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Sample records for adrenal androgen secretion

  1. Control of adrenal androgen production.

    PubMed

    Odell, W D; Parker, L N

    The major adrenal androgens are dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS) and androstenedione (delta 4). Studies by Cutler et al in 1978 demonstrated that these androgens are detectable in blood of all domestic and laboratory animals studied, but that only 4 species show increase in one or more with sexual maturation: rabbit, dog, chimpanzee and man. Studies by Grover and Odell in 1975 show these androgens do not bind to the androgen receptor obtained from rat prostate and thus probably are androgens only by conversion to an active androgen in vivo. Thomas and Oake in 1974 showed human skin converted DHEA to testosterone. The control of adrenal androgen secretion is in part modulated by ACTH. However, other factors or hormones must exist also, for a variety of clinical observations show dissociation in adrenal androgen versus cortisol secretion. Other substances that have been said to be controllers of adrenal androgen secretion include estrogens, prolactin, growth hormone, gonadotropins and lipotropin. None of these appear to be the usual physiological modulator, although under some circumstances each may increase androgen production. Studies from our laboratory using in vivo experiments in the castrate dog and published in 1979 indicated that crude extracts of bovine pituitary contained a substance that either modified ACTH stimulation of adrenal androgen secretion, or stimulated secretion itself - Cortisol Androgen Stimulating Hormone. Parker et al in 1983 showed a 60,000 MW glycoprotein was extractable from human pituitaries, which stimulated DHA secretion by dispersed canine adrenal cells in vitro, but did not stimulate cortisol secretion. This material contained no ACTH by radioimmunoassay. In 1982 Brubaker et al reported a substance was also present in human fetal pituitaries, which stimulated DHA secretion, but did not effect cortisol. PMID:6100259

  2. Interleukin-6 inhibits adrenal androgen release from bovine adrenal zona reticularis cells by inhibiting the expression of steroidogenic proteins.

    PubMed

    McIlmoil, S; Call, G B; Barney, M; Strickland, J; Judd, A M

    2015-10-01

    Interleukin-6 (IL-6) is secreted by adrenocortical cells and modifies cortisol secretion. In this study, the effects of IL-6 on adrenal androgen release were investigated. The zona reticularis (ZR) was generally isolated from bovine adrenal glands by dissection. In select experiments, the intact adrenal cortex (ie, all 3 adrenocortical zones) was dissected from the adrenal glands. For androgen release experiments, ZR and intact adrenocortical cubes were dispersed into isolated cells, the cells cultured and exposed to IL-6 and/or adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), and androgen release determined by radioimmunoassay. Basal and ACTH-stimulated androgen release from the ZR was inhibited by IL-6 in a concentration-dependent (10-1000 pg/mL) and time-dependent (4-24 h) manner (P < 0.01 by 1-way analysis of variance and the Bonferroni test). In contrast, IL-6 increased basal and ACTH-stimulated androgen release from mixed adrenocortical cells (P < 0.01). The mechanism of IL-6 inhibition of androgen release was investigated by exposing ZR strips to IL-6 and measuring the expression of the messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein of steroidogenic factors. Basal and ACTH-stimulated expression of the mRNA and protein for steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, cholesterol side chain cleavage enzyme, 3-β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2, steroid 17-α-hydroxylase/17,20 lyase/17,20 desmolase, and the nuclear factor steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1), that stimulates steroidogenesis, were decreased by IL-6 (P < 0.01). In contrast IL-6 increased the mRNA and protein for dosage-sensitive sex reversal, adrenal hypoplasia critical region, on chromosome X, gene 1 (DAX-1), a nuclear factor that inhibits steroidogenesis (P < 0.01). In summary, IL-6 decreased androgen release and the expression of steroidogenic factors in the ZR, and this decrease may be mediated in part through increasing DAX-1 and decreasing SF-1. PMID:26218834

  3. Steroidogenic enzyme profile in an androgen-secreting adrenocortical oncocytoma associated with hirsustism

    PubMed Central

    Tetsi Nomigni, Milène; Ouzounian, Sophie; Benoit, Alice; Vadrot, Jacqueline; Tissier, Frédérique; Renouf, Sylvie; Lefebvre, Hervé; Christin-Maitre, Sophie; Louiset, Estelle

    2015-01-01

    Hirsutism induced by hyperandrogenism can be associated with polycystic ovary syndrome, 21-hydroxylase (OH) deficiency or androgen-secreting tumors, including ovarian and adrenal tumors. Adrenal androgen-secreting tumors are frequently malignant. Adrenal oncocytomas represent rare causes of hyperandrogenism. The aim of the study was to investigate steroidogenic enzyme expression and steroid secretion in an androgen-secreting adrenal oncocytoma in a young woman presenting with hirsutism. Hyperandrogenism was diagnosed on the basis of elevated plasma Δ4-androstenedione and testosterone levels. Pelvic ultrasound was normal, CT scanning revealed a right adrenal mass. Androgens were assessed in adrenal and ovarian vein samples and proved a right adrenal origin. Adrenalectomy normalized androgen levels and the adrenal tumor was diagnosed as an oncocytoma. Real time-PCR, immunohistochemistry and cell culture studies were performed on tumor explants to investigate the steroid secretion profile. Among enzymes required for cortisol synthesis, 17α-OH and 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase 2 (3β-HSD2) were highly expressed whereas 21-OH and 11β-OH were weakly produced at the mRNA and/or protein levels. Enzymes involved in testosterone production, 17β-HSD5 and 17β-HSD3, were also detected. ACTH receptor was present in the tissue. Cortisol, Δ4-androstenedione and testosterone secretions by cultured cells were increased by ACTH. These results provide the first demonstration, to our knowledge, of abnormal expression profile of steroidogenic enzymes in an adrenocortical oncocytoma. Our results also indicate that Δ4-androstenedione hypersecretion resulted from high 17α-OH and 3β-HSD2 expression in combination with low expression of 21-OH and 11β-OH. Testosterone production was ascribed to occurrence of 17β-HSD5 and 17β-HSD3. Finally, our results indicate that androgen secretion was stimulated by ACTH. PMID:26034121

  4. Noncholinergic control of adrenal catecholamine secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Livett, B G; Marley, P D

    1993-01-01

    It has been known for over 70 years that adrenal catecholamine secretion can be modulated or elicited by noncholinergic neurotransmitters and hormones. However, our understanding of the cellular mechanisms by which these agents produce their effects and the physiological conditions under which they act are not well characterised. Here we briefly review the mechanisms by which one such agent (the neuropeptide substance P) modulates the cholinergic secretory response of adrenal chromaffin cells, and another agent (angiotensin II) elicits catecholamine secretion independently of the cholinergic innervation. PMID:7507911

  5. The agonistic adrenal: melatonin elicits female aggression via regulation of adrenal androgens.

    PubMed

    Rendon, Nikki M; Rudolph, Lauren M; Sengelaub, Dale R; Demas, Gregory E

    2015-11-22

    Classic findings have demonstrated an important role for sex steroids as regulators of aggression, but this relationship is lacking within some environmental contexts. In mammals and birds, the adrenal androgen dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), a non-gonadal precursor of biologically active steroids, has been linked to aggression. Although females, like males, use aggression when competing for limited resources, the mechanisms underlying female aggression remain understudied. Here, we propose a previously undescribed endocrine mechanism regulating female aggression via direct action of the pineal hormone melatonin on adrenal androgens. We examined this in a solitary hamster species, Phodopus sungorus, in which both sexes are highly territorial across the seasons, and display increased aggression concomitant with decreased serum levels of sex steroids in short 'winter-like' days. Short- but not long-day females had increased adrenal DHEA responsiveness co-occurring with morphological changes in the adrenal gland. Further, serum DHEA and total adrenal DHEA content were elevated in short days. Lastly, melatonin increased DHEA and aggression and stimulated DHEA release from cultured adrenals. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that DHEA is a key peripheral regulator of aggression and that melatonin coordinates a 'seasonal switch' from gonadal to adrenal regulation of aggression by direct action on the adrenal glands.

  6. Adrenal adenoma and normal androgen levels in a young woman with polycystic ovaries: a case of idiopathic hirsutism?

    PubMed

    Orio, F; Palomba, S; Cascella, T; Tauchmanovà, L; Di Biase, S; Labella, D; Russo, T; Pellicano, M; Savastano, S; Zullo, F; Lombardi, G; Colao, A

    2004-01-01

    A case of unusual combination of polycystic ovaries (PCO), adrenal non-functioning adenoma and severe hirsutism in a young woman from Southern Italy is reported here. A 18-yr-old woman was referred to our Department because of oligomenhorrea, acne and severe hirsutism. During evaluation of the cause of her symptoms, PCO and small left adrenal adenoma were revealed. Although adrenal androgen excess has been shown to dysregulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis, causing PCO-like syndrome, normal circulating androgen values were found. Androgens and cortisol levels were completely suppressed by low-dose dexamethasone test, excluding autonomous steroid secretion by the adrenal mass. Normal response of cortisol and adrenal androgens to corticotropin stimulation test permitted the exclusion of functional adrenal hyperandrogenism. Despite normal LH/FSH ratio, anovulatory cycles were revealed by persistently low progesterone values. Glucose and insulin response to oral glucose tolerance test did not differ from those of normal population. The patient showed an improvement of acne and hirsutism on therapy with estro-progestins (EP). In conclusion, despite normal pattern of serum androgens and LH/FSH ratio, this patient had anovulatory cycles and good response to the EP treatment. These findings suggest that ultrasonography evidence of PCO together with anovulatory cycles contributed to her clinical picture whereas adrenal adenoma seemed to have no relevant role. This case report underlines the need of cautious interpretation of imaging results and clinical signs of severe hirsutism, reminding one that the true cause of a medical problem may not be the most evident.

  7. Luteinizing hormone (LH)-releasing hormone agonist reduces serum adrenal androgen levels in prostate cancer patients: implications for the effect of LH on the adrenal glands.

    PubMed

    Nishii, Masahiro; Nomura, Masashi; Sekine, Yoshitaka; Koike, Hidekazu; Matsui, Hiroshi; Shibata, Yasuhiro; Ito, Kazuto; Oyama, Tetsunari; Suzuki, Kazuhiro

    2012-01-01

    Recently, adrenal androgens have been targeted as key hormones for the development of castration-resistant prostate cancer therapeutics. Although circulating adrenal androgens originate mainly from the adrenal glands, the testes also supply about 10%. Although widely used in androgen deprivation medical castration therapy, the effect of luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LH-RH) agonist on adrenal androgens has not been fully studied. In this study, changes in testicular and adrenal androgen levels were measured and compared to adrenocorticotropic hormone levels. To assess the possible role of LH in the adrenal glands, immunohistochemical studies of the LH receptor in normal adrenal glands were performed. Forty-seven patients with localized or locally progressive prostate cancer were treated with LH-RH agonist with radiotherapy. Six months after initiation of treatment, testosterone, dihydrotestosterone, and estradiol levels were decreased by 90%-95%, and dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate, dehydroepiandrosterone, and androstenedione levels were significantly decreased by 26%-40%. The suppressive effect of LH-RH agonist at 12 months was maintained. Adrenocorticotropic hormone levels showed an increasing trend at 6 months and a significant increase at 12 months. LH receptors were positively stained in the cortex cells of the reticular layer of the adrenal glands. The long-term LH-RH agonist treatment reduced adrenal-originated adrenal androgens. LH receptors in the adrenal cortex cells of the reticular layer might account for the underlying mechanism of reduced adrenal androgens.

  8. Combined Adrenal and Ovarian Venous Sampling to Localize an Androgen Producing Tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwal, Monica D.; Trerotola, Scott O.

    2010-12-15

    A postmenopausal woman presented with hirsutism and elevated serum testosterone levels. A 1-cm adrenal adenoma was noted on computed tomography. Combined adrenal and ovarian venous sampling was performed to localize an androgen producing tumor to the left ovary. The patient underwent a bilateral salpingo-oophrectomy and was spared an unnecessary adrenalectomy.

  9. Activation of two mutant androgen receptors from human prostatic carcinoma by adrenal androgens and metabolic derivatives of testosterone.

    PubMed

    Culig, Z; Stober, J; Gast, A; Peterziel, H; Hobisch, A; Radmayr, C; Hittmair, A; Bartsch, G; Cato, A C; Klocker, H

    1996-01-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) plays a central regulatory role in prostatic carcinoma and is a target of androgen ablation therapy. Recent detection of mutant receptors in tumor specimens suggest a contribution of AR alterations to progression towards androgen independence. In a specimen derived from metastatic prostate cancer we have reported a point mutation in the AR gene that leads to a single amino acid exchange in the ligand binding domain of the receptor. Another amino acid exchange resulting from a point mutation was also identified 15 amino acids away from our mutation. This mutation was detected in the AR gene isolated from an organ-confined prostatic tumor. Here we report the functional characterization of the two mutant receptors in the presence of adrenal androgens and testosterone metabolites. These studies were performed by cotransfecting androgen-responsive reporter genes and either the wild-type or mutant AR expression vectors into receptor negative DU-145 and CV-1 cells. The indicator genes used consisted of the promoter of the androgen-inducible prostate-specific antigen gene or the C' Delta9 enhancer fragment from the promoter of the mouse sex-limited protein driving the expression of the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyl transferase gene. Cotransfection-transactivation assays revealed that the adrenal androgen androstenedione and two products of testosterone metabolism, androsterone and androstandiol, induced reporter gene activity more efficiently in the presence of the mutant receptors than in the presence of the wild-type receptor. No difference between wild-type and mutant receptors was observed in the presence of the metabolite androstandione. The interaction of receptor-hormone complexes with target DNA was studied in vitro by electrophoretic mobility shift assays (EMSA). Dihydrotestosterone and the synthetic androgen mibolerone induced a faster migrating complex with all receptors, whereas the androgen metabolite androstandione induced this

  10. Investigation of patients with atypical or severe hyperandrogenaemia including androgen-secreting ovarian teratoma.

    PubMed

    Dennedy, Michael Conall; Smith, Diarmuid; O'Shea, Donal; McKenna, T Joseph

    2010-02-01

    Approximately 7% of women of reproductive age manifest polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and <0.5% have other causes of hyperandrogenism including congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), androgen-secreting tumour of an ovary or an adrenal gland, Cushing's syndrome or hyperthecosis. The presence of features atypical of PCOS should prompt more extensive evaluation than that usually undertaken. Features atypical of PCOS include the onset of symptoms outside the decade of 15-25 years, rapid progression of symptoms, the development of virilization and a serum testosterone concentration in excess of twice the upper limit of the reference range. Ethnic background, family history and specific clinical findings, e.g. Cushingoid appearance, may inform a focused investigation. Otherwise, patients should have measurement of 17-hydroxyprogesterone (17-OHP) under basal conditions ideally in the early morning, and if abnormal, they should have measurement of 17-OHP one hour after the administration of synthetic ACTH, 250 microg i.v., to screen for CAH, which is present in approximately 2% of hyperandrogenic patients. The overnight cortisol suppression test employing 1 mg dexamethasone at midnight is a sensitive test for Cushing's syndrome. Coronal tomographic (CT) scanning of the adrenals and transvaginal ultrasonography of the ovaries are the investigations of choice when screening for tumours in these organs. Less frequently required is catheterization and sampling from both adrenal and ovarian veins, which is a technically demanding procedure with potential complications which may provide definitive diagnostic information not available from other investigations. Illustrative case reports highlight some complexities in the investigation of hyperandrogenic patients presenting with features atypical of PCOS and include only the ninth case report of an androgen-secreting ovarian teratoma.

  11. Testosterone-secreting adrenal adenoma in a peripubertal girl

    SciTech Connect

    Kamilaris, T.C.; DeBold, C.R.; Manolas, K.J.; Hoursanidis, A.; Panageas, S.; Yiannatos, J.

    1987-11-13

    A 15-year-old girl who presented with primary amenorrhea and virilization had an adrenocortical adenoma that secreted predominantly testosterone. To the authors' knowledge, she is the first peripubertal and second youngest patient with a testosterone-secreting adrenal tumor described. Serum dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate and urinary 17-ketosteroid an 17-hydroxycorticosteroid levels were normal. A tumor was located by a computed tomographic (CT) scan and by uptake of 6-..beta..-(/sup 75/Se) selenomethylnorcholesterol. Microscopic examination of the tumor showed typical features of an adrenocortical adenoma with no histologic features characteristic of Leydig cells. Postoperatively, her hirsutism regressed, she rapidly went through puberty, and regular monthly menstruation started four months later. Finding the source of testosterone in a virilized patient can be difficult. Eleven of the 14 previously described patients with testosterone-secreting adrenal tumors initially underwent misdirected surgery on the ovaries. Review of these cases revealed that results of hormone stimulation and suppression tests are unreliable and that these tumors are usually large. Therefore, CT scanning of the adrenal glands is recommended in all patients suspected of having a testosterone-secreting tumor.

  12. Nonreutilizaton of adrenal chromaffin granule membranes following secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Nobiletti, J.B.

    1985-01-01

    The intracellular postexocytotic fate of the adrenal chromaffin granule membrane (reutilization vs. nonreutilization) was addressed through two experimental approaches. First, (/sup 3/H) leucine pulse-chase labeling experiments were conducted in two systems - the isolated retrograde perfused cat adrenal gland and cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells to compare chromaffin granule soluble dopamine-B-hydroxylase (DBH) turnover (marker for granule soluble content turnover) to that of membrane-bound DBH (marker for granule membrane turnover). Experiments in cat adrenal glands showed that at all chase periods the granule distribution of radiolabeled DBH was in agreement with the DBH activity distribution (73% membrane-bound/27% soluble) - a result consistent with parallel turnover of soluble and membrane-bound DBH. Experiments in cultured bovine cells showed that labeled soluble and membrane-bound DBH had parallel turnover patterns and at all chase period, the distribution of radiolabeled DBH between the soluble contents and membranes was similar to the DBH activity distribution (50% soluble/50% membrane-bound). The above experiments showed that the soluble contents and membranes turnover in parallel and are consistent with nonreutilization of chromaffin granule membranes following exocytosis. Isolated retrograde perfused bovine adrenal glands were subjected to repetitive acetylcholine stimulation to induce exocytosis and then the dense and less-dense chromaffin granule fractions were isolated. Since both approaches gave results consistent with membrane nonreutilization, the authors conclude that once a chromaffin granule is involved in exocytosis, its membrane is not reutilized for the further synthesis, storage, and secretion of catecholamines.

  13. Adrenal androgen abnormalities in women with late onset and persistent acne.

    PubMed

    Aizawa, H; Niimura, M

    1993-01-01

    Androgens are an essential prerequisite for the development of acne. The present study was undertaken to characterize the androgen status of women with late onset and persistent acne only and, using the dexamethasone (dex) suppression test, to identify the source(s) of the androgen excess. We measured serum levels of total testosterone (T), free testosterone (FT), androstenedione (delta 4A), dihydrotestosterone (DHT), dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEA-S) and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) in 34 healthy control subjects, in 34 women with mild acne and in 29 women with moderate or severe acne. Serum FT, DHT and DHEA-S levels in patients of both acne groups were significantly higher than those in the control subjects. The other hormone levels showed no significant differences between patients and control subjects, and there were no significant differences between the two acne groups in any of the androgen levels. In order to evaluate the ovarian and adrenal contributions to serum androgens in the acne patients, the serum levels of delta 4A, T, DHT and DHEA-S were measured prior to and following 2 weeks of dex therapy. Following the dex test, the DHT and T of adrenal origin were significantly higher in the acne patients than in the control subjects. These results suggest that, in acne patients, hyperandrogenaemia is likely to develop as a result of adrenal androgen excess. In addition, since abnormally high androgen levels are frequently seen in late onset and persist acne, it seems that this condition is likely to be a sign of hyperandrogenism. PMID:8466282

  14. Adrenal androgens and androgen precursors: definition, synthesis, regulation and physiologic actions

    PubMed Central

    Turcu, Adina; Smith, Joshua M.; Auchus, Richard; Rainey, William E.

    2015-01-01

    The human adrenal produces more 19 carbon (C19) steroids, by mass, than either glucocorticoids or mineralocorticoids. However, the mechanisms regulating adrenal C19 steroid biosynthesis continue to represent one of the most intriguing mysteries of endocrine physiology. This review will discuss the C19 steroids produced in the human adrenal and the features within the adrenal that allow production of these steroids. Finally, we consider the effects of these steroids in normal physiology and disorders of adrenal C19 steroid excess. PMID:25428847

  15. Adrenal androgen excess in the polycystic ovary syndrome: sensitivity and responsivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis.

    PubMed

    Azziz, R; Black, V; Hines, G A; Fox, L M; Boots, L R

    1998-07-01

    Over 50% of patients with the polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) demonstrate excess levels of adrenal androgens (AAs), particularly dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHS). Nonetheless, the mechanism for the AA excess remains unclear. It has been noted that in PCOS the pituitary and ovarian responses to their respective trophic factors (i.e. GnRH and LH, respectively) are exaggerated. Similarly, we have postulated that excess AAs in PCOS arises from dysfunction of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, due to 1) exaggerated pituitary secretion of ACTH in response to hypothalamic CRH, 2) excess sensitivity/responsivity of AAs to ACTH stimulation, or 3) both. To test this hypothesis we studied 12 PCOS patients with AA excess (HI-DHS; DHS, > 8.1 mumol/L or 3000 ng/mL), 12 PCOS patients without AA excess (LO-DHS; DHS, < 7.5 mumol/L or 2750 ng/mL), and 11 controls (normal subjects). Each subject underwent an acute 90-min ovine CRH stimulation test (1 microgram/kg) and an 8-h incremental i.v. stimulation with ACTH-(1-24) at doses ranging from 20-2880 ng/1.5 m2.h) with a final bolus of 0.25 mg. All patient groups had similar mean body mass indexes and ages, and both tests were performed in the morning during the follicular phase (days 3-10) of the same menstrual cycle, separated by 48-96 h. During the acute ovine CRH stimulation test, no significant differences in the net maximal response (i.e. change from baseline to peak level) for ACTH, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHA), androstenedione (A4), or cortisol (F) or for the DHA/ACTH, A4/ACTH, or F/ACTH ratios was observed. Nonetheless, the net response of DHA/F and the areas under the curve (AUCs) for DHA and DHA/F indicated a greater response for HI-DHS vs. LO-DHS or normal subjects. The AUC for A4 and A4/F and the delta A4/delta F ratio (delta = net maximum change) indicated that HI-DHS and LO-DHS had similar responses, which were greater than that of the normal subjects, although the difference between LO-DHS patients and normal

  16. Adrenal Androgen Production in Catarrhine Primates and the Evolution of Adrenarche

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, Robin M.; Sterner, Kirstin N.; Wildman, Derek E.

    2015-01-01

    Adrenarche is a developmental event involving differentiation of the adrenal gland and production of adrenal androgens, and has been hypothesized to play a role in the extension of the preadolescent phase of human ontogeny. It remains unclear whether any nonhuman primate species shows a similar suite of endocrine, biochemical, and morphological changes as are encompassed by human adrenarche. Here, we report serum concentrations of the adrenal androgens dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) measured in 698 cross-sectional and mixed longitudinal serum samples from catarrhine primates ranging from 0.6 to 47 years of age. DHEAS in Pan is most similar to that of humans in both age-related pattern and absolute levels, and a transient early increase appears to be present in Gorilla. DHEA levels are highest in Cercocebus, Cercopithecus, and Macaca. We also tested for evidence of adaptive evolution in six genes that code for proteins involved in DHEA/S synthesis. Our genetic analyses demonstrate the protein-coding regions of these genes are highly conserved among sampled primates. We describe a tandem gene duplication event probably mediated by a retro-transposon that resulted in two 3-β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase/Delta 5-Delta 4 genes (HSD3B1 and HSD3B2) with tissue specific functions in catarrhines. In humans, HSD3B2 is expressed primarily in the adrenals, ovary, and testis, while HSD3B1 is expressed in the placenta. Taken together, our findings suggest that while adrenarche has been suggested to be unique to hominoids, the evolutionary roots for this developmental stage are more ancient. PMID:22271526

  17. Adrenal-derived 11-Oxygenated 19-Carbon Steroids are the Dominant Androgens in Classic 21-Hydroxylase Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Turcu, Adina F.; Nanba, Aya T.; Chomic, Robert; Upadhyay, Sunil K.; Giordano, Thomas J.; Shields, James J.; Merke, Deborah P.; Rainey, William E.; Auchus, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To comprehensively characterize androgens and androgen precursors in classic 21-hydroxylase deficiency (21OHD) and to gain insight to the mechanisms of their formation. Design Serum samples were obtained from 38 patients (19 men) with classic 21OHD, age 3-59, and 38 sex- and age-matched controls; 3 patients with 11β-hydroxylase deficiency; 4 patients with adrenal insufficiency; and 16 patients (8 men) undergoing adrenal vein sampling. Paraffin-embedded normal (n=5) and 21OHD adrenal tissue (n=3) was used for immunohistochemical studies. Methods We measured 11 steroids in all sera using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Immunofluroescence localized 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (HSD3B2) and cytochrome b5 (CYB5A) within the normal and 21OHD adrenals. Results Four 11-oxygenated 19-carbon (11oxC19) steroids were significantly higher in male and female 21OHD patients than in controls: 11β-hydroxyandrostenedione, 11-ketoandrostenedione 11β-hydroxytestosterone, and 11-ketotestosterone (3-4-fold, p< 0.0001). For 21OHD patients, testosterone and 11-ketotestosterone were positively correlated in females, but inversely correlated in males. All 11oxC19 steroids were higher in adrenal vein than in inferior vena cava samples from men and women and rose with cosyntropin stimulation. Only trace amounts of 11oxC19 steroids were found in sera from patients with 11β-hydroxylase deficiency and adrenal insufficiency, confirming their adrenal origin. HSD3B2 and CYB5A immunoreactivities were sharply segregated in the normal adrenal glands, whereas areas of overlapping expression were identified in the 21OHD adrenals. Conclusions All four 11oxC19 steroids are elevated in both men and women with classic 21OHD. Our data suggest that 11oxC19 steroids are specific biomarkers of adrenal-derived androgen excess. PMID:26865584

  18. Organizational role for pubertal androgens on adult hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal sensitivity to testosterone in the male rat.

    PubMed

    Evuarherhe, O; Leggett, J D; Waite, E J; Kershaw, Y M; Atkinson, H C; Lightman, S L

    2009-06-15

    The inhibitory effect of androgens on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in basal and stress conditions in adult male rats is well documented. Major sex-related neuroendocrine changes take place during puberty. There is a robust rise in production and secretion of gonadal steroids, which is thought to underlie numerous neural and behavioural changes brought on after puberty. The present study investigated the effect of the pubertal rise in gonadal steroid levels on the subsequent adult corticosterone profile, particularly the sensitivity of the adult HPA axis to testosterone. Animals were castrated either prepubertally (28 days) or in adulthood (11 weeks) and adult animals were subsequently treated with subcutaneous implants containing either testosterone or cholesterol. Using an automated blood sampling system, blood was collected from each freely moving, conscious rat every 10 min (i) over a 24 h period; (ii) in response to 10 min of noise stress, and (iii) following an immunological challenge with lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Analysis revealed that testosterone treatment did not significantly affect overall corticosterone release over the 24 h period in adult animals castrated before puberty in contrast to animals castrated in adulthood in which testosterone significantly suppressed corticosterone secretion. Following either a noise stress or LPS injection, testosterone treatment did not affect the hypothalamic or adrenal stress response in animals castrated prepubertally. Testosterone significantly suppressed the corticotrophin-releasing hormone and arginine vasopressin mRNA as well as the corticosterone response to LPS in castrated animals that had had their testes intact over puberty. These data provide evidence that puberty is a critical organizational period during which rising levels of gonadal steroids programme the sensitivity of the adult HPA axis to gonadal steroids in adulthood.

  19. Development of adrenal cortical zonation and expression of key elements of adrenal androgen production in the chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) from birth to adulthood.

    PubMed

    Parker, C R; Grizzle, W E; Blevins, J K; Hawkes, K

    2014-04-25

    The basis for the pattern of adrenal androgen production in the chimpanzee, which resembles that of humans, is poorly defined. We characterized the developmental zonation and expression of elements of the androgen biosynthetic pathway in the chimpanzee adrenal. The newborn adrenal contained a broad fetal zone (FZ) expressing CYP17, SULT2A1, and Cytochrome B5 (CB5) but not HSD3B; the outer cortex expressed HSD3B but not SULT2A1 or CB5. During infancy, the FZ involuted and the HSD3B-expressing outer cortex broadened. By 3years of age, a thin layer of cells that expressed CB5, SULT2A1, and CYP17 adjoined the medulla and likely represented the zona reticularis; the outer cortex consisted of distinct zonae fasiculata and glomerulosa. Thereafter, the zona reticularis broadened as also occurs in the human. The adult chimpanzee adrenal displayed other human-like characteristics: intramedullary clusters of reticularis-like cells and also a cortical cuff of zona fasiculata-like cells adjoining the central vein.

  20. Early androgen exposure modulates spatial cognition in congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH)

    PubMed Central

    Mueller, S.C.; Temple, V.; Oh, E.; VanRyzin, C.; Williams, A.; Cornwell, B.; Grillon, C.; Pine, D.S.; Ernst, M.; Merke, DP

    2008-01-01

    Major questions remain about the exact role of hormones in cognition. Furthermore, the extent to which early perturbation in steroid function affects human brain development continues to be a wide open area of research. Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia (CAH), a genetic disorder of steroid dysfunction characterized in part by in utero over-production of testosterone, was used as a natural model for addressing this question. Here, CAH (n=54, mean age = 17.53, 31 female) patients were compared to healthy age- and sex-matched individuals (n=55, mean age = 19.02, 22 female) on a virtual equivalent of the Morris Water Maze task (Morris, 1984), an established measure of sex differences in spatial cognition in rodents. Findings revealed that females with CAH with the most severe form of the disease and expected highest level of in utero exposure to androgens were found to perform similarly to both healthy males and CAH males, whereas strong sex differences were apparent in milder forms of the disorder and in controls. Moreover, advanced bone age, an indicator of long-term childhood exposure to testosterone was correlated with improved performance. The results indicate that individuals exposed to both excess androgens prenatally and prolonged exposure during childhood may manifest long-lasting changes in cognitive function. Such finding suggests a pivotal role of hormonal function on brain development in humans, mirroring results from the animal literature. PMID:18675711

  1. Novel structures in secreting the androgenic gland hormone.

    PubMed

    Negishi, S; Hasegawa, Y; Nakajima, Y

    2001-12-01

    The secretory granules in the androgenic gland of the terrestrial isopod Armadillidium vulgare, which have been indistinct for long time because of vulnerable structures, were revealed by using the rapid-freezing and freeze-substitution method. The fine structure of the androgenic gland is conspicuous by the distribution of numerous particular organelles in the cytoplasm consisting of the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi complex, and by having a number of highly organized structures developed between the androgenic gland cells. The structures connect to the intercellular space, which is seen as intercellular canaliculi for exporting the androgenic gland hormone. The plasma membranes near the particular structure of the intercellular canaliculi in the androgenic gland are often specialized to form cellular junctions. The secretory granules including the electron-dense materials, which are supposed to be peptides of androgenic gland hormone, are distributed beside the particular structure of the intercellular canaliculi. Some of the granules are seen to fuse with the plasma membranes. This observation suggests that, in the Armadillidium vulgare, the secretory granules containing androgenic gland hormone are transferred to the extracellular space through the intercellular canaliculi particularly developed for exporting the peptide hormone. This is the first evidence to show the secretory mechanism of the androgenic gland hormone in the Isopoda. PMID:11911080

  2. Concentrations of the adrenocorticotropic hormone, corticosterone and sex steroid hormones and the expression of the androgen receptor in the pituitary and adrenal glands of male turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) during growth and development.

    PubMed

    Kiezun, J; Kaminska, B; Jankowski, J; Dusza, L

    2015-01-01

    Androgens take part in the regulation of puberty and promote growth and development. They play their biological role by binding to a specific androgen receptor (AR). The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of AR mRNA and protein in the pituitary and adrenal glands, to localize AR protein in luteinizing hormone (LH)-producing pituitary and adrenocortical cells, to determine plasma concentrations of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone and the concentrations of corticosterone, testosterone (T), androstenedione (A4) and oestradiol (E2) in the adrenal glands of male turkeys at the age of 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24 and 28weeks. The concentrations of hormones and the expression of AR varied during development. The expression of AR mRNA and protein in pituitary increased during the growth. The increase of AR mRNA levels in pituitary occurred earlier than increase of AR protein. The percentage of pituitary cells expressing ARs in the population of LH-secreting cells increased in week 20. It suggests that AR expression in LH-producing pituitary cells is determined by the phase of development. The drop in adrenal AR mRNA and protein expression was accompanied by an increase in the concentrations of adrenal androgens. Those results could point to the presence of a compensatory mechanism that enables turkeys to avoid the potentially detrimental effects of high androgen concentrations. Our results will expand our knowledge of the role of steroids in the development of the reproductive system of turkeys from the first month of age until maturity.

  3. Concentrations of the adrenocorticotropic hormone, corticosterone and sex steroid hormones and the expression of the androgen receptor in the pituitary and adrenal glands of male turkeys (Meleagris gallopavo) during growth and development.

    PubMed

    Kiezun, J; Kaminska, B; Jankowski, J; Dusza, L

    2015-01-01

    Androgens take part in the regulation of puberty and promote growth and development. They play their biological role by binding to a specific androgen receptor (AR). The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of AR mRNA and protein in the pituitary and adrenal glands, to localize AR protein in luteinizing hormone (LH)-producing pituitary and adrenocortical cells, to determine plasma concentrations of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone and the concentrations of corticosterone, testosterone (T), androstenedione (A4) and oestradiol (E2) in the adrenal glands of male turkeys at the age of 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24 and 28weeks. The concentrations of hormones and the expression of AR varied during development. The expression of AR mRNA and protein in pituitary increased during the growth. The increase of AR mRNA levels in pituitary occurred earlier than increase of AR protein. The percentage of pituitary cells expressing ARs in the population of LH-secreting cells increased in week 20. It suggests that AR expression in LH-producing pituitary cells is determined by the phase of development. The drop in adrenal AR mRNA and protein expression was accompanied by an increase in the concentrations of adrenal androgens. Those results could point to the presence of a compensatory mechanism that enables turkeys to avoid the potentially detrimental effects of high androgen concentrations. Our results will expand our knowledge of the role of steroids in the development of the reproductive system of turkeys from the first month of age until maturity. PMID:25776460

  4. Identification of pro-opiomelanocortin and secretion of its peptide fragments in bovine adrenals

    SciTech Connect

    Tennov, A.V.; Dmitriev, A.D.; Kizim, E.A.; Ustinova, E.E.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the results of an investigation to show that biosynthesis of POMC, its proteolytic processing, an secretion of the peptide products of that processing take place in the bovine adrenals. Rabbit antisera against endorphins were obtained and used for radioimmunoassay of peptides. I 125-labeled peptides were obtained by the chloramine method and purified from free I 125 on Sephadex G-10 (0.7 x 5 cm, centrifugation for 10 min at 1500 g). To detect secretion of peptide fragments of POMC in the adrenals experiments were undertaken to determine the beta-endorphin content in perfusates obtained during retrograde perfusion of the bovine adrenals. It was found that immunoreactive compounds, indistinguishable in their immunochemical properties from beta-endorphin, are present in the perfusates, just as in the tissue extracts.

  5. [Adrenalitis].

    PubMed

    Saeger, W

    2016-05-01

    Inflammation of the adrenal glands is caused by autoimmunopathies or infections and can induce adrenal insufficiency. Autoimmune lymphocytic adrenalitis is often combined with other autoimmune diseases and the most frequent cause of Addison's disease; however, it only becomes clinically apparent when more than 90 % of the adrenal cortex has been destroyed. Histological features are characterized by lymphoplasmacytic inflammation leading to an increased destruction of adrenocortical tissue but less severe courses can also occur. The second most frequent form of adrenalitis is adrenal tuberculosis, showing typical granulomatous findings that are nearly always caused by spreading from a tuberculous pulmonary focus. Other bacterial as well as viral infections, such as Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), cytomegalovirus (CMV) and others, generally affect the adrenal glands only in patients with immunodeficiency disorders. In these infections, the adrenal cortex and medulla are frequently involved to roughly the same extent. Although surgical specimens from inflammatory adrenal lesions are extremely rare, the various forms of adrenalitis play an important role in the post-mortem examination of the adrenal glands for clarification of unclear causes of death (e.g. death during an Addisonian crisis). PMID:27099224

  6. Linking Prenatal Androgens to Gender-Related Attitudes, Identity, and Activities: Evidence From Girls With Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Endendijk, Joyce J; Beltz, Adriene M; McHale, Susan M; Bryk, Kristina; Berenbaum, Sheri A

    2016-10-01

    Key questions for developmentalists concern the origins of gender attitudes and their implications for behavior. We examined whether prenatal androgen exposure was related to gender attitudes, and whether and how the links between attitudes and gendered activity interest and participation were mediated by gender identity and moderated by hormones. Gender attitudes (i.e., gender-role attitudes and attitudes about being a girl), gender identity, and gender-typed activities were reported by 54 girls aged 10-13 years varying in degree of prenatal androgen exposure, including 40 girls with classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia (C-CAH) exposed to high prenatal androgens and 14 girls with non-classical (NC) CAH exposed to low, female-typical, prenatal androgens. Both girls with C-CAH and NC-CAH reported positive attitudes about being a girl and egalitarian gender attitudes, consistent with their female-typical gender identity. In contrast, girls with C-CAH had more male-typed activity interest and participation than girls with NC-CAH. Gender attitudes were linked to activities in both groups, with gender identity mediating the links. Specifically, gender-role attitudes and positive attitudes about being a girl were associated with feminine gender identity, which in turn was associated with decreased male-typed activity interests and participation, and increased female-typed activity interests. Our results are consistent with schema theories, with attitudes more closely associated with gender identity than with prenatal androgens. PMID:26940967

  7. Linking Prenatal Androgens to Gender-Related Attitudes, Identity, and Activities: Evidence From Girls With Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Endendijk, Joyce J; Beltz, Adriene M; McHale, Susan M; Bryk, Kristina; Berenbaum, Sheri A

    2016-10-01

    Key questions for developmentalists concern the origins of gender attitudes and their implications for behavior. We examined whether prenatal androgen exposure was related to gender attitudes, and whether and how the links between attitudes and gendered activity interest and participation were mediated by gender identity and moderated by hormones. Gender attitudes (i.e., gender-role attitudes and attitudes about being a girl), gender identity, and gender-typed activities were reported by 54 girls aged 10-13 years varying in degree of prenatal androgen exposure, including 40 girls with classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia (C-CAH) exposed to high prenatal androgens and 14 girls with non-classical (NC) CAH exposed to low, female-typical, prenatal androgens. Both girls with C-CAH and NC-CAH reported positive attitudes about being a girl and egalitarian gender attitudes, consistent with their female-typical gender identity. In contrast, girls with C-CAH had more male-typed activity interest and participation than girls with NC-CAH. Gender attitudes were linked to activities in both groups, with gender identity mediating the links. Specifically, gender-role attitudes and positive attitudes about being a girl were associated with feminine gender identity, which in turn was associated with decreased male-typed activity interests and participation, and increased female-typed activity interests. Our results are consistent with schema theories, with attitudes more closely associated with gender identity than with prenatal androgens.

  8. Decreased catecholamine secretion from the adrenal medullae of chronically diabetic BB-Wistar rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilke, R. A.; Riley, D. A.; Lelkes, P. I.; Hillard, C. J.

    1993-01-01

    Many humans with IDDM eventually lose the capacity to secrete epinephrine from their adrenal medullae. The mechanism for this pathological change is unknown. We hypothesized that this abnormality is attributable to neuropathic changes in the greater splanchnic nerves or in the chromaffin cells that they innervate. To study this hypothesis, we isolated rat adrenal glands, perfused them ex vivo, and measured the epinephrine content of the perfusate under various conditions of stimulation. We used transmural electrical stimulation (20-80 V, at 10 Hz) to induce epinephrine secretion indirectly by selectively activating residual splanchnic nerve terminals within the isolated glands. Under these conditions, epinephrine secretion was severely attenuated in glands from female BB-Wistar rats with diabetes of 4 mo duration compared with their age-matched, nondiabetic controls. These perfused diabetic adrenal medullae also demonstrated decreased catecholamine release in response to direct chromaffin cell depolarization with 20 mM K+, evidence that a functional alteration exists within the chromaffin cells themselves. Nonetheless, total catecholamine content of adrenal medullae from these diabetic rats was not significantly different from controls, indicating that the secretory defect was not simply attributable to a difference in the amount of catecholamines stored and available for release. Herein, we also provide histological evidence of degenerative changes within the cholinergic nerve terminals that innervate these glands.

  9. CT and MR imaging of the adrenal glands in cortisol-secreting tumors.

    PubMed

    Lumachi, Franco; Marchesi, Paolo; Miotto, Diego; Motta, Raffaella

    2011-09-01

    Cushing's syndrome (CS), first described by the neurosurgeon Harvey Cushing in the 1930s, is the result of chronic glucocorticoid excess. In patients with adreno-corticotropic hormone (ACTH)-dependent CS, bilateral hyperplasia of the adrenal cortex occurs, while in those with ACTH-independent primary CS, either adrenocortical tumors or primary adrenal hyperplasia can be observed. Cortisol-secreting adrenocortical tumors are more frequently adenomas, while adrenal carcinoma accounts for only 5% of cases. Unfortunately, no reliable endocrinological tests are available and no specific tumor markers exist to differentiate between benign and malignant adrenal tumors, so both computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging studies are currently required to localize and define adrenal lesions. Additional information to conventional imaging can be obtained using ¹⁸F-fluoro-2-deoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/CT, while percutaneous image-guided fine-needle aspiration cytology (FNAC) in some cases has shown a high accuracy in detecting malignancy and in confirming adrenal metastases. New PET tracers with selective affinity for the adrenal tissue are still under evaluation. Multidetector CT scan, with the combination of unenhanced and dynamic scans, represents the single most accurate modality for the detection and the characterization of adrenal adenomas. In these lesions, chemical-shift MR imaging produces a typical loss of signal intensity on out-of-phase breath-hold gradient-echo images in lipid-rich adenomas. For these lesions there is no difference between CT and MR imaging, while MR chemical shift imaging is very helpful in identifying the additional small group of adenomas where intracellular lipid content is minimal. PMID:21868539

  10. The effects of vasoactive intestinal peptide on adrenal steroid hormone secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, L.A.

    1988-01-01

    Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-immunoreactive nerve fibers have been demonstrated in the rat adrenal cortex in close association with zona glomerulosa cells. We have studied the effects of VIP on steroid hormone secretion from the outer zones of the normal rat adrenal cortex. Intact capsule-glomerulosa preparations, consisting of the capsule, zona glomerulosa, and a small portion of the zona fasciculata were perifused in vitro. The secretory responsiveness was assessed by measuring aldosterone and corticosterone release following stimulation with the physiological secretagogues ACTH and angiotensin II. The distribution of adrenal VIP receptors was assessed by in vitro autoradiography of {sup 125}I-VIP binding. {sup 125}I-VIP (0.75 and 2.0 nM) binding was concentrated in the capsule and zone glomerulosa, coincident with the distribution of VIP nerve fibers which aborize extensively in this region. The specificity of this binding was demonstrated using unlabelled VIP, ACTH and angiotensin II.

  11. Aldosterone secretion, measurements of membrane potential and intracellular potassium activity in the isolated adrenal zone glomerulosa.

    PubMed

    Wiederholt, M; Hampel, J; Belkien, L; Oelkers, W

    1984-09-01

    Cell membrane potential and intracellular potassium activity (microelectrodes filled with ion-sensitive liquid ion exchanger) were measured in the zona glomerulosa of superfused hemi-adrenals of rats kept on different diets. Simultaneously, samples of the superfusate were collected and analyzed by radioimmunoassay for aldosterone content. Cell membrane potential and intracellular potassium activity were not influenced by high sodium, low sodium or high potassium diet. However, aldosterone secretion significantly changed. These results suggest that membrane potential and intracellular potassium activity per se may not be linked to changes in aldosterone secretion.

  12. Secretion of Catecholamines from Adrenal Gland by a Single Electrical Shock: Electrotonic Depolarization of Medullary Cell Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakade, Arun R.; Wakade, Taruna D.

    1982-05-01

    Transmural stimulation of the isolated adrenal gland of the rat and guinea pig results in secretion of catecholamines. The secretion is due to activation of cholinergic receptors of the adrenal medulla by acetylcholine released from splanchnic nerve terminals after transmural stimulation. Our aim was to see whether the same experimental technique could be used to directly excite the adrenal medullary cell membrane by electrical stimulation and whether such stimulation would result in secretion of catecholamines. We demonstrate here that a single electrical shock to the perfused adrenal gland of the rat results in massive secretion of epinephrine and norepinephrine. The secretion is directly related to the strength and duration of the applied stimulus over a wide range. Catecholamine secretion is unaffected by tetrodotoxin or hexamethonium/atropine but is abolished by Ca2+ lack or 3 mM Mn2+. We suggest that the adrenal medullary membrane undergoes nonpropagated electrotonic depolarization on electrical stimulation and thereby voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels are opened to initiate secretion.

  13. Adrenal insufficiency in a child following unilateral excision of a dual-hormone secreting phaeochromocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Sjoeholm, Annika; Li, Cassandra; Leem, Chaey; Lee, Aiden; Stack, Maria P; Hofman, Paul L

    2015-01-01

    Summary Phaeochromocytomas are a rare clinical entity, with dual hormone-secreting lesions particularly uncommon, seen in <1%. ACTH is the most common hormone co-produced, and is potentially lethal if not diagnosed. We present the case of a previously well 10-year-old boy, who presented acutely with a hypertensive crisis and was found to have a unilateral, non-syndromic phaeochromocytoma. Medical stabilization of his hypertension was challenging, and took 3 weeks to achieve, before proceeding to unilateral adrenalectomy. Post-operatively the child experienced severe fatigue and was subsequently confirmed to have adrenal insufficiency. He improved markedly with hydrocortisone replacement therapy, which is ongoing 6 months post-operatively. In retrospect this likely represents unrecognized, sub-clinical ACTH-dependent Cushing's syndrome secondary to an ACTH/or precursor dual-hormone secreting phaeochromocytoma. At follow-up, his hypertension had resolved, there was no biochemical evidence of recurrence of the phaeochromocytoma, and genetic analysis was indicative of a sporadic lesion. Learning points Dual hormone secreting phaeochromocytomas with ACTH/or a precursor may cause secondary adrenal insufficiency following surgical removal.The concurrent features of Cushing's syndrome can be mild and easily overlooked presenting diagnostic and management pitfalls.As concomitant syndromes of hormone excess are rare in phaeochromocytomas; the diagnosis requires a high index of suspicion.Serial/diurnal cortisol levels, ACTH measurement +/− low dose dexamethasone suppression (when clinically stable, appropriate adrenergic blockade in place, and well supervised), can all be considered as needed. PMID:26113981

  14. Trifluoperazine inhibits 45Ca2+ uptake and catecholamine secretion and synthesis in adrenal medullary cells.

    PubMed

    Wada, A; Yanagihara, N; Izumi, F; Sakurai, S; Kobayashi, H

    1983-02-01

    In isolated adrenal medullary cells, carbamylcholine and high K+ cause the calcium-dependent secretion of catecholamines with a simultaneous increase in the synthesis of 14C-catecholamines from [14C]tyrosine. In these cells, trifluoperazine, a selective antagonist of calmodulin, inhibited both the secretion and synthesis of catecholamines. The stimulatory effect of carbamylcholine was inhibited to a greater extent than that of high K+. The inhibitory effect of trifluoperazine on carbamylcholine-evoked secretion of catecholamines was not overcome by an increase in either carbamylcholine or calcium concentration, showing that inhibition by trifluoperazine occurs by a mechanism distinct from competitive antagonism at the cholinergic receptor and from direct inactivation of calcium channels. Doses of trifluoperazine that inhibited catecholamine secretion and synthesis also inhibited the uptake of radioactive calcium by the cells. These results suggest that trifluoperazine inhibits the secretion and synthesis of catecholamines mainly due to its inhibition of calcium uptake. Trifluoperazine seems to inhibit calcium uptake by uncoupling the linkage between calcium uptake by uncoupling the linkage between cholinergic receptor stimulation and calcium channel activation.

  15. Evaluation of the glucocorticoid, mineralocorticoid, and adrenal androgen secretion dynamics in a large cohort of patients aged 6-18 years with transfusion-dependent β-thalassemia major, with an emphasis on the impact of cardiac iron load.

    PubMed

    Uçar, Ahmet; Öner, Nergiz; Özek, Gülcihan; Çetinçakmak, Mehmet Güli; Abuhandan, Mahmut; Yıldırım, Ali; Kaya, Cemil; Ünverdi, Sena; Emeksiz, Hamdi Cihan; Yılmaz, Yasin; Yetim, Aylin

    2016-07-01

    The variable presence of adrenal insufficiency (AI) due to hypocortisolemia (HC) in patients with thalassemia is well established; however, the prevalence of adrenocortical hypofunction (ACH) in the zona glomerulosa and zona reticularis of the adrenal cortex is unknown. To establish the prevalence of ACH, we examined the cortisol response to 1-µg and 250-µg ACTH tests, plasma aldosterone (A)/plasma renin activity (PRA) ratio, and serum dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) levels in a large cohort of patients with thalassemia, and to investigate the impact of total body iron load (TBIL) on adrenocortical function. The setting used was University hospital and government-based tertiary care center. One hundred twenty-one (52 females) patients with β-thalassemia major (β-TM) and 72 healthy peers (38 females) were enrolled. The patients underwent a 250-µg cosyntropin test if their peak cortisol was <500 nmol/L in a 1-µg cosyntropin test. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed to assess the MRI-based liver iron content and cardiac MRI T2* iron. The associations between ACH and TBIL were investigated. The patients with thalassemia had lower ACTH, cortisol, DHEAS, and A/PRA values compared with the controls (p < 0.001). Thirty-nine patients (32.2 %) had HC [primary (n = 1), central (n = 36), combined (n = 2)], and 47 (38.8 %) patients had reduced DHEAS levels; 29 (24.0 %) patients had reduced A/PRA ratios. Forty-six (38.0 %) patients had hypofunction in one of the adrenal zones, 26 (21.5 %) had hypofunction in two adrenal zones, and 9 (7.4 %) had hypofunction in all three zones. Patient age and TBIL surrogates were significant independent parameters associated with ACH. Cardiac MRI T2* iron was the only significant parameter that predicted the severity of ACH at a cut-off of 20.6 ms, with 81 % sensitivity and 78 % specificity. Patients with thalassemia have a high prevalence of AI due to HC and zona glomerulosa and zona reticularis

  16. Evaluation of the glucocorticoid, mineralocorticoid, and adrenal androgen secretion dynamics in a large cohort of patients aged 6-18 years with transfusion-dependent β-thalassemia major, with an emphasis on the impact of cardiac iron load.

    PubMed

    Uçar, Ahmet; Öner, Nergiz; Özek, Gülcihan; Çetinçakmak, Mehmet Güli; Abuhandan, Mahmut; Yıldırım, Ali; Kaya, Cemil; Ünverdi, Sena; Emeksiz, Hamdi Cihan; Yılmaz, Yasin; Yetim, Aylin

    2016-07-01

    The variable presence of adrenal insufficiency (AI) due to hypocortisolemia (HC) in patients with thalassemia is well established; however, the prevalence of adrenocortical hypofunction (ACH) in the zona glomerulosa and zona reticularis of the adrenal cortex is unknown. To establish the prevalence of ACH, we examined the cortisol response to 1-µg and 250-µg ACTH tests, plasma aldosterone (A)/plasma renin activity (PRA) ratio, and serum dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) levels in a large cohort of patients with thalassemia, and to investigate the impact of total body iron load (TBIL) on adrenocortical function. The setting used was University hospital and government-based tertiary care center. One hundred twenty-one (52 females) patients with β-thalassemia major (β-TM) and 72 healthy peers (38 females) were enrolled. The patients underwent a 250-µg cosyntropin test if their peak cortisol was <500 nmol/L in a 1-µg cosyntropin test. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed to assess the MRI-based liver iron content and cardiac MRI T2* iron. The associations between ACH and TBIL were investigated. The patients with thalassemia had lower ACTH, cortisol, DHEAS, and A/PRA values compared with the controls (p < 0.001). Thirty-nine patients (32.2 %) had HC [primary (n = 1), central (n = 36), combined (n = 2)], and 47 (38.8 %) patients had reduced DHEAS levels; 29 (24.0 %) patients had reduced A/PRA ratios. Forty-six (38.0 %) patients had hypofunction in one of the adrenal zones, 26 (21.5 %) had hypofunction in two adrenal zones, and 9 (7.4 %) had hypofunction in all three zones. Patient age and TBIL surrogates were significant independent parameters associated with ACH. Cardiac MRI T2* iron was the only significant parameter that predicted the severity of ACH at a cut-off of 20.6 ms, with 81 % sensitivity and 78 % specificity. Patients with thalassemia have a high prevalence of AI due to HC and zona glomerulosa and zona reticularis

  17. Androgens.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Rakesh; Handelsman, David J

    2016-01-01

    Androgen abuse is the most potent and prevalent form of sports doping detected. It originated from the early years of the Cold War as an epidemic confined to drug cheating within elite power sports. In the decades following the end of the Cold War, it has become disseminated into an endemic based within the illicit drug subcultures serving recreational abusers seeking cosmetic body sculpting effects. Within sports, both direct androgen abuse (administration of androgens), as well as indirect androgen abuse (administration of nonandrogenic drugs to increase endogenous testosterone), is mostly readily detectable with mass spectrometry-based anti-doping urine tests. The ongoing temptation of fame and fortune and the effectiveness of androgen abuse in power sports continue to entice cheating via renewed approaches aiming to exploit androgens. These require ongoing vigilance, inventiveness in anti-doping science, and targeting coaches as well as athletes in order to build resilience against doping and maintain fairness in elite sport. The challenge of androgen abuse in the community among recreational abusers has barely been recognized and effective approaches remain to be developed. PMID:27347677

  18. Infertility and Reproductive Function in Patients with Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia: Pathophysiology, Advances in Management, and Recent Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Lekarev, Oksana; Lin-Su, Karen; Vogiatzi, Maria G

    2015-12-01

    Individuals with congenital adrenal hyperplasia have reduced fertility. However, reproductive outcomes have improved over the years. This review provides an update on the multiple pathologic processes that contribute to reduced fertility in both sexes, from alterations of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis to the direct effect on gonadal function by elevated circulating adrenal androgens. In addition, elevated serum progesterone concentrations may hinder ovulation and embryo implantation in women, whereas in men testicular adrenal rest tumors can be a major cause of infertility. Suppression of adrenal androgen secretion represents the first line of therapy toward spontaneous conception in both sexes.

  19. Perturbations of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis and adrenal androgen (AA) functions in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Masi, A T; Da Silva, J A; Cutolo, M

    1996-05-01

    The available evidence reviewed does not allow definitive response to the question of a primary versus secondary role of sex hormone perturbations in RA. However, this conclusion should not be discouraging in view of the relatively recent focus upon this facet of the physiopathogenesis of RA and the enormous complexities of sex hormone biology and this disease. Specifically, data on the incidence of RA as well as life cycle changes in serum androgenic-anabolic (A-A) and sex hormone levels suggest important risk correlations. Furthermore, HLA-susceptibility markers for RA, gender, menopause and older age are all factors which significantly relate to the risk of developing RA and each has been shown to associate with sex hormone status. Whether or not HPG-AA hormonal status may modulate RA risk (or its course) primarily and independently or merely be predictive markers of other biological mechanisms was critically considered and requires further study. Sex hormone influences on cellular and humoral immunological reactivity and vascular pathogenetic mechanisms in RA were summarized. Androgens generally suppress immunoreactivity and cartilage responses to inflammation-mediated injury processes and may enhance synovial macrophage-like lining cell apoptosis. Oestrogens generally enhance immunoreactivity, offer some protection to inflammation-mediated cartilage damage (but less than androgens) and may inhibit apoptosis in certain in vitro cell models. Scant information is available on the balance of sex hormones (and glucocorticoids) in RA or its presumed pathogenetic mechanisms. Data were reviewed which support the concept of a spectrum of androgenicity in the normal population, particularly among women. A simplified schema of trophic and tropic steroidogenic mechanisms was proposed which could influence androgenic-anabolic (A-A) status and might relate to RA. Serum concentrations of DHAS (mumol/l), T (nmol/l) and O2 (pmol/l) span several orders of magnitude in normal

  20. Hormonal doping and androgenization of athletes: a secret program of the German Democratic Republic government.

    PubMed

    Franke, W W; Berendonk, B

    1997-07-01

    Several classified documents saved after the collapse of the German Democratic Republic (GDR) in 1990 describe the promotion by the government of the use of drugs, notably androgenic steroids, in high-performance sports (doping). Top-secret doctoral theses, scientific reports, progress reports of grants, proceedings from symposia of experts, and reports of physicians and scientists who served as unofficial collaborators for the Ministry for State Security ("Stasi") reveal that from 1966 on, hundreds of physicians and scientists, including top-ranking professors, performed doping research and administered prescription drugs as well as unapproved experimental drug preparations. Several thousand athletes were treated with androgens every year, including minors of each sex. Special emphasis was placed on administering androgens to women and adolescent girls because this practice proved to be particularly effective for sports performance. Damaging side effects were recorded, some of which required surgical or medical intervention. In addition, several prominent scientists and sports physicians of the GDR contributed to the development of methods of drug administration that would evade detection by international doping controls.

  1. Adrenal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Li-Ng, Melissa; Kennedy, Laurence

    2012-10-01

    Adrenocortical insufficiency may arise through primary failure of the adrenal glands or due to lack of ACTH stimulation as a result of pituitary or hypothalamic dysfunction. Prolonged administration of exogenous steroids will suppress the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, and hence cortisol secretion. We review briefly the causes, investigation, and treatment of adrenal insufficiency, and highlight aspects of particular relevance to patients with adrenal tumors.

  2. Androgens alter corticotropin releasing hormone and arginine vasopressin mRNA within forebrain sites known to regulate activity in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis.

    PubMed

    Viau, V; Soriano, L; Dallman, M F

    2001-05-01

    To reveal direct effects of androgens, independent of glucocorticoids, we studied the effects of gonadectomy (GDX) in adrenalectomized (ADX) rats with or without androgen replacement on corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) and arginine vasopressin (AVP) mRNA expression within various forebrain sites known to regulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. These included the medial parvocellular portion of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (mp PVN), the central and medial nuclei of the amygdala and bed nuclei of the stria terminalis (BNST). In the mp PVN, ADX stimulated both CRH and AVP mRNA expression. Combined ADX + GDX inhibited only AVP, and testosterone and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) restored AVP mRNA. In the central nucleus of the amygdala, ADX decreased CRH mRNA expression, and this response was unaffected by GDX +/- testosterone or DHT replacement. In the medial amygdala, AVP mRNA expression was decreased by ADX, abolished by ADX + GDX, and restored by androgen replacement. ADX had no effect on CRH and AVP mRNA expression in the BNST. GDX + ADX, however, reduced CRH mRNA expression only within the fusiform nuclei of the BNST and reduced the number of AVP-expressing neurones in the posterior BNST. Androgen replacement reversed both responses. In summary, in ADX rats, AVP, but not CRH mRNA expression in the amygdala and mp PVN, is sensitive to GDX +/- androgen replacement. Both CRH- and AVP-expressing neurones in the BNST respond to GDX and androgen replacement, but not to ADX alone. Because androgen receptors are not expressed by hypophysiotropic PVN neurones, we conclude that glucocorticoid-independent, androgenic influences on medial parvocellular AVP mRNA expression are mediated upstream from the PVN, and may involve AVP-related pathways in the medial amygdala, relayed to and through CRH- and AVP-expressing neurones of the BNST.

  3. A novel androgen receptor gene mutation in a patient with congenital adrenal hyperplasia associated with penoscrotal hypospadias.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Vikas; Thangaraj, Kumarasamy; Jyothy, Akka

    2014-08-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) associated with penoscrotal hypospadias is a rare case of disorders of sex development. Here, we report clinical, genetic, biochemical, and molecular findings in a 2-year-old infant with CAH and penoscrotal hypospadias. Chromosomal analysis revealed 46,XX karyotype. Hormonal investigations indicated low levels of cortisol and elevated levels of testosterone, 17-hydroxyprogesterone, and androstenedione hormone. Molecular genetic testing of androgen receptor (AR) gene identified a novel homozygous missense mutation of single nucleotide transition G to A at position 2058 (GenBank accession number GU784855), resulting in amino acid interchange alanine to threonine at codon 566 in exon 2 (Ala566Thr) (GenBank Protein_id ADD26777.1). The nature of the mutation presented is in the highly conserved DNA-binding domain of the AR gene. The novel mutation identified in the rare genetic disorder provides additional support to the previously reported genotype-phenotype correlations, and our finding has expanded the spectrum of known mutations of the AR gene. PMID:24907477

  4. Dual effects of nobiletin, a citrus polymethoxy flavone, on catecholamine secretion in cultured bovine adrenal medullary cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Han; Toyohira, Yumiko; Ueno, Susumu; Shinohara, Yuko; Itoh, Hideaki; Furuno, Yumi; Yamakuni, Tohru; Tsutsui, Masato; Takahashi, Kojiro; Yanagihara, Nobuyuki

    2010-08-01

    Nobiletin, a compound of polymethoxy flavones found in citrus fruits, possesses a wide range of pharmacological activities. Here we report the effects of nobiletin on catecholamine secretion in cultured bovine adrenal medullary cells. Nobiletin (1.0-100 microM) concentration-dependently stimulated catecholamine secretion and (45)Ca(2+) influx. Its stimulatory effect of nobiletin on catecholamine secretion was abolished by deprivation of extracellular Ca(2+) and partially inhibited by specific inhibitors of voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels and Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchangers. On the other hand, nobiletin suppressed catecholamine secretion and (22)Na(+) and (45)Ca(2+) influx induced by acetylcholine, an agonist of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, in a concentration-dependent manner. It also inhibited catecholamine secretion, (22)Na(+) influx and/or (45)Ca(2+) influx induced by veratridine, an activator of voltage-dependent Na(+) channels, and 56 mM K(+), an activator of voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels. In Xenopus oocytes expressing alpha3beta4 neuronal acetylcholine receptors, nobiletin directly inhibited the current evoked by acetylcholine in a concentration-dependent manner similar to that observed in catecholamine secretion. The present findings suggest that nobiletin, by itself, stimulates catecholamine secretion via activation of voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels or Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchangers, whereas it inhibits catecholamine secretion induced by acetylcholine through the suppression of Na(+) influx and Ca(2+) influx in cultured bovine adrenal medullary cells.

  5. Secretion of Unconjugated Androgens and Estrogens by the Normal and Abnormal Human Testis before and after Human Chorionic Gonadotropin

    PubMed Central

    Weinstein, R. L.; Kelch, R. P.; Jenner, M. R.; Kaplan, S. L.; Grumbach, M. M.

    1974-01-01

    The secretion of androgens and estrogens by normal and abnormal testes was compared by determining the concentrations of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), androstenedione (Δ4A), testosterone (T), estrone (E1), and 17β-estradiol (E2) in peripheral and spermatic venous plasma samples from 14 normal men and 5 men with unilateral testicular atrophy. Four normal men and one patient with unilateral atrophy of the testis were given human chorionic gonadotropin (HCG) before surgery. Plasma estrogens were determined by radioimmunoassay; plasma androgens were measured by the double-isotope dilution derivative technique. Peripheral concentrations of these steroids before and after HCG were similar in both the normal men and the patients with unilateral testicular atrophy. In normal men, the mean ±SE spermatic venous concentrations were DHEA, 73.1±11.7 ng/ml; Δ4A, 30.7±7.9 ng/ml; T, 751±114 ng/ml; E1, 306±55 pg/ml; and E2, 1298±216 pg/ml. Three of four subjects with unilateral testicular atrophy had greatly diminished spermatic venous levels of androgens and estrogens. HCG treatment increased the testicular secretion of DHEA and T fivefold, Δ4A threefold, E1 sixfold, and E2 eightfold in normal men. In the single subject with an atrophic testis who received HCG, the spermatic venous concentrations of androgens and estrogens were much less than in normal men similarly treated. We conclude that: (a) E1 is secreted by the human testis, but testicular secretion of E1 accounts for less than 5% of E1 production in normal men; (b) HCG stimulation produces increases in spermatic venous estrogens equal to or greater than the changes in androgens, including testosterone; and (c) strikingly decreased secretion of androgen and estrogen by unilateral atrophic human tests cannot be appreciated by analyses of peripheral steroid concentrations. PMID:4271572

  6. Influence of hemorrhage on adrenal secretion, blood glucose and serum insulin in the awake pig.

    PubMed Central

    Carey, L C; Curtin, R; Sapira, J D

    1976-01-01

    A study was performed to quantitate the adrenal medullary and cortical response to hemorrhage in awake animals bled at different rates and to relate these responses to simultaneous changes in blood glucose and serum insulin. A series of awake pigs were bled either slowly or rapidly of 30% of their calculated blood volume. Infusions of exogenous epinephrine were performed in an additional series of unbled animals and infusions of epinephrine plus hydrocortisone were similarly performed in an additonal series. Increase in blood glucose and epinephrine secretion rate following hemorrhage were found to be significantly dependent upon the rate of initial hemorrhage. Cortisol secretion was found to rise significantly during and following hemorrhage in both rapidly and slowly bled animals. Serum insulin levels remained at baseline levels during shock, despite the presence of significant hyperglycemia. In unbled animals infused with epinephrine at rates comparable to those measured in shock, elevations in blood glucose were markedly lower, shifting to the right of the dose-response curve during hemorrhage. Simultaneous infusions of cortisol and epinephrine resulted in a dose-response curve which did not differ significantly from that following infusion of epinephrine alone. Images Fig. 2. PMID:1247317

  7. Intracellular Molecular Differences in Aldosterone- Compared to Cortisol-Secreting Adrenal Cortical Adenomas.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Eric; Scholl, Ute I

    2016-01-01

    The adrenal cortex is a major site of steroid hormone production. Two hormones are of particular importance: aldosterone, which is produced in the zona glomerulosa in response to volume depletion and hyperkalemia, and cortisol, which is produced in the zona fasciculata in response to stress. In both cases, acute stimulation leads to increased hormone production, and chronic stimulation causes hyperplasia of the respective zone. Aldosterone- and cortisol-producing adenomas (APAs and CPAs) are benign tumors of the adrenal cortex that cause excess hormone production, leading to primary aldosteronism and Cushing's syndrome, respectively. About 40% of the APAs carry somatic heterozygous gain-of-function mutations in the K(+) channel KCNJ5. These mutations lead to sodium permeability, depolarization, activation of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels, and Ca(2+) influx. Mutations in the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase subunit ATP1A1 and the plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase ATP2B3 similarly cause Na(+) or H(+) permeability and depolarization, whereas mutations in the Ca(2+) channel CACNA1D directly lead to increased calcium influx. One in three CPAs carries a recurrent gain-of-function mutation (L206R) in the PRKACA gene, encoding the catalytic subunit of PKA. This mutation causes constitutive PKA activity by abolishing the binding of the inhibitory regulatory subunit to the catalytic subunit. These mutations activate pathways that are relatively specific to the respective cell type (glomerulosa versus fasciculata), and there is little overlap in mutation spectrum between APAs and CPAs, but co-secretion of both hormones can occur. Mutations in CTNNB1 (beta-catenin) and GNAS (Gsα) are exceptions, as they can cause both APAs and CPAs through pathways that are incompletely understood. PMID:27445978

  8. Intracellular Molecular Differences in Aldosterone- Compared to Cortisol-Secreting Adrenal Cortical Adenomas.

    PubMed

    Seidel, Eric; Scholl, Ute I

    2016-01-01

    The adrenal cortex is a major site of steroid hormone production. Two hormones are of particular importance: aldosterone, which is produced in the zona glomerulosa in response to volume depletion and hyperkalemia, and cortisol, which is produced in the zona fasciculata in response to stress. In both cases, acute stimulation leads to increased hormone production, and chronic stimulation causes hyperplasia of the respective zone. Aldosterone- and cortisol-producing adenomas (APAs and CPAs) are benign tumors of the adrenal cortex that cause excess hormone production, leading to primary aldosteronism and Cushing's syndrome, respectively. About 40% of the APAs carry somatic heterozygous gain-of-function mutations in the K(+) channel KCNJ5. These mutations lead to sodium permeability, depolarization, activation of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels, and Ca(2+) influx. Mutations in the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase subunit ATP1A1 and the plasma membrane Ca(2+)-ATPase ATP2B3 similarly cause Na(+) or H(+) permeability and depolarization, whereas mutations in the Ca(2+) channel CACNA1D directly lead to increased calcium influx. One in three CPAs carries a recurrent gain-of-function mutation (L206R) in the PRKACA gene, encoding the catalytic subunit of PKA. This mutation causes constitutive PKA activity by abolishing the binding of the inhibitory regulatory subunit to the catalytic subunit. These mutations activate pathways that are relatively specific to the respective cell type (glomerulosa versus fasciculata), and there is little overlap in mutation spectrum between APAs and CPAs, but co-secretion of both hormones can occur. Mutations in CTNNB1 (beta-catenin) and GNAS (Gsα) are exceptions, as they can cause both APAs and CPAs through pathways that are incompletely understood.

  9. Intracellular Molecular Differences in Aldosterone- Compared to Cortisol-Secreting Adrenal Cortical Adenomas

    PubMed Central

    Seidel, Eric; Scholl, Ute I.

    2016-01-01

    The adrenal cortex is a major site of steroid hormone production. Two hormones are of particular importance: aldosterone, which is produced in the zona glomerulosa in response to volume depletion and hyperkalemia, and cortisol, which is produced in the zona fasciculata in response to stress. In both cases, acute stimulation leads to increased hormone production, and chronic stimulation causes hyperplasia of the respective zone. Aldosterone- and cortisol-producing adenomas (APAs and CPAs) are benign tumors of the adrenal cortex that cause excess hormone production, leading to primary aldosteronism and Cushing’s syndrome, respectively. About 40% of the APAs carry somatic heterozygous gain-of-function mutations in the K+ channel KCNJ5. These mutations lead to sodium permeability, depolarization, activation of voltage-gated Ca2+ channels, and Ca2+ influx. Mutations in the Na+/K+-ATPase subunit ATP1A1 and the plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase ATP2B3 similarly cause Na+ or H+ permeability and depolarization, whereas mutations in the Ca2+ channel CACNA1D directly lead to increased calcium influx. One in three CPAs carries a recurrent gain-of-function mutation (L206R) in the PRKACA gene, encoding the catalytic subunit of PKA. This mutation causes constitutive PKA activity by abolishing the binding of the inhibitory regulatory subunit to the catalytic subunit. These mutations activate pathways that are relatively specific to the respective cell type (glomerulosa versus fasciculata), and there is little overlap in mutation spectrum between APAs and CPAs, but co-secretion of both hormones can occur. Mutations in CTNNB1 (beta-catenin) and GNAS (Gsα) are exceptions, as they can cause both APAs and CPAs through pathways that are incompletely understood. PMID:27445978

  10. Marked elevation of adrenal steroids, especially androgens, in saliva of prepubertal autistic children.

    PubMed

    Majewska, Maria Dorota; Hill, Martin; Urbanowicz, Ewa; Rok-Bujko, Paulina; Bieńkowski, Przemysław; Namysłowska, Irena; Mierzejewski, Paweł

    2014-06-01

    Autism is diagnosed on the basis of behavioral manifestations, but its biomarkers are not well defined. A strong gender bias typifying autism (it is 4-5 times more prevalent in males) suggests involvement of steroid hormones in autism pathobiology. In order to evaluate the potential roles of such hormones in autism, we compared the salivary levels of 22 steroids in prepubertal autistic male and female children from two age groups (3-4 and 7-9 years old) with those in healthy controls. The steroids were analyzed using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and radioimmunoassay. Statistical analysis (ANOVA) revealed that autistic children had significantly higher salivary concentrations of many steroid hormones (both C21 and C19) than control children. These anomalies were more prominent in older autistic children and in boys. The levels of androgens (androstenediol, dehydroepiandrosterone, androsterone and their polar conjugates) were especially increased, indicative of precocious adrenarche and predictive of early puberty. The concentrations of the steroid precursor, pregnenolone, and of several pregnanolones were also higher in autistic than in healthy children, but cortisol levels were not different. Some steroids, whose levels are raised in autism (allopregnanolone, androsterone, pregnenolone, dehydroepiandrosterone and their sulfate conjugates) are neuroactive and modulate GABA, glutamate, and opioid neurotransmission, affecting brain development and functioning. These steroids may contribute to autism pathobiology and symptoms such as elevated anxiety, sleep disturbances, sensory deficits, and stereotypies among others. We suggest that salivary levels of selected steroids may serve as biomarkers of autism pathology useful for monitoring the progress of therapy.

  11. Catecholamine secretion by chemical hypoxia in guinea-pig, but not rat, adrenal medullary cells: differences in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Harada, K; Endo, Y; Warashina, A; Inoue, M

    2015-08-20

    The effects of mitochondrial inhibitors (CN(-), a complex IV inhibitor and CCCP, protonophore) on catecholamine (CA) secretion and mitochondrial function were explored functionally and biochemically in rat and guinea-pig adrenal chromaffin cells. Guinea-pig chromaffin cells conspicuously secreted CA in response to CN(-) or CCCP, but rat cells showed a little, if any, secretory response to either of them. The resting metabolic rates in rat adrenal medullae did not differ from those in guinea-pig adrenal medullae. On the other hand, the time course of depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) in guinea-pig chromaffin cells in response to CN(-) was slower than that in rat chromaffin cells, and this difference was abolished by oligomycin, an F1F0-ATPase inhibitor. The extent of CCCP-induced decrease in cellular ATP in guinea-pig chromaffin cells, which was indirectly measured using a Mg(2+) indicator, was smaller than that in rat chromaffin cells. Relative expression levels of F1F0-ATPase inhibitor factor in guinea-pig adrenal medullae were smaller than in rat adrenal medullae, and the opposite was true for F1F0-ATPase α subunit. The present results indicate that guinea-pig chromaffin cells secrete more CA in response to a mitochondrial inhibitor than rat chromaffin cells and this higher susceptibility in the former is accounted for by a larger extent of reversed operation of F1F0-ATPase with the consequent decrease in ATP under conditions where ΔΨm is depolarized. PMID:26047729

  12. Catecholamine secretion by chemical hypoxia in guinea-pig, but not rat, adrenal medullary cells: differences in mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Harada, K; Endo, Y; Warashina, A; Inoue, M

    2015-08-20

    The effects of mitochondrial inhibitors (CN(-), a complex IV inhibitor and CCCP, protonophore) on catecholamine (CA) secretion and mitochondrial function were explored functionally and biochemically in rat and guinea-pig adrenal chromaffin cells. Guinea-pig chromaffin cells conspicuously secreted CA in response to CN(-) or CCCP, but rat cells showed a little, if any, secretory response to either of them. The resting metabolic rates in rat adrenal medullae did not differ from those in guinea-pig adrenal medullae. On the other hand, the time course of depolarization of the mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) in guinea-pig chromaffin cells in response to CN(-) was slower than that in rat chromaffin cells, and this difference was abolished by oligomycin, an F1F0-ATPase inhibitor. The extent of CCCP-induced decrease in cellular ATP in guinea-pig chromaffin cells, which was indirectly measured using a Mg(2+) indicator, was smaller than that in rat chromaffin cells. Relative expression levels of F1F0-ATPase inhibitor factor in guinea-pig adrenal medullae were smaller than in rat adrenal medullae, and the opposite was true for F1F0-ATPase α subunit. The present results indicate that guinea-pig chromaffin cells secrete more CA in response to a mitochondrial inhibitor than rat chromaffin cells and this higher susceptibility in the former is accounted for by a larger extent of reversed operation of F1F0-ATPase with the consequent decrease in ATP under conditions where ΔΨm is depolarized.

  13. Modulation of adrenal catecholamine secretion by in vivo gene transfer and manipulation of G protein-coupled receptor kinase-2 activity.

    PubMed

    Lymperopoulos, Anastasios; Rengo, Giuseppe; Zincarelli, Carmela; Soltys, Stephen; Koch, Walter J

    2008-02-01

    We recently reported that the upregulation of adrenal G protein-coupled receptor kinase-2 (GRK2) causes enhanced catecholamine (CA) secretion by desensitizing sympatho-inhibitory alpha (2)-adrenergic receptors (alpha (2)ARs) of chromaffin cells, and thereby aggravating heart failure (HF). In this study, we sought to develop an efficient and reproducible in vivo adrenal gene transfer method to determine whether manipulation of adrenal GRK2 levels/activity regulates physiological CA secretion in rats. We specifically investigated two different in vivo gene delivery methods: direct injection into the suprarenal glands, and retrograde delivery through the suprarenal veins. We delivered adenoviral (Ad) vectors containing either GRK2 or an inhibitor of GRK2 activity, the beta ARKct. We found both delivery approaches equally effective at supporting robust (>80% of the whole organ) and adrenal-restricted transgene expression, in the cortical region as well as in the medullar region. Additionally, rats with AdGRK2-infected adrenals exhibit enhanced plasma CA levels when compared with control rats (AdGFP-injected adrenals), whereas plasma CA levels after Ad beta ARKct infection were significantly lower. Finally, in isolated chromaffin cells, alpha (2)ARs of AdGRK2-infected cells failed to inhibit CA secretion whereas Ad beta ARKct-infected cells showed normal alpha (2)AR responsiveness. These results not only indicate that in vivo adrenal gene transfer is an effective way of manipulating adrenal gland signalling, but also identify GRK2 as a critically important molecule involved in CA secretion.

  14. Role of ACTH in the Interactive/Paracrine Regulation of Adrenal Steroid Secretion in Physiological and Pathophysiological Conditions.

    PubMed

    Lefebvre, Hervé; Thomas, Michaël; Duparc, Céline; Bertherat, Jérôme; Louiset, Estelle

    2016-01-01

    In the normal human adrenal gland, steroid secretion is regulated by a complex network of autocrine/paracrine interactions involving bioactive signals released by endothelial cells, nerve terminals, chromaffin cells, immunocompetent cells, and adrenocortical cells themselves. ACTH can be locally produced by medullary chromaffin cells and is, therefore, a major mediator of the corticomedullary functional interplay. Plasma ACTH also triggers the release of angiogenic and vasoactive agents from adrenocortical cells and adrenal mast cells and, thus, indirectly regulates steroid production through modulation of the adrenal blood flow. Adrenocortical neoplasms associated with steroid hypersecretion exhibit molecular and cellular defects that tend to reinforce the influence of paracrine regulatory loops on corticosteroidogenesis. Especially, ACTH has been found to be abnormally synthesized in bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia responsible for hypercortisolism. In these tissues, ACTH is detected in a subpopulation of adrenocortical cells that express gonadal markers. This observation suggests that ectopic production of ACTH may result from impaired embryogenesis leading to abnormal maturation of the adrenogonadal primordium. Globally, the current literature indicates that ACTH is a major player in the autocrine/paracrine processes occurring in the adrenal gland in both physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:27489549

  15. Role of ACTH in the Interactive/Paracrine Regulation of Adrenal Steroid Secretion in Physiological and Pathophysiological Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Lefebvre, Hervé; Thomas, Michaël; Duparc, Céline; Bertherat, Jérôme; Louiset, Estelle

    2016-01-01

    In the normal human adrenal gland, steroid secretion is regulated by a complex network of autocrine/paracrine interactions involving bioactive signals released by endothelial cells, nerve terminals, chromaffin cells, immunocompetent cells, and adrenocortical cells themselves. ACTH can be locally produced by medullary chromaffin cells and is, therefore, a major mediator of the corticomedullary functional interplay. Plasma ACTH also triggers the release of angiogenic and vasoactive agents from adrenocortical cells and adrenal mast cells and, thus, indirectly regulates steroid production through modulation of the adrenal blood flow. Adrenocortical neoplasms associated with steroid hypersecretion exhibit molecular and cellular defects that tend to reinforce the influence of paracrine regulatory loops on corticosteroidogenesis. Especially, ACTH has been found to be abnormally synthesized in bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia responsible for hypercortisolism. In these tissues, ACTH is detected in a subpopulation of adrenocortical cells that express gonadal markers. This observation suggests that ectopic production of ACTH may result from impaired embryogenesis leading to abnormal maturation of the adrenogonadal primordium. Globally, the current literature indicates that ACTH is a major player in the autocrine/paracrine processes occurring in the adrenal gland in both physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:27489549

  16. No Postoperative Adrenal Insufficiency in a Patient with Unilateral Cortisol-Secreting Adenomas Treated with Mifepristone Before Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Saroka, Rachel M.; Kane, Michael P.; Robinson, Lawrence; Busch, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Glucocorticoid replacement is commonly required to treat secondary adrenal insufficiency after surgical resection of unilateral cortisol-secreting adrenocortical adenomas. Here, we describe a patient with unilateral cortisol-secreting adenomas in which the preoperative use of mifepristone therapy was associated with recovery of the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis, eliminating the need for postoperative glucocorticoid replacement. CASE PRESENTATION A 66-year-old Caucasian man with type 2 diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and obesity was hospitalized for Fournier’s gangrene and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus sepsis. Abdominal computed tomography scan revealed three left adrenal adenomas measuring 1.4, 2.1, and 1.2 cm and an atrophic right adrenal gland. Twenty-four-hour urinary free cortisol level was elevated (237 µg/24 hours, reference range 0–50 µg/24 hours). Hormonal evaluation after resolution of the infection showed an abnormal 8 mg overnight dexamethasone suppression test (cortisol postdexamethasone 14.5 µg/dL), suppressed adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH; <5 pg/mL, reference range 7.2–63.3 pg/mL), and low-normal dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (50.5 µg/dL, male reference range 30.9–295.6 µg/dL). Because of his poor medical condition and uncontrolled diabetes, his Cushing’s syndrome was treated with medical therapy before surgery. Mifepristone therapy was started and, within five months, his diabetes was controlled and insulin discontinued. The previously suppressed ACTH increased to above normal range accompanied by an increase in dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate levels, indicating recovery of the HPA axis and atrophic contralateral adrenal gland. The patient received one precautionary intraoperative dose of hydrocortisone and none thereafter. Two days postoperatively, ACTH (843 pg/mL) and cortisol levels (44.8 µg/dL) were significantly elevated, reflecting an appropriate HPA axis response to

  17. Direct visualization of secretion from single bovine adrenal chromaffin cells by laser-induced native fluorescence imaging microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Tong, W.; Yeung, E.S.

    1998-03-01

    Direct visualization of the secretion process of individual bovine adrenal chromaffin cells was achieved with laser-induced native fluorescence imaging microscopy. By monitoring the native fluorescence of catecholamines excited by the 275 nm laser line with an intensified charge-coupled-device (CCD) camera, we obtained good temporal and spatial resolution simultaneously without using additional fluorescent probes. Large variations were found among individual cells in terms of the amounts of catecholamines secreted and the rates of secretion. Different regions of a cell also behave differently during the secretion process. However, the degree of this local heterogeneity is smaller than in neurons and neuralgia. The influence of deep-ultraviolet (UV) laser excitation on cells is also discussed. This quantitative imaging technique provides a useful noninvasive approach for the study of dynamic cellular changes and the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of secretory processes. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital Society for Applied Spectroscopy}

  18. Do androgens directly regulate gonadotropin secretion in the polycystic ovary syndrome?

    PubMed

    Dunaif, A

    1986-07-01

    This study was designed to investigate whether androgens directly, independent of their aromatization to estrogens, disrupt gonadotropin secretion in hyperandrogenic women with the polycystic ovary syndrome (PCO). Pulsatile gonadotropin release and gonadotroph sensitivity to GnRH were determined on consecutive study days basally and during a primed continuous infusion of testosterone (T; n = 4; 100 micrograms/h; twice the mean production rate of T in PCO) or dihydrotestosterone (DHT; n = 5; 50 micrograms/h). To determine if the gonadotropin secretory changes during T infusion were secondary to spontaneous variation, four patients had two consecutive basal studies, and all patients received DHT on the third study day. T infusion that increased mean plasma T levels from 76 +/- 12 (+/- SE) to 315 +/- 28 ng/dl produced no significant changes in the amount or pattern of LH release or in LH sensitivity to GnRH. Mean plasma FSH levels decreased slightly but significantly during T infusion (basal, 242 +/- 29 vs. T 226 +/- 30 ng/ml LER-907; P less than 0.05 by two-tailed paired t test), but the pulsatile pattern of FSH release and FSH sensitivity to GnRH did not change. DHT infusion increased plasma DHT levels from 17 +/- 3 to 244 +/- 31 ng/dl, but did not alter the mean levels, pulsatile patterns, or sensitivity to GnRH of LH or FSH. These data suggest that androgens do not directly alter gonadotropin release in PCO. Thus, regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis in women with PCO is different from that in men despite chronic exposure to hyperandrogenemia.

  19. Use of plasma metanephrine to aid adrenal venous sampling in combined aldosterone and cortisol over-secretion

    PubMed Central

    Goupil, Rémi; Wolley, Martin; Ungerer, Jacobus; McWhinney, Brett; Mukai, Kuniaki; Naruse, Mitsuhide; Gordon, Richard D

    2015-01-01

    Summary In patients with primary aldosteronism (PA) undergoing adrenal venous sampling (AVS), cortisol levels are measured to assess lateralization of aldosterone overproduction. Concomitant adrenal autonomous cortisol and aldosterone secretion therefore have the potential to confound AVS results. We describe a case where metanephrine was measured during AVS to successfully circumvent this problem. A 55-year-old hypertensive male had raised plasma aldosterone/renin ratios and PA confirmed by fludrocortisone suppression testing. Failure of plasma cortisol to suppress overnight following dexamethasone and persistently suppressed corticotrophin were consistent with adrenal hypercortisolism. On AVS, comparison of adrenal and peripheral A/F ratios (left 5.7 vs peripheral 1.0; right 1.7 vs peripheral 1.1) suggested bilateral aldosterone production, with the left gland dominant but without contralateral suppression. However, using aldosterone/metanephrine ratios (left 9.7 vs peripheral 2.4; right 1.3 vs peripheral 2.5), aldosterone production lateralized to the left with good contralateral suppression. The patient underwent left laparoscopic adrenalectomy with peri-operative glucocorticoid supplementation to prevent adrenal insufficiency. Pathological examination revealed adrenal cortical adenomas producing both cortisol and aldosterone within a background of aldosterone-producing cell clusters. Hypertension improved and cured of PA and hypercortisolism were confirmed by negative post-operative fludrocortisone suppression and overnight 1 mg dexamethasone suppression testing. Routine dexamethasone suppression testing in patients with PA permits detection of concurrent hypercortisolism which can confound AVS results and cause unilateral PA to be misdiagnosed as bilateral with patients thereby denied potentially curative surgical treatment. In such patients, measurement of plasma metanephrine during AVS may overcome this issue. Learning points Simultaneous autonomous

  20. Ovarian and Adrenal Androgens and Their Link to High Human Chorionic Gonadotropin Levels: A Prospective Controlled Study

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Gutiérrez, René; Villarreal-Pérez, Jesús Zacarías; Morales-Martinez, Felipe Arturo; Rodríguez-Guajardo, René; González-Saldivar, Gloria; Mancillas-Adame, Leonardo G.; Alvarez-Villalobos, Neri Alejandro; Lavalle-Gonzalez, Fernando Javier; González-González, José Gerardo

    2014-01-01

    Background. Although the association between human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) and hyperandrogenism was identified more than 40 years ago, relevant questions remain unanswered. Design and Methods. We conducted a prospective, longitudinal, and controlled study in 23 women with a diagnosis of a complete hydatidiform mole (HM). Results. All participants completed the study. Before HM evacuation mean hCG was markedly higher in the cases than in the control group (P ≤ 0.001). Free testosterone (T) and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S) were found to be higher in the cases (2.78 ± 1.24 pg/mL and 231.50 ± 127.20 μ/dL) when compared to the control group (1.50 ± 0.75 pg/mL and 133.59 ± 60.69 μ/dL) (P = 0.0001 and 0.001), respectively. There was a strong correlation between hCG and free T/total T/DHEA-S concentrations (r = 0.78; P ≤ 0.001, r = 0.74;  P ≤ 0.001, and r = 0.71;  P ≤ 0.001), respectively. In the cases group 48 hours after HM evacuation, hCG levels were found to be significantly lower when compared to initial levels (P = 0.001) and free T and DHEA-S declined significantly (P = 0.0002 and 0.009). Conclusion. Before uterus evacuation, hCG, free T, and DHEA-S levels were significantly higher when compared with controls finding a strong correlation between hCG and free T/DHEA-S levels. Forty-eight hours after HM treatment hCG levels declined and the difference was lost. A novel finding of our study is that in cases, besides free T, DHEA-S was also found to be significantly higher and both the ovaries and adrenal glands appear to be the sites of this androgen overproduction. PMID:25505909

  1. Ovarian and adrenal androgens and their link to high human chorionic gonadotropin levels: a prospective controlled study.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Gutiérrez, René; Villarreal-Pérez, Jesús Zacarías; Morales-Martinez, Felipe Arturo; Rodríguez-Guajardo, René; González-Saldivar, Gloria; Mancillas-Adame, Leonardo G; Alvarez-Villalobos, Neri Alejandro; Lavalle-Gonzalez, Fernando Javier; González-González, José Gerardo

    2014-01-01

    Background. Although the association between human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) and hyperandrogenism was identified more than 40 years ago, relevant questions remain unanswered. Design and Methods. We conducted a prospective, longitudinal, and controlled study in 23 women with a diagnosis of a complete hydatidiform mole (HM). Results. All participants completed the study. Before HM evacuation mean hCG was markedly higher in the cases than in the control group (P ≤ 0.001). Free testosterone (T) and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S) were found to be higher in the cases (2.78 ± 1.24 pg/mL and 231.50 ± 127.20 μ/dL) when compared to the control group (1.50 ± 0.75 pg/mL and 133.59 ± 60.69 μ/dL) (P = 0.0001 and 0.001), respectively. There was a strong correlation between hCG and free T/total T/DHEA-S concentrations (r = 0.78; P ≤ 0.001, r = 0.74;  P ≤ 0.001, and r = 0.71;  P ≤ 0.001), respectively. In the cases group 48 hours after HM evacuation, hCG levels were found to be significantly lower when compared to initial levels (P = 0.001) and free T and DHEA-S declined significantly (P = 0.0002 and 0.009). Conclusion. Before uterus evacuation, hCG, free T, and DHEA-S levels were significantly higher when compared with controls finding a strong correlation between hCG and free T/DHEA-S levels. Forty-eight hours after HM treatment hCG levels declined and the difference was lost. A novel finding of our study is that in cases, besides free T, DHEA-S was also found to be significantly higher and both the ovaries and adrenal glands appear to be the sites of this androgen overproduction.

  2. Growth and adrenal androgen status at 7 years in very low birth weight survivors with and without bronchopulmonary dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Korhonen, P; Hyodynmaa, E; Lenko, H; Tammela, O

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate whether 7 year old VLBW (very low birth weight, <1500 g) survivors with and without bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) evince similar growth status and higher adrenal androgen (AA) levels than term controls, and whether AA levels are higher in VLBW children born small for gestational age (SGA) than in non-SGA cases. Methods: Assessment of height standard deviation score (SDs), body mass index (BMI), and serum androstenedione and dehydroepiandrostenedione sulphate levels in 31 VLBW children with BPD, 33 without BPD (no-BPD group), and 33 term controls. Results: Lower median (range) height SDs was found in BPD (-1.0 (-3.4 to 1.4) SD) and no-BPD (-0.9 (-2.9 to 2.2) SD) children than in term controls (0.3 (-1.5 to 1.9) SD). Low BMI (below 10th centile) was more common in both the BPD (18 (58%)) and no-BPD (16 (49%)) children compared to term cases (3 (9%)). The median (range) androstenedione levels tended to be higher in the BPD (0.8 (0 to 2.8) nmol/l) and no-BPD (0.8 (0 to 2.3) nmol/l) groups than in term controls (0.6 (0 to 1.8)). Higher median (range) dehydroepiandrostenedione sulphate levels were detected in the no-BPD compared to the term group (0.9 (0 to 4.1) v 0.3 (0 to 2.3) µmol/l). VLBW children born SGA had higher AA levels compared to non-SGA cases. Conclusions: At 7 years of age, VLBW children are shorter and tend to have higher AA levels than term controls, but VLBW children with and without BPD do not differ from each other in growth or AA status. Those born SGA have higher AA levels compared to non-SGA cases. The consequences of these findings to final height and to later metabolic and vascular health remain to be determined. PMID:15033838

  3. Expression of the beacon gene in the rat adrenal gland: direct inhibitory effect of beacon[47-73] on aldosterone secretion from dispersed adrenal zona glomerulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Ziolkowska, Agnieszka; Rucinski, Marcin; Neri, Giuliano; Di Liddo, Rosa; Nussdorfer, Gastone G; Malendowicz, Ludwik K

    2004-02-01

    Beacon gene was recently identified in the rat hypothalamus, and there is evidence that beacon may be involved in the functional regulation of neuroendocrine axes. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and immunocytochemistry showed the expression of beacon mRNA and protein in the rat adrenal gland, especially in the cortex. Beacon[47-73], at a concentration over 10(-7) M decreased basal aldosterone secretion from dispersed rat zona glomerulosa (ZG) cells, without affecting the ACTH-stimulated one. Basal and agonist-stimulated corticosterone secretion from dispersed zona fasciculata-reticularis cells and catecholamine release from adrenomedullary slices were unaffected by beacon[47-73]. The suppressive effect of beacon[47-73] on aldosterone secretion from ZG cells was abolished by either H-89 or calphostin-C, which are inhibitors of protein kinase A and C signaling cascades. Taken together, these findings allow us to suggest that beacon can be included in the group of regulatory peptides involved in the fine tuning of ZG secretory activity.

  4. Physiological Basis for the Etiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Adrenal Disorders: Cushing’s Syndrome, Adrenal Insufficiency, and Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Raff, Hershel; Sharma, Susmeeta T.; Nieman, Lynnette K.

    2014-01-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is a classic neuroendocrine system. One of the best ways to understand the HPA axis is to appreciate its dynamics in the variety of diseases and syndromes that affect it. Excess glucocorticoid activity can be due to endogenous cortisol overproduction (spontaneous Cushing’s syndrome) or exogenous glucocorticoid therapy (iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome). Endogenous Cushing’s syndrome can be subdivided into ACTH-dependent and ACTH-independent, the latter of which is usually due to autonomous adrenal overproduction. The former can be due to a pituitary corticotroph tumor (usually benign) or ectopic ACTH production from tumors outside the pituitary; both of these tumor types overexpress the proopiomelanocortin gene. The converse of Cushing’s syndrome is the lack of normal cortisol secretion and is usually due to adrenal destruction (primary adrenal insufficiency) or hypopituitarism (secondary adrenal insufficiency). Secondary adrenal insufficiency can also result from a rapid discontinuation of long-term, pharmacological glucocorticoid therapy because of HPA axis suppression and adrenal atrophy. Finally, mutations in the steroidogenic enzymes of the adrenal cortex can lead to congenital adrenal hyperplasia and an increase in precursor steroids, particularly androgens. When present in utero, this can lead to masculinization of a female fetus. An understanding of the dynamics of the HPA axis is necessary to master the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of pituitary-adrenal diseases. Furthermore, understanding the pathophysiology of the HPA axis gives great insight into its normal control. PMID:24715566

  5. Clinical features, outcome and prognostic factors in dogs diagnosed with non-cortisol-secreting adrenal tumours without adrenalectomy: 20 cases (1994-2009).

    PubMed

    Arenas, C; Pérez-Alenza, D; Melián, C

    2013-11-23

    The aims of this study were to describe the clinical features, the outcome and the prognostic factors of dogs with non-cortisol-secreting adrenal masses without adrenalectomy, and also to provide clinical data that can be useful for making decisions when managing dogs with these types of neoplasms. Medical records from 1994 to 2009 were reviewed and 20 dogs were included in the study. The results showed that mean age at diagnosis for dogs with non-cortisol-secreting adrenal masses was 12 years with no sex predisposition. Most dogs were asymptomatic. The most frequent clinical signs, when present, were lethargy, weakness and hypertension. Radiological evidence of metastases at diagnosis was not frequent. The maximal dorso-ventral thickness of the adrenal mass ranged from 10.0 to 45.0 mm. Right adrenal gland masses were more frequent than left-sided. Hypertension was found to be related to tumour growth during follow-up. The median survival time of dogs with non-cortisol-secreting tumours was 17.8 months. Body weight at diagnosis, tumour size and the presence of metastases at diagnosis were inversely related to survival. In conclusion, survival of dogs with non-cortisol-secreting adrenal tumours without adrenalectomy is relatively high and comparable with that of dogs treated with adrenalectomy. Dogs with metastasis and large adrenal tumours have a poorer prognosis. Hypertension is related to tumour growth, and might be used as an additional tool to assess the potential growing capacity of the tumour.

  6. Increased Catecholamine Secretion from Single Adrenal Chromaffin Cells in DOCA-Salt Hypertension Is Associated with Potassium Channel Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The mechanism of catecholamine release from single adrenal chromaffin cells isolated from normotensive and DOCA-salt hypertensive rats was investigated. These cells were used as a model for sympathetic nerves to better understand how exocytotic release of catecholamines is altered in this model of hypertension. Catecholamine secretion was evoked by local application of acetylcholine (1 mM) or high K+ (70 mM), and continuous amperometry was used to monitor catecholamine secretion as an oxidative current. The total number of catecholamine molecules secreted from a vesicle, the total number of vesicles fusing and secreting, and the duration of secretion in response to a stimulus were all significantly greater for chromaffin cells from hypertensive rats as compared to normotensive controls. The greater catecholamine secretion from DOCA-salt cells results, at least in part, from functionally impaired large conductance, Ca2+-activated (BK) and ATP-sensitive K+ channels. This work reveals that there is altered vesicular release of catecholamines from these cells (and possibly from perivascular sympathetic nerves) and this may contribute to increased vasomotor tone in DOCA-salt hypertension. PMID:23937098

  7. Negative feedback regulation of gonadotropin secretion by androgens in fetal rhesus macaques.

    PubMed

    Resko, J A; Ellinwood, W E

    1985-09-01

    Previously we described sex differences in circulating gonadotropin concentrations (greater in females) in fetal rhesus macaques, and demonstrated that these sex differences relate, at least in part, to the negative feedback actions of testicular secretions. A fully functional gonadal-hypothalamic-pituitary feedback relationship is present as early as Day 100 of gestation in fetal males because castration at this time results in a dramatic increase (greater than 10-fold) in fetal luteinizing hormone (LH) concentrations. Although short-term (6-h) treatment of fetuses with testosterone (T) 3 wk after gonadectomy (GX) does not lower LH levels in males, it is completely effective in females. These data suggest that either T is not the primary testicular factor responsible for feedback suppression of LH in fetal males, or the hypothalamic-pituitary axis becomes insensitive to T after GX. To determine if immediate treatment with T after GX is effective in maintaining LH levels, we gonadectomized five fetal rhesus males on Days 98-104 of gestation and immediately implanted crystalline-T-containing intraabdominal Silastic capsules. An additional five fetuses were treated with the nonaromatizable androgen dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Umbilical arterial samples for hormone analysis were obtained prior to GX and again approximately 3 wk later. Serum from control males (n = 11) castrated in utero on Day 100 of gestation contained significantly greater concentrations of LH and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) 3 wk after the operation than before GX. Five sham-operated male fetuses did not have elevated levels of either LH or FSH in their serum on Day 120 of gestation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Is androgen production in association with immune system activation potential evidence for existence of a functional adrenal/ovarian autoimmune system in women?

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Low functional ovarian reserve (FOR) is at all ages associated with low testosterone (T) levels. Causes are, however, unknown. We, therefore, investigate whether androgens with low FOR are associated with non-specific immune system activation. Methods 322 infertile women with low and normal FOR (controls) were assessed with a broadly based immune profile, which in previous studies has proven effective in differentiating infertile patients with and without immune system activation. Patients were either immune-positive (greater than or equal to one positive tested parameter) or immune negative (no positive test). 135 suffered from prematurely diminished FOR (POA/OPOI; < age 38), 155 from physiologic diminished FOR due to age (DOR; > age 40), and 32 were controls (< age 38 with normal age-specific FOR). Prevalence of immune-positive vs. negative was assessed in all 3 patient groups. Results Women with immune abnormalities, overall, demonstrated higher total T (TT, P = 0.004) and free T (FT, P < 0.001) levels than those without. The three clinical and two immunologic-defined patient groups demonstrated significant statistical interaction in mean TT (P = 0.008), with mean TT and FT in women with positive immune findings being significantly higher in control than in POA/OPOI and physiologic DOR patients (all 4 differences P < 0.001). No such differences between the three groups were seen in women without immune abnormalities. Conclusions In this study we used a definition of immune-positivity, which favors sensitivity over specificity, resulting in significant numbers of false-positives but likely only few false-negatives. The study allows suggesting the possibility of an immune system-derived androgen-production factor (APF), which maintains normal androgen levels but is deficient in women with low FOR and immune system inactivity. Existence of such an APF would suggest the presence of a still unknown functional adrenal autoimmune system

  9. Adrenal Steroidogenesis and Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Turcu, Adina F.; Auchus, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Adrenal steroidogenesis is a dynamic process, reliant on de novo synthesis from cholesterol, under the stimulation of ACTH and other regulators. The syntheses of mineralocorticoids, glucocorticoids and adrenal androgens occur in separate adrenal cortical zones, each expressing specific enzymes. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) encompasses a group of autosomal recessive enzymatic defects in cortisol biosynthesis. 21-hydroxylase (21OHD) deficiency accounts for over 90% of CAH cases and when milder or nonclassic forms are included, 21OHD is one of the most common genetic diseases. This review discusses in detail the epidemiology, genetics, diagnostic, clinical aspects and management of 21OHD. PMID:26038201

  10. Domestication Effects on Stress Induced Steroid Secretion and Adrenal Gene Expression in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Fallahsharoudi, Amir; de Kock, Neil; Johnsson, Martin; Ubhayasekera, S. J. Kumari A.; Bergquist, Jonas; Wright, Dominic; Jensen, Per

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the genetic basis of phenotypic diversity is a challenge in contemporary biology. Domestication provides a model for unravelling aspects of the genetic basis of stress sensitivity. The ancestral Red Junglefowl (RJF) exhibits greater fear-related behaviour and a more pronounced HPA-axis reactivity than its domesticated counterpart, the White Leghorn (WL). By comparing hormones (plasmatic) and adrenal global gene transcription profiles between WL and RJF in response to an acute stress event, we investigated the molecular basis for the altered physiological stress responsiveness in domesticated chickens. Basal levels of pregnenolone and dehydroepiandrosterone as well as corticosterone response were lower in WL. Microarray analysis of gene expression in adrenal glands showed a significant breed effect in a large number of transcripts with over-representation of genes in the channel activity pathway. The expression of the best-known steroidogenesis genes were similar across the breeds used. Transcription levels of acute stress response genes such as StAR, CH25 and POMC were upregulated in response to acute stress. Dampened HPA reactivity in domesticated chickens was associated with changes in the expression of several genes that presents potentially minor regulatory effects rather than by means of change in expression of critical steroidogenic genes in the adrenal. PMID:26471470

  11. Domestication Effects on Stress Induced Steroid Secretion and Adrenal Gene Expression in Chickens.

    PubMed

    Fallahsharoudi, Amir; de Kock, Neil; Johnsson, Martin; Ubhayasekera, S J Kumari A; Bergquist, Jonas; Wright, Dominic; Jensen, Per

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the genetic basis of phenotypic diversity is a challenge in contemporary biology. Domestication provides a model for unravelling aspects of the genetic basis of stress sensitivity. The ancestral Red Junglefowl (RJF) exhibits greater fear-related behaviour and a more pronounced HPA-axis reactivity than its domesticated counterpart, the White Leghorn (WL). By comparing hormones (plasmatic) and adrenal global gene transcription profiles between WL and RJF in response to an acute stress event, we investigated the molecular basis for the altered physiological stress responsiveness in domesticated chickens. Basal levels of pregnenolone and dehydroepiandrosterone as well as corticosterone response were lower in WL. Microarray analysis of gene expression in adrenal glands showed a significant breed effect in a large number of transcripts with over-representation of genes in the channel activity pathway. The expression of the best-known steroidogenesis genes were similar across the breeds used. Transcription levels of acute stress response genes such as StAR, CH25 and POMC were upregulated in response to acute stress. Dampened HPA reactivity in domesticated chickens was associated with changes in the expression of several genes that presents potentially minor regulatory effects rather than by means of change in expression of critical steroidogenic genes in the adrenal. PMID:26471470

  12. Domestication Effects on Stress Induced Steroid Secretion and Adrenal Gene Expression in Chickens.

    PubMed

    Fallahsharoudi, Amir; de Kock, Neil; Johnsson, Martin; Ubhayasekera, S J Kumari A; Bergquist, Jonas; Wright, Dominic; Jensen, Per

    2015-10-16

    Understanding the genetic basis of phenotypic diversity is a challenge in contemporary biology. Domestication provides a model for unravelling aspects of the genetic basis of stress sensitivity. The ancestral Red Junglefowl (RJF) exhibits greater fear-related behaviour and a more pronounced HPA-axis reactivity than its domesticated counterpart, the White Leghorn (WL). By comparing hormones (plasmatic) and adrenal global gene transcription profiles between WL and RJF in response to an acute stress event, we investigated the molecular basis for the altered physiological stress responsiveness in domesticated chickens. Basal levels of pregnenolone and dehydroepiandrosterone as well as corticosterone response were lower in WL. Microarray analysis of gene expression in adrenal glands showed a significant breed effect in a large number of transcripts with over-representation of genes in the channel activity pathway. The expression of the best-known steroidogenesis genes were similar across the breeds used. Transcription levels of acute stress response genes such as StAR, CH25 and POMC were upregulated in response to acute stress. Dampened HPA reactivity in domesticated chickens was associated with changes in the expression of several genes that presents potentially minor regulatory effects rather than by means of change in expression of critical steroidogenic genes in the adrenal.

  13. Developmental programming of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS): prenatal androgens establish pancreatic islet α/β cell ratio and subsequent insulin secretion

    PubMed Central

    Ramaswamy, S.; Grace, C.; Mattei, A. A.; Siemienowicz, K.; Brownlee, W.; MacCallum, J.; McNeilly, A. S.; Duncan, W. C.; Rae, M. T.

    2016-01-01

    Exogenous androgenic steroids applied to pregnant sheep programmes a PCOS-like phenotype in female offspring. Via ultrasound guidance we applied steroids directly to ovine fetuses at d62 and d82 of gestation, and examined fetal (day 90 gestation) and postnatal (11 months old) pancreatic structure and function. Of three classes of steroid agonists applied (androgen - Testosterone propionate (TP), estrogen - Diethystilbesterol (DES) and glucocorticoid - Dexamethasone (DEX)), only androgens (TP) caused altered pancreatic development. Beta cell numbers were significantly elevated in prenatally androgenised female fetuses (P = 0.03) (to approximately the higher numbers found in male fetuses), whereas alpha cell counts were unaffected, precipitating decreased alpha:beta cell ratios in the developing fetal pancreas (P = 0.001), sustained into adolescence (P = 0.0004). In adolescence basal insulin secretion was significantly higher in female offspring from androgen-excess pregnancies (P = 0.045), and an exaggerated, hyperinsulinaemic response to glucose challenge (P = 0.0007) observed, whereas prenatal DES or DEX treatment had no effects upon insulin secretion. Postnatal insulin secretion correlated with beta cell numbers (P = 0.03). We conclude that the pancreas is a primary locus of androgenic stimulation during development, giving rise to postnatal offspring whose pancreas secreted excess insulin due to excess beta cells in the presence of a normal number of alpha cells. PMID:27265420

  14. Developmental programming of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS): prenatal androgens establish pancreatic islet α/β cell ratio and subsequent insulin secretion.

    PubMed

    Ramaswamy, S; Grace, C; Mattei, A A; Siemienowicz, K; Brownlee, W; MacCallum, J; McNeilly, A S; Duncan, W C; Rae, M T

    2016-01-01

    Exogenous androgenic steroids applied to pregnant sheep programmes a PCOS-like phenotype in female offspring. Via ultrasound guidance we applied steroids directly to ovine fetuses at d62 and d82 of gestation, and examined fetal (day 90 gestation) and postnatal (11 months old) pancreatic structure and function. Of three classes of steroid agonists applied (androgen - Testosterone propionate (TP), estrogen - Diethystilbesterol (DES) and glucocorticoid - Dexamethasone (DEX)), only androgens (TP) caused altered pancreatic development. Beta cell numbers were significantly elevated in prenatally androgenised female fetuses (P = 0.03) (to approximately the higher numbers found in male fetuses), whereas alpha cell counts were unaffected, precipitating decreased alpha:beta cell ratios in the developing fetal pancreas (P = 0.001), sustained into adolescence (P = 0.0004). In adolescence basal insulin secretion was significantly higher in female offspring from androgen-excess pregnancies (P = 0.045), and an exaggerated, hyperinsulinaemic response to glucose challenge (P = 0.0007) observed, whereas prenatal DES or DEX treatment had no effects upon insulin secretion. Postnatal insulin secretion correlated with beta cell numbers (P = 0.03). We conclude that the pancreas is a primary locus of androgenic stimulation during development, giving rise to postnatal offspring whose pancreas secreted excess insulin due to excess beta cells in the presence of a normal number of alpha cells. PMID:27265420

  15. Estrogen Regulation of Fetal Adrenal Cortical Zone-Specific Development in the Nonhuman Primate Impacts Adrenal Production of Androgen and Cortisol and Response to ACTH in Females in Adulthood.

    PubMed

    Pepe, Gerald J; Maniu, Adina; Aberdeen, Graham; Lynch, Terrie J; Albrecht, Eugene D

    2016-05-01

    We showed that the volume of the fetal zone of the fetal adrenal gland and serum dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHAS) levels at term were increased in baboons in which estradiol levels were suppressed by treatment with aromatase inhibitor 4,4-[1,2,3-triazol-1yl-methylene] bis-benzonitrite (letrozole). The fetal zone remodels postnatally into the reticular zone and DHAS production, and serum levels decline with age. Therefore, we determined whether the trajectory of reticular zone DHAS secretion and response to ACTH were altered in offspring deprived of estrogen in utero. Female offspring were delivered to baboons untreated or treated daily throughout the second half of gestation with letrozole (estradiol reduced >95%) or letrozole plus estradiol and cortisol and DHAS determined in blood samples obtained bimonthly between 4 and 125 months and after iv bolus of ACTH. The slope/rate of decline in serum DHAS with advancing age was greater (P < .01) in letrozole-treated (-0.54 ± 0.005) than untreated (-0.32 ± 0.003) baboons and partially restored by letrozole-estradiol (-0.43 ± 0.004). Serum cortisol was similar and relatively constant in all offspring. Moreover, in letrozole-treated offspring, serum DHAS at 61-66, 67-95, and 96-125 months were lower (P < .05), and cortisol to DHAS ratio was greater (P < .05) than in untreated offspring. ACTH at high level increased cortisol and DHAS in untreated baboons and cortisol but not DHAS in letrozole-treated offspring. We propose that postnatal development of the primate adrenal cortex, including the decline in reticular zone DHAS production, response to ACTH and maintenance of cortisol to DHAS ratio with advancing age is modulated by exposure of the fetal adrenal to estradiol. PMID:26990066

  16. Androgen therapy in women.

    PubMed

    Arlt, Wiebke

    2006-01-01

    Androgens in women either derive from direct ovarian production or from peripheral conversion of the adrenal sex steroid precursor, dehydroepiandrosterone, towards active androgens. Therefore, loss of adrenal or ovarian function, caused by Addison's disease or consequent to bilateral oophorectomy, results in severe androgen deficiency, clinically often associated with a loss of libido and energy. Importantly, physiological menopause does not necessarily lead to androgen deficiency, as androgen synthesis in the ovaries may persist despite the decline in estrogen production. However, the definition of female androgen deficiency, as recently provided by the Princeton consensus statement, is not precise enough and may lead to over-diagnosis due to the high prevalence of its diagnostic criteria: androgen levels below or within the lower quartile of the normal range and concurrent sexual dysfunction. Importantly, physiological menopause is not necessarily associated with androgen deficiency and therefore does not routinely require androgen therapy. Current replacement options include transdermal testosterone administration or dehydroepiandrosterone treatment, both of which have been shown to result in significant improvements, in particular in libido and mood, while effects on body composition and muscular function are not well documented. It is important to keep in mind that the number of randomized controlled trials is still limited and that currently none of the available preparations is officially approved for use in women. Currently, androgen replacement should be reserved for women with severe androgen deficiency due to an established cause and matching clinical signs and symptoms. PMID:16381985

  17. Expression of receptors for luteinizing hormone, gastric-inhibitory polypeptide, and vasopressin in normal adrenal glands and cortisol-secreting adrenocortical tumors in dogs.

    PubMed

    Galac, S; Kars, V J; Klarenbeek, S; Teerds, K J; Mol, J A; Kooistra, H S

    2010-07-01

    Hypercortisolism caused by an adrenocortical tumor (AT) results from adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-independent hypersecretion of glucocorticoids. Studies in humans demonstrate that steroidogenesis in ATs may be stimulated by ectopic or overexpressed eutopic G protein-coupled receptors. We report on a screening of 23 surgically removed, cortisol-secreting ATs for the expression of receptors for luteinizing hormone (LH), gastric-inhibitory polypeptide (GIP), and vasopressin (V(1a), V(1b), and V(2)). Normal adrenal glands served as control tissues. Abundance of mRNA for these receptors was quantified using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (QPCR), and the presence and localization of these receptors were determined by immunohistochemistry. In both normal adrenal glands and ATs, mRNA encoding for all receptors was present, although the expression abundance of the V(1b) receptor was very low. The mRNA expression abundance for GIP and V(2) receptors in ATs were significantly lower (0.03 and 0.01, respectively) than in normal adrenal glands. The zona fasciculata of normal adrenal glands stained immunonegative for the GIP receptor. In contrast, islands of GIP receptor-immunopositive cells were detected in about half of the ATs. The zona fasciculata of both normal adrenal glands and AT tissue were immunopositive for LH receptor; in ATs in a homogenous or heterogenous pattern. In normal adrenal glands, no immunolabeling for V(1b)R and V(2) receptor was present, but in ATs, V(2) receptor-immunopositive cells were detected. In conclusion, QPCR analysis did not reveal overexpression of LH, GIP, V(1a), V(1b), or V(2) receptors in the ATs. However, the ectopic expression of GIP and V(2) receptor proteins in tumorous zona fasciculata tissue may play a role in the pathogenesis of canine cortisol-secreting ATs.

  18. Adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) and corticosterone secretion by perifused pituitary and adrenal glands from rodents exposed to 2,3,7, 8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD).

    PubMed

    Pitt, J A; Buckalew, A R; House, D E; Abbott, B D

    2000-10-26

    Although in utero maternal stress has been shown to have lasting effects on rodent offspring, fetal effects of chemically-induced alterations of the maternal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) have not been well studied. This study examined the effects of in vivo 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) exposure on pituitary-adrenal function in the male rat, pregnant female rat and pregnant female mouse. The secretion of adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) and corticosterone (CORT) in pituitary and adrenal glands, respectively, was assessed in ex vivo perifusion cultures. Male and pregnant female (gestation day 8) Sprague-Dawley rats were gavaged once with 10 microgram/kg TCDD, pregnant female mice once with 24 microgram/kg TCDD, and euthanized 10 days later. Hemi-pituitary (rat) or whole anterior pituitaries (mice) and right adrenal glands from the same animal were quartered, perifused under baseline and stimulated conditions. In both males and pregnant females, TCDD did not affect corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH)-stimulated ACTH secretion. Neither total pituitary ACTH nor plasma ACTH was altered in either sex or species by TCDD treatment. ACTH-stimulated CORT secretion was not affected by TCDD in either sex or species, and adrenal tissue and plasma CORT levels were unchanged in males and pregnant females by TCDD. However, the plasma ACTH:CORT ratio was decreased about 46% in male rats treated with TCDD. Plasma CORT levels were 23-fold higher and plasma ACTH levels were 1.5-fold higher in pregnant females than in male rats. In male versus female rats, adrenal CORT and anterior pituitary ACTH tissue levels were about 7.5- and 1.75-fold higher and ACTH, respectively. Female mouse adrenal tissue CORT was about 4-fold greater than female rat. The reduced plasma ACTH:CORT ratio in the male rat suggests that TCDD disturbs HPA function. Exposure of male rat to a 5-fold higher dose in earlier studies clearly demonstrated effects of TCDD on male rat HPA. The present

  19. Progesterone secreting adrenal mass in a cat with clinical signs of hyperadrenocorticism.

    PubMed

    Boord, M; Griffin, C

    1999-03-01

    A 7-year-old 7-kg (16-lb) neutered male Himalayan cat had nonpruritic progressive alopecia of 9 months' duration. The cat had hyperglycemia and glucosuria. Physical examination revealed complete alopecia along the abdomen, inguinal area, medial and caudal areas of the thighs, ventral area of the thorax, and axilla. Clinical signs were consistent with endocrine-induced alopecia and hyperadrenocorticism, however, results of diagnostic tests (ACTH stimulation and low-dose dexamethasone suppression) were not supportive of hyperadrenocorticism. Abdominal ultrasonography revealed a mass cranial to the left kidney. Blood samples were obtained before and after ACTH stimulation to measure sex hormone concentrations. Analysis revealed markedly high blood progesterone concentrations before and after ACTH stimulation. An adrenalectomy was performed and histologic examination of the mass revealed a well-differentiated adrenocortical carcinoma. The right adrenal gland could not be viewed during surgery and was assumed to be atrophic. Following surgery, the hyperglycemia and glucosuria resolved. Within 4 months of surgery, the hyperprogesteronemia had resolved, and at 12 months the cat's coat quality appeared normal. Findings suggest that cats with signs of hyperadrenocorticism should be evaluated not only for abnormal cortisol concentrations, but also for sex hormone abnormalities.

  20. Perturbations of hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and adrenal androgen functions in rheumatoid arthritis: an odyssey of hormonal relationships to the disease.

    PubMed

    Masi, A T; Chatterton, R T; Aldag, J C

    1999-06-22

    serum DHEAS level (mumol/L) was found in the pre-RA subgroup I, than in the 43 CN (2.14 +/- 0.47 vs. 3.62 +/- 0.37, respectively, (p = 0.033). The 25 older pre-RA and 100 CN (subgroups II and III) showed close mean DHEAS levels (1.89 +/- 0.30 and 1.94 +/- 0.14, respectively, p = 0.45). The serum DHEAS levels in pre-RA vs. CN subgroups were validated in a second reference laboratory. Also, the youngest pre-RA subgroup (I) showed a significant dissociation between entry serum DHEAS and cortisol levels (r = -0.660, p = 0.027), which differed (p = 0.017) from its matched CN, and from the older pre-RA (p = 0.004). Analyses of results based upon subgroupings by EMS and entry age (a, b, c, d) showed similar results. No significant differences were found between pre-RA and CN groups in levels of serum cortisol, other adrenal steroids, or the sex hormones assayed. In a sample of younger premenopausal women, significantly low serum DHEAS levels were found 4 to 20 years prior to onset of RA. Dissociation of serum cortisol and DHEAS levels was also found in the youngest, but not older, pre-RA subjects. The data suggest that subtle adrenal cortical dysfunction, manifested mainly by adrenal androgen (AA) deficiency, may either predispose to younger-onset RA or be a long-term marker in a minority subgroup of women.

  1. Butanol isomers exert distinct effects on voltage-gated calcium channel currents and thus catecholamine secretion in adrenal chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    McDavid, Sarah; Bauer, Mary Beth; Brindley, Rebecca L; Jewell, Mark L; Currie, Kevin P M

    2014-01-01

    Butanol (C4H10OH) has been used both to dissect the molecular targets of alcohols/general anesthetics and to implicate phospholipase D (PLD) signaling in a variety of cellular functions including neurotransmitter and hormone exocytosis. Like other primary alcohols, 1-butanol is a substrate for PLD and thereby disrupts formation of the intracellular signaling lipid phosphatidic acid. Because secondary and tertiary butanols do not undergo this transphosphatidylation, they have been used as controls for 1-butanol to implicate PLD signaling. Recently, selective pharmacological inhibitors of PLD have been developed and, in some cases, fail to block cellular functions previously ascribed to PLD using primary alcohols. For example, exocytosis of insulin and degranulation of mast cells are blocked by primary alcohols, but not by the PLD inhibitor FIPI. In this study we show that 1-butanol reduces catecholamine secretion from adrenal chromaffin cells to a much greater extent than tert-butanol, and that the PLD inhibitor VU0155056 has no effect. Using fluorescent imaging we show the effect of these drugs on depolarization-evoked calcium entry parallel those on secretion. Patch-clamp electrophysiology confirmed the peak amplitude of voltage-gated calcium channel currents (I(Ca)) is inhibited by 1-butanol, with little or no block by secondary or tert-butanol. Detailed comparison shows for the first time that the different butanol isomers exert distinct, and sometimes opposing, effects on the voltage-dependence and gating kinetics of I(Ca). We discuss these data with regard to PLD signaling in cellular physiology and the molecular targets of general anesthetics.

  2. p38MAPK activation is involved in androgen-independent proliferation of human prostate cancer cells by regulating IL-6 secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Shida, Yohei; Igawa, Tsukasa . E-mail: tigawa@net.nagasaki-u.ac.jp; Hakariya, Tomoaki; Sakai, Hideki; Kanetake, Hiroshi

    2007-02-16

    Increased levels of serum interleukin-6 (IL-6) are frequently observed in patients with advanced, hormone-refractory prostate cancer. However, the precise mechanism of IL-6 regulation is still largely unknown. Since prostate cancer gradually progresses to an androgen-independent state despite the stress caused by various therapeutic agents, we hypothesized the stress-activated protein kinases (SAPKs) involvement in androgen-independent growth or IL-6 secretion of prostate cancer cells. Using PC-3 and DU145 human prostate cancer cells, we analyzed the role of SAPKs in IL-6 mediated cell growth and found that the p38MAPK and JNK are involved in androgen-independent cancer cell growth. Furthermore, IL-6 secretion by PC-3 and DU145 cells was significantly suppressed by SAPKs inhibitor, especially by p38MAPK inhibitor SB203580, but not by JNK inhibitor SP600125 nor by MEK inhibitor, PD98059. These results raised the possibility that the IL-6 mediated androgen-independent proliferation of PC-3 and DU145 cells is regulated at least partly via SAPKs signaling pathway especially through p38MAPK activation.

  3. A connection between extracellular matrix and hormonal signals during the development of the human fetal adrenal gland.

    PubMed

    Chamoux, E; Otis, M; Gallo-Payet, N

    2005-10-01

    The human adrenal cortex, involved in adaptive responses to stress, body homeostasis and secondary sexual characters, emerges from a tightly regulated development of a zone-specific secretion pattern during fetal life. Its development during fetal life is critical for the well being of pregnancy, the initiation of delivery, and even for an adequate adaptation to extra-uterine life. As early as from the sixth week of pregnancy, the fetal adrenal gland is characterized by a highly proliferative zone at the periphery, a concentric migration accompanied by cell differentiation (cortisol secretion) and apoptosis in the central androgen-secreting fetal zone. After birth, a strong reorganization occurs in the adrenal gland so that it better fulfills the newborn's needs, with aldosterone production in the external zona glomerulosa, cortisol secretion in the zona fasciculata and androgens in the central zona reticularis. In addition to the major hormonal stimuli provided by angiotensin II and adrenocorticotropin, we have tested for some years the hypotheses that such plasticity may be under the control of the extracellular matrix. A growing number of data have been harvested during the last years, in particular about extracellular matrix expression and its putative role in the development of the human adrenal cortex. Laminin, collagen and fibronectin have been shown to play important roles not only in the plasticity of the adrenal cortex, but also in cell responsiveness to hormones, thus clarifying some of the unexplained observations that used to feed controversies. PMID:16172742

  4. Androgen receptors, sex behavior, and aggression.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Rebecca L; Lumia, Augustus R; McGinnis, Marilyn Y

    2012-01-01

    Androgens are intricately involved in reproductive and aggressive behaviors, but the role of the androgen receptor in mediating these behaviors is less defined. Further, activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis can influence each other at the level of the androgen receptor. Knowledge of the mechanisms for androgens' effects on behaviors through the androgen receptor will guide future studies in elucidating male reproductive and aggressive behavior repertoires.

  5. Trichosporin-B-III, an alpha-aminoisobutyric acid-containing peptide, causes Ca(2+)-dependent catecholamine secretion from adrenal medullary chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Tachikawa, E; Takahashi, S; Furumachi, K; Kashimoto, T; Iida, A; Nagaoka, Y; Fujita, T; Takaishi, Y

    1991-11-01

    We examined the effect of trichosporin-B-III, an alpha-aminoisobutyric acid-containing antibiotic peptide consisting of 19 amino acid residues and a phenylalaninol, on catecholamine secretion from cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells. Incubation of the cells with trichosporin-B-III (3-20 microM) caused an increase in the secretion of catecholamines. The secretion induced by trichosporin-B-III at low concentrations (3 and 5 microM) was completely dependent on external Ca2+, whereas that induced by higher concentrations (10 and 20 microM) was partly independent of Ca2+. Trichosporin-B-III at low concentration (5 microM) did not increase the release of lactate dehydrogenase, a marker enzyme of cytoplasm, from the cells. In contrast, the peptide at higher concentration (10 microM) increased the release of the enzyme. Trichosporin-B-III also caused both 45Ca2+ influx into the cells and an increase in the intracellular free Ca2+ concentration. The increases in catecholamine secretion and 45Ca2+ influx behaved similarly in relation to trichosporin-B-III concentration (3-10 microM). The time courses of the increases in secretion, 45Ca2+ influx, and intracellular free Ca2+ concentration induced by trichosporin-B-III were also quite similar. Trichosporin-B-III-induced (at 5 microM) secretion was not affected by the elimination of Na+ from the incubation medium or by the addition of tetrodotoxin, a blocker of highly selective voltage-dependent Na+ channels, or hexamethonium, a blocker of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. On the other hand, both diltiazem (2-200 microM) and nicardipine (1-200 microM), blockers of voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels, inhibited the secretion induced by trichosporin-B-III (5 microM) in a concentration-dependent manner. Trichosporin-B-III-induced (at 5 microM) secretion also was suppressed by the addition of Mn2+ (5 mM) to the medium. The diltiazem (20 microM) inhibition of trichosporin-B-III-induced (at 5 microM) secretion was reversed by

  6. Urinary androgens and cortisol metabolites in field-sampled bonobos (Pan paniscus).

    PubMed

    Dittami, John; Katina, Stanislav; Möstl, Erich; Eriksson, Jonas; Machatschke, Ivo H; Hohmann, Gottfried

    2008-02-01

    Urinary metabolites of androgens and cortisol were measured in free-living male and female bonobos. Sex differences and correlations between adrenal and gonadal steroid excretion were investigated. The immunoreactive concentrations of androgens were measured with two different androgen assays. One assay used a testosterone (T) antibody raised with a 17beta-hydroxy group, and the other employed an antibody raised against a reduced form, 5alpha-androstane-17alpha-ol-3-one-CM (17alpha) with cross reactivity for epitestosterone and 5alpha-androstanedione. Both assays have been used in bonobo and chimpanzee studies where non-invasive techniques were employed. The levels of 17alpha-androgen metabolites were 1.7- and 3-fold higher than those of T-metabolites in males and females. The two androgen assay results correlated in males but not females. There was a sex difference in the T-metabolites measured. Male levels were significantly higher. Levels of 17alpha in the two sexes were similar. Cortisol metabolite levels (CORT) were similar between the sexes. The T-metabolites were significantly correlated with CORT in males but not in females. In females, the 17alpha-androgen metabolites correlated with CORT. This suggests that either androgen secretion or metabolism differs between the sexes. A parsimonious interpretation of the androgen assay cortisol/androgen correlation differences would be that larger components of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), androstenedione or epitestosterone from the adrenal androgens were being excreted and measured in the females. The CORT/T metabolite interactions in males may reflect male-specific social or metabolic endocrine conditions.

  7. Adrenal Insufficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... What is adrenal insufficiency? Did you know? The adrenal glands, located on top of the kidneys, make hormones ... body functions. The outer layer (cortex) of the adrenal glands makes three types of steroid hormones. In adrenal ...

  8. Role of endogenous opiates in the expression of negative feedback actions of androgen and estrogen on pulsatile properties of luteinizing hormone secretion in man.

    PubMed

    Veldhuis, J D; Rogol, A D; Samojlik, E; Ertel, N H

    1984-07-01

    We have tested the participation of endogenous opiate pathways in the negative feedback actions of gonadal steroids on pulsatile properties of luteinizing (LH) hormone release in normal men. To this end, sex steroid hormones were infused intravenously at dosages that under steady state conditions selectively suppressed either the frequency or the amplitude of the pulsatile LH signal. The properties of pulsatile LH secretion were assessed quantitatively by computerized analysis of LH series derived from serial blood sampling over 12 h of observation. When the pure (nonaromatizable) androgen, 5-alpha-dihydrotestosterone, was infused continuously for 108 h at the blood production rate of testosterone, we were able to achieve selective inhibition of LH pulse frequency akin to that observed in experimental animals after low-dosage androgen replacement. Under these conditions, serum concentrations of testosterone and estradiol-17 beta did not change significantly, but serum 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone concentrations increased approximately two- to threefold, with a corresponding increase in levels of its major metabolite, 5 alpha-androstan-3 alpha, 17 beta-diol. In separate experiments, the infusion of estradiol-17 beta at its blood production rate over a 4.5-d interval selectively suppressed LH pulse amplitude without influencing LH pulse frequency. Estrogen infusion increased serum estradiol-17 beta levels approximately twofold without significantly altering blood androgen concentrations. We then used these schedules of selective androgen or estrogen infusion to investigate the participation of endogenous opiates in the individual inhibitory feedback actions of pure androgen or estrogen on pulsatile LH release by administering a potent and specific opiate-receptor antagonist, naltrexone, during the infusions. Our observations indicate that, despite the continuous infusion of a dosage of 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone that significantly suppresses LH pulse frequency, co

  9. Anesthetic considerations on adrenal gland surgery.

    PubMed

    Domi, Rudin; Sula, Hektor; Kaci, Myzafer; Paparisto, Sokol; Bodeci, Artan; Xhemali, Astrit

    2015-01-01

    Adrenal gland surgery needs a multidisciplinary team including endocrinologist, radiologist, anesthesiologist, and surgeon. The indications for adrenal gland surgery include hormonal secreting and non-hormonal secreting tumors. Adrenal hormonal secreting tumors present to the anesthesiologist unique challenges requiring good preoperative evaluation, perioperative hemodynamic control, corrections of all electrolytes and metabolic abnormalities, a detailed and careful anesthetic strategy, overall knowledge about the specific diseases, control and maintaining of postoperative adrenal function, and finally a good collaboration with other involved colleagues. This review will focus on the endocrine issues, as well as on the above-mentioned aspects of anesthetic management during hormone secreting adrenal gland tumor resection. PMID:25368694

  10. Anesthetic Considerations on Adrenal Gland Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Domi, Rudin; Sula, Hektor; Kaci, Myzafer; Paparisto, Sokol; Bodeci, Artan; Xhemali, Astrit

    2015-01-01

    Adrenal gland surgery needs a multidisciplinary team including endocrinologist, radiologist, anesthesiologist, and surgeon. The indications for adrenal gland surgery include hormonal secreting and non-hormonal secreting tumors. Adrenal hormonal secreting tumors present to the anesthesiologist unique challenges requiring good preoperative evaluation, perioperative hemodynamic control, corrections of all electrolytes and metabolic abnormalities, a detailed and careful anesthetic strategy, overall knowledge about the specific diseases, control and maintaining of postoperative adrenal function, and finally a good collaboration with other involved colleagues. This review will focus on the endocrine issues, as well as on the above-mentioned aspects of anesthetic management during hormone secreting adrenal gland tumor resection. PMID:25368694

  11. Early Hormonal Influences on Cognitive Functioning in Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Resnick, Susan M.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Reports the results of cognitive test performance and early childhood activities in individuals with congenital adrenal hyperplasia, an autosomal recessive disorder associated with elevated prenatal adrenal androgen levels, demonstrating the effects of early exposure to excess androgenizing hormones on sexually dimorphic cognitive functioning.…

  12. Adrenal oncoctyoma of uncertain malignant potential: a rare etiology of adrenal incidentaloma.

    PubMed

    Kedia, Rohit R; Muinov, Lucy; Lele, Subodh M; Shivaswamy, Vijay

    2016-03-01

    A rare cause for rapid adrenal enlargement is adrenal oncocytoma of uncertain malignant potential. A full biochemical evaluation is warranted to screen secreting adrenal adenomas as well as to evaluate adrenal cortical carcinoma. Careful pathologic evaluation is required as the diagnosis of AOC cannot be made by imaging. PMID:27014458

  13. Intracrine Androgens Enhance Decidualization and Modulate Expression of Human Endometrial Receptivity Genes.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Douglas A; Simitsidellis, Ioannis; Cousins, Fiona L; Critchley, Hilary O D; Saunders, Philippa T K

    2016-01-01

    The endometrium is a complex, steroid-dependent tissue that undergoes dynamic cyclical remodelling. Transformation of stromal fibroblasts (ESC) into specialised secretory cells (decidualization) is fundamental to the establishment of a receptive endometrial microenvironment which can support and maintain pregnancy. Androgen receptors (AR) are present in ESC; in other tissues local metabolism of ovarian and adrenal-derived androgens regulate AR-dependent gene expression. We hypothesised that altered expression/activity of androgen biosynthetic enzymes would regulate tissue availability of bioactive androgens and the process of decidualization. Primary human ESC were treated in vitro for 1-8 days with progesterone and cAMP (decidualized) in the presence or absence of the AR antagonist flutamide. Time and treatment-dependent changes in genes essential for a) intra-tissue biosynthesis of androgens (5α-reductase/SRD5A1, aldo-keto reductase family 1 member C3/AKR1C3), b) establishment of endometrial decidualization (IGFBP1, prolactin) and c) endometrial receptivity (SPP1, MAOA, EDNRB) were measured. Decidualization of ESC resulted in significant time-dependent changes in expression of AKR1C3 and SRD5A1 and secretion of T/DHT. Addition of flutamide significantly reduced secretion of IGFBP1 and prolactin and altered the expression of endometrial receptivity markers. Intracrine biosynthesis of endometrial androgens during decidualization may play a key role in endometrial receptivity and offer a novel target for fertility treatment. PMID:26817618

  14. Targeting of CYP17A1 Lyase by VT-464 Inhibits Adrenal and Intratumoral Androgen Biosynthesis and Tumor Growth of Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Maity, Sankar N.; Titus, Mark A.; Gyftaki, Revekka; Wu, Guanglin; Lu, Jing-Fang; Ramachandran, S.; Li-Ning-Tapia, Elsa M.; Logothetis, Christopher J.; Araujo, John C.; Efstathiou, Eleni

    2016-01-01

    Cytochrome P450 17α-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase (CYP17A1) is a validated treatment target for the treatment of metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Abiraterone acetate (AA) inhibits both 17α-hydroxylase (hydroxylase) and 17,20-lyase (lyase) reactions catalyzed by CYP17A1 and thus depletes androgen biosynthesis. However, coadministration of prednisone is required to suppress the mineralocorticoid excess and cortisol depletion that result from hydroxylase inhibition. VT-464, a nonsteroidal small molecule, selectively inhibits CYP17A1 lyase and therefore does not require prednisone supplementation. Administration of VT-464 in a metastatic CRPC patient presenting with high tumoral expression of both androgen receptor (AR) and CYP17A1, showed significant reduction in the level of both dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and serum PSA. Treatment of a CRPC patient-derived xenograft, MDA-PCa-133 expressing H874Y AR mutant with VT-464, reduced the increase in tumor volume in castrate male mice more than twice as much as the vehicle (P < 0.05). Mass spectrometry analysis of post-treatment xenograft tumor tissues showed that VT-464 significantly decreased intratumoral androgens but not cortisol. VT-464 also reduced AR signaling more effectively than abiraterone in cultured PCa cells expressing T877A AR mutant. Collectively, this study suggests that VT-464 therapy can effectively treat CRPC and be used in precision medicine based on androgen receptor mutation status. PMID:27748439

  15. Adrenal glands

    MedlinePlus

    ... disorders , infections, tumors, and bleeding. Related topics: Addison disease Adrenal insufficiency Congenital adrenal hyperplasia Cushing syndrome Diabetes mellitus - secondary Glucocorticoid medications Hirsutism Hump ...

  16. Central organization of androgen-sensitive pathways to the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis: implications for individual differences in responses to homeostatic threat and predisposition to disease.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Martin; Bingham, Brenda; Viau, Victor

    2005-12-01

    Despite clear evidence of the potency by which sex steroids operate on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and genuine sex differences in disorders related to HPA dysfunction, the biological significance of this remains largely ignored. Stress-induced increases in circulating glucocorticoid levels serve to meet the metabolic demands of homeostatic threat head-on. Thus, the nature of the stress-adrenal axis is to protect the organism. As one develops, matures, and ages, still newer and competing physiological and environmental demands are encountered. These changing constraints are also met by shifts in sex steroid release, placing this class of steroids beyond the traditional realm of reproductive function. Here we focus on the dose-related and glucocorticoid-interactive nature by which testosterone operates on stress-induced HPA activation. This provides an overview on how to exploit these characteristics towards developing an anatomical framework of testosterone's actions in the brain, and expands upon the idea that centrally projecting arginine vasopressin circuits in the brain act to register and couple testosterone's effects on neuroendocrine and behavioural responses to stress. More generally, the work presented here underscores how a dual adrenal and gonadal systems approach assist in unmasking the bases by which individuals resist or succumb to stress.

  17. Functional zonation of the rat adrenal cortex: the development and maintenance

    PubMed Central

    MITANI, Fumiko

    2014-01-01

    The adrenal cortex of mammals consists of three concentric zones, i.e., the zona glomerulosa (zG), the zona fasciculata (zF), and the zona reticularis (zR), which secrete mineralocorticoids, glucocorticoids, and adrenal androgens, respectively. In 1994, we identified immunohistochemically a new zone between zG and zF of the rat adrenal gland. The zone appeared to be devoid of any significant endocrine functions specific to adrenocortical zones, therefore, we designated the zone as “undifferentiated cell zone (zU)”. Further, BrdU (5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine)-incorporating cells (cells in S-phase) were concentrated at the outer region and the inner region of zU, and these cells proliferated and migrated bidirectionally: toward zG centrifugally and toward zF centripetally. We proposed that cells in and around zU are stem/progenitor cells of the rat adrenal cortex, maintaining functional zonation of the adrenal cortex. The view is consistent with observations reported recently that Sonic hedgehog (Shh), an important factor in embryonic development and adult stem cell maintenance, exists in zU of the rat adrenal gland and the Shh-containing cells seem to migrate bidirectionally. PMID:24814991

  18. Anti-androgens in gynaecological practice.

    PubMed

    Reed, M J; Franks, S

    1988-09-01

    Hirsutism and acne in women are common distressing problems. Unwanted hair growth, acne and seborrhoea result from the action of androgens on the skin. Such effects depend not only on increased androgen production by the ovary or adrenal gland but also on the bioavailability of androgen to peripheral tissues. This in turn is related to transport of androgens in plasma by specific binding proteins and to peripheral metabolism of testosterone and androstenedione to their more potent 5 alpha-reduced derivatives. An effective anti-androgen is one which blocks the androgen receptor-mediated actions of testosterone and DHT on skin. CPA, the treatment of choice in the UK, is a potent androgen receptor-blocking steroid which also has progestational properties. When combined with ethinyloestradiol it also suppresses ovarian function, thus reducing androgen production, and provides effective contraception. PMID:2976627

  19. [Mechanisms of adrenal embryogenesis].

    PubMed

    Barinov, E F; Sulaeva, O N

    2001-01-01

    The aim of this vie is to discuss the general principles of prenatal development of adrenal gland. On the basis of spatial-temporal heterogenity of structural particularites of fetal adrenal cortex, spectrum steroidogenic enzymes and secreting hormones expression in adrenocorticocytes, regulation of proliferation and differentiation processes mechanisms, authors discuss adrenal morphogenesis in three periods of gestation. It was noted the close relationship between placenta development and hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenocortical system formation with specification in each gestation period. Adrenal embryogenesis accompanied by remodeling of structural, functional and biochemical properties of parenchimal-stromal elements of fetal organ. Definitive zonation formation determined by morphogens: ACTH, renal and intraadrenal angiotensin II, estrogens, prostaglandines and other. The action of these factors realization is due to immediately and thought growth factor system (IGF-I, IGF-II, EGF, bFGF), working as paracrine amplificators of morphogenetic signals and activators of transcriptional factors--c-fos and c-jun.

  20. Spontaneous and electrically-evoked catecholamine secretion from long-term cultures of bovine adrenal chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Noga, Brian R; Pinzon, Alberto

    2013-09-01

    Catecholamine release was measured from bovine adrenal medullary chromaffin cell (CC) cultures maintained over a period of three months. Cells were plated over simple biocompatible cell platforms with electrical stimulation capability and at specified times transferred to an acrylic superfusion chamber designed to allow controlled flow of superfusate over the culture. Catecholamine release was measured from the superfusates using fast cyclic voltammetry before, during and after electrical stimulation of the cells. Immunocytochemical staining of CC cultures revealed that they were composed of epinephrine (EP) and/or norepinephrine (NE) type cells. Both spontaneous and evoked-release of catecholamines from CCs were observed throughout the testing period. EP predominated during spontaneous release, whereas NE was more prevalent during electrically-evoked release. Electrical stimulation for 20 s, increased total catecholamine release by 60-130% (measured over a period of 500 s) compared to that observed for an equivalent 20 s period of spontaneous release. Stimulus intensity was correlated with the amount of evoked release, up to a plateau which was observed near the highest intensities. Shorter intervals between stimulation trials did not significantly affect the initial amount of release, and the amount of evoked release was relatively stable over time and did not decrease significantly with age of the culture. The present study demonstrates long-term survival of CC cultures in vitro and describes a technique useful for rapid assessment of cell functionality and release properties of cultured monoaminergic cell types that later can be transplanted for neurotransmitter replacement following injury or disease. PMID:23891791

  1. Etiopathogeny of Primary Adrenal Hypercortisolism.

    PubMed

    Vélayoudom-Céphise, Fritz-Line; Haissaguerre, Magali; Tabarin, Antoine

    2016-01-01

    Primary adrenal hypercortisolism is mainly due to cortisol-producing adrenocortical adenomas, bilateral micronodular or macronodular disease, and adrenal carcinomas. Important advances in the pathophysiology of primary adrenal hypercortisolism have been made in the last few years, partly through the use of new molecular biology tools. Most adrenal abnormalities leading to increased cortisol production involve somatic or germinal mutations of genes encoding elements of the cyclic AMP/protein kinase A signaling pathway, as shown in adrenal adenomas in 2014. One peculiar condition is primary macronodular adrenal hyperplasia (PMAH), which has given rise to new pathophysiological concepts such as regulation of cortisol secretion by illegitimate ligands through aberrant expression of G protein-coupled transmembrane receptors in adrenal nodules and stimulation of cortisol production by local adrenocorticotropic hormone production through autocrine/paracrine mechanisms. These findings provide a basis for the development of targeted therapies as an alternative to surgery. The recent identification of germinal mutations of ARMC5 in PMAH raises the possibility that this is much more frequently an inherited disease than previously suspected. It also offers the possibility of earlier diagnosis of PMAH by genetic screening and, hopefully, of earlier intervention to prevent the onset of hypercortisolism and its complications. The pathophysiology of Cushing's syndrome associated with a subset of adrenal adenomas, including subclinical cortisol-secreting incidentalomas and adrenal carcinomas, remains to be determined. PMID:27212135

  2. Glucocorticoid metabolism in the developing lung: adrenal-like synthesis pathway.

    PubMed

    Provost, Pierre R; Boucher, Eric; Tremblay, Yves

    2013-11-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are essential to normal lung development. They participate in the regulation of important developmental events including morphological changes, and lung maturation leading to the surge of surfactant synthesis by type II epithelial cells. Antenatal GC is administered to mothers at risk of premature delivery to reduce the risk of respiratory distress syndrome (RDS). Sex differences were reported in RDS, in the efficiency of antenatal GC treatment independently of surfactant levels, and in surfactant lipid synthesis. Type II epithelial cell maturation is regulated by epithelial-fibroblast cell-cell communication and involves paracrine factors secreted by fibroblasts under the stimulatory effect of GC. This positive action of GC can be inhibited by androgens through the androgen receptor (AR) present in fibroblasts. In fact, lung development is regulated not only by GC and androgens but also by GC and androgen metabolisms within the developing lung. We recently reviewed the metabolism of androgens in the fetal lung [45]. Here, we review multiple aspects of GC metabolism in the developing lung including inactivation and re-activation by 11β-HSDs, synthesis from the adrenal-like synthesis pathway expressed within the lung and the putative role of CRH and ACTH originating from lung in the regulation of this pathway. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Pregnancy and Steroids'.

  3. [Giant adrenal myelolipoma].

    PubMed

    El Mejjad, Amine; Fekak, Hamid; Dakir, Mohamed; Sarf, Ismail; Manni, Ahmed; Meziane, Fethi

    2004-02-01

    Adrenal myelolipoma is a rare, benign, non-secreting tumour composed of adipose and haematopoietic tissue. The authors report a rare case of giant adrenal myelolipoma in a 53-year-old patient presenting with low back pain and a palpable flank mass on examination. CT scan suggested the diagnosis and surgical resection was indicated in view of the size and symptomatic nature of this mass. Histological examination confirmed the diagnosis. The outcome was favourable without recurrence after a follow-up of one year. The diagnosis of adrenal myelolipoma is based on radiology. Conservative management is generally sufficient for small asymptomatic tumours, but resection is required for large (> 5 cm) and/or symptomatic tumours.

  4. USP10 Expression in Normal Adrenal Gland and Various Adrenal Tumors.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zhi; Zhou, Ziying; Zhan, Na; Yuan, Jingping; Ye, Baixin; Gu, Lijuan; Wang, Jun; Jian, Zhihong; Xiong, Xiaoxing

    2015-12-01

    Ubiquitin-specific protease 10 (USP10), a novel deubiquitinating enzyme, is associated with androgen receptor transcriptional activity and pathological processes of tumor. However, information between USP10 and the adrenal gland is limited. In particular, the role of USP10 in adrenal tumors has not been elucidated yet. This study aims to investigate the expression of USP10 in the human normal adrenal gland and various adrenal tumors. Tissue samples were obtained from 30 adrenocortical adenomas, nine adrenocortical adenocarcinomas, and 20 pheochromocytomas following laparoscopic surgery. Twenty normal adrenal glands were obtained from kidney surgical resection conducted due to renal cell carcinomas. USP10 expression was investigated on protein levels using immunohistochemistry and on mRNA levels using bioinformatics analysis in the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) Datasets. In the 20 cases of normal adrenal glands analyzed, USP10 protein was constantly expressed in situ in the cortex of the adrenal glands, but in the medulla of the gland, only the sustentacular cells were detected positive. In adrenal tumors, detectable levels of USP10 protein were found in 100 % (30/30) adrenocortical adenomas, 88.89 % (8/9) adrenocortical carcinomas, and 10 % (2/20) pheochromocytomas. Bioinformatics analysis did not show a significant difference in USP10 messenger RNA (mRNA) expression between adrenal tumors and normal adrenal gland tissues. A positive USP10 immunoreaction can be useful in distinguishing adrenal cortical tumors from pheochromocytoma.

  5. Assessing the presence of abnormal regulation of cortisol secretion by membrane hormone receptors: in vivo and in vitro studies in patients with functioning and non-functioning adrenal adenoma.

    PubMed

    Dall'Asta, C; Ballarè, E; Mantovani, G; Ambrosi, B; Spada, A; Barbetta, L; Colombo, P; Travaglini, P; Loli, P; Beck-Peccoz, P

    2004-08-01

    Regulation of cortisol secretion by aberrant hormone receptors may play a role in the pathogenesis of ACTH-independent Cushing's syndrome. In this study, the topic was evaluated by combining in vivo and in vitro approaches. Cortisol responses to various stimuli (standard meal, GnRH + TRH, cisapride, vasopressin, glucagon) were assessed in 6 patients with clinical or subclinical adrenal Cushing's syndrome, and non-functioning adrenal adenoma in two cases. Abnormal responses were observed in three patients with Cushing's syndrome; one patient showed a gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP)-dependent cortisol rise after meal, together with responses after GnRH and cisapride; the second patient showed an LH-dependent cortisol response to GnRH, and in the third cortisol rose after cisapride. The pattern of receptor expression performed by RT-PCR showed that while GIP-R was only expressed in tumor from the responsive patient, 5-hydroxytryptamine type 4 receptor and LH-R were also present in normal adrenal tissues and tissues from non-responsive patients. Interestingly, an activating mutation of Gsalpha gene was identified in one of these tumors. Therefore, cortisol responses to agents operating via Gs protein coupled receptors (in one case associated with Gsalpha mutation) were found in Cushing's patients, while these responses were absent in the others. The finding of receptor expression in normal and non-responsive tumors suggests that different mechanisms are probably involved in inducing in vivo cortisol responses. PMID:15326569

  6. Adrenal myelolipoma.

    PubMed

    Cyran, K M; Kenney, P J; Memel, D S; Yacoub, I

    1996-02-01

    In 1905, Gierke [1] first described the occurrence of a tumor in the adrenal composed of mature fat and mixed myeloid and erythroid cells, subsequently termed "formations myelolipomatoses" by Oberling [2] in 1929. PMID:8553954

  7. Are the Endocrine Society's Clinical Practice Guidelines on Androgen Therapy in Women misguided? A commentary.

    PubMed

    Traish, Abdulmaged; Guay, Andre T; Spark, Richard F

    2007-09-01

    The Endocrine Society Clinical Guidelines on Androgen Therapy in Women (henceforth referred to as the Guidelines) do not necessarily represent the opinion held by the many health-care professionals and clinicians who are specialized in the evaluation, diagnosis, and treatment of women's health in androgen insufficiency states. The recommendations provided in the published Guidelines are neither accurate nor complete. We disagree with the therapeutic nihilism promoted by these Guidelines. The members of the Guidelines Panel (henceforth referred to as the Panel), in their own disclaimer, stated that the Guidelines do not establish a standard of care. Based on data available in the contemporary literature, on the role of androgens in women's health, we provide in this commentary a point-by-point discussion of the arguments made by the Panel in arriving at their recommendations. It is our view that the Guidelines are not based on the preponderance of scientific evidence. Health-care professionals, physicians, and scientists often disagree when determining how best to address and manage new and emerging clinical issues. This is where we stand now as we endeavor to understand the role of androgens in a woman's health and welfare. Indeed, some basic facts are not in contention. All agree that dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S) production from the adrenal gland begins during the preteen years, peaks in the mid 20s, then declines progressively over time. In contrast, ovarian androgen (i.e., testosterone) secretion commences at puberty, is sustained during a woman's peak reproductive years and declines as a woman ages, with a more rapid and steep decrease after surgical menopause. However, there are ample data to suggest that adrenal androgens play a role in the development of axillary and pubic hair, and that testosterone is critical for women's libido and sexual function. We take this opportunity to invite members of the Panel on Androgen Therapy in Women to discuss

  8. Low-dose Bisphenol A Activates Cyp11a1 Gene Expression and Corticosterone Secretion in Adrenal Gland via the JNK Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Lan, Hsin-Chieh; Lin, I-Wen; Yang, Zhi-Jie; Lin, Jyun-Hong

    2015-11-01

    Certain commonly used compounds that interfere with the functions of the endocrine system are classified as endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs). Bisphenol A (BPA) is an EDC that is widely used in food containers. BPA levels in human sera are commonly observed to be approximately 1-100 nM. Compared with the effects of BPA on the gonads, its effects on the adrenal gland are poorly understood. To investigate the influence of BPA on steroidogenesis, we examined the activity of the steroidogenic gene Cyp11a1 and its regulatory pathways in mouse Y1 adrenal cortex cells. Treatment with BPA at < 100 µM did not cause cell death. However, increased promoter activity and protein expression of Cyp11a1 were induced by low doses of BPA (10-1000 nM). Moreover, BPA induced c-Jun phosphorylation, and a specific inhibitor of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) significantly suppressed BPA-induced steroidogenesis. Thus, treatment of adrenal cells with low doses of BPA activated Cyp11a1 and increased corticosterone production through the JNK/c-Jun signaling pathway. Identical results were observed in rats after BPA injection. The abnormal induction of hormone synthesis by BPA in the adrenal gland might be linked to human metabolic defects and neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:26209791

  9. Adrenal incidentalomas: A collection of six interesting cases and brief review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Panchani, Roopal; Goyal, Ashutosh; Varma, Tarun; Gupta, Nitinranjan; Tripathi, Sudhir; Kumar, Surender

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Adrenal incidentalomas (AI) are detected in approximately 4-7% of patients in imaging studies. Majority are benign, but careful evaluation is warranted to rule out carcinoma and functional adenomas. Aim: The purpose of presenting these cases is to highlight the approach to management of AI in terms of diagnosis, follow-up, and treatment. Materials and Methods: Seven patients presenting in the endocrine clinic with AI were evaluated for their presenting clinical features and investigated. Results: Case 1 was a 49-year-old female, with adrenal androgen secreting adrenocortical carcinoma with amenorrhoea which was mistaken as menopause. She had minimal hirsutism, which was mistaken as postmenopausal hirsutism. Case 2 was a 39-year-old male, presenting with hyperglycemia found to have Conns’ syndrome with aldosterone producing adenoma on routine ultrasound. Case 3 was a 32-year-old male, presenting with gastritis and bloating, where ultrasound showed bilateral large adrenal masses revealed as diffuse large B cell lymphoma on biopsy. Case 4 was a 21-year-old boy, who had pheochromocytoma misdiagnosed as benign intracranial hypertension (HTN). Case 5 was a 59-year-old hypertensive male, presenting with fever had pheochromocytoma with catecholamine excess, producing fever. Case 6 was isolated adrenal tuberculosis who presented with chronic diarrhea. Conclusion: AI are common, though prevalence varies depending on the reason for scanning, the characteristics of the population studied, and the radiological techniques used. Most are non-secreting cortical adenomas. AI should be evaluated both biochemically and radiologically. When a hormonal disorder is suspected clinically, targeted, diagnostic testing for autonomous cortisol secretion, pheochromocytoma, and hyperaldosteronism is indicated. PMID:23565436

  10. Neurologic complications of disorders of the adrenal glands.

    PubMed

    Bertorini, Tulio E; Perez, Angel

    2014-01-01

    Disorders of the adrenal glands frequently have secondary neurological manifestations, while some diseases that involve the central nervous system are accompanied by adrenal gland dysfunction. Excessive corticosteroid secretions in primary or secondary Cushing's syndrome causes muscle weakness and behavioral disturbances, such as emotional lability and sometimes depression, while adrenal insufficiency may cause fatigue, weakness, and depression. Adrenoleukodystrophy and adrenoneuromyelopathy are X-linked recessive disorders of the metabolism of very long chain fatty acids that manifest with white matter abnormalities of the brain, myelopathy and/or neuropathy, as well as adrenal insufficiency. Other disorders of the adrenal glands include hyperaldosteroidism, which may cause weakness from hypokalemia. Dysfunction of the adrenal medulla causes excessive or deficient secretion of catecholamines, primarily causing cardiovascular symptoms. This chapter reviews the clinical manifestations and diagnostic aspects and treatment of the various disorders of the adrenal glands. Some of the congenital adrenal diseases are also discussed.

  11. Effect of leuprolide and dexamethasone on hair growth and hormone levels in hirsute women: the relative importance of the ovary and the adrenal in the pathogenesis of hirsutism.

    PubMed

    Rittmaster, R S; Thompson, D L

    1990-04-01

    Ten hirsute women with polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCO) and nine with idiopathic hirsutism (IH) underwent selective ovarian suppression with leuprolide for 5-6 months and then were randomized to receive, in addition, dexamethasone or placebo for 4 more months. Serum hormone levels and hair growth rates were determined before and after each treatment period. During the initial treatment period with leuprolide alone, testosterone decreased by 54 +/- 6% (mean +/- SEM) in PCO and by 36 +/- 3% in IH (P = 0.02). Androstenedione decreased by 53 +/- 6% in PCO and by 31 +/- 7% in IH (P = 0.02). Androstanediol glucuronide (Adiol-G) decreased by 14 +/- 6% in PCO and by 7 +/- 3% in IH. There was no change in dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS). While initial serum androgen levels were higher in PCO than in IH, they were similar after ovarian suppression in the two groups. After ovarian suppression, Adiol-G was more consistently correlated with testosterone and androstenedione than was DHEAS, suggesting that Adiol-G may be a better marker than DHEAS of adrenal androgen secretion. Hair growth rates decreased by 37 +/- 6% in PCO and by 14 +/- 10% in IH (P = 0.07). The change in hair growth correlated with the change in androstenedione (r = 0.66; P = 0.002), but not significantly with the change in testosterone (r = 0.29; P = 0.2). After the addition of dexamethasone therapy (0.5 mg daily), testosterone, androstenedione, and DHEAS levels fell to near or below assay detection limits, while Adiol-G decreased by 80 +/- 3%. Hair growth rates decreased slightly more in women during dexamethasone (46 +/- 6%) than during placebo (26 +/- 9%; P = 0.18). In summary, the ovary was the major source of circulating testosterone and androstenedione in PCO. The adrenal contributed a substantial minority of these hormones in PCO and was the major source of androgen secretion in IH. Adrenal hyperandrogenism was common in both IH and PCO. Hair growth rates correlated best with changes in serum

  12. Nonclassical Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia and Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Cuhaci, Neslihan; Aydın, Cevdet; Yesilyurt, Ahmet; Pınarlı, Ferda Alpaslan; Ersoy, Reyhan; Cakir, Bekir

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The most common form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is 21-hydroxylase (21-OH) deficiency due to mutation of the CYP21A2 gene. Patients with nonclassical CAH (NC-CAH) are usually asymptomatic at birth and typically present in late childhood, adolescence, or adulthood with symptoms of excessive androgen secretion. Subfertility is relative in NC-CAH, but the incidence of spontaneous miscarriage is higher. Here, we report a previously undiagnosed female who gave birth to a normal male child and is planning to become pregnant again. Case Report. A 32-year-old female was referred to our clinic for obesity. Her medical history revealed that she had had three pregnancies. She was planning to become pregnant again. Her laboratory results revealed that she had NC-CAH. Since her husband is the son of her aunt and she had miscarriages and intrauterin exitus in her history, their genetic analyses were performed. Conclusion. Since most patients with NC-CAH have a severe mutation, these patients may give birth to a child with the classical CAH (C-CAH) if their partner is also carrying a severe mutation. Females with NC-CAH who desire pregnancy must be aware of the risk of having an infant with C-CAH. PMID:26558116

  13. Androgens inhibit aromatase expression through DAX-1: insights into the molecular link between hormone balance and Leydig cancer development.

    PubMed

    Maris, Pamela; Campana, Antonella; Barone, Ines; Giordano, Cinzia; Morelli, Catia; Malivindi, Rocco; Sisci, Diego; Aquila, Saveria; Rago, Vittoria; Bonofiglio, Daniela; Catalano, Stefania; Lanzino, Marilena; Andò, Sebastiano

    2015-04-01

    Leydig cell tumors (LCTs) of the testis are steroid-secreting tumors associated with various steroid biosynthetic abnormalities and endocrine dysfunctions. Despite their overall rarity, LCTs are still of substantial interest owing to the paucity of information regarding their exact nature and malignant potential. In the present study, we disclose the ability of androgens to inhibit Leydig tumor cell proliferation by opposing to self-sufficient in situ estrogen production. In rat Leydig tumor cells, R2C, androgen treatment significantly decreases the expression and the enzymatic activity of cytocrome P450 aromatase, responsible for the local conversion of androgens into estrogens. This inhibitory effect relies on androgen receptor (AR) activation and involves negative regulation of the CYP19 gene transcriptional activity through the nuclear orphan receptor DAX-1 (dosage-sensitive sex reversal, adrenal hypoplasia critical region, on chromosome X, gene 1). Ligand-activated AR up-regulates the expression of DAX-1 and promotes its increased recruitment within the steroidogenic factor-1 site-containing region of the aromatase proximal promoter II in association with the nuclear receptor corepressor. The biological relevance in LCTs of the newly highlighted functional interplay between AR, DAX-1, and aromatase is underlined by our in vivo observations, revealing a marked down-regulation of AR and DAX-1 expression and a strong increase in aromatase levels in testes tissues from old Fischer rats with spontaneously developed Leydig cell neoplasia, compared with normal testes tissues from younger animals. In elucidating a mechanism by which androgens modulate the growth of Leydig tumor cells, our finding support the hypothesis that maintaining the adequate balance between androgen and estrogens may represent the key for blocking estrogen-secreting Leydigioma development, opening new prospects for therapeutic intervention. PMID:25603045

  14. Androgens and Male Sexual Function: A Review of Human Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schiavi, Raul C.; White, Daniel

    1976-01-01

    The scope of this article is a review and brief discussion of recently gathered information on androgens and sexual behavior in men. Current pharmacological research does not furnish specific evidence that administration of androgens or preprations that stimulate the secretion of endogenous androgens have beneficial effects on functional…

  15. [Sexual and gonadal dysfunction in adrenal disorders].

    PubMed

    Horiba, N

    1997-11-01

    Among various diseases of the adrenals, major disorders that cause sexual and gonadal disturbances are congenital adrenal hyperplasia(CAH) and Cushing's syndrome, and the others include virilizing or feminizing adrenocortical tumors. CAH was reviewed based on the recent advances in molecular genetics. The most striking discovery was steroidogenic acute regulatory protein, mutations of which produce lipoid adrenal hyperplasia that was previously attributed to P-450scc deficiency. Reversible amenorrhea or impotence is found in patients with Cushing's syndrome. Low plasma estrogen and testosterone levels are associated with female and male patients, respectively. Elevated adrenal androgen accounts for mild virilization in female patients with ACTH-dependent subtypes. The sites of action at which hypercortisolemia suppresses the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis were discussed.

  16. [Morphometry in Development of Red Deer's Adrenal Glands].

    PubMed

    Ovcharenko, N D; Gribanova, O G; Bondyreva, L A

    2015-01-01

    Histological structures and morphometric and some histochemical indicators of elk's adrenal gland development as subspecies of red deer in prenatal and postnatal ontogenies stages was studied. It was found that the growth of the fetus adrenal glands weight and the thickness of the structures adrenal glands fragments continue throughout the prenatal period of ontogeny. The cells of androgenic zone with single wandering sympathogoniae are differentiated in the adrenal glands in the second month of development. The androgenic and definite zone and the adrenal medulla are differentiated by the third month of development. At the 4 months, adrenal gland cortex zona glomerulosa and zona fasciculate-reticularis are differentiated; zona reticularis is differentiated only by the seventh month. By the eighth month, the structure of adrenal glands corresponds to the adrenal glands of a newborn. Full structural formation of the adrenal glands takes place in young animals by age 1.5. Obvious structural changes were not found late in the postnatal stages of development.

  17. Dexamethasone-suppression adrenal scintigraphy in hyperandrogenism: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Gross, M.D.; Freitas, J.E.; Swanson, D.P.; Woodbury, M.C.; Schteingart, D.E.; Beierwaltes, W.H.

    1981-01-01

    To assess the contribution of adrenal-derived androgens in women with hirsutism, adrenal scintigrams under dexamethasone suppression (DS) were performed on 35 women with increasing facial or body hair and irregular or absent menses. Based upon the DS regimen chosen (8 mg/d for 2 days or 4 md/d for 7 days before the injection of 6..beta..-(/sup 131/I)iodomethylnorcholesterol), three imaging patterns were identified. The first was the absence of uptake before 3 days (8-mg DS) or before 5 days (4-mg DS) after injection. This imaging pattern was seen in 17 of the 35 patients studied and was considered normal. The second pattern was bilateral uptake earlier than 3 days (8-mg DS regimen) or 5 days (4-mg DS) after injection. This was seen in 13 of the 35 patients and was interpreted as bilateral early visualization. Adrenal-vein catheterization performed on six patients with this pattern showed increased adrenal-vein testosterone. The third pattern, observed in five patients, was unilateral early visualization, which in four cases investigated to date was the result of an adrenocortical adenoma. This study confirms the adrenal cortex as a source of androgens in women with hirsutism and hyperandrogenism and demonstrates that DS adrenal scintigraphy can be utilized to identify those women in whom adrenal-derived androgens contribute to their hyperandrogenism.

  18. [Adrenal mass and adrenal insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Martínez Albaladejo, M; García López, B; Serrano Corredor, S; Alguacil García, G

    1996-12-01

    Primary adrenal insufficiency is a non frequent disease, that is declared in young adults and in the most of the cases is produced from an autoimmune mechanism or a tuberculous disease. The incidence of these forms in the different geographic areas is dependent of degree of irradication of the tuberculosis. We report the case of a patient with latent chronic adrenal insufficiency of tuberculous origin who was affected for an addisonian crisis during an intercurrent infectious disease, which permitted the diagnosis of the addisonian crisis, and Mal of Pott was moreover detected. Evolution with corticosteroid and specific treatment was very favorable.

  19. A novel cell layer without corticosteroid-synthesizing enzymes in rat adrenal cortex: histochemical detection and possible physiological role.

    PubMed

    Mitani, F; Suzuki, H; Hata, J; Ogishima, T; Shimada, H; Ishimura, Y

    1994-07-01

    A stratum of cells that did not contain both aldosterone synthase cytochrome P450 (cytochrome P450aldo) and cytochrome P45011 beta was found immunohistochemically between the zona glomerulosa and the zona fasciculata of the rat adrenal cortex. As cytochromes P450aldo and P45011 beta are the enzymes responsible for the biosynthesis of aldosterone and corticosterone, respectively, the cells there are considered to be incapable of synthesizing both aldosterone and corticosterone. Furthermore, the cells are regarded as inert in producing adrenal androgens, because rat adrenal cortex is known to lack steroid 17 alpha-hydroxylase. Thus, the stratum is composed of cells that do not synthesize any of the major corticosteroids in significant quantities. It was 5-10 cells thick under normal feeding conditions, but diminished to 4-5 cells thick when animals were maintained under Na restriction, which is known to stimulate the secretion of angiotensin-II. When the distribution of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine-labeled nuclei in the adrenocortex from BrdU-administered rats was examined, the stained nuclei were concentrated in and around the cell stratum. The pulse-chase experiments showed that the labeled cells migrated out of this layer and into the zonae fasciculata-reticularis. On the basis of these findings, we suggest that the newly discovered cell layer is the progenitor cell zone of the rat adrenal cortex.

  20. [Immunoendocrine associations in adrenal glands].

    PubMed

    Sterzl, I; Hrdá, P

    2010-12-01

    Immune and endocrine systems are basic regulatory mechanisms of organism and, including the nervous system, maintain the organism's homeostasis. The main immune system representatives are mononuclear cells, T- and B-cells and their products, in the endocrine system the main representatives are cells of the glands with inner secretion and their products. One of the most important glands for maintaining homeostasis are adrenal glands. It has been proven that either cells of the immune system, either endocrine cells can, although in trace amounts, produce mutually mediators of both systems (hormones, cytokines). Disorders in one system can lead to pathological symptoms in the other system. Also here represent adrenals an important model.

  1. [The effect of low doses of nakom on the hormonal secretion of the hypothalamo-hypophyseal-adrenal system in patients with infantile cerebral palsy].

    PubMed

    Brin, I L; Mashilov, K V

    1996-01-01

    The levels of hormones of hypothalamo-hypophyseal-adrenal system were measured in 14 10-14 year old children with infantile cerebral paralysis (ICP) with central catecholaminergic motor insufficiency. Contents of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), hydrocortisone (HC), somatotropic hormone, prolactin (P) were examined before and during Nacome administration (62.5 mg once daily in the morning). 110 patients of the same age with ICP and 18 children with acquired encephalopathy (EP) formed the control group. The elevations of ACTH, HC and P were revealed in spastic forms of ICP. Meanwhile nearly normal hormonal levels were observed in hyperkinetic forms of ICP and EP. The more pronounced effect was noted in "dopamine-dependent" children in which the drug's administration resulted in normalization of clinical and biochemical indices. Hyperkinetic phenomena revealed the connection between the character of neuromotor dyskinesias and the state of hypothalamo-hypophyseal-adrenal axis which is regulated by dopamine. The data obtained show hypofunction of dopaminergic neurotransmitter cerebral systems in patients with ICP that plays important pathogenetic role in development of disease with systemic manifestations. PMID:9281279

  2. Cardiovascular risk factors and events in women with androgen excess.

    PubMed

    Macut, D; Antić, I B; Bjekić-Macut, J

    2015-03-01

    Androgen excess (AE) was approximated to be present in 7% of the adult population of women. Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is the most prevalent among them, followed by idiopathic hirsutism (IH), congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), hyperandrogenic insulin-resistant acanthosis nigricans (HAIRAN) syndrome, and androgen-secreting neoplasms (ASNs). Increased cardiovascular risk was implicated in women with AE. Serum testosterone independently increases risk for cardiovascular disease (CVD), and correlates even with indices of subclinical atherosclerosis in various populations of postmenopausal women. Hyperandrogenism in PCOS is closely related to the aggravation of abdominal obesity, and together with insulin resistance forming the metabolic core for the development of CVD. However, phenotypic variability of PCOS generates significant influence on the cardiometabolic risks. Numerous risk factors in PCOS lead to 5-7 times higher risk for CVD and over 2-fold higher risk for coronary heart disease and stroke. However, issue on the cardiometabolic risk in postmenopausal women with hyperandrogenic history is still challenging. There is a significant overlapping in the CVD characteristics of women with PCOS and variants of CAH. Relevant clinical data on the prevalence and cardiometabolic risk and events in women with IH, HAIRAN syndrome or ASNs are scarce. The effects of various oral contraceptives (OCs) and antiandrogenic compounds on metabolic profile are varying, and could be related to the selected populations and different therapy regiments mainly conducted in women with PCOS. It is assumed relation of OCs containing antiandrogenic progestins to the increased risk of cardiovascular and thromboembolic events.

  3. Guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of adrenal insufficiency in the adult.

    PubMed

    de Miguel Novoa, Paz; Vela, Elena Torres; García, Nuria Palacios; Rodríguez, Manuela Moreira; Guerras, Icíar Solache; Martínez de Salinas Santamaría, María de Los Ángeles; Masó, Anna Aulinas

    2014-09-01

    Adrenal insufficiency (AI) is a disease characterized by a deficient production or action of glucocorticoids, with or without deficiency in mineral corticoids and/or adrenal androgens. It can result from disease intrinsic to the adrenal cortex (primary AI), from pituitary diseases that hamper the release of corticotropin (secondary AI) or from hypothalamic disorders that impair the secretion of the corticotropin-releasing hormone (tertiary AI). It is a disease with a low prevalence but its impact on the affected individual is very high as it can be life-threathening if not treated or lead to health problems if inadequately treated. However, currently there are no specific guidelines for the management of this disease. Therefore, at the proposal of the Spanish Society of Endocrinology and Nutrition (SEEN) board, a task-force under the Neuroendocrinology Knowledge Area of the SEEN was established, with the mandate of updating the diagnosis and treatment of AI. In fulfilment of this mandate the task-force has elaborated the present guide that, based on a comprehensive review of literature, is intended to provide an answer to questions related to the management of this disease. It is, therefore, an essentially practical document, mainly aimed at guiding the health professionals involved in the care of IA patients.

  4. Functioning adrenal myelolipoma: A rare cause of hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Jakka, Nagendar; Venkateshwarlu, J.; Satyavani, Naga; Neelaveni, K.; Ramesh, Jayanthy

    2013-01-01

    Co-occurrence of adrenal incidentaloma with hypertension calls for evaluation of endocrine causes including pheochromocytoma, Cushing's disease, and primary aldosteronism. We are reporting 40-years-old man who presented with hypertension and adrenal mass. He had elevated metanephrines, histology of resected adrenal mass revealed adrenal myelolipoma, and immuno-histochemistry was positive for chromogranin A. Both his blood pressure and urinary metanephrines returned to normal after surgery. The association of hypertension and adrenal myelolipoma may not be entirely coincidental, as it may be associated with secreting catecholamine. Literature on such an uncommon association is reviewed briefly as well. PMID:24251175

  5. Diagnosis and management of adrenal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Bancos, Irina; Hahner, Stefanie; Tomlinson, Jeremy; Arlt, Wiebke

    2015-03-01

    Adrenal insufficiency continues to be a challenge for patients, their physicians, and researchers. During the past decade, long-term studies have shown increased mortality and morbidity and impaired quality of life in patients with adrenal insufficiency. These findings might, at least partially, be due to the failure of glucocorticoid replacement therapy to closely resemble physiological diurnal secretion of cortisol. The potential effect of newly developed glucocorticoid drugs is a focus of research, as are the mechanisms potentially underlying increased morbidity and mortality. Adrenal crisis remains a threat to lives, and awareness and preventative measures now receive increasing attention. Awareness should be raised in medical teams and patients about adrenal insufficiency and management of adrenal crisis to improve clinical outcome.

  6. Adrenal adrenoceptors in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    de Lucia, Claudio; Femminella, Grazia D.; Gambino, Giuseppina; Pagano, Gennaro; Allocca, Elena; Rengo, Carlo; Silvestri, Candida; Leosco, Dario; Ferrara, Nicola; Rengo, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a chronic clinical syndrome characterized by the reduction in left ventricular (LV) function and it represents one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite considerable advances in pharmacological treatment, HF represents a severe clinical and social burden. Sympathetic outflow, characterized by increased circulating catecholamines (CA) biosynthesis and secretion, is peculiar in HF and sympatholytic treatments (as β-blockers) are presently being used for the treatment of this disease. Adrenal gland secretes Epinephrine (80%) and Norepinephrine (20%) in response to acetylcholine stimulation of nicotinic cholinergic receptors on the chromaffin cell membranes. This process is regulated by adrenergic receptors (ARs): α2ARs inhibit CA release through coupling to inhibitory Gi-proteins, and β ARs (mainly β2ARs) stimulate CA release through coupling to stimulatory Gs-proteins. All ARs are G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and GPCR kinases (GRKs) regulate their signaling and function. Adrenal GRK2-mediated α2AR desensitization and downregulation are increased in HF and seem to be a fundamental regulator of CA secretion from the adrenal gland. Consequently, restoration of adrenal α2AR signaling through the inhibition of GRK2 is a fascinating sympatholytic therapeutic strategy for chronic HF. This strategy could have several significant advantages over existing HF pharmacotherapies minimizing side-effects on extra-cardiac tissues and reducing the chronic activation of the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone and endothelin systems. The role of adrenal ARs in regulation of sympathetic hyperactivity opens interesting perspectives in understanding HF pathophysiology and in the identification of new therapeutic targets. PMID:25071591

  7. Autonomic control of adrenal function.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, A V; Jones, C T

    1993-01-01

    Recent studies of adrenal function in conscious calves are reviewed. These have involved collecting the whole of the adrenal effluent blood from the right adrenal gland at intervals and, where necessary, prior functional hypophysectomy by destruction of the pituitary stalk under general halothane anaesthesia 3 d previously. The adrenal medulla was found to release numerous neuropeptides, in addition to catecholamines, in response to stimulation of the peripheral end of the right splanchnic nerve, which was carried out below behavioural threshold. Many of these responses were enhanced by stimulating intermittently at a relatively high frequency. Intra-aortic infusions of a relatively low dose of acetylcholine (4.5 nmol min-1 kg-1) elicited similar responses. In the adrenal cortex, agonists which either potentiated the steroidogenic response to ACTH or exerted a direct steroidogenic action included VIP, CGRP, CRF and ACh acting via muscarinic receptors. Stimulation of the peripheral end of the right splanchnic nerve strongly potentiated the steroidogenic response to ACTH and there is compelling evidence that the innervation normally plays an important part in cortisol secretion. PMID:8300417

  8. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Vocal Folds in Women with Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia and Virilized Voices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nygren, Ulrika; Isberg, Bengt; Arver, Stefan; Hertegård, Stellan; Södersten, Maria; Nordenskjöld, Agneta

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Women with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) may develop a virilized voice due to late diagnosis or suboptimal suppression of adrenal androgens. Changes in the vocal folds due to virilization have not been studied in vivo. The purpose was to investigate if the thyroarytenoid (TA) muscle is affected by virilization and correlate…

  9. Acne vulgaris related to androgens - a review.

    PubMed

    Khondker, L; Khan, S I

    2014-01-01

    Sebum production is stimulated by androgens and is the key in the development of acne vulgaris. Several investigators have looked for direct relationships between serum androgen levels, sebum secretion rate and the presence of acne. The presence of acne in prepubertal girls and sebum production in both sexes correlate with serum dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) levels. Although increased serum androgen levels correlate with the presence of severe nodular acne in men and women, these levels are often within the normal range in mild to moderate acne. This raises the question of whether there is an increased local production of androgens within the sebaceous gland of patients with acne vulgaris that leads to increased sebum secretion.

  10. Hyperinsulinaemic androgen excess in adolescent girls.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez, Lourdes; Ong, Ken K; López-Bermejo, Abel; Dunger, David B; de Zegher, Francis

    2014-08-01

    Hyperinsulinaemic androgen excess is the most common cause of hirsutism, acne and menstrual irregularity in adolescent girls. Here, we propose that the disorder frequently originates from an absolute or relative excess of lipids in adipose tissue, and from associated changes in insulin sensitivity, gonadotropin secretion and ovarian androgen release. Girls from populations with genotypes attuned to nutritionally harsh conditions seem to be particularly vulnerable to the development of hyperinsulinaemic androgen excess in today's obesogenic environment. We propose that hirsutism, hyperandrogenaemia and menstrual irregularity (≥2 years after menarche) is used as a diagnostic triad for the disorder. No pharmacological therapy has been approved for girls with androgen excess; however, lifestyle intervention is essential to reduce adiposity. In girls without obesity who are not sexually active, insulin sensitization has more broadly normalizing effects than estradiol-progestogen combinations. The early recognition of girls at risk of developing hyperinsulinaemic androgen excess might enable prevention in childhood.

  11. Presence of kisspeptin-like immunoreactivity in human adrenal glands and adrenal tumors.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Shoji, Itaru; Shibasaki, Akiko; Kato, Ichiro; Hiraishi, Keisuke; Yamamoto, Hajime; Kaneko, Kiriko; Murakami, Osamu; Morimoto, Ryo; Satoh, Fumitoshi; Ito, Sadayoshi; Totsune, Kazuhito

    2010-05-01

    Kisspeptins are neuropeptides which activate the hypothalamo-pituitary gonadal axis and are considered to play important physiological roles in the reproduction. Kisspeptins have also been reported to stimulate the aldosterone secretion from the adrenal cortex. However, the expression of kisspeptins in human adrenal glands and adrenal tumors has not been clarified yet. We, therefore, studied the presence of kisspeptin-like immunoreactivity (LI) in human adrenal glands and adrenal tumors (adrenocortical adenomas, adrenocortical carcinomas, and pheochromocytomas) by radioimmunoassay and immunocytochemistry. Kisspeptin-LI was detected in all the tissues examined; normal portions of adrenal glands (3.0 +/- 2.3 pmol/g wet weight, n = 21, mean +/- SD), aldosterone-producing adenomas (4.6 +/- 3.3 pmol/g wet weight, n = 10), cortisol-producing adenomas (2.7 +/- 1.4 pmol/g wet weight, n = 14), adrenocortical carcinomas (1.7 +/- 0.2 pmol/g wet weight, n = 4), and pheochromocytomas (1.8 +/- 0.8 pmol/g wet weight, n = 6). There was no significant difference in kisspeptin-LI levels among them. Immunocytochemistry showed positive kisspeptin-immunostaining in normal adrenal glands, with stronger immunostaining found in the medulla. Furthermore, positive kisspeptin-immunostaining was found in all types of adrenal tumors examined; adrenocortical adenomas, adrenocortical carcinomas, and pheochromocytomas. The intensity of kisspeptin-immunostaining in these adrenal tumors was, however, not so strong as that in normal adrenal medulla. The present study has shown for the first time the presence of kisspeptin-LI in adrenal glands and adrenal tumors.

  12. Bone Mineral Status in Children with Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Fleischman, Amy; Ringelheim, Julie; Feldman, Henry A.; Gordon, Catherine M.

    2013-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is caused by a deficiency in an adrenal enzyme resulting in alterations in Cortisol and aldosterone production. Bone status is affected by chronic glucocorticoid therapy and excess androgen exposure in children with CAH. This cross-sectional study enrolled participants with 21-hydroxylase deficiency from a pediatric referral center. Bone mineral density in the participants was normal when compared to age, gender and ethnicity adjusted standards, with respect to chronological age or bone age. Lean body mass was positively correlated with bone mineral content (BMC), independent of fat mass (p <0.001). There was no significant correlation between glucocorticoid dose or serum androgen levels and skeletal endpoints. In conclusion, lean body mass appears to be an important correlate of BMC in patients with CAH. The normal bone status may be explained by the differential effects of glucocorticoids on growing bone, beneficial androgen effects, or other disease specific factors. PMID:17396440

  13. Clinicopathological correlates of adrenal Cushing's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Duan, Kai; Hernandez, Karen Gomez; Mete, Ozgur

    2015-06-01

    Endogenous Cushing's syndrome is a rare endocrine disorder that incurs significant cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, due to glucocorticoid excess. It comprises adrenal (20%) and non-adrenal (80%) aetiologies. While the majority of cases are attributed to pituitary or ectopic corticotropin (ACTH) overproduction, primary cortisol-producing adrenal cortical lesions are increasingly recognised in the pathophysiology of Cushing's syndrome. Our understanding of this disease has progressed substantially over the past decade. Recently, important mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of adrenal hypercortisolism have been elucidated with the discovery of mutations in cyclic AMP signalling (PRKACA, PRKAR1A, GNAS, PDE11A, PDE8B), armadillo repeat containing 5 gene (ARMC5) a putative tumour suppressor gene, aberrant G-protein-coupled receptors, and intra-adrenal secretion of ACTH. Accurate subtyping of Cushing's syndrome is crucial for treatment decision-making and requires a complete integration of clinical, biochemical, imaging and pathology findings. Pathological correlates in the adrenal glands include hyperplasia, adenoma and carcinoma. While the most common presentation is diffuse adrenocortical hyperplasia secondary to excess ACTH production, this entity is usually treated with pituitary or ectopic tumour resection. Therefore, when confronted with adrenalectomy specimens in the setting of Cushing's syndrome, surgical pathologists are most commonly exposed to adrenocortical adenomas, carcinomas and primary macronodular or micronodular hyperplasia. This review provides an update on the rapidly evolving knowledge of adrenal Cushing's syndrome and discusses the clinicopathological correlations of this important disease. PMID:26045561

  14. Clinicopathological correlates of adrenal Cushing's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Duan, Kai; Gomez Hernandez, Karen; Mete, Ozgur

    2015-03-01

    Endogenous Cushing's syndrome is a rare endocrine disorder that incurs significant cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, due to glucocorticoid excess. It comprises adrenal (20%) and non-adrenal (80%) aetiologies. While the majority of cases are attributed to pituitary or ectopic corticotropin (ACTH) overproduction, primary cortisol-producing adrenal cortical lesions are increasingly recognised in the pathophysiology of Cushing's syndrome. Our understanding of this disease has progressed substantially over the past decade. Recently, important mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of adrenal hypercortisolism have been elucidated with the discovery of mutations in cyclic AMP signalling (PRKACA, PRKAR1A, GNAS, PDE11A, PDE8B), armadillo repeat containing 5 gene (ARMC5) a putative tumour suppressor gene, aberrant G-protein-coupled receptors, and intra-adrenal secretion of ACTH. Accurate subtyping of Cushing's syndrome is crucial for treatment decision-making and requires a complete integration of clinical, biochemical, imaging and pathology findings. Pathological correlates in the adrenal glands include hyperplasia, adenoma and carcinoma. While the most common presentation is diffuse adrenocortical hyperplasia secondary to excess ACTH production, this entity is usually treated with pituitary or ectopic tumour resection. Therefore, when confronted with adrenalectomy specimens in the setting of Cushing's syndrome, surgical pathologists are most commonly exposed to adrenocortical adenomas, carcinomas and primary macronodular or micronodular hyperplasia. This review provides an update on the rapidly evolving knowledge of adrenal Cushing's syndrome and discusses the clinicopathological correlations of this important disease. PMID:25425660

  15. Clinicopathological correlates of adrenal Cushing's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Duan, Kai; Gomez Hernandez, Karen; Mete, Ozgur

    2015-03-01

    Endogenous Cushing's syndrome is a rare endocrine disorder that incurs significant cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, due to glucocorticoid excess. It comprises adrenal (20%) and non-adrenal (80%) aetiologies. While the majority of cases are attributed to pituitary or ectopic corticotropin (ACTH) overproduction, primary cortisol-producing adrenal cortical lesions are increasingly recognised in the pathophysiology of Cushing's syndrome. Our understanding of this disease has progressed substantially over the past decade. Recently, important mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of adrenal hypercortisolism have been elucidated with the discovery of mutations in cyclic AMP signalling (PRKACA, PRKAR1A, GNAS, PDE11A, PDE8B), armadillo repeat containing 5 gene (ARMC5) a putative tumour suppressor gene, aberrant G-protein-coupled receptors, and intra-adrenal secretion of ACTH. Accurate subtyping of Cushing's syndrome is crucial for treatment decision-making and requires a complete integration of clinical, biochemical, imaging and pathology findings. Pathological correlates in the adrenal glands include hyperplasia, adenoma and carcinoma. While the most common presentation is diffuse adrenocortical hyperplasia secondary to excess ACTH production, this entity is usually treated with pituitary or ectopic tumour resection. Therefore, when confronted with adrenalectomy specimens in the setting of Cushing's syndrome, surgical pathologists are most commonly exposed to adrenocortical adenomas, carcinomas and primary macronodular or micronodular hyperplasia. This review provides an update on the rapidly evolving knowledge of adrenal Cushing's syndrome and discusses the clinicopathological correlations of this important disease.

  16. Clinicopathological correlates of adrenal Cushing's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Duan, Kai; Hernandez, Karen Gomez; Mete, Ozgur

    2015-06-01

    Endogenous Cushing's syndrome is a rare endocrine disorder that incurs significant cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, due to glucocorticoid excess. It comprises adrenal (20%) and non-adrenal (80%) aetiologies. While the majority of cases are attributed to pituitary or ectopic corticotropin (ACTH) overproduction, primary cortisol-producing adrenal cortical lesions are increasingly recognised in the pathophysiology of Cushing's syndrome. Our understanding of this disease has progressed substantially over the past decade. Recently, important mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of adrenal hypercortisolism have been elucidated with the discovery of mutations in cyclic AMP signalling (PRKACA, PRKAR1A, GNAS, PDE11A, PDE8B), armadillo repeat containing 5 gene (ARMC5) a putative tumour suppressor gene, aberrant G-protein-coupled receptors, and intra-adrenal secretion of ACTH. Accurate subtyping of Cushing's syndrome is crucial for treatment decision-making and requires a complete integration of clinical, biochemical, imaging and pathology findings. Pathological correlates in the adrenal glands include hyperplasia, adenoma and carcinoma. While the most common presentation is diffuse adrenocortical hyperplasia secondary to excess ACTH production, this entity is usually treated with pituitary or ectopic tumour resection. Therefore, when confronted with adrenalectomy specimens in the setting of Cushing's syndrome, surgical pathologists are most commonly exposed to adrenocortical adenomas, carcinomas and primary macronodular or micronodular hyperplasia. This review provides an update on the rapidly evolving knowledge of adrenal Cushing's syndrome and discusses the clinicopathological correlations of this important disease.

  17. The innervation of the mammalian adrenal gland.

    PubMed Central

    Parker, T L; Kesse, W K; Mohamed, A A; Afework, M

    1993-01-01

    Early conflicting reports and the lack of sensitive anatomical methods have led to an oversimplified view of adrenal gland innervation. It was not until the introduction of nerve fibre tracing techniques in the mid-1970s that the true complexity of adrenal innervation began to emerge. The first part of this article comprises a brief review of these and other relevant reports dealing with both medullary and cortical innervation. In the second part a detailed account is given of the work undertaken in Rex Coupland's Department relating to the innervation of the rodent and primate adrenal medulla using a retrograde fluorescent tracer technique. It was concluded that, in all 3 species studied, the adrenal medulla receives a sympathetic and parasympathetic efferent and an afferent innervation. The possible interrelationship between neural control of cortical and medullar secretions is discussed briefly. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 5 PMID:8300416

  18. Naloxone inhibits and morphine potentiates. The adrenal steroidogenic response to ACTH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heybach, J. P.; Vernikos, J.

    1980-01-01

    The adrenal actions were stereospecific since neither the positve stereoisomer of morphine, nor that of naloxone, had any effect on the adrenal response to exogenous adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH). The administration of human beta endorphin to phyophysectomized rats had no effect on the adrenal corticosterone concentration nor did it alter the response of the adrenal gland to ACTH. These results indicate that morphine can potentiate the action of ACTH on the adrenal by a direct, stereospecific, dose dependent mechanism that is prevented by naloxone pretreatment and which may involve competition for ACTH receptors on the corticosterone secreting cells of the adrenal cortex.

  19. How Is Adrenal Surgery Performed?

    MedlinePlus

    HOME ADRENAL GLANDS Background Where are the adrenal glands? What do the adrenal glands do? Is this adrenal tumor a genetic problem? Primary hyperaldosteronism (aldosterone-producing tumor) What is primary hyperaldosteronism? Signs ...

  20. Association between megestrol acetate treatment and symptomatic adrenal insufficiency with hypogonadism in male patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Dev, Rony; Del Fabbro, Egidio; Bruera, Eduardo

    2007-09-15

    Patients with advanced cancer may develop cachexia, which is often treated with megestrol acetate (MA). In addition to thromboembolic disease, MA may cause symptomatic suppression of the hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis. In male patients with cancer, treatment with MA may also suppress the gonadal axis, resulting in symptomatic androgen deficiency. Three cases are presented to highlight the symptomatic burden of adrenal insufficiency and hypogonadism. Clinicians need an increased awareness of the complication of adrenal insufficiency secondary to MA treatment and a low threshold to test for adrenal and gonadal dysfunction in symptomatic male patients with advanced cancer.

  1. Laparoscopic Adrenal Gland Removal

    MedlinePlus

    ... adrenal tumors that appear malignant. What are the Advantages of Laparoscopic Adrenal Gland Removal? In the past, ... of procedure and the patients overall condition. Common advantages are: Less postoperative pain Shorter hospital stay Quicker ...

  2. Adrenal Gland Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    The adrenal glands are small glands located on top of each kidney. They produce hormones that you can't live ... stress and has many other important functions. With adrenal gland disorders, your glands make too much or not ...

  3. Adrenal Gland Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... either benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer. Malignant ones are. Most adrenal gland tumors are ... and may not require treatment. Malignant adrenal gland cancers are uncommon. Types of tumors include Adrenocortical carcinoma - ...

  4. Adrenal imaging (Part 2): Medullary and secondary adrenal lesions

    PubMed Central

    Dhamija, Ekta; Panda, Ananya; Das, Chandan J.; Gupta, A. K.

    2015-01-01

    Adrenal malignancies can be either primary adrenal tumors or secondary metastases, with metastases representing the most common malignant adrenal lesion. While imaging cannot always clearly differentiate between various adrenal malignancies, presence of certain imaging features, in conjunction with appropriate clinical background and hormonal profile, can suggest the appropriate diagnosis. The second part of the article on adrenal imaging describes adrenal medullary tumors, secondary adrenal lesions, bilateral adrenal lesions, adrenal incidentalomas and provides an algorithmic approach to adrenal lesions based on current imaging recommendations. PMID:25593821

  5. Disorders of adrenal development.

    PubMed

    Ferraz-de-Souza, Bruno; Achermann, John C

    2008-01-01

    Human adrenal development is a complex and relatively poorly understood process. However, significant insight into some of the mechanisms regulating adrenal development and function is being obtained through the analysis of individuals and families with adrenal hypoplasia. Adrenal hypoplasia can occur: (1) secondary to defects in pituitary adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) synthesis, processing and release (secondary adrenal hypoplasia; e.g. HESX1, LHX4, SOX3, TPIT, pituitary POMC, PC1); (2) as part of several ACTH resistance syndromes (e.g. MC2R/ACTHR, MRAP, Alacrima, Achalasia, Addison disease), or as (3) a primary defect in the development of the adrenal gland itself (primary adrenal hypoplasia; e.g. DAX1/NR0B1 - dosage-sensitive sex reversal, adrenal hypoplasia congenita critical region on the X chromosome 1). Indeed, the X-linked form of primary adrenal hypoplasia due to deletions or mutations in the orphan nuclear receptor DAX1 occurs in around half of male infants presenting with a salt-losing adrenal crisis, where no obvious steroidogenic defect (e.g. 21-hydroxylase deficiency), metabolic abnormality (e.g. neonatal adrenoleukodystrophy) or physical cause (e.g. adrenal haemorrhage) is found. Establishing the underlying basis of adrenal failure can have important implications for investigating associated features, the likely long-term approach to treatment, and for counselling families about the risk of other children being affected.

  6. Ovarian adrenal interactions during the menopausal transition

    PubMed Central

    Lasley, B. L.; Crawford, S. L.; Mcconnell, D. S.

    2015-01-01

    Observations over the past decade using longitudinal data reveal a gender-specific shift in adrenal steroid production. This shift is represented by an increase in the circulating concentrations of delta 5 steroids in 85% of all women and is initiated only after the menopausal transition has begun. While the associated rise in the major adrenal androgen, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), is modest, the parallel rises in dehydroepiandrosteone (DHEA) and androstenediol (Adiol) are much more robust. These increases in circulating steroid concentrations are qualitatively similar on average between ethnicities but quantitatively different between individual women. Both circulating testosterone (T) and androstenedione (Adione) also rise concomitantly but modestly by comparison. This phenomenon presents a new and provocative aspect to the endocrine foundations of the menopausal transition and may provide important clues to understanding the fundamentals of mid-aged women's healthy aging, particularly an explanation for the wide diversity in phenotypes observed during the MT as well as their different responses to hormone replacement therapies. Experimental studies using the nonhuman primate animal model show an acute adrenal response to human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) challenge as well as the presence of luteinizing hormone receptors (LHR) in their adrenal cortices. These experimental results support the concept that LHRs are recruited to the adrenal cortices of mid-aged women that subsequently function to respond to increasing circulating LH to shunt pregnenolone metabolites towards the delta 5 pathway. Future investigations are required to determine the relationship of these changes in adrenal function to symptoms and health outcomes of mid-aged women. PMID:24346252

  7. Mechanisms of androgen deficiency in human immunodeficiency virus-infected women with the wasting syndrome.

    PubMed

    Grinspoon, S; Corcoran, C; Stanley, T; Rabe, J; Wilkie, S

    2001-09-01

    Although prior studies suggest reduced androgen levels in women with acquired immune deficiency syndrome wasting, little is known regarding the regulation of adrenal and ovarian androgen secretion in such patients. We investigated ovarian and adrenal function in 13 human immunodeficiency virus-infected women with acquired immune deficiency syndrome wasting and 21 age- and body mass index-matched healthy control subjects studied in the early follicular phase. Subjects received hCG (5000 U, im) on d 1 and Cosyntropin (0.25 mg, i.v.) on d 3 after dexamethasone (1 mg, orally, at 2400 h) pretreatment on d 2. At baseline, human immunodeficiency virus-infected subjects demonstrated significantly reduced T [18 +/- 2 vs. 25 +/- 2 ng/dl (0.6 +/- 0.1 vs. 0.9 +/- 0.1 nmol/liter); P = 0.02], free T [1.5 +/- 0.1 vs. 2.4 +/- 0.2 pg/ml (5.3 +/- 0.5 vs. 8.3 +/- 0.6 pmol/liter); P = 0.001], androstenedione [119 +/- 6 vs. 162 +/- 14 ng/dl (4.16 +/- 0.20 vs. 5.66 +/- 0.48 nmol/liter); P = 0.02], and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate [0.96 +/- 0.17 vs. 1.55 +/- 0.19 microg/ml (2.6 +/- 0.5 vs. 4.2 +/- 0.5 micromol/liter); P = 0.047] levels compared with the control subjects. T [8 +/- 2 vs. 6 +/- 2 ng/dl (0.3 +/- 0.1 vs. 0.2 +/- 0.1 nmol/liter); P = 0.48], free T [0.5 +/- 0.2 vs. 0.4 +/- 0.1 pg/ml (1.7 +/- 0.7 vs. 1.5 +/- 0.5 pmol/liter); P = 0.85], 17 hydroxyprogesterone [0.5 +/- 0.2 vs. 0.7 +/- 0.2 microg/liter (1.6 +/- 0.6 vs. 2.0 +/- 0.6 nmol/liter); P = 0.63], and androstenedione [-1 +/- 12 vs. 8 +/- 11 ng/dl (-0.03 +/- 0.42 vs. 0.28 +/- 0.39 nmol/liter), P = 0.61] responses to hCG were not different between the groups. Cortisol responses were increased and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate responses were decreased in the human immunodeficiency virus-infected vs. control subjects after ACTH stimulation. The ratio of DHEA to cortisol was significantly decreased at 60 (71 +/- 11 vs. 107 +/- 10; P = 0.02) and 90 (63 +/- 8 vs. 102 +/- 9; P = 0.004) min post-ACTH in the human immunodeficiency

  8. The Next 150 Years of Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Turcu, Adina F.; Auchus, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasias (CAH) are a group of autosomal recessive defects in cortisol biosynthesis. Substantial progress has been made since the description of the first report, 150 years ago. This article reviews some of the recent advances in the genetics, diagnosis and treatment of CAH. In addition, we underline the aspects where further progress is required, including, among others, better diagnostic modalities for the mild phenotype and for some of the rare forms of disease, elucidation of epigenetic factors that lead to different phenotypes in patients with identical genotype and expending on treatment options for controlling the adrenal androgen excess. PMID:26047556

  9. Therapeutic innovations in endocrine diseases - Part 2: Modified-release glucocorticoid compounds: What good do they provide to the adrenal insufficient patient?

    PubMed

    Reznik, Yves

    2016-06-01

    Intensive researches on modified-release hydrocortisone compounds developed in the last decade have paved the way for obtaining near-physiological glucocorticoid replacement in the adrenal insufficient patient. The dual-release Duocort (Plenadren) allows a unique morning intake and closely mimics the circadian rhythm of cortisol secretion, except for the progressive nocturnal increase and the morning cortisol peak observed in healthy subjects. Duocort treatment during a 6-month period was associated with favorable changes in weight, blood pressure and glycemic control in patients with diabetes mellitus. Chronocort, a multiparticulate formulation with sustained-release properties replaces endogenous cortisol in a near-physiologic manner and fully restores the end of night cortisol peak. A twice-daily Chronocort regimen was effective in controlling androgen excess in adults with CAH. Recently, the new multiparticulate formulation Infacort was designed for the treatment of adrenal insufficiency during infancy. Long term effectiveness and safety studies are needed until these promising hydrocortisone formulations become routine therapeutic tools in adrenal insufficiency. PMID:27260966

  10. What is the best approach to the teenage patient presenting with nonclassical congenital adrenal hyperplasia: should we always treat with glucocorticoids?

    PubMed

    Matthews, Deborah; Cheetham, Tim

    2013-03-01

    Patients with Congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to partial deficiency in the enzyme 21-hydroxylase can present in childhood or adolescence with signs of adrenal androgen excess. Strategies to reduce the impact of androgen excess in females include cosmetic measures as well as antiandrogens and agents such as the combined oral contraceptive pill. Glucocorticoid may not be appropriate straightaway but can be introduced if other measures are ineffective or when pregnancy is planned.

  11. An analysis of the relationship between insulin resistance and the activity of steroid C17,20-lyase and 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase in ovaries and adrenals in women with polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vrbíklová, J; Hill, M; Stárka, L; Vondra, K; Sulcová, J; Snajderová, M; Cibula, D; Pobisová, Z; Bendlová, B

    2000-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is connected with insulin resistance (IR), and often with the hypersecretion of adrenal androgens. Mutual relationships between IR and adrenal and ovarian steroidogenesis were investigated in the group of 19 oligo/amenorhoeic women with PCOS. The age and body mass index (BMI) of the patients were 21+/-4.7 years and 26.4+/-5 kg/m2 (average+/-SD), respectively. All underwent a 60-minute adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) stimulation test, a gonadoliberin analogue (GnRHa) test with buserelin and an oral glucose tolerance test (oGTT) in the early follicular phase of the menstrual cycle. When absolute stimulated steroid levels after GnRHa were studied, a significant positive correlation between DHEA and area under curve during oGTT for C peptide (AUC-CP) (r=0.477, p= 0.039) and a borderline negative correlation (r=-0.404, p= 0.087) between AUC-CP and 17-OH progesterone, were found. Considering steroid values after ACTH, a significant positive correlation of IR index was found only with 17-OH-progesterone (r=0.499, p= 0.03). When stimulated enzymatic activities (expressed as product/ precursor ratios) were analyzed using factor analysis, a positive relationship between IR and ovarian C17,20-lyase in both delta4 and delta5 pathway was revealed. On the other hand, no relationship was confirmed between IR and enzymatic activities in the adrenals. The authors conclude that insulin resistance and/or hyperinsulinemia is probably not the primary factor responsible for the exaggerated adrenal androgen secretion found in a great number of patients with PCOS. PMID:11083066

  12. Hemorrhagic adrenal cyst.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, M D

    1993-05-01

    Adrenal cysts are uncommon. They may be fatal if they hemorrhage and are not rapidly diagnosed. Most adrenal cysts are small and asymptomatic. When they are symptomatic, it is usually because the cyst has enlarged, causing flank discomfort, gastrointestinal complaints, and hemorrhage. Occasionally, a palpable mass may be found. It is thought that hemorrhage occurs secondary to trauma or some toxic or infectious process. The author describes a case in which a previously healthy man had a sudden hemorrhage within a benign adrenal cyst with infarction of the kidney. A discussion of adrenal cysts follows.

  13. Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Speiser, Phyllis W.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia associated with deficiency of steroid 21-hydroxylase is the most common inborn error in adrenal function and the most common cause of adrenal insufficiency in the pediatric age group. As patients now survive into adulthood, adult health-care providers must also be familiar with this condition. Over the past several years, F1000 has published numerous commentaries updating research and practical guidelines for this condition. The purposes of this review are to summarize basic information defining congenital adrenal hyperplasia and to highlight current knowledge and controversies in management. PMID:26339484

  14. Mechanisms of drug resistance that target the androgen axis in castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC).

    PubMed

    Penning, Trevor M

    2015-09-01

    Castrate resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is the fatal-form of prostate cancer and remains androgen dependent. The reactivation of the androgen axis occurs due to adaptive intratumoral androgen biosynthesis which can be driven by adrenal androgens and/or by changes in the androgen receptor (AR) including AR gene amplification. These mechanisms are targeted with P450c17 inhibitors e.g., abiraterone acetate and AR super-antagonists e.g., enzalutamide, respectively. Clinical experience indicates that with either agent an initial response is followed by drug resistance and the patient clinically progresses on these agents. This article reviews the mechanisms of intrinsic and acquired drug resistance that target the androgen axis and how this might be surmounted.

  15. Immunolocalization of steroidogenic enzymes in equine fetal adrenal glands during mid-late gestation.

    PubMed

    Weng, Qiang; Tanaka, Yumiko; Taniyama, Hiroyuki; Tsunoda, Nobuo; Nambo, Yasuo; Watanabe, Gen; Taya, Kazuyoshi

    2007-10-01

    To elucidate the relationship between steroidogenic hormones and developing adrenal glands, we investigated the immunolocalization of steroidogenic enzymes in equine fetal adrenal glands during mid-late gestation. Fetal adrenal glands were obtained from three horses at 217, 225 and 235 days of gestation. Steroidogenic enzymes were immunolocalized using polyclonal antisera raised against bovine adrenal cholesterol side-chain cleavage cytochrome P450 (P450scc), human placental 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3betaHSD), porcine testicular 17alpha-hydroxylase cytochrome P450 (P450c17) and human placental aromatase cytochrome P450 (P450arom). Histologically, cortex and medulla cells were clearly observed in the three fetal adrenal gland tissue samples. P450scc and P450c17 were identified in cortex cells close to medulla cells and in some medulla cells in the fetal adrenal glands. P450arom was present in both cortex and medulla cells in the fetal adrenal glands. However, 3betaHSD was not found in any of the equine fetal adrenal gland tissue samples. These results suggest that equine fetal adrenal glands have the ability to synthesize androgen and estrogen, which may play an important physiological role in the development of equine fetal adrenal glands.

  16. Role of adrenal imaging in surgical management

    SciTech Connect

    Lamki, L.M.; Haynie, T.P. )

    1990-03-01

    Adrenal imaging using radiopharmaceuticals is a functional test that can contribute significantly to surgical management and follow-up of patients with either benign or malignant conditions of the adrenal cortex and medulla. Imaging of the cortex is achieved by iodine-131-labeled iodomethyl nor-cholesterol (NP-59), while adrenal medulla imaging can be successfully accomplished by 131I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), which localizes in the adrenergic nerve terminal with norepinephrine. Both tests carry high sensitivity and specificity for functional tumors and hyperplasia, and often better than CT scanning. This article reviews the current status and clinical utility of nuclear imaging of the adrenal cortex in congenital hyperplasia, low renin hypertension and aldosteronism, and Cushing's syndrome. Adrenal medulla imaging is reviewed in light of our experience at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in pheochromocytoma, neuroblastoma, and other neuroectodermal tumors. Investigation of {sup 131}I-MIBG therapy of metastatic tumors of neuroectodermal origin potentially offers a means of at least controlling symptoms of hormonal secretion in these patients. 40 references.

  17. A rare adrenal incidentaloma: adrenal schwannoma.

    PubMed

    Adas, Mine; Ozulker, Filiz; Adas, Gokhan; Koc, Bora; Ozulker, Tamer; Sahin, Ilknur Mansuroglu

    2013-01-01

    Adrenal schwannoma is an extremely uncommon cause of incidentaloma. It originates from neural sheath Schwann cells of the adrenal gland. We report the case of a left adrenal schwannoma incidentally discovered in a 32-year-old woman during examination of bloated feeling and stomach ache. The patient was incidentally found to have a left adrenal mass of 9 cm on abdominal ultrasonography. Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen and [(18)F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) were also performed. Metabolic evaluation was unremarkable. Due to the large size of the tumor, left adrenalectomy was performed. The postoperative course was uneventful. Histological examination established the diagnosis of schwannoma. This diagnosis was supported by immunohistochemistry of S-100 and vimentin positivity. In conclusion, adrenal schwannoma is an extremely rare entity and can grow considerably in size. The present case report emphasizes that clinicians should be aware of the possibility of retroperitoneal schwannoma. Total excision of benign schwannoma is associated with a favorable outcome. To our knowledge, there are case reports of schwannoma with CT and magnetic resonance imaging findings in the literature, although this is the first schwannoma case with PET-CT imaging. PMID:24403879

  18. A Rare Adrenal Incidentaloma: Adrenal Schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    Adas, Mine; Ozulker, Filiz; Adas, Gokhan; Koc, Bora; Ozulker, Tamer; Sahin, Ilknur Mansuroglu

    2013-01-01

    Adrenal schwannoma is an extremely uncommon cause of incidentaloma. It originates from neural sheath Schwann cells of the adrenal gland. We report the case of a left adrenal schwannoma incidentally discovered in a 32-year-old woman during examination of bloated feeling and stomach ache. The patient was incidentally found to have a left adrenal mass of 9 cm on abdominal ultrasonography. Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen and [18F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) were also performed. Metabolic evaluation was unremarkable. Due to the large size of the tumor, left adrenalectomy was performed. The postoperative course was uneventful. Histological examination established the diagnosis of schwannoma. This diagnosis was supported by immunohistochemistry of S-100 and vimentin positivity. In conclusion, adrenal schwannoma is an extremely rare entity and can grow considerably in size. The present case report emphasizes that clinicians should be aware of the possibility of retroperitoneal schwannoma. Total excision of benign schwannoma is associated with a favorable outcome. To our knowledge, there are case reports of schwannoma with CT and magnetic resonance imaging findings in the literature, although this is the first schwannoma case with PET-CT imaging. PMID:24403879

  19. Involvement of the hypothalamic--pituitary--adrenal/gonadal axis and the peripheral nervous system in rheumatoid arthritis: viewpoint based on a systemic pathogenetic role.

    PubMed

    Straub, R H; Cutolo, M

    2001-03-01

    From the compendium presented above, the following statements become evident: 1) Inappropriately low secretion of cortisol in relation to inflammation is a typical feature of the inflammatory disease in patients with RA. 2) The secretion of adrenal androgens is significantly reduced, which is a problem in postmenopausal women and elderly men due to a lack of downstream sex hormones. 3) Serum levels of testosterone are markedly reduced in RA. 4) Sympathetic nerve fibers are markedly reduced in the synovial tissue of patients with RA, whereas proinflammatory sensory fibers (substance P) are present. 5) Substance P serves to continuously sense painful stimuli in the periphery, and the nociceptive input from the inflamed joint shows a large amplification in the spinal cord. This leads to continuous pain with stabilization of the afferent sensory input and continuous release of proinflammatory substance P into the lumen of the joint. From these facts it is obvious that alterations of the systemic antiinflammatory feedback systems contribute significantly to the pathogenesis of RA. Disease therapy directed at these alterations must provide a mechanism to replace the adrenal glands (glucocorticoids), the gonadal glands (androgens), and the sympathetic nervous system (adenosine increase by low-dose MTX, sulfasalazine, and salicylates) in order to integrate their immunosuppressive effects at the local site of synovial inflammation. Although local processes of the adaptive immune system are important in pathogenesis in the acute phase of RA, these mechanisms may be less important during the chronic phase of the disease in the absence of a specific trigger. We believe that a defect of systemic antiinflammatory feedback systems is an important factor in the perpetuation of RA. This review reinforces the belief that combined therapeutic approaches on a neuroendocrine immune basis are of crucial importance in a pathogenetically oriented therapy of RA.

  20. Adrenal insufficiency: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Munver, Ravi; Volfson, Ilya A

    2006-01-01

    Adrenal insufficiency is a disorder characterized by hypoactive adrenal glands resulting in insufficient production of the hormones cortisol and aldosterone by the adrenal cortex. This disorder may develop as a primary failure of the adrenal cortex or be secondary to an abnormality of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis. Patients with adrenal insufficiency often are asymptomatic or they may present with fatigue, muscle weakness, weight loss, low blood pressure, and sometimes darkening of the skin. The presentation of adrenal insufficiency varies dramatically and poses a major diagnostic dilemma. This review focuses on the diagnosis and treatment of primary and secondary adrenal insufficiency.

  1. Steroid Sulfatase Deficiency and Androgen Activation Before and After Puberty

    PubMed Central

    Idkowiak, Jan; Taylor, Angela E.; Subtil, Sandra; O'Neil, Donna M.; Vijzelaar, Raymon; Dias, Renuka P.; Amin, Rakesh; Barrett, Timothy G.; Shackleton, Cedric H. L.; Kirk, Jeremy M. W.; Moss, Celia

    2016-01-01

    Context: Steroid sulfatase (STS) cleaves the sulfate moiety off steroid sulfates, including dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) sulfate (DHEAS), the inactive sulfate ester of the adrenal androgen precursor DHEA. Deficient DHEA sulfation, the opposite enzymatic reaction to that catalyzed by STS, results in androgen excess by increased conversion of DHEA to active androgens. STS deficiency (STSD) due to deletions or inactivating mutations in the X-linked STS gene manifests with ichthyosis, but androgen synthesis and metabolism in STSD have not been studied in detail yet. Patients and Methods: We carried out a cross-sectional study in 30 males with STSD (age 6–27 y; 13 prepubertal, 5 peripubertal, and 12 postpubertal) and 38 age-, sex-, and Tanner stage-matched healthy controls. Serum and 24-hour urine steroid metabolome analysis was performed by mass spectrometry and genetic analysis of the STS gene by multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification and Sanger sequencing. Results: Genetic analysis showed STS mutations in all patients, comprising 27 complete gene deletions, 1 intragenic deletion and 2 missense mutations. STSD patients had apparently normal pubertal development. Serum and 24-hour urinary DHEAS were increased in STSD, whereas serum DHEA and testosterone were decreased. However, total 24-hour urinary androgen excretion was similar to controls, with evidence of increased 5α-reductase activity in STSD. Prepubertal healthy controls showed a marked increase in the serum DHEA to DHEAS ratio that was absent in postpubertal controls and in STSD patients of any pubertal stage. Conclusions: In STSD patients, an increased 5α-reductase activity appears to compensate for a reduced rate of androgen generation by enhancing peripheral androgen activation in affected patients. In healthy controls, we discovered a prepubertal surge in the serum DHEA to DHEAS ratio that was absent in STSD, indicative of physiologically up-regulated STS activity before puberty. This may

  2. Role of adrenals in the mobilization of carbohydrate and fat resources after overstimulation of rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khechninashvili, G. G.

    1980-01-01

    The role of the cortical and cerebral layers of the adrenal glands in mobilizing carbohydrate and fatty resources in response to the effect of an extreme stimulant was investigated. It is shown that following adrenodemedullation and adrenalectomy, the leading role is played by the secretion of the adrenal medullary layer, whereas the role of suprarenals in the mobilization of fats is only slightly pronounced.

  3. Acute adrenal crisis

    MedlinePlus

    ... condition that occurs when there is not enough cortisol. This is a hormone produced by the adrenal ... parts. The outer portion, called the cortex, produces cortisol. This is an important hormone for controlling blood ...

  4. Renin knockout rat: control of adrenal aldosterone and corticosterone synthesis in vitro and adrenal gene expression

    PubMed Central

    Gehrand, Ashley; Bruder, Eric D.; Hoffman, Matthew J.; Engeland, William C.; Moreno, Carol

    2014-01-01

    The classic renin-angiotensin system is partly responsible for controlling aldosterone secretion from the adrenal cortex via the peptide angiotensin II (ANG II). In addition, there is a local adrenocortical renin-angiotensin system that may be involved in the control of aldosterone synthesis in the zona glomerulosa (ZG). To characterize the long-term control of adrenal steroidogenesis, we utilized adrenal glands from renin knockout (KO) rats and compared steroidogenesis in vitro and steroidogenic enzyme expression to wild-type (WT) controls (Dahl S rat). Adrenal capsules (ZG; aldosterone production) and subcapsules [zona reticularis/fasciculata (ZFR); corticosterone production] were separately dispersed and studied in vitro. Plasma renin activity and ANG II concentrations were extremely low in the KO rats. Basal and cAMP-stimulated aldosterone production was significantly reduced in renin KO ZG cells, whereas corticosterone production was not different between WT and KO ZFR cells. As expected, adrenal renin mRNA expression was lower in the renin KO compared with the WT rat. Real-time PCR and immunohistochemical analysis showed a significant decrease in P450aldo (Cyp11b2) mRNA and protein expression in the ZG from the renin KO rat. The reduction in aldosterone synthesis in the ZG of the renin KO adrenal seems to be accounted for by a specific decrease in P450aldo and may be due to the absence of chronic stimulation of the ZG by circulating ANG II or to a reduction in locally released ANG II within the adrenal gland. PMID:25394830

  5. Management of adrenal incidentalomas: European Society of Endocrinology Clinical Practice Guideline in collaboration with the European Network for the Study of Adrenal Tumors.

    PubMed

    Fassnacht, Martin; Arlt, Wiebke; Bancos, Irina; Dralle, Henning; Newell-Price, John; Sahdev, Anju; Tabarin, Antoine; Terzolo, Massimo; Tsagarakis, Stylianos; Dekkers, Olaf M

    2016-08-01

    : By definition, an adrenal incidentaloma is an asymptomatic adrenal mass detected on imaging not performed for suspected adrenal disease. In most cases, adrenal incidentalomas are nonfunctioning adrenocortical adenomas, but may also represent conditions requiring therapeutic intervention (e.g. adrenocortical carcinoma, pheochromocytoma, hormone-producing adenoma or metastasis). The purpose of this guideline is to provide clinicians with best possible evidence-based recommendations for clinical management of patients with adrenal incidentalomas based on the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) system. We predefined four main clinical questions crucial for the management of adrenal incidentaloma patients, addressing these four with systematic literature searches: (A) How to assess risk of malignancy?; (B) How to define and manage low-level autonomous cortisol secretion, formerly called 'subclinical' Cushing's syndrome?; (C) Who should have surgical treatment and how should it be performed?; (D) What follow-up is indicated if the adrenal incidentaloma is not surgically removed? SELECTED RECOMMENDATIONS: (i) At the time of initial detection of an adrenal mass establishing whether the mass is benign or malignant is an important aim to avoid cumbersome and expensive follow-up imaging in those with benign disease. (ii) To exclude cortisol excess, a 1mg overnight dexamethasone suppression test should be performed (applying a cut-off value of serum cortisol ≤50nmol/L (1.8µg/dL)). (iii) For patients without clinical signs of overt Cushing's syndrome but serum cortisol levels post 1mg dexamethasone >138nmol/L (>5µg/dL), we propose the term 'autonomous cortisol secretion'. (iv) All patients with '(possible) autonomous cortisol' secretion should be screened for hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus, to ensure these are appropriately treated. (v) Surgical treatment should be considered in an individualized approach in patients with

  6. Management of adrenal incidentalomas: European Society of Endocrinology Clinical Practice Guideline in collaboration with the European Network for the Study of Adrenal Tumors.

    PubMed

    Fassnacht, Martin; Arlt, Wiebke; Bancos, Irina; Dralle, Henning; Newell-Price, John; Sahdev, Anju; Tabarin, Antoine; Terzolo, Massimo; Tsagarakis, Stylianos; Dekkers, Olaf M

    2016-08-01

    : By definition, an adrenal incidentaloma is an asymptomatic adrenal mass detected on imaging not performed for suspected adrenal disease. In most cases, adrenal incidentalomas are nonfunctioning adrenocortical adenomas, but may also represent conditions requiring therapeutic intervention (e.g. adrenocortical carcinoma, pheochromocytoma, hormone-producing adenoma or metastasis). The purpose of this guideline is to provide clinicians with best possible evidence-based recommendations for clinical management of patients with adrenal incidentalomas based on the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation) system. We predefined four main clinical questions crucial for the management of adrenal incidentaloma patients, addressing these four with systematic literature searches: (A) How to assess risk of malignancy?; (B) How to define and manage low-level autonomous cortisol secretion, formerly called 'subclinical' Cushing's syndrome?; (C) Who should have surgical treatment and how should it be performed?; (D) What follow-up is indicated if the adrenal incidentaloma is not surgically removed? SELECTED RECOMMENDATIONS: (i) At the time of initial detection of an adrenal mass establishing whether the mass is benign or malignant is an important aim to avoid cumbersome and expensive follow-up imaging in those with benign disease. (ii) To exclude cortisol excess, a 1mg overnight dexamethasone suppression test should be performed (applying a cut-off value of serum cortisol ≤50nmol/L (1.8µg/dL)). (iii) For patients without clinical signs of overt Cushing's syndrome but serum cortisol levels post 1mg dexamethasone >138nmol/L (>5µg/dL), we propose the term 'autonomous cortisol secretion'. (iv) All patients with '(possible) autonomous cortisol' secretion should be screened for hypertension and type 2 diabetes mellitus, to ensure these are appropriately treated. (v) Surgical treatment should be considered in an individualized approach in patients with

  7. Sex steroid modulation of cortisol secretion in sheep.

    PubMed

    van Lier, E; Carriquiry, M; Meikle, A

    2014-06-01

    There is strong evidence that the gonads modulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. To investigate these sex differences at the adrenal glands of sheep we compared the cortisol response to ACTH (experiment 1) and measured the relative expression of oestrogen receptor alpha (ERS1), androgen receptor (AR), melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2R) and steroid acute regulatory protein (STAR) mRNA in adrenal glands (experiment 2) of gonadectomised rams and ewes either with or without sex steroid replacement. In experiment 1 six castrated adult rams and four ovariectomised adult ewes were used in two ACTH trials. On each trial blood samples were taken every 15 min for 4 h through an indwelling jugular catheter and each animal received 0.5 mg of an ACTH analogue i.v., immediately after the sample at 1 h from the beginning of the trial. Four days after the first trial the males received 100 mg of Testosterone Cyclopentilpropionate (TC) i.m. and the females received 2.5 mg of Oestradiol Benzoate (EB) i.m. At 72 h after TC or EB administration the second trial was performed. In experiment 2 the adrenal glands were obtained from gonadectomised adult rams (n=8) and adult ewes (n=8). Four rams received 100 mg of TC i.m. and four females received 0.5 mg of EB i.m. Blood samples were taken at 0, 12, 24, 48 and 72 h relative to steroid replacement and the animals were thereafter slaughtered. Cortisol, testosterone and 17β-oestradiol were determined by radioimmunoanalysis. The transcripts of ERS1, AR, MC2R and STAR were determined by real-time reverse transcription PCR in adrenal tissue. Cortisol secretion was higher in female sheep than in male sheep, and higher in EB-treated than non-treated ewes. No difference in cortisol secretion was observed between TC-treated and non-treated rams. Gonadectomised rams treated with TC presented greater AR mRNA and MC2R mRNA expression than males without the steroid replacement. Gonadectomised ewes treated with EB tended to present lower AR m

  8. Mifepristone Accelerates HPA Axis Recovery in Secondary Adrenal Insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Cohan, Pejman

    2016-01-01

    Context. Transient secondary adrenal insufficiency (SAI) is an expected complication following successful adenomectomy of ACTH-secreting pituitary adenomas or unilateral adrenalectomy for cortisol-secreting adrenal adenomas. To date, no pharmacological therapy has been shown to hasten recovery of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in this clinical scenario. Case Description. A 33-year-old woman underwent uncomplicated unilateral adrenalectomy for a 3.7 cm cortisol-secreting adrenal adenoma. Postoperatively, she developed SAI and was placed on hydrocortisone 15 mg/day, given in divided doses. In the ensuing six years, the patient's HPA axis failed to recover and she remained corticosteroid-dependent. Quarterly biochemical testing (after withholding hydrocortisone for 18 hours) consistently yielded undetectable serum cortisol and subnormal plasma ACTH levels. While she was on hydrocortisone 15 mg/day, mifepristone was initiated and gradually titrated to a maintenance dose of 600 mg/day after 5 months. Rapid recovery of the HPA axis was subsequently noted with ACTH rising into the supranormal range at 4 months followed by a subsequent rise in cortisol levels into the normal range. After 6 months, the dose of hydrocortisone and mifepristone was lowered and both were ultimately stopped after 8 months. The HPA axis remains normal after an additional 16 months of follow-up. Conclusion. Mifepristone successfully restored the HPA axis in a woman with prolonged secondary adrenal insufficiency (SAI) after adrenalectomy for Cushing's syndrome (CS).

  9. Mifepristone Accelerates HPA Axis Recovery in Secondary Adrenal Insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Cohan, Pejman

    2016-01-01

    Context. Transient secondary adrenal insufficiency (SAI) is an expected complication following successful adenomectomy of ACTH-secreting pituitary adenomas or unilateral adrenalectomy for cortisol-secreting adrenal adenomas. To date, no pharmacological therapy has been shown to hasten recovery of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in this clinical scenario. Case Description. A 33-year-old woman underwent uncomplicated unilateral adrenalectomy for a 3.7 cm cortisol-secreting adrenal adenoma. Postoperatively, she developed SAI and was placed on hydrocortisone 15 mg/day, given in divided doses. In the ensuing six years, the patient's HPA axis failed to recover and she remained corticosteroid-dependent. Quarterly biochemical testing (after withholding hydrocortisone for 18 hours) consistently yielded undetectable serum cortisol and subnormal plasma ACTH levels. While she was on hydrocortisone 15 mg/day, mifepristone was initiated and gradually titrated to a maintenance dose of 600 mg/day after 5 months. Rapid recovery of the HPA axis was subsequently noted with ACTH rising into the supranormal range at 4 months followed by a subsequent rise in cortisol levels into the normal range. After 6 months, the dose of hydrocortisone and mifepristone was lowered and both were ultimately stopped after 8 months. The HPA axis remains normal after an additional 16 months of follow-up. Conclusion. Mifepristone successfully restored the HPA axis in a woman with prolonged secondary adrenal insufficiency (SAI) after adrenalectomy for Cushing's syndrome (CS). PMID:27516913

  10. Mifepristone Accelerates HPA Axis Recovery in Secondary Adrenal Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Context. Transient secondary adrenal insufficiency (SAI) is an expected complication following successful adenomectomy of ACTH-secreting pituitary adenomas or unilateral adrenalectomy for cortisol-secreting adrenal adenomas. To date, no pharmacological therapy has been shown to hasten recovery of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in this clinical scenario. Case Description. A 33-year-old woman underwent uncomplicated unilateral adrenalectomy for a 3.7 cm cortisol-secreting adrenal adenoma. Postoperatively, she developed SAI and was placed on hydrocortisone 15 mg/day, given in divided doses. In the ensuing six years, the patient's HPA axis failed to recover and she remained corticosteroid-dependent. Quarterly biochemical testing (after withholding hydrocortisone for 18 hours) consistently yielded undetectable serum cortisol and subnormal plasma ACTH levels. While she was on hydrocortisone 15 mg/day, mifepristone was initiated and gradually titrated to a maintenance dose of 600 mg/day after 5 months. Rapid recovery of the HPA axis was subsequently noted with ACTH rising into the supranormal range at 4 months followed by a subsequent rise in cortisol levels into the normal range. After 6 months, the dose of hydrocortisone and mifepristone was lowered and both were ultimately stopped after 8 months. The HPA axis remains normal after an additional 16 months of follow-up. Conclusion. Mifepristone successfully restored the HPA axis in a woman with prolonged secondary adrenal insufficiency (SAI) after adrenalectomy for Cushing's syndrome (CS). PMID:27516913

  11. Gender difference in hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis response to alcohol in the rat: activational role of gonadal steroids.

    PubMed

    Ogilvie, K M; Rivier, C

    1997-08-22

    Alcohol administration activates the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis of both male and female rats, with females secreting more adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) and corticosterone than males in response to the same dose of alcohol. Our earlier work suggested that this gender difference arises due to the activational effects of gonadal steroids. In particular, we hypothesized that both androgens and estrogens play a role, with androgens exerting an inhibitory influence while estrogens elevate activity of the HPA. In the present studies, we tested this hypothesis by manipulating steroidal milieu in male rats using surgical castration and chronic implantation of testosterone (T), dihydrotestosterone (DHT), or estradiol (E2). Intact male and female rats were included as controls. Injection of alcohol (3 g/kg b.wt., i.p.) resulted in elevation of blood alcohol levels, ACTH and corticosterone in all groups. However, the amount of ACTH secreted was greater in females and castrated males implanted with E2 than in intact males. In castrated males, regardless of androgen implantation, the ACTH response was intermediate, with mean levels between those of females and males, but not differing significantly from either. In contrast to the ACTH results, significantly higher corticosterone secretion was measured in females and castrated males which did not receive a steroid implant. Since there were no significant differences between groups in blood alcohol levels (BALs), these results are not due to steroid-dependent alterations in alcohol metabolism. Because the ACTH data confirmed an activational effect of E2, we sought to determine whether this steroid regulated levels of corticotropin-releasing factor (CRF) and arginine vasopressin (AVP) mRNAs in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN). Four pretreatment groups were studied: intact males, intact females, castrated males, and castrated males implanted with E2. Two weeks after surgery, alcohol or vehicle was

  12. [Adrenal pseudocyst; a case report].

    PubMed

    Minagawa, Tomonori; Nishizawa, Shuji; Nakayama, Tsuyoshi; Okaneya, Toshikazu

    2007-02-01

    We report a case of adrenal pseudocyst. A 35-year-old woman presented with palpation of right upper abdominal mass without tenderness. Abdominal computed tomographic scan showed a right retroperitoneal cystic mass 20 cm in diameter. The patient underwent complete resection of the mass, including the normal adrenal gland. The cyst contained 3100 ml of dark brown thrombotic liquid. Histopathological examination revealed adrenal pseudocyst with a thick figrocollagenous wall. The normal adrenal gland was compressed by the wall. Adrenal pseudocyst is a rare disease. The mechanisms of adrenal pseudocyst formation and their expanding nature are discussed.

  13. Cushing syndrome associated with an adrenal tumour

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Helena; Brain, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    Cushing syndrome (CS) in children is a rare disorder that is most frequently caused by an adrenal tumour or a pituitary corticotrophin-secreting adenoma. The management is challenging and requires an individualised approach and multidisciplinary care. We present the case of a 23-month-old female child with a history of excessive weight gain, growth failure, hirsutism, acne and behavioural difficulties. Investigations revealed elevated serum midnight cortisol and 24 h urinary free cortisol. Overnight dexamethasone suppression testing showed no suppression of cortisol levels. Abdominal imaging revealed a right-sided suprarenal mass. She underwent right adrenalectomy and the histology showed an adrenal cortical carcinoma. There was clinical improvement with catch-up growth and weight normalisation. Despite being rare in clinical practice, in a child with weight gain, hirsuitism and growth failure the diagnosis must be considered. The overall prognosis of CS in childhood is good, but challenges remain to ensure normal growth and body composition. PMID:22927284

  14. GPCRs of adrenal chromaffin cells & catecholamines: The plot thickens.

    PubMed

    Lymperopoulos, Anastasios; Brill, Ava; McCrink, Katie A

    2016-08-01

    The circulating catecholamines (CAs) epinephrine (Epi) and norepinephrine (NE) derive from two major sources in the whole organism: the sympathetic nerve endings, which release NE on effector organs, and the chromaffin cells of the adrenal medulla, which are cells that synthesize, store and release Epi (mainly) and NE. All of the Epi in the body and a significant amount of circulating NE derive from the adrenal medulla. The secretion of CAs from adrenal chromaffin cells is regulated in a complex way by a variety of membrane receptors, the vast majority of which are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), including adrenergic receptors (ARs), which act as "presynaptic autoreceptors" in this regard. There is a plethora of CA-secretagogue signals acting on these receptors but some of them, most notably the α2ARs, inhibit CA secretion. Over the past few years, however, a few new proteins present in chromaffin cells have been uncovered to participate in CA secretion regulation. Most prominent among these are GRK2 and β-arrestin1, which are known to interact with GPCRs regulating receptor signaling and function. The present review will discuss the molecular and signaling mechanisms by which adrenal chromaffin cell-residing GPCRs and their regulatory proteins modulate CA synthesis and secretion. Particular emphasis will be given to the newly discovered roles of GRK2 and β-arrestins in these processes and particular points of focus for future research will be highlighted, as well.

  15. Androgens and the breast.

    PubMed

    Dimitrakakis, Constantine; Bondy, Carolyn

    2009-01-01

    Androgens have important physiological effects in women while at the same time they may be implicated in breast cancer pathologies. However, data on the effects of androgens on mammary epithelial proliferation and/or breast cancer incidence are not in full agreement. We performed a literature review evaluating current clinical, genetic and epidemiological data regarding the role of androgens in mammary growth and neoplasia. Epidemiological studies appear to have significant methodological limitations and thus provide inconclusive results. The study of molecular defects involving androgenic pathways in breast cancer is still in its infancy. Clinical and nonhuman primate studies suggest that androgens inhibit mammary epithelial proliferation and breast growth while conventional estrogen treatment suppresses endogenous androgens. Abundant clinical evidence suggests that androgens normally inhibit mammary epithelial proliferation and breast growth. Suppression of androgens using conventional estrogen treatment may thus enhance estrogenic breast stimulation and possibly breast cancer risk. Addition of testosterone to the usual hormone therapy regimen may diminish the estrogen/progestin increase in breast cancer risk but the impact of this combined use on mammary gland homeostasis still needs evaluation.

  16. Androgens and the breast

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Androgens have important physiological effects in women while at the same time they may be implicated in breast cancer pathologies. However, data on the effects of androgens on mammary epithelial proliferation and/or breast cancer incidence are not in full agreement. We performed a literature review evaluating current clinical, genetic and epidemiological data regarding the role of androgens in mammary growth and neoplasia. Epidemiological studies appear to have significant methodological limitations and thus provide inconclusive results. The study of molecular defects involving androgenic pathways in breast cancer is still in its infancy. Clinical and nonhuman primate studies suggest that androgens inhibit mammary epithelial proliferation and breast growth while conventional estrogen treatment suppresses endogenous androgens. Abundant clinical evidence suggests that androgens normally inhibit mammary epithelial proliferation and breast growth. Suppression of androgens using conventional estrogen treatment may thus enhance estrogenic breast stimulation and possibly breast cancer risk. Addition of testosterone to the usual hormone therapy regimen may diminish the estrogen/progestin increase in breast cancer risk but the impact of this combined use on mammary gland homeostasis still needs evaluation. PMID:19889198

  17. Expression of sfrp1 and activation of the Wnt pathway in the adrenal glands of healthy ferrets and neutered ferrets with hyperadrenocorticism.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Marja K; Schoemaker, Nico J; Mol, Jan A

    2013-05-01

    Gonadectomy induces the pathogenesis of luteinising hormone receptor positive, androgen and oestrogen producing tumours in the adrenal cortex of ferrets. In mice, the castration-dependent appearance of adrenocortical tumours has been attributed to loss of expression of the tumour suppressor gene Secreted Frizzled Related Protein 1 (sfrp1), a dominant inhibitor of the Wnt pathway, which controls cell proliferation and 'cell faith' decisions. This study investigated whether sfrp1 and the Wnt pathway play a similar role in the pathogenesis of hyperadrenocorticism in ferrets. The expression of sfrp1 and three target genes of the Wnt pathway (c-myc, axin2 and cyclinD1) in seven adrenal glands from healthy ferrets and in 13 adrenocortical tumours were studied by quantitative real-time PCR. Nuclear β-catenin staining was assessed by immunohistochemistry. Sfrp1 mRNA expression was up-regulated and axin2 and cyclinD1 were down-regulated in the tumour group in comparison with the control group. Decreased nuclear β-catenin staining supported the decrease in active Wnt signalling in adrenocortical tumours in ferrets. Therefore, it is unlikely that the involvement of sfrp1 and the Wnt pathway in the pathogenesis of adrenocortical tumours in ferrets is similar to that described in mice.

  18. What Is Adrenal Cortical Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... include pheochromocytomas (which are most often benign) and neuroblastomas . This document is about tumors and cancers of ... does not discuss tumors of the adrenal medulla. Neuroblastoma s are covered in a separate document . Adrenal cortex ...

  19. Genetics of adrenal tumors.

    PubMed

    Opocher, G; Schiavi, F; Cicala, M V; Patalano, A; Mariniello, B; Boaretto, F; Zovato, S; Pignataro, V; Macino, B; Negro, I; Mantero, F

    2009-06-01

    The impact of genetics and genomics on clinical medicine is becoming more and more important. Endocrinology pioneered the development of molecular medicine, but also the study of adrenal tumors had a great impact in this field. Particularly important was the detection of genetics of tumors derived from the adrenal medulla, as well as that of those derived from the sympathetic and parasympathetic paraganglia. The identification of mutations in one of the several pheochromocytoma/paraganglioma susceptibility genes may indicate a specific clinical management drive. Less well understood is the genetics of adrenal cortex tumors, in particular adrenocortical carcinoma, a rare and particularly aggressive disease. There are only a few examples of hereditary transmission of adrenocortical carcinoma, but the analysis of low penetrance genes by genome wide association study may enable us to discover new genetic mechanisms responsible for adrenocortical-derived tumors. PMID:19471236

  20. Androgens and the aging male.

    PubMed

    Seidman, Stuart N

    2007-01-01

    In contrast to women, men do not experience a sudden cessation of gonadal function comparable to menopause. However, there is a progressive reduction in male hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis function: testosterone levels decline through both central (pituitary) and peripheral (testicular) mechanisms, and there is a loss of the circadian rhythm of testosterone secretion. The progressive decline in testosterone levels has been demonstrated in both cross-sectional and longitudinal studies, and overall at least 25% of men over age 70 meet laboratory criteria for hypogonadism (ie, testosterone deficiency). Such age-associated HPG hypofunctioning, which has been termed "andropause," is thought to be responsible for a variety of symptoms experienced by elderly men, including weakness, fatigue, reduced muscle and bone mass, impaired hematopoiesis, sexual dysfunction (including erectile dysfunction and loss of libido), and depression. Although, it has been difficult to establish correlations between these symptoms and plasma testosterone levels, there is some evidence that testosterone replacement leads to symptom relief, particularly with respect to muscle strength, bone mineral density, and erectile dysfunction. There is little evidence of a link between the HPG axis hypofunctioning and depressive illness, and exogenous androgens have not been consistently shown to have antidepressant activity. This article reviews the relationship between androgens, depression, and sexual function in aging men.

  1. Adrenal venous sampling in a patient with adrenal Cushing syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Villa-Franco, Carlos Andrés; Román-Gonzalez, Alejandro; Velez-Hoyos, Alejandro; Echeverri-Isaza, Santiago

    2015-01-01

    The primary bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia or the independent adrenocorticotropic hormone bilateral nodular adrenal hyperplasia is a rare cause hypercortisolism, its diagnosis is challenging and there is no clear way to decide the best therapeutic approach. Adrenal venous sampling is commonly used to distinguish the source of hormonal production in patients with primary hyperaldosteronism. It could be a useful tool in this context because it might provide information to guide the treatment. We report the case of a patient with ACTH independent Cushing syndrome in whom the use of adrenal venous sampling with some modifications radically modified the treatment and allowed the diagnosis of a macronodular adrenal hyperplasia. PMID:26309345

  2. Adrenal venous sampling in a patient with adrenal Cushing syndrome.

    PubMed

    Builes-Montaño, Carlos Esteban; Villa-Franco, Carlos Andrés; Román-Gonzalez, Alejandro; Velez-Hoyos, Alejandro; Echeverri-Isaza, Santiago

    2015-01-01

    The primary bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia or the independent adrenocorticotropic hormone bilateral nodular adrenal hyperplasia is a rare cause hypercortisolism, its diagnosis is challenging and there is no clear way to decide the best therapeutic approach. Adrenal venous sampling is commonly used to distinguish the source of hormonal production in patients with primary hyperaldosteronism. It could be a useful tool in this context because it might provide information to guide the treatment. We report the case of a patient with ACTH independent Cushing syndrome in whom the use of adrenal venous sampling with some modifications radically modified the treatment and allowed the diagnosis of a macronodular adrenal hyperplasia.

  3. Androgens and prostate disease

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Lori A; Page, Stephanie T

    2014-01-01

    A growing body of literature has established the anabolic benefits of testosterone (T) therapy in hypogonadal men. However, there remains a paucity of data regarding the risks of exogenous androgen use in older men and the potential for adverse effects on the prostate gland. Whether T therapy in older, hypogonadal men might worsen lower urinary tract symptoms or exacerbate, unmask, or even incite prostate cancer development has tempered enthusiasm for T therapy, while known prostatic disease has served as a relative contraindication to T therapy. Androgens are necessary for the development and maintenance of the prostate gland. However, epidemiologic studies do not consistently find a positive relationship between endogenous serum androgen concentrations and the risk of prostate disease. Recent data demonstrate that 5α-reductase inhibitors decrease the risk of low-grade prostate cancer, suggesting that modifying androgen metabolism may have beneficial effects on prostate health, yet similar reductions in high-grade disease have not been observed, thereby questioning the true clinical benefits of these agents for chemoprevention. Knowing how to best investigate the relationship between androgens and the development of prostate disease given the lack of large, randomized trials is difficult. Accumulating data challenges the assumption that alterations in serum androgens have parallel effects within the prostate hormonal environment or change androgen-regulated processes within the gland. Long-term intervention studies are needed to truly ascertain the effects of androgen manipulation on prostate tissue and disease risk. However, available data do not support the notion that restoring serum androgens to normal physiologic ranges drives prostate disease. PMID:24407178

  4. Micropenis and congenital adrenal hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Bourgeois, M J; Jones, B; Waagner, D C; Dunn, D

    1989-01-01

    Micropenis is often an early sign of congenital hypopituitarism. It has also been associated with congenital adrenal hypoplasia in infants with anencephaly and pituitary agenesis. This report is on two infants with micropenis and congenital adrenal hypoplasia. One presented with a similar clinical course and postmortem findings to previously reported cases of adrenal hypoplasia and pituitary agenesis. The other patient represents the first reported case of an infant with micropenis and congenital adrenal hypoplasia in the absence of pituitary agenesis. The histologic patterns of adrenal hypoplasia, as well as the etiologic and clinical implications of its association with micropenis, are discussed.

  5. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... or inappropriately). Congenital adrenal hyperplasia can affect both boys and girls. About 1 in 10,000 to 18,000 ... penis but normal testes Well-developed muscles Both boys and girls will be tall as children, but much shorter ...

  6. Diagnosis and management of classical congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Marumudi, Eunice; Khadgawat, Rajesh; Surana, Vineet; Shabir, Iram; Joseph, Angela; Ammini, Ariachery C

    2013-08-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is among the most common genetic disorders. Deficiency of adrenal steroid 21-hydroxylase deficiency due to mutations in the CYP21A2 gene accounts for about 95% cases of CAH. This disorder manifests with androgen excess with or without salt wasting. It also is a potentially life threatening disorder; neonatal screening with 17-hydroxyprogesterone measurement can diagnose the condition in asymptomatic children. Carefully monitored therapy with glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid supplementation will ensure optimal growth and development for children with CAH. Genital surgery may be required for girls with CAH. Continued care is required for individuals with CAH as adults to prevent long-term adverse consequences of the disease, including infertility, metabolic syndrome and osteoporosis.

  7. Immunological Studies on Adrenal Glands

    PubMed Central

    Milgrom, Felix; Witebsky, Ernest

    1962-01-01

    Rabbits injected with a bovine adrenal suspension incorporated into Freund adjuvants produced antibodies reacting in a variety of serological tests with extracts of bovine adrenals as well as with extracts of other bovine organs. The double diffusion gel precipitation procedure and absorption experiments revealed that part of these antibodies were specific for adrenal only. In immunoelectrophoretic analysis the adrenal-specific reaction appeared as a line on the anodal part of the electrophoretic field. When extraction was performed at 100° and the extracts autoclaved at 120°, the adrenal-specific antigen remained unaltered, whereas all but one of the non-adrenal-specific antigens (i.e. antigens shared by other bovine organs) were destroyed. The adrenal-specific antigen was localized predominantly, if not exclusively, in the medulla. A similar or identical antigen was found in the adrenals of sheep but not in those of any other species tested. The adrenal-specific antigen was precipitated by ethanol at 72 per cent concentration; it was not destroyed by 90 per cent phenol extraction. Re-dissolved ethanol precipitate of boiled bovine adrenal extract incorporated into Freund adjuvants elicited production of adrenal-specific antibodies when injected into rabbits. ImagesFIG. 2FIG. 3FIG. 4FIG. 5FIG. 8 PMID:14473880

  8. Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia and Schmid Metaphyseal Chondrodysplasia in a Child

    PubMed Central

    Khorasani, Efat; Vakili, Rahim

    2016-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is a group of hereditary diseases, which are autosomal recessive. CAH occurs due to defect in one of the cortisol coding genes and often clinically presents itself with signs of androgen overproduction. In this article, we report a case of CAH and Schmid metaphyseal dysplasia. Our literature review indicated that this report is the first attempt on CYP11B1 and Schmid dysplasia in a child. The specific diagnosis of 11-β-hydroxylase deficiency can be determined using high basal levels of deoxycorticosterone and/or 11-deoxycortisol serums. PMID:26722148

  9. Perspectives on the relationship of adrenal steroids to rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Masi, Alfonse T; Chatterton, Robert T; Aldag, Jean C; Malamet, Raymond L

    2002-06-01

    An expanded model of RA is presented that incorporates cumulative multifactorial processes operating over a prolonged physiological phase prior to initial clinical manifestations. During this phase, progressive imbalances in the homeostasis of core neuroendocrine, immunological, and microvascular systems are believed to occur. Normal adrenal function plays an essential role in helping to maintain homeostasis of core systems in health. In RA, chronic adrenal hypocompetence is suspected to occur in a minority subset of females who have younger clinical onset and males who have associated low serum testosterone levels. Chronic, relative glucocorticoid insufficiency is believed to contribute to development of inflammatory manifestations in RA patients. Androgenic deficiencies, particularly of gonadal origin in males, may also contribute to RA, particularly its decreased anabolic features. Precise influences of hypocompetent adrenal steroid function on long-term modeling of the immunological compartment and control of microvascular activation processes are not well understood. These complex mechanisms need to be elucidated for better understanding of the physiopathogenesis of RA. Nevertheless, at a clinical level, sufficient data are currently available to endorse further controlled studies of early clinical onset patients and prospective investigations to determine more definitively the roles of adrenal (and gonadal) steroids in subsets of RA patients and unaffected susceptible persons in the population.

  10. Motor development in individuals with congenital adrenal hyperplasia: Strength, targeting, and fine motor skill

    PubMed Central

    Collaer, Marcia L.; Brook, Charles; Conway, Gerard S.; Hindmarsh, Peter C.; Hines, Melissa

    2009-01-01

    Summary This study investigated early androgen influence on the development of human motor and visuomotor characteristics. Participants, ages 12 to 45 years, were individuals with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), a disorder causing increased adrenal androgen production before birth (40 females, 29 males) and their unaffected relatives (29 females, 30 males). We investigated grip strength and visuomotor targeting tasks on which males generally outperform females, and fine motor pegboard tasks on which females generally outperform males. Physical characteristics (height and weight) were measured to explore whether body parameters could explain differences in motor skills. Females with CAH were stronger and showed better targeting than unaffected females and showed reduced fine visuomotor skill on one pegboard measure, with no difference on the other. Males with CAH were weaker than unaffected males in grip strength but did not differ on the targeting or pegboard measures. Correction for body size could not explain the findings for females, but suggests that the reduced strength of males with CAH may relate to their smaller stature. Further, the targeting advantage in females with CAH persisted following adjustment for their greater strength. Results in females support the hypothesis that androgen may masculinize, or promote, certain motor characteristics at which males excel, and contribute to defeminization of certain fine motor characteristics at which females excel. Thus, these data suggest that organizational effects of androgens on behavior during prenatal life may extend to motor characteristics and may contribute to general sex differences in motor-related behaviors; however, alternative explanations based on activational influences of androgen or altered experiential factors cannot be excluded without further study. KEYWORDS: congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), androgen, sex, motor, strength, targeting PMID:18938041

  11. Modulating the pituitary-adrenal response to stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernikos-Danellis, J.

    1975-01-01

    Serotonin is believed to be a transmitter or regulator of neuronal function. A possible relationship between the pituitary-adrenal secretion of steroids and brain serotonin in the rat was investigated by evaluating the effects of altering brain 5-hydroxy tryptamine (HT) levels on the daily fluctuation of plasma corticosterone and on the response of the pituitary-adrenal system to a stressful or noxious stimulus in the rat. The approach was either to inhibit brain 5-HT synthesis with para-chlorophenyl alanine or to raise its level with precursors such as tryptophan or 5-hydroxy tryptophan.

  12. Ovarian overproduction of androgens

    MedlinePlus

    ... the body's testosterone. Tumors of the ovaries and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) can both cause too much androgen production. ... come back after they have been removed. In polycystic ovary syndrome, these things can reduce symptoms caused by high ...

  13. Effects of long-term simvastatin treatment on testicular and adrenal steroidogenesis in hypercholesterolemic patients.

    PubMed

    Bernini, G P; Argenio, G F; Gasperi, M; Vivaldi, M S; Franchi, F; Salvetti, A

    1994-04-01

    Simvastatin is an inhibitor of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl glutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, the key enzyme in the synthesis of cholesterol, recently introduced in the therapy of hypercholesterolemic patients. Cholesterol is the precursor of the biosynthesis of steroid hormones; thus, a reduction of the availability of cholesterol in the adrenal and testicular cells may reduce the synthesis of corticosteroids and androgens. To establish whether chronic therapy with simvastatin interferes with the integrity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and with the adrenal and testicular reserve, we administered simvastatin orally in a single-day 10 mg dose for 6 months in 8 mildly hypercholesterolemic male patients. At weeks 0, 6 and 24 of treatment we evaluated the lipids, the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis by means of the Corticotropin-Releasing Hormone (CRH) test, the adrenal reserve by means of the Corticotropin rapid test and, finally, the testicular reserve by means of the Human Chorionic Gonadotropin (HCG) test. Total cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol were significantly reduced by Simvastatin, while the HDL-cholesterol and triglycerides did not change significantly. The hormonal responses to CRH, ACTH and HCG tests at weeks 6 and 24 of treatment were comparable to those obtained in basal conditions. We conclude that Simvastatin, while effective in reducing total and LDL-cholesterol in hypercholesterolemic male patients, did not interfere with hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity or with basal and stimulated adrenal and testicular steroidogenesis.

  14. Regulation of androgen action during establishment of pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Douglas A; Simitsidellis, Ioannis; Saunders, Philippa T K

    2016-07-01

    During the establishment of pregnancy, the ovarian-derived hormones progesterone and oestradiol regulate remodelling of the endometrium to promote an environment that is able to support and maintain a successful pregnancy. Decidualisation is characterised by differentiation of endometrial stromal cells that secrete growth factors and cytokines that regulate vascular remodelling and immune cell influx. This differentiation process is critical for reproduction, and inadequate decidualisation is implicated in the aetiology of pregnancy disorders such as foetal growth restriction and preeclampsia. In contrast to progesterone and oestradiol, the role of androgens in regulating endometrial function is poorly understood. Androgen receptors are expressed in the endometrium, and androgens are reported to regulate both the transcriptome and the secretome of endometrial stromal cells. In androgen-target tissues, circulating precursors are activated to mediate local effects, and recent studies report that steroid concentrations detected in endometrial tissue are distinct to those detected in the peripheral circulation. New evidence suggests that decidualisation results in dynamic changes in the expression of androgen biosynthetic enzymes, highlighting a role for pre-receptor regulation of androgen action during the establishment of pregnancy. These results suggest that such enzymes could be future therapeutic targets for the treatment of infertility associated with endometrial dysfunction. In conclusion, these data support the hypothesis that androgens play a beneficial role in regulating the establishment and maintenance of pregnancy. Future studies should be focussed on investigating the safety and efficacy of androgen supplementation with the potential for utilisation of novel therapeutics, such as selective androgen receptor modulators, to improve reproductive outcomes in women.

  15. Genetic disorders involving adrenal development.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lin; Ferraz-de-Souza, Bruno; Achermann, John C

    2007-01-01

    The past decade has seen significant advances in our understanding of the genetic aetiology of several forms of adrenal failure that present in infancy or childhood. Several of these disorders affect adrenal development and are termed 'adrenal hypoplasia'. These conditions can be broadly divided into: (1) secondary forms of adrenal hypoplasia due to panhypopituitarism (e.g. HESX1, LHX4, SOX3) or abnormalities in ACTH synthesis (TPIT) or processing (e.g. POMC or PC1); (2) adrenal hypoplasia as part of an ACTH resistance syndrome [MC2R/ACTH receptor, MRAP, AAAS (triple A syndrome)], and (3) primary defects in the development of the adrenal gland itself (primary adrenal hypoplasia). Primary adrenal hypoplasia most commonly occurs in an X-linked form due to mutations in the nuclear receptor DAX1 (NR0B1) but can occur in a poorly understood recessive form or as part of the IMAGe (intrauterine growth retardation, metaphyseal dysplasia, adrenal hypoplasia, genitourinary anomalies) syndrome. Defining the molecular basis of these conditions can have significant clinical implications for management, counselling and presymptomatic diagnosis, as well as providing fascinating insight into normal and abnormal mechanisms of adrenal development in humans.

  16. Profiling of androgen response in rainbow trout pubertal testis: relevance to male gonad development and spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rolland, Antoine D; Lardenois, Aurélie; Goupil, Anne-Sophie; Lareyre, Jean-Jacques; Houlgatte, Rémi; Chalmel, Frédéric; Le Gac, Florence

    2013-01-01

    The capacity of testicular somatic cells to promote and sustain germ cell differentiation is largely regulated by sexual steroids and notably androgens. In fish species the importance of androgens is emphasized by their ability to induce sex reversal of the developing fries and to trigger spermatogenesis. Here we studied the influence of androgens on testicular gene expression in trout testis using microarrays. Following treatment of immature males with physiological doses of testosterone or 11-ketotestosterone, 418 genes that exhibit changes in expression were identified. Interestingly, the activity of testosterone appeared stronger than that of 11-ketotestosterone. Expression profiles of responsive genes throughout testis development and in isolated germ cells confirmed androgens to mainly affect gene expression in somatic cells. Furthermore, specific clusters of genes that exhibit regulation coincidently with changes in the natural circulating levels of androgens during the reproductive cycle were highlighted, reinforcing the physiological significance of these data. Among somatic genes, a phylogenetic footprinting study identified putative androgen response elements within the proximal promoter regions of 42 potential direct androgen target genes. Finally, androgens were also found to alter the germ line towards meiotic expression profiles, supporting the hypothesis of a role for the somatic responsive genes in driving germ cell fate. This study significantly increases our understanding of molecular pathways regulated by androgens in vertebrates. The highly cyclic testicular development in trout together with functions associated with regulated genes reveal potential mechanisms for androgen actions in tubule formation, steroid production, germ cell development and sperm secretion. PMID:23301058

  17. The adrenal gland and progesterone stimulates testicular steroidogenesis in the rat in vivo.

    PubMed

    Feek, C M; Tuzi, N L; Edwards, C R

    1989-04-01

    Administration of pharmacological doses of glucocorticoid to male rats in vivo suppresses adrenal steroidogenesis and inhibits testicular steroidogenesis by inhibiting the anterior pituitary secretion of LH. In contrast, administration of ACTH to these pharmacologically-suppressed rats stimulates the adrenal secretion of progesterone and testicular steroidogenesis. The mechanism by which ACTH increases testicular steroidogenesis is dependent on the presence of the adrenal gland and is reproduced by the administration of progesterone. The conclusion from these data is that the adrenal gland has an important role in generating external signals that modulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis in male rats. The adrenal secretion of glucocorticoid acts as a negative signal to testicular steroidogenesis whereas progesterone acts as a positive signal. The adrenal secretion of progesterone and its conversion to testosterone by steroidogenic enzymes in the cytoplasm of the Leydig cell may provide an alternative pathway for testosterone biosynthesis and may account for the increased plasma testosterone levels during the acute phase of stress and mating.

  18. INCREASED CLEARANCE OF CORTISOL BY 5β-REDUCTASE IN A SUBGROUP OF WOMEN WITH ADRENAL HYPERANDROGENISM IN POLYCYSTIC OVARY SYNDROME

    PubMed Central

    Gambineri, Alessandra; Forlani, Giulia; Munarini, Alessandra; Tomassoni, Federica; Cognigni, Graciela E.; Ciampaglia, Walter; Pagotto, Uberto; Walker, Brian R; Pasquali, Renato

    2015-01-01

    Objective Increased peripheral metabolism of cortisol may explain compensatory ACTH-dependent adrenal steroidogenesis and hence hyperandrogenism in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Previous studies have described an increased 5α-reduction of cortisol or impaired regeneration of cortisol by 11β-HSD1 in PCOS. However, these observations may be confounded by obesity. Moreover, the relationship between alterations in cortisol metabolism and the extent of adrenal androgen hyper-secretion in response to ACTH has not been established. This study aimed to examine the association between cortisol metabolism and ACTH-dependent adrenal hyperandrogenism in PCOS, independently of obesity. Design We compared 90 PCOS women (age 18-45 yr) stratified by adrenal androgen responses to ACTH1-24 and 45 controls matched for age and body weight. Methods PCOS women were stratified as normal responders-NR, intermediate responders-IR, and high responders-HR to 250 μg ACTH1-24: NR (n= 27) had androstenedione and DHEA responses within 2 SD of the mean in controls; IR (n= 43) had DHEA responses >2 SD above controls; HR (n= 20) had both androstenedione and DHEA responses >2 SD above controls. Results All groups were similar for age, body weight, and body fat distribution. Basal testosterone, androstenedione, and 5α-dihydrotestosterone plasma levels were similarly elevated among the three groups of PCOS compared with controls, whereas basal DHEA-S was higher in HR (2.8±1.2 μg/mL) and IR (2.4±1.1 μg/mL) than in NR (1.8±0.8 μg/mL) and controls (1.7±0.6 μg/mL). The HR group had the lowest basal plasma cortisol levels (101±36 ng/mL versus IR 135±42 ng/mL, NR 144±48 ng/mL, and controls 165±48 ng/mL; all P< 0.01), but the greatest cortisol response to ACTH1-24 (Δ(60-0)cortisol 173±60 ng/mL versus IR 136±51 ng/mL, NR 114±50 ng/mL, and controls 127±50 ng/mL; all P< 0.01), and the highest urinary excretion of total and 5β-reduced cortisol metabolites (eg 5

  19. CT demonstration of bilateral adrenal hemorrhage

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, D.; Korobkin, M.; Silverman, P.M.; Dunnick, N.R.

    1983-08-01

    Bilateral adrenal hemorrhage with subsequent adrenal insufficiency is a recognized complication of anticoagulant therapy. Because the clinical manifestations are often nonspecific, the antemortem diagnosis of adrenal hemorrhage has been a difficult clinical problem. Computed tomography (CT) provides detailed images of the adrenal glands that are not possible with conventional imaging methods. The CT findings of bilateral adrenal hemorrhage in an anticoagulated patient are reported.

  20. SAH pituitary adrenal dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Vespa, P

    2011-09-01

    Disruption of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis may occur after aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage, resulting in hypopituitarism. An electronic literature search was conducted to identify articles with English-language abstracts published between 1980 and March 2011 that addressed hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis insufficiency and hormone replacement. A total of 18 observational and prospective, randomized studies were selected for this review. Limited data are available evaluating pituitary effects during the acute stage after subarachnoid hemorrhage, with inconsistent results reported. Overall, acutely after subarachnoid hemorrhage, cortisol levels may initially be supranormal, decreasing toward normal levels over time. During the months to years after subarachnoid hemorrhage, pituitary deficiency may occur in up to one in three patients. Limited data suggest modest outcome benefits with fludrocortisone and no benefit or harm from corticosteroids. PMID:21800209

  1. Thyroid and adrenal relationships

    PubMed Central

    Parsons, Victor; Ramsay, Ian

    1968-01-01

    A brief review of the actions of adrenal medullary and thyroid hormones is presented and the ways in which they interact are examined. It is concluded that thyroid hormone produces the necessary intracellular environment without which the steady state and emergency actions of cathecholamines would be vitiated. In hyperthyroidism the increased concentration of thyroid hormones results in a lowering of the threshold for catecholamine action. For this reason it is possible to alleviate many of the symptoms of thyrotoxicosis by means of drugs which block β-adrenergic receptors. Attention is also drawn to the simultaneous occurrence of thyroid and adrenal disease, in the hope that this will encourage the search for further links in this field of endocrinology. PMID:5655216

  2. Naloxone inhibits and morphine potentiates the adrenal steroidogenic response to ACTH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heybach, J. P.; Vernikos, J.

    1981-01-01

    The administration of morphine to hypophysectomized rats potentiated the steroidogenic response of the adrenal cortex to exogenous adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) in a dose-dependent fashion. Conversely, the opiate antagonist naloxone inhibited the adrenal response to ACTH. Naloxone pretreatment also antagonized the potentiating effect of morphine on ACTH-induced steroidogenesis in a dose-dependent manner. Neither morphine nor naloxone, administered to hypophysectomized rats, had any direct effect on adrenal steroidogenesis. These adrenal actions were stereospecific since neither the (+)-stereoisomer of morphine, nor that or naloxone, had any effect on the adrenal response to ACTH. The administration of human beta-endorphin to hypophysectomized rats had no effect on the adrenal corticosterone concentration nor did it alter the response of the adrenal gland to ACTH. These results indicate that morphine can potentiate the action of ACTH on the adrenal by a direct, stereospecific, dose-dependent mechanism that is prevented by naloxone pretreatment and which may involve competition for ACTH receptors on the corticosterone-secreting cells of the adrenal cortex.

  3. Expression and localization of the diacylglycerol kinase family and of phosphoinositide signaling molecules in adrenal gland.

    PubMed

    Hozumi, Yasukazu; Akimoto, Ryo; Suzuki, Akihito; Otani, Koichi; Watanabe, Masahiko; Goto, Kaoru

    2015-11-01

    Adrenal glands play a central role in the secretion of steroid hormones and catecholamines. Previous studies have revealed that molecules engaged in phosphoinositide (PI) turnover are expressed in the adrenal gland, suggesting the importance of PI signaling in adrenal signal transduction. Diacylglycerol kinase (DGK) catalyzes the phosphorylation of diacylglycerol (DG), a major second messenger in the PI signaling cascade. The DGK family is expressed in distinct patterns in endocrine organs at the mRNA and protein levels. Nevertheless, little is known about the characteristics and morphological aspects of DGKs in the adrenal gland. We have performed immunohistochemical analyses to investigate the expression and localization of DGK isozymes, together with PI signaling molecules, in the adrenal gland at the protein level. Our results show that the DGK family and a set of PI signaling molecules are expressed intensely in zona glomerulosa cells and medullary chromaffin cells in the adrenal gland. In adrenal cells, DGKγ localizes to the Golgi complex, DGKε to the plasma membrane, and DGKζ to the nucleus. These findings show the distinct expression and subcellular localization of DGK isozymes and PI signaling molecules in the adrenal gland, suggesting that each DGK isozyme has a role in signal transduction in adrenal cells, especially in the zona glomerulosa and medulla.

  4. Radioguided Adrenal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Deus, Javier; Millera, Alfonso; Andrés, Alejandro; Prats, Enrique; Gil, Ismael; Suarez, Manuel; Salcini, José L.; Lahoz, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The laparoscopic adrenalectomy is considered as the procedure of choice for the treatment of adrenal hyperplasia and tumor lesions. However, some special situations may limit the use of this method due to the difficulty to locate the gland and perform the lesion excision. We analyze 2 patients of a left adrenal tumor, explaining how they have overcome the difficulties in both situations. The first case was a patient with a history of intra-abdominal surgery and the other patient suffered from severe obesity. We performed with the use of the gamma probe, and the 2 cases, was of great help to access and glandular localization. The help of gamma probe test was achieved in the surgical bed, that removal was complete. The use of the portable gamma probe facilitated the access to the left adrenal gland as well as conducting the glandular excision without delay, despite the difficulties due to the intra abdominal surgery caused by the previous surgery, and in the case of severe obesity. PMID:26426608

  5. Elevated androgens during puberty in female rhesus monkeys lead to increased neuronal drive to the reproductive axis: a possible component of polycystic ovary syndrome

    PubMed Central

    McGee, W.K.; Bishop, C.V.; Bahar, A.; Pohl, C.R.; Chang, R.J.; Marshall, J.C.; Pau, F.K.; Stouffer, R.L.; Cameron, J.L.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hyperandrogenemia is associated with several clinical disorders in which both reproductive dysfunction and metabolic changes may coexist [i.e. polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), obesity and congenital adrenal hyperplasia]. Moreover, there is growing evidence that the elevated levels of circulating androgens in obese girls may lead to an increased neuroendocrine drive to the reproductive axis, similar to that associated with PCOS. METHODS To test whether androgen exposure in the childhood and adolescent period could lead to pubertal alterations in LH secretory patterns, female rhesus monkeys received subcutaneous testosterone implants prepubertally beginning at 1 year of age, maintaining a 3.7-fold increase (P = 0.001) in circulating testosterone levels over cholesterol-implant controls (n = 6/group) into the post-pubertal period. In early adulthood, pulsatile secretion of LH was measured over 12 h during the early follicular phase of a menstrual cycle, and responsiveness of the pituitary to gonadotrophin-releasing hormone was determined. In addition, ultrasounds were performed to assess ovarian morphology and glucose tolerance testing was performed to assess insulin sensitivity. RESULTS The timing of menarche was similar between groups. Testosterone-treated animals had a significantly greater LH pulse frequency during the early follicular phase compared with controls (P = 0.039) when measured at 5 years of age. There was a larger LH response to GnRH when testosterone-treated animals were 4 years of age (P = 0.042), but not when the animals were 5 years old (P = 0.57). No differences were seen in insulin sensitivity or ovarian morphology, and the groups showed similar rates of ovulation in early adulthood. CONCLUSIONS Exposure to increased levels of androgens over the course of pubertal development appears to trigger physiological changes in the neural drive to the reproductive axis that resemble those of obese hyperandrogenemic girls in early adulthood

  6. Adrenal Schwannoma: A Rare Incidentaloma.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sumit; Karthikeyan, Vilvapathy S; Manohar, Chikkamoga S; Sreelakshmi, K; Shivalingaiah, Maregowda

    2016-08-01

    Adrenal schwannomas are very rare tumours that are difficult to diagnose preoperatively. A 42-year-old male presented with epigastric pain and indigestion. He had history of repeated operations for recurrent facial swelling on both sides of face diagnosed as Angiolymphoid Hyperplasia with Eosinophilia (ALHE). Physical examination revealed right facial swelling. Laboratory tests showed no evidence of hormonal hypersecretion. CECT abdomen showed a well-defined heterogenously enhancing right adrenal mass (5x4cm). Patient underwent right adrenalectomy. Histopathology revealed adrenal schwannoma, confirmed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) showing diffuse expression of S-100. Fine-needle aspiration biopsy of facial lesion confirmed ALHE recurrence. Less than 35 cases have been reported. Diagnosis of adrenal schwannoma on imaging studies is very difficult and surgical resection when performed for non-functioning adrenal masses >4cm clinches the diagnosis. Adrenal schwannoma is highly uncommon and was incidentally associated with recurrent ALHE. PMID:27656499

  7. Suckling and salsolinol attenuate responsiveness of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis to stress: focus on catecholamines, corticotrophin-releasing hormone, adrenocorticotrophic hormone, cortisol and prolactin secretion in lactating sheep.

    PubMed

    Hasiec, M; Tomaszewska-Zaremba, D; Misztal, T

    2014-12-01

    In mammals, the responsiveness of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis to stress is reduced during lactation and this mainly results from suckling by the offspring. The suckling stimulus causes a release of the hypothalamic 1-metyl-6,7-dihydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline (salsolinol) (a derivative of dopamine), one of the prolactin-releasing factors. To investigate the involvement of salsolinol in the mechanism suppressing stress-induced HPA axis activity, we conducted a series of experiments on lactating sheep, in which they were treated with two kinds of isolation stress (isolation from the flock with lamb present or absent), combined with suckling and/or i.c.v infusion of salsolinol and 1-methyl-3,4-dihydro-isoqinoline (1-MeDIQ; an antagonistic analogue of salsolinol). Additionally, a push-pull perfusion of the infundibular nucleus/median eminence (IN/ME) and blood sample collection with 10-min intervals were performed during the experiments. Concentrations of perfusate corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) and catecholamines (noradrenaline, dopamine and salsolinol), as well as concentrations of plasma adenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH), cortisol and prolactin, were assayed. A significant increase in perfusate noradrenaline, plasma ACTH and cortisol occurred in response to both kinds of isolation stress. Suckling and salsolinol reduced the stress-induced increase in plasma ACTH and cortisol concentrations. Salsolinol also significantly reduced the stress-induced noradrenaline and dopamine release within the IN/ME. Treatment with 1-MeDIQ under the stress conditions significantly diminished the salsolinol concentration and increased CRH and cortisol concentrations. Stress and salsolinol did not increase the plasma prolactin concentration, in contrast to the suckling stimulus. In conclusion, salsolinol released in nursing sheep may have a suppressing effect on stress-induced HPA axis activity and peripheral prolactin does not appear to participate in

  8. Stress and Androgen Activity During Fetal Development.

    PubMed

    Barrett, Emily S; Swan, Shanna H

    2015-10-01

    Prenatal stress is known to alter hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity, and more recent evidence suggests that it may also affect androgen activity. In animal models, prenatal stress disrupts the normal surge of testosterone in the developing male, whereas in females, associations differ by species. In humans, studies show that (1) associations between prenatal stress and child outcomes are often sex-dependent, (2) prenatal stress predicts several disorders with notable sex differences in prevalence, and (3) prenatal exposure to stressful life events may be associated with masculinized reproductive tract development and play behavior in girls. In this minireview, we examine the existing literature on prenatal stress and androgenic activity and present new, preliminary data indicating that prenatal stress may also modify associations between prenatal exposure to diethylhexyl phthalate, (a synthetic, antiandrogenic chemical) and reproductive development in infant boys. Taken together, these data support the hypothesis that prenatal exposure to both chemical and nonchemical stressors may alter sex steroid pathways in the maternal-placental-fetal unit and ultimately alter hormone-dependent developmental endpoints. PMID:26241065

  9. Stress and Androgen Activity During Fetal Development

    PubMed Central

    Swan, Shanna H.

    2015-01-01

    Prenatal stress is known to alter hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity, and more recent evidence suggests that it may also affect androgen activity. In animal models, prenatal stress disrupts the normal surge of testosterone in the developing male, whereas in females, associations differ by species. In humans, studies show that (1) associations between prenatal stress and child outcomes are often sex-dependent, (2) prenatal stress predicts several disorders with notable sex differences in prevalence, and (3) prenatal exposure to stressful life events may be associated with masculinized reproductive tract development and play behavior in girls. In this minireview, we examine the existing literature on prenatal stress and androgenic activity and present new, preliminary data indicating that prenatal stress may also modify associations between prenatal exposure to diethylhexyl phthalate, (a synthetic, antiandrogenic chemical) and reproductive development in infant boys. Taken together, these data support the hypothesis that prenatal exposure to both chemical and nonchemical stressors may alter sex steroid pathways in the maternal-placental-fetal unit and ultimately alter hormone-dependent developmental endpoints. PMID:26241065

  10. Oral contraceptives as anti-androgenic treatment of acne.

    PubMed

    Lemay, André; Poulin, Yves

    2002-07-01

    Although acne is seldom associated with high serum levels of androgens, it has been shown that female acne patients have definite increases in ovarian and adrenal androgen levels when compared to appropriate controls. As shown in several pilot and in multiple open and comparative studies, oral contraceptives (OCs) are effective in causing a significant regression of mild to moderate acne. These results have been confirmed by multicentre randomized trials where low-dose OCs did not cause side effects different from those of the placebo-controlled group. The beneficial effect of OCs is related to a decrease in ovarian and adrenal androgen precursors; to an increase in sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG), which limits free testosterone; and to a decrease in 3a-androstenediol glucuronide conjugate, the catabolite of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) formed in peripheral tissues. The estrogen-progestin combination containing cyproterone acetate (CPA) is particularly effective in treating acne, since this progestin also has a direct peripheral anti-androgenic action in blocking the androgen receptor. Only two open studies and one randomized study on small numbers of patients have reported some efficacy of spironolactone used alone or in combination with an OC in the treatment of acne. The new non-steroidal anti-androgens flutamide and finasteride are being evaluated for the treatment of hirsutism. Oral antibiotics are prescribed to patients with inflammatory lesions, where they are effective in decreasing the activity of microbes, the activity of microbial enzymes, and leukocyte chemotaxis. Concomitant intake of an OC and an antibiotic usually prescribed for acne does not impair the contraceptive efficacy of the OC. A second effective contraceptive method should be used whenever there would be decreased absorption or efficacy of the OC (digestive problems, breakthrough bleeding), lack of compliance and use of a type or dose of antibiotic different from that usually prescribed

  11. Gender difference in alcohol-evoked hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal activity in the rat: ontogeny and role of neonatal steroids.

    PubMed

    Ogilvie, K M; Rivier, C

    1996-04-01

    Alcohol administration results in activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, with female rats secreting more adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) and corticosterone (B) than males in response to the same dose of alcohol. We first examined the ontogeny of the gender difference in HPA responsiveness to alcohol by administering four doses (0, 1, 2, or 3 g/kg body weight) to animals at 21, 41, and 61 days of age (prepubertal, peripubertal, and postpubertal, respectively). We then investigated the organizational role of steroids by manipulating the neonatal steroidal milieu. Rats of both genders were gonadectomized or injected with testosterone propionate within 24 hr of birth and the HPA response to 3 g/kg body weight alcohol was tested in adulthood (postpubertal period). Our data show that the gender difference in HPA responsiveness to alcohol administration arises peripubertally. In addition, HPA response to alcohol is quantitatively smaller in intact male rats than in feminized groups (gonadectomized males and females, intact females) and masculinized female rats. We conclude that the gender difference in HPA response to alcohol observed in postpubertal rats injected with alcohol depends on the activational role of testicular androgens, rather than on their organizational influence.

  12. Adrenal crisis secondary to bilateral adrenal haemorrhage after hemicolectomy

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Venessa H M; Kabir, Shahrir; Ip, Julian C Y

    2016-01-01

    Summary Adrenal haemorrhage is a rare cause of adrenal crisis, which requires rapid diagnosis, prompt initiation of parenteral hydrocortisone and haemodynamic monitoring to avoid hypotensive crises. We herein describe a case of bilateral adrenal haemorrhage after hemicolectomy in a 93-year-old female with high-grade colonic adenocarcinoma. This patient’s post-operative recovery was complicated by an acute hypotensive episode, hypoglycaemia and syncope, and subsequent computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen revealed bilateral adrenal haemorrhage. Given her labile blood pressure, intravenous hydrocortisone was commenced with rapid improvement of blood pressure, which had incompletely responded with fluids. A provisional diagnosis of hypocortisolism was made. Initial heparin-induced thrombocytopenic screen (HITTS) was positive, but platelet count and coagulation profile were both normal. The patient suffered a concurrent transient ischaemic attack with no neurological deficits. She was discharged on a reducing dose of oral steroids with normal serum cortisol levels at the time of discharge. She and her family were educated about lifelong steroids and the use of parenteral steroids should a hypoadrenal crisis eventuate. Learning points: Adrenal haemorrhage is a rare cause of hypoadrenalism, and thus requires prompt diagnosis and management to prevent death from primary adrenocortical insufficiency. Mechanisms of adrenal haemorrhage include reduced adrenal vascular bed capillary resistance, adrenal vein thrombosis, catecholamine-related increased adrenal blood flow and adrenal vein spasm. Standard diagnostic assessment is a non-contrast CT abdomen. Intravenous hydrocortisone and intravenous substitution of fluids are the initial management. A formal diagnosis of primary adrenal insufficiency should never delay treatment, but should be made afterwards.

  13. Traumatic and non-traumatic adrenal emergencies.

    PubMed

    Chernyak, Victoria; Patlas, Michael N; Menias, Christine O; Soto, Jorge A; Kielar, Ania Z; Rozenblit, Alla M; Romano, Luigia; Katz, Douglas S

    2015-12-01

    Multiple traumatic and non-traumatic adrenal emergencies are occasionally encountered during the cross-sectional imaging of emergency department patients. Traumatic adrenal hematomas are markers of severe polytrauma, and can be easily overlooked due to multiple concomitant injuries. Patients with non-traumatic adrenal emergencies usually present to an emergency department with a non-specific clinical picture. The detection and management of adrenal emergencies is based on cross-sectional imaging. Adrenal hemorrhage, adrenal infection, or rupture of adrenal neoplasm require immediate detection to avoid dire consequences. More often however, adrenal emergencies are detected incidentally in patients being investigated for non-specific acute abdominal pain. A high index of suspicion is required for the establishment of timely diagnosis and to avert potentially life-threatening complications. We describe cross-sectional imaging findings in patients with traumatic and non-traumatic adrenal hemorrhage, adrenal infarctions, adrenal infections, and complications of adrenal masses.

  14. [Hyperprogesteronism due to bilateral adrenal carcinomas in a cat with diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Quante, S; Sieber-Ruckstuhl, N; Wilhelm, S; Favrot, C; Dennler, M; Reusch, C

    2009-09-01

    An 8 year old male castrated Russian Blue cat with polyuria, polydipsia, polyphagia, abdominal enlargement, unkempt and easily epilated hair coat and abdominal alopecia is described. As a first step diabetes mellitus was diagnosed. Further work-up by ultrasonography revealed severe bilateral enlargement of the adrenal glands. Hypercortisolism was suspected and therefore ACTH stimulation test and dexamethasone suppression test were performed. In all samples cortisol concentrations were below the detection limit of the assay used. Various precursor hormones were measured and high progesterone concentrations were found. Histologically, the adrenal masses were characterised as bilateral adrenal carcinomas of the adrenal cortex. The case report demonstrates that adrenal gland tumors are also capable to secrete sex hormones instead of cortisol. Clinical signs of hyperprogesteronism are identical to those of hypercortisolism.

  15. Androgens in human evolution. A new explanation of human evolution.

    PubMed

    Howard, J

    2001-01-01

    Human evolution consists of chronological changes in gene regulation of a continuous and relatively stable genome, activated by hormones, the production of which is intermittently affected by endogenous and exogenous forces. Periodic variations in the gonadal androgen, testosterone, and the adrenal androgen, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), significantly participated in all hominid transformations. The hominid characteristics of early Australopithecines are primarily a result of increased testosterone. The first significant cold of the early Pleistocene resulted in an increase in DHEA that simultaneously produced Homo and the robust Australopithecines. Subsequent Pleistocene climatic changes and differential reproduction produced changes in DHEA and testosterone ratios that caused extinction of the robust Australopithecines and further changes and continuation of Homo. Changes in testosterone and DHEA produce allometric and behavioral changes that are identifiable and vigorous in modern populations. PMID:11702658

  16. Androgens in human evolution. A new explanation of human evolution.

    PubMed

    Howard, J

    2001-01-01

    Human evolution consists of chronological changes in gene regulation of a continuous and relatively stable genome, activated by hormones, the production of which is intermittently affected by endogenous and exogenous forces. Periodic variations in the gonadal androgen, testosterone, and the adrenal androgen, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), significantly participated in all hominid transformations. The hominid characteristics of early Australopithecines are primarily a result of increased testosterone. The first significant cold of the early Pleistocene resulted in an increase in DHEA that simultaneously produced Homo and the robust Australopithecines. Subsequent Pleistocene climatic changes and differential reproduction produced changes in DHEA and testosterone ratios that caused extinction of the robust Australopithecines and further changes and continuation of Homo. Changes in testosterone and DHEA produce allometric and behavioral changes that are identifiable and vigorous in modern populations.

  17. A case of bilateral aldosterone-producing adenomas differentiated by segmental adrenal venous sampling for bilateral adrenal sparing surgery.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, R; Satani, N; Iwakura, Y; Ono, Y; Kudo, M; Nezu, M; Omata, K; Tezuka, Y; Seiji, K; Ota, H; Kawasaki, Y; Ishidoya, S; Nakamura, Y; Arai, Y; Takase, K; Sasano, H; Ito, S; Satoh, F

    2016-06-01

    Primary aldosteronism due to unilateral aldosterone-producing adenoma (APA) is a surgically curable form of hypertension. Bilateral APA can also be surgically curable in theory but few successful cases can be found in the literature. It has been reported that even using successful adrenal venous sampling (AVS) via bilateral adrenal central veins, it is extremely difficult to differentiate bilateral APA from bilateral idiopathic hyperaldosteronism (IHA) harbouring computed tomography (CT)-detectable bilateral adrenocortical nodules. We report a case of bilateral APA diagnosed by segmental AVS (S-AVS) and blood sampling via intra-adrenal first-degree tributary veins to localize the sites of intra-adrenal hormone production. A 36-year-old man with marked long-standing hypertension was referred to us with a clinical diagnosis of bilateral APA. He had typical clinical and laboratory profiles of marked hypertension, hypokalaemia, elevated plasma aldosterone concentration (PAC) of 45.1 ng dl(-1) and aldosterone renin activity ratio of 90.2 (ng dl(-1) per ng ml(-1 )h(-1)), which was still high after 50 mg-captopril loading. CT revealed bilateral adrenocortical tumours of 10 and 12 mm in diameter on the right and left sides, respectively. S-AVS confirmed excess aldosterone secretion from a tumour segment vein and suppressed secretion from a non-tumour segment vein bilaterally, leading to the diagnosis of bilateral APA. The patient underwent simultaneous bilateral sparing adrenalectomy. Histopathological analysis of the resected adrenals together with decreased blood pressure and PAC of 5.2 ng dl(-1) confirmed the removal of bilateral APA. S-AVS was reliable to differentiate bilateral APA from IHA by direct evaluation of intra-adrenal hormone production. PMID:26538381

  18. A case of bilateral aldosterone-producing adenomas differentiated by segmental adrenal venous sampling for bilateral adrenal sparing surgery

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, R; Satani, N; Iwakura, Y; Ono, Y; Kudo, M; Nezu, M; Omata, K; Tezuka, Y; Seiji, K; Ota, H; Kawasaki, Y; Ishidoya, S; Nakamura, Y; Arai, Y; Takase, K; Sasano, H; Ito, S; Satoh, F

    2016-01-01

    Primary aldosteronism due to unilateral aldosterone-producing adenoma (APA) is a surgically curable form of hypertension. Bilateral APA can also be surgically curable in theory but few successful cases can be found in the literature. It has been reported that even using successful adrenal venous sampling (AVS) via bilateral adrenal central veins, it is extremely difficult to differentiate bilateral APA from bilateral idiopathic hyperaldosteronism (IHA) harbouring computed tomography (CT)-detectable bilateral adrenocortical nodules. We report a case of bilateral APA diagnosed by segmental AVS (S-AVS) and blood sampling via intra-adrenal first-degree tributary veins to localize the sites of intra-adrenal hormone production. A 36-year-old man with marked long-standing hypertension was referred to us with a clinical diagnosis of bilateral APA. He had typical clinical and laboratory profiles of marked hypertension, hypokalaemia, elevated plasma aldosterone concentration (PAC) of 45.1 ng dl−1 and aldosterone renin activity ratio of 90.2 (ng dl−1 per ng ml−1 h−1), which was still high after 50 mg-captopril loading. CT revealed bilateral adrenocortical tumours of 10 and 12 mm in diameter on the right and left sides, respectively. S-AVS confirmed excess aldosterone secretion from a tumour segment vein and suppressed secretion from a non-tumour segment vein bilaterally, leading to the diagnosis of bilateral APA. The patient underwent simultaneous bilateral sparing adrenalectomy. Histopathological analysis of the resected adrenals together with decreased blood pressure and PAC of 5.2 ng dl−1 confirmed the removal of bilateral APA. S-AVS was reliable to differentiate bilateral APA from IHA by direct evaluation of intra-adrenal hormone production. PMID:26538381

  19. Reinforcing aspects of androgens.

    PubMed

    Wood, Ruth I

    2004-11-15

    Are androgens reinforcing? Androgenic-anabolic steroids (AAS) are drugs of abuse. They are taken in large quantities by athletes and others to increase performance, often with negative long-term health consequences. As a result, in 1991, testosterone was declared a controlled substance. Recently, Brower [K.J. Brower, Anabolic steroid abuse and dependence. Curr. Psychiatry Rep. 4 (2002) 377-387.] proposed a two-stage model of AAS dependence. Users initiate steroid use for their anabolic effects on muscle growth. With continued exposure, dependence on the psychoactive effects of AAS develops. However, it is difficult in humans to separate direct psychoactive effects of AAS from the user's psychological dependence on the anabolic effects of AAS. Thus, studies in laboratory animals are useful to explore androgen reinforcement. Testosterone induces a conditioned place preference in rats and mice, and is voluntarily consumed through oral, intravenous, and intracerebroventricular self-administration in hamsters. Active, gonad-intact male and female hamsters will deliver 1 microg/microl testosterone into the lateral ventricles. Indeed, some individuals self-administer testosterone intracerebroventricularly to the point of death. Male rats develop a conditioned place preference to testosterone injections into the nucleus accumbens, an effect blocked by dopamine receptor antagonists. These data suggest that androgen reinforcement is mediated by the brain. Moreover, testosterone appears to act through the mesolimbic dopamine system, a common substrate for drugs of abuse. Nonetheless, androgen reinforcement is not comparable to that of cocaine or heroin. Instead, testosterone resembles other mild reinforcers, such as caffeine, nicotine, or benzodiazepines. The potential for androgen addiction remains to be determined.

  20. Atrial natriuretic factor mRNA and binding sites in the adrenal gland.

    PubMed Central

    Nunez, D J; Davenport, A P; Brown, M J

    1990-01-01

    The factor inhibiting aldosterone secretion produced by the adrenal medulla may be atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), since the latter abolishes aldosterone release in response to a number of secretagogues, including angiotensin II and K+. In this study we have shown that cells in the adrenal medulla contain ANF mRNA and therefore have the potential to synthesize this peptide. The presence of binding sites for ANF predominantly in the adrenal zona glomerulosa suggests that, if ANF is synthesized in the medulla and transferred to the cortex, it may affect mineralocorticoid status. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:2146954

  1. The role of bilateral adrenalectomy in the treatment of congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Van Wyk, Judson J; Ritzen, E Martin

    2003-07-01

    This report summarizes follow-up studies in 18 patients who underwent bilateral adrenalectomy for congenital adrenal hyperplasia. Three of these patients were young children with null/null mutations of CYP21, and the other 15 were adrenalectomized because of difficulties in their management on conventional therapy. The average duration of follow-up was 59 months and represents an aggregate of 90 postoperative years. The adrenals were removed laparoscopically in 13 patients and by open flank incisions in five. Adrenal crises associated with severe illnesses occurred in five patients at times when their glucocorticoid substitution was suboptimal. All were responsive to appropriate therapy. Two of these patients were young children who had hypoglycemia during gastroenteritis or febrile illness associated with poor food intake or vomiting. Significant elevations of adrenal steroid precursors, presumably from ectopic adrenal rests, were observed postoperatively in eight of the patients. Patients and parents were nearly unanimous in their enthusiasm for adrenalectomy. In most, signs of androgen excess have decreased, and obesity has become less of a problem with lowering the dose of glucocorticoid. We conclude that adrenalectomy is a safe and efficacious method of managing congenital adrenal hyperplasia in selected patients. Prophylactic adrenalectomy in young children with double null mutations remains experimental. PMID:12843131

  2. [Morphometry of the adrenals].

    PubMed

    Chumachenko, P A

    1977-05-01

    The authors report on the method of determination of the weight indices of the adrenyl gland glomerular, testicular-reticular and medullar zones with a spheroid shape; it is substantiated by mathematical analysis of a plasticine model of the adrenal gland, whose characteristics approached the actual ones. The method was particularly accurate in determination of the weight of the fascicular-reticular and glomerular zones, and less--in determination of the weight of the medullary layer, the method's error being 0.6-0.9% in the first case, 2.7-3.5% in the second and 5.3-6.4 in the last. PMID:884280

  3. Adrenal hemangioma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Auh, Y H; Anand, J; Zirinsky, K; Kazam, E

    1986-01-01

    Adrenal hemangioma is a very rare tumor. Presented is the 18th case proved by autopsy or surgery reported in world literature. The tumor was incidentally discovered at autopsy. Unless this tumor has characteristic calcifications, phlebolith or phlebolithlike, its computed tomography appearance is nonspecific. Therefore, by computed tomography this tumor cannot be differentiated from other primary or secondary adrenal tumors. PMID:3943357

  4. Leiomyosarcoma of the adrenal vein.

    PubMed

    Shao, I-Hung; Lee, Wei-Chen; Chen, Tai-Di; Chiang, Yang-Jen

    2012-01-01

    Leiomyosarcoma of the adrenal gland is extremely rare in the literature. We present a patient with an adrenal leiomyosarcoma originating from the adrenal vein, the pathologic findings and management. A 66-year-old man who was a hepatitis B virus carrier was found to have a huge left suprarenal mass on sonography and computed axial tomography. A huge tumor in the left suprarenal area with a markedly engorged adrenal vein was found during an adrenalectomy. The tumor thrombus extended into the renal vein, close to the inferior vena cava. The left adrenal gland with the whole tumor thrombus was removed completely. Microscopically, the adrenal gland was compressed but not invaded by the spindle cell tumor, which was composed of interlacing fascicles of neoplastic smooth muscle cells. The tumor was localized within the adrenal vein and arose from the venous wall. The patient had no local recurrence for 18 months after en bloc excision of the tumor. We suggest that en bloc excision with a clear and adequate surgical margin is the most important cure procedure for adrenal leiomyosarcoma.

  5. Primary bilateral adrenal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma associated with normal adrenal function.

    PubMed

    Gu, Bin; Ding, Qiang; Xia, Guowei; Fang, Zujun; Fang, Jie; Jiang, Haowen; Yao, Mengshu

    2009-04-01

    Primary bilateral adrenal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma is rare. Adrenal insufficiency or adrenal failure as a result of tumor destruction is the main pathophysiological change of most cases. Normal adrenal function despite bulky bilateral adrenal masses is extremely rare. We present a case of primary bilateral adrenal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma associated with normal adrenal function. Positron emission tomography-computed tomography is helpful to the diagnosis.

  6. Giant adrenal cyst: case study

    PubMed Central

    Carsote, M; Chirita, P; Terzea, D; Paun, S; Beuran, M

    2010-01-01

    One of the rarest situations regarding an adrenal incidentaloma is an adrenal cyst. We present the case of a 61Z–year old male patient diagnosed with peritonitis. During surgery, a right adrenal tumor of 2 cm is discovered. The patient was referred to endocrinology. 6 months later the diameter of the tumor is 7 times bigger than the initial stage. It has no secretory phenotype, except for the small increase of serum aldosterone and the 24–h 17–ketosteroids. Open right adrenalectomy is performed and a cyst of 15 cm is removed. The evolution after surgery is good. The pathological exam reveals an adrenal cyst with calcifications and osteoid metaplasia. The immunohistochemistry showed a positive reaction for CD34 and ACT in the vessels and VIM in the stroma. The adrenal cysts are not frequent and represent a challenge regarding the preoperative diagnostic and surgical procedure of resection. The pathological exam highlights the major aspects. PMID:20945822

  7. [SF-1, a key player in adrenal and gonadal differentiation: implications in gonadal dysgenesis and primary ovarian insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Martinerie, L; Bouvattier, C; Lombes, M

    2009-09-01

    Steroidogenic factor 1 (SF-1) gene, identified by Keith Parker in 1992, encodes for an orphan nuclear receptor, NR5A1, whose expression is detected during fetal life in adrenal and gonadal steroidogenic tissues, but also in the developing hypothalamus and in pituitary gonadotropic cells. SF-1 knock-out mouse models exhibit complete adrenal and gonadal agenesis. Human mutations of this transcription factor, were initially associated with primary adrenal failure and male gonadal dysgenesis with various degrees of under androgenization. More recently, identification of novel SF-1 mutations responsible for isolated 46, XY gonadal dysgenesis or 46, XX primary ovarian insufficiency, underscores its central role in the control and maintenance of adrenal and reproductive functions. A better understanding in the regulatory mechanisms of SF-1 signaling pathway, will open new avenues for diagnostic and therapeutic managements of sex differentiation disorders and infertilities.

  8. The effects of intra-abdominal hypertension on the secretory function of canine adrenal glands.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jian; Fu, XiaoJuan; Chang, MingTao; Zhang, LiangChao; Chen, ZhiQiang; Zhang, LianYang

    2013-01-01

    Intra-abdominal hypertension (IAH) can damage multiple organ systems, but the explicit impact on the adrenal gland is unclear. To evaluate the effects of intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) on the secretory function of the adrenal glands, we established canine models of IAH. By comparing morphology; hemodynamics; plasma cortisol, aldosterone, epinephrine, and norepinephrine concentrations; and the expression of IL-1, IL-6, and TNF-α in adrenal gland tissue from these dogs, we found that hemodynamic instability occurred after IAH and that IAH increased the plasma cortisol, aldosterone, epinephrine, and norepinephrine concentrations. Higher IAPs resulted in more significant changes, and the above indicators gradually returned to normal 2 h after decompression. Compared with the sham-operated group, IAH significantly increased IL-1, IL-6, and TNF-α levels in adrenal tissue, with larger increases in the presence of higher IAPs. However, the concentrations of these markers remained higher than those in the sham-operated group despite their decrease after 2 h of decompression. Histopathological examination revealed congestion, red blood cell exudation, and neutrophil infiltration in the adrenal glands when IAP was elevated; these conditions became more significant with more severe IAH. These results suggest that the secretion of adrenal hormones and adrenal gland inflammation are positively correlated with IAP and that abdominal decompression effectively corrects adrenal gland function.

  9. Modulation of ovine fetal adrenocorticotropin secretion by androstenedione and 17beta-estradiol.

    PubMed

    Saoud, C J; Wood, C E

    1997-04-01

    Parturition in sheep is initiated by increases in activity of the fetal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. We have previously reported that cortisol negative feedback efficacy is decreased at the end of gestation. The present study was designed to test the hypothesis that increasing plasma estrogen and/or androgen concentrations in the fetus might increase plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) concentration, either by stimulating ACTH secretion or by altering the negative feedback effect of cortisol on ACTH. Fetal sheep were chronically catheterized and treated with no steroid (control), 17beta-estradiol, or androstenedione (each approximately 0.24 mg/day). After catheterization and implantation of steroid pellet, fetuses were subjected to two short (10 min) periods of sodium nitroprusside-induced hypotension with or without pretreatment with intravenous infusion of hydrocortisone sodium succinate (0.5 microg/min) to test fetal ACTH responsiveness to stress and cortisol negative feedback efficacy. Estradiol treatment significantly increased basal plasma ACTH and cortisol concentrations relative to control fetuses but did not interfere with the inhibition of ACTH secretion by cortisol. Fetal plasma ACTH responses to hypotension were significantly suppressed approximately 60% in both control and estradiol-treated groups. Androstenedione treatment significantly increased basal fetal plasma ACTH and decreased basal fetal plasma cortisol concentration. Androstenedione did not alter stimulated levels of fetal ACTH but did block the inhibition of stimulated ACTH by cortisol. We conclude that increased fetal cortisol and ACTH secretion at the end of gestation may be due to the combined effects of the gonadal steroids in that estradiol increases basal plasma ACTH secretion while androstenedione reduces cortisol negative feedback efficacy.

  10. Aberrant expression of glucagon receptors in adrenal glands of a patient with Cushing's syndrome and ACTH-independent macronodular adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    de Miguel, Valeria; Redal, María Ana; Viale, María Lorena; Kahan, Mariano; Glerean, Mariela; Beskow, Axel; Fainstein Day, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    Adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) independent bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia (AIMAH) is a rare cause of Cushing's syndrome, characterized by bilateral adrenal lesions and excess cortisol production despite ACTH suppression. Cortisol synthesis is produced in response to abnormal activation of G-protein-coupled receptors, such as gastric inhibitory peptide, vasopressin, beta adrenergic agonists, LH/hCG and serotonin receptors. The aim of this study was to analyze the expression of glucagon receptors in adrenal glands from an AIMAH patient. A patient with ACTH-independent Cushing's syndrome and bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia was screened for altered activation of adrenal receptors by physiological (mixed meal) and pharmacological (gonadotrophin releasing hormone, ACTH and glucagon) tests. The results showed abnormally high levels of serum cortisol after stimulation with glucagon. Hypercortisolism was successfully managed with ketoconazole treatment. Interestingly, a 4-month treatment with a somatostatin analogue (octreotide) was also able to reduce cortisol secretion. Finally, Cushing's syndrome was cured after bilateral adrenalectomy. Abnormal mRNA expression for glucagon receptor in the patient's adrenal glands was observed by Real-Time PCR procedure. These results strongly suggest that the mechanism of AIMAH causing Cushing's syndrome in this case involves the illicit activation of adrenal glucagon receptors. This is the first case reported of AIMAH associated with ectopic glucagon receptors.

  11. QUANTITATIVE STUDIES OF PROSTATIC SECRETION

    PubMed Central

    Huggins, Charles; Clark, Philip Johnson

    1940-01-01

    Cystic hyperplasia of the prostate occurs spontaneously in senile dogs only when they possess physiologically effective amounts of androgenic hormone. The cysts are closely grouped and radially arranged in a conical manner with the base of the cone at the periphery of the gland. Flattened and columnar epithelium, varying from about 5 to 25µ are seen in each cyst. The cysts communicate with the urethra by way of ducts. Both normal and cystic prostates undergo marked atrophy when the testes are removed, the chief difference 3 months after orchiectomy being the persistence of slightly dilated clefts and spaces at the site of the former cysts in the senile state. In the castrate dog whose prostate gland is being reconstructed as result of the influence of daily injections of androgen, certain doses of estrogen prevent increase of secretion and still larger doses greatly depress the output of the gland. In dogs so treated by daily injections of testosterone propionate, 10 mg., the amount of secretion is maintained from day to day at a level by daily injections of stilbestrol, 0.4 to 0.6 mg. and greatly depressed by doses of 1 to 1.5 mg. When the larger amounts of estrogen are used, together with androgen, squamous metaplasia occurs in the posterior lobe of the prostate while the epithelium of the acini decreases in height to cuboidal or low columnar form; these histological signs of activity of both androgen and estrogen on the prostate show that inhibition of the male hormone by stilbestrol is incomplete at these ratios. In dogs with either normal or cystic prostate glands, the prostate decreases in size when estrogen is injected in amounts to depress prostatic secretion profoundly. The gland is maintained in an atrophic state and overdosage avoided by controlled periodic injections of stilbestrol until secretion is reduced to the minimum, followed by free intervals, the estrogen being again administered when secretion measurably increases. The shrinkage is related to

  12. Intracellular mediators of potassium-induced aldosterone secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Ganguly, A.; Chiou, S.; Davis, J.S. )

    1990-01-01

    We have investigated the intracellular messengers of potassium in eliciting aldosterone secretion in calf adrenal glomerulosa cells since there were unresolved issues relating to the role of phosphoinositides, cAMP and protein kinases. We observed no evidence of hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP{sub 2}) in {sup 3}H-inositol labeled alf adrenal cells or increase of cAMP in response to potassium. Addition of calcium channel blocker, nitrendipine after stimulating adrenal glomerulosa cells with potassium, markedly inhibited aldosterone secretion. A calmodulin inhibitor (W-7) produced greater reduction of aldosterone secretion than an inhibitor of protein kinase C (H-7). These results suggest that a rise in cytosolic free calcium concentration through voltage-dependent calcium channel and calmodulin are the critical determinants of aldosterone secretion stimulated by potassium.

  13. Adrenal involvement in non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Paling, M.R.; Williamson, B.R.J.

    1983-08-01

    Adrenal masses are described in seven cases of non-Hodgkin lymphoma in a series of 173 patients. In all seven patients the lymphoma was diffuse rather than nodular. Three patients had adrenal masses at the time of presentation, whereas in four cases the adrenal gland was a site of tumor recurrence after therapy. Three patients had simultaneous bilateral adrenal involvement by tumor. No characteristic features were recognized that might have distinguished these tumors from other adrenal masses. Appropriate therapy successfully resolved the adrenal masses in all but one case. The latter patient was the only one with evidence of adrenal insufficiency.

  14. Androgen receptor drives transcription of rat PACAP in gonadotrope cells.

    PubMed

    Grafer, Constance M; Halvorson, Lisa M

    2013-08-01

    Gonadotropin expression is precisely regulated within the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis through the complex interaction of neuropeptides, gonadal steroids. and both gonadal- and pituitary-derived peptides. In the anterior pituitary gland, the neuropeptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) modulates gonadotropin biosynthesis and secretion, acting both alone and in conjunction with GnRH. Steroid hormone feedback also influences gonadotropin expression via both direct and indirect mechanisms. Evidence from nonpituitary tissues suggests that PACAP may be a target for gonadal steroid regulation. In the present study, we show that androgen markedly stimulates rat (r) PACAP promoter-reporter activity in the LβT2 mature mouse gonadotrope cell line. 5'-Serial deletion analysis of reporter constructs identifies 2 regions of androgen responsiveness located at (-915 to -818) and (-308 to -242) of the rPACAP promoter. Androgen receptor (AR) binds directly to DNA cis-elements in each of these regions in vitro. Site-directed mutagenesis of 3 conserved hormone response element half-sites straddling the (-308 to -242) region dramatically blunts androgen-dependent PACAP promoter activity and prevents AR binding at the mutated promoter element. Chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrates that endogenous AR binds the homologous region on mouse chromatin in LβT2 cells in both the presence and absence of androgen. These data demonstrate that androgen stimulates PACAP gene expression in the pituitary gonadotrope via direct binding of AR to a specific cluster of evolutionarily conserved hormone response elements in the proximal rPACAP gene promoter. Thus, androgen regulation of pituitary PACAP expression may provide an additional layer of control over gonadotropin expression within the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis.

  15. Unilateral adrenal tumor, erectile dysfunction and infertility in a patient with 21-hydroxylase deficiency: effects of glucocorticoid treatment and surgery.

    PubMed

    Scaroni, C; Favia, G; Lumachi, F; Opocher, G; Bonanni, G; Mantero, F; Armanini, D

    2003-02-01

    In untreated congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency (21OHDS) the presence of adrenal and testicular tumors had been described; however little is known about the effect of the enzymatic defect on fertility in males. We studied a male adult patient affected by 21OHDS for infertility, after a long period of discontinuation of glucocorticoid therapy and then during resumption of treatment and 8 months after monoadrenalectomy. The initial spermatic count revealed azoospermia and testicular needle aspiration showed a cytological picture consistent with prepuberty. The morphofunctional study revealed a right adrenal mass with reduced uptake at radioscan. Treatment was resumed with onset of impotency, which improved after reduction of the dose of glucocorticoids. The patient was monoadrenalectomised and his spermatic count increased. The patient shows that corticosteroid therapy in 21OHDS should be continued lifelong to avoid adrenal hyperplasia with possible areas of autonomy and to allow regular fertility. Impotence during treatment is probably due to a decrease of excessive adrenal androgens while testicular androgen production is still suppressed. PMID:12605349

  16. Preliminary results suggesting exaggerated ovarian androgen production early in the course of polycystic ovary syndrome.

    PubMed

    Francis, G L; Getts, A; McPherson, J C

    1990-11-01

    Excess ovarian androgen production might be a cause of the polycystic ovary syndrome (PCO). Previous studies have evaluated adult women with long-standing abnormality of the hypothalamic-pituitary gonadal axis. Abnormal ovarian function in such patients could be a primary or even a secondary finding. For that reason, this study was designed to evaluate ovarian androgen production in symptomatic adolescent females. Simultaneous adrenal suppression, by using dexamethasone, and ovarian stimulation, by using gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), were achieved in 12 patients. Following stimulation, blood was serially obtained over 8 hr to measure gonadotropin, estrogen, and androgen responses. Based on the androgen response, patients could be divided into two groups. Group A (five) had a significant increase (p less than 0.01) in free testosterone, whereas group B (seven) had no increase in any androgen, including free testosterone (significantly different from group A, p = 0.01). All patients in group A had enlarged or cystic ovaries, whereas only one-quarter patients in group B had enlarged ovaries (significantly different from group A, p less than 0.03). The pituitary and estrogenic response was similar in both groups. These preliminary data suggest that some patients with PCO (group A) have a primary abnormality in ovarian androgen production early in the course of their disease.

  17. Expression of adiponectin receptors in mouse adrenal glands and the adrenocortical Y-1 cell line: adiponectin regulates steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Li, Ping; Sun, Fei; Cao, Huang-Ming; Ma, Qin-Yun; Pan, Chun-Ming; Ma, Jun-Hua; Zhang, Xiao-Na; Jiang, He; Song, Huai-Dong; Chen, Ming-Dao

    2009-12-25

    Obesity is frequently associated with malfunctions of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and hyperaldosteronism, but the mechanism underlying this association remains unclear. Since the adrenal glands are embedded in adipose tissue, direct cross-talk between adipose tissue and the adrenal gland has been proposed. A previous study found that adiponectin receptor mRNA was expressed in human adrenal glands and aldosterone-producing adenoma (APA). However, the expression of adiponectin receptors in adrenal glands has not been confirmed at the protein level or in other species. Furthermore, it is unclear whether adiponectin receptors expressed in adrenal cells are functional. We found, for the first time, that adiponectin receptor (AdipoR1 and AdipoR2) mRNA and protein were expressed in mouse adrenal and adrenocortical Y-1 cells. However, adiponectin itself was not expressed in mouse adrenal or Y-1 cells. Furthermore, adiponectin acutely reduced basal levels of corticosterone and aldosterone secretion. ACTH-induced steroid secretion was also inhibited by adiponectin, and this was accompanied by a parallel change in the expression of the key genes involved in steroidogenesis. These findings indicate that adiponectin may take part in the modulation of steroidogenesis. Thus, adiponectin is likely to have physiological and/or pathophysiological significance as an endocrine regulator of adrenocortical function.

  18. Metabolic Syndrome, Androgens, and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Moulana, Mohadetheh; Lima, Roberta; Reckelhoff, Jane F.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is one of the constellation of factors that make up the definition of the metabolic syndrome. Metabolic syndrome is also associated with insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, hypertriglyceridemia, and type 2 diabetes mellitus. The presence of obesity and metabolic syndrome in men and women is also associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease and hypertension. In men, obesity and metabolic syndrome are associated with reductions in testosterone levels. In women, obesity and metabolic syndrome is associated with increases in androgen levels. In men reductions in androgen levels is associated with inflammation. Androgen supplements reduce inflammation in men. In women, increases in androgens are associated with increases in inflammatory cytokines, and reducing androgens reduces inflammation. In this review the possibility that androgens may have different effects on metabolic syndrome and its sequelae in males and females will be discussed. PMID:21274756

  19. Exposure to an Extremely-Low-Frequency Magnetic Field Stimulates Adrenal Steroidogenesis via Inhibition of Phosphodiesterase Activity in a Mouse Adrenal Cell Line

    PubMed Central

    Kitaoka, Kazuyoshi; Kawata, Shiyori; Yoshida, Tomohiro; Kadoriku, Fumiya; Kitamura, Mitsuo

    2016-01-01

    Extremely low-frequency magnetic fields (ELF-MFs) are generated by power lines and household electrical devices. In the last several decades, some evidence has shown an association between ELF-MF exposure and depression and/or anxiety in epidemiological and animal studies. The mechanism underlying ELF-MF-induced depression is considered to involve adrenal steroidogenesis, which is triggered by ELF-MF exposure. However, how ELF-MFs stimulate adrenal steroidogenesis is controversial. In the current study, we investigated the effect of ELF-MF exposure on the mouse adrenal cortex-derived Y-1 cell line and the human adrenal cortex-derived H295R cell line to clarify whether the ELF-MF stimulates adrenal steroidogenesis directly. ELF-MF exposure was found to significantly stimulate adrenal steroidogenesis (p < 0.01–0.05) and the expression of adrenal steroid synthetic enzymes (p < 0.05) in Y-1 cells, but the effect was weak in H295R cells. Y-1 cells exposed to an ELF-MF showed significant decreases in phosphodiesterase activity (p < 0.05) and intracellular Ca2+ concentration (p < 0.01) and significant increases in intracellular cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) concentration (p < 0.001–0.05) and cAMP response element-binding protein phosphorylation (p < 0.05). The increase in cAMP was not inhibited by treatment with NF449, an inhibitor of the Gs alpha subunit of G protein. Our results suggest that ELF-MF exposure stimulates adrenal steroidogenesis via an increase in intracellular cAMP caused by the inhibition of phosphodiesterase activity in Y-1 cells. The same mechanism may trigger the increase in adrenal steroid secretion in mice observed in our previous study. PMID:27100201

  20. Androgen receptor genomic regulation

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Hong-Jian; Kim, Jung

    2013-01-01

    The transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor (AR) is not only critical for the normal development and function of the prostate but also pivotal to the onset and progression of prostate cancer (PCa). The studies of AR transcriptional regulation were previously limited to a handful of AR-target genes. Owing to the development of various high-throughput genomic technologies, significant advances have been made in recent years. Here we discuss the discoveries of genome-wide androgen-regulated genes in PCa cell lines, animal models and tissues using expression microarray and sequencing, the mapping of genomic landscapes of AR using Combining Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-on-chip and ChIP-seq assays, the interplay of transcriptional cofactors in defining AR binding profiles, and the genomic regulation and AR reprogramming in advanced PCa. PMID:25237629

  1. Adrenal Gland Disorders: Condition Information

    MedlinePlus

    ... of salt and water Controlling the "fight or flight" response to stress Maintaining pregnancy Initiating and controlling ... overview of the adrenal glands: Beyond fight or flight . Retrieved June 29, 2012 from http://www.endocrineweb. ...

  2. 11-Ketotestosterone and 11-Ketodihydrotestosterone in Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer: Potent Androgens Which Can No Longer Be Ignored

    PubMed Central

    Pretorius, Elzette; Africander, Donita J.; Vlok, Maré; Quanson, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    Dihydrotestosterone (DHT) is regarded as the most potent natural androgen and is implicated in the development and progression of castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). Under castrate conditions, DHT is produced from the metabolism of the adrenal androgen precursors, DHEA and androstenedione. Recent studies have shown that the adrenal steroid 11β-hydroxyandrostenedione (11OHA4) serves as the precursor to the androgens 11-ketotestosterone (11KT) and 11-ketodihydrotestosterone (11KDHT). In this study we comprehensively assess the androgenic activity of 11KT and 11KDHT. This is the first study, to our knowledge, to show that 11KT and 11KDHT, like T and DHT, are potent and efficacious agonists of the human androgen receptor (AR) and induced both the expression of representative AR-regulated genes as well as cellular proliferation in the androgen dependent prostate cancer cell lines, LNCaP and VCaP. Proteomic analysis revealed that 11KDHT regulated the expression of more AR-regulated proteins than DHT in VCaP cells, while in vitro conversion assays showed that 11KT and 11KDHT are metabolized at a significantly lower rate in both LNCaP and VCaP cells when compared to T and DHT, respectively. Our findings show that 11KT and 11KDHT are bona fide androgens capable of inducing androgen-dependant gene expression and cell growth, and that these steroids have the potential to remain active longer than T and DHT due to the decreased rate at which they are metabolised. Collectively, our data demonstrates that 11KT and 11KDHT likely play a vital, but overlooked, role in the development and progression of CRPC. PMID:27442248

  3. Laparoscopic Resection of Adrenal Teratoma

    PubMed Central

    Vitagliano, Gonzalo; Villeta, Matias; Arellano, Leonardo; Santis, Oscar

    2006-01-01

    Background: Teratoma is a germ-cell tumor that commonly affects the gonads. Its components originate in the ectoderm, endoderm, and mesoderm. Extragonadal occurrence is rare. Teratomas confined to the adrenal gland are exceptional; only 3 cases have been reported in the English-language literature. We report 2 cases of mature teratomas of the adrenal gland that were laparoscopically excised. Methods: Two patients (ages 8 and 61 years) were diagnosed with adrenal teratoma at our institution. Radiological examination showed a solid 8-cm adrenal lesion in both cases. Hormonal assessment was normal. Both patients underwent laparoscopic transperitoneal adrenalectomy. Results: Surgical time was 120 minutes and 50 minutes, respectively. One patient was discharged on postoperative day 2, and the other remained hospitalized until day 10. The latter patient required percutaneous drainage of a retroperitoneal collection. Both tumors were identified as mature cystic teratomas. No evidence was present of recurring disease in either patient. Conclusions: Adrenal teratoma is rare. Laparoscopic transperitoneal adrenalectomy is a feasible, effective technique that enables excellent oncologic results. To our knowledge, this is the first report of laparoscopic adrenalectomy for pure adrenal teratoma. PMID:17575773

  4. Studies on the functional relationship between thyroid, adrenal and gonadal hormones.

    PubMed

    Tohei, Atsushi

    2004-02-01

    In order to clarify the functional relationship between thyroid, adrenal and gonadal hormones, hypothyroidism was induced by administration of thiuoracil in adult male and female rats, and the effects of hypothyroidism on the adrenal and the gonadal axes were investigated in the present study. 1. The functional relationship between thyroid and adrenal hormones: Adrenal weights and corticosterone were lowered, whereas the secretion of ACTH, corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) and arginine vasopressin (AVP) increased in hypothyroid rats compared to euthyroid rats. These results indicate that hypothyroidism causes adrenal dysfunction directly and results in hypersecretion of CRH and AVP from the hypothalamus. 2. The functional relationship between thyroid and gonadal hormones: The pituitary response to LHRH was lowered, whereas the testicular response to hCG was not changed in hypothyroid rats. Hypothyroidism suppressed copulatory behavior in male rats. These results suggest that hypothyroidism probably causes dysfunction in gonadal axis at the hypothalamic-pituitary level in male rats. In adult female rats, hypothyroidism inhibited the follicular development accompanied estradiol secretion, whereas plasma concentrations of progesterone and prolactin (PRL) increased in hypothyroid female rats. Hypothyroidism significantly increased the pituitary content of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) though it did not affect dopamine synthesis. These results suggest that hypothyroidism increases pituitary content of VIP and this increased level of VIP likely affects PRL secretion in a paracrine or autocrine manner. In female rats, inhibition of gonadal function in hypothyroid rats mediated by hyperprolactinemia in addition to hypersecretion of endogenous CRH.

  5. Steroidogenesis inhibitors alter but do not eliminate androgen synthesis mechanisms during progression to castration-resistance in LNCaP prostate xenografts.

    PubMed

    Locke, Jennifer A; Nelson, Colleen C; Adomat, Hans H; Hendy, Stephen C; Gleave, Martin E; Guns, Emma S Tomlinson

    2009-07-01

    In castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) many androgen-regulated genes become re-expressed and tissue androgen levels increase despite low serum levels. We and others have recently reported that CRPC tumor cells can de novo synthesize androgens from adrenal steroid precursors or cholesterol and that high levels of progesterone exist in LNCaP tumors after castration serving perhaps as an intermediate in androgen synthesis. Herein, we compare androgen synthesis from [(3)H-progesterone] in the presence of specific steroidogenesis inhibitors and anti-androgens in steroid starved LNCaP cells and CRPC tumors. Similarly, we compare steroid profiles in LNCaP tumors at different stages of CRPC progression. Steroidogenesis inhibitors targeting CYP17A1 and SRD5A2 significantly altered but did not eliminate androgen synthesis from progesterone in steroid starved LNCaP cells and CRPC tumors. Upon exposure to inhibitors of steroidogenesis prostate cancer cells adapt gradually during CRPC progression to synthesize DHT in a compensatory manner through alternative feed-forward mechanisms. Furthermore, tumors obtained immediately after castration are significantly less efficient at metabolizing progesterone ( approximately 36%) and produce a different steroid profile to CRPC tumors. Optimal targeting of the androgen axis may be most effective when tumors are least efficient at synthesizing androgens. Confirmatory studies in humans are required to validate these findings.

  6. Developmental aspects of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis.

    PubMed

    Wintour, E M

    1984-06-01

    The ovine fetal adrenal cortex and pituitary are functional secretory organs by the end of the first third of gestation (term is 142-152 days). By half-way through gestation the zona glomerulosa is mature morphologically, more than 80% of the aldosterone in fetal blood is of fetal adrenal origin, but conventional stimuli, for example, increased plasma K+ or angiotensin II, do not increase aldosterone secretion until near term. The zona fasciculata is immature histologically, relatively unresponsive to ACTH, and contributes less than 10% of the cortisol in fetal blood between 100 and 120 days of gestation. After this time the zona fasciculata cells begin to mature, to respond to ACTH and to produce an increasing proportion of the cortisol in fetal blood. A functional relationship between hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal cortex matures over the last fifth of gestation. It is hypothesized that cortisol exerts a local effect in maturation of fetal zona fasciculata cells, such that low concentrations of ACTH have increasingly larger effects on growth and secretion of the fasciculata and that the level of negative feedback by cortisol on the hypothalamic-pituitary axis is reset. The analogy is drawn between the changes in gonadotrophin and gonadal hormones which culminates in puberty in man and the changes in ACTH and cortisol which culminate in parturition in sheep.

  7. Binding sites of atrial natriuretic peptide in tree shrew adrenal gland

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs, E.; Shigematsu, K.; Saavedra, J.M.

    1986-09-01

    Adrenal gland binding sites for atrial natriuretic peptide-(99-126) (ANP) were quantitated in tree shrew (Tupaia belangeri) by incubation of adrenal sections with (3-(/sup 125/I)-iodotyrosyl28) atrial natriuretic peptide-(99-126), followed by autoradiography with computerized microdensitometry. In the adrenal glands, there are three types of ANP binding sites. One is located in the zona glomerulosa (BMax 84 +/- 6 fmol/mg protein; Kd 122 +/- 9 pM); the second in the zona fasciculata and reticularis (BMax 29 +/- 2 fmol/mg protein; Kd 153 +/- 6 pM) and the third in the adrenal medulla (BMax 179 +/- 1 fmol/mg protein; Kd 70 +/- 2 pM). Besides the influence of ANP on the regulation of adrenocortical mineralcorticoid and glucocorticoid secretion our findings raise the possibility for a local site of action of atrial natriuretic peptide in the regulation of adrenomedullary catecholamines in the tree shrew, primates and man.

  8. From the radiologic pathology archives: Adrenal tumors and tumor-like conditions in the adult: radiologic-pathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Lattin, Grant E; Sturgill, Eric D; Tujo, Charles A; Marko, Jamie; Sanchez-Maldonado, Katherine W; Craig, William D; Lack, Ernest E

    2014-01-01

    Advanced imaging often reveals adrenal tumors and tumor-like conditions in both symptomatic and asymptomatic patients. When adrenal disease is clinically suspected, cross-sectional imaging can be helpful in evaluating the etiology of the patient's symptoms. When adrenal disease is incidentally identified, what the clinician and patient really want to know is whether the findings are benign or malignant, as this ultimately will affect their next step in management. Using radiologic-pathologic correlation, we broadly classify common, uncommon, and rare tumors and tumor-like conditions that can occur in the adrenal as benign or malignant. This classification follows predominant trends in observed biologic behavior while acknowledging those tumors that may behave in the minority in an unpredictable manner. We review the clinical background and presentation of functional adrenal tumors including Conn syndrome, Cushing syndrome, and catecholamine-secreting tumors, as well as their relationship with adrenal anatomy. We discuss a variety of benign tumors, including adrenal cortical adenoma (including oncocytoma) and pheochromocytoma, as well as uncommonly and rarely encountered tumors such as myelolipoma, hemangioma, lymphangioma, schwannoma, ganglioneuroma, and adenomatoid tumor. A variety of tumefactive but nonneoplastic lesions are addressed, including adrenal cortical hyperplasia, adrenal hemorrhage, adrenal cysts, and infections. Malignant tumors discussed include adrenal cortical carcinoma, the rare malignant pheochromocytoma, lymphoma, metastases, and sarcomas. For each tumor and tumor-like lesion, the clinical presentation, epidemiology, key imaging findings, diagnostic differential considerations, and management options are briefly addressed. Finally, an approach to the workup of suspected or incidentally discovered tumors is presented based on a selected literature survey and our clinical experience. Radiologists play an important role in identification and

  9. From the radiologic pathology archives: Adrenal tumors and tumor-like conditions in the adult: radiologic-pathologic correlation.

    PubMed

    Lattin, Grant E; Sturgill, Eric D; Tujo, Charles A; Marko, Jamie; Sanchez-Maldonado, Katherine W; Craig, William D; Lack, Ernest E

    2014-01-01

    Advanced imaging often reveals adrenal tumors and tumor-like conditions in both symptomatic and asymptomatic patients. When adrenal disease is clinically suspected, cross-sectional imaging can be helpful in evaluating the etiology of the patient's symptoms. When adrenal disease is incidentally identified, what the clinician and patient really want to know is whether the findings are benign or malignant, as this ultimately will affect their next step in management. Using radiologic-pathologic correlation, we broadly classify common, uncommon, and rare tumors and tumor-like conditions that can occur in the adrenal as benign or malignant. This classification follows predominant trends in observed biologic behavior while acknowledging those tumors that may behave in the minority in an unpredictable manner. We review the clinical background and presentation of functional adrenal tumors including Conn syndrome, Cushing syndrome, and catecholamine-secreting tumors, as well as their relationship with adrenal anatomy. We discuss a variety of benign tumors, including adrenal cortical adenoma (including oncocytoma) and pheochromocytoma, as well as uncommonly and rarely encountered tumors such as myelolipoma, hemangioma, lymphangioma, schwannoma, ganglioneuroma, and adenomatoid tumor. A variety of tumefactive but nonneoplastic lesions are addressed, including adrenal cortical hyperplasia, adrenal hemorrhage, adrenal cysts, and infections. Malignant tumors discussed include adrenal cortical carcinoma, the rare malignant pheochromocytoma, lymphoma, metastases, and sarcomas. For each tumor and tumor-like lesion, the clinical presentation, epidemiology, key imaging findings, diagnostic differential considerations, and management options are briefly addressed. Finally, an approach to the workup of suspected or incidentally discovered tumors is presented based on a selected literature survey and our clinical experience. Radiologists play an important role in identification and

  10. Obesity in transgenic female mice with constitutively elevated luteinizing hormone secretion.

    PubMed

    Kero, Jukka T; Savontaus, Eriika; Mikola, Maarit; Pesonen, Ullamari; Koulu, Markku; Keri, Ruth A; Nilson, John H; Poutanen, Matti; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo T

    2003-10-01

    Transgenic (TG) female mice, expressing a chimeric bovine luteinizing hormone (LH) beta-subunit/human chorionic gonadotropin beta-subunit COOH-terminal extension (bLHbeta-CTP) gene, produce high levels of circulating LH and serve as a model for functional ovarian hyperandrogenism and follicular cysts. We report here that obesity is a typical feature of these female mice. The mean body weight of the bLHbeta-CTP females was significantly higher than in controls at, and beyond 5 wk of age, and at 5 mo, it was 32% increased. At this age, the amount of white adipose tissue in the bLHbeta-CTP females was significantly increased, as reflected by the weight difference of the retroperitoneal fat pad. In addition, the expression of leptin mRNA in white adipose tissue of the TG females was elevated about twofold. Serum leptin and insulin levels, and food intake, were also increased significantly in the TG females. Brown adipose tissue (BAT) thermogenic activity, as measured by GDP binding to BAT mitochondria, was reduced (P < 0.05). Ovariectomy at the age of 3 wk totally prevented the development of obesity. In summary, the present results show that intact female bLHbeta-CTP mice are obese, have increased food consumption, and reduced BAT thermogenic activity. The weight gain can be explained partly by elevated androgens but is probably also contributed to the increased adrenal steroidogenesis. Hence, the bLHbeta-CTP mice provide a useful model for studying obesity related to elevated LH secretion, with consequent alterations in ovarian and adrenal function.

  11. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita

    MedlinePlus

    ... glands on top of each kidney called the adrenal glands . These glands produce a variety of hormones that ... disorder is adrenal insufficiency, which occurs when the adrenal glands do not produce enough hormones. Adrenal insufficiency typically ...

  12. Adipose cell-adrenal interactions: current knowledge and future perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ronconi, Vanessa; Turchi, Federica; Bujalska, Iwona J; Giacchetti, Gilberta; Boscaro, Marco

    2008-04-01

    The central role of adipose tissue in the development of cardiovascular and metabolic pathology has been highlighted by the discovery of mediators (adipokines) secreted by adipose tissue and their involvement in the regulation of various biological processes. In light of recent experimental data, cross-talk between adipose tissue and the adrenal gland, particularly via the mineralocorticoid aldosterone, has been proposed. Aldosterone can induce adipogenesis, and human white adipose tissue is reported to release as-yet-uncharacterized factors that stimulate adrenocortical steroidogenesis and aldosterone production. These data could provide new insights into the pathophysiology of obesity-related disorders, including hypertension and aldosterone excess, with further studies necessary for confirming and better defining such adipose-adrenal interactions.

  13. Compensatory adrenal growth - A neurally mediated reflex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dallman, M. F.; Engeland, W. C.; Shinsako, J.

    1976-01-01

    The responses of young rats to left adrenalectomy or left adrenal manipulation were compared to surgical sham adrenalectomy in which adrenals were observed but not touched. At 12 h right adrenal wet weight, dry weight, DNA, RNA, and protein content were increased (P less than 0.05) after the first two operations. Left adrenal manipulation resulted in increased right adrenal weight at 12 h but no change in left adrenal weight. Sequential manipulation of the left adrenal at time 0 and the right adrenal at 12 h resulted in an enlarged right adrenal at 12 h (P less than 0.01), and an enlarged left adrenal at 24 h (P less than 0.05), showing that the manipulated gland was capable of response. Bilateral adrenal manipulation of the adrenal glands resulted in bilateral enlargement of 12 h (P less than 0.01). Taken together with previous results, these findings strongly suggest that compensatory adrenal growth is a neurally mediated reflex.

  14. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal and gonadal axes in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Cutolo, M; Villaggio, B; Foppiani, L; Briata, M; Sulli, A; Pizzorni, C; Faelli, F; Prete, C; Felli, L; Seriolo, B; Giusti, M

    2000-01-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) and the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axes involvement or response to immune activation seems crucial for the control of excessive inflammatory and immune conditions such as autoimmune rheumatic diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, female patients seem to depend more on the HPA axis, whereas male patients seem to depend more on the HPG axis. In particular, hypoandrogenism may play a pathogenetic role in male RA patients because adrenal and gonadal androgens, both products of the HPA and HPG axes, are considered natural immunosuppressors. A significantly altered steroidogenesis of adrenal androgens (i.e., dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, DHEAS and DHEA) in nonglucocorticoid-treated premenopausal RA patients has been described. The menopausal peak of RA suggests that estrogens and/or progesterone deficiency also play a role in the disease, and many data indicate that estrogens suppress cellular immunity, but stimulate humoral immunity (i.e., deficiency promotes cellular Th1-type immunity). A range of physical and psychosocial stressors are also implicated in the activation of the HPA axis and related HPG changes. Chronic and acute stressors appear to have different actions on immune mechanisms with experimental and human studies indicating that acute severe stressors may be even immunosuppressive, while chronic stress may enhance immune responses. The interactions between the immunological and neuroendocrine circuits is the subject of active and extensive ongoing research and might in the near future offer highly promising strategies for hormone-replacement therapies in RA.

  15. Ashwagandha root in the treatment of non-classical adrenal hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Kalani, Amir; Bahtiyar, Gul; Sacerdote, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is a well-characterised family of disorders of the adrenal cortices, resulting in varying degrees of cortisol, aldosterone and androgen deficiency or androgen excess, depending on the enzyme(s) affected and the degree of quantitative or functional enzyme deficit. Withania somnifera (WS), commonly known as Ashwagandha, is a medicinal plant that has been employed for centuries in ayurvedic medicine. Preclinical studies have shown that WS increases circulating cortisol levels and improves insulin sensitivity. We report the case of a 57-year-old woman with non-classical adrenal hyperplasia due to both 3-β-ol dehydrogenase deficiency and aldosterone synthase deficiency who was self-treated with WS for 6 months. After 6 months of treatment her serum 18-OH-hydroxycorticoserone, 17-OH-pregnenolone, corticosterone and 11-deoxycortisol decreased by 31%, 66%, 69% and 55%, respectively. The biochemical improvement was accompanied by a noticeable reduction in scalp hair loss. PMID:22987912

  16. Androgen-activating enzymes in the central nervous system.

    PubMed

    Poletti, A; Martini, L

    1999-01-01

    In the rat brain, several steroids can be converted by specific enzymes to either more potent compounds or to derivatives showing new biological effects. One of the most studied enzyme is the 5alpha-reductase (5alpha-R), which acts on 3keto-delta4 steroids. In males, testosterone is the main substrate and gives rise to the most potent natural androgen dihydrotestosterone. In females, progesterone is reduced to dihydroprogesterone, a precursor of allopregnanolone, a natural anxiolytic/anesthetic steroid. Other substrates are some gluco- and minero-corticoids. Two isoforms of the 5alpha-R, with limited degree of homology, have been cloned: 5alpha-R type 1 and type 2. The 5alpha-R type 1 possesses low affinity for the various substrates and is widely distributed in the body, with the highest levels in the liver; in the brain, this isoform is expressed throughout life and does not appear to be controlled by androgens. 5Alpha-R type 1 in the rat brain is mainly concentrated in myelin membranes, where it might be involved in the catabolism of potentially neurotoxic steroids. The 5alpha-R type 2 shows high affinity for the various substrates, a peculiar pH optimum at acidic values and is localized in androgen-dependent structures. In the rat brain, the type 2 isoform is expressed at high levels only in the perinatal period and is controlled by androgens, at least in males. In adulthood, the type 2 gene appears to be specifically expressed in localised brain regions, like the hypothalamus and the hippocampus. The 5alpha-R type 2 is present in the GT1 cells, a model of LHRH-secreting neurons. These cells also contain the androgen receptor, which is probably involved in the central negative feedback effect exerted by androgens on the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. The physiological significance of these and additional data will be discussed.

  17. Rare association of adrenal tumors.

    PubMed

    Tica, Irjna; Tica, V I; Mihailov, Claudia

    2007-01-01

    Adrenal incidentalomas represent a true problem both in the clinical diagnosis and in their treatment. A great variety of pathologies may be found under the umbrella of this concept: benign adenomas - functioning or not, myelolipomas, hamartomas, or granulomatous infiltrations of the adrenal. The possibility of malignancy should be considered in each case, especially in patients with a known extra-adrenal primary. In true incidentalomas, size appears to be predictive of malignancy. We present an interesting case because of the surprising association of two adrenal tumors, with a long time lapse between them, with ascites and pleurisy and because of the difficulty of treatment in a patient refusing surgery. We did not find such an association in the medical literature. Miss MR, 61 years old, was treated surgically for pheochromocytoma 28 years ago (left adrenalectomy). She was diagnosed in the past with peritoneal carcinomatosis; paraneoplastic left pleurisy, chronic hepatitis of unknown etiology. She presented at admission cashexia, pallor, signs of left pleural effusion and of ascites, hearts beats and blood pressure within normal limits. Investigations were performed including hormonal tests, ultrasound investigation, hepatic tests, and CT scan but no specific tumour markers. A right adrenal incidentaloma of 21/15 mm - in association with ascites and pleurisy - was found at CT scan. Diagnostic problems are discussed because the patient refused surgery, so no pathological examination was available.

  18. Selective androgen receptor modulator activity of a steroidal antiandrogen TSAA-291 and its cofactor recruitment profile.

    PubMed

    Hikichi, Yukiko; Yamaoka, Masuo; Kusaka, Masami; Hara, Takahito

    2015-10-15

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) specifically bind to the androgen receptor and exert agonistic or antagonistic effects on target organs. In this study, we investigated the SARM activity of TSAA-291, previously known as a steroidal antiandrogen, in mice because TSAA-291 was found to possess partial androgen receptor agonist activity in reporter assays. In addition, to clarify the mechanism underlying its tissue selectivity, we performed comprehensive cofactor recruitment analysis of androgen receptor using TSAA-291 and dihydrotestosterone (DHT), an endogenous androgen. The androgen receptor agonistic activity of TSAA-291 was more obvious in reporter assays using skeletal muscle cells than in those using prostate cells. In castrated mice, TSAA-291 increased the weight of the levator ani muscle without increasing the weight of the prostate and seminal vesicle. Comprehensive cofactor recruitment analysis via mammalian two-hybrid methods revealed that among a total of 112 cofactors, 12 cofactors including the protein inhibitor of activated STAT 1 (PIAS1) were differently recruited to androgen receptor in the presence of TSAA-291 and DHT. Prostate displayed higher PIAS1 expression than skeletal muscle. Forced expression of the PIAS1 augmented the transcriptional activity of the androgen receptor, and silencing of PIAS1 by siRNAs suppressed the secretion of prostate-specific antigen, an androgen responsive marker. Our results demonstrate that TSAA-291 has SARM activity and suggest that TSAA-291 may induce different conformational changes of the androgen receptor and recruitment profiles of cofactors such as PIAS1, compared with DHT, to exert tissue-specific activity.

  19. Giant adrenal cyst displacing the right kidney.

    PubMed

    Chodisetti, Subbarao; Boddepalli, Yogesh; Kota, Malakondareddy

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal cysts are rare and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of retroperitoneal cysts. We present a case of a huge adrenal cyst displacing the right kidney anteriorly toward the left side in a young female.

  20. Cushing syndrome due to adrenal tumor

    MedlinePlus

    Adrenal tumor - Cushing syndrome ... Cushing syndrome is a disorder that occurs when your body has a higher than normal level of the ... or cancerous (malignant). Noncancerous tumors that can cause ... Adrenal adenomas Micronodular hyperplasia Cancerous tumors that ...

  1. Adrenal cortex dysfunction: CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Huebener, K.H.; Treugut, H.

    1984-01-01

    The computed tomographic appearance of the adrenal gland was studied in 302 patients with possible endocrinologic disease and 107 patients undergoing CT for nonendocrinologic reasons. Measurements of adrenal size were also made in 100 adults with no known adrenal pathology. CT proved to be a sensitive diagnostic tool in combination with clinical studies. When blood hormone levels are increased, CT can differentiate among homogeneous organic hyperplasia, nodular hyperplasia, benign adenoma, and malignant cortical adenoma. When blood hormone levels are decreased, CT can demonstrate hypoplasia or metastatic tumorous destruction. Calcifications can be demonstrated earlier than on plain radiographs. When hormone elimination is increased, the morphologic substrate can be identified; tumorous changes can be localized and infiltration of surrounding organs recognized.

  2. Spontaneous adrenal haemorrhage in pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    A, Anagnostopoulos; S, Sharma

    2011-01-01

    The authors present a case of spontaneous adrenal haemorrhage, in a 28-year-old woman at 36 weeks of a twin pregnancy. Initial symptom was sudden onset chest pain which soon migrated to abdomen, accompanied by hypovolaemic shock and fetal bradycardia. Subsequent caesarean section for suspected placental abruption and resuscitation with nine units of blood, 10 of cryoprecipitate, four of fresh frozen plasma and two of platelets, in order to treat anaemia of Hgb of 3.6 g/dl and disseminated intravascular coagulation, failed to stabilise the woman. A CT scan of abdomen and pelvis then revealed a 15×17×17 cm retroperitoneal haematoma, secondary to right adrenal haemorrhage. Management was with laparotomy drainage and packing of the retroperitoneal haematoma along with the use of activated factor VII. Adrenal haemorrhage in pregnancy is an extremely rare, acute, life-threatening condition, presenting with non-specific symptoms. PMID:22679231

  3. Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia: Classification of Studies Employing Psychological Endpoints

    PubMed Central

    Stout, Stephanie A.; Litvak, Margarita; Robbins, Natashia M.; Sandberg, David E.

    2010-01-01

    Psychological outcomes in persons with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) have received substantial attention. The objectives of this paper were to (1) catalog psychological endpoints assessed in CAH outcome studies and (2) classify the conceptual/theoretical model shaping the research design and interpretation of CAH-related psychological effects. A total of 98 original research studies, published between 1955 and 2009, were categorized based on psychological endpoints examined as well as the research design and conceptual model guiding analysis and interpretation of data. The majority of studies (68%) investigated endpoints related to psychosexual differentiation. The preponderance of studies (76%) examined a direct relationship (i.e., inferring causality) between prenatal androgen exposure and psychological outcomes. Findings are discussed in relation to the observed imbalance between theoretical interest in the role of prenatal androgens in shaping psychosexual differentiation and a broader conceptual model that examines the role of other potential factors in mediating or moderating the influence of CAH pathophysiology on psychological outcomes in both affected females and males. The latter approach offers to identify factors amenable to clinical intervention that enhance both health and quality of life outcomes in CAH as well as other disorders of sex development. PMID:20976294

  4. Androgen actions and the ovary.

    PubMed

    Walters, K A; Allan, C M; Handelsman, D J

    2008-03-01

    Although androgens and the androgen receptor (AR) have defining roles in male reproductive development and function, previously no role in female reproductive physiology beyond testosterone (T) as the precursor in estradiol (E(2)) biosynthesis was firmly established. Understanding the role and specific mechanisms of androgen action via the AR in the ovary has been limited by confusion on how to interpret results from pharmacological studies, because many androgens can be metabolized in vivo and in vitro to steroids that can also exert actions via the estrogen receptor (ESR). Recent genetic studies using mouse models with specific disruption of the Ar gene have highlighted the role that AR-mediated actions play in maintaining female fertility through key roles in the regulation of follicle health, development, and ovulation. Furthermore, these genetic studies have revealed that AR-mediated effects influence age-related female fertility, possibly via mechanisms acting predominantly at the hypothalamic-pituitary axis in a dose-dependent manner. This review focuses on combining the findings from pharmacological studies and novel genetic mouse models to unravel the roles of ovarian androgen actions in relation to female fertility and ovarian aging, as well as creating new insights into the role of androgens in androgen-associated reproductive disorders such as polycystic ovarian syndrome.

  5. Approach to the Patient: The Adult With Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Arlt, Wiebke

    2013-01-01

    The most common form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia is steroid 21-hydroxylase deficiency (21OHD). When the nonclassical (mild) form is included, 21OHD is the most common genetic disease in human beings. With the advent of pharmaceutical preparation of glucocorticoids starting in the 1960s and newborn screening starting in the 1990s, the majority of children with 21OHD are reaching adulthood, which has yielded a cohort of patients with, in essence, a new disease. Only recently have some data emerged from cohorts of adults with 21OHD, and in some centers, experience with the management of these patients is growing. These patients suffer from poor health, infertility, characteristic tumors in the adrenal glands and gonads, and consequences of chronic glucocorticoid therapy. Their care is fragmented and inconsistent, and many stop taking their medications out of frustration. Internal medicine residents and endocrinology fellows receive little training in their care, which further discourages their seeking medical attention. Adults with 21OHD have a different physiology from patients with Addison's disease or other androgen excess states, and their needs are different than those of young children with 21OHD. Consequently, their care requires unorthodox treatment and monitoring strategies foreign to most endocrine practitioners. Our goal for this article is to review their physiology, complications, and needs in order to develop rational and effective treatment and monitoring strategies. PMID:23837188

  6. Androstenedione rhythms in saliva in congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed Central

    Young, M C; Walker, R F; Riad-Fahmy, D; Hughes, I A

    1988-01-01

    Serial samples of saliva were collected at home by 17 patients being treated for congenital adrenal hyperplasia to determine the circadian rhythm of androstenedione as an index of therapeutic control. Single samples of blood for measurement of plasma testosterone, 170H-progesterone, and androstenedione concentrations were collected from these and a further seven patients for comparison. Plasma androstenedione concentrations showed a close correlation with plasma concentrations of 170H-progesterone and testosterone. There was a strong correlation between the salivary androstenedione profiles and plasma testosterone concentrations in pubertal girls. Concentrations of androstenedione in saliva decreased during the day but remained raised at each sampling time in relation to plasma testosterone concentrations. Salivary androstenedione profiles are shown as nomograms to distinguish the degree of therapeutic control. The concentration of androstenedione, measured in plasma or saliva, is an alternative marker to monitor control of treatment in congenital adrenal hyperplasia. The measurement in saliva is a useful index of androgen production when blood sampling is difficult. PMID:3389892

  7. [Adrenal cystic masses. Our experience].

    PubMed

    Costantino, V; Petrin, P; Da Lio, C; Zaramella, D; Pedrazzoli, S

    1993-10-01

    Cystic masses of the adrenal gland are clinically and pathologically rare findings and few cases have been reported up to now in the medical literature. In the present work 5 new cases are reported: 3 adrenal pseudocysts, 1 lymphangioma, 1 cystic pheochromocytoma. In 3 cases there were clinical symptoms of retroperitoneal mass (lumbar pain, palpable mass, digestive symptoms); in 3 cases conventional radiology was helpful; ultrasonography was used for diagnosis in 1, CT scan in 2. In the pheochromocytoma case the real nature of the mass was determined through fluid hormone determination after fine needle puncture. All cases were treated by surgery.

  8. Photoperiod and testosterone regulate androgen receptor immunostaining in the Siberian hamster brain.

    PubMed

    Bittman, Eric L; Ehrlich, David A; Ogdahl, Justyne L; Jetton, Amy E

    2003-09-01

    Day length regulates the effects of gonadal steroids on gonadotropin secretion and behavior in seasonal breeders. To determine whether this influence of photoperiod results from changes in androgen receptor expression in Siberian hamster brain regions that regulate neuroendocrine function, androgen receptor immunostaining was examined in castrated animals given either no androgen replacement or one of three doses of testosterone (T) resulting in physiological serum concentrations. Half of the animals were housed under inhibitory photoperiod conditions, and immunostaining was quantified 11 days later. Measurement of serum gonadotropin and prolactin concentrations confirmed that androgen exerted graded effects on pituitary function but that the animals were killed before photoperiodic influences had fully developed. T significantly increased the numbers of androgen receptor-immunoreactive cells in every brain region examined. Photoperiod exerted no significant influence on androgen receptor-immunoreactive cell number in the arcuate nucleus, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (BNST), medial preoptic nucleus, or in medial amygdala. An interaction between T and photoperiod was observed in the BNST and in the rostral and middle portions of the arcuate nucleus. Although increasing concentrations of T resulted in more intense cellular immunostaining in the BNST and arcuate, this effect was not influenced by day length. These results indicate that relatively short-duration (11 days) exposure to inhibitory photoperiod triggers localized and regionally specific changes in androgen receptor expression.

  9. Androgen excess fetal programming of female reproduction: a developmental aetiology for polycystic ovary syndrome?

    PubMed

    Abbott, D H; Barnett, D K; Bruns, C M; Dumesic, D A

    2005-01-01

    The aetiology of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) remains unknown. This familial syndrome is prevalent among reproductive-aged women and its inheritance indicates a dominant regulatory gene with incomplete penetrance. However, promising candidate genes have proven unreliable as markers for the PCOS phenotype. This lack of genetic linkage may represent both extreme heterogeneity of PCOS and difficulty in establishing a universally accepted PCOS diagnosis. Nevertheless, hyperandrogenism is one of the most consistently expressed PCOS traits. Animal models that mimic fetal androgen excess may thus provide unique insight into the origins of the PCOS syndrome. Many female mammals exposed to androgen excess in utero or during early post-natal life typically show masculinized and defeminized behaviour, ovulatory dysfunction and virilized genitalia, although behavioural and ovulatory dysfunction can coexist without virilized genitalia based upon the timing of androgen excess. One animal model shows particular relevance to PCOS: the prenatally androgenized female rhesus monkey. Females exposed to androgen excess early in gestation exhibit hyperandrogenism, oligomenorrhoea and enlarged, polyfollicular ovaries, in addition to LH hypersecretion, impaired embryo development, insulin resistance accompanying abdominal obesity, impaired insulin response to glucose and hyperlipidaemia. Female monkeys exposed to androgen excess late in gestation mimic these programmed changes, except for LH and insulin secretion defects. In utero androgen excess may thus variably perturb multiple organ system programming and thereby provide a single, fetal origin for a heterogeneous adult syndrome. PMID:15941725

  10. Androgen suppresses testicular cancer cell growth in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Hideo; Ueda, Takashi; Ito, Saya; Shiraishi, Takumi; Taniguchi, Hidefumi; Kayukawa, Naruhiro; Nakanishi, Hiroyuki; Ushijima, So; Kanazawa, Motohiro; Nakamura, Terukazu; Naya, Yoshio; Hongo, Fumiya; Kamoi, Kazumi; Okihara, Koji; Ukimura, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    Silencing of androgen receptor (AR)-meditated androgen signaling is thought to be associated with the development of testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs). However, the role of the androgen/AR signal in TGCT development has not been investigated. In this study, we show that the androgen/AR signal suppressed the cell growth of seminomas (SEs), a type of TGCT, in vitro and in vivo. Growth of SE cells was suppressed by DHT treatment and reduction of androgen levels by surgical castration promoted cancer cell growth in an in vivo xenograft model. Tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (TPH1), the rate limit enzyme in serotonin synthesis, was one of the genes which expression was reduced in DHT-treated SE cells. TPH1 was highly expressed in SE cancer tissues compared with adjacent normal tissues. Activation of androgen/AR signaling in SE cells reduced the expression of TPH1 in SE cells, followed by the reduction of serotonin secretion in cell culture supernatant. These results suggested that silencing of androgen/AR signaling may cause initiation and progression of SE through increase in TPH1 gene expression level. PMID:27144435

  11. Two case reports of bilateral adrenal myelolipomas

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yu; Ye, Lin-Yang; Yu, Bo; Guo, Jia-Xiang; Liu, Qian; Chen, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Primary adrenal myelolipoma is a rare, non-functioning adrenal benign tumor that is composed of mature adipose tissue and a variable amount of haemopoietic elements. Clinically, it is difficult to get diagnosed with adrenal myelolipoma because the patient usually doesn’t have obvious symptoms and signs in early stage. In the present study, two cases of primary bilateral adrenal myelolipomas are reported. Clinical presentation, imaging diagnostic features, histopathological changes and surgical treatments of the two patients are discussed. Preoperative diagnostic imaging examinations (B-mode ultrasonography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging sans) assisted getting a prediction diagnosis of bilateral adrenal myelolipomas. A two-stage surgery was used to successfully excise bilateral adrenal myelolipomas in the two patients. Conventional open adrenalectomy was applied to remove the adrenal myelolipomas greater than 6 cm, and laparoscopic adrenalectomy was performed to excise the adrenal tumors smaller than 6 cm. Bilateral adrenal myelolipomas of the two patients were finally confirmed by postoperative histopathological examinations. Understanding clinical, imaging diagnostic and histopathological features of bilateral adrenal myelolipomas will facilitate timely diagnosis and treatment of this condition. Surgical removal of bilateral adrenal myelolipomas is safe, curative and beneficial. The two-stage surgery appears to be the best treatment option for the patients with bilateral adrenal myelolipomas because it achieves optimal treatment effectiveness with minimized sequelae. PMID:26380835

  12. Spontaneous Retroperitoneal Hemorrhage from Adrenal Artery Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez Valverde, F.M. Balsalobre, M.; Torregrosa, N.; Molto, M.; Gomez Ramos, M.J.; Vazquez Rojas, J.L.

    2007-04-15

    Spontaneous adrenal hemorrhage is a very rare but serious disorder of the adrenal gland that can require emergent treatment. We report on a 42-year-old man who underwent selective angiography for diagnosis and treatment of retroperitoneal hemorrhage from small adrenal artery aneurysm. This case gives further details about the value of transluminal artery embolization in the management of visceral aneurysm rupture.

  13. [Prenatal exposure to androgens as a factor of fetal programming].

    PubMed

    Recabarren, Sergio E; Sir-Petermann, Teresa; Maliqueo, Manuel; Lobos, Alejandro; Rojas-García, Pedro

    2006-01-01

    Both epidemiological and clinical evidence suggest a relationship between the prenatal environment and the risk of developing diseases during adulthood. The first observations about this relationship showed that prenatal growth retardation or stress conditions during fetal life were associated to cardiovascular, metabolic and other diseases in later life. However, not only those conditions may have lasting effects after birth. Growing evidence suggests that prenatal exposure to steroids (either of fetal or maternal origin) could be another source of prenatal programming with detrimental consequences during adulthood. We have recently demonstrated that pregnant women with polycystic ovary syndrome exhibit elevated androgen levels compared to normal pregnant women, which could provide an androgen excess for both female or male fetuses. We have further tested this hypothesis in an animal model of prenatal androgenization, finding that females born from androgenized mothers have a low birth weight and high insulin resistance, that starts at an early age. On the other hand, males have low testosterone and LH secretion in response to a GnRH analogue test compared to control males and alterations in seminal parameters. We therefore propose that our efforts should be directed to modify the hyperandrogenic intrauterine environment to reduce the potential development of reproductive and metabolic diseases during adulthood.

  14. Adrenal insufficiency and adrenal replacement therapy. Current status in Spain.

    PubMed

    Aulinas, Anna; Casanueva, Felipe; Goñi, Fernando; Monereo, Susana; Moreno, Basilio; Picó, Antonio; Puig-Domingo, Manel; Salvador, Javier; Tinahones, Francisco J; Webb, Susan M

    2013-03-01

    Adrenal insufficiency (AI) is a rare endocrine disease, associated to increased mortality if left untreated. It can be due to a primary failure of the adrenal glands (primary AI) or malfunctioning of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) (secondary AI). The lack of data on incidence/prevalence of adrenal insufficiency in Spain complicates any evaluation of the magnitude of the problem in our country. Initial symptoms are non-specific, so often there is a delay in diagnosis. Current therapy with available glucocorticoids is associated with decreased quality of life in patients with treated AI, as well as with increased mortality and morbidity, probably related to both over-treatment and lack of hydrocortisone, associated with non-physiological peaks and troughs of the drug over the 24 hours. The availability of a new drug with a modified dual release (immediate and retarded), that requires one only daily dose, improves and simplifies the treatment, increases compliance as well as quality of life, morbidity and possibly mortality. This revision deals with the knowledge on the situation both globally and in Spain, prior to the availability of this new drug.

  15. Alpha-human atrial natriuretic polypeptide (. cap alpha. -hANP) specific binding sites in bovine adrenal gland

    SciTech Connect

    Higuchi, K.; Nawata, H.; Kato, K.I.; Ibayashi, H.; Matsuo, H.

    1986-06-13

    The effects of synthetic ..cap alpha..-human atrial natriuretic polypeptide (..cap alpha..-hANP) on steroidogenesis in bovine adrenocortical cells in primary monolayer culture were investigated. ..cap alpha..-hANP did not inhibit basal aldosterone secretion. ..cap alpha..-hANP induced a significant dose-dependent inhibition of basal levels of cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) secretion and also of aCTH (10/sup -8/M)-stimulated increases in aldosterone, cortisol and DHEA secretion. Visualization of (/sup 125/I) ..cap alpha..-hANP binding sites in bovine adrenal gland by an in vitro autoradiographic technique demonstrated that these sites were highly localized in the adrenal cortex, especially the zona glomerulosa. These results suggest that the adrenal cortex may be a target organ for direct receptor-mediated actions of ..cap alpha..-hANP.

  16. GABA Signaling and Neuroactive Steroids in Adrenal Medullary Chromaffin Cells

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Keita; Matsuoka, Hidetada; Fujihara, Hiroaki; Ueta, Yoichi; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Inoue, Masumi

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is produced not only in the brain, but also in endocrine cells by the two isoforms of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), GAD65 and GAD67. In rat adrenal medullary chromaffin cells only GAD67 is expressed, and GABA is stored in large dense core vesicles (LDCVs), but not synaptic-like microvesicles (SLMVs). The α3β2/3γ2 complex represents the majority of GABAA receptors expressed in rat and guinea pig chromaffin cells, whereas PC12 cells, an immortalized rat chromaffin cell line, express the α1 subunit as well as the α3. The expression of α3, but not α1, in PC12 cells is enhanced by glucocorticoid activity, which may be mediated by both the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). GABA has two actions mediated by GABAA receptors in chromaffin cells: it induces catecholamine secretion by itself and produces an inhibition of synaptically evoked secretion by a shunt effect. Allopregnanolone, a neuroactive steroid which is secreted from the adrenal cortex, produces a marked facilitation of GABAA receptor channel activity. Since there are no GABAergic nerve fibers in the adrenal medulla, GABA may function as a para/autocrine factor in the chromaffin cells. This function of GABA may be facilitated by expression of the immature isoforms of GAD and GABAA receptors and the lack of expression of plasma membrane GABA transporters (GATs). In this review, we will consider how the para/autocrine function of GABA is achieved, focusing on the structural and molecular mechanisms for GABA signaling. PMID:27147972

  17. Changes in human adrenal and gonadal function onboard Spacelab.

    PubMed

    Strollo, F; Strollo, G; More, M; Ferretti, C; Mangrossa, N; Casarosa, E; Luisi, M; Riondino, G

    1997-07-01

    Astronauts have to face chronic stress during the mission period. This might cause: (i) increased adrenocortico-trophin (ACTH) and cortisol (Cort) secretion; (ii) impaired luteinizing hormone (LH) output with consequent testosterone (T) hyposecretion in men. Moreover, should the subjects prove not to synchronize their inner clocks to the time shift protocols defined by NASA, most results would be questionable. The aim of this study was to verify if plasma testicular androgens were lower than baseline and Cort biorhythm was preserved in male astronauts during a short duration flight.

  18. Effects of DDT on bobwhite quail adrenal gland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lehman, J.W.; Peterle, T.J.; Mulls, C.M.

    1974-01-01

    A wide range of responses to sublethal levels of DDT exist, many of which are species specific and vary within each species depending upon age, sex, and physiological state. Sublethal levels of DDT do cause an increase in the adrenal cortical tissue of bobwhite quail, which may cause increased secretion of corticosteroids, and in turn affect reproduction. A delicate homeostatic balance exists within the avian endocrine system which may be disturbed by feeding sublethal levels of chlorinated hydrocarbon pesticides. This adverse effect on the endocrine system may cause subtle reproductive failures which go unnoticed until the population is greatly reduced.

  19. Sympathetic regulation of estradiol secretion from the ovary.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Sae

    2015-01-01

    It is well known that hormone secretion from endocrine glands is regulated by hierarchical feedback mechanisms. However, although Cannon revealed in the 1920s that sympathoadrenal medullary function increased during emergency situations, no studies on the autonomic nervous regulation of hormone secretion have been undertaken for many years. In the past 40 years, the autonomic nervous regulation of insulin secretion from the pancreas, gastrin secretion from the stomach, glucocorticoid secretion from the adrenal cortex, etc., has been demonstrated. Estradiol secretion from the ovary is strongly controlled by the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis, and its possible regulation by autonomic nerves has been largely unnoticed. Some histological studies have revealed rich adrenergic sympathetic innervation in the ovary. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the activation of the sympathetic nerves to the ovary directly reduces estradiol secretion from the ovary. This article reviews physiological and morphological studies, primarily in rats, on the sympathetic regulation of estradiol secretion from the ovary.

  20. Adrenal lymphangioma removed by a retroperitoneoscopic procedure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ben; Li, Yanyuan; Wang, Shuo

    2013-02-01

    We report a case of an adrenal lymphangioma removed by retroperitoneal laparoscopy. A 45-year-old female was referred to the urological ward for an adrenal mass that was incidentally detected by ultrasound examination one month earlier. An abdominal ultrasonography (US) scan revealed a 3.0 cm anechoic cystic mass, while a computed tomography (CT) scan revealed a 3.0×2.7 cm left adrenal cystic mass, which was suspected to be an adrenal cyst. The patient underwent retroperitoneoscopic removal of the tumor. Pathological evaluation revealed a cystic lymphangioma in the left adrenal gland.

  1. Adrenal gland and nonrenal retroperitoneum.

    PubMed

    Yeh, H C

    1987-01-01

    Ultrasound, as the initial cross-sectional imaging technique, confirmed the value of axial records. Although computerized tomography and possibly magnetic resonance offers better resolution, ultrasonography has the advantage of being less expensive, convenient, and highly portable. With these specific indications and reservations, ultrasonography of the adrenal and retroperitoneum has an accepted role in imaging.

  2. Steroid secretion in polycystic ovarian disease after ovarian suppression by a long-acting gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist.

    PubMed

    Chang, R J; Laufer, L R; Meldrum, D R; DeFazio, J; Lu, J K; Vale, W W; Rivier, J E; Judd, H L

    1983-05-01

    The principal glandular source of increased serum androgens in polycystic ovarian disease (PCO) is controversial), since complete separation of ovarian from adrenal function has not been achieved. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a long-acting GnRH agonist could be used to selectively inhibit ovarian steroid secretion in PCO and ovulatory women. Each of five typical PCO patients and six ovulatory subjects on day 2 of their menstrual cycles received D-Trp6-Pro9-NEt-LHRH (GnRH-a; 100 micrograms) for 28 consecutive days. Their results were compared to basal serum hormone values in eight oophorectomized women. In response to GnRH-a, PCO and normal subjects exhibited sharp and sustained rises of LH and gradual decreases in FSH. These levels were clearly less than basal levels seen in oophorectomized women. Episodic LH release was significantly attenuated in both groups at the end of GnRH-a treatment. After the administration of agonist, serum estradiol (E2), estrone (E1), androstenedione (A), and testosterone (T) were suppressed to castrate levels in both groups. The decrements of E2 and E1 in PCO were gradual and continuous compared to initial dramatic rises, which reached peaks at 14 days, and subsequent abrupt falls in the ovulatory controls. Serum A and T declined steadily in both groups. Basal serum dehydroepiandrosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, but not cortisol, levels were elevated in PCO subjects. The 24-h secretion patterns and responses to ACTH of these hormones in PCO and ovulatory subjects were unaltered by GnRH-a administration. These data demonstrate that 1) in PCO subjects, GnRH-a induced complete suppression of ovarian steroid secretion, as circulating levels at the end of treatment were comparable to those seen in our oophorectomy subjects; 2) elevated A and T levels in PCO patients were derived primarily from the ovary; and 3) adrenal steroid secretion was unaltered by GnRH-a in both PCO and normal women.

  3. Down-regulation of the beacon gene expression in the regenerating rat adrenal cortex.

    PubMed

    Ziolkowska, Agnieszka; Rucinski, Marcin; Tyczewska, Marianna; Belloni, Anna Sandra; Nowak, Magdalena; Nussdorfer, Gastone G; Malendowicz, Ludwik K

    2006-12-01

    Beacon, a hypothalamic peptide involved in the regulation of food intake, has been recently shown to be expressed in the adrenal cortex, and to inhibit its secretion and growth. To further characterize the role of beacon in the control of adrenal growth, we investigated the level of beacon gene expression in the regenerating rat adrenal cortex. Conventional reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and immunocytochemistry demonstrated the expression of beacon mRNA and protein in the adrenals at both days 5 and 8 of regeneration after enucleation and contralateral adrenalectomy. Semiquantitative real time-PCR revealed a net down-regulation of beacon mRNA in the regenerating glands, as compared to the intact adrenal cortex of sham-operated animals. Beacon gene expression was higher at day 8 than at day 5 of regeneration. Mitotic index, as assayed by the stachmokinetic method with vincristin, was negligible in the intact adrenal, but greatly elevated in regenerating gland, with a higher index found at day 5 than at day 8 after surgery. Taken together our findings indicate that the level of beacon gene expression is inversely correlated with the proliferative activity of adrenocortical cells, and suggest that beacon might act as an endogenous inhibitor of adrenocortical growth in the rat.

  4. A case of ACTH-independent bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia and severe congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Suri, D; Alonso, M; Weiss, R E

    2006-11-01

    Cortisol secretion in ACTH independent bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia (AIMAH) can be regulated by aberrant adrenal receptors. We describe a patient with Cushing's syndrome (CS) due to AIMAH and concomitant Class IV congestive heart failure (CHF). Clinical testing for the presence of aberrant receptors revealed a pronounced serum cortisol (257%) and aldosterone response (212%) to the administration of ACTH and a partial serum cortisol (35%) and aldosterone (106%) response to upright posture. This suggested the possible presence of aberrant hormone receptors for ACTH [melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2-R)], vasopressin, catecholamines or angiotensin II (AT-II) on the patient's adrenal glands. Adrenal tissue from the patient demonstrated an eight-fold increased expression of MC2-R compared to normal adrenal tissue. This increased expression was consistent with the increase in cortisol and aldosterone seen in response to exogenous ACTH. We propose that the severe CHF resulted in activation of the renin-angiotensin system, with an increased production of AT-II. The elevated circulating levels of AT-II may have led to increased expression of MC2-R on the patient's adrenal glands and increased responsiveness to ACTH. This unusual case of CS may elucidate a heretofore unknown mechanism for the development of AIMAH.

  5. Adrenal Cortical Adenoma: The Fourth Component Of Carney Triad and an Association With Subclinical Cushing Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Carney, J. Aidan; Stratakis, Constantine A.; Young, William F.

    2013-01-01

    Carney triad is the combination of gastric stromal sarcoma, pulmonary chondroma, and extra-adrenal paraganglioma. Herein, we describe the clinical, imaging, pathologic, and follow-up findings from 14 patients for a fourth component of the syndrome, adrenal adenoma, and clinical and imaging findings consistent with the tumor from 14 others. The adrenal neoplasm was asymptomatic and usually a late finding. Results of adrenocortical function tests were normal. Computed tomography revealed low-density adrenal masses that were consistent with adenomas. Bilateral lesions were present in 4 patients. In 13 of the 14 patients who underwent surgery, resected adrenal glands and biopsy specimens featured 1 or more circumscribed, yellow tumors, up to 3.5 cm in diameter, composed of well-differentiated polygonal cells with clear vacuolated cytoplasm and a smaller component of eosinophilic cells. The extratumoral cortex had combinations normal histologic features, discrete clear cell micronodules, zonal clear cell hypertrophy, or marked atrophy. The lesion in the 14th patient was different, grossly and microscopically resembling the usual sporadic cortisol-secreting adenoma. After the tumor was excised, the patient required glucocorticoid support. None of the tumors recurred or metastasized. Fourteen additional patients had unilateral or bilateral adrenal tumors consistent with adenomas detected by imaging studies. PMID:23681078

  6. High prevalence of abnormal adrenal response in girls with central precocious puberty at early pubertal stages.

    PubMed

    Lazar, L; Kauli, R; Bruchis, C; Nordenberg, J; Galatzer, A; Pertzelan, A

    1995-10-01

    Abnormal adrenal response is often observed in girls with precocious adrenarche (1). We studied the adrenal response in 112 girls with idiopathic true central precocious puberty (CPP) at early stages of puberty compared to that in 21 girls with normal puberty (controls). The aims of this study were to determine the prevalence of abnormal adrenal response at early stages of puberty, the possible correlation of abnormal adrenal response with pubertal signs at onset of puberty and with plasma androgen levels, and a possible association with the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. All participants underwent a combined i.v. adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) test at Tanner stage 2-3: 62 of the CPP girls before and 50 during treatment with GnRH analog. The stimulated levels of 17-hydroxypregnenolone (17OHPreg) and the stimulated 17OHPreg/17-hydroxyprogesterone ratio were analyzed and compared to previously reported norms. The result revealed three patterns of adrenal response: normal (17OHPreg < or = 24 nmol/l and 17OHPreg/17OHP ratio < or = 7) in 50/112 (44.6%) CPP patients and 17/21 (80.9%) controls; exaggerated (17OHPreg > 24 nmol/l, 17OHPreg/17OHP ratio < or = 7) in 50/112 (44.6%) CPP patients and 3/21 (14.3%) controls; and non-classical 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase deficiency (17OHPreg > 24 nmol/l and 17OHPreg/17OHP ratio > 7) in 12/112 (10.8%) CPP patients and 1/21 (4.8%) controls. The clinical features at onset of puberty were comparable in all girls with the CPP in spite of the different adrenal response patterns.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. [Clinical features and StAR gene mutations in children with congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia].

    PubMed

    Xie, Ting; Zheng, Ji-Peng; Huang, Yong-Lan; Fan, Chun; Wu, Dong-Yan; Tan, Min-Yi; Li, Xiu-Zhen; Cheng, Jing; Liu, Li

    2015-05-01

    This article reported the clinical manifestations, steroid profiles and adrenal ultrasound findings in two unrelated Chinese girls with lipoid congenital adrenal hyperplasia (LCAH). Direct DNA sequencing and restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis were used to identify the mutations of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) gene. The two patients with 46,XX karyotype, presented hyperpigmentation, growth retardation, and hyponatremia. Steroid profiles analysis revealed elevated plasma adrenocorticotrophic hormone levels, decreased or normal serum cortisol levels and low levels of androgens. Ultrasound examinations revealed that enlarged adrenals in patient 1 and normal adrenals in patient 2. Direct DNA sequencing of StAR gene showed a reported homozygous for c.772C>T(p.Q258X) in patient 1. Compound heterozygous for c.367G>A(p.E123K) and IVS4+2T>A (both novel mutations) were found in patient 2, inherited from her mother and father respectively. The amino acid of mutant position of the novel p.E123K was highly conserved in ten different species and was predicted to have impacts on the structure and function of StAR protein by the PolyPhen-2 prediction software. RFLP analysis revealed three bands (670, 423 and 247 bp) in patient 2 and her father and two bands (423 and 247 bp) in her mother and 50 controls. It is concluded that LCAH should be considered in girls with early onset of adrenal insufficiency and that steroid profiles, karyotype analysis, adrenal ultrasound and StAR gene analysis may be helpful for the definite diagnosis of LCAH.

  8. Dynamic pituitary-adrenal interactions in response to Cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Jamie J; Russell, Georgina M; Stevenson, Kirsty; Kershaw, Yvonne; Zhao, Zidong; Henley, David; Angelini, Gianni D; Lightman, Stafford L

    2014-01-01

    corticosterone measurement. Rats were sacrificed 6 hours after the injection and the adrenal glands were collected for measurement of StAR, SF-1 and DAX1 mRNA and protein using RTqPCR and Western immunoblotting, respectively. Adrenal levels of the ACTH receptor (MC2R) mRNA and its accessory protein (MRAP) were also measured by RTqPCR. In response to LPS, rats showed a pattern of ACTH and corticosterone that was similar to patients undergoing CABG. We were also able to demonstrate increased intra-adrenal corticosterone levels and an increase in StAR, SF-1 and MRAP mRNAs and StAR protein, and a reduction in DAX1 and MC2R mRNAs, 6h after LPS injection. Conclusions Severe inflammatory stimuli activate the HPA axis resulting in increased steroidogenic activity in the adrenal cortex and an elevation of cortisol levels in the blood. Following CABG there is a massive increase in both ACTH and cortisol secretion. Despite a subsequent fall of ACTH to basal levels, cortisol remains elevated and co-ordinated ACTH - cortisol pulsatility is maintained. This suggested that there is an increase in adrenal sensitivity to ACTH, which we confirmed in our animal model of immune activation of the HPA axis. Using this model we were able to show that this increased adrenal sensitivity results from changes in the regulation of both stimulatory and inhibitory intra-adrenal signaling pathways. Increased understanding of the dynamics of normal HPA responses to major surgery will provide us with a more rational approach to glucocorticoid therapy in critically ill patients. PMID:25517478

  9. Intraoperative identification of adrenal-renal fusion

    PubMed Central

    Boll, Griffin; Rattan, Rishi; Yilmaz, Osman; Tarnoff, Michael E

    2015-01-01

    Adrenal - renal fusion is a rare entity defined as incomplete encapsulation of the adrenal gland and kidney with histologically adjacent functional tissue. This report describes the first published intraoperative identification of this anomaly during laparoscopic adrenalectomy. The patient was a 59-year-old man with chronic hypertension refractory to multiple antihypertensives found to be caused by a right-sided aldosterone-producing adrenal adenoma in the setting of bilateral adrenal hyperplasia. During laparoscopic adrenalectomy, the normal avascular plane between the kidney and adrenal gland was absent. Pathologic evaluation confirmed adrenal - renal fusion without adrenal heterotopia. Identified intraoperatively, this may be misdiagnosed as invasive malignancy, and thus awareness of this anomaly may help prevent unnecessarily morbid resection. PMID:26195881

  10. [Adrenal injury in blunt abdominal trauma].

    PubMed

    Abakumov, M M; Smoliar, A N; Barmina, T G; Boĭko, A V; Shalimova, I G

    2009-01-01

    10 patients with adrenal damage were observed during 2.5 years. It amounted 0.93% of all patients with closed abdominal injuries. The right adrenal gland was traumatized in all cases evidently due to it's compression between right lobe of liver and vertebral column. Adrenal damage is observed quite often in combination with injuries of right liver lobe, right kidney and retroperitoneal hematoma formation. 5 patients underwent laparotomy on account of intra-abdominal bleeding, but adrenal damage was never revealed. Ultrasound and tomographic semiotics of adrenal damage was worked out, which allowed ascertaining diagnosis in 80% on application of ultrasound study and in 100% at computer tomography. Injury of one adrenal gland was not accompanied by adrenal failure and did not require hormonal replacement therapy.

  11. Association of the GTP-binding protein Rab3A with bovine adrenal chromaffin granules

    SciTech Connect

    Darchen, F.; Hammel, F.; Monteils, M.P.; Scherman, D. ); Zahraoui, A.; Tavitian, A. )

    1990-08-01

    The Rab3A protein belongs to a large family of small GTP-binding proteins that are present in eukaryotic cells and that share amino acid identities with the Ras proteins (products of the ras protooncogenes). Rab3A, which is specifically located in nervous and endocrine tissues, is suspected to play a key role in secretion. Its localization was investigated in bovine adrenal gland by using a polyclonal antibody. Rab3A was detected in adrenal medulla but not in adrenal cortex. In cultured adrenal medulla cells, Rab3A was specifically expressed in the catecholamine-secreting chromaffin cells. Subcellular fractionation suggested that Rab3A is about 30% cytosolic and that particulate Rab3A is associated with the membrane of chromaffin granules (the catecholamine storage organelles) and with a second compartment likely to be the plasma membrane. The Rab3A localization on chromaffin granule membranes was confirmed by immunoadsorption with an antibody against dopamine {beta}-hydroxylase. Rab3A was not extracted from this membrane by NaCl or KBr but was partially extracted by urea and totally solubilized by Triton X-100, suggesting either an interaction with an intrinsic protein or a membrane association through fatty acid acylation. This study suggests that Rab3A, which may also be located on other secretory vesicles containing noncharacterized small GTP-binding proteins, is involved in their biogenesis or in the regulated secretion process.

  12. Silent intravascular lymphoma initially manifesting as a unilateral adrenal incidentaloma.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yoshiko; Iida, Keiji; Hino, Yasuhisa; Ohara, Takeshi; Kurahashi, Toshifumi; Tashiro, Takashi; Chihara, Kazuo

    2012-01-01

    Intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (IVLBCL) is a rare subtype of malignant lymphoma. Although the involvement of adrenal glands in IVLBCL is often observed, primary adrenal IVLBCL is rare. Most reported cases of adrenal IVLBCL showed bilateral lesions resulting in rapidly progressive adrenal failure and poor prognosis. Here, we report a case of slowly progressive primary adrenal IVLBCL manifesting initially with unilateral adrenal incidentaloma. This case is a silent IVLBCL and shows that the enlargement of both adrenal glands can be followed.

  13. (/sup 3/H)nitrendipine binding to adrenal capsular membranes

    SciTech Connect

    Finkel, M.S.; Aguilera, G.; Catt, K.J.; Keiser, H.R.

    1984-08-20

    The physiologic regulation of aldosterone secretion is dependent on extracellular calcium and appears to be mediated by increases in cytosolic free calcium concentration in the zona glomerulosa cell. A specific role for voltage-dependent calcium channels was suggested by previous studies with the calcium channel antagonist verapamil. The authors therefore studied the (/sup 3/H)nitrendipine calcium channel binding site in adrenal capsules. These studies revealed a single class of saturable, high affinity sites with K/sub D/ = .26 +/- .04 nM and B/sub max/ = 105 +/- 5.7 fmol/mg protein. Specific binding of (/sup 3/H)nitrendipine was inhibited by calcium channel antagonists with potencies nitrendipine = nifedipine >> verapamil, while diltiazem had no inhibitory effect. In the rat, binding sites for (/sup 3/H)nitrendipine were located in the adrenal capsule and medulla and were undetectable in the zona fasciculata. Physiologic studies with collagenase-dispersed adrenal glomerulosa cells demonstrated that nifedipine selectively inhibited angiotensin-II and potassium-stimulated steroidogenesis. These observations suggest both a pharmacologic and physiologic role for the nitrendipine binding site in aldosterone production. 17 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  14. Adrenal medulla calcium channel population is not conserved in bovine chromaffin cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Benavides, A; Calvo, S; Tornero, D; González-García, C; Ceña, V

    2004-01-01

    During the stress response adrenal medullary chromaffin cells release catecholamines to the bloodstream. Voltage-activated calcium channels present in the cell membrane play a crucial role in this process. Although the electrophysiological and pharmacological properties of chromaffin cell calcium channels have been studied in detail, the molecular composition of these channels has not been defined yet. Another aspect that needs to be explored is the extent to which chromaffin cells in culture reflect the adrenal medulla calcium channel characteristics. In this sense, it has been described that catecholamine release in the intact adrenal gland recruits different calcium channels than those recruited during secretion from cultured chromaffin cells. Additionally, recent electrophysiological studies show that chromaffin cells in culture differ from those located in the intact adrenal medulla in the contribution of several calcium channel types to the whole cell current. However there is not yet any study that compares the population of calcium channels in chromaffin cells with that one present in the adrenal medulla. In order to gain some insight into the roles that calcium channels might play in the adrenal medullary cells we have analyzed the alpha1 subunit mRNA expression profile. We demonstrate that the expression pattern of voltage-dependent calcium channels in cultured bovine chromaffin cells markedly differs from that found in the native adrenal medulla and that glucocorticoids are only partially involved in those differences. Additionally, we show, for the first time, that the cardiac isoform of L-type calcium channel is present in both bovine adrenal medulla and cultured chromaffin cells and that its levels of expression do not vary during culture. PMID:15450357

  15. Adrenal Development in Mice Requires GATA4 and GATA6 Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Tevosian, Sergei G; Jiménez, Elizabeth; Hatch, Heather M; Jiang, Tianyu; Morse, Deborah A; Fox, Shawna C; Padua, Maria B

    2015-07-01

    The adrenal glands consist of an outer cortex and an inner medulla, and their primary purposes include hormone synthesis and secretion. The adrenal cortex produces a complex array of steroid hormones, whereas the medulla is part of the sympathetic nervous system and produces the catecholamines epinephrine and norepinephrine. In the mouse, GATA binding protein (GATA) 4 and GATA6 transcription factors are coexpressed in several embryonic tissues, including the adrenal cortex. To explore the roles of GATA4 and GATA6 in mouse adrenal development, we conditionally deleted these genes in adrenocortical cells using the Sf1Cre strain of animals. We report here that mice with Sf1Cre-mediated double deletion of Gata4 and Gata6 genes lack identifiable adrenal glands, steroidogenic factor 1-positive cortical cells and steroidogenic gene expression in the adrenal location. The inactivation of the Gata6 gene alone (Sf1Cre;Gata6(flox/flox)) drastically reduced the adrenal size and corticosterone production in the adult animals. Adrenocortical aplasia is expected to result in the demise of the animal within 2 weeks after birth unless glucocorticoids are provided. In accordance, Sf1Cre;Gata4(flox/flox)Gata6(flox/flox) females depend on steroid supplementation to survive after weaning. Surprisingly, Sf1Cre;Gata4(flox/flox)Gata6(flox/flox) males appear to live normal lifespans as vital steroidogenic synthesis shifts to their testes. Our results reveal a requirement for GATA factors in adrenal development and provide a novel tool to characterize the transcriptional network controlling adrenocortical cell fates.

  16. Adrenal Development in Mice Requires GATA4 and GATA6 Transcription Factors

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez, Elizabeth; Hatch, Heather M.; Jiang, Tianyu; Morse, Deborah A.; Fox, Shawna C.

    2015-01-01

    The adrenal glands consist of an outer cortex and an inner medulla, and their primary purposes include hormone synthesis and secretion. The adrenal cortex produces a complex array of steroid hormones, whereas the medulla is part of the sympathetic nervous system and produces the catecholamines epinephrine and norepinephrine. In the mouse, GATA binding protein (GATA) 4 and GATA6 transcription factors are coexpressed in several embryonic tissues, including the adrenal cortex. To explore the roles of GATA4 and GATA6 in mouse adrenal development, we conditionally deleted these genes in adrenocortical cells using the Sf1Cre strain of animals. We report here that mice with Sf1Cre-mediated double deletion of Gata4 and Gata6 genes lack identifiable adrenal glands, steroidogenic factor 1-positive cortical cells and steroidogenic gene expression in the adrenal location. The inactivation of the Gata6 gene alone (Sf1Cre;Gata6flox/flox) drastically reduced the adrenal size and corticosterone production in the adult animals. Adrenocortical aplasia is expected to result in the demise of the animal within 2 weeks after birth unless glucocorticoids are provided. In accordance, Sf1Cre;Gata4flox/floxGata6flox/flox females depend on steroid supplementation to survive after weaning. Surprisingly, Sf1Cre;Gata4flox/floxGata6flox/flox males appear to live normal lifespans as vital steroidogenic synthesis shifts to their testes. Our results reveal a requirement for GATA factors in adrenal development and provide a novel tool to characterize the transcriptional network controlling adrenocortical cell fates. PMID:25933105

  17. Identification and characterization of androgenic gland specific insulin-like peptide-encoding transcripts in two spiny lobster species: Sagmariasus verreauxi and Jasus edwardsii.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Tomer; Fitzgibbon, Quinn; Battaglene, Stephen; Sagi, Amir; Elizur, Abigail

    2015-04-01

    In this study we describe, for the first time in spiny lobsters, the androgenic gland and its putative hormone. The androgenic gland in crustaceans is the key regulator of crustacean masculinity. The transcript encoding the insulin-like androgenic gland specific factor has recently been identified and characterized in a number of decapod crustacean species including commercially important crabs, crayfish, prawns and shrimps. This insulin-like factor has proven to be the androgenic gland masculinizing hormone, and is absent in females. While the androgenic gland and its putative hormone have been identified in all other commercially valuable groups, none had been identified in lobsters. We identified and characterized the androgenic glands of two spiny lobster species (Sagmariasus verreauxi and Jasus edwardsii) and conducted a transcriptomic analysis of the S. verreauxi androgenic gland. Bioinformatics analysis led to the discovery and characterization of the insulin-like androgenic gland specific factors in both species studied. Changes in androgenic gland cell size and quantity between sub-adult and sexually mature males were evident. The transcriptomic database established for the S. verreauxi androgenic gland might enable to elucidate the mechanisms through which the insulin-like factor is secreted, transported to the target cells and how it triggers the physiological effects of sexual differentiation towards maleness and maintenance of the male gonad.

  18. Identification and characterization of androgenic gland specific insulin-like peptide-encoding transcripts in two spiny lobster species: Sagmariasus verreauxi and Jasus edwardsii.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Tomer; Fitzgibbon, Quinn; Battaglene, Stephen; Sagi, Amir; Elizur, Abigail

    2015-04-01

    In this study we describe, for the first time in spiny lobsters, the androgenic gland and its putative hormone. The androgenic gland in crustaceans is the key regulator of crustacean masculinity. The transcript encoding the insulin-like androgenic gland specific factor has recently been identified and characterized in a number of decapod crustacean species including commercially important crabs, crayfish, prawns and shrimps. This insulin-like factor has proven to be the androgenic gland masculinizing hormone, and is absent in females. While the androgenic gland and its putative hormone have been identified in all other commercially valuable groups, none had been identified in lobsters. We identified and characterized the androgenic glands of two spiny lobster species (Sagmariasus verreauxi and Jasus edwardsii) and conducted a transcriptomic analysis of the S. verreauxi androgenic gland. Bioinformatics analysis led to the discovery and characterization of the insulin-like androgenic gland specific factors in both species studied. Changes in androgenic gland cell size and quantity between sub-adult and sexually mature males were evident. The transcriptomic database established for the S. verreauxi androgenic gland might enable to elucidate the mechanisms through which the insulin-like factor is secreted, transported to the target cells and how it triggers the physiological effects of sexual differentiation towards maleness and maintenance of the male gonad. PMID:24997416

  19. Primary bilateral adrenal intravascular large B-cell lymphoma associated with adrenal failure.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Ayumi; Okada, Yosuke; Tanikawa, Takahisa; Onaka, Takashi; Tanaka, Aya; Higashi, Takehiro; Tsukada, Junichi; Tanaka, Yoshiya

    2003-07-01

    We report a rare case of bilateral primary adrenal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with adrenal failure. A 66-year-old woman developed symptoms of adrenal failure. The cause of adrenal failure was suspected to be malignant lymphoma based on the high levels of serum soluble interleukin-2 receptor and LDH. Bilateral adrenalectomy was performed and pathological examination showed intravascular large B-cell lymphoma (IVL). Although complete remission was achieved, recurrence occurred three months later with brain metastases. IVL should be suspected in patients with bilateral adrenal tumors who present with rapidly progressive adrenal failure.

  20. Changes in the fecal concentrations of cortisol and androgen metabolites in captive male jaguars (Panthera onca) in response to stress.

    PubMed

    Morato, R G; Bueno, M G; Malmheister, P; Verreschi, I T N; Barnabe, R C

    2004-12-01

    In the present study we determined the efficacy of the measurement of fecal cortisol and androgen metabolite concentrations to monitor adrenal and testicular activity in the jaguar (Panthera onca). Three captive male jaguars were chemically restrained and electroejaculated once or twice within a period of two months. Fecal samples were collected daily for 5 days before and 5 days after the procedure and stored at -20 degrees C until extraction. Variations in the concentrations of cortisol and androgen metabolites before and after the procedure were determined by solid phase cortisol and testosterone radioimmunoassay and feces dry weight was determined by drying at 37 degrees C for 24 h under vacuum. On four occasions, fecal cortisol metabolite levels were elevated above baseline (307.8 +/- 17.5 ng/g dry feces) in the first fecal sample collected after the procedure (100 to 350% above baseline). On one occasion, we did not detect any variation. Mean (+/- SEM) fecal androgen concentration did not change after chemical restraint and electroejaculation (before: 131.1 +/- 26.7, after: 213.7 +/- 43.6 ng/g dry feces). These data show that determination of fecal cortisol and androgen metabolites can be very useful for a noninvasive assessment of animal well-being and as a complement to behavioral, physiological, and pathological studies. It can also be useful for the study of the relationship between adrenal activity and reproductive performance in the jaguar.

  1. Changes in the fecal concentrations of cortisol and androgen metabolites in captive male jaguars (Panthera onca) in response to stress.

    PubMed

    Morato, R G; Bueno, M G; Malmheister, P; Verreschi, I T N; Barnabe, R C

    2004-12-01

    In the present study we determined the efficacy of the measurement of fecal cortisol and androgen metabolite concentrations to monitor adrenal and testicular activity in the jaguar (Panthera onca). Three captive male jaguars were chemically restrained and electroejaculated once or twice within a period of two months. Fecal samples were collected daily for 5 days before and 5 days after the procedure and stored at -20 degrees C until extraction. Variations in the concentrations of cortisol and androgen metabolites before and after the procedure were determined by solid phase cortisol and testosterone radioimmunoassay and feces dry weight was determined by drying at 37 degrees C for 24 h under vacuum. On four occasions, fecal cortisol metabolite levels were elevated above baseline (307.8 +/- 17.5 ng/g dry feces) in the first fecal sample collected after the procedure (100 to 350% above baseline). On one occasion, we did not detect any variation. Mean (+/- SEM) fecal androgen concentration did not change after chemical restraint and electroejaculation (before: 131.1 +/- 26.7, after: 213.7 +/- 43.6 ng/g dry feces). These data show that determination of fecal cortisol and androgen metabolites can be very useful for a noninvasive assessment of animal well-being and as a complement to behavioral, physiological, and pathological studies. It can also be useful for the study of the relationship between adrenal activity and reproductive performance in the jaguar. PMID:15558198

  2. Signaling Interactions in the Adrenal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Spät, András; Hunyady, László; Szanda, Gergő

    2016-01-01

    The major physiological stimuli of aldosterone secretion are angiotensin II (AII) and extracellular K+, whereas cortisol production is primarily regulated by corticotropin (ACTH) in fasciculata cells. AII triggers Ca2+ release from internal stores that is followed by store-operated and voltage-dependent Ca2+ entry, whereas K+-evoked depolarization activates voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels. ACTH acts primarily through the formation of cAMP and subsequent protein phosphorylation by protein kinase A. Both Ca2+ and cAMP facilitate the transfer of cholesterol to mitochondrial inner membrane. The cytosolic Ca2+ signal is transferred into the mitochondrial matrix and enhances pyridine nucleotide reduction. Increased formation of NADH results in increased ATP production, whereas that of NADPH supports steroid production. In reality, the control of adrenocortical function is a lot more sophisticated with second messengers crosstalking and mutually modifying each other’s pathways. Cytosolic Ca2+ and cGMP are both capable of modifying cAMP metabolism, while cAMP may enhance Ca2+ release and voltage-activated Ca2+ channel activity. Besides, mitochondrial Ca2+ signal brings about cAMP formation within the organelle and this further enhances aldosterone production. Maintained aldosterone and cortisol secretion are optimized by the concurrent actions of Ca2+ and cAMP, as exemplified by the apparent synergism of Ca2+ influx (inducing cAMP formation) and Ca2+ release during response to AII. Thus, cross-actions of parallel signal transducing pathways are not mere intracellular curiosities but rather substantial phenomena, which fine-tune the biological response. Our review focuses on these functionally relevant interactions between the Ca2+ and the cyclic nucleotide signal transducing pathways hitherto described in the adrenal cortex. PMID:26973596

  3. Androgen receptor (AR) in cardiovascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chiung-Kuei; Lee, Soo Ok; Chang, Eugene; Pang, Haiyan; Chang, Chawnshang

    2016-04-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) are still the highest leading cause of death worldwide. Several risk factors have been linked to CVDs, including smoking, diabetes, hyperlipidemia, and gender among others. Sex hormones, especially the androgen and its receptor, androgen receptor (AR), have been linked to many diseases with a clear gender difference. Here, we summarize the effects of androgen/AR on CVDs, including hypertension, stroke, atherosclerosis, abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA), myocardial hypertrophy, and heart failure, as well as the metabolic syndrome/diabetes and their impacts on CVDs. Androgen/AR signaling exacerbates hypertension, and anti-androgens may suppress hypertension. Androgen/AR signaling plays dual roles in strokes, depending on different kinds of factors; however, generally males have a higher incidence of strokes than females. Androgen and AR differentially modulate atherosclerosis. Androgen deficiency causes elevated lipid accumulation to enhance atherosclerosis; however, targeting AR in selective cells without altering serum androgen levels would suppress atherosclerosis progression. Androgen/AR signaling is crucial in AAA development and progression, and targeting androgen/AR profoundly restricts AAA progression. Men have increased cardiac hypertrophy compared with age-matched women that may be due to androgens. Finally, androgen/AR plays important roles in contributing to obesity and insulin/leptin resistance to increase the metabolic syndrome.

  4. Adrenal and gonadal function in obesity.

    PubMed

    Pasquali, R; Vicennati, V; Gambineri, A

    2002-11-01

    Obesity is associated with multiple alterations of the endocrine systems, including abnormal circulating blood hormone concentrations, due to changes in their pattern of secretion and/or metabolism, altered hormone transport, and/or action at the level of target tissues. There is evidence that alterations of endocrine systems regulating sex hormones and corticosteroids may play a crucial role in the development of obesity, particularly the abdominal phenotype. Obese women are characterized by a condition of sc"functional hyperandrogenism", whereas in males, obesity is associated with reduced T levels and decreased LH secretory pattern from the pituitary. In addition, in both sexes a dysregulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis has been reported, including both neuroendocrine and peripheral alterations, finally leading to inappropriately higher than normal exposure to F of peripheral tissues, particularly the visceral adipose tissue. By these mechanisms, it can be hypothesized that both visceral fat enlargement and alterations of insulin action and associated metabolic disturbances may develop, therefore predisposing abdominally obese individuals to Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

  5. Adrenal imaging (Part 1): Imaging techniques and primary cortical lesions

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Ananya; Das, Chandan J.; Dhamija, Ekta; Kumar, Rakesh; Gupta, A. K.

    2015-01-01

    Adrenal glands can be affected by a variety of lesions. Adrenal lesions can either be primary, of adrenal origin, or secondary to other pathologies. Primary adrenal lesions can further be either of cortical or medullary origin. Functioning adrenal lesions can also give clues to the histologic diagnosis and direct workup. Over the years, various imaging techniques have been developed that have increased diagnostic accuracy and helped in better characterization of adrenal lesions non-invasively. In the first part of the two part series, we review adrenal imaging techniques and adrenal cortical tumors such as adenomas, adrenocortical tumors, adrenal hyperplasia and oncocytomas. PMID:25593820

  6. Androgenic influence on serotonergic activation of the HPA stress axis.

    PubMed

    Goel, Nirupa; Plyler, Kimberly S; Daniels, Derek; Bale, Tracy L

    2011-05-01

    The higher incidence of stress-mediated affective disorders in women may be a function of gonadal hormone influence on complex interactions between serotonin and neural circuits that mediate the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) stress axis. The paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) receives serotonergic innervation, and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors such as citalopram activate the HPA axis independent of stress. We have previously demonstrated that the magnitude of this serotonergic activation was greater in females and was attenuated by testosterone administration; however, the potential central sites of action where androgens reduce these serotonergic effects have not been determined. Therefore, we examined a time course of corticosterone production and used central c-Fos protein levels to assay neuronal activation in stress-related brain regions in female, male, and gonadectomized male mice after an acute citalopram injection (15 mg/kg). In the hippocampus, c-Fos-immunoreactivity was greater in males than in females or gonadectomized males. This same pattern emerged in the lateral septum after vehicle and gonadectomy reversed the effect of citalopram. These regions are important for inhibitory influences on the PVN, and accordingly, hippocampal c-Fos levels were negatively correlated with corticosterone production. No sex differences in c-Fos were detected in the PVN, cingulate cortex, or paraventricular thalamus in response to vehicle or citalopram. These data support brain region-specific regulation of the HPA axis where sex differences may be mediated partly through androgen enhancement of signaling in inhibitory regions.

  7. Hypochlorite Oxidation of Select Androgenic Steroids

    EPA Science Inventory

    Steroid hormones are vital for regulation of various biological functions including sexual development. Elevated concentrations of natural and synthetic androgenic steroids have been shown to adversely affect normal development in indigenous aqueous species. Androgens and their s...

  8. Robotic renal and adrenal surgery.

    PubMed

    Sung, Gyung Tak; Gill, Inderbir S

    2003-12-01

    Technology today is evolving at a dramatic rate. Quantum development has occurred in the area of robotic enhancement technology (RET) in the last decade. Incorporation of RET with advanced telecommunication technologies is a recent integration in medicine, with growth potential and application in the delivery of modern health care. There remain, however, many areas which need to be further improved and evaluated before clinical applications of the robot become accepted in adrenal and renal minimally invasive surgery. PMID:14712880

  9. False Positive Radioiodinated Metaiodobenzylguanidine ((123)I-MIBG) Uptake in Undifferentiated Adrenal Malignant Tumor.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hee Soo; Moon, Seok Jun; Kim, Yun Mi; Kang, Hye Rim; Lee, Seok Mo; Jung, Soo Jin; Choi, Seok Jin; Kim, Tae Kyoon; Kwon, Min Jeong; Park, Jeong Hyun; Lee, Soon Hee

    2015-01-01

    (123)I-Metaiodobenzylguanidine ((123)I-MIBG) scintigraphy is a widely used functional imaging tool with a high degree of sensitivity and specificity in diagnosis of pheochromocytoma. However, rare cases of false positive reactions have been reported. A 67-year-old male patient was admitted with epigastric pain. Abdominal computed tomography (CT) revealed a heterogeneous left adrenal mass 6 cm in diameter; following hormone testing, (123)I-MIBG scintigraphy was performed to determine the presence of pheochromocytoma, which confirmed eccentric uptake by a large left adrenal gland mass. Chest CT and PET-CT confirmed metastatic lymphadenopathy; therefore, endobronchial ultrasound transbronchial needle aspiration was performed. Metastatic carcinoma of unknown origin was suspected from a lymph node biopsy, and surgical resection was performed for definitive diagnosis and correction of excess hormonal secretion. A final diagnosis of undifferentiated adrenal malignant tumor was rendered, instead of histologically malignant pheochromocytoma, despite the uptake of (123)I-MIBG demonstrated by scintigraphy.

  10. Laparoscopic Resection of an Adrenal Schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    Konstantinos, Toutouzas G.; Panagiotis, Kekis B.; Nikolaos, Michalopoulos V.; Ioannis, Flessas; Andreas, Manouras; Geogrios, Zografos

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Schwannomas are tumors originating from Schwann cells of the peripheral nerve sheath (neurilemma) of the neuroectoderm. Rarely, schwannomas can arise from the retroperitoneum and adrenal medulla. We describe a case of a 71-y-old woman who presented with an incidentally discovered adrenal tumor. Methods: Ultrasound and computed tomography scans revealed a lesion with solid and cystic areas originating from the left adrenal gland. The patient underwent complete laparoscopic resection of the tumor and the left adrenal gland. Results: Histopathological examination and immunohistochemical staining of the excised specimen revealed a benign schwannoma measuring 5.5×5×3.7 cm. To our knowledge, few other cases of laparoscopic resection of adrenal schwannomas have been reported. Conclusion: Because preoperative diagnosis of adrenal tumors is inconclusive, complete laparoscopic excision allows for definitive diagnosis with histological evaluation and represents the treatment of choice. PMID:23484583

  11. Adrenal cyst--a case report.

    PubMed

    Huang, S P; Chen, C C; Li, C C; Wu, W J; Chou, Y H; Huang, C H

    2001-03-01

    Adrenal cysts are rare and mostly silent clinically. Herein we report a case of adrenal cyst. A 55-year-old female was incidentally found to have a left suprarenal cystic lesion with a calcified wall by abdominal sonography during a work-up for her epigastralgia and left flank pain. Then, computed tomography (CT) revealed a left adrenal cystic mass with wall calcification, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed left retroperitoneal cystic mass with fluid content, and angiography demonstrated an avascular lesion. Surgical exploration was performed via a flank incision and a calcified cystic adrenal mass was excised. The pathologic diagnosis was adrenal pseudocyst with calcified wall. We discuss the diagnosis and management of adrenal cyst and briefly review the literature.

  12. Androgen insensitive male rats display increased anxiety-like behavior on the elevated plus maze.

    PubMed

    Hamson, Dwayne K; Jones, Bryan A; Csupity, Attila S; Ali, Faezah M; Watson, Neil V

    2014-02-01

    Male rats carrying the testicular feminization mutation (Tfm-affected males) are insensitive to androgens, resulting in a female-typical peripheral phenotype despite possession of inguinal testes that are androgen secretory. Androgen-dependent neural and behavioral processes may likewise show atypical sexual differentiation. Interestingly, these mutant rats display elevated serum corticosterone, suggesting a chronic anxiety phenotype and dysregulated hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. In order to understand if elevated anxiety-like behavior is a possible mediating variable affecting the display of certain androgen-dependent behaviors, we compared the performance of Tfm-affected males to wild type males and females in the elevated plus maze (EPM). Two well-established indicators of anxiety-like behavior in the EPM were analyzed: total percentage of time spent on the open arms, and the percentage of open arm entries. We also analyzed the total number of open arm entries. Interestingly, Tfm-affected males spent less percentage of time on the open arms than both males and females, suggesting increased anxiety-like behavior. Percentage of open arm entries and the total number of arm entries was comparable between the groups, indicating that the observed decrease in the percentage of time spent on the open arms was not due to a global reduction in exploratory behavior. These data, in contrast to earlier reports, thus implicate androgen receptor-mediated functions in the expression of anxiety behaviors in male rats. Given that anxiety is widely reported as a precipitating factor in depression, studying the role of the androgen receptor in anxiety may give insights into the pathogenesis of major depressive disorder.

  13. The transcriptional programme of the androgen receptor (AR) in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Lamb, Alastair D; Massie, Charlie E; Neal, David E

    2014-03-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is essential for normal prostate and prostate cancer cell growth. AR transcriptional activity is almost always maintained even in hormone relapsed prostate cancer (HRPC) in the absence of normal levels of circulating testosterone. Current molecular techniques, such as chromatin-immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq), have permitted identification of direct AR-binding sites in cell lines and human tissue with a distinct coordinate network evident in HRPC. The effectiveness of novel agents, such as abiraterone acetate (suppresses adrenal androgens) or enzalutamide (MDV3100, potent AR antagonist), in treating advanced prostate cancer underlines the on-going critical role of the AR throughout all stages of the disease. Persistent AR activity in advanced disease regulates cell cycle activity, steroid biosynthesis and anabolic metabolism in conjunction with regulatory co-factors, such as the E2F family, c-Myc and signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) transcription factors. Further treatment approaches must target these other factors.

  14. Operative approaches to the adrenal gland.

    PubMed

    Guz, B V; Straffon, R A; Novick, A C

    1989-08-01

    Various adrenal disorders necessitate surgical intervention, and familiarity with adrenal pathophysiology and surgical anatomy is crucial to the success of these procedures. A number of operative approaches--anterior, posterior, flank, and thoracoabdominal--are available; the choice must be made on the basis of the patient's adrenal pathology, body habitus, and surgical history as well as the surgeon's experience and familiarity with the different options. PMID:2665278

  15. Hyperfunctioning unilateral adrenal macronodule in three patients with Cushing's disease: hormonal and imaging characterization.

    PubMed

    Abs, R; Nobels, F; Verhelst, J; Chanson, P; Mahler, C; Corthouts, B; Blockx, P; Beckers, A

    1993-10-01

    We aimed to investigate the dynamics of adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) and cortisol secretion in pituitary-dependent Cushing's syndrome with bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia presenting as a single adrenal macronodule, and to determine the imaging characteristics of this syndrome. Three female patients were studied. Plasma ACTH and serum cortisol secretion were studied by determining their rhythmicity and pulsatility and their responses to the administration of ovine corticotropin-releasing factor, thyrotropin-releasing hormone, metyrapone, tetracosactrin, insulin and dexamethasone. Techniques used to localize the anatomical lesion were bilateral simultaneous inferior petrosal sinus sampling, magnetic resonance examination of the pituitary, computed tomography (CT) scanning and [75Se]cholesterol scintigraphy of the adrenal glands. Plasma ACTH and serum cortisol levels were measured using a commercial radioimmunoassay and an immunoradiometric assay. The ACTH and cortisol pulse number and amplitude were calculated using established computer software. In all three patients ACTH and cortisol secretory dynamics fulfilled the requirements for diagnosis of pituitary-dependent Cushing's syndrome. A close relationship between ACTH and cortisol pulses also favored a pituitary dependency. Study of the amplitude of cortisol pulses classified two patients in the group of hypopulsatile Cushing's disease. Adrenal CT scanning demonstrated the presence of a large single nodule. [75Se]Cholesterol scintigraphy showed bilateral radionuclide uptake, although mostly localized over the adrenal nodule. All patients underwent successful trans-sphenoidal hypophysectomy. Over a period of 1 year, a slow shrinkage of the adrenal nodule was observed in two patients, while no change in volume was observed in one patient.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Adrenal Failure due to Adrenal Metastasis of Lung Cancer: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Faulhaber, Gustavo Adolpho Moreira; Borges, Flavia Kessler; Ascoli, Aline Maria; Seligman, Renato; Furlanetto, Tania Weber

    2011-01-01

    We report a case of a patient with adrenal failure due to bilateral adrenal metastasis of lung cancer. This is a rare presentation of lung cancer. We review the differential diagnosis of weight loss and how to make diagnosis of adrenal insufficiency. PMID:22606443

  17. Adrenal scan in 17-alpha-hydroxylase deficiency: false indication of adrenal adenoma

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, R.M.; Lieberman, L.M.; Newman, T.J.; Friedman, A.; Bargman, G.J.

    1981-07-01

    A patient who was thought to have testicular feminization syndrome and primary aldosteronism had an adrenal scan that suggested an adrenal adenoma. After later diagnosis of 17-alpha-hydroxylase deficiency, she was treated with glucocorticoids rather than surgery. Her clinical course and a repeat adrenal scan confirmed she did not have a tumor.

  18. Imaging of adrenal and renal hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Nancy A; Lostumbo, Antonella; Adam, Sharon Z; Remer, Erick M; Nikolaidis, Paul; Yaghmai, Vahid; Berggruen, Senta M; Miller, Frank H

    2015-10-01

    Hemorrhage of the kidneys and adrenal glands has many etiologies. In the adrenal glands, trauma, anticoagulation, stress, sepsis, surgery, and neoplasms are common causes of hemorrhage. In the kidneys, reasons for hemorrhage include trauma, bleeding diathesis, vascular diseases, infection, infarction, hemorrhagic cyst rupture, the Antopol-Goldman lesion, and neoplasms. Angiomyolipoma and renal cell carcinoma are the neoplasms most commonly associated with hemorrhage in the kidneys and adrenal cortical carcinoma, metastases, and pheochromocytoma are associated with hemorrhage in the adrenal glands. Understanding the computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging features, and causes of hemorrhage in the kidneys and adrenal glands is critical. It is also important to keep in mind that mimickers of hemorrhage exist, including lymphoma in both the kidneys and adrenal glands, and melanoma metastases in the adrenal glands. Appropriate imaging follow-up of renal and adrenal hemorrhage should occur to exclude an underlying malignancy as the cause. If there is suspicion for malignancy that cannot be definitively diagnosed on imaging, surgery or biopsy may be warranted. Angiography may be indicated when there is a suspected underlying vascular disease. Unnecessary intervention, such as nephrectomy, may be avoided in patients with benign causes or no underlying disease. Appropriate management is dependent on accurate diagnosis of the cause of renal or adrenal hemorrhage and it is incumbent upon the radiologist to determine the etiology.

  19. Hormonal status modifies renin-angiotensin system-regulating aminopeptidases and vasopressin-degrading activity in the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis of male mice.

    PubMed

    García, María Jesús; Martínez-Martos, José Manuel; Mayas, María Dolores; Carrera, María Pilar; Ramírez-Expósito, María Jesús

    2003-06-20

    Local renin-angiotensin systems (RAS) have been postulated in brain, pituitary and adrenal glands. These local RAS have been implicated, respectively, in the central regulation of the cardiovascular system and body water balance, the secretion of pituitary hormones and the secretion of aldosterone by adrenal glands. By other hand, it is known that the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is involved in blood pressure regulation, and is affected by sex hormones. The aim of the present work is to analyze the influence of testosterone on RAS-regulating aminopeptidase A, B and M activities and vasopressin-degrading activity in the HPA axis, measuring these activities in their soluble and membrane-bound forms in the hypothalamus, pituitary and adrenal glands of orchidectomized males and orchidectomized males treated subcutaneously with several doses of testosterone. The present data suggest that in male mice, testosterone influences the RAS- and vasopressin-degrading activities at all levels of the HPA axis.

  20. Androgen receptors in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Culig, Z; Klocker, H; Bartsch, G; Hobisch, A

    2002-09-01

    The androgen receptor (AR), a transcription factor that mediates the action of androgens in target tissues, is expressed in nearly all prostate cancers. Carcinoma of the prostate is the most frequently diagnosed neoplasm in men in industrialized countries. Palliative treatment for non-organ-confined prostate cancer aims to down-regulate the concentration of circulating androgen or to block the transcription activation function of the AR. AR function during endocrine therapy was studied in tumor cells LNCaP subjected to long-term steroid depletion; newly generated sublines could be stimulated by lower concentrations of androgen than parental cells and showed up-regulation of AR expression and activity as well as resistance to apoptosis. Androgenic hormones regulate the expression of key cell cycle regulators, cyclin-dependent kinase 2 and 4, and that of the cell cycle inhibitor p27. Inhibition of AR expression could be achieved by potential chemopreventive agents flufenamic acid, resveratrol, quercetin, polyunsaturated fatty acids and interleukin-1beta, and by the application of AR antisense oligonucleotides. In the clinical situation, AR gene amplification and point mutations were reported in patients with metastatic disease. These mutations generate receptors which could be activated by other steroid hormones and non-steroidal antiandrogens. In the absence of androgen, the AR could be activated by various growth-promoting (growth factors, epidermal growth factor receptor-related oncogene HER-2/neu) and pleiotropic (protein kinase A activators, interleukin-6) compounds as well as by inducers of differentiation (phenylbutyrate). AR function is modulated by a number of coactivators and corepressors. The three coactivators, TIF-2, SRC-1 and RAC3, are up-regulated in relapsed prostate cancer. New experimental therapies for prostate cancer are aimed to down-regulate AR expression and to overcome difficulties which occur because of the acquisition of agonistic properties

  1. Circadian rise in maternal glucocorticoid prevents pulmonary dysplasia in fetal mice with adrenal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Venihaki, M; Carrigan, A; Dikkes, P; Majzoub, J A

    2000-06-20

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, including hypothalamic corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and pituitary corticotropin, is one of the first endocrine systems to develop during fetal life, probably because glucocorticoid secretion is necessary for the maturation of many essential fetal organs. Consistent with this, pregnant mice with an inactivating mutation in the Crh gene deliver CRH-deficient offspring that die at birth with dysplastic lungs, which can be prevented by prenatal maternal glucocorticoid treatment. But children lacking the ability to synthesize cortisol (because of various genetic defects in adrenal gland development or steroidogenesis) are not born with respiratory insufficiency or abnormal lung development, suggesting that the transfer of maternal glucocorticoid across the placenta might promote fetal organ maturation in the absence of fetal glucocorticoid production. We used pregnant mice with a normal HPA axis carrying fetuses with CRH deficiency to characterize the relative contributions of the fetal and maternal adrenal to the activity of the fetal HPA axis, and related these findings to fetal lung development. We found that in the presence of fetal adrenal insufficiency, normal fetal lung development is maintained by the transfer of maternal glucocorticoid to the fetus, specifically during the circadian peak in maternal glucocorticoid secretion.

  2. Alpha-inhibin gene expression occurs in the ovine adrenal cortex, and is regulated by adrenocorticotropin.

    PubMed

    Crawford, R J; Hammond, V E; Evans, B A; Coghlan, J P; Haralambidis, J; Hudson, B; Penschow, J D; Richards, R I; Tregear, G W

    1987-10-01

    Inhibin is a glycoprotein hormone composed of two nonidentical subunits. It is produced by the ovary and testis and plays a vital role in gonadal function by inhibiting the secretion of FSH. More recently, additional activities associated with inhibin peptides have been identified. Inhibin heterodimers (alpha-beta) are reported to act directly on ovarian granulosa cells and inhibit estrogen production induced by FSH. Furthermore, homodimers of beta-inhibin subunits stimulate the secretion of FSH, an activity that is directly opposite to that of inhibin. Each of these inhibin-related activities are concerned with the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis. We have investigated further the complexity of inhibin activity by determining whether inhibin genes are expressed in nongonadal tissue. RNA hybridization experiments demonstrate that the alpha-inhibin gene is expressed in the sheep adrenal cortex and hybridization histochemistry shows that this gene is expressed in each of the functional zones within the cortex. Dot blot analysis showed that the level of alpha mRNA within the adrenal is influenced by ACTH, one of the major regulators of adrenal cortex function. These observations imply that there are inhibin-related peptides not directly associated with the gonads. beta-inhibin gene expression was not clearly detected in the adrenal and we conclude that if expression occurs then it does so at extremely low levels.

  3. Temporal and spatial distribution of mast cells and steroidogenic enzymes in the human fetal adrenal.

    PubMed

    Naccache, Alexandre; Louiset, Estelle; Duparc, Céline; Laquerrière, Annie; Patrier, Sophie; Renouf, Sylvie; Gomez-Sanchez, Celso E; Mukai, Kuniaki; Lefebvre, Hervé; Castanet, Mireille

    2016-10-15

    Mast cells are present in the human adult adrenal with a potential role in the regulation of aldosterone secretion in both normal cortex and adrenocortical adenomas. We have investigated the human developing adrenal gland for the presence of mast cells in parallel with steroidogenic enzymes profile and serotonin signaling pathway. RT-QPCR and immunohistochemical studies were performed on adrenals at 16-41 weeks of gestation (WG). Tryptase-immunopositive mast cells were found from 18 WG in the adrenal subcapsular layer, close to 3βHSD- and CYP11B2-immunoreactive cells, firstly detected at 18 and 24 WG, respectively. Tryptophan hydroxylase and serotonin receptor type 4 expression increased at 30 WG before the CYP11B2 expression surge. In addition, HDL and LDL cholesterol receptors were expressed in the subcapsular zone from 24 WG. Altogether, our findings suggest the implication of mast cells and serotonin in the establishment of the mineralocorticoid synthesizing pathway during fetal adrenal development. PMID:27302892

  4. Angiotensin II binding to cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells: identification of angiotensin II receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, V.L.; Printz, M.P.

    1986-03-05

    Physiological experiments have provided evidence that angiotensin II stimulates catecholamine secretion from the adrenal gland. Their laboratory and others have now shown by receptor autoradiography the presence of angiotensin II receptors (AIIR) in bovine and rat adrenal medulla. In order to extend these studies they have undertaken to define AIIR on cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells. Cells were isolated using the method of Levitt including cell enrichment with Percoll gradient centrifugation. Primary cultures of bovine adrenal medullary cells were maintained in DME/F12 medium containing 10% FCS. Cells were characterized by immunocytochemistry for Met- and Leu-enkephalin, PNMT, DBH and Chromagranin A. Cultured cells bind with high affinity and specificity (/sup 125/I)-ANG II yielding a K/sub D/ of 0.74 nM and B/sub max/ of 24,350 sites/cell. After Percoll treatment values of .77 nm and 34,500 sites/cell are obtained. K/sub D/ values are in close agreement with that obtained in adrenal slices by Healy. Competition studies identify a rank order of binding by this receptor similar to that of other tissues. They conclude that cultured chromaffin cells provide a suitable model system for the investigation and characterization of the ANG II receptor and for cellular studies of its functional significance.

  5. Targeting intratumoral androgens: statins and beyond.

    PubMed

    Schweizer, Michael T; Yu, Evan Y

    2016-09-01

    While initially effective, androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is not curative, and nearly all men with advanced prostate cancer will eventually progress to the more resistant, and ultimately lethal form of the disease, so called castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). The maintenance of androgens within the prostate cancer microenvironment likely represents one of the key mechanisms by which this transition from hormone-sensitive to CRPC occurs. This can be accomplished either through intratumoral androgen biosynthesis or the active transport of androgens and androgenic precursors into the tumor microenvironment. More recently, preclinical and clinical data supported therapeutic strategies that seek to target these two mechanisms, either through the use of drugs that impair androgen biosynthesis (e.g. inhibiting the steroidogenic enzymes CYP17 and AKR1C3 with abiraterone and indomethacin, respectively) or drugs that inhibit the SLCO transporters responsible for importing androgens (e.g. statins). PMID:27583031

  6. Targeting intratumoral androgens: statins and beyond

    PubMed Central

    Schweizer, Michael T.; Yu, Evan Y.

    2016-01-01

    While initially effective, androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) is not curative, and nearly all men with advanced prostate cancer will eventually progress to the more resistant, and ultimately lethal form of the disease, so called castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). The maintenance of androgens within the prostate cancer microenvironment likely represents one of the key mechanisms by which this transition from hormone-sensitive to CRPC occurs. This can be accomplished either through intratumoral androgen biosynthesis or the active transport of androgens and androgenic precursors into the tumor microenvironment. More recently, preclinical and clinical data supported therapeutic strategies that seek to target these two mechanisms, either through the use of drugs that impair androgen biosynthesis (e.g. inhibiting the steroidogenic enzymes CYP17 and AKR1C3 with abiraterone and indomethacin, respectively) or drugs that inhibit the SLCO transporters responsible for importing androgens (e.g. statins). PMID:27583031

  7. Adrenal cortical carcinoma with tumor thrombus extension into the right atrium: A case report

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YIMIN; ZHOU, FENG; PAN, HAO; JIN, BAIYE

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal cortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare aggressive malignant tumor associated with a poor prognosis. Patients with ACC usually present with abnormal hormone secretion, tumor growth or encroachment on the surrounding viscera. An early diagnosis of ACC is considered challenging. The present study reports a case of ACC with tumor thrombus extension into the inferior vena cava and right atrium. A 33-year-old male patient exhibited symptoms of gynecomastia and abdominal distention, which were due to the abnormal hormone secretion levels and to the presence of a large mass in the right adrenal gland. An en bloc resection of the tumor was the selected treatment option. Extirpation of the tumor thrombus was performed by means of extracorporeal circulation. No signs of metastasis or recurrence were identified at the 1-month follow-up. PMID:27313728

  8. Adrenal haemorrhage with cholestasis and adrenal crisis in a newborn of a diabetic mother.

    PubMed

    Koklu, Esad; Kurtoglu, Selim; Akcakus, Mustafa; Koklu, Selmin

    2007-03-01

    The large hyperaemic foetal adrenal gland is vulnerable to vascular damage. This may occur in the neonatal period as a consequence of difficult labour, or its aetiology may not be apparent. The spectrum of presentation is considerable, ranging from asymptomatic to severe life-threatening intra-abdominal haemorrhage. The presentation of adrenal insufficiency may be delayed but the regenerative capacity of the adrenal is great, and most adrenal haemorrhage is not associated with significantly impaired function. Some reports showed that cholestatic hepatopathy with congenital hypopituitarism reversed by hydrocortisone treatment is considered in the context of the endocrine syndrome, probably as a consequence of the adrenal failure. We describe a case of bilateral adrenal haemorrhage with hepatitis syndrome and persistent hypoglycaemia in a newborn male with striking features of neonatal cholestasis and adrenal crisis.

  9. Delayed Diagnosis of Graves' Thyrotoxicoisis Presenting as Recurrent Adrenal Crisis in Primary Adrenal Insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Naik, Dukhabandhu; Jebasingh, K Felix; Thomas, Nihal

    2016-04-01

    Adrenal crisis is a potential life threatening complication. The common causes of adrenal crisis are infections, surgical stress and abrupt cessation of steroid medications. Endocrine causes like Graves' disease with thyrotoxicosis is one of the less common causes of an adrenal crisis. We report a 42-year-old female who presented with recurrent episodes of adrenal crisis due to delayed diagnosis of thyrotoxicosis. She was initially treated with Carbimazole followed by Radio-iodine ablation and currently she is euthyroid. Her adrenal insufficiency was initially treated with hydrocortisone during the time of adrenal crisis followed by Prednisolone 5 mg once daily in the morning along with fludrocortisone 50 mcg once daily. This case highlights the need for high index of suspicion and less common causes like thyrotoxicosis should be ruled out in patients with adrenal crisis.

  10. Yolk androgens reduce offspring survival.

    PubMed

    Sockman, K W; Schwabl, H

    2000-07-22

    Females may favour some offspring over others by differential deposition of yolk hormones. In American kestrels (Falco sparverius), we found that yolks of eggs laid late in the sequence of a clutch had more testosterone (T) and androstenedione (A4) than yolks of first-laid eggs. To investigate the effects of these yolk androgens on nestling 'fitness', we injected both T and A4 into the yolks of first-laid eggs and compared their hatching time, nestling growth and nestling survival with those of first-laid eggs in which we injected vehicle as a control. Compared to controls, injection of T and A4 at a dose intended to increase their levels to those of later-laid eggs delayed hatching and reduced nestling growth and survival rates. Yolk androgen treatment of egg 1 had no effect on survival of siblings hatching from subsequently laid eggs. The adverse actions of yolk androgen treatment in the kestrel are in contrast to the favourable actions of yolk T treatment found previously in canaries (Serinus canaria). Additional studies are necessary in order to determine whether the deposition of yolk androgens is an adaptive form of parental favouritism or an adverse by-product of endocrine processes during egg formation. Despite its adaptive significance, such 'transgenerational' effects of steroid hormones may have helped to evolutionarily shape the hormonal mechanisms regulating reproduction. PMID:10983830

  11. Yolk androgens reduce offspring survival.

    PubMed Central

    Sockman, K W; Schwabl, H

    2000-01-01

    Females may favour some offspring over others by differential deposition of yolk hormones. In American kestrels (Falco sparverius), we found that yolks of eggs laid late in the sequence of a clutch had more testosterone (T) and androstenedione (A4) than yolks of first-laid eggs. To investigate the effects of these yolk androgens on nestling 'fitness', we injected both T and A4 into the yolks of first-laid eggs and compared their hatching time, nestling growth and nestling survival with those of first-laid eggs in which we injected vehicle as a control. Compared to controls, injection of T and A4 at a dose intended to increase their levels to those of later-laid eggs delayed hatching and reduced nestling growth and survival rates. Yolk androgen treatment of egg 1 had no effect on survival of siblings hatching from subsequently laid eggs. The adverse actions of yolk androgen treatment in the kestrel are in contrast to the favourable actions of yolk T treatment found previously in canaries (Serinus canaria). Additional studies are necessary in order to determine whether the deposition of yolk androgens is an adaptive form of parental favouritism or an adverse by-product of endocrine processes during egg formation. Despite its adaptive significance, such 'transgenerational' effects of steroid hormones may have helped to evolutionarily shape the hormonal mechanisms regulating reproduction. PMID:10983830

  12. Images of pheochromocytoma in adrenal glands

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Colin J.; Blake, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Pheochromocytomas are relatively rare tumors of the adrenal medulla. A wide spectrum of imaging findings has been described. The aim of this article is to describe the multimodality imaging features of pheochromocytomas including diagnostic pearls that can help differentiate them from other adrenal lesions and pitfalls to avoid. PMID:26310999

  13. Unilateral adrenal hemorrhagic infarction in essential thrombocythemia.

    PubMed

    Burnet, G; Lambert, M; Annet, L; Lefebvre, C

    2015-12-01

    Adrenal hemorrhage is a rare disease associated with various conditions. We report a case of a 68-year-old woman with abdominal and back pain. The diagnostic work-up showed a left adrenal gland infarction associated with essential thrombocythemia. Treatment consisted in painkillers and treating the underlying condition in order to prevent further thrombotic events.

  14. Images of pheochromocytoma in adrenal glands.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Shaunagh; McCarthy, Colin J; Blake, Michael A

    2015-08-01

    Pheochromocytomas are relatively rare tumors of the adrenal medulla. A wide spectrum of imaging findings has been described. The aim of this article is to describe the multimodality imaging features of pheochromocytomas including diagnostic pearls that can help differentiate them from other adrenal lesions and pitfalls to avoid.

  15. Computed tomographic findings in bilateral adrenal tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wilms, G.E.; Baert, A.L.; Kint, E.J.; Pringot, J.H.; Goddeeris, P.G.

    1983-03-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) features of bilateral adrenal tuberculosis are reported in two cases that demonstrate two typical different clinical and morphological manifestations of the disease. The incidence and CT appearance of adrenal tuberculosis are discussed, with emphasis on differential diagnosis.

  16. [Two cystic retroperitoneal lesions mimicking adrenal cysts].

    PubMed

    Grabellus, F; Dereskewitz, C; Schmitz, K J; Kaiser, G M; Kühl, H; Kersting, C; Frilling, A; Metz, K A; Baba, H A

    2005-05-01

    Adrenal cysts are uncommon lesions and most of them are found incidentally during abdominal imaging. We report on two benign extraadrenal lesions mimicking adrenal tumors in abdominal imaging. The histopathological investigation of the lesions revealed a foregut duplication cyst of the lesser gastric curvature and an epithelial inclusion cyst (epidermoid cyst) in an intrapancreatic accessory spleen respectively.

  17. Laparoscopic extirpation of giant adrenal ganglioneuroma

    PubMed Central

    Abraham, George P; Siddaiah, Avinash T; Das, Krishanu; Krishnamohan, Ramaswami; George, Datson P; Abraham, Jisha J; Chandramathy, Sreerenjini K

    2014-01-01

    Laparoscopic adrenalectomy is the standard of care for management of adrenal neoplasms. However, large sized adrenal lesions are considered as relative contraindication for laparoscopic extirpation. We report laparoscopic excision of giant ganglioneuroma of adrenal gland in a 33-year-old female patient. Patient was presented with left loin pain of 2 months duration. Computed tomography (CT) scan was suggestive of non-enhancing left suprarenal mass measuring 17 × 10 cm. Preoperative endocrine evaluation ruled out functional adrenal tumor. Patient underwent transperitoneal excision of suprarenal mass. The lesion could be completely extirpated laparoscopically. Duration of surgery was 250 minutes. Estimated blood loss was 230 milliliters. Specimen was extracted through pfannenstiel incision. No significant intraoperative or postoperative happenings were recorded. Microscopic features were suggestive of ganglioneuroma of adrenal gland. PMID:24501511

  18. Extensive expertise in endocrinology. Adrenal crisis.

    PubMed

    Allolio, Bruno

    2015-03-01

    Adrenal crisis is a life-threatening emergency contributing to the excess mortality of patients with adrenal insufficiency. Studies in patients on chronic replacement therapy for adrenal insufficiency have revealed an incidence of 5-10 adrenal crises/100 patient years and suggested a mortality rate from adrenal crisis of 0.5/100 patient years. Patients with adrenal crisis typically present with profoundly impaired well-being, hypotension, nausea and vomiting, and fever responding well to parenteral hydrocortisone administration. Infections are the major precipitating causes of adrenal crisis. Lack of increased cortisol concentrations during infection enhances pro-inflammatory cytokine release and sensitivity to the toxic effects of these cytokines (e.g. tumour necrosis factor alpha). Furthermore, pro-inflammatory cytokines may impair glucocorticoid receptor function aggravating glucocorticoid deficiency. Treatment of adrenal crisis is simple and highly effective consisting of i.v. hydrocortisone (initial bolus of 100  mg followed by 200  mg over 24  h as continuous infusion) and 0.9% saline (1000  ml within the first hour). Prevention of adrenal crisis requires appropriate hydrocortisone dose adjustments to stressful medical procedures (e.g. major surgery) and other stressful events (e.g. infection). Patient education is a key for such dose adjustments but current education concepts are not sufficiently effective. Thus, improved education strategies are needed. Every patient should carry an emergency card and should be provided with an emergency kit for parenteral hydrocortisone self-administration. A hydrocortisone pen would hold a great potential to lower the current barriers to hydrocortisone self-injection. Improved patient education and measures to facilitate parenteral hydrocortisone self-administration in impending crisis are expected to significantly reduce morbidity and mortality from adrenal crisis.

  19. The CXCL12/CXCR4 axis promotes ligand-independent activation of the androgen receptor.

    PubMed

    Kasina, Sathish; Macoska, Jill A

    2012-04-01

    The molecular mechanisms responsible for the transition of some prostate cancers from androgen ligand-dependent to androgen ligand-independent are incompletely established. Molecules that are ligands for G protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) have been implicated in ligand-independent androgen receptor (AR) activation. The purpose of this study was to examine whether CXCL12, the ligand for the GPCR, CXCR4, might mediate prostate cancer cell proliferation through AR-dependent mechanisms involving functional transactivation of the AR in the absence of androgen. The results of these studies showed that activation of the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis promoted: The nuclear accumulation of both wild-type and mutant AR in several prostate epithelial cell lines; AR-dependent proliferative responses; nuclear accumulation of the AR co-regulator SRC-1 protein; SRC-1:AR protein:protein association; co-localization of AR and SRC-1 on the promoters of AR-regulated genes; AR- and SRC-1 dependent transcription of AR-regulated genes; AR-dependent secretion of the AR-regulated PSA protein; P13K-dependent phosphorylation of AR; MAPK-dependent phosphorylation of SRC-1, and both MAPK- and P13K-dependent secretion of the PSA protein, in the absence of androgen. Taken together, these studies identify CXCL12 as a novel, non-steroidal growth factor that promotes the growth of prostate epithelial cells through AR-dependent mechanisms in the absence of steroid hormones. These findings support the development of novel therapeutics targeting the CXCL12/CXCR4 axis as an ancillary to those targeting the androgen/AR axis to effectively treat castration resistant/recurrent prostate tumors.

  20. Gonadal steroid replacement reverses gonadectomy-induced changes in the corticosterone pulse profile and stress-induced hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity of male and female rats.

    PubMed

    Seale, J V; Wood, S A; Atkinson, H C; Harbuz, M S; Lightman, S L

    2004-12-01

    We investigated the effects of gonadal hormone replacement on the pulsatile parameters underlying basal circadian corticosterone secretion in castrated male and ovariectomized female rats using an automated sampling system. Blood was collected from freely moving, unanaesthetized rats every 10 min over a 24-h period and sampling was continued during a noise stress and after lipopolysaccharide (LPS) administration. Castrated male rats had markedly higher corticosterone levels than intact controls. This was reflected by increased number and frequency of pulses in addition to an increase in the pulse height and amplitude under both basal circadian and stress conditions. Hormone replacement with either testosterone or dihydrotestosterone returned these corticosterone levels and circadian profile to those found in intact males, confirming an androgen-mediated effect. Ovariectomized females had significantly lower basal and stress-induced corticosterone levels with lower frequency and amplitude of corticosterone pulses than intact females. 17beta-oestradiol replacement returned basal levels, pulsatile measurements and stress-induced corticosterone levels to those found in intact females. Three hours post-LPS administration, castrated males demonstrated significantly higher values of parvocellular paraventricular nucleus (PVN) arginine vasopressin and corticotrophin-releasing factor and anterior pituitary pro-opiomelanocortin mRNA while ovariectomized females showed significantly lower levels of all three transcripts compared to intact controls. PVN glucocorticoid receptor mRNA levels 3 h post-LPS administration were significantly decreased in castrated males and significantly increased in ovariectomized female rats. Replacement of gonadal steroids resulted in a return to the levels found in intact controls after LPS. Gonadal steroid replacement is sufficient to reverse changes in the pulsatile characteristics of corticosterone release after gonadectomy. In addition

  1. A case of human intramuscular adrenal gland transplantation as a cure for chronic adrenal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Grodstein, E; Hardy, M A; Goldstein, M J

    2010-02-01

    Intramuscular endocrine gland transplantation has been well described as it pertains to parathyroid autotransplantation; however, transplantation of the adrenal gland is less well characterized. While adrenal autotransplantation in the setting of Cushing's disease has been described, intramuscular adrenal allotransplantation as a cure for adrenal insufficiency to our knowledge has not been previously carried out. Current treatment for adrenal insufficiency leaves patients without diurnal variation in cortisol release and susceptible to the detrimental effects of chronic hypercortisolism. We describe here the case of a 5-year-old girl with renal failure who had adrenal insufficiency following fulminant meningococcemia that led to requirements for both stress-dose steroid and mineralocorticoid replacement. Ten months after the onset of her disease, she received a simultaneous renal and adrenal gland transplant from her mother. The adrenal gland allograft was morselized into 1 mm(3) segments and implanted into three 2 cm pockets created in her rectus abdominis muscle. Three years after surgery, her allograft remains fully functional, responding well to adrenocorticotropin hormone stimulation and the patient does not require any steroid or mineral-corticoid supplementation. We believe this case represents the first description of successful functional intramuscular adrenal allograft transplantation with long-term follow up as a cure for adrenal insufficiency.

  2. Endocrine differentiation of fetal ovaries and testes of the spotted hyena (Crocuta crocuta): timing of androgen-independent versus androgen-driven genital development.

    PubMed

    Browne, P; Place, N J; Vidal, J D; Moore, I T; Cunha, G R; Glickman, S E; Conley, A J

    2006-10-01

    Female spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta) have an erectile peniform clitoris and a pseudoscrotum but no external vagina, all established by day 35 of a 110-day gestation. Recent studies indicate that these events are androgen-independent, although androgen secretion by fetal ovaries and testis was hypothesized previously to induce phallic development in both sexes. We present the first data relating to the capacity of the ovaries and testes of the spotted hyena to synthesize androgens at different stages of fetal life. Specifically, spotted hyena fetal gonads were examined by immunohistochemistry at GD 30, 45, 48, 65, and 95 for androgen-synthesizing enzymes, as related to the morphological development. Enzymes included 17alpha-hydroxylase/17,20-lyase cytochrome P450 (P450c17), cytochrome b5, 3beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3betaHSD), and cholesterol side-chain cleavage cytochrome P450 (P450scc). Anti-Müllerian-hormone (AMH) expression was also examined. AMH was strongly expressed in fetal Sertoli cells from GD 30 and after. P450c17 expression was detected in Leydig cells of developing testes and surprisingly in Müllerian duct epithelium. Fetal ovaries began to organize and differentiate by GD 45, and medullary cells expressed P450c17, cytochrome b5, 3betaHSD, and P450scc. The findings support the hypothesis that external genital morphology is probably androgen-independent initially, but that fetal testicular androgens modify the secondary, male-specific phallic form and accessory organs. Fetal ovaries appear to develop substantial androgen-synthesizing capacity but not until phallic differentiation is complete, i.e. after GD 45 based on circulating androstenedione concentrations. During late gestation, fetal ovaries and testes synthesize androgens, possibly organizing the neural substrates of aggressive behaviors observed at birth in spotted hyenas. These data provide an endocrine rationale for sexual dimorphisms in phallic structure and reveal a potential

  3. Cortisol levels in central adrenal insufficiency: light and shade.

    PubMed

    De Sanctis, Vincenzo; Soliman, Ashraf; Yassin, Mohamed; Garofalo, Piernicola

    2015-03-01

    Evaluating children or adolescents with central adrenal insufficiency (CAI) is a difficult task in clinical practice, especially in subjects with hypothalamic-pituitary diseases and partial ACTH deficiency, or in those with recent pituitary surgery or brain irradiation when the adrenal cortex may still be responsive to stress. In 2008, a meta-analysis reported a three-step approach for evaluating patients at risk for CAI with no acute illness. In particular, the authors recommended the evaluation of morning cortisol, a low dose ACTH test (LDST) and the "gold standard" insulin tolerance test or metyrapone test if the low LDCT was not diagnostic. Cortisol and ACTH secretion exhibit significant fluctuation throughout the day. The reference ranges supplied by labs are so wide that they only flag up extremely low cortisol levels. Interpreting the results correctly can be difficult for a physician without an experience in adrenal dysfunctions. The lack of uniformity in these cut-off levels could in part be attributed to differences in study populations, variability of dynainic tests, the use of different serum cortisol assays and dissimilar cut-off peak serum cortisol response indicative of a normal axis response and the difference in the clinical context in which the studies were done. Therefore, Laboratories have to advertise the need to establish reference values for given populations, both for basal or stimulated hormone levels. Failure to apply this rule may elicit false-positive and more critically, false-negative results. LDST (1 pg synthetic ACTH as iv bolus with measurement of serum cortisol) has been proposed as a sensitive test for the diagnosis of CAl. However, the advantage of LDST compared with the high dose test may be offset by the technical difficulties inherent to dilution of 250 pg ampoules. Clinical judgment remains imperative especially regarding the use of glucocorticoid supplementation during extreme stress. PMID:25962205

  4. Quantitative and qualitative evaluation of CART-containing cells in adrenal glands of male rats with hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kasacka, I; Piotrowska, Ż; Knaś, M; Lewandowska, A

    2014-10-01

    Adrenal activity is stimulated and secretion of stress hormones is increased during advanced stages of renovascular hypertension. The literature suggests that the neuropeptide, cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript (CART), might regulate adrenal secretory function and thus could influence its activity. We assessed potential quantitative and qualitative changes in the cells that contained CART in the adrenal glands of rats with renovascular hypertension. The renal arteries of ten rats were subjected to a clipping procedure, i.e., two-kidney one-clip (2K1C) model of arterial hypertension, and after 6 weeks each rat developed stable hypertension. CART was localized using immunohistochemistry. CART was detected in a large population of cells in the medulla, sparse nerve fibers in the cortex and the capsule of the adrenal gland. The population of CART-positive cells in adrenal glands of two kidney-one clip (2K1C) treated rats was greater and their immunoreactivity was increased compared to controls. Similarly, the length, width, area and diameter of CART-immunoreactive cells were significantly greater in the hypertensive rats than in controls. We demonstrated that renovascular hypertension alters the number and immunoreactivity of CART-containing cells in adrenal glands.

  5. Development, validation and application of a stable isotope dilution liquid chromatography electrospray ionization/selected reaction monitoring/mass spectrometry (SID-LC/ESI/SRM/MS) method for quantification of keto-androgens in human serum.

    PubMed

    Tamae, Daniel; Byrns, Michael; Marck, Brett; Mostaghel, Elahe A; Nelson, Peter S; Lange, Paul; Lin, Daniel; Taplin, Mary-Ellen; Balk, Steven; Ellis, William; True, Larry; Vessella, Robert; Montgomery, Bruce; Blair, Ian A; Penning, Trevor M

    2013-11-01

    Prostate cancer is the most frequently diagnosed form of cancer in males in the United States. The disease is androgen driven and the use of orchiectomy or chemical castration, known as androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) has been employed for the treatment of advanced prostate cancer for over 70 years. Agents such as GnRH agonists and non-steroidal androgen receptor antagonists are routinely used in the clinic, but eventually relapse occurs due to the emergence of castration-resistant prostate cancer. With the appreciation that androgen signaling still persists in these patients and the development of new therapies such as abiraterone and enzalutamide that further suppresses androgen synthesis or signaling, there is a renewed need for sensitive and specific methods to quantify androgen precursor and metabolite levels to assess drug efficacy. We describe the development, validation and application of a stable isotope dilution liquid chromatography electrospray ionization selected reaction monitoring mass spectrometry (SID-LC/ESI/SRM/MS) method for quantification of serum keto-androgens and their sulfate and glucuronide conjugates using Girard-T oxime derivatives. The method is robust down to 0.2-4pg on column, depending on the androgen metabolite quantified, and can also quantify dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S) in only 1μL of serum. The clinical utility of this method was demonstrated by analyzing serum androgens from patients enrolled in a clinical trial assessing combinations of pharmacological agents to maximally suppress gonadal and adrenal androgens (Targeted Androgen Pathway Suppression, TAPS clinical trial). The method was validated by correlating the results obtained with a hydroxylamine derivatization procedure coupled with tandem mass spectrometry using selected reaction monitoring that was conducted in an independent laboratory.

  6. Effects of Aromatase Inhibition and Androgen Activity on Serotonin and Behavior in Male Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Bethea, Cynthia L.; Reddy, Arubala P.; Robertson, Nicola; Colemen, Kristine

    2014-01-01

    Aggression in humans and animals has been linked to androgens and serotonin function. To further our understanding of the effect of androgens on serotonin and aggression in male macaques, we sought to manipulate circulating androgens and the activity of aromatase; and to then determine behavior and the endogenous availability of serotonin. Male Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) were castrated for 5-7 months and then treated for 3 months with [1] placebo, [2] testosterone (T), [3] T+Dutasteride (5a reductase inhibitor; AvodartTM), [4] T+Letrozole (non-steroidal aromatase inhibitor; FemeraTM), [5] Flutamide+ATD (androgen antagonist plus steroidal aromatase inhibitor) or [6] dihydrotestosterone (DHT)+ATD (n=5/group). Behavioral observations were made during treatments. At the end of the treatment period, each animal was sedated with propofol and administered a bolus of fenfluramine (5 mg/kg). Fenfluramine causes the release of serotonin proportional to endogenous availability and in turn, serotonin stimulates the secretion of prolactin. Therefore, serum prolactin concentrations reflect endogenous serotonin. Fenfluramine significantly increased serotonin/prolactin in all groups (p <0.0001). Fenfluramine-induced serotonin/prolactin in the T-treated group was significantly higher than the other groups (p<0.0001). Castration partially reduced the serotonin/prolactin response; and Letrozole partially blocked the effect of T. Complete inhibition of aromatase with ATD, a non-competitve inhibitor, significantly and similarly reduced the fenfluramine-induced serotonin/prolactin response in the presence or absence of DHT. Neither aggressive behavior nor yawning (indicators of androgen activity) correlated with serotonin/prolactin, but posited aromatase activity correlated significantly with prolactin (p<0.0008; r2 =0.95). In summary, androgens induced aggressive behavior but they did not regulate serotonin. Altogether, the data suggest that aromatase activity supports

  7. Effects of aromatase inhibition and androgen activity on serotonin and behavior in male macaques.

    PubMed

    Bethea, Cynthia L; Reddy, Arubala P; Robertson, Nicola; Coleman, Kristine

    2013-06-01

    Aggression in humans and animals has been linked to androgens and serotonin function. To further our understanding of the effect of androgens on serotonin and aggression in male macaques, we sought to manipulate circulating androgens and the activity of aromatase; and to then determine behavior and the endogenous availability of serotonin. Male Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) were castrated for 5-7 months and then treated for 3 months with (a) placebo; (b) testosterone (T); (c) T + Dutasteride (5a reductase inhibitor; AvodartTM); (d) T + Letrozole (nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor; FemeraTM); (e) Flutamide + ATD (androgen antagonist plus steroidal aromatase inhibitor); or (f) dihydrotestosterone (DHT) + ATD (n = 5/group). Behavioral observations were made during treatments. At the end of the treatment period, each animal was sedated with propofol and administered a bolus of fenfluramine (5 mg/kg). Fenfluramine causes the release of serotonin proportional to endogenous availability and in turn, serotonin stimulates the secretion of prolactin. Therefore, serum prolactin concentrations reflect endogenous serotonin. Fenfluramine significantly increased serotonin/prolactin in all groups (p < .0001). Fenfluramine-induced serotonin/prolactin in the T-treated group was significantly higher than the other groups (p < .0001). Castration partially reduced the serotonin/prolactin response and Letrozole partially blocked the effect of T. Complete inhibition of aromatase with ATD, a noncompetitive inhibitor, significantly and similarly reduced the fenfluramine-induced serotonin/prolactin response in the presence or absence of DHT. Neither aggressive behavior nor yawning (indicators of androgen activity) correlated with serotonin/prolactin, but posited aromatase activity correlated significantly with prolactin (p < .0008; r² = 0.95). In summary, androgens induced aggressive behavior but they did not regulate serotonin. Altogether, the data suggest that aromatase activity

  8. Hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis and prolactin abnormalities in suicidal behavior.

    PubMed

    Pompili, Maurizio; Serafini, Gianluca; Palermo, Mario; Seretti, Maria Elena; Stefani, Henry; Angeletti, Gloria; Lester, David; Amore, Mario; Girardi, Paolo

    2013-11-01

    Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal (HPA) axis hyperactivity measured with the dexamethasone suppression test and the dexamethesone/CRH test may have some predictive power for suicidal behavior in patients with mood disorders. Increased prolactin (PRL) levels may be related both to physiological and pathological conditions. HPA-axis abnormalities and increased levels of PRL may coexist, and common neuroendocrine changes may activate both HPA axis and PRL release. HPA-axis hyperactivity is presumably present in a large subpopulation of depressed subjects. Suicidal behavior is considered to be a form of inward-directed aggression, and aggressive behavior has been connected to high androgen levels. However, lower plasma total testosterone levels have also been reported in subjects with depression and higher suicidality. Lipid/immune dysregulations, the increased ratio of blood fatty acids, and increased PRL levels may each be associated with the increased production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, which have been reported in patients with major depression and patients engaging in suicidal behavior. Although no studies have been done to determine whether ante-mortem physical stress may be detected by raised post-mortem PRL, this would be of great interest for physicians.

  9. Sonography of the adrenal glands in the adult.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung Won; Kim, Jeong Kon; Choi, Hyuck Jae; Kim, Mi-hyun; Lee, Jeongjin; Cho, Kyoung-Sik

    2012-01-01

    Although its capability has been overlooked, sonography can be a useful screening tool for adrenal lesion in adults. In this article, we discuss scan technique, patient positioning, and anatomic consideration for adrenal sonography in adults and illustrate sonographic appearance of normal adrenal gland as well as adrenal tumors and tumor-like lesions.

  10. Androgens and the role of female "hyperaggressiveness" in spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta).

    PubMed

    Goymann, W; East, M L; Hofer, H

    2001-02-01

    It has been suggested that female dominance in spotted hyenas evolved due to selection for "hyperaggressive" androgenized females. According to this view, virilized external genitalia of female hyenas developed as a byproduct of selection for "androgen-facilitated social dominance." The evidence that female hyenas have higher androgen levels than males or other female mammals is inconclusive. We compared concentrations of testosterone (T), 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and androstenedione (AE) from a population in the Serengeti. Females had significantly lower T and DHT levels than predispersal and postdispersal males. AE levels did not significantly differ between females and postdispersal males, but were significantly lower in predispersal males. Our results, and those from studies that have demonstrated that male and female hyenas experience similar levels of maternal androgens during fetal development, provide little support for a theory of selection for female dominance and hyperaggressiveness through enhanced secretion of androgens. Our data are consistent with an alternative view that female virilization is a byproduct of selection for precocial aggressive cubs of both sexes. According to this view, high investment in lactation favored selection for accelerated fetal development, high neonatal aggression, and facultative siblicide.

  11. Modulation of adrenal gap junction expression.

    PubMed

    Murray, S A; Shah, U S

    1998-01-01

    To increase our knowledge of the role of peptide hormone stimulation in gap junction protein expression and adrenal cortical cell function, primary rat adrenal cortical cells were treated with adrenocorticotropin, and gap junction proteins were measured. Immunocytochemistry and western blot analysis were used to detect and characterize gap junction type and distribution. The gap junction protein, connexin 43 (alpha 1), was detected. Analysis of six connexin protein types did not reveal gap junction species other than alpha 1. Cells of the inner adrenal cortical zones, zonae fasciculata and reticularis, were demonstrated to have the highest number of gap junctions per cell in the adrenal gland. Adrenal cell cultures enriched for the two inner cortical adrenal zones were established and demonstrated also to express alpha 1 gap junction protein. Adrenocorticotropin (40 mUnits/ml) and dibutyryl cyclic adenosine monophosphate (1 mM) treatments increased alpha 1 gap junction protein levels and decreased cell proliferation rates in the cell cultures. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that gap junction expression can be regulated by adrenocorticotropin acting through the second messenger cyclic adenosine monophosphate. It can be suggested that gap junction expression in the adrenal gland may be under hormonal influence, and that gap junctions serve as passage for movement of molecules involved in control of cell proliferation. PMID:9694574

  12. Spatial and activity-dependent catecholamine release in rat adrenal medulla under native neuronal stimulation.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Kyle; Zarkua, Georgy; Chan, Shyue-An; Sridhar, Arun; Smith, Corey

    2016-09-01

    Neuroendocrine chromaffin cells of the adrenal medulla in rat receive excitatory synaptic input through anterior and posterior divisions of the sympathetic splanchnic nerve. Upon synaptic stimulation, the adrenal medulla releases the catecholamines, epinephrine, and norepinephrine into the suprarenal vein for circulation throughout the body. Under sympathetic tone, catecholamine release is modest. However, upon activation of the sympathoadrenal stress reflex, and increased splanchnic firing, adrenal catecholamine output increases dramatically. Moreover, specific stressors can preferentially increase release of either epinephrine (i.e., hypoglycemia) or norepinephrine (i.e., cold stress). The mechanism for this stressor-dependent segregated release of catecholamine species is not yet fully understood. We tested the hypothesis that stimulation of either division of the splanchnic selects for epinephrine over norepinephrine release. We introduce an ex vivo rat preparation that maintains native splanchnic innervation of the adrenal gland and we document experimental advantages and limitations of this preparation. We utilize fast scanning cyclic voltammetry to detect release of both epinephrine and norepinephrine from the adrenal medulla, and report that epinephrine and norepinephrine release are regulated spatially and in a frequency-dependent manner. We provide data to show that epinephrine is secreted preferentially from the periphery of the medulla and exhibits a higher threshold and steeper stimulus-secretion function than norepinephrine. Elevated stimulation of the whole nerve specifically enhances epinephrine release from the peripheral medulla. Our data further show that elimination of either division from stimulation greatly attenuated epinephrine release under elevated stimulation, while either division alone can largely support norepinephrine release. PMID:27597763

  13. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in the night eating syndrome.

    PubMed

    Birketvedt, Grethe S; Sundsfjord, Johan; Florholmen, Jon R

    2002-02-01

    The typical neuroendocrine characteristics of the night eating syndrome have previously been described as changes in the circadian rhythm by an attenuation in the nocturnal rise of the plasma concentrations of melatonin and leptin and an increased circadian secretion of cortisol. The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that night eaters have an overexpressed hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis with an attenuated response to stress. Five female subjects with the night-eating syndrome and five sex-, age-, and weight-matched controls performed a 120-min corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) test (100 microg iv). Blood samples were drawn intravenously for measurements of the plasma concentrations of ACTH and cortisol. The results showed that, in night eaters compared with controls, the CRH-induced ACTH and cortisol response was significantly decreased to 47 and 71%, respectively. In conclusion, disturbances in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis with an attenuated ACTH and cortisol response to CRH were found in subjects with night-eating syndrome.

  14. Neuroprotective actions of androgens on motoneurons.

    PubMed

    Fargo, Keith N; Foecking, Eileen M; Jones, Kathryn J; Sengelaub, Dale R

    2009-07-01

    Androgens have a variety of protective and therapeutic effects in both the central and peripheral nervous systems. Here we review these effects as they related specifically to spinal and cranial motoneurons. Early in development, androgens are critical for the formation of important neuromuscular sex differences, decreasing the magnitude of normally occurring cell death in select motoneuron populations. Throughout the lifespan, androgens also protect against motoneuron death caused by axonal injury. Surviving motoneurons also display regressive changes to their neurites as a result of both direct axonal injury and loss of neighboring motoneurons. Androgen treatment enhances the ability of motoneurons to recover from these regressive changes and regenerate both axons and dendrites, restoring normal neuromuscular function. Androgens exert these protective effects by acting through a variety of molecular pathways. Recent work has begun to examine how androgen treatment can interact with other treatment strategies in promoting recovery from motoneuron injury.

  15. Adrenomyeloneuropathy Presenting With Adrenal Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hee Dong; Choi, Yong Min; Kang, Jin Ho

    2013-01-01

    Adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN), one of the variants of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD), is inherited peroxisomal disorder associated with the accumulation of very long chain fatty acids (VLCFA). AMN is characterized primarily by involvements of long ascending and descending tracts of the spinal cord and peripheral neuropathy, which leads to spastic paraparesis and urinary and erectile dysfunction. We experienced the AMN case of a 33-year-old man presenting bilateral progressive spastic paraparesis, impotence and urge incontinence with primary adrenal failures, as confirmed by increased serum of VLCFA concentrations. Considering that somatosensory evoked potentials in posterior tibial nerve was the only abnormal finding in electrophysiologic findings when compared with the severe spastic gait pattern shown, it is necessary to follow up with electrophysiologic studies. PMID:24020038

  16. Recognition and management of adrenal emergencies.

    PubMed

    Torrey, Susan P

    2005-08-01

    Although clinical conditions associated with dysfunction of the ad-renal gland are often subtle, even insidious, in their presentation,and diagnosis and treatment usually are confined to outpatient clinics and offices, there are several situations that warrant the attention of emergency physicians. Recognition of the spectrum of presentations of pheochromocytoma, adrenal insufficiency, and pituitary apoplexy, and the sequelae of corticosteroid therapy and withdrawal, are critically important areas to emergency medicine. Prompt diagnosis with appropriate treatment and referral will reduce morbidity and mortality in many patients each year. A related topic pertinent to emergency physicians is the management of incidental adrenal masses that are discovered on abdominal radio-logic imaging.

  17. Muscarine binding sites in bovine adrenal medulla.

    PubMed

    Barron, B A; Murrin, L C; Hexum, T D

    1986-03-18

    The presence of muscarinic binding sites in the bovine adrenal medulla was investigated using [3H]QNB and the bovine adrenal medulla. Scatchard analysis combined with computer analysis yielded data consistent with a two binding site configuration. KDs of 0.15 and 14 nM and Bmax s of 29 and 210 fmol/mg protein, respectively, were observed. Displacement of [3H]QNB by various cholinergic agents is, in order of decreasing potency: QNB, dexetimide, atropine, scopolamine, imipramine, desipramine, oxotremorine, pilocarpine, acetylcholine, methacholine and carbachol. These results demonstrate the presence of more than one muscarine binding site in the bovine adrenal gland. PMID:3709656

  18. Adrenal enlargement and failure of suppression of circulating cortisol by dexamethasone in patients with malignancy.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, P J; Sohaib, S A; Trainer, P J; Lister, T A; Besser, G M; Reznek, R

    1999-08-01

    The aim of this study was to further elucidate the activity of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in patients with malignancy and to correlate this with the size of the adrenal glands. Fourteen patients with a variety of malignancies were studied prior to receiving cytotoxic chemotherapy. During routine staging computerized tomographic (CT) scans, the size of the body, medial and lateral limbs of the adrenal glands were measured and compared with those of a normal group of patients studied previously. Measurements of 09:00 h serum cortisol and plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels were made before and after the administration of dexamethasone (0.5 mg 6-hourly for 48 h) in addition to the peak cortisol response to i.v corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH). Overall, patients with malignancy had significantly larger adrenal glands than patients without malignancy; those with non-haematological malignancies had larger glands than patients with haematological malignancies. Following dexamethasone to suppress circulating cortisol levels, nine patients (64%) demonstrated abnormal resistance with cortisol levels > 50 nmol l(-1): mean value 294 nmol l(-1) (range 67-1147). Those patients who failed to suppress after dexamethasone had significantly larger adrenal glands than those that did suppress and tended to have non-haematological malignancies. ACTH levels were undetectable or low in three patients in whom it was measured and who did not suppress with dexamethasone. Following CRH, the cortisol levels were highest (823 and 853 nmol l(-1)) in two of these patients. Malignancy is associated with diffuse enlargement of the adrenal glands and resistance to dexamethasone-induced suppression of the HPA axis, which is not due to ectopic ACTH secretion. This disturbance of the normal control of the HPA axis is unexplained and its functional significance remains uncertain.

  19. Genetic Approaches to Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis Regulation.

    PubMed

    Arnett, Melinda G; Muglia, Lisa M; Laryea, Gloria; Muglia, Louis J

    2016-01-01

    The normal function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, and resultant glucocorticoid (GC) secretion, is essential for human health. Disruption of GC regulation is associated with pathologic, psychological, and physiological disease states such as depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, hypertension, diabetes, and osteopenia, among others. As such, understanding the mechanisms by which HPA output is tightly regulated in its responses to environmental stressors and circadian cues has been an active area of investigation for decades. Over the last 20 years, however, advances in gene targeting and genome modification in rodent models have allowed the detailed dissection of roles for key molecular mediators and brain regions responsible for this control in vivo to emerge. Here, we summarize work done to elucidate the function of critical neuropeptide systems, GC-signaling targets, and inflammation-associated pathways in HPA axis regulation and behavior, and highlight areas for future investigation.

  20. Preconditioning stimuli that augment chromaffin cell secretion.

    PubMed

    Tapia, Laura; García-Eguiagaray, Josefina; García, Antonio G; Gandía, Luis

    2009-04-01

    We have investigated here whether a preconditioned stimulation of nicotinic and muscarinic receptors augmented the catecholamine release responses elicited by supramaximal 3-s pulses of 100 muM acetylcholine (100ACh) or 100 mM K(+) (100K(+)) applied to fast-perifused bovine adrenal chromaffin cells. Threshold concentrations of nicotine (1-3 muM) that caused only a tiny secretion did, however, augment the responses elicited by 100ACh or 100K(+) by 2- to 3.5-fold. This effect was suppressed by mecamylamine and by Ca(2+) deprivation, was developed with a half-time (t(1/2)) of 1 min, and was reversible. The nicotine effect was mimicked by threshold concentrations of ACh, choline, epibatidine, and oxotremorine-M but not by methacholine. Threshold concentrations of K(+) caused lesser potentiation of secretion compared with that of threshold nicotine. The data are compatible with an hypothesis implying 1) that continuous low-frequency sympathetic discharge places chromaffin cells at the adrenal gland in a permanent "hypersensitive" state; and 2) this allows an explosive secretion of catecholamines by high-frequency sympathetic discharge during stress.

  1. A case of adrenal Cushing’s syndrome with bilateral adrenal masses

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ya-Wun; Hwu, Chii-Min; Won, Justin Ging-Shing; Chu, Chia-Huei

    2016-01-01

    Summary A functional lesion in corticotrophin (ACTH)-independent Cushing’s syndrome is difficult to distinguish from lesions of bilateral adrenal masses. Methods for distinguishing these lesions include adrenal venous sampling and 131I-6β-iodomethyl-19-norcholesterol (131I-NP-59) scintigraphy. We present a case of a 29-year-old Han Chinese female patient with a history of hypercholesterolaemia and polycystic ovary syndrome. She presented with a 6month history of an 8kg body weight gain and gradual rounding of the face. Serial examinations revealed loss of circadian rhythm of cortisol, elevated urinary free-cortisol level and undetectable ACTH level (<5pg/mL). No suppression was observed in both the low- and high-dose dexamethasone suppression tests. Adrenal computed tomography revealed bilateral adrenal masses. Adrenal venous sampling was performed, and the right-to-left lateralisation ratio was 14.29. The finding from adrenal scintigraphy with NP-59 was consistent with right adrenal adenoma. The patient underwent laparoscopic right adrenalectomy, and the pathology report showed adrenocortical adenoma. Her postoperative cortisol level was 3.2μg/dL, and her Cushingoid appearance improved. In sum, both adrenal venous sampling and 131I-NP-59 scintigraphy are good diagnostic methods for Cushing’s syndrome presenting with bilateral adrenal masses. Learning points The clinical presentation of Cushing’ syndrome includes symptoms and signs of fat redistribution and protein-wasting features. The diagnosis of patients with ACTH-independent Cushing’s syndrome with bilateral adrenal masses is challenging for localisation of the lesion. Both adrenal venous sampling and 131I-NP-59 scintigraphy are good methods to use in these patients with Cushing’s syndrome presenting with bilateral adrenal masses. PMID:27252858

  2. Radiology of the adrenals with sonography and CT

    SciTech Connect

    Mitty, H.A.; Yeh, H.C.

    1982-01-01

    The basic science and application of clinical adrenal imaging is presented. The initial chapters deal with anatomic review and methods of adrenal imaging. The bulk of the book consists of individual chapters describing pathologic entities and syndromes of adrenal disease. The final chapter deals with differentiation of adrenal lesions from masses arising in adjacent organs. There is no other single source available which so concisely presents adrenal imaging. (KRM)

  3. Sex-specific prenatal stress effects on the rat reproductive axis and adrenal gland structure

    PubMed Central

    George, Susan O; Hogg, Charis O; Lai, Yu-Ting; Brunton, Paula J

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Social stress during pregnancy has profound effects on offspring physiology. This study examined whether an ethologically relevant social stress during late pregnancy in rats alters the reproductive axis and adrenal gland structure in post-pubertal male and female offspring. Prenatally stressed (PNS) pregnant rats (n=9) were exposed to an unfamiliar lactating rat for 10 min/day from day 16 to 20 of pregnancy inclusive, whereas control pregnant rats (n=9) remained in their home cages. Gonads, adrenal glands and blood samples were obtained from one female and one male from each litter at 11 to 12-weeks of age. Anogenital distance was measured. There was no treatment effect on body, adrenal or gonad weight at 11–12 weeks. PNS did not affect the number of primordial, secondary or tertiary ovarian follicles, numbers of corpora lutea or ovarian FSH receptor expression. There was an indication that PNS females had more primary follicles and greater ovarian aromatase expression compared with control females (both P=0.09). PNS males had longer anogenital distances (0.01±0.0 cm/g vs 0.008±0.00 cm/g; P=0.007) and higher plasma FSH concentrations (0.05 ng/mL vs 0.006 ng/mL; s.e.d.=0.023; P=0.043) compared with control males. There were no treatment effects on the number of Sertoli cells or seminiferous tubules, seminiferous tubule area, plasma testosterone concentration or testis expression of aromatase, FSH receptor or androgen receptor. PNS did not affect adrenal size. These data suggest that the developing male reproductive axis is more sensitive to maternal stress and that PNS may enhance aspects of male reproductive development. PMID:27026714

  4. Functional atrial natriuretic peptide receptor in human adrenal tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Shionoiri, H.; Hirawa, N.; Takasaki, I.; Ishikawa, Y.; Oda, H.; Minamisawa, K.; Sugimoto, K.; Matsukawa, T.; Ueda, S.; Miyajima, E.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of synthetic human atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) on the release of catecholamines, aldosterone, or cortisol were observed in human adrenal tumors obtained surgically from patients with pheochromocytoma, primary aldosteronism, or Cushing's syndrome, respectively. Each tumor tissue or adjacent normal cortical tissue was sectioned into slices, which were incubated in medium-199 in the presence or absence of adrenocorticotrophin (ACTH) and ANP. The amounts of epinephrine, norepinephrine, aldosterone, or cortisol released into the medium were measured. Existence of ANP receptors on the adrenal tissues was examined by binding assays, affinity labeling, and immunohistochemistry. Release of catecholamines from pheochromocytoma tissues was inhibited by ANP, and the presence of the ANP receptor on pheochromocytoma was further demonstrated by both binding assays and affinity labeling; Scatchard analysis revealed a single class of binding sites for ANP with a Kd of 1.0 nM and a Bmax of 0.4 pmol/mg of protein and the molecular size was estimated as 140 and a 70 kDa under nonreducing and reducing conditions, respectively. The presence of ANP receptors in pheochromocytoma was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry. ANP inhibited both basal and ACTH-stimulated aldosterone secretion in the slices of normal cortex, and localization of ANP receptors in zona glomerulosa cells was also demonstrated. However, ANP did not inhibit basal and ACTH-stimulated aldosterone and cortisol secretion in both tissue slices from aldosteronoma and Cushing's adenoma. Consistent with these observations, the absence of ANP receptors in adenoma tissues was determined by binding assays, affinity labeling, and immunohistochemistry.

  5. [A rare form of adrenal tuberculosis presenting as an asymptomatic adrenal mass].

    PubMed

    Sarf, Ismail; el Mejjad, Amine; Badre, Latifa; Dakir, Mohamed; Aboutaieb, Rachid; Meziane, Fethi

    2003-02-01

    The authors report a case of adrenal tuberculosis discovered during staging of a biopsy-confirmed bladder tumour, in a 70-year-old patient consulting for haematuria. Cystoscopy with biopsy revealed a high-grade papillary urothelial carcinoma invading the detrusor. Staging abdominopelvic computed tomography revealed a necrotic, multilobed right adrenal mass. Histological examination of the adrenalectomy specimen revealed adrenal tuberculosis. Antituberculous therapy was administered for 9 months and comprised streptomycin, isoniazid, rifampicin and pyrazinamide for 2 months, followed by rifampicin and isoniazid for 7 months. In the light of this case and with the increasing incidence of AIDS, the diagnosis of adrenal tuberculosis must be considered in any case of incidentaloma.

  6. Bilateral adrenal myelolipoma in Cushing's disease: a relook into the role of corticotropin in adrenal tumourigenesis.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Partha Pratim; Bhattacharjee, Rana; Mukhopadhyay, Pradip; Chowdhury, Subhankar

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal myelolipomas are infrequently encountered benign tumours of unknown aetiology. In the majority of cases they are unilateral, and clinically and hormonally silent, only requiring periodic follow-up. However, bilateral adrenal myelolipomas are sometimes associated with endocrine disorders and warrant appropriate evaluation. Though the understanding of the pathophysiology of adrenal myelolipomas has long been elusive, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) has been proposed as the main tropic factor in a number of studies. Cushing's disease is rarely associated with bilateral and sometimes giant myelolipomas. In this article, the association of bilateral adrenal myelolipomas with Cushing's disease has been discussed and the role of ACTH in the tumourigenesis has been reviewed. PMID:27307426

  7. Bilateral adrenal myelolipoma in Cushing's disease: a relook into the role of corticotropin in adrenal tumourigenesis.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Partha Pratim; Bhattacharjee, Rana; Mukhopadhyay, Pradip; Chowdhury, Subhankar

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal myelolipomas are infrequently encountered benign tumours of unknown aetiology. In the majority of cases they are unilateral, and clinically and hormonally silent, only requiring periodic follow-up. However, bilateral adrenal myelolipomas are sometimes associated with endocrine disorders and warrant appropriate evaluation. Though the understanding of the pathophysiology of adrenal myelolipomas has long been elusive, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) has been proposed as the main tropic factor in a number of studies. Cushing's disease is rarely associated with bilateral and sometimes giant myelolipomas. In this article, the association of bilateral adrenal myelolipomas with Cushing's disease has been discussed and the role of ACTH in the tumourigenesis has been reviewed.

  8. Image-Guided Ablation of Adrenal Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Yamakado, Koichiro

    2014-01-01

    Although laparoscopic adrenalectomy has remained the standard of care for the treatment for adrenal tumors, percutaneous image-guided ablation therapy, such as chemical ablation, radiofrequency ablation, cryoablation, and microwave ablation, has been shown to be clinically useful in many nonsurgical candidates. Ablation therapy has been used to treat both functioning adenomas and malignant tumors, including primary adrenal carcinoma and metastasis. For patients with functioning adenomas, biochemical and symptomatic improvement is achieved in 96 to 100% after ablation; for patients with malignant adrenal neoplasms, however, the survival benefit from ablation therapy remains unclear, though good initial results have been reported. This article outlines the current role of ablation therapy for adrenal lesions, as well as identifying some of the technical considerations for this procedure. PMID:25049444

  9. Hyperkalemic paralysis in primary adrenal insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Ajay; Pandya, Himanshu V.; Dave, Nikhil; Sapre, Chinmaye M.; Chaudhary, Sneha

    2014-01-01

    Hyperkalemic paralysis due to Addison's disease is rare, and potentially life-threatening entity presenting with flaccid motor weakness. This case under discussion highlights Hyperkalemic paralysis as initial symptomatic manifestation of primary adrenal insufficiency. PMID:25136192

  10. Relationships Between Androgens, Serotonin Gene Expression and Innervation in Male Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Bethea, Cynthia L.; Coleman, Kristine; Phu, Kenny; Reddy, Arubala P.; Phu, Andy

    2014-01-01

    Androgen administration to castrated individuals was purported to decrease activity in the serotonin system. However, we found that androgen administration to castrated male macaques increased fenfluramine-induced serotonin release as reflected by increased prolactin secretion. In this study, we sought to define the effects of androgens and aromatase inhibition on serotonin-related gene expression in the dorsal raphe, as well as serotonergic innervation of the LC. Male Japanese macaques (Macaca fuscata) were castrated for 5–7 months and then treated for 3 months with [1] placebo, [2] testosterone (T), [3] dihydrotestosterone (DHT; non- aromatizable androgen) and ATD (steroidal aromatase inhibitor), or [4] Flutamide (FLUT; androgen antagonist) and ATD (n=5/group). This study reports the expression of serotonin-related genes: tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (TPH2), serotonin reuptake transporter (SERT) and the serotonin 1A autoreceptor (5HT1A) using digoxigenin-ISH and image analysis. To examine the production of serotonin and the serotonergic innervation of a target area underlying arousal and vigilance, we measured the serotonin axon density entering the LC with ICC and image analysis. TPH2 and SERT expression were significantly elevated in T- and DHT+ATD- treated groups over placebo- and FLUT+ATD- treated groups in the dorsal raphe (p<0.007). There was no difference in 5HT1A expression between the groups. There was a significant decrease in the pixel area of serotonin axons and in the number of varicosities in the LC across the treatment groups with T > placebo >DHT+ATD = FLUT+ATD treatments. Comparatively, T- and DHT+ATD -treated groups had elevated TPH2 and SERT gene expression, but the DHT+ATD group had markedly suppressed serotonin axon density relative to the T-treated group. Further comparison with previously published data indicated that TPH2 and SERT expression reflected yawning and basal prolactin secretion. The serotonin axon density in the LC agreed with the

  11. Pituitary androgen receptor signalling regulates prolactin but not gonadotrophins in the male mouse.

    PubMed

    O'Hara, Laura; Curley, Michael; Tedim Ferreira, Maria; Cruickshanks, Lyndsey; Milne, Laura; Smith, Lee B

    2015-01-01

    Production of the androgen testosterone is controlled by a negative feedback loop within the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. Stimulation of testicular Leydig cells by pituitary luteinising hormone (LH) is under the control of hypothalamic gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH), while suppression of LH secretion by the pituitary is controlled by circulating testosterone. Exactly how androgens exert their feedback control of gonadotrophin secretion (and whether this is at the level of the pituitary), as well as the role of AR in other pituitary cell types remains unclear. To investigate these questions, we exploited a transgenic mouse line (Foxg1 Cre/+; AR fl/y) which lacks androgen receptor in the pituitary gland. Both circulating testosterone and gonadotrophins are unchanged in adulthood, demonstrating that AR signalling is dispensable in the male mouse pituitary for testosterone-dependent regulation of LH secretion. In contrast, Foxg1 Cre/+; AR fl/y males have a significant increase in circulating prolactin, suggesting that, rather than controlling gonadotrophins, AR-signalling in the pituitary acts to suppress aberrant prolactin production in males.

  12. Pituitary Androgen Receptor Signalling Regulates Prolactin but Not Gonadotrophins in the Male Mouse

    PubMed Central

    O’Hara, Laura; Curley, Michael; Tedim Ferreira, Maria; Cruickshanks, Lyndsey; Milne, Laura; Smith, Lee B.

    2015-01-01

    Production of the androgen testosterone is controlled by a negative feedback loop within the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. Stimulation of testicular Leydig cells by pituitary luteinising hormone (LH) is under the control of hypothalamic gonadotrophin releasing hormone (GnRH), while suppression of LH secretion by the pituitary is controlled by circulating testosterone. Exactly how androgens exert their feedback control of gonadotrophin secretion (and whether this is at the level of the pituitary), as well as the role of AR in other pituitary cell types remains unclear. To investigate these questions, we exploited a transgenic mouse line (Foxg1Cre/+; ARfl/y) which lacks androgen receptor in the pituitary gland. Both circulating testosterone and gonadotrophins are unchanged in adulthood, demonstrating that AR signalling is dispensable in the male mouse pituitary for testosterone-dependent regulation of LH secretion. In contrast, Foxg1Cre/+; ARfl/y males have a significant increase in circulating prolactin, suggesting that, rather than controlling gonadotrophins, AR-signalling in the pituitary acts to suppress aberrant prolactin production in males. PMID:25799562

  13. Adrenal hemangioma: computed tomogram and angiogram appearances.

    PubMed

    Wang, J H; Chiang, J H; Chang, T

    1992-08-01

    Adrenal hemangiomas are rare. To our knowledge, about 22 cases have been reported in the literature, of which 13 cases were surgically removed. We report probably the first case of CT and angiographically diagnosed and surgically confirmed adrenal hemangioma in Taiwan. We concluded that characteristic appearances on computed tomogram and angiogram associated with phlebolith-like calcification in the tumor may allow the radiologists to make correct preoperative diagnosis. PMID:1327475

  14. Hormonal and metabolic evaluation of adrenal incidentalomas.

    PubMed

    Wagnerova, H; Dudasova, D; Lazurova, I

    2009-01-01

    The biochemical and hormonal data in patients with adrenal incidentalomas were evaluated to compare the differences between adrenal adenomas and other benign lesions and to find the relationship between metabolic parameters and adrenal hormones. Ninety two patients (29men, age 20-90 years) with incidentally discovered unilateral or bilateral adrenal masses detected on CT were included in this study for the reasons others than adrenal pathology. Glycemia, cholesterolemia, triglyceridemia, hormonal evaluation including plasma ACTH, plasma aldosterone, plasma renin acitivity, overnight dexametasone test, ACTH test, free plasma metanephrines, urinary catecholamines were determined. In the group of patients with adrenal masses the prevalence of arterial hypertension was three fold higher, the prevalence of DM was approximately five fold higher and the prevalence of the overweight and obesity two fold higher than is reported in the general population. The most frequent adrenal masses were nonfunctional masses, the occurence of functional lesions was as follows: steroid enzymopathies (an exaggerated response of 17-OHP indicating a possible 21-hydroxylase deficiency), subclinical Cushing syndrome, primary aldosteronism and pheochromocytoma (5%, 2%, 2% and 1% respectively). There were no significant differences in evaluated data between patients with adenomas and hyperplasia and also no significant difference in evaluated data between lesions smaller than 3 cm and lesions greater than 3 cm. We did not find any correlations between plasma cortisol and lipid values. In this study we confirmed a higher prevalence of symptoms characteristic for different metabolic syndromes in these patients with adrenal incidentalomas, which indicate systematic screening for the metabolic syndrome including evaluation of the insuline resistance in this patients. PMID:19728761

  15. Chronic Heroin Dependence Leading to Adrenal Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Opioids have been the mainstay for pain relief and palliation over a long period of time. They are commonly abused by drug addicts and such dependence usually imparts severe physiologic effects on multiple organ systems. The negative impact of opioids on the endocrine system is poorly understood and often underestimated. We describe a patient who developed severe suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal (HPA) axis leading to secondary adrenal insufficiency due to long standing abuse of opioids. PMID:25221675

  16. New insights into the androgen biotransformation in prostate cancer: A regulatory network among androgen, androgen receptors and UGTs.

    PubMed

    Qin, Xuan; Liu, Mingyao; Wang, Xin

    2016-04-01

    Androgen, as one kind of steroid hormones, is pivotal in the hormone-sensitive cancer, such as prostate cancer (PCa). The synthesis, elimination, and bioavailability of androgen in prostate cells have been proved to be a main cause of the carcinogenesis, maintenance and deterioration of PCa. This review illustrates the outlines of androgen biotransformation, and further discusses the different enzymes, especially UDP-glucuronyltransferases (UGTs) embedded in both benign and malignant prostate cells, which catalyze the reactions. Although many inhibitors of the enzymes responsible for the synthesis of androgens have been developed into drugs to fight against PCa, the elimination procedures metabolized by the UGTs are less emphasized. Thus the regulatory network among androgen, androgen receptors (AR) and UGTs is carefully reviewed in this article, indicating the determinant effects of UGTs on prostatic androgens and the regulation of AR. Finally, the hypothesis is also put forward that the regulators of UGTs may be developed to accelerate the androgen elimination and benefit PCa therapy. PMID:26926093

  17. Adrenal-Derived Hormones Differentially Modulate Intestinal Immunity in Experimental Colitis.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Patrícia Reis; Sales-Campos, Helioswilton; Basso, Paulo José; Nardini, Viviani; Silva, Angelica; Banquieri, Fernanda; Alves, Vanessa Beatriz Freitas; Chica, Javier Emílio Lazo; Nomizo, Auro; Cardoso, Cristina Ribeiro de Barros

    2016-01-01

    The adrenal glands are able to modulate immune responses through neuroimmunoendocrine interactions and cortisol secretion that could suppress exacerbated inflammation such as in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Therefore, here we evaluated the role of these glands in experimental colitis induced by 3% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in C57BL/6 mice subjected to adrenalectomy, with or without glucocorticoid (GC) replacement. Mice succumbed to colitis without adrenals with a higher clinical score and augmented systemic levels of IL-6 and lower LPS. Furthermore, adrenalectomy negatively modulated systemic regulatory markers. The absence of adrenals resulted in augmented tolerogenic lamina propria dendritic cells but no compensatory local production of corticosterone and decreased mucosal inflammation associated with increased IFN-γ and FasL in the intestine. To clarify the importance of GC in this scenario, GC replacement in adrenalectomized mice restored different markers to the same degree of that observed in DSS group. Finally, this is the first time that adrenal-derived hormones, especially GC, were associated with the differential local modulation of the gut infiltrate, also pointing to a relationship between adrenalectomy and the modulation of systemic regulatory markers. These findings may elucidate some neuroimmunoendocrine mechanisms that dictate colitis outcome. PMID:27403034

  18. Effect of a water-rich diet on adrenal zona glomerulosa in Gerbillus tarabuli.

    PubMed

    Saadi, Leila; Lebaili, Nemcha

    2012-02-01

    The objective of this work is to evaluate the aldosterone level and to study the gerbil adrenal zona glomerulosa morphology in the presence of an important water diet content during seven days. Thirty adult gerbils, Gerbilus tarabuli, were randomly assigned to two watering regimes, with fifteen gerbils per group. The first group was the control and the second group was exposed to a water-rich diet during seven days. Thin sections of the adrenal glands were observed in photonic and electron microscopy. Their blood was sampled and analyzed for aldosterone, electrolyte concentrations and hematocrit. Urine was collected after 24hours. A water-rich diet decreased the body weight but increased the hematocrit, total protein, aldosterone concentration and urine volume. In electronic microscopy, the adrenal zona glomerulosa cells present a decrease in lipid compartment and Golgi apparatus zone development. The blood electrolyte concentrations were not changed significantly. These findings indicate that the water-rich diet exerts a potent stimulatory effect on aldosterone secretion by the gerbil adrenal zona glomerulosa through plasma volume perturbation.

  19. Adrenal-Derived Hormones Differentially Modulate Intestinal Immunity in Experimental Colitis

    PubMed Central

    de Souza, Patrícia Reis; Basso, Paulo José; Nardini, Viviani; Silva, Angelica; Banquieri, Fernanda

    2016-01-01

    The adrenal glands are able to modulate immune responses through neuroimmunoendocrine interactions and cortisol secretion that could suppress exacerbated inflammation such as in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). Therefore, here we evaluated the role of these glands in experimental colitis induced by 3% dextran sulfate sodium (DSS) in C57BL/6 mice subjected to adrenalectomy, with or without glucocorticoid (GC) replacement. Mice succumbed to colitis without adrenals with a higher clinical score and augmented systemic levels of IL-6 and lower LPS. Furthermore, adrenalectomy negatively modulated systemic regulatory markers. The absence of adrenals resulted in augmented tolerogenic lamina propria dendritic cells but no compensatory local production of corticosterone and decreased mucosal inflammation associated with increased IFN-γ and FasL in the intestine. To clarify the importance of GC in this scenario, GC replacement in adrenalectomized mice restored different markers to the same degree of that observed in DSS group. Finally, this is the first time that adrenal-derived hormones, especially GC, were associated with the differential local modulation of the gut infiltrate, also pointing to a relationship between adrenalectomy and the modulation of systemic regulatory markers. These findings may elucidate some neuroimmunoendocrine mechanisms that dictate colitis outcome. PMID:27403034

  20. Role of calcium in effects of atrial natriuretic peptide on aldosterone production in adrenal glomerulosa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chartier, L.; Schiffrin, E.L.

    1987-04-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) inhibits the stimulation of aldosterone secretion by isolated adrenal glomerulosa cells produced by angiotensin II (ANG II), ACTH, and potassium. The effect of ANP on the dose-response curve of aldosterone stimulated by ANG II, ACTH, and potassium on isolated rat adrenal glomerulosa cells was studied. In the presence of ANP the maximal response of aldosterone output stimulated by ANG II or potassium decreased and the half-maximum (EC/sub 50/) of the response to ACTH was displaced to the right. Because these effects resemble those of calcium-channel blockers, the authors investigated the effect of different concentrations of nifedipine, a dihydropyridine calcium-channel blocker, on the dose-response curve of aldosterone stimulated by ANG II, ACTH, and potassium. Nifedipine produced effects similar to ANP. The maximal response of aldosterone stimulated by ANG II and potassium was decreased and the dose-response curve to ACTH was displaced to the right. ANP decreased the maximal response of aldosterone to the dihydropyridine derivative BAY K8644, a calcium-channel activator, without change in its EC/sub 50/. In contrast, nifedipine displaced the dose-response curve to BAY K8644 to the right as expected of a competitive inhibitor. The effect of ANP and nifedipine on basal and stimulated /sup 45/Ca influx into isolated rat adrenal glomerulosa cells was studied. ANP may act on the rat adrenal glomerulosa cells at least in part by interference with calcium entry.

  1. Transcriptional up-regulation of the human androgen receptor by androgen in bone cells.

    PubMed

    Wiren, K M; Zhang, X; Chang, C; Keenan, E; Orwoll, E S

    1997-06-01

    Androgen regulation of androgen receptor (AR) expression has been observed in a variety of tissues, generally as inhibition, and is thought to attenuate cellular responses to androgen. AR is expressed in osteoblasts, the bone-forming cell, suggesting direct actions of androgens on bone. Here we characterized the effect of androgen exposure on AR gene expression in human osteoblastic SaOS-2 and U-2 OS cells. Treatment of osteoblastic cells with the nonaromatizable androgen 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone increased AR steady state messenger RNA levels in a time- and dose-dependent fashion. Reporter assays with 2.3 kilobases of the proximal 5'-flanking region of the human AR promoter linked to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene in transfected cultures showed that up-regulation of AR promoter activity by androgen was time and dose dependent. Treatment with other steroid hormones, including progesterone, 17beta-estradiol, and dexamethasone, was without effect. The antiandrogen hydroxyflutamide completely antagonized androgen up-regulation. Thus, in contrast to many other androgen target tissues, androgen exposure increases steady state AR messenger RNA levels in osteoblasts. This regulation occurs at least partially at the level of transcription, is mediated by the 5'-promoter region of the AR gene, and is dependent on functional AR. These results suggest that physiological concentrations of androgens have significant effects on AR expression in skeletal tissue. PMID:9165014

  2. The Role of Androgen and Androgen Receptor in the Skin-Related Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Jiann-Jyh; Chang, Philip; Lai, Kuo-Pao; Chen, Lumin; Chang, Chawnshang

    2013-01-01

    Androgen and androgen receptor (AR) may play important roles in several skin related diseases, such as androgenetic alopecia and acne vulgaris. Current treatments for these androgen/AR-involved diseases, which target the synthesis of androgens or prevent its binding to AR, can cause significant adverse side effects. Based on the recent studies using AR knockout mice, it has been suggested that AR and androgens play distinct roles in the skin pathogenesis, and AR seems to be a better target than androgens for the treatment of these skin diseases. Here we review recent studies of androgen/AR roles in several skin-related disorders, including acne vulgaris, androgenetic alopecia, and hirsutism, as well as cutaneous wound healing. PMID:22829074

  3. The effect of adrenal medullectomy on metabolic responses to chronic intermittent hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Shin, Mi-Kyung; Han, Woobum; Bevans-Fonti, Shannon; Jun, Jonathan C; Punjabi, Naresh M; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y

    2014-11-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea causes intermittent hypoxia (IH) and is associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. IH increases plasma catecholamine levels, which may increase insulin resistance and suppress insulin secretion. The objective of this study was to determine if adrenal medullectomy (MED) prevents metabolic dysfunction in IH. MED or sham surgery was performed in 60 male C57BL/6J mice, which were then exposed to IH or control conditions (intermittent air) for 6 weeks. IH increased plasma epinephrine and norepinephrine levels, increased fasting blood glucose and lowered basal and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. MED decreased baseline epinephrine and prevented the IH induced increase in epinephrine, whereas the norepinephrine response remained intact. MED improved glucose tolerance in mice exposed to IH, attenuated the impairment in basal and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, but did not prevent IH-induced fasting hyperglycemia or insulin resistance. We conclude that the epinephrine release from the adrenal medulla during IH suppresses insulin secretion causing hyperglycemia. PMID:25179887

  4. Exercise and Serum Androgens in Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westerlind, Kim C.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    This study examining the effect of a 10-week hydraulic resistance exercise program on serum androgen levels, strength, and lean body weight in 18 college women revealed that training did not result in significant increases in androgen hormones, although there were significant gains in strength. (Author/CB)

  5. Tetrodotoxin-insensitive Na+ channel activator palytoxin inhibits tyrosine uptake into cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, K.; Teraoka, K.; Azuma, M.; Oka, M.; Hamano, S. )

    1991-07-01

    The effects of the tetrodotoxin-insensitive Na+ channel activator palytoxin on both the secretion of endogenous catecholamines and the formation of 14C-catecholamines from (14C)tyrosine were examined using cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells. Palytoxin was shown to cause the stimulation of catecholamine secretion in a concentration-dependent manner. However, this toxin caused the reduction rather than the stimulation of 14C-catecholamine formation at the same concentrations. Palytoxin failed to cause any alteration in the activity of tyrosine hydroxylase prepared from bovine adrenal medulla. Furthermore, the uptake of (14C)tyrosine into the cells was shown to be inhibited by this toxin under the conditions in which the suppression of 14C-catecholamine formation was observed, and this inhibitory action on tyrosine uptake was closely correlated with that on catecholamine formation. The inhibitory action of palytoxin on tyrosine uptake into the cells was observed to be noncompetitive, and this effect was not altered by the removal of Na+ from the incubation mixture. These results suggest that palytoxin may be able to inhibit the uptake of (14C)tyrosine into the cells, resulting in the suppression of 14C-catecholamine formation, probably through its direct action on the plasma membranes of bovine adrenal chromaffin cells.

  6. Failure to visualize adrenal glands in a patient with bilateral adrenal hyperplasia. [/sup 131/I

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, L.; Mayfield, R.K.; Levine, J.H.; Lopes-Virella, M.F.; Sagel, J.; Buse, M.G.

    1980-01-01

    A patient with clinical and biochemical evidence of Cushing's disease and severe hyperlipidemia underwent an adrenal imaging procedure with NP-59 (6..beta..-(/sup 131/I)iodomethyl-19-norcholesterol), without visualization of either gland. Correction of the hyperlipidemia followed by repeated adrenal imaging resulted in bilateral visualization. A pituitary tumor was removed at surgery, confirming the diagnosis of Cushing's disease.

  7. Androgen receptor gene mutation, rearrangement, polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Eisermann, Kurtis; Wang, Dan; Jing, Yifeng; Pascal, Laura E; Wang, Zhou

    2013-09-01

    Genetic aberrations of the androgen receptor (AR) caused by mutations, rearrangements, and polymorphisms result in a mutant receptor that has varied functions compared to wild type AR. To date, over 1,000 mutations have been reported in the AR with most of these being associated with androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS). While mutations of AR associated with prostate cancer occur less often in early stage localized disease, mutations in castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) patients treated with anti-androgens occur more frequently with 10-30% of these patients having some form of mutation in the AR. Resistance to anti-androgen therapy usually results from gain-of-function mutations in the LBD such as is seen with bicalutamide and more recently with enzalutamide (MDV3100). Thus, it is crucial to investigate these new AR mutations arising from drug resistance to anti-androgens and other small molecule pharmacological agents.

  8. [Adrenal insufficiency in cirrhotic patients].

    PubMed

    Orozco, Federico; Anders, María; Mella, José; Antinucci, Florencia; Pagano, Patricia; Esteban, Paula; Cartier, Mariano; Romero, Gustavo; Francini, Bettina; Mastai, Ricardo

    2016-01-01

    Relative adrenal insufficiency (RAI) is a common finding in cirrhotic patients with severe sepsis, and increased mortality. Its significance is unknown in stable conditions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of RAI in stable cirrhotic patients at different stages of the disease. Also, the impact of RAI on the survival was evaluated and basal cortisol levels between plasma and saliva was correlated in control subjects and cirrhotic patients. Forty seven ambulatory patients and 16 control subjects were studied. RAI was defined as a serum cortisol increase of less than 9 υg/dl from baseline after the stimulation with 250 mg of synthetic ACTH. Twenty two had Child-Pugh = 8 and 25 = 9. The prevalence of RAI in patients with stable cirrhosis was 22%. A higher incidence of RAI was observed in patients with a Child-Pugh = 9 (8/32) than in those with = 8 (3/13, p < 0.05). A correlation between salivary cortisol and basal plasma cortisol (r = 0.6, p < 0.0004) was observed. Finally, survival at 1 year (97%) and 3 years (91%) was significantly higher without RAI than those who developed this complication (79% and 51%, p < 0.05, respectively). In summary, the prevalence of RAI is frequent in patients with stable cirrhosis and that it is related to the severity of liver diseaseand increased mortality. PMID:27576278

  9. Primary Bilateral Non-Hodgkin's Lymphoma of the Adrenal Gland Presenting as Incidental Adrenal Masses

    PubMed Central

    Rizzo, Christopher; Camilleri, David James; Gatt, Andre'

    2015-01-01

    Although lymphoma may occasionally involve the adrenal glands as part of a generalized disease process, primary adrenal lymphoma (PAL) is a rare disease. We present a case of a 62-year-old woman with a history of mild/moderate hereditary spherocytosis with a well-compensated baseline haemoglobin, who presented with rapidly progressive symptomatic anaemia. During the diagnostic workup, imaging revealed bilateral large adrenal masses and she was later diagnosed with diffuse large B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (DLBCL), with the adrenal glands being the dominant site of the disease. The patient was started on systemic chemotherapy, but her disease progressed with neurological involvement which responded to second-line therapy. Her adrenal disease however was refractory to further therapy. PMID:26681947

  10. Interrelationship between excessive levels of circulating androgens in blood and ovulatory failure.

    PubMed

    Parker, C R; Mahesh, V B

    1976-08-01

    The association of excessive circulating androgens in blood and ovulatory failure in women is well documented in a variety of clinical conditions. The restoration of ovulatory function by wedge resection of the polycystic ovary, by the administration of glucocorticoids or removal of tumors of the adrenal or ovary--measures that also reduce the level of circulating androgens--is also well documented. In view of the many hypotheses of adrenal and ovarian abnormalities and disorders of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis in the human, resulting in hirsutism and ovulatory failure, a normal intact rat model was developed to study the effect of androgens on ovulation. The administration of a weak androgen, dehydroepiandrosterone (DHA), to immature rats resulted in a single precocious ovulation followed by ovulatory failure. The conversion of DHA to estrogens appeared to be the principle mechanism for the precocious ovulation. The steps appeared to be an elevation in blood estradiol, followed by the depletion of cytoplasmic estradiol receptors of the hypothalamus and pituitary and the gonadotropin surge leading to ovulation. These events appeared to be similar to those occuring in the adult cycling rat, in precocious puberty induced by the administration of pregnant mare serum gonadotropins and during the onset of natural puberty. The role of estrogens in inducing the precocious ovulation was further supported by the absence of precocious ovulation in animals in which the conversion of DHA to estrogens was blocked or by administering androgens that could not be converted to estrogens. In contrast, the subsequent ovulatory failure could not be explained entirely by the conversion of DHA to estrogens. There was a considerable time lag between the withdrawal of DHA treatment and the replenishment of pituitary and hypothalamic cytoplasmic estradiol receptors. Unlike those of the cycling animal, the receptors were not replenished when the levels of circulating estradiol in blood

  11. Androgen Deficiency Exacerbates High-Fat Diet-Induced Metabolic Alterations in Male Mice.

    PubMed

    Dubois, Vanessa; Laurent, Michaël R; Jardi, Ferran; Antonio, Leen; Lemaire, Katleen; Goyvaerts, Lotte; Deldicque, Louise; Carmeliet, Geert; Decallonne, Brigitte; Vanderschueren, Dirk; Claessens, Frank

    2016-02-01

    Androgen deficiency is associated with obesity, metabolic syndrome, and type 2 diabetes mellitus in men, but the mechanisms behind these associations remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the combined effects of androgen deficiency and high-fat diet (HFD) on body composition and glucose homeostasis in C57BL/6J male mice. Two models of androgen deficiency were used: orchidectomy (ORX) and androgen receptor knockout mice. Both models displayed higher adiposity and serum leptin levels upon HFD, whereas no differences were seen on a regular diet. Fat accumulation in HFD ORX animals was accompanied by increased sedentary behavior and occurred in spite of reduced food intake. HFD ORX mice showed white adipocyte hypertrophy, correlated with decreased mitochondrial content but not function as well as increased lipogenesis and decreased lipolysis suggested by the up-regulation of fatty acid synthase and the down-regulation of hormone-sensitive lipase. Both ORX and androgen receptor knockout exacerbated HFD-induced glucose intolerance by impairing insulin action in liver and skeletal muscle, as evidenced by the increased triglyceride and decreased glycogen content in these tissues. In addition, serum IL-1β levels were elevated, and pancreatic insulin secretion was impaired after ORX. Testosterone but not dihydrotestosterone supplementation restored the castration effects on body composition and glucose homeostasis. We conclude that sex steroid deficiency in combination with HFD exacerbates adiposity, insulin resistance, and β-cell failure in 2 preclinical male mouse models. Our findings stress the importance of a healthy diet in a clinical context of androgen deficiency and may have implications for the prevention of metabolic alterations in hypogonadal men.

  12. Diagnosis of adrenal tumors with radionuclide imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Beierwaltes, W.H.; Sisson, J.C.; Shapiro, B.

    1984-01-01

    The development of radiolabeled cholesterols in 1969 as precursors of adrenocortical steroid production allowed the first noninvasive imaging of the adrenal cortices. FDA-NDA approval in 1984 should allow routine use of these agents in most hospitals. NP-59 is most commonly used in the diagnosis and management of Cushing syndrome; the second most common use is in the diagnosis of primary aldosteronism. It is also helpful in the differential diagnosis of adrenal and ovarian hyperandrogenism and hirsutism, and is the only noninvasive method of detecting unilateral adrenocortical hypofunction. The newest and most popular use is in the differential diagnosis of asymptomatic masses in the region of the adrenal gland discovered incidentally with CT scan (incidentalomas). In this situation, the NP-59 scan can define whether the tumor is in the adrenal gland and if it is functional or nonfunctional. The authors believe that, in the future, radiolabeled enzyme inhibitors might offer better diagnostic imaging of the adrenal cortex, although these agents will probably not be available for routine use for some time. The development of a radioiodinated guanethidine analog, /sup 131/I-MIBG, has allowed differentiation of normal adrenal medullary function from bilateral adrenal medullary hyperplasia before the development of hypertension or tachycardia, diagnostic increases in plasma or urinary catecholamines, or abnormal CT scans. The search for a pheochromocytoma should begin with /sup 131/I-MIBG scintigraphy. While over 90% of primary pheochromocytomas occur in the abdomen, neither a survey of the abdomen nor the finding of a single tumor should conclude the search.

  13. [The imaging diagnosis of adrenal tumors].

    PubMed

    Cózar Olmo, J M; Martínez-Piñeiro, J A; García-Matres, M J; Hervás, C M; Cárcamo, P; Martínez-Piñeiro, L; Avellana, J A; de la Peña, J

    1992-05-01

    From 1967 to 1991 we have diagnosed and treated 73 adrenal tumors in 63 patients: 12 pheochromocytomas, 24 adrenal cortical adenomas, 15 hyperplasias, 16 carcinomas, 3 myelolipomas, 2 cysts and 1 neuroblastoma. We conducted a retrospective study to analyze the preoperative images obtained by different diagnostic techniques and attempted to correlate tumor size and site with the results of the histological analysis of the surgical specimen. Nephrotomography with pneumoretroperitoneum and IV Nephrotomography were useful in detecting the increase of the size of the gland in 10 of 25 cases submitted to these procedures (40%). Arteriography as second or third technique of choice confirmed the presence of an adrenal tumor in 15 of the 21 cases evaluated by this procedure (70%). US and CT detected 94% (31/33) and 100% (33/33) of the cases, respectively. Fourteen cases were incidentally discovered by CT (7) and US (7). A direct relationship between tumor size and degree of malignancy could be established since the carcinomas had a mean diameter of 7 cm (range 5 to 12 cm). Concerning the histologic nature of the disease, specific images were found in 3 cases of adrenal myelolipoma (hyperechoic on US and of low density similar to fat on CT) and 2 cysts (anechoic with posterior band evidenced on us and liquid on CT). Radioisotopes were also utilized for tumor localization and there was positive uptake of I-131-IMBG in 2 cases of adrenal pheochromocytoma; 1 extra-adrenal (left lateral aortic paraganglioma) and 1 case of malignant adrenal pheochromocytoma with metastasis to the lungs.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  14. In Vitro Androgen Bioassays as a Detection Method for Designer Androgens

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Elliot R.; McGrath, Kristine C. Y.; Heather, Alison K.

    2013-01-01

    Androgens are the class of sex steroids responsible for male sexual characteristics, including increased muscle mass and decreased fat mass. Illicit use of androgen doping can be an attractive option for those looking to enhance sporting performance and/or physical appearance. The use of in vitro bioassays to detect androgens, especially designer or proandrogens, is becoming increasingly important in combating androgen doping associated with nutritional supplements. The nutritional sports supplement market has grown rapidly throughout the past decade. Many of these supplements contain androgens, designer androgens or proandrogens. Many designer or proandrogens cannot be detected by the standard highly-sensitive screening methods such as gas chromatography-mass spectrometry because their chemical structure is unknown. However, in vitro androgen bioassays can detect designer and proandrogens as these assays are not reliant on knowing the chemical structure but instead are based on androgen receptor activation. For these reasons, it may be advantageous to use routine androgen bioassay screening of nutraceutical samples to help curb the increasing problem of androgen doping. PMID:23389345

  15. Aldo Keto Reductase 1B7 and Prostaglandin F2α Are Regulators of Adrenal Endocrine Functions

    PubMed Central

    Lambert-Langlais, Sarah; Volat, Fanny; Manin, Michèle; Coudoré, François; Val, Pierre; Sahut-Barnola, Isabelle; Ragazzon, Bruno; Louiset, Estelle; Delarue, Catherine; Lefebvre, Hervé; Urade, Yoshihiro; Martinez, Antoine

    2009-01-01

    Prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α), represses ovarian steroidogenesis and initiates parturition in mammals but its impact on adrenal gland is unknown. Prostaglandins biosynthesis depends on the sequential action of upstream cyclooxygenases (COX) and terminal synthases but no PGF2α synthases (PGFS) were functionally identified in mammalian cells. In vitro, the most efficient mammalian PGFS belong to aldo-keto reductase 1B (AKR1B) family. The adrenal gland is a major site of AKR1B expression in both human (AKR1B1) and mouse (AKR1B3, AKR1B7). Thus, we examined the PGF2α biosynthetic pathway and its functional impact on both cortical and medullary zones. Both compartments produced PGF2α but expressed different biosynthetic isozymes. In chromaffin cells, PGF2α secretion appeared constitutive and correlated to continuous expression of COX1 and AKR1B3. In steroidogenic cells, PGF2α secretion was stimulated by adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) and correlated to ACTH-responsiveness of both COX2 and AKR1B7/B1. The pivotal role of AKR1B7 in ACTH-induced PGF2α release and functional coupling with COX2 was demonstrated using over- and down-expression in cell lines. PGF2α receptor was only detected in chromaffin cells, making medulla the primary target of PGF2α action. By comparing PGF2α-responsiveness of isolated cells and whole adrenal cultures, we demonstrated that PGF2α repressed glucocorticoid secretion by an indirect mechanism involving a decrease in catecholamine release which in turn decreased adrenal steroidogenesis. PGF2α may be regarded as a negative autocrine/paracrine regulator within a novel intra-adrenal feedback loop. The coordinated cell-specific regulation of COX2 and AKR1B7 ensures the generation of this stress-induced corticostatic signal. PMID:19809495

  16. The organochlorine o,p'-DDD disrupts the adrenal steroidogenic signaling pathway in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss).

    PubMed

    Lacroix, Martin; Hontela, Alice

    2003-08-01

    The mechanisms of action of o,p'-DDD on adrenal steroidogenesis were investigated in vitro in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). Acute exposures to o,p'-DDD inhibited ACTH-stimulated cortisol secretion while cell viability decreased significantly only at the highest concentration tested (200 microM o,p'-DDD). Stimulation of cortisol secretion with a cAMP analogue (dibutyryl-cAMP) was inhibited at a higher concentration than that needed to inhibit ACTH-stimulated cortisol synthesis in cells exposed to o,p'-DDD. Forskolin-stimulated cortisol secretion and cAMP production, and NaF-stimulated cAMP production were inhibited in a concentration-dependent manner by o,p'-DDD. In contrast, basal cortisol secretion was stimulated while basal cAMP production was unaffected by o,p'-DDD. Pregnenolone-stimulated cortisol secretion was enhanced by o,p'-DDD at a physiologically relevant pregnenolone concentration, while o,p'-DDD inhibited cortisol secretion when a pharmacological concentration of pregnenolone was used. Our results suggest that the cAMP generation step is a target in o,p'-DDD-mediated disruption of ACTH-stimulated adrenal steroidogenesis in rainbow trout but that other downstream targets such as steroidogenic enzymes responsible for cortisol synthesis might also be affected.

  17. Ageing changes the cellular basis of the "fight-or-flight" response in human adrenal chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Elhamdani, Abdeladim; Palfrey, Clive H; Artalejo, Cristina R

    2002-01-01

    Stress-induced increases in plasma epinephrine in man have been reported to decrease with age. To investigate the possible cellular basis for this decline we determined the characteristics of calcium currents and their relationship to catecholamine secretion in isolated human adrenal chromaffin (AC) cells. Cells derived from young individuals displayed prominent prepulse facilitation of L-type Ca channels but this property was absent in cells from older subjects. Robust quantal secretion in young cells as determined by amperometry was strongly coupled to the activation of these channels with an average delay of only approximately 3 msec. N- and P-type Ca channels also contributed to secretion but were more weakly coupled to catecholamine release sites. Cells from older subjects secreted much less efficiently and showed only weak coupling between Ca channels and secretion. These studies suggest that the magnitude and timing of adrenal secretion changes with age and that the facilitation Ca channel is key to rapid activation of the fight-or-flight response in young individuals.

  18. Theaflavin-3,3'-digallate and penta-O-galloyl-beta-D-glucose inhibit rat liver microsomal 5alpha-reductase activity and the expression of androgen receptor in LNCaP prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hung-Hsiao; Ho, Chi-Tang; Lin, Jen-Kun

    2004-07-01

    Androgens play a critical role in regulating the growth, differentiation and survival of epithelial cells in many androgen-responsive organs, such as prostate and skin. The enzyme steroid 5alpha-reductase (EC 1.3.99.5) catalyzes the conversion of testosterone (T) to a more active androgen, dihydrotestosterone (DHT). DHT then binds to androgen receptors (AR) and functions in the nucleus to regulate specific gene expression. Androgens via their cognate receptor may be involved in the development and progression of benign prostate hyperplasia, prostate cancer, hirsutism, male pattern alopecia and acne. The aim of this study was to determine whether theaflavin-3,3'-digallate (TF3) and penta-O-galloyl-beta-D-glucose (5GG) have inhibitory effects on androgen production and action. We found that TF3 and 5GG inhibit rat liver microsomal 5alpha-reductase activity. Furthermore, TF3 and 5GG significantly reduced androgen-responsive LNCaP prostate cancer cell growth, suppressed expression of the AR and lowered androgen-induced prostate-specific antigen secretion and fatty acid synthase protein level. In conclusion, our result suggests that TF3 and 5GG might be useful chemoprevention agents for prostate cancer through suppressing the function of androgen and its receptor. PMID:14963012

  19. Infanticide secrets

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Jennieffer A.; Beck, Cheryl T.

    2008-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To explore thoughts of infanticide that did not lead to the act among mothers with postpartum depression. DESIGN A phenomenologic hermeneutic study in which women were invited to share their experiences of having thoughts of infanticide. SETTING Community setting in a large metropolitan city, Brisbane, Australia. PARTICIPANTS Fifteen women who had been diagnosed as clinically depressed with postpartum onset whose babies were 12 months of age or younger. METHOD Audiotaped, in-depth interviews were transcribed verbatim. Thematic analysis commenced immediately after the first interview, and data collection continued until saturation was achieved. A questioning approach that reflected hermeneutics was facilitated by use of journals by the researchers. MAIN FINDINGS Six themes emerged from the data: imagined acts of infanticide, the experience of horror, distorted sense of responsibility, consuming negativity, keeping secrets, and managing the crisis. CONCLUSION Women who experienced nonpsychotic depression preferred not to disclose their thoughts of infanticide to health professionals, including trusted general practitioners or psychiatrists. These women were more likely to mention their suicidal thoughts than their infanticidal thoughts in order to obtain health care. General practitioners and other health professionals should directly ask about whether a woman has been experiencing thoughts of harming herself or her baby, regardless of the reason why she has presented. PMID:19074717

  20. [Acute adrenal insufficiency in the newborn].

    PubMed

    Limal, J-M; Bouhours-Nouet, N; Rouleau, S; Gatelais, F; Coutant, R

    2006-10-01

    Neonatal acute adrenal insufficiency is a rare condition. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia with 21-hydroxylase defect appears to be the most frequent cause, but the neonatal screening has improved its potential severe outcome. The other causes and the various clinical presentations have been exposed, with a special reference to the salt-wasting syndrome. Among them, the severity of X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita (AHC) deserves special attention. Two other causes of adrenal hypoplasia have been recently discovered, i.e. a mutation of the SF-1 gene and the syndrome IMAGe. Adrenal insufficiency secondary to ACTH deficiency is often unrecognised despite the risk of severe seizures and hypoglycaemia with brain damage. Finally, the hormonal diagnostic testing and the main therapeutic approach by corticosteroids have been indicated. The aim of this work is to focus the attention of paediatricians who examine a newborn because the risk of delayed diagnosis and fatal outcome may be limited if the clinical symptoms are soon recognized. PMID:16962294

  1. Thymus and adrenal glands in elder abuse.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takahito; Bunai, Yasuo; Ago, Kazutoshi; Ago, Mihoko; Ogata, Mamoru

    2011-12-01

    Endogenous glucocorticoid-induced thymic involution is generally considered to be an important finding for determining child abuse. The present study investigated the weight of the thymus and the adrenal glands in elder abuse cases to identify a potential marker for elder abuse. There was no significant difference in the thymus and the adrenal weight between elder abuse and control cases. However, the elder abuse cases in which the duration of abuse was less than 3 months showed a significant increase in the adrenal weight in comparison to control cases. In such cases, histopathological findings showed a loss of intracellular light granules from the zona fasciculata, which might indicate a loss of cholesterol due to the overproduction of glucocorticoid. These results might imply that the elderly, who were maltreated for less than 3 months, were in the early phase of a long-term stress state during which stress-induced overproduction of glucocorticoid was observed in adrenal glands as indicated by Selye. Our results suggest that an increase in adrenal weight may be a potential marker for elder abuse of relatively short periods, especially less than a few months.

  2. Adrenal insufficiency in patients with decompensated cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Karagiannis, Apostolos KA; Nakouti, Theodora; Pipili, Chrysoula; Cholongitas, Evangelos

    2015-01-01

    Adrenal reserve depletion and overstimulation of the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis are causes for adrenal insufficiency (AI) in critically ill individuals. Cirrhosis is a predisposing condition for AI in cirrhotics as well. Both stable cirrhotics and liver transplant patients (early and later after transplantation) have been reported to present AI. The mechanisms leading to reduced cortisol production in cirrhotics are the combination of low cholesterol levels (the primary source of cortisol), the increased cytokines production that overstimulate and exhaust HPA axis and the destruction of adrenal glands due to coagulopathy. AI has been recorded in 10%-82% cirrhotics depending on the test used to evaluate adrenal function and in 9%-83% stable cirrhotics. The similarity of those proportions support the assumption that AI is an endogenous characteristic of liver disease. However, the lack of a gold standard method for AI assessment and the limitation of precise thresholds in cirrhotics make difficult the recording of the real prevalence of AI. This review aims to summarize the present data over AI in stable, critically ill cirrhotics and liver transplant recipients. Moreover, it provides information about the current knowledge in the used diagnostic tools and the possible effectiveness of corticosteroids administration in critically ill cirrhotics with AI. PMID:26052400

  3. The aging male: androgens, erectile dysfunction, and depression.

    PubMed

    Seidman, Stuart N

    2003-01-01

    In contrast to women, men do not experience a sudden cessation of gonadal function comparable to menopause. However, there is a progressive reduction in hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis activity in aging men: testosterone levels decline and there is a loss of the circadian rhythm of testosterone secretion. Such progressive HPG-axis hypofunctioning is thought to be responsible for some signs and symptoms that are common in elderly men such as fatigue, reduced muscle and bone mass, sexual dysfunction, and depression. Yet, such presumed hypogonadal sequelae have not been correlated with testosterone levels. Unlike the profound effects of replacement therapy in young men with frank hypogonadism, testosterone replacement in men with age-related mild hypogonadism is not apparently effective in reversing these symptoms. This article reviews the relationship between androgens, sexual function, and depression in aging men.

  4. Adrenal Steroidogenesis after B Lymphocyte Depletion Therapy in New-Onset Addison's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mitchell, Anna L.; Bennett, Stuart; King, Phil; Chandran, Sukesh; Nag, Sath; Chen, Shu; Smith, Bernard Rees; Isaacs, John D.; Vaidya, Bijay

    2012-01-01

    Context: A diagnosis of Addison's disease means lifelong dependence on daily glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid therapy and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality as well as a risk of unexpected adrenal crisis. Objective: The objective of the study was to determine whether immunomodulatory therapy at an early stage of autoimmune Addison's disease could lead to preservation or improvement in adrenal steroidogenesis. Design and Intervention: This was an open-label, pilot study of B lymphocyte depletion therapy in new-onset idiopathic primary adrenal failure. Doses of iv rituximab (1 g) were given on d 1 and 15, after pretreatment with 125 mg iv methylprednisolone. Patients and Main Outcome Measures: Six patients (aged 17–47 yr; four females) were treated within 4 wk of the first diagnosis of idiopathic primary adrenal failure. Dynamic testing of adrenal function was performed every 3 months for at least 12 months. Results: Serum cortisol levels declined rapidly and were less than 100 nmol/liter (3.6 μg/dl) in all patients by 3 months after B lymphocyte depletion. Serum cortisol and aldosterone concentrations remained low in five of the six patients throughout the follow-up period. However, a single patient had sustained improvement in both serum cortisol [peak 434 nmol/liter (15.7 μg/dl)] and aldosterone [peak 434 pmol/liter (15.7 ng/dl)] secretion. This patient was able to discontinue steroid medications 15 months after therapy and remains well, with improving serum cortisol levels 27 months after therapy. Conclusion: New-onset autoimmune Addison's disease should be considered as a potentially reversible condition in some patients. Future studies of immunomodulation in autoimmune Addison's disease may be warranted. PMID:22767640

  5. Differential expression and function of beacon in the rat adrenal cortex and medulla.

    PubMed

    Rucinski, Marcin; Andreis, Paola G; Ziolkowska, Agnieszka; Nussdorfer, Gastone G; Malendowicz, Ludwik K

    2005-07-01

    Beacon gene is overexpressed in obese rats, and beacon was found to stimulate food intake. Evidence has been recently provided that beacon is also expressed in the endocrine glands of normal rats, including adrenal cortex, of which it appears to regulate secretory activity. To further characterize the role of beacon in the rat adrenals, we investigated the level of beacon expression in the adrenal zona glomerulosa (ZG), zona fasciculata-reticularis (ZF/R) and medulla (AM), and the in vitro secretory responses to beacon[47-73] (hereinafter, beacon) of adrenocortical and adrenomedullary tissues. Real-time polymerase chain reaction revealed similar high levels of beacon mRNA in the ZG and ZF/R, and significantly lower (-80%) levels in AM. Immunocytochemistry showed that the distribution of beacon protein followed that of beacon mRNA. Quantitative high pressure liquid chromatography demonstrated that beacon (5x10(-7) M) reduced by about 56% the in vitro total steroid-hormone production from ZG and ZF/R tissues, without affecting catecholamine secretion from AM specimens. The beacon-induced lowering in the secretory activity of adrenal cortex depended on similar reductions (from 50-64%) in the production of the main adrenocortical hormones (pregnenolone, progesterone, 11-deoxycorticosterone, corticosterone, 18-hydroxy-corticosterone and aldosterone), thereby suggesting an inhibitory action of beacon in the early step of steroidogenesis (i.e. the conversion of cholesterol to pregnenolone). The hypothesis is advanced that beacon is to be considered an autocrine-paracrine negative regulator of mineralo- and glucocorticoid synthesis in the rat adrenal gland.

  6. Structural characteristics of anabolic androgenic steroids contributing to binding to the androgen receptor and to their anabolic and androgenic activities. Applied modifications in the steroidal structure.

    PubMed

    Fragkaki, A G; Angelis, Y S; Koupparis, M; Tsantili-Kakoulidou, A; Kokotos, G; Georgakopoulos, C

    2009-02-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are synthetic derivatives of testosterone introduced for therapeutic purposes providing enhanced anabolic potency with reduced androgenic effects. Androgens mediate their action through their binding to the androgen receptor (AR) which is mainly expressed in androgen target tissues, such as the prostate, skeletal muscle, liver and central nervous system. This paper reviews some of the wide spectrum of testosterone and synthetic AAS structure modifications related to the intended enhancement in anabolic activity. The structural features of steroids necessary for effective binding to the AR and those which contribute to the stipulation of the androgenic and anabolic activities are also presented.

  7. Mechanisms of Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Saraon, Punit; Drabovich, Andrei P.; Jarvi, Keith A.; Diamandis, Eleftherios P.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths among men in North America. Almost all prostate cancers begin in an androgen-dependent state, so androgen deprivation therapy is administered and results in improved clinical outcomes. However, over time, some cancerous cells are able to survive and grow during this treatment, resulting in androgen-independent prostate cancer. At this point, the disease is fatal, as there are no effective targeted therapies available. Most prostate cancer tumors require androgen receptor (AR) signalling for survival. During the progression to androgen-independence, this signalling cascade has been found to be altered at many levels within prostate cancers. Mechanisms that enhance AR signalling during androgen deprivation include: AR gene amplifications, AR gene mutations, changes in expression of AR co-regulatory proteins, changes in expression of steroid-generating enzymes, ligand-independent activation of AR via ‘outlaw’ pathways, and AR-independent pathways that become activated, termed ‘bypass’ pathways. One or more of these aforementioned changes can lead to prostate cancer cells to gain androgen-independent properties. Understanding the molecular alterations that occur during this process will allow for improved therapeutic strategies to target key molecules and pathways important for this progression. PMID:27683456

  8. Biochemical and physiological aspects of endogenous androgens.

    PubMed

    Kicman, Andrew T

    2010-01-01

    This review attempts to give a synopsis of the major aspects concerning the biochemistry of endogenous androgens, supplemented with several facets of physiology, particularly with respect to testosterone. Testosterone continues to be the most common adverse finding declared by World Anti-Doping Agency accredited laboratories, such samples having an augmented testosterone to epitestosterone ratio. Knowledge regarding the precursors and metabolism of endogenous testosterone is therefore fundamental to understanding many of the issues concerning doping with testosterone and its prohormones, including the detection of their administration. Further, adverse findings for nandrolone are frequent, but this steroid and 19-norandrostenedione are also produced endogenously, an appealing hypothesis being that they are minor by-products of the aromatization of androgens. At sports tribunals pertaining to adverse analytical findings of natural androgen administration, experts often raise issues that concern some aspect of steroid biochemistry and physiology. Salient topics included within this review are the origins and interconversion of endogenous androgens, the biosynthesis of testosterone and epitestosterone, the mechanism of aromatization, the molecular biology of the androgen receptor, the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis, disturbances to this axis by anabolic steroid administration, the transport (binding) of androgens in blood, and briefly the metabolism and excretion of androgens.

  9. Mechanisms of Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Saraon, Punit; Drabovich, Andrei P.; Jarvi, Keith A.; Diamandis, Eleftherios P.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths among men in North America. Almost all prostate cancers begin in an androgen-dependent state, so androgen deprivation therapy is administered and results in improved clinical outcomes. However, over time, some cancerous cells are able to survive and grow during this treatment, resulting in androgen-independent prostate cancer. At this point, the disease is fatal, as there are no effective targeted therapies available. Most prostate cancer tumors require androgen receptor (AR) signalling for survival. During the progression to androgen-independence, this signalling cascade has been found to be altered at many levels within prostate cancers. Mechanisms that enhance AR signalling during androgen deprivation include: AR gene amplifications, AR gene mutations, changes in expression of AR co-regulatory proteins, changes in expression of steroid-generating enzymes, ligand-independent activation of AR via ‘outlaw’ pathways, and AR-independent pathways that become activated, termed ‘bypass’ pathways. One or more of these aforementioned changes can lead to prostate cancer cells to gain androgen-independent properties. Understanding the molecular alterations that occur during this process will allow for improved therapeutic strategies to target key molecules and pathways important for this progression.

  10. Immediate postnatal rise in whole body androgen content in male rats: correlation with increased testicular content and reduced body clearance of testosterone.

    PubMed

    Baum, M J; Brand, T; Ooms, M; Vreeburg, J T; Slob, A K

    1988-06-01

    Whole body content of androgen (testosterone + 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone) was invariably higher in male than in female rat pups killed 1 or 3 h after natural delivery, whereas androgen content was equivalent in males and females killed immediately or 6, 12, and 24 h after birth. Testicular content of androgen was significantly elevated in males killed 1 and 24 h after birth, compared with levels in males killed immediately, or 3, 6, and 12 h after birth. Thus, heightened testicular androgen content was only initially associated with increased systemic levels of androgen in males during the immediate postpartum period. A second study assessed the possibility that the body's clearance (i.e., metabolism plus excretion) of testosterone is lower in newborn rats upon separation from the placental circulation than in slightly older pups. Rats of both sexes killed 1 and 3 h after s.c. injection of [3H] testosterone had significantly higher plasma concentrations of [3H] testosterone as well as several 5 alpha-reduced androgens (5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone, 3 alpha-androstanediol, and androsterone) when injections were given within minutes as opposed to 24 h after birth. This suggests that in both sexes the clearance of testosterone is slower immediately after birth than at later ages. This phenomenon together with a brief postnatal elevation in the testicular synthesis and secretion of testosterone may explain the temporary rise in circulating androgen concentrations that occurs in the newborn male rat.

  11. Selective androgen receptor modulators: in pursuit of tissue-selective androgens.

    PubMed

    Omwancha, Josephat; Brown, Terry R

    2006-10-01

    The androgen receptor mediates the androgenic and anabolic activity of the endogenous steroids testosterone and 5alpha-dihydrotestosterone. Current knowledge of the androgen receptor protein structure, and the molecular mechanisms surrounding the binding properties and activities of agonists and antagonists has led to the design and development of novel nonsteroidal ligands with selected tissue-specific androgen receptor agonist and antagonist activities. The activity of these compounds, termed selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs), is directed toward the maintenance or enhancement of anabolic effects on bone and muscle with minimal androgenic effects on prostate growth. SARMs are of potential therapeutic value in the treatment of male hypogonadism, osteoporosis, frailty and muscle wasting, burn injury and would healing, anemia, mood and depression, benign prostatic hyperplasia and prostate cancer.

  12. Adrenal Lymphangioma Masquerading as a Catecholamine Producing Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Hodish, Israel; Schmidt, Lindsay; Moraitis, Andreas G.

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To report the unusual case of an adrenal lymphangioma presenting in a patient with an adrenal cystic lesion and biochemical testing concerning for pheochromocytoma. The pertinent diagnostic and imaging features of adrenal lymphangiomas are reviewed. Methods. We describe a 59-year-old patient who presented with hyperhidrosis and a 2.2 by 2.2 cm left adrenal nodule. Biochemical evaluation revealed elevated plasma-free normetanephrine, urine normetanephrine, urine vanillylmandelic acid, and urine norepinephrine levels. Elevated plasma norepinephrine levels were not suppressed appropriately with clonidine administration. Results. Given persistent concern for pheochromocytoma, the patient underwent adrenalectomy. The final pathology was consistent with adrenal lymphangioma. Conclusions. Lymphangiomas are benign vascular lesions that can very rarely occur in the adrenal gland. Imaging findings are generally consistent with a cyst but are nonspecific. Excluding malignancy in patients presenting with adrenal cysts can be difficult. Despite its benign nature, the diagnosis of adrenal lymphangioma may ultimately require pathology. PMID:26618011

  13. How Do I Find an Experienced Adrenal Surgeon?

    MedlinePlus

    ... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Adrenal Gland Disorders: Other FAQs Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page ... do I find an experienced adrenal surgeon? Make sure that the surgeon you choose ...

  14. What Are the Treatments for Adrenal Gland Disorders?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Resources and Publications What are the treatments for adrenal gland disorders? Skip sharing on social media links Share ... a variety of surgical and medical treatments for adrenal gland disorders. These include 1 : Surgery to remove tumors ...

  15. [Mantle cell lymphoma markedly infiltrated into adrenal glands with adrenal insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Ryo; Iwakiri, Rika; Tsutsumi, Hisashi; Ohta, Masatsugu; Mori, Mayumi

    2004-07-01

    A 66-year-old male was admitted to our hospital complaining of bilateral hypochondrial pain, back pain and loss of weight in May, 2002. Superficial lymph nodes were not palpable on admission. The leukocyte count was 3430/microl, hemoglobin concentration, 13.0g/dl, and platelet count, 174000/microl. LDH, soluble IL-2 receptor, ACTH and cortisol values were out of the normal range (LDH 1368IU/l, sIL-2R 2630U/ml, ACTH 132pg/ml, cortisol 7.4microg/dl). Abdominal CT scan showed bilateral adrenal masses, and abnormal uptake of Ga-scintigraphy was seen correspondent with the bilateral adrenal masses. The histological diagnosis of bilateral adrenal masses cannot be performed because of the bleeding tendency, but atypical cells were observed in the patient's bone marrow aspirate. Surface marker analysis of atypical cells showed CD5+, cyclin D1+, CD19+, CD20+ and HLA-DR+. From these results we diagnosed this case as a mantle cell lymphoma (stage IV B) markedly infiltrated into the adrenal glands with adrenal insufficiency. The bilateral adrenal masses dramatically reduced in size after CHOP chemotherapy with hydrocortisone supplementation. We report on the present case and summarize the reports of adrenal grand-infiltrating lymphomas. PMID:15359915

  16. Adrenal Hypoplasia Congenita: A Rare Cause of Primary Adrenal Insufficiency and Hypogonadotropic Hypogonadism

    PubMed Central

    Loureiro, Marta; Reis, Filipa; Robalo, Brígida; Pereira, Carla; Sampaio, Lurdes

    2015-01-01

    Primary adrenal insufficiency is defined by the impaired synthesis of adrenocortical hormones due to an intrinsic disease of the adrenal cortex. Determining its etiology is crucial to allow adequate long-term management and genetic counseling. We report the case of a male adolescent that presented in the neonatal period with adrenal crisis and received replacement therapy for primary adrenal insufficiency. During follow-up, adrenal hypoplasia congenita (AHC) was suspected given his persistently raised adrenocorticotropic hormone levels, with markedly low 17-OH progesterone and androstenedione levels. DNA sequence analysis revealed a mutation in NR0B1 gene (c.1292delG), confirming the diagnosis. Delayed puberty and persistent low levels of gonadotropins led to testosterone replacement therapy. X-linked AHC is a rare cause of primary adrenal insufficiency and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism, related to mutations in NR0B1 gene. Despite its rarity, AHC should be considered in patients who present with primary adrenal failure, low levels of 17-OH progesterone and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. PMID:26500747

  17. Critical role of androgen receptor in the postnatal period in male sexual behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Shunji; Ohoya, Miku; Takanami, Keiko; Matsuda, Ken Ichi; Kawata, Mitsuhiro

    2015-11-16

    Gonadal hormones have a developmental role in organization of the nervous system that regulates sexually dimorphic behavior. It is well known that androgen secreted from testes in the perinatal period is converted to estrogen by aromatase in rodent brain, and that estrogen and its receptor play a pivotal role in masculinization of brain structure and function. Treatment with flutamide, an androgen receptor (AR) antagonist, during the perinatal period inhibits development of malespecific brain structure and function, suggesting that androgen signaling via AR also influences brain masculinization. In this study, we investigated which stage during the postnatal period is critical for androgen signaling in brain masculinization. The postnatal period was designated as postnatal days (PD) 0-22, and divided into stages I (PD 0-7), II (PD 8-14), and III (PD 15-22). Newborn male rats were given flutamide subcutaneously in each stage. After adulthood, the effects of postnatal flutamide treatment on brain masculinization were evaluated byanalysis of male sexual behavior. Continuous inhibition of AR throughout stages I and II caused a robust reduction of the intromission ratio and ejaculation frequency compared with other groups. AR inhibition in stage I, II, or III did not cause any change. AR inhibition had no effect onmount behavior. These results show that stage-specific AR activation in the first two postnatal weeks may contribute to brain masculinization mediating male sexual behavior in adulthood.

  18. Critical role of androgen receptor in the postnatal period in male sexual behavior in rats.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Shunji; Ohoya, Miku; Takanami, Keiko; Matsuda, Ken Ichi; Kawata, Mitsuhiro

    2015-11-16

    Gonadal hormones have a developmental role in organization of the nervous system that regulates sexually dimorphic behavior. It is well known that androgen secreted from testes in the perinatal period is converted to estrogen by aromatase in rodent brain, and that estrogen and its receptor play a pivotal role in masculinization of brain structure and function. Treatment with flutamide, an androgen receptor (AR) antagonist, during the perinatal period inhibits development of malespecific brain structure and function, suggesting that androgen signaling via AR also influences brain masculinization. In this study, we investigated which stage during the postnatal period is critical for androgen signaling in brain masculinization. The postnatal period was designated as postnatal days (PD) 0-22, and divided into stages I (PD 0-7), II (PD 8-14), and III (PD 15-22). Newborn male rats were given flutamide subcutaneously in each stage. After adulthood, the effects of postnatal flutamide treatment on brain masculinization were evaluated byanalysis of male sexual behavior. Continuous inhibition of AR throughout stages I and II caused a robust reduction of the intromission ratio and ejaculation frequency compared with other groups. AR inhibition in stage I, II, or III did not cause any change. AR inhibition had no effect onmount behavior. These results show that stage-specific AR activation in the first two postnatal weeks may contribute to brain masculinization mediating male sexual behavior in adulthood. PMID:26493607

  19. Image-Guided Adrenal and Renal Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Karun V.; Venkatesan, Aradhana M.; Swerdlow, Daniel; DaSilva, Daniel; Beck, Avi; Jain, Nidhi; Wood, Bradford J.

    2010-01-01

    Image-guided biopsy is a safe and well-established technique that is familiar to most interventional radiologists (IRs). Improvements in image-guidance, biopsy tools and biopsy techniques now routinely allow for safe biopsy of renal and adrenal lesions which traditionally were considered difficult to reach or technically challenging. Image-guided biopsy is used to establish the definitive tissue diagnosis in adrenal mass lesions that can not be fully characterized with imaging or laboratory tests alone. It is also used to establish definitive diagnosis in some cases of renal parenchymal disease and has an expanding role in diagnosis and characterization of renal masses prior to treatment. Although basic principles and techniques for image-guided needle biopsy are similar regardless of organ, this paper will highlight some technical considerations, indications and complications which are unique to the adrenal gland and kidney because of their anatomic location and physiologic features. PMID:20540919

  20. Imaging of the adrenal gland lesions.

    PubMed

    Herr, Keith; Muglia, Valdair F; Koff, Walter José; Westphalen, Antonio Carlos

    2014-01-01

    With the steep increase in the use of cross-sectional imaging in recent years, the incidentally detected adrenal lesion, or "incidentaloma", has become an increasingly common diagnostic problem for the radiologist, and a need for an approach to classifying these lesions as benign, malignant or indeterminate with imaging has spurred an explosion of research. While most incidentalomas represent benign disease, typically an adenoma, the possibility of malignant involvement of the adrenal gland necessitates a reliance on imaging to inform management decisions. In this article, we review the literature on adrenal gland imaging, with particular emphasis on computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and photon-emission tomography, and discuss how these findings relate to clinical practice. Emerging technologies, such as contrast-enhanced ultrasonography, dual-energy computed tomography, and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging will also be briefly addressed.

  1. Imaging of the adrenal gland lesions*

    PubMed Central

    Herr, Keith; Muglia, Valdair F.; Koff, Walter José; Westphalen, Antonio Carlos

    2014-01-01

    With the steep increase in the use of cross-sectional imaging in recent years, the incidentally detected adrenal lesion, or "incidentaloma", has become an increasingly common diagnostic problem for the radiologist, and a need for an approach to classifying these lesions as benign, malignant or indeterminate with imaging has spurred an explosion of research. While most incidentalomas represent benign disease, typically an adenoma, the possibility of malignant involvement of the adrenal gland necessitates a reliance on imaging to inform management decisions. In this article, we review the literature on adrenal gland imaging, with particular emphasis on computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and photon-emission tomography, and discuss how these findings relate to clinical practice. Emerging technologies, such as contrast-enhanced ultrasonography, dual-energy computed tomography, and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging will also be briefly addressed. PMID:25741090

  2. Gallium-68 PSMA uptake in adrenal adenoma.

    PubMed

    Law, W Phillip; Fiumara, Frank; Fong, William; Miles, Kenneth A

    2016-08-01

    Gallium-68 (Ga-68) labelled prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) imaging by positron emission tomography (PET) has emerged as a promising tool for staging of prostate cancer and restaging of disease in recurrence or biochemical failure after definitive treatment of prostate cancer. Ga-68 PSMA PET produces high target-to-background images of prostate cancer and its metastases which are reflective of the significant overexpression of PSMA in these cells and greatly facilitates tumour detection. However, relatively little is known about the PSMA expression of benign neoplasms and non-prostate epithelial malignancies. This is a case report of PSMA uptake in an adrenal adenoma incidentally discovered on PET performed for restaging of biochemically suspected prostate cancer recurrence. With the increasing use of PSMA PET in the management of prostate cancer - and the not infrequent occurrence of adrenal adenomas - the appearance of low- to moderate-grade PSMA uptake in adrenal adenomas should be one with which reporting clinicians are familiar.

  3. Bilateral adrenal hemorrhage in polycythemia vera.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, Shruti; Agito, Katrina; Krug, Esther I

    2016-01-01

    Bilateral adrenal hemorrhage (BAH) is a rare complication typically seen in critically ill patients, which can lead to acute adrenal insufficiency and death unless it is recognized promptly and treated appropriately. We describe the case of a 64-year-old man with polycythemia vera found to be unresponsive with fever, hypotension, tachycardia, and hypoglycemia. Electrocardiogram showed ST-elevation with elevated troponin, hemoglobin, prothrombin time, and partial thromboplastin time. He required aggressive ventilator and vasopressor support. Despite primary coronary intervention, he remained hypotensive. Random cortisol level was low. He received stress dose hydrocortisone with immediate hemodynamic stability. BAH was highly suspected and was confirmed by non-contrast abdominal computed tomography. Prompt recognition and timely initiated treatment remain crucial to impact the mortality associated with acute adrenal insufficiency. PMID:27609733

  4. Bilateral adrenal hemorrhage in polycythemia vera

    PubMed Central

    Agito, Katrina; Krug, Esther I.

    2016-01-01

    Bilateral adrenal hemorrhage (BAH) is a rare complication typically seen in critically ill patients, which can lead to acute adrenal insufficiency and death unless it is recognized promptly and treated appropriately. We describe the case of a 64-year-old man with polycythemia vera found to be unresponsive with fever, hypotension, tachycardia, and hypoglycemia. Electrocardiogram showed ST-elevation with elevated troponin, hemoglobin, prothrombin time, and partial thromboplastin time. He required aggressive ventilator and vasopressor support. Despite primary coronary intervention, he remained hypotensive. Random cortisol level was low. He received stress dose hydrocortisone with immediate hemodynamic stability. BAH was highly suspected and was confirmed by non-contrast abdominal computed tomography. Prompt recognition and timely initiated treatment remain crucial to impact the mortality associated with acute adrenal insufficiency. PMID:27609733

  5. A very rare bilateral adrenal tumor.

    PubMed

    Toniato, Antonio; Boschin, Isabella Merante; Pelizzo, Maria Rosa

    2014-04-01

    We report a case of very rare adrenal tumor. A 54-year-old patient was classified as affected by bilateral adrenal incidentaloma that surprisingly, on histology resulted solitary fibrous tumors. Solitary fibrous tumor (SFT) is an uncommon mesenchymal neoplasm. Only five cases of localization of SFT in adrenal gland are reported in the literature, while the frequency of retroperitoneum localization is more frequent, about 30 cases. Immunohistochemically, SFT can be positive for CD34 antigen, vimentin, CD99, and bcl-2 and usually negative for cytokeratins, chromogranin A, NSE, neurofilaments, synoptophysin, and S-100. Surgical excision remains the main treatment in fact the recurrence is locoregional and correlated with positive margins due to incomplete excision, while distant metastases are correlated with atypical or malignant features.

  6. Principles and management of adrenal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Javadpour, N.

    1987-01-01

    This book provides information on adrenal diseases of latest developments and guides the clinicians in the care of their patients. The book is divided into two parts. The first section gives an overview of the embryology, anatomy, physiology, markers, pathology, imaging and the current progress in the field. The second edition covers specific diseases of the adrenal cortex and medulla. The increasingly significant roles played by steroids, catecholamines, blockers, computed tomography and magnetic resonance are elucidated and discussed. The contents include: Overview of progress; current problems, and perspectives - embryology anatomy, physiology, and biologic markers; pathology; advances in diagnosis; imaging techniques; adrenal disorders in childhood; primary aldosteronism; Cushing's syndrome; carcinoma; pheochromocytoma; neuroblastoma; metastatic disease; surgical management; and subject index.

  7. Spontaneous Idiopathic Unilateral Adrenal Haemorrhage (SIAH).

    PubMed

    Naqvi, Syed Ali; Zaman, Shamas; Ahmed, Irfan

    2015-04-01

    Spontaneous Idiopathic Adrenal Haemorrhage (SIAH) is an unusual surgical emergency which can present with life threatening massive retroperitoneal bleeding. Most of the cases reported in the literature are associated with use of anticoagulation or underlying adrenal pathology such as tumors or cysts. Since this clinical entity is uncommon and clinical presentation is very indistinct, the diagnosis can be easily missed and can be challenging for the treating physicians. Nevertheless a raised clinical suspicion coupled with advances in radiological imaging have considerably improved the detection of SIAH in recent times. We report an unusual case of a 20 years old healthy female student who presented to our hospital with sudden onset of abdominal pain and shock. She was diagnosed as a case of massive spontaneous idiopathic unilateral adrenal haemorrhage, unaccompanied by any hematologic disorder, trauma or underlying pathology. Although patient was hemodynamically unstable at presentation, she was resuscitated promptly, investigated appropriately, hence recovered uneventfully with conservative management alone.

  8. The androgen receptor gene mutations database.

    PubMed

    Patterson, M N; Hughes, I A; Gottlieb, B; Pinsky, L

    1994-09-01

    The androgen receptor gene mutations database is a comprehensive listing of mutations published in journals and meetings proceedings. The majority of mutations are point mutations identified in patients with androgen insensitivity syndrome. Information is included regarding the phenotype, the nature and location of the mutations, as well as the effects of the mutations on the androgen binding activity of the receptor. The current version of the database contains 149 entries, of which 114 are unique mutations. The database is available from EMBL (NetServ@EMBL-Heidelberg.DE) or as a Macintosh Filemaker file (mc33001@musica.mcgill.ca).

  9. Androgens in pregnancy: roles in parturition

    PubMed Central

    Makieva, Sofia; Saunders, Philippa T.K.; Norman, Jane E.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Understanding the physiology of pregnancy enables effective management of pregnancy complications that could otherwise be life threatening for both mother and fetus. A functional uterus (i) retains the fetus in utero during pregnancy without initiating stretch-induced contractions and (ii) is able to dilate the cervix and contract the myometrium at term to deliver the fetus. The onset of labour is associated with successful cervical remodelling and contraction of myometrium, arising from concomitant activation of uterine immune and endocrine systems. A large body of evidence suggests that actions of local steroid hormones may drive changes occurring in the uterine microenvironment at term. Although there have been a number of studies considering the potential role(s) played by progesterone and estrogen at the time of parturition, the bio-availability and effects of androgens during pregnancy have received less scrutiny. The aim of this review is to highlight potential roles of androgens in the biology of pregnancy and parturition. METHODS A review of published literature was performed to address (i) androgen concentrations, including biosynthesis and clearance, in maternal and fetal compartments throughout gestation, (ii) associations of androgen concentrations with adverse pregnancy outcomes, (iii) the role of androgens in the physiology of cervical remodelling and finally (iv) the role of androgens in the physiology of myometrial function including any impact on contractility. RESULTS Some, but not all, androgens increase throughout gestation in maternal circulation. The effects of this increase are not fully understood; however, evidence suggests that increased androgens might regulate key processes during pregnancy and parturition. For example, androgens are believed to be critical for cervical remodelling at term, in particular cervical ripening, via regulation of cervical collagen fibril organization. Additionally, a number of studies highlight

  10. Androgen-responsive gene database: integrated knowledge on androgen-responsive genes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Mei; Ma, Yunsheng; Chen, Congcong; Fu, Xuping; Yang, Shu; Li, Xia; Yu, Guohua; Mao, Yumin; Xie, Yi; Li, Yao

    2009-11-01

    Androgen signaling plays an important role in many biological processes. Androgen Responsive Gene Database (ARGDB) is devoted to providing integrated knowledge on androgen-controlled genes. Gene records were collected on the basis of PubMed literature collections. More than 6000 abstracts and 950 original publications were manually screened, leading to 1785 human genes, 993 mouse genes, and 583 rat genes finally included in the database. All the collected genes were experimentally proved to be regulated by androgen at the expression level or to contain androgen-responsive regions. For each gene important details of the androgen regulation experiments were collected from references, such as expression change, androgen-responsive sequence, response time, tissue/cell type, experimental method, ligand identity, and androgen amount, which will facilitate further evaluation by researchers. Furthermore, the database was integrated with multiple annotation resources, including National Center for Biotechnology Information, Gene Ontology, and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway, to reveal the biological characteristics and significance of androgen-regulated genes. The ARGDB web site is mainly composed of the Browse, Search, Element Scan, and Submission modules. It is user friendly and freely accessible at http://argdb.fudan.edu.cn. Preliminary analysis of the collected data was performed. Many disease pathways, such as prostate carcinogenesis, were found to be enriched in androgen-regulated genes. The discovered androgen-response motifs were similar to those in previous reports. The analysis results are displayed in the web site. In conclusion, ARGDB provides a unified gateway to storage, retrieval, and update of information on androgen-regulated genes.

  11. Orchidectomy selectively increases follicle-stimulating hormone secretion in gonadotropin-releasing hormone antagonist-treated male rats.

    PubMed

    Tena-Sempere, M; Pinilla, L; Aguilar, E

    1995-03-01

    The pituitary component of the feedback mechanisms exerted by testicular factors on gonadotropin secretion was analyzed in adult male rats treated with a potent gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) antagonist. In order to discriminate between androgens and testicular peptides, groups of males were orchidectomized (to eliminate androgens and non-androgenic testicular factors) or injected with ethylene dimethane sulfonate (EDS), a selective toxin for Leydig cells (to eliminate selectively androgens) and treated for 15 days with vehicle or the GnRH antagonist Ac-D-pClPhe-D-pClPhe-D-Trp-Ser-Tyr-D-Arg-Leu-Arg-Pro-D-Ala-+ ++NH2CH3COOH (Org.30276, 5 mg/kg/72 hours). Serum concentrations of luteinizing hormone (LH) and follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) were measured 7 and 14 days after the beginning of treatment. We found that: in males treated with GnRH antagonist, orchidectomy or EDS treatment did not induce any increase in LH secretion; and orchidectomy, but not EDS treatment, increased FSH secretion in GnRH-treated males. The present results show that negative feedback of testicular factors on LH secretion is mediated completely through changes in GnRH actions. In contrast, a part of the inhibitory action of the testis on FSH secretion is exerted directly at the pituitary level. It can be hypothesized that non-Leydig cell testicular factor(s) inputs at different levels of the hypothalamic-pituitary axis in controlling LH and FSH secretion.

  12. Adrenal glands in patients with cogenital renal anomalies: CT appearance

    SciTech Connect

    Kenney, P.J.; Robbins, G.L.; Ellis, D.A.; Spirt, B.A.

    1985-04-01

    The CT appearance of the adrenal glands was investigated in 30 patients with congenital renal anomalies. The ipsilateral adrenal was clearly identified in 83% of these patients; in all of them, the adrenal was a paraspinal disk-shaped organ, which appeared linear on CT. Conversely, the adrenals retained their normal shape in a control group of 20 patients with acquired renal atrophy or prior simple nephrectomy.

  13. Localization of metastatic adrenal cortical carcinoma with Ga-67

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, F.T.; Anderson, J.H.; Jelinek, J.; Anderson, D.W. )

    1991-02-01

    Data are limited on the localization of Ga-67 in primary or metastatic adrenal cortical carcinoma. We report the localization of Ga-67 to pathologically confirmed adrenal cortical carcinoma metastatic to the lung. A review of the literature revealed four patients have previously been reported to have metastatic adrenal cortical carcinoma detected on Ga-67 scan. Gallium imaging may be useful in the evaluation of patients with adrenal cortical carcinoma. SPECT imaging should further improve lesion resolution and localization.

  14. Crossover of the hypothalamic pituitary-adrenal/interrenal, -thyroid, and -gonadal axes in testicular development.

    PubMed

    Castañeda Cortés, Diana C; Langlois, Valerie S; Fernandino, Juan I

    2014-01-01

    Besides the well-known function of thyroid hormones (THs) for regulating metabolism, it has recently been discovered that THs are also involved in testicular development in mammalian and non-mammalian species. THs, in combination with follicle stimulating hormone, lead to androgen synthesis in Danio rerio, which results in the onset of spermatogenesis in the testis, potentially relating the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid (HPT) gland to the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axes. Furthermore, studies in non-mammalian species have suggested that by stimulating the thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH), THs can be induced by corticotropin-releasing hormone. This suggests that the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal/interrenal gland (HPA) axis might influence the HPT axis. Additionally, it was shown that hormones pertaining to both HPT and HPA could also influence the HPG endocrine axis. For example, high levels of androgens were observed in the testis in Odonthestes bonariensis during a period of stress-induced sex-determination, which suggests that stress hormones influence the gonadal fate toward masculinization. Thus, this review highlights the hormonal interactions observed between the HPT, HPA, and HPG axes using a comparative approach in order to better understand how these endocrine systems could interact with each other to influence the development of testes.

  15. Involvement of the adrenal glands and testis in gap junction formation via testosterone within the male rat anterior pituitary gland.

    PubMed

    Sakuma, Eisuke; Wada, Ikuo; Otsuka, Takanobu; Wakabayashi, Kenjiro; Ito, Kinya; Soji, Tsuyoshi; Herbert, Damon C

    2012-12-01

    We investigated the influence of testicular and adrenal androgens on the presence of gap junctions between folliculo-stellate cells in the anterior pituitary glands of 60-day-old Wistar-Imamichi strain male rats. The animals were separated into six groups: Group A served as the controls and had free access to a normal diet and water, Group B was given a normal diet and 0.9% NaCl for their drinking water as the controls of adrenalectomized groups, Group C was castrated, Group D was adrenalectomized, Group E was both castrated and adrenalectomized, and Group F was also both castrated and adrenalectomized. In addition, the animals of Group F were administered a dose of testosterone that is known to produce high physiological levels of the hormones in plasma. Five rats from each group were sacrificed 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 days after their respective operation, and the anterior pituitary glands were removed and prepared for observation by transmission electron microscopy. We quantified the number of follicles and gap junctions and calculated the rate of occurrence as the ratio of the number of gap junctions existing between folliculo-stellate cells per intersected follicle profile. Simultaneous removal of adrenal glands with castration resulted in a significantly decrease in the number of gap junctions, whereas the administration of testosterone to these rats compensated for this change. These observations indicate that the preservation of gap junctions between folliculo-stellate cells is mainly dependent on androgens from both the testes and adrenal glands in adult male rats.

  16. The effect of anabolic steroids on the gastrointestinal system, kidneys, and adrenal glands.

    PubMed

    Modlinski, Ryan; Fields, Karl B

    2006-04-01

    Over the past several decades we have seen an increase in the prevalence of anabolic steroid use by athletes. Because use of anabolic steroids is illicit, much of our knowledge of their side effects is derived from case reports, retrospective studies, or comparisons with studies in other similar patient groups. It has been shown that high-dose anabolic steroids have an effect on lowering high-density lipoprotein, increasing low-density lipoprotein, and increasing the atherogenic-promoting apolipoprotein A. Steroid abuse can also be hepatotoxic, promoting disturbances such as biliary stasis, peliosis hepatis, and even hepatomas, which are all usually reversible upon discontinuation. Suppression of the hypothalamic adrenal axis can also lead to profound adrenal changes that are also reversible with time. Although rare, renal side effects have also been documented, leading to acute renal failure and even Wilms' tumors in isolated cases. Much of our knowledge of these potentially severe but usually limited side effects is confounded by use of combinations of different steroid preparations and by the concomitant use with other substances. Physicians must target their efforts at counseling adolescents and other athletes about the potential harms of androgenic anabolic steroids and the legal options to improve strength and performance.

  17. Functional link between bone morphogenetic proteins and insulin-like peptide 3 signaling in modulating ovarian androgen production

    PubMed Central

    Glister, Claire; Satchell, Leanne; Bathgate, Ross A. D.; Wade, John D.; Dai, Yanzhenzi; Ivell, Richard; Anand-Ivell, Ravinder; Rodgers, Raymond J.; Knight, Philip G.

    2013-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) are firmly implicated as intra-ovarian regulators of follicle development and steroidogenesis. Here we report a microarray analysis showing that treatment of cultured bovine theca cells (TC) with BMP6 significantly (>twofold; P < 0.01) up- or down-regulated expression of 445 genes. Insulin-like peptide 3 (INSL3) was the most heavily down-regulated gene (−43-fold) with cytochrome P450, subfamily XVII (CYP17A1) and other key steroidogenic transcripts including steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (STAR), cytochrome P450 family 11, subfamily A1 (CYP11A1) and 3 beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (HSD3B1) also down-regulated. BMP6 also reduced expression of nuclear receptor subfamily 5A1 (NR5A1) known to target the promoter regions of the aforementioned genes. Real-time PCR confirmed these findings and also revealed a marked reduction in expression of INSL3 receptor, relaxin/insulin-like family peptide receptor 2 (RXFP2). Secretion of INSL3 protein and androstenedione were also suppressed suggesting a functional link between BMP and INSL3 pathways in controlling androgen synthesis. RNAi-mediated knockdown of INSL3 reduced INSL3 mRNA (75%) and protein (94%) level and elicited a 77% reduction in CYP17A1 mRNA and 83% reduction in androstenedione secretion. Knockdown of RXFP2 also reduced CYP17A1 expression (81%) and androstenedione secretion (88%). Conversely, treatment with exogenous (human) INSL3 increased androstenedione secretion ∼twofold. The CYP17A1 inhibitor abiraterone abolished androgen secretion and reduced expression of both INSL3 and RXFP2. Collectively, these findings indicate a positive autoregulatory role for INSL3 signaling in maintaining thecal androgen production, and visa versa. Moreover, BMP6-induced suppression of thecal androgen synthesis may be mediated, at least in part, by reduced INSL3-RXFP2 signaling. PMID:23530236

  18. Expanding the therapeutic use of androgens via selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs).

    PubMed

    Gao, Wenqing; Dalton, James T

    2007-03-01

    Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) are a novel class of androgen receptor (AR) ligands that might change the future of androgen therapy dramatically. With improved pharmacokinetic characteristics and tissue-selective pharmacological activities, SARMs are expected to greatly extend the clinical applications of androgens to osteoporosis, muscle wasting, male contraception and diseases of the prostate. Mechanistic studies with currently available SARMs will help to define the contributions of differential tissue distribution, tissue-specific expression of 5alpha-reductase, ligand-specific regulation of gene expression and AR interactions with tissue-specific coactivators to their observed tissue selectivity, and lead to even greater expansion of selective anabolic therapies.

  19. Intratumoral de novo steroid synthesis activates androgen receptor in castration-resistant prostate cancer and is upregulated by treatment with CYP17A1 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Cai, Changmeng; Chen, Sen; Ng, Patrick; Bubley, Glenn J; Nelson, Peter S; Mostaghel, Elahe A; Marck, Brett; Matsumoto, Alvin M; Simon, Nicholas I; Wang, Hongyun; Chen, Shaoyong; Balk, Steven P

    2011-10-15

    Relapse of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) that occurs after androgen deprivation therapy of primary prostate cancer can be mediated by reactivation of the androgen receptor (AR). One important mechanism mediating this AR reactivation is intratumoral conversion of the weak adrenal androgens DHEA and androstenedione into the AR ligands testosterone and dihydrotestosterone. DHEA and androstenedione are synthesized by the adrenals through the sequential actions of the cytochrome P450 enzymes CYP11A1 and CYP17A1, so that CYP17A1 inhibitors such as abiraterone are effective therapies for CRPC. However, the significance of intratumoral CYP17A1 and de novo androgen synthesis from cholesterol in CRPC, and the mechanisms contributing to CYP17A1 inhibitor resistance/relapse, remain to be determined. We report that AR activity in castration-resistant VCaP tumor xenografts can be restored through CYP17A1-dependent de novo androgen synthesis, and that abiraterone treatment of these xenografts imposes selective pressure for increased intratumoral expression of CYP17A1, thereby generating a mechanism for development of resistance to CYP17A1 inhibitors. Supporting the clinical relevance of this mechanism, we found that intratumoral expression of CYP17A1 was markedly increased in tumor biopsies from CRPC patients after CYP17A1 inhibitor therapy. We further show that CRPC cells expressing a progesterone responsive T877A mutant AR are not CYP17A1 dependent, but that AR activity in these cells is still steroid dependent and mediated by upstream CYP11A1-dependent intraturmoral pregnenolone/progesterone synthesis. Together, our results indicate that CRPCs resistant to CYP17A1 inhibition may remain steroid dependent and therefore responsive to therapies that can further suppress de novo intratumoral steroid synthesis.

  20. Identification, characterization, and regulation of a nicotinic acetylcholine receptor on bovine adrenal chromaffin cells in culture

    SciTech Connect

    Higgins, L.S.

    1988-01-01

    Synaptic input to bovine adrenal chromaffin cells is mediated by nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) and results in secretion of catecholamines. Three probes previously shown to recognize AChRs on neurons were used to identify the AChR on bovine adrenal chromaffin cells in culture: monoclonal antibody mAb 35, a toxin that blocks receptor function, and the agonist nicotine. Competition for {sup 3}H-nicotine binding was used to measure the affinity of cholinergic ligands, and revealed the pharmacological profile expected for a neuronal-type AChR. At steady state the rate both of receptor insertion into and loss from the plasma membrane is about 3%/hour, resulting in a half-life in the surface of about 24 hours. Exposure to the anti-AChR antibody results in a loss of AChRs from the surface of the cells through a process that has the characteristics of antigenic modulation. The number of AChRs on the surface of the chromaffin cells can also be modulated by agonists and hormones, including glucocotricoids. Catecholamines, three peptides that may be secreted by chromaffin cells, and K{sup +}-induced secretion reduce agonist-induced catecholamine release by decreasing the number of AChRs, providing a mechanism for autoregulation.

  1. Atrial natriuretic factor: radioimmunoassay and effects on adrenal and pituitary glands

    SciTech Connect

    Gutkowska, J.; Horky, K.; Schiffrin, E.L.; Thibault, G.; Garcia, R.; De Lean, A.; Hamet, P.; Tremblay, J.; Anand-Srivastava, M.B.; Januszewicz, P.

    1986-06-01

    A simple and sensitive radioimmunoassay was developed for measurement of immunoreactive atrial natriuretic factor (IR-ANF) in rat and human plasma and in rat atria. The two atria contain about 20 ..mu..g ANF per rat. The right atrium contained 2.5 times more ANF than did the left. Ether anesthesia and morphine markedly increased IR-ANF in rat plasma. The concentration of IR-ANF in plasma of clinically normal human subjects was 65.3 +/- 2.5 pg/ml. Paroxysmal tachycardia and rapid atrial pacing significantly increased IR-ANF in human plasma. Two- to seven-fold higher concentrations were found in coronary sinus blood than in the peripheral circulation. In the plasma of rats and humans, circulating ANF is probably a small-molecular-weight peptide. ANF acts on the adrenal and the pituitary. ANF inhibits aldosterone secretion from rat zona glomerulosa and steroid secretion by bovine adrenal zona glomerulosa and fasciculata. ANF stimulated the basal secretion of arginine vasopressin (AVP) in vitro and inhibited KCl-stimulated release of AVP.

  2. A success story in congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Kriplani, Alka; Lunkad, Amol; Agarwal, Nutan; Kulshreshtha, Bindu; Ariachery, C Aminni

    2012-12-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is a group of autosomal recessive disorders characterized by enzyme defects in adrenal steroidogenic pathways. CAH due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency accounts for 95 % of cases. This case was diagnosed to have simple virilizing type of CAH and started on dexamethasone, and underwent genitoplasty and clitoroplasty at 25 years of age, then was married 3 years after surgery and conceived spontaneously 2 years after marriage, to deliver a healthy male baby. Thus, proper diagnosis and treatment with steroids and genitoplasty can give females with CAH a normal sexual, normal menstrual, and reproductive function.

  3. Diagnosis and Management of Hereditary Adrenal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Angelousi, Anna; Zilbermint, Mihail; Berthon, Annabel; Espiard, Stéphanie; Stratakis, Constantine A

    2016-01-01

    Benign adrenocortical tumours (ACT) are relatively frequent lesions; on the contrary, adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare and aggressive malignancy with unfavourable prognosis. Recent advances in the molecular understanding of adrenal cancer offer promise for better therapies in the future. Many of these advances stem from the molecular elucidation of genetic conditions predisposing to the development of ACC. Six main clinical syndromes have been described to be associated with hereditary adrenal cancer. In these conditions, genetic counselling plays an important role for the early detection and follow-up of the patients and the affected family members. PMID:27075352

  4. Prenatal Diagnosis of Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Yau, Mabel; Khattab, Ahmed; New, Maria I

    2016-06-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) owing to 21-hydroxylase deficiency is a monogenic disorder of adrenal steroidogenesis. To prevent genital ambiguity, in girls, prenatal dexamethasone treatment is administered early in the first trimester. Prenatal genetic diagnosis of CAH and fetal sex determination identify affected female fetuses at risk for genital virilization. Advancements in prenatal diagnosis are owing to improved understanding of the genetic basis of CAH and improved technology. Cloning of the CYP21A2 gene ushered in molecular genetic analysis as the current standard of care. Noninvasive prenatal diagnosis allows for targeted treatment and avoids unnecessary treatment of males and unaffected females. PMID:27241964

  5. Brain serotonin and pituitary-adrenal functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernikos-Danellis, J.; Berger, P.; Barchas, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    It had been concluded by Scapagnini et al. (1971) that brain serotonin (5-HT) was involved in the regulation of the diurnal rhythm of the pituitary-adrenal system but not in the stress response. A study was conducted to investigate these findings further by evaluating the effects of altering brain 5-HT levels on the daily fluctuation of plasma corticosterone and on the response of the pituitary-adrenal system to a stressful or noxious stimulus in the rat. In a number of experiments brain 5-HT synthesis was inhibited with parachlorophenylalanine. In other tests it was tried to raise the level of brain 5-HT with precursors.

  6. Regulation of aldosterone secretion during altered sodium intake.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, G; Catt, K J

    1983-07-01

    The interactions of the renin-angiotensin system with other factors in the regulation of aldosterone secretion were analyzed during altered sodium in the rat. During sodium restriction, the rise in aldosterone one secretion was accompanied by trophic changes in the adrenal glomerulosa zone including increased angiotensin II receptors and enzymes of early and late steps in the aldosterone biosynthetic pathway. All these effects of sodium restriction were reproduced by infusion of angiotensin II, and could be prevented by administration of the converting enzyme inhibitor, SQ 14,225. These findings indicate that the adrenal secretory and trophic responses to sodium restriction are mediated by angiotensin II. In hypophysectomized rats, the basal activities of the enzymes of the early aldosterone biosynthetic pathway were reduced, contributing to the blunted aldosterone responsiveness to sodium deficiency. However, sodium restriction for 6 days significantly increased adrenal glomerulosa angiotensin II receptors and enzymes of the early and late aldosterone biosynthetic pathway, indicating that the pituitary gland is not necessary for the adrenal effects of angiotensin II. In contrast to the prominent glomerulotropic actions of angiotensin II in rats on normal or low sodium intake, infusion of angiotensin II during high sodium intake did not increase blood aldosterone, angiotensin II receptors, or 18-hydroxylase activity, indicating that the trophic actions of the octapeptide are determined by the state of sodium balance. In recent studies, other factors including potassium, dopamine and somatostatin have been shown to potentiate or inhibit the actions of angiotensin II on the adrenal gland. The ability of such factors to influence the effects of angiotensin II could serve as a protective mechanism to modulate aldosterone responses to angiotensin II when elevations in the circulating level of the peptide occur in the absence of sodium deficiency.

  7. A case of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma primary arising in both adrenal glands associated with adrenal failure.

    PubMed

    Nishiuchi, Takamasa; Imachi, Hitomi; Fujiwara, Mako; Murao, Koji; Onishi, Hiroaki; Kiguchi, Tohru; Takimoto, Hidetaka; Kushida, Yoshio; Haba, Reiji; Ishida, Toshihiko

    2009-02-01

    It is known that adrenal insufficiency is one of the complications in primary adrenal lymphoma, especially those with bilateral adrenal involvement. A 73-year-old man was referred for general fatigue and high fever to the nearest hospital. The patient was transferred to our hospital for evaluation of bilateral adrenal tumors and hyponatremia. He was diagnosed as having non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) with primaries arising in both adrenal glands. Primary adrenal lymphoma (PAL) is a rare extra-nodal NHL. Although an appropriate treatment of this disease has not been established, our case has demonstrated that the combination of rituximab and THP-COP chemotherapy could be administered, and that it improved clinical manifestations. This case raises the suggestion that malignant lymphoma should be suspected in patients with bilateral adrenal tumors that present with progressive adrenal insufficiency.

  8. Adrenal pseudotumors on CT due to dilated portosystemic veins

    SciTech Connect

    Mitty, H.M.; Cohen, B.A.; Sprayregen, S.; Schwartz, K.

    1983-10-01

    The adrenal and periadrenal venous systems are part of the portosystemic collateral pathways that may enlarge in portal hypertension. The cross-sectional image of the resulting enlarged venous channels may simulate an adrenal msss. Three examples of such computed tomographic (CT) scans are presented with selective venographic correlation. Patients with portal hypertension and suspected adrenal pathology may require enhanced or dynamic CT scans.

  9. Ultrasonographic appearance of adrenal glands in healthy and sick cats.

    PubMed

    Combes, Anaïs; Pey, Pascaline; Paepe, Dominique; Rosenberg, Dan; Daminet, Sylvie; Putcuyps, Ingrid; Bedu, Anne-Sophie; Duchateau, Luc; de Fornel-Thibaud, Pauline; Benchekroun, Ghita; Saunders, Jimmy H

    2013-06-01

    The first part of the study aimed to describe prospectively the ultrasonographic features of the adrenal glands in 94 healthy cats and 51 chronically sick cats. It confirmed the feasibility of ultrasonography of adrenal glands in healthy and chronically sick cats, which were not statistically different. The typical hypoechoic appearance of the gland surrounded by hyperechoic fat made it recognisable. A sagittal plane of the gland, not in line with the aorta, may be necessary to obtain the largest adrenal measurements. The reference intervals of adrenal measurements were inferred from the values obtained in the healthy and chronically sick cats (mean ± 0.96 SD): adrenal length was 8.9-12.5 mm; cranial height was 3.0-4.8 mm; caudal height was 3.0-4.5 mm. The second part of the study consisted of a retrospective analysis of the ultrasonographic examination of the adrenal glands in cats with adrenal diseases (six had hyperaldosteronism and four had pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism) and a descriptive comparison with the reference features obtained in the control groups from the prospective study. Cats with hyperaldosteronism presented with unilateral severely enlarged adrenal glands. However, a normal contralateral gland did not preclude a contralateral infiltration in benign or malignant adrenal neoplasms. The ultrasonographic appearance of the adrenal glands could not differentiate benign and malignant lesions. The ultrasonographic appearance of pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism was mainly a symmetrical adrenal enlargement; however, a substantial number of cases were within the reference intervals of adrenal size.

  10. Biopsy of the right adrenal gland by the transhepatic approach

    SciTech Connect

    Price, R.B.; Bernardino, M.E.; Berkman, W.A.; Sones, P.J. Jr.; Torres, W.E.

    1983-08-01

    A transhepatic computed-tomographic-guided biopsy of a right adrenal mass is described. This method is simpler to perform than the usual posterior biopsy carried out with the patient prone and is less likely to cause a complicating pneumothorax. In seven of eight patients with right adrenal masses, adrenal tissue was obtained and an accurate diagnosis was possible. No complications resulted.

  11. Imaging of an adrenal cortical carcinoma and its skeletal metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Drane, W.E.; Graham, M.M.; Nelp, W.B.

    1983-08-01

    Though the typical scintigraphic appearance in adrenal cortical carcinoma is bilateral nonvisualization of the adrenal glands, a case with simultaneous visualization of both an adrenal cortical carcinoma and its skeletal metastasis using 6-..beta..-(/sup 131/I)iodomethyl-19-norcholesterol is reported.

  12. Imaging of an adrenal cortical carcinoma and its skeletal metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Drane, W.E.; Graham, M.M.; Nelp, W.B.

    1983-08-01

    Though the typical scintigraphic appearance in adrenal cortical carcinoma is bilateral nonvisualization of the adrenal glands, we report a case with simultaneous visualization of both an adrenal cortical carcinoma and its skeletal metastasis using 6-beta-(/sup 131/I)iodomethyl-19-norcholesterol.

  13. Retroperitoneal foregut duplication cyst presenting as an adrenal mass.

    PubMed

    Terry, N Elizabeth; Senkowski, Christopher K; Check, William; Brower, Steven T

    2007-01-01

    A 75 year-old woman presented to the authors' institution with abdominal pain and early satiety. An adrenal mass was found on CT scanning. Laparoscopic adrenalectomy was performed, and the patient was found to have a retroperitoneal bronchogenic cyst adherent to the adrenal gland. The workup of an adrenal mass is discussed as well as the pathophysiology of bronchogenic cysts.

  14. Do androgen deprivation drugs affect the immune cross-talk between mononuclear and prostate cancer cells?

    PubMed

    Salman, Hertzel; Bergman, Michael; Blumberger, Naava; Djaldetti, Meir; Bessler, Hanna

    2014-02-01

    The aim of the study was to examine the effect of androgen deprivation drugs, i.e. leuprolide and bicalutamide on the immune cross-talk between human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and cells from PC-3 and LNCaP human prostate cancer lines. PBMC, PC-3 and LNCaP were separately incubated without and with two androgen-deprivation drugs, i.e. leuprolide and bicalutamide, and the secretion of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-1ra and IL-10 was examined. In addition, the effect of both drugs on the production of those cytokines was carried out after 24 hours incubation of PBMC with both types of cancer cells. Leuprolide or bicalutamide did not affect the production of the cytokines by PBMC or by the prostate cancer cells from the two lines. Incubation of PBMC with PC-3 or LNCaP cells caused increased production of IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-10 as compared with PBMC incubated without malignant cells. While 10(-7) M and 10(-8) M of leuprolide caused a decreased secretion of IL-1β by PBMC previously incubated with prostate cancer cells without the drug, bicalutamide did not affect this PBMC activity at any drug concentration. This observation suggests the existence of an additional mechanism explaining the effect of androgen deprivation therapy in prostate cancer patients.

  15. Erroneous prenatal diagnosis of congenital adrenal hyperplasia owing to a duplication of the CYP21A2 gene.

    PubMed

    Lekarev, O; Tafuri, K; Lane, A H; Zhu, G; Nakamoto, J M; Buller-Burckle, A M; Wilson, T A; New, M I

    2013-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is an autosomal recessive disorder where steroidogenesis in the adrenal cortex is impaired. The most common form is caused by 21-hydroxylase deficiency (21OHD). Classical 21OHD is characterized by glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid deficiency and by overproduction of adrenal androgens. The diagnosis rests on biochemical and genetic analyses. In families with history of CAH, prenatal genetic diagnosis is offered. We herein present a case of an infant whose parents were identified to carry mutations on the CYP21A2 gene. The fetal DNA analysis demonstrated that the fetus carried a paternal exon 8 (Q318X) mutation and a maternal exon 8 (R356X) mutation. The fetus was presumed to be affected with CAH, yet his clinical presentation at birth was not consistent with the diagnosis. Repeated genetic analysis identified a paternal CYP21A2 gene duplication with Q318X mutation on one copy of CYP21A2. We conclude that a duplication of the CYP21A2 gene should be suspected when clinical and hormonal findings do not support the genetic diagnosis. Furthermore, because individuals with Q318X mutation frequently have a duplication of the CYP21A2 gene, when Q318X is detected, it is important to distinguish the severe point mutation in single gene copy alleles from the non-deficient variant in gene-duplicated alleles.

  16. Adrenal axis activation by chronic social stress fails to inhibit gonadal function in male rats.

    PubMed

    Lemaire, V; Taylor, G T; Mormède, P

    1997-11-01

    Stress in males via the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis may set into motion varied physiological alterations, including dysfunction of the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. However, the influence of the HPA on the HPG axis may not always be inhibitory. Presence or absence of stimuli of sexual significance that typically activates the HPG axis may alter the influence of the adrenal axis on gonadal axes. In this project, we used male rats and chronic social stimulation that included brief or extended periods with female rats to examine HPA-HPG axes interactions. In experiment 1, we used intact males and a 'chronic social stress' paradigm developed in our previous research that induces social instability by daily changing the membership of group-housed males with females. Thymus weight was reduced and corticosterone levels were marginally increased by chronic social stress, indicating a HPA axis hyperactivity. The HPG axis was also activated as shown by the increased weight of the androgen-sensitive sex structures. These results indicate that when these two axes are stimulated together, neither interferes with nor suppresses activities of the other. Implants of corticosterone pellets to adrenalectomized animals that maintained constant, high corticosterone levels failed to reverse the gonadal hyperactivity induced by sexual stimulation. In a second experiment, we studied the influence of different intensity of sexual stimulations on HPA-HPG axes interactions. Increased corticosterone levels and adrenal weight, indicating a HPA hyperactivity, failed to inhibit HPG hyperactivity as measured by the increased sexual organs weight, whatever the sexual intensity of the stimulation. This work demonstrates that the gonadal axis is freed from suppression when sexual stimulation occurs together with stress. The general conclusion is that the nature of complex social settings is important in determining interactions between the two neuroendocrine axes.

  17. Combined steroidogenic characters of fetal adrenal and Leydig cells in childhood adrenocortical carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Fujisawa, Yasuko; Sakaguchi, Kimiyoshi; Ono, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Rie; Kato, Fumiko; Kagami, Masayo; Fukami, Maki; Ogata, Tsutomu

    2016-05-01

    Although childhood adrenocortical carcinomas (c-ACCs) with a TP53 mutation are known to produce androgens, detailed steroidogenic characters have not been clarified. Here, we examined steroid metabolite profiles and expression patterns of steroidogenic genes in a c-ACC removed from the left adrenal position of a 2-year-old Brazilian boy with precocious puberty, using an atrophic left adrenal gland removed at the time of tumorectomy as a control. The c-ACC produced not only abundant dehydroepiandrosterone-sulfate but also a large amount of testosterone via the Δ5 pathway with Δ5-androstenediol rather than Δ4-androstenedione as the primary intermediate metabolite. Furthermore, the c-ACC was associated with elevated expressions of CYP11A1, CYP17A1, POR, HSD17B3, and SULT2A1, a low but similar expression of CYB5A, and reduced expressions of AKR1C3 (HSD17B5) and HSD3B2. Notably, a Leydig cell marker INSL3 was expressed at a low but detectable level in the c-ACC. Furthermore, molecular studies revealed a maternally inherited heterozygous germline TP53 mutation, and several post-zygotic genetic aberrations in the c-ACC including loss of paternally derived chromosome 17 with a wildtype TP53 and loss of maternally inherited chromosome 11 and resultant marked hyperexpression of paternally expressed growth promoting gene IGF2 and drastic hypoexpression of maternally expressed growth suppressing gene CDKN1C. These results imply the presence of combined steroidogenic properties of fetal adrenal and Leydig cells in this patient's c-ACC with a germline TP53 mutation and several postzygotic carcinogenic events.

  18. Transcriptome Profiling Reveals Differentially Expressed Transcripts Between the Human Adrenal Zona Fasciculata and Zona Reticularis

    PubMed Central

    Rege, Juilee; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Wang, Tao; Merchen, Todd D.; Sasano, Hironobu

    2014-01-01

    Context: The human adrenal zona fasciculata (ZF) and zona reticularis (ZR) are responsible for the production of cortisol and 19-carbon steroids (often called adrenal androgens), respectively. However, the gene profiles and exact molecular mechanisms leading to the functional phenotype of the ZF and ZR are still not clearly defined. In the present study, we identified the transcripts that are differentially expressed in the ZF and ZR. Objective: The objective of the study was to compare the transcriptome profiles of ZF and ZR. Design and Methods: ZF and ZR were microdissected from 10 human adrenals. Total RNA was extracted from 10 ZF/ZR pairs and hybridized to Illumina microarray chips. The 10 most differentially expressed transcripts were studied with quantitative RT-PCR (qPCR). Immunohistochemistry was also performed on four zone-specific genes. Results: Microarray results demonstrated that only 347 transcripts of the 47 231 were significantly different by 2-fold or greater in the ZF and ZR. ZF had 195 transcripts with 2-fold or greater increase compared with its paired ZR, whereas ZR was found to have 152 transcripts with 2-fold or greater higher expression than in ZF. Microarray and qPCR analysis of transcripts encoding steroidogenic enzymes (n = 10) demonstrated that only 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, steroid sulfotransferase, type 5 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase, and cytochrome b5 were significantly different. Immunohistochemistry and qPCR studies confirmed that the ZF had an increased expression of lymphoid enhancer-binding factor 1 and nephroblastoma overexpressed, whereas ZR showed an increased expression of solute carrier family 27 (fatty acid transporter) (SLC27A2), member 2 and TSPAN12 (tetraspanin 12) Conclusion: Microarray revealed several novel candidate genes for elucidating the molecular mechanisms governing the ZF and ZR, thereby increasing our understanding of the functional zonation of these two adrenocortical zones. PMID:24423296

  19. Synthetic Androgens as Designer Supplements

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Jan Felix; Parr, Maria Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are some of the most common performance enhancing drugs (PED) among society. Despite the broad spectrum of adverse effects and legal consequences, AAS are illicitly marketed and distributed in many countries. To circumvent existing laws, the chemical structure of AAS is modified and these designer steroids are sold as nutritional supplements mainly over the Internet. Several side effects are linked with AAS abuse. Only little is known about the pharmacological effects and metabolism of unapproved steroids due to the absence of clinical studies. The large number of designer steroid findings in dietary supplements and the detection of new compounds combined with legal loopholes for their distribution in many countries show that stricter regulations and better information policy are needed. PMID:26074745

  20. Synthetic androgens as designer supplements.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Jan Felix; Parr, Maria Kristina

    2015-01-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are some of the most common performance enhancing drugs (PED) among society. Despite the broad spectrum of adverse effects and legal consequences, AAS are illicitly marketed and distributed in many countries. To circumvent existing laws, the chemical structure of AAS is modified and these designer steroids are sold as nutritional supplements mainly over the Internet. Several side effects are linked with AAS abuse. Only little is known about the pharmacological effects and metabolism of unapproved steroids due to the absence of clinical studies. The large number of designer steroid findings in dietary supplements and the detection of new compounds combined with legal loopholes for their distribution in many countries show that stricter regulations and better information policy are needed. PMID:26074745

  1. Characterization of the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal-Axis in Familial Longevity under Resting Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Jansen, Steffy W.; Roelfsema, Ferdinand; Akintola, Abimbola A.; Oei, Nicole Y.; Cobbaert, Christa M.; Ballieux, Bart E.; van der Grond, Jeroen; Westendorp, Rudi G.; Pijl, Hanno; van Heemst, Diana

    2015-01-01

    Objective The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA)-axis is the most important neuro-endocrine stress response system of our body which is of critical importance for survival. Disturbances in HPA-axis activity have been associated with adverse metabolic and cognitive changes. Humans enriched for longevity have less metabolic and cognitive disturbances and therefore diminished activity of the HPA axis may be a potential candidate mechanism underlying healthy familial longevity. Here, we compared 24-h plasma ACTH and serum cortisol concentration profiles and different aspects of the regulation of the HPA-axis in offspring from long-lived siblings, who are enriched for familial longevity and age-matched controls. Design Case-control study within the Leiden Longevity study cohort consisting of 20 middle-aged offspring of nonagenarian siblings (offspring) together with 18 partners (controls). Methods During 24 h, venous blood was sampled every 10 minutes for determination of circulatory ACTH and cortisol concentrations. Deconvolution analysis, cross approximate entropy analysis and ACTH-cortisol-dose response modeling were used to assess, respectively, ACTH and cortisol secretion parameters, feedforward and feedback synchrony and adrenal gland ACTH responsivity. Results Mean (95% Confidence Interval) basal ACTH secretion was higher in male offspring compared to male controls (645 (324-1286) ngl/L/24 h versus 240 (120-477) ng/L/24 h, P = 0.05). Other ACTH and cortisol secretion parameters did not differ between offspring and controls. In addition, no significant differences in feedforward and feedback synchrony and adrenal gland ACTH responsivity were observed between groups. Conclusions These results suggest that familial longevity is not associated with major differences in HPA-axis activity under resting conditions, although modest, sex-specific differences may exist between groups that might be clinically relevant. PMID:26193655

  2. Genetics Home Reference: androgen insensitivity syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... typically raised as females and have a female gender identity. Affected individuals have male internal sex organs ( ... and may have a male or a female gender identity. People with mild androgen insensitivity are born ...

  3. The androgen receptor gene mutations database.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, B; Trifiro, M; Lumbroso, R; Vasiliou, D M; Pinsky, L

    1996-01-01

    The current version of the androgen receptor (AR) gene mutations database is described. We have added (if available) data on the androgen binding phenotype of the mutant AR, the clinical phenotype of the affected persons, the family history and whether the pathogenicity of a mutation has been proven. Exonic mutations are now listed in 5'-->3' sequence regardless of type and single base pair changes are presented in codon context. Splice site and intronic mutations are listed separately. The database has allowed us to substantiate and amplify the observation of mutational hot spots within exons encoding the AR androgen binding domain. The database is available from EML (ftp://www.ebi.ac.uk/pub/databases/androgen) or as a Macintosh Filemaker file (MC33@musica.mcgill.ca).

  4. Androgen deprivation therapy for prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Singer, Eric A; Golijanin, Dragan J; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Messing, Edward M

    2008-02-01

    Androgen deprivation continues to play a crucial role in the treatment of advanced and metastatic prostate cancer. In the 65 years since its use was first described, urologists and medical oncologists have developed new and innovative ways to manipulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis with the goal of alleviating symptoms and prolonging the life of men with prostate cancer. Despite the successes that androgen deprivation therapy has brought, each method and regimen possesses unique benefits and burdens, of which the clinician and patient must be cognizant. This review discusses the first-line androgen deprivation methods and regimens presently in use with special attention paid to their side effects and the management of them, as well as the question of when to initiate androgen deprivation therapy.

  5. Chronic psychosocial stress in male mice causes an up-regulation of scavenger receptor class B type 1 protein in the adrenal glands.

    PubMed

    Füchsl, Andrea M; Uschold-Schmidt, Nicole; Reber, Stefan O

    2013-07-01

    Mice exposed to chronic subordinate colony housing (CSC, 19 days) show an exaggerated adrenal corticosterone response to an acute heterotypic stressor (elevated platform (EPF), 5 min) despite no difference from EPF-exposed single-housed control (SHC) mice in corticotropin (ACTH) secretion. In the present study, we asked the question whether this CSC-induced increase in adrenal capability to produce and secrete corticosterone is paralleled by an enhanced adrenal availability and/or mobilization capacity of the corticosterone precursor molecule cholesterol. Employing oil-red staining and western blot analysis we revealed comparable relative density of cortical lipid droplets and relative protein expression of hormone-sensitive lipase, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase and low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) between CSC and SHC mice. However, relative protein expression of the scavenger receptor class B type 1 (SR-BI) was increased following CSC exposure. Moreover, analysis of plasma high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) and LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) revealed increased LDL-C levels in CSC mice. Together with the pronounced increase in adrenal weight, evidently mediated by hyperplasia of adrenocortical cells, these data strongly indicate an enhanced adrenal availability of and capacity to mobilize cholesterol in chronic psychosocially-stressed mice, contributing to their increased in vivo corticosterone response during acute heterotypic stressor exposure.

  6. Androgen deprivation treatment of sexual behavior.

    PubMed

    Houts, Frederick W; Taller, Inna; Tucker, Douglas E; Berlin, Fred S

    2011-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists are underutilized in patients seeking diminution of problematic sexual drives. This chapter reviews the literature on surgical castration of sex offenders, anti-androgen use and the rationale for providing androgen deprivation therapy, rather than selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or more conservative interventions, for patients with paraphilias and excessive sexual drive. Discussions of informed consent, side effects, contraindications and case examples are provided.

  7. Androgen deprivation treatment of sexual behavior.

    PubMed

    Houts, Frederick W; Taller, Inna; Tucker, Douglas E; Berlin, Fred S

    2011-01-01

    Gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists are underutilized in patients seeking diminution of problematic sexual drives. This chapter reviews the literature on surgical castration of sex offenders, anti-androgen use and the rationale for providing androgen deprivation therapy, rather than selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors or more conservative interventions, for patients with paraphilias and excessive sexual drive. Discussions of informed consent, side effects, contraindications and case examples are provided. PMID:22005210

  8. Androgen receptor in male breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sas-Korczynska, Beata; Adamczyk, Aagnieszka; Niemiec, Joanna; Harazin-Lechowska, Agnieszka; Ambicka, Aleksandra; Jakubowicz, Jerzy

    2015-12-01

    We present the androgen receptor (AR) status in 32 breast cancers diagnosed in male patients. Androgen receptor expression was found in 62.5% tumors and it was more frequent (85% of cases) in estrogen-positive tumours. The analyses of its impact on treatment results showed that AR immmunopositivity is a prognostic factor for overall survival, and AR immunonegativity is also correlated with worse prognosis (distant metastases developed more frequently and earlier).

  9. Effects of prenatal treatment with antiandrogens on luteinizing hormone secretion and sex steroid concentrations in adult spotted hyenas, Crocuta crocuta.

    PubMed

    Place, Ned J; Holekamp, Kay E; Sisk, Cheryl L; Weldele, Mary L; Coscia, Elizabeth M; Drea, Christine M; Glickman, Stephen E

    2002-11-01

    Prenatal androgen treatment can alter LH secretion in female offspring, often with adverse effects on ovulatory function. However, female spotted hyenas (Crocuta crocuta), renowned for their highly masculinized genitalia, are naturally exposed to high androgen levels in utero. To determine whether LH secretion in spotted hyenas is affected by prenatal androgens, we treated pregnant hyenas with antiandrogens (flutamide and finasteride). Later, adult offspring of the antiandrogen-treated (AA) mothers underwent a GnRH challenge to identify sex differences in the LH response and to assess the effects of prenatal antiandrogen treatment. We further considered the effects of blocking prenatal androgens on plasma sex steroid concentrations. To account for potential differences in the reproductive state of females, we suppressed endogenous hormone levels with a long-acting GnRH agonist (GnRHa) and then measured plasma androgens after an hCG challenge. Plasma concentrations of LH were sexually dimorphic in spotted hyenas, with females displaying higher levels than males. Prenatal antiandrogen treatment also significantly altered the LH response to GnRH. Plasma estradiol concentration was higher in AA-females, whereas testosterone and androstenedione levels tended to be lower. This trend toward lower androgen levels disappeared after GnRHa suppression and hCG challenge. In males, prenatal antiandrogen treatment had long-lasting effects on circulating androgens: AA-males had lower T levels than control males. The sex differences and effects of prenatal antiandrogens on LH secretion suggest that the anterior pituitary gland of the female spotted hyena is partially masculinized by the high androgen levels that normally occur during development, without adverse effects on ovulatory function.

  10. Anesthetic management of a rare case of extra-adrenal pheochromocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Pratibha, S. D.; Katti, Vijay; Patil, Basvaraj

    2016-01-01

    Anesthetic management of pheochromocytoma is complicated and challenging. Extra-adrenal pheochromocytoma is a rare neuroendocrine tumor that produces, stores and secretes catecholamines. The main-stay in the management of pheochromocytoma surgeries is Preoperative preparation which has improved perioperative outcome. Modern anesthetic drugs with advanced monitoring have contributed to intraoperative stability. Resection of the tumor results in acute withdrawal of catecholamines, which may lead to severe hypotension. In perioperative period, adequate hydration should be maintained. Beta-blockers, nitroglycerine, sodium nitroprusside and phenylephrine are required to avoid hemodynamic fluctuations and should be used appropriately. PMID:26957701

  11. Androgen receptor expression in gastrointestinal stromal tumor.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Lisandro F; Bacchi, Carlos E

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of estrogen, progesterone, and androgen receptors in a large series of gastrointestinal stromal tumors. Clinical and pathologic data were reviewed in 427 cases of gastrointestinal stromal tumor and the expression of such hormone receptors was investigated by immunohistochemistry using tissue microarray technique. All tumors were negative for estrogen receptor expression. Progesterone and androgen receptors expression was observed in 5.4% and 17.6% of tumors, respectively. We found the higher average age at diagnosis, the lower frequency of tumors located in the small intestine, and the higher frequency of extragastrointestinal tumors to be statistically significant in the group of tumors with androgen receptor expression in contrast to the group showing no androgen receptor expression. There was no statistic difference between such groups regarding sex, tumor size, mitotic count, cell morphology, and risk of aggressive behavior. Considering that the expression of androgen receptors in gastrointestinal stromal tumors is not negligible, further studies are encouraged to establish the role of androgen deprivation therapy for gastrointestinal stromal tumors.

  12. Opioid-Induced Androgen Deficiency (OPIAD): Diagnosis, Management, and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    O'Rourke, Timothy K; Wosnitzer, Matthew S

    2016-10-01

    Opioid-induced androgen deficiency (OPIAD) was initially recognized as a possible consequence of opioid use roughly four decades ago. Long-acting opioid use carries risks of addiction, tolerance, and systemic side effects including hypogonadotropic hypogonadism with consequent testosterone depletion leading to multiple central and peripheral effects. Hypogonadism is induced through direct inhibitory action of opioids on receptors within the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axes as well as testosterone production within the testes. Few studies have systematically investigated hormonal changes induced by long-term opioid administration or the effects of testosterone replacement therapy (TRT) in patients with OPIAD. Clomiphene citrate, a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM), is a testosterone enhancement treatment which upregulates endogenous hypothalamic function. This review will focus on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of OPIAD, including summary of literature evaluating OPIAD treatment with TRT, and areas of future investigation. PMID:27586511

  13. Piper cubeba targets multiple aspects of the androgen-signalling pathway. A potential phytotherapy against prostate cancer growth?

    PubMed

    Yam, Jianying; Kreuter, Matthias; Drewe, Juergen

    2008-01-01

    Despite the high prevalence of prostate cancer (PC) in the Western world, there is a dearth of effective medication. Since the androgen-signalling pathway is very much involved in PC growth and development, we investigated the potential of Piper cubeba L. extract, P9605, in targeting multiple events simultaneously within this pathway. This may be more effective compared to an antiandrogen monotherapy. Our results indicated that P9605 inhibited proliferation in androgen-dependent LNCaP human prostate cancer cells by reducing DNA synthesis and inducing apoptosis. This antigrowth effect was less pronounced in androgen-independent PC-3 prostate cancer cell lines. P9605 potently inhibited 5 alpha-reductase II activity, which is responsible for converting testosterone to its active form, dihydrotestosterone (DHT), in the prostate. It also acted as an antagonist at recombinant wild-type androgen receptors (AR). P9605 suppressed cell growth and prostate-specific antigen (PSA) secretion stimulated by physiological concentrations of DHT in LNCaP cells. Interestingly, it down-regulated AR levels. In conclusion, our findings suggest that P9605 may potentially retard the growth of androgen-dependent PC via several mechanisms.

  14. Bilateral adrenal [corrected] nodules due to histoplasmosis in an elderly.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Flávio Pedreira de Freitas de; Curiati, José Antônio Esper; Mauad, Thaís; Incerti, Milena Mendes; Jacob Filho, Wilson

    2007-02-01

    We report a case history of an 84-year-old elderly male patient that presented with a clinical picture suggestive of adrenal failure and bilateral adrenal nodules detected by abdominal computed tomography. A fine needle-guided biopsy was inconclusive for achieving a final diagnosis. The patient died due to septic shock and the autopsy disclosed histoplasmosis with extensive bilateral necrosis of the adrenal glands. Although the adrenal involvement in chronic disseminated histoplasmosis has been described, there have been few reports of the infection being associated with adrenal insufficiency.

  15. Adrenal gland denervation and diving in ducks.

    PubMed

    Mangalam, H J; Jones, D R; Lacombe, A M

    1987-06-01

    The extreme elevation in plasma levels of free norepinephrine (NE) and free epinephrine (EP), which occurs during forced diving of ducks (Anas platyrhynchos), was studied before and after denervation of the adrenal glands. In intact animals both NE and EP concentration increased by up to two orders of magnitude in a 4-min dive but by a significantly lesser amount if the duck breathed O2 before the dive. Denervating the adrenal glands reduced the amounts of both catecholamines (CA) released during dives, plasma EP decreased to 10%, and NE to 50% of values obtained before denervation. Breathing O2 before a dive virtually eliminated CA release in denervates, indicating that hypoxia was the important non-neural releasing agent. Hypoxia was also the most important neural releasing agent compared with hypercapnia, acidosis, or hypoglycemia. Adrenal denervation did not cause significant changes in heart rate, blood pressure, arterial blood gas tensions, pH, or plasma glucose during dives, although denervation caused increased variation in some of these variables. In ducks CA release in dives is largely due to decreasing arterial O2 partial pressure, and full expression of the response is dependent on intact innervation of the adrenal gland. PMID:3591985

  16. Genetics Home Reference: primary macronodular adrenal hyperplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... germline and somatic mutations are associated with both primary macronodular adrenal hyperplasia and meningioma. J Clin Endocrinol Metab. 2015 Jan;100(1):E119-28. doi: 10.1210/jc.2014-2648. Citation on PubMed or Free article on PubMed Central Faucz FR, Zilbermint M, Lodish ...

  17. Imaging features of benign adrenal cysts.

    PubMed

    Sanal, Hatice Tuba; Kocaoglu, Murat; Yildirim, Duzgun; Bulakbasi, Nail; Guvenc, Inanc; Tayfun, Cem; Ucoz, Taner

    2006-12-01

    Benign adrenal gland cysts (BACs) are rare lesions with a variable histological spectrum and may mimic not only each other but also malignant ones. We aimed to review imaging features of BACs which can be helpful in distinguishing each entity and determining the subsequent appropriate management. PMID:16962278

  18. Adrenal Cushing's syndrome may resemble eating disorders.

    PubMed

    Hatakeyama, Makiko; Nakagami, Taku; Yasui-Furukori, Norio

    2014-01-01

    We encountered a patient who presented extreme weight loss and received an eating disorder diagnosis that was later identified as adrenal Cushing's syndrome. A 32-year-old woman with a 2-year history of an eating disorder was admitted to our psychiatric ward due to dehydration, malnutrition and low weight. Her height and body weight were 152.1 cm and 29.8 kg, respectively (body mass index: 12.8). Her other symptoms included a depressed mood, decreased interest, retardation and suicidal ideation. Standard medical cares were prescribed to treat the depressive symptoms and eating disorder, but the depressive episode and low body weight of the patient persisted. Computed tomography of the abdomen revealed an unexpected left adrenal gland tumor. Cushing's syndrome was diagnosed based on several endocrinological examinations. After an enucleation of the left adrenal gland tumor, the patient began eating, and her body weight increased gradually. Her body weight increased to 42.0-47.0 kg (body mass index: 18.2-20.3). Her mental and physical conditions had stabilized. This case suggests that adrenal Cushing's syndrome may resemble eating disorders.

  19. Adrenal metabolism of mitotane and related compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Djanegara, T.K.S.

    1989-01-01

    Mitotane (o,p{prime}-DDD; 1-(2-chlorophenyl)-1-(4-chlorophenyl)-2,2-dichloroethane) has been used in the treatment of Cushing's syndrome due to adrenal hyperfunction and it the drug of choice for adrenocortical carcinoma. The object of this investigation is to study the biotransformation of o,p{prime}-DDD and p,p{prime}-DDD in dogs and bovine adrenal cortex to explain its selective toxicity and mechanism of action. The in vitro biotransformation of {sup 14}C-labeled o,p{prime}-DDD and p,p{prime}-DDD by dog and bovine adrenal cortex as studied. Of the cortex subcellular fractions, the cytosol fraction was found to be the most active in metabolizing the substrates, followed by the mitochondrial fraction. This metabolism including that in cytosolic fractions, did not take place with boiled enzyme preparations and required an NADPH generating system. This study has been directed towards establishing the metabolic activation mechanism which may account for the adrenocorticolytic effect of mitotane in contrast to detoxication by the liver. HPLC and TLC metabolic profiles have been generated from incubations of bovine and dog adrenal cortex homogenates and their subfractions for {sup 14}C-labeled p,p{prime}-DDD, o,p{prime}-DDD and its monochloroethylene derivative, o,p{prime}-DDMU.

  20. Haemorrhagic adrenal pseudocyst: a case report.

    PubMed

    Jain, P; Shukla, N K; Das, S K; Kapila, K; Kapur, M

    1988-01-01

    A case of a non-functioning adrenal pseudocyst is reported herein. The key role of sonography and abdominal CT in the diagnosis of this rare retroperitoneal cystic lesion is highlighted. A possible etiological relationship with the trauma of parturition is proposed in our patient.

  1. Regulation of aldosterone synthesis and secretion.

    PubMed

    Bollag, Wendy B

    2014-07-01

    Aldosterone is a steroid hormone synthesized in and secreted from the outer layer of the adrenal cortex, the zona glomerulosa. Aldosterone is responsible for regulating sodium homeostasis, thereby helping to control blood volume and blood pressure. Insufficient aldosterone secretion can lead to hypotension and circulatory shock, particularly in infancy. On the other hand, excessive aldosterone levels, or those too high for sodium status, can cause hypertension and exacerbate the effects of high blood pressure on multiple organs, contributing to renal disease, stroke, visual loss, and congestive heart failure. Aldosterone is also thought to directly induce end-organ damage, including in the kidneys and heart. Because of the significance of aldosterone to the physiology and pathophysiology of the cardiovascular system, it is important to understand the regulation of its biosynthesis and secretion from the adrenal cortex. Herein, the mechanisms regulating aldosterone production in zona glomerulosa cells are discussed, with a particular emphasis on signaling pathways involved in the secretory response to the main controllers of aldosterone production, the renin-angiotensin II system, serum potassium levels and adrenocorticotrophic hormone. The signaling pathways involved include phospholipase C-mediated phosphoinositide hydrolysis, inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate, cytosolic calcium levels, calcium influx pathways, calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinases, diacylglycerol, protein kinases C and D, 12-hydroxyeicostetraenoic acid, phospholipase D, mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways, tyrosine kinases, adenylate cyclase, and cAMP-dependent protein kinase. A complete understanding of the signaling events regulating aldosterone biosynthesis may allow the identification of novel targets for therapeutic interventions in hypertension, primary aldosteronism, congestive heart failure, renal disease, and other cardiovascular disorders. PMID:24944029

  2. Adrenal Nodular Hyperplasia in Hereditary Leiomyomatosis and Renal Cell Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shuch, Brian; Ricketts, Christopher J.; Vocke, Cathy D.; Valera, Vladimir A.; Chen, Clara C.; Gautam, Rabi; Gupta, Gopal N.; Macias, Gabriela S. Gomez; Merino, Maria J.; Bratslavsky, Gennady; Linehan, W Marston

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell carcinoma (HLRCC) is characterized by cutaneous leiomyomas, uterine fibroids, and aggressive papillary renal cell carcinoma (RCC). A number of our HLRCC patients were found to have atypical adrenal nodules and which were further evaluated to determine if these adrenal nodules were associated with HLRCC. Methods HLRCC patients underwent a comprehensive clinical and genetic evaluation. Clinical presentation, anatomic and functional imaging, endocrine evaluation, pathologic examination and the results from germline mutation testing were reviewed. Results Twenty of 255 HLRCC patients (7.8%) were found to have primary adrenal lesions. Among these, three were found to have bilateral adrenal lesions and four were found to have multiple nodules. Two patients had ACTH-independent hypercortisolism. A total of 27 adrenal lesions were evaluated. The imaging characteristics of five (18.5%) of these lesions were not consistent with adenoma by non-contrast CT criteria. PET imaging was positive in 7 of 10 cases (70%). Twelve nodules were surgically resected from ten adrenal glands. Pathologic examination revealed macronodular adrenal hyperplasia in all specimens. Conclusions Unilateral and bilateral adrenal nodular hyperplasia was detected in a subset of patients affected with HLRCC. A functional endocrine evaluation is recommended when an adrenal lesion is discovered. Imaging frequently demonstrates lesions that are not typical of adenomas and PET imaging may be positive. To date, no patient has been found to have adrenal malignancy and active surveillance of HLRCC adrenal nodules appears justified. PMID:22982371

  3. Adrenal myelolipoma: Controversies in its management

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Vasanth G.; Thota, Anuroop; Shankar, Ravi; Desai, Mallikarjun G.

    2015-01-01

    Adrenal myelolipomas (AMLs) are rare, benign neoplasms of the adrenal gland with varied clinical presentations. The rarity of these tumors precludes any case-controlled or randomized study into their management. The available literature is limited to case reports and short series from referral centers. This review is an effort to put the available literature into perspective such that clinical decision making can be done with some clarity. The PubMed and Cochrane databases were searched with key words Adrenal Myelolipoma, Adrenal Incidentaloma (AI) and Adrenal Collision Tumor (ACT). From over 1300 search results, 547 relevant publications dating from 1954 to 2014 were reviewed. Details of about 1231 AMLs in the indexed literature were analyzed. Increasing usage of imaging studies has significantly increased the discovery of AMLs. Although AMLs are benign tumors, those measuring larger than 6 cm are prone to rupture and hemorrhage. Thorough endocrine work-up may benefit a selected group of patients, especially those who are hypertensive, diabetic/pre-diabetic, young patients (<50 years) and those with bilateral AML. Regular observation is needed for AML patients who are being treated non-operatively, as many of them may require surgery during follow-up. Although the AACE/AAES guidelines for AI (2009) exclude AML from mandatory metabolic work-up for a newly discovered AI, we feel that a significant number of patients with AML would benefit from metabolic work-up. In the literature, endocrine dysfunction in AML is 7% as compared with 11% in AI. Endocrine dysfunction in AML is probably underdiagnosed. PMID:25878407

  4. Cardiovascular physiology of androgens and androgen testosterone therapy in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Ling, Shanhong; Komesaroff, Paul A; Sudhir, Krishnankutty

    2009-03-01

    Women before menopause are at relatively lower risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) compared with age-matched men and after menopause this gender advantage disappears. Androgen has been known to be an independent factor contributing to the higher male susceptibility to CVD, through adverse effects on lipids, blood pressure, and glucose metabolism. High androgen levels also contribute to CVD development in women with polycystic ovary syndrome as well as androgen abusing athletes and body builders. On the other hand, decline in androgen levels, as a result of ageing in men, is associated with hypertension, diabetes and atherosclerosis. Postmenopausal women, particularly those with oophorectomy are generally in low levels of sex hormones and androgen insufficiency is independently associated with the higher incidence of atherosclerosis in postmenopausal women. Androgen testosterone therapy (ATT) has been commonly used to improve well-being and libido in aging men with low androgen levels. The therapy has been demonstrated also to effectively reduce atherogenesis in these people. The use of ATT in postmenopausal women has increased in recent years and to date, however, the cardiovascular benefits of such therapy in these women remain uncertain. This review focuses on research regarding the impact of endogenous androgens and ATT on the cardiovascular physiology and CVD development in postmenopausal women.

  5. Histoplasmosis of the adrenal glands studied by CT

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, D.A.; Muchmore, H.G.; Tisdal, R.G.; Fahmy, A.; Pitha, J.V.

    1984-03-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of the adrenal glands was performed on seven patients who had histologically proved disseminated histoplasmosis. All seven patients showed some degree of adrenal gland abnormality. The range of CT findings included minimal enlargement with faint flecks of calcium, moderate enlargement with focal low attenuation nodules, and massive enlargement with large areas of necrosis or dense calcification. The changes in each patient were bilateral and symmetrical. Adrenal gland shape was usually preserved. Finding of percutaneous adrenal biopsy, which was performed under CT guidance, made the diagnosis in one patient. Five of seven patients had adrenal insufficiency. It is concluded that the diagnosis of disseminated histoplasmosis should be considered in any patient who has bilateral adrenal gland enlargement and who resides in an endemic area, especially if there is evidence of adrenal insufficiency.

  6. A case study of virilizing adrenal tumor in an adolescent female elite tennis player--insight into the use of anabolic steroids in young athletes.

    PubMed

    Eliakim, Alon; Cale-Benzoor, Mia; Klinger-Cantor, Beatrice; Freud, Enrique; Nemet, Dan; Feigin, Elad; Weintrob, Neomi

    2011-01-01

    A 14-year-old Caucasian girl was referred to the endocrine clinic for evaluation of voice deepening, facial hirsutism, and acne starting 2 years previously. She had been a competitive tennis player since age 7 years, practicing for 4-6 hours daily. On physical examination she was noticed to have a masculine appearance with mild facial acne and moderate hirsutism. Tanner stage was 1 for breast tissue and 5 for pubic hair. Her androgen levels (testosterone, androstenedione, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate) were extremely elevated. Adrenal ultrasonography revealed a round left 4.6 × 5.3-cm adrenal mass. Laparoscopic left adrenalectomy was performed. The histologic findings were compatible with a benign adrenocortical tumor. Postoperatively, androgen levels dropped to within the normal range. Breast development proceeded normally, menarche occurred 2 months after tumor resection, and menses has been regular since then. Muscle strength of the dominant and nondominant upper and lower extremities was measured 1 month before surgery and 1 year later, using an isokinetic dynamometer (Biodex Systems II, Biodex, Shirley, NY, USA). There was no significant decrease in overall muscle strength after removal of the virilizing tumor and the marked drop in circulating androgens. In addition, the patient maintained her age category, number 1, national tennis ranking. The results suggest that even extremely high levels of tumor-related circulating androgens had no evident effect on muscle strength and competitive performance in a female adolescent tennis player. The lack of beneficial effect on performance in adolescents, combined with the potentially hazardous side effects of anabolic steroids, suggests that teenage athletes should avoid their use.

  7. Selective androgen receptor modulators as improved androgen therapy for advanced breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Coss, Christopher C; Jones, Amanda; Dalton, James T

    2014-11-01

    Androgens were at one time a therapeutic mainstay in the treatment of advanced breast cancer. Despite comparable efficacy, SERMs and aromatase inhibitors eventually became the therapies of choice due to in part to preferred side-effect profiles. Molecular characterization of breast tumors has revealed an abundance of androgen receptor expression but the choice of an appropriate androgen receptor ligand (agonist or antagonist) has been confounded by multiple conflicting reports concerning the role of the receptor in the disease. Modern clinical efforts have almost exclusively utilized antagonists. However, the recent clinical development of selective androgen receptor modulators with greatly improved side-effect profiles has renewed interest in androgen agonist therapy for advanced breast cancer.

  8. 3βHSD and CYB5A double positive adrenocortical cells during adrenal development/aging

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Fujishima, Fumiyoshi; Hui, Xiao-Gang; Felizola, Saulo J.A.; Shibahara, Yukiko; Akahira, Jun-ichi; McNamara, Keely M.; Rainey, William E.; Sasano, Hironobu

    2014-01-01

    Androstenedione is a common precursor of sex steroids produced and secreted in the human adrenal gland and produced by 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3βHSD), 17α-hydroxylase/17-20 lyase (CYP17) and cytochrome b5 (CYB5A). 3βHSD is expressed in the zona glomerulosa (ZG) and fasciculata (ZF), CYP17 in the ZF and zona reticularis (ZR) and CYB5A in the ZR, respectively. We previously demonstrated the presence of cortical parenchymal cells co-expressing 3βHSD and CYB5A with hybrid features of both ZF and ZR in human adrenal cortex and hypothesized that these cells may play an important role in androstenedione production in human adrenal gland. Age-related morphologic development of these hybrid cells has, however, not been studied. Therefore, in this study, 48 human adrenal specimens from various age groups were retrieved. Double-immunohistochemical analyses were used in order to study the correlation between this hybrid cell type and age. In both male and female adrenal cortex, the mean of total adrenocortical area, the area of CYB5A positive cells and the mean of its ratio reached highest peak in the 21–40 year-old (y.o.). The greatest overlap between 3βHSD and CYB5A in both total and relative area was present in the 13–20 y.o. group. For all of the markers above, statistically significant differences were detected among the different age groups examined (P<0.05). These findings all indicated that both area and ratio of 3βHSD and CYB5A double positive cells, which could represent the hybrid cells of ZF and ZR, are correlated with human adrenal development and could subsequently influence age-related serum androstenedione levels. PMID:24832628

  9. The Role of gsp Mutations on the Development of Adrenocortical Tumors and Adrenal Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Villares Fragoso, Maria Candida Barisson; Wanichi, Ingrid Quevedo; Cavalcante, Isadora Pontes; Mariani, Beatriz Marinho de Paula

    2016-01-01

    Somatic GNAS point mutations, commonly known as gsp mutations, are involved in the pathogenesis of McCune-Albright syndrome (MAS) and have also been described in autonomous hormone-producing tumors, such as somatotropinoma, corticotrophoma, thyroid cancer, ovarian and testicular Leydig cell tumors, and primary macronodular adrenocortical hyperplasia (PMAH) (1-3). The involvement of gsp mutations in adrenal tumors was first described by Lyons et al. Since then, several studies have detected the presence of gsp mutations in adrenal tumors, but none of them could explain its presence along or the mechanism that leads to tumor formation and hormone hypersecretion. As a result, the molecular pathogenesis of the majority of sporadic adrenocortical tumors remains unclear (3). PMAH has also been reported with gsp somatic mutations in a few cases. Fragoso et al. identified two distinct gsp somatic mutations affecting arginine residues on codon 201 of GNAS in a few patients with PMAH who lacked any features or manifestations of MAS. Followed by this discovery, other studies have continued looking for gsp mutations based on strong prior evidence demonstrating that increased cAMP signaling is sufficient for cell proliferation and cortisol production (2, 4). With consideration for the previously reported findings, we conjecture that although somatic activating mutations in GNAS are a rare molecular event, these mutations could probably be sufficient to induce the development of macronodule hyperplasia and variable cortisol secretion. In this manuscript, we revised the presence of gsp mutations associated with adrenal cortical tumors and hyperplasia. PMID:27512387

  10. The Role of gsp Mutations on the Development of Adrenocortical Tumors and Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Villares Fragoso, Maria Candida Barisson; Wanichi, Ingrid Quevedo; Cavalcante, Isadora Pontes; Mariani, Beatriz Marinho de Paula

    2016-01-01

    Somatic GNAS point mutations, commonly known as gsp mutations, are involved in the pathogenesis of McCune–Albright syndrome (MAS) and have also been described in autonomous hormone-producing tumors, such as somatotropinoma, corticotrophoma, thyroid cancer, ovarian and testicular Leydig cell tumors, and primary macronodular adrenocortical hyperplasia (PMAH) (1–3). The involvement of gsp mutations in adrenal tumors was first described by Lyons et al. Since then, several studies have detected the presence of gsp mutations in adrenal tumors, but none of them could explain its presence along or the mechanism that leads to tumor formation and hormone hypersecretion. As a result, the molecular pathogenesis of the majority of sporadic adrenocortical tumors remains unclear (3). PMAH has also been reported with gsp somatic mutations in a few cases. Fragoso et al. identified two distinct gsp somatic mutations affecting arginine residues on codon 201 of GNAS in a few patients with PMAH who lacked any features or manifestations of MAS. Followed by this discovery, other studies have continued looking for gsp mutations based on strong prior evidence demonstrating that increased cAMP signaling is sufficient for cell proliferation and cortisol production (2, 4). With consideration for the previously reported findings, we conjecture that although somatic activating mutations in GNAS are a rare molecular event, these mutations could probably be sufficient to induce the development of macronodule hyperplasia and variable cortisol secretion. In this manuscript, we revised the presence of gsp mutations associated with adrenal cortical tumors and hyperplasia. PMID:27512387

  11. Expression of the human apolipoprotein E gene suppresses steroidogenesis in mouse Y1 adrenal cells

    SciTech Connect

    Reyland, M.E.; Forgez, P.; Prack, M.M.; Williams, D.L. ); Gwynne, J.T. )

    1991-03-15

    The lipid transport protein, apolipoprotein E (apoE), is expressed in many peripheral tissues in vivo including the adrenal gland and testes. To investigate the role of apoE in adrenal cholesterol homeostasis, the authors have expressed a human apoE genomic clone in the Y1 mouse adrenocortical cell line. Y1 cells do not express endogenous apoE mRNA or protein. Expression of apoE in Y1 cells resulted in a dramatic decrease in basal steroidogenesis; secretion of fluorogenic steroid was reduced 7- to {gt}100-fold relative to Y1 parent cells. Addition of 5-cholesten-3{beta},25-idol failed to overcome the suppression of steroidogenesis in these cells. Cholesterol esterification under basal conditions, as measured by the production of cholesteryl ({sup 14}C)oleate, was similar in the Y1 parent and the apoE-transfected cell lines. Upon incubation with adrenocorticotropin or dibutyryl cAMP, production of cholesteryl ({sup 14}C)oleate decreased 5-fold in the Y1 parent cells but was unchanged in the apoE-transfected cell lines. These results suggest that apoE may be an important modulator of cholesterol utilization and steroidogenesis in adrenal cells.

  12. Synthesis of hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acids (HETE's) by adrenal glomerulosa cells and incorporation into cellular lipids

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, W.B.; Richards, C.F.; Brady, M.T.; Falck, J.R.

    1986-03-05

    The role of lipoxygenase metabolites of arachidonic acid (AA) in the regulation of aldosterone secretion was studied in isolated rat adrenal glomerulosa cells. Cells were incubated with /sup 14/C-AA in the presence of angiotensin (AII). The media was extracted, metabolites isolated by HPLC, and structures of the metabolites determined by UV absorbance and mass spectrometry. The major products were 12- and 15-HETE with lesser amounts of 11- and 5-HETE. When adrenal cells were incubated with 15-, 12- or 5-HPETE or their respective HETE's (0.03-300nM), there was no significant change in basal or AII-stimulated aldosterone release. Cells were incubated with (/sup 3/H)-AA, -5-HETE, -15-HETE, -12-HETE or -LTB. The cellular lipids were extracted and analyzed by TLC. AA was incorporated into phospholipids (22%), cholesterol esters (50%) and triglycerides (21%). Neither the HETE's or LTB/sub 4/ were incorporated into phospholipids. 5-HETE was taken up into di- and mono-glycerides. The rates of incorporation of AA and 5-HETE were similar (+ 1/2 = 10 min). The incorporation of 5-HETE into glycerol esters did not modify the release of aldosterone by the cells. Thus, while adrenal cells synthesize HETE's, these eicosanoids do not appear to alter the synthesis of aldosterone.

  13. Prenatal stress increases the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis response in young and adult rats.

    PubMed

    Henry, C; Kabbaj, M; Simon, H; Le Moal, M; Maccari, S

    1994-06-01

    Prenatal stress is considered as an early epigenetic factor able to induce long-lasting alterations in brain structures and functions. It is still unclear whether prenatal stress can induce long-lasting modifications in the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis. To test this possibility the effects of restraint stress in pregnant rats during the third week of gestation were investigated in the functional properties of the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis and hippocampal type I and type II corticosteroid receptors in the male offspring at 3, 21 and 90 days of age. Plasma corticosterone was significantly elevated in prenatally-stressed rats at 3 and 21 days after exposure to novelty. At 90 days of age, prenatally-stressed rats showed a longer duration of corticosterone secretion after exposure to novelty. No change was observed for type I and type II receptor densities 3 days after birth, but both receptor subtypes were decreased in the hippocampus of prenatally-stressed offspring at 21 and 90 days of life. These findings suggest that prenatal stress produces long term changes in the hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal axis in the offspring. PMID:7920600

  14. Social modulation of androgen levels in male teleost fish.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Rui F; Hirschenhauser, Katharina; Carneiro, Luis A; Canario, Adelino V M

    2002-05-01

    Androgens are classically thought of as the sex steroids controlling male reproduction. However, in recent years evidence has accumulated showing that androgens can also be affected by the interactions between conspecifics, suggesting reciprocal interactions between androgens and behaviour. These results have been interpreted as an adaptation for individuals to adjust their agonistic motivation and to cope with changes in their social environment. Thus, male-male interactions would stimulate the production of androgens, and the levels of androgens would be a function of the stability of its social environment ['challenge hypothesis', Gen. Comp. Endocrinol. 56 (1984) 417]. Here the available data on social modulation of androgen levels in male teleosts are reviewed and some predictions of the challenge hypothesis are addressed using teleosts as a study model. We investigate the causal link between social status, territoriality and elevated androgen levels and the available evidence suggests that the social environment indeed modulates the endocrine axis of teleosts. The association between higher androgen levels and social rank emerges mainly in periods of social instability. As reported in the avian literature, in teleosts the trade-off between androgens and parental care is indicated by the fact that during the parental phase breeding males decreased their androgen levels. A comparison of androgen responsiveness between teleost species with different mating and parenting systems also reveals that parenting explains the variation observed in androgen responsiveness to a higher degree than the mating strategy. Finally, the adaptive value of social modulation of androgens and some of its evolutionary consequences are discussed.

  15. In situ androgen and estrogen biosynthesis in endometrial cancer: focus on androgen actions and intratumoral production.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kiyoshi; Miki, Yasuhiro; Suzuki, Takashi; McNamara, Keely May; Sasano, Hironobu

    2016-07-01

    In situ estrogen biosynthesis is considered to play pivotal roles in the development and progression of human endometrial carcinoma. However, the biological roles of androgen have remained virtually unknown. Various epidemiological studies have revealed that elevated serum androgen levels are generally associated with an increased risk of developing endometrial carcinoma; however, studies directly examining androgens in carcinoma tissues are relatively rare and reviews summarizing this information are scarce. Therefore, we summarized recent studies on androgens in endometrial carcinoma, especially focusing androgen actions and in situ androgen biosynthesis. Among the enzymes required for local biosynthesis of androgen, 17β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 5 (conversion from androstenedione to testosterone) and 5α-reductase (reduction of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone (DHT)) are the principal enzymes involved in the formation of biologically most potent androgen, DHT. Both enzymes and androgen receptor were expressed in endometrial carcinoma tissues, and in situ production of DHT has been reported to exist in endometrial carcinoma tissues. However, testosterone is not only a precursor of DHT production, but also a precursor of estradiol synthesis, as a substrate of the aromatase enzyme. Therefore, aromatase could be another key enzyme serving as a negative regulator for in situ production of DHT by reducing amounts of the precursor. In an in vitro study, DHT was reported to exert antiproliferative effects on endometrial carcinoma cells. Intracrine mechanisms of androgens, the downstream signals of AR, which are directly related to anticancer progression, and the clinical significance of DHT-AR pathway in the patients with endometrial carcinoma have, however, not been fully elucidated. PMID:27287451

  16. Menstrual bleeding in a female infant with congenital adrenal hyperplasia: altered maturation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis.

    PubMed

    Uli, N; Chin, D; David, R; Geneiser, N; Roche, K; Marino, F; Shapiro, E; Prasad, K; Oberfield, S

    1997-10-01

    Vaginal bleeding during the neonatal period is commonly related to the withdrawal of maternal estrogens. Vaginal bleeding has also been reported in female infants with congenital adrenal hyperplasia and has been proposed to be due to a treatment-induced activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-ovarian axis. We report a female infant with the salt-losing form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency, who had the onset of vaginal bleeding at 3 months of life. Adrenal steroid suppression had been achieved by 2.5 weeks of age. At the time of bleeding, imaging studies revealed an enlarged right ovary with a dominant 3-cm cyst and additional small cysts that had not been seen on the newborn sonogram. The uterus was enlarged and stimulated. Three weeks later (1 week after the cessation of bleeding), repeat ultrasound demonstrated a marked decrease in the size of the right ovary, and the dominant cyst was no longer seen. The patient had a heightened FSH response to GnRH and elevated levels of estradiol for age. At 5 months of age, no further episodes of sustained vaginal bleeding were observed. Repeat hormonal levels were prepubertal, and pelvic sonogram demonstrated no evidence of stimulation. The findings in our patient suggest that a decline in adrenal androgens after glucocorticoid treatment resulted in an increase in gonadotropin levels, which then triggered a transient and augmented end-organ response (menses). Further, we suggest that our infant's hormonal findings may reflect a delay in the timely development of the negative restraint by sex steroids on gonadotropins that is normally observed in infancy.

  17. Effects of androgens and antiandrogens on the quantitative immunohistochemistry of gonadotrope cells in prepubertal male rats.

    PubMed

    Cónsole, G G; Rulli, S B; Riccillo, F L; Calandra, R S; Gómez Dumm, C L

    1999-10-01

    In the male rat, androgens are involved in the feedback regulation of gonadotropin synthesis and secretion. Specific androgen-receptor blockade by the nonsteroidal antiandrogens, flutamide and Casodex, has proven to be a valid tool for studying androgen effects in vivo. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of antiandrogen administration at the pituitary level by evaluating the changes in gonadotropes through quantitative immunohistochemistry, and by comparing these alterations with the effect of androgen deprivation by castration either with or without subsequent androgen replacement. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (23 days old) were randomly divided into 5 groups for the following treatments: (a) controls; (b) flutamide-injected (10 mg/rat/day in a gelatin vehicle); (c) Casodex-injected (10 mg/rat/day in an oil vehicle); (d) castrated, and (e) castrated and dihydrotestosterone propionate-replaced (40 microg/rat/day in an oil vehicle). Groups were then sacrificed after 10 days of maintenance under each condition. Pituitaries were fixed in Bouin's fluid and embedded in paraffin. Serial sections (4 micrometer) were obtained at different levels and immunostained by means of the primary murine monoclonal antibodies anti-FSH and anti-LH and a peroxidase-mediated EnVision System (Dako). Measurements of volume density (VD) and individual mean cell area were made by means of an image-analysis system (Imaging Technology, Optimas). Serum FSH and LH levels were determined by radioimmunoassay (RIA). Serum gonadotropin levels, VD, and mean cell area increased significantly in the flutamide-treated, Casodex-treated, and castrated groups (p < 0.05). Androgen replacement in the castrated rats, however, reduced VD, mean cell area, and serum gonadotropins to levels comparable to those of controls. We conclude that either androgen blockade by antiandrogens or castration produce an enhancement in the gonadotrope cell population in prepubertal rats, as shown by an

  18. Sex-dependent role of glucocorticoids and androgens in the pathophysiology of human obesity.

    PubMed

    Pasquali, R; Vicennati, V; Gambineri, A; Pagotto, U

    2008-12-01

    Obesity, particularly its abdominal phenotype, a harbinger of the metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2D), is becoming one of the most significant public health problems worldwide. Among many other potential factors, derangement of multiple hormone systems have increasingly been considered for their potential importance in the pathophysiology of obesity and the metabolic syndrome, with particular reference to glucocorticoids and sex hormones. These systems have a fundamental and coordinating role in the physiology of intermediate metabolism and cardiovascular function, and in the response to acute and chronic stress challenge. Abdominal obesity is associated with a hyperactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis and impaired androgen balance, although these alterations differ according to sex. As there is also increasing evidence that there are many differences between the sexes in the susceptibility and development of obesity, T2D and CVDs, we support the hypothesis that alterations of the HPA axis and androgen balance may have an important function in this context. This is further supported by the fact that there are important differences between males and females in their ability to adapt to both internal and particularly to environmental (external) stressors. In addition, there is also evidence that, in both physiological and pathological conditions, a close cross talk exists between sex hormones and glucocorticoids at both neuroendocrine and peripheral level, again with different specificities according to sex.

  19. Specificity of anti-prostate cancer CYP17A1 inhibitors on androgen biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Udhane, Sameer S; Dick, Bernhard; Hu, Qingzhong; Hartmann, Rolf W; Pandey, Amit V

    2016-09-01

    The orteronel, abiraterone and galeterone, which were developed to treat castration resistant prostate cancer, inhibit 17,20 lyase activity but little is known about their effects on adrenal androgen biosynthesis. We studied the effect of several inhibitors and found that orteronel was selective towards 17,20 lyase activity than abiraterone and galeterone. Gene expression analysis showed that galeterone altered the expression of HSD3B2 but orteronel did not change the expression of HSD3B2, CYP17A1 and AKR1C3. The CYP19A1 activity was not inhibited except by compound IV which lowered activity by 23%. Surprisingly abiraterone caused complete blockade of CYP21A2 activity. Analysis of steroid metabolome by gas chromatography - mass spectrometry revealed changes in steroid levels caused by different inhibitors. We can conclude that orteronel is a highly specific inhibitor of 17,20 lyase activity. The discovery of these specific drug actions on steroidogenic enzyme activities would be valuable for understanding the regulation of androgens. PMID:27395338

  20. Androgen actions on the human hair follicle: perspectives.

    PubMed

    Inui, Shigeki; Itami, Satoshi

    2013-03-01

    Androgens stimulate beard growth but suppress hair growth in androgenetic alopecia (AGA). This condition is known as 'androgen paradox'. Human pilosebaceous units possess enough enzymes to form the active androgens testosterone and dihydrotestosterone. In hair follicles, 5α-reductase type 1 and 2, androgen receptors (AR) and AR coactivators can regulate androgen sensitivity of dermal papillae (DP). To regulate hair growth, androgens stimulate production of IGF-1 as positive mediators from beard DP cells and of TGF-β1, TGF-β2, dickkopf1 and IL-6 as negative mediators from balding DP cells. In addition, androgens enhance inducible nitric oxide synthase from occipital DP cells and stem cell factor for positive regulation of hair growth in beard and negative regulation of balding DP cells. Moreover, AGA involves crosstalk between androgen and Wnt/β-catenin signalling. Finally, recent data on susceptibility genes have provided us with the impetus to investigate the molecular pathogenesis of AGA. PMID:23016593