

    2015-01-01

    Halogens are atypical elements in biology, but are common as substituents in ligands, including thyroid hormones and inhibitors, which bind specifically to proteins and nucleic acids. The short-range, stabilizing interactions of halogens - now seen as relatively common in biology - conform generally to halogen bonds characterized in small molecule systems and as described by the σ-hole model. The unique properties of biomolecular halogen bonds (BXBs), particularly in their geometric and energetic relationship to classic hydrogen bonds, make them potentially powerful tools for inhibitor design and molecular engineering. This chapter reviews the current research on BXBs, focusing on experimental studies on their structure-energy relationships, how these studies inform the development of computational methods to model BXBs, and considers how BXBs can be applied to the rational design of more effective inhibitors against therapeutic targets and of new biological-based materials.

  5. Insulation bonding test system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beggs, J. M.; Johnston, G. D.; Coleman, A. D.; Portwood, J. N.; Saunders, J. M.; Redmon, J. W.; Porter, A. C. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A method and a system for testing the bonding of foam insulation attached to metal is described. The system involves the use of an impacter which has a calibrated load cell mounted on a plunger and a hammer head mounted on the end of the plunger. When the impacter strikes the insulation at a point to be tested, the load cell measures the force of the impact and the precise time interval during which the hammer head is in contact with the insulation. This information is transmitted as an electrical signal to a load cell amplifier where the signal is conditioned and then transmitted to a fast Fourier transform (FFT) analyzer. The FFT analyzer produces energy spectral density curves which are displayed on a video screen. The termination frequency of the energy spectral density curve may be compared with a predetermined empirical scale to determine whether a igh quality bond, good bond, or debond is present at the point of impact.

  6. Cooperativity in beryllium bonds.

    PubMed

    Alkorta, Ibon; Elguero, José; Yáñez, Manuel; Mó, Otilia

    2014-03-01

    A theoretical study of the beryllium bonded clusters of the (iminomethyl)beryllium hydride and (iminomethyl)beryllium fluoride [HC(BeX)=NH, X = H, F] molecules has been carried out at the B3LYP/6-311++G(3df,2p) level of theory. Linear and cyclic clusters have been characterized up to the decamer. The geometric, energetic, electronic and NMR properties of the clusters clearly indicate positive cooperativity. The evolution of the molecular properties, as the size of the cluster increases, is similar to those reported in polymers held together by hydrogen bonds.

  7. Atomic Level Distributed Strain within Graphene Divacancies from Bond Rotations.

    PubMed

    Chen, Qu; Robertson, Alex W; He, Kuang; Gong, Chuncheng; Yoon, Euijoon; Lee, Gun-Do; Warner, Jamie H

    2015-08-25

    Vacancy defects play an important role in influencing the properties of graphene, and understanding their detailed atomic structure is crucial for developing accurate models to predict their impact. Divacancies (DVs) are one of the most common defects in graphene and can take three different structural forms through various sequences of bond rotations to minimize the energy. Using aberration-corrected transmission electron microscopy with monochromation of the electron source, we resolve the position of C atoms in graphene and measure the C-C bond lengths within the three DVs, enabling a map of bond strain to be generated. We show that bond rotations reduce the maximum single bond strain reached within a DV and help distribute the strain over a larger number of bonds to minimize the peak magnitude.

  8. Interface nanochemistry effects on stainless steel diffusion bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, M. J.; Carpenter, R. W.; Kim, M. J.

    2002-02-01

    The diffusion-bonding behavior of single-phase austenitic stainless steel depends strongly on the chemistry of the surfaces to be bounded. We found that very smooth (0.5 nm root-mean-square (RMS) roughness), mechanically polished and lapped substrates would bond completely in ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) in 1 hour at 1000 °C under 3.5 MPa uniaxial pressure, if the native oxide on the substrates was removed by ion-beam cleaning, as shown by in-situ Auger analysis. No voids were observed in these bonded interfaces by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and the strength was equal to that of the unbounded bare material. No bond formed between the substrates if in-situ ion cleaning was not used. The rougher cleaned substrates partially bonded, indicating that roughness, as well as native oxides, reduced the bonding kinetics.

  9. Disulfide bond cleavage: a redox reaction without electron transfer.

    PubMed

    Hofbauer, Florian; Frank, Irmgard

    2010-05-01

    By using Car-Parrinello molecular dynamics (CPMD) simulations we have simulated a mechanically induced redox reaction. Previous single-molecule atomic force microscopy (AFM) experiments demonstrated that the reduction of disulfide bonds in proteins with the weak reducing agent dithiothreitol depends on a mechanical destabilization of the breaking bond. With reactive molecular dynamics simulations the single steps of the reaction mechanism can be elucidated and the motion of the electrons can be monitored. The simulations show that the redox reaction consists of the heterolytic cleavage of the S--S bond followed by a sequence of proton transfers. PMID:20349464

  10. Bonds Between Atoms.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holden, Alan

    The field of inquiry into how atoms are bonded together to form molecules and solids crosses the borderlines between physics and chemistry encompassing methods characteristic of both sciences. At one extreme, the inquiry is pursued with care and rigor into the simplest cases; at the other extreme, suggestions derived from the more careful inquiry…

  11. Dialogic Bonds and Boundaries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khawaja, Mabel

    A study of literature cannot be divorced from cultural contexts, nor can it ignore the humanist vision in interpreting literary texts. To discover dialogic bonds and boundaries between the reader and the text, or the writer and the audience, English classes should have two objectives: (1) to explore the diversity of perspectives, and (2) to relate…

  12. Photochemical tissue bonding

    DOEpatents

    Redmond, Robert W.; Kochevar, Irene E.

    2012-01-10

    Photochemical tissue bonding methods include the application of a photosensitizer to a tissue and/or tissue graft, followed by irradiation with electromagnetic energy to produce a tissue seal. The methods are useful for tissue adhesion, such as in wound closure, tissue grafting, skin grafting, musculoskeletal tissue repair, ligament or tendon repair and corneal repair.

  13. Bonding without Tears.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Akeroyd, F. Michael

    1982-01-01

    Discusses merits of using sigma-pi model of ethylene as a teaching aid in introductory organic chemistry. The nonmathematical treatment of sigma-pi bonding is then extended to such phenomena as conjugation, hyperconjugation, Markovnikoff addition, aromaticity, and aromatic substitution. (SK)

  14. GRAPHITE BONDING METHOD

    DOEpatents

    King, L.D.P.

    1964-02-25

    A process for bonding or joining graphite members together in which a thin platinum foil is placed between the members, heated in an inert atmosphere to a temperature of 1800 deg C, and then cooled to room temperature is described. (AEC)

  15. Bonding with the Past.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Common Ground: Archeology and Ethnography in the Public Interest, 1998

    1998-01-01

    An interview with Linda Mayro, archaeologist and cultural resources manager for Pima County, Arizona, discusses efforts of local groups to preserve local Native-American and Mexican cultural-heritage sites in oppositon to commercial land developers. A public information campaign led to passage of a $6.4 million historic preservation bond. (SAS)

  16. Athermal fracture of covalent bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Gilman, J.J.

    1999-08-01

    Most fracture is athermal. Either because it occurs at low temperatures or because it occurs too fast for thermal activation to be effective. Thus it must be directly activated by applied stresses. This can occur via quantum tunneling when the chemical bonding of a solid resides in localized (covalent) bonds. Then applied stresses can cause the bonding electrons to become delocalized (anti-bonded) through quantum tunneling. That is, the bonds become broken. The process is related to the Zener tunneling process that is thought to be responsible for dielectric breakdown in semiconductors. Under a driving force, bonding electrons tunnel at constant energy from their bonding states into anti-bonding states through the forbidden gap in the bonding energy spectrum.

  17. Chitosan Adhesive Films for Photochemical Tissue Bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauto, Antonio; Mawad, Damia; Barton, Matthew; Piller, Sabine C.; Longo, Leonardo

    2011-08-01

    Photochemical tissue bonding (PTB) is a promising sutureless technique for tissue repair. PTB is often achieved by applying a solution of rose bengal (RB) between two tissue edges, which are irradiated by a green laser to crosslink collagen fibers with minimal heat production. In this study, RB has been incorporated in chitosan films to create a novel tissue adhesive that is laser-activated. Materials and Methods. Adhesive films, based on chitosan and containing ˜0.1wt% RB were manufactured and bonded to calf intestine by a solid state laser (wavelength = 532 nm, Fluence ˜110 J/cm2, spot size ˜5 mm). A single-column tensiometer, interfaced with a personal computer, tested the bonding strength. K-type thermocouples recorded the temperature (T) at the adhesive-tissue interface during laser irradiation. Human fibroblasts were also seeded on the adhesive and cultured for 48 hours to assess cell growth. Results and Conclusion. The RB-chitosan adhesive bonded firmly to the intestine (15±2 kPa, n = 31). The adhesion strength dropped to 0.5±0.1 kPa (n = 8) when the laser was not applied to the adhesive. The average temperature of the adhesive increased from 26 °C to 32 °C during laser exposure. Fibroblasts grew confluent on the adhesive without morphological changes. A new biocompatible chitosan adhesive has been developed that bonds photochemically to tissue with minimal temperature increase.

  18. Evaluation of micro-shear bond strength of resin modified glass-ionomer to composite resins using various bonding systems

    PubMed Central

    Kasraie, Shahin; Shokripour, Mohadese; Safari, Mahin

    2013-01-01

    Aim: The aim was to compare the micro-shear bond strength between composite and resin-modified glass-ionomer (RMGI) by different adhesive systems. Materials and Methods: A total of 16 discs of RMGI with a diameter of 15 mm and a thickness of 2 mm were randomly divided into four groups (n = 4). Four cylinders of composite resin (z250) were bonded to the RMGI discs with Single Bond, Clearfil SE Bond and Clearfil S3 Bond in Groups 1-3, respectively. The fourth group was the control. Samples were tested by a mechanical testing machine with a strain rate of 0.5 mm/min. Failure mode was assessed under a stereo-microscope. Results: The means of micro-shear bond strength values for Groups 1-4 were 14.45, 23.49, 16.23 and 5.46 MPa, respectively. Using a bonding agent significantly increased micro-shear bond strength (P = 0.0001). Conclusion: Micro-shear bond strength of RMGI to composite increased significantly with the use of adhesive resin. The bond strength of RMGI to composite resin could vary depending upon the type of adhesive system used. PMID:24347892

  19. 26 CFR 1.148-4 - Yield on an issue of bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... mortgage bonds or qualified student loan bonds to use a single yield for two or more issues. (b) Computing... qualified student loans, a guarantee of payments on a purpose investment is a qualified guarantee of the... issue. (g) Yield on certain mortgage revenue and student loan bonds. For purposes of section 148...

  20. 26 CFR 1.148-4 - Yield on an issue of bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... mortgage bonds or qualified student loan bonds to use a single yield for two or more issues. (b) Computing... qualified student loans, a guarantee of payments on a purpose investment is a qualified guarantee of the... issue. (g) Yield on certain mortgage revenue and student loan bonds. For purposes of section 148...

  1. 26 CFR 1.148-4 - Yield on an issue of bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... mortgage bonds or qualified student loan bonds to use a single yield for two or more issues. (b) Computing... qualified student loans, a guarantee of payments on a purpose investment is a qualified guarantee of the... issue. (g) Yield on certain mortgage revenue and student loan bonds. For purposes of section 148...

  2. 26 CFR 1.148-4 - Yield on an issue of bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... mortgage bonds or qualified student loan bonds to use a single yield for two or more issues. (b) Computing... qualified student loans, a guarantee of payments on a purpose investment is a qualified guarantee of the... issue. (g) Yield on certain mortgage revenue and student loan bonds. For purposes of section 148...

  3. 26 CFR 1.148-4 - Yield on an issue of bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... mortgage bonds or qualified student loan bonds to use a single yield for two or more issues. (b) Computing... qualified student loans, a guarantee of payments on a purpose investment is a qualified guarantee of the... issue. (g) Yield on certain mortgage revenue and student loan bonds. For purposes of section 148...

  4. Effect of sodium ascorbate on the bond strength of all-in-one adhesive systems to NaOCl-treated dentin

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi-Chaharom, Mohammad-Esmaeel; Kimyai, Soodabeh; Mohammadi, Narmin; Oskoee, Parnian-Alizadeh; Daneshpuy, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    Background Ascorbic acid and its salts are low-toxicity products, which are routinely used in food industries as antioxidants. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of 10% sodium ascorbate on the bond strength of two all-in-one adhesive systems to NaOCl-treated dentin. Material and Methods After exposing the dentin on the facial surface of 90 sound human premolars and mounting in an acrylic resin mold, the exposed dentin surfaces were polished with 600-grit SiC paper under running water. Then the samples were randomly divided into 6 groups of 15. Groups 1 and 4 were the controls, in which no surface preparation was carried out. In groups 2 and 5 the dentin surfaces were treated with 5.25% NaOCl alone for 10 minutes and in groups 3 and 6 with 5.25% NaOCl for 10 minutes followed by 10% sodium ascorbate for 10 minutes. Then composite resin cylinders, measuring 2 mm in diameter and 2 mm in height, were bonded on the dentin surfaces in groups 1, 2 and 3 with Clearfil S3 Bond and in groups 4, 5 and 6 with Adper Easy One adhesive systems according to manufacturers’ instructions. The samples were stored in distilled water for 24 hours at 37°C and then thermocycled. Finally, the samples underwent shear bond strength test in a universal testing machine at a strain rate of 1 mm/min. Data were analyzed with two-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey tests at α=0.05. Results The differences between groups 1 and 2 (P=0.01), 1 and 5 (P=0.003). 1 and 6 (P=0.03) and 4 and 5 (P=0.03) were statistically significant. Two-by-two comparisons did not reveal any significant difference between other groups (P>0.05). Conclusions Use of 10% sodium ascorbate for 10 minutes restored the decreased bond strength of the adhesive systems to that of the control groups. Key words:Sodium ascorbate, adhesive systems, all-in-one, bond strength, sodium hypochlorite. PMID:26644835

  5. 27 CFR 24.147 - Operations bond or unit bond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... or contiguous distilled spirits plant qualified under 27 CFR part 19 for the production of distilled... amended, give an operations bond or unit bond in accordance with the applicable provisions of 27 CFR part... BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS WINE Establishment and Operations Bonds and Consents of...

  6. How a Community Decides to Issue Bonds. Municipal Bonds Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wandschneider, Philip; And Others

    Intended for local municipal officials and their advisors on public finance issues, this publication describes the legal environment surrounding bonds and examines some of the factors affecting the political feasibility of bond issues. Four categories of state controls of municipal bonds are discussed: limits on the amount of debt municipalities…

  7. The effect of delayed placement of composite and double application of single-bottle adhesives on microleakage of composite restorations.

    PubMed

    Shafiei, Fereshteh; Kiomarsi, Nazanin; Alavi, Ali Asghar

    2011-01-01

    This study evaluated the effect of delayed placement of composite and double application of adhesive on microleakage of two-step, total-etch (single-bottle) adhesives. Standard Class V cavities were prepared in 140 sound premolars and randomly assigned into 10 groups (n = 14). Excite, Optibond Solo Plus, and Adper Scotchbond Multi-Purpose (as a control) were used. After the first layer of single-bottle adhesive was photocured, the adhesive was reapplied and photocured in four of the groups. A microhybrid composite was applied in five of the groups immediately after the adhesive was photocured; in the other five groups, the composite was placed after a three-minute delay. After 24 hours of storage in distilled water and thermocycling, the samples were placed in 1% methylene blue. All samples then were sectioned longitudinally and evaluated for microleakage at the occlusal and gingival margins under a stereomicroscope at 20x magnification. Data were analyzed using nonparametric tests. Delayed placement of composite significantly increased leakage at the gingival margins when single-bottle adhesives were used (p < 0.05). Double application of the single-bottle adhesives significantly reduced leakage at the gingival margin when placement of the composite was delayed. There was no significant difference between single and double application when the composite was placed immediately (p < 0.05).

  8. IMPROVED BONDING METHOD

    DOEpatents

    Padgett, E.V. Jr.; Warf, D.H.

    1964-04-28

    An improved process of bonding aluminum to aluminum without fusion by ultrasonic vibrations plus pressure is described. The surfaces to be bonded are coated with an aqueous solution of alkali metal stearate prior to assembling for bonding. (AEC) O H19504 Present information is reviewed on steady state proliferation, differentiation, and maturation of blood cells in mammals. Data are cited from metabolic tracer studies, autoradiographic studies, cytologic studies, studies of hematopoietic response to radiation injuries, and computer analyses of blood cell production. A 3-step model for erythropoiesis and a model for granulocyte kinetics are presented. New approaches to the study of lymphocytopoiesis described include extracorporeal blood irradiation to deplete lymphocytic tissue without direct injury to the formative tissues as a means to study the stressed system, function control, and rates of proliferation. It is pointed out that present knowledge indicates that lymphocytes comprise a mixed family, with diverse life spans, functions, and migration patterns with apparent aimless recycling from modes to lymph to blood to nodes that has not yet been quantitated. Areas of future research are postulated. (70 references.) (C.H.)

  9. Cooperativity in Tetrel Bonds.

    PubMed

    Marín-Luna, Marta; Alkorta, Ibon; Elguero, José

    2016-02-01

    A theoretical study of the cooperativity in linear chains of (H3SiCN)n and (H3SiNC)n complexes connected by tetrel bonds has been carried out by means of MP2 and CCSD(T) computational methods. In all cases, a favorable cooperativity is observed, especially in some of the largest linear chains of (H3SiNC)n, where the effect is so large that the SiH3 group is almost equidistant to the two surrounding CN groups and it becomes planar. In addition, the combination of tetrel bonds with other weak interactions (halogen, chalcogen, pnicogen, triel, beryllium, lithium, and hydrogen bond) has been explored using ternary complexes, (H3SiCN)2:XY and (H3SiNC)2:XY. In all cases, positive cooperativity is obtained, especially in the (H3SiNC)2:ClF and (H3SiNC)2:SHF ternary complexes, where, respectively, halogen and chalcogen shared complexes are formed. PMID:26756083

  10. Direct bonded space maintainers.

    PubMed

    Santos, V L; Almeida, M A; Mello, H S; Keith, O

    1993-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate clinically a bonded space maintainer, which would reduce chair-side time and cost. Sixty appliances were fabricated from 0.7 mm stainless steel round wire and bonded using light-cured composite to the two teeth adjacent to the site of extraction of a posterior primary tooth. Twenty males and sixteen females (age range 5-9-years-old) were selected from the Pedodontic clinic of the State University of Rio de Janeiro. The sixty space maintainers were divided into two groups according to the site in which they were placed: a) absent first primary molar and b) absent second primary molar. Impressions and study models were obtained prior to and 6 months after bonding the appliances. During this period only 8.3% of failures were observed, most of them from occlusal or facial trauma. Student t-test did not show statistically significant alterations in the sizes of the maintained spaces during the trial period.

  11. Dynamics of Bond Breaking Studied by Chemical Force Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noy, Aleksandr; Zepeda, Salvador; Orme, Chris; Yeh, Yin; Deyoreo, Jim

    2000-03-01

    Intermolecular forces underline a variety of phenomena in chemical and in biological systems, such as cell adhesion, protein folding and molecular recognition in ligand-receptor pairs. Understanding the dynamics of these interactions is critical for modeling and controlling these processes. The advent of ultra-sensitive force measurement techniques has enabled direct measurement of the bond strength on the relevant length scales. Recent measurements have pointed out the importance of kinetic factors in bond strength and pointed out the necessity to explore the whole energy landscape of a chemical bond. Still, little is known about the response of the bond strength to the environmental variables such as temperature. The analysis of this response provides a way to determine thermodynamic characteristics of the binding interaction. We used chemical force microscopy to measure the temperature dependence of the interaction forces in a well-defined system presenting a finite number of identical bonds. The tip of the scanning probe microscope was modified with distinct chemical functionalities to give rise to the well-defined and uniform interactions with the sample surface. We will discuss the theoretical framework for interpretation of such measurements, as well as the relative importance of thermodynamic and kinetic factors affecting the bond strength in the presence of solvent medium. We also point out the differences in kinetics of bond breaking in single bond systems vs. multiple bond systems.

  12. 31 CFR 363.169 - What transactions can I conduct in a converted savings bond on which I am registered as the...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... converted savings bond on which I am registered as the single owner, either coowner, the owner with a... transactions can I conduct in a converted savings bond on which I am registered as the single owner, either... single owner or entity form of registration. By converting a definitive savings bond of any...

  13. 46 CFR Sec. 10 - Bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... REPAIRS UNDER NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 10 Bonds. (a... awarded work and the furnishing of the performance and payment bonds required by Article 14 of the NSA... of the NSA-LUMPSUMREP Contract, the standard form of individual performance bond (Standard Form...

  14. 46 CFR Sec. 10 - Bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... REPAIRS UNDER NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 10 Bonds. (a... awarded work and the furnishing of the performance and payment bonds required by Article 14 of the NSA... of the NSA-LUMPSUMREP Contract, the standard form of individual performance bond (Standard Form...

  15. 46 CFR Sec. 10 - Bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... REPAIRS UNDER NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 10 Bonds. (a... awarded work and the furnishing of the performance and payment bonds required by Article 14 of the NSA... of the NSA-LUMPSUMREP Contract, the standard form of individual performance bond (Standard Form...

  16. 46 CFR Sec. 10 - Bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... REPAIRS UNDER NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 10 Bonds. (a... awarded work and the furnishing of the performance and payment bonds required by Article 14 of the NSA... of the NSA-LUMPSUMREP Contract, the standard form of individual performance bond (Standard Form...

  17. Coulombic Models in Chemical Bonding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sacks, Lawrence J.

    1986-01-01

    Compares the coulumbic point charge model for hydrogen chloride with the valence bond model. It is not possible to assign either a nonpolar or ionic canonical form of the valence bond model, while the covalent-ionic bond distribution does conform to the point charge model. (JM)

  18. Urethane/Silicone Adhesives for Bonding Flexing Metal Parts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Paul D.

    2004-01-01

    Adhesives that are blends of commercially available urethane and silicone adhesives have been found to be useful for bonding metal parts that flex somewhat during use. These urethane/silicone adhesives are formulated for the specific metal parts to be bonded. The bonds formed by these adhesives have peel and shear strengths greater than those of bonds formed by double-sided tapes and by other adhesives, including epoxies and neat silicones. In addition, unlike the bonds formed by epoxies, the bonds formed by these adhesives retain flexibility. In the initial application for which the urethane/silicone adhesives were devised, there was a need to bond spring rings, which provide longitudinal rigidity for inflatable satellite booms, with the blades that provide the booms axial strength. The problem was to make the bonds withstand the stresses, associated with differences in curvature between the bonded parts, that arose when the booms were deflated and the springs were compressed. In experiments using single adhesives (that is, not the urethane/ silicone blends), the bonds were broken and, in each experiment, it was found that the adhesive bonded well with either the ring or with the blade, but not both. After numerous experiments, the adhesive that bonded best with the rings and the adhesive that bonded best with the blades were identified. These adhesives were then blended and, as expected, the blend bonded well with both the rings and the blades. The two adhesives are Kalex (or equivalent) high-shear-strength urethane and Dow Corning 732 (or equivalent) silicone. The nominal mixture ratio is 5 volume parts of the urethane per 1 volume part of the silicone. Increasing the proportion of silicone makes the bond weaker but more flexible, and decreasing the proportion of silicone makes the bond stronger but more brittle. The urethane/silicone blend must be prepared and used quickly because of the limited working time of the urethane: The precursor of the urethane

  19. Antigen-specific TCR–pMHC catch bonds trigger signaling by fast accumulation of force-prolonged bond lifetimes

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Baoyu; Chen, Wei; Evavold, Brian D.; Zhu, Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Summary TCR–pMHC interactions initiate adaptive immune responses, but the mechanism of how such interactions under force induce T-cell signaling is unclear. We show that force prolongs lifetimes of single TCR–pMHC bonds for agonists (catch bonds) but shortens those for antagonists (slip bonds). Both magnitude and duration of force are important as the highest Ca2+ responses were induced by 10 pN via both pMHC catch bonds whose lifetime peaks at this force and anti-TCR slip bonds whose maximum lifetime occurs at 0 pN. High Ca2+ levels require early and rapid accumulation of bond lifetimes whereas short-lived bonds that slow early accumulation of lifetimes correspond to low Ca2+ responses. Our data support a model where force on the TCR induces signaling events depending on its magnitude, duration, frequency, and timing, such that agonists form catch bonds that trigger the T cell digitally, whereas antagonists form slip bonds that fail to activate. PMID:24725404

  20. Resolving the molecular mechanism of cadherin catch bond formation

    SciTech Connect

    Manibog, Kristine; Li, Hui; Rakshit, Sabyasachi; Sivasankar, Sanjeevi

    2014-06-02

    Classical cadherin Ca(2+)-dependent cell-cell adhesion proteins play key roles in embryogenesis and in maintaining tissue integrity. Cadherins mediate robust adhesion by binding in multiple conformations. One of these adhesive states, called an X-dimer, forms catch bonds that strengthen and become longer lived in the presence of mechanical force. Here we use single-molecule force-clamp spectroscopy with an atomic force microscope along with molecular dynamics and steered molecular dynamics simulations to resolve the molecular mechanisms underlying catch bond formation and the role of Ca(2+) ions in this process. Our data suggest that tensile force bends the cadherin extracellular region such that they form long-lived, force-induced hydrogen bonds that lock X-dimers into tighter contact. When Ca(2+) concentration is decreased, fewer de novo hydrogen bonds are formed and catch bond formation is eliminated

  1. Universal prediction of intramolecular hydrogen bonds in organic crystals.

    PubMed

    Galek, Peter T A; Fábián, László; Allen, Frank H

    2010-04-01

    A complete exploration of intramolecular hydrogen bonds (IHBs) has been undertaken using a combination of statistical analyses of the Cambridge Structural Database and computation of ab initio interaction energies for prototypical hydrogen-bonded fragments. Notable correlations have been revealed between computed energies, hydrogen-bond geometries, donor and acceptor chemistry, and frequencies of occurrence. Significantly, we find that 95% of all observed IHBs correspond to the five-, six- or seven-membered rings. Our method to predict a propensity for hydrogen-bond occurrence in a crystal has been adapted for such IHBs, applying topological and chemical descriptors derived from our findings. In contrast to intermolecular hydrogen bonding, it is found that IHBs can be predicted across the complete chemical landscape from a single optimized probability model, which is presented. Predictivity of 85% has been obtained for generic organic structures, which can exceed 90% for discrete classes of IHB. PMID:20305358

  2. Intramolecular amide bonds stabilize pili on the surface of bacilli

    SciTech Connect

    Budzik, Jonathan M.; Poor, Catherine B.; Faull, Kym F.; Whitelegge, Julian P.; He, Chuan; Schneewind, Olaf

    2010-01-12

    Gram-positive bacteria elaborate pili and do so without the participation of folding chaperones or disulfide bond catalysts. Sortases, enzymes that cut pilin precursors, form covalent bonds that link pilin subunits and assemble pili on the bacterial surface. We determined the x-ray structure of BcpA, the major pilin subunit of Bacillus cereus. The BcpA precursor encompasses 2 Ig folds (CNA{sub 2} and CNA{sub 3}) and one jelly-roll domain (XNA) each of which synthesizes a single intramolecular amide bond. A fourth amide bond, derived from the Ig fold of CNA{sub 1}, is formed only after pilin subunits have been incorporated into pili. We report that the domains of pilin precursors have evolved to synthesize a discrete sequence of intramolecular amide bonds, thereby conferring structural stability and protease resistance to pili.

  3. Hydrogen bonding in ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Patricia A; Ashworth, Claire R; Matthews, Richard P

    2015-03-01

    Ionic liquids (IL) and hydrogen bonding (H-bonding) are two diverse fields for which there is a developing recognition of significant overlap. Doubly ionic H-bonds occur when a H-bond forms between a cation and anion, and are a key feature of ILs. Doubly ionic H-bonds represent a wide area of H-bonding which has yet to be fully recognised, characterised or explored. H-bonds in ILs (both protic and aprotic) are bifurcated and chelating, and unlike many molecular liquids a significant variety of distinct H-bonds are formed between different types and numbers of donor and acceptor sites within a given IL. Traditional more neutral H-bonds can also be formed in functionalised ILs, adding a further level of complexity. Ab initio computed parameters; association energies, partial charges, density descriptors as encompassed by the QTAIM methodology (ρBCP), qualitative molecular orbital theory and NBO analysis provide established and robust mechanisms for understanding and interpreting traditional neutral and ionic H-bonds. In this review the applicability and extension of these parameters to describe and quantify the doubly ionic H-bond has been explored. Estimating the H-bonding energy is difficult because at a fundamental level the H-bond and ionic interaction are coupled. The NBO and QTAIM methodologies, unlike the total energy, are local descriptors and therefore can be used to directly compare neutral, ionic and doubly ionic H-bonds. The charged nature of the ions influences the ionic characteristics of the H-bond and vice versa, in addition the close association of the ions leads to enhanced orbital overlap and covalent contributions. The charge on the ions raises the energy of the Ylp and lowers the energy of the X-H σ* NBOs resulting in greater charge transfer, strengthening the H-bond. Using this range of parameters and comparing doubly ionic H-bonds to more traditional neutral and ionic H-bonds it is clear that doubly ionic H-bonds cover the full range of weak

  4. Periodic trends in bond dissociation energies. A theoretical study.

    PubMed

    Mó, Otilia; Yáñez, Manuel; Eckert-Maksić, Mirjana; Maksić, Zvonimir B; Alkorta, Ibón; Elguero, José

    2005-05-19

    Bond dissociation energies (BDEs) of all possible A-X single bonds involving the first- and second-row atoms, from Li to Cl, where the free valences are saturated by hydrogens, have been estimated through the use of the G3-theory and at the B3LYP/6-311+G(3df,2pd)//B3LYP/6-31G(2df,p) DFT level of theory. BDEs exhibit a periodical behavior. The A-X (A = Li, Be, B, Na, Mg, Al, and Si) BDEs show a steady increase along the first and the second row of the periodic table as a function of the atomic number Z(X). For A-X bonds involving electronegative atoms (A = C, N, O, F, P, S, and Cl) the bond energies achieve a maximum around Z(X) = 5. The same behavior is observed when BDEs are plotted against the electronegativity chi(X) of the atom X. Thus, for A-X bonds (A = Li, Be, B, Na, Mg, Al, Si), the BDEs for a fixed A increases, grosso modo, as the electronegativity differences between X and A increase, with some exceptions, which reflect the differences in the relaxation energies of the radicals produced upon the bond cleavage. A similar trend, albeit less pronounced, is found for single A-X bonds, where A = C, N, O, F, P, S, and Cl. However, there is an additional feature embodied in the enhancement of the strength of the A-boron bonds due to the ability of boron to act as a strong electron acceptor. The trends in bond lengths and charge densities at the bond critical points are in line with the aforementioned behavior.

  5. 26 CFR 1.144-1 - Qualified small issue bonds, qualified student loan bonds, and qualified redevelopment bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... student loan bonds, and qualified redevelopment bonds. (a) Overview. Interest on a private activity bond... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Qualified small issue bonds, qualified student loan bonds, and qualified redevelopment bonds. 1.144-1 Section 1.144-1 Internal Revenue...

  6. 26 CFR 1.144-1 - Qualified small issue bonds, qualified student loan bonds, and qualified redevelopment bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... student loan bonds, and qualified redevelopment bonds. (a) Overview. Interest on a private activity bond... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Qualified small issue bonds, qualified student loan bonds, and qualified redevelopment bonds. 1.144-1 Section 1.144-1 Internal Revenue...

  7. 26 CFR 1.144-1 - Qualified small issue bonds, qualified student loan bonds, and qualified redevelopment bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... student loan bonds, and qualified redevelopment bonds. (a) Overview. Interest on a private activity bond... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Qualified small issue bonds, qualified student loan bonds, and qualified redevelopment bonds. 1.144-1 Section 1.144-1 Internal Revenue...

  8. 26 CFR 1.144-1 - Qualified small issue bonds, qualified student loan bonds, and qualified redevelopment bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... student loan bonds, and qualified redevelopment bonds. (a) Overview. Interest on a private activity bond... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Qualified small issue bonds, qualified student loan bonds, and qualified redevelopment bonds. 1.144-1 Section 1.144-1 Internal Revenue...

  9. 26 CFR 1.144-1 - Qualified small issue bonds, qualified student loan bonds, and qualified redevelopment bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... student loan bonds, and qualified redevelopment bonds. (a) Overview. Interest on a private activity bond... 26 Internal Revenue 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Qualified small issue bonds, qualified student loan bonds, and qualified redevelopment bonds. 1.144-1 Section 1.144-1 Internal Revenue...

  10. Review of methods for fusion bonding thermoplastic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Benatar, A.; Gutowski, T.G.

    1987-02-01

    Bonding of thermoplastic composites is a critical step in the manufacture of aerospace structures. The objective of this project is to investigate different methods for fusion bonding thermoplastic composites quickly, with a good bond strength, and without warping and deconsolidation. This is best accomplished by heating and melting the thermoplastic on the bond surface only, and then pressing the parts together for a fusion bond. For this purpose, a variety of surface heating techniques were examined for bonding of PEEK and J Polymer composites. These included: resistance heating, infrared heating, induction heating, dielectric/microwave heating, and ultrasonic welding. In resistance heating, a single prepreg ply was placed between the composites and heated by passing electric current through the graphite fibers. With induction heating, a single ply of nickel coated graphite fibers was placed between the composites and heated. Ultrasonic welding was done by molding thermoplastic-only energy directors into the composites; the ultrasonic vibration melted these energy directors thereby fusion bonding the parts. 20 references.

  11. Bond strength and SEM observation of CO2 laser irradiated dentin, bonded with simplified-step adhesives.

    PubMed

    Koshiro, K; Inoue, S; Niimi, K; Koase, K; Sano, H

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated, mechanically and morphologically, whether the dentin surface irradiated by CO2 laser could be a possible adherent when bonded with simplified-step adhesives. Buccal enamel and cementum of extracted human premolars were removed to expose a flat dentin surface. The dentin surfaces were irradiated continuously with CO2 laser at 1.0 W. Before bonding with either a single-bottle adhesive (Single Bond) or a self-etching priming system (Mega Bond), the irradiated dentin surface was treated as follows: no treatment, NaHCO3 powder abrasion and wet-grinding with 600-grit SiC paper. The treated dentin surfaces were bonded to resin composite with either of the two adhesives. Non-irradiated dentin surfaces were also used as control. Resin bonded specimens were stored in water at 37 degrees C for 24 hours and subjected to microtensile bond test. Additionally, to observe the resin/irradiated dentin interface, resin-bonded specimens were similarly prepared, sectioned into slabs, embedded in epoxy resin, polished with diamond pastes, sputter coated Au-Pd and examined with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). After SEM observation, the specimens were further polished with diamond paste to remove the Au-Pd sputter-coat, immersed in HCL and NaOCl and finally observed by SEM again. In the presence of carbonized dentin, microtensile bond strength drastically decreased but recovered to the control value by removing the carbonized dentin layer visually with SiC paper for both adhesive systems. However, the laser-affected dentin that remained on the bonded interface was easily dissolved with NaOCl and HCl. PMID:15853101

  12. On homogeneous L-bonds and heterogeneous L-bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konecny, Jan; Ojeda-Aciego, Manuel

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, we deal with suitable generalizations of the notion of bond between contexts, as part of the research area of Formal Concept Analysis. We study different generalizations of the notion of bond within the ? -fuzzy setting. Specifically, given a formal context, there are three prototypical pairs of concept-forming operators, and this immediately leads to three possible versions of the notion of bond (so-called homogeneous bond wrt certain pair of concept-forming operators). The first results show a close correspondence between a homogeneous bond between two contexts and certain special types of mappings between the sets of extents (or intents) of the corresponding concept lattices. Later, we introduce the so-called heterogeneous bonds (considering simultaneously two types of concept-forming operators) and generalize the previous relationship to mappings between the sets of extents (or intents) of the corresponding concept lattices.

  13. Valence bond cluster studies of alkali metal/semiconductor bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tatar, Robert C.; Messmer, Richard P.

    1986-12-01

    We present results of cluster studies of alkali metal/semiconductor bonding. Using the Generalized Valence Bond (GVB) method, we find a remarkable consistency in the behavoir of bonding orbitals for a variety of systems, including: LiH, CLi4, LiH4 and several hypervalent systems, such as SiH3Li2, SiH4Li2. Our results show that the metal-semiconductor bonding in these systems can be understood in terms of a pairing between McAdon-Goddard type metallic bonding orbitals and a set of equivalent orbitals of the non-metallic species. We propose that the results are relevant to the initial stages of alkali overlayer growth on semiconductor surfaces and lead to a simple picture of the bonding including the transition from a non-conducting to a conducting layer. We have considered numerous proposed hypervalent structures in light of the above results and find that they can be understood.

  14. Electrostatic model for hydrogen bonds in alcohols

    SciTech Connect

    Giguere, P.A.; Pigeon-Gosselin, M.

    1988-11-01

    The authors have measured the Raman spectra of liquid methanol at temperatures between 50/sup 0/ and -77/sup 0/C. The weak O-H stretching bands appear, under amplification, more and more asymmetric as the temperature is lowered. They can be decomposed into three Gaussian components centered at about 3220, 3310, and 3400 cm/sup -1/. The former, predominant at low temperature, corresponds to single, linear hydrogen bonds (LHB) between two molecules. The other two are assigned to branched hydrogen bonds, respectively bifurcated (BHB), between three molecules, and trifurcated (THB), between four molecules. They conclude that the molecular structure of liquid alcohols is not chain-like, as presumed so far, but a three-dimensional network featuring a mixture of single (LBH), and multiple hydrogen bonds (BHB, and THB). They are mainly electrostatic in nature, their relative proportions and geometry governed by the packing conditions for minimum energy. They form distinct trimers and tetramers in dilute solutions of alcohols in inert solvents and frozen matrices, and the latter even in the vapor.

  15. Diffusion-bonded-stacked gallium arsenide for mid- infrared generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gordon, Leslie Ann

    One of the limiting factors in mid-infrared nonlinear generation is the availability of adequate crystals. Current mid-infrared nonlinear crystals suffer from poor thermal properties and/or high absorption, minimizing their usefulness for high-peak and high-average-power conversion. While new materials are continually being explored, more than 15 years may be necessary to develop and test a new crystal, with no guarantee of final success. A new nonlinear material has been synthesized, combining the knowledge from two existing fields: quasi- phasematching (QPM) and diffusion bonding. QPM allows the use of well known semiconductors which are not birefringent, but which have good thermal properties, high damage thresholds, and high nonlinear coefficients. Diffusion bonding provides a robust monolithic structure. Prior to this work, bonded semiconductor structures were single interface, with little attention to optical losses. During this work, techniques were developed to precisely thin and clean the wafers in preparation for bonding. Two generations of bonding furnaces were designed and built to provide uniform temperatures and pressures, fully adjustable and repeatable bonding parameters, and multiple-interface capabilities. GaAs wafers were stacked with alternating crystal orientation, and annealed under compression to diffusion bond the interfaces. The quasi-phasematching was controlled by the wafer thickness. Diffusion-bonded stacks of 2 to 50-layers were bonded, and demonstrated close to theoretical conversion efficiency of second- harmonic generation of CO2 laser radiation. The quality of the bonds was affected by surface cleanliness and contact uniformity of the interfaces. Conversion efficiency was limited by fabrication techniques, chiefly accurate wafer thinning and process- induced bulk losses. Diffusion-bonded-stacked structures can be optimized for all types of nonlinear devices. This technology can be expanded to other well known semiconductors, and is

  16. Valence bond distribution and correlation in bipartite Heisenberg antiferromagnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwandt, David; Alet, Fabien; Oshikawa, Masaki

    2014-03-01

    Every singlet state of a quantum spin-1/2 system can be decomposed into a linear combination of valence bond basis states. The range of valence bonds within this linear combination as well as the correlations between them can reveal the nature of the singlet state and are key ingredients in variational calculations. In this work, we study the bipartite valence bond distributions and their correlations within the ground state of the Heisenberg antiferromagnet on bipartite lattices. In terms of field theory, this problem can be mapped to correlation functions near a boundary. In dimension d ≥2, a nonlinear σ model analysis reveals that at long distances the probability distribution P (r) of valence bond lengths decays as |r|-d-1 and that valence bonds are uncorrelated. By a bosonization analysis, we also obtain P(r )∝|r|-d-1 in d =1 despite the different mechanism. On the other hand, we find that correlations between valence bonds are important even at large distances in d =1, in stark contrast to d ≥2. The analytical results are confirmed by high-precision quantum Monte Carlo simulations in d =1, 2, and 3. We develop a single-projection loop variant of the valence bond projection algorithm, which is well designed to compute valence bond probabilities and for which we provide algorithmic details.

  17. Hydrogen bonds in PC{sub 61}BM solids

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, Chun-Qi; Li, Wen-Jie; Du, Ying-Ying; Chen, Guang-Hua; Chen, Zheng; Li, Hai-Yang; Li, Hong-Nian

    2015-09-15

    We have studied the hydrogen bonds in PC{sub 61}BM solids. Inter-molecular interaction is analyzed theoretically for the well-defined monoclinic (P2{sub 1}/n) structure. The results indicate that PC{sub 61}BM combines into C–H⋯O{sub d} bonded molecular chains, where O{sub d} denotes the doubly-bonded O atom of PC{sub 61}BM. The molecular chains are linked together by C–H⋯O{sub s} bonds, where O{sub s} denotes the singly-bonded O atom of PC{sub 61}BM. To reveal the consequences of hydrogen bond formation on the structural properties of PC{sub 61}BM solids (not limited to the monoclinic structure), we design and perform some experiments for annealed samples with the monoclinic (P2{sub 1}/n) PC{sub 61}BM as starting material. The experiments include differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction and infrared absorption measurements. Structural phase transitions are observed below the melting point. The C–H⋯O{sub d} bonds seem persisting in the altered structures. The inter-molecular hydrogen bonds can help to understand the phase separation in polymer/PC{sub 61}BM blends and may be responsible for the existence of liquid PC{sub 61}BM.

  18. The coevolution of long-term pair bonds and cooperation.

    PubMed

    Song, Z; Feldman, M W

    2013-05-01

    The evolution of social traits may not only depend on but also change the social structure of the population. In particular, the evolution of pairwise cooperation, such as biparental care, depends on the pair-matching distribution of the population, and the latter often emerges as a collective outcome of individual pair-bonding traits, which are also under selection. Here, we develop an analytical model and individual-based simulations to study the coevolution of long-term pair bonds and cooperation in parental care, where partners play a Snowdrift game in each breeding season. We illustrate that long-term pair bonds may coevolve with cooperation when bonding cost is below a threshold. As long-term pair bonds lead to assortative interactions through pair-matching dynamics, they may promote the prevalence of cooperation. In addition to the pay-off matrix of a single game, the evolutionarily stable equilibrium also depends on bonding cost and accidental divorce rate, and it is determined by a form of balancing selection because the benefit from pair-bond maintenance diminishes as the frequency of cooperators increases. Our findings highlight the importance of ecological factors affecting social bonding cost and stability in understanding the coevolution of social behaviour and social structures, which may lead to the diversity of biological social systems. PMID:23496797

  19. Bond strength with custom base indirect bonding techniques.

    PubMed

    Klocke, Arndt; Shi, Jianmin; Kahl-Nieke, Bärbel; Bismayer, Ulrich

    2003-04-01

    Different types of adhesives for indirect bonding techniques have been introduced recently. But there is limited information regarding bond strength with these new materials. In this in vitro investigation, stainless steel brackets were bonded to 100 permanent bovine incisors using the Thomas technique, the modified Thomas technique, and light-cured direct bonding for a control group. The following five groups of 20 teeth each were formed: (1) modified Thomas technique with thermally cured base composite (Therma Cure) and chemically cured sealant (Maximum Cure), (2) Thomas technique with thermally cured base composite (Therma Cure) and chemically cured sealant (Custom I Q), (3) Thomas technique with light-cured base composite (Transbond XT) and chemically cured sealant (Sondhi Rapid Set), (4) modified Thomas technique with chemically cured base adhesive (Phase II) and chemically cured sealant (Maximum Cure), and (5) control group directly bonded with light-cured adhesive (Transbond XT). Mean bond strengths in groups 3, 4, and 5 were 14.99 +/- 2.85, 15.41 +/- 3.21, and 13.88 +/- 2.33 MPa, respectively, and these groups were not significantly different from each other. Groups 1 (mean bond strength 7.28 +/- 4.88 MPa) and 2 (mean bond strength 7.07 +/- 4.11 MPa) showed significantly lower bond strengths than groups 3, 4, and 5 and a higher probability of bond failure. Both the original (group 2) and the modified (group 1) Thomas technique were able to achieve bond strengths comparable to the light-cured direct bonded control group.

  20. Modulating the strength of tetrel bonding through beryllium bonding.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingxiu; Yang, Li; Li, Qingzhong; Li, Wenzuo; Cheng, Jianbo; Xiao, Bo; Yu, Xuefang

    2016-08-01

    Quantum chemical calculations were performed to investigate the stability of the ternary complexes BeH2···XMH3···NH3 (X = F, Cl, and Br; M = C, Si, and Ge) and the corresponding binary complexes at the atomic level. Our results reveal that the stability of the XMH3···BeH2 complexes is mainly due to both a strong beryllium bond and a weak tetrel-hydride interaction, while the XMH3···NH3 complexes are stabilized by a tetrel bond. The beryllium bond with a halogen atom as the electron donor has many features in common with a beryllium bond with an O or N atom as the electron donor, although they do exhibit some different characteristics. The stability of the XMH3···NH3 complex is dominated by the electrostatic interaction, while the orbital interaction also makes an important contribution. Interestingly, as the identities of the X and M atoms are varied, the strength of the tetrel bond fluctuates in an irregular manner, which can explained by changes in electrostatic potentials and orbital interactions. In the ternary systems, both the beryllium bond and the tetrel bond are enhanced, which is mainly ascribed to increased electrostatic potentials on the corresponding atoms and charge transfer. In particular, when compared to the strengths of the tetrel and beryllium bonds in the binary systems, in the ternary systems the tetrel bond is enhanced to a greater degree than the beryllium bond. Graphical Abstract A tetrel bond can be strengthened greatly by a beryllium bond. PMID:27464738

  1. Modulating the strength of tetrel bonding through beryllium bonding.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mingxiu; Yang, Li; Li, Qingzhong; Li, Wenzuo; Cheng, Jianbo; Xiao, Bo; Yu, Xuefang

    2016-08-01

    Quantum chemical calculations were performed to investigate the stability of the ternary complexes BeH2···XMH3···NH3 (X = F, Cl, and Br; M = C, Si, and Ge) and the corresponding binary complexes at the atomic level. Our results reveal that the stability of the XMH3···BeH2 complexes is mainly due to both a strong beryllium bond and a weak tetrel-hydride interaction, while the XMH3···NH3 complexes are stabilized by a tetrel bond. The beryllium bond with a halogen atom as the electron donor has many features in common with a beryllium bond with an O or N atom as the electron donor, although they do exhibit some different characteristics. The stability of the XMH3···NH3 complex is dominated by the electrostatic interaction, while the orbital interaction also makes an important contribution. Interestingly, as the identities of the X and M atoms are varied, the strength of the tetrel bond fluctuates in an irregular manner, which can explained by changes in electrostatic potentials and orbital interactions. In the ternary systems, both the beryllium bond and the tetrel bond are enhanced, which is mainly ascribed to increased electrostatic potentials on the corresponding atoms and charge transfer. In particular, when compared to the strengths of the tetrel and beryllium bonds in the binary systems, in the ternary systems the tetrel bond is enhanced to a greater degree than the beryllium bond. Graphical Abstract A tetrel bond can be strengthened greatly by a beryllium bond.

  2. A systematic structural study of halogen bonding versus hydrogen bonding within competitive supramolecular systems

    PubMed Central

    Aakeröy, Christer B.; Spartz, Christine L.; Dembowski, Sean; Dwyre, Savannah; Desper, John

    2015-01-01

    As halogen bonds gain prevalence in supramolecular synthesis and materials chemistry, it has become necessary to examine more closely how such interactions compete with or complement hydrogen bonds whenever both are present within the same system. As hydrogen and halogen bonds have several fundamental features in common, it is often difficult to predict which will be the primary interaction in a supramolecular system, especially as they have comparable strength and geometric requirements. To address this challenge, a series of molecules containing both hydrogen- and halogen-bond donors were co-crystallized with various monotopic, ditopic symmetric and ditopic asymmetric acceptor molecules. The outcome of each reaction was examined using IR spectroscopy and, whenever possible, single-crystal X-ray diffraction. 24 crystal structures were obtained and subsequently analyzed, and the synthon preferences of the competing hydrogen- and halogen-bond donors were rationalized against a background of calculated molecular electrostatic potential values. It has been shown that readily accessible electrostatic potentials can offer useful practical guidelines for predicting the most likely primary synthons in these co-crystals as long as the potential differences are weighted appropriately. PMID:26306192

  3. Solder extrusion pressure bonding process and bonded products produced thereby

    DOEpatents

    Beavis, L.C.; Karnowsky, M.M.; Yost, F.G.

    1992-06-16

    Disclosed is a process for production of soldered joints which are highly reliable and capable of surviving 10,000 thermal cycles between about [minus]40 C and 110 C. Process involves interposing a thin layer of a metal solder composition between the metal surfaces of members to be bonded and applying heat and up to about 1000 psi compression pressure to the superposed members, in the presence of a reducing atmosphere, to extrude the major amount of the solder composition, contaminants including fluxing gases and air, from between the members being bonded, to form a very thin, strong intermetallic bonding layer having a thermal expansion tolerant with that of the bonded members.

  4. Solder extrusion pressure bonding process and bonded products produced thereby

    DOEpatents

    Beavis, Leonard C.; Karnowsky, Maurice M.; Yost, Frederick G.

    1992-01-01

    Production of soldered joints which are highly reliable and capable of surviving 10,000 thermal cycles between about -40.degree. C. and 110.degree. C. Process involves interposing a thin layer of a metal solder composition between the metal surfaces of members to be bonded and applying heat and up to about 1000 psi compression pressure to the superposed members, in the presence of a reducing atmosphere, to extrude the major amount of the solder composition, contaminants including fluxing gases and air, from between the members being bonded, to form a very thin, strong intermetallic bonding layer having a thermal expansion tolerant with that of the bonded members.

  5. Solder extrusion pressure bonding process and bonded products produced thereby

    SciTech Connect

    Beavis, L.C.; Karnowsky, M.M.; Yost, F.G.

    1990-12-31

    Production of soldiered joints which are highly reliable and capable of surviving 10,000 thermal cycles between about {minus}40{degrees}C and 110{degrees}C. Process involves interposing a thin layer of a metal solder composition between the metal surfaces of members to be bonded and applying heat and up to about 1000 psi compression pressure to the superposed members, in the presence of a reducing atmosphere, to extrude the major amount of the solder composition, contaminants including fluxing gases and air, from between the members being bonded, to form a very thin, strong intermetallic bonding layer having a thermal expansion tolerant with that of the bonded members.

  6. 27 CFR 28.66 - Strengthening bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... bonds. In all cases where the penal sum of any bond becomes insufficient, the principal shall either give a strengthening bond with the same surety to attain a sufficient penal sum, or give a new bond to... of any bond to less than its full penal sum. Strengthening bonds shall show the current date...

  7. Bond Sensitivity to Silicone Contamination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caldwell, G. A.; Hudson, W. D.; Hudson, W. D.; Cash, Stephen F. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    Currently during fabrication of the Space Shuttle booster rocket motors, the use of silicone and silicone-containing products is prohibited in most applications. Many shop aids and other materials containing silicone have the potential, if they make contact with a bond surface, to transfer some of the silicone to the substrates being bonded. Such transfer could result in a reduction of the bond strength or even failure of the subsequent bonds. This concern is driving the need to understand the effect of silicones and the concentration needed to affect a given bond-line strength. Additionally, as silicone detection methods used for materials acceptance improve what may have gone unnoticed earlier is now being detected. Thus, realistic silicone limits for process materials (below which bond performance is satisfactory) are needed rather than having an absolute no silicone permitted policy.

  8. Bonding and nondestructive evaluation of graphite/PEEK composite and titanium adherends with thermoplastic adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hodges, W. T.; Tyeryar, J. R.; Berry, M.

    1985-01-01

    Bonded single overlap shear specimens were fabricated from Graphite/PEEK (Polyetheretherketone) composite adherends and titanium adherends. Six advanced thermoplastic adhesives were used for the bonding. The specimens were bonded by an electromagnetic induction technique producing high heating rates and high-strength bonds in a few minutes. This contrasts with conventionally heated presses or autoclaves that take hours to process comparable quality bonds. The Graphite/PEEK composites were highly resistant to delamination during the testing. This allowed the specimen to fail exclusively through the bondline, even at very high shear loads. Nondestructive evaluation of bonded specimens was performed ultrasonically by energizing the entire thickness of the material through the bondline and measuring acoustic impedance parameters. Destructive testing confirmed the unique ultrasonic profiles of strong and weak bonds, establishing a standard for predicting relative bond strength in subsequent specimens.

  9. Anion transport with halogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Jentzsch, Andreas Vargas; Matile, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    This review covers the application of halogen bonds to transport anions across lipid bilayer membranes. The introduction provides a brief description of biological and synthetic transport systems. Emphasis is on examples that explore interactions beyond the coordination with lone pairs or hydrogen bonds for the recognition of cations and anions, particularly cation-π and anion-π interactions, and on structural motifs that are relevant for transport studies with halogen bonds. Section 2 summarizes the use of macrocyclic scaffolds to achieve transport with halogen bonds, focusing on cyclic arrays of halogen-bond donors of different strengths on top of calixarene scaffolds. This section also introduces methods to study anion binding in solution and anion transport in fluorogenic vesicles. In Sect. 3, transport studies with monomeric halogen bond-donors are summarized. This includes the smallest possible organic anion transporter, trifluoroiodomethane, a gas that can be bubbled through a suspension of vesicles to turn on transport. Anion transport with a gas nicely illustrates the power of halogen bonds for anion transport. Like hydrogen bonds, they are directional and strong, but compared to hydrogen-bond donors, halogen-bond donors are more lipophilic. Section 3 also offers a concise introduction to the measurement of ion selectivity in fluorogenic vesicles and conductance experiments in planar bilayer membranes. Section 4 introduces the formal unrolling of cyclic scaffolds into linear scaffolds that can span lipid bilayers. As privileged transmembrane scaffolds, the importance of hydrophobically matching fluorescent p-oligophenyl rods is fully confirmed. The first formal synthetic ion channel that operates by cooperative multiion hopping along transmembrane halogen-bonding cascades is described. Compared to homologs for anion-π interactions, transport with halogen bonds is clearly more powerful.

  10. Second sphere coordination complexes via hydrogen bonding: Synthesis, spectroscopic characterisation of [ trans-Co(en) 2Cl 2]CdX 4 (X=Br or I) and single crystal X-ray structure determination of [ trans-Co(en) 2Cl 2]CdBr 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Raj Pal; Sharma, Rajni; Bala, Ritu; Salas, Juan M.; Quiros, Miguel

    2006-08-01

    In an effort to explore [ trans-Co(en) 2Cl 2] + as anion receptor for tetrabromocadmate and tetraiodocadmate ion, green coloured single crystals of [ trans-Co(en) 2Cl 2]CdBr 4I and [ trans-Co(en) 2Cl 2]CdI 4II have been obtained by slowly mixing the separately dissolved trans-dichlorobis(ethylenediamine)cobalt(III) chloride with potassium tetrabromocadmate and tetraiodocadmate in aqueous medium in 2:1 molar ratio. The newly synthesized complex salt was characterized on the basis of elemental analysis and spectroscopic techniques (IR, UV/visible, 1H and 13C NMR). Single crystal X-ray structure determination of [ trans-Co(en) 2Cl 2] 2CdBr 4 revealed that it crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group Pbca with a=18.6201(10), b=12.0872(6), c=24.0877(12) Å, V=5421.3(5) Å 3, Z=8, R=0.0727. Supramolecular hydrogen bonding networks between ionic groups: bromide ions of tetrabromocadmate group and NH groups of coordinated ethylenediamine molecules, i.e. N-H⋯Br - interactions by second sphere coordination besides electrostatic forces of attraction have been observed. This suggests that [ trans-Co(en) 2Cl 2] + is a promising anion receptor for the tetrabromocadmate.

  11. Photoinduced hydrogen-bonding dynamics.

    PubMed

    Chu, Tian-Shu; Xu, Jinmei

    2016-09-01

    Hydrogen bonding dynamics has received extensive research attention in recent years due to the significant advances in femtolaser spectroscopy experiments and quantum chemistry calculations. Usually, photoexcitation would cause changes in the hydrogen bonding formed through the interaction between hydrogen donor and acceptor molecules on their ground electronic states, and such transient strengthening or weakening of hydrogen bonding could be crucial for the photophysical transformations and the subsequent photochemical reactions that occurred on a time scale from tens of femtosecond to a few nanoseconds. In this article, we review the combined experimental and theoretical studies focusing on the ultrafast electronic and vibrational hydrogen bonding dynamics. Through these studies, new mechanisms and proposals and common rules have been put forward to advance our understanding of the hydrogen bondings dynamics in a variety of important photoinduced phenomena like photosynthesis, dual fluorescence emission, rotational reorientation, excited-state proton transfer and charge transfer processes, chemosensor fluorescence sensing, rearrangements of the hydrogen-bond network including forming and breaking hydrogen bond in water. Graphical Abstract We review the recent advances on exploring the photoinduced hydrogen bonding dynamics in solutions through a joint approach of laser spectroscopy and theoretical calculation. The reviewed studies have put forward a new mechanism, new proposal, and new rule for a variety of photoinduced phenomena such as photosynthesis, dual fluorescence emission, rotational reorientation, excited-state proton transfer and charge transfer, chemosensor fluorescence sensing, and rearrangements of the hydrogen-bond network in water. PMID:27491849

  12. The evolution of model catalytic systems; studies of structure, bonding and dynamics from single crystal metal surfaces to nanoparticles, and from low pressure (<10(-3) Torr) to high pressure (>10(-3) Torr) to liquid interfaces.

    PubMed

    Somorjai, Gabor A; York, Roger L; Butcher, Derek; Park, Jeong Y

    2007-07-21

    The material and pressure gap has been a long standing challenge in the field of heterogeneous catalysis and have transformed surface science and biointerfacial research. In heterogeneous catalysis, the material gap refers to the discontinuity between well-characterized model systems and industrially relevant catalysts. Single crystal metal surfaces have been useful model systems to elucidate the role of surface defects and the mobility of reaction intermediates in catalytic reactivity and selectivity. As nanoscience advances, we have developed nanoparticle catalysts with lithographic techniques and colloidal syntheses. Nanoparticle catalysts on oxide supports allow us to investigate several important ingredients of heterogeneous catalysis such as the metal-oxide interface and the influence of noble metal particle size and surface structure on catalytic selectivity. Monodispersed nanoparticle and nanowire arrays were fabricated for use as model catalysts by lithographic techniques. Platinum and rhodium nanoparticles in the 1-10 nm range were synthesized in colloidal solutions in the presence of polymer capping agents. The most catalytically active systems are employed at high pressure or at solid-liquid interfaces. In order to study the high pressure and liquid interfaces on the molecular level, experimental techniques with which we bridged the pressure gap in catalysis have been developed. These techniques include the ultrahigh vacuum system equipped with high pressure reaction cell, high pressure Sum Frequency Generation (SFG) vibration spectroscopy, High Pressure Scanning Tunneling Microscopy (HP-STM), and High Pressure X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy (HP-XPS), and Quartz Crystal Microbalance (QCM). In this article, we overview the development of experimental techniques and evolution of the model systems for the research of heterogeneous catalysis and biointerfacial studies that can shed light on the long-standing issues of materials and pressure gaps.

  13. 30 CFR 281.33 - Bonds and bonding requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bonds and bonding requirements. 281.33 Section 281.33 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR OFFSHORE LEASING OF MINERALS OTHER THAN OIL, GAS, AND SULPHUR IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Financial Considerations §...

  14. Highly covalent ferric-thiolate bonds exhibit surprisingly low mechanical stability.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Peng; Li, Hongbin

    2011-05-01

    Depending on their nature, different chemical bonds show vastly different stability with covalent bonds being the most stable ones that rupture at forces above nanonewton. Studies have revealed that ferric-thiolate bonds are highly covalent and are conceived to be of high mechanical stability. Here, we used single molecule force spectroscopy techniques to directly determine the mechanical strength of such highly covalent ferric-thiolate bonds in rubredoxin. We observed that the ferric-thiolate bond ruptures at surprisingly low forces of ∼200 pN, significantly lower than that of typical covalent bonds, such as C-Si, S-S, and Au-thiolate bonds, which typically ruptures at >1.5 nN. And the mechanical strength of Fe-thiolate bonds is observed to correlate with the covalency of the bonds. Our results indicated that highly covalent Fe-thiolate bonds are mechanically labile and display features that clearly distinguish themselves from typical covalent bonds. Our study not only opens new avenues to investigating this important class of chemical bonds, but may also shed new lights on our understanding of the chemical nature of these metal thiolate bonds.

  15. Direct and Auger Electron-Induced, Single- and Double-Strand Breaks on Plasmid DNA Caused by 99mTc-Labeled Pyrene Derivatives and the Effect of Bonding Distance

    PubMed Central

    Reissig, Falco; Mamat, Constantin; Steinbach, Joerg; Pietzsch, Hans-Juergen; Freudenberg, Robert; Navarro-Retamal, Carlos; Caballero, Julio; Kotzerke, Joerg; Wunderlich, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    It is evident that 99mTc causes radical-mediated DNA damage due to Auger electrons, which were emitted simultaneously with the known γ-emission of 99mTc. We have synthesized a series of new 99mTc-labeled pyrene derivatives with varied distances between the pyrene moiety and the radionuclide. The pyrene motif is a common DNA intercalator and allowed us to test the influence of the radionuclide distance on damages of the DNA helix. In general, pUC 19 plasmid DNA enables the investigation of the unprotected interactions between the radiotracers and DNA that results in single-strand breaks (SSB) or double-strand breaks (DSB). The resulting DNA fragments were separated by gel electrophoresis and quantified by fluorescent staining. Direct DNA damage and radical-induced indirect DNA damage by radiolysis products of water were evaluated in the presence or absence of the radical scavenger DMSO. We demonstrated that Auger electrons directly induced both SSB and DSB in high efficiency when 99mTc was tightly bound to the plasmid DNA and this damage could not be completely prevented by DMSO, a free radical scavenger. For the first time, we were able to minimize this effect by increasing the carbon chain lengths between the pyrene moiety and the 99mTc nuclide. However, a critical distance between the 99mTc atom and the DNA helix could not be determined due to the significantly lowered DSB generation resulting from the interaction which is dependent on the type of the 99mTc binding motif. The effect of variable DNA damage caused by the different chain length between the pyrene residue and the Tc-core as well as the possible conformations of the applied Tc-complexes was supplemented with molecular dynamics (MD) calculations. The effectiveness of the DNA-binding 99mTc-labeled pyrene derivatives was demonstrated by comparison to non-DNA-binding 99mTcO4–, since nearly all DNA damage caused by 99mTcO4– was prevented by incubating with DMSO. PMID:27583677

  16. Direct and Auger Electron-Induced, Single- and Double-Strand Breaks on Plasmid DNA Caused by 99mTc-Labeled Pyrene Derivatives and the Effect of Bonding Distance.

    PubMed

    Reissig, Falco; Mamat, Constantin; Steinbach, Joerg; Pietzsch, Hans-Juergen; Freudenberg, Robert; Navarro-Retamal, Carlos; Caballero, Julio; Kotzerke, Joerg; Wunderlich, Gerd

    2016-01-01

    It is evident that 99mTc causes radical-mediated DNA damage due to Auger electrons, which were emitted simultaneously with the known γ-emission of 99mTc. We have synthesized a series of new 99mTc-labeled pyrene derivatives with varied distances between the pyrene moiety and the radionuclide. The pyrene motif is a common DNA intercalator and allowed us to test the influence of the radionuclide distance on damages of the DNA helix. In general, pUC 19 plasmid DNA enables the investigation of the unprotected interactions between the radiotracers and DNA that results in single-strand breaks (SSB) or double-strand breaks (DSB). The resulting DNA fragments were separated by gel electrophoresis and quantified by fluorescent staining. Direct DNA damage and radical-induced indirect DNA damage by radiolysis products of water were evaluated in the presence or absence of the radical scavenger DMSO. We demonstrated that Auger electrons directly induced both SSB and DSB in high efficiency when 99mTc was tightly bound to the plasmid DNA and this damage could not be completely prevented by DMSO, a free radical scavenger. For the first time, we were able to minimize this effect by increasing the carbon chain lengths between the pyrene moiety and the 99mTc nuclide. However, a critical distance between the 99mTc atom and the DNA helix could not be determined due to the significantly lowered DSB generation resulting from the interaction which is dependent on the type of the 99mTc binding motif. The effect of variable DNA damage caused by the different chain length between the pyrene residue and the Tc-core as well as the possible conformations of the applied Tc-complexes was supplemented with molecular dynamics (MD) calculations. The effectiveness of the DNA-binding 99mTc-labeled pyrene derivatives was demonstrated by comparison to non-DNA-binding 99mTcO4-, since nearly all DNA damage caused by 99mTcO4- was prevented by incubating with DMSO. PMID:27583677

  17. 29 CFR 2580.412-19 - Term of the bond, discovery period, other bond clauses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... SECURITY ACT OF 1974 TEMPORARY BONDING RULES General Bond Rules § 2580.412-19 Term of the bond, discovery... 29 Labor 9 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Term of the bond, discovery period, other bond clauses... new bond must be obtained each year. There is nothing in the Act that prohibits a bond for a...

  18. Pauling bond strength, bond length and electron density distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbs, Gerald V.; Ross, Nancy L.; Cox, David F.; Rosso, Kevin M.; Iversen, Bo B.; Spackman, M. A.

    2014-01-18

    A power law regression equation, = 1.46(<ρ(rc)>/r)-0.19, connecting the average experimental bond lengths, , with the average accumulation of the electron density at the bond critical point, <ρ(rc)>, between bonded metal M and oxygen atoms, determined at ambient conditions for oxide crystals, where r is the row number of the M atom, is similar to the regression equation R(M-O) = 1.39(ρ(rc)/r)-0.21 determined for three perovskite crystals for pressures as high as 80 GPa. The two equations are also comparable with those, = 1.43(/r)-0.21, determined for a large number of oxide crystals at ambient conditions and = 1.39(/r)-0.22, determined for geometry optimized hydroxyacid molecules, that connect the bond lengths to the average Pauling electrostatic bond strength, , for the M-O bonded interactions. On the basis of the correspondence between the two sets of equations connecting ρ(rc) and the Pauling bond strength s with bond length, it appears that Pauling’s simple definition of bond strength closely mimics the accumulation of the electron density between bonded pairs of atoms. The similarity of the expressions for the crystals and molecules is compelling evidence that the M-O bonded interactions for the crystals and molecules 2 containing the same bonded interactions are comparable. Similar expressions, connecting bond lengths and bond strength, have also been found to hold for fluoride, nitride and sulfide molecules and crystals. The Brown-Shannon bond valence, σ, power law expression σ = [R1/(R(M-O)]N that has found wide use in crystal chemistry, is shown to be connected to a more universal expression determined for oxides and the perovskites, <ρ(rc)> = r[(1.41)/]4.76, demonstrating that the bond valence for a bonded interaction is likewise closely connected to the accumulation of the electron density between the bonded atoms. Unlike the Brown-Shannon expression, it is universal in that it holds for the M

  19. Bond breaking in a Morse chain under tension: Fragmentation patterns, higher index saddles, and bond healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauguière, F. A. L.; Collins, P.; Ezra, G. S.; Wiggins, S.

    2013-04-01

    We investigate the fragmentation dynamics of an atomic chain under tensile stress. We have classified the location, stability type (indices), and energy of all equilibria for the general n-particle chain, and have highlighted the importance of saddle points with index >1. We show that for an n = 2-particle chain under tensile stress the index 2 saddle plays a central role in organizing the dynamics. We apply normal form theory to analyze phase space structure and dynamics in a neighborhood of the index 2 saddle. We define a phase dividing surface (DS) that enables us to classify trajectories passing through a neighborhood of the saddle point using the values of the integrals associated with the normal form. We also generalize our definition of the dividing surface and define an extended dividing surface (EDS), which is used to sample and classify all trajectories that pass through a phase space neighborhood of the index 2 saddle at total energies less than that of the saddle. Classical trajectory simulations are used to study fragmentation patterns for the n = 2 chain under tension. That is, we investigate the relative probability for breaking one bond versus concerted fission of several (two, in this case) bonds. Initial conditions for trajectories are obtained by sampling the EDS at constant energy. We sample trajectories at fixed energies both above and below the energy of the saddle. The fate of trajectories (single versus multiple bond breakage) is explored as a function of the location of the initial condition on the EDS, and a connection made to the work of Chesnavich on collision-induced dissociation. A significant finding is that we can readily identify trajectories that exhibit bond healing. Such trajectories pass outside the nominal (index 1) transition state for single bond dissociation, but return to the potential well region, possibly several times, before ultimately dissociating.

  20. Microwave bonding of MEMS component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, Martin B. (Inventor); Mai, John D. (Inventor); Jackson, Henry W. (Inventor); Budraa, Nasser K. (Inventor); Pike, William T. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Bonding of MEMs materials is carried out using microwave. High microwave absorbing films are placed within a microwave cavity, and excited to cause selective heating in the skin of the material. This causes heating in one place more than another. Thereby minimizing the effects of the bonding microwave energy.

  1. Coulombic Models in Chemical Bonding.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sacks, Lawrence J.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a bonding theory which provides a framework for the description of a wide range of substances and provides quantitative information of remarkable accuracy with far less computational effort than that required of other approaches. Includes applications, such as calculation of bond energies of two binary hydrides (methane and diborane).…

  2. Computational Chemistry of Adhesive Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Donald H.

    1999-01-01

    This investigation is intended to determine the electrical mechanical, and chemical properties of adhesive bonds at the molecular level. The initial determinations will be followed by investigations of the effects of environmental effects on the chemistry and properties of the bond layer.

  3. On the Relative Merits of Non-Orthogonal and Orthogonal Valence Bond Methods Illustrated on the Hydrogen Molecule

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Angeli, Celestino; Cimiraglia, Renzo; Malrieu, Jean-Paul

    2008-01-01

    Valence bond (VB) is one of the cornerstone theories of quantum chemistry. Even if in practical applications the molecular orbital (MO) approach has obtained more attention, some basic chemical concepts (such as the nature of the chemical bond and the failure of the single determinant-based MO methods in describing the bond cleavage) are normally…

  4. The Nature of the Idealized Triple Bonds Between Principal Elements and the σ Origins of Trans-Bent Geometries-A Valence Bond Study.

    PubMed

    Ploshnik, Elina; Danovich, David; Hiberty, Philippe C; Shaik, Sason

    2011-04-12

    We describe herein a valence bond (VB) study of 27 triply bonded molecules of the general type X≡Y, where X and Y are main element atoms/fragments from groups 13-15 in the periodic table. The following conclusions were derived from the computational data: (a) Single π-bond and double π-bond energies for the entire set correlate with the "molecular electronegativity", which is the sum of the X and Y electronegativites for X≡Y. The correlation with the molecular electronegativity establishes a simple rule of periodicity: π-bonding strength generally increases from left to right in a period and decreases down a column in the periodic table. (b) The σ frame invariably prefers trans bending, while π-bonding gets destabilized and opposes the trans distortion. In HC≡CH, the π-bonding destabilization overrides the propensity of the σ frame to distort, while in the higher row molecules, the σ frame wins out and establishes trans-bent molecules with 2(1)/2 bonds, in accord with recent experimental evidence based on solid state (29)Si NMR of the Sekiguchi compound. Thus, in the trans-bent molecules "less bonds pay more". (c) All of the π bonds show significant bonding contributions from the resonance energy due to covalent-ionic mixing. This quantity is shown to correlate linearly with the corresponding "molecular electronegativity" and to reflect the mechanism required to satisfy the equilibrium condition for the bond. The π bonds for molecules possessing high molecular electronegativity are charge-shift bonds, wherein bonding is dominated by the resonance energy of the covalent and ionic forms, rather than by either form by itself.

  5. Social bonding: regulation by neuropeptides

    PubMed Central

    Lieberwirth, Claudia; Wang, Zuoxin

    2014-01-01

    Affiliative social relationships (e.g., among spouses, family members, and friends) play an essential role in human society. These relationships affect psychological, physiological, and behavioral functions. As positive and enduring bonds are critical for the overall well-being of humans, it is not surprising that considerable effort has been made to study the neurobiological mechanisms that underlie social bonding behaviors. The present review details the involvement of the nonapeptides, oxytocin (OT), and arginine vasopressin (AVP), in the regulation of social bonding in mammals including humans. In particular, we will discuss the role of OT and AVP in the formation of social bonds between partners of a mating pair as well as between parents and their offspring. Furthermore, the role of OT and AVP in the formation of interpersonal bonding involving trust is also discussed. PMID:25009457

  6. Advances in bonding technology for high power diode laser bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jingwei; Li, Xiaoning; Hou, Dong; Feng, Feifei; Liu, Yalong; Liu, Xingsheng

    2015-02-01

    Due to their high electrical-optical conversion efficiency, compact size and long lifetime, high power diode lasers have found increased applications in many fields. As the improvement of device technology, high power diode laser bars with output power of tens or hundreds watts have been commercially available. With the increase of high current and output power, the reliability and lifetime of high power diode laser bars becomes a challenge, especially under harsh working conditions and hard-pulse operations. The bonding technology is still one of the bottlenecks of the advancement of high power diode laser bars. Currently, materials used in bonding high power diode laser bars are commonly indium and goldtin solders. Experimental and field application results indicates that the lifetime and reliability of high power diode laser bars bonded by gold-tin solder is much better than that bonded by indium solder which is prone to thermal fatigue, electro-migration and oxidization. In this paper, we review the bonding technologies for high power diode laser bars and present the advances in bonding technology for single bars, horizontal bar arrays and vertical bar stacks. We will also present the challenges and issues in bonding technology for high power diode laser bars and discuss some approaches and strategies in addressing the challenges and issues.

  7. Strained-bond semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dow, John D.

    1994-05-01

    Theories of strained-bond semiconductors and superconductors have been developed that promise to have significant impact on future electronic devices of interest to the Air Force. These include: (1) development of a theory of high-temperature superconductivity based on the idea of strained-layer superlattices, (2) elucidation of the physics of doping in Type-2 semiconductor superlattices, which is now central to the development of high-speed field-effect transistors, (3) a theory of dimerization and reconstruction on (001) semiconductor surfaces, (4) theory of Mobius transforms as applied to physics and remote sensing, (5) new understanding of how defects affect the vibrational properties of semiconductors, (6) new methods of efficiently computing the trajectories of atoms in semiconductors by a priori molecular dynamics, (7) elucidation of the criteria affecting quantum-well luminescence from Si, (8) models of the effects of vacancies in large-gap Al(x)Ga(1-x)N alloys, (9) physics of rare-earth-doped silicon, (10) models of Co adsorption to silicon surfaces, (11) theories of how defects affect the properties of large band-gap superlattices, and (12) models of the effects of electronic structure on the properties of semiconductors.

  8. Hydrostatic intrapulpal pressure and bond strength of bonding systems.

    PubMed

    Prati, C; Pashley, D H; Montanari, G

    1991-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of intra-pulpal pressure on shear bond strength of three light-cured glass-ionomer cements (GC lining cement, Vitrabond, and Zionomer) and four dentin bonding agents [Gluma/Scotchbond, Scotchbond 2, MBL, and Clearfil Photo Bond]. Buccal dentin surfaces were prepared just below the DEJ by means of a diamond bur. Dentin treatments were made for Zionomer (Zionomer conditioner), Scotchbond 2 (Scotchprep), MBL (10-3 solution), Clearfil PB (H3PO4), GC lining cement (Polyacrylic acid), and Gluma/Scotchbond (EDTA). Resin composites were inserted into tubes, positioned on dentin, cured, tested after five min or 24 h, and compared with samples bonded and stored under an intra-pulpal pressure of 36 cm of saline. After 24 h in superficial dentin, intrapulpal pressure reduced the bond strength only in MBL, Scotchbond 2, and Zionomer. Clearfil PB bond strength was increased, while Vitrabond, GC lining cement, and Gluma/Scotchbond were unaffected by the presence of pulpal pressure. However, in deep dentin, Scotchbond 2 and Clearfil PB shear bond strengths were significantly reduced by storage in the presence of 36-cm H2O pulpal pressure. Only Vitrabond remained unaffected by pulpal pressure in deep dentin. PMID:1901813

  9. A Halogen-Bond-Induced Triple Helicate Encapsulates Iodide.

    PubMed

    Massena, Casey J; Wageling, Nicholas B; Decato, Daniel A; Martin Rodriguez, Enrique; Rose, Ariana M; Berryman, Orion B

    2016-09-26

    The self-assembly of higher-order anion helicates in solution remains an elusive goal. Herein, we present the first triple helicate to encapsulate iodide in organic and aqueous media as well as the solid state. The triple helicate self-assembles from three tricationic arylethynyl strands and resembles a tubular anion channel lined with nine halogen bond donors. Eight strong iodine⋅⋅⋅iodide halogen bonds and numerous buried π-surfaces endow the triplex with remarkable stability, even at elevated temperatures. We suggest that the natural rise of a single-strand helix renders its linear halogen-bond donors non-convergent. Thus, the stringent linearity of halogen bonding is a powerful tool for the synthesis of multi-strand anion helicates. PMID:27411932

  10. Dual resin bonded joints in polyetheretherketone (PEEK) matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelenak, Steve; Radford, Donald W.; Dean, Michael W.

    1993-04-01

    The paper describes applications of the dual resin (miscible polymer) bonding technique (Smiley, 1989) developed as an alternative to traditional bonding approaches to joining thermoplastic matrix composite subassemblies into structures. In the experiments, the performance of joint geometries, such as those that could be used to assemble large truss structures in space, are investigated using truss joint models consisting of woven carbon fiber/PEEK tubes of about 1 mm wall thickness. Specific process conditions and hand-held hardware used to apply heat and pressure were chosen to simulate a field asembly technique. Results are presented on tube/cruciform double lap shear tests, pinned-pinned tube compression tests, and single lap shear bond tests of joints obtained using the dual resin bonding technique.

  11. The Halogen Bond in the Design of Functional Supramolecular Materials: Recent Advances

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Halogen bonding is an emerging noncovalent interaction for constructing supramolecular assemblies. Though similar to the more familiar hydrogen bonding, four primary differences between these two interactions make halogen bonding a unique tool for molecular recognition and the design of functional materials. First, halogen bonds tend to be much more directional than (single) hydrogen bonds. Second, the interaction strength scales with the polarizability of the bond-donor atom, a feature that researchers can tune through single-atom mutation. In addition, halogen bonds are hydrophobic whereas hydrogen bonds are hydrophilic. Lastly, the size of the bond-donor atom (halogen) is significantly larger than hydrogen. As a result, halogen bonding provides supramolecular chemists with design tools that cannot be easily met with other types of noncovalent interactions and opens up unprecedented possibilities in the design of smart functional materials. This Account highlights the recent advances in the design of halogen-bond-based functional materials. Each of the unique features of halogen bonding, directionality, tunable interaction strength, hydrophobicity, and large donor atom size, makes a difference. Taking advantage of the hydrophobicity, researchers have designed small-size ion transporters. The large halogen atom size provided a platform for constructing all-organic light-emitting crystals that efficiently generate triplet electrons and have a high phosphorescence quantum yield. The tunable interaction strengths provide tools for understanding light-induced macroscopic motions in photoresponsive azobenzene-containing polymers, and the directionality renders halogen bonding useful in the design on functional supramolecular liquid crystals and gel-phase materials. Although halogen bond based functional materials design is still in its infancy, we foresee a bright future for this field. We expect that materials designed based on halogen bonding could lead to

  12. Evolution of displays within the pair bond

    PubMed Central

    Servedio, Maria R.; Price, Trevor D.; Lande, Russell

    2013-01-01

    Although sexual selection is an important cause of display evolution, in socially monogamous species (e.g. many birds), displays continue after formation of the pair bond. Here, we consider that these displays evolve because they stimulate the partner to increase investment in offspring. Our study is motivated by elaborate mutual displays in species that are largely monomorphic and have long-term pair bonds (e.g. the great crested grebe, Podiceps cristatus) and by many empirical results evidencing that display manipulation affects parental investment. Using population genetic models, we show that a necessary condition for the permanent establishment of mutual displays in the pair bond is that the benefit of investment by the pair is more than twice that resulting from investment by a single individual. Pre-existing biases to respond to displays by increased investment are a necessary component of display evolution. We also consider examples where one sex (e.g. males) stimulates increased investment in offspring by the other sex. Here, display and additional investment cannot evolve permanently, but can increase and linger at high frequency for a long time before loss. We discuss how such transient effects may lead to the evolution of permanent displays as a result of evolution at additional loci. PMID:23427172

  13. 27 CFR 25.95 - New bond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false New bond. 25.95 Section 25... TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Bonds and Consents of Surety § 25.95 New bond. The appropriate TTB officer may at any time, at his or her discretion, require a new bond. A new bond is required immediately in the case...

  14. 27 CFR 25.95 - New bond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false New bond. 25.95 Section 25... TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Bonds and Consents of Surety § 25.95 New bond. The appropriate TTB officer may at any time, at his or her discretion, require a new bond. A new bond is required immediately in the case...

  15. 27 CFR 24.153 - Strengthening bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Strengthening bonds. In any instance where the penal sum of the bond on file becomes insufficient, the principal shall either give a strengthening bond with the same surety to attain a sufficient penal sum or give a... limiting the amount of either bond to less than its full penal sum. Strengthening bonds will show...

  16. 27 CFR 19.246 - Strengthening bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Strengthening bonds. In all cases when the penal sum of any bond becomes insufficient, the principal shall either give a strengthening bond with the same surety to attain a sufficient penal sum, or give a new... amount of any bond to less than its full penal sum. Strengthening bonds shall show the current date...

  17. Shear bond strength of resin composite bonded with two adhesives: Influence of Er: YAG laser irradiation distance

    PubMed Central

    Shirani, Farzaneh; Birang, Reza; Malekipour, Mohammad Reza; Hourmehr, Zahra; Kazemi, Shantia

    2014-01-01

    Background: Dental surfaces prepared with different Er:YAG laser distance may have different characteristics compared with those prepared with conventional instruments. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Er:YAG laser irradiation distance from enamel and dentin surfaces on the shear bond strength of composite with self-etch and etch and rinse bonding systems compared with conventional preparation method. Materials and Methods: Two hundred caries-free human third molars were randomly divided into twenty groups (n = 10). Ten groups were designated for enamel surface (E1-E10) and ten for dentin surface (D1-D10). Er: YAG laser (2940 nm) was used on the E1-E8 (240 mJ, 25 Hz) and D1-D8 (140 mJ, 30 Hz) groups at four different distances of 0.5 (standard), 2, 4 and 11 mm. Control groups (E9, E10, D9 and D10) were ground with medium grit diamond bur. The enamel and dentin specimens were divided into two subgroups that were bonded with either Single Bond or Clearfil SE Bond. Resin composite (Z100) was dispensed on prepared dentin and enamel. The shear bond strengths were tested using a universal testing machine. Data were analyzed by SPSS12 statistical software using three way analysis of variance, Tukey and independent t-test. P < 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: There was a significant difference between enamel and dentin substrates (P < 0.001) and between lased and un-lased groups; the un-lased group had significantly higher bond strength (P < 0.001). Shear bond strength increased significantly with an increase in the laser irradiation distance (P < 0.05) on enamel surfaces (in both bonding agent subgroups) and on dentin surfaces (in the Single Bond subgroup). Conclusion: Laser irradiation decreases shear bond strength. Irradiation distance affects shear bond strength and increasing the distance would decrease the negative effects of laser irradiation. PMID:25540665

  18. Method of bonding

    DOEpatents

    Saller, deceased, Henry A.; Hodge, Edwin S.; Paprocki, Stanley J.; Dayton, Russell W.

    1987-12-01

    1. A method of making a fuel-containing structure for nuclear reactors, comprising providing an assembly comprising a plurality of fuel units; each fuel unit consisting of a core plate containing thermal-neutron-fissionable material, sheets of cladding metal on its bottom and top surfaces, said cladding sheets being of greater width and length than said core plates whereby recesses are formed at the ends and sides of said core plate, and end pieces and first side pieces of cladding metal of the same thickness as the core plate positioned in said recesses, the assembly further comprising a plurality of second side pieces of cladding metal engaging the cladding sheets so as to space the fuel units from one another, and a plurality of filler plates of an acid-dissolvable nonresilient material whose melting point is above 2000.degree. F., each filler plate being arranged between a pair of said second side pieces and the cladding plates of two adjacent fuel units, the filler plates having the same thickness as the second side pieces; the method further comprising enclosing the entire assembly in an envelope; evacuating the interior of the entire assembly through said envelope; applying inert gas under a pressure of about 10,000 psi to the outside of said envelope while at the same time heating the assembly to a temperature above the flow point of the cladding metal but below the melting point of any material of the assembly, whereby the envelope is pressed against the assembly and integral bonds are formed between plates, sheets, first side pieces, and end pieces and between the sheets and the second side pieces; slowly cooling the assembly to room temperature; removing the envelope; and dissolving the filler plates without attacking the cladding metal.

  19. Metal–Metal Bonding in Uranium–Group 10 Complexes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Heterobimetallic complexes containing short uranium–group 10 metal bonds have been prepared from monometallic IUIV(OArP-κ2O,P)3 (2) {[ArPO]− = 2-tert-butyl-4-methyl-6-(diphenylphosphino)phenolate}. The U–M bond in IUIV(μ-OArP-1κ1O,2κ1P)3M0, M = Ni (3–Ni), Pd (3–Pd), and Pt (3–Pt), has been investigated by experimental and DFT computational methods. Comparisons of 3–Ni with two further U–Ni complexes XUIV(μ-OArP-1κ1O,2κ1P)3Ni0, X = Me3SiO (4) and F (5), was also possible via iodide substitution. All complexes were characterized by variable-temperature NMR spectroscopy, electrochemistry, and single crystal X-ray diffraction. The U–M bonds are significantly shorter than any other crystallographically characterized d–f-block bimetallic, even though the ligand flexes to allow a variable U–M separation. Excellent agreement is found between the experimental and computed structures for 3–Ni and 3–Pd. Natural population analysis and natural localized molecular orbital (NLMO) compositions indicate that U employs both 5f and 6d orbitals in covalent bonding to a significant extent. Quantum theory of atoms-in-molecules analysis reveals U–M bond critical point properties typical of metallic bonding and a larger delocalization index (bond order) for the less polar U–Ni bond than U–Pd. Electrochemical studies agree with the computational analyses and the X-ray structural data for the U–X adducts 3–Ni, 4, and 5. The data show a trend in uranium–metal bond strength that decreases from 3–Ni down to 3–Pt and suggest that exchanging the iodide for a fluoride strengthens the metal–metal bond. Despite short U–TM (transition metal) distances, four other computational approaches also suggest low U–TM bond orders, reflecting highly transition metal localized valence NLMOs. These are more so for 3–Pd than 3–Ni, consistent with slightly larger U–TM bond orders in the latter. Computational studies of the model systems (PH3)3MU(OH)3I

  20. Metal-Metal Bonding in Uranium-Group 10 Complexes.

    PubMed

    Hlina, Johann A; Pankhurst, James R; Kaltsoyannis, Nikolas; Arnold, Polly L

    2016-03-16

    Heterobimetallic complexes containing short uranium-group 10 metal bonds have been prepared from monometallic IU(IV)(OAr(P)-κ(2)O,P)3 (2) {[Ar(P)O](-) = 2-tert-butyl-4-methyl-6-(diphenylphosphino)phenolate}. The U-M bond in IU(IV)(μ-OAr(P)-1κ(1)O,2κ(1)P)3M(0), M = Ni (3-Ni), Pd (3-Pd), and Pt (3-Pt), has been investigated by experimental and DFT computational methods. Comparisons of 3-Ni with two further U-Ni complexes XU(IV)(μ-OAr(P)-1κ(1)O,2κ(1)P)3Ni(0), X = Me3SiO (4) and F (5), was also possible via iodide substitution. All complexes were characterized by variable-temperature NMR spectroscopy, electrochemistry, and single crystal X-ray diffraction. The U-M bonds are significantly shorter than any other crystallographically characterized d-f-block bimetallic, even though the ligand flexes to allow a variable U-M separation. Excellent agreement is found between the experimental and computed structures for 3-Ni and 3-Pd. Natural population analysis and natural localized molecular orbital (NLMO) compositions indicate that U employs both 5f and 6d orbitals in covalent bonding to a significant extent. Quantum theory of atoms-in-molecules analysis reveals U-M bond critical point properties typical of metallic bonding and a larger delocalization index (bond order) for the less polar U-Ni bond than U-Pd. Electrochemical studies agree with the computational analyses and the X-ray structural data for the U-X adducts 3-Ni, 4, and 5. The data show a trend in uranium-metal bond strength that decreases from 3-Ni down to 3-Pt and suggest that exchanging the iodide for a fluoride strengthens the metal-metal bond. Despite short U-TM (transition metal) distances, four other computational approaches also suggest low U-TM bond orders, reflecting highly transition metal localized valence NLMOs. These are more so for 3-Pd than 3-Ni, consistent with slightly larger U-TM bond orders in the latter. Computational studies of the model systems (PH3)3MU(OH)3I (M = Ni, Pd) reveal

  1. Hydroperoxides as Hydrogen Bond Donors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Møller, Kristian H.; Tram, Camilla M.; Hansen, Anne S.; Kjaergaard, Henrik G.

    2016-06-01

    Hydroperoxides are formed in the atmosphere following autooxidation of a wide variety of volatile organics emitted from both natural and anthropogenic sources. This raises the question of whether they can form hydrogen bonds that facilitate aerosol formation and growth. Using a combination of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, FT-IR, and ab initio calculations, we have compared the gas phase hydrogen bonding ability of tert-butylhydroperoxide (tBuOOH) to that of tert-butanol (tBuOH) for a series of bimolecular complexes with different acceptors. The hydrogen bond acceptor atoms studied are nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorus and sulphur. Both in terms of calculated redshifts and binding energies (BE), our results suggest that hydroperoxides are better hydrogen bond donors than the corresponding alcohols. In terms of hydrogen bond acceptor ability, we find that nitrogen is a significantly better acceptor than the other three atoms, which are of similar strength. We observe a similar trend in hydrogen bond acceptor ability with other hydrogen bond donors including methanol and dimethylamine.

  2. Tensile Bond Strength of Latex-Modified Bonded Concrete Overlays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Cameron; Ramseyer, Chris

    2010-10-01

    The tensile bond strength of bonded concrete overlays was tested using the in-situ pull-off method described in ASTM C 1583 with the goal of determining whether adding latex to the mix design increases bond strength. One slab of ductile concrete (f'c > 12,000 psi) was cast with one half tined, i.e. roughened, and one half steel-troweled, i.e. smooth. The slab surface was sectioned off and overlay mixtures containing different latex contents cast in each section. Partial cores were drilled perpendicular to the surface through the overlay into the substrate. A tensile loading device applied a direct tensile load to each specimen and the load was increased until failure occurred. The tensile bond strength was then calculated for comparison between the specimens.

  3. A History of the Double-Bond Rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoogenboom, Bernard E.

    1998-05-01

    The tautomeric polar systems recognized by Laar in 1886 contain an active atom that appeared to migrate from its original position. The tautomeric systems are of a general structural form and can be represented as X=Y-Z-A. Later workers recognized the same bond weakening effect in a variety of organic structures in which atom A is halogen, hydrogen, carbon, or nitrogen. Hermann Staudinger recognized the weakness of that bond, an allyl bond, in hydrocarbons and exploited the behavior for the preparation of isoprene from terpene hydrocarbons. In 1922 he formulated a generality, a rule, regarding the allyl bond reactivity He noted that natural rubber also decomposed to form isoprene and therefore concluded that natural rubber is an unsaturated hydrocarbon, that isoprene units in natural rubber represent weakly held allyl substituents, and that natural rubber is a macromolecular combination of isoprene units. From his different experience as an industrial chemist, Otto Schmidt recognized the same bond weakening effect in hydrocarbons and in 1932 postulated the "Double-Bond Rule," stating that the presence of a double bond in a hydrocarbon has an alternating strengthening and weakening effect on single bonds throughout the molecule, diminishing with distance from the double bond. Schmidt not only understood the practical benefit of this rule, but he also offered an explanation for the Rule on theoretical grounds. Novel in its time, his theoretical explanation did not find popular acceptance, despite his considerable efforts to promote it in the literature. His concept of the Rule was supplanted by the new theory of resonance devised by Pauling and Wheland and by the implied notion of the stabilization of products by delocalization effects.

  4. Method for vacuum fusion bonding

    DOEpatents

    Ackler, Harold D.; Swierkowski, Stefan P.; Tarte, Lisa A.; Hicks, Randall K.

    2001-01-01

    An improved vacuum fusion bonding structure and process for aligned bonding of large area glass plates, patterned with microchannels and access holes and slots, for elevated glass fusion temperatures. Vacuum pumpout of all components is through the bottom platform which yields an untouched, defect free top surface which greatly improves optical access through this smooth surface. Also, a completely non-adherent interlayer, such as graphite, with alignment and location features is located between the main steel platform and the glass plate pair, which makes large improvements in quality, yield, and ease of use, and enables aligned bonding of very large glass structures.

  5. Fusion bonding and alignment fixture

    DOEpatents

    Ackler, Harold D.; Swierkowski, Stefan P.; Tarte, Lisa A.; Hicks, Randall K.

    2000-01-01

    An improved vacuum fusion bonding structure and process for aligned bonding of large area glass plates, patterned with microchannels and access holes and slots, for elevated glass fusion temperatures. Vacuum pumpout of all the components is through the bottom platform which yields an untouched, defect free top surface which greatly improves optical access through this smooth surface. Also, a completely non-adherent interlayer, such as graphite, with alignment and location features is located between the main steel platform and the glass plate pair, which makes large improvements in quality, yield, and ease of use, and enables aligned bonding of very large glass structures.

  6. Effect of phenyl and benzyl group in heterocyclic dithiocarbamates on the ZnS 4N chromophore: Synthesis, spectral, valence-bond parameters and single crystal X-ray structural studies on (pyridine)bis(1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinolinedithiocarbamato)zinc(II) and (pyridine)bis(1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinolinedithiocarbamato)zinc(II)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, N.; Thirumaran, S.; Ciattini, Samuele

    2009-03-01

    Two Zn(II)dithiocarbamates with ZnS 4N chromophores have been synthesized ([Zn(thqdtc) 2(py)] ( 1) and [Zn(thiqdtc) 2(py)] ( 2) (where thqdtc = 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroquinolinedithiocarbamate, thiqtc = 1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinolinedithiocarbamate and py = pyridine)) from [Zn(thqdtc) 2] ( 3) and [Zn(thiqdtc) 2] ( 4), respectively. Their structures and properties have been characterized by IR and NMR spectra. The structures of both the complexes were determined by single crystal X-ray crystallography. The observed deshielding of the H-2 protons for 1 and 3 and H-1 and H-3 protons for 2 and 4 in the 1H NMR spectra is attributed to the drift of electrons from the nitrogen of the NR 2 group, forcing a high electron density towards sulfur via the thioureide π-system. In the 13C NMR spectra, the most important thioureide (N 13CS 2) carbon signals are observed in the region 204-207 ppm. The upfield shift of NCS 2 carbon signal for 1 (204.2 ppm) from the chemical shift value of 2 (206.9 ppm) is due to electron withdrawing resonance effect of phenyl ring thereby decreasing the double bond character in tetrahydroquinolinedithiocarbamate, whereas benzyl group in tetrahydroisoquinolinedithiocarbamate cannot participate in resonance delocalization in the same way. Single crystal X-ray structural analysis of 1 and 2 showed that the zinc atom is pentacoordinated with four sulfur atoms from the dithiocarbamate ligands and one nitrogen atom from the pyridine. VBS values support the correctness of the determined structure. The lower VBS value of 2 is due to the steric effect exerted by the thiqdtc. The phenyl and benzyl group in the heterocyclic dithiocarbamates influences the electronic properties of 1 and 2. The shift of ν C- N(thioureide) and thioureide N 13CS 2 carbon signals are correlated with the electronic effects of the dithiocarbamate ligands.

  7. Topological hydrogen-bond definition to characterize the structure and dynamics of liquid water.

    PubMed

    Henchman, Richard H; Irudayam, Sheeba Jem

    2010-12-23

    A definition that equates a hydrogen bond topologically with a local energy well in the potential energy surface is used to study the structure and dynamics of liquid water. We demonstrate the robustness of this hydrogen-bond definition versus the many other definitions which use fixed, arbitrary parameters, do not account for variable molecular environments, and cannot effectively resolve transition states. Our topology definition unambiguously shows that most water molecules are double acceptors but sizable proportions are single or triple acceptors. Almost all hydrogens are found to take part in hydrogen bonds. Broken hydrogen bonds only form when two molecules try to form two hydrogen bonds between them. The double acceptors have tetrahedral geometry, lower potential energy, entropy, and density, and slower dynamics. The single and triple acceptors have trigonal and trigonal bipyramidal geometry and when considered together have higher density, potential energy, and entropy, faster dynamics, and a tendency to cluster. These calculations use an extended theory for the entropy of liquid water that takes into account the variable number of hydrogen bonds. Hydrogen-bond switching is shown to depend explicitly on the variable number of hydrogen bonds accepted and the presence of interstitial water molecules. Transition state theory indicates that the switching of hydrogen bonds is a mildly activated process, requiring only a moderate distortion of hydrogen bonds. Three main types of switching events are observed depending on whether the donor and acceptor are already sharing a hydrogen bond. The switch may proceed with no intermediate or via a bifurcated-oxygen or cyclic dimer, both of which have a broken hydrogen bond and symmetric and asymmetric forms. Switching is found to be strongly coupled to whole-molecule vibration, particularly for the more mobile single and triple acceptors. Our analysis suggests that even though water is heterogeneous in terms of the

  8. Mechanical properties of a metal-organic framework containing hydrogen-bonded bifluoride linkers.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Kiran, M S R N; Manson, Jamie L; Schlueter, John A; Thirumurugan, A; Ramamurty, U; Cheetham, Anthony K

    2013-05-18

    We report the mechanical properties of a framework structure, [Cu2F(HF)(HF2)(pyz)4][(SbF6)2]n (pyz = pyrazine), in which [Cu(pyz)2](2+) layers are pillared by HF2(-) anions containing the exceptionally strong F-H···F hydrogen bonds. Nanoindentation studies on single-crystals clearly demonstrate that such bonds are extremely robust and mechanically comparable with coordination bonds in this system.

  9. Three Hydrogen Bond Donor Catalysts: Oxyanion Hole Mimics and Transition State Analogues

    SciTech Connect

    Beletskiy, Evgeny V.; Schmidt, Jacob C.; Wang, Xue B.; Kass, Steven R.

    2012-11-14

    Enzymes and their mimics use hydrogen bonds to catalyze chemical transformations. Small molecule transition state analogs of oxyanion holes are characterized by gas phase IR and photoelectron spectroscopy and their binding constants in acetonitrile. As a result, a new class of hydrogen bond catalysts is proposed (OH donors that can contribute three hydrogen bonds to a single functional group) and demonstrated in a Friedel-Crafts reaction.

  10. Bond selective chemistry beyond the adiabatic approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, L.J.

    1993-12-01

    One of the most important challenges in chemistry is to develop predictive ability for the branching between energetically allowed chemical reaction pathways. Such predictive capability, coupled with a fundamental understanding of the important molecular interactions, is essential to the development and utilization of new fuels and the design of efficient combustion processes. Existing transition state and exact quantum theories successfully predict the branching between available product channels for systems in which each reaction coordinate can be adequately described by different paths along a single adiabatic potential energy surface. In particular, unimolecular dissociation following thermal, infrared multiphoton, or overtone excitation in the ground state yields a branching between energetically allowed product channels which can be successfully predicted by the application of statistical theories, i.e. the weakest bond breaks. (The predictions are particularly good for competing reactions in which when there is no saddle point along the reaction coordinates, as in simple bond fission reactions.) The predicted lack of bond selectivity results from the assumption of rapid internal vibrational energy redistribution and the implicit use of a single adiabatic Born-Oppenheimer potential energy surface for the reaction. However, the adiabatic approximation is not valid for the reaction of a wide variety of energetic materials and organic fuels; coupling between the electronic states of the reacting species play a a key role in determining the selectivity of the chemical reactions induced. The work described below investigated the central role played by coupling between electronic states in polyatomic molecules in determining the selective branching between energetically allowed fragmentation pathways in two key systems.

  11. Generalized Valence Bond Description of Chalcogen-Nitrogen Compounds. III. Why the NO-OH and NS-OH Bonds Are So Different.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, Tyler Y; Dunning, Thom H

    2016-09-01

    Crabtree et al. recently reported the microwave spectrum of nitrosyl-O-hydroxide (trans-NOOH), an isomer of nitrous acid, and found that this molecule has the longest O-O bond ever observed: 1.9149 Å ± 0.0005 Å. This is in marked contrast to the structure of the valence isoelectronic trans-NSOH molecule, which has a normal NS-OH bond length and strength. Generalized valence bond calculations show that the long bond in trans-NOOH is the result of a weak through-pair interaction that singlet couples the spins of the electrons in singly occupied orbitals on the hydroxyl radical and nitrogen atom, an interaction that is enhanced by the intervening lone pair of the oxygen atom in NO. The NS-OH bond is the result of the formation of a stable recoupled pair bond dyad, which accounts for both its length and strength.

  12. Generalized Valence Bond Description of Chalcogen-Nitrogen Compounds. III. Why the NO-OH and NS-OH Bonds Are So Different.

    PubMed

    Takeshita, Tyler Y; Dunning, Thom H

    2016-09-01

    Crabtree et al. recently reported the microwave spectrum of nitrosyl-O-hydroxide (trans-NOOH), an isomer of nitrous acid, and found that this molecule has the longest O-O bond ever observed: 1.9149 Å ± 0.0005 Å. This is in marked contrast to the structure of the valence isoelectronic trans-NSOH molecule, which has a normal NS-OH bond length and strength. Generalized valence bond calculations show that the long bond in trans-NOOH is the result of a weak through-pair interaction that singlet couples the spins of the electrons in singly occupied orbitals on the hydroxyl radical and nitrogen atom, an interaction that is enhanced by the intervening lone pair of the oxygen atom in NO. The NS-OH bond is the result of the formation of a stable recoupled pair bond dyad, which accounts for both its length and strength. PMID:27501366

  13. Influence of Er:YAG and Ti:sapphire laser irradiation on the microtensile bond strength of several adhesives to dentin.

    PubMed

    Portillo, M; Lorenzo, M C; Moreno, P; García, A; Montero, J; Ceballos, L; Fuentes, M V; Albaladejo, A

    2015-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the influence of erbium:yttrium-aluminum-garnet (Er:YAG) and Ti:sapphire laser irradiation on the microtensile bond strength (MTBS) of three different adhesive systems to dentin. Flat dentin surfaces from 27 molars were divided into three groups according to laser irradiation: control, Er:YAG (2,940 nm, 100 μs, 2.7 W, 9 Hz) and Ti:sapphire laser (795 nm, 120 fs, 1 W, 1 kHz). Each group was divided into three subgroups according to the adhesive system used: two-step total-etching adhesive (Adper Scotchbond 1 XT, from now on XT), two-step self-etching adhesive (Clearfil SE Bond, from now on CSE), and all-in-one self-etching adhesive (Optibond All-in-One, from now on OAO). After 24 h of water storage, beams of section at 1 mm(2) were longitudinally cut from the samples. Each beam underwent traction test in an Instron machine. Fifteen polished dentin specimens were used for the surface morphology analysis by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Failure modes of representative debonded microbars were SEM-assessed. Data were analyzed by ANOVA, chi-square test, and multiple linear regression (p < 0.05). In the control group, XT obtained higher MTBS than that of laser groups that performed equally. CSE showed higher MTBS without laser than that with laser groups, where Er:YAG attained higher MTBS than ultrashort laser. When OAO was used, MTBS values were equal in the three treatments. CSE obtained the highest MTBS regardless of the surface treatment applied. The Er:YAG and ultrashort laser irradiation reduce the bonding effectiveness when a two-step total-etching adhesive or a two-step self-etching adhesive are used and do not affect their effectiveness when an all-in-one self-etching adhesive is applied.

  14. Influence of charge and coordination number on bond dissociation energies, distances, and vibrational frequencies for the phosphorus-phosphorus bond.

    PubMed

    Chitnis, Saurabh S; Whalen, J Marc; Burford, Neil

    2014-09-01

    We report a comprehensive and systematic experimental and computational assessment of the P-P bond in prototypical molecules that represent a rare series of known compounds. The data presented complement the existing solid-state structural data and previous computational studies to provide a thorough thermodynamic and electronic understanding of the P-P bond. Comparison of homolytic and heterolytic bond dissociation for tricoordinate-tricoordinate, tricoordinate-tetracoordinate, and tetracoordinate-tetracoordinate P-P bonds in frameworks 1-6 provides fundamental insights into covalent bonding. For all types of P-P bond discussed, homolytic dissociation is favored over heterolytic dissociation, although the distinction is small for 2(1+) and 6(1+). The presence of a single cationic charge in a molecule substantially strengthens the P-P bond (relative to analogous neutral frameworks) such that it is comparable with the C-C bond in alkanes. Nevertheless, P-P distances are remarkably independent of molecular charge or coordination number, and trends in values of d(PC) and νsymm(PC) imply that a molecular cationic charge is distributed over the alkyl substituents. In the gas phase, the diphosphonium dication 3(2+) has similar energy to two [PMe3](+) radical cations, so that it is the lattice enthalpy of 3[OTf]2 in the solid-state that enables isolation, highlighting that values from gas-phase calculations are poor guides for synthetic planning for ionic compounds. There are no relationships or correlations between bond lengths, strengths, and vibrational frequencies.

  15. 27 CFR 19.245 - Bonds and penal sums of bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bonds and penal sums of... Bonds and penal sums of bonds. The bonds, and the penal sums thereof, required by this subpart, are as follows: Penal Sum Type of bond Basis Minimum Maximum (a) Operations bond: (1) One plant bond—...

  16. 27 CFR 25.94 - Strengthening bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) Requirement. When the penal sum of the brewer's bond (calculated as provided in § 25.93) in effect is not... strengthening bond in sufficient penal sum if the surety is the same as on the bond in effect. If the surety is... bond may not in any way release a former bond or limit a bond to less than the full penal sum. (c)...

  17. Modified bonded bridge space maintainer.

    PubMed

    Liegeois, F; Limme, M

    1999-01-01

    The premature loss of primary teeth can create the need for space maintenance and restoration of function. This article presents a fixed bonded space maintainer, which allows space to be maintained with economy of dental tissues.

  18. Double pancake bonds: pushing the limits of strong π-π stacking interactions.

    PubMed

    Cui, Zhong-hua; Lischka, Hans; Beneberu, Habtamu Z; Kertesz, Miklos

    2014-09-17

    The concept of a double-bonded pancake bonding mechanism is introduced to explain the extremely short π-π stacking contacts in dimers of dithiatriazines. While ordinary single pancake bonds occur between radicals and already display significantly shorter interatomic distances in comparison to van der Waals (vdW) contacts, the double-bonded pancake dimer is based on diradicaloid or antiaromatic molecules and exhibits even shorter and stronger intermolecular bonds that breach into the range of extremely stretched single bonds in terms of bond distances and binding energies. These properties give rise to promising possibilities in the design of new materials with high electrical conductivity and for the field of spintronics. The analysis of the double pancake bond is based on cutting edge electron correlation theory combining multireference (nondynamical) effects and dispersion (dynamical) contributions in a balanced way providing accurate interaction energies and distributions of unpaired spins. It is also shown that the present examples do not stand isolated but that similar mechanisms operate in several analogous nonradical molecular systems to form double-bonded π-stacking pancake dimers. We report on the amazing properties of a new type of stacking interaction mechanism between π conjugated molecules in the form of a "double pancake bond" which breaks the record for short intermolecular distances and provides formidable strength for some π-π stacking interactions. PMID:25203200

  19. Bond percolation in higher dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corwin, Eric I.; Stinchcombe, Robin; Thorpe, M. F.

    2013-07-01

    We collect results for bond percolation on various lattices from two to fourteen dimensions that, in the limit of large dimension d or number of neighbors z, smoothly approach a randomly diluted Erdős-Rényi graph. We include results on bond-diluted hypersphere packs in up to nine dimensions, which show the mean coordination, excess kurtosis, and skewness evolving smoothly with dimension towards the Erdős-Rényi limit.

  20. Method to improve commercial bonded SOI material

    DOEpatents

    Maris, Humphrey John; Sadana, Devendra Kumar

    2000-07-11

    A method of improving the bonding characteristics of a previously bonded silicon on insulator (SOI) structure is provided. The improvement in the bonding characteristics is achieved in the present invention by, optionally, forming an oxide cap layer on the silicon surface of the bonded SOI structure and then annealing either the uncapped or oxide capped structure in a slightly oxidizing ambient at temperatures greater than 1200.degree. C. Also provided herein is a method for detecting the bonding characteristics of previously bonded SOI structures. According to this aspect of the present invention, a pico-second laser pulse technique is employed to determine the bonding imperfections of previously bonded SOI structures.

  1. 31 CFR 363.171 - How do I redeem a converted savings bond?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I redeem a converted savings... converted savings bond? (a) Before final maturity—(1) Savings bond of any series registered in the single owner, owner with beneficiary, or entity form of registration. You may redeem your converted...

  2. Fabrication of a high power Faraday isolator by direct bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothhardt, Carolin; Rekas, Miroslaw; Kalkowski, Gerhard; Haarlammert, Nicoletta; Eberhardt, Ramona; Tünnermann, Andreas

    2013-03-01

    With increasing output power of lasers, absorption in optical components grows larger and demands on heat withdrawal become challenging. We report on the fabrication of a Faraday isolator for high power fiber laser applications (P = 1 kW) at a wavelength of 1080 nm and operation at ambient conditions. We investigate direct bonding of Terbium Gallium Garnet to sapphire disks, to benefit from the good heat spreading properties (having a 6-fold higher thermal conductivity than TGG) at high transparency of the latter. Successful bonding was achieved by extensive cleaning of the plane and smooth surfaces prior to low pressure plasma activation. The surfaces to be bonded were then contacted in a vacuum environment at elevated temperature under axial load. Our measurements show that the bonded interface has no measurable influence on transmission properties and bonded samples are stable for laser output powers of at least 260 W. As compared to a single Terbium Gallium Garnet substrate, wavefront aberrations were significantly decreased by bonding sapphire disks to Terbium Gallium Garnet.

  3. Metal complexes with varying intramolecular hydrogen bonding networks

    PubMed Central

    Lacy, David C.; Mukherjee, Jhumpa; Lucas, Robie L.; Day, Victor W.; Borovik, A.S.

    2013-01-01

    Alfred Werner described the attributes of the primary and secondary coordination spheres in his development of coordination chemistry. To examine the effects of the secondary coordination sphere on coordination chemistry, a series of tripodal ligands containing differing numbers of hydrogen bond (H-bond) donors were used to examine the effects of H-bonds on Fe(II), Mn(II)–acetato, and Mn(III)–OH complexes. The ligands containing varying numbers of urea and amidate donors allowed for systematic changes in the secondary coordination spheres of the complexes. Two of the Fe(II) complexes that were isolated as their Bu4N+ salts formed dimers in the solid-state as determined by X-ray diffraction methods, which correlates with the number of H-bonds present in the complexes (i.e., dimerization is favored as the number of H-bond donors increases). Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies suggested that the dimeric structures persist in acetonitrile. The Mn(II) complexes were all isolated as their acetato adducts. Furthermore, the synthesis of a rare Mn(III)–OH complex via dioxygen activation was achieved that contains a single intramolecular H-bond; its physical properties are discussed within the context of other Mn(III)–OH complexes. PMID:24904193

  4. Enthalpy-entropy compensation in biomolecular halogen bonds measured in DNA junctions.

    PubMed

    Carter, Megan; Voth, Andrea Regier; Scholfield, Matthew R; Rummel, Brittany; Sowers, Lawrence C; Ho, P Shing

    2013-07-23

    Interest in noncovalent interactions involving halogens, particularly halogen bonds (X-bonds), has grown dramatically in the past decade, propelled by the use of X-bonding in molecular engineering and drug design. However, it is clear that a complete analysis of the structure-energy relationship must be established in biological systems to fully exploit X-bonds for biomolecular engineering. We present here the first comprehensive experimental study to correlate geometries with their stabilizing potentials for fluorine (F), chlorine (Cl), bromine (Br), or iodine (I) X-bonds in a biological context. For these studies, we determine the single-crystal structures of DNA Holliday junctions containing halogenated uracil bases that compete X-bonds against classic hydrogen bonds (H-bonds), estimate the enthalpic energies of the competing interactions in the crystal system through crystallographic titrations, and compare the enthalpic and entropic energies of bromine and iodine X-bonds in solution by differential scanning calorimetry. The culmination of these studies demonstrates that enthalpic stabilization of X-bonds increases with increasing polarizability from F to Cl to Br to I, which is consistent with the σ-hole theory of X-bonding. Furthermore, an increase in the X-bonding potential is seen to direct the interaction toward a more ideal geometry. However, the entropic contributions to the total free energies must also be considered to determine how each halogen potentially contributes to the overall stability of the interaction. We find that bromine has the optimal balance between enthalpic and entropic energy components, resulting in the lowest free energy for X-bonding in this DNA system. The X-bond formed by iodine is more enthalpically stable, but this comes with an entropic cost, which we attribute to crowding effects. Thus, the overall free energy of an X-bonding interaction balances the stabilizing electrostatic effects of the σ-hole against the competing

  5. Competition between halogen, dihalogen and hydrogen bonds in bromo- and iodomethanol dimers.

    PubMed

    Riley, Kevin E; Rezáč, Jan; Hobza, Pavel

    2013-07-01

    O-H...X and O-H...O H-bonds as well as C-X...X dihalogen and C-X...O halogen bonds have been investigated in halomethanol dimers (bromomethanol dimer, iodomethanol dimer, difluorobromomethanol…bromomethanol complex and difluoroiodomethanol…iodomethanol complex). Structures of all complexes were optimized at the counterpoise-corrected MP2/cc-pVTZ level and single-point energies were calculated at the CCSD(T)/aug-cc-pVTZ level. Energy decomposition for the bromomethanol dimer complex was performed using the DFT-SAPT method based on the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set. OH...O and OH...X H-bonds are systematically the strongest in all complexes investigated, with the former being the strongest bond. Halogen and dihalogen bonds, being of comparable strength, are weaker than both H-bonds but are still significant. The strongest bonds were found in the difluoroiodomethanol…iodomethanol complex, where the O-H...O H-bond exceeds 7 kcal mol(-1), and the halogen and dihalogen bonds exceed 2.5 and 2.3 kcal mol(-1), respectively. Electrostatic energy is dominant for H-bonded structures, in halogen bonded structures electrostatic and dispersion energies are comparable, and, finally, for dihalogen structures the dispersion energy is clearly dominant. PMID:23296565

  6. Topology of electron charge density for chemical bonds from valence bond theory: a probe of bonding types.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lixian; Ying, Fuming; Wu, Wei; Hiberty, Philippe C; Shaik, Sason

    2009-01-01

    To characterize the nature of bonding we derive the topological properties of the electron charge density of a variety of bonds based on ab initio valence bond methods. The electron density and its associated Laplacian are partitioned into covalent, ionic, and resonance components in the valence bond spirit. The analysis provides a density-based signature of bonding types and reveals, along with the classical covalent and ionic bonds, the existence of two-electron bonds in which most of the bonding arises from the covalent-ionic resonance energy, so-called charge-shift bonds. As expected, the covalent component of the Laplacian at the bond critical point is found to be largely negative for classical covalent bonds. In contrast, for charge-shift bonds, the covalent part of the Laplacian is small or positive, in agreement with the weakly attractive or repulsive character of the covalent interaction in these bonds. On the other hand, the resonance component of the Laplacian is always negative or nearly zero, and it increases in absolute value with the charge-shift character of the bond, in agreement with the decrease of kinetic energy associated with covalent-ionic mixing. A new interpretation of the topology of the total density at the bond critical point is proposed to characterize covalent, ionic, and charge-shift bonding from the density point of view.

  7. Fast and accurate predictions of covalent bonds in chemical space.

    PubMed

    Chang, K Y Samuel; Fias, Stijn; Ramakrishnan, Raghunathan; von Lilienfeld, O Anatole

    2016-05-01

    We assess the predictive accuracy of perturbation theory based estimates of changes in covalent bonding due to linear alchemical interpolations among molecules. We have investigated σ bonding to hydrogen, as well as σ and π bonding between main-group elements, occurring in small sets of iso-valence-electronic molecules with elements drawn from second to fourth rows in the p-block of the periodic table. Numerical evidence suggests that first order Taylor expansions of covalent bonding potentials can achieve high accuracy if (i) the alchemical interpolation is vertical (fixed geometry), (ii) it involves elements from the third and fourth rows of the periodic table, and (iii) an optimal reference geometry is used. This leads to near linear changes in the bonding potential, resulting in analytical predictions with chemical accuracy (∼1 kcal/mol). Second order estimates deteriorate the prediction. If initial and final molecules differ not only in composition but also in geometry, all estimates become substantially worse, with second order being slightly more accurate than first order. The independent particle approximation based second order perturbation theory performs poorly when compared to the coupled perturbed or finite difference approach. Taylor series expansions up to fourth order of the potential energy curve of highly symmetric systems indicate a finite radius of convergence, as illustrated for the alchemical stretching of H2 (+). Results are presented for (i) covalent bonds to hydrogen in 12 molecules with 8 valence electrons (CH4, NH3, H2O, HF, SiH4, PH3, H2S, HCl, GeH4, AsH3, H2Se, HBr); (ii) main-group single bonds in 9 molecules with 14 valence electrons (CH3F, CH3Cl, CH3Br, SiH3F, SiH3Cl, SiH3Br, GeH3F, GeH3Cl, GeH3Br); (iii) main-group double bonds in 9 molecules with 12 valence electrons (CH2O, CH2S, CH2Se, SiH2O, SiH2S, SiH2Se, GeH2O, GeH2S, GeH2Se); (iv) main-group triple bonds in 9 molecules with 10 valence electrons (HCN, HCP, HCAs, HSiN, HSi

  8. Fast and accurate predictions of covalent bonds in chemical space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, K. Y. Samuel; Fias, Stijn; Ramakrishnan, Raghunathan; von Lilienfeld, O. Anatole

    2016-05-01

    We assess the predictive accuracy of perturbation theory based estimates of changes in covalent bonding due to linear alchemical interpolations among molecules. We have investigated σ bonding to hydrogen, as well as σ and π bonding between main-group elements, occurring in small sets of iso-valence-electronic molecules with elements drawn from second to fourth rows in the p-block of the periodic table. Numerical evidence suggests that first order Taylor expansions of covalent bonding potentials can achieve high accuracy if (i) the alchemical interpolation is vertical (fixed geometry), (ii) it involves elements from the third and fourth rows of the periodic table, and (iii) an optimal reference geometry is used. This leads to near linear changes in the bonding potential, resulting in analytical predictions with chemical accuracy (˜1 kcal/mol). Second order estimates deteriorate the prediction. If initial and final molecules differ not only in composition but also in geometry, all estimates become substantially worse, with second order being slightly more accurate than first order. The independent particle approximation based second order perturbation theory performs poorly when compared to the coupled perturbed or finite difference approach. Taylor series expansions up to fourth order of the potential energy curve of highly symmetric systems indicate a finite radius of convergence, as illustrated for the alchemical stretching of H 2+ . Results are presented for (i) covalent bonds to hydrogen in 12 molecules with 8 valence electrons (CH4, NH3, H2O, HF, SiH4, PH3, H2S, HCl, GeH4, AsH3, H2Se, HBr); (ii) main-group single bonds in 9 molecules with 14 valence electrons (CH3F, CH3Cl, CH3Br, SiH3F, SiH3Cl, SiH3Br, GeH3F, GeH3Cl, GeH3Br); (iii) main-group double bonds in 9 molecules with 12 valence electrons (CH2O, CH2S, CH2Se, SiH2O, SiH2S, SiH2Se, GeH2O, GeH2S, GeH2Se); (iv) main-group triple bonds in 9 molecules with 10 valence electrons (HCN, HCP, HCAs, HSiN, HSi

  9. Fast and accurate predictions of covalent bonds in chemical space.

    PubMed

    Chang, K Y Samuel; Fias, Stijn; Ramakrishnan, Raghunathan; von Lilienfeld, O Anatole

    2016-05-01

    We assess the predictive accuracy of perturbation theory based estimates of changes in covalent bonding due to linear alchemical interpolations among molecules. We have investigated σ bonding to hydrogen, as well as σ and π bonding between main-group elements, occurring in small sets of iso-valence-electronic molecules with elements drawn from second to fourth rows in the p-block of the periodic table. Numerical evidence suggests that first order Taylor expansions of covalent bonding potentials can achieve high accuracy if (i) the alchemical interpolation is vertical (fixed geometry), (ii) it involves elements from the third and fourth rows of the periodic table, and (iii) an optimal reference geometry is used. This leads to near linear changes in the bonding potential, resulting in analytical predictions with chemical accuracy (∼1 kcal/mol). Second order estimates deteriorate the prediction. If initial and final molecules differ not only in composition but also in geometry, all estimates become substantially worse, with second order being slightly more accurate than first order. The independent particle approximation based second order perturbation theory performs poorly when compared to the coupled perturbed or finite difference approach. Taylor series expansions up to fourth order of the potential energy curve of highly symmetric systems indicate a finite radius of convergence, as illustrated for the alchemical stretching of H2 (+). Results are presented for (i) covalent bonds to hydrogen in 12 molecules with 8 valence electrons (CH4, NH3, H2O, HF, SiH4, PH3, H2S, HCl, GeH4, AsH3, H2Se, HBr); (ii) main-group single bonds in 9 molecules with 14 valence electrons (CH3F, CH3Cl, CH3Br, SiH3F, SiH3Cl, SiH3Br, GeH3F, GeH3Cl, GeH3Br); (iii) main-group double bonds in 9 molecules with 12 valence electrons (CH2O, CH2S, CH2Se, SiH2O, SiH2S, SiH2Se, GeH2O, GeH2S, GeH2Se); (iv) main-group triple bonds in 9 molecules with 10 valence electrons (HCN, HCP, HCAs, HSiN, HSi

  10. Halogen bonds in crystal engineering: like hydrogen bonds yet different.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Arijit; Tothadi, Srinu; Desiraju, Gautam R

    2014-08-19

    The halogen bond is an attractive interaction in which an electrophilic halogen atom approaches a negatively polarized species. Short halogen atom contacts in crystals have been known for around 50 years. Such contacts are found in two varieties: type I, which is symmetrical, and type II, which is bent. Both are influenced by geometric and chemical considerations. Our research group has been using halogen atom interactions as design elements in crystal engineering, for nearly 30 years. These interactions include halogen···halogen interactions (X···X) and halogen···heteroatom interactions (X···B). Many X···X and almost all X···B contacts can be classified as halogen bonds. In this Account, we illustrate examples of crystal engineering where one can build up from previous knowledge with a focus that is provided by the modern definition of the halogen bond. We also comment on the similarities and differences between halogen bonds and hydrogen bonds. These interactions are similar because the protagonist atoms-halogen and hydrogen-are both electrophilic in nature. The interactions are distinctive because the size of a halogen atom is of consequence when compared with the atomic sizes of, for example, C, N, and O, unlike that of a hydrogen atom. Conclusions may be drawn pertaining to the nature of X···X interactions from the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD). There is a clear geometric and chemical distinction between type I and type II, with only type II being halogen bonds. Cl/Br isostructurality is explained based on a geometric model. In parallel, experimental studies on 3,4-dichlorophenol and its congeners shed light on the nature of halogen···halogen interactions and reveal the chemical difference between Cl and Br. Variable temperature studies also show differences between type I and type II contacts. In terms of crystal design, halogen bonds offer a unique opportunity in the strength, atom size and interaction gradation; this may be

  11. "Vibrational bonding": a new type of chemical bond is discovered.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, Christopher J; Macrae, Roderick M

    2015-01-01

    A long-sought but elusive new type of chemical bond, occurring on a minimum-free, purely repulsive potential energy surface, has recently been convincingly shown to be possible on the basis of high-level quantum-chemical calculations. This type of bond, termed a vibrational bond, forms because the total energy, including the dynamical energy of the nuclei, is lower than the total energy of the dissociated products, including their vibrational zero-point energy. For this to be the case, the ZPE of the product molecule must be very high, which is ensured by replacing a conventional hydrogen atom with its light isotope muonium (Mu, mass = 1/9 u) in the system Br-H-Br, a natural transition state in the reaction between Br and HBr. A paramagnetic species observed in the reaction Mu +Br2 has been proposed as a first experimental sighting of this species, but definitive identification remains challenging.

  12. Welding, Bonding and Fastening, 1984

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, J. D. (Editor); Stein, B. A. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    A compilation of papers presented in a joint NASA, American Society for Metals, The George Washington University, American Welding Soceity, and Society of Manufacturing Engineers conference on Welding, Bonding, and Fastening at Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA, on October 23 to 25, 1984 is given. Papers were presented on technology developed in current research programs relevant to welding, bonding, and fastening of structural materials required in fabricating structures and mechanical systems used in the aerospace, hydrospace, and automotive industries. Topics covered in the conference included equipment, hardware and materials used when welding, brazing, and soldering, mechanical fastening, explosive welding, use of unique selected joining techniques, adhesives bonding, and nondestructive evaluation. A concept of the factory of the future was presented, followed by advanced welding techniques, automated equipment for welding, welding in a cryogenic atmosphere, blind fastening, stress corrosion resistant fasteners, fastening equipment, explosive welding of different configurations and materials, solid-state bonding, electron beam welding, new adhesives, effects of cryogenics on adhesives, and new techniques and equipment for adhesive bonding.

  13. Highly polar bonds and the meaning of covalency and ionicity--structure and bonding of alkali metal hydride oligomers.

    PubMed

    Bickelhaupt, F Matthias; Solà, Miquel; Guerra, Célia Fonseca

    2007-01-01

    The hydrogen-alkali metal bond is simple and archetypal, and thus an ideal model for studying the nature of highly polar element-metal bonds. Thus, we have theoretically explored the alkali metal hydride monomers, HM, and (distorted) cubic tetramers, (HM)4, with M = Li, Na, K, and Rb, using density functional theory (DFT) at the BP86/TZ2P level. Our objective is to determine how the structure and thermochemistry (e.g., H-M bond lengths and strengths, oligomerization energies, etc.) of alkali metal hydrides depend on the metal atom, and to understand the emerging trends in terms of quantitative Kohn-Sham molecular orbital (KS-MO) theory. The H-M bond becomes longer and weaker, both in the monomers and tetramers, if one descends the periodic table from Li to Rb. Quantitative bonding analyses show that this trend is not determined by decreasing electrostatic attraction but, primarily, by the weakening in orbital interactions. The latter become less stabilizing along Li-Rb because the bond overlap between the singly occupied molecular orbitals (SOMOs) of H* and M* radicals decreases as the metal ns atomic orbital (AO) becomes larger and more diffuse. Thus, the H-M bond behaves as a text-book electron-pair bond and, in that respect, it is covalent, despite a high polarity. For the lithium and sodium hydride tetramers, the H4 tetrahedron is larger than and surrounds the M4 cluster (i.e., H-H > M-M). Interestingly, this is no longer the case in the potassium and rubidium hydride tetramers, in which the H4 tetrahedron is smaller than and inside the M4 cluster (i.e., H-H < M-M). PMID:17328442

  14. 21 CFR 1005.23 - Bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Bonds. 1005.23 Section 1005.23 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH IMPORTATION OF ELECTRONIC PRODUCTS Bonding and Compliance Procedures § 1005.23 Bonds. The bond required...

  15. 27 CFR 26.69 - Strengthening bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Liquors and Articles in Puerto Rico Bonds § 26.69 Strengthening bonds. In all cases where the penal sum of... surety to attain a sufficient penal sum, or give a new bond to cover the entire liability. Strengthening... penal sum. Strengthening bonds shall show the current date of execution and the effective date....

  16. Pet Bonding and Pet Bereavement among Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Brenda H.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Studied adolescent-pet bonding and bereavement following pet loss (n=55). Hypothesized that highly-bonded adolescents experience more intense grief when a pet dies than do those less bonded; degree of bonding is greater for girls than for boys; and intensity of bereavement is greater for girls than for boys. Results supported the hypotheses. (RB)

  17. 27 CFR 25.96 - Superseding bond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Superseding bond. 25.96 Section 25.96 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... principal submits a new bond to supersede a bond or bonds in effect, the appropriate TTB officer,...

  18. How to maximize return on bond proceeds.

    PubMed

    Deluccia, D J

    1989-09-01

    Healthcare organizations issuing tax-exempt bonds to finance the acquisition, construction, or renovation of their facilities often neglect to invest bond proceeds to gain the maximum allowable return. Bond indentures--documents that contain all the terms and provisions of the financing plan--generally spell out a number of options for investing bond proceeds.

  19. 27 CFR 24.146 - Bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    .... (c) Wine vinegar plant bond. The proprietor of a wine vinegar plant who withdraws wine from a bonded wine premises without payment of tax for use in the manufacture of vinegar shall file a bond on TTB F 5510.2, Bond Covering Removal to and Use of Wine at Vinegar Plant, to ensure the payment of the tax...

  20. 27 CFR 24.146 - Bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... (c) Wine vinegar plant bond. The proprietor of a wine vinegar plant who withdraws wine from a bonded wine premises without payment of tax for use in the manufacture of vinegar shall file a bond on TTB F 5510.2, Bond Covering Removal to and Use of Wine at Vinegar Plant, to ensure the payment of the tax...

  1. 27 CFR 24.146 - Bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    .... (c) Wine vinegar plant bond. The proprietor of a wine vinegar plant who withdraws wine from a bonded wine premises without payment of tax for use in the manufacture of vinegar shall file a bond on TTB F 5510.2, Bond Covering Removal to and Use of Wine at Vinegar Plant, to ensure the payment of the tax...

  2. 27 CFR 24.146 - Bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    .... (c) Wine vinegar plant bond. The proprietor of a wine vinegar plant who withdraws wine from a bonded wine premises without payment of tax for use in the manufacture of vinegar shall file a bond on TTB F 5510.2, Bond Covering Removal to and Use of Wine at Vinegar Plant, to ensure the payment of the tax...

  3. 27 CFR 24.146 - Bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    .... (c) Wine vinegar plant bond. The proprietor of a wine vinegar plant who withdraws wine from a bonded wine premises without payment of tax for use in the manufacture of vinegar shall file a bond on TTB F 5510.2, Bond Covering Removal to and Use of Wine at Vinegar Plant, to ensure the payment of the tax...

  4. School Bond Success: An Exploratory Case Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holt, Carleton R.; Wendt, Matthew A,; Smith, Roland M.

    2006-01-01

    Following two-failed school bond issues in 1995 and 1998, one mid-sized rural school district organized an effort that led to two successful school bond elections in 2001 and 2003. The school district's strategic plan mirrored many of the recommendations for successful bond referendums published in School Bond Success: A Strategy for Building…

  5. 21 CFR 1005.23 - Bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Bonds. 1005.23 Section 1005.23 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH IMPORTATION OF ELECTRONIC PRODUCTS Bonding and Compliance Procedures § 1005.23 Bonds. The bond required...

  6. 21 CFR 1005.23 - Bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Bonds. 1005.23 Section 1005.23 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH IMPORTATION OF ELECTRONIC PRODUCTS Bonding and Compliance Procedures § 1005.23 Bonds. The bond required...

  7. 21 CFR 1005.23 - Bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Bonds. 1005.23 Section 1005.23 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH IMPORTATION OF ELECTRONIC PRODUCTS Bonding and Compliance Procedures § 1005.23 Bonds. The bond required...

  8. 21 CFR 1005.23 - Bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Bonds. 1005.23 Section 1005.23 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) RADIOLOGICAL HEALTH IMPORTATION OF ELECTRONIC PRODUCTS Bonding and Compliance Procedures § 1005.23 Bonds. The bond required under section 360(b) of the Act shall...

  9. 46 CFR Sec. 4 - Posting of bond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Posting of bond. Sec. 4 Section 4 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION A-NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY BONDING OF SHIP'S PERSONNEL Sec. 4 Posting of bond. The General Agent shall retain an executed copy of each such bond in its principal...

  10. 46 CFR Sec. 2 - Amount of bond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Amount of bond. Sec. 2 Section 2 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION A-NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY BONDING OF SHIP'S PERSONNEL Sec. 2 Amount of bond. The amount of the bond must be governed by the amount of monies advanced or value of...

  11. 46 CFR Sec. 2 - Amount of bond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Amount of bond. Sec. 2 Section 2 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION A-NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY BONDING OF SHIP'S PERSONNEL Sec. 2 Amount of bond. The amount of the bond must be governed by the amount of monies advanced or value of...

  12. 46 CFR Sec. 4 - Posting of bond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Posting of bond. Sec. 4 Section 4 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION A-NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY BONDING OF SHIP'S PERSONNEL Sec. 4 Posting of bond. The General Agent shall retain an executed copy of each such bond in its principal...

  13. 46 CFR Sec. 4 - Posting of bond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Posting of bond. Sec. 4 Section 4 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION A-NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY BONDING OF SHIP'S PERSONNEL Sec. 4 Posting of bond. The General Agent shall retain an executed copy of each such bond in its principal...

  14. 46 CFR Sec. 4 - Posting of bond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Posting of bond. Sec. 4 Section 4 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION A-NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY BONDING OF SHIP'S PERSONNEL Sec. 4 Posting of bond. The General Agent shall retain an executed copy of each such bond in its principal...

  15. 46 CFR Sec. 4 - Posting of bond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Posting of bond. Sec. 4 Section 4 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION A-NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY BONDING OF SHIP'S PERSONNEL Sec. 4 Posting of bond. The General Agent shall retain an executed copy of each such bond in its principal...

  16. 46 CFR Sec. 2 - Amount of bond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Amount of bond. Sec. 2 Section 2 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION A-NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY BONDING OF SHIP'S PERSONNEL Sec. 2 Amount of bond. The amount of the bond must be governed by the amount of monies advanced or value of...

  17. 46 CFR Sec. 2 - Amount of bond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Amount of bond. Sec. 2 Section 2 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION A-NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY BONDING OF SHIP'S PERSONNEL Sec. 2 Amount of bond. The amount of the bond must be governed by the amount of monies advanced or value of...

  18. 46 CFR Sec. 2 - Amount of bond.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Amount of bond. Sec. 2 Section 2 Shipping MARITIME ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION A-NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY BONDING OF SHIP'S PERSONNEL Sec. 2 Amount of bond. The amount of the bond must be governed by the amount of monies advanced or value of...

  19. Three methods to measure RH bond energies

    SciTech Connect

    Berkowitz, J.; Ellison, G.B.; Gutman, D.

    1993-03-21

    In this paper the authors compare and contrast three powerful methods for experimentally measuring bond energies in polyatomic molecules. The methods are: radical kinetics; gas phase acidity cycles; and photoionization mass spectroscopy. The knowledge of the values of bond energies are a basic piece of information to a chemist. Chemical reactions involve the making and breaking of chemical bonds. It has been shown that comparable bonds in polyatomic molecules, compared to the same bonds in radicals, can be significantly different. These bond energies can be measured in terms of bond dissociation energies.

  20. Halogen Bonding in Organic Synthesis and Organocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Bulfield, David; Huber, Stefan M

    2016-10-01

    Halogen bonding is a noncovalent interaction similar to hydrogen bonding, which is based on electrophilic halogen substituents. Hydrogen-bonding-based organocatalysis is a well-established strategy which has found numerous applications in recent years. In light of this, halogen bonding has recently been introduced as a key interaction for the design of activators or organocatalysts that is complementary to hydrogen bonding. This Concept features a discussion on the history and electronic origin of halogen bonding, summarizes all relevant examples of its application in organocatalysis, and provides an overview on the use of cationic or polyfluorinated halogen-bond donors in halide abstraction reactions or in the activation of neutral organic substrates.

  1. Two Comments on Bond Angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glaister, P.

    1997-09-01

    Tetrahedral Bond Angle from Elementary Trigonometry The alternative approach of using the scalar (or dot) product of vectors enables the determination of the bond angle in a tetrahedral molecule in a simple way. There is, of course, an even more straightforward derivation suitable for students who are unfamiliar with vectors, or products thereof, but who do know some elementary trigonometry. The starting point is the figure showing triangle OAB. The point O is the center of a cube, and A and B are at opposite corners of a face of that cube in which fits a regular tetrahedron. The required bond angle alpha = AÔB; and using Pythagoras' theorem, AB = 2(square root 2) is the diagonal of a face of the cube. Hence from right-angled triangle OEB, tan(alpha/2) = (square root 2) and therefore alpha = 2tan-1(square root 2) is approx. 109° 28' (see Fig. 1).

  2. Anion Transport with Chalcogen Bonds.

    PubMed

    Benz, Sebastian; Macchione, Mariano; Verolet, Quentin; Mareda, Jiri; Sakai, Naomi; Matile, Stefan

    2016-07-27

    In this report, we introduce synthetic anion transporters that operate with chalcogen bonds. Electron-deficient dithieno[3,2-b;2',3'-d]thiophenes (DTTs) are identified as ideal to bind anions in the focal point of the σ holes on the cofacial endocyclic sulfur atoms. Anion binding in solution and anion transport across lipid bilayers are found to increase with the depth of the σ holes of the DTT anionophores. These results introduce DTTs and related architectures as a privileged motif to engineer chalcogen bonds into functional systems, complementary in scope to classics such as 2,2'-bipyrroles or 2,2'-bipyridines that operate with hydrogen bonds and lone pairs, respectively. PMID:27433964

  3. Direct detection of N-H[...]O=C hydrogen bonds in biomolecules by NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cordier, Florence; Nisius, Lydia; Dingley, Andrew J; Grzesiek, Stephan

    2008-01-01

    A nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiment is described for the direct detection of N-H[...]O=C hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) in 15N and 13C isotope-labeled biomolecules. This quantitative 'long-range' HNCO-COSY (correlation spectroscopy) experiment detects and quantifies electron-mediated scalar couplings across the H-bond (H-bond scalar couplings), which connect the magnetically active (15)N and (13)C nuclei on both sides of the H-bond. Detectable H-bonds comprise the canonical backbone H-bonds in proteins as well as other H-bonds in proteins and nucleic acids with N-H donors and O=C (carbonylic or carboxylic) acceptors. Unlike other NMR observables, which provide only indirect evidence of the presence of H-bonds, the H-bond scalar couplings identify all partners of the H-bond, the donor, the donor proton and the acceptor, in a single experiment. The size of the scalar couplings can be related to H-bond geometries. The time required to detect the N-H[...]O=C H-bonds in small proteins (< or = approximately 10 kDa) is typically on the order of 1 d at millimolar concentrations, whereas H-bond detection for larger proteins (< or = approximately 30 kDa) may be possible within several days depending on concentration, isotope composition, magnetic field strength and molecular weight. The proteins ubiquitin (8.6 kDa), dimeric RANTES (2 x 8.5 kDa) and MAP30 (30 kDa) are used as examples to illustrate this procedure. PMID:18274525

  4. To Bond or Not to Bond? That Is the Question

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balzer, Wayne E.

    2015-01-01

    This case, inspired by a real school district scenario, was developed for use in a graduate-level course in school finance. James Spencer had just been selected as the new superintendent of a low-income, 400-student, rural school district in need of many capital improvements. The previous superintendent had refused to hold a bond election because…

  5. Anodic bonding using a hybrid electrode with a two-step bonding process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Luo; Jing, Xie; Yang, Zhang; Chaobo, Li; Yang, Xia

    2012-06-01

    A two-step bonding process using a novel hybrid electrode is presented. The effects of different electrodes on bonding time, bond strength and the bonded interface are analyzed. The anodic bonding is studied using a domestic bonding system, which carries out a detailed analysis of the integrity of the bonded interface and the bond strength measurement. With the aid of the hybrid electrode, a bubble-free anodic bonding process could be accomplished within 15-20 min, with a shear strength in excess of 10 MPa. These results show that the proposed method has a high degree of application value, including in most wafer-level MEMS packaging.

  6. What holds paper together: nanometre scale exploration of bonding between paper fibres.

    PubMed

    Schmied, Franz J; Teichert, Christian; Kappel, Lisbeth; Hirn, Ulrich; Bauer, Wolfgang; Schennach, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Paper, a man-made material that has been used for hundreds of years, is a network of natural cellulosic fibres. To a large extent, it is the strength of bonding between these individual fibres that controls the strength of paper. Using atomic force microscopy, we explore here the mechanical properties of individual fibre-fibre bonds on the nanometre scale. A single fibre-fibre bond is loaded with a calibrated cantilever statically and dynamically until the bond breaks. Besides the calculation of the total energy input, time dependent processes such as creep and relaxation are studied. Through the nanometre scale investigation of the formerly bonded area, we show that fibrils or fibril bundles play a crucial role in fibre-fibre bonding because they act as bridging elements. With this knowledge, new fabrication routes can be deduced to increase the strength of an ancient product that is in fact an overlooked high-tech material.

  7. What holds paper together: Nanometre scale exploration of bonding between paper fibres

    PubMed Central

    Schmied, Franz J.; Teichert, Christian; Kappel, Lisbeth; Hirn, Ulrich; Bauer, Wolfgang; Schennach, Robert

    2013-01-01

    Paper, a man-made material that has been used for hundreds of years, is a network of natural cellulosic fibres. To a large extent, it is the strength of bonding between these individual fibres that controls the strength of paper. Using atomic force microscopy, we explore here the mechanical properties of individual fibre-fibre bonds on the nanometre scale. A single fibre-fibre bond is loaded with a calibrated cantilever statically and dynamically until the bond breaks. Besides the calculation of the total energy input, time dependent processes such as creep and relaxation are studied. Through the nanometre scale investigation of the formerly bonded area, we show that fibrils or fibril bundles play a crucial role in fibre-fibre bonding because they act as bridging elements. With this knowledge, new fabrication routes can be deduced to increase the strength of an ancient product that is in fact an overlooked high-tech material. PMID:23969946

  8. Carbon–carbon bond activation of cyclobutenones enabled by the addition of chiral organocatalyst to ketone

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bao-Sheng; Wang, Yuhuang; Jin, Zhichao; Zheng, Pengcheng; Ganguly, Rakesh; Chi, Yonggui Robin

    2015-01-01

    The activation of carbon–carbon (C–C) bonds is an effective strategy in building functional molecules. The C–C bond activation is typically accomplished via metal catalysis, with which high levels of enantioselectivity are difficult to achieve due to high reactivity of metal catalysts and the metal-bound intermediates. It remains largely unexplored to use organocatalysis for C–C bond activation. Here we describe an organocatalytic activation of C–C bonds through the addition of an NHC to a ketone moiety that initiates a C–C single bond cleavage as a key step to generate an NHC-bound intermediate for chemo- and stereo-selective reactions. This reaction constitutes an asymmetric functionalization of cyclobutenones using organocatalysts via a C–C bond activation process. Structurally diverse and multicyclic compounds could be obtained with high optical purities via an atom and redox economic process. PMID:25652912

  9. A polar copper-boron one-electron σ-bond.

    PubMed

    Moret, Marc-Etienne; Zhang, Limei; Peters, Jonas C

    2013-03-13

    Virtually all chemical bonds consist of one or several pairs of electrons shared by two atoms. Examples of σ-bonds made of a single electron delocalized over two neighboring atoms were until recently found only in gas-phase cations such as H2(+) and Li2(+) and in highly unstable species generated in solid matrices. Only in the past decade was bona fide one-electron bonding observed for molecules in fluid solution. Here we report the isolation and structural characterization of a thermally stable compound featuring a Cu-B one-electron bond, as well as its oxidized (nonbonded) and reduced (two-electrons-bonded) congeners. This triad provides an excellent opportunity to study the degree of σ-bonding in a metalloboratrane as a function of electron count. PMID:23418750

  10. Intermetallic Compound Formation Mechanisms for Cu-Sn Solid-Liquid Interdiffusion Bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, H.; Wang, K.; Aasmundtveit, K. E.; Hoivik, N.

    2012-09-01

    Cu-Sn solid-liquid interdiffusion (SLID) bonding is an evolving technique for wafer-level packaging which features robust, fine pitch and high temperature tolerance. The mechanisms of Cu-Sn SLID bonding for wafer-level bonding and three-dimensional (3-D) packaging applications have been studied by analyzing the microstructure evolution of Cu-Sn intermetallic compounds (IMCs) at elevated temperature up to 400°C. The bonding time required to achieve a single IMC phase (Cu3Sn) in the final interconnects was estimated according to the parabolic growth law with consideration of defect-induced deviation. The effect of predominantly Cu metal grain size on the Cu-Sn interdiffusion rate is discussed. The temperature versus time profile (ramp rate) is critical to control the morphology of scallops in the IMC. A low temperature ramp rate before reaching the bonding temperature is believed to be favorable in a SLID wafer-level bonding process.

  11. Fluxless flip chip bonding processes and aerial fluxless bonding technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Dongwook

    New fluxless flip chip processes of Sn-rich non-eutectic Au-Sn solder bumps were developed using vacuum deposition and electroplating technique. It is believed that this is the first report that non-eutectic Au-Sn flip chip solder bonding is achieved without the use of flux. In order to make 200mum diameter and 10mum thick Au-Sn solder bump 0.03mum of Cr, 10mum of Sn and 0.3mum of Au were vacuum deposited on the Si wafer through the high carbon steal stencil mask. Nearly void-free solder bumps with small grains of AuSn4 intermetallic compound were achieved. The re-melting temperature of solder bumps was measured to be 220°C. In the second part, first, the fluxless bonding process was performed in hydrogen environment with electroplated 4 mm x 4mm Au-Sn multi-layer chips if electroplating technique is compatible with our process. High quality and nearly void free solder joint was successfully achieved with this new process. After proving compatibility of the process, tall electroplated Sn/Au bumps (50 mum) were produced by photolithography method using Su-8 photoresist. The bumps in the chip were flip chip bonded to the borosilicate glass wafer coated with Cr (0.03 mum) and Au (0.05 mum) pads without using any flux. Fluxless and lead-free bonding technology in air ambient based on non eutectic 5 at. % Au-95 at. % Sn and eutectic 57 at. %Sn-43 at. % Bi with Au capping layer have been developed and studied. To understand the fluxless bonding principles in air ambient, phase formation mechanism of Au-Sn intermetallics embedded in Bi matrix has been postulated. The Au-Sn intermetallic-capping layer covers most outer surface of the samples and inhibits formation of oxide layer due to the minimizing exposure of (beta-Sn) phase to the air. In conclusion, new-lead free and fluxless bonding processes for flip chip packages were developed. In this work, Sn-rich Au-Sn flip chip solder bumps using vacuum deposition and electroplating process were successfully produced. It is

  12. Dynamical Crossover in Hot Dense Water: The Hydrogen Bond Role.

    PubMed

    Ranieri, Umbertoluca; Giura, Paola; Gorelli, Federico A; Santoro, Mario; Klotz, Stefan; Gillet, Philippe; Paolasini, Luigi; Koza, Michael Marek; Bove, Livia E

    2016-09-01

    We investigate the terahertz dynamics of liquid H2O as a function of pressure along the 450 K isotherm, by coupled quasielastic neutron scattering and inelastic X-ray scattering experiments. The pressure dependence of the single-molecule dynamics is anomalous in terms of both microscopic translation and rotation. In particular, the Stokes-Einstein-Debye equations are shown to be violated in hot water compressed to the GPa regime. The dynamics of the hydrogen bond network is only weakly affected by the pressure variation. The time scale of the structural relaxation driving the collective dynamics increases by a mere factor of 2 along the investigated isotherm, and the structural relaxation strength turns out to be almost pressure independent. Our results point at the persistence of the hydrogen bond network in hot dense water up to ice VII crystallization, thus questioning the long-standing perception that hydrogen bonds are broken in liquid water under the effect of compression. PMID:27479235

  13. Alkali metal mediated C-C bond coupling reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tachikawa, Hiroto

    2015-02-01

    Metal catalyzed carbon-carbon (C-C) bond formation is one of the important reactions in pharmacy and in organic chemistry. In the present study, the electron and hole capture dynamics of a lithium-benzene sandwich complex, expressed by Li(Bz)2, have been investigated by means of direct ab-initio molecular dynamics method. Following the electron capture of Li(Bz)2, the structure of [Li(Bz)2]- was drastically changed: Bz-Bz parallel form was rapidly fluctuated as a function of time, and a new C-C single bond was formed in the C1-C1' position of Bz-Bz interaction system. In the hole capture, the intermolecular vibration between Bz-Bz rings was only enhanced. The mechanism of C-C bond formation in the electron capture was discussed on the basis of theoretical results.

  14. Alkali metal mediated C–C bond coupling reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Tachikawa, Hiroto

    2015-02-14

    Metal catalyzed carbon-carbon (C–C) bond formation is one of the important reactions in pharmacy and in organic chemistry. In the present study, the electron and hole capture dynamics of a lithium-benzene sandwich complex, expressed by Li(Bz){sub 2}, have been investigated by means of direct ab-initio molecular dynamics method. Following the electron capture of Li(Bz){sub 2}, the structure of [Li(Bz){sub 2}]{sup −} was drastically changed: Bz–Bz parallel form was rapidly fluctuated as a function of time, and a new C–C single bond was formed in the C{sub 1}–C{sub 1}′ position of Bz–Bz interaction system. In the hole capture, the intermolecular vibration between Bz–Bz rings was only enhanced. The mechanism of C–C bond formation in the electron capture was discussed on the basis of theoretical results.

  15. Flip-chip bonding of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers using laser-induced forward transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, K. S. Missinne, J.; Van Steenberge, G.

    2014-02-10

    This letter reports the use of the Laser-Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT) technique for the fabrication of indium micro-bumps for the flip-chip (FC) bonding of single vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser chips. The FC bonded chips were electrically and optically characterized, and the successful functioning of the devices post-bonding is demonstrated. The die shear and life-time tests carried out on the bonded chips confirmed the mechanical reliability of the LIFT-assisted FC bonded assemblies.

  16. Flip-chip bonding of vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers using laser-induced forward transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, K. S.; Missinne, J.; Van Steenberge, G.

    2014-02-01

    This letter reports the use of the Laser-Induced Forward Transfer (LIFT) technique for the fabrication of indium micro-bumps for the flip-chip (FC) bonding of single vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser chips. The FC bonded chips were electrically and optically characterized, and the successful functioning of the devices post-bonding is demonstrated. The die shear and life-time tests carried out on the bonded chips confirmed the mechanical reliability of the LIFT-assisted FC bonded assemblies.

  17. Vector-based model of elastic bonds for simulation of granular solids.

    PubMed

    Kuzkin, Vitaly A; Asonov, Igor E

    2012-11-01

    A model (further referred to as the V model) for the simulation of granular solids, such as rocks, ceramics, concrete, nanocomposites, and agglomerates, composed of bonded particles (rigid bodies), is proposed. It is assumed that the bonds, usually representing some additional gluelike material connecting particles, cause both forces and torques acting on the particles. Vectors rigidly connected with the particles are used to describe the deformation of a single bond. The expression for potential energy of the bond and corresponding expressions for forces and torques are derived. Formulas connecting parameters of the model with longitudinal, shear, bending, and torsional stiffnesses of the bond are obtained. It is shown that the model makes it possible to describe any values of the bond stiffnesses exactly; that is, the model is applicable for the bonds with arbitrary length/thickness ratio. Two different calibration procedures depending on bond length/thickness ratio are proposed. It is shown that parameters of the model can be chosen so that under small deformations the bond is equivalent to either a Bernoulli-Euler beam or a Timoshenko beam or short cylinder connecting particles. Simple analytical expressions, relating parameters of the V model with geometrical and mechanical characteristics of the bond, are derived. Two simple examples of computer simulation of thin granular structures using the V model are given. PMID:23214773

  18. Vector-based model of elastic bonds for simulation of granular solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzkin, Vitaly A.; Asonov, Igor E.

    2012-11-01

    A model (further referred to as the V model) for the simulation of granular solids, such as rocks, ceramics, concrete, nanocomposites, and agglomerates, composed of bonded particles (rigid bodies), is proposed. It is assumed that the bonds, usually representing some additional gluelike material connecting particles, cause both forces and torques acting on the particles. Vectors rigidly connected with the particles are used to describe the deformation of a single bond. The expression for potential energy of the bond and corresponding expressions for forces and torques are derived. Formulas connecting parameters of the model with longitudinal, shear, bending, and torsional stiffnesses of the bond are obtained. It is shown that the model makes it possible to describe any values of the bond stiffnesses exactly; that is, the model is applicable for the bonds with arbitrary length/thickness ratio. Two different calibration procedures depending on bond length/thickness ratio are proposed. It is shown that parameters of the model can be chosen so that under small deformations the bond is equivalent to either a Bernoulli-Euler beam or a Timoshenko beam or short cylinder connecting particles. Simple analytical expressions, relating parameters of the V model with geometrical and mechanical characteristics of the bond, are derived. Two simple examples of computer simulation of thin granular structures using the V model are given.

  19. Vector-based model of elastic bonds for simulation of granular solids.

    PubMed

    Kuzkin, Vitaly A; Asonov, Igor E

    2012-11-01

    A model (further referred to as the V model) for the simulation of granular solids, such as rocks, ceramics, concrete, nanocomposites, and agglomerates, composed of bonded particles (rigid bodies), is proposed. It is assumed that the bonds, usually representing some additional gluelike material connecting particles, cause both forces and torques acting on the particles. Vectors rigidly connected with the particles are used to describe the deformation of a single bond. The expression for potential energy of the bond and corresponding expressions for forces and torques are derived. Formulas connecting parameters of the model with longitudinal, shear, bending, and torsional stiffnesses of the bond are obtained. It is shown that the model makes it possible to describe any values of the bond stiffnesses exactly; that is, the model is applicable for the bonds with arbitrary length/thickness ratio. Two different calibration procedures depending on bond length/thickness ratio are proposed. It is shown that parameters of the model can be chosen so that under small deformations the bond is equivalent to either a Bernoulli-Euler beam or a Timoshenko beam or short cylinder connecting particles. Simple analytical expressions, relating parameters of the V model with geometrical and mechanical characteristics of the bond, are derived. Two simple examples of computer simulation of thin granular structures using the V model are given.

  20. Wafer bonded epitaxial templates for silicon heterostructures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atwater, Harry A., Jr. (Inventor); Zahler, James M. (Inventor); Morral, Anna Fontcubera I (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A heterostructure device layer is epitaxially grown on a virtual substrate, such as an InP/InGaAs/InP double heterostructure. A device substrate and a handle substrate form the virtual substrate. The device substrate is bonded to the handle substrate and is composed of a material suitable for fabrication of optoelectronic devices. The handle substrate is composed of a material suitable for providing mechanical support. The mechanical strength of the device and handle substrates is improved and the device substrate is thinned to leave a single-crystal film on the virtual substrate such as by exfoliation of a device film from the device substrate. An upper portion of the device film exfoliated from the device substrate is removed to provide a smoother and less defect prone surface for an optoelectronic device. A heterostructure is epitaxially grown on the smoothed surface in which an optoelectronic device may be fabricated.

  1. Wafer bonded epitaxial templates for silicon heterostructures

    DOEpatents

    Atwater, Jr., Harry A.; Zahler, James M.; Morral, Anna Fontcubera I

    2008-03-11

    A heterostructure device layer is epitaxially grown on a virtual substrate, such as an InP/InGaAs/InP double heterostructure. A device substrate and a handle substrate form the virtual substrate. The device substrate is bonded to the handle substrate and is composed of a material suitable for fabrication of optoelectronic devices. The handle substrate is composed of a material suitable for providing mechanical support. The mechanical strength of the device and handle substrates is improved and the device substrate is thinned to leave a single-crystal film on the virtual substrate such as by exfoliation of a device film from the device substrate. An upper portion of the device film exfoliated from the device substrate is removed to provide a smoother and less defect prone surface for an optoelectronic device. A heterostructure is epitaxially grown on the smoothed surface in which an optoelectronic device may be fabricated.

  2. Heat pipes made of roll bond panels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moeller, M.; Heil, K.

    1983-06-01

    The use of large surfaced aluminum roll bond panels with an integral flow system as heat pipes is studied. With a suitable flow system e.g., parallel passages with a cross-connection, one single filling procedure is required for the operating medium. Adequate materials for the manufacture of heat pipes are Al 99,3; AlMn1, 5 and AlMn1, 5Sil,5. Peel, creep and burst tests as well as corrosion tests were made on specimens and structural elements of these materials. Results show that the use of such panels for heat pipe manufacturing is appropriate for limited maximum temperature applications. Prototypes of heat pipes and their characteristic features are described in view of their use as absorbers in solar collectors. Good heat exchange performances obtained.

  3. Seniority Number in Valence Bond Theory.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhenhua; Zhou, Chen; Wu, Wei

    2015-09-01

    In this work, a hierarchy of valence bond (VB) methods based on the concept of seniority number, defined as the number of singly occupied orbitals in a determinant or an orbital configuration, is proposed and applied to the studies of the potential energy curves (PECs) of H8, N2, and C2 molecules. It is found that the seniority-based VB expansion converges more rapidly toward the full configuration interaction (FCI) or complete active space self-consistent field (CASSCF) limit and produces more accurate PECs with smaller nonparallelity errors than its molecular orbital (MO) theory-based analogue. Test results reveal that the nonorthogonal orbital-based VB theory provides a reverse but more efficient way to truncate the complete active Hilbert space by seniority numbers.

  4. Ligand "Brackets" for Ga-Ga Bond.

    PubMed

    Fedushkin, Igor L; Skatova, Alexandra A; Dodonov, Vladimir A; Yang, Xiao-Juan; Chudakova, Valentina A; Piskunov, Alexander V; Demeshko, Serhiy; Baranov, Evgeny V

    2016-09-01

    The reactivity of digallane (dpp-Bian)Ga-Ga(dpp-Bian) (1) (dpp-Bian = 1,2-bis[(2,6-diisopropylphenyl)imino]acenaphthene) toward acenaphthenequinone (AcQ), sulfur dioxide, and azobenzene was investigated. The reaction of 1 with AcQ in 1:1 molar ratio proceeds via two-electron reduction of AcQ to give (dpp-Bian)Ga(μ2-AcQ)Ga(dpp-Bian) (2), in which diolate [AcQ](2-) acts as "bracket" for the Ga-Ga bond. The interaction of 1 with AcQ in 1:2 molar ratio proceeds with an oxidation of the both dpp-Bian ligands as well as of the Ga-Ga bond to give (dpp-Bian)Ga(μ2-AcQ)2Ga(dpp-Bian) (3). At 330 K in toluene complex 2 decomposes to give compounds 3 and 1. The reaction of complex 2 with atmospheric oxygen results in oxidation of a Ga-Ga bond and affords (dpp-Bian)Ga(μ2-AcQ)(μ2-O)Ga(dpp-Bian) (4). The reaction of digallane 1 with SO2 produces, depending on the ratio (1:2 or 1:4), dithionites (dpp-Bian)Ga(μ2-O2S-SO2)Ga(dpp-Bian) (5) and (dpp-Bian)Ga(μ2-O2S-SO2)2Ga(dpp-Bian) (6). In compound 5 the Ga-Ga bond is preserved and supported by dithionite dianionic bracket. In compound 6 the gallium centers are bridged by two dithionite ligands. Both 5 and 6 consist of dpp-Bian radical anionic ligands. Four-electron reduction of azobenzene with 1 mol equiv of digallane 1 leads to complex (dpp-Bian)Ga(μ2-NPh)2Ga(dpp-Bian) (7). Paramagnetic compounds 2-7 were characterized by electron spin resonance spectroscopy, and their molecular structures were established by single-crystal X-ray analysis. Magnetic behavior of compounds 2, 5, and 6 was investigated by superconducting quantum interference device technique in the range of 2-295 K. PMID:27548713

  5. Transient liquid phase bonding of titanium-aluminum-niobium-chromium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Tao

    heat treatment is necessary to obtain an ideal strength. Some other joints with some different bonding parameters (compared to the regular conditions) are also conducted with some consideration for industrial application. Some other materials (single crystal NiAl-7Ti and poly-crystal Mo) have also been joined with TLP bonding technologies.

  6. 46 CFR Sec. 10 - Bonds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... November 1950) respectively, shall be used. Such bonds (in the respective penal sums of 50 percent of the... penal sum of 40 percent of such job order contract price) shall guarantee the Contractor's performance... contractors to the awarding offices (General Agents or local offices of NSA) to verify the correctness of...

  7. Mother-To-Infant 'Bonding'.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herbert, M.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Critically reviews the concept of "bonding," exploring its empirical basis and the implications that follow from its application in practice. Among the conclusions reached are that there is a tendency to oversimplify attachment phenomena and that the notion of a sensitive period for attachment has no direct empirical support. (RH)

  8. Electronegativity and the Bond Triangle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meek, Terry L.; Garner, Leah D.

    2005-01-01

    The usefulness of the bond triangle for categorizing compounds of the main-group elements may be extended by the use of weighted average electronegativities to allow distinction between compounds of the same elements with different stoichiometries. In such cases a higher valency for the central atom leads to greater covalent character and the…

  9. Bonding Elastomers To Metal Substrates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickerson, George E.; Kelley, Henry L.

    1990-01-01

    Improved, economical method for bonding elastomers to metals prevents failures caused by debonding. In new technique, vulcanization and curing occur simultaneously in specially designed mold that acts as form for desired shape of elastomer and as container that positions and supports metal parts. Increases interface adhesion between metal, adhesive, and elastomer.

  10. Enhanced rigid-bond restraints

    SciTech Connect

    Thorn, Andrea; Dittrich, Birger; Sheldrick, George M.

    2012-07-01

    An extension is proposed to the rigid-bond description of atomic thermal motion in crystals. The rigid-bond model [Hirshfeld (1976 ▶). Acta Cryst. A32, 239–244] states that the mean-square displacements of two atoms are equal in the direction of the bond joining them. This criterion is widely used for verification (as intended by Hirshfeld) and also as a restraint in structure refinement as suggested by Rollett [Crystallographic Computing (1970 ▶), edited by F. R. Ahmed et al., pp. 167–181. Copenhagen: Munksgaard]. By reformulating this condition, so that the relative motion of the two atoms is required to be perpendicular to the bond, the number of restraints that can be applied per anisotropic atom is increased from about one to about three. Application of this condition to 1,3-distances in addition to the 1,2-distances means that on average just over six restraints can be applied to the six anisotropic displacement parameters of each atom. This concept is tested against very high resolution data of a small peptide and employed as a restraint for protein refinement at more modest resolution (e.g. 1.7 Å)

  11. Bonded polyimide fuel cell package

    DOEpatents

    Morse, Jeffrey D.; Jankowski, Alan; Graff, Robert T.; Bettencourt, Kerry

    2010-06-08

    Described herein are processes for fabricating microfluidic fuel cell systems with embedded components in which micron-scale features are formed by bonding layers of DuPont Kapton.TM. polyimide laminate. A microfluidic fuel cell system fabricated using this process is also described.

  12. Non-bonded ultrasonic transducer

    DOEpatents

    Eoff, J.M.

    1984-07-06

    A mechanically assembled non-bonded ultrasonic transducer includes a substrate, a piezoelectric film, a wetting agent, a thin metal electrode, and a lens held in intimate contact by a mechanical clamp. No epoxy or glue is used in the assembly of this device.

  13. Substituent Effects on the [N–I–N]+ Halogen Bond

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    We have investigated the influence of electron density on the three-center [N–I–N]+ halogen bond. A series of [bis(pyridine)iodine]+ and [1,2-bis((pyridine-2-ylethynyl)benzene)iodine]+ BF4– complexes substituted with electron withdrawing and donating functionalities in the para-position of their pyridine nitrogen were synthesized and studied by spectroscopic and computational methods. The systematic change of electron density of the pyridine nitrogens upon alteration of the para-substituent (NO2, CF3, H, F, Me, OMe, NMe2) was confirmed by 15N NMR and by computation of the natural atomic population and the π electron population of the nitrogen atoms. Formation of the [N–I–N]+ halogen bond resulted in >100 ppm 15N NMR coordination shifts. Substituent effects on the 15N NMR chemical shift are governed by the π population rather than the total electron population at the nitrogens. Isotopic perturbation of equilibrium NMR studies along with computation on the DFT level indicate that all studied systems possess static, symmetric [N–I–N]+ halogen bonds, independent of their electron density. This was further confirmed by single crystal X-ray diffraction data of 4-substituted [bis(pyridine)iodine]+ complexes. An increased electron density of the halogen bond acceptor stabilizes the [N···I···N]+ bond, whereas electron deficiency reduces the stability of the complexes, as demonstrated by UV-kinetics and computation. In contrast, the N–I bond length is virtually unaffected by changes of the electron density. The understanding of electronic effects on the [N–X–N]+ halogen bond is expected to provide a useful handle for the modulation of the reactivity of [bis(pyridine)halogen]+-type synthetic reagents. PMID:27265247

  14. Atomic contributions to bond dissociation energies in aliphatic hydrocarbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matta, Chérif F.; Castillo, Norberto; Boyd, Russell J.

    2006-11-01

    This paper explores the atomic contributions to the electronic vibrationless bond dissociation enthalpy (BDE) at 0K of the central C-C bond in straight-chain alkanes (CnH2n+2) and trans-alkenes (CnH2n) with an even number of carbon atoms, where n =2, 4, 6, 8. This is achieved using the partitioning of the total molecular energy according to the quantum theory of atoms in molecules by comparing the atomic energies in the intact molecule and its dissociation products. The study is conducted at the MP2(full)/6-311++G(d,p) level of theory. It is found that the bulk of the electronic energy necessary to sever a single C-C bond is not supplied by these two carbon atoms (the α-carbons) but instead by the atoms directly bonded to them. Thus, the burden of the electronic part of the BDE is primarily carried by the two hydrogens attached to each of the α-carbons and by the β-carbons. The effect drops off rapidly with distance along the hydrocarbon chain. The situation is more complex in the case of the double bond in alkenes, since here the burden is shared between the α-carbons as well as the atoms directly bonded to them, namely, again the α-hydrogens and the β-carbons. These observations may lead to a better understanding of the bond dissociation process and should be taken into account when locally dense basis sets are introduced to improve the accuracy of BDE calculations.

  15. IMMEDIATE HUMAN PULP RESPONSE TO ETHANOL-WET BONDING TECHNIQUE

    PubMed Central

    Scheffel, Débora Lopes Salles; Sacono, Nancy Tomoko; Ribeiro, Ana Paula Dias; Soares, Diana Gabriela; Basso, Fernanda Gonçalves; Pashley, David Henry; Costa, Carlos Alberto de Souza; Hebling, Josimeri

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the short-term response of human pulps to ethanol-wet bonding technique associated with an etch-and-rinse adhesive system. Methods Deep class V cavities were prepared on the buccal surface of 17 sound premolars scheduled for extraction for orthodontics. The teeth were assigned into three groups: Ethanol-wet bonding (G1), water-wet bonding (G2) and calcium hydroxide (G3, control). Two teeth were used as intact control. After acid-etching, the cavities from G1 were filled with 100% ethanol for 60s and blot-dried before the application of Single Bond 2. In G2, the cavities were filled with distilled water for 60s previously to adhesive application and in G3, the cavity floor was lined with calcium hydroxide before etching and bonding. All cavities were restored with resin composite. The teeth were extracted 48h after the clinical procedures. From each tooth 6 μm-thick serial sections were obtained and stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H/E) and Masson's trichrome. Bacteria microleakage was assessed using Brown & Brenn. All sections were blindly evaluated and scored for five histological features. Results Mean remaining dentin thickness was 463±65μm (G1); 425±184μm (G2); and 348±194μm (G3). Similar pulp reactions followed ethanol- or water-wet bonding techniques. Slight inflammatory responses and disruption of the odontoblast layer related to the cavity floor were seen in all groups. Stained bacteria were not detected in any cavities. Normal pulp tissue was observed in G3 except for one case. Conclusions After 48 h, ethanol-wet bonding technique applied on deep cavities prepared in vital teeth does not increase pulpal damage compared to water-wet bonding technique. Clinical significance Ethanol-wet bonding has been considered an experimental technique that may increase resin-dentin bond durability. This study reported the in vivo response of human pulp tissue when 100% ethanol was applied previously to an etch-and-rinse simplified adhesive

  16. A Unique Bonding Technique for Immediate Orthognathic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ayinipully, Hariprasad; Paul, Rosaline Tina; Ponnambathayil, Shaji Aboobacker; Rasheed, Althaf Thanimoottil

    2015-01-01

    Introduction A challenge in orthodontics is achieving ideal bracket position which determines treatment results and finishing. A new bonding method is done indirectly on the cast and bonded directly on the teeth, but it does not require conventional trays to carry the brackets to the teeth. Materials and Methods Heavy sized archwires like 0.019″x0.025″ or 0.018″ SS are bent to the malocclusion to generate a template which comprises of an Bracket -Archwire Assembly (BAA). This assembly is transferred onto the teeth using the molar bands with tubes which serves as a jig for proper orientation of the BAA, then the adhesive is cured at one shot to complete the bonding procedure. Results Two surgical cases successfully bonded with this technique is presented in this article. Conclusion This bonding method finds specific advantages in surgical orthodontics – when the surgeon decides on a surgery-first treatment objective, management of single or a couple of periodontally extruded teeth, management of impacted teeth and in patients needing fixed functional appliance immediately before the completion of growth spurt. PMID:26266212

  17. Isolation of dangling bond states on Si(100) surfaces for quantum information applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherpelz, Peter; Galli, Giulia

    Hydrogen resist lithography allows dangling bonds to be created and manipulated on Si(100) surfaces, both for use as a controlled quantum system, and as a step in the deterministic placement of dopants at the single-atom level. However, previous experiments and computations have shown conflicting results on the location of dangling bond energy levels, which can impact their utility as qubits. Here we use large-scale density functional theory and many-body perturbation theory (GW) calculations to show that in clean, H-passivated Si(100)-(2x1) surfaces a singly-occupied dangling bond does not give rise to an electronic state isolated from the valence bands. However, very thin (1-3 nm) samples terminated by a (100) surface should provide isolated singly-occupied and doubly-occupied dangling bond states. We also explore the effect of strain, and consider novel uses of boron dopants

  18. Method for fusion bonding thermoplastic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Benatar, A.; Gutowski, T.G.

    1986-10-01

    Bonding of thermoplastic composites is a critical step in the manufacture of aerospace structures. The objective of this project is to investigate different methods for fusion bonding thermoplastic composites quickly, with a good bond strength, and without warping and deconsolidation. This is best accomplished by heating and melting the thermoplastic on the bond surface only, and then pressing the parts together for a fusion bond. For this purpose, a variety of surface heating techniques were examined for bonding of PEEK and J Polymer composites. These included: resistance heating, infrared heating, induction heating, dielectric/microwave heating, and ultrasonic welding. 20 references, 10 figures, 1 table.

  19. Chemical Bonding Technology: Direct Investigation of Interfacial Bonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koenig, J. L.; Boerio, F. J.; Plueddemann, E. P.; Miller, J.; Willis, P. B.; Cuddihy, E. F.

    1986-01-01

    This is the third Flat-Plate Solar Array (FSA) Project document reporting on chemical bonding technology for terrestrial photovoltaic (PV) modules. The impetus for this work originated in the late 1970s when PV modules employing silicone encapsulation materials were undergoing delamination during outdoor exposure. At that time, manufacturers were not employing adhesion promoters and, hence, module interfaces in common with the silicone materials were only in physical contact and therefore easily prone to separation if, for example, water were to penetrate to the interfaces. Delamination with silicone materials virtually vanished when adhesion promoters, recommended by silicone manufacturers, were used. The activities related to the direct investigation of chemically bonded interfaces are described.

  20. Creating, Varying, and Growing Single-Site Molecular Contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siaj, Mohamed; McBreen, Peter H.

    2005-07-01

    The known range of chemisorption bonds forms the toolbox for the design of electrical contacts in molecular electronics devices. Double-bond contacts to technologically relevant materials would be attractive for a number of reasons. They are truly single-site, bonding to a single surface atom. They obviate the need for a thiol linkage, and they may be amenable to further modification through olefin-metathesis methodologies. We report olefin-metathesis methods for establishing, varying, and growing thermally stable double-bond contacts to molybdenum carbide, a conducting material.