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Sample records for adrenal catecholamine content

  1. The content of catecholamines in the adrenal glands and sections of the brain under hypokinesia and injection of some neurotropic agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Melnik, B. E.; Paladiy, E. S.

    1980-01-01

    The dynamics of catecholamine content were studied in the adrenal glands and in various region of the brain of white rats under hypokinesia and injections of neurotropic agents. Profound changes in body catecholamine balance occured as a result of prolonged acute restriction of motor activity. Adrenalin retention increased and noradrenanalin retention decreased in the adrenal glands, hypothalamus, cerebral hemispheres, cerebellum and medulla oblongata. Observed alterations in catecholamine retention varied depending upon the type of neurotropic substance utilized. Mellipramine increased catecholamine retention in the tissues under observation while spasmolytin brought about an increase in adrenalin concentration in the adrenals and a decrease in the brain.

  2. Change in energy expenditure and brain and adrenal content of catecholamines in rats during muscular loading and hypokinesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rozanova, V. D.; Savkiv, T. G.; Khodorova, N. A.

    1980-01-01

    In male 1-7 month old rats, the growth and the protein content of skeletal muscles were higher than in female rats while the O2 consumption and the heart rate were lower. This is combined with reduction of the thyroid gland weight and of catecholamine content in adrenals at the age of 7 months. The development of male and female rats (1-7 month) under conditions of systematic muscular loads increases the growth tempo and protein of skeletal muscles and intensifies the degree of reduction of energy expenditure and the heart rate. This is accomplished by the greater reduction of relative weight of the thyroid gland and, at the age of 7 months, by reduction of the noradrenaline content in the brainstem. Hypodynamic conditions have the exact opposite effect.

  3. Noncholinergic control of adrenal catecholamine secretion.

    PubMed Central

    Livett, B G; Marley, P D

    1993-01-01

    It has been known for over 70 years that adrenal catecholamine secretion can be modulated or elicited by noncholinergic neurotransmitters and hormones. However, our understanding of the cellular mechanisms by which these agents produce their effects and the physiological conditions under which they act are not well characterised. Here we briefly review the mechanisms by which one such agent (the neuropeptide substance P) modulates the cholinergic secretory response of adrenal chromaffin cells, and another agent (angiotensin II) elicits catecholamine secretion independently of the cholinergic innervation. PMID:7507911

  4. Direct effects of recurrent hypoglycaemia on adrenal catecholamine release.

    PubMed

    Orban, Branly O; Routh, Vanessa H; Levin, Barry E; Berlin, Joshua R

    2015-01-01

    In Type 1 and advanced Type 2 diabetes mellitus, elevation of plasma epinephrine plays a key role in normalizing plasma glucose during hypoglycaemia. However, recurrent hypoglycaemia blunts this elevation of plasma epinephrine. To determine whether recurrent hypoglycaemia affects peripheral components of the sympatho-adrenal system responsible for epinephrine release, male rats were administered subcutaneous insulin daily for 3 days. These recurrent hypoglycaemic animals showed a smaller elevation of plasma epinephrine than saline-injected controls when subjected to insulin-induced hypoglycaemia. Electrical stimulation of an adrenal branch of the splanchnic nerve in recurrent hypoglycaemic animals elicited less release of epinephrine and norepinephrine than in controls, without a change in adrenal catecholamine content. Responsiveness of isolated, perfused adrenal glands to acetylcholine and other acetylcholine receptor agonists was also unchanged. These results indicate that recurrent hypoglycaemia compromised the efficacy with which peripheral neuronal activity stimulates adrenal catecholamine release and demonstrate that peripheral components of the sympatho-adrenal system were directly affected by recurrent hypoglycaemia.

  5. THE NUMBER OF CATECHOLAMINE STORAGE GRANULES IN ADRENAL MEDULLA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    A method is described for counting the catecholamine-containing heavy granules of adrenal glands. There are 5.0 ! 0.8 (S. E.) x 10 to the 12th power... granules /gram wet weight of fowl adrenal gland. Individual heavy granules contain about 8 million molecules of catecholamines (1.4 x 10 to the 17th...power mole). Reference to published electron microphotographs of adrenal medulla cells allows estimation of the average volume of heavy granules and

  6. Catecholamines of the adrenal medula and their morphological changes during adaptation to repeated immobilization stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kvetnansky, R.; Mitro, A.; Mikulaj, L.; Hocman, G.

    1980-01-01

    Changes of the adrenal medulla of rats were studied in the course of adaptation to repeated immobilization stress. An increase in the number of cells in the adrenal medulla was found in the adapted animals; this increase was confirmed by weight indices of the medulla and by cell counts per surface unit. Simultaneous karyometric measurements of the nuclei of adrenal medulla cells and an analysis of the catecholamine contents in the adrenals explain the increased activity of the adrenal medulla in the course of adaptation.

  7. Pendrin localizes to the adrenal medulla and modulates catecholamine release.

    PubMed

    Lazo-Fernandez, Yoskaly; Aguilera, Greti; Pham, Truyen D; Park, Annie Y; Beierwaltes, William H; Sutliff, Roy L; Verlander, Jill W; Pacak, Karel; Osunkoya, Adeboye O; Ellis, Carla L; Kim, Young Hee; Shipley, Gregory L; Wynne, Brandi M; Hoover, Robert S; Sen, Shurjo K; Plotsky, Paul M; Wall, Susan M

    2015-09-15

    Pendrin (Slc26a4) is a Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchanger expressed in renal intercalated cells and mediates renal Cl(-) absorption. With pendrin gene ablation, blood pressure and vascular volume fall, which increases plasma renin concentration. However, serum aldosterone does not significantly increase in pendrin-null mice, suggesting that pendrin regulates adrenal zona glomerulosa aldosterone production. Therefore, we examined pendrin expression in the adrenal gland using PCR, immunoblots, and immunohistochemistry. Pendrin protein was detected in adrenal lysates from wild-type but not pendrin-null mice. However, immunohistochemistry and qPCR of microdissected adrenal zones showed that pendrin was expressed in the adrenal medulla, rather than in cortex. Within the adrenal medulla, pendrin localizes to both epinephrine- and norepinephrine-producing chromaffin cells. Therefore, we examined plasma catecholamine concentration and blood pressure in wild-type and pendrin-null mice under basal conditions and then after 5 and 20 min of immobilization stress. Under basal conditions, blood pressure was lower in the mutant than in the wild-type mice, although epinephrine and norepinephrine concentrations were similar. Catecholamine concentration and blood pressure increased markedly in both groups with stress. With 20 min of immobilization stress, epinephrine and norepinephrine concentrations increased more in pendrin-null than in wild-type mice, although stress produced a similar increase in blood pressure in both groups. We conclude that pendrin is expressed in the adrenal medulla, where it blunts stress-induced catecholamine release.

  8. Pendrin localizes to the adrenal medulla and modulates catecholamine release

    PubMed Central

    Lazo-Fernandez, Yoskaly; Aguilera, Greti; Pham, Truyen D.; Park, Annie Y.; Beierwaltes, William H.; Sutliff, Roy L.; Verlander, Jill W.; Pacak, Karel; Osunkoya, Adeboye O.; Ellis, Carla L.; Kim, Young Hee; Shipley, Gregory L.; Wynne, Brandi M.; Hoover, Robert S.; Sen, Shurjo K.; Plotsky, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Pendrin (Slc26a4) is a Cl−/HCO3− exchanger expressed in renal intercalated cells and mediates renal Cl− absorption. With pendrin gene ablation, blood pressure and vascular volume fall, which increases plasma renin concentration. However, serum aldosterone does not significantly increase in pendrin-null mice, suggesting that pendrin regulates adrenal zona glomerulosa aldosterone production. Therefore, we examined pendrin expression in the adrenal gland using PCR, immunoblots, and immunohistochemistry. Pendrin protein was detected in adrenal lysates from wild-type but not pendrin-null mice. However, immunohistochemistry and qPCR of microdissected adrenal zones showed that pendrin was expressed in the adrenal medulla, rather than in cortex. Within the adrenal medulla, pendrin localizes to both epinephrine- and norepinephrine-producing chromaffin cells. Therefore, we examined plasma catecholamine concentration and blood pressure in wild-type and pendrin-null mice under basal conditions and then after 5 and 20 min of immobilization stress. Under basal conditions, blood pressure was lower in the mutant than in the wild-type mice, although epinephrine and norepinephrine concentrations were similar. Catecholamine concentration and blood pressure increased markedly in both groups with stress. With 20 min of immobilization stress, epinephrine and norepinephrine concentrations increased more in pendrin-null than in wild-type mice, although stress produced a similar increase in blood pressure in both groups. We conclude that pendrin is expressed in the adrenal medulla, where it blunts stress-induced catecholamine release. PMID:26173457

  9. Chronic cardiac pressure overload induces adrenal medulla hypertrophy and increased catecholamine synthesis.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Johanna; Lother, Achim; Hein, Lutz; Gilsbach, Ralf

    2011-06-01

    Increased activity of the sympathetic system is an important feature contributing to the pathogenesis and progression of chronic heart failure. While the mechanisms and consequences of enhanced norepinephrine release from sympathetic nerves have been intensely studied, the role of the adrenal gland in the development of cardiac hypertrophy and progression of heart failure is less well known. Thus, the aim of the present study was to determine the effect of chronic cardiac pressure overload in mice on adrenal medulla structure and function. Cardiac hypertrophy was induced in wild-type mice by transverse aortic constriction (TAC) for 8 weeks. After TAC, the degree of cardiac hypertrophy correlated significantly with adrenal weight and adrenal catecholamine storage. In the medulla, TAC caused an increase in chromaffin cell size but did not result in chromaffin cell proliferation. Ablation of chromaffin α(2C)-adrenoceptors did not affect adrenal weight or epinephrine synthesis. However, unilateral denervation of the adrenal gland completely prevented adrenal hypertrophy and increased catecholamine synthesis. Transcriptome analysis of microdissected adrenal medulla identified 483 up- and 231 downregulated, well-annotated genes after TAC. Among these genes, G protein-coupled receptor kinases 2 (Grk2) and 6 and phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (Pnmt) were significantly upregulated by TAC. In vitro, acetylcholine-induced Pnmt and Grk2 expression as well as enhanced epinephrine content was prevented by inhibition of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent signaling. Thus, activation of preganglionic sympathetic nerves innervating the adrenal medulla plays an essential role in inducing adrenal hypertrophy, enhanced catecholamine synthesis and induction of Grk2 expression after cardiac pressure overload.

  10. Decreased catecholamine secretion from the adrenal medullae of chronically diabetic BB-Wistar rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilke, R. A.; Riley, D. A.; Lelkes, P. I.; Hillard, C. J.

    1993-01-01

    Many humans with IDDM eventually lose the capacity to secrete epinephrine from their adrenal medullae. The mechanism for this pathological change is unknown. We hypothesized that this abnormality is attributable to neuropathic changes in the greater splanchnic nerves or in the chromaffin cells that they innervate. To study this hypothesis, we isolated rat adrenal glands, perfused them ex vivo, and measured the epinephrine content of the perfusate under various conditions of stimulation. We used transmural electrical stimulation (20-80 V, at 10 Hz) to induce epinephrine secretion indirectly by selectively activating residual splanchnic nerve terminals within the isolated glands. Under these conditions, epinephrine secretion was severely attenuated in glands from female BB-Wistar rats with diabetes of 4 mo duration compared with their age-matched, nondiabetic controls. These perfused diabetic adrenal medullae also demonstrated decreased catecholamine release in response to direct chromaffin cell depolarization with 20 mM K+, evidence that a functional alteration exists within the chromaffin cells themselves. Nonetheless, total catecholamine content of adrenal medullae from these diabetic rats was not significantly different from controls, indicating that the secretory defect was not simply attributable to a difference in the amount of catecholamines stored and available for release. Herein, we also provide histological evidence of degenerative changes within the cholinergic nerve terminals that innervate these glands.

  11. Effect of dietary copper and sucrose on catecholamine concentrations in the adrenal medulla

    SciTech Connect

    Koo, S.I.; Peterson, D.F.; Mason, P.A. KCOM, Kirksville, MO Air Force/SAM/RZP, Brooks AFB, TX )

    1991-03-11

    The severity of copper (Cu) deficiency in the rat is enhanced by dietary sucrose. Possible interactive effects of Cu status and sucrose on catecholamine concentrations in the adrenal medulla were investigated in Cu deficient rats fed a diet were investigated in Cu deficient rats fed a diet containing either glucose or sucrose, as compared with respective Cu-adequate controls. Catecholamines were analyzed by an HPLC method using 3,4-dihydroxybenxylamine as the internal standard. Cu deficiency caused pronounced decreases in norepinephrine and epinephrine, with no significant effect on dopamine, as expressed in nmoles/mg tissue. Dietary sucrose showed no appreciable effect on catecholamines in the adrenal medulla. The adrenal glands were markedly enlarged in Cu-deficient rats, whether fed glucose or sucrose. Adrenal weights were not affected by dietary sucrose. Data indicate that the increased severity of copper deficiency due to sucrose feeding is not associated with changes in adrenal catecholamine output.

  12. Changes in rat adrenal catecholamines and proenkephalin metabolism after denervation.

    PubMed

    Fleminger, G; Lahm, H W; Udenfriend, S

    1984-06-01

    Adrenal enkephalin-containing peptides are known to increase 10- to 15-fold in the rat after surgical denervation of the gland. In this report we show that the increase is preceded by a lag of several hours, which is indicative of stimulation of protein synthesis at the transcriptional level. The major species of newly appearing enkephalin-containing peptide appears to be the intact precursor, proenkephalin. Processing of proenkephalin to smaller enkephalin-containing peptides in the denervated glands is slow and limited. The only product that accumulates in the process is a peptide of 3-4 kilodaltons that is derived from the carboxyl terminus of proenkephalin. An interesting observation was the dissociation between the effects of denervation on enkephalin-containing peptides and catecholamines. This is surprising because both are localized in the chromaffin granules of the gland.

  13. Changes in rat adrenal catecholamines and proenkephalin metabolism after denervation.

    PubMed Central

    Fleminger, G; Lahm, H W; Udenfriend, S

    1984-01-01

    Adrenal enkephalin-containing peptides are known to increase 10- to 15-fold in the rat after surgical denervation of the gland. In this report we show that the increase is preceded by a lag of several hours, which is indicative of stimulation of protein synthesis at the transcriptional level. The major species of newly appearing enkephalin-containing peptide appears to be the intact precursor, proenkephalin. Processing of proenkephalin to smaller enkephalin-containing peptides in the denervated glands is slow and limited. The only product that accumulates in the process is a peptide of 3-4 kilodaltons that is derived from the carboxyl terminus of proenkephalin. An interesting observation was the dissociation between the effects of denervation on enkephalin-containing peptides and catecholamines. This is surprising because both are localized in the chromaffin granules of the gland. PMID:6587373

  14. Gintonin facilitates catecholamine secretion from the perfused adrenal medulla

    PubMed Central

    Na, Seung-Yeol; Kim, Ki-Hwan; Choi, Mi-Sung; Ha, Kang-Su

    2016-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the characteristics of gintonin, one of components isolated from Korean Ginseng on secretion of catecholamines (CA) from the isolated perfused model of rat adrenal gland and to clarify its mechanism of action. Gintonin (1 to 30 µg/ml), perfused into an adrenal vein, markedly increased the CA secretion from the perfused rat adrenal medulla in a dose-dependent fashion. The gintonin-evoked CA secretion was greatly inhibited in the presence of chlorisondamine (1 µM, an autonomic ganglionic bloker), pirenzepine (2 µM, a muscarinic M1 receptor antagonist), Ki14625 (10 µM, an LPA1/3 receptor antagonist), amiloride (1 mM, an inhibitor of Na+/Ca2+ exchanger), a nicardipine (1 µM, a voltage-dependent Ca2+ channel blocker), TMB-8 (1 µM, an intracellular Ca2+ antagonist), and perfusion of Ca2+-free Krebs solution with 5mM EGTA (a Ca2+chelater), while was not affected by sodium nitroprusside (100 µM, a nitrosovasodialtor). Interestingly, LPA (0.3~3 µM, an LPA receptor agonist) also dose-dependently enhanced the CA secretion from the adrenal medulla, but this facilitatory effect of LPA was greatly inhibited in the presence of Ki 14625 (10 µM). Moreover, acetylcholine (AC)-evoked CA secretion was greatly potentiated during the perfusion of gintonin (3 µg/ml). Taken together, these results demonstrate the first evidence that gintonin increases the CA secretion from the perfused rat adrenal medulla in a dose-dependent fashion. This facilitatory effect of gintonin seems to be associated with activation of LPA- and cholinergic-receptors, which are relevant to the cytoplasmic Ca2+ increase by stimulation of the Ca2+ influx as well as by the inhibition of Ca2+ uptake into the cytoplasmic Ca2+ stores, without the increased nitric oxide (NO). Based on these results, it is thought that gintonin, one of ginseng components, can elevate the CA secretion from adrenal medulla by regulating the Ca2+ mobilization for exocytosis, suggesting

  15. A calcium ionophore stimulating the secretion of catecholamines from the cat adrenal.

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, A G; Kirpekar, S M; Prat, J C

    1975-01-01

    1. Experiments were performed on perfused cat adrenal glands to examine the effect of a calcium ionophore A-23187 in the secretion of catecholamines. 2. Ionophore (1-10 muM) caused a dose-dependent release of catecholamines and the output was about 100-fold greater at 10 mum than at 1 mum. 3. Release of catecholamines by the ionophore was dependent on the calcium concentration of the perfusion medium. Omission of calcium blocked the response to the ionophore while excess calcium facilitated it. 4. Magnesium antagonized the secretory response to the ionophore. Excess calcium overcame the inhibitory effect of magnesium. 5. The ionophore did not modify release of catecholamines by induced splanchnic nerve stimulation. 6. The results suggest that the ionophore, like depolarization, introduces calcium into the chromaffin cell to cause release of catecholamines. PMID:1091727

  16. Adrenal Medullary Grafts Restore Olfactory Deficits and Catecholamine Levels of 6-OHDA Amygdala Lesioned Animals

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Ruiz, Juan; Guzmán, Rubén; Martínez, María Dolores; Miranda, María Isabel; Bermúdez-Rattoni, Federico; Drucker-Colín, René

    1993-01-01

    Aside from motor and cognitive deficits, Parkinson patients also manifest a little-studied olfactory deficit. Since in Parkinson's disease there is a dopamine depletion of the amygdala due to mesocorticolimbic system degeneration, we decided to test olfactory and taste performance of 6-OHDA amygdala lesioned rats, as well as the possible restoration of either function with adrenal medullary transplants. Two 6-OHDA lesioned groups and one control group were tested in the potentiation of odor by taste aversion paradigm. On taste aversion none of the groups showed any impairment. In contrast, the 6-OHDA lesioned rats showed a marked impairment in olfactory aversion. At this point, one of the lesioned groups received a bilateral adrenal medullary graft within the lesioned area. After two months, all groups were submitted again to the behavioral paradigm. Taste remained unaffected, but the lesioned only group did not recover either olfactory aversion or normal catecholamine levels. The grafted group, on the other hand, restored olfactory aversion and catecholamine levels. It can be concluded from this study that catecholamine depletion of the amygdala is sufficient to produce a selective olfactory deficit, not accompanied by taste impairments, and that such a deficit can be reversed by adrenal medullary transplants, which in turn restore catecholamine levels. PMID:7948179

  17. [Extra-adrenal pheochromocytoma with the manifestation of catecholamines cardiomyopathy: a case report].

    PubMed

    Kuramoto, Tomomi; Nishizawa, Satoshi; Fujii, Reona; Nanpou, Yoshihito; Matsumura, Nagahide; Inagaki, Takeshi; Kohjimoto, Yasuo; Hara, Isao

    2010-11-01

    A 22-year old female had an episode of acute heart and respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation ducing a trip overseas. Echocardiography demonstrated akinesis of the apical area (left ventricle ejectionfraction(LVEF) =15%). Since computed tomography (CT) with coronary angiography to rule out acute coronary syndrome showed no abnormalities, she was diagnosed with morphological stress cardiomyopathy due to akinesis of the apical area. After returning to Japan, she was admitted to our hospital for further examination. She had an increased level of catecholamines in 24-hour urine. ¹³¹Imetaiodobenzyguanidine scintigraphy, CT scan and fluorodexyglucose positron emission tomography revealed a retroperitoneal mass. From these results, a diagnosis of extra-adrenal pheochromocytoma with catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy was made. Histological diagnosis of the laparoscopically resected tumor was pheochromocytoma. After the operation, the level of catecholamines in 24-hour urine was normalized.

  18. Increased gene expression of catecholamine-synthesizing enzymes in adrenal glands contributes to high circulating catecholamines in pigs with tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Tomaszek, A; Kiczak, L; Bania, J; Paslawska, U; Zacharski, M; Janiszewski, A; Noszczyk-Nowak, A; Dziegiel, P; Kuropka, P; Ponikowski, P; Jankowska, E A

    2015-04-01

    High levels of circulating catecholamines have been established as fundamental pathophysiological elements of heart failure (HF). However, it is unclear whether the increased gene expression of catecholamine-synthesis enzymes in the adrenal glands contributes to these hormone abnormalities in large animal HF models. We analyzed the mRNA levels of catecholamine-synthesizing enzymes: tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AAAD), dopamine-β-hydroxylase (DBH) and phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT) in adrenal glands of 18 pigs with chronic systolic non-ischaemic HF (tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy due to right ventricle pacing) and 6 sham-operated controls. Pigs with severe HF demonstrated an increased expression of TH and DBH (but neither AAAD nor PNMT) as compared to animals with milder HF and controls (P<0.05 in all cases). The increased adrenal mRNA expression of TH and DBH was accompanied by a reduced left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF) (P<0.001) and an elevated plasma B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) (P<0.01), the other indices reflecting HF severity. There was a positive relationship between the increased adrenal mRNA expression of TH and DBH, and the high levels of circulating adrenaline and noradrenaline (all P<0.05). The association with noradrenaline remained significant also when adjusted for LVEF and plasma BNP, suggesting a significant contribution of adrenals to the circulating pool of catecholamines in subjects with systolic HF.

  19. Catecholamine secretion and adrenal nerve activity in response to movements of normal and inflamed knee joints in cats.

    PubMed Central

    Sato, A; Sato, Y; Schmidt, R F

    1986-01-01

    The effects of articular stimulation on adrenal catecholamine secretion and adrenal sympathetic nerve activity were studied using halothane anaesthetized cats. Various natural passive movements were applied to the normal and inflamed knee joints. Rhythmic flexions and extensions as well as rhythmic inward and outward rotation of normal knee joints within their physiological range of motion did not change nerve activity or the secretion of adrenal catecholamines. Static outward rotation in the normal working range was also ineffective. However, as soon as this static rotation was extended into the noxious range, significant increases in both of these variables were elicited. In the acutely inflamed knee joint, various passive movements produced increases in both adrenal sympathetic and catecholamine secretion. Especially noteworthy was the finding that movements of the inflamed knee joint that were within the normal range of motion produced increases in all variables. Articularly induced increases in adrenal sympathetic nerve activity were diminished by severing various hind-limb somatic afferent nerves and abolished by complete denervation of the knee joint. Additionally, section of the adrenal sympathetic nerves eliminated the catecholamine secretion response. From these data it was concluded that the responses observed in these experiments were reflexes having an afferent limb in hind-limb nerves and an efferent limb in the adrenal sympathetic nerves. A contribution of supraspinal structures was suggested for the reflex responses of sympatho-adrenal medullary function evoked by knee joint stimulations, since spinal transection at the C2 level completely abolished the responses. PMID:3795070

  20. Modulation of catecholamine-synthesizing enzymes in adrenal medulla and stellate ganglia by treadmill exercise of stressed rats.

    PubMed

    Gavrilovic, Ljubica; Spasojevic, Natasa; Dronjak, Sladjana

    2012-03-01

    The sympatho-adrenal system represents one of the main systems involved in the response to stressful events because its stress-induced activation results in an increased release of catecholamines. Exercise training acts as an important modulator of sympatho-adrenal system, adrenal medulla and stellate ganglia being two components of this system. This study aimed at investigating physical exercise-related changes in gene expression of catecholamine biosynthetic enzymes tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine-β-hydroxylase (DBH) and phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase in the adrenal medulla and stellate ganglia of chronically psychosocially stressed adult rats exposed daily to 20-min treadmill exercise for 12 weeks, using TaqMan RT-PCR assay. Chronic psychosocial stress decreased gene expression of the examined enzymes in the adrenal medulla and treadmill exercise did not lead to further modulation of the corresponding gene expression. On the other hand, chronic psychosocial stress produced a significant increase of TH (about 51%) and DBH (about 103%) gene expression in stellate ganglia, while treadmill exercise decreased gene expression of these enzymes to control levels in psychosocially stressed rats. Our data indicate that treadmill exercise leads to a decreased gene transcription of catecholamine biosynthetic enzymes in stellate ganglia and attenuation of cardiac noradrenaline production in stressful situations. Reduction of catecholamine synthesis in stellate ganglia may be linked to the beneficial effects of treadmill exercise on cardiovascular system in stressed animals.

  1. Extracellular Ionic Composition Alters Kinetics of Vesicular Release of Catecholamines and Quantal Size During Exocytosis at Adrenal Medullary Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-07-05

    cytosolic calcium concentration in single bovine adrenal chromaffin cells form video imaging of fura - 2 , EMBO J. 8, 401-411. Pollard, H. B., Ornberg, R...Key words: chromaffin cells, catecholamine, barium induced exocytosis, fura - 2 , calcium independent exocytosis Running title: Effects of extracellular...calibration of the fluorescent calcium indicator Fura - 2 , Cell Calcium 11, 75-83. Winkler, H. (1976) The Composition of Adrenal Chromaffin Granules

  2. Enhancement by GABA of the stimulation-evoked catecholamine release from cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Kitayama, S; Morita, K; Dohi, T; Tsujimoto, A

    1990-05-01

    The possible involvement of GABAergic mechanisms in the catecholamine (CA) release from adrenal medulla was investigated in a primary culture of bovine adrenal chromaffin cells. GABA elicited CA release and enhanced acetylcholine (ACh)-, excess K(+)- and veratridine-evoked CA release. Muscimol, a selective GABAA receptor agonist, mimicked the action of GABA on CA release. On the other hand, baclofen, a GABAB receptor agonist, failed to affect basal or evoked CA release. Furthermore, bicuculline and picrotoxin blocked the enhancement by GABA of veratridine-evoked CA release without affecting basal CA release and CA release evoked by veratridine. In Ca2(+)-free medium, GABA failed to affect basal and caffeine-evoked CA release. ACh-evoked CA release was slightly reduced by bicuculline, whereas excess K(+)-evoked CA release was not, suggesting the involvement of endogenous GABA in CA release evoked by ACh. These results suggest a facilitatory modulation by GABA of basal and evoked release of CA from bovine adrenal medulla through GABAA receptor-mediated mechanisms.

  3. Secretion of Catecholamines from Adrenal Gland by a Single Electrical Shock: Electrotonic Depolarization of Medullary Cell Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakade, Arun R.; Wakade, Taruna D.

    1982-05-01

    Transmural stimulation of the isolated adrenal gland of the rat and guinea pig results in secretion of catecholamines. The secretion is due to activation of cholinergic receptors of the adrenal medulla by acetylcholine released from splanchnic nerve terminals after transmural stimulation. Our aim was to see whether the same experimental technique could be used to directly excite the adrenal medullary cell membrane by electrical stimulation and whether such stimulation would result in secretion of catecholamines. We demonstrate here that a single electrical shock to the perfused adrenal gland of the rat results in massive secretion of epinephrine and norepinephrine. The secretion is directly related to the strength and duration of the applied stimulus over a wide range. Catecholamine secretion is unaffected by tetrodotoxin or hexamethonium/atropine but is abolished by Ca2+ lack or 3 mM Mn2+. We suggest that the adrenal medullary membrane undergoes nonpropagated electrotonic depolarization on electrical stimulation and thereby voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels are opened to initiate secretion.

  4. Pannexin 1 channels: new actors in the regulation of catecholamine release from adrenal chromaffin cells

    PubMed Central

    Momboisse, Fanny; Olivares, María José; Báez-Matus, Ximena; Guerra, María José; Flores-Muñoz, Carolina; Sáez, Juan C.; Martínez, Agustín D.; Cárdenas, Ana M.

    2014-01-01

    Chromaffin cells of the adrenal gland medulla synthesize and store hormones and peptides, which are released into the blood circulation in response to stress. Among them, adrenaline is critical for the fight-or-flight response. This neurosecretory process is highly regulated and depends on cytosolic [Ca2+]. By forming channels at the plasma membrane, pannexin-1 (Panx1) is a protein involved in many physiological and pathological processes amplifying ATP release and/or Ca2+ signals. Here, we show that Panx1 is expressed in the adrenal gland where it plays a role by regulating the release of catecholamines. In fact, inhibitors of Panx1 channels, such as carbenoxolone (Cbx) and probenecid, reduced the secretory activity induced with the nicotinic agonist 1,1-dimethyl-4-phenyl-piperazinium (DMPP, 50 μM) in whole adrenal glands. A similar inhibitory effect was observed in single chromaffin cells using Cbx or 10Panx1 peptide, another Panx1 channel inhibitors. Given that the secretory response depends on cytosolic [Ca2+] and Panx1 channels are permeable to Ca2+, we studied the possible implication of Panx1 channels in the Ca2+ signaling occurring during the secretory process. In support of this possibility, Panx1 channel inhibitors significantly reduced the Ca2+ signals evoked by DMPP in single chromaffin cells. However, the Ca2+ signals induced by caffeine in the absence of extracellular Ca2+ was not affected by Panx1 channel inhibitors, suggesting that this mechanism does not involve Ca2+ release from the endoplasmic reticulum. Conversely, Panx1 inhibitors significantly blocked the DMPP-induce dye uptake, supporting the idea that Panx1 forms functional channels at the plasma membrane. These findings indicate that Panx1 channels participate in the control the Ca2+ signal that triggers the secretory response of adrenal chromaffin cells. This mechanism could have physiological implications during the response to stress. PMID:25237296

  5. Determination of catecholamines in single adrenal medullary cells by capillary electrophoresis and laser-induced native fluorescence

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, H.T.; Yeung, E.S. |

    1995-03-15

    The present study demonstrates that native fluroescence detection combined with capillary electrophoresis separation at low pH provides high sensitivity (down to nanomolar), high resolution, high speed, and low interference for the analysis of catecholamines. Further, this method has been employed successfully for the measurement of the amounts of epinephrine and norepinephrine in individual bovine adrenal medullary cells. Application of this method to the study of neurochemistry is promising. 46 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  6. Enhanced BDNF signalling following chronic hypoxia potentiates catecholamine release from cultured rat adrenal chromaffin cells

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Angela L; Zhang, Min; Nurse, Colin A

    2015-01-01

    Environmental stressors, including chronic hypoxia, enhance the ability of adrenomedullary chromaffin cells (AMCs) to secrete catecholamines; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we investigated the role of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signalling in rat AMCs exposed to chronic hypoxia. In rat adrenal glands, BDNF and its tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) receptor are highly expressed in the cortex and medulla, respectively. Exposure of AMCs to chronic hypoxia (2% O2; 48 h) in vitro caused a significant increase to TrkB mRNA expression. A similar increase was observed in an immortalized chromaffin cell line (MAH cells); however, it was absent in MAH cells deficient in the transcription factor HIF-2α. A specific TrkB agonist, 7,8-dihydroxyflavone (7,8-DHF), stimulated quantal catecholamine secretion from chronically hypoxic (CHox; 2% O2) AMCs to a greater extent than normoxic (Nox; 21% O2) controls. Activation of TrkB by BDNF or 7,8-DHF increased intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i), an effect that was significantly larger in CHox cells. The 7,8-DHF-induced [Ca2+]i rise was sensitive to the tyrosine kinase inhibitor K252a and nickel (2 mm), but not the Ca2+ store-depleting agent cyclopiazonic acid. Blockade of T-type calcium channels with TTA-P2 (1 μm) or voltage-gated Na+ channels with TTX inhibited BDNF-induced [Ca2+]i increases. BDNF also induced a dose-dependent enhancement of action potential firing in CHox cells. These data demonstrate that during chronic hypoxia, enhancement of BDNF-TrkB signalling increases voltage-dependent Ca2+ influx and catecholamine secretion in chromaffin cells, and that T-type Ca2+ channels play a key role in the signalling pathway. Key points We investigated the role of the neurotrophin BDNF signalling via the TrkB receptor in rat adrenomedullary chromaffin cells (AMCs) exposed to normoxia (Nox; 21% O2) and chronic hypoxia (CHox; 2% O2) in vitro for ∼48 h. TrkB receptor expression was

  7. Inhibitory effects of caffeine on secretagogue-induced catecholamine secretion from adrenal chromaffin cells of the guinea-pig.

    PubMed Central

    Nakazato, Y.; Tani, Y.; Teraoka, H.; Sugawara, T.; Asano, T.; Ohta, T.; Ito, S.

    1994-01-01

    1. The inhibitory action of caffeine on catecholamine secretion induced by secretagogues was investigated in perfused adrenal glands and dispersed chromaffin cells of the guinea-pig. 2. Caffeine (10 mM) caused a reversible inhibition of catecholamine secretion evoked by acetylcholine (ACh, 50 microM), KCl (56 mM, high K+) and veratridine (100 microM) and that induced by muscarinic receptor activation in the absence of extracellular Ca2+ in perfused adrenal glands. 3. In dispersed chromaffin cells, caffeine caused a dose-dependent inhibition of the secretory responses to 100 microM ACh and veratridine. Forskolin (30 microM), dibutyryl cyclic AMP (1 mM) and 8-bromo cyclic AMP (1 mM) did not mimic the action of caffeine. 4. In the voltage-clamp, whole-cell recording mode (at a holding potential of -60 mV or -70 mV), ACh (100 microM) evoked an inward current, and depolarizing pulses elicited inward Na+, Ca2+ and outward K+ currents. All these responses were partially inhibited by caffeine (20 mM). 5. ACh rapidly increased the intracellular concentration of Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) in fura-2-loaded cells in either the presence or the absence of external Ca2+, though its magnitude was decreased by about 50% in Ca(2+)-free conditions. Caffeine (20 mM) inhibited these ACh-induced increases in [Ca2+]i. 6. In permeabilized chromaffin cells, caffeine (20 mM) caused an inhibition of catecholamine secretion evoked by Ca2+ (10 microM). 7. These results suggest that caffeine inhibits evoked catecholamine secretion through mechanisms such as the blockade of voltage-dependent Na+ and Ca2+ currents and ACh receptor current, and reduction of the release of intracellularly stored Ca2+ and/or Ca(2+)-sensitivity of the secretory apparatus. PMID:8019771

  8. miR-375 Negatively Regulates the Synthesis and Secretion of Catecholamines by Targeting Sp1 in Rat Adrenal Medulla.

    PubMed

    Gai, Yedan; Zhang, Jinglin; Wei, Chao; Cao, Wei; Cui, Yan; Cui, Sheng

    2017-03-29

    Adrenal gland is a crucial endocrine gland, and the most important function is to synthesize and secrete catecholamines (CATs) which play crucial roles in balancing homeostasis and the responding to stress. microRNA-375 (miR-375) has been detected to highly express in the adrenal, however its role and underlying mechanism are currently unclear. Herein, our results showed that miR-375 was specifically localized to the rat adrenal medulla chromaffin cells, and miR-375 expressing level decreased, when the rats were exposed to stress. The further functional studies demonstrated that the inhibition of endogenous miR-375 induced the secretion of CATs in primary rat medulla chromaffin cells and in PC12 cells, and over-expression of miR-375 resulted in decline of the CATs secretion. Furthermore, the results showed that miR-375 negatively regulated tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and dopamine-beta-hydroxylase (DBH) and mediated adrenomedullary CATs biosynthesis. Sp1(a transcriptional activator of TH and DBH) was involved in mediating the regulation of TH and DBH as miR-375 direct target gene. These novel findings suggest that miR-375 acts as a potent negative mediator in regulating the synthesis and secretion of CATs in the adrenal medulla during the maintenance of homeostasis under stress.

  9. (+)-isradipine but not (-)-Bay-K-8644 exhibits voltage-dependent effects on cat adrenal catecholamine release.

    PubMed Central

    López, M. G.; Michelena, P.; Gandía, L.; García, A. G.

    1991-01-01

    1. Catecholamine release from cat adrenal glands perfused at a high rate (4 ml min-1) at 37 degrees C with polarizing (1.2 or 5.9 mM K+) or depolarizing (17.7, 35, 59 or 118 mM K+) solutions, was triggered by 5 or 10 s pulses of Ca2+ (0.5 or 2.5 mM) in the presence of various concentrations of K+. 2. In polarized glands, secretion was greater the higher the K+ concentration present during the secretory K+/Ca2+ test pulse. Thus, in 17.7 mM K+, catecholamine released was 162 +/- 27 ng per pulse, while in 118 mM K+ secretion rose to 1839 +/- 98 ng per pulse. In depolarized glands, secretion reached a peak of around 1000 ng per pulse in 35-59 mM K+; in 118 mM K+, secretion did not increase further, suggesting that voltage changes are implicated in the control of the secretory process. 3. Blockade of secretion by increased concentrations of (+)-isradipine was much more manifest in polarized glands. The higher the degree of depolarization was (35, 59 or 118 mM K+), the lower the IC50 s were. So, the ratios between the IC50 s in polarized and depolarized glands rose from 3.92 in 35 mM K+ to 26.7 in 118 mM K+. 4. In contrast, the Ca2+ channel activator (-)-Bay K 8644 potentiated catecholamine release evoked by K+/Ca2+ pulses equally well in polarized or depolarized glands. The ratios between EC50 s in polarized or depolarized glands were, respectively, 0.30, 0.59 and 0.69 for 17.7, 35 and 118 mM K+. 5. In simultaneous experiments, the two enantiomers of Bay K 8644 exhibited opposite effects on secretion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1707711

  10. Identification of muscarinic receptor subtypes involved in catecholamine secretion in adrenal medullary chromaffin cells by genetic deletion

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Keita; Matsuoka, Hidetada; Miyata, Hironori; Matsui, Minoru; Inoue, Masumi

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose Activation of muscarinic receptors results in catecholamine secretion in adrenal chromaffin cells in many mammals, and muscarinic receptors partly mediate synaptic transmission from the splanchnic nerve, at least in guinea pigs. To elucidate the physiological functions of muscarinic receptors in chromaffin cells, it is necessary to identify the muscarinic receptor subtypes involved in excitation. Experimental Approach To identify muscarinic receptors, pharmacological tools and strains of mice where one or several muscarinic receptor subtypes were genetically deleted were used. Cellular responses to muscarinic stimulation in isolated chromaffin cells were studied with the patch clamp technique and amperometry. Key Results Muscarinic M1, M4 and M5 receptors were immunologically detected in mouse chromaffin cells, and these receptors disappeared after the appropriate gene deletion. Mouse cells secreted catecholamines in response to muscarinic agonists, angiotensin II and a decrease in external pH. Genetic deletion of M1, but not M3, M4 or M5, receptors in mice abolished secretion in response to muscarine, but not to other stimuli. The muscarine-induced secretion was suppressed by MT7, a snake peptide toxin specific for M1 receptors. Similarly, muscarine failed to induce an inward current in the presence of MT7 in mouse and rat chromaffin cells. The binding affinity of VU0255035 for the inhibition of muscarine-induced currents agreed with that for the M1 receptor. Conclusions and Implications Based upon the effects of genetic deletion of muscarinic receptors and MT7, it is concluded that the M1 receptor alone is responsible for muscarine-induced catecholamine secretion. PMID:25393049

  11. Substance P modulates the time course of nicotinic but not muscarinic catecholamine secretion from perfused adrenal glands of rat.

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, X. F.; Marley, P. D.; Livett, B. G.

    1991-01-01

    1. Substance P (SP) and acetylcholine (ACh) are contained within the splanchnic nerve terminals in the adrenal gland and can be released in response to stress. In the rat, the release of aCh brings about secretion of catecholamines (CA) by acting on nicotinic and muscarinic receptors on the adrenal chromaffin cells. 2. In the present study, we have used a rat isolated adrenal gland preparation to investigate the effects of SP, perfused at different concentrations, on CA secretion evoked by 10(-5) M nicotine and 10(-4) M muscarine. 3. In the first 10 min stimulation period (S1), in the absence of SP, nicotine (10(-5) M) evoked substantial and equal secretion of noradrenaline (NA) and adrenaline (Ad). In a second 10 min stimulation period (S2), carried out 18 min after S1, the nicotinic response was desensitized. In contrast, the muscarinic response, which preferentially evoked Ad secretion in S1 (Ad/NA: 8.7/1), was well maintained in S2. 4. SP present in S1 had no effect on desensitization of the subsequent nicotinic response in S2. 5. At low concentrations (10(-7)-10(-10) M), SP changed the time course of nicotine-induced CA secretion during S1 by enhancing CA secretion in the first 4 min and inhibiting CA secretion thereafter. The maximal effect occurred at 10(-9) M SP. 6. At a higher concentration (10(-5) M), SP inhibited total nicotinic CA secretion throughout S1 and produced a biphasic secretion of CA (depressed in the presence of SP and enhanced after wash out of SP).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1723914

  12. Clonidine-induced suppression of plasma catecholamines in states of adrenal medulla hyperfunction.

    PubMed

    Gross, M D; Shapiro, B; Sisson, J C; Zweifler, A

    1987-08-01

    To assess adrenal medulla activity in states of hyperfunction, a single 0.3 mg oral dose of clonidine hydrochloride (Catapres) was given to twelve patients with varying evidence of familial adrenal medullary hyperplasia and pheochromocytomas from kindreds with Multiple Endocrine Neoplasia type 2 syndrome (MEN-2), seven patients with sporadic pheochromocytomas and six normal subjects. Mean arterial blood pressure and plasma norepinephrine (NE) levels were lower than baseline values 2 h after clonidine in the normal subjects. Plasma epinephrine (E) rose in one normal but fell in the remainder after clonidine administration. In sporadic pheochromocytoma patients, E fell slightly in 4 and NE fell in 3 while mean arterial blood pressure was not significantly lower than baseline values in 7 patients 2 h after clonidine. In MEN-2, mean arterial blood pressure fell and there was a variable response of plasma E and NE to clonidine, which appears to be related to the presence of detectable anatomic (CT scan) and functional (131I-mlBG scintigraphy) abnormalities of the adrenal medulla. These findings are thus compatible with the spectrum of adrenal medulla dysfunction and the presumed development of pheochromocytoma in this syndrome.

  13. Muscarinic and opioid receptor modulation of release of (Met/sup 5/-enkephalin immunoreactive material and catecholamines from the bovine adrenal gland

    SciTech Connect

    Barron, B.A.

    1985-01-01

    Retrogradely perfused bovine adrenal glands were stimulated by acetylcholine (ACh) and 1,1-dimethyl-4-phenyl-piperazinium (DMPP), with or without: hexamethonium (C-6), atropine, imipramine, methacholine, pilocarpine, etorphine, or diprenorphine. Stimulation by either ACh DMPP resulted in an increased release of both (Met/sup 5/)-enkephalin immunoreactive material (ME-IRM) and catecholamines as measured by radioimmunoassay and high performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection, respectively. ACh (5 x 10/sup -5/ M) and DMPP (5 x 10/sup -5/ M) stimulated the release of norepinephrine greater than the release of epinephrine. The action of these agents was antagonized by C-6(5 x 10/sup -4/ M). Atropine (5 x 10/sup -7/ M) antagonized the action of ACh to stimulate norepinephrine and MI-IRM release while having no effect on DMPP-stimulated release. Imipramine (5 x 10/sup -6/ M) had no effect on either ACh or DMPP-stimulated release. Methacholine (4 x 10/sup -5/ M) potentiated the DMPP (1 x 10/sup -5/ M) stimulation of ME-IRM and catecholamine release; pilocarpine (4 x 10/sup -5/ M) significantly potentiated only the DMPP-stimulated release of norepinephrine. Pilocarpine (5 x 10/sup -5/ M) and muscarine (5 x 10/sup -5/ M) had no effect on the secretion of MI-IRM and catecholamines from the bovine adrenal gland. Etorphine (5 x 10/sup -7/ M) significantly decreased the ACh and DMPP stimulation ME-IRM and catecholamine release. The activity of a muscarinic cholinergic receptor in the bovine adrenal medulla in stimulus-secretion coupling has been controversial. The binding of /sup 3/H-quinuclidinyl benzilate to chromaffin granule membranes was investigated to further characterize muscarinic receptors in the bovine adrenal gland.

  14. Selective blockade of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors by pimobendan, a drug for the treatment of heart failure: reduction of catecholamine secretion and synthesis in adrenal medullary cells.

    PubMed

    Toyohira, Yumiko; Kubo, Tatsuhiko; Watanabe, Miyabi; Uezono, Yasuhito; Ueno, Susumu; Shinkai, Koji; Tsutsui, Masato; Izumi, Futoshi; Yanagihara, Nobuyuki

    2005-02-01

    Pimobendan, a Ca(2+) sensitizer, is used clinically in the treatment of chronic heart failure. Although chronic heart failure is associated with activation of the sympathetic nervous system, it remains unknown whether pimobendan affects the function of sympathetic neurons and the adrenal medulla. Here, we report the inhibitory effects of pimobendan on catecholamine secretion and synthesis in cultured bovine adrenal medullary cells. Pimobendan decreased the catecholamine secretion (IC(50)=29.5 microM) elicited by carbachol, an agonist at nicotinic acetylcholine receptors, but not that elicited by veratridine, an activator of voltage-dependent Na(+) channels, or by high K(+), an activator of voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels. Pimobendan also inhibited carbachol-induced influx of (22)Na(+) (IC(50)=25.9 microM) and (45)Ca(2+) (IC(50)=26.0 microM), but not veratridine-induced (22)Na(+) influx or high K(+)-induced (45)Ca(2+) influx. The reduction of catecholamine secretion caused by pimobendan was not overcome by increasing the concentration of carbachol. UD-CG 212, an active metabolite of pimobendan, lowered carbachol-induced catecholamine secretion with a concentration/inhibition curve similar to that of pimobendan. In experiments in situ, pimobendan suppressed both basal and carbachol-stimulated (14)C-catecholamine synthesis (IC(50)=5.3 and 4.9 microM) from [(14)C] tyrosine [but not from L: -3, 4-dihydroxyphenyl [3-(14)C] alanine ([(14)C]DOPA)], as well as tyrosine hydroxylase activity (IC(50)=3.8 and 4.3 microM). These findings suggest that pimobendan inhibits carbachol-induced catecholamines secretion and synthesis through suppression of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors.

  15. Ethanol and stress activate catecholamine synthesis in the adrenal: effects on bone.

    PubMed

    Patterson-Buckendahl, Patricia; Pohorecky, Larissa A; Kubovcakova, Lucia; Krizanova, Olga; Martin, R Bruce; Martinez, Daniel A; Kvetnanský, Richard

    2008-12-01

    Ethanol consumption and mental stress activate the sympathetic nervous system, which can adversely affect bone. We compared six groups of 10 young adult rats, three with and three without 2 h daily restraint stress. Two groups consumed food and water ad libitum, two received food and 6% (w/v) ethanol as drinking water, and two received the amount of food consumed by ethanol rats the previous day plus water ad libitum (pairfed). After 6 weeks, rats were killed. Plasma, femurs, lumbar vertebrae, and adrenals were harvested. Femoral dimensions were measured and biomechanical properties were tested by three-point bending. Plasma osteocalcin, vertebral osteocalcin mRNA levels, and adrenomedullary tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH), and phenylethanolamine N-methyl transferase (PNMT) mRNA levels were quantified. Daily restraint decreased weight gain and femoral length compared to dietary controls, and appeared to partially preserve bone strength, especially in calorie-restricted pairfed rats. Femoral strength was significantly affected by treatment in that bones of pairfed controls were weakest, ethanol drinkers were intermediate, and ad libitum restrained were strongest. Femoral yield load, displacement, and work at yield load were negatively correlated with TH and DBH mRNA levels, but not PNMT, suggesting a negative influence of norepinephrine. Plasma osteocalcin and dry weight of lumbar 3-5 vertebrae were unaffected; however, osteocalcin mRNA in second lumbar vertebrae was positively correlated with TH, DBH, and PNMT levels. Ethanol consumption at this level had little effect on femur morphology or strength. In contrast, the data suggested possible stimulation rather than inhibition of vertebral bone formation.

  16. Butanol Isomers Exert Distinct Effects on Voltage-Gated Calcium Channel Currents and Thus Catecholamine Secretion in Adrenal Chromaffin Cells

    PubMed Central

    Brindley, Rebecca L.; Jewell, Mark L.; Currie, Kevin P. M.

    2014-01-01

    Butanol (C4H10OH) has been used both to dissect the molecular targets of alcohols/general anesthetics and to implicate phospholipase D (PLD) signaling in a variety of cellular functions including neurotransmitter and hormone exocytosis. Like other primary alcohols, 1-butanol is a substrate for PLD and thereby disrupts formation of the intracellular signaling lipid phosphatidic acid. Because secondary and tertiary butanols do not undergo this transphosphatidylation, they have been used as controls for 1-butanol to implicate PLD signaling. Recently, selective pharmacological inhibitors of PLD have been developed and, in some cases, fail to block cellular functions previously ascribed to PLD using primary alcohols. For example, exocytosis of insulin and degranulation of mast cells are blocked by primary alcohols, but not by the PLD inhibitor FIPI. In this study we show that 1-butanol reduces catecholamine secretion from adrenal chromaffin cells to a much greater extent than tert-butanol, and that the PLD inhibitor VU0155056 has no effect. Using fluorescent imaging we show the effect of these drugs on depolarization-evoked calcium entry parallel those on secretion. Patch-clamp electrophysiology confirmed the peak amplitude of voltage-gated calcium channel currents (ICa) is inhibited by 1-butanol, with little or no block by secondary or tert-butanol. Detailed comparison shows for the first time that the different butanol isomers exert distinct, and sometimes opposing, effects on the voltage-dependence and gating kinetics of ICa. We discuss these data with regard to PLD signaling in cellular physiology and the molecular targets of general anesthetics. PMID:25275439

  17. Endothelin-1-induced down-regulation of NaV1.7 expression in adrenal chromaffin cells: attenuation of catecholamine secretion and tau dephosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, Takayuki; Yanagita, Toshihiko; Maruta, Toyoaki; Sugita, Chihiro; Satoh, Shinya; Kanai, Tasuku; Wada, Akihiko; Murakami, Manabu

    2013-04-02

    Endothelin-1 and voltage-dependent sodium channels are involved in control and suppression of neuropathological factors, which contribute to sculpting the neuronal network. We previously demonstrated that veratridine-induced NaV1.7 sodium channel activation caused intracellular calcium elevation, catecholamine secretion and tau dephosphorylation in adrenal chromaffin cells. The aim of this study was to examine whether endothelin-1 could modulate NaV1.7. Our results indicated that endothelin-1 decreased the protein level of NaV1.7 and the veratridine-induced increase in intracellular calcium. In addition, it also abolished the veratridine-induced dephosphorylation of tau and the phosphorylation of glycogen synthase kinase-3β and extracellular signal-regulated kinase. These findings suggest that the endothelin-1-induced down-regulation of NaV1.7 diminishes NaV1.7-related catecholamine secretion and dephosphorylation of tau.

  18. Catecholamines released from the adrenal medulla exert a compensatory, protective effect at beta 2-adrenoceptors against Paf-induced death in mice.

    PubMed

    Criscuoli, M; Subissi, A

    1988-01-01

    1. The effects of a number of drugs and experimental conditions, which inhibit or stimulate adrenergic function, were evaluated on platelet-activating factor (Paf)-induced death in conscious mice. 2. Adrenalectomy markedly potentiated Paf toxicity, while guanethidine and reserpine did not. However, reserpine, which produced a virtually complete depletion of catecholamines (CA) in cardiac tissue, was not able to reduce adrenal CA by more than 58%. Drugs which release noradrenaline from the adrenergic nerve terminals, such as tyramine and amphetamine, did not protect mice from Paf toxicity, while drugs or conditions which favour the release of CA from the adrenal medulla, such as urethane and cold-induced stress, did. 3. beta 2- and beta 1 + beta 2-adrenoceptor antagonists (ICI 118551, propranolol and nadolol), but not beta 1-antagonists (atenolol, practolol, metoprolol and CGP 20712 A), potentiated Paf toxicity at low doses; beta 2- and beta 1 + beta 2-agonists (salbutamol, fenoterol and isoprenaline), but not beta 1-agonists (prenalterol and tazolol) were potent inhibitors of Paf toxicity. alpha 1- and alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonists and antagonists did not exert significant effects. Propranolol did not appear to enhance the hypotensive action of Paf in pentobarbitone-anaesthetized mice. 4. It is concluded that manipulation of the release of CA from the adrenal medulla, but not from adrenergic nerves, has profound effects on Paf toxicity in mice. A number of considerations support the hypothesis that bronchoconstriction is a major determinant of Paf-induced death in mice.

  19. The adrenal medulla and Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Stoddard, S L

    1994-01-01

    This paper reviews the literature describing the condition of the adrenal medulla in Parkinson's disease. Parkinson's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder that is characterized primarily by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra. Clinical observations have revealed that Parkinson's disease is also frequently accompanied by a variety of autonomic symptoms. The adrenal medulla is a major component of the autonomic nervous system. However, until recently this organ has not been of particular interest in Parkinson's disease. Early studies found histologic abnormalities in adrenal medullary cells, and several groups measured urinary and plasma catecholamines to determine general autonomic status. In the late 1980s adrenal medullary tissue was first transplanted to the caudate nucleus in an attempt to augment the decreased levels of dopamine, and thus treat the symptoms of Parkinson's disease. At this time the status of the adrenal medulla in this disease became clinically important. We measured the total catecholamine content of the parkinsonian adrenal medulla in tissue collected both at autopsy and in conjunction with adrenal-caudate transplants. Adrenal medullary catecholamines and several neuropeptides were severely depressed in parkinsonian glands. Thus, the adrenal medulla appears to be a target of the peripheral manifestations of Parkinson's disease.

  20. Effect of hypoxia and hypercapnia on catecholamine content in cat carotid body.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, R S; Garger, P; Hauer, M C; Raff, H; Fechter, L

    1983-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the content of catecholamines (CA) in the cat carotid body before and after 0.5 h exposures to normoxic normocapnia [arterial O2 partial pressure (Pao2) 126 +/- 28 Torr, arterial CO2 partial pressure (Paco2) 36.4 +/- 1.5 Torr], hypoxic normocapnia (Pao2 25 +/- 3 Torr, Paco2 36.7 +/- 3.3 Torr), and normoxic hypercapnia (Pao2 132 +/- 13 Torr, Paco2 = 98.2 +/- 7.6 Torr). CA synthesis was blocked using alpha-methylparatyrosine methyl ester (AMPT) prior to alterations in the inspired air. There was a significant decrease in carotid body content of dopamine (DA), norepinephrine (NE), and epinephrine (E) 1 h after AMPT administration. Analysis of variance and Duncan new multiple range procedures revealed that during the subsequent 0.5-h exposures to normoxia, hypoxia, or hypercapnia, only the decrease in DA during hypoxia was significantly greater than that during normoxia; the loss during hypercapnia was not. The decreases in NE during the three exposures were indistinguishable among themselves as were the decreases in E. The decrease in CA content is probably attributable to increased release. The data reveal that the release of CAs during the chemoreception of hypoxia is different from that during the chemoreception of hypercapnia and support the concept of different mechanisms for the chemoreception of hypoxia and hypercapnia.

  1. Catecholamine exocytosis during low frequency stimulation in mouse adrenal chromaffin cells is primarily asynchronous and controlled by the novel mechanism of Ca2+ syntilla suppression

    PubMed Central

    Lefkowitz, Jason J; DeCrescenzo, Valerie; Duan, Kailai; Bellve, Karl D; Fogarty, Kevin E; Walsh, John V; ZhuGe, Ronghua

    2014-01-01

    Adrenal chromaffin cells (ACCs), stimulated by the splanchnic nerve, generate action potentials (APs) at a frequency near 0.5 Hz in the resting physiological state, at times described as ‘rest and digest’. How such low frequency stimulation in turn elicits sufficient catecholamine exocytosis to set basal sympathetic tone is not readily explained by the classical mechanism of stimulus–secretion coupling, where exocytosis is synchronized to AP-induced Ca2+ influx. By using simulated action potentials (sAPs) at 0.5 Hz in isolated patch-clamped mouse ACCs, we show here that less than 10% of all catecholaminergic exocytosis, measured by carbon fibre amperometry, is synchronized to an AP. The asynchronous phase, the dominant phase, of exocytosis does not require Ca2+ influx. Furthermore, increased asynchronous exocytosis is accompanied by an AP-dependent decrease in frequency of Ca2+ syntillas (i.e. transient, focal Ca2+ release from internal stores) and is ryanodine sensitive. We propose a mechanism of disinhibition, wherein APs suppress Ca2+ syntillas, which themselves inhibit exocytosis as they do in the case of spontaneous catecholaminergic exocytosis. PMID:25128575

  2. Thymic involution in the suspended rat - Adrenal hypertrophy and glucocorticoid receptor content

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steffen, J. M.; Musacchia, X. J.

    1986-01-01

    The relationship between thymic involution and adrenal hypertrophy is studied. The thymus, adrenal glands, and tissue water content are evaluated in male Sprague rats suspended in antiorthostatic (AO) or orthostatic (O) positions. A 50 percent decrease in the wet weight of the thymus and hypertrophy of the adrenal glands are observed during the seven days of AO suspension. After seven days of recovery the thymus weight is increased to control level; however, the hypertrophy of the adrenal glands remains unchanged. Thymic and renal responses in O postioned rats are similar to AO reactions. Thymic glucocorticoid (GC) receptor concentrations in the rats are analyzed; a 20 percent decrease in GC receptor site concentration, which is related to thymic involution, is detected in both AO and O rats. It is concluded that there is a temporal correlation between thymic involution and adrenal hypertrophy, which is not affected by AO positioning, and thymic involution is not associated with an increased sensitivity to GC.

  3. Effects of nonylphenol on the calcium signal and catecholamine secretion coupled with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pei-Shan; Liu, Ging-Hui; Chao, Wei-Liang

    2008-02-03

    Nonylphenol (NP) is the most critical metabolite of alkylphenol polyethoxylate detergents. NP is known as an endocrine disruptor with estrogenic activities and as an inhibitor of endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase. Estrogen has modulatory roles on ligand-gated ion channels, such as nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitors can modulate the cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](c)]) and thus can affect the calcium signaling coupled with nAChRs. Therefore, NP is predicted to have complex effects on the Ca(2+) signaling and secretion coupled with nAChRs. This study investigated these effects using bovine adrenal chromaffin cells. The results show that NP suppressed the Ca(2+) signaling coupled with nAChRs and voltage-operated Ca(2+) channels in a dose-dependent manner, with IC(50)s of 1 and 5.9 microM, respectively. Estradiol exhibits similar suppression but much lower inhibitory potencies. NP alone induced a transient rise in [Ca(2+)](c) in the presence or absence of extracellular calcium. Thapsigargin, an endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitor, partially suppressed the [Ca(2+)](c) rise induced by NP, but NP totally blocked the [Ca(2+)](c) rise induced by thapsigargin. This illustrates that NP can cause Ca(2+) release from thapsigargin-insensitive pools. Thapsigargin suppressed the Ca(2+) signaling coupled with nAChRs but increased that coupled with voltage-operated Ca(2+) channels. We propose that three routes are responsible for the effects of NP on nAChRs: named receptor channels, voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels, and Ca(2+)-induced Ca(2+) release. Three routes are related to the characteristics of NP as steroid-like compounds and Ca(2+)-ATPase inhibitor.

  4. Catecholamines - urine

    MedlinePlus

    Dopamine-urine test; Epinephrine-urine test; Adrenalin-urine test; Urine metanephrine; Normetanephrine; Norepinephrine-urine test; Urine catecholamines; VMA; HVA; Metanephrine; Homovanillic acid (HVA)

  5. Effect of consecutive cooling and immobilization on catecholamine metabolism in rat tissues

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matlina, E. S.; Waysman, S. M.; Zaydner, I. G.; Kogan, B. M.; Nozdracheva, L. V.

    1979-01-01

    The combined effect of two stressor stimuli--cooling and immobilization--acting successively on the sympathetic-adrenaline system was studied experimentally in rats that were cooled for 8 hours at 7 C on the first day and immobilized for 6 hours on the next day. The biochemical and histochemical methods used and the experimental technique involved are described in detail. The following conclusions were formulated: (1) the successive action of cooling and immobilization results in a stronger decrease in the adrenaline and noradrenaline content in the adrenal gland than that which could be due to a simple summation of the cooling and immobilization effects; (2) successive cooling and immobilization are followed by activation of catecholamine synthesis in the adrenal gland; and (3) 1-DOPA administration (45 mg/kg 3 times in 2 days) intraabdominally activated catecholamine synthesis in the adrenal glands in both the control and test animals.

  6. GABAA receptor sites modulating catecholamine secretion in the rat adrenal gland: evidence from 3H-muscimol autoradiography and in vivo functional studies.

    PubMed

    Amenta, F; Collier, W L; Erdö, S L; Giuliani, S; Maggi, C A; Meli, A

    1988-01-01

    The occurrence and distribution of specific 3H-muscimol binding sites, most probably identical with A type gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptors, were studied in sections of the rat adrenal gland by light microscope autoradiography. Specific binding was found primarily in the adrenal medulla, in association with chromaffin cells. A limited number of binding sites was also observed within the adrenal cortex. In urethane-anaesthetized hexamethonium-pretreated rats, intravenous GABA produced a set of 'excitatory' cardiovascular effects (increase in heart rate, force of contraction and blood pressure) which were mimicked by intravenous muscimol but not by intravenous baclofen, and were antagonized by pretreatment with bicuculline. The cardiovascular excitatory effects of intravenous GABA were unaffected by reserpine pretreatment, markedly reduced by administration of phentolamine plus propranolol, and almost completely abolished by adrenalectomy. Our findings indicate the presence of GABA receptor sites on adrenal chromaffin cells, whose excitation can produce changes in cardiovascular function.

  7. Catecholamines 101

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    This review of clinical catecholamine neurochemistry is based on the Streeten Memorial Lecture at the 19th annual meeting of the American Autonomic Society and lectures at a satellite of the 6th Congress of the International Society of Autonomic Neuroscience. Here I provide historical perspective, describe sources and meanings of plasma levels of catecholamines and their metabolites, present a model of a sympathetic noradrenergic neuron that conveys how particular aspects of sympathetic nervous function affect plasma levels of catecholamines and their metabolites, and apply the model to understand plasma neurochemical patterns associated with some drugs and disease states. PMID:20623313

  8. Principles and management of adrenal cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Javadpour, N.

    1987-01-01

    This book provides information on adrenal diseases of latest developments and guides the clinicians in the care of their patients. The book is divided into two parts. The first section gives an overview of the embryology, anatomy, physiology, markers, pathology, imaging and the current progress in the field. The second edition covers specific diseases of the adrenal cortex and medulla. The increasingly significant roles played by steroids, catecholamines, blockers, computed tomography and magnetic resonance are elucidated and discussed. The contents include: Overview of progress; current problems, and perspectives - embryology anatomy, physiology, and biologic markers; pathology; advances in diagnosis; imaging techniques; adrenal disorders in childhood; primary aldosteronism; Cushing's syndrome; carcinoma; pheochromocytoma; neuroblastoma; metastatic disease; surgical management; and subject index.

  9. Chromaffin granules in the rat adrenal medulla release their secretory content in a particulate fashion.

    PubMed

    Crivellato, Enrico; Belloni, Anna; Nico, Beatrice; Nussdorfer, Gastone G; Ribatti, Domenico

    2004-03-01

    Exocytosis is considered the main route of granule discharge in chromaffin cells. We recently provided ultrastructural evidence suggesting that piecemeal degranulation (PMD) occurs in mouse adrenal chromaffin cells. In the present study, we processed rat adrenal glands for transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and examined chromaffin cells for changes characteristic of PMD. Both adrenaline (A)- and noradrenaline (NA)-storing cells express ultrastructural features suggestive of a slow and particulate mode of granule discharge. In adrenaline-containing cells, some granules present enlarged dimensions accompanied by eroded or dissolved matrices. Likewise, a number of granules in NA-releasing cells show content reduction with variably expanded granule chambers. Dilated, empty granule containers are recognizable in the cytoplasm of both cell types. Characteristically, altered granules and empty containers are seen intermingled with normal, resting granules. In addition, chromaffin granules often show irregular profiles, with budding or tail-like projections of their limiting membranes. Thirty 150-nm-diameter membrane-bound vesicles with a moderately electron-dense or -lucent internal structure are observable in the cytoplasm of both cell types. These vesicles are seen among the granules and some of them are fused with the perigranule membranes in the process of attachment to or budding from the granules. These data add further support to the concept that PMD may be an alternative secretory pathway in adrenal chromaffin cells.

  10. Plasma Catecholamines (CA) and Gene Expression of CA Biosynthetic Enzymes in Adrenal Medulla and Sympathetic Ganglia of Rats Exposed to Single or Repeated Hypergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrak, J.; Jurani, M.; Baranovska, M.; Hapala, I.; Frollo, I.; Kvetnansky, R.

    2008-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate plasma epinephrine (EPI) and norepinephrine (NE) levels in blood collected directly during a single or 8-times repeated centrifugation at hypergravity 4G, using remote controlled equipment. Plasma EPI levels showed a huge hypergravity-induced increase. After the last blood collection during hypergravity, the centrifuge was turned off and another blood sampling was performed immediately after the centrifuge decelerated and stopped (10 min). In these samples plasma EPI showed significantly lower levels compared to centrifugation intervals. Plasma NE levels showed none or small changes. Repeated exposure to hypergravity 4G (8 days for 60 min) eliminated the increase in plasma EPI levels at the 15 min interval but did not markedly affect plasma NE levels. To explain these findings we measured mRNA levels of CA biosynthetic enzymes tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine-β-hydroxylase (DBH) and phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT) in the adrenal medulla (AM) and stellate ganglia (SG) of rats exposed to continuous hypergravity (2G) up to 6 days. In AM, TH, DBH and PNMT mRNA levels were significantly increased in intervals up to 3 days, however, after 6 day hypergravity exposure, no significant elevation was found. In SG, no significant changes in gene expression of CA enzymes were seen both after a single or repeated hypergravity. Thus, our data show that hypergravity highly activates the adrenomedullary system, whereas the sympathoneural system is not significantly changed. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that during repeated or continuous exposure of the organism to hypergravity the adrenomedullary system is adapted, whereas sympathoneural system is not affected.

  11. Nonreutilizaton of adrenal chromaffin granule membranes following secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Nobiletti, J.B.

    1985-01-01

    The intracellular postexocytotic fate of the adrenal chromaffin granule membrane (reutilization vs. nonreutilization) was addressed through two experimental approaches. First, (/sup 3/H) leucine pulse-chase labeling experiments were conducted in two systems - the isolated retrograde perfused cat adrenal gland and cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells to compare chromaffin granule soluble dopamine-B-hydroxylase (DBH) turnover (marker for granule soluble content turnover) to that of membrane-bound DBH (marker for granule membrane turnover). Experiments in cat adrenal glands showed that at all chase periods the granule distribution of radiolabeled DBH was in agreement with the DBH activity distribution (73% membrane-bound/27% soluble) - a result consistent with parallel turnover of soluble and membrane-bound DBH. Experiments in cultured bovine cells showed that labeled soluble and membrane-bound DBH had parallel turnover patterns and at all chase period, the distribution of radiolabeled DBH between the soluble contents and membranes was similar to the DBH activity distribution (50% soluble/50% membrane-bound). The above experiments showed that the soluble contents and membranes turnover in parallel and are consistent with nonreutilization of chromaffin granule membranes following exocytosis. Isolated retrograde perfused bovine adrenal glands were subjected to repetitive acetylcholine stimulation to induce exocytosis and then the dense and less-dense chromaffin granule fractions were isolated. Since both approaches gave results consistent with membrane nonreutilization, the authors conclude that once a chromaffin granule is involved in exocytosis, its membrane is not reutilized for the further synthesis, storage, and secretion of catecholamines.

  12. The adrenal gland: common disease states and suspected new applications.

    PubMed

    Gorman, Linda S

    2013-01-01

    The adrenal gland, while small in size, provides a major punch to human metabolism. The interplay between the adrenal cortex hormones aldosterone and cortisol provides needed regulation to human metabolism. Aldosterone regulates the body sodium content affecting blood pressure thru fluid-volume regulation by the kidney. Cortisol, also from the adrenal cortex, contributes to regulation of glucose and protein metabolism. Diseases like addison's disease and Cushing's syndrome that affect the normal levels of these hormones can lead to serious pathologies that need to be detected thru clinical laboratory testing. The inner core of the adrenal gland, called the medulla, houses the catecholamine epinephrine, a fast acting neuropeptide hormone that can influence body action and energy levels quickly. The pheochromocytomas pathology of the adrenal medulla adversely affects the medulla hormones and needs to be recognized by clinical laboratory testing. The overview of the adrenal gland and its potential pathologies needs to be looked at anew in relation to post-traumatic stress disorder to find any linkage that may aid in the treatment and cure of our affected military soldiers. This interrelationship between cortisol and epinephrine in PTSD should be closely evaluated to determine if the suspected linkages are significant.

  13. The effect of adrenal demedullation on cardiovascular responses to environmental stimulation in conscious rats.

    PubMed Central

    Borkowski, K. R.; Kelly, E.

    1986-01-01

    Circulating plasma adrenaline has been implicated in the facilitation of neurogenic pressor responses and development of hypertension. Bilateral adrenal demedullation in rats did not affect body weight, urine output, urinary electrolyte (Na+, K+ and Cl-) excretion, nor plasma corticosterone concentration, indicating the selective nature of the demedullation procedure. Adrenal demedullation did induce significant reductions in adrenal catecholamine content, plasma adrenaline levels, resting blood pressure and heart rate in conscious rats, but did not affect alerting-induced increases in blood pressure. The adrenal medulla and circulating plasma adrenaline appear to contribute to the maintenance of resting cardiovascular parameters, but would not appear to be involved in nor facilitate the cardiovascular responses to environmental stimulation. PMID:3742165

  14. Imaging the primate adrenal medulla with (/sup 123/I) and (/sup 131/I) metaiodobenzylguanidine: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Wieland, D.M.; Brown, L.E.; Tobes, M.C.; Rogers, W.L.; Marsh, D.D.; Mangner, T.J.; Swanson, D.P.; Beierwaltes, W.H.

    1981-04-01

    An evaluation of radioiodinated meta-iodobenzylguanidine (m-IBG) as an adrenomedullary imaging agent is reported in 15 rhesus monkeys. Scintiscans of the monkey adrenal medulla have been obtained with (/sup 123/I)- and (m-/sup 131/)IBG at 2 to 6 days after injection. The imaging superiority of m-IBG over its positional isomer, para-iodobenzylguanidine (p-IBG), is documented in both dogs and monkeys. Administration of reserpine, a depletor of catecholamine stores, markedly lowers the (m-/sup 131/I)-IBG content of the dog adrenal medulla, but the adrenergic blocking agents phenoxybenzamine and propanolol have no effect. Subcellular fractionation of the dog's adrenal medullae reveals that m-IBG is sequestered mainly in the chromaffin storage granules. The results of this study suggest that radioiodinated m-IBG, previously reported to image the primate myocardium, also merits evaluation as a clinical radiopharmaceutical for the adrenal medulla.

  15. Effect of heart failure on catecholamine granule morphology and storage in chromaffin cells

    PubMed Central

    Mahata, Sushil K; Zheng, Hong; Mahata, Sumana; Liu, Xuefei

    2016-01-01

    One of the key mechanisms involved in sympathoexcitation in chronic heart failure (HF) is the activation of the adrenal glands. Impact of the elevated catecholamines on the hemodynamic parameters has been previously demonstrated. However, studies linking the structural effects of such overactivation with secretory performance and cell metabolism in the adrenomedullary chromaffin cells in vivo have not been previously reported. In this study, HF was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats by ligation of the left coronary artery. Five weeks after surgery, cardiac function was assessed by ventricular hemodynamics. HF rats showed increased adrenal weight and adrenal catecholamine levels (norepinephrine, epinephrine and dopamine) compared with sham-operated rats. Rats with HF demonstrated increased small synaptic and dense core vesicle in splanchnic–adrenal synapses indicating trans-synaptic activation of catecholamine biosynthetic enzymes, increased endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi lumen width to meet the demand of increased catecholamine synthesis and release, and more mitochondria with dilated cristae and glycogen to accommodate for the increased energy demand for the increased biogenesis and exocytosis of catecholamines from the adrenal medulla. These findings suggest that increased trans-synaptic activation of the chromaffin cells within the adrenal medulla may lead to increased catecholamines in the circulation which in turn contributes to the enhanced neurohumoral drive, providing a unique mechanistic insight for enhanced catecholamine levels in plasma commonly observed in chronic HF condition. PMID:27402067

  16. Effect of heart failure on catecholamine granule morphology and storage in chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Mahata, Sushil K; Zheng, Hong; Mahata, Sumana; Liu, Xuefei; Patel, Kaushik P

    2016-09-01

    One of the key mechanisms involved in sympathoexcitation in chronic heart failure (HF) is the activation of the adrenal glands. Impact of the elevated catecholamines on the hemodynamic parameters has been previously demonstrated. However, studies linking the structural effects of such overactivation with secretory performance and cell metabolism in the adrenomedullary chromaffin cells in vivo have not been previously reported. In this study, HF was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats by ligation of the left coronary artery. Five weeks after surgery, cardiac function was assessed by ventricular hemodynamics. HF rats showed increased adrenal weight and adrenal catecholamine levels (norepinephrine, epinephrine and dopamine) compared with sham-operated rats. Rats with HF demonstrated increased small synaptic and dense core vesicle in splanchnic-adrenal synapses indicating trans-synaptic activation of catecholamine biosynthetic enzymes, increased endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi lumen width to meet the demand of increased catecholamine synthesis and release, and more mitochondria with dilated cristae and glycogen to accommodate for the increased energy demand for the increased biogenesis and exocytosis of catecholamines from the adrenal medulla. These findings suggest that increased trans-synaptic activation of the chromaffin cells within the adrenal medulla may lead to increased catecholamines in the circulation which in turn contributes to the enhanced neurohumoral drive, providing a unique mechanistic insight for enhanced catecholamine levels in plasma commonly observed in chronic HF condition.

  17. A vicious cycle of acute catecholamine cardiomyopathy and circulatory collapse secondary to pheochromocytoma.

    PubMed

    Otusanya, Olufisayo; Goraya, Harmeen; Iyer, Priyanka; Landi, Kristen; Tibb, Amit; Msaouel, Pavlos

    2015-10-01

    Acute catecholamine cardiomyopathy is an uncommon, life-threatening manifestation of pheochromocytoma. The massive release of catecholamines from the adrenal medulla and their toxic effects on the coronary vessels and the cardiac myocytes play a significant role in the pathogenesis of cardiomyopathy in patients with pheochromocytoma. Severe manifestations, such as acute catecholamine cardiomyopathy, may be the initial presentation, especially in unsuspected and untreated pheochromocytoma cases. The clinical course of catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy is unpredictable as patients may rapidly deteriorate into circulatory collapse and multisystem crisis. We report a case of a 25-year-old man who presented with catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy.

  18. Neonatal hyperleptinaemia programmes adrenal medullary function in adult rats: effects on cardiovascular parameters.

    PubMed

    Trevenzoli, I H; Valle, M M R; Machado, F B; Garcia, R M G; Passos, M C F; Lisboa, P C; Moura, E G

    2007-04-15

    Epidemiological studies have shown a strong correlation between stressful events (nutritional, hormonal or environmental) in early life and development of adult diseases such as obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular failure. It is known that gestation and lactation are crucial periods for healthy growth in mammals and that the sympathoadrenal system is markedly influenced by environmental conditions during these periods. We previously demonstrated that neonatal hyperleptinaemia in rats programmes higher body weight, higher food intake and hypothalamic leptin resistance in adulthood. Using this model of programming, we investigated adrenal medullary function and effects on cardiovascular parameters in male rats in adulthood. Leptin treatment during the first 10 days of lactation (8 microg 100 g(-1) day(-1), s.c.) resulted in lower body weight (6.5%, P < 0.05), hyperleptinaemia (10-fold, P < 0.05) and higher catecholamine content in adrenal glands (18.5%, P < 0.05) on the last day of treatment. In adulthood (150 days), the rats presented higher body weight (5%, P < 0.05), adrenal catecholamine content (3-fold, P < 0.05), tyrosine hydroxylase expression (35%, P < 0.05) and basal and caffeine-stimulated catecholamine release (53% and 100%, respectively, P < 0.05). Systolic blood pressure and heart rate were also higher in adult rats (7% and 6%, respectively, P < 0.05). Our results show that hyperleptinaemia in early life increases adrenal medullary function in adulthood and that this may alter cardiovascular parameters. Thus, we suggest that imprinting factors which increase leptin and catecholamine levels during the neonatal period could be involved in development of adult chronic diseases.

  19. Maternal perinatal undernutrition alters postnatal development of chromaffin cells in the male rat adrenal medulla.

    PubMed

    Molendi-Coste, Olivier; Laborie, Christine; Scarpa, Maria Cristina; Montel, Valérie; Vieau, Didier; Breton, Christophe

    2009-01-01

    Numerous data suggest that the development of the sympathoadrenal system is highly sensitive to the perinatal environment. We previously reported that maternal perinatal food restriction by 50% (FR50) altered chromaffin cell (CC) organization and activity in offspring at weaning. This study investigated the effects of FR50 on the postnatal time course of CC functional and structural adaptations. FR50 pups exhibited smaller and more abundant scattered clusters of noradrenergic CCs as early as postnatal day 7 (P7), indicating that morphological changes took place earlier during development. At birth, the adrenaline release was defective in FR50 pups, suggesting that maternal FR50 impaired the non-neurogenic control of catecholamine release. At P4, the catecholamine release in response to insulin-induced hypoglycaemia was also absent in FR50 pups. This was associated with the reduction of adrenal catecholamine contents, indicating that the failure to synthesize catecholamine might lead to impaired secretion. We hypothesized that maternal FR50 accelerated the functional connections between CCs and splanchnic nerve endings, leading to the premature loss of the non-neurogenic response. Acetylcholine-containing synaptic endings seemed more precociously functional in FR50 pups, as suggested by increased levels of acetylcholine esterase activity at P14. At P7, insulin-induced hypoglycaemia caused preferential adrenaline release associated with increased catecholamine contents in both groups. However, the response was accentuated in FR50 pups. At P14, the insulin challenge increased plasma levels of adrenaline in control rats, whereas it markedly enhanced the circulating level of both catecholamines in FR50 pups. We demonstrated that maternal FR50 leads to developmentally impaired noradrenergic CC aggregation and advanced splanchnic neurotransmission maturation associated with altered medulla activity in response to metabolic stress. This might contribute to the long

  20. Adrenal gland and bone.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Rowan; Cooper, Mark S

    2010-11-01

    The adrenal gland synthesizes steroid hormones from the adrenal cortex and catecholamines from the adrenal medulla. Both cortisol and adrenal androgens can have powerful effects on bone. The overproduction of cortisol in Cushing's disease leads to a dramatic reduction in bone density and an increase risk of fracture. Overproduction of adrenal androgens in congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) leads to marked changes in bone growth and development with early growth acceleration but ultimately a significant reduction in final adult height. The role of more physiological levels of glucocorticoids and androgens on bone metabolism is less clear. Cortisol levels measured in elderly individuals show a weak correlation with measures of bone density and change in bone density over time with a high cortisol level associated with lower bone density and more rapid bone loss. Cortisol levels and the dynamics of cortisol secretion change with age which could also explain some age related changes in bone physiology. It is also now clear that adrenal steroids can be metabolized within bone tissue itself. Local synthesis of cortisol within bone from its inactive precursor cortisone has been demonstrated and the amount of cortisol produced within osteoblasts appears to increase with age. With regard to adrenal androgens there is a dramatic reduction in levels with aging and several studies have examined the impact that restoration of these levels back to those seen in younger individuals has on bone health. Most of these studies show small positive effects in women, not men, but the skeletal sites where benefits are seen varies from study to study.

  1. [Adrenal tumours in childhood].

    PubMed

    Martos-Moreno, G A; Pozo-Román, J; Argente, J

    2013-09-01

    This special article aims to summarise the current knowledge regarding the two groups of tumours with their origin in the adrenal gland: 1) adrenocortical tumours, derived from the cortex of the adrenal gland and 2) phaeochromocytomas and paragangliomas, neuroendocrine tumours derived from nodes of neural crest derived cells symmetrically distributed at both sides of the entire spine (paragangliomas [PG]). These PGs can be functioning tumors that secrete catecholamines, which confers their typical dark colour after staining with chromium salts (chromaffin tumors). Among these, the term phaeochromocytoma (PC) is restricted to those PGs derived from the chromaffin cells in the adrenal medulla (intra-adrenal PGs), whereas the term PG is used for those sympathetic or parasympathetic ones in an extra-adrenal location. We analyse the state of the art of their pathogenic and genetic bases, as well as their clinical signs and symptoms, the tests currently available for performing their diagnosis (biochemical, hormonal, imaging and molecular studies) and management (surgery, pre- and post-surgical medical treatment), considering the current and developing strategies in chemo- and radiotherapy.

  2. Adrenal crisis secondary to bilateral adrenal haemorrhage after hemicolectomy

    PubMed Central

    Tsang, Venessa H M; Kabir, Shahrir; Ip, Julian C Y

    2016-01-01

    Summary Adrenal haemorrhage is a rare cause of adrenal crisis, which requires rapid diagnosis, prompt initiation of parenteral hydrocortisone and haemodynamic monitoring to avoid hypotensive crises. We herein describe a case of bilateral adrenal haemorrhage after hemicolectomy in a 93-year-old female with high-grade colonic adenocarcinoma. This patient’s post-operative recovery was complicated by an acute hypotensive episode, hypoglycaemia and syncope, and subsequent computed tomography (CT) scan of the abdomen revealed bilateral adrenal haemorrhage. Given her labile blood pressure, intravenous hydrocortisone was commenced with rapid improvement of blood pressure, which had incompletely responded with fluids. A provisional diagnosis of hypocortisolism was made. Initial heparin-induced thrombocytopenic screen (HITTS) was positive, but platelet count and coagulation profile were both normal. The patient suffered a concurrent transient ischaemic attack with no neurological deficits. She was discharged on a reducing dose of oral steroids with normal serum cortisol levels at the time of discharge. She and her family were educated about lifelong steroids and the use of parenteral steroids should a hypoadrenal crisis eventuate. Learning points: Adrenal haemorrhage is a rare cause of hypoadrenalism, and thus requires prompt diagnosis and management to prevent death from primary adrenocortical insufficiency. Mechanisms of adrenal haemorrhage include reduced adrenal vascular bed capillary resistance, adrenal vein thrombosis, catecholamine-related increased adrenal blood flow and adrenal vein spasm. Standard diagnostic assessment is a non-contrast CT abdomen. Intravenous hydrocortisone and intravenous substitution of fluids are the initial management. A formal diagnosis of primary adrenal insufficiency should never delay treatment, but should be made afterwards. PMID:27855238

  3. PHEOCHROMOCYTOMA: A CATECHOLAMINE AND OXIDATIVE STRESS DISORDER

    PubMed Central

    Pacak, Karel

    2012-01-01

    The WHO classification of endocrine tumors defines pheochromocytoma as a tumor arising from chromaffin cells in the adrenal medulla — an intra-adrenal paraganglioma. Closely related tumors of extra-adrenal sympathetic and parasympathetic paraganglia are classified as extra-adrenal paragangliomas. Almost all pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas produce catecholamines. The concentrations of catecholamines in pheochromocytoma tissues are enormous, potentially creating a volcano that can erupt at any time. Significant eruptions result in catecholamine storms called “attacks” or “spells”. Acute catecholamine crisis can strike unexpectedly, leaving traumatic memories of acute medical disaster that champions any intensive care unit. A very well-defined genotype-biochemical phenotype relationship exists, guiding proper and cost-effective genetic testing of patients with these tumors. Currently, the production of norepinephrine and epinephrine is optimally assessed by the measurement of their O-methylated metabolites, normetanephrine or metanephrine, respectively. Dopamine is a minor component, but some paragangliomas produce only this catecholamine or this together with norepinephrine. Methoxytyramine, the O-methylated metabolite of dopamine, is the best biochemical marker of these tumors. In those patients with equivocal biochemical results, a modified clonidine suppression test coupled with the measurement of plasma normetanephrine has recently been introduced. In addition to differences in catecholamine enzyme expression, the presence of either constitutive or regulated secretory pathways contributes further to the very unique mutation-dependent catecholamine production and release, resulting in various clinical presentations. Oxidative stress results from a significant imbalance between levels of prooxidants, generated during oxidative phosphorylation, and antioxidants. The gradual accumulation of prooxidants due to metabolic oxidative stress results in proto

  4. Catecholamines in shock.

    PubMed

    Alho, A; Jäättelä, A; Lahdensuu, M; Rokkanen, P; Avikainen, V; Karaharju, E; Tervo, T; Lepistö, P

    1977-06-01

    The role of endogenous catecholamines in various clinical shock and stress states is reviewed; the effects, especially on the peripheral circulation, of catecholamine secretion are the same independent of the cause. Risks of using sympathomimetic agents in the treatment of shock are evaluated. A prolonged noradrenaline activity is to be expected in surgical stress states, e.g. multiple injuries, fat embolism syndrome, burns and infections; therapeutic approaches to minimize the sympathoadrenal activity are outlined.

  5. Centrally evoked increase in adrenal sympathetic outflow elicits immediate secretion of adrenaline in anaesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Tsuchimochi, Hirotsugu; Nakamoto, Tomoko; Matsukawa, Kanji

    2010-01-01

    To examine whether feedforward control by central command activates preganglionic adrenal sympathetic nerve activity (AdSNA) and releases catecholamines from the adrenal medulla, we investigated the effects of electrical stimulation of the hypothalamic locomotor region on preganglionic AdSNA and secretion rate of adrenal catecholamines in anaesthetized rats. Pre- or postganglionic AdSNA was verified by temporary sympathetic ganglionic blockade with trimethaphan. Adrenal venous blood was collected every 30 s to determine adrenal catecholamine output and blood flow. Hypothalamic stimulation for 30 s (50 Hz, 100-200 microA) induced rapid activation of preganglionic AdSNA by 83-181% depending on current intensity, which was followed by an immediate increase of 123-233% in adrenal adrenaline output. Hypothalamic stimulation also increased postganglionic AdSNA by 42-113% and renal sympathetic nerve activity by 94-171%. Hypothalamic stimulation induced preferential secretion of adrenal adrenaline compared with noradrenaline, because the ratio of adrenaline to noradrenaline increased greatly during hypothalamic stimulation. As soon as the hypothalamic stimulation was terminated, preganglionic AdSNA returned to the prestimulation level in a few seconds, and the elevated catecholamine output decayed within 30-60 s. Adrenal blood flow and vascular resistance were not affected or slightly decreased by hypothalamic stimulation. Thus, it is likely that feedforward control of catecholamine secretion from the adrenal medulla plays a role in conducting rapid hormonal control of the cardiovascular system at the beginning of exercise.

  6. Role of TrkB expression in rat adrenal gland during acute immobilization stress

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Yusuke; To, Masahiro; Saruta, Juri; Hayashi, Takashi; Sugiyama, Hiroki; Tsukinoki, Keiichi

    2013-01-01

    Expression of tyrosine receptor kinase B (TrkB), a receptor for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), is markedly elevated in the adrenal medulla during immobilization stress. Catecholamine release was confirmed in vitro by stimulating chromaffin cells with recombinant BDNF. We investigated the role of TrkB and the localization of BDNF in the adrenal gland during immobilization stress for 60 min. Blood catecholamine levels increased after stimulation with TrkB expressed in the adrenal medulla during 60-min stress; however, blood catecholamine levels did not increase in adrenalectomized rats. Furthermore, expression of BDNF mRNA and protein was detected in the adrenal medulla during 60-min stress. Similarly, in rats undergoing sympathetic nerve block with propranolol, BDNF mRNA and protein were detected in the adrenal medulla during 60-min stress. These results suggest that signal transduction of TrkB in the adrenal medulla evokes catecholamine release. In addition, catecholamine release was evoked by both the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis and autocrine signaling by BDNF in the adrenal gland. BDNF–TrkB interaction may play a role in a positive feedback loop in the adrenal medulla during immobilization stress. PMID:23017014

  7. Adrenal glands

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002219.htm Adrenal glands To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. The adrenal glands are two triangle-shaped glands. One gland is ...

  8. Neurologic complications of disorders of the adrenal glands.

    PubMed

    Bertorini, Tulio E; Perez, Angel

    2014-01-01

    Disorders of the adrenal glands frequently have secondary neurological manifestations, while some diseases that involve the central nervous system are accompanied by adrenal gland dysfunction. Excessive corticosteroid secretions in primary or secondary Cushing's syndrome causes muscle weakness and behavioral disturbances, such as emotional lability and sometimes depression, while adrenal insufficiency may cause fatigue, weakness, and depression. Adrenoleukodystrophy and adrenoneuromyelopathy are X-linked recessive disorders of the metabolism of very long chain fatty acids that manifest with white matter abnormalities of the brain, myelopathy and/or neuropathy, as well as adrenal insufficiency. Other disorders of the adrenal glands include hyperaldosteroidism, which may cause weakness from hypokalemia. Dysfunction of the adrenal medulla causes excessive or deficient secretion of catecholamines, primarily causing cardiovascular symptoms. This chapter reviews the clinical manifestations and diagnostic aspects and treatment of the various disorders of the adrenal glands. Some of the congenital adrenal diseases are also discussed.

  9. Plasma catecholamines and postoperative gastric emptying and small intestinal propulsion in the rat.

    PubMed

    Dubois, A; Henry, D P; Kopin, I J

    1975-03-01

    The role of adrenal medullary discharge of catecholamines on inhibition of gastric emptying and small intestinal propulsion after laparotomy was examined in rats. The rate of movement of a 51Cr-labeled liquid test meal, which had been introduced by gastric intubation, out of the stomach and through the small intestine, was retarded 12 hr after laparotomy. Adrenal demedullation produced a striking decrease in plasma catecholamines and abolished surgically induced elevation of the catecholamines, but had no significant effect on gastric emptying or intestinal propulsion in rats subjected to laparotomy or in the unoperated control animals. Thus circulating catecholamines play little if any role in controlling normal gastroinestinal motility or in the postoperative decrease in rate of gastric emptying and small intestinal motility.

  10. Adrenal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Auron, Moises; Raissouni, Nouhad

    2015-03-01

    Adrenal insufficiency is a life-threatening condition that occurs secondary to impaired secretion of adrenal glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid hormones. This condition can be caused by primary destruction or dysfunction of the adrenal glands or impairment of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. In children, the most common causes of primary adrenal insufficiency are impaired adrenal steroidogenesis (congenital adrenal hyperplasia) and adrenal destruction or dysfunction (autoimmune polyendocrine syndrome and adrenoleukodystrophy), whereas exogenous corticosteroid therapy withdrawal or poor adherence to scheduled corticosteroid dosing with long-standing treatment constitute the most common cause of acquired adrenal insufficiency. Although there are classic clinical signs (eg, fatigue, orthostatic hypotension, hyperpigmentation, hyponatremia, hyperkalemia, and hypoglycemia) of adrenal insufficiency, its early clinical presentation is most commonly vague and undefined, requiring a high index of suspicion. The relevance of early identification of adrenal insufficiency is to avoid the potential lethal outcome secondary to severe cardiovascular and hemodynamic insufficiency. The clinician must be aware of the need for increased corticosteroid dose supplementation during stress periods.

  11. [Catecholamine response to the Wingate test in untrained women].

    PubMed

    Vincent, Sophie; Gratas-Delamarche, Arlette; Berthon, Phanélie Marie; Zouhal, Hassane; Jacob, Christophe; Bentue-Ferrer, Danièle; Delamarche, Paul

    2003-10-01

    Supramaximal exercises are well known to induce a severe stress on the adrenal medulla and nervous sympathetic system. This stress induces increased plasma catecholamines concentrations. The responses of catecholamines to supramaximal exercises in women are still not well characterized and have been studied mostly in trained subjects. Hence the aim of the present study was to evaluate plasma catecholamine responses to a Wingate test in young and untrained women (n = 6) and men (n = 7). Venous plasma catecholamine concentrations were determined by HPLC, at rest, at the end of the warm-up and of the exercise, and during recovery (5, 10, 20, and 30 mn). Our results failed to show any significant difference in resting catecholamine concentrations ([A]p: 0.41 +/- 0.05 vs. 0.45 +/- 0.05 nmol. L-1; [NA]p: 3.28 +/- 0.68 vs. 2.58 +/- 0.26 nmol.L-1), kinetics, and maximal plasma catecholamine concentrations (Amax: 4.47 +/- 1.08 vs. 3.31 +/- 0.63 nmol.L-1; NAmax: 18.05 +/- 1.11 vs. 14.01 +/- 2.02 nmol.L-1) in response to the Wingate test between women and men, respectively. The Amax/NAmax ratio used as an index of adrenal medulla sensitivity to sympathetic input was also similar between genders. In conclusion, this study was able to demonstrate, in untrained subjects, that gender did not alder the sympatho-adrenergic response induced by a severe stress.

  12. Temporal changes of the adrenal endocrine system in a restraint stressed mouse and possibility of postmortem indicators of prolonged psychological stress.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takahito; Ikematsu, Kazuya; Abe, Yuki; Ihama, Yoko; Ago, Kazutoshi; Ago, Mihoko; Miyazaki, Tetsuji; Ogata, Mamoru

    2014-07-01

    We investigated temporal changes of adrenal endocrine systems through the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) and sympathetic-adrenomedullary (SA) axis in restraint stressed mice. Restraint stress for 1 day to 3 weeks caused a significant increase in serum levels of ACTH and glucocorticoids accompanied with an increase in adrenal weights, indicating activation of the HPA axis. Reflecting the overproduction of glucocorticoids, adrenal cholesterol content decreased. Moreover, adrenal gene expression involved in cholesterol supply, including scavenger receptor-class B type I, HMG-CoA reductase, and hormone-sensitive lipase, was increased over the same period. After 4 weeks stress, all of these changes returned to control levels. In contrast, adrenal gene expression of chromogranin A, which is cosecreted with catecholamine via the SA axis, was increased with 1 day to 2 weeks of stress, and decreased with 3-4 weeks of stress. Our results suggest that analyses of adrenal endocrine systems based on the combination of several markers examined here would be useful for not only proving prolonged psychological stress experience but also determining its duration.

  13. [Effect of chloditan on the changes of activity of glutathione transferase, glutathione reductase and glutathione content in the adrenal glands and liver in rats].

    PubMed

    Zorich, P A; Tronko, N D; Mikosha, A S

    1994-01-01

    The chloditan (o.p-DDD, mitotane), which causes the destruction of the human and dog adrenal cortex, on the most essential system of xenobiotic metabolism: glutathione-S-transferase--glutathione has been studied. The effect of o,p-DDD on GSH level and activity of glutathione-S-transferase and glutathione reductase which maintain the level of reduced glutathione was analyzed in the adrenal and liver tissue of rats. This species is resistant to adrenocorticolytic action of o,p-DDD. It was shown that feeding of rats weighting 200-240 g with oil solution of o,p-DDD (75 mg daily) for 3 days causes the decrease in activity of glutathione-S-transferase and content of oxidazed glutathione in the adrenals with simultaneous increase of the content of reduced glutathione. The glutathione-S-transferase and glutathione reductase activity in the liver rises under the effect of o,p-DDD, the decrease of the GSH level being observed. The revealed changes may explain the species sensitivity of animals to o,p-DDD.

  14. The study of adrenal chromaffin of fish, Carassius auratus (Toleostei).

    PubMed

    Sampour, M

    2008-04-01

    In C. auratus the adrenal chramaffin tissue is situated around the posterior cardinal veins, in the head kidney. Chromaffin tissue consists of two types of cells containing secretory granules, adrenaline and nor adrenaline cells. The cells produced catecholamine hormones. Adrenaline cell contains electron-lucent granules, whereas nor adrenaline cells possesses electron-dense granules. Cholinergic fibers embedded in the head kidney innervated the chromaffin cell. Two types of secretory structures, synaptic vesicles and secretory granules are found within the presynaptic terminal. Secretory granules discharge their contests, as neuropeptide in non synaptic area of nerve terminal by exocytosis, whereas synaptic vesicles discharge their contents as neurotransmitters at the synaptic thickening (active zone) in the presynaptic terminal by exocytosis.

  15. Adrenal Insufficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... three types of steroid hormones. In adrenal insufficiency (AI), the cortex does not make enough steroid hormones. ... unlike “adrenal fatigue.” There are two kinds of AI: • Primary AI, also called Addison’s disease. In this ...

  16. [Pheochromocytomas as adrenal gland incidentalomas].

    PubMed

    Cerović, Snezana; Cizmić, Milica; Milović, Novak; Ajdinović, Boris; Brajusković, Goran

    2002-07-01

    Adrenal incidentalomas are a heterogeneous group of pathological entities, including benign or malignant adrenocortical or medullary tumors, hormonally active or inactive lesions, which are identified incidentally during the examination of nonadrenal-related abdominal complaints. About 1.5% to 23% of adrenal incidentalomas are pheochromocytomas. Composite pheochromocytoma is a rare tumour of adrenal medulla with divergente clinical course. This type of pheochromocytoma is designated "composite" or "mixed," depending on whether pheochromocytoma and nonpheochromocytoma components show the same embryologic origin. Nonpheochromocytoma components found in the composite pheochromocytoma include ganglioneuroma, ganglioneuroblastoma, neuroblastoma, and malignant schwannoma. The biologic behavior of composite pheochromocytomas may be as difficult to predict as more traditional pheochromocytomas; based on the number of cases reported to date the presence of areas resembling ganglioneuroblastoma or neuroblastoma does not necessary indicate a poor prognosis. Some may behave in a malignant fashion with metastasis by a component of the tumour which has neural features. Pheochromocytomas and paragangliomas are well-defined entities. Some of their nonsporadic associations and unusual morphological appearances are not universally appreciated. We report on a rare association of left adrenal CP, with typical right adrenal phochromocytoma and retroperitoneal paraganglioma, and a review of literature. We analyzed the clinical and immunohistochemical features in a 24-year-old woman with composite pheochromocytoma localized in the left adrenal gland and associated with blood pressure of 200/140 mmHg. Abdominal computed tomography and 131-J MIBG revealed a 65 x 60 mm mass in the right adrenal gland, but no revealed 45 x 40 mm retroperitoneal mass and 20 x 20 mm mass in the left adrenal region. Serum and urinary adrenaline levels were high, and catecholamine levels in the blood sample of

  17. Symptomatic pheochromocytoma with normal urinary catecholamine metabolites.

    PubMed

    Zianni, Dimitra; Tzanela, Marinella; Klimopoulos, Serafim; Thalassinos, N C

    2004-01-01

    A 61-year old female presented with paroxysmal hypertension and a 4.5cm left adrenal mass on CT scan. Repeated measurements of 24-hour urinary fractionated metanephrines, total catecholamines and vanillylmandelic acid (VMA) were within normal range. A further scintigraphic study with (131)I -metaiodobenzylguanidine ((131)I-MIBG) revealed selective concentration of the radiotracer, corresponding to the CT mass. After adequate preoperative treatment, successful surgical excision of the tumor was performed and the pathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of a cystic pheochromocytoma with a 2cm solid tumor. On reevaluation three months later using (131)I-MIBG, no evidence of remaining or recurrent disease was found. The patient, off any antihypertensive medication, reported mild recurrent hypertension and panic attacks that were adequately controlled with antidepressants. This is a rare case of a symptomatic pheochromocytoma without elevated urine catecholamines and metanephrines. According to the literature, plasma free metanephrines would be the ideal test for biochemical detection of the tumor. However, in the event that they are not available and there is a high clinical suspicion for the presence of pheochromocytoma, as in our patient, we suggest performance of a functional nuclear medicine study, such as (131)I-MIBG, to confirm the clinical diagnosis.

  18. Adipose tissue and adrenal glands: novel pathophysiological mechanisms and clinical applications.

    PubMed

    Kargi, Atil Y; Iacobellis, Gianluca

    2014-01-01

    Hormones produced by the adrenal glands and adipose tissues have important roles in normal physiology and are altered in many disease states. Obesity is associated with changes in adrenal function, including increase in adrenal medullary catecholamine output, alterations of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, elevations in circulating aldosterone together with changes in adipose tissue glucocorticoid metabolism, and enhanced adipocyte mineralocorticoid receptor activity. It is unknown whether these changes in adrenal endocrine function are in part responsible for the pathogenesis of obesity and related comorbidities or represent an adaptive response. In turn, adipose tissue hormones or "adipokines" have direct effects on the adrenal glands and interact with adrenal hormones at several levels. Here we review the emerging evidence supporting the existence of "cross talk" between the adrenal gland and adipose tissue, focusing on the relevance and roles of their respective hormones in health and disease states including obesity, metabolic syndrome, and primary disorders of the adrenals.

  19. [A Case of Synchronous Malignant Pheochromocytomas in Bilateral Adrenal Glands].

    PubMed

    Usui, Kimitsugu; Hirasawa, Terukazu; Kobayashi, Masataka; Shioi, Kouichi; Kobayashi, Kazuki; Sakai, Naoki; Noguchi, Sumio; Tsuura, Yukio

    2016-06-01

    We present a case of synchronous malignant pheochromocytoma in bilateral adrenal glands. A 73- year-old man presented to our hospital with bilateral adrenal masses incidentally found during abdominal ultrasonography examination for an unrelated issue. The patient had a 30-year history of hypertension and paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging showed heterogeneous tumors in bilateral adrenal glands and an enlarged para-aortic lymph node. Hormonal examinations revealed a high value of urinary catecholamines. Metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) scintigraphy showed increased uptake in bilateral adrenal glands and the lymph node. Both adrenal tumors and the node were surgically removed. Pathological examination revealed histologically distinct tissue between the two adrenal tumors. The patient received five cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy, consisting of cyclophosphamide, vincristine, and dacarbazine. The patient has been in remission for 32 months following surgical treatment.

  20. Adrenal Diagnostics: An Endocrinologist’s Perspective focused on Hyperaldosteronism

    PubMed Central

    Fuller, Peter J

    2013-01-01

    The era of sophisticated high resolution imaging with the consequent identification of previously unrecognised adrenal masses (adrenal incidentalomas), has emphasised the need for an appropriate biochemical approach to define adrenal function. The focus of this testing is on catecholamines from the adrenal medulla (testing that has been rendered relatively straightforward by plasma metanephrine measurements) and the physiological corticosteroids, cortisol and aldosterone, synthesised by the adrenal cortex. The diagnosis of hypercortisolism remains a challenge and has been extensively reviewed. In the context of hypertension and an adrenal incidentaloma, the exclusion of hyperaldosteronism has an importance beyond simple blood pressure control. This review focuses on the recommended approaches to both the diagnosis of hyperaldosteronism and the characterisation of its aetiology. Monogenetic causes of mineralocorticoid hypertension are discussed as are recent developments with respect to both the molecular aetiology and the differential diagnosis of aldosterone-producing adenomas. PMID:24353356

  1. Compensatory adrenal growth - A neurally mediated reflex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dallman, M. F.; Engeland, W. C.; Shinsako, J.

    1976-01-01

    The responses of young rats to left adrenalectomy or left adrenal manipulation were compared to surgical sham adrenalectomy in which adrenals were observed but not touched. At 12 h right adrenal wet weight, dry weight, DNA, RNA, and protein content were increased (P less than 0.05) after the first two operations. Left adrenal manipulation resulted in increased right adrenal weight at 12 h but no change in left adrenal weight. Sequential manipulation of the left adrenal at time 0 and the right adrenal at 12 h resulted in an enlarged right adrenal at 12 h (P less than 0.01), and an enlarged left adrenal at 24 h (P less than 0.05), showing that the manipulated gland was capable of response. Bilateral adrenal manipulation of the adrenal glands resulted in bilateral enlargement of 12 h (P less than 0.01). Taken together with previous results, these findings strongly suggest that compensatory adrenal growth is a neurally mediated reflex.

  2. Structural changes in the liver and content of steroid hormones in the blood and adrenal glands of mice with systemic candidiasis treated with a composition of amphotericin B and dialdehyde dextran.

    PubMed

    Shkurupiy, V A; Selyatitskaya, V G; Palchikova, N A; Kurilin, V V; Tsyrendorzhiev, D D; Travin, M A; Nadeev, A P

    2008-12-01

    In CBA mice infected with C. albicans, phasic pattern of granulomatosis development was observed. In all groups, the number of granulomas in the liver was minimum on day 56 after infection. Treatment with free amphotericin B and its composition with dialdehyde dextran (CA) reduced the number of infiltrations and granulomas in the liver, the changes were more pronounced in animals receiving CA. A different pattern of cyclic fluctuations of cortisol content in the blood and adrenal glands and progesterone content in the adrenal gland was observed. By the end of observation (day 84), cortisol content in the blood and adrenals of mice treated with CA was considerably lower than in untreated mice and animals receiving amphotericin B.

  3. The innervation of the adrenal gland. IV. Innervation of the rat adrenal medulla from birth to old age. A descriptive and quantitative morphometric and biochemical study of the innervation of chromaffin cells and adrenal medullary neurons in Wistar rats.

    PubMed Central

    Tomlinson, A; Coupland, R E

    1990-01-01

    The innervation of the adrenal medulla has been investigated in normal Wistar rats from birth to old age and ultrastructural findings compared with biochemical markers of the cholinergic innervation of the adrenal gland and catecholamine storage. Morphological evidence of the immaturity of the innervation during the first postnatal week is provided and using quantitative morphometry the innervation of chromaffin cells is shown to reach a mean total of 5.4 synapses per chromaffin cell during the period 26 days to 12 weeks of age. The variation in contents of synaptic profiles is discussed in the light of recent work that demonstrates a major sensory as well as visceral efferent innervation of the gland. Adrenal medullary neurons usually occur in closely packed groups, intimately associated with Schwann cells. Axodendritic and axosomatic synapses on these neurons are described and the likely origin of axonal processes innervating the neurons discussed. In old age the density of innervation remains the same as in young adult animals even though the medulla shows evidence of hyperplasia and hypertrophy of individual chromaffin cells. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 13 Fig. 14 Fig. 15 Fig. 16 Fig. 17 Fig. 18 Fig. 19 Fig. 20 Fig. 21 Fig. 22 Fig. 23 Fig. 24 Fig. 25 PMID:2384334

  4. Adrenal adrenoceptors in heart failure

    PubMed Central

    de Lucia, Claudio; Femminella, Grazia D.; Gambino, Giuseppina; Pagano, Gennaro; Allocca, Elena; Rengo, Carlo; Silvestri, Candida; Leosco, Dario; Ferrara, Nicola; Rengo, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is a chronic clinical syndrome characterized by the reduction in left ventricular (LV) function and it represents one of the most important causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Despite considerable advances in pharmacological treatment, HF represents a severe clinical and social burden. Sympathetic outflow, characterized by increased circulating catecholamines (CA) biosynthesis and secretion, is peculiar in HF and sympatholytic treatments (as β-blockers) are presently being used for the treatment of this disease. Adrenal gland secretes Epinephrine (80%) and Norepinephrine (20%) in response to acetylcholine stimulation of nicotinic cholinergic receptors on the chromaffin cell membranes. This process is regulated by adrenergic receptors (ARs): α2ARs inhibit CA release through coupling to inhibitory Gi-proteins, and β ARs (mainly β2ARs) stimulate CA release through coupling to stimulatory Gs-proteins. All ARs are G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and GPCR kinases (GRKs) regulate their signaling and function. Adrenal GRK2-mediated α2AR desensitization and downregulation are increased in HF and seem to be a fundamental regulator of CA secretion from the adrenal gland. Consequently, restoration of adrenal α2AR signaling through the inhibition of GRK2 is a fascinating sympatholytic therapeutic strategy for chronic HF. This strategy could have several significant advantages over existing HF pharmacotherapies minimizing side-effects on extra-cardiac tissues and reducing the chronic activation of the renin–angiotensin–aldosterone and endothelin systems. The role of adrenal ARs in regulation of sympathetic hyperactivity opens interesting perspectives in understanding HF pathophysiology and in the identification of new therapeutic targets. PMID:25071591

  5. Tetrodotoxin-insensitive Na+ channel activator palytoxin inhibits tyrosine uptake into cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells

    SciTech Connect

    Morita, K.; Teraoka, K.; Azuma, M.; Oka, M.; Hamano, S. )

    1991-07-01

    The effects of the tetrodotoxin-insensitive Na+ channel activator palytoxin on both the secretion of endogenous catecholamines and the formation of 14C-catecholamines from (14C)tyrosine were examined using cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells. Palytoxin was shown to cause the stimulation of catecholamine secretion in a concentration-dependent manner. However, this toxin caused the reduction rather than the stimulation of 14C-catecholamine formation at the same concentrations. Palytoxin failed to cause any alteration in the activity of tyrosine hydroxylase prepared from bovine adrenal medulla. Furthermore, the uptake of (14C)tyrosine into the cells was shown to be inhibited by this toxin under the conditions in which the suppression of 14C-catecholamine formation was observed, and this inhibitory action on tyrosine uptake was closely correlated with that on catecholamine formation. The inhibitory action of palytoxin on tyrosine uptake into the cells was observed to be noncompetitive, and this effect was not altered by the removal of Na+ from the incubation mixture. These results suggest that palytoxin may be able to inhibit the uptake of (14C)tyrosine into the cells, resulting in the suppression of 14C-catecholamine formation, probably through its direct action on the plasma membranes of bovine adrenal chromaffin cells.

  6. [Adrenal mass and adrenal insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Martínez Albaladejo, M; García López, B; Serrano Corredor, S; Alguacil García, G

    1996-12-01

    Primary adrenal insufficiency is a non frequent disease, that is declared in young adults and in the most of the cases is produced from an autoimmune mechanism or a tuberculous disease. The incidence of these forms in the different geographic areas is dependent of degree of irradication of the tuberculosis. We report the case of a patient with latent chronic adrenal insufficiency of tuberculous origin who was affected for an addisonian crisis during an intercurrent infectious disease, which permitted the diagnosis of the addisonian crisis, and Mal of Pott was moreover detected. Evolution with corticosteroid and specific treatment was very favorable.

  7. Rare adrenal tumors in children.

    PubMed

    Mihai, Radu

    2014-04-01

    Apart from neuroblastomas, adrenal tumors are exceedingly rare in children and young adults. In this age group, the vast majority of patients present with clinical signs associated with excess hormone production. The most common tumor to arise from the adrenal cortex is an adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC). Similar to the situation in adults, this tumor is frequently diagnosed at a late stage and carries a very poor prognosis. ACCs require extensive/aggressive local resection followed by mitotane chemotherapy. A multidisciplinary approach is essential, and these children should be referred to units that have previous experience in managing ACCs. International registries are an invaluable source for evidence-based care, and such collaborations should be further developed in the future. Pheochromocytomas are derived from the adrenal medulla and present with symptoms caused by high secretion of catecholamines. At least one-third of these children will be found to carry genetic mutations, most commonly the RET gene (MEN2 syndrome) or the VHL gene. Open radical adrenalectomy should be offered to children with adrenocortical cancers. For all other cases, laparoscopic adrenalectomy is the treatment of choice. It is possible that the retroperitoneoscopic approach will gain increasing favor. The role of robotic adrenalectomy remains controversial.

  8. The effect of CdSe-ZnS quantum dots on calcium currents and catecholamine secretion in mouse chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Gosso, Sara; Gavello, Daniela; Giachello, Carlo N G; Franchino, Claudio; Carbone, Emilio; Carabelli, Valentina

    2011-12-01

    Semiconductor nanocrystal quantum dots (QDs) possess an enormous potential of applications in nanomedicine, drug delivery and bioimaging which derives from their unique photoemission and photostability characteristics. In spite of this, however, their interactions with biological systems and impact on human health are still largely unknown. Here we used neurosecretory mouse chromaffin cells of the adrenal gland for testing the effects of CdSe-ZnS core-shell quantum dots (5-36 nM) on Ca(2+) channels functionality and Ca(2+)-dependent neurosecretion. Prolonged exposure (24 h) to commonly used concentrations of CdSe-ZnS QDs (≥16 nM) showed that the semiconductor nanocrystal is effectively internalized into the cells without affecting cell integrity (no changes of membrane resistance and cell capacitance). QDs reduced the size of Ca(2+) currents by ∼28% in a voltage-independent manner without affecting channel gating. Correspondingly, depolarization-evoked exocytosis, measured at +10 mV, where Ca(2+) currents are maximal, was reduced by 29%. CdSe-ZnS QDs reduced the size of the readily releasable pool (RRP) of secretory vesicles by 32%, the frequency of release by 33% and the overall quantity of released catecholamines by 61%, as measured by carbon fibers amperometry. In addition, the Ca(2+)-dependence of exocytosis was reduced, whereas the catecholamine content of single granules, as well as the kinetics of release, remained unaltered. These data suggest that exposure to CdSe-ZnS QDs impairs Ca(2+) influx and severely interferes with the functionality of the exocytotic machinery, compromising the overall catecholamine supply from chromaffin cells.

  9. How Do Health Care Providers Diagnose Adrenal Gland Disorders?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gland Disorders > About > Diagnosis Page Content ​ ​How do health care providers diagnose adrenal gland disorders? Methods for diagnosing ... Tumors To diagnose an adrenal gland tumor, a health care provider may order one or more tests. 3 ...

  10. Adrenocortical hemorrhagic necrosis: the role of catecholamines and retrograde medullary-cell embolism

    SciTech Connect

    Szabo, S.; McComb, D.J.; Kovacs, K.; Huettner, I.

    1981-10-01

    We investigated the pathogenesis of adrenal necrosis using animal models of the disease (induced by administration of acrylonitrile, cysteamine, or pyrazole) and human cases. Results of electron-microscopic and histochemical time-response studies with rat models revealed an early, retrograde embolization of medullary cells and cell fragments in the cortical capillaries that showed prominent endothelial injury. The experimental adrenal lesions were prevented by surgical removal of the medulla one month before administration of adrenocorticolytic chemicals, or by the administration of the alpha-adrenergic antagonist phenoxybenzamine hydrochloride. Histochemical staining for medullary (argyrophil) granules in human cases of adrenal necrosis demonstrated tissue fragments that stained positively for silver in vascular cortical spaces in nine of ten autopsy specimens and in all four surgical cases we reviewed. Thus, catecholamines released from the adrenal medulla and from the retrograde medullary emboli in the cortex may have a role in the pathogenesis of adrenocortical necrosis.

  11. The metabolites of catecholamines in urine of patients irradiated therapeutically.

    PubMed

    Pericić, D; Deanović, Z

    1976-04-01

    The metabolites of catecholamines were determined in 24-hour urine samples of patients with genital carcinoma and treated by radio therapy. The patients were irradiated first with gamma-rays of radium and then with X-rays. The radium sources (80 mCi) were placed intracavitarily for 46 hours twice within 2 weeks. X-irradiation (800 R daily), applied 1 month after radium treatment, was delivered on four abdominal fields over 15 days. The quantities of excreted catecholamine metabolites during irradiation were compared with control values (obtained before irradiation) in the same patients. Gamma-irradiation provoked a significant increase in the excretion of 3-methoxy-4-hydroxy-mandelic acid, metadrenaline and normetadrenaline, as well as of homovanillic acid, whereas X-irradiation provoked only a significant increase in the excretion of free 3-methoxy-4-hydroxy-phenylglycol. The increased excretion might be explained: (1) in the case of radium application, by direct radiation-induced release of catecholamines from the peripheral symphathetic nerves; (2) in the case of X-irradiation, by putting in the motion the complex of early neuroendocrine reactions via irradiated adrenal medulla.

  12. Immunohistochemical demonstration of syntaxin and SNAP-25 in chromaffin cells of the frog adrenal gland.

    PubMed

    Quintanar, J L; Salinas, E; Reig, J A

    1998-08-01

    The release of catecholamines from chromaffin cells involves specific proteins such as synaptobrevin present in the secretory vesicles as well as syntaxin and synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25), both present in the plasma membrane. We have found syntaxin and SNAP-25 in chromaffin cells of the frog adrenal gland by immunohistochemistry. This result suggests that the secretion of catecholamines from chromaffin cells involves these proteins in the frog.

  13. Plasma catecholamine activity in chronic lead poisoning

    SciTech Connect

    deCastro, F.J.

    1990-04-01

    Plasma catecholamines where measured in 15 children with chronic lead poisoning and 15 matched controls by radioimmunassay. The data suggest that plasma catecholamines (norepinephrine and epinphrine) were significantly elevated in chronic lead poisoning. Plasma catecholamine elevation may well be important in the clinical finding of hyperactivity and hypertension associated with chronic lead poisoning.

  14. Diagnosis of adrenal tumors with radionuclide imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Beierwaltes, W.H.; Sisson, J.C.; Shapiro, B.

    1984-01-01

    The development of radiolabeled cholesterols in 1969 as precursors of adrenocortical steroid production allowed the first noninvasive imaging of the adrenal cortices. FDA-NDA approval in 1984 should allow routine use of these agents in most hospitals. NP-59 is most commonly used in the diagnosis and management of Cushing syndrome; the second most common use is in the diagnosis of primary aldosteronism. It is also helpful in the differential diagnosis of adrenal and ovarian hyperandrogenism and hirsutism, and is the only noninvasive method of detecting unilateral adrenocortical hypofunction. The newest and most popular use is in the differential diagnosis of asymptomatic masses in the region of the adrenal gland discovered incidentally with CT scan (incidentalomas). In this situation, the NP-59 scan can define whether the tumor is in the adrenal gland and if it is functional or nonfunctional. The authors believe that, in the future, radiolabeled enzyme inhibitors might offer better diagnostic imaging of the adrenal cortex, although these agents will probably not be available for routine use for some time. The development of a radioiodinated guanethidine analog, /sup 131/I-MIBG, has allowed differentiation of normal adrenal medullary function from bilateral adrenal medullary hyperplasia before the development of hypertension or tachycardia, diagnostic increases in plasma or urinary catecholamines, or abnormal CT scans. The search for a pheochromocytoma should begin with /sup 131/I-MIBG scintigraphy. While over 90% of primary pheochromocytomas occur in the abdomen, neither a survey of the abdomen nor the finding of a single tumor should conclude the search.

  15. Incidence and Cause of Hypertension During Adrenal Radiofrequency Ablation

    SciTech Connect

    Yamakado, Koichiro Takaki, Haruyuki; Yamada, Tomomi; Yamanaka, Takashi; Uraki, Junji; Kashima, Masataka; Nakatsuka, Atsuhiro; Takeda, Kan

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the incidence and cause of hypertension prospectively during adrenal radiofrequency ablation (RFA). Methods: For this study, approved by our institutional review board, written informed consent was obtained from all patients. Patients who received RFA for adrenal tumors (adrenal ablation) and other abdominal tumors (nonadrenal ablation) were included in this prospective study. Blood pressure was monitored during RFA. Serum adrenal hormone levels including epinephrine, norepinephrine, dopamine, and cortisol levels were measured before and during RFA. The respective incidences of procedural hypertension (systolic blood pressure >200 mmHg) of the two patient groups were compared. Factors correlating with procedural systolic blood pressure were evaluated by regression analysis.ResultsNine patients underwent adrenal RFA and another 9 patients liver (n = 5) and renal (n = 4) RFA. Asymptomatic procedural hypertension that returned to the baseline by injecting calcium blocker was found in 7 (38.9%) of 18 patients. The incidence of procedural hypertension was significantly higher in the adrenal ablation group (66.7%, 6/9) than in the nonadrenal ablation group (11.1%, 1/9, P < 0.0498). Procedural systolic blood pressure was significantly correlated with serum epinephrine (R{sup 2} = 0.68, P < 0.0001) and norepinephrine (R{sup 2} = 0.72, P < 0.0001) levels during RFA. The other adrenal hormones did not show correlation with procedural systolic blood pressure. Conclusion: Hypertension occurs frequently during adrenal RFA because of the release of catecholamine.

  16. Inhibition of adrenomedullary catecholamine release by propranolol isomers and clonidine involving mechanisms unrelated to adrenoceptors.

    PubMed Central

    Orts, A.; Orellana, C.; Cantó, T.; Ceña, V.; González-García, C.; García, A. G.

    1987-01-01

    1 Transmural electrical stimulation (10 Hz, 40 V, 1 ms for 60s) increased total catecholamine secretion from perfused cat adrenal glands; this response was enhanced by neostigmine and inhibited by mecamylamine, suggesting that release of acetylcholine from splanchnic nerve terminals was stimulating nicotinic receptors and enhancing catecholamine secretion. 2 Isoprenaline, (-)-propranolol and (+)-propranolol (10(-7)-10(-5)M) inhibited the electrically-evoked secretory response by 40-70%; similar reductions were obtained with clonidine and yohimbine. Neither, (+)-propranolol nor (-)-propranolol inhibited K-evoked secretion from cat adrenals; in contrast, nimodipine potently inhibited it (IC50 = 24 nM). 3 Either, racemic propranolol or the (+)- or (-)-isomers (1-10 microM) equally inhibited [3H]-noradrenaline release evoked by nicotine or acetylcholine from cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells; clonidine (10 microM) inhibited secretion by 50% and yohimbine or isoprenaline did not affect it. 4 The results indicate that adrenomedullary catecholamine release evoked by splanchnic nerve stimulation is not modulated by alpha- or beta-adrenoceptors and suggest that propranolol may inhibit secretion by blocking ion fluxes through the acetylcholine receptor ionophore. Clonidine may inhibit secretion by this same mechanism, and/or by interfering with some intracellular event in the secretory mechanism. PMID:2827826

  17. [Body weight and adrenal function in rats with "foster mothers" from the moment of birth].

    PubMed

    Suárez, M M; Perassi, N I

    1990-01-01

    In rats, the effect of the separation from their mothers on the corporal weight and on the levels of adrenal hormones, adrenal and plasmatic corticosterone and adrenal catecholamines was studied. The litters were grouped according to: a) maintained with their biological mothers, and b) maintained with their mothers interchanged immediately after birth (foster mother). All were lactating mother rats. In group b) the corporal weight was lower (p less than 0.001) than in group a) from the 14th to the 28th day of life, their weight increased thereafter. The levels of adrenal corticosterone were higher (p less than 0.01) in group b), but the plasmatic corticosterone levels were similar to that in group a). With respect to catecholamines, the noradrenaline values were higher in group b) (p less than 0.001), whereas the adrenaline levels were lower (p less than 0.01) than those in group a).

  18. GABAA and GABAB receptors are functionally active in the regulation of catecholamine secretion by bovine chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Castro, E; Oset-Gasque, M J; González, M P

    1989-07-01

    GABA stimulates the basal catecholamine release from adrenal bovine chromaffin cells in a calcium-dependent manner. This release represents about 70% of that obtained by similar doses of nicotine under similar experimental conditions. This effect is mediated by GABAA receptor sites present in chromaffin cells, since it was mimicked by muscimol and reversed by bicuculline. In addition, GABA, through its GABAA receptors, increases the catecholamine release evoked by submaximal doses of nicotine, but it has no effect on nicotine-evoked secretion of catecholamines when nicotine was given at maximal doses. These results seem to indicate that both nicotine and GABA release catecholamines from the same intracellular pool. In contrast, baclofen, a GABAB receptor agonist, depressed both basal and nicotine-evoked catecholamine release; this result indicates that in addition to GABAA control of catecholamine secretion by chromaffin cells, there is a GABAB control of this function. These results support the existence of a dual regulation of catecholamine secretion by both the GABAA and GABAB receptors in a similar way as that proposed for muscarinic and nicotinic cholinergic receptors.

  19. Urinary catecholamine levels and gingivitis in children.

    PubMed

    Vanderas, A P; Kavvadia, K; Papagiannoulis, L

    1998-05-01

    This study investigated the relationship between gingivitis and emotionally stressful states measured by the urinary catecholamines in children. Three-hundred and fourteen (314) children, boys and girls, aged 6 to 8 years were included in the study. Gingivitis was recorded by the gingival bleeding index and dental plaque by the plaque control record index. Proximal decayed surfaces, faulty restorations, and stainless steel crowns were diagnosed clinically and radiographically. Information concerning systemic and socioeconomic factors was collected by a questionnaire. A 24-hour urine sample was collected for each subject and analyzed by the HPLC technique to assay the catecholamine content. The multiple-regression analysis was carried out to test whether gingivitis was affected by the studied variables. The 95% probability was used. The results showed that epinephrine, norepinephrine, and dopamine did not have a significant association with gingival index. Dental plaque and proximal decayed surfaces significantly affected gingivitis. Of the socioeconomic factors, mother's education had a significant association with gingivitis when all factors were included in the analysis. The data suggest that emotionally stressful states may not increase the probability of developing gingivitis in children of this age.

  20. Urinary catecholamine levels and bruxism in children.

    PubMed

    Vanderas, A P; Menenakou, M; Kouimtzis, T; Papagiannoulis, L

    1999-02-01

    This study was performed to test the hypothesis that emotionally stressful states measured by the urinary catecholamines may affect the development of bruxism. Three hundred and fourteen children, boys and girls, aged 6-8 years were included in this study. Bruxism was recorded by a clinical examination and an interview. Positive evidence of this parafunction was defined as the presence of both historical and clinical indicators. Information concerning systemic and socio-economic factors was collected by a questionnaire. A 24-h urine sample was collected for each subject and analysed by the high performance liquid chromatography technique to assay the catecholamine content. Of the total of 273 children who had a complete 24-h urine sample, 167 were identified to be with and without positive evidence of bruxism. The logistic multiple-regression analysis was carried out to test whether the presence of bruxism was affected by the variables studied; 95% probability was used. The results showed that epinephrine and dopamine had a significant and strong association with bruxism. The data therefore provide support for the concept that emotional stress is a prominent factor in the development of bruxing behaviour.

  1. Adrenal gland disorders.

    PubMed

    Berry, Matthew E

    2009-01-01

    Medical imaging of the adrenal glands is an important aspect of the diagnosis of any adrenal gland disorder. This article discusses the normal anatomy and functions of the adrenal glands, as well as specific adrenal gland disorders and how they are diagnosed and treated. Radiologic technologists need to understand the causes, signs, symptoms, diagnosis and management of disorders that prevent the adrenal glands from functioning properly.

  2. Osmotic pressures of solutions of ATP and catecholamines relating to storage in chromaffin granules.

    PubMed

    Kopell, W N; Westhead, E W

    1982-05-25

    The chromaffin granule, which is the catecholamine storage organelle of the adrenal medulla, contains at least 0.73 M ions, yet it is isotonic with 0.3 osM solutions. One hypothesis which accounts for this disparity is formation of a complex between major constituents of the granule: the catecholamines, the proteins, and the ATP. In this paper we show by vapor pressure osmometry, which affords a direct measure of colligative properties, that ATP-catecholamine mixtures form highly nonideal solutions. At 37 degrees C, solutions containing 0.6 M epinephrine and 0.15 M ATP show an effective osmotic pressure of only 0.25 osM. The existence of polymeric complexes is implied by the fact that the increase of osmotic pressure with increasing concentrations of ATP and catecholamine falls off substantially at concentrations approaching those in the chromaffin granules. Neither inorganic ions nor calcium chelators cause regain of ideal colligative behavior. Osmotic measurements on model compounds suggest that the primary interaction is between the phosphate and amino groups. There is also evidence that the effects are not wholly due to the formation of discrete complexes; factors of nonideal solution behavior also play a role in lowering the osmotic pressure. These observations show that the stability of the chromaffin granule in situ can be accounted for, perhaps entirely, by spontaneous interactions among nucleotides and catecholamines.

  3. Bilateral congenital adrenal agenesis: a rare disease entity and not a result of poor autopsy technique.

    PubMed

    D'Arcy, Colleen; Pertile, Mark; Goodwin, Tess; Bittinger, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    Congenital adrenal agenesis is an extremely rare condition wherein the adrenal glands fail to develop. The absence of adrenal tissue results in the complete absence of hormones produced in the adrenal cortex (cortisol, aldosterone) and medulla (catecholamines), and is not compatible with postnatal life without artificial hormone replacement therapy. To date, 9 cases of adrenal agenesis have been reported, many of which are associated with additional congenital anomalies. Most cases were not detected on antenatal imaging and were detected incidentally at postmortem examination. We present a case of adrenal agenesis, detected incidentally at postmortem examination after termination of pregnancy for suspected fetal hydrops, and review the heterogeneous phenotype of this condition with associated abnormalities and molecular genetics. This case reinforces the role of the perinatal autopsy to investigate cause of perinatal mortality, allowing correlation of pathology with antenatal imaging findings and clinical details.

  4. Adrenal Steroidogenesis and Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Turcu, Adina F.; Auchus, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Adrenal steroidogenesis is a dynamic process, reliant on de novo synthesis from cholesterol, under the stimulation of ACTH and other regulators. The syntheses of mineralocorticoids, glucocorticoids and adrenal androgens occur in separate adrenal cortical zones, each expressing specific enzymes. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) encompasses a group of autosomal recessive enzymatic defects in cortisol biosynthesis. 21-hydroxylase (21OHD) deficiency accounts for over 90% of CAH cases and when milder or nonclassic forms are included, 21OHD is one of the most common genetic diseases. This review discusses in detail the epidemiology, genetics, diagnostic, clinical aspects and management of 21OHD. PMID:26038201

  5. How Is Adrenal Surgery Performed?

    MedlinePlus

    HOME ADRENAL GLANDS Background Where are the adrenal glands? What do the adrenal glands do? Is this adrenal tumor a genetic problem? Primary hyperaldosteronism (aldosterone-producing tumor) What is primary hyperaldosteronism? Signs ...

  6. Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide is a sympathoadrenal neurotransmitter involved in catecholamine regulation and glucohomeostasis.

    PubMed

    Hamelink, Carol; Tjurmina, Olga; Damadzic, Ruslan; Young, W Scott; Weihe, Eberhard; Lee, Hyeon-Woo; Eiden, Lee E

    2002-01-08

    The adrenal gland is important for homeostatic responses to metabolic stress: hypoglycemia stimulates the splanchnic nerve, epinephrine is released from adrenomedullary chromaffin cells, and compensatory glucogenesis ensues. Acetylcholine is the primary neurotransmitter mediating catecholamine secretion from the adrenal medulla. Accumulating evidence suggests that a secretin-related neuropeptide also may function as a transmitter at the adrenomedullary synapse. Costaining with highly specific antibodies against the secretin-related neuropeptide pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) and the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT) revealed that PACAP is found in nerve terminals at all mouse adrenomedullary cholinergic synapses. Mice with a targeted deletion of the PACAP gene had otherwise normal cholinergic innervation and morphology of the adrenal medulla, normal adrenal catecholamine and blood glucose levels, and an intact initial catecholamine secretory response to insulin-induced hypoglycemia. However, insulin-induced hypoglycemia was more profound and longer-lasting in PACAP knock-outs, and was associated with a dose-related lethality absent in wild-type mice. Failure of PACAP-deficient mice to adequately counterregulate plasma glucose levels could be accounted for by impaired long-term secretion of epinephrine, secondary to a lack of induction of tyrosine hydroxylase, normally occurring after insulin hypoglycemia in wild-type mice, and a consequent depletion of adrenomedullary epinephrine stores. Thus, PACAP is needed to couple epinephrine biosynthesis to secretion during metabolic stress. PACAP appears to function as an "emergency response" cotransmitter in the sympathoadrenal axis, where the primary secretory response is controlled by a classical neurotransmitter but sustained under paraphysiological conditions by a neuropeptide.

  7. Adrenal Gland Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... either benign or malignant. Benign tumors aren't cancer. Malignant ones are. Most adrenal gland tumors are ... and may not require treatment. Malignant adrenal gland cancers are uncommon. Types of tumors include Adrenocortical carcinoma - ...

  8. Adrenal Gland Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    The adrenal glands are small glands located on top of each kidney. They produce hormones that you can't live ... stress and has many other important functions. With adrenal gland disorders, your glands make too much or not ...

  9. Adrenal Gland Tumors: Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Gland Tumor: Statistics Request Permissions Adrenal Gland Tumor: Statistics Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , 03/ ... primary adrenal gland tumor is very uncommon. Exact statistics are not available for this type of tumor ...

  10. Laparoscopic Adrenal Gland Removal

    MedlinePlus

    ... malignant. Laparoscopic Adrenal Gland Removal What are the Advantages of Laparoscopic Adrenal Gland Removal? In the past, ... of procedure and the patients overall condition. Common advantages are: Less postoperative pain Shorter hospital stay Quicker ...

  11. Adrenal glands are essential for activation of glucogenesis during undernutrition in fetal sheep near term.

    PubMed

    Fowden, A L; Forhead, A J

    2011-01-01

    In adults, the adrenal glands are essential for the metabolic response to stress, but little is known about their role in fetal metabolism. This study examined the effects of adrenalectomizing fetal sheep on glucose and oxygen metabolism in utero in fed conditions and after maternal fasting for 48 h near term. Fetal adrenalectomy (AX) had little effect on the rates of glucose and oxygen metabolism by the fetus or uteroplacental tissues in fed conditions. Endogenous glucose production was negligible in both AX and intact, sham-operated fetuses in fed conditions. Maternal fasting reduced fetal glucose levels and umbilical glucose uptake in both groups of fetuses to a similar extent but activated glucose production only in the intact fetuses. The lack of fasting-induced glucogenesis in AX fetuses was accompanied by falls in fetal glucose utilization and oxygen consumption not seen in intact controls. The circulating concentrations of cortisol and total catecholamines, and the hepatic glycogen content and activities of key gluconeogenic enzymes, were also less in AX than intact fetuses in fasted animals. Insulin concentrations were also lower in AX than intact fetuses in both nutritional states. Maternal glucose utilization and its distribution between the fetal, uteroplacental, and nonuterine maternal tissues were unaffected by fetal AX in both nutritional states. Ovine fetal adrenal glands, therefore, have little effect on basal rates of fetal glucose and oxygen metabolism but are essential for activating fetal glucogenesis in response to maternal fasting. They may also be involved in regulating insulin sensitivity in utero.

  12. The human adrenal gland proteome defined by transcriptomics and antibody-based profiling.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Julia; Botling, Johan; Fagerberg, Linn; Hallström, Björn M; Djureinovic, Dijana; Uhlén, Mathias; Pontén, Fredrik

    2016-11-30

    The adrenal gland is a composite endocrine organ with vital functions that include the synthesis and release of glucocorticoids and catecholamines. To define the molecular landscape that underlies the specific functions of the adrenal gland, we combined a genome-wide transcriptomics approach based on mRNA sequencing of human tissues with immunohistochemistry-based protein profiling on tissue microarrays. Approximately two-thirds of all putative protein coding genes were expressed in the adrenal gland and the analysis identified 253 genes with an elevated pattern of expression in the adrenal gland, with only 37 genes showing a markedly higher expression level (>5-fold) in the adrenal gland compared to 31 other normal human tissue types analyzed. The analyses allowed for an assessment of the relative expression levels for well-known proteins involved in adrenal gland function, but also identified previously poorly characterized proteins in the adrenal cortex, such as FERM domain containing 5 (FRMD5) and protein NOV homolog (NOV). In summary, we provide a global analysis of the adrenal gland transcriptome and proteome, with a comprehensive list of genes with elevated expression in the adrenal gland and spatial information with examples of protein expression patterns for corresponding proteins. These genes and proteins constitute important starting points for an improved understanding of the normal function and pathophysiology of the adrenal glands.

  13. Bilateral adrenal masses: a single-centre experience

    PubMed Central

    Bandgar, Tushar; Khare, Shruti; Jadhav, Swati; Lila, Anurag; Goroshi, Manjunath; Kasaliwal, Rajeev; Khadilkar, Kranti; Shah, Nalini S

    2016-01-01

    Background Bilateral adrenal masses may have aetiologies like hyperplasia and infiltrative lesions, besides tumours. Hyperplastic and infiltrative lesions may have coexisting hypocortisolism. Bilateral tumours are likely to have hereditary/syndromic associations. The data on clinical profile of bilateral adrenal masses are limited. Aims To analyse clinical, biochemical and radiological features, and management outcomes in patients with bilateral adrenal masses. Methods Retrospective analysis of 70 patients with bilateral adrenal masses presenting to a single tertiary care endocrine centre from western India (2002–2015). Results The most common aetiology was pheochromocytoma (40%), followed by tuberculosis (27.1%), primary adrenal lymphoma (PAL) (10%), metastases (5.7%), non-functioning adenomas (4.3%), primary bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia (4.3%), and others (8.6%). Age at presentation was less in patients with pheochromocytoma (33 years) and tuberculosis (41 years) compared with PAL (48 years) and metastases (61 years) (P<0.001). The presenting symptoms for pheochromocytoma were hyperadrenergic spells (54%) and abdominal pain (29%), whereas tuberculosis presented with adrenal insufficiency (AI) (95%). The presenting symptoms for PAL were AI (57%) and abdominal pain (43%), whereas all cases of metastasis had abdominal pain. Mean size of adrenal masses was the largest in lymphoma (5.5cm) followed by pheochromocytoma (4.8cm), metastasis (4cm) and tuberculosis (2.1cm) (P<0.001). Biochemically, most patients with pheochromocytoma (92.8%) had catecholamine excess. Hypocortisolism was common in tuberculosis (100%) and PAL (71.4%) and absent with metastases (P<0.001). Conclusion In evaluation of bilateral adrenal masses, age at presentation, presenting symptoms, lesion size, and biochemical features are helpful in delineating varied underlying aetiologies. PMID:27037294

  14. In Vivo Voltammetric Monitoring of Catecholamine Release in Subterritories of the Nucleus Accumbens Shell

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jinwoo; Aragona, Brandon J.; Kile, Brian M.; Carelli, Regina M.; Wightman, R. Mark

    2010-01-01

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) at carbon-fiber microelectrodes has been used to demonstrate that sub-second changes in catecholamine concentration occur within the nucleus accumbens (NAc) shell during motivated behaviors, and these fluctuations have been attributed to rapid dopamine signaling. However, FSCV cannot distinguish between dopamine and norepinephrine, and caudal regions of the NAc shell receive noradrenergic projections. Therefore, in the present study, we examined the degree to which norepinephrine contributes to catecholamine release within rostral and caudal portion of NAc shell. Analysis of tissue content revealed that dopamine was the major catecholamine detectable in the rostral NAc shell, whereas both dopamine and norepinephrine were found in the caudal subregion. To examine releasable catecholamines, electrical stimulation was used to evoke release in anesthetized rats with either stimulation of the medial forebrain bundle, a pathway containing both dopaminergic and noradrenergic projections to the NAc, or the ventral tegmental area/substantia nigra, the origin of dopaminergic projections. The catecholamines were distinguished by their responses to different pharmacological agents. The dopamine autoreceptor blocker, raclopride, as well as the monoamine and dopamine transporter blockers, cocaine and GBR 12909, increased evoked catecholamine overflow in both the rostral and caudal NAc shell. The norepinephrine autoreceptor blocker, yohimbine, and the norepinephrine transporter blocker, desipramine, increased catecholamine overflow in the caudal NAc shell without significant alteration of evoked responses in the rostral NAc shell. Thus, the neurochemical and pharmacological results show that norepinephrine signaling is restricted to caudal portions of the NAc shell. Following raclopride and cocaine or raclopride and GBR 12909, robust catecholamine transients were observed within the rostral shell but these were far less apparent in the caudal

  15. Bilateral adrenal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with adrenal insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Ellis, R; Read, D

    2000-01-01

    A 74 year old women presented with lethargy and weight loss and was found to have profound adrenal insufficiency and bilateral adrenal mass lesions. Histological examination revealed non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. There was no evidence of lymphoma outside the adrenal glands. Isolated bilateral adrenal masses may rarely be due to primary adrenal non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, which is often associated with adrenal insufficiency.


Keywords: lymphoma; adrenal insufficiency PMID:10908383

  16. A microfluidic platform for chemical stimulation and real time analysis of catecholamine secretion from neuroendocrine cells.

    PubMed

    Ges, Igor A; Brindley, Rebecca L; Currie, Kevin P M; Baudenbacher, Franz J

    2013-12-07

    Release of neurotransmitters and hormones by calcium-regulated exocytosis is a fundamental cellular process that is disrupted in a variety of psychiatric, neurological, and endocrine disorders. As such, there is significant interest in targeting neurosecretion for drug and therapeutic development, efforts that will be aided by novel analytical tools and devices that provide mechanistic insight coupled with increased experimental throughput. Here, we report a simple, inexpensive, reusable, microfluidic device designed to analyze catecholamine secretion from small populations of adrenal chromaffin cells in real time, an important neuroendocrine component of the sympathetic nervous system and versatile neurosecretory model. The device is fabricated by replica molding of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) using patterned photoresist on silicon wafer as the master. Microfluidic inlet channels lead to an array of U-shaped "cell traps", each capable of immobilizing single or small groups of chromaffin cells. The bottom of the device is a glass slide with patterned thin film platinum electrodes used for electrochemical detection of catecholamines in real time. We demonstrate reliable loading of the device with small populations of chromaffin cells, and perfusion/repetitive stimulation with physiologically relevant secretagogues (carbachol, PACAP, KCl) using the microfluidic network. Evoked catecholamine secretion was reproducible over multiple rounds of stimulation, and graded as expected to different concentrations of secretagogue or removal of extracellular calcium. Overall, we show this microfluidic device can be used to implement complex stimulation paradigms and analyze the amount and kinetics of catecholamine secretion from small populations of neuroendocrine cells in real time.

  17. [Pediatric emergency: adrenal insufficiency and adrenal crisis].

    PubMed

    Martínez, Alicia; Pasqualini, Titania; Stivel, Mirta; Heinrich, Juan Jorge

    2010-04-01

    Adrenal insufficiency is defined by impaired secretion of adrenocortical hormones. It is classified upon the etiology in primary and secondary. Rapid recognition and therapy of adrenocortical crisis are critical to survival. Patients often have nonspecific symptoms: anorexia, vomiting, weakness, fatigue and lethargy. They are followed by hypotension, shock, hypoglicemia, hyponatremia and hyperkalemia. All patients with adrenal insufficiency require urgent fluid reposition, correction of hypoglycemia and glucocorticoid replacement, in order to avoid serious consequences of adrenal crisis. After initial crisis treatment, maintenance dose of corticoids should be indicated. Mineralocorticoids replacement, if necessary, should also be initiated.

  18. Localization of pheochromocytoma by selective venous catheterization and assay of plasma catecholamines.

    PubMed Central

    Davies, R. A.; Patt, N. L.; Sole, M. J.

    1979-01-01

    The diagnosis of pheochromocytoma rests primarily on determination of the 24-hour urinary excretion of catecholamines and their metabolites. In most cases nephrotomography and selective arteriography or venography, or both, are sufficient to localize the tumour. Selective venous catheterization and the assay of plasma catecholamines should be considered for pheochromocytoma localization in: (a) patients in whom standard techniques fail to localize the tumour; (b) patients who exhibit idiosyncratic reactions to the angiographic contrast materials; (c) young patients or patients with familial pheochromocytoma, including those with multiple neurofibromatosis or multiple endocrine adenomatosis, type 2; (d) patients with recurrent, malignant, or suspected multicentric or extra-adrenal tumours; and (e) patients excreting only norepinephrine in the urine. The validity of the results is particularly dependent on the skill with which venous catheterization is carried out. PMID:436033

  19. Catecholamines and myocardial contractile function during hypodynamia and with an altered thyroid hormone balance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pruss, G. M.; Kuznetsov, V. I.; Zhilinskaya, A. A.

    1980-01-01

    The dynamics of catecholamine content and myocardial contractile function during hypodynamia were studied in 109 white rats whose motor activity was severely restricted for up to 30 days. During the first five days myocardial catecholamine content, contractile function, and physical load tolerance decreased. Small doses of thyroidin counteracted this tendency. After 15 days, noradrenalin content and other indices approached normal levels and, after 30 days, were the same as control levels, although cardiac functional reserve was decreased. Thyroidin administration after 15 days had no noticeable effect. A detailed table shows changes in 17 indices of myocardial contractile function during hypodynamia.

  20. The agonistic adrenal: melatonin elicits female aggression via regulation of adrenal androgens

    PubMed Central

    Rudolph, Lauren M.; Sengelaub, Dale R.; Demas, Gregory E.

    2015-01-01

    Classic findings have demonstrated an important role for sex steroids as regulators of aggression, but this relationship is lacking within some environmental contexts. In mammals and birds, the adrenal androgen dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), a non-gonadal precursor of biologically active steroids, has been linked to aggression. Although females, like males, use aggression when competing for limited resources, the mechanisms underlying female aggression remain understudied. Here, we propose a previously undescribed endocrine mechanism regulating female aggression via direct action of the pineal hormone melatonin on adrenal androgens. We examined this in a solitary hamster species, Phodopus sungorus, in which both sexes are highly territorial across the seasons, and display increased aggression concomitant with decreased serum levels of sex steroids in short ‘winter-like' days. Short- but not long-day females had increased adrenal DHEA responsiveness co-occurring with morphological changes in the adrenal gland. Further, serum DHEA and total adrenal DHEA content were elevated in short days. Lastly, melatonin increased DHEA and aggression and stimulated DHEA release from cultured adrenals. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that DHEA is a key peripheral regulator of aggression and that melatonin coordinates a ‘seasonal switch’ from gonadal to adrenal regulation of aggression by direct action on the adrenal glands. PMID:26582025

  1. The agonistic adrenal: melatonin elicits female aggression via regulation of adrenal androgens.

    PubMed

    Rendon, Nikki M; Rudolph, Lauren M; Sengelaub, Dale R; Demas, Gregory E

    2015-11-22

    Classic findings have demonstrated an important role for sex steroids as regulators of aggression, but this relationship is lacking within some environmental contexts. In mammals and birds, the adrenal androgen dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), a non-gonadal precursor of biologically active steroids, has been linked to aggression. Although females, like males, use aggression when competing for limited resources, the mechanisms underlying female aggression remain understudied. Here, we propose a previously undescribed endocrine mechanism regulating female aggression via direct action of the pineal hormone melatonin on adrenal androgens. We examined this in a solitary hamster species, Phodopus sungorus, in which both sexes are highly territorial across the seasons, and display increased aggression concomitant with decreased serum levels of sex steroids in short 'winter-like' days. Short- but not long-day females had increased adrenal DHEA responsiveness co-occurring with morphological changes in the adrenal gland. Further, serum DHEA and total adrenal DHEA content were elevated in short days. Lastly, melatonin increased DHEA and aggression and stimulated DHEA release from cultured adrenals. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that DHEA is a key peripheral regulator of aggression and that melatonin coordinates a 'seasonal switch' from gonadal to adrenal regulation of aggression by direct action on the adrenal glands.

  2. A comparison of biochemical tests for pheochromocytoma: measurement of fractionated plasma metanephrines compared with the combination of 24-hour urinary metanephrines and catecholamines.

    PubMed

    Sawka, Anna M; Jaeschke, Roman; Singh, Ravinder J; Young, William F

    2003-02-01

    We compared the diagnostic efficacy of fractionated plasma metanephrine measurements to measurements of 24-h urinary total metanephrines and catecholamines in outpatients tested for pheochromocytoma at Mayo Clinic Rochester from January 1, 1999, until November 27, 2000. Catecholaminesecreting tumors were histologically proven. The sensitivity of fractionated plasma metanephrines was 97% (30 of 31 patients), compared with a sensitivity of 90% (28 of 31) for urinary total metanephrines and catecholamines (P = 0.63). The specificity of fractionated plasma metanephrines was 85% (221 of 261), compared with 98% (257 of 261; P < 0.001) for urinary measurements. The likelihood ratios for positive tests were 6.3 (95% confidence interval, 4.7 to 8.5) for fractionated plasma metanephrines and 58.9 (95% confidence interval, 22.1 to 156.9) for urinary total metanephrines and catecholamines. An adrenal pheochromocytoma was missed by urinary testing in two patients with familial syndromes and one asymptomatic patient with an incidentally discovered adrenal mass. An extra-adrenal paraganglioma was missed by plasma testing in one patient. In conclusion, measurements of 24-h urinary total metanephrines and catecholamines yield fewer false-positive results, an attribute preferred for testing low-risk patients, but fractionated plasma metanephrine measurements may be preferred in high-risk patients with familial endocrine syndromes.

  3. Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Speiser, Phyllis W.

    2015-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia associated with deficiency of steroid 21-hydroxylase is the most common inborn error in adrenal function and the most common cause of adrenal insufficiency in the pediatric age group. As patients now survive into adulthood, adult health-care providers must also be familiar with this condition. Over the past several years, F1000 has published numerous commentaries updating research and practical guidelines for this condition. The purposes of this review are to summarize basic information defining congenital adrenal hyperplasia and to highlight current knowledge and controversies in management. PMID:26339484

  4. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) appearances of an adrenal phaeochromocytoma in a child with Von Hippel-Lindau disease.

    PubMed

    Al Bunni, Faise; Deganello, Annamaria; Sellars, Maria E; Schulte, Klaus-Martin; Al-Adnani, Mudher; Sidhu, Paul S

    2014-12-01

    A phaeochromocytoma is a rare catecholamine-secreting tumour arising from the chromaffin cells. We describe a case of a child with Von Hippel-Lindau disease, with an adrenal phaeochromocytoma who presented with severe dilated cardiomyopathy driven by secondary hypertension. Contrast-enhanced ultrasound findings are described and compared with both magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography imaging.

  5. How Is Adrenal Cancer Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... exam will give other information about signs of adrenal gland cancer and other health problems. Your doctor will ... an adrenal cancer will spread outside of the adrenal gland. Imaging tests Chest x-ray A chest x- ...

  6. Urinary catecholamine levels in children with and without dental caries.

    PubMed

    Vanderas, A P; Manetas, C; Papagiannoulis, L

    1995-10-01

    Urinary catecholamines have been used to measure emotionally stressful states which may affect the development of dental caries. This study investigates the hypothesis that children with and without dental caries do not differ significantly in the mean values of urinary catecholamines such as epinephrine, norepinephrine, and dopamine. As a test of this hypothesis, 314 children, males and females, aged from 6 to 8 years, were included in the study. Dental caries were recorded clinically and radiographically, and oral hygiene was evaluated by the recording of dental plaque. A 24-hour urine sample was collected for each subject, and a representative sample (25 mL) was analyzed by the HPLC technique to assay the catecholamine content. Socioeconomic factors such as parental age, education, and profession were recorded by a questionnaire distributed to the parents. Of the examined children, 38 (14 males and 24 females) were free of dental caries and constituted the case group. Two control groups, A and B, of 38 children each (14 males and 24 females) with dental caries were matched by age and gender. Differences in the quantitative and qualitative data were tested by the paired t test and the X2-test, respectively, while a regression analysis was applied to measure the effects of norepinephrine and dopamine on epinephrine. The logistic multiple-regression analysis was used to test, in the entire population, the impact of catecholamines and other related factors on the probability of subjects' developing dental caries. The 95% probability was used. The results showed statistically significant differences in epinephrine values between the case group and control groups A and B. The data suggest, therefore, that children with emotionally stressful states have higher probability of developing dental caries.

  7. Anesthetic management of a rare case of extra-adrenal pheochromocytoma

    PubMed Central

    Pratibha, S. D.; Katti, Vijay; Patil, Basvaraj

    2016-01-01

    Anesthetic management of pheochromocytoma is complicated and challenging. Extra-adrenal pheochromocytoma is a rare neuroendocrine tumor that produces, stores and secretes catecholamines. The main-stay in the management of pheochromocytoma surgeries is Preoperative preparation which has improved perioperative outcome. Modern anesthetic drugs with advanced monitoring have contributed to intraoperative stability. Resection of the tumor results in acute withdrawal of catecholamines, which may lead to severe hypotension. In perioperative period, adequate hydration should be maintained. Beta-blockers, nitroglycerine, sodium nitroprusside and phenylephrine are required to avoid hemodynamic fluctuations and should be used appropriately. PMID:26957701

  8. A rare adrenal incidentaloma: adrenal schwannoma.

    PubMed

    Adas, Mine; Ozulker, Filiz; Adas, Gokhan; Koc, Bora; Ozulker, Tamer; Sahin, Ilknur Mansuroglu

    2013-01-01

    Adrenal schwannoma is an extremely uncommon cause of incidentaloma. It originates from neural sheath Schwann cells of the adrenal gland. We report the case of a left adrenal schwannoma incidentally discovered in a 32-year-old woman during examination of bloated feeling and stomach ache. The patient was incidentally found to have a left adrenal mass of 9 cm on abdominal ultrasonography. Computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen and [(18)F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) were also performed. Metabolic evaluation was unremarkable. Due to the large size of the tumor, left adrenalectomy was performed. The postoperative course was uneventful. Histological examination established the diagnosis of schwannoma. This diagnosis was supported by immunohistochemistry of S-100 and vimentin positivity. In conclusion, adrenal schwannoma is an extremely rare entity and can grow considerably in size. The present case report emphasizes that clinicians should be aware of the possibility of retroperitoneal schwannoma. Total excision of benign schwannoma is associated with a favorable outcome. To our knowledge, there are case reports of schwannoma with CT and magnetic resonance imaging findings in the literature, although this is the first schwannoma case with PET-CT imaging.

  9. Catecholamine metabolism in a psychoactive cactus.

    PubMed

    Keller, W J; Yeary, R A

    1980-04-01

    The Dona Ana cactus, Coryphantha macromeris (Engelm.) Br. and R. and its runyonii (Br. and R.) L. Benson variety are being promoted as natural and legal psychedelic agents with about one-fifth potency of peyote [Lophophora williamsii (Lem.) Coult.]. Like peyote, Dona Ana produces and accumulates various methylated catecholamine derivatives. Of these phenethylamines, normacromerine (N-methyl-3,4-dimethoxy-beta-hydroxyphenethylamine) is by far the most abundant and has been shown to affect animal behavior in such a way as to suggest psychoactivity. It has been demonstrated that the catecholamines epinephrine and norepinephrine occur naturally in C. macromeris var. runyonii and serve as biosynthetic intermediates in normacromerine biosynthesis. Catecholamine precursors and derivatives have also been shown to be part of the metabolic pathway leading to the formation of normacromerine in Dona Ana. Normacromerine appears to be the end product of catecholamine metabolism since recent studies have revealed that very little of this compound is metabolized once it has been formed by the cactus. Completed research of this type has allowed the comparison of catecholamine metabolism leading to the formation of a mind-altering drug in a cactus plant and the metabolism of catecholamines in humans. These data together with evidence from future research will allow biochemical analogies which may suggest etiologies for certain types of mental illness.

  10. Cystic adrenal lesions: focus on pediatric population (a review)

    PubMed Central

    CARSOTE, MARA; GHEMIGIAN, ADINA; TERZEA, DANA; GHEORGHISAN-GALATEANU, ANCUTA AUGUSTINA; VALEA, ANA

    2017-01-01

    Background and aim The cysts may potentially affect any organ; adrenals cysts are rare. This is a review of the literature regarding adrenal cysts, focusing on children and young adults. General data Three major types have been described: pure cysts (endothelial, epithelial, and hemorrhagic or pseudocyst), parasitic (as hydatid) cysts and cystic part of a tumour (most frequent are neuroblastoma, ganglioneuroma, pheocromocytoma, and teratoma). The complications are: bleeding, local pressure effects; infection; rupture (including post-traumatic); arterial hypertension due to renal vessels compression. Adrenal hemorrhage represents a particular condition associating precipitating factors such as: coagulation defects as Factor IX or X deficiency, von Willebrand disease, thrombocytopenia; antiphospholipid syndrome; previous therapy with clopidogrel or corticosteroids; the rupture of a prior tumour. At birth, the most suggestive features are abdominal palpable mass, anemia, and persistent jaundice. Adrenal insufficiency may be found especially in premature delivery. The hemorrhage is mostly self-limiting. Antenatal ultrasound diagnosis of a cyst does not always predict the exact pathology result. The most important differential diagnosis of adrenal hemorrhage/hemorrhagic cyst is cystic neuroblastoma which is highly suggestive in the presence of distant metastases and abnormal catecholamine profile. The major clue to differentiate the two conditions is the fact that the tumor is stable or increases over time while the adrenal hemorrhage is expected to remit within one to two weeks. Conclusion Pediatric adrenal cysts vary from simple cysts with a benign behavior to neoplasia- related lesions displaying severe prognosis as seen in cystic neuroblastoma. A multidisciplinary team is required for their management which is conservative as close follow-up or it makes necessary different surgical procedures in cases with large masses or if a malignancy suspicion is presented

  11. Hypertension and adrenal disorders.

    PubMed

    Blumenfeld, J D

    1993-03-01

    Abnormalities of adrenal cortical and medullary function are important causes of hypertension in adults. Mineralocorticoid hypertension, characterized by spontaneous hypokalemia with excessive kaliuresis and low plasma renin activity, is most commonly caused by aldosterone-producing adenoma or, less frequently, by nonadenomatous adrenal hyperplasia. However, recent evidence indicates that this classification oversimplifies the pathophysiologic diversity of this syndrome. Advances in steroid biochemistry and molecular biology have improved our ability to identify patients with various forms of mineralocorticoid hypertension and also provide evidence that they are underdiagnosed. Pheochromocytomas are most commonly located in the adrenal medulla, where they may overproduce norepinephrine or epinephrine. Appropriate screening of norepinephrine, epinephrine, and their metabolites is essential because tumors that secrete epinephrine exclusively may not present with hypertension and, thus, can be overlooked. Extra-adrenal pheochromocytomas are more prevalent than previously considered and pose special problems because they may be multicentric, difficult to locate, and more likely to be malignant than are adrenal pheochromocytomas.

  12. Adrenal Gland Microenvironment and Its Involvement in the Regulation of Stress-Induced Hormone Secretion during Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Kanczkowski, Waldemar; Sue, Mariko; Bornstein, Stefan R

    2016-01-01

    Survival of all living organisms depends on maintenance of a steady state of homeostasis, which process relies on its ability to react and adapt to various physical and emotional threats. The defense against stress is executed by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and the sympathetic-adrenal medullary system. Adrenal gland is a major effector organ of stress system. During stress, adrenal gland rapidly responds with increased secretion of glucocorticoids (GCs) and catecholamines into circulation, which hormones, in turn, affect metabolism, to provide acutely energy, vasculature to increase blood pressure, and the immune system to prevent it from extensive activation. Sepsis resulting from microbial infections is a sustained and extreme example of stress situation. In many critical ill patients, levels of both corticotropin-releasing hormone and adrenocorticotropin, the two major regulators of adrenal hormone production, are suppressed. Levels of GCs, however, remain normal or are elevated in these patients, suggesting a shift from central to local intra-adrenal regulation of adrenal stress response. Among many mechanisms potentially involved in this process, reduced GC metabolism and activation of intra-adrenal cellular systems composed of adrenocortical and adrenomedullary cells, endothelial cells, and resident and recruited immune cells play a key role. Hence, dysregulated function of any of these cells and cellular compartments can ultimately affect adrenal stress response. The purpose of this mini review is to highlight recent insights into our understanding of the adrenal gland microenvironment and its role in coordination of stress-induced hormone secretion.

  13. Adrenal Gland Microenvironment and Its Involvement in the Regulation of Stress-Induced Hormone Secretion during Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Kanczkowski, Waldemar; Sue, Mariko; Bornstein, Stefan R.

    2016-01-01

    Survival of all living organisms depends on maintenance of a steady state of homeostasis, which process relies on its ability to react and adapt to various physical and emotional threats. The defense against stress is executed by the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal axis and the sympathetic–adrenal medullary system. Adrenal gland is a major effector organ of stress system. During stress, adrenal gland rapidly responds with increased secretion of glucocorticoids (GCs) and catecholamines into circulation, which hormones, in turn, affect metabolism, to provide acutely energy, vasculature to increase blood pressure, and the immune system to prevent it from extensive activation. Sepsis resulting from microbial infections is a sustained and extreme example of stress situation. In many critical ill patients, levels of both corticotropin-releasing hormone and adrenocorticotropin, the two major regulators of adrenal hormone production, are suppressed. Levels of GCs, however, remain normal or are elevated in these patients, suggesting a shift from central to local intra-adrenal regulation of adrenal stress response. Among many mechanisms potentially involved in this process, reduced GC metabolism and activation of intra-adrenal cellular systems composed of adrenocortical and adrenomedullary cells, endothelial cells, and resident and recruited immune cells play a key role. Hence, dysregulated function of any of these cells and cellular compartments can ultimately affect adrenal stress response. The purpose of this mini review is to highlight recent insights into our understanding of the adrenal gland microenvironment and its role in coordination of stress-induced hormone secretion. PMID:28018291

  14. Binding sites of atrial natriuretic peptide in tree shrew adrenal gland

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs, E.; Shigematsu, K.; Saavedra, J.M.

    1986-09-01

    Adrenal gland binding sites for atrial natriuretic peptide-(99-126) (ANP) were quantitated in tree shrew (Tupaia belangeri) by incubation of adrenal sections with (3-(/sup 125/I)-iodotyrosyl28) atrial natriuretic peptide-(99-126), followed by autoradiography with computerized microdensitometry. In the adrenal glands, there are three types of ANP binding sites. One is located in the zona glomerulosa (BMax 84 +/- 6 fmol/mg protein; Kd 122 +/- 9 pM); the second in the zona fasciculata and reticularis (BMax 29 +/- 2 fmol/mg protein; Kd 153 +/- 6 pM) and the third in the adrenal medulla (BMax 179 +/- 1 fmol/mg protein; Kd 70 +/- 2 pM). Besides the influence of ANP on the regulation of adrenocortical mineralcorticoid and glucocorticoid secretion our findings raise the possibility for a local site of action of atrial natriuretic peptide in the regulation of adrenomedullary catecholamines in the tree shrew, primates and man.

  15. New advances in the biochemical diagnosis of pheochromocytoma: moving beyond catecholamines.

    PubMed

    Lenders, Jacques W M; Pacak, Karel; Eisenhofer, Graeme

    2002-09-01

    Pheochromocytomas are dangerous tumors that, although a rare cause of hypertension, require consideration among large numbers of patients. The resulting low prevalence of the tumor among tested populations and the inadequacies of commonly used biochemical tests make excluding or confirming the tumor an often difficult and time-consuming task. Recognition that catecholamines are metabolized to free metanephrines within pheochromocytoma tumor cells, and that this process is independent of catecholamine release, provides a rationale for use of these metabolites in the biochemical diagnosis of pheochromocytoma. Here we briefly review the history of biochemical diagnosis of pheochromocytoma in relation to recent data about the diagnostic utility of plasma free metanephrines for detection of these tumors. Measurements of urinary or plasma catecholamines have reasonable sensitivity for detection of most pheochromocytomas, particularly those in patients with sustained hypertension. False-negative test results can, however, occur in asymptomatic patients tested because of an adrenal incidentaloma or a familial predisposition for pheochromocytoma, or when sampling is carried out between episodes of paroxysmal hypertension. Measurements of urinary total metanephrines or vanillylmandelic acid are less reliable and are of little value as initial screening tests. In contrast, measurements of plasma concentrations or free metanephrines or 24-hour urinary outputs of fractionated normetanephrine and metanephrine almost always reveal the tumor. Although, both tests have similarly high sensitivity, the relatively low specificity of urinary fractionated metanephrines means that pheochromocytomas can be more efficiently excluded or confirmed using measurements of plasma free metanephrines.

  16. Prenatal excess glucocorticoid exposure and adult affective disorders: a role for serotonergic and catecholamine pathways.

    PubMed

    Wyrwoll, Caitlin S; Holmes, Megan C

    2012-01-01

    Fetal glucocorticoid exposure is a key mechanism proposed to underlie prenatal 'programming' of adult affective behaviours such as depression and anxiety. Indeed, the glucocorticoid metabolising enzyme 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11β-HSD2), which is highly expressed in the placenta and the developing fetus, acts as a protective barrier from the high maternal glucocorticoids which may alter developmental trajectories. The programmed changes resulting from maternal stress or bypass or from the inhibition of 11β-HSD2 are frequently associated with alterations in the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Hence, circulating glucocorticoid levels are increased either basally or in response to stress accompanied by CNS region-specific modulations in the expression of both corticosteroid receptors (mineralocorticoid and glucocorticoid receptors). Furthermore, early-life glucocorticoid exposure also affects serotonergic and catecholamine pathways within the brain, with changes in both associated neurotransmitters and receptors. Indeed, global removal of 11β-HSD2, an enzyme that inactivates glucocorticoids, increases anxiety- and depressive-like behaviour in mice; however, in this case the phenotype is not accompanied by overt perturbation in the HPA axis but, intriguingly, alterations in serotonergic and catecholamine pathways are maintained in this programming model. This review addresses one of the potential adverse effects of glucocorticoid overexposure in utero, i.e. increased incidence of affective behaviours, and the mechanisms underlying these behaviours including alteration of the HPA axis and serotonergic and catecholamine pathways.

  17. Management of Adrenal Masses.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Hattangadi Sanjay; Tiyadath, Balagopal Nair

    2017-03-01

    An adrenal mass can be either symptomatic or asymptomatic in the form of adrenal incidentalomas (AIs) in up to 8 % in autopsy and 4 % in imaging series. Once a diagnosis of adrenal mass is made, we need to differentiate whether it is functioning or nonfunctioning, benign, or malignant. In this article, we provide a literature review of the diagnostic workup including biochemical evaluation and imaging characteristics of the different pathologies. We also discuss the surgical strategies with laparoscopy as the mainstay with partial adrenalectomy in select cases and adrenalectomy in large masses. Follow-up protocol of AIs and adrenocortical carcinoma is also discussed.

  18. [Medullary layer activity of the rat adrenals after a flight on the Kosmos-1129 biosatellite].

    PubMed

    Kvetnanský, R; Blazicek, P; Tigranian, R A

    1982-01-01

    After a 18.5-day space flight on Cosmos-1129 rat adrenals were investigated for the concentration of catecholamines and activity of enzymes involved in their synthesis, i.e. tyrosine hydroxylase, dopamine-beta-hydroxylase, and phenyl ethanol amine-N-methyl transferase. It was found that inflight the sympatho-adreno-medullary system of rats was not exposed to a prolonged or strong stressogenic effect. Postflight the rats showed an increased reactivity to the immobilization stress.

  19. Attention deficit disorder symptoms and urine catecholamines.

    PubMed

    Rogeness, G A; Maas, J W; Javors, M A; Macedo, C A; Fischer, C; Harris, W R

    1989-03-01

    The symptoms of hyperactivity, impulsivity, and concentration deficits associated with attention deficit disorder (ADD) may be related, in part, to alterations in dopaminergic and noradrenergic functioning. In this study we correlate the above symptoms with 24-hour urinary catecholamines and their metabolites in emotionally disturbed boys divided into two groups based on their plasma dopamine-beta-hydroxylase (DBH) activities and also divided into the following diagnostic groups: conduct disorder, undersocialized; conduct disorder, socialized; and subjects without conduct disorder. Boys in the low DBH group showed significant correlations between the ADD symptoms and the biochemical measures. The low DBH group may be more genetically homogeneous with regard to catecholamine function, making relationships between catecholamine function and behavior more visible. The group of boys with conduct disorder, socialized had higher 24-hour urinary norepinephrine and vanillylmandelic acid output. The relationship between monoamines and their metabolites appeared to differ among diagnostic groups.

  20. Decreased norepinephrine content in the medulla oblongata in severely hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Takami, T; Ito, H; Suzuki, T

    1993-03-01

    1. To clarify possible abnormalities in catecholamines in the medulla oblongata in relation to severe hypertension, the authors measured changes in catecholamine levels in the medulla oblongata of malignant stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive rats (M-SHRSP). Effects of the adrenal medullae and peripheral nerves were ruled out by adrenal demedullation and chemical sympathectomy. 2. The level of norepinephrine in the medulla oblongata was significantly lower in untreated M-SHRSP than in untreated WKY (control) rats at 10 weeks of age. Further, it was significantly lower in treated M-SHRSP than in the treated WKY group at both 6 and 10 weeks of age. The level of epinephrine in 6 week old treated M-SHRSP was significantly higher than that in age-matched treated WKY, but no other differences were observed in terms of epinephrine content. There were no age- or treatment-related differences in dopamine levels in the medullar oblongata. 3. Since norepinephrine has an inhibitory effect on blood pressure elevation in the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) in the medulla oblongata, the suppression of negative feedback due to a decrease in the activity of inhibitory neurons in the medulla oblongata appears to be involved in the development and progression of severe hypertension in M-SHRSP.

  1. Managing Adrenal Insufficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... the body. • Surgical removal of the adrenals Temporary AI is caused by some medications, infections, and/or surgeries. Causes of temporary AI include the following: • Transsphenoidal surgery for Cushing’s disease ...

  2. Acute adrenal crisis

    MedlinePlus

    ... condition that occurs when there is not enough cortisol. This is a hormone produced by the adrenal ... parts. The outer portion, called the cortex, produces cortisol. This is an important hormone for controlling blood ...

  3. Dynamin and Myosin Regulate Differential Exocytosis from Mouse Adrenal Chromaffin Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Shyue-An; Doreian, Bryan; Smith, Corey

    2011-01-01

    Neuroendocrine chromaffin cells of the adrenal medulla represent a primary output for the sympathetic nervous system. Chromaffin cells release catecholamine as well as vaso- and neuro-active peptide transmitters into the circulation through exocytic fusion of large dense-core secretory granules. Under basal sympathetic activity, chromaffin cells selectively release modest levels of catecholamines, helping to set the “rest and digest” status of energy storage. Under stress activation, elevated sympathetic firing leads to increased catecholamine as well as peptide transmitter release to set the “fight or flight” status of energy expenditure. While the mechanism for catecholamine release has been widely investigated, relatively little is known of how peptide transmitter release is regulated to occur selectively under elevated stimulation. Recent studies have shown selective catecholamine release under basal stimulation is accomplished through a transient, restricted exocytic fusion pore between granule and plasma membrane, releasing a soluble fraction of the small, diffusible molecules. Elevated cell firing leads to the active dilation of the fusion pore, leading to the release of both catecholamine and the less diffusible peptide transmitters. Here we propose a molecular mechanism regulating the activity-dependent dilation of the fusion pore. We review the immediate literature and provide new data to formulate a working mechanistic hypothesis whereby calcium-mediated dephosphorylation of dynamin I at Ser-774 leads to the recruitment of the molecular motor myosin II to actively dilate the fusion pore to facilitate release of peptide transmitters. Thus, activity-dependent dephosphorylation of dynamin is hypothesized to represent a key molecular step in the sympatho-adrenal stress response. PMID:21061163

  4. Clinical catecholamine neurochemistry: a legacy of Julius Axelrod.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, David S; Eisenhofer, Graeme; Kopin, Irwin J

    2006-01-01

    1. Discoveries, insights, and concepts that Julius Axelrod introduced about the disposition and metabolism of catecholamines provided the scientific basis and spurred the development of clinical catecholamine neurochemistry. 2. Here, we provide examples of this aspect of Axelrod's scientific legacy.

  5. Work up of incidental adrenal mass: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Bada, Maida; Castellan, Pietro; Tamburro, Fabiola R; Berardinelli, Francesco; Neri, Fabio; Cindolo, Luca; Schips, Luigi

    2016-11-18

    Due to the increasing use of radiological investigations, the detection of incidental adrenal masses has become even more frequent. Therefore, it is crucial to identify the nature of the adrenal mass in order to decide the type of treatment that should be undertaken. Toward this goal, biochemical tests are useful in order to assess catecholamines levels for the presence of a pheochromocytoma or cortisol excess in case of Cushing's syndrome. Furthermore, the dexamethasone suppression test and late-night salivary cortisol may be useful in measuring plasma cortisol, respectively, in the blood and urine. Hyperaldosteronism could be suspected in the presence of arterial hypertension. With regard to imaging modalities, the contrast washout and Hounsfield units estimation might play a role as indicators on computed tomography. In terms of treatment, a surgical approach is most suitable for a hyperfunctioning adrenal mass irrespective of size, and for nonfunctioning masses >4 cm. For indeterminate smaller lesions, with washout >50%, <10 Hounsfield Unit, nonfunctioning, benign-appearing, undergoing a follow-up in regular intervals is more appropriate in order to estimate mass growth. This paper summarizes recent findings on the management of incidental adrenal masses, with a special focus on the use of imaging, surgical management and follow-up modalities in improving patient outcomes.

  6. Magnetron sputtered diamond-like carbon microelectrodes for on-chip measurement of quantal catecholamine release from cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuanfang; Chen, Xiaohui; Gupta, Sanju; Gillis, Kevin D; Gangopadhyay, Shubhra

    2008-10-01

    Carbon electrodes are widely used in electrochemistry due to their low cost, wide potential window, and low and stable background noise. Carbon-fiber electrodes (CFE) are commonly used to electrochemically measure "quantal" catecholamine release via exocytosis from individual cells, but it is difficult to integrate CFEs into lab-on-a-chip devices. Here we report the development of nitrogen doped diamond-like carbon (DLC:N) microelectrodes on a chip to monitor quantal release of catecholamines from cells. Advantages of DLC:N microelectrodes are that they are batch producible at low cost, and are harder and more durable than graphite films. The DLC:N microelectrodes were prepared by a magnetron sputtering process with nitrogen doping. The 30 microm by 40 microm DLC:N microelectrodes were patterned onto microscope glass slides by photolithography and lift-off technology. The properties of the DLC:N microelectrodes were characterized by AFM, Raman spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. Quantal catecholamine release was recorded amperometrically from bovine adrenal chromaffin cells on the DLC:N microelectrodes. Amperometric spikes due to quantal release of catecholamines were similar in amplitude and area as those recorded using CFEs and the background current and noise levels of microchip DLC:N electrodes were also comparable to CFEs. Therefore, DLC:N microelectrodes are suitable for microchip-based high-throughput measurement of quantal exocytosis with applications in basic research, drug discovery and cell-based biosensors.

  7. Catecholamines and cognition after traumatic brain injury

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Peter O.; Mehta, Mitul A.

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive problems are one of the main causes of ongoing disability after traumatic brain injury. The heterogeneity of the injuries sustained and the variability of the resulting cognitive deficits makes treating these problems difficult. Identifying the underlying pathology allows a targeted treatment approach aimed at cognitive enhancement. For example, damage to neuromodulatory neurotransmitter systems is common after traumatic brain injury and is an important cause of cognitive impairment. Here, we discuss the evidence implicating disruption of the catecholamines (dopamine and noradrenaline) and review the efficacy of catecholaminergic drugs in treating post-traumatic brain injury cognitive impairments. The response to these therapies is often variable, a likely consequence of the heterogeneous patterns of injury as well as a non-linear relationship between catecholamine levels and cognitive functions. This individual variability means that measuring the structure and function of a person’s catecholaminergic systems is likely to allow more refined therapy. Advanced structural and molecular imaging techniques offer the potential to identify disruption to the catecholaminergic systems and to provide a direct measure of catecholamine levels. In addition, measures of structural and functional connectivity can be used to identify common patterns of injury and to measure the functioning of brain ‘networks’ that are important for normal cognitive functioning. As the catecholamine systems modulate these cognitive networks, these measures could potentially be used to stratify treatment selection and monitor response to treatment in a more sophisticated manner. PMID:27256296

  8. Epinephrine regulation of hemodynamics in catecholamine knockouts and the pithed mouse.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ping; Bao, Xuping; Elayan, Hamzeh; Milic, Milos; Liu, Fujun; Ziegler, Michael G

    2008-12-01

    Phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT) catalyzes synthesis of epinephrine (E) and is present in the brain, heart, and adrenal. E is a neurotransmitter and important hormone; however, its role in regulating cardiovascular dynamics is still unclear. We generated an E-deficient mouse model by knocking out the PNMT gene. The PNMT KO mouse had normal resting blood pressure, while treadmill exercise caused hypertension, suggesting an impaired response to stress in the absence of the stress hormone E. As PNMT occurs at a lower concentration in many extra-adrenal tissues including the brain, we set up a pithed mouse model to study the peripheral effects of E on cardiovascular dynamics, using pithing to eliminate central and reflex effects. The pithed mouse requires different surgical techniques and stimulation voltages than rats, and showed voltage- and frequency-dependent blood pressure responses to electrical stimuli. Stimulation with the alpha-adrenergic agonist phenylephrine gave a marked systolic pressor response, while the beta2 agonist salbutamol lowered diastolic blood pressure. The pithed PNMT KO mouse had an exaggerated blood pressure response to salbutamol, suggesting beta2 receptor supersensitivity. A targeted KO of tyrosine hydroxylase in PNMT-producing cells produced a mouse deficient in catecholamines in the adrenal. These targeted KO mice displayed significantly smaller pressor responses than pithed control mice. We find that E release during stress prevents an excessive increase in blood pressure.

  9. Pathophysiology and diagnosis of disorders of the adrenal medulla: focus on pheochromocytoma.

    PubMed

    Lenders, Jacques W M; Eisenhofer, Graeme

    2014-04-01

    The principal function of the adrenal medulla is the production and secretion of catecholamines. During stressful challenging conditions, catecholamines exert a pivotal homeostatic role. Although the main adrenomedullary catecholamine, epinephrine, has a wide array of adrenoreceptor-mediated effects, its absence does not cause life-threatening problems. In contrast, excess production of catecholamines due to an adrenomedullary tumor, specifically pheochromocytoma, results in significant morbidity and mortality. Despite being rare, pheochromocytoma has a notoriously bad reputation because of its potential devastating effects if undetected and untreated. The paroxysmal signs and symptoms and the risks of missing or delaying the diagnosis are well known for most physicians. Nevertheless, even today the diagnosis is still overlooked in a considerable number of patients. Prevention and complete cure are however possible by early diagnosis and appropriate treatment but these patients remain a challenge for physicians. Yet, biochemical proof of presence or absence of catecholamine excess has become more easy and straightforward due to developments in assay methodology. This also applies to radiological and functional imaging techniques for locating the tumor. The importance of genetic testing for underlying germline mutations in susceptibility genes for patients and relatives is increasingly recognized. Yet, the effectiveness of genetic testing, in terms of costs and benefits to health, has not been definitively established. Further improvement in knowledge of genotype-phenotype relationships in pheochromocytoma will open new avenues to a more rationalized and personalized diagnostic approach of affected patients.

  10. Effect of MPTP on primate chromaffin cells in vitro: relevance for adrenal medullary cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Notter, M F; Kaniuki, M; Felten, S Y; Hansen, J T; Gash, D M

    1991-01-01

    Primate adrenal medullary cells were exposed to l-methyl-4-phenyl-l,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) in vitro to examine the effect of this neurotoxic agent on chromaffin cells. Chromaffin cells from monkey and humans were cultured in the presence of 100 ng/ml nerve growth factor for 1 week and then exposed to 150 μM MPTP or its active metabolite methylpyridinium ion (MPP+) for an additional week. Cells which had extended neurites in the presence of NGF showed no morphological effect in response to MPTP or MPP+ at the light microscopic level. However, there was a significant loss in catecholamines as seen by histofluorescence and high performance liquid chromotography (HPLC). Electron microscopy revealed a depletion in dense-core vesicles in chromaffin cells after chronic exposure to MPTP while the mitochondria appeared similar to those observed in control cells. Replacement of MPTP medium with standard medium stimulated restoration of catecholamine histofluorescence after 7 days. An acute 15 min pretreatment of chromaffin cells with MPTP or MPP+ induced secretion of catecholamines over a 1 h pulse, with MPP+ producing the maximum and more rapid secretion as determined by HPLC. These data indicate that MPTP induces a dramatic loss in catecholamines in primate chromaffin cells in vitro after both acute and chronic exposures; however, removal of the toxic agent permits restoration of catecholamines without permanent effect on the integrity of these cells.

  11. Stress, Allostatic Load, Catecholamines, and Other Neurotransmitters in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    As populations age, the prevalence of geriatric neurodegenerative diseases will increase. These diseases generally are multifactorial, arising from complex interactions among genes, environment, concurrent morbidities, treatments, and time. This essay provides a concept for the pathogenesis of Lewy body diseases such as Parkinson disease, by considering them in the context of allostasis and allostatic load. Allostasis reflects active, adaptive processes that maintain apparent steady states, via multiple, interacting effectors regulated by homeostatic comparators—“homeostats.” Stress can be defined as a condition or state in which a sensed discrepancy between afferent information and a setpoint for response leads to activation of effectors, reducing the discrepancy. “Allostatic load” refers to the consequences of sustained or repeated activation of mediators of allostasis. From the analogy of an idling car, the revolutions per minute of the engine can be maintained at any of a variety of levels (allostatic states). Just as allostatic load (cumulative wear and tear) reflects design and manufacturing variations, byproducts of combustion, and time, eventually leading to engine breakdown, allostatic load in catecholaminergic neurons might eventually lead to Lewy body diseases. Central to the argument is that catecholaminergic neurons leak vesicular contents into the cytoplasm continuously during life and that catecholamines in the neuronal cytoplasm are autotoxic. These neurons therefore depend on vesicular sequestration to limit autotoxicity of cytosolic transmitter. Parkinson disease might be a disease of the elderly because of allostatic load, which depends on genetic predispositions, environmental exposures, repeated stress-related catecholamine release, and time. PMID:21615193

  12. Stress, Allostatic Load, Catecholamines, and Other Neurotransmitters in Neurodegenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    As populations age, the prevalence of geriatric neurodegenerative diseases will increase. These diseases generally are multifactorial, arising from complex interactions among genes, environment, concurrent morbidities, treatments, and time. This essay provides a concept for the pathogenesis of Lewy body diseases such as Parkinson disease, by considering them in the context of allostasis and allostatic load. Allostasis reflects active, adaptive processes that maintain apparent steady states, via multiple, interacting effectors regulated by homeostatic comparators—“homeostats.” Stress can be defined as a condition or state in which a sensed discrepancy between afferent information and a setpoint for response leads to activation of effectors, reducing the discrepancy. “Allostatic load” refers to the consequences of sustained or repeated activation of mediators of allostasis. From the analogy of an idling car, the revolutions per minute of the engine can be maintained at any of a variety of levels (allostatic states). Just as allostatic load (cumulative wear and tear) reflects design and manufacturing variations, byproducts of combustion, and time, eventually leading to engine breakdown, allostatic load in catecholaminergic neurons might eventually lead to Lewy body diseases. Central to the argument is that catecholaminergic neurons leak vesicular contents into the cytoplasm continuously during life and that catecholamines in the neuronal cytoplasm are autotoxic. These neurons therefore depend on vesicular sequestration to limit autotoxicity of cytosolic transmitter. Parkinson disease might be a disease of the elderly because of allostatic load, which depends on genetic predispositions, environmental exposures, repeated stress-related catecholamine release, and time. PMID:22297542

  13. Myth vs. Fact: Adrenal Fatigue

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hormones Do? Infographics Myth vs Fact Scientific Statements Social Media Resources Peer Support Resources Diseases and Conditions Adrenal ... Hormones Do? Infographics Myth vs Fact Scientific Statements Social Media Resources Peer Support Resources Diseases and Conditions Adrenal ...

  14. What Is Adrenal Cortical Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... include pheochromocytomas (which are most often benign) and neuroblastomas . This document is about tumors and cancers of ... does not discuss tumors of the adrenal medulla. Neuroblastoma s are covered in a separate document . Adrenal cortex ...

  15. Percutaneous ablation of adrenal tumors.

    PubMed

    Venkatesan, Aradhana M; Locklin, Julia; Dupuy, Damian E; Wood, Bradford J

    2010-06-01

    Adrenal tumors comprise a broad spectrum of benign and malignant neoplasms and include functional adrenal adenomas, pheochromocytomas, primary adrenocortical carcinoma, and adrenal metastases. Percutaneous ablative approaches that have been described and used in the treatment of adrenal tumors include percutaneous radiofrequency ablation, cryoablation, microwave ablation, and chemical ablation. Local tumor ablation in the adrenal gland presents unique challenges, secondary to the adrenal gland's unique anatomic and physiological features. The results of clinical series employing percutaneous ablative techniques in the treatment of adrenal tumors are reviewed in this article. Clinical and technical considerations unique to ablation in the adrenal gland are presented, including approaches commonly used in our practices, and risks and potential complications are discussed.

  16. Association of the GTP-binding protein Rab3A with bovine adrenal chromaffin granules

    SciTech Connect

    Darchen, F.; Hammel, F.; Monteils, M.P.; Scherman, D. ); Zahraoui, A.; Tavitian, A. )

    1990-08-01

    The Rab3A protein belongs to a large family of small GTP-binding proteins that are present in eukaryotic cells and that share amino acid identities with the Ras proteins (products of the ras protooncogenes). Rab3A, which is specifically located in nervous and endocrine tissues, is suspected to play a key role in secretion. Its localization was investigated in bovine adrenal gland by using a polyclonal antibody. Rab3A was detected in adrenal medulla but not in adrenal cortex. In cultured adrenal medulla cells, Rab3A was specifically expressed in the catecholamine-secreting chromaffin cells. Subcellular fractionation suggested that Rab3A is about 30% cytosolic and that particulate Rab3A is associated with the membrane of chromaffin granules (the catecholamine storage organelles) and with a second compartment likely to be the plasma membrane. The Rab3A localization on chromaffin granule membranes was confirmed by immunoadsorption with an antibody against dopamine {beta}-hydroxylase. Rab3A was not extracted from this membrane by NaCl or KBr but was partially extracted by urea and totally solubilized by Triton X-100, suggesting either an interaction with an intrinsic protein or a membrane association through fatty acid acylation. This study suggests that Rab3A, which may also be located on other secretory vesicles containing noncharacterized small GTP-binding proteins, is involved in their biogenesis or in the regulated secretion process.

  17. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Merke, Deborah P; Bornstein, Stefan R

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) due to deficiency of 21-hydroxylase is a disorder of the adrenal cortex characterised by cortisol deficiency, with or without aldosterone deficiency, and androgen excess. Patients with the most severe form also have abnormalities of the adrenal medulla and epinephrine deficiency. The severe classic form occurs in one in 15,000 births worldwide, and the mild non-classic form is a common cause of hyperandrogenism. Neonatal screening for CAH and gene-specific prenatal diagnosis are now possible. Standard hormone replacement fails to achieve normal growth and development for many children with CAH, and adults can experience iatrogenic Cushing's syndrome, hyperandrogenism, infertility, or the development of the metabolic syndrome. This Seminar reviews the epidemiology, genetics, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and management of CAH, and provides an overview of clinical challenges and future therapies.

  18. The rat adrenal medulla.

    PubMed

    Tischler, A S

    1989-01-01

    Adult adrenal medullary cells, in many strains of rats, develop diffuse and nodular hyperplasia and neoplasia under a variety of conditions. Both endogenous and exogenous factors affect the development of these proliferative changes. The former include the animals' strain, age, and sex. The latter include drugs and other environmental agents, diet, and perhaps stress. Adrenal medullary neoplasms which arise under diverse circumstances often closely resemble each other both morphologically and functionally, and exhibit characteristics of immature chromaffin cells. Recent data indicate that normal, mature-appearing epinephrine- and norepinephrine-type chromaffin cells are able to divide, and suggest that signals which regulate chromaffin cell function also regulate cell proliferation. Prolongation of these signals or superimposed abnormalities might initiate pathological proliferative states. It remains to be determined whether the mechanisms which promote or prevent cell proliferation in the adult adrenal are related to those involved in normal development.

  19. Decreased adrenal medullary tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA in DMBA (7,12-dimethylbenz(a)anthracene)-induced mammary carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Bunce, O.R.; Badary, O.A.; Abou El-Ela, S.; Hartle, D.K. )

    1991-03-15

    Adrenal cortical hormones suppress initiation and promotion of DMBA-induced mammary tumorigenesis. The authors found a positive correlation between presence of DMBA-induced adrenal cortical necrosis and mammary tumor incidence. Because they find adrenal medullary as well as cortical lesions in tumor bearing (TB) DMBA-treated rats, they evaluated medullary function by quantitating hybridized cDNA- TH-S{sup 35} with in situ TH-mRNA u sing computer assisted quantitative autoradiographic technique. Virgin female Sprague-Dawley rats were given a 10 mg i.g. dose of DMBA. Three wks later, rats were placed on 20% polyunsaturated (PUFA) fat diets containing omega-6 and omega-3 fatty acids. All were killed 15 wks post-DMBA. TH-mRNA levels in adrenal medullae of TB animals were decreased compared to non-TB rats. Histopathology indicated a high incidence of medullary necrosis in TB rats, whereas, adrenal necrosis did not occur in non-TB animals. Adrenal necrosis correlated positively with tumor burden, but no correlation was found between incidence of adrenal lesions and type of PUFA in the diet. The authors suggest that DMBA adrenal necrosis may reduce TH-mRNA in the medulla, compromise its catecholamine synthetic capability, and thereby contribute to the overall metabolic stress condition of TB rats.

  20. Adrenal venous sampling in a patient with adrenal Cushing syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Villa-Franco, Carlos Andrés; Román-Gonzalez, Alejandro; Velez-Hoyos, Alejandro; Echeverri-Isaza, Santiago

    2015-01-01

    The primary bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia or the independent adrenocorticotropic hormone bilateral nodular adrenal hyperplasia is a rare cause hypercortisolism, its diagnosis is challenging and there is no clear way to decide the best therapeutic approach. Adrenal venous sampling is commonly used to distinguish the source of hormonal production in patients with primary hyperaldosteronism. It could be a useful tool in this context because it might provide information to guide the treatment. We report the case of a patient with ACTH independent Cushing syndrome in whom the use of adrenal venous sampling with some modifications radically modified the treatment and allowed the diagnosis of a macronodular adrenal hyperplasia. PMID:26309345

  1. Adrenal venous sampling in a patient with adrenal Cushing syndrome.

    PubMed

    Builes-Montaño, Carlos Esteban; Villa-Franco, Carlos Andrés; Román-Gonzalez, Alejandro; Velez-Hoyos, Alejandro; Echeverri-Isaza, Santiago

    2015-01-01

    The primary bilateral macronodular adrenal hyperplasia or the independent adrenocorticotropic hormone bilateral nodular adrenal hyperplasia is a rare cause hypercortisolism, its diagnosis is challenging and there is no clear way to decide the best therapeutic approach. Adrenal venous sampling is commonly used to distinguish the source of hormonal production in patients with primary hyperaldosteronism. It could be a useful tool in this context because it might provide information to guide the treatment. We report the case of a patient with ACTH independent Cushing syndrome in whom the use of adrenal venous sampling with some modifications radically modified the treatment and allowed the diagnosis of a macronodular adrenal hyperplasia.

  2. CT-guided fine needle aspiration cytology diagnosis of extra-adrenal pheochromocytoma.

    PubMed

    Rangaswamy, M; Kumar, Sandeep P; Asha, M; Manjunath, Gv

    2010-01-01

    Pheochromocytoma is a rare tumor, accounting for <0.1% of the hypertensive population. Extra-adrenal pheochromocytomas (EAPs) are rarer still, accounting for 10% of all pheochromocytomas. Pheochromocytomas are functional catecholamine-secreting tumors of the paraganglionic chromaffin cells found in the adrenal medulla and the extra-adrenal paraganglia cells. EAPs are readily detected by computed tomography (CT) as soft tissue masses closely associated with the entire length of the abdominal aorta. Here, we present a rare case of EAP in a 45-year-old male hypertensive patient diagnosed by CT-guided fine needle aspiration cytology. The smears showed loosely cohesive tumor cells with prominent anisokaryosis and abundant eosinophilic, granular cytoplasm. The diagnosis was later confirmed by histopathology. The present case also highlights the fact that fine needle aspiration of pheochromocytoma is not necessarily contraindicated.

  3. Adrenal morpho-functional alterations in patients with acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Scaroni, C; Selice, R; Benedini, S; De Menis, E; Arosio, M; Ronchi, C; Gasperi, M; Manetti, L; Arnaldi, G; Polenta, B; Boscaro, M; Albiger, N; Martino, E; Mantero, F

    2008-07-01

    Acromegaly is associated with a greater morbidity and higher incidence of tumors, possibly due to the permissive role of elevated GH and IGF-I levels. In the general population, adrenal masses are frequently discovered (prevalence 1-5%) at computed tomography (CT). We evaluated the prevalence of adrenal lesions in patients with acromegaly. We studied 94 acromegalic patients, 54 females (mean age 55.0+/-16.0 yr) and 40 males (mean age 50+/-14 yr) referred to 5 Endocrinology Units between 2001-2003; 49 had active disease and 45 had been treated with surgery and/or were controlled with medical therapy. Abdominal CT showed adrenal lesions in 27 patients; 9 of them had unilateral masses (10%) with benign features (diameter 0.5-3 cm) and 18 had hyperplasia (14 monolateral and 4 bilateral), with no significant differences between patients with active vs controlled disease, and with no correlation between prevalence of masses and duration of disease, GH and IGF-I levels. Hormone study (urinary free cortisol, catecholamines/metanephrines, upright plasma renin activity and aldosterone, morning plasma ACTH and low-dose dexamethasone suppression test) disclosed no major endocrine alterations. During a 1-yr follow-up, the adrenal masses increased in size in 3 cases and 1 patient also developed subclinical Cushing's syndrome. Adrenal lesions seem more frequent in acromegaly than in the general population, but no single factor (GH/IGF-I levels or disease duration) predicts them. The masses appear to be benign and nonhypersecreting, but a longer follow-up is recommended to disclose any changes in their morphofunctional state.

  4. The autonomic nervous system and chromaffin tissue: neuroendocrine regulation of catecholamine secretion in non-mammalian vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Perry, Steve F; Capaldo, Anna

    2011-11-16

    If severe enough, periods of acute stress in animals may be associated with the release of catecholamine hormones (noradrenaline and adrenaline) into the circulation; a response termed the acute humoral adrenergic stress response. The release of catecholamines from the sites of storage, the chromaffin cells, is under neuroendocrine control, the complexity of which appears to increase through phylogeny. In the agnathans, the earliest branching vertebrates, the chromaffin cells which are localized predominantly within the heart, lack neuronal innervation and thus catecholamine secretion in these animals is initiated solely by humoral mechanisms. In the more advanced teleost fish, the chromaffin cells are largely confined to the walls of the posterior cardinal vein at the level of the head kidney where they are intermingled with the steroidogenic interrenal cells. Catecholamine secretion from teleost chromaffin cells is regulated by a host of cholinergic and non-cholinergic pathways that ensure sufficient redundancy and flexibility in the secretion process to permit synchronized responses to a myriad of stressors. The complexity of catecholamine secretion control mechanisms continues through the amphibians, reptiles and birds although neural (cholinergic) regulation may become increasingly important in birds. Discrete adrenal glands are present in the non-mammalian tetrapods but unlike in mammals, there is no clear division of a steroidogenic cortex and a chromaffin cell enriched medulla. However, in all groups, there is an obvious intermingling of chromaffin and steroiodogenic cells. The association of the two cell types may be particularly important in the amphibians and birds because like in mammals, the enzyme catalysing the methylation of noradrenaline to adrenaline, PNMT, is under the control of the steroid cortisol.

  5. Plasma catecholamine concentrations associated with cerebral vasospasm.

    PubMed

    Loach, A B; Benedict, C R

    1980-03-01

    Plasma concentrations of adrenaline and noradrenaline were measured sequentially over the immediate post-operative period following clipping of an intracranial aneurysm in 11 patients. Those patients who developed local cerebral vasospasm showed a sustained rise in plasma catecholamines, particularly noradrenaline, whilst those patients who developed generalised cerebral vasospasm showed early peaks of very high concentrations of adrenaline and noradrenaline which preceded radiological evidence of generalized vasospam.

  6. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... or inappropriately). Congenital adrenal hyperplasia can affect both boys and girls. About 1 in 10,000 to 18,000 ... penis but normal testes Well-developed muscles Both boys and girls will be tall as children, but much shorter ...

  7. Neurotransmitter alterations in PTSD: catecholamines and serotonin.

    PubMed

    Southwick, S M; Paige, S; Morgan, C A; Bremner, J D; Krystal, J H; Charney, D S

    1999-10-01

    In this chapter we review trauma-related studies involving epinephrine (E), norepinephrine (NE), and serotonin (5-HT). Central catecholamine neurons seem to play a critical role in level of alertness, vigilance, orienting, selective attention, memory, fear conditioning, and cardiovascular responses to life-threatening stimuli. Evidence of catecholamine dysregulation in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) includes exaggerated increases in heart rate and blood pressure when exposed to visual and auditory reminders of trauma, elevated 24-hour urine catecholamine excretion, decreased platelet alpha-2 adrenergic receptor number, exaggerated behavioral, cardiovascular, and biochemical responses to IY yohimbine, decreased cortical brain metabolism secondary to IV yohimbine, and clinical efficacy of adrenergic blocking agents. Serotonin seems to play numerous roles in the central nervous system, including regulation of sleep, aggression, appetite, cardiovascular and respiratory activity, motor output, anxiety, mood, neuroendocrine secretion, and analgesia. Evidence of serotonergic dysregulation in PTSD includes frequent symptoms of aggression, impulsivity, depression and suicidality, decreased platelet paroxetine binding, blunted prolactin response to fenfluramine, exaggerated reactivity to m-chloro-phenyl-piperazine, and clinical efficacy of serotonin reuptake inhibitors. It has been suggested that alterations in NE, E, and 5-HT may have relevance for symptoms commonly seen in survivors with PTSD, including hypervigilance, exaggerated startle, irritability, impulsivity, aggression, intrusive memories, depressed mood, and suicidality.

  8. [Subclinical adrenal diseases: silent pheochromocytoma and subclinical Addison's disease].

    PubMed

    Thuillier, P; Kerlan, V

    2012-10-01

    The silent pheochromocytoma, a hidden form of pheochromocytoma, exposes the patient to an increased risk of mortality if the diagnosis is not established on time. Biological diagnosis of pheochromocytoma can be difficult. Catecholamine secretion is dependent on tumor size and a large number of physiological, pharmacological, lifestyle modifications and sampling conditions influence the measurement of urinary and plasma metanephrines. The prevalence of pheochromocytoma is 2% among adrenal incidentaloma smaller than 3 cm (2/3 of tumors). Recent studies suggest the almost zero risk of pheochromocytoma among these tumors if they are hypodense (<10 housefield units) on adrenal tomography. Addison's disease is a pathology affecting about 1 in 8000. Immunopathology is still unknown, but some elements advocated the hypothesis of a predominant cell-mediated immunity in particular Interferon-gamma production by CD4 T lymphocytes in the presence of an epitope from the 21-hydroxylase, as well as IgG1 subtype produced by activated B lymphocytes, autoantibodies do appear to be a simple marker of the disease. Subclinical Addison's disease is defined by the presence of anti-21-hydroxylase autoantibodies, without clinical symptoms. It evolves faster to the clinical phase in young subjects, male, having high levels of autoantibodies and with an initially impaired adrenal function. Dosage of ACTH, plasma renin active, and basal cortisol and after Synacthen allow to discriminate the subjects with low or high risk of evolution and establish an appropriate monitoring.

  9. Stimulation of adrenal DNA synthesis in cadmium-treated male rats

    SciTech Connect

    Nishiyama, S.; Nakamura, K.

    1984-07-01

    Cadmium chloride (CdCl2) at a dose of 1 mg/kg body wt was injected into male rats of the Wistar strain, weighing 250 g on the average, twice a day (12-hr intervals) for 7 consecutive days. DNA and RNA contents and (/sup 3/H)-thymidine and (/sup 3/H)-uridine incorporation into the acid-insoluble fraction significantly increased in the adrenals of rats treated with Cd for 2 and 7 consecutive days. Adrenal protein content and weight also significantly increased. These results indicate that continued treatment with Cd stimulates DNA and RNA synthesis in the adrenal cortex, which in turn results in the increase of the total protein contents of the adrenal gland and subsequently in the enlargement of the gland. Serum adrenocorticotrophin (ACTH) and insulin levels in Cd-treated rats were not higher than control levels, suggesting that the stimulation of DNA synthesis in the adrenals of Cd-treated rats is due to factor(s) other than serum ACTH and insulin. Treatment with Cd inhibited DNA synthesis in cultured adrenocortical cells at concentrations of 10(-4) to 10(-8) M, suggesting that Cd does not directly stimulate DNA synthesis in the adrenal gland in vivo. Although the adrenal gland became enlarged, the total adrenal corticosterone content decreased significantly. The decrease of total adrenal corticosterone content may be due to the fall in serum ACTH level of Cd-treated rats.

  10. Vesicle Pools: Lessons from Adrenal Chromaffin Cells

    PubMed Central

    Stevens, David R.; Schirra, Claudia; Becherer, Ute; Rettig, Jens

    2011-01-01

    The adrenal chromaffin cell serves as a model system to study fast Ca2+-dependent exocytosis. Membrane capacitance measurements in combination with Ca2+ uncaging offers a temporal resolution in the millisecond range and reveals that catecholamine release occurs in three distinct phases. Release of a readily releasable (RRP) and a slowly releasable (SRP) pool are followed by sustained release, due to maturation, and release of vesicles which were not release-ready at the start of the stimulus. Trains of depolarizations, a more physiological stimulus, induce release from a small immediately releasable pool of vesicles residing adjacent to calcium channels, as well as from the RRP. The SRP is poorly activated by depolarization. A sequential model, in which non-releasable docked vesicles are primed to a slowly releasable state, and then further mature to the readily releasable state, has been proposed. The docked state, dependent on membrane proximity, requires SNAP-25, synaptotagmin, and syntaxin. The ablation or modification of SNAP-25 and syntaxin, components of the SNARE complex, as well as of synaptotagmin, the calcium sensor, and modulators such complexins and Snapin alter the properties and/or magnitudes of different phases of release, and in particular can ablate the RRP. These results indicate that the composition of the SNARE complex and its interaction with modulatory molecules drives priming and provides a molecular basis for different pools of releasable vesicles. PMID:21423410

  11. Adrenal cortical and medullary imaging.

    PubMed

    Freitas, J E

    1995-07-01

    Adrenal disease can be manifested by endocrine dysfunction or anatomic abnormalities detected by cross-sectional imaging modalities. With the advent of newer and more reliable in vitro assays and a better understanding of the spectrum of adrenal pathology, the physician can now adopt a more accurate and cost-effective approach to the diagnosis of adrenal disease. Both functional and anatomic imaging modalities can play an important role in the evaluation of the incidental adrenal mass, the early detection of adrenal metastases, differentiation of the various causes of Cushings's syndrome, selection of patients for potentially curative surgery in primary aldosteronism and adrenal hyperandrogenism, and localization of pheochromocytomas and neuroblastomas. The usefulness of the adrenal cortical radiopharmaceutical, 131I-6-beta-iodomethylnorcholesterol (NP-59), and the adrenal medullary radiopharmaceuticals, 131I and 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), is detailed for these various clinical settings and the role of NP-59 and MIBG is contrasted to that of the cross-sectional modalities, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Incidental adrenal masses are common, but malignancies are few. Imaging studies select those patients who require a further evaluation by biopsy examination or adrenalectomy. In the hyperfunctioning endocrine states, such as Cushing's syndrome, primary aldosteronism, adrenal androgenism, and pheochromocytoma, correlation of biochemical findings with both functional and anatomic imaging is necessary to avoid inappropriate and ineffective surgical intervention, yet not miss an opportunity for curative resection. Lastly, MIBG and MRI are complementary in the detection and staging of neuroblastoma.

  12. Inhibitory effects of tramadol on nicotinic acetylcholine receptors in adrenal chromaffin cells and in Xenopus oocytes expressing alpha 7 receptors.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Munehiro; Minami, Kouichiro; Uezono, Yasuhito; Yanagihara, Nobuyuki; Shigematsu, Akio; Shibuya, Izumi

    2002-05-01

    1. Tramadol has been used clinically as an analgesic; however, the mechanism of its analgesic effects is still unknown. 2. We used bovine adrenal chromaffin cells to investigate effects of tramadol on catecholamine secretion, nicotine-induced cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) increases and membrane current changes. We also investigated effects of tramadol on alpha7 nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (AChRs) expressed in Xenopus oocytes. 3. Tramadol concentration-dependently suppressed carbachol-induced catecholamine secretion to 60% and 27% of the control at the concentration of 10 and 100 microM, respectively, whereas it had little effect on veratridine- or high K(+)-induced catecholamine secretion. 4. Tramadol also suppressed nicotine-induced ([Ca(2+)](i)) increases in a concentration-dependent manner. Tramadol inhibited nicotine-induced inward currents, and the inhibition was unaffected by the opioid receptor antagonist naloxone. 5. Tramadol inhibited nicotinic currents carried by alpha7 receptors expressed in Xenopus oocytes. 6. Tramadol inhibited both alpha-bungarotoxin-sensitive and -insensitive nicotinic currents in bovine adrenal chromaffin cells. 7. In conclusion, tramadol inhibits catecholamine secretion partly by inhibiting nicotinic AChR functions in a naloxone-insensitive manner and alpha7 receptors are one of those inhibited by tramadol.

  13. Stimulation of catecholamine synthesis through unique estrogen receptors in the bovine adrenomedullary plasma membrane by 17{beta}-estradiol

    SciTech Connect

    Yanagihara, Nobuyuki . E-mail: yanagin@med.uoeh-u.ac.jp; Liu, Minhui; Toyohira, Yumiko; Tsutsui, Masato; Ueno, Susumu; Shinohara, Yuko; Takahashi, Kojiro; Tanaka, Kazumi

    2006-01-13

    Incubation of cultured bovine adrenal medullary cells with 17{beta}-estradiol (E{sub 2}) (0.3-100 nM) or membrane-impermeable E{sub 2}-bovine serum albumin (100 nM) acutely increased {sup 14}C-catecholamine synthesis from [{sup 14}C]tyrosine. The stimulatory effect of E{sub 2} was not inhibited by ICI182,780, a nuclear estrogen receptor inhibitor. E{sub 2} also increased tyrosine hydroxylase activity and p44/42MAPK phosphorylation, the former of which was attenuated by U0126, an inhibitor of p44/42MAPK kinase. The plasma membrane isolated from the gland showed two classes of specific binding sites of [{sup 3}H]E{sub 2} with apparent K {sub d}s of 3.2 and 106 nM, and B {sub max}s of 0.44 and 8.5 pmol/mg protein, respectively. The high-affinity binding of [{sup 3}H]E{sub 2} was most strongly inhibited by E{sub 2} and phytoestrogens, and to lesser extents by other steroid hormones, while it was enhanced by ICI182,780 and environmental estrogenic pollutants. These findings suggest that E{sub 2} acutely stimulates catecholamine synthesis via activation of p44/42MAPK through unique estrogen receptors in the plasma membrane of bovine adrenal medulla.

  14. CT demonstration of bilateral adrenal hemorrhage

    SciTech Connect

    Ling, D.; Korobkin, M.; Silverman, P.M.; Dunnick, N.R.

    1983-08-01

    Bilateral adrenal hemorrhage with subsequent adrenal insufficiency is a recognized complication of anticoagulant therapy. Because the clinical manifestations are often nonspecific, the antemortem diagnosis of adrenal hemorrhage has been a difficult clinical problem. Computed tomography (CT) provides detailed images of the adrenal glands that are not possible with conventional imaging methods. The CT findings of bilateral adrenal hemorrhage in an anticoagulated patient are reported.

  15. Adrenal Development in Mice Requires GATA4 and GATA6 Transcription Factors.

    PubMed

    Tevosian, Sergei G; Jiménez, Elizabeth; Hatch, Heather M; Jiang, Tianyu; Morse, Deborah A; Fox, Shawna C; Padua, Maria B

    2015-07-01

    The adrenal glands consist of an outer cortex and an inner medulla, and their primary purposes include hormone synthesis and secretion. The adrenal cortex produces a complex array of steroid hormones, whereas the medulla is part of the sympathetic nervous system and produces the catecholamines epinephrine and norepinephrine. In the mouse, GATA binding protein (GATA) 4 and GATA6 transcription factors are coexpressed in several embryonic tissues, including the adrenal cortex. To explore the roles of GATA4 and GATA6 in mouse adrenal development, we conditionally deleted these genes in adrenocortical cells using the Sf1Cre strain of animals. We report here that mice with Sf1Cre-mediated double deletion of Gata4 and Gata6 genes lack identifiable adrenal glands, steroidogenic factor 1-positive cortical cells and steroidogenic gene expression in the adrenal location. The inactivation of the Gata6 gene alone (Sf1Cre;Gata6(flox/flox)) drastically reduced the adrenal size and corticosterone production in the adult animals. Adrenocortical aplasia is expected to result in the demise of the animal within 2 weeks after birth unless glucocorticoids are provided. In accordance, Sf1Cre;Gata4(flox/flox)Gata6(flox/flox) females depend on steroid supplementation to survive after weaning. Surprisingly, Sf1Cre;Gata4(flox/flox)Gata6(flox/flox) males appear to live normal lifespans as vital steroidogenic synthesis shifts to their testes. Our results reveal a requirement for GATA factors in adrenal development and provide a novel tool to characterize the transcriptional network controlling adrenocortical cell fates.

  16. Adrenal Disorders and the Paediatric Brain: Pathophysiological Considerations and Clinical Implications

    PubMed Central

    Polizzi, Agata; Di Rosa, Gabriella; Romeo, Anna Claudia; Dipasquale, Valeria; Chirico, Valeria; Arrigo, Teresa; Ruggieri, Martino

    2014-01-01

    Various neurological and psychiatric manifestations have been recorded in children with adrenal disorders. Based on literature review and on personal case-studies and case-series we focused on the pathophysiological and clinical implications of glucocorticoid-related, mineralcorticoid-related, and catecholamine-related paediatric nervous system involvement. Childhood Cushing syndrome can be associated with long-lasting cognitive deficits and abnormal behaviour, even after resolution of the hypercortisolism. Exposure to excessive replacement of exogenous glucocorticoids in the paediatric age group (e.g., during treatments for adrenal insufficiency) has been reported with neurological and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormalities (e.g., delayed myelination and brain atrophy) due to potential corticosteroid-related myelin damage in the developing brain and the possible impairment of limbic system ontogenesis. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), a disorder of unclear pathophysiology characterised by increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure, has been described in children with hypercortisolism, adrenal insufficiency, and hyperaldosteronism, reflecting the potential underlying involvement of the adrenal-brain axis in the regulation of CSF pressure homeostasis. Arterial hypertension caused by paediatric adenomas or tumours of the adrenal cortex or medulla has been associated with various hypertension-related neurological manifestations. The development and maturation of the central nervous system (CNS) through childhood is tightly regulated by intrinsic, paracrine, endocrine, and external modulators, and perturbations in any of these factors, including those related to adrenal hormone imbalance, could result in consequences that affect the structure and function of the paediatric brain. Animal experiments and clinical studies demonstrated that the developing (i.e., paediatric) CNS seems to be particularly vulnerable to alterations induced by adrenal

  17. Adrenal disorders and the paediatric brain: pathophysiological considerations and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Salpietro, Vincenzo; Polizzi, Agata; Di Rosa, Gabriella; Romeo, Anna Claudia; Dipasquale, Valeria; Morabito, Paolo; Chirico, Valeria; Arrigo, Teresa; Ruggieri, Martino

    2014-01-01

    Various neurological and psychiatric manifestations have been recorded in children with adrenal disorders. Based on literature review and on personal case-studies and case-series we focused on the pathophysiological and clinical implications of glucocorticoid-related, mineralcorticoid-related, and catecholamine-related paediatric nervous system involvement. Childhood Cushing syndrome can be associated with long-lasting cognitive deficits and abnormal behaviour, even after resolution of the hypercortisolism. Exposure to excessive replacement of exogenous glucocorticoids in the paediatric age group (e.g., during treatments for adrenal insufficiency) has been reported with neurological and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) abnormalities (e.g., delayed myelination and brain atrophy) due to potential corticosteroid-related myelin damage in the developing brain and the possible impairment of limbic system ontogenesis. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension (IIH), a disorder of unclear pathophysiology characterised by increased cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) pressure, has been described in children with hypercortisolism, adrenal insufficiency, and hyperaldosteronism, reflecting the potential underlying involvement of the adrenal-brain axis in the regulation of CSF pressure homeostasis. Arterial hypertension caused by paediatric adenomas or tumours of the adrenal cortex or medulla has been associated with various hypertension-related neurological manifestations. The development and maturation of the central nervous system (CNS) through childhood is tightly regulated by intrinsic, paracrine, endocrine, and external modulators, and perturbations in any of these factors, including those related to adrenal hormone imbalance, could result in consequences that affect the structure and function of the paediatric brain. Animal experiments and clinical studies demonstrated that the developing (i.e., paediatric) CNS seems to be particularly vulnerable to alterations induced by adrenal

  18. Inhibition of /sup 22/Na influx by tricyclic and tetracyclic antidepressants and binding of (/sup 3/H)imipramine in bovine adrenal medullary cells

    SciTech Connect

    Arita, M.; Wada, A.; Takara, H.; Izumi, F.

    1987-10-01

    In bovine adrenal medullary cells we investigated the effects of antidepressants on ionic channels and secretion of catecholamines. Tricyclic (imipramine, amitriptyline and nortriptyline) and tetracyclic (maprotiline and mianserin) antidepressants inhibited carbachol-induced influx of /sup 22/Na, /sup 45/Ca and secretion of catecholamines (IC50, 14-96 microM). Influx of /sup 22/Na, /sup 45/Ca and secretion of catecholamines due to veratridine also were inhibited by these drugs (IC50, 10-17 microM). However, antidepressants did not suppress high concentration of K-induced 45Ca influx and catecholamine secretion, suggesting that antidepressants do not inhibit voltage-dependent Ca channels. (/sup 3/H)Imipramine bound specifically to adrenal medullary cells. Binding was saturable, reversible and with two different equilibrium dissociation constants (13.3 and 165.0 microM). Tricyclic and tetracyclic antidepressants competed for the specific binding of (/sup 3/H)imipramine at the same concentrations as they inhibited /sup 22/Na influx caused by carbachol or veratridine. Carbachol, d-tubocurarine, hexamethonium, tetrodotoxin, veratridine and scorpion venom did not inhibit the specific binding of (/sup 3/H)imipramine. These results suggest that tricyclic and tetracyclic antidepressants bind to two populations of binding sites which are functionally associated with nicotinic receptor-associated ionic channels and with voltage-dependent Na channels, and inhibit Na influx. Inhibition of Na influx leads to the reduction of Ca influx and catecholamine secretion caused by carbachol or veratridine.

  19. Radioguided Adrenal Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Deus, Javier; Millera, Alfonso; Andrés, Alejandro; Prats, Enrique; Gil, Ismael; Suarez, Manuel; Salcini, José L.; Lahoz, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The laparoscopic adrenalectomy is considered as the procedure of choice for the treatment of adrenal hyperplasia and tumor lesions. However, some special situations may limit the use of this method due to the difficulty to locate the gland and perform the lesion excision. We analyze 2 patients of a left adrenal tumor, explaining how they have overcome the difficulties in both situations. The first case was a patient with a history of intra-abdominal surgery and the other patient suffered from severe obesity. We performed with the use of the gamma probe, and the 2 cases, was of great help to access and glandular localization. The help of gamma probe test was achieved in the surgical bed, that removal was complete. The use of the portable gamma probe facilitated the access to the left adrenal gland as well as conducting the glandular excision without delay, despite the difficulties due to the intra abdominal surgery caused by the previous surgery, and in the case of severe obesity. PMID:26426608

  20. Congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Congenital lipoid adrenal hyperplasia (lipoid CAH) is the most fatal form of CAH, as it disrupts adrenal and gonadal steroidogenesis. Most cases of lipoid CAH are caused by recessive mutations in the gene encoding steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR). Affected patients typically present with signs of severe adrenal failure in early infancy and 46,XY genetic males are phenotypic females due to disrupted testicular androgen secretion. The StAR p.Q258X mutation accounts for about 70% of affected alleles in most patients of Japanese and Korean ancestry. However, it is more prevalent (92.3%) in the Korean population. Recently, some patients have been showed that they had late and mild clinical findings. These cases and studies constitute a new entity of 'nonclassic lipoid CAH'. The cholesterol side-chain cleavage enzyme, P450scc (CYP11A1), plays an essential role converting cholesterol to pregnenolone. Although progesterone production from the fetally derived placenta is necessary to maintain a pregnancy to term, some patients with P450scc mutations have recently been reported. P450scc mutations can also cause lipoid CAH and establish a recently recognized human endocrine disorder. PMID:25654062

  1. Plasma catecholamines during an ultrarapid heroin detoxification.

    PubMed

    Macedo, T R; Relvas, J; Fontes Ribeiro CA; Pacheco, F; Morgadinho, M T; Pinto, C M; Gomes, P C; Ventura, M; Henriques, V; Nunes, S V; Ruis, G R; Ramalheira, C; Boto, I; Vale, L L

    2000-09-01

    The adrenergic system has long been known to be activated in a situation of stress and thus during opiate withdrawal. A method for detoxification that decreases the stimulation of the sympathetic nervous system will prevent changes of catecholamine levels. Some of such methods have been developed. One of them uses direct transition from heroin to oral naltrexone after deep sedation with midazolam in conjunction with naloxone, droperidol, ondansetron, and clonidine treatment for 24 hours. Can such method prevent adrenergic changes? Moreover, 5-HT has been related to mood disorders. This study aims to determine plasma catecholamines and 5-HT before heroin withdrawal, during the day of the withdrawal, and at the ends of the first day, the first week, and the first 6 months. Forty-three patients with more than 6 years of drug abuse volunteered to seek help to detoxify. After clinical evaluation, blood samples were taken. Plasma catecholamines were isolated by standard alumina procedures and measured by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Only for NE was there a significant decrease in the day of heroin withdrawal with deep sedation, followed the next day by an increase. During the following days, NE plasma concentrations returned slowly to basal levels. Epinephrine and dopamine plasma levels did not significantly change. Platelet 5-HT levels progressively decreased from the day before detoxification until the last period of observation. We also found that there were no abrupt changes in cardiovascular functions. In conclusion, our results suggest that this type of ultrarapid opiate detoxification prevents the dramatic activation of the autonomic nervous system.

  2. Renal and adrenal tumors: Pathology, radiology, ultrasonography, therapy, immunology

    SciTech Connect

    Lohr, E.; Leder, L.D.

    1987-01-01

    Aspects as diverse as radiology, pathology, urology, pediatrics and immunology have been brought together in one book. The most up-do-date methods of tumor diagnosis by CT, NMR, and ultrasound are covered, as are methods of catheter embolization and radiation techniques in case of primarily inoperable tumors. Contents: Pathology of Renal and Adrenal Neoplasms; Ultrasound Diagnosis of Renal and Pararenal Tumors; Computed-Body-Tomography of Renal Carcinoma and Perirenal Masses; Magnetic Resonance Imaging of Renal Mass Lesions; I-125 Embolotherapy of Renal Tumors; Adrenal Mass Lesions in Infants and Children; Computed Tomography of the Adrenal Glands; Scintigraphic Studies of Renal and Adrenal Function; Surgical Management of Renal Cell Carcinoma; Operative Therapy of Nephroblastoma; Nonoperative Treatment of Renal Cell Carcinoma; Prenatal Wilms' Tumor; Congenital Neuroblastoma; Nonsurgical Management of Wilms' Tumor; Immunologic Aspects of Malignant Renal Disease.

  3. Nitric oxide plays a role in the regulation of adrenal blood flow and adrenocorticomedullary functions in the llama fetus

    PubMed Central

    Riquelme, Raquel A; Sánchez, Gina; Liberona, Leonel; Sanhueza, Emilia M; Giussani, Dino A; Blanco, Carlos E; Hanson, Mark A; Llanos, Aníbal J

    2002-01-01

    The hypothesis that nitric oxide plays a key role in the regulation of adrenal blood flow and plasma concentrations of cortisol and catecholamines under basal and hypoxaemic conditions in the llama fetus was tested. At 0.6-0.8 of gestation, 11 llama fetuses were surgically prepared for long-term recording under anaesthesia with vascular and amniotic catheters. Following recovery all fetuses underwent an experimental protocol based on 1 h of normoxaemia, 1 h of hypoxaemia and 1 h of recovery. In nine fetuses, the protocol occurred during fetal i.v. infusion with saline and in five fetuses during fetal i.v. treatment with the nitric oxide synthase inhibitor l-NAME. Adrenal blood flow was determined by the radiolabelled microsphere method during each of the experimental periods during saline infusion and treatment with l-NAME. Treatment with l-NAME during normoxaemia led to a marked fall in adrenal blood flow and a pronounced increase in plasma catecholamine concentrations, but it did not affect plasma ACTH or cortisol levels. In saline-infused fetuses, acute hypoxaemia elicited an increase in adrenal blood flow and in plasma ACTH, cortisol, adrenaline and noradrenaline concentrations. Treatment with l-NAME did not affect the increase in fetal plasma ACTH, but prevented the increments in adrenal blood flow and in plasma cortisol and adrenaline concentrations during hypoxaemia in the llama fetus. In contrast, l-NAME further enhanced the increase in fetal plasma noradrenaline. These data support the hypothesis that nitric oxide has important roles in the regulation of adrenal blood flow and adrenal corticomedullary functions during normoxaemia and hypoxaemia functions in the late gestation llama fetus. PMID:12356897

  4. The Effects of Insulin-Induced Hypoglycaemia on Tyrosine Hydroxylase Phosphorylation in Rat Brain and Adrenal Gland.

    PubMed

    Senthilkumaran, Manjula; Johnson, Michaela E; Bobrovskaya, Larisa

    2016-07-01

    In this study we investigated the effects of insulin-induced hypoglycaemia on tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) protein and TH phosphorylation in the adrenal gland, C1 cell group, locus coeruleus (LC) and midbrain dopaminergic cell groups that are thought to play a role in response to hypoglycaemia and compared the effects of different concentrations of insulin in rats. Insulin (1 and 10 U/kg) treatment caused similar reductions in blood glucose concentration (from 7.5-9 to 2-3 mmol/L); however, plasma adrenaline concentration was increased 20-30 fold in response to 10 U/kg insulin and only 14 fold following 1 U/kg. Time course studies (at 10 U/kg insulin) revealed that in the adrenal gland, Ser31 phosphorylation was increased between 30 and 90 min (4-5 fold), implying that TH was activated to increase catecholamine synthesis in adrenal medulla to replenish the stores. In the brain, Ser19 phosphorylation was limited to certain dopaminergic groups in the midbrain, while Ser31 phosphorylation was increased in most catecholaminergic regions at 60 min (1.3-2 fold), suggesting that Ser31 phosphorylation may be an important mechanism to maintain catecholamine synthesis in the brain. Comparing the effects of 1 and 10 U/kg insulin revealed that Ser31 phosphorylation was increased to similar extent in the adrenal gland and C1 cell group in response to both doses whereas Ser31 and Ser19 phosphorylation were only increased in response to 1 U/kg insulin in LC and in response to 10 U/kg insulin in most midbrain regions. Thus, the adrenal gland and some catecholaminergic brain regions become activated in response to insulin administration and brain catecholamines may be important for initiation of physiological defences against insulin-induced hypoglycaemia.

  5. Posttranscriptional regulation of adrenal TH gene expression contributes to the maladaptive responses triggered by insulin-induced recurrent hypoglycemia.

    PubMed

    Kudrick, Necla; Chan, Owen; La Gamma, Edmund F; Kim, Juhye Lena; Tank, Arnold William; Sterling, Carol; Nankova, Bistra B

    2015-02-01

    Acute metabolic stress such as insulin-induced hypoglycemia triggers a counterregulatory response during which the release of catecholamines (epinephrine), the activation of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) enzyme and subsequent compensatory catecholamine biosynthesis occur in the adrenal medulla. However, recurrent exposure to hypoglycemia (RH), a consequence of tight glycemic control in individuals with type 1 and type 2 diabetes compromises this physiological response. The molecular mechanisms underlying the maladaptive response to repeated glucose deprivation are incompletely understood. We hypothesize that impaired epinephrine release following RH reflects altered regulation of adrenal catecholamine biosynthesis. To test this hypothesis, we compared the effect of single daily (RH) and twice-daily episodes of insulin-induced hypoglycemia (2RH) on adrenal epinephrine release and production in normal rats. Control animals received saline injections under similar conditions (RS and 2RS, respectively). Following 3 days of treatment, we assessed the counterregulatory hormonal responses during a hypoglycemic clamp. Changes in adrenal TH gene expression were also analyzed. The counterregulatory responses, relative TH transcription and TH mRNA levels and Ser40-TH phosphorylation (marker for enzyme activation) were induced to a similar extent in RS, 2RS, and RH groups. In contrast, epinephrine and glucagon responses were attenuated in the 2RH group and this was associated with a limited elevation of adrenal TH mRNA, rapid inactivation of TH enzyme and no significant changes in TH protein. Our results suggest that novel posttranscriptional mechanisms controlling TH mRNA and activated TH enzyme turnover contribute to the impaired epinephrine responses and may provide new therapeutic targets to prevent HAAF.

  6. Time-Course of Release of Catecholamines from Individual Vesicles During Exocytosis at Adrenal Medullary Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-10-12

    microelectrodes. Two electrochemical techniques were employed: cyclic voltammetry and amperometry. Spikes obtained by amperometry had a faster time course than...those measured by cyclic voltammetry , consistent with the different concentration profiles established by each technique. However, the experimental data

  7. Development of adrenal cortex zonation.

    PubMed

    Xing, Yewei; Lerario, Antonio M; Rainey, William; Hammer, Gary D

    2015-06-01

    The human adult adrenal cortex is composed of the zona glomerulosa (zG), zona fasciculata (zF), and zona reticularis (zR), which are responsible for production of mineralocorticoids, glucocorticoids, and adrenal androgens, respectively. The final completion of cortical zonation in humans does not occur until puberty with the establishment of the zR and its production of adrenal androgens; a process called adrenarche. The maintenance of the adrenal cortex involves the centripetal displacement and differentiation of peripheral Sonic hedgehog-positive progenitors cells into zG cells that later transition to zF cells and subsequently zR cells.

  8. [Sonography of the adrenal glands].

    PubMed

    Rüeger, R

    2005-03-02

    In the abdominal ultrasonography, the representation of normal adrenal glands is frequently problematic, also for experienced practitioners in ultrasonography. During a seminary at the congress of the SGUM in Davos, in June 2004, it was specially entered to this problematic by anatomical illustrations and live demonstrations. These statements will be summarized in the following article. Also, the technics of examination of the adrenal glands will be explained, especially in comparison to anatomical cut-preparations. It will be entered to particular pathological statements of the adrenal glands. The proceeding will be described by the localisation of accidentally detected tumours of adrenal glands.

  9. Adrenal medulla imaging agents: a structure-distribution relationship study of radiolabeled aralkylguanidines

    SciTech Connect

    Wieland, D.M.; Mangner, T.J.; Inbasekaran, M.N.; Brown, L.E.; Wu, J.L.

    1984-02-01

    Fourteen /sup 125/I-labeled aralkylguanidines were synthesized and evaluated as potential imaging agents for the adrenal medullae and tumors of adrenomedullary origin. These guanidines are radiotracer analogues of guanethidine, an antihypertensive agent thought to mediate neuron blockade by uptake into adrenergic nerves. Dog adrenal medullae were used as a model to test radiotracer affinity for catecholamine storage tissue. Tissue distribution studies revealed that a number of radioiodinated guanidines showed pronounced localization in the adrenal medullae following intravenous injection, in certain cases exceeding that of either (-)-(/sup 3/H)norepinephrine or (/sup 14/C)guanethidine. (m-(/sup 125/I)Iodobenzyl)guanidine (m-IBG, 2b) gave the best combination of high concentration and selectivity. The low adrenomedullary affinity observed with (/sup 14/C)guanidine and m-(/sup 125/I)iodobenzylamine demonstrates the uniqueness of the aralkylguanidine structure. Preliminary evidence suggests that 2b is a storage analogue of norepinephrine. (/sup 125/I)2a is now being used clinically in imaging and radiotherapy of catecholamine tumors, such as pheochromocytoma.

  10. Endothelial Cells from Bovine Adrenal Medulla Develop Capillary-Like Growth Patterns in Culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Dipak K.; Ornberg, Richard L.; Youdim, Moussa B. H.; Heldman, Eli; Pollard, Harvey B.

    1985-07-01

    The endocrine barrier between chromaffin cells and the blood stream in the adrenal medulla is made of capillary endothelial cells. We have now succeeded in isolating endothelial cells from adrenal medullary tissue, which are probably derived from this barrier. These cells grow on plastic surfaces in the absence of special growth factors or collagen overlays and differentiate into organized structures quite similar to true capillaries. The cells contain factor VIII:R, a marker for endothelial cells, and form intercellular junctions characteristic of capillary endothelial cells. They also synthesize and secrete basal lamina structures and engage in transcytosis, a characteristic ultrastructural and functional combination of exocytosis and endocytosis across the thin endothelial cell processes. These endothelial cells can take up and deaminate catecholamines by A-type monoamine oxidase, an enzyme functionally distinct from the B-type monoamine oxidase found in chromaffin cells. These data indicate that the chromaffin cell and its endothelial cell neighbor may constitute the functional unit of catecholamine metabolism in the adrenal medulla.

  11. Carcinoembryonic antigen-producing adrenal adenoma resected using combined lateral and anterior transperitoneal laparoscopic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hori, Tomohide; Taniguchi, Kentaro; Kurata, Masashi; Nakamura, Kenji; Kato, Kenji; Ogura, Yoshifumi; Iwasaki, Makoto; Okamoto, Shinya; Yamakado, Koichiro; Yagi, Shintaro; Iida, Taku; Kato, Takuma; Saito, Kanako; Wang, Linan; Kawarada, Yoshifumi; Uemoto, Shinji

    2007-01-01

    A 74-year-old woman presented with symptoms consistent with hyperadrenocorticism and hyperca-techolaminism. She had a cushingoid appearance and her cortisol level was elevated. Her serum dopamine and noradrenalin levels were also elevated. Computed tomography detected a left adrenal mass measuring 3.5 cm × 3.0 cm in diameter. Metaiodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy was negative. Unexpectedly, the serum Serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) level was elevated. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography showed increased uptake in the adrenal tumor only, with a maximum standardized uptake value of 2.8. Selective venography and blood sampling revealed that the concentrations of cortisol, catecholamines and CEA were significantly elevated in the vein draining the tumor. A diagnosis of CEA-producing benign adenoma was made. After preoperative management, we performed a combined lateral and anterior transperitoneal laparoscopic adrenectomy. Her vital signs remained stable during surgery. Histopathological examination revealed a benign adenoma. Her cortisol, catecholamine and CEA levels normalized immediately after surgery. We present, to the best of our knowledge, the first case of CEA-producing adrenal adenoma, along with a review of the relevant literature, and discuss our laparoscopic surgery techniques. PMID:18023107

  12. Traumatic and non-traumatic adrenal emergencies.

    PubMed

    Chernyak, Victoria; Patlas, Michael N; Menias, Christine O; Soto, Jorge A; Kielar, Ania Z; Rozenblit, Alla M; Romano, Luigia; Katz, Douglas S

    2015-12-01

    Multiple traumatic and non-traumatic adrenal emergencies are occasionally encountered during the cross-sectional imaging of emergency department patients. Traumatic adrenal hematomas are markers of severe polytrauma, and can be easily overlooked due to multiple concomitant injuries. Patients with non-traumatic adrenal emergencies usually present to an emergency department with a non-specific clinical picture. The detection and management of adrenal emergencies is based on cross-sectional imaging. Adrenal hemorrhage, adrenal infection, or rupture of adrenal neoplasm require immediate detection to avoid dire consequences. More often however, adrenal emergencies are detected incidentally in patients being investigated for non-specific acute abdominal pain. A high index of suspicion is required for the establishment of timely diagnosis and to avert potentially life-threatening complications. We describe cross-sectional imaging findings in patients with traumatic and non-traumatic adrenal hemorrhage, adrenal infarctions, adrenal infections, and complications of adrenal masses.

  13. [Catecholamines and their metabolic enzymes in the hypothalamus of rats after a flight on the Kosmos-782 biosatellite].

    PubMed

    Kvetnanský, R; Tigranian, R A; Torda, T; Babusiková, D; Jahnová, E

    1979-01-01

    The concentration of catecholamines, and activity of enzymes involved in their synthesis (tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine-beta-hydroxylase) and degradation (monoamine oxidase) were measured in the hypothalamus of rats flown for 19.5 days aboard the biosatellite Cosmos-782, synchronous and vivarium controls sacrificed on R+O and R+25 days. No significant changes in the above parameters of the flight rats were found. The findings give evidence that a prolonged space flight induces no changes in the content, synthesis or degradation of catecholamines in the rat hypothalamus. This seems to indicate that weightlessness does not act as an acute stressor.

  14. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis function during perinatal depression.

    PubMed

    Gelman, Phillipe Leff; Flores-Ramos, Mónica; López-Martínez, Margarita; Fuentes, Carlos Cruz; Grajeda, Juan Pablo Reyes

    2015-06-01

    Abnormal function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is an important pathological finding in pregnant women exhibiting major depressive disorder. They show high levels of cortisol pro-inflammatory cytokines, hypothalamic-pituitary peptide hormones and catecholamines, along with low dehydroepiandrosterone levels in plasma. During pregnancy, the TH2 balance together with the immune system and placental factors play crucial roles in the development of the fetal allograft to full term. These factors, when altered, may generate a persistent dysfunction of the HPA axis that may lead to an overt transfer of cortisol and toxicity to the fetus at the expense of reduced activity of placental 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2. Epigenetic modifications also may contribute to the dysregulation of the HPA axis. Affective disorders in pregnant women should be taken seriously, and therapies focused on preventing the deleterious effects of stressors should be implemented to promote the welfare of both mother and baby.

  15. Diagnostic value of biochemical parameters in the differential diagnosis of an adrenal mass.

    PubMed

    Petersenn, Stephan; Unger, Nicole; Walz, Martin K; Mann, Klaus

    2006-08-01

    In patients with an adrenal mass, hormonally active tumors including pheochromocytomas as well as aldosterone- and cortisol-secreting adenomas need to be considered. Several studies have demonstrated that metanephrines, which are the metabolites of catecholamines, are reliable parameters for the diagnosis of pheochromocytoma. In patients with an adrenal mass, we found plasma metanephrines, measured by a newly available radioimmunoassay, to be highly sensitive and specific for pheochromocytomas, with a better accuracy than any other biochemical parameter. The plasma aldosterone concentration (PAC) to plasma renin activity (PRA) ratio is an established screening tool for primary hyperaldosteronism. However, determination of active renin concentration (ARC) in contrast to PRA may offer advantages in regard to processing and standardization. We found a PAC to ARC ratio of >62 in patients with PAC levels>200 ng/L to be a reliable screening method for primary hyperaldosteronism in patients with adrenal masses. The screening for hypercortisolism relies on excess urinary cortisol secretion, loss of the physiological feedback during dexamethasone challenge, and loss of the circadian rhythm. Because urinary-free cortisol may not identify subclinical Cushing's syndrome, in which hypercortisolism is still mild, the 1-mg dexamethasone suppression test has been recommended in all patients with incidentally detected masses. Alternatively, late-night cortisol levels in saliva have been found to have a high sensitivity and specificity for the diagnosis of Cushing's syndrome. In summary, in patients with an adrenal mass, hormonally active adrenal tumors can be excluded with high certainty using a few highly reliable biochemical parameters.

  16. Angiotensin II binding to cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells: identification of angiotensin II receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, V.L.; Printz, M.P.

    1986-03-05

    Physiological experiments have provided evidence that angiotensin II stimulates catecholamine secretion from the adrenal gland. Their laboratory and others have now shown by receptor autoradiography the presence of angiotensin II receptors (AIIR) in bovine and rat adrenal medulla. In order to extend these studies they have undertaken to define AIIR on cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells. Cells were isolated using the method of Levitt including cell enrichment with Percoll gradient centrifugation. Primary cultures of bovine adrenal medullary cells were maintained in DME/F12 medium containing 10% FCS. Cells were characterized by immunocytochemistry for Met- and Leu-enkephalin, PNMT, DBH and Chromagranin A. Cultured cells bind with high affinity and specificity (/sup 125/I)-ANG II yielding a K/sub D/ of 0.74 nM and B/sub max/ of 24,350 sites/cell. After Percoll treatment values of .77 nm and 34,500 sites/cell are obtained. K/sub D/ values are in close agreement with that obtained in adrenal slices by Healy. Competition studies identify a rank order of binding by this receptor similar to that of other tissues. They conclude that cultured chromaffin cells provide a suitable model system for the investigation and characterization of the ANG II receptor and for cellular studies of its functional significance.

  17. Ultrastructural findings in adrenal cortical adenomas clinically mimicking pheochromocytoma: a comparison with other adrenal tumors and tissue preparation techniques.

    PubMed

    Perrino, Carmen M; Prall, David N; Calomeni, Edward P; Nadasdy, Tibor; Zynger, Debra L

    2012-10-01

    Adrenal cortical tumors clinically mimicking pheochromocytomas are extremely rare, with 14 cases in the literature. The authors describe 2 patients with adrenal cortical adenoma (ACA) and catecholamine elevations. The impact of tissue preparation methods on electron microscopy (EM) images was assessed in ACA mimicking pheochromocytoma, pheochromocytoma, and ACA lacking pheochromocytoma-like symptoms. Ten adrenal cortical tumors were examined using EM after a variety of tissue preparation techniques, including fixation with glutaraldehyde, formalin for varying lengths of time followed by glutaraldehyde, and/or formalin followed by paraffin embedding. Electron micrographs were assessed for image quality and the presence of dense secretory granules and eccentric, norepinephrine (NE)-type granules. Images created from tissue fixed in glutaraldehyde and/or formalin and embedded in resin were of good quality, while those derived from paraffin-embedded specimens were poor with disrupted cellular architecture. When pheochromocytoma was fixed in glutaraldehyde for 24 h or in formalin for 8 days, eccentric granules were identified. These granules were absent when tissue was fixed in formalin for 20 days or was obtained from a paraffin block. ACA without pheochromocytoma-like symptoms and ACA mimicking pheochromocytoma both had noneccentric dense-core granules on EM regardless of tissue preparation, and eccentric NE-type granules were absent. ACA is a rare cause of pheochromocytoma-like symptoms. These tumors lack eccentric, NE-type dense-core granules present in pheochromocytoma. Glutaraldehyde alone or formalin fixation followed by glutaraldehyde produces electron micrographs that may aid in the diagnosis of adrenal cortical tumors, whereas formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue results in images that are inadequate.

  18. Identification and characterization of an angiotensin II receptor on cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells

    SciTech Connect

    Boyd, V.L.

    1987-01-01

    The presence of an angiotensin II receptor on cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells was demonstrated by radioligand binding. A single class of finding sites with a K/sub D/ of 0.7 nM was characterized. The use of radioligands also allows the localization of receptors by autoradiography. Autoradiography demonstrated that approximately 50% of the isolated cells bound angiotensin II. It was of interest to see if angiotensin II bound to a cell that possessed a certain phenotype. In order to evaluate this possibility a technique was developed that combined autoradiography and immunocytochemistry. Results indicated that angiotensin II binding sites were not localized preferentially to either norepinephrine or epinephrine cells. Binding of angiotensin II was associated with the release of intracellular catecholamine stores. Cells were pre-loaded with /sup 3/H-norepinephrine and secretion was monitored by following radioactivity released into the supernatant. Alternatively, release of endogenous catecholamines was determined by fluorometric assay.

  19. Intraoperative hypertensive crisis due to a catecholamine-secreting esthesioneuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Salmasi, Vafi; Schiavi, Adam; Binder, Zev A.; Ruzevick, Jacob; Orr, Brent A.; Burger, Peter C.; Ball, Douglas W.; Blitz, Ari M.; Koch, Wayne M.; Ishii, Masaru; Gallia, Gary L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Although uncommon, esthesioneuroblastomas may produce clinically significant amounts of catecholamines. Methods We report a patient with a catecholamine-secreting esthesioneuroblastoma who developed intraoperative hypertensive crisis. Results A patient with history of hypertension was referred to our skull base center for management of a residual esthesioneuroblastoma. A staged endonasal endoscopic approach was planned. At the conclusion of the first stage, a hypertensive crisis occurred. Work-up revealed elevated levels of serum and urinary catecholamines. The patient was treated with alpha adrenoceptor blockade prior to the second stage. Serum catecholamine levels following this second stage were normal. On immunohistochemical analysis, the tumor cells were found to be positive for tyrosine hydroxylase, the rate limiting enzyme in cathecholamine synthesis, and achaete-scute homologue 1, a transcription factor essential in the development of olfactory and sympathetic neurons. Conclusion Catecholamine production should be considered in the differential of unexpected extreme hypertension during surgical resection of esthesioneuroblastoma. PMID:25352487

  20. Nanomechanics of Poly(catecholamine) Coatings in Aqueous Solutions.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chanoong; Huang, Jun; Kim, Sunjin; Lee, Haeshin; Zeng, Hongbo; Hwang, Dong Soo

    2016-03-01

    Mussel-inspired self-polymerized catecholamine coatings have been widely utilized as a versatile coating strategy that can be applied to a variety of substrates. For the first time, nanomechanical measurements and an evaluation of the contribution of primary amine groups to poly(catecholamine) coatings have been conducted using a surface-forces apparatus. The adhesive strength between the poly(catecholamine) layers is 30-times higher than that of a poly(catechol) coating. The origin of the strong attraction between the poly(catecholamine) layers is probably due to surface salt displacement by the primary amine, π-π stacking (the quadrupole-quadrupole interaction of indolic crosslinks), and cation-π interactions (the monopole-quadrupole interaction between positively charged amine groups and the indolic crosslinks). The contribution of the primary amine group to the catecholamine coating is vital for the design and development of mussel-inspired catechol-based coating materials.

  1. Functional atrial natriuretic peptide receptor in human adrenal tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Shionoiri, H.; Hirawa, N.; Takasaki, I.; Ishikawa, Y.; Oda, H.; Minamisawa, K.; Sugimoto, K.; Matsukawa, T.; Ueda, S.; Miyajima, E.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of synthetic human atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) on the release of catecholamines, aldosterone, or cortisol were observed in human adrenal tumors obtained surgically from patients with pheochromocytoma, primary aldosteronism, or Cushing's syndrome, respectively. Each tumor tissue or adjacent normal cortical tissue was sectioned into slices, which were incubated in medium-199 in the presence or absence of adrenocorticotrophin (ACTH) and ANP. The amounts of epinephrine, norepinephrine, aldosterone, or cortisol released into the medium were measured. Existence of ANP receptors on the adrenal tissues was examined by binding assays, affinity labeling, and immunohistochemistry. Release of catecholamines from pheochromocytoma tissues was inhibited by ANP, and the presence of the ANP receptor on pheochromocytoma was further demonstrated by both binding assays and affinity labeling; Scatchard analysis revealed a single class of binding sites for ANP with a Kd of 1.0 nM and a Bmax of 0.4 pmol/mg of protein and the molecular size was estimated as 140 and a 70 kDa under nonreducing and reducing conditions, respectively. The presence of ANP receptors in pheochromocytoma was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry. ANP inhibited both basal and ACTH-stimulated aldosterone secretion in the slices of normal cortex, and localization of ANP receptors in zona glomerulosa cells was also demonstrated. However, ANP did not inhibit basal and ACTH-stimulated aldosterone and cortisol secretion in both tissue slices from aldosteronoma and Cushing's adenoma. Consistent with these observations, the absence of ANP receptors in adenoma tissues was determined by binding assays, affinity labeling, and immunohistochemistry.

  2. Training status (endurance or sprint) and catecholamine response to the Wingate-test in women.

    PubMed

    Jacob, C; Zouhal, H; Vincent, S; Gratas-Delamarche, A; Berthon, P M; Bentué-Ferrer, D; Delamarche, P

    2002-07-01

    The aim of this study was to verify if, as for men, training status induces different catecholamine responses to exercise. To do this, we investigated the effect of training status (sprint or endurance) on plasma catecholamine response to a supramaximal exercise in women. Nineteen subjects took part in our study: six untrained subjects (UT), seven endurance trained subjects (ET) and six sprint trained ones (ST). The trained subjects (ET and ST) were all competing at a high national level. The maximal power (W max ) and the mean power (W) were determined from the Wingate-test. Blood lactate, adrenaline (A) and noradrenaline (NA) were analysed at rest (La 0, A 0 and NA 0 ), immediately at the end of the exercise (A max and NA max ) and after 5 min recovery (La max [3 min in arterialized blood], A 5 and NA 5 ). The disappearance of A and NA was judged by the ratio (A max -A 5 )/A max and (NA max -NA 5 )/NA 5. The ratio A max /NA max was considered as an index of the adrenal medulla responsiveness to the sympathetic nervous activity. As expected, during the Wingate-test ST exhibited significantly higher performances compared to UT and ET. But in contrast to the men's data no difference was observed between the three groups both for La max (13.1 +/- 0.8 mmol x L (-1); 14.8 +/- 1.0 mmol x L (-1) and 11.2 +/- 0.5 mmol x L (-1) respectively for ET, ST and UT), NA max (22.1 +/- 1.2 nmol x L (-1); 13.1 +/- 2.4 nmol x L (-1) and 20.2 +/- 7 nmol x L (-1)respectively for ET, ST and UT) and A max (4.1 +/- 0.8 nmol x L (-1); 2.6 +/- 0.6 nmol x L (-1); 13.1 +/- 0.6 nmol x L (-1) respectively for ET, ST and UT). Consequently the ratio A max /NA max was similar in UT, ET and ST (respectively 0.2 +/- 0.03; 0.2 +/- 0.04; 0.17 +/- 0.04), These results indicated, in contrast to the men's data, that the catecholamine response to the Wingate-test did not differ between female subjects of different status of training. In conclusion this study did not find any significant effect of training

  3. Plasma and urine catecholamine levels in cosmonauts during long-term stay on Space Station Salyut-7

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kvetn̆anský, R.; Davydova, N. A.; Noskov, V. B.; Vigas̆, M.; Popova, I. A.; Us̆akov, A. C.; Macho, L.; Grigoriev, A. I.

    The activity of the sympathetic adrenal system in cosmonauts exposed to a stay in space lasting for about half a year has so far been studied only by measuring catecholamine levels in plasma and urine samples taken before space flight and after landing. The device "Plasma 01", specially designed for collecting and processing venous blood from subjects during space flight on board the station Salyut-7 rendered it possible for the first time to collect and freeze samples of blood from cosmonauts in the course of a long-term 237-day space flight. A physician-cosmonaut collected samples of blood and urine from two cosmonauts over the period of days 217-219 of their stay in space. The samples were transported to Earth frozen. As indicators of the sympathetic adrenal system activity, plasma and urine concentrations of epinephrine and norepinephrine as well as urine levels of the catecholamine metabolites metanephrine, normetanephrine, and vanillylmandelic acid were determined before, during and after space flight. On days 217-219 of space flight plasma epinephrine and norepinephrine levels were slightly increased, yet not substantially different from normal. During stress situations plasma norepinephrine and epinephrine levels usually exhibit a manifold increase. On days 217-219 of space flight norepinephrine and epinephrine levels in urine were comparable with pre-flight values and the levels of their metabolites were even significantly decreased. All the parameters studied, particularly plasma norepinephrine as well as urine norepinephrine, normetanephrine, and vanillylmandelic acid, reached the highest values 8 days after landing. The results obtained suggest that, in the period of days 217-219 of the cosmonauts' stay in space in the state of weightlessness, the sympathetic adrenal system is either not activated at all or there is but a slight activation induced by specific activities of the cosmonauts, whereas in the process of re-adaptation after space flight on

  4. Primary malignant hepatic pheochromocytoma with negative adrenal scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Homma, Koichiro; Hayashi, Koichi; Wakino, Shu; Irie, Rie; Mukai, Makio; Kumagai, Hiroo; Shibata, Hirotaka; Saruta, Takao

    2006-07-01

    A 60-year-old male patient with hypertension was referred to our hospital because of insufficient blood pressure control (190/98 mmHg) and to rule out secondary hypertension. A computed tomography scan revealed no adrenal tumor but a large liver mass (5 x 5 cm), and magnetic resonance imaging showed a high signal intensity lesion on the T2-weighted image. Twenty-four hour urinary excretion of catecholamine metabolites was markedly increased, although a 123I-metaiodobenzyl guanidine (MIBG) scintigram failed to show accumulation in the hepatic mass, and no difference was noted between the catecholamine concentration in the tumor-drainage vein and that obtained from the vein draining from the non-tumor area. Liver biopsy did show features compatible with pheochromocytoma (i.e., chromogranin A-positive cells). Transcatheter arterial embolization of the liver tumor was conducted and resulted in a marked (50%) decrease in the 24-h urine normetanephrine excretion. Several metastatic foci were noted in the spinal bone and transcatheter arterial embolization (TAE) was also conducted with successful results. Thus, we experienced a case of primary malignant hepatic pheochromocytoma with negative 123I-MIBG scanning.

  5. [Adrenal carcinoma induced hypoglycemia].

    PubMed

    Soutelo, Jimena; Saban, Melina; Borghi Torzillo, Florencia; Lutfi, Ruben; Leal Reyna, Mariela

    2013-01-01

    Adrenal carcinoma is a rare malignancy of poor prognosis. The most common clinical presentation is secondary to hormone production, while the development of symptomatic hypoglycemia is exceptional. We report the case of a 37 year old-woman admitted to hospital with severe hypoglycemia, hypertension, hypokalemia and amenorrhea. In the laboratory we found hypoglycemia, with low insulin levels, and androgen levels in tumor range. CT of abdomen and pelvis showed a heterogeneous lesion of solid appearance without a cleavage plane relative to liver parenchyma, and intense contrast enhancement. Retroperitoneal mass was removed, and the patient evolved without complications, blood glucose and potassium were normalized, blood pressure stabilized and menstrual cycles recovered.

  6. Real-time monitoring of electrically evoked catecholamine signals in the songbird striatum using in vivo fast-scan cyclic voltammetry

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Amanda R.; Garris, Paul A.; Casto, Joseph M.

    2015-01-01

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry is a powerful technique for monitoring rapid changes in extracellular neurotransmitter levels in the brain. In vivo fast-scan cyclic voltammetry has been used extensively in mammalian models to characterize dopamine signals in both anesthetized and awake preparations, but has yet to be applied to a non-mammalian vertebrate. The goal of this study was to establish in vivo fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in a songbird, the European starling, to facilitate real-time measurements of extracellular catecholamine levels in the avian striatum. In urethane-anesthetized starlings, changes in catecholamine levels were evoked by electrical stimulation of the ventral tegmental area and measured at carbon-fiber microelectrodes positioned in the medial and lateral striata. Catecholamines were elicited by different stimulations, including trains related to phasic dopamine signaling in the rat, and were analyzed to quantify presynaptic mechanisms governing exocytotic release and neuronal uptake. Evoked extracellular catecholamine dynamics, maximal amplitude of the evoked catecholamine signal, and parameters for catecholamine release and uptake did not differ between striatal regions and were similar to those determined for dopamine in the rat dorsomedial striatum under similar conditions. Chemical identification of measured catecholamine by its voltammogram was consistent with the presence of both dopamine and norepinephrine in striatal tissue content. However, the high ratio of dopamine to norepinephrine in tissue content and the greater sensitivity of the carbon-fiber microelectrode to dopamine compared to norepinephrine favored the measurement of dopamine. Thus, converging evidence suggests that dopamine was the predominate analyte of the electrically evoked catecholamine signal measured in the striatum by fast-scan cyclic voltammetry. Overall, comparisons between the characteristics of these evoked signals suggested a similar presynaptic regulation of

  7. Real-time monitoring of electrically evoked catecholamine signals in the songbird striatum using in vivo fast-scan cyclic voltammetry.

    PubMed

    Smith, Amanda R; Garris, Paul A; Casto, Joseph M

    2015-01-01

    Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry is a powerful technique for monitoring rapid changes in extracellular neurotransmitter levels in the brain. In vivo fast-scan cyclic voltammetry has been used extensively in mammalian models to characterize dopamine signals in both anesthetized and awake preparations, but has yet to be applied to a non-mammalian vertebrate. The goal of this study was to establish in vivo fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in a songbird, the European starling, to facilitate real-time measurements of extracellular catecholamine levels in the avian striatum. In urethane-anesthetized starlings, changes in catecholamine levels were evoked by electrical stimulation of the ventral tegmental area and measured at carbon-fiber microelectrodes positioned in the medial and lateral striata. Catecholamines were elicited by different stimulations, including trains related to phasic dopamine signaling in the rat, and were analyzed to quantify presynaptic mechanisms governing exocytotic release and neuronal uptake. Evoked extracellular catecholamine dynamics, maximal amplitude of the evoked catecholamine signal, and parameters for catecholamine release and uptake did not differ between striatal regions and were similar to those determined for dopamine in the rat dorsomedial striatum under similar conditions. Chemical identification of measured catecholamine by its voltammogram was consistent with the presence of both dopamine and norepinephrine in striatal tissue content. However, the high ratio of dopamine to norepinephrine in tissue content and the greater sensitivity of the carbon-fiber microelectrode to dopamine compared to norepinephrine favored the measurement of dopamine. Thus, converging evidence suggests that dopamine was the predominate analyte of the electrically evoked catecholamine signal measured in the striatum by fast-scan cyclic voltammetry. Overall, comparisons between the characteristics of these evoked signals suggested a similar presynaptic regulation of

  8. Pharmacological characterization and autoradiographic localization of dopamine receptors in the rat adrenal medulla.

    PubMed

    Barili, P; Zaccheo, D; Amenta, F

    1996-08-29

    The pharmacological profile and the anatomical localization of dopamine D1-like and D2-like receptors were studied in sections of rat adrenal medulla, with radioligand binding and autoradiographic techniques, respectively. [3H]([R]-(+)-chloro-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-5-phenyl-1 H-3benzazepin-al hemimaleate) (SCH 23390) was used as a ligand for dopamine D1-like receptors and [3H]spiperone was used as a ligand for dopamine D2-like receptors. Radioligand binding and light microscope autoradiography did not show specific [3H]SCH 23390 binding in sections of rat adrenal medulla. This suggests that rat adrenal medulla does not express dopamine D1-like receptors. [3H]Spiperone was specifically bound to sections of rat adrenal medulla. The binding was time-, temperature- and concentration-dependent, with a dissociation constant (Kd) of 1.05 nM and a maximum density of binding sites (Bmax) of 100.2 +/- 3.8 fmol/mg tissue. The pharmacological profile of [3H]spiperone binding to rat adrenal medulla was similar to that displayed by neostriatum, which is known to express dopamine D2 receptors. Light microscope autoradiography showed the accumulation of specifically bound [3H]spiperone as silver grains within sections of adrenal medulla. Silver grains were found primarily over the cellular membrane of chromaffin cells. The above data indicate that chromaffin cells of the rat adrenal medulla express dopamine receptors belonging to the dopamine D2 receptor subtype. These receptors are probably involved in the modulation of catecholamine release from chromaffin cells, as documented by functional studies.

  9. Dynamics for the storage control of a endocrine gland: A model for adrenal epinephrine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortez, Celia Martins; Neto, Antonio Pires; Motta, Art Adriel E. A.

    2016-12-01

    In this work, we are presenting a simple mathematical model to simulate the control dynamics of synthesis, storage and secretion in an endocrine gland. In this, the hormone normally is synthetized from material selected and removed from the blood. In cell, material is processed and the final product, the hormone, can be stored until being released to the blood. The model associates the classical theory enzymatic kinetics to Lotka-Volterra equations. To test the proposed model, we take as an example the regulation of catecholamine synthesis-storage-release in the adrenal medulla.

  10. Adrenal lymphangioma: clinicopathologic and immunohistochemical characteristics of a rare lesion.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Carla L; Banerjee, Priya; Carney, Erin; Sharma, Rajni; Netto, George J

    2011-07-01

    flattened, bland, simple lining. The cystic channels/spaces occasionally contained proteinaceous material and lacked red blood cell content. On immunohistochemical stains, D2-40 cytoplasmic staining was positive in all 9 examined lesions, whereas AE1/AE3 was negative, thus, confirming their lymphatic nature. D2-40 staining was diffuse in 2 and focal in the 7 remaining lesions. Adrenal lymphangiomas are very rare, benign lymphatic neoplasms with a female, right-sided predominance in our current series. They may clinically present with abdominal pain or can be incidentally found during adulthood as a mass, necessitating surgical removal to rule out other types of adrenal neoplasms.

  11. Catecholamines promote Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae growth by regulating iron metabolism.

    PubMed

    Li, Lu; Chen, Zhaohui; Bei, Weicheng; Su, Zhipeng; Huang, Qi; Zhang, Liang; Chen, Huanchun; Zhou, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Catecholamines are host stress hormones that can induce the growth of many bacteria by facilitating iron utilization and/or regulate the expression of virulence genes through specific hormone receptors. Whether these two responsive pathways are interconnected is unknown. In our previous study, it was found that catecholamines can regulate the expression of a great number of genes of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, an important swine respiratory pathogen. However, bacterial growth was not affected by catecholamines in rich medium. In this study, it was discovered that catecholamines affected A. pleuropneumoniae growth in chemically defined medium (CDM). We found that serum inhibited A. pleuropneumoniae growth in CDM, while epinephrine, norepinephrine and dopamine promoted A. pleuropneumoniae growth in the CDM containing serum. The known bacterial hormone receptor QseC didn't play roles in this process. Ion-supplementation and transcriptome analysis indicated that serum addition resulted in iron-restricted conditions which were alleviated by the addition of catecholamines. Transferrin, one of the components in serum, inhibited the growth of A. pleuropneumoniae in CDM, an effect reversed by addition of catecholamines in a TonB2-dependent manner. Our data demonstrate that catecholamines promote A. pleuropneumoniae growth by regulating iron-acquisition and metabolism, which is independent of the adrenergic receptor QseC.

  12. Effects of Altered Catecholamine Metabolism on Pigmentation and Physical Properties of Sclerotized Regions in the Silkworm Melanism Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaofan; He, Songzhen; Tong, Xiaoling; Wu, Songyuan; Hu, Hai; Wang, Rixin; Hu, Hongwei; Chen, Lushi; Zhang, Li; Wu, Jie; Dai, Fangyin; Lu, Cheng; Xiang, Zhonghuai

    2012-01-01

    Catecholamine metabolism plays an important role in the determination of insect body color and cuticle sclerotization. To date, limited research has focused on these processes in silkworm. In the current study, we analyzed the interactions between catecholamines and melanin genes and their effects on the pigmentation patterns and physical properties of sclerotized regions in silkworm, using the melanic mutant melanism (mln) silkworm strain as a model. Injection of β-alanine into mln mutant silkworm induced a change in catecholamine metabolism and turned its body color yellow. Further investigation of the catecholamine content and expression levels of the corresponding melanin genes from different developmental stages of Dazao-mln (mutant) and Dazao (wild-type) silkworm revealed that at the larval and adult stages, the expression patterns of melanin genes precipitated dopamine accumulation corresponding to functional loss of Bm-iAANAT, a repressive effect of excess NBAD on ebony, and upregulation of tan in the Dazao-mln strain. During the early pupal stage, dopamine did not accumulate in Dazao-mln, since upregulation of ebony and black genes led to conversion of high amounts of dopamine into NBAD, resulting in deep yellow cuticles. Scanning electron microscope analysis of a cross-section of adult dorsal plates from both wild-type and mutant silkworm disclosed the formation of different layers in Dazao-mln owing to lack of NADA, compared to even and dense layers in Dazao. Analysis of the mechanical properties of the anterior wings revealed higher storage modulus and lower loss tangent in Dazao-mln, which was closely associated with the altered catecholamine metabolism in the mutant strain. Based on these findings, we conclude that catecholamine metabolism is crucial for the color pattern and physical properties of cuticles in silkworm. Our results should provide a significant contribution to Lepidoptera cuticle tanning research. PMID:22937004

  13. [Lumbar pain and bilateral adrenal masses].

    PubMed

    García, Elena; Sánchez, Raquel; Martínez, Guillermo; Bernal, Carmen; Calatayud, M; Partida, M; Hawkins, Federico

    2009-05-01

    Many problems may arise when defining whether adrenal lesions are primary to the adrenal glands or represent other tissue, whether they are benign or malignant and whether they are functioning or nonfunctioning. Adrenal imaging complements the clinical and hormonal evaluation of these patients. We present a patient with lumbar pain and bilateral adrenal masses.

  14. Adrenal involvement in non-Hodgkin lymphoma

    SciTech Connect

    Paling, M.R.; Williamson, B.R.J.

    1983-08-01

    Adrenal masses are described in seven cases of non-Hodgkin lymphoma in a series of 173 patients. In all seven patients the lymphoma was diffuse rather than nodular. Three patients had adrenal masses at the time of presentation, whereas in four cases the adrenal gland was a site of tumor recurrence after therapy. Three patients had simultaneous bilateral adrenal involvement by tumor. No characteristic features were recognized that might have distinguished these tumors from other adrenal masses. Appropriate therapy successfully resolved the adrenal masses in all but one case. The latter patient was the only one with evidence of adrenal insufficiency.

  15. Adrenal and gonadal function in hypothyroid adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Tohei, A; Akai, M; Tomabechi, T; Mamada, M; Taya, K

    1997-01-01

    The functional relationship between thyroid, adrenal and gonadal hormones was investigated using adult male rats. Hypothyroidism was produced by the administration of 4-methyl-2-thiouracil (thiouracil) in the drinking water for 2 weeks. Plasma concentrations of TSH dramatically increased, whereas plasma concentrations of tri-iodothyronine and thyroxine decreased in thiouraciltreated rats as compared with euthyroid rats. Hypothyroidism increased basal levels of plasma ACTH and pituitary content of ACTH. The pituitary responsiveness to CRH for ACTH release markedly increased, whereas the adrenal responsiveness to ACTH for corticosterone release decreased. These results indicated that hypothyroidism causes adrenal dysfunction in adult male rats. Pituitary contents of LH and prolactin decreased in hypothyroid rats as compared with euthyroid rats. In addition, hypothyroidism lowered pituitary LH responsiveness to LHRH. Testicular responsiveness to human chorionic gonadotrophin for testosterone release, however, was not different between euthyroid and hypothyroid animals. These results indicated that hypothyroidism causes adrenal dysfunction and results in hypersecretion of ACTH from the pituitary gland. Adrenal dysfunction may contribute to the inhibition of LHRH secretion from the hypothalamus, possibly mediated by excess CRH.

  16. Catecholamines are required for androgen-induced ODC expression but not for hypertrophy of mouse kidney.

    PubMed

    Manteuffel-Cymborowska, M; Peska, M; Chmurzyńska, W; Grzelakowska-Sztabert, B

    1997-05-27

    Catecholamine depletion, evoked by reserpine, dramatically impaired (5-fold) the testosterone-induced increase of ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) activity in female mouse kidney. However, reserpine did not prevent kidney hypertrophy evoked by testosterone. This is evidenced by the activity of sensitive, biochemical markers of renal hypertrophy, namely arginase and ornithine aminotransferase (OAT), that responded with the increase and decrease of activities to testosterone treatment, respectively. Arginine and ornithine, substrates and/or products of marker enzymes, showed a striking homeostasis as their level was not affected by testosterone and reserpine, and only slightly by DFMO. Northern blot analysis revealed that the ODC mRNA level, that was increased 10-fold by testosterone, was decreased 2-fold in catecholamine-depleted hypertrophic kidney. Thus, ODC transcript level, lowered by reserpine, correlated partially with an attenuated response of ODC activity to testosterone. This was in contrast to DFMO, which inhibited ODC activity, but significantly increased its mRNA content. It is concluded that catecholamines could be involved together with testosterone in regulation of the ODC gene expression in mouse kidney.

  17. Early diagnosis of and surgical strategy for adrenal medullary disease in MEN II gene carriers

    SciTech Connect

    Jansson, S.; Tisell, L.E.; Fjaelling, M.L.; Lindberg, S.; Jacobsson, L.; Zachrisson, B.F.

    1988-01-01

    Sixteen multiple endocrine neoplasia type II (MEN II) gene carriers--12 who had undergone thyroidectomy because of medullary carcinoma of the thyroid and 4 whose thyroid glands had been removed because of C cell hyperplasia--were examined for the presence of pheochromocytomas. No patient had sought medical advice for pheochromocytoma symptoms. Fourteen patients had MEN IIa syndromes, one patient had a MEN IIb and another patient had a mixed syndrome of von Recklinghausen's neurofibromatosis and MEN II. Eight patients had undergone unilateral adrenalectomy for pheochromocytoma 11 +/- 4 years before. The patients underwent clinical examination, determination of the urinary excretion of catecholamines and metabolites, and /sup 131/I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (/sup 131/I-MIBG) and CAT scans. /sup 131/I-MIBG scanning was performed with images 1, 4, and 7 days after the radionuclide injection. In seven of eight patients who had undergone unilateral adrenalectomies, the /sup 131/I-MIBG scans showed accumulation of the radionuclide in the remaining adrenal gland. Bilateral adrenal accumulation of the radionuclide was demonstrated in seven of eight MEN IIa gene carriers who had not undergone adrenalectomy. Five patients, two of whom had undergone adrenalectomy, were found to have unilateral pheochromocytomas less than 2 cm in diameter. Only one of these five patients had an elevated excretion of urinary catecholamines. Between day 4 and day 7 after /sup 131/I-MIBG injection, adrenal glands with pheochromocytomas increased their relative accumulation of the radionuclide significantly more (p less than 0.02) than did adrenal glands without any demonstrable pheochromocytomas. All the pheochromocytomas were viewed by means of CAT scans.

  18. GABA Signaling and Neuroactive Steroids in Adrenal Medullary Chromaffin Cells

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Keita; Matsuoka, Hidetada; Fujihara, Hiroaki; Ueta, Yoichi; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Inoue, Masumi

    2016-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is produced not only in the brain, but also in endocrine cells by the two isoforms of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), GAD65 and GAD67. In rat adrenal medullary chromaffin cells only GAD67 is expressed, and GABA is stored in large dense core vesicles (LDCVs), but not synaptic-like microvesicles (SLMVs). The α3β2/3γ2 complex represents the majority of GABAA receptors expressed in rat and guinea pig chromaffin cells, whereas PC12 cells, an immortalized rat chromaffin cell line, express the α1 subunit as well as the α3. The expression of α3, but not α1, in PC12 cells is enhanced by glucocorticoid activity, which may be mediated by both the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and the glucocorticoid receptor (GR). GABA has two actions mediated by GABAA receptors in chromaffin cells: it induces catecholamine secretion by itself and produces an inhibition of synaptically evoked secretion by a shunt effect. Allopregnanolone, a neuroactive steroid which is secreted from the adrenal cortex, produces a marked facilitation of GABAA receptor channel activity. Since there are no GABAergic nerve fibers in the adrenal medulla, GABA may function as a para/autocrine factor in the chromaffin cells. This function of GABA may be facilitated by expression of the immature isoforms of GAD and GABAA receptors and the lack of expression of plasma membrane GABA transporters (GATs). In this review, we will consider how the para/autocrine function of GABA is achieved, focusing on the structural and molecular mechanisms for GABA signaling. PMID:27147972

  19. A potential benefit of albinism in Astyanax cavefish: downregulation of the oca2 gene increases tyrosine and catecholamine levels as an alternative to melanin synthesis.

    PubMed

    Bilandžija, Helena; Ma, Li; Parkhurst, Amy; Jeffery, William R

    2013-01-01

    Albinism, the loss of melanin pigmentation, has evolved in a diverse variety of cave animals but the responsible evolutionary mechanisms are unknown. In Astyanax mexicanus, which has a pigmented surface dwelling form (surface fish) and several albino cave-dwelling forms (cavefish), albinism is caused by loss of function mutations in the oca2 gene, which operates during the first step of the melanin synthesis pathway. In addition to albinism, cavefish have evolved differences in behavior, including feeding and sleep, which are under the control of the catecholamine system. The catecholamine and melanin synthesis pathways diverge after beginning with the same substrate, L-tyrosine. Here we describe a novel relationship between the catecholamine and melanin synthesis pathways in Astyanax. Our results show significant increases in L-tyrosine, dopamine, and norepinephrine in pre-feeding larvae and adult brains of Pachón cavefish relative to surface fish. In addition, norepinephrine is elevated in cavefish adult kidneys, which contain the teleost homologs of catecholamine synthesizing adrenal cells. We further show that the oca2 gene is expressed during surface fish development but is downregulated in cavefish embryos. A key finding is that knockdown of oca2 expression in surface fish embryos delays the development of pigmented melanophores and simultaneously increases L-tyrosine and dopamine. We conclude that a potential evolutionary benefit of albinism in Astyanax cavefish may be to provide surplus L-tyrosine as a precursor for the elevated catecholamine synthesis pathway, which could be important for adaptation to the challenging cave environment.

  20. The role of catecholamines in the production of ischaemia-induced ventricular arrhythmias in the rat in vivo and in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Daugherty, A.; Frayn, K. N.; Redfern, W. S.; Woodward, B.

    1986-01-01

    The role of catecholamines in the production of ischaemia-induced ventricular arrhythmias in vivo and in vitro was studied using coronary artery ligation in the rat. Increases in plasma catecholamine concentrations during coronary artery ligation in pentobarbitone-anaesthetized animals were prevented by either acute adrenalectomy or chronic adrenal demedullation, but these procedures did not protect against the occurrence of ventricular arrhythmias. Thus plasma catecholamines were not obligatory mediators of arrhythmogenesis. Three protocols were used in vitro to evaluate the possible influence of intramyocardial release of noradrenaline, produced by the local conditions of ischaemia, on the production of ventricular arrhythmias. During coronary artery ligation in isolated perfused hearts, no enhanced output of 3H could be detected from [3H]-noradrenaline loaded hearts, even in the presence of inhibitors of catecholamine uptake processes, although washout of lactate from ischaemic regions was readily demonstrable. Both optical isomers of propranolol were equally effective in reducing the incidence of arrhythmias, implying a non-specific effect, since the (+)-isomer possesses considerably less beta-adrenoceptor blocking activity. The equipotency of optical isomers of propranolol combined with a lack of effect of atenolol suggested that arrhythmia production was not a consequence of beta-adrenoceptor stimulation. The alpha-adrenoceptor blockers phentolamine and prazosin, both exerted antiarrhythmic actions of similar potency, but phenoxybenzamine and trimazosin had no significant effects. An evaluation of the pharmacological properties of the alpha-adrenoceptor blockers showed that those drugs which had demonstrable local anaesthetic properties also exerted significant antiarrhythmic effects. No relationship was found between potency of alpha-adrenoceptor blockade and antiarrhythmic efficacy. The overall conclusion from these multifaceted approaches was that

  1. Spontaneous proliferative lesions of the adrenal medulla in aging Long-Evans rats. Comparison to PC12 cells, small granule-containing cells, and human adrenal medullary hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Tischler, A S; DeLellis, R A; Perlman, R L; Allen, J M; Costopoulos, D; Lee, Y C; Nunnemacher, G; Wolfe, H J; Bloom, S R

    1985-10-01

    Aging rats of the Long-Evans strain spontaneously develop diffuse and nodular hyperplasia of the adrenal medulla in association with other abnormalities commonly encountered in human multiple endocrine neoplasia syndromes. The cells which comprise the adrenal nodules resemble those in the parent tumor of the rat PC12 pheochromocytoma cell line in that they show varying degrees of spontaneous or nerve growth factor-induced neurite outgrowth in culture and they contain little or no epinephrine. In addition, cells from at least some of the nodules contain immunoreactive neurotensin and neuropeptide-Y, which are also found in PC12 cells. There are a number of striking resemblances between the cells in adrenal nodules and the small granule-containing cells in the normal rodent adrenal. The findings suggest that spontaneous rat adrenal medullary nodules and PC12 cells might be derived from small granule-containing cells, or that cells within the nodules might regain properties of immature chromaffin cells and acquire characteristics of small granule-containing cells and of PC12 cells in the course of neoplastic progression. They further suggest a possible relationship between proliferative capacity and neurotransmitter phenotype in the adult rat adrenal medulla. By virtue of their sparse epinephrine content and their small granules, the cells in adrenal medullary nodules of Long-Evans rats differ from those in adrenal medullary nodules of humans with multiple endocrine neoplasia syndromes.

  2. Reversible catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy due to pheochromocytoma: case report.

    PubMed

    Satendra, Milan; de Jesus, Cláudia; Bordalo e Sá, Armando L; Rosário, Luís; Rocha, José; Bicha Castelo, Henrique; Correia, Maria José; Nunes Diogo, António

    2014-03-01

    Pheochromocytoma is a tumor originating from chromaffin tissue. It commonly presents with symptoms and signs of catecholamine excess, such as hypertension, tachycardia, headache and sweating. Cardiovascular manifestations include catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy, which may present as severe left ventricular dysfunction and congestive heart failure. We report a case of pheochromocytoma which was diagnosed following investigation of dilated cardiomyopathy. We highlight the dramatic symptomatic improvement and reversal of cardiomyopathy, with recovery of left ventricular function after treatment.

  3. Effects of intra-abdominal pressure on adrenal gland function and morphology in rats.

    PubMed

    Akkapulu, Nezih; Tirnaksiz, Mehmet Bulent; Kulac, Ibrahim; Tezel, Gaye Guler; Hayran, Mutlu; Dogrul, Ahmet Bulent; Cetinkaya, Erdinc; Yorganci, Kaya

    2015-01-01

    Intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome (IAH/ACS) are life-threatening conditions and caused by several clinical status. Although there is insufficient data regarding its effects on adrenal glands. This study aimed to identify whether elevated intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) caused any alteration on the morphology and function of adrenal glands in a rat model. Twenty four Sprague-Dawley male rats were included in the study. Animals were allocated into 4 groups. IAP was elevated to 15 mmHg for one hour and four hours in group 2 and 4. Group 1 and 3 were sham groups. Blood samples were taken for the assessment of plasma adrenaline, noradrenaline, and corticosterone levels and adrenalectomies were performed to evaluate apoptosis. Blood adrenaline, noradrenaline and corticosterone levels were significantly higher in the study groups compared with the sham groups. However, there were no significant changes in apoptotic index scores in the study groups as compared to sham groups. These results support that increased IAH leads to discharge of catecholamine and corticosterone from the adrenal glands. Failure to demonstrate similar changes in apoptotic index score may be concluded as apoptosis is not a leading pathway for impairment of adrenal glands during IAH period.

  4. Effects of intra-abdominal pressure on adrenal gland function and morphology in rats

    PubMed Central

    Akkapulu, Nezih; Tirnaksiz, Mehmet Bulent; Kulac, Ibrahim; Tezel, Gaye Guler; Hayran, Mutlu; Dogrul, Ahmet Bulent; Cetinkaya, Erdinc; Yorganci, Kaya

    2015-01-01

    Intra-abdominal hypertension and abdominal compartment syndrome (IAH/ACS) are life-threatening conditions and caused by several clinical status. Although there is insufficient data regarding its effects on adrenal glands. This study aimed to identify whether elevated intra-abdominal pressure (IAP) caused any alteration on the morphology and function of adrenal glands in a rat model. Twenty four Sprague-Dawley male rats were included in the study. Animals were allocated into 4 groups. IAP was elevated to 15 mmHg for one hour and four hours in group 2 and 4. Group 1 and 3 were sham groups. Blood samples were taken for the assessment of plasma adrenaline, noradrenaline, and corticosterone levels and adrenalectomies were performed to evaluate apoptosis. Blood adrenaline, noradrenaline and corticosterone levels were significantly higher in the study groups compared with the sham groups. However, there were no significant changes in apoptotic index scores in the study groups as compared to sham groups. These results support that increased IAH leads to discharge of catecholamine and corticosterone from the adrenal glands. Failure to demonstrate similar changes in apoptotic index score may be concluded as apoptosis is not a leading pathway for impairment of adrenal glands during IAH period. PMID:26045846

  5. [Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia in Adults].

    PubMed

    Vrbíková, Jana

    2016-01-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia is a life-long disease requiring an integrated therapy. It may negatively influence the quality of life. In childhood, the main problems of the care of these patients involve sex determination and ensuring optimum growth and puberty. The therapeutic goals for adults are the prevention of Addisonian crisis and ensuring the best possible quality of life, including fertility.Key words: androgens - cardiovascular risk - congenital adrenal hyperplasia - bone density - testicular rest tumors.

  6. Budesonide-related adrenal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Arntzenius, Alexander; van Galen, Louise

    2015-10-01

    Iatrogenic adrenal insufficiency is a potential harmful side effect of treatment with corticosteroids. It manifests itself when an insufficient cortisol response to biological stress leads to an Addisonian crisis: a life-threatening situation. We describe a case of a patient who developed an Addisonian crisis after inappropriate discontinuation of budesonide (a topical steroid used in Crohn's disease) treatment. Iatrogenic adrenal insufficiency due to budesonide use has been rarely reported. Prescribers should be aware of the resulting risk for an Addisonian crisis.

  7. Abdomen: Retroperitoneum, peritoneum, gastrointestinal tract, kidney, and adrenal gland

    SciTech Connect

    Suen, K.C.

    1987-01-01

    In this book the author explores aspiration biopsy as it can be applied to lesions of the retroperitoneum, gastrointestinal tract, kidney, peritoneum, and adrenal gland. With experience from two different institutions - one an acute general care hospital, the other a cancer referral center - Dr. Suen has achieved in creating a text that reflects a wide range of experience. Throughout the work, Dr. Suen stresses pattern recognition of cytologic material. And a chapter on unusual and interesting lesions is included. Contents: Introduction and General Considerations; Abdomen Imaging Techniques; Clinical Relevance; Indentification of Normal ABC; retroperitoneum; Gastrointestinal Tract; Kidney; Adrenal Gland; Unusual Lesions; Immunocytochemistry and Electron Microscopy; Index.

  8. Xylamine, a ligand for the catecholamine transporter

    SciTech Connect

    Waggaman, L.A.

    1985-01-01

    Previous studies have established xylamine (N-2'-chloro-ethyl-N-ethyl-2-methylbenzylamine) irreversibly inhibits neuronal norepinephrine uptake with no concomitant effect on other neurotransmitter systems. Since xylamine is thought to alkylate transport-associated sites in the plasma membrane of noradrenergic neurons, so the loss of endogenous norepinephrine may be a consequence of neuronal membrane damage resulting from the alkylation of membrane components. In these studies, xylamine, under in vitro conditions, irreversibly inhibited both neuronal norepinephrine and dopamine uptake in the rat cortex and striatum, respectively. The efficacy of xylamine as a neuronal dopamine uptake inhibitor appeared to depend on its ability to access dopaminergic neurons during tissue exposure to the drug. In sympathetically innervated peripheral tissues, (/sup 3/H)xylamine was accumulated in noradrenergic neurons in a carrier-dependent manner. Although the data suggested that xylamine was interacting with the norepinephrine uptake carrier, (/sup 3/H)xylamine exposure to isolated synaptic membranes from superior cervical ganglia revealed a large proportion of (/sup 3/H)xylamine binding that was not associated with the noradrenergic transporter. For a closer characterization of xylamine binding in synaptic membranes, brain tissue was chosen as a more practical source of these membranes. While these experiments did not meet with great success, xylamine remains potentially useful as a ligand for identifying the catecholamine transporter, particularly in conjunction with procedures for protein purification and reconstitution.

  9. Bidirectional regulation of bakuchiol, an estrogenic-like compound, on catecholamine secretion

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Haoping; Wang, Hong; Ma, Shangwei; Xu, Yantong; Zhang, Han; Wang, Yuefei; Niu, Zichang; Fan, Guanwei; Zhu, Yan; Gao, Xiu Mei

    2014-01-01

    Excess or deficiency of catecholamine (CA) secretion was related with several diseases. Recently, estrogen and phytoestrogens were reported to regulate the activity of CA system. Bakuchiol is a phytoestrogen isolated from the seeds of Psoralea corylifolia L. (Leguminosae) which has been used in Traditional Chinese medicine as a tonic or aphrodisiac. In the present study, bovine adrenal medullary cells were employed to investigate the effects and mechanisms of bakuchiol on the regulation of CA secretion. Further, its anti-depressant like and anti-stress effects were evaluated by using behavioral despair and chronic immobilization stress models. Our results indicated that bakuchiol showed bidirectional regulation on CA secretion. It stimulated basal CA secretion in a concentration dependent manner (p < 0.01), while it reduced 300 μM acetylcholine (ACh) (p < 0.01), 100 μM veratridine (Ver) (p < 0.01) and 56 mM K{sup +} (p < 0.05) induced CA secretion, respectively. We also found that the stimulation of basal CA secretion by bakuchiol may act through estrogen-like effect and the JNK pathway in an extra-cellular calcium independent manner. Further, bakuchiol elevated tyrosine hydroxylase Ser40 and Ser31 phosphorylation (p < 0.01) through the PKA and ERK1/2 pathways, respectively. Bakuchiol inhibited ACh, Ver and 56 mM K{sup +} induced CA secretion was related with reduction of intracellular calcium rise. In vivo experiments, we found that bakuchiol significantly reduced immobilization time in behavioral despair mouse (p < 0.05 or 0.01), and plasma epinephrine (E) and norepinephrine (NE) levels in chronic immobilization stress (p < 0.05). Overall, these results present a bidirectional regulation of bakuchiol on CA secretion which indicated that bakuchiol may exert anti-stress and the potential anti-depressant-like effects. - Highlights: • Bakuchiol stimulated basal catecholamine secretion. • Bakuchiol inhibited various secretagogues induced catecholamine secretion

  10. Effects of Cultured Adrenal Chromaffin Cell Implants on Hindlimb Reflexes of the 6-OHDA Lesioned Rat

    PubMed Central

    Pulford, Bruce E.; Mihajlov, Andrea R.; Nornes, Howard O.; Whalen, L. Ray

    1994-01-01

    The effects of implantation of cultured adrenal medullary cells on the recovery of neurotransmitter specific reflex activity were studied in the rat spinal cord using electrophysiological testing methods. Cell suspensions of cultured neonatal adrenal medullary chromaffin (AM) cells (which produce catecholamines), or Schwann (Sc) cells (controls) were implanted into the lumbar region of the spinal cord 2 weeks after catecholamine (CA) denervation by intracisternal injection of 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). All cells were taken from 7 day neonates and cultured for 10 days in the presence of nerve growth factor (NGF). Three months after implantation, the extent of implant-associated recovery of reflex activity was determined by measuring electromyogram (EMG) activity and force associated with the long latency component of the hindlimb withdrawal reflex (which is CA modulated). After the electrophysiological testing, rats were anesthetized, and the spinal cords were rapidly removed and frozen. Spinal cords were sectioned longitudinally, and implanted cells were visualized using glyoxylic acid techniques. Labelled sections were examined to determine cell survival. Results indicate that 1) chromaffin cells survive for 3 months in the segments of the cord into which they have been implanted and 2) rats implanted with AM cells have significantly more forceful withdrawal reflexes than those that received Sc cells or received no implant after lesioning. PMID:7703294

  11. Biochemical changes in tissue catecholamines and serotonin in duodenal ulceration caused by cysteamine or propionitrile in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Szabo, S.; Horner, H.C.; Maull, H.; Schnoor, J.; Chiueh, C.C.; Palkovits, M.

    1987-03-01

    Previous structure-activity and pharmacologic studies with duodenal ulcerogens cysteamine and propionitrile implicating catecholamines in the pathogenesis of duodenal ulceration have now been followed up by dose- and time-response biochemical investigations to assess the importance of monoamines in the development of duodenal ulcers. The concentrations of norepinephrine (noradrenaline), dopamine, serotonin and their metabolites were measured in total brain, brain regions, stomach, duodenum, pancreas and adrenals in the rat. Turnover of catecholamines was determined in rats pretreated with the inhibitor of tyrosine hydroxylase alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine. The duodenal ulcerogens caused a dose- and time-dependent depletion of norepinephrine in virtually all the tissues examined. The effect was maximal 4 or 7 hr after cysteamine or propionitrile, and norepinephrine levels returned to normal in 24 hr. Dopamine changes were selective and often biphasic, e.g., elevation in adrenals, biphasic in brain cortex, hippocampus and midbrain, but uniformly decreasing in glandular stomach and duodenum. In the median eminence dopamine levels decreased by 181 and 324% at 15 and 30 min, respectively, after cysteamine, but neither dopamine nor 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid was modified in the periventricular nucleus. Serotonin levels were relatively stable, revealing slight elevations or no changes in most of the tissues. The turnover of norepinephrine was accelerated by both chemicals in virtually all brain regions, but dopamine turnover was affected only in a few areas, e.g., in the corpus striatum and medulla oblongata cysteamine decreased dopamine turnover, whereas propionitrile first (at 1 hr) accelerated then (at 8 hr) significantly suppressed it.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Inhibitory effect of strychnine on acetylcholine receptor activation in bovine adrenal medullary chromaffin cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kuijpers, G A; Vergara, L A; Calvo, S; Yadid, G

    1994-01-01

    1. Strychnine, which is known as a potent and selective antagonist of the inhibitory glycine receptor in the central nervous system, inhibits the nicotinic stimulation of catecholamine release from bovine cultured adrenal chromaffin cells in a concentration-dependent (1-100 microM) manner. At 10 microM nicotine, the IC50 value for strychnine is approximately 30 microM. Strychnine also inhibits the nicotine-induced membrane depolarization and increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration. 2. The inhibitory action of strychnine is reversible and is selective for nicotinic stimulation, with no effect observed on secretion elicited by a high external K+ concentration, histamine or angiotensin II. 3. Strychnine competes with nicotine in its effect, but not modify the apparent positive cooperatively of the nicotine binding sites. In the absence of nicotine, strychnine has no effect on catecholamine release. Glycine does not affect catecholamine release nor the inhibitory action of strychnine on this release. 4. These results suggest that strychnine interacts with the agonist binding site of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor in chromaffin cells, thus exerting a pharmacological effect independently of the glycine receptor. PMID:7834198

  13. Adrenal chromaffin cells do not swell when exposed to nanosecond electric pulses.

    PubMed

    Craviso, Gale L; Fisher, Christa; Chatterjee, Indira; Vernier, P Thomas

    2015-06-01

    High intensity, nanosecond duration electric pulses (NEPs) permeabilize plasma membranes causing osmotic cell swelling that can elicit a wide variety of cellular effects. This study examined the possibility that cell swelling is the mechanism by which 5 ns NEPs trigger the release of catecholamines from neuroendocrine adrenal chromaffin cells. Swelling was assessed by comparing measurements of cell area obtained from bright field images of the cells before and at 10s intervals following exposure of the cells to 5 ns pulses at a field intensity of 5-6 MV/m. The results indicated that chromaffin cells do not swell in response to a single pulse or a train of ten pulses delivered at repetition frequencies of 10 Hz and 1 kHz. Swelling was also not observed in response to a train of 50 pulses whereas Jurkat T lymphoblast cell area increased 15% on average under the same NEP exposure conditions. These results demonstrating that chromaffin cells do not undergo swelling when exposed to 5 ns NEPs have important implications regarding the mechanism by which these pulses stimulate the release of catecholamines from these cells, namely that catecholamine secretion is most likely not caused by cell swelling.

  14. The Importance of Exclusion of Obstructive Sleep Apnea During Screening for Adrenal Adenoma and Diagnosis of Pheochromocytoma.

    PubMed

    Weeks, Alicia C; Kimple, Michelle E; Davis, Dawn Belt

    2015-01-01

    Context. As catecholamine elevation is a key element in the diagnosis of pheochromocytoma, more commonplace causes of sympathetic excess, such as obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), should be excluded as standard practice prior to diagnosis. This is essential to avoid misdiagnosis of adrenal incidentalomas identified in the estimated 42 million Americans with OSA, with greater than 4 million projected to undergo a computed tomography study annually. Case Description. A 56-year-old woman presented with a several year history of paroxysmal hypertension, palpitations, and diaphoresis. Abdominal/pelvic computed tomography performed during an unrelated hospitalization revealed a 2-cm left-sided adrenal nodule initially quantified at 37 Hounsfield units. Posthospitalization, 24-hour urine normetanephrine level was markedly elevated. Reassessment 2 weeks later revealed continued normetanephrine excess. Following normal thyroid function tests, morning cortisol, aldosterone, and plasma renin activity, laparoscopic adrenalectomy was performed. Surgical pathology identified an adrenal cortical adenoma. As paroxysms continued postoperatively, repeat 24-hour urine metanephrines were measured, demonstrating essentially unchanged normetanephrine elevation. Search for an alternate cause ensued, revealing OSA with progressive continuous positive airway pressure noncompliance over the preceding year. Regular continuous positive airway pressure therapy was resumed, and at the end of 7 weeks, 24-hour urine normetanephrine levels had declined. Conclusion. Pheochromocytomas are rare and sleep apnea is common. However, the overlap of clinical symptoms between these disorders is substantial, as is their ability to produce catecholamine excess. Thus, excluding uncontrolled or undiagnosed OSA in high-risk patients should be standard practice before diagnosing pheochromocytoma.

  15. Cav1.3 Channels as Key Regulators of Neuron-Like Firings and Catecholamine Release in Chromaffin Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vandael, David H.F.; Marcantoni, Andrea; Carbone, Emilio

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal and neuroendocrine L-type calcium channels (Cav1.2, Cav1.3) open readily at relatively low membrane potentials and allow Ca2+ to enter the cells near resting potentials. In this way, Cav1.2 and Cav1.3 shape the action potential waveform, contribute to gene expression, synaptic plasticity, neuronal differentiation, hormone secretion and pacemaker activity. In the chromaffin cells (CCs) of the adrenal medulla, Cav1.3 is highly expressed and is shown to support most of the pacemaking current that sustains action potential (AP) firings and part of the catecholamine secretion. Cav1.3 forms Ca2+-nanodomains with the fast inactivating BK channels and drives the resting SK currents. These latter set the inter-spike interval duration between consecutive spikes during spontaneous firing and the rate of spike adaptation during sustained depolarizations. Cav1.3 plays also a primary role in the switch from “tonic” to “burst” firing that occurs in mouse CCs when either the availability of voltage-gated Na channels (Nav) is reduced or the β2 subunit featuring the fast inactivating BK channels is deleted. Here, we discuss the functional role of these “neuron-like” firing modes in CCs and how Cav1.3 contributes to them. The open issue is to understand how these novel firing patterns are adapted to regulate the quantity of circulating catecholamines during resting condition or in response to acute and chronic stress. PMID:25966692

  16. Effect of prolonged nicotine infusion on response of rat catecholamine biosynthetic enzymes to restraint and cold stress.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shu-Yuan; Glazkova, Dina; Serova, Lidia; Sabban, Esther L

    2005-11-01

    There is a paradoxical relationship between nicotine and stress. To help elucidate their relationship on catecholamine biosynthesis, rats were infused with nicotine for 7-14 days before exposure to cold or restraint stress. Nicotine (5 mg/kg/day, 14 days) did not alter basal plasma corticosterone or its elevation with 24 h cold stress, but prevented corticosterone elevation following 2 h restraint stress. In adrenal medulla (AM), response of dopamine beta-hydroxylase (DBH), but not tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) mRNA, to both stressors was attenuated in nicotine-infused rats. In locus coeruleus (LC), restraint stress elevated TH and DBH mRNA in saline-, but not in nicotine-infused rats. Cold stress triggered a similar response of TH and DBH mRNAs in LC with and without nicotine infusion. With shorter nicotine infusion (8 mg/kg/day, 7 days), TH mRNA in AM was not induced by restraint stress on one (1x) or two (2x) consecutive days nor was DBH mRNA in AM or LC by 2x. The findings demonstrate that constant release of nicotine can modulate, or even prevent, some stress responses at the level of the HPA axis and gene expression of catecholamine biosynthetic enzymes in LC and AM.

  17. Effect of high-dose total body irradiation on ACTH, corticosterone, and catecholamines in the rat.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Eric P; Bruder, Eric D; Cullinan, William E; Ziegler, Dana; Raff, Hershel

    2011-01-01

    Total body irradiation (TBI) or partial body irradiation is a distinct risk of accidental, wartime, or terrorist events. Total body irradiation is also used as conditioning therapy before hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. This therapy can result in injury to multiple tissues and might result in death as a result of multiorgan failure. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis could play a causative role in those injuries, in addition to being activated under conditions of stress. In a rat model of TBI, we have established that radiation nephropathy is a significant lethal complication, which is caused by hypertension and uremia. The current study assessed HPA axis function in rats undergoing TBI. Using a head-shielded model of TBI, we found an enhanced response to corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) in vitro in pituitaries from irradiated compared with nonirradiated rats at both 8 and 70 days after 10-Gy single fraction TBI. At 70, but not 8 days, plasma adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH) and corticosterone levels were increased significantly in irradiated compared with nonirradiated rats. Plasma aldosterone was not affected by TBI at either time point, whereas plasma renin activity was decreased in irradiated rats at 8 days. Basal and stimulated adrenal steroid synthesis in vitro was not affected by TBI. In addition, plasma epinephrine was decreased at 70 days after TBI. The hypothalamic expression of CRH messenger RNA (mRNA) and hippocampal expression of glucocorticoid receptor mRNA were unchanged by irradiation. We conclude that the hypertension of radiation nephropathy is not aldosterone or catecholamine-dependent but that there is an abscopal activation of the HPA axis after 10 Gy TBI. This activation was attributable at least partially to enhanced pituitary ACTH production.

  18. Pyrilamine inhibits nicotine-induced catecholamine secretion.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong-Chan; Yun, So Jeong; Park, Yong-Soo; Jun, Dong-Jae; Kim, Dongjin; Jiten Singh, N; Kim, Sanguk; Kim, Kyong-Tai

    2014-07-01

    Function of nicotine, which induces activation of all parts of the body including our brain, has been receiving much attention for a long period of time and also been actively studied by researchers for its pharmacological actions in the central nervous system. The modulation of nicotine concentration and the inhibition of nicotine binding on target receptors in the brain are the key factors for smoking addiction therapy. In previous studies showed that influx of nicotine at the blood-brain barrier was through the pyrilamine-sensitive organic cation transporters. But the direct interacting mechanism of pyrilamine on the nicotine binding target receptors has not yet been clarified. The aim of the present study is to investigate the direct binding mechanisms of a pyrilamine on the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs). We found that pyrilamine shares the same ligand binding pocket of nicotine (NCT) on nAChRs but interacts with more amino acid residues than NCT does. The extended part of pyrilamine interacts with additional residues in the ligand binding pocket of nAChRs which are located nearby the entrance of the binding pocket. The catecholamine (CA) secretion induced by nAChR agonist (NCT') was significantly inhibited by the pyrilamine pretreatment. Real time carbon-fiber amperometry confirmed the inhibition of the NCT'-induced exocytosis by pyrilamine in a single cell level. We also found that pyrilamine inhibited the NCT'-induced [Ca(2+)]i. In contrast, pyrilamine did not affect the increase in calcium induced by high K(+). Overall, these data suggest that pyrilamine directly docks into the ligand binding site of nAChRs and specifically inhibits the nAChR-mediated effects thereby causing inhibition of CA secretion. Therefore, pyrilamine may play an important role to explore new treatments to aid smoking cessation.

  19. Cushing syndrome due to adrenal tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome. It occurs when a tumor of the adrenal gland releases excess amounts of the hormone cortisol. Causes ... hormone cortisol. This hormone is made in the adrenal glands . Too much cortisol can be due to various ...

  20. Adrenal gland disease in ferrets.

    PubMed

    Simone-Freilicher, Elisabeth

    2008-01-01

    Adrenal gland disease in ferrets is unique to this species, with clinical signs and pathophysiology different from those seen in the dog. Its prevalence is increasing; 70% of pet ferrets in the United States were affected in 2003. The exact causes of the adrenal gland changes that lead to the disease are not known. Early oophorohysterectomies and neutering, combined with the artificially prolonged photoperiod experienced by indoor pet ferrets, and a possible genetic component, may be contributing factors. Signs of adrenal gland disease include progressive hair loss, pruritus, lethargy, atrophy, and, in female ferrets, vulvar swelling. An understanding of the signs and physiologic changes is necessary for diagnosis and treatment. A review of anatomy, physiology, and current surgical and medical options is presented.

  1. Adrenal cortex dysfunction: CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Huebener, K.H.; Treugut, H.

    1984-01-01

    The computed tomographic appearance of the adrenal gland was studied in 302 patients with possible endocrinologic disease and 107 patients undergoing CT for nonendocrinologic reasons. Measurements of adrenal size were also made in 100 adults with no known adrenal pathology. CT proved to be a sensitive diagnostic tool in combination with clinical studies. When blood hormone levels are increased, CT can differentiate among homogeneous organic hyperplasia, nodular hyperplasia, benign adenoma, and malignant cortical adenoma. When blood hormone levels are decreased, CT can demonstrate hypoplasia or metastatic tumorous destruction. Calcifications can be demonstrated earlier than on plain radiographs. When hormone elimination is increased, the morphologic substrate can be identified; tumorous changes can be localized and infiltration of surrounding organs recognized.

  2. Adrenal myelolipoma with osseous metaplasia and hypercortisolism

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ujwal; Priyadarshi, Shivam; Tomar, Vinay; Vohra, Rishi Raj

    2017-01-01

    Adrenal myelolipomas are rare adrenal tumors generally diagnosed incidentally. A 42-year-old female reported to us with complaints of left flank pain attributable to her left ureteric calculi. On evaluation, a large adrenal mass was diagnosed along with hypercortisolism. After adrenalectomy, the histopathology revealed adrenal myelolipoma along with osseous metaplasia not reported in English literature, to the best of our knowledge till date. PMID:28216934

  3. Acute myocardial infarction secondary to catecholamine release owing to cocaine abuse and pheochromocytoma crisis.

    PubMed

    Martinez-Quintana, Efren; Jaimes-Vivas, Ricardo; Cuba-Herrera, Javiel; Saiz-Udaeta, Beatriz; Rodríguez-Gonzalez, Fayna; Martinez-Martin, Maria Soledad

    2013-01-01

    Most pheochromocytomas are not suspected clinically while a high percentage of them are curable with surgery. We present the case of an adult cocaine-addicted male patient with an underlying pheochromocytoma and repeated myocardial infarctions. Computed tomography showed a left round adrenal mass, also high 24-hour urine levels of catecholamines and metanephrines were detected from urinalysis. The patient was given alpha and beta blockers, moreover a laparoscopic left adrenalectomy was performed. Cocaine can block the reuptake of noradrenaline, leading to increasing its concentration and consequently its effects as well, and induce local or diffuse coronary vasoconstriction in normal coronary artery segments per se, cocaine can also trigger pheochromocytoma crisis, and therefore, cardiac complications such as myocardial infarction due to these additive effects are intended to occur. For this reason, in the presence of typical clinical manifestations of pheochromocytoma, such as sustained or paroxysmal hypertension, headache, sweating, tachycardia and abdominal pain, probable association of this tumor in patients with cocaine abuse and associated cardiac complications must be ruled out.

  4. Differential plasma catecholamine and neuropeptide Y responses to acute stress in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Zukowska-Grojec, Z.; Konarska, M.; McCarty, R.

    1988-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a vasoconstrictor present in the sympatho-adrenomedullary system and may be co-released with norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (EPI) during sympathetic activation. The authors studied plasma NPY-immunoreactivity (-ir, radioimmunoassay) and catecholamine (radioenzymatic) responses during two acute stress paradigms that differ in character, intensity, and duration. The intermittent stress of footshock evoked intensity-dependent immediate increments in plasma NE and EPI, and a delayed NPY-ir response. Prolonged immobilization caused greater increases in plasma NE and EPI levels and no changes in plasma NPY-ir until the end of the stress session. Plasma NPY-ir responses correlated with those of NE but not with EPI suggesting a sympathetic origin for the release of the peptide. Relatively greater NPY-ir responses to footshock than to immobilization may be consistent with a preferential release of the peptide by a bursting but not continuous mode of sympathetic activation. However, it may also be due to a differential activation of the sympathetic nerves and adrenal medulla by these two stress situations.

  5. [Immunoendocrine associations in adrenal glands].

    PubMed

    Sterzl, I; Hrdá, P

    2010-12-01

    Immune and endocrine systems are basic regulatory mechanisms of organism and, including the nervous system, maintain the organism's homeostasis. The main immune system representatives are mononuclear cells, T- and B-cells and their products, in the endocrine system the main representatives are cells of the glands with inner secretion and their products. One of the most important glands for maintaining homeostasis are adrenal glands. It has been proven that either cells of the immune system, either endocrine cells can, although in trace amounts, produce mutually mediators of both systems (hormones, cytokines). Disorders in one system can lead to pathological symptoms in the other system. Also here represent adrenals an important model.

  6. Spontaneous bilateral adrenal hemorrhage following cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Dahan, Meryl; Lim, Chetana; Salloum, Chady

    2016-01-01

    Postoperative bilateral adrenal hemorrhage is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication. This diagnosis is often missed because the symptoms and laboratory results are usually nonspecific. We report a case of bilateral adrenal hemorrhage associated with acute primary adrenal insufficiency following laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The knowledge of this uncommon complication following any abdominal surgery allows timey diagnosis and rapid treatment. PMID:27275469

  7. The adrenal glands and their functions.

    PubMed

    De Silva, Deepthi C; Wijesiriwardene, Bandula

    2007-09-01

    The adrenal glands secrete hormones essential for metabolism, regulation of blood pressure, and sodium and glucose homeostasis. Hypo- or hypersecretion of these hormones is life threatening. Understanding the physiological functions of adrenal hormones is a prerequisite to the management of adrenal gland disease.

  8. Spontaneous Retroperitoneal Hemorrhage from Adrenal Artery Aneurysm

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez Valverde, F.M. Balsalobre, M.; Torregrosa, N.; Molto, M.; Gomez Ramos, M.J.; Vazquez Rojas, J.L.

    2007-04-15

    Spontaneous adrenal hemorrhage is a very rare but serious disorder of the adrenal gland that can require emergent treatment. We report on a 42-year-old man who underwent selective angiography for diagnosis and treatment of retroperitoneal hemorrhage from small adrenal artery aneurysm. This case gives further details about the value of transluminal artery embolization in the management of visceral aneurysm rupture.

  9. Spontaneous bilateral adrenal hemorrhage following cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Dahan, Meryl; Lim, Chetana; Salloum, Chady; Azoulay, Daniel

    2016-06-01

    Postoperative bilateral adrenal hemorrhage is a rare but potentially life-threatening complication. This diagnosis is often missed because the symptoms and laboratory results are usually nonspecific. We report a case of bilateral adrenal hemorrhage associated with acute primary adrenal insufficiency following laparoscopic cholecystectomy. The knowledge of this uncommon complication following any abdominal surgery allows timey diagnosis and rapid treatment.

  10. Immobilized Catecholamine and Cocaine Effects on Contractility of Cardiac Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Venter, J. Craig; Ross, John; Dixon, Jack E.; Mayer, Steven E.; Kaplan, Nathan O.

    1973-01-01

    Isoproterenol, norepinephrine, and epinephrine covalently bound to glass beads exert a positive inotropic effect on isometrically contracting papillary muscles from cats. Immobilized isoproterenol maintains increases in force and velocity of contraction for more than 5 hr. 1 μM Cocaine potentiates the action of immobilized norepinephrine, isoproterenol, and epinephrine, but not of isoproterenol in solution. The data presented indicate that the effects of immobilized catecholamines are not due to their coming off the glass. The effects observed with cocaine and immobilized catecholamines are not altered by prior treatment of the muscle with reserpine. These results suggest that the major site of catecholamine action is on receptors located on the extended surface of myocardial cells and a post-junctional site for cocaine potentiation. Images PMID:4515619

  11. Adrenal Gland Tumor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Content ASCO Conquer Cancer Foundation Journal of Clinical Oncology Journal of Oncology Practice ASCO University Donate eNEWS SIGNUP f Cancer. ... of medical, surgical, radiation, gynecologic, and pediatric oncologists, oncology nurses, physician assistants, social workers, and patient advocates. ...

  12. Catecholamines: Mediator of the Hypermetabolic Response to Thermal Injury

    PubMed Central

    Wilmore, Douglas W.; Long, James M.; Mason, Arthur D.; Skreen, Robert W.; Pruitt, Basil A.

    1974-01-01

    Hypermetabolism characterizes the metabolic response to thermal injury and the extent of energy production is positively related to the rate of urinary catecholamine excretion. Alpha and beta adrenergic blockade decreased metabolism from 69.6 ± 5.3 Kcal/m2/hr to 57.4 ± 5.2 (p < 0.01), and infusion of 6 µgm epinephrine/minute in normal man significantly increased metabolic rate. Twenty noninfected burned adults with a mean burn size of 45% total body surface (range 7-84%) and four normal controls were studied in an environmental chamber at two or more temperatures between 19 and 33 C with vapor pressure constant at 11.88 mm Hg. All burn patients were hypermetabolic at all temperatures studied and their core and mean skin temperatures were significantly elevated above control values. Between 25 and 33 C ambient, metabolism was unchanged in controls and burns of less than 40% total body surface (48.9 ± 4.6 Kcal/m2/hr vs. 48.9 ± 4.5), but metabolic rate decreased in larger burns in the warmer environment (72.0 ± 1.9 vs. 65.8 ± 1.7, p < 0.001). At 21 C, metabolism and catecholamines increased, except in four nonsurvivors who became hypothermic with decreased catechol elaboration. Metabolic rate in ten patients with bacteremia was below predicted levels while catecholamines were markedly elevated suggesting interference with tissue uptake of the neurohormonal transmitters. Feeding burn patients or administering glucose and insulin improved nitrogen retention and altered substrate flow but did not significantly reduce urinary catecholamines or metabolic rate. Burned patients are internally warm, not externally cold, and catecholamines appear to mediate their increased heat production. Hypermetabolism may be modified by ambient temperature, infection, and pharmacologic means. Alterations in hypothalamic function due to injury, resulting in increased catecholamine elaboration, would explain the metabolic response to thermal injury. PMID:4412350

  13. Synthesis, internalization, and localization of atrial natriuretic peptide in rat adrenal medulla

    SciTech Connect

    Morel, G.; Chabot, J.G.; Garcia-Caballero, T.; Gossard, F.; Dihl, F.; Belles-Isles, M.; Heisler, S.

    1988-07-01

    Some, though not all studies, have indicated that atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) can bind to adrenal medullary cells. ANP-like immunoreactivity (ANP-LI) has also been identified in catecholamine-secreting cells. Together, these findings suggest that ANP may be taken up and/or synthesized in the adrenal medulla. The present study was designed to ascertain, by in situ hybridization, whether adrenal chromaffin cells could synthesize ANP, to define by an in vivo ultrastructural autoradiographic approach, whether ANP could, in fact, bind to rat adrenal medulla cells, to determine whether there was a cellular (noradrenaline (NA) vs. adrenaline (A)) selectivity in the binding process, and to establish whether extracellular (125I)ANP could be internalized by these cells. The cellular and subcellular distribution of endogenous ANP-LI was also investigated in both cell types by cryoultramicrotomy and immunocytochemical approaches. The in situ hybridization studies indicate the presence of mRNA to ANP in about 15% of adrenal medullary cells. Intravenous injection of (125I)ANP resulted in a 3-fold, preferential and specific radiolabeling of A-as compared to NA-containing cells. In A-containing cells, plasma membranes were significantly labeled 2 and 5 min post injection; cytoplasmic matrix, mitochondria, and secretory granules throughout the time course studied (1-30 min post injection). Lysosomes, rough endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, and nuclei were not labeled. ANP-LI was identified in both NA- and A-containing cells; in the former, it was almost exclusively localized in secretory vesicles, in the latter it was detected in plasma membranes, cytoplasmic matrix, nuclear euchromatin, some mitochondria and relatively fewer granules than in NA-containing cells.

  14. Brain cyclooxygenase and prostanoid TP receptors are involved in centrally administered epibatidine-induced secretion of noradrenaline and adrenaline from the adrenal medulla in rats.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Takahiro; Yokotani, Kunihiko

    2009-03-15

    Plasma adrenaline mainly originates from adrenaline-containing cells in the adrenal medulla, whereas plasma noradrenaline reflects not only the release from sympathetic nerves but also the secretion from noradrenaline-containing cells in the adrenal medulla. The present study was undertaken to examine the mechanisms involved in centrally administered epibatidine (a potent agonist of nicotinic acethylcholine receptors)-induced elevation of plasma catecholamines with regard to the brain prostanoid. Intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) administered epibatidine (1, 5 and 10 nmol/animal) effectively elevated plasma noradrenaline and adrenaline. The epibatidine (5 nmol/animal, i.c.v.)-induced elevation of both catecholamines was attenuated by hexamethonium (an antagonist of nicotinic acethylcholine receptors) (0.9 and 1.8 micromol/animal, i.c.v.), indomethacin (an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase) (0.6 and 1.2 micromol/animal, i.c.v.) and (+)-S-145 (an antagonist of prostanoid TP receptors) (0.6 and 1.3 micromol/animal, i.c.v.), and abolished by acute bilateral adrenalectomy. On the other hand, intravenously administered epibatidine (5 nmol/animal) was largely ineffective on the plasma levels of catecholamines, and intravenous pretreatment with hexamethonium (1.8 micromol/animal) had no effect on the epibatidine (5 nmol/animal, i.c.v.)-induced elevation of both catecholamines. These results suggest that centrally administered epibatidine activates the brain nicotinic acethylcholine receptors, thereby evoking the secretion of noradrenaline and adrenaline from the adrenal medulla by brain cyclooxygenase- and prostanoid TP receptor-mediated mechanisms in rats.

  15. [The brain catecholamines during domestication of the silver fox Vulpes fulvus].

    PubMed

    Nikulina, E M

    1990-01-01

    Studies have been made on the content of catecholamines (noradrenaline and dopamine) as well as metabolites of dopamine (3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic and homovanillic acids) in the brain structures of silver foxes which differ in their handling reactions. The level of noradrenaline was found to be significantly higher in the anterior hypothalamus of domesticated animals; no differences in noradrenaline content were found in the frontal cortex, hippocamp, posterior hypothalamus and midbrain in animals from aggressive and domesticated groups. Dopamine content was higher in the tuberculum olfactorium of domesticated animals, being lower in the striatum and n. accumbens. Metabolite level remained unaffected which is presumably due to changes in dopamine synthesis in the investigated structures. It was concluded that domestication of animals favours the specimens with an altered state of catecholaminergic system of the brain.

  16. Chronic stress induces adrenal hyperplasia and hypertrophy in a subregion-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Ulrich-Lai, Yvonne M; Figueiredo, Helmer F; Ostrander, Michelle M; Choi, Dennis C; Engeland, William C; Herman, James P

    2006-11-01

    The adrenal gland is an essential stress-responsive organ that is part of both the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and the sympatho-adrenomedullary system. Chronic stress exposure commonly increases adrenal weight, but it is not known to what extent this growth is due to cellular hyperplasia or hypertrophy and whether it is subregion specific. Moreover, it is not clear whether increased production of adrenal glucocorticoid after chronic stress is due to increased sensitivity to adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) vs. increased maximal output. The present studies use a 14-day chronic variable stress (CVS) paradigm in adult male rats to assess the effects of chronic stress on adrenal growth and corticosterone steroidogenesis. Exogenous ACTH administration (0-895 ng/100 g body wt) to dexamethasone-blocked rats demonstrated that CVS increased maximal plasma and adrenal corticosterone responses to ACTH without affecting sensitivity. This enhanced function was associated with increased adrenal weight, DNA and RNA content, and RNA/DNA ratio after CVS, suggesting that both cellular hyperplasia and hypertrophy occurred. Unbiased stereological counting of cells labeled for Ki67 (cell division marker) or 4,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (nuclear marker), combined with zone specific markers, showed that CVS induced hyperplasia in the outer zona fasciculata, hypertrophy in the inner zona fasciculata and medulla, and reduced cell size in the zona glomerulosa. Collectively, these results demonstrate that increased adrenal weight after CVS is due to hyperplasia and hypertrophy that occur in specific adrenal subregions and is associated with increased maximal corticosterone responses to ACTH. These chronic stress-induced changes in adrenal growth and function may have implications for patients with stress-related disorders.

  17. Anesthetic Considerations on Adrenal Gland Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Domi, Rudin; Sula, Hektor; Kaci, Myzafer; Paparisto, Sokol; Bodeci, Artan; Xhemali, Astrit

    2015-01-01

    Adrenal gland surgery needs a multidisciplinary team including endocrinologist, radiologist, anesthesiologist, and surgeon. The indications for adrenal gland surgery include hormonal secreting and non-hormonal secreting tumors. Adrenal hormonal secreting tumors present to the anesthesiologist unique challenges requiring good preoperative evaluation, perioperative hemodynamic control, corrections of all electrolytes and metabolic abnormalities, a detailed and careful anesthetic strategy, overall knowledge about the specific diseases, control and maintaining of postoperative adrenal function, and finally a good collaboration with other involved colleagues. This review will focus on the endocrine issues, as well as on the above-mentioned aspects of anesthetic management during hormone secreting adrenal gland tumor resection. PMID:25368694

  18. [Frequency of Kongenital Adrenal Hyperplasia (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Müller, W; Prader, M; Kofler, J; Glatzl, J; Geir, W

    1979-01-01

    The frequency of homozygous congenital adrenal hyperplasia in Tyrol is found to be 1 : 8991, the gene-frequency for congenital adrenal hyperplasia 1 : 95 and the frequency of heterozygous congenital adrenal hyperplasia 1 : 48. Our data is compared on a numerical and statistical base with that in Zürich and Munich with regard to the frequency of congenital adrenal hyperplasia, to its distribution with and without salt loss and to its sex-distribution. According to our study one may assume a frequency of homozygous congenital adrenal hyperplasia in Tyrol, Zürich and Munich of 1 : 7000--10,000.

  19. Adrenal Insufficiency and Addison's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... used if the diagnosis remains unclear. What other tests might a health care provider perform after diagnosis of adrenal insufficiency? After ... skin. A nurse or lab technician performs the test in a health care provider’s office; a patient does not need anesthesia. ...

  20. Caries increment in children and urinary catecholamines: findings at one-year.

    PubMed

    Vanderas, A P; Manetas, K; Papagiannoulis, L

    2000-01-01

    This one-year follow-up study investigates the relationship between urinary catecholamine levels and dental caries increment in 314 children, boys and girls, ages six to eight years. Dental caries was recorded clinically and radiographically and oral hygiene was evaluated by recording the dental plaque. A 24-hour urine sample was collected for each subject, in a year interval, and a representative sample was analyzed by the HPLC technique to assay the catecholamine content. Socioeconomic factors such as parental age, education, and profession were recorded by a questionnaire distributed to the parents. Of the examined children, forty-four (16 boys and 28 girls) did not develop new dental caries and constituted the Caries-Free group. Two New Caries groups, A and B, of forty-four children each (16 boys and 28 girls) were matched by age and sex. Differences were tested in the quantitative and qualitative data by the paired t-test and the chi 2 test, respectively, while a regression analysis was applied to measure the effects of norepinephrine and dopamine on epinephrine. The logistic multiple-regression analysis was used to test, in the entire population, the impact of catecholamines and other related factors on the probability of a subject's developing new dental caries. The 95 percent probability was used. The results showed statistically significant differences in epinephrine and norepinephrine values between Caries-Free and New Caries group A in both examinations. Also, significant differences were found between Caries-Free and New Caries group B in epinephrine and norepinephrine at the first examination, while at the second examination the difference was significant only in epinephrine. The data provide evidence, therefore, that an emotionally stressful state can be an etiologic factor of dental caries.

  1. Effects of lactic acid and catecholamines on contractility in fast-twitch muscles exposed to hyperkalemia.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Anders Krogh; Clausen, Torben; Nielsen, Ole Baekgaard

    2005-07-01

    Intensive exercise is associated with a pronounced increase in extracellular K+ ([K+]o). Because of the ensuing depolarization and loss of excitability, this contributes to muscle fatigue. Intensive exercise also increases the level of circulating catecholamines and lactic acid, which both have been shown to alleviate the depressing effect of hyperkalemia in slow-twitch muscles. Because of their larger exercise-induced loss of K+, fast-twitch muscles are more prone to fatigue caused by increased [K+]o than slow-twitch muscles. Fast-twitch muscles also produce more lactic acid. We therefore compared the effects of catecholamines and lactic acid on the maintenance of contractility in rat fast-twitch [extensor digitorum longus (EDL)] and slow-twitch (soleus) muscles. Intact muscles were mounted on force transducers and stimulated electrically to evoke short isometric tetani. Elevated [K+]o (11 and 13 mM) was used to reduce force to approximately 20% of control force at 4 mM K+. In EDL, the beta2-agonist salbutamol (10(-5) M) restored tetanic force to 83 +/- 2% of control force, whereas in soleus salbutamol restored tetanic force to 93 +/- 1%. In both muscles, salbutamol induced hyperpolarization (5-8 mV), reduced intracellular Na+ content and increased Na+-K+ pump activity, leading to an increased K+ tolerance. Lactic acid (24 mM) restored force from 22 +/- 4% to 58 +/- 2% of control force in EDL, an effect that was significantly lower than in soleus muscle. These results amplify and generalize the concept that the exercise-induced acidification and increase in plasma catecholamines counterbalance fatigue arising from rundown of Na+ and K+ gradients.

  2. Centrally administered N-methyl-d-aspartate evokes the adrenal secretion of noradrenaline and adrenaline by brain thromboxane A2-mediated mechanisms in rats.

    PubMed

    Okada, Shoshiro; Yamaguchi-Shima, Naoko; Shimizu, Takahiro; Arai, Junichi; Yorimitsu, Mieko; Yokotani, Kunihiko

    2008-05-31

    Plasma adrenaline mainly originated from adrenaline-containing cells in the adrenal medulla, while plasma noradrenaline reflects the release from sympathetic nerves in addition to the secretion from noradrenaline-containing cells in the adrenal medulla. The present study was undertaken to characterize the source of plasma catecholamines induced by centrally administered N-methyl-d-aspartate with regard to the brain prostanoid, using urethane-anesthetized rats. Intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) administered N-methyl-d-aspartate (1.0, 5.0, 10.0 nmol/animal) dose-dependently elevated plasma levels of noradrenaline and adrenaline. The N-methyl-d-aspartate (5.0 nmol/animal, i.c.v.)-induced elevation of both catecholamines was reduced by dizocilpine maleate (5 nmol/animal, i.c.v.), a non-competitive N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonist. Indomethacin (0.6 and 1.2 micromol/animal, i.c.v.), an inhibitor of cyclooxygenase, dose-dependently reduced the N-methyl-d-aspartate (5.0 nmol/animal, i.c.v.)-induced elevation of both catecholamines. The N-methyl-d-aspartate-induced response was dose-dependently attenuated by furegrelate (0.9 and 1.8 micromol/animal, i.c.v.), an inhibitor of thromboxane A2 synthase. Furthermore, the acute bilateral adrenalectomy abolished the N-methyl-d-aspartate-induced responses, indicating that the source of increase in plasma noradrenaline evoked by N-methyl-d-aspartate is due to secretion from the adrenal gland and not due to release from sympathetic nerve terminals. These results suggest that centrally administered N-methyl-d-aspartate induces the secretion of noradrenaline and adrenaline from adrenal medulla by the brain thromboxane A2-mediated mechanisms in rats.

  3. Improved Quantification of Plasma Catecholamines by the Radioenzymic Kit Method.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-01

    TLC zones to scintillation vials, (g) elution of the metanephrines from the silica gel, followed by their oxidation to 3H- vanillin , (h) extraction of...the 3H- vanillin into scintillation counting fluid, (i) measurement of the radioactivity of each vial, and (j) calculation of catecholamine

  4. 21 CFR 862.1165 - Catecholamines (total) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Catecholamines (total) test system. 862.1165 Section 862.1165 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  5. 21 CFR 862.1165 - Catecholamines (total) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Catecholamines (total) test system. 862.1165 Section 862.1165 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  6. 21 CFR 862.1165 - Catecholamines (total) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Catecholamines (total) test system. 862.1165 Section 862.1165 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  7. 21 CFR 862.1165 - Catecholamines (total) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Catecholamines (total) test system. 862.1165 Section 862.1165 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  8. 21 CFR 862.1165 - Catecholamines (total) test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Catecholamines (total) test system. 862.1165 Section 862.1165 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  9. Molecular Profiling: Catecholamine Modulation of Gene Expression in Enteropathogenic Bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Investigations of the enteric pathogens Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Vibrio parahaemolyticus have demonstrated that these bacteria can respond to the presence of catecholamines, including norepinephrine and/or epinephrine, in their environment by modulating g...

  10. Reduced catecholamine response to exercise in amenorrheic athletes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies have found an array of endocrine disturbances related to energy deprivation in women with functional hypothalamic amenorrhea. Purpose: We examined the catecholamine response to exercise in five eumenorrheic (EU) and five amenorrheic (AM) athletes, matched by age (mean T SEM: EU = 29.8 T 2.5 ...

  11. Suppression of the Hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis after Oral Hydrocortisone Succinate Ingestion in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mims, Robert B.

    1978-01-01

    Groups of Holtzman female rats were fed 10 mg/day of hydrocortisone succinate orally to study the responsiveness of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis to acute stress. Pituitary ACTH content, plasma ACTH, adrenal venous corticosterone, and adrenal weights were studied simultaneously in experimental and control rats before, during, and up to two weeks after oral hydrocortisone administration. There was a significant decrease in pituitary ACTH content (p=<0.001), suppression of plasma ACTH and corticosterone in response to acute stress (p=<0.001), and adrenal atrophy during and following oral hydrocortisone administration. After discontinuing the hydrocortisone it required three to five days for the rats to respond adequately to acute stress. However, it was seven to ten days post-hydrocortisone before plasma ACTH and corticosterone responses to acute stress had returned to basal values, but decreased pituitary ACTH content and partial adrenal atrophy continued throughout the ten-day post-hydrocortisone study interval. Recovering from the suppressive effects of oral hydrocortisone was more rapid than following parenteral hydrocortisone. However, oral hydrocortisone causes identical but less sustained suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis as observed in animals treated with parenteral glucocorticoid preparations. PMID:212574

  12. Catecholamine response during 12 days of high-altitude exposure (4, 300 m) in women.

    PubMed

    Mazzeo, R S; Child, A; Butterfield, G E; Mawson, J T; Zamudio, S; Moore, L G

    1998-04-01

    We have previously demonstrated that acclimatization to high altitude elicits increased sympathetic nerve activity in men. The purpose of this investigation was to determine 1) whether women respond in a similar manner as found previously in men and 2) the extent to which menstrual cycle phase influences this response. Sixteen eumenorrheic women (age, 23.6 +/- 1.2 yr; weight, 56.2 +/- 4. 3 kg) were studied at sea level and during 12 days of high-altitude exposure (4,300 m) in either their follicular (F; n = 11) or luteal (L; n = 5) phase. Twenty-four-hour urine samples were collected at sea level and during each day at altitude. Catecholamines were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Compared with sea-level values, urinary norepinephrine excretion increased significantly during altitude exposure, peaking on days 4-6. Thereafter, levels remained constant throughout the duration of altitude exposure. The magnitude of this increase was similar between the F (138%) and L (93%) phase. Urinary epinephrine levels were elevated on day 2 of altitude exposure compared with sea-level values for both F and L subjects (93%). Thereafter, urinary epinephrine excretion returned to sea-level values, and no differences were found between F and L subjects. Plasma catecholamine content was consistent with urinary values and supports the concept of an elevation in sympathetic activity over time at altitude. Mean and diastolic blood pressure as well as heart rate adjustments to high altitude correlated significantly with urinary norepinephrine excretion rates. It was concluded that 1) urinary and plasma catecholamine responses to 12 days of high-altitude exposure in women are similar to those previously documented to occur for men; 2) whereas no differences in catecholamine levels were observed between F- and L-phase assignments, for a given urinary norepinephrine excretion rate, blood pressure and heart rates were lower for F vs. L

  13. Prenatal glucocorticoid exposure programs adrenal PNMT expression and adult hypertension.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, P; Khurana, S; Peltsch, H; Grandbois, J; Eibl, J; Crispo, J; Ansell, D; Tai, T C

    2015-11-01

    Prenatal exposure to glucocorticoids (GCs) programs for hypertension later in life. The aim of the current study was to examine the impact of prenatal GC exposure on the postnatal regulation of the gene encoding for phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT), the enzyme involved in the biosynthesis of the catecholamine, epinephrine. PNMT has been linked to hypertension and is elevated in animal models of hypertension. Male offspring of Wistar-Kyoto dams treated with dexamethasone (DEX) developed elevated systolic, diastolic and mean arterial blood pressure compared to saline-treated controls. Plasma epinephrine levels were also elevated in adult rats exposed to DEX in utero. RT-PCR analysis revealed adrenal PNMT mRNA was higher in DEX exposed adult rats. This was associated with increased mRNA levels of transcriptional regulators of the PNMT gene: Egr-1, AP-2, and GR. Western blot analyses showed increased expression of PNMT protein, along with increased Egr-1 and GR in adult rats exposed to DEX in utero. Furthermore, gel mobility shift assays showed increased binding of Egr-1 and GR to DNA. These results suggest that increased PNMT gene expression via altered transcriptional activity is a possible mechanism by which prenatal exposure to elevated levels of GCs may program for hypertension later in life.

  14. Brain prostanoid TP receptor-mediated adrenal noradrenaline secretion and EP3 receptor-mediated sympathetic noradrenaline release in rats.

    PubMed

    Yokotani, Keiko; Okada, Shoshiro; Nakamura, Kumiko; Yamaguchi-Shima, Naoko; Shimizu, Takahiro; Arai, Junichi; Wakiguchi, Hiroshi; Yokotani, Kunihiko

    2005-04-04

    Sympathetic nerves release noradrenaline, whereas adrenal medullary chromaffin cells secrete noradrenaline and adrenaline. Therefore, plasma noradrenaline reflects the secretion from adrenal medulla in addition to the release from sympathetic nerves, however the exact mechanisms of adrenal noradrenaline secretion remain to be elucidated. The present study was designated to characterize the source of plasma noradrenaline induced by intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) administered bombesin and prostaglandin E2 in urethane-anesthetized rats. Bombesin (1.0 nmol/animal, i.c.v.) elevated plasma noradrenaline and adrenaline, while prostaglandin E2 (0.3 nmol/animal, i.c.v.) elevated only plasma noradrenaline. The bombesin-induced elevations of both catecholamines were attenuated by pretreatments with furegrelate (an inhibitor of thromboxane A2 synthase) [250 and 500 microg (0.9 and 1.8 micromol)/animal, i.c.v.)] and [(+)-S-145] [(+)-(1R,2R,3S,4S)-(5Z)-7-(3-[4-3H]-phenylsulphonyl-aminobicyclo[2.2.1]hept-2-yl)hept-5-enoic acid sodium salt] (an antagonist of prostanoid TP receptors) [100 and 250 microg (250 and 625 nmol)/animal)], and abolished by acute bilateral adrenalectomy. On the other hand, the prostaglandin E2-induced elevation of plasma noradrenaline was not influenced by acute bilateral adrenalectomy. These results suggest that adrenal noradrenaline secretion and sympathetic noradrenaline release are mediated by differential central mechanisms; brain prostanoid TP receptors activated by bombesin are involved in the adrenal noradrenaline secretion, while brain prostanoid EP (probably EP3) receptors activated by prostaglandin E2 are involved in the sympathetic noradrenaline release in rats. Brain prostanoid TP receptors activated by bombesin are also involved in the adrenal adrenaline secretion.

  15. Diurnal Profiles of Melatonin Synthesis-Related Indoles, Catecholamines and Their Metabolites in the Duck Pineal Organ

    PubMed Central

    Lewczuk, Bogdan; Ziółkowska, Natalia; Prusik, Magdalena; Przybylska-Gornowicz, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    This study characterizes the diurnal profiles of ten melatonin synthesis-related indoles, the quantitative relations between these compounds, and daily variations in the contents of catecholamines and their metabolites in the domestic duck pineal organ. Fourteen-week-old birds, which were reared under a 12L:12D cycle, were killed at two-hour intervals. The indole contents were measured using HPLC with fluorescence detection, whereas the levels of catecholamines and their metabolites were measured using HPLC with electrochemical detection. All indole contents, except for tryptophan, showed significant diurnal variations. The 5-hydroxytryptophan level was approximately two-fold higher during the scotophase than during the photophase. The serotonin content increased during the first half of the photophase, remained elevated for approximately 10 h and then rapidly decreased in the middle of the scotophase. N-acetylserotonin showed the most prominent changes, with a more than 15-fold increase at night. The melatonin cycle demonstrated only an approximately 5-fold difference between the peak and nadir. The 5-methoxytryptamine content was markedly elevated during the scotophase. The 5-hydroxyindole acetic acid, 5-hydroxytryptophol, 5-methoxyindole acetic acid and 5-methoxytryptophol profiles were analogous to the serotonin rhythm. The norepinephrine and dopamine contents showed no significant changes. The DOPA, DOPAC and homovanillic acid levels were higher during the scotophase than during the photophase. Vanillylmandelic acid showed the opposite rhythm, with an elevated level during the daytime. PMID:25032843

  16. Primitive neuroectodermal adrenal gland tumour.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Y P; Lang, Brian H H; Tam, S C; Wong, K P

    2014-10-01

    Ewing's sarcoma, also called primitive neuroectodermal tumour of the adrenal gland, is extremely rare. Only a few cases have been reported in the literature. We report on a woman with adult-onset primitive neuroectodermal tumour of the adrenal gland presenting with progressive flank pain. Computed tomography confirmed an adrenal tumour with invasion of the left diaphragm and kidney. Radical surgery was performed and the pain completely resolved; histology confirmed the presence of primitive neuroectodermal tumour, for which she was given chemotherapy. The clinical presentation of this condition is non-specific, and a definitive diagnosis is based on a combination of histology, as well as immunohistochemical and cytogenic analysis. According to the literature, these tumours demonstrate rapid growth and aggressive behaviour but there are no well-established guidelines or treatment strategies. Nevertheless, surgery remains the mainstay of local disease control; curative surgery can be performed in most patients. Adjuvant chemoirradiation has been advocated yet no consensus is available. The prognosis of patients with primitive neuroectodermal tumours remains poor.

  17. Laparoscopic Resection of an Adrenal Schwannoma

    PubMed Central

    Konstantinos, Toutouzas G.; Panagiotis, Kekis B.; Nikolaos, Michalopoulos V.; Ioannis, Flessas; Andreas, Manouras; Geogrios, Zografos

    2012-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Schwannomas are tumors originating from Schwann cells of the peripheral nerve sheath (neurilemma) of the neuroectoderm. Rarely, schwannomas can arise from the retroperitoneum and adrenal medulla. We describe a case of a 71-y-old woman who presented with an incidentally discovered adrenal tumor. Methods: Ultrasound and computed tomography scans revealed a lesion with solid and cystic areas originating from the left adrenal gland. The patient underwent complete laparoscopic resection of the tumor and the left adrenal gland. Results: Histopathological examination and immunohistochemical staining of the excised specimen revealed a benign schwannoma measuring 5.5×5×3.7 cm. To our knowledge, few other cases of laparoscopic resection of adrenal schwannomas have been reported. Conclusion: Because preoperative diagnosis of adrenal tumors is inconclusive, complete laparoscopic excision allows for definitive diagnosis with histological evaluation and represents the treatment of choice. PMID:23484583

  18. Occult adrenal insufficiency in surgical patients.

    PubMed Central

    Hubay, C A; Weckesser, E C; Levy, R P

    1975-01-01

    Eight patients admitted to a University hospital with acute surgical problems and related adrenal insufficiency were reviewed and three are presented in detail. Surgical stress and continued sepsis played major roles in the lack of responsiveness to usual modes of therapy until the adrenal insufficiency was corrected. The patients fell into three major clinical categories of adrenal insufficiency. Chronic illness and sepsis are shown to affect steroid production and metabolism, as well as adrenal responsiveness to ACTH. Pharmacologic amounts of steroids are often needed in patients with shock, gram negative sepsis and prolonged illnesses, even if normal or elevated serum cortisols are present. Therapeutic trials of cortisol administration are shown to be confusing when not accompanied by easily performed diagnostic tests of adrenal function. It is emphasized that a pretreatment serum cortisol should be obtained whenever possible. The evaluation of adrenal function is of lifelong importance to the patient. PMID:165792

  19. Hypercalcemic effect of catecholamines and its prevention by thyrocalcitonin.

    PubMed

    Hsu, W H; Cooper, C W

    1975-12-18

    Earlier work by others has shown that the catecholamines, epinephrine and isoproterenol, can raise blood calcium levels in parathyroidectomized but not intact rats, and can restrict the hypocalcemic effect of injected thyrocalcitonin (TCT). The present findings support this earlier work, further showing that such catecholamines can produce hypercalcemia in rats after removal of the thyroid gland by acute thyroparathyroidectomy (TPTX) and indicating that these drugs may raise blood calcium by mobilizing calcium from bone. Rats were fasted overnight, subjected to TPTX and concurrently injected with adrenergic agonist or antagonist drugs alone or in combination. Epinephrine, isoproterenol, and the beta-2 adrenergic agonist, salbutamol, in doses greater than or equal to 1 mg/kg raised blood calcium from low normal levels (approximately 9-10 mg/100 ml) by 1.5 to 2 mg/100 ml (p less than 0.01). Hypercalcemia was apparent by 1 hour after injection and lasted for 1-4 hours. The extent of Ca elevation was dose-related. Pretreatment of rats with the alpha-adrenergic antagonist, phenoxybenzamine, enhanced the effect of epinephrine while pretreatment with the beta-antagonist, propranolol, reduced the effect of isoproterenol. The more selective beta-2 antagonist, butoxamine, but not the beta-1 antagonist, practolol, also reduced the hypercalcemic effect of isoproterenol in TPTX rats. These results suggest that catecholamine-induced hypercalcemia in TPTX rats is mediated by beta-2 adrenergic receptors. Related studies using rats prelabeled with 45Ca further suggest that the catecholamines, like parathyroid hormone, may act to raise blood calcium by mobilizing calcium from bone. The fact that these catecholamines could induce marked hypercalcemia in acutely TPTX rats but not in intact rats indicated that endogenous TCT protects the thyroid intact rat against hypercalcemia. The present findings support this idea in showing that isoproterenol and salbutamol raised levels of

  20. [Development of the human adrenal glands].

    PubMed

    Folligan, K; Bouvier, R; Targe, F; Morel, Y; Trouillas, J

    2005-09-01

    The human adrenal is an endocrine gland located at the superior part of the kidney. Composed of the adrenal cortex of mesoblastic origin and the adrenal medulla of neuroectoblastic origin, the human fetal adrenal grows considerably during the first three months of development. From 12 to 18 weeks of development (WD), the weight of the adrenals increases seven-fold. The gland's weight doubles from 18 to 28 WD and from 28 to 36 WD. At birth, the two adrenals weigh on average 10 g. At the 8th week, two zones are individualized in the adrenal cortex: the definitive zone and the fetal inner zone. At the second trimester, according to ultrastructural and biochemical studies, a third zone, called the transition zone, is individualized between the definitive zone and the fetal inner zone. The definitive zone persists, but the origin of the three zones (glomerular, fascicular and reticular) of adult adrenal cortex is not known. The fetal inner zone regresses from the 5th month of gestation and disappears totally one year after birth. At the 8th week, the immature neuroblasts migrate to the definitive zone, then to the fetal inner zone to compose the adrenal medulla, which develops essentially after birth and during the first year. Before the 10th week, the human fetal adrenal is able to produce steroid hormones, in particular dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S); the secretion of cortisol remains discussed. The development of the human fetal adrenal is complex and is under the control of hormones (ACTH, LH and betaHCG), growth factors (ACTH essentially) and transcription factors (essentially SF1 and DAX-1). Knowledge of morphological and molecular phenomena of this development permits to understand the pathophisiology of congenital adrenal deficiencies.

  1. Metabolism of adrenal cholesterol in man

    PubMed Central

    Borkowski, Abraham; Delcroix, Claude; Levin, Sam

    1972-01-01

    The kinetics of plasma and adrenal cholesteral equilibration were analyzed in patients undergoing bilateral adrenalectomy for generalized mammary carcinoma. A biological model is proposed to help in the understanding of adrenal cholesterol physiology. It comprises two intracellular compartments: (1) A compartment of free adrenal cholesterol which is small (of the order of 17 mg) but turns over very fast; it is renewed approximately 8 times per day: 3 times by the inflow of free plasma cholesterol, and 5 times by the hydrolysis of esterified adrenal cholesterol, the contribution of adrenal cholesterol synthesis appearing to be relatively small. (2) A compartment of esterified adrenal cholesterol which is 20 times larger; it is constantly renewed by in situ esterification and hydrolysis with a daily fractional turnover rate of the order of 0.25. The direct and selective accumulation of plasma cholesteryl esters is practically absent. Only free adrenal cholesterol returns to plasma, mostly after conversion into steroid “hormones.” However small the synthesis of adrenal cholesterol may be, it seems more important in the zona “reticularis.” On the other hand, the inflow of plasma cholesterol and the turnover of the free adrenal compartment tend to be faster in the zona “fasciculata.” The equilibration of plasma and adrenal cholesterol can proceed unmodified under conditions of ACTH suppression. In one patient with Cushing's disease the size of the two adrenal compartments was clearly increased but their equilibration with plasma cholesterol proceeded normally. In another patient the kinetics of hydrocortisone corresponded to those of free adrenal cholesterol in the control studies. PMID:4338119

  2. Ageing changes the cellular basis of the "fight-or-flight" response in human adrenal chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Elhamdani, Abdeladim; Palfrey, Clive H; Artalejo, Cristina R

    2002-01-01

    Stress-induced increases in plasma epinephrine in man have been reported to decrease with age. To investigate the possible cellular basis for this decline we determined the characteristics of calcium currents and their relationship to catecholamine secretion in isolated human adrenal chromaffin (AC) cells. Cells derived from young individuals displayed prominent prepulse facilitation of L-type Ca channels but this property was absent in cells from older subjects. Robust quantal secretion in young cells as determined by amperometry was strongly coupled to the activation of these channels with an average delay of only approximately 3 msec. N- and P-type Ca channels also contributed to secretion but were more weakly coupled to catecholamine release sites. Cells from older subjects secreted much less efficiently and showed only weak coupling between Ca channels and secretion. These studies suggest that the magnitude and timing of adrenal secretion changes with age and that the facilitation Ca channel is key to rapid activation of the fight-or-flight response in young individuals.

  3. Adrenal scan in 17-alpha-hydroxylase deficiency: false indication of adrenal adenoma

    SciTech Connect

    Shore, R.M.; Lieberman, L.M.; Newman, T.J.; Friedman, A.; Bargman, G.J.

    1981-07-01

    A patient who was thought to have testicular feminization syndrome and primary aldosteronism had an adrenal scan that suggested an adrenal adenoma. After later diagnosis of 17-alpha-hydroxylase deficiency, she was treated with glucocorticoids rather than surgery. Her clinical course and a repeat adrenal scan confirmed she did not have a tumor.

  4. Imaging of adrenal and renal hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Nancy A; Lostumbo, Antonella; Adam, Sharon Z; Remer, Erick M; Nikolaidis, Paul; Yaghmai, Vahid; Berggruen, Senta M; Miller, Frank H

    2015-10-01

    Hemorrhage of the kidneys and adrenal glands has many etiologies. In the adrenal glands, trauma, anticoagulation, stress, sepsis, surgery, and neoplasms are common causes of hemorrhage. In the kidneys, reasons for hemorrhage include trauma, bleeding diathesis, vascular diseases, infection, infarction, hemorrhagic cyst rupture, the Antopol-Goldman lesion, and neoplasms. Angiomyolipoma and renal cell carcinoma are the neoplasms most commonly associated with hemorrhage in the kidneys and adrenal cortical carcinoma, metastases, and pheochromocytoma are associated with hemorrhage in the adrenal glands. Understanding the computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging features, and causes of hemorrhage in the kidneys and adrenal glands is critical. It is also important to keep in mind that mimickers of hemorrhage exist, including lymphoma in both the kidneys and adrenal glands, and melanoma metastases in the adrenal glands. Appropriate imaging follow-up of renal and adrenal hemorrhage should occur to exclude an underlying malignancy as the cause. If there is suspicion for malignancy that cannot be definitively diagnosed on imaging, surgery or biopsy may be warranted. Angiography may be indicated when there is a suspected underlying vascular disease. Unnecessary intervention, such as nephrectomy, may be avoided in patients with benign causes or no underlying disease. Appropriate management is dependent on accurate diagnosis of the cause of renal or adrenal hemorrhage and it is incumbent upon the radiologist to determine the etiology.

  5. Centrally administered histamine evokes the adrenal secretion of noradrenaline and adrenaline by brain cyclooxygenase-1- and thromboxane A2-mediated mechanisms in rats.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Takahiro; Okada, Shoshiro; Yamaguchi, Naoko; Sasaki, Tsuyoshi; Lu, Lianyi; Yokotani, Kunihiko

    2006-07-17

    Plasma adrenaline is originated from adrenal medulla, while plasma noradrenaline reflects the release from sympathetic nerves in addition to the secretion from adrenal medulla. The present study was designed to characterize the source of plasma catecholamines induced by centrally administered histamine, with regard to the brain prostanoids. Intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) administered histamine (1, 5 and 10 microg/animal) elevated plasma noradrenaline and adrenaline (noradrenalinecatecholamines, while NS-398 (a selective inhibitor of cyclooxygenase-2) (250 and 500 microg/animal, i.c.v.) had no effect. The histamine-induced response was dose-dependently attenuated by furegurelate (an inhibitor of thromboxane A(2) synthase) (250 and 500 microg/animal, i.c.v.), and abolished by acute bilateral adrenalectomy. These results suggest that centrally administered histamine evokes plasma noradrenaline and adrenaline from adrenal medulla by brain cyclooxygenase-1- and thromboxane A(2)-mediated mechanisms in rats.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita

    MedlinePlus

    ... X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse ... Open All Close All Description X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita is a disorder that mainly affects males. ...

  7. Maternal separation and lesion of adtn alters anxiety and adrenal activity in male rats.

    PubMed

    Esquivel, Bárbara Bárcena; Levin, Gloria; Rivarola, María Angélica; Suárez, Marta Magdalena

    2009-01-01

    The present study investigated the effect of early maternal separation on anxiety and hypophyso-adrenal system activity to anterodorsal thalamic nuclei (ADTN) lesion in male rats as adults in order to compare this with previous results with female rats. During the first 3 weeks of life, male rats were isolated 4.5 hr daily and tested as adults. Thirty days after ADTN lesion we found that adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) plasma levels were affected neither by maternal separation nor by ADTN lesion. Plasma corticosterone (CORT) concentration was increased with lesion of the ADTN in maternally separated rats. A significant increase in plasma catecholamine concentration was induced by early maternal separation. In ADTN-lesioned rats, plasma norepinephrine (NE) concentration was significantly lower than in the respective sham-lesioned groups. In terms of anxiety, there were no significant effects of early experience. However, the ADTN lesion tended to decrease anxiety-related behavior.

  8. Spectrophotometric determination of some catecholamine drugs using sodium bismuthate.

    PubMed

    Sorouraddin, M H; Manzoori, J L; Kargarzadeh, E; Haji Shabani, A M

    1998-12-01

    A novel spectrophotometric method is described for the determination of epinephrine (EP) and norepinephrine (NE). The method is based on the development of a red colour with sodium bismuthate, as a sensitive chromogenic reagent, in aqueous medium at pH 3. Oxidation of these catecholamines produces aminochrome derivatives which can be measured spectrophotometrically at 486.0 nm. Calibration graphs are linear in the range 4.8-800 (micromol l(-1)) for epinephrine bitartarate and 4.8-600 (micromol l(-1)) for norepinephrine bitartarate with detection limits of 0.26 (micromol l(-1)) and 2.46 (micromol l(-1)) for epinephrine and norepinephrine bitartarate salts, respectively. The method has successfully been applied to determination of these catecholamines in pharmaceutical preparations.

  9. Microfluorometric Detection of Catecholamines with Multiphoton-Excited Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balaji, J.; Reddy, Chandra S.; Kaushalya, S. K.; Maiti, Sudipta

    2004-04-01

    We demonstrate sensitive spatially resolved detection of physiological chromophores that emit in the ultraviolet (less than 330 nm). An atypical laser source (a visible wavelength femtosecond optical parametric oscillator), and an unconventional collection geometry (a lensless detector that detects the forward-emitted fluorescence) enable this detection. We report the excitation spectra of the catecholamines dopamine and norepinephrine, together with near-UV emitters serotonin and tryptophan, in the range of 550-595 nm. We estimate the molecular two-photon action cross section of dopamine, norepinephrine, and serotonin to be 1.2 mGM (1 GM, or Goppert Mayor, is equal to 10^-58 m^4 s^-1 photon^-1), 2 mGM, and 43 mGM, respectively, at 560 nm. The sensitivity achieved by this method holds promise for the microscopic imaging of vesicular catecholamines in live cells.

  10. PREDICTORS OF PLASMA AND URINARY CATECHOLAMINE LEVELS IN NORMOTENSIVE AND HYPERTENSIVE MEN AND WOMEN

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Aditi R.; Chamarthi, Bindu; Williams, Gordon H.; Hopkins, Paul N.; Seely, Ellen W.

    2013-01-01

    Age, sex, hypertension and dietary sodium are proposed to affect plasma and urinary catecholamines. Yet no prior study has examined the simultaneous effects of these factors within the same study population, so results may have been confounded by factors not determined. We investigate, for the first time, the impact of simultaneously determined predictors of plasma and urinary catecholamines, and the relationship of catecholamines with the diagnosis of hypertension. Hypertensive and normotensive subjects (n=308) were studied off antihypertensives in liberal and low sodium balance. Twenty-four hour urinary catecholamines (norepinephrine and epinephrine) were measured. Plasma catecholamines were measured supine after overnight fast. Repeated measures multivariate linear regression models examined effect of sex, race, age, body mass index, dietary salt (liberal salt vs. low salt), hypertension status, and mean arterial pressure on plasma and urinary catecholamines. Logistic regression determined the relationship of catecholamines with diagnosis of hypertension. Dietary sodium restriction and increasing age predicted increased plasma and urinary norepinephrine, with sodium restriction having greatest effect. Female sex predicted lower urinary and plasma epinephrine. Neither plasma nor urinary catecholamines predicted the diagnosis of hypertension. In summary, specific demographic factors variably impact catecholamines and should be considered when assessing catecholamines in research and clinical settings. PMID:24226101

  11. Predictors of plasma and urinary catecholamine levels in normotensive and hypertensive men and women.

    PubMed

    Saxena, A R; Chamarthi, B; Williams, G H; Hopkins, P N; Seely, E W

    2014-05-01

    Age, sex, hypertension and dietary sodium are proposed to affect plasma and urinary catecholamines. Yet no prior study has examined the simultaneous effects of these factors within the same study population. So results may have been confounded by factors not determined. We investigate, for the first time, the impact of simultaneously determined predictors of plasma and urinary catecholamines and the relationship of catecholamines with the diagnosis of hypertension. Hypertensive and normotensive subjects (n=308) were studied off antihypertensives in liberal and low sodium balance. 24 h urinary catecholamines (norepinephrine and epinephrine) were measured. Plasma catecholamines were measured supine after overnight fast. Repeated measures multivariate linear regression models examined the effect of sex, race, age, body mass index (BMI), dietary salt (liberal salt vs low salt), hypertension status and mean arterial pressure (MAP) on plasma and urinary catecholamines. Logistic regression determined the relationship of catecholamines with diagnosis of hypertension. Dietary sodium restriction and increasing age predicted increased plasma and urinary norepinephrine, with sodium restriction having the greatest effect. Female sex predicted lower urinary and plasma epinephrine. Neither plasma nor urinary catecholamines predicted the diagnosis of hypertension. In summary, specific demographic factors variably impact catecholamines and should be considered when assessing catecholamines in research and clinical settings.

  12. Chronic hyperoxic effects on cat carotid body catecholamines and structure.

    PubMed

    Mokashi, A; Di Guilio, C; Morelli, L; Lahiri, S

    1994-06-01

    To account for the loss of O2 chemoreception in the cat carotid body during chronic hyperoxia, we studied the putative neurotransmitter correlates. Also, we studied the structural aspect of the carotid body tissues. We found that catecholamine concentrations increased and that the densecored vesicles in the glomus cells were not depleted, indicating that a lack of transmitters was not the cause for the loss of O2 chemoreception.

  13. Bone mineral status in children with congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Fleischman, Amy; Ringelheim, Julie; Feldman, Henry A; Gordon, Catherine M

    2007-02-01

    Congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) is caused by a deficiency in an adrenal enzyme resulting in alterations in cortisol and aldosterone production. Bone status is affected by chronic glucocorticoid therapy and excess androgen exposure in children with CAH. This cross-sectional study enrolled participants with 21-hydroxylase deficiency from a pediatric referral center. Bone mineral density in the participants was normal when compared to age, gender and ethnicity adjusted standards, with respect to chronological age or bone age. Lean body mass was positively correlated with bone mineral content (BMC), independent of fat mass (p < 0.001). There was no significant correlation between glucocorticoid dose or serum androgen levels and skeletal endpoints. In conclusion, lean body mass appears to be an important correlate of BMC in patients with CAH. The normal bone status may be explained by the differential effects of glucocorticoids on growing bone, beneficial androgen effects, or other disease specific factors.

  14. Catecholamine differential modulation of PMA and superantigen stimulated lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Downs, M.O.; Johnson, H.M. )

    1991-03-15

    Neurotransmitters have been demonstrated to be important modulators of immune regulation. The authors have previously demonstrated that the catecholamine agonists isoproterenol (Iso), epinephrine (Epi), and norepinephrine (Nor) are potent inhibitors of IFN{gamma} production by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) stimulated T-cell lymphoma cell line (L12-R4) with the order of potency being Iso > Epi > Nor. Herein, they describe a differential effect of catecholamine influence on staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA) stimulated murine splenic cell cultures. Norepinephrine and to a lesser extent Epi can cause a biphasic modulation of IFN{gamma} production. Inhibition of INF{gamma}was seen in the micromolar range while augmentation occurred at the nanomolar range. In light of previous work, these data suggest that {beta}-adrenergic agonist stimulation of antigen presenting cells (APC) may be immunosuppressive while {alpha}-agonist stimulation immunopotentiating. Further, APC may play a central role in determining the net outcome of catecholamine stimulation by being able to mediate signals from both pathways. This response may represent a peripheral neurotransmitter mediated mechanism for fine tuning' immunoreactivity.

  15. Hypotension and reduced catecholamines in neuropeptide Y transgenic rats.

    PubMed

    Michalkiewicz, Mieczyslaw; Knestaut, Kriss M; Bytchkova, Elena Yu; Michalkiewicz, Teresa

    2003-05-01

    The neurons that control blood pressure express neuropeptide Y. Administered centrally, this neuropeptide reduces blood pressure and anxiety, together with lowering sympathetic outflow. The generation of neuropeptide Y transgenic rats overexpressing this peptide, under its natural promoter, has allowed us to examine the role of endogenous neuropeptide Y in the long-term control of blood pressure by the sympathetic nervous system. This study tested a hypothesis that endogenous neuropeptide Y acts to reduce blood pressure and catecholamine release. Blood pressure was measured by radiotelemetry in conscious male transgenic and nontransgenic littermates (control). Novel cage with cold water and forced swimming were used as stressors. Catecholamines were determined in 24-hour urine (baseline) and plasma (cold water stress) by a radioenzymatic assay. Blood pressures in baseline and during the stresses were significantly reduced in the transgenic rats. The lower blood pressure was associated with reduced catecholamines, lower decrease in pressure after autonomic ganglionic blockade, and increased longevity. Data obtained through the use of this transgenic rat model support and extend the evidence for the previously postulated sympatholytic and hypotensive effects of neuropeptide Y and provide novel evidence for an important physiological role of endogenous peptide in blood pressure regulation. As indicated by the increased longevity of these rats, in long-term regulation, these buffering actions of neuropeptide Y may have important cardiovascular protective effects against sympathetic hyperexcitation.

  16. Copper deficiency in neonatal mice alters brain catecholamine levels

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, W.R.; Prohaska, J.R. )

    1991-03-15

    Copper (Cu) deficiency was investigated in Swiss albino mice to develop a model that alters brain catecholamine metabolism without serious growth impairment. Cu deficiency was induced by feeding a diet low in Cu to dams beginning either 7 days (d) prior, 4d prior, 4d after, or on the day of parturition. All 4-week-old male Cu-deficient ({minus}Cu) offspring were anemic and exhibited biochemical characteristics of Cu deficiency when compared to their respective +Cu control mice. However, the best model, which resulted in altered catecholamine metabolism characterized by elevation of dopamine (DA) and depression in norepinephrine (NE) in brain, heart, and spleen, was when treatment began 4d prior to birth. Body and brain weight were not altered. However, levels of Cu in brain and liver of {minus}Cu mice were markedly reduced to 21% and 31% of those measured in +Cu controls, respectively. Furthermore, brain NE and DA concentrations of {minus}Cu mice were 72% and 132% of those quantified in +Cu offspring, respectively. A plausible explanation is that dietary Cu deficiency results in lower activity of brain dopamine-{beta}-monooxygenase, the Cu dependent enzyme that catalyzes conversion of DA to NE. It is not yet known if these changes in Ne and DA pool size altered the quantity or characteristics of the neuronal catecholamine receptors, and more importantly, whether or not the observed changes are reversible by nutritional intervention.

  17. Reciprocal Catecholamine Changes during Opiate Exposure and Withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Fox, Megan E; Rodeberg, Nathan T; Wightman, R Mark

    2017-02-01

    Dysregulated catecholamine signaling has long been implicated in drug abuse. Although much is known about adaptations following chronic drug administration, little work has investigated how a single drug exposure paired with withdrawal influences catecholamine signaling in vivo. We used fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in freely moving rats to measure real-time catecholamine overflow during acute morphine exposure and naloxone-precipitated withdrawal in two regions associated with the addiction cycle: the dopamine-dense nucleus accumbens (NAc) and norepinephrine-rich ventral bed nucleus of the stria terminalis (vBNST). We compared dopamine transients in the NAc with norepinephrine concentration changes in the vBNST, and correlated release with specific withdrawal-related behaviors. Morphine increased dopamine transients in the NAc, but did not elicit norepinephrine responses in the vBNST. Conversely, dopamine output was decreased during withdrawal, while norepinephrine was released in the vBNST during specific withdrawal symptoms. Both norepinephrine and withdrawal symptoms could be elicited in the absence of morphine by administering naloxone with an α2 antagonist. The data support reciprocal roles for dopamine and norepinephrine signaling during drug exposure and withdrawal. The data also support the allostasis model and show that negative-reinforcement may begin working after a single exposure/withdrawal episode.

  18. Cyclic nucleotides of canine antral smooth muscle. Effects of acetylcholine, catecholamines and gastrin.

    PubMed

    Baur, S; Grant, B; Wooton, J

    1981-01-07

    1. The effects of acetylcholine, catecholamines and gastrin on the intracellular content of cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP in antral circular muscle have been determined. 2. Acetylcholine results in a significant but transient increase in intracellular cyclic GMP. 3. Isoproterenol and norepinephrine increase intracellular cyclic AMP. Based on half-maximal effective doses, isoproterenol is 2.7-times more effective than norepinephrine. The increase in intracellular cyclic AMP by both agents is inhibited by propranolol but not phentolamine, indicating that both agents act on the muscle cell by a beta-receptor-coupled mechanism. 4. Gastrin has no demonstrable effect on either cyclic AMP or cyclic GMP. This suggests that while gastrin and acetylcholine can produce a like myoelectric response in the muscle cell, the action of gastrin is mediated by a separate receptor, presumably on the muscle cell, and not by a release of acetylcholine.

  19. A Case Report of Bilateral Sarcomatoid Carcinoma of Adrenal Glands With Adrenal Insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, Noriyoshi; Nagase, Mamiko; Takami, Saki; Araki, Asuka; Ishikawa, Nahoko; Koike, Chiaki; Shiina, Hiroaki; Maruyama, Riruke

    2016-12-01

    Adrenocortical carcinomas are relatively rare, but they are considered to be highly aggressive malignant tumors. Sarcomatoid carcinomas represent an even more aggressive type. Bilateral malignant adrenal tumors are extraordinary rare, except for those that represent metastatic spread from a primary neoplasm. Here we report a case of a 69-year-old woman who presented symptoms that raised strong suspicions of adrenal insufficiency. Bilateral adrenal masses, identified in the imaging study, were responsible for the clinical manifestation and surgically resected. Surgical specimens of the bilateral adrenal tumors shared histological features compatible with sarcomatoid carcinoma. It was very difficult to confirm that the sarcomatoid carcinomas were derived from the cortex of the adrenal glands, but careful morphological observation and the panel of antibodies used for immunohistochemistry made the diagnosis possible. This is the first report of sarcomatoid carcinomas involving both adrenal glands. It should be emphasized that sarcomatoid carcinoma can arise bilaterally from even functionally impaired adrenal glands.

  20. Delayed Diagnosis of Graves’ Thyrotoxicoisis Presenting as Recurrent Adrenal Crisis in Primary Adrenal Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Dukhabandhu; Jebasingh, K Felix

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal crisis is a potential life threatening complication. The common causes of adrenal crisis are infections, surgical stress and abrupt cessation of steroid medications. Endocrine causes like Graves’ disease with thyrotoxicosis is one of the less common causes of an adrenal crisis. We report a 42-year-old female who presented with recurrent episodes of adrenal crisis due to delayed diagnosis of thyrotoxicosis. She was initially treated with Carbimazole followed by Radio-iodine ablation and currently she is euthyroid. Her adrenal insufficiency was initially treated with hydrocortisone during the time of adrenal crisis followed by Prednisolone 5 mg once daily in the morning along with fludrocortisone 50 mcg once daily. This case highlights the need for high index of suspicion and less common causes like thyrotoxicosis should be ruled out in patients with adrenal crisis. PMID:27190873

  1. Serum Catecholamines and Dysautonomia in Diabetic Gastroparesis and Liver Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Aslam, Naeem; Kedar, Archana; Nagarajarao, Harsha S.; Reddy, Kartika; Rashed, Hani; Cutts, Teresa; Riely, Caroline; Abell, Thomas L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Plasma catecholamine influences autonomic function and control, but there are few reports correlating them. In this study, 47 individuals (mean age, 38 years) were studied: 19 diabetes mellitus (DM) patients with gastroparesis, 16 with liver disease and 12 control subjects. Methods Noninvasive autonomic function was assessed for sympathetic adrenergic functions as peripheral vasoconstriction in response to cold stress test and postural adjustment ratio (PAR) and cholinergic function as Valsalva ratio, represented by change in R-R intervals. Measurements were compared by analysis of variance and Spearman’s correlation, and results were reported as mean ± standard error. Results Plasma norepinephrine (1902.7 ± 263.3; P = 0.001) and epinephrine (224.5 ± 66.5; P = 0.008) levels, as well as plasma dopamine levels (861.3 ± 381.7), and total plasma catecholamine levels were highest for patients with liver disease, who also had significant negative correlation between norepinephrine level and vasoconstriction (P = 0.01; r = −0.5), PAR1 (P = 0.01; r = −0.5), sympathetic adrenergic functions (P = 0.005; r = −0.6), total autonomic index (P = 0.01–0.5) and total autonomic function (P = 0.01; r = −0.2) and also negative correlation between epinephrine plasma level and total autonomic function (P = 0.04; r = 0.4). DM patients were next highest in norepinephrine level (133.26 ± 7.43), but lowest for plasma catecholamine; a positive correlation between dopamine level and PAR1 (P = 0.008; r = 0.6) was also seen in this group. Plasma dopamine levels and spider score correlated negatively (P = 0.04; r = −0.5) and total plasma catecholamine positively with encephalopathy (P = 0.04; r = 0.5) in patients with liver disease. Conclusions Plasma catecholamine levels correlated with adrenergic functions in control subjects and patients with DM and liver disease, with no significant correlation seen for cholinergic function. PMID:26181082

  2. Unilateral adrenal hemorrhagic infarction in essential thrombocythemia.

    PubMed

    Burnet, G; Lambert, M; Annet, L; Lefebvre, C

    2015-12-01

    Adrenal hemorrhage is a rare disease associated with various conditions. We report a case of a 68-year-old woman with abdominal and back pain. The diagnostic work-up showed a left adrenal gland infarction associated with essential thrombocythemia. Treatment consisted in painkillers and treating the underlying condition in order to prevent further thrombotic events.

  3. Computed tomographic findings in bilateral adrenal tuberculosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wilms, G.E.; Baert, A.L.; Kint, E.J.; Pringot, J.H.; Goddeeris, P.G.

    1983-03-01

    The computed tomographic (CT) features of bilateral adrenal tuberculosis are reported in two cases that demonstrate two typical different clinical and morphological manifestations of the disease. The incidence and CT appearance of adrenal tuberculosis are discussed, with emphasis on differential diagnosis.

  4. Structural and biochemical remodelling in catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy: comparative and ontogenetic aspects.

    PubMed

    Ostádal, B; Pelouch, V; Ostádalová, I; Nováková, O

    Excessive release or administration of beta-mimetic catecholamines may induce cardiomegaly, necrotic lesions and accumulation of connective tissue in the heart of adult homoiotherms. It was examined here whether similar changes can also be observed at different stages of evolution of the cardiovascular system, i.e. in poikilotherms and in homoiotherms during embryonic life. Sensitivity of the poikilothermic hearts (carp, frog, turtle) to isoproterenol (IPRO) was significantly lower than in the homoiotherms. Necrotic lesions, if present, were localized in the inner spongious musculature which has no vascular supply but which exhibits higher activities of enzymes connected with aerobic oxidation. Moreover, the IPRO-induced decrease of the phospholipid content was also significantly more expressed in the spongious layer. IPRO treatment did not influence the total weight of the fish heart but the proportion of the outer compact layer was significantly higher. These changes were accompanied by an increase of collagen, higher water content and an increase of isomyosin with a lower ATPase activity. The response of the poikilothermic heart to IPRO-induced overload thus differs significantly from that in the homoiotherms. The administration of IPRO during embryonic life of homoiotherms (chick) induces serious cardiovascular disturbances, including cardiomegaly and cellular oedema. Necroses of myofibrils, characteristic of IPRO-induced lesions of adults, were, however, rather exceptional. IPRO did not elevate the concentration of 85Sr (as a calcium homologue) in the immature myocardium; it seems, therefore, that IPRO-induced changes of the embryonic heart are not necessarily due to an intracellular calcium overload. It may be concluded that the character of catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy is not uniform and depends strictly on the stage of cardiac development.

  5. Brain and Adrenal Metabolic Responses to Stress (The Role of Brain Catecholamines in Regulation of Response to Stress).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-15

    Effects of Cold Water Stress and Hallucinogenics on Brain Amines The effects of cold water stress were compared to LSO, psilocybin , mescaline, and...enhanced release similar to the effects of amphetamine and psilocybin . The data indicate that the psychotomimetic drugs tested work by different mechanisms

  6. Electrophysiological properties and augmented catecholamine release from chromaffin cells of WKY and SHR rats contributing to the hypertension development elicited by chronic EtOH consumption.

    PubMed

    Bomfim, Guilherme Henrique Souza; Méndez-López, Iago; Fernández-Morales, José Carlos; Padín, Juan Fernando; Jurkiewicz, Aron; Jurkiewicz, Neide Hyppolito; García, Antonio García

    2017-03-16

    It is known that chronic ethanol (EtOH) consumption leads to hypertension development and has been associated with deleterious effects on the cardiovascular system. Whether this condition alters calcium (Ca(2+)) signaling and exocytosis in adrenal chromaffin cells (CCs) as the case is for genetic hypertension, is unknown. We explored this question in four randomized experimental groups, male Wistar Kyoto (WKY/EtOH) and Spontaneously Hypertensive (SHR/EtOH) rats were subjected to the intake of increasing EtOH concentrations (5-20%, for 30 days) and their respective controls (WKY/Control and SHR/Control) received water. WKY/EtOH developed hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy; blood aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) and H2O2 were also augmented. In comparison with WKY/Control, CCs from WKY/EtOH had the following features: (i) depolarization and higher frequency of spontaneous action potentials; (ii) decreased Ca(2+) currents with slower inactivation; (iii) decreased K(+) currents; (iv) augmented K(+)-elicited cytosolic Ca(2+) transients ([Ca(2+)]c); (v) enhanced K(+)-elicited catecholamine release. These cardiovascular, blood and CCs changes were qualitatively similar to those undergone by SHR/Control and SHR/EtOH. The results suggest that the hypertension elicited by chronic EtOH has pathogenic features common to genetic hypertension namely, augmented [Ca(2+)]c transients and catecholamine release from their CCs.

  7. Adrenal GRK2 lowering is an underlying mechanism for the beneficial sympathetic effects of exercise training in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Rengo, Giuseppe; Leosco, Dario; Zincarelli, Carmela; Marchese, Massimo; Corbi, Graziamaria; Liccardo, Daniela; Filippelli, Amelia; Ferrara, Nicola; Lisanti, Michael P; Koch, Walter J; Lymperopoulos, Anastasios

    2010-06-01

    Exercise training has been reported to exert beneficial effects on cardiac function and to reduce morbidity and mortality of chronic heart failure (HF). Augmented sympathetic nervous system (SNS) activity, leading to elevated circulating catecholamine (CA) levels, is a hallmark of chronic HF that significantly aggravates this disease. Exercise training has been shown to also reduce SNS overactivity in HF, but the underlying molecular mechanism(s) remain unidentified. We recently reported that adrenal G protein-coupled receptor kinase-2 (GRK2), an enzyme that regulates the sympathoinhibitory alpha(2)-adrenoceptors (alpha(2)-ARs) present in the CA-producing adrenal medulla, is upregulated in HF, contributing to the chronically elevated CA levels and SNS activity of the disease. In the present study, we tested whether exercise training can affect the adrenal GRK2-alpha(2)-AR-CA production system in the context of HF. For this purpose, a 10-wk-long exercise training regimen of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats starting at 4 wk postmyocardial infarction (post-MI) was employed, and examination at the end of this treatment period revealed significant amelioration of beta-AR-stimulated contractility in response to exercise training, accompanied by cardiac GRK2 reduction and restoration of circulating plasma CA levels. Importantly, adrenal GRK2 expression (72 + or - 5% reduction vs. post-MI untrained) and alpha(2)-AR number were also restored after exercise training in post-MI animals. These results suggest that exercise training restores the adrenal GRK2-alpha(2)-AR-CA production axis, and this might be part of the mechanism whereby this therapeutic modality normalizes sympathetic overdrive and impedes worsening of the failing heart.

  8. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, neuroendocrine factors and stress.

    PubMed

    Tsigos, Constantine; Chrousos, George P

    2002-10-01

    The stress system coordinates the adaptive responses of the organism to stressors of any kind.(1). The main components of the stress system are the corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) and locus ceruleus-norepinephrine (LC/NE)-autonomic systems and their peripheral effectors, the pituitary-adrenal axis, and the limbs of the autonomic system. Activation of the stress system leads to behavioral and peripheral changes that improve the ability of the organism to adjust homeostasis and increase its chances for survival. The CRH and LC/NE systems stimulate arousal and attention, as well as the mesocorticolimbic dopaminergic system, which is involved in anticipatory and reward phenomena, and the hypothalamic beta-endorphin system, which suppresses pain sensation and, hence, increases analgesia. CRH inhibits appetite and activates thermogenesis via the catecholaminergic system. Also, reciprocal interactions exist between the amygdala and the hippocampus and the stress system, which stimulates these elements and is regulated by them. CRH plays an important role in inhibiting GnRH secretion during stress, while, via somatostatin, it also inhibits GH, TRH and TSH secretion, suppressing, thus, the reproductive, growth and thyroid functions. Interestingly, all three of these functions receive and depend on positive catecholaminergic input. The end-hormones of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, glucocorticoids, on the other hand, have multiple roles. They simultaneously inhibit the CRH, LC/NE and beta-endorphin systems and stimulate the mesocorticolimbic dopaminergic system and the CRH peptidergic central nucleus of the amygdala. In addition, they directly inhibit pituitary gonadotropin, GH and TSH secretion, render the target tissues of sex steroids and growth factors resistant to these substances and suppress the 5' deiodinase, which converts the relatively inactive tetraiodothyronine (T(4)) to triiodothyronine (T(3)), contributing further to the suppression of

  9. Effects of noradrenaline administration on the interrenal gland of the newt, Triturus carnifex: evidence of intra-adrenal paracrine interactions.

    PubMed

    Capaldo, A; Gay, F; Valiante, S; Laforgia, V; Varano, L

    2004-01-01

    The existence of paracrine control of steroidogenic activity by adrenochromaffin cells in Triturus carnifex was investigated by in vivo noradrenaline (NA) administration. The effects were evaluated by examination of the ultrastructural morphological and morphometrical features of the tissues as well as the serum levels of aldosterone, NA, and adrenaline (A). In March and July, NA administration increased aldosterone release (from 187.23 +/- 2.93 pg/ml to 878.31 +/- 6.13 pg/ml in March; from 314.60 +/- 1.34 pg/ml to 622.51 +/- 2.65 pg/ml in July) from steroidogenic cells. The cells showed clear signs of stimulation, as evidenced by a strong reduction of lipid content. Moreover, NA administration decreased the mean total number of secretory vesicles in the chromaffin cells in March (from 7.24 +/- 0.18 granules/micro2 to 5.57 +/- 1.88 granules/micro2) and July (from 7.74 +/- 0.74 granules/micro2 to 6.04 +/- 1.13 granules/micro2). In March, however, when T. carnifex chromaffin cells contain both catecholamines, NA (3.88 +/- 0.13 granules/micro2) and A (3.36 +/- 0.05 granules/micro2) in almost equal quantities, NA administration reduced A content (1.29 +/- 1.04 granules/micro2) in the chromaffin cells, enhancing adrenaline secretion (from 681.27 +/- 1.83 pg/ml to 1527.02 +/- 2.11 pg/ml). In July, when the chromaffin cells contain almost exclusively NA granules (NA: 7.42 +/- 0.86 granules/micro2; A: 0.32 +/- 0.13 granules/micro2), NA administration reduced the number of NA granules (5.45 +/- 1.10 granules/micro2), thereby increasing noradrenaline release from the chromaffin cells (from 640.19 +/- 1.65 pg/ml to 1217.0 +/- 1.14 pg/ml). The results of this study indicate that NA influences the steroidogenic cells, eliciting aldosterone release. Noradrenalin effects on the chromaffin cells, increase of NA or A secretion, according to the period of chromaffin cell functional cycle, may be direct and/or mediated through the steroidogenic cells. The existence of intra-adrenal

  10. Quantitation of iodine-123 MIBG uptake by normal adrenal medulla in hypertensive patients

    SciTech Connect

    Bomanji, J.; Flatman, W.D.; Horne, T.; Fettich, J.; Britton, K.E.; Ross, G.; Besser, G.M.

    1987-03-01

    Eighteen hypertensive patients with a clinical suspicion of pheochromocytoma and raised or borderline raised plasma catecholamine and urinary vanillyl mandelic acid (VMA) levels were studied by scintigraphy using /sup 123/I-labeled metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG). None of these patients had any scintigraphic evidence of pheochromocytoma at the time of study or on subsequent clinical follow-up. A quantitative approach was taken to calculate the adrenal medullary uptake of (/sup 123/I)MIBG in these patients. Three different methods of quantitation were evaluated using data acquired from an anthropomorphic phantom and analysed by three independent observers. In the patient studies 34 out of 35 adrenal medullas were visualized with uptake in the range of 0.01-0.22% of the administered dose 22 hr postinjection which was calculated using the preferred quantitation method. This is an appropriate control group range for comparison with patients who have proven norepinephrine and epinephrine secreting tumors. A quantitative approach to (/sup 123/I)MIBG imaging provides an important tool for studying adrenomedullary pathophysiology.

  11. Body Mass Changes Associated With Hyper-Gravity are Independent of Adrenal Derived Hormones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, Charles E.; Moran, Megan M.; Wang, Tommy J.; Baer, Lisa A.; Yuan, Fang; Fung, Cyra K.; Stein, T. Peter; Dalton, Bonnie P. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Exposure to hyper-gravity results in a number of metabolic changes associated with increases in catecholamines and corticosterone. These changes result in a loss of body and fat mass. To assess the role of hormones derived from the adrenal gland in the changes we studied sham operated (SO) and adrenalectomized (ADX) male rats exposed to hyper-gravity of 2 G for 14 days. Control groups at 1 G were also studied. Urinary epinephrine (EPI) and corticosterone (CORT) were reduced in ADX animals. In response to 2 G there was an increase in urinary EPI and CORT in SO rats, while levels were unchanged in ADX animals. Both groups of animals had similar increases in urinary norepinephrine levels. The reductions of body mass gain in response to 2 G were the same in both groups. The decrease in relative fat mass was greater in ADX. Energy intake and expenditure were not different between groups. In response of returning to 1 G for 24 hours and reexposure to hyper-gravity there were no differences between SO and ADX in the changes of food and water intake, body mass or activity. The changes in metabolism with exposure to hyper-gravity do not appear to require hormones derived from the adrenal gland. The increase in lypolysis and alterations body and fat mass appear to be modulated by sympathetically derived norepinehrine.

  12. Sonography of the adrenal glands in the adult.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyoung Won; Kim, Jeong Kon; Choi, Hyuck Jae; Kim, Mi-hyun; Lee, Jeongjin; Cho, Kyoung-Sik

    2012-01-01

    Although its capability has been overlooked, sonography can be a useful screening tool for adrenal lesion in adults. In this article, we discuss scan technique, patient positioning, and anatomic consideration for adrenal sonography in adults and illustrate sonographic appearance of normal adrenal gland as well as adrenal tumors and tumor-like lesions.

  13. Clinicopathological correlates of adrenal Cushing's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Duan, Kai; Gomez Hernandez, Karen; Mete, Ozgur

    2015-03-01

    Endogenous Cushing's syndrome is a rare endocrine disorder that incurs significant cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, due to glucocorticoid excess. It comprises adrenal (20%) and non-adrenal (80%) aetiologies. While the majority of cases are attributed to pituitary or ectopic corticotropin (ACTH) overproduction, primary cortisol-producing adrenal cortical lesions are increasingly recognised in the pathophysiology of Cushing's syndrome. Our understanding of this disease has progressed substantially over the past decade. Recently, important mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of adrenal hypercortisolism have been elucidated with the discovery of mutations in cyclic AMP signalling (PRKACA, PRKAR1A, GNAS, PDE11A, PDE8B), armadillo repeat containing 5 gene (ARMC5) a putative tumour suppressor gene, aberrant G-protein-coupled receptors, and intra-adrenal secretion of ACTH. Accurate subtyping of Cushing's syndrome is crucial for treatment decision-making and requires a complete integration of clinical, biochemical, imaging and pathology findings. Pathological correlates in the adrenal glands include hyperplasia, adenoma and carcinoma. While the most common presentation is diffuse adrenocortical hyperplasia secondary to excess ACTH production, this entity is usually treated with pituitary or ectopic tumour resection. Therefore, when confronted with adrenalectomy specimens in the setting of Cushing's syndrome, surgical pathologists are most commonly exposed to adrenocortical adenomas, carcinomas and primary macronodular or micronodular hyperplasia. This review provides an update on the rapidly evolving knowledge of adrenal Cushing's syndrome and discusses the clinicopathological correlations of this important disease.

  14. Corticomedullary mixed tumor of the adrenal gland.

    PubMed

    Wieneke, J A; Thompson, L D; Heffess, C S

    2001-10-01

    Corticomedullary mixed tumors of the adrenal gland are quite rare, with only five well-documented cases reported in the literature.(1-4) Herein, we report the light microscopic and immunohistochemical features of two cases of this rare tumor. Patient 1 is a 34-year-old woman who presented with hypertension, hair loss, and amenorrhea of 1-year duration. Patient 2 is a 52-year-old woman who presented with flank pain and what appeared to be a renal mass on arteriogram with no history of hypertension, Cushing's syndrome, or other endocrine abnormalities. At surgery, the tumor was noted to arise from the adrenal gland rather than the kidney and adrenalectomy was performed. In both cases, the surgically resected specimens consisted of a well-circumscribed, single adrenal mass surrounded by a rim of uninvolved adrenal cortical tissue. The tumors were composed of adrenal cortical cells intimately admixed with pheochromocytes. Immunohistochemical studies highlighted these two cellular components. The pheochromocytes were strongly reactive with chromogranin and the sustentacular cells with S-100 protein, whereas the adrenal cortical cells reacted specifically with inhibin. Thus, we report two additional cases of mixed corticomedullary tumor of the adrenal gland. Ann Diagn Pathol 5:304-308, 2001. This is a US government work. There are no restrictions on its use.

  15. The catecholamine response to spaceflight: role of diet and gender

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, T. P.; Wade, C. E.

    2001-01-01

    Compared with men, women appear to have a decreased sympathetic nervous system (SNS) response to stress. The two manifestations where the sexual dimorphism has been the most pronounced involve the response of the SNS to fluid shifts and fuel metabolism during exercise. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether a similar sexual dimorphism was found in the response to spaceflight. To do so, we compared catecholamine excretion by male and female astronauts from two similar shuttle missions, Spacelab Life Sciences 1 (SLS1, 1991) and 2 (SLS2, 1993) for evidence of sexual dimorphism. To evaluate the variability of the catecholamine response in men, we compared catecholamine excretion from the two SLS missions against the 1996 Life and Microgravity Sciences Mission (LMS) and the 1973 Skylab missions. RESULTS: No gender- or mission-dependent changes were found with epinephrine. Separating out the SLS1/2 data by gender shows that norepinephrine excretion was essentially unchanged with spaceflight in women (98 +/- 10%; n = 3) and substantially decreased with the men (41 +/- 9%; n = 4, P < 0.05). Data are a percentage of mean preflight value +/- SE. Comparisons among males demonstrated significant mission effects on norepinephrine excretion. After flight, there was a transient increase in norepinephrine but no evidence of any gender-specific effects. We conclude that norepinephrine excretion during spaceflight is both mission and gender dependent. Men show the greater response, with at least three factors being involved, a response to microgravity, energy balance, and the ratio of carbohydrate to fat in the diet.

  16. Lorry drivers' work stress evaluated by catecholamines excreted in urine.

    PubMed Central

    van der Beek, A J; Meijman, T F; Frings-Dresen, M H; Kuiper, J I; Kuiper, S

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To evaluate lorry drivers' work stress by measurement of adrenaline and noradrenaline excreted in the urine, and to find out which factors in their working situation are related to the excretion rates of these catecholamines. METHODS--The urinary excretion of adrenaline and noradrenaline of 32 lorry drivers, who also had loading and unloading activities to perform, was studied for one working day and one rest day. Each driver was asked to provide six urine samples on both days. RESULTS--For all samples, except the first (overnight) sample, the excretion rates of both catecholamines on the working day were higher than those on the rest day. Hierarchical multiple regression analyses were carried out to find out which factors in the drivers' working situation were related to the excretion rate of the working day. The excretion rate of adrenaline on the rest day, age, and psychosomatic complaints were positively related to the excretion rate on the working day (all P < 0.05). Body mass index and physical workload during loading and unloading were positively related to noradrenaline excretion rate (both P < 0.01). Psychosocial job strain did not significantly contribute to the proportion of variance explained in the excretion rates of both catecholamines. CONCLUSIONS--The excretion rates of adrenaline and, especially, noradrenaline on the working day were higher than those found in earlier studies among professional drivers and insufficient recovery took place after the work was ended. The only association between excretion rate on the working day and work stressors was found for noradrenaline and physical workload. The drivers' sympathoadrenal medullary reactivity to everyday work demands shows the characteristics of sustained activation. PMID:7670621

  17. Interspecies variations in Bordetella catecholamine receptor gene regulation and function.

    PubMed

    Brickman, Timothy J; Suhadolc, Ryan J; Armstrong, Sandra K

    2015-12-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica can use catecholamines to obtain iron from transferrin and lactoferrin via uptake pathways involving the BfrA, BfrD, and BfrE outer membrane receptor proteins, and although Bordetella pertussis has the bfrD and bfrE genes, the role of these genes in iron uptake has not been demonstrated. In this study, the bfrD and bfrE genes of B. pertussis were shown to be functional in B. bronchiseptica, but neither B. bronchiseptica bfrD nor bfrE imparted catecholamine utilization to B. pertussis. Gene fusion analyses found that expression of B. bronchiseptica bfrA was increased during iron starvation, as is common for iron receptor genes, but that expression of the bfrD and bfrE genes of both species was decreased during iron limitation. As shown previously for B. pertussis, bfrD expression in B. bronchiseptica was also dependent on the BvgAS virulence regulatory system; however, in contrast to the case in B. pertussis, the known modulators nicotinic acid and sulfate, which silence Bvg-activated genes, did not silence expression of bfrD in B. bronchiseptica. Further studies using a B. bronchiseptica bvgAS mutant expressing the B. pertussis bvgAS genes revealed that the interspecies differences in bfrD modulation are partly due to BvgAS differences. Mouse respiratory infection experiments determined that catecholamine utilization contributes to the in vivo fitness of B. bronchiseptica and B. pertussis. Additional evidence of the in vivo importance of the B. pertussis receptors was obtained from serologic studies demonstrating pertussis patient serum reactivity with the B. pertussis BfrD and BfrE proteins.

  18. Interspecies Variations in Bordetella Catecholamine Receptor Gene Regulation and Function

    PubMed Central

    Brickman, Timothy J.; Suhadolc, Ryan J.

    2015-01-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica can use catecholamines to obtain iron from transferrin and lactoferrin via uptake pathways involving the BfrA, BfrD, and BfrE outer membrane receptor proteins, and although Bordetella pertussis has the bfrD and bfrE genes, the role of these genes in iron uptake has not been demonstrated. In this study, the bfrD and bfrE genes of B. pertussis were shown to be functional in B. bronchiseptica, but neither B. bronchiseptica bfrD nor bfrE imparted catecholamine utilization to B. pertussis. Gene fusion analyses found that expression of B. bronchiseptica bfrA was increased during iron starvation, as is common for iron receptor genes, but that expression of the bfrD and bfrE genes of both species was decreased during iron limitation. As shown previously for B. pertussis, bfrD expression in B. bronchiseptica was also dependent on the BvgAS virulence regulatory system; however, in contrast to the case in B. pertussis, the known modulators nicotinic acid and sulfate, which silence Bvg-activated genes, did not silence expression of bfrD in B. bronchiseptica. Further studies using a B. bronchiseptica bvgAS mutant expressing the B. pertussis bvgAS genes revealed that the interspecies differences in bfrD modulation are partly due to BvgAS differences. Mouse respiratory infection experiments determined that catecholamine utilization contributes to the in vivo fitness of B. bronchiseptica and B. pertussis. Additional evidence of the in vivo importance of the B. pertussis receptors was obtained from serologic studies demonstrating pertussis patient serum reactivity with the B. pertussis BfrD and BfrE proteins. PMID:26371128

  19. Adrenal G protein-coupled receptor kinase-2 in regulation of sympathetic nervous system activity in heart failure.

    PubMed

    McCrink, Katie A; Brill, Ava; Lymperopoulos, Anastasios

    2015-09-26

    Heart failure (HF), the number one cause of death in the western world, is caused by the insufficient performance of the heart leading to tissue underperfusion in response to an injury or insult. It comprises complex interactions between important neurohormonal mechanisms that try but ultimately fail to sustain cardiac output. The most prominent such mechanism is the sympathetic (adrenergic) nervous system (SNS), whose activity and outflow are greatly elevated in HF. SNS hyperactivity confers significant toxicity to the failing heart and markedly increases HF morbidity and mortality via excessive activation of adrenergic receptors, which are G protein-coupled receptors. Thus, ligand binding induces their coupling to heterotrimeric G proteins that transduce intracellular signals. G protein signaling is turned-off by the agonist-bound receptor phosphorylation courtesy of G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs), followed by βarrestin binding, which prevents the GRK-phosphorylated receptor from further interaction with the G proteins and simultaneously leads it inside the cell (receptor sequestration). Recent evidence indicates that adrenal GRK2 and βarrestins can regulate adrenal catecholamine secretion, thereby modulating SNS activity in HF. The present review gives an account of all these studies on adrenal GRKs and βarrestins in HF and discusses the exciting new therapeutic possibilities for chronic HF offered by targeting these proteins pharmacologically.

  20. Effects of adrenal cortex hormones on limbic structures: some experimental and clinical correlations related to depression.

    PubMed Central

    Dubrovsky, B

    1993-01-01

    Cushing's disorder and depression present overlapping although not identical psychological symptomatology. In turn, a subset of patients with affective disorders present with hypercortisolemia and disturbances, specifically disinhibition, of the hypothalamic hypophysio adrenal axis (HHAA). Memory disturbances, in particular, biasing toward negative contents, overlapping sleep abnormalities (marked reduction of stages 3 and 4) increased fatigue and loss of energy, attentional deficits and irritability, are just part of the common symptomatology presented by patients with both Cushing's disorder and depression. All of these behavioral manifestations are known to be affected by adrenal steroid hormones. There is consensus that hippocampal structures are a main target for adrenal steroid hormones; hence, these neural regions are some of the most likely mediators of the effects of corticoadrenal steroids on behavior. This paper proposes that an imbalance of adrenal steroids and their metabolites may play a fundamental role in the psychophysiopathology of Cushing's and depressive disorders. The imbalance of these hormones, especially at limbic sites, could distort mood and memory content affecting cognition based on recollection and present experiences. Reestablishing an adrenal balance could therefore be considered as a therapeutic aid in a subset of depressive disorders. PMID:8461280

  1. Coexistence of Cushing syndrome from functional adrenal adenoma and Addison disease from immune-mediated adrenalitis.

    PubMed

    Colucci, Randall; Jimenez, Rafael E; Farrar, William; Malgor, Ramiro; Kohn, Leonard; Schwartz, Frank L

    2012-06-01

    A 56-year-old woman presented with an incidental adrenal adenoma and physical examination findings that included moderate obesity, a slight cervicothoracic fat pad ("buffalo hump"), increased supraclavicular fat pads, and white abdominal striae. Biochemical workup revealed elevated levels of 24-hour urinary free cortisol but normal serum morning cortisol and suppressed levels of corticotropin, suggestive of adrenal-dependent Cushing syndrome. The resected adrenal gland revealed macronodular cortical hyperplasia with a dominant nodule. Other findings included an absent cortisol response to corticotropin stimulation, presence of serum anti-21-hydroxylase antibodies, and mononuclear cell infiltration--consistent with adrenalitis. The findings represent, to the authors' knowledge, the first known case of a patient with coexistent functional cortisol-secreting macronodular adrenal tumor resulting in Cushing syndrome and immune-mediated adrenalitis resulting in Addison disease.

  2. Severe hyponatremia caused by hypothalamic adrenal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Shibata, T; Oeda, T; Saito, Y

    1999-05-01

    A 60-year-old woman was admitted with severe hyponatremia. Basal values of adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), thyroid hormone and cortisol were normal on admission. Impairment of water diuresis was observed by water loading test. Initially, we diagnosed her condition as the syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone (SIADH). By provocation test, we finally confirmed that the hyponatremia was caused by hypothalamic adrenal insufficiency. The basal values of ACTH and cortisol might not be sufficient to exclude the possibility of adrenal insufficiency. Therefore, it is necessary to evaluate adrenal function by provocation test or to re-evaluate it after recovery from hyponatremia.

  3. Spontaneous Unilateral Adrenal Hemorrhage in Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahem, Rawaa; Munguti, Cyrus; Mortada, Rami

    2017-01-01

    Spontaneous adrenal hemorrhage (SAH) is a serious medical condition associated with variable clinical presentation depending on the extent of the hemorrhage. Pregnancy-induced adrenal hemorrhage is poorly understood. A low cortisol level in the peripartum period with radiological findings is sufficient to establish the diagnosis. Prompt hormone replacement and supportive care to ensure good clinical outcomes is crucial. Due to the potentially life-threatening complications, physicians should have a high suspicion for adrenal hemorrhage when they evaluate patients with hypotension, fatigue, and abdominal pain during the peripartum period. PMID:28191381

  4. Presence of kisspeptin-like immunoreactivity in human adrenal glands and adrenal tumors.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Kazuhiro; Shoji, Itaru; Shibasaki, Akiko; Kato, Ichiro; Hiraishi, Keisuke; Yamamoto, Hajime; Kaneko, Kiriko; Murakami, Osamu; Morimoto, Ryo; Satoh, Fumitoshi; Ito, Sadayoshi; Totsune, Kazuhito

    2010-05-01

    Kisspeptins are neuropeptides which activate the hypothalamo-pituitary gonadal axis and are considered to play important physiological roles in the reproduction. Kisspeptins have also been reported to stimulate the aldosterone secretion from the adrenal cortex. However, the expression of kisspeptins in human adrenal glands and adrenal tumors has not been clarified yet. We, therefore, studied the presence of kisspeptin-like immunoreactivity (LI) in human adrenal glands and adrenal tumors (adrenocortical adenomas, adrenocortical carcinomas, and pheochromocytomas) by radioimmunoassay and immunocytochemistry. Kisspeptin-LI was detected in all the tissues examined; normal portions of adrenal glands (3.0 +/- 2.3 pmol/g wet weight, n = 21, mean +/- SD), aldosterone-producing adenomas (4.6 +/- 3.3 pmol/g wet weight, n = 10), cortisol-producing adenomas (2.7 +/- 1.4 pmol/g wet weight, n = 14), adrenocortical carcinomas (1.7 +/- 0.2 pmol/g wet weight, n = 4), and pheochromocytomas (1.8 +/- 0.8 pmol/g wet weight, n = 6). There was no significant difference in kisspeptin-LI levels among them. Immunocytochemistry showed positive kisspeptin-immunostaining in normal adrenal glands, with stronger immunostaining found in the medulla. Furthermore, positive kisspeptin-immunostaining was found in all types of adrenal tumors examined; adrenocortical adenomas, adrenocortical carcinomas, and pheochromocytomas. The intensity of kisspeptin-immunostaining in these adrenal tumors was, however, not so strong as that in normal adrenal medulla. The present study has shown for the first time the presence of kisspeptin-LI in adrenal glands and adrenal tumors.

  5. Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma involving a femur bone and bilateral adrenal glands alone with adrenal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Iwahara, Yoshihito; Shinohara, Tsutomu; Naruse, Keishi; Komatsu, Yukihisa

    2017-01-31

    Primary bone lymphoma and primary adrenal lymphoma are rare clinicopathological entities of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL). We present the first case of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma with the involvement of a single bone and both adrenal glands alone with adrenal insufficiency. As primary extranodal NHL may have other unusual extranodal lesions, which may present unexplained clinical findings, patients with primary extranodal NHL require careful systemic examination, even when lymphadenopathy is absent.

  6. A case of adrenal Cushing’s syndrome with bilateral adrenal masses

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Ya-Wun; Hwu, Chii-Min; Won, Justin Ging-Shing; Chu, Chia-Huei

    2016-01-01

    Summary A functional lesion in corticotrophin (ACTH)-independent Cushing’s syndrome is difficult to distinguish from lesions of bilateral adrenal masses. Methods for distinguishing these lesions include adrenal venous sampling and 131I-6β-iodomethyl-19-norcholesterol (131I-NP-59) scintigraphy. We present a case of a 29-year-old Han Chinese female patient with a history of hypercholesterolaemia and polycystic ovary syndrome. She presented with a 6month history of an 8kg body weight gain and gradual rounding of the face. Serial examinations revealed loss of circadian rhythm of cortisol, elevated urinary free-cortisol level and undetectable ACTH level (<5pg/mL). No suppression was observed in both the low- and high-dose dexamethasone suppression tests. Adrenal computed tomography revealed bilateral adrenal masses. Adrenal venous sampling was performed, and the right-to-left lateralisation ratio was 14.29. The finding from adrenal scintigraphy with NP-59 was consistent with right adrenal adenoma. The patient underwent laparoscopic right adrenalectomy, and the pathology report showed adrenocortical adenoma. Her postoperative cortisol level was 3.2μg/dL, and her Cushingoid appearance improved. In sum, both adrenal venous sampling and 131I-NP-59 scintigraphy are good diagnostic methods for Cushing’s syndrome presenting with bilateral adrenal masses. Learning points The clinical presentation of Cushing’ syndrome includes symptoms and signs of fat redistribution and protein-wasting features. The diagnosis of patients with ACTH-independent Cushing’s syndrome with bilateral adrenal masses is challenging for localisation of the lesion. Both adrenal venous sampling and 131I-NP-59 scintigraphy are good methods to use in these patients with Cushing’s syndrome presenting with bilateral adrenal masses. PMID:27252858

  7. Radiology of the adrenals with sonography and CT

    SciTech Connect

    Mitty, H.A.; Yeh, H.C.

    1982-01-01

    The basic science and application of clinical adrenal imaging is presented. The initial chapters deal with anatomic review and methods of adrenal imaging. The bulk of the book consists of individual chapters describing pathologic entities and syndromes of adrenal disease. The final chapter deals with differentiation of adrenal lesions from masses arising in adjacent organs. There is no other single source available which so concisely presents adrenal imaging. (KRM)

  8. [Neonatal adrenal hemorrhage revealed by jaundice: a case report].

    PubMed

    Oulmaati, A; Hays, S; Mory-Thomas, N; Bretones, P; Bensaid, M; Jordan, I; Bonfils, M; Godbert, I; Picaud, J-C

    2012-04-01

    The clinical presentation of adrenal hemorrhage varies, depending on the extent of hemorrhage as well as the amount of adrenal cortex involved by the hemorrhage. We report here a case of neonatal adrenal hemorrhage revealed by late onset of neonatal jaundice. This adrenal hemorrhage most probably resulted from shoulder dystocia. The aim of this work was to focus on the fact that jaundice can be caused by adrenal hemorrhage and to emphasize the crucial importance of abdominal ultrasound in cases of persistent jaundice.

  9. Purification and characterization of bovine adrenal cytochrome b561 expressed in insect and yeast cell systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wen; Kamensky, Yury; Kakkar, Reva; Foley, Erin; Kulmacz, Richard J; Palmer, Graham

    2005-04-01

    Bovine adrenal chromaffin granule cytochrome (cyt) b561 is a transmembrane hemoprotein that plays a key role in transporting reducing equivalents from ascorbate to dopamine-beta-hydroxylase for catecholamine synthesis. We have developed procedures for expression and purification of functional bovine adrenal cyt b561 in insect and yeast cell systems. The bovine cyt b561 coding sequence, with or without a hexahistidine-tag sequence at the C-terminus, was cloned into the pVL1392 transfer vector under the control of the polyhedrin promoter to generate recombinant baculovirus for protein expression in Sf9 insect cells (approximately 0.5 mg detergent-solubilized cyt b561/L culture). For the yeast system, the cyt b561 cDNA was modified with a hexahistidine-tag sequence at the C-terminus, and inserted into the pPICZB vector under the control of the alcohol oxidase promoter. The recombinant plasmid was transformed into Pichia pastoris GS115 competent cells to give methanol-inducible cyt b561 expression (approximately 0.7 mg detergent-solubilized cyt b561/L culture). Recombinant His-tagged cyt b561 expressed in Sf9 or Pichia cells was readily solubilized from membrane fractions with dodecyl maltoside and purified to electrophoretic homogeneity by one-step chromatography on Ni-NTA affinity resin. The purified recombinant cytochrome from both systems had a heme to protein ratio close to two and was fully functional, as judged by comparison with the spectroscopic and kinetic parameters of the endogenous cytochrome from chromaffin granules. A novel procedure for isolation of chromaffin granule membranes was developed to utilize frozen adrenal glands instead of fresh tissue.

  10. Catecholamine-Based Treatment in AD Patients: Expectations and Delusions

    PubMed Central

    Stefani, Alessandro; Olivola, Enrica; Liguori, Claudio; Hainsworth, Atticus H.; Saviozzi, Valentina; Angileri, Giacoma; D’Angelo, Vincenza; Galati, Salvatore; Pierantozzi, Mariangela

    2015-01-01

    In Alzheimer disease, the gap between excellence of diagnostics and efficacy of therapy is wide. Despite sophisticated imaging and biochemical markers, the efficacy of available therapeutic options is limited. Here we examine the possibility that assessment of endogenous catecholamine levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) may fuel new therapeutic strategies. In reviewing the available literature, we consider the effects of levodopa, monoamine oxidase inhibitors, and noradrenaline (NE) modulators, showing disparate results. We present a preliminary assessment of CSF concentrations of dopamine (DA) and NE, determined by HPLC, in a small dementia cohort of either Alzheimer’s disease (AD) or frontotemporal dementia patients, compared to control subjects. Our data reveal detectable levels of DA, NE in CSF, though we found no significant alterations in the dementia population as a whole. AD patients exhibit a small impairment of the DA axis and a larger increase of NE concentration, likely to represent a compensatory mechanism. While waiting for preventive strategies, a pragmatic approach to AD may re-evaluate catecholamine modulation, possibly stratified to dementia subtypes, as part of the therapeutic armamentarium. PMID:25999852

  11. Genetics Home Reference: primary macronodular adrenal hyperplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... produced from the GNAS gene helps stimulate the activity of an enzyme called adenylate cyclase. This enzyme is involved in controlling the production of several hormones that help regulate the activity of certain endocrine glands, including the adrenal glands. ...

  12. Advanced glycosylation end products in adrenal lipofuscin.

    PubMed

    Shimokawa, I; Higami, Y; Horiuchi, S; Iwasaki, M; Ikeda, T

    1998-01-01

    The present study examined the presence of advanced glycosylation end products (AGEs) in lipofuscin present in the brain and adrenal gland of aging rats by immunohistochemistry using antibodies raised against AGEs. Lipofuscin identified as yellow to brown granules emitting bright yellow to orange autofluorescence with ultraviolet light were detected in cortical neurons, cerebellar Purkinje cells, and adrenal cells in the inner part of the zona reticularis. However, none of the antibodies visualized lipofuscin in these areas. The outer part of the zona reticularis contained yellow granules emitting a faint orange autofluorescence. These granules were immunostained by an antibody that reacted with AGEs structures unrelated to the carboxymethyllysine moiety. Newly formed adrenal cortical cells are thought to migrate from the outer layer to the inner layer of the zona reticularis. Therefore, our results suggest that glycosylation-related processes are involved in lipofuscinogenesis, at least in its early stage, in the adrenal zona reticularis.

  13. Ancient history of congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    New, Maria I

    2011-01-01

    Although there are many erudite reports on the history of endocrinology and endocrine disorders, the history of congenital adrenal hyperplasia has not been published. I have tried to review ancient as well as modern history of CAH.

  14. Image-guided ablation of adrenal lesions.

    PubMed

    Yamakado, Koichiro

    2014-06-01

    Although laparoscopic adrenalectomy has remained the standard of care for the treatment for adrenal tumors, percutaneous image-guided ablation therapy, such as chemical ablation, radiofrequency ablation, cryoablation, and microwave ablation, has been shown to be clinically useful in many nonsurgical candidates. Ablation therapy has been used to treat both functioning adenomas and malignant tumors, including primary adrenal carcinoma and metastasis. For patients with functioning adenomas, biochemical and symptomatic improvement is achieved in 96 to 100% after ablation; for patients with malignant adrenal neoplasms, however, the survival benefit from ablation therapy remains unclear, though good initial results have been reported. This article outlines the current role of ablation therapy for adrenal lesions, as well as identifying some of the technical considerations for this procedure.

  15. Primary hydatid cyst in the adrenal gland.

    PubMed

    Mohammadi, Afshin; Ghasemi-Rad, Mohammad; Oklu, Rahmi

    2014-10-23

    An elderly man presented with a 2-year history of refractory hypertension. His medical history, physical examination and laboratory findings were unremarkable. On subsequent ultrasound study for the evaluation of renal artery stenosis, a large mass obliterating the adrenal gland containing internal cystic structures was identified. A CT study confirmed the diagnosis of primary adrenal gland hydatid cyst. Following surgical resection, the patient's hypertension resolved and medications to control blood pressure were discontinued.

  16. Metabolism of adrenal cholesterol in man

    PubMed Central

    Borkowski, Abraham; Delcroix, Claude; Levin, Sam

    1972-01-01

    The synthesis of adrenal cholesterol, its esterification and the synthesis of the glucocorticosteroid hormones were studied in vitro on human adrenal tissue. It was found that the synthesis of adrenal cholesterol may normally be small in the zona “fasciculata,” particularly when compared with the synthesis of the glucocorticosteroid hormones, that it is several times higher in the zona “reticularis” where esterified cholesterol is less abundant, and that under ACTH stimulation it increases strikingly and proportionally to the degree of esterified adrenal cholesterol depletion. On the other hand, the relative rate of esterification as well as the concentration of free adrenal cholesterol are remarkably stable: they do not differ according to the adrenal zonation and are unaffected by ACTH. Furthermore, from a qualitative point of view, the relative proportions of Δ1 and Δ2 cholesteryl esters formed in situ are similar to those anticipated from their relative concentrations, suggesting that the characteristic fatty acid distribution of the adrenal cholesteryl esters results from an in situ esterification rather than from a selective uptake of the plasma cholesteryl esters. Besides, the in vitro esterification reveals a propensity to the formation of the most unsaturated cholesteryl esters. Regarding hydrocortisone and corticosterone, their synthesis tends to be more elevated in the zona “fasciculata.” Despite its higher cholesterol concentration the zona “fasciculata” should not therefore be viewed as a quiescent functional complement to the zona “reticularis” and the cortical distribution of glucocorticosteroid hormone synthesis is quite distinct from that of adrenal cholesterol synthesis. PMID:4338120

  17. Black adrenal adenoma causing preclinical Cushing's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Inomoto, Chie; Sato, Haruhiro; Kanai, Genta; Hirukawa, Takashi; Shoji, Sunao; Terachi, Toshiro; Kajiwara, Hiroshi; Osamura, Robert Yoshiyuki

    2010-07-20

    Functioning black adrenal adenoma (BAA) rarely causes preclinical Cushing's syndrome (CS). In the present case, a 46-year-old Japanese Peruvian woman presented with left flank pain and hypertension. Abdominal computed tomography showed that she had a 15-mm in diameter, round, left adrenal adenoma. She had no physical features of CS, such as moon face, buffalo hump, truncal obesity, or purple striae. Endocrinological examination showed that the plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) level was below the detectable level, despite a serum cortisol level within the normal range. A normal cortisol circadian rhythm was not present. Dexamethasone (1 mg and 8 mg) suppression testing did not decrease serum cortisol levels to the reference levels. These findings were compatible with preclinical CS. The left adrenal adenoma was laparoscopically removed. Examination of the surgical specimen revealed unilateral double adrenal adenomas of the left adrenal gland, one of which was a BAA. The BAA measured 20 × 11 × 10 mm. Microscopically, the BAA showed proliferation of compact cells containing numerous brown-pigmented granules. There were also foci of myelolipomatous degenerative changes in the tumor. The compact cell zones remained in the adrenal cortex adjacent to the BAA showed atrophic change. These findings indicated that BAA appeared to have caused preclinical CS in this patient.

  18. Outcome of congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Kuhnle, U; Bullinger, M

    1997-09-01

    In congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH) due to 21-hydroxylase deficiency, affected girls are born with ambiguous genitalia due to increased secretion of androgens in utero by the defective adrenal gland. Even though it is generally accepted that there are differences between male and female brain development, determining factors have been difficult to identify. Girls with CAH have frequently been studied to evaluate the impact of prenatal androgen exposure on psychological, psychosocial, and psychosexual development, and impairments in various areas have been identified. However, there is no comprehensive study available regarding the outcome of this chronic disorder in adult life. We studied the quality of life in women with CAH, with particular emphasis on how they cope with genital malformations, genital operations, and chronic disease as well as lifelong medication. The patients filled out questionnaires covering their physical state, psychological well-being, social relationships, and functional capacity, as well as questionnaires on psychosexual identification and psychosocial integration. The results were evaluated using a computerized statistical program for social studies. Out of a total of 94 patients above 18 years of age, 45 agreed to participate and were compared to 46 healthy, age-matched controls. Age at diagnosis was 2. 31 +/- 1.55 years and 38% suffered from the simple-virilizing, 45% from the salt-wasting, and 17.0% from the late-onset form of CAH. About one-third of patients had Prader stage 3 or 4 genital virilization. While the overall quality of life did not differ significantly, CAH patients were more often single (47.8% vs. 66.7%) and fewer of them had children (22.2% vs. 38.6%) compared to controls. Significant impairments were found in regard to body image and attitudes toward sexuality, but there was no increased homosexual preference. The women were successful in adjusting to illness and receiving social support. It is speculated that

  19. Adrenal Imaging: Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Colin J; McDermott, Shaunagh; Blake, Michael A

    2016-01-01

    The adrenal glands are located superior to the kidneys and play an important role in the endocrine system. Each adrenal gland contains an outer cortex, responsible mainly for the secretion of androgens and corticosteroids, and an inner medulla, which secretes epinephrine and norepinephrine. Here, we review the anatomy of the adrenal glands and explain the current imaging modalities that are most useful for the assessment of the various conditions--both benign and malignant--that can affect these glands. As adrenal lesions are often identified incidentally on cross-sectional imaging performed for other reasons, the management of such adrenal 'incidentalomas' is also discussed. In many cases, adrenal lesions have distinctive imaging features that allow for a full characterization with noninvasive techniques. In some cases, invasive studies such as adrenal vein sampling or adrenal biopsy become necessary. This review should give the reader a wide overview of how various imaging techniques can be useful in the assessment of adrenal pathology.

  20. Identification of pro-opiomelanocortin and secretion of its peptide fragments in bovine adrenals

    SciTech Connect

    Tennov, A.V.; Dmitriev, A.D.; Kizim, E.A.; Ustinova, E.E.

    1986-01-01

    This paper describes the results of an investigation to show that biosynthesis of POMC, its proteolytic processing, an secretion of the peptide products of that processing take place in the bovine adrenals. Rabbit antisera against endorphins were obtained and used for radioimmunoassay of peptides. I 125-labeled peptides were obtained by the chloramine method and purified from free I 125 on Sephadex G-10 (0.7 x 5 cm, centrifugation for 10 min at 1500 g). To detect secretion of peptide fragments of POMC in the adrenals experiments were undertaken to determine the beta-endorphin content in perfusates obtained during retrograde perfusion of the bovine adrenals. It was found that immunoreactive compounds, indistinguishable in their immunochemical properties from beta-endorphin, are present in the perfusates, just as in the tissue extracts.

  1. Failure to visualize adrenal glands in a patient with bilateral adrenal hyperplasia. [/sup 131/I

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, L.; Mayfield, R.K.; Levine, J.H.; Lopes-Virella, M.F.; Sagel, J.; Buse, M.G.

    1980-01-01

    A patient with clinical and biochemical evidence of Cushing's disease and severe hyperlipidemia underwent an adrenal imaging procedure with NP-59 (6..beta..-(/sup 131/I)iodomethyl-19-norcholesterol), without visualization of either gland. Correction of the hyperlipidemia followed by repeated adrenal imaging resulted in bilateral visualization. A pituitary tumor was removed at surgery, confirming the diagnosis of Cushing's disease.

  2. [Adrenal insufficiency in cirrhotic patients].

    PubMed

    Orozco, Federico; Anders, María; Mella, José; Antinucci, Florencia; Pagano, Patricia; Esteban, Paula; Cartier, Mariano; Romero, Gustavo; Francini, Bettina; Mastai, Ricardo

    Relative adrenal insufficiency (RAI) is a common finding in cirrhotic patients with severe sepsis, and increased mortality. Its significance is unknown in stable conditions. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of RAI in stable cirrhotic patients at different stages of the disease. Also, the impact of RAI on the survival was evaluated and basal cortisol levels between plasma and saliva was correlated in control subjects and cirrhotic patients. Forty seven ambulatory patients and 16 control subjects were studied. RAI was defined as a serum cortisol increase of less than 9 υg/dl from baseline after the stimulation with 250 mg of synthetic ACTH. Twenty two had Child-Pugh = 8 and 25 = 9. The prevalence of RAI in patients with stable cirrhosis was 22%. A higher incidence of RAI was observed in patients with a Child-Pugh = 9 (8/32) than in those with = 8 (3/13, p < 0.05). A correlation between salivary cortisol and basal plasma cortisol (r = 0.6, p < 0.0004) was observed. Finally, survival at 1 year (97%) and 3 years (91%) was significantly higher without RAI than those who developed this complication (79% and 51%, p < 0.05, respectively). In summary, the prevalence of RAI is frequent in patients with stable cirrhosis and that it is related to the severity of liver diseaseand increased mortality.

  3. Aerobic fitness and sympatho-adrenal response to short-term psycho-emotional stress under field conditions.

    PubMed

    Wittels, P; Rosenmayr, G; Bischof, B; Hartter, E; Haber, P

    1994-01-01

    A possible relationship between aerobic fitness (AF), measured by maximal cycle ergometry (CE) and sympatho-adrenal response to acute, short lasting psycho-emotional stress was investigated by monitoring heart rate (fc) and excretion of catecholamines. The activation of the sympatho-adrenal system was characterised by the noradrenaline: adrenaline ratio. A group of 11 healthy men [22.8 (SD 2.52) years] lived under identical environmental conditions; their mean maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) was 47.1 (SD 3.9) ml.min-1.kg-1. After the physiological and psychological laboratory tests had been completed the fc of the subjects was monitored continuously during the "guerilla slide" and "parachute jump by night", two emotionally stressful military tasks. Maximal fc (fc, max) attained during these events was 84.5% and 83% of fc, max during CE (fc, max, CE), respectively. A significant relationship (r = -0.92, P < 0.0002) between fc, max reached during the stressful tasks and VO2max was found only for the guerilla slide, which was preceded by physical strain, sleep deprivation and energy deficit. One subject with some prior experience in parachuting showed the lowest fc response and the lowest sympatho-adrenal activation in both events, independent of the degree of AF. In conclusion, AF was found to influence the sympatho-adrenal and fc response to acute, short-lasting emotional stress when the stressful event was aggravated by preceding physical strain, the magnitude of the stress response depending largely on individual experience and effective mechanisms for coping with specific stimuli.

  4. A Case Report of Bilateral Adrenal Sarcomatoid Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cerit, Ethem Turgay; Özkan, Çiğdem; Altınova, Eroğlu; Çimen, Ali Rıza; Sözen, Sinan; Kerem, Mustafa; Aktürk, Müjde; Memiş, Leyla; Törüner, Baloş; Çakır, Nuri; Arslan, Metin

    2016-01-01

    Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) is a rare and aggressive malignancy. Sarcomatoid adrenal carcinoma is even more aggressive type of ACC. Bilateral malignant adrenal tumors are extremely rare except for those that represent metastasis from an extra-adrenal organ. Here we report a 53-year-old woman who presented with abdominal pain and weight loss. Abdominal computed tomography revealed bilateral adrenal masses and a mass in her liver. Surgical specimens showed pleomorphic tumor cells with epithelial and spindle cell morphology and immunohistochemical staining was compatible with sarcomatoid carcinoma. Sarcomatoid adrenal carcinoma should be kept in mind during the management of bilateral adrenal masses. PMID:28097033

  5. Adrenal diseases during pregnancy: pathophysiology, diagnosis and management strategies.

    PubMed

    Kamoun, Mahdi; Mnif, Mouna F; Charfi, Nadia; Kacem, Faten H; Naceur, Basma B; Mnif, Fatma; Dammak, Mohamed; Rekik, Nabila; Abid, Mohamed

    2014-01-01

    : Adrenal diseases--including disorders such as Cushing's syndrome, Addison's disease, pheochromocytoma, primary hyperaldosteronism and congenital adrenal hyperplasia--are relatively rare in pregnancy, but a timely diagnosis and proper treatment are critical because these disorders can cause maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. Making the diagnosis of adrenal disorders in pregnancy is challenging as symptoms associated with pregnancy are also seen in adrenal diseases. In addition, pregnancy is marked by several endocrine changes, including activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis. The aim of this article was to review the pathophysiology, clinical manifestation, diagnosis and management of various adrenal disorders during pregnancy.

  6. Genetics Home Reference: congenital adrenal hyperplasia due to 11-beta-hydroxylase deficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... collectively called congenital adrenal hyperplasia) that affect the adrenal glands . The adrenal glands are located on top of the kidneys and ... CAH due to 11-beta-hydroxylase deficiency, the adrenal glands produce excess androgens, which are male sex hormones. ...

  7. Plasma catecholamines during behavioral treatments for Raynaud's disease.

    PubMed

    Freedman, R R; Keegan, D; Migály, P; Galloway, M P; Mayes, M

    1991-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that the vasospastic attacks of Raynaud's disease can be induced despite blockade of efferent digital nerves and that feedback-induced vasodilation is mediated through a non-neural, beta-adrenergic mechanism. Here, we sought to determine the role of sympathetic activity, as measured by plasma epinephrine and norepinephrine, during finger temperature feedback and autogenic training. Thirty-one female patients with idiopathic Raynaud's disease were randomly assigned to receive finger temperature feedback or autogenic training over 28 days. Half of each group began and finished training during the follicular phase of the menstrual cycle, the other half during the luteal phase. During training, significant temperature elevations were shown by feedback patients but not by autogenic patients. There were no significant effects for norepinephrine and epinephrine for either group. Cycle phase did not interact with training effects or with catecholamines. These findings do not support the role of decreased sympathetic activation in behavioral treatments for Raynaud's disease.

  8. Effects of water immersion on plasma catecholamines in normal humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Epstein, M.; Johnson, G.; Denunzio, A. G.

    1983-01-01

    An investigation was conducted in order to determine whether water immersion to the neck (NI) alters plasma catecholamines in normal humans. Eight normal subjects were studied during a seated control study (C) and during 4 hr of NI, and the levels of norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (E) as determined by radioenzymatic assay were measured hourly. Results show that despite the induction of a marked natriuresis and diuresis indicating significant central hypervolemia, NI failed to alter plasma NE or E levels compared with those of either C or the corresponding prestudy 1.5 hr. In addition, the diuresis and natriuresis was found to vary independently of NE. These results indicate that the response of the sympathetic nervous system to acute volume alteration may differ from the reported response to chronic volume expansion.

  9. The effect of sleep apnea on plasma and urinary catecholamines.

    PubMed

    Dimsdale, J E; Coy, T; Ziegler, M G; Ancoli-Israel, S; Clausen, J

    1995-06-01

    Numerous studies have suggested an alteration of sympathetic nervous system functioning in sleep apnea. However, most of these studies did not control for confounding factors such as diet, obesity, hypertension and anti-hypertensive medications. We examined plasma and urinary catecholamines in 43 patients, including hypertensive and normotensive individuals with and without sleep apnea. Hypertensive patients were studied at least 3 weeks following tapering of anti-hypertensive medication. All patients consumed similar diets and were of similar age and level of obesity. Twenty-four-hour urinary norepinephrine levels were significantly higher in apneics (58.2 ng vs. 40.2 ng in nonapneics, p < 0.002). Urinary norepinephrine in apneics was increased during both day and night. Plasma norepinephrine levels were not significantly elevated in apneic patients but were elevated in hypertensive patients both during sleep and in the morning (p < 0.05).

  10. Alteration of catecholamine concentrations in rat testis after methamphetamine exposure.

    PubMed

    Janphet, S; Nudmamud-Thanoi, S; Thanoi, S

    2017-03-01

    Methamphetamine (METH) is an illicit drug that can lead to changes in catecholamines in the brain. It also has substantial effects on reproductive function. We investigated whether rat models of METH abuse could induce changes in the dopamine metabolite 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), norepinephrine (NE) and its metabolite, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylglycol (DHPG), in testis. Four groups of rats received vehicle, acute dose (AB), escalating dose (ED) or ED with an acute high dose (ED-binge) METH. DOPAC, NE and DHPG were determined using HPLC. DOPAC was significantly increased in the AB while NE was significantly decreased in the ED-binge. DHPG was also significantly decreased in the ED and ED-binge. METH induces alterations of DOPAC, NE and DHPG testicular concentrations that may result in male reproductive dysfunction.

  11. Taurine inhibition of metal-stimulated catecholamine oxidation.

    PubMed

    Dawson, R; Baker, D; Eppler, B; Tang, E; Shih, D; Hern, H; Hu, M

    2000-01-01

    Taurine is an abundant amino acid found in mammalian tissues and it has been suggested to have cytoprotective functions. The aim of the present study was to determine if taurine had the potential to reduce oxidative stress associated with metal-stimulated catecholamine oxidation. Taurine and structural analogs of taurine were tested for their ability to inhibit metal-stimulated quinone formation from dopamine or L-dopa. Oxidative damage to proteins and lipids were also assessed in vitro and the effects of taurine were determined. Taurine (20 mM) was found to decrease significantly ferric iron (50-500 microM)- and manganese (10 microM)-stimulated L-dopa or dopamine oxidation. Taurine had no effect on zinc-induced dopamine oxidation and slightly potentiated copper- and NaIO(4)-stimulated quinone formation. Ferric iron-stimulated lipid peroxidation was not affected by taurine (1-20 mM). Protein carbonyl formation induced by ferric iron (500 microM) and L-dopa (500 microM) was significantly reduced by 10 mM taurine. The cytotoxicity of L-dopa (250 microM) and ferric chloride (75 microM) to LLC-PK(1) cells was attenuated by 10 mM taurine or hypotaurine. Homotaurine alone stimulated L-dopa oxidation and potentiated the cytotoxic effects of ferric iron. Homotaurine was found to be cytotoxic when combined with L-dopa or L-dopa/iron. In contrast, hypotaurine inhibited quinone formation and protected LLC-PK(1) cells. These studies suggest that taurine may exhibit cytoprotective effects against the oxidation products of catecholamines by acting as a scavenger for free radicals and cytotoxic quinones.

  12. Pattern of elevation of urine catecholamines in intracerebral haemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Hamann, G F; Strittmatter, M; Hoffmann, K H; Holzer, G; Stoll, M; Keshevar, T; Moili, R; Wein, K; Schimrigk, K

    1995-01-01

    Autonomic nervous system dysfunction is a common complication of severe intracranial disease. The aim of this study was to reveal the autonomic changes in patients suffering from acute intracerebral haemorrhage (ICH). 25 patients with spontaneous ICH within 24 hours of onset of symptoms were included. All patients were treated with standardised medical management and the meta- and normetanephrines were detected by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) in 24-hour urine every day. The mean level of normetanephrine (709 +/- 579 micrograms/day) and metanephrine (244 +/- 161 mg/day) were significantly elevated in comparison with a control group, p < or = 0.01. The norepinephrine elevation was of greater diagnostic and prognostic importance. Maximum urinary catecholamine metabolite levels occurred between day 3 to 10 after the bleeding. Normetanephrines correlated with the prognosis and the complications of ICH: intraventricular involvement resulted in significantly elevated normetanephrine levels (896 +/- 520 micrograms/day versus 311 +/- 78 micrograms/day) p < or = 0.01. Patients with a great volume of haematoma developed severe autonomic dysregulation (normetanephrines 1114 +/- 493 micrograms/day), whereas patients with smaller haematoma did not (339 +/- 125 micrograms/day) p < or = 0.0001; patients with bad outcome (1014 +/- 620 mg/day) had higher levels of normetanephrines than those with a good prognosis (322 +/- 110 micrograms/day) p < or = 0.001. A close relationship to elevated intracranial pressure was established. This study demonstrated the feasibility of detecting autonomic nervous system dysfunction in neurological intensive care patients by means of examination of the metabolites of the catecholamines in the urine.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Heart rate variability and urinary catecholamines from job stress in korean male manufacturing workers according to work seniority.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyoung-Ho; Yoon, Kijung; Ha, Mina; Park, Jungsun; Cho, Soo-Hun; Kang, Daehee

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationships between job stress and indicators of autonomic nervous system activity in employees of the manufacturing industry. A total of 140 employees from a company that manufactures consumer goods (i.e., diapers and paper towels) were recruited for participation in this study. Job stress was assessed using Karasek's Job Content Questionnaire. Heart rate variability (HRV) was measured using a heart rate monitor, and urinary catecholamines were measured by an HPLC-ECD. Information on demographic characteristics, previous job history, smoking status and alcohol consumption was also collected. Job stress did not have a significant effect on HRV or catecholamines. However, low-frequency HRV was significantly higher in the high-strain group of subjects with a short duration of employment. Low- and high-frequency HRV were higher in the high-strain group than in the low-strain group, but these differences were not statistically significant. The results of the present study indicate that low-frequency HRV was significantly higher in the high-strain group of subjects with a short duration of employment. In addition, the results of this study show that HRV can be used as a potential physiologic indicator of job stress in employees with a short duration of employment.

  14. Adrenal toxicology: a strategy for assessment of functional toxicity to the adrenal cortex and steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Philip W; Everett, David J; Springall, Christopher J

    2007-01-01

    The adrenal is the most common toxicological target organ in the endocrine system in vivo and yet it is neglected in regulatory endocrine disruption screening and testing. There has been a recent marked increase in interest in adrenal toxicity, but there are no standardised approaches for assessment. Consequently, a strategy is proposed to evaluate adrenocortical toxicity. Human adrenal conditions are reviewed and adrenocortical suppression, known to have been iatrogenically induced leading to Addisonian crisis and death, is identified as the toxicological hazard of most concern. The consequences of inhibition of key steroidogenic enzymes and the possible toxicological modulation of other adrenal conditions are also highlighted. The proposed strategy involves an in vivo rodent adrenal competency test based on ACTH challenge to specifically examine adrenocortical suppression. The H295R human adrenocortical carcinoma cell line is also proposed to identify molecular targets, and is useful for measuring steroids, enzymes or gene expression. Hypothalamo-pituitary-adrenal endocrinology relevant to rodent and human toxicology is reviewed (with an emphasis on multi-endocrine axis effects on the adrenal and also how the adrenal affects a variety of other hormones) and the endocrinology of the H295R cell line is also described. Chemicals known to induce adrenocortical toxicity are reviewed and over 60 examples of compounds and their confirmed steroidogenic targets are presented, with much of this work published very recently using H295R cell systems. In proposing a strategy for adrenocortical toxicity assessment, the outlined techniques will provide hazard assessment data but it will be regulatory agencies that must consider the significance of such data in risk extrapolation models. The cases of etomindate and aminoglutethimide induced adrenal suppression are clearly documented examples of iatrogenic adrenal toxicity in humans. Environmentally, sentinel species, such as

  15. Optical fiber biosensor based on enzymatic coating matrix for catecholamines assessment in human urine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Lurdes I. B.; Freitas, Ana C.; Rocha-Santos, Teresa A. P.; Pereira, M. E.; Duarte, Armando C.

    2010-09-01

    An optical fiber (OF) biosensor has been developed and applied for simultaneous determination of catecholamines (dopamine, norepinephrine and epinephrine) in human urine. The developed analytical device shows a high potential for catecholamines quantification with a detection limit of 2.1, 2.6 and 3.4 pg mL-1 for dopamine, norepinephrine and epinephrine, respectively. The analytical performance of the OF biosensor was found to be similar to that of the High Performance Liquid Chromatography - Electrochemical Detector (HPLC-ED) regarding catecholamines determination in samples of human urine.

  16. Catecholamines and in vitro growth of pathogenic bacteria: enhancement of growth varies greatly among bacterial species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belay, Tesfaye; Aviles, Hernan; Vance, Monique; Fountain, Kimberly; Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of catecholamines on in vitro growth of a range of bacterial species, including anaerobes. Bacteria tested included: Porphyromonas gingivalis, Bacteriodes fragilis, Shigella boydii, Shigella sonnie, Enterobacter Sp, and Salmonella choleraesuis. The results of the current study indicated that supplementation of bacterial cultures in minimal medium with norepinephrine or epinephrine did not result in increased growth of bacteria. Positive controls involving treatment of Escherichia coli with catecholamines did result in increased growth of that bacterial species. The results of the present study extend previous observations that showed differential capability of catecholamines to enhance bacterial growth in vitro.

  17. Neurogenic hypertension associated with an excessively high excretion rate of catecholamine metabolites.

    PubMed Central

    Funck-Brentano, C; Pagny, J Y; Menard, J

    1987-01-01

    A 60 year old hypertensive patient suffered several cerebral infarctions. A phaeochromocytoma was suspected because the excretion rates of vanillylmandelic acid and its methoxy derivatives were raised and the patient had hypertensive crises. No tumour was found, however, by 131mI-iodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy and computed tomography of the abdomen. Moreover, the enhanced orthostatic plasma catecholamine response suggested that the high excretion rates of catecholamine metabolites were more likely to be caused by the syndrome of raised catecholamines after cerebrovascular accidents than a phaeochromocytoma. A phaeochromocytoma should not be diagnosed within several months of cerebral infarction without first excluding the possibility of a hyperadrenergic state induced by cerebral infarction. PMID:3593621

  18. Role of adrenal imaging in surgical management

    SciTech Connect

    Lamki, L.M.; Haynie, T.P. )

    1990-03-01

    Adrenal imaging using radiopharmaceuticals is a functional test that can contribute significantly to surgical management and follow-up of patients with either benign or malignant conditions of the adrenal cortex and medulla. Imaging of the cortex is achieved by iodine-131-labeled iodomethyl nor-cholesterol (NP-59), while adrenal medulla imaging can be successfully accomplished by 131I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG), which localizes in the adrenergic nerve terminal with norepinephrine. Both tests carry high sensitivity and specificity for functional tumors and hyperplasia, and often better than CT scanning. This article reviews the current status and clinical utility of nuclear imaging of the adrenal cortex in congenital hyperplasia, low renin hypertension and aldosteronism, and Cushing's syndrome. Adrenal medulla imaging is reviewed in light of our experience at the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center in pheochromocytoma, neuroblastoma, and other neuroectodermal tumors. Investigation of {sup 131}I-MIBG therapy of metastatic tumors of neuroectodermal origin potentially offers a means of at least controlling symptoms of hormonal secretion in these patients. 40 references.

  19. Thymus and adrenal glands in elder abuse.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Takahito; Bunai, Yasuo; Ago, Kazutoshi; Ago, Mihoko; Ogata, Mamoru

    2011-12-01

    Endogenous glucocorticoid-induced thymic involution is generally considered to be an important finding for determining child abuse. The present study investigated the weight of the thymus and the adrenal glands in elder abuse cases to identify a potential marker for elder abuse. There was no significant difference in the thymus and the adrenal weight between elder abuse and control cases. However, the elder abuse cases in which the duration of abuse was less than 3 months showed a significant increase in the adrenal weight in comparison to control cases. In such cases, histopathological findings showed a loss of intracellular light granules from the zona fasciculata, which might indicate a loss of cholesterol due to the overproduction of glucocorticoid. These results might imply that the elderly, who were maltreated for less than 3 months, were in the early phase of a long-term stress state during which stress-induced overproduction of glucocorticoid was observed in adrenal glands as indicated by Selye. Our results suggest that an increase in adrenal weight may be a potential marker for elder abuse of relatively short periods, especially less than a few months.

  20. Modes of secretagogue-induced [Ca(2+)](i) responses in individual chromaffin cells of the perfused rat adrenal medulla.

    PubMed

    Warashina, A; Satoh, Y

    2001-12-01

    Chromaffin cells in the perfused rat adrenal medulla were loaded with indo-1 for confocal image analyses. Resting levels of [Ca(2+)](i) in chromaffin cells were similar and were stable with time. This is in contrast to the situation in isolated rat chromaffin cells, in which spontaneous oscillations of [Ca(2+)](i) are known to occur. When chromaffin cells were stimulated for 3-4 min by high K(+) or nicotine, [Ca(2+)](i) increased to a peak in 20-30 s and then declined rather smoothly. In contrast, chromaffin cells stimulated by muscarine or low pH (6.5) commonly exhibited irregular oscillations in [Ca(2+)](i). This provides additional evidence supporting the previous claim that muscarine and low pH evoke catecholamine secretion using partly shared mechanisms. Although muscarine and low pH were speculated to produce weaker responses in noradrenaline-secreting cells due to their selective stimulation of adrenaline secretion, no clear indications for segregation of cell types from [Ca(2+)](i) responses to these stimulants were found. The perfused adrenal medulla loaded with Indo-1 was also employed for simultaneously monitoring integrated changes in [Ca(2+)](i)(Ca responses) by conventional microfluorometry and in catecholamine secretion from a whole medulla (secretory responses). When the profiles of secretory responses were approximated by the kth power of the profiles of Ca responses, the k-values were estimated to be 2.2 and 2.3 for high-K(+)- and nicotine-elicited responses, respectively, whereas a k-value of 1.4 was obtained for both muscarine- and low-pH-elicited responses. An analysis showed that the significant difference in the k-value with these two classes of stimulants is accounted for by the stimulant-dependent patterns of [Ca(2+)](i) responses found in confocal image analysis.

  1. Halothane inhibits the cholinergic-receptor-mediated influx of calcium in primary culture of bovine adrenal medulla cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yashima, N.; Wada, A.; Izumi, F.

    1986-04-01

    Adrenal medulla cells are cholinoceptive cells. Stimulation of the acetylcholine receptor causes the influx of Ca to the cells, and Ca acts as the coupler of the stimulus-secretion coupling. In this study, the authors investigated the effects of halothane on the receptor-mediated influx of /sup 45/Ca using cultured bovine adrenal medulla cells. Halothane at clinical concentrations (0.5-2%) inhibited the influx of /sup 45/Ca caused by carbachol, with simultaneous inhibition of catecholamine secretion. The influx of /sup 45/Ca and the secretion of catecholamines caused by K depolarization were inhibited by a large concentration of Mg, which competes with Ca at Ca channels, but not inhibited by halothane. Inhibition of the /sup 45/Ca influx by halothane was not overcome by increase in the carbachol concentration. Inhibition of the /sup 45/Ca influx by halothane was examined in comparison with that caused by a large concentration of Mg by the application of Scatchard analysis as the function of the external Ca concentration. Halothane decreased the maximal influx of /sup 45/Ca without altering the apparent kinetic constant of Ca to Ca channels. On the contrary, a large concentration of Mg increased the apparent kinetic constant without altering the maximal influx of /sup 45/Ca. Based on these findings, the authors suggest that inhibition of the /sup 45/Ca influx by halothane was not due to the direct competitive inhibition of Ca channels, nor to the competitive antagonism of agonist-receptor interaction. As a possibility, halothane seems to inhibit the receptor-mediated activation of Ca channels through the interference of coupling between the receptor and Ca channels.

  2. Acute incremental exercise, performance of a central executive task, and sympathoadrenal system and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity.

    PubMed

    McMorris, Terry; Davranche, Karen; Jones, Glenys; Hall, Ben; Corbett, Jo; Minter, Charles

    2009-09-01

    The purposes of this study were to examine the effect of acute incremental exercise on the performance of a central executive task; the responses of the sympathoadrenal system (SAS) and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPAA) during exercise, while simultaneously carrying out the central executive task; and the ability of Delta plasma concentrations of epinephrine, norepinephrine, adrenocorticotropin hormone (ACTH) and cortisol to predict Delta performance on the central executive task. Subjects undertook a flanker task at rest and during exercise at 50% and 80% maximum aerobic power (MAP). SAS and HPAA activity were measured pre- and post-treatment by plasma concentrations of catecholamines, and cortisol and ACTH, respectively. Reaction time (RT) and number of errors for congruent and incongruent trials on the flanker task showed significant main effects with performance at 80% MAP higher than in the other conditions. RT post-correct responses were significantly faster than RT post-error at rest and 50% MAP but not at 80%. Pre- and post-treatment catecholamines showed a main effect of exercise with a linear increase. Post-treatment ACTH concentrations at 80% MAP were significantly greater than in the other conditions. Delta epinephrine and ACTH combined were significant predictors of Delta RT and Delta norepinephrine was a significant predictor of Delta number of errors. It was concluded that exercise must be at a high intensity to affect performance on the flanker task. Both the SAS and HPAA appear to play a role in the exercise-cognition interaction.

  3. Imaging of the adrenal gland lesions.

    PubMed

    Herr, Keith; Muglia, Valdair F; Koff, Walter José; Westphalen, Antonio Carlos

    2014-01-01

    With the steep increase in the use of cross-sectional imaging in recent years, the incidentally detected adrenal lesion, or "incidentaloma", has become an increasingly common diagnostic problem for the radiologist, and a need for an approach to classifying these lesions as benign, malignant or indeterminate with imaging has spurred an explosion of research. While most incidentalomas represent benign disease, typically an adenoma, the possibility of malignant involvement of the adrenal gland necessitates a reliance on imaging to inform management decisions. In this article, we review the literature on adrenal gland imaging, with particular emphasis on computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and photon-emission tomography, and discuss how these findings relate to clinical practice. Emerging technologies, such as contrast-enhanced ultrasonography, dual-energy computed tomography, and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging will also be briefly addressed.

  4. Image-Guided Adrenal and Renal Biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Karun V.; Venkatesan, Aradhana M.; Swerdlow, Daniel; DaSilva, Daniel; Beck, Avi; Jain, Nidhi; Wood, Bradford J.

    2010-01-01

    Image-guided biopsy is a safe and well-established technique that is familiar to most interventional radiologists (IRs). Improvements in image-guidance, biopsy tools and biopsy techniques now routinely allow for safe biopsy of renal and adrenal lesions which traditionally were considered difficult to reach or technically challenging. Image-guided biopsy is used to establish the definitive tissue diagnosis in adrenal mass lesions that can not be fully characterized with imaging or laboratory tests alone. It is also used to establish definitive diagnosis in some cases of renal parenchymal disease and has an expanding role in diagnosis and characterization of renal masses prior to treatment. Although basic principles and techniques for image-guided needle biopsy are similar regardless of organ, this paper will highlight some technical considerations, indications and complications which are unique to the adrenal gland and kidney because of their anatomic location and physiologic features. PMID:20540919

  5. Imaging of the adrenal gland lesions*

    PubMed Central

    Herr, Keith; Muglia, Valdair F.; Koff, Walter José; Westphalen, Antonio Carlos

    2014-01-01

    With the steep increase in the use of cross-sectional imaging in recent years, the incidentally detected adrenal lesion, or "incidentaloma", has become an increasingly common diagnostic problem for the radiologist, and a need for an approach to classifying these lesions as benign, malignant or indeterminate with imaging has spurred an explosion of research. While most incidentalomas represent benign disease, typically an adenoma, the possibility of malignant involvement of the adrenal gland necessitates a reliance on imaging to inform management decisions. In this article, we review the literature on adrenal gland imaging, with particular emphasis on computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and photon-emission tomography, and discuss how these findings relate to clinical practice. Emerging technologies, such as contrast-enhanced ultrasonography, dual-energy computed tomography, and magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging will also be briefly addressed. PMID:25741090

  6. Adrenal Hemorrhage in Neonates: Unusual Presentation.

    PubMed

    Alabsi, Samir Y; Layland, Teresa

    2015-01-01

    Adrenal hemorrhage (AH) is a relatively uncommon condition in newborns. It may be asymptomatic or may present with flank abdominal mass, anemia, jaundice, or rarely as scrotal bruising or hematoma. We report two cases of AH in neonates; the first presented with scrotal hematoma and the second with adrenal mass associated with hypertension and oliguria, primarily secondary to coincidental renal vein thrombosis. Diagnosis was confirmed by abdominal ultrasound. Patients were managed conservatively with clinical observation and by following hemoglobin and bilirubin levels closely. Both infants were discharged without surgical intervention after several days in the hospital. Clinicians should consider AH when a newborn presents with scrotal bruising or hematoma, unexplained anemia, unexplained jaundice, or flank abdominal mass. Timely ultrasonographic evaluation of both adrenal glands and testes in neonates with scrotal hematoma may spare infants from unnecessary surgical intervention because scrotal hematoma often raises the suspicion of testicular torsion.

  7. Bilateral adrenal hemorrhage in polycythemia vera

    PubMed Central

    Agito, Katrina; Krug, Esther I.

    2016-01-01

    Bilateral adrenal hemorrhage (BAH) is a rare complication typically seen in critically ill patients, which can lead to acute adrenal insufficiency and death unless it is recognized promptly and treated appropriately. We describe the case of a 64-year-old man with polycythemia vera found to be unresponsive with fever, hypotension, tachycardia, and hypoglycemia. Electrocardiogram showed ST-elevation with elevated troponin, hemoglobin, prothrombin time, and partial thromboplastin time. He required aggressive ventilator and vasopressor support. Despite primary coronary intervention, he remained hypotensive. Random cortisol level was low. He received stress dose hydrocortisone with immediate hemodynamic stability. BAH was highly suspected and was confirmed by non-contrast abdominal computed tomography. Prompt recognition and timely initiated treatment remain crucial to impact the mortality associated with acute adrenal insufficiency. PMID:27609733

  8. Laparoscopic Operative Technique for Adrenal Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Szostek, Grzegorz; Nazarewski, Slawomir; Borkowski, Tomasz; Chudzinski, Witold; Tolloczko, Tadeusz

    2000-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Laparoscopy has acquired an unquestionable position in surgical practice as a diagnostic and operative tool. Recently, the laparoscopic approach has become a valuable option for adrenalectomy. This paper reports, in detail, our experience of laparoscopic adrenalectomy performed for adrenal tumors. Methods: We performed 12 laparoscopic adrenalectomies from October 29, 1997 to October 31, 1998. The technique of laparoscopic adrenalectomy is described thoroughly in all relevant details for either left or right-sided adrenal lesions. Results: The presented technique of laparoscopic adrenalectomy in all 12 cases provided good and relatively simple exposure of the immediate operative area. All relevant vascular elements were safely controlled, adrenal tumors could be successfully removed, and adequate hemostasis was achieved. No intraoperative or postoperative complications were observed. Conclusions: Laparoscopic adrenalectomy is a safe alternative to open surgery and is preferred for most patients because of shorter postoperative hospital stay and less postoperative discomfort. PMID:10917119

  9. Adrenal glands in patients with cogenital renal anomalies: CT appearance

    SciTech Connect

    Kenney, P.J.; Robbins, G.L.; Ellis, D.A.; Spirt, B.A.

    1985-04-01

    The CT appearance of the adrenal glands was investigated in 30 patients with congenital renal anomalies. The ipsilateral adrenal was clearly identified in 83% of these patients; in all of them, the adrenal was a paraspinal disk-shaped organ, which appeared linear on CT. Conversely, the adrenals retained their normal shape in a control group of 20 patients with acquired renal atrophy or prior simple nephrectomy.

  10. Localization of metastatic adrenal cortical carcinoma with Ga-67

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, F.T.; Anderson, J.H.; Jelinek, J.; Anderson, D.W. )

    1991-02-01

    Data are limited on the localization of Ga-67 in primary or metastatic adrenal cortical carcinoma. We report the localization of Ga-67 to pathologically confirmed adrenal cortical carcinoma metastatic to the lung. A review of the literature revealed four patients have previously been reported to have metastatic adrenal cortical carcinoma detected on Ga-67 scan. Gallium imaging may be useful in the evaluation of patients with adrenal cortical carcinoma. SPECT imaging should further improve lesion resolution and localization.

  11. Two cases of neonatal adrenal hemorrhage presenting with persistent jaundice.

    PubMed

    Ruffini, E; De Petris, L; Zorzi, G; Paoletti, P; Mambelli, G; Carlucci, A

    2013-01-01

    The adrenal hemorrhage is a relatively rare event in newborns but must be considered in the presence of a persistent unexplained jaundice, especially in presence of predisposing factors. Serial ultrasonography is the modality of choice for initial diagnosis and follow-up of neonatal adrenal hemorrhage. We report two cases of neonatal adrenal hemorrhage presenting with persistent jaundice. The causes of the neonatal adrenal hemorrhages were a difficult vaginal delivery in macrosomic infant and a neonatal infection.

  12. Steroid 21 hydroxylase deficiency congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Nimkarn, Saroj; Lin-Su, Karen; New, Maria I

    2011-10-01

    Steroid 21 hydroxylase deficiency is the most common form of congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH). The severity of this disorder depends on the extent of impaired enzymatic activity, which is caused by various mutations of the 21 hydroxylase gene. This article reviews adrenal steroidogenesis and the pathophysiology of 21 hydroxylase deficiency. The three forms of CAH are then discussed in terms of clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment, and genetic basis. Prenatal diagnosis and treatment are also reviewed. The goal of therapy is to correct the deficiency in cortisol secretion and suppress androgen overproduction. Glucocorticoid replacement has been the mainstay of treatment for CAH, but new treatment strategies continue to be developed and studied.

  13. Brain serotonin and pituitary-adrenal functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernikos-Danellis, J.; Berger, P.; Barchas, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    It had been concluded by Scapagnini et al. (1971) that brain serotonin (5-HT) was involved in the regulation of the diurnal rhythm of the pituitary-adrenal system but not in the stress response. A study was conducted to investigate these findings further by evaluating the effects of altering brain 5-HT levels on the daily fluctuation of plasma corticosterone and on the response of the pituitary-adrenal system to a stressful or noxious stimulus in the rat. In a number of experiments brain 5-HT synthesis was inhibited with parachlorophenylalanine. In other tests it was tried to raise the level of brain 5-HT with precursors.

  14. Cystic Pheochromocytoma Presenting as Adrenal Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Abdulsalam, Mohammed Shafi; Satish, Priyanka; Janakiraman, Raghunath Keddy; Singh, Shivshankar

    2016-01-01

    Pheochromocytomas are usually solid tumours. But it can present as cystic lesions in the adrenal gland. Cystic lesions in adrenal gland with hypertension needs attention to rule out pheochromocytoma. If ignored, it may lead to hypertensive emergency, multisystem crisis and death. Early diagnosis with biochemistry, Computed Tomography (CT) or Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) of abdomen, proper functional imaging like Meta Iodo Benzyl Guanidine (MIBG) scan is essential. Proper preoperative preparation is important to prevent hypertensive crisis during and after surgery. We are reporting a case of cystic pheochromocytoma in a young male. PMID:28050427

  15. ALTERATION OF CATECHOLAMINES IN PHOECHROMOCYTOMA (PC12) CELLS IN VITRO BY THE METABOLITES OF CHLOROTRIAZINE HERBICIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of four major chlorotriazine metabolites on the constitutive synthesis of the catecholamines dopamine (DA) and norepinephrine (NE) were examined using undifferentiated PC12 cells. NE release and intracellular DA and NE concentrations were quantified following treatme...

  16. DISTRIBUTION OF ATRAZINE IN PC12 CELLS AND MODULATION OF CATECHOLAMINE SYNTHESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previously, we reported that atrazine disrupts ovarian function by altering hypothalamic catecholamine (CA) concentrations and the consequent regulation of pituitary LH release and prolactin secretion in the young female rat. We also showed that atrazine directly interacts with t...

  17. Adrenal pseudotumors on CT due to dilated portosystemic veins

    SciTech Connect

    Mitty, H.M.; Cohen, B.A.; Sprayregen, S.; Schwartz, K.

    1983-10-01

    The adrenal and periadrenal venous systems are part of the portosystemic collateral pathways that may enlarge in portal hypertension. The cross-sectional image of the resulting enlarged venous channels may simulate an adrenal msss. Three examples of such computed tomographic (CT) scans are presented with selective venographic correlation. Patients with portal hypertension and suspected adrenal pathology may require enhanced or dynamic CT scans.

  18. Ultrasonographic appearance of adrenal glands in healthy and sick cats.

    PubMed

    Combes, Anaïs; Pey, Pascaline; Paepe, Dominique; Rosenberg, Dan; Daminet, Sylvie; Putcuyps, Ingrid; Bedu, Anne-Sophie; Duchateau, Luc; de Fornel-Thibaud, Pauline; Benchekroun, Ghita; Saunders, Jimmy H

    2013-06-01

    The first part of the study aimed to describe prospectively the ultrasonographic features of the adrenal glands in 94 healthy cats and 51 chronically sick cats. It confirmed the feasibility of ultrasonography of adrenal glands in healthy and chronically sick cats, which were not statistically different. The typical hypoechoic appearance of the gland surrounded by hyperechoic fat made it recognisable. A sagittal plane of the gland, not in line with the aorta, may be necessary to obtain the largest adrenal measurements. The reference intervals of adrenal measurements were inferred from the values obtained in the healthy and chronically sick cats (mean ± 0.96 SD): adrenal length was 8.9-12.5 mm; cranial height was 3.0-4.8 mm; caudal height was 3.0-4.5 mm. The second part of the study consisted of a retrospective analysis of the ultrasonographic examination of the adrenal glands in cats with adrenal diseases (six had hyperaldosteronism and four had pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism) and a descriptive comparison with the reference features obtained in the control groups from the prospective study. Cats with hyperaldosteronism presented with unilateral severely enlarged adrenal glands. However, a normal contralateral gland did not preclude a contralateral infiltration in benign or malignant adrenal neoplasms. The ultrasonographic appearance of the adrenal glands could not differentiate benign and malignant lesions. The ultrasonographic appearance of pituitary-dependent hyperadrenocorticism was mainly a symmetrical adrenal enlargement; however, a substantial number of cases were within the reference intervals of adrenal size.

  19. Imaging of an adrenal cortical carcinoma and its skeletal metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Drane, W.E.; Graham, M.M.; Nelp, W.B.

    1983-08-01

    Though the typical scintigraphic appearance in adrenal cortical carcinoma is bilateral nonvisualization of the adrenal glands, we report a case with simultaneous visualization of both an adrenal cortical carcinoma and its skeletal metastasis using 6-beta-(/sup 131/I)iodomethyl-19-norcholesterol.

  20. Imaging of an adrenal cortical carcinoma and its skeletal metastasis

    SciTech Connect

    Drane, W.E.; Graham, M.M.; Nelp, W.B.

    1983-08-01

    Though the typical scintigraphic appearance in adrenal cortical carcinoma is bilateral nonvisualization of the adrenal glands, a case with simultaneous visualization of both an adrenal cortical carcinoma and its skeletal metastasis using 6-..beta..-(/sup 131/I)iodomethyl-19-norcholesterol is reported.

  1. Biopsy of the right adrenal gland by the transhepatic approach

    SciTech Connect

    Price, R.B.; Bernardino, M.E.; Berkman, W.A.; Sones, P.J. Jr.; Torres, W.E.

    1983-08-01

    A transhepatic computed-tomographic-guided biopsy of a right adrenal mass is described. This method is simpler to perform than the usual posterior biopsy carried out with the patient prone and is less likely to cause a complicating pneumothorax. In seven of eight patients with right adrenal masses, adrenal tissue was obtained and an accurate diagnosis was possible. No complications resulted.

  2. Brain phospholipase C-diacylglycerol lipase pathway is involved in vasopressin-induced release of noradrenaline and adrenaline from adrenal medulla in rats.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Takahiro; Okada, Shoshiro; Yamaguchi-Shima, Naoko; Yokotani, Kunihiko

    2004-09-19

    Recently, we reported that intracerebroventricularly (i.c.v.) administered arginine-vasopressin evokes the release of noradrenaline and adrenaline from adrenal medulla by brain thromboxane A2-mediated mechanisms in rats. These results suggest the involvement of brain arachidonic acid in the vasopressin-induced activation of the central adrenomedullary outflow. Arachidonic acid is released mainly by two pathways: phospholipase A2 (PLA2)-dependent pathway; phospholipase C (PLC)- and diacylglycerol lipase-dependent pathway. In the present study, therefore, we attempted to identify which pathway is involved in the vasopressin-induced release of both catecholamines from adrenal medulla using urethane-anesthetized rats. Vasopressin (0.2 nmol/animal, i.c.v.)-induced elevation of plasma noradrenaline and adrenaline was dose-dependently reduced by neomycin [0.28 and 0.55 micromol (250 and 500 microg)/animal, i.c.v.] and 1-[6-[[(17beta)-3-methoxyestra-1,3,5(10)-trien-17-yl]amino]hexyl]-1H-pyrrole-2,5-dione (U-73122) [5 and 10 nmol (2.3 and 4.6 microg)/animal, i.c.v.] (inhibitors of PLC), and also by 1,6-bis(cyclohexyloximinocarbonylamino)hexane (RHC-80267) [1.3 and 2.6 micromol (500 and 1000 microg)/animal, i.c.v.] (an inhibitor of diacylglycerol lipase). On the other hand, mepacrine [1.1 and 2.2 micromol (500 and 1000 microg)/animal, i.c.v.] (an inhibitor of PLA2) was largely ineffective on the vasopressin-induced elevation of plasma catecholamines. These results suggest that vasopressin evokes the release of noradrenaline and adrenaline from adrenal medulla by the brain PLC- and diacylglycerol lipase-dependent mechanisms in rats.

  3. Correlation between catecholamine secretion from bovine isolated chromaffin cells and [3H]-ouabain binding to plasma membranes

    PubMed Central

    Aunis, Dominique; García, Antonio G.

    1981-01-01

    1 Secretion of catecholamines (CA) evoked by ouabain, chlormadinone acetate (CMA), phenoxybenzamine (Pbz) and vanadate, four agents known to inhibit Na+, K+-dependent Mg2+-activated adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) activity has been studied in suspensions of bovine isolated adrenal medullary cells. 2 Acetylcholine (ACh) evoked a 5 fold increase of the basal CA secretion from isolated cells suspended in oxygenated Krebs-bicarbonate solution kept at 27°C. Secretion was antagonized by Ca2+-deprivation or hexamethonium, indicating good functional viability of the cells. 3 Ouabain (10-7 to 10-4 M) evoked a progressive, dose-dependent release of CA from cell suspensions. Study of the time course of the secretory response for 2 h allowed the separation of two components in the secretory response at all doses studied: a slow initial component (0.011 pg/min CA) and a second faster component (0.032 pg/min CA). 4 CMA evoked a clear-cut CA secretory response. The ED50 for CMA was 10-4 M, as compared to 3 × 10-6 M for ouabain. Pbz and vanadate did not induce CA release. 5 [3H]-ouabain was taken up and bound to intact isolated cells by a non-saturable binding process. However, in semi-purified plasma membranes from bovine adrenal medulla a saturable specific [3H]-ouabain binding process was observed with a KD of 8.1 nM. Binding to the membranes was ATP-dependent and antagonized by K+. 6 [3H]-ouabain specific binding to membranes was antagonized by ouabain and CMA, but not by Pbz or vanadate; the ID50 for ouabain and CMA were 10-6 and 10-5 M respectively. 7 Ouabain partially inhibited, in a dose-dependent manner, Na+, K+-Mg2+ ATPase activity of the semi-purified plasma membranes. 8 The results demonstrate a good correlation between the ability of different drugs, known to inhibit ATPase activity, to displace [3H]-ouabain binding to adreno—medullary plasma membranes and their capacity to evoke a CA secretory response from isolated chromaffin cells. The data also suggest that

  4. Electrochemical sensors and biosensors for determination of catecholamine neurotransmitters: A review.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, José A; Fernandes, Paula M V; Pereira, Carlos M; Silva, F

    2016-11-01

    This work describes the state of the art of electrochemical devices for the detection of an important class of neurotransmitters: the catecholamines. This class of biogenic amines includes dopamine, noradrenaline (also called norepinephrine) and adrenaline (also called epinephrine). Researchers have focused on the role of catecholamine molecules within the human body because they are involved in many important biological functions and are commonly associated with several diseases, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson. Furthermore, the release of catecholamines as a consequence of induced stimulus is an important indicator of reward-related behaviors, such as food, drink, sex and drug addiction. Thus, the development of simple, fast and sensitive electroanalytical methodologies for the determination of catecholamines is currently needed in clinical and biomedical fields, as they have the potential to serve as clinically relevant biomarkers for specific disease states or to monitor treatment efficacy. Currently, three main strategies have used by researchers to detect catecholamine molecules, namely: the use electrochemical materials in combination with, for example, HPLC or FIA, the incorporation of new materials/layers on the sensor surfaces (Tables 1-7) and in vivo detection, manly by using FSCV at CFMEs (Section 10). The developed methodologies were able not only to accurately detect catecholamines at relevant concentration levels, but to do so in the presence of co-existing interferences in samples detected (ascorbate, for example). This review examines the progress made in electrochemical sensors for the selective detection of catecholamines in the last 15 years, with special focus on highly innovative features introduced by nanotechnology. As the literature in rather extensive, we try to simplify this work by summarizing and grouping electrochemical sensors according to the manner their substrates were chemically modified. We also discuss the current and future

  5. Catecholamine Stress Hormones Regulate Cellular Iron Homeostasis by a Posttranscriptional Mechanism Mediated by Iron Regulatory Protein

    PubMed Central

    Tapryal, Nisha; Vivek G, Vishnu; Mukhopadhyay, Chinmay K.

    2015-01-01

    Adequate availability of iron is important for cellular energy metabolism. Catecholamines such as epinephrine and norepinephrine promote energy expenditure to adapt to conditions that arose due to stress. To restore the energy balance, epinephrine/norepinephrine-exposed cells may face higher iron demand. So far, no direct role of epinephrine/norepinephrine in cellular iron homeostasis has been reported. Here we show that epinephrine/norepinephrine regulates iron homeostasis components such as transferrin receptor-1 and ferritin-H in hepatic and skeletal muscle cells by promoting the binding of iron regulatory proteins to iron-responsive elements present in the UTRs of transferrin receptor-1 and ferritin-H transcripts. Increased transferrin receptor-1, decreased ferritin-H, and increased iron-responsive element-iron regulatory protein interaction are also observed in liver and muscle tissues of epinephrine/norepinephrine-injected mice. We demonstrate the role of epinephrine/norepinephrine-induced generation of reactive oxygen species in converting cytosolic aconitase (ACO1) into iron regulatory protein-1 to bind iron-responsive elements present in UTRs of transferrin receptor-1 and ferritin-H. Our study further reveals that mitochondrial iron content and mitochondrial aconitase (ACO2) activity are elevated by epinephrine/norepinephrine that are blocked by the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine and iron regulatory protein-1 siRNA, suggesting involvement of reactive oxygen species and iron regulatory protein-1 in this mechanism. This study reveals epinephrine and norepinephrine as novel regulators of cellular iron homeostasis. PMID:25572399

  6. Physiological Basis for the Etiology, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Adrenal Disorders: Cushing’s Syndrome, Adrenal Insufficiency, and Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia

    PubMed Central

    Raff, Hershel; Sharma, Susmeeta T.; Nieman, Lynnette K.

    2014-01-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis is a classic neuroendocrine system. One of the best ways to understand the HPA axis is to appreciate its dynamics in the variety of diseases and syndromes that affect it. Excess glucocorticoid activity can be due to endogenous cortisol overproduction (spontaneous Cushing’s syndrome) or exogenous glucocorticoid therapy (iatrogenic Cushing’s syndrome). Endogenous Cushing’s syndrome can be subdivided into ACTH-dependent and ACTH-independent, the latter of which is usually due to autonomous adrenal overproduction. The former can be due to a pituitary corticotroph tumor (usually benign) or ectopic ACTH production from tumors outside the pituitary; both of these tumor types overexpress the proopiomelanocortin gene. The converse of Cushing’s syndrome is the lack of normal cortisol secretion and is usually due to adrenal destruction (primary adrenal insufficiency) or hypopituitarism (secondary adrenal insufficiency). Secondary adrenal insufficiency can also result from a rapid discontinuation of long-term, pharmacological glucocorticoid therapy because of HPA axis suppression and adrenal atrophy. Finally, mutations in the steroidogenic enzymes of the adrenal cortex can lead to congenital adrenal hyperplasia and an increase in precursor steroids, particularly androgens. When present in utero, this can lead to masculinization of a female fetus. An understanding of the dynamics of the HPA axis is necessary to master the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of pituitary-adrenal diseases. Furthermore, understanding the pathophysiology of the HPA axis gives great insight into its normal control. PMID:24715566

  7. Oral branched-chain amino acid supplements that reduce brain serotonin during exercise in rats also lower brain catecholamines.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sujean; Disilvio, Briana; Fernstrom, Madelyn H; Fernstrom, John D

    2013-11-01

    Exercise raises brain serotonin release and is postulated to cause fatigue in athletes; ingestion of branched-chain amino acids (BCAA), by competitively inhibiting tryptophan transport into brain, lowers brain tryptophan uptake and serotonin synthesis and release in rats, and reputedly in humans prevents exercise-induced increases in serotonin and fatigue. This latter effect in humans is disputed. But BCAA also competitively inhibit tyrosine uptake into brain, and thus catecholamine synthesis and release. Since increasing brain catecholamines enhances physical performance, BCAA ingestion could lower catecholamines, reduce performance and thus negate any serotonin-linked benefit. We therefore examined in rats whether BCAA would reduce both brain tryptophan and tyrosine concentrations and serotonin and catecholamine synthesis. Sedentary and exercising rats received BCAA or vehicle orally; tryptophan and tyrosine concentrations and serotonin and catecholamine synthesis rates were measured 1 h later in brain. BCAA reduced brain tryptophan and tyrosine concentrations, and serotonin and catecholamine synthesis. These reductions in tyrosine concentrations and catecholamine synthesis, but not tryptophan or serotonin synthesis, could be prevented by co-administering tyrosine with BCAA. Complete essential amino acid mixtures, used to maintain or build muscle mass, were also studied, and produced different effects on brain tryptophan and tyrosine concentrations and serotonin and catecholamine synthesis. Since pharmacologically increasing brain catecholamine function improves physical performance, the finding that BCAA reduce catecholamine synthesis may explain why this treatment does not enhance physical performance in humans, despite reducing serotonin synthesis. If so, adding tyrosine to BCAA supplements might allow a positive action on performance to emerge.

  8. Mussel-inspired catecholamine polymers as new sizing agents for fiber-reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wonoh; Lee, Jea Uk; Byun, Joon-Hyung

    2015-04-01

    Mussel-inspired catecholamine polymers (polydopamine and polynorepinephrine) were coated on the surface of carbon and glass fibers in order to increase the interfacial shear strength between fibers and polymer matrix, and consequently the interlaminar shear strength of fiber-reinforced composites. By utilizing adhesive characteristic of the catecholamine polymer, fiber-reinforced composites can become mechanically stronger than conventional composites. Since the catecholamine polymer is easily constructed on the surface by the simultaneous polymerization of its monomer under a weak basic circumstance, it can be readily coated on micro-fibers by a simple dipping process without any complex chemical treatments. Also, catecholamines can increase the surface free energy of micro-fibers and therefore, can give better wettability to epoxy resin. Therefore, catecholamine polymers can be used as versatile and effective surface modifiers for both carbon and glass fibers. Here, catecholamine-coated carbon and glass fibers exhibited higher interfacial shear strength (37 and 27% increases, respectively) and their plain woven composites showed improved interlaminar shear strength (13 and 9% increases, respectively) compared to non-coated fibers and composites.

  9. Effects of mental workload and caffeine on catecholamines and blood pressure compared to performance variations.

    PubMed

    Papadelis, Christos; Kourtidou-Papadeli, Chrysoula; Vlachogiannis, Emmanouil; Skepastianos, Petros; Bamidis, Panayiotis; Maglaveras, Nikos; Pappas, Kostantinos

    2003-02-01

    Caffeine is characterised as a central nervous system stimulant, also affecting metabolic and cardiovascular functions. A number of studies have demonstrated an effect of caffeine on the excretion of catecholamines and their metabolites. Urinary epinephrine and norepinephrine have been shown to increase after caffeine administration. Similar trends were observed in our study in adrenaline (ADR) and noradrenaline (NORADR) levels and additionally a dose dependent effect of caffeine. The effect of caffeine on cognitive performance, blood pressure, and catecholamines was tested under resting conditions and under mental workload. Each subject performed the test after oral administration of 1 cup and then 3 cups of coffee. Root mean square error (RMSE) for the tracking task was continuously monitored. Blood pressure was also recorded before and after each stage of the experiment. Catecholamines were collected and measured for three different conditions as: at rest, after mental stress alone, after one dose of caffeine under stress, and after triple dose of caffeine under stress. Comparison of the performance of each stage with the resting conditions revealed statistically significant differences between group of smokers/coffee drinkers compared with the other two groups of non-coffee drinkers/non-smokers and non-smokers/coffee drinkers. There was no statistically significant difference between the last two groups. There was an increase of urine adrenaline with 1 cup of coffee and statistically significant increase of urine noradrenaline. Both catecholamines were significantly increased with triple dose of caffeine. Mental workload increased catecholamines. There was a dose dependent effect of caffeine on catecholamines.

  10. Between 21 and 34 years of age, aging alters the catecholamine responses to supramaximal exercise in endurance trained athletes.

    PubMed

    Zouhal, H; Gratas-Delamarche, A; Rannou, F; Granier, P; Bentue-Ferrer, D; Delamarche, P

    1999-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of aging and training on the adrenaline (A) and noradrenaline (NA) responses during the Wingate-test in three age groups of subjects: 21 year old untrained subjects (21U), 21 year old endurance trained (21T) (national elite runners), 34 year old endurance trained (34T) (national elite runners). Performances during the test were judged using the usual parameters of peak power (Wmax) and mean power (W) expressed in absolute or relative values. A and NA responses were measured at rest (A0 and NA0) immediately at the end of the exercise (Amax and NAmax) and after 5 minutes recovery (A5 and NA5). Plasma maximal lactate (La(max)) was determined 3 minutes after the end of the exercise. Wmax, W and La(max) were always significantly lower in 34T compared to 21T and 21U. The catecholamine responses were similar in 21T and 21U. Inversely, a significantly lower value of Amax was observed in 34T (2.01 +/- 0.5 nmol x l(-1)) compared to 21U (3.62 +/- 0.3 nmol x l(-1)) associated with a significantly higher value of NA(max) in 34T versus 21T and 21U. Thus, the Amax/NA(max) ratio was found to be significantly lower in the older subjects versus both 21T and 21U. All these findings indicated that endurance training did not affect the sympathoadrenergic responses to a supramaximal exercise and suggested that only one decade may reduce the capacity of the medulla to secrete adrenaline and therefore the adrenal medulla responsiveness to the sympathetic nervous activity.

  11. Recovery of Adrenal Function in Patients with Glucocorticoids Induced Secondary Adrenal Insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Jong Ha; Kim, Soo Kyoung; Jung, Jung Hwa; Hahm, Jong Ryeal

    2016-01-01

    Background The chronic use of glucocorticoids (GC) suppresses function of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and often results in secondary adrenal insufficiency (AI). The present study aimed to determine the recovery rate of adrenal function in patients with secondary AI within 1 to 2 years and to assess the factors predictive of adrenal function recovery. Methods This was a retrospective observational study that enrolled patients diagnosed with GC-induced secondary AI between 2007 and 2013. AI was defined by peak serum cortisol levels <18 µg/dL during a standard-dose short synacthen test (SST). A follow-up SST was performed after 1 to 2 years, and responders were defined as those with adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH)-stimulated peak serum cortisol levels ≥18 µg/dL. Results Of the total 34 patients diagnosed with GC-induced secondary AI at first, 20 patients (58.8%) recovered normal adrenal function by the time of the follow-up SST (median follow-up period, 16.5 months). Although the baseline serum ACTH and cortisol levels at the first SST did not differ between responders and non-responders, the incremental cortisol response during the first SST was higher in responders than that of non-responders (7.88 vs. 3.56, P<0.01). Additionally, higher cortisol increments during the first SST were an independent predictive factor of the adrenal function recovery (odds ratio, 1.58; 95% confidence interval, 1.02 to 2.46; P<0.05). Conclusion In the present study, adrenal function recovery was achieved frequently in patients with GC-induced secondary AI within 1 to 2 years. Additionally, an incremental cortisol response at the first SST may be an important predictive factor of adrenal function recovery. PMID:26676337

  12. Increased DNA methylation of scavenger receptor class B type I contributes to inhibitory effects of prenatal caffeine ingestion on cholesterol uptake and steroidogenesis in fetal adrenals

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Dong-Mei; He, Zheng; Ma, Liang-Peng; Wang, Lin-Long; Ping, Jie; Wang, Hui

    2015-06-01

    Steroid hormones synthesized from cholesterol in the fetal adrenal are crucial for fetal development. We have observed the inhibited fetal adrenal corticosterone synthesis and increased intrauterine growth retardation (IUGR) rate in rats under prenatal caffeine ingestion. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of prenatal caffeine ingestion on cholesterol supply in fetal adrenal steroidogenesis in rats and explore the underlying epigenetic mechanisms. Pregnant Wistar rats were treated with 60 mg/kg·d caffeine from gestational day (GD) 7 to GD17. Histological changes of fetal adrenals and increased IUGR rates were observed in the caffeine group. There were significantly decreased steroid hormone contents and cholesterol supply in caffeine-treated fetal adrenals. Data from the gene expression array suggested that prenatal caffeine ingestion caused increased expression of genes related to DNA methylation and decreased expression of genes related to cholesterol uptake. The following conjoint analysis of DNA methylation array with these differentially expressed genes suggested that scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) may play an important role in caffeine-induced cholesterol supply deficiency. Moreover, real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemical detection certified the inhibitory effects of caffeine on both mRNA expression and protein expression of SR-BI in the fetal adrenal. And the increased DNA methylation frequency in the proximal promoter of SR-BI was confirmed by bisulfite-sequencing PCR. In conclusion, prenatal caffeine ingestion can induce DNA hypermethylation of the SR-BI promoter in the rat fetal adrenal. These effects may lead to decreased SR-BI expression and cholesterol uptake, which inhibits steroidogenesis in the fetal adrenal. - Highlights: • Prenatal caffeine ingestion inhibits steroid hormone production in the fetal adrenal. • Prenatal caffeine ingestion inhibits cholesterol uptake in the fetal adrenal. • Prenatal caffeine

  13. Adrenal venous sampling using Dyna-CT--a practical guide.

    PubMed

    Plank, Christina; Wolf, Florian; Langenberger, Herbert; Loewe, Christian; Schoder, Maria; Lammer, Johannes

    2012-09-01

    Primary hyperaldosteronism due to aldosterone secreting adrenal adenomas is an important and potentially curable cause for hypertension. The differentiation between unilateral or bilateral adrenal adenomas is crucial, as unilateral adenomas can easily be cured by surgery whereas bilateral adenomas have to be treated conservatively. Exact diagnosis can be made when unilateral or bilateral hormone production is proven with adrenal vein sampling. We present an effective step-by-step technique how to perform an adrenal vein sampling with a special emphasis on how to reliably catheterize the right adrenal vein using Dyna CT.

  14. Imaging features of benign adrenal cysts.

    PubMed

    Sanal, Hatice Tuba; Kocaoglu, Murat; Yildirim, Duzgun; Bulakbasi, Nail; Guvenc, Inanc; Tayfun, Cem; Ucoz, Taner

    2006-12-01

    Benign adrenal gland cysts (BACs) are rare lesions with a variable histological spectrum and may mimic not only each other but also malignant ones. We aimed to review imaging features of BACs which can be helpful in distinguishing each entity and determining the subsequent appropriate management.

  15. Adrenal metabolism of mitotane and related compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Djanegara, T.K.S.

    1989-01-01

    Mitotane (o,p{prime}-DDD; 1-(2-chlorophenyl)-1-(4-chlorophenyl)-2,2-dichloroethane) has been used in the treatment of Cushing's syndrome due to adrenal hyperfunction and it the drug of choice for adrenocortical carcinoma. The object of this investigation is to study the biotransformation of o,p{prime}-DDD and p,p{prime}-DDD in dogs and bovine adrenal cortex to explain its selective toxicity and mechanism of action. The in vitro biotransformation of {sup 14}C-labeled o,p{prime}-DDD and p,p{prime}-DDD by dog and bovine adrenal cortex as studied. Of the cortex subcellular fractions, the cytosol fraction was found to be the most active in metabolizing the substrates, followed by the mitochondrial fraction. This metabolism including that in cytosolic fractions, did not take place with boiled enzyme preparations and required an NADPH generating system. This study has been directed towards establishing the metabolic activation mechanism which may account for the adrenocorticolytic effect of mitotane in contrast to detoxication by the liver. HPLC and TLC metabolic profiles have been generated from incubations of bovine and dog adrenal cortex homogenates and their subfractions for {sup 14}C-labeled p,p{prime}-DDD, o,p{prime}-DDD and its monochloroethylene derivative, o,p{prime}-DDMU.

  16. Laparoscopic adrenalectomy for benign adrenal tumors.

    PubMed

    Ishikawa, T; Inaba, M; Nishiguchi, Y; Ishibashi, R; Ogisawa, K; Yukimoto, K; Ogawa, Y; Onoda, N; Hirakawa, K; Chung, Y S

    2000-06-01

    Laparoscopic adrenalectomy has been rapidly accepted for treatment of benign adrenal tumors. To evaluate the advantages of laparoscopic adrenalectomy, we examined 55 patients who underwent laparoscopic adrenalectomy. In all patients, adrenal tumors were successfully removed. The mean operating time was 143 minutes, and the estimated mean blood loss was 49 mL in all patients. The postoperative course was uneventful in all cases. The mean frequency of administration of analgesics was only 2.9 times, and the time elapsed to first walking after surgery was 17 hours. The peak white blood cell count and C-reactive protein values after surgery were 8,266 +/- 1,963/mm3 and 2.5 +/- 1.2 mg/dL, respectively. Of the 55 patients, 44 underwent total adrenalectomy and another 11 underwent partial adrenalectomy, which was introduced in the expectation of preserving normal adrenal cortex; it is therefore indicated in solitary and peripherally located benign tumors. The mean operating time was 154 minutes for the total adrenalectomy, which was longer than that of partial adrenalectomy (92 minutes). The estimated blood loss was 50 mL for the total and 46 mL for the partial adrenalectomy. The postoperative course was uneventful and surgical outcome was excellent in each group. In conclusion, our results are encouraging enough to suggest that laparoscopic adrenalectomy should be a preferential therapeutic option for benign adrenal tumors; also, partial adrenalectomy could be a safe, effective, and less invasive procedure in selected cases.

  17. Plasma concentrations of adrenomedullin and atrial and brain natriuretic peptides in patients with adrenal pheochromocytoma.

    PubMed

    Hu, Wei; Shi, Lei; Zhou, Pang-Hu; Zhang, Xiao-Bin

    2015-11-01

    of blood pressure in patients with PC, and there may be an ADM/catecholamine local regulatory mechanism that is important for the control of adrenal medulla functions.

  18. Altered catecholamine receptor affinity in rabbit aortic intimal hyperplasia

    SciTech Connect

    O'Malley, M.K.; Cotecchia, S.; Hagen, P.O. )

    1991-08-01

    Intimal thickening is a universal response to endothelial denudation and is also thought to be a precursor of atherosclerosis. The authors have demonstrated selective supersensitivity in arterial intimal hyperplasia to norepinephrine and they now report a possible mechanism for this. Binding studies in rabbit aorta with the selective alpha 1-adrenergic radioligand 125I-HEAT demonstrated that there was no change in receptor density (20 {plus minus} 4 fmole/10(6) cells) in intact vascular smooth muscle cells at either 5 or 14 days after denudation. However, competition studies showed a 2.6-fold increase in alpha 1-adrenergic receptor affinity for norepinephrine in intimal hyperplastic tissue (P less than 0.05). This increased affinity for norepinephrine was associated with a greater increase in 32P-labeled phosphatidylinositol (148% intimal thickening versus 76% control) and phosphatidic acid (151% intimal thickening versus 56% control) following norepinephrine stimulation of free floating rings of intimal hyperplastic aorta. These data suggest that the catecholamine supersensitivity in rabbit aortic intimal hyperplasia is receptor mediated and may be linked to the phosphatidylinositol cycle.

  19. Irrelevant stimulus processing in ADHD: catecholamine dynamics and attentional networks

    PubMed Central

    Aboitiz, Francisco; Ossandón, Tomás; Zamorano, Francisco; Palma, Bárbara; Carrasco, Ximena

    2014-01-01

    A cardinal symptom of attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a general distractibility where children and adults shift their attentional focus to stimuli that are irrelevant to the ongoing behavior. This has been attributed to a deficit in dopaminergic signaling in cortico-striatal networks that regulate goal-directed behavior. Furthermore, recent imaging evidence points to an impairment of large scale, antagonistic brain networks that normally contribute to attentional engagement and disengagement, such as the task-positive networks and the default mode network (DMN). Related networks are the ventral attentional network (VAN) involved in attentional shifting, and the salience network (SN) related to task expectancy. Here we discuss the tonic–phasic dynamics of catecholaminergic signaling in the brain, and attempt to provide a link between this and the activities of the large-scale cortical networks that regulate behavior. More specifically, we propose that a disbalance of tonic catecholamine levels during task performance produces an emphasis of phasic signaling and increased excitability of the VAN, yielding distractibility symptoms. Likewise, immaturity of the SN may relate to abnormal tonic signaling and an incapacity to build up a proper executive system during task performance. We discuss different lines of evidence including pharmacology, brain imaging and electrophysiology, that are consistent with our proposal. Finally, restoring the pharmacodynamics of catecholaminergic signaling seems crucial to alleviate ADHD symptoms; however, the possibility is open to explore cognitive rehabilitation strategies to top-down modulate network dynamics compensating the pharmacological deficits. PMID:24723897

  20. Prefrontal/accumbal catecholamine system processes high motivational salience

    PubMed Central

    Puglisi-Allegra, Stefano; Ventura, Rossella

    2012-01-01

    Motivational salience regulates the strength of goal seeking, the amount of risk taken, and the energy invested from mild to extreme. Highly motivational experiences promote highly persistent memories. Although this phenomenon is adaptive in normal conditions, experiences with extremely high levels of motivational salience can promote development of memories that can be re-experienced intrusively for long time resulting in maladaptive outcomes. Neural mechanisms mediating motivational salience attribution are, therefore, very important for individual and species survival and for well-being. However, these neural mechanisms could be implicated in attribution of abnormal motivational salience to different stimuli leading to maladaptive compulsive seeking or avoidance. We have offered the first evidence that prefrontal cortical norepinephrine (NE) transmission is a necessary condition for motivational salience attribution to highly salient stimuli, through modulation of dopamine (DA) in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), a brain area involved in all motivated behaviors. Moreover, we have shown that prefrontal-accumbal catecholamine (CA) system determines approach or avoidance responses to both reward- and aversion-related stimuli only when the salience of the unconditioned stimulus (UCS) is high enough to induce sustained CA activation, thus affirming that this system processes motivational salience attribution selectively to highly salient events. PMID:22754514

  1. Alternatively activated macrophages produce catecholamines to sustain adaptive thermogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Khoa D.; Qiu, Yifu; Cui, Xiaojin; Goh, Y.P. Sharon; Mwangi, Julia; David, Tovo; Mukundan, Lata; Brombacher, Frank; Locksley, Richard M.; Chawla, Ajay

    2011-01-01

    All homeotherms utilize thermogenesis to maintain core body temperature, ensuring that cellular functions and physiologic processes can ensue in cold environments1-3. In the prevailing model, when the hypothalamus senses cold temperatures, it triggers sympathetic discharge, resulting in the release of noradrenaline in brown adipose tissue (BAT) and white adipose tissue (WAT)4,5. Acting via the β3-adrenergic receptors, noradrenaline induces lipolysis in white adipocytes6, whereas it stimulates the expression of thermogenic genes, such as PPARγ coactivator 1a (Ppargc1a), uncoupling protein 1 (Ucp1), and acyl-CoA synthetase long-chain family member 1 (Acsl1), in brown adipocytes7-9. However, the precise nature of all the cell types involved in this efferent loop is not well established. Here we report an unexpected requirement for the interleukin 4 (IL4)-stimulated program of alternative macrophage activation in adaptive thermogenesis. Cold exposure rapidly promoted alternative activation of adipose tissue macrophages, which secrete catecholamines to induce thermogenic gene expression in BAT and lipolysis in WAT. Absence of alternatively activated macrophages impaired metabolic adaptations to cold, whereas administration of IL4 increased thermogenic gene expression, fatty acid mobilization, and energy expenditure, all in a macrophage-dependent manner. We have thus discovered a surprising role for alternatively activated macrophages in the orchestration of an important mammalian stress response, the response to cold. PMID:22101429

  2. Secretory patterns of catecholamines in Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Miwa; Nozawa, Aoi; Ueda, Keiichi; Bungo, Takashi; Terao, Hiromi; Asahina, Kiyoshi

    2012-05-15

    Catecholamines (CAs), namely adrenaline (A), noradrenaline (NA), and dopamine (DA), are secreted by the sympathoadrenal system and participate in a diverse array of functions, e.g., heat production, cardiovascular regulation, stress response and so on. However, little is known regarding peripheral CA fluctuations in cetaceans; nevertheless aquatic animals like them have needed to modify their physiological response especially for thermoregulation in water and oxygen economy during diving. To understand CA dynamism in cetaceans, diurnal changes in serum A, NA, and DA concentrations were measured during the winter and summer solstices in four Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops aduncus). The average serum NA concentration was much higher than the average A and DA concentrations, and all concentrations were higher than those reported in other cetacean species. No distinct diurnal fluctuations were observed in CA concentrations in either solstice, suggesting inhibition of the decrease in CA concentrations during nocturnal periods by the unique sleep pattern of dolphins. All the serum CA concentrations were negatively correlated with water temperature as body temperatures were, indicating that the sympathoadrenal system might be more active during winter than in summer season, suggesting a role of CA in thermoregulation.

  3. Irrelevant stimulus processing in ADHD: catecholamine dynamics and attentional networks.

    PubMed

    Aboitiz, Francisco; Ossandón, Tomás; Zamorano, Francisco; Palma, Bárbara; Carrasco, Ximena

    2014-01-01

    A cardinal symptom of attention deficit and hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is a general distractibility where children and adults shift their attentional focus to stimuli that are irrelevant to the ongoing behavior. This has been attributed to a deficit in dopaminergic signaling in cortico-striatal networks that regulate goal-directed behavior. Furthermore, recent imaging evidence points to an impairment of large scale, antagonistic brain networks that normally contribute to attentional engagement and disengagement, such as the task-positive networks and the default mode network (DMN). Related networks are the ventral attentional network (VAN) involved in attentional shifting, and the salience network (SN) related to task expectancy. Here we discuss the tonic-phasic dynamics of catecholaminergic signaling in the brain, and attempt to provide a link between this and the activities of the large-scale cortical networks that regulate behavior. More specifically, we propose that a disbalance of tonic catecholamine levels during task performance produces an emphasis of phasic signaling and increased excitability of the VAN, yielding distractibility symptoms. Likewise, immaturity of the SN may relate to abnormal tonic signaling and an incapacity to build up a proper executive system during task performance. We discuss different lines of evidence including pharmacology, brain imaging and electrophysiology, that are consistent with our proposal. Finally, restoring the pharmacodynamics of catecholaminergic signaling seems crucial to alleviate ADHD symptoms; however, the possibility is open to explore cognitive rehabilitation strategies to top-down modulate network dynamics compensating the pharmacological deficits.

  4. Delay in Diagnosis of Adrenal Insufficiency Is a Frequent Cause of Adrenal Crisis

    PubMed Central

    Rabijewski, Michał

    2013-01-01

    Delay of diagnosis of primary adrenal insufficiency (PAI) leads to adrenal crisis which is potentially lethal complication. The objective of our work was an assessment whether the establishment of diagnosis of adrenocortical insufficiency in Poland is so much delayed as assessed in the past. We have analysed data from 60 patients with diagnosis of PAI established in our department during the past 12 years and who are still under our care. We found that the time to diagnosis of primary adrenal insufficiency in Poland exceeds 3 months in every patient and 6 months in patients admitted with symptoms of adrenal crisis. Forty-four percent of patients were diagnosed only just after the hospitalisation due to crisis, despite the evident signs and symptoms of PAI. Lack of appetite and loss of body weight occurred in all patients and for that reason a diagnosis of chronic gastric and duodenal ulcer disease was the most often incorrect diagnosis. After the proper diagnosis and treatment, in the course of 1–11 years of observation, there was only 6 imminent adrenal crises in 5 patients. Our results indicated that training of primary care physicians in the field of recognising and treatment of adrenal insufficiency is still essential. PMID:23864857

  5. Histoplasmosis of the adrenal glands studied by CT

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, D.A.; Muchmore, H.G.; Tisdal, R.G.; Fahmy, A.; Pitha, J.V.

    1984-03-01

    Computed tomography (CT) of the adrenal glands was performed on seven patients who had histologically proved disseminated histoplasmosis. All seven patients showed some degree of adrenal gland abnormality. The range of CT findings included minimal enlargement with faint flecks of calcium, moderate enlargement with focal low attenuation nodules, and massive enlargement with large areas of necrosis or dense calcification. The changes in each patient were bilateral and symmetrical. Adrenal gland shape was usually preserved. Finding of percutaneous adrenal biopsy, which was performed under CT guidance, made the diagnosis in one patient. Five of seven patients had adrenal insufficiency. It is concluded that the diagnosis of disseminated histoplasmosis should be considered in any patient who has bilateral adrenal gland enlargement and who resides in an endemic area, especially if there is evidence of adrenal insufficiency.

  6. Laparoscope resection of ectopic corticosteroid-secreting adrenal adenoma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xian-Ling; Dou, Jing-Tao; Gao, Jiang-Ping; Zhong, Wen-Wen; Jin, Du; Hui, Lüzhao; Lu, Ju-Ming; Mu, Yi-Ming

    2012-01-01

    Tumors originating from ectopic adrenal tissue are relatively rare. In this article, we describe a case with Cushing's syndrome caused by an ectopic adrenal adenoma. A 38 year-old male patient presenting with cushingoid appearance for 2 years was diagnosed to have ACTH-independent Cushing's syndrome based on endocrinological evaluation. Mutiple radiological examinations detected bilateral adrenal atrophy. When the images were investigated in a more expanded scope, a 3.0×3.5×5.3 cm mass was detected in the anterior of left renal hilum and left renal vein. The mass was successfully resected with intraoperative endoscopy and pathological evaluation revealed an ectopic adrenal tumor. It is suggested that when the endocrinlogically confirmed adrenal neoplasm could not be well and definitely localized, the possibility of ectopic adrenal should be presumed and further radiography examinations should extend to the field where ectopic adrenal usually presents.

  7. Adrenal myelolipoma: Controversies in its management

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Vasanth G.; Thota, Anuroop; Shankar, Ravi; Desai, Mallikarjun G.

    2015-01-01

    Adrenal myelolipomas (AMLs) are rare, benign neoplasms of the adrenal gland with varied clinical presentations. The rarity of these tumors precludes any case-controlled or randomized study into their management. The available literature is limited to case reports and short series from referral centers. This review is an effort to put the available literature into perspective such that clinical decision making can be done with some clarity. The PubMed and Cochrane databases were searched with key words Adrenal Myelolipoma, Adrenal Incidentaloma (AI) and Adrenal Collision Tumor (ACT). From over 1300 search results, 547 relevant publications dating from 1954 to 2014 were reviewed. Details of about 1231 AMLs in the indexed literature were analyzed. Increasing usage of imaging studies has significantly increased the discovery of AMLs. Although AMLs are benign tumors, those measuring larger than 6 cm are prone to rupture and hemorrhage. Thorough endocrine work-up may benefit a selected group of patients, especially those who are hypertensive, diabetic/pre-diabetic, young patients (<50 years) and those with bilateral AML. Regular observation is needed for AML patients who are being treated non-operatively, as many of them may require surgery during follow-up. Although the AACE/AAES guidelines for AI (2009) exclude AML from mandatory metabolic work-up for a newly discovered AI, we feel that a significant number of patients with AML would benefit from metabolic work-up. In the literature, endocrine dysfunction in AML is 7% as compared with 11% in AI. Endocrine dysfunction in AML is probably underdiagnosed. PMID:25878407

  8. Hindbrain medulla catecholamine cell group involvement in lactate-sensitive hypoglycemia-associated patterns of hypothalamic norepinephrine and epinephrine activity.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, P K; Tamrakar, P; Ibrahim, B A; Briski, K P

    2014-10-10

    Cell-type compartmentation of glucose metabolism in the brain involves trafficking of the oxidizable glycolytic end product, l-lactate, by astrocytes to fuel neuronal mitochondrial aerobic respiration. Lactate availability within the hindbrain medulla is a monitored function that regulates systemic glucostasis as insulin-induced hypoglycemia (IIH) is exacerbated by lactate repletion of that brain region. A2 noradrenergic neurons are a plausible source of lactoprivic input to the neural gluco-regulatory circuit as caudal fourth ventricular (CV4) lactate infusion normalizes IIH-associated activation, e.g. phosphorylation of the high-sensitivity energy sensor, adenosine 5'-monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK), in these cells. Here, we investigated the hypothesis that A2 neurons are unique among medullary catecholamine cells in directly screening lactate-derived energy. Adult male rats were injected with insulin or vehicle following initiation of continuous l-lactate infusion into the CV4. Two hours after injections, A1, C1, A2, and C2 neurons were collected by laser-microdissection for Western blot analysis of AMPKα1/2 and phosphoAMPKα1/2 proteins. Results show that AMPK is expressed in each cell group, but only a subset, e.g. A1, C1, and A2 neurons, exhibit increased sensor activity in response to IIH. Moreover, hindbrain lactate repletion reversed hypoglycemic augmentation of pAMPKα1/2 content in A2 and C1 but not A1 cells, and normalized hypothalamic norepinephrine and epinephrine content in a site-specific manner. The present evidence for discriminative reactivity of AMPK-expressing medullary catecholamine neurons to the screened energy substrate lactate implies that that lactoprivation is selectively signaled to the hypothalamus by A2 noradrenergic and C1 adrenergic cells.

  9. Sectional anatomy of the adrenal gland in the coronal plane.

    PubMed

    Ma, Gang; Liu, Shu Wei; Zhao, Zhen Mei; Lin, Xiang Tao; Lou, Li; Li, Zhen Ping; Tang, Yu Chun; Zhong, Shi Zhen

    2008-05-01

    To provide practical anatomic data for the imaging diagnosis and surgical treatment of adrenal disease, we investigated the anatomy of the adrenal gland and its relationships to regional structures using 31 sets of serial coronal sections of upper abdomen of Chinese adult cadavers and correlated coronal magnetic resonance (MR) images of ten upper abdomens of adult healthy volunteers and coronal reconstructed multislice spiral computed tomography (MSCT) images of five patients without lesions in the adrenal gland. The adrenal glands were visualized mainly on the successive coronal sections between 18 mm anterior to the posterior margin of inferior vena cava and 24 mm posterior to the posterior margin of inferior vena cava. In general, the left adrenal gland was visualized two sections earlier than the right adrenal gland. On the plane through the anterior parts of bilateral renal hili (A18), the appearance rate of bilateral adrenal glands was 100%, and the maximal measurements of bilateral adrenal glands were visualized. The length, width, thickness of right adrenal body, thickness of medial limb and lateral limb were, respectively, 34.02 +/- 2.12 mm, 10.91 +/- 0.89 mm, 5.82 +/- 0.26 mm, 2.78 +/- 0.08 mm, 2.62 +/- 0.06 mm, whereas the measurements of left adrenal gland were 28.31 +/- 2.46 mm, 18.40 +/- 1.06 mm, 6.84 +/- 0.24 mm, 3.02 +/- 0.08 mm, 2.86 +/- 0.07 mm, respectively. The coronal plane has superior advantage in showing the bilateral adrenal glands. The shapes of adrenal glands are various, whereas the range of adrenal thickness is quite narrow. The thickness of adrenal medial and lateral limbs, especially the thickness of lateral limb are useful for the diagnosis of the bilateral adrenocortical disease.

  10. Three uncommon adrenal incidentalomas: a 13-year surgical pathology review

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The discovery of adrenal incidentalomas due to the widespread use of sophisticated abdominal imaging techniques has resulted in an increasing trend of adrenal gland specimens being received in the pathology laboratory. In this context, we encountered three uncommon adrenal incidentalomas. The aim of this manuscript is to report in detail the three index cases of adrenal incidentalomas in the context of a 13-year retrospective surgical pathology review. Methods The three index cases were investigated and analyzed in detail with relevant review of the English literature as available in PubMed and Medline. A 13-year retrospective computer-based histopathological surgical review was conducted in our laboratory and the results were analyzed in the context of evidence-based literature on adrenal incidentalomas. Results A total of 94 adrenal specimens from incidentalomas were identified, accounting for 0.025% of all surgical pathology cases. In all 76.6% were benign and 23.4% were malignant. A total of 53 females (56.4%) and 41 males (43.6%) aged 4 to 85 years were identified. The benign lesions included cortical adenoma (43.1%), pheochromocytoma (29.3%) and inflammation/fibrosis/hemorrhage (8.3%). Metastatic neoplasms were the most common malignant lesions (50%) followed by primary adrenocortical carcinomas (31.8%) and neuroblastoma (13.6%). These cases were discovered as adrenal incidentalomas that led to surgical exploration. The three index cases of adrenal incidentalomas with unusual pathologies were encountered that included (a) adrenal ganglioneuroma, (b) periadrenal schwannoma and (c) primary adrenal pleomorphic leiomyosarcoma. These cases are discussed, with a literature and clinicopathological review. Conclusions Adrenal lesions are uncommon surgical specimens in the pathology laboratory. However, higher detection rates of adrenal incidentalomas aided by the ease of laparoscopic adrenalectomy has resulted in increased adrenal surgical specimens

  11. Characterization of a novel ACTH inducible cytochrome P-450 from rat adrenal microsomes

    SciTech Connect

    Otto, S.A.; Marcus, C.M.; Jefcoate, C.R. )

    1990-02-26

    In rat adrenal cortex 7,12 dimethylbenz(a)anthracene (DMBA) causes massive necrosis that is dependent of ACTH. This is related to an ACTH inducible adrenal microsomal cytochrome P-450 that catalyzes hydrocarbon metabolism. Rat adrenal microsomes, catalyze the formation of DMBA 3,4 diol a precursor of the bay region reactive electrophile DMBA 3,4 diol 1,2 oxide. Both DMBA metabolism and a 57Kd protein have disappeared from microsomes 30 days after hypophysectomy, but are restored by 14 days treatment with ACTH. Dexamethasone which fully suppresses ACTH only partially suppresses this activity. The 57 Kd protein was partially purified to a single major band in one step from solubilized microsomes by h.p.l.c. chromatography using detergent elution from a novel column that mimics phospholipid membranes. This preparation exhibits a specific content of 2 nm P-450/mg protein and a turnover number of 1,500pm DMBA/nm P-450/minutes. A polyclonal antisera raised against this preparation provides a single western blot corresponding to the 57Kd ACTH sensitive protein. This antibody did not blot microsomal P-450 c21, nor did selected antibodies from known families react with this adrenal P-450 protein, suggesting substantial sequence differences from known P-450's.

  12. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the adrenal gland: a rare cause of primary adrenal insufficiency.

    PubMed

    de Sousa Lages, Adriana; Bastos, Margarida; Oliveira, Patrícia; Carrilho, Francisco

    2016-03-18

    Although it is a rare entity, primary lymphoma of the adrenal gland should be considered in the differential diagnosis of bilateral nodular adrenal lesions, particularly when there is evidence of associated adrenal insufficiency. We describe the case of an 83-year-old woman admitted to the emergency department due to a month's history of asthenia, weight loss, anorexia and nausea. Abdominopelvic CT showed bilateral nodular lesions of adrenal glands and a stimulation test with tetracosactide was compatible with primary adrenal insufficiency. CT-guided biopsy of the left adrenal gland was performed, and histopathological results were consistent with diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Positron emission tomography (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose detected two intensely hypermetabolic lesions limited to both adrenal glands. Replacement therapy with hydrocortisone 15 mg/day and fludrocortisone 0.1 mg/day was promptly started and chemotherapy with rituximab, cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine and prednisone was initiated after haematology-oncology consultation.

  13. Evidence for a Critical Role of Catecholamines for Cardiomyocyte Lineage Commitment in Murine Embryonic Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Martin; Nguemo, Filomain; Wagh, Vilas; Pfannkuche, Kurt; Hescheler, Jürgen; Reppel, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Catecholamine release is known to modulate cardiac output by increasing heart rate. Although much is known about catecholamine function and regulation in adults, little is known about the presence and role of catecholamines during heart development. The present study aimed therefore to evaluate the effects of different catecholamines on early heart development in an in vitro setting using embryonic stem (ES) cell-derived cardiomyocytes. Effects of catecholamine depletion induced by reserpine were examined in murine ES cells (line D3, αPIG44) during differentiation. Cardiac differentiation was assessed by immunocytochemistry, qRT-PCR, quantification of beating clusters, flow cytometry and pharmacological approaches. Proliferation was analyzed by EB cross-section measurements, while functionality of cardiomyocytes was studied by extracellular field potential (FP) measurements using microelectrode arrays (MEAs). To further differentiate between substance-specific effects of reserpine and catecholamine action via α- and β-receptors we proved the involvement of adrenergic receptors by application of unspecific α- and β-receptor antagonists. Reserpine treatment led to remarkable down-regulation of cardiac-specific genes, proteins and mesodermal marker genes. In more detail, the average ratio of ∼40% spontaneously beating control clusters was significantly reduced by 100%, 91.1% and 20.0% on days 10, 12, and 14, respectively. Flow cytometry revealed a significant reduction (by 71.6%, n = 11) of eGFP positive CMs after reserpine treatment. By contrast, reserpine did not reduce EB growth while number of neuronal cells in reserpine-treated EBs was significantly increased. MEA measurements of reserpine-treated EBs showed lower FP frequencies and weak responsiveness to adrenergic and muscarinic stimulation. Interestingly we found that developmental inhibition after α- and β-adrenergic blocker application mimicked developmental changes with reserpine. Using several

  14. GABAB receptors modulate catecholamine secretion in chromaffin cells by a mechanism involving cyclic AMP formation.

    PubMed Central

    Oset-Gasque, M. J.; Parramón, M.; González, M. P.

    1993-01-01

    1. The function of gamma-aminobutyric acidB (GABAB) receptors in modulation of catecholamine secretion by chromaffin cells and the possible mechanism involved in this action have been examined. 2. The GABAB agonists (-)-baclofen and 3-aminopropylphosphinic acid (3-APPA) were found to induce a dose-dependent increase of basal catecholamine secretion. The EC50s were 151 +/- 35 microM and 225 +/- 58 microM for baclofen and 3-APPA, respectively. This stimulatory effect was specific since it could be blocked by 0.5 mM of the specific GABAB antagonist CGP-35348. 3. In contrast, preincubation of chromaffin cells with the GABAB agonists was found to inhibit, in a dose-dependent manner, the catecholamine secretion evoked by 10 microM nicotine and 200 microM muscimol. 4. The effects of GABAB agonists on both basal and evoked catecholamine secretion were found to be accompanied by parallel changes in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). GABAB agonists produced a dose-dependent increase in [Ca2+]i which was partially blocked by CGP 35348, but they produced a strong inhibition of the [Ca2+]i increase induced by nicotine and muscimol. 5. The GABAB agonists also produced a dose-dependent increase in intracellular cyclic AMP levels, there being a direct correlation between both increase in catecholamine secretion and in intracellular cyclic AMP levels. 6. The pretreatment of chromaffin cells with pertussis toxin doubled the catecholamine secretion and increased by four times the intracellular cyclic AMP levels evoked by GABAB agonists. 7. The possible involvement of adenylate cyclase in the mechanism of GABAA receptor modulation of catecholamine secretion is discussed. PMID:8306105

  15. GABAB receptors modulate catecholamine secretion in chromaffin cells by a mechanism involving cyclic AMP formation.

    PubMed

    Oset-Gasque, M J; Parramón, M; González, M P

    1993-12-01

    1. The function of gamma-aminobutyric acidB (GABAB) receptors in modulation of catecholamine secretion by chromaffin cells and the possible mechanism involved in this action have been examined. 2. The GABAB agonists (-)-baclofen and 3-aminopropylphosphinic acid (3-APPA) were found to induce a dose-dependent increase of basal catecholamine secretion. The EC50s were 151 +/- 35 microM and 225 +/- 58 microM for baclofen and 3-APPA, respectively. This stimulatory effect was specific since it could be blocked by 0.5 mM of the specific GABAB antagonist CGP-35348. 3. In contrast, preincubation of chromaffin cells with the GABAB agonists was found to inhibit, in a dose-dependent manner, the catecholamine secretion evoked by 10 microM nicotine and 200 microM muscimol. 4. The effects of GABAB agonists on both basal and evoked catecholamine secretion were found to be accompanied by parallel changes in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i). GABAB agonists produced a dose-dependent increase in [Ca2+]i which was partially blocked by CGP 35348, but they produced a strong inhibition of the [Ca2+]i increase induced by nicotine and muscimol. 5. The GABAB agonists also produced a dose-dependent increase in intracellular cyclic AMP levels, there being a direct correlation between both increase in catecholamine secretion and in intracellular cyclic AMP levels. 6. The pretreatment of chromaffin cells with pertussis toxin doubled the catecholamine secretion and increased by four times the intracellular cyclic AMP levels evoked by GABAB agonists. 7. The possible involvement of adenylate cyclase in the mechanism of GABAA receptor modulation of catecholamine secretion is discussed.

  16. PC12 Cells Differentiate into Chromaffin Cell-Like Phenotype in Coculture with Adrenal Medullary Endothelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizrachi, Yaffa; Naranjo, Jose R.; Levi, Ben-Zion; Pollard, Harvey B.; Lelkes, Peter I.

    1990-08-01

    Previously we described specific in vitro interactions between PC12 cells, a cloned, catecholamine-secreting pheochromocytoma cell line derived from the rat adrenal medulla, and bovine adrenal medullary endothelial cells. We now demonstrate that these interactions induce the PC12 cells to acquire physical and biochemical characteristics reminiscent of chromaffin cells. Under coculture conditions involving direct cell-cell contact, the endothelial cells and the PC12 cells reduced their rates of proliferation; upon prolonged coculture PC12 cells clustered into nests of cells similar to the organization of chromaffin cells seen in vivo. Within 3 days in coculture with endothelial cells, but not with unrelated control cells, PC12 cells synthesized increased levels of [Met]enkephalin. In addition, PC12 cells, growing on confluent endothelial monolayers, failed to extend neurites in response to nerve growth factor. Neither medium conditioned by endothelial cells nor fixed endothelial cells could by themselves induce all of these different phenomena in the PC12 cells. These results suggest that under coculture conditions PC12 cells change their state of differentiation toward a chromaffin cell-like phenotype. The rapid, transient increase in the expression of the protooncogene c-fos suggests that the mechanism(s) inducing the change in the state of differentiation in PC12 cells in coculture with the endothelial cells may be distinct from that described for the differentiation of PC12 cells--e.g., by glucocorticoids. We propose that similar interactions between endothelial cells and chromaffin cell precursors may occur during embryonic development and that these interactions might be instrumental for the organ-specific differentiation of the adrenal medulla in vivo.

  17. Sensitivity of adrenal glands to adrenocorticotropic hormone in animals with alimentary obesity.

    PubMed

    Pankina, T V; Kuzminova, O I; Selyatitskaya, V G

    2008-12-01

    Blood concentration of corticosterone in obese rats did not differ from the control value. In vitro synthesis of progesterone and corticosterone in adrenal slices from obese rats was lower compared to control animals, but these differences disappeared after addition of adrenocorticotropic hormone to the incubation medium. In obese rats, blood content of corticosterone in response to administration of adrenocorticotropic hormone in vivo increased by 8 times, while in control animals this parameter increased by only 4.5 times.

  18. Catecholamine regulation of lactate dehydrogenase in rat brain cell culture

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S.; McGinnis, J.F.; de Vellis, J.

    1980-03-25

    The mechanism of catecholamine induction of the soluble cytoplasmic enzyme lactate dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.27) was studied in the rat glial tumor cell line, C6. Lactate dehydrogenase was partially purified from extracts of (/sup 3/H)leucine-labeled cells by affinity gel chromatography and quantitatively immunoprecipitated with anti-lactate dehydrogenase-5 IgG and with antilactate dehydrogenase-1 IgG. The immunoprecipitates were dissociated and electrophoresed on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gels. Using this methodology, the increased enzyme activity of lactate dehydrogenase in norepinephrine-treated C6 cells was observed to be concomitant with the increased synthesis of enzyme molecules. Despite the continued presence of norepinephrine, the specific increase in the rate of synthesis of lactate dehydrogenase was transient. It was first detected at 4 h, was maximum at 9 h, and returned to basal levels by 24 h. The half-life of lactate dehydrogenase enzyme activity was 36 h during the induction and 40 h during deinduction. The half-life for decay of /sup 3/H-labeled lactate dehydrogenase was 41 h. These observations suggest that the increase in lactate dehydrogenase activity in norepinephrine-treated cells does not involve any change in the rate of degradation. Norepinephrine increased the specific rate of synthesis of both lactate dehydrogenase-5 (a tetramer of four M subunits) and lactate dehydrogenase-1 (a tetramer of four H subunits), although to different extents. Since these subunits are coded for by two separate genes on separate chromosomes, it suggests that the regulatory mechanism involves at least two separate sites of action.

  19. Plasma catecholamines and renin activity in wrestlers following vigorous swimming.

    PubMed

    Vigas, M; Celko, J; Juránková, E; Jezová, D; Kvetnanský, R

    1998-01-01

    Cardiovascular and neuroendocrine responses to exercise in a physically fit and an untrained group of young healthy subjects were compared to study the significance of physical fitness for performance in a discipline for which the athletes were not trained. Ten wrestlers of national rank prepared for an international competition (age 18 years) and 9 untrained healthy males (age 21 years). Exercise consisted of 27-min swimming, freestyle, in water of 29 degrees C, with last 3 min increased to maximal effort. The blood pressure, heart rate and sublingual temperature were measured and blood samples were withdrawn before exercise, immediately after and after a 30 min period of rest. Catecholamines were analyzed by radioenzymatic method and plasma renin activity (PRA) using commercial kits. Systolic blood pressure and heart rate after swimming were increased comparably in the two groups, diastolic pressure was unchanged in the controls and decreased in the wrestlers. Plasma cortisol remained unchanged. Plasma glucose tended to increase in the controls and so decrease in wrestlers, with a significant difference between them after swimming (p < 0.05). However, plasma adrenaline was concomitantly increased in both groups (p < 0.01). Noradrenaline and PRA were increased after swimming in both the control and trained group. The increments of noradrenaline and PRA in wrestlers were significantly reduced compared to the control group (p < 0.01, p < 0.05, respectively). Higher physical fitness in athletes significantly reduced plasma noradrenaline and angiotensin responses to maximal exercise demanding special skill in work performance which had not been included in their training program. Training of wrestlers did not cause an exaggerated plasma adrenaline response to exercise.

  20. Stress-induced sensitization: the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and beyond.

    PubMed

    Belda, Xavier; Fuentes, Silvia; Daviu, Nuria; Nadal, Roser; Armario, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to certain acute and chronic stressors results in an immediate behavioral and physiological response to the situation followed by a period of days when cross-sensitization to further novel stressors is observed. Cross-sensitization affects to different behavioral and physiological systems, more particularly to the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. It appears that the nature of the initial (triggering) stressor plays a major role, HPA cross-sensitization being more widely observed with systemic or high-intensity emotional stressors. Less important appears to be the nature of the novel (challenging) stressor, although HPA cross-sensitization is better observed with short duration (5-15 min) challenging stressors. In some studies with acute immune stressors, HPA sensitization appears to develop over time (incubation), but most results indicate a strong initial sensitization that progressively declines over the days. Sensitization can affect other physiological system (i.e. plasma catecholamines, brain monoamines), but it is not a general phenomenon. When studied concurrently, behavioral sensitization appears to persist longer than that of the HPA axis, a finding of interest regarding long-term consequences of traumatic stress. In many cases, behavioral and physiological consequences of prior stress can only be observed following imposition of a new stressor, suggesting long-term latent effects of the initial exposure.

  1. Effect of pituitary graft-induced hyperprolactinemia on adrenal circadian rhythmicity.

    PubMed

    Villanúa, M A; Tresguerres, J A; Esquifino, A I

    1988-01-01

    Prolactin is involved in the regulation of several endocrine functions. In this study, the possible influence of hyperprolactinemia on circadian corticosterone secretion has been investigated. Pituitary grafted male and female rats exhibited increased plasma PRL levels at 1000 when compared to sham-operated controls. This increase was only maintained over the 24 h period in grafted female rats but not in males, thus suggesting a different sex dependent modification of the regulatory mechanisms of prolactin. The corticosterone secretion pattern in sham operated male and female rats was similar to those described earlier but was altered by hyperprolactinemia according to the sex of the animal. There was a significant decrease in the total amount of corticosterone secreted in a 24 h period in grafted males as compared to control animals, whereas no significant differences were observed in grafted female rats as compared to controls. Grafted females showed a 4 h delay in the 24 h secretion rhythm as compared to control animals. These data suggest that pituitary transplant induced hyperprolactinemia, directly or through modifications in catecholamine turnover, is able to modify adrenal rhythmicity.

  2. An isolated inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor of adrenal gland.

    PubMed

    Al Sannaa, Ghadah; Wimmer, Jana L; Ayala, Alberto G; Ro, Jae Y

    2016-12-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor (IMT) is an uncommon lesion that shows a wide range of anatomic distribution. The adrenal gland, however, is a distinctly rare site of occurrence. To date, only a few cases of IMT arising in the adrenal gland have been reported in the English literature. Here, we report another case of isolated adrenal IMT. A 34-year-old man presented to the emergency department with a complaint of a sudden severe right-sided back pain. Subsequent computed tomographic scan imaging studies demonstrated a large right adrenal mass associated with a hematoma. The right adrenal gland was resected. Microscopic examination revealed an encapsulated cellular spindle cell proliferation with a prominent inflammatory infiltrate. Immunohistochemically, those spindle cells were diffusely and strongly positive for anaplastic lymphoma kinase-1, and focally and weakly positive for smooth muscle actin. S-100 protein and cytokeratin were negative. The findings were consistent with IMT arising from the adrenal gland. Although IMTs in the adrenal gland are rare, they should be considered in the differential diagnosis of adrenal masses. The clinical behavior of IMTs in general is currently indeterminate and a close clinical follow-up is recommended. The behavior of adrenal IMTs remains uncertain because of rare reported cases and lack of long-term follow-up. Further follow-up of reported cases and recognition of additional new cases is warranted to unmask the true biological behavior of adrenal IMTs.

  3. Adrenal gland hemorrhage in patients with fatal bacterial infections.

    PubMed

    Guarner, Jeannette; Paddock, Christopher D; Bartlett, Jeanine; Zaki, Sherif R

    2008-09-01

    A wide spectrum of adrenal gland pathology is seen during bacterial infections. Hemorrhage is particularly associated with meningococcemia, while abscesses have been described with several neonatal infections. We studied adrenal gland histopathology of 65 patients with bacterial infections documented in a variety of tissues by using immunohistochemistry. The infections diagnosed included Neisseria meningitidies, group A streptococcus, Rickettsia rickettsii, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Ehrlichia sp., Bacillus anthracis, Leptospira sp., Clostridium sp., Klebsiella sp., Legionella sp., Yersinia pestis, and Treponema pallidum. Bacteria were detected in the adrenal of 40 (61%) cases. Adrenal hemorrhage was present in 39 (60%) cases. Bacteria or bacterial antigens were observed in 31 (79%) of the cases with adrenal hemorrhage including 14 with N. meningitidis, four with R. rickettsii, four with S. pneumoniae, three with group A streptococcus, two with S. aureus, two with B. anthracis, one with T. pallidum, and one with Legionella sp. Bacterial antigens were observed in nine of 26 non-hemorrhagic adrenal glands that showed inflammatory foci (four cases), edema (two cases), congestion (two cases), or necrosis (one case). Hemorrhage is the most frequent adrenal gland pathology observed in fatal bacterial infections. Bacteria and bacterial antigens are frequently seen in adrenal glands with hemorrhage and may play a pathogenic role. Although N. meningitidis is the most frequent bacteria associated with adrenal gland pathology, a broad collection of bacteria can also cause adrenal lesions.

  4. Role of splanchnic nerve on steroid-hormone-induced alteration of adrenomedullary catecholamines in untreated and reserpinized pigeon.

    PubMed

    Mahata, S K; Ghosh, A

    1991-01-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to ascertain (1) the effect of steroid hormones (corticosterone, dexamethasone, deoxycorticosterone, progesterone, testosterone and oestrogen) on the neural regulation of adrenomedullary catecholamine (CA) content, and (2) the neural modulation of the effect of glucocorticoid hormones (corticosterone and dexamethasone) on reserpine-induced resynthesis of CA. The experiment was conducted on unilaterally splanchnic-denervated pigeons. The findings revealed that 7 consecutive days of steroid treatments (2.5 mg.kg b.w.-1, i.m.) resulted in significant changes of CA content. Interestingly, the changes of epinephrine (E) content differed significantly between the innervated and denervated glands. This clearly indicates that the splanchnic nerve regulates steroid-induced alterations of E content in the pigeon. The results further revealed that the glucocorticoid hormones augmented reserpine-induced resynthesis of CA specifically in the innervated glands. This confirms that the splanchnic nerve is essential for the synergistic action of glucocorticoids and reserpine in accelerating resynthesis of CA.

  5. Adrenal regeneration hypertension prevented by thyroidectomy: a quantitative ultrastructural study of the regenerating adrenal cortex.

    PubMed Central

    Conran, R. M.; Nickerson, P. A.

    1980-01-01

    Thyroparathyroidectomy (TPX) prevents adrenal regeneration hypertension (ARH) in female rats and concomitantly inhibits regeneration of the adrenal cortex. Removal of the thyroid gland plays the major role in preventing ARH inasmuch as parathyroidectomized adrenal-enucleated (PX-AE) rats became hypertensive, whereas thyroparathyroidectomized adrenal-enucleated rats (TPX-AE + PT) did not. Inhibition of adrenocortical regneration by TPX is reflected by a significant decrease in adrenal weight, volume of cortical parenchymal tissue per gland, and average cell volume at three weeks, compared with the regenerating adrenal gland in adrenal-enucleated thyroid-parathyroid-intact (AE) rats. Mitochondria in TPX-AE rats resembled closely those from zona fasciculata cells of a normal adrenal gland; stereologic techniques for electron microscopic examination confirmed that mitochondrial volume/cell and surface area of total mitochondrial membranes/cell (outer/inner membranes plus cristae) of adrenocortical cells from TPX-AE rats did not differ significantly from those of AE animals. The surface area of mitochondrial cristae of TPX-AE rats, however, was significantly greater than that of AE rats, whereas the surface area of the inner/outer mitochondrial membrane of the TPX-AE group was decreased significantly as compared with that of the AE group. The diameter of mitochondria in TPX-AE rats was larger than in the AE group, although the number of mitochondria/cell was significantly less in TPX-AE rats than in AE rats. Although TPX had no significant effect on the levels of DOC or corticosterone in the serum of quiescent AE rats as compared with TPX-AE rats, the rise in DOC in the serum after ether stress was blunted in the TPX-AE group as compared with that in the AE group. The rise in corticosterone in the TPX-AE group was comparable to that of the AE animals. Thus, partial inhibition of adrenal regeneration in TPX-AE rats in combination with a blunted rise in DOC levels in

  6. Preparation of Sticky Escherichia coli through Surface Display of an Adhesive Catecholamine Moiety

    PubMed Central

    Park, Joseph P.; Choi, Min-Jung; Kim, Se Hun

    2014-01-01

    Mussels attach to virtually all types of inorganic and organic surfaces in aqueous environments, and catecholamines composed of 3,4-dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine (DOPA), lysine, and histidine in mussel adhesive proteins play a key role in the robust adhesion. DOPA is an unusual catecholic amino acid, and its side chain is called catechol. In this study, we displayed the adhesive moiety of DOPA-histidine on Escherichia coli surfaces using outer membrane protein W as an anchoring motif for the first time. Localization of catecholamines on the cell surface was confirmed by Western blot and immunofluorescence microscopy. Furthermore, cell-to-cell cohesion (i.e., cellular aggregation) induced by the displayed catecholamine and synthesis of gold nanoparticles on the cell surface support functional display of adhesive catecholamines. The engineered E. coli exhibited significant adhesion onto various material surfaces, including silica and glass microparticles, gold, titanium, silicon, poly(ethylene terephthalate), poly(urethane), and poly(dimethylsiloxane). The uniqueness of this approach utilizing the engineered sticky E. coli is that no chemistry for cell attachment are necessary, and the ability of spontaneous E. coli attachment allows one to immobilize the cells on challenging material surfaces such as synthetic polymers. Therefore, we envision that mussel-inspired catecholamine yielded sticky E. coli that can be used as a new type of engineered microbe for various emerging fields, such as whole living cell attachment on versatile material surfaces, cell-to-cell communication systems, and many others. PMID:24123747

  7. Genistein-induced histomorphometric and hormone secreting changes in the adrenal cortex in middle-aged rats.

    PubMed

    Ajdzanović, Vladimir; Sosić-Jurjević, Branka; Filipović, Branko; Trifunović, Svetlana; Manojlović-Stojanoski, Milica; Sekulić, Milka; Milosević, Verica

    2009-02-01

    The soybean phytoestrogen, genistein, is increasingly consumed as an alternative therapeutic for age-related diseases, namely cardiovascular conditions, cancer and osteoporosis. Besides estrogenic/antiestrogenic action, this isoflavone exerts a prominent inhibitory effect on tyrosine kinase and the steroidogenic enzyme families, thus affecting hormonal homeostasis. The aim of this study was to examine the effects of genistein on: histomorphometric features of the adrenal cortex, blood concentrations of aldosterone, corticosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and adrenal tissue corticosterone content in orchidectomized middle-aged male rats. Sixteen-month-old Wistar rats were divided into sham-operated (SO), orchidectomized (Orx) and genistein-treated orchidectomized (Orx+G) groups. Genistein (30 mg/kg/day) was administered subcutaneously for three weeks, while the control groups received the vehicle alone. The adrenal cortex was analysed histologically and morphometrically. Circulating concentrations of aldosterone, corticosterone and DHEA, as well as adrenal tissue corticosterone levels, were determined by immunoassay. When compared to the SO group, orchidectomy decreased the ZG and ZR cell volume by 43% and 29%, respectively (P<0.05). Serum concentrations of aldosterone and DHEA were markedly lower [13% and 41%, respectively (P<0.05)], while serum and adrenal tissue levels of corticosterone did not change after orchidectomy. Orchidectomy followed by genistein treatment increased the ZG, ZF and ZR cell volume by 54%, 34% and 77%, respectively (P<0.05), compared to the untreated orchidectomized group. Histological analysis revealed noticeable vacuolization of the ZG and ZF cells in the Orx+G group. Serum aldosterone and corticosterone concentrations together with adrenal tissue corticosterone were 47%, 31% and 44% lower, respectively (P<0.05), whereas serum DHEA concentration was 342% higher (P<0.05) in this group in comparison with the Orx group. This study

  8. Congenital adrenal hyperplasia with cholestatic jaundice.

    PubMed

    Ali, Nisreen Feroz; Zafar, Farhana; Bangash, Areeb Sohail; Malik, Abdul; Mohammedi, Karimunnisa

    2014-01-01

    Congenital Adrenal Hyperplasia describes a group of autosomal recessive disorders characterized by a decrease in Cortisol production. 11 beta hydroxylase deficiencies is the second most common form. However, its presentation with cholestatic jaundice is extremely rare. We present a case of a 29-day-old infant who came to us with unusual dark complexion, persistent jaundice, and electrolyte imbalance. On investigation he was diagnosed as a case of congenital adrenal hyperplasia. Treatment with hydrocortisone and fludrocortisone cleared his jaundice and complexion with subsequent improvement in electrolytes. The aim of this report is to illustrate an unusual presentation of CAH with Cholestatic jaundice. This is the first case to be reported from Pakistan. The case outlines the difficult workup that was encountered in the diagnosis and management of the patient.

  9. Cushing syndrome associated with an adrenal tumour

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Helena; Brain, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    Cushing syndrome (CS) in children is a rare disorder that is most frequently caused by an adrenal tumour or a pituitary corticotrophin-secreting adenoma. The management is challenging and requires an individualised approach and multidisciplinary care. We present the case of a 23-month-old female child with a history of excessive weight gain, growth failure, hirsutism, acne and behavioural difficulties. Investigations revealed elevated serum midnight cortisol and 24 h urinary free cortisol. Overnight dexamethasone suppression testing showed no suppression of cortisol levels. Abdominal imaging revealed a right-sided suprarenal mass. She underwent right adrenalectomy and the histology showed an adrenal cortical carcinoma. There was clinical improvement with catch-up growth and weight normalisation. Despite being rare in clinical practice, in a child with weight gain, hirsuitism and growth failure the diagnosis must be considered. The overall prognosis of CS in childhood is good, but challenges remain to ensure normal growth and body composition. PMID:22927284

  10. The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis.

    PubMed

    Feek, C M; Marante, D J; Edwards, C R

    1983-11-01

    Anterior pituitary corticotrophin cells secrete ACTH as part of a larger precursor molecule, pro-opiomelanocortin. Post-translational cleavage of this precursor yields three major peptides: ACTH, beta-LPH and N-POMC. Experiments both in vivo and in vitro suggest that N-POMC may act as a prohormone amplifier for ACTH-induced adrenal steroidogenesis and as regulator of adrenocortical cell growth. The secretion of POMC is under the control of CRF. These findings are discussed in relation to the pathophysiology of corticotrophinoma. The primary defect in this condition appears to reside at the level of the anterior pituitary cell and is readily amenable to treatment by trans-sphenoidal microsurgery. The estimation of plasma ACTH concentrations is proving useful in the monitoring of various clinical conditions including Addison's disease and congenital adrenal hyperplasia.

  11. Cushing syndrome associated with an adrenal tumour.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Helena; Brain, Caroline

    2012-08-27

    Cushing syndrome (CS) in children is a rare disorder that is most frequently caused by an adrenal tumour or a pituitary corticotrophin-secreting adenoma. The management is challenging and requires an individualised approach and multidisciplinary care. We present the case of a 23-month-old female child with a history of excessive weight gain, growth failure, hirsutism, acne and behavioural difficulties. Investigations revealed elevated serum midnight cortisol and 24 h urinary free cortisol. Overnight dexamethasone suppression testing showed no suppression of cortisol levels. Abdominal imaging revealed a right-sided suprarenal mass. She underwent right adrenalectomy and the histology showed an adrenal cortical carcinoma. There was clinical improvement with catch-up growth and weight normalisation. Despite being rare in clinical practice, in a child with weight gain, hirsuitism and growth failure the diagnosis must be considered. The overall prognosis of CS in childhood is good, but challenges remain to ensure normal growth and body composition.

  12. Functional ectopic adrenal carcinoma in a dog.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Jim A; Lee, Maris S; Nicholson, Matthew E; Justin, Robert B

    2014-09-01

    An 11-year-old spayed female pit bull terrier was presented with a 2-month history of polyuria, polydipsia, polyphagia, and panting. Serum chemistry, blood and urine analysis, and tests for hyperadrenocorticism suggested an adrenal tumor. Abdominal ultrasound identified a mass caudal to the right kidney. The mass was completely excised and histopathology was consistent with endocrine carcinoma. Three years later there was no evidence of recurrence or metastasis.

  13. Adrenal Metastasis from Uterine Papillary Serous Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lubana, Sandeep Singh; Singh, Navdeep; Tuli, Sandeep S.; Seligman, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Female, 60 Final Diagnosis: UPSC with adrenal metastasis Symptoms: Post menopausal bleeding Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Adrenalectomy Specialty: Oncology Objective: Rare disease Background: Uterine papillary serous carcinoma (UPSC) is a highly malignant form of endometrial cancer with a high propensity for metastases and recurrences even when there is minimal or no myometrial invasion. It usually metastasizes to the pelvis, retroperitoneal lymph nodes, upper abdomen, and peritoneum. However, adrenal metastases from UPSC is extremely rare. Here, we present a case of UPSC with adrenal metastasis that occurred 6 years after the initial diagnosis. Case Report: A 60-year-old woman previously diagnosed with uterine papillary serous carcinoma at an outside facility presented in September of 2006 with postmenopausal bleeding. She underwent comprehensive surgical staging with FIGO (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics) stage 2. Post-operatively, the patient was treated with radiation and chemotherapy. The treatment was completed in April of 2007. The patient had no evidence of disease until July 2009 when she was found to have a mass highly suspicious for malignancy. Subsequently, she underwent right upper lobectomy. The morphology of the carcinoma was consistent with UPSC. She refused chemotherapy due to a previous history of chemotherapy-induced neuropathy. The patient was followed up with regular computed tomography (CT) scans. In October 2012 a new right adrenal nodule was seen on CT, which showed intense metabolic uptake on positron emission tomography (PET)/CT scan. The patient underwent right adrenalectomy. Pathology of the surgical specimen was consistent with UPSC. Conclusions: UPSC is an aggressive variant of endometrial cancer associated with high recurrence rate and poor prognoses. Long-term follow-up is needed because there is a possibility of late metastases, as in this case. PMID:27117594

  14. Effect of current and lifetime posttraumatic stress disorder on 24-hour urinary catecholamines and cortisol: results from the Mind Your Heart Study

    PubMed Central

    Wingenfeld, Katja; Whooley, Mary A.; Neylan, Thomas C.; Otte, Christian; Cohen, Beth E.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease and several other chronic illnesses. Alterations in the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in PTSD might contribute to these associations but findings regarding SNS and HPA activity in PTSD are heterogeneous. We measured 24-hour urinary catecholamines and cortisol in a large cohort of adult outpatients recruited from 2 Veterans Affairs medical centers. 24-hour urinary norepinephrine, epinephrine, dopamine and cortisol were measured by tandem mass spectrometry. Lifetime and current PTSD were assessed with the Clinician Administered PTSD Scale using DSM-IV-TR criteria. Out of 613 participants, 199 (32.5%) had current PTSD, 100 (16.3%) had lifetime but not current PTSD, and 314 (51.2%) never had PTSD. Patients with current PTSD had significantly higher norepinephrine secretion compared to those without PTSD. Patients in the lifetime PTSD group exhibited lower cortisol values compared to those without PTSD. Participants who never had PTSD showed the lowest norepinephrine and the highest cortisol values. All results remained stable when controlling for potentially confounding variables. This study provides evidence for increased norepinephrine secretion and decreased cortisol in PTSD. Future longitudinal studies are needed to determine whether these changes contribute to adverse health outcomes in patients with PTSD. PMID:25459895

  15. [Primary hyperaldosteronism due to unilateral adrenal hyperplasia with surgical resolution].

    PubMed

    Rubio-Puchol, O; Garzón-Pastor, S; Salom-Vendrell, C; Hernández-Mijares, A

    Unilateral adrenal hyperplasia is a rare cause of primary hyperaldosteronism (around a 3%) that has surgical treatment. A case of a patient with hypertension resistant to conventional therapy in treatment with 7 drugs who presented with primary hyperaldosteronism due to unilateral adrenal hyperplasia is presented. A left adrenalectomy was performed, and the patient had a good clinical response, with no need of any drug after 2 years of surgery. Unilateral adrenal hyperplasia is a different entity and it is not an asymmetric variant of the bilateral adrenal hyperplasia. In the study of patients with primary hyperaldosteronism and imaging tests with absence of adenoma is a diagnosis that must be considered before cataloguing patients with bilateral adrenal hyperplasia and start a medical treatment, because unilateral adrenal hyperplasia would have a surgical resolution.

  16. Morphological and functional manifestations of rat adrenal-cortex response to sodium bromide administration under hypodynamic stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirichek, L. T.; Zholudeva, V. I.

    1979-01-01

    Functional and morphological manifestations of adrenal cortex response to hypodynamia (2-hr immobilization on an operating table) under the influence of bromine preparations were studied. The sodium bromide was administered intraperitoneally in 100, 250, and 500 mg/kg doses once and repeatedly during ten days. The adrenal gland was evaluated functionally by ascorbic acid and cholesterol content and morphologically by coloring it with hematoxylin-eosin and Sudans for lipid revealing at freezing. Results are displayed in two tables and microphotographs. They are summarized as follows: the bromine weakens the functional state of the adrenal cortex in intact rats, causing changes similar to those under stress. During immobilization combined with preliminary bromine administration, a less pronounced stress reaction is noticeable.

  17. Computed tomography of the abdomen of calves during the first 105 days of life: III. Urinary tract and adrenal glands.

    PubMed

    Braun, U; Schnetzler, C; Augsburger, H; Bettschart, R; Ohlerth, S

    2014-05-01

    Computed tomographic (CT) findings of the urinary tract and adrenal glands of five healthy male calves in the first 105 days of life were compared with corresponding cadaver slices. The structures seen on CT images were identified using the corresponding cadaver slices. CT produced exact images of the kidneys, urinary bladder, urethra and adrenal glands, but reliable images of the ureters were only obtained near the renal hilus. There was excellent agreement between the structures on the CT images and the tissue slices. The structure and vessels of the kidneys, the origin of the ureters, the location, size and content of the urinary bladder and the course of the urethra in the pelvis and penis were evident on images. The size and volume of the kidneys and the length and width of the adrenal glands increased significantly during the study, but the ureteral and urethral diameters changed little.

  18. Impaired release of corticosterone from adrenals contributes to impairment of circadian rhythms of activity in hyperammonemic rats.

    PubMed

    Llansola, Marta; Ahabrach, Hanan; Errami, Mohammed; Cabrera-Pastor, Andrea; Addaoudi, Kaoutar; Felipo, Vicente

    2013-08-15

    Patients with liver cirrhosis may present impaired sleep-wake and circadian rhythms, relative adrenal insufficiency and altered hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal gland (HPA) axis. The underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Circadian rhythms are modulated by corticosteroids which secretion is regulated by HPA axis. Hyperammonemia alters circadian rhythms of activity and corticosterone in rats. The aims were: (1) assessing whether corticosterone alterations are responsible for altered circadian rhythm in hyperammonemia: (2) to shed light on the mechanism by which corticosterone circadian rhythm is altered in hyperammonemia. The effects of daily corticosterone injection at ZT10 on circadian rhythms of activity, plasma corticosterone, adreno-corticotropic hormone (ACTH) and hypothalamic corticotropic releasing hormone (CRH) were assessed in control and hyperammonemic rats. ACTH-induced corticosterone release was analyzed in cultured adrenal cells. Corticosterone injection restores the corticosterone peak in hyperammonemic rats and their activity and circadian rhythm. Plasma ACTH and CRH in hypothalamus are increased in hyperammonemic rats. Corticosterone injection normalizes ACTH. Chronic hyperammonemia impairs adrenal function, reduces corticosterone content and ACTH-induced corticosterone release in adrenals, leading to reduced feedback modulation of HPA axis by corticosterone which contributes to impair circadian rhythms of activity. Impaired circadian rhythms and motor activity may be corrected in hyperammonemia and hepatic encephalopathy by corticosterone treatment.

  19. Lesson of the month 2: Catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy - pitfalls in diagnosis and medical management.

    PubMed

    Mamoojee, Yaasir; Arham, Munawar; Elsaify, Wael; Nag, Sath

    2016-04-01

    Cardiomyopathy as the initial presentation of phaeochromocytoma (PCA) is uncommon. Diagnostic work-up and perioperative management may be challenging within this context. We report three cases of PCA presenting with cardiomyopathy to illustrate the pitfalls in diagnosis and management. None of the patients had typical adrenergic symptoms and all three were established on beta-blockers prior to diagnosis. Their fractionated plasma catecholamine levels were elevated and the diagnosis of PCA was confirmed with various imaging modalities and post adrenalectomy. Interpretation of fractionated catecholamine levels in the context of established cardiomyopathy is difficult as cardiac failure of any aetiology generates an adrenergic response. Hence screening all patients with idiopathic cardiomyopathy is likely to generate a high false-positive rate. However, a high index of suspicion should prompt further diagnostic work-up in patients with idiopathic cardiomyopathy for occult PCAs. Peer-reviewed guidelines are required to guide the investigation and management of suspected catecholamine-induced cardiomyopathy.

  20. Increased biogenic catecholamine and metabolite levels in two patients with malignant catatonia.

    PubMed

    Nisijima, Koichi

    2013-01-01

    The pathophysiology of malignant catatonia, a rare life-threatening psychiatric syndrome, has not yet been elucidated. This paper reports on two patients with malignant catatonia who showed elevated urinary or plasma catecholamine levels. Patient 1 had high catecholamine and metabolite levels in a 24-hour urine sample, and patient 2 had elevated plasma catecholamine levels. These findings indicate the presence of peripheral sympathetic nervous system hyperactivity in malignant catatonia. Symptoms of autonomic dysfunction, including tachycardia, labile blood pressure, and diaphoresis, are typical features of malignant catatonia and may be related to the increased levels of biogenic amines in these cases. Although the findings in the present study cannot entirely explain the pathophysiology of malignant catatonia, they do indicate that hyperactivity of the sympathetic nervous system may be involved in the pathology of this condition.

  1. Effects of Labor Contractions on Catecholamine Release and Breathing Frequency in Newborn Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ronca, April E.; Abel, Regina A.; Ronan, Patrick J.; Renner, Kenneth J.; Alberts, Jeffrey R.

    2009-01-01

    Plasma catecholamines in newborn rats (0–2 hr old) were analyzed following vaginal birth, cesarean section with simulated labor contractions, or cesarean section without labor contractions. Upon delivery, pups were exposed to key elements of the rat’s natural birth process, that is, umbilical cord occlusion, tactile stimulation, and cooling. Only pups exposed to actual or simulated labor showed an immediate rise in norepinephrine and epinephrine. Initial postpartum respiratory frequencies were higher in vaginal than in cesarean delivered pups and, in all groups, inversely correlated with catecholamine titers, suggesting respiratory distress or transient tachypnea at lower catecholamine levels. These findings establish a rat model for analyzing effects of labor on neonatal adaptive response during the transition from prenatal to postnatal life. PMID:17201476

  2. Dorsomedial hindbrain catecholamine regulation of hypothalamic astrocyte glycogen metabolic enzyme protein expression: Impact of estradiol.

    PubMed

    Tamrakar, P; Shrestha, P K; Briski, K P

    2015-04-30

    The brain astrocyte glycogen reservoir is a vital energy reserve and, in the cerebral cortex, subject among other factors to noradrenergic control. The ovarian steroid estradiol potently stimulates nerve cell aerobic respiration, but its role in glial glycogen metabolism during energy homeostasis or mismatched substrate supply/demand is unclear. This study examined the premise that estradiol regulates hypothalamic astrocyte glycogen metabolic enzyme protein expression during normo- and hypoglycemia in vivo through dorsomedial hindbrain catecholamine (CA)-dependent mechanisms. Individual astrocytes identified in situ by glial fibrillary acidic protein immunolabeling were laser-microdissected from the ventromedial hypothalamic (VMH), arcuate hypothalamic (ARH), and paraventricular hypothalamic (PVH) nuclei and the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) of estradiol (E)- or oil (O)-implanted ovariectomized (OVX) rats after insulin or vehicle injection, and pooled within each site. Stimulation [VMH, LHA] or suppression [PVH, ARH] of basal glycogen synthase (GS) protein expression by E was reversed in the former three sites by caudal fourth ventricular pretreatment with the CA neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). E diminished glycogen phosphorylase (GP) protein profiles by CA-dependent [VMH, PVH] or -independent mechanisms [LHA]. Insulin-induced hypoglycemia (IIH) increased GS expression in the PVH in OVX+E, but reduced this protein in the PVH, ARH, and LHA in OVX+O. Moreover, IIH augmented GP expression in the VMH, LHA, and ARH in OVX+E and in the ARH in OVX+O, responses that normalized by 6-OHDA. Results demonstrate site-specific effects of E on astrocyte glycogen metabolic enzyme expression in the female rat hypothalamus, and identify locations where dorsomedial hindbrain CA input is required for such action. Evidence that E correspondingly increases and reduces basal GS and GP in the VMH and LHA, but augments the latter protein during IIH suggests that E regulates

  3. Adrenal incidentalomas: are they being worked up appropriately?

    PubMed Central

    Sahni, Pooja; Trivedi, Apoorva; Omer, Abdulkadir; Trivedi, Nitin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Adrenal incidentalomas are defined as masses picked up on imaging studies that were done for apparently different reasons. With frequent use of imaging modalities, incidental adrenal masses are commonly encountered in clinical practice. Guidelines are currently available for the diagnosis and management of adrenal incidentalomas, but the appropriateness of initial work-up and subsequent follow-up of incidental adrenal masses in the community hospital setting is unknown. Objective We studied the appropriateness of initial work-up and follow-up of incidental adrenal masses discovered on abdominal computerized tomography (CT). Methods In our retrospective study, we reviewed sequential CT scans of the abdomen performed in the month of January 2010 at a community hospital. Once patients with one or more adrenal masses were identified, outpatient charts for initial biochemical testing and follow-up imaging were obtained either through directly accessing the electronic medical records or through contacting primary care physician's offices. Patient charts were reviewed to assess the data for the next 2 years following the discovery of an adrenal abnormality. Results Twenty adrenal masses were incidentally discovered on 723 abdominal CTs performed within the month of January 2010 resulting in an overall incidence of 2.76%. Of the patients with incidentally discovered adrenal masses, appropriate biochemical and follow-up imaging were only performed in patients referred to an endocrinologist (2 of 20 patients). Thirty percent of patients with incidental masses received a repeat CT scan for non-adrenal reasons, and no change in the mass size was noted. Conclusion Despite published guidelines, the initial work-up and follow-up of patients with an incidentally discovered adrenal mass is unsatisfactory. There is a desperate need for education of providers regarding appropriate work-up of incidental adrenal masses. PMID:27802863

  4. Catecholamine autotoxicity. Implications for pharmacology and therapeutics of Parkinson disease and related disorders.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, David S; Kopin, Irwin J; Sharabi, Yehonatan

    2014-12-01

    Several neurodegenerative diseases involve loss of catecholamine neurons-Parkinson disease is a prototypical example. Catecholamine neurons are rare in the nervous system, and why they are vulnerable in PD and related disorders has been mysterious. Accumulating evidence supports the concept of "autotoxicity"-inherent cytotoxicity of catecholamines and their metabolites in the cells in which they are produced. According to the "catecholaldehyde hypothesis" for the pathogenesis of Parkinson disease, long-term increased build-up of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetaldehyde (DOPAL), the catecholaldehyde metabolite of dopamine, causes or contributes to the eventual death of dopaminergic neurons. Lewy bodies, a neuropathologic hallmark of PD, contain precipitated alpha-synuclein. Bases for the tendency of alpha-synuclein to precipitate in the cytoplasm of catecholaminergic neurons have also been mysterious. Since DOPAL potently oligomerizes and aggregates alpha-synuclein, the catecholaldehyde hypothesis provides a link between alpha-synucleinopathy and catecholamine neuron loss in Lewy body diseases. The concept developed here is that DOPAL and alpha-synuclein are nodes in a complex nexus of interacting homeostatic systems. Dysfunctions of several processes, including decreased vesicular sequestration of cytoplasmic catecholamines, decreased aldehyde dehydrogenase activity, and oligomerization of alpha-synuclein, lead to conversion from the stability afforded by negative feedback regulation to the instability, degeneration, and system failure caused by induction of positive feedback loops. These dysfunctions result from diverse combinations of genetic predispositions, environmental exposures, stress, and time. The notion of catecholamine autotoxicity has several implications for treatment, disease modification, and prevention. Conversely, disease modification clinical trials would provide key tests of the catecholaldehyde hypothesis.

  5. Isolated adrenal masses in nonsmall-cell bronchogenic carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Oliver, T.W. Jr.; Bernardino, M.E.; Miller, J.I.; Mansour, K.; Greene, D.; Davis, W.A.

    1984-10-01

    Computed tomography has become an important diagnostic modality in the preoperative staging of patients with bronchogenic carcinoma. The adrenal glands represent one of the most frequent sites of metastasis. Therefore, an isolated adrenal mass discovered on preoperative thoracoabdominal CT poses a diagnostic problem. Three hundred thirty patients with histologically proved nonsmall-cell bronchogenic carcinoma were evaluated. Thirty-two had adrenal masses without further evidence of disease in the abdomen, Eight of these 32 masses were metastases, 17 were proved adenomas, and 7 did not undergo biopsy. Thus an isolated adrenal mass is more likely benign than metastatic, and biopsy is advocated prior to withholding potentially curative surgery.

  6. [Morphometry in Development of Red Deer's Adrenal Glands].

    PubMed

    Ovcharenko, N D; Gribanova, O G; Bondyreva, L A

    2015-01-01

    Histological structures and morphometric and some histochemical indicators of elk's adrenal gland development as subspecies of red deer in prenatal and postnatal ontogenies stages was studied. It was found that the growth of the fetus adrenal glands weight and the thickness of the structures adrenal glands fragments continue throughout the prenatal period of ontogeny. The cells of androgenic zone with single wandering sympathogoniae are differentiated in the adrenal glands in the second month of development. The androgenic and definite zone and the adrenal medulla are differentiated by the third month of development. At the 4 months, adrenal gland cortex zona glomerulosa and zona fasciculate-reticularis are differentiated; zona reticularis is differentiated only by the seventh month. By the eighth month, the structure of adrenal glands corresponds to the adrenal glands of a newborn. Full structural formation of the adrenal glands takes place in young animals by age 1.5. Obvious structural changes were not found late in the postnatal stages of development.

  7. Partial adrenalectomy in patients with multiple adrenal tumors.

    PubMed

    Pavlovich, C P; Linehan, W M; Walther, M M

    2001-02-01

    Most adrenal tumors are found incidentally and appear as small solitary nodules on abdominal imaging. Occasionally, work-up demonstrates multifocal or bilateral adrenal tumors. Certain patients are predisposed to multiple lesions, such as those with hereditary forms of pheochromocytoma as seen in von Hippel-Lindau disease, multiple endocrine neoplasia type II, and von Recklinghausen's disease. Partial rather than total adrenalectomy should be considered for these patients in an attempt to preserve endogenous adrenocortical function. Partial adrenalectomy has also been used to resect other types of adrenal tumors, especially in patients with a solitary adrenal gland. A discussion of the indications for partial adrenalectomy and of the surgical technique follows.

  8. The clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of adrenal emergencies.

    PubMed

    Tucci, Veronica; Sokari, Telematé

    2014-05-01

    Emergency medicine physicians should be able to identify and treat patients whose clinical presentations, including key historical, physical examination, and laboratory findings are consistent with diagnoses of primary, secondary, and tertiary adrenal insufficiency, adrenal crisis, and pheochromocytoma. Failure to make a timely diagnosis leads to increased morbidity and mortality. As great mimickers, adrenal emergencies often present with a constellation of nonspecific signs and symptoms that can lead even the most diligent emergency physician astray. The emergency physician must include adrenal emergencies in the differential diagnosis when encountering such clinical pictures.

  9. Rifampicin induced adrenal crisis in an uncommon setting

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Animesh; Suri, J. C.; Gupta, Mansi

    2013-01-01

    Adrenal crisis occurs when there is decreased secretions of steroid hormones (mainly cortisol) from the adrenal glands due to varied reasons. It may arise due to a primary adrenal condition or due to decreased hormonal signals from the pituitary secondary to a hypofunctioning pituitary. Hypopituitarism may result due to direct causes like trauma, tumour, infection or it may be due to some vascular insult as seen in Sheehan syndrome. We report an unusual presentation of Sheehan syndrome in the form of life-threatening adrenal crisis precipitated by the usage of rifampicin. PMID:24339502

  10. Involvement of multiple distinct Bordetella receptor proteins in the utilization of iron liberated from transferrin by host catecholamine stress hormones

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Sandra K.; Brickman, Timothy J.; Suhadolc, Ryan J.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Bordetella bronchiseptica is a pathogen that can acquire iron using its native alcaligin siderophore system, but can also use the catechol xenosiderophore enterobactin via the BfeA outer membrane receptor. Transcription of bfeA is positively controlled by a regulator that requires induction by enterobactin. Catecholamine hormones also induce bfeA transcription and B. bronchiseptica can use the catecholamine norepinephrine for growth on transferrin. In this study, B. bronchiseptica was shown to use catecholamines to obtain iron from both transferrin and lactoferrin in the absence of siderophore. In the presence of siderophore, norepinephrine augmented transferrin utilization by B. bronchiseptica, as well as siderophore function in vitro. Genetic analysis identified BfrA, BfrD and BfrE as TonB dependent outer membrane catecholamine receptors. The BfeA enterobactin receptor was found to not be involved directly in catecholamine utilization; however, the BfrA, BfrD and BfrE catecholamine receptors could serve as receptors for enterobactin and its degradation product 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid. Thus, there is a functional link between enterobactin-dependent and catecholamine-dependent transferrin utilization. This investigation characterizes a new B. bronchiseptica mechanism for iron uptake from transferrin that uses host stress hormones that not only deliver iron directly to catecholamine receptors, but also potentiate siderophore activity by acting as iron shuttles. PMID:22458330

  11. Mainly adrenal gland involving NK/T-cell nasal type lymphoma diagnosed with delay due to mimicking adrenal hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Kang, Seon Mee; Kim, Woong Ji; Lee, Kyung Ae; Baek, Hong Sun; Park, Tae Sun; Jin, Heung Yong

    2011-10-01

    A 29-yr-old man, presented with abdominal pain and fever, had an initial computed tomography (CT) scan revealing low attenuation of both adrenal glands. The initial concern was for tuberculous adrenalitis or autoimmune adrenalitis combined with adrenal hemorrhage. The patient started empirical anti-tuberculous medication, but there was no improvement. Enlargement of cervical lymph nodes were developed after that and excisional biopsy of cervical lymph nodes was performed. Pathological finding of excised lymph nodes was compatible to NK/T-cell lymphoma. The patient died due to the progression of the disease even after undergoing therapeutic trials including chemotherapy. Lymphoma mainly involving adrenal gland in the early stage of the disease is rare and the vast majority of cases that have been reported were of B-cell origin. From this case it is suggested that extra-nodal NK/T-cell lymphoma should be considered as a cause of bilateral adrenal masses although it is rare.

  12. Contralateral adrenal metastasis from renal cell carcinoma with tumor thrombus in the adrenal vein: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Muśko, Natalia; Kozikowski, Mieszko; Nyk, Łukasz; Borówka, Andrzej; Dobruch, Jakub

    2015-01-01

    A 64-year-old woman presented with contralateral right adrenal metastasis with adrenal vein thrombus, which was diagnosed many years after left nephrectomy with adrenalectomy due to renal cell cancer. The patient underwent right adrenalectomy with adrenal vein tumor thrombectomy for treatment. The pathologic examination confirmed metastatic clear cell carcinoma. The remote but existing risk of developing contralateral adrenal metastasis (CAM) after primary radical nephrectomy supports the idea of sparing the adrenal gland in suitable patients who undergo radical nephrectomy. Contralateral adrenal metastasis from RCC is a rare finding with the potential benefit of cure after resection. Care must be taken in preoperative diagnostics, as this metastasis is capable of causing inferior vena cava tumor thrombus via the suprarenal venous route. According to our knowledge, our case is the second similar entity described in literature so far. PMID:26807301

  13. Adrenal-preserving minimally invasive surgery: the role of laparoscopic partial adrenalectomy, cryosurgery, and radiofrequency ablation of the adrenal gland.

    PubMed

    Munver, Ravi; Del Pizzo, Joseph J; Sosa, R Ernest

    2003-02-01

    Adrenalectomy has become the standard of care for the management of hormonally active adrenal masses. Various surgical therapies have been proposed to excise completely or destroy these adrenal lesions, which may be benign or malignant. New minimally invasive, adrenal-sparing procedures have recently been introduced, among them laparoscopic partial adrenalectomy, cryosurgery, and radiofrequency ablation. These procedures focus on reducing patient morbidity and hastening postoperative recovery while preserving normal adrenal tissue. However, questions remain about the risks and benefits associated with routine application of minimally invasive therapies for adrenal-sparing surgery in terms of complete tumor extirpation. Clearly, more experience and longer follow-up is necessary to validate these procedures. Herein we describe the surgical techniques and early results of treatment with adrenal-sparing surgery.

  14. Shrinking and development of lipid droplets in adipocytes during catecholamine-induced lipolysis.

    PubMed

    Nagayama, Masafumi; Shimizu, Kyoko; Taira, Toshio; Uchida, Tsutomu; Gohara, Kazutoshi

    2010-01-04

    Time-lapse observation of adipocytes during catecholamine-induced lipolysis clearly shows that shrinking of existing lipid droplets (LDs) occurs in some adipocytes and that small LDs are newly developed in almost all cells. Immunofluorescence imaging reveals that activation and localization of hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) on the surface of LDs, which are required for conferring maximal lipolysis, are necessary for the shrinking of the LDs. However, not all adipocytes in which phosphorylated HSL is localized on LDs exhibit shrinking of LDs. The simultaneous shrinking and development of LDs yield apparent fragmentation and dispersion of LDs in adipocytes stimulated with catecholamine.

  15. Changes in plasma catecholamines levels as preclinical biomarkers in experimental models of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, A R; Ugryumov, M V

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the changes in the concentrations of blood plasma catecholamines as possible biomarkers of Parkinson's disease (PD) in the mouse experimental model of PD induced by 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). A significant decrease was detected in the levels of dopamine and L-DOPA in the PD preclinical stage model as a result of the catecholamines systemic metabolism disfunction. In the PD early clinical stage models, the level of L-DOPA and dihydroxyphenylacetic acid decreased, which is consistent with the results of blood tests in untreated patients.

  16. Effect of. beta. -endorphin on catecholamine levels in rat hypothalamus and cerebral cortex

    SciTech Connect

    Slavnov, V.N.; Valueva, G.V.; Markov, V.V.; Luchitskii, E.V.

    1986-10-01

    The authors studied the effect of beta-endorphin on catecholamine concentrations in the hypothalmus and cerebral cortex in rats, as a contribution to the explanation of the mechanism of action of this peptide on certain pituitary trophic functions. Concentrations of dopamine, noradrenalin, and adrenalin were determined by a radioenzymatic method. A Mark 3 scintillation system was used for radiometric investigation of the samples. The results of these experiments indicate that beta-endorphin has a marked effect on brain catecholamine levels mainly in the hypothalamus.

  17. Effect of microgravity on plasma catecholamine responses to stressors during space flight.

    PubMed

    Kvetnansky, R; Macho, L; Koska, J; Pacak, K; Hoff, T; Ksinantova, L; Noskov, V B; Kobzev, E; Grigoriev, A I; Vigas, M

    2001-07-01

    The effect of microgravity on the sympathicoadrenal system (SAS) activity in humans and animals has not yet been clarified. Our previous studies suggested that the SAS activity, evaluated by circulating and/or urinary catecholamine (CA) levels in astronauts during space flights, was found to be rather unchanged. However, CA levels were measured in astronauts only at rest conditions. The aim of the present study was to investigate effect of microgravity during space flight and post-flight readaptation on responsiveness of the SAS to somatic and psychic stressors evaluated by levels of catecholamines and their metabolite in the blood of the Slovak cosmonaut during his stay on board the space station Mir.

  18. Health Alert: Adrenal Crisis Causes Death in Some People Who Were Treated with hGH

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Resource List Health Alert: Adrenal Crisis Causes Death in Some People Who Were Treated with hGH ... People lacking this hormone are at risk of death from adrenal crisis, but adrenal crisis can be ...

  19. Normal adrenal function in an infant following a pregnancy complicated by maternal adrenal cortical carcinoma and mitotane exposure.

    PubMed

    Kojori, Fatemeh; Cronin, Catherine M G; Salamon, Elizabeth; Burym, Craig; Sellers, Elizabeth Ann Cameron

    2011-01-01

    Maternal adrenal cortical carcinoma in pregnancy is rare. We report a case of an infant born to a mother with a history of adrenal cortical carcinoma. The pregnancy was complicated by fetal exposure to mitotane and dexamethasone. Despite the potential teratogenic exposures, there was no evidence of adrenal dysfunction in the infant. Growth and development at 12 months of age are normal and prognosis appears favorable. The long-term impact of fetal exposure to mitotane and glucocorticoid requires further investigation.

  20. Adrenaline cells of the rat adrenal cortex and medulla contain renin and prorenin.

    PubMed

    Berka, J L; Kelly, D J; Robinson, D B; Alcorn, D; Marley, P D; Fernley, R T; Skinner, S L

    1996-05-31

    The distribution and content of renin in Sprague-Dawley (SD) and transgenic (mREN-2)27 rats (TG) were compared to further define the cellular basis and function of the adrenal renin-angiotensin system. Antibody binding (to rat and mouse renin protein and prosequence) was visualised in serial paraffin sections using an avidin-biotin peroxidase technique. Chromaffin and adrenaline cells were identified by tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase immunoreactivity, respectively. In SD zona glomerulosa (ZG), renin and its prosequence localised to small steroid cells while in homozygous (receiving lisinopril) and heterozygous (untreated) TG, steroid cells labelled in all cortical zones. In addition, throughout the cortex of each strain, large polyhedral adrenaline chromaffin cells occurring singly or in small groups and occasionally in rays labelled for renin and prosequence. Similar large adrenaline cells immunolabelled for all antisera in medulla while other cells were only TH-positive. Total adrenal renin content was 53 times higher in heterozygous transgenics than SD rats and was mainly (74%) prorenin. In SD, 37% of cortical renin was prorenin but in adrenal medulla only active renin was detected. Thus, from present and previous work both renin and prorenin occur not only in mitochondrial dense bodies of the ZG, but also in secretory granules of adrenaline chromaffin cells in both cortex and medulla implying in situ synthesis and paracrine functions.

  1. [Morphological studies of rat adrenal glands after space flight on "Kosmos-1667"].

    PubMed

    Prodan, N G; Bara'nska, V

    1989-01-01

    Histological and histomorphometric examinations of rat adrenals after a 7-day flight revealed the following changes: blood congestion in the cortex and medulla, progressive delipoidization of the cortex, slight enlargement of the nuclear volume of glomerular and fascicular zones, vacuolization of the cytoplasm of medulla cells, reduction of the area of noradrenocyte islets and cell nuclei of the medulla; the adrenal weight remained however unchanged. It is concluded that an early period of adaptation to microgravity was accompanied by a weak stress-reaction. Upon return to Earth the rats developed an acute gravitational stress. From the morphological point of view the stress manifested as: increased volume of nuclei in fascicular cells, decreased content of lipids in them, and greater vacuolization of the cytoplasm of medulla cells. The lack of medulla hypertrophy, reduction of the area of noradrenocyte islets and nuclei of medulla cells suggest that 7-day exposure to microgravity did not exert of stimulating effect on the sympathetic system of rats.

  2. Anatomical and pharmacological characterization of catecholamine transients in the medial prefrontal cortex evoked by ventral tegmental area stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Shnitko, Tatiana A.; Robinson, Donita L.

    2014-01-01

    Voltammetric measurements of catecholamines in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) are infrequent because of lack of chemical selectivity between dopamine and norepinephrine and their overlapping anatomical inputs. Here, we examined the contribution of norepinephrine to the catecholamine release in the mPFC evoked by electrical stimulation of the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Initially, electrical stimulation was delivered in the midbrain at incremental depths of −5 to −9.4mm from bregma while catecholamine release was monitored in the mPFC. Although catecholamine release was observed at dorsal stimulation sites that may correspond to the dorsal noradrenergic bundle (DNB, containing noradrenergic axonal projections to the mPFC), maximal release was evoked by stimulation of the VTA (the source of dopaminergic input to the mPFC). Next, VTA-evoked catecholamine release was monitored in the mPFC before and after knife incision of the DNB, and no significant changes in the evoked catecholamine signals were found These data indicated that DNB fibers did not contribute to the VTA-evoked catecholamine release observed in the mPFC. Finally, while the D2-receptor antagonist raclopride significantly altered VTA-evoked catecholamine release, the α2-adrenergic receptor antagonist idazoxan did not. Specifically, raclopride reduced catecholamine release in the mPFC, opposite to that observed in the striatum, indicating differential autoreceptor regulation of mesocortical and mesostriatal neurons. Together, these findings suggest that the catecholamine release in the mPFC arising from VTA stimulation was predominately dopaminergic rather than noradrenergic. PMID:24285555

  3. PGE2 suppresses NK activity in vivo directly and through adrenal hormones: effects that cannot be reflected by ex vivo assessment of NK cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Meron, G; Tishler, Y; Shaashua, L; Rosenne, E; Levi, B; Melamed, R; Gotlieb, N; Matzner, P; Sorski, L; Ben-Eliyahu, S

    2013-02-01

    Surgery can suppress in vivo levels of NK cell cytotoxicity (NKCC) through various mechanisms, including catecholamine-, glucocorticoid (CORT)-, and prostaglandin (PG)-mediated responses. However, PGs are synthesized locally following tissue damage, driving proinflammatory and CORT responses, while their systemic levels are often unaffected. Thus, we herein studied the role of adrenal factors in mediating in vivo effects of PGs on NKCC, using adrenalectomized and sham-operated F344 rats subjected to surgery or PGE(2) administration. In vivo and ex vivo approaches were employed, based on intravenous administration of the NK-sensitive MADB106 tumor line, and based on ex vivo assessment of YAC-1 and MADB106 target-line lysis. Additionally, in vitro studies assessed the kinetics of the impact of epinephrine, CORT, and PGE(2) on NKCC. The results indicated that suppression of NKCC by epinephrine and PGE(2) are short lasting, and cannot be evident when these compounds are removed from the in vitro assay milieu, or in the context of ex vivo assessment of NKCC. In contrast, the effects of CORT are long-lasting and are reflected in both conditions even after its removal. Marginating-pulmonary NKCC was less susceptible to suppression than circulating NKCC, when tested against the xenogeneic YAC-1 target line, but not against the syngeneic MADB106 line, which seems to involve different cytotoxicity mechanisms. Overall, these findings indicate that elevated systemic PG levels can directly suppress NKCC in vivo, but following laparotomy adrenal hormones mediate most of the effects of endogenously-released PGs. Additionally, the ex vivo approach seems limited in reflecting the short-lasting NK-suppressive effects of catecholamines and PGs.

  4. Adrenal clocks and the role of adrenal hormones in the regulation of circadian physiology.

    PubMed

    Leliavski, Alexei; Dumbell, Rebecca; Ott, Volker; Oster, Henrik

    2015-02-01

    The mammalian circadian timing system consists of a master pacemaker in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and subordinate clocks that disseminate time information to various central and peripheral tissues. While the function of the SCN in circadian rhythm regulation has been extensively studied, we still have limited understanding of how peripheral tissue clock function contributes to the regulation of physiological processes. The adrenal gland plays a special role in this context as adrenal hormones show strong circadian secretion rhythms affecting downstream physiological processes. At the same time, they have been shown to affect clock gene expression in various other tissues, thus mediating systemic entrainment to external zeitgebers and promoting internal circadian alignment. In this review, we discuss the function of circadian clocks in the adrenal gland, how they are reset by the SCN and may further relay time-of-day information to other tissues. Focusing on glucocorticoids, we conclude by outlining the impact of adrenal rhythm disruption on neuropsychiatric, metabolic, immune, and malignant disorders.

  5. Apparent diffusion coefficient of normal adrenal glands*

    PubMed Central

    Teixeira, Sara Reis; Elias, Paula Condé Lamparelli; Leite, Andrea Farias de Melo; de Oliveira, Tatiane Mendes Gonçalves; Muglia, Valdair Francisco; Elias Junior, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Objective To assess the feasibility and reliability of apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) measurements of normal adrenal glands. Materials and methods This was a retrospective study involving 32 healthy subjects, divided into two groups: prepubertal (PreP, n = 12), aged from 2 months to 12.5 years (4 males; 8 females); and postpubertal (PostP, n = 20), aged from 11.9 to 61 years (5 males; 15 females). Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DW-MRI) sequences were acquired at a 1.5 T scanner using b values of 0, 20, 500, and 1000 s/mm2. Two radiologists evaluated the images. ADC values were measured pixel-by-pixel on DW-MRI scans, and automatic co-registration with the ADC map was obtained. Results Mean ADC values for the right adrenal glands were 1.44 × 10-3 mm2/s for the PreP group and 1.23 × 10-3 mm2/s for the PostP group, whereas they were 1.58 × 10-3 mm2/s and 1.32 × 10-3 mm2/s, respectively, for the left glands. ADC values were higher in the PreP group than in the PostP group (p < 0.05). Agreement between readers was almost perfect (intraclass correlation coefficient, 0.84-0.94; p < 0.05). Conclusion Our results demonstrate the feasibility and reliability of performing DW-MRI measurements of normal adrenal glands. They could also support the feasibility of ADC measurements of small structures. PMID:28057963

  6. Spontaneous Massive Adrenal Hemorrhage: A Management Dilemma

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Anshuman

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Adrenal hemorrhage (AH) is a rare but life-threatening condition. Small focal hemorrhage may present subclinically, but massive hemorrhage may lead to rapid cardiovascular collapse and ultimately death if not diagnosed appropriately and treated quickly. Most cases reported in the literature have been treated conservatively. In an event of increasing hemorrhage during conservative management, it may be tricky to intervene surgically because of the hematoma around the gland. Here we describe a case where we managed a large spontaneous AH by a combination of angioembolization and laparoscopic adrenalectomy. PMID:27579389

  7. Serotonin involvement in pituitary-adrenal function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernikos-Danellis, J.; Kellar, K. J.; Kent, D.; Gonzales, C.; Berger, P. A.; Barchas, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    Experiments clarifying the effects of serotonin (5-HT) in the regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical system are surveyed. Lesion experiments which seek to determine functional maps of serotonergic input to areas involved in regulation are reported. Investigations of the effects of 5-HT levels on the plasma ACTH response to stress and the diurnal variation in basal plasma corticosterone are summarized, and the question of whether serotonergic transmission is involved in the regulation of all aspects of pituitary-adrenal function is considered with attention to the stimulatory and inhibitory action of 5-HT.

  8. Fully automated high-performance liquid chromatographic assay for the analysis of free catecholamines in urine.

    PubMed

    Said, R; Robinet, D; Barbier, C; Sartre, J; Huguet, C

    1990-08-24

    A totally automated and reliable high-performance liquid chromatographic method is described for the routine determination of free catecholamines (norepinephrine, epinephrine and dopamine) in urine. The catecholamines were isolated from urine samples using small alumina columns. A standard automated method for pH adjustment of urine before the extraction step has been developed. The extraction was performed on an ASPEC (Automatic Sample Preparation with Extraction Columns, Gilson). The eluate was collected in a separate tube and then automatically injected into the chromatographic column. The catecholamines were separated by reversed-phase ion-pair liquid chromatography and quantified by fluorescence detection. No manual intervention was required during the extraction and separation procedure. One sample may be run every 15 min, ca. 96 samples in 24 h. Analytical recoveries for all three catecholamines are 63-87%, and the detection limits are 0.01, 0.01, and 0.03 microM for norepinephrine, epinephrine and dopamine, respectively, which is highly satisfactory for urine. Day-to-day coefficients of variation were less than 10%.

  9. Concepts of Scientific Integrative Medicine Applied to the Physiology and Pathophysiology of Catecholamine Systems

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, David S.

    2016-01-01

    This review presents concepts of scientific integrative medicine and relates them to the physiology of catecholamine systems and to the pathophysiology of catecholamine-related disorders. The applications to catecholamine systems exemplify how scientific integrative medicine links systems biology with integrative physiology. Concepts of scientific integrative medicine include (i) negative feedback regulation, maintaining stability of the body’s monitored variables; (ii) homeostats, which compare information about monitored variables with algorithms for responding; (iii) multiple effectors, enabling compensatory activation of alternative effectors and primitive specificity of stress response patterns; (iv) effector sharing, accounting for interactions among homeostats and phenomena such as hyperglycemia attending gastrointestinal bleeding and hyponatremia attending congestive heart failure; (v) stress, applying a definition as a state rather than as an environmental stimulus or stereotyped response; (vi) distress, using a noncircular definition that does not presume pathology; (vii) allostasis, corresponding to adaptive plasticity of feedback-regulated systems; and (viii) allostatic load, explaining chronic degenerative diseases in terms of effects of cumulative wear and tear. From computer models one can predict mathematically the effects of stress and allostatic load on the transition from wellness to symptomatic disease. The review describes acute and chronic clinical disorders involving catecholamine systems—especially Parkinson disease—and how these concepts relate to pathophysiology, early detection, and treatment and prevention strategies in the post-genome era. PMID:24265239

  10. Catecholamine responses to virtual combat: implications for post-traumatic stress and dimensions of functioning

    PubMed Central

    Highland, Krista B.; Costanzo, Michelle E.; Jovanovic, Tanja; Norrholm, Seth D.; Ndiongue, Rochelle B.; Reinhardt, Brian J.; Rothbaum, Barbara; Rizzo, Albert A.; Roy, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms can result in functional impairment among service members (SMs), even in those without a clinical diagnosis. The variability in outcomes may be related to underlying catecholamine mechanisms. Individuals with PTSD tend to have elevated basal catecholamine levels, though less is known regarding catecholamine responses to trauma-related stimuli. We assessed whether catecholamine responses to a virtual combat environment impact the relationship between PTSD symptom clusters and elements of functioning. Eighty-seven clinically healthy SMs, within 2 months after deployment to Iraq or Afghanistan, completed self-report measures, viewed virtual-reality (VR) combat sequences, and had sequential blood draws. Norepinephrine responses to VR combat exposure moderated the relationship between avoidance symptoms and scales of functioning including physical functioning, physical-role functioning, and vitality. Among those with high levels of avoidance, norepinephrine change was inversely associated with functional status, whereas a positive correlation was observed for those with low levels of avoidance. Our findings represent a novel use of a virtual environment to display combat-related stimuli to returning SMs to elucidate mind-body connections inherent in their responses. The insight gained improves our understanding of post-deployment symptoms and quality of life in SMs and may facilitate enhancements in treatment. Further research is needed to validate these findings in other populations and to define the implications for treatment effectiveness. PMID:25852586

  11. Fight or flight, forbearance and fortitude: the spectrum of actions of the catecholamines and their cousins.

    PubMed

    Arun, C P

    2004-06-01

    Catecholamines are recognized to play an important part in the fight-or-flight response to impending stress. Catecholamine and other phase-reactant levels are raised in the first 24 h following acute stress, but the bigger picture of their action on the organism is unavailable. In this article, we examine their actions in light of the theory of phase transitions borrowed from the numerate sciences. Phase transitions involve changes in the state of matter or an organism with a common example of what is termed a first-order phase transition (sudden change) being provided by the popular expression "the straw that broke the camel's back." We propose that the response to catecholamines follows a triphasic response: a Phase I response is the fight-or-flight response to impending stress that protects the animal. With mild to intermediate stress, the Phase II or forbearance response allows it to tolerate the physiological upset. With severe stress, however, severe vital organ vasoconstriction leads to a quick death. The present theory has value in understanding the clinical picture in acute stress. Phase II or Forbearance Phase corresponds to Classes I, II, and III of hemorrhagic shock, and Phase III or Fortitude Phase to Class IV. Thus, a Phase III or fortitude response is to the animal what apoptosis is to the individual cell and has social implications. The present framework provides a fresh perspective on the action of the catecholamines and their cousins.

  12. DIFFERENTIAL MODULATION OF CATECHOLAMINES BY CHLOROTRIAZINE HERBICIDES IN PHEOCHROMOCYTOMA (PC12) CELLS IN VITRO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Differential modulation of catecholamines by chlorotriazine herbicides in pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells in vitro.

    Das PC, McElroy WK, Cooper RL.

    Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill 27599, USA.

    Epidemiological, wildlife, and lab...

  13. POTENTIAL MECHANISMS RESPONSIBLE FOR CHLOROTRIAZINE-INDUCED ALTERATIONS IN CATECHOLAMINES IN PHEOCHROMOCYTOMA (PC12) CELLS

    EPA Science Inventory

    ABSTRACT

    Potential Mechanisms Responsible for Chlorotriazine-induced Changes in Catecholamine Metabolism in Pheochromocytoma (PC12) Cells*
    PARIKSHIT C. DAS1, WILLIAM K. McELROY2 , AND RALPH L. COOPER2+
    1Curriculum in Toxicology, University of North Carolina, Chape...

  14. Protective Effects of D-Penicillamine on Catecholamine-Induced Myocardial Injury.

    PubMed

    Říha, Michal; Hašková, Pavlína; Martin, Jan; Filipský, Tomáš; Váňová, Kateřina; Vávrová, Jaroslava; Holečková, Magdalena; Homola, Pavel; Vítek, Libor; Palicka, Vladimír; Šimůnek, Tomáš; Mladěnka, Přemysl

    2016-01-01

    Iron and copper release participates in the myocardial injury under ischemic conditions and hence protection might be achieved by iron chelators. Data on copper chelation are, however, sparse. The effect of the clinically used copper chelator D-penicillamine in the catecholamine model of acute myocardial injury was tested in cardiomyoblast cell line H9c2 and in Wistar Han rats. D-Penicillamine had a protective effect against catecholamine-induced injury both in vitro and in vivo. It protected H9c2 cells against the catecholamine-induced viability loss in a dose-dependent manner. In animals, both intravenous D-penicillamine doses of 11 (low) and 44 mg/kg (high) decreased the mortality caused by s.c. isoprenaline (100 mg/kg) from 36% to 14% and 22%, respectively. However, whereas the low D-penicillamine dose decreased the release of cardiac troponin T (specific marker of myocardial injury), the high dose resulted in an increase. Interestingly, the high dose led to a marked elevation in plasma vitamin C. This might be related to potentiation of oxidative stress, as suggested by additional in vitro experiments with D-penicillamine (iron reduction and the Fenton reaction). In conclusion, D-penicillamine has protective potential against catecholamine-induced cardiotoxicity; however the optimal dose selection seems to be crucial for further application.

  15. The Control of Responsiveness in ADHD by Catecholamines: Evidence for Dopaminergic, Noradrenergic and Interactive Roles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oades, Robert D.; Sadile, Adolfo G.; Sagvolden, Terje; Viggiano, Davide; Zuddas, Alessandro; Devoto, Paola; Aase, Heidi; Johansen, Espen B.; Ruocco, Lucia A.; Russell, Vivienne A.

    2005-01-01

    We explore the neurobiological bases of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) from the viewpoint of the neurochemistry and psychopharmacology of the catecholamine-based behavioural systems. The contributions of dopamine (DA) and noradrenaline (NA) neurotransmission to the motor and cognitive symptoms of ADHD (e.g. hyperactivity, variable…

  16. Protective Effects of D-Penicillamine on Catecholamine-Induced Myocardial Injury

    PubMed Central

    Říha, Michal; Hašková, Pavlína; Martin, Jan; Filipský, Tomáš; Váňová, Kateřina; Vávrová, Jaroslava; Holečková, Magdalena; Homola, Pavel; Vítek, Libor; Palicka, Vladimír; Šimůnek, Tomáš; Mladěnka, Přemysl

    2016-01-01

    Iron and copper release participates in the myocardial injury under ischemic conditions and hence protection might be achieved by iron chelators. Data on copper chelation are, however, sparse. The effect of the clinically used copper chelator D-penicillamine in the catecholamine model of acute myocardial injury was tested in cardiomyoblast cell line H9c2 and in Wistar Han rats. D-Penicillamine had a protective effect against catecholamine-induced injury both in vitro and in vivo. It protected H9c2 cells against the catecholamine-induced viability loss in a dose-dependent manner. In animals, both intravenous D-penicillamine doses of 11 (low) and 44 mg/kg (high) decreased the mortality caused by s.c. isoprenaline (100 mg/kg) from 36% to 14% and 22%, respectively. However, whereas the low D-penicillamine dose decreased the release of cardiac troponin T (specific marker of myocardial injury), the high dose resulted in an increase. Interestingly, the high dose led to a marked elevation in plasma vitamin C. This might be related to potentiation of oxidative stress, as suggested by additional in vitro experiments with D-penicillamine (iron reduction and the Fenton reaction). In conclusion, D-penicillamine has protective potential against catecholamine-induced cardiotoxicity; however the optimal dose selection seems to be crucial for further application. PMID:26788248

  17. Potentiometric and NMR complexation studies of phenylboronic acid PBA and its aminophosphonate analog with selected catecholamines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ptak, Tomasz; Młynarz, Piotr; Dobosz, Agnieszka; Rydzewska, Agata; Prokopowicz, Monika

    2013-05-01

    Boronic acids are a class of intensively explored compounds, which according to their specific properties have been intensively explored in last decades. Among them phenylboronic acids and their derivatives are most frequently examined as receptors for diverse carbohydrates. In turn, there is a large gap in basic research concerning complexation of catecholamines by these compounds. Therefore, we decided to undertake studies on interaction of chosen catecholamines, namely: noradrenaline (norephinephrine), dopamine, L-DOPA, DOPA-P (phosphonic analog of L-DOPA) and catechol, with simple phenyl boronic acid PBA by means of potentiometry and NMR spectroscopy. For comparison, the binding properties of recently synthesized phenylboronic receptor 1 bearing aminophosphonate function in meta-position were investigated and showed promising ability to bind catecholamines. The protonation and stability constants of PBA and receptor 1 complexes were examined by potentiometry. The obtained results demonstrated that PBA binds the catecholamines with the following affinity order: noradrenaline ⩾ dopamine ≈ L-DOPA > catechol > DOPA-P, while its modified analog 1 reveals slightly different preferences: dopamine > noradrenaline > catechol > L-DOPA > DOPA-P.

  18. Facial swelling secondary to inhaled bronchodilator abuse: catecholamine-induced sialadenosis.

    PubMed

    Loria, R C; Wedner, H J

    1989-04-01

    A patient with asthma presented with a history of recurrent episodes of facial swelling. The swelling occurred in the preauricular area and extended to the angle of the jaw. The patient attributed these episodes to a "food allergy" as they occurred during or immediately following meals. The only medication the patient was using was inhaled epinephrine (Primatene MistR), two puffs, ten to twenty times a day. Subsequent evaluation revealed that the patient had sarcoidosis. Differential diagnosis of the facial swelling included food-related angioedema, sarcoid parotitis, or catecholamine-induced sialadenosis, which is a rare complication associated with excessive catecholamine administration. A gallium-67 citrate scan demonstrated abnormal pulmonary and hilar uptake of the radiotracer, but not lacrimal or parotid gland uptake, strongly arguing against sarcoidosis as the cause of the facial swelling. Episodes of swelling completely abated when the patient stopped using the epinephrine inhalers. At 5 months of follow-up she has had two recurrent episodes of facial swelling, each time associated with the use of inhaled epinephrine. Thus this patient's facial swelling most likely represents catecholamine-induced sialadenosis. This adverse drug reaction, associated with excessive use of inhaled catecholamines must be kept in mind in patients who abuse inhaled beta-adrenergic agonists and report parotid swelling.

  19. Beta-amyloid peptides undergo regulated co-secretion with neuropeptide and catecholamine neurotransmitters.

    PubMed

    Toneff, Thomas; Funkelstein, Lydiane; Mosier, Charles; Abagyan, Armen; Ziegler, Michael; Hook, Vivian

    2013-08-01

    Beta-amyloid (Aβ) peptides are secreted from neurons, resulting in extracellular accumulation of Aβ and neurodegeneration of Alzheimer's disease. Because neuronal secretion is fundamental for the release of neurotransmitters, this study assessed the hypothesis that Aβ undergoes co-release with neurotransmitters. Model neuronal-like chromaffin cells were investigated, and results illustrate regulated, co-secretion of Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42) with peptide neurotransmitters (galanin, enkephalin, and NPY) and catecholamine neurotransmitters (dopamine, norepinephrine, and epinephrine). Regulated secretion from chromaffin cells was stimulated by KCl depolarization and nicotine. Forskolin, stimulating cAMP, also induced co-secretion of Aβ peptides with peptide and catecholamine neurotransmitters. These data suggested the co-localization of Aβ with neurotransmitters in dense core secretory vesicles (DCSV) that store and secrete such chemical messengers. Indeed, Aβ was demonstrated to be present in DCSV with neuropeptide and catecholamine transmitters. Furthermore, the DCSV organelle contains APP and its processing proteases, β- and γ-secretases, that are necessary for production of Aβ. Thus, Aβ can be generated in neurotransmitter-containing DCSV. Human IMR32 neuroblastoma cells also displayed regulated secretion of Aβ(1-40) and Aβ(1-42) with the galanin neurotransmitter. These findings illustrate that Aβ peptides are present in neurotransmitter-containing DCSV, and undergo co-secretion with neuropeptide and catecholamine neurotransmitters that regulate brain functions.

  20. Hypoxic alligator embryos: chronic hypoxia, catecholamine levels and autonomic responses of in ovo alligators.

    PubMed

    Eme, John; Altimiras, Jordi; Hicks, James W; Crossley, Dane A

    2011-11-01

    Hypoxia is a naturally occurring environmental challenge for embryonic reptiles, and this is the first study to investigate the impact of chronic hypoxia on the in ovo development of autonomic cardiovascular regulation and circulating catecholamine levels in a reptile. We measured heart rate (f(H)) and chorioallantoic arterial blood pressure (MAP) in normoxic ('N21') and hypoxic-incubated ('H10'; 10% O(2)) American alligator embryos (Alligator mississippiensis) at 70, 80 and 90% of development. Embryonic alligator responses to adrenergic blockade with propranolol and phentolamine were very similar to previously reported responses of embryonic chicken, and demonstrated that embryonic alligator has α and β-adrenergic tone over the final third of development. However, adrenergic tone originates entirely from circulating catecholamines and is not altered by chronic hypoxic incubation, as neither cholinergic blockade with atropine nor ganglionic blockade with hexamethonium altered baseline cardiovascular variables in N21 or H10 embryos. In addition, both atropine and hexamethonium injection did not alter the generally depressive effects of acute hypoxia - bradycardia and hypotension. However, H10 embryos showed significantly higher levels of noradrenaline and adrenaline at 70% of development, as well as higher noradrenaline at 80% of development, suggesting that circulating catecholamines reach maximal levels earlier in incubation for H10 embryos, compared to N21 embryos. Chronically elevated levels of catecholamines may alter the normal balance between α and β-adrenoreceptors in H10 alligator embryos, causing chronic bradycardia and hypotension of H10 embryos measured in normoxia.

  1. Development of Sensitive and Direct Methods for Measuring Plasma Aldosterone and Catecholamine Concentrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haber, E.

    1972-01-01

    Radioimmunoassays for renin activity, angiotensin 1, and angiotensin 2 in the study of vasomotor regulation give new insight into the role of the renin system in maintaining postural homeostatsis. Similar laboratory procedures for specific assays of aldosterone and catecholamines achieve accurate determinations in small human blood samples.

  2. Unexpected changes in urinary catecholamines and vanillylmandelic acid following rape assault.

    PubMed

    Ende, N; Gertner, S B; Socha, B

    1990-03-01

    Although psychological changes are recognized to occur in rape assault survivors there is no information on the biochemical changes in these victims. This study compares urinary catecholamines and metabolites in 17 rape victims to two female control groups (one of which engaged in normal sexual intercourse and the other did not). We found, in the rape victims, unexpected changes in the excretion pattern of catecholamines and metabolites as compared to the various control groups. The most significant difference was the dramatic increase in urinary conjugated dopamine (P less than 0.01) in the rape victims which remained elevated for over 24 hr. Urinary vanillylmandelic acid (VMA) rose significantly in rape assault victims when compared to the normal control group. The VMA levels in rape victims were significantly lower, however, than in the women who had undergone (normal) sexual intercourse (P less than 0.01). Urinary free epinephrine showed a marked decline and remained depressed for over 24 hr in the rape assault victims (P less than 0.01) compared to normal controls. Some possible reasons for these patterns in catecholamines and metabolite excretion are suggested. These changes may be of importance in the poststress syndrome that occurs following the rape assault. In summary, a different profile of catecholamine and metabolite excretion patterns was found in rape compared to normal sexual intercourse. The enhanced dopamine excretion is contrary to the expected change of enhanced epinephrine secretion in severe stress.

  3. Concepts of scientific integrative medicine applied to the physiology and pathophysiology of catecholamine systems.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, David S

    2013-10-01

    This review presents concepts of scientific integrative medicine and relates them to the physiology of catecholamine systems and to the pathophysiology of catecholamine-related disorders. The applications to catecholamine systems exemplify how scientific integrative medicine links systems biology with integrative physiology. Concepts of scientific integrative medicine include (i) negative feedback regulation, maintaining stability of the body's monitored variables; (ii) homeostats, which compare information about monitored variables with algorithms for responding; (iii) multiple effectors, enabling compensatory activation of alternative effectors and primitive specificity of stress response patterns; (iv) effector sharing, accounting for interactions among homeostats and phenomena such as hyperglycemia attending gastrointestinal bleeding and hyponatremia attending congestive heart failure; (v) stress, applying a definition as a state rather than as an environmental stimulus or stereotyped response; (vi) distress, using a noncircular definition that does not presume pathology; (vii) allostasis, corresponding to adaptive plasticity of feedback-regulated systems; and (viii) allostatic load, explaining chronic degenerative diseases in terms of effects of cumulative wear and tear. From computer models one can predict mathematically the effects of stress and allostatic load on the transition from wellness to symptomatic disease. The review describes acute and chronic clinical disorders involving catecholamine systems-especially Parkinson disease-and how these concepts relate to pathophysiology, early detection, and treatment and prevention strategies in the post-genome era.

  4. A Case of Adrenal Lymphangiectatic Cyst Associated with Severe Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ha Young; Lee, Jun Ho; Lee, Hye Ran; Choi, Chan Ok; Park, Jang Pil; Jin, Tae Sun; Lee, Sung Yoon

    1990-01-01

    Adrenal lymphangiectatic cyst is a very rare pathological and clinical disease entity, and its clinical silence and lack of characteristic symptoms and signs makes it difficult to diagnose preoperatively. We experienced a case of adrenal lymphangiectatic cyst, accompanied by severe refractory hypertension, which was corrected by surgical removal of the cyst. We reprot it with a review of the literature. PMID:2098094

  5. Bilateral Cystic Adrenal Neuroblastoma with Cystic Liver metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Aslan, Mine; Kalyoncu, Ayse Ucar; Habibi, Hatice Arioz; Ozdemir, Gul Nihal; Koc, Basak; Adaletli, Ibrahim

    2017-01-01

    Bilateral congenital cystic adrenal neuroblastoma (NB) with cystic liver metastasis is a very rare condition and only few cases have been reported in the literature. Herein we report a case of a congenital bilateral cystic adrenal NB with cystic liver metastasis and briefly discuss characteristic imaging features of cystic NB. PMID:28163998

  6. Embryological and molecular development of the adrenal glands.

    PubMed

    Ross, Ian L; Louw, Graham J

    2015-03-01

    In this mini review, the embryological and functional development of the adrenal glands is presented from a molecular perspective. While acknowledging that this is a highly complex series of events, the processes are described in simple and broad strokes in a single text for the reader who is interested in this field but is not an active researcher. The origin of the adrenal glands is in the mesodermal ridge as early as the fourth week of gestation. Between the eighth and ninth weeks of gestation, the adrenal glands are encapsulated and this results in the presence of a distinct organ. There have been great strides in deciphering the very complicated molecular aspects of adrenal gland development in which multiple transcription factors have been identified, directing the adrenogonadal primordium into the adrenal cortex, kidney, or bipotential gonad. Adrenocorticotrophic hormone is critical for early development of the hypothalamic-pituitary adrenal axis. Several mutations in transcription factors, responsible for normal adrenal gland development have been found to induce the familial syndrome of congenital adrenal hypoplasia or neoplasia.

  7. Adrenal incidentaloma in thalassemia: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Gamberini, Maria Rita; Prandini, Napoleone; Chiodi, Elisabetta; Farneti, Carlotta; Garani, Maria Chiara

    2011-03-01

    In the last 30 years the development and widespread use of modern imaging techniques has caused a 20-time increase in the diagnosis of adrenal incidentaloma (AI). Among AIs myelolipoma (ML) is reported with a frequency up to 10%. In the literature 8 patients with adrenal masses in thalassaemia or chronic haemolytic anaemia have been reported: five cases were shown to have extramedullary haematopoiesis (EH) and 3 ML. We describe here a case of an adult male affected by beta thalassaemia intermedia and large bilateral lipomatous adrenal masses. The patient was referred to our ward at the age of 55 and underwent hormonal testing, MRI, and SPECT/CT scans. Adrenal masses were hormonally inactive, and fat-containing on MRI and CT scans. SPECT/CT examination with 99mTccolloid demonstrated the presence of marrow tissue. ML and EH are the only two tumours with marrow tissue among lipomatous adrenal masses. In our patient a brown nodular mass was resected and histologically classified as ML. In benign adrenal masses, radiological follow-up is indicated; in case of large bilateral masses adrenal function tests are suggested periodically in order to detect possible adrenal hypofunction.

  8. Adrenal hemorrhage complicating ACTH therapy in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Levin, T L; Morton, E

    1993-01-01

    Huge dose ACTH therapy is used in some severely ill patients with inflammatory bowel disease. We report a teenage girl with Crohn's disease who developed an acute abdomen following ACTH therapy. CT revealed the mass to be a hemorrhagic adrenal gland; the opposite adrenal gland was hypertrophied but without signs of hemorrhage.

  9. Is There Such a Thing as Adrenal Fatigue?

    MedlinePlus

    ... it? Is there such a thing as adrenal fatigue? Answers from Todd B. Nippoldt, M.D. Adrenal fatigue is a term applied to a collection of nonspecific symptoms, such as body aches, fatigue, nervousness, sleep disturbances and digestive problems. The term ...

  10. Primary hyperaldosteronism: comparison of CT, adrenal venography, and venous sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Geisinger, M.A.; Zelch, M.G.; Bravo, E.L.; Risius, B.F.; O'Donovan, P.B.; Borkowski, G.P.

    1983-08-01

    Twenty-nine patients with primary hyperaldosteronism were evaluated with computed tomography (CT), adrenal venous sampling, and adrenal venography. Twenty-three patients had aldosteronomas and six had bilateral adrenocortical hyperplasia. Sixteen (70%) of the adenomas were accurately located by CT. All nodules of 1.5 cm or larger diameter and 50% of nodules 1.0 to 1.4 cm in diameter were demonstrated. Nodules of less than 1.0 cm in diameter generally were not detected. High-resolution CT appeared more sensitive than standard CT (75% vs 58%). Adrenal venous sampling for aldosterone assay was the most sensitive of the three methods, localizing 22 (96%) of the 23 adenomas. Eighteen (78%) of the adenomas were identified by adrenal venography, although two patients with bilateral cortical hyperplasia were mistakenly diagnosed as having a small adenoma. No such false-positive studies were encountered with CT or adrenal venous sampling.

  11. Stereotactic body radiation therapy for metastasis to the adrenal glands.

    PubMed

    Shiue, Kevin; Song, Andrew; Teh, Bin S; Ellis, Rodney J; Yao, Min; Mayr, Nina A; Huang, Zhibin; Sohn, Jason; Machtay, Mitchell; Lo, Simon S

    2012-12-01

    Many primary cancers can metastasize to the adrenal glands. Adrenalectomy via an open or laparoscopic approach is the current definitive treatment, but not all patients are eligible or wish to undergo surgery. There are only limited studies on the use of conventional radiation therapy for palliation of symptoms from adrenal metastasis. However, the advent of stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) - also named stereotactic ablative radiotherapy for primary lung cancer, metastases to the lung, and metastases to the liver - have prompted some investigators to consider the use of SBRT for metastases to the adrenal glands. This review focuses on the emerging data on SBRT of metastasis to the adrenal glands, while also providing a brief discussion of the overall management of adrenal metastasis.

  12. Adrenal insufficiency presenting as bilateral rigid auricles: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Stiff ears appear to be a warning sign for adrenal insufficiency. This remarkable and rare sign has not been described to present in adrenal insufficiency in the setting of critical care. Case presentation We present the case of a 68-year-old Caucasian male who underwent a thymoma resection and suffered from preoperative weight loss and lack of strength. The perioperative phase was characterised by hypotension and sputum stasis due to muscle weakness, which caused two readmissions to the intensive care unit. His physical examination showed two fully rigid auricles. In retrospect, our patient suffered from secondary adrenal insufficiency and hypogonadism. Conclusions The bilateral rigid auricles appeared to be a warning sign for adrenal insufficiency. This remarkable sign is easily checked, and should prompt a higher index of suspicion towards adrenal insufficiency and other hormonal deficiencies. PMID:25209544

  13. Distribution of catecholamine and indoleamine neurons in the brain of the common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus).

    PubMed Central

    Schofield, S P; Dixson, A F

    1982-01-01

    The distribution of monoamine neurons in the brains of ten common marmosets (Callithrix jacchus) was examined by means of the Falck-Hillarp formaldehyde histofluorescence technique. Large populations of catecholamine and indoleamine neurons were found throughout the brain stem. Catecholamine cell bodies corresponded essentially to th noradrenaline and dopamine groups defined as A1-A7 and A8-A14, respectively. In contrast to Old World primate species, however, the noradrenaline cell populations (particularly the pontine coeruleal A6 group) were less numerous. Ascending catecholamine fibre pathways were not observed within the medulla or pons, although numerous axons were found near the mesodiencephalic border. These were fine and smooth in appearance in contrast to those of other species and this finding may represent a significant morphological difference. The catecholamine terminal innervation of the diencephalon was modest in the marmoset and was less dense than in other primates. In contrast, limbic areas and the striatum contained very large numbers of terminals. Indoleamine cell bodies, equivalent to the serotonin groups defined as B1-B9, were also observed. The most rostral cell populations (B7-9) were large. In addition, pontine and medullary indoleamine neurons extended laterally through the tegmentum as noted in other primates, such that they often adjacent to catecholamine neurons. A prominent bundle of indoleamine axons was observed in the mesencephalon and corresponded to a fibre pathway seen in rodents and other primates. No terminal varicosities were noted. Images Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 9 PMID:6804424

  14. Neural control of adrenal medullary and cortical blood flow during hemorrhage

    SciTech Connect

    Breslow, M.J.; Jordan, D.A.; Thellman, S.T.; Traystman, R.J.

    1987-03-01

    Hemorrhagic hypotension produces an increase in adrenal medullary blood flow and a decrease in adrenal cortical blood flow. To determine whether changes in adrenal blood flow during hemorrhage are neurally mediated, the authors compared blood flow responses following adrenal denervation (splanchnic nerve section) with changes in the contralateral, neurally intact adrenal. Carbonized microspheres labeled with /sup 153/Gd, /sup 114/In, /sup 113/Sn, /sup 103/Ru, /sup 95/Nb or /sup 46/Se were used. Blood pressure was reduced and maintained at 60 mmHg for 25 min by hemorrhage into a pressurized bottle system. Adrenal cortical blood flow decreased to 50% of control with hemorrhage in both the intact and denervated adrenal. Adrenal medullary blood flow increased to four times control levels at 15 and 25 min posthemorrhage in the intact adrenal, but was reduced to 50% of control at 3, 5, and 10 min posthemorrhage in the denervated adrenal. In a separate group of dogs, the greater splanchnic nerve on one side was electrically stimulated at 2, 5, or 15 Hz for 40 min. Adrenal medullary blood flow increased 5- to 10-fold in the stimulated adrenal but was unchanged in the contralateral, nonstimulated adrenal. Adrenal cortical blood flow was not affected by nerve stimulation. They conclude that activity of the splanchnic nerve profoundly affects adrenal medullary vessels but not adrenal cortical vessels and mediates the observed increase in adrenal medullary blood flow during hemorrhagic hypotension.

  15. Ultrasonographic measurements of adrenal glands in cats with hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Combes, Anaïs; Vandermeulen, Eva; Duchateau, Luc; Peremans, Kathelijne; Daminet, Sylvie; Saunders, Jimmy

    2012-01-01

    Feline hyperthyroidism is potentially associated with exaggerated responsiveness of the adrenal gland cortex. The adrenal glands of 23 hyperthyroid cats were examined ultrasonographically and compared to the adrenal glands of 30 control cats. Ten hyperthyroid cats had received antithyroid drugs until 2 weeks before sonography, the other 13 were untreated. There was no difference in adrenal gland shape between healthy and hyperthyroid cats: bean-shaped, well-defined, hypoechoic structures surrounded by a hyperechoic halo in 43/60 (71.6%) healthy cats and 34/46 (73.9%) hyperthyroid cats; more ovoid in 13/60 (21.6%) healthy cats and 9/46 (19.6%) hyperthyroid cats while more elongated in 4/60 (6.7%) healthy cats, 3/46 (6.5%) hyperthyroid cats. Hyperechoic foci were present in 9/23 (39.1%) hyperthyroid cats and 2/30 (6.7%) healthy cats. The adrenal glands were significantly larger in hyperthyroid cats, although there was overlap in size range. The mean difference between hyperthyroid cats and healthy cats was 1.6 and 1.7 mm in left and right adrenal gland length, 0.8 and 0.9 mm in left and right cranial adrenal gland height, and 0.4 and 0.9 mm in left and right caudal adrenal gland height. There was no significant difference between the adrenal gland measurements in treated and untreated hyperthyroid cats. The adrenomegaly was most likely associated with the hypersecretion of the adrenal cortex documented in hyperthyroid cats. Hyperthyroidism should be an alternative to hyperadrenocorticism, hyperaldosteronism, and acromegaly in cats with bilateral moderate adrenomegaly.

  16. Effects of endotoxin on monoamine metabolism in the rat.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pohorecky, L. A.; Wurtman, R. J.; Taam, D.; Fine, J.

    1972-01-01

    Examination of effects of administered endotoxin on catecholamine metabolism in the rat brain, sympathetic neurons, and adrenal medulla. It is found that endotoxin, administered intraperitoneally, lowers the norepinephrine content in peripheral sympathetic neurons and the brain, and the catecholamine content in the adrenal medulla. It also accelerates the disappearance of H3-norepinephrine from all these tissues. It is therefore suggested that the effects of endotoxin on body temperature may be mediated in part by central non-adrenergic neurons.

  17. Acute adrenal insufficiency secondary to bilateral adrenal B-cell lymphoma: a case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    De Miguel Sánchez, Carlos; Ruiz, Luis; González, Jose Luis; Hernández, Jose Luis

    2016-01-01

    Primary adrenal lymphoma is an extremely rare entity which constitutes less than 1% of extranodal lymphomas. Most cases present with bilateral adrenal masses and without extraadrenal involvement, which can lead to symptoms of adrenal insufficiency. The prognosis is usually poor and chemotherapy is the first-line treatment option. We report here on a 78-year-old man admitted to our Internal Medicine Department because of constitutional symptoms and high fever spikes. He was diagnosed with adrenal insufficiency and a CT-scan revealed bilateral adrenal masses of about 6 cm in diameter. A percutaneous biopsy was performed and the histological exam was consistent with diffuse large B cell lymphoma. A review of the literature of this unusual entity was also carried out. PMID:27170834

  18. [Catecholamines and their metabolic enzymes in the rat myocardium after a flight on the Kosmos-936 biosatellite].

    PubMed

    Kwetncanski, R; Tigranian, R A; Torda, T

    1982-01-01

    In the myocardium of the weightless and centrifuged rats flown for 18.5 days onboard the biosatellite Cosmos-936 the catecholamine concentration and activity of enzymes involved in their synthesis and degradation--dopamine-beta-hydroxylase, monoamine oxidase and catechol-O-methyl transferase--were measured. The catecholamine concentration in the myocardium of both flight groups significantly increased, and the enzyme activity did not change. These results suggest that an exposure to space flight increases the catecholamine concentration and exerts no effect on their synthesis and degradation in the rat myocardium.

  19. Tianeptine influence on plasmatic catecholamine levels and anxiety index in rats under variable chronic stress after early maternal separation.

    PubMed

    Trujillo, Verónica; Masseroni, María Lujan; Levin, Gloria; Suárez, Marta Magdalena

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this work was to determine the effect of chronic treatment with 5 mg/kg of tianeptine in male adult Wistar rats separated from the mother as neonates and submitted to variable chronic stress, plasma catecholamines, and anxiety. The plus maze test was performed in order to calculate the anxiety index and catecholamine levels were determined by high-pressure liquid chromatography. Both stress and maternal separation elevated catecholamine levels without affecting anxiety. In the maternally separated stress group, tianeptine decreased epinephrine. Anxiety was reduced in the maternally separated unstressed tianeptine group. Also, all groups showed a tendency to lower anxiety index.

  20. Transgenic Expression of Ad4BP/SF-1 in Fetal Adrenal Progenitor Cells Leads to Ectopic Adrenal Formation

    PubMed Central

    Zubair, Mohamad; Oka, Sanae; Parker, Keith L.; Morohashi, Ken-ichirou

    2009-01-01

    Deficiency of adrenal 4 binding protein/steroidogenic factor 1 (Ad4BP/SF-1; NR5A1) impairs adrenal development in a dose-dependent manner, whereas overexpression of Ad4BP/SF-1 is associated with adrenocortical tumorigenesis. Despite its essential roles in adrenal development, the mechanism(s) by which Ad4BP/SF-1 regulates this process remain incompletely understood. We previously identified a fetal adrenal enhancer (FAdE) that stimulates Ad4BP/SF-1 expression in the fetal adrenal gland by a two-step mechanism in which homeobox proteins initiate Ad4BP/SF-1 expression, which then maintains FAdE activity in an autoregulatory loop. In the present study, we examined the effect of transgenic expression of Ad4BP/SF-1 controlled by FAdE on adrenal development. When Ad4BP/SF-1 was overexpressed using a FAdE-Ad4BP/SF-1 transgene, FAdE activity expanded outside of its normal field, resulting in increased adrenal size and the formation of ectopic adrenal tissue in the thorax. The increased size of the adrenal gland did not result from a corresponding increase in cell proliferation, suggesting rather that the increased levels of Ad4BP/SF-1 may divert uncommitted precursors to the steroidogenic lineage. The effects of FAdE-controlled Ad4BP/SF-1 overexpression in mice provide a novel model of ectopic adrenal formation that further supports the critical role of Ad4BP/SF-1 in the determination of steroidogenic cell fate in vivo. PMID:19628584